Making the Move to Healthy Choices- A Healthy

Making the Move to Healthy Choices- A Healthy
Making the Move to
Healthy
Choices
A HeAltHy eAting toolkit
for Recreation, Sport and Community
Food SeRviCe PRovideRS
2
Making the Move to Healthy Choices
Acknowledgements
the eat great and Participate program would like to thank Manitoba’s Healthy Food Choices for
Community Recreation Facilities Committee for permission to use material from their Making the Move to
Healthy Choices toolkit. thank you as well to Alberta Health Services- nutrition Services for allowing us to
adapt content from their Marketing Healthy Food Choices resource (see pages 31-32).
We also gratefully acknowledge the contribution and support of the eat great and Participate program
Steering Committee members: Recreation newfoundland and labrador, Sport newfoundland and
labrador, School Sports newfoundland and labrador, Community youth network, Aboriginal Sport and
Recreation Circle of newfoundland and labrador, Regional Health Authorities/ Regional nutritionists,
Healthy Students Healthy Schools, department of tourism, Culture and Recreation and the department of
Health and Community Services.
Reviewers
Regional nutritionists from the four Regional Health Authorities; Food Service Providers from the following
recreation, sport and community facilities: Jack Byrne Arena, gros Morne Arena, Mount Pearl glacier,
Fortune Arena, the Bay Arena, Joe Byrne Memorial Stadium, Wabush Arena, and Hodder Memorial
Stadium.
3
A Healthy Eating Toolkit for Recreation, Sport and Community Food Service Providers
Table Of Contents
5
7
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8
9
9
11
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19
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21
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23
28
30
31
33
34
36
37
38
38
39
39
40
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41
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42
43
43
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46
SECTION 1 - Introduction
SECTION 2 - Taking Steps to Offering Healthy Choices
Step 1: gather a team
Step 2: Where are we now?
Step 3: Where do we want to go?
SECTION 3 - Healthy Food & Beverage Guidelines for Concessions,
Canteens, Snack Bars and Special Events
Planning your new Menu
Meal items
Snacks
Beverages
Breakfast ideas
tips for Planning a tournament or Special event
SECTION 4 - Choosing Healthy Food and Beverages
eating Well with Canada’s Food guide
Beverages for Health and Sport
Reading labels
SECTION 5 – Marketing the Healthy Choices
SECTION 6 - Food Safety
Celebrating Our Successes
Food Safety tips
Food Handlers’ Storage guide
SECTION 7 - Quick and Healthy Recipes
Fast Chili
vegetable Barley Soup
Beef and vegetable Stew
Chicken and vegetable Wrap
Whole Wheat Macaroni and Cheese
Quick Spaghetti Sauce
taco Wrap
Chicken and Cheese Quesadillas
easy Coleslaw
Quick and easy Bean Salad
easy Hummus
tasty yogurt dip
yogurt Parfait
Fruit Smoothie
SECTION 8 - Additional Resources
Contact information
Advertising template
4
Making the Move to Healthy Choices
SECTION
Introduction
Purpose
everyone at all ages needs to eat healthy to perform at his or her best
whether it’s for leisure and recreation activities or for competitive sports.
the goal of the Making the Move to Healthy Choices toolkit is to make
it easier for recreation, sport and community food service providers
to provide more healthy food and beverage choices in their facilities
and at events. By offering healthy choices in these settings we
1
encourage and create opportunities for people to eat healthy.
the Making the Move to Healthy Choices toolkit has been
developed through the eat great and Participate program and
is intended for food service providers in recreation, sport and
community facility concessions, canteens, snack bars and
special events. in some cases, recommendations may apply to
vending machines. it also includes strategies for marketing
healthy choices, food safety considerations and easy to
prepare healthy recipes.
Some of the facilities and events that we hope will use this
toolkit to increase the healthy food and beverage choices
they serve include:
5
Adopting healthy behaviors early in life is important for good health. Recreation, sport and community
settings provide a place for community members of all ages to come together to enjoy being physically
active. it makes sense to also promote healthy eating in these settings.
in 2010, a provincial survey of Food, Beverages and Food Service equipment in Recreation Facilities in
newfoundland and labrador showed that most recreation food service providers offer primarily unhealthy
food choices. Based on a sample of 35 facilities, the top four food choices were chips, chocolate bars, hot
dogs and fries.
Most commonly available food choices served in Newfoundland and
Labrador recreation facilities, 2010 survey.
Chips
Chocolate Bars
Hot dogs
Fries
Chicken nuggets
onion Rings
Poutine
Soup
Burgers
granola Bars
Chili
%
79%
79%
64%
61%
57%
54%
50%
36%
32%
32%
29%
0
10
6
Making the Move to Healthy Choices
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
SECTION
Taking Steps to Offering
Healthy Choices
Changing the types of food and beverages offered in a facility’s
concession, canteen, snack bar, at events and in vending machines can
2
sometimes timing is everything.
STEP 1: GATHER A TEAM
involve key people that can help make it easier to introduce more
healthy food and beverage choices. Consider:
support.
and opinions.
Moms).
STEP 2: WHERE ARE WE NOW?
Before you start making decisions about what changes you
want to make, it is important to take a look at your current
situation. Consider:
7
STEP 3: WHERE dO WE WANT TO GO?
it is great to develop a long term goal of what you want to do, but it is just as important to identify what
plan to move forward. Consider:
changes that are “easy wins”. early success will keep everyone motivated and positive during more
8
Making the Move to Healthy Choices
SECTION
Healthy Food & Beverage
Guidelines for Concessions,
Canteens, Snack Bars and
Special Events
3
PLANNING YOuR MENu
the following healthy food and beverage guidelines can help you
determine the choices to offer in your concession, canteen, snack bar
and at events. Some items may be suitable for vending machines.
the guidelines are adapted from the Provincial School Food
guidelines and places food and beverages into "serve most",
"serve moderately" and "not included under serve most and serve
moderately" categories.
Vendinges
machin
e
vending servic
Contact your
y
k what health
provider to as
ve available
choices they ha
have them
and request to
facility.
offered in your
9
HEALTHY FOOd ANd BEvERAGE GuIdELINES
SERvE
Most
generally lower in added fat and/or sugar and/or salt.
included in one of the four food groups of Canada’s Food guide.
SERvE
Moderately
result of processing.
included in one of the four food groups in Canada’s Food guide.
Not Included
uNdER SERvE MOST ANd SERvE MOdERATELY
not found in Canada’s Food guide.
low in nutrients and may be high in fat, sugar, salt, caffeine and/or calories.
tend to be highly processed foods that often are deep fried, or high in trans fats or sodium.
these foods do not contribute to a healthy eating environment.
