Wyse WY-30 Terminal Maintenance

Wyse WY-30 Terminal Maintenance
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For Service Manuals
MAURITRON SERVICES
8 Cherry Tree Road, Chlnnor
Oxfordshire, OX9 4QY.
Tel (01844) 351694
Fax (01844) 352554
email:·[email protected]
WY-30
Maintenance
Manual
WYSE
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OVERVIEW
This maintenance manual contains information on how to service
and repair the WY-30 terminal. We assume you are a qualified
service technician with previous experience in terminal and
computer repair. To take full advantage of this manual, we
suggest you read the information in the order presented.
HOW TO USE THIS MANUAL
This manual is divided into seven chapters and four appendixes.
Chapter one provides important information for the technician who
has never serviced this terminal before. If you are already
familiar with the terminal, the technical information in Appendix
A can remind you about the terminal.
Here is a summary of this manual:
"General Information," describes the terminal,
including information about internal functions, input/output
(I/O), telecommunications, environmental needs, and operator
controls.
Chapter 1,
Chapter 2, "Removal and Replacement Procedures," shows you how to
take the terminal apart and put it back together again.
Chapter 3, "Troubleshooting," tells you what to look for and how
to fix problems with the terminal. It includes a list of tools
needed for troubleshooting, a quick reference guide, and a
flowchart.
Chapter 4, "Adjustments and Alignments," describes power supply
and monitor adjustments that control the quality of the display.
Chapter 5, "Illustrated Parts List," includes a list of display
and keyboard assembly parts.
Chapter 6, "Theory of Operation," describes the terminal
operation by function.
Chapter 7, "Schematics," contains schematic representations of
all the terminal's circuits.
iii
Appendix A, "Specifications," lists the terminal's
specifications.
Appendix B, "Connector Pin Assignments," lists the signals on
each pin of the MODEM and the AUX ports located on the rear panel
of the terminal.
Appendix C, "Test Connectors," describes how to make diagnostic
hood test connectors.
Appendix D, "Display Inspection With the Reticle," describes how
to check the terminal's display with a special tool, the reticle.
REFERENCE MANUALS
The following publications provide additional information about
the termina l:
WY-30 User's Guide,
Document 880093-01
WY-30 Programmer's Guide,
Document 880093-02
iv
TABLE OF CONTENTS
OVERVIEW
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
iii
GENERAL INFORMATION
Introduction
High Level Functional Description
Microcomputer
1-2
1-2
1-2
Memory
1-2
Terminal Control
Input/Output Devices
Environment
Operator Interfaces
Setup Parameters
Cleaning
2
·
···············
REMOVAL AND REPLACEMENT PROCEDURES
Overview
Before You Start
Removing and Replacing Assemblies in the
Keyboard Mod ule
Removing and Replacing Assemblies in the
Terminal Module
3
2-2
2-2
2- 3
2-5
TROUBLESHOOTING
Before You Start
Troubleshooting Quick Reference Guide
Troubleshooting Flowchart
Troubleshooting Aids
4
1-2
1-2
1-4
1-5
1-6
1-7
3-2
3-3
3-3
3-8
ADJUSTMENTS AND ALIGNMENTS
Before You Start
Power Adjustments
Does the Terminal Meet the Display Specifications?
Aligning the Terminal Display
Adjustments
v
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-6
4-7
5
ILLUSTRATED PARTS LIST
Introduction
Terminal Display Assembly Exploded View
Keyboard Assembly Exploded View
Terminal Components List
Keyboard Components List
Terminal Board Assembly Layout
6
THEORY OF OPERATION
Introduction
Microcomputer and Related Logic
Power Supply and Monitor Circuitry
Keyboard
Communication Ports
Terms and Abbreviations
7
5-2
5-3
5-4
5-5
5-8
5-9
6-2
6-2
6-10
6-13
6-13
· · · · · · · · 6-13
SCHEMATICS
Keyboard PCB
Terminal PCB (Logic)
Terminal PCB (Monitor/Power Supply)
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-3
7-5
7-7
APPENDIXES
A
B
C
D
Specifications
Connector Pin Assignments
Test Connectors
Display Inspection with the Reticle
··· A-1
B-1
C-1
D-1
INDEX
1-1
LIST OF FIGURES
1-1
1-2
1-3
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
2-6
2-7
2-8
2-9
3-1
Keyboard
·······
Terminal Dimensions
Operator Interfaces
··········
Terminal Modules
Keyboard Assembly
Removing the Terminal Enclosure
Replacing the Fuse
Removing the Terminal PCB •••.••..••.••.•••...••••••••.
Removing the CRT/Yoke Assembly
Replacing the Yoke
Discharging the Anode Before Removal
Discharging the Anode Before Installation
Troubleshooting Flowchart
vi
1-3
1-4
1-5
2-2
2-4
2-6
2-7
2-9
2-11
2-12
2-13
2-14
3-4
LIST OF FIGURES Continued
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-5
5-1
5-2
5-3
6-1
7-1
7-2
7-3
D-1
D-2
D-3
Power Supply Component Layout
Ad j us tmen t Locations
Yoke Lock on the CRT Neck
Display Magnets
~
Centering Rings
Terminal Display Assembly Exploded View
Keyboard Assembly Exploded View
Terminal Board Assembly Layout
Memory Map
Keyboard PCB Schematic
Terminal PCB Schematic (Logic)
Terminal PCB Schematic (Monitor/Power Supply)
Video Inspection Reticle
Checking Width and Height
Checking Straightness, Pincushioning,
Centering, and Vertical Linearity
4-3
4-8
4-10
4-11
4-12
5-3
5-4
5-9
6-3
7-3
7-5
7-7
D-1
D-3
D-4
LIST OF TABLES
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-5
4-1
4-2
5-1
5-2
5-3
6-1
6-2
6-3
B-1
B-2
Troubleshooting Quick Reference Guide
Terminal Installation Checklist
Power-On Self-Test Error Messages
Diagnostic Self-Test Error Messages
Terminal PCB Circuit Isolation Jumpers
Display Problems and Adjustments
Screen Areas Affected by Display Magnets
Terminal PCB Components List
Keyboard Components List
Diagnostic Self-Test Connectors
6800 Interrupt Sources
Values Loaded into CRTC
Screen Attribute Assignments
MODEM Port Pin Assignments (DTE)
AUX Port Pin Assignments (DTE)
vii
3-3
3-8
3-11
3-12
3-13
4-7
4-11
5-5
5-8
5-11
6-3
6-7
6-8
B-1
B-1
1
GENERAL INFORMATION
. . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . .. .
Introduction
1-2
High Level Functional Description
1-2
Microcomputer
1-2
Memory
1-2
Terminal Control
1-2
Input/Output Devices
CRT Display
Communications Interfaces
Keyboard
1-2
Environment
1-3
1-3
1-3
. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . ...
1-4
Operator Interfaces
Keyboard
P ower Cord
Communications Cable
AC Power Switch
Brigh tness Slideswi tch
Touch/Tilt Screen Adjustment
1-5
1-5
1-6
1-6
1-6
1-6
1-6
Setup Parameters
1-6
Cleaning
1-7
1-1
INTRODUCTION
The WY-30 is a low-cost, entry-level, ASCII display terminal. It
consists of a display console and a detachable keyboard. A user
enters information for display from the keyboard. The terminal
contains all of the electronics that support the display and
keyboard.
In addition to the cathode ray tube (CRT) and keyboard, the WY-30
contains two independent communications interfaces.
Peripherals,
including a hard-copy printer or plotter, can be attached to the
terminal with interface connectors on the rear panel.
The component parts are organized around and controlled by the
microprocessor. The microprocessor controls all internal data
manipulation and processing functions.
HIGH LEVEL FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION
The terminal consists of a microprocessor and related logic, a
CRT controller and associated control logic, input/output (I/O)
devices, monitor and power supply circuitry, and a CRT. All
circuitry is mounted on a single printed circuit board (PCB), the
terminal PCB. The microprocessor controls all basic functions.
MICROCOMPUTER
The microcomputer comprises a clock and synchronization circuit,
program memory, 4K of RAM, a reset circuit, and the heart of the
terminal--a 2-megahertz, 6800-family microprocessor--the 68BOO.
MEMORY
Terminal memory consists of RAM and ROM.
The microprocessor uses
4K of RAM for buffers, variable storage and system stack. The
video interface shares this RAM for screen refresh. Program
memory, 8K of ROM, holds all the terminal control firmware.
TERMINAL CONTROL
Functions of the terminal control firmware include keyboard
scanning, video control, data transfer to and from the
communication ports, and on-screen data manipulation.
INPUT/OUTPUT DEVICES
I/O devices consist of a CRT display, two communications
interfaces, and a keyboard.
1-2
CRT Display
The terminal has a 14-inch, flat-screen CRT. It displays 24 rows
of characters, 80 columns, and two control rows (one for terminal
status and the other for label, message, and setup). The CRT
controller reads displayed characters from RAM on a direct memory
access (DMA) basis.
Communications Interfaces
The terminal has two asynchronous serial interfaces that conform
with the EIA standard RS-232C.
Data rates are set for both
interfaces together. These parameters are operator controlled
and are defined in "Setup Parameters" in this chapter.
Both
interfaces can communicate at data rates up to 38.4K bits per
second (bps).
Keyboard
The keyboard consists of 83 keys mounted on a single-sided PCB.
All keys are momentary action key switches. The microprocessor
periodically scans the keys checking for key closures.
Figure 1-1 shows the keyboard.
You can find a detailed
description in Chapter 6, "Theory of Operations."
Figure 1-1
Keyboard
F5
Ins Char
ins Line
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Send
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BackSpace
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Print P3ge
F7
Del Char Clr Line
Del. l,ne (II Page
F8
Replae'
Insert
Copy PM
A Page
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1-3
ENVIRONMENT
The terminal can be placed on a table, desktop, or any other
vibration-free horizontal surface that is free from lint and
dust.
Abnormally bright room light or direct sunlight can
interfere with the display."
Figure 1-2 shows the WY-30 dimensions.
The user should allow
three inches of clearance on all sides when installing the
terminal.
Users can install the terminal near most other types of electrical
or electronic equipment without serious interference. They should
avoid locations near strong magnetic fields that can distort and
interfere with the operating or servicing of the video display.
Figure 1-2
Terminal Dimensions
2'14" Extended
1'12" Flat
Ambient room temperature should never exceed 45 degrees Celsius
(113 degrees Fahrenheit) when the terminal is on; however, the
terminal needs no special cooling. Users should make sure the
rear of the terminal has a free flow of air. They shouldn't set
the terminal on sound-deadening devices that block the flow of
air beneath it.
1-4
OPERATOR INTERFACES
Figure 1-3 shows all operator interfaces, including the keyboard,
power cord, and brightness slideswitch. It also points out the
MODEM and AUX ports.
Figure 1-3
Operator Interfaces
Power ON/OFF
Power Cord
--.-,;?
Keyboard
Plug the keyboard cable connector into the keyboard connector
jack on the left side of the terminal.
1-5
Power Cord
Insert the power cord into the connection on the rear panel, and
then plug the three-pronged connector into the AC power source.
Caution--Compare the voltage specified on the configuration label
(on the back of the CRT enclosure) with the AC power source to
avoid damaging the terminal.
Communications Cable
Connect the communications cable from the computer or modem to
the communications port labeled MODEM. This port defaults at
9600 baud, no parity, with one stop bit and eight data bits. The
operator can change these parameters in setup mode.
AC Power Switch
The power switch is on the right side of the terminal.
the back of the switch turns AC power on.
Pressing
Brightness Slideswitch
The brightness slideswitch is located on the lower-right corner
of the front bezel. Sliding the switch to the right increases
the display brightness; sliding it to the left decreases the
brightness.
Touch/Tilt Screen Adjustment
The touch/tilt screen adjustment is a spring-controlled support
flap on the bottom of the terminal enclosure. A user can adjust
the angle at which he views the screen by pushing or pulling the
terminal bezel.
SETUP PARAMETERS
When a user turns the power on, the terminal executes an internal
self-test. When the self-test finishes and the CRT is warm
(approximately 30 seconds), the cursor appears in the upper
left-hand corner of the display. The unit is now ready for
operation based on the setup parameters.
To inspect the parameters, press both the SHIFT and SETUP keys.
The first level of parameters appears across the bottom of the
screen. To examine the other levels of parameters, press the
CURSOR DOWN key.
Each time you press this key, you can see
another 1 ev e 1.
1-6
To change the parameters, follow these steps:
1.
Enter setup mode by pressing the SHIFT and SETUP keys.
2.
Press CURSOR DOWN until the parameter to be changed is
displayed in the setup line, the row of highlighted fields
at the bottom row of the screen.
3.
Press CURSOR RIGHT or LEFT until the specific parameter to
be changed is highlighted.
4.
Press the spacebar to advance the parameter to the specific
setting desired.
5.
Press the cursor keys as required to advance to the next
parameter to be changed.
6.
To leave setup mode, press the SHIFT and SETUP keys.
The status line flashes a message asking if the changed
parameters should be saved for power-on. Parameter changes
are implemented immediately.
Pressing the Y key saves the parameters that you keyed in.
Pressing the N key saves all changes temporarily. The new
parameters are effective only until you turn off the power.
Pressing the ESC key returns all parameters to their factory
default values.
Pressing the ENTER key restores all parameters from memory
before leaving setup mode.
7.
To return to a normal operation mode,
press any key.
The terminal is now operational using the parameters defined in
the setup mode.
See the WY-30 User's Guide for more comprehensive setup
instructions.
