lMWGMX256 - Commercial Communications

lMWGMX256 - Commercial Communications
I N T EGR AT ED
lMWGMX256
\
INSTALLATION AND FIELD
MAINTENANCE MANUAL
Part No. 440.8074
Issue 1, November 1994
TM
lMwGMX256
INSTALLATION AND FIELD
MAINTENANCE MANUAL
NOTICE
IMX 81 GMX COMBINED INTO ONE MANUAL
With the new 1995 North American Numbering Plan software releases, the Ih4X 256 and GMX-256 products are identical except for the station instruments that can be installed on them. To provide better service, condense reference
materials, streamline training, and facilitate technical support, the installation manuals for the two systems have been
combined into one generic manual.
When using this combined manual to help sell, install, or service a particular system, be aware that not all of the station
instruments described in this manual are available on both products. Listed below are the station instruments that can
be installed on each product.
IMX 256 Station Instruments
(including PCDPMs 62 MDPMs)
GMX-256 Station Instruments
0 Inter-Tel/DVK Keysets
l
Digital Keyseta
l
IMX AIM Keysets (including “dual-circuit” keysets)
0 Gh42C Keysets
l
lMX (non-AIM) Keysets
0 G X Keysets
l Attendant Computer Consoles
0 G X Keysets
l
Attendant Computer Consoles
0 Inter-Tel/DVK DSS/BLF Units
0 Digital DSS/BLF Units
0 GhIX DSS/BLF Units
0 IMX DSS/BLF Units
0 GX DSS/BLF Units
0 GX DSS/BLF Units
0 GMX Single-Line Instruments (SLIs)
l
Enhanced Single-Line Sets (ESLSs)
0 IMX Single-Line Instruments (SLls)
0 Single-Line DTMF Sets
Part No. 440.8074
Issue 1, November 1994
.
GXSLIs
0 Single-Line DTMF Sets
Part Number
440.8074
INTEGRATED
TM
lMwGMX256
INSTALLATION AND
FIELD MAINTENANCE
MANUAL
Issue 1, November 1994
@Inter-Tel Integrated Systems, inc. 1994
Printed in USA
IMX 256 ISSUE 2 - INDEX OF NEW FEATURES
For those individuals who are already familiar with the Issue 1 manuals for the lMX 256 and GMX-256 Systems, the
following new items are documented in this combination manual. For complete information on each item, refer to the
page numbers following the brief explanation. Also, throughout the manual, %hange bars” like the one at the right
have been placed in the margins to indicate any new or revised information since the original manuals.
IMX And GMX Combined Into One Manual
with the new 1995 North American Numbering Plan software releases, the IMX 256 and GMX-256 products are
identical except for the station instruments that can be installed on them. To provide better service, condense reference materials, streamline training, and facilitate technical support, the installation manuals for the two systems
have been combined into one generic manual. When using this combined manual to help sell, install, or service a
particular system, be aware that not all of the station instruments described in this manual are available on both
products. See page 2-2 for a list of the station instruments that can be installed on each product.
North American Numbering Plan (NANP)
The growth of telecommunications services has created an increasing demand for more telephone numbers. To
meet the demand, Bellcore has prepared a long-range North American Numbering Plan (NANP) to provide additional telephone numbers. The plan expands the capacity of the current numbering system by making area and
office codes interchangeable. That is, numbering patterns formerly reserved for office codes can be used as new
area codes and office codes within existing area codes can have the same pattern as other area codes. This version
of software supports the new numbering plan. See pages 4-28 and 5-90.
Home And Local Area Codes
In many areas, the telephone company has created call-cost arrangements that refer to “home” and “local” area
codes. The home area code is the area code within which the system resides. The local area codes are additional
area codes that, when called, use the local or toll local call-cost rate instead of the long distance rate. Up to three
local area codes can be programmed and then extended within toll restriction progxamming to provide proper call
costing. See pages 4-29 and 5-171.
Loop Start ‘Ikunk Glare Protection
During a “glare” connection, the software now allows the incoming call to remain connected, while still protecting
against possible toll fraud. See pages 2-14 and 5-68.
Station Exchange
This programmable station feature allows a station user to exchange the extension numbers of two station circuits.
This swaps the database and user programmed features of the extension numbers between two station circuits
without the need for database programming . The circuit number of the station locations are unchanged, but the
extension numbers are changed. See pages 4-99 and 5-31.
Digital Cards, Diil Keysets, and Diiti DSWBLF Units
The IMX 256 System can now support the digital station instruments originally designed for the Inter-Tel Axxess
System. See pages 2-2,2-g, 2-12,2-13,2-21 to 2-27,2-33,2-34,2-44,3-7,3-22,3-28,3-29,347,3-48,
3-62 to 3-70,3-90,3-91,4-21,4-40,4-50,5-24,547,5-135,6-3,7-1,
and 7-3.
All digital keysets utilize DSP shared resources for speakerphones, and Executive Digital Keysets have enhanced
displays. See pages 2-22,440, and 4-41.
APC Data Port Module (PCDPM) must be installed on digital keysets to provide the secondary voice path needed
for the OIWA feature. See pages 2-23,3-66, and 4-61.
A customer-provided, modem-equipped data device may be attached to any digital keyset with a PC Data Port
Module (PCDPM) and a Modem Data Port module (MDPM) installed. See pages 2-23,3-70, and 4-101.
Feature And Speed-Dial Keys On DSWBLF Units
DSS/BLF Units can have feature keys or system speed-dial keys programmed in their keymaps. See pages 4-50,
4-87, and 5-50.
Page v
I
INDEX OF NEW FEATURES (continued)
Keyset “Hot” Dial Pad Keys
There is a system-wide option that, if enabled, allows keyset users to dial line access codes and feature codes without lifting the handset or pressing the SPKR or SPCL key. This programmable feature is called “hot dial pad” to
indicate that the dial pad keys are always activated. See pages 44,4-42, and 5-68.
Private Intercom Call Override
If a keyset station has the Private Intercom Override feature enabled, the user can place a handsfree call by pressing l or # when calling a keyset station that has handsfree mode disabled. See pages 4-56,5-30, and 5-52.
%ilent” u Tone Selection
When setting the ring tone on a keyset, the keyset user can enter 0 to disable ring tones. See page 4-48.
Toll Sew&yFeat=Set
The Extended software package now includes the following Toll Security features:
Weekly Toll Limits: When enabled, the weekly toll limit feature keeps track of the accumulated call cost for specified types of toll calls. The feature can monitor 7- and lOdigit toll calls and/or operator-assisted/international
calls. Alarm messages have been added for toll limit management. See pages 4-10,4-30,4-62,4-63,4-83,
4-1X2,4-125,5-97, and 6-8.
Inter-Tel Services: The weekly toll limit feature can only be enabled by Inter-Tel Services. See page 6-41.
Enhanced DISA Security Codes: DISA security codes can be 4-7 digits long. ADISA caller will have only three
opportunities to enter a valid security code. If the caller fails three times, the failure will generate a system alarm
and that trunk will be inoperable for five minutes. See pages 4-38,5-111,5-115, and 6-8.
DISA Toll Restriction: DISA lines can be given day and/or night mode toll restrictions like those for individual
stations (except LCR-Only). See pages 4-38,5-106,5-111, and 5-116.
SMDR Blocked DISA Calls Option: A programming flag has been added to SMDR that allows blocked DISA
calls to appear in the Sh4DR report. See pages 4-38,4-123, and 4-124.
DISA And Hunt Group Information In SMDA Summary Reports
DISAcall information has been added to the System Summary report and a new Hunt Croup option has been added
to the Summary Report. See pages 4-38,4-115,4-118, and 5-140.
End-Of-Dialing Digit Suppression
Display and Redial: A system programmin g flag allows the programmer to specify whether all dialed digits or
just the digits that make up the valid call are displayed and stored in the redial buffer. If desired, the “extra” digits
used for dial-up banking machine, voice mail, automated attendant, or other purposes canbe suppressed. Suppressing the extra digits prevents entries, such as PIN numbers and other codes, from being displayed when they are
dialed. See pages 4-93 and 5-69.
SMDRReportszA programming flag has been added to the SMDRreport programming prompts that allows you
to specify whether all dialed digits or just the digits that make up the valid call appear in the SMDR report. See
pages 4-123 and 5-142.
Account Code Enhancements
LCR Toll Forced Account Code: Forced account codes for toll calls only can be programmed for stations with
LCR-Only toll restriction in day und night modes. When this account code type is enabled, the user only has to
enter an account code if the system detects that a toll call has been dialed whenLCR is used. See pages 4-33,4-66,
5-32, and 5-55.
Validated Forced Account Codes: Forced account codes can be validated or non-validated. See page 4=-66,5-32,
5-33, and 5-55.
Page vi
INDEX OF NEW FEATURES (continued) ’
Voice Mail/Computer Enhancements
Do-Not-Disturb Breakthrough:
Normally, calls to a station through DIM, the automated attendant, or a voice
computer are not blocked by placing the station in do-notdisturb. If desired, individual stations can be set to prevent these calls from breaking through do-not-disturb. See pages 4-14,4-21,4-38,5-30, and 5-52.
Voice Mail/Computer Hunt Groups In All Software Packages: In any software package, any hunt group can be
designated as a voice computer hunt group. See pages 4-16,4-21, S-61, and 5-62.
Automated Attendant Hunt Groups: Voice computer hunt groups can be designated as automated attendant
hunt groups. See pages 4-21 and 5-63.
Dial RuleS: Voice mail/computer hunt groups can be assigned dial rules. See pages 4-21 and 5-63.
Recall Destination: Avoicc mail/computer hunt group can have an assigned recall destination. See pages 4-21
and 5-64.
Overflow/AnnouncementStations: Voice mail/computer hunt groups can serve as overflow/announcement stations. See page 5-66.
DTMF Feedback Tones: The progress tones that are normally sent to a voice computer can be replaced with
-“feedback” tones that determine call status. See pages 4-21,5-31, and 5-52. If feedback tones are enabled,
the “extended” set of feedback tones can also be enabled in system-wide programming. See pages 5-67 and 5-68.
Allow Cross-Tenant Voice Mail/Computer ‘Itaffic: The Programmer can determine whether voice mail units
and voice mail computers will be allowed to place intercom calls, forward intercom calls, or transfer intercom or
outside calls to stations that are in different tenant groups. See pages 4-21 and 5-67.
Version Feature Code: When entered at a voice computer port this feature code generates a four-digit IYIMF
code that indicates the last four digits of the software part number. It is used by voice processing software to ensure
that the KSU software is compatible with the voice pro&sing features. See page 4-7.
Remote Hunt Group Remove/Replace
The Hunt Group Remove/Replace feature can be controlled from the attendant’s station using the Remote Hunt
Group Replace feature code. See pages 4-144-19, and 4-111.
Hunt Group Enhancements
There is a system option that can be enabled to send uZZ unanswered hunt group calls first to the announcement
station and then to the overflow station. See pages 4-17 and 5-68.
If a station that receives a recalling hunt group call chooses to transfer the call back to the hunt group, the call
retains its original queue position in the hunt group. Also, calls that go to the announcement and overflow stations
do not lose their places in the queue. While the call is at a playback device announcement or overflow station
(except voice compufer overflow/announcement stations) it continues to circulate through the hunt group. If a
hunt group member picks up the call, it is pulled back from a playback device overflow/announcement station and
connected to the hunt group station. See pages 4-18 and 4-19.
Station Off-Hook Alarm
The STXlTON OFF HOOK alarm now indicates the station that is off hook. Also, the alarm clears automatically
when the station user hangs up. See pages 4-1X2,4-125, and 6-8.
Equal Access “1OlXXXX”Numbers Supported
The system supports the “lo-and “1OXXX” equal access numbers. Toll restriction SCOS 7 has also been
modified to support equal access dialing. See pages 4-27,4-B, and 5-88, and 5-113.
Password Required
The password prompt will always appear when a programmer logs in to a programming session. In the default state
there is no database programming password and pressing RETURN will allow access to the database. See page
5-10.
Page vii
INTER-TELPRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INS’IXLJATION
& MAINTENANCE
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Issue 1, November 1994
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PAGE
CONTENTS
INDEXOFNEW FEATURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V
TABLE OF CONTENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix...
LIST OF FIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ml1
FCC REGULATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
SAFETY REGULATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
LIMITED WARRANTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
...........................................................
l-l
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Capacities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Software Packages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation, Programming, And Maintenance Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Features Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
l-l
l-l
1-2
l-3
1-3
1-4
SPECIFICATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-l
OVERVIEiV
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cabling And The Main Distribution Frame (MDF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Equipment Cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Station Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Additional System Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
INSTALLATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Installation Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pre-Installation Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Station Cabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assembling The Main Distribution Frame (MDF) Backboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Equipment Cabinet Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Station Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SMDR/SMDA Output Device Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
External Paging Equipment Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
External Music Source Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preventative Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Post-Installation Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Page ix
2-2
2-4
2-6
2-21
2-31
3-1
3-2
3-2
3-3
3-6
3-9
3-35
3-62
3-98
3-98
3-99
3-99
3-100
I
TXBLE OF CONTENT!3
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTIcEs
lMX/GMX 2% INSTALLATION & MAJNTENANCE
PAGE
CONTENTS
FEATURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2. Accessing The Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3. System Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4. Tnmk Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5. Station Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6. User-Programmable Feature Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7. Automatic Call Access (Keysets Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8. Music-On-Hold And Background Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9. Signals And Tones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10. Intercom Galls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11. Inter-Station Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12. Off-Hook Voice Announce (OHVA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13. Outside Galls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14. Placing Calls On Hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15. Call Waiting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16. Call Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17. Reverse Transfer And Group Call Pick-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18. Call Privacy And Privacy Release . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19. Barge (Keysets Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20. Conference Galls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21. System Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22. Call Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23. Speed Dialing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24. Optional System Directory - Intercom And Outside (Keysets Only) . . . . . . . . . . .
25. House Phone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
26. Redialing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
27. Paging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
28. Remove From Paging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29. Do-Not-Disturb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
30. Cancel Miscellaneous Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
31. Hookflash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
32. Reminder Messages (Keysets Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B 33. Optional Station Exchange Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
34. Optional Data Device Attachments (Keysets Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
35. Attendant Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36. Record Keeping And Maintenance Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Page x
4-l
4-4
4-4
4-12
4-24
4-40
4-51
4-52
4-53
4-54
4-55
4-58
4-61
4-62
4-67
4-69
4-70
4-73
4-74
4-75
4-76
4-79
4-82
4-85
4-90
4-92
4-93
4-94
4-94
4-95
4-97
4-97
4-98
4-99
4-101
4-103
4-114
‘3,
2
.“‘:
j
lNTER-TELPRACTIcEs
IMX/GMX 256 IN-‘l-ION & MAINTENANCE
,
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Issue 1, November 1994
CONTENTS
PAGE
PROGRAMMING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2. System Set-Up For Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3. Session Timer And Screen Saver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4. Microsoft Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5. How To Use The Programming Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6. Applications Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7. Defauli Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8. Station Programming - Individual Station Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9. Station Programming - Batch Programming Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10. System-Wide Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11. Toll Restriction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12. Least-Cost Routing @CR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13. Trunk Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14. Attendants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15. Station Message Detail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16. Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-l
5-3
5-3
5-11
5-11
5-12
5-15
5-24
5-25
5-44
5-54
5-88
5-98
5-103
5-132
5-137
5-145
TROUBLESHOOTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2. Troubleshooting Checklist
3. Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4. Alarm Messages And Field Service Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5. Troubleshooting Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6. Customer Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7. Defective Unit Return Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-l
6-l
6-l
6-l
6-8
6-12
6-41
6-41
REPLACEMENT PARTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2. Ordering Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3. Replacement Parts List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4. Recommended Spare Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-l
7-l
7-l
7-l
7-1
APPENDIX A- GX STATION INSTRUMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1. Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2. Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3. Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4. Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5. Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-l
A-l
A-l
A-4
A-10
A-10
.............................................
Page xi
TABLEOF CONTENTS
Issue 1, November 2294
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX7GM.X 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
comms
PAGE
APPENDIX B - GMX STATION INSTRUMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1. Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2. Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3. Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..*............*.......
4. Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5. Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B-l
B-l
B-l
B-5
B-10
B-10
INDEX ..;.............................................................
I-l
Page xii
‘I-%
)
lNTEx-TELPRAcTIcEs
IM.X/GMX 256INS‘E4LLATION
& MAINTENANCE
LIST OFFIGURJS
Issue 1, November 1994
LIST OF FIG-URIZS
iWMBER
TlTLE
SPECIFICATIONS
Figure 2-l.
Voice Channel Allocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 2-2.
Digital AC Transformer Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
Figure 2-3.
Executive Digital Keyset (also called Executive Digital Terminal) . . . .
Figure 2-4.
Standard Digital Keyset (also called Standard Digital Terminal) . . . . . .
Figure 2-5,
IMX 24-Line Keyset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 2-6.
IMX 24-Line AIM Keyset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 2-7.
IMX 1ZLine Keyset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 2-8.
IMX 12-Line AIM Keyset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 2-9.
IMX 8-Line Keyset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 2-10.
IMX 8-Line AIM Keyset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 2-11.
Inter-Tel/DVK 24-Line Keyset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 2-12.
Inter-Tel/DVK 1ZLine Keyset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 2-13.
Inter-Tel/DVK 8-Line Keyset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 2-14.
Digital Direct Station Selection/Busy Lamp Field (DSS/BLF) Unit . . .
Figure 2-15.
IMXDSS/BLFUnit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 2-16.
Inter-Tel/DVK DSS/BLF Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 2-17.
Enhanced Single-Line Set (ESLS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 2-18.
Single-Line Instrument (SLI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
INSTALLATION
Figure 3-l.
Digital Keyset Modular Jack Assembly Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 3-2.
Analog Station Modular Jack Assembly Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 3-3.
Sample MDF Block Layout And Cable Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 3-4.
Example Of Ferrite Bead Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 3-5.
LGC/LSC Block Cable Terminations (Method A) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 3-6.
LGC/LSC Block Cable Terminations (Method B) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 3-7.
IDC Block Cable Terminations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 3-8.
EMC Block Cable Terminations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 3-9.
Tl Span Terminations From RJ48C Jacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modular Jack Assembly Wiring For Tl Spans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 3-10.
Figure 3-11.
Tl Span Terminations From RJ-Type Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 3-12. Using The Tl Card’s Optional DB15 Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Digital KSC Block Cable Terminations For Keysets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 3-13.
Figure 3-14. Analog KSC Block Cable Terminations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Page xiii
PAGE
2-7
2-24
2-33
2-34 I
2-35
2-36
2-37
2-38
2-39
2-40
2-41
2-42
2-43
2-44 I
2-45
2-46
2-47
2-48
3-7 1
3-8
3-10
3-12
3-13
3-14
3-15
3-16
3-18
3-18
3-19
3-20
3-22 m
3-23
LIST OFFIGURES
Issue 1, November 1994
h”UMBER
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
m Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
3-15.
3-16.
3-17.
3-18.
3-19.
3-20.
3-21.
3-22.
3-23.
3-24.
3-25.
3-26.
3-27.
3-28.
3-29.
3-30.
3-31.
3-32.
