Boston Whaler - Brunswick Commercial

Boston Whaler - Brunswick Commercial
Operation & Maintenance Manual
Boston Whaler ®
27 Vigilant® Series
© 2013 Brunswick Commercial & Government Products. All Rights Reserved.
420 Megan Avenue Edgewater Florida 32132 USA
Safety Notices
This manual uses three levels of notification
for safety-related information.
The signal words CAUTION, WARNING, and
DANGER identify specific levels of hazard.
They are defined as:
! CAUTION
A hazard that might result in injury or
damage to property or equipment.
! WARNING
A hazard that could result in death or
serious injury.
Brunswick Commercial & Government Products reserves the right to make changes at
any time, without notice, to features, specifications, and model availability. The right is
also reserved to change any specification,
part, or system without incurring any obligation to update older boats.
The information in this manual is based on the
latest specifications available at the time of
publication. The photographs and illustrations
might not depict actual models or equipment,
but are intended as representative views for
reference only. The continuing accuracy of
this manual cannot be guaranteed.
Certain features, parts, options, systems, and
accessories discussed in this manual might
not be found on your boat.
! DANGER
Be sure that the operator and at least one
other person in the boat are familiar with the
contents of this manual. A second person
should be able to safely operate the boat if
the primary operator is not available.
A hazard that will result in death or serious injury.
Make this manual available to anyone who
will operate this boat.
When you see a safety information box in this
manual, carefully read the message before
you proceed. Take these safety warnings
seriously and be alert to the possibility of
property damage, serious injury, or death.
If you do not understand a safety warning, call
the Customer Service Department at Brunswick Commercial & Government Products.
About This Manual
The information and illustrations in this manual are protected by copyright. You may not
merge, adapt, translate, modify, assign, store,
reproduce, or distribute this manual’s contents without written permission from Brunswick Commercial & Government Products.
All rights related to this manual are reserved
and protected by Brunswick Commercial &
Government Products.
Warranty Information
Read the Brunswick Commercial & Government Products limited commercial warranty statement located on the inside rear
cover of this manual. The statement explains
what is covered and what is not covered
under the warranty. The statement also
explains your responsibilities and obligations
as the boat owner.
A product registration card was shipped with
your boat. Complete this card and mail it to
Brunswick Commercial & Government Products using the postage-paid envelope supplied. We use this information to initiate your
warranty coverage and to contact you in case
of a safety-related issue with your boat.
Include your boat’s Hull Identification Number (HIN) on the product registration card and
anytime you contact the factory. See information about your boat’s HIN in Section 6 of this
manual.
Table of Contents
Section 1 - ! Safety
Operator Responsibilities ......................1-1
Giving Assistance ...................................1-1
Personal Flotation Devices ....................1-2
Exhaust Emissions .................................1-3
Fire Extinguishers ...................................1-4
Fires .........................................................1-4
Severe Weather .......................................1-5
EPIRB .......................................................1-5
Boat Load Capacities .............................1-6
Capsizing .................................................1-6
Swamping ................................................1-7
Diving Operations ...................................1-7
Dive/Rescue Door ...................................1-8
Proposition 65 Information ....................1-9
Deck Occupancy Chart .........................1-10
Warning Label Chart .............................1-12
T-1
Table of Contents
Section 2 - Boat Operation
Pre-operation Checklist ......................... 2-1
Boat Trim Tabs ..................................... 2-21
Ignition Shutoff Switch ........................... 2-2
Operation ....................................... 2-22
Main Engine Key Switches .................... 2-4
Stopping Procedure ............................. 2-23
Battery Parallel Switch ........................... 2-6
Trailering ............................................... 2-24
Starting Procedure ................................. 2-7
Safety Checklist ............................ 2-26
Shift and Throttle Control ...................... 2-8
Towing ............................................ 2-27
Shifting ............................................. 2-8
Backing .......................................... 2-28
Neutral Throttle ................................ 2-8
Lifting and Slinging .............................. 2-29
Speed Control .................................. 2-9
Safety Warnings ............................ 2-29
Engine Trim ...................................... 2-9
Gunwale Lifting Eyes .................... 2-30
Engine Gauges ...................................... 2-11
Slings ............................................. 2-31
Tachometer .................................... 2-11
Forklift ............................................ 2-32
Hour Meter ...................................... 2-12
Fuel Gauges ................................... 2-12
Water Pressure Gauge .................. 2-13
Voltmeter ........................................ 2-13
Trim Gauge ..................................... 2-14
SmartCraft Vessel View® System ....... 2-15
Propellers .............................................. 2-16
Maneuvering ......................................... 2-18
Load Distribution .................................. 2-20
T-2
Table of Contents
Section 3 - Fuel System
Safety Warnings ......................................3-1
General Description ................................3-2
Fuel System Diagram .............................3-4
Racor® Gasoline Filters .........................3-6
Fuel Gauge and Sending Unit ................3-7
Fuel Stripping Pump ...............................3-8
Bonding System ......................................3-9
Maintenance .....................................3-9
Repair ................................................3-9
Contaminated Gasoline ........................3-10
Fueling Procedures ..............................3-11
Safety Warnings .............................3-11
Static Electricity .............................3-12
General Guidelines ........................3-13
Blended Fuels .......................................3-14
T-3
Table of Contents
Section 4 - Boat Systems
General Description ............................... 4-1
Cabin Lights .......................................... 4-16
Helm Station Layout ............................... 4-2
Cockpit Lighting ................................... 4-16
Steering System ...................................... 4-4
Floodlights ............................................ 4-17
Steering System Diagram ...................... 4-5
Interior Red/White Light ....................... 4-17
Navigation Lights .................................... 4-6
Towing System .................................... 4-18
Operation .......................................... 4-6
Towing a Boat ................................ 4-18
Compass .................................................. 4-7
Being Towed .................................. 4-19
Deviation .......................................... 4-7
Remote Spotlight .................................. 4-20
Variation ........................................... 4-7
Sea Water Washdown Pump ............... 4-21
Night Lighting .................................. 4-7
Windshield Wipers ............................... 4-22
Bilge Pumps ............................................ 4-8
Cabin Fans ............................................ 4-23
Operation ......................................... 4-9
ELCI System ......................................... 4-24
Battery Parallel Switch ......................... 4-10
Generator .............................................. 4-25
Trim Tabs ............................................... 4-11
Carbon Monoxide Detector ................. 4-26
Trim Tab Control Box .................... 4-12
Fire Suppression System .................... 4-26
Proper Boat Trim .......................... 4-13
AC Power Distribution Panel ............... 4-27
Rough Water .................................. 4-13
Air Conditioning System ..................... 4-28
Trim Tabs and Engines ................. 4-14
Signal Horn ........................................... 4-15
Battery Status Indicator
..................... 4-15
Bilge Pump Special ....................... 4-15
T-4
Table of Contents
Section 5 - Battery Systems
General Description ................................5-1
Batteries ...................................................5-2
Safety Warnings ...............................5-2
Capacities .........................................5-3
Charging ...........................................5-4
Grounding and Bonding .........................5-5
Definitions ........................................5-5
Grounding ........................................5-5
Bonding ............................................5-6
Battery Switches .....................................5-8
Battery Parallel Switch ....................5-8
Battery OFF-ON Switches ...............5-9
Bilge Pump Special .........................5-9
DC Power Distribution .........................5-10
Starboard Engine ...........................5-10
Port Engine .....................................5-10
Bilge Pumps ...................................5-11
Helm Station Switch Panel ............5-12
Accessory Fuse Block ..................5-13
Electronics Distribution Panel ......5-14
Wire Color Chart ...................................5-15
T-5
Table of Contents
Section
Section
6 - 6Boat
- Maintenance
Maintenance
Specifications ......................................... 6-1
Steering System ................................... 6-14
Hull Identification Number ..................... 6-2
Approved Steering Fluids ............ 6-15
Options .................................................... 6-3
Batteries ................................................ 6-16
Hull Maintenance .................................... 6-3
Safety Warnings ............................ 6-16
Washing ........................................... 6-3
Capacities ...................................... 6-17
Waxing ............................................. 6-4
Maintenance .................................. 6-17
Compounding .................................. 6-4
Cleaning ......................................... 6-18
Gelcoat & Fiberglass Repair .......... 6-4
Bilge Pumps .......................................... 6-19
Trim Care ................................................ 6-5
Trim Tabs .............................................. 6-19
Aluminum ......................................... 6-5
Off-Season Storage .............................. 6-20
Deck Hardware ................................. 6-5
Outboards ...................................... 6-20
Cutwater & Chafe Plates ....................... 6-6
Fire Pumps and Generators ......... 6-20
Drains & Scuppers .................................. 6-6
Air Conditioning ............................ 6-21
Hull Blistering ........................................ 6-7
Batteries ......................................... 6-22
Storage
........................................... 6-8
Windshield Washer Reservoir ..... 6-22
Inspection ......................................... 6-8
Fuel System ................................... 6-23
Waxing .............................................. 6-8
Sea Water Washdown System ..... 6-24
Bottom Painting ............................... 6-8
Fresh Water System ...................... 6-24
Storage and Trailers ............................. 6-11
Marine Sanitation Device .............. 6-24
Trailer Setup .......................................... 6-12
Hull Drainage ................................. 6-25
Fuel System ........................................... 6-13
Engine Bracket .............................. 6-25
T-6
Safety
Section 1
Operator Responsibilities
It is expected by Brunswick Commercial & Government Products (BCGP) that the personnel authorized
to operate this boat are experienced boat handlers
familiar with high-performance boating. BCGP cannot
predict, nor warn against, every possible hazardous
situation related to the operation and maintenance of
this boat.
If you use a method or procedure different from one
outlined in this manual, you must satisfy yourself that
your method or procedure will not put your boat, your
crew, or other boaters at risk.
The safety of this boat and its crew is always your
responsibility. Follow these general guidelines when
operating this boat:
• Read this manual before you operate the boat.
Understand all of the information in the manual,
particularly Sections 1 and 2.
• Understand the operation of all boat controls and
systems.
• Make this manual available to any person who
might operate this boat.
• Always operate this boat within the limits of your
skill and experience. If you do not have the
appropriate level of experience, ask someone to
instruct you.
• Understand and follow all applicable boating regulations.
• Always use safety equipment and operating procedures that are appropriate for your mission.
• Never work alone around machinery such as outboard engines, generators, and fire pumps.
Giving Assistance
The 1971 Federal Boat Safety Act grants protection
to any person who offers good faith assistance to
another boater who is in distress. The “Good Samaritan” rule will protect you from liability if you act in a reasonable and prudent manner while attempting to
render assistance during a boating emergency.
You should attempt to give assistance when you see a
distress signal while boating if you can do so without
endangering your boat or your crew.
1-1
Section 1
Safety
Personal Flotation Devices
Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs) are designed to save lives. It is your responsibility to ensure
that the boat has a sufficient number of PFDs for your crew. It is your responsibility to ensure
that non-swimmers wear PFDs at all times and that everyone wears a PFD during emergencies,
special operations, and severe weather.
The United States Coast Guard recognizes four types of wearable devices and one type of
throwable device.
•
•
•
•
Type I – Life preserver, appropriate for open ocean, off-shore, and foul weather.
Type II – Buoyant vest, appropriate for near-shore and inland waters.
Type III – Flotation aid, appropriate for calm inland waters.
Type IV – Throwable device, appropriate to throw to a person already in the water. These
devices must never be worn as a vest.
• Type V – Special-purpose vest, includes harnesses, working vests, and rafting vests.
These vests must be worn while underway to count toward minimum PFD requirements.
All PFDs must be easily accessible. They must be removed from their shipping bags and they
should be unbuckled. Make sure that everyone knows where the PFDs are located. Make sure
that everyone knows how to put one on and correctly adjust it.
Check the availability and condition of all PFDs before each mission.
1-2
Safety
Section 1
Exhaust Emissions
Gasoline-powered engines produce carbon monoxide
when they are running. Carbon monoxide is a colorless and odorless gas. It is extremely toxic.
Always be aware of operating conditions that might
allow carbon monoxide to collect in occupied spaces
on your boat. Remember these general precautions:
• Avoid running your engines or generator in confined areas such as boat houses
• Be aware of engine exhaust from other boats
when you are moored
• Be aware of wind direction when operating your
boat at slow speeds
• Adjust hatches, doors, windows, and canvas to
increase air movement in confined spaces when
your engines and generator are running
! DANGER
Prolonged exposure to carbon monoxide can
cause serious injury or death. Always insure
that confined spaces in your boat have an
adequate supply of fresh air.
! DANGER
Prolonged exposure to carbon monoxide can
cause serious injury or death. Be sure that
your boat is equipped with a current,
functioning carbon monoxide alarm system
before you operate the engines or generator.
For more information about the dangers of carbon
monoxide, read the booklet What You Can’t See that
is in your owner’s bag.
1-3
Section 1
Safety
Fire Extinguishers
Your boat is equipped with at least three 2¾-pound
United States Coast Guard approved Type ABC fire
extinguishers. Each extinguisher is UL Rated 1-A:10BC. This rating indicates that each extinguisher can
be used to fight Class A, B, and C fires. These
classes include fires involving wood, cloth, gasoline,
oil, grease, and live electrical equipment.
The fire extinguishers are mounted in locations that
allow quick access in case of a fire emergency. Be
familiar with these locations. Read and understand
the instructions on the extinguisher label and in the
manufacturer’s instruction booklet located in your
owner’s bag.
Formulate a fire plan in advance that will help you
evaluate your risk and response in case of an onboard fire emergency.
Fires
Most marine fires result from spilled gasoline or oil
accumulating in the bilge. Careful use of on-board fire
extinguishers should control small fires.
Direct the fire extinguisher output toward the base of
the flames in a sweeping motion. Check carefully and
verify that the fire has been extinguished. Evaluate
the damage and get assistance immediately.
Larger fires involving the boat’s fuel tank might result
in explosion and complete destruction of the boat.
Formulate a fire plan in advance that will help you
decide if you can fight the fire or if you should abandon
the boat.
! WARNING
Gasoline floats on water. If you abandon the
boat, swim up wind or up current from the boat
to avoid burning gasoline that might spread on
the surface of the water.
1-4
Safety
Section 1
Severe Weather
Follow these important safety precautions if you must
operate your boat in severe weather conditions:
• Review the condition and operation of all safety
and communication gear
• Have everyone wear personal flotation devices
• Verify that your radio’s Digital Selective Calling
system (DSC) is functioning
• Use your ignition shutoff clip and lanyard
• Stow loose gear and lash down equipment
• Close all hatches, doors, and windows
• Install the dive door, if equipped
• Reduce boat speed
• Periodically report your situation by radio
• Monitor marine weather advisories
EPIRB
Your boat might be equipped with an emergency position-indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).
The EPIRB is capable of sending important location
information to the Cospas-Sarsat satellite system during an emergency. You must register the EPIRB with
the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration
(NOAA) to ensure an effective search and rescue
response.
In case of an emergency, the beacon can be deployed
manually or it can be released by a hydrostatic feature
if the boat sinks.
The EPIRB requires regular attention to stay in mission-ready condition:
•
•
•
•
Every 30 days – perform self-test procedure
Every 90 days – inspect category 1 bracket
Every 2 years – replace HRU unit
Every 5 years – replace EPIRB battery
Refer to the EPIRB operator’s manual for detailed
operation and maintenance information.
1-5
Section 1
Safety
Boat Load Capacities
The United States Coast Guard requires boats less
than 20 feet (6 m) to display a capacity plate that indicates the maximum number of people and the maximum weight that the boat can support under normal
operating conditions. Additional capacity information
for your boat is listed in Section 6 of this manual.
• Do not exceed the capacity limits of this boat
under any circumstances
• Consider reducing these capacity limits during
emergencies, special operations, and severe
weather
• You are always responsible for the safety of the
boat and its crew even if the capacity limits have
not been exceeded
! WARNING
The dive/rescue door is a specialized piece of
rescue equipment. All posted USCG and NMMA
load capacities are suspended when the dive/
rescue door is out. Operate your boat carefully
to avoid swamping or capsizing.
Capsizing
Your boat might capsize due to improper loading,
improper operation, or severe weather conditions.
Formulate a capsizing plan in advance that includes
the following actions:
• Try to turn off the outboard engines to avoid injury
and additional damage
• Activate EPIRB and DSC systems if possible
• Locate all crew and evaluate their condition
• Stay with the boat, it will always float and it is easier to locate
• Distribute PFDs if possible
• Try to climb onto the hull
1-6
Safety
Section 1
Swamping
Swamping (flooding the interior of the boat) can occur
for a number of reasons, including severe weather
conditions, improper operation, and improper loading. Consider the following:
• Know the safe loading limits for this boat under
normal conditions. Refer to the boat specifications in Section 6 of this manual and the NMMA
Certification Plate in the boat.
• Consider reducing those loading limits during
emergencies, special operations, and severe
weather.
• Distribute any load or cargo evenly front to back
and port to starboard so that the approximate center of the load is near the center of the boat.
• Close all hatches, doors, and windows during
severe weather.
• Install the dive door, if equipped.
• Adjust boat trim and speed to match weather conditions.
• Avoid backing into large waves whenever possible.
• Check operation of all bilge pumps, float switches,
and water level sensors before each trip.
Diving Operations
! DANGER
KC-0250
Never start or operate the engines when people
are in the water near your boat. Contact with
the boat, engines, or rotating propellers can
cause serious injury or death.
Navigational Rules require a vessel which is engaged
in diving operations to display a rigid replica of the
international Alpha signal flag during daylight hours.
During night operations, you would display RIAM
lights on a special display mast. Both these displays
indicate that your boat is operating with restricted
maneuverability.
Some local or state regulations might require the red
and white diver’s flag during daylight hours to indicate
that a person is in the water.
1-7
Section 1
Safety
Dive/Rescue Door
Your boat might be equipped with a dive/rescue door.
The dive/rescue door can expand your operational
capabilities by providing easy access to the water and
to the boat.
Operating a Boston Whaler when the dive/rescue door
is out requires experience and a high level of skill.
Always operate any boat within the limits of your experience. If you do not have this experience, ask someone to instruct you or gain experience through
experimentation under controlled conditions.
