Table 1. DIP Switch Settings
CAUTION: (Read This First)
This panel has been designed to make it nearly bullet proof to mistakes made when
wiring it to your DAS equipment and to the supplied 15 VDC power supply and 12 VDC
backup battery, but please observe the following basic procedure which will prevent any
damage if something is wired wrong. It also makes it easy to troubleshoot if there are
any problems.
1. Wire the 15 VDC DC power supply to connector J5 as shown in Figure 11. Before
connecting anything else, plug the power supply into a 120 VAC outlet. When power is
applied the LEDS will turn RED, GREEN and BLUE for a few seconds as the unit goes
through its self-test routine. It will also repeat this every time the “PUSH to Test” button
is pressed and released.
2. Once you have verified that DC power is correctly wired, you can unplug the DC supply
and wire everything else to the other connectors except the panel’s backup battery and
its outboard charger. The panel’s charger and 12 VDC battery should be the very last
things to get plugged in and connected once you have verified that everything else is
working as expected.
2
TOOLS REQUIRED
Standard Voltmeter
Tools and hardware for wall mounting
INCLUDED TOOLS:
The screw driver for the connector clamps is included in the accessories
A trim pot adjustment tool is included with the accessories
Cable Lengths
This panel is designed to work with standard Cat 5 or Cat 6 cable that typically has a DC resistance of
about 2.5 ohms per 100 ft for a single wire strand.
For all the connections to standard dry relay contacts in the DAS equipment the length of the cable
between the panel and the DAS equipment is not critical because the current in the loop is only about
1 milliamp. So cable runs up to 5000 feet or longer can easily be accommodated.
This is not true however for only the Model 1221-A interface connections that are used to sense the
status of the outdoor Donor Antenna. The panel has a circuit in it that measures the DC resistance of a
50-ohm terminator installed at the outdoor antenna via a bias-T fitting. If the resistance is too high
indicating an open circuit or too low indicating a short circuit an alarm is triggered. So the DC resistance of the coax cable, any connectors and surge protectors in line and the Cat 5 or Cat 6 cabling
leading to the panel can be a significant factor in the overall DC resistance that the panel measures. To
null these variables out of the equation there is a trim pot adjustment that must be made when the
panel is first installed, but there is a limit to how much resistance can be nulled. For this circuit to
work well a single twisted pair of cat 5 / cat 6 cable can be used up to 1000 feet in length. If the
cable run is longer than this (for example 2000 feet) then two twisted pairs should be used in parallel
to lower the cable resistance. Please consult our customer service for additional advice and
information.
Other Available Options
There are other optional powering methods available that will allow the unit to be powered from
the same DC supply or backup battery that the DAS equipment uses. It is available in either 24 or 48
VDC. Please contact us for more information.
An additional module can be purchased that provides SNMP communications. It operates on a local
area network providing ethernet / Internet SMTP or MODBUS alarm monitoring with e-mail
notification, event logging and temperature / humidity sensing. Please contact us for more
information.
Special BDA Configurations and Settings
If your BDA does not conform to the standard alarm relay configuration shown in Figures 2 or 3,
please contact us. We have designed into the panel several special DIP switch settings that can
accommodate almost any non-standard alarm set up . For example the CommScope NODE A
requires some special settings to deal with some issues when power is disconnected. Please contact
us for more information.
3
Model 1221-A and 1221-B Independent DAS Annunciator Panel
Included Items:
QTY
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
10
1
1
1
Description
Main Alarm Panel
16 pin cable connector
8 pin cable connector
6 pin DC Power connector
Screw Driver for mating wires to connectors
8 Ahr 12 vdc SLA backup battery
AC socket mount battery charger
Trim pot adjustment tool
Installation Manual
10 k Ohm 0.25 watt end-of -line resistor
15 VDC wall mount power supply
Spare 1 amp battery fuse
Door latch key
This panel is designed to meet the requirements of NFPA -72 (versions 2010, 2013 and 2016), and
the 2016 version of NFPA-1221.
It consists of several component sections that enable its use with many different types of BDA’s and
backup power supplies / UPS. It also has the capability to support DAS installations that have
multiple amplifiers and donor antennas. Physically the panel modules consist of two printed circuit
boards: the LED Board which is mounted on the back side of the door and the Mother Board that is
mounted inside the main body of the enclosure. There is a shelf / cavity which holds the included
8 Ahr 12 vdc SLA emergency backup battery. A battery charger and 15 VDC power supply are also
included which can be connected to any 120 VAC electrical outlet. Figure 1 shows the main
components. Figure 12 shows the other supplied items. (NOTE: If the included key is lost you can
open the panel with a standard set of needle nose pliers.)
The main system sections are as follows:
1. HIGH Brightness 3-color (Red, Green, Blue) LED Annunciator Displays
• Main AC power Loss
• BDA / Amplifier Alarm
• Summary System Alarm
• Antenna Failure
• DAS Battery Charger Failure
• DAS Battery Capacity Low (less than 30%)
It also provides individual LED indications if there is a communications error (open, disconnected or
shorted cable between the panel and the DAS equipment).
2. Communications Integrity Sensors
For each alarm input from the BDA or backup power supply a sensor is provided that detects if the
cables connecting to these devices are open or disconnected. A set of dry relay Form-C contacts are
also provided to communicate this problem to the main fire alarm panel (MFAP).
3. FORM- C Dry Relay Contacts to mate with common Fire Alarm Panels
These alarm contacts are rated at 1 amp and include provisions for easily installing End of Line
Resistors (EOLR) inside the panel. These relays utilize the same signaling format as smoke
detectors. So that in the event of an alarm or panel failure the relays will close shorting the end-of
line resistor.
4. ANTENNA Failure (Model 1221-A See Figure 6)
Since many BDA’s lack the capability to detect problems with the donor antenna or its lead-in cable,
this panel includes the internal circuitry to provide this functionality if the BDA does not provide it. It
mates with user supplied bias –T fittings to sense common donor antenna feed problems.
4
5
5. DAS Backup Battery Charger Failure ( Model 1221-A)
If the DAS backup battery charger or UPS does not have a failure sensor, the panel can provide
alternative functionality.
6. DAS Backup Battery Capacity less than 30% (Model 1221-A)
If the backup power supply or UPS does not have this alarm capability, the panel can provide
alternative capability.
7. Backup 24 Hour Panel Power
The panel is powered via an external wall mounted 15 VDC power supply. There is also an external
Charger provided that keeps an internally mounted 8 Ahr 12 vdc SLA battery charged. In the event
of AC power loss, the panel will continue normal operation for at least 24 hours. Although these
types of batteries in our application have a lifetime of 4-5 years, best practices call for replacement
on an annual basis. Its five-stage charger has LED indicators showing if the battery needs to be
replaced or if it has failed for any reason. The panel is designed for a battery with these maximum
dimensions: 5.96” L x 2.58” W x 3.65” H or smaller. The replacement battery is available from
Amstron (Model AP-1280 F1).
The panel’s battery also has a method of reporting its failure or its need for replacement to the Main
Fire Alarm Panel. This feature can be turned OFF or ON since some installations with alternate
backup power do not need this battery. The default mode for this is OFF.
8. NEMA-4 rated wall mounted enclosure
The fire codes require that this panel meet the NEMA-4 water resistant requirements. It has four
thermoplastic knockouts on the bottom of the panel that provide four openings for standard ½” and
¾” EMT conduit fittings. The panel is provided with brackets to mount it to any wall. Its dimensions
are 5.85 “H x 7.87” W x 3.98” D and it weighs 11.7 pounds.
9. Test Features
A “push to test” button is provide that will illuminate each of the 3 color LEDs (red , green and blue)
for a few seconds in each color. During this test the alarm relays to the main fire alarm panel
(MFAP) are also actuated. To statically test the alarm relays there are internal DIP switch settings
that will simulate alarms or normal status for the these relays. (see Table 1).
Model Differences
The panel is available in two different configurations. Model 1221-A and 1221-B. The table below
shows the differences.
Module
Model 1212 A






Annunciator Panel with FORM-C relay outputs to
main fire alarm system
Alternative Donor Antenna Failure Sense Module
(bias-T fittings not supplied)
Alternative DAS Battery Capacity Sense Module
Alternative DAS Battery Charger
Module
Panel Backup Battery (8Ahr)
Failure Sense
Panel Power Supply and battery Charger
6
Model 1221 B



Mating with DAS Equipment
Figure 2 shows the standard method of mating this panel with a BDA and UPS. The standard method is
the same as that used to connect to most Fire Alarm Panels where an end- of- line- resistor (EOLR) is
used to sense the alarm status and detect if the cables are open, disconnected or shorted. Most BDA
and UPS units are provided with Form- C dry relay contacts that can be connected so if there is an
alarm or power failure the relay will close providing a short across the end-of-line resistor. For this panel
the EOLR is 10 k Ohms and these are provided with the panel for connection at the DAS equipment.
Some BDA or UPS suppliers do not provide Form-C dry relay alarm contacts (See Figure 3). Instead
they use Form-A contacts which open when there is an alarm. In this case the panel can be programmed
to accommodate this mode by closing the appropriate DIP switch as shown Table 1.
Figure 4 shows how to wire to the panel if multiple BDA’s or UPS units are utilized in the system. In this
configuration, the EOLR is located at the last unit in the daisy chain.
In the event it is not possible to install the 10k Ohm EOLR at the DAS equipment, these can be simulated
by closing the appropriate DIP switch as shown in Table 1. This method can also be utilized for testing to
simulate an ’OK’ status input when the DAS equipment is not connected or if one or some of the DAS
inputs are not used.
Figure 5 shows the output cable connections from the internal relays to the Main Fire Alarm Panel
(MFAP). NOTE: Connectors J2 and J7 on the LED PC board are designed to be directly wired to
the MFAP. Connectors J4 and J3 on the LED PC Board are internally connected pin-for-pin to the
relays and are intended to hold and connect the end-of-line resistors specified by the MFAP
supplier to the relay contacts (See Figure 20). Figure 5 shows the relays in their “not energized”
power off (Alarm) positions. The plugs for these connectors are mated with their headers on the PC
board. To connect them to external wiring a miniature screw driver is included that is used to tighten the
wire clamp on each pin. (See Figure 17) The wire clamps will accommodate wire sizes up to 16 AWG in
diameter and as small as 26 AWG. Note that these connectors are NOT keyed, so careful attention
must be paid to the pin numbers that are marked on the PC board when mating the connector.
You also must check that the connector is not offset to insure that all of the appropriate pins of
the header are mated with the plug. This is an easy error to make when mating this type of
connector.
The relays are shown connected to a master fire panel that uses the normal conventional alarm
configuration (i.e. when the relays signal an alarm, they are closed causing the EOLR to be shorted). In
the unlikely event you are connecting to a panel that uses the opposite convention, the unused
contacts on the output relays are also available to connect to and conform to this non-standard convention.
DIP Switch Settings
DIP switches are used to program the functionality of the panel. Unless we have advised you otherwise,
the panel is shipped with the standard default factory settings shown in the table below. Details regarding
the function of each switch are shown in the APPENDIX.
