Exporting GIS Pro Data and Working with GIS Pro Data in ArcGIS

Exporting GIS Pro Data and Working with GIS Pro Data in ArcGIS
Exporting GIS Pro Data and
Working with GIS Pro Data in ArcGIS
Contents
Exporting GIS Pro data using iTunes ......................................................................................................... 2
Exporting a dataset with associated images and configuring dataset in ArcGIS to attach the images to
related points ............................................................................................................................................ 8
Working with a Shapefile with Images file that only has one image associated with each station ....... 21
Manually attaching imagery to points in an edit session ....................................................................... 25
GIS Pro feature class with individual multiple image attributes and ArcGIS .......................................... 28
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 1
Exporting GIS Pro Data Using iTunes
GIS Pro screen shots from version 2.3, current as of 8/23/13
Export data from the GIS Pro project using the Export Format icon at either the Project or Layers level of
the Table of Contents (TOC). You can aslo export from the GIS Pro Project screen (Home screen).
Clicking on the icon brings up the Export Format window offering a number of file formats to export the
data in. KMZ is the native format for data use in Google Earth, GPX is the format for transferring data to
a GPS unit, CSV is a Comma Separated Text file which can be used in a number of programs, Shapefile is
a format for vector (point, line or polygon) data in ArcGIS and other GIS programs, Shapefile with
Images is a new format with this version release and combines the shapefile vector data with a folder of
images associated with the vector data. The Layer Hierarchy is simply a template of the data layout and
contains no actual data. This dataset is simply a point dataset, so exporting as a Shapefile is fine.
Shapefile with images is covered later in this document.
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 2
The small gear icon in the upper right of the Export Format window opens the Export Options window.
The options are pretty self-explanatory, but I am still trying to find out what the units are for the max
height and width. The fact that “0” means that images are not resized makes me think this is percent
change(?).
New in GIS Kit and Pro version 2.3.1 (9/12/13) is the ability to turn off image resizing.
Clicking on the Shapefile line brings up the Choose Export Class window. Shapefiles are Points, Lines or
Polygons and a given shapefile can only contain one type of data. Also, if there are multiple features of
the same type but symbolized differently each must be exported as their own shapefile. In this case
there is only one format, points symbolized by a red flag (Do you have a flag?).
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 3
Click to select the class to be exported, in this case, Observations. The Export To window opens with
options to export to iTunes, Email, Open in…, or Local Peer. Small datasets can be transferred via Email
and Open in can be used to transfer data via DropBox or open the data directly into another app such as
Google Earth if the export format was KMZ. Local Peer allows for transfer between to devices connected
by WiFi and Bluetooth.
Select iTunes and depending on the size of the file the Export Complete window may appear
immediately or after some time. The generated file is a zipped file that is stored within the folder
structure of the GIS Pro app. If you wish to check the quality of the export, you can see the file by
clicking on the Import from iTunes icon.
Clicking on the New Project_Observations imports the file. Depending
on the size of the file it may take a bit for the Importing window to
disappear.
Once the data is imported a new window opens allowing you to choose the symbology for the newly
imported points. Choosing a contrasting symbol allows for a quick QC of the exported data.
The only reason to do this is to QC the exported data. In most cases you would not import a dataset
that you just exported.
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 4
Connect the iPad to a computer, Mac or PC , with iTunes installed. If the plan is to transfer the data for
use in ArcGIS, use a PC. If you are simply backing up the data or setting it up for transfer to another iPad,
either platform can be used. These screen shots are from a PC running Windows 7.
When the iPad is connected, iTunes automatically opens and the iPad icon appears in the upper right of
the iTunes screen.
Click on the iPad icon,
not the eject arrow, and the iPad screen opens.
Click on the Apps text to open the Apps screen.
When the Apps screen opens, scroll down the screen to the File Sharing section. Listed in this section are
all the apps that can transfer data between the iPad and the computer. Scroll down the list to find GIS
Pro and click on it to select it. In the window on the right a listing of all GIS Pro documents will appear.
