toolkit manual - City of Edmonton

toolkit manual - City of Edmonton
How To Use the
green Home
Energy
Toolkit
Instructions for the
Green Home Energy Toolkit
Produced December 2015
The Green Home Energy Toolkit was
developed in partnership with:
and supported by a grant from:
2015 YOU’RE GONNA LOVE GREEN—EDMONTON.CA/LOVEGREEN
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Printed on 100%
Post Consumer
Recycled Paper
Table Contents
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Heating and Cooling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Other Appliances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Lighting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Additional Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Recommended Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
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EDMONTON’S GREEN LIVING GUIDE | Introduction
Introduction
Thank you for borrowing this Green Home Energy Toolkit. It provides tools,
tests and information to help you understand your household energy use.
The Green Home Energy Toolkit will also help you identify some ways to
save energy and money.
Our homes impact the city’s long term sustainability. By taking some
simple, affordable steps to understanding energy use and greening your
home, you’re helping to reduce Edmonton’s impact on the environment.
There are both economic and environmental benefits to reducing energy
use in Edmonton. Currently, over 50% of Alberta’s energy comes from
burning coal. Some of the negative impacts associated with coal-fired
power plants include water and air pollution. Coal-fired plants also create
large quantities of toxic wastes like ash and sludge.
In addition, coal produces more carbon dioxide per energy unit generated
than either oil or natural gas. By making your house more efficient and
reducing your energy consumption, you are reducing the amount of coal
burned in Alberta, and therefore reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.
!
It is important to understand that you are not undergoing a
home energy audit. An energy audit is an extensive series of tests
conducted by a trained professional. You are simply doing your own
evaluation of your home’s energy use to understand opportunities to
conserve energy.
Before you start your evaluation, please watch this video of a real
home energy audit: edmonton.ca/energyauditvideo
Building, buying or renovating?
The Green Home Energy Toolkit is designed to be used in an existing home.
If you are planning on buying or building a home or considering major
renovations in your current one, the building materials and design you
select will have an impact on how energy efficient your home will be.
The City of Edmonton’s Green Home Guide offers detailed information
about energy-saving green ideas. The Green Home Guide can be found in
this toolkit and at edmonton.ca/greenhomeguide.
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EDMONTON’S GREEEN LIVING GUIDE | Introduction
Toolkit contents
!
ALL ITEMS MUST BE RETURNED WITH THE TOOLKIT.
Kill-A-Watt Meter ($18)
Measures the energy demand of an electrical
appliance.
Imaging IR (Infrared) Thermometer ($400)
Measures the temperature of areas, objects and
surfaces.
Stopwatch ($18)
Records accurate time for shower or tap flow rate test.
Light Meter ($22)
Measures the amount of light in a room.
LED Lightbulb ($15)
Use with Kill-A-Watt meter to see the difference in
energy use compared to conventional incandescent or
compact fluorescent lightbulb (CFL).
Battery Charger ($45)
Rechargeable Batteries ($3.50 to $15.00 each)
Batteries for each tool and a charging station to
recharge them.
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EDMONTON’S GREEN LIVING GUIDE | Introduction
Average home energy usage
The chart below shows how energy is used in a typical Canadian home.
Your home heating system is usually the biggest energy user, accounting
for roughly 63% of your total home energy use. For the biggest savings,
focus on reducing your heating demands. Also watch out for high energyusing appliances such as older refrigerators and freezers, hot tubs, heat
lamps and aquariums.
63% SPACE HEATING
2% SPACE COOLING
4% LIGHTING
13% APPLIANCES
18% WATER HEATING
Source: NRCAN 2007
Need help?
If at any point you require help while using the Green Home Energy Toolkit,
or if you would like more advice about conserving home energy, please
contact the City of Edmonton:
thewaywegreen@edmonton.ca
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EDMONTON’S GREEEN LIVING GUIDE | Heating And Cooling
Heating and Cooling
We can conserve energy used for heating and cooling by making physical
upgrades to our houses, like adding insulation and replacing windows. But we
can also decrease household heating and cooling energy use by just making
simple changes to what we do in our homes each day.
For general tips on how to heat and cool your home for less, go to page 24
in the Green Living Guide (2nd edition, edmonton.ca/greenlivingguide), or
page 22 in the Green Home Guide (edmonton.ca/greenhomeguide).
