Cessna 150 Pilots Operating Handbook

Cessna 150 Pilots Operating Handbook
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PERFORMANCE - SPECIFICATIONS
STANDARD
| Model 150 * | AND TRAINER COMMUTER
GROSS WEIGHT 1600 lbs 1600 165
SPEED:
Top Speed At Sea Level . . . . 122 mph 122 mph
Cruise, 75% Power at 7000 ft . 117 mph 117 mph
RANGE:
Cruise, 75% Power at 7000 ft 475 mi 475 mi
22.5 Gallons, No Reserve 4.1 hrs 4.1 hrs
117 mph 117 mph
Cruise, 75% Power at 7000 ft . . . 725 mi 725 mi
Long Range Version, 35.0 Gallons 6.2 hrs 6. 2 hrs
117 mph 117 mph
Optimum Range at 10,000 ft . 565 mi 565 mi
22.5 Gallons, No Reserve 6.1 hrs 6.1 hrs
93 mph 93 mph
Optimum Range at 10,000 ft . . . . 880 mi 880 mi
Long Range Version, 35.0 Gallons 9.4 hrs 9.4 hrs
93 mph 93 mph
RATE OF CLIMB AT SEA LEVEL . . . . . . . 670 fpm 670 fpm
SERVICE CEILING . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 12, 650 ft 12, 650 ft
TAKE-OFF:
Ground Run . . . . . . . . . +... 735 ft 735 ft
Total Distance Over 50-ft Obstacle . . . . . 1385 ft 1385 ft
LANDING:
Landing Roll. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 445 ft 445 ft
Total Distance Over 50-ft Obstacle . . . . . 1075 ît 1075 ft
EMPTY WEIGHT: (Approximate) Standard Trainer
With Standard Fuel Tanks . . . . . . . 980 lbs 1010 1bs 1065 155
With Long Range Fuel Tanks. . . . . . 985 165 1015 165 1070 lbs
BAGGAGE . . . . . . . . . e eee e eo 120 165 120 lbs
WING LOADING: Pounds/Sq Foot . . . . . . . 10. 2 10. 2
POWER LOADING: Pounds/HP. 16.0 16.0
FUEL CAPACITY:
Total (Standard Tanks) . . . . . . . . . . 26 gal. 26 gal.
Total (Long Range Tanks) . . . . . . . . . 38 gal. 38 gal.
OIL CAPACITY: . . . . 6 qts 6 qts
(One additional quart is required when
optional oil filter is installed)
PROPELLER: Fixed Pitch (Diameter) . . . . . 69 inches 69 inches
ENGINE: Continental Engine Coe. 0-200-A 0-200-A
100 rated HP at 2750 RPM
SS so"!
* This manual covers operation of the Model 150 which is certificated as Model 150H
under FAA Type Certificate No. 3A19 The manual also covers operation of the Mode!
E150 which is certificated as Model F150H under French Type Certificate No. 38 ard
FAA Туре Certificate No. A13EU. The Model F150, manufactured by Reims Aviation S.A,
Reims (Marne), France, is identical to the 150 except that it is powered by an O-200-A
engine manufactured under license by Rolls Royce, Crewe, England. Ati 150 information
in this manual pertains to the F150 as well
COPYRIGHT © 1984
D518-13 Cessna Aircraft Company
CONGRATULATIONS . . . ..
Welcome to the ranks of Cessna owners! Your Cessna has been designed
and constructed to give you the most in performance, economy, and com-
fort. It is our desire that you will find flying it, either for business or
pleasure, a pleasant and profitable experience.
This Owner's Manual has been prepared as a guide to help you get the
most pleasure and utility from your Model 150. It contains information
about your Cessna's equipment, operating procedures, and performance;
and suggestions for its servicing and care. We urge you to read it from
cover to cover, and to refer to it frequently.
Our interest in your flying pleasure has not ceased with your purchase of
a Cessna. World-wide, the Cessna Dealer Organization backed by the
Cessna Service Department stands ready to serve you. The following
services are offered by most Cessna Dealers:
FACTORY TRAINED PERSONNEL to provide you with courteous
expert service.
FACTORY APPROVED SERVICE EQUIPMENT to provide you
with the most efficient and accurate workmanship possible.
A STOCK OF GENUINE CESSNA SERVICE PARTS on hand
when you need them.
THE LATEST AUTHORITATIVE INFORMATION FOR SERV -
ICING CESSNA AIRPLANES, since Cessna Dealers have all
of the Service Manuals and Parts Catalogs, kept current by
Service Letters and Service News Letters, published by Cessna
Aircraft Company.
We urge all Cessna owners to use the Cessna Dealer Organization to the
fullest.
A current Cessna Dealer Directory accompanies your new airplane. The
Directory is revised frequently, and a current copy can be obtained from
your Cessna Dealer. Make your Directory one of your cross-country
flight planning aids; a warm welcome awaits you at every Cessna Dealer.
* Maximum height of airplane with nose gear depressed and
an optional flashing beacon installed.
** Overall length of airplane with optional bullet - shaped
propeller spinner. When standard propeller spinner
is installed, length ie 23'. ,
*8'-77' MAX.
1
PRINCIPAL
DIMENSIONS
Ш Ш
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ID
5.9" MAX, 4
ii
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page —
СЕСТЮМ | - ОРЕВАТИЧС СНЕСК 15Т.............. 1-1
SECTION |II - DESCRIPTION AND
OPERATING DETAILS -............. nn... 2-1
SECTION Ill - OPERATING LIMITATIONS............ 3-1
SECTION IV- CARE OF THE AIRPLANE ............ 4-1
OWNER FOLLOW-UP SYSTEM... 4-8
SECTION V - OPERATIONAL DATA -e..............——.. 5-1
SECTION VIi- OPTIONAL SYSTEMS ...............ee..... 6-1
ALPHABETICAL INDEX -......e..conconccacenranianannanananano Index-1
This manual describes the operation and perfor mance of
the Standard Model 150, the Trainer and the Commuter. Equip-
ment described as "Optional" denotes that the subject equipment
is optional on the Standard airplane. Much of this equipment is
standard on the Trainer and Commuter.
iii
EXTERIOR
INSPECTION
Visually check fuel filler caps,
ingpection plates, and general
aircraft condition during walk-
around inspection. If night
flight is planned, check operation
of all lights, and make sure a
flashlight ls avallable.
De
(b)
(с)
(а)
(a)
(b)
iv
Turn on master switch and check fuel quantity (с)
indicators, then turn master switch off,
Check ignition switch "OFF." (d)
Check fuel valve handle "ON."
Remove control wheel lock.
Remove rudder gust lock, if installed,
Disconnect tail tie-down,
(e)
(1)
Remove gust lock, if installed.
Check main wheel tire for proper inflation.
Inspect airspeed static source hole on side of
fuselage for stoppage (left side only),
Disconnect wing tie-down, (7 (a)
(0)
Check oil level. Do not operate with less than (e)
4 quarts. Fill for extended flights,
Check propeller and spinner for nicks and
security.
Figure 1-1,
Check carburetor air filter for restrictions by
dust or other foreign matter.
Before first flight of day and after each refueling,
pull out strainer drain knob for about four seconds
to clear fuel strainer of possible water and sedi-
ment. Check strainer drain closed. If water is
observed, there is a possibility that the wing
tank sumps contain water. Thus, the wing tank
sump drain plugs and fuel line drain plug should
be removed to check for presence of water.
Check nosewheel strut and tire for proper
inflation.
Disconnect nose tie-down.
Same as (4)
Remove pitot tube cover, if installed, and
check pitot tube opening for stoppage.
Check fuel tank vent opening for stoppage.
Check stall warning vent opening for stoppage.
Same as ®
“Hp se J
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Section |
E
Ши —
OPERATING CHECK LIST
One of the first steps in obtaining the utmost performance, service,
and flying enjoyment from your Cessna is to familiarize yourself with your
airplane's equipment, systems, and controls. This can best be done by
reviewing this equipment while sitting in the airplane. Those items whose
function and operation are not obvious are covered in Section II.
Section I lists, in Pilot's Check List form, the steps necessary to
operate your airplane efficiently and safely. It is not a check list in its
true form as it is considerably longer, but it does cover briefly all of the
points that you should know for a typical flight.
The flight and operational characteristics of your airplane are normal
in all respects. There are no unconventional characteristics or operations
that need to be mastered. All controls respond in the normal way within
the entire range of operation. All airspeeds mentioned in Sections I and
II are indicated airspeeds. Corresponding calibrated airspeeds may
be obtained from the Airspeed Correction Table in Section V.
BEFORE ENTERING THE AIRPLANE.
(1) Make an exterior inspection in accordance with figure 1-1.
BEFORE STARTING THE ENGINE.
(1) Seats and Seat Belts -- Adjust and lock,
(2) Brakes -- Test and set.
(3) Master Switch -- "ON."
(4) Fuel Valve Handle -- "ON."
STARTING THE ENGINE.
(1) Carburetor Heat -- Cold.
(7)
Mixture -- Rich.
Primer -- As required.
Ignition Switch -- "BOTH."
Throttle -- Open 1/4".
Propeller Area -- Clear.
Starter Handle -- Pull.
BEFORE TAKE-OFF.
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
(9)
(10)
TAKE-
Throttle Setting -- 1700 RPM.
Engine Instruments -- Within green arc.