(see next page)
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 5
Find the dataset you want to transfer and click on it to select it and, if necessary, scroll to the bottom of
the window to the Save To button.
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 6
Browse to where the data should be saved and click OK.
To use the data in ArcGIS the dataset will need to be unzipped. If the data will be transferred to another
iPad running GIS Pro it is not necessary to unzip it. GIS Pro will import zipped datasets without issue.
Data opens fine in ArcGIS (screen shot is v.10.1). Data is exported in GCS WGS 84 and may need to be
projected, depending on usage.
This dataset has no associated images and was exported as just a shapefile. Attempting to export a
dataset that contains images as a shapefile will crash GIS Pro. If unsure if the dataset has images (and
you want a shapefile), export as a shapefile with images. If there are no images the shapefile will be
generated correctly, if there are images, GIS Pro will not crash during export.
Next pages look at exporting a dataset with associated images.
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 7
Exporting a Dataset with Associated Images and Configuring
Dataset in ArcGIS to Attach the Images to Related Points
This example uses data collected in Clinton during the flooding event on 6/28/13.
In this case the data was exported directly from the GIS Pro Project screen.
Click the download icon, select Shapefile with Images, choose the Export Class, and choose iTunes on
the Export To screen.
Wait for the Export Complete window to appear. This may take some time depending on the size of the
dataset and the number of photos.
Connect the iPad to the computer and Save To a folder on the computer from the iPad File Sharing
screen in iTunes as outlined in previous section.
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 8
Unzip the saved zipped file on the hard drive and view the contents in windows Explorer. The four files
with folded page icons Kirkland flooding 6_28 (dbf, prj, shp, shx) are the files that will create the point
shapefile in ArcGIS. The rest of the files are JPEG image files obviously. These files can be opened in any
image processing software, or pasted into Word or Powerpoint, the file names tie them to the locations
where they were collected. Do not change the file names associated with the images.
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 9
Adding the shapefile to ArcGIS shows the data, symbolized with green triangles, correctly placed. ArcGIS
view is GCS WGS 84.
Using the Identify tool in ArcGIS and clicking on a point reveals the metadata associated with the point
and a listing of the photos associated with the point, but the photos are not visible in either the Identify
window or using the HTML Popup tool. Dataframe has been projected to NAD83 UTM 18N.
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 10
Here is where the work begins
NOTE: instructions are different if there is only one image (or no image) attached to a single station for
each station in the entire dataset. If, in the dataset, any station has more than one image attached the
complete process outlined below must be followed or no images will be attached to the points. Working
with a shapefile with only a single image per station is outlined later in this document.
I’m not clear that GIS Pro software engineers intended for the collected images to “automatically” link
with the points in the shapefile in ArcGIS. When a shapefile with images is exported from GIS Pro the
attribute table for the shapefile lists the images associated with each point, but they cannot be
“automatically” attached to the points in ArcGIS with the current configuration of the shapefile attribute
table. The following steps worked out with the assistance of Stacey @ ESRI Tech Support allow the data
to be configured so that multiple images can be associated with a single station and queried/displayed
in ArcMap.
The problem comes from the fact that the attribute table generated by GIS Pro for the shapefile with
images lists multiple image files associated with a given station on a single line.
The tools that ArcGIS uses to “automatically” attach an image to a point are looking for a 1:1 relation
between a point and the image to attach. To achieve this the attribute table must be edited to provide
this 1:1 relationship.
The next steps are time consuming and it may be easier to manually attach images to the points rather
than editing the attribute table to allow for “automatic” attachment. Technique for manually attaching
image(s) to a point is also outlined later in this document.
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 11
In Windows Explorer locate the dbf file associated with the exported shapefile with images and open
this file in Excel. Once a dbf file has been opened in Excel, Excel recognizes the file type and an Excel icon
appears in the file icon. If you have not opened a dbf file in Excel previously, the icon will be similar to
those to the right of the dbf. Look at the file name to identify the correct file to open; it will end in
“.dbf”.