10
Making the Move to Healthy Choices
MEAL ITEMS
SERvE
CHILI
(See recipe on page 38)
Most
lots of vegetables.
SALAd
alternatives (e.g. beans, tuna, chicken, turkey, nuts, seeds, egg) and lower
fat cheese.
SkINLESS CHICkEN
BuRGER
and grill as needed.
SOuP
(See recipe on page 38)
barley, brown rice, wild rice or whole grain pasta.
STEW
(See recipe on page 39)
SANdWICH/WRAP
(See recipe on page 39)
vegetables and lower fat cheese.
mayonnaise.
remove some of the salt.
TACO SALAd
lower fat cheese and lots of vegetables.
WHOLE WHEAT
MACARONI
ANd CHEESE
(See recipe on page 40)
tomatoes.
11
A Healthy Eating Toolkit for Recreation, Sport and Community Food Service Providers
SERvE
Moderately
PIzzA
cheese.
PACkAGEd BREAdEd
CHICkEN BuRGER
PACkAGEd CHICkEN
FINGERS
Not Included
uNdER SERvE MOST ANd SERvE MOdERATELY
dEEP FRIEd FRENCH
FRIES
HOT dOG/
SAuSAGE
if on the menu:
portions.
if on the menu:
poultry and the shortest ingredients list.
ONION RINGS
if on the menu:
12
Making the Move to Healthy Choices
Simple
to prepare
Tips
11
the types of food and beverage
choices you offer will depend on the
EQuIPMENT and SPACE available
to prepare and to keep foods at the
proper temperature.
22
dEEP-FRYING is NOT a
recommended method of cooking.
33
Adding COLOuRFuL vegetables to
sandwiches, lean burgers, subs and
COLESLAW
Buy the bagged varieties and add your own carrot and
of coleslaw dressing (see recipe on page 42). Makes a great
FRESH OR FROzEN FRuIT WITH dIP
the bottom with yogurt and top with fruit pieces.
MIxEd BEAN SALAd
drain and rinse a can of assorted beans, a can of green beans
great sellers.
dressing made of vinegar, oil and pinch of sugar (see recipe on
page 42).
with: cucumber, spinach, lettuce,
tomato, peppers and carrots.
SALMON, TuNA OR EGG SANdWICH
bread choices such as whole
wheat, rye, multi-grain and
pumpernickel.
onions, celery, shredded carrot and lettuce and serve on whole
vEGETABLES ANd dIP
Fill the bottom of a clear cup with a small amount of dip and
place a variety of vegetables inside such as carrots, cucumbers,
celery, peppers or broccoli (see dip recipe on page 43).
vEGETABLE SALAd
Chop a variety of seasonal, fresh vegetables and marinate with
a dressing made of vinegar, oil and pinch of sugar.
Most deep-fried foods can be either
baked or grilled.
44
Check your FLYER for promotions
fruit before planning your menu.
Serve what’s on sale and in season
to get the best price on healthy
food.
13
A Healthy Eating Toolkit for Recreation, Sport and Community Food Service Providers
for the
Grill
CHICkEN CAESAR WRAP
grill pieces of chicken breasts with small amount of Caesar dressing. Add romaine
lettuce and parmesan cheese. Wrap and serve.
CHICkEN PITA
(cucumber and yogurt) and serve on a whole wheat pita.
FAjITA
Wrap warm grilled chicken breast pieces, salsa and pepper strips in a tortilla. offer
with light sour cream on the side.
QuESAdILLA
ingredients such as salsa, onions, shredded grilled chicken breast and lower-fat
cheese. top with a second tortilla and grill on both sides until warm and cheese is
melted (see recipe on page 41).
GRILLEd CHEESE, TOMATO ANd HAM
lightly spread one side of whole grain bread with a non-hydrogenated soft
margarine. top with shredded lower fat cheese, tomato slices and lean ham. grill
and serve.
14
Making the Move to Healthy Choices
for the
Oven
BAkEd APPLE
Core apples and add small amount of brown sugar and cinnamon. Bake or
microwave until apple is warm and tender.
BAkEd POTATO
Add your own toppings such as salsa, chili, sautéed mushrooms, baked beans,
onions and lower fat shredded cheese.
MEATLOAF MuFFINS
tin for a perfect serving for one.
PITA PIzzAS
top a whole grain pita with a variety of ingredients such as vegetables, lean ham,
and lower fat cheese. Bake until cheese is melted.
TuNA MELT
15
A Healthy Eating Toolkit for Recreation, Sport and Community Food Service Providers
for the
Stove Top
CORN ON THE COB
Boil this great summer vegetable for an event or tournament special.
Serve with non-hydrogenated soft margarine.
PASTA ANd SAuCE
Serve whole grain ravioli, tortellini or spaghetti with a tomato based
sauce. if purchasing canned sauce, choose one that is lower in sodium
(see recipe on page 40).
QuICk PASTA SALAd
toss whole grain pasta shapes with assorted vegetables and small
amount of italian dressing. Sprinkle with herbs such as dill to add more
POTATO SALAd
Skip the traditional and make a light version using boiled potatoes (with
skins on), shredded carrot, green or red onion and a small amount of
italian dressing.
TACO RICE SALAd
seasonings such as cumin and chili powder. top with lower fat shredded
cheese.
TACO WRAP
toss cooked lean ground beef in mild salsa. Add romaine lettuce,
tomatoes and onion. Wrap and serve. offer a spicy version by using
medium or hot salsa (see recipe on page 41).
16
Making the Move to Healthy Choices
SNACkS
new snack foods are always entering the food market. Choosing the healthiest option is not easy. Some
mostly sugar.
Follow the guidelines below for healthy snack ideas for concessions, canteens, snack bars and events. Some
items may be suitable for vending machines.
SERvE
vEGETABLES & FRuIT
(FRESH, FROzEN,
CANNEd, dRIEd)
Most
added salt’.
100% FRuIT SNACkS
APPLE SAuCE OR
OTHER FRuIT SAuCE
FROzEN 100% FRuIT
juICE BAR
FRuIT SMOOTHIE
milk and yogurt with 2% of less milk fat (M.F).
BAGEL
YOGuRT
YOGuRT TuBE
YOGuRT PARFAIT
granola.
CHEESE STRING
TRAIL MIx
17
A Healthy Eating Toolkit for Recreation, Sport and Community Food Service Providers
SERvE
Moderately
POPCORN
PRETzELS
GRANOLA BAR
COOkIE
MuFFIN
When making homemade: use ingredients such as non-hydrogenated soft
margarine, oats, nuts and dried fruit.
Whole grain varieties.
Aim for trans-fat free and less than 1 g of saturated fat.
When making homemade use canola or vegetable oil to replace shortening,
lard or hard butters. try adding oatmeal, fruit and fruit purees.
