standard operating procedure

standard operating procedure
Washington Conservation District Monitoring
S.O.P. 1: Groundwater Monitoring
Version 1
Date: 08/23/07
Page 1 of 6
Water Monitoring Program
WASHINGTON CONSERVATION DISTRICT
STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE (S.O.P.) No. 1
GROUNDWATER MONITORING
Washington Conservation District Monitoring
S.O.P. 1: Groundwater Monitoring
Version 1
Date: 08/23/07
Page 2 of 6
Water Monitoring Program
Standard Operating Procedure No. 1
GROUNDWATER MONITORING
Table of Contents
1.0
2.0
3.0
SCOPE AND APPLICABILITY......................................................................... 3
.1
Overview of Groundwater Monitoring Procedures ....................................................3
.2
Scope of the S.O.P. .....................................................................................................3
EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS ..................................................................... 3
PROCEDURES ..................................................................................................... 4
.1
Procedure for field data collection..............................................................................4
.1.1 Static well manual elevation measurements........................................... 4
.1.2 Procedure for Data logger data collection.............................................. 4
.1.3 Procedure of Data Compilation and Management ................................. 5
Washington Conservation District Monitoring
S.O.P. 1: Groundwater Monitoring
Version 1
Date: 08/23/07
Page 3 of 6
1.0
SCOPE AND APPLICABILITY
.1
Overview of Groundwater Monitoring Procedures
This S.O.P is designed to define the procedures that are performed in groundwater monitoring to
ensure the accuracy and usability of the data after the raw data has been collected. Multiple
agencies collect these types of data and have specific standard procedures for their specific data
collection needs. This S.O.P. specifically defines the methods used by the Washington
Conservation District (WCD) and does not reflect the exact procedures used by others.
Although other agency S.O.P.’s may look similar, careful investigation may reveal differences
between procedures that should be taken into account.
.2
Scope of the S.O.P.
This SOP describes required procedures for groundwater monitoring. This SOP describes:
•
•
•
Field data collection
Data logger data collection
Data compilation and management
2.0
EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS
The following equipment and materials will be required:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Field log book or electronic field log book
Electronic Well Sounder or Steel Tape with Chalk
Laptop computer
Desktop computer
Connection to network server
Software
• Microsoft Office software products (Word, Access, Excel)
• Global Water or similar level logger software
• Pendragon Forms 5.0
Washington Conservation District Monitoring
S.O.P. 1: Groundwater Monitoring
Version 1
Date: 08/23/07
Page 4 of 6
3.0
PROCEDURES
.1
Procedure for field data collection
.1.1
Static well manual elevation measurements
At least every 30 days, site visits will be performed to take a measurement of static well water
elevations in our monitoring well network. If field personal can’t locate a well visually, a GPS
device will be used to locate the coordinates of the well. Once at the monitoring well, field
personnel will record the date, time, unique well identification number from the well, the
measuring point from which the personnel will take the reading, and any other nearby activities
that could be affecting groundwater elevations (i.e. irrigation, pump tests, etc.). Personnel will
then remove the cap from the well and lower either an electric sounder or a pre-chalked steel
tape.
The water level device used will be lowered until it either sounds (electric sounder) or is lowered
to a pre-determined depth. The electric sounder will be pulled up and down numerous times in
order to ensure that they have found the water surface. The tape user will pre-determine the
amount that he or she will lower the tape by looking at the previous reading taken and using that
as a starting point for how much the tape will be lowered. A 5-10 ft. span will be chalked
surrounding the pre-determined elevation. If no water is detected on the tape using a 5-10 ft.
chalked span a 10-20 ft. chalked span will be lowered. Once either the sounder or the tape has
found the water surface, the data must be recorded in the field data log book or electronic log
book. For the sounder, record the length from the measuring point to the sounding sensor (most
have pre-measured rules on them already). For the tape, measure the distance to the wetted point
on the chalk. Record these values in the log book for later data translation.
.1.2
Procedure for Data logger data collection
At least every 14 days, site visits will performed to ensure the integrity of the monitoring site and
its data. If field personal can’t locate a well visually, a GPS device will be used to locate the
coordinates of the well. Once at the monitoring well, field personnel will record the date, time,
unique well identification number from the well, the measuring point from which the personnel
will take the manual reading, the data logger that is being downloaded, any data logger data that
looks strange or wrong, and any other nearby activities that could be affecting groundwater
elevations (i.e. irrigation, pump tests, etc.).
Personnel will remove the cap from the well and connect the data logger to the laptop computer.
The data logger will be downloaded and the data will be stored in the laptop until it is backed up
to a network server in the office. Once downloaded, look at the data to ensure the data looks
Washington Conservation District Monitoring
S.O.P. 1: Groundwater Monitoring
Version 1
Date: 08/23/07
Page 5 of 6
accurate. If something appears strange or incorrect, a note will be made in the log book and it
will be further examined in the office. Once the data logger has been downloaded, a manual
static water elevation measurement will need to be taken. See procedure above for protocol of
static water elevation measurement. The reason a manual measurement is taken is because the
manual measurement and continuous data should have the same offset between values of
measurement throughout the monitoring season and if they don’t the data logger data may be
incorrect.
.1.3
Procedure of Data Compilation and Management
With field data collected, the process of data compilation and management must be performed in
the office.
For manual static water elevation measurements, the data collected in the field log book or
electronic log book will be transferred to a desktop computer’s spreadsheet program. Once in
the spreadsheet, the data can be saved to the network server for more permanent storage. The
groundwater elevation above mean sea level (MSL) is determined by subtracting the
measurement taken in the field by the elevation of a known point on the surface or the measuring
point. This point will either have an elevation assigned to it that is determined by an accurate
survey or will utilize an assumed elevation (i.e.100). A graph should be generated to view the
data in order to determine if any reading seems wrong or strange. If anything seems wrong a
note should be made to flag this data point and a subsequent measurement may need to be made
to verify this measurement. This information will then be recorded in the spreadsheet and saved
to the network server.
For data logger data elevation measurements, the data collected in the field log book or
electronic log book will be transferred to a desktop computer’s spreadsheet program. Once in
the spreadsheet, the data can be saved to the network server for more permanent storage. See the
procedure above to determine water elevations for manual measurement. The data logger
information should be saved to the network server during normal data backup procedures (see
WCD S.O.P. 1 Data Management). To compile and manage the data logger data, the data should
be plotted on a graph within a spreadsheet. If any data points seem strange or wrong, a note will
be recorded by that data point or points. All manual elevations recorded during site visits should
also be recorded within the spreadsheet to match the date and time of the data logger data. An
offset should be determined between the data logger data and the manual elevation measurement.
The offset should be the same or within 0.02 or 0.03 ft. for each measurement. If there are
measurements outside this range, then a note should be made indicating the data may be
inaccurate. If it is determined from the data that the data logger may be malfunctioning, then the
data logger should be pulled from the site and sent in for recalibration or repair. Once all of the
data logger data and manual measurements are compiled, then the elevation of the water must be
translated to the data logger data. Data logger data is not in elevation MSL. The data logger
simply measures the depth of water with which it is submerged in. To translate this data into
Washington Conservation District Monitoring
S.O.P. 1: Groundwater Monitoring
Version 1
Date: 08/23/07
Page 6 of 6
elevation MSL, the offset determined between data logger measurement and the manual
measurement elevation should be added to the measurement by the data logger. Perform this
operation on every data logger data point and you’ll have continuous elevation data. This
information should be recorded in the spreadsheet and saved to the network server.
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