In Excel, you will need to resize the fields so data is a little easier to look at.
Note for each station (rows 2-8 in the above illustration) under Photos1 there are either single or
multiple associated images. As mentioned previously this is where the issue arises in getting ArcGIS to
automatically associate an image with a point.
Goal is to create a new Excel file with each station being associated with a single image. If a station has
more than one image associated with it, then new rows must be added to the spreadsheet and the
spreadsheet edited to add the station name to the new rows under “Name” and then copy a single
image file into the corresponding Photos1 field.
See next page for example
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 12
Station”Root Glen @ 233” has two images associated with it, shpimg_90.jpg and shpimg_92.jpg
Station “Rt233” has one image associated with it, shpimg_93.jpg
Station “233 Near 12B int” has four images, shpimg_94 through shpimg_97.jpg
To achieve the needed 1:1 relationship, a new row needs to be added between rows 2 &3 and 3
additional rows need to be added following row 4
To add a row, right click in the row number directly below the row where you want to insert a new row
and choose “Insert”
A new blank row is added
In this row, copy the station name from the cell above and paste it into the blank cell in the new row.
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 13
In the blank cell in the column Photos1 paste in the file name of the second image (shpimg_92.jpg) be
sure that you delete the comma if that is pasted in as well.
The file names need to be clean of any extra punctuation. Copy and Paste is the best way to do this
because the “Names” and “Photo1” text must be exact from row to row for a given station and exactly
match the original dbf file.
Modify the entire dbf file so that every station “Name” has a single associated image per line in the
spreadsheet.
Screen shot of a portion of the edited 83 row
sheet for this dataset. You do not need to copy
the “Description” to each new row because the
unmodified dbf file is providing the metadata to
the shapefile.
When editing of the dbf file is complete save it as
an Excel XLSX file in an appropriate folder such as
the folder with the data exported from GIS Pro.
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 14
Working in ArcMap
Start a new ArcMap and add a basemap background
In ArcCatalog or in the Catalog tab within ArcMap, create a new file or personal geodatabase.
This can be in the folder with the data exported from GIS Pro, or elsewhere.
Name it with a short name and no spaces
Import the shapefile into the geodatabase
Right click on geodatabase > Import > Feature Class (single)
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 15
When the new Feature Class is created it is added to the open ArcMap document. Stations are shown
with green triangles. Symbology changed to enhance visibility. Background map is Clinton 7.5 minute
quad downloaded from the NY State GIS Clearinghouse (http://gis.ny.gov/).
Using the HTML Pop-Up or Identify tool on these points reveals the original dbf file metadata associated
with the point shape file. This is because the edited file was saved as an XLSX which is not used by
ArcMap with the shapefile. It will be used to join the photos to the points however.
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 16
The individual images are associated with the points as Attachments.
In order to add attachments to a shapefile, it must first be enabled to accept attachments.
In the catalog tab of ArcMap, right click on the feature class imported into the geodatabase. Scroll to
Manage > Create Attachments. This must be done on the feature class within the geodatabase, not the
original shapefile.
All the fine print about what the Create Attachments does is in the info box.
This step is necessary before you can add attachments to a shapefile using the add attachments tool or
adding attachments manually in an edit session.
A feature class that has Create Attachments enabled looks like this in the geodatabase.
You can remove the attachments sub files by using right
click feature class > Manage > Delete Attachments .
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 17
With attachments enabled, the Add Attachments tool can now be used to attach the images to the
appropriate points in the shapefile using the edited dbf file that is now saved as an XLSX.
You do not need to generate an Attachment Match Table; the XLSX file is used as the match table.
Arc Toolbox > Data Management Tools > Attachments > Add Attachments
The input file is the feature class within the geodatabase
The Input Join field is the “Name” field within the feature class attribute table
The Match Table is the edited XLSX file. Be sure you expand the file out to the “$” level when browsing
to the file.