CLEANING
You may find that the terminal needs to be cleaned when you've
finish servicing it. The screen should be cleaned with a soft,
lint-free cloth. Apply a safe cleaner to the cloth, not directly
to the screen.
Caution--Don't ever clean the screen with chemical substances,
abrasives, or commercial glass cleaners that contain alcohol or
ammonia.
1-7
2
REMOVAL AND REPLACEMENT PROCEDURES
Overview
. . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . ... . ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Before You Start
2-2
Safety
2-2
2-2
Required Tools
2-3
Removing and Replacing Assemblies in the
Keyboard Module
Keyboard
;:,
Keyboard Cable
Keyboard PCB
2- 3
2-3
2-4
2-5
Removing and Replacing Assemblies in the
Terminal Module
Removing the Terminal Enclosure
Replacing the Fuse
Replacing the Terminal PCB
Replacing the CRT/Yoke Assembly
Replacing the yoke
Replacing the Terminal Enclosure
Discharging the Anode
2-1
2-5
2-6
2-7
2-8
2-10
·········· 2-12
2-13
2-13
OVERVIEW
This chapter explains how to remove and replace assemblies and
components in both terminal modules. For purposes of
orientation, "front" is the monitor face, and "back" is the rear
panel and power cord location.
The terminal consists of two major modules (see Figure 2-1):
o
Terminal
The terminal module includes the CRT/yoke
assembly and the terminal PCB. The terminal
PCB holds all control logic, power supply
circuitry, and the circuitry to amplify and
display horizontal, vertical, and video
signals on the CRT screen.
o
Keyboard
The keyboard module includes the keyboard PCB
and the keyboard cable.
Figure 2-1
Terminal Modules
Termlnal--'"
"h~- Keyboard
BEFORE YOU START
Safety
Warning--This terminal contains high voltage. Don't attempt to
service the terminal without taking all the precautions necessary
to work with high voltage, including the following:
o
If you must open the terminal for any reason, turn off the
power, disconnect any communications cables, and unplug the
terminal.
2-2
o
Remove any jewelry, especially on hands and wrists.
o
Avoid wearing clothing that holds a static charge.
o
Use only insulated or nonconductive tools.
o
Whenever you disconnect the anode lead from the anode,
make sure to ground the anode as directed in "Discharging
the Anode."
o
If you need to remove or replace the CRT/yoke assembly,
remember that it can implode if you drop it or break the
neck. The flying glass can injure anyone within a radius
six to ten feet.
Required Tools
Before you remove or replace any assemblies in the terminal, ma
sure you have the tools and materials listed below.
a
o
No.
Phillips screwdriver
o
No. 2 Phillips screwdriver
o
Insulated flat-blade screwdriver
o
Alligator clips
o
Digital multimeter (or voltmeter)
o
Nonscratch mat or surface
o
Fuse puller or small flat-blade screwdriver
REMOVING AND REPLACING ASSEMBLIES IN THE KEYBOARD MODULE
This section describes procedures to remove and replace the
keyboard, keyboard cable, and keyboard PCB.
Keyboard
Tools required:
None
To replace the keyboard (see Figure 2-2), follow these steps:
1.
Turn off the terminal.
2.
Press the keyboard cable connector tab and pull the keyboa
cable out of the keyboard.
3.
Plug the keyboard cable into the new keyboard's connector.
2-3
Figure 2-2
Keyboard Assembly
Bottom Cover
Cable Connector
ESD Shield
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..&"!iill~_--Prlnted
Circuit Board
Top Cover
Cable
For Service Manuals
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8 Cherry Tree Road, Chlnnor
Oxford.hlre, OX9 4QY.
Tel (01844) 351694
Fax (01844) 352554
Keyboard Cable
Tools required:
email:[email protected]
None
To replace the keyboard cable (see Figure 2-2), follow these
steps:
1.
Turn the terminal off.
2.
Press the keyboard cable connector tab and pull the keyboard
cable out of the keyboard.
3.
Press the other keyboard cable connector tab and pull the
keyboard cable out of the left side of the terminal.
4.
Insert one end of the new keyboard cable into the keyboard
connector. Insert the other end into the left side of the
terminal.
2-4
Keyboard PCB
Tools required:
No. 0 Phillips screwdriver
No. 2 Phillips screwdriver
To replace the keyboard PCB (see Figure 2-2), follow these step
1.
Turn off the terminal.
2.
Unp 1 ug the keyboard cab 1 e from the keyboard.
3.
Turn the keyboard over and remove the six No.2 Phillips
screws that attach the keyboard bottom cover to the
keyboard.
4.
Lift off the keyboard bottom cover.
5.
Remove the No. 0 Phillips screw beneath the spacebar
that holds the keyboard top cover to the PCB assembly.
6.
Unscrew the three No. 0 Phillips screws and washers that
hold the keyboard ESD shield on the keyboard PCB.
7.
Lift the PCB assembly out of the keyboard cover.
8.
Cover the under side of the new keyboard PCB with the
keyboard ESD shield. Replace the screws and washers.
Tighten.
9.
Fit the new keyboard PCB assembly back into the keyboard t
cover.
10.
Replace the No. 0 Phillips screw that holds the PCB assemb
in place.
11.
Reattach the bottom cover of the keyboard assembly.
12.
Plug the keyboard cable back into the terminal.
REMOVING AND REPLACING ASSEMBLIES IN THE TERMINAL MODULE
This section describes removing and replacing the terminal
enclosure, the fuse, the terminal PCB, and the CRT/yoke assembl
It also describes how to discharge the CRT anode.
2-5
Removing the Terminal Enclosure
Tool required:
No.2 Phillips screwdriver
To remove the terminal enclosure (see Figure 2-3),
steps:
follow these -
1.
Remove all cables and power cords from the rear of the
terminal.
2.
Rest the display face of the terminal on a nonscratch
surface.
3.
Disconnect the keyboard cable on the left side of the
terminal enclosure.
4.
Remove two No.2 Phillips screws from the rear panel of
the terminal enclosure.
5.
Remove two No.2 Phillips screws from the bottom of the
terminal enclosure, next to the back bezel.
6.
Lift off the terminal enclosure.
Figure 2-3
Removing the Terminal Enclosure
2-6
Replacing the Fuse
Tool required:
Fuse puller or screwdriver
The terminal has one fuse, rated 2 amps, 125 volts.
2-4 for the fuse location on the terminal PCB.
To check or replace the fuse,
1.
See Figure
follow these steps:
Remove the terminal enclosure.
2.
Use a fuse puller to remove the suspected fuse.
3.
Check the fuse. If the fuse is broken or blackened,
new fuse into the fuse socket.
push a
If the fuse is good, push it back into the fuse socket.
4.
Replace the terminal enclosure (see "Replacing the Termina
EnClosure" for instructions).
Figure
2-4
Replacing the Fuse
2-7
Replacing the Terminal PCB
Tools required:
No. 2 Phillips screwdriver
Flat-bladed screwdriver
Alligator clips
To remove the terminal PCB (see Figure 2-5), follow these steps:
1.
Remove the terminal enclosure.
2.
Slide the barrier plates mounted on either side of the back
bezel out from under the restraining tabs.
3.
Leaving the terminal on its face, pull the back bezel off
the terminal chassis.
4.
Discharge the anode (see "Discharging the Anode" for
instructions).
5.
Disconnect the anode lead.
6.
Disconnect the yoke harness connector, P201, from the
termina I PCB.
Warning--Handle the CRT neck carefully. If you break it,
flying glass can injure anyone within a radius of six to ten
feet.
7.
Disconnect the filament harness from the neck of the CRT.
8.
Unscrew the two Phillips No.2 screws securing grounding
wires to the CRT chassis.
Caution--Don't remove the Phillips screws directly
underneath the rear panel on the terminal PCB. They fasten
the rear panel to the terminal PCB.
9.
Remove the four plastic studs securing the ESD shield to the
back of the terminal PCB.
10.
Loosen any screws holding the ESD shield in place.
11.
Remove the ESD shield.
12.
Loosen the six No.2 Phillips screws on the underside of the
termina I PCB.
13.
Lift the terminal PCB up and out.
2-8
Figure 2-5
Removing the Terminal PCB
Back Bezel
Bamer Plate
.4
Filament Harness
Grounding Wires
PlastiC Studs
~/
.~
~
.2-9
r
To replace the terminal PCB, follow these steps:
1.
Position the ESD shield on the back of the terminal PCB.
2.
Replace the four plastic studs that secure it.
3.
Position the terminal PCB in its slot in the bezel. Make
sure the lever of the brightness potentiometer fits into the
brightness slideswitch on the bezel.
4.
Tighten the six screws that secure the terminal PCB to the
chassis.
5.
Reconnect the grounding wires to the chassis.
6.
Reconnect the yoke harness to P201 on the terminal PCB.
Warning--Handle the CRT neck carefully. If you break it,
flying glass can injure anyone within a radius of six to ten
feet.
7.
Reconnect the filament harness to the CRT neck.
8.
Discharge the anode on the CRT (see "Discharging the Anode."
9.
Reconnect the anode lead.
10.
Replace the back bezel and both barrier plates.
11.
Replace the terminal enclosure and keyboard.
Replacing the CRT/Yoke Assembly
Tools required:
No.2 Phillips screwdriver
Flat-bladed screwdriver
Alligator clips
To remove the CRT/yoke assembly (see Figure 2-6), follow these
steps:
1.
Remove the terminal enclosure, keyboard cable, back bezel,
and barrier p 1 a tes.
2.
Remove the terminal PCB and insulation sheet.
3.
Unscrew the four No.2 Phillips screws securing the chassis
to the front bezel.
Warning--Handle the CRT carefully. If you break it, flying
glass can injure anyone within a radius of six to ten feet.
4.
Lift up the chassis, and remove the CRT/yoke assembly.
2-10
Figure 2-6
Removing the CRT/Yoke Assembly
Tension Band Tightening Screw
CRT/Yoke Assembly - - " - M .
To replace the CRT/yoke assembly, follow these steps:
1.
Discharge the anode on the new CRT.
Warning--If you are replacing the same CRT/yoke assembly,
you still need to discharge the anode. A CRT left standing
for any length of time will develop a charge from the air,
and need to be discharged again.
2.
Place the assembly in the front bezel. Make sure the anode
faces the keyboard connector jack on the terminal PCB.
3.
Fit the chassis back into the bezel.
4.
Replace the four No.2 Phillips screws that secure the
assembly to the chassis.
Tighten.
5.
Replace the terminal PCB and insulator sheet.
6.
Make sure the tension band is tight.
it.
2-11
If it isn 't, tighten
7.
Replace the back bezel, barrier plates, and keyboard cable.
8.
Replace the terminal enclosure.
Replacing the Yoke
Tools required:
None
To remove the yoke, follow these steps:
1.
Remove the CRT/yoke assembly from the terminal.
2.
Loosen the yoke lock on the neck of the CRT (see Figure 2-7).
3.
Remove the yoke.
To replace the yoke, follow these steps:
Warning--Before you reattach the yoke assembly, you must
discharge the anode. A CRT left standing for any length of time
will develop a charge from the air, and need to be discharged
again.
1.
Position the yoke on the neck of the CRT (see Figure 2-7).
2.
Tigh ten the yoke lock.
3.
Replace the CRT/yoke assembly in the terminal.
Figure 2-7
Replacing the Yoke
Yoke Lock
2-12
Replacing the Terminal Enclosure
Tool required:
No.2 Phillips screwdriver
To replace the terminal enclosure, follow these steps:
1.
With the terminal "face on a nonscratch surface, reseat the
enclosure over the chassis into the back bezel.
2.
Replace the two No.2 Phillips screws on the rear of the
terminal enclosure.
Tighten.
3.
Replace the two No.2 Phillips screws on the bottom of the
terminal.
Tighten.
Discharging the Anode
Tools required:
Insulated flat-blade screwdriver
Alligator clips
We have written specific warnings throughout this chapter about
discharging the anode on the side of the CRT. If you have never
discharged the anode, or need a review, follow these
instructions.
To discharge the CRT anode before removal (see Figure 2-8),
follow these steps:
Figure 2-8
Discharging the Anode Before Removal
Terminal ChaSSIS
Allgator Clips
2-13
1.
Turn off the terminal and unplug it from its power source.
2.
Remove the terminal enclosure.
3.
Ground the shaft of an insulated flat-bladed screwdriver to
the terminal chassis with alligator clips.
4.
Slip the blade between the anode cap and the anode. Touch
the blade to the wire anode leads under the cap. Listen for
a popping or crackling sound.
5.
Remove the anode lead.
To discharge the anode before installation (See Figure 2-9),
follow these steps:
1.
Ground the shaft of an insulated flate-bladed screwdriver.
2.
Touch the blade of the screwdriver to the anode.
a popping or crackling sound.
3.
Install the CRT.
Figure 2-9
Listen for
Discharging the Anode Before Installation
Ground
Insulated Flat-Blade Screwdriver
2-14
3
TROUBLESHOOTING
Before You Start
Safety
Required Tool s
3-2
3-2
3-2
Troubleshooting Quick Reference Guide
3-3
Troubleshooting Flowchart
3-3
Troubleshooting Aids
Installation Checklist
······
Checking for Continuity
Power Supply Check on the Terminal PCB
Power-On Self-Test . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostic Self-Test
Checking the Keyboard
Isolating Circuits
3-8
3-8
3-9
3-9
3-1
3-10
3-11
3-12
3-13
BEFORE YOU START
Safety
Warning--This terminal contains high voltage.