Magnetos -- Check (75 RPM maximum differential between magnetos
Carburetor Heat -- Check operation.
Suction Gage -- Check (4.6 to 5.4 inches of mercury).
Flight Controls -- Check.
Trim Tab -- "TAKE-OFF" setting.
Cabin Doors -- Latched.
Flight Instruments and Radios -- Set.
Optional Wing Leveler -- "OFF."
OFF.
NORMAL TAKE-OFF.
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
Wing Flaps -- Up.
Carburetor Heat -- Cold.
Throttle - Full "OPEN."
Elevator Control -- Lift nose wheel at 50 MPH.
Climb Speed -- 73 MPH until all obstacles are cleared, then set
up climb speed as shown in "NORMAL CLIMB" paragraph.
MAXIMUM PERFORMANCE TAKE-OFF.
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
Wing Flaps - Up.
Carburetor Heat -- Cold.
Brakes -- Hold.
Throttle -- Full "OPEN,"
Brakes -- Release.
Elevator Control -- Slightly tail low.
Climb Speed -- 57 MPH (with obstacles ahead).
CLIMB.
NORMAL CLIMB.
(1)
1-2
Air Speed -- 75 to 80 MPH.
ECT DO
A Pe pn, SE В 3 *
(2) Power -- Full throttle.
(3) Mixture -- Rich (unless engine is rough).
MAXIMUM PERFORMANCE CLIMB.
(1) Air Speed -- 73 MPH.
(2) Power -- Full throttle.
(3) Mixture -- Rich (unless engine is rough).
CRUISING.
(1) Power -- 2000 to 2750 RPM.
(2) Elevator Trim -- Adjust.
(3) Mixture -- Lean to maximum RPM.
BEFORE LANDING.
(1) Mixture -- Rich,
(2) Carburetor Heat -- Apply full heat before closing throttle.
(3) Airspeed -- 65 to 75 MPH.
(4) Wing Flaps -- As desired below 100 MPH.
(5) Airspeed -- 60 to 70 MPH (flaps extended).
NORMAL LANDING.
(1) Touch Down -- Main wheels first.
(2) Landing Roll -- Lower nose wheel gently.
(3) Braking -- Minimum required.
AFTER LANDING.
(1) Wing Flaps -- Up.
(2) Carburetor Heat -- Cold.
SECURE AIRCRAFT.
(1) Mixture -- Idle cut-off.
(2) All Switches -- Off.
(3) Parking Brake -- Set.
(4) Control Lock -- Installed.
1-3
| INSTRUMENT PANEL
1 23 4 5 6 7 38 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
25 24 23 22 21 20
38 37 36 35 34 33 32 31 30
29 26
28 27
1. Altimeter 14. Oil Temperature Gage 26. Throttle
2. Airspeed Indicator 15. Ammeter 27. Elevator Trim Control Wheel
3. Turn Coordinator (Opt. ) 16. Fuel Quantity Indicator (Right) 28. Microphone (Opt. )
4. Directional Gyro (Opt.) 17. Optional Instrument Space 29. Electrical Switches
5. Omni Course Indicator (Opt.} 18. Suction Gage (Opt.) 30. Carburetor Heat Control Knob
6. Gyro Horizon (Opt.) 19. Optional Instrument Space 31. Vertical Speed Indicator (Opt. )
7. Aircraft Registration Number 20. Map Compartment 32. Parking Brake Control Knob
8. Optional Radio 21. Fuse/Circuit Breaker Panel 33. Wing Leveler Control! Knob (Opt. )
9. Rear View Mirror (Opt. ) 22. Cabin Air and Heat Control 34. Clock (Opt. )
10. Flight Hour Recorder (Opt.) Knobs 35. Starter Handle
11. Fuel Quantity Indicator (Left} 23. Cigar Lighter (Opt.) 36. Ignition Switch
12. Tachometer 24. Wing Flap Switch 37. Primer
13. Oil Pressure Gage 25. Mixture Control Knob 38. Master Switch
ACT ES
Figure 2-1.
1-4
DESCRIPTION AND OPERATING DETAILS
The following paragraphs describe the systems and equipment whose
function and operation is not obvious when sitting in the airplane, This
section also covers in somewhat greater detail some of the items listed
in Check List form in Section I that require further explanation,
FUEL SYSTEM.
Fuel is supplied to the engine from two tanks, one in each wing.
From these tanks, fuel flows by gravity through a fuel shutoff valve and
fuel strainer to the carburetor.
Refer to figure 2-2 for fuel quantity data. For fuel system service
information, refer to Lubrication and Servicing Procedures in Section IV.
FUEL STRAINER DRAIN KNOB.
Refer to fuel strainer servicing procedure, Section IV,
FUEL QUANTITY DATA (U.S. GALLONS)
ONE
USABLE FUEL TOTAL
TANKS ALL FLIGHT UNUSABLE FUEL
CONDITIONS VOLUME
TWO, STANDARD WING
(13 GAL. EACH) 22.5 3.5 26. 0
TWO, LONG RANGE WING 25.0 10 2.0
(19 GAL. EACH)
— mo E E есонооаоннняе
Figure 2-2,
2-1
Section If
ei ey fl sem
ET ARIAS
LEFT FUEL TANK RIGHT FUEL TANK
FUEL SHUTOFF
VALVE CODE
FUEL SUPPLY
9 VENT
MECHANICAL
LINKAGE
TO INTAKE mm
MANIFOLD wisi
ENGINE
PRIMER
THROTTLE
FUEL =" HO
CARBURETOR |<.
SYSTEM Tag
TO ENGINE
«SCHEMATIC E MIXTURE
CYLINDERS CONTROL
wv KNOB
Figure 2- Je
2-2
REA TA EE TT
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM.
Electrical energy is supplied by a 14-volt, direct-current system
powered by an engine-driven alternator (see figure 2-4). A 12-volt
storage battery is located on the right, forward side of the firewall just
inside the cowl access door. The master switch controls all electrical
circuits except the engine ignition system, optional clock and optional
flight hour recorder (operative only when engine is operating).
AMMETER.
The ammeter indicates the flow of current, in amperes, from the
alternator to the battery or from the battery to the aircraft electrical
system. When the engine is operating and the master switch is "ON,
the ammeter indicates the charging rate applied to the battery. In the
event the alternator is not functioning or the electrical load exceeds the
output of the alternator, the ammeter indicates the discharge rate of the
battery.
FUSES AND CIRCUIT BREAKERS.
Fuses on the right side of the instrument panel protect the majority
of electrical circuits in the airplane. Labeling above each fuse retainer
indicates the circuits protected by the fuses. Fuse capacity is shown on
each fuse retainer cap. Fuses are removed by pressing the fuse retainers
inward and rotating them counterclockwise until they disengage. The
faulty fuse may then be lifted out and replaced. Spare fuses are held in a
clip on the inside of the map compartment door.
NOTE
A special "SLO-BLO" fuse protects the wing flaps circuit.
If this fuse is replaced, care should be taken to assure
that the replacement fuse is of the proper type and capa-
city. A "SLO-BLO" fuse is identified by an integrally
mounted spring encircling the fuse element.
Two additional fuses are provided in the airplane. A fuse located
adjacent to the battery protects the optional clock and flight hour recorder
circuits. An in-line fuse located in the wire bundle just left of center be-
hind the instrument panel protects the alternator field circuit.
A "push-to-reset" circuit breaker (labeled "GEN'") on the instrument
panel protects the alternator circuit. The cigar lighter is protected by a
2-3
JAN EEE
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM SCHEMATIC
TO WING FLAP SYSTEM
FLAPS
SLO-BLO
TO LANDING 4
TAXI LIGHTS {OPT}
LAND
ALTERNATOR LTS
TO FLASHING
BEACON (OPT)
CIGAR LIGHTER
(WITH CIRCUIT BREAKER)
1
| 10
FLIGHT AMMETER (3
HOUR
RECORDER e
(OPT) — BATTERY
+ 1
7 44
он. >
PRESSURE
SWITCH
и STARTER
(ОРТ) |
BCN LY
PITOT HT TO PITOT HEAT
SYSTEM (OPT)
[J
+
TO RADIO {OPT}
RADIO ]
Y HANDLE
TO RADIO (OPT)
RADIO 2
BATTERY
> TO RADIO (OPT)
DE CONTACTOR
RADIO 3
—
TO DOME LIGHT
DOME LT
TO NAYIGATION LIGHTS
MASTER STARTER
TO TURN
Te COORDINATOR (OPT)
CODE
Q) CIRCUIT BREAKER
@ rus EDO TO INSTRUMENT LIGHTS
FUEL IND
@- FUSE (IN-LINE) INT LTS
<44- DIODE TO FUEL QUANTITY
It CAPACITOR INDICATORS
wen MECHANICAL CONNECTION
MAGNETOS
Figure 2-4.
2-4
ma,
manually reset type circuit breaker mounted directly on the back of the
lighter behind the instrument panel.
LANDING LIGHTS (OPT).
A three-position, push-pull type switch controls the optional landing
lights mounted in the leading edge of the left wing. To turn one lamp on
for taxiing, pull the switch out to the first stop. To turn both lamps on
for landing, pull the switch out to the second stop.
FLASHING BEACON (OPT).
The flashing beacon should not be used when flying through clouds or
overcast; the flashing light reflected from water droplets or particles in
the atmosphere, particularly at night, can produce vertigo and loss of
orientation.