3-33.
3-34.
3-35.
3-36.
3-37.
I Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure 3-38. 3-39. 3-40. 3-41. 3-42.
Figure 3-43.
Figure 3-44.
Figure 3-45.
Figure 3-46.
Figure 3-47.
Figure 3-48.
Figure 3-49.
Figure 3-50.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INS-TION & MAINTENANCE
TITLE
Installing &Line IMX AIM Keysets Two To A Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . .
KSC-D Block Cable Terminations For Dual-Circuit Keysets . . . . . . . . .
SLC Block Cable Terminations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IDC Block Cable Terminations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Station Cable Terminations On The Station Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RCPU Card Cable Terminations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modular Jack Assembly Wiring For Optional Tl Alarm Relays . . . . . .
Connecting Two Tl Cards Together . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Cable Connectors On The Telecom Motherboard . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting The Power Cable To The Telecom Motherboard . . . . . . . . .
Cable Connections To The Power Supply Chassis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Supply Module Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Equipment Cabinet Grounding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Supply Connector Pinouts And Voltage Test Point Locations . . .
RCPU Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Digital Keyset Card (DKSC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keyset Card (KSC Or KSC-D) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Single-Line Card (SLC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inward Dialing Card (IDC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Loop/Ground Start Card (LGC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Loop Start Card (LX) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E&M Card (EMC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TlC Card (TlC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Standard Digital Keyset LCD Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Digital Keyset Self-Test Key Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Digital PC Data Port Module (PCDPM) Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sample Digital PCDPM Cable Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Digital Modem Data Port Module (MDPM) Installation . . . . . . . . . . . .
IMX 24/12-Line Keyset LCD Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bottom Of 8-Line Dual-Circuit IMX AIM Keyset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IMX Keyset Data Port Module Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IMX Keyset LRA Set-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inter-Tel/DVK 24Line Keyset “Large” LCD Installation . . . . . . . . . . .
Inter-Tel/DVK 12/8-Line Keyset “Small” LCD Installation . . . . . . . . .
Inter-Tel/DVK Data Port Module Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inter-Tel/DVK LRA Set-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Page xiv
PAGE
3-24
3-25
3-26
3-27
3-28
3-31
3-33
3-34
3-36
3-37
3-38
3-40
3-41
3-43
3-46
3-48
3-50
3-52
3-53
3-55
3-56
3-58
3-60
3-63
3-65
3-68
3-69
3-70
3-72
3-76
3-79
3-80
3-82
3-84
3-88
3-89
.\:+,
./
,‘,
.\
-2
>
LIST OFFIGURES
Issue 1. November 1994
NUMBER
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
3-51.
3-52.
3-53.
3-54.
TITLE
PAGE
Back Of Digital DSS/BLF Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inter-Tel/DVK DSS/BLF Unit Control Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SLI Control Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bottom Of ESLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-91 m
3-94
3-96
3-97
Tl Span Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SMDA Account Code Report Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SMDA Summary Report Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SMDA Detailed Report Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SMDR Report Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-36
4-117
4-118
4-120
4-124
FEATURES
Figure 4-l.
Figure 4-2.Figure 4-3.
Figure 4-4.
Figure 4-5.
PROGRAMMING
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
5-1.
5-2.
5-3.
5-4.
5-5.
5-6.
5-7.
5-8.
5-9.
5-10.
5-11.
5-12.
5-13.
5-14.
5-15.
5-16.
5-17.
5-18.
5-19.
5-20.
5-21.
5-22.
5-23.
5-24.
5-25.
Tl Applications And Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customized Programming Report Samples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sample Board-To-Voice Bus Mapping Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Individual Station Programming (STN) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Assignments (KEY) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ring Zone Programming (ZONE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Station Features (SFEA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Account Codes (ACCI’) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Do-Not-Disturb And Reminder Messages (MESG) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Extensions, Usernames, And Feature Codes (EXT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hunt Groups (HUNT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Misc. System-Wide Information (MISC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Page Zones (PAGE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.......
Relays @LAY) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Forwarding Paths (SFWD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Speed Dial (SSPD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Timer (TIMR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tenant Groups (TNT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Carriers And Allowed Long Distance (ALT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Area/Office Code Restriction User Groups (AREA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Station Class Of Service/LCR Advances (SCOS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Toll Security (TOLL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Least-Cost Routing (LCR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Individual Trunk (INDT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trunk Groups, Did Groups & Ring-IdAnswer Patterns (TRNK) . . . . .
Page xv
5-124
5-156
5-173
5-174
5-177
5-188
5-189
5-190
5-195
5-197
5-202
5-203
5-204
5-204
5-205
5-206
5-207
5-210
5-211
5-212
5-213
5-216 1
5-217
5-223
5-224
LEST OFFIGURES
Issue 1, November 1994
NUMBER
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
5-26.
S-27.
5-28.
5-29.
S-30.
5-31.
S-32.
5-33.
5-34.
5-35.
lNTER-TELPRACTIcEs
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALL.A~ON& MAINTENANCE
TITLE
Tl Programming (Tl) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Attendants - Alias Programming (ALSS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Attendants - DSWBLF Units (DSS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Call Cost (COST) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SMDA (SMDA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SMDR (SMDR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error Reports (ERR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Passwords (PASS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Serial Port Configuration (PORT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Configuration (CONF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TROUBLESHOOTING
Figure 6-1.
Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 6-2.
System Troubleshooting Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 6-3.
CO Trunk Troubleshooting Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 6-4.
Feature Troubleshooting Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 6-5.
Keyset Troubleshooting Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 6-6.
Single-Line Set Troubleshooting Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 6-7.
DSS/BLF Unit Troubleshooting Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PAGE
5-227
5-228
5-229
5-230
5-231
5-232
5-233
5-233
5-234
5-235
6-3
6-14
6-18
6-24
6-30
6-36
6-39
REPLACEMENTPARTS
Figure 7-l.
Replacement Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 7-2.
Recommended Spare Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-l
7-5
APPENDIX A
Figure A-l.
GX 24-Line Keyset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure A-2.
GX Keyset Bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
GX DSS/BLF Unit Bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure A-3.
Figure A-4.
Key Assignments (KEY) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-3
A-5
A-9
A-11
APPENDIX B
GMX 24-Line Keyset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure B-l.
GMX 1ZLine Keyset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure B-2.
GMX 24-Line Keyset Data Port Module Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure B-3.
GMX DSS/BLF Unit Bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure B-4.
Key Assignments (KEY) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure B-5.
B-3
B-4
B-7
B-9
B-11
Page xvi
lNTER-TEJaPRAcTIcES
IMX/GMX 256 lNSTAlLLATlON
FCC REGULATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
& MAINTENANCE
FCC REGIJIAI’IONS
IMPORTANT:
1 . This equipment complies with Part 68 of FCC rules.
On the back of the equipment cabinet is a label that
contains, among other information, the FCC registration number and ringer equivalence number
(BEN) for this equipment. Customers connecting
this equipment to the telephone network shall, before such connection is made, give notice to the telephone company of the particular line(s) to which
such connection is to be made, and shall provide the
telephone company with the following information:
- Complies with Part 68 of FCC rules
- FCC registration number: BE2USA40751MF-E (for MF-rated systems) or BE2USA61845KF-E (for KF-rated systems)
- Quantities and USOC numbers of required interface jacks (see chart on next page)
- Sequence in which trunks are to be connected
- Binger equivalence number (BEN) or service order code (WC), as applicable, by position (see
chart on next page)
NOTE: The FEN is used to determine the quantity of devices which may be connected to the
telephone line. Excessive RENs on the telephone
line may result in the devices not ringing in response to an incoming call. In most, but not all
areas, the sum of the RENs should not exceed
five (5.0). To be certain of the number of devices
that may be connected to the line, as determined
by the total RENs, contact the telephone company to determine the maximum BEN for the calling area.
- Facility interface code (FIG) by position (see
chart on next page)
The telephone company should also be given notice
upon final disconnection of this equipment from the
particular line(s).
It is also the responsibility of the customer to provide
the telephone company with registration numbers of
any other devices which are configured for connection to the telephone network.
2 . This equipment cannot be used on public coin service provided by the telephone company. Connec-
tion to party line service is subject to state tarif%.
(Contact the state public utility commission, public
service commission, or corporation commission for
information.)
3 . If this equipment causes harm to the telephone network, the telephone company will notify the customer in advance that service may be temporarily
discontinued. But if advance notice is not practical,
the telephone company will notify the customer as
soon as possible. Also, the customer will be advised
of the right to file a complaint with the FCC, ifnecessary.
4 . The telephone company may make changes in its facilities, equipment, operations, or procedures which
may affect the operation of this equipment. If so, the
customer shall be given advance notice so that any
necessary modifications can be made in order to
maintain uninterrupted service.
5 . If trouble is experienced with this equipment, contact a local authorized factory service representative
for repairs and/or warranty information. The customer, users, and unauthorized technicians should
not repair, make adjustments to, or attempt to service this equipment in any way.
In the event of trouble with the telephone line(s), this
equipment must be disconnected from the telephone
line(s). If trouble ceases, the equipment must be repaired by an authorized factory service representative. If the trouble continues to occur with the
equipment disconnected, the telephone company
should be notified that they have a problem. If this is
the case, repairs or adjustments made by the telephone company will be made at their expense.
6 . Allowing this equipment to be operated in such a
manner as to not provide proper answer supervision
signaling is in violation of Part 68 of FCC rules. This
equipment returns answer supervision signals to the
public telephone network when: answered by the
called station, answered by the attendant, routed to a
recorded announcement that can be administered by
the equipment user, and routed to a dial prompt. This
equipment also returns answer supervision on all
DID calls forwarded back to the public telephone
network. Permissible exceptions are: a call is unanswered, busy tone is received, and reorder tone is received.
Page xvii
FCC REGULATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
IIUTER-TELPRACTICES
IM.X/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
* Available with MF-rated systems only. According to FCC regulations, tar%& do not permit the use of groundstart facilities with RF-rated systems.
* * When using Tl facilities to provide DID service, do not use the DID facility interface code (FIG) as listed above;
instead, provide the telephone company with DID answer supervision code “AS.2” and the FIC for the requested
Tl service.
c** Also interfaces with Class A and B.
7 . This equipment does not currently comply with the
amended Part 64 of FCC rules (CC Docket No.
91-35), which requires that equipment sold and
installed in the “call aggregator”market (i.e., hotels,
motels, hospitals, universities, etc.) must allow users
equal access to the long distance carriers of their
choice (i.e., must allow the 10xXx dialing sequences normally used for “operator-assisted” calls,
while blocking those normally used for ‘direct-dial”
calls). In the future, this equipment may be modified
to comply with this requirement.
dio and TV reception requiring the operator to take
whatever steps are necessary to correct the interference.
However, there is no guarantee that interference will not
occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does
cause interference to radio or television reception,
which can be determined by turning the equipment off
and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:
NOTICE: THE TELEPHONE lNSTRUMENTS SPECIFICALLY DESIGNED FOR THIS SYSTEM HAVE
HEARlNG-AID COMP-LE HANDSEXS THAIARE lN COMPLIANCE WlTH SECTION 68.316 OF
THE FCC RULES.
- Check that the equipment cabinet and receiver are
not on the same circuit; the equipment cabinet must
be powered from an isolated, dedicated AC outlet
WARNING: This equipment generates and uses radio
frequency energy and if not installed and used properly,
that is, in strict accordance with the manufacturer’s
instructions, may cause interference to radio and television reception. It has been type tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A computing device in
accordance with the specifications in Subpart J of Part
15 of FCC Rule. Operation of this equipment in a residential area may cause unacceptable interference to ra-
- Reorient the receiving antenna
- Relocate the equipment cabinet with respect to the
receiver
If necessary, the user should consult the dealer or an experienced radio/television technician for additional
suggestions. The user may find the following booklet
prepared by the FCC helpful: “How to Identify and Resolve Radio-TV Interference Problems”
This booklet is available from the U.S. Government
Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402, Stock No.
- 3 9 8 - 5 .
If RFI problems persist, contact Inter-Tel Customer
support.
Page xviii
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTAUATION & MAINTENANCE
SAF+ETYREGULATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
.SAF’ETY REG-ONS
cian to replace your obsolete outlet. Do not defeat
the safety purpose of the grounding type plug.
The Inter-Tel Ih4X and GMX 256 Systems are
listed by Communication Certification Laboratory
(CCL) as meeting the Product Safety Requirements
of UL 1459, Standard for Telephone Equipment.
CCL is approved by the Occupational Health and
Safety Administration (OSHA) as a Nationally
Recognized Testing Laboratory (NRI’L). Befonz
installation, also check the local eldrical codes
for importalrt information concerning the irzstallation of telephone and electronic quipment.
9 . Do not allow anything to rest on the power cord. Do
not locate this product where the cord will be
abused by persons walking on it.
10. Do not use an extension cord with this product’s AC
power cord. The AC outlet for this product should
not be used for any other electrical equipment.
The following safety information is reprinted from UL
1459.
IMPORTANT SAFETY
INSTRUCTIONS
When using your telephone equipment, basic safetyprecautions should always be followed to reduce the risk of
fire, electric shock, and injury to persons, including the
following:
1. Read and understand all instructions.
11. Never push objects of any kind into this product
through cabinet slots as they may touch dangerous
voltage points or short out parts that could result in a
risk of fire or electric shock. Never spill liquid of
any kind on the product.
12. To reduce the risk of electric shock, do not disassemble this product, but take it to a qualified
serviceman when some service or repair work is required. Opening or removing covers may expose
you to dangerous voltages or other risks. Incorrect
reassembly can cause electric shock when the product is subsequently used.
13. Unplug this product from the wall outlet and refer
servicing to qualified service personnel under the
following conditions:
2 . Follow all warnings and instructions marked on the
product.
A. When the power supply cord or plug is damaged or frayed.
3. Unplug this product from the wall outlet before
cleaning. Do not use liquid cleaners or aerosol
cleaners. Use a damp cloth for cleaning.
B. If liquid has been spilled into the product.
C. If the product has been exposed to rain or water.
4. Do not use this product near water (for example, in a
wet basement).
D. If the product does not operate normally by following the operating instructions. Adjust only
those controls that are covered by the operating
instructions because improper adjustment of
other controls may result in damage and will
often require extensive work by a qualified
technician to restore the product to normal operation.
5 . Do not place this product on an unstable cart, stand,
or table. The product may fall, causing serious damage to the product.
6. Slots and openings in the cabinet and the back or
bottom are provided for ventilation, to protect it
from overheating; these openings must not be
blocked or covered. This product should never be
placed near or over a radiator or heat register. This
product should not be placed in a built-in installation unless proper ventilation is provided.
7. This product should be operated only from the type
of power source indicated in the manual. If you are
not sure of the type of power source to your building, consult your dealer or local power company.
8. This product is equipped with a three-wire grounding type plug, a plug having a third (grounding) pin.
This plug will only fit into a grounding type power
outlet. This is a safety feature. If you are unable to
insert the plug into the outlet, contact your electri-
E. If the product has been dropped or the cabinet
has been damaged.
F.
If the product exhibits a distinct change in performance.
14. Avoid using a telephone (other than a cordless type)
during an electrical storm. There may be a remote
risk of electric shock from lightning.
15. Do not use the telephone to report a gas leak in the
vicinity of the leak.
Page xix
SAVE THESE
INSTRUCTIONS
JMXIGMX
E~mber1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
256 INSTALLATION & MAJNTENANCE
-LIMITlSD W-Y
For a period of one (1) year from the date of shipment to
Buyer, INTER--TEL warrants the Equipment (except for
fuses and lamps) to be free from defects in material,
workmanship, or both, and to comply with specifications for the Equipment, as set forth in the Zn&&tion
and Field Main&nunce Manual. Buyer’s sole and exclusive remedy for breach of this Limited Warranty
shall be to have the defective Equipment (or parts) repaired or replaced at INTER-TEL% option. Shipping
costs incurred returning warranty work to INTER-TEL
shall be paid for by the Buyer. This Limited Warranty
extendsonly to the Buyer, notto any customer, user, or
thirdprvty. This Limited Warranty does not apply to
Equipment (or parts) damaged by improper handling,
normal wear and tear, accidents, lightning damage, negligence, or improper use or maintenance, and does not
apply to Equipment altered without authorization by
INTER-TEL. This Limited Warranty does not extend to
any claims, suits, damages, liabilities, costs, and expenses arising from any act, action, or inaction of Buyer.
Although the Moss-Magnuson Act should not apply, in
the event that it is held to apply by a court of competent
jurisdiction, the implied warranty of fitness for a particular purpose shall extend for the one-year (l-year)
period from the date that the Equipment was shipped to
the Buyer.
THIS W-ISZN LlEU OF AND EXCLUDES
ALL OTHER W-S, EXPRESS OR ZiUPKlED,
ZhK’LUDZNG, BVTNOTLhUZlED To, THEZiUPXLED
W-OF iU??RC i!MNlABm OR FIluESS
FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. THEM AZ&5 NO
W-ZESWZiZZCHEXTEND BEYOND TZf&SLZMZTEDW-ZNNOEiXNTSZULLINTER-TEL
BE L.MZ3LE FOR LOSS OF Ah’TZCZR~D PROFZl3,
ZhVZDENlXL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAM!XGES,
LOSS OF TZiUE OR OTHER LOSSES ZNCUZMED BY
BUYER ZN CONNECl7ON Wi’TH THE PURPOSE,
POSSESSION, OPERAIION, OR USE OF THE
EQlIJLPm SUCH CLAZiUS BEZNG EXPRESSLY
WmD BY THE ZhKfXUVG COMB3
Page xx
For complete information on returning equip
merit, refer to the current Inter-Tel Material Return Policy (document part number 835.1065).
This document includes specific information on
the following subjects: warranty, procedures to
follow when returning equipment, equipment
damaged in shipment, insurance, repair policy,
and advance replacement policy.
‘-3
OVERVIEW
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INSTAWLATION & MAINTENANCE
OVEIRVIEW
PAGE
CONTENTS
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
l-l
2. System Capacities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
l-l
3. Software Packages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
l-2
4. Hardware Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
l-3
5.
Installation, Programming, And Maintenance Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6. Features Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. System Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Keyset Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C . Enhanced Single-Line Set (ESLS) Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. Single-Line Instrument (SLI) Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E. Direct Station Selection/Busy Lamp Field (DSS/BLF) Unit Features . . . . . . .
. Attendant Computer Console Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G. Attendant Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
H. Maximum Capacities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1. INTRODUCTION
1.1
l-3
l-4
l-4
l-5
l-6
l-6
l-7
l-7
l-7
l-8
2. SYSTEM CAPACITIES
The 256 System is a state-of-the-art, digital, voi-
ce/data, hybrid telephone system. As a hybrid system, it
incorporates many of the user-tiendly features of key
systems with many of the expanded features and flexibility of private branch exchange (PBX) systems.