Don't attempt to
service the terminal without taking all the precautions necessary
for working with high voltage, including the following:
o
If you must open the terminal for any reason, turn off
the power, disconnect any communication cables, and unplug
the terminal.
o
Remove any jewelry, especially from your hands and wrists.
o
Avoid wearing clothing that holds a static charge.
o
Use only insulated or nonconductive tools.
o
Whenever you disconnect the anode from the anode lead,
make sure to discharge the anode as directed in Chapter 2.
o
If you need to
remember that
the neck. The
radius of six
remove or replace the CRT/yoke assembly,
the CRT can implode if you drop it or break
flying glass can injure anyone within a
to ten feet.
Required Tools
Before you start to repair in the terminal, make sure you ha ve
the tools and materials listed below.
o
No.2 Phillips screwdriver
o
3/16-inch flat-bladed screwdriver
o
Digital multimeter (or an ohmmeter and voltmeter)
o
Test connectors for the MODEM and AUX ports (See Appendix C
for instructions to make them or Chapter 5 for ordering
information.)
o
Nonconductive video alignment tool
o
Tie-wraps and clippers
3-2
TROUBLESHOOTING QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE
Table 3-1 is a troubleshooting reference guide. Once you
discover the major symptoms, this table can quickly direct you to
the most likely problem ~rea. However, don't automatically
replace the suggested modules until you've studied the problem or
checked related details in the troubleshooting flowchart.
Table 3-1
.
~
Troubleshooting Quick Reference Guide
Symptom
Possible Problem Area(s)
No display
Terminal PCB, CRT/yoke assembly
Poor display quality
Adjustments, terminal PCB
Wrong size display
Crooked
Too bright
Not in focus
Adjustments, terminal PCB, yoke
Fails self-test
Terminal PCB
Fails diagnostic test
Terminal PCB, wrong diagnostic setup,
faulty test connectors
Inoperative keys
Keyboard, terminal PCB, keyboard cable
Can't communicate
with computer
Setup parameters, terminal PCB,
communication cable
Letters or error
codes on the screen
Terminal PCB
Touch/tilt doesn't
respond correctly
Touch/tilt screw tension
TROUBLESHOOTING FLOWCHART
Read the troubleshooting flowchart and match the symptoms with
the suggested solutions. Any flowchart block that requires a
procedure includes a bold number that is keyed to the legend on
each page of the flowchart. The legend lists the procedure name
and the page number in this manual where you can find the
necessary procedure.
3-3
Figure 3-1
Troubleshooting Flowchart, page 1 of 4
TURN TERMINAL
OFF DISCONNECT
COMMUNICATION
CA3LE
CHECK
SE~lP
COMPUTER
- ....JRN ON
DOCJMENTATION
TERMINAL
RUN SYSTEM
DIAGNOSTIC
8
Terminal Troubleshooting
Flowchart Legend
1 Replacing the Fuse, page 2-7
2 Replacing the Terminal PCB,
page 2-8
3 Checking the Power Supply, page 4-3
4 Replacing the CRT/Yoke Assembly,
page 2-10
5 Aligning the Brightness, page 4-8
6 Aligning the Display, page 4-6
7 Replacing the Yoke, page 2-12
8 Running the Diagnostic Self-Test.
page 3-11
9 Checking the Keyboard, page 3-12
10 Checking the Communications Cable,
page 3-8
11 Replacing the Keyboard, page 2-3
3-4
Figure 3-1
Troubleshooting Flowchart, page 2 of 4
CHECK
FUSE
REPLACE
FUSE
REPLACE
TERMINAL PCB
2
CHECK
POWER SUPPLY
3
No
REPLACE
TERMINAL PCB
2
ADJUST
3
Terminal Troubleshooting
Flowchart Legend
1 Replacing the Fuse, page 2-7
2 Replacing the Terminal PCB,
page 2-8
3 Checking the Power Supply, page 4-3
4 Replacing the CRT/Yoke Assembly,
page 2-10
5 Aligning the Brightness, page 4-8
For Service Manuals
MAURITRON SERVICES
6 Aligning the Display, page 4-6
8 Cherry Tree Road, Chlnnor
Oxfordshlre, OX9 4QY.
Tel (01844) 351694
Fax (01844) 352554
7 Replacing the Yoke, page 2-12
8 Running the Diagnostic Self-Test,
page 3-11
9 Checking the Keyboard, page 3-12
email:[email protected]
10 Checking the Communications Cable,
page 3-8
11 Replacing the Keyboard, page 2-3
3-5
Troubleshooting Flowchart, page 3 or 4
Figure 3-1
REPLACE
TERMINAL PCB
2
TURN OFF TERMINAL.
REMOVE ENCLOSURE
TURN ON TERMINAL
REPLACE
TUBE
REPLAC=
TERMINAL PCB
4
2
PER"ORM
BRIGHTNESS
ALIGNMENT
PERFORM
FULL MONITOR
ALIGNMENT
6
REPLACE
TERMINAL oCB
2
REPLACE
YOKE
REPLACE
TERMINAL PCB
2
Terminal Troubleshooting
Flowchart Legend
1 Replacing the Fuse, page 2-7
2 Replacing the Terminal PCB,
page 2-8
3 Checking the Power Supply, page 4-3
4 ReplaCing the CRT/Yoke Assembly,
page 2-10
5 Aligning the Brightness, page 4-8
6 Aligning the Display, page 4-6
7 Replacing the Yoke, page 2-12
8 Running the Diagnostic Self-Test,
page 3·11
9 Checking the Keyboard, page 3-12
10 Checking the Communications Cable,
page 3-8
11 ReplaCing the Keyboard, page 2-3
3-6
7
Figure 3-1
Troubleshooting Flowchart, page 4 of 4
PERFORM
KEYBOARD
CHECK
9
No
REPLACE WITH
KNOWN GOOD
KEYBOARD 11
No
CHECK
COMMUNICATIONS
CABLE
10
REPLACE
TERMINAL PCB
REPLACE OLD
KEYBOARD
No
REPLACE
CABLE
CHECK HOST
SOFTWARE
Terminal Troubleshooting
Flowchart Legend
1 Replacing the Fuse, page 2-7
2 Replacing the Terminal PCB,
page 2-8
3 Checking the Power Supply, page 4-3
4 Replacing the CRT/Yoke Assembly,
page 2-10
5 Aligning the Brightness. page 4-8
6 Aligning the Display. page 4-6
7 Replacing the Yoke. page 2-12
8 Running the Diagnostic Self-Test.
page 3-11
9 Checking the Keyboard. page 3-12
10 Checking the Communications Cable.
page 3-8
11 Replacing the Keyboard, page 2-3
.-
3-7
TROUBLESHOOTING AIDS
This section contains a number of specialized procedures to help
you repair the terminal. Most of them are referenced on the
troubleshooting flowchart.
Installation Checklist
The checklist in Table 3-2 helps you quickly check terminal
installation. If a user installs the terminal incorrectly, it
may not function properly.
If you can't find the problem,
improper installation may be the key.
Table 3-2
Terminal Installation Checklist
Environment
Room temperature is between +40 and +91 degrees Fahrenheit
(5 and 33 degrees Celsius).
Terminal isn't near a magnetic field.
Keyboard
Keyboard cable is in the keyboard connector jack on the left
side of the terminal.
Keyboard cable is in the connector jack on the rear of
the keyboard.
AC Power Cord
Female end of the power cord is plugged into the AC power
socket on the rear panel of the terminal.
Male end of the power cord is plugged into the wall socket.
Communication Interface Cable
One end of the RS-232C interface cable is connected to the
MODEM port on the terminal's rear panel.
The other end of the interface cable is correctly connected
to the computer.
3-8
Table 3-2
Continued
Computer Interface
You'll need to check the computer's documentation to determine
the following information:
Correct baud rate
Correct stop bits
Correct data bits
Correct parity type
Correct handshaking protocol
Checking for Continuity
Sometimes you can fix the problem without opening the terminal.
The problem could be a damaged cable or power cord. Sometimes,
you may need to open the terminal to check the fuse or internal
connections. Check this list, then, with an ohmmeter, check the
continuity of the components listed below.
Outside the terminal, check the
o
Power cord
o
Communication cable (supplied with the computer)
Inside the terminal, check the
o
Fuse
o
AC power input receptacle (on the rear panel of the
terminal)
o
Terminal PCB to the CRT/yoke wiring harness
Hold the probes in place for five seconds, or until the ohmmeter
settles, to ensure an accurate reading.
If the part in question
is open, replace it.
Power Supply Check on the Terminal PCB
You can quickly isolate problems if you check power supply
voltages on the terminal PCB.
3-9
Tools required:
No.2 Phillips screwdriver
Digital multimeter
Nonconductive video alignment tool
To check the voltages, follow these steps:
1.
Turn the terminal off.
2.
Remove the terminal enclosure.
3.
Attach one lead from the DMM to the chassis as ground.
4.
Turn the terminal on.
5.
With the other lead from the DMM, look for these voltages at
these points on the terminal PCB:
Voltage
+5V
~5%
Point
R15
+12V +5%
C27
~5%
C31
-12V
6.
If one or more of these voltages are not in tolerance,
adjust VR101.
7.
If you adjust VR101, and the voltage or voltages are
still not within tolerance, replace the terminal PCB.
Power-on Self-Test
The power-on self-test checks the terminal's random-access memory
(RAM), read-only memory (ROM), electrically eraseable read-only
memory (EEROM), and external communication ports.
Each time you turn the terminal on, the power-on self-test
occurs.
If the test detects an error, an error message appears
on the display. Table 3-3 defines these error messages. If any
of these messages appear, replace the terminal PCB.
3-10
Table 3-3
Power-On Self-Test Error Messages
Error
Message
Failure
K
EEROM checksum error
o
RAM error
x
MODEM port TXD/RXD error
C
MODEM port DTR/DCD error
A
MODEM port RTS/CTS error
y
AUX port error
9
EEROM read/write error
P
PROM checksum error
Diagnostic Self-Test
The terminal diagnostic self-test routine starts in setup mode.
This test routine includes communications circuitry tests,
read/write tests, and row buffer tests. Two special test
connectors allow the diagnostic test to function (see Appendix C
for connector definitions or Chapter 5 for ordering information).
After you start it, the diagnostic test continues to run until
you stop it.
If the test detects an error, an error message
appears in the lower right-hand corner of the screen (see Table
3- 4 for error message de fini t ions).
Follow these steps to start the diagnostic self-test:
1.
Turn the terminal off.
2.
Detach any communications cables on the back of the terminal.
3.
Attach the test connectors to the MODEM and AUX ports that
are on the rear panel of the terminal.
Note--See Appendix C for a description of these test
connectors and instructions for making them.
4•
Turn the terminal on.
5.
Hold the SHIFT key, then press the SETUP key.
6.
Press CURSOR DOWN five times. Look for to the TEST:OFF
field in the setup line at the bottom of the screen.
7.
Press CURSOR RIGHT four times.
3-11
8.
Press the spacebar.
9.
Hold SHIFT, then press SETUP.
flashing test pattern.
10.
Look for one of the error messages found in Table 3-4.
This toggles the TEST field ON.
Press N.
You should see a
Note--To fully test the terminal, let the diagnostic
self-test run five minutes.
11.
If you see an error message, replace the terminal logic PCB;
if you don't see an error, press SETUP twice.
12.
Turn the terminal off. Remove the test connectors, and
reattach the communications cables.
Table 3-4
Diagnostic Self-Test Error Messages
Error
Message
Failure
A
RTS to CTS data communications error on MODEM port
C
DTR to DCD data communications error on MODEM port
K
EEROM data check sum error
o
RAM error
X
Transmit/receive data error on MODEM port
Y
Printer port error
9
EEROM read/write diagnostic self-test error
P
Program ROM check sum error
Checking the Keyboard
If you suspect the keyboard is the source of the problem, follow
this procedure to verify it:
1.
Turn the terminal off.
2.
Disconnect the communication cable.
3.
Connect pins 2 and 3 on the MODEM port.
4.
Turn the terminal on.
5.
The terminal should be in FDX (full-duplex) mode. (If it
isn't, go in to setup mode, se 1 ect the FDX parameter, then
leave setup mode.)
3-12
6.
Type on the keys. Test a 11 the keys in shi fted and
unshi ft ed pos it ions.
I f the ke ys don It respond, see sect ion
E of "Troubleshooting Flowchart."
Isolating Circuits
If you troubleshoot to the component level using the schematics
in Chapter 7, you may want to isolate the logic, monitor, or
power supply circuitry. Table 3-5 is a list of jumpers on the
terminal PCB and the areas they isolate. For an exact location,
see the terminal PCB component layout in Chapter 5.
Table
3-5
Terminal PCB Circuit Isolation Jumpers
Jumper
Areas Isolated
J525
J526
Ground from logic
J524
J527
Power supply from logic
J543
Video circuit
Logic from monitor circuitry
J522
Vertical synchronization
Logic from monitor circuitry
J545
Horizontal synchronization
Logic from monitor circuitry
J725
Dim circuit
Logic from monitor circuitry
3-13
4
ADJUSTMENTS AND ALIGNMENTS
Before You Start
4-2
4-2
4-2
Safety
Tools Required
.
Power Adjustments . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . .. .. . .. . .. . . .. .. .. . . . . .
.. . . .. .. . . . ..
4-3
Does the Terminal Meet the Display Specifications?
4-4
Aligning the Terminal Display
4-6
Adjustments
Height
Vertical Hold
Lineari ty
Brightness
4-7
4-7
4-7
4-8
4-8
Focus
4-9
Wid th
Display Leveling
Display Magnets
Cen tering Rings
4-9
4-9
4-11
4- 12
4-1
BEFORE YOU START
Safety
Warning--This terminal contains high voltage.
