FarSounder Operation Manual

FarSounder Operation Manual
FarSounder Operation Manual
FS-3, FS-3DT, and FS-3DL Sonar Systems
FarSounder, Inc.
43 Jefferson Blvd.
Warwick, RI 02888
United States
phone: +1 401 784 6700
fax: +1 401 784 6708
info@farsounder.com
www.farsounder.com
Copyright © 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 FarSounder, Inc.
FarSounder is committed to providing the best quality and performance possible with our products. As part of this policy, all information herein is subject to change as new and improved versions of our software and hardware are released.
FarSounder, the FarSounder logo, Power Module, Transducer Module, and SonaSoft are trademarks of FarSounder, Inc.
"Jeppesen", "Jeppesen Marine", "Jeppesen OnBoard", and "C-Map" are trademarks of Jeppesen
Sanderson, Inc. Maptech, the Maptech logo and Maptech ChartKit are trademarks of Maptech,
Inc.
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Table of Contents
1. SonaSoft™ User Interface Computer Requirements ............................................................................... 3
1.1. Overview ............................................................................................................................ 3
1.2. Minimum Requirements ........................................................................................................ 3
2. The User Interface Workspace .......................................................................................................... 4
2.1. Overview ............................................................................................................................ 4
2.2. Managing the Sidebar Workspace ........................................................................................... 4
2.3. Using The Application Buttons ............................................................................................... 5
3. The 3D Sonar Display ..................................................................................................................... 9
3.1. Overview ............................................................................................................................ 9
3.2. 3D Volumetric/Standard View .............................................................................................. 10
3.3. Profile View ...................................................................................................................... 11
3.4. Forward Looking Alarm Use ................................................................................................ 11
3.5. Menu Bar Controls ............................................................................................................. 14
3.6. Mouse Controls .................................................................................................................. 14
3.7. 3D Sonar Processing Options ................................................................................................ 15
3.8. Control Settings Examples ................................................................................................... 17
4. Chart Display ............................................................................................................................... 22
4.1. Overview .......................................................................................................................... 22
4.2. Menu Bar Controls ............................................................................................................. 23
4.3. Mouse Controls .................................................................................................................. 23
4.4. Configuration Manager Options ............................................................................................. 23
5. Nav Info Display .......................................................................................................................... 27
5.1. Overview .......................................................................................................................... 27
5.2. Configuration Manager Options ............................................................................................. 27
6. Connecting NMEA Devices ............................................................................................................ 29
6.1. Overview .......................................................................................................................... 29
6.2. COM Port Configuration ...................................................................................................... 30
7. System Settings Options ................................................................................................................. 31
7.1. Overview .......................................................................................................................... 31
7.2. System Depth Units ............................................................................................................ 31
7.3. System Range Units ............................................................................................................ 31
7.4. Set Vessel Draft ................................................................................................................. 31
7.5. Advanced Settings .............................................................................................................. 31
A. Understanding Interference and Other Limitations .............................................................................. 33
1. Overview ............................................................................................................................. 33
2. Other Sonar Interference ........................................................................................................ 33
3. Bubble Cloud/Wake Interference .............................................................................................. 34
4. Sea State Limitations ............................................................................................................. 36
5. Vessel Speed Limitations ........................................................................................................ 36
B. Understanding Water Depth Performance .......................................................................................... 37
C. Troubleshooting ............................................................................................................................ 38
1. Overview ............................................................................................................................. 38
2. Power Module LED Descriptions ............................................................................................. 38
3. Power Module LED Diagnostics .............................................................................................. 38
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1. SonaSoft™ User Interface Computer Requirements
1.1. Overview
The SonaSoft™ software package has significant hardware resource requirements. Performance may be affected if
SonaSoft™ is run on a platform that does not meet these requirements. It is recommended that no other software
applications are run during SonaSoft™ operation. As with any shipboard electronic systems, it is highly recommended
that both the user interface computer and the FarSounder Power Module be powered through a UPS.
1.2. Minimum Requirements
• Processor Type: Core2 Duo
• Processor Speed: 2.6 GHz minimum
• Front Side Bus: 800 MHz
• Memory size: 1 GB minimum
• Memory Speed: 533 MHz Dual Channel
• Video Card: Fully OpenGL and CUDA compatible (nVidia works well)
• Video Card Memory Size: 1 GB minimum
• Video Card Resolution: 1280 x 1024 minimum
• NIC: 1 Gb/s minimum
• Operating System: Microsoft Windows XP Pro or Windows 7 (x64) Pro (US Versions)
• Serial: RS-232 or NMEA interface port
• Optical Drive: CD-ROM required
• Keyboard: yes (set up only)
• Mouse/Trackball/HID: yes
• Recommended video card:
- NVIDIA GeForce 9800 GT
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2. The User Interface Workspace
2.1. Overview
Figure 1. The user interface workspace
The SonaSoft™ user interface is divided vertically into two main sections called workspaces. On the left there is the
"main workspace", and on the right there is the "sidebar workspace". These workspaces contain display windows for
the different types of information displayed by SonaSoft™. The user can move a view from one workspace to the other
at any time. In the main workspace, only one view is visible at a time. In the sidebar workspace, several windows are
visible at a time, but they are much smaller.
The user can interact with the workspace through the following actions:
• Managing the Sidebar Workspace
• Resizing the Sidebar
• Using the Application Buttons
2.2. Managing the Sidebar Workspace
Windows in the sidebar workspace have a vertical window resizer bar along their bottom edge. They also have a left
arrow button which when pressed will cause the selected side bar window to swap places with the main workspace
window. Some display windows include a menu bar at the top of the window. Both the left arrow button and the
windows menu bars will only be displayed when the mouse is within a sidebar window's frame. This way more display
real estate is used for displaying pertinent navigation information. Note that when moved to the main workspace, no
arrow buttons are ever displayed and menu bars are always visible.
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2.2.1. Dragging the Sidebar
Figure 2. Left Click and Drag to resize the sidebar workspace
Between the two workspaces there is a vertical bar called the sidebar resize splitter. The user can drag the splitter
with the mouse to resize the sidebar. To hide the sidebar (and all the windows it contains), drag the resize splitter to
the right side of the screen. To quickly toggle between showing and hiding the sidebar workspace, double click on
the resize splitter.
2.2.2. Resizing Sidebar Windows
The sidebar window views always take up the full width of the sidebar. As a result, the only way to resize the window
is the sizer bar along the bottom border. To resize a sidebar window, click on the resizer bar and drag with the mouse
while holding down the left mouse button.
