1931 Cadillac V8 - GM Heritage Center

1931 Cadillac V8 - GM Heritage Center
Sales Data
Presentation Outline
EXTERNAL APPEARANCE STORY
S i d e View
Large quarter windows. Small overhang of body.
Hood, Cowl
Fenders and
Running Boards.. . .
Well proportioned. Hoods have door
ports. Leather corner pads on hood.
18-gauge metal. Wire reinforced in
rolled edge. Stainless steel moulding.
Fender shelf one-piece construction.
Head-on-View
lOM-inch lens.
Chromium supports.
Unusually strong. Bumper brackets
integral with frame.
SECTION D
COMFORT—THE PASSENGER STORY
Cadillac 355 V-8
Supplementary
Sales Data
Comfort
Rear Door
Door width, 293¾ inches. Opening
and closing action cushioned b>
spring in door check.
Head Room
Height, 49 inches (from floor).
Upholstery
Seven optional cloths—three Broadcloths, two Mohairs, t w o Whipcords.
Shoulder support—seat back 21
inches high.
Ample space for baggage if required.
Quarter lights for convenience and
comfort a t night.
.Strong and durable. Ternstedt make.
All doors can be locked.
All Sedan and Coupe bodies wired
for radio installation.
145
mmmmmm
Presentation Outline
Sales Data
Presentation Outline
E X T E R N A L F E A T U R E S STORY'—Conl.
T H E OWNER-DRIVER STORY
Front Seat
Door
Adjustment
Comfort
Vision
Steering Wheel
Steering Type
Controls
Instrument B o a r d . .
1 gnition—Trans-
Width 3 6 ¾ inches. Front seat frame
covered with upholstery. No exposed
metal.
4 inches maximum adjustment.
Shoulder support—seat back 21
inches high.
Unobstructed by left middle pillar.
18 inches diameter. Moulded Bakelite wheel with steel core prevents
splintering.
Hourglass t y p e worm provides more
contact surface with sector.
Well lighted bv 2 lights. Oil gauge
pressure 30 lbs. a t 30 M. P . H .
Shutters open a t 155 degrees. Full
open a t 180 degrees.
Seven-degree angle. Glass channels
chrome plated.
Greater safety with wiping of entire
windshield for bad weather driving.
Turning off ignition automatically
locks car.
Sales Data
Optional Equipment
5-wheel. Wire %
. Demountable wood $
. Disc $
6-wheel (including fender wells, 2
spare tires and trunk rack). Wire
$
.Demountable w o o d $
Disc $
. Tires in fender wells
supported by frame bracket do not
chafe from rubbing against metal.
Ball Bearings.
Make—New Departure.
Tires
Size wood wheels standard 6.50 x 19.
Demountable wood or wire or disc
7.00 x 18. Optional tires—United
States, Firestone and Goodyear.
Pressure 40 lbs. rear, 45 lbs. front.
No extra charge for larger tires on
optional wheel equipment.
Springs
Construction. . . .
Sizes:
(a) Front
(b) Rear
Silico-Manganese steel.
tical (rolled point).
Semiellip-
9 l e a v e s 3 8 " x 2" i , T , ,
„ > Underslung.
11 leaves 58" x 2 ' J
Lubrication......
Graphite and grease lubricant used
in metal covers. Alemite system for
shackles.
EXTERNAL FEATURES STORY
Wheel base
134 inches.
Covers
Turning R a d i u s . . . .
23 feet 10 inches (right and left).
Over-all length (fender wells) 202 f i
inches. Over-all length of car with
rear tirecarrier (Sedans) 203 }f inches.
Metal with spring clips on rear
springs.
Spring Shackles. .
Compression type.
Wheels
set under hydraulic pressure. Lateral
lacing of spokes in wire wheels provides greater strength.
146
Duodraulic Shock
Absorbers
Adjustments
Lubrication.
Varying sizes of metering pins.
Alemite nipples.
147
Presentation Outline
Sales Data
EXTERNAL FEATURES STORY— Cont,
Frame
Size—Depth 8 inches; thickness ^
Strength.
inches; pressed carbon steel; width
top flange 3 inches; bottom flange
2 ¾ inches.
Cross Members.
Seven.
FISHER BODY STORY
Wood a n d Steel
Strength
Preparation.
Body F r a m e s
Paneling
Body F e a t u r e s
Roof
After milling, wood seasons for three
months. Then it is kiln dried to 5 per
cent moisture content and cut to size.
Curved pieces are cut, notsteam bent.
After cutting, pieces are again stored
for seasoning. (Steam bent process
allows wood to warp, lose shape.)
Presentation Outline
Sales Data
GENERAL MOTORS STORY
General M o t o r s
leadership a n d
affiliation h e l p s
Cadillac
Purchasing Econo m y M e a n s Added
Value
Value of Research
Accomplishments...
Proving G r o u n d
Valve silencer, 2-plane crankshaft,
vacuum assister brake, intake muffler, Duco, ethyl compound, harmonic balancer.
A yardstick to measure all cars, even
foreign makes and competitors.
1245 acres.
Parts Q u a l i t y
Control
Assembled separately from body.
Such firms as Harrison Radiator
Corp., A. C. Spark Plug, Delco
Products, Delco-Remy Corp., Hyatt
Bearings Div., New Departure Mfg.
Company, etc.
Doors
Resist weaving.
Uniform and national service through
United Motors.
Body Mounting.
Anti-squeak, nonhardening paste is
used.
Safety Glass
Construction
Ability
Manufacturing
Control
GMAC
Rates
Lower rates than other companies.
Center layer of pyroxalin is coaled
with cementing substance (cellulose
acetate) and two pieces of heavy
plate glass are pressed to either side
under a pressure of 360 lbs. per
square inch.
148
149
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Sales Data
GENERAL MOTORS STORY—Cont.
Summary
T H E V - 8 E N G I N E S T O R Y — Cont.
Short Crankshaft.
Length 23s§- inches (outer ends of
front to rear bearings). High carbon
steel. Completely machined all over.
Compensators bolted t o shaft and
spot welded to insure rigidity. Weighs
68 lbs. 2 oz. Diameter 2?« inches.
Main Bearings.
Three main bearings. Babbitt-bronze
backed. Clearance .001 inch to .0015
inch. Dimensions: Front, 1\\ inches
by 2 3 s inches; center, \% inches by
2 ? s inches; rear, 2 ¾ inches by 2f ,
inches (combined length 63¾ inches).
Rear bearing takes thrust. Bearing
area 4 8 ¾ square inches. Replacement cost $39.85. Compares with
$115.50 on Packard 8.
Complete Engine
Ventilation
Positive ciroidation of air through
crankcase lubricates valve springs in
valve chamber. Compensators on
crankshaft when turning act as air
pump, drawing air through inlet
breather a t side of left block and discharging it through two vent tubes
one each at front of left block and
rear of right block.
Being a unit of General Motors it Las
a friendly interest in dealer and
purchaser.
Mechanical Features
T H E V-tt E N G I N E S T O R Y
Engine
I m p r o v e m e n Is
Model and
Model 355. Engine numbers start a t
Serial No
8(1(1.()01.
Engine Size.
Bore 3s-jj inches, stroke i\% inches.
Displacemen 1355 cubic inches. Compression 108 ll>s. a t 1000 R . P . M .
Compression ratio 5.35 to 1. Optional
5.26 to 1.
Horsepower.
N.A.C.C. rating 36.45 actually develops more t h a n 95 ll'.P. a t 3000
R . P . M . Maximum R . P . M . about
4200.
Gear Ratios
(Sizes) 4 t o 1; 4.40 t o 1; 4.75 t o 1.
Intake M u l l l e r . . .
Resonance type.
Strong Crankease.
Silicon aluminum. Non-resonant.
Heavily ribbed for strength and
strong support to bearing bridges.
Separate from engine block. Reduces
service costs in case of accident.
Lower half is pressed-steel oil pan.
5-point suspension.
R e a s o n s for S u p e r i o r i t y of V - t y p e
Principle Engines
Torsional Vibration
Cancelled
Known also as twist, whip, crankshaft wind up.
150
Sides Data
Presentation Outline
Engine Parts
Connecting Rods.
Material—Drop-forged chrome
Molybdenum steel. Bearing material
poured Babbitt. No shims used.
Bearing clearance .001 to .0025. Rods
can be removed through bottom of
engine without taking off cylinder
head. Diameter of rifle-drilled passage f i n c h e s . Set of 8 rods balanced
within }s ounce each. Journal width
and length Z% inches by l ? s inches.
Length center to center 1 0 ¾ inches.
Both ends diamond bored.
151
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Sales Data
Presentation Outline
T H E V - 8 E N G I N E S T O R Y — Cont.
Camshaft.
Pistons.
Morse chain drive from crankshaft.
Chain 1 ¾ inches wide, 27 inches
long. Material high- carbon steel
forging. Drilled from end to end for
oil passage. Four bearings: No. ] ,
1 ¼ inches b y I f f inches; No. 2,
2-H inches by 1 inch; No. 3, 2 $ |
inches b y l i s inches; No. 4, 1 ¾
inches by 1 { | inches. Weight 9 ½ lbs.
Turns a t one half crankshaft speed.
Distributor drive gear separate on
shaft. Can be replaced without installing new camshaft.
Material—Close-grained nickel-iron
piston. 3 times harder than aluminum. 3 compression rings above
piston pin. 1 oil ring below pin. Lightweight—tapered skirt. Piston weight,
without rings, pin or bushing, 24
ounces. H a n d fitted t o limits of .003
inches. Piston pin locked by set
screw—in piston boss. Piston pin
length 3 y j inches, diameter J/g inch.
Piston ring make—perfect circle.
Pistons and rods each held t o
A-ounce limit in weight.
Cylinder H e a d s .
Cover plates protect wiring.
Cylinders
Cast en bloc of 4. Machined, reamed
and honed t o finish. Honing gives
glasslike finish t o cylinder walls and
adds life to pistons and rings. Blocks
are staggered t o permit use of sideby-side connecting rods. Crankcase
cast separately from blocks. Blocks
are interchangeable.
152
Sales Data
T H E V-8 ENGINE
Manifolds
Expansion joints a t front of motor.
Exhaust....
Intake
Porcelain finish. Two 4-port cast
iron, Y connection.
Two two-port cast-iron; diameter 1}'>$
inches.
Chains
Morse. Timing chain drives camshaft
from crankshaft. Generator and
p u m p driven from crankshaft. Two
chains distribute load, longer life.
Adjustment of position of water
pump and generator mounting takes
up chain stretch.
Timing chain width
length 27 inches.
1¾
inches,
Generator and p u m p chain width
1 finches.
Valves
'
16 valves operated by single camshaft. Valve action through rollers
on cam slide. Diameter valve lifter
1 ^f inches.
Inlet
Inlet valve Tungsten. Diameter
\14 inches (clear). Valve seat angle
30 degrees.
Exhaust . . . .
Exhaust valve silichrome. Diameter 1 ½ inches (clear). Valve seat 45
degrees.
Valve lift H-inch valve guides—removable. Lubricated through ports
in cylinder walls. Valve spring pressure open 160 lbs. Closed 79 lbs.
Valve springs retained by split tapered bushing and not by pin which
is liable to shear off.
153
mm
STORY—Conl.
Presentation Outline
Sales Data
Presentation Outline
COOLING
COOLING SYSTEM
Fan.
h gallons.
Impeller type. Connected to generator with laminated couplings. Safet y
pin in shaft sheers off if p u m p is
frozen, and protects chain. Location
on outside of engine. Greater accessibility. Has positive nozzle action.
Better design t h a n agitator t y r e
mounted in cylinder block. P u n p
delivers 5880 gallons per h o r r
(41.000 lbs.) a t 3200 R. P . M. (98
gallons per minute).
Cylinder blocks interconnected by
brass tubes cast integral with crankcase providing equal distribution of
water. One drain plug on inlet elbow
on t h e right-band cylinder block accessible from above. Water is changed approximately 1175 times per
hour in engine at 65 M.P.H.. taking
heat out, of engine quickly.
Make—Harrison cellular with copper core because it is an efficient conductor of heat and resists corrosion.
Pressed steel casing is copper plated
and polished, then nickel plated
twice and polished, then chrome
plated.
Built in. Opens 155 degrees t o 165
degrees. Closes 175 degrees to 165
degrees.
Thermostat controlling shutters
mounted in radiator in direct path of
water flow from engine. Assist in
quick warming up of engine in cold
weather starting.
154
Sales Data
Advantages of
V-type Cadillac
cooling over
Straight-8 Design.
Engine Lubrication
Importance
Pressure S y s t e m . . .
Filter and Screen. .
Regulator.
Gauge.
SYSTEM—Cord.
Own make—six blades—Diameter
21 inches. Automatically lubricated
by oil p u m p in engine. Fan belt
% inches wide, 91£ inches long, endless V-type design. Driven from pulley on crankshaft. F a n belt drives
fan only. Belt adjustment by raising
or lowering fan bracket.
6 advantages.
Determines life of car. Protects t h e
precision of the parts.
Capacity, 8 quarts. Pressure b y gear
type oil p u m p . 8 quarts of oil pass
through oil passage in 43 seconds a t
3000 R . P . M . P u m p driven b y lower
end of distributor shaft from spiral
gear on camshaft.
AC filter located on by-pass in oil
line. N o danger of stopping circulation to engine. Oil screen covers oil
pan, strains oil returning from engine ; prevents sediment collection at
pump.
Accessible location on outside a t
front of engine. Oil flows over timing
and water p u m p chains. Automatic
pressure type. Valve opens a t 11 lbs.
pressure approximately 10 M . P . H .
Normal oil pressure 30 lbs. a t 30
M.P.H.
Float type. Positivereading. Located
at rear of engine.
Change oil every 2000 miles.
155
Presentation Outline
Sales Data
CHASSIS LUBRICATION
System
Lubricants.
Pressure System...
Schedule and
Charges
Manual Lubrication
also necessary with
automatic system...
Alemite—High pressure.
Lubricant must reach bearing to accomplish purpose. 4 kinds are necessary and supplied in Cadillac: Engine
Oil—Differential and Transmission
Grease — Chassis Lubricant — Rear
Axle Grease.
Ordinary hand grease gun pressure
500 lbs. to square inch, higher pressure with service station equipment
insures distribution of lubricant to
bearing surface and expels dirt. Positive protection regardless of weather.
So-called automatic systems use only
low pressure in line, 45 lbs. and oil
reaches bearing points through drip
oilers. Some systems use capillary
action only, caused by movement of
car when in operation.
Cadillac standard lubrication schedule specifies visit to service station
SO day periods (or every 1000 miles).
Charge for positive lubrication of all
points on car costs no more than partial service necessary with centralized
systems.
No possible chance of forgetting universal joint lubrication on Cadillac.
Sales Data
Presentation Outline
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
Delco-Remy
Two contact arms—4-lobe cam. Jump
spark type. Firing order 1L; 4R; 4L;
2L: 3R; 3L; 2R: IR. A.C. Metric
(18 m.m.) spark plugs. Wiring in insulated cable in metal conduits. Rechecking timing through hole in flywheel cover on transmission case.
Ratio between starter and flywheel
Starter
25 to 1 (approx.). Engine cranking
speed 90-100 R.P.M.
120 amp. hour, 6-volt. Positive terBattery
minal grounded.
2-pole. 19 M.P.H. maximum normal
Generator
charging speed. Thermostat opening
temperature 175 degrees F. Positive
chain driven instead of through fan
belt.
Short circuit indicated by buzzing.
Breaker
Nothing to replace. No fuses to use
or replace.
Automatic advance 28 degrees. ManSpark Control
ual advance (on dash) 19 degrees.
Greater protection against car theft
Ignition Lock.
than cars with only ignition switch.
Ignition
Distributor.
FUEL SYSTEM
Fuel S y s t e m
Variable mileage periods when different parts need attention supplemented by necessity to remember
daily operation of plunger makes socalled automatic systems less efficient
when compared with (Cadillac standard lubrication service at same cost.
156
Tank
21-22 gallons.
Fuel Feed and
Vacuum Pump.
Stewart - Warner vacuum tank.
Driven by camshaft located at rear
of engine. Assures engine adequate
fuel supply regardless of speed or bill
climbing.
157
F U E L SYSTEM—Cont.
Carburetor
Type
Features.
Plunger P u m p .
Intake Muffler.
Own make. Air valve single jet type.
2-inch throat. One adjustment.
Thermostatic control of vapor and
air volumes. Thermostats in auxiliary
air valve open a t 65 degrees to 85
degrees. 2 thermostats t o relieve
bowl pressures. First, opens a t 74
degrees to 78 degrees. Second, opens
a t 125 degrees t o 130 degrees.
T o provide carburetor with extra gas
for quick acceleration.
Developed by General Motors R e search (see engine improvements).
POWER TRANSMISSION SYSTEM—Cont.
Gear Reductions
in Transmission..
R e a r Axle
? 4 -FloatingType.
Kelease.
Design.
Transmission
Design......
Superiorities.
Plate type. Dry. Own make. 3 driving plates, 2 driven discs. Outside
diameter 10 inches. Inside diameter
7 inches. Balanced statically and
dynamically, 12 springs.
Very light driven discs and hub, giving very little inertia, reduce the
spinning action. No drag permits
quick, smooth engagement.
Facings of woven asbestos material.
Thickness .135 inch to .145 inch ( ^
inch). Clutch facing area 160 square
inches.
Syncro-Mesh 3 speeds forward, 1
reverse. Selective. Oil capacity, 3
quarts. Unit with power plant.
Anybody who can drive can change
gears without clashing. Less complicated than any 4-speed transmission.
158
Reverse 3.0 to I
Low
2.5 t o 1
Second 1.3 t o 1
High 1.0 t o 1
Cadillac make, .^-floating. Spiral
bevel gears. Propeller shaft tubular,
2-inch diameter. Road clearance
under center of rear axle 7 f | inches.
Oil capacity 3 quarts.
Torque T u b e Drive
Strong tube enclosing drive shaftOne universal joint only. Relieves
springs of driving strains and
stresses.
Bearings.
Two tapered roller in differential
carrier. 2 ball in pinion shaft. 1 ball
on each rear wheel.
Universal J o i n t s . . .
X-type Spicer make. Only one is used.
No worry about lubrication as on
other cars.
Axle Shafts.
1'1 s-inch diameter enclosed in strong
housing with welded inner sleeve.
Wheels mounted on bearings on outside of axle housing, taking load off
axle shafts.
POWER TRANSMISSION SYSTEM
Clutch
Type.
Sales Data
Presentation Outline
]"reseutatiou Outline
Ring Gears and
Pinions
Tread..
Ratios.
All pinions and ring gears are manufactured by Cadillac, matched and
adjusted in final assembly in soundproof room.
59 Vi inches.
1 to 1; 4.40 t o 1; 4.75 to 1.
159
Presentation Outline
Brakes
Design.
Sales Data
Presentation Outline
HARMONIZED STEERING
BRAKING SYSTEM
Self-centering Cains
and Articulated
Link
Drums.
RoUer Bearings. .
Adjustment.
Internal expanding. Safety mechanical brakes. Aluminum brake shoes
operated with articulated linkage by
cam, assures full contact of shoes
with drums at all times. Brake lining
2 inches wide, length 2 1 ¾ inches per
wheel. Total braking area 173 square
inches (1.2 square feet). 100 per cent
effective when used.
Pressed steel. Machined to close
limits, fully assembled with hub.
(7/1000-inch limits.) Rearwirewheel
hubs have two flanges reducing possibility of wheel collapse from
skidding or accident.
Cadillac only company to use roller
bearings (15 sets) to reduce friction
in braking system. Ordinarily 50 per
cent braking effort is lost between
pedal and the wheels, because of friction in brake shafts.
Micrometer adjustment, made by
turning one nut on outside of each
dust shield. Complete adjustment
and testing operation in 30 minutes.
Competitors' 2-Shoe
Brakes do not
match Cadillac
Competitors using 2-shoe brakes, do
not have articulated linkage, selfcentering cams, aluminum shoes or
roller bearings.
General.
Braking power division 50-50. Lead
plates on tips of large brake shoes
lubricate inside drum braking surface
to prevent scoring. Mechanism fully
enclosed against weather and dirt.
160
Sales Data
Design
Type.
Hourglass design gives more surface
contact with sector and provides
easier steering.
18 inches in diameter. Moulded Bakelite with steel insert reduction 17 to 1.
3 ¾ turns of wheel for full left turn.