Toolkit
Use the infrared thermometer to check room
temperatures. See page 18 for instructions.
Check the temperature in a few places around your
house, focusing on windows, doors, baseboards and
electrical outlets along exterior walls, heating vents, where the walls
meet the foundation and the walls themselves.
Make note of any places that seem to show a large temperature
change, indicated by green or blue on the screen.
Take readings in several locations in your room and house to see
if your home is at an even temperature or if there are significant
differences.
If you are seeing temperature differences between the top and
bottom of your walls, this could indicate your insulation has settled.
Consider getting an official home energy audit, or asking your landlord
or condo board to provide one for you. For more information on home
energy audits, see page 16 of this guide.
Regardless of whether you rent, own a condo or are a homeowner, there
are several low cost options to fix the problems you might find.
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EDMONTON’S GREEN LIVING GUIDE | Heating And Cooling
Apply weatherstripping
Weatherstripping allows you to seal the gap around windows
and doors. It will make your home feel warmer, while also saving
money on your energy bills.
It is generally inexpensive and there are several types available. Talk
to someone at your local hardware store to find the best type for your
specific needs.
Use plastic wrap on windows
You can buy a window insulation kit from a hardware store or make your
own using plastic wrap or drycleaner bags that are free of holes and
double-sided tape. Ensure the plastic stretches across the window frame with
about one inch of excess on all sides.
For further insulation, spray the glass lightly with water and apply bubble
wrap before putting up the plastic.
Be sure to leave one window in each room uncovered as a fire escape.
!
Safety Warning
Plastic can lead to suffocation. Be careful when using this material
around children.
Put up heavy or layered curtains
Use heavy fabrics or layer curtains over windows to keep out drafts.
These can be matched to your home décor and also help to
block out light.
Apply caulking
Caulking is used to seal off air leaks and keep out moisture.
There are several types of caulking available. Talk to someone at
your local hardware store to ensure you make the right choices
for your home.
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EDMONTON’S GREEEN LIVING GUIDE | Heating And Cooling
Use draft snakes
These are fabric tubes placed under a window sill or door to prevent cold air
from sneaking in.
They can be made by sewing a tube of fabric to fit the width of your
window or door and filling it with rice.
Install a programmable thermostat
A programmable thermostat lets you set the furnace to turn down
automatically at times when you don’t typically need as much heat (for
example, at night and during work or school hours) and to turn it up when
you require heat.
You can also change or clean your furnace filter monthly during the cold
season to improve efficiency. For better air flow and heat distribution,
make sure that furniture is not blocking your heat vents.
And instead of turning up the heat when you feel a little chilly, consider
grabbing a blanket, or putting on a sweater and maybe slippers or extra
socks too!
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EDMONTON’S GREEN LIVING GUIDE | Heating And Cooling
Use a fan instead of air conditioning
Air conditioning uses a tremendous amount of energy. Fans can
provide comfort and air movement on hot summer days, and they
use far less energy than air conditioning. To maximize the use of
your ceiling fan make sure you have it turning in the correct direction.
During the warm weather months, you want your ceiling fan to be rotating
counter clockwise (looking at it from below), this will push the air down
towards you. You will be able to tell that the fan is turning in the right
direction if you stand under the fan and feel the air moving. Set it to
medium or high for maximum effect. Better yet, if there is a cool breeze,
open a window instead.
During the cooler weather months, change your ceiling fan’s direction so
that it is rotating clockwise (looking at it from below). When the ceiling fan is
rotating clockwise it will help circulate the warm air throughout the room. A
low fan setting should be enough.
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EDMONTON’S GREEEN LIVING GUIDE | Water
Water
Heating water is expensive. When you use hot water at home, you are
paying for both the water itself and the energy used to heat it.
One way to reduce your GHG emissions related to water is to use a rain
barrel for outdoor use, such as watering gardens. Other ways include
taking shorter showers, only running your dishwasher and washing
machine with full loads and turning off the tap when brushing your teeth.
A 20% reduction in water use can save a family up to $128/year and
reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 80 kg. Using the cold water setting
for laundry also saves energy.
For more tips on how to save money on water heating, see page 26 in the
Green Home Guide.
Toolkit
Use the stopwatch to measure your shower and tap flow
rate. For instructions, go to page 20.
This activity is best done with two people. You will also need a bucket
and a large measuring cup.
Turn on the shower or tap to full capacity. Start the stopwatch as you
put the bucket under the water.
