GCSE PE SKILL AREA ORIENTEERING This document has been

GCSE PE SKILL AREA ORIENTEERING This document has been
GCSE PE
SKILL AREA ORIENTEERING
This document has been produced by British Orienteering to assist teachers in meeting the requirements and terminology of the National
Curriculum Orders for Physical Education for England, Wales and Northern Ireland. It is not intended to be a definitive syllabus for the
orienteering activity area of GCSE Physical Education.
GCSE PE (SKILL AREA - ORIENTEERING) - PROGRESSION OF SKILLS IN ORDER OF DIFFICULTY.
Acquire and develop
skills
Map reading
Scale
Legend
Orientate map to terrain
Orientate map using
compass.
Control points
Navigate along a single
line feature
Select and Apply skills
Introduce plans of rooms, tabletops,
gymnasiums and location of
apparatus/equipment within that space.
Progress to school grounds with a plan of the
buildings/playing fields.
Introduce a variety of scales from room sizes to
playing fields and more difficult areas
Recognise all the colours and common features
on an orienteering map.
Candidates identify where they are, identify
features around them and locate these on the
map. Students change grip to keep the map
set.
Set the map - compass fixed to North and
needle running parallel with the Magnetic North
lines on the map. With the map still candidates
should be able to identify some features around
them.
Recognise control points on the map and at the
relevant feature in the terrain. Also how routes
are shown.
Navigate from one control to the next along a
single line feature i.e. path, wall.
Assessment based on a 5 band marking system.
Band
Description
1
Candidates should be able to
• Show simple understanding of maps.
• Recognise common map symbols and define
map colours.
• Orientate the map well, using terrain and
compass.
• Navigate from one control to the next along a
single line feature e.g. path.
Observable behaviour
• Does not warm up
• Wears inappropriate clothing.
• Before the start pays scant attention to the
map, start in a lack lustre way.
• May lose essential items e.g. control card,
map, compass.
• May stand still for long periods, fail to set
map correctly.
• May need to be located and directed back to
finish.
• After the event cannot or will not attempt to
analyse their performance.
Acquire and develop
skills
Use line feature’s as
handrails
Thumb map
Sense of scale to
distance
Select and Apply skills
Navigate from one control to the next using
handrails.
Candidates use their thumb, folding the map if
appropriate, to indicate their present location.
Use spatial distance judgement e.g. halfway
along.
Assessment based on a 5 band marking system.
Band
Description
2
Candidates should be able to
• Use the features on the map to move from
path to paths by selecting the correct route.
• Thumb the map.
• Use spatial distance judgement to measure
the distance along a route.
Observable behaviour
• Does not warm up
• Wears inappropriate clothing.
• Before the start pays brief attention to the
map, chooses to collude with others, starts
in a lack lustre way.
• May stand still for long periods, wander
aimlessly, little success with setting map
correctly.
• After the event may reluctantly and
simplistically analyse their performance.
Acquire and develop
skills
Knowledge of the sport
of orienteering
Understanding of safety
Cutting corners
Aiming off
Compass directions
Attack points
Absolute distance
judgement
Select and Apply skills
Introduce candidates to types of compass, maps,
events e.g. cross country, score and footwear,
Candidates should be aware of importance of
whistle (when and how to use), watch, safety
bearing, body cover, appropriate clothing and
selection of course relative to physical fitness
and technical competence.
Candidates aim to one side of a control or feature
so that they know which way to turn when they
hit the feature and before seeing the control.
Introduce candidates to the features of a
compass and how to navigate using cardinal
directions.
Candidates navigate to an obvious feature near
the control point from which the control can be
located.
Candidates use the map scale to calculate
distance along a route e.g. 100m along
Assessment based on a 5 band marking system.
Band
Description
3
Candidates should be able to show understanding of
• The sport including types of compass, maps,
events e.g. cross country, score and footwear.
• Safety including importance of whistle, watch,
safety bearing, body cover, appropriate clothing
and selection of course relative to physical
fitness.
Candidates should have confidence to
• Take short cuts off paths.
• To navigate using cardinal directions
• Use attack points
• Use absolute distance judgement
Observable behaviour
• Little attempt to warm up
• Clothing may inhibit athletic performance but
reasonable for prevailing conditions..
• Before the start looks at the map, may choose
to collude with others, starts in a forthright
manner.
• Appears to read the map on the move and while
stood still. When setting the map they may be
slow but will do so correctly.
• After the event will be able to simply analyse
their performance. May be evasive if they have
under performed and/or relied on others.
Acquire and develop
skills
Compass bearings.
Rough orienteering with
good catching features.
Pace counting
Fine orienteering on
short legs.
Select and Apply skills
Show candidates how to use a compass using
the ‘direction of travel’ method. Use simple
direction cards in a gymnasium, progress onto
maps.
Candidates navigate quickly using rough
compass bearings and obvious features on the
map and ground.
Introduce candidates to use of pacing to check
off distance covered .
Candidates use map, pacing and compass to
accurately navigate along a short route in
detailed terrain.
Assessment based on a 5 band marking system.
Band
Description
4
Candidates should have greater confidence to
• Perform the skills at greater speed.
• Use the compass to take bearings and/or use the
‘direction of travel’ method for travel and
reference.
• Rough orienteer against good catching features.
• Use pace counting.
• Fine orienteer over short distances using pacing
and compass.
Observable behaviour
• Candidate stretches.
• Wears comfortable appropriate clothing.
• Before the start carefully looks at the map, may
briefly collude with others, starts in a forthright
manner.
• Appears to read the map on the move and while
stood still only for short periods. Sets the map
quickly and accurately.
• After the event they will analyse their
performance and be good at recognising
mistakes at particular locations on the course.
Acquire and develop
skills
Understand simple
contour shapes
Select and Apply skills
Navigate through
different types of terrain
Competitive techniques
Introduce candidates to a variety of terrains e.g.
woods, safe lowland open areas.
Provide opportunities for candidates to take part
in competitive events.
Introduce candidates to contours on maps. Use
simple contour shapes for navigation over short
distances.
Assessment based on a 5 band marking system.
Band
Description
5
Candidates should be very confident in orienteering. They
will:
• Be able to use contours to aid navigation.
• Use quick decision making.
• Be able to navigate through different types of
terrain.
• Know when to use the compass and pacing.
• Have experience of competitive orienteering.
Observable behaviour
• Candidate stretches and warms up.
• Wears appropriate clothing for athletic
performance and prevailing conditions.
• Before the start attentively looks at the map,
offers advice to others who approach them.,
starts in a competitive manner.
• Appears to move continuously, stopping only
briefly.
• After the event they clearly define mistakes,
analyse their performance and may recognise
other extenuating circumstances.
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