Wheel.
Mounted on same side as steering
mechanism. It dampens road shocks
before they travel from frame to
steering gear.
Modulator.
FRONT AXLE
Reverse Elliott I-beam construction.
Wheels—Double ball bearing each
wheel (New Departure).
King Pin—Upper and lower ball
bearings (New Departure).
Type...
Bearings.
Tread
ST^incbes
CADILLAC ACHIEVEMENTS STORY
Leadership
Firsts a n d Car
Improvements
Before 1 9 1 4 . . .
1912 Cadillac introduced electric
starting, lighting and ignition. Recognized trend to closed bodies. First
large order (150) for closed bodies
was placed with Fisher in 1910.
Model 51
First 90-degree, V-type, high-speed
engine.
Introduced thermostatic control of
cooling medium.
1914.
1916.
161
CADILLAC
OPERATOR'S
MANUAL
EDITION N O . 355-1
In ordering a duplicate oj Mr Manual specify the
above number or the engine number oj the car.
V8
i'lLE
**.f% fs»ov p^^'iys"
CHAPTER I
Table of Contents
C A D I L L A C S E R V LtJ
CHAPTER I—Cadillac Service
Cadillac-La Salle Service Stations—Service card—Service chargesRepair parts—The owner's obligation—Lubrication—Inspection.
CHAPTER II—Operation
Locks—Ignition switch lock—Gasoline gauge—Throttle control—
Carburetor choke control—Spark control—Starter pedal—Oil pressure
gauge—Ammeter—Clutch pedal—Transmission control—Coasting—
Brakes—Lighting switch—Danger of running engine in closed garage.
CHAPTER III—Equipment
Windshield and ventilation—Windshield cleaner—Adjustable seats—
Cigar lighters—Tools—TIRES—Inflation pressure—Spare wheel carrier
—Spare tire carrier—Use of jack in changing tires—Changing tires—
Tire balancing marks.
hU I i t - / • * • / r —
T
HE owner of a Cadillac car has purchased not simply a fine
piece of machinery, ingeniously designed and carefully
built—he has purchased a pleasant and dependable mode of
8 •> transportation. The car itself is only one factor in securing this
transportation—the other factor is Cadillac Service, which is
built upon a standard policy, clearly defined to the car owner and
guaranteeing him efficient service everywhere at standard prices under
factory regulation.
3
Ar
21
''
Cadillac-La Salle Service Stations
*'
Cadillac Service extends wherever Cadillac and La Salle cars
are sold.
Service stations
conducted by Cadillac distribCHAPTER IV-—Lubrication
30
utors and dealers are designatLubrication schedule—Lubrication chart—LUBRICANTS—Engine oil
ed as "Authorized Cadillac—Gear lubricant—Chassis grease—Wheel bearing grease—Water pump
grease—ENGINE LUBRICATION^Oil level—Crankcase ventilating
- La Salle Service Stations" and
system and oil filter—Replacing engine oil.
are identified by the exclusive
sign illustrated on this page.
CHAPTER V—Cold Weather Operation
37
Wherever this sign is displayed,
PREPARING FOR COLD WEATHER—Anti-freezing solutionsthe owner will find an organCapacity of cooling system—Winter lubrication—Storage battery—
Gasoline system—STARTING THE ENGINE—Choke button—
« ization prepared to service
Priming the carburetor—Position of throttle hand lever—Position of
spark control—Use of starter—Use of accelerator before engine is
^ Cadillac cars. This means propwarm.
er equipment, factory trained
personnel, a stock of genuine
CHAPTER VI—General Care
44
replacement parts and standardStorage battery—Cooling system—Gasoline filter—Temporary brake
ized policies and methods.
adjustments—BODY—Care of finish—Care of the top—Cleaning upholstery—Door hardware.
Fig. 1. Authorized Cadillac-LaSalle
CHAPTER VII—Storing Car
Engine—Storage battery—Tires—Body and top—Taking car out of
storage.
50
CHAPTER VIII—Specifications
53
and License Data
[2]
.
The car owner's first and service stations display this sign at
the service entrance.
most frequent contact with
Cadillac Service will naturally be in the service station of the
distributor or dealer w h o sold him the car and w h o therefore
has the greatest interest at stake in assuring his satisfaction.
[3]
mm
m
tJ0
b|ev<|rt$ieless, he may feel perfectly free to use his car for
eitended.taraWe^without depriving himself of the service benefits
.fO'wbial^ne is entitled at his local service station. He will find
l|otier Authorized Cadillac-La Salle Service Stations able and
willing to render the same service.
Service Card
As a means of introduction at other Authorized CadillacLaSalle Service Stations, every purchaser of a Cadillac car is
given credentials in the form of a Service Card. This card is
mailed to him by the Cadillac factory immediately after the
delivery of the car is reported by the distributor or dealer. It is
supplied in a celluloid case, and is intended to be carried in a
holder on the car.
„
Itareh 1 1 9 »
_ „
»]S PROMPT, EFFICIENT and COURTEOUS .wnea (nun ANY
X g AUTaRaRlZESCAlULLAC SERVICE STATION. U n n ^ w t , .
nPKi*lea al tbl. aard Iw la »|M> antltlad to n o w . aanlca In acutd 3 g n K a a W l d n U n n n ; t f e Standard Cadlllaa Sanrtea Palicv a.
outuAMTan aha baak af tklaaard.
CADILLAC MOTOR CAR COMPANY. Datrelt. M
i=
-L\^&J~LS^2*S3£
Fig. 2. The Service Card, when properly
signed, identifies a Cadillac owner at any
authorized Cadillac-La Salle service station.
Upon presentation of
this Service Card to any
Authorized Cadillac-La
Salle Service Station, the
car owner is entitled to
uniform standard service
in accordance w i t h the
Cadillac Owner Service
Policy. This Policy is
explained in detail in a
certificate issued to each
owner and mailed to him
w i t h his Service Card.
Briefly, it entitles the owner t o :
1. All adjustments free of all charges that may be required
within 90 days after the original delivery date (as shown on
the card), provided the mileage of the car does not exceed 3000
and the adjustments are not made necessary by accident, abuse
or neglect. This includes everything except lubrication, washing
and storing.
material or workmanship within one year after the delivery
date, provided the mileage of the car does not exceed 12,000 and
that the replacement was not made necessary by accident, abuse
or neglect. This includes material and labor.
The Service Card is not transferable, and the no-charge service
set forth above is effective only while the car is in the hands of
its original owner.
Standard Service Contract
Owners may be assured of continuous satisfactory operation
and maintenance of their cars at a predetermined, economical
cost by purchasing a Standard Service Contract. Two contracts
are available covering complete lubrication and all adjustments
and repairs made necessary by normal wear. The first Contract
covers the first 12 months or 12,000 miles and the second covers
the second 12 months or second 12,000 miles.
The Standard Service Contract is based on Cadillac's principle
of preventive service and insures the owner the greatest amount
of satisfaction w i t h the fewest possible interruptions. This is
accomplished by complete lubrication on schedule and regular
inspection to anticipate the need of adjustment and repair,
eliminating the necessity of service between inspections.
The Contract is recognized by all authorized CadiUac-J.aSalle
service stations in the United States and Canada regardless of
where the Contract was purchased. The owner is thus assured
of all Contract service due him without additional charge
wherever he may travel, the same as if the work was performed
by the Service Station from which the Contract was purchased.
These Contracts are available at all Cadillac sales rooms and
authorized service stations. Owners are urged to purchase
Standard Service Contracts at the time of delivery of the new car.
Service Charges
2. Free replacement of any part which has proved to the
Cadillac Motor Car Company's satisfaction to be defective in
Service work other than that described above is performed by
Authorized Cadillac-La Salle Service Stations on a flat-rate basis.
When a car enters the service station, it is promptly inspected by
[4]
[5]
a tester, who then quotes the owner an exact price for the work
he finds necessary. The owner authorizes the work at this
price, and when he receives his bill, this is the price he pays.
Charges prevailing at Authorized Cadillac-LaSalle Service
Stations are based on standard schedules furnished by the Cadillac
Motor Car Company. These schedules call for methods and
tools approved by the same engineers who designed and built
the car, assuring the highest quality of work at the lowest
possible price. Standard Price Schedules are open to inspection
by owners at any Authorized Cadillac-La Salle Service Station.
Repair P a r t s
Genuine Cadillac parts, manufactured to the same rigid
specifications as the parts entering into the original assembly of
the car, are carried in stock by Authorized Cadillac-La Salle
Service Stations. They are sold at uniform prices throughout
the United States, and are not subject to the addition of handling, excise or other supplementary charges. Printed price lists,
published by the Cadillac Motor Car Company, are open to
inspection by owners at any authorized Cadillac distributor's
or dealer's establishment.
T h e Owner's Obligation
All of these service facilities are placed at the disposal of the
Cadillac owner, in order that his car may be a continuous source
of satisfaction and utility. This result cannot be guaranteed,
however, unless the owner fulfills certain definite obligations
himself, as follows:
1. To drive the car at moderate speeds for the first 500 miles.
2. To operate the car in accordance with the instructions
contained in this manual.
3. To check the engine oil level every 100 to 150 miles, and
add oil as often as necessary to keep the indicator at "full."
4. To check the tire pressure at least every week, and keep
it up to the recommended pressure—40 pounds in front and
rear—on cars driven at high speeds, 45 pounds in front.
[6]
5. To add distilled water to the storage battery every 1000
miles, and in warm weather every 500 miles, or at least every
two weeks.
6. To have the car lubricated every 1000 miles, or once a
month, in accordance with the lubrication schedule on page 29.
7. To take the car to an Authorized Service Station for
inspection every 1000 miles, or at least once a month.
Lubrication
The first five items above are details which do not necessarily
warrant a visit to the service station. For lubrication, however,
the owner is urged to patronize Authorized Cadillac-LaSalle
Service Stations, because they are prepared to furnish this service
in a manner that cannot be duplicated elsewhere. Only approved
lubricants are used, the specifications of which have been worked
out by Cadillac engineers to give the best possible results.
Workmen who specialize on Cadillac cars know exactly where
lubrication points are located and how much lubricant to apply.
The charge for this lubrication service is less than half a cent a
mile, which includes the cost of the lubricants.
Inspection
Preventive service is a fundamental principle of Cadillac
Service. "Preventive service" is the practice of inspecting the
car at regular intervals and making those adjustments that need
attention before the need becomes an emergency. Inspections
should be made every 1000 miles, in order to insure transportation satisfaction. Authorized Cadillac-La Salle Service Stations
will make such inspections without charge, provided no dismantling of units is necessary.
The Cadillac owner is urged to take full advantage of this,
not only while the car is new, but throughout its entire life.
Preventive service rendered every 1,000 miles or once
a m o n t h by an Authorized Cadillac-La Salle Service
Station, is the surest guarantee of long life and c o m plete motoring satisfaction at t h e least possible
expense.
[7]
»
off the ignition and lock the transmission, turn the key to the
locked position and push the lock cylinder all the way in. The
car can be locked when the transmission is in neutral or in reverse.
Do not attempt to shut off the ignition when the transmission is
in any forward gear. Be sure to remove the key before leaving
the car.
CHAPTER II
OPERATION
NE of the first things the driver of a new car should do is
to familiarize himself with the various controls described
in the following chapter.
O
Locks
Each car is equipped with a hexagonal-handled key which is
used to operate the combination ignition and transmission lock,
the door lock and the tire carrier lock. In addition, cars that
have rumble seats or package compartments fitted with locks
have a separate key for these compartments. The compartment
key has an oval handle.
The lock number is stamped on each key, but not upon the face
of the lock. The owner should make a record of the key numbers as soon as he takes delivery of his car, so that in the event
both keys are lost, a duplicate key can easily be obtained from a
Cadillac distributor or dealer.
The right front door can be locked from the inside to prevent
intruders from forcing their way into the car. This can be done
by turning the key to the locked position on the outside before
entering the car. The door will then be locked from the outside,
although it can be opened from the inside in the usual manner.
Ignition Switch Lock
The lock in the center of the instrument panel controls both
the ignition switch and the transmission lock. When the key
is turned, the cylinder of the lock will slide out about half an
inch, turning on the ignition and unlocking the transmission
by means of a cable connection to the shifter shafts. To shut
Gasoline Gauge
The gasoline gauge, marked "Fuel," is the small dial on the
extreme left. This gauge indicates in gallons the quantity of
fuel in the tank at the
rear of the car, and is
operated electrically
by current taken from
the ignition circuit.
To read from the
gauge the quantity of
fuel in the tank the
ignition m u s t be
turned on.
T h r o t t l e Control
The
throttle of the
Fig. 3. The gasoline gauge is operated elec-
trically by current from t h e
carburetor is controlled
'S nition circuit by a hand lever and
a foot pedal or accelerator. The normal position of the
hand lever for driving the car is all the way up to "CLOSE."
In this position the throttle of the carburetor is open just enough
to permit the engine to run at idling speed after it is warm. For
starting, however, the lever should be moved approximately
one-fourth the way down, and should be left in this position
until the engine is warm enough to permit the lever to be returned
to the idling position without stalling the engine. (Also see
Chapter on "Cold Weather Operation.")
[9]
[8]
»
Carburetor Choke Control
Spark Control
Correct use of the choke control is essential not only to quick
starting of the engine, but also has an important effect on the
life of the engine. The button must be pulled out far enough
in starting to provide an explosive mixture quickly so that the
battery is not unnecessarily discharged by useless cranking.
The button must also be left out far enough during the warmingup period so that the engine will run without missing and
"popping b a c k . "
Correct timing of the ignition in relation to the positions of
the pistons is controlled automatically by the timer-distributor,
which provides for all ordinary advancing and retarding of the
spark.
On the other hand, it should not be pulled out any further or
left out any longer than is necessary to accomplish these results,
because some of the excess liquid gasoline in the enriched mixture
does not burn and may wash off the oil on the cylinder walls, interfering w i t h proper lubrication
of the pistons. Push the button all
the way in as soon as this can be
done without causing "poppingback."
A hand control is also provided. This is the button at the left
on the instrument panel. This button should be pushed all the
way in (full advance) for starting and for all ordinary driving.
The button can be pulled partly out to retard the spark in case
of " p i n g " caused by carbon, heavy pulling, the use of regular
(not anti-knock) gasoline, or in case there should ever be occasion
to crank the engine by hand.
If the engine still retains heat
from previous running, the choke
control should not be used withF/g. 4. The choke button must out first attempting to start the
be held out while the starter is engine on the normal mixture.
cranking the engine.
If the choke button is pulled out
for starting a hot engine the
mixture may be made so rich that starting will be impossible.
The Cadillac engine is a high compression engine and it will
perform most satisfactorily when an anti-knock fuel is used.
Regular gasoline can be used, although this may necessitate
driving w i t h the spark slightly
retarded to avoid " p i n g . " The
spark should be retarded just
to the point where the engine
' 'pings'' slightly on rapid acceleration. This slight amount of spark
knock is absolutely harmless to
the engine and is an indication to
the driver that the spark is set
Fig. 5. Drive with spark control
at the point that will give maxas far advanced as possible.
imum power and economy.
The choke button is not a priming device. It has no effect
whatever on the fuel or the fuel mixture unless the engine is
being cranked or is running under its own power. To have
any effect, the button must be pulled out and kept partly out
during the cranking operation.
Carbon deposit, which accumulates with use in all engines,
also causes spark knock and in time may require retarding the
spark. Regardless of the kind of fuel or the presence of carbon,
the correct setting of the spark control at any time is at the point
where the engine " p i n g s " slightly on rapid acceleration.
[10]
[11]
Starter Pedal
The starter pedal is at the right of the accelerator. Pushing
this pedal forward brings into action the electric motor that
cranks the engine for starting. Do not push the starter pedal
when the engine is running.
The starter pedal is only one of the controls that must be
manipulated to start the engine. Unless there is an explosive
mixture in the cylinders and a spark to ignite it, it is useless to
crank the engine. The starter pedal should not be operated,
therefore, until the necessary preliminary steps have been taken.
The following, in their proper order, are the various steps that
must be performed when starting the engine:
1. Place the throttle lever
about one-fourth the way
down from the "CLOSE"
position.
2. See that the spark
control button is all the
way in.
Fig. 6. The starter pedal is only one
of the controls that must be used to
start the engine.
3. Make sure that the
transmission control lever
is in neutral.
4. Turn on the ignition.
5. Unless the engine is still warm, pull out the choke button.
If the engine is still warm, do not pull out the choke button unless
the engine fails to start on the normal mixture.
6. To start the engine, push the starter pedal forward, releasing it as soon as the engine starts. If the engine does not
start readily, do not run the battery down by continuing to crank
the engine, but look for the trouble and correct it. (See below
for probable causes for the engine failing to start.)
[12]
7. Push the choke button in part way as soon as the engine
starts, and all the way in as soon as the engine is warm enough
to permit it.
8. Note whether pressure is indicated on the oil pressure
gauge and stop the engine at once if no pressure is indicated.
9. Move the throttle lever up to the "CLOSE" position as
soon as the engine is warm enough to permit it.
In cold weather, disengage the clutch during the cranking
operation. This relieves the starter of the necessity of turning the
transmission gears, which are immersed in lubricant. The
additional load is small in warm weather when the lubricant is
thin, but in cold weather the power required to turn the gears
through the thickened lubricant adds unnecessarily to the
load on the starter and the battery.
What To Do If The Engine Fails To Start
If the engine does not start readily, release the starter pedal and
look for the cause.
The ignition may not be turned on.
There may be no gasoline in the tank in the rear of the car.
There may be no gasoline in the vacuum tank on the dash.
If the fuel supply should give out on the road, so that the vacuum
tank on the dash becomes empty, it will be necessary after
refilling the tank to add gasoline to the vacuum tank.
The carburetor may be flooded by unnecessary use of the
choke when the engine is warm. To get rid of this surplus
gasoline in the cylinders open the throttle wide, and, with the
ignition turned off, hold the starter pedal down for 10 to 15
seconds. Then return the throttle lever to the usual position for
starting, turn on the ignition and try once more to start the
engine.
[13]
Oil Pressure Gauge
is running ten or twelve miles per hour in high gear. If the
ammeter should show "Discharge" with all lights off", either
when the engine is not running or when the car is running
more than twelve miles per hour, the cause should be investigated.
The small dial at the left of the
clock is the oil pressure gauge.
This gauge does not indicate the
quantity of oil in the engine. It
indicates only the pressure under
which the oil is forced to the
engine bearings.
Clutch Pedal
Fig. 7. The oil gauge does not
When the engine is not running, indicate quantity; it only shows
the pointer on the oil pressure the pressure under which oil is
forced to the engine bearings.
gauge should remain at zero, but
as soon as the engine is started
and as long as it runs, the gauge should show pressure. If no
pressure is indicated when the engine is running, stop the engine
at once and determine the cause. Serious damage may be done
if the engine is run without oil pressure.
Ammeter
The ammeter shows how much current the generator is furnishing the battery when the motor is running and how much the
lights and ignition are drawing from the battery when the
generator is not charging. It does not register the current drawn
by the starting motor when starting the engine nor the total output of the generator when the lights are on.
The ammeter should indicate
on the "Charge" side most of
the time. Otherwise, more current will be taken out of the
battery than is put into it and the
battery will eventually become
fully discharged.
Ordinarily,
Fig. 8. The ammeter indicates
the amount of electrical current
flowing to or from the battery.
are
in
use
t n e
show 'Charge
[14]
when
ammeter
no
lights
should
as soon as the car
The clutch has two uses: First, to enable the car to be started
gradually and without jerk or jar; second, to permit shifting of
the transmission gears. The operation of the clutch is discussed
below in connection with the transmission control. Further
comment is unnecessary at this point, except the following
suggestions to the driver:
Do not drive with the foot resting on the clutch pedal. The
Cadillac clutch operates so easily that even the weight of the
driver's foot may unintentionally cause the clutch to slip.
Do not form the practice of disengaging the clutch whenever
the brakes are applied. Most occasions for use of the brakes
require only slowing down without stopping or even shifting
gears. A skilled driver will not touch the clutch pedal until the
car is just about to stop or
until he is about to shift to
a lower gear. It is a mistaken idea that applying
the brakes w i t h the clutch
engaged is more severe on
the brake lining. The opposite is actually the case,
proof of which is in the fact
that in coasting down
grades, the resistance of the
engine is used to assist the
brakes in controlling the
,
Car Speed.
