Product Manual - Chart Industries

Product Manual - Chart Industries
Product Manual
E-Stop
Emergency Stop Control System
Designed and Built by:
Chart Inc.
407 7th Street NW
New Prague, MN 56071 USA
(800) 400-4683
Part Number 11683185 Rev. D
© 2016 Chart Inc.
iii
Product Manual - E-Stop Control System
Contents
Revision Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iv
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Product Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Product Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Acronyms / Abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Safety Bulletin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Oxygen Deficient Atmospheres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Oxygen Enriched Atmospheres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Principle of Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
E-Stop Control System Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
RESET Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Pressure Regulator/Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Solenoid Valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Indicating Lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Indicating Horn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Oxygen Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Fault Relay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Plumbing Air Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Multiple Oxygen Monitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Auxiliary Input Alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Auxiliary Output Indication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Recommended Spare Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Service and Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Replace the Solenoid Valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Replace the Fuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Replace the Relay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Schematic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
iv Table of Contents
Product Manual - E-Stop Control System
Revision Log
Revision Level
Date
D
04/20/2016
Description
Reformat and update PN
1
Product Manual - E-Stop Control System
Preface
General
The E-Stop Control System is for use with remote,
pneumatically actuated valves and oxygen monitors. This
control system was developed to assist in monitoring
automated cryogenic systems that use inert gas such as
nitrogen to assure an oxygen deficient atmosphere does not
occur. With the E-Stop Control System, you can be confident
the cryogenic system is operating safely.
Specifications
• Power - 120 VAC
• Air Supply - 20 - 145 psig max., 1/4” fpt connection
• Dimensions - 16”H x 14”W x 6”D
• Designed to work with pneumatic actuated valves which
require air pressure to open and will close in the absence
of air pressure
• Air to actuator - 1/4” fpt connection (fittings are supplied
to accommodate 1/4” copper or 1/4” flexible poly tube)
• Internal pressure regulator to accommodate different
actuator requirements
Product Features
The E-Stop Control System interfaces with Chart’s
Oxygen Monitor/Alarm.
The remote actuated liquid nitrogen supply valve will close
if any of the following conditions occur:
• Oxygen monitor goes into a low oxygen alarm state
• Oxygen monitor loses its power or detects an internal
fault
• The red mushroom E-Stop button is pushed
• An auxiliary alarm condition occurs
• Power is lost to the E-Stop control system
The E-Stop Control System provides positive indication
of the following:
• When the power is on and all conditions are safe, the
system has a green indicating light illuminated.
• When any alarm happens, a red indicating light becomes
illuminated, identifying which alarm condition exists.
• When the alarm condition exists, an audible horn sounds
to alert personnel in the area.
• After an alarm occurs, the liquid nitrogen supply valve
will not open immediately when the alarm condition goes
away. The latching alarms, requiring acknowledgement
by personnel to be sure the system is safe again to
resume operation. The need for acknowledging the alarm
is indicated by the illuminated RESET button. When
the RESET button is pressed, and the alarm condition
no longer exists, the system will re-open the liquid
nitrogen supply valve and the RESET button will lose its
illumination.
Product Manual
This manual is designed to be used in conjunction with the
E-Stop Control System. It should be thoroughly read and
understood by anyone that operates this equipment. If there
are any questions regarding the operation of this product,
contact Chart’s Technical Service division at 1-800-4004683.
The safety requirements for operating this system and
handling or transporting extremely cold liquid products are
shown in the Safety section. It is imperative that all persons
having contact with this system become thoroughly familiar
with all maintenance, safety precautions, and procedures
contained in this product manual.
The Introduction section discusses the principle of operation
and gives a brief description of the E-Stop Control System
Components.
For instructions on installing this system please refer to the
Installation section.
The Operation section includes information on setting up
multiple monitors, discussing the auxiliary input alarm and
output indication, and a section on service and repair.
Please refer to the Specifications section for a detailed
schematic of the E-Stop Control System.