Collect all the water coming out of the shower head for ten seconds.
Measure the amount of water in litres.
Multiply the number of litres by 6 to give you a flow rate per minute.
If you collected two litres in ten seconds, the flow rate is 2 litres X 6 =
12 litres per minute.
If you see a shower flow rate higher than 15 L per minute, you should
consider installing a low-flow showerhead.
If your tap flow rate is higher than 6 L per minute, you may want to
install an aerator, which screws onto your faucet head, delivering a
stream of both water and air. Most newer homes will already have
aerators, but they may need replacing over time.
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EDMONTON’S GREEN LIVING GUIDE | Water
Flow rate chart
Low
Bathroom Faucet
6 L per minute
Kitchen Faucet
6-9 L per minute
Shower
15 L per minute
Insulate hot water pipes
Insulating hot water pipes keeps the water in
the pipes warmer. That way, less water needs
to be heated to bring hot water to a faucet.
Pipe insulation can be found at your local
hardware store.
Toilet leak test
In just minutes, you can find out if your toilet is wasting
thousands of litres of water due to a leak.
Here’s how:
1. Remove the tank lid, then flush.
2. After the flapper/tank ball drops and the tank refills, add
several drops of dark food colouring.
3. Wait at least 20 minutes without flushing.
After the 20 minutes, look in the toilet bowl. If any trace of
colour appears, there is a leak.
Leaks often occur at the flapper valve, which is simple
and inexpensive to replace. Your local hardware store can
recommend the best valve for you.
Source: EPCOR Water
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EDMONTON’S GREEEN LIVING GUIDE | Other Appliances
Other Appliances
Although individual appliance energy costs may be low, when you add up
all the appliances in your home, they can contribute significantly to your
energy costs.
Always try to use the right appliance for the job. Heating up something
small? Consider using the toaster oven instead of the full-size oven.
Smaller appliances such as toaster ovens, microwaves and slow cookers
use less energy than the stove, even if cooking takes longer. Matching pots
and pans to the right size of burner and using lids also saves energy.
There is no need to keep that fridge cooler than the suggested setting or
to use the heat-dry setting on your dishwasher. If possible, run appliances
only when there is a full load, maximizing energy efficiency. Some
appliances even come with eco-setting suggestions. These settings will
help you use less energy.
When you need to replace an appliance, look for the Energy
Star® symbol. Energy Star is a voluntary labelling program to
identify and promote energy efficient products.
Toolkit
Use the Kill-A-Watt meter to check how much energy is
used by appliances in your home when they are in use,
when they are on a different setting (e.g. eco-setting) and
on stand-by. See page 21 for instructions.
Take a bite out of vampire power
Phantom or vampire power is electricity used by a device when
it is turned off. This wasted power is responsible for up to 10%
of home electricity use. An easy way to avoid this problem is to
plug your devices into a power bar and turn the bar off when
not in use. Some power bars can leave one or two items fully powered
while automatically shutting off the others when not in use.
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EDMONTON’S GREEN LIVING GUIDE | Other Appliances
Toolkit
Use the infrared thermometer to measure your fridge
and freezer temperatures by pointing the thermometer
at the inside of the appliances. See page 18 for
instructions.
It is important to keep your fridge and freezer at the correct temperature.
According to EPCOR, the ideal temperature for maximum efficiency and
food safety is 3°C (38°F) for the refrigerator and -18°C (0°F) for the freezer
temperature.
Maintain your appliances
Basic maintence ensures your appliances are working as efficiently as
possible. For example, consider vacuuming the coils at the back of your
fridge and draining sediment from the bottom of your hot water tank.
And ensure doors seal properly. Keep fridge, freezer and oven door seals
clean. Wipe them regularly and check the condition of the sealing strip.
Inspect it for sections that are brittle, cracked or pressed out of shape.
The door seal should be strong enough to grip a piece of paper. Place a
piece of paper between the door and the seal and gently pull it. If the
paper comes away, the seal needs to be replaced. It is a good idea to check
several places around the door.
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EDMONTON’S GREEEN LIVING GUIDE | Other Appliances
Beware of old fridges and freezers!
Appliance efficiency has increased significantly in recent years.
If your fridge or freezer is more than ten years old, it may be
costing you more to run than you realize. Be sure to check your
extra freezer in the basement too.