1.2 The 256 System is designed to meet the needs of
growing businesses. In fact, the system’s unique structure (including digital signal processing) allows it to be
easily adapted and expanded as business communication needs change. The modular design makes the system easy to install and service. And, the programmable
features provide an abundance of user-friendly applications to meet each customer’s needs. Highlights of the
system’s design include:
2.1 The equipment cabinet has 16 slots for station and
trunk cards. The actual number of stations and trunk
available depenak on the nwnber and type of cards, station in&uznts, andpower supply motihles installed
2.2 For example, if all 16 cards are station cards, there
can be a maximum of 256 station instruments installed.
Or, if only one of the cards is a type of Keyset Card (required), four are Tl Cards (the maximum allowed), and
the other 11 are Loop/Ground Start Cards, the system
maximum is 16 stations (using digital keysets or using
g-line IMX AIM keysets, which can be installed two to a
circuit) and 184 trunks. Of course, in most circumstances, the maximums listed below will never be
reached due to the variety of cards and station instruments installed.
I
2 3 A fully-equipped 256 System has the capacity for
up to:
Advanced microprocessor technology.
Modular, easily replace-able hardware with add-on
capabilities for optional features.
Flexible programming to customize many system
and station features.
Page l-l
- 256 Ports (16 available card slots with a maximum 16 circuits per card equals 256 ports.
Although it is theoretically possible to equip
more than 256 ports [e.g., using Tl Cards and/or
digital or 8-line IMX AIM keysets], the system
limits the number to 256. See page 2-6 for more
information.)
I
INTER-TELPRACTICES
OVERVIEW
Issue 1, November 1994
IMWGMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
- 216-220 Non-Blocking Voice Channels (The
- SO Keyset Circuits Equipped With Direct Station Selection/Busy Lamp Field @SS/BLF)
Units (Digital DSWBLF Units are physically at-
exact number of voice channels available depends on the number of DTMF decoders
installed in the system. The voice channels are
available for outside calls, intercom calls, and
paging on a first-come, first-served basis. See
page 2-6 for more information.)
tached to and programmed to be used with specific digital keysets. Up to four units may be
attached to one keyset. The units are powered by
their own AC transformers and do not require a
DKSC circuit that is separate from the keyset’s
circuit. Analog keys&, analog DSS/BLP Units,
and Attendant Computer Consoles use separate
KSC or KSC-D circuits. For each analog DSS/
BLF Unit installed, one less analog keyset or Attendant Computer Console may be installed. Up
to four analog DSS/BLF Units may be connected
to a single Keyset Card, and as many units as desired can be used with a single keyset. See page
2-27 for more information.)
- 184 Central Office (CO) Trunks (Loop start
and/or ground start trunks installed in increments
of up to eight or 24, depending on the number of
Loop/Ground Start Cards [LGCS], Loop Start
Cards [LsCs], and/or Tl Cards FlCs] installed
in the equipment cabinet. LGCs and LSCs can
have up to eight CO trunks installed, while TlCs
can have up to 24 CO trunk circuits installed.)
NOTE: The system is limited to a maximum of
four Tl Cards. (Pour cards with up to 24 circuits
per card equals 96 possible Tl trunk circuits.)
- 184 Direct Inward Dialing (DID) l’kunks
(Direct station access trunks installed in increments of up to eight or 24, depending on the number of Inward Dialing Cards [n>cs] and/or Tl
Cards installed in the equipment cabinet. IDCs
can have up to eight DID trunks installed, while
TlCs can have up to 24 DID trunk circuits
installed.)
- 140 E&M ‘Ihmks (Special “tie” trunks between
two supporting telephone systems [e.g., between
two 256 Systems] installed in increments of up to
four or 24, depending on the number of E&M
Cards WCs] and/or Tl Cards installed in the
equipment cabinet. EMCs can have up to four
E&M trunks installed, while TlCs can have up to
24 E&M trunk circuits installed.)
I
I
- 256 Stations (Combinations of keysets, DSS/
BLF Units, Attendant Computer Consoles, and
single-line sets in increments of up to eight or 16,
depending on the number of Digital Keyset
Cards [DKSCs], Keyset Cards PCs or KSCDs], Single-Line Cards [SLCs], and/or Inward
Dialing Cards @DCs] installed in the equipment
cabinet. XSCs can have from eight to 16 stations
connected depending on the type of keysets
used, SLCs can have up to 16 stations connected,
and IDCs can have up to eight.)
NOTE: At least one DKSC, KSC, or KSC-D
must be installed to provide an attendant
(equipped with a display keyset or an Attendant
Computer Console) to program selected system
data, act as the attendant for unsupervised CO recalls, receive system alarm messages, etc.
3. SOFTWARE PACKAGES
3.1 The IMX 256 System is available in five software
“packages” (refer to REPLACEMENT PATnrs for the
part numbers). The customer can choose between one
KP-rated system and four MP-rated systems. The KPrated system permits only one trunk to be accessed per
trunk key, and users can access only one auto trunk and
only one trunk in each of the trunk groups. The MP-rated
systems permit one-key access to multiple outgoing
trunks. The five software packages are listed below.
l
MF-rated, Basic package:
- This software package has all of the features
described in this manual except Toll Security,
Intercom/Outside Directory, Automated Attendant, Station Message Detail Accounting
(SMDA), Tl, and E&M.
l
MErated, Extended package:
- This software package has all of the features
described in this manual except Tl and E&&M.
l
MF-rated, Etiendedplus Tl and E&M package:
- This software package has all of the features
described in this manual.
l
Xl?-rated, Ext&plus Tl and E&M package:
- This software package has all of the features
described in this manual except Least-Cost
Routing @CR).
3.2 The IMX 256 system has an additional software
package that has all of the features described in this
manual, plus it allows the GX station instruments to be
installed on the system. (Refer to Appendix A in the
back of the manual for complete information.)
Page l-2
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
NO’I‘E: According to FCC regulations, if a customer
wishes to change from an existing RF-rated system to an
MF-rated system (or vice versa), the installing company
must advise the customer “to notify the telephone cornparty of the change if they want the [ICF or MF] rate and
that they may have to certify in writing to the telephone
company that the equipment is configured as a key system and pay appropriate service order charges.”
OVERVIEW
Issue 1, November 1994
ties of the system facilitate installation and repair with
minimal down-time. Strict quality control standards for
manufacturing and thorough field testing provide the
system with the reliability demanded by today’s hightechnology market.
4 . HfmDwAREsuMMARY
5.2 The IN~~ON section contains instructions for assembling the main distribution frame ([email protected])
and for installing the equipment cabinet, power supply,
circuit cards, station instruments, and other optional
hardware.
4.1’ The SPEClFICATIONS section of this manual explains environmental requirements of the system, describes the hardware, and gives pre-installation
information. The hardware descriptions include: equip
ment cabinet, power supply, circuit cards, station instruments, and additional equipment needed for the
optional features.
5 3 ThePRGGRWMING section describes the procedures for programming the system features. After the
system is installed, the flexible software allows the database to be customized to meet the customer’s needs. An
external, customer-provided, IBM AT-compatible personal computer (PC) is used to perform this task.
5.4 The TROUBLESHGGTING
5.
INSTALLATION, PROGRAMMING,
AND MAINTENANCE SUMMARY
5.1
The modular design and self-diagnostic capabili-
section gives
instructions for correcting system problems and replacing defective parts. Part numbers and a recommended
inventory of spare parts are listed in the REPIACEMENT PARTS section.
Page 1-3
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
OVERVIEW
Issue 1, November 1994
6.
FEATURESSUMMARY
6.1
System, keyset, single-line set, DSS/BLF Unit,
Attendant Computer Console, and attendant features are
listed on the following pages. Those future murkzd
with an asterisk (*) mquire aa2iitional eqwpment. For
complete descriptions and operating instructions, refer
to the SPECIFICAI’IONS and m sections of
this manual.
k
SYSTEMFEATURES
System Organization and Record Keeping
Featpres
l
Hardware add General System Featulres
l
* Optional facsimile machine
*
*
l Optronal
doorbox
l * Optional battery back-up
l * Optional exte ma1 paging equipment
l * Optional playback devices for use with the automated attendant and hunt group features
l
l
Five available software packages
Flexible station instrument con&uration and numbering plan
mo DB9 connectors on the ROM Central Processing Unit (RCPU) Card for connecting optional
SMDR/SMDA output devices or an external (IBM
AT-compatible) PC for programming
Easily accessible system voltage test points on the
front edge of the RCPU Card
Database battery back-up with voltage test points
Adjustable baud rates for on-site programming and
the optional SMDR/SMDA output devices (110,
300,600,1200,2400,4800,9600, and 19200 baud)
Computer modem with software auto-baud on the
RCPU Card for remote programming (300 and 1200
baud)
Variable system timers
Industry-standard message waiting capability on
SLCs (using -1OWDC derived from a combination
of system voltages)
* Optional Station Message Detail Recording
(SMDR) and/or Station Message Detail Accounting
(SMDA) output device(s)
* One relay on the RCPU Card is dedicated as a power
failure transfer relay; the other relay is a general purpose relay that can be used for night transfer, general
signaling devices, etc.
a* Optional Attendant Co mputer Consoles (personal
computers equipped with headsets; allow the user to
view system activity on the monitor and to process
calls and messages using the keyboard)
l * Two optional external music sources
l * Optional off- premises extensions (OPXs) with variable ring cadence
l * Optional OPX repeaters
l * Optional multi-port voice mail system
l
l
l
l
l
lhmkFeatures
l
l
Ten paging zones and nine external paging ports
* Station Message Detail Recording (SMDR)
* Station Message Detail Accounting (SMDA) available only in the Exfer&d and Ex&naMplus Tl
and E&M software packages
* Programmable reports for toll restriction, Least& Routing &CR), and station data
Call cost accounting (estimated)
Forced, forced LCR toll, standard, optional, and
class-of-service account codes (forced account
codes can be validated or non-validated)
I
Flexible attendant arrangements
Tenant groups and departments
* Hunt groups with individually-programmed timers
(may have optional overflow and announcement stations with playback devices)
System alarm display and reporting
Voice computer hunt groups with optional IYIMF
feedback tones
I
l
l
* Optional talkback speaker equipment
Page 14
Auto trunks and trunk groups (restricted to accessing
a single trunk on KF-rated systems)
Automatic incoming trunk answering
Dual-tone multi-frequency (MMF) or dial-pulse
signaling
Loop start and/or ground start compatibility
Hybrid balancing (ideal, loaded, or unloaded) for
optimal CO trunk performance
CO trunk receive and transmit adjustments for optimal voice volume levels
Relaxed ring detection (ground start trunks on LGCs
OdY)
Outgoing-access, allowed-answer, and ring-in
assignments on a station-by-station basis (day lists
and night lists)
Day and night modes of operation (by tenant group)
Day and night toll restriction on a station-by-station
basis (including provisions for eight area/office code
INTER-TELPBACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INt3lXLLATION& MAINTENANCE
restriction user groups and PBX, absorbed-digit, and
equal access dialing)
Least-Cost Routing (LCR) (may be programmed on
a station-by-station basis to be transparent to the
=4 -not available in the KF-rated, Exhznakdplus
Tl and E&M software package
System-wide Call Privacy Release option
Trunk reseize capability on a station-by-station
basis
Direct Inward System Access @ISA) - in the
Extended and Extendedplus Tl and E&U software
packages, DISA lines can have toll restriction class
of service similar to station toll restrictions
l * Automated attendant - available only in the
Exmuiki and ExtUplus Tl and E&Msdware
packages
Basic Tl trunk emulation
Basic E&M networking (tie trunks)
Direct inward dialing (DID) trunks
Flexible DID ring-in assignments
Programmable wink, immediate, or delay start options for DID and EgLM trunks
Toll Security with weekly limits for 7- and Xl-digit
and/or operator-assisted and international calls available only in the Extended and Exzendedplus TI
and E&M software packages
0
0
0
0
I
0
.. I
General Station Features
0
0
0
0
0
I.
0
I.
0
Programmable feature codes for easy station operation
Call privacy/privacy release
Station-to-station intercom calls
Off-Hook Voice Announce (OHVA) calls (the ability to place or receive OHVA calls depends on the
type of station instrument used, and may be enabled/
disabled on a station-by-station basis)
Inter-station messages and message cancel
Station exchange
Ring intercom always
Private intercom call override
Automatic camp on to busy stations, trunks, and
LCR (ability to camp on to LCR may be disabled on
a station-by-station basis)
Busy trunk/station callback (queue)
Individual hold
Call splitting
Hold recall
OVERVIEW
Issue 1, November 1994
a Call waiting
0 Call transfer to outside telephone numbers and ex0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
B.
tension numbers
Transfer to hold
Transfer recall
Reverse transfer and group call pick-up
conference calls -capacity ranges from 10 simultaneous three-party conferences to four simultaneous &party conferences
System forwarding (routes calls based on the type of
call and the status of the intended station)
Call forward to extension numbers and hunt group
pilot numbers
Call forward to outside telephone numbers
System speed dialing (including non-display and
tenant-specific numbers) - can be programmed to
override station class of service
Station speed dialing
Redial (last number dialed or, at keysets only, last
number saved)
Do-not-disturb with customized messages (the ability to place a station in do-notdisturb may be enabled/disabled on a station-by-station basis)
Cancel miscellaneous operations
Hookflash (over all types of trunks)
Hunt group remove/replace
House phone
Silent messaging (leaves a message at a stationwithout placing an actual call)
KEYSET FEATURES
0 Various digital and analog keyset models are avail- 1
able (for a complete listing of all the keyset models
available and the optional equipment that may be installed on them, refer to pages 2-21 and 2-25 in
SPEClPICAl-IONS)
0 Digital keysets, AIM keysets, and Inter-Tel/DVK 1
keysets allow the users to individually control voice
and tone volume levels for intercom calls, outside
calls, background music, etc.
l * Liquid crystal display (LCD) (optional on some
models) for viewing: numbers dialed; speeddial
numbers; inter-station, do-notdisturb, and reminder
messages; date/time; keyset identification; station
programming; etc.
l * Optional Data Port Module on IMX 12-/2Q-line keysets and Inter-Tel/DVK keysets for installing a
modem-equipped data device (for simultaneous
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
OVERVIEW
Issue 1, November 1994
l
l
0
0
I
0
0
l
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
l
l
l
l
l
l
voice/data communication), or for installing a loud
ringing adapter (LRA) and signaling device(s)
* Optional Personal Computer Data Port Module
(PCDPM) on digital keysets for off-hook voice announce receive capability and to allow a digital
DSS/BLF Unit and/or an optional Modem Data Port
Module to bc installed
* Optional Modem Data Port Module (MDPMJ on
digital keysets for installing a modem+z&peddata
device (for simultaneous voice/data communication) or a single-line set -requires a PCDPM
12-key pushbutton keypad
“Hot” keypad-allows dialing of feature codes, extension numbers, and trunk access codes without
pressing the SPCL key or lifting the handset
Up to 20 key maps for determining the exact layout
and function of the keys
Feature keys for one-key access to feature codes
(some of the keys may be designated as user programmable)
ICKO speed-dial (SD) keys with light-emitting
diode (LED) indicators
Call appearance keys with LED indicators (for incoming call indication/access)
Secondary call keys with LED indicators (show
ring-in indications for the designated ‘Primary” station)
Individual trunk keys with LED indicators (for incoming and outgoing call indication/access)
Trunk group keys with LED indicators (for outgoing
call access and trunk group status)
Integrated speakerphone (allows handsfree operation on outside calls and intercom calls)
Speakerphone on/off
Slide-out directory card
Ring and voice volume controls
User-programmable ring tone
Self-test function
Hearing aid-compatible (I-WC) handset
Reversible baseplate and cradle hook for wall
mounting
* Optional headset
* Optional handset amplifier
* Background music (two sources)
Microphone mute
Handsfree answer enable/disable
On-hook dialing/monitoring
System hold
Station call monitoring (hunt group supervisors
OdY)
Call barge (break through to a busy station)
Do-not-disturb override (the ability to override donot-disturb may be enabled/disabled on a station-bystation basis)
Activity release feature (primarily intended for use
with the Attendant Computer Console; entering this
feature code terminates any current activity and returns the station to idle or dial tone)
Page remove/replace
Intercom (extension number) and outside (system
speeddial number) directories - available only in
the Extended and ExendedpruS Tl and E&M software packages
Automatic intercom and/or outside call access
C.
l
D.
ENHANCED SINGLE-LINE SET @SL!3)
FEATURES
12-key pushbutton keypad
User-programmable feature keys for one-key access
to feature codes
Timed hookflash (FLASH) key
Neon lamp for message waiting indication
Ring volume control
Selectable ring tone (HI or LO)
Hearing aid-compatible (HAC) handset
Reversible baseplate and cradle hook for wall
mounting
Selectable AC/DC ringer
* Optional handset amplifier
SINGLELINE INSTRUMENT (SLI)
FEATURES
0 l%-key pushbutton keypad
l User-programmable feature keys for one-key access
to feature codes
l Timed hookflash (FLASH) key
0 Ring volume control
l Hearing aid-compatible (HAC) handset
0 Reversible baseplate for wall mounting
0 Selectable AC/DC ringer
l Optional message waiting indication tones
l * Optional handset amplifier
Page l-6
INTER-TETJPRACTIC~
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION
E.
OVERVIEW
Issue 1, November 1994
& MAINTENANCE
DIRECT STATION SEZECTION/FWSY
LAMP FIELD @SS/B~ UNlT FEATURES
programmiq~ instructions, refer to the manual included
with the console.
1 l * Up to 50 keyset circuits may have units installed
0 Each unit has 60 keys with LED indicators for onekey access to up to 60 extension numbers (the LEDs
show the status of the assigned stations and/or hunt
groups)
0 Up to eight key maps for determining the layout and
numbers accessed by the keys
G . AlTENDANTF’EATURE!3
0
0
0
0
0
F.
A’lTENDA.NT COMPUTER CONSOLE
FEnwtEs
0
0
0 IBM XT-, AT-, or 3Wcompatible computer
0 CGA, EGA, or VGA monitor and Monitor Interface
Card
0 122-key custom keyboard
0 Headset operation
0 Visual display of system call activity, system directory, system alarms, date and time, etc.
0 Automatic call priority
0 Quick, simple call answering and transfer
NOTE: For additional information on the Attendant
Computer Console, along with detailed installation and
0
0
0
0
0
Page l-7
System speed-dial number/name programming
Remote canceling of do-not-disturb and call forward
for stations served
System alarm reporting/clearing
Enable/disable system night mode
Set date and time of day
Attendant recall
System do-not-disturb and reminder message proEFamminP
Station feature programming (user name, tenant
group, department, and attendant)
Immediate off-hook voice announce (OHVA) calls
(requires special programming and an Attendant
Computer Console or a DSS/BLF Unit)
Enable/disable background music to external paging speaker(s)
Trunk maintenance feature for taking trunks out of
service and placing them back in again
SMDAreport can be generated at any time by entering a feature code
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 lNSTALLATION% MAINTENANCE
OVERVIEW
Issue 1, November 1994
H .
MAXIMUMCAPAClTlE!3
FEATURE
Some of the features have maximum capacities
that are dependent on the availability of system channels and/or circuits. The features with such capacities
are listed in the following table.