! WARNING
The dive/rescue door is a specialized piece of
rescue equipment. All posted USCG and NMMA
load capacities are suspended when the dive/
rescue door is out. Operate your boat carefully
to avoid swamping or capsizing.
! DANGER
Always monitor the amount of water on the
deck while the dive/rescue door is out. An
unexpected shift in water weight might cause
your boat to capsize.
Water can come into the boat when the dive/rescue
door is removed. You must manage the water, the
rescue operation, and all personnel to avoid swamping
or capsizing your boat. Refer to Load Distribution in
Section 2 for additional information.
When your dive/rescue door is in place, it must be
secured with the cam locks provided. When your dive/
rescue door is out, it must be stored and secured in
the storage blocks provided.
1-8
Safety
Section 1
Proposition 65 Information
When you received your boat, NMMA hang tag part
number NW501-07 was attached to the steering
wheel. The distribution of this tag is required by California’s Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986.
This hang tag outlines important information about
certain chemicals known by the State of California to
cause cancer and birth defects. The hang tag also
includes information about limiting your exposure to
these harmful chemicals.
Read the information on this hang tag and store the
tag in your owner’s bag.
1-9
Section 1
Safety
Deck Occupancy Chart
1-10
Safety
Section 1
Working Decks: Do not allow passengers on these
decks while the boat is underway. These decks can
only be used when you are at the dock, mooring, or
anchoring.
Accommodation Decks: You can allow passengers
to move around these decks while the boat is underway. You must continually evaluate the sea state
and boat performance. Restrict passenger access to
these decks if conditions warrant. Keep accommodation decks free of loose gear.
! WARNING
Gelcoat surfaces are always slippery when wet.
Use extreme caution when walking on wet
surfaces to avoid slipping or falling. Never wax
portions of the boat that have a non-skid
pattern.
! DANGER
Never occupy working decks while the boat is
underway. Do not sit on the gunwales or any
part of a working deck while the boat is
underway.
1-11
Section 1
Safety
Warning Label Chart
1
2 3
4 5
6 7
8 9
0
0
A
A
B
B
5
C
C
D
E
F
1-12
Safety
Section 1
1 1017078 Do Not Stand
2 1017136 Hi-performance Boat
3 1016518 Steering Effort
4 1950698 Rotating Propellers
5 2090315 Dive/Rescue Door
6 1811368 Carbon Monoxide
7 1744737 Discharge of Oil
8 0125062 NMMA Yacht Certification
9 1817722 Customer Information Tag
0 0995704 Fuel Fill
A 1016898 Do Not Drill, Fuel Lines
B 1016443 Do Not Drill, Fuel Tank
C 1016922 Battery Terminals
D 1903624 Rotating Propellers
E 1811367 Carbon Monoxide
F 1016880 Do Not Paint
1-13
Operator Notes
1-14
Boat Operation
Section 2
Pre-operation Checklist
Review all the items on this checklist each time you
prepare for a mission. Resolve any issues before you
begin your mission.
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❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
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❑
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❑
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❑
❑
❑
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Drain plug installed in hull
Drain plug installed in engine bracket
Hull in seaworthy condition
Submit mission plan to officer-in-charge
Compare expected load to boat capacity
Verify trip routing and navigational information
Check regional weather advisories
Boat operator’s manual on-board
Safety equipment on-board
EPIRB in mission-ready condition
VHF and HF radios operational
Radio’s DSC system operational
Chart plotting units operational
Radar operational
Adequate fuel load for mission
Fuel tanks and fuel hoses good condition
Fuel tank selector valves correctly set
Fuel filters in good condition
No water in water separators
Navigation lights operational
RIAM lights operational
Signal horn operational
Bilge pumps operational
Bilge pump float switches operational
Water level sensors operational
Engine starting batteries in good condition
House battery in good condition
Battery OFF-ON switches correctly set
Engine control levers in NEUTRAL
Ignition shutoff clip and lanyard in place
Engines in full Tilt Down position
Engines operational and normal
Steering system operational and normal
! CAUTION
Test your bilge pumps and float switches before
each mission.
Manually activate the float
switch when the toggle switch is in the AUTO
position and verify pump operation. Clear away
any sludge or debris that might restrict the
pump or float switch.
2-1
Section 2
Boat Operation
Ignition Shutoff Switch
Your boat is equipped with one ignition shutoff switch.
The ignition shutoff switch is located at the helm station.
The ignition shutoff switch is designed to shut off both
engines if you move away from the helm station by
accident, either by falling down or by being ejected
from the helm seat. Both of these situations can be
caused by unsafe operating techniques or severe
operating conditions. Do not use the ignition shutoff
switch to stop the engines during normal boat operation.
! WARNING
Do not activate the ignition shutoff switch
during normal operations when the boat is on
plane. Activating the ignition shutoff switch at
planing speeds will cause the boat to suddenly
decelerate, possibly injuring or ejecting
passengers.
You should connect the ignition shutoff switch clip and
lanyard to a sturdy part of your life vest or your clothing. If you move beyond the scope of the lanyard, the
ignition shutoff switch will be activated and the engines
will shut off immediately.
2-2
Boat Operation
Section 2
Understand this important information about your
ignition shutoff switch:
• It is your responsibility to decide when to attach
the switch lanyard, but we strongly recommend
that you use the shutoff switch anytime you are
operating the boat.
• Test the ignition shutoff switch periodically by pulling the clip and lanyard while the engines are at
idle speed. Both engines should stop immediately.
• The engines will not start if the clip and lanyard is
not attached to the shutoff switch.
• The switch can only function properly when the
lanyard is attached to a sturdy part of your life
vest or your clothing.
• Do not shorten the switch lanyard. It must be long
enough to avoid inadvertent switch activation during normal operator activity.
• Refer to the outboard engine operator’s manual
for specific information about the ignition shutoff
switch.
2-3
Section 2
Boat Operation
Main Engine Key Switches
Your boat is equipped with two main engine key
switches. The key switches are located at the helm
station. The key switches control the starting, running,
and stopping of the outboard engines. The key
switches also control the operation of certain engine
accessory systems.
Each switch has a unique key that can only be
removed when the switch is in the OFF position.
Record and save the key number following the instructions in Section 6.
! DANGER
Never start or operate the engines when people
are in the water near your boat. Contact with
the boat, engines, or rotating propellers can
cause serious injury or death.
• You must turn the engine battery OFF-ON
switches to the ON position before you use the
main engine key switches.
• You must turn the main engine key switches to the
OFF position after you secure the engines from
service.
• You should turn the engine battery OFF-ON
switches to the OFF position after you secure the
engines from service.
2-4
Boat Operation
Section 2
To START the port outboard engine, the control port
lever must be in the NEUTRAL position. The ignition
shutoff switch clip and lanyard must be attached to the
shutoff switch. Turn the port main engine key switch
to the ON position and then to the START position.
DO NOT hold the key in the START position. The port
engine’s electronic control module (ECU) will start the
engine automatically. If the port engine does not start,
turn the key to the OFF position and repeat the starting
process.
To STOP the port engine, turn the port main engine
key switch to the ACC or OFF position. If you are
securing the port engine from service, turn the port
main engine key switch to the OFF position.
! CAUTION
Leaving the main engine key switches in the
ACC or ON position when the engines are not
running will drain the starting batteries and
might damage the engines’ electrical systems.
To start or stop the starboard engine, follow the procedures above using the control starboard lever and the
starboard main engine key switch.
For additional engine control information, refer to the
engine operator’s manual in your owner’s bag.
2-5
Section 2
Boat Operation
Battery Parallel Switch
Your boat is equipped with an emergency battery parallel switch. The switch is located at the helm station.
You can use the emergency battery parallel switch to
connect the two engine starting batteries in parallel if
one engine will not start due to low battery voltage.
The battery parallel switch controls a solenoid that
connects the two engine starting batteries. The switch
is a three-position rocker switch that is ON-OFF-ON.
The center switch position is OFF. Both the left and
right switch positions are momentarily ON when held
down. When you release the switch, it will return to
the center OFF position.
If one of your outboard engines will not start due to low
battery voltage, use the emergency battery parallel
switch to provide power from the other starting battery.
Push and hold the battery parallel switch ON to either
the left or right position. Note this position. Hold the
battery parallel switch in the ON position and try to
start the engine.
If the engine does not start, release the battery parallel
switch to the OFF position. Move the battery parallel
switch to ON in the opposite direction. Hold the battery parallel switch in the ON position and try to start
the engine.
2-6
Boat Operation
Section 2
Starting Procedure
Use the following checklist each time you start the outboard engines. Additional detailed information about
these systems is covered in the engine operator’s
manual.
! DANGER
Never start or operate the engines when people
are in the water near your boat. Contact with
the boat, engines, or rotating propellers can
cause serious injury or death.
! CAUTION
Never start or run the outboard engines without
an adequate supply of cooling water. The
engines will be damaged immediately.
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Boat operator’s manual on-board
Review Pre-operation Checklist
Engine battery OFF-ON switches to ON position
House battery OFF-ON switch to ON position
Release engine tilt locks and lower engines to
full Tilt Down position
Verify fuel supply
Move engine control levers to NEUTRAL position
Attach ignition shutoff switch clip and lanyard
Start engines using the main engine key
switches
Use emergency battery parallel switch if required
Verify engine cooling system operation by
observing the overboard indicators
Verify all engine systems using the gauges
Let outboard engines idle in NEUTRAL for five
minutes before leaving the dock
2-7
Section 2
Boat Operation
Shift and Throttle Control
Boat direction, boat speed, and close-quarter maneuvering are controlled by the dual-lever control. The
dual-lever control includes gear selection, engine
speed, and engine trim angle functions. Additional
detailed information about your dual-lever control is
covered in the engine operator’s manual.
Shifting
• Each shift lever controls gear selection for one
engine. The shift lever must be in NEUTRAL
before starting the engine. The engine will not
start if the shift lever is in FORWARD or
REVERSE.
• The engines must be running before you shift into
FORWARD or REVERSE.
• From NEUTRAL, move the shift lever forward to
select FORWARD gear.
• From NEUTRAL, move the shift lever backward to
select REVERSE gear.
• Never shift directly from FORWARD to REVERSE
without pausing in NEUTRAL.
• Never shift directly from REVERSE to FORWARD
without pausing in NEUTRAL.
! CAUTION
Shifting the engines from FORWARD to
REVERSE at any boat speed above idle can
cause catastrophic engine damage.
This
engine damage can include gearcase failure or
water ingestion.
Neutral Throttle
• The dual-lever control has a neutral throttle feature. Depress the Throttle Only button and move
the shift lever forward to increase engine speed in
NEUTRAL.
• Move the shift lever back to NEUTRAL to disengage the neutral throttle feature.
2-8
Boat Operation
Section 2
Speed Control
• Move the shift lever forward from the FORWARD
gear detent to increase engine speed in forward
gear.
• Move the shift lever backward from the
REVERSE gear detent to increase speed in
reverse gear.
Engine Trim
! WARNING
Certain combinations of engine trim angle, boat
operating angle, and boat speed can reduce
your forward-facing visibility.
Reduced
operator visibility can contribute to collisions,
causing serious injury or death.
Trimming your engines down or in is best for acceleration and carrying heavy loads. The boat ride tends to
be slower and wetter, and the boat might bow steer.
Trimming your engines up or out increases boat performance and fuel economy. Excessive trim angle will
reduce boat performance. Excessive trim angle might
cause propeller ventilation and engine over-speed
alarms.
! WARNING
Excessive engine trim angle can cause the boat
to “porpoise” or bounce.
Porpoising can
reduce operator control and visibility, resulting
in unsafe boat operation.
2-9
Section 2
Boat Operation
You must determine the correct engine trim adjustments through experimentation or experience, based
on your mission loads and operating conditions.
• Adjusting engine trim angles can affect ride comfort and boat performance. 4° “bow up” is an
average setting for boat operating angle.
• Adjusting engine trim angles can compensate for
uneven boat loading and some weather conditions.
• Typically, your dual-lever control will have three
engine trim switches located on the port control
lever.
• The center trim switch moves both engines at the
same rate to change general boat operating
angle.
• The left and right trim switches are used to
change the trim angles of the port and starboard
engines individually. This function allows you to
synchronize engine trim angles or compensate for
changes in boat load distribution and some
weather conditions.
! CAUTION
Do not trailer your boat with the engines in their
fully tilted position.
! CAUTION
Center the engines before tilting to avoid
contact with any special towing equipment on
your boat.
2-10
Boat Operation
Section 2
Engine Gauges
Your boat might be equipped with a number of dashmounted gauges that display the condition of various
engine systems.
The gauges power up when the engine ignition switch
is turned to the ON position.
The engine gauges are illuminated for nighttime operation. The brightness of the gauge lights is controlled
by the dimmer switch located on the helm station
switch panel.
Review this general information about each gauge.
Refer to the engine operator’s manual for detailed
information about the gauges and their functions.
Tachometer
The tachometer displays engine speed in revolutions
per minute (RPM). You can take the gauge reading on
most tachometers and multiply by 1,000 to calculate
engine speed. You can use engine RPM to influence
fuel consumption, adjust boat performance, and evaluate propeller selection.
Some tachometers are driven by a signal from the
engine’s battery charging system. If your engine is
running and the tachometer is reading zero, you might
have a charging system problem.
! CAUTION
Never allow your engines to exceed the
maximum RPM listed in the engine operator’s
manual. Excessive RPM will cause extensive
engine damage.
2-11
Section 2
Boat Operation
Hour Meter
The hour meter records cumulative hours of engine
operation. The hour meter powers up when the
engine ignition switch is turned to the ON position.
Always turn the engine ignition switch to the OFF position when the engine is secured from service. The
hour meter will continue to count time when the engine
is not running if the ignition switch is left in the ACC or
ON position.
The engine operating hours can be used to schedule
periodic maintenance for the boat and the engines.
Fuel Gauges
The fuel gauges power up when the starboard engine
ignition switch is turned to the ON position. The fuel
gauges display the approximate fuel level in the fuel
tanks.
The correlation between the gauge readings and fuel
loads is approximately linear from FULL to ¼ FULL.
The accuracy of the fuel level readings decreases
below ¼ FULL because of the tank’s profile.
The most accurate reading is obtained when the boat
is at rest and level.
! CAUTION
The fuel gauge reading is approximate. Verify
the gauge reading using other methods. Be
conservative when estimating fuel on-board.
2-12
Boat Operation
Section 2
Water Pressure Gauge
The water pressure gauge displays the pressure in the
engine’s cooling system. The gauge’s unit of measure
is pounds per square inch (PSI).
The water pressure gauge is a good indicator of cooling system condition. Notice the readings at various
engine RPM settings and watch for any variation.
Refer to the engine operator’s manual for PSI ranges
for your engine.
! CAUTION
If the water pressure reading drops significantly
while the boat is on plane, stop the boat
immediately. Check the engine’s water intakes
and cooling system.
If the engine is
overheating, continued operation could cause
extensive damage.
Voltmeter
Each outboard engine has an alternator that charges
its starting battery when the engine is running above
idle speed. The voltmeter displays engine battery voltage measured in DC volts (VDC).
These readings indicate that engine battery systems
are in good condition:
• Key OFF: 0 volts
• Key ON, engine not running: 12 volts
• Engine running above idle: 14½ volts
Refer to the engine operator’s manual for additional
detailed information about the engine charging systems.
2-13
Section 2
Boat Operation
Trim Gauge
The trim gauge measures the engine’s angle position
relative to the boat’s transom. The first 15° of movement is the engine’s trim range. The additional
engine movement is referred to as the tilt range.
Engine movement through the tilt range does not register on the trim gauge.
The trim gauge displays this value as relative Bow Up
or Bow Down.
It takes specific experience with each boat/engine/propeller combination to identify the best engine trim settings for certain conditions. Remember that either
extreme of the trim range is usually inefficient.
Generally, engine trim IN is good for acceleration and
load carrying. Engine trim OUT is good for speed and
fuel efficiency.
Refer to the engine operator’s manual for detailed
information about the engine trim systems.
2-14
Boat Operation
Section 2
SmartCraft Vessel View® System
Your boat might be equipped with Mercury Marine’s
SmartCraft Vessel View boat and engine information
system. The Vessel View color LCD display is located
at the helm station, directly above the steering wheel.
The Vessel View system powers up when either
engine main ignition key switch is turned to the ON
position.
The Vessel View system is a comprehensive boat and
engine information center that continuously monitors
and reports detailed information about your boat, your
engines, and your boating environment. Your Vessel
View system is networked with the boat’s GPS to provide detailed operational information such as navigation, speed over ground, and fuel to destination.
Your Vessel View system has a user-friendly interface
that is controlled by seven buttons and a track pad.
These controls allow you to calibrate and control all of
the information reports and formats.
The Vessel View information reports are grouped into
four categories.
• Propulsion includes all engine systems information
• Vessel includes information about fuel use, tank
levels, generators, and air conditioning
• Environmental includes information about water
depth, navigation, and GPS
• Setup includes screens related to calibration, display, and setup
The Vessel View system reports warnings using five
levels of graphical icons. The icons change appearance as the warnings become more critical.
Refer to the SmartCraft Vessel View operation manual in your owner’s bag for detailed information about
the setup and operation of this important system.
2-15
Section 2
Boat Operation
Propellers
Your outboard engines are equipped with propellers of
a tested size and design to provide best engine and
boat performance.
Refer to the engine operator’s manual for detailed
information about propeller designs and the correct
propeller selection method.
! CAUTION
Never use propellers that allow the engines to
operate outside of their recommended RPM
range at full throttle. Extensive engine damage
can occur.
You should always carry a spare propeller, propeller
hardware, and propeller wrench on-board. Universal
propeller wrench P/N 1964627 is available from Boston Whaler. You should replace your propeller when it
becomes damaged to avoid additional damage to the
engine.
! WARNING
To prevent the engine from starting
accidentally, turn the correct engine battery
OFF-ON switch to the OFF position before
changing a propeller.
In some situations, you might want to change the propellers to give your boat slightly different performance
characteristics. Changes to your boat’s configuration,
such as additional equipment or adding bottom paint,
can affect the type and size of propellers required.