Don't attempt to
service the terminal without taking all the precautions necessary
for working with high voltage, including the following:
o
If you must open the terminal for any reason, turn off the
power, disconnect any communication cables, and unplug the
terminal.
o
Remove any jewelry, especially on your hands and wrists.
o
Avoid wearing clothing that holds a static charge.
o
Use only insulated or nonconductive tools.
o
Whenever you disconnect the anode from the anode lead, make
sure to ground the anode as directed in Chapter 2,
"Discharging the Anode."
o
If you need to remove or replace the CRT/yoke assembly,
remember that it can implode if you drop it or break the
neck. The flying glass can injure anyone within a radius of
six to ten feet.
Tools Required
Before you test the power supply voltages or make any adjustments
to the power supply or monitor assemblies, make sure you have the
tools listed below.
o
Flat-bladed nonconductive alignment tool
o
Hex nonconductive alignment tool
o
No. 2 Phillips screwdriver
o
Digital voltmeter
o
Oscilloscope
o
Millimeter ruler or reticle (optional--see Appendix D for
instructions on how to use the reticle when you align the
terminal display)
Note--Before you make any adjustments on the power supply or
monitor assembly, make sure to let the terminal warm-up for 30
minutes.
4-2
POWER ADJUSTMENTS
The monitor/power supply PCB provides all of the voltages for the
logic (+5V, +12V, and -12V). You can adjust the +5 supply.
Note--You can find the locations of all components and test
points referred to in this chapter in Figure 4-1.
Figure 4-1
Power Supply Component Layout
To adjust the power supply, follow these steps:
1.
Turn the termina I off.
2.
Unplug the power cord from the back of the terminal. If
communications cables are attached to the back of the
terminal, detach those, too.
3.
Place the terminal on its face and remove the terminal
enclosure and back bezel (see Chapter 2).
4.
Plug the terminal into an AC power source.
5.
Turn the terminal on.
6.
Check the +5V supply at R15 on the terminal PCB, using the
chassis as ground.
7.
Adjust VR101 until the digital voltmeter reads between 4.9
and 5.1 volts.
4-3
Note--If you can't bring the +5V supply into tolerance, see
Chapter 3,
"Troubleshooting."
8.
Check the -12V supply at C31 on the terminal PCB. The
digital voltmeter shou'ld read -12V (+5 percent).
If the
-12V supply is not within tolerance after you have adjusted
the +5 supply, see Chapter 3, "Troubleshooting."
9.
Check the +12V supply at C27 on the terminal PCB. The
digital voltmeter should read +12V (+5 percent). If the
+12V supply is not within tolerance after you have adjusted
the +5 supply, see Chapter 3, "Troubleshooting."
10.
Turn the terminal so the screen is visible. Set the
terminal PCB on a surface where the traces will not touch
other metal.
11.
Check to see if the display needs alignment.
(See "Does
the Terminal Meet the Display Specifications?") If it
doesn't need alignment, turn off the terminal, unplug it,
and replace the top cover.
If the display needs alignment, go to "Aligning the Terminal
Display."
DOES THE TERMINAL MEET THE DISPLAY SPECIFICATIONS?
Before you adjust the display on the monitor, measure the screen
margins and study the display, following the procedure below.
Note--If you have just finished checking and adjusting the power
supplies,
go to step 4.
1.
Turn the terminal off.
2.
Unplug the power cord from the back of the terminal.
3.
If any communications cables are attached to the back of the
terminal, detach them.
4.
Attach the test connectors to the MODEM and AUX ports on the
rear pane 1.
Note--See Appendix C for a description of these connectors
and instructions for making them.
See Chapter 5 for
ordering information.
5.
Plug in the power cord and turn the terminal on.
for 30 minutes.
Let it run
Note--If you check the display before it runs for 30
minutes, your measurements may not be accurate.
4-4
6.
Hold the SHIFT key, then press the SETUP key.
7.
Press CURSOR DOWN fi ve times.
Look for the TEST:OFF
field in the setup line at the bottom of the screen.
8.
Press CURSOR RIGHT four times.
9.
Press the spacebar.
10.
Hold the CTRL key, then press the SETUP key. Press the N
key.
You should see a flashing test pattern.
11.
Hold down the spacebar until the test pattern stops
flashing.
12.
Margins on the top, bottom, and both sides should measure
11mm (+2mm).
If they don't, see the next section,
"AlignTng the Terminal Display."
13.
Look at the display.
This toggles the TEST field ON.
Do you see any of these problems?
o
Barreling (display edges that curve outwards)
o
Pincushioning (display edges that curve inwards)
o
Display edges aren't straight
o
Display is too wide or too narrow
o
Display is too high or too short
For Service Manuals
MAURITRON SERVICES
o
Display isn't centered or level
o
Poor focus
o
Too dim or too bright
o
Poor contrast
o
Letters at the top of the pattern are a different size
than the letters the bottom
o
Letters aren't uniform throughout
8 Cherry Tree Road, Chlnnor
Oxfordshire, OX9 4QY.
Tel (01844) 351694
Fax (01844) 352554
emall:[email protected]
If you find any of the problems mentioned here, go to the
next section, "Aligning the Terminal Display."
If the display is within specification and looks normal,
turn the terminal off. If the terminal was opened, you can
close it, remove the connectors, and reattach the
communications cables.
4-5
ALIGNING THE TERMINAL DISPLAY
Warning--The CRT/yoke assembly has high volt~ges. Only qualified
service personnel should perform these adjustments.
The monitor has several alignments and adjustments.
If the
terminal display is out of tolerance in one or two areas, make
adjustments to correct only those problems. If you change the
CRT/yoke assembly or the terminal PCB, you must perform a full
alignment.
Peform these procedures only if the display is out of
tolerance and doesn't match the specification.
Note--If you already have the test pattern on the screen, go to
step 9.
To align the terminal display, follow these steps:
1.
Turn the terminal off.
2.
Disconnect the communications cables and power cord.
3.
Attach the test connectors to the MODEM and AUX ports on the
rear panel.
Note--See Appendix C for a description of these connectors
and instructions for making them.
4.
Plug the power cord into the back of the terminal and turn
it on. Let it run for 30 minutes.
(If it has already run
for 30 minutes, continue the procedure.)
5.
Hold the SHIFT key, then press the SETUP key.
6.
Press CURSOR DOWN fi ve times.
Look for the TEST:OFF
field in the setup line at the bottom of the screen.
7.
Press CURSOR RIGHT four times.
8.
Press the spacebar.
9.
Hold the CTRL key, then press the SETUP key. Press the N
key.
You shou 1 d see a f lashing test pattern.
10.
Hold down the spacebar until the test pattern stops
flashing.
11.
Adjust the display.
locations.
This toggles the TEST field ON.
Check Figure 4-1 for component
Note--If you finish both the power and display adjustments, and
the display still has problems, see Chapter 3, "Troubleshooting."
4-6
Table 4-1
Display Problems and Adjustments
Display Problems
Adjustments
Page
Letters at the top of the
display aren't the same
height as those at the
bottom of the display
Linearity
4-8
Fuzzy letters
Focus
4-9
Too bright; too dim;
raster scan lines show;
individual problems with
or dim
Brightness
4-8
Display too short or too tall
Height
4-7
Too wide or too narrow
Width
4-7
No vertical hold
Vertical hold
4-7
Not centered
Centering rings
4-12
Not level
Yoke lock
4-9
Pincushioning, barreling,
crooked edges, corners
sag or move out of
specification
Disp lay magnets
4-10
ADJUSTMENTS
This section contains detailed instructions for each adjustment
mentioned in Table 4-1. Figure 4-2 can help you to identify
adjustment locations on the terminal PCB.
Height
The height adjustment is labeled VR302 on the terminal PCB.
Adjust VR302 until the top edge and the bottom edge of the
display are both 11mm (+2mm) from the edge of the bezel.
Vertical Hold
The height adjustment is labeled VR301 on the terminal PCB.
Adjust VR301 until the display is steady and the video dosen't
roll.
4-7
Figure 4-2
Adjustment Locations
VR201, Focus
VR202, Full Brightness
VR303, Linearity
Linearity
The linearity adjustment is labeled VR303 on the terminal PCB.
Adjust VR303 until characters on the bottom of the display are
the same height as those on the top.
Brightness
You can adjust bright and dim separately. Although you can adjust
them independently, it's a good idea to adjust bright first, and
then dim.
1.
Slide the brightness slideswith as far right as possible
(full brightness).
2.
Turn VR202 on the terminal PCB as far clockwise as possible.
You should see the raster lines on the screen.
3.
Slowly turn VR202 counterclockwise, just until the raster is
no longer visible. VR202 adjusts full brightness.
4-8
4.
Compare the full bright line-blocks in the test pattern to
the dim line-blocks in the test pattern. If dim looks
either too bright or not bright enough, adjust VR401 until
the contrast looks correct.
Focus
Note--Do not use the focus control to adjust the outer
extremities of the screen.
CRT.
Some focus distortion happens in any
The focus adjustment is labeled VR201 on the terminal PCB.
Adjust VR201 until the characters halfway between the center of
the display and the bezel are distinct and clear.
Width
Caution--Do not use a metal tool to adjust the width coil. The
magnetic properties of a metal tool will affect the adjustment.
The width adjustment is labeled L202 on the terminal PCB. With a
hex nonconductive alignment tool, adjust L202 until either side
of the display is 11mm (+2mm) from the edge of the bezel.
Display Leveling
The yoke lock is located on the neck of the CRT (see Figure 4-3).
To level the display, follow these steps:
1.
Loosen the yoke lock on the neck of the CRT.
2.
Rotate the yoke until the top and bottom edges of the
display are level with the top and bottom of the bezel.
3.
Tighten the yoke lock.
Warning--Do not tighten the yoke lock too much or the neck of the
CRT will break causing the CRT to implode. The flying glass can
injure anyone within a radius of six to ten feet.
4-9
Figure
4-3
Yoke Lock on the CRT Neck
Yoke
Yoke Lock
" ' - - Centering Ring Magnets
Rotate Yoke
To Level Display
~=-------
II
- - - - - - - - - - _
II
I
'I
I
I
I
iI
/ I
i I
/ I
Display
/
4-10
Display Magnets
There are eight display magnets on a ring around the yoke. When
turned, they change corresponding screen areas. They can also
affect adjacent areas. Figure 4-4 identifies each magnet; Table
4-2 identifies which portion of the screen each changes.
Figure 4-4
Display Magnets
3
7
5
Table 4-2
Magnet
Number
Screen Areas Affected by Display Magnets
Area
Affected
Top
2
Upper left corner
3
Left
4
Lower left corner
5
Bottom
6
Lower right corner
7
Right
8
Upper right corner
4-11
Centering Rings
There are two display centering rings around the yoke. When
turned, they move the display position on the screen. Figure 4-5
shows the rings.
If the display isn't in the center of the
screen, tu~n the rings until" it is, then make height and width
adjustments described on pages 4-7 and 4-9.
Figure 4-5
Centering Rings
Centering Ring
4-12
5
ILLUSTRATED PARTS LIST
Introduction
5-2
Terminal Display Assembly Exploded View
5-3
Keyboard Assembly Exploded View
5-4
Terminal Components List
5-5
Keyboard Components List
5-8
Terminal Board Assembly Layout
5-9
5-1
INTRODUCTION
This chapter provides the information you need to order parts for
the termina 1.
The first part of this chapter provides two exploded assembly
drawings: Figure 5-1, the terminal display, and Figure 5-2, the
keyboard. Each replaceable assembly, plastic covering, or cable
is labeled on the drawings with a specific part name and part
number. When you order replacement parts, please give both the
part name and the part number.
In the second part of this chapter, we list all piece parts,
their values or generic industry numbers when relevant, and
locations on the terminal PCB or the keyboard PCB. Table 5-1
lists components on the terminal PCB. Table 5-2 lists components
on the keyboard PCB. Figure 5-3 is the terminal PCB component
layout and Table 5-3 lists the diagnostic self-test connectors.