Consider reducing the number of fridges and freezers in your home, or
buying newer, more efficient models. While buying new appliances can
be expensive, they will use less energy and save you money long-term.
Time for a new fridge?
It is important to think about the life of your appliance from the
time you bring it home through to its disposal.
Take all household hazardous waste, electrical items and big
bulky items to an Eco Station for recycling and safe disposal. Electronic
waste (anything with a cord or a battery) and household hazardous waste
can be dropped off for free. Taking these items to an Eco Station enables
reuse and recycling of some parts, and suitable disposal or treatment of
hazardous materials. For example, used oil and paint are made into new
products.
Fridges, freezers and air conditioners are also accepted at Eco Stations, but
there is a small fee to drop off these items.
Visit edmonton.ca/ecostations for up-to-date fees, locations and hours.
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EDMONTON’S GREEN LIVING GUIDE | Lighting
Lighting
Maximize your use of sunlight
You can use the sun’s energy to heat and light up your house when it is
cold and block it from your house when it is warm and bright. Simply open
your blinds on winter days and close them on summer days.
Toolkit
Use the Kill-A-Watt meter to check how much energy
is used by plug-in light fixtures in your home, both
when they are in use and on stand-by. See page 21 for
instructions.
After using the Kill-A-Watt for a day or two, try switching an
incandescent or compact fluorescent light (CFL) to the LED
light provided to compare energy use. Be sure to return the
LED to the toolkit before returning it to the library.
Save energy through lighting
The best energy-saving device is the light switch. Try to get into
the habit of turning off the lights when a room is not occupied.
Consider using CFLs or LEDs, which are more energy efficient
and longer lasting than “old style” incandescent bulbs. Also,
think about how many bulbs you actually require in a room.
Task lighting, such as a reading lamp, can focus light only where you need
it. Lighting controls such as automatic timers, motion sensors and dimmer
switches can also help reduce electricity usage.
Measure light
There are several terms used to reference how much light is present at any
one time. The most common unit for measuring light intensity is lux.
1 lux is equal to the illumination of a surface one metre away from a single
candle. Some common lux readings include:
• 50,000 – summer sunshine
• 5 – typical side road lighting
• 5,000 – overcast sky
• 1 – moonlight
• 400 – sunrise/sunset with a clear sky
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EDMONTON’S GREEEN LIVING GUIDE | Lighting
Toolkit
Use the light meter to measure your light availability and
compare it to your task needs See page 22 for instructions.
How much light do you need?
Once you have your current lux rating for each room in your house,
compare it to the table below to determine how much light you actually
need. The process of rightsizing your lighting has been referred to as
“delamping”. If you have too much light in an area for the tasks that are
commonly done in that area, you can remove or replace one or more of
the bulbs and reduce energy use. If you find your lighting is not bright
enough, consider replacing bulbs with brighter, high efficient ones such as
LEDs.
The numbers presented below are given as a range, as some people prefer
brighter lighting while others prefer dimmer lighting. Age can also have an
impact on the amount of light one needs, with older individuals requiring
more light than their younger counterparts.
RECOMMENDED MINIMUM LUX
Activity
Entertaining and dining
Casual reading and grooming
Kitchen, laundry (general light)
Office work
Kitchen (food preparation), prolonged reading or
studying, workshop activities, sewing (medium coloured
fabrics)
Sewing (dark fabrics) and hobbies involving fine detail
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Lux
100-220
220-550
220-550
320-640
550-1,100
1,100-2,200
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EDMONTON’S GREEN LIVING GUIDE | Additonal Information
Additional
Information
Take our survey
Let us know about your experience with the Green Home Energy
Toolkit. Fill out our survey at: surveymonkey.com/r/QNJX3JN
Home energy audit
If you are interested in pursuing a full home energy audit, including
receiving an EnerGuide rating for your home, go to:
edmonton.ca/energyadvisors
Understanding your energy bill
The average apartment in Edmonton uses 200-500 kWh each month. Compare
this to the average condo at 500-700 kWh, house at 800-1,200 kWh and
mobile home at 1,000-1,500 kWh.
For more information on understanding your energy bill, go to:
www.epcor.com/bill/Pages/understanding-alberta.aspx
Using the battery charger
If the tools are not working, try recharging the batteries.
1. Open lid and place batteries in charger,
matching the polarity marks (+ and -).
!
16
When charging the AAA batteries, a minimum of two AAA batteries
are required for the charger to work.