6.2
FEATURE
1 CAPACllY
Voon-blocking voice chaanels/poxts
220
Paging zones
10
Extexnal paging pelts
9
Conference
32
dmuits available
Parties per conference
Simultaneous conferences
System speed dialing
Numbers per system
Digits per number
8
1W
400
32
Station speed dialing
Numbers per keyset - CO
Numbers per keyset - IC
Numbers per single-line set
- CO and/or IC
Digits per entry - CO
Digits per entry - IC
Redial numbers per station
Digits per number
10
10
10
16
4h
1
48
LCR
Route groups
Facility groups
19
24
Trunk groups per facility group
Dial rules (16 digits each)
- total
- programmable
Facility group callback requests per
47
system
Camp on requests per system
50
so
Callback (queue) requests
per station
Camp on by a station
32
29
1
1
Stations camped on to a station
255
Ptatlons camped on to a tnmk group
240
hter-station messages per system
286
Programmable
reminder
messages
Message requesk per system
20
120
Do-not-disturb messages
Messages par system
20
266
Ring-in/allowed-answer
patterns
System forwarding paths
Paths per station
Points per path
40
200
3
4
CAPAClTY
Toll action user groups
Extended area codes par group
8
4
Allowed long distance numbem
Digits per number
20
10
Alteraate canier numbers
Digits per number
20
10
Account codes
Forced
Standard
clsss-of-selvice
Digits per code
SMDA account codes
256
128
256
8
2s
Attendants
Attendant Computer Consoles
DSS/RL.F-equipped
circuits
Rxtension numbers per DSS/RLF Unit
256
128
50
60
Hunt groups
Per system
Stations per hunt group
Announcement stations per hunt
group
Overflow stations per group
overflow counts
Tenant groups
Departments per tenant group
Tlhlnks
Auto tnmks
CO/E&M trunk groups
Trunks per group
DID trunk groups
Trunks per group
DID entries
Entries per DID group
B
iis
3
1
o-127c
8
10
184
47
184
11
184
:z
Map pup assignments
Keyset
DSWRLF
20
8
Secondarg call key stations per prhuy
station
Secondary tail keys per station
10
16
b Ifuaingthrewiigitext enaion num~anexte.naionn~canbe
pr~edwithaponnd(#)tospeeddialprivateintercomcallstothe
station. Or, a “4” (the default feature coda for ravaraa transfer) may
be entered before a station extension rumba or hunt group pilot
number to qaickly reverse tramfar (pii up) calla Lam that station
or hunt group.
= Plualovcrflow
* Asmanyasdesireduntilatotalof480forallhuntgroupsisreached
c orunlimited
f AsmanyPSdcSireduntilatotalof400forallDIDtrunLgroupsb
Page l-8
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INS’E4LLATION Lik MAINTENANCE
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
SPECIFICATIONS
CONTENTS
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-2
2.
2-4
2-4
2-5
Cabling And The Main Distribution Frame (MDF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
..i.
. Station Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. ‘Ihnk Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3. Equipment Cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. E&ipment Cabinet Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Functional Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. Environmental Requirements
D. System Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E. Circuit Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-6
2-6
2-6
4. Station Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. IMX 256 Keysets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B . GMX.256 Keysets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C . IMX 256 DSS/BLF Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. GMX-256 DSWBLF Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E. Attendant Computer Consoles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F. Single-Line Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G. Off-Premises Extensions (OPXs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
H. Playback Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-21
2-21
2-25
2-27
2-28
2-28
2-29
2-30
2-30
5. Additional System Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
Personal Computer (PC) For On-Site Or Stand-Alone/Remote
Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Programming PC And SMDR/SMDA Output Device Requirements . . . . . .
C System Battery Back-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. Additional Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-31
......................................
Page 2-l
2 - 8
2-8
2-10
2-31
2-31
2-32
2-32
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
1.
INTER-TELPRAcTlcEs
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
INTRODUCTION
0
1.1 This section of the manual describes the following
256 System hardware:
- Cabling and the Main Distribution Frame (MDF)
- Equipment Cabinet
- Power Supply
- Circuit Cards
- Station Instruments
- Additional System Equipment
1.2
The 256 System has 16 slots available for station
andtrunkcards.l%emarimum number of stations and
trunk9 that can be installed&pen& on the number and
typ of cards; station insmunent s, aMww0 ~PP&
mod&s used. For example, there could be as many as
184 trunks installed (using one Keyset Card [required],
four Tl Cards [the maximum allowed], and 11 othertype trunk cards). Or, there could be as many as 256 stam tions (using a combination of digital keysets, 8-line
IMX AIM keysets, and single-line sets).
NOTE: Generally, one station instrument can be installed on each available station circuit. However, the
new 84ine “dual-circuit” IMX AIM keyset has been
specially designed so that two of these keysets can be installed on a single circuit, if desired. Keyset Cards can
be equipped with any combination of the various keyset
models.
1.3
The trunks and stations are controlled by the cir-
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
GMX-256 Analog Station Instruments
0
‘0
0
0
0
0
1.4 A wide variety of station instruments can be used
0
on the Inter-Tel IMX and GMX-256 Systems, including:
0
IMX 256 Digital Station Instruments
0
Standard Digital Keyseta (also referred to as Standard Digital Terminals) - display and non-display
l Executive Digital Keysets (also referred to as
Executive Digital Terminals) - display only
0 Digital Direct Station Selection/Busy Lamp Field
(DWBLF) units
,I
IMX 256 Analog Station Instruments
l
24-Line AIM Keysets (display only)
Industry-Standard Single-Line, Dual-Tone
Multi-Frequency (DTMF) Sets
NOTE: With the proper software package, the Inter-Tel
GX station instruments can also be installed on the IMX
256 System. Refer to Appendix A in the back of the
manual for complete information.
cuit cards in the equipment cabinet.
l
12-Line AlM Keyseta (display only)
8-Line Dual-Circuit AIM Keysets (display only)
24-Line Keysets (standard and display)
12-Line Keysets (standard and display)
8-Line Keysets (non-display only)
Attendant Computer Consoles
DSS/BLF Units
Enhanced Single-Line Sets (ESLSs)
Single-Line Instruments (SLIs)
0
l
0
0
Inter-Tel/DVK 24-Line Keysets (standard and display)
Inter-Tel/DVK 12-Line Keysets (standard and display)
Inter-Tel/DVK 8-Line Keysets (standard and display)
GMX 24-Line Keysets (standard and display)
GMX 12-Line Keysets (non-display only)
GX 24-Line Keysets (standard and display)
Attendant Computer Consoles
Inter-Tel/DVK Direct Station Selection/Busy Lamp
Field (DSWBLF) Units (single or tandem)
GMX DSWBLF Units (single only)
GX DSWBLF Units (single or tandem)
GMX Single-Line Instruments (SLls)
GX SLIS
Industry-Standard Single-Line, Dual-Tone
Multi-Frequency (MMF) Sets
NOTE: For more information on the GX and GMX station instruments, refer to appendixes Aand Bin the back
of this manual.
Page 2-2
INTER-TELPRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
1.5 A wide variety of optional system equipment can
also be installed, including:
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
Power failure transfer equipment, refer to pages
2-11 and 3-30.
Off-premises extensions (OPXs) and OPXrepeaters,
refer to pages 2-30 and 3-30.
Night switch equipment, refer to pages 2-11 and
3-30.
Playback devices, see pages 2-30 and 3-95.
General signaling devices, refer to pages 2-11 and
3-30.
Output device(s) for the Station Message Detail Recording (SMDR), error recording, and Station Message Detail Accounting (SMDA) features, refer to
pages 2-31 and 3-98.
External paging speaker equipment, refer to pages
2-6 and 3-98.
System battery back-up (uninterruptable power sup
ply or standby power supply), refer to page 2-32.
Multi-port voice mail equipment, refer to page
2-32.
?kro external music sources, refer to pages 2-10 and
3-99.
Page 2-3
Doorbox, refer to page 2-32.
Facsimile machine, refer to page 2-32.
Talkback speaker equipment, refer to page 2-32.
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
2.
CABLING AND THEMAIN
DISTRIBUTION FRAME (MDF)
mount the terminal blocks, modular jack assemblies,
and any optional peripheral equipment.
2.1
0xwctions between the hnks, station instru-
A. SllATION CONNECTIONS
ments, external equipment, and the station and trunkcircuit cards are made at the MDF. The MDF is made up of
industry-standard, 66Ml-SO-type terminal blocks and,
if using Tl Cards, eight-conductor (RJ48C) modular
jack assemblies. Bridging clips are used on all terminal
blocks to complete the connections. As many as 17
blocks may be needed, including any combination of the
following: _
l
l-15 blocks for CO trunk terminations and Loop/
Ground Start Card (LGC) and/or Loop Start Card
(LX) terminations.
0
1-15 blocks for DID trunk terminations and Inward
Dialing Card (IDC) terminations.
0
1-15 blocks for E&M trunk terminations and E&M
Card @MC) terminations.
I0
0
1-16 blocks for station cabling terminations and
Digital Keyset Card (DKSC), Keyset Card (KSC or
RX-D), Single-Line Card (SLC), and/or Inward
Dialing Card (IDC) terminations.
1 block for optional system equipment terminations
and ROM Central Processing Unit (RCPU) Card terminations.
2.2 The MDF requires at least a 4 x &foot (1.2 x
2.4meter), @rich plywood backboard. (Depending on
the number of stations and trunks installed, a larger
backboard may be necessary.) This will allow room to
2.3
For each keyset, analog DSS/BLF Unit, Attendant
Computer Console, single-line set, and playback
device, three-pair (24 AWG) twisted cable is run from
the station location to the MDF. All station cables are
terminated on blocks at the MDF and on six-conductor
modular jack assemblies at the station locations.
NOTE: It is recommended that three-pair twisted cable
and six-conductor modular jacks be used for all station
ConnectiOllS. This allows the various types of station instruments to be easily interchanged if necessary. However, if desired, ESLSs, SLIs, single-line DTMF sets,
and playback devices can be installed using one-pair
twisted cable and four-conductor modular jacks.
2.4 Industry-standard, 25-pair telephone cable is used
to connect the station blocks to their corresponding station cards. Female %-pin amphenol-type connectors on
the cables attach to the male connectors on the station
cards in the cabinet.
2.5 To meet Part 15 of FCC Regulations, all station
cables must be equipped with ferrite beads. ‘Iwo ferrite
“split” beads (two half beads) are installed on each
25-pair cable just below the amphenol-type connector.
The beads help to reduce electromagnetic interference
(EMI) and radio frequency interference (RPI).
NOTE: Each ferrite split bead, which is actually half of
a fall bead, is ordered individually (see REPLACEMENT PARTS for the part number). Two split beads are
required to form one complete bead.
Page 2-4
lNTEIbTELPR4mcES
JMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
B. TRUNK CONNECTIONS
2.6 The CO, DID, and E&M trunks are terminated on
telephone company RI-type blocks, as required by FCC
regulations. Cross-connect cable is used to connect the
RI-type blocks to the CO, DID, and E&M terminal
blocks on the MDF. The trunks are then connected to the
Loop/Ground Start Cards (LGCs), Loop Start Cards
(LSCs), Inward Dialing Cards (IDCs), and/or E&M
Cards (E&Q) using industry-standard, 25-pair cable.
Female 50-pin amphenol-type w~ectors on the cables
attach to the male connectors on the cards.
2.7 To meet Part 15 of FCC Regulations, all trunk
cables must be equipped with ferrite beads. *o ferrite
“split” beads (two half beads) are installed on each
25-pair cable just below the amphenol-type connector.
The beads help to reduce electromagnetic interference
(EMI) and radio frequency interference (RFI).
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
mod-to-mod line cord is used to connect each Tl span
directly to the Tl jack on the corresponding Tl Card.
(Or, to use the optional DB15 connector instead, see
page 3-20.)
2 3 It is recommended that gas discharge tubes with
silicon avalanche suppressors be installed on all non-T1
trunks for lightning protection. (For Tl spans, the CSU
itself provides the lightning protection.) Also, in areas
with frequent occurrences of lightning, it is recommended that the cable between the telephone company
termination and the gas discharge tubes be at least 75
feet long (the cable may be coiled up if desired).
2.10 The 256 System has the following trunk characteristics:
NOTE: Each ferrite split bead, which is actually half of
a full bead, is ordered individually (see REPLACEMENT PARIS for the part number). Two split beads are
required to form one complete bead.
2.8 Tl spans are terminated on telephone company
RJ4gC modular jacks (or on RI-type blocks that are then
cross-connected to modular jack assemblies), as required by FCC regulations. Four-pair, non-reversing,
Page 2-5
Losshxx
CO to keyset
CO to .single4ne set
cotoco
Ringer quivalenca
Ringing voltage
Ring frequency
Loop currcnt
&m (@lLHz, 0 fL)
CUB (@lLHz 0 fQ
odB @W-k 0 k)
0.6B
4ovRMs minimum
17-63I-h
2chnAminimum
l-$-to-ring
4OOV transient
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
lNTER-TELPBAcIIcES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
3. EQUIPMENT CABINET
A.
software automatically distributes the cards to make the
best possible use of the available voice channels.
EQUIPMENT CABINET DESCRIPTION
3.1 The 256 equipment cabinet houses the system
power supply, the Telecom Motherboard, a 17-slot cardftle assembly, and the circuit cards, including: ROM
Central Processing Unit (RCPU) Card, Tl Cards
(TlCs), E&M Cards (EMCs), Loop/Ground Start Cards
(WCs), Loop Start Cards (LSCs), Digital Keyset Cards
I @KS&), Keyset Cards (KSCs or KSC-Ds), SingleLine Cards (SLCs), and Inward Dialing Cards (IDCs).
3.2 Hquipment cabinet dimensions are as follows:
Height
Width
Depth
Weight
26.0 in. (66.0 cm.)
32.0 in. (81.3 an.)
23.0 in. (58.4 cm.)
- Empty
- Loaded
98 lbs. (44 kg.)
146 lbs. (66 kg.)
B. FCJNCTIONAZ
DESCRIPTION
3.3 Together, the circuit cards in the equipment cabinet perform the switching activities for the system; detect incoming calls, process data-controlled features;
control the interaction of station instruments, trunks,
and intercom calls; etc.
3.4 The system is a microprocessor-controlled, pulse
code modulation (PCM), time-division multiplex
(TDM) system. Memory includes 512k bytes read-only
memory (ROM) and 512k bytes random access memory
(RAM) on the ROM Central Processing Unit (RCPU)
Card. In addition, each keyset contains a microprocessor that communicates via a Keyset Card with the microprocessor on the RCPU Card.
3.5 The 256 circuitry and software combine to produce an “integrated switching matrix” of 256 time slots
(8 PCM highways Ibuses] x 32 time slots). Of the 256
time slots, 32 are reserved for conferencing and four are
reserved for MMP decoders. If additional M’MF decoders are installed (up to four), additional time slots are
also reserved. This leaves between 216 and 220 time
slots available for voice channels. (For a diagram of the
system voice channel allocation, refer to Figure 2-l on
page 2-7.) Therefore, the total number of non-blockingvoice channels available ranges from 216to 22O(depending on the number of additional IYTMP decoders
installed on the RCPU Card).
3.6 Whenever there is a change in the system’s circuit
card con&uration, all equipped cards are assigned to
one of the PCM highways (also called buses). The individual circuits on each card may use only those voice
channels available on the assigned PCM highway. The
.:
-\,
:j
3.7 If there is a large mrmber of cards installed, two or
more cards may be assigned to the same PCM highway.
The voice channels on each PCM highway are then allocated to the assigned cards for outside calls, intercom
calls, and pages on a first-come, first-served basis. Since
each two-way conversation requires two voice channels, the maximum number of simultaneous two-way
conversations available ranges from 108 to 110.
3.8 If, on a single PCM highway, there are more ports
equipped than there are voice channels, there is a remote
possibility that all the voice channels could be in use at
one time (see Figure 2-l on page 2-7). If this happens,
a user attempting to place a call or page hears reorder
tones and must try again (the system also generates an
error message to indicate that no voice channels were
available). Generally, a voice channel will be available
on the second attempt.
NOTE: It is possible to equip more ports than there are
available voice channels, especially when installing a
number of Tl spans, single-line sets, digital keysets, or 1
8-line IMX AIM keysets installed two to a circuit. (In
fact, the programmer can equip up to 256 ports.) For total non-blocking applications, it is necessary to limit the
number of circuit cards installed in the cabinet. (Refer to
PROGRAMMING, page 5-172, for information on designating certain circuit cards as non-blocking and generating voice channel allocation data for traffic
analysis.)
3.9 As many as nine external paging ports can be used
for comtecting external paging speaker equipment.
Each external paging port requires au available SLC,
LGC, or LSC circuit.
NOTE: When installing external paging equipment on
an LGC or LSC circuit, use a paging amplifier that provides talk battery. When installing external paging
equipment on an SLC circuit, use a paging amplifier that
DOES NOT provide talk battery.
Usmg a pagmg amplifier wrth talk battery on an
3.10 The 256 System has two music channels. If desired, two different music-on-hold sources (port 1 and
port 2) maybe connected to the RCPU Card. By entering
a feature code, individual keyset users can choose to listen to background music from either of the two music
sources. Internal users will also hear music from the
selected source when on hold and when camped on. For
outside callers, the source for the Music-On-Hold feature is assigned on a trunk group-by-trunk group basis.
Page 2-6
-~
, ;;‘\:j
.-
INTER-TELPRACTIcEs
IW4GMX 256 Il’iSTALLA’I’ION & MAINTENANCE
SPECIF’I~~ONS
Issue 1, November 1994
3.11 The card slot on the far right (17th slot) of the
cabinet is reserved for the RCPU Card. Other than that,
any station or trunk card may be placed in any of the remaining 16 slots.
card slot must be entered through database programruing.
- See page 5-170 in PROGRAMMING.
3.12 The Telecom Motherboard power cable, which
comes alreadv installed in the equipment cabinet, connects the systim power supply to the Telecom Motherboard.
NOTE: Information on the type of card installed in each
FIGURE 2-l.
VOICE
CHANNEL
1
2
3
4
5
32 voke
52 voice
S2Vdtcb
Channels
32VOkO
Channels
Channels
Channels Channels
ALLOCATION
52 voice
EOUIPMENT CABINET -5 PCM HIGHWAYS WITH 22 TIME SLOTS PER HIGHWAY
‘.
-.
-.
-1
VOICE CHANNELS
AVAILABLE
pq/nSAMPLE ALLOCATlON FOR ONE PCM HlGHWAY
NOTE: The above example shows a sample voice channel allocation for one PCM highway (voice
bus) in a heavily-loaded equipment cabinet. The system has assigned one Tl Card, one Single-Line
Card, and one Inward Dialing Card to the same PCh4 highway. If all three cards are designated as
“blocking” in database programming, the 48 circuits will vie for the 32 voice channels on a firstcome, first-served basis. If, however, the Tl Card is designated as “non-blocking,” the system will
rebalance the cards so that the Tl Card is assigned to a highway that has no more than 32 equipped
ports. (Refer to PRGG RAMMING, page 5-172, for information on designating certain circuit cards
as non-blocking and generating voice. channel allocation data for tra5c analysis.)
