Security Grille Door Solutions in the Design Project

Security Grille Door Solutions in the Design Project
Security Grille Door Solutions in the Design
Project: Application, Operation,
Installation & Aesthetic
dyn08a
An AIA Continuing Education Program
Credit for this course is 1 AIA HSW CE Hour
© Ron Blank & Associates, Inc. 2013
5738 Warner Drive
Long Sault, Ontario
K0C 1P0
1-800-663-4599
(613) 938-1222
www.dynamicclosures.com
An American Institute of Architects (AIA) Continuing
Education Program
Approved Promotional Statement:
Ron Blank & Associates, Inc. is a registered provider with The American
Institute of Architects Continuing Education System. Credit earned upon
completion of this program will be reported to CES Records for AIA
members. Certificates of Completion are available for all course
participants upon completion of the course conclusion quiz with +80%.
Please view the following slide for more information on Certificates of
Completion through RBA
This program is registered with the AIA/CES for continuing
professional education. As such, it does not include content
that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or
endorsement by the AIA or Ron Blank & Associates, Inc. of any
material of construction or any method or manner of handling,
using, distributing, or dealing in any material or product.
An American Institute of Architects (AIA) Continuing
Education Program
Course Format: This is a structured, web-based, self study
course with a final exam.
Course Credit: 1 AIA Health Safety & Welfare (HSW) CE Hour
Completion Certificate: A confirmation is sent to you by email
and you can print one upon successful completion of a course or
from your RonBlank.com transcript. If you have any difficulties
printing or receiving your Certificate please send requests to
certificate@ronblank.com
Design professionals, please remember to print or save your
certificate of completion after successfully completing a course
conclusion quiz. Email confirmations will be sent to the email
address you have provided in your RonBlank.com account.
Course Description
This course about grille doors discusses different types of doors,
materials the doors are made of and various operation choices
available. It will help you decide which door to specify as you
will learn which door is best for a particular plan. You will also
learn about security features of these doors and ADA
accessibility guidelines.
Course Objectives
After completing this course, the design professional will be able to:
1.
List and define typical applications for grille doors
2.
Recognize the main operation choices for grille doors and how
to choose the correct product when specifying a job
3.
Understand the various available mounting options
4.
Describe the layout options for side folding doors and learn
how they can influence or complement the overall design
integrity of your project
5.
Gain an understanding of curtain and panel material choices
and how they work to achieve continuity in your design
Exploring the typical applications for grille doors
Grille Door Applications
Applications – Pedestrian Control
Security Grille Doors are used in a variety of building
applications. Some common uses for grille doors include
providing pedestrian control, limiting product access, dividing a
store within a store and providing a security barrier to a service
counter to storefront windows.
Applications – Pedestrian Control
In areas where you want to control the flow of pedestrian traffic,
security grilles are a fantastic option. In educational facilities,
grilles can separate the dining hall from the cafeteria while still
maintaining line of site. They can also be used in hallways to
restrict entry to certain areas during after-hours or divide a
room for separate events. In airports, security grilles limit
security lanes and entrances and divide access to concourse
areas as required.
Applications – Pedestrian Control
Multi-use buildings such as a library may have organizations or
clubs use the facilities but need to be limited to just a portion of
the building. Another use is to sector off common areas to
private properties. For example, a cinema located in a mall has
extended hours past regular mall hours. Grilles can block access
to the general mall areas, providing security and safety.
Applications – Product Access
Blocking access to products is effortless with side-folding grilles.
In retail or commercial applications grilles can close off aisles
that house merchandise with restricted selling hours such as
alcohol or pharmacy areas. In addition to products, other areas
to consider using side-folding grilles include computer server
rooms or an areas that store sensitive records.
Applications – Interior Storefronts
Over the last several years, stores within a store have been
popping up all over the nation as retailers are beginning to
realize the benefits of joining forces to attract more consumers.
Shoppers have been given a vast array of one-stop shopping
choices. However, these smaller stores often have varying hours
of operations other than the big box store or common areas
they are located in. Grilles provide security for these stores ondisplay items while not impeding visual appeal.
Applications – Service Counters
Because side-folding grilles can be laid out to operate in an
irregular opening, they are an excellent choice for service
counters. These include:
• Pharmacies
• Food services
• “Parts” counters
• Banks
• Information counters
• Reception counters in
office buildings, hospitals, etc.