2
Preface
Product Manual - E-Stop Control System
Terms
Acronyms / Abbreviations
Throughout this manual safety precautions will be designated
as follows:
The following acronyms / abbreviations are used throughout
this manual:
Warning! Description of a condition that
can result in personal injury or
death.
Caution! Description of a condition that
can result in equipment or
component damage.
Note: A statement that contains information
that is important enough to emphasize or
repeat.
CGA
Compressed Gas Association
FPT
Female Pipe Thread
NFPA
National Fire Protection Association
O2
Oxygen
OD
Outer Dimension
PSIG
Pounds per Square Inch (Gauge)
VAC
Voltage - Alternating Current
3
Product Manual - E-Stop Control System
Safety
Strict compliance with proper safety and handling practices
is necessary when using a cryogenic system. We recommend
that all our customers re-emphasize safety and safe handling
practices to all their employees and customers. While every
possible safety feature has been designed into the system and
safe operations are anticipated, it is essential that the user
of the cryogenic system carefully read and fully understand
all WARNINGS and CAUTION notes listed in this safety
summary and enumerated below. Also read the information
provided in the Safety Bulletin for Oxygen and Inert Gases
following this Safety Summary. Periodic review of the Safety
Summary is recommended.
Warning! In an oxygen enriched
atmosphere flammable items
burn vigorously and could
explode.
Excess accumulation of oxygen creates an oxygen-enriched
atmosphere (defined by the Compressed Gas Association
as an oxygen concentration above 23%). Certain items
considered non-combustible in air may burn rapidly in
such an environment. Keep all organic materials and other
flammable substances away from possible contact with
oxygen; particularly oil, grease, kerosene, cloth, wood, paint,
tar, coal, dust, and dirt which may contain oil or grease.
DO NOT permit smoking or open flame in any area where
oxygen is stored, handled, or used. Failure to comply with
this warning may result in serious personal injury or death.
Warning! Nitrogen and argon vapors in air
may dilute the concentration of
oxygen necessary to support or
sustain life.
Exposure to such an oxygen deficient atmosphere can lead to
unconsciousness and serious injury, including death.
Warning! Accidental contact of liquid
gases with skin or eyes may
cause a freezing injury similar to
a burn.
Caution! Before locating oxygen
equipment, become familiar with
the relevant EU Directives or
NFPA Standard No. 55 (www.nfpa.
org), “Compressed Gases and
Cryogenic Fluids Code” and with
all local safety codes.
The NFPA standard covers general principles recommended
for the installation, storage, use and handling of
compressed gases and cryogenic fluids in portable and
stationary containers, cylinders, equipment and tanks in all
occupancies.
Safety Bulletin
Portions of the following information are extracted from
Safety Bulletin SB-2 from the Compressed Gas Association,
Inc. (CGA). For the full text of Safety Bulletin SB-2 and for
more information about oxygen atmospheres, refer to Safety
Bulletin SB-2 from the CGA. Additional information on
nitrogen and argon and liquid cylinders is available in CGA
Pamphlet P-9. Write to the Compressed Gas Association,
Inc., 1235 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, VA 22202 or
visit their website at www.cganet.com.
Oxygen Deficient Atmospheres
The normal oxygen content of air is approximately 21%.
Depletion of oxygen content in air, either by combustion
or by displacement with inert gas, is a potential hazard and
users should exercise suitable precautions.
One aspect of this possible hazard is the response of humans
when exposed to an atmosphere containing only 8 to 12%
oxygen. In this environment, unconsciousness can be
immediate with virtually no warning.
When the oxygen content of air is reduced to about 15
to 16%, the flame of ordinary combustible materials,
including those commonly used as fuel for heat or light,
may be extinguished. Somewhat below this concentration,
an individual breathing the air is mentally incapable of
diagnosing the situation because the onset of symptoms
such as sleepiness, fatigue, lassitude, loss of coordination,
errors in judgment and confusion can be masked by a state of
“euphoria” leaving the victim with a false sense of security
and well being.