Fig. 9. A good driver uses the clutch
pedal only when shifting gears or about
to stop.
[151
It will be observed in operating the clutch pedal that the
pedal offers almost no resistance until it has been moved
about one inch. It is at this point that it actually begins to
disengage the clutch. It is important that the pedal have
this "lost m o t i o n . " If the full pressure of the clutch springs
is felt just as soon as the pedal is moved, the control rod
should be readjusted. Failure to make this adjustment will
result in the clutch slipping.
Transmission Control
The operation of the Cadillac Syncro-mesh transmission is,
in general, the same as the operation of the conventional selective sliding-gear type of transmission. The positions of the
control lever for the various speed combinations are the same
and the directions in which the control lever is moved are the
same. It is also necessary to disengage the clutch before moving
the control lever, the same as w i t h the conventional transmission.
The only difference is in the manner of moving the control
lever.' With the conventional transmission, it is customary when
shifting to a higher gear to hesitate momentarily in neutral and
then move the lever quickly to its new position. With the
Cadillac Syncro-mesh transmission there is no necessity either
for the hesitation in neutral or for the rapid movement of the
lever during the latter part of the shift. Instead, the movement
of t h e c o n t r o l l e v e r
should be one smooth,
continuous movement.
The
synchronizing
principle applies to all
shifts into intermediate
or high; in other words,
to the following shifts:
Fig. 10. The control lever positions
are the same as for the conventional
type of transmission.
[16]
Low to intermediate
Intermediate to high
High to intermediate
There is no synchronizing mechanism for low or reverse gears
because shifts into these gears are usually made when the car is
standing still. When shifting from neutral to low or reverse,
therefore, it may be necessary to await an instant after disengaging the clutch, to give the gears a chance to stop "spinning."
Do not attempt to shift from intermediate to low unless the car
is standing still or moving very slowly.
If, when descending a grade at high speed, it becomes desirable to shift from high to intermediate in order to use the engine
as a brake, re-engage the clutch slowly after making the shift.
This will bring the engine up to speed gradually and avoid the
sudden load that would otherwise be imposed upon the clutch.
Coasting
In coasting down grades, it is recommended that the transmission be left in gear and the clutch engaged. With the throttle
in the idling position, the car is thus made to drive the engine,
the resistance of which assists the brakes and saves wear on the
brake lining. It must be remembered that the brakes are subjected to much more severe use on grades than on the level,
because gravity acts continuously, whereas on the level, the
brakes need absorb only the momentum of the car.
Ordinarily, the resistance offered by the engine when the
transmission is in high, supplemented by moderate use of the
brakes, is sufficient to control the speed of the car. On steep
grades, however, the transmission control should be shifted to
intermediate.
Do not turn off the ignition when coasting with the car driving
the engine. Contrary to a common impression, this does not
appreciably increase the resistance, and is likely to cause damage
to the engine. Even with the throttle closed, some fuel is admitted to the cylinders, and if this is not burned, it condenses on
the cylinder walls and washes away the oil which lubricates the
pistons.
117]
Brakes
The foot brakes are internal brakes of the shoe type, applied
on all four wheels through a mechanical linkage.
When applying the brakes while driving on wet asphalt streets
or slippery roads, more care should be exercised and more time
should be allowed for stopping the car than is necessary on dry
pavements. The brakes should be applied gently while the
clutch is still engaged. The clutch should not be released until
the car has almost stopped.
Do not attempt sudden stops. Cadillac four-wheel brakes
minimize the possibility of skidding under slippery conditions,
but their effectiveness should not induce anyone to drive less
carefully.
As the brake lining wears, the pedal must be pushed farther
down to apply the brakes. Do not wait until the pedal goes all
the way to the floor board before having the brakes readjusted.
Readjustment is recommended as soon as the pedal must be
pushed down to within one inch of the floor board. A temporary
adjustment of the brakes is explained on page 47For parking, the brakes are operated by the hand lever at the
right of the transmission control lever.
Lighting Switch
Fig. 11. The lighting switch control
is at the hub of the steering wheel.
[18]
The lighting
switch
control is at the upper end
of the steering column in
the center of the steering
wheel. The lever has four
positions: " P A R K I N G , "
" O F F , " " D O W N " and
" U P . " Turning the lever
to " P A R K I N G " turns on
the parking lamps and the
two rear lamps.
Turning
the lever to " D O W N " turns on the headlamp lower beams
and the two rear lamps, while turning the lever to " U P " turns
on the headlamp upper beams and the two rear lamps.
The instrument lamps are controlled by the upper button at
the extreme left of the instrument panel.
The lamp bulbs which are used are as follows:
Lamp
Voltage
Candle-Power
Headlamps
6-8
21 (Two Filament)
Mazda No. 1U0
Rear Lamps
Stop Light
6 8
15 Mazda No. 87
Tail Light
6-8 ]
Parking lamps
6 8!
3 Mazda No. 63
Instrument lamps
6-8 f
Closed car lamps
6-8 j
Danger of R u n n i n g Engine in Closed Garage
Every person having to do with the operation or care of a
motor car should be warned of the danger that attends running
the engine while the car is in a small closed garage.
Carbon monoxide, a deadly poisonous gas, is present in the
exhaust of all internal combustion engines. Most people are
already familiar with carbon monoxide in the form of illuminating gas, or in the gas produced by furnaces and stoves when
insufficient air is supplied to give complete combustion. But
illuminating gas and coal gas have an unpleasant odor, which
serves as a warning, whereas carbon monoxide, as produced in
the internal combustion engine, is colorless, taseless and almost
odorless, so that the victim may be overcome before he is aware
of the danger. When the engine exhausts into the open air,
the carbon monoxide is so diluted that it has no effect. It is
when the engine is run for a time in a closed room that the proportion of carbon monoxide in the air may increase to the point
at which continued breathing of it would be fatal. The United
[19]
States Public Health Service advises that the average automobile
engine warming up in a single car garage will give off enough
carbon monoxide in three minutes to endanger life.
Proper precaution must be taken in cold weather when the
natural tendency is to keep the garage doors and windows
closed. The practice of letting the engine warm up in a closed
garage before opening the doors is unsafe. The risk is made
greater by the fact that the enriching of the mixture by manipulation of the carburetor choke increases the amount of carbon
monoxide formed.
CHAPTER III
EQUIPMENT
N addition to the controls and instruments used in driving,
the car is equipped with various devices which are for the
convenience and comfort of the occupants, and are used only as
occasion demands. It is suggested that the driver anticipate his
use of such equipment by becoming familiar at once with the
directions contained in this chapter.
I
Windshield and Ventilation
Cadillac closed cars are equipped with a one-piece slanting
windshield that can be moved up and down by means of the
handle just above the windshield (Fig. 12). For ventilation
under the cowl, the windshield should be raised not more than
one inch, so that the lower
edge of the glass is still
below the ledge over the
instrument board. With the
windshield in this position
air is deflected into the
driving
compartment
through an opening in the
cowl just forward of the
instrument board. If desir• f « - « - The straight type windshield
et ] t j , e windshield can be
is controlled by the handle above the
windshield.
raised above the level of
the ledge over the instrument board, and air will then enter directly into the car.
Cowl ventilators are also provided on the closed cars to supplement the ventilation provided by the windshield. These venti[20]
[21]
lators are at the sides of the cowl compartment and open toward
the rear, serving as outlets for the air entering under the windshield.
In warm weather, satisfactory ventilation in the front compartment cannot be expected unless the hood doors are open.
Ordinarily, these should be opened at the beginning of warm
weather and left open for the season. The temperature in the
front compartment can thereafter be controlled by the windshield
and ventilators.
Cigar Lighter
Cordless lighters are provided on the instrument panel
and with the smoking sets of
the various body styles. The
lighter on the instrument panel
has a green translucent button
through which the glow of the
heating element may be seen
FiS. 11. The cigar lighter on the w h e n t h e ]j„hter is ready for
instrument panel is or the
Windshield Cleaner
pass
°
J
around" type.
The windshield cleaner consists of two wiper blades, operated
by the suction or vacuum in the passages between the carburetor
and the engine. The cleaner is controlled by the lower button
at the extreme left-hand end of the instrument board. This
button, when pulled all the way out, will cause one blade to work
on each half of the windshield, cleaning the entire surface.
Pulling the button only half way out will cause both blades to
operate on the left-hand half of the windshield, cleaning only the
part in front of the driver.
To park both blades at the extreme left of the windshield when
they are not needed to clean the glass, pull the control button
halfway out, wait until the left-hand blade travels over to meet
the right-hand blade and returns with it to the left-hand side;
then push the button all the way in.
use. To use the lighter, hold it
all the way in until the glow is
seen; then lift it out. The lighters in the smoking sets do not
have the translucent button. The current for these lighters is
turned on by pressing the button beside the lighter.
Tools
The tools are carried under the front seat. When putting tools
in their compartment be sure they are placed so that they do not
interfere with the front seat adjusting mechanism.
The tools comprising the standard equipment are listed below:
Hammer
Monkey wrench
Large screw-driver
Small screw-driver
Crescent adjustable wrench
Oil can
Spark plug wrench
Starting crank
Pliers
Hub cap wrench
Brace wrench (wood and
disc wheels)
Jack handle
Jack
Tool bag
Lubrication chart
Operator's Manual
Adjustable Seat
Tires
The front seat is adjustable on all Cadillac closed cars, except
those which are intended to be chauffeur-driven. Except on the
five-passenger coupe, the entire front seat can be moved forward
or backward. This adjustment is controlled by a handle on the
center of the seat base, just above the floorboards. As the front
seat on the five-passenger coupe is divided, only the driver's half
of the seat is adjustable.
For normal driving, both the front and the rear tires should be
inflated to a pressure of 40 lbs. Important—On cars driven at
high speeds, the front tires should be inflated to 45 lbs. The tires
should be checked at least weekly, and the pressure should
never be permitted to drop more than 5 lbs.
[22]
[23]
Inflation Pressure
Spare Wheel Carrier
To remove a spare wheel from the carrier, unlock the lock and
take it out, using the key as a handle. It may be necessary to
hold on to the lock while turning the key. Then unscrew the
clamping screw underneath
the lock, after which the
large dust shield can be
removed and the wheel
taken off the carrier.
To reinstall a spare wheel,
mount it on the carrier,
place the large dust shield in
position, tighten the clamping screw, and then snap
the lock back into place.
These instructions apply
both to spare wheel carriers
Fig. 14. To remove a spare wheel,
unlock the lock, and remove the screw
on the-rear of the car and
and the dummy hub cap.
to carriers in the front
fender.
Spare Tire Carrier (Standard Wood Wheels)
To remove the spare tire
from the carrier, unlock the
lock and remove it, using the
key as a handle. It may be
necessary to hold on to the
lock while turning the key.
Unscrew the clamping screw
with the brace wrench furnished in the tool equipment
and remove the rim clamp,
Fig. 15. To remove
taking care not to lose the
unlock the lock, remove
clamping screw. Remove the take
off the clamp.
tire with rim, by pulling it
out at the bottom and then lifting it off the carrier.
[24]
To place a tire and rim on the carrier, reverse the above order.
After tightening the clamping screw, unlock the lock and put it
into place.
Use of Jack in Changing Tires
When a tire is "flat," the axle is not always far enough above
the ground to permit placing the jack directly under the axle.
Fig. 16. The correct position of the jack for raising either front or rear wheels
is shown above.
It is then necessary to make use of the adjustable shoulder which
engages with teeth on the side of the jack.
The illustrations in Figure 16 show how the adjustable
shoulder should be placed under the axles.
Changing Tires
a spare tire,
the screw and
If an inflated tire is always carried on the spare rim or wheel,
the driver will seldom or never have to disassemble a tire from
the rim. In case of tire trouble, it is then merely necessary to
remove the rim or wheel with the flat tire and then install the
spare in its place. Illustrated directions for performing this
work on wire and on standard wood wheels are given on pages
[25]
27 and 28. Disc and demountable wood wheels are changed in
the same manner as wire wheels except that the hub caps should
not be removed.
Tire Balancing Marks
The tires are balanced to offset t h e weight of t h e valve stem.
If a tire is removed, it must be re-installed in its original position
w i t h respect t o the rim; otherwise the tire and wheel will be
unbalanced.
Fig. 17.1. Remove the hub cap with
the wrench in the tool kit. Hub caps
are marked with arrows showing the
direction in which they screw on and
off.
A small red or black square is accordingly branded in t h e rubber
on t h e side of each tire. This mark must always be in line with
the valve stem.
Fig. 17b. Jack up the axle until the
weight of the car is off of the wheel,
but with the tire still dragging.
Loosen the cap screws around the
wheel hub by turning them in a
counter-clockwise direction with the
wrench. Then jack the wheel up
further, remove the cap screws and
take the wheel off of the hub.
Fig. 17c. To mount a wheel simply
set it up on the hub and start the
cap screws by hand. Then tighten
the screws with the wrench, but do
not tighten them in rotation. After
tightening one screw, tighten the
screw directly opposite.
Fit,. 17. Changing Wire Wheels
1261
[27]
Fig. UJ. Jack up the wheel until
the tire clears the ground. Remove
the dust cap and clamping nut from
the valve stem. Remove the six rim
clamps, unscrewing them with the
brace wrench supplied in the tool kit.
LUBRICATION SCHEDULE
CADIULAC 355
O W N E R S NAME_
ADDRESS
ENGINE NO.
_DATE D£I_IVERED_
DO NOT WAIT FOR SCHEDULE LUBRICATIONS
BEFORE ADOING ENGINE OIL. THE Oil. LEVEL
SHOULD BE CHECKED EVERY »W TO '5° MILES
AMD OIL ADDED IF THE INDICATOR BALL IS
BELOW ••FULL.••
TH.S IS ESPECIALLY IMPORTANT ON CARS DRIVEN AT HIGH SPEEDS.
^.U BR 1 CATION !• ' . A N D MILEAGE A T WHICH DUE
LUBRICANT
o o|o
ENGINE OIL
Fig. 18b. Rotate the wheel until
the valve stem is at the top, and pull
the bottom of the rim away from the
wheel.
DOOR H A R D W A R E
ENGINE Oil,
CHECK TIRE INFLATION
ool
o
o
o o o
o
o lo IO iOl,ol o
o o o o o o op
oo o
p
o IO' o p
o
o
oo
o O iOl
o
o o
o
o
T R A N S M ISSION—ADO LUBRICANT
Fig. 18c. Then rotate the wheel
umil the valve stem approaches the
bottom, when the rim and tire will roll
free from the wheel and can be removed
without lifting.
To mount a rim, rotate the wheel
until the hole for the valve stem is in
the position shown in the last illustration. Insert the valve stem and
rotate the wheel, which will carry the
rim with it, until the valve stem is at
the top. Then push the lower part of
the rim into place. Install the rim
clamps over the rim and turn the nuts
partly down. Go over the nuts again
and tighten them firmly. Install the
valve stem clamping nut and the dust
cap. Be sure the clamping nut is tight.
Fig. 18. Changing Rims (Standard
Wood Wheels)
[28]
REAR A X L E — A D D L U B R I C A N T
;0
TIMER DISTRIBUTOR C A M
o
o
o
JO
o
WHEEL BEARINGS
SPEEDOMETER DRIVE S H A F T
**REPILL SHOCK ABSORBERS
Pi
*»FLUSH COOLING SYSTEM
E V E R Y 12.000 M I L E S
* I N SUM.MCR INSPECT BATTERY EVERV 500 MILES OB AT LEAST EVERY Z WEEKS.
••RECOMMENDED BUT NOT INCLUDED IN LUBRICATIONS 6 AND 12.
THE FOLLOWING OPERATIONS CANNOT BE PLACED ON A MILEAGE BASIS ANO ARC NOT (MCt-UOED ll
THE ABOVE SCHEDULE
THIN B E » R AXLC AND TRANSMISSION LUBRICANT—AS REQUIRED FOR LOW TEMPERATURES.
DRA'N AND REPLACE REAR AXLE ANO TRANSMISSION LtjBWICANT — AT BEGINNING OF MILD WEATHEI
IN SPRING
RECORD O N OTHER SIDE
Fig. 19. This is a fac-simile of the Cadillac Lubrication Schedule and Record
Card. Provision is made on the back of the card for recording when and where
the car is lubricated. A copy of this card can be obtained on request from Cadillac
distributors and dealers.
[29]
CHAPTER IV
LUBRICATION
Lubrication Schedule
YSTEMATIC lubrication, at regular mileage intervals, is the
only kind t h a t is effective. On page 29 is a complete lubrication schedule, which, if faithfully followed, will insure
correct lubrication for each wearing surface.
S
The unit of the schedule is 12000 miles, which is divided into
twelve 1000-mile intervals. Corresponding to these is a series
of twelve consecutive groups of lubricating operations. When
the car has traveled 1000 miles, the points enumerated under
Lubrication N o . 1 should receive attention. At 2000 miles,
Lubrication No. 2 is due, and so on until at 12000 miles, Lubrication N o . 12 should be performed. At 13000 miles, the schedule
begins again w i t h Lubrication No. 1.
It will be noticed from the
schedule that there are actually
only four different lubrication
operations, but that they are
numbered according to the various times that they come due.
The driver can easily check this with the speedometer mileage
by opening the left front door a few inches. Authorized CadillacLa Salle service stations, after performing each schedule operation,
post the number of the next operation due and the mileage at
which it is due. When the mileage recorded by the speedometer
is the same as the mileage marked on the notice, the car may be
taken to any authorized Cadillac-La Salle service station, and,
without further ordering other than specifying "schedule lubrication," the car will receive the exact lubrication necessary.
Although this schedule is expressed in terms of miles, it is
intended that the car be lubricated once each month if the
mileage traveled is less than 1000 since the last lubrication
operation was performed. This lubrication work can be done
while the car is in the service station for its regular monthly or
1000-mile inspection.
Lubrication Chart
The lubrication chart (18 x 24 inches in size) which accompanies this manual gives complete detailed instructions for
lubricating the car. All of the points which require lubrication
are designated on this chart, together with the kind of lubricant
to be used, the method of applying it and the frequency with
which it should be applied.
The operations are grouped on the chart in the same manner
as on the schedule shown in Fig. 19- If the car is lubricated at
an "Authorized Station," this schedule will be followed; if not,
whoever does the lubrication should follow the schedule and
chart exactly.
A metal lubrication tag in
the shape of the Cadillac crest
is provided on each new car
for ease in determining the date,
the mileage and the schedule
number of the next lubrication
due. This tag is mounted on
the left front pillar, about four
inches below the hinge as
Fig
S h o w n in t h e illustration.
your car should be lubricated.
Lubricants
[30]
20
This notke
tdls
you
when
The selection of proper lubricants should be one of the first
concerns of the owner in his attention to the lubrication of the
car. The lubricants must not only be of high quality, but their
viscosity and other characteristics must be suited to the car.
[31]
The owner is urged to consult the distributor or dealer from
whom he purchased his car in regard to the names of lubricants
which have been tested and approved for use in the Cadillac car.
Engine Oil
The chart of engine oil recommendations given on page 32
indicates the proper grades of oil to be used for average driving
and for prolonged high speed driving.
ENGINE OIL RECOMMENDATIONS
WINTER
SUMMER
TYPE OF
SERVICE
AVERAGE
DRIVING
(No prolonged
high speed
driving)
PROLONGED
HIGH SPEED
DRIVING
All Temperatures
Above 32° F.
Between 32° and
15° Above
Below 15° Above
Zero
S. A. E.
vise. 40
or 50
S. A. E.
vise. 20
S. A. E.
vise. 10
These oils are not suitable for prolonged
high speed driving and if used under such
conditions the oil level must be closely
watched, as the rate of consumption will
be higher than with heavier oils.
CADILLAC APPROVED "HEAVY DUTY" O I L S SUMMER AND WINTER
These oils have an S. A. E. viscosity of 40-50-60, and are
required to meet certain specifications as to volatility in
order to demonstrate their fitness for prolonged high speed
driving. To make certain of using an oil approved for this
service, consult your Cadillac distributor or dealer.
NOTE: Approved heavy duty oils vary in their suitability for winter use. If an approved heavy duty oil with
sufficiently low cold viscosity is not available and if the car
is not kept in a heated garage, the lighter oils specified
above for average driving must be used to avoid hard starting. In this case, be sure to watch the oil level closely as
cautioned above.
*The system used in this table to designate body or viscosity is the one recently
developed by the Society of Automotive Engineers and adopted by all oil companies. It takes the place of the old indefinite method of describing oils as
"Light," "Medium," "Heavy," etc. Oil should be called for by these numbers.