The Match Join field is the field in the match table that contains the same information as the Input Join
Field. In this case “Name”
The Match Path Field is what you want to join to the point with a specific name, in this case Photos 1 in
the Match Table.
Finally, the Working Folder is the folder which contains the images, it is listed as optional, but as the
photos do not have the full path names associated with them it is necessary to map the path to the
folder with the images.
See next page for graphic illustration of the relationships defined in the Add Attachments toolbox.
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 18
Attribute table for the feature class
Section from the XLSX file associated with the highlighted line above
The first column in the XLSX file is “Name” and the second column is “Photos1”
The Add Attachments tool dialog box shows from the Input data set (feature class) use the “Name” field
to join data for this point to the “Name” field in the Match Table defined by the XLSX file.
Then, with this association established, use the Match Path Field to find the attachments associated
with a particular “Name” field.
Object 18 Point has a name University And Lower Norton in the Feature Class, this matches three
“Name” fields in the Match Table (lines 51, 52 and 53) and for each of these occurrences there is a path
to an individual image for a total of 3 attachments associated with the point.
This should make it clear why you need to be careful editing the dbf file to create the XLSX file used as
the Match Table.
When run, the tool dialog box will show if any issues occurred with creating attachments between the
points and the images.
You may get a Datum Conflict warning when the tool finishes running. This is because the point
shapefile is in WGS 84, the default Geographic Coordinate System (GCS) for GPS derived data. The map
document is in Projected Coordinate System (PCS) NAD 27 UTM 18N from the Clinton Quad added first.
The coordinate warning is to let you know that ArcMap is “projecting on the fly” and using a default
transform to transform the WGS 84 GCS data into the NAD 27 UTM 18N PCS.
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 19
The end result will look exactly the same as when the points did not have attachments, but now using
the HTML Pop-Up and/or Identify Tool will display the images associated with a given point.
The HTML Pop-Up displays the first image in the window and links to all the images underneath it.
Clicking the links opens the image in a new window.
The Identify tool shows that there are 3 attachments associated the point. Clicking on the downward
arrow opens a listing of the images. Clicking on the link will open the image in a new window. The
Attachment Manager allows you to Open and Save the images.
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 20
Working with a Shapefile with Images File that only has
One Image Associated with Each Station
Dataset collected on Swans Island, Maine with iPad and GIS Pro. Only one image per station was
collected along with extensive additional data.
Data was exported from iPad using Shapefile with images via iTunes, unzipped and opened in ArcMap
with the ESRI online imagery as a background.
The attribute table shows that for each station there is either one photo or none (N/A)
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 21
As the necessary 1:1 relation between points and images exists, no editing of the attribute table is
necessary.
Create a geodatabase for the data, import the shapefile as a feature class within the geodatabase, the
new feature class is automatically added to the map, shown as green diamonds on top of the original
shapefile red stars.
Create attachments for the feature class In the
geodatabase.
Right click > manage > Create Attachments.
Because the attribute table has the 1:1 relationship
between the stations and the images, once attachments
are enabled, the Add Attachments tool can be used to link
the images to the stations.
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 22
In the Add Attachments dialog box:
-
-
The Input Dataset is the Feature Class “station_photos”
The Match Table is also the Feature Class “station_photos”. This is because there is a 1:1
relationship between the stations and the photos. No additional Match Table needs to be
generated.
When the Match table is specified as same as the Input Dataset, the Input Join Field and Match
Join Field automatically fill.
The Match Path Field is the field in the attribute table that lists the image files to associate with
each station.
The Working Folder is the path to the folder that contains the images.
In the Attribute Table, the ObjectID specifies both the station “Name” and the associated image
“Outcrop_Ph”. In the circled lines, staion “Joint 1” has no associated image “N/A”, station “Joint 2” has
an associated image “shpimg_419.jpg”.