7
DEFAULT FACTORY SETTINGS FOR DIP SWITCHES
DIP SWITCH
SW1-1
SW1-2
SW1-3
SW1-4
SW1-5
SW1-6
SW1-7
SW1-8
SW1-9
SW1-10
SETTING
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
LOCATION
Mother Board
Mother Board
Mother Board
Mother Board
Mother Board
Mother Board
Mother Board
Mother Board
Mother Board
Mother Board
SW2-1
SW2-2
SW2-3
SW2-4
SW2-5
SW2-6
SW2-7
SW2-8
SW2-9
SW2-10
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
Mother Board
Mother Board
Mother Board
Mother Board
Mother Board
Mother Board
Mother Board
Mother Board
Mother Board
Mother Board
SW3-1
SW3-2
SW3-3
SW3-4
SW3-5
SW3-6
SW3-7
SW3-8
SW3-9
SW3-10
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
Mother Board
Mother Board
Mother Board
Mother Board
Mother Board
Mother Board
Mother Board
Mother Board
Mother Board
Mother Board
SW4-1
SW4-2
SW4-3
SW4-4
SW4-5
SW4-6
SW4-7
SW4-8
SW4-9
SW4-10
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
LED Board
LED Board
LED Board
LED Board
LED Board
LED Board
LED Board
LED Board
LED Board
LED Board
8
Model 121-A
or 1221-B
9
Model 121-A
or 1221-B
10
Model 1221-A
or 1221-B
11
Figure 5. Relay Connections to Main Fire Alarm Panel
( Model 1221-A or 1221-B)
12
Antenna Failure Sense
If the BDA in your system does not have the capability to test antenna and lead-in cable failures,
this panel can provide an alternative method for detecting most common problems (cable shorted
or disconnected). It should be noted that up until the release of the 2016 version of NFPA-1221
there was some ambiguity in the codes relative to this requirement relating to the need to test all
the antennas in the system (both indoor and outdoor) or if the code required addressing only the
outdoor donor antenna. In the 2016 version, the requirement is clearly stated for the outdoor donor
antenna. Detecting problems with the indoor antennas is optional.
The method we use involves injecting a DC voltage (10 VDC) onto the lead-in cable at the input to
the BDA using a user supplied bias-T (user supplied). Another bias-T (user supplied ) is used outdoors at the antenna to provide a 50 Ohm DC load. (See Figure 6). A typical bias-T can be
purchased from Mini-Circuits Part # ZNBT-60-1W+.
If the cable is shorted or open the detector will sense this and trigger an alarm. If multiple
antennas are to be sensed, connect them as shown in Figure 7. Since cable and connector DC
resistance may vary in each installation there is a trim pot adjustment provided to null these
variables out. The procedure is as follows.
•
On the Mother Board set the DIP switches as follows:
SW1-3 ON
SW3-6 OFF
SW3-7 ON
•
Connect a DC voltmeter to the test points labeled ANTENNA and Ground.on the LED
Board
•
Adjust the trim pot labeled ANT TRIM (R35) on the LED board until the DC voltage
reads 5.0 VDC. This voltage as an acceptable window of +/- 1 VDC but you should try to
adjust it as close to 5.0 VDC as possible
This method obviously does not detect all antenna problems such as the antenna being blown
down in a storm or a new building being constructed between the donor antenna and the public
safety repeater, but it will detect common faults such as a short circuit, a severed cable or a loose
connector and it will pass the test that most inspectors employ by simply disconnecting the cable
going to the outdoor donor antenna.
13
14
15
DAS Secondary Power Backup Battery Capacity Test (Model 1221-A)
The code requires monitoring the DAS backup secondary battery to determine when it has less than
30 % capacity left under normal full load emergency backup conditions (no AC power). If the UPS in
the system does not have the capability to do this, the panel provides an alternative technique.
(see Figure 8 which shows appropriate connections to the external DAS backup power battery). This
method measures the battery voltage and when it reaches a predetermined threshold an alarm is
triggered. To enable this mode connect the DAS battery as shown in Figure 8 and set the DIP
switches on the Mother board as follows:
SW1-10 ON
SW3-10 OFF
Battery suppliers provide specifications that show how the nominal battery voltage varies as a
function of load current and capacity. Different types of batteries from different vendors will have
varying specifications. To accommodate this variability a trim pot adjustment is provided on the LED
PC board. The table below shows the appropriate DIP switch settings for 48, 24 and 12 VDC
systems. Once these switches are set, connect a DC voltmeter to the test points labeled BAT CAP
and Ground. Adjust the trim pot labeled “DAS BAT Threshold Adjust (R41)” to set the 30% threshold
to the require voltage. NOTE: The test point provides the threshold voltage scaled down by a
factor of 10. For example, a threshold trigger point of 45 VDC will read 4.50 VDC on your voltmeter.