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EDMONTON’S GREEEN LIVING GUIDE | Additonal Information
2. Plug transformer into a standard outlet.
3. Charge the batteries based on the
recommended times in the table below.
4. Unplug charger when charging is complete
and return all materials to toolkit.
Battery Size
AA
AAA
9V
!
CHARGING TIMES
Number of batteries
1-4
5-8
2-8
1
Estimated charging
time
3 hours
6 hours
3 hours
6 hours
Safety Warning
• It is important to charge only the included batteries. Charging other
types of batteries may cause them to leak, rupture or explode.
• Use the charger only in dry locations. Keep away from rain,
snow or excessive moisture.
• Never plug battery chargers into an extension cord.
• Do not operate the charger if damaged. Instead, email:
thewaywegreen@edmonton.ca
• Do not disassemble, modify any part of the charger or attempt
to use the charger as a power source.
• The charger is not a toy and should not be used by children
without adequate supervision.
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EDMONTON’S GREEN LIVING GUIDE | Additonal Information
Using the infrared thermometer
!
To prevent dropping the thermometer, please remember to use the
handstrap.
Charging the infrared thermometer
1. Plug the provided cable into the charging box labeled
INFRARED THERMOMETER.
2. Lift the flap on the top of the thermometer, revealing
a micro USB port.
3. Plug the cord into the micro USB port.
4. Allow it to charge for four to six hours before use.
Using the infrared thermometer
1. Press and hold the
(power) button for a few seconds to power on or
off. If the screen goes black, it has likely timed out. Just press and hold
the power button again.
2. The centre of the screen will show an infrared image, while the top left
corner shows the temperature at the centre of the image (in the white
square).
• Greens and blues represent cooler temperatures.
• Yellows, oranges, reds and whites represent warmer temperatures.
3. Pull and release the trigger to take a photo.
Note: The image will automatically delete in 5 seconds. If you want to
keep a photo, use a camera or smartphone to capture the image on the
thermometer screen.
4. Pull the trigger again to return to real-time imaging.
Having problems understanding the thermometer? Watch the home
energy audit video: edmonton.ca/energyauditvideo
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EDMONTON’S GREEEN LIVING GUIDE | Additonal Information
An example of what you might see:
Using the infrared thermometer laser
Press the trigger and a red dot will appear on the surface of what the
thermometer is pointed at.
!
Safety Warning
Do not point the laser in people’s eyes. This can lead to blindness.
Children should be supervised when using the infrared thermometer.
Batteries required: none - use thermometer plug-in to recharge.
Return to page 5 (Heating and Cooling ) or page 12 (Other Appliances).
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EDMONTON’S GREEN LIVING GUIDE | Additonal Information
Using the stopwatch
Count down timer settings
1. To reset, press MIN and SEC (grey) buttons at the
same time to reset to zero.
2. Press the START/STOP (red) button once and the
timer will start to count down at one second intervals.
3. Stop alarm at 10 seconds by pressing the START/STOP (red) button.
4. To pause, press START/STOP (red) button once. Press again to continue
counting.
5. To clear display, press MIN and SEC (grey) buttons together. Display will
now show “00:00”.
Count up timer settings
1. When timer is in reset stage (see step 5 above), press START/STOP (red)
button once to activate count up feature. The timer will count up in one
second intervals.
2. To pause, press START/STOP (red) button once. Press again to continue
counting.
3. To return the count up timer to zero, first press START/STOP (red)
button, then press MIN and SEC (grey) buttons together.
Batteries required: one AAA battery
Return to page 9 (Water).
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EDMONTON’S GREEEN LIVING GUIDE | Additonal Information
Using the Kill-A-Watt meter
1. Plug the Kill-A-Watt meter into a standard wall
outlet. An outlet higher up on a wall is preferred for
ease of reading.
2. Plug any device into the Kill-A-Watt meter.
3. The LCD shows all meter readings: Volts, Current,
Watts, Frequency, PF (power factor) and VA (voltampere). The unit will start to accumulate kWh and
powered duration time (hour) after power is applied.
4. The “KWH/Hour” (purple) button is a toggle function button. Press
it once to show the cumulative energy consumption since power
was applied to the unit. Then press the button again to display the
cumulative time since power was applied to the unit.