5-2
Figure 5-1
Terminal Display Assembly Exploded View
Enclosure Assembly
830017-01
Barner Plate, Power
On/Off (AC Switch)
710049-01
Back Bezel Assembly
830018-01
AC Socket
840266-01
Pow
340C
Module Jack
560009-01
Bezel Front
710053-01
Operator Brightness (Key) Slide
710052-01
5-3
Figure 5-2
Keyboard Assembly Exploded View
Module Jack
560009-01
Keyboard peBA
990067-01
Keyboard Cable
94-038-03
Keyboard Assembly
5-4
840013-01
Table 5-1
Part Number
Terminal PCB Components List
Location
Description
Integrated Circuits
230129-01
250220-01
80-300-02
80-400-00
80-400-04
80-400-09
80-400-11
80-400-15
80-400-24
80-400-26
80-400-27
80-400-29
80-400-34
80-400-64
80-430-04
80-431-12
80-431-34
80-431-40
80-432-00
80-432-01
80-432-15
80-432-20
80-432-23
80-435-12
80-520-10
ASY FIRMWARE CHAR. GEN. PRO
ASY FIRMWARE PROGRAM PROM
PPT BEEPER,AUDIO
PPT IC 74LSOO
PPT IC 74LS04
PPT IC 74LS 139
PPT IC 74LS174
PPT IC 74LS374
PPT IC 74LS132
PPT IC 74LS74
PPT IC 74LS283
PPT IC 74LS158
PPT IC 74LS138
PPT IC 74LS368
PPT IC 4016 2K x 8K STATIC RAM
PPT IC 2661-B
PPT IC CRT CNTL 6845RA 2MHZ
PPT IC 68BOO MICROPROCESSOR
PPT IC 1488
PPT IC 1489
PPT IC ADJ. SHUNT REGULATOR
PPT IC TDA 1170N
PPT IC 4N35
PPT IC GATE ARRAY (VIDEO)
ER5911A 1024 BIT EEROM
U12
U18
B1
U4
U14,U5
U29
U24
U13,U15,U16
U20
u26
U7,U9
U3,U6,U8
U23
U19
U1 , U2
U22
U10
U17
U27
U28
IC102
IC301
IC101
U11
U25
Resistors
80-161-29
80-161-37
80-161-38
80-161-39
80-161-40
80-161-43
80-161-46
80-163-03
80-900-00
80-900-02
80-900-04
80-900-05
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
RES. ,VAR.1K OHM
RES. ,VAR.100K-B
RES. ,VAR.100K-B
RES. ,VAR.200K-B
RES. ,VAR.2MEG-B
RES.,VAR.500 OHM
RES.,VAR.100K-A
THERMISTOR SG-15 50HM 1A
RES, CF 100 OHM 1/4W 5%
RES, CF 470 OHM 1/4W 5%
RES, CF 680 OHM 1/4W 5%
RES, CF 1K OHM 1/4W 5%
80-900-08
80-900-11
80-900-12
80-900-13
80-900-14
80-900-15
80-900-17
80-900-19
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
CF
CF
CF
CF
CF
CF
CF
CF
10K OHM 1/4W 5%
3.3 OHM 1/4W 5%
47 OHM 1/4W 5%
68 OHM 1/4W 5%
220 OHM 1/4W 5%
1.5K OHM 1/4W 5%
39K OHM 1/4W 5%
56K OHM 1/4W 5%
5-5
VR101
R221
VR303
VR202, 301 ,302
VR201
VR401
VR203
TR101
R402
R201,407
R403
R112,R13,R3
R6,R7,R8
R1,R223,R3 01
R311
R404,R406,R410
R106,R4
R409
R109
R305
R307,R310
Table 5-1
Part Number
Continued
Location
Description
Resistors (continued)
80-900-20
80-900-21
80-900-22
80-900-23
80-900-24
80-900-31
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
CF
CF
CF
CF
CF
CF
68K OHM 1/4W 5%
150K OHM 1/4W 5%
270K OHM 1/4W 5%
470K OHM 1/4W 5%
12K OHM 1/4W 5%
4.7K OHM 1/4W 5%
80-900-33
80-900-35
80-900-37
80-900-39
80-900-46
80-900-58
80-900-65
80-900-69
80-900-89
80-900-90
80-900-93
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
CF
CF
CF
CF
CF
CF
CF
CF
CF
CF
CF
120K OHM 1/4W 5%
100K OHM 1/4W 5%
82 OHM 1/4W 5%
2.2K OHM 1/4W 5%
22K OHM 1/4W 5%
1MEG, 1/4W 5%
220K OHM 1/4W 5%
62 OHM 1/4W 5%
15K OHM 1/4W 5%
33 OHM 1/4W 5%
10 OHM 1/4W 5%
80-901-04
80-901-50
80-901-63
80-901-69
80-901-71
80-901-76
80-904-03
80-904-15
80-904-42
80-904-50
80-905-43
80-905-64
80-905-66
80-905-69
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
RES,
CF 57 OHM 1/4W 5%
CF 180K OHM 1/4W 5%
MOF 12 OHM 2W 5%
WW 1.5 OHM 3W 5%
MOF 1K OHM 2W 5%
CF 330K 1W 5%
CF 120K OHM 1/2W 5%
CF 1 OHM 1/2W 5%
CF 3K OHM 1/4W 5%
CF 10 OHM 1/2W 5%
MOF 33 OHM 1W 5%
CF 220K OHM 1/2W 5%
MOF 560 OHM 1W 5%
MOF 1K OHM 5W 5%
R225,R309
R218,R303
R304
R306
R108
R107,R12,R14
R15,R16
R219
R214
R313
R10,R11,R2,R9
R220
R215
R312
R405
R11 0
R104,R5
R22,R23,R24,R25
R26,R27,R28,R29
R202
R302
R 113
R105
R408
R101
R114,R115
R308
R222
R224
R102,R203
R216,R217
R204
R103
Crystals, Coils, Diodes, Transistors
410009-01
410010-01
410011-01
80-006-06
80-170-01
80-170-19
80-170-24
80-170-25
80-170-43
80-170-44
80-170-47
80-170-55
80-170-66
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
COIL, HOR. WIDTH
COIL, HOR. LINERARITY
COIL, DYNAMIC FOCUS
COIL, 10UH CHOKE
DIODE, IN914B
DIODE, V09C
DIODE, RGP5020
DIODE, RGP30G
DIODE, IN4937 1A/600V
DIODE, IN4004 1A/400V
DIODE, SB 350 3A/50V
DIODE, IN747A
DIODE, V19E
5-6
L202
L203
L204
L104
D1,D2,D403
D205,D206,D301
D105
D108
D106,D110
D107
D109
D3
D202
Table 5-1
Part Number
Continued
Location
Description
Crystals, Coils, Diodes, Transistors (continued)
80-170-61
80-170-68
80-110-69
80-170-78
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
DIODE,
DIODE,
DIODE,
DIODE,
V11 N
1S2016
ZENER HZ6C2
1N5397
80-170-19
80-170-80
80-180-02
80-180-04
80-180-06
80-180-07
80-180-25
80-180-48
80-180-65
80-180-46
80-190-05
80-600-25
80-690-23
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
DIODE, U19C
DIODE, ZENER HZ3B2
TRANSISTOR, 2N2222
TRANSISTOR, 2N2906
TRANSISTOR, 2N2369
TRANSISTOR, BU406
TRANSISTOR, 2SC3150
TRANSISTOR, 2SC1213
TRANSISTOR, BSX-32
TRANSISTOR, BSX-59
LED, 5219
COIL, CHOKE 10UH 1.5A
CRYSTAL, 19.6614MHZ HC18/W
D203
D401
D402,Z1,Z2,Z3
D101,D102,D103
D104
D201
D404
Q102,Q403
Q1
Q401
Q202
Q101
Q201
Q402
SUB
DS1
L102,L103
X1
Capacitors
80-920-04
80-920-09
80-920-11
PPT CAP., CD .01MF 1KV
PPT CAP., CD .001MF 50V
PPT CAP., MG .1MF 50V AXIAL
80-920-25
80-920-29
PPT CAP., CD 1000PF 500V
PPT CAP., MG 220PF 50V (AXIAL)
80-920-34
80-920-36
PPT CAP., CD 680PF 50V
PPT CAP., 22PFAXIAL 50V
80-920-41
80-920-54
80-920-92
80-920-93
80-920-94
80-920-98
80-930-00
80-930-01
80-930-04
80-930-11
80-930-21
80-930-22
80-930-42
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
CAP.,
CAP.,
CAP.,
CAP.,
CAP.,
CAP.,
CAP.,
CAP.,
CAP.,
CAP.,
CAP.,
CAP.,
CAP.,
MG 330PF 50V K
MPF .22MF 100V
CD 560PF 1KV K Y5P
CD 330PF 500V K Y5P
CD 1000PF 1KV Z
CD 100PF 50V K Y5P
AEL 10MF 16V
AEL 41MF 25V VT. MNT.
AEL 220MF 25V
AEL 10UF 25V VT. MNT.
AEL 1MF 50V
AEL 10MF 160V
AEL 470MF 16V VT. MNT.
5-7
C210
C204
C8,C9,C10,C11,C12
C120,C121,C122,
C123,C124,C125,
C13,C14,C19,C216,
C24,C25,C26,C21,
C3 ,C30 , C31 , C32 ,
C33,C36,C41,C6,C7
C215
C15 ,C16 ,C17 ,C18
C20,C21,C22,C 2 3
C305,C30 8
C34,C35,C40,C42,
C43
C29
C11 1
C109
C207
C214
C301
C1
C108,C2
C116 ,C117 ,C209
C110,C306
C202
C212
C208
Table 5-1
Continued
Location
Description
Part Number
Capacitors (continued)
1000MF 16V VT. MNT. C310
C112,C113
2200MF 16V
C37,C39
100MF 16V
C309,C311
100MF 16V
C211
100MF 63V
C105,C106
220MF 200V
2200UF 10V,
C114,C115
C205
6.8UF 35V
C4
.39MFD 100V
C203
.022MFD 400V
C107,C302,C303
.1MFD 100V
C304,C307
C213
PPT CAP., PPN .018MF 630V 5%
C201,C401
PPT CAP., PEE .22MF 50V 5%
C206
PPT CAP., PPN .22UF 630V J
C118
PPT CAP., PEE .22UF 100V K
C5
PPT CAP., MICA 56PF
PPT CAP., INTERF. SUPP.,
C101
.47MFD 250VAC
PPT CAP., INTERF. SUPP.,
C104
. 1MFD/ 250VAC
PPT CAP., .0047MFD 250VAC-Y
C102,C103
PME271YA4L470M FIF
C28
PPT CAP., MG 1000PF/50V KX7R
C402
PPT CAP., MK 200PF 50V J NPO
PPT CAP.,
PPT CAP.,
PPT CAP.,
PPT CAP.,
PPT CAP.,
PPT CAP.,
PPT CAP.,
85 DEGREE
PPT CAP.,
PPT CAP.,
PPT CAP.,
PPT CAP.,
80-930-43
80-930-51
80-930-58
80-930-82
80-930-84
80-930-86
80-930-89
80-930-92
80-940-06
80-940-17
80-940-19
80-940-30
80-940-49
80-940-66
80-940-67
80-950-02
80-960-01
80-960-02
80-960-03
80-960-20
80-960-25
AEL
AEL
AEL
AEL
AEL
AEL
AEL
C
AEL
MPF
PPN
MPF
Transformers
4200028-01
4200029-01
4200030-01
4200031-01
680002-01
Table 5-2
PWR TRANSFORMER EI-40
DRIVE TRANSFORMER
HOR. DRIVE TRANSFORMER
FLYBACK
LINE FILTER, COMMON CHOKE 18MH
T101
T102
TL01
T202
L101
Keyboard Components List
Part Number
Description
Location
80-170-01
80-170-69
80-435-13
80-900-39
80-900-93
80-904-47
80-920-11
80-930-35
80-960-05
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
PPT
D1,D2,D3,D4
D5
U1
R1
R3,R4,R5,R6
R2
C3
C1
C2
DIODE, IN914B
DIODE, ZENER HZ6C2
IC KEYBOARD GATE ARRAY
RES, CF 2.2K OHM 1/4W 5%
RES, CF 10 OHM 1/4W 5%
RES, CF 24K OHM 1/4W 5%
CAP., MG .1MF 50V AXIAL
CAP., AEL 470MF 6.3V
CAP., MG .0015MF 50V K X7R
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02ffoRO~-kc:10
J509
CJ
J514
I ~ ~ lT~
U12~
~~
I;
,
,
1
no.'
1T 5
RI08
~
I
I
!
C!JSOa
1 I ~1--1 ~
T
!:
J51]1
c==J
[==:J ~
__
(Jq
J512
J507/
f
1
J7o')
U26
VR:.?O-i
t~RJ
C37
T
CI
CJ6
0106
GPJ
J63g*J725
- - 0401
J545
-+f--r,............-J543 J544
R.OI
:
If C.O
J558
..&§.L
• C305
R312
_
I f tI •
C39,.
9
0
C115
102
I-z]
,....
-.
<%l
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01
UI]
~
R409
~
J58B0205
20.
J6<~ ~9
\..
0
~~~~
fRl09
--
OGP2
Q CI~
• -_
J504
~
lllO'
CII9 T
C116
0·404
C309
n~..
0203
L202
,~~
R
8RN
DI
_J_5_7<_
C207r-;{
0206
'lTT'
l7
C302
_ _3_
C212
-~
~
B~/--Jl03---....
1 "T
TJ; Q
RIOI
Clll
~
1/
~R1J2
fJTp
ICIOI
"
n
~
w
,-------",
-II--
fC20G
~
Tti
8
6/'A\
WHT
0
E \ / ....
C
"
(]
Cll0
RIO'}
5101
JI02
~
R3D7
---............
J57
1
J.
T
TI02
BLK
C108
E Q102'"
~~
~rv~\~ \ J
~ ~~
GP5
T 0
~
1f
lIO
J:~:
C304
--II--C210
~
VR 302
T
-;::ttl
~
l204
Rm-
T
..rnT'L5
VR 301
~~
-H-
e215
R219
~VGP12
J2
T
VR 303
GRN
R".
REtyC2l4
l14
~
0101
CIO
~~
-H- lIO. ~12'
~
J529
~ -..::..-.I-- R106
~ -- _
RJ02
Rl2.
~ J523
J530
R21..
41...............
CJIl
J519
BLU ------ R30,
<=>
J51B
-0 r::::::::J
U R107n B IIJ52' 11 -J531
1 UII
C211l- ~ ~JO~l - J520
.l.y
J52
J528
C26
f ~ Rio9 IC301 ~ ---'!4ll- GP7 C1I7 Q'25VR'011 OGPB
7, 1T
JI
~
I
..L
~ o
~
\,Q
!
I~
J50
\J
lID2
fG VR202
LJ
I't (~\
0109 CI21
f
/
CIIJ
Ul
I
1
n
5
CI2
Jlbl
=E:
A~105~
-.4 {!!..
7
C~,I*B 3~' Do~
T
....
L2
8
'RIo3
~ ~1I
O$TRI01
,
10 9
2
cII8
~ ~
GRIOI
J501
Cl03
E
r
0
TlO.
