600 Series Disk and Drum Lathe Operators Manual - Snap

600 Series Disk and Drum Lathe Operators Manual - Snap
600 Series
Disk and Drum Lathe
Operators Manual
FORM 3804-11
CHECK LIST
1. Standard equipment is shown on page 3.
2. Optional accessories are available from your John Bean Dealer. You may also order by contacting John Bean
Company, Exchange Ave., Conway, AR.72032 or by calling 1 - (800) 362-8326
3. Assemble deluxe bench if ordered. The lathe can be mounted on either when removed from the carton.
SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
Warning!
For Your Own Safety, Read Instruction Manual Before Operating Lathe
1. Lathes are supplied with a threewire cord to provide grounding if your
electrical system is properly installed
by a qualified electrician and in compliance with the national, regional and
local electrical codes.
2. Improper grounding can cause
electrical shock. In the event of a
malfunction or breakdown, grounding
provides a path of least resistance for
electrical current to reduce risk of
electric shock.
GROUNDING INSTRUCTIONS
All grounded, cord-connected tools:
The lathe is equipped with an electric
cord having an equipment-grounding
conductor and a grounding gap. The
plug must be plugged into a matching
outlet that is properly installed and
grounded in accordance with all codes
and ordinances.
Do not modify the plug provided with
domestic lathes - if it will not fit the
outlet, have the proper outlet installed
by a qualified electrician.
Improper connection of the equipment
grounding conductor can result in a
risk of electric shock. In the U.S.A.,
the conductor with insulation having
an outer surface that is green with or
without yellow stripes is the equipment-grounding conductor. If repair
or replacement of the electrical cord
or plug is necessary, do not connect
the equipment-grounding conductor
to a live terminal.
Check with a qualified electrician or
serviceman if the grounding instructions are not completely understood,
or if in doubt as to whether the tool is
properly grounded.
Lathes sold and installed in the U.S.A.
should use only 3-wire extension cords
that have 3-prong grounding plugs
and 3-pole receptacles that accept
the power plug.
1
Repair or replace damaged or worn
cords immediately.
This tool is intended for use on a
circuit that has an outlet that looks like
the one illustrated in Sketch (A) below. The tool has a grounding plug
that looks like the plug illustrated in
Sketch (A) above. A temporary
5. DON’T FORCE LATHE. It will do
the job better and safer at the rate for
which it was designed.
6. USE RIGHT TOOL. Don’t force
lathe or attachment for a job for which
it was not designed.
7. WEAR PROPER APPAREL. Do
not wear loose clothing, gloves, necktie, rings, bracelets, or other jewelry
that might get caught in moving parts.
Nonslip footwear is recommended.
Wear protective hair covering to contain long hair.
adapter should be used only until a
properly grounded outlet can be installed by a qualified electrician. A
temporary adapter which looks like
the adapter illustrated in sketch (C),
may be used to connect to a 2-pole
receptacle as shown in Sketch (B).
The green-colored rigid ear, lug, etc.
extending from the adapter must be
connected to a permanent ground,
such as a properly grounded outlet
box or a cold water pipe (metal).
SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
1. KEEP GUARDS IN PLACE and in
working order.
2. REMOVE ALL TOOLS FROM THE
WORK AREA before turning lathe on.
Always place tools in storage area.
3. KEEP WORK AREA CLEAN. Cluttered areas and benches invite accidents.
4. DON’T USE IN DANGEROUS ENVIRONMENT. Use lathe indoors only.
Don’t use lathe in damp or wet locations, or expose to rain. Keep work
area well lighted.
8. ALWAYS WEAR SAFETY
GLASSES. Everyday eyeglasses
only have impact resistant lenses,
they are NOT safety glasses. Also
use face or dust mask if cutting operation is dusty.
9. DON’T OVERREACH. Keep proper
footing and balance.
10. MAINTAIN LATHE WITH CARE.
Keep cutters sharp and clean for best
performance and to reduce the risk of
injury to persons. Follow instructions
for lubricating and changing accessories.
11. DISCONNECT LATHE before servicing, or when changing accessories, such as spacers, collets, cutters
and the like.
12. REDUCE THE RISK OF UNINTENTIONAL STARTING. Make sure
unit power switch is in the off position
before plugging in.
13. USE RECOMMENDED ACCESSORIES. The use of improper accessories could result in risk of injury to
persons as well as cause poor performance on disks or drums being Machined. Consult the operator's manual
for recommended accessories.
14. CHECK FOR DAMAGED
PARTS. Before use of the lathe, a
guard or other part that is damaged
should be checked to determine that it
will operate properly and perform its
intended function. Check for alignment of moving parts, binding of moving parts, breakage of parts, mounting, and any other conditions that may
affect its operation. A guard or other
part that is damaged should be properly repaired or replaced.
15. DIRECTION OF FEED. Feed
work into cutter against the direction
of rotation of the cutter only.
16. NEVER STAND ON TOOL. Serious injury could result if tool is tipped
or if the cutting tool is unintentionally
contacted.
17. NEVER LEAVE LATHE RUNNING UNATTENDED. TURN
POWER OFF. Don’t leave lathe until
it comes to a complete stop.
18. CLEAN CHIPS FROM LATHE.
Chip accumulation can cover tips,
preventing proper adjustment. Never
use your fingers to remove chips from
cutter tips. Use a brush to remove
chip accumulations.
19. KEEP UNAUTHORIZED PERSONNEL AWAY from all equipment
in shop. Alternative - disconnect all
electrical cords from wall plug.