Human exposure to atmosphere containing 12% or less
oxygen leads to rapid unconsciousness. Unconsciousness can
occur so rapidly that the user is rendered essentially helpless.
This can occur if the condition is reached by an immediate
change of environment, or through the gradual depletion of
oxygen.
4
Safety
Product Manual - E-Stop Control System
Most individuals working in or around oxygen deficient
atmospheres rely on the “buddy system” for protection obviously the “buddy” is equally susceptible to asphyxiation
if he or she enters the area to assist the unconscious partner
unless equipped with a portable air supply. Best protection
is obtainable by equipping all individuals with a portable
supply of respirable air. Life lines are acceptable only if the
area is essentially free of obstructions and individuals can
assist one another without constraint.
Oxygen system components, including but not limited to,
containers, valves, valve seats, lubricants, fittings, gaskets
and interconnecting equipment including hoses, shall have
adequate compatibility with oxygen under the conditions
of temperature and pressure to which the components may
be exposed in the containment and use of oxygen. Easily
ignitable materials shall be avoided unless they are parts of
equipment or systems that are approved, listed, or proven
suitable by tests or by past experience.
If an oxygen deficient atmosphere is suspected or known to
exist:
Oxygen Enriched Atmospheres
Compatibility involves both combustibility and ease of
ignition. Materials that burn in air may burn violently in pure
oxygen at normal pressure, and explosively in pressurized
oxygen. In addition, many materials that do not burn in
air may do so in pure oxygen, particularly when under
pressure. Metals for containers and piping must be carefully
selected, depending on service conditions. The various steels
are acceptable for many applications, but some service
conditions may call for other materials (usually copper or
its alloy) because of their greater resistance to ignition and
lower rate of combustion.
An oxygen-enriched atmosphere occurs whenever the normal
oxygen content of air is allowed to rise above 23%. While
oxygen is nonflammable, ignition of combustible materials
can occur more readily in an oxygen-rich atmosphere than
in air; and combustion proceeds at a faster rate although no
more heat is released.
Similarly, materials that can be ignited in air have lower
ignition energies in oxygen. Many such materials may
be ignited by friction at a valve seat or stem packing, or
by adiabatic compression produced when oxygen at high
pressure is rapidly introduced into a system initially at low
pressure.
1.
Use the “buddy system.” Use more than one “buddy” if
necessary to move a fellow worker in an emergency.
2.
Both the worker and “buddy” should be equipped with
self-contained or airline breathing equipment.
It is important to locate an oxygen system in a well
ventilated location since oxygen-rich atmospheres may
collect temporarily in confined areas during the functioning
of a safety relief device or leakage from the system.
5
Product Manual - E-Stop Control System
Introduction
Principle of Operation
The E-Stop (Emergency Stop) Control System is designed
to work with an area oxygen monitor/alarm system. This
control system provides added safety by closing a remote,
pneumatically actuated liquid nitrogen supply valve when
any of the following occur:
• Power to this control system is lost
• The area's oxygen monitor has alarmed
• The red mushroom E-Stop button has been pushed
• An alarm has occurred on the "Auxiliary Input Alarm"
terminals.
If any of these system faults occur, the system will deenergize the solenoid valve and consequently close the
pneumatic actuated valve in the field. When any of the faults
occur, a red indicating light will appear and a horn will sound
to notify personnel which fault has happened.
Note: This system is designed to work with a
pneumatic actuated valve, which requires
10-20 psig pressure to open the valve, and
closes when the pressure is removed from
the actuator.
Note: Consideration should be given to using
nitrogen gas rather than air in cold
environments. If the dew point of the
compressed air source is higher than
the expected temperatures outside, it is
possible to get water condensation/ice in
the air lines which may damage this system
or the actuator on the liquid nitrogen
valve. If nitrogen gas is used instead,
caution must be taken to ensure that the
pressure of the nitrogen supply gets no
higher that 145 psig, and no less than the
pressure required to operate the actuator
being used on the liquid nitrogen valve.