Not Included
uNdER SERvE MOST ANd SERvE MOdERATELY
ICE CREAM
if on the menu:
CHIPS/CRISPERS
if on the menu:
NACHO CHIPS ANd
CHEESE SAuCE
if on the menu:
CHOCOLATE BAR
if on the menu:
PASTRY, PIE, dONuT
if on the menu:
PACkAGEd CRACkERS
ANd CHEESE
if on the menu:
18
Making the Move to Healthy Choices
BEvERAGES
the following beverage guidelines offer some ideas for concessions, canteens, snack bars and events. Some
items may be suitable for vending machines. if offering large beverages, offer them in containers with a
screw top so customers don’t need to drink them all at once.
SERvE
FOuNTAIN OR BOTTLEd
WATER
WHITE MILk OR FORTIFIEd
SOY BEvERAGE
100% vEGETABLE juICE
100% FRuIT juICE
additives (e.g. caffeine, sodium).
SERvE
CHOCOLATE MILk
HOT CHOCOLATE
MAdE WITH MILk
YOGuRT dRINkS
Most
Moderately
choose varieties that offer 20%
or more of % daily value for Calcium.
added sugar.
Not Included
uNdER SERvE MOST ANd SERvE MOdERATELY
FLAvOuREd WATER
COFFEE/POP/SOFT dRINkS/
ENERGY dRINkS
if on the menu:
sodium).
See Beverages for Health and Sport on page 28.
19
A Healthy Eating Toolkit for Recreation, Sport and Community Food Service Providers
Breakfast
ideas
BAGELS
offer whole wheat or whole grain varieties. Serve with non-hydrogenated soft margarine or light cream
cheese.
BREAkFAST BANANA SPLIT
Cook up a batch of oatmeal from plain rolled oats. Add sliced banana and a scoop of yogurt. top with
raisins or dried cranberries and serve.
BREAkFAST ON THE GO
Pack a brown paper bag with a small carton of milk or 100% fruit juice carton, a piece of fruit or a fruit
be creative!
SMOOTHIES
strawberries and 100% orange juice (see recipe on page 44).
FANTASTIC FRENCH TOAST
small amount of syrup and yogurt.
SPICY ROLL-uP
Scramble egg on the grill. Roll up in a wrap with lower fat shredded cheese and salsa.
ENGLISH EGG SANdWICH
the microwave and serve.
20
Making the Move to Healthy Choices
planning meals & snacks
Tips for
for a tournament or special
event
11
22
33
44
55
6
vegetables and fruit are great choices and should be included in every meal and snack. Check local
what’s on sale and in season to get the best price and most nutrition.
oatmeal or whole wheat pasta. limit commercial baked goods, crackers, cookies, biscuits, pies,
Choose lean cuts of meat and trim off fat.
Remove skin from poultry. limit or avoid
processed meats such as bologna, wieners,
bacon, sausages and pepperoni.
offer dressings, sauces or dips on the side.
Goody Bag ideas
Here are some ideas for items to give out in the
tournament or event goody Bag instead of candy,
chips, pop and other high sugar, fat and sodium
items:
the best beverages to offer at events are water,
milk, and 100% fruit and vegetable juices.
When offering meals, a plate is well balanced when
it has one quarter meat and alternatives, one quarter
grain products and one half vegetables. to complete
the meal, add a glass of milk to drink and some
fresh fruit for dessert.
and oranges
fruit)
21
A Healthy Eating Toolkit for Recreation, Sport and Community Food Service Providers
Quick,
healthy
meal combos for
tournaments or events
Consider including a menu of healthy meal combos in your tournament or event information packages
so people are aware healthy choices will be available before they arrive.
Recipes can be found in Section 7: Quick and Healthy Recipes.
A
A
CHICkEN ANd CHEESE QuESAdILLAS
Carrot Sticks with Hummus
Fruit Smoothie
B
B
BEEF ANd vEGETABLE STEW
Whole grain Bun
orange
Small White or Chocolate Milk Carton
C
C
CHICkEN ANd vEGETABLE WRAP
yogurt Parfait
Small 100% Fruit Juice Carton
D
D
CHILI
Whole grain Bun
Apple
Small White or Chocolate Milk Carton
22
Making the Move to Healthy Choices
SECTION
Choosing Healthy Food
and Beverages
4
Eating
Well with
Canada’s
Food Guide
23
is One Food Guide Serving?
the examples below.
Make each Food Guide Serving count…
wherever you are – at home, at school, at work or when eating out!
Eat at least one dark green and one orange vegetable each day.
t(PGPSEBSLHSFFOWFHFUBCMFTTVDIBTCSPDDPMJSPNBJOFMFUUVDFBOETQJOBDI
t(PGPSPSBOHFWFHFUBCMFTTVDIBTDBSSPUTTXFFUQPUBUPFTBOEXJOUFSTRVBTI
ozen or canned
vegetables
Leafy vegetables
( ⁄2 cup)
t&OKPZWFHFUBCMFTTUFBNFECBLFEPSTUJSGSJFEJOTUFBEPGEFFQGSJFE
Raw:
Children
Age in Years
2-3
Sex
Cooked:
125
mLfat,
( ⁄2sugar
cup)or salt.
Choose vegetables and fruit prepared with
little or no
added
1
Recommended Number of Food Guide Servings per Day
1
250 mL (1 cup)
Have vegetables and fruit more often than juice.
4-8
Teens
9-13
Girls and Boys
Fresh, frozen or
canned fruits
1Vegetables
fruit or 125 mL (1⁄2 cup)
5 6
and Fruit 4
Adults
14-18
Females
19-50
Males
Females
51+
Males
100% Juice
125 mL (1⁄2 cup)
Females
Males
7
8 7-8 8-10 7
7
6
7 6-7 8
7
Make at least half of your grain products whole grain each day.
t&BUBWBSJFUZPGXIPMFHSBJOTTVDIBTCBSMFZCSPXOSJDFPBUTRVJOPBBOEXJMESJDF
t&OKPZXIPMFHSBJOCSFBETPBUNFBMPSXIPMFXIFBUQBTUB
Choose grain products that are lower in fat, sugar or salt.
t$PNQBSFUIF/VUSJUJPO'BDUTUBCMFPOMBCFMTUPNBLFXJTFDIPJDFT
t&OKPZUIFUSVFUBTUFPGHSBJOQSPEVDUT8IFOBEEJOHTBVDFTPSTQSFBETVTFTNBMMBNPVOUT
Grain
Products
3
1
1
t)BWFN-DVQT
PGNJMLFWFSZEBZGPSBEFRVBUFWJUBNJO%
t%SJOLGPSUJGJFETPZCFWFSBHFTJGZPVEPOPUESJOLNJML
Milk and
Alternatives
Select lower fat milk alternatives.
t$PNQBSFUIF/VUSJUJPO'BDUTUBCMFPOZPHVSUTPSDIFFTFTUPNBLFXJTFDIPJDFT
Have meat alternatives such as beans, lentils and tofu often.
powdered
Canned milk
Fortified soy
Eat at least two Food Guide Servings of fish each week.*
constituted)
(evaporated)
beverage
t$IPPTFGJTITVDIBTDIBSIFSSJOHNBDLFSFMTBMNPOTBSEJOFTBOEUSPVU
(1 cup)
125 mL (1⁄2 cup)
250 mL (1 cup)
Select lean meat and alternatives prepared with little or no added fat or salt.