21. USE PROPER EXTENSION
CORD. Make sure your extension
cord is in good condition. When using
an extension cord, be sure to use one
heavy enough to carry the current
your lathe will require. An undersized
cord will cause a drop in line voltage
resulting in loss of power and overheating. See chart below for correct
size to use depending on cord length
and ampere rating. If in doubt use the
next heavier cord. NOTE: the smaller
the gage number the heavier the wire.
Total length of cord in feet
AWG
0 - 50ft
50 - 100ft
over 100ft *
14
12
Not Recommended over 100 ft.
Size figured for voltage of 115v @ 14amps
20. ADDITIONAL SAFETY PRECAUTIONS are noted throughout this
manual.
1. This lathe was thoroughly tested before shipment to perform all operations for which it was designed.
2. Before operating your lathe, read and thoroughly familiarize yourself with the contents of this manual. Your JBC
Dealer or Representative is available to acquaint you with the features of this lathe. Do not operate the lathe until
you understand all of its functions.
3. Become familiar with the standard equipment supplied with your lathe. Review the adapter chart supplied and
determine if optional adapters will be required for the type of passenger cars and light trucks that frequent your
establishment.
4. For your convenience, when supplies and parts are required, John Bean has a serviceman caring for your area
who carries parts for emergency requirements. Refer to the Parts Reference and order parts by their 'Part Number'.
This manual contains operating instructions, safety information, preventive maintenance instructions, and other
information relating to the proper operation of John Bean Lathes.
Table of Contents
Topics of Interest
Check List
Safety Instructions
Preview
Specifications
Standard Equipment
Feeds and Speeds
Cutting Tools
Installation Instructions for 600 Series Lathes
Mounting Equipment on Base or Bench
How to Machine a Brake Drum
How to Machine a Disc Brake Rotor
Operating the Lathe
Preventive Maintenance
Warranty
Page
1
1
2
3
3
4
5
5
6
8
11
12
15
17
2
SPECIFICATIONS
Capacity:
Drums 6" diameter, 6" wide face
Discs 6" to 20" Diameter, 2" thick
Motor:
Spindle Speed 105 and 160 RPM
Shipping Weight:
Feeds:
Power crossfeed: 001 - .010" per
spindle revolution
Carriage: .005 & .0125 per spindle
revolution
600 - 320 lbs.
Notice: Components of the 600 Series Lathes may change as requirements vary and these changes will
be made, to increase the basic capacity of the equipment, without prior
notice.
1 HP, 115-230 Volt, 50/60Hz, 1Phase
Notice: In the event the motor should
be determined unserviceable, the
motor should be replaced only with a
unit purchased though JBC or a JBC
certified representative.
Standard Equipment for the 600
Catalog
Number
3
Description
Supplied with
601
1
610
Silencer - Lg. Passenger Car Rotor
1
1
90989
Silencer - Passenger Car Rotors
1
1
90196
Silencer - Sm Solid Rotor
1
1
90988
Silencer - Sm. Passenger Car Drums
90198
Clip-on Silencer
90490
Cutter Kit, RH Cutter with 2 - 90847 Tips
1
1
90519
Small Disc Collet Adapter
2
2
2
90520
Medium Disc Collet Adapter
1
1
1
90521
Large Disc Collet Adapter
1
1
1
90527
Hubless Rotor Adapter Set
90528
Hubless Rotor Adapter Set
90547
Self-centering Arbor Nut
1
1
1
90554
Spacer, 1" Long
1
1
1
90578
Spanner Wrench
1
1
1
90556
Spacer, 2" Long
1
1
1
90644
Rotor-Truer with 90495 LH &90494 RH
Cutters and 90711 Spacer
1
1
90178
Chrysler Drum/Disc Collets
1
1
1
90642
Drum Cutter Tool
1
1
90156
Collet, Chrysler - Special
2
2
90526
Floating Drum Attachment
90194
600
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
FEEDS AND SPEEDS
1. Drum Machining - 600 is equipped
with two feed speeds. See Figure 1.
2. Disc Machining - Model 600
Lathes are equipped to machine disc
brake rotors with a feed rate of .003"
per spindle revolution.
A. Rough Cut - .0125" per spindle
revolution.
This feed rate will produce the desired
finish on rotors.
B. Finish Cut - .005" per spindle
revolution.
Normally, the finish of the rotor after
machining will meet or exceed most
car manufacturers’ specifications. If
you desire an even smoother finish,
an approximate 30 second application for each side of the rotor with the
90646 Rotor Finisher (optional accessory) will provide a smooth non-directional finish. See Figure 2.
The above feed settings have been
established after years of research
and experience in conjunction with
car manufacturers’ recommendations.
A finish cut produces an excellent
surface for all types of or brake linings, hard or soft, woven or molded.
3. All Model 600 Lathes are equipped
with a motor and pulleys to produce
spindle speeds of 105 and 160 RPM,
See Figures 3 and 4.
A. Most passenger car drums and
rotors can be machined at the 160
RPM.
B. The 105 RPM is recommended for
drums and rotors over 12" in diameter. Some drums and rotors which
have hard spots can be satisfactorily
machined at this speed.
C. To decrease or increase speed,
the belt must be moved to the top
largest diameter pulley for 105 RPM
or to the top smallest for the 160 RPM.
D. With the motor turned off, pull the
belt guard back, placing hand as
shown in figure 4, until the upper pulley is exposed. Then lift the base of
the motor and move the belt as described above.
WARNING!!!
Rough Cut
Turn motor off before attempting
to move belt. Motor may accidentally engage resulting in serious
personal injury.
Finish Cut
Figure 1
105 RPM
160 RPM
Lift
Motor
Figure 2
Move Belt Guard
to Down Position
Figure 3
Figure 4
4
CUTTING TOOLS
Tool Holders, Cutter Shanks and
Carbide Tips
1. JBC Lathes are designed to use
cutter shanks with No. 90487 carbide
tips with three cutting edges.
2. IMPORTANT: Sharp cutting tips
must be used at all times. A dull cutter
will affect the finish of both drums and
rotors.
3. Cutter shanks with coated carbide
tips are available for heavy duty drum
and disc machining. Order part number 91281 for a pack of ten.
4. Tip life is affected by speed, grade
of carbide, cutter tip design and size.
These are all based on mechanical
considerations of the lathe - motor,
speed, and gear ratios.
5. Check tightness of carbide tip in the
cutting tool. Examine for breaks on
the cutting edge. If the cutting edge is
damaged, replace it promptly. Be
sure no metal chips are under tip
when changing tips.
Be sure to keep an adequate supply of
replaceable carbide tips on hand at all
times.
Cutting Tools
Cutters Supplied with 600
90490 Right Hand Cutter Kit with 2 extra
90487 Carbide Tips
90494 Right Hand Cutter with 90487 Carbide Tip
90495 Left Hand Cutter With 90487 Carbide Tip
INSTALLATION
INSTRUCTIONS
For 600 Brake Lathes
Electrical Requirements:
1. Refer to the name plate located on
the back of the lathe. Be sure the
power source is of sufficient voltage
and amperage to operate the lathe. If
in doubt, have a qualified electrician
check. See Figure 5.
2. Domestic Lathes. An approved
three-wire cord and a three-pronged
plug is supplied with the lathe and the
prong for grounding must not be removed. Change the receptacle in the
wall socket if necessary to insure
proper grounding.
If the use of an extension cord is
necessary, use a heavy duty 3-wire
cord containing a grounding prong
and the proper receptacle to accept
the plug on the lathe cord.
5
WARNING!!!
Lathe must be grounded whenever in use. Failure to do so may
result in electrical shock and
cause serious personal injury.
Brake Lathe
Model
Serial #
Volts 115
Hz 60/50
600
J81JM030
Amps 14
Phase 1
John Bean Company
Conway, AR. 72032
Figure 5
3. Should the electric power supply
cord become damaged, repair or replace it immediately. Use only part
number specified or equivalent.
4. If wiring the lathe to a permanent
connection is desired, be sure the
ground wire in the lathe cord is connected to a ground in an approved
metal outlet box. The power source
must be fused or have a circuit breaker
large enough to handle the voltage
and amperage as specified on the
name plate.
Initial Cleaning/Lubrication
Clean all machined surfaces of factory-applied rust preventive. Apply a
good lubricant (e.g. WD40 or CRC) to
the dovetail ways (housing & carriage), cross slide and rotor truer. See
Figure 10.
MOUNTING EQUIPMENT
WARNING!!!
Keep all loose equipment properly
stored and away from the area of
the revolving hand wheel. See
Figure 9.
On Base or Bench
1. The Base is designed for one lathe.
Follow assembly instructions supplied
with each.
2. Mounting hardware, nuts, bolts,
accessory hooks, etc. are supplied
with the bench. See Figure 6.
3. A rubber pad is supplied with the
674 Base, and must be used between
the lathe and the base.
Figure 9
Drum Prevents hand wheel from turning,
causing damage to gear train.
Figure 6
4. Be sure the mounting bolts are
tightened securely to eliminate any
possibility of vibration. If the lathe is
not mounted securely, it may cause
the lathe to operate improperly.
5. Provisions for storing adapters and
accessories are incorporated with the
Base. See Figure 7.
Accessory hooks are supplied for
cones, spacers, and collets. A shelf is
provided for larger items.
6. Adapters and accessories should
be stored on the accessory hooks
provided underneath the top of the
base, or on the sign board.
Base with Lathe,
Sign and Accessories
Figure 7
6
Flexible Light
Oil Fill Plug (Under Tray)
Tool Tray
Cutter Lock Screw
Removable Arbor
Adustable Pivot
Post Lock Nut
Oil Level
Tri-Tips
Cross Slide Lock Nut
Tool Post
Feed Shift Lever
Tool Post Holder
Micrometer Dial Wheel
Carriage Traverse
Hand Wheel
Drum Rotor Lever
On-Off Switch
Flexible Light
Oil Fill Plug (Under Tray)
Tool Tray
Cutter Lock Screw
Thumb Screws
Removable Arbor
Adustable Pivot
Post Lock Nut
Oil Level
Cross Slide Lock Nut
Micrometer Dial
Feed Shift Lever
Tool Post
Tool Post Spacer
Micrometer Dial Wheel
Carriage Traverse
Hand Wheel
Drum Rotor Lever
Figure 10
7
On-Off Switch
HOW TO MACHINE A
BRAKE DRUM
Model 600
See Figure 10.
After the following instructions are
read and understood, obtain a scrap
brake drum for practice. Select the
proper adapters for mounting on a
spindle. Mounting is one of the most
important functions of the machining
operation, since it affects accuracy
and finish.
Practice setting cutter for machining
drums. Learn all the functions thoroughly to insure proper operation.
Machining Limitations - Drums
Drums produced recently have the
maximum drum diameter value cast
into the outer surface. The proper
procedure for determining whether
to resurface drums or discard them is
listed below:
A. Check to see if the brake drum
has a maximum size cast into it. If
not, refer to the current JBC Drum
and Rotor Specifications Book.
B. Measure the drum with the optional JBC 90240 Drum micrometer
(90239 - Metric) and, if it is smaller
than the maximum allowable size, it
can be machined.
C. After machining, check size again
with the Drum Micrometer and discard if it is beyond the maximum
limits.
Figure 11
Use of collets to mount tapered roller
bearings equipped brake drums.
Mounting Brake Drums
1. Hub type Drums.
On a 600 Lathe, proceed as follows:
A. Clean excess grease from bearing
races of drum. Inspect bearing races
for damage and replace if necessary.
B. Select collets to fit in bearing
races, by referring to the current Drum
and Rotor Specs. book.
C. Install collet for inner bearing race
on arbor. See Figure 11. Mount the
drum (to be Machined), the collet for
outer bearing race, and necessary
spacers to fill arbor past mounting
surface. Install arbor nut and tighten
by hand. This will center the drum on
the collets. Using 90578 Spanner
Wrench, tighten arbor nut snugly. If
drum touches housing, place a spacer
on arbor between inner collet and
arbor shoulder.
D. IMPORTANT: Do not overtighten
arbor nut when mounting drums or
rotors on the spindle. Usually the
pressure of one hand with the Spanner Wrench engaged in the arbor nut
is sufficient to tighten. See Figure 14.
If spacers and adapters are not clean
and free of nicks, burrs or foreign
matter when the arbor is tightened, it
could introduce spindle runout. This
can be detected by observing the end
of spindle when the arbor is revolving.
If this occurs, check spacers and
adapters for nicks, etc., to be sure
they are smooth and clean and that
the arbor nut is properly tightened.
E. Wrap a 90988 silencer around the
drum (snug, but not too tight). See
Figure 14. The rubber silencer deadens vibration of the drum while Machining. A brake drum is like a bell and
Figure 12
Use 90526 floating drum attachment to
mount floating hubless rear drums.
Hand tighten arbor nut
with 90578 spanner
wrench.
Figure 14
when it is Machined without the silencer band, vibration is created by
the cutter tip removing metal, resulting in a poor finish.
For wider drums or large finned drums,
the wider, optional 90983 Deluxe Silencer band is recommended. See
Figure 13.
2. Mounting Hubless Brake Drums.
A. When machining rear hubless
drums, use the 90526 Floating Drum
Attachment (90559 or 90560 Truck
Face Plate Set if truck drums are to be
machined), select the proper cone to
fit the center hole in the drum. Follow
the illustration as shown in Figures 12
& 15.
B. Clean the inner face of the drum
with a wire brush.
C. Place one face plate over arbor.
Install spring and centering cone.
Figure 13
Dampen vibrations during the
Machining operation. Excessive
tightness of silencer on drums may
result in minor chatter.
8
D. Place drum over the centering
cone and follow with the other face
plate and necessary spacers to fill
arbor past mounting surface. Install
arbor nut and tighten by hand. This
will center the drum between the face
plates.
E. Tighten arbor nut snugly with spanner wrench. If drum touches housing,
place a spacer on arbor between inner face plate and arbor shoulder.
NOTE: If you experience hard spots
when Machining front and rear drums,
turn motor off, slow the speed and
finish the cut. If the finish is objectionable, discard the drum.
This control lever must be in the drum
position to machine a brake drum.
See Figure 16.
2. Depending on width of drum, advance carriage assembly toward the
drum by turning carriage traverse hand
wheel clockwise, until left side of carriage is approximately one-half inch
beyond the end of lathe housing.
3. Move cross slide to its innermost
position and then back off by turning
dial wheel five turns (about 1/2") counterclockwise. Loosen nut and adjust
tool post holder, tool bar, and cutter
assembly to approximate drum diameter. Tighten nut and leave feed shift
lever in neutral (N) position. See
Figure 17.
4. Loosen two square head set screws
on tool post holder and move cutter
and tool bar into brake drum until it
Tighten
Rear drum mounted
using 90526 floating
drum attachment
Figure 15
Operating Lathe
1. The Model 600 Combination Drum
and Disc Lathe is equipped with a
control lever on the carriage.
Figure 17
touches back of drum. While tightening set screws, rock tool bar clockwise and counterclockwise until set
screws tighten on flat surfaces. Cutter tip should extend from tool bar no
more than 3/4" when turning a typical
brake drum. Some small drums may
Tighten
1/2"
Move control
lever to drum
position
Figure 16
9
Figure 18
require less cutter extension. See
Figure 18.
5. Turn lathe on and advance carriage by turning traverse hand wheel
until cutter is at the extreme back of
drum. Advance cutter into braking
surface to be machined by turning
micrometer dial wheel counterclockwise. Continue turning dial wheel until
desired depth of cut is obtained.
NOTE: Micrometer dial wheel reading
indicates the amount of metal removed
from diameter of drum (not radius).
6. Tighten adjusting knob on side of
carriage. Engage feed lever in either
rough or finish cut, depending on the
condition of the drum surface to be
machined.