E-Stop Control System Components
RESET Button
When any of the system faults occur (or when turning the
power on) the RESET button will become illuminated. Any
time the button is illuminated, the solenoid valve is deenergized, and the remote pneumatically actuated valve is
now closed. The RESET button will remain illuminated until
someone acknowledges the fault and presses the RESET
button. When the RESET button is pressed, the light will go
out (if the fault condition no longer exists) and the solenoid
valve will energize, which will open the actuated valve.
If the fault condition still exists, the RESET button will
remain illuminated even after pressing it, and the remote
pneumatically actuated valve will remain closed.
Pressure Regulator/Filter
The system has an integral pressure regulator/filter included
so that is can be adjusted to work with many different
operating pressure/actuators. The filter on the regulator will
help keep the air supply (see note on this page regarding
usage of nitrogen gas rather than air), clean for longest life
on the pneumatic components including the solenoid valve
and pneumatic actuator. It is very important to make sure the
pressure regulator is adjusted properly. Proper adjustment
will assure the pneumatic actuated valve will open properly
as well as prevent too much pressure from being applied,
which would damage/destroy the actuator.
The pressure setting on the regulator is adjusted by turning
the adjustment knob on top (clock-wise to increase pressure,
counter clock-wise to decrease pressure) until the desired
pressure is read on the gauge. When the correct pressure is
set, push down on the adjustment knob and it will snap into
a locked position. Once the regulator has been set for the
actuator that is being used, it should not need to be adjusted
again, unless a new actuator, which requires a different
pressure to open, is installed at a later date.
The filter on the regulator has a clear bowl around it so that
it can easily be visually inspected for cleanliness. When the
filter gets too dirty, it should be changed with a new one to
protect the pneumatic components downstream.
Solenoid Valve
A 3-way solenoid valve is used to control pressure being
supplied to the pneumatic actuated valve. When the valve is
energized (power on and no faults), it will supply pressure
(as set by the regulator) to the pneumatic actuator in the
field. When the valve becomes de-energized, it will vent
any pressure that was being supplied to the actuator out
the EXHAUST port, which will allow the pneumatically
actuated valve to close.
The solenoid valve has a small orange button that can be
pushed to manually energize the valve (if power is turned
on). The valve will remain energized (supplying air to the
"ACTUATOR" port) as long as the button is held down.
6
Introduction
Releasing the button will return the valve to the de-energized
state. This can be useful if any troubleshooting of the system
needs to be done.
Indicating Lights
The front of the control unit has some red and green
indicating lights to help give visual indication of the status
of the system. The lights and their actions are defined as
follows:
• POWER - a green light that will be on any time the
system is powered up.
• E-STOP ALARM - a red light that will be on if any of the
following occur:
–– The red mushroom E-Stop button which is mounted in
this control assembly has been pushed in.
–– Any remote E-Stop button, wired into this control
system, has been pushed in.
Note: The light does not indicate whether it was
the E-STOP button which was supplied
with this control system, or if it was a
remote E-Stop button which caused the
condition.
• O2 MONITOR ALARM - a red light that will be on in
either of the following conditions:
–– The oxygen monitor has detected an oxygen level
that is below the desired level. If using the Toxgard
II oxygen monitor, this could be the CAUTION, or
WARNING level, depending on which relay has been
wired into the system.
Caution! Be sure to read the "Oxygen
Monitor" section of this manual
for details about the different
alarm relays.
–– The Fault relay on the Toxgard II oxygen monitor (if
being used) has tripped, indicating a loss of power to
the oxygen monitor, or an internal fault in the oxygen
monitor.
• AUXILIARY ALARM - a red light that will be on if the
auxiliary alarm has tripped (if used).