2.2.3. Swapping Sidebar and Main Workspace Displays
The Swap-with-Main-Workspace Button moves a display from the sidebar workspace and places it in the main
workspace. It is located on the dropdown toolbar. The view previously displayed in the main workspace is moved to
the location sidebar where the new display in the main workspace was previously located.
2.3. Using The Application Buttons
At the very top left of SonaSoft™, are two buttons. These buttons are used to access menus and options for advanced
controls and features.
2.3.1. System Menu
The system menu button is shaped like a gear. Clicking this button displays the system menu. This menu provides
access to:
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• Configuration options for various components
• System Status display
• Help Documentation
• About Panel
• Exit button
Information about the particular configuration options available for each component is described in the individual
component help descriptions.
Figure 3. The System Menu
2.3.2. System Status
The System Status display window displays real-time status information produced by various components of
SonaSoft™. Some components include a status indicator icon. This icon is a circle colored either Green, Yellow, or
Red. Green indicates all systems are functioning properly. Yellow indicates there is a system warning. Red indicates
there is a serious problem with part of the system.
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Figure 4. System Status display window
Figure 4, “System Status display window” shows the System Status display with three indicators and a hydrophone
(receiver) waveform display. The first indicator shows that the Sonar Processor is properly configured and is in the
middle of processing a ping.
The second indicator shows that the software is listening for NMEA messages over the serial port. The status of that
component shows that it is listening on COM1 at 9600 baud. If more than one serial port is enabled, multiple ports
would be listed here and the baud at which they are connected. These ports are configured under the Configuration
Manager's NMEA Settings menu.
The third indicator shows that SonaSoft™ is currently connected to the Sonar and is awaiting data from the sensor. It
also indicates the sonar's current roll and pitch orientation relative to the earth in degrees. This indicator may display
a yellow or red status if there are problem connecting to the Transducer Module.
The Hydrophone Data display is somewhat different. It is a graphical display of hydrophone data. This display is very
useful for debugging purposes and to confirm the presence of echo sounder interference. In this display, the waveform
of a single receiver channel is shown on the left with the start of the echo's timeseries at the far left. On the right
portion of this display is a graphic of the receiver's transducer array. Each box represents the spatial location of an
individual hydrophone. Clicking on one of the boxes, selects that channel for the waveform display. Note that the four
corner channels are always blank.
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2.3.3. SonaSoft™ Help
The help button icon is a circle with a question mark in the middle. Clicking this button brings up the SonaSoft
documentation.
2.3.4. Exit
The exit button is square with an X-shape through the center. Clicking this button will shut down SonaSoft™.
2.3.5. Color Themes
The color themes button is shaped like three vertical rectangles. Clicking this button opens a simple menu which lists
the available color themes. Each theme is a set of colors that facilitates the use of the software in various lighting
conditions. Currently, the software supports Day, Dusk, Night, and Red color themes. A theme may be selected by
clicking on a theme from the list.
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3. The 3D Sonar Display
3.1. Overview
The 3D Sonar Display is the window where FarSounder's 3D Forward-Looking Sonar information is shown. In this
view, the user is given a 3-dimensional picture of the sea floor ahead of the vessel along with in-water targets.
FarSounder's processing algorithms employ spatial classification techniques which are used to differentiate between
the sea floor and in-water targets. The sea floor is displayed as a smooth continuous surface while in-water targets
are displayed as small spheres, also known as voxels, which represent the target's 3D location. All FarSounder sonars
are specified as 8 water depth sonars. This means that they can map the sea floor out to a distance of at least 8 times
the depth of water in which the sonar is operating. Beyond their water depth capabilities, the products can still detect
in-water targets out to the full range of the system.
The user can select between various display modes such as the 3D volumetric display, which allows the user to rotate
the 3D image with real-time perspective, and the standard display, which shows the 3D information in a look-down
display (much like a radar view, except below the water).
The Sonar View consists of four main components. They are: the 3D volumetric/standard views, the profile view, the
menu bar, and the color scale. These are shown in the figure below. Additionally, the user can set an alarm, display
2D depth profiles ahead of the vessel at a user selected bearing, and configure other advanced options in the display.
This display also has various options in the Configuration Manager.
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Figure 5. The 3D Sonar Display
3.2. 3D Volumetric/Standard View
This view shows the data in either 3D Volumetric or Standard modes. To switch between these modes, click the mode
button in the menu bar.
In the 3D volumetric mode (as shown above), the data is shown with shading and perspective on. Color is mapped
to depth, where blue is deep and red is shallow as defined in the color scale. Any mouse movement while clicking
and holding the left mouse button will rotate the 3D entire volume of data. Any mouse movement while clicking and
holding the right mouse button will zoom the data in and out.
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Figure 6. Standard Mode
In standard mode, the data is shown with perspective turned off (orthographic projection) with the user looking down
on the data. This looks much like a common radar display. However, where radar gives a picture of what is above the
water, FarSounder’s sonar displays a picture of what is below the water. As with the 3D volumetric mode, the standard
mode has color mapped to depth and zoom capabilities.
In both modes, a white line (or plane) is shown. This is the Profile Selector. The Profile Selector denotes the angle
along which a 2D depth profile ahead of the vessel is shown in the Profile View. The number at the end of the profile
selector denotes the bearing of the profile selector relative to the vessel's bow or the actual compass heading. This
option is configured in the 3D sonar view's configuration options. The depth profile slice specified with the Profile
Selector is shown in the Profile View.
3.3. Profile View
The Profile View shows the depth profile (bathymetry) ahead of the vessel at the bearing selected by the Profile Selector
in either the 3D Volumetric or Standard View. The bearing angle of the Profile Selector and the depth profile currently
selected is shown in the lower left corner of the Profile View. In the Configuration Manager options, the user can select
between displaying the Profile Selector bearing relative to either the vessel or the absolute heading.
3.4. Forward Looking Alarm Use
The user can define an alarm which will automatically notify the user of potentially hazardous obstacles. The user
can define the area of surveillance for the alarm by depth, minimum range, maximum range, and field-of-view angle
width. The user is notified by both visual and audible notifications. Additionally, the user can specify the number of
hits before the alarm is triggered.
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Figure 7. Alarm Volume shown in red
3.4.1. Alarm Configuration
The user definable alarm is configured under the System Menu's 3D Sonar Display option. When configuring the
alarm, the user can define the volume of water within which targets will trigger the alarm. The trigger area is defined to
be the volume of water bounded by 4 thresholds: Max Depth, Min Range, Max Range and Field-of-View (FOV) angle.
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Figure 8. Alarm configuration settings
The FOV setting specifies the sector width of the alarm trigger volume in degrees. For example 40° means that only
targets within 20° to either side of the bow will be able to trigger the alarm. The Max Depth setting specifies the
maximum depth of the alarm trigger volume. The Min Range setting specifies the minimum range extent of the alarm
trigger volume. The Max Range setting specifies the maximum range extent of the alarm trigger volume. The Max
Depth, Min Range, and Max Range settings are displayed using the unit of measure defined in the Configuration
Manager's System Settings.
Like any marine sensor (radar, echo sounder, etc) the FarSounder sonar systems may detect spurious noises. These
"noises" include reflections from bubbles in the water column and small bits of debris in the water. The alarm hit
number specifies the number of pings in a row that a target must be detected within the alarm volume to trigger the
alarm. By specifying a number higher than 1 for the hit number, false alarms can be reduced. For every ping with a
detection within the alarm volume an internal counter is incremented. For every ping without a detection within the
volume the internal counter is decremented until reaching a minimum value of 0. If the counter value reaches the hit
number specified by the user, the alarm is triggered.
The last configuration option is check box called "Blink Screen On Alarm". When checked, the 3D Sonar Display
screen will blink if the alarm is triggered. If not, the display will not blink. This setting does not affect the audible
alarm notification.
3.4.2. Alarm Operation
Once configured, the alarm is simple to use. The alarm can be turned on by clicking the "Alarm" button in the Menu
Bar at the top of the 3D Sonar Display window. Once active, the alarm conditions will take effect. The alarm will
ONLY be triggered if the button is set to active. When active, the alarm button is depressed.
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Figure 9. Alarm acknowledge button
Should the alarm be triggered, a warning will sound, the 3D Sonar Display window will blink blue, and an alarm acknowledge message box will appear in the lower left corner of the sonar viewer window. Simply click the "acknowledge alarm" message box to acknowledge and temporarily silence the alarm. For example, the vessel may be passing
by a shallow area which triggers the alarm. After the user acknowledges the alarm, it will not sound again even if
alarm conditions are met until the alarm acknowledge time has passed. If alarm conditions still exist after the alarm
acknowledge time has passed, the alarm will sound again.
3.5. Menu Bar Controls
3.5.1. Processor Settings
Click this button to toggle display of the Processor Settings toolbar (see section entitled "3D Sonar Processing Options).
3.5.2. Standard/3D View
Click this button to toggle between standard view mode and 3D view mode. By default, both of these modes map the
color of sonar targets to depth, where blue is deep and red is shallow. The user can define these values with the Color
Bar. Additionally, for advanced applications, the color map can be changed so that color indicates the strength of the
received signals from a particular target. In this mode, red is "loud" and blue is "quiet".
3.5.3. Activate Alarm
When depressed, the alarm is active, and will be triggered by objects in the alarm volume.
3.5.4. Color Map to Depth/Signal Level
Toggles between color mapped to Signal Level in decibels and color mapped to depth. The color scale will be changed
to the user's last color extent values for the color map currently being shown.
The user can change the scale's extents by clicking on the red or blue extent values. A number pad will then pop up
allowing for mouse or keyboard specification of a new value. The new settings will be active on the next ping.
Note that with color mapped to Depth, the depth indicated is either "Depth Below Surface" or "Depth Below Keel" as
noted by a lable in the bottom left corner of the 3D sonar display. With color mapped to Signal Level, the numbers
correspond to the same scale as the Squelch settings as described in "3D Sonar Processing Options".
3.6. Mouse Controls
3.6.1. Mouse Drag Left Button (Any Direction in 3D View)
Left dragging has two different behaviors, depending on where the user starts dragging the mouse.
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When positioned at the end of the profile selector, a large double sided arrow will appear. In this case, left dragging
will change the angle of the profile selector.
When in 3D mode and not over the end of the profile selector, left click dragging the mouse will rotate the 3D display
volume.
3.6.2. Mouse Drag Right Button (Up and Down)
In the 3D view, this action will zoom in and out, enlarging the data (up) and shrinking the data (down). This control
is valid in both 3D Mode and Standard Mode.
In the Profile View, this action changes the aspect ratio of the profile view. Note: The angular line extending downwards from the boat icon represents a 45 degree angle from horizontal.
3.6.3. Mouse Hover Over Color Scale (When Shown)
This action shows the depth or decibel value for a given color on the color scale.
3.6.4. Mouse Hover Over Color Scale Extent Numbers
This action shows an edit box that can be used to enter new color scale extent values. Newly changed values will be
active on the next ping.
3.7. 3D Sonar Processing Options
Like other marine electronics sensors, there are processing control settings for the FarSounder sonars. FarSounder has
developed autonomous processing algorithms that intelligently control various stages of the processing routines and
automatically remove most of the "noise" in the image without user interaction. The few controls that require user
interaction are found in the Processor Settings tool bar (Figure 10, “Processor Configuration Window”). This tool bar
is displayed when the user clicks on the "Processor Settings" button at the top of the 3D Sonar Display (see Figure 5,
“The 3D Sonar Display”). Working from left to right, this window has the following controls: Processing Mode Drop
Down Selector, Detect Bottom Check Box, Auto Squelch Check Box, and Squelch slider.
Figure 10. Processor Configuration Window
3.7.1. Processing Mode Drop Down Selector
The processing mode selection drop down sets the system's range and field of view while pinging. Note: At least one
ping must be processed before this value can be changed.
• 90° x 110m (360 ft) (FS-3, FS-3DT, FS-3DL)
• 90° x 220m (720 ft) (FS-3, FS-3DT)
• 90° x 330m (1080 ft) (FS-3, FS-3DT)
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• 60° x 440m (1440 ft) (FS-3DT only)
• Alternating between 90° x 330m (1080 ft) and 60° x 440m (1440 ft) (FS-3DT only)
3.7.2. Detect Bottom Check Box
If this check box is checked, then the processor will attempt to detect the bottom so that it may be drawn as a surface in
the 3D Sonar Display. If this check box is not checked, then there will be no surface drawn in the 3D Sonar View. This
feature is useful when operating in water depths beyond 160 feet (approximately 50 meters) deep. If "Detect Bottom"
is checked in deep water conditions, the processing software may falsely interpret in-water targets as the bottom and
create some strange images. Note: If this check box is not checked and there is a bottom, then that bottom may show
up as a large number of targets, provided the squelch is set to a low enough value.
3.7.3. Auto Squelch Check Box
If this check box is checked, then the processor will attempt to detect in-water targets automatically, without considering the Squelch setting (see "Squelch Control"). Most of the time, the Auto Squelch mode will perform better than
manually setting the Squelch level.
3.7.4. Squelch Control
The 3D sonar processing technology that FarSounder has developed and integrated into the sonar systems utilizes
spatial classification and correlation techniques to identify particular targets as either part of the sea floor/river bed or as
an in-water target. The classification of targets into distinct target categories is an important part of FarSounder's signal
processing and image display chain. Different target categories are processed differently utilizing a priori information
pertaining to the target category type. For example, the sea floor is generally comprised of many small reflectors as
part of one larger continuous surface, while in-water targets are typically comprised of fewer target points and often
have many angles and surfaces which face the sonar. By exploiting these and other differences, FarSounder's products
are able to operate effectively in shallow water and at navigationally significant ranges.
To produce the most complete pictures, some parameters of the processing controls may need to be modified to suit the
environment. These parameters are controlled by the Squelch slider. This control can fine-tune the processing system
in the event that too few targets are displayed, or too many targets are making the view difficult to understand.
To effectively use the Squelch control, it is important to understand how different sonar targets reflect sound waves.
The reflections from different targets are detected by the system as a signal with some energy level relative to the
energy level of the ambient noise in the water and the electronics. This relationship between the signal level and the
noise level is called the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). The larger the SNR, the better the system will detect a target
and separate it from the noise.
SNR is generally controlled by two metrics: the acoustic reflectivity of a target and the distance to the target. Targets
that are physically larger, have a large gas content, have large surfaces facing the sonar, or are very hard will generally
be more reflective than targets that are physically small, have high water contents, have surfaces not facing the sonar,
or are very soft; the higher the reflectivity of the target, the higher the SNR from the reflected signal. Additionally, a
target at close range will have a higher SNR than the same target at far range.
Because of these two controlling metrics, the system must filter out targets that have low signal levels at varying ranges.
These signals may be from targets that are too far away or physically too small to detect. Larger, more reflective targets
will be detected at longer ranges than smaller, less reflective targets.
Note that when changing any of the processor settings (ie. Squelch levels, processing ranges, etc.) changes will not
take effect until the next complete processing cycle. This typically means 2 pings after adjusting the control, you will
see the change, since generally when you see an image that needs adjusting there is already another ping processing
with those same settings internal to the software. Changes will be applied to the next "fresh" ping.
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3.7.4.1. Squelch Control Slider
Variations in target characteristics also have effects on how "noise" is related to in-water targets. Generally, in-water
targets are "louder" (more reflective) targets than the sea floor, and require a different target size (reflectivity) cutoff.
The Squelch slider controls the target size cutoff for in-water targets. In general, setting this control to a lower level
will detect smaller, less reflective in-water targets.
For best operation, the user should typically set the Squelch until clutter from in-water debris is filtered effectively.
A value of 165-175 is typical for most conditions. Like with radar, it is recommended that the squelch be set so that
occasional false alarms are detected. This will help to ensure that real targets are not missed due to squelch levels
set too high.
When making Squelch adjustments, typically a change of a few dB is all that is needed. Remember that changes
generally take 2 pings to become visible.
3.8. Control Settings Examples
When learning to use the sonar, it may be useful to practice adjusting the settings in a simple environment where you
have a good idea of what is actually under the water. Like any navigation tool, you should practice using the tool and
get comfortable with the display and data representation in good weather and in good conditions so that when you find
yourself in situations where you really need the sonar, you will be comfortable and well versed in its operation.
The following discussion will use an example ping of a bridge piling in deep water in an effort to illustrate the aforementioned controls. For this discussion, a single ping of a deep water bridge piling (Figure 11, “Bridge piling used in
control setting images”) is processed with various control settings. This environment was used because of the simple
sea floor and simple in-water target environment.
NOTE: Once the sonar's settings are set appropriately, it will generally not be necessary to frequently change the
settings unless the water environment changes drastically.
NOTE: In very soft, silty bottom environments, the bottom may not be detected well or at extended water depths. Even
in this case though, in-water targets will be well detected. Large rocks, pilings or other "hard" targets sitting in the silt
will also be detected well. These targets may be shown as in-water targets rather than the sea floor.
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Figure 11. Bridge piling used in control setting images
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Figure 12. A sea floor and a single piling target with "good" settings
Figure 12, “A sea floor and a single piling target with "good" settings” shows a 3-dimensional image generated from
a single ping of a deep water bridge piling. The piling is clearly detected ahead of the vessel at about 165 meters
(545 feet) range. In this image, color is mapped to depth, and appropriate control settings have been used. The control
settings used to generate this image are shown at the top of the screen shot. In this image, the Squelch is set to 170 dB.
Let us now discuss how it was determined that these are "good" settings.
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Figure 13. Color mapped to signal strength with "poor" settings
Figure 13, “Color mapped to signal strength with "poor" settings” shows the same ping with "poor" processor settings.
In this image, color has been mapped to signal strength. Red shows that a target is highly reflective, where blue shows
that a target is less reflective. One can clearly see that there is a nice regular looking sea floor, but there is a lot of
in-water target clutter. In this test case, we know that there should be a single in-water target that is a strong reflector;
the piling. In the figure, one can clearly see that there is a single very reflective in-water target (the red blip). Its position
corresponds precisely to where the piling was visually sighted. All of the other in-water targets are most likely noise
blips caused by poor settings. Certainly, there may be other legitimate in-water targets that are in the water column
and not visible to the eye above the water. However, they would likely be much louder than the sea floor, and nearer
to the signal level of the piling.
Proper adjustment of the Squelch level will remove false in-water targets and clutter.
Noise blips are spurious and are not generally consistent from ping to ping. If an in-water target is detected on multiple
pings, even if it is of a lower signal strength, it is probably a legitimate target. Before changing the settings too much,
look at multiple pings for consistent, low signal strength targets. From this single image, it is clear that the in-water
target cutoff needs to be increased.
Hint: Map color to signal strength in order to identify a single target against noise blips
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Figure 14. Color mapped to signal strength with "somewhat poor" settings
In Figure 14, “Color mapped to signal strength with "somewhat poor" settings”, the Squelch has been increased. There
are less in-water blips than in Figure 14, “Color mapped to signal strength with "somewhat poor" settings”, but still
there is much more than just the single piling shown. It is likely that the In-Water Squelch is still too low. Notice that
many of the in-water targets are very close in signal strength to the sea floor, and that they appear to be truncated by
the surface of the sea floor itself. These two characteristics are indications of noise blips rather than less reflective,
legitimate targets. The original image generated in Figure 12, “A sea floor and a single piling target with "good"
settings” utilized a slightly higher In-Water level setting. This slight increase was enough to raise the in-water target
cutoff slightly and clean up the image. During the rest of the cruise, these settings did not need to change.
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4. Chart Display
4.1. Overview
FarSounder's C-Map Chart Display provides SonaSoft™ with advanced chart plotting capabilities. C-Map charts (not
included with this software) provide the necessary maps for route planning, route monitoring, and charted obstacle
avoidance. The Chart Display in SonaSoft™ supports any C-Map chart database provided by Jeppesen Marine, including the Professional+ and ENC databases. The Chart Display window provides various chart plotting functionalities,
such as showing the position of the vessel on the chart, zooming in an out on the chart, measuring the distance between
two points on the chart, and showing Lat/Long coordinates of the cursor position. Figure 15, “SonaSoft™ Chart Display” shows a screen shot of SonaSoft's™ chart display. The various features and controls are explained below.
Figure 15. SonaSoft™ Chart Display
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4.2. Menu Bar Controls
4.2.1. Auto Center
When depressed, the vessel graphic will remain in the window with any new GPS information updates received by the
Digital Chart Viewer. Otherwise, the vessel will move across the map with each latitude/longitude position update.
4.2.2. Zoom In
Clicking this button will zoom in on the scale of the chart. If auto center is depressed, then the boat will be at the center
of the newly zoomed view. If auto center is not checked, then the zooming will be centered on the position of the cursor.
4.2.3. Zoom Out
Clicking this button will zoom out on the scale of the chart. If auto center is depressed, then the boat will be at the center
of the newly zoomed view. If auto center is not checked, then the zooming will be centered on the position of the cursor.
4.3. Mouse Controls
4.3.1. Left Button Mouse Click
Clicking the left mouse button will pan the chart image by centering the chart on the mouse position.
4.3.2. Right Button Mouse Drag
Dragging the mouse with the right mouse button down will draw an orange range line from the initial mouse position
when first depressed to the final mouse position when released. While the button is depressed, the length of the line
specified in system units will be drawn near the mouse. Once released, the distance will be displayed along the orange
line.
4.3.3. Right Button Mouse Double Click
Double clicking with the right mouse button brings up a dialog that provides information about objects under the cursor.
4.3.4. Shift + Right Button Mouse Double Click
Double clicking with the right mouse button while holding shift brings up a dialog with detailed, raw database about
the databases and objects under the cursor. This dialog is for experts only while troubleshooting database issues.
4.4. Configuration Manager Options
In order for this component to work properly, NMEA compatible heading and location sensors must be connected to
the SonaSoft™ User Interface computer. These sensors include: gps, loran, compass, etc. More information on NMEA
connections can be found in the chapter entitled Section 6, “Connecting NMEA Devices”. Under the the Configuration
Manager's Chart Display tab, the user can specify the type of NMEA message to use. The user can select between RMC
(recommended minimum Specific GNSS data), GGA (Global Positioning System Fix Information), HDG (Heading,
Deviation, and Variation) and HDT (Heading True) where appropriate.
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Figure 16. Chart Display Configuration Manager Options
4.4.1. Track History Length
Every time a new latitude and longitude position is received by the system, the vessel's position is updated on the
chart. A dot is placed on the chart at previous locations, and a line is drawn between consequitive points that are close
together. The number of most recent locations noted is defined by the Track History Length setting. A setting of 0
removes all history markings from the chart.
4.4.2. Show Lat/Long and Scale
If this option is selected, the latitude and longitude at the cursor's position as well as the chart's scale is shown in the
lower left hand corner of the chart. If the cursor moves off the chart, the overlay window disappears.
4.4.3. Presentation Detail
The Presentation Detail dropdown menu determines which Presentation Parameters are overlayed onto the map. Successive levels of presentation increase the number of elements shown.
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Figure 17. Add/Remove Databases Dialog
4.4.4. Add/Remove Databases from View
Manipulates the databases shown in the map view area. To have the option to view a database, it must first be added
to the system using the C-Map Chart Manager.
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Figure 18. C-Map Chart Manager Dialog
4.4.5. C-Map Chart Manager
Used to add or remove C-Map chart databases on the system. Changes in this dialog require SonaSoft™ restart. To add
a database to the system, use the "Search Automatically" button to locate and register the database. When prompted,
save this database to the hard drive.
Hint: For a database to be loaded automatically on SonaSoft™ startup, it must be set as the default in the Chart
Manager.
If licenses have been purchased for this database, use the Licenses tab in the Chart Manager to unlock the purchased
areas. Please refer to documentation from Jeppesen for more information about using C-Map licenses.
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5. Nav Info Display
5.1. Overview
The Nav Info Display provides basic conning information (Depth, Heading, Position, and Speed) to the user in a text
format when external NMEA sensors are connected to the SonaSoft user interface computer.
Figure 19. The Nav Info Display
When available, the most recently received conning information is shown in this display. If a particular sensor is not
available, that portion of the Nav Info Display will contain dashes to reflect the missing information. If the user knows
that there is no data available for a particular type of conning info, he/she may un-check the "Listen" option in the
Configuration Manager's NMEA Settings menu to suppress that type from being displayed as dashes this display.
Please see Section 6.2.5, “NMEA Message Selection” for more details.
5.2. Configuration Manager Options
In order for this component to work properly, NMEA compatible depth, heading, GPS, and speed sensors must be
connected to the SonaSoft User Interface computer. These sensors include: echo sounder, GPS, gyro-compass, Doppler
speed log, paddle wheel transducer, etc. More information on NMEA connections can be found in the chapter entitled
Section 6, “Connecting NMEA Devices”. Under the the Configuration Manager's NMEA Settings menu, the user can
specify the type of NMEA message to use.
For echo sounder depth, the user can select from the following NMEA messages:
• DBT: Depth below transducer.
• DPT: Depth below the transducer with reference to keel or surface.
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For vessel heading, the user can select from the following NMEA messages:
• HDG: Heading, Deviation, and Variation.
• HDT: Heading True.
• RMC: Recommended minimum Specific GNSS data.
• VHW: Water Speed and Heading.
• VTG: Course over ground and ground speed.
Due to the sensor type the data provided may be either heading or course. For example, some GPS units may output a
message that is intended as heading yet the instrument fills the particular values with course data. You should consult
your sensor's documentation to be sure of the information type displayed in SonaSoft's Vessel Heading Display. Some
messages provide heading in either sensor heading/course values, magnetic heading/course values, or true heading/
course values. When available, the user can select the values they prefer.
For vessel position, the user can select from the following NMEA messages:
• GGA: Global Positioning System Fix Data.
• GLL: Geographic Latitude and Longitude.
• RMC: Recommended minimum Specific GNSS data.
For vessel speed, the user can select from the following NMEA messages:
• RMC: Recommended minimum Specific GNSS data.
• VHW: Water Speed and Heading.
• VTG: Course over ground and ground speed.
Some messages provide speed in either knots or km/h. When available, the user can select the units they prefer.
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6. Connecting NMEA Devices
6.1. Overview
The SonaSoft™ user interface software has been designed to interface with external navigation sensors via standard
NMEA 0183 interface sentences. It is highly recommended that a GPS, echo sounder, and heading sensor (if available)
be connected to the SonaSoft™ computer. For vessel speeds up to 10 knots, FarSounder's 3D sonar display capability
does not require any external NMEA sensors.
Figure 20. COM Port NMEA configuration options
However, in order to take full advantage of SonaSoft's™ navigation display capabilities, external sensors are needed
for features such as:
• plotting the ship's location on top of a digital chart
• showing the Depth Profile angle in absolute heading
• displaying vessel speed
• displaying vessel heading
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• displaying vessel position
• displaying echo sounder information
The SonaSoft™ software has been designed to accept information from external sensors via standard NMEA-0183
sentences. SonaSoft™ connects to these NMEA sensors via the host computer's COM ports. SonaSoft™ can listen to
and process the following sentences: RMC, VHW, VTG, HDG, HDT, DBT, DPT.
In most cases, the host computer's COM ports will be basic serial ports (RS-232). However, some marine computers
come equipped with true NMEA-0183 hardware ports (opto-isolated RS-422). In all cases, these COM port settings
can be configured under the Configuration Manager's COM Port NMEA tab. If the host computer has multiple COM
ports, the software can be configured to listen on multiple ports to multiple sensors. Additionally, a standard NMEA
multiplexer can be used to connect multiple sensors to a single COM port.
6.2. COM Port Configuration
Upon viewing the Configuration Manager tab, a list of all available COM ports on which SonaSoft™ can listen will
be generated. Each row in the list contains a check box, a COM port number, a baud rate selection drop down box,
and a Show Trace button. SonaSoft™ can read all standard NMEA-0183 messages on any COM port in the list.
6.2.1. COM Port Check Box
The check boxes indicate on which COM ports the SonaSoft™ should listen (an empty box indicates that the port is
not being used, a red check indicates that the port is in use). When the checkbox is checked, the show trace button
will be active.
6.2.2. Baud Rate Drop Down Box
The baud rate for each COM port is selected with this drop down selection box.
6.2.3. Show Trace Button
Pressing the Show Trace button will pop up a window where the user can see all of the COM port data being read
off the port.
6.2.4. Re-Scan for Available Ports Button
This button will re-scan to find any available COM ports for SonaSoft™ to listen on. Available COM ports will be
listed in the COM port list.
6.2.5. NMEA Message Selection
At the bottom of this window, there are four rows of drop-down selectors where the NMEA messages to be used for
Depth, Heading, Position, and Speed can be selected. The Heading and Speed selections also have a second drop-down
selector for configuring options specific to certain messages. SonaSoft™ will only listen to the messages selected for
each data type.
Each message type (Depth, Heading, Position, and Speed) also has a "Listen" check box option. When "Listen" is
unchecked, SonaSoft™ will not listen for any messages of that type. For example, if there are no Depth messages
available on any of the COM ports selected, then the "Listen" checkbox for Depth messages can be unchecked.
NOTE: Message selection is independent of COM port selection. This means that if a particular message is selected
for a given data type, it does not matter on which COM port it is received.
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7. System Settings Options
7.1. Overview
There are a number of System Settings inside SonaSoft™. These settings are general configuration options which are
used throughout the software. These settings are found under the Configuration Manager's System Settings tab.
Figure 21. System Settings dialog box
7.2. System Depth Units
The units selected from this drop down box are used for depth measurements throughout various displays and setting
controls within SonaSoft™. The following units are supported: feet, meters, fathoms.
7.3. System Range Units
The units selected from this drop down box are used for range measurements throughout various displays and setting
controls within SonaSoft™. The following units are supported: feet, yards, meters, kilometers, miles (statute), miles
(nautical), cables.
7.4. Set Vessel Draft
The value entered here is used for all calculations within SonaSoft™ which require knowing the draft of the vessel. For
large vessels that frequently load and discharge cargo or fuel, this value may need to be updated frequently. Smaller
vessels may never need to update this value. Note: To ensure that all displayed depths are correct, it is REQUIRED
that this value is correctly updated.
7.5. Advanced Settings
The current version of SonaSoft™ has a single advanced setting. This setting is the transducer depth relative to the
vessel's keel or deepest draft location on the hull. This value is REQUIRED for setting all depth information relative
to the surface or the keel. Positive values indicate that the transducer is above the keel. Negative values indicate the
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transducer is below the keel. This value is generally set once at installation, and does not need to be updated unless
the installation is modified.
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A. Understanding Interference and Other Limitations
1. Overview
FarSounder has developed advanced signal processing algorithms that allow the software to operate largely without
significant user input. These algorithms represent the state of the art in forward looking, obstacle avoidance sonar
technology. However, like any shipboard tool, Forward Looking Sonar will not solve every problem 100% of the
time. It will, however, solve many problems most of the time. It is therefore important to accurately understand how
interference and other limitations effect the system's performance.
2. Other Sonar Interference
FarSounder's sonars operate at 60 kHz. The most common echo sounder frequency is 50 kHz. Since these frequencies
are close to one another, users may sometimes experience interference from other sonars. Generally, interference is only
experienced when the echosounders on large commercial ships are close to the user's vessel and when the FarSounder
is pointed towards the other ship. Such interference appears on the FarSounder display as a “ring” of echoes all at
the same range as shown in Figure A.1, “Echo sounder interference”. Usually, they appear as in-water targets, but
sometimes they can also appear as a raised mound or sharp dip in the sea bottom at all angles. The interference can
also be seen in the System Status's Hydrophone Data display as shown in Figure A.2, “Echo sounder interference”
and Figure A.3, “Echo sounder interference”. In this view, the interference appears as sharp “spikes” in the signal at
regular intervals. Generally, between 6 and 20 spikes will be present at a time in the Hydrophone Data Display. It is
important to realize that if another vessel is interfering with the FarSounder sonar, this usually means the area is well
trafficked and often well known. Locations where the FarSounder sonar is most valuable, echosounder interference is
usually not present. Generally, the FarSounder will not interfere with echosounders.
Figure A.1. Echo sounder interference
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Dolphins and porpoise are another source of interference similar to echosounders. When dolphins or porpoise are near
the vessel or playing in the bow wake, interference will often be present. This is from the animals' own sonar systems
pinging back at the FarSounder sonar. Though FarSounder's sonars operate outside the hearing ranges of the great
whales, dolphins and porpoises can hear the transmissions just as they do those of echosounders. FarSounder has taken
great care in ensuring that their sonars will not cause any harm to any marine life. The duty cycles and transmit powers
are significantly lower than those of other marine acoustic systems that are commonly accepted throughout the world.
In fact, FarSounder's products have been reviewed by scientists at the National Marine Fisheries Service and been
found to have no negative impact on the marine environment 1.
Figure A.2. Echo sounder interference
Figure A.3. Echo sounder interference
3. Bubble Cloud/Wake Interference
Bubbles make really good sonar reflectors. This means that bubbles will interfere any sonar by creating echo returns at
the bubble's location and blocking sound from passing through a bubble cloud. This effect is not unique to FarSounder
sonars. Rather this effect is true for all sonar technologies. Bubble clouds consisting of large bubbles tend to reflect
echos back to the sonar and prevent sound energy from continuing beyond the bubble cloud. Bubble clouds consisting
of small bubbles tend to dissipate the sound energy by dispersing the echos in many directions. They also prevent
sound energy from continuing beyond the bubble cloud, but they don't generally reflect a lot of echo back to the sonar.
In both cases, the larger the bubble cloud, the more energy from the sonar is disrupted. Bubbles are produced by a
1
"NOAA's Ocean Acoustics Program (NMFS Office of Science and Technology) has assessed the technical specifications of the current version of
the FarSounder sonar technology and concurs that, based on the sound source level, signal duration, directionality, and operational frequency band,
there are no anticipated injurious effects on marine mammals or other marine species from it's deployment." --Brandon Southall, NMFS
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variety of things such as waves, vessel wakes, and turbulent current flows around stationary objects like pilings and
buoys. Each of these types of bubbles clouds will effect FarSounder sonars differently.
Waves produce bubbles by forcing pockets of air down into the water column as the waves splash and break. The
bigger the waves, the more air bubbles will be pushed deeper into the water. It turns out, that most bubbles from most
waves most of the time in most waters are in the upper 6 feet of the water column. This means that the deeper the
sonar is installed on the vessel, the better the system will perform in worse sea conditions. Bubbles created by waves
will often show up as in-water targets. They will be transient (meaning they do not always show up in the same place)
and will often be slightly less reflective than large navigation obstacles. Like radar, higher sea states will cause more
interference with the sensor. Like increasing a radar's wave reject setting, increasing the sonar's In-Water Squelch
setting a few decibels will often remove much of the wave induced “noise” reflections. Also like radar, this will have
the cost of not detecting actual smaller objects. It is recommended that the user view the 3D Sonar Display with color
mapped to Signal Level to best determine the general reflectivity level of the wave induced bubbles. From this, the
user can set the In-Water Squelch appropriately.
Vessel Wakes are another source of bubbles. Their bubbles are created by the hull forcing air into the water as the
vessel cuts through the water and by the propulsion system creating cavitation. Vessel wakes generally reach a depth
no greater than the draft of the vessel from which they were created. These bubbles clouds tend to be a mixture of large
and small bubbles. The larger bubbles reflect strong echoes back to the sonar and dissipate relatively quickly (generally
within a couple of minutes). The smaller bubbles tend to disburse the sonar energy without reflecting many strong
echoes back to the sonar. They dissipate slowly and can be trapped in the water for 10 minutes or more. Generally, if
the path of the vessel is still visible at the surface of the water, wake induced bubbles are still present.
Figure A.4. Wake interference
From far away, vessel wakes generally appear on the sonar as a long line of in-water targets similar to a jetty or pier
wall. However, once the sonar enters the wake area, normal operation will generally be disrupted since the bubbles are
blocking the outgoing transmit energy directly at the transducer. When inside a wake, the Hydrophone Data viewer
inside the System Status Display will show a short period of strong energy followed by a period of almost no energy.
Figure A.4, “Wake interference” shows an example of the sonar inside a wake. The short, strong energy seen is the
transmit signal as it passes through the transducer before the bubbles block the signal. Once the sonar passes through
a wake, normal operation will resume.
Turbulent Current Flows around stationary objects like pilings and buoys produce bubble clouds mostly through
cavitation. In general, these bubble clouds consist of small to medium sized bubbles. This means that sometimes the
object in the water creating the turbulence will be masked by the small bubbles dissipating the sound with few strong
reflections back to the sonar. Generally, this effect will only be seen when approaching such objects from down current.
In other situations, the mediums sized bubbles will dominate and the sonar will detect a slightly fluctuating “tail” to
the actual object. Like wakes, if the sonar enters a turbulence field, normal operation of the sonar will generally be
disrupted until the sonar passes through the turbulence.
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4. Sea State Limitations
In addition to creating bubbles, increased sea states can have additional effects on the sonar system. The most obvious
is transducer movement. Inside the Transducer Module is a roll and pitch sensor. This sensor will significantly stabilize
the image shown to the user when the vessel is undergoing rolling and pitching up to 20 degrees. Though the Transducer
Module should stay submerged, should heavy pitching bring the unit out of the water occasionally, the unit will not be
damaged. However, should the unit be transmitting or receiving during that period, no image will be seen. Additionally,
if the unit is in the water and a wave trough is between the sonar and a target of interest, the trough will block the
sonar from “seeing” the target. The sonar works as a line of sight system and sonar energy cannot cross the water/air
boundary.
5. Vessel Speed Limitations
FarSounder's FS3 and FS3-DT sonars are designed for up to 20 knots operational vessel speed. This rating is based
upon an ideal installation. Some vessels have significant mechanical vibration or create turbulence in front of the
Transducer Module. In these cases, system performance may degrade a speeds less than 20 knots. Going beyond 20
knots will not damage the system. However, at higher speeds, performance will decrease as speed increases. That
being said, some FarSounder customers have reported good performance even at speeds over 25 knots.
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B. Understanding Water Depth Performance
Besides operating as a true 3D sonar, creating a 3D image with a single ping, FarSounder's technology distinguishes
itself as a shallow water sonar system with its impressive Water Depth Performance and its ability to detect objects in
shallow water even beyond its water depth limit. To best understand how FarSounder's technology is able to operate
so well in shallow water it is first necessary to understand the metrics used in shallow water sonars.
There are two metrics used when talking about the maximum range of a forward looking sonar: Maximum Range and
Water Depth Performance. Both of these metrics are important, yet most other Forward Looking Sonar products do
not like to talk about their Water Depth Performance.
Maximum Range is the farthest distance at which the system can detect targets under ideal conditions. This range is
absolute and varies based on a target's acoustic reflectivity. Generally, larger objects have more reflectivity. However
some materials and shapes also effect a target's acoustic reflectivity. In some cases, a “large” object who's material or
shape does not reflect well will not be detected as well as “smaller” objects who's material and shape do reflect well.
Good reflecting targets will be detected at the full range of the sonar. Weaker reflectors will be detected at shorter
ranges.
Water Depth Performance is the ratio between the depth of water below the transducer and the range at which the sea
bottom can be mapped. As an example, if a 2 water depth sonar system is operating in 50 feet of water, that system can
generate bottom maps only out to 100 feet. Water Depth Performance is limited by various physical effects. When a
sound wave is transmitted from the sonar and reflects off the sea bottom, some of the energy reflects back to the sonar
and some of the energy reflects forward. The percentage of energy reflected back to the sonar's receiver is a function
of the sea bottom's material type and shape as well as the angle at which the sound wave hits the sea bottom. Hard
rough sea bottom materials like rocks and sand reflect better than soft materials like mud and silt. Likewise, steeper
angles reflect more energy back to the sonar than shallow angles. Therefore, as range increases, the angle at which the
incoming sound wave hits the sea floor becomes shallower. At some angle, not enough energy is reflected back to the
receiver to allow for sea bottom detection and mapping.
One of the most impressive features of FarSounder's technology is its shallow water capability. Though FarSounder's
products are specified as 8 Water Depth systems, 10+ Water Depth performance can sometimes be achieved in certain
conditions. However, even beyond their water depth capability, FarSounder sonars are still able to detect objects out
to farther ranges. For instance, in shallow water areas, FarSounder systems can not only create bottom maps to 8
water depths but also detect in-water targets and targets sticking up off the sea floor up to the full range of the sonar
over the entire field-of-view. In these cases, the sonar may not be able to determine the actual depth of the long
range, in-water target, but it is able to tell the user that something is there. Please visit the screen shots gallery at
http://www.farsounder.com for examples of shallow water operation at ranges well beyond our water depth capability.
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C. Troubleshooting
1. Overview
The development team at FarSounder has worked hard to create robust, reliable products. However, as with any piece
of complex marine equipment, there is always the chance of something unexpected happening. FarSounder technicians
and and engineers are always willing to work directly with our customers and dealers to resolve any issues as quickly
as possible.
The first step in resolving any issues is understanding what is happening. Checking the following items is often helpful
in pinpointing the exact problem.
1. Did the issue suddenly appear or has it always been present?
2. Is the user interface software able to communicate with the sonar hardware?
3. What are the results of the Power Module LED diagnostics?
2. Power Module LED Descriptions
The Power Module is equipped with six (6) LED lights on the front faceplate. These lights show the status of the
Power Module and Sonar, and are very useful when troubleshooting the system. Here is a short description of what
each LED signals:
• Power: Indicates that the Power Module has power.
• Bank 1: Indicates that one of the two large amplifier capacitors is charged.
• Bank 2: Indicates that the other of the two large amplifier capacitors is charged.
• Ping: Indicates that the transmit amplifier is generating an output ping.
• CTRL A and CTRL B: Indicate states of the Output Select lines coming from the Transducer Module
3. Power Module LED Diagnostics
The state of LEDs on the Power Module can often provide insight into any issues that may be occuring with the sonar's
electrical system. The following procedure can help diagnose some hardware issues.
1. Turn off the Power Module. Wait ~30 seconds for all LEDs to turn off.
2. Unplug the ethernet cable from back of the Power Module.
3. Turn on the Power Module. What do the LEDs show at power up?
4. Wait ~90 seconds for the system to boot. What do the LEDs show after booting?
The table below describes some of the LED indications. Please note that the "LED State" column contains one circle
indicator for each LED light. Possible values for each indicator are as follows:
•
: The light is off.
•
: The light is on.
•
: The light is flashing.
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•
: The light may be on or off.
Table C.1.
LED State LED Status
When
Description
Immediately After Powering This is normal, and the status should
On Power Module
change after approximately 90 seconds.
After Powering On Power
Module (greater than 90
seconds)
Transducer Module is not responding. If
able to ping IP Address of TM, check RED,
WHITE, and BLUE wires in Amphenol
Connector assembly are securely soldered.
If not able to ping IP Address of TM, check
Orange and Yellow wires in Amphenol
Connector assembly
Flashing:
A-A-B-B-A-A...
After powering on the
Power Module prior to
connecting with SonaSoft
The Transducer Module is ready for a
SonaSoft connection or a firmware update
Flashing: A-B-A-B...
After powering on the
Power Module while
waiting for a connection to
SonaSoft
The Transducer Module is ready for a
SonaSoft connection
Flashing: Simultaneously While communicating with
4 times
SonaSoft
Possible data collection error. If this
condition continues, restart Power Module
Flashing: PING
While the Power Module is
powered on
The system is in operation and transmitting
into the water when PING LED is
illuminated
While the Power Module
is powered on and
communicating with
SonaSoft
The system is in operation, but not
transmitting Inspect BLACK wire is
securely soldered in Amphenol Connector
assembly to PIN C
Anytime
The Power switch is in the OFF position. A
fuse is blown. Power is not being supplied
to Power Module. The Power Module has
an internal fault
After powering on the
Power Module while
waiting for a connection to
SonaSoft
Check RED, WHITE, and BLUE wires
in Amphenol Connector assembly are
securely soldered
After powering on the
Power Module while
waiting for a connection
to SonaSoft
Check RED, WHITE, and BLUE wires
in Amphenol Connector assembly are
securely soldered
FarSounder, Inc.
F31552 (Rev. 2.3.4)
Page 39 of 39
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