12
o
Table 5-3
Diagnostic Self-Test Connectors
Part
Part Number
Connector set
940268-01
MODEM port connector
940270-01
AUX port connector
940267-01
5-10
6
THEORY OF OPERATION
Introduction
.
Microcomputer and Related Logic
Microcomputer
Interrupt vectors
Direct Addressing Mode
Input/Output Considerations
Memory Limitations
Video Interface and Synchronization
6845 CRT Controller Parameters
Video Interrupt
Character Attributes
Video Character Data
Screen Attributes
Input/Output Devices
Power Supply and Monitor Circuitry
Power Supply
Circuit Protection
Display Monitor Circuitry
Vertical Deflection
Horizontal Deflection
Focus and Brightness Circuits
Video Amplification
........
6-2
6-2
6-2
6-2
6-3
6-3
6-3
6-6
6-7
6-7
·················· 6-8
6-9
6-9
·················· 6-10
··············· 6-10
6-10
··················· 6-11
6-11
6-11
6-12
6-12
6-13
Keyboard
6-13
Communication Ports
6-13
Terms and Abbreviations
6-13
For Service Manuale
MAURITRON SERVICES
8 Cherry li'ee Road, Chlnrior
Oxfordehlre, OX9 4QY.
Tel (01844) 351694 .
Fax (01844) 352554
emall:[email protected]
6-1
INTRODUCTION
This chapter explains the terminal's operation and can be used in
conj unct ion wi th the schema tics in Chapter 7.
The section "Terms
and Abbreviations" at the end of this chapter introduces terms
with whi6h you may not be "familiar and describes new concepts.
If you are an inexperienced technician, and haven't encountered
these concepts, you may want to read this section first.
We have organized this chapter into five sections: microcomputer
and related logic, monitor, power supply, keyboard, and
communications ports. You may read them in sequence or refer to
sections as you need them.
MICROCOMPUTER AND RELATED LOGIC
The terminal logic contains three major functional areas:
the
microcomputer, video interface and synchronization, and I/O
devices.
The following sections describe the functions of each
group.
Microcomputer
The CPU is a complete microcomputer that runs terminal firmware.
The firmware, permanently stored in ROM, controls the terminal.
Functions of this firmware include scanning the keyboard,
controlling the video circuitry, transferring data to and from
the serial ports, and performing data-manipulation tasks such as
inserting or deleting data from the text shown on the screen.
The terminal's microcomputer is built around the 2 megahertz
version of the 6800 CPU, the 68800. The microcomputer is the
combination of this CPU, together with several other components:
a two-phase clock, program memory, 4K of RAM, and a reset
circuit.
The synchronization circuit generates the two-phase
clock circuit. The program memory is 8K of ROM. The RAM, used
by the microprocessor for variable storage and system stack, is
shared with the video interface as screen refresh. The reset
circuit generates a system reset whenever it detects a low-power
condition.
Memory Limitations--The 6800 can address 64K of memory. If more
memory is needed, then a page-select scheme is used. When the
extended ROM page is used on this termina 1, then all of the
interrupt vectors and interrupt routines are duplicated in the
extended page. It is not necessary to duplicate the reset vector
or routine, since a reset will automatically select the main ROM
page.
Figure 6-1 shows the terminal memory map.
6-2
Figure 6-1
OOOOH
OOFFH.
0100H.
OFFFH
1000H
1FFFH'
2000H.
3FFFH
4000H
4001H.
4002H.
4003H
4004H
4005H.
4006H'
4007H
4008H
57FFH
6000H.
7FFFH
8000H
9FFFH.
Memory Map
RAM TABLES & BUFFERS
Two KBD scan tables
DATACOM buffers
ASSorted flags, etc.
SCREEI\J DATA (More RAM storage
Including softkey line.)
NOT USED (Addresses same memory
as OOOOH to OFFFH)
ROW OFFSET REGISTER
(All locations In this block
address the same register.)
UART REGISTERS
Receive Holding Reg (READ)
Status Register (READ)
Mode Registers (READ)
Command Register (READ)
Transmit Holding Reg. (WRITE)
SYN 1/SYN2/DLE Reg's (WRITE)
Mode Registers (WRITE)
Command Register (WRITE)
NOT USED (Addresses UART)
KEYBOARD CLOCK (WRITE ONLY)
Writing xxxx xxx1 to this
Iccatlon clocks the keyboard
once. Writing xxxx xxxOb to
this location clears the
keyboard Counter Writes to
any address In this block
performs the same operation
Mise INPUT PORT (READ ONLY)
Reading any byte In this
Will get the same byte The
bits are defined as follows
O. Keyboard Data/
1. VSYNC/
2-5 Not Used
6 EEROM Ready/Signal
7. EEROM Data Out/Signal
6-3
I
I
Figure 6-1 Continued
AOOOH.
MISe. OUTPUT PORT (WRITE ONLY)
Wrrtlng any location in this
block will wrrte to the same
port. The bits are defined
as follows
0-1: Not Used
2. CRTC Reset/
3: ROM Page Select
4 BEEP /
5 EEROM Chip Select
6 EEROM Clock. Prrnter
Port Enable
7 EEROM Data In.
Alternate Character Set
WARNING: Reading from this port
will cause random data
to be wrrtten to the
port. Do not use
read-modify-wme
instructions.
This port is initialized
to OOH by hardware
BFFFH
COOOH
COOSH
CRTC REGISTERS
Address Register (READ/WRITE)
Data Register (READ/WRITE)
(All other locations in this
block address the same CRTC
registers.)
DFFFH
I
EOOOH.
EXTENDED PROGRAM ROM
MAIN PROGRAM ROM
This is one of two SK pages
of ROM. Note that ALL interrupt vectors and routines
must be In the exact same
location in both pages l
-
FFFFH
Video Interface and Synchronization
The video interface includes both the CRT controller (CRTC) and
the video attribute and dot logic.
The video interface is
completely synchronized with the CPU. This eliminates the need
for a row buffer, while allowing the CPU and the CRTC to have
unrestricted access to the screen-refresh RAM.
(The
synchronization circuitry is part of the video interface.)
The terminal video interface is designed around the two megahertz
version of the 6845 CRTC (the 68B45) and a custom video gate
array.
This gate array performs many functions, including
synchronizing the CPU with the CRTC.
These functions are
listed below:
o
Generation of CPU and CRTC clocks as a function of the dot
clock
6-4
o
Character attribute decode and generation
o
Screen-refresh RAM address multiplexor control
o
Screen attribute decode and generation
o
Combined video and attribute serialization
o
Horizontal sync pulse stretch
o
UART clock generation
o
Generation of a CPU interrupt at the beginning of each
character row
The address outputs of the CRTC are modified by the contents of
the row offset register using a pair of adders.
The row offset
register is reloaded at the beginning of each character row, so
the CRTC can address nonsequencial character rows (indirect row
addressing).
The modified address from the CRTC selects the next data byte to
be displayed on the screen from the screen refresh RAM. This
address is sent to the refresh RAM through the address MUX, whicr
alternately allows the CRTC and the CPU to address the RAM. The
terminal has 4K of display RAM, which is shared by the CPU.
Character data from the screen display RAM moves directly into
the gate array for attribute decoding. It simultaneously goes t(
the character latch. The character latch, together with the
pixel row number from the gate array, selects a row of pixels to
be displayed from the character generator. The character
generator is a ROM that contains pixel patterns for each
displayable character, whose outputs go back to the gate array tr
be displayed on the screen.
68B45 CRT Controller Parameters--These are the 68B45 CRT
controller display parameters:
Vertical frequency
Horizontal frequency
Video dot frequency
Character (& CPU) clock
Vertical retrace time
Horizontal retrace time
Horizontal sync pulse
Vertical sync pulse
Display size
Character cell size
60.00 Hz
(frames/second)
19.86 KHz (lines/second)
19.66 MHz (dots/second)
1.966 MHz (characters/second
0.957 mSec (19 lines)
9.664 uSec (19 characters)
16.79 uSec
(33 characters)
805.64 uSec (16 lines)
26 rows of 80 characters
12 lines of 10 dots
The gate array adds 32 character times (16.28 mSec) to the
programmed horizontal sync pulse, so the CRTC Sync Width RegistE
must be programmed with 33-32=1. The gate array also generates
the horizontal sync pulse one character interval early. Table t
gives the values loaded into the CRTC.
6-5
Table 6-2
Register
Number
Values Loaded into CRTC
Register File
Value
R10
Horizontal total
Horizontal displayed
Horizontal sync position
Sync width
Vertical total
Vertical total adjust
Vertical displayed
Vertical sync position
Interlace mode and skew
Max scan line address
Cursor start
R11
Cursor end
62h
50h
51h
01h
1Ah
07h
1Ah
1Ah
OOh
OBh
a (block style)
OAh (line style)
OBh
RO
R1
R2
R3
R4
R5
R6
R7
R8
R9
R10 and R12-R15 will change during program execution.
are light pen registers and are ignored.
R16 and R17
Video Interrupt--The video interrupt is a nonmaskable interrupt
(NMI) that occurs at the beginning of each scan line O.
Note
that if one scan line a follows immediately after another scan
line a (for instance, in smooth scrolling), then no interrupt
will occur at the beginning of the second scan line O. Whenever
the CRTC is enabled, this interrupt occurs. The purpose of the
interrupt is to allow the processor to change the row address of
each row before it is displayed, allowing indirect row
addressing.
When this interrupt occurs, the processor has the
length of time of 12 scan lines (604 mSec) to load the row offset
register with the offset value for the next row.
Note--The 8-bit value loaded into the row offset register is
added to bits 4 through 11 of the 12-bit address produced by the
CRTC. This indicates three operating conditions:
o
Rows must begin at an even 16-byte boundary.
o
The row offset register must be loaded with the position of
the row in me m0 r y r e 1. a t i!.~ tot h e po sit ion 0 f t hat row 0 n
the screen.
o
Negative values of row offset are expressed in two's
comp 1 iment form.
Character Attributes--The gate array generates all the terminal's
video attributes. There are two types of attributes available to
the terminal: hidden and serial attributes. Each character
displayed on the screen is represented by eight bits of RAM. If
the high three bits are 100, the CPU assumes the character is a
nonhidden attribute, which causes two actions--a blank cell is
displayed and the attribute value stored in the low five bits is
loaded into the serial attribute latches within the gate array~
6-6
If the high order bit is 1 and the next two bits are not 00, then
the character is displayed with the hidden attribute specified by
the screen attribute byte.
Any other combination of attribute
bits is displayed with no attribute or the currently loaded
ser ia 1 at tr i bu te.
Tab I.e 6- 3 shows the at tr i bu te assignmen ts.
Table 6-3
OOOxxxxx
100RUSBD
R
U
S
B
D
Screen Attribute Assignments
Graphics character (cannot be displayed with
hidden attribute)
= Serial
attribute:
= Reverse (inverts video)
= Underline (places underline at scan line 9)
= Security (or blank--blanks only video dots)
= Blink (blinks video dots and underline)
= Dim (dims video)
Attributes are combined using the following Boolean function:
v = Output of video shift register
= Cursor
= Display enabled (not retracing)
= Scan line 11 (last scan line)
= Nonhidden (serial) attribute
o = Output of blink oscillator
BL = 0 AND B
UL = U AND L
VIDEO = E AND (N AND (BL AND (S AND
C
E
L
N
DIM
=E
V) OR UL) XOR R) XOR C)
AND NAND D
Video Character Data
The video character data is generated by the character generator,
and sent to the gate array.
This data is combined with the
attribute data and appears as serial data at the VIDEO pin. Bit
7 appears firs t (on the 1 eft), fo 11 owed by bi ts 6 through O. Bit
o is displayed twice in a row at the right side of the current
character cell, and is displayed as the first (leftmost) dot of
the next character cell. Each character cell is 10 dots wide.
Screen Attributes
There are nine attributes that, when set, apply to the whole
screen.
These are true reverse and alternate attribute (ATM),
screen blank, and six protect modes.
o
True reverse inverts the screen display.
6-7
o
ATM changes the manner in which serial attributes are
terminated. If ATM is off, then a serial attribute is
terminated only by another serial attribute. This means
that the screen must contain at least one serial attribute
somewhere, so that the serial attributes are defined. The
firmware always places an attribute at the beginning and end
of the status line. If ATM is on, then serial attributes
are terminated by either another serial attribute, or by the
end of the character row, which ever comes first.
o
Screen blank blanks the screen.
o
The six protect modes are dim, double wide, reverse,
underline, blink and blank.
These protect mode bits can be
combined to allow a total of 32.
The screen attributes are controlled by the screen attribute byte
(SAB).
The SAB is the first byte of both of the two character
rows of vertical blanking.
It is sufficient to set the first byte
of the first vertical blanking row to 0, and to set the first byte
of the second blanking row to contain the current screen
attributes. The bits within the SAB are assigned as follows:
Bit Position
Function
7
Protect = double wide
Alternate attribute mode (ATM)
True reverse
Protect = reverse
Protect = underline
Protect = blank
Protect = blink
Protect = dim
6
5
4
3
2
1
o
Note--If both Protect = Blink and Protect = Blank are selected,
the entire screen is blanked.
Input/Output Devices
I/O devices for the 6800 CPU are specialized memory locations;
the same instructions that manipulate memory manipulate the 6800
I/O devices. There are two I/O devices in the CRTC circuitry of
the previous section--the 68B45 itself, with several control
registers, and the row offset register.
In addition to the 68B45
and the row offset register, there are several more I/O devices:
o
The UART, which controls both serial ports (modem and AUX)
o
The beeper, which is turned on and off by the CPU
o
The keyboard, which is scanned through a special serial link
o
EEROM, which is written to and read from through a serial
interface
6-8
POWER SUPPLY AND MONITOR CIRCUITRY
The following paragraphs describe the power supply and monitor
circuitry on the terminal PCB. You may want to look at the
schematics in Chapter 7 as you read the following descriptions.