Page 2-7
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 IN-TION & MAINTENANCE
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
c .
ENvrRoIvMENmL REQUIREMENTS
3.13 The equipment cabinet and the station instruments require the following environmental conditions:
#OPERATlON
Temperature
(Cabinet)
32’ to 104” F
O”t0 4o”c
-40°t0185’F
-4WtOSS”C
Temperature
(Station Instruments)
32” to 113’ F
o”to 4Yc
-40” to 185” F
40°t08S”C
Relative Humidity
(Non-condensing)
5% to 95%
5% to 95%
AltiNde
up to 10,000 ft.
Upto40,OOOR
(12,192 m.)
(3,048 m.1
3.18 Based on the number of dual-circuit 8-line IMX
AIM keysets and other-type keysets installed, the following chart can be used to determine the number of
Slave 30V Modules needed. (The programming PC will
also display a message if an additional module is needed.) If it is determined that two Slave 30V Modules are
needed, a version C power supply chassis and version C
power supply modules must be used (see paragraphs
3.21 and 3.22).
NOTE: It is recommended that the maximum operating
temperature (as stated above) never be exceeded.
Therefore, when iustalling the equipment cabinet and
station iustruments, allow a sufficient margin for error
in case of air conditioning failure, routine mechanical
maintenance, plant shutdown, etc. As a general guideline, if the conditions are suitable for office personnel,
they are also suitable for all equipment and station instrument operation. A properly controlled environment
will help to extend the operating life of the equipment.
3.14 While in operation, a fully-loaded equipment
cabinet generates approximately 1,000 British Thermal
Units (BTUs) of heat per hour. The maximum amount of
heat generated per individual station instrument is 6.8
BTUs per hour.
NOTE: This information is provided so that any cooling
needed to meet the proper environmental conditions (as
listed in the chart) can be calculated.
D.
Generator Module must be installed. If any SLCs, IBCs,
LGCs, or EMCs are used, a -48V Module must be installed. KSCs, LSCs, and TlCs do not use -48vDc.
(Refer to REPLACEMENT PARIS for the part numbers of the various power supply modules.)
SYSTEM POWER SUPPLY
3.15 The system power supply is installed to provide
power to the circuit cards and to all stations. The power
supply itself is comprised of a metal chassis with various
modules installed.
3.16 The power supply must have an isolated, dedicated, 10%12!5VAC, HA, 57-63H2, single-phase cornmercial power source (for details, refer to the first
NOTE on page 3-3 in INS’WLLAIION).
3.17 All systems are equipped with one Quad Module
(+5V, -5V, +12V, and -12V) and one Master 30V Module. Depending on the number and type of keysets installed, one or two Slave 30V Modules may also be
needed (see the following paragraph for details). If any
AC-ringing single-line devices are to be used, a Ring
(S-line AIhis X 0.0755) + (other analog keysets X 0.125)
+ (digital keysets X 0.060) = y
I
If y ( 8, only the Master 30V Module is required.
Ify > 8, but ,( 16, one Slave 30V Module is
also required.
Ify > 16, two Slave 30V Modules are also
required.
3.19 Located on the front side of the power supply
chassis are the ON/OPP power switch, a 1OA or 15A
fuse that isolates the AC power source from the system,
and the removable cover plate.
3.20 Located on the back side of the power supply
chassis are the AC power cable, all of the connectors for
the various power cables, and a grounding lug to connect the equipment cabinet to an earth ground.
Power Supply Modules
3.21 Currently, there are three versions of power sup
ply modules used on the 256 System: (A) part numbers
440.0102-0106, (B) part numbers 440.01% 0122, and
(C)part numbers 440.0112- 0115. (Refer to REPLACEMENT PARTS for a complete list of the part numbers.)
3.22 Version A and B power supply modules are compatible with each other, and they use the same chassis.
However, due to numerous design enhancements, version C modules and chassis are not compatible with versions A and B. Either use all version A and B power
supply modules and chassis, or use all version C modules and chassis. Do not mix the two @pes.
4
.. . .
Page 2-8
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IM.X/GMX 256 INSTACLATION & MAINTENANCE
3.23
The version A Ring Generator Module has a 3
amp fuse, while all other version A power supply modules have 6 amp fuses. Maximum power outputs for
each version A module are shown below.
MOOUE
M
A
S
T
Voltage Sutge and Spike Protection
-48V MODUU
+NDc, 18A
-WDC, 4A
+12vDc, 6A
12VJ.X, .5A
3.25 To reduce the effects of AC voltage surges and
spikes that may cause system malfunctions, false logic,
and/or damage to the electronic components, a surge/
spike protector is provided. (Refer to REPLACEMENT
PARTS for the part number.) Its specifications are:
-48VDC, 5A
E
R
SLAM
+3ovDc, 8A
NOTE: For easier power supply module removal, each
version C power supply chassis is shipped with an extractor tool attached to the inside, front cover. The extractor tool may be used with version B and C modules
only.
+3ovDc, 8A
NOR MODULE
0 Clamp voltage transients at 300VDC within 5 nanoseconds when exposed to waveforms as described in
the ANSI/IEEE Standard C62.41-1980 (IEEE 587).
l
90VAC 0,2OW
Ring Frequency, mI-k
Reduces RFI/EMI noise by at least 20dB at frequencies between &I-Ix and 3OMHz.
Battery Back-Up
3.24 Except for the Quad Module (SA fuse, +WDC
output of 23A, and +12VDC output of 4A), version B
and C power supply modules have the same fuses and
maximum power outputs. Also, there is only one version
C 3OV Module, which can be used as either a master or a
slave.
3.26 To provide back-up power in the event of a power
failure or brownout condition, the power supply can
have optional battery back-up using a customer-provided uninterruptable power supply (UPS) unit or a
standby power supply (SPS) unit. Refer to page 2-32 for
more information.
Page 2-9
INTER-TELPRACTICES
SPECIJ?ICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
E. CIRCUITCARDS
Reset switch is used to manually reset the system
during troubleshooting. This is a software reset (minor reset), not a hardware reset (major reset). Pushing this switch does the following:
- Preserves the battery-backed database iuformation, non-conference calls in progress, outside
calls being dialed from keyset stations, inter-station messages, calls on individual hold, do-notdisturb messages, and reminder messages. A call
on system hold is changed to individual hold at
the station that placed it on hold.
- Restores MMF decoders, modem access, and
speech channels, and resets the station clocks to
match the system clock. Updates trunk key, DSS/
BLF key, speeddial key, and feature key lamp
SMUS.
- Interrupts system operation, which disconnects
pages in progress, calls ringing in, calls using the
conference resources (as described on the next
page), and calls using DTMF decoders. Campedon calls are disconnected and queue requests are
canceled.
- Terminates system and user programming.
3.27 In addition to the power supply, the equipment
cabinet houses the Telecom Motherboard and the circuit
cards that control and coordinate the functions of the
system. Up to 17 cards may be connected to the Telecom
Motherboard, including:
m
1
l-16,
1-W
1-W
1-W
l-15’
l-15
l-4
l
ROM centralpromsing unit (RCPU) card - rquircd
KcysctCard(DKSC,KSC,orKSGD)-atlcastoneis
=w=l
siiglc!-Line card (SLq
Inward Dialing Card @DC)
LoopF3round
Start Card (LGC)
Ltwpslartcard(Lsc)
=Q=d(EMc)
T l Card VlC)
Refer to page Z-21 for station capacities.
328 Descriptions of the cards are given in the following paragraphs. Drawings of the cards are located in the
INSTALIA-ION section.
ROM Central Processing Unit (RCPU) Card
3.29 The RCPU Card contains the main controlling
IIlicroprocesso r and associated control logic and
memory circuits. It is under the control of a program,
stored in the ROM, which is activated when the system
is powered up. ROMs containing the system software
are installed on the RCPU Card before it is installed in
the equipment cabinet.
i
Database back-up battery (3.6V, HAA lithium
battery) that can support the database for at least two
months of accumulated system down time.
Battery voltage test points and check button for
checking the database back-up battery charge. If the
battery voltage is not greater than 2.!WDC, replace
the battery.
330 The RCPU Card contains the following system
resources:
Ratteryback-up jumper strap for activating the
lb0 RS-232-C (DB9) connectors (g-pin subminia-
database back-up battery. The jumper strap should
be placed in the ON position (over the top two pins)
before the RCPU Card is installed. When the card is
taken out of service for repair or storage, the jumper
strap should be placed in the OFF position (lower
two pins) to preserve the battery charge.
NOTE: Placing the BmRY jumper strap in the
OFF position erases the database.
ture “D” male connectors) for connecting SMDR/
SMDA output devices and/or a personal computer
for programming the system database (see page
2-31 for requirements).
Voltage test points for checking the system +WDC,
-5vDc, +12vDC, -12vDC, +3ovDC, -4WDC,
and AC ring voltage levels. To measure system voltage levels, voltmeter probes are iuserted into the
ground test point and the desired voltage test point.
Refer to INSTXLATION, page 3-45, for details.
“:,
0
LED indicators show main processor operation
(CPU ACTIVE), major system alarms (MAJOR
ALARM), minor system alarms (h4lNOR
ALARM), database error occurrences (DAlXBASE
ERROR), database back-up battery connection
(BAZTERY OFF), high power supply temperature
(POWER ALARM), and external clock activity
(EXTERNAL CLOCK ACTIVE). Refer to TROUBLESHOOTING for detailed LED information.
Page 2-10
Male 50-pin amphenol-typeconnector for connecting up to two music sources, a power failure
transfer relay, and a general purpose relay:
- Up to two external music sources (such as radios,
tape players, etc.) may be connected to the
RCPU Card. AGC circuits on the RCPU Card automatically hold the volume of each music
source to a predetermined level that is slightly
lower than the normal voice volume, as required
by FCC regulations. Optimal input level is
0.775VRMS (OdB). For installation instructions,
see page 3-99.
i,
,-J ;:
INTER-TELlPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
- Relay 1, which is the power failure transfer relay
(and cannot be changed),can be used to connect
one or more single-line sets to predetermined CO
trunks in the event of processor card failure or a
power failure. (If ground start trunks are used,
the single-line set must be equipped with a
ground start button.) The output is a normallyopen DPDT relay that is held closed during system operation. Additional equipment needed
includes a customer-provided PFT relay card
and card mounting case. The RCPU Card relay
contact ratings are listed below. (See also page
2-32.)-
REICARD
0.6A at 125VAC
0.6A at 1lOvDC
2.OA at 30VDC
- Relay 2 can be used to activate an external signaling device when a call rings in on assigned
CO trunks. The dry contacts follow the normal
keyset CO ringing cycle (two seconds on/four seconds off). Ring in for the relay can be programmed for day and/or night modes.
Or, relay 2 can be used for night switch to turn on
or off lights, an alarm system, or other devices.
The relay, which is activated when an attendant
in the designated tenant group places the system
iu night mode, causes the swing connection to
move from the “break” to the “make” position.
Or, relay 2 can be used for activating external
paging. The relay, which is activated when the
paging zone to which it is assigned is accessed by
a station user, causes the swing connection to
move from the “break” to the “make” position.
This contact can be used to activate the microphone input of an externally-mounted paging
amplifier.
0 Music-on-hold (MOJX) jumper straps for enabling
one or both of the external music sources that are
heard by callers when they are placed on hold or
camped on. If connecting an external music source,
place the associated jumper strap in the ON position
(over the top two pins). Then, in the database, each
trunk group can be assigned music port 1, music port
2, silence, or tick-tones. Refer to PROGRAMMING, page 5-103.
0 300~baud and 1200~baud modem interface for re-
mote progr amming. When the system is in the de-
Page 2-11
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
fault contiguration, the 300-baud Bell modem is
assigned extension number 270, the 12OO-baud Bell
modem is 271, the 300-baud CCITT modem is 272,
and the 1200-lbaud CCI’IT modem is 273. Any attendant can transfer a call to the modem, or it can be
accessed directly using DISA.
Conferencing resources for connecting up to 32
parties in multiple conferences. There can be up to
10 simultaneous three-way conferences or four simultaneous eight-party conferences. Except for the
fact that there can be only eight parties involved in a
single conference, any combination using the 32
dedicated conference circuits is possible. The conferencing resources also support the Call Forward,
Call Transfer, Station Call Monitoring, and DISA
features when two trunks are connected. Conferencing utilizes a zero dB loss function so that there is no
substantial loss in voice volume no matter howmany
people are in the conference.
DTMF decoding circuits (four) are used when sing-
le-line sets are dialing and when features such as
DISA and Automated Attendant are used. They are
also used for the Unsupervised CO Call Continuation feature (as described in paragraph 4.88 on page
4-37). These four decoders convert DTMF signals
to the digital codes used by the system. They are in
use only while the dialed number is beii processed,
not for the duration of the call. If all four DTMF decoders are busy, the user may camp on.
NOTE: If necessary, up to four additional DTMF
decoding circuits can be added to the RCPU Card by
installing lYIMF Expansion Chips (two chips per
circuit; four chips per kit). Refer REPLACEMENT
PARIS for the part number.
Tone generating circuit generates DTMF tones
whenever needed by the system (for example, when
a station user uses one of the system auto-dial features, such as LCR, Call Forward To The public Network, Station or System Speed Dialing, etc.). The
circuit is also used to produce all of the system tones
(busy, reorder, do-not-disturb, etc.) heard by digital
keyset, single-line set, DISA, and automated atten- I
dant users. (Analog keysets generate their own systern tones.)
A-law/mu-law jumper strap for choosing the
method of encoding sampled audio waveforms used
in pulse code modulation systems. Domestic telephone companies use the mu-law method. The a-law
method is widely used outside of North America.
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
lNTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATON & MAINTENANCE
4 Keyset Cards (DKSCs, KSCs, or KSC-Ds) and
Single-Line Cards (SLCs)
circuit causes a thermistor to open, it will automatically
close when the short is removed.
331
Station instrnments are connected to the station
cards in the equipment cabinet. Digital keysets are conI nected to Digital Keyset Cards. Analog keysets, analog
DSS/BLF Units, and Attendant Computer Consoles are
connected to Keyset Cards. Enhanced Single-Line Sets
(ESLSs), Single-Line Instruments (SLIs), industrystandard single-line DTMF sets, and playback devices
are uxmected to either Single-Line Cards (AC-ringing
instruments only) or Inward Dialing Cards (AC or DC).
For more infoimation on Inward Dialing Cards, refer to
page 2-15.
332
Digital Keyset Card (DKSC): Each DKSC pro-
vides up to 16 circuits for connecting digital keysets.
Each circuit has a self-correcting thermistor to protect
the system from damage due to a short circuit in the station cabling. If a short circuit causes a thermistor to
open, it will automatically close when the short is removed.
3.33 Up to 50 digital keysets may be equipped with up
to four digital DSS/BLF Units each. The units are connected in series to the PC Data Port Module (PCDPM)
on the back of the corresponding keyset. Unlike analog
units, digital DSWBLF Units do nor require station cabling separate from the keyset’s cabling; instead, they are
powered by their own AC transformer.
334 Each DKSC has a green LED (CARD ON-LINE)
to indicate the card’s functional readiness and 16 green
LEDs (CIRCUlT BUSY) to indicate whether any circuit
on the card is busy (see Figure 3-30 on page 3-48).
3.35 Each DKSC comes equipped with one Digital
Signal Processor (DSP) that provides resources for up to
12 shared speakerphones. If desired, a second DSP can
he installed to provide an additional 12 shared speakerphone resources.
NOTE: For information on using shared speakerphones
for digital keysets, see page 4-40 in FEAWRES.
3.36
Keyset Card (KSC or KSC-D): Each KSC (or
KSC-D, see the following note) provides up to eight circuits for connecting analog keysets, analog DSS/BLF
Units, and Attendant Computer Consoles to the system.
fl Up to 50 KSC circuits can be used for installing analog
DSS/BLF Units. As many as four analog units can be
connected to a single card. Some KSCs have a 2A,
25OVAC, AGC 2 (fast-acting) fuse to protect the system
from damage due to a short circuit in the station cabling.
Newer version KSCs have eight self-correcting thermistors (one for each circuit) instead of the fuse. If a short
NOTE: To install any &line IMX AIM keyseta nuo to II
circuit, the new “dual-circuit” version Keyset Card
(KSC-D) must be used (see REPLACEMENT PARTS
for the part number). To install 8-line AIM keysets one
to a cinxir, either the KSC or the KSC-D can be used.
337 Each KSC has an LED (CARD ACTIVE) to indicate the card’s functional readiness. In addition, eachindividual circuit on each card has an LED to indicate the
circuit’s activity (lit green) or failure (lit red).
3.38 Single-Line Card (SLC): SLCs are used for
connecting AC-ringing ESLSs, SLIs, single-line DTMF
sets, and playback devices. They can also be used for
connecting external paging equipment. Off-premises
stations cannot be legally connected to SLCs; instead,
Inward Dialing Cards (IDCa) must be used (see page
2-15). Some SLCa have a fuse to protect the -48V output. Thisfuse cannot be qdacedin thefield If the fuse
is defective, the entire card must be sent in for repair.
Newer version SLCs have a self-correcting thermistor
instead of the fuse. If a short circuit causea a thermistor
to open, it will automatically close when the short is removed.
NOTE: For optimal performance, it is recommended
that voice mail units and automated attendant playback
devices be installed on IDC circuits rather than SLC circuits. Doing this mutes any DTMF digits automatically
dialed by the system (e.g., those generated when transferriug or forwarding an outside caller to voice mail).
339 Each SLC has an LED (CARD ACTIVE) to indicate the card’s functional readiness. In addition, each individual circuit on each card has an LED to indicate the
circuit’s activity (lit green) or failure (lit red).
3.40
Station configuration: Station instrument configuration depends on the number and type of station
cards installed in the equipment cabinet. There can be
any combination of station cards allowing combinations
of keysets in eight-station increments (or 16-station increments if using digital keysets or &line dual-circuit 1
IMX AIM keysets) and single-line sets or playback
devices in increments of 16 (using SLCs) or in increments of eight (using IDCs).
NOTE: At least one Keyset Card (DK!X, KSC, or 1
KSC-D) ~ULR be installed to provide an attendant
(equipped with a display keyset or an Attendant Computer Console) that can receive system alarm messages,
program system data, act as the attendant for unsupervised CO recalls, etc.
3.41 Each station card circuit is assigned a hardware
address number according to the card’s slot in the equip
Page 2-12
-\.
/
INTER-TELPlGKTICES
IMX/GMX 256 IN-TION & MAINTENANCE
SPECIF’ICA~ONS
Issue 1. November 1994
ment cabinet and the location of the circuit on the card.
For example, circuit 1.2 is the second circuit on the first
card installed in the equipment cabinet.
Refer to PRGGRAMMIN G, page 5-170, for more information.
NOTE: In the default database configuration, there are
no keyset circuits assigned for 8-line dual-circuit JMX
AIM keysets installed two to a circuit (e.g., 1.2A and
1.2B).
3.43 The system assigns extension number 100 to station circuit 1.1, extension number 101 to station circuit
1.2, and so on to match the initial configuration. Circuit
1.1 is equipped as the primary attendant’s keyset when
the system is in the default configuration. If desired, the
circuits can be assigned different extension numbers
and/or four-digit extension numbers through database
programming. Refer to PRGGWWMJNG, page 5-58,
for more information.
3.42 When the system is first powered up, the default
configuration is used to assign extension numbers to the
station circuits. On IMX 256 Systems, card slots l-4 are
considered KSCs or KSC-Ds, slots 5-6 are DKSC!s, slots
I 7-g are unassigned, slots 9-12 are SLCs, and slots
13-16 are LGCs. On GMX-256 Systems, card slots l-8
are considered KSCs or KSC-Ds, slots 9-12 are SLCs,
and slots 13-16 are LGCs. Changes to the default configuration can be made through database programming.
NOTE: When 8-line IMX AIM keysets are assigned to
dual circuits, the “B” circuits do not have extension
numbers until they are assigned in database programming-
Page 2-13
INTER-TELPRACTICB
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
Loop/Ground Start Cards (LGCs) and Loop Start
~~a.=3
cated and may provide better performance in certainsituations.
3.44 Each LGC and LSC has circuitry for up to eight
trunks. LGC and LSC circuits may also be used for installing external paging equipment. LSCs can only have
loop start trunks connected to them. LGCs can have either loop start or ground start trunks. Each individual
circuit on the LGC has two jumper straps for designating
whether the circuit is loop start or ground start. Individual trunks may be designated as either loop start or
ground start in database programming.
NOTE: Single-line sets generate their own MMF tones
when dialing. If used on dial-pulse trunks, both the
DTMP tones generated by the phone and the dial-pulse
signals generated by the system are sent to the central
office, which may be a problem if the central office recognixes both. To avoid this problem, single-line sets
should be restricted to LCR only when using dial-pulse
trunks. Then, only the LCR-generated dial-pulse signals
will be sent to the central office.
NOTE: For each LGC circuit, both jumper straps must
be in the proper (LS or GS) position. If the strap settings
are mixed, or if one or both of the straps is missing, the
circuit will not function properly. Also, when setting the
straps, note the unique ordering of the LGC circuits as
shown in Figure 3-34 on page 3-55.
3.49 With loop start trunks, it is sometimes possible
for the user to attempt to place an outgoing call and
instead be connected to an incoming call on the same
trunk. This unintended connection, called glare, is due
to the natural switching delay characteristics of the telco
equipment and the system. Previously, if the user did not
dial a valid outside number, the glare connection was
dropped. The software now allows the incoming call to
remain connected, while still protecting against possible toll fraud. A new system-wide programmable op
tion, called Drop Incomplete Outgoing Calls, has been
added to the Miscellaneous System-Wide information
screen, as shown on page 5-67 in PROGlWMMING.
3.45 For optimal CO trunk transmission performance,
each LGC and LSC circuit should be “hybrid balanced”
in database programming. Hybrid balancing refers to
selecting the balance network - ideal, loaded, or unloaded -that best matches the trunk’s impedance. Refer to PROGRAh4MlN G, page 5-147, for details.
3.46 Should voice transmit or voice receive volume
problems occur, the receive gain and/or the transmit
gain for individual trunks can be adjusted in database
programming. Refer to PROGRAMMIN G, page 5-103,
for additional information.
3.47 Each LGC and LSC has 16 speciallydesigned
fuses soldered to the card to protect it from large voltage
surges due to lightning. If a fuse is open (blown), it may
mean that other parts of the card have also been damaged. For this reason, open fuses must not be replaced in
the field. Instead, the entire card must be returned for
testing and possible repair. Failure to follow this policy
will void the warranty on the card.
3.48 When the system is in the default configuration,
all trunks are configured for M’MF signaling. If necessary, some or all of the trunks can be reprogrammed for
dial-pulse signaling through database programming.
Although both the LGC and the LSC can use dial-pulse
trunks, the pulse circuitry on the LGC is more sophisti-
3.50 The CO circuits are assigned hardware address
numbers according to the card’s slot in the equipment
cabinet and the location of the circuit on the card. For
example, when using the initial configuration (see paragraph 3.42), CO circuit 13.4 is the fourth circuit on the
13th card (an LGC) installed.
351 When the system is in the default confi~ation,
the first four trunk keys on each keyset are assigned as
call keys for incoming call indication/access. Qhe ANSWER key may also be used to access incoming calls.)
No individual trunk keys or trunk group keys are assigned. Key assignments can be designated in database
programming. Refer to PROG RAMMING, page 5-44,
for more information.
3.52 CO trunk groups may be assigned on a tenant-bytenant basis. Up to 47 CO trunk groups can be distributed among the tenant grouPs. Refer to FEAWRES,
vage 4-15. for more information.
Page 2-14
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INS~TION & MAlNTENANCE
Inward Dialing Cards (IDCs)
353 IDCs are used for connecting direct inward dialing (DID) trunks and off-premises single-line stations.
Like SLCs (described on page 2-12), IDCs may also be
used for connecting on-premises single-line sets and
playback devices. In fact, for optimal performance, it is
recommended that voice mail units and automated attendant playback devices be installed on IDC circuits
rather than SLC circuits. Doing this mutes any DTMF
digits automatically dialed by the system (e.g., those
generated when transferring or forwarding an outside
caller to voice mail).
NOTE: IDCs do not support message waiting applications. If single-line sets with message waiting lamps are
installed on IDCs, the lamps will not function.
3.54 On older-version IDCs, each IDC circuit has a
2-pin AC ENABLE jumper strap that must be removed
when installing a DID trunk or a DC-ringing station.
AC-ringing off-premises stations can be connected directly to IDC circuits provided that both the optional
-48V Module and the optional Ring Generator Module
are installed in the power supply chassis (external
HVRA Units, power supplies, and ring generators are
not needed).
3.55 On newer-version IDCs, each IDC circuit has a
3-pin RING SELECT jumper strap that must be set in
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
either the AC/OPX position (over the bottom two pins)
or the DC/DID position (over the top two pins).
I
NOTE: When setting the jumper straps on either version card, note the unique ordering of the IDC circuits as
shown in Figure 3-33 on page 3-53.
3.56 Each IDC can have up to eight DID trunks or up
to eight single-line sets, or any combination of the two.
357
DID trunks may be programmed to ring in to individual stations, multiple stations, or hunt groups. Or,
they may be programmed to ring in as DISAcalls. Ifprogrammed to ring in at a single station, the DID call will
follow any programmed forward.
3.58 DID trunk groups may be assigned on a tenantby-tenant basis. Up to 11 DID trunk groups can be distributed among the tenant groups. Refer to FEAWREB,
page 4-15, for more information. Also, DID trunk
groups maybe designated as immediate start, wink start,
or delay start in database programming.
3.59 Each IDC has 16 specially-designed fuses soldered to the card to protect it from large voltage surges
due to lightning. If a fuse is open (blown), it may mean
that other parts of the card have also been damaged. For
this reason, open fuses must not be replaced in the field.
Instead, the entire card must be returned for testing and
possible repair. Failure to follow this policy will void the
warranty on the card.
Page 2-15
SPECIFICA~ONS
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TEL+PRAcTKEs
IMXfGMX256 INSTAT.,LATION & MAINTENANCE
E&M Cards (EMCs)
3.60
E&M trunks, also called “tie” lines, are special
trunks that tie individual telephone systems together.
They allow the users of either telephone system transparent access to the users and resources of the other telephone system, often for less than what it would cost to
use normal long distance service.
3.61 E&M (literally “ear” and “mouth”) refers to the
pair of wires that carry the signals between the trunk
equipment and a separate signaling unit. The M lead
transmits a ground or battery condition to the signaling
equipment, while the E lead receives open or ground signals from the signaling equipment.
3.62 If designated for “auto ring-in,” E&M trunks
may be programmed to ring in to individual stations,
multiple stations, or hunt groups on the other telephone
system. (If programmed to ring in at a single station, the
E&M call will follow any programmed forward.)
3.63 If designated for “dial repeating,” E&M trunks
may be programmed to ring in as DISA calls.
3.64 Additionally, LCR may be used to turn what
would normally be a long distance call into a local call.
For example, when a call is made from one telephone
system to a long distance number that is local to the other telephone system, LCR could be programmed to
route the call through the E&M network to make a local
call from the other telephone system.
3.65
Each EMC has circuitry for up to four E&M
trunks. Each individual circuit on the EMC has two
jumper straps, one for selecting the signaling type (1,2
4, or 5) and one for selecting the audio type (2-wire or
4-wire). The signaling and audio type for each circuit
must also be programmed in the database.
3.66 Although not currently operational, the EMC is
equipped with a “make-busy” switch for removing all
circuits on the card from service and placing them back
in again, The switch is reserved for possible future use.
3.67 For optimal E&M trunk transmission performance, each 2-wire EMC circuit should be “hybrid balanced” in database programming (4-wire circuits
cannot be hybrid balanced). Hybrid balancing refers to
selecting the balance network - ideal, loaded, or unloaded -that best matches the trunk’s impedance. Refer to PRGGRAh4MlN G, page 5-147, for details.
3.68 Should voice transmit or voice receive volume
problems occur, the receive gain and/or the transmit
gain for individual E&M trunks can be adjusted in database programming. Refer to PROGRAMMING, page
S-103, for additional information.
3.69 Each EMC has 24 speciallydesigned fuses soldered to the card to protect it from large voltage surges
due to lightning. If a fuse is open (blown), it may mean
that other parts of the card have also been damaged. For
this reason, open fuses must not be replaced in the field.
Instead, the entire card must be returned for testing and
possible repair. Failure to follow this policy will void the
warranty on the card.
3.70 When the system is in the default configuration,
all E&M trunks are configured for IYI’MF signaling and
dial repeating. If necessary, some or all of the trunks can
be reprogrammed for dial-pulse signaling and/or auto
ring-in through database programming.
3.71 The E&M circuits are assigned hardware address
numbers according to the card’s slot in the equipment
cabinet and the location of the circuit on the card. For
example, E&M circuit 13.4 refers to the fourth circuit on
the 13th card (an EMC) installed in the equipment cabinet.
3.72 When the system is in the default con.&uration,
the lirst four trunk keys on each keyset are assigned as
call keys for incoming call indication/access. (The ANSWER key may also be used to access incoming calls.)
No individual E&M trunk keys or trunk group keys are
assigned. Key assignments can be designated in database programming. Refer to PROGRAMMING, page
5-44, for more information.
3.73 E&M trunk groups may be assigned on a tenantby-tenant basis. Up to 47 E&M trunk groups can be distributed among the tenant groups. Refer to FEAWRES,
page 4-15, for more information. Also, E&M trunk
groups may be designated as immediate start, wink start,
or delay start in database programming.
,’ i
Page 2-16
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1. November 1994
NOTE: The acronym for the Tl Card -TlC -should
not be confused with the special TIC digital carrier system (which operates at twice the data rate of the standard
Tl carrier system). The 256 Tl Card does not support
TlC.
3.74 The term “Tl” refers to a specific digital method
of transmitting voice and data; it is the basic 24-chamtel
time-division multiplex (TDM), 1.544 Mb/s pulse code
modulation (PCM) system as used in the United States.
3.75 The Ti standard, which was developed as a
method of reducing cabling and increasing transmission
quality between distant central offices, is actually a subset of a multi-level Digital Signal (DS) scheme. Inpopular usage, Tl refers to the DSl rate as transmitted via any
type of media (e.g., copper wire, fiber optics, or microwave).
3.76 Since each Tl span actually consists of 24 individual circuits (or channels) multiplexed together, it is
often less expensive to purchase a single Tl span than it
is to purchase multiple individual trunks. Each of the 24
Tl circuits can be programmed as a loop start, ground
start, DID, E&M, or OPXtrunk (or as unequipped). Any
combination is possible.
3.77 “Fractional” Tl, often called Ffl, is a special Tl
service where only a portion of the 24 channels are used
and paid for. To implement fractional Tl (if available),
equip only those circuits that are provided.
NOTE: Currently, the Tl Card is used to transmit voice
signals only, not data. In the future, data transmissions
over Tl circuits may also be supported.
3.78 To interface with the public network, each Tl
Card must be equipped with a customer-provided, onboard Channel Service Unit (CSU) or a customer-provided, external CSU. If the optional on-board CSU is
installed, the programmer must select the line build-out
(LBO) attenuation, which is determined by the distance
to the nearest public network Tl repeater. (This information is available from the Tl provider.) If an external
CSU is installed instead, the programmer must select
the DSX-1 line length, which is determined by the distance from the Tl Card to the external CSU. (The card
and the external CSU must be located in the same building, and the cabling between them must be less than 655
feet.)
I
NOTIG The on-board CSU can now be purchased
directly from Inter-Tel using part number 440.3004.
3.79 Although most Tl interfaces will be with the
public network, it is possible to use Tl Cards to connect
two telephone systems together (e.g., two 256 Systems).
To do this without CSUs, the two systems must be located in the same building and the cabling between them
must be less than 655 feet. If each system is equipped
with a CSU, they may be located in separate buildings
and the cabling between them may be as long as 6000
feet. (See page 3-34 for more information on connecting two 256 Tl Cards together.)
NOTE: For information on programming various types
of Tl installations, refer to pages 5-122 to 5-129.
3.gO In the future, a Tl span could possibly be used to
connect the 256 System to a host computer via a digital
multiplexed interface @MI). Also, the Tl Card has
been designed to interface with the coming Integrated
Services Digital Network (ISDN) features, when available.
3.81 When a Tl span is used to connect a 256 System
to the public network or to another telephone system, it
is important that the two endpoints communicate at the
same frequency. Since it is practically impossible for
both endpoints to have clocks running at identical fiequencies, one endpoint is given “master” clock status
and the other endpoint is given “slave” clock status. The
slave clock can then extract and lock onto the master
clock frequency from the incoming Tl information.
This master/slave synchronixation is programmed in the
.database. When connected to the public network, the
256 System is automatically designated as the slave
clock.
3.82 When information (currently, voice only) is
transmitted over a Tl span, a “framing” bit is added so
that the receiving end can recognize where the information begins and ends (as long as the clock circuitry of the
two endpoints is synchronized). Currently, the 256 System supports the two major types of framing schemes in
use today: D4 Super&me, which is the most common,
and Extended Superframe @SF), which is required to
support future ISDN and DMI features. For voice transmissions, D4 Superframe is quite adequate. However,
for data transmissions (not currently supported), ESF is
much more reliable and efficient.
383 Digital information is transmitted over the Tl
span as a series of 1s and 0s (e.g., . ..lOOO 000 0000
OOOL..). If there are too many consecutive zeroes, the
Tl clock extraction circuitry will not operate correctly.
To prevent this, Tl carrier equipment limits the number
of consecutive zeroes. The 256 System supports the two
major types of xero code suppression schemes in use
today: Alternate Mark Inversion (AMI), also called
bit-7 stuffing, and Bipolar Eight Zero Substitution
@QS). Again, for voice transmissions, AMI is quite
adequate. However, for 64 kb/s clear channel data transmissions (not currently supported), BSES is required.
Page 2-17
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPBACTICES
IMX/GMX 256lNSTALLATlON & MAlNTENANCE
3.84 Like the Tl repeater distance, the framing
Card and monitoring the transmit and receive signals.
scheme type and xero code suppression scheme type are
also available from the Tl provider. In fact, when ordering a Tl span, always request the following information
from the Tl provider:
CAUTION
When a live Tl span is installed on the Tl Card, test
equipment should be used for monitoring purposes
only. Do not attempt to send signals over either the
transmit or receive audio ports on the Tl Card if a Tl
span is installed. Also, be sure the test equipment is
set in the “bridge” mode.
- Framing scheme: D4 Superframe or ESF
- Zero code suppression scheme: AMI or B8ZS
- If the optional on-board CSU is to beinshlle~ distancefrom the MDF to neBrpsf public networkTl
repeater (for determining the line build-out
attenuation): O-1599 feet (15dB), 1600-2999 feet
(7.5dB), or 3OO&6000 feet (OdB)
0 Optional Tl span DB15 connector (15-pin sub
3.85
miniature “D” female connector) for connecting a
single, 24-channel Tl span to the Tl Card.
3.86 The Tl Card itself is equipped with the following
resources:
NOTE: In certain situations (e.g., when using an external CSU equipped with a DB15 connector), it
may be more convenient to use the optional DB15
connector instead of the standard RJ48C jack also
provided on the card.
LED indicators are provided to show the status of
0 Make-busy switch with LED for removing all cir-
Each TlC has circuitry for up to 24 trunk channels. The 24 channels (or circuits) can be any combinationofloopstarttru&,groundstarttnmks,DIDtrunks,
E&M trunks, or OPX trunks.
l
cuits on the card from service and placing them back
in again. Pressing the switch will light the LED and
begin the process of “busying out” each circuit not in
use. The circuits that are in use are then busied out as
soon as the users hang up. When all circuits are
busied out, the make-busy LED and all 24 circuit
LBDs flash slowly, and the card can be removed
from its slot in the cabinet. Ifthe card is not removed
within a certain amount of time, a programmable
timer expires and the card returns to normal operation; however, the make-busy LED will then flash
rapidly until the make-busy switch is released.
each circuit and to show Tl trunk alarms and boardlevel error occurrences. Refer to the TROUBLE!SHOOTING section of this manual for additional
LED information.
0 Audio jack (8-pin, a-conductor modular jack) for
possible future use.
NOTE: The audio jack is currently used for engineering diagnostic purposes only.
0 Alarm relay jack @-pin, 8-conductor
modular
jack) for connecting optional Tl alarm signaling devices. The Tl Card relay contact ratings are:
0 Channel Service Unit (CSU) connector for install-
ing the optional on-board CSU Module. If the Tl
Card interfaces with the public network, either the
on-board CSU Module or an external CSU must be
connected to the card.
I= RF’ PY CONTA~ RATINGS
0.6A at 125VAC
0.6A at 1lOVDC
2.OA at 30VDC
l
Serial port jack @S-232-C, g-pin, &conductor
0 DSXKSU j&per plug for indicating whether the
on-board CSU is installed. If the on-board CSU is installed, place the jumper plug in the CSU position. If
there is no on-board CSU, place the jumper plug in
the DSX position. This information must also be
programmed in the database.
modular jack) for possible future use.
NOTE: The serial port jack is currently used for engineering diagnostic purposes only.
l
Tl span jack (RJ4SC, g-pin, 8-conductor modular
jack) for connecting a single, 24-channel Tl span to
l
the Tl Card. (If this jack is used, do not use the optional DB15 connector also provided on the card.)
NOTE: All Tl spans should be disconnected from
their cards before turning the system power on or off.
l
Dual bantam jack(with transmit and receive audio
ports) for connecting Tl test equipment to the Tl
Page 2-18
Line build-out jumper plug for selecting the proper
line build-out (LBO) attenuation of the Tl span connected to the card. This selection is necessary only if
the optional on-board CSU is installed. If the distance between the equipment cabinet and the closet
public network Tl repeater is less than 1600 feet,
place the jumper plug in the 15dB position. If the distance is between 1600 and 2999 feet, place the jump
er plug in the 7.5dB position. And, if the distance is
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTIcEs
l.MX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
between 3ooO and 6000 feet, place the jumper plug
in the OdB position. This information, which can be
obtained from the Tl provider, must also be programmed in the database.