Product Manual - E-Stop Control System
• RESET - a red illuminated push-button which will
not be illuminated if the power is on and there are no
alarm conditions present. The push button will become
illuminated any time an alarm has occurred and either:
–– The alarm condition has not gone away, or
–– The alarm has not been acknowledged by pressing the
RESET button
Indicating Horn
The front of the control unit has a small indicating horn that
will sound when any alarm condition is present (oxygen
monitor, E-Stop button, etc.). The only alarm condition that
the horn will not sound on is loss of power to this E-Stop
system itself. The horn will also sound upon power being
applied to the panel. The horn will continue to sound until
the alarm condition is cleared and the RESET button has
been pressed.
Oxygen Monitor
This system was designed with the MSA Toxgard II oxygen
monitor in mind. However, it could be used with many
different types of oxygen monitors as long as they have a
relay contact for the alarm conditions, which operates such
that the relay is CLOSED when no alarm conditions are
present, and OPENS when the alarm condition occurs. If the
oxygen monitor has adjustable set points for the alarms, this
will enable the user to adjust the oxygen level at which the
actuated liquid nitrogen supply valve will close.
Note: If the MSA Toxgard II unit is used, it has
three relays (CAUTION, WARNING and
ALARM) that can be used. The CAUTION
and WARNING alarms are negative acting
(meaning the alarm will activate when the
current oxygen level goes BELOW the set
point) and the ALARM alarm is positive
acting (meaning the alarm will activate
when the current oxygen level goes
ABOVE the set point). Because the intent
of this safety system is to close the supply
of liquid nitrogen in the event of a lack
of oxygen in the room, this system should
be used with either the CAUTION or the
WARNING alarms, but not the ALARM
alarm. Take special note of this when
wiring the system.
Product Manual - E-Stop Control System
This system will cause the remote pneumatically actuated
valve to close when the oxygen level drops below the
set point of the alarm, which is wired in the installation
(either the CAUTION or the WARNING). Therefore, it is
possible to wire the system such that it will close the remote
pneumatically actuated valve when the MSA Toxgard II unit
goes into a CAUTION state, rather than the WARNING
state.
The set points for both the CAUTION and WARNING
alarms can be set by the user. For details on this procedure,
refer to the "Changing Parameter Settings" section in the
MSA Toxgard II manual.
Introduction
Fault Relay
If the Toxgard II unit is used, it has a Fault relay that should
be used. Using the Fault relay makes the system more failsafe. The Fault relay can be used to signal events such as
losing its power or detecting an internal fault. The Fault relay
of the Toxgard II monitor is designed to be energized under
normal operating conditions. The NO and NC contacts reflect
the de-energized, power-off, or Fault condition. If the Fault
relay is wired into this control system properly, the remote
pneumatically actuated valve will close whenever the Fault
relay trips. Since the CAUTION, WARNING and ALARM
relays of the Toxgard II oxygen monitor are NOT energized,
this control system has no way of knowing if the oxygen
monitor is turned on or not, unless the Fault relay is used. As
a result, it is strongly recommended to wire the Fault relays
of the Toxgard II oxygen monitor into this control system.
7
9
Product Manual - E-Stop Control System
Installation
Mounting
• In most cases, this system is intended to be
used as a safe-guard against LOW oxygen
levels. Consequently, the system should be
used with either the “CAUTION” or the
“WARNING” alarms, and NOT the “ALARM”
alarm.
Mount the control unit on the wall. The unit can be mounted
anywhere indoors. It is not designed to be used outdoors.
It may be more convenient if the unit is mounted near the
oxygen monitor, however this is not necessary.
• If the MSA Toxgard II monitor is not used,
the installer should take care to wire to the
terminals of an alarm whose contacts will
OPEN upon the alarm condition and CLOSE
during the safe condition.
Wiring
Note: Refer to the supplied electrical schematics
for all questions and connections. The
following steps are guidelines. The
electrical schematics should always be
regarded as the most current and accurate
at all times.