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 23
Running the tool will show errors in the dialog box that are highlighted in green and show that certain
files could not be opened. These are the stations that had no image associated with them.
This is OK because the stations that did have an image associated with it have now had that image
added to it as an attachment. Using the HTML Pop-Up the station image along with all the metadata
collected at the station can be viewed.
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 24
Manually Attaching Imagery to Points in an Edit Session
You might want to do this if you have images that were not originally taken within GIS Pro, or do not
have georeference information associated with them. These could be images taken with a camera that
does not record GPS coordinates, or a historic image from a scan.
A shapefile from GPS coordinates associated with the project can be used, or a new shapefile can be
created specifically for georeferencing the imagery.
Images can be attached manually to points in an Edit session. The shapefile must be imported into a
geodatabase and attachments must be enabled as outlined previously.
Attribute table for the feature class shows no location or associated image information.
Start an edit session with the outcrops_man feature class set as the layer to be edited.
Use the Editor selection tool to select a point in the Feature Class
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 25
With a point selected, open the Attributes window on the Editor toolbar. This can be docked similarly to
ArcToolbox, Catalog and Search if desired.
The Attributes window opens for the selected point (OBJECTID 1) with Attachments pull-down. This
attachment pull-down will not display if attachments have not been enabled for the dataset.
Pull down the Attachments Pull-Down and select Open Attachment Manager
Click Add and browse to the image you want
to attach to the point. Multiple images can be
added by simply clicking the Add button again
and browsing to the next desired image.
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 26
The Remove button can be used to remove an image if added by mistake. Simply select the image to
remove and click Remove.
Once images are attached, using the HTML Pop-Up displays the first attached image and lists links to all
of the attached images. Clicking in the image window, or on a link opens a full sized image in a new
window.
The Identify tool can also be used to link to the attachments by clicking on the point and then using the
Attachments pull-down in the Identify window to link to each of the associated images.
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 27
GIS Pro Feature Class with Individual Multiple Image Attributes and ArcGIS
Another way to collect multiple images in GIS Pro and associate them with points in ArcGIS requires
some pre-planning.
Create a new Feature Class in GIS Pro and use Add Attribute to create multiple Photo attributes.
At a station, use this Feature Class to define the station and collect ONE image per Photo attribute field.
(It is not necessary to fill all photo fields, they can be left blank, but they cannot contain more than one
image)
This GISPro screen shot shows a station with three associated images. Note the blank field in Photos 3.
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 28
Once all data is collected, export the data from GIS Pro as “Shapefile with images” and transfer to
computer via iTunes or other route.
Unzip the exported file
In ArcCatalog or Catalog tab in ArcMap, create a new geodatabase
Import the shapefile into the geodatabase as a single Feature Class (right click on geodatabase > import
>Feature Class (single)
Enable attachments on this Feature Class (right click on Feature Class > Manage > Create Attachments)
Use Add Attachments tool (ArcToolbox > Data Management Tools > Attachments > Add Attachments)
In the Add Attachments tool window, specify the Feature Class as the input and the match table. The
input join field and match join field will fill automatically with OBJECTID.
Choose “Photos” for the Match Path Field and specify the Working Folder.
This has attached the first image to the points. Re-run the tool as many times as needed to attach each
of the “Photos X” attributes to the points. Sample shown uses 5 additional Photo attributes (Photos,
Photos 1, Photos 2, Photos 3, Photos 4, and Photos 5) for a possible total of 6 images per point.
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 29
With the tool run to attach all Photo X attributes, the points in ArcMap have all images associated with
them and if less than the total number of possible images were collected, only those images associated
with the point are attached to a given point.
Little Falls station 2 (LF-2) had 3 images collected, Little Falls station 1 (LF-1) had six. HTML Pop-Up tool
shows the station metadata including station name, date and time, description and associated images all
of which were attributes set in GIS Pro prior to collecting data.
GIS Pro, Imagery & ArcGIS
Dave Tewksbury – Geosciences - Hamilton College
Page 30
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising