The Classics
The Classics
All recipes are merely interpretations of the
original fragrances. As all of these fragrances
incorporate synthetics.
As I have never smelled many of the original
formulations, and I am not incorporating any
of the synthetics that are present in each of
these fragrances--I have done my best to
interpret them and formulate these
compositions as best as possible for the
Natural Perfumer, and I suggest you guard
these perfume gems and not share them with
others not in the Aromatic Artistry course.
By Perfumer: JK DeLapp
Of
The Rising Phoenix Perfumery
www.TheRisingPhoenixGroup.com
I have created these fragrances to be built as tiers of Accords. Unless specified, build
these as French Perfumes at concentrations of Parfum Extrait or Eau de Parfume.
Notable Noses:
François Coty of Coty
Ernest Daltroff of Caron
Jacques Guerlain of Guerlain
Ernest Beaux of Chanel
Paul Parquet of Houbigant
The 1880’s
Fougere Royal
Debuted: 1882
Nose: Paul Parquet
House: Houbigant
First fragrance to use the natrual isolate, Coumarin
àCan use Tonka Bean
Basic Fougere Recipe
Oakmoss
Tonka Abs
Patchouli
Hay Abs
Vetiver
1 oz
1/3 oz
1 oz
1/3 oz
¼ oz
Lavender Abs
Lavender, Mailette EO
Geranium
1 oz
2 oz
¾ oz
Bergamot
2 oz
“There are only two good Fougeres, Jicky and Mouchoir de Monsieur—all the rest are
for truck-drivers.”
~Paul Guerlain
Jicky
Debuted: 1889
Nose: Aimé Guerlain
House: Guerlain
First fragrance to use the natural isolate, Vanillin
àCan use Vanilla CO2 with a 25% Vanillin content
Suggested Recipe:
Top:
Bergamot
Lavender augustafolia
Lavender, Mailette
Basil
Bay Rum
Rosemary EO
Rosemary Abs
2 oz
1 oz
1 oz
¾ oz
1 oz
¾ oz
¼ oz
(Can substitute Tulsi)
Heart:
**Strangely, this fragrance has no Heart.
àIntended to create a strange, almost paradoxical effect
Base:
Sandalwood
Cinnamon Abs
Civet
Tonka
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
3 oz
¼ oz
1/16th oz
¾ oz
½ oz
Nicknamed “Jicky”, for his lost love, Jacqueline, whom Aimé was never allowed to
marry, and composed at the age of 55.
The 1900’s
L’Origin
Debuted: 1905
Nose: François Coty
House: Coty
François Coty was one of the first perfumers to embrace Absolutes
Also combined two pivotal synthetic bases made by Firmenich, Iralia and Dianthene
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Neroli
Neroli sur Fleur
2 oz
½ oz
1 oz
Heart:
Carnation Abs
Jasmine Abs
Rose Abs
Violet
Ylang Abs
Bergamot
1 oz
¾ oz
½ oz
½ oz (Can substitue Orris 15% Irones)
¾ oz
1 oz
Base:
Sandalwood
Tonka
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
Vetiver
3 oz
¾ oz
½ oz
½ oz
Jicky was the inspiration for Apres L’Ondée and L’Heure Bleue by Guerlain, Opium by
Yves Saint Laurent, Oscar de la Renta by Oscar de la Renta, Bal á Versailles by Jean
Despréz, and Poison by Christian Dior.
The 1910’s
Narcisse Noir
Debuted: 1911
Nose: Ernest Daltroff
House: Caron
Glassmaker: Pantin
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
2 oz
Heart:
Narcissus Abs
Orange Blossom Abs
Rose Abs
Jasmine Abs
½ oz
1 oz
¾ oz
½ oz
Base:
Sandalwood
Vetiver
Civet @ 1%
Deer Musk @ 1%
2 oz
¾ oz
1/16th oz
1/16th oz
Can substitue for the Animal Ingredients:
Cumin @ 2%
Ambrette
1/16th oz
1/16th oz
L’Heure Bleue
Debuted: 1912
Nose: Jacques Guerlain
House: Guerlain
The first fragrance to pre-empt the coming decade’s rise of the Oriental Accord.
This fragrance utilized the synthetic isolate, Heliotropin
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
1 oz
Heart:
Orris 15% Irones
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
Rose, Bulgarian Abs
Clove Abs
1 oz
½ oz
2 oz
1/16th oz
Base:
Carnation
Sandalwood
Basic Oriental Accord
Musk @ 1%
Ambrette
½ oz
3 oz
1 oz
1/8th oz
Can substitue for the Animal Ingredients:
1/16th oz
Jacques was strolling along the edge of the river Seine, in Paris, one evening when he became aware of
the beauty of the sky at precisely the moment when it is no longer day, but not yet night. He
considered this moment so perfect, beautiful, and fleeting that he wated to capture the moment.
“I felt something so intense I could only express it in a perfume.”
~Jacques Guerlain
Le Chypré
Debuted: 1917
Nose: François Coty
House: Coty
Bottle: Baccarat Crystal, by Geores Chevalier
Understated chic luxury at its best.
It’s abstract structure demonstrates a new, paired down, simplicity more akin to Cubism,
which was popular in the art of the period.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
5 oz
Heart:
Jasmine Abs
Rose Abs
*Lilac Doppelganger
Bergamot
3 oz
1 ½ oz
1 oz
1 oz
Base:
Oakmoss
Bergamot
Patchouli
Vetiver
Sandalwood
Labdanum
Liquidambar (Styrax)
Benzoin
Civet @ 1%
Deer Musk @ 1 %
Orris
Tonka
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
3 oz
3 oz
¼ oz
½ oz
1 oz
1 oz
¼ oz
1 oz
½ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
½ oz
½ oz
Lilac Doppelganger
Sandalwood
Rosewood
Zdravetz
Peru Balsam
Liquidambar (Styrax)
1 oz
3 oz
½ oz
¾ oz
½ oz
Tagetes Abs
Champa, White CO2
Cassie Abs
Jasmine grand Abs
Davana
Rose de Mai Abs
¼ oz (Can substitute Genda Attar)
¼ oz
1/3 oz
½ oz
½ oz
1/8 oz
Spikenard
Ylang Extra
Basil linalool
¼ oz
½ oz
½ oz
Full of materials long considered masculine, this fragrance was to become what was
considered “ultra-femininity”.
Le Chypré inspired compositions such as Mitsouko by Guerlain, Femme by Rochas,
Cabochard by Grés, and Eau Sauvage by Christian Dior.
Legendary perfumer, Roudnitska, has hailed Le Chypré as being Coty’s finest creation.
Tabac Blond
Debuted: 1919
Nose: Ernest Daltroff
House: Caron
Considered to be an “anarchist’s fragrance,” this perfume was to underscore the feminist
emancipation of the 1920’s.
Intended for women, but also a distinctive creation to be worn by men.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
4 oz
Heart:
Tobacco Abs
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
Jasmine
Mimosa
Bergamot
+/Birch Tar
2 oz
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
2 oz
*1/16th mL (To make it Smokier)
Base:
CarnationAbs
Vetiver
Patchouli
Cedar, Virginia
Oakmoss
Bergamot
Orris
Lime
½ oz
1 oz
1 oz
½ oz
1 oz
1 oz
½ oz
2 oz
Mitsouko
Debuted: 1919
Nose: Jacques Guerlain
House: Guerlain
Mitsouko referrs to the structure of Coty’s Le Chypré for inspiration, but rather than
referencing Leather and Tobacco, Jacques looked to the synthetic aldehyde C14 for it’s
Peach Note, and when combined with Oakmoss and Patchouli, landed on one of the
most beautiful harmonies the world of perfumery had ever smelt.
Famous fans of this fragrance were Charlie Chaplin, and Sergei Diaghilev (who was
reknoned to spray the drapes with it when he traveled—and to whom which Roja Dove
named his fragrance after).
Worn for 30 years by Roja Dove, Guerlain’s first non-family member to serve as
Guerlain’s Global Ambassedor. Devestated when the original formulation had been
changed so much as to lose his connection with it, when he later opened his own
perfumery, Roja Parfums, he composed Diaghilev to take it’s place.
I have a bottle of Diagilev, and it is incredible!
http://www.rojaparfums.com/#Roja_Parfums_Diaghilev.php
If you are able to pick up a bottle of or a sample of Diagilev, you’ll have what is
probably the closest you are going to get to smelling the original Mitsouko.
Mitsouko has gone on to inspire fragrances such as Femme by Rochas, Quadrille by
Balenciaga, Yvress by Yves Saint Laurent, and The Party by The Party.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Kaffir Lime Leaf
Lemon
Lime
Orange
Cumin
Tarragon
3 oz
1 oz
½ oz
1 oz
½ oz
1/32nd oz
1/16th oz
Heart:
*Apricot-Osmanthus Accord
*Asian Garden Accord
Osmanthus
1 oz
1 oz
½ oz
àSubstituting Apricot-smelling Osmanthus for the Peachy C14 Aldehyde
Kaffir Lime Leaf
Jasmine
Rose
Tuberose
Ylang
Patchouli
¼ oz
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
Base:
Oakmoss
Bergamot
Vetiver
Cedar, Virginia
Black Pepper Abs
Cinnamon Abs
Ambergris @ 1%
2 oz
2 oz
1 oz
1 oz
1/8th oz
1/8th oz
1 oz
Apricot-Osmanthus Accord
Osmanthus
Champa, White CO2
Jasmine sambac Abs
Mandarin, Red
Cassia
½ oz
2 oz
1 oz
3 oz
¼ oz
Asian Garden Accord
Osmanthus
Mandarin, Red
Cinnamon, Bark Abs
Anise
Jasmine sambac Abs
Pine Abs
Lotus, Pink
Magnolia Lily CO2
Patchouli
Sandalwood
¼ oz
½ oz
1/30th oz
1/15th oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
Diagilev: JK’s Interpretation : Roja Dove’s Interpretation
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Kaffir Lime Leaf
Lemon
Lime
Orange
Cumin
Tarragon
3 oz
1 oz
½ oz
1 oz
½ oz
1/32nd oz
1/16th oz
Heart:
Black Current Abs
Jasmine sambac Abs
*Osmanthus Accord (pick one)
Rose Abs
Tuberose
Orris
Ylang
½ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
Base:
Cedar, Virginia
Clove Abs
Guaiacwood
Nutmeg Abs
Oakmoss
Bergamot
Patchouli
Sandalwood
Vetiver
Ambrette
Benzoin
Civet @ 1%
Labdanum
Deer Musk @ 1%
Peru Balsam
Liquidambar (Styrax)
1 oz
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
2 oz
2 oz
½ oz
1 oz
½ oz
1/8th oz
½ oz
1 oz
1 oz
1 oz
½ oz
¼ oz
The 1920’s
No. 5
Debuted: 1921
Nose: Ernest Beaux
House: Chanel
Ernest Beaux was, interestingly, the last perfumer to to Russian Royal Court.