1.
c. Connect a wire from terminal #104 in the E-Stop
panel to the COM terminal of the “FAULT” relay in
the MSA Toxgard II monitor.
Note: If using only one of the MSA Toxgard II
monitors, it is possible to make a short
jumper wire to go from the COM terminal
of the alarm relay used in the previous step
to the COM terminal of the FAULT relay.
However, if any other oxygen monitor is
used, or more than one MSA Toxgard II
monitor is used, do not connect the COM
terminals.
Have a properly trained electrical run 120vac power
wires in conduits to the control box. Terminate the wires
as follows:
a. Hot power (typically black) wire to terminal #101.
b. Neutral (typically white) wire to terminal #N.
c. Ground (typically green) wire to grounding lug on
the sub-panel.
2.
d. Connect a wire from terminal #105 in the E-Stop
panel to the NO terminal of the “FAULT” relay in
the MSA Toxgard II monitor.
Connect wires from the oxygen monitor alarm to the
E-Stop panel as follows:
a. Connect a wire from terminal #103 in the E-Stop
panel to the NC terminal of the appropriate oxygen
monitor alarm.
b. Connect a wire from terminal #104 in the E-Stop
panel to the COM terminal of the appropriate
oxygen monitor alarm.
Note: The Toxgard II monitor has 3 alarms
available labeled “CAUTION”,
“WARNING” and “ALARM”.
• The “CAUTION” and “WARNING” alarm are
negative acting, meaning the alarm will trip
as the oxygen level drops below the set-point.
Each of these alarms has its own set-point,
which can be adjusted by the user.
• The “ALARM” alarm is positive acting,
meaning the alarm will trip as the oxygen level
rises above the set-point.
3.
Connect the wires for the Auxiliary Input Alarm as
follows:
• If only one auxiliary input alarm is used:
a. Remove the jumper wire between terminals #103
and #111.
b. Connect a wire from terminal #103 in the E-Stop
panel to the COM terminal of the Auxiliary input
alarm.
c. Connect a wire from terminal #111 in the E-Stop
panel to the NC terminal of the Auxiliary input
alarm.
Note: The Auxiliary input alarm should work
such that the contacts are CLOSED during
normal, safe operation and OPEN in the
event of an alarm.
10 Installation
• If two auxiliary input alarms are being used:
Product Manual - E-Stop Control System
5.
a. Remove the jumper wire between terminals #103
and #111.
a. Connect one wire of the detecting circuit to terminal
#122 in the E-Stop panel. This terminal is the
common terminal of the Form C auxiliary output
relay.
b. Remove the jumper wire between terminals #111
and #112.
b. Connect the second wire of the detecting circuit to
either terminal #121 for normally open action, or to
terminal #123 for normally closed action.
c. Connect a wire from terminal #103 in the E-Stop
panel to the COM terminal of the first Auxiliary
alarm.
Note: This relay is energized under normal, safe
operation. In normal safe operation, the
normally closed terminal is open, and the
normally open terminal is closed. When an
alarm condition is present, the relay deenergizes and the normally open contact
becomes open and the normally closed
contact becomes closed.
d. Connect a wire from terminal #111 in the E-Stop
panel to the NC terminal of the first Auxiliary
alarm.
e. Connect a wire from terminal #111 in the E-Stop
panel to the COM terminal of the second Auxiliary
alarm.
f. Connect a wire from terminal #112 in the E-Stop
panel to the NC terminal of the second Auxiliary
alarm.
Note: Both Auxiliary input alarms should work
such that the contacts are CLOSED during
normal, safe operation and OPEN in the
event of an alarm.
Connect the auxiliary output indication as follows:
Plumbing Air Lines
1.
Have a properly trained technician supply shop air to
the “AIR SUPPLY” port on top of the unit.
Note: Maximum supply pressure is 145 psig.