Power Supply
When the terminal receives power, coil (L10l) filters incoming
AC line voltage, then transistor TR101 reduces the surge
current. If the load is too great, line fuse F101 opens. Jack
J102 selects either 115 volt or 230 volt operation. When
operating with 115 volts, J102 enables the voltage doubling
circuit to provide the DC/AC converter with the nominal 320 VDC
it needs to operate.
Diodes D101, D102,
that rectifies the
primary winding of
Q101 is turned on.
secondary windings
alternately on the
winding.
Dl03, and D104 form the bridge diode network
incoming current.
Energy is stored in the
switching transformer T101 when transistor
This stored energy is transferred to the
when Q101 is turned off.
Q102 conducts
half-cycle, storing energy in the primary
When receiving power, the free-running switching rate is
approximately 20 kHz.
Transformer T102 synchronizes the 19.8 kHz
horizontal sweep rate with the switching rate to reduce the noise
that high-frequency generates.
The flyback transformer, T202,
generates the horizontal sweep rate when it receives the
horizontal sync signal from the CRT controller chip.
The secondary windings provide three voltage taps:
24 VAC, and 48 VAC.
54 VAC,
54 VAC is half-wave rectified by D108, smoothed by LC network
L102 and C125, and filtered by C120 and C113 to produce +12V.
24 VAC is half-wave rectified by D109, smoothed by LC network
L103 and C124, and filtered by C121, C114, and C115 to produce
+5V.
48 VAC is half-wave rectified by Dl10, smoothed by LC network
Ll04 and C125, and filtered by C122, C116, and C117 to produce
-12V.
A feedback loop through IC101 regulates all three voltages. ThiE
opto-isolated coupler senses and samples a fraction of the +5V
and +12V output. The +5V tap drives the logic and must be tightl
controlled. As the primary DC voltage decreases, or as load
current increases, the voltage change at the output of IC101
extends the width of the "on" time of each half cycle.
In a
similar fashion, a primary DC voltage increase or a load current
decrease will cause a decrease in the width of the "on" time,
producing a constant voltage at the output point.
6-9
VR101 is the only power supply adjustment. Since the +5V output
is sampled for feedback to the primary side, adjusting VR101
affects all three outputs.
Circuit Protection
Q101, Q102, R104, and R105 protect against overload and shortcircuit conditions. As the primary current increases, the base
current of Q102 increases, turning off Q101 and the output.
The IC102 crowbar circuit protects from overvoltage problems.
When the threshold volt~ge is exceeded, the gate fires, and the
+5V output is shorted to ground. This open circuit action
protects sensitive components on the +5V power bus.
Display Monitor Circuitry
The display monitor circuitry contains vertical deflection,
horizontal deflection, focus and brightness circuits, and video
amplification circuitry.
Vertical Deflection--The vertical deflection circuit contains
IC301 and additional discrete components. The +12V supply
applied to pin 2 drives the internal oscillator. The oscillator
frequency depends on the charging time constant of C302, R302 and
VR301. Adjusting VR301 (vertical hold) synchronizes the vertical
synchronization input at pin 8 with the oscillator.
Vertical Size, VR202, controls the amplitude of the internal
vertical RAM generator. Adjusting VR202 affects the pin 4
output, which changes the vertical dimension of the raster.
To obtain sufficiently short flyback times, the internal flyback
generator do~bles the input voltage at pin 5, applying it to the
vertical yoke through the power amplifier.
The ramp curve produced by C303, C304, R304, R305, and the
internal buffer stage results in a high degree of linearity.
VR303 adjusts vertical linearity.
Horizontal Deflection--Horizontal deflection contains these main
circuits and components: the horizontal driver circuit, the
horizontal output circuit, the flyback transformer, and the
linearity modulating coil.
The horizontal driver applies the horizontal synchronization
signal from the logic to the base of Q201 through R201 where it
is amplified and inverted. Current flows through the primary
winding of T201 from the 12V bias through R203 while Q201
conducts to saturation.
The energy is passed onto the secondary
of T201 when Q201 turns off, turning Q202 0!1.
C201 and R202
protect Q201 by absorbing the inductive spikes from the switching
action.
6-10
Horizontal output transistor Q202 and damping diode D202 act as
the switches in this switching circuit.
The net effect of:
(a) the swi tching action of transistor Q202; (b) the damping
action of D202; and (c) the large time constant offered by the inductive reactance of the horizontal deflection coil is a
sawtooth waveform through the deflection coil.
The flyback transformer, T202, sends signals and voltages to
various stages of the horizontal output circuit and the power
supply switching synchronization. The secondary taps provide 50V
for the video output stage, -100V for brightness control grid,
and 600V for the focus grid. T202 also generates the anode high
vol tag e 0 f 13 to 14k V.
The linearity modulating coil, L202, causes the beam to sweep
across the screen at a constant rate, compensating for time
constant produced by resistive elements in the circuit. If the
beam travels across the screen at a constant rate, characters
displayed at the center of the screen appear narrower than those
disp layed a t the edges.
"S" curve correction capaci tor C205 is
connected in series with the deflection yoke to match the
curvature of the CRT. The result is uniformity of character
width across the screen.
Focus and Brightness Circuits--The focus and brightness circuits
contain the following components and controls:
Focus is controled by static focus control VR201. The signal for
the horizontal dynamic focus is picked up from damping diode
D202, boosted through C206 and L204 and applied to the focus grid
together with the static focus voltage.
Brightness and sub-brightness controls VR203 and VR202 are
connected to the -100V output of the flyback, the 12V bias, and
the brightness grid. Brightness adjustments are VR203, VR202,
and the brightness slideswitch.
Video Amplification--Q40S, D403, D404, and R410 clamp the VIDEO
signal from the video logic circuit. Both the VIDEO and DIM
signals are applied to the base of Q401. VR401 adjusts the
balance between the two signals. D401 prevents interference from
the VIDEO signal during DIM adjusment. Q401 and Q402 are the
cascade amplifier which amplifies the input signal to drive the
CRT.
C402 and R406 form an emitter peaking circuit. The +12V
supply generates the heater voltage through R224.
KEYBOARD
The keyboard is scanned by a keyscanning integrated circuit (IC).
This Ie contains a scanner that addresses a different key for
each of the counter's values.
A long clock (>30 usec) pulse
clears the counter. A short clock pulse «6 usec) increments the
counter to address the next key.
The scanner communicates with
the terminal through the keyboard's four-wire interface.
6-11
The line from the keyboard to the processor gives the status of
the key currently being addressed.
The processor in the terminal is connected to this keyboard with
a special port. Writing a one to this port causes a short low
pulse to be sent to the keyboard. Writing a zero to this port
causes a constant low level to be sent to the keyboard. Note
that the first one sent to the port following a zero will not
increment the keyboard counter; it only terminates the constant
low level caused by the previous zero.
COMMUNICATION PORTS
The termina 1 has two ports, the MODEM and AUX (pr in te r) ports.
Both ports are controlled by a Signetics SCN2661 UART, which is
switched by an output bit as shown in the memory map (p. 6-x).
Since the UART serves two ports, both ports run at the same baud
rate.
The clock source for the UART comes from the gate array.
This clock is equal to the dot clock divided by four, or 4.915 MHz.
The MODEM port accepts standard modern handshaking signals (TxD,
RxD, RTS, CT~ DCD).
The AUX (printer) port sends only
one output, RxD, and one input, DTR. The input connects with the
DSR input of the UART. The unused outputs (CTS, DSR, DCD) are
tied high (active) with a 1K resistor to +12 volts. The DTR input
is connected to two pins (pin 20 = DTR and pin 11 = PRDY), to allow
connection to both Epson-style and Oki-style printers.
TERMS AND ABBREVIATIONS
This section introduces the terms and abbreviations found
throughout the theory of operation. They are listed in
alphabetical order, so you can used the list as a quick
reference.
AUX port
AuxilIary output port, intended to connect to a
printer.
Baud rate
The rate of speed at which data is transmitted (or
received) by a serial port. The units of baud
rate are bits per second.
Bit
Binary digit. This can be either a 1 or a O. In
dig ita 1 term ina 1 c i r cui t s , a 1 is rep res e nted by a
voltage between 2.5 V and 5 V and a 0 is
represented by a voltage between 0 V and 0.75 V.
An 8-bit binary number.
Byte
CPU
Central processing unit.
68BOO microprocessor.
CRT
Cathode ray tube.
screen.
6-12
The terminal CPU is a
This is the terminal display
CRTC
CRT controller integrated circuit.
uses a 68B45 CRTC.
EEROM
Electrically erasable read-only memory. The
terminal uses an ER5911 EEROM as its nonvolatile
storage.
I/O
Input/output.
MODEM port
The terminal's main communication port.
It can be
connected to a modem, a computer, or any other
compatible device.
MUX
Multiplexer.
two sources.
Pixel
Picture element. This is the basic unit of a
raster display. It appears as a dot on the
screen.
RAM
Random-access memory.
This device contains
display data, communication buffers, and all other
changeable data. All data in RAM is lost when the
power is turned off.
ROM
Read-only memory.
The terminal's program memory
and charac ter genera tor are ROM.
(This data isn't
lost when the power is turned off.)
UART
Universal asynchronous receiver transmitter. This
device converts parallel data to and from the
serial encoding format used by the MODEM and AUX
por ts.
The termina 1 uses a 2661 UART.
The terminal
This device selects data from one of
6-13
7
SCHEMATICS
Schematic
Part
Figure
Page
Keyboard PCB
960067-01
7-1
7-3
Terminal PCB
(Logic)
960066-01
7-2
7-5
Terminal PCB
(Monitor/Power
Supply)
960066-01
7-3
7-7
This chapter contains schematic diagrams for the terminal's
keyboard PCB and terminal PCB to help you troubleshoot the
terminal.
For Service Menue'e
MAURITRON SERVICES
8 C~rry Tree Roed, Chlnnor
",,,,ordehlre, OX9 4QY.
Tel (01844) 351694 .
Fax (01844l 352554
emall:- [email protected] .pIpex.com
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APPENDIX A
SPECIFICATIONS
Power Requirements
Line voltage
Line frequency
Power consumption
Fuse
115/230 VAC
47 to 63 Hz
42 watts
125V, 2.0 ampere fast blow
Operating Requirments
Ambient air temperature
Nonoperating air temperature
Operating altitude
Nonoperating altitude
Environmental humidity
+10 to +40 degrees Centigrade
-40 to +60 degrees Centigrade
10,000 feet, ASL
40,000 feet, ASL
20 to 80%, noncondensing
Scan Frequency
Horizontal
19.858
19.860
59.994
60.000
Vertical
to 19.862 kHz
kHz, nominal
to 60.006 Hz
Hz, nominal
Display Time
Horizontal
Vertical
40.48 to 40.88 us
40.68 ms
Resolution
Horizontal
Vertical
800 dots
312 lines
Display Format
Horizontal
Vertical
80 columns
26 rows
Font Density
7 dots
Horizontal
Vertical
10 dots
Character Cell
10 pixels
12 pixels
Horizontal
Vertical
A-1
Retrace Time
7.002 us (max)
0.400 ms (max)
Horizontal
Vertical
Display Size
23 7 mm, + 2 . 37 mm
172 mm, +2.37 mm
Horizontal
Vertical
Display Intensity, Nominal
50 fL, +8 fL
17 fL, +8 fL
Full bright
Dim
50%
Focus
Linearity
12%
12%
Horizontal
Vertical
Centering
+4.00 mm
+1 . 185 mm
Margin tolerance
Pincushion and tilt
Measurement Direction
Neck north
Warmup Time
30 minutes
FCC Regulations
Meets FCC rules and regulations, Part 15, Subpart J, Class A
Regulatory Agencies
UL 478 and CSA C22.2, no. 154 approved
Dimensions
Terminal
11.5"H x 12.5"W x 13"D
(29cm x 32.cm x 33.5cm)
Screen
14" (diagonal)
(35cm)
Keyboard
2.2"H x 16.4"W x 5.5"D
(5.5cm x 42cm x 14cm)
Shipping Weight
19 Ibs. (8.6 kg)
Tilt and swivel
Movement
P31 green
Phosphor
A-2
Synchronization
TTL levels
Video Attributes
Dim, blink, blank, underline,
reverse, protect, and
combinations
Cursor Attributes
Block, underline, with or
without blinking
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For ServIce Manuall
c~URITRON SERVICES
erry Tree Road, Chlnnor
Oxfordlhlre. aX9 4QY.
Tel (01844) 351694 •
Fax (01644) 352
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. lpex. com
A-3
APPENDIX B
CONNECTOR PIN ASSIGNMENTS
The
MODEM and AUX port connector pin assignments are listed
below.
Table B-1
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
7
8
20
Table B-2
Pin
1
3
5
6
7
8
11
20
MODEM Port Pin Assignments (DTE)
Signal
Shield ground
Transmit data
(output)
Receive data
(input)
Request to send
(output)
Clear to send
(input)
Signal ground
Data carrier detect
(input)
Data terminal ready
(output)
AUX Port Pin Assignments (DTE)
Signal
Frame ground
Transmit data
(output)
Clear to send
(output)
Data set ready
(output)
Signal ground
Data carrier detect
(output)
Printer ready (input)
Data terminal ready (input)
B-1
APPENDIX C
TEST CONNECTORS
This appendix describes connections, signals connected, and the
connector hood types needed for making the test connectors
referenced in Chapters 3 and 4.