CABIN HEATING AND VENTILATING SYSTEM.
The temperature and volume of airflow into the cabin can be regulated
to any degree desired by manipulation of the push-pull "CABIN HEAT" and
"CABIN AIR" knobs.
Heated fresh air and outside air are blended in a cabin manifold just
aft of the firewall by adjustment of the heat and air controls; this air is
then vented into the cabin from outlets in the cabin manifold near the
pilot's and passenger's feet. Windshield defrost air is also supplied by
a duct leading from the manifold.
A separate adjustable ventilator near each upper corner of the wind-
shield supplies additional outside air to the pilot and passenger.
PARKING BRAKE SYSTEM.
To set parking brake, pull out on the parking brake knob, apply and
release toe pressure to the pedals, and then release the parking brake
knob. To release the parking brake, apply and release toe pressure on
the pedals while checking to see that the parking brake knob is full in.
2-5
USE UP AILERON ON à
LEFT WING AND
NEUTRAL ELEVATOR
USE DOWN AILERON
ON LEFT WING AND
DOWN ELEVATOR
[> WIND DIRECTION
2-6
тот |
TAXIING DIAGRAM
suas USE UP AILERON ON
RIGHT WING AND
> NEUTRAL ELEVATOR
E x
USE DOWN AILERON |
ON RIGHT WING AND =
DOWN ELEVATOR
AA
NOTE Su... a
Strong quartering tailwinds require caution.
Avoid sudden bursts of the throttle and sharp
braking when the airplane is in this attitude.
Use the steerable nose wheel and rudder to
maintain direction.
Figure 2-5.
STARTING ENGINE.
Ordinarily the engine starts easily with one or two strokes of primer
in warm temperatures to six strokes in cold weather, with the throttle
open approximately 1/4 inch. In extremely cold temperatures, it may
be necessary to continue priming while cranking.
Weak intermittent explosions followed by puffs of black smoke from
the exhaust stack indicate overpriming or flooding. Excess fuel can be
cleared from the combustion chambers by the following procedure: Set
the mixture control in full lean position, throttle full open, and crank
the engine through several revolutions with the starter. Repeat the
starting procedure without any additional priming.
If the engine is underprimed (most likely in cold weather with a cold
engine) it will not fire at all, and additional priming will be necessary.
As soon as the cylinders begin to fire, open the throttle slightly to keep
it running.
After starting, if the oil gage does not begin to show pressure with-
in 30 seconds in the summertime and about twice that long in very cold
weather, stop engine and investigate. Lack of oil pressure can cause
serious engine damage. After starting, avoid the use of carburetor heat
unless icing conditions prevail.
TAXING.
When taxiing, it is important that speed and use of brakes be held to
a minimum and that all controls be utilized (see taxiing diagram, figure
2-5) to maintain directional control and balance.
Taxiing over loose gravel or cinders should be done at low engine
speed to avoid abrasion and stone damage to the propeller tips.
The nose wheel is designed to automatically center straight ahead
when the nose strut is fully extended. In the event the nose strut is over-
inflated and the airplane is loaded to a rearward center of gravity posi-
tion, it may be necessary to partially compress the strut to permit steer -
ing. This can be accomplished prior to taxiing by depressing the airplane
nose (by hand) or during taxi by sharply applying brakes.
2-1
BEFORE TAKE-OFF.
WARM-UP.
Most of the warm-up will have been conducted during taxi, and addi-
tional warm-up before take-off should be restricted to the checks out-
lined in Section I. Since the engine is closely cowled for efficient in-flight
cooling, precautions should be taken to avoid overheating on the ground.
MAGNETO CHECK.
The magneto check should be made at 1700 RPM as follows: Move the
ignition switch first to "R' position and note RPM. Then move switch
back to "BOTH" position to clear the other set of plugs. Then move
switch to "L'' position and note RPM. The difference between the two
magnetos operated individually should not be more than 75 RPM. If
there is a doubt concerning the operation of the ignition system, RPM
checks at higher engine speeds will usually confirm whether a deficiency
exists.
An absence of RPM drop may be an indication of faulty grounding of
one side of the ignition system or should be cause for suspicion that the
magneto timing is set in advance of the setting specified.
TAKE-OFF.
POWER CHECKS.
It is important to check full-throttle engine operation early in the take-
off run. Any signs of rough engine operation or sluggish engine accelera-
tion is good cause for discontinuing the take-off. If this occurs, you are
justified in making a thorough full-throttle, static runup before another
take-off is attempted. The engine should run smoothly and turn approxi-
mately 2500 to 2600 RPM with carburetor heat off.
Full throttle runups over loose gravel are especially harmful to pro-
peller tips. When take-offs must be made over a gravel surface, it is
very important that the throttle be advanced slowly. This allows the air-
plane to start rolling before high RPM is developed, and the gravel will
be blown back of the propeller rather than pulled into it. When unavoid-
2-8
able small dents appear in the propeller blades, they should be immediate -
ly corrected as described in Section IV.
Prior to take-off from fields above 5000 feet elevation, the mixture
should be leaned to give maximum RPM in a full-throttle, static runup.
FLAP SETTINGS.
Normal and obstacle clearance take-offs are performed with flaps up.
The use of 10° flaps will shorten the ground run approximately 10%, but
this advantage is lost in the climb to a 50-foot obstacle. Therefore the
use of 10° flap is reserved for minimum ground runs or for take-off
from soft or rough fields with no obstacles ahead.
If 10° of flaps are used in ground runs, it is preferable to leave them
extended rather than retract them in the climb to the obstacle. The ex-
ception to this rule would be in a high altitude take-off in hot weather
where climb would be marginal with flaps 10°.
Flap deflections of 30° and 40° are not recommended at any time for
take-off.
PERFORMANCE CHARTS.
Consult the take-off chart in Section V for take-off distances under
various gross weight, altitude, and headwind conditions.
CROSSWIND TAKE-OFFS.
Take-offs into strong crosswinds normally are performed with the
minimum flap setting necessary for the field length, to minimize the
drift angle immediately after take-off. The airplane is accelerated to
a speed slightly higher than normal, then pulled off abruptly to prevent
possible settling back to the runway while drifting. When clear of the
ground, make a coordinated turn into the wind to correct for drift.
CLIMB.
CLIMB DATA.
For detailed data, see Maximum Rate-of-Climb Data chart in
Section V.
2-9
CLIMB SPEEDS.
Normal climbs are conducted at 75 to 80 MPH with flaps up and full
throttle, for best engine cooling. The mixture should be full rich unless
the engine is rough due to too rich a mixture. The best rate-of-climb
speeds range from 73 MPH at sea level to 65 MPH at 10, 000 feet. If an
obstruction dictates the use of a steep climb angle, the best angle-of-
climb speed should be used with flaps up and full throttle. These speeds
vary from 57 MPH at sea level to 60 MPH at 10, 000 feet.
NOTE
Steep climbs at these low speeds should be of short
duration to allow improved engine cooling.
GO-AROUND CLIMB.
In a balked landing (go-around) climb, the wing flap setting should
be reduced to 20° immediately after full power is applied. Upon reach-
ing a safe airspeed, the flaps should be slowly retracted to the full up
position.
CRUISE.
Normal cruising is done at 65% to 75% of METO power. The set-
tings required to obtain these powers at various altitudes and outside
air temperatures can be determined by using your Cessna Power Com-
puter or the OPERATIONAL DATA, Section V.
Cruising can be done most efficiently at high altitude because of the
higher true airspeeds obtainable at the same power. This is illustrated
in the following table for 75% power.
OPTIMUM CRUISE PERFORMANCE
ALTITUDE RPM TRUE AIRSPEED
Sea Level * 2525 110
5000 feet * 2650 115
7000 feet * Full Throttle 117
* 75% POWER
2-10
STALLS.
The stall characteristics are conventional for the flaps up and flaps
down condition. Slight elevator buffeting may occur just before the stall
with flaps down.
The stalling speeds are shown in Section V for aft c.g., full gross
weight conditions. They are presented as calibrated airspeeds because
indicated airspeeds are unreliable near the stall. Other loadings result
in slower stalling speeds. The stall warning horn produces a steady
signal 5 to 10 MPH before the actual stall is reached and remains on
until the airplane flight attitude is changed.
LANDING.
Normal landings are made power off with any flap setting. Approach
glides are normally made at 65 to 75 MPH with flaps up, or 60 to 70 MPH
with flaps down, depending upon the turbulence of the air.
SHORT FIELD LANDINGS.
For a short field landing, make a power off approach at 58 MPH with
flaps 40% and land on the main wheels first. Immediately after touchdown,
lower the nose gear to the ground and apply heavy braking as required.
Raising the flaps after landing will provide more efficient braking.
CROSSWIND LANDINGS.
When landing in a strong crosswind, use the minimum flap setting
required for the field length. Use a wing low, crab, or a combination
method of drift correction and land in a nearly level attitude.
Excessive nose strut inflation can hinder nose wheel alignment with
the airplane ground track in a drifting crosswind landing at touchdown
and during ground roll. This can be counteracted by firmly lowering the
nose wheel to the ground after initial contact. This action partially com-
presses the nose strut, permitting nose wheel swiveling and positive
ground steering.
COLD WEATHER OPERATION.
Prior to starting on cold mornings, it is advisable to pull the pro-
peller through several times by hand to "break loose" or "limber" the
oil, thus conserving battery energy. In extremely cold (0°F and lower)
weather the use of an external preheater is recommended whenever
possible to reduce wear and abuse to the engine and the electrical system.