387 Compared to the other trunk cards in the system,
the Tl Card is very sophisticated and offers some unique
programming options. The information that is programmed comnwn to all Tl Cads installed in the system includes:
- Dialingfeedbackconfiguration: When a number is
dialed over a Tl circuit, the user hears the feedback
from the signals (either M’MF or dial-pulse, depending on how the circuit is designated). By adjusting the M’MF gain control or the dial-pulse gain
control (from -15dB to 15dB), the programmer can
determine how loud the signals appear to the user. If
the circuit is designated for dial-pulse signaling, the
programmer can also select the type of dial-pulse
tone the user hears (23 different tones are available).
- Error thresholds: The programmer can set muneri-
cal thresholds (number per hour and number per
day) for certain Tl Card errors. If a threshold is exceeded, an error is printed on the SMDR report.
Card. In the UnitedStates, this will almost always be
mu-law to mu-law.
- Relay activation: If desired, the programmer may
enable the two relays, Tl line error and Tl line OK,
on the Tl Card.
- Channel service unit (CSU): The programmer
must designate whether the optional on-board CSU
is installed on the Tl Card. (‘The database selection
must match the jumper selection on the card.)
- Line build-out (LBO): If the optional on-board
CSU is installed, the programmer must designate the
LB0attenuation of the Tl span connected to the
card. This value is determined by the distance to the
nearest public network Tl repeater. (The database
selection must match the jumper selection on the
card.)
- DSX-1 line length: If the optional on-board CSU is
not installed, the programmer must designate the
length of the cabling between the Tl Card and the
external CSU, or between the Tl Card and the other
telephone system to which it is connected.
- Reference clock programming: The programmer
must first designate whether the Tl Card is connected to the public network. If it is, the card is automatically designated as a slave clock (the public
network always acts as the master clock). If the card
is not connected to the public network, but is instead
connected to another Tl Card or a card in another
telephone system, the programmer must designate
whether the card is a master clock or a slave clock (in
relation to the card on the other end).
- Reference clock back-up priorities: One of the Tl
Cards installed in the system must be programmed
as the system reference clock (see “reference clock
programming” following paragraph 3.88). If more
than one Tl Card is installed in the system, the programmer may designate one or more of the cards as a
“backup” to the system reference clock. Then, if the
Tl Card acting as the system reference clock fails or
is taken out of service, the next Tl Card on the backup priority list takes over.
In addition, one of the Tl Cards installed in the system must be programmed as the system reference
clock. The reference clock then becomes the clock
for all the other cards in the system. If there is no Tl
Card acting as the reference clock, the Matrix Card
becomes the system reference clock.
3.88 The information that is programmed specijic to
each Tl Cad installed in the system includes:
- Card type: The programmer must select the type of
framing scheme, D4 Superframe or Extended Superframe (ESF), used by the Tl span connected to each
card.
If a Tl Card is designated as both a master clock and
the system reference clock, the programmer must
then designate whether the card’s on-board oscillator is the source of the clock or whether there is an
external clock.
- Zero code suppression scheme: The programmer
must select the type zero suppression scheme, AMI
(bit-7 stufling) or Bipolar Eight Zero Substitution
(BSZS), used by the Tl span comected to each card.
- PCM encoding law: In pulse code modulation
(PCM) systems, there are two primary methods of
encoding analog signals (sampled audio waveforms) into digital signals. In North America and Japan, the “mu-law” method is normally used. In other
places, like Europe, the “a-law” method is widely
used. The programmer must select both the transmit
and receive method of encoding used by the Tl
NOTE: The external clock option is provided for
possible future use only. For now, always designate
the card’s on-board oscillator as the source of the
clock.
- Test tone: If desired, the programmer can transmit a
Page 2-19
digital test tone (1007Ex, OdBM, sine wave) over the
selected Tl circuit. The tone can be verified by monitoring the transmit audio port on the card’s dual bantam jack.
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION 4% MAINTENANCE
- Error diagnostics: If desired; the programmer can
22 AWG
generate the current Tl error counts (by hour and by
day) for the selected card. The error counts can be
displayed in a graphical or tabular format, printed
(stand-alone/remote only), or saved in a file for future reference.
Individually shielded two-pair (or with the transmit
and receive pairs run in separate cables or binder
&TOT4
ABAM or PIC (a level-3 cable designed specifically
for the T-carrier transmission rate)
3.89 The information that is programmed specifzc to
each circuir (i.e., each of the 24 channels) on the Tl
Card includes:
Maximum capacitance of lSpF/ft.
- Circuit type: Each individual circuit can be programmed 3s a loop start, ground start, DID, E&M, or
OPX trunk.
Maximum attenuation of 5dB/lOOO ft. at 772kHx
and 70“ F
- Diital gain control:As with the other trunk cards,
NOTE: The programming prompts for LB0 attenuation and DSX-1 line length assume that proper Tl cable
(with the above characteristics) is being used. When
transmitting over shorter distances (e.g., when the nearest public network Tl repeater is less than 2000 feet
from the MDF), it may be possible to use standard twopair voice frequency cable instead; however, the programmer may have to compensate by selecting longer
LB0 distances or DSX-1 line lengths. Also, no matter
which type of cable is used, the transmit and receive
pairs must be shielded from each other (or nm in separate cables or binder groups).
should voice transmit or voice receive volume prob
lems occur, the programmer can adjust the receive
gain and/or the transmit gain (-15dB to 15dB) for individual Tl circuits.
- DTMF’ or dial-pulse signaliug: When the system is
in the default configuration, all trunk circuits are
configured for DTMP signaling. If necessary, some
or all of the circuits can be reprogrammed for dialpulse signaling.
3.90 The Tl circuits are assigned hardware address
numbers according to the card’s slot in the equipment
cabinet and the location of the circuit on the card. For
example, Tl circuit 6.21 is the 21st circuit on the 6th
card, a TlC, installed in the equipment cabinet.
3.91
Special Tl cablingrequirements: It is recommended that special high-speed data cable with the following characteristics be used for all Tl installations:
3.92 If the optional DB15 corrector on the Tl Card is
used in place of the standard RJ48C jack, a flat, 2SAWG,
twisted-pair ribbon cable with a maximum capacitance
of 16pF/ft. may be used for distances of up to 50 feet (see
page 3-20 for more information). For distances longer
than 50 feet, use the special high-speed data cable
described in paragraph 3.91.
Page 2-20
E!E=2imcw
STALLATION
&
4. STATION INSTRUMENTS
4.1 A wide variety of station instruments can be used
on the 256 System. The combination of station instruments depends on the number and type of station cards
installed.
4.2 The system capacity for stations is as follows:
Total Station hstrnments
Key-Using Digital Keysets Only
-Using &Line Dual-M. AIMS
-UsingOther’QpeKeysetsOnly
Attendant calDuter Consoles
Single-Line Se&
Dss/BLFunits
-using Digital units only
-using Analog units only
I
I
I
4.4 For illustrations of the keysets (and other station
instruments), refer to the drawings beginning on page
2-33. The feature keys, speeddial keys, call keys, and
station programmable keys shown in the drawings are as
they appear when the system is in the default cotiguration.
4.5 The approximate dimensions of both the Standard
and Executive Digital Keysets are:
256
Only
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
MAINTENANCE
Height 3.0 in. (7.6 cm.)
Width 7.5 in. (19.1 cm.)
Length 9.0 in. (22.9 cm.)
Weight 2.3 lb. (1.0 kg.)
CL256
O-256
O-128
&128
&240’
4.6
cL200
O-50-
are:
* At least one Kevset Card must be installed to urovide an attendant (equipped kitlt a display keyset
or an Am&ant
Computer
Console) to re4xive system alarm messages,
program system
data,andrecciveamqen&dCOrecaUs.Whenthesystemis
in the default umtiguration, circuit 1.1 is designated as a keyset
and the primaxy attendant.
l *
Analog Keysets, analog DWBIP Units, and Attendant Cornputer Consoles use separate KSC or KSCD citcnits. Therefore,
for each analog DSS/BLF
Unit installed, one less analog key&
or Attendant Computer Console may be installed. (A DWBLF
Unitcannotbepro~edasthe”IT’circaitforan&linedualcircuit JhfX AIh4 keyset.)
NOTE: Since most systems will be installed with a variety of station and trunk cards and a variety of station instruments, the maximum station and trunk capacities
listed in this manual will rarely be reached.
A.
IMX 256 KEYSETS
4.3 Refer to page 3-71 for keyset installation instruc1 tions. The following digital and analog models are
available:
I
l
0
0
0
a
0
0
0
The IMX 12~line and 24-line keyset dimensions
I
Standard Digital Keysets (also referred to as Standard Digital Terminals) - display and non-display
Executive Digital Keysets (also referred to as
Executive Digital Terminals) - display only
24Line AlM Keysets (display only)
12-Line AIM Keysets (display only)
8-Line Dual-Circuit AIM Keysets (display only)
24Line Keysets (standard and display)
12-Line Keysets (standard and display)
8-Line Keysets (non-display only)
NOTE: With the proper software package, the Inter-Tel
GX station instruments can be installed on the system.
Refer to Appendix A in the back of the manual for complete information.
Height 5.5 in. (14.0 cm.)
Width 9.0 in. (22.9 cm.)
Length 9.5 in. (24.1 cm.)
Weight 3.1 lb. (1.4 kg.)
4.7
The lMX 8-line keyset dimensions are:
Height 4.5 in. (11.4 cm.)
Width 6.5 in. (16.5 cm.)
Length 9.5 in. (24.1 cm.)
Weight 2.5 lb. (1.1 kg.)
4.8
All keysets (except as noted) have the following
design features in their default configuration:
0
12-key pushbutton keypad
0
Avariety of feature keys (some of which may be designated as user programmable)
0
IC/CO speed-dial (SD) keys with light-emitting
diode (LED) indicators (S-line keysets do not have
SD keys in the default configuration)
0
Four call keys with LED indicators for incoming call
access and indication
0
Integrated speakerphone (digital keysets have
access to shared speakerphone resources)
0
Ring and voice volume controls (digital and AIM
keysets have UP and DOWN keys for adjusting volume levels)
0
Slide-out directory card
l
Self-test feature (for testing keyset functions)
0
Hearing aid-compatible (HAC) handset
0
Reversible baseplate for wall mounting and reversible cradle hook for holding the handset on wallmounted keysets
Page 2-21
I
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
Integrated
INTEX-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSWTION & MAINTENANCE
Speakerphone
4.9 A built-in, integrated speakerphone is standard in
all IMX analog keysets. All digital keysets have a speaker and a microphone for handsfree intercom reply, but
they do not have a true integrated speakerphone. However, the DSP(s) on the associated DISC can be used to
provide shared integrated speakerphone circuitry. (See
page 4-40 for more information.)
NOTE: If there are no DSP speakerphone resources
available when a digital keyset user attempts to use the
speakerphone, the MUTE key lights and display keysets
show NO SPKR AVAIL COME OFF HOOK The user
can only monitor the call and must lift the handset to
Speak.
4.10 The integrated speakerphone allows users to
place and receive outside calls and intercom calls without lifting the handset. Once a call is connected, the keyset user may speak handsfree over the speakerphone or
lift the handset to speak privately. When using the handset, the user may switch to the speakerphone by pressing
the SPKR key and replacing the handset. If enabled,
pages and/or background music may be broadcast over
the speaker when the phone is not being used.
Liquid Crystal Display (LCD)
1 4.11
All Executive Digital Keysets and all IMX AIM
keysets @I-line, ll-line, and S-line) come equipped
m with LCDs. Standard Digital Keysets and standard Ih$X
24-line and ll-line keysets can be converted to display
sets by installing the appropriate LCD Unit (see REPLACEMENT PARTS for the part number). Non-AM
g-line keysets cannot be equipped with displays.
4.12 Each “display” keyset has a liquid crystal display
(LCD) with two 16character lines. The display helps
the user to process calls more efficiently and professionally. There are display messages for date and time, numbers dialed, call cost data, reminders, do-notdisturb,
forwarding, voice mail processing, incoming calls, station and system status, system alarms, and programming. These displays are indicated throughout the
PEKWRES section of the manual.
4.13 Executive Digital Keysets have four additional
16-character display lines that are associated with the
eight menu selection keys that border them. The menu
I display changes to reflect the functions of the menu
keys. Pressing the key next to the displayed option
selects that option. Refer to page 4-41 in IMMURES
for information about the available menu options.
ElectretCircuitry
4.14 All newer keysets and handsets have been de-
signed using “electret” microphone circuitry, rather
than the “dynamic” microphone circuitry used on many
previous Inter-Tel keyset models. Electret keysets and
handsets are not electrically compatible with dynamic
keysets and handsets.
4.15 If a dynamic handset is attached to an electret
keyset, the handset transmit levels will be noticeably
lower. If an electret handset is attached to a dynamic
keyset, the handset will not transmit. (In both cases, neither the keyset nor the handset will be damaged.)
4.16 Electret keysets can be identified by the manufacturer’s label on the bottom of the keyset. Electret
handsets can be identified by the “El” embossed in the
recess for the wall-mount hook (near the receiver).
Optional Headsets
4.17 A headset may be attached to any keyset by unplugging the handset from the handset jack on the base
of the keyset, plugging the headset into the handset jack,
and entering a feature code to enable the headset. The
SPKR key, which is used to turn the headset on and of&
is lit when placing and receiving calls and unlit when the
headset is not in use. The keysets are compatible with
industry-standard, four-conductor, modular headsets.
The headsets can have electret or dynamic micro- 1
phones, as needed (or carbon-microphone headsets that
are connected to the keyset through an extemally-powered jackset, which makes the headset dynamiccompatible). Refer to page 3-77for installation iustructions.
Optional Handset Amplifiers
4.18 The typical handset amplifier is an external device that plugs into the keyset (where the handset is normally connected); the handset is then plugged into the
amplifier. Receiver voice volume is controlled by tuming a thumbwheel (or similar control) located on the amplifier. Such amplifiers are generally equipped with a
transformer that requires a 1lOVAC outlet. Refer to page
3-77 for installation instructions. AIM keysets do not
require handset amplifiers.
?
.,’
Page 2-22
INTER-TELPRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Optional Personal Computer Data Port Module
(PCDPM) for Diital Keysets
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
4.23
4.19 For off-hook voice announce receive capability,
and to allow an optional digital DWBLFUnit and/or an
optional Modem Data Port Module to be installed, any
digital keyset may be equipped with an optional PC
Data Port Module (part no. 550.3014). See page 3-66
for instructions on installing the PC Data Port Module.
NOTE: PCDPMs require AC transformers when they
are connected to DSS/BLF Units only. PCDPMs do nor
require AC transformers when they are used for offhook voice announce only or have attached MDPMs.
For a diagram of AC transformer requirements, refer to
Figure 2-2 on page 2-24.
Optional Modem Data Port Module (MDPMY) for
Digital Keysets
4.20 Digital keysets equipped with PC Data Port
Modules may also be equipped with optional Modem
Data Port Modules (part no. 550.3015). The MDPM
contains a jack that can be used to connect a data device
(such as a Personal computer equ+d with a modem)
to the keyset. Each MDPM is powered by its own AC
transformer.
NOTE: MDPMs always require their own separate AC
transformers. For a diagram of AC transformer requirements, refer to Figure 2-2 on page 2-24.
4.21 The data device attached to the MDPM must
have a direct-connection modem. The modem must be
external1 y powered (or capable of operating on 20mA of
loop current) and have an RJll CO interface. The data
device can be used by the associated keyset to communicate with remote data equipment over voice channels being used for CO or intercom calls. Refer to pages
3-78 and 4-101 for installation and operation instmctiOllS.
Optional Data Port Module for IMX 12-Lime and
24-Lime Keysets
4.22 All IMX 12-line and 24line keysets may be
equipped with optional Data Port Modules (refer to REPLACHMRNT PARTS for the part number). The module contains a four-conductor, RJll modular jack that
can be used to connect either a data device (such as a
personal computer equ$ped with a modem) or a loud
ringing adapter (LRA) and an external signaling device
(such as a loud bell, horn, flashing light, etc.) to the keyset. The Data Port Module is a source for 20-26mA of
loop current (constant current source). Refer to page
3-78 for instructions on installing the optional Data Port
Module.
Specifications for modem-equipped data de-
vice: The data device must have a direct-connection
modem. The modem must be externally powered (or capable of operating on 20mAof loop current) and have an
RJll CO interface. The data device can be used with the
keyset to communicate with remote data equipment
over voice channels being used for CO or intercom calls.
Refer to pages 3-78 and 4-101 for installation and operation instructions.
4.24 Specifications for loud ringing adapter
(I&A): An external LRAmay be connected to the Data
Port Module to provide a relay for controlling external
signaling devices. The LRA is connected to the Data
Port Module, and the external signaling device is connected to the LRA. Refer to page 3-80 for installation
instructions. Each time the keyset rings, the Data Port
Module provides 20-26mA of loop current to the LRA.
This causes the LRA contacts to close and activates the
signaling device. The LRA is not affected by the ring
tone or the ringer volume of the keyset. The LRA must
be capable of operating on 20mA current (approximately 2OvDc).
S-Line lMX AIM Keysets On Dual Ciiuits
4.25 If desired, new 8-line IMX AIM keys& can be
installed two to a circuit using the new “dual-circuit”
version Keyset Card @SC-D). (To install 8-line AIM
keysets one to a circuit, either the KSC or the KSC-D
can be used.) There are jumper straps on the back of the
8-line AIM keyset to select the baud rate (2400 baud for
two to a circuit; 1200 baud for one to a circuit) and to
select the circuit position (A or B), depending on how
the keyset’s circuit will be designated in database programming.
4.26 Each 8-line AIM keyset is shipped with a standard (six-foot, three-pair) “flat” line cord for connecting
the keyset to its corresponding modular jack assembly.
For most installations, this flat line cord is more than adequate. However, when 8-line AIM keysets are installed
two to a circuit, low-level crosstalk between the two stations sharing the circuit may occur in certain situations.
This is because the wires in a flat line cord are parallel to
each other for long distances, thereby providing a susceptibility to audio bleedover. The level of crosstalk is
dependent on the voice volume of the users, the length
of the line cord, and the station cable loop length.
4.27 To eliminate this low-level crosstalk, if necessary, replace the flat line cord with a twisted-pair line
cord that has the following characteristics:
Telcc orientation (rather than data)
0 26-gauge, stranded
l 6to8twistsperfoot
l
Page 2-23
SPECIFICAlIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATlON& MAINTENANCE
0 Equipped with connectors designed specifically for
round, twisted-pair line cord
4.28 Charcoal and grey twisted-pair line cords of various lengths can be purchased from a local supply house
or directly from a cable distributor, such as:
.-
AmericsnSources
Interstate Business Park #/806
Fredericksburg, VA 22405
Phone: (703) 899-3777
FAX: (703) 371-4350
Pt. No.: LCM65OxL (Grey), LCM66OxL (Charcoal)
(whae x = kngth ia feet; e.g., LCM65O2.5L
\
:!
