Competition Brief
Give a Get a
PARK
Give a Get a
PARK
DESIGN COMPETITION
APPLICATIONS DUE JULY 31, 2017
WWW.GAPGAPDETROIT.ORG
Photo © Jim West Photography
Ride It Sculpture Park, video still courtesy of Tony
Hawk Foundation
Photo of Morningside © Jim West Photography
VISION
PROCESS
RESULTS
We seek to cultivate public spaces
This project takes place in a strong
where residents can meet, eat, play,
neighborhood where opportunities
plan, and share the unique identity
exist to exchange a surplus, de1) City agency coordination
of their neighborhood. In addition
commissioned park with a vacant
2) Active community engagement
to sharing the top park design
corner lot in a better location.
3) Design excellence achieved
The competition to design this new
submissions from the result of this
through an open competition
park space stimulates the emerging
competition, the City of Detroit will
professional design community
publish a how-to guide to support
within Detroit as well as regionally
future efforts within Detroit as well
and nationwide.
as provide a model for other cities.
The ‘Give a Park, Get a Park’
project has 3 goals in mind:
Photos courtesy of General Services Department
02
CONTENTS
GREETINGS
1 CITY OF DETROIT & KNIGHT FOUNDATION
page 4
2
GIVE A PARK, GET A PARK
3
PROJECT SITE
4
TIMELINE
5
DESIGN JURY
6
INSTRUCTIONS
7
RESOURCES
page 5
page 6
page 12
page 14
page 16
page 19
SUMMARY
CONTEXT, NEIGHBORHOOD PROFILE & SITE DETAILS
STAGES, SCHEDULE & LOGISTICS
LOCAL/NATIONAL DESIGNERS & CITY LEADERSHIP
REGISTRATION & SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Q+A & CONTACT INFORMATION
03
Photos © Jim West Photography
FROM THE CITY OF DETROIT
& THE KNIGHT FOUNDATION
D
etroit is working to reorganize
two of its greatest assets – public
land and green space. Our
city has 131,000 vacant lots, over 100
abandoned public school sites, and
95 small parks under an acre, all of
which require continued stewardship.
Recognizing new patterns of growth in
the city, we aim to act more efficiently
with the public land that we have.
Unlike buildings, public parks and green
spaces are flexible and can be quickly
repositioned without incurring large costs.
Detroit has an opportunity that most cities
do not have – to reposition public parks
where neighborhoods need them most.
Like many American cities, Detroit has
a legacy of neighborhood mini parks
under an acre that have fallen out of use
due to poor location or lack of resources.
In addition, maintenance is the largest
expense in the public park budget. With
‘Give a Park, Get a Park’ Detroit seeks
to offer more populated neighborhoods
a better urban park experience that
minimizes maintenance expenses while
maximizing accessibility and enhancing
public life.
In this project the City of Detroit will
‘give a park’ – offer to sell a mid-block,
decommissioned mini-park to adjacent
community residents, allowing residents
to increase financial equity and physical
stake in their neighborhoods. The same
neighborhood will then ‘get a park’ –
a larger park comprised of vacant,
city-owned corner lots less than a mile
from the former park. This new park
1
will be planned and designed through a
combined community engagement process
and innovative design competition.
The ‘Give a Park, Get a Park’ project
will pilot a strategy for better-positioned,
high-quality, and unique public spaces
without significantly raising maintenance
costs. It will also serve as a broadbased community engagement effort that
asks Detroit residents what they want to
see in their neighborhood park – and
delivers through thoughtful engagement
and dialogue. Lastly, it will stimulate
the local, regional, and national design
communities by inviting the brightest
designers to join Detroit residents in
realizing better neighborhood parks.