• Theater ticket booths
Applications – Window Security
Installing grilles behind glass is a costeffective way to provide security to
storefronts. Grilles provide an extra
level of protection against “smash &
grab” type burglaries. Historically,
exterior-mounted rolling doors were
used to close off a storefront during
off-hours. This exterior application
detracts from the building’s
architecture and can be off-putting to
potential clientele.
Applications – Window Security
In fact, many cities are mandating that exterior rolling doors not
be used on buildings. When security grilles are designed into the
interior space behind the glass at the plan stage they can offer
better protection than exterior rolling grilles and doors. The
reason is because once the glass broken the alarm goes off and
the grille still needs to be compromised. This acts as a strong
deterrent, yet also still allows a passerby to view the store’s
merchandise.
Specifying the correct product
Operation Choices
for Grille Doors
Operation Choices – Rolling Operation
Rolling grille doors are also referred to as coiling, overhead or
roll-up doors. Curtains on rolling doors roll up on a barrel that is
often recessed in to the ceiling above the opening.
Operation Choices – Rolling Door Benefits
While rolling doors are often
associated with industrial-type
applications, they can have benefits
for interior applications. For example,
because the barrel can be hidden in
the ceiling the opening maintains a
clean appearance. Rolling doors can
also be installed first, before other
finishes are completed. Another
advantage a rolling door offers, is that
it can be motor-operated allowing for
ease of operation. Motor-operated
doors are available with safety
reversing devices that comply with UL
325.
Operation Choices – Rolling Door Benefits
Any operator that has a UL mark must be manufactured to the
ANSI/UL325 standard. Included in this standard is that the
operator will not close with momentary pressure on the
provided key switch or three-button control unless a monitored
external reversing device such as photo eyes or a sensing edge is
attached to the door.
End users should also be aware that this door system includes at
least one monitored entrapment protection device, and if there
is a “failure” of that monitored device, the door will not close
unless the close button is held down in a “constant pressure
mode” until the door is fully closed. This standard improves the
safety of motorized commercial door systems and can reduce
potential injury to people and damage to materials.
Operation Choices – Rolling Door Benefits
• UL325 Compliance - All operators bearing the UL label must
continuously monitor safety devices such as photo sensors
and/or sensing edges. This is a mandatory requirement for
operation other than constant contact to close.
• Motorized grilles usually use a key switch
• Emergency egress device disengages motor from shaft and
allows grille to “pop” off the floor approx. 4 ft.
• Bottom bar contains locking device
• 2, 3 and 4 above do not comply with ADA
Operation Choices – Rolling Door Benefits
Other benefits include:
•
May be manually operated
•
May be crank operated (for countertop applications)
•
Safety edge/photo beam available – Complies with UL325
standard for commercial door operators
•
Emergency release device
•
Key switch or push button control
•
Can be installed first – before anything else
•
Widths ranging from 24 to 36 feet x heights of 12 to 20 feet are
typical maximums depending on models and manufacturer
Rolling Door Mounting Options
Typical motor operation for grilles is with a standard jackshaft
commercial operator mounted on or next to the bracket plate. A
jackshaft operator is able to lift a very large curtain which is an
advantage for large openings. Another option is an internal tube
motor mounted inside the barrel assembly. Unlike a jackshaft
operator, no additional side room is required, offering a clean
self-contained design. This motor is used for smaller openings.
Option 1:
Standard
Jackshaft
Operator
Option 2:
Internal Tube Motor –
Contained in Barrel
Operation Choices – Side Folding Operation
Side folding operation is simplified to
one choice that works for all sizes.
Side folding grille doors operate
manually on an overhead track
system, gliding smoothly from side to
side. When the door is fully opened
the curtain is stacked into the side of
the opening in a pocket built into the
wall. Side folding really does not have
a width limit, height limits will vary
from 12 feet to 22 feet depending on
manufacturer.
Operation Choices – Side Folding Operation Benefits
There are several benefits of choosing side folding operation. From two to 200
feet, because these doors are easily operated manually, you don’t need to be
afraid of spanning a large, complicated or even a curved opening. Unlike
rolling doors, side folding doors can also operate in very low headroom
conditions, expanding your interior space planning options. Another benefit is
that because there is no motor operation, side folding doors are virtually
maintenance free helping to reduce expenses. There can be an optional swing
out emergency egress door built into the curtain. If your layout is angled from
90 to 179 degrees rolling/coiling will require support posts between different
grille/doors; side folding does not. Finally, side folding doors meet ADA
accessibility guidelines. Let’s explore how ADA guidelines pertain to side
folding grille doors.