If a filling station attendant does not know the S. A. E. numbers of his oils, the
following grades can be substituted in emergency: S. A. E. 10, Extra Light;
S. A. E. 20, Light; S. A. E. 40, Heavy; S. A. E. 50-60, Extra Heavy.
[32]
Gear Lubricant
Lubricant conforming to the specifications for Gear Lubricant
must be used in the transmission, rear axle and steering gear.
It is particularly important that only recommended lubricants
be used in the transmission. Engine oil or soap greases will not
perform satisfactorily.
Lubricants conforming to these specifications may be used
without thinning during all weather, except winter weather
below temperatures of 20° above zero. Below this temperature,
thinning w i t h kerosene is necessary, unless grease of sufficiently
low pour point is used to secure easier gear shifting and proper
lubrication of gears and bearings. See an authorized CadillacLa Salle service station for recommendations on this lubricant.
I m p o r t a n t : The Gear Lubricant known as "sulphurized"
oil and designated by " E . P , " following its S.A.E. classification
is n o t satisfactory for use in the transmission or rear axle on
Cadillac cars and should not be used in these assemblies under
any circumstances. This lubricant is injurious to bronze parts
such as are used in gear assemblies of all higher quality cars and
is particularly injurious to the synchro-mesh transmission.
Chassis Grease
Lubricant conforming to the specifications for Chassis Grease
is recommended for all chassis points fitted with grease gun connections. Do not use ordinary cup grease, as such greases are
not effective enough to lubricate satisfactorily over the 1000mile interval.
Wheel Bearing Grease
Greases approved under the specifications for Wheel Bearing
Grease are suitable for lubricating the wheel bearings and the
clutch release bearing.
This grease is not recommended for chassis lubrication, as
Chassis Grease is much more effective. Furthermore, Chassis
[33]
Grease or ordinary cup grease should not be used in the wheel
bearings as such lubricants do not have a sufficiently high melting point to render satisfactory service.
Water P u m p Grease
A water-resistant calcium soap grease is recommended for use
in the water pump grease cup. Only greases that meet the
specifications for Water Pump Grease should be used; other
greases will be dissolved into the cooling system liquid.
The owner of a Cadillac car is urged to have his car put on
schedule lubrication at an authorized Cadillac-La Salle service
station; in this way he is assured of having the proper lubricants
used for all lubricating points at the proper mileage intervals.
Engine Lubrication
The supply of oil is carried in the cast aluminum oil pan that
covers the bottom of the crankcase. The oil is circulated by a
camshaft. The oil circulated by the pump lubricates the main
and connecting rod bearings, the camshaft bearings, the cylinder
walls, pistons and piston pins, the front end chains, the valve
mechanism and the fan.
There are a few points on the engine that are not taken care
of in the pressure system. These are the starter, generator and
distributor oil cups and the water pump. Lubricating instructions for these points are given in the lubrication chart.
Oil Level
The normal capacity of the oil pan is eight quarts, which fills
it to the level of the screen in the pan. When the oil pan contains this amount, the oil level indicator on the right-hand side
of the engine (Fig. 21) shows " F u l l . " As the oil level descends,
the indicator indicates " F i l l " and then " M T " (Empty). Oil
should be added as soon as the indicator ball has dropped to
" F i l l . " If the indicator indicates " M T , " under no circumstances
should the engine be run until oil has been added.
The mileage interval at which oil must be added depends
upon individual circumstances. It is recommended that the oil
level indicator be checked every one hundred to one hundred and
fifty miles, although it is improbable that oil will be required as
frequently as this.
Crankcase Ventilating System and Oil Filter
Cadillac engines are equipped with a crankcase ventilating
system, which prevents contamination of the lubricating oil
from seepage vapors; and an oil filter, which removes any dirt
or solid matter from the oil.
Fig. 21. Showing the location of the oil filler, oil level indicator, oil pan drain
plug and other lubrication features.
gear pump inside of the crankcase. The pump is driven by a
vertical shaft, which is, in turn, driven by a spiral gear on the
[34]
The crankcase ventilating system
functions throughout the life of the
attention from the owner. The oil
becomes filled with the solid matter
[35]
is entirely automatic and
car without requiring any
filter, however, gradually
taken from the oil until it
becomes so clogged that it ceases to function. The lubrication
schedule as followed by authorized Cadillac-La Salle service
stations provides for testing the oil filter as part of the regular
2000 mile lubrication. Filter cartridges should be replaced at
least every 12,000 miles. Replacement cartridges can be obtained
from Cadillac distributors and dealers.
The oil pan and screen should be removed and cleaned with
kerosene or gasoline whenever the oil filter cartridge is replaced.
Replacing Engine Oil
Although the crankcase ventilating system and the oil filter
described in the preceding section greatly prolong the useful life
of the oil, it is recommended that the oil be drained and replaced
with fresh oil every 2000 miles.
To drain the oil, simply remove the drain plug (Fig. 21). Be
sure to reinstall the drain plug before adding the fresh oil. Eight
quarts of oil are required to bring the oil level indicator ball to
"Full."
CHAPTER V
COLD WEATHER OPERATION
ATISFACTORY operation of the car in freezing weather depends
upon having the car prepared for cold weather and in giving
it the special attention which is required at that time. In this
chapter has been grouped all the information relating to care
and operation of the car during cold weather. It should be
reviewed just prior to the beginning of the winter season.
S
Preparing for Cold Weather
Anti-Freezing Solutions
The available commercial materials for preparing anti-freezing
solutions for automobile radiators are denatured alcohol, methanol (synthetic wood alcohol), distilled glycerine, and ethylene
glycol.
Denatured alcohol and methanol solutions are, at present, the
most generally used anti-freezing solutions. These preparations
are widely distributed, afford protection against freezing, and are
not injurious to the cooling system.
There are two principal objections to denatured alcohol and
methanol-—they are lost by evaporation, and are harmful to the
car finish. Any material accidentally spilled on the finish should
be flushed off immediately with a large quantity of water.
Solutions of these materials in the radiator must be tested
periodically and sufficient methanol or alcohol should be added to
replace the loss by evaporation. Otherwise, the engine or
radiator, or both, are likely to be damaged by freezing. Evaporation is much more rapid on heavy runs, and the solution should
be tested more often under such circumstances.
[36]
[37]
Methanol, for ami-freeze purposes, is sold in the United States
in the correct concentration to give the same protection against
freezing as denatured alcohol. The table below may be used for
both denatured alcohol and methanol.
Lowest
Temperature
Expected
10° F.
0°F.
—10° F.
—20° F.
—30° F.
Per cent
by
Volume
30
38
45
51
57
Specific G ravity
(at60 c F.) '
Denatured Alcohol
.9668
.9567
.9475
.9350
.9260
Methanol
Qts. Alcohol
required to make
6 gals, solution
.972
.964
•957
.950
.944
7M
9¼
10¾
12
13¾
Distilled glycerine and ethylene glycol solutions are, in first
cost, more expensive than alcohol, but as they are not lost by
evaporation, only water need be added to replace evaporation
losses, except that any solution lost mechanically, by leakage
foaming, etc., must be replaced by additional new anti-freezing
solution. These solutions under ordinary conditions are not
injurious to the car finish.
The principal objections to glycerine and ethylene glycol are
the tendency of these solutions to loosen the scale and iron rust
which forms in the water passages of the cylinder block and head,
and the difficulty of securing and maintaining tight, leakproof
connections. It is absolutely necessary to thoroughly clean and
flush the entire cooling system before glycerine or ethylene
glycol is used.
Ethylene glycol, sold in the U. S. for anti-freezing purposes, is
chemically treated to overcome the principal difficulties mentioned in the above paragraph, and under normal operating conditions w i t h tight hose connections and cylinder head gaskets
should be satisfactory for use in the cooling systems.
Glycerine or ethylene glycol should be used in accordance
with the instructions and in the proportions recommended by
the anti-freeze manufacturer.
In using a hydrometer to determine the temperature at which
a solution will freeze, the test must be made at the temperature
at which the hydrometer is calibrated. If the solution is warmer
or colder, it must be brought to this temperature or correction
must be made for the difference in temperature, otherwise large
errors may result. Freezing point hydrometers can not be used
interchangeably, a different float being required for denatured
alcohol, methanol, glycerine and ethylene glycol. In some cases
these errors may be as large as 30 degrees Fahrenheit.
Salt solutions, such as calcium or magnesium chloride, sodium
silicate, etc., honey, glucose and sugar solutions and oils are not
satisfactory for use in automobile radiators.
Capacity of Cooling System
It is also necessary to tighten or replace the cylinder head
gaskets and pump packing. The cylinder head gaskets must be
kept tight to prevent the solution from leaking into the crankcase where it might cause gumming and sticking of the moving
parts. The pump packing must be kept tight to prevent air
from being drawn into the cooling system in order to avoid
foaming and other difficulties which may result when air is
present.
The capacity of the cooling system is six gallons when filled
to the proper level. It is not necessary to add liquid to the
radiator whenever the level falls below the filler. There is
sufficient liquid in the cooling system if the upper tank is halffull, and any liquid in excess of this is usually forced out through
the overflow pipe as soon as the engine becomes warm. When
water is used, any loss from this cause is of little consequence,
but in winter to conserve anti-freeze, it is important to avoid
adding more liquid than is necessary.
[3S]
[39]
Winter Lubrication
Storage Battery
Lubrication of the car requires special attention in winter, not
only to insure proper lubrication of the moving parts, but to
secure the same ease of operation in starting, steering and shifting
gears as during warm weather.
The electrical system of an automobile has much more to do
in winter than in summer. The engine is harder to crank and
must usually be cranked longer before it starts. The lights are
also used to much greater extent than during the long days of
summer. AJ1 this means that the battery must be ready for
increased demands.
The chart of engine oil recommendations on page 33 gives the
proper grade of oil to be used for cold weather driving. It will
be noted that lighter oils can be used for cold weather providing
no prolonged high speed driving is done. For prolonged high
speed driving, "Heavy duty" oils must be used. Authorized
Cadillac-La Salle Service Stations are prepared with full information on winter lubrication.
The lubricant in the transmission and rear axle should be
thinned with kerosene as soon as the weather is so cold that the
transmission gears are hard to shift. If a sufficient amount of
kerosene is added to provide for the lowest winter temperature
expected, it will not be necessary to add kerosene again thereafter during the winter. If ten per cent (a little over half a
pint) kerosene is added, this will take care of temperatures
down to ten below zero.
There are several lubricants on the market which have a low
enough pour point so that they will not require thinning. See an
authorized Cadillac-La Salle Service Station for information on
these lubricants. If one has been regularly used, no kerosene
should be added. Thinning of such a lubricant is not only unnecessary, but defeats the purpose of using it because it would
have to be drained and replaced on return of warm weather.
Steering gear lubricant, in any case, should not be thinned as
the pressure between the worm and sector will force out the
thinned lubricant, resulting in excessive wear. A lubricant of
low enough cold test so as not to require thinning should be used.
[40]
It is therefore a good plan in preparing for the winter season
to see that the battery is fully charged, that the battery connections are clean and tight, and that the charging rate is sufficient
to take care of the requirements of the system.
Gasoline System
The carburetor on the Cadillac engine has automatic compensation for temperature. Nevertheless it is a good plan to have
the carburetor adjustment checked when cold weather arrives.
This inspection should give special attention to the carburetor
choke control to make sure that the enriching device is fully
effective when the choke button is operated.
In warm weather, a small amount of water in the gasoline has
little or no effect on the running of the engine. In freezing
weather, however, even a small amount of water may freeze
and stop the entire flow of fuel to the carburetor. One of the
things to be done in preparing for winter weather, therefore, is
to clean the gasoline filter and the sediment chambers in the
gasoline system.
Starting t h e Engine
Choke B u t t o n
The first difference between starting the engine in cold weather
and starting the engine in warm weather is in the greater use of
the choke necessary in cold weather. Gasoline does not vaporize
[41]
as readily at low temperatures, and in order to supply the cylinders with a gaseous mixture rich enough to be ignited, the
proportion of liquid gasoline to air must be increased.
At the same time, it is important not to apply the choke more
than is necessary. The unvaporized gasoline collects on the
cylinder walls and works down past the pistons, washing off
the lubricant as it goes. Although dilution of the oil supply
with this unburned gasoline is minimized by the crankcase
ventilating system, it is best to avoid an excess of liquid gasoline
in the combustion chambers by careful and judicious use of the
choke.
The following rule should govern the use of the choke in
winter weather: Pull the choke back just as far as it is necessary
to start the engine, but as soon as the engine starts, return the
button as far as possible without causing the engine to stop or
slow down. Then push the button all the way in as soon as the
engine is warm enough to permit doing so.
Priming t h e Carburetor
In extremely cold weather, if the engine does not start after
cranking for a few seconds with the choke button fully applied,
release the starter pedal. Then prime the carburetor by opening
and closing the throttle once or twice rather rapidly with the
accelerator. Opening and closing the throttle operates a throttle
pump on the carburetor and raises the level of the gasoline in
the carburetor. The carburetor should never be primed in warm
weather and should not be primed unnecessarily in cold weather.
Excessive priming is likely to make starting difficult rather than
easy.
In warm weather, however, the lever may be returned to the
idling position almost as soon as the engine is started. In cold
weather the throttle must be left slightly open until the engine
becomes warm.
Position of Spark Control
It is the practice of some drivers to retard the spark all the way
whenever starting the engine. This is the correct position if the
engine is to be cranked by hand, but if the engine is to be cranked
with the starter, the spark button should be left all the way in or
in the fully advanced position.
Use of Starter
In extremely cold weather, when the car has been standing
long enough to become thoroughly chilled, it is a good plan to
disengage the clutch during the cranking operation. If this is
not done, the starter is called upon to turn the jackshaft gears
in the transmission in addition to cranking the engine. At
ordinary temperatures, the additional energy required is negligible, but in extremely cold weather, the lubricant in the
transmission offers sufficient resistance to rotation of the transmission gears to increase considerably the demand upon the
battery and to retard the cranking speed.
Use of Accelerator Before Engine Is Warm
The correct position of the throttle hand lever for starting in
cold weather is the same as for starting under other conditions,
that is, about one-fourth the way down from the idling position.
In cold weather, after the engine has been started and before
it has run long enough to become warm, the engine cannot
deliver its normal power, and it should not be called upon to do
so. In accelerating the engine to start the car and in accelerating
the car after the transmission is in gear, do not open the throttle
suddenly or too far. To do so is not only to invite "popping
back" in the carburetor, but to increase the amount of excess
unvaporized gasoline in the combustion chambers, both of
which results are undesirable.
[42]
[43]
Position of Throttle H a n d Lever
All battery service, other than the addition of distilled water
when necessary, should be performed by an experienced and
reliable battery man.
CHAPTER VI
i
GENERAL CARE
o attempt has been made to include in this manual directions for making adjustments or repairs to the car. Most
Cadillac owners prefer to depend for such work on authorized
Cadillac-La Salle service stations, as these stations can invariably perform the work more conveniently and economically.
N
Every owner should, however, know how to perform the few
simple operations of general care described in this chapter.
These operations are not difficult enough to necessitate a visit
to the service station, although this work can also be done in
the service station, if desired.
Storage Battery
The storage battery is attached to the right-hand side bar of
the frame under the front seat. It is accessible after removing the
seat cushion and cover plate.
The battery is filled with an acid solution from which the
water slowly evaporates, and fresh distilled water must be added
to each of the three cells at regular intervals to bring the level
up to the bottom of the filling tubes. Distilled water should
be added at least every 1000 miles, and in warm weather, every
500 miles, or at least every two weeks. If distilled water is not
available, melted artificial ice or rain water caught in an earthenware receptacle may be used. Hydrant water or water that
has been in contact with metallic surfaces will cause trouble
if used. Acid must never be added to the battery.
After adding water to the storage battery in freezing weather,
the car should immediately be run far enough to mix the water
and acid solution thoroughly. If the car is parked immediately
after adding water, the water is likely to stay on top of the acid
solution and may freeze, causing extensive damage.
As the storage battery is charged and discharged, the solution
reacts chemically with the plates of the battery, the specific
gravity of the solution changing as the reaction proceeds. The
state of charge of the battery is thus indicated by the specific
gravity of the solution. As the battery is charged, the specific
gravity of the solution increases, reaching 1.270 to 1.285 when
the battery is fully charged. The specific gravity of the solution decreases as the battery is discharged. A fully discharged
battery has a specific gravity of 1.150 to 1.165.
A hydrometer is the instrument used to measure the specific
gravity of a solution. A hydrometer syringe is a hydrometer
especially designed for convenience in testing the specific gravity
of the acid solution in the storage battery. A hydrometer
syringe can be obtained at any battery service station. Be sure
and get a reliable instrument, for cheap ones may be in error as
much as 25 or 30 points.
The specific gravity of the acid solution should never be
tested immediately after adding distilled water. If the solution
is below the plates, so that it cannot be reached with the syringe,
add the necessary amount of water, then drive the car for a few
hours before taking the hydrometer reading.
Important: "Dope" or "rejuvenator" solutions frequently
advertised are harmful to the battery and should never be used.
The battery is a Delco battery, made by the Delco-Remy
Corporation, Anderson, Indiana. If the storage battery is in need
of attention other than recharging, it should always be taken
to an authorized Cadillac service station or to a United Motors
service station.
[44]
["5]
Cooling System
The cooling system should be kept filled with 6 gallons of
water, except in freezing weather, when a suitable anti-freezing
solution, such as those described on page 37, must be used.
The drain valve for the cooling system is in the water inlet
elbow on the right side of the crankcase just in back of the
generator.
The cooling system should be
drained and flushed every 6000
miles. If possible, this should
be done at a Cadillac service
station, or where there are facilities for reversing the flow of
water through the radiator. If
this is not possible, use the following method:
Run the engine until the opening of the radiator shutters
indicates that the engine is warm.
Stop the engine and immediately
open the drain valve.
Fig. 22. The entire cooling system can be drained by opening this
one valve.
After the liquid has drained off, refill the cooling system with
hot water and repeat the operation described above. If, in
draining the second time, the water is very dirty, it may be
advisable to repeat the flushing operation a third time, placing
one or two handfuls of sal-soda in through the radiator filler.
The sal-soda must not be permitted to get on the finish of the
hood or radiator. If sal-soda is used, the cooling system must
be drained and flushed again before refilling for use.
glass bowl through which the accumulation of water and sediment can be easily seen. The bowl should be removed and the
gauze screen should be cleaned as soon as any accumulation
appears in the bowl. This can be done as follows:
First shut off the gasoline by turning clockwise the small
T-handle valve at the side of the filter. Then unscrew the thumb
screw under the bowl, after which the yoke supporting the bowl
can be swung to one side and the bowl can be removed. If the
screen does not come off with the bowl, it can be removed by
pulling it straight down.
In putting back the bowl,
make sure that it seats properly against the cork gasket in
the top of the filter before
tightening the thumb screw.
Do not forget to turn the
gasoline on by turning the
valve counter-clockwise as far
as it will go.
There is also a strainer in
the v a c u u m t a n k a t t h e p o i n t
c.
,,
T,
,•
,-,
tig. 23. Ine two gasoline niters
should be removed and cleansed
where the gasoline enters the rcgu y"
inner chamber. This strainer
should be removed and cleaned occasionally. It is accessible
after disconnecting the feed pipe and unscrewing the inlet elbow.
Temporary Brake Adjustment
Gasoline Filter
It is recommended that all adjustment of the brakes be done
at an authorized Cadillac-La Salle service station. In an emergency, however, the following temporary adjustment can be
made by the driver.
A gasoline filter (Fig. 23) is provided in the gasoline line
between the vacuum tank and the carburetor. The filter has a
Each brake is fitted with an adjusting nut on the cam lever,
as shown in Fig. 24. To tighten the brake adjustment turn all
[46]
[47]
four adjusting nuts half a turn clockwise. These adjusting nuts
lock each sixth of a turn.
wet a clean soft chamois, wring it as dry as possible and dry the
finish. The finish can then be rubbed with a clean soft cloth to
bring out the luster.
Care of t h e Top
Fig. 24. A temporary brake adjustment can be secured by turning the adjusting
nut on each brake clockwise one-half turn. The front brake is shown above at
the left, the rear brake at the right.
