ESI Communications Servers Administrator`s Manual

ESI Communications Servers Administrator`s Manual
ESI Communications Servers
ESI-1000 • ESI-600 • ESI-200 • ESI-100 • ESI-50
Administrator’s Manual
0450-1048
Rev. H
Copyright © 2009 ESI (Estech Systems, Inc.).
IVX is a registered trademark of Estech Systems, Inc. Ethernet is a registered trademark of
Xerox Corporation. Microsoft, Windows, and Outlook are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
Panasonic and DBS are registered trademarks of Matsushita Electric Corporation of America.
Information contained herein is subject to change without notice. Certain features described herein
may not be available at initial release. ESI products are protected by various U.S. Patents, granted
and pending. Visit ESI on the Web at www.esi-estech.com.
Contents
Administrator programming: An introduction ...............A.1
Function 6: Recording..........................................................F.1
System capacities .................................................................B.1
Function 61: Re-record system and branch prompts.............. F.1
Function 62: Record directory names..................................... F.2
Function 63: Message-on-hold (MOH) programming.............. F.3
Function 1: System parameters.........................................C.1
Function 13: Administrator password....................................... C.1
Function 14: System clock ..................................................... C.1
Function 16: System feature parameters ............................... C.3
Function 17: System speed-dial............................................. C.4
Function 3: Extension programming................................D.1
Function 30: Station move ..................................................... D.1
Function 32: Extension feature authorization ......................... D.2
Function 33: Department programming.................................. D.7
Function 37: RFID programming............................................ D.8
Function 5: Voice mail programming...............................E.1
Function 7: Reports..............................................................G.1
Report printing....................................................................... G.1
Reporting functions ............................................................... G.1
Feature description: SMDR ................................................ H.1
Standard tabular SMDR format ..............................................H.1
CSV SMDR format.................................................................H.2
SMDR format when using account codes...............................H.3
Reporting conventions and rules (standard and CSV formats)H.4
Extended SMDR format .........................................................H.5
Index
Function 53: Guest/info mailboxes......................................... E.1
Function 54: Group mailboxes and the broadcast mailbox..... E.2
Function 55: Message notification.......................................... E.3
Function 56: Cascade notification mailboxes ......................... E.4
Function 57: Q & A mailboxes................................................ E.5
Note: Remember to tell your users about www.esiusers.com — ESI’s User’s Guide on the Web.
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Administrator programming: An introduction
Administrator programming: An introduction
You can program an ESI Communications Server (ESI-1000, ESI-600, ESI-200, ESI-100, or ESI-50) locally or
remotely from a 48-Key or 24-Key Feature Phone while the system is operating. You also can program using
ESI System Administrator, a Windows-based software application your ESI Reseller can provide.
Read the User’s Guide first. The programming of features requires a clear understanding of user interface
and application.
Administrator’s duties
The System Administrator can perform the following tasks:
•
•
•
•
•
Administering station assignments
Managing station feature authorization
Maintaining the employee directory (if it’s used)
Re-recording system prompts
Administering manual change of day/night mode
(if required)
User assistance
Each ESI Communications Server’s Verbal User Guide includes all of the information printed in the User’s
Guide (except for special features). Additionally, the ESI system users’ Web site, www.esiusers.com,
includes all the information in the User’s Guide, and more.
Note: Except where noted, the remainder of this “General description” chapter describes only features, rather than
any system capacities. For system-specific capacity specifications — e.g., CO lines, ports, message
storage, etc. — see “System capacities” (page B.1).
Telephone system features
•
•
•
Impressive expansion capability — Each system accepts one or more Expansion Cabinets to maximize its
potential call-handling.
1
T1 and PRI support — Can connect to higher-bandwidth lines, which more and more offices use.
ESI Feature Phones — Compact and stylish, yet rugged, each ESI Feature Phone includes a high-quality
speakerphone, large and informative multi-functional display and a specially designed key layout with several
dedicated keys to minimize or eliminate the need to memorize codes. ESI’s 48-Key Feature Phone comes in
two versions, digital and IP. Each 48-Key Feature Phone model includes an integrated headset jack and is
available with backlit display. Other ESI phone models include the 24-Key Feature Phone (available with
2
backlit display), 12-Key Feature Phone, and Cordless Handsets.
Note: The 12-Key Feature Phone has the same stylish, rugged ESI Feature Phone design and offers the most
basic phone functions. It is intended for use in areas such as lobbies, cashier stations, warehouses and
employee lunchrooms, where only minimal phone system features are needed.
•
•
•
•
1
2
3
Extensive help — ESI’s Verbal User Guide™ uses spoken and displayed help prompts to help everyone from the
Installer through the Administrator down to the least experienced end user. Easily accessible with one press
of either the HELP key on the 48-Key Feature Phone or the PROG/HELP combo key on the 24-Key Feature
Phone. One can also visit www.esiusers.com for comprehensive help.
3
Enhanced Caller ID — Allows one-touch automatic message return. An ESI Communications Server
passes Caller ID data to both digital and analog ports.
Live call recording — Can record any conversation or personal memo, with moving or copying of any
recording to another user’s voice mailbox (see “Voice mail features,” below).
Call waiting — Includes helpful display, showing both calls’ Caller ID information, and easy one-key toggling
between calls.
The ESI-50 supports only PRI (not T1).
See also the ESI Communications Servers Hardware Installation Manual (ESI document #0450-1049).
This and all other references to Caller ID service within this manual assume the end-user organization subscribes to Caller ID service from its
telephone service provider.
A.1
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
•
•
•
•
•
Administrator programming: An introduction
Conference calling — Includes up to 64 dynamic conference ports; a single conference may contain up to
1
16 members. Conference bridges are dynamic, so possible conference sizes include: 21 three-member; 16
four-member; 10 six-party; and various combinations in-between. Analog phones on the system also may
originate conferences.
Esi-Dex™ speed-dialing — Calls any number using four separate lists (personal, station, system and —
when Esi-Link is in use — cabinet location); uses Caller ID information or direct keypad entries.
Dedicated overhead paging interface — Allows for external paging through overhead speakers or multizone paging units (amplification required) and separate, vendor-supplied zone page adapters.
Intelligent Call Forwarding™ — Lets users of compatible PRI-equipped ESI systems view the original Caller ID
data of a call forwarded to an off-premises phone.
2
911 alert — Provides immediate line access if any station dials 9 1 1 to report an emergency; sends a
message via the serial port indicating the start date, time, station number and end-time of the 911; also
sounds an audible warning at the operator station and displays, for example:
911 CALL FROM
X102 JOHN JAMES
3
Important: Remember to advise your customers not to make 911 calls using a remote IP phone. Because such a
phone isn't connected directly to the local telephone network, it’s necessary instead to use a regular
phone connected locally, not the remote IP phone, to make 911 or other emergency calls. (For more
information, see the documentation included with the remote IP phone.)
•
•
Shared-office tenanting — Tenant service allows multiple business entities to share a telephone system
while maintaining separation of various facilities and features. For more details, consult your ESI Reseller.
Support for these options:
– Esi-Link — Allows a multi-site enterprise to network any combination of dozens of compatible ESI phone
systems across an IP-based network.
Note: The ESI-50 can be in an Esi-Link network with only other ESI Communications Servers running
certain system software. If necessary, consult your ESI Reseller for assistance.
– VIP™ — Provides a value-added interface to an ESI Communications Server. Delivers call control and
®
–
–
–
–
–
1
2
3
®
on-screen message handling; available in standalone and Microsoft Outlook -integrated versions.
ESI Presence Management — Provides integrated building entry control, access control, status
indication, personal call routing, and (optionally) time and attendance management.
ESI Cellular Management — Part of ESI Bluetooth Voice Integration, ESI Cellular Management provides
unique hardware and features to bridge the gap between cellular handsets and ESI’s line of Feature Phones.
ESI Mobile Messaging — Lets users receive messages (voice mails and recordings) as .WAV attachments
to regular e-mails; works with any standard e-mail client application.
ESI Media Management — Provides software and hardware to monitor the workplace and (with ESI
Presence Management) help users control access; lets authorized supervisors record and monitor calls to
help improve employees’ customer service and efficiency; archives system-created video, audio, and data for
off-system storage.
ESI Video Viewer — Shows live streaming video from cameras connected to an ESI Communications
Server. Basic version is free; optional Advanced version offers multi-camera views and much more.
See “System capacities” (page B.1).
An ESI Remote IP Cordless Handset sends 911 calls via the local analog CO line attached to the Cordless Handset’s base station. The 911 alert
information isn’t available at the operator station or via serial port.
A remotely installed IP Feature Phone II, a Remote IP Cordless Handset, or a remote installation of VIP Softphone.
A.2
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Administrator programming: An introduction
Voice mail features
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Built-in voice mail ports — These are in addition to the call-processing ports; thus, you may build the
system to its maximum for call-handling without having to balance voice mail needs versus call-handling needs.
For specific voice storage capacities on a system-by-system basis, see “System capacities” (page B.1).
Highest-grade voice quality (64-kilobit/second sampling) for voice mail and other storage of voice messages.
Message-on-hold (MOH) recordings — Among these are three prerecorded tracks; also supports live entry.
If your Installer has enabled tenant service, each tenant has its own MOH source.
Off-premises message delivery — Automatically delivers voice messages to designated phone number,
such as a cell phone, when one is out of the office.
Urgent messages — Can deliver higher-priority messages first.
Several different mailbox types, including group, broadcast, informational, cascade notification and Q & A.
Message Recycle Bin (undelete) — Remembers, and can restore, each mailbox’s 10 most recently
deleted messages.
™
Quick Groups — Makes it easy to leave voice mail messages for several users.
™
Quick Move — Records a conversation into another user’s mailbox.
™
Virtual Mailbox Key allows easy monitoring of a second mailbox.
Auto attendant features
•
•
Six levels, 100 branches — Allow you and your customer to set up a more caller-friendly answering
environment, including a company directory.
Virtually unlimited call routing — Includes off-premises transfer, pager notification, more.
ACD features
•
•
•
Routes calls within designated departments for quickest possible call answering.
Uses three-line Digital Feature Phone display to provide up-to-the-second information on queues,
wait times, delay announcement, priority queueing, and overflow routing.
Optional VIP ACD Supervisor and VIP ACD Agent enhance ACD usage; VIP ACD Supervisor offers highly
1
useful reports and also gives ability to customize reports.
Feature Phone overlays
Each Feature Phone comes with one overlay for the programmable feature keys. To order additional overlays,
™
visit the DESI Web site, www.desi.com. While there, you may also want to download the free Windows-based
software, DESI Lite, which allows you to print on the overlays. For assistance with DESI products, contact DESI
(the DESI Web site contains contact information).
Tip: Remember that ESI System Administrator (Windows-based software available from your ESI Reseller) also
lets you print on the overlays as well as perform many other programming tasks.
1
Report customization requires either Crystal Reports Standard Edition or Crystal Reports Professional Edition (not available from ESI).
A.3
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Administrator programming: An introduction
Programming basics
1
As mentioned earlier, you may program from any ESI 24-Key or 48-Key Digital Feature Phone in the system:
1. Press PROGRAM at any digital station. The normal station programming menu prompts will begin to play.
2. Press HOLD. The “enter password” prompt will play.
2
3. Enter the Administrator password. Then, to confirm the password, either press # or wait two seconds.
You are now in programming mode. The extension will be automatically placed in DND, and its display
will show:
ADMINISTRATOR
CMD:
4. The system will play the system programming menu. Follow it to program as you wish.
5. When finished, hang up.
Warning: Always FINISH programming in ANY function BEFORE exiting programming mode (as needed, press # to
accept current entries for function parameters you’re not changing).
Note: The system will automatically exit programming mode after 10 minutes of inactivity.
Example: If your Administrator password is 465, enter programming mode by pressing PROGRAM HOLD 4 6 5 #.
(To exit programming mode, hang up.)
1
2
Although a 12-Key Feature Phone allows you to enter Administrator programming, we don’t recommend that you use a 12-Key Feature Phone for
programming because of its one-line display and small number of programmable feature keys.
The default is 4 5 6.
A.4
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Administrator programming: An introduction
System programming overview
1 System parameters
5 Voice mail programming
13 Administrator password
14 System clock
141 Set time/date
142 Automatic time setting
143 Clock adjustment
16 System feature parameters
162 Connect tone
163 Station feature set activation
17 System speed-dial
53 Guest/info mailboxes
54 Group mailboxes
55 Message notification options
551 Station delivery options
552 Delivery/paging parameters
56 Cascade notification mailboxes
57 Q & A mailboxes
6 Recording
61 Record system prompts
62 Record directory names
63 MOH programming
631 MOH source
632 Record MOH
633 MOH volume
3 Extension programming
32 Extension feature authorization
33 Department programming
332 VIP ACD parameters
37 RFID programming
371 Access schedules
372 RFID tag programming
373 View RFID tag numbers
374 ESI Presence Management parameters
375 ESI Presence Management Reader parameters
376 ESI Video Adapter programming
1
30 Station move
7 Reports
72
73
74
75
ESI Presence Management access door report
ACD department detail report
Voice mail statistics report
System speed-dial list
Programming keys
During programming, the first line of the display will show the current item being programmed, and the second line
will be the entry line. You can enter values as directed by the combination of the voice prompts and display.
To enter multiple values, such as a list of extension numbers, separate each value by # (to exit the list, enter # #).
To...
Press ...
Enter
#
Confirms new or existing entry and advances to next
programming step.
Backs up to previous prompt without changing its value.
Back up (i.e., reverse direction)
Delete
Exit
Help
Select/scroll
What this does
HOLD
[Hang up]
Deletes data or recording.
Exits programming mode and removes extension from DND.
HELP
(left-side scroll key)
(right-side scroll key)
Provides more detailed instructions during programming.
•
•
•
•
•
During entry of a value, backs up.
If a list is present (“>” is displayed), scrolls to left.
Selects from options presented.
If a list is present (“>” is displayed), scrolls to right.
Inserts a space during entry of a name.
Notes: Either < or > in the display indicates that additional choices or values are available by pressing a
corresponding scroll key (or ).
Only one person at a time can be performing Installer or Administrator programming.
1
Shown in the same order as it appears in the programming menu on an ESI desktop Feature Phone.