NOTE: When machining a barrel
shaped or worn drum, the outer edge
(open end) of drum usually has a
smaller diameter than the center section where the brake shoe exerts the
most wear. The smaller diameter
area (outer edge) must be machined
first before making the finish cut. See
Figure 19.
Some drums may have a deep groove
or grooves (usually .020" or less) that
can be Machined in one pass. When
this condition exists, move cutter to
bottom of deepest groove and note
micrometer dial reading. Turn dial
wheel to remove cutter from groove
Figure 19
and move cutter to back of drum. Turn
dial wheel to previous measurement
plus .002 or .003 inches and proceed
to machine drum as described below.
See Figure 20.
If the switch fails, the feed nut will drop
into the undercut and the carriage
movement stops. To re-engage the
feed nut on the threads of the feed
screw, turn off lathe, apply slight
pressure on the right side of the carriage while turning hand wheel clockwise. Care must be taken not to
crossthread the feed nut. If hand
wheel turns hard, back off and start
over again.
Figure 20
7. When the machining is completed,
disengage feed lever from finish cut to
neutral (N). See Figure 21.
Figure 21
8. The lathe is equipped with an automatic shut-off rod. It is preset at the
factory to turn lathe off when the carriage reaches its maximum travel to
the right.
9. Prepare to remove the drum by
turning the carriage traverse hand
wheel counterclockwise to clear cutter from the drum and silencer band.
Follow same procedure for front
drums.
10. To remove a front drum from the
arbor, loosen the arbor nut one turn
and place the handle end of the spanner between the hub of the drum and
the collet in the outer bearing race.
Push the top of the wrench down
toward the drum to free the collet from
the bearing race. A slight hand tap on
the wrench may be necessary. See
Figure 23.
After the collet has been loosened,
hold the drum with one hand and
attachment, thus require no special
demount instructions, other than to be
careful not to allow drum to drop on
the spindle when demounting.
11. If the next operation is to machine
a rotor on a 600 lathe, proceed to
page 11.
Adjusting Belt Tension
The Lathe is supplied with a spring
loaded motor mounting that establishes the correct belt tension. See
Figure 23A. The tension can be adjusted to obtain a quiet running motor
as follows:
A. Turn wing nut counter-clockwise to
increase belt tension.
B. Turn clockwise to decrease belt
tension.
Normally, tension adjustment is only
required when machining a large drum
or when making an excessively heavy
cut. See Figure 23A
CAUTION!!
DO NOT REMOVE THE SHUT-OFF
ROD
Adjust belt tension
Figure 23A
Shut off rod
Switch
Loosen nut one turn
remove collet.
Figure 22
A safety factor has also been incorporated with an undercut on the carriage
feed screw. This feature prevents
any damage to the lathe in case of an
electrical switch malfunction. See
Figure 22.
Figure 23
remove the arbor nut, spacers, collet,
and the drum. Remove the remaining
collet on the arbor and remove any
foreign matter before mounting the
next drum. Most rear drums are
mounted with the 90526 floating drum
10
HOW TO MACHINE A DISC sure the thickness again, and, if it is
not within the allowable minimum limBRAKE ROTOR
its, discard it.
Model 600 Series
After the following instructions are read
and understood, obtain a scrap rotor
for practice. Select the proper adapters for mounting on spindle. Mounting is one of the most important functions of the machining operation, as it
affects accuracy and finish.
Practice setting cutters for machining
rotors. Learn all the function thoroughly to insure proper operation.
Machining Limitations - Rotors
Since 1971, rotors have the minimum
thickness values cast into the outer
surface.
The proper procedure for determining
whether to resurface rotors or discard
them is listed below:
A. Using a micrometer or some other
micrometer suitable for measuring the
thickness of the rotor to be machined,
check the rotor thickness at four points
(90 degrees apart) about 1" from the
outer diameter.
B. If the thickness at any of the four
points is less than the minimum established by car manufacturers as
shown on the rotor or in the current
Brake Specifications Book, replace
the rotor.
C. The rotor may be resurfaced if
scored or it has a small amount of
runout, provided it is within the minimum thickness requirement.
NOTE: This check requires a measurement in only one spot if both braking surfaces cleaned up 100%, because the turning operation assures
almost absolute parallelism.
Mounting Brake Rotors
1. Hub Type Rotors
On a 600 Series lathe, proceed as
follows:
A. Clean excess grease from bearing
races of rotor. Inspect bearing races
for damage and replace if necessary.
B. Select collets to fit in bearing
races. Refer to current Drum and
Rotor Specs. book.
C. Install collet for inner bearing race
on arbor. See Figure 25. Then mount
the rotor, collet for outer bearing race,
and necessary spacers to fill arbor
past mounting surface. Install arbor
nut and tighten by hand. This will
center the rotor on the collets. Using
91286 Spanner Wrench, tighten arbor nut snugly. If rotor touches housing, place a spacer on arbor between
inner collet and arbor shoulder.
2. Mounting Hubless Rotors.
A. Locate 90527 Hubless Rotor
Adapter Set and proper cone to fit
rotor to be machined.
C. Place rotor over arbor and centering cone, then install second face
plate over arbor and up against rotor.
D. Add necessary spacers to fill arbor
past mounting surface. Install arbor
nut and tighten by hand. This will
center the rotor to the face plates.
Use 90578 Spanner Wrench to tighten
arbor nut snugly. If rotor touches
housing, place a spacer on arbor between the inner face plate and arbor
shoulder.