Body
Care of Finish
The lacquer finish of Cadillac bodies can be kept new and
lustrous with the simplest care. The car should merely be
wiped off every few days with a soft dry cloth. An occasional
polishing with some recognized lacquer polish (for sale by all
Cadillac distributors and dealers) will prove beneficial.
If the finish receives this attention at regular intervals, it will
not need to be washed, except when it has accumulated a considerable amount of mud or dust. When washing the car, use
plenty of clean cold water. Do not use hot water, and do not
wash the hood while it is hot, as this will in time destroy the
luster. Do not use soap.
If a hose is used in washing, do not use a nozzle, but let the
water flow gently from the hose and flush off the dirt gradually.
A soft wool sponge can be used to advantage in removing dirt.
After the washing is completed, squeeze the sponge as dry as
possible and pick up all water from crevices. Then thoroughly
[48]
Ordinary dust can be removed from the top with a soft dry
cloth. Grease spots, stains and dirt film can be removed by
washing with a mild, neutral soap. Rinse thoroughly with
clear water to remove all traces of the soap, then dry with a
chamois or cloth. Gasoline, naphtha, kerosene and fabric
cleaners should not be used for cleaning the top, as such preparations are likely to dull the luster and damage the fabric, causing
leaks.
Cleaning Upholstery
To keep the upholstery in closed cars in the best condition, it
should be cleaned thoroughly at least once a month with a
whisk broom and vacuum cleaner. Dirt and grit accumulating
in the fabric wear it out faster than use.
Spots on the upholstery may be cleaned with any good dry
cleaner but care should be taken not to apply too much. The use
of too much or too strong a cleaner may dissolve the rubber backing of plush upholstery, causing the nap to loosen. When the
cleaner has thoroughly evaporated, apply a hot flatiron wrapped
in a wet cloth. Steaming the fabric and rubbing lightly against
the nap will raise the nap on plush fabrics to its normal position.
Door Hardware
Many owners who give careful attention to lubrication of the
chassis do not give the same attention to the lubrication of door
locks and hinges. If the door hardware is to operate properly,
it must be lubricated regularly. Directions for this lubrication
are included in the lubrication chart, and these directions should
be followed as faithfully as the rest of the chart.
[491
CHAPTER VII
STORING CAR
p THE car is not to be used for a period of several months, it
should be protected from deterioration during the period
when it is not in use by carefully preparing it for storage.
I
Engine
To prepare the engine for storage, proceed as follows: Run
the engine until opening of the radiator shutters indicates that
the engine is warm. This may be done by driving on the road
or by running the engine idle. In the latter case, care should be
taken that there is sufficient ventilation to avoid personal injury
from carbon monoxide poisoning. (See page 19). After the engine
is warm, place the car where it is to be stored and stop the engine.
Remove the spark plugs. Inject two or three tablespoonfuls
of engine oil into each spark plug hole, and before replacing the
plugs, crank the engine three or four revolutions with the
ignition switched off. This will tend to distribute the oil over
the cylinder walls. The engine should not be started again after
injecting the oil. If it is started, it will be necessary to repeat
the treatment.
Drain the cooling system.
Storage Battery
If the car is to be stored during the winter, the storage battery
should have special treatment in order to protect it against
freezing.
\
bottom of the filling tubes. (See page 44.) After the water
added has had an opportunity to mix thoroughly with the acid
solution by running the car or engine, the specific gravity should
be tested with a hydrometer. If the specific gravity of the
solution is above 1.270, there will be no danger of the acid
solution freezing. If, however, the specific gravity is below
1.270, the battery should be removed and charged. Unless the
battery is fully charged, or nearly so, it is probable that the
acid solution will freeze and cause extensive damage.
The battery ground connection should in all cases be disconnected during storage, as a slight leak in the wiring will discharge the battery and lower the specific gravity to the point
where the solution may freeze.
If possible, the storage battery should be removed and charged
from an outside source every two months during the storage
period.
Tires
During the storage of the car, it is best to remove the tires
from the rims and to keep the casings and tubes in a fairly warm
atmosphere away from the light. The tubes should be inflated
slightly after the tires have been removed.
If it is not convenient to remove the tires from the car, and
the car is stored in a light place, cover the tires to protect them
from strong light, which has a deteriorating effect on rubber.
The weight of the car should not be allowed to rest on tires
during the storage period. If tires are not removed, the car
should be blocked up, so that no weight is borne by the tires.
The tires should also be partly deflated.
Body and Top
Shortly before the car is used for the last time, distilled water
A cover should be placed over the entire car to protect it
should be added to bring the level of the solution up to the J from dust. In storing an open car, the top should be up.
[50]
hi]
Taking Car out of Storage
In putting into use again a car that has been stored, it is
advisable, unless the storage battery has been removed and
charged at periodic intervals, to remove the battery from the'^
car and give it a fifty-hour charge at a four-ampere rate. If the
battery has received periodic charges, or if the specific gravity
is above 1.200, simply add distilled water to the proper level
and connect the leads. If there is a greenish deposit on the
terminals of the battery, remove this with a solution of bicarbonate of soda (common cooking soda) and water. Do not
allow any oi this solution to get into the battery.
y
CHAPTER VIII
SPECIFICATIONS AND LICENSE DATA
Type of engine
8 cyi. V-type
Diameter of cylinder bore
3¾ in.
Length of stroke
4¾ in.
Piston displacement
353 cu. in.
Horsepower (N. A. C. C. rating)
36.45
Engine number.
See below
Before starting the engine, drain the oil from the oil pan and
Capacity
of
gasoline
tank
21
gals.
remove and clean the oil pan and screen. After reinstalling the
Capacity
of
engine
lubricating
system
8
qts.
oil pan, add eight quarts of fresh engine oil. Fill the cooling
Capacity of cooling system
6 gals.
system, being sure to use anti-freezing solution in freezing
Capacity
of
transmission
3 qts.
weather. Remove the spark plugs and inject two or three table-1
Capacity
oi
rear
axle
3
qts.
spoonfuls of engine oil into each cylinder. Reinstall the spark
Wheelbase
134
in.
plugs and, with the ignition switched off, crank the engine a
Tires,
standard
wood
wheels
6.50-19
few seconds with the starter to distribute the oil over the cylinTires, demountable wheels
700-18
der walls.
Spark plug setting
025-028 in.
Start the engine in the usual manner. As soon as the engine Contact point setting
018-.022 in.
starts, push the choke button as far forward as possible without „
,
/15-17 amps, cold
causing the engine to stop or slow down materially, and then Generator charging rate, maximum
S „ ,„
,
& &
open the throttle until the ammeter reads approximately 10 with
(8-10 amps, hot
all lights switched off. Release the choke button entirely as soon
Engine and Unit Assembly Numbers
as the engine is warm enough to permit it.
Each Cadillac car, when shipped, carries an engine number,
which is also a serial number. This is the number to be used in
filling out license and insurance applications and in general
reference of the car. The engine number is stamped on the right
hand side of the crankcase just below the water inlet.
The various units, such as the transmission, steering gear, etc.,
also carry unit assembly numbers. These are located as described
below. It is important in ordering parts to give, not only the
I52|
[53]
$-3
i,
engine number of the car, but also the unit assembly number of
the unit to which the part belongs.
Transmission number—on the upper left-hand edge of the flange
by which the transmission is bolted to the crankcase.
Steering gear number—on the steering gear housing next to the
grease plug
Generator number—oa the right-hand side of the generator.
Starting motor number—on the right-hand side of the starter,
just below the switch.
Front axle number—on the upper surface of the right-hand spring
pad, just outside of the car spring.
Rear axle number—on the rear surface of the axle housing just to j
the right of the cover plate.
f
INDEX
1
Accelerator
9
Accelerator, use in cold weather. . . .43
Adding water to battery
44
Adjustable seats
22
Alcohol for anti-freeze
37
Ammeter
14
Anti-freeze solutions
37
Authorized service stations
3
B
Balancing marks on tires
Battery
Battery, preparing for storage
Brake adjustment
Brakes
Chassis (Jrame) number—on the flange of the first channel cross- | Cadillac service
member, next to the left front engine support.
[ Carbon monoxide poisoning
Carburetor
flooded
Carburetor, to prime
Card, service
Changing engine oil
Changing ttres
Charging rate
Charges for service
Chart, lubrication
Chassis grease
Choke button
26
44
50
47
18
3
19
13
42
4
35
25
14, 50
5
31
33
10
15
17
8
40
37
23
5
37, 46
35
D
Danger from carbon monoxide
Driver's seat adjustment
Driving speed when new
154]
37
13
34
53
32
35
40
50
19
21
Filter for gasoline
Filter for oil
Flat-rate service charges
Flooded carburetor
Flushing cooling system
Foot brakes
46
35
5
13
46
18
Gasoline
filter
Gasoline gauge
Gasoline system, cold weather
Gear lubricant
General care
Glycerine for anti-freeze
Greases
46
9
41
33
44
38
31
H
&^:::::::::::::::::::::8
Clutch, use of
Coasting
Coincidental lock
Cold weather lubrication
Cold weather operation
Compartment for tools
Contract, Service
Cooling system
Crankcase ventilating system
Effect of Alcohol on
finish
Engine fails to start
Engine lubrication
Engine number
Engine oil
Engine oil, changing
Engine oil, thinning
Engine, preparing for storage
Engine, running in garage
Equipment
^^I
Ignition control
Ignition switch lock
Inflation pressure
Inspections
J
Jack, use of
19
22
6
11, 43
8
23
7
25
K
Keys.
155]
L
License data
Lighting switch
Locks
Locks for spare tires
Lubricants
Lubrication
Lubrication, chart
Lubrication, cold weather
Lubrication, engine
Lubrication notice
Lubrication, schedule
53
18
8
24
31
7, 30
31
40
31
31
29
o
Obligations of owner
Oil
filter
Oil level
Oil pressure
Operation
6
35
35
14
8, 37
P
Parts, uniform prices
Preventive service
Priming carburetor
5
7
42
R
Repair parts
Replacing engine oil
Replacing filter cartridge
6
36
35
T
Throttle control
Tire balancing marks
Tire carrier
Tire pressure
Tires, changing
Tires, preparing for storage
30
22
4
5
5
3
16
24
11, 43
9, 43
26
24
6, 23
25
51
Tools
23
Tourists, service to
Transmission control
Transmission lock
3
16
8
U
Unit assembly numbers
53
Use of accelerator before engine is
warm
43
Use of jack
25
Ventilators
S
Schedule lubrication
Seat adjustments
Service card
Service contract
Service charges
Service stations
Shifting gears
Spare tire carriers
Spark control
Specifications
53
Specific gravity of battery
45
Standard Service Contract
5
Starting the engine
12'
Starting the engine in cold weather 41
Storage battery
40, 44
Storing car
50
Syncro-mesh transmission
16
21
w
Water pump grease
Wheel bearing grease
Windshield
Windshield cleaner
Winter lubrication
Winter operation
Wire wheel carrier
Copyright 1930 by
Cadillac Motor Car Company
34
33
21
22
40
37
24
»5-1»
2300-801
Printed in U. S. A.
[56]
/f ,
i
/
¥
PRELIMINARY
SERVICE INFORMATION
Cadillac 355
La Salle 345
i'^f]
September, 1930
U-'L-'7"7
*iQ HOT KZMQVb
Ui
Service Department
CADILLAC MOTOR CAR COMPANY
DETROIT, MICHIGAN
/ ^ / ' " "7" ("i *""•?<* ft* S ;
CONTENTS
Axles
Body
Brakes
Clutch ...
Cooling System
Electrical
.....
Battery
Generator ....
Horns
Ignition
—
Starting Motor
Wiring
W/nng Diagram
Engine
Exhaust System
Frame
Gasoline System .... ....
Intake Muffler
Carburetor
Lighting System
Springs
Shock Absorbers
Steering Gear
—
Adjustments
Steering Connecting Rod
Transmission
Speedometer Drive
Wheels
.
....
Tire Sizes
-
—
—.
—
—
.—
—
—
.
Copyright, 1930
Cadillac Motor Car CoDetroit,
Mich.,
U. S. A.
..
Puqe
3
4
5
6
6
7
7
7
7
7
7
8
9
8
10
10
10
10
11
11
1 1
12
12
13
14
1'5
15
15
15
Cadillac V-8
Preliminary
Service Information
Cadillac 355 - - La Salle 345
I, I / ..
Front Axle
The front axle on both of the new cars is like
the La Salle 340 front axle except for the angle
of the knuckle pins and the method of attaching the shock absorbers. On the new models
the steering knuckle pin is only 8 ^ ° from vertical instead of 10¾° as on the 340 and 353. This
does not affect the camber, however, because the
angle between the wheel spindle and the steering knuckle pin has been changed to 100°, giving
1½° camber which is the same as on the 340.
The caster on both of the new cars is 2y2°
to 2>y2° instead of \y2
as on the 340 and
2y2° as on the 353. This caster is obtained by
using a 1½° wedge spacer (Part No. 876813,
303-353 Parts List) between the spring and the
axle.
The axle I-beam on the new models is interchangeable except for the method of attaching
the shock absorbers. The front shock absorber
links on the 355 are attached under the spring
clip nuts as on the V-16, while those on the 345
are attached at the drilled boss on the I-beam
as on the 340. Neither of these axles is interchangeable with the 340 and the 353.
The steering knuckles, arms, pins and all parts
excepting the I-beams themselves are, "however,
interchangeable on the 345 and the 355. For
service it is only necessary to stock the type 345
I-beam, because this I-beam can be used on the
355 also.
Except as noted, all service operations and
adjustments on the front axle are the same as
on the La Salle 340 and the Cadillac 353.
GOPY
,. r.r,T ngiSQVE
11/2° Camber
8½°
C/LoF Wheel Spindle
Fig. 1. The front axle camber is iy2", the same as
the 340 and 353, although the angle of the steering
knuckle pin is different.
Rear Axle
The rear axle on the La Salle 345 is the same
as on the 340 and is interchangeable with it except for the gear ratios. The Cadillac 355 rear
axle is similar to the 345, but is not interchangeable, because the rear spring seats on the
355 are 5V$" closer together than on the La Salle
345 and 340, to take care of the new frame and
different spring suspension used on the Cadillac,
The gear ratios being furnished on the new
cars are :
Actual
Nominal
4.07 to 1
4.00 to 1
4.54 to 1
4.50 to 1
4.75 to 1
4.75 to 1
Cadillac V-8 Preliminary Service
Information
The nominal values given vary slightly from
the actual ratios but are used because they are
more easily remembered.
On a few of the first cars shipped, a 4.40 to 1
ratio has been used instead of a 4.50. The performance with either of these ratios is practically the same, and after the present stock of 4.40
to 1 is exhausted, only the 4.50 to 1 will be furnished on order from the Parts Division.
Fig. 2. The 355 rear springs are directly under the
frame and the spring seats are accordingly 5¥a" closer
together on the 345.
The above gear ratios will also be supplied by
the P a r t s Division for service on the. La Salle
340 and 328 when the present stock of differential carrier assemblies of different ratios is exhausted. These three different differential carrier assemblies will therefore be interchangeable
on four models; the 328, 340, 345 and 355.
Body
On the La Salle 345, practically the same body
is used as on the 340. The dash, however, has
been insulated to better protect the body from
the heat of the engine. The radiator on the 345
is mounted vertically instead of being tipped
slightly backward at the top as on the 340, and
the hood is about Yi inch longer than on the 340
to take care of the change in the radiator position.
The 345 fenders are the same shape as those
on the 340. The front fenders are not interchangeable however because of the different location for the holes for the head lamp brackets.
The left-hand rear fender also differs in the size
and shape of the holes for the rear lamp. In or-
have a template attached to the underside so that
these holes can be cut for the particular model
on which the fender is to be used.
Fig. 4. The 355 door checks are in the pillars as
shown above and are adjustable.
The body on the Cadillac 355 is entirely new.
It is lower and wider than any Cadillac or La
Salle body previously used.
On the doors, four hinges are used instead of
three as on past models. The hinge pins are
chromium-plated and are tapered at the bottom
to make removal and installation of the pins
easier. This type of pin can be driven out without danger of upsetting the end, and can be replaced easily because the tapered end aligns the
two sections of the hinges.
Fig. 3. The hinge pin on the 355 is tapered at the
end and can be removed or installed without injury
to pin or hinge.
(lev to make these fenders interchangeable all
left-hand rear lenders shipped by the Parts Division for either of these models will not have
the holes punched for the rear lain]), but will
The door cluck used on the 355 is in the pillar
instead ol in the top of the door as on previous
models. Two rubber bumpers are provided for
the check, one on the pillar and the other on the
check itself. The checks are adjustable upon
removing the quarter panel of the upholstery.
The front seats on the 355 are *4 inch lower
than on the ,^5.^ and are provided with the same
Cadillac V-8 Preliminary Service
means of adjustment as the 353. The tool compartment on this new Cadillac is under the front
seat instead of in the dust-shield as on the 353.
The 355 floor boards are made of metal and are
lined with Celotex instead of being; made of
wood. The dash on this model is also provided
with a heat insulator to prevent heat from the
5
engine being transmitted to the driver's compartment.
The 355 hood is longer than the 345 or the
353 and has ports instead of louvres. In warm
weather driving it is important to keep these
ports open so that the heat from the engine can
pass out freeL
•:t** .-
Brakes
The brakes are identical on both cars. The
size and construction are the same as on the
La Salle 340 except for a minor difference in the
rear brake rods and the rocker shafts on the
Cadillac.
Information
ILL uopr
DO NOT REMV£
frame cross member like the V-16, on account
of the rear engine support at the transmission
ball-joint socket.
Hycoe semi-moulded brake lining is standard
equipment on both cars. This lining is the same
as has been recently furnished for service on 353
and 340 cars.
Fig. 5. Hycoe semi-moulded brake lining is used
on both the 345 and 355.
The rear brake rocker shaft on the Cadillac
355 is mounted on the rear flange of the center
r Engine Support Shafi [ f,
Fig. 7. The brake pull rod is connected at the
lowest hole on the pedal lever.
The brake pull rod on both new cars is connected at the lowest hole on the brake pedal as
on the Cadillac 353. This is necessarv because
of the different co-efficient of friction of the
Hycoe semi-moulded lining used on these cars.
All brake and pedal adjustments and other brake
service operations are the same as on the I .a
Salle 340.
Fig. 6. The 355 brake rocker shafts are arranged
as on the V-16.
With the exception of the method of connecting the brake pull rod as noted above all the
brake cables and rods are adjusted exactly as on
the La Salle 340. The position of the brake
cams on the dust shields are also the same as on
the 340.
6
Cadillac V-8 Preliminary Service
Information
Clutch
The clutch is the same on both cars and is
identical with the late type 353 clutch, which
has bronze bushings in the driving plates, heavier
release fingers and a larger release shaft than
were used on earlier 340 and 353 clutches. Only
one type of clutch need be carried in stock to
service the 340, 345, and the 353 and 355 cars. The
service operations on the clutch are the same
on all these models.
Cooling System
The cooling system on both cars is identical
with the exception of the radiators and the fan
supports.
fan is mounted %" lower to correspond with the
lower radiator position. This requires a shorter
fan belt and shorter hose connections on the 355.
The fan belt on the new models should be
adjusted exactly the same as on the 340 and 353,
with Y&" slack midway between the pulleys.
The distance from center to center of the fan
pulleys is 1 0 ½ " on the 345 and 9y/ on the 355.
The change in fan position is taken care of bousing a different fan bracket on the 355. The
fans, shafts and bearings are identical on both
cars.
Fig. 8. Bronze bushings are used in the
clutch driving plates.
The radiator on the La Salle 345 is the same
as the La Salle 340, but is mounted vertically
instead of being tipped backwards slightly as
on the 340.
The Cadillac 355 radiator is new in shape and
is not interchangeable with any of the others,
(t is mounted lower on the frame than the La
Salle radiator and the top of the radiator is
lower with relation to the engine than on the
345.
The portion of the upper.tank over the fan
on the 355 is not as deep as on the 345, and the
Fig. 9. The 355 fan bracket. The dotted line
shows the shape of the 345 fan bracket.
The lower hose connection between the water
pump and the radiator on the 345 is the same
as on the 340 and 353. The upper hose connections are of different lengths on both models
and are not interchangeable with those on the
340, 353 or with each other.
Cadillac V-8 Preliminary Service
Information
7
Electrical System
The electrical system is the same on both cars
except for the rear lamps and horns. The general arrangement of both systems is similar to
that on the La Salle 340.
The horns used on the Cadillac 355 are tuned
in pairs the same as on the V-16. In case of
difficult}- with the horns on this job, only the
one giving trouble need be replaced, because of
the ease with which these horns may be
adjusted.
The same service instructions applv as on the
Cadillac 353.
Ignition
The ignition system is the same on both cars
with the exception of the spark advance control,
and is like the Cadillac 353.
The 345 spark control is like that used on the
340 and 353 while the 355 spark control is of the
push-pull type as used on the V-16.
The ignition coil on both of the new cars is
the same type as is used on the V-16. This coil
has improved windings that give it increased
efficiency. It is mounted horizontally between
the radiator support rods almost directly above
the distributor. The wires from the coil to the
distributor are protected by a heavy rubber
conduit.
Fig. 10. Warranty service on the new Delco battery used on both cars is taken care of by the United
Motors Service Corporation.
Storage Battery
The battery is the same on both cars. It is a
Dclco-Remv, type 15 CAY. 120 amp. hr. battery
and has greater capacity than the 100 amp. hr.
battery used on the La Salle 340. The battery
is carried under the front seat on both cars and
is readily accessible upon lifting out the front
cushion.
Warrant}' service on the new Delco battery
used on the 345 and 355 cars will be taken care
of by the United Motors Service Corporation.
Generator
The generator on both of the new cars is a
Delco. type 927-1). This is the same type that
was used on the 340 and 353 models. The driving chain for the generator is adjusted in the
same manner on all these models. The generator cut-out is mounted on top of the generator
as before.
Horns
The La Salic 345 has one horn only, mounted
under the left headlamp as on the 340, while the
Cadillac 355 ha* two horns, one under each
headlamp. The horns on both cars are the same
as used on the 353.
Fig. 11. The 355 distributor is iy2" higher
than the 345.
The distributor is \]A" higher on the Cadillac
355 than on the La Salle 345.
The ignition is timed exactly the same as on
the 353 and 340. with the spark fully advanced
and the IG/A mark (2'4" ahead of center on the
fly-wheel) in line with the indicator in the timing inspection opening. The contact gap should
be adjusted to .018" to .022" the same as before.
All other service operations on the electrical
system are the same as on the 340 and 353
models.
Starting Motor
The starting motor on both of the new cars
is a Delco type 728-D. This is the same starting
motor that is used on the 34<> and 353 model*
and it is interchangeable on all four cars.
8
Cadillac V-8 Preliminary Service
Wiring
The general arrangement of the chassis wiring
on both cars is similar to that on the La Salle
340 and Cadillac 353, except for the horn circuit
and for the connections at the terminal block.
The connections at the terminal block on the
355 are similar to those on the later V-16 cars.
Information
On the 345 these connections are the same as
on the 340.
The wiring diagram shown is for the La Salle
345. The circuits, on the Cadillac 355 are arranged in the same manner but of course provide for the two rear lamps and two horns used
on this model.
Engine
Fig. 12. The Cadillac 355 engine. The La Salle 345 is the same except in appearance and method of mounting.
The engines used on both cars are identical
with the exception of appearance and mounting
details. The bore is Z-/&"; the stroke 4-15/16";
the piston displacement 353 cubic inches, and the
X.A.C.C. rating 36.45 H.P.
All engine parts except the front covers and
fan supports are interchangeable on both cars
and on the Cadillac 353.
The La Salle 345 engine is supported at three
points in exactly the same manner as on the
353 and 340.
The Cadillac 355 engine has five-point suspension following the manner of the Cadillac
Y 1(>. and lln- same l\ pi- of rubber insulated
supports are used as on the Y-lo. The front
Fin. I J. The JS5 engine supports at the flywheel
housing are different than on the 345.
INSTRUMENT PANEL LIGHTS
6-avoLT a c p e u j
A - T A I L - 6 - 6 - 3 C P BULS
B - S T O P - 6 - 8 - I S C P BULB
PARKING LAMPS
d - B V O L T S S C P BULBS
Fig. 14.
STORAGE BATTERY
NOTE
6 VOLTS
CIRCUIT COMPLETED TO GROUND WITHOUT WWE
INDICATED WITH BROKEN L f C S THUS ™ ™ ~ ~
The La Salle 345 Wiring Diagram. The Cadillac 355 has two horns and two rear
with the terminal block connections the same as on the late V-16 cars.
lamps,
10
Cadillac V-8 Preliminary Service
supports at each side of the timing chain cover
differ slightly from the Cadillac V-16. Only one
through-bolt is used on each side on the Cadillac
355 instead of two as on the V-16. This bolt
passes directly through the center of the supporting cone on the motor support bracket and
should be tightened in the same manner as on
the V-16. by drawing the nut down until there
is no more play in the bolt and then tightening
the nut exactly one and one-half turns further
before putting the cotter pin in place.
The supports at the sides of the flywheel
housing are designed differently than on the
V-16. because of the greater width of the 355
frame at this point.
The supports at the rear of the transmission
on the Cadillac 355 are identical with those on
the Cadillac V-16 and are interchangeable with
them.
All other service operations are identical with
those on the La Salle 340 and Cadillac 353.
Information
''? %. \
«11
•/iSw^sifiP'Su
" * %%,' - * 'Ih^y
mwi
Q | ^ m ^ ^ ^ | Front Cover |
jj£f]l wLJ&JRKiJl m
JiHHlSr V^^3it4lslL% Jjf^Hi
'mafgL ^*<*&tJ&?Wamim * J G I H F !
&*.>0°k«,**->
•
\*
jfe^fcl* " '5*
iftfet
'i?*3
Engine Support
brackets
\^"^
Fig. 15. The Cadillac 355 engine has a new front
cover with an engine support bracket on each side
similar to the V-16.
Exhaust System
The exhaust system on both cars is the same,
but a new and more effective muffler is used.
This muffler has the same dimensions as used on
the 340 and 353 and can be used interchangeably
on all four cars.
The heat control valve for the intake manifold
is identically the same as on the 340 and 353, and
the same service operations apply.
Frame
The frame on the La Salle 345 is identically
the same as the frame used on the La Salle
340. The Cadillac 355. however, has an entirely
new frame, especially designed for the five point
motor support and the new type of spring sus-
pension now used on this job.
The wheelbase on both models is 134 inches,
the same as the La Salle 340. The side bar section on the Cadillac 355 frame is identically the
same as the La Salle 340.
Gasoline System
The gasoline system is the same on both cars
and is like that on the 340 except for the use of
an intake muffler. The tank on the 345 is exactly the same as the 340 and is interchangeable with it. A new tank of 21 gallons capacity,
however, is used on the 355. This tank is not
interchangeable with any other.
fcrr—.
Air Passage
Carburetor
to
Intake Muffler
The intake muffler silences the roar of the
intake characteristic at certain engine speeds
under open throttle. It is mounted on an elbow
attached to the bottom of the auxiliary air intake
of the carburetor. From the lowest point on
this elbow a duct leads to the primary air intake
at the bottom of the carburetor.
This intake muffler operates on an entirely
new principle. The silencing is not accomplished
by baffle plates, but by means of opposing vibrations set up within the muffler itself.
The accompanying sectional view of the intake
muffler shows that there is an unrestricted Ilow
Neutralizing
Chamber
Fig. 16. The intake muffler does not affect the
carburetor adjustments. They are made exactly as
on the 340 and 353 cars.
Cadillac V-8 Preliminary Service
of air through the muffler and elbow to the carburetor. The flow of air through the intake
manifold is not continuous, however, but is constantly being interrupted by the opening and
closing of the intake valves. These interruptions
cause vibrations that would develop into a pronounced roar at certain engine speeds under
open throttle, were it not for the intake muffler.
The vibrations thus caused set up counter vibrations within the neutralizing or dead-air
chamber of the muffler. Through scientific designing of this dead-air chamber, these opposing
vibrations arc of the exact frequency necessary
Information
11
to effectively neutralize the vibrations in the
inrushing air passing through the carburetor.
The intake muffler requires no attention and
the service operations on the rest of the gasoline
system are the same as on the 340 and 353.
Carburetor
The same carburetor is used on both of the
ntw cars. It is fully interchangeable on these
models but not with those on the 340 and 353
because of the use of the intake muffler on the
later models. The spray nozzle. No. 16, is the
same on 340, 345. 353 and 355 models.
Lighting
The headlamps on the La Salle 345 are the
same as on the La Salle 340. Those on the
Cadillac 355 are similar in design to those on the
Cadillac Y-16. The parking lamps on the fenders
are the same as used on the La Salle 340.
The arrangement of the rear lamps on both
cars is the same as in the past although the
lamps are entirely new in design.
r*
Springs
tit
COPY
n'o HOT BEHOVE
The front springs on the new cars are alike,
but are not fully interchangeable as rights and
lefts. The left-hand front spring on all except
a few of the first cars shipped, has the second
leaf wrapped about a quarter of a turn around
the front eye to give additional support at this
point for the steering modulator. The right
Fig. 18. The 355 shock absorber is attached under
the spring clip nuts as shown above. The 345 front
axle has the boss drilled for this connection.
Fig. 17. The main leaf on the left-hand front
spring is reinforced at the front end.
front spring, however, does not have this construction as there is not sufficient clearance at
the front outrigger. The right and left springs
arc. therefore, not interchangeable. The leftband front springs, however, are'interchangeable
"ii the 340. ,345 and 355 as are the right-hand
front springs.
The rear springs on the 345 are the same as
on the 340, but those on the 355 are different on
account of the new frame used on this car. On
the Cadillac 355 the rear springs are suspended
directly underneath the frame instead of alongside the frame side bars as in former Cadillac
practice.
Metal spring covers on the front and rear
springs of both models insure permanent lubrication. All the springs are provided with rebound clips, one at each end. to reduce side sway.
The rear springs on both cars are underslung as
in the past.
Cadillac
12
V-8
Preliminary
Shock Absorbers
T h e n e w t y p e of shock a b s o r b e r link with adj u s t a b l e c o n n e c t i o n s a n d an a l e m i t e fitting is
used on the 355. On this m o d e l t h e front shock
a b s o r b e r links a r e a t t a c h e d u n d e r t h e springclips, as on t h e Y-16 and t h e r e a r shock a b s o r b e r s
a r e m o u n t e d on t h e f r a m e side b a r in front of
t h e r e a r axle i n s t e a d of b e h i n d it. O n t h e 345.
h o w e v e r , t h e front and r e a r shock a b s o r b e r s a r e
a t t a c h e d as on the 340.
Service
Information
tions a n d the c o r r e s p o n d i n g key n u m b e r s a r e
given b e l o w .
Kev No.
Snubber fin
Bumper fin
43
25
27
44
28
?>2
T h e last t w o l e t t e r s indicate t h e s n u b b e r a n d
relief valves. In each of t h e s e i n s t a n c e s t h e
s n u b b e r d e s i g n a t i o n is given first.
T h e m e t e r i n g pin a n d relief valve e q u i p m e n t
o n b o t h cars is the s a m e and is listed b e l o w .
Metering fins
Front
Snubber
Bumper
25
...- 27
Relief V a l v e s
E
(>
Rear
Snubber
28
(4
Bumper
. S2
J
The m a r k i n g s i n d i c a t i n g t h e m e t e r i n g pin and
relief valve e q u i p m e n t on t h e shock a b s o r b e r s as
t h e y leave t h e factory will be found on the s n u b ber relief valve, a s i n d i c a t e d in t h e a c c o m p a n y i n g i l l u s t r a t i o n . In e x p l a n a t i o n of t h e s e m a r k s .
" 1 5 7 6 " d e n o t e s t h e t y p e of shock a b s o r b e r . T h e
" R " d e n o t e s the location on each car as s h o w n in
t h e c h a r t below.
345
355
Location
A
N
R.H. Front
B
P
L.H. Front
K
R
R.H. R e a r
J
S
1..H. R e a r
T h e n u m b e r following this l e t t e r indicates the
m e t e r i n g pin e q u i p m e n t . T h e v a r i o u s c o m b i n a -
Location
on Car
Relief Valve Equipment |
\ Metering
Pin Equipment
Fig. 19. These markings indicate the
pin and relief valve equipment when the
shipped.
metering
car was
On relief valves furnished by t h e f a r t s Division, only t h e m a r k i n g of t h a t relief valve will
be s h o w n . If t h e r e is any q u e s t i o n a b o u t t h e
size of t h e m e t e r i n g pin or if t h e o r i g i n a l s n u b ber relief valve has been c h a n g e d , it will be nece s s a r y t o r e m o v e t h e t o p cover t o d e t e r m i n e t h e
m e t e r i n g pin e q u i p m e n t .
Steering Gear
The s t e e r i n g g e a r on b o t h c a r s is identical. It
is of t h e h o u r - g l a s s w o r m and s e c t o r t y p e like
t h a t used on the Cadillac Y-16.
On the I-a Salle 345 t h e g e a r is m o u n t e d t h e
s a m e as on the 340. with the s e c t o r shaft h o r i zontal.
()n the Cadillac 355. h o w e v e r , t h e s t e e r i n g g e a r
is m o u n t e d with the s e c t o r shaft inclined u p w a r d at an angle with t h e side of the frame to
p r o v i d e sufficient c l e a r a n c e and p r o p e r a l i g n m e n t of the s t e e r i n g c o n n e c t i n g rod with the
steering arms.
The g e a r s are the s a m e e x c e p t for t h e
different m e t h o d of m o u n t i n g . T h e s e m o u n t i n g
differences a r e t a k e n care of by the shape of t h e
m o u n t i n g llanges on the s t e e r i n g g e a r s u p p o r t .
Fig. 20.
The S5S steering gear sector shaft
tipped upward at the outer end.
is
Cadillac V-8 Preliminary Service
Adjustments
The adjustments of the steering gear are made
in the same manner as on the V-16, excepting
for the amount of drag on the steering wheel.
A brief description of the construction of the
gear will better enable the service man to make
these adjustments correctly.
The two parts of the housing are held together by three studs, a pivot bolt and an eccentric bolt. The boles for the three studs are
oversize, permitting the small amount of movement necessary to adjust the sector back-lash.
The other two adjustments—worm up-and-down
plav and sector shaft end-play--are similar to
the' Cadillac 353.
Before making any of these adjustments, disconnect the steering connecting rod from the
steering gear arm. Then proceed in the following order:
13
Information
so that the line of pull will be practically tangent to the wheel. After tightening the clamp
bolt, re-check the pull with the spring scale.
If the adjustment is too tight, back it off until
the wheel spins free and then tighten it again
very carefully to secure proper adjustment.
3. Before disturbing the eccentric adjustment, check with the spring scale at the high
point of the sector. If the pull at this point is
between four and five pounds, then no further
adjustment of the gear is necessary.
I Tapered Roller Bearings
Fig. 22. Check the steering wheel drag carefully.
The limits of drag on the new cars are 1 lb. less than
on the V-16.
i"J|
J 3 5 5 Type Support |
If the pull at the high point of the sector is
less than four pounds, the back-lash between
the worm and the sector should be reduced. This
adjustment is accessible from below after dropping the splash pan.
I Worm Up-and-down Adjustment}
^^^fS^mmmmmmmmm^^ammm^mmmmmmmmmmmmmm^mm
Fig. 21. The steering gear on both cars is the
same type as on the V-16, but is not as heavy.
1. With the sector well off the high spot
(center position) make sure the sector shaft is
free from end-play, but not tight. This rarely
requires adjustment after leaving the factory.
2. Turn the steering wheel to the extreme
right. Tighten the worm adjusting nut until a
pull of one or two pounds at the rim of the
steering wheel is necessary to move the wheel
toward the left. This pull should be measured with a spring scale attached to the rim ot
the steering wheel. The spring scale furnished
with Tool IIWJy-T for fitting pistons can be
used for this purpose. In making this check,
hold the scale as close to the wheel as possible
I Housing Studs
Sector
Endplay
Adjustment
Lock Bolt
and Nut
(pivof Bolt r " |
' I
*——"~"~ J
[Eccentric Bushing I
Fig. 23. The adjustments of the steering gear are
the same as on the later V-16 type gear.
14
Cadillac V-8 Preliminary Service
It is made by means of a split eccentric bushing that is locked by two cones which expand
the bushing when drawn together with a bolt
and nut.
To make this adjustment, loosen the nuts on
the three housing studs not more than one-sixth
turn each, and the nut on the bushing clamp bolt
one-half turn. Do not loosen the pivot bolt nut,
but make sure that it is drawn up tight.
As installed at the f a c t o r y , the eccentric bushing must be turned clockwise (looking from the engine side of the gear) to move
the sector toward the worm. The adjustment is
correct when a pull of four to five pounds at
the rim of the steering wheel is necessary to
pull the wheel through the high spot in the center of the sector. In securing this adjustment,
always advance the sector toward the worm. If
the sector should be moved too far, bring it
back and advance it again toward the worm.
Before tightening the nut on the bushing
clamp bolt, turn the eccentric back very slightly,
not more than one-sixteenth of a turn. After
all the stud nuts and lock nuts have been drawn
up the adjustment should be carefully checked,
to make sure that it remains the same.
The drag on the up-and-down adjustment of
the worm and the high point of the sector is in
each instance about one pound less than on the
Cadillac V-16. This is on account of the lighter
construction of the 345 and 355 gears.
Steering Connecting Rod
It is important on cars using the hour-glass
type steering gear to set the high spot of the
sector exactly at the straight ahead position.
This adjustment must be made accurately as
follows:
Find the exact location of the high spot by
noting the point at which the spring scale shows
the maximum pull. Mark this point by placing
tape at the top center of the wheel. ""
With the front wheels in the straight ahead
position, shorten or lengthen the steering con-
Information
necting rod as necessary so that the steering arm
can be installed without moving the steering
wheel from the marked position. The standard
washers which have been furnished in the steering connecting rod are ]/z inch thick; one of
these washers will make a difference of 3 inches
measured at the steering wheel rim. In order
to permit a finer adjustment than this, washers
1/16 inch thick have been released and can be
procured on order from the Parts Division under
part number 885143.
Fig. 24. Be sure to place the washers against the
Hanged end of the stop as shown when adjusting the
length of the steering connecting rod.
It is important when making this adjustment
to place the washers in the proper position. The
washers should go next to the flanged end of the
stop. If they are placed over the small diameter
of the stop, they would then have no effect on
the length of the rod and would only increase
the spring pressure on the seats.
After reconnecting the steering rod, leave the
tape on the wheel and road-test the car. With
the car moving straight ahead, the tape should
not be more than one inch to the right or left
of its original position. If necessary, re-arrange
the washers in the steering connecting rod.
Transmission
The same transmission is used on both of the
new cars. It is the same type as on the Cadillac
353 and is identical with the Cadillac V-16, with
the same gear ratios:
High
.....
Intermediate
Low
Reverse ..—
1
1.5
2.5
3.0
to
to
to
to
1
1
1
1
All transmissions shipped by the Parts Division for service on the 345, 355 and V-16 cars
will be sent out without the ball-joint socket,
and will thus be interchangeable on all of these
models.
The removal of the transmission on the Cadillac 355 is like that on the V-16. The transmission
is attached to the crankcase in exactly the same
manner as on the 353, but the additional support
at the rear of the transmission case must also
be disconnected before the transmission can be
dropped. When reinstalling the transmission, it
is a good plan to loosen the front engine support
bolts. This permits the rubber cushions to become properly equalized at all five points of
Cadillac V-8 I'reliminary
support. After the through bolts at the rear
support have been drawn up tight, the front engine supports should be adjusted as directed in
the engine section
nit: engine sct-ut/ii.
The
'Hie removal of the transmission on the La
Salle 345 is identical with that on the 340 and
Cadillac 353.
Service
Information
15
have practical!} the same overall diameter and
rolling radius.
Speedometer Drive
The same type of speedometer drive is used
on both models as on the 340 and 353. The
pinions differ, however, and the correct speedometer drive pinion for each gear ratio is given
below.
Gear Ratio
....4.00
4.40
4.50
4.75
Pinion
19
20
21
22
These pinions take care of the 6.50 x 19 as
well as the 7.00 x 18 tires, as both of these tires
Fig. 25. The 355 rear engine support as seen from
underneath. The through bolts at the rear support on
the 355 must be removed before the transmission can
be dropped.
Wheels
Wood wheels with demountable rims are
standard equipment on both of the new cars. Demountable wheels, either wire, disc or demountable wood, are optional equipment at extra
charge.