A.5
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Administrator programming: An introduction
Entering alphanumeric characters
You enter names for extensions, departments, branch IDs, CO lines, guest mailboxes and DIDs by
pressing the dial pad key that corresponds to the character to be entered. The key’s possible entries will change
each time the key is pressed, and the display will show this. When the desired character appears on the display,
press # to confirm; the cursor will move to the next character position. You may move the cursor left (to correct
an entry) by pressing the left scroll key () or move right (to add a space) by pressing the right scroll key ().
Key
0
Options
0, - (hyphen), _ (underline)
Key
7
Options
P, R, S, 7
1
Q, Z, 1, “_” (space)
8
T, U, V, 8
2
A, B, C, 2
9
W, X,Y, 9
3
D, E, F, 3
(left scroll key)
4
5
G, H, I, 4
J, K, L, 5
(right scroll key)
#
6
M, N, O, 6
##
Backs up and erases
Adds a space
[Enter]
Ends the name
Example: To enter a B, press 2 twice (the possible options to scroll through are A, B, C and 2). When B is displayed,
press # to confirm; the cursor will move to the next character to be entered. To complete the name, press # #.
Note: On an incoming call, the name you assigned to the call’s CO line or DID — rather than the Caller ID data —
will appear until the call is answered.
Selectable numbering plan
The ESI Communications Server’s selectable numbering plan offers up to nine pre-configured ranges — three
three-digit plans and six four-digit plans. When an extension range is selected, department numbers and guest
mailbox numbers are also changed. However, regardless of which extension range is selected, feature key codes and
CO line group access numbers will stay the same. The dial plan range is selected through Installer programming.
1
Notes: The ESI Presence Management RFID Reader uses one digital extension, regardless of dial plan.
The IP Feature Phone II, the IP Cordless Handset (Local or Remote), VIP Softphone, and a SIP phone
each use one IP port, regardless of dial plan.
Important: Full capacity on the ESI-1000, ESI-600, or ESI-200 can be achieved only by using a four-digit plan.
(See “System capacities,” page B.1.)
1
For more information, see the ESI Presence Management Installation Manual (ESI # 0450-0792).
A.6
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Administrator programming: An introduction
Three-digit numbering plan selections (all ESI Communications Servers)
Selection 100 (default)
From
To Used for
Selection 200
From
Selection 300
To Used for
From
To Used for
100
267 Extensions
200
367 Extensions
300
467 Extensions
280
299 Departments
380
399 Departments
470
489 Departments
300
489 Guest/info mboxes
100
199 Guest/info mboxes
100
289 Guest/info mboxes
400
489 Guest/info mboxes
Common to all three-digit numbering plan selections (all models)
From
To Used for
From
0
— Operator
700
709 Esi-Link locations
770
799 Esi-Link locations
490
500
499 Q & A mailboxes
— Broadcast mailbox
501
532 Group mboxes
533
542 Cascade notif. mboxes
600
699 System speed-dial
71
8
9
#
To Used for
1
76 Esi-Link/CO line grps.
— CO line grp.
— CO line grp./ARS
— Call pickup
— Paging
Four-digit numbering plan selections (ESI-600, ESI-200, ESI-100, and ESI-50)
Note: The “From” number is the same on all systems. The “To” number is dependent on the system type
because of the specific capacities of each system. See “System capacities” (page B.1).
Selection 1000
Selection 2000
Selection 3000
From
1000
To Used for
1407 Extensions
From
2000
To Used for
2407 Extensions
From
3000
To Used for
3407 Extensions
1408
1471 Departments
2408
2471 Departments
3408
3471 Departments
3000
3999 Guest/info mboxes
3000
3999 Guest/info mboxes
2000
2999 Guest/info mboxes
4000
— Broadcast mailbox
4000
— Broadcast mailbox
4000
4001
4032 Group mboxes
4001
4032 Group mboxes
4040
4060
4059 Q & A mboxes
4040
4079 Cascade notif. mboxes
4060
6000
6999 System speed-dial
6000
Selection 4000
— Broadcast mailbox
4001
4032 Group mboxes
4059 Q & A mboxes
4040
4059 Q & A mboxes
4079 Cascade notif. mboxes
4060
4079 Cascade notif. mboxes
6999 System speed-dial
6000
6999 System speed-dial
Selection 5000
Selection 6000
From
To Used for
From
To Used for
From
To Used for
4000
4407 Extensions
5000
5407 Extensions
6000
6407 Extensions
4408
4471 Departments
5408
5471 Departments
6408
6471 Departments
3000
3999 Guest/info mboxes
3000
3999 Guest/info mboxes
3000
3999 Guest/info mboxes
2000
— Broadcast mailbox
4000
— Broadcast mailbox
4000
2001
2032 Group mboxes
4001
4032 Group mboxes
2040
2060
2059 Q & A mboxes
4040
2079 Cascade notif. mboxes
4060
6000
6999 System speed-dial
6000
— Broadcast mailbox
4001
4032 Group mboxes
4059 Q & A mboxes
4040
4059 Q & A mboxes
4079 Cascade notif. mboxes
4060
4079 Cascade notif. mboxes
6999 System speed-dial
2000
2999 System speed-dial
Common to all four-digit numbering plan selections for these models
From
To Used for
From
0
— Operator
8
— CO line grp.
76 CO line grps. or
Esi-Link loc. prefixes
9
— CO line grp./ARS
71
1
700
709 Esi-Link locations
770
799 Esi-Link locations
#
To Used for
— Call pickup
— Paging
For more information, see www.esi-estech.com/Esi-Link.
A.7
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Administrator programming: An introduction
Four-digit numbering plan selections (ESI-1000 only)
Selection 1000
Selection 2000
Selection 3000
From
To Used for
From
To Used for
From
To Used for
1000
1815 Extensions
2000
2815 Extensions
3000
3815 Extensions
1872
1999 Departments
2872
2999 Departments
3872
3999 Departments
3000
3999 Guest/info mboxes
3000
3999 Guest/info mboxes
2000
2999 Guest/info mboxes
4000
4001
— Broadcast mailbox
4064 Group mboxes
4000
4001
— Broadcast mailbox
4064 Group mboxes
4000
4001
— Broadcast mailbox
4064 Group mboxes
4065
4084 Q & A mboxes
4065
4084 Q & A mboxes
4065
4084 Q & A mboxes
4085
4124 Cascade notif. mboxes
4085
4124 Cascade notif. mboxes
4085
4124 Cascade notif. mboxes
6000
6999 System speed-dial
6000
6999 System speed-dial
6000
6999 System speed-dial
Selection 4000
Selection 5000
Selection 6000
From
To Used for
From
To Used for
From
To Used for
4000
4872
4815 Extensions
4999 Departments
5000
5872
5815 Extensions
5999 Departments
6000
6872
6815 Extensions
6999 Departments
3000
3999 Guest/info mboxes
3000
3999 Guest/info mboxes
3000
3999 Guest/info mboxes
2000
— Broadcast mailbox
4000
— Broadcast mailbox
4000
2001
2064 Group mboxes
4001
4064 Group mboxes
2065
2085
2084 Q & A mboxes
4065
2124 Cascade notif. mboxes
4085
6000
6999 System speed-dial
6000
— Broadcast mailbox
4001
4064 Group mboxes
4084 Q & A mboxes
4065
4084 Q & A mboxes
4124 Cascade notif. mboxes
4085
4124 Cascade notif. mboxes
6999 System speed-dial
2000
2999 System speed-dial
Common to all four-digit numbering plan selections for the ESI-1000
From
To Used for
From
0
— Operator
8
— CO line grp.
76 CO line grps. or
Esi-Link loc. prefixes
9
— CO line grp./ARS
71
700
709 Esi-Link locations
770
799 Esi-Link locations
#
To Used for
— Call pickup
— Paging
A.8
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Administrator programming: An introduction
Remote setting of day, night, holiday and auto modes
Normally, the system’s day/night mode operation will be manually controlled at an ESI Feature Phone and/or
set to follow the day/night mode tables (programmed by the Installer) automatically. In addition, the
Administrator can remotely change the mode and/or re-record the holiday greeting to handle unexpected
closings such as for inclement weather.
Remotely logging into the system with either the Installer password or the Administrator password lets the
caller do the following for branch IDs 1–8:
• Re-record the greetings (day, night, day2 and night2).
• Re-record the holiday greeting.
• Change the mode to day/night/holiday/day2/night2 (or auto).
1. At the main greeting, enter 7 8 9 # or 4 5 6 # — or the new password — to enter remote
programming mode.
2. You’ll hear prompts that will allow you to change the answer mode (day, night, day2, night2, holiday or
auto) and/or to re-record the holiday greeting and the main greeting (ID 1). Follow the prompts to perform
the desired operation.
Note: To access these options for branch IDs 1–8, you must call in on the phone number of the tenant
that uses those branches.
3. Exit by pressing and hanging up.
Prompts for remote settings: an outline
1 Set answer mode
1
2
3
4
5
6
Day mode
Night mode
Holiday mode
Use day/night table*
Day2 mode
Night2 mode
2 Record holiday main greeting
3 Record daytime main greeting
4 Record nighttime main greeting
5 Record day2 main greeting
6 Record night2 main greeting
Note: If the system is answered live and call is then routed to a mailbox, the Administrator can press 8 to return
to the main greeting and then follow the steps for making remote settings.
* This is used if the Installer has programmed an automatic calendar.
A.9
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
System capacities
System capacities
Important: Each ESI Presence Management RFID Reader uses one digital station. The same is true for each ESI
Cellular Management Access Device.
Stations and trunks
The specifications shown below reflect maximum capacities and configurations. Not all of the station and trunk
maximums can be reached simultaneously.
Example: The ESI-100 can’t achieve 72 IP stations and 48 digital stations and 28 analog stations and 42 trunks
and 24 Esi-Link stations at the same time, because the system’s four-port-card limit makes such a
configuration impossible. The maximum configuration for this system is 108 ports, which could be achieved
by one DLC12 card (24 T1 trunks, 12 digital stations), two IVC 24Rs (48 IP stations), and one IVC EL24
(24 Esi-Link channels).
Dialing plans (-digits)
Max. port cards
2
Max. port configuration
– Max. stations
– Max. IP stations
– Max. digital stations
– Max. analog stations
Max. CO lines
Max. DLCs (T1/PRI)
Max. IVCs
Max. Esi-Link port cards (up to 24
5
Esi-Link channels per card)
Max. SIP trunk cards
Max. SIP trunks
ESI-1000
Four
Three
42
14
1,128
276
816
168
816
168
504
168
384
56
240
84
6
3
34
7
ESI-600
Four
Three
28
14
624
276
408
168
408
168
336
168
188
56
168
84
6
3
17
7
ESI-200
Four
Three
14
14
300
276
192
168
192
168
168
168
56
56
84
84
3
3
8
7
ESI-100
Four
Three
4
4
108
108
84
84
72
72
48
48
28
28
42
42
1
1
3
3
ESI-50
Four
Three
1
1
4
4
87
87
52
52
12
12
32
32
8
8
35
35
3
3
1
1
4
4
1
1
4
4
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
10
240
3
72
6
144
3
72
3
72
3
72
1
24
1
24
1
24
1
24
Dedicated ports
Dialing plans (-digits)
6
Voice mail/auto attendant ports
Conference ports (max. of 16
members per conference)
7
NSP
8
Overhead paging ports
Serial/SMDR ports
ESI-1000
Four
Three
128
128
ESI-600
Four
Three
32
32
ESI-200
Four
Three
16 or 24 16 or 24
ESI-100
Four
Three
8
8
ESI-50
Four
Three
8
8
64
64
64
64
24
24
16
16
16
16
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Voice mail capacities
Dialing plans (-digits)
Voice mail storage (hours)
Broadcast mailbox (one to
all extensions)
Cascade notification mailboxes
Group mailboxes/max. members
Guest/info mailboxes
Maximum station mailboxes
Q & A mailboxes
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
ESI-1000
Four
Three
ESI-600
Four
Three
ESI-200
Four
Three
140 or
140 or
600
600
1,200
1,200
1,200
1,200
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
40
64/200
1,000
816
20
10
32/200
190
168
10
20
32/64
1,000
408
20
10
32/64
190
168
10
10
16/64
1,000
192
10
ESI-100
Four
Three
140
140
15 or 60
15 or 60
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
10
16/64
190
168
10
10
16/32
1,000
84
10
10
16/32
190
84
10
10
16/32
190
52
10
10
16/32
190
52
10
Includes built-in 482 port card.
Includes Esi-Link channels.
ESI-50 supports only PRI.
IVC 12 is built into ESI-50 main board.
Esi-Link channels are allocated to “reserved” ports; i.e. Esi-Link channels do not reduce CO or station capacity.
On the ESI-200: 16 ports for 140-hr. model, 24 ports for 280-hr. and 600-hr. models.
Network Services Processor; see the ESI Communications Server Hardware Installation Manual (ESI # 0450-1049).
On the ESI-200: A non-IVC card must be installed in slot 1 or 2. On the ESI-100: An IVC can’t be installed in slot 1.
B.1
ESI-50
Four
Three
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
System capacities
Departments
Dialing plans (-digits)
Max. departments
Department types: Ring-all, ACD,
UCD, in-order, pick-up, attendant
Max. members, non-ring-all depts.
Max members, ring-all depts.