Yogurt
Meat
175and
g
Alternatives
(3⁄4 cup)
t5SJNUIFWJTJCMFGBUGSPNNFBUT3FNPWFUIFTLJOPOQPVMUSZ
t6TFDPPLJOHNFUIPETTVDIBTSPBTUJOHCBLJOHPSQPBDIJOHUIBUSFRVJSFMJUUMFPSOPBEEFEGBU
t*GZPVFBUMVODIFPONFBUTTBVTBHFTPSQSFQBDLBHFENFBUTDIPPTFUIPTFMPXFSJOTBMUTPEJVN
BOEGBU
Enjoy a variety
d fish, shellfish,
Cooked
of foods
fromlegumes
, lean meat
175 mL (3⁄4 cup)
the four
1
⁄2 oz.)/125 mL (1⁄2 cup)
food groups.
Satisfy your
thirstTofu
with water!
Drink 150
water regularly.
g or It’s a
calorie-free
way
⁄4 cup)
175
mLto(3quench
your thirst. Drink more
water in hot weather or
when you are very active.
2
1
1
Making the Move to Healthy Choices
3
2
2
3
Having the amount and type of food recommended and
following the tips in Canada’s Food Guide will help:
Eggs
2 eggs
3
Cheese
50
3 g (121⁄2 oz.)3
The chart above shows how many Food Guide Servings you
need from each of the four food groups every day.
t.FFUZPVSOFFETGPSWJUBNJOTNJOFSBMTBOEPUIFSOVUSJFOUT
Peanut or nut butters
Shelled nuts
t3FEVDFZPVSSJTLPGPCFTJUZUZQFEJBCFUFTIFBSUEJTFBTF
30
mL
(2
Tbsp)
certain types of cancer and osteoporosis.and seeds
60 mL (1⁄4 cup)
t$POUSJCVUFUPZPVSPWFSBMMIFBMUIBOEWJUBMJUZ
t Include a small amount – 30 to 45 mL (2 to 3 Tbsp) – of unsaturated fat
each day. This includes oil used for cooking, salad dressings, margarine
and mayonnaise.
t Use vegetable oils such as canola, olive and soybean.
t Choose soft margarines that are low in saturated and trans fats.
t Limit butter, hard margarine, lard and shortening.
24
Kefir
g2
1-2175
(3⁄4 cup)
6
Cooked pasta
or couscous
125 mL (1⁄2 cup)
2 3-4 3-4 3-4 2
)FBMUI$BOBEBQSPWJEFTBEWJDFGPSMJNJUJOHFYQPTVSFUPNFSDVSZGSPNDFSUBJOUZQFTPGGJTI3FGFSUPXXXIFBMUIDBOBEBHDDBGPSUIFMBUFTUJOGPSNBUJPO
Oils and Fats
6
Cereal
Cold: 30 g
Hot: 175 mL (3⁄4 cup)
Cooked rice,
Flat breads
⁄2 pita or 1⁄2 tortilla (35 g) bulgur or quinoa
125 mL (1⁄2 cup)
Drink skim, 1%, or 2% milk each day.
Bagel
⁄2 bagel (45 g)
35g)
4
t(PGPSEBSLHSFFOWFHFUBCMFTTVDIBTCSPDDPMJSPNBJOFMFUUVDFBOETQJOBDI
t(PGPSPSBOHFWFHFUBCMFTTVDIBTDBSSPUTTXFFUQPUBUPFTBOEXJOUFSTRVBTI
Choose vegetables and fruit prepared with little or no added fat, sugar or salt.
t&OKPZWFHFUBCMFTTUFBNFECBLFEPSTUJSGSJFEJOTUFBEPGEFFQGSJFE
Have vegetables and fruit more often than juice.
What is One Food Guide Serving?
Look at
the examples
below.
Make
at least
half of your grain products whole grain each day.
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t&OKPZXIPMFHSBJOCSFBETPBUNFBMPSXIPMFXIFBUQBTUB
Choose grain products that are lower in fat, sugar or salt.
Fresh, frozen or canned vegetables
Leafy vegetables
Fresh, frozen or
125 mLt$PNQBSFUIF/VUSJUJPO'BDUTUBCMFPOMBCFMTUPNBLFXJTFDIPJDFT
(1⁄2 cup)
Cooked: 125 mL (1⁄2 cup)
canned fruits
Raw: 250 mL (1 cup)
1 fruit or 125 mL (1⁄2 cup)
100% Juice
125 mL (1⁄2 cup)
t&OKPZUIFUSVFUBTUFPGHSBJOQSPEVDUT8IFOBEEJOHTBVDFTPSTQSFBETVTFTNBMMBNPVOUT
Drink skim, 1%, or 2% milk each day.
Breadt)BWFN-DVQT
PGNJMLFWFSZEBZGPSBEFRVBUFWJUBNJO%
Cooked rice,
Flat breads
Bagel
1
1
1 slice (35g)
⁄2 bagel (45 g)
⁄2 pita or 1⁄2 tortilla (35 g) bulgur or quinoa
t%SJOLGPSUJGJFETPZCFWFSBHFTJGZPVEPOPUESJOLNJML 125 mL (1⁄2 cup)
Cereal
Cold: 30 g
Hot: 175 mL (3⁄4 cup)
Cooked pasta
or couscous
125 mL (1⁄2 cup)
Select lower fat milk alternatives.
t$PNQBSFUIF/VUSJUJPO'BDUTUBCMFPOZPHVSUTPSDIFFTFTUPNBLFXJTFDIPJDFT
Milk or powdered
milk (reconstituted)
250 mL (1 cup)
Canned milk
(evaporated)
125 mL (1⁄2 cup)
Fortified soy
beverage
250 mL (1 cup)
Kefir
175 g
(3⁄4 cup)
Yogurt
175 g
(3⁄4 cup)
Cheese
50 g (1 1⁄2 oz.)
Have meat alternatives such as beans, lentils and tofu often.