Tire Sizes
All of the new La Salle 345 cars, excepting the
7-passenger models with demountable wheels,
are equipped with 6.50 x 19 tires. This includes
7-passenger cars with standard wood wheels.
7-passenger La Salle cars with demountable
wheels either wire, disc or demountable wood
are equipped with 7.00 x 18 tires.
On the. Cadillac 355 all cars with demountable
rims are equipped with 6.50 x 19 tires, Avhile all
cars with demountable wheels are equipped with
7.00 x 18 tires.
The correct pressure, for these tires is 45
pounds for the front and 40 pounds for the rear,
the same as the 340 and 353.
/ » / / r*
COPY
DOmTBE&QyE
100
PHINTTO
9-30
IN
U S A
ENGINE
LaSalle
345
Number of Cylinders
Valve arrangement
Bore and Stroke
Engine Mounting
Number of Points of Suspension
Make
Cylinder arrangement
Cylinder Bore finish
Cylinder Head finish
Number of Cylinders Cast Enbloc
Crankcase Integral
Crankcase Material, upper half
Crankcase Material, lower half
8
LHead
3%' x <vw
Bolts thru
rubber
3
Own
90° Vee
Honed
Cast
4
No
SiliconAluminum
Pressed Steel
Cadillac
355
1
LHead
3%"x4W
Bolt* thru
rubber
5
Own
90°Vee
Honed
Cast
4
No
SiliconAluminum
Pressed Steel
Piston Displacement (cu in.)
353
Taxable Horse Power
36.45
Maximum Brake Horse Power at RPM 95 @ 3000
353
36.45
95 @ 3000
Brake Horse Power cu. in. Displacement .269.
Maximum Brake Torque at RPM
225' lbs. @
1000
Maximum B.M.E.P. at RPM
97 lbs. sq. in.
@1000
.269
225' lbs. @
1000
97 lbs. sq. in.
©1000
Cadillac
370
__
Cadillac
452
~16
Overhead
3"x4"
Bolts thru
rubber
5
Own
45° Vee
Honed
Machined
8
No
SiliconAluminum
Aluminum
Alloy
368
452
46.9
57.5
135 @ 3400
165 © 3400
RPM
RPM
.366
.366
250' lbs. ©
300' lbs. @
1200
1400
102 lbs. sq. in. 102 lbs. sq. in.
©1200
@ 1400
Overhead
3^"x4*
Bolts thru
rubber
5
Own
45° Vee
Honed
Machined
6
No
SiliconAluminum
Pressed Steel
ENGINE (Continued)
Compression Pressure at RPM
LaSalle
345
Cadillac
355
Cadillac
370
Cadillac
452
108 lbs. sq. in.
@1000
5.35 to 1
5.26 to 1
108 lbs; sq. in.
@1000
5.35 to 1
5.26 to 1
111 lbs. sq. in.
@1000
5.27 to 1
108 lbs. sq. in.
©1000
5.11 to 1
5.36 to 1
700 lbs.
None
880 lbs.
1080 lbs.
None available None
Standard Compression Ratio
Optional Compression Ratio
Engine Weight dry with Flywheel less
Transmission and Clutch all accessories in place
700 lbs.
None
Extra cost for optional Head
PISTONS AND RINGS
Piston Make
Piston Material
Piston Weight, ounces (without rings,
pin or bushing)
Number of Piston Rings used
Is lower OO Groove drilled radially?
Number of Oil Rings used per Piston
Width of Oil Ring
Number of Compression Rings
Width of Compression Rings
Own
Molybdenum
Cast Iron
Own
Molybdenum
Cast Iron
Own
Molybdenum
Cast Iron
Own
Molybdenum
Cast Iron
24 oz.
4
Yes
2
One *A'
OneJ?'
2
One «4
One
24 oz.
4
Yes
2
One»/f,»
One J * '
2
Cta»*A'
OneJ?'
21½ oz.
4 '
Yes
1
1911/6 oz.
4
Yes
1
PISTONS AND RINGS
Piston Ring make
Number of Rings above Pin
w
One*/
Two % " •
3
One *A'
TwoJ*»
(Continued)
LaSalle
345
Cadillac
355
Cadillac
370
Cadillac
452
Perfect oircle
3
Perfect circle
3
Perfect circle
3
Perfect circle
3
CONNECTING RODS AND WRIST PINS
Wrist Pin dia.
Is Wrist Pin locked in Rod or Piston or
floating?
W
%"
Locked in
Piston
Lock screw
Diamond
Bored
10M"
Dropped
Forged Chrome
Molybdenum
Steel
Babbitt
Diamond
Bored
None
Locked in
Piston
Lock screw
Diamond
Bored
9H'
Dropped
Forged Chrome
Molybdenum
Steel
Babbitt
Diamond
Bored
None
Locked in
Piston
Lock screw
Diamond
Bored
9H'
Dropped
ForgedChrome
Molybdenum
Steel
Babbitt
Diamond
Bored
None
Poured
2%'%\%"
Poured
2H"*lH'
Poured
2H"*iys'
%'
Locked in
Piston
Wrist Pin locking method
Lock screw
Wrist Pin Hole finish
Diamond
Bored
Connecting Rod length, center to center 1 0 ^ '
Connecting Rod material
Dropped
Forged Chrome
Molybdenum
Steel
Connecting Rod Bearing material
Babbitt
Connecting Rod Bearing finish
Diamond
Bored
Connecting Rod Bearing type of shim
None
Connecting Rod Bearing Poured or
Separate Poured
Poured
Crank Pin Journal diameter and length 2 ^ ' x l ^ '
CRANKSHAFT
Vibration Dampener used?
Front Flywheel used?
Is Crankshaft completely machined?
Vibration Dampener type
Crankshaft Counter Weights used, No.
of
Length of Crankshaft to Outer Ends of
front and rear Bearings
Which Main Bearing takes thrust?
Main Bearing material
Main Bearing, No. of
Main Bearing, Interchangeable?
No. 1 Main Bearing dia. and length
No. 2 Main Bearing dia. and length
No. 3 Main Bearing dia. and length
No. 4 Main Bearing dia. and length
No. 5 Main Bearing dia. and length
Crankshaft material
Crankshaft Weight
LaSalle
345
Cadillac
353
Cadillac
370
Cadillac
452
No
No
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Spring controlled inertia
Yes
No
Yes
Spring controlled inertia
4 bolted to
shaft
4 bolted to
shaft
4 Fbrged
integral
4 Forged
integral
23%'
Rear
BabbittBronze backed
3
Yet
23%»
Rear
BabbittBronze backed
3
Yes
31»
No.t
Babbitt
Steel backed
4
Yes
2%"x\%"
2*A'x\W
2H'x2H'
2%'xlH'
2H"xl$i'
2H"x2W
2H' x %'
2H'xlH'
2H'xiH'
39¼ '
Center
Babbitt
Steel backed
5
Yes
25*' x 2%*
No. 1045 Steel
68¾ lbs.
No. 1045 Steel
68H lbs-
2Wx&Ar
No. 1045 Steel
83½ lbs.
2Wx\%"
2Wx\W
2H"xl%'
25*» x 3 % '
No. 1045 Steel
130 lbs.
CAMSHAFT
LaSalle
345
Cadillac
355
Cadillac
370
Camshaft Drive
Camshaft Bearings, No. of
Timing Chain make
Timing Chain width
Timing Chain pitch
Timing Chain adjustment
Camshaft location
Chain
4
Morse
Chain
4
Morse
Chain
4
Morse
one
At top of
crankcasein
center of Vee
Automatic
At top of
crankcasein
center of Vee
Valve Action
Roller cam follower, push
rods and
rocker arms
ThompsonThompsonThompsonRich
Rich
Rich
ThompsonThompsonThompsonRich
Rich
Rich
Tungsten Steel Tungsten Steel Silichrome
Steel
SiKchrome
SiKchrome
Steel
Steel
1%'
1%'
IH'
45°
30°
\H'
a
one
At top of
crankcasein
center of Vee
\w
8
¥
VALVES
Intake Valve make
Exhaust Valve make
Intake Valve material
Exhaust Valve material
Intake Valve clear dia.
Exhaust Valve clear dia.
Angle of Intake Valve Seat
Thru roller
cam slide
follower
Thru roller
cam slide
follower
Cadillac
452
Chain'
5
Morse
IH'
W
Automatic
At top of
crankcase in
center of Vee
Roller cam follower, push
rods and
rocker arms
ThompsonRich
ThompsonRich
Silichrome
Steel
Silichrome
Steel
1%'
»*'
45°
VALVES (Continued)
Angle of Exhuast Valve Seat
Valve Stem end style
LaSalle
345
Cadillac
355
Cadillac
370
Cadillac
452
45°
Split tapered
keeper
45°
Split tapered
keeper
«% r
Yes
45°
Split tapered
keeper
Yes
45°
Split tapered
keeper
"4t*
Yes
.006'
0
0
.004'
9°BTC
46.5° BBC
58° ABC
7°ATC
0
TDC
39° BBC
44° ABC
5°ATC
0
TDC
39° BBDC
44° ABC
5° ATDC
€
Valve Lift, Intake and Exhaust
Are Valve Guides removable?
Operating Tappet Clearance, Intake
.006'
at 35 MPH
Operating Tappet Clearance, Exhaust
.004'
Valve Timing Intake Opens
9°BTC
Valve Timing Exhaust Opens
46.5° BBC
Valve Timing Intake Closes
58° ABC
Valve Timing Exhaust Closes
7°ATC
LUBRICATION
Lubricating System type
Oil Pressure to Main Bearings?
Oil Pressure to Connecting Rod Bearings?
Oil Pressure to Wrist Pins?
Oil Pressure to Camshaft Bearings
Pressure
Yes
Pressure
Yes
Pressure
Yes
Pressure
Yes '
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
LUBRICATION (Continued)
Timing Gear Lubrication
LaSalle
345
Cadillac
355
Cadillac
370
Cadillac
452
Overflow from
pressure
regulator
Gear
Overflow from
pressure
regulator
Gear
Overflow from
pressure
regulator
Gear
Overflow from
pressure
regulator
Gear
40-50
20
30 lbs. @ 30
MPH
8
AC
2000 miles
Plug
Float
AC
High pressure
Alemite
Yes
40-50
20
30 lbs. @ 60
MPH
9
AC
2000 miles
u
H
*
Float
AC
High pressure
Alemite
Yes—Thermostatic control
40-50
20
30 lbs. @ 60
MPH
10
AC
2000 miles
Own
21-22 Gals.
Own
21-22 Gals.
Own
25 Gals.
Oil Pump type
Oil Grade recommended (S.A.E. Vise.)
Summer 40-50
Winter 20
30 lbs. @ 30
Normal Oil Pressure, lbs. @ MPH
MPH
8
Capacity of Oil Reservoir, Qts.
AC
Oil Pressure Gauge make
2000 miles
Change Oil every—
Plug
Type of Oil Dram
Float
Oil Reservoir Gauge type
AC
External Oil Filter make
High pressure
Chassis lubrication type
Chassis lubrication make
Alemite
Yes
Crankcase Ventilating System
H"*
Float
AC
High pressure
Alemite
Yes—Thermostatic control
FUEL
Gasoline Tank make
Gasoline Tank Capacity, Gallons
Own
23 Gals.
FUEL (Continued)
Fuel Feed type
Fuel Feed make
Gasoline Filter make
Carburetor make
Carburetor size
Carburetor type
Intake Mixture heated, how?
Heat adjustment
Carburetor Muffler make
Exhaust Pipe dia.
Muffler make
Manifolds: Intake—
LaSalle
345
Cadillac
355
Cadillac
370
Cadillac
452
Vacuum Tank
and Auxiliary
Pump
Stewart-Warner
Vac. Tank and
own Pump
Gascolator
Own
2'
Air valve
Manifold
Header
Automatic
AC
2H'
Oldberg
2-2 Port Cast
Iron IH'
Vacuum Tank
and Auxiliary
Pump
Stewart-Warner
Vac. Tank and
own Pump
Gascolator
Own
2'
Air valve
Manifold
Header
Automatic
AC
2H'
Oldberg
2-2 Port Cast
Ironl^*
2-4 Port Cast
Iron "Y"
Connection
Vacuum Tank
and Auxiliary
Pump
Stewart-Warner
Vac. Tank and
own Pump
Gascolator
Own
2-1H'
Air valve
Exhaust
hot-spot
None
AC
2H'
Oldberg
2-1%* 3 Port
Cast
Aluminum
2-2 Piece 6
Port Cast Iron
Vacuum Tank
and Auxiliary
Pump
Stewart-War'r
Vac. Tank and
own Pump
Gascolator
Own
Pump
Centrifugal
Pump
Centrifugal
2-4 Port Cast
Iron"Y"
Connection
Exhaust—
Air valve
Exhaust
hot-spot
None
None
2^'
Oldberg
2-1%' 4 Port
Cast
Aluminum
2-3 Piece 8
Port Cast Iron
COOLING
Cooling Circulation, type
Water Pump type
Pump
Centrifugal
Pump
Centrifugal
COOLING (Continued)
Water Pump Drive
Radiator Shutter make
Radiator Shutter Control
Radiator Core type
Radiator Core make
Cooling System Capacity, Gallons
Fan make
Fan dia.
LaSalle
345
Cadillac
355
Cadillac
370
Cadillac
452
Chain
Own
Thermostatic
Cellular
Harrison
6 Gals.
Own—Six
Blades
21'
Chain
Own
Thermostatic
Cellular
Harrison
6 Gals.
Own—Six
Blades
21'
Chain
Own
Thermostatic
Cellular
Harrison
6 ½ Gals.
Own—Six
Blades
21'
Chain
Own
Automatic
Cellular
Harrison
7 Gals.
Own—Six
Blades
21'
Delco Remy
Delco Remy
14°
30°
.018-.024
Two—6 lobe
Cam
18 mm Metric
Type G 10 AC
.025-.028
Delco Remy
Delco Remy
9°
32°
.015-.020
Two—8 lobe
Cam
18 mm Metric
Type G 10 AC
.025-.028
IGNITION
Ignition Unit make
Ignition Coil make
Distributor, Manual Advance
Distributor, Automatic Advance
Distributor Breaker Gap
Distributor Number of Contact Arms
Spark Plug Thread
Spark Plug make
Spark Plug Gap
Delco Remy
Delco Remy
19°
28°
.018-.022
Two—4 lobe
Cam
18 mm Metric
Type G 10 AC
.025-.028
Delco Remy
Delco Remy
19°
28°
.018-.022
Two—4 lobe
Cam
18 mm Metric
Type G 10 AC
.025-.028
BATTERY
Battery make
Battery Capacity, Ampere Hours
Battery Voltage
Battery, which Terminal is Grounded
Battery Case
Battery location
LaSalle
345
Cadillac
355
Cadillac
370
Cadillac
452
Delco
120
6
Positive
Moulded
composition
Under Rt. Fr.
Seat
Delco
120
6
Positive
Moulded
composition
Under Rt. Fr.
Seat
Exide
130
6
Positive
Moulded
composition
In Rt. Fr.
Fender
Exide
130
6
Positive
Moulded
composition
In Rt. Dust
Shield
21 Mazda
3 Mazda
3 Mazda
15 Mazda
3 Mazda
2
2
Yes
Depressed
beam
Parabolic
21 Mazda
3 Mazda
3 Mazda
15 Mazda
3 Mazda
2
2
Yes
Depressed
beam
Parabolic
LAMPS
Candle Power of Headlights
Candle Power of Fender lights
Candle Power of Tail lights
Candle Power of Stop lights
Candle Power of Dash lights
No. of Tail lights
No. of Stop lights
Are double Filament Bulbs used?
How are headlights dimmed?
Headlight reflector type
21 Mazda
3 Mazda
3 Mazda
IS Mazda
3 Mazda
1
1
Yes
Depressed
beam
Parabolic
LAMPS
Are Tail and Dash lights in Series?
Horn type
Horn make
No. of Horns used
21 Mazda
3 Mazda
3 Mazda
15 Mazda
3 Mazda
2
2
Yes
Depressed
beam
Parabolic
(Continued)
LaSalle
345
Cadillac
355
Cadillac
370
Cadillac
452
No
Vibrator
Delco Remy
1
No
Vibrator
Delco Remy
2
No
Vibrator
Delco Remy
2
No
Vibrator
Delco Remy
2
Delco Remy
(2 Pole)
Front end
Chain
3rd brush
Delco Remy
(2 Pole)
Front end
Chain
3rd brush
Delco Remy
(2 Pole)
Front end
Chain
3rd brush
175°
Delco Remy
7.5 amps.
approx.
8 to 10 MPH
18 amps.
175°
Delco Remy
7.5 amps.
approx.
8 to 10 MPH
18 amps.
175°
Delco Remy
7.5 amps.
approx.
8 to 10 MPH
18 amps.
19 MPH
7.3-7.7 Volts
28 MPH
7.3-7.7 Volts
30 MPH
7.3-7.7 Volts
l^tol
AC
l^tol
AC
AC^1
GENERATOR
Generator make
Generator Driven by
Delco Remy
(2 Pole)
Front end
Chain
3rd brush
Generator Voltage Regulation, type of
Generator Thermostat Opening temperature
175°
Cutout Relay make
Delco Remy
Voltage at Cutout closing
7.5 amps.
approx.
Car speed at Cutout closing
8 to 10 MPH
Generator Maximum Normal Charging
Rate, Cold
18 amps.
Car speed for Maximum Normal
Charging
19 MPH
Voltage at Maximum Normal Charging 7.3-7.7 Volts
Ratio of Generator RPM to Engine
RPM
l^tol
Ammeter make
AC
STARTING MOTOR
LaSalle
345
Delco Remy
(4 Pole)
Overrunning
Starting Motor type of drive
Clutch
Flywheel Teeth integral, or Steel Ring Steel Ring
Gear Ratio between Starter Armature
25 to 1 approx.
and Flywheel
Normal Engine Cranking speed, RPM 90-100 RPM
Starting Motor make
Cadillac
355
Cadillac
370
Cadillac
452
Delco Remy
(4 Pole)
Overrunning
Clutch
Steel Ring
Delco Remy
(6 Pole)
Overrunning
Clutch
Steel Ring
Delco Remy
(6 Pole)
Overrunning
Clutch
Steel Ring
25 to 1 approx. 25 to 1 approx. 25 to 1 approx.
75 R P M
80 RPM
90-100 RPM
CLUTCH
Clutch make
Own
Clutch type
2 Plata
Clutch vibration installation or neutralizer
None
Number of Clutch Driving Discs
3
Number of Clutch Driven Discs
2
Clutch operates in Oil or Dry
Dry
Clutch Facing inside dia.
7*
Clutch Facing outside dia.
10'
No. of Clutch Facings required
4
Total Area of Clutch Facing
226.20 sq. in.
Own
2 Plate
Own
2 Plate
Own
2 Plate
None
3
2
Dry
"
10*
4
226.20 sq. in.
None
3
2
Dry
7'
10»
4
226.20 sqs in.
None
3
2
Dry
7'
10»
4
226.20 sq. in.
CLUTCH (Continued)
Is Clutch adjustable?
Is Clutch Brake fitted?
LaSalle
345
Cadillac
355
Cadillac
370
Cadillac
452
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
TRANSMISSION
Transmission make
Transmission location
Number of forward speeds
Gear Ratio in high, standard 5-Pass.
4-Door Sedan
Transmission, ratio in second
Transmission, ratio in low
Transmission, ratio in reverse
Transmission Oil Capacity pounds or
quarts
Torque taken through
Drive taken through
Own
Unit power
plant
3
Own
Unit power
plant
3
Own
Unit power
plant
3
Own
Unit power
plant
3
4.54
1.5 to 1
2.5 to 1
3.0 to 1
4.54
1.5 to 1
2.5 to 1
3.0 to 1
4.54
1.5 to 1
2.5 to 1
3.0 to 1
4.39
1.5 to 1
2.5 to 1
3.0 to 1
3qts.
Torque tube
and radius rods
Torque tube
3qts.
Torque tube
and radius rods
Torque tube
3 qts.
Torque tube
and radius rods
Torque tube
3 qts.
Torque tube
and radius rods
Torque tube
Own
% Floating
Own
M Floating
REAR AXLE
Rear Axle make
Rear Axle type
Own
% Floating
Own
% Floating
REAR AXLE (Continued)
LaSsJIe
345
Minimum road clearance under center
7%'
of axle—tires inflated
Rear Axle Oil capacity, pounds or quarts 3 qts.