2-16
Boat Operation
Section 2
Reducing propeller pitch and diameter will increase
acceleration and load carrying capability, with a slight
decrease in top speed. It will also increase the
engine’s full-throttle RPM at a rate of about 150 RPM
per inch of pitch change.
Increasing propeller pitch and diameter will
decrease acceleration and might increase top speed.
It will also decrease the engine’s full-throttle RPM at a
rate of about 150 RPM per inch of pitch change.
Your boat might be equipped with one engine that is
counter-rotating, which means that the port propeller
rotates in a counter-clockwise direction while in forward gear when viewed from behind the boat. Counter-rotating propellers have significant advantages for
the boat operator. They improve slow-speed maneuverability, help cancel engine torque, reduce steering
effort, and help carry extra weight.
! CAUTION
Mismatching propellers on a pair of counterrotating outboard engines could cause a loss of
directional control and could result in
catastrophic gearcase failure.
If you are considering a propeller change, the type,
pitch, and diameter should be discussed with an
authorized outboard servicing dealer.
Refer to the engine operator’s manual for detailed
information about propellers.
2-17
Section 2
Boat Operation
Maneuvering
Maneuvering this boat requires experience and a high level of skill. Always operate any boat
within the limits of your experience. If you do not have this experience, ask someone to instruct
you or gain experience through experimentation under controlled conditions.
If you do not have this experience, do not operate this boat under high-risk conditions, such as:
•
•
•
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•
•
Heavy wind or current
High-traffic areas
Mission-related time limitations
Confined or restricted areas
Carrying hazardous cargo
Compromised boat or engine systems
Always follow established boating regulations and directions from boating law authorities when
maneuvering or underway. Always maneuver around objects, docks, and other boats at idle
speed.
Always evaluate the wind strength, wind direction, current strength, and current direction as you
maneuver. If possible, approach a dock or another boat moving into the wind or current.
Always keep your crew informed and prepared. Have mooring lines and fenders in place before
you reach the dock.
2-18
Boat Operation
Section 2
At idle speed, you can control boat direction and position by engine gear selection alone. With
both outboard engines facing straight ahead:
• You can rotate the boat to port by shifting the starboard engine into FORWARD and the
port engine into REVERSE.
• You can rotate the boat to starboard by shifting the port engine into FORWARD and the
starboard engine into REVERSE.
Above idle speed in FORWARD, you can control boat direction with the steering wheel:
• Turn the steering wheel in a counter-clockwise direction to turn to port.
• Turn the steering wheel in a clockwise direction to turn to starboard.
You can use the engine throttles to greatly increase boat response while performing certain
slow speed turning maneuvers. To turn quickly to port or starboard at slow speed, turn the
steering wheel in the direction you want to go. After you have turned the steering wheel,
increase the engine speed and the boat will turn quickly. It is important to turn the steering
wheel before you increase engine speed, because the boat will accelerate in the direction it is
steered.
Backing down, you can control boat direction with the steering wheel:
• Turn the steering wheel in a counter-clockwise direction to back down to port.
• Turn the steering wheel in a clockwise direction to back down to starboard.
KC-1521
2-19
Section 2
Boat Operation
Load Distribution
Placement and concentration of non-permanent loads
in a boat can affect boat performance and crew safety.
Refer to Boat Load Capacities in Section 6 of this
manual for additional information.
! WARNING
Improper
operation,
excessive
loading,
improper load distribution, and mismatching
loads to existing conditions can contribute to
boat swamping or capsizing. These situations
can result in serious injury or death.
Follow these guidelines for non-permanent loads:
• Never exceed the capacity limits listed in this
manual.
• Consider reducing these capacity limits during
emergencies, special operations, and severe
weather.
• Never concentrate a heavy load in one small
area.
• Equipment and people are considered part of
your non-permanent load.
• Distribute any non-permanent load or cargo
evenly, front-to-back and port-to-starboard.
• The center of the non-permanent load distribution
should be in the center of the boat.
• Do not allow your non-permanent loads or cargo
to shift unexpectedly. Always secure non-permanent loads and cargo with netting, tie-down
straps, lines, and appropriate deck hardware.
• You must be prepared to adjust the load distribution as operating conditions change.
2-20
Boat Operation
Section 2
Boat Trim Tabs
Your boat is equipped with Lenco® electro-mechanical
trim tabs. The trim tab control buttons and LED indicator lights are located at the helm station, near the
engine controls.
Using the boat trim tabs properly requires experience
and skill. Always operate any boat system within the
limits of your experience. If you do not have this experience, ask someone to instruct you or gain experience
through experimentation under controlled conditions.
! WARNING
The boat’s attitude and steering effort can react
very quickly to changes in trim tab position.
Adjust trim tab deployment in small increments
to avoid loss of boat control.
You can use the boat trim tabs to:
•
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•
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•
Adjust for uneven load distribution
Adjust for strong crosswinds
Adjust for changing weather conditions
Trim the boat fore and aft
Trim the boat port and starboard
Improve ride smoothness
Improve boat performance
The electro-mechanical cylinders and trim tabs are
located on the lower portion of the boat’s transom.
The trim tab control box senses switched 12 VDC at
the starboard engine main ignition key switch.
• The trim tab system will only operate when the
starboard engine main ignition key switch is ON
• The trim tabs will automatically retract when the
starboard engine main ignition key switch is
turned OFF
2-21
Section 2
Boat Operation
Operation
The trim tab switch panel is labeled and wired to make
tab operation simple. When operating the trim buttons, think of how you want the bow of the boat to
move to properly trim the boat.
To lower the port bow, push the left DOWN button.
This lowers the trim plane on the starboard side of the
transom.
To lower the starboard bow, push the right DOWN
button. This lowers the trim plane on the port side of
the transom.
To evenly lower or raise the bow, you can push both
buttons at the same time. To evenly lower the bow,
push both DOWN buttons. To evenly raise the bow,
push both UP buttons.
The Lenco switch panel includes two LED segment
bars that represent the relative position of both trim
tabs. When you lower one or both of the trim tabs, the
LED segment bars will extend to indicate that the trim
tabs are moving down. When you raise one or both of
the trim tabs, the LED segment bars will retract to indicate that the trim tabs are moving up.
! CAUTION
The trim tabs will automatically retract when the
starboard engine main ignition key is turned
OFF. Make sure that both trim tabs are fully
retracted before you put the boat on a trailer,
cradle, or boatlift. Contact with the trim tabs
can cause serious damage to the tabs and boat.
Refer to the Lenco operation manual in your owner’s
bag for detailed information about the operation and
maintenance of the trim tab system.
2-22
Boat Operation
Section 2
Stopping Procedure
Use the following checklist at the end of each mission
to verify that the appropriate boat systems are configured for a short period of non-use at the dock.
If you are not going to use the boat for a long period of
time, refer to Off-Season Storage in Section 6.
❑ Put both engine control levers in NEUTRAL
❑ Secure the boat. Deploy fenders and fender
boards.
❑ Turn the main engine key switches to the OFF
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position
Verify that the boat trim tabs are fully retracted
Power down all electronic equipment following
manufacturer’s instructions
Center the outboard engines before tilting to
avoid contact with any special towing equipment
Raise the engines to full Tilt Up position and
engage tilt locks
Turn engine battery OFF-ON switches to OFF
position
Turn house battery OFF-ON switch to OFF position
Remove battery OFF-ON switch knobs, if appropriate
Bilge pumps have an uninterruptible power supply to support automatic operation
Verify bilge pump toggle switches are in the
AUTO position
Connect and activate shore power, if appropriate
Verify shore power polarity
! CAUTION
Keep the bilge pump switches in the AUTO
position anytime the bilge drain plug is in place,
whether the boat is in the water or on a trailer.
Keeping the switches in the AUTO position
allows the system to sense rainwater or melting
snow that might accumulate in the bilge.
2-23
Section 2
Boat Operation
Trailering
If Boston Whaler supplied the trailer for your boat, it is
designed specifically for your boat and it is commercial-grade. The trailer construction is heavy-duty and
it exceeds the capacity requirements for your boat.
This trailer might be equipped with additional
upgrades to suit your mission.
Regulations controlling trailer equipment and manufacture vary from place to place. You must verify that
your trailer meets the laws and transportation regulations in the states or countries where you use it.
Refer to the trailer owner’s manual for detailed information about the operation and maintenance of this
trailer.
! CAUTION
Do not trailer your boat with the engines in their
fully tilted position.
! CAUTION
Center the engines before tilting to avoid
contact with any special towing equipment on
your boat.
2-24
Boat Operation
Section 2
If you supplied the trailer for your boat, you must
verify that the trailer’s design is adequate for your
boat.
Review these guidelines when evaluating a customersupplied trailer:
• The trailer’s net carrying capacity must exceed
the weight of the boat in its fully-loaded condition
• Construction materials must suit your operating
environment
• The trailer should have torsion axles
• All trailer equipment (brakes, tires, winch, straps,
etc.) should be heavy-duty
• Trailer bunks must be continuous and as long as
the boat’s running surface
• Trailer bunk contact angle must match the hull
deadrise angle
• Trailer bunks must be parallel with the boat centerline and must not touch any lifting strake
• Trailer should be equipped with a barge stop to
support the boat’s bow
• Trailer bunks must not be segmented or swivel
• Trailer must not be an “all-roller” design
• Trailer must not support boat weight at any single,
concentrated point such as a keel roller
Refer to Trailer Setup in Section 6 for detailed information about trailer dimensions.
! CAUTION
Transporting your boat on a sub-standard
trailer can cause serious, permanent damage to
the hull. This type of hull damage is considered
“improper storage” and is not covered under
the BCGP limited commercial warranty.
2-25
Section 2
Boat Operation
Safety Checklist
Use the following safety checklist to verify that your
boat, trailer, and towing vehicle are in good condition.
Use this checklist each time you prepare for a mission.
Resolve any issues before beginning your mission.
❑ Trailer maintenance log is current
❑ Tow vehicle gross combined weight rating
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(GCWR) must exceed combined weights of your
tow vehicle, boat, and trailer
Tow vehicle is in good condition
All gear and equipment in boat is secured
Outboard engines supported by trailering locks
Boat correctly positioned on trailer bunks
Winch cable tight and locked
Bow safety cable attached
Bow tie-down link secured
Stern tie-down straps secured
Trailer surge or electric brakes operational
Trailer tires and spare in good condition
Tire pressures are correct
Lug nuts are correctly tightened
Wheel bearings lubricated and functional
Trailer coupler securely attached to tow vehicle
Trailer safety cables attached to tow vehicle
using criss-cross pattern
Trailer brake emergency actuator chain attached
to tow vehicle
Trailer light connector plugged in to tow vehicle
Trailer clearance, brake, and turn signal lights
operational
Trailer jack completely retracted and caster
wheel removed if possible
Refer to the trailer owner’s manual for detailed information about maintenance procedures and service
specifications.
2-26
Boat Operation
Section 2
Towing
! WARNING
Tow vehicle GCWR must exceed the combined
weights of your tow vehicle, boat, and trailer.
Overloading the tow vehicle is unsafe and
could cause loss of vehicle control.
Towing your boat on a trailer requires experience and
skill. Always operate a towing vehicle within the limits
of your experience. If you do not have this experience,
ask someone to instruct you or gain experience
through experimentation under controlled conditions.
When maneuvering on streets or highways, always
remember that the boat and trailer have at least doubled the effective length and weight of your tow vehicle. Follow these guidelines when towing:
• Always use common sense when trailering a boat
• Operate your tow vehicle well within the existing
traffic regulations
• Pay close attention to road and weather conditions
• Always avoid traffic situations where rapid acceleration or deceleration is required
• Double the standard following distance for your
vehicle speed
• Always be aware of traffic conditions around you
• Identify any possible “blind spots” behind or on
either side of your trailer
• Plan ahead and check your mirrors carefully when
changing lanes, stopping, or turning
• Always signal your intentions well in advance of a
lane change or a turn
• Make very wide turns. Your trailer will not follow
the path of your tow vehicle tires
• Stop periodically to check the condition of the
trailer, boat, and tow vehicle
2-27
Section 2
Boat Operation
Backing
1
2
3
KC-1801
Backing a trailer requires experience and skill. Always
operate a towing vehicle within the limits of your experience. If you do not have this experience, ask someone to instruct you or gain experience through
experimentation under controlled conditions.
Follow these guidelines when backing your trailer:
• Have a spotter outside the vehicle to assist with
instructions
• Check your mirrors constantly
• Always know where the boat is in relation to any
fixed objects
• Never accelerate in reverse. Back up slowly!
• When the trailer is straight behind the tow vehicle,
the rear of the trailer will move opposite the direction that you turn the steering wheel
• If you turn the steering wheel clockwise, the trailer
will move to the left
• If you move the steering wheel counter-clockwise,
the trailer will move to the right
• Half way through the turn, adjust the steering
wheel to follow the trailer through its turn
• Do not allow the trailer to turn so sharply that the
trailer or boat hits the tow vehicle
KC-1737
2-28
Boat Operation
Section 2
Lifting and Slinging
Safety Warnings
! DANGER
Verify that the lifting equipment, spreader bars,
slings,
and
attaching
hardware
are
professionally certified to a working load of at
least 13,000 pounds (5897 kg) with a safety
factor of five. Failure of any lifting component
could cause extensive damage to the boat,
serious injury, or death.
! DANGER
Never allow anyone to be in the boat or under
the boat while you are lifting it. A mistake in the
lifting procedure or a component failure could
cause serious injury or death.
! DANGER
Inspect all lifting equipment for signs of wear or
fatigue each time you lift the boat. Re-certify or
replace the lifting equipment annually. Failure
of any lifting component could cause serious
injury or death.
! WARNING
Never use the boat’s bow eye, stern
cleats, or railings as attachment points
this boat. Failure of these items during
could cause extensive damage to the
serious injury, or death.
eyes,
to lift
lifting
boat,
! CAUTION
Before you lift your boat, inspect the bottom to
determine if there are any thru-hull transducers
installed. Contact between lifting gear and a
transducer will cause immediate, extensive
damage to the transducer and the hull.
2-29
Section 2
Boat Operation
Gunwale Lifting Eyes
Your boat might be equipped with gunwale lifting eyes.
These gunwale lifting eyes are only available as a
factory-installed option.
Your hull would have a special lamination schedule
and aluminum plate inserts to distribute the lifting load.
If your boat has gunwale lifting eyes that were installed
by the factory, you may use them as attaching points
to lift your boat.
If you use the gunwale lifting eyes to move the boat,
attach a four-point harness that is professionally certified to a working load of at least 13,000 pounds (5897
kg) with a safety factor of five. Your boat might have
been shipped with a Boston Whaler lifting sling set that
meets all manufacturer requirements for lifting this
boat.
To provide a 5° bow-up angle during lifting, the front
two straps are slightly longer than the rear two straps.
The front two straps are marked FORWARD and rear
two straps are marked REAR.
Attach at least two guide lines to control the boat while
it is being lifted.
! DANGER
Never allow anyone to be in the boat or under
the boat while you are lifting it. A mistake in the
lifting procedure or a component failure could
cause serious injury or death.
! CAUTION
Lift sling angles must always be greater than
60° from the deck, measured in any direction.
Lift sling angles less than 60° will multiply the
lifting forces and will damage the gunwale
lifting eyes and the boat.
Move the boat slowly.
2-30
Boat Operation
Section 2
Slings
You can use a spreader bar and slings to lift your boat.
The system must be professionally certified to a working load of at least 13,000 pounds (5897 kg) with a
safety factor of five. The slings must be a wide, flat,
belted design to distribute the load and protect the
boat.
Position the spreader bar and slings to lift the boat
evenly. The spreader bar’s center of lift should be
positioned directly over the boat’s longitudinal center
of gravity (LCG). The boat’s LCG is approximately
102 inches (259 cm) forward of the transom.
! CAUTION
The boat’s LCG can be influenced by things
such as factory-installed options, agency gear,
and fuel loads.
Carefully test the sling
positions before you commit to the lift.
Position the slings so they do not contact any thru-hull
fittings on the sides or bottom of the boat.
Protect the boat sides and rub rails with carpet during
the lift. Attach at least two guide lines to control the
boat while it is being moved.
! DANGER
Never allow anyone to be in the boat or under
the boat while you are lifting it. A mistake in the
lifting procedure or a component failure could
cause serious injury or death.
Move the boat slowly.
2-31
Section 2
Boat Operation
Forklift
You can use a large marine forklift to move your boat.
The forklift must be professionally rated to a working
load of at least 13,000 pounds (5897 kg) with a safety
factor of five. Adjust the forks to lift the boat evenly.
The forks must not contact any thru-hull fittings on the
bottom of the boat.
! DANGER
Never allow anyone to be in the boat or under
the boat while you are lifting it. A mistake in the
lifting procedure or a component failure could
cause serious injury or death.
Move the boat slowly.
2-32
Fuel Systems
Section 3
Safety Warnings
! WARNING
Inspect your fuel system and fuel tanks before
each mission. Correct the cause of any gasoline
leak immediately. Ventilate the area to eliminate
gasoline vapor before energizing any electrical
circuits or starting the outboard engines.
! DANGER
Leaking gasoline is a fire and explosion hazard.
Gasoline vapor is extremely flammable and highly
explosive under certain conditions. Correct the
cause of any gasoline leak immediately.
! WARNING
This fuel system is not designed to support an
automatic “hands free” fuel nozzle. Never use an
automatic fuel nozzle to fill these tanks and never
leave a fueling process unattended.
! WARNING
The components in your boat fuel system are
designed to work with automotive gasoline
containing up to 10% ethanol, by volume. Using
automotive gasoline with higher concentrations
of ethanol will damage boat fuel system
components and might cause fuel leaks.
! CAUTION
Carefully follow the engine manufacturer’s
recommendations when selecting gasoline for
your outboard engines. Using non-recommended
fuels can cause serious engine damage and
might void your engine warranty.
! CAUTION
Gasoline and oil spills are a safety hazard and can
contaminate the marine environment.
Never
allow gasoline or oil to be discharged into the
water.