• If the Auxiliary input alarm(s) feature is NOT
being used:
• A fitting for 1/4” OD copper tubing is supplied
to connect into the 1/4” FPT fitting in the “AIR
SUPPLY” port.
a. Install a jumper wire from terminal #103 to terminal
#111.
b. Install a jumper wire from terminal #111 to terminal
#112.
c. Both of these jumper wires are installed at the
factory before it ships.
4.
• A fitting for 1/4” OD flexible poly tubing is supplied
to connect into the 1/4” FPT fitting in the “AIR
SUPPLY” port.
2.
Connect the wires for any remote E-Stop (Emergency
Stop) buttons as follows:
• Fittings for 1/4” OD copper tubing are supplied
to connect into the 1/4” FPT fitting in the “AIR
SUPPLY” port and a 1/4” FPT connection on the
actuator.
a. Remove the jumper wire from terminals #106 and
#107.
b. Connect a wire from terminal #106 to the COM
terminal of the remote E-Stop button.
• Fittings for 1/4” OD poly tubing are supplied
to connect into the 1/4” FPT fitting in the “AIR
SUPPLY” port and a 1/4” FPT connection on the
actuator.
c. Connect a wire from terminal #107 to the NC
terminal of the remote E-Stop button.
d. If additional E-Stop buttons are used, continue
removing jumper wires and wiring to the remote
E-Stop button’s COM and NC terminals in this
fashion. Refer to the supplied electrical prints for
details.
Run an air line from the “ACTUATOR” port to the
pneumatic actuated valve.
3.
Before turning the power switch on, measure the
voltage between terminals #101 and #N to be sure the
proper voltage is present. If the proper voltage is not
present, remedy the situation before continuing.
Installation 11
Product Manual - E-Stop Control System
4.
Obtain the specifications for the pneumatic actuator
being used on the actuated liquid nitrogen valve and
determine the correct pressure required for opening the
valve.
5.
Push the red E-Stop button.
6.
Turn the system power switch to ON.
7.
Adjust the air pressure regulator by turning the
adjustment knob on top until the pressure is set to the
value required to open the valve (determined in step 8).
8.
9.
Push the adjustment knob on the regulator down to
“lock” the setting in place.
Turn on and set-up the oxygen monitor.
• Refer to the Oxygen monitor manual for details on
setting the unit up and setting alarm set points.
• Verify no alarms are present on the oxygen monitor.
10. Pull the E-Stop button out.
11. Push the RESET button.
12. Verify the actuated valve opens.
13. Test to be sure the actuated liquid nitrogen valve closes
when:
• The red E-Stop button is pushed in.
• The power to the control unit is turned off.
• An oxygen monitor alarm has been activated.
• The auxiliary alarm trips (if being used).
13
Product Manual - E-Stop Control System
Operation
Multiple Oxygen Monitors
This system was designed such that multiple oxygen
monitors can be used all at the same time for added system
safety. The design allows the customer to use only one, or
as many oxygen monitors as they would like. If wired as
described, the system will close the remote actuated valve if
any of the oxygen monitors experiences a low oxygen level,
or has a fault alarm, or loses power.
To include multiple oxygen monitors, make the following
wiring changes:
1.
Connect a wire from terminal #103 in the control panel
to the NC terminal of the first oxygen monitor alarm
(see step 2a of the Wiring Installation instructions).
Auxiliary Input Alarm
The system has an auxiliary input alarm that can be used to
signal the remote pneumatic actuated valve to close. This
feature is optional and need not be used, but is included as
an added feature for versatility. Possible uses for this feature
might include, but are not limited to:
2.
Connect a wire from the COM terminal of the first
oxygen monitor to the NC terminal of the second
oxygen monitor.
3.
Connect a wire from the COM terminal of the second
oxygen monitor to the NC terminal of the third oxygen
monitor.
• A remote ON/OFF switch in another room
Continue in this fashion until you get to the last oxygen
monitor.
• A second oxygen monitor alarm in another room
5.
Connect a wire from the COM terminal of the last
oxygen monitor to terminal #104 in the control panel.