04
GIVE A PARK, GET A PARK
SUMMARY
GIVE
• City GIVES decommissioned park to
resident as a “side lot” sale
2
GET
• Neighborhood GETS a new park in
exchange
• Small park (< 0.5 acres)
• Larger park (> 1 acre)
• Former park parcel will be rezoned
• Parcels are City-owned or a
and resident-owned
• Park still needed in neighborhood
• Poor location (mid-block)
soon-to-be vacant lot
• Neighborhood has high density,
seniors & youth
• Located on corner(s), near
neighborhood center
ENGAGE & DESIGN
• Open competition connects community with
local, regional, and national designers
• Ideas refined through community workshop
and design review
• Winning park design slated for
implementation by the City of Detroit
05
3
MORNINGSIDE
NEIGHBORHOOD
DOWNTOWN DETROIT
CAMPUS MARTIUS
PROJECT SITE: CONTEXT
I-94
R
UTE
The City took a data driven approach
to identifying viable neighborhoods
eligible for this park relocation project.
The 2016 Parks Master Plan includes
extensive research on each of the 300plus public park properties which were
surveyed, categorized, and ranked while
considering park service gaps, priority
neighborhood study areas and targeted
commercial corridors.
VE
DRI
EO
Morningside was selected due to a:
UX
DIE
CA
UTE
EO
REN
R
WA
• Stable or growing population in need
of quality open space
• Small, decommissioned park in a
E
RIV
RD
poorly accessible location; and
• Cluster of opportune, publicly-owned
ER
ALT
ERS
ALM
CH
corner lots that are larger and more
accessible to a greater number of
neighborhood residents.
CK
MA
06
Mural at Mothers Park and community gathering, photos © Jim West Photography
PROJECT SITE:
MORNINGSIDE NEIGHBORHOOD
NEIGHBORHOOD CHARACTER
SITE CONDITIONS
DESIGN OPPORTUNITIES
Morningside is a far east-side
neighborhood with a combination of
historic homes and newer built Habitat
for Humanity houses. Residents range
from school children to seniors, all of
whom are seeking more park amenities.
The only city park in this neighborhood
is Fiori Park, an inactive park less than
half an acre, on the very north border
along the I-94 highway. The proposed
park site at the corner of Three Mile
Drive and Munich would relocate
this single amenity to a more much
accessible location. The challenge is to
address the four soon-to-be vacant street
corners and give this neighborhood
the real park that they have long been
waiting for.
How can four corners combine to make
one cohesive park? This site features a
number of particular, dynamic conditions
that must be harnessed:
• Currently a four-way intersection allows one-way, non-stop traffic from north
to south and bidirectional yield traffic east-west. What kinds of traffic
calming methods or traffic pattern adjustments could provide safety for
residents, especially with the prospect of four corner park pieces?
1) the northeast corner features an
existing community-built memorial called
Mothers Park;
2) the northwest corner is currently
vacant but will expand with a planned
house demolition;
3) the southeast and southwest corners
have blighted houses that will be
demolished; and
• Incorporate the existing mid-block park with its playground equipment into
the larger design vision. Should the playground be repositioned?
• Incorporate the existing Mothers Park memorial into the larger design vision.
It is a space for community art, murals, and gathering for meetings. How
might this program and unique character be celebrated, maintained and
also enhanced?
• Design residential screening from park activities and improve lighting,
security and surveillance methods. How can a residential park be a safe,
space and but also remain buffered from adjacent homes?
• Increase fitness opportunities for all age groups. What kinds of activities will
safely and proportionally fit in this space?
4) the southwest corner has a mid-block
playscape that was recently built without
community input and must be merged
with the larger design.
07
PROJECT SITE AT THREE MILE DR & MUNICH
M
IC
UN
D
H
RD R
House to be demolished
ST
O
BEDF
A
Houses to be demolished
B
C
Mothers Park
Recently built park
to be reconfigured
THR
ILE
EE M
DR
Houses to be demolished
08
A
PROJECT SITE AT THREE MILE DR & MUNICH
B
C
09
PROJECT SITE:
DESIGN AND ENGAGEMENT PRINCIPLES
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
ENGAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS
Pre-competition engagement meetings
with residents revealed themes common to
the site that dovetail with goals of the City
of Detroit. Design teams should consider:
Each of the selected design teams must
make an effort to work closely with
residents throughout the competition
process. Half of the design competition
is predicated on a sensitivity to listening
to community concerns and ideas,
and helping residents to realize their
own park. Responsiveness and quality
communication skills are critical.
Residents will be evaluating design teams
on some of the following criteria:
• Initial construction cost
• Annual maintenance cost
• Use of low-cost materials
• Green stormwater management
potential
• Neighborhood branding and
identification
• Lighting and public safety
• Inclusive design for individuals of all
ages and abilities
• Listening skills and curiosity to address
community concerns
• Ability to adapt designs and translate
ideas into images at the community
design review
• Inclusivity with all residents regardless
of age, race, gender, sexual
orientation or ability
Farwell Park, photo courtesy of General Services Department
10
STAGE
1
JUN 19 – JUL 31
COMPETITION CALL
AUG 14
PARTICIPANT ANNOUNCEMENT
STAGE
2
5 TEAMS
$1,000
TRAVEL
STIPENDS
COMPETITION TIMELINE & PROCESS
AUG 26
SITE VISIT /
COMMUNITY DESIGN REVIEW
IN
DETROIT
SHORTLIST ANNOUNCEMENT
3 TEAMS
$1,000
TRAVEL
STIPENDS
IN
DETROIT
1st PLACE PRIZE $10,000
2nd PLACE PRIZE $5,000
3rd PLACE PRIZE $2,500
SEP 1
STAGE
3
4
The Give a Park, Get a Park competition
occurs in three stages: 1) an initial call for
participants; 2) a site visit and community
design review, after which a shortlist
of teams are selected, and; 3) a final
presentation and public exhibition where
the winning design will be selected.
1st, 2nd, and 3rd place designs will be
chosen with input from the community and a
diverse design jury.
SEP 4 – OCT 1
DESIGN PROCESS CHECK-IN
& FINAL DESIGN SUBMISSION
OCT 14
PUBLIC EXHIBITION & PRESENTATION
ANNOUNCEMENT OF WINNING DESIGNS
11
STAGE
1
COMPETITION CALL,
APPLICATION SUBMISSION &
PARTICIPANT ANNOUNCEMENT
STAGE
2
SITE VISIT / COMMUNITY
DESIGN REVIEW & SHORTLIST
ANNOUNCEMENT
Application opening: June 19, 2017
Application deadline: July 31, 2017
Site visit/community design review date:
Saturday August 26, 2017
Applicant teams submit written letters of
intent, resumes, portfolios of relevant work,
and additional information.
Participant teams will attend a morning site
visit neighborhood orientation, led by PDD
& GSD staff. In the early afternoon teams
will participate in a community meeting
and design review in a neighborhood
venue. Teams will meet community members
and present their initial ideas for review,
feedback, and charrettes. In this critical
stage teams will listen carefully to residents in
order to answer questions and document their
ideas, concerns, and preferences. Residents
will rank teams in order of preference with
regard to quality of community engagement
and design ideas. Teams will receive this
information as well as suggestions for
improving their designs.
After a panel of cross-departmental
commission review of submissions,
5 participant teams will be selected.
Upon selection, finalists will be awarded
a $1,000 travel stipend for housing and
transportation to Detroit.
Participant teams will receive an onboarding
package of additional information and begin
preparing initial ideas, sketches, questions,
and investigations. Teams then schedule their
plan their travel to Detroit to participate in the
Site Visit/Community Design Review.
3 shortlisted teams will be selected to
continue to the next phase following a
post-meeting review by the competition
commission. These 3 teams will receive a
second $1,000 travel stipend to return to
Detroit in October to present their projects at
a combined public exhibition.
STAGE
3
FINAL DESIGN SUBMISSION, PUBLIC
EXHIBITION & PRESENTATION,
WINNERS ANNOUNCEMENT
Final Submission: October 1, 2017
Public exhibition & presentation date:
Saturday October 14, 2017
Shortlisted teams will take what they have
learned and recorded from the site visit and
community design review, including the site
details and public feedback, and apply it in
the design studio. Shortlisted teams will have
check-in opportunities with PDD & GSD in
order to ensure that projects are developing
in accordance with the preferences of the
community and the City.
At the beginning of October shortlisted teams
will submit their final designs according to the
requirements listed in the Instructions Section
of this brief. The final boards will be plotted
and prepared by the competition commission
in preparation for the public exhibition.
Shortlisted teams will then return to Detroit to
present their final presentations at a public
event. Each team will make a 10 minute
presentation followed by a 20 minute Q&A
period from the audience and design jury.
Following the presentations and based on
community feedback, the design jury will
announce 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place awards
for each team.
12
AWARDS & TRAVEL STIPEND
At the conclusion of STAGE 1 the 5 selected
participant teams will receive $1,000 per
team to cover travel expenses and room and
board for the site visit and community design
review in August, 2017.
At the conclusion of STAGE 2 the 3 shortlisted
teams will receive another $1,000 per team
to cover travel expenses and room and
board for the public exhibition and final
presentations in October, 2017.
At conclusion of STAGE 3, the winning
team will receive a $10,000 cash prize, the
second and third place teams will receive
$5,000 and $2,500, respectively.
Community meeting, photo courtesy of Planning & Development Department
PUBLIC EXHIBITION
Winning teams will present their design
proposals at a high-visibility, public
event in October, 2017 to City leaders,
representatives from City agencies,
developers and landowners, local
stakeholders, and the public. The event will
be held in a public venue in or near the
Morningside neighborhood. The competition
sponsors will facilitate the public event.
The competition results will be announced at
the public exhibition and on the competition
website shortly thereafter.
The 1st place team will have their designs
sent to the Landscape Design Unit of the
General Services Department for further
review and refinement with the goal of
implementation and construction by the
City of Detroit. An online gallery on the
competition website will display all of the
submissions for public view at the end of the
competition.
We remind applicants and participants
that this is an ideas competition; there is no
guarantee that any of the park designs will
be implemented or constructed as submitted.
13
Julie Bargmann
Founder & Principal, D.I.R.T. Studio;
Associate Professor & Graduate Director of
Landscape Architecture, University of Virginia
School of Architecture
Charles Cross
Senior Landscape Designer,
Detroit Collaborative Design Center;
Adjunct Professor, University of Detroit Mercy
School of Architecture
Julie Bargmann is internationally recognized as
an innovative designer in building regenerative
landscapes and with interdisciplinary design
education. In both academic explorations as well
as her design practice, Bargmann’s on-going
research continues to excavate the creative potential
of degraded landscapes. Her graduate design
studios and courses focus on the design potential for
productive futures of fallow cities.
Charles Cross, ASLA, is the Senior Landscape
Designer at the Detroit Collaborative Design Center;
as well as an Adjunct Professor at the University of
Detroit Mercy School of Architecture. He holds a BS
in Agriculture from Western Michigan University,
and a BS in Urban Landscape Architecture and
Masters of Urban Design from The City College
of New York. He maintains a firm belief that
underserved communities deserve good design, and
therefore should be the patrons of the process -not
just the consumers of the end product.
Applying this research at her small design practice,
projects at the D.I.R.T. studio explore past and
present industrial operations and urban processes
in relationship to ecological systems, cultural
constructs and emerging technologies. From closed
quarries to abandoned coal mines, fallow factories
and urban railyards, Bargmann joins teams of
architects, artists, engineers, historians and scientists
to imagine the next evolution of these working
landscapes.
Along with a degree in sculpture from CarnegieMellon University, Bargmann earned a masters in
landscape architecture at Harvard GSD followed
by a Fellowship at the American Academy in
Rome. Bargmann’s work was awarded the National
Design Award by Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt
Museum. TIME, CNN and Newsweek, along with
national and international design publications
have recognized Bargmann as leading the next
generation in making a difference for design and
the environment.
Charles was awarded the Certificate of Merit by
the ASLA New York City Chapter in 2002. He has
been an invited guest critic at Columbia University,
The City College of New York, The Cooper Hewitt
National Design Museum, and University of Detroit
Mercy.
5
DESIGN JURY
Eligible submissions will be judged by
representatives across three City agencies:
the Planning and Development Department,
General Services Department, and Parks
and Recreation Department. The design
jury for final design submissions will include
the above-mentioned directors of the three
departments as well as noted local and
national landscape architects.
14
Maurice Cox
Director, Planning & Development Department
City of Detroit
Brad Dick
Director, General Services Department
City of Detroit
Keith Flournoy
Interim Director, Parks & Recreation Department
City of Detroit
Maurice Cox has received national acclaim for his
ability to incorporate active citizen participation
into the design process while achieving the highest
quality of design excellence; Fast Company
magazine named him one of America’s “20
Masters of Design” for his practice of “democratic
design.” Prior to moving to Michigan, he was
director of Tulane City Center and Associate Dean
for Community Engagement at the Tulane University
School of Architecture in New Orleans.
Brad Dick served as the Deputy Director of
the General Services Department (GSD) from
its creation in July 2006. He was tasked with
centralizing the governmental support functions
that make city services possible. In May 2011 Brad
was promoted to Director of GSD. In 2016 Brad
led the team to update the City of Detroit’s Parks &
Recreation Master Plan initiatives that have saved
the city nearly $30 million since his department’s
inception. He is serving as the team lead to
implement the $12 million Phase 1 renovation of 40
neighborhood parks in the City of Detroit.
Keith Flournoy is Interim Director and General
Manager for the Detroit Parks and Recreation
Department. Born and raised in Detroit, Keith
started his career with the Detroit Parks and
Recreation Department in 2003 as a District
Supervisor after working for various recreation
agencies throughout Metro Detroit. From 2006
to 2013 Keith served as Park Manager for Belle
Isle. Keith describes himself as a boomeranger as
he once again returned to the Detroit Parks and
Recreation in December 2015 following a position
as Parks Division Manager for the City of Rowlett,
Texas.
A co-founder of the national SEED (Social,
Economic, Environmental, Design) Network,
Cox served as design director of the National
Endowment for the Arts in Washington, DC from
2007-2010. In that capacity, he led the Mayor’s
Institute on City Design, the Governor’s Institute on
Community Design, and oversaw the award of over
$2M a year in NEA design grants across the US.
Cox served on the faculty of the School of
Architecture at the University of Virginia, as city
councilmember, and then mayor of the City of
Charlottesville from 1996-2004. During his mayoral
term the city was ranked as the “#1 Best Place to
Live in the USA & Canada” by Frommer’s Cities
Ranked and Rated and was also the smallest city
in America to maintain a AAA-bond rating for
excellence in fiscal management. Under Cox’s
leadership, Charlottesville completed several large
projects, including the passage of an awardwinning mixed-use zoning ordinance, pedestrianoriented development; new residential infill, mixedincome higher-density housing, and the design of a
federally funded parkway entrance into the city.
Brad’s career spans private and public service,
and crosses cultures. For MSX International and
Geometric Results Incorporated, a wholly owned
subsidiary of Ford Motor Company, Brad managed
innovative human capital programs for Delphi
Corporation and Blue Cross Blue Shield of South
Carolina, and was an Implementation Manager at
Ford Motor Company in Colchester, England for
two years. Additionally Brad served as a project
manager for MSX International in Mexico City,
Mexico and Paris, France for long term projects
in those locations. He proudly served the United
States Department of State as a Foreign Service
Recruiter after spending two years as a Peace
Corps Volunteer in Tanzania East Africa, where he
taught agriculture business programs at the Songea
Institute of Technology.
Keith is a graduate of Wayne State University with a
Bachelor of Science Degree in Parks and Recreation
Administration. He has served on various Michigan
Recreation and Parks Association committees
throughout his career. Keith is credentialed through
the National Parks and Recreation Association
(NRPA) as a Certified Parks and Recreation
Professional (CPRP).
Keith’s philosophy is that the Parks and Recreation
departments across the country are an integral
part of the sustainability of America’s communities.
In Detroit, parks and recreation programming
contributes to the missions of many other city
agencies through crime prevention, public health
improvements, economic development, and
increased neighborhood home value.
15
INSTRUCTIONS
Community meeting, photo courtesy of Planning & Development Department
6
COMPETITION REGISTRATION
ELIGIBILITY AND TEAMS
All entrants or teams must register to
participate in the competition before
submitting their application. To register,
visit www.gapgap.org. We encourage
registration as soon as possible so that
teams receive updates and reminders of
the application submission deadline.
This design competition is open to all
persons above the age of 18. However,
special consideration will be given to
local and regional talent (Detroit and
Michigan respectively). Students and
emerging professionals in the fields of
landscape architecture, architecture,
urban planning, and urban design are
especially encouraged to apply. An
individual or team of up to 3 individuals
may register and compete. No individual,
however, may be part of multiple teams.
During the registration process, each
entrant or team will be asked to fill-out an
online registration form which requests
from the entrant(s): a primary contact’s
full name and contact information, team
member names and contact information,
and relevant details regarding current
profession, area of expertise, etc.
Registration is ‘received’ when the
City of Detroit server records the entry.
Subsequently, a confirmation email will be
sent to the primary contact.
PARTICIPATION AND TRAVEL REQUIREMENTS
At least one team member must be able to
travel to Detroit twice: in August, 2017 for
the site visit and community design review
and in October, 2017 for the public
exhibition and final presentation.
16
SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS
STAGE REQUIREMENTS:
1
APPLICATION SUBMISSION
Entrants and teams are asked to submit:
• A brief description or bio of the
individual or team submitting materials
(max 500 words)
• A statement of purpose, stating the
individual or team’s interest and
experience in enhancing Detroit
neighborhoods, innovative and
sustainable design of urban public
spaces, and inclusive community
engagement (max 1,000 words)
• Resumes for each team member with
mention of any professional affiliations,
for example: AIA, ASLA, APA, ASCE,
etc. (1 page per team member)
Image courtesy of Planning & Development Department
• Brief descriptions and visual
documentation of relevant past
projects by team members, if
applicable. Work samples or a
curated portfolio are preferred.
Please note which team members
have participated in the included
relevant past projects (up to 10 pages
per entire team as one PDF; 10 MB
max)
Applications will be accepted until 12:00
PM EST on July 31, 2017 via email
according to the instructions received
upon your registration. The City of Detroit
will not consider applicaiton submissions
that are received after the deadline.
17
STAGE REQUIREMENTS: INITIAL CONCEPT
2
STAGE REQUIREMENTS: FINAL DESIGN
3
DESIGN FOR SITE VISIT /
COMMUNITY DESIGN REVIEW
Participant teams are asked to submit 2
design boards with layout of visual and
written materials for the initial design ideas,
dimensions of 48x36 inches in PDF format,
25 MB max. Design boards should include
the following visual materials:
• Board 1: An overall visual concept
framework for the park as it fits in the
context of its immediate surroundings
• Board 2: Illustrative design ideas with
human-scale experiential renderings of
3-5 concept scenarios
Visual materials and illustrative drawings
may include: sketches, site plans, renderings,
diagrams, maps, photographs, and
axonometric drawings among others.
Design boards should include a brief text
describing the team’s understanding and
analysis of the site (500 words max) and a
brief narrative explaining the teams design
approach (500 words max).
Design materials must be received by
12:00 PM EST on August 25, 2017.
SUBMISSION FOR PUBLIC
EXHIBITION & PRESENTATION
Teams must be available and prepared to
participate in the site visit and community
design review in June, exact day to be
announced. The community design review
will test the flexibility and communication
skills of team members with the goal of
listening, acknowledging, and visually
interpreting the ideas and concerns of the
community. Teams will be assigned to
smaller groups of community members to
work closely and gain further insight that will
be documented and presented back to the
entire audience. At the end of the meeting
community members will anonymously rank
teams in order of preference. Their evaluation
may include qualities like listening skills,
responsive design based on feedback, and
ability to reach greater community consensus.
Individuals or design teams are asked to
submit 2 design boards with layout of visual
and written materials for the design proposal,
dimensions of 48x36 inches in PDF format,
25 MB max. Design boards should include
the following visual materials:
Following the community design review
teams will be notified of their status moving
forward: 3 of the 5 teams will be invited to
advance their ideas in the final stage.
Design boards should include a brief text
describing the team’s understanding and
analysis of the site (500 words max) and a
brief narrative explaining the teams design
approach (500 words max).
• Board 1: An overall conceptual design
for the park as it fits in the context of its
immediate surroundings
• Board 2: Illustrative design with humanscale experiential renderings of one wellconsidered scenario
Visual materials and illustrative drawings
may include: sketches, site plans, renderings,
diagrams, maps, photographs, and
axonometric drawings among others.
Design materials must be received on
October 1, 2017 before midnight,
12:00 AM EST.
18
RESOURCES
Photo courtesy of General Services Department
7
COMPETITION INQUIRES (Q&A)
NEIGHBORHOOD ADVISORY COMMITTEE
Entrants will have the opportunity to ask
questions by email to the competition
commission, the City of Detroit Planning
and Development Department and
General Services Department.
Questions should be e-mailed to
gapgap@detroitmi.gov.
A group of representatives from
involved City agencies, key community
stakeholders and local design industry
representatives from the region have been
invited to contribute to the competition
as part of the Neighborhood Advisory
Committee (NAC).
This is the main method of communication
for entrants. Please note that telephone
inquiries will not be accepted, and the
latest date for submitting inquiries is July
28, 2017. Teams selected to participate
will have further opportunities to discuss
and clarify competition objectives.
The Neighborhood Advisory Committee
has provided input into the creation of the
design competition brief and the structure
of the competition process. The NAC
is also involved in the promotion of the
competition, will support the jury process,
and participate in the public event for the
winning teams.
19
Photos © Jim West Photography
PARTNERING CITY AGENCIES
The Give a Park, Get a Park competition
is a collaborative effort managed by the
following City agencies:
Planning and Development Department (PDD)
General Services Department (GSD)
Parks and Recreation Department (DPRD)
The City of Detroit Planning and
Development Department provides
professional and technical expertise in
planning, design, and development that
helps to inform and seed sustainable
environments, and neighborhoods for
citizens and businesses. PDD works to
create an infrastructure that supports
citizens, investors, and other partners
in their expressed efforts to advance
initiatives that create walkable urban
places that serve the largest and broadest
needs of the Detroit Community.
The mission of the General Services
Department is to improve City services
and achieve operational efficiencies
by consolidating support functions from
various agencies. They provide repair,
maintenance, lawn-mowing, and trash
collection services to all city-owned
properties, facilities and vehicular fleets.
They also design, construct, and maintain
the City’s public parks.
The Parks and Recreation Department
manages and programs the urban parks
and leisure facilities for the benefit of the
city’s children, families, and seniors.
The department is responsible for 308
parks and 12 recreation facilities across
every neighborhood in the City.
Detroit’s parks range from mini parks
under 2 acres of land, to large parks
like Rouge Park, which covers more than
1,000 acres. Active amenities include
basketball and volleyball courts, soccer
and football fields, ice skating rinks,
sledding hills, and more.
20
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS
Photo courtesy of General Services Department
Each entrant, by participating in the
not obligated to use any submission. Each
competition, grants the City of Detroit
entrant acknowledges that other entrants
and the Knight Foundation a royalty-free,
may have created plans and concepts
non-exclusive license to use depictions and
contained in their submission that may
descriptions of all works submitted to the
have familiarities or similarities to his/her
competition in any promotion or for any
own submission, and that he/she will not
non-commercial purpose.
be entitled to any compensation or right to
Each entrant, by participating in the
competition, except where legally
negotiate with the contest entities because
of these familiarities or similarities.
prohibited, grants permission for the contest
By submitting an entry to the competition,
entities and their designees to use his/her
each entrant or team hereby represents
name, likeness, and prize information for
and warrants that (1) the submission is his/
public relations and promotional purposes
her/their original work and he/she/they
without further compensation, in all media
is/are the sole and executive owner and
now or hereafter discovered, for an
rights holder of the submission and have
unlimited period, without notice or review
the right to submit the design in the contest
or approval.
and grant all required licenses; and (2) the
Entrants agree that City of Detroit and
sponsors shall have the sole discretion
in determining the extent and manner of
non-commercial use of submissions and are
submission shall not infringe any thirdparty proprietary, intellectual property or
other rights, including, without limitation,
copyright, trademark, design, patent, or
confidentiality obligation.
21
Give a Get a
PARK
Give a Get a
PARK
Give a Get a
PARK
APPLICATIONS DUE JULY 31, 2017
WWW.GAPGAPDETROIT.ORG
21 June 2017
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