Spiral bevel
Type of final Gearing
Gear ratio standard 5-Pass. 4-Door
4.54
Sedan
Optional Gear ratios
4.07 and 4.91
How is Pinion adjusted
Shims
Wheels, type, std.
Artillery
Wheels, type, optional
Wire, Disc,
Demountable
Wood
Rim dia. std.
19'
5'
Rim width, std.
Rim width, wire wheels only
5'
U.S.
Tire make
Tire Size, std.
Tire Size, optional wheel equipment
Cadillac
355
Cadillac
370
Cadillac
452
7%»
3 qts.
Spiral bevel
7%'
3 qts.
Spiral bevel
m'
3 qts.
Spiral bevel
4.54
4.54
4.39
4l07 and 4.91 4.07 and 4.75
4.07 and 4.91
Shims
Shims
Shims
Artillery
Artillery^
Artillery
Wire, Disc,
Wire, Disc,
Wire, Disc,
Demountable
Demountable
Demountable
Wood
Wood
Wood
19'
19'
19'
5'
5'
5'
6'
6'
5'
U.S., Firestone, U.S., Firestone, U.S.,Fire8tone,
Goodyear
Goodyear
Goodyear
7.00 x 19
6.50 x 19
7.50 x 19
6.50 x 19
7.50 x 18
7.50 x 19
6.50 x 19 except 7.00 x 18
on seven passenger closed cars
which take 7.00
x!8
REAR AXLE (Continued)
No. of Plies in Tire
Front Tire inflation pressure
Rear Tire inflation pressure
LaSalle
345
Cadillac
355
Cadillac
370
Cadillac
452
6
45 lbs.
40 lbs.
6
45 lbs.
40 lbs.
6
45 lbs.
40 lbs.
6
45 lbs.
40 lbs.
SPRINGS
Front Spring type
Front Spring length
Front Spring width
Front Spring number of leaves, 5-Pass.
Sedan
Front Spring shackled front or rear
Rear Spring type
Rear Spring length
Rear Spring width
Rear Spring number of leaves 5-Pass.
Sedan
Spring Leaves lubricated with
Spring Shackles (rear) type
Spring Shackles make
Spring Cover, type—(make)
Semi-elliptic
38'
2'
Semi-elliptic
38'
2'
Semi-elliptic
40'
Semi-elliptic
42'
2H'
2H'
9
Rear
Semi-elliptic
58'
2'
9
Rear
Semi-elliptic
58'
2'
9
Rear
Semi-elliptic
58'
2Hr
10
Rear
Semi-elliptic
60'
11
Graphite &
Grease
Compression
Own
Metal
(Anderson)
11
Graphite &
Grease
Compression
Own
Metal
(Anderson)
11
Graphite &
Grease
Compression
Own
Metal
(Anderson)
10
Graphite &
Grease
Tension
Own
Metal
(Anderson)
m'
STEERING
Steering Wheel, dia.
Steering Gear, type
Steering Gear Ratio
Car turning dia., tire wall, right
left
Car turning dia., fender sweep, right
left
Castor Angle
Camber Angle
Toe In
Front Axle make
Front Axle section type
Front Axle end type
LaSaUe
345
Cadillac
355
Cadillac
370
Cadillac
45¾
18'
Hour Glass
Worm & Sector
17tol
48'9'
44'6*
50' 9"
46'6'
1¼ 00
1½
18'
Hour Glass
Worm & Sector
17tol
51'9'
46'6'
53'8'
48'8'
1¾°
1½°
15'
Hour Glass
Worm & Sector
l7tol
53' 8 '
53'3*
56'1*
55'8»
2^--3½0
19'
Hour Glass
Worm & Sector
17tol
55'
54'5*
56'2'
55'7'
2½°
Own
I-Beam
Reverse Effiot
Own
I-Beam
Reverse Elliot
Own
I-Beam
Reverse Elliot
W
Own
I-Beam
Reverse Elliot
Own
4
Internal articulated shoe
Mechanical
with Vacuum
assister
Own
4
Internal articulated shoe
Mechanical
with Vacuum
assister
Di°
BRAKES
Foot Brakes make
Number of complete Brakes
Foot Brake, type of mechanism
Foot Brake, method of application
Own
4
Internal articulated shoe
Mechanical
Own
4
Internal articulatedshoe
Mechanical
BRAKES (Continued)
LaSaUe
345
Front & Rear
Hycoe Semimoulded
Rear Brake Drum dia.
15'
Rear Brake, internal or external
Internal
Rear Brake Lining width
2'
Front Brake Drum dia.
15*
Front Brake, internal or external
Internal
Front Brake Lining width
2'
Per cent Braking power on Rear Wheeb 50%
Hand Brake location
Rear
Hand Brake
Rear Service
Location of Service Brakes
Brake Lining make
Cadillac
355
Cadillac
370
Cadillac
452
Front & Rear
Hycoe Semimoulded
15'
Internal
2'
15'
Internal
2'
50%
Rear
Rear Service
Front & Rear
Hycoe Semimoulded
15'
Internal
2'
15'
Internal
2'
50%
Rear
Rear Service
Front & Rear
Hycoe Semimoulded
16^'
Internal
! & •
Internal
2
HL*
50%
Rear
Rear Service
FRAME
Frame material
Frame depth
Frame thickness
Frame Flange width
Wheelbase
Carbon Steel
8'
Carbon Steel
8'
»4'
3* at Top—
Top—
2%'at bottom 3*
2 ¾at'bottom
134'
134'
Carbon Steel
8'
s
Carbon Steel
9'
3*
at Top—
2½'bottom
140'—143*
3 M ' at Top—
2½'bottom
148'
4'
FRAME (Continued)
Tread, front
Tread, rear
Overall length of car with Bumpers and
Spare Tires in Fenderwells
LaSalle
345
Cadillac
355
Cadillac
370
Cadillac
452
57¾ '
59½ '
57>£'
59½'
57¾ '
59H»
57&'
59H'
210 '—213 '
219¾ ' appro*.
202%'
202%'
215H"~218H' 2 2 2 ^ with
2 0 3 % ' with
2 0 3 % ' with
rear tire carrier rear tire carrier with fenderwells rear tire carrier
and trunk rack
La Salle V-8, Series 345
Cadillac V-8, Series 355
(.134-inch Wheelbase)
Style
List Delivered
2-Passenger Coupe
$2195.00
2-Passenger Roadster
2245.00
2-Passenger Convertible Coupe... 2295.00
5-Passenger Coupe
2295.00
5-Passenger Sedan
2295.00
5-Passenger Town Sedan
2345.00
7-Passenger Touring
2345.00
7-Passenger Sedan
2475.00
7-Passenger Imperial
2595.00
_
5-Passenger Sedanet
3245.00
5-Passenger Sedanet Cabriolet... 3245.00
5-Passenger All-Weather Phaeton. 3245.00
Chassis 134-inch Wheelbase
1900.00
Standard wheel equipment: Wood; tire size 6.50 x 19.
(134-inch Wheelbase)
Style
List Delivered
2-Passenger Coupe
$2695.00
(140—143-inch
Style
2-Passenger Coupe
5-Passenger Coupe
2795.00
5-Passenger Coupe
3895.00
5-Passenger Sedan
2795.00
5-Passenger Sedan
3895.00
2-Passenger Roadster
2845.00
2-Passenger Roadster
3945.00
5-Passenger Town Sedan
2845.00
5-Passenger Town Sedan
3945.00
5-Passenger Phaeton
4045.00
Extras
5 Wire wheels
$ 60.00
6 Wire wheels, fender wells, 2 spare tires and
trunk rack
190.00
5 Demountable wood wheels
50.00
6 Demountable wood wheels, fender wells, 2
spare tires and trunk rack
190.00
5 Disc wheels
50.00
6 Disc wheels, fender wells, 2 spare tires and
trunk rack
190.00
Above extra equipment carries 6.50 x 19 tires except
La Salle 7-Passenger Touring, 7-Passenger Sedan and
Imperial. For La Salle 7-Passenger Touring, 7-Passenger Sedan and Imperial use Cadillac V-8 extra equipment prices and tire sizes. Black side wall tires.
2-Passenger Convertible Coupe... 2945.00
Cadillac V-12, Series 370
Wheelbase)
List Delivered
$3795.00
5-Passenger Phaeton...,,..
2945.00
7-Passenger Sedan
2945.00
2-Passenger Convertible Coupe... 4045.00
7-Passenger Imperial.
3095.00
7-Passenger Sedan
4195.00
5-Passenger All-Weather Phaeton. 3795.00
7-Passenger Imperial
4345.00
Chassis 134-inch Wheelbase
5-Passenger All-Weather Phaeton. 4895.00
Chassis 152-inch Wheelbase.
.. 2000.00
2200.00
Standard wheel equipment: Wood; tire size 6.50 x 19.
Extras
5 Wire wheels
$ 70.00
6 Wire wheels, fender wells, 2 spare tires and
trunk rack
210.00
5 Demountable wood wheels
50.00
6 Demountable wood wheels, fender wells, 2
spare tires and trunk rack
190.00
5 Disc wheels
50.00
6 Disc wheels, fender wells, 2 spare tires and
trunk rack
190.00
Above extra equipment carries 7.00 x 18 tires. Black
side wall tires.
Chassis 140-inch Wheelbase
3100.00
Chassis 143-inch Wheelbase
. 3200.00
Interiors all body styles by Fleetwood.
Standard wheel equipment: Wood; tire size 7.00 x 19.
Black side wall tires.
Extras
5 Wire wheels
$ 70.00
6 Wire wheels, fender wells, 2 spare tires and
trunk rack
240.00
5 Demountable wood wheels
50.00
6 Demountable wood wheels, fender wells, 2
spare tires and trunk rack
230.00
Above extra equipment carries 7.50 x 18 tires, white
side wall, with black side wall tires optional.
Cadillac V-16, Series 452
(.148-inch Wheelbase)
Fleetwood Custom Bodies
Style No.
List Delivered
4302 2-Passenger Roadster
$5350.00
4260 5-Passenger Phaeton
6500.00
4380 All-Weather Phaeton
5750.00
4476 2-Passenger Coupe
5800.00
4276 2-Passenger Coupe
6850.00
4381 5-Passenger Coupe
5950.00
4235 2-Passenger Convertible
Coupe
6900.00
4361-S 5-Passenger Club Sedan. . . 5950.00
4161-S 5-Passenger Club Sedan... 6950.00
4330-S 5-Passenger Sedan
5950.00
4330 5-Passenger Imperial (opera
seats)
6300.00
4130-S 5-Passenger Sedan
6950.00
4130 5-Passenger Imperial (opera
seats)
7300.00
4355-S 5-Passenger Sedan Cabriolet 6125.00
4355 5-Passenger Imperial
Cabriolet (opera seats). 6350.00
4155-S 5-Passenger Sedan Cabriolet 7125.00
4155 5-Passenger Imperial
Cabriolet (opera seats). 7350.00
4375-S 7-Passenger Sedan (FF aux.
seats)
6225.00
4375 7-Passenger Imperial
(FF aux. seats)
6525.00
4175-S 7-Passenger Sedan (FF aux.
7225.00
Cadillac V-16—Continued
Style No.
List Delivered
4175 7-Passenger Imperial
(FF aux. seats)
$7525.00
4312 Town Cabriolet (opera seats) 6525.00
4212 Town Cabriolet (opera seats) 8750.00
4320 Town Cabriolet (quar. windows)—(FF aux. seats).. 6525.00
4220 Town Cabriolet (quar. windows)—(FF aux. seats).. 8750.00
4325 Town Cabriolet (full leather
quar.)—(FFaux.seats).. 6525.00
4225 Town Cabriolet (full leather
quar.)—(FF aux. seats). 8750.00
4391 Limousine Brougham (FF
aux. seats)
6525.00
4291 Limousine Brougham (FF
aux. seats)
8750.00
4264 Town Brougham (opera
seats)
9200.00
4264-B Town Brougham (special
cane work)
9700.00
Standard wheel equipment: Wood; tire size 7.50 x 19.
White side wall tires standard.
PRICE LIST
La Salle V-8
Cadillac V-8
Cadillac V-12
Cadillac V-16
Extras
5 Wire wheels
$ 70.00
6 Wire wheels, fender wells, 2 spare tires and
trunk rack
300.00
5 Demountable wood wheels
50.00
6 Demountable wood wheels, fender wells, 2
spare tires and trunk rack
280.00
5 Disc wheels
50.00
6 Disc wheels, fender wells, 2 spare tires and
trunk rack
280.00
October 15,1930
All prices f.o.b. Detroit
Subject to change without notice
CADILLAC MOTOR CAR COMPANY
Detroit, Michigan, U.S.A.
102
THE
BOOK
Or
THE
FLEETWOOD
All fenders and chassis black.
In addition, Fleetwood bodies in a variety of
rich colors, lighter in shade, will be brought
through periodically for stock. Bulletins will
announce these.
Colors available on open types, All-Weather
types, and Sedanette types will be announced
periodically.
BOOK
Or
FLEETWOOD
103
The first two blend well with complementary body colors, Taupe, because of its
neutral shade, going well with any color.
Fifteen special exclusive Fleetwood Aero
leathers by Radel. These are lightweight, soft,
pliable, and luxurious, four being specified for
stock with the balance optional without extra
charge, with a reasonable added time allowance.
UPHOLSTERY
rich exclusive Fleetwood Doeskin
Suede broadcloths by Wiese in subdued
colorings harmonizing with any exterior color.
*
Exclusive Fleetwood Wiese broadcloths:
E
IGHT
Weise 2969
Weise 2970
Weise 2971
Weise 2972
Weise 2973
Weise 2994
Wiese 3288
Wiese 3363
Optional
types.
in
-
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
-
-
- .
- - - - - - - - - - - - all enclosed drive
- - Green Gray
- Maroon Taupe
- - - Tan
- - Silver Gray
- Blue Gray
- .
Tan Taupe
- Dark Gray
-DarkTaupe
and transformable
Special Radel Aero leathers:
5885
4 5
2646
5897
68
6016
9205
5875
4339
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - - - - -
-
-Silver Gray
- - Pearl Gray
- - Blue Gray
- - Green Blue
- Blue (Standard)
- - Dark Blue
- Deep Maroon
- Rich Maroon
Green (Standard)
Three special Venetian mohairs of short nap.
Exclusive Fleetwood Venetian mohairs:
108-T 109-T 110-T -
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Optional in all enclosed drive and
types.
-
-
Green
Gray
Taupe
transformable
/
Vanity cases are designed exclusively for Fleetwood bodies
and contain 8-day clock, mirror, leather cigarette
case, and two ash receivers
104
THE
0019 - 6012 - 9128 - 9131 - .
743 - .
2645 - .
Optional
open types.
BOOK
OF
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - . - - - . - - . - - - - - in All-Weather
THE
FLEETWOOD
- - - Soft Green
- - - - Dark Green
- - Light Brown
. - Dark Brown
. Tan (Standard)
- Black (Standard)
Phaeton, Sedanette, and
BOOK
Of
Wiese 2662-F, 2762-F - - Wiese 2663-F, 2763-F - - \V1Cse 2665-F, 2765-F - - Wiese 2666-F, 2766-F - - Optional in All-Weather
types.
FLEETWOOD
- - - - - - - - Phaeton
105
- -Gray
Blue Gray
Maroon Taupe
Tan Taupe
and Sedanette
W i t h the w i d e variety offered in the regular
exclusive Fleetwood upholstery materials, we
recommend t h a t cloths be selected from Wiese
collection N o . 61 only when absolutely necessary,
as there will be delays involved in securing
curtains and o t h e r t r i m m i n g materials t o
m a t c h . These delays are avoided in the case of
the regular Fleetwood materials.
Enclosed drive types and transformable types.
Eight exclusive Fleetwood Wiese broadcloths—optional.
Three exclusive Venetian mohairs—optional.
Any material in current Wiese Collection No. 61—
optional.
All-Weather
This picture shows a hood with damaskeen finish,
a unique and attractive treatment
Six weatherproof Bedford cords by Wiese.
T h e corded fabrics are used for seats w i t h plain
material to m a t c h for head linings. T h e waterproof feature of these materials makes t h e m
especially desirable for All-Weather types.
Special ivaterproof Wiese Bedford cords:
Wiese 2659-F, 2759-F - - - Wiese 2661-F, 2761-F - - - - - -
- Green Gray
Brown Gray
and Sedanette
types:
Fifteen Fleetwood Radel Aero leathers—optional.
Six weatherproof Fleetwood Wiese Bedford cords—
optional.
Open types:
Fifteen Fleetwood Radel Aero leathers—optional.
(In the case of All-Weather Phaetons, Sedanettes, and
open types, four of the exclusive Fleetwood Radel Aero
leathers in the sample book will be specified for stock.
The balance are optional with reasonable added time
allowance.)
-X "J*!. *^t
r^yywryK^y-ag^PT^jv^-TB
> *. M ' - T , ! * .J"
'.
n
MM^»<» «n»o m
eries 355^
Color
Combinations
MAY
1931
CADILLAC MOTOR CAR COMPANY
M A D E IN DETROIT, U. S. A.
r
Lower Panels—Maxfield Parish
Blue, Duco 2466772.
Mouldings, Fenders, Chassis—
Maxfield Parrish Blue Deep,
Duco 2466774
Stripe, Door Saddle—Tokio
Ivory R-M 20722.
"Combination 29
Rear Quarters, Upper Panels,
Mouldings—Black.
Ix>wer Panels, Window Reveals .
— G a r n e t M a r o o n , R-M
20661.
Door Saddle—Cerise Red, Duco
2446031.
Stripe—Gold Bronze.
Combination 30
Rear Quarters, Upper Panels,
Mouldings, Fenders, Chassis
—Ravenswood Brown, R-M
28845.
Lower Panels, Window Reveals
—Saxon Gray, R-M 21160.
Door Saddle—Indiana Gray,
R-M 20157.
S t r i p e — T o k i o I v o r y , R-M
20722.
Combination 31
I
Series 355-V-8 Optional Colors
Rear Quarters, Upper Panels,
Mouldings—Black.
Lower Panels, Window Reveals
— H i g h l a n d G r e e n , R-M
20338.
Door Saddle—Chantilly Green,
Duco 2464628.
S t r i p e — T o k i o I v o r y ,R-M
20722.
Combination 32
Entire Body—Black.
Stripe, Door Saddle—Tokio
Ivory, R-M 20722.
Combination 33
Rear Quarters, Upper Panels,
Mouldings—Black.
Lower Panels, Window Reveals
—Viceroy M a r o o n , R - M
20623.
Door Saddle—Flamingo Carmine, R-M 20549.
Stripe—Gold Bronze.
Combination 34
E n t i r e Body—Classic Blue
22290.
H' i S r . ^ : .'•.•'<
Door Saddle—Salamanca Blue,
Duco 2466163.
S t r i p e — T o k i o I v o r y , R-M
20722.
Combination 35
Entire Body—Black.
Stripe, Door Saddle—Flamingo
Carmine, R-M 20549.
Combination 36
Rear Quarters, Upper Panels,
Mouldings—Black.
Lower Panels, Window Reveals
— K e n n e r l e y B l u e , R-M
22304.
Door Saddle—Maxfield Parrish
. Blue, Duco 2466772.-Z.3 3X.I.
S t r i p e — T o k i o I v o r y , R-M
20722.
Combination 37
Rear Quarters, Upper Panels,
Mouldings, Fenders, Chassis
—Auto Green, Duco 2466676.
Lower Panels, Window Reveals
—Auto Green Light, Duco
2466669.
Stripe, Door Saddle—Chantilly
Green, Duco 2464628.
Combination 38
•Combination 29 is not recommended for 5-Passenger and 7-Passenger
Closed Body Styles.
Fenders-Chassis—Black, on all combinations where no mention is made
otherwise.
Roof—Black all Stationary Top Body Styles.
Roof—Burbank, all Open Car, Convertible Coupe Body Styles.
Regular extra charges apply to fenders-chassis in color.
Optional Upholstering
Closed Body Styles
41T131
43T131
46T131
49T131
52T131
55T131
96T131
Taupe Mohair
Green Broadcloth
Grey Broadcloth
Taupe Broadcloth
Taupe Whipcord \ Optional, Convertible Coupe,
Gray Whipcord /
All-Weather Phaeton
Tan-Brown Pin Stripe Broadcloth
Open and Convertible Body Styles
9T1331
10T1331
11T1331
12T1331
Brown Leather
Green Leather
Black Leather
Blue-Gray Leather
s
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