Coco Chanel was, at one point in her life, homeless. When branching into making perfumes, Paul
Poiret snubbed her, and was noted to have said, “No woman would ever wear a dress-maker’s
perfume, as women took more care choosing their perfumer than they did their dress-maker.” 90 years
later, Chanel No. 5 is still one of the Top 10 selling fragrances of all time!
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
*Osmanthus Accord (pick one)
Kaffir Lime Leaf
2 oz
½ oz
1 oz
Heart:
Rose de Mai
Jasmine
Ylang Extra
Orris
*Lily of the Valley Doppelganger
1 ½ oz
¾ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
½ oz
Base:
Vetiver
Cedar, Virginia
Sandalwood
Civet @ 1%
Deer Musk @ 1%
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
Ambergris @ 1%
2 oz
½ oz
1 oz
1 oz
1 oz
½ oz
1 oz
Nuit de Noel
Debuted: 1922
Nose: Ernest Daltroff
House: Caron
Bottle: Baccarat
Guy Robert is believed to have said of NdN, “that you could be sitting in a theater with
some of the world’s most beautiful women sitting to your left, right, and in front of you,
each wearing one of the worlds finest perfume creations…But, if a woman were to enter
wearing Nuit de Noel, all the other women would become invisible.”
This fragrance utilized an Accord known as Mousse de Saxe. A little bit of it’s history:
http://perfumeshrine.blogspot.com/2011/12/mousse-de-saxe-base-creation-history.html
Structure & History of Creation of "Mousse de Saxe"
The "Mousse de Saxe accord" is comprised of geranium, licorice (created with anise),
isobutyl quinoline (a synthetic, sweet-smelling leather note), iodine and vanillin (synthesized
vanilla).
It was used since the turn of the 20th century and produced by the great aroma-producing firm
of de Laire, a composite made by Marie Thérèse de Laire. Edgar de Laire's wife gave birth to
the new branch of the factory dedicated to the production of aromatic compounds in 1895.
Founded by chemist Georges de Laire (1836-1908), the de Laire firm quickly became a source
of synthetic aroma chemicals and "perfumers' bases" (i.e. a ready-made accords of ingredients
producing a specific effect, such as famously Prunol, Bouvardia, Ambré 83 and Mousse de
Saxe), but also of finished fragrances such as de Laire's Cassis from 1889 or Miel Blanc.
Dark, earthy, mossy bases were in production even in the late years of the 19th century, long
before oakmoss and tree moss would fall under the rationing of perfumery regulatory body
IFRA, and besides Mousse de Saxe there was also Mousse de Crête (Creatan moss) and
Mousse de Chypre (Cypriot moss). The geographical names might hint at some inspiration
coming from a material found in Prussia (most of the perfumery mosses traditionally came
from the Balkans), much like the dark blue hue in painting is called Bleu de Prusse (Prussian
blue) from the military uniforms of the men of the -then independent- Prussia, a counrty
sharing lands amongst modern day Germany and Poland (The dye was produced in the
eighteenth century via sulfuric acid/indigo).
Odour Profile
Mousse de Saxe is a complex creation: It has a dark, sweetish, mossy-woody powdery aspect
(indeed chypré) with green, fresh, bracing accents and a musk and leather background of
"animalic" character, which is very characteristic once you experience it. De Laire probably
infused it with its own revolutionary ionone molecule (which entered in Violetta by Roger &
Gallet). The bracing, "cutting" freshness is due to the quinolines (bitter green leathery with a
hint of styrax), as De Laire was among the first to produce these novel ingredients.
This base must have been a novel approach in the years of its creation and one can only
imagine how perfumers of the time had received it, since perfume formulae have remained a
well-kept secret for so long. That reception must have been overwhelmingly positive
nevertheless, because of its influence in perfumery in later years.
Suggested Mousse de Saxe Doppelganger
Geranium
Anise
Oakmoss
Bergamot
Labdanum
Cistus
Galbanum
Civet @ 1%
Agarwood, Assam
Birch Tar
2 oz
1 oz
1 oz
1 oz
½ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
1 oz
*1mL
*1/8th mL
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Grapefruit, Pink
Grapefruit, Ruby Red
Rosewood
Ylang Extra
2 oz
1 oz
1 oz
1 oz
½ oz
Heart:
Rose Abs
Jasmine Abs
Ylang Abs
Ylang Extra
Tuberose
Sandalwood
Vetiver
Orris
1 oz
¾ oz
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
1 oz
¼ oz
½ oz
Base:
Sandalwood
Vetiver
*Mousse de Saxe Doppelganger
3 oz
2 oz
1 oz
Shalimar
Debuted: 1925
Nose: Jacques Guerlain
House: Guerlain
Bottle: Baccarat
Means “Temple of Love” in Sanskrit.
It is said that there were three ethings which were improper for a “lady” to do: to smoke,
to dance the tango, and to wear Shalimar.
This fragrance used synthetic Ethyl Vanillin, which, when combined with Civet, created
a “dirty” smelling vanilla. For those that have smelled the original Shalimar, you’ll
understand that “dirty vanilla” note that I’m referencing.
Suggested Recipe
Top: 30%
Bergamot
*To constitue 30% of the final composition
Heart: 30%
Jasmine
Rose
Ylang
Orris
1 oz
1 oz
½ oz
¼ oz
Base: 40%
Sandalwood
Orris
Opoponax
Tonka
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
1 oz
½ oz
1 oz
½ oz
½ oz
+/Deer Musk @ 1%
Civet @ 1%
Ambergris @ 1%
Castoreum @ 1%
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
Dirty Vanilla Accord
àTo make a Pre-fixed Alcohol Base for the perfume:
190 Proof Alki
Frankincense
Benzoin
Civet Abs
4 oz
1 mL
2 mL
1 mL
Arpège
Debuted: 1927
Nose: André Fraysse
House: Lanvin
Bottle: Baccarat, Armand-Albert Rateau
Top:
Bergamot
*Osmanthus Accord (pick one)
Kaffir Lime Leaf
2 oz
½ oz
1 oz
Heart:
Rose
Jasmine
*Lily of the Valley Doppelganger
Ylang Abs
Orris
Coriander
Tuberose
1 oz
¾ oz
½ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
Base:
Vetiver
Labdanum
Benzoin
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
Sandalwood
Deer Musk @ 1%
2 oz
1 oz
1 oz
½ oz
2 oz
1 oz
Joy
Debuted: 1929
Nose: Henri Alméras
House: Jean Patou
Bottle: Baccarat, Louis Sue
“With it’s 10,000 Jasmine blossoms and its 336 Roses and a whisper of Civet in every
30 millilitres of perfume…joyous!”
Jean Patou started is perfumery business in 1925 with one of perfumery’s legendary
trilogies: Amour Amour, Que Sais Je?, and Adieu Sagesse—To Fall in Love, What Do I
Know?, and Goodbye Wisdom.
Joy was to be his legendary creation, and is centered around two of the most precious
perfumery materials: Rose de Mai and Jasmine from Grasse, both costing roughly
$28,000/kilo. Although we don’t have access to these two materials…we can take full
advantage of what we can get our hands on!
Top:
Bergamot
*Osmanthus Accord (pick one)
Kaffir Lime Leaf
Galbanum
Champa Leaf
2 oz
½ oz
1 oz
1/16th oz
½ oz
Heart:
*Jasmine Accord
Rose de Mai
Ylang
Tuberose
2 oz
½ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
Base:
Sandalwood
Tonka
Deer Musk @ 1%
Civet @ 1%
4 oz
¼ oz
1 oz
1 oz
Jasmine Accord
Jasmine sambac Abs
Jasmine sambac CO2
Jasmine grand Abs
Jasmine auriculatum Abs
Henna Leaf CO2
Neroli
Champa Flower
Rose Otto
Lotus, White Abs
1/8th oz
½ oz
¾ oz
1/8th oz
1/8th oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
1/6th oz
½ oz
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
Galbanum
Labdanum
Cistus
Ambrette CO2
1/8th oz
1/16th oz
1/8th oz
1/16th oz
1/8th oz
The 1930’s
Tabu
Debuted: 1931
Nose: Jean Carles
House: Dana
The “Perfumer’s Triangle,” AKA the Fragrance Curve/Pyramid was a creation of Jean
Carles’, as it was he who tried to explain the work of the perfumer in layman’s terms.
The secret to the success of this fragrance is in the juxtaposition between Patchouli and
Carnation, coupled with Heliotropin—which gives an outrageous degree of sensuality.
This fragrance went on to inspire the creation of both Youth Dew, and Opium.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Lemon
Basil
3 oz
1 oz
½ oz
Heart:
Patchouli
Carnation
Rose
Ylang Abs
Cinnamon Abs
Nutmeg Abs
Jasmine
Mimosa
1 ½ oz
¾ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
Base:
Sandalwood
Oakmoss
Bergamot
Labdanum
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
3 oz
1 oz
1 oz
1 oz
1/8th oz
(Can substitute Tulsi)
Je Reviens
Debuted: 1932
Nose: Maurice Blanchet
House: Worth
Bottle: Lilique, Rene Lalique
The 4th of five creations by Maurice Blanchet, who co-founded his company with
Jacques Worth.
Their other fragrances were founded on the notion of a fragrant love letter: Dans la Nuit,
Vers le Jour, Sans Adieu, Je Reviens, Vers Toi; “In the Night, Just before Dawn, With
No Goodbye, I will Return, To You.”