E. IMPORTANT: Do not overtighten
arbor nut when mounting rotors on the
spindle. Usually the pressure of one
hand with the spanner wrench engaged in the arbor nut is sufficient to
tighten. See Figure 14. If spacers
and adapters are not clean and free of
nicks and burrs or foreign matter when
the arbor is tightened, it could introduce spindle runout. This can be
detected by observing the end of the
spindle when the arbor is revolving. If
this occurs, check spacers and adapters for nicks, etc., to be sure they are
smooth and clean and that the arbor
nut is properly tightened.
3. Install Rotor Silencer.
Select silencer that is appropriate for
rotor being machined, and install
around outer edge of rotor. There are
four (4) sizes of band type silencers,
plus a clip-on silencer. One of them
will be appropriate for the rotor being
machined. See Figure 27.
B. Install one face plate over arbor,
then follow with a spring and centering cone.
D. After the rotor is machined, mea-
Figure 25 Use collets in bearing race
as illustrated, add necessary spacers
11
Figure 26 An accurate way to machine
hubless rotors. Follow instructions
supplied with 90527.
Figure 27 90989 Rotor Silencer band.
Operating Lathe
1. Align the carriage pointer with the
pointer on the lathe housing by turning
the carriage traverse hand wheel.
Control lever must be in DRUM position to move carriage. It is very important to view this alignment when you
are directly in front of the lathe. If you
are off to the side, the pointers may
appear aligned, when in actuality, they
are not. See Figure 28.
If control lever moves freely to rotor
position, alignment is correct. If it
does not, then examine the pointers
for proper alignment. Push the control lever to the neutral (N) position
and turn off the lathe. See Figure 30.
1/2"
Loosen when
Machining Rotors
Move to
Neutral
Point to Point
Figure 30
Figure 28 Point to point alignment
2. After pointers are aligned, save
setup time by turning on the lathe and
slowly pulling the control lever on the
right side of the carriage to the rotor
position.
This is the farthest movement toward
operator. See Figure 29. The physical shape of the drive shaft and its
mating driven shaft is a hexagon, just
like a socket wrench and the head of
a bolt.
3. If drum machining was the last
operation performed, remove the tool
post nut, washer, and the tool bar
assembly. Always loosen cross slide
adjusting knob when preparing to
machine disc brake rotors. See Figure 30.
4. Be sure the arbor and adapters are
absolutely clean. A small chip, nick,
or burr on the surfaces where spacers
and adapters come together might
cause the rotor to be machined inaccurately and create improper operation when the rotor is reinstalled on
the vehicle.
Cleanliness is of the utmost importance. See Figure 31.
Clean between
spacers
Clean collets
and arbor
Figure 29 -Pull lever to rotor position as
shown
By carefully aligning the pointers (Step
1), you insure the proper alignment of
the two hex parts.
6. Advance cross slide to within approximately 1/2" of its extreme inward
position. See Figure 30.
CAUTION!!!
Before placing the rotor-truer on the
adjustable pivot post, it is extremely
important that all chips, dirt, and any
foreign matter be removed from the
top of the cross slide and the bottom
surface of the rotor-truer plate. Because of the very large contact area
between the rotor-truer plate and the
cross slide, any small chips or pieces
of dirt measuring only a few thousandths of an inch can cause the rotor
to be machined improperly. If chips
are present, you may notice that extra
effort is required to turn the micrometer dial wheel. See Fig. 30.
Clean Surface
Figure 32
7. IMPORTANT: In all cases when
machining rotors, be sure the adjusting knob that locks the cross slide is
always loose. If tightened, it will create unnecessary wear and strain on
the drive train. See Figure 33.
Loosen when
machining rotors
Shift to
neutral
when
machining rotors
Figure 31
5. Mount the rotor on the arbor using
the required adapters (collets, optional
90527 Hubless Rotor Attachment, or
other Special Adapters).
Figure 33
12
IMPORTANT:
Whenever machining a rotor always
be sure the feed shift lever that controls the drum feed is in the neutral (N)
position.
mum rigidity of the lathe, while machining either drums or rotors. See
Figures 36 and 37.
8. Now that the Rotor-Truer and cross
slide surfaces have been properly
cleaned, place the Rotor-Truer on the
cross slide over the adjustable pivot
post. Install a spacer, washer and
nut. Hand tighten. See Figure 34.
11. With the lathe still running, advance the cross slide until these cutters reach the innermost portion of the
braking surface. Turn the knurled
knobs in the direction of the arrow with
micrometer dial wheels past zero to
.003 or .004" to clean up the rotor.
See Figure 36.
Tension Handle
Hand Tighten
Figure 36
9. Arbor and feed rate can be selected to provide optimum cut. See
page 4 for selecting the proper feed
rate. A slow rate is also suggested for
large rotors, while the faster rate is
selected for smaller rotors.
Figure 34
Adjust to inner surface
of rotor
10. Turn lathe on. If the rotor to be
machined is rough and scored, with
grooves no deeper than .010", move
the cross slide until the cutter tip is
opposite the deepest groove. Turn
the knurled micrometer knob on the
rotor truer until the cutter tip touches
the bottom of the groove. Now turn
the micrometer dial (next to the knurled
knob) to zero. See Figure 37.
Figure 35
Adjust the cutting tips are approximately opposite each other and then
tighten the nut with the spanner
wrench, locking the rotor-truer in the
operating position. See Figure 35.
NOTE: Some rotors have a swept
area on more one side than the other,
which necessitates adjustment of the
cutters to insure both surfaces are
machined complete at the same time.