2010 ADA Accessibility Guidelines
A convenient safety feature that can be seamlessly incorporated in the overall
grille or closure design includes a swing out emergency egress fire exit to
meet strict fire code regulations. Additionally, ADA requires that entry or exit
latches, handles or locks must be no lower than 15 inches and no higher than
48 inches from the floor. Standard height placement for such devices on side
folding doors is 42 inches for all non-keyed devices. Latch handles and paddle
devices can be installed on lead posts on closure models. Make sure to check
with local fire marshal's office for required egress hardware.
Lever
Paddle
2010 ADA Accessibility Guidelines
• 308.3.1 Unobstructed
 The high side reach shall be 48 inches (1220 mm) maximum
and the low side reach shall be 15 inches (380 mm) minimum
above the finish floor or ground.
• 309.4 Operation
 Operable parts shall be operable with one hand and shall not
require tight grasping, pinching, or twisting of the wrist. The
force required to activate operable parts shall be five pounds
(22.2 N) maximum.
• 309.4 is very difficult to accommodate because it eliminates all use
of standard keys and cylinder locks. ADA compliancy also requires
the locking mechanisms on a traditional coiling grill to be placed
15” off the ground. Since these locks or handles cannot typically
wrap onto the coil, the curtain must hang an additional 15” in the
guides. This creates a situation where even more headroom space
is required and limits the clear opening space available.
Sidefolding grilles have a clear advantage in this scenario.
2010 ADA Accessibility Guidelines
• 4.13.9 Door Hardware
•
Lever-operated mechanisms, push-type mechanisms, and
U-shape handles are acceptable designs. Hardware required
for accessible door passage shall be mounted no higher
than 48 inches (1219.2 mm) above finished floor.
• 4.2.1 Wheelchair Passage Width
•
A minimum clear width of 32 inches (812.8 mm) will
provide adequate clearance.
• 4.4.2 Headroom
•
Shall have 80 inches (2032 mm) minimum clear headroom.
Mounting Options
Mounting Options
Rolling and side folding doors can be self-supported or mounted
to structural elements of the building. Depending on your
project’s requirements, a variety of mounting options are
available to ensure that you specify the right door for the right
application.
Mounting Options – Rolling Doors
Face of wall mount
Let’s take a look a the mounting options for rolling doors. First we will discuss
face of wall mount, also referred to as surface-mount or face-mount. Two
standard mounting options are available: E-Mount or Z-Mount. E-Mounts are
typically required when the jambs are capped with steel. With this mounting
option the angle faces toward the opening. Z-Mounts are used for wood,
concrete or masonry block. With Z-mounted the angle faced away from the
opening. The side room required with this type of mounting option is based
upon the distance past the bracket plate. A minimum 3 inches is required
while 5 inches is typical.
Mounting Options – Rolling Doors
Aluminum Angle
Another mounting option for rolling doors is utilizing aluminum mounting
angles. Because the angles are constructed of a double-wall design, the
fasteners used to mount the angles are completely hidden, providing a
smooth finish and a clean appearance. This is ideal for commercial and public
buildings.
Mounting Options – Rolling Doors
Steel Support Tubes
• Tubes typically cut from 20 ft. lengths
ALUMINUM
MOUNTING
TUBE
2 ½ X 3 in
• Tubes are typically mounted into a bottom
sleeve cup and attached to steel bar joists at
the top
• Tube mounting allows for the grille/closure to
be installed first before walls are built
STEEL
MOUNTING
TUBE
3 X 3 in
4 x 4 in
• The majority of grille/closure installations use
3” tubes
• Grilles mounted side by side may share a
support tube, but heights may need to be
staggered to accommodate chain hoists or
motor operation
ALUMINUM or STEEL TUBE
Mounting Options – Rolling Doors
Telescoping Aluminum Tubes
Support tubes that are designed to extend beyond
the opening to the deck above
Advantages:
• A good choice for ease of use
•
They are simple to attach to the floor and
ceiling deck and require no modifications on the
job site
•
For locations with poor access, the telescoping
option eliminates the need to cut steel for
transport and then weld it back to a longer
length in order to fit into the space
•
Their compact size also makes getting them to
the jobsite a much more convenient task
•
Excellent choice for retrofit projects
Layout Options – Rolling Doors
Depending on space restrictions, coiling doors can have external motor
operators mounted in several positions. It is important to understand the
clearances required to properly install a coiling door. Many of these
dimensions vary with the size of the door being used. Doors that are hidden
above a false ceiling require a minimum 6” slot to accommodate the bottom
bar assembly. The optional ceiling conceal attached to the bottom bar “hides”
the slot that is required in the ceiling.