By the end of the decade, Je Reviens was to take on a special meaning as many of the
men who bought it gave it to their sweethearts to reassure them that they would return
from the trenches of WWII, into the arms of those they loved.
The fragrance is centered between three principle themes: Narcissus, Coumarin, and
Amyl Salicylate.
Hyacinth and Amyl Salicylate were used together to produce freshness, depth, and
sensuality.
The bottle, developed by Rene Lalique, was designed to embody the style of the times,
taking its inspiration from the skyscrapers which were mushrooming across the
Manhattan skyline and it, like the scent, was resolutely modern.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Kaffir Lime Leaf
**Osmanthus Accord (pick one)
3 oz
1 oz
½ oz
Heart:
Narcissus Abs
Tonka
*Hyacinth
*Jasmine Abs
*Lilac Accord
Orris
½ oz
½ oz
th
1/8 oz (Can substitute Lily of the Valley Doppelganger)
½ oz (Can substitute Jasmine Accord)
¼ oz
¼ oz
Base:
Vetiver
Tolu Balsam
Oakmoss
Sandalwood
Deer Musk @ 1%
2 oz
1 oz
½ oz
3 oz
1 oz
Vol de Nuit
Debuted: 1933
Nose: Jacques Guerlain
House: Guerlain
This fragrance went on to influence many other great perfumes, most notably Miss Dior
by Paul Vacher, and to a lesser degree Vent Vert, by Germaine Cellier and No. 19,
by Guy Robert.
This fragrance was the first to use Galbanum in a large concentration.
The bottle, which captures the spirit of adventure from the solo flights of Amy
Johnson’s, flying from Britain to Australia;Amelia Erhart crossing the Atlantic; Helen
Boucher; Jean Batten et al; together with the Normandi—all inspired the creative spirit
of the time, which manifested in fragrances such as En Avion, Normandie, and Vol de
Nuit. The bottle, itself, was inspired by the spinning of a propeller.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Kaffir Lime Leaf
**Osmanthus Accord (pick one)
Orange
Galbanum
Allspice
Basil
Coriander
Tarragon
3 oz
1 oz
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
½ oz
1/8th oz
1/8th oz
Heart:
*Jasmine Accord
Rose
Ylang
Tuberose
Cinnamon Abs
1 oz
½ oz
¼ oz
1/8th oz
1/8th oz
Base:
Oakmoss
Bergamot
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
Galbanum
Benzoin
Orris
Peru Balsam
Sandalwood
Deer Musk @ 1%
Ambergris @ 1%
Castoreum @ 1%
3 oz
3 oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
1 oz
½ oz
½ oz
2 oz
1 oz
1 oz
1 oz
(Can substitute Tulsi)
Shocking
Debuted: 1935
Nose: Jeans Carles
House: Schiaparelli
Bottle: Baccarat, Léonore Fini
Elsa Schiaparelli was the first couturier to have a fragrance created by a compounding
house, thus opening the door to other couturiers who wanted a scent, but did not wish to
open their own perfumery which, at the time, was the only way to enter the industry.
This fragrance is said to “reek of sex,” and is said to be one of the most honest
fragrances ever made, as it gets straight to the point.
This fragrance was the inspiration for Le Classique, by Jean-Paul Gaultier.
Top: Only a slight touch of “Aldehydes”
Bergamot
Kaffir Lime Leaf
**Osmanthus Accord (pick one)
Tarragon
3 oz
1 oz
½ oz
¼ oz
Heart:
Rose
Honey Abs
*Jasmine Accord
Carnation
Narcissus
1 oz
¼ oz
¾ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
Base:
Honey Abs
Civet Abs
Oakmoss
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
Vetiver
Deer Musk @ 1%
Ambergris @ 1%
2 oz
*1 mL
¾ oz
¼ oz
½ oz
1 oz
1 oz
The 1940’s
Femme
Debuted: 1944
Nose: Edmond Roudnitska
House: Rochas
Bottle: Lalique, Original Bottle design by Marc Lalique, Limited Edition
1 Year later, the Bottle was redesigned by: Marcel Rochas
This fragrance is of particular note, as it was one of the first fragrances by Edmond
Roudnitska, one of the most famous perfumers of the 2nd half of the 20th Century.
Femme was Rochas 4th fragrance creation, but it was their 1st commercial fragrance.
Natural materials were difficult to come by during the War, and Roudnitska relied more
heavily on synthetics. Once such synthetic that he put to work, Prunol, is redolent of
rich, fat, sticky, sugary prunes that gently crystallize, which he paired with spices and
wood, as he had originally found the Prunol in wooden barrels that had been left in a
wooden barrel for several years.
Prunol Doppelganger
Jasmine grand
Fir, Balsam Abs
Yuzu
Lavender Abs
Bay Rum
Allspice Abs
Nutmeg Abs
Anise
Sandalwood
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
Tonka
1 oz
1 oz
5 oz
3 oz
½ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
1/8th oz
2 oz
1/16th oz
½ oz
Suggested Recipe
Top: 30 %
Bergamot
Kaffir Lime Leaf
**Osmanthus Accord (pick one)
Petit-grain, Bergamot
Rosewood
Lemon
Rose Geranium
3 oz
1 oz
½ oz
1 oz
1 oz
½ oz
¼ oz
Heart: 30 %
**Prunol Doppelganger
Tuberose
Jasmine
Rose
Kaffir Lime Leaf
Oakmoss
2 oz
½ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
½ oz
½ oz
Base: 40%
Sandalwood
Oakmoss
Bergamot
Patchouli
Labdanum
Cinnamon Abs
2 oz
3 oz
3 oz
2 oz
2 oz
½ oz
Bandit
Debuted: 1944
Nose: Germaine Cellier
House: Piguet
Bandit in the current formulation is dark, dank, mossy, bitter, refreshingly herbal – all
things I love. The leather is discreet, there's orange peel in the heart and a floral bouquet
that somehow always stays several steps behind the bitter chypric impression.
This new type of leather chypré parted ways with the violet-ionone note found in
Guerlain’s Parfums des Champs-Elysées (1904), and Caron’s Tabac Blond. Instead,
Cellier relied heavily on the synthetic isolate Isobutyl Quinoline. This is the material
that makes most modern “Leather” fragrances sweet, rather than the smokiness found
from the inclusion of Birch Tar or Cade. I generally use Labdanum and Cistus in place
of IBQ.
Bandit went on to inspire Cabochard and Aramis, both by Grés.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Petit-grain Bergamot
Orange
Neroli
Neroli sur Fleur
Orange Blossom Abs
Jasmine grand
Tonka
3 oz
1 oz
1 oz
¾ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
1/8th oz
1/16th oz
Heart:
*Jasmine Accord
Rose
Ylang Abs
Neroli
Tuberose
Galbanum
2 oz
½ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
¾ oz
½ oz
Base:
Oakmoss
Vetiver
Patchouli
Deer Musk @ 1%
1 oz
1 oz
3 oz
1 oz
*Instead of Isobutyl Quinoline:
Labdanum
Cistus
Benzoin
1 oz
1 oz
1 oz
Ma Griffe
Debuted: 1946
Nose: Jean Carles
House: Carven
“Ma Griffe” is French for “my mark” or “my stamp,” although it can also mean “it’s
mine” or “this is me.”
Incorporates Styrallyl Acetate, of whom Jean Carles was the first to use this synthetic
material, which is very “fresh” smelling. The material does occur naturally in flowers,
and Jean Carles used it to connect the ultra sharp hesperitic Top Notes of Citronellal
and Aldehydes, tying them to the woody components in the Base, with a touch of leather
from the inclusion of a whisper of Styrax.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Kaffir Lime Leaf
**Osmanthus Accord (pick one)
Petit-grain, Bergamot
Clary Sage EO
Citranella
Galbanum
3 oz
1 oz
½ oz
1 oz
1 oz
½ oz
¼ oz
Heart:
*Gardenia, Enfleurage or Accord
*Jasmine Accord
Ylang EO
Ylang Abs
Rose Abs
1 oz
¾ oz
¼ oz
1/8th oz
¼ oz
Base:
Cabrueva
Vetiver
Cinnamon Abs
Tonka
2 oz
1 oz
¼ oz
½ oz
Gardenia Accord
Gardenia Enfluerage
Ylang Abs
Jasmine sambac Abs
Jasmine auriculatum Abs
Tagetes
Tuberose Abs
Ruh Kewda, AKA Kewdra
Beeswax Abs
Michelia Leaf EO
½ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
¾ oz
1/8th oz
¼ oz
1/8th oz
¼ oz
2 oz (Can Substitute Champa Leaf)
Vanilla Abs
Ambrette CO2
Galbanum
Muhuhu
1/8th oz
1/8th oz
1/32 oz
1 oz
Le Dix
Debuted: 1947
Nose: Francis Fabron
House: Balenciaga
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Kaffir Lime Leaf
**Osmanthus Accord (pick one)
Lemon
3 oz
1 oz
½ oz
¾ oz
Heart:
*Rose Accord
*Jasmine Accord
Ylang Abs
Orris
2 oz
1 ½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
Base:
Sandalwood
Vetiver
Tonka
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
Orris
Civet @ 1%
Deer Musk @ 1%
4 oz
1 oz
½ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
1 oz
1 oz
Rose Accord
Lotus, Pink Abs
Rose Geranium
Rose de Mai Abs
Rose, Damask Abs
Rose Otto
Beeswax Abs
Sandalwood
Labdanum
Hops CO2
Black Pepper Abs
1/16th oz
1 ½ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
1/8th oz
¼ oz
¾ oz
1/8th oz
1/8th oz
1/16th Abs
Vent Vert
Debuted: 1947
Nose: Germain Cellier
House: Balmain
Vent Vert in French, translates as “Fresh Wind.”
Germain Cellier was one of the only female creative perfumers of the time.
Was a source of influence for Chanel’s No. 19 and Cristalle, Cartier’s So Pretty, and
Stephen Burlingham’s Truly.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Galbanum
3 oz
1 oz
Heart:
*Rose Accord
*Lily of the Valley Doppelganger
*Jasmine Accord
*Neroli Accord
Orris
2 oz
1 oz
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
Base: Can use the same Base Accord from Bandit
Oakmoss
Vetiver
Patchouli
Deer Musk @ 1%
1 oz
1 oz
3 oz
1 oz
*Instead of Isobutyl Quinoline:
Labdanum
Cistus
Benzoin
1 oz
1 oz
1 oz
Neroli Accord
Petit-grain Bergamot
Neroli
Orange Blossom Abs
Jasmine grand Abs
Tonka
1 oz
1 oz
¼ oz
1/8th oz
1/16th oz
Miss Dior
Debuted: 1947
Nose: Paul Vacher
House: Christian Dior
Bottle: Baccarat, Guéricolas
Christian Dior often said that the one thing he remembered about most women was the
perfume that she would wear.
When François Coty died, three key members of the Coty firm left to start their own
ventures: Lancome, Charles of the Ritz (and later launched Parfums Yves Saint
Laurent), and Parfums Christian Dior was formed at the suggestion of Serge HeftlerLouiche, who was a close friend of Christian Dior’s.
Christian Dior wore Coty’s Le Chypré, and so approached Paul Vacher to creat a scent
of this style.
The synthetic Styrallyl Acetate was combined with Narcissus to create an extreme
freshness.
Legend has it that Christian named the perfume after his little sister, to whom he gave
the first bottle, while others claim that the name alludes to youthfulness, and, because it
is an English name for a perfume, that it was named so to appeal more to the American
market, in which it has been a huge it.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Galbanum
Kaffir Lime Leaf
3 oz
¼ oz
1 oz
Heart:
*Jasmine Accord
Jasmine
Rose
Narcissus
Galbanum
Orris
2 oz
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
Base:
Oakmoss
Bergamot
Patchouli
Vetiver
Castoreum @ 1%
Galbanum
Orris
Sandalwood
2 oz
2 oz
1 ½ oz
¾ oz
1 oz
1 oz
¼ oz
1 oz
L’Air du Temps
Debuted: 1948
Nose: Francis Fabron
House: Nina Ricci
The Genius of this fragrance lies in the large volume of natural materials, which was
unusual for the 1940’s, which gave a level of sophistication which was rarely found in
other fragrances from the era. I have an original bottle, and…OMG!
This fragrance was known for its ability to make its scent seem as if it were swirling in
the air. Fabron created this little trick by creating a fresh harmony of Bergamot, Neroli,
and the inclusion of Rosewood.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Petit-grain Bergamot
Neroli
Neroli sur Fleur
Rosewood
1 oz
1 oz
¼ oz
¾ oz
1 oz
Heart:
Rose de Mai
Ylang Abs
*Jasmine Abs ( or Accord)
Orris 15% Irones
Clove
1 oz
¼ oz
1 oz
¼ oz
1/8th oz
Base:
Oakmoss
Vetiver
Cedar, Virginia
Sandalwood
Benzoin
Deer Musk @ 1%
½ oz
1 ½ oz
1 oz
2 oz
¾ oz
1 oz
Fracas
Debuted: 1948
Nose: Germain Cellier
House: Piguet
Another creation by female perfumer Germain Cellier.
This fragrance was said to be ravinshingly beautiful, and the name Fracas alludes, in
French, to “disturbance”—which was embodied by its uncanny ability to create a
polarizing effect.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Orange Blossom Abs
Petit-grain Bergamot
Neroli sur Fleur
Galbanum
2 oz
¾ oz
1 oz
½ oz
1/16th oz
Heart:
*Tuberose Accord
*Jasmine Accord
*Rose Accord
Carnation
2 oz
1 ½ oz
1 oz
½ oz
Base:
*Osmanthus Accord (pick one)
Cedar, Virginia
Sandalwood
Benzoin
Galbanum
Civet @ 1%
1 oz
1 oz
2 oz
1 oz
½ oz
1 oz
Tuberose Accord
Bergamot
Grapefruit, Pink
Tuberose Abs
Cepes Abs
Rose Abs
Rosewood
Sandalwood
Benzoin
1 oz
½ oz
¾ oz
¼ oz
½ oz
¾ oz
¾ oz
1 oz
**The genius of this fragrance that made this Fracas the enduring legacy of Cellier’s
was in the brightness of her green, leafy note.
The 1950’s
Youth Dew
Debuted: 1952
Nose: Josephine Catapano
House: Estée Lauder
Bottle: Lalique
Youth is an unusual fragrance in that Estée Lauder created it initially to be an oil-based
bath oil, rather than an alcoholic French perfume.
Estée took to heart the work that François Coty began—making scent accessible to
every woman. Coty had said, “give a woman the best product that you can make, make
it in the perfect bottle, beautiful in its simplicty yet impeccable in taste, ask a reasonable
price for it, and you will witness the birth of a business the size of which the world has
never seen.” And that is exactly what Estée Lauder accomplished with her release of her
fragrances bath oil.
Also a revolutionary marketing ploy, as women of the time felt guilty for splurging on
fragrance, Estée created an extremely concentrated bath oil which she said should be
applied to the skin after a bath (or a few drops added to bath water to gently fragrance
the skin). This bath oil cost a fraction of the French style perfumes (also testament to the
large amount of synthetics used).
Because the scent was made from oil, consumers felt that the fragrance lasted much
longer than the classical French alcoholic structures, and began demanding oil-based
fragrances, which created a large shift in the industry.
“Another factor, albeit more subtle, was also to undermine what the French houses had
built up over the past century—the use of perfume alongside an Eau de Toilette. For,
now, one product did it all and the market did not know how to respond. With the
advent of the super-concentrate, the French introduced the idea of Eau de Parfum and,
in so doing, heralded the death of perfume, itself. (It took some 20 years for this to take
full effect but, certainly by the 1990’s, it was dead). {Rojas} has always said ‘that we
forgot the art of wearing perfume, and consumers would start bemoaning the fact that
their fragrances did not last and that they could not sell them.’
àAll of this was set in motion by Estée Lauder’s revolutionary oil-based bath oil,
Youth Dew.
~Roja Dove, The Essence of Perfume. p. 135
Suggested Recipe
Top: 20%
Bergamot
Petit-grain Bergamot
*Osmanthus Accord (pick One)
Orange
2 oz
½ oz
1 oz
¼ oz
Heart: 30 %
Ylang Abs
Jasmine Accord
Rose Abs
*Lily of the Valley Doppelganger
Carnation
Cinnamon Abs
1 oz
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
Base: 50%
Tolu Balsam
Benzoin
Labdanum
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
Frankincense
Oakmoss
Perfu Balsam
Patchouli
1 oz
1 oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
1 ½ oz
¾ oz
1 oz
2 oz
(Replacing synthetic Orchid)
Diorissimo
Debuted: 1956
Nose: Edmond Roudnitska
House: Christian Dior
Bottle: Baccarat, Guéricolas
Issimo is Italian for “more” or “very”, and sets the tone for “Very Dior.”
Apparently, Christian Dior was a very superstitious man, and Lily of the Valley was his
lucky charm. Every Spring at the Fashion Shows in Paris, he would sew a sprig of the
flower blossom into each of the garments in his collection. Roudnitska took this as his
inpiration, and created a Lily of the Valley fragrance which was launched just one year
before Christian Dior’s death, and is said to have captured the essence of his style
perfectly.
Diorissimo was the epitome of a body of work that was created for Dior by Roudnitska,
including Eau Fraiche (which was to become the generic name of a style of fragrances
I mentioned all the way back in Class 2), and Diorama.
One year after the release of this fragrance, when Christian Dior died, his coffin was
covered in Lily of the Valley, enveloping him in the scent that he loved so much,
carrying him on to meet his Creator in a “Very Dior” way.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Petit-grain Bergamot
*Osmanthus Accord (pick One)
Ylang EO
Violet Leaf Abs
2 oz
½ oz
1 oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
Heart:
*Lily of the Valley Doppelganger
*Lilac Doppelganger
*Jasmine Accord
Boronia Abs
Rose
Oakmoss
1 oz
¾ oz
½ oz
½ oz (A special floral from Tasmania)
¼ oz
¼ oz
Base:
Sandalwood
Civet Abs
4 oz
*1 mL
Cabochard
Debuted: 1959
Nose: Guy Robert
House: Gres
The French translates as “stubborn” or “headstrong.”
Guy Robert, a very distinguished perfumer, also composed the greats Caleche and
Madame Rochas. He is also known for creating the perfume museum, the
Osmotheque, near Versailles.
This fragrance was inspired by a fragrance named Chouda, which was composed by
Bernard Chant, who created a leathery accord (based around Isobutyl Quinoline)
enveloping the scent of Tuberose for Germaine Emilie Krebs, AKA Gres.
Gres was a woman of impeccable style, and was considered to be the most chic woman
in the world. It is said that it was only in her hands, and in the hands of Balenciaga, that
couture really became Art.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Ylang EO
Galbanum
3 oz
1 oz
½ oz
Heart:
*Tuberose Accord
Rose Abs
*Jasmine Accord
Orris 15% Irones
2 oz
¾ oz
1 oz
½ oz
Base:
*Isobutyl Quinoline Accord
Rose
Jasmine
Ylang Abs
Vetiver
Oakmoss
Patchouli
Civet
2 oz
¾ oz
¾ oz
½ oz
¾ oz
½ oz
1 oz
* ½ mL
The 1960’s
Madame Rochas
Debuted: 1960
Nose: Guy Robert
House: Rochas
Bottle: Pierre Dinande
This fragrance builds on the aldehydic floral theme found in Arpege as the starting
point, but plays on a warmer and more sensual base.
The bottle, which was designed by Pierre with some inspiration from an antique bottle
in Madame Rochas’ private collection, used a small label in the shape of a French street
sign, imparting the suggestion of an elegant destination, written in black script on a
simple copperplate that bore the name of the fragrance.
It is said that the honey-rose Heart Note combined with the earthy moss notes in the
Base pre-empted the “naturalness” of the Hippy movement that was to dominate most of
the decade.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Neroli
Orange Blossom Abs
Broom/Genet
Honeysuckle Abs
Lemon
Violet Leaf Abs
3 oz
½ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
¾ oz
¼ oz
Heart:
Rose, Bulgarian Abs
Rose de Mai
Honey Abs
Black Pepper
*Jasmine Accord
Narcissus
Orris 15% Irones
*Tuberose Accord
Ylang Abs
Oakmoss
2 oz
1 oz
2 oz
¼ oz
1 oz
½ oz
½ oz
1 oz
½ oz
¾ oz
Base:
*Amber Accord
Cedar, Virginia
*JK’s Sandalwood Accord
Oakmoss
Vetiver
Tonka
Benzoin
Civet Abs
2 oz
¾ oz
3 oz
¾ oz
1 oz
½ oz
½ oz
*1 mL
Caleche
Debuted: 1961
Nose: Guy Robert
House: Hermes
The name Caleche signified a beautiful horse-drawn carriage that was traditionally used
to show a woman off as she travelled through parks or elegant boulevards, which was
the perfect symbol for a company that began as a luxury saddlemaking company
(founded in 1801)—and served to connect their traditional patrimony with their
newfound femininity.
Other notable fragrances by Hermes are Eau de Victoria (1944), Roudnitska’s Eau
d’Hermes (1951), Doblis by Guy Robert (1955), and all of the wonderful fragrances
created by their current in-House perfumer Jean-Claude Ellena (of which the story of his
addition to the Hermes Clan is told in The Perfect Scent by Chandler Burr).
This fragrance was a new version of the classical Chypré—less sweet, and more floral.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Mandarin, Red
Mandarin, Green
Lemon
Neroli
Neroli sur Fleur
*Osthmanthus Accord
Kaffir Lime Leaf
3 oz
½ oz
½ oz
1 oz
½ oz
½ oz
1 oz
1 oz
Heart:
*Lily of the Valley Doppelganger
Rose
Jasmine Accord
Ylang Abs
Oakmoss
2 oz
½ oz
1 oz
½ oz
½ oz
Base:
Cypress, Wood
Frankincense
Vetiver
Sandalwood
Oakmoss
Bergamot
1 oz
2 oz
¾ oz
2 oz
2 oz
2 oz
Fidji
Debuted: 1966
Nose: Josaphine Catapano
House: Rochas
“A woman is an island, Fidji is her perfume.”
Fidji was the first French perfume that was to heavily use an American-style of
marketing. It took other houses much longer to understand that it was no longer enough
to launch a new fragrance—you had to make that fragrance tell a story, and the story
and allure of the Island of Fiji was incredibly seductive.
This fragrance takes L’Air du Temps as its starting point, but rather than make a pretty
bouquet of flowers, it elaborates on the woody notes in the Base, making it much more
fresh and tenacious—and transforms the flowery bouquet into a spicy tropical floral
Heart with a pronounced “Green” Note.
Fidji went on to inspire such creations as Anais Anais, Chanel No. 19, and Charlie.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Lemon
Galbanum
Hyacinth
3 oz
1 oz
1/8th oz
½ oz (Can substitute Lily of the Valley Accord)
Heart:
Rose
Jasmine Abs (or Accord)
Ylang Abs
Carnation
Orris
Honey Abs
Clove Abs
Cinnamon Abs
Allspice
Ginger CO2
Oakmoss
Violet Leaf Abs
2 oz
1 oz
¾ oz
½ oz
½ oz
1 oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
½ oz
Base:
Vetiver
Oakmoss
Sandalwood
Patchouli
Deer Musk @ 1%
Ambergris @ 1 %
2 oz
1 oz
5 oz
2 oz
1 oz
1 oz
Chamade
Debuted: 1969
Nose: Jean-Paul Guerlain
House: Guerlain
“My heart beats Chamade”—a reference to when our heart surrenders to another. This
phrase alludes to the battlefields of old and the names of the drum-beats that told
soldiers what to do. The very final drumbeat, the drumbeat of surrender, was known in
French as La Chamade.
Created at the pinnacle of the Era of Free Love, it’s a shame that unless you speak a
little French, you’d have no idea just how perfect the name of the fragrance is.
Jean-Paul Guerlain was known to have said just how lucky he was, as he had 150 years
of know-how that had been passed on to him from his grand-father, whom had learnt his
skill from his forebears. This was not his first fragrance for women, but it was a brand
new fragrance, referencing Vol de Nuit, and is an ultra-fresh, aldehydic floriental.
The freshness of this fragrance uses a huge burst of the synthetic isolate
Dihydrojasmonate, which naturally occurs in Jasmine, but not nearly in the
concentrations found in use in the isolate. The isolate was discovered by Firmenich and
was first used by Roudnitska in Eau Sauvage.
The bottle, itself, is ingenious—rightside up, it looks a bit like a shell. But turned
upside down, and you can clearly see a heart, thrown topsy-turvy as it surrenders itself
to love. The stopper looks like a tear drop, for whenever you lose your heart—whether
from sorrow or happiness—you always shed a tear.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Galbanum
Blackcurrant Abs
3 oz
1/8 oz
¼ oz
Heart:
*Lilac Accord
Rose
Jasmine
Ylang Abs
Tuberose
Blacurrant Abs
Kaffir Lime Leaf
Bergamot Petit-grain
½ oz
2 oz
1 oz
¾ oz
¼ oz
½ oz
1 oz
1 oz
Base:
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
Sandalwood
Vetiver
Orris 15% Irones
Ambergris 1%
¾ oz
3 oz
1 oz
¾ oz
1 oz
Calandre
Debuted: 1969
Nose: Michael Hy
House: Paco Rabanne
Bottle: Pierre Dinande
A classic Rose Chypre with a woody-mossy drydown.
Incorporates the natural isolate Evernyl, which naturally occurs in Oakmoss. I
substistute Cedarmoss for this natural isolate.
This fragrance in its original form is highly synthetic, using a Rose Oxide along with a
number of Aldehydes, and was formulated to smell like nature, heat, metal, and sex,
reflecting the Pop Art of the time, incorporating plastics, metals, and synthetic fibers.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
*Osmanthus Accord (pick one)
Kaffir Lime Leaf
3 oz
1 oz
1 oz
Heart:
*Rose Cool Floral Accord
*Jasmine Accord
Galbanum
Violet Leaf Abs
3 oz
1 oz
½ oz
¼ oz
Base:
*Amber Accord
Sandalwood
Cedar, Virginia
Oakmoss
Cedarmoss
Civet @ 1%
Deer Musk @ 1%
2 oz
3 oz
¾ oz
¼ oz
½ oz
1 oz
1 oz
The 1970’s
No. 19
Debuted: 1970
Nose: Henri Robert
House: Chanel
Gabrielle Chanel earned her nickname, Coco, as a poor orphan on the streets of Paris,
where she would visit the cafes in Montmartre. There, she begged for money with songs
and smiles. The locals had a soft-spot for her and would chant when she arrived for her
to sing a song about a little dog named Coco…”Coco, Coco, Coco,” to get her to sing
their favorite song. As she got older, the nickname stuck—and this is why we know her
as Coco Chanel.
I actually ate several times at a café that she was known to frequent as a child back
when she lived in Paris…quite cute. I can only imagine witnessing one of the poor
orphans so common on the streets of Paris rising in fame as Coco had. A rare success
story from the streets…
August 19th 1970 saw the release of No. 19 on Coco’s 87th birthday. Shortly after it’s
release, she passed away.
The fragrance was composed by Henri Robert, an uncle of Guy Robert’s.
The fragrance uses an overdose of Dihydrojasmonate, along with Galbanum, Bergamot,
and Neroli to attain an unparalleled leve of freshness, and if you’ve smelled this
fragrance, you’ll recognize the airy blast of crisp freshness that I’m referring to.
The Base was ironically a take on the chypré facet designed by Henri’s nephew in
Caleche.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Kaffir Lime Leaf
Petit-grain Bergamot
Galbanum
Bergamot
Neroli
Neroli sur Fleur
Orange, Wild, Dominican
Hyacinth Abs
½ oz
1 oz
¼ oz
1 oz
½ oz
¾ oz
½ oz
1/8th oz
Heart:
Rose de Mai
Rose, Bulgarian Abs
Rose Otto
Rose Geranium
*Jasmine Accord
Narcissus
Tonka
Ylang Abs
Orris 15% Irones
½ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
1 oz
1 oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
Base:
Sandalwood
Cabrueva
Oakmoss
Labdanum
Cistus
Patchouli
Cedar, Virginia
Galbanum
Rose
Jasmine
Civet @ 1%
Deer Musk @ 1%
2 oz
1 oz
¾ oz
½ oz
½ oz
¾ oz
¾ oz
¼ oz
½ oz
½ oz
1 oz
1 oz
Diorella
Debuted: 1972
Nose: Edmond Roudnitska
House: Christian Dior
Bottle: Serge Mansau
Roudnitska said of his creation, Diorella, “Diorella is my proudest creation.”
Diorella’s construction follows that of Roudnitska’s Eau Sauvage (which was
basically a modern Eau de Cologne with notes of Lemon, Rosemary, Petit-grain, and
Basil with a light Jasmine Heart, on a base of Sandalwood and Vetiver…not very
different from the structures for Colognes that I have already given you…but nearly all
synthetic). Eau Sauvage and Eau Fraiche are considered, by some, to be some of the
most important creations of the second half of the 20th century—their genius being in
their longevity, due to their use of synthetics. Women loved these Christian Dior
fragrances because they were not too rich or sweet, like many of the opulent fragrances
of the times (1966 and 1953, respectively).
Whereas Coty’s Le Chypré was an overdose of Jasmin on a Chypré base, Diorella is a
much more fresh version that maintains its tenacity (due to a high dosing of
Dihydrojasmonate and Cyclomen.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Petit-grain Bergamot
Kaffir Lime Leaf
Basil, Sweet
2 oz
1 oz
½ oz
1/8th oz
Heart:
*Jasmine Accord
Carnation
Rose de Mai
Tulsi
Black Pepper
2 oz
¼ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
1/32nd oz
Base:
Oakmoss
Vetiver
Patchouli
Cabrueva
Deer Musk @ 1%
½ oz
1 oz
2 oz
¾ oz
1 oz
Coriandre
Debuted: 1973
Nose: Gerard Pelpal
House: Jean Couturier
Bottle: Pierre Dinand
A Chypré with an unusual combination of synthetic Aldehydes, coupled with Angelica
and Coriander.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
*Neroli Accord
*Osmanthus Accord (pick one)
Angelica
Coriander
2 oz
1 oz
1 oz
1/8th oz
¼ oz
Heart:
*Rose Accord
*Jasmine Accord
Orrange Blossom Abs
Geranium
*Lily of the Valley Accord
Orris 15% Irones
1 ½ oz
1 oz
¼ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
Base:
Oakmoss
Bergamot
Lime
Patchouli
Cedar, Virginia
Sandalwood
Vetiver
Orris 15% Irones
Civet @ 1%
1 oz
1 oz
½ oz
1 oz
¾ oz
2 oz
¾ oz
¼ oz
1 oz
Chloé
Debuted: 1975
Nose: Bethy Busse
House: Chloé
Bottle: Joseph Messina
Inspired by Ernest Beauz’s Gardenia, and Germain Cellier’s Fracas.
There is a Green Accord that is used in Chloé that is used just a few years later in
Giorgio. I propose an Accord here to be used in both fragrances.
Tuberose Accord #2
Tuberose Enfleurage
Tuberose Abs
Sandalwood
Tonka
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
Patchouli
Galbanum
1/8th oz
¼ oz
1 oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
1 oz
1/32nd oz
Green Accord
Petit-grain Bergamot
Geranium
Lavender
Peppermint
Bay Rum
Juniper Berry
Galbanum
1 oz
1 oz
1 oz
½ oz
¼ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
Suggested Recipe
Top: 30 %
Bergamot
*Green Accord
1 oz
1 oz
Heart: 30 %
*Tuberose Accord #2
*Jasmine Accord
*Osmanthus Accord (pick one)
Ylang Abs
2 oz
1 oz
½ oz
¼ oz
Base: 40%
JK’s Sandalwood Accord
Cabrueva
Vetiver
Patchouli
2 oz
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
First
Debuted: 1976
Nose: Jean-Claude Ellena
House: Van Cleef & Arpels
Bottle: Jacques Llorente
Van Cleef & Arpels was the first jewellery company to launch a fragrance—a move that
many other jewerly companies were quick to follow. VC&A was quite proud of this,
and taunted their competitors by using “First” as it’s name.
This is also the fragrance that launched the career of Jean-Claude Ellena (now the InHouse Perfumer at Hermés).
This fragrance is heavily influenced by Chamade, and really pushes up the volume of
Dihydrojasmonate.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
*Osmanthus Accord
Kaffir Lime Leaf
Blackcurrent Abs
3 oz
1 oz
½ oz
¼ oz
Heart:
Chamade Skeleton:
*Lilac Accord
Rose
Jasmine
Ylang Abs
Tuberose
Blacurrant Abs
Kaffir Lime Leaf
Bergamot Petit-grain
½ oz
2 oz
1 oz
¾ oz
¼ oz
½ oz
1 oz
1 oz
Add:
Hyacinth
Narcissus
*Tuberose Accord (pick one)
¼ oz
¼ oz
1 oz
Base: (Same as Chamade)
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
Sandalwood
Vetiver
Orris 15% Irones
Ambergris 1%
¾ oz
3 oz
1 oz
¾ oz
1 oz
Opium
Debuted: 1977
Nose: Jean-Louis Sieuzac
House: Yves Saint Laurent
Bottle: Pierre Dinand
A landmark fragrance in the ballpark of Thierry Mugler’s Angel, Davidoff’s Cool
Water, and Issy Miyake’s L’Eau d’Issey.
This fragrance is a shocking Oriental that is warm, rich, sensual, and spicy—the
advertising images suggested a level of decadent hedonism that had never before been
put forth to the public.
The iconic bottle was received with quite a bit of shock, as it is in the shape of a
Japanese Inro, with its netsuke with the name Ichi on it. The reason for the level of
shock this created, is that this is a replica of the bottles that the Japanese Samurai kept
their opium pills in.
Opium was used in the Orient in several ways. It was recreationally (and medicinally)
used as a Narcotic, and was a very common ingredient in incense. You’ll notice on
some incense boxes that you purchase today that it may state, “This Product Contains
No Narcotics”—which is a reference to the very frequent use of a small dose of Opium,
and a handful of other psychogentic substances that were very commonly in use up until
recent history.
This historical fact led them to an interesting marketing ploy—as orders came in for the
fragrance, they were always cut, further creating a demand for the product, turning the
world into Opium addicts craving their next fix, overnight!
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Osmanthus Accord
Kaffir Lime Leaf
Orange
Allspice
Cinnamon EO
Mandarin, Red
Grapefruit, Pink
Grapefruit, Ruby Red
3 oz
1 oz
1 oz
½ oz
¾ oz
1/16th oz
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
Heart:
Rose
Rose Geranium
Rose centifolia
Tuberose
Ylang Abs
*Jasmine Accord
Davana
Beeswax Abs
Carnation
Sandalwood
Tulsi
White Ginger Lily Abs
Tagetes
1 oz
1 oz
½ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
1 oz
¼ oz
½ oz
½ oz
1 oz
½ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
Base:
Tolu Balsam
Benzoin
Cinnamon Abs
Sandalwood
Patchouli
Frankincense
Opoponax
Cumin
Ylang Abs
Ginger CO2
Cardamom CO2
Jasmine sambac Abs
Galbanum
Birch Tar
Orris 15% Irones
*Amber Accord
1 oz
1 oz
¼ oz
2 oz
1 oz
1 oz
¾ oz
1/8th oz
1 oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
½ oz
1/16th oz
*1/4 mL
½ oz
1 ½ oz
Oscar
Debuted: 1977
Nose: Jean-Louis Sieuzac
House: Oscar de la Renta
Bottle: Serge Mansau
With the release of Oscar, there was a reignition of the semi-Oriental style under a new
name—“Floriental”—and this is the fragrance from which we get the term.
The roots of the fragrance are found in Coty’s L’Origin and Guerlain’s L’Heure
Bleue.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
*Osmanthus Accord (pick one)
Kaffir Lime Leaf
3 oz
1 ½ oz
½ oz
Heart:
Rose
*Lily of the Valley Doppelganger
*Jasmine Accord
*Gardenia Accord
*Osmanthus Accord
Honey Abs
Davana
Kaffir Lime Leaf
Oakmoss
Galbanum
¾ oz
¼ oz
1 oz
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
1/16th oz
Base:
*Basic Oriental Accord
Deer Musk @ 1%
Ambergris @ 1%
2 oz
½ oz
½ oz
Lauren
Debuted: 1977
Nose: Bernard Chant
House: Ralph Lauren
Bottle: Ben Kotyuk
Bernard also composed Cabochard, for Gres.
A fresh, spicy Chypré
Suggested Recipe:
Top:
Bergamot
Orange
Tangerine
Petit-grain Bergamot
*Lily of the Valley
3 oz
1 ½ oz
1 oz
1 oz
½ oz
Heart:
*Jasmine Accord
*Rose Accord
*Lilac Accord
Clove Abs
2 oz
1 oz
¾ oz
1/8th oz
Base:
Bergamot
Oakmoss
Lime
Cedar, Virginia
Vetiver
Sandalwood
1 ½ oz
1 ½ oz
½ oz
¾ oz
¾ oz
2 oz
Nahema
Debuted: 1979
Nose: Jean-Paul Guerlain
House: Guerlain
“On repeat wears and sniffs, another American candy holiday keeps coming to mind in
flashes of memory: Valentine's Day. The contrived romance, unappetizing glut of
chocolates, plasticky dew drop roses. And this very same evocation could be
delightfully irreverent, romantic, or disco cool to someone else.
Interestingly, this scent helped to shape creative perfumery for the next 20 years—the
fruity floral. It was “ahead of its time”, and despite its genius, which made many others
fortunes imitating its genius…it was a commercial failure.
The newly discovered natural isolate Damascenones (more commonly made today
synthetically), with their fruity rose note were offered to Jean-Paul, who worked them
with 4 rose notes:
Rose de Mai Abs
Rose de Mai Otto
Bulgarian Rose Abs
Bulgarian Rose Otto
Damascenones
This was to become a power Accord in so many fragrances to follow in its wake,
particulary those of Sophia Grosjman, who used them in nearly all of her commercial
blockbusters, and that of N’Aimez Que Moi, by Ernest Daltroff.
In Liu of using the Damascenones, you can always try using a little bit of a Rose
Concrete, especially if making this as an oil-based fragrance, and macerate it into the
base oil that you’ll be building the fragrance upon.
I think you’ll like the Fruity Rose Heart that I’ve created.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
*Osmanthus Accord (pick one)
Kaffir Lime Leaf
3 oz
1 oz
¼ oz
Heart:
Rose de Mai Abs
Rose de Mai Otto
Bulgarian Rose Abs
Bulgarian Rose Otto
Osmanthus
Blackcurrent Abs
Litsea cubeba
Ylang EO
Orange
Rosewood
Larel Leaf
Oakmoss
Violet Leaf Abs
1 oz
¼ oz
1 oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
½ oz
¾ oz
½ oz
¾ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
Base:
Sandalwood
Tonka
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
4 oz
½ oz
½ oz
The 1980’s
Must de Cartier
Debuted: 1981
Nose: Jean-Jacques Diener
House: Cartier
There are connections in this fragrance alluding to both Shalimar and Alliage.
The fragrance utilized Galaxolide, which is a synthetic musk that is as soft and creamy
as clean skin, and smells very similar to Ambergris.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Mandarin, Red
Mandarin, Green
Mandarin, Yellow
*Neroli Accord
*Osmanthus Accord (pick one)
Galbanum
3 oz
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
¾ oz
¼ oz
Heart:
*Rose Accord
*Jasmine Accord
Jonquil Abs
2 oz
1 oz
½ oz
Base:
Sandalwood
Vetiver
Benzoin
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
Frankincense
Tonka
Ambergris @ 1%
Civet @ 1%
3 oz
¾ oz
1 oz
½ oz
¼ oz
½ oz
1 oz
1 oz
Giorgio
Debuted: 1981
Nose: Jean-Jacques Diener
House: Giorgio Beverly Hills
Bottle: Brosse
In 1979 it was decided that Giorgio Beverly Hills should have a signature fragrance and
after two years in development, Giorgio was born in November '81. The perfume was
kept exclusive to the boutiques clients but consumer demand was huge. In May 1983,
the fragrance was advertised in Vogue with a scent strip - a marketing device not used
before. The response was huge and orders came flooding in. Although out of favour
now, Giorgio led the way for the strong, sweet, "don't mess with me" scents of the 80’s.
I happen to looooove the smell of the original formulation, despite being nearly entirely
synthetic. It’s a real kick in the nose—very Tuberose floral, with a very strong dose of
Animalic Civet in the Base.
Giorgio was a modern interpretation of Fracas, and was considered to be a new style
called “Linear,” where the central theme is so strong and dominant that you do not have
the feeling of movement or development, and is amplified through the lack of
Hesperidic Notes.
This fragrance was so strong smelling that it was the first fragrance to be banned by
many restaurants, as it could literally fill the room within a few moments. The olfactory
equivalent of shoulder pads—it screamed, “SMELL ME, I’M WEARING GIORGIO,
AND I CAN AFFORD IT!”
**Make this as an oil-based fragrance, and a little will go a very long way!
Suggested Recipe
Top: (Small Dose) 20%
Bergamot
Orange Blossom Abs
3 oz
½ oz
Heart: 40%
*Tuberose Accord #2
*Gardenia Accord
Ylang Abs
Hyacinth Abs
Narcissus
Orange Blossom
Bergamot
*Green Accord
Oakmoss
2 oz
¾ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
1 oz
1 oz
¼ oz
Base: 40%
Sandalwood
Patchouli
Cedar, Virginia
Tonka
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
Oakmoss
Civet Abs
3 oz
1 oz
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
*1 ½ mL
Ombre Rose
Debuted: 1981
Nose: François Caron
House: Jean-Charles Brosseau
Bottle: Jean-Charles Brosseau
Ombre Rose was an overnight sensation, and was sold in Jean-Charles boutique in the
Place des Victoires, in Paris.
The original formulation was built upon two synthetic Bases that had been made by
Roure, as well as a natural isolate from Virginia Cedar--and required quite a bit of
freshening up, as the synthetics can often smell “flat” compared to the level of
complexity normally found in using naturals.
This was a Gourmand Balsamic fragrance that led the way to the Gourmand fragrances
of the 90’s and 2000’s.
The bottle was devised as a result of an old bottle of Narcisse Bleu, by Mury that JeanCharles’ daughter had found in a market, and with a little work and development, the
iconic black bottle was created.
The name Ombre Rose is very poetic in French, as it means “Shadow.” Rose alludes not
to the flower, but to the color pink—“la vie en rose”, translates as “life in the pink,” and
referrs to a “life of happines,” and essoterically, the name suggests a life that is
shadowed by happiness.
When the fragrance was launched in the USA in Bergdorf Goodman, it was so wellreceived by their buyer that she bought their entire stock, launched it on Mother’s Day,
and took the unprecedented step of advertising the bottles in the windows of the store. It
was an overnight sensation, and was totally sold out!
The formula to the scent was sold, and was later bought back by Jean-Claude, his wife,
and his son, Benoît. It took them 10 years to make the purchase, but once back in their
hands, it was relaunched as Ombre Rose L’Original.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
*No Top Notes
Heart and Base, Combined:
Ylang Abs
*Lily of the Valley Doppelganger
*Osmanthus Accord (pick one)
Rose de Mai Abs
Rose, Bulgarian Abs
Rosewood
Rose Geranium
Sandalwood
Cedar, Virginia
Beeswax Abs
Tonka
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
Orris
Oakmoss
Deer Musk @ 1%
¾ oz
1 oz
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
1 oz
½ oz
3 oz
½ oz
¾ oz
¾ oz
½ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
1 oz
Poison
Debuted: 1985
Nose: Edouard Flechier
House: Christian Dior
Bottle: Véronique Mono
The bottle design is based on the form of a poison apple—the Fruit of Temptation. The
bottle has lines which run down its length, harking back to a time when people were
illiterate, and poison bottles always had such ridges on them to warn of the dangerous
liquied contained within.
The fragrance has a huge Tuberose and Jasmine melange, blended in with an enourmous
dose of Damascenones, with their pronounced fruity aspect.
Interestingly, when the fragrance launched, many consumers tried to “Francofy” the
name, and would ask for bottles of ‘poisson,’ which is quite commical, as poisson is
French for ‘fish.’ Hehehe
This is an interesting fragrance—filled with tons of synthetic fruity notes of black and
red currants, with blackberries and raspberries—melded into the fruity laden of
Damascenones. I might suggest tincturing some freeze-dried blackberries and
raspberries, and maybe even some strawberries, to try to duplicate these notes. But if
not…that’s ok. Just build on it’s idea, and make it your own.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
+/Tictured Blackberries, Raspberries, and Strawberries
Ylang EO
Orange
Yuzu
Rosewood
Laurel Leaf
Litsea cubeba
Osmanthus
Blackcurrent Abs
½ oz
1 oz
¼ oz
¾ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
1/16th oz
1/8th oz
Heart:
*Tuberose Accord #2
*Jasmine Accord
*Rose Heart Accord from Nahema
Black Pepper
Cinnamon Abs
Coriander
2 oz
1 oz
1 oz
1/8th oz
1/8th oz
1/8th oz
Base:
Black Pepper
Cinnamon Abs
Coriander
Cabrueva
JK’s Sandalwood Accord
Labdanum
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
Opoponax
Ambergris @ 1%
1/8th oz
¼ oz
½ oz
2 oz
1 oz
1 oz
½ oz
1 ½ oz
1 oz
Samsara
Debuted: 1989
Nose: Jean-Paul Guerlain
House: Guerlain
Bottle: Robert Granai
Jean-Paul Guerlain once said, “Bearing the name Jean-Paul was very easy—bearing the
name Guerlain, was difficult.” He talked a lot about always being compared to his
grandfather, and we can only imagine what life must have been like living in the
shadow of a perfumer hailed as one of the finest exponenets of their craft. Could you
imagine the emotional turmoil of growing up in that shadow…and in the footsteps of
the creator of one of the greatest perfume Houses of all time??
Jean-Paul was said to have created this fragrance in a moment, within just his first few
trials, but carried on workong on it for years as he did not believe that anything could
have come that easily, or quickly. He said of Samsara, that “he felt it was within him
just waiting to be born, and that with Samsara, he felt he no longer had to compete with
his grandfather.”
The name Samsara is Sanskrit, and refers to the Wheel of Life—our journey to reach
Nirvana. It was actually created in 1985 for Decia de Powell, the woman who owned his
heart, and she wore it exclusively for four years before its commercial launch.
It was launched exactly 100 years after the creation of Jicky.
Jean-Paul had always said that he may not have been the most handsome men in the
world, but was the world’s greatest perfumer. Decia had never found a scent that she
liked, but she did really love the smell of Jasmine and Sandalwood…and so, Jean-Paul
got to work…
This fragrance is the perfect example of how we should each tap into the Power of
Love, and the grip that each person that we hold dear in our lives holds on us. Tapping
into that power, as Jean-Paul did, can unleash the masterpiece within each of us, simply
awaiting to be born.
Sandalwood is an interesting material, as it plays a little trick on your nose…one
moment it’s there, and the next, gone—only to reappear again later. It also has a bit of a
paradoxical effect—having great tenacity and lingering quality, bit it can be a bit
suppressive of the materials used with it…especially with synthetics.
Jean-Paul took an unprecedented step and pushed the levels of Sandalwood in the
fragrance from the Industry Standard of just 2%, and cranked it up to 30% of the
formulation.
**As you’ve seen in my formulations, I tend to use larger doses of Sandalwood—partly
from this trick of Jean-Pauls that I’ve learned, as well as the fact that we are using
natural Sandalwood, as opposed to synthetic Santol isolates, as is common in
commercial fragrances.
Jean-Paul’s overdosing of an ingredient, which is so common in perfumes that have
gone on to become Classics, gives this fragrance an originality that forces the perfumer
to re-weigh everything built around that material in a totally new and original way, with
no points of reference as you are constructing them as you go.
Both Jasmine and Sandalwood have spiritual connotations, which fit perfectly into the
marketing strategy behind the fragrance. The bottle was inspired by Cambodian statues
found in the Guimet Museum, in Paris. The golden cap symbolized Buddha, his eyes
shut in contemplation. The gold fret around the waist represented the ampleness of
womankind’s form. The small collar that makes the neck of the bottle were to represent
the lines on the necks of the ancient statues, for in this ancient civilization, lines on the
neck were considered beautiful. The burnt color of orange/red is the color of spirituality
itself-the color of the Temples in Tibet—the Gateway to Nirvana, itself.
Suggested Recipe
Top: 30%
Bergamot
Ylang EO
Rosewood
Grapefruit, Pink
Grapefruit, Orange
Nutmeg CO2
3 oz
½ oz
¾ oz
½ oz
½ oz
1/8th oz
Heart: 40 %
*Jasmine Accord
Jasmine sambac Abs
Jasmine grand Abs
Jasmine auriculatum (Juhi) Abs
Rose
Narcissus
Ylang Abs
Ylang EO
Orris 15% Irones
Nutmeg CO2
Oakmoss
Galbanum
Petit-grain Bergamot
3 oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
1 oz
Base: 30%
Sandalwood
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
Tonka
Orris 15% Irones
Patchouli
Oakmoss
4 ½ oz
¼ oz
¾ oz
1/8th oz
1/8th oz
1/8th oz
The 1990’s
Escape
Debuted: 1991
Nose: ?
House: Calvin Klein
Bottle: Pierre Dinand
Escape was the third of the great Calvin Klein blockbusters—first, you became
Obsessed, then you pledged Eternity, but in the end, all you wated to do was Escape.
CK used to have some amazing print-ad campaigns—do you remember them? I did a
shoot for them back in the mid-2000’s back in my modeling days, and that shot is one of
my favorites!
There is a strong ‘Oceanic’ Note in this fragrance that is tough to duplicate with
Naturals. It is a molecule made by Pfizer called Calone, and was originally used in
detergents to make laundry smell more “fresh.” It has an ultra-acqueous melon note that
the public was convinced smelled like the scent of the sea—and this is where the socalled Oceanic Note was born.
Used first in perfumery in the 80’s, and in higher concentration in New West by
Aramis in 1991—it was Escape that defined the new Oceanic style.
L’Ea d’Issey, by Issey Miyake (1994) is the perfect example of an enduring Oceanic
fragrance.
In the Heart, Cyclomen is used, along with Heliotrope.
I’ll provide here an “Oceanic” Accord to try to duplicate some of this effect.
Oceanic Accord
Bay Rum
Juniper Berry
Peppermint
Lavender
Geranium
Eucalyptus
Clove EO
Cajeput
Wintergreen
Seaweed Abs
Ambergris @ 1%
1 oz
1 oz
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
1 oz
1/8th oz
1/8th oz
1/8th oz
1/8th oz
1 oz
*My note for “Melon”:
Blackcurrent Abs
Litsea
Orange
Ylang
Laural Leaf
Osmanthus
½ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
1/8th oz
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
*Oceanic Accord
*Melon Note
*Osmanthus Accord
3 oz
1 oz
½ oz
½ oz
Heart:
Petit-grain Bergamot
*Lily of the Valley Doppelganger
Rose
Carnation
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
Tonka
1 oz
1 oz
¾ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
Base:
Cedar, Virginia
Sandalwood
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
Ambrette
1 oz
3 oz
¼ oz
1/8th oz
Casmir
Debuted: 1991
Nose: Michel Almairac
House: Chopard
Bottle: Caroline Scheufele
Casmir was a pivotal creation, along with Ombre Rose, as these two scents established
the “Gourmand” category of fragrances, and went on to inspire Angel, and it’s most
successful derivative, Prada. I make an oil-based natural version of Prada, and it is a
huge hit with my clientelle. An incredibly sexy, gourmand masculine fragrance that
wears beautifully on a woman.
Lotus is a principle theme in this fragrance, drawing on it’s accociation with spirituality
and divinity. In Buddhism, the Lotus is a symbol signifying transcendence.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Petit-grain Bergamot
Geranium
Lotus, White Abs
Lotus, Pink Abs
2 oz
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
Heart:
*Jasmine Accord
*Osmanthus Accord
Coconut Oil (not FCO)
*Mango Melange
1 ½ oz
1 oz
½ oz
¾ oz (from White Lotus Aromatics)
Base:
Patchouli
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
Chocolate Abs
Coffee Abs
Sandalwood
Ambergris @ 1%
Castoreum Abs @ 1%
3 oz
¼ oz
½ oz
½ oz
1 oz
1 oz
½ oz
Angel
Debuted: 1992
Nose: Olivier Cresp & Yves de Chiris
House: Thierry Mugler
Bottle: Thierry Mugler
Angel is probably the most polarizing of all creations, due to the use of an unusal
synthetic material, Veltol, which smells of candyfloss and caramel. Veltol is the same
synthetic that is used to flavor cotton candy. Coupled with Patchouli, this gives an
incredibly unique gourmand flavor. They coupled this with Dihydrojasmonate, and an
enormous synthetic fruity facet of Stawberry, Dewberry, Coconut, and Honey.
When Thierry Mugler was a child, he used to believe that the stars were his friends,
shining back at him. Stars became more and more important to him, and eventually
became his lucky emblam, as stars transcend race and creed, inspire dreams, and reflect
timelessness.
The star was the starting point of the creative process of this fragrance, and the bottle,
unusually, came before the scent. The bottle was the color of the sky, the same color
when the first magical stars shimmer and appear as if by magic, and it was this color of
blue that was to become the House Color for Thierry Mugler.
With the bottle already conceptualized, next came the addictive fragrance that Mugler
had in mind: the scent of the fairground—of candyfloss, toffee apples, and fairground
treats…the smell of his childhood. Without realizing it, Mugler had stumbled on the
dominant them of the decade—Escapism to the carefree times of childhood.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Geranium
Orange
Ylang
Yuzu
Laurel Leaf
Rosewood
Coconut Oil (not FCO)
Beeswax Abs
3 oz
¾ oz
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
¾ oz
½ oz
¾ oz
Heart:
Jasmine Accord
Rose
Osmanthus Accord
1 ½ oz
¼ oz
¾ oz (replacing the synthetic Orchid)
Base:
Patchouli
Jasmine sambac
Butter Abs
Chocolate Abs
Coffee Abs
Allspice Abs
Nutmeg Abs
Ginger CO2
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
Tonka
Sandalwood
Benzoin
Civet @ 1%
3 oz
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
½ oz
1 ½ oz
½ oz
1 oz
**Could also modify the Prunol Doppelganger that I gave to you with some Butter Abs,
Chocolate and Coffee Abs, and Patchouli.
CK1
Debuted: 1994
Nose: Alberto Morillas
House: Calvin Klein
Bottle: Fabien Baron
CK1 went on to re-invent the way that fragrances were sold. Whereas older generations
bought megalithic fragrances, CK1 smelled more of “clean water,” which appealed to
the younger generations. This was also a “genderless” fragrance, intended to be worn by
both of the sexesm a 90 year old change in the industry’s marketing, heralding back to
the olden-days when fragrances were worn by both sexes. The press fell for the
marketing hype, and Calvin Klein has since been known as the first to invent “unisex
fragrances.”
Eau de Colognes were always unisex, and the first scent sold as “unisex” was Patou’s
Le Sien (1929)…but it’s easier to overlook those little details. =)
Incredibly synthetic—as this mostly aromatic Eau de Cologne-style fragrance wouldn’t
last 30 minutes were it not.
Freesia Doppelganger
Lemon
Lemon Verbena
Anise
Peppermint Abs
Ylang Extra
Champa, White CO2
Rose, Damask Abs
Liquidambar (Styrax)
Cabrueva
1 ½ oz
½ oz
1/16th oz
¼ oz (can use EO)
1 oz
1 ½ oz
½ oz
1/8th oz
2 ½ oz
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Lemon
Mandarin, Red
Ylang EO
Orange
Rosewood
Laurel Leaf
Osmanthus Abs
3 oz
¾ oz
½ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
¾ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
Heart:
*Lily of the Valley Doppelganger
*Freesia Doppelganger
Orris 15% Irones
*Jasmine Accord
Rose
1 oz
1 ½ oz
¼ oz
¾ oz
¼ oz
Base:
Oakmoss
Bergamot
Lime
Cedar, Virginia
Sandalwood
Nutmeg CO2
Ambrette
Angelica
1 oz
1 oz
1 oz
¾ oz
2 oz
½ oz
1/4 oz
1/8th oz
The 2000’s
Nu
Debuted: 2001
Nose: Tom Ford & Jacques Cavallier of Firmenich
House: Yves Saint Laurent
Bottle: Tom Ford
Yves Saint Laurent has always been known for his packaging, as it is quite polarizeing.
He was the first to bottle scent in a shiny tin can (Rive Gauche), which had never been
used before—and has since been adopted by the ‘body spray’ market, like the current
Axe Body Spray trend. The bottles were made of PET and SAN, which were beginning
to be used by the airline industry to bottle alcohol.
It’s an interesting fragrance, with the main interest lying in the Base, made from an
Accord of Wood, Spice, Balsams, and Animal Notes. It has a pronounced White Orchid
Heart Note, which is synthetic—so I’d suggest adding a Floral Accord of your choice to
fill that gap.
Cedar Chest Doppelganger
Bergamot
Geranium
Cassia CO2
Cardamom CO2
White Ginger Lily Flower Abs
Cedar, Virginia
Patchouli
Huhuhu
Vetiver
Balsam Peru
Birch Tar
2 oz
1 oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
1 oz
2 oz
½ oz
1 oz
1 oz
¼ oz
*1/16th mL
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
Neroli
Neroli sur Fleur
3 oz
½ oz
1 oz
Heart:
*Jasmine Accord
*Floral Accord of your Choice
Black Pepper
1 ½ oz
1 oz
1/8th oz
Base:
Cedar, Virginia
Cardamom CO2
Frankincese
Opoponax
Vetiver
Cabrueva
Benzoin
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
Orris 15% Irones
3 oz
½ oz
1 oz
¾ oz
¾ oz
2 oz
¾ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
**You can also Substitute this for the Cedar Chest Doppelganger
Narcisso Rodriguez For Her
Debuted: 2003
Nose: Christine Nagal & Francis Kurkdijan
House: Yves Saint Laurent
A very floral Chypré that was inspired by a synthetic musk oil that Rodriguez ran across
on one of him many trips to the Middle East, which actually makes this of a bit of a
Mukhallat-style of a Floral Chypré.
The Base utilizes a synthetic Amberlyn, which has a strong scent of Ambergris.
The bottle is an interesting one, fashioned after the traditional Japanese snuff bottles,
where the color is applied inside the bottle, rather than outside.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
1 oz
Heart:
Rose
*Osmanthus Accord
Orange Blossom
Osmanthus Abs
½ oz
1 ½ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
Base:
Oakmoss
Bergamot
Lime
Labdanum
Cistus
Cabrueva
Vetiver
Ambergris @ 1%
Vanilla CO2 25% Vanillin
½ oz
½ oz
½ oz
¼ oz
¼ oz
2 oz
¾ oz
¾ oz
1/8th oz
Perles de Lalique
Debuted: 2006
Nose: Nathalie Lorson
House: Lalique
Bottle: René Lalique
Perles de Lalique redefined the Chypré Accord in a totally new way by working a
Bulgarian Rose Note into the Classical Chypré structure.
The bottle is a unique and original design that is called ‘Cactus,’ and has a boa of
feathers around the neck. The EdP bottle has small black pearls along its edges and was
an inpiration by a garniture de toilette, which existed in René Lalique’s archive and was
called Perles.
Suggested Recipe
Top:
Bergamot
3 oz
Heart:
Rose, Bulgarian Abs
Black Pepper, Bourbon
Rose Geranium
1 oz
1/8th oz
½ oz
Base:
Oakmoss
Bergamot
Lime
Rose, Bulgarian Abs
Black Pepper Abs, Bourbon
Patchouli
1 oz
1 oz
1 oz
1 oz
1/8th oz
3 oz
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