5. Consumption will be displayed in kilowatt-hours (from 0.01 kWh to
9,999 kWh). Time will initially be displayed as Hours:Minutes (from 00:00)
and switch to Hours (to 9,999). Counters will recycle to zero when they
reach their maximum. To reset, remove power from unit momentarily.
Definitions
Ampere: a measure of electrical current
Current: the flow of electricity
Kilowatt-hour(kWh): the use of 1,000 watts over an hour
Volt: a unit of electricity
Watt: a measure of electric power
For more definitions, check out:
• www.enwin.com/kids/glossary
• energy.gov/eere/energybasics/articles/glossary-energy-related-terms
Other meter readings
Other readings are available on the meter but are beyond what is required
for the energy tests in this kit.
Batteries required: none
Return to page 11 (Other Appliances) or page 14 (Lighting).
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EDMONTON’S GREEN LIVING GUIDE | Additonal Information
Using the light meter
sensor
1. Take the cover off the sensor.
2. For most rooms, the sensor will need to
be switched to the ‘2,000’ mark, meaning
the range the meter will measure is from
1-2,000.
3. Move the switch to the ‘ON’ position.
4. Put the sensor and meter on a table in the
room you want to measure.
meter
5. When the meter becomes somewhat stable, record the number and
compare it to the table on page 15 (Recommended Minimum Lux).
6. When finished with the light meter, be sure it is powered off and
replace the cover.
Batteries required: one 9 volt
Return to page 15 (Lighting).
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EDMONTON’S GREEEN LIVING GUIDE | Recommended Reading
Recommended Reading
The Edmonton Public Library has graciously provided books and DVDs
to supplement the information in this guide. Please take a look at these
resources for further ideas on greening your home.
You can also check out the recommended titles below.
Adults
DeGunther, R. Energy efficient homes for dummies. Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley,
2008.
Findley, D. Do-it-yourself home energy audits: 140 simple solutions to
lower energy costs, increase your home’s efficiency, and save the
environment. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2010.
Harley, B. Cut your energy bills now: 150 smart ways to save money
& make your home more comfortable & green. Newtown, Conn.:
Taunton, 2008.
Provey, Joseph. 300 home-improvement tips for working smarter, safer,
greener. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Creative Homeowner, 2010.
Scheckel, P. The home energy diet: How to save money by making your
house energy-smart. Gabriola Island, BC: New Society, 2005.
Scheckel, P. The homeowner’s energy handbook: Your guide to getting off
the grid. North Adams, MA: Storey Publishing, 2013.
Sunset Books Editors. 136 best ways to save on your home energy. Menlo
Park, California: Sunset, 2010.
Vasil, A. Ecoholic home: The greenest, cleanest and most energy-efficient
information under one (Canadian) roof. Toronto: Vintage Canada, 2009.
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EDMONTON’S GREEN LIVING GUIDE | Recommended Reading
Teens*
Anderson, T., & Taudte, J. Our Planet: Change is possible. New York: Collins,
2008.
Savedge, J. The green teen: The eco-friendly teen’s guide to saving the
planet. Gabriola Island, BC: New Society, 2009.
Scott, J. Green career$: You can make money and save the planet.
Montréal, Quebec: Lobster Press, 2010.
Sivertsen, L., & Sivertsen, T. Generation green: The ultimate teen guide to
living an eco-friendly life. New York: Simon Pulse, 2008.
*Although these books are aimed at teens, many of the concepts and activities are also engaging for
adults.
Kids
Berenstain, J., & Berenstain, M. The Berenstain Bears go green. New York:
Harper Festival, 2013.
Cole, J., & Degen, B. The magic school bus and the climate challenge. New
York: Scholastic Press, 2010.
Dalgleish, S. Saving water. Philadelphia: Chelsea House, 2003.
Davila, C. Luz sees the light. Toronto: Kids Can Press, 2011.
Douglis, C., & Kennaway, A. Ting and the possible futures. Nairobi: United
Nations Environment Programme, 2008.
McKay, K., & Bonnin, J. True green kids: 100 things you can do to save the
planet. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic, 2008.
Rodger, E. Building a green community. New York: Crabtree, 2008.
Walsh, M. My green day: 10 green things I can do today. London: Walker,
2010.
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2015 YOU’RE GONNA LOVE GREEN—EDMONTON.CA/LOVEGREEN
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2015 YOU’RE GONNA LOVE GREEN–EDMONTON.CA/LOVEGREEN
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