3-1
Section 3
Fuel Systems
General Description
Read and understand all the fuel-related information
and warnings in this section and in your outboard
engine operator’s manual.
Your boat is equipped with a built-in gasoline fuel system. The fuel system includes one or more fuel tanks.
The fuel tanks are manufactured using marine-grade
5052-H32 aluminum alloy and they are installed in the
mid-bilge area. Each fuel tank has a manufacturer’s
compliance label next to the fuel level sending unit.
The compliance label includes information about tank
capacity, construction materials, and date of manufacture.
Your gasoline fuel system is designed to meet the
diurnal emissions requirements outlined in ABYC
Standard H24.18.4.1 and in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, sub-parts 1045 and 1060. These
design elements work to limit liquid and vapor hydrocarbon (HC) emissions from your on-board gasoline
fuel system.
The fuel system working capacity is:
• 190 gallons for standard wing tanks
• 165 gallons for optional centerline tank
Each fuel tank has an electric sending unit that sends
fuel level information to a fuel gauge located at the
helm station.
Each fuel tank has a separate fuel withdrawal tube for
the port and starboard outboard engines and an additional withdrawal tube for an optional generator or fire
pump. Each fuel withdrawal tube has a manual fuel
shutoff valve. You can use these valves to stop fuel
flow during storage, during fuel system servicing, or in
the event of an on-board fire.
The manual fuel shutoff valve is in the OPEN position
when the lever is parallel with the valve body and the
fuel valve is in the CLOSE position when the lever is
perpendicular to the valve body.
3-2
Fuel Systems
Section 3
The Fuel System Diagram in this section shows locations of the fuel tanks, fuel fills, fuel tank vents, fuel
level sending units, fuel withdrawal tubes, fuel shutoff
valves, fuel filters, and certain emission system components.
The standard wing tank installation includes two fuel
tank selector valves which are located on the transom
interior bulkhead. You can use these valves to select
either tank as the source of fuel for either outboard
engine. Under normal operating conditions, the port
outboard engine would draw gasoline from port wing
tank and the starboard outboard engine would draw
gasoline from the starboard wing tank.
The fuel fill caps are located on the port and starboard
ring decks, midship. The fuel fill hoses are equipped
with flow-control valves which will not allow liquid gasoline to escape from the fuel fill cap during normal fueling operations.
The fuel tank vents are located on the port and starboard hull sides, midship. The fuel tank venting systems are equipped with carbon canisters which reduce
vapor hydrocarbon (HC) emissions.
! WARNING
Do not allow any liquid gasoline to enter the
boat or accumulate in the bilge. Liquid gasoline
is a fire and explosion hazard. Gasoline vapor
is extremely flammable and highly explosive
under certain conditions.
3-3
Section 3
Fuel Systems
Fuel System Diagram
1
2
3
4
B
5
6
7
8
9
0
A
3-4
Fuel Systems
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
A
B
Section 3
Valve, fuel level vent
Canister, carbon, vent
Cap, fuel fill
Vent, fuel tank
Valve, flow-control
Tank, gasoline
Label, manufacturer compliance
Sender, fuel level
Tube, fuel withdrawal (3 per tank)
Valve, grade level vent
Filter, gasoline, Racor (2 places)
Tank, gasoline, centerline (optional)
Starboard wing tank typical
3-5
Section 3
Fuel Systems
Racor® Gasoline Filters
Your boat might be equipped with two Racor® 320RRAC-01 gasoline filters. This filter features a waterseparating 10-micron filter element, a replaceable
spin-on canister, and a clear bowl to help detect water
in your fuel.
Your inspection and servicing routine is directly related
to the quality and quantity of gasoline that you take onboard. You should check the sight bowls for evidence
of moisture before and after every mission.
Refer to Blended Fuels in this section for more information about water in gasoline.
Replace the filter elements on this schedule, whichever happens first:
• Every 100 operating hours
• Annually
• Noticeable engine performance loss
! WARNING
Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations
exactly when servicing these filters to avoid
engine damage or fuel leaks. Refer to the
manufacturer’s instruction booklet in your
owner’s bag for detailed information about
these service procedures.
!WARNING
Do not allow any liquid gasoline to enter the
boat or accumulate in the bilge. Liquid gasoline
is a fire and explosion hazard. Gasoline vapor
is extremely flammable and highly explosive
under certain conditions.
3-6
Fuel Systems
Section 3
Fuel Gauge and Sending Unit
Each fuel tank has an electric sending unit that sends
fuel level information to a fuel gauge located at the
helm station. The fuel level sending unit is manufactured by ISSPRO. The sending unit is fully electronic
and compatible with Mercury Marine’s SmartCraft
gauge system. The sending unit generates a fuel level
signal ranging between 240 ohms (empty) and 33
ohms (full).
The fuel gauges power up when the starboard engine
main ignition key switch is turned to the ON position.
The fuel gauges display the approximate fuel level in
the fuel tanks. The correlation between the gauge
reading and fuel load is approximately linear from
FULL to ¼ FULL. The accuracy of the reading
decreases below ¼ FULL because of the tank’s profile.
The most accurate fuel level reading is obtained when
the boat is at rest and level.
! CAUTION
The fuel gauge reading is approximate.
Confirm the gauge reading using other
methods. Be conservative when estimating fuel
on-board.
3-7
Section 3
Fuel Systems
Fuel Stripping Pump
Your boat might be equipped with a system that allows
you to manually strip gasoline and possibly water from
the bottom of the fuel tanks.
Refer to Contaminated Gasoline in this section for
detailed information about the risks related to taking
on gasoline that might contain ethanol or might be
contaminated.
The optional fuel stripping pump is designed to work
through the fuel tank sounding port. The boat must be
at rest and level before you remove the sounding cap.
! WARNING
Do not attempt to remove the sounding cap if
the boat is in motion. Spilled liquid gasoline is
a fire and explosion hazard. Gasoline vapor is
extremely flammable and highly explosive
under certain conditions.
Adjust the boat angle so that the lowest portion of the
fuel tank is below the sounding hole. If possible, let
the gasoline “rest” for 30 minutes before sampling.
Install the pump so the pickup foot is touching the bottom of the tank. Pump the sample gasoline into a
clean container and inspect for moisture or particulate
contamination. Dispose of the test sample following
all state and federal regulations.
Carefully remove the stripping pump. Remove all
residual fuel from the stripping pump and reinstall the
sounding cap following these guidelines:
• DO NOT over-tighten the sounding cap.
• DO NOT use tools to reinstall the cap.
• Confirm that no liquid gasoline is around the
sounding cap after five minutes of boat operation.
3-8
Fuel Systems
Section 3
Bonding System
A green #8 awg insulated copper wire forms a common bond among the fuel tanks, the fuel fill caps, and
the bonding plate on the hull.
Bonding is the process of connecting various metal
components in the boat to a common electrical contact. This helps to reduce the chance of rails and
other metal objects carrying dangerous electrical
charges.
The bonding buss system is also connected to the
negative buss system to reduce the possibility of a
voltage challenge between the two systems.
Maintenance
Check the bonding system periodically to assure that
the wire and connections are not broken or damaged.
You can verify the integrity of the system by checking
for continuity with an ohmmeter or continuity light
between the bonding plate and the fuel fill caps. If the
meter or light indicates a break in continuity, replace
the bonding system wires. After testing, coat all
screws and terminals with liquid neoprene.
Repair
The following procedure covers the removal and
installation of the bonding system wires. Bonding
wires are accessed through the deck access plates
and access hatches. Refer to the Fuel System Diagram in this section for component locations.
Perform a continuity test as described in Bonding
System Maintenance. Remove the screw at each
terminal location of the faulty wire. Attach a new wire
to the end of the faulty wire and use the faulty wire to
pull the new wire into position. Secure the wire to the
terminal with a screw. Coat the terminal and screw
with liquid neoprene.
3-9
Section 3
Fuel Systems
Contaminated Gasoline
Water from condensation and sediment from contaminated gasoline can collect in your fuel tanks. Contaminated gasoline can damage boat fuel system
components, corrode fuel tanks, clog fuel filters, and
damage your engines’ fuel systems.
Your fuel filter inspection and servicing routine is
directly related to the quality and quantity of gasoline
that you take on-board. You should check the fuel filter sight bowls for evidence of moisture before and
after every mission.
Refer to Blended Fuels in this section for more information about water in gasoline.
Use your fuel stripping pump to sample the gasoline
for evidence of moisture or particulate contamination.
Adjust the boat angle so that the lowest portion of the
fuel tank is below the sounding hole. If possible, let
the gasoline “rest” for 30 minutes before sampling.
Pump the sample gasoline into a clean container and
inspect for moisture or particulate contamination. Dispose of the test sample following all state and federal
regulations.
Refer to Fuel Stripping Pump in this section for
detailed information about this service procedure.
If the test sample shows evidence of moisture or particulate contamination, consult a professional tankcleaning contractor about having your fuel tanks
pumped out and cleaned.
Verify that the contractor is fully licensed and that he
can dispose of the contaminated gasoline following all
state and federal regulations.
! WARNING
Do not allow any liquid gasoline to enter the
boat or accumulate in the bilge. Liquid gasoline
is a fire and explosion hazard. Gasoline vapor
is extremely flammable and highly explosive
under certain conditions.
3-10
Fuel Systems
Section 3
Fueling Procedures
Safety Warnings
! DANGER
Gasoline vapor is extremely flammable and
highly explosive under certain conditions.
Always stop the engines and never smoke or
allow open flames or sparks within 50 feet (15
meters) of the fueling area when refueling.
! DANGER
A discharge of static electricity can ignite
gasoline vapor, causing serious injury, death,
and destruction of property.
! WARNING
This fuel system is not designed to support an
automatic “hands free” fuel nozzle. Never use
an automatic fuel nozzle to fill these tanks and
never leave a fueling process unattended.
! WARNING
The components in your boat fuel system are
designed to work with automotive gasoline
containing up to 10% ethanol, by volume.
Using automotive gasoline with higher
concentrations of ethanol will damage boat fuel
system components and might cause fuel
leaks.
! CAUTION
Carefully follow the engine manufacturer’s
recommendations when selecting gasoline for
your outboard engines.
Using nonrecommended fuels can cause serious engine
damage and might void your engine warranty.
3-11
Section 3
Fuel Systems
Static Electricity
A discharge of static electricity can ignite gasoline
vapor that has accumulated during the fueling process. Use extreme caution when fueling your boat
under unusual circumstances such as when the boat
is suspended in a boatlift.
Your boat has important safety features and systems
that can be defeated by not following standard fueling
practices. Under normal conditions, your boat’s bonding system protects it from accumulating and discharging static electricity.
Here are some important guidelines to protect you
from static electricity discharge while fueling:
• Always keep your boat in continuous contact with
the water or a land-based grounding system during fueling.
• Always keep the fuel nozzle in contact with the
fuel fill assembly or the edge of the fuel tank
opening during the fueling process. This contact
must be continuously maintained until fuel flow
has stopped.
• Never fuel your boat under unsafe conditions that
could increase the possibility of creating static
electricity.
• Only fill portable gasoline tanks while on land,
never on-board the boat.
• Never use homemade containers as a source of
gasoline to fill your tanks.
• Only carry gasoline on-board in a UL-approved
container or in a portable gasoline tank such as
those provided with outboard engines.
• Never store portable gasoline tanks in living,
engine, or mechanical spaces.
3-12
Fuel Systems
Section 3
General Guidelines
Also follow these important guidelines during fueling operations:
! WARNING
This fuel system is not designed to support an
automatic “hands free” fuel nozzle. Never use
an automatic fuel nozzle to fill these tanks and
never leave a fueling process unattended.
• Shut down outboard engines, electric motors, and
fans before fueling. All possible sources of ignition must be OFF before you begin taking on gasoline.
• Close all ports, windows, doors, hatches, and
compartments.
• Extinguish cigarettes, pipes, stoves, and all other
flame-producing devices.
• Make sure all electrical power is OFF. Do not
operate any electrical switches.
• Never take on gasoline at night, except in welllighted areas.
• Insert fuel nozzle and make sure nozzle is in contact with or grounded against fill pipe before you
pump gasoline. This contact must be continuously maintained until gasoline flow has stopped.
• Never exceed a fill rate of 9 GPM. Slow the fill
rate to 6 GPM for the final ¼ of tank.
• DO NOT fill the tank completely. Allow a minimum of 2% of tank volume for temperaturerelated expansion. Allow for 6% expansion if the
temperature of the gasoline taken on-board is
32°F or lower.
• Close and secure the fuel fill cap after fueling.
• Wipe up any spillage completely and dispose of
rags or waste on-shore following all state and federal regulations.
• Ventilate the general area to eliminate any signs
of gasoline vapor.
3-13
Section 3
Fuel Systems
Blended Fuels
! WARNING
The components in your boat fuel system are
designed to work with automotive gasoline
containing up to 10% ethanol, by volume.
Using automotive gasoline with higher
concentrations of ethanol will damage boat fuel
system components and might cause fuel
leaks.
Automotive gasoline has contained various oxygenated hydrocarbon compounds as replacements for
lead since 1985. These compounds boost the octane
rating of gasoline. Two familiar compounds are MTBE
and ethanol. Ethanol is now the most common compound since MTBE was identified as a serious polluter
of ground water.
Ethanol for gasoline is a highly refined grain alcohol
rated at about 200 proof. The U.S. EPA currently
allows automotive gasoline to contain up to 10% ethanol, by volume. While E-10 gasoline does not cause
significant problems in road vehicles, it does require
extra attention when used in your boat.
Follow these rules when using E-10 gasoline in
your boat:
• Read and understand all of the fuel-related safety
warnings and maintenance procedures outlined in
this operator manual.
• Read and understand all of the fuel-related safety
warnings and maintenance procedures outlined in
your outboard engine operator’s manual.
• Ethanol is hygroscopic, meaning that it attracts
and easily mixes with moisture. E-10 gasoline will
corrode metal fuel system parts faster than gasoline without ethanol. If you are switching to E-10
gasoline, it can loosen scale and deposits in older
fuel systems. Regularly inspect all fuel system
components and fuel filters for signs of corrosion
and particulate contamination.
3-14
Fuel Systems
Section 3
• If E-10 gasoline absorbs enough moisture, it can
suffer phase separation. The ethanol and water
mixture will fall out of suspension and collect in
the lowest parts of the fuel system. The ethanol
and water mixture can damage engines, clog fuel
filters, and corrode metal fuel system parts. Fuel
tanks with E-10 gasoline should always be kept
as full as possible to reduce exposure to moisture
from condensation and humidity.
• Concentrations of ethanol greater than 10% can
change the physical properties of some rubber
and plastic fuel system parts such as gaskets,
hoses, tanks, and filters. Regularly inspect all
non-metal fuel system parts for signs of swelling
or deterioration. In some extreme cases, rubber
parts such as hoses and gaskets can actually
sweat liquid gasoline. Be alert for the odor of gasoline or small droplets of gasoline near these
parts.
• Always have fuel system repairs performed by a
qualified marine technician.
3-15
Operator Notes
3-16
Boat Systems
Section 4
General Description
This section contains general theory and functional
information about the boat systems. This information
is intended to give you an idea about how each boat
system is configured and how it should be used.
The content of this section is based on the most current design and assembly information available at the
time of publication. The information and illustrations
are general representations of the boat systems. The
information is not meant to be used as a detailed parts
manual or a service manual.
Certain features, parts, systems, and accessories discussed in this section might not be found on your boat.
This boat and these boat systems should be maintained by an experienced marine technician.
Specific troubleshooting and parts information for each
accessory component might be included in the OEM
literature contained in your owner’s bag.
4-1
Section 4
Boat Systems
Helm Station Layout
1
2
3
4
6
7
5
8
9
0
B
D
A
E
C
F
G
H
I
J
4-2
Boat Systems
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
Section 4
Fan, cabin, 12 VDC (2 places)
Radio, VHF
Touch pad, ACR spotlight
Control head, Whelen light bar
Control knob, rotary, windshield wipers
Display, navigation
Compass, magnetic
Instrumentation, engines
Windshield wiper (2 places)
Panel, switch, Lenco trim tabs
Helm, steering, manual hydraulic
Control, engine, dual-lever
Panel, LED, battery status
Switch, key, engine ignition (2 places)
Switch, engines, emergency shutoff
Gauge, operating hours, engines
Door, access, lower cabin
Panel, switch, battery parallel
Panel, switch, helm station
Foot rest, helm station
4-3
Section 4
Boat Systems
Steering System
The steering system installed in your boat is a Teleflex
Sea Star II hydraulic system. This is a manually operated, closed-loop hydraulic system requiring no electrical pumps or motors. The system consists of the
following components:
•
•
•
•
•
Steering wheel
Sea Star II helm pump
Teleflex hydraulic hoses
Front-mount steering cylinders
Aero Shell® #41 fluid
The Sea Star II helm pump is an axial piston pump
specifically designed for manual steering. It has a
built-in lock valve to prevent the steering load of the
engines from feeding back to the boat operator. The
lock valve will not allow the outboards to move unless
the steering wheel is turned. The lock valve also contains a pressure relief valve which provides over-pressure protection for the mechanical components, the
hydraulic hoses, and the fittings.
When the steering wheel is turned clockwise, hydraulic fluid is pumped out of the helm unit, into the starboard hydraulic lines and then into the steering
cylinders. As the fluid is pumped into one side of the
steering cylinders, an equal volume of fluid is displaced from the opposite side. The steering cylinder
bodies move to port. The cylinder bodies are connected directly to the engine steering arms. The
engine steering arms also move to port and put the
boat into a starboard turn. The fluid displaced from
the steering cylinders returns to the helm pump reservoir.
Turning the steering wheel counter-clockwise results
in a similar response, but in the opposite direction.
When no course correction is required, the lock valve
holds the outboard engines in place.
Return the steering wheel to the CENTERED position
when you turn the engines OFF.
4-4
Boat Systems
Section 4
Steering System Diagram
1
2
3
4
Outboard engine
Steering cylinder
Tie bar
Steering arm
5
6
7
8
Hydraulic hoses
Helm reservoir
Fill port
Steering wheel
2
4
8
7
3
1
6
4
5
2
5
4-5
Section 4
Boat Systems
Navigation Lights
Your boat is equipped with navigation lights for your
safety. Regulations state that all boats, regardless of
size, must display navigation lights at night.