NOTE: The T-slot feature, with its
adjustable pivot post, allows you to
machine rotors of all sizes with the
cross slide dovetail ways in full contact with carriage. This insures maxi-
13
Be sure set screws
are tight
Set dial
to zero
IMPORTANT:
Be careful not to move the knurled
knob which moves the cutter.
Turn the knurled knob in until the
cutter is clear of the rotor. Repeat this
operation on the other side, if scored.
In many instances, the other side may
be perfectly flat and a normal cut can
be taken.
12. Tighten the tension handles on
top of the rotor truer to hold tool bars
in proper position. See Figure 36.
Engage the feed by pulling the control
lever on the carriage slowly to the
rotor position. The cutters will move
across the face of the rotor, machining both sides simultaneously. On
severely scored rotors, it may be necessary to make more than one cut. If
so, repeat step 11.
NOTE: It is not necessary to loosen
the tension handles in order to increase depth of cut.
13. Normally the finish of the rotor
after machining will meet or exceed
most car manufacturers' specifications. If a smoother finish is desired,
an application with the 90646 Rotor
Finisher on each side of the rotor for a
30 second duration will provide a
smooth, non-directional finish.
14. Carbide tip cutters last longer providing more cuts per tip when the lathe
is operated at low speed.
T-Slot
Knurled knob
15. When machining is complete,
move the control lever on the side of
the carriage to the neutral position.
Figure 37 Groove simulated here.
16. Prepare to remove the rotor by
turning the micrometer dial wheel
counter-clockwise until the cutters
clear the rotor and silencers. See Figure 38.
Turn
counterclockwise
Drum
position
1234
12345
1234
12345
1234
12345
12345
Figure 38
17. To remove the rotor from the arbor, loosen the arbor one turn and
place the spanner wrench between
the rotor and the collet in the outer
bearing race. Push the top of the
wrench toward the rotor, a slight hand
tap on the wrench may be necessary
to free the collet from the bearing
race. See Figure 39.
After the collet has been loosened
hold the rotor with one hand and remove the arbor nut, spacers, collet
and the rotor.
Remove the remaining collet on the
arbor and remove any grease or chips
before mounting the next rotor or drum.
Many rotors are mounted with the
90527 Hubless Rotor Attachment,
thus requiring no special demount instructions, other than to be careful not
to allow the rotor to drop on the spindle
when demounting.
Figure 40
Figure 39
20. In the case where the cross slide
is allowed to run until it begins to ‘Free
Wheel’. Reverse the direction of the
cross slide by placing the shift lever in
neutral and turning the dial wheel until
the cranking handle is at the 6 o’clock
position. Using the heel of the hand,
firmly bump the end of the cross slide
and, at the same time, start turning the
dial wheel. If, for any reason, the feed
nut and feed screw tends to bind up
during this re-engagement action,
back up and start over.
18. An important feature of this lathe
is the control lever on the carriage.
When in the neutral (N) position, the
carriage is automatically locked in that
position and conversely, when the
control lever is moved out of the neutral position and into drum position,
the carriage is unlocked for movement during the drum machining operation. See Figure 40.
19. If another rotor is to be machined,
repeat the operation described above.
If the next operation is to machine a
drum, move the control lever to the
drum position, remove the Rotor Truer
and install the tool bar assembly. Then
proceed with steps shown in “How to
Machine a Brake Drum" on page 8.
WARNING:
Do not force re-engagement because
it may result in damage to the feed
nut.
14
PREVENTIVE
MAINTENANCE
1. The satisfactory performance of
precision brake service equipment is
directly proportionate to the care given
each item by the operator.
Oil fill
Figure 52
4. Always keep the lathe as clean as
possible. A 2" paint brush is an excellent tool to assist the operator with
cleanliness. Brush chips off of dovetail ways, carriage, cross slide, tool
bar and holder, rotor truer, and cutters.
6. It is important to keep the arbor
clean and lightly lubricated to permit
adapters and collets to slide on and off
easily. See Figure 53.
7. After using adapters, collets or
cones, a few seconds spent to wipe
off dirt, chips and grease is recommended. This helps maintain accuracy at all times. It is also recommended that the slots in collets be
cleaned periodically. This can be
accomplished easily with a length of
soft twine by running it back and forth
in the slots. Wipe off dirt as it is
removed from the slots in the collets.
See Figure 54.
Figure 50
WARNING!!!
2. As part of the maintenance procedure, we remind the operator not to
operate the lathe unless oil in the gear
case (viewed through the oil sight
tube) is up to the center mark when
lathe is not running. If below center,
add SAE 90 wt. oil to bring oil up to the
center mark.
Use of air to blow chips off lathe is
dangerous to the operators eyes and
this practice is not recommended.
5. An occasional spray of lubricant
(CRC or WD40) on the feed screw
and nut is recommended. See Figure
53.
Figure 54
Oil level gauge
Figure 51
IMPORTANT: Do not over fill. See
Figure 51.
3. When first operating the lathe, a
small amount of oil leakage at the
breather is normal. The reason for
this is that pressure builds up in the oil
cavity. This is normal to the operation
of the lathe. Add oil when necessary.
See Fig 52.
15
Dove tails
Feed screw
Figure 53
8. The rotor truer must be kept clean.
A periodic spray of lubricant directed
under the cover casting is recommended. This will keep the tool bar
lubricated and operating freely when
turning the micrometer feed dial knobs.
See Figure 53.