ESI-1000
Four
Three
ESI-600
Four
Three
ESI-200
Four
Three
ESI-100
Four
Three
ESI-50
Four
Three
128
20
64
20
20
20
10
10
10
10
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
64
48
64
48
64
48
64
48
48
48
48
48
32
32
32
32
32
32
32
32
Shared-office tenanting
Dialing plans (-digits)
Tenants
ESI-1000
Four
Three
8
8
ESI-600
Four
Three
8
8
ESI-200
Four
Three
4
4
ESI-100
Four
Three
2
2
ESI-50
Four
Three
2
2
ESI-1000
Four
Three
Yes
Yes
ESI-600
Four
Three
Yes
Yes
ESI-200
Four
Three
Yes
Yes
ESI-100
Four
Three
Yes
Yes
ESI-50
Four
Three
Yes
Yes
CO line groups
Dialing plans (-digits)
Line groups 9, 8, 71–76
Max. members, CO ring
assignment list
48
48
48
48
48
48
32
32
32
32
Translation tables
Dialing plans (-digits)
1
Pilot numbers (non-SIP )
2
Pilot numbers (using SIP )
Max. DID entries
ESI-1000
Four
Three
80
80
100
100
1,200
1,200
ESI-600
Four
Three
40
40
100
100
600
600
ESI-200
Four
Three
20
20
100
100
300
300
ESI-100
Four
Three
10
10
100
100
300
300
ESI-50
Four
Three
10
10
100
100
300
300
ESI-600
Four
Three
1,000
100
ESI-200
Four
Three
1,000
100
ESI-100
Four
Three
1,000
100
ESI-50
Four
Three
100
100
ESI-100
Four
Three
ESI-50
Four
Three
System speed-dial numbers
Dialing plans (-digits)
System speed-dial numbers
ESI-1000
Four
Three
1,000
100
Maximum installations of VIP applications3
Dialing plans (-digits)
Installations,
VIP PC Attendant Console
Installations,
VIP auto-recording
Installations,
VIP ACD Supervisor
1
2
3
ESI-1000
Four
Three
ESI-600
Four
Three
ESI-200
Four
Three
16
16
8
8
4
4
2
2
2
2
32
32
16
16
8
8
4
4
4
4
16
16
8
8
4
4
2
2
2
2
Prior to June 15, 2009.
With release of system software on or after June 15, 2009.
Standalone (SE) or Outlook-integrated versions.
B.2
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
System capacities
ESI Presence Management features
Dialing plans (-digits)
RFID Reader access door records
1
RFID Reader entries in Fn. 372
Max. RFID tags (“electronic keys”)
ESI-1000
Four
Three
50,000
50,000
64
64
2,000
2,000
ESI-600
Four
Three
10,000
10,000
32
32
500
500
ESI-200
Four
Three
10,000
10,000
32
32
500
500
ESI-100
Four
Three
10,000
10,000
16
16
500
500
ESI-50
Four
Three
10,000
10,000
16
16
500
500
ESI-200
Four
Three
Yes
Yes
ESI-100
Four
Three
Yes
Yes
ESI-50
Four
Three
Yes
Yes
ESI-200
Four
Three
168
168
100
100
ESI-100
Four
Three
84
84
50
50
ESI-50
Four
Three
52
52
50
50
ESI-100
Four
Three
30
30
ESI-50
Four
Three
15
15
ESI Cellular Management features
Dialing plans (-digits)
Support for ESI Cellular Mgmt.
ESI-1000
Four
Three
Yes
Yes
ESI-600
Four
Three
Yes
Yes
ESI Mobile Messaging features
Dialing plans (-digits)
2
Maximum stations
2
Maximum guest mailboxes
ESI-1000
Four
Three
816
816
250
250
ESI-600
Four
Three
408
408
250
250
ESI Video Viewer and ESI Video Adapters
Dialing plans (-digits)
ESI Video Adapters
RFID Readers per
ESI Video Adapter
User exts./depts. per
ESI Video Adapter
ESI Video Viewer users
ESI-1000
Four
Three
75
75
ESI-600
Four
Three
60
60
ESI-200
Four
Three
45
45
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
64
64
64
64
48
48
32
32
32
32
30
30
20
20
15
15
10
10
5
5
ESI Media Management features
Dialing plans (-digits)
Video recordings
Audio recordings
SMDR events
Fob activity
ESI Media Manager users
1
2
ESI-1000
Four
Three
48
48
384
384
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
30
30
ESI-600
Four
Three
36
36
192
192
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
20
20
ESI-200
Four
Three
24
24
64
64
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
15
15
See the ESI Presence Management Administrator’s Manual (ESI document #0450-0795).
With release of system software on or after June 15, 2009.
B.3
ESI-100
Four
Three
12
12
32
32
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
10
10
ESI-50
Four
Three
12
12
32
32
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
5
5
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 1: System parameters
Function 1: System parameters
Function 13: Administrator password
These functions will display the existing password and prompt for entry of a new password. The passwords can
be 2–8 digits long, followed by #. The Installer can change either the Installer or Administrator Password.
Only those functions listed in the Administrator Manual can be programmed via the Administrator
Password. The default Administrator password is 4 5 6.:
Note: Be sure to write down the new Administrator password, and store it in a safe place.
Accessing user station programming
Should a user forget his password or if an employee leaves the organization, this feature allows the
Administrator to enter a user's station programming and operate within it as if he were the user. From the
user’s station, enter the Administrator password when the system prompts for the user password.
Example: From station 105, entering 4 5 6 # instead of the user password (1 0 5 #) will enter the station’s user
programming. (Default passwords shown for this example).
Function 14: System clock
Function 141: Set time/date
1. Enter a new time in a twelve-hour format.
Example: Enter 1 2 3 3 for 12:33, or 3 1 5 for 3:15 (note that you need no leading zero for the time).
2. Select AM or PM by pressing a scroll key (either or ).
3. Enter a new date in an eight-digit format, including leading zeroes.
Example: Enter 0 7 0 4 2 0 0 7 for July 4, 2007 (note that leading zeroes are required here, unlike in Step 1).
4. Press # to finish the entry.
Note: A built-in battery maintains the correct time and date, even in the event of a power loss.
C.1
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 1: System parameters
Function 142: Automatic time setting
1: Synchronize with Caller ID1
This function, when enabled, synchronizes the real-time clock with Caller ID (CID) messaging: call
processing compares the time of a CID message to the system real-time clock and, if the difference is
more than two minutes, resets the real-time clock to match the time (minutes) of the CID message. The
system will analyze each such message (or — if it receives more than four calls with CID information
within a one-minute period — as is needed). Select ENABLE or DISABLE by pressing a scroll key (either
or ). Choosing ENABLE will allow the CID data to update the time and date.
Default: Disabled.
Esi-Link-related notes:
If “synchronize with Caller ID” is enabled, Esi-Link time synchronization (from location 700)
will be disabled.
If “synchronize with Caller ID” is disabled, Esi-Link time synchronization will be allowed (minutes only).
When Esi-Link is used, all cabinets’ time will be synchronized by cabinet 700, unless “synchronize
with Caller ID” is enabled in Function 142.
2: Adjust for Daylight Saving Time
This function, when enabled, causes the real-time clock to adjust itself automatically for Daylight Saving
Time (DST). Select AUTO or DISABLE for DST by pressing a scroll key (either or ). Choosing
DISABLE is best for those areas that don’t observe DST.
Default: Disabled.
Note: If this function is enabled and it causes an automatic time change, the system won’t update the realtime clock from either Caller ID messages (Function 1421, above) or Esi-Link time synchronization
for 25 hours before and 25 hours after the time change is due to be effective (i.e., 2:00 AM Sunday).
Function 143: Clock adjustment
This function lets the Installer or Administrator have the system automatically compensate for a clock that’s
running too fast or too slow. The clock adjustment speeds up or slows down the clock over a 30-day period by
the amount selected. If the system clock is running slow, select a positive value. If the clock is running fast,
select a negative value.
Range: -2 to +5.5 minutes. Default: 0.
Example: If the clock is running two minutes fast over a month, select -2 (minus two minutes).
1
Does not work with PRI.
C.2
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 1: System parameters
Function 16: System feature parameters
Function 162: Connect tone
This sets whether the system plays a system connect tone (two short beeps a user hears when a
station answers).
Default: Enabled (the beeps play).
Function 163: Station feature set activation
Field 1: Group listen enable/disable
With this feature disabled: if a station user presses SPEAKER while on a call, the Feature Phone
immediately turns off the handset and switches to hands-free mode.
If enabled, the group listen feature is available system-wide. If disabled, it is no longer available.
Default: Disabled.
Field 2: Privacy release enable/disable
With this feature enabled: if a station user presses a CO line key that is in use (lit red), the user will be
immediately conferenced with the call in progress on that line. With this feature disabled: pressing an in-use
CO line key has no effect.
Default: Disabled.
Warning: Adjusting this parameter while calls are in progress may result in temporary loss of audio.
Field 3: VIP text-messaging enable/disable
1
With this enabled, users of VIP Professional-compatible applications can use VIP to text-message.
Default: Enabled.
1
VIP Professional, VIP ACD Agent, VIP ACD Supervisor, VIP PC Attendant Console, and VIP Softphone.
C.3
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 1: System parameters
Function 17: System speed-dial
1
Up to 1,000 system speed-dial names and associated numbers can be stored for access by any station.
A user can initiate a system speed-dial by dialing the speed-dial location number or by accessing the name
through the Esi-Dex feature. In Function 32, access to system speed-dial can be denied to individual stations
(see page D.2).
Note: System speed-dialing overrides extension toll restrictions (Function 32, page D.2).
1. Enter the three-digit or four-digit speed-dial number to program. (For acceptable system speed-dial
numbers, see “Selectable numbering plan,” page A.6.)
2. Enter a name up to 10 characters in length (see “Entering alphanumeric characters,” page A.6).
3. Enter the number to be dialed (including the line groups 9, 8, or 71–76). Press the left scroll key () to
delete any character or digit entered in error.
Important: When using PRI, don’t enter a pause (“P”) after the line group number. If you do, the system will
send all digits after the pause as DTMF digits, and the call won’t be completed.
Here’s an example:
1.
Speed-dial number
601
2.
Name
AUTO RENTL
3.
Number
915552221212
The number dialed in Step 3 can be up to 30 digits long including special characters:
Code
#
F
P
What it produces
# DTMF tone
DTMF tone
Flash hook
2-second pause
Use the scroll key to enter special characters; use the scroll key to backspace. Press # to confirm the
inserted character and continue. Press # # to complete the entry.
Example: To create a system speed-dial number that dials 9, then 214-555-5644, then pauses for four seconds and
finally dials #104, enter the following dial string:
Deleting a speed-dial number
To delete an entire speed-dial number and name, delete the location number by pressing HOLD or the
left scroll key () during Step 1 in the speed-dialing procedure described above.
Note: Speed-dial keys can’t be used when the station is already connected to a CO line.
1
Up to 100 if three-digit dial plan is used.
C.4
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 3: Extension programming
Function 3: Extension programming
This section provides programming for extensions and department groups.
Important: Where any gray shading (■) appears in an example, it represents values either unavailable to the function
or unused in the particular example.
Function 30: Station move
This feature allows the Installer or Administrator to exchange the extension numbers of two extensions. It is used
only for exchanging extensions — not guest mailboxes or departments.
Important: Before you use this function on two extensions, make sure they’re both idle at the time.
Along with the extension numbers, this function also will exchange the following parameters (depending on
station type):
1
•
•
Extension name and other assignments (including of the Operator to extension 0 from Functions 31 and 32).
Mailbox information (personal greeting, notification, schedules).
•
•
Programmable feature keys.
Personal Dex.
Function 30 has the following limitations:
•
Mailboxes cannot be exchanged. Instead, the Installer must use Function 34 (flexible number assignment).
•
Both extensions must be of the same “type” — i.e.., analog to analog, digital to digital, IP to IP — as shown in
the following table:
From . . .
Digital phone
Analog extension
IP Phone (local or remote)
Digital phone
IP Phone (local or remote)
IP Phone (local or remote)
Fax, modem, door, ringer, server,
RFID Reader, SIP station, VIP Softphone
To . . .
Digital phone
Analog extension
IP Phone (local or remote)
Analog extension
Analog extension
Digital phone
Any type of phone
Function 30 allowed?
Yes
Yes
Yes
2
No
1
No
1
No
1
No
To use this feature:
1. Enter Installer programming through a Digital or IP Feature Phone and go to Function 30.
2. Enter the first extension and press #.
STATION MOVE
1ST EXT: 1044
3. Enter the second extension and then press #.
X1044 J SMITH
2ND EXT: 1056
(Continued)
1
2
Function 31 is accessible by only Installers.
Your installing ESI Reseller must use Function 34 to change the numbers of these types of extensions.
D.1
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 3: Extension programming
4. Both extensions will now appear in the display. Confirm the exchange by pressing #.
X1044 J SMITH
X1056 S BROWN
5. If one of the phones is in use, the display will show that extension:
STATION MOVE
EXT 1044 BUSY
(If both are in use, the display will show only the first extension.)
To back up to the previous step, press and then re-try the extension exchange by pressing # again.
Function 32: Extension feature authorization
Function 321: Standard feature authorization
The Installer or Administrator can allow or deny many extension features on an extension-by-extension basis.
A User, however, can only program and use allowed features (by using a combination of voice and display
prompts) from his/her phone. Below is an example of a completed Function 321 programming worksheet.
1.
2.
Ext.
XXX
100
101
102
103
110*
Name
Default
Jane
Roger
Sally
Sam
Bill
3.
Call
wait
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
4.
5.
6.
AA
DND block Rec.
Y
N
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
N
N
7.
8.
9.
10.
Svc. Local Toll
Sys.
obs. allow allow spd. dial
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
11.
AutoPage
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
N
12.
Ext.
fwdg.
Y
N
N
N
N
N
13.
14.
15.
Fwdg. to Trk-to- Assoc.
toll nos. trk xfer
ext.
N
Y
N
N
†
N
N
X206
N
N
N
N
N
N
16.
Mob.
Msg.
N
Y
N
Y
Y
Here are the programming steps.
1. Extension number — Enter the extension number to program.
2. Extension name — Name the extension (if not previously named in Installer programming).
For each of the following features, press a scroll key ( or ) to select YES or NO.
1
3. Call waiting — Allows the user to turn call waiting on or off for his station.
4. Do not disturb — Allows the user to activate DND from his station.
5. Auto attendant block — Blocks calls from being transferred to the station from the auto attendant;
follows the extension’s call forward day/night as programmed by the Installer.
6. Live recording feature — If enabled, will allow the user to record conversations.
7. Service observing — Allows the user to monitor the conversations of those stations listed in the
service observing list for his/her station. If this is enabled, you must enter a list of allowed extensions.
Note: A Department number can be entered as an extension in the Service Observing list and will then
automatically include all members of the Department even if the members of the Department are
later changed.
8. Local allow — “YES” allows the user to place seven-digit toll calls. If you select “NO,” the user can
make only calls to numbers listed in the local allow table (Installer-programmed).