Cold weather starting procedures are as follows:
With Preheat:
(1) With ignition switch "OFF" and throttle closed, prime the
engine four to ten strokes as the propeller is being turned over
by hand.
NOTE
Use heavy strokes of primer for best atomization of fuel.
After priming, push primer all the way in and turn to locked
position to avoid possibility of engine drawing fuel through
the primer.
(2) Clear propeller.
(3) Pull master switch "ON."
(4) Turn ignition switch to "BOTH."
(5) Open throttle 1/4" and engage starter.
Without Preheat:
(1) Prime the engine eight to ten strokes while the propeller
is being turned by hand with throttle closed. Leave primer
charged and ready for stroke.
(2) Clear propeller.
(3) Pull master switch "ON."
(4) Turn ignition switch to "BOTH."
(5) Pump throttle rapidly to full open twice. Return to 1/4"
open position,
(6) Engage starter and continue to prime engine until it is run-
ning smoothly, or alternately, pump throttle rapidly over first
1/4 of total travel.
(7) Pull carburetor air heat knob full on after engine has started.
Leave on until engine is running smoothly.
(8) Lock primer.
2-12
NOTE
If the engine does not start during the first few attempts,
or if engine firing diminishes in strength, it is probable
that the spark plugs have been frosted over. Preheat
must be used before another start is attempted.
NOTE
Pumping the throttle may cause raw fuel to accumulate
in the intake air duct, creating a fire hazard in the event
of a backfire. If this occurs, maintain a cranking action
to suck flames into the engine. An outside attendant with
a fire extinguisher is advised for cold starts without pre-
heat.
During cold weather operations, no indication will be apparent on the
oil temperature gage prior to take-off if outside air temperatures are very
cold. After a suitable warm-up period (2 to 5 minutes at 1000 RPM), ac-
celerate the engine several times to higher engine RPM. If the engine
accelerates smoothly and the oil pressure remains normal and steady,
the airplane is ready for take-off.
When operating in sub-zero temperature, avoid using partial carbu-
retor heat. Partial heat may increase the carburetor air temperature to
the 32° to 70° range, where icing is critical under certain atmospheric
conditions.
Refer to Section VI for cold weather equipment.
2-13
ECC na
LL Toes
Section Ill
| — DT
OPERATING LIMITATIONS
OPERATIONS AUTHORIZED.
Your Cessna exceeds the requirements for airworthiness as set forth
by the United States Government, and is certificated under FAA Type Cer -
tificate No. 3A19.
With standard equipment, the airplane is approved for day and night
operation under VFR. Additional optional equipment is available to in-
crease its utility and to make it authorized for use under IFR day and
night.
Your airplane must be operated in accordance with all FAA -approved
markings, placards and check lists in the airplane. If there is any infor -
mation in this section which contradicts the FAA -approved markings, plac-
ards and check lists, it is to be disregarded.
MANEUVERS-UTILITY CATEGORY.
This airplane is not designed for purely aerobatic flight. However,
in the acquisition of various certificates such as commercial pilot, in-
strument pilot and flight instructor, certain maneuvers are required by
the FAA, All of these maneuvers are permitted in this airplane when op-
erated in the utility category. In connection with the foregoing, the fol-
lowing gross weight and flight load factors apply, with maximum entry
speeds for maneuvers as shown:
Gross Weight . . . . ...... ......... 1600 lbs
Flight Maneuvering Load Factor, *Flaps Up . . . +4.4 -1.76
Flight Maneuvering Load Factor, *Flaps Down . . +3.5
*The design load factors are 150% of the above, and in
all cases, the structure meets or exceeds design loads.
3-1
No aerobatic maneuvers are approved except those listed below:
MAXIMUM ENTRY SPEED
MANEUVER
Chandelles .
Lazy Eights . . .
Steep Turns . .
Spins . . . . « « » e e e + e e « e.
Stalls (Except Whip Stalls). . . . . . .
. 109 MPH (95 knots)
. 109 MPH (95 knots)
. 109 MPH (95 knots)
Use Slow Deceleration
Use Slow Deceleration
During prolonged spins, the aircraft engine may stop; however, spin
recovery is not adversely affected by engine stoppage. Intentional spins
with wing flaps extended are prohibited.
Aerobatics that may impose high inverted loads should not be attempt -
ed. The important thing to bear in mind in flight maneuvers is that the
airplane is clean in aerodynamic design and will build up speed quickly
with the nose доме. Proper speed control is an essential requirement
for execution of any maneuver, and care should always be exercised to
avoid excessive speed which in turn can impose excessive loads. In the
execution of all maneuvers, avoid abrupt use of controls.
AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS.
The following are the certificated calibrated airspeed limits for
the Cessna 150:
. 162 MPH (red line)
. 120-162 MPH (yellow arc)
. 56-120 MPH (green arc)
. 49-100 MPH (white arc)
Maximum (Glide or dive, smooth air) .
Caution Range .
Normal Range .
Flap Operating Range .
Maneuvering Speed* 109 MPH
*The maximum speed at which you can use abrupt
control travel without exceeding the design load factor.
ENGINE OPERATION LIMITATIONS.
Power and Speed. . . . . . « + + + +» . 100 BHP at 2750 RPM
3-2
ENGINE INSTRUMENT MARKINGS.
OIL TEMPERATURE GAGE.
Normal Operating Range . . . Green Arc
Maximum Allowable . . . . . . . 225°F Red Line
OIL PRESSURE GAGE.
Minimum Idling . . . . . e... ce eee ee 10 PSI (red line)
Normal Operating Range . . . . . . . . 30-60 PSI (green arc)
Maximum . . . « +. +... +... . 100 PSI (red line)
FUEL QUANTITY INDICATORS.
Empty (1.75 gallons unusable each standard tank)
E (red line)
(1.50 gallons unusable each long range tank)
TACHOMETER.
Normal Operating Range:
At sea level . . . . 2000-2550 (inner green arc)
At 5000 feet . . . . . . . 2000-2650 (middie green arc)
At 10,000 feet . . . . . 2000-2750 (outer green arc)
Maximum Allowable . . . . . . . . . . . . 2750 (red line)
WEIGHT AND BALANCE.
The following information will enable you to operate your Cessna
within the prescribed weight and center of gravity limitations. To figure
the weight and balance for your particular airplane, use the Sample Prob-
lem, Loading Graph, and Center of Gravity Moment Envelope as follows:
Take the licensed Empty Weight and Moment/1000 from the Weight
and Balance Data sheet, plus any changes noted on forms FAA-337,
carried in your airplane, and write them down in the proper columns.
Using the Loading Graph, determine the moment/1000 of each item to be
carried, Total the weights and moments/1000 and use the Center of
Gravity Moment Envelope to determine whether the point falls within the
envelope, and if the loading is acceptable.
3-3
AREAS (1) + (2) = 120 POUNDS
a : и
SAMPLE AIRPLANE YOUR AIRPLANE |
Moment
SAMPLE LOADING PROBLEM [| vom | Moment Weight
(lba.) /1000) (Iba. ) т
== == 0.
Licensed Empty Weight (Sample Airplane). . 1038 34.1 <
2. Oil (6 gts. - Full oíl may be assumed 1.
for all flights) . . . . . . . . . ... ... 11 -0.1 11 -0.1
3. Fuel (Standard - 22.5 gal at 6 lbs. /galion}. . . 135 5.7 о
Fuel (Long Range - 35 gal. at 6 ibs. /gallon). . (0
4. Pilot and Passenger. . . . . . . . . . . . . 340 13.3 Z
5, Baggage - Area 1 (or children on child's A
Beat)... aaa 76 4.9 О 52
6. Baggage - Area 2. . . . . . 2 4 44 4 2 2 0 0 0.0 <. =
D
7. TOTAL WEIGHT AND MOMENT 1600 57.9 О &
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Locate this point (1400 at 57.9) on the center of gravity moment envelope, A
and since this point falls within the envelope, the loading is acceptable. &
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MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE LOADS 59% 0® SE 3S
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*% TIE-DOWN NET ATTACH POINTS
* A cargo tie-down net is provided to secure baggage in the baggage area.
The net attaches to six tie-down rings. Two rings are located on the floor
just aft of the seat backs and one ring is located two inches above the floor
on each cabin wall at the aft end of area © . Two additional rings are
located at the top, aft end of area . At least four rings should be used
to restrain the maximum baggage load of 1204.
If the airplane is equipped with an optional utility shelf, it should be re- o © © <
moved prior to loading and tying down large baggage items. (Slide the tab of 2 ey SL we
the locking clips on each end of the shelf inboard to disengage the shelf from
the aircraft structure.) Alter baggage is loaded and secured, either stow
the shelf or, if space permits, install it for storing small articles. (SaNNOd) LHOIJM IVOT
3-6
CENTER OF GRAVITY
MOMENT ENVELOPE
1550
NORMAL CATEGORY
UTILITY CATEGORY
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Section IV
EB osm В
CARE OF THE AIRPLANE
If your airplane is to retain that new-plane performance, stamina, and
lependability, certain inspection and maintenance requirements must be
ollowed. It is always wise to follow a planned schedule of lubrication and
naintenance based on the climatic and flying conditions encountered in
our locality.