Motor placement
Mounts right or left side
Ceiling conceal
added to bottom bar
Mounting Options – Rolling Doors
Between Jamb Mounting
Rolling doors that are mounted between the jambs, or “inside”
the opening, require the guides to be mounted using “pack-out”
angles which reduces the useable opening space. Some designs
use a low profile, direct-mount system that preserves more of
the original opening width.
Mounting Options – Side Folding
An option for mounting side folding doors from the ceiling
utilizes threaded rods attached to the structural ceiling deck.
This allows the track to be placed lower at the level of the false
ceiling.
Mounting Options – Side Folding
Metal Stud Mount
Side folding door track can also be mounted to the underside of
a metal stud wall. In this application it is recommended that
wood blocking is used to help reinforce the connection points,
otherwise movement of the door over time could loosen screws
placed directly into the lighter gauge metals studs. The wood
blocking also eliminates screw vibration in the metal stud.
Mounting Options
Self-supporting Mounts
Grille doors with manufacturer’s pocket can self support by mounting pocket
directly to the floor or wall and add header directly to pocket with “c”
strut/channel, depending on distance spanned, may not require additional
bracing.
•
Side folding offers models manufactured in a steel pocket frame. This type of grille door can aid in
difficult installations by providing header support
•
Strut channel construction to top of pocket – track mounts to channel
•
Bolts hold plate for strut channel – can turn 90 degrees
•
Saddle brackets hold strut channel to the top of metal-framed product
•
Pocket is bolted to floor & walls
•
Below layout used to restrict access to an aisle or end cap
Mounting Options
Self-contained Mounting
Compact, self-supporting design makes for easy, fast installs.
Ideal design for closing off aisles or hallways in facilities with
very high ceilings that would make normal ceiling attachment
impractical. The curtain pocket can be turned 90 degrees to the
opening to reduce side room requirements and allow more aisle
space.
• Easily adapted for retrofit applications
• Self-supporting design doesn’t require ceiling attachment for
high headroom situations
• Curtain can turn 90 degrees out of pocket to reduce
sideroom
• Self-contained design speeds & simplifies installation
Mounting Options
Self-contained Mounting
Layout Options
Layout Options – Rolling Doors
Rolling doors can be configured several different ways. Standard
manual operation uses a spring assisted barrel to coil the curtain
as it is manually raised. An easier solution, especially for large or
tall doors is motor operation, where an electric operator rotates
the barrel to coil the curtain.
An advantage of rolling doors is that they do not require opening
height structural ceilings for mounting. The barrel supports the
curtain and the barrel and guide assemblies are supported by
the opening jambs or steel support tubes.
Rolling doors take up very little floor space and are available
with an emergency egress release when needed.
Layout Options – Rolling Doors
• Layout may only be a straight line
• Spring assisted manual operation
• Easily motor-operated
• Mounting solutions for nonstructural ceilings
• Takes up less than 1 sq ft of floor
space
• Egress release available on motor
operation
Layout Options – Side Folding Doors
If you want to take the best advantage of valuable floor space or
openings with low headroom, side folding doors are a clear
choice. In contrast to rolling doors, side folding doors can be laid
out in a host of options, free of mullions and restrictive pillars,
providing the ultimate in practicality.
Unlike rolling doors with overhead operation, side folding doors
are available to accommodate special curves and layout options
making trendsetting construction methods possible. Curve may
not be tighter than 90 degrees.
Layout Options – Side Folding Doors
• Side folding panels are typically stored in a pocket – an area
inside a wall structure provided by a general contractor when
in the full open position.
• Standard pockets have an 8 inch opening. Typical stud walls
are built to both sides of the opening. Note: Inside of pocket
should be dry-walled so curtain flows smoothly from stored
position.
Layout Options – Side Folding Doors
• For projects with space limitations, products are available
that fit into a 6 inch steel stud wall. This pocket is created by
self-supporting adjustable steel tubing for 6 inch wide walls
with depths from 15 ½ to 60 inches.
• When panels are stored they are referred to as a stack.
Layout Options – Side Folding Doors
While using a pocket to store stacks is the most common option, the type of
layout you want depends on the space limitations of the project, the type of
closure you need and how you want the door to operate. Several popular
options are stacking between the jambs, with no pockets, single stacking into
a pocket, bi-parting operation with stacking into two pockets on both sides
and a 90 degree curve into a single pocket.
Stack Between Jambs – No Pocket
Single Stack into a Pocket
Bi-Part/Pocket Both Sides
90 Degree Curve into a Pocket
Layout Options – Side Folding Doors
Common layout options:
Stack between jambs – no pocket
Single stack into a pocket
Bi-part/pocket both sides
90 degree curve into a pocket
1 – Wall Channel: Curtain height piece of extruded
aluminum that lead post locks into. Channel is secured
permanently to wall.
2 – Lead Post: First post of curtain to pull out of stack area
& extend across opening. Post has hook bolt lock that
secures to wall channel.
3 – Bi-Part Curtain: Curtain that stacks on both sides of
the opening & joins at shared lead post into a wall channel
post with an added drop bolt to keep curtain rigid.
Typically larger curtains (over 29 ft) are bi-parted for ease
of operation but can still stack to one side.
5 – Intermediate Post: Middle post in curtain, located no
more than 10 ft (full height) or 6 ft (counter height) from
any other post. Note: Intermediate posts should be placed
on or near center of curves. A spring-loaded drop bolt
engages into floor or counter sockets & unlocked with a
keyed cylinder.
9 – Traveling End Post: Last post of curtain that travels to
front of pocket when curtain is extended across opening.
Locks into a header stopper and floor V stop inside pocket.
10 – Fixed End Post: Last post of the curtain –
permanently mounted to the wall.
Layout Options – Side Folding Doors
Custom Curves
For unique projects, attractive special curves are available to
compliment the surrounding architecture.
Layout Options – Side Folding Doors
Stack Between Jambs – No Pocket
When no side room is available to create a pocket, the curtain can be stacked
between the jambs. This simple design is a practical solution when space is at
a premium.
Layout Options – Side Folding Doors
Single Stack Into a Pocket
In this layout, the curtain is stored into a single pocket located on one side of
the opening. The first post of the curtain to pull out of the stack area is called
the lead post. When closed, the lead post has a hook bolt lock that secures to
the wall channel, a curtain height piece of extruded aluminum that is located
opposite the stack side. The last post of the curtain that travels to the front of
the pocket when it is extended across the opening is called the traveling end
post. It locks into a header stopper and floor v-stop inside the pocket.
Layout Options – Side Folding Doors
Bi-Part Curtain - Pocket Both Sides
Bi-parting curtains operate the same as single stack layouts except the
curtain parts into two and is stacked on both sides of the opening when
opened. Typically, larger curtains over 29 feet are bi-parted for ease of
operation but can still stack to one side.
Layout Options – Side Folding Doors
For curtains that need to curve around a 90 degree corner, the
curtain can be either stacked into a single pocket or for openings
over 30 feet, bi-parted and stored in two pockets. Again,
intermediate posts should be located at or near any curve.
Layout Options – Side Folding Doors
Special Layout Options – Emergency Egress
Full-size door opens fully in direction of egress. Depending on
locality, hardware and door should comply with ICBO and ADA
egress requirements. Emergency Egress will add 8 to 10 inches
of additional stack.
Layout Options – Side Folding Doors
Special Layout Options
In addition to special curves and radius layouts, side folding
doors are adaptable to fill irregular openings such as multi-level
counter heights, sloping forms, counter cut-outs and knee walls.
This maintains the architectural integrity of the space. Also top
and bottom lead posts attached to a spacing post with cut-outs
can provide a secure fit without altering wall fixtures.
Multi-level counter heights
Surrounds a knee wall
Layout Options – Side Folding Doors
Drop Bolt Sockets
Flush mount drop bolt sockets are designed to secure
intermediate posts when the door is closed, yet remain
unobtrusive when the door is open.
Spring Loaded
Floor Socket
Countertop
Trim Ring
Curtain and Panel Materials for Design Continuity
Curtain/Panel Materials
Curtain/Panel Materials
Material Choices
Whether it is maintaining visibility, providing security or maintaining airflow, a
variety of panel and curtain materials can be specified to support project
goals.
Total Reach-Through Security
Visibility
Walk-Through Security
Curtain/Panel Materials
Common Rolling Grille Material Choices
Aluminum rod and link curtain designs in both straight and brick
patterns allow for the greatest product visibility and airflow
while still maintaining security. Polycarbonate curtains help to
maintain visibility while restricting access and lower airflow
exchange. Perforated doors provide the ultimate in airflow with
a higher degree of security. Finally, solid aluminum curtains
provide the most security with no visibility when in the closed
position.
Curtain/Panel Materials
Common Rolling Grille Material Choices
Aluminum – Straight Pattern
Polycarbonate
Aluminum – Brick Pattern
Perforated
Solid Aluminum
Curtain/Panel Materials
Common Side Folding Material Choices:
Rod & Link Aluminum
One of the most common material choices for side folding
curtains is rod and link aluminum. Curtains can be specified in a
variety of patterns to complement the design aesthetic or
desired security level you need to achieve.
Curtain/Panel Materials
Common Side Folding Material Choices:
Rod & Link Aluminum
Rod Link Brick
Standard Profile
Rod Link Straight
Standard Profile
Rod Link
Straight
Wide Profile
Rod Link
Straight
Slim Profile
Rod Link Brick
Wide Profile
Curtain/Panel Materials
Common Side Folding Material Choices:
Polycarbonate
Another common material for side folding curtains is
polycarbonate. Available in the slim, standard and wide profiles,
this curtain choice allows products to be seen without the
possibility of any reach-through security situations.
Polycarbonate is virtually unbreakable.
Curtain/Panel Materials
Common Side Folding Material Choices: Polycarbonate
Polycarbonate
Slim Profile
Polycarbonate
Standard Profile
Polycarbonate
Wide Profile
Curtain/Panel Materials
Common Side Folding Material Choices:
Perforated
Perforated aluminum curtains are also available in a variety of
profiles and materials. Due to the small pattern layout, these
curtains offer a higher degree of security than standard grilles
while still providing ventilation for any HVAC needs.
Curtain/Panel Materials
Common Side Folding Material Choices:
Perforated
Perforated
Aluminum
Panels Slim
Profile
Perforated Steel
Standard Profile
Perforated Steel
Wide Profile
Curtain/Panel Materials
Common Side Folding Material Choices:
Tempered Glass
Tempered glass in standard or wide profiles is a good choice
when maintaining high visibility for a storefront. A benefit of this
material is that it can be used to separate two different
conditioned spaces to achieve maximum HVAC efficiencies.
Curtain/Panel Materials
Common Side Folding Material Choices:
Tempered Glass
Tempered Glass
Standard Profile
Tempered Glass
Wide Profile
Curtain/Panel Materials
Common Side Folding Material Choices:
Opaque Solid Aluminum
Solid opaque aluminum curtains provide maximum security and
restricts all visibility from one area to another.
Curtain/Panel Materials
Common Side Folding Material Choices: Opaque Solid Aluminum
Solid Aluminum
Slim Profile
Solid Aluminum
Standard Profile
Solid Aluminum
Wide Profile
Curtain/Panel Materials
Finishes
To complete design requirements side folding and rolling grilled doors are
available in variety of anodized finished, Clear Anodized is the standard of
most manufacturers. Custom powder-coating is also available on selected
models, check with manufacturer.
Clear
Champagne
LT Bronze
Bronze
Black
Other Examples
Other Examples
Other Examples
Other Examples
Course Summary
Now, the design professional will be able to:
1.
List and define typical applications for grille doors
2.
Recognize the main operation choices for grille doors and how
to choose the correct product when specifying a job
3.
Understand the various available mounting options
4.
Describe the layout options for side folding doors and learn
how they can influence or complement the overall design
integrity of your project
5.
Gain an understanding of curtain and panel material choices
and how they work to achieve continuity in your design
Security Grille Door Solutions in the Design
Project: Application, Operation,
Installation & Aesthetic
dyn08a
An AIA Continuing Education Program
Credit for this course is 1 AIA HSW CE Hour
© Ron Blank & Associates, Inc. 2013
5738 Warner Drive
Long Sault, Ontario
K0C 1P0
1-800-663-4599
(613) 938-1222
www.dynamicclosures.com
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