9. Toll allow — “YES” allows the user to place toll calls. If you select “NO,” the user can make only either
2
non-toll calls or calls to numbers listed in the allow exception table.
10. System speed-dial — “YES” allows the user to access and place system speed-dial calls.
†
An example of a digital Cordless Handset.
* An example of an analog phone.
Analog stations programmed as FAX or MODEM can’t have call waiting.
2
Set in the fixed allow table (Function 222, which is an Installer-only function).
1
D.2
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 3: Extension programming
11. AutoPage — Lets the user turn AutoPage (defined below) on or off at his/her station.
Note: This feature is used in conjunction with the directory names recorded in Function 62. If a name
isn’t recorded in Function 62, the station default name (“Extension [xxx]”) is paged.
If the station user has his/her mailbox set to answer with personal greeting 3 and a caller presses 3 to
page that user, this feature automatically pages the station user in the page zones entered in Function 31.
If no page zone is entered, all ESI Digital Feature Phones and locally installed ESI 48-Key IP Feature
1
Phones II on the system are paged.
Default: Enabled.
Note: When AutoPage is enabled, the system will use the last installed idle digital port to perform
the page. Therefore, if a phone is on the last installed port (e.g., X111 on a system with only a 612
card), the phone’s user may experience a brief delay in telephone operation if he/she picks up the
handset (or presses SPEAKER) during the AutoPage.
12. External forwarding — Allows the station user to use the call forwarding/off-premises and offpremises “reach-me” features. See the User’s Guide for more information about these features.
Default: Enabled.
Note: After the system dials the external forwarding number, it will play a prompt saying, “You are
receiving a forwarded call. Press any key to accept.” This prompt will play continuously for
30 seconds. If the forwarded call is answered and the called person dials a digit, the forwarded
call will be connected to that person. If no digit is dialed, the caller is automatically forwarded to
voice mail. While the two lines (trunks) are connected, the system constantly monitors the line for
open loop conditions (hang-up). If an open loop is detected on either line, the call is disconnected.
The system also monitors for voice activity on the connected lines; if voice is no longer detected,
2
the call is disconnected. Finally, if both lines are connected for more than 60 minutes, the call will
be disconnected.
13. Forwarding to toll numbers — This feature is used in conjunction with external forwarding (see previous
item). When enabled, this feature lets the user program a long-distance number for external forwarding.
Default: Disabled.
14. Trunk-to-trunk transfer — When enabled, this lets the station user initiate a trunk-to-trunk transfer.
The user, while connected to a CO line, can press TRANSFER, dial an off-site number and then
complete the trunk-to-trunk transfer by simply hanging up. Both outside parties are then connected.
A station user also can set up a conference call and then drop out of the conference, leaving the other
members conferenced. This feature MUST be enabled in order for external call forwarding and/or
off-premises “reach-me” to succeed.
Default: Enabled.
Important: USE OF FEATURES, SUCH AS TRUNK-TO-TRUNK TRANSFER, THAT REQUIRE TRUNK-TO-TRUNK
CONNECTIONS WILL INCREASE THE RISK OF TOLL FRAUD. IN NO EVENT SHALL ESI (ESTECH
SYSTEMS, INC.) BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES
WHATSOEVER INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, FRAUDULENT TOLL CHARGES, LOSS OF BUSINESS
PROFITS, BUSINESS INTERRUPTIONS OR ANY OTHER COSTS OR DAMAGES RELATED THERETO
ARISING FROM THE USE OF THESE FEATURES.
(Continued)
1
2
ESI Cordless Handsets don’t receive pages.
Default timer setting. To adjust this, contact ESI Technical Support.
D.3
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 3: Extension programming
15. Associated extension — Enter the desired ESI Cordless Handset extension or VIP Softphone
extension. This creates a relationship that allows use of the Quick Switch key. For information about
the Quick Switch key, consult the User’s Guide (ESI # 0450-1047). This field is not available for an
extension using a 12-Key Feature Phone or ESI Cordless Handset.
16. Mobile Messaging — If this is enabled, each time a new voice mail message arrives for the user, the
system sends the user an e-mail (with or without an attached .WAV file of the voice message).
Default: No.
Example: Here is a portion of a completed programming worksheet for extension feature authorization. Note that:
• Extension 100 cannot record calls but can make toll calls (except those listed in the deny table)
and can access the system speed-dial numbers.
1.
•
By comparison, extension 102 cannot make general toll calls but also can call any system
speed-dial number — including to make a toll call — even those listed in the allow table.
•
Extension 102 is associated with an ESI Digital Cordless Handset at extension 113; and
extension 115 is associated with a VIP Softphone installation at extension 119.
•
(Extension 112 doesn’t have DND, AA block, recording, or service observing capability because
it’s an analog port.)
2.
Ext. Name
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
Sys.
Fwdg. Trk.Call
AA
Svc. Local Toll spd. Auto- Ext. to toll to-trk. Assoc.
wait DND blk. Rec. obsv. allow allow dial Page fwdg. nos.
xfer
ext.
100 Jane
Y
Y
N
N
N
Y
Y
Y
N
N
N
N
102 Sally
Y
Y
N
Y
N
Y
N
Y
Y
N
N
N
112* Bill
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
N
N
N
113 (Sally’s
Y
Y
N
Y
N
Y
N
Y
Y
N
N
115 Tom
Y
Y
N
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
119 (Tom’s VIP
Y
Y
N
Y
N
Y
N
Y
Y
N
16.
Mob.
Msg.
N
X113
Y
N
X102
Y
N
N
X119
Y
N
N
X115
Y
Cordless)
Softphone)
Paired ESI Feature Phone/analog phone operation
For someone wishing to have an ESI Feature Phone (Digital or IP) in his office and an existing analog
cordless phone for roaming the building, program as follows:
1. Create a call-forward key on the ESI Feature Phone to forward to the analog cordless phone.
2. Assign the analog cordless phone’s call forward busy/no answer to the ESI Feature Phone’s mailbox.
The user will then have all of his messages in one location (but can retrieve them from either phone).
* An example of an analog phone.
D.4
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 3: Extension programming
Function 322: Advanced extension feature authorization
This function allows authorization of some other ESI features, particularly those involving licensing.
Below is an example of a completed Function 322 programming worksheet.
1.
2.
Ext. Name
XXX
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
110*
Default
Jane
Roger
Sally
John
Dave
Bob
Kathy
Bill
3.
4.
5.
6.
VIP
Type
Autorecord
Record
threshold
N
Y
30
Y
Y
30
30
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
N
N
Attendant
Pro
VIP
Agent
Supervisor
7.
VIP ACD
Supervisor
department(s)
290, 291
8.
9.
Media
Media
Manager
Manager Administrator
N
N
Y
N
Y
Y
N
Y
N
Y
N
N
Y
N
10.
11.
Video
files
N
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
N
Y
Call
record
N
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
N
Y
12.
13.
SMDR
Fob
events
Y
Y
Here are the programming steps.
1. Ext. — Enter the extension number to program.
2. Name — Enter the name of the extension.
Note: For more information on the VIP family of software applications mentioned in steps 3–6, refer to the
VIP Setup and User’s Guide (ESI # 0450-0513) and the VIP ACD Supervisor Setup and User’s
Guide (ESI # 0450-0986).
3. VIP — Scroll to enable (YES) or disable (NO) the extension to use VIP or a VIP Professional1
compatible application.
Notes: Before you enable VIP Softphone in Function 322, your Installer must first have completed
Function 31 programming for the PC phone.
If you select NO in this step, the remaining steps are non-applicable and won’t appear.
4. Type — Scroll to select which type of VIP application the extension can use.
Choices: VIP (regular VIP), PRO (VIP Professional), ATTEND (VIP PC Attendant Console), SPVR
(VIP ACD Supervisor), AGNT (VIP ACD Agent), and SOFT (VIP Softphone).
Notes: If you select VIP Softphone and the extension hasn’t previously been programmed in Function 31
as a Local or Remote PC Phone, an error message will play.
If you select VIP in this step, the remaining steps are non-applicable and won’t appear.
5. Auto-record — Scroll to enable (YES) or disable (NO) the extension for auto-record. This feature requires
2
1
appropriate licensing and is available only for users of VIP Professional-compatible applications.
Note: If you select NO in this step, the next step is non-applicable and won’t appear.
6. Record threshold — Enter the number of auto-recordings that an authorized extension can make
before all recording functionality is disabled. For information on auto-recording, consult the VIP Setup
and User’s Guide (ESI # 0450-0513).
Range: 5–50 (ESI-1000 or ESI-600), 5–40 (ESI-200), or 5–30 (ESI-100 or ESI-50).
Default: 40 (ESI-1000 or ESI-600), 30 (ESI-200), or 20 (ESI-100 or ESI-50).
7. VIP ACD Supervisor departments (this step appears only if you selected SPVR in step 3) —
Enter the ACD department numbers for which this extension is a supervisor.
Maximum: 4.
(Continued)
* An example of an analog phone.
1
VIP Professional, VIP PC Attendant Console, VIP ACD Supervisor, VIP ACD Agent, or VIP Softphone.
2
For limits on VIP licensing, see “System capacities,” page B.1.
D.5
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 3: Extension programming
8. ESI Media Manager — Scroll to enable (YES) or disable (NO) the extension’s ability to use
ESI Media Manager.
Note: If you select NO in this step, the options in steps 9 and 11 cannot be programmed (because they
won’t appear).
9. ESI Media Manager Administrator — Scroll to enable (YES) or disable (NO) the extension’s ability to
serve as the ESI Media Manager Administrator.
Note: Only one extension per system can be set as the ESI Media Manager Administrator. This
extension also will be notified in case the Applications Services Card drive is nearly out of
recording space.
10. Video files — Scroll to enable (YES) or disable (NO) the extension’s ability to view video recordings by
using ESI Media Manager.
Note: Extensions where this option is enabled can retrieve and view video recordings from those
cameras that the user has been authorized (in Function 376) to view.
11. Call recording — Scroll to enable (YES) or disable (NO) the extension’s ability to listen to audio
recordings by using ESI Media Manager.
Note: Extensions where this option is enabled can retrieve and listen to recordings made by not only
themselves but also those extensions listed in the service observe list in Function 321 (see the
ESI Communications Servers Programming Manual [ESI # 0450-1050]).
12. Station message detail recording (SMDR) — Scroll to enable (YES) or disable (NO) the ESI Media
Manager Administrator’s ability to view SMDR records for all extensions.
Note: This option is available only for an extension that has been defined in step 9, above, as the ESI
Media Manager Administrator.
13. Fob events — Scroll to enable (YES) or disable (NO) the ESI Media Manager Administrator’s ability to
view ESI Presence Management fob events for all extensions.
Note: This option is available only for an extension that has been defined in step 9, above, as the ESI
Media Manager Administrator.
D.6
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 3: Extension programming
Function 33: Department programming
Departments can be used to direct inbound calls for more extensive call coverage. Each ESI Communications
Server has a maximum number of departments, and members per department (for details, see “System capacities,”
page B.1). You also can assign an extension to more than one department.
Function 332: VIP ACD parameters
This function establishes settings to be used for VIP ACD. It covers programming for the database owner,
the real-time display clearing, and the service level.
Note: See also the VIP ACD Supervisor Setup and User’s Guide (ESI # 0450-0986).
Function 3321: Assign database owner
Enter the extension that will be the VIP ACD database owner (the VIP ACD Supervisor extension that
collects and stores ACD events in the ACD event database). Only one extension is needed, regardless of
the number of ACD departments in the system.
Important: This extension must keep its VIP ACD Supervisor application running at all times, in order to collect
event records that will be stored in the ACD event database.
Function 3322: Manual real-time display clearing
Enter the number of the department whose real-time statistics are to be cleared.
Clearing the real-time statistics resets the counters in the VIP ACD Supervisor Department Details (realtime statistics) display to zero, so new statistics can be calculated until the display is manually or
automatically cleared again.
Function 3323: Automatic real-time display clearing
At a programmed time, this function clears the real-time statistics, which automatically resets the counters
in the VIP ACD Supervisor Department Details (real-time statistics) display to zero. Only one clearing
time can be set per department.
1. Enter the department number.
2. Select ENABLED or DISABLED.
Default: DISABLED.
3. Enter the time (in 24-hour format) when the department’s real-time statistics are to be cleared.
Range: 00:00–23:59. Default: 00:00.
Function 3324: Service level
This function sets the threshold time, in minutes and seconds, by which service level is determined for
the VIP ACD Supervisor Department Details display. The service level is calculated by dividing the
number of calls answered within the threshold by the last 30 calls presented to the queue. (The number of
calls used to make this calculation — 30 — is rolling and can’t be adjusted.)
Example: The threshold time is set to 02:00 (two minutes, zero seconds; that’s the default). Thus, each call
must be answered within two minutes from the time it goes to the department. If 30 calls are
presented and the department agents answer 20 of them within each call’s two-minute threshold
time, the service level is 67% (20 ÷ 30 = 0.6667). This percentage will appear in the supervisor’s
Department Details display.
Range: 00:00–16:00 (zero to 16 minutes). Default: 02:00.
D.7
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 3: Extension programming
Function 37: RFID programming
Choices are:
•
1 — Access control schedule programming.
•
•
2 — RFID tag assignment.
3 — View RFID tag number.
•
4 — ESI Presence Management parameters.
Note: For more information about ESI Presence Management, consult its Installation Manual (ESI # 0450-0792).
Function 371: Access schedule programming
Access schedules are used to allow or deny door access with electronic keys (“RFID tags” on the system
display) at certain times of the day. Up to seven access schedules can be programmed. Each schedule has
an allow access time and a deny access time for each day of the week. By default, all access schedules allow
access 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
Note: Access schedules don’t take effect until the current time has passed the next schedule time. For example:
if you program a schedule time to deny access Wednesdays at 5:30 PM but it’s already 5:45 PM on
Wednesday when this programming occurs, the change won’t take effect until the following Wednesday.
1. Using the scroll keys, select the access schedule to be programmed. Press # to confirm.
Range: 1–7.
Note: Schedule 0 (default of full-time access) isn’t selectable.