Keep in touch with your Cessna dealer, and take advantage of his
:nowledge and experience. He knows your airplane and how to maintain
t. He will remind you when lubrications and oil changes are necessary
und about other seasonal and periodic services.
3ROUND HANDLING.
The airplane is most easily and safely maneuvered by hand with a
ow-bar attached to the nose wheel.
NOTE
When using the tow-bar, never exceed the turning
angle of 30°, either side of center, or damage to
the gear will result.
VOORING YOUR AIRPLANE.
Proper tie-down is the best precaution against damage to your parked
irplane by gusty or strong winds. To tie down your airplane securely,
roceed as follows:
(1) Set parking brake and install control wheel lock.
(2) Install a surface control lock between each aileron and flap.
(3) Tie sufficiently strong ropes or chains (700 pounds tensile
strength) to wing and tail tie-down fittings, and secure each rope
4-1
to ramp tie-down.
(4) Install a surface control lock over the fin and rudder.
(5) Install a pitot tube cover.
(6) Tie a rope to an exposed portion of the engine mount and secure
the opposite end to a ramp tie-down,
WINDSHIELD-WINDO WS.
The plastic windshield and windows should be cleaned with an aircraft
windshield cleaner. Apply the cleaner sparingly with soft cloths, and rub
with moderate pressure until all dirt, oil scum and bug stains are re-
moved. Allow the cleaner to dry, then wipe it off with soft flannel cloths.
If a windshield cleaner is not available, the plastic can be cleaned
with soft cloths moistened with Stoddard solvent to remove oil and grease.
NOTE
Never use gasoline, benzine, alcohol, acetone, carbon
tetrachloride, fire extinguisher or anti-ice fluid, lacquer
thinner or glass cleaner to clean the plastic. These ma-
terials will attack the plastic and may cause it to craze.
Follow by carefully washing with a mild detergent and plenty of water.
Rinse thoroughly, then dry with a clean moist chamois. Do not rub the
plastic with a dry cloth since this builds up an electrostatic charge which
attracts dust. Waxing with a good commercial wax will finish the clean-
ing job. A thin, even coat of wax, polished out by hand with clean soft flan-
nel cloths, will fill in minor scratches and help prevent further scratching.
Do not use a canvas cover on the windshield unless freezing rain or
sleet is anticipated since the cover may scratch the plastic surface.
PAINTED SURFACES.
The painted exterior surfaces of your new Cessna have a durable,
long lasting finish and, under normal conditions, require no polishing or
buffing. Approximately 15 days are required for the paint to cure com-
pletely; in most cases, the curing period will have been completed prior
to delivery of the airplane. In the event that polishing or buffing is re-
quired within the curing period, it is recommended that the work be done
4-2
by someone experienced in handling uncured paint. Any Cessna Dealer
can accomplish this work.
Generally, the painted surfaces can be kept bright by washing with
water and mild soap, followed by a rinse with water and drying with cloths
or a chamois. Harsh or abrasive soaps or detergents which cause cor-
rosion or make scratches should never be used. Remove stubborn oil
and grease with a cloth moistened with Stoddard solvent.
Waxing is unnecessary to keep the painted surfaces bright. However,
if desired, the airplane may be waxed with a good automotive wax. A
heavier coating of wax on the leading edges of the wings and tail and on
the engine nose cap and propeller spinner will help reduce the abrasion
encountered in these areas.
ALUMINUM SURFACES.
The clad aluminum surfaces of your Cessna require only minimum care
to keep them bright and clean. The airplane may be washed with water to
remove dirt; oil and grease may be removed with gasoline, naphtha, car-
bon tetrachloride or other non-alkaline solvents. Dulled aluminum sur-
faces may be cleaned effectively with an aircraft aluminum polish.
After cleaning, and periodically thereafter, waxing with a good auto-
motive wax will preserve the bright appearance and retard corrosion.
Regular waxing is especially recommended for airplanes operated in salt
water areas as a protection against corrosion.
PROPELLER CARE.
Preflight inspection of propeller blades for nicks, and wiping them
occasionally with an oily cloth to clean off grass and bug stains will as-
sure long, trouble-free service. It is vital that small nicks on the blades,
particularly near the tips and on the leading edges, are dressed out as
soon as possible since these nicks produce stress concentrations, and if
ignored, may result in cracks. Never use an alkaline cleaner on the blades;
remove grease and dirt with carbon tetrachloride or Stoddard solvent.
INTERIOR CARE.
To remove dust and loose dirt from the upholstery, headliner, and
4-3
carpet, clean the interior regularly with a vacuum cleaner.
Blot up any spilled liquid promptly, with cleansing tissue or rags.
Don't pat the spot; press the blotting material firmly and hold it for sev-
eral seconds. Continue blotting until no more liquid is taken up. Scrape
off sticky materials with a dull knife, then spot-clean the area.
Oily spots may be cleaned with household spot removers, used spar-
ingly. Before using any solvent, read the instructions on the container
and test it on an obscure place on the fabric to be cleaned. Never satu-
rate the fabric with a volatile solvent; it may damage the padding and back-
ing materials.
Soiled upholstery and carpet may be cleaned with foam-~type detergent,
used according to the manufacturer's instructions. To minimize wetting
the fabric, keep the foam as dry as possible and remove it with a vacuum
cleaner.
The plastic trim, instrument panel and control knobs need only be
wiped off with a damp cloth. Oil and grease on the control wheel and con-
trol knobs can be removed with a cloth moistened with kerosene. Volatile
solvents, such as mentioned in paragraphs on care of the windshield, must
never be used since they soften and craze the plastic.
INSPECTION SERVICE AND INSPECTION PERIODS.
With your airplane you will receive an Owner's Service Policy. Cou-
pons attached to the policy entitle you to an initial inspection and the first
100-hour inspection at no charge. If you take delivery from your Dealer,
he will perform the initial inspection before delivery of the airplane to
you. If you pick up the airplane at the factory, plan to take it to your
Dealer reasonably soon after you take delivery on it. This will permit
him to check it over and to make any minor adjustments that may appear
necessary. Also, plan an inspection by your Dealer at 100 hours or 180
days, whichever comes first, This inspection also is performed by your
Dealer for you at no charge. While these important inspections will be
performed for you by any Cessna Dealer, in most cases you will prefer
to have the Dealer from whom you purchased the airplane accomplish this
work.
Federal Aviation Regulations require that all airplanes have a periodic
(annual) inspection as prescribed by the administrator, and performed by
a person designated by the administrator. In addition, 100-hour periodic
4-4
inspections made by an ''appropriately-rated mechanic'' are required if
the airplane is flown for hire. The Cessna Aircraît Company recom-
mends the 100-hour periodic inspection for your airplane. The procedure
for this 100-hour inspection has been carefully worked out by the factory
and is followed by the Cessna Dealer Organization. The complete famil-
iarity of the Cessna Dealer Organization with Cessna equipment and with
factory-approved procedures provides the highest type of service possible
at lower cost.
AIRCRAFT FILE.
There are miscellaneous data, information and licenses that are a
part of the aircraft file. The following is a check list for that file. In
addition, a periodic check should be made of the latest Federal Aviation
Regulations to insure that all data requirements are met.
A. To be displayed in the aircraft at all times:
(1) Aircraft Airworthiness Certificate (Form FAA-1362B).
(2) Aircraft Registration Certificate (Form FAA-500A).
(3) Aircraft Radio Station License (Form FCC-404, if transmitter
installed). |
В. To be carried in the aircraft at all times:
(1) Weight and Balance, and associated papers (latest copy of the
Repair and Alteration Form, Form FAA-337, if applicable).
(2) Aircraft Equipment List.
C. To be made available upon request:
(1) Aircraft Log Book.
(2) Engine Log Book.
NOTE
Cessna recommends that these items, plus the Owner's
Manual, "Cessna Flight Guide" (Flight Computer), and
Service Policies, be carried in the aircraft at all times.
Most of the items listed are required by the United States Federal
Aviation Regulations. Since the regulations of other nations may require
other documents and data, owners of exported aircraft should check with
their own aviation officials to determine their individual requirements.
4-5
ET A EEE
LUBRICATION AND SERVICING
PROCEDURES
Specific servicing information is provided here for items requiring daily
attention. A Servicing Intervals Check List is included to inform the pilot
when to have other items checked and serviced.
DAILY
FUEL TANK FILLERS:
Service after each flight with 80/87 minimum grade fuel. The capac-
ity of each wing tank is 13 gallons for standard fuel tanks, 19 gallons
for optional long range tanks.
FUEL STRAINER:
Before first flight of the day and after each refueling, pull out fuel
strainer drain knob (located just inside cowl access door) for about
four seconds, to clear fuel strainer of possible water and sediment.
Release drain knob, then check that strainer drain is closed after
draining. If water is observed, there is a possibility that the wing
tank sumps contain water. Thus, the wing tank sump drain plugs and
fuel line drair plug should be removed to check for presence of water.
OIL FILLER:
When preflight check shows low oil level, service with aviation grade
engine oil; SAE 40 above 40°F and SAE 10W30 or SAE 20 below 40°F.
(Multi-viscosity oil with a range of SAE 10W30 is recommended for
improved starting in cold weather.) Detergent or dispersant oil, con-
forming to Continental Motors Specification MHS-24A, must be used.
Your Cessna Dealer can supply approved brands of oil.
NOTE
To promote faster ring seating and improved oil control,
your Cessna was delivered from the factory with straight
mineral oil (non-detergent). This "break-in" oil should
be used only for the first 20 to 30 hours of operation, at
which time it must be replaced with detergent oil.