Your navigation lights let people operating other vessels know the approximate size of your boat and the
direction your boat is traveling. Depending on which
lights are displayed, they let people operating other
vessels know your position while you are underway or
anchored.
Your navigation lights must be displayed at night or in
low visibility conditions. It is your responsibility to verify that the navigation lights are in working condition
and that proper lighting is displayed.
! CAUTION
Installing after-market accessories such as
radar domes, arches, and strobe lights can
obstruct the navigation lights and decrease
their effectiveness. It is your responsibility to
comply with regulations regarding the normal
operation of the navigation lights.
Operation
Operate your navigation lights using the two OFF-ON
toggle switches located on the helm station switch
panel. One toggle switch is labeled ANCHOR and
one toggle switch is labeled NAV.
While underway, move the NAV toggle switch to the
ON position. This turns on the port red, starboard
green, and 360° white lights. The red and green lights
are located on the forward ring deck. The 360° white
light is located on a folding mast.
At anchor, move the NAV toggle switch to the OFF
position and the ANCHOR toggle switch to the ON
position. This turns on only the 360° white light.
No lights are lighted when both toggle switches are in
the OFF position.
4-6
Boat Systems
Section 4
Compass
! WARNING
All magnetic compasses are subject to
magnetic interference, which can produce
errors called deviation. Compass deviation can
contribute to inaccurate course plotting and
position fixes, placing your crew, your boat,
and others at risk.
Deviation
Your magnetic compass is located in line with the helm
station, below the operator’s line of sight so it can be
easily read during normal boat operation.
The location of your compass has been selected to
minimize deviation caused by other equipment
installed on the boat. Magnets, ferrous metals, and
current-carrying devices are common causes of deviation.
Periodically check the alignment of the compass to
verify that it is installed properly and compensated.
Compensation is the act of correcting for deviation.
Refer to the compass manufacturer’s literature for
detailed information about the compensation procedure.
Variation
It is important to understand that magnetic compasses
point toward magnetic north. There is a difference
between magnetic north and true north. That difference is called variation. Variation differs depending on
your geographical location and can be determined by
referring to a local chart.
Night Lighting
The internal red night operation light is connected to
the lighting circuit of the engine gauges. The compass
night light, like the engine gauge lights, is dimmed
using the dimmer switch on the helm station switch
panel.
4-7
Section 4
Boat Systems
Bilge Pumps
Your bilge pump system consists of a forward 1100
gallon per hour (GPH) and an aft 2000 GPH pump.
Each pump is connected to a water level sensor that
will activate automatically when water in the bilge
reaches a depth of about two inches.
The 1100 GPH pump is located in the lower cabin. It
is below the sump cover in the floor of the cabin. The
discharge for the forward bilge pump is located midship on the starboard side.
The 2000 GPH pump is located in the aft bilge area
and can be accessed through the splashwell hatch.
This pump discharges on the starboard side just forward of the transom.
The bilge pump power circuit is wired directly to the
battery side of the port engine battery OFF-ON switch.
The bilge pump system has an uninterruptible power
supply that is not affected by the position of the port
engine battery OFF-ON switch.
The uninterruptible bilge pump power circuit is protected by a 20-amp blade fuse. The fuse is located in
a water-proof holder that is within seven inches of the
port engine battery OFF-ON switch.
4-8
Boat Systems
Section 4
Operation
The bilge pumps are controlled by two 2-position toggle switches located on the helm station switch panel.
The AUTO switch position supplies constant power to
the water level sensor so water is pumped anytime it is
detected.
The switch panel has a red LED indicator that will be
lighted anytime the bilge pump is running.
! CAUTION
Keep the bilge pump switches in the AUTO
position anytime the bilge drain plug is in place,
whether the boat is in the water or on a trailer.
Keeping the switches in the AUTO position
allows the system to sense rainwater or melting
snow that might accumulate in the bilge.
The MANUAL switch position supplies power directly
to the bilge pump. When the toggle switch is in the
MANUAL position, the bilge pump will run even if
there is no water in the bilge.
The switch panel has a red LED indicator that will be
lighted anytime the bilge pump is running.
! CAUTION
The bilge pumps will be damaged if they are run
continuously when no water is in the bilge.
! CAUTION
Test your bilge pumps and float switches before
each mission.
Manually activate the float
switch when the toggle switch is in the AUTO
position and verify pump operation. Clear away
any sludge or debris that might restrict the
pump or float switch.
4-9
Section 4
Boat Systems
Battery Parallel Switch
Your boat is equipped with an emergency battery parallel switch. The switch is located at the helm station.
You can use the emergency battery parallel switch to
connect the two engine starting batteries in parallel if
one engine will not start due to low battery voltage.
The battery parallel switch controls a solenoid that
connects the two engine starting batteries. The switch
is a three-position rocker switch that is ON-OFF-ON.
The center switch position is OFF. Both the left and
right switch positions are momentarily ON when held
down. When you release the switch, it will return to
the center OFF position.
If one of your outboard engines will not start due to low
battery voltage, use the emergency battery parallel
switch to provide power from the other starting battery.
Push and hold the battery parallel switch ON to either
the left or right position. Note this position. Hold the
battery parallel switch in the ON position and try to
start the engine.
If the engine does not start, release the battery parallel
switch to the OFF position. Move the battery parallel
switch to ON in the opposite direction. Hold the battery parallel switch in the ON position and try to start
the engine.
4-10
Boat Systems
Section 4
Trim Tabs
Your boat is equipped with Lenco® electro-mechanical
trim tabs. The trim tab system consists of four major
components. The switch panel with LED tab indicators is located at the helm station, near the engine
controls. The system control box is located inside the
starboard electrical locker, in the lower cabin. There
are also two electro-mechanical actuator assemblies
with stainless steel trim planes fastened to the transom.
When the tab buttons are pressed, the trim tabs move
into position. Water force on the trim tab lower surface
creates upward pressure, raising the stern and lowering the bow. Properly sized trim tab planes improve
boat performance over a wider range of loads,
weather, and water conditions.
The switch panel is labeled to make trim tab operation
simple. When operating the tab buttons, think of how
you want the bow of the boat to move to properly trim
the boat.
To lower the port bow, push the left DOWN button.
This lowers the trim plane on the starboard side of the
transom.
To lower the starboard bow, push the right DOWN
button. This lowers the trim plane on the port side of
the transom.
To evenly lower or raise the bow, you can push both
buttons at the same time. To evenly lower the bow,
push both DOWN buttons. To evenly raise the bow,
push both UP buttons.
The Lenco switch panel includes two LED segment
bars that represent the relative position of both trim
tabs. When you lower one or both of the trim tabs, the
LED segment bars will extend to indicate that the trim
tabs are moving down. When you raise one or both of
the trim tabs, the LED segment bars will retract to indicate that the trim tabs are moving up.
4-11
Section 4
Boat Systems
Trim Tab Control Box
The trim tab control box operates on power supplied
through the accessory fuse block. The trim tab power
circuit is protected a 20-amp blade fuse. The trim tab
control box senses 12 VDC when the starboard engine
ignition key switch is in the ON position.
Because the trim tab control box senses switched
12 VDC at the starboard engine ignition switch:
• The trim tab system will only operate when the
starboard engine ignition switch is ON
• The trim tabs will automatically retract when the
starboard engine ignition switch is turned OFF
! CAUTION
The trim tabs will automatically retract when the
starboard engine is turned OFF. Make sure that
both trim tabs are fully retracted before you put
the boat on a trailer, cradle, or boatlift. Contact
with the trim tabs can cause serious damage to
the tabs and the boat.
Turning the house battery OFF-ON switch to the OFF
position at the end of your mission will cut power to the
trim tab control box.
4-12
Boat Systems
Section 4
Proper Boat Trim
All boats “break over” or get on plane at a particular
speed. This speed is determined by load distribution,
water conditions, and other factors. Trim tabs allow
your boat to plane at speeds below its natural planing
speed. By pressing the BOW DOWN buttons, your
trim tabs move down. This will raise your stern and
lower your bow, getting the boat on plane sooner.
When learning to use trim tabs, begin by pressing the
tab buttons in ½ second bursts for gradual trimming. A
momentary delay occurs from the time you press the
tab buttons to the time the boat reacts. This delay is
normal and varies with boat speed. Be careful not to
over-trim the boat. An over-trimmed boat will “plow” or
“bow-steer”. If you over-trim the boat, push both BOW
UP buttons to raise the bow.
! WARNING
The boat’s attitude and steering effort can react
very quickly to changes in trim tab position.
Adjust trim tab deployment in small increments
to avoid loss of boat control.
Rough Water
When running in chop or heavy seas, press both BOW
DOWN buttons to lower the bow elevation. This will
bring the “V” of the hull in more contact with the waves
and reduce the pounding effect.
! WARNING
Do not over-trim, particularly at high speeds, as
the bow will dig in and wave action might cause
the boat to veer. While underway, do not move
one trim tab significantly farther down than the
other, as undesirable listing will occur.
4-13
Section 4
Boat Systems
Trim Tabs and Engines
Adjusting the trim tabs in conjunction with the trim
function on your outboard engines will improve your
boat performance and maneuverability.
When the boat comes on plane, adjust the trim tabs to
achieve the desired running attitude of the boat. Then
trim the outboard engines up using the trim function on
the dual-lever control until the engine propellers are
parallel with the surface of the water.
If necessary, readjust the boat trim tabs to fine tune
the running attitude of the boat.
Refer to the Lenco operation manual in your owner’s
bag for detailed information about the operation and
maintenance of the trim tab system.
4-14
Boat Systems
Section 4
Signal Horn
Your boat is equipped with a 12 VDC signal horn. The
signal horn is installed on the starboard side of the
cabin. The HORN toggle switch is located on the helm
station switch panel, just to the right of the steering
wheel. This signal horn satisfies United States Coast
Guard Navigation Rule 36 for signals to attract attention.
The signal horn circuit is protected a 10-amp push button breaker located next to the toggle switch.
Turning the house battery OFF-ON switch to the OFF
position at the end of your mission will cut power to the
signal horn circuit.
Battery Status Indicator
Your boat is equipped with a battery status indicator
panel. The panel is mounted at the helm station. The
panel has a green LED that is lighted anytime a battery switch or a boat accessory circuit is powered and
active.
Turn all battery OFF-ON switches to the OFF position before you leave the boat unattended for any
period of time. Check to make sure that the battery status green LED is not lighted.
Leaving the boat unattended with the battery status
green LED lighted might allow one or more of the batteries to become discharged.
Bilge Pump Special
The only exception to the 12 VDC circuit control
described above is the bilge pump system. The bilge
pump system has an uninterruptible power supply that
originates at the battery side of the port engine battery
OFF-ON switch. The bilge pump system is powered
and active regardless of the position selected on any
of the battery OFF-ON switches.
4-15
Section 4
Boat Systems
Cabin Lights
Your boat is equipped with 12 VDC area lighting in the
lower cabin. You can use the lights to illuminate the
cabin while you are working.
The cabin lighting is controlled an OFF-ON toggle
switch located on the helm station switch panel. The
cabin lighting power circuit is protected by a 10-amp
push button breaker located next to the toggle switch.
Turn off the cabin lights when they are not required to
avoid discharging the house battery.
Turning the house battery OFF-ON switch to the OFF
position at the end of your mission will cut power to the
cabin lighting circuit.
Cockpit Lighting
Your boat might be equipped with red cockpit night
lighting. The lights are used to illuminate the deck surfaces without creating glare at night. The red cockpit
lights are usually installed in pairs, port and starboard.
Typically, they are located on the interior hull sides,
under the gunwale boards or ring deck.
To operate the red cockpit lights, move the COCKPIT
LIGHTS toggle switch at the helm station switch panel
to the ON position. Each cockpit light fixture also has
an OFF-ON rocker switch that is used to control the
individual light fixture.
The cockpit light power circuit is protected by a 10amp push button breaker located next to the toggle
switch.
Turn off the cockpit lights when they are not required
to avoid discharging the house battery.
Turning the house battery OFF-ON switch to the OFF
position at the end of your mission will cut power to the
cockpit light circuit.
4-16
Boat Systems
Section 4
Floodlights
Your boat might be equipped with one or more 12
VDC floodlights. The floodlights are usually mounted
on the cabin roof and the tow tower frame. You can
use the floodlights to illuminate the deck or surrounding water while you are working or doing boarding
operations.
Each floodlight is controlled by an OFF-ON toggle
switch located on the helm station switch panel. Each
floodlight power circuit is protected by a 10-amp push
button breaker located next to the toggle switch.
Turn off the floodlights when they are not required to
avoid discharging the house battery.
Turning the house battery OFF-ON switch to the OFF
position at the end of your mission will cut power to all
of the floodlight circuits.
Interior Red/White Light
Your boat is equipped with one combination red/white
light fixture above the helm area. Operation of the red/
white light is controlled by its black bezel. There is no
OFF-ON switch on the helm station switch panel.
Rotate the bezel in either direction to select the color
and intensity of the overhead light.
The combination red/white light is protected by a 1amp blade fuse located in the accessory fuse block
inside the starboard electrical locker.
Turn off the combination red/white light when it is not
required to avoid discharging the house battery.
Turning the house battery OFF-ON switch to the OFF
position at the end of your mission will cut power to the
combination red/white light circuit.
4-17
Section 4
Boat Systems
Towing System
Your boat might be equipped with a towing system.
Towing another boat requires experience and skill.
Always operate any boat within the limits of your experience. If you do not have this experience, ask someone to instruct you or gain experience through
experimentation under controlled conditions.
! CAUTION
Your towing system is designed to tow another
boat of similar displacement at non-planing
speeds for an unrestricted period of time.
! DANGER
Never allow personnel to stand near a deployed
tow rig. The tow line or a tow component could
fail with a high level of energy, causing serious
injury or death.
Towing a Boat
Understand this information before towing another
boat:
• Evaluate the condition of the target boat and its
crew before beginning a tow operation.
• Remove all non-essential crew from the target
boat.
• Make sure that all tow rig components on both
boats are of sufficient capacity for the tow.
• Set the tow rig as low and as close to the boat
centerlines as possible.
• Take at least one-half turn around the tow bar
before you secure the tow line using a series of
figure eights.
• DO NOT use any knots to secure the tow line.
• Set engines or rudders on target boat to maintain
station behind your boat.
4-18
Boat Systems
Section 4
• Keep all crew in both boats clear of the tow rig.
• Keep your tow line clear of your engines and propellers.
• Always avoid shock loading your tow rig and towing system. Never attempt to jerk an excessive
load into motion.
• Maintain communications with crew on target
boat.
• Continuously evaluate condition of tow rig and target boat.
Being Towed
Understand this information before being towed by
another boat:
• Evaluate the condition of your boat before beginning the tow operation.
• Remove all non-essential cargo and crew from
your boat.
• Make sure that all tow rig components on both
boats are of sufficient capacity for the tow.
• Set the tow rig as low and as close to the boat
centerlines as possible.
• Use your boat’s bow eye as the attachment point
for the tow rig.
• Set your engines to maintain station behind the
towing boat.
• Keep your crew inside the cabin, clear of the tow
rig.
• Maintain communications with crew on the towing
boat.
• Continuously evaluate condition of your boat and
the tow rig.
4-19
Section 4
Boat Systems
Remote Spotlight
Your boat might be equipped with a remotely operated
spotlight manufactured by ACR®. The spotlight is usually mounted on the cabin roof or a folding mast. The
soft-touch remote control is mounted at the helm station, near the steering wheel. Your spotlight is an ACR
model RCL-100D and it is rated at 200,000 peak candlepower.
The spotlight power circuit is protected by a 15-amp
blade fuse located in the accessory fuse block inside
the starboard electrical locker.
To operate the remote spotlight:
• Turn the house battery OFF-ON switch to the ON
position
• A dim light in the center of the control pad will indicate the spotlight is in STANDBY mode
• Push the ON/OFF button one time to turn on the
spotlight
• The indicator light will brighten and the spotlight
will turn on
• Push the soft-touch control pad to control the
spotlight
• Push the SPEED button one time to slow the
spotlight response speed
• Push the ON/OFF button one time to turn off the
spotlight
Turn off the remote spotlight when it is not required to
avoid discharging the house battery.
Turning the house battery OFF-ON switch to the OFF
position at the end of your mission will cut power to the
remote spotlight circuit.
Refer to the ACR operation manual in your owner’s
bag for detailed information about the operation and
maintenance of this spotlight.
4-20
Boat Systems
Section 4
Sea Water Washdown Pump
Your boat might be equipped with a 12 VDC sea water
washdown system. The sea water pump and sea
strainer are located in the transom area. The pump
and sea strainer can be inspected and serviced
through the transom hatches just forward of the
engines. The washdown system includes a seacock
that can be closed if you service the system while the
boat is in the water.
The washdown pump output can be accessed through
the hose fitting located on the interior transom bulkhead.
The pump is controlled by an OFF-ON toggle switch
located on the helm station switch panel. The pump
power circuit is protected by a 10-amp push button
breaker located next to the toggle switch.
The pump is equipped with a pressure switch that activates the pump on demand when the control switch is
in the ON position.
Turn off the sea water washdown pump when it is not
required to avoid discharging the house battery.
Turning the house battery OFF-ON switch to the OFF
position at the end of your mission will cut power to the
sea water washdown pump.
4-21
Section 4
Boat Systems
Windshield Wipers
Your boat is equipped with two independently operated windshield wiper assemblies. The port and starboard wipers have separate speed controls and
washer pumps. Both washer pumps draw fluid from
the same reservoir.
There are two wiper control knobs located on the face
of the overhead electronics box. These are rotary
control knobs with three positions. To operate the
windshield wiper, rotate the control knob clockwise to
the LOW speed setting. Continue to rotate the control
knob clockwise to the HIGH speed setting. Turn the
control knob fully counter-clockwise to PARK the
wiper.
Push the control knob IN to spray fluid onto the windshield. The washer will function in any knob position.
The washer pump will continue to run as long as the
knob is pushed in.