ACCESS SCHEDULES
1-ACC SCHED1 >
2. Enter the name of the schedule (up to 10 characters in length).
Press # to confirm.
Default: ACC SCHED[x], where [x] represents the access schedule selected in step 1.
ACC SCHED1
NAME:
3. Use the scroll keys to select the day of the week to program for the selected access schedule.
Press # to confirm.
ACC SCHED1
DAY: MONDAY >
If you haven’t yet assigned an allow time (see next step) for this schedule, the display will show
something like:
ACC SCHED1 MON
NO ALLOW TIME
(Continued)
D.8
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 3: Extension programming
4. Enter the allow time — the time when an electronic key user can begin controlling door locks —
in 12-hour format. (To delete an entry, press HOLD.)
Press # to confirm when done.
ACC SCHED1 MON
ALLOW: 900
5. Select AM or PM by pressing a scroll key. Press # to confirm.
ACC SCHED1 MON
ALLOW: 900 AM
If you haven’t yet assigned a deny time (next step) for this schedule, the display will show something like:
ACC SCHED1 MON
NO DENY TIME
6. Now, enter the deny time — the time when an electronic key user begins to be denied door lock
control — in 12-hour format. (To delete an entry, press HOLD.)
Press # to confirm when done.
ACC SCHED1 MON
DENY: 700 >
7. Select AM or PM by pressing a scroll key. Press # to confirm.
ACC SCHED1 MON
DENY: 700 PM
8. Press # again to exit the function, or select another day of the week by using the scroll keys and then
go back to step 4.
D.9
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 3: Extension programming
Function 372: RFID tag number programming
As described earlier in this document, each electronic key has an embedded unique RFID tag number. This
function is used to associate each RFID tag number to an extension or mailbox for Personal Call Routing and
presence indication (except mailboxes).
1. Enter an RFID tag number, or use the scroll keys to select from the list of tag numbers.
Note: If using any RFID features — i.e., if using ESI Presence Management for anything more than its
doorphone capabilities — you should save time by first scanning the electronic keys at any RFID
Reader connected to the system. The system will store the electronic keys’ tag numbers
automatically, and you can use the scroll keys to select the tag numbers to be assigned.
To delete a tag number, press HOLD. Press # to confirm.
TAG ID: 2
9012345678 >
The tag ID is the list index of the RFID tag number.
Note: If a tag number is entered manually but the tag limit has been exceeded, LICENSE EXCEEDED will
appear on the display. Therefore, you must delete one or more unassigned tag numbers.
2. Enter the extension or mailbox number to which you wish to assign the tag number. (To delete an
entry, press HOLD.)
Press # to confirm.
RFID TAG PROG
EXT OR MB:
1
3. Enter the extension numbers of up to the system limit of ESI Presence Management RFID Readers for
which this tag is allowed to control door access. To give the tag access to all doors, press FLASH. (To
delete an entry, press HOLD.) Press # after each entry and then press # again to confirm (in other
words: after the last entry, you’ll press # twice).
Note: If all ESI Presence Management RFID Readers are allowed, “ALL” will appear on the second line.
DOOR ACCESS:
123 124 138 >
4. Use the scroll keys to select an access schedule. Access schedules are used to allow or deny door
access with an electronic key at certain times of the day. Each day of the week can have a start time
to allow access and a stop time to deny access.
To allow constant (“full”) door access, select 0 - FULL. Otherwise, select a schedule to restrict access. The
schedule name will appear.
Range: 1–7. Default: 0 (full)
Note: You assign access schedules in Function 371 (see page D.8). If not using access schedules,
select 0 – FULL.
ACCESS SCHEDULE:
0 - FULL >
1
For details on the maximum number of RFID Readers that can be entered for your system, see “ESI Presence Management features” in “System
capacities” (page B.1).
D.10
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 3: Extension programming
Function 373: View RFID tag number
This is used to display tag numbers that are associated to extensions or mailboxes. You can only view tag
numbers with this function. You cannot change any tag numbers or assignments.
Enter the station or mailbox number to display, and then press #. If there’s an RFID tag number assigned to
that extension or mailbox, it will appear.
RFID TAG DISPLAY
EXT:
Tip: You can use ESI System Programmer to print out a list of assigned tag numbers.
Function 374: ESI Presence Management parameters
Playing prompts
This determines whether the system plays a prompt — and, if so, which one — when the ESI Presence
Management RFID Reader reads an electronic key. Select YES to enable playing of the prompt or NO to
disable playing of the prompt.
Default: YES (a prompt will play).
EPM RFID READER
PROMPTS: YES >
When this function is set to NO, no prompts will play through the ESI Presence Management RFID
Reader. When “EPM RFID Reader prompts” is set to YES, prompts will play as shown below. (These
prompts can’t be customized.)
When the RFID Reader displays:
WELCOME
GOODBYE
ACCESS DENIED
LICENSE EXCEEDED
ERROR
READER FULL
It plays this prompt:
“Welcome”
“Goodbye”
“Invalid entry”
“Error”
“Error”
Enable/disable sending time and attendance records
Notes: The NSP must be programmed and connected to a local area network for time and attendance
record collection.
Only ESI Presence Management RFID Readers programmed as type ENTRANCE/EXIT (Function 31)
generate time and attendance records.
This parameter is used when the optional ESI TimeLine time and attendance management software
application is used in conjunction with the ESI Presence Management RFID Reader.
Use the scroll keys to enable or disable time and attendance records, and press # to confirm.
Default: Disabled.
D.11
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 3: Extension programming
Function 375: RFID Reader parameters
This function is used to adjust the doorphone speaker volume of each ESI Presence Management
RFID Reader.
1. Enter the extension number of the RFID Reader.
EPM READER SET
EXT:
2. Select the volume level by using the scroll keys.
X211 FRONT DOOR
VOLUME: 6
>
Range: 1–8, with 8 as the highest. Default: 4.
Function 376: ESI Video Adapter programming
Local Video Adapter
An ESI Video Adapter’s type is either local or remote (local IP or remote IP). Here, we will program a local
ESI Video Adapter.
Important: You may perform only limited ESI VIdeo Adapter programming using a phone, as opposed to use of
ESI System Programmer (for full details, see the ESI Video Adapter Installation and Programming
Manual, ESI # 0450-1241).
For step 4 of this procedure, you will need to know the Video Adapter’s unique MAC address (located
on its underside), so it’s best to write down that information before installing the Video Adapter.
1. Each ESI Video Adapter on the system has a unique ID number.
Range: 1–999.
You may create or delete an ESI Video Adapter’s ID number.
Enter the desired ID number (here, 150):
VIDEO_ADP_ID:150
To create the ID number, press # to accept and continue programming the Video Adapter.
To delete the ID number you entered, press HOLD and ignore the remaining steps.
2. An ESI Video Adapter’s type is either local IP or remote IP.
Notes: One Video Adapter can be associated with one ESI Presence Management RFID Reader.
An ESI Video Adapter uses no ports on the ESI Communications Server.
Select LOCAL for the ESI Video Adapter type by using the scroll keys:
VIDEO_ADP_TYPE:
SURV_LOCAL
After making your selection, press # to confirm.
(Continued)
D.12
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 3: Extension programming
3. Each ESI Video Adapter has a name (1–10 characters in length). You’ll probably want to edit the
default name so ESI Video Viewer users can easily identify and view video from the Adapter’s
camera.
Default: VID_ADP### (where ### refers to the Video Adapter’s ID number).
Enter the desired name (if necessary, review “Entering alphanumeric characters,” page A.6) — or
make no entry if the currently displayed name is acceptable . . .
VID_ADP150
NAME:MAIN_LOBBY
. . . and press # to confirm.
4. Each ESI Video Adapter has a unique MAC address.
Note: The Adapter’s MAC address can be found on its bottom side.
Use the first six programmable feature keys to enter the letters A, B, C, D, E, or F, respectively, in
the MAC address. You may choose to make no entry if the value shown is acceptable.
VID_ADP150_MAC:
00304D13579A
Press # to confirm.
Note: For each IP address in the following steps, enter the address in a dotted-decimal format consisting
of four numbers separated by dots. Valid numbers are 0 through 255. Use # to enter the dots
between numbers.
5. Enter the ESI Video Adapter’s IP address:
VA150_IP_ADD:
10.0.5.115
. . . and press # to confirm.
Default: 0.0.0.0.
Note: The ESI system will allow the entry of any number, but an erroneous entry which cannot
constitute a valid IP address (such as 10.0.5115 instead of 10.0.5.115) will leave the Video
Adapter’s IP address unchanged.
6. The Video Adapter’s HTTP port number provides access through gateways and network firewalls
for access to the Video Adapter.
Enter the Video Adapter’s HTTP port number:
HTTP_PORT:
59000
. . . and press # to confirm.
Range: 10000–65000.
(Continued)
D.13
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 3: Extension programming
7. If desired, one (and only one) ESI Presence Management RFID Reader extension can be
associated with the Video Adapter. Often, a camera may be installed primarily to capture motiondetection events in locations where no RFID Reader is installed; in such a case, there would be no
need to make an entry in this step.
Enter an RFID Reader extension here only if the Video Adapter’s location corresponds to that of an
RFID Reader (or leave the entry blank, otherwise):
EPM_EXT:
150
. . . and press # to confirm.
8. Now, enter the authorized user extensions whose users may view video from this Adapter.
Notes: Be mindful here of network utilization and bandwidth considerations. The ease with which
ESI Video Viewer users can create multi-view layouts (as described in the ESI Video Viewer
Setup and User’s Guide, ESI # 0450-1214) can tempt users to put many available camera
views on their screens, when they may really need only a very small quantity of available
views to do their jobs.
If you prefer to come back to this field later, you may leave the entry blank.
Enter the authorized user extensions for viewing this Adapter’s video:
AUTH_VIEWER_EXT:
100_101_102_103>
. . . and press # to confirm.
Range: 0–64 extensions.
9. Use the scroll keys to select the ASC to which this camera’s video output will be recorded (or
remove the associated ASC and select NONE):
ASSOC ASC CARD
NONE
. . . and press # to confirm.
Default: NONE.
Note: Only ASCs to which fewer than 12 ESI Video Adapters have been assigned will be shown.
If NONE is selected, the camera’s output will not be recorded.
D.14
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 3: Extension programming
Remote Video Adapter
An ESI Video Adapter’s type is either local or remote (local IP or remote IP). Here, we will program a
remote ESI Video Adapter.
Important: You may perform only limited ESI VIdeo Adapter programming using a phone, as opposed to use of
ESI System Programmer (for full details, see the ESI Video Adapter Installation and Programming
Manual, ESI # 0450-1241).
For step 4 of this procedure, you will need to know the Video Adapter’s unique MAC address (located
on its underside), so it’s best to write down that information before installing the Video Adapter.
1. Each ESI Video Adapter on the system has a unique ID number.
Range: 1–999.
You may create or delete an ESI Video Adapter’s ID number.
Enter the desired ID number (here, 150):
VIDEO_ADP_ID:150
To create the ID number, press # to accept and continue programming the Video Adapter.
To delete the ID number you entered, press HOLD and ignore the remaining steps.
2. An ESI Video Adapter’s type is either local IP or remote IP.
Notes: One Video Adapter can be associated with one ESI Presence Management RFID Reader.
An ESI Video Adapter uses no ports on the ESI Communications Server.
Select REMOTE for the ESI Video Adapter type by using the scroll keys:
VIDEO_ADP_TYPE:
SURV_REMOTE
After making your selection, press # to confirm.
(Continued)
D.15
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 3: Extension programming
3. Each ESI Video Adapter has a name (1–10 characters in length). You’ll probably want to edit the
default name so ESI Video Viewer users can easily identify and view video from the Adapter’s
camera.
Default: VID_ADP### (where ### refers to the Video Adapter’s ID number).
Enter the desired name (if necessary, review “Entering alphanumeric characters,” page A.6) — or
make no entry if the currently displayed name is acceptable . . .
VID_ADP150
NAME:MAIN_LOBBY
. . . and press # to confirm.
4. Each ESI Video Adapter has a unique MAC address.
Note: The Adapter’s MAC address can be found on its bottom side.
Use the first six programmable feature keys to enter the letters A, B, C, D, E, or F, respectively, in
the MAC address. You may choose to make no entry if the value shown is acceptable.
VID_ADP150_MAC:
00304D13579A
Press # to confirm.
Note: For each IP address in the following steps, enter the address in a dotted-decimal format consisting
of four numbers separated by dots. Valid numbers are 0 through 255. Use # to enter the dots
between numbers.
5. Enter the ESI Video Adapter’s IP address:
VA150_IP_ADD:
10.0.5.115
. . . and press # to confirm.
Note: The ESI system will allow the entry of any number, but an erroneous entry which cannot
constitute a valid IP address (such as 10.0.5115 instead of 10.0.5.115) will leave the Video
Adapter’s IP address unchanged.
6. Enter the remote-access HTTP port of the network to which the ESI Video Adapter is connected:
REM ACC HTTP PRT
8080
. . . and press # to confirm.
Range: 0–65000. Default: 8080.
7. Enter the default gateway IP address for the ESI Video Adapter:
VA150_GATEWAY:
0.0.0.0
. . . and press # to confirm.
(Continued)
D.16
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 3: Extension programming
8. The Video Adapter’s remote-access IP address provides remote access to this Adapter.
Enter the remote-access IP address for the Video Adapter:
RMT_ACCESS_IP:
65.115.210.33
. . . and press # to confirm.
9. The Video Adapter’s HTTP port number provides access through gateways and network firewalls
for remote access to the Video Adapter.
Enter the Video Adapter’s HTTP port number:
HTTP_PORT:
59000
. . . and press # to confirm.
Range: 10000–65000.
10. If desired, one (and only one) ESI Presence Management RFID Reader extension can be
associated with the Video Adapter. Often, a camera may be installed primarily to capture motiondetection events in locations where no RFID Reader is installed; in such a case, there would be no
need to make an entry in this step.
Enter an RFID Reader extension here only if the Video Adapter’s location corresponds to that of an
RFID Reader (or leave the entry blank, otherwise):
EPM_EXT:
150
. . . and press # to confirm.