Eat at least two Food Guide Servings of fish each week.*
t$IPPTFGJTITVDIBTDIBSIFSSJOHNBDLFSFMTBMNPOTBSEJOFTBOEUSPVU
Cooked legumes
Cooked
fish, shellfish,
Tofu
Eggs
175 mL (3⁄4 cup)
poultry, lean meat
150 g or
2 eggs
1
1
3
75 g (2 ⁄2 oz.)/125 mL ( ⁄2 cup)
175 mL ( ⁄4 cup)
Peanut or nut butters
30 mL (2 Tbsp)
Shelled nuts
and seeds
60 mL (1⁄4 cup)
Select lean meat and alternatives prepared with little or no added fat or salt.
t5SJNUIFWJTJCMFGBUGSPNNFBUT3FNPWFUIFTLJOPOQPVMUSZ
t6TFDPPLJOHNFUIPETTVDIBTSPBTUJOHCBLJOHPSQPBDIJOHUIBUSFRVJSFMJUUMFPSOPBEEFEGBU
Oils and Fats
t Include a small amount – 30 to 45 mL (2 to 3 Tbsp) – of unsaturated fat
t*GZPVFBUMVODIFPONFBUTTBVTBHFTPSQSFQBDLBHFENFBUTDIPPTFUIPTFMPXFSJOTBMUTPEJVN
BOEGBU
each day. This includes oil used for cooking, salad dressings, margarine
and mayonnaise.
t Use vegetable oils such as canola, olive and soybean.
t Choose soft margarines that are low in saturated and trans fats.
t Limit butter, hard margarine, lard and shortening.
Enjoy a variety
of foods from
the four
food groups.
Satisfy your
thirst with water!
Drink water regularly. It’s a
calorie-free way to quench
your thirst. Drink more
water in hot weather or
when you are very active.
)FBMUI$BOBEBQSPWJEFTBEWJDFGPSMJNJUJOHFYQPTVSFUPNFSDVSZGSPNDFSUBJOUZQFTPGGJTI3FGFSUPXXXIFBMUIDBOBEBHDDBGPSUIFMBUFTUJOGPSNBUJPO
* Health Canada provides advice for limiting exposure to mercury from certain types of fish. Refer to www.healthcanada.gc.ca for the latest information.
25
A Healthy Eating Toolkit for Recreation, Sport and Community Food Service Providers
Advice for different ages and stages…
Children
Women of childbearing age
Men and women over 50
'PMMPXJOHCanada’s Food GuideIFMQT
DIJMESFOHSPXBOEUISJWF
"MMXPNFOXIPDPVMECFDPNFQSFHOBOU
BOEUIPTFXIPBSFQSFHOBOUPS
CSFBTUGFFEJOHOFFEBNVMUJWJUBNJO
DPOUBJOJOHfolic acidFWFSZEBZ
1SFHOBOUXPNFOOFFEUPFOTVSFUIBU
UIFJSNVMUJWJUBNJOBMTPDPOUBJOTiron
"IFBMUIDBSFQSPGFTTJPOBMDBOIFMQZPV
GJOEUIFNVMUJWJUBNJOUIBUTSJHIUGPSZPV
5IFOFFEGPSvitamin DJODSFBTFTBGUFS
UIFBHFPG
:PVOHDIJMESFOIBWFTNBMMBQQFUJUFTBOE
OFFEDBMPSJFTGPSHSPXUIBOE
EFWFMPQNFOU
t4FSWFTNBMMOVUSJUJPVTNFBMTBOETOBDLT
FBDIEBZ
t%POPUSFTUSJDUOVUSJUJPVTGPPETCFDBVTF
PGUIFJSGBUDPOUFOU0GGFSBWBSJFUZPG
GPPETGSPNUIFGPVSGPPEHSPVQT
t.PTUPGBMMCFBHPPESPMFNPEFM
*OBEEJUJPOUPGPMMPXJOHCanada’s Food
GuideFWFSZPOFPWFSUIFBHFPGTIPVME
UBLFBEBJMZWJUBNJO%TVQQMFNFOUPG
˜H*6
1SFHOBOUBOECSFBTUGFFEJOHXPNFOOFFE
NPSFDBMPSJFT*ODMVEFBOFYUSBUP
'PPE(VJEF4FSWJOHT
FBDIEBZ
Here are two
examples:
t)BWFGSVJUBOEZPHVSU
GPSBTOBDLPS
t)BWFBOFYUSB
TMJDFPGUPBTUBU
CSFBLGBTUBOEBO
FYUSBHMBTTPGNJML
BUTVQQFS
How do I count Food Guide Servings in a meal?
Here is an example:
Vegetable and beef stir-fry with rice, a glass of milk and an apple for dessert
26
Making the Move to Healthy Choices
N-DVQ
NJYFECSPDDPMJ
DBSSPUBOETXFFUSFEQFQQFS
=
Vegetables and Fruit'PPE(VJEF4FSWJOHT
H1⁄2P[
MFBOCFFG
=
Meat and Alternatives'PPE(VJEF4FSWJOH
N-DVQ
CSPXOSJDF
=
Grain Products'PPE(VJEF4FSWJOHT
N-UTQ
DBOPMBPJM
=
QBSUPGZPVSOils and FatsJOUBLFGPSUIFEBZ
N-DVQ
NJML
=
Milk and Alternatives 'PPE(VJEF4FSWJOH
BQQMF
=
Vegetables and Fruit 'PPE(VJEF4FSWJOH
Eat well and be active today and every day!
Take a step today…
The benefits of eating well and being active include:
t Better overall health.
t Lower risk of disease.
t A healthy body weight.
t Feeling and looking better.
t More energy.
t Stronger muscles and bones.
Be active
To be active every day is a step towards better health and a healthy body weight.
It is recommended that adults accumulate at least 2 1⁄2 hours of moderate to vigorous
physical activity each week and that children and youth accumulate at least 60 minutes
per day. You don’t have to do it all at once. Choose a variety of activities spread
throughout the week.
Start slowly and build up.
Eat well
Another important step towards better health and a healthy body weight is to follow
Canada’s Food Guide by:
t Eating the recommended amount and type of food each day.
t Limiting foods and beverages high in calories, fat, sugar or salt (sodium) such as cakes and
pastries, chocolate and candies, cookies and granola bars, doughnuts and muffins, ice cream
and frozen desserts, french fries, potato chips, nachos and other salty snacks, alcohol, fruit
flavoured drinks, soft drinks, sports and energy drinks, and sweetened hot or cold drinks.
Read the label
t Compare the Nutrition Facts table on food
labels to choose products that contain less
fat, saturated fat, trans fat, sugar
and sodium.
t Keep in mind that the calories and
nutrients listed are for the amount of
food found at the top of the Nutrition
Facts table.