9. After each three months of operation, lubrication with chassis grease
through grease fitting at arbor end (on
the back side of the housing) is recommended. See Figure 53.
Replace felt when worn
Adjust Gib Screws
Figure 59
Figure 56
10. Check the "v" belt for alignment
and wear; check tightness of the pulleys periodically. Be sure the belt is
vertical, pulley set screws are tight
and motor is properly secured to motor mounting base.
Adjuster knob
Tighten Set Screw
Lock nut
Figure 57
Figure 60
13. Check the electric cords for breaks
or cuts that may cause short circuiting. Replace defective cords promptly.
Figure 55
11.Periodically check the retaining
screw on the carriage traverse hand
wheel for looseness. If found to be
loose, tighten securely. Spray the
handles of hand wheels with lubricants so they turn freely and are easy
to operate. See Figure 55.
12. Check gib wiper on carriage to
make sure that chips are being removed from ways as carriage moves
back to prevent any undue wear on
the surface of the ways. Replace the
felt wipers, if worn. See Figure 56.
14. Check the silencers periodically
for possible damage. See Figure 57.
carriage gib screws located under the
carriage. Test tightness by turning
the dial wheel and the hand wheel. If
correct, a slight drag should be felt.
See Figures 59 and 60.
15. There is a possibility, after considerable use, that a clicking noise may
be heard when Machining a rotor.
This noise is caused by the loss of
elasticity in the rubber silencer and,
as the rotor revolves, the metal tubes
move away from the rotor and then
snap back. It is recommended that
the 90195 silencer band be replaced
if this noise occurs.
16. Periodic adjustment of the cross
slide and carriage gibs may be necessary. Slight tightening of the lock nut
will provide the desired adjustment of
the cross slide gib. If necessary,
make the same adjustment on the
16
STANDARD FACTORY WARRANTY
JOHN BEAN 600 SERIES BRAKE LATHES: John Bean Company warrants each new Brake Lathe
to be free from defects in material and workmanship for a period of 12 months from the date of original
equipment installation to the original equipment owner under normal use and service. The labor and
service call charges to correct such defects is covered by this warranty for 90 days. Brake Lathe
accessory items are warranted to be free from defects in material and workmanship for a period of 90
days including labor and Service call charges. THE FOREGOING WARRANTY IS IN LIEU OF ALL
OTHER WARRANTIES, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING THOSE OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR ANY PURPOSE.
John Bean will not be responsible for claims arising on any unit which (1) has been subject to misuse
through negligence or accident (in installation or operation), (2) shall have been repaired altered or
serviced in any manner by anyone other than John Bean Company or its authorized representative,
or (3) shall have been operated in a manner other than as specified by John Bean Company so as, in
our judgment, to affect its operation adversely, when the claim is due to one of the above mentioned
causes.
Any cause of action for breach of the foregoing warranty must be brought within one year from the
date the alleged breach was discovered or would have been discovered, whichever occurs first.
John Bean’s liability for our products shall be limited to, and the customer’s remedies are limited to
repairing or replacing parts found by us to be defective, or at our option, to refunding the purchase
price of such products or parts. At our request, Buyer will send, at Buyers expense, any allegedly
defective parts to the plant which manufactured them.
DISCLAIMER OF CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES
Seller shall not be liable for consequential damages arising out of or in connection with its products.
Consequential damages shall include, without limitation, loss of use, income, or profit, loss sustained
as the result of injury (including death) to any person, or loss of or damage to property (including property
handled, processed or tested by our products). NOTE: The equipment registration card attached to
each serialized item must be completed and returned to the factory for warranty to be valid.
John Bean Company
Exchange Avenue
Conway, Arkansas 72032
17
USA
John Bean Company
309 Exchange Avenue
Conway, Arkansas 72032
Tel.: (800) 362-8326 or (501) 450-1500
Fax: (501) 450-1585
IRELAND
Formguide Services Ltd.
T/a John Bean Company
Sitecast Industrial Estate
Little Island, Cork
Tel: (353) 21-354477
Fax: (353) 21-354488
GERMANY
John Bean Auto Service Gerate
Division to Sun Electric Deutschland GMbH
Gewerbepark Sinn
D-35764 Sinn Herborner Str. 7-9
Tel: (49) 2772-9404-0
Fax: (49) 2772-94042-23
FRANCE
John Bean Company
Z.I. Du Haut Galy - Galy 8
93623 Aulnay S/S Bois
Tel: (33) 1-4865-3828
Fax: (33) 1-4865-7331
CANADA
John Bean Company
6500 Millcreek Drive
Mississauga, Ontario
Canada L5N 2W6
Tel: (905) 814-0114
Fax: (905) 814-0110
LATIN AMERICA
Rua Apinages
1268 cj. 605B
Perdizes-Sao Paulo-S.P.
Cep: 05017-0000
Brazil
Tel: (55) 11-871-0713
Fax: (55) 11-871-0713
Notice: The information contained in this document is subject to change without notice. John Bean
Company makes no warranty with regard to this material. John Bean Company shall not be liable
for errors contained herein or for incidental consequential damages in connection with furnishings,
performance, or use of this material.
This document contains proprietary information which is protected by copyright and patents. All
rights are reserved. No part of this document may be photocopied, reproduced, or translated without
prior written consent of John Bean Company.
is a registered trademark of the John Bean Company and Snap-on Corporation.
Form 3804-11
File:i:\pubs\lathes\form3804.p65...wdc...9/97
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