OIL DIPSTICK:
Check oil level before each flight. Do not operate on less than 4
quarts. To minimize loss of oil through breather, fill to 5 quart
level for normal flights of less than 3 hours. For extended flight,
fill to 6 quarts. If optional oil filter is installed, one additional
quart is required when the filter element is changed.
4-6
SERVICING INTERVALS CHECK LIST
EACH 50 HOURS
BATTERY --Check and service. Check oftener (at least every 30 days)
if operating in hot weather.
ENGINE OIL AND OIL FILTER --Change engine oil and replace filter
element. If optional oil filter is not installed, change oil and clean screen
every 25 hours. Change engine oil at least every four months even though
less than 50 hours have been accumulated. Reduce periods for prolonged
operation in dusty areas, cold climates, or when short flights and long
idie periods result in sludging conditions.
NOTE
After first 20 to 30 hours of engine operation, an initial
oil change should be made to remove 'break-in'"' oil and
change the filter, if installed.
CARBURETOR AIR FILTER--Clean or replace. Under extremely dusty
conditions, daily maintenance of the filter is recommended.
NOSE GEAR TORQUE LINKS--Lubricate. When operating under dusty
conditions, more frequent lubrication is recommended.
EACH 100 HOURS
BRAKE MASTER CYLINDERS--Check and fill.
SHIMMY DAMPENER--Check and fill.
FUEL STRAINER--Disassemble and clean.
FUEL TANK SUMP DRAINS--Drain water and sediment.
FUEL LINE DRAIN PLUG--Drain water and sediment.
VACUUM SYSTEM OIL SEPARATOR (OPT)--Clean.
SUCTION RELIEF VALVE INLET SCREEN (OPT)--Clean.
SPARK PLUGS -- Clean, test and regap.
EACH 500 HOURS
VACUUM SYSTEM AIR FILTER (OPT)--Replace filter element. Re-
place sooner if suction gage reading drops to 4.6 in. Hg.
WHEEL BEARINGS--Lubricate at first 100 hours and at 500 hours there-
after. Reduce lubrication interval to 100 hours when operating in dusty
or seacoast areas, during periods of extensive taxiing, or when numerous
take -offs and landings are made.
AS REQUIRED
NOSE GEAR SHOCK STRUT--Keep filled with fluid and inflated to 20 psi.
Do not over-inflate.
4-7
OWNER FOLLOW-UP SYSTEM Section Ÿ
Ba po Er ee Ш
; Your Cessna Dealer has an owner follow-up system to notify you
when he receives information that applies to your Cessna. In addi- OPERATIONAL DATA
tion, if you wish, you may choose, to receive similar notification
directly from the Cessna Service Department. À subscription card
is supplied in your aircraft file for your use, should you choose to
request this service. Your Cessna Dealer will be glad to supply The operational data shown on the following pages are compiled from
you with details concerning these follow-up programs, and stands actual tests with the airplane and engine in good condition, and using
ready through his Service Department to supply you with fast, average piloting technique and best power mixture. You will find this
efficient, low cost service. data a valuable aid when planning your flights.
To realize the maximum usefulness from your Cessna, you should
PUBLICATIONS take advantage of its high cruising speeds. However, if range is of pri-
mary importance, it may pay you to fly at a low cruising RPM, thereby
. es , . increasing your range and allowing you to make the trip non-stop with
Included in your aircraft file are various manuals which describe the ample fuel reserve. The cruise performance table (figure 5-4) should be
operation of the equipment in your aircraft. These manuals, plus , . :
many other supplies that are applicable to your aircraft, are available used to solve flight planning problems of this nature.
from your Cessna Dealer, and, for your convenience, are listed below.
In the table (figure 5-4), range and endurance are given for lean mix-
ture from 2500 feet to 12, 500 feet. All figures are based on zero wind,
e OWNER'S MANUALS FOR YOUR 22.5 and 35.0 gallons of fuel for cruise, McCauley 1A101/DCM6948
ELECTRONIC S - 300 SERIES propeller, 1600 pounds gross weight, and standard atmospheric conditions.
- Mixture is leaned to maximum RPM. Allowances for fuel reserve, head-
winds, take-offs and climb, and variations in mixture leaning technique
ER > ? . .
. 5 RRA ALS AND PARTS CATALOGS FOR YOUR should be made as no allowances are shown on the chart. Other indetermi-
ENGINE AND ACCESSORIES nate variables such as carburetor metering characteristics, engine and
ELECTRONICS - 300 SERIES propeller conditions, and turbulence of the atmosphere may account for
WING LEVELER variations of 10% or more in maximum range.
o COMPUTERS Remember that the charts contained herein are based on standard day
conditions. For more precise power, fuel consumption, and endurance in-
AL ? .
e SALES AND SERVICE DEALER DIRECTORY formation, consult the Cessna Flight Guide (Power Computer) supplied
with your aircraft. With the Flight Guide, you can easily take into account
© DO'S AND DON'TS ENGINE BOOKLET . :
temperature variations from standard at any flight altitude.
Your Cessna Dealer has a current catalog of all Customer Services
Supplies that are available, many of which he keeps on hand. Supplies
which are not in stock, he will be happy to order for you.
4-8 5-1
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Figure 5-2.
5-3
e SPEED 65 MPH (IAS)
—CRUISE PERFORMANCE —— Wi LEAN MAXIMUM GLIDE «PROPELLER WINDMILLING
MIXTURE = o FLAPS UP ZERO WIND
has
END.! HOURS RANCE, MILES | Las 12,000
ALTITUDE RPM | %BHP | TAS MPH | GAL/HR. | STANDARD [LONG RANGE] STANDARD RONG RANGE —
22.5 GAL. | 35 GAL. 22.5 GAL.] 35 GAL. > 10,000
2500 2750 92 121 7,0 3.2 5.0 390 605 J
2700 87 119 6.6 3.4 5,3 410 635 a 8000
2600 77 114 5,8 3.9 6.1 445 690 oc
2500 68 108 5,1 4,4 6.9 475 740 Las
2400 60 103 4,6 4.9 7.7 505 790 > 6000
2300 53 96 4.1 5.5 8.6 535 830 a
2200 46 89 3.6 6.2 9.7 550 860 >
2100 40 . , 10.9 555 865
79 3.2 7.0 O 4000
- co
5000 2750 85 121 6.4 3.5 5.5 425 660 < В
2700 80 118 6.0 3.8 5.8 445 690 2000 =
2600 71 113 5.3 4.2 6.6 475 740 pur ei
2500 83 107 4.8 4.7 7.4 505 790 т eu
2400 56 101 4.3 5.3 8.2 530 830 © 0 if
2300 49 93 3.8 5.9 9.2 550 —
2200 43 84 3.4 6.6 10.3 360 870 т 0 5 10 15 20
2100 37 71 3.0 7.5 11.1 5
GROUND DISTANCE (STATUTE MILES)
7500 2700 74 117 5.5 4.1 6.3 480 745
2600 66 111 4.9 4.6 7.1 505 790
2500 58 105 4,4 5.1 7.9 535 830
2400 52 98 4.0 5.7 8.8 555 860 Figure 5-5.
2300 45 89 3.6 6.3 9.8 560 875
2200 40 77 3.2 7.1 11.1 550 850
10, 000 2700 68 116 5.1 4.4 6.8 510 790
2600 61 109 4.6 4.9 7.6 535 830
2500 54 102 4.1 5.4 8.5 555 865
2400 48 93 3.7 6.1 9.4 565 880
2300 42 82 3.3 6.8 10.6 555 860
12,500 2650 50 110 4.5 5.0 7.8 550 855
2600 56 106 4.3 5.3 8.2 555 865
2500 50 97 3.9 5.8 91 565 880
2400 44 86 3.5 6.5 10.1 560 870
NOTES: 1. Maximum cruise is normally limited to 75% power.
2. In the above calculations of endurance in hours and range in miles, no allowances were made
for take - off or reserve.
Figure 5-4.
5-5
Section II
I а Ba
OPTIONAL SYSTEMS
Le Se PO A ATTE AI MC EL A IS EE
da EEE ATA DA PA
This section contains a description, operating procedures, and per -
formance data (when applicable) for some of the optional equipment which
may be installed in your Cessna. Owner's Manual Supplements are pro-
vided to cover operation of other optional equipment systems when in-
stalled in your airplane. Contact your Cessna Dealer for a complete
list of available optional equipment.
LONG RANGE FUEL TANKS
Special wings with long range fuel tanks are available to replace the
standard wings and fuel tanks for greater endurance and range. Each
tank has a total capacity of 19 gallons. Usable fuel in each long range
tank, for all flight conditions, is 17.5 gallons.
COLD WEATHER EQUIPMENT
WINTERIZATION KIT.
For continuous operation in temperatures consistently below 20°F,
the Cessna winterization kit should be installed to improve engine opera-
tion. The kit consists of a shield to partially cover the cowl nose cap
opening, the addition of heat ducting from the right exhaust manifold for
additional cabin heat, a carburetor airbox heat outlet cap, and insulation
for the engine breather line.