Limit trans fat
When a Nutrition Facts table is not available, ask
for nutrition information to choose foods lower in
trans and saturated fats.
Nutrition Facts
Per 0 mL (0 g)
Amount
% Daily Value
Calories 0
Fat 0 g
SaturateD 0 g
+ Trans 0 g
Cholesterol 0 mg
Sodium 0 mg
Carbohydrate 0 g
Fibre 0 g
Sugars 0 g
Protein 0 g
Vitamin A 0 %
Calcium
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
Vitamin C
Iron
0%
0%
Have breakfast every day. It may help
control your hunger later in the day.
Walk wherever you can – get off the
bus early, use the stairs.
Benefit from eating vegetables and fruit
at all meals and as snacks.
Spend less time being inactive such as
watching TV or playing computer games.
Request nutrition
information about
menu items when
eating out to help
you make healthier
choices.
Enjoy eating with
family and friends!
Take time to eat and
savour every bite!
For more information, interactive
tools, or additional copies visit
Canada’s Food Guide on-line at:
www.healthcanada.gc.ca/foodguide
or contact:
Publications
Health Canada
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9
E-Mail: [email protected]
Tel.: 1-866-225-0709
Fax: (613) 941-5366
TTY: 1-800-267-1245
Également disponible en français sous le titre :
Bien manger avec le Guide alimentaire canadien
This publication can be made available on
request on diskette, large print, audio-cassette
and braille.
© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of Health Canada, 2011. This publication may be reproduced without permission.
No changes permitted. HC Pub.: 4651 Cat.: H164-38/1-2011E-PDF ISBN: 978-1-100-19255-0
27
A Healthy Eating Toolkit for Recreation, Sport and Community Food Service Providers
Beverages
for health and sport
SPORTS dRINkS
Sport drinks are not appropriate for everyone and Canada’s Food guide recommends limiting the
use of sports drinks.
What you should know about sports drinks:
Generally, if exercising for less than an hour and exercising at a low to moderate
intensity, plain water will quench your thirst and help you perform at your best.
ENERGY dRINkS
these beverages are not recommended for children and youth.
What you should know about energy drinks:
these beverages.
after athletic events. the caffeine, high sugar content and carbination
of energy drinks can interfere with hydration.
may be added to energy drinks are unknown.
28
Making the Move to Healthy Choices
CAFFEINE IN BEvERAGES
What you should know about caffeine:
Maximum daily limits for caffeine
400 mg
Adults
Caffeine content of common beverages
(per 237 ml serving)
300 mg
Women of childbearing age
135 mg
Coffee
85 mg
10-12 years
80 mg
energy drink
62.5 mg
7-9 years
43 mg
tea
45 mg
4-6 years
36-46 mg
Pop
30 mg
green tea
8 mg
Milk
5 mg
Hot Cocoa
Source: Health Canada, 2011
Source: Health Canada, 2012
SuGAR IN BEvERAGES
What you should know about sugar:
content, and contribute to tooth decay, especially
when sipped over long periods.
Sugar content of common beverages
(per 250 ml serving)
33 g
Fruit drinks and Fruit Punches
28 g
Pop
23 g
iced tea
16 g
Sports drink, Fruit Flavour
Fact
= 1 cube or
4 g of sugar
r
1 tsp of suga
9 tsp of sugar
1 can of pop =
er day for
1 can of pop p
gar
= 31.3 lbs of su
1 year
Source: Health Canada, 2010. Nutrient Values in Some Common Foods
29
A Healthy Eating Toolkit for Recreation, Sport and Community Food Service Providers
reading
Labels
COMPARE FOOd ANd BEvERAGE PROduCTS ANd MAkE HEALTHY CHOICES
nutrition information on food labels can help you make informed choices and are based on Health
Canada regulations.
Nutrition Claims:
2) tell you how your food and beverage choices can affect your health.
Ingredient List:
tell you what ingredients are in the packaged food or beverage, from most to least by weight.
Nutrition Facts Table:
give you detailed information about the nutrition content of food and beverages.
NuTRITION FACTS TABLE
Nutrition Facts
Per 1/3 cup (55 g)
Per. All nutrition information on
the label is based on the amount
food package.
the label will give information on
calories and 13 core nutrients.
30
Making the Move to Healthy Choices
Amount
Calories 40
Fat 0 g
Saturated 0 g
+ Trans 0 g
Cholesterol 80 mg
Sodium 200 mg
Carbohydrate 0 g
Fibre 0 g
Sugars 0 g
Protein 8 g
Vitamin A
Vitamin C
Calcium
Iron
% Daily Value
0%
9%
0%
0%
0%
0%
4%
2%
the % daily value tells you if there
is a little or a lot of a nutrient in
one serving. Choose foods with
5% daily value or less for fat,
saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol
and sodium. Choose foods with
vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium and
iron.
the number after the nutrient is
the actual amount of the nutrient
5
SECTION
Marketing the Healthy Choices
to encourage people to choose the healthy food and beverage choices
consider the 4 P’s of marketing:
1. Product availability
2. Pricing
3. Placement
4. Promotion
11 Product Availability
be available. take a look at what healthy choices you are already
providing and where you might consider making changes.
22 Pricing
Price may be one of the most important factors in helping
people make healthier choices. if healthy foods cost more
than less healthy foods, it may discourage people from
purchasing them.
Example of a
GOLd
MEdAL
than less healthy choices to encourage sales.
what choices they would like to see offered. your
sales of these foods may soar!
choices.
Package
Snack:
Yogurt Parfait
Meal:
Chicken and veggie Wrap
veggies and dip
Fruit Cup
Milk
Hint: Have the team pre-order the meal before
the tournament to save time in preparations.
31
33 Placement
Remember the saying “out of sight…out of mind”? Healthier food choices should be more plentiful and
more visible than the less healthy choices. try these tips:
garnishes to make these foods stand out.
44 Promotion
Rather than label foods as “healthy” or “unhealthy”, focus on recommendations from Canada’s Food
guide and promote the positive attributes of food such as what nutrients they contain, how they fuel the
body and how they keep the body healthy.
HOW TO PROMOTE?
the price of fruit on “Fresh Fruit Fridays”.
beverages.
promote healthy food and beverage choices.
trying it - they’ll be more likely to buy it later.
Remember to involve youth in the planning committee and
promotion process - ask them how to get youth support and buy-in!
32
Making the Move to Healthy Choices
SECTION
Food Safety
Food safety is an important issue for the food service industry.
6
provide food safety education for employees, volunteers
and/or summer students serving or preparing food.
For more information, visit http://www.servicenl.gov.nl.ca/.
you may also want to encourage employees, volunteers and/or
summer students serving or preparing foods to take a Food Safety
http://www.health.gov.nl.ca/health/publichealth/envhealth/
foodsafetyinfo.html.
33
Fact
food safety
Tips
lting from
any illness resu
on of
the consumpti
food.
contaminated
sources of
most common
ess.
foodborne illn
HANdLE PERISHABLE FOOdS SAFELY
Perishable foods must be handled safely to protect from contamination. Please follow
these recommendations:
11
AvOId THE TEMPERATuRE dANGER zONE
bacteria can grow (e.g. on the kitchen counter).
22
CLEAN
Wash your hands frequently with soap and water:
- Before handling food or eating.
- After handling raw meats.
- After using the toilet, touching pets/animals and changing diapers.
- Note: Hand sanitizers are not a substitute for washing your hands.
eaten).
ml (2 tsp) of bleach per gallon (3.8 l) of water).
33
SEPARATE
juices in the raw meats from contaminating these foods.
34
Making the Move to Healthy Choices
Action
Refrigeration
Temperature Required
4
Cooking
internal temperature of
containing
poulty, eggs,
10 minutes
44
COOk
internal temperature, as listed in the table.
other potentially
to prevent the growth of bacteria.
Pork, lamb, veal,
beef (whole cuts)
Rare roast beef
Poultry
internal temperature of
and storage temperatures.
internal temperature
minutes
internal temperature
seconds
74
ground meat
71
eggs
63
seconds
Fish
71
Reheating
74
Holding hot foods 60
Cooling
60
20
55
CHILL
improper cooling is one of the leading causes
of food borne illness.
or less, to prevent the growth of bacteria.
cold water (needs to be changed every 30
minutes), or a microwave oven, not at room
temperature.
20
water must be cooked immediately.
4
66
RE-HEATING & HOT HOLdING FOOd
dishes and warming trays are not permitted
for re-heating.
and warming trays can be used for hot
holding.
35
A Healthy Eating Toolkit for Recreation, Sport and Community Food Service Providers
36
Making the Move to Healthy Choices
SECTION
Quick and Healthy Recipes
7
37
fast
Chili
Ingredients (8 Servings)
vegelable barley
Soup
Ingredients (12 Servings)
1 cup
1 cup
1 cup
sliced white or red onion
diced green bell peppers
sliced mushrooms
3 tbsp
chili powder
2l and 1 cup (2250 ml)
3/4 cup
3/4 cup
3/4 cup
3/4 cup
3/4 cup
3/4 cup
dash
chicken broth (reduced sodium)
diced potato
diced celery
diced onion
diced carrot
diced turnip
barley
ground black pepper
Ingredients (24 Servings)
Ingredients (36 Servings)
3 cups
3 cups
3 cups
sliced white or red onion
diced green bell peppers
sliced mushrooms
9 tbsp
chili powder
directions
6l and 3 cups (2750 ml)
2 1/4 cups
2 1/4 cups
2 1/4 cups
2 1/4 cups
2 1/4 cups
2 1/4 cups
1 tsp
chicken broth (reduced sodium)
diced potato
diced celery
diced onion
diced carrot
diced turnip
barley
ground black pepper
directions
softened, about 5 minutes.
celery, onion, carrot, turnip, barley and pepper to taste.
30 minutes.
Adapted from Great Food Fast, Dietitians of Canada.
38
Making the Move to Healthy Choices
Adapted from Cook!, Dietitians of Canada.
Stew
beef & vegetable
Ingredients (9 Servings)
1/4 tsp
Pinch
salt
ground black pepper
2 tbsp
1
3 cups
3/4 cup
3/4 cup
3
3
1 cup
non-hydrogenated soft margarine
onion, chopped
beef stock (reduced sodium)
potato, diced
turnip, diced
carrots, sliced
stalks celery, chopped
sliced mushrooms
Ingredients (4 Servings)
4
2
8 leaves
1 cup
1/4 cup
1 cup
1/4 cup
Ingredients (12 Servings)
12
6
24 leaves
3 cups
3/4 cup
3 cups
Ingredients (27 Servings)
3/4 tsp
1/2 tsp
salt
ground black pepper
6 tbsp
3
2 l and 1 cup (2250 ml)
2 1/4 cups
2 1/4 cups
9
9
3 cups
non-hydrogenated soft margarine
onions, chopped
beef stock (reduced sodium)
potato, diced
turnip, diced
carrots, sliced
stalks celery, chopped
sliced mushrooms
chicken &
vegetable
3/4 cup
Wrap
large soft tortillas (whole wheat)
cooked chicken breasts, thinly sliced
green leaf lettuce
carrot, grated
red onion, thinly sliced
peppers, thinly sliced (red, yellow,
orange or green)
Cheddar or Monterey)
Ranch dressing (could also try other
sauces and spreads such as BBQ,
large soft tortillas (whole wheat)
cooked chicken breasts, thinly sliced
green leaf lettuce
carrots, grated
red onion, thinly sliced
peppers, thinly sliced (red, yellow,
orange or green)
Cheddar or Monterey)
Ranch dressing (could also try other
sauces and spreads such as BBQ,
directions
directions
breast sliced (if using), 2 green leaves of lettuce, 1/4 cup carrot, 1
tbsp red onion, 1/4 cup peppers and 2 tbsp cheese.
plate.
and wrap in parchment paper.
beef and onion; cook for about 2 minutes or until beef is browned
and onion is softened.
Adapted from Manitoba’s Making the Move to Healthy Choices –
Tournament/Competition Menu Items.
Add potatoes, turnips, carrots, celery, mushrooms and tomatoes.
Adapted from Better Baby Food, 2nd edition.
39
A Healthy Eating Toolkit for Recreation, Sport and Community Food Service Providers
whole
wheat
Mac & Cheese
Ingredients (6 Servings)
1 1/2 cups
whole wheat macaroni
3 tbsp
non-hydrogenated soft margarine
quick
Spaghetti
Ingredients (12 Servings)
1/4 cup
1/4 cup
1/4 cup
1/4 cup
2 tbsp
1 tsp
1 tsp
carrot, diced
celery, diced
green bell pepper, diced
onions, diced
garlic, minced
chili powder
paprika
Ingredients (18 Servings)
4 1/2 cups
whole wheat macaroni
9 tbsp
non-hydrogenated soft margarine
1/4 tsp
black pepper
3/4 tsp
6 cups
6 cups
Ingredients (36 Servings)
1/4 tsp
2 cups
2 cups
1/4 cup
salt
milk (skim, 1% or 2%)
shredded Cheddar cheese (lower fat medium
or sharp)
dry whole wheat bread crumbs
salt
milk (skim, 1% or 2%)
shredded Cheddar cheese (lower fat medium
or sharp)
dry whole wheat bread crumbs
dish.
3/4 cup
3/4 cup
3/4 cup
3/4 cup
6 tbsp
3 tsp
3 tsp
carrot, diced
celery, diced
green bell pepper, diced
onions, diced
garlic, minced
chili powder
paprika
bite. drain.
3/4 tsp
black pepper
3/4 cup
directions
Whisk in milk, 1/2 cup at a time. Cook, stirring frequently, until
sauce thickens, about 5 minutes. (Add more milk if sauce is too
thick). Remove from heat and stir in pepper. Stir in cheese until
melted. Stir in macaroni until well coated.
directions
softened, about 5 minutes.
with bread crumbs.
pepper; cook for 2 minutes.
golden.
Reduce to low heat and simmer, about 12 minutes.
Adapted from Simply Great Food, Dietitians of Canada.
Serve 1/2 cup of sauce over spaghetti or other noodles.
40
Making the Move to Healthy Choices
sauce
taco
Wrap
Ingredients (10 Servings)
chicken
& cheese
Quesadillas
beans
Ingredients (4 Servings)
4
large soft tortillas (whole wheat)
2
chicken breasts, diced
3 cups
chopped vegetables (such as peppers,
mushrooms and/or green onions)
1/2 cup
salsa
4 tbsp
10
1
1/2
medium soft tortillas (whole wheat)
tomato, chopped
sweet green bell pepper, chopped
Shredded lettuce
light sour cream or plain yogurt
(optional)
1/2 medium
onion, chopped
Ingredients (30 Servings)
1 1/2 medium
onion, chopped
Ingredients (12 Servings)
12
large soft tortillas (whole wheat)
6
chicken breasts, diced
9 cups
chopped vegetables (such as peppers,
mushrooms and/or green onions)
3/4 cup
beans
1 1/2 cups
salsa
30
3
1 1/2
medium soft tortillas (whole wheat)
tomatoes, chopped
sweet green bell peppers, chopped
Shredded lettuce
light sour cream or plain yogurt
(optional)
sliced olives or sun dried tomatoes (optional)
Salsa
light sour cream or plain yogurt (optional)
sliced olives or sun dried tomatoes (optional)
Salsa
light sour cream or plain yogurt (optional)
directions
vegetables. Set aside.
cheese, 1/2 chicken breast, 3/4 cup chopped vegetables, olives or
tomatoes (if using) and top with another 2 tbsp of cheese. Fold
second side.
directions
offer with salsa and light sour cream or yogurt on the side.
Option 1:
Adapted from ActNowBC, Healthy Eating for Seniors.
pepper and salsa. Roll up and serve.
Option 2:
wrap with foil. Re-heat in the oven or microwave and serve with
lettuce, tomato, peppers, salsa and sour cream or yogurt (optional)
on the side.
Adapted from Alan S. Kesselheim. Camp Cook’s Companion A Pocket Guide.
2002.
41
A Healthy Eating Toolkit for Recreation, Sport and Community Food Service Providers
easy
Coleslaw
Ingredients (8 Servings)
2 cups
Dressing
1/4 cup
2 tbsp
1 tsp
1 tsp
1/2 tsp
Salad
Ingredients (12 Servings)
head
carrot, shredded
1
1
apple cider vinegar
olive oil
celery seed
sugar
black pepper
Ingredients (24 Servings)
6 cups
fast & easy bean
head
carrot, shredded
white onion, sliced into rings
green pepper, seeded and sliced into
rings
Tarragon vinaigrette
1/4 cup
1/4 cup
2 tbsp
1 tsp
1
1 tsp
1 tsp
canola oil
white vinegar
granulated sugar
dry mustard
clove garlic, minced
dried tarragon
dried basil
Ingredients (36 Servings)
Dressing
3/4 cup
6 tbsp
3 tsp
3 tsp
3/4 tsp
apple cider vinegar
olive oil
celery seed
sugar
black pepper
directions
over the salad and toss to coat.
Adapted from the Heart and Stroke Foundation, www.heartandstroke.com.
3
3
white onions, sliced into rings
green peppers, seeded and sliced into
rings
Tarragon vinaigrette
3/4 cup
3/4 cup
6 tbsp
3 tsp
3
3 tsp
3 tsp
canola oil
white vinegar
granulated sugar
dry mustard
cloves garlic, minced
dried tarragon
dried basil
directions
serving. garnish with onion and green pepper rings.
Adapted from the Heart and Stroke Foundation, www.heartandstroke.com.
42
Making the Move to Healthy Choices
easy
Hummus
Ingredients (1 1/2 cups)
3 tbsp
2 tbsp
1 tsp
2
lemon juice
canola or olive oil
ground cumin
garlic cloves, chopped or crushed
salt and pepper to taste
Ingredients (5 cups)
9 tbsp
6 tbsp
3 tsp
6
lemon juice
canola or olive oil
ground cumin
garlic cloves, chopped or crushed
salt and pepper to taste
tasty
Yogurt
Ingredients (3/4 cup)
3/4 cup
plain yogurt
1/2 tsp
dried dill weed
1/2 tsp
onion powder
Ingredients (3 cups)
3 cups
plain yogurt
2 tsp
dried dill weed
2 tsp
onion powder
directions
Serve as a dip with a variety of vegetables.
directions
needed.
43
A Healthy Eating Toolkit for Recreation, Sport and Community Food Service Providers
yogurt
Parfait
dip
Ingredients (1 Serving)
choice
fruit
Smoothie
Ingredients (1 Serving)
3/4 cup
skim milk
1
2
banana
strawberries
directions
with half of fruit. Repeat layers.
Adapted from Manitoba’s Making the Move to Healthy Choices –
Tournament/Competition Menu Items.
Ingredients (10 Servings)
7 1/2 cups
skim milk
10
20
bananas
strawberries
directions
speed until smooth.
Hint:
banana and optional ice cubes and blend.
Adapted from Manitoba’s Making the Move to Healthy Choices –
Tournament/Competition Menu Items.
44
Making the Move to Healthy Choices
SECTION
Additional Resources
EASTERN HEALTH
8
Regional nutritionist:
St. john’s and Area
(709) 752-4422
Rural Avalon and Burin & Bonavista Peninsulas
(709) 229--1605
CENTRAL HEALTH
Regional nutritionist:
Gander
(709) 651-6335
WESTERN HEALTH
Regional nutritionist:
Corner Brook
LABRAdOR–GRENFELL HEALTH
Regional nutritionist:
St. Anthony
(709) 454-0320
Happy valley- Goose Bay
(709) 897-2330
RECREATION NEWFOuNdLANd
ANd LABRAdOR
www.recreationnl.com
(709) 729-3892
45
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