11. Now, enter the authorized user extensions whose users may view video from this Adapter.
Notes: Be mindful here of network utilization and bandwidth considerations. The ease with which
ESI Video Viewer users can create multi-view layouts (as described in the ESI Video Viewer
Setup and User’s Guide, ESI # 0450-1214) can tempt users to put many available camera
views on their screens, when they may really need only a very small quantity of available
views to do their jobs.
If you prefer to come back to this field later, you may leave the entry blank.
Enter the authorized user extensions for viewing thie Adapter’s video:
AUTH_VIEWER_EXT:
100_101_102_103>
. . . and press # to confirm.
Range: 0–64 extensions.
12. Use the scroll keys to select the ASC to which this camera’s video output will be recorded (or
remove the associated ASC and select NONE):
ASSOC ASC CARD
NONE
. . . and press # to confirm.
Default: NONE.
Note: Only ASCs to which fewer than 12 ESI Video Adapters have been assigned will be shown.
If NONE is selected, the camera’s output will not be recorded.
D.17
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 5: Voice mail programming
Function 5: Voice mail programming
To simplify initial installation, all programmed extensions will automatically have the generic personal greeting,
“You have reached the mailbox for extension [xxx].” The mailbox user should replace this with a personalized
greeting. Each guest/info, group, cascade notification, or Q & A mailbox must have a greeting recorded for the
system to consider the mailbox active.
Important: A mailbox will not receive broadcast messages until a greeting has been recorded for it.
Additionally: If the greeting is deleted, the mailbox will be considered inactive.
On the 12-Key Feature Phone, it is necessary to assign the code 5 7 9 (voice mail) to a programmable
feature key for the mailbox to become active.
If a programmable feature key is programmed as a Virtual Mailbox Key with any mailbox number, the key’s LED
1
will blink, to indicate that new messages exist. To retrieve messages from a station, either (a.) press the Virtual
Mailbox Key or (b.) press VOICE MAIL and then enter the mailbox number. To record a greeting, press
PROGRAM and enter the mailbox number; then press # to confirm, and follow the prompts. The default
password is the mailbox number. To retrieve messages from the outside, press and enter the mailbox number
during the main greeting. To enter mailbox programming from any ESI phone on the system, press
PROGRAM and enter the mailbox number.
Function 53: Guest/info mailboxes
Important: Although Function 53 programs guest and info mailboxes, remember that information mailboxes don’t work
with ESI Mobile Messaging.
2
Any guest mailbox can be programmed as either a guest or info mailbox. Enter the mailbox number and select
Guest or Info by pressing a scroll ( or ) key.
Guest mailboxes are designed to be used by personnel, such as in outside sales or manufacturing, who don’t
have an extension assigned to them. A guest mailbox requires no programming other than the assigning of a
name. The maximum recording length is controlled by Function 51; the default is 10 minutes.
Notes: A guest mailbox can be handled like a regular extension (i.e., listed in the directory, assigned a station key,
etc.), and is password-protected by default.
Guest mailboxes do not support AutoPage (but do support off-premises “reach-me”).
Info mailboxes can be used to give callers information on a variety of different subjects by “publishing” these
mailbox numbers. Info Mailboxes are identical to Guest Mailboxes except that the caller will not be given a
record tone after the personal greeting (the information to be played). Instead, the caller will be forwarded as
programmed in this function (default is the caller will be disconnected after the information is played).
Guest/info mailboxes are created or deleted here, but are turned “on” only when a personal greeting (the
information to be played) has been recorded. Deleting the personal greetings will turn “off” the mailbox.
To record a greeting, press PROGRAM and the mailbox number; then press # to confirm, and follow the prompts.
The default password is the mailbox number. The maximum length of the recording time is 14 minutes.
Below is an example of a completed Programming Worksheet, showing the sequence of programming:
1.
MB
2.
Name
3.
Type
4.
Ext. fwd.
5.
Line grp.
400
Dana
Guest
Y
9
401
402
Doug
Literature
Guest
Info
Y
9, 8
6.
CF day
7.
CF night
N
Y
MB 100
MB 100
(Continued)
1
2
Otherwise, the key is a station key that allows for single-key transfer of a call with no message indication.
Guest and info mailboxes’ range depends on dial plan selected (see “Selectable numbering plan,” page A.6).
E.1
8.
Mobile Msg.
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 5: Voice mail programming
Each programming step is defined as follows:
1. Mailbox number — Enter a guest mailbox number.
2. Name — The mailbox name is used for the display, reports, and as a programming aid. The name length
can be no longer than 10 characters (see “Entering alphanumeric characters,” page A.6).
Default: The mailbox number.
3. Type — Select a mailbox type: Guest or Info.
Default: Guest.
4. External forward (guest mailbox only) — A guest mailbox can be set to allow off-premises “reach-me.”
Default: No.
5. Line group (guest mailbox only) — Used for off-premises “reach-me.”
Default: 9.
6. and 7. Call forward (info mailbox only) — An info mailbox can be set to call forward after the personal greeting
has played to an extension, department, a mailbox or a branch ID for day mode and differently for night mode.
Default: ID9999 (automatic disconnect).
8. Mobile Messaging (guest mailbox only) — A guest mailbox can be set so that, whenever it receives a new
voice mail message, the mailbox’s user will receive an e-mailed notification (at a location set in user programming).
Default: No.
Function 54: Group mailboxes and the broadcast mailbox
Broadcast mailbox
1
The broadcast mailbox is a special group mailbox which can be used to leave messages for all of the
system’s station users who have recorded a personal greeting. The broadcast mailbox’s user list cannot be
edited. Guest mailboxes are not included in the broadcast group.
Group mailboxes
Group mailboxes can be used for quickly leaving the same message simultaneously in mailboxes belonging
to extensions and guests. Anyone who knows the password can leave messages for all users listed as members
of that group and who have recorded a personal greeting. (If no member has a personal greeting recorded,
the group mailbox won’t save any messages.) The Administrator or group mailbox “owner(s)” may set or
change the list of group mailbox members. To record a greeting, press PROGRAM and the mailbox
number; then press # to confirm, and follow the prompts. The default password is the mailbox number. The
maximum recording length is controlled by Function 51; the default is 10 minutes. For system-by-system
number of group mailboxes and users per group mailbox, see “System capacities,” page B.1.
Important: A group mailbox is turned “on” (able to record and playback messages) only when its “owner” has
recorded a greeting for it, such as “This is the group mailbox for East Coast Regional Sales.” Similarly,
deleting the group mailbox greeting will turn “off” the group mailbox; any outstanding messages will
remain in its members’ mailboxes until erased by each member.
Notes: Programming 0 (zero) as the password lets anyone leave group messages or program the group mailbox.
If a user saves a group message, it will be saved as a new message.
Broadcast and group mailboxes can have a maximum of 32 messages per mailbox. Only extensions and
guest mailboxes can be members of a group.
When a message is deleted from the group mailbox, this deletes all copies from its member mailboxes.
Conversely, when the last user to delete his/her copy of the message does so, this deletes the message
from the group mailbox.
(Continued)
1
Mailbox numbering depends on the selected dial plan; see page A.6.
E.2
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 5: Voice mail programming
Here is the programming sequence:
1
1. Enter the group mailbox number.
2. Enter group member mailboxes’ numbers —
Separate each by #; enter # # to end the list.
Range: Depends on dial plan selected (see “Selectable
numbering plan,” page A.6).
1.
MB
2.
Group member mailboxes’ numbers
501
102 104 106 107 122 303 314
Function 55: Message notification
On a mailbox-by-mailbox basis for user or guest mailboxes, the system can be programmed to call an off-premises
number or another extension to deliver messages and/or dial to an external commercial paging network to activate a
user's pager. The system will call and/or page when the first new message is left in a mailbox, and will repeat (at
the interval of minutes programmed in this function) until the new message(s) have been deleted, saved, or moved.
The user can program the numbers and delay and can also select delivery of only messages marked as urgent.
The Installer and Administrator can set, on an individual-station basis:
•
•
The number to be called
A delay period
•
•
The number of attempts (maximum of 99)
The interval between attempts
•
A “quiet period" to suspend phone delivery — e.g., late at night (the quiet
period is an on-and-off time that applies to all days of the week)
Function 551: Station delivery options
Programming of the station options, as shown below, can be performed by the Installer or Administrator.
In addition, the user can change his phone number and pager number (but not phone or pager delay time).
The phone number’s maximum length is 24 digits.
1.
Number
2.
Delay
1. Phone
2145556789
30
2. Pager
2145551234
0
3.
Attempts
4.
Interval
5.
Quiet on
6.
Quiet off
6
60
10:30PM
7:15AM
10
30
To program, enter the extension number to program and select phone or pager to program. Then, enter:
1. Phone/pager number — The number to be dialed (without the CO line Group).
Note: Use the scroll key to enter special characters; use the scroll key to backspace. Press # to
confirm the inserted character and continue. Press # # to complete the entry.
To change the number, delete and then re-enter it.
2. Delay — How many minutes the system is to wait before dialing the phone or pager number.
This allows the user to pick up a message if he is in the office.
Range: 0–500. Default: 0.
3. Attempts — How many times that the system will call/page.
Range: 0–99. (0 turns off delivery.) Default: 3.
4. Interval — How many minutes should elapse between attempts.
Range: 10–1440. Default: 30.
5. Quiet period on — When the quiet period should begin.
Default: (None.)
6. Quiet period off — When the quiet period should end.
Default: (None.)
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ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 5: Voice mail programming
Function 552: Delivery/paging parameters
The sequence of programming is as follows:
1. CO line access — Enter the CO line group (9, 8, or 71–76) to be accessed for delivery.
Default: 9.
2. Pager dialing pause — When paging, the ESI Communications Server will send the mailbox number
to be shown in the pager’s display. To allow time for the paging service to answer, enter the pause,
in seconds, to occur between when the system dials the pager number and when it then dials the
mailbox number.
Range: 0–20. Default: 6.
Note: The message notification and delivery process uses one CO line at a time. As a result, if a system has
multiple users who have programmed delivery options, there may be a delay in notification.
Function 56: Cascade notification mailboxes
In addition to individual mailbox paging, the ESI Communications Server supports cascade notification
mailboxes. These can be assigned to anyone who requires escalating levels of notification beyond the single
level available in all user mailboxes. In this function, you program the notification numbers and number of times
each is to be notified before the next notification number is dialed; additionally, the mailbox owner can program
these settings. To record a greeting, press PROGRAM and the mailbox number; then press # to confirm, and
follow the prompts. The default password is the mailbox number. The maximum recording length is controlled by
Function 51; the default is 10 minutes. For information on the number of cascade notification mailboxes
supported by your system and its numbering plan, see “System capacities,” page B.1.
Cascade mailbox options
The user can program up to three external numbers, of up to 24 digits each, to be called or paged whenever
the mailbox takes a new or urgent message. The system will dial the first number (for the number of times
listed), then dial the second paging number (for the number of times listed), and finally dial the third number,
continuing in this sequence to call all three numbers until the message has been retrieved.
1.
MB
533
2.
1st Number
2145553232
3.
Type
PHONE
4.
Attempts
2
5.
2nd Number
2145554254
6.
7.
Type
Attempts
PHONE
3
8.
3rd Number
2145555452
9.
Type
PAGER
To program this, enter:
1. The mailbox number — Range: Depends on dial plan selected (see “Selectable numbering plan,”
page A.6). [Then press 1 to enter number programming, and proceed to Step 2.]
2. First number — The number to be dialed (without the CO line group).
3. Type — PHONE or PAGER. Use scroll keys to select.
4. Attempts — How many times the system will call before adding the second number.
Range: 0–99 (0 immediately pages all numbers). Default: 1.
5. Second number — The number to be dialed (without the CO line group).
6. Type — PHONE or PAGER. Use scroll keys to select.
7. Attempts — How many times the system will call before adding the third number.
Range: 0–99. Default: 1.
8. Third number — The number to be dialed (without the CO line group).
9. Type — PHONE or PAGER. Use scroll keys to select.
Notes: Use the scroll key to enter special characters; use the scroll key to backspace. Press # to
confirm the inserted character and continue. Press # # to complete the entry.
To change the number, delete and then re-enter it.
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ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 5: Voice mail programming
Cascade notification parameters
The cascade notification mailboxes will use the same CO line group and pager dialing pause as programmed
in Function 552 (see page E.4).
Notification interval
To program the notification interval parameter for a cascade notification mailbox:
1. Enter the mailbox number.
1
2. Press 2 to set parameters for the mailbox.
3. Enter the number of minutes for the interval between attempts.
Range: 1–1440. Default: 30.
Function 57: Q & A mailboxes
1
You can create question and answer (Q & A) mailboxes. Each Q & A mailbox owner can record up to 10
questions. The questions are recorded in the same manner as recording users’ multiple personal greetings (see
the User’s Guide). The individual answer segments recorded by the caller are stored as a single message, with
the answer segments separated by short beep tones. Each answer segment's maximum length will be as
programmed by the Installer. Normal message handling capability — delete, save, etc. — applies to the entire
message (all segments). For information on the number of Q & A mailboxes supported by your system and its
numbering plan, see “System capacities,” page B.1.
The caller, when recording each answer, can be instructed to conclude by pressing 1 or to pause for the next
question (the system advances when it detects either a 3-second period of silence or the pressing of 1) — e.g.,
"Record your name at the tone and press 1 when finished”… “Record your address at the tone and press 1
when finished." If the caller fails to respond to two questions in a row, the system disconnects the call.
Important: This programming creates or deletes Q & A mailboxes, but these mailboxes are turned “on” only when the
mailbox owner has recorded questions. Similarly, deleting all questions turns “off” the mailbox.
To record questions, press PROGRAM and the mailbox number; then press # to confirm, and follow the prompts.
The default password is the mailbox number. The maximum recording length is controlled by Function 51; the
default is 10 minutes.
Here is an example of a completed programming worksheet (numbers correspond to steps on next page):
1.
MB
2.
Name
3.
CF day
4.
CF night
490
Employment
ID 9999
ID 9999
491
Survey
ID 9999
ID 9999
Each programming step is defined as follows:
1
1. Mailbox number — Enter a Q & A mailbox number.
2. Name — The mailbox name is used for the display, reports, and as a programming aid. The name length
can be no longer than 10 characters (see “Entering alphanumeric characters,” page A.6).