6-1
RADIO TRANSMITTER SELECTOR SWITCH
Operation of the radio equipment is normal as covered in the respec -
tive radio manuals. When more than one radio with transmitter function
is installed, a transmitter switch is necessary. The transmitter selector
switch is mounted in the upper left corner of the control pedestal and has
two positions, labeled "TRANS 1" and "TRANS 2." When two transmitters
are installed, it is necessary to switch the microphone to the radio unit
the pilot desires to use for transmission. This is accomplished by
placing the transmitter selector switch in the position corresponding to
the radio unit which is to be used. The up position selects the upper
transmitter and the down position selects the lower transmitter.
| TRUE AIRSPEED INDICATOR
A true airspeed indicator is available to replace the standard airspeed
indicator in your airplane. The true airspeed indicator has a calibrated
rotatable ring which works in conjunction with the airspeed indicator dial
in a manner similar to the operation of a flight computer.
TO OBTAIN TRUE AIRSPEED, rotate ring until pressure altitude
is aligned with outside air temperature in degrees Fahrenheit. Then
read true airspeed on rotatable ring opposite airspeed needle.
NOTE
Pressure altitude should not be confused with indicated
altitude. To obtain pressure altitude, set barometric
scale on altimeter to "29.92" and read pressure altitude
on altimeter. Be sure to return altimeter barometric
scale to original barometric setting after pressure alti-
tude has been obtained.
6-2
WING LEVELER
A wing leveler may be installed to augment the lateral and directional
stability of the airplane. The system uses the Turn Coordinator for roll
and yaw sensing. Vacuum pressure, from the engine-driven vacuum
pump, is routed from the Turn Coordinator to cylinder-piston servo units
attached to the aileron and rudder control systems. As the airplane de-
viates from a wing level attitude or a given direction, vacuum pressure
in the servo units is increased or relieved as needed to actuate the ailerons
and rudder to oppose the deviations. The rudder action effectively cor-
rects adverse yaw induced by the ailerons.
The wing leveler system has manual roll trim capabilities which may
be used to compensate for asymmetrical loading of fuel and passengers,
and to optimize system performance in climb, cruise and let-down.
OPERATING CHECK LIST
TAKE-OFF.
(1) "WING LVLR" Control Knob -- Check in off position (full in).
CLIMB.
(1) Adjust elevator trim for climb.
(2) "WING LVLR'" Control Knob -- Pull control knob "ON".
(3) "ROLL TRIM'" Control Knob -- Adjust for wings level attitude.
CRUISE.
(1) Adjust power and elevator trim for level flight.
(2) "ROLL TRIM" Control Knob -- Adjust as desired.
DESCENT.
(1) Adjust power and elevator trim for desired speed and rate of
descent.
(2) "ROLL TRIM' Control Knob -- Adjust as desired.
|
LANDING.
(1) Before landing, push "WING LVLR" control knob full in to the off
position.
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
If a malfunction should occur, the system is easily overpowered with
pressure on the control wheel. The system should then be turned off. In
the event of partial or complete vacuum failure, the stability augmenta-
tion system will automatically become inoperative.
OPERATING NOTES
(1) The wing leveler system may be overpowered at any time without
damage or wear. « However, for extended periods of maneuvering it may
be desirable to turn the system off.
(2) It is recommended that the system not be engaged during take -off
and landing. Although the system can be easily overpowered, servo forces
could significantly alter the manual "feel" of the aileron control, especially
should a malfunction occur.
| FUEL TANK QUICK-DRAIN VALVE KIT
Two fuel tank quick-drain valves and a fuel sampler cup are available
as a kit to facilitate daily draining and inspection of fuel in the main tanks
for the presence of water and sediment. The valves replace existing fuel
tank drain plugs located at the lower inboard area of the wing. The fuel
sampler cup, which may be stowed in the map compartment, is used to
drain the valves. The sampler cup has a probe in the center of the cup.
When the probe is inserted into the hole in the bottom of the drain valve
and pushed upward, fuel flows into the cup to facilitate visual inspection
of the fuel. As the cup is removed, the drain valve seats, stopping the
flow of fuel.
ALPHABETICAL INDEX
A
After Landing, 1-3
Air and Heat Controls, Cabin, 1-4
Air Filter, Carburetor, 4-7
Air Filter, Vacuum System, 4-7
Aircraft Registration Number, 1-4
Airplane,
before entering, 1-1
file, 4-5
ground handling, 4-1
mooring, 4-1
secure, 1-3
Airspeed Correction Table, 5-2
Airspeed Indicator, 1-4 ‚6-2
Airspeed Limitations, 3-2
Alternator, 2-4
Altimeter, 1-4
Aluminum Surfaces, 4-3
Ammeter, 1-4, 2-3, 2-4
Authorized Operations, 3-1
Baggage, Capacity, inside cover
Baggage Loading/Tie-Down, 3-4
Battery, 2-4, 4-7
Battery Contactor, 2-4
Beacon, Flashing, 2-5
Before Entering the Airplane, 1-1
Before Landing, 1-3
Before Starting the Engine, 1-1
Before Take-Off, 1-2, 2-8
magneto check, 2-8
warm-up, 2-8
Brake Master Cylinders, 4-7
Brake System, Parking, 2-5
C
Cabin Air and Heat Controls, 1-4
Cabin Heating and Ventilating
System, 2-5
Capacity,
baggage, inside cover
fuel, inside covers
oil, inside covers
Carburetor, 2-2
air filter, 4-7
air heat control, 1-4
Care,
exterior, 4-2, 4-3
interior, 4-3
propeller, 4-3
Center of Gravity Moment
Envelope, 3-6
Check List, Servicing Intervals, 4-7
Cigar Lighter, 1-4, 2-4
Climb, 1-2, 2-9
climb data, 2-9
climb speeds, 2-10
go-around climb, 2-1v
maximum performance, 1-3
maximum rate-of-climb data,
5-3
normal, 1-2
Clock, 1-4, 2-4
Cold Weather Equipment, 6-1
winterization kit, 6-1
Cold Weather Operation, 2-12
Correction Table, Airspeed, 5-2
Crosswind Landing, 2-11
Crosswind Take-Off, 2-9
Cruise Performance,Optimum, Z-10
Cruise Performance Table, 5-4
Cruising, 1-3, 2-10
Index-1
D
Diagram,
baggage loading/tie-down, 3-4
electrical, 2-4
exterior inspection, iv
fuel, 2-2
maximum glide, 5-5
principal dimensions, ii
taxiing, 2-6
Dimensions, Principal, ii
Dipstick, Oil, 4-6
Directional Gyro, 1-4
Distance Table,
landing, 5-3
take-off, 5-3
Electrical System, 2-3
alternator, 2-4
ammeter, 1-4, 2-3, 2-4
battery, 2-4, 4-7
battery contactor, 2-4
cigar lighter, 1-4, 2-4
clock, 1-4, 2-4
flashing beacon, 2-5
fuses and circuit breakers,
2-3, 2-4
ignition switch, 1-4, 2-4
landing lights, 2-5
magnetos, 2-4
master switch, 1-4, 2-4
regulator, 2-4
schematic, 2-4
starter, 2-4
starter handle, 1-4, 2-4
switches, 1-4
Elevator Trim Control Wheel, 1-4
Empty Weight, inside cover
Engine, inside cover
before starting, 1-1
Index-2
instrument markings, 3-3
oil dipstick, 4-6
oil filler, 4-6
operation limitations, 3-2
primer, 2-2
starting, 1-1, 2-7
Equipment, Cold Weather, 6-1
Exterior Care, 4-2, 4-3
Exterior Inspection Diagram, iv
Р
File, Aircraft, 4-5
Filler, Oil, 4-6
Filter, Carburetor Air, 4-7
Filter, Oil, 4-7
Flashing Beacon, 2-5
Flight Hour Recorder, 1-4
Fuel System, 2-1
capacity, inside covers
carburetor, 2-2
fuel line drain plug, 4-7
fuel tanks, 2-2
fuel tank fillers, 4-6
fuel tank quick-drain valve kit,
6-4
fuel tank sump drains, 4-7
long range fuel tanks, 6-1
mixture control knob, 1-4, 2-2
primer, 1-4, 2-2
quantity data, 2-1
quantity indicators, 1-4, 3-3
schematic, 2-2
shut -off valve, 2-2
strainer, 2-1, 2-2, 4-6, 4-7
Fuse/Circuit Breaker Panel, 1-4
Fuses and Circuit Breakers, 2-3, 2-4
G
Go-Around Climb, 2-10
Gross Weight, inside cover, 3-1
Ground Handling, 4-1
Gyro, Directional, 1-4
Gyro Horizon, 1-4
H
Handling Airplane on Ground, 4-1
Heating and Ventilating System,
Cabin, 2-5
Hydraulic Fluid, inside back cover
Indicator,
airspeed, 1-4, 6-2
turn-and-bank, 1-4
vertical speed, 1-4
Indicators, Fuel Quantity, 1-4, 3-3
Ignition Switch, 1-4, 2-4
Inspection Diagram, Exterior, iv
Inspection Service and Inspection
Periods, 4-4
Instrument Markings, Engine, 3-3
Interior Care, 4-3
L
Landing, inside cover, 2-11
after, 1-3
before, 1-3
crosswind, 2-11
distance table, 5-3
lights, 2-5
normal, 1-3
short field, 2-11
Light, Landing, 2-5
Limitations,
airspeed, 3-2
engine operation, 3-2
ading, Power, inside cover
Loading Graph, 3-5
Loading Problem, Sample, 3-4
Long Range Fuel Tanks, 6-1
Lubrication and Servicing
Procedures, 4-6
M
Magnetos, 2-4
Maneuvers - Utility Category, 3-1
Map Compartment, 1-4
Markings, Instrument, 3-3
Master Cylinders, Brake, 4-7
Master Switch, 1-4, 2-4
Maximum Glide, 5-5
Maximum Performance Climb, 1-3
Maximum Performance Take-Off,
1-2
Maximum Rate-of-Climb Data, 5-3
Microphone, 1-4
Mixture Control Knob, 1-4, 2-2
Moment Envelope, Center of
Gravity, 3-6
Mooring Your Airplane, 4-1
N
Normal Climb, 1-2
Normal Landing, 1-3
Normal Take-Off, 1-2
Nose Gear Shock Strut, 4-7
Nose Gear Torque Links, 4-7
O
Oil System,
capacity, inside covers
dipstick, 4-6
engine oil, 4-7, inside back
cover
filler, 4-6
Index-3
filter, 4-7
temperature gage, 1-4, 3-3
pressure gage, 1-4, 3-3
Omni Course Indicator, 1-4
Operation, Cold Weatner, 2-12
Operation Limitations, Engine, 3-2
Operations Authorized, 3-1
Optimum Cruise Performance, 2-10
Optional Instrument Space, 1-4
Owner Follow-Up System, 4-8
P
Painted Surfaces, 4-2
Parking Brake Control, 1-4
Parking Brake System, 2-5
Performance - Specifications,
inside cover
Power, inside cover
Power Loading, inside cover
Primer, Engine, 1-4, 2-2
Principal Dimensions, ii
Propeller, inside cover
care, 4-3
Publications, 4-8
Q
Quantity Data, Fuel, 2-1
Quantity Indicators, Fuel, 1-4, 3-3
Quick - Drain Valve Kit, Fuel, 6-4
R
Radio, 1-4
Radio Transmitter Selector
Switch, 6-2
Range, inside cover
Rate of Climb, inside cover
Rate-of-Climb Data Table, 5-3
Rear View Mirror, 1-4
Index-4
Registration Number, Aircraft, 1-4
Regulator, Voltage, 2-4
S
Sample Loading Problem, 3-4
Secure Aircraft, 1-3
Service Ceiling, inside cover
Servicing and Lubrication, 4-6
Servicing Intervals Check List, 4-7
Servicing Requirements Table,
inside back cover
Shimmy Dampener, 4-7
Short Field Landing, 2-11
Shut-Off Valve, Fuel, 2-2
Specifications - Performance,
inside cover
Speed, inside cover
Speeds, Climb, 2-10
Stalls, 2-11
speed chart, 5-2
Starter, 2-4
Starter Handle, 1-4, 2-4
Starting Engine, 1-1, 2-7
before, 1-1
Strainer, Fuel, 2-1, 2-2, 4-6, 4-7
Suction Gage, 1-4
Suction Relief Valve Inlet Screen,
4-7
Surfaces,
aluminum, 4-3
painted, 4-2
Sy stem,
cabin heating and ventilating,
2-5
electrical, 2-3
fuel, 2-1
owner follow-up, 4-8
parking brake, 2-5
T
Table of Contents, iii
Tachometer, 1-4, 3-3
Take-Off, inside cover, 1-2, 2-8
before take-off, 1-2, 2-8
crosswind, 2-9
distance table, 5-3
flap settings, 2-9
maximum performance, 1-2
normal, 1-2
performance charts, 2-9
power checks, 2-8
Taxiing, 2-7
diagram, 2-6
Throttle, 1-4, 2-2
Tire Pressure, inside back cover
Trim Tab Control Wheel, Elevator,
1-4
True Airspeed Indicator, 6-2
Turn Coordinator, 1-4
U
Utility Category, Maneuvers, 3-1
Vv
Vacuum System Air Filter, 4-7
Vacuum System Oil Separator, 4-7
Vertical Speed Indicator, 1-4
W
Weight,
empty, inside cover
gross, inside cover, 3-1
Weight and Balance, 3-3
center of gravity envelope, 3-6
loading graph, 3-5
sample loading problem, 3-4
Wheel Bearings, 4-7
Windshield - Windows, 4-2
Wing Flap Switch, 1-4
Wing Leveler Control, 1-4
Wing Loading, inside cover
Winterization Kit, 6-1
Index-5
WARRANTY
The Cessna Aircraft Company ("Cessna") warrants each new aircraft manufactured
by it, and all new aircraft equipment and accessories, including Cessna-Crafted
Electronics (as herein defined), and all new service parts for such aircraft, aircraft
equipment and accessories sold by it, to be free from defects in material and work-
manship under normal use and service for a period of six (6) months after delivery
to the original retail purchaser or first user in the case of aircraft, aircraft equipment
and accessories (except Cessna-Crafted Electronics as herein defined) and service
parts therefor, and for a period of one (1) year after such delivery inthe case of
Cessna-Crafted Electronics (which term includes all communication, navigation and
autopilot systems bearing the name "Cessna", beginning at the connection to the air-
craft electrical system (bus bar) and including "black boxes”, antennas, microphones,
speakers and other components and associated wiring but excluding gyro instruments
used in connection with autopilot and navigation systems) and service parts therefor.
Cessna's obligation under this warranty is limited to repairing or replacing, at its
option, any part or parts which, within the applicable six (6) or twelve (12) months
period as above set forth, shall be returned transportation charges prepaid to Cessna
at Wichita, Kansas, or to any Cessna appointed or Cessna Distributor appointed dealer
authorized by such appointment to sell the aircraft, equipment, accessories and service
parts of the type invelved and which upon examination shall disclose to Cessna's satis-
faction to have been thus defective. (A new warranty period is not established for
replacements. Replacements are warranted for the remainder of the applicable six (6)
or twelve (12) months original warranty period). The repair or replacement of defec-
tive parts under this warranty will be made by Cessna or the dealer without charge for
parts, or labor for removal, installation and/or actual repair of such defective parts.
(Locations of such dealers will be furnished by Cessna on request).
The provisions of this warranty do not apply to any aircraft, equipment, accessories
(including Cessna-Crafted Electronics) or service parts therefor manufactured or sold
by Cessna which have been subject to misuse, negligence, or accident, or which shall
have been repaired or altered outside of Cessna's factory in any way so as in the
judgment of Cessna to affect adversely its performance, stability and reliability, nor
to normal maintenance services (such as engine tune up, cleaning, control rigging,
brake and other mechanical adjustments, maintenance inspections, etc.) and the
replacement of service items (such as spark plugs, brake linings, filters, hoses,
belts, tires, etc.) made in connection with such services or required as maintenance,
nor to normal deterioration of soft trim and appearance items (such as paint, uphol-
stery, rubber-like items, etc.) due to wear and exposure.
THIS WARRANTY IS EXPRESSLY IN LIEU OF ANY OTHER WARRANTIES, EXPRESSED
OR IMPLIED IN FACT OR BY LAW, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF
MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, AND OF ANY
OTHER OBLIGATION OR LIABILITY ON THE PART OF CESSNA TO ANYONE OF ANY
NATURE WHATSOEVER BY REASON OF THE MANUFACTURE AND/OR SALE OR
THE USE OF SUCH AIRCRAFT PRODUCTS, INCLUDING LIABILITY FOR CONSE-
QUENTIAL OR SPECIAL DAMAGES, AND CESSNA NEITHER ASSUMES NOR AU-
THORIZES ANYONE TO ASSUME FOR IT ANY OTHER OBLIGATION OR LIABILITY
IN CONNECTION WITH SUCH AIRCRAFT PRODUCTS.
SERVICING REQUIREMENTS
>
FUEL:
AVIATION GRADE -- 80/87 MINIMUM GRADE
CAPACITY EACH STANDARD TANK -- 13 GALLONS
CAPACITY EACH LONG RANGE TANK -- 19 GALLONS
ENGINE OIL:
AVIATION GRADE -- SAE 40 ABOVE 40° F.
SAE 10W30 OR SAE 20 BELOW 40° F.
(MULTI-VISCOSITY OIL WITH A RANGE OF SAE 10W30
IS RECOMMENDED FOR IMPROVED STARTING IN COLD
WEATHER. DETERGENT OR DISPERSANT OIL, CON-
FORMING TO CONTINENTAL MOTORS SPECIFICATION
MHS-24A, MUST BE USED.
CAPACITY OF ENGINE SUMP -- 6 QUARTS
(DO NOT OPERATE ON LESS THAN 4 QUARTS, TO
MINIMIZE LOSS OF OIL THROUGH BREATHER, FILL
TO 5 QUART LEVEL FOR NORMAL FLIGHTS OF LESS
THAN 3 HOURS. FOR EXTENDED FLIGHT, FILL TO
6 QUARTS. IF OPTIONAL OIL FILTER IS INSTALLED,
ONE ADDITIONAL QUART IS REQUIRED WHEN THE
FILTER ELEMENT IS CHANGED.
HYDRAULIC FLUID:
MIL-H-5606 HYDRAULIC FLUID
TIRE PRESSURE:
NOSE WHEEL --- 30 PSI ON 5:00 X 5 TIRE
MAIN WHEELS -- 21 PSI ON 6:00 xX 6 TIRES
NOSE GEAR SHOCK STRUT:
KEEP FILLED WITH FLUID AND INFLATED TO 20 PSI.
DO NOT OVER-INFLATE.
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