The windshield washer fluid reservoir is located inside
the starboard electrical locker, in the lower cabin. To
add fluid to the reservoir, remove the top cap and add
fluid until the tank is full. Use fluid that offers sufficient
protection from freezing if you operate in cold climates.
Follow the fluid manufacturer’s instructions when
using washer fluid that is concentrated and mixed with
water.
Do not mix water with ready-to-use washer fluids.
The additional water can cause the fluid to freeze.
Only fill the washer fluid reservoir ¾ full when temperatures approach freezing. This will allow for fluid
expansion if the system freezes.
Turn off the windshield wipers when they are not
required to avoid discharging the house battery.
Turning the house battery OFF-ON switch to the OFF
position at the end of your mission will cut power to the
windshield wipers.
4-22
Boat Systems
Section 4
Cabin Fans
Your boat is equipped with two 12 VDC oscillating
fans. The fans can be used for windshield defogging
and ventilation.
The fans are controlled by an OFF-ON toggle switch
located on the helm station switch panel. The fan
power circuit is protected by a 10-amp push button
breaker located next to the toggle switch.
To operate the fans, move the FANS toggle switch to
the ON position. This will turn on the port and starboard fans. Each fan also has an integral OFF-ON
switch. The body of the fan can be rotated up and
down by loosening the thumbscrew on the side of the
fan housing.
Turn off the fans when they are not required to avoid
discharging the house battery.
Turning the house battery OFF-ON switch to the OFF
position at the end of your mission will cut power to the
fan circuit.
4-23
Section 4
Boat Systems
ELCI System
If your boat is equipped with a 110 VAC or 220 VAC
shore power system, the installation includes an electrical leakage circuit interrupter (ELCI). The ELCI
system is an important safety feature designed to eliminate the possibility of stray current in the water around
your boat when the shore power system is active.
The ELCI system will respond to leakage of AC electrical current outside of its intended circuit path. If the
stray current exceeds 30mA, the primary ELCI circuit
breaker will trip and a red fault light will come on.
! DANGER
If your ELCI circuit breaker trips repeatedly and
the red fault light is on, your shore power
system might be leaking AC current into the
water around your boat. This stray current
could shock or electrocute people in the water
around your boat. Disable your shore power
system immediately and have it serviced by an
experienced marine electrician.
Follow these steps to test your ELCI system each time
you activate the shore power system:
• Move main ELCI breaker to the OFF position
• Route and connect shore power cord
• Listen for audible warning indicating reverse
polarity
• Verify green POWER light on ELCI panel
• Move main ELCI breaker to the ON position
• Press TEST button on ELCI panel
• Red FAULT light should come on and ELCI
breaker should trip
• Press RESET button on ELCI panel
• Verify green POWER light on ELCI panel
• Move main ELCI breaker to the ON position
• Activate AC power distribution panel inside cabin
or control console
4-24
Boat Systems
Section 4
Generator
Your boat might be equipped with a 110 VAC or 220
VAC Kohler® generator, typically to support the operation of an air conditioning system. The generator will
be installed in the mid-bilge area and the option will
include a power distribution panel, a bilge blower, a
fire suppression system, a carbon monoxide detector,
and a dash-mounted control panel.
Follow these steps to bring the generator on-line:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Fuel supply valve OPEN
Sea water seacock OPEN
Generator starting battery switch ON
Fire suppression status light ON
CO detector status light ON
All primary and secondary AC breakers OFF
Run blower for at least 4 minutes
Press MODE button on control panel until START
is displayed
Press and release START button
Generator will start automatically (3 attempts)
Verify cooling water at exhaust outlet
Run generator for three minutes before bringing
on-line
Refer to the Kohler operation manual in your owner’s
bag for detailed information about the operation and
maintenance of this generator.
4-25
Section 4
Boat Systems
Carbon Monoxide Detector
If your boat is equipped with a generator or a fire
pump, a carbon monoxide detector is installed in the
lower cabin. The detector is active when the house
battery OFF-ON switch is in the ON position.
The detector is calibrated by the manufacturer to
sound an alarm when the time-weighted effect of
exposure would cause a 10% saturation of carbon
monoxide in your blood stream.
! DANGER
Prolonged exposure to carbon monoxide can
cause serious injury or death. Verify that the
detector status light is ON before you start the
generator or fire pump.
For more information about the dangers of carbon
monoxide, read the booklet What You Can’t See that
is in your owner’s bag.
Fire Suppression System
If your boat is equipped with a generator or a fire
pump, a FireBoy® fire suppression system is installed
in the bilge area. The system includes an extinguisher
bottle located in the bilge and a status panel installed
near the helm station.
The fire suppression system is active when the generator or fire pump starting battery OFF-ON switch is in
the ON position. Verify that the system is active by
looking for the status light before you start the generator or fire pump.
If the starting battery switch is ON and the status light
is not lighted, there are four possible causes:
•
•
•
•
The system fuse is blown
The system has discharged due to a fire
The starting battery is discharged or disconnected
The status light or pressure switch is inoperative
Refer to the FireBoy operation manual in your owner’s
bag for detailed information about the operation and
maintenance of this system.
4-26
Boat Systems
Section 4
AC Power Distribution Panel
If your boat is equipped with a generator or a shore
power system, an AC power distribution panel is
installed near the helm area. The panel includes
source selector breakers, primary disconnect breakers
for the panel, secondary breakers for the individual AC
accessories, a line voltmeter, and a load ammeter.
Use the AC power distribution panel to select a power
source, select certain AC accessories, and monitor the
performance of your AC power system.
Follow these steps when activating the AC power system in your boat:
• Move all primary, secondary, and source breakers
to the OFF position
• Choose shore power or the generator as your
source of AC power
• Follow the steps outlined in this section to bring
that power source on-line
• Select a power source using the source breakers
on the panel
• Verify appropriate system voltage using the panel
voltmeter
• Select certain AC accessories using the individual
breakers
• Cumulative total accessory amperage cannot
exceed line breaker amperage rating
• Move all breakers to the OFF position before
deselecting the power source
4-27
Section 4
Boat Systems
Air Conditioning System
Your boat might be equipped with an 18,000 BTU (110
VAC) or a 24,000 BTU (220 VAC) Cruisair® marine air
conditioning system. This option includes a chilled
water air conditioning unit, a raw water circulating
pump, a raw water seacock, and a control panel.
The compressor, fan, and water pump power circuits
are protected by a 15-amp breaker on the AC power
distribution panel.
Before you use the air conditioning system, you must:
• Verify that the raw water seacock is OPEN
• Turn all knobs on the control panel to OFF
• Select a power source at the AC power distribution panel, either shore power or the generator
• Move the AIR CONDITIONING circuit breaker to
the ON position
Follow these steps to operate the air conditioning system:
• Use the top knob to select FAN ONLY or AC
• Use the center knob to adjust fan speed
• Use the bottom knob to adjust system temperature
Verify system operation after the air conditioning starts
by looking for the raw water discharge. You can
expect an approximate 17°F air-to-air differential when
this system is operating normally.
Refer to the Cruisair operation manual in your
owner’s bag for detailed information about the operation and maintenance of this system.
4-28
Battery Systems
Section 5
General Description
Your boat is equipped with a 12 volt direct current (12
VDC) electrical system. The 12 VDC electrical system
provides power to all DC electrical loads on the boat.
The complete 12 VDC electrical system consists of six
main power distribution circuits that are electrically
connected on the negative side of the system.
Power for all 12 VDC systems is normally supplied by
two house (electronics) batteries and two engine starting batteries.
Your boat might have additional starting batteries to
power options such as a generator or a fire pump.
The engine and house batteries are charged when the
outboard engines are running above idle speed,
regardless of battery OFF-ON switch position.
Each electrical circuit is configured as a two-wire, negative-return system, which includes a 12 VDC power
lead and a negative-return lead. Each electrical circuit
is powered by one of four 12-volt batteries, is controlled by one of three battery OFF-ON switches, and
is protected by two or more circuit breakers.
All 12 VDC wiring in your boat conforms to ASTM
Standard B-33 and is premium-grade tinned copper
marine cable, designed to minimize voltage drop and
resist corrosion. The termination of each 12 VDC
electrical circuit is protected from moisture intrusion by
self-sealing heat-shrink insulation on each connector.
5-1
Section 5
Battery Systems
Batteries
Safety Warnings
! CAUTION
Batteries should always be enclosed in the
covered battery boxes provided with your boat.
The boxes will contain any spilled acid and will
protect the battery terminals from damage or
shorting due to contact with metal objects. The
battery boxes should always be secured using
the heavy-duty straps and aluminum trays
provided. The boxes, heavy-duty straps, and
aluminum trays are designed to hold the
batteries in place while the boat is underway,
reducing the possibility of damage to the
batteries and other equipment in the storage
area.
! DANGER
Never use an open flame in the battery storage
area. Avoid striking sparks near the batteries. A
battery can explode if a flame or spark ignites
the free hydrogen gas vented during charging.
Always disconnect the batteries before doing
any work on the 12 VDC electrical systems.
! WARNING
Always wear eye protection when servicing
batteries. Batteries contain sulfuric acid, which
can cause serious injury. Avoid contact with
skin, eyes, and clothing. If contact occurs,
immediately flush the affected area with water
and call for medical assistance.
! CAUTION
The 110 VAC battery chargers have been
programmed
to
support
the
charging
requirements of your batteries. Changing the
battery type without reprogramming the battery
chargers can damage the batteries.
5-2
Battery Systems
Section 5
Capacities
Exide® marine heavy-duty 12-volt batteries are normally selected for your boat. One Group 24 1000
marine cranking amp (MCA) battery is provided for
each outboard engine and two Group 27 115 amp
hour, deep cycle batteries are normally provided for
the boat’s electrical accessories. These batteries are
considered wet-cell and require periodic maintenance.
Your boat might be equipped with Optima® Blue Top
marine batteries. Optima batteries use spiral cell technology to improve vibration resistance and service life.
These batteries are classified as non-spillable and do
not require periodic checks of electrolyte levels.
With proper care, these marine heavy-duty batteries
will last several years. Refer to any maintenance
information that came with the batteries and to Batteries in Section 6 of this manual.
5-3
Section 5
Battery Systems
Charging
The outboard engine alternators charge the four batteries when the engines are running above idle speed.
All outboard engines charge their starting batteries
through the starting circuit. Some outboard engines
charge the house batteries through an integral auxiliary charging circuit and some require an external battery charge isolator. The external charge isolator
diverts some of the engine charging output to the
house batteries.
The engine and house batteries are charged when the
outboard engines are running above idle speed,
regardless of battery OFF-ON switch position.
The charge isolator also prevents a higher-charged
battery 1 from discharging into a lower-charged battery 2 by keeping the batteries electrically isolated.
The battery charge isolator output circuits are protected by four 70-amp push-button circuit breakers
located inside the port electrical locker.
Your boat is normally equipped with two 110 VAC battery chargers that charge all batteries when the boat is
connected to shore power. All batteries are charged
when the 110 VAC battery chargers are active, regardless of battery OFF-ON switch positions.
Each AC battery charger output circuit is protected by
a 40-amp push-button circuit breaker located inside
the port electrical locker.
! CAUTION
The 110 VAC battery chargers have been
programmed
to
support
the
charging
requirements of your batteries. Changing the
battery type without reprogramming the battery
chargers can damage the batteries.
Refer to the battery charger operation manual in your
owner’s bag for detailed information about its programming and operation.
5-4
Battery Systems
Section 5
Grounding and Bonding
Definitions
The terms grounding and bonding are often incorrectly
used interchangeably. They are different systems that
can work together to provide solutions to common
problems and risks on the water.
Bonding is the process of connecting various metal
components in the boat to a common electrical contact. This helps to reduce the chance of rails and
other metal objects carrying dangerous electrical
charges.
Grounding is defined as the method in which any electrical potential is connected to the surrounding water
for the purpose of energy dissipation.
Properly designed grounding and bonding systems
incorporating zinc or aluminum anodes and bronze
plates will also help control corrosion of aluminum and
stainless steel parts.
Grounding
The negative terminals of all house and starting batteries, and the negative cables from the outboard
engines, are connected together at the negative buss
bars located inside the port electrical locker. These
negative buss bars serve as the return point for the
entire 12 VDC electrical system.
The accessory fuse block and negative terminal strip
on the electronics distribution panel also connect to
the negative side of the 12 VDC electrical system at
the buss bars. The connections are made with #8 awg
black wires from each device.
Note: All grounding wires and cables are black.
5-5
Section 5
Battery Systems
Bonding
Your boat’s bonding system starts with a bronze plate
located below the water line at the center of the transom. A #8 awg green cable connects the bronze plate
to the bonding buss system. The fuel tanks, fuel fills,
engine crash rail, hand rails, engine bracket, and tow
post are also connected to the bonding buss system
with #8 awg green cables.
Also directly connected to the bonding system are any
shielded cables from certain sensitive electronic
devices. This helps mitigate radio frequency interference (RFI) generated by various electrical systems.
The negative buss system and the bonding buss system are also connected to each other to reduce the
possibility of a voltage challenge between the two systems.
Note: All bonding wires and cables are green.
5-6
Operator Notes
5-7
Section 5
Battery Systems
Battery Switches
Battery Parallel Switch
Your boat is equipped with an emergency battery parallel switch. The switch is located at the helm station.
You can use the emergency battery parallel switch to
connect the two engine starting batteries in parallel if
one engine will not start due to low battery voltage.
The battery parallel switch controls a solenoid that
connects the two engine starting batteries. The switch
is a three-position rocker switch that is ON-OFF-ON.
The center switch position is OFF. Both the left and
right switch positions are momentarily ON when held
down. When you release the switch, it will return to
the center OFF position.
If one of your outboard engines will not start due to low
battery voltage, use the emergency battery parallel
switch to provide power from the other starting battery.
Push and hold the battery parallel switch ON to either
the left or right position. Note this position. Hold the
battery parallel switch in the ON position and try to
start the engine.
If the engine does not start, release the battery parallel
switch to the OFF position. Move the battery parallel
switch to ON in the opposite direction. Hold the battery parallel switch in the ON position and try to start
the engine.
The emergency battery parallel system is protected by
two 10-amp in-line blade fuses wired to the load sides
of both engine battery OFF-ON switches. The two inline blade fuses protect the electrical wiring between
the solenoid and battery parallel switch.
Periodically check the condition of the two 10-amp inline blade fuses located next to the parallel solenoid.
One blown fuse would not allow the battery parallel
solenoid to function in one switch position.
5-8
Battery Systems
Section 5
Battery OFF-ON Switches
The base boat is equipped with three battery OFF-ON
switches that allow you to turn battery power on and
off to the outboard engines and to each main 12 VDC
power distribution circuit in the boat. Your boat might
have additional battery OFF-ON switches to control
options such as a generator or a fire pump. The battery switches are located in a panel near the helm station.
• One battery switch controls power to all main 12
VDC power distribution circuits
• One battery switch controls power to the port outboard engine and certain engine accessories
• One battery switch controls power to the starboard outboard engine and certain engine accessories
! CAUTION
Never move the engine battery OFF-ON
switches to the OFF position while the outboard
engines are running. Moving the engine battery
OFF-ON switches to the OFF position while the
engines are running will cause immediate
damage to the engines’ charging systems.
You can disable each battery OFF-ON switch by
removing its handle. Turn the switch handle an additional 20° counter-clockwise from the OFF position to
remove it. Disabling the battery OFF-ON switches
gives you an additional level of security when the boat
is left unattended.
Bilge Pump Special
The only exception to the 12 VDC circuit control
described above is the bilge pump system. The 20amp in-line blade fuse that protects the bilge pump
system has an uninterruptible power supply that originates at the battery side of the port engine battery
OFF-ON switch. The bilge pump system is powered
and active regardless of the position selected on any
of the battery OFF-ON switches.
5-9
Section 5
Battery Systems
DC Power Distribution
All DC electrical devices and systems in your boat are
controlled and protected by six main 12 VDC power
distribution circuits.
Starboard Engine
Main 12 VDC power circuit 1 of 6 provides power for
starting the starboard engine through a battery OFFON switch connected to a Group 24 1000 MCA battery. The starboard engine battery OFF-ON switch is
properly labeled and is located near the helm station.
The main power and negative cables from the starboard engine route through the splash-well boot and
connect to this power circuit through a main two-position, heavy-duty terminal strip located near the transom. This main terminal strip simplifies engine
removal for service or replacement.
Turning the starboard engine battery OFF-ON switch
to the OFF position at the end of your mission will cut
power to the starboard engine and its accessories.
Port Engine
Main 12 VDC power circuit 2 of 6 provides power for
starting the port engine through a battery OFF-ON
switch connected to a Group 24 1000 MCA battery.
The port engine battery OFF-ON switch is properly
labeled and is located near the helm station.
The main power and negative cables from the port
engine route through the splash-well boot and connect
to this power circuit through a main two-position,
heavy-duty terminal strip located near the transom.
This main terminal strip simplifies engine removal for
service or replacement.
Turning the port engine battery OFF-ON switch to the
OFF position at the end of your mission will cut power
to the port engine and its accessories.
See Wire Color Chart in this section for wire colors.
5-10
Battery Systems
Section 5
Bilge Pumps
Main 12 VDC power circuit 3 of 6 provides uninterruptible power to the bilge pump switches located on
the helm station switch panel. The circuit is directly
connected to the port engine battery OFF-ON switch.
The connection is made on the battery side of the
battery OFF-ON switch and is always powered,
regardless of switch position.
The circuit is protected by one 20-amp, in-line blade
fuse located within seven inches of the port engine
battery OFF-ON switch.
This uninterruptible power circuit provides flexibility in
controlling your bilge pumps. With the port engine battery OFF-ON switch in the OFF position, you can still
operate your bilge pumps in the automatic or manual
mode.
See Wire Color Chart in this section for wire colors.
5-11
Section 5
Battery Systems
Helm Station Switch Panel
Main 12 VDC power circuit 4 of 6 provides power to
the helm station switch panel. The helm station switch
panel controls most of the basic boat systems, such as
navigation lights, signal horn, cabin lights, fans, floodlights, and courtesy lights.