SW4-1
SW4-2
SW4-3
SW4-4
SW4-5
SW4-6
DIP Switch SW-4 on LED Board Settings
12 VDC Battery 24 VDC Battery
48 VDC Battery
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
DAS Battery Charger Failure (Model 1221-A)
(On mother Board set SW3-8 OFF and SW3-9 ON)
The code requires monitoring the charger used to keep the DAS secondary power battery at full
charge in case of AC Power failure. If the UPS in the system does not have the capability to do this,
the panel provides an alternative technique. This method measures the battery voltage and when it
reaches a predetermined voltage threshold, an alarm is triggered. To enable this mode set DIP
Switch SW3-8 on the Mother board to OFF and SW3-9 on the Mother board to the ON position.
Different types of batteries and chargers from different vendors will have varying performance. To
accommodate this variability a trim pot adjustment is provided on the LED PC board. The table
above shows the appropriate DIP switch settings for 48, 24 and 12 VDC systems. Once these
switches are set, connect a DC voltmeter to the test points labeled “Charger Bad Threshold” and
Ground. Adjust the trim pot labeled “DAS Charger Threshold Adjust” to set the desired threshold to
the require voltage. NOTE: The test point provides the threshold voltage scaled down by a factor of 10. For example, a threshold trigger point of 52 VDC will read 5.20 VDC on your
voltmeter.
To determine the appropriate threshold, you should run a test to measure the nominal battery voltage
when the charger is on vs when the charger is turned off or disconnected. The battery voltage should
be lower when the charger is off and the battery is under load.
.
16
Model 1221-A
17
AC Power Loss Alarm ( Model 1221-A and Model 1221-B)
There are two methods that can be used to detect loss of AC Power:
1. Connect the panel to an external DAS device (BDA or UPS) that provides Form-C relay
contacts to signal an alarm. Figure 2 shows these connections.
2. Use the loss of AC power to the panel’s 15 VDC power supply to sense AC power loss. To
enable this mode, on the Mother Board set DIP switch SW1-6 ON and SW1-1 to ON
18
Panel Power Supply and Battery Charger
The panel’s backup battery charger is shown in Figure 10. When doing an installation connect
these items last after you have determined that everything else is working correctly on the
15 VDC power supply. This will help eliminate the possibility that the battery’s external fuse
might blow if something is not wired correctly
The G750 charger is a direct wall plug-in charger, with 12 feet of DC cable attached. The Red lead is
the positive (nominally +12 to 15 Vdc) output while the black lead is the negative or ground connection.
Figure 11 shows how it should be connected to the panel and attached to pins 3 and 4 of the J5
connector on the LED PC Board.
Attach the battery to the red and black leads that are soldered to the LED board as shown in Figure 11.
Place the battery into its holder making sure that all wire connections and the battery’s 1 amp
fuse are routed around and below the surface of the battery case to ensure they will not
interfere with closing the door of the panel or damage any components on the LED PC board
when the door is completely closed and latched. See Figures 13, 14 and 19.
When the battery is connected and the charger is powered, the charger LED after a few seconds will
blink red to indicate the battery is charging. When the battery is nearly charged it will blink green and
eventually turn solid green when the battery is fully charged. The diagnostics LED on the charger
provides the following indications:
•
Single Flash: Battery will not hold a charge
•
Double Flash: Possible battery short
•
Triple Flash: Battery voltage is too high for the selected charge mode. Double check the
battery is a 12 VDC Sealed Lead Acid type.
•
LED Solid Red: Reverse polarity. Reverse the connections to the battery.
The standby LED will be solid Orange if the battery is not connected or its voltage is too low for the
charger to detect.
There is an option to monitor the status of this battery and notify the building’s main fire alarm panel if
it is low or needs replacement. This can be done by setting DIP SW4-10 on the LED board to the OFF
position. If the battery needs to be replaced or if it is disconnected the SYSTEM LED will flash on and
off once per second and the SYSTEM alarm relay will signal an alarm to the building’s main fire alarm
panel. The circuit that senses this battery’s status has a time lag of about 10 seconds. So once the
panel’s battery is connected or disconnected it will take about 10 seconds before the LED on the panel
reacts.