Default: The mailbox number.
3. & 4. Call forward — A Q & A mailbox can be set to call forward, after the last question has been answered,
to an extension, department, a mailbox or a branch ID for day mode and differently for night mode.
Default: ID9999 (automatic disconnect).
Tip: If you need a Q & A mailbox with more than 10 questions, set the call-forwarding to another Q & A mailbox.
Default: Disabled.
1
Mailbox numbering depends on the selected numbering plan; see page A.6.
E.5
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 6: Recording
Function 6: Recording
Function 61: Re-record system and branch prompts
An ESI Communications Server plays the system prompts to an outside caller at different points in the call routing
or mailbox functions. These system prompts have been pre-recorded at the factory but you may re-record them,
if preferred — e.g., in a different voice or with different instructions.
The auto attendant branch prompts (such as the main greeting or sub-menus) are also recorded here. For each,
enter the branch ID number as the prompt number — e.g., the prompt for ID 1 is prompt 1, the prompt for ID 2 is
prompt 2, etc. Once you record the day greeting for a main ID branch such as ID 1 or ID 2, the system will give
you the option to record greetings for night, day2, and night2. (If necessary, consult your installing ESI Reseller
for more information concerning the built-in auto attendant.)
For both system prompts and branch prompts, the maximum recording length is five minutes per prompt.
Recording a prompt
1. Practice the prompt by recording and re-recording (start and stop by pressing 1).
2. When satisfied with its quality, press # to confirm.
Note: Deleting a system prompt by pressing HOLD (instead of #) restores to the default recording.
System prompts
• Busy Prompt: 530 — Plays to the outside caller if an extension is busy.
Default: "That extension is busy.”
• No Answer Prompt: 531 — Plays to the caller if an extension does not answer.
Default: "That extension does not answer.”
• Hold Prompt: 532 — Plays to the caller who makes a menu selection or enters an extension number.
Default: "One moment, please.”
• Q/Z Prompt: 534 — Plays to a caller who has selected an alphabetic directory; instructs the caller to press 1
for the letters Q or Z since these two letters do not appear on the phone keypad; plays at the end of the
first directory prompt (but only if a name in the directory starts with a Q or Z).
Default: "For the letters Q or Z, use key number 1.”
• No Names Matched Prompt: 535 — Played to the caller if, in a directory branch, the first letter he/she
selected does not have any names associated with it, or if he/she has listened to all of the names played and
has not made a selection. After playing the prompt, the system forwards the call to the extension, branch or
mailbox as programmed in call forward no response.
Default: "No names matched; one moment please.”
• End of Message Prompt: 537 — Plays after a caller leaving a message presses 1 to stop recording; the
prompt then tells the caller his/her options.
Default: “To continue this recording, press 1; to return to the main menu, press 8; or, if finished, press and hang up.”
• ACD Queue Announcements: 538, 548, 558, 568, 578, 588 — The first prompt played to a caller when
all extensions are busy in an ACD department.
Default: “All agents are currently assisting other customers. Please hold; your call will be answered in the
order received.”
• ACD Second Announcements: 539, 549, 559, 569, 579, 589 — Periodically played to callers on hold in
an ACD department when all extensions are busy. See Function 33 (page D.7) for information about
assigning the ACD Second Announcement.
Default: “All agents are still busy assisting other customers. Please hold; your call will be answered in the
order received.”
(Continued)
F.1
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 6: Recording
• Holiday Main Greeting Prompt: 540 — Plays to callers when the system has been manually placed in
holiday mode.
Default: "Thank you for calling. Our office is closed in observance of the holiday. You may dial your
party’s extension, at any time, or please call back during regular business hours.”
Note: While in holiday mode, the system follows night mode programming for call routing. The day/night
mode setting and holiday greeting can be activated remotely (see “Remote setting of day, night and
holiday modes," page A.9).
• VIP PC Attendant Console Queue Prompts: 648, 649, 650, 651, 652, 653, 654, 655 — Played to
callers automatically or manually placed in the Attendant Queue in VIP PC Attendant Console.
Default: “All attendants are currently busy. One moment, please.”
Function 62: Record directory names
This function is accessible only if a directory branch has been created as part of auto attendant programming.
Enter the extension number and record the name. If this is a by-alpha branch, the system will automatically set
the name key using the name assigned in Functions 31, 33, or 53; if necessary, enter a different name key.
Important: Make photocopies of the blank worksheet for preparing directories and making future changes. As names
change, the Administrator can enter this function and change any field via the Administrator password.
1.
Ext.
2.
Recorded name
3.
Key
102
John Jones
564
113
Janet Smith
526
Each programming step is defined as follows:
1. Extension number — Enter the extension number for the directory name.
2. Record name — Press 1 to begin recording and press 1 again when finished.
3. Name key — (Necessary if the directory type is alpha [ask your ESI Reseller if you’re not sure].)
Enter the numeric equivalent to the letters appearing on a phone keypad (for Q or Z, use 1). Up to three
numbers may be entered. Your ESI Reseller can give you more information about this.
A by-alpha directory branch allows the caller to be connected to a system user by selecting his/her name from a
directory. The alpha directory has two prompts: the first instructs the caller to enter the first three letters of the
individual’s first or last name; the second instructs the caller to press # when he/she hears the desired individual’s
name. The system then plays the matched names to the caller, in alphabetical order according to the extension
names programmed iby the Installer.
With the name key set to three digits, when a caller selects a directory branch and dials only one or two digits to
select a name, the system will wait three seconds for the entry of another digit. If the system receives no other
digit within that time, the auto attendant will begin to play, in alphabetical order, the subset of directory names
bounded by the digits dialed.
Examples: Caller dials 5 and waits three seconds. The system plays names beginning with J, K, and L.
Caller dials 3 2 and waits three seconds. The system plays names beginning with DA through FC.
Caller dials 7 7 2. The system plays names beginning with PPA through SSC.
If a user dials more than three digits, the system ignores the additional digits (except for the # key, which signals
the directory to connect the caller to the extension or department associated with the directory entry that’s playing).
Note: To re-record the prompt that says, “Enter the first three letters of the person’s last name,” you must enter
Function 61 and then enter the ID number of the directory branch.
F.2
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 6: Recording
Function 63: Message-on-hold (MOH) programming
MOH can be:
•
A live feed from an external music source connected to the MOH connector located on the side of
the cabinet (see the ESI Communications Servers Hardware Installation Manual).
•
One of three default, generic MOHs pre-recorded by the factory.
•
One of up to nine custom MOHs loaded into the system by using a CD player or similar device connected to
the MOH connector.
Note: If ACD is used, we recommend that you use prompt 590, prompt 591, or a custom prompt without
periodic “voice-overs,” since the ACD hold prompt also will be played while a caller is on hold.
Function 631: MOH source
This selects the source for the system (or only tenant 1, if tenant service is enabled) that will be played to callers
on hold.
Code
590
591
592
593
594
595
596
597
598
599
600
601
602
Without tenant service enabled
Live external source*
Pre-recorded music
Pre-recorded with “please continue to hold”
Pre-recorded with “dial 0 or extension from hold”
Customer-recorded message on hold
Customer-recorded message on hold
Customer-recorded message on hold
Customer-recorded message on hold
Customer-recorded message on hold
Customer-recorded message on hold
Customer-recorded message on hold
Customer-recorded message on hold
Customer-recorded message on hold
With tenant service enabled
[same]
[same]
[same]
[same]
Customer-recorded message on hold
Customer-recorded message on hold
Tenant 2 customer-recorded message on hold [fixed]
Tenant 3 customer-recorded message on hold [fixed]
Tenant 4 customer-recorded message on hold [fixed]
Tenant 5 customer-recorded message on hold [fixed]
Tenant 6 customer-recorded message on hold [fixed]
Tenant 7 customer-recorded message on hold [fixed]
Tenant 8 customer-recorded message on hold [fixed]
* If desired, dialing off-hold can be disabled by your Installer.
Default: 592 (generic message-on-hold).
Notes: While any of the MOH sources can be assigned for tenant 1, MOH source isn’t selectable for
tenants 2–8; if tenant service is enabled, each of these tenants has a fixed MOH source as indicated in
the table above.
For each tenant, if there is no customer-recorded message, the default, generic MOH source (592) will
be played, instead.
F.3
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 6: Recording
Function 632: MOH recording
1. Connect the message/music source to the MOH port on the side of the cabinet.
Note: The connector is monophonic-only — if you use a stereo source, you must either set it to output
mono, if possible, or use a stereo-to-mono conversion cable (or adapter).
2. Enter the prompt number to be recorded.
3. Press 1 to begin recording. To aid you in queuing, the source will be played through the
phone’s speaker.
Note: The recorded material should not have a “beginning” or “end” — so that playback can loop
continuously. The maximum record length is controlled by the amount of space available on the
Memory Module.
4. Press 1 when finished. The recording will play back so you can review it.
5. Press # to accept the recording. (To delete it, press HOLD.)
Function 633: MOH volume
If a custom MOH is recorded, the output volume can be adjusted in this function.
Range: 1 (faint)–12 (loudest). Default: 6.
Notes: If an external audio source such as a radio is used for MOH, adjust the volume at the source.
To turn live MOH volume completely off, turn off volume at the source.
To turn recorded MOH volume completely off, select (in Function 631) one of the prompts in the range
of 594–598, but make sure it’s blank. These prompts are blank by default; if you have recorded some
audio on all of them, just select one and record a few seconds of silence.
F.4
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 7: Reports
Function 7: Reports
Important: You may wish to read “Feature description: SMDR” (beginning on page H.1) before using this function.
Report printing
The system’s built-in reports can be output to a printer or a PC via the Maintenance/SMDR port.
When printing captured reports from the PC to a laser printer, use a fixed monoproportional font (such as
Consolas, Courier New, Andale Mono, or Letter Gothic), 9 points or smaller.
From either the Installer or Administrator programming menu, select the desired report as shown in Functions
72–75 (starting below). The reports can be printed with either: (1) the data saved for inclusion in future reports, or
(2) the data and totals cleared. (You can’t clear data in either the system program report or the system
speed-dial report.)
Reporting functions
•
•
Function 72: ESI Presence Management access door report — Provides historical data on
access door entry.
Function 73: ACD department detail report — (See G.3.)
•
Function 74: Voice mail statistics report — Provides statistics indicating the message activity in each
mailbox since the data was last cleared.
•
Function 75: System speed-dial list — Lists the current system speed-dial numbers. Distribute a copy to
those who are authorized to use them.
Function 72: ESI Presence Management access door report
The ESI Presence Management access door report is available to the Installer and System Administrator, and is
1
based on historical data for the desired access door RFID Reader.
The report contains records of extensions/mailboxes, names, RFID tag numbers, and the date and time from the
10,000 most recent records for access-only door (not entrance/exit) RFID Readers in the system. Once the limit
of 10,000 is reached, older records are discarded as newer records are stored. Initializing the system deletes all
stored records.
1. Enter the extension number of the desired access door RFID Reader, and press #.
EPM READER
EXT: 123
2. Enter the start time in 12-hour, HHMM format, and press #.
ENTER START TIME
3. Use the scroll keys to select AM or PM for the start time, and press #.
ENTER AM OR PM
(Continued)
1
For reference, if necessary, consult the ESI Presence Management Administrator’s Manual (ESI #0450-0795).
G.1
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 7: Reports
4. The eight-digit start date for this report is composed of two digits for the month, two digits for the day, and
four digits for the year. The start date should be today’s date or earlier. Enter the start date in MMDDYYYY
format, and press #.
ENTER START DATE
5. Enter the end time in 12-hour, HHMM format, and press #.
ENTER END TIME
6. Use the scroll keys to select AM or PM for the end time, and press #.
ENTER AM OR PM
7. The eight-digit end date for this report is composed of two digits for the month, two digits for the day, and
four digits for the year. The end date should be no earlier than the start date. Enter the end date in
MMDDYYYY format, and press #.
ENTER END DATE
8. To print the report, press 1 and then #.
PRESS 1 TO PRINT
REPORT
Here’s an example of an access door report for an RFID Reader:
Notes: Extensions and mailboxes are reported as four digits each, regardless of your numbering plan selection.
Each RFID tag that hasn’t been assigned an extension or mailbox is reported as 0000.
G.2
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 7: Reports
Function 73: ACD department detail report
The ACD department detail report provides extension usage by ACD department. This report includes the
following “fixed” information:
•
All ACD departments will be included.
•
The current report’s start date and time will be the previous report’s end date and time.
•
The current report’s end date and time will be the current date and time.
Function 73 offers two choices:
1. Current report (“Press 1 to print the current ACD report”) — Outputs the current ACD department report.
All information is automatically copied to the previous report (see next choice) and cleared from the
current report.
2. Previous report (“Press 2 to repeat the previous ACD report”) — Re-sends the last report printed.
Notes: After the current report is requested, it will be stored indefinitely (as the “previous” report) until the next
“current” report is selected.
The optional VIP ACD Supervisor provides greatly enhanced ACD reporting capabilities. See the VIP ACD
Product Overview (ESI # 0450-0988).
Sample Function 73 report
Function 73 report description
The ACD department detail report is divided into four major sections: the report header, the incoming ACD
call statistics, the PBX call statistics, and the report footer.
Report header
The report header
includes the report name (“ACD Report by Department, Current” or “ACD Report by
Department, Previous”), ACD department name and number, report start date and time, and ending date
and time:
•
Start — Beginning date and time of the reporting period. This will match the ending date and time of
the previous report.
•
End — Ending date and time of the reporting period.
G.3
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Function 7: Reports
Incoming ACD call statistics
The incoming ACD call statistics section
shows ACD calls offered to each ACD agent position.
These are calls that are transferred to, or ring into, the department number and then are distributed to the
agent positions (extensions).
Column name
Ext
Name
Answer
Duration
1
Recovered
Description
ACD extension
Extension name
Number of ACD incoming calls answered at that extension
(includes Esi-Link calls to the ACD department)
Total time connected to ACD calls
Number of ACD calls unanswered at that extension and
returned to the ACD queue.
PBX call statistics
The PBX call statistics section
shows non-ACD calls for each extension — i.e., all calls that weren’t
delivered directly through the ACD department number.