If you prefer, you can order
sets of them. See Chapter 5.
MODEM PORT
Use a male DB-25 pin connector.
Connect these pins (signals):
Pin 2 to Pin 3
(TxD to RxD)
Pin 4 to Pin 5
(RTS to CTS)
Pin 20 to Pin 8
(DTR to DCR)
AUX PORT
Use a male DB-25 pin connector.
Pin 3 to Pin 20
Connect these pins (signals):
(RxD to DTR)
C-1
APPENDIX D
DISPLAY INSPECTION WITH THE RETICLE
The video inspection reticle, a sheet of milled plastic with
markings, hel ps you measure the 14-inch monochrome disp lay to
determine whether or not the display is within specification.
Figure D-1 shows the reticle and its markings.
Figure D-1
Video Inspection Reticle
Maximum Display Height
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Straightness
Tolerance
Minimum
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Minimum
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D-1
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/
DEFINITIONS
Before checking the display, make sure you understand these terms:
Bezel
The front-piece of the display case that
frames the face of the CRT.
Display
The portion of the screen where the video
display alignment pattern appears.
Linearity
A comparison of character height and width
ranges in the display. You can check both
vertical and horizontal linearity by
comparing character height and width within
the display. True linearity results in
characters that are the same height and width
range everywhere. See Appendix A for
linearity tolerances.
Pincushion and
Barrel
Distortion
Distortion that results if deflection is not
uniform at the raster edges when compared
with the center of the display. Scan lines
bowed inward are ca 11 ed pincushion
distortion.
Scan lines bowed outward are
called barrel distortion.
Video Display
Alignment Pattern
A test pattern to measure display alignment.
BEFORE YOU START
Before you check the alignment, do the following:
1.
Turn on the terminal at least 30 minutes before you check
the display.
This warm-up period settles the display and
gives you an accurate test pattern to measure.
2.
Generate the terminal test pattern (as discussed in Chapter 4).
3.
Point the neck of the CRT toward magnetic north to minimize
the effects of the earth's magnetic field.
4.
Have the video display reticle on hand to inspect the
display.
.-
D-2
CHECKING THE DISPLAY WITH THE RETICLE
Checking Width
To check the display's width, follow these steps:
1.
Rest the reticle along the lower horizontal edge of the
bezel.
2.
Check the left vertical edge, then the right vertical edge,
of the alignment pattern by moving the reticle along the
edge of the bezel.
Both edges should fall between the
minimum and maximum display width bands on the reticle (see
Figure D-2).
3.
If either edge falls outside the bands, adjust the display
(see the alignment instructions in Chapter 4).
Figure D-2
/~
Checking Width and Height
Reticle ~f\
Maximum Height"
T
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Minimum
Height"
I
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i
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D-3
LlL/
Checking Height
To check the display height, follow these steps:
1.
Rest the reticle on the left vertical edge of the bezel.
2.
Move the reticle up and down along the edge. Check the top
edge, then the bottom edge, of the alignment pattern. Both
edges should fall between the minimum and maximum display
height bands on the reticle (see Figure D-2).
3.
If one or the other edge falls outside the bands, adjust the
display (see the alignment instructions in Chapter 4).
Checking Straightness and Pincushioning
To check straightness and pincushioning, follow these steps:
1.
Move the reticle along a horizontal edge of the bezel.
Check the right vertical edge, then the left vertical edge,
against the straightness lines etched on the perimeter of
the retic 1 e (see Figure D- 3).
Figure D-3
Checking Straightness, Pincushioning, Centering, and
Vertical Linearity
l'=fr=:':==~===::::::::::"_--...,-----:r-'==F====~~-,
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Reticle
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these lines on all corners
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between each of these lines
(see specificatiOn for tolerances)
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t
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D-4
2.
Move the reticle along a vertical edge of the bezel. Check
the top edge, then the bottom edge, against the straightness
lines etched on the perimeter of the reticle.
3.
Position the upper right corner of the display between the
etched markings on the upper right corner of the reticle.
The display corner edge should fall within the scribed
markings on the corner of the reticle.
4.
Repeat the same procedure for the other corners of the
display.
5.
If an edge or corner doesn't fall within the markings,
adjust the display (see Chapter 4).
Checking Centering
To check the centering follow these steps:
1.
Hold the reticle over the center of the alignment pattern.
2.
Move the reticle against the right edge of the bezel, then
the left edge of the bezel. If the right and the left
edges of the alignment pattern are inside the etched lines on
the left and right sides of the reticle, the display is
horizontally centered (see Figure D-3).
3.
If the alignment pattern on the display isn't horizontally
centered, adjust the display (see the instructions in
Chapter 4).
4.
Move the reticle against the top bezel edge, then the bottom
bezel edge. If the top and the bottom edges of the
alignment pattern are inside the etched lines on the top and
bottom sides of the reticle, the display is vertically
centered.
5.
If the alignment pattern on the display isn't vertically
centered, adjust the display (see Chapter 4).
Checking Vertical Linearity
To check vertical linearity, follow these steps:
1.
Place the right side of the reticle against the right edge
of the bezel (see Figure D-3).
2.
Count the number of rows between each etched line on the
reticle. The numbers should be within ~15 percent of each
other (90 percent of one line).
3.
If numbers of rows between each line etched on the reticel
aren't equal, adjust the display.
D-5
.-
INDEX
A
Adjustments
centering rings, 4-12
display leveling, 4-9
display magnets, 4-11
focus, 4-9
height, 4-7
linearity, 4-8
power, 4-3
sub-brightness, 4-8
terminal display, 4-6
vertical hold, 4-7
wid th, 4-9
Alignment
display, 4-6
safety warning, 4-2
Anode discharging, 2-13
Attributes
assignments, 6-7
character, 6-6
cursor, A-3
screen, 6-7
AUX port
definition, 6-12
pin assignments, B-1
test connector, C-1
B
Barrel distortion, D-2
Baud rate, 6-12
Bezel, D-2
Bit, 6-12
Brightness
alignment, 4-8
slideswi tch, 1-6
theory of operation, 6-11
Byte, 6-12
C
Capacitors, 5-7
Cathode ray tube (see CRT)
Centering
checking with reticle, D-5
rings, 4-12
specifications, A-2
Central processing unit
(see CPU)
Character
attributes, 6-6, 6-7
cell, A-1
Circuit isolation jumpers,
3-13
Circuit protection, 6-10
Cleaning, 1-7
Coils, 5-6
Communication cable
installation, 1-6
Communication ports, 6-12
Component diagram
power supply, 4-3
terminal PCB, 5-9
Components list
capacitors, 5-7
coils, 5-6
crystals, 5-6
diodes, 5-6
integrated circuits, 5-5
keyboard, 5-8
resistors, 5-5
transformers, 5-8
transistors, 5-6
Computer interface, 3-9
Continuity check, 3-9
CPU definition, 6-12
CRT
definition, 6-12
display, 1-3
CRT/yoke assembly
removing, 2-10
replacing, 2-11
CRTC
definition, 6-13
values, 6-6
Crystals, 5-6
Cursor attributes, A-3
D
Diagnostic self-test
connectors, 5-10
error messages, 3-12
procedure, 3-11
Dimensions
keyboard, A-2
terminal, A-2
1-1
Diodes, 5-6
Discharging the anode, 2-13
Display
adjustments, 4-7
alignment, 4-6
capacity, 1-3
check with reticle, D-3
circuitry, 6-10
definition, D-2
format, A-1
intensity, A-2
leveling adjustment, 4-9
margins, 4-5
monitor circuitry, 6-10
problems, 4-7
size, A-2
specification, 4-4
time, A-1
Display magnets, 4-11
E
EAROM definition, 6-13
Environment, 1-4, 3-8
Environmental considerations
air flow, 1-4
temperature, 1-4
Error messages
diagnostic self-test,
3-12
power-on self-test, 3-11
Exploded view
keyboard assembly, 5-4
terminal display assembly,
5-3
F
Flowchart for
troubleshooting, 3-3
Flyback transformer, 6-11
Focus
adjustment, 4-9
specification, A-2
theory of operation, 6-11
Font density, A-1
Frequency, A-1
Fuse
removal/replacement, 2-7
specifications, A-1
H
Height
adjustment, 4-7
checking with reticle, D-4
Horizontal deflection, 6-10
Horizontal font density, A-1
I
I/O (see Input/Output)
Input/Output
definition, 6-13
devices, 1-2
Installation
communication cable, 1-6
keyboard, 1-5
power cord, 1-6
terminal, 1-4
terminal checklist, 3-8
Integrated circuits, 5-5
Interfaces
asynchronous, 1-3
modern, 1-3
operator, 1-5
primary, 1-3
RS-232C, 1-3
video, 6-4
Interrupts, video, 6-6
Isolating circuits, 3-13
K
Keyboard
assembly components list,
5-4
checking, 3-12
description, 1-3
ins talla tion, 1-5
PCB, 2-5
removal/replacement, 2-3
schematic, 7-3
theory of operation, 6-11
Keyboard cable
removal/replacement, 2-4
replacement, 2-4
L
Linearity
adjustment, 4-8
checking with reticle, D-5
definition, D-2
horizontal, A-2
modulating coil, 6-11
vertical, A-2
Logic, 6-2, 7-5
M
Measurement direction, A-2
Memory
limitations, 6-2
map, 6-3
terminal, 1-2
Microcomputer
defini t ion, 1-2
I-2
Microcomputer (continued)
input/output, 6-8
theory of operation, 6-2
MODEM port
definition, 6-13
pin assignments, B-1
test connector, C-1
MUX, 6-13
o
Operating requirements, A-1
Operator interfaces
brightness slideswitch,
1-6
communication cable, 1-6
keyboard, 1-5
power cord, 1-6
power switch, 1-6
set up parameters, 1-6
touch/tilt screen
adjustment, 1-6
p
Parameters
CRT controller, 6-5
setup, 1-6
Parts, 5-2
Pin assignments
AUX port, B-1
MODEM port, B-1
Pincushion
check with reticle, D-4
definition, D-2
Pixel, 6-13
Power cord
installation, 1-6
installation checklist,
3-8
Power on self-test
description, 3-10
error messages, 3-11
Power requirements, A-1
Power supply
adjusting, 4-3
adjustments, 4-3
theory of operation, 6-9
voltage check, 3-9
Power switch, 1-6
R
RAM definition, 6-13
Removal and replacement
modules, 2-2
Removing
assemblies in the
terminal module, 2-5
CRT/yoke assembly, 2-10
terminal enclosure, 2-6
terminal PCB, 2-8
the keyboard, 2-3
the keyboard cable, 2-4
the keyboard PCB, 2-5
yoke, 2-12
Replacing
CRT/yoke assembly, 2-11
fuse, 2-7
terminal enclosure, 2-13
terminal PCB, 2-10
yoke, 2-12
Requirements
operating, A-1
power, A-1
Resistors, 5-5
Resolution, A-1
Reticle
checking centering, D-5
checking height, D-4
checking linearity, D-5
checking pincushioning,
D-4
checking straightness, D-4
checking width, D-3
Retrace time, A-2
ROM definition, 6-13
S
Safety warnings, 2-2, 3-2,
4-2
Scan frequency, A-1
Schematics
keyboard, 7-3
terminal PCB (logic), 7-5
terminal PCB (monitor/
power supply), 7-7
Screen
aligning the display, 4-6
dimensions, A-2
touch/tilt adjustment, 1-6
Self-test
diagnostic, 3-11
power-on, 3-10
Setup parameters, 1-6
Shipping weight, A-2
Spare parts, 5-2
Specifications, A-1
Straightness check, D-4
Sub-brightness adjustment, 4-8
1-3
T
Terminal
aligning the display, 4-6
cleaning, 1-7
clearances, 1-4
control, 1"":2
description, 1-2
dimensions, 1-4
display assembly list, 5-3
installation, 1-4
installation checklist,
3-8
logic, 6-2
preparation for reticle
procedure, D-2
specifications, A-1
Terminal enclosure
removal, 2-6
replacing, 2-13
Terminal PCB
component layout diagram,
5-9
removing, 2-8
replacing, 2-10
schematic, 7-5, 7-7
Test connector
AUX port, C-1
MODEM port, C-1
Theory of operation
brightness, 6-11
circuit protection, 6-10
communication ports, 6-12
display monitor
circuitry, 6-10
flyback transformer, 6-11
focus, 6-11
focus and brightness
circuits, 6-11
horizontal deflection,
6-10
keyboard, 6-11
linearity modulating
coil, 6-11
microcomputer, 6-2
power supply and monitor
circuitry, 6-9
vertical deflection, 6-10
vertical size, 6-10
video amplification, 6-11
Tools required
alignment, 4-2
power supply check, 3-9
removal or replacement
of assemblies, 2-3
Touch/tilt screen
adjustment, 1-6
Transformers, 5-8
Transistors, 5-6
Troubleshooting
aids, 3-8
flowchart, 3-3
quick reference guide, 3-3
safety warning, 3-2
symptoms, 3-3
tools required, 3-2
U
UART definition, 6-13
V
Vertical
deflection, 6-10
hold adjustment, 4-7
Vertical font density, A-1
Video
amplification, 6-11
attributes, A-3
character data, 6-7
display alignment pattern,
D-2
inspection reticle, D-1
interrupt, 6-6
synchronization, 6-4
Voltages
checking, 3-10
power supply, 3-9
specifications, A-1
W
Warmup time, A-2
Weight, A-2
Width
adjustment, 4-9
checking with reticle, D-3
y
Yoke
removing, 2-12
replacing, 2-12
Yoke lock
display leveling
adjustment, 4-9
saftey warning, 4-9
1-4
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