Figure 11 also shows how the 15 VDC power supply is attached.
End to End Testing.
DIP switch settings on the Mother board are provided to simulate various alarm conditions:
•
DIP switch SW1-7 (Normally OFF, when ON all LEDs will be Red and all relay signals to the main
fire alarm panel will be forced the alarm state except the Communications Fault Alarm
•
DIP switch SW1-8 (Normally OFF, when ON all LEDs will be Green and all relay signals to the
main fire alarm panel will be forced to the normal non-alarm state.
19
Test Points (TP)
Test Points (TP) are provided on the LED board to use for troubleshooting and system setup (see
Figure 18). These TPs are designed to mate with standard voltmeter probes. Each TP is isolated
from the main circuits via a 10k resistor so if a TP is inadvertently shorted, no damage will result.
The table below shows the nominal DC signals that can be measured at each TP.
Name
+14 VDC
DC Voltage
11-15 VDC
10 VDC
Antenna
10 VDC
5 VDC
DAS Charger Threshold
varies
DAS Battery Low
DAS Battery +
DAS Battery Ground
Comments
Approximately 12 VDC when running
on panel backup battery. 15 VDC when
power supply is active
Output of panel's 10 VDC regulator
Nominal level is 5.0 VDC. Will vary as a
function of antenna cable length and
number of antennas that are monitored.. Use the Antenna trim pot to
adjust this voltage to a nominal 5 VDC
value
Depends on threshold value set to
detect DAS Charger failure
varies
Depends on threshold value set to
detect DAS battery capacity
Depends on
Connected to DAS battery positive and
DAS Battery.
negative terminals so the status of the
Either 12 , 24 or DAS Backup Battery can be measured
48 VDC
0 vdc
Connected to circuit ground and
enclosure chassis
20
21
Model 1221-A
or 1221-B
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Table 1. DIP Switch Settings
LED PC Board
DIP Switch
Function
SW4-1
12 VDC Battery
SW4-2
12 VDC Battery
SW4-3
24 VDC Battery
SW4-4
24 VDC Battery
SW4-5
48 VDC Battery
SW4-6
SW4-7
SW4-8
48 VDC Battery
Not Used
Not Used
SW4-9
Not Used
SW4-10
Normally OFF, ON enables monitoring of Panel Battery Status
Mother PC Board
DIP Switch
SW1-1
Function
Normally OFF, ON places 10 k Ohm EOLR across AC Alarm input
SW1-2
Normally OFF, ON places 10 k Ohm EOLR across BDA-Amplifier Alarm input
SW1-3
Normally OFF, ON places 10 k Ohm EOLR across Antenna Alarm input from BDA
SW1-4
Normally OFF, ON places 10 k Ohm EOLR across DAS Battery Charger Alarm input
SW1-5
Normally OFF. ON places 10 k Ohm EOLR across DAS Battery Capacity Alarm input
SW1-6
SW1-7
Normally OFF, ON enables 15 VDC Power Supply to trigger AC power loss Alarm. SW1-1 must be also be ON
Normally OFF, ON forces all output relays into Alarm mode (RED LEDS)
SW1-8
Normally OFF, ON forces all output relays to the MFAP into the OK state (GREEN LEDS)
SW1-9
Normally OFF, ON forces a Communications Fault Alarm to the MFAP (BLUE LEDS)
SW1-10
Normally OFF, ON connects internal Battery Capacity sensor to MFAP, In the ON state SW3-10 must be OFF.
