Never reheat milk. GUIDE TO… STEAMING MILK
GUIDE TO… STEAMING MILK FOR LATTE ART
Latte and cappuccino are the UK’s two favourite coffees and a staple on our coffee menus. Take a look at our
guide to creating latte art that will create a lasting impression.
Latte art
started as a US
craze in the
1980s.
Never
reheat milk.
TO CREATE GREAT LATTE ART, FIRST PERFECT YOUR MILK
• Create microfoam not froth – good microfoam looks shiny and smooth with no visible bubbles, which is just right for perfecting
latte art. Nicely textured microfoam will also enhance an exceptional espresso
• Microfoam is best created with the coldest, freshest milk available. Always keep your milk refrigerated. If milk is left out for
long periods of time the fat content will break down leaving it difficult to foam. Steaming to a temperature of around 65°C will produce
a wonderful sweet tasting, creamy milk that is an acceptable temperature to drink straight away
• Milk will start to ‘burn’ at 78°C. It will also start to lose its natural sweetness, taste and burn your palate. The texture of this milk will
also be very hard to get creative with
WHAT YOU NEED:
• Pitcher/jug • Milk • Cloth • Crockery
No.1
Fill jug with cold milk,
enough for your cup.
No.2
Submerge steam wand to
just below the surface of
milk and turn on.
No.3
Gently lower the jug
to maintain a constant
hissing/chirping noise,
this is the noise of the milk
being stretched. The longer
you stretch the milk, the
more foam you will create.
No.4
NOW FOR THE LATTE ART...
Latte art will make your coffee stand out
from the crowd. The key is getting your
milk texture right – which will also
make your coffee taste delicious!
Patterns come with (a lot of)
practice, so here’s our top tips to
creating three popular designs:
Heart
Pour slightly behind the centre of
the espresso, while still pouring
make a small wiggling motion
from side to side. When a white
circle appears, pull the pitcher
up and pour a thin stream of
milk through and up the circle to
create a heart.
Move the jug up after
stretching so the tip of the
steam arm is in the centre
of the milk at an angle to
create a whirlpool effect.
This is texturing and heating
the milk. Turn off the
steam wand once you have
steamed to your desired
temperature.
Rosetta
Bang or tap the milk on the
counter to pop any surface
bubbles and ‘polish’ or
‘swirl’ to blend foam and
liquid together to create a
beautiful sheen.
Continue to swirl until the
moment you pour the milk.
No.7
tart your pour a couple
S
of inches away from the
surface of the coffee and use
a steady pour around the
cup to break up the crema.
When your cup starts to fill,
lower the jug and use your
pour as a pencil to create
patterns.
Rosetta
Same process as the heart,
but start at the far side
of the cup and instead of
wiggling on the spot, pour
towards yourself while
making a side to side
motion. When you get to
the edge of the cup, pull
up the pitcher and pour
a thin stream through to
finish off the Rosetta.
No.5
No.6
Heart
Tulip
Tulip
Angle your espresso as
you pour. When you move
your pitcher towards the
coffee, push the milk into
the coffee and angle your
cup back as you push
to create a semi-circle,
repeat this again to push
another semi-circle into the
first. Keep repeating until
you have the desired amount
of semi-circles. When you have
poured enough, pull the pitcher up
and pour a thin stream through the
circles to finish off your tulip.
Latte Art
Champion
2014
Christian Ullrich
Won by making a turtle!
To find out more about the art of steaming milk for latte art for you and
your customers contact info@cooperscoffee.co.uk
together with
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