6.
Connect a wire from terminal #104 in the control panel
to the COM terminal of the Fault relay of the first
oxygen monitor (see step 2c of the Wiring Installation
instructions).
If the auxiliary input alarm function is not going to be used,
a jumper must be installed at the appropriate terminals in
the panel at installation. Refer to the supplied drawings as
well as the notes in the Installation section of this manual for
details of jumper wire placement.
7.
Connect a wire from the NO terminal of the first oxygen
monitor to the COM terminal of the Fault relay of the
second oxygen monitor.
4.
8.
Connect a wire from the NO terminal of the second
oxygen monitor to the COM terminal of the Fault relay
of the third oxygen monitor.
9.
Continue in this fashion until you get to the last oxygen
monitor.
10. Connect a wire from the NO terminal of the Fault relay
of the last oxygen monitor to terminal #105 in the
control panel.
The following diagram illustrates how three oxygen monitors
could be wired into this system. The same process could be
followed for any other number of oxygen monitors.
• A second oxygen monitor alarm in the room
• Pressure switch installed in liquid supply line
Auxiliary Output Indication
The system has an auxiliary output feature that can be used
to signal other monitoring equipment when the E-Stop
system goes into an alarm condition. The auxiliary output is
a Form C relay, which provides contacts for both normally
open and normally closed action. The relay is energized
in normal, safe operation. When the relay is energized, the
normally open contact will be closed, and the normally
closed contact will be open. The relay de-energizes upon any
alarm condition (Oxygen monitor, E-Stop, Auxiliary, loss
of power, etc.) and the normally open contact will become
open, and the normally closed contact will become closed.
The contacts for this relay are rated at 10 amps.
14 Operation
Product Manual - E-Stop Control System
Recommended Spare Parts
Replace the Fuse
This system is very simple and uses few moving parts to
ensure long-term reliability and stable operation. However,
since it is a safety related device, it is highly recommended
to have a few spare parts on hand for immediate replacement,
should it be necessary. The following table identifies the
parts suggested to have on hand. Some of the parts can be
ordered from Chart at www.chartparts.com (the Chart part
number is provided below). The relays and fuses are easiest
to obtain locally and the manufacturer’s part number is
indicated.
1.
Turn system power switch to the OFF position.
2.
Loosen the two clamps on the side and open the control
unit door.
3.
Pull the fuse out of the fuse holder.
4.
Insert a new fuse into the fuse holder.
5.
Close the control unit door and tighten the clamps.
6.
Turn power switch to the ON position.
Description
Recommended
Spare Qty
3-way solenoid valve - 120vac
(Chart PN 10904353)
1
Pressure regulator/filter
(Chart PN 11668410
1
2-pole Relay
(Mfg. PN IDEC#RH2B-UAC120V)
1
3-pole Relay
(Mfg. PN IDEC#RH3B-UAC120V)
1
Fuse, 1A
(Mfg. PN BUSS MDL 1A, 250V)
2
Service and Repair
Should any service or repair be required on this system, use
the following procedures:
Replace the Solenoid Valve
1.
Turn system power switch to the OFF position.
2.
Loosen the two clamps on the side and open the control
unit door.
3.
Remove the solenoid valve wiring connector.
4.
Remove the two small screws, which hold the valve
body in place.
5.
Remove the valve body.
6.
Install the new valve by reversing the above steps.
• Take special care to ensure the tubing returns to the
correct valve ports.
Replace the Relay
1.
Turn system power switch to the OFF position.
2.
Loosen the two clamps on the side and open the control
unit door.
3.
Pull the relay body out of the relay base.
4.
Align the metal tabs on the bottom of the new relay
body with the slots in the relay base.
5.
Push the new relay body into the relay base so that it is
firmly seated.
6.
Close the control unit door and tighten the clamps.
7.
Turn power switch to the ON position.
Product Manual - E-Stop Control System
Specifications
Schematic
15
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