The bilge pump switches are located on the helm
station switch panel, but they are not included in
this power circuit.
This circuit is protected by one 105-amp, push button
breaker. The 105-amp breaker is located inside the
port electrical locker, within seven inches of the house
battery OFF-ON switch.
Two Group 27 115 amp hour, deep cycle batteries
normally power this circuit through the house battery
OFF-ON switch.
The helm station switch panel has no connection to
the negative side of the 12 VDC electrical system.
Any accessories installed on these switches must also
connect to the negative side of the 12 VDC electrical
system through one of the negative terminal strips provided. These negative terminal strips are located in
the starboard electrical locker.
If the 105-amp push button breaker trips electrically,
troubleshoot the power circuit and its protected
devices before you reset the breaker.
Turning the house battery OFF-ON switch to the OFF
position at the end of your mission will cut power to all
of the helm station switch panel circuits except the
bilge pump system.
See Wire Color Chart in this section for wire colors.
! CAUTION
The total combined amperage ratings for all
accessories connected to the helm station
switch panel must not exceed 105 amps.
Overloading the helm station switch panel
might cause repeated tripping of the 105-amp
breaker and other electrical problems.
5-12
Battery Systems
Section 5
Accessory Fuse Block
Main 12 VDC power circuit 5 of 6 provides power to
the accessory fuse block located inside the starboard
electrical locker. The accessory fuse block protects
most of the basic boat systems, such as trim tabs, 12volt outlets, and windshield wipers.
This circuit is protected by one 60-amp, push button
breaker. The 60-amp breaker is located inside the
port electrical locker, within seven inches of the house
battery OFF-ON switch.
Two Group 27 115 amp hour, deep cycle batteries
normally power this circuit through the house battery
OFF-ON switch.
Ten branch circuits can be connected to the 12 VDC
electrical system at the accessory fuse block. The
accessory fuse block also has ten connection points
for the negative side of the 12 VDC electrical system.
Some of the electrical accessories might have been
installed at the factory.
If the 60-amp push button breaker trips electrically,
troubleshoot the power circuit and its protected
devices before you reset the breaker.
Turning the house battery OFF-ON switch to the OFF
position at the end of your mission will cut power to the
accessory fuse block.
See Wire Color Chart in this section for wire colors.
! CAUTION
The total combined amperage ratings for all
accessories connected to the fuse block must
not exceed 60 amps.
Overloading the
accessory fuse block might cause repeated
tripping of the 60-amp breaker and other
electrical problems.
5-13
Section 5
Battery Systems
Electronics Distribution Panel
Main 12 VDC power circuit 6 of 6 provides power to
the electronics distribution panel (optional) located in
the starboard electrical locker. The electronics distribution panel protects your sensitive communication
and navigation systems.
This circuit is protected by one 60-amp, push button
breaker. The 60-amp breaker is located inside the
port electrical locker, within seven inches of the house
battery OFF-ON switch.
Two Group 27 115 amp hour, deep cycle batteries
normally power this circuit through the house battery
OFF-ON switch.
The electronics distribution panel has eight switchable
circuit breakers controlled by one main 50-amp switchable breaker. This panel provides a convenient point
to connect all existing and future electronics. The
electronics distribution panel also has nine connection
points for the negative side of the 12 VDC electrical
system. Some of the electronics might have been
installed at the factory.
If the 60-amp push button breaker trips electrically,
troubleshoot the power circuit and its protected
devices before you reset the breaker.
Turning the house battery OFF-ON switch to the OFF
position at the end of your mission will cut power to the
electronics distribution panel.
See Wire Color Chart in this section for wire colors.
! CAUTION
The total combined amperage ratings for all
electronics connected to the distribution panel
must not exceed 60 amps. Overloading the
electronics distribution panel might cause
repeated tripping of the 60-amp breaker and
other electrical problems.
5-14
Battery Systems
Section 5
Wire Color Chart
Black
Black/brown
Black/orange
Black/green
Black/blue
Black/gray
Black/white
Black/white
Black/white
Black/yellow
Ground
Ground, pumps
Ground, accessories
Ground, water level sender
Ground, lighting
Ground, navigation lights
Ground, blower
Ground, parallel solenoid
Generator stop
Engine stop
Green
Green/yellow
Bonding system
AC grounding
Brown
Brown/red
Brown/orange
Brown/white
Brown/yellow
Brown/green
Brown/blue
Brown/purple
Bilge pumps, manual
Bilge pumps, automatic
Fuel transfer pumps
Macerator pumps
Baitwell pumps
Sea water washdown
Fresh water washdown
Available
Red
Red/purple
Battery, unprotected
Battery, protected
Purple
Engine, switched 12 volts
Pink
Sender, fuel level
Yellow
Yellow/red
Yellow/gray
Bilge blower
Engine start
Horn
Orange
Orange/red
Orange/green
Orange/white
Orange/purple
Orange/blue
Orange/brown
Orange/black
Orange/yellow
Accessories, general
Wiper, port
Wiper, starboard
Wiper, center
Navigation equipment
Communication equipment
Electric head
Audio system
Diesel preheat
Gray
Gray/white
Gray/black
Gray/red
Gray/green
Gray/blue
Gray/orange
Gray/purple
Navigation lights
Anchor light
Masthead light
Remote spotlight
Strobe light
Flood lights
Docking lights
Windless
Blue
Blue/orange
Blue/yellow
Blue/black
Blue/black
Blue/red
Blue/red
Blue/purple
Gauge back lighting
Engine room lights
Remote lighting
Dome light, T-top
Dome light, console
Boarding lights
Courtesy lights
Deck lights
White
CO monitor
BCGP 2013
5-15
Operator Notes
5-16
Boat Maintenance
Section 6
Specifications
Length, overall
26 ft. 7 in.
8,1 m
Length, overall (transom bracket)
29 ft. 2 in.
8,9 m
Trailered length
39 ft. 5 in.
12 m
42 ft.
12,8 m
12 ft. 7 in.
3,8 m
10 ft.
3m
Boat weight - Note 1
6200 lbs.
2812 kg
Draft, engines tilted
21 in.
53 cm
9 ft. 1 in.
2,8 m
25 in.
64 cm
4000 lbs.
1814 kg
Maximum engine power
600 HP
447 kW
Maximum engine weight
1400 lbs.
635 kg
Minimum engine power
300 HP
224 kW
Fuel tank capacity - Note 3
190 gallons
719 liters
Optional center fuel tank - Note 3
165 gallons
625 liters
Trailered length (transom bracket)
Trailered height - Note 2
Beam
Bridge clearance, floating - Note 2
Engine shaft length, dual
Load capacity (people, engines, gear)
Note 1 - Base boat, excluding engines and options
Note 2 - Masts folded
Note 3 - Calculated under CFR Title 40
6-1
27 VG 13
Section 6
Boat Maintenance
Hull Identification Number
The Hull Identification Number (HIN) is located on the starboard outboard side of the transom.
This is the most important form of boat identification and it must be included in all correspondence related to your boat.
Model and serial number information for each piece of equipment installed on your boat was
gathered during the construction process. This important information was recorded on a Serial
Number Sheet. A copy of the Serial Number Sheet is in your owner’s bag.
Keep a copy of this important information somewhere safe on shore.
USCG Manufacturer’s Identification
Month Built (January = A)
Boat Serial Number
US
WCG
XXXXX
Country of Origin
X
Year Built
6-2
X
XX
Model Year
Boat Maintenance
Section 6
Options
Brunswick Commercial & Government Products
(BCGP) designs, engineers, and manufactures each
boat for your specific mission. We add extra Phenolic
plate, aluminum plate, and fiberglass material during
the molding process to reinforce attachment points for
the various options. For this reason, many options
cannot be added after the boat leaves the factory. If
you want to add options or accessories to the boat,
you must contact Brunswick Commercial & Government Products Customer Service Department in the
United States at 386-423-2900, for advice.
! WARNING
Installing certain options and accessories on
the hull and deck can lead to structural failure
or boat instability. Improper installations can
cause property damage and serious injury.
Improper installations might void portions of
your hull warranty.
Hull Maintenance
Regularly scheduled maintenance will help keep your
boat mission-ready and help protect it from deterioration caused by its working environment. Your experience with your particular working environment will help
determine the appropriate time intervals between significant system inspections.
Washing
Exterior and interior laminated fiberglass parts and all
metal parts should be washed frequently using fresh
water, a mild soap, and clean cloths or a sponge. DO
NOT use abrasive cleaners, abrasive pads, steel or
bronze wool, or alkaline cleaners to clean your boat.
After washing, rinse thoroughly with fresh water. Dry
the boat to prevent water spots from forming on the
hull and powder-coated hardware.
6-3
Section 6
Boat Maintenance
Waxing
! WARNING
Gelcoat surfaces are always slippery when wet.
Use extreme caution when walking on wet
surfaces to avoid slipping or falling. Never wax
portions of the boat that have a non-skid
pattern.
The interior and exterior fiberglass parts of the hull
should be waxed a minimum of twice per year to protect the gelcoat from salt, dirt, and ultraviolet degradation. Use a wax that is formulated for fiberglass and
gelcoat surfaces. DO NOT wax the boat in direct sunlight. The gelcoat could “haze” over if waxed in direct
sunlight or extreme heat. DO NOT wax the non-skid
surfaces on the decks.
Compounding
It might be necessary to compound the hull and interior fiberglass components to remove stains, light
scratches, and hazed film on the gelcoat. Compounding should only be done after the boat has been thoroughly cleaned to remove all dirt and oil. Use a fine
grade compound formulated for gelcoat and fiberglass
parts. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions carefully.
After compounding, re-wax all surfaces following the
above steps.
Gelcoat & Fiberglass Repair
The interior and exterior of your hull might sustain
damage that cannot be compounded or waxed out.
Typical damage would be cracks, gouges, holes, and
chips. They can be caused from dropping heavy items
inside your boat, or hard impacts with other things
such as docks, other boats, and submerged objects. If
you strike an underwater object while underway, the
boat should be hauled and thoroughly inspected for
damage.
6-4
Boat Maintenance
Section 6
Fiberglass repairs should only be done by an experienced fiberglass repair facility. If the damage penetrates the hull, call Brunswick Commercial &
Government Products Customer Service Department
for the correct repair procedures. The repair must be
done following Boston Whaler’s recommendations.
Improper repairs can lead to hull failure and might void
portions of your commercial warranty.
Trim Care
All trim on your boat must be regularly maintained to
extend its life and service. Most items can be cleaned
with a mild soap and a soft cloth or sponge.
Aluminum
Wash aluminum parts with clear water and mild detergent. Protect surface with liquid cleaner or wax. DO
NOT use harsh chemicals or abrasives. To minimize
corrosion from contact between dissimilar metals, use
a high quality marine grade caulking compound when
mounting non-aluminum hardware. Also ensure all
electrical equipment is insulated from the aluminum
hardware.
Deck Hardware
Clean deck hardware frequently with a mild soap and
water. A glass cleaner is usually safe for stainless
hardware. Remove rust spots as soon as possible
with a brass, silver, or chrome cleaner. Never use an
abrasive like sandpaper or steel wool on stainless
steel parts.
6-5
Section 6
Boat Maintenance
Cutwater & Chafe Plates
Your boat might be equipped with an optional stainless
steel cutwater. This is a plate that protects the keel
against debris while underway and possible damage
while beaching. Inspect the cutwater several times a
year for loose screws, missing screws, and large gaps
along the outside edges. If you service or replace any
screws, you must use the correct screws and bed
them with black 3M® 5200 sealant.
! CAUTION
The cutwater retaining screws are very special.
They do not penetrate through the hull. DO
NOT drill out the holes or substitute any other
screws. Incorrect service procedures could
cause serious hull damage and might void
portions of your hull warranty.
Your boat might be equipped with stainless steel transom corner chafe plates. The same precautions apply
to these items. All chafe plates are powder-coated to
give them a longer service life, but sometimes the
powder-coat might be worn or chipped away. If the
powder-coat gets chipped away, touch up the part with
a high quality, acrylic enamel.
Drains & Scuppers
Check all compartment drains, scuppers, and bilge
discharge fittings at least once a month. Inspect for
gaps in sealant, tightness, cracks, and UV damage.
Inspect scupper flaps for deterioration. If any drains or
thru-hull fittings are damaged, have them serviced or
replaced immediately.
! CAUTION
Failure to properly maintain thru-hull fittings
might lead to serious hull damage and could
void portions of your hull warranty.
6-6
Boat Maintenance
Section 6
Hull Blistering
The chemical and physical structure of all fiberglass
boats is somewhat porous. Water can permeate
through gelcoat and fiberglass during long periods of
immersion in water. This process is referred to as
hydrolysis.
The effect of hydrolysis over time allows water to enter
the gelcoat and substrate, forming a blister. Blistering
is caused by the deterioration of certain water-soluble
materials in the hull laminate. Blisters can form in
near-surface layers of gelcoat or very deep in the
fiberglass substrate.
The damage can range from cosmetic to structural,
although structural damage is a rare occurrence.
Studies point to long-term immersion of a boat in warm
water as a primary cause of hull blisters. Stress
cracks on the hull below the waterline can also contribute to the formation of blisters.
6-7
Section 6
Boat Maintenance
Damage caused by blistering is not covered under
your hull warranty.
There are a number of important things that you
can do to avert hull blistering. They include:
Storage
Store your boat out of the water when not in use.
Store your boat on a trailer, in a boatlift, or on a cradle.
Be sure to use a bunk style design that supports the
boat well.
Refer to Storage and Trailers in this section for more
information about trailer design and proper boat support.
Inspection
Inspect the entire surface of the boat bottom on a frequent basis. Address any structural or cosmetic
issues immediately. Even a minor scratch or scrape
might allow water to enter the hull laminate.
Waxing
Applying a high-quality wax formulated for marine use
can slow the hydrolysis process. Be sure the boat bottom is clean and follow all of the wax manufacturer’s
recommendations.
Bottom Painting
Painting the bottom of your boat slows the formation of
blisters and controls marine growth. Bottom coatings fall into two general categories, barrier coating and conventional bottom painting.
6-8
Boat Maintenance
Section 6
! CAUTION
Some compound of copper is the active
ingredient in most conventional bottom paints.
Do not apply any copper-based bottom paints
to the engine bracket or the engines. Severe
damage resulting from galvanic corrosion will
occur.
! WARNING
There are risks and dangers associated with
using paints and solvents.
Follow all the
manufacturer’s guidelines and precautions
while painting your boat.
Dispose of all
painting supplies following all local regulations.
Barrier coating is a process where a vinyl ester resin
is applied to the boat’s bottom. This process is complicated and very lengthy, including a long “drying out”
phase. The vinyl ester resin barrier coat is then covered by conventional bottom paint. This process
should only be done by a professional fiberglass repair
facility.
The second process is conventional bottom painting using a high-quality product. Bottom painting
slows the process of hydrolysis and protects your boat
from most types of marine growth. If the boat has
never had bottom paint, consider using one of the
newer formulations of paint that does not contain copper compounds.
To determine the waterline, place the boat in the water
with a full load of fuel and gear and mark the waterline.
Measure above the marked line about two inches (5
cm) for placement of the tapeline. Use a vinyl/rubber
masking tape such as 3M® 471.
6-9
Section 6
Boat Maintenance
Preparation is the key to successful hull painting. If
the hull is bare, the gelcoat will have to be de-waxed
before sanding can begin. After de-waxing is complete, light sanding with 80-grit sandpaper is recommended.
Proper ventilation and dust collection is essential. The
dust created from sanding is toxic and should not be
breathed. A properly fitted respirator must be used.
DO NOT use a paper filter mask.
The bottom paint can be applied after sanding and
cleaning is complete. Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations for applying the paint. Always use the
etching primer called for by the paint manufacturer.
Humidity and weather will play a role in how and when
the paint is applied. Several thin layers are better than
one thick layer. Make sure there is enough paint left to
cover areas that were not accessible during painting
because of slings or jack stands.
Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations for periodic maintenance after the painting is complete. If the
hull bottom is already painted, you must be sure to test
the new paint’s adhesion to the old paint. If the paints
are incompatible, the new paint will “lift” the old paint.
Never apply paint without first preparing the old
painted surface.
6-10
Boat Maintenance
Section 6
Storage and Trailers
Store your boat out of the water when you are not
using it to avoid the short-term effects of marine
growth and the long-term effects of hydrolysis. Hydrolysis is the process where moisture can be absorbed
by gelcoat and fiberglass over a long period of exposure.
Choose your trailer, boatlift, or storage cradle carefully. Be sure they incorporate a continuous bunk
design that supports the boat well. Refer to Trailer
Setup in this section for the correct dimensions if you
are buying or replacing your trailer.
Review these guidelines when evaluating a trailer for
your boat:
• The trailer’s net carrying capacity must exceed
the weight of the boat in its fully-loaded condition
• Construction materials must suit your operating
environment
• The trailer should have torsion axles
• Trailer bunks must be continuous and as long as
the boat’s running surface
• Trailer bunk contact angle must match the hull
deadrise angle
• Trailer bunks must be parallel with the boat centerline and must not touch any lifting strake
• Trailer bunks must not be segmented or swivel
• Trailer must not be an “all-roller” design
• Trailer must not support boat weight at any single,
concentrated point such as a keel roller
Heavy-duty trailers and storage cradles supplied by
BCGP meet all these requirements and are approved
for use with Boston Whaler and Impact boats.
! CAUTION
Storing your boat on a sub-standard trailer or
boatlift can cause serious, permanent damage
to the hull. This type of hull damage is
considered “improper storage” and is not
covered under the BCGP limited commercial
warranty.
6-11
Section 6
Boat Maintenance
Trailer Setup
6-12
Boat Maintenance
Section 6
Fuel System
Your boat is equipped with one or more below-deck
aluminum fuel tanks that require little maintenance.
You should visually inspect the fuel tanks and all associated hoses and fittings for leaks or deterioration
before each mission. If you suspect a leak, you should
have your boat serviced immediately by an experienced marine technician.
! WARNING
Do not allow any liquid gasoline to enter the
boat or accumulate in the bilge. Liquid gasoline
is a fire and explosion hazard. Gasoline vapor
is extremely flammable and highly explosive
under certain conditions.