SW2-1
Normally OFF, ON disables AC Power Blue LED
SW2-2
Normally OFF, ON disables AMPLIFIER Blue LED
SW2-3
Normally OFF, ON disables ANTENNA Blue LED
SW2-4
Normally OFF, ON disables CHARGER Blue LED
SW2-5
Normally OFF, ON disables BATTERY CAPACITY Blue LED
SW2-6
Normally OFF, ON for use with CommScope NODE A amplifiers
SW2-7
Normally ON, OFF for use with CommScope NODE A amplifiers
SW2-8
Normally ON, OFF for use with some UPS's
SW2-9
SW2-10
NOT USED
ALWAYS OFF
SW3-1
Normally OFF, ON reverses polarity of external AC power loss alarm input from DAS
SW3-2
Normally OFF, ON reverses polarity of DAS BDA-Amplifier alarm input
SW3-3
Normally OFF, ON reverses polarity of external DAS Antenna fail alarm input
SW3-4
Normally OFF, ON reverses polarity of external DAS Battery Charger alarm input
SW3-5
Normally OFF, ON reverses polarity of external DAS Battery Capacity low alarm input
SW3-6
Normally ON to connect external DAS Antenna Fail alarm to the MFAP. In the ON state SW3-7 must be OFF
SW3-7
Normally OFF, ON connects internal DAS Antenna Fail sensor alarm to the MFAP. In the ON state SW3-6 must
be OFF
Normally ON to connect external DAS Battery Charger Fail alarm to the MFAP. In the ON state SW3-9 must be
OFF
Normally OFF, ON connects internal DAS Battery Charger Fail sensor alarm to the MFAP. In the ON state
SW-3-8 must be OFF.
SW3-8
SW3-9
SW3-10
Normally ON, connects external Battery Capacity sensor to the MFAP. In the ON state SW1-10 must be OFF
32
Connector Pin Assignments and Functions
PIN #
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
PIN #
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
J1 on Mother PC Board (Inputs from DAS Equipment)
Function / Name
AC Power Loss +10 VDC Excite (to UPS)
AC Power Loss input (from UPS)
BDA-Amplifier Fail +10 VDC Excite (to BDA)
BDA-Amplifier Fail input (from BDA)
Antenna Fail Alarm +10 VDC Excite (to BDA)
Antenna Fail Alarm input (from BDA)
DAS Battery Charger Fail +10 VDC Excite (to UPS)
DAS Battery Charger Fail Alarm (from UPS)
DAS Battery Capacity Low +10 VDC Excite (to UPS)
DAS Battery Capacity Low Alarm (from UPS)
Not used
Not used
Not used
Not used
+ 14 VDC Power for SNMP Module
Not used
J2 on LED PC Board (Relay outputs to Main Fire Alarm Panel)
Function / Name
AC Fail (COMMON) Alarm relay
AC Fail (N.C.) Alarm Relay Contact (closed to common when in alarm or not powered)
AC Fail (N.O.) alarm Relay Contact (open to common when in alarm or not powered)
BDA-Amplifier (COMMON) Fail Alarm relay
BDA-Amplifier (N.C.) Fail Alarm Relay Contact (closed to common when in alarm or not
powered)
BDA-Amplifier (N.O) Fail Alarm Relay Contact (open to common when in alarm or not
powered)
Antenna (COMMON) Alarm Relay
Antenna Alarm (N.C.) Relay Contact (closed to common when in alarm or not powered)
Antenna Alarm (N.O) Relay Contact (open to common when in alarm or not powered)
DAS Charger (COMMON) Alarm Relay
DAS Charger (N.C.) Alarm Relay Contact (closed to common when in alarm or not powered)
DAS Charger Alarm Relay (N.O.) Contact (open to common when in alarm or not
powered)
DAS Battery Capacity (COMMON) Alarm Relay
DAS Battery Capacity (N.C.) Alarm Relay Contact (closed to common when in alarm or not
powered)
DAS Battery Capacity (N.O.) Relay Contact (open to common when in alarm or not
powered)
Not used
33
Connector Pin Assignments and Functions (continued)
PIN #
1
2
J4 on LED PC Board (End of Line Resistor-EOLR contacts)
Function / Name
EOLR (COMMON) connection for AC Fail Alarm relay
EOLR (N.C.) connection for AC Fail Alarm Relay Contact (closed to common when in alarm or
not powered)
3