Column name
Answer
Duration
Out
Duration
Description
Number
Total time connected to incoming PBX calls
Number of PBX calls originated at that extension
Total time connected to outgoing PBX calls
Report footer
The report footer
includes totals of the incoming ACD call statistics and PBX call statistics; it also
includes the average and maximum queue times, as well as total abandoned calls and rerouted calls, for
each ACD department:
•
Average CO queue time — The average length of time, in minutes and seconds, that callers were
holding (‘queued”) for an available agent over the reporting period.
•
Max CO queue time — The maximum length of time, in minutes and seconds, that one or more
callers had been queued for an available agent over the reporting period.
•
Abandoned calls — Total ACD calls that disconnected (hung up) while held in queue or listening to
the ACD queue or hold prompt (announcement).
•
Rerouted calls — Total ACD calls that followed the ACD department call forwarding assigned in
Function 33 after expiration of the ACD exit timer (assigned in Function 154).
Notes:
1. A CO call transferred to an ACD department or ACD extension will be counted as a new call each time
it’s successfully transferred.
2. An ACD call transferred to the same, or another, ACD department will be counted as a new ACD call for
that department.
3. An ACD call transferred to an ACD extension will be counted as a PBX incoming call for that extension.
4. A PBX call (outgoing or incoming) transferred to an ACD department will be counted as an ACD call.
5. A call retrieved from hold will be counted as an incoming PBX call.
6. PBX calls that forward to voice mail or other forwarding destinations are not included in the ACD
department report.
7. An incoming ACD call that disconnects (hangs up) while ringing at an ACD extension won’t be counted
as an abandoned call.
1
Each time a call is recovered, that ACD extension will be automatically logged-out of the ACD department. For more information, see the User’s Guide.
G.4
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Feature description: SMDR
Feature description:
SMDR
SMDR (station message detail reporting) call records are output in real time via an ESI Communications
Server’s Maintenance/SMDR serial port. Connect a standard serial printer or call accounting system to the serial
port. SMDR data will be stored temporarily if a laptop is connected for programming (five minutes after you exit
programming mode, the buffered SMDR will resume output to the serial port).
The output from the serial port is: 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, and no parity [the baud rate is selected by the Installer].
SMDR may be output in one of three formats, selected in system programming: standard, CSV, or extended.
The tabular format is the default.
Standard tabular SMDR format
®
®
ESI’s tabular SMDR output format, which is compatible with the standard Panasonic DBS format except for
the last two (ESI-exclusive) items, is as shown below:
Four-digit dial plan
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
T MM/DD HH:MM:SS HH:MM:SS NNNN XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX AAAAAAAAAA EE RR LLL
Three-digit dial plan
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
T MM/DD HH:MM:SS HH:MM:SS NNN XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX AAAAAAAAAA EE RR LL
The columns are:
•
Call type — Outbound (“O”), inbound (“I”) or transferred (“T”) at column 1.
•
Date (“MM/DD”) — Begins at column 3.
•
•
Start time (“HH:MM:SS”) — Begins at column 9.
Duration (“HH:MM:SS”) — Begins at column 18.
•
Extension number (“NNNN” under the four-digit dial plan, “NNN” under the three-digit dial plan) — Begins at
column 27.
•
Digits dialed (right-justified)/Caller ID (left-justified) — Begins at column 32 under the four-digit dial plan or
column 31 under the three-digit dial plan (28 characters).
•
Account code (“AAAA”) — Begins at column 60. (See also “SMDR format when using account codes,”
page H.3.)
•
Esi-Link home location number (“EE”) — Begins at column 71.
•
•
Esi-Link remote location number (“RR”) — Begins at column 74.
CO line number (“LLL” under the four-digit dial plan, “LL” under the three-digit dial plan) — Begins at column 77.
1
1
Each record is terminated with a line feed and carriage return character.
1
Used only when Esi-Link is enabled and programmed. Esi-Link SMDR records are generated at only the home location.
H.1
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Feature description: SMDR
CSV SMDR format
®
The comma-separated value (CSV) format is readable from within Microsoft Excel and other spreadsheet
applications.
Note: The CSV format does not support account codes (see page H.3).
A CSV record is output for each completed call, and represented as follows (word-wrapped):
Format:
"T","MMDDYYYY","HHMMSS","HHMMSS","NNN","XXXXXXXXXX. . .XXX","CCCCCCCCCC. . .CCC","EE","RR","LL"
Example A (with Esi-Link):
"I","07042002","000852","000059","101","2144229700","ESTECH SYS INC. ","01","04","54"
Example B (no Esi-Link):
"O","10312003","221502","020512","190","12125551212",""," "," ","11"
The fields are:
•
Call type (“T”) — Outbound (“O”), inbound (“I”) or transferred (“T”).
•
•
Start date (“MMDDYYYY”) — Eight characters, zero-filled.
Start time (“HHMMSS”) — Six characters, zero-filled; 24 hour clock.
•
Duration (“HHMMSS”) — Six characters, zero-filled.
•
•
Extension number (“NNN”) — Four characters, space-filled, right-justified.
Digits dialed/Caller ID (“XXXXXXXX . . . XXX”) — Up to 28 characters, null-filled.
•
•
Caller ID name (“CCCCCCCCC . . . CCC”) — Up to 24 characters, null-filled.
1
Esi-Link home location number (“EE”) — Two characters (two-digit suffix).
•
Esi-Link remote location number (“RR”) — Two characters, null-filled (two-digit suffix).
•
Line number (“LL”) — Three characters, null-filled, right-justified.
1
Each field is delimited with double quote marks and separated with a single comma. Null fields are still included as
place holders (see Example B, above). Each record is terminated with a line feed and carriage return character.
1
Used only when Esi-Link is enabled and programmed. Esi-Link SMDR records are generated at only the home location.
H.2
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Feature description: SMDR
SMDR format when using account codes
The account code will be output in the SMDR record in character positions 60 through 69, inclusive (compliant
with Panasonic DBS SMDR format). A new line will be generated each time someone enters an account code
(indicated below by “A”).
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
T MM/DD HH:MM:SS HH:MM:SS NNN XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX AAAAAAAAAA EE RR LL
Examples: One account code entered during an incoming call:
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
I 11/23 09:22:45 00:10:15 104 2145559700 DOE AND CO.
1234500001 EE RR 07
Three different account codes entered during the same incoming call:
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
I 11/23 09:22:45 00:10:15 104 2145552324 AAA FINANCIAL
1234500001 EE RR 07
I 11/23 09:33:00 00:27:00 104 2145552324 AAA FINANCIAL
1234500010 EE RR 07
I 11/23 10:00:00 00:56:22 104 2145552324 AAA FINANCIAL
1234500050 EE RR 07
A user should be able to tell from this SMDR report that the following charges should apply:
• Account 1234500001, for a 10-minute, 15-second call (between 9:22:45 and 9:33:00).
• Account 1234500010, for a 27-minute call (between 9:33:00 and 10:00:00).
• Account 1234500050, for a 56-minute, 22-second call (between 10:00:00 and 10:56:22).
There’s no indication in the SMDR record if an incorrect account number was used.
Note: The Es and Rs starting at position 70 will be the only digits used for Esi-Link, which will display the last two
digits of the cabinet numbers. For example, an Esi-Link intercom call between Cabinet 701 in Dallas and
Cabinet 702 in Chicago would appear as: 01 02.
Capturing SMDR data over Ethernet
1
The NSP can be used to output SMDR data over an IP network; and a Telnet connection can be made to the
NSP, using port xx003 (default is 59003), to capture this data. For more information, see NSP Installation
Made Simple (ESI # 0450-0669).
TAPIT EX compatibility
Trisys, Inc., offers a call accounting application, TAPIT EX, that supports ESI’s extended SMDR format.
For more information about TAPIT EX, contact Trisys at 973 360-2300 or visit www.trisys.com.
1
Network Services Processor, a standard feature of all ESI Communications Servers.
H.3
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Feature description: SMDR
Reporting conventions and rules (standard and CSV formats)
•
Inbound and outbound call records are generated only for calls between a station and a CO line.
ESI systems provide SMDR records only for calls answered by, or originated from, a system extension.
Unless otherwise noted, ESI systems don’t provide SMDR records for the following types of calls:
– Incoming calls . . .
•
1
To the auto attendant that don’t leave the auto attendant.
1
•
Directly to a mailbox.
•
Call-forwarded off-premises (using Intelligent Call Forwarding or ESI Presence Management).
– Outgoing calls . . .
•
•
Call-forwarded off-premises (using Intelligent Call Forwarding or ESI Presence Management).
•
Sent to the auto attendant and forwarded out using go-to outdial branches.
•
Generated using message delivery notification.
The duration of each call record represents the period of time that that station controlled its portion of a call. A
record is generated each time a station does any of the following:
– Disconnects.
– Places a call on hold.
– Transfers a call.
•
A single CO call could be included in multiple records if it is transferred from station to station.
•
Periods when calls are placed on hold or attempts at supervised transfers are unsuccessful are included in
the station's record.
•
Periods when calls are on hold, in the auto attendant, leaving/retrieving voice mail or in an ACD queue are
not included in call records.
A new record begins when a station answers an incoming call, a transferred call, or a hold recall.
•
•
Records will be generated independently for all stations in a conference. If more than one CO line is
involved in a conference, each call record generated by that conference will be associated with only the
last line disconnected.
•
•
Dialed digits don’t include the line group or location number.
Outbound calls begin a call record 10 seconds after the call has cleared toll restriction.
PC interface
2
Use an RS-232C cable to connect a PC’s serial port to the system’s Maintenance/SMDR port.
Note: SMDR data will be stored temporarily if a laptop is connected for programming (five to 15 minutes after
you exit programming mode, the buffered SMDR data will resume output to the serial port).
1
2
Extended format only.
If necessary, consult the ESI Communications Servers Hardware Installation Manual (ESI #0450-1049).
H.4
ESI Communications Servers Administrator’s Manual
Feature description: SMDR
Extended SMDR format
Note: The extended SMDR format is available on only ESI Communications Servers that are running system
software xx.3.0 (or higher). For system software downloads, visit www.esiresellers.com/software.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
0123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012
T MM/DD HH:MM:SS HH:MM:SS NNNN VTTT dddddddddddddddddddddddd aaaaaaaaaa
dddddddddddd cccccccccccc
The columns are:
• Call type — Outbound (“O”), inbound (“I”) or transferred (“T”) at column 1.
• Date (“MM/DD”) — Begins at column 3.
• Start time (“HH:MM:SS”) — Begins at column 8.
The start date and time of (a.) when the call was originated from or (b.) presented to the system or
(c.) retrieved from hold or (d.) successfully transferred.
• Duration (“HH:MM:SS”) — Begins at column 17.
The duration of the connection to the call plus, if the call was transferred or placed on hold, the duration
the call was on hold until the call was retrieved from hold or the transfer was completed or the call was
released (disconnected).
• Extension number (“NNNN”) — Begins at column 26.
Includes the number of the resource that answered or originated the trunk call. Trunk numbers are prefixed
with T (trunk-to-trunk calls only). If an incoming call isn’t answered and subsequently disconnects, this field will
be blank.
• CO trunk number (“VTTT”) — Begins at column 31.
When a voice mailbox answers a trunk call and the caller disconnects, the call record generated will populate
this field with an asterisk (*). Otherwise, the field will be blank.
• Digits dialed — Begins at column 36 (24 characters).
Outgoing and transferred outgoing calls: dialed number. Incoming and incoming transferred calls: DNIS or DID
digits (DNIS takes precedence).
• Account code (“AAAA”) — Begins at column 61. (See also “SMDR format when using account codes,”
page H.3.)
The account code will appear only in the call record of the station that dialed the account code.
• Incoming Caller ID number (“dddd”) — Begins at column 78 (10 characters).
• Incoming Caller ID name (“cccc”) — Begins at column 91 (12 characters).
Each record is terminated with a line feed and carriage return character.
Note: For more information concerning this format, see the SMDR Feature Overview (ESI # 0450-0463).
H.5
Index
Access schedules, D.8
Accessing user station programming, C.1
ACD, G.1–G.4
Alphanumeric characters, entering, A.6
Auto attendant block, D.2
Auto attendant programming — Remote setting, A.9
Call waiting, D.2
CO lines. See System capacities
Day/night/holiday modes, A.9
Do not disturb (DND), D.2
ESI Presence Management, A.6, B.1, G.1
Esi-Dex, C.4
System speed-dial, D.2
System speed-dial list, G.1
Functions
Function 1 — System parameters, C.1–C.4
Function 5 — Voice mail programming, E.1–E.5
Function 6 — Recording, F.1–F.4
Function 7 — Reports, G.1–G.4
Overview, A.5
Holiday mode, A.9, F.2
Local allow, D.2
Maintenance port, H.1
MOH, F.3–F.4
Overlays, A.3
Overriding user password. See Accessing user station programming
Password, Installer and Administrator, C.1
Personal Call Routing, D.10
Programming
Accessing user station programming, C.1
Entering programming mode, A.4
Functions overview, A.5
Keys, A.5
Selectable numbering plan, A.6
Prompts, re-recording, F.1–F.2
Recording, D.2, F.1–F.4
MOH programming, F.3–F.4
Recording directory names, F.2
Re-recording system prompts, F.1–F.2
Reports, G.1–G.4, H.1
ACD department detail report, G.1–G.4
ESI Presence Management access door report, G.1
SMDR, H.1
System speed-dial list, G.1
Voice mail programming report, G.1
Voice mail statistics report, G.1
RFID Reader
Parameters, D.12
RFID tag number, D.10
Selectable numbering plan, A.6
Serial ports, H.1
Service observing, D.2
SMDR, H.1–H.5
Speed-dialing. See Esi-Dex
System capacities, B.1
System modes. See Day/night/holiday modes
System prompts, re-recording, F.1–F.2
Tenant service, F.3
Time/date, setting, C.1
Toll allow, D.2
VIP Softphone, D.4
Voice mail programming, E.1–E.5
Cascade notification mailboxes, E.4–E.5
Group mailboxes, E.2
Guest/info mailboxes, E.1–E.2
Message notification, E.3–E.4
Q & A mailboxes, E.5
Voice mail statistics report, G.1
www.esi-estech.com
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