Your boat might be equipped with Racor® 320R-RAC01 gasoline fuel filters. These filters feature a waterseparating 10-micron filter element, a replaceable
spin-on canister, and a clear bowl to help detect water
in your fuel.
Your inspection and servicing routine is directly related
to the quality and quantity of gasoline that you take onboard. You should check the sight bowls for evidence
of moisture before and after every mission.
Replace the filter element on this schedule, whichever
happens first:
• Every 100 operating hours
• Annually
• Noticeable engine performance loss
! WARNING
Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations
exactly when servicing this gasoline filter to
avoid engine damage or fuel leaks. Refer to the
manufacturer’s instruction booklet in your
owner’s bag for detailed information about
these service procedures.
6-13
Section 6
Boat Maintenance
Steering System
Your boat is equipped with a manual hydraulic steering system.
! WARNING
Follow the steering system manufacturer’s
maintenance
recommendations
exactly.
Improper maintenance might cause loss of
steering, which could cause property damage
or serious injury.
Be sure to check the operation of the steering system
before each mission. Turn the steering wheel from
hard port to hard starboard while watching for any
unusual engine movement and listening for any
unusual noise. If any unusual movement or noise is
detected, have the steering system serviced before
operating the boat.
Weekly, check the steering fluid level in the helm reservoir. It should be maintained at no less than ½ inch
and no more than ⅛ inch below the bottom of the filler
cap threads. Be careful not to overfill the reservoir.
6-14
Boat Maintenance
Section 6
Every six months, a qualified marine technician
should check the following items:
• Check fluid level in the helm reservoir.
• Check outboard engine tilt tubes for salt deposits
or signs of corrosion. Clean and grease as
required.
• Check and grease slider assembly on front of the
engine steering cylinder assemblies.
• Check mechanical linkage and connections.
• Tighten loose parts and replace any worn items.
• Check all self-locking fasteners and locking tabs
for tightness.
• Check system for hydraulic fluid leaks. Refill and
purge system as necessary.
• Check steering hoses for signs of chafing, cuts,
and leaks. Replace any steering hose that shows
signs of damage.
• Inspect the bilge, cabin interior, and splashwell for
signs of leaking hydraulic fluid.
Approved Steering Fluids
The following fluids are approved for use in this manual hydraulic steering system:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Sea Star HA-5430
Texaco H015
Aero Shell #41
Esso Univis N15 or J13
Chevron Aviation fluid A
Mobil Aero HFA
Any MIL SPEC H-5606-C fluid
Dexron II automatic transmission fluid may be used in
an emergency.
! WARNING
Never use brake fluid in your manual hydraulic
steering system. Brake fluid will damage the
system and can cause loss of steering control.
6-15
Section 6
Boat Maintenance
Batteries
Safety Warnings
! CAUTION
Batteries should always be enclosed in the
covered battery boxes provided with your boat.
The boxes will contain any spilled acid and will
protect the battery terminals from damage or
shorting due to contact with metal objects. The
battery boxes should always be secured using
the heavy-duty straps and aluminum trays
provided. The boxes, heavy-duty straps, and
aluminum trays are designed to hold the
batteries in place while the boat is underway,
reducing the possibility of damage to the
batteries and other equipment in the storage
area.
! DANGER
Never use an open flame in the battery storage
area. Avoid striking sparks near the batteries. A
battery can explode if a flame or spark ignites
the free hydrogen gas vented during charging.
Always disconnect the batteries before doing
any work on the 12 VDC electrical systems.
! WARNING
Always wear eye protection when servicing
batteries. Batteries contain sulfuric acid, which
can cause serious injury. Avoid contact with
skin, eyes, and clothing. If contact occurs,
immediately flush the affected area with water
and call for medical assistance.
6-16
Boat Maintenance
Section 6
Capacities
Exide® marine heavy-duty 12-volt batteries are normally selected for your boat. One Group 24 1000
marine cranking amp (MCA) battery is provided for
each engine and two Group 27 115 amp hour, deep
cycle batteries are normally provided for the boat’s
electrical accessories. These batteries are considered
wet-cell and require periodic maintenance.
Your boat might be equipped with Optima® Blue Top
marine batteries. Optima batteries use spiral cell technology to improve vibration resistance and service life.
These batteries are classified as non-spillable and do
not require periodic checks of electrolyte levels.
With proper care, these marine heavy-duty batteries
will last several years.
Maintenance
Only use elastic lock nuts with flat washers or standard hex nuts with split lock washers and flat washers
to secure cables to the battery terminals. DO NOT
use wing nuts to secure cables to the battery terminals.
Periodic battery maintenance is important to assure
that the boat will be ready for operation when needed.
Battery maintenance should include:
• Inspect the batteries and charging systems before
each mission for loose connections and damaged
wiring.
• Check and maintain the electrolyte level in all wetcell batteries. Add distilled water only, as necessary.
• Coat the terminals and cable connections with
heavy grease to reduce corrosion.
• Keep the batteries dry and clean.
6-17
Section 6
Boat Maintenance
Remove the batteries from the boat during cold
weather or off-season storage. Always protect the
batteries from freezing temperatures.
You must not allow your batteries to become completely discharged. As a battery discharges, the active
material on both positive and negative plates changes
to lead sulfate, causing the plates to become similar in
chemical composition.
The battery electrolyte
becomes weaker and the voltage drops. As the battery remains discharged, this process continues until
recharging the battery becomes impossible.
If the battery does become discharged, be sure to
recharge it as soon as possible. Overcharging a battery can also reduce its effective life.
Cleaning
! WARNING
Always wear eye protection when servicing
batteries. Batteries contain sulfuric acid, which
can cause serious injury. Avoid contact with
skin, eyes, and clothing. If contact occurs,
immediately flush the affected area with water
and call for medical assistance.
At least once a year, or when they appear to have dirt
or corrosion on the terminals, the batteries should be
cleaned. To clean the batteries, turn the battery OFFON switches to the OFF position. Disconnect the battery cables from the terminals. Remove the negative
(black) cable first. Remove the battery from the plastic battery box. Clean the terminals and casing with a
solution of baking soda and water. Use a soft wire
brush on the terminals. Do not allow the cleaning
solution to enter the battery cells. Wipe the battery
and terminals dry with a clean cloth. Clean the battery
cable ends in the same manner. Connect the cables
to the appropriate terminals and coat the cable connections with heavy grease. Connect the positive
(red) cable first.
6-18
Boat Maintenance
Section 6
Bilge Pumps
The bilge pumps and float switches are sealed units
and do not require any periodic maintenance. Check
the bilge area weekly to make sure there is no debris
or sludge that could foul the float switch or clog the
pump.
! CAUTION
Test your bilge pumps and float switches before
each mission.
Manually activate the float
switch when the toggle switch is in the AUTO
position and verify pump operation. Clear away
any sludge or debris that might restrict the
pump or float switch.
Periodically check the condition of the bilge pumps by
turning the pumps on manually. You should see them
pump water out the through-hull fittings if there is
water in the bilge, or hear the pump motors running.
Trim Tabs
Periodically check the condition of the trim tab actuators. The actuators are completely sealed and require
no maintenance. However, marine growth should be
removed from the actuator shafts by pressure washing.
Cold temperatures do not affect the trim tab system.
No winterization procedure is necessary.
In saltwater, to control galvanic corrosion, a zinc
anode should be attached to the top of each trim tab.
The anode must be in clean, direct contact with the
stainless steel trim plane. Do not ground the trim tabs
to other underwater metal objects.
Erosion of the anode material is a natural result of its
protective responsibility. Replace the anodes when
they have eroded to one-half their original size.
Refer to the Lenco operator’s manual for detailed
information about system operation and maintenance.
6-19
Section 6
Boat Maintenance
Off-Season Storage
All boat and engine systems must be carefully prepared for long periods of non-use. This preparation is
particularly important in regions where you experience
extreme changes in temperature or where the winter
temperatures are consistently below freezing.
Outboards
You must protect your outboard engines from freeze
damage and from internal corrosion caused by
extreme changes in temperature.
Trapped water can freeze and cause extensive engine
damage. Store your outboards in the vertical, operating position to avoid trapping water in the cooling system passageways.
Internal engine parts can be damaged by corrosion
due to lack of proper storage lubrication. Your outboard engine operator’s manual has a detailed procedure for adding extra internal lubrication just before the
engines are stored.
Refer to the OEM engine manuals in your owner’s bag
for detailed information about storage and winterization.
Fire Pumps and Generators
You must protect your generator and fire pump
engines from freeze damage and from internal corrosion caused by extreme changes in temperature.
Trapped water can freeze and cause extensive engine
damage. Use the engine manufacturer’s recommendations to drain all raw water cooling passages, manifolds, hoses, and circulating pumps.
Internal engine parts can be damaged by corrosion
due to lack of proper storage lubrication.
Refer to the OEM engine manuals in your owner’s bag
for detailed information about storage and winterization.
6-20
Boat Maintenance
Section 6
Air Conditioning
Your boat might be equipped with a chilled water
marine air conditioning system. You must protect your
air conditioning system from freeze damage during
winter storage.
There are two general procedures for protecting your
air conditioning system from freeze damage.
The preferred method is to replace the entire volume
of raw water in the system with non-toxic antifreeze.
To accomplish this, close the raw water seacock.
Remove the raw water supply hose from the inlet side
of the raw water strainer. Install a temporary supply
hose between the raw water strainer and a supply of
non-toxic antifreeze. Run the air conditioning system
until the antifreeze displaces all of the raw water in the
system. Verify the result by watching the discharge fitting on the hull. Turn off the system and reinstall the
original raw water supply hose. Open the seacock if
the boat will be stored out of the water.
The alternate method is to drain all of the raw water
from the system. To accomplish this, you must partially disassemble the system and drain all of the raw
water from:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Water inlet hose
Water supply hose
Water discharge hose
Raw water seacock
Raw water strainer
Raw water pump
Heat exchanger at chiller
Refer to the OEM maintenance manuals in your
owner’s bag for detailed information about these storage and winterization procedures.
6-21
Section 6
Boat Maintenance
Batteries
Remove the batteries from the boat during cold
weather or off-season storage. Always protect the
batteries from freezing temperatures.
You must not allow your batteries to become completely discharged. As a battery discharges, the active
material on both positive and negative plates changes
to lead sulfate, causing the plates to become similar in
chemical composition.
The battery electrolyte
becomes weaker and the voltage drops. As the battery remains discharged, this process continues until
recharging the battery becomes impossible.
Leave the batteries in their plastic boxes. Store the
batteries in a cool, dry location. Check the battery
condition monthly during storage to avoid serious
damage.
Make sure the batteries are fully charged before you
reinstall them.
Windshield Washer Reservoir
You must protect the windshield washer reservoir and
supply hoses from damage caused by freezing temperatures. Follow these steps:
• Remove any existing washer fluid from the reservoir.
• Fill the reservoir ½ full with colored, non-toxic
antifreeze. DO NOT use automotive antifreeze in
the system because it will damage the hoses and
wiper blades.
• Separately press and hold each windshield
washer knob until you see the colored antifreeze
spraying on the windshield.
• Recheck the fluid level in the reservoir to make
sure it is at least ¼ full.
• Wash the non-toxic antifreeze off the windshields
and deck surfaces with fresh water.
6-22
Boat Maintenance
Section 6
Fuel System
You must take appropriate steps to protect your boat’s
fuel system and engines during periods of non-use.
Situations where fuel isn’t being consumed and exposure to extreme changes in temperature will cause
condensation to accumulate in your fuel system. This
moisture can compromise your fuel, your fuel system,
and your engines.
Use a high-quality fuel stabilizer formulated for gasoline containing ethanol when you perform these steps.
Review the storage information contained in your
engine operator’s manual.
Follow these suggestions to minimize the possibility of
damage to your fuel system and engines during storage:
• If possible, use fuel that does not contain ethanol
on a regular basis, or just before storing your boat
• Store your boat with the fuel tanks full to avoid
exposing the fuel to moisture in the atmosphere
• Refer to Fueling Procedures in Section 3 of this
manual for fueling information
• Add a high-quality fuel stabilizer to the fuel following the additive manufacturer’s recommendations
• Run each engine at idle for at least ten minutes to
pump stabilized fuel through the engine’s fuel system
• If possible, store your boat where it will not be
exposed to extreme changes in temperature
Refer to Blended Fuels in Section 3 of this manual for
more information about moisture and gasoline.
6-23
Section 6
Boat Maintenance
Sea Water Washdown System
Your boat might be equipped with a sea water washdown system. You must protect the washdown system from damage caused by freezing temperatures.
Use the following steps to prepare this system for offseason storage:
• Remove the cap from the hose outlet fitting
• Verify that the inlet seacock is in the OPEN position
• Run the washdown pump for approximately ten
seconds or until the water stops flowing
• Leave the inlet seacock in the OPEN position and
the hose outlet cap off during storage
Fresh Water System
Your boat might be equipped with a fresh water system. You must protect the fresh water system from
damage caused by freezing temperatures.
Use the following steps to prepare this system for offseason storage:
• Treat the fresh water holding tank with a non-toxic
antifreeze following the manufacturer’s recommendations
• Run the treated water through all the outlets and
faucets to protect the under-deck plumbing
Marine Sanitation Device
Your boat might be equipped with a marine sanitation
device. You must protect this system from damage
caused by freezing temperatures.
Use the following steps to prepare this system for offseason storage:
• Flush the head system with fresh water and then
pump it out completely
• Run two gallons of a 50/50 mix of non-toxic antifreeze and fresh water through the system
• Pump the system out completely
6-24
Boat Maintenance
Section 6
Hull Drainage
Remove the main hull drain plug. Open all internal
seacocks and drains. Verify that there is no debris
plugging any drain, seacock, or limber hole.
Store the boat with the bow higher than the stern to
promote adequate drainage.
Secure the main hull drain plug to the steering wheel
to alert personnel that the boat is in storage configuration.
Engine Bracket
Your boat might be equipped with an aluminum engine
bracket. Remove the engine bracket drain plug. Verify that there is no debris plugging the drain hole.
Store the boat with the bow higher than the stern to
promote adequate drainage.
Secure the engine bracket drain plug to the steering
wheel to alert personnel that the boat is in storage
configuration.
6-25
Operator Notes
6-26
Boston Whaler® Products
Limited Commercial Warranty
Brunswick Commercial & Government Products (BCGP) warrants that each Boston Whaler hull manufactured by BCGP
will be free from structural defects due to substandard material or workmanship, under conditions of reasonable commercial
or government service, for a period of ten years from the date of manufacture. The following stipulations apply to this
warranty:







The hull warranty is offered on a pro-rata basis. Available reimbursement will be reduced each month by a
percentage, which will be the number of months from date of manufacture divided by 120. As an example, if the
repair occurs 72 months after date of manufacture (72 ÷ 120 = 0.6), 60% of the pro-rata warranty has expired. BCGP
will pay 40% of the authorized warranty repair or replacement cost.
All warranty repairs must be authorized in advance by BCGP. Any structural defects will be repaired at a service
agent chosen by BCGP or at the BCGP repair facility in Edgewater, Florida.
Expenses for towing, hauling out, transportation to and from the BCGP service agent, or to and from the BCGP
repair facility in Edgewater, Florida are the responsibility of the boat owner.
Damage resulting from abuse, misuse, accidents, improper storage, sub-freezing temperatures, lack of reasonable
and proper maintenance, overloading or overpowering, and modification or alteration of the hull is not covered.
Damage resulting from a war, police action, or armed conflict is not covered.
This warranty is not transferable from the original owner.
Specifically excluded from this warranty are gelcoat issues such as fading, color shifting, chalking, blistering,
cracking, crazing, and stress lines.
Accessories manufactured and installed by BCGP are warranted for 12 months from date of installation against defective
material or workmanship. Specifically excluded from this accessory warranty are windshield breakage or leakage, engines,
engine components, batteries, propellers, controls, control cables, steering systems, electronics, and any other accessory
covered by a separate OEM warranty. This accessory warranty is not transferable from the original owner.
None of these warranties applies to any Boston Whaler hull, accessory, or part that has been structurally altered or
subjected to unreasonable use, improper storage, lack of reasonable and proper maintenance, negligence, or
accident.
The obligation of BCGP under this warranty is limited to the pro-rata cost to repair or replace a hull or part that has, within the
warranty period, been determined by BCGP to be defective in material or workmanship. The decision to repair or replace a
hull or part shall be solely at the election of BCGP. If a warranted defect is determined to exist, BCGP will provide written
authorization for exactly what repair will be made. No work of any kind may be performed without this written
authorization. BCGP makes no other express warranties, and intends no implied warranties. Implied warranties of fitness
and merchantability are specifically excluded. BCGP also disclaims any liability for product failure or other economic loss
arising from claims of negligence, defective design, manufacturing defect, failure to warn or instruct, lack of seaworthiness,
and any other theory of liability not expressly covered by this warranty. If any implied warranties are found to exist, such
implied warranties will be subject to the time limits in this warranty. Some states do not allow limitations on how long an
implied warranty lasts, so the above limitation might not apply to you. BCGP will not be liable for incidental or consequential
damages including, but not limited to, loss of profits, rental of substitute equipment, or other commercial loss. Some states do
not allow the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages, so this limitation or exclusion might not apply to
you. BCGP will not be liable for any warranty expressed by a third party, if such warranty is not also expressed in writing by
BCGP.
BCGP reserves the right to improve its products through ongoing changes in design and materials without obligation to
incorporate such changes on existing boats. Speed, boat weight, fuel consumption, and other boat performance
characteristics are estimates and cannot be guaranteed.
To initiate a warranty claim, it is the responsibility of the boat owner to contact BCGP or an authorized BCGP service agent
immediately after discovering a defect. The boat owner must supply details of the problem, hull identification number, date of
purchase, and selling dealer name, if applicable. BCGP will be solely responsible for determining and authorizing warranty
repairs.
This warranty gives you specific rights and you might have other rights that vary from state to state. Other BCGP products
might have warranties that are different from this one.
2013
World-class support for World-class boats.
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