EOLR (N.O.) connection for AC Fail Alarm Relay Contact (open to common when in alarm or not
powered)
4
5
EOLR (COMMON) connection for BDA-Amplifier Fail Alarm relay
EOLR (N.C.) connection for BDA-Amplifier Fail Alarm Relay Contact (closed to common when
in alarm or not powered)
6
EOLR (N.O.) connection for BDA-Amplifier Fail Alarm Relay Contact (open to common when in
alarm or not powered)
7
8
EOLR (COMMON) connection for Antenna Alarm Relay
EOLR (N.C.) connection for Antenna Alarm Relay Contact (closed to common when in alarm or
not powered)
9
EOLR (N.O.) connection for Antenna Alarm Relay Contact (open to common when in alarm or
not powered)
10
11
EOLR (COMMON) connection for DAS Charger Alarm Relay common
EOLR (N.C.) connection for DAS Charger Alarm Relay Contact (closed to common when in
alarm or not powered)
12
EOLR (N.O.) connection for DAS Charger Alarm Relay Contact (open to common when in alarm
or not powered)
13
14
EOLR (COMMON) connection for DAS Battery Capacity Alarm Relay
EOLR (N.C.) connection for DAS Battery Capacity Alarm Relay Contact (closed to common
when in alarm or not powered)
15
EOLR (N.O.) connection for DAS Battery Capacity Relay Contact (open to common when in
alarm or not powered)
16
Not used
34
Connector Pin Assignments and Functions (continued)
PIN #
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
PIN #
1
2
J7 on LED PC Board (Relay outputs to Main Fire Alarm Panel)
Function / Name
System Summary (COMMON) Alarm relay
System Summary (N.C.) Alarm Relay Contact (closed to common when in alarm or not
powered)
System Summary (N.O.) Alarm Relay Contact (open to common when in alarm or not
powered)
Communications Fault (COMMON) Alarm relay
Communications Fault (N.C.) Alarm Relay Contact (closed to common when in alarm
or not powered)
Communications Fault (N.O) Alarm Relay Contact (open to common when in alarm or
not powered)
Not used
Shield connection from Bias- T
Center conductor connection from Bias-T
Not used
Not Used
Ground
Ground
+14 VDC Output
+14 VDC output
Not used
J3 on LED PC Board (End of Line Resistor-EOLR contacts)
Function / Name
EOLR (COMMON) connection for System Summary Alarm relay
EOLR (N.C.) connection for System Summary Alarm Relay Contact (closed to common when in alarm or not powered)
3
EOLR (N.O.) connection for System Summary Alarm Relay Contact (open to common when in alarm or not powered)
4
EOLR (COMMON) connection for Communication fault Alarm relay
5
EOLR (N.C.) connection for Communications fault Contact (closed to common when
in alarm or not powered)
6
EOLR (N.O.) connection for Communications fault Contact (open to common when in
alarm or not powered)
7
8
Not used
Not used
35
Connector Pin Assignments and Functions (continued)
PIN #
1
2
3
4
5
6
J5 on LED PC Board (DC Power)
Function / Name
+15 VDC from external power supply
Ground form external power supply
Panel Battery Charger (+) RED
Panel Battery Charger (-) BLACK
DAS Backup Battery (+) positive terminal
DAS Backup Battery (-) negative terminal
36
Specifications
Dimensions
Weight
9.84" H x 7.87" W x 3.98"D
11.7 Lbs
120 VAC Power
System Fault
Amplifier
Form-C (1 amp) dry relay
Antenna
outputs to Main Fire Alarm
Battery Charger
Panel
Battery Capacity
Communications Error
Alarm Inputs from DAS
Antenna OK / Fail
Amplifier / BDA OK/ Fail
Charger OK /Fail
Battery capacity OK / Low
120 VAC OK / Fail
Analog inputs
Antenna sense
DAS Backup Battery +/-
Power
15 VDC @160 milliamps from supplied external
power supply
24 HR backup SLA Battery supplied
Certifications
UL : E194432, ETL 4001276
37
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