,,j
is a 25 ft. grcy cord)
-FIGURE 2-2. DIGITAL AC TRANSFORMER REQUIREMENTS
IEJ
= AC transformer required
(for off-hook voice announce only)
NOTE: Digital DSS/BLF Units and MDPMs always require their own separate AC transformers. PCDPMs
require AC transformers when they are connected to DSS/BLF Units only. PCDPMs do not require AC transformers when they are used for off-hook voice announce only or have attached MDPMs.
. >,
.‘.!
.
Page 2-24
’
!3PEClFICATlONS
Issue 1, November 1994
~LF~RA&CTICES
ii?INLATION & MAINTENANCE
B. GMX-256KEYSETS
4.29 A maximum of 128 keysets can be connected to
the GMX-256 System. Refer to page 3-81 for GMX-256
keyset installation instructions. The following analog
models are available:
0 Inter-Tel/DVK 24-Line Keysets (standard and display)
0 Inter-Tel/DVK 12-Line Keysets (standard and display)
0 Inter-Tel/DVX 8-Line Keysets (standard and display)
l GMX 24-Line Keysets (standard and display)
0 GMX 12-Line Keysets (non-display only)
0 GX 24Line Keysets (standard and display)
NOTE For more information on the GX and Gh4X keysets, refer to appendixes A and B in the back of this
manual.
4.30 For illustrations of the Inter-Tel/DVK keysets,
refer to the drawings beginning on page 2-33. The feature keys, speed-dial keys, call keys, and station programmable keys shown in the drawings are as they
appear when the system is in the default configuration.
4.31 The Inter-Tel/DVX 24-line keyset dimensions
are:
Height 3.8 in. (9.7 cm.)
Width
9.2 in. (16.5 cm.)
Length 95in. (24.1cm.)
Weight 2.8 lb. (1.3 kg.)
4.32 The Inter-Tel/DVK 12-line keyset and 8-line
keyset dimensions are:
Ring and voice volume controls (using the VOL Up
and VOL DN keys)
l
Slide-out directory card
l
l
Self-test feature (for testing keyset functions)
Hearing aid-compatible @AC) handset
l
Reversible baseplate for wall mounting
Integrated Speakerphone
4.34 Abuilt-in, integrated speakerphone is standard in
all keysets. The integrated speakerphone allows users to
place and receive outside calls and intercom calls without lifting the handset. Once a call is connected, the keyset user may speak handsfiee over the speakerphone or
lift the handset to speak privately. When using the handset, the user may switch to the speakerphone by pressing
the SPKR key and replacing the handset. If enabled,
pages and/or background music may be broadcast over
the speaker when the phone is not being used.
Liquid Crystal Display (LCD)
4.35 Each “display” keyset has a liquid crystal display
(LCD) with two 16-character lines. The display helps
the user to process calls more e5ciently and professionally. There are display messages for date and time, numbers dialed, call cost data, reminders, do-not-disturb,
forwarding, voice mail processing, incoming calls, station and system status, system alarms, and programmiug. These displays are indicated throughout the
FEMURES section of the manual.
4.36 All standard Inter-Tel/DVX keysets can be converted to display sets by installing an LCD Unit. The
24&e keysets use the Zarge LCD Kit (part no.
828.1166). The 12-line and 8-line keysets use the small
LCD Kit (part no. 828.1165).
ElectretCircuitry
Height 3.8 in. (9.7 cm.)
Width 7.0 in. (17.8 cm.)
Length 9.5 in. (24.1 cm.)
Weight 2.5 lb. (1.1 kg.)
437
433 All Inter-Tel/DVK keysets have the following
design features in their default [email protected]:
12-key pushbutton keypad
Avariety of feature keys (some of whichmay be designated as user programmable)
IC/CO speed-dial (SD) keys with light-emitting
diode (LED) indicators
Four call keys with LED indicators for incoming call
access and indication
Integrated speakerphone
l
All newer keysets and handsets have been designed using “electret” microphone circuitry, rather
than the “dynamic” microphone circuitry used on many
previous Inter-Tel keyset models. Electret keysets and
handsets are not electrically compatible with dynamic
keysets and handsets.
4.38 If a dynamic handset is attached to an electret
keyset, the handset transmit levels will be noticeably
lower. If an electret handset is attached to a dynamic
keyset, the handset will not transmit. (In both cases, neither the keyset nor the handset will be damaged.)
439 Electret keysets can be identified by the manufacturer’s label on the bottom of the keyset. Electret
handsets can be identified by the “El” embossed in the
recess for the wall-mount hook (near the receiver).
Page 2-25
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICEs
IMX/GMX256 INS~TION & MAINTENANCE
Optional Headsets
4.40 A headset may be attached to any keyset by unplugging the handset from the handset jack on the base
of the keyset, plugging the headset into the handset jack,
and entering a feature code to enable the headset. The
SPKR key, which is used to turn the headset on and off,
is lit when placing and receiving calls and unlit when the
headset is not in use. The keysets are compatible with
industry-standard, four-conductor, modular headsets
that have dynamic microphones, or carbon-microphone
headsets that are connected to the keyset through an externally powered jackset (which makes the headset dynamic-compatible). Refer to page 3-86 for installation
illStNCtiOUS.
Optional Data Port Module
4.41
All Inter-TeUDVKkeysets maybe equipped with
optional Data Port Modules (refer to REPLACFMJZNT
PA#rs for the part number). The module contains a
four-conductor, RJll modular jack that can be used to
connect either a data device (such as a personal computer equipped with a modem) or a loud ringing adapter
(LRA) and an external signaling device (such as a loud
bell, horn, flashing light, etc.) to the keyset. The Data
Port Module is a source for 2O-26mA of loop current
(constant current source). Refer to page 3-87 for instructions on installing the optional Data Port Module.
4.42
Specifications for modem-equipped data de-
vice: The data device must have a direct-connection
modem. The modem must be externally powered (or capable of operating on 2omA of loop current) and have an
RJll CO interface. The data device can be used with the
keyset to communicate with remote data. equipment
over voice channels being used for CO or intercom calls.
Refer to pages 3-87 and 4-101 for installation and operation instructions.
4.43 Speciticationsfor loud ringing adapter
(:An external LRAmay be connected to the Data
Port Module to provide a relay for controlling external
signaling devices. The LRA is connected to the Data
Port Module, and the external signaling device is connected to the LRA. Refer to page 3-89 for installation
instructions. Each time the keyset rings, the Data Port
Module provides 2O-26ti of loop current to the LRA
This causes the LRA contacts to close and activates the
signaling device. The LRA is not affected by the ring
tone or the ringer volume of the keyset. The LRA must
be capable of operating on 2OmAcurrent (approximately 2ovDC).
Page 2-26
lNlxR-TELPRACTIcES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
C.
IMX 256 DSWBLF UNlTS
4.44 The lMX 256 System can have as many as 50
keyset circuits equipped with DSS/HLF Units. For example, there could be a maximum of 50 digital keysets
(i.e., DKSC circuits) equipped with up to four digital
DSS/BLF Units each. Or, there could be a maximum of
50 KSC or KSC-D circuits equipped with one analog
DSS/BLF Unit each. Or, there could be any combination
I of the two using up to 50 keyset circuits.
4.45 Each unit provides one-key access to 60 numbers. The numbm can be station extension numbers,
hunt group pilot numbers, system feature codes, or system speed-dial numbers.
4.46 Digital DSS/HLF Units are physically attached
to and programmed to be used with specific digital keysets. The units are connected in series to the PC Data
Port Module (PCDPM) on the back of the corresponding
keyset. Unlike analog units, digital DSS/BLF Units do
not require station cabling separate from the keyset’s
cabling; instead, they are powered by their own AC
transformer. If desired, all units can be connected to
keysets installed on the same Digital Keyset Cards. (Refer to page 3-90 for digital DSS/BLF Unit installation
instructions.)
NOTE: Digital DSSBLF Units always require their
own separate AC transformers. For a diagram of AC
transformer requirements, refer to Figure 2-2 on page
2-24.
4.47 Analog DSS/HLF Units are programmed to be
used with specific analog keysets, but are not physically
attached to the keysets. The units can be distributed
among several keysets or, if desired, they can be
assigned to one keyset. Each unit requires a KSC or
KSC-D circuit that is separate from the keyset’s circuit.
If50 station circuits are used for analog DSS/HLFUnits,
I 50 fewer analog keysets and/or Attendant Computer
Consoles can be installed. Up to four analog units canbe
SPECIF’ICATIONS
Issue 1. November 1994
installed on a single Keyset Card. (Refer to page 3-92
for IMK DSS/BLF Unit installation instructions.)
4.48 For illustrations of the DSS/HLFUnits (and other
station instruments), refer to the drawings beginuing on
page 2-33.
4.49
Digital DSS/BLF Unit dimensions are:
Height 3.0 in. (7.6 cm.)
Width 7.5 in. (19.1 cm.)
Length 9.0 in. (22.9 cm.)
Weight 1.7 lb. (0.8 kg.)
4.50
._
lMX DSS/HLF Unit dimensions are:
Height 5.5 in.
Width 9.0 in.
Length 9.6 in.
Weight 2.0 lb.
(14.0 cm.)
(22.9 cm.)
(24.1 cm.)
(0.9 kg.)
4.51 As stated earlier, each DSS/HLF Unit provides
one-key access to up to 60 numbers. These numbers can
be station extension numbers, hunt group pilot numbers,
or system feature codes, or system speed-dial numbers. m
The layout of the keys and the numbets they access are
assigned using one of up to eight key maps in database
progr-g.
4.52 Together, the lamps in the keys create a busy
lamp field that indicates the status of each station or hunt
group assigned to the keys. The LED indicator in the key
is solidly lit when the associated station is busy, flashes
slowly when the station is in do-not-disturb, flashes fast
when the station has a call ringing in, or flutters continuously if the station is causing a SDXI’ION OFF-HOOK
system alarm. If assigned to a hunt group, the LED indicator is solidly lit when all stations in the hunt group are
unavailable (busy, forwarded, in do-not-disturb, or removed from the hunt group) and it flashes fast when a
call is camped on to a hunt group.
Page 2-27
INTER-TELPRACTICES
lM.WGMX 256 INSmTlON & MAINTENANCE
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
D.
GMX-256 DSWBLF
UNITS
453 There can be a maximum of 50 Direct Station
Selection/Busy Lamp Field @SS/BLP) Units installed
on the GMX-256 System, including any of the followillg:
Inter-Tel/DVK DSS/BLF Units -single or tandem
0 GMX DSS/BLP Units -single only
0 GX DSS/BLF Units - single or tandem
l
NOTE: For more information on the GMX and GX station instruments, refer to appendixes A and B in the back
of the manual.
4.54 A DSS/BLF Unit consists of either a single unit
or two units connected together to form a tandem unit.
Each single unit provides one-key access to 6Onumbers,
while tandem units provide access to 120 numbers. The
numbers can be station extension numbers, hunt group
pilot numbers, system feature codes, or system speeddial numbers.
4.55 The 50 single/tandem units can be distributed
among several keysets or, if desired, they can be assigned to one keyset. (Refer to page 3-93 for DSS/BLF
Unit installation instructions.)
4.56 DSS/BLF Units are programmed to be used with
specific keysets, but are not physically attached to the
keysets. Each unit requires a KSC-D circuit that is separate from the keyset’s circuit. If 50 station circuits are
used for DSS/BLF Units, 50 fewer keysets and/or Attendant Computer Consoles can be installed. Up to four
units can be installed on a single Keyset Card.
457 For an illustration of the DSS/BLF Unit (and
other Inter-TellDVK station instruments), refer to the
drawings beginning on page 2-33. DSS/BLF Unit
dimensions are:
(12 in expanded systems) in database programming.
The intercom number/key assignments are programmed
in two lists, DSS 1 and DSS 2. Single DSS/HLF Units
can be assigned with either list. Tandem Inter-Tel/DVK
units are assigned with the DSS 1 list, then an internal
strap is set to identify the key arrangement each individual unit will use.
4.59 Together, the lamps in the keys create a busy
lampfieldthatindicatesthestatusofeachstationorhunt
group assigned to the keys. The LFD indicator in the key
is solidly lit when the associated station is busy, flashes
slowly when the station is in do-not-disturb, flashes fast
when the station has a call ringing in, or flutters continuously if the station is causing a STATION OFF-HOOK
system alarm. If assigned to a hunt group, the LED indicator is solidly lit when all stations in the hunt group are
unavailable (busy, forwarded, in do-not-disturb, or removed from the hunt group) and it flashes fast when a
call is camped on to a hunt group.
E.
4.60 The Attendant Computer Console is an IBMcompatible personal computer that is connected to an
available KSC or KSC-D circuit (they cannot be connected to DKSC circuits). The computer contains a proprietary circuit card and special software. It is primarily
designed for use by attendants of larger 256 Systems those systems with so many station users that it would
make using DSS/BLF Units somewhat awkward. However, due to its enhanced functionality, including electronic text messaging and directory dialing, the
Attendant Computer Console is also an attractive option
for smaller 256 Systems as well.
4.61 Attendant Computer Console design features include:
IBM XT-, AT-, or 386-compatible processing unit
CGA, EGA, or VGA monitor and Monitor Interface
Card
122-key custom keyboard
Headset operation
Specially-designed circuit card and interface software
Height 3.8 in. (9.7 cm.)
width 7.0 in. (17.8 cm.)
Length 9.5 in. (24.1 cm.)
Weight 2.5 lb. (1.1 kg.)
4.58 As stated earlier, each single DSS/BLF Unit provides one-key access to up to 60 numbers. These numbers can be station extension numbers, hunt group pilot
numbers, or system feature codes, or system speed-dial
numbers. The layout of the keys and the numbers they
access are assigned using one of up to eight key maps
A’ITENDANT COMPUTER CONSOLES
NOTE For additional information on the Attendant
Computer Console, along with detailed installation and
programming instructions, refer to the manual included
with the console.
Page 2-28
~LI&Jyms
STALLATION
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
& MAINTENANCE
F. SINGLE-LINE SETS
Reversible baseplate and cradle hook for wall
mounting
A ringer that can be set for AC or DC by moving a
jumper strap located on the control board
Selectable ring pitch jumper strap (HI or LO) on the
control board
4.62 Up to 240 single-line sets may be installed on the
256 System. The models available are:
8 Enhanced Single-Line Sets (EEiLSs) -available on
IMX 256 Systems only
0 Single-Line Instruments (SLIs)
0 Industry-standard, single-line DTMF sets
4.63 For illustrations of the ESLS and SLI (and other
station instruments), refer to the drawings beginning on
page 2-33. The feature keys shown in the drawings are
as they appear when the system is in the default conflguration.
4.64 The dimensions of the ESLS are:
Height 45 in. (11.4 cm.)
Width
6.5 in. (16.5 cm.)
Length 9.5 in. (24.1 cm.)
Weight 2.2 lb. (1.0 kg.)
4.67 SLI design features include:
0 Four user-programmable feature keys and a nonprogrammable timed hookflash (FLASH) key
0 A ring volume thumbwheel control
l Hearing aid-compatible (HAC) handset (may be
equipped with a handset amplifier as described on
page 2-22)
l Reversible baseplate for wall mounting
0 AringerthatcanbesetforACorDCbymovinga
jumper strap located on the control board
4.68 Single-line set users access some station features
simply by lifting the handset and pressing a feature key
(or entering a feature code). Other features are accessed
using a combination of a hookflash (FLASH key) and a
feature key or code. Refer to the FEMURES section of
this manual for details.
4.65 The dimensions of the SLI are:
Height 3.5 in. ( 8.8 cm.)
Width
7.5 in. (18.8 cm.)
Length 9.0 in. (22.5 cm.)
Weight 2.0 lb. (0.9 kg.)
4.66 ESLS design features include:
0 Nine user-programmable feature keys and a nonprogrammable timed hookflash (FLASH) key
0 A neon light for message waiting indication
l A ring volume thumbwheel control
0 Hearing aid-compatible @AC) handset (may be
equipped with a handset amplifier as described on
page 2-22)
4.69 When single-line sets are connected to SingleLine Cards (SLCs), they must be equipped with AC
ringers (ESLSs and SLIs have internal jumper straps
that can be moved to set the ringer for AC or UC). When
connected to Inward Dialing Cards (ID&), single-line
sets may have AC ringers by setting the lDC circuit for
AC ringing, or they may have DC ringers by setting the
circuit for DC ringing. (Refer to page 3-95 for singleline set installation instructions.)
NOTE: IDCs do not support message waiting applications. If single-line sets with message waiting lamps are
installed on IDCs, the lamps will not function.
Page 2-29
INTER-TELPRACTlCE8
SPECIFICM’IONS
Issue 1, November 1994
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
G. OFF-PREMISES EXTENSIONS (OPXs)
4.70 An OPX is an AC ringer-equipped BSLS, SLI, or
single-line M’MF set that is placed in a remote location
and connected to the system through a telephone company OPX circuit or a customer-provided circuit.
4.71 Off-premises stations are connected to Inward
Dialing Cards (up to eight circuits on a card) or Tl Cards
(up to 24 circuits on a card). If necessary, the receive
gain and/or the transmit gain for each circuit can be adjusted in database programming (see page 5-30 for details).
_
NOTE: lf connecting OPXs, Inward Dialing Cards
must be used. FCC regulations prohibit connecting
OPXs to Single-Line Cards.
4.72 The OPX circuits provided by the telephone
company are identified with Facility Interface Codes
(FE): Class A, OL13A; Class B, OL13B; or Class C,
OL13C. The service order code is 9.OF (fully protected
private circuit). Ifthe impedance does not exceed a loop
measurement of 800 ohms (loop of 15,600 feet using
24AWG wire), a customer-provided circuit between the
remote location and the system may be used.
4.73 The 8OO-ohm loop limitation is usually suitable
for accessing on-premises stations from off-premises
stations. However, for applications where one off-premises station will be calling another through the station
card, the impedance between the two off-premises stations (both circuits added together) must be less than
800 ohms (loop measurement). In this situation, a Class
A or B FIC circuit is preferable.
4.74 When an IDC circuit is designated for OPX use in
database programming (see page 5-170), its voice volume levels are increased approximately 3dB over normal single-line set voice volume levels. This is an
attempt to compensate for any loss in the external OPX
circuit. However, in certain off-premises applications,
the voice volume levels may still be unacceptable. This
degradation in voice volume is due to the natural voice
frequency range limitations of the telephone company
or customer-provided circuit. To increase the frequency
range, installation of a two-wire, negative impedance
repeater unit is recommended. Such units typically provide from O-15 decibels of voice volume gain and allow
regulation of the gain in each direction when simulta-
neous voice transmission oczurs. The switching sensitivity on the unit should also be adjustable.
4.75 The repeater unit is installed at the MDFbetween
the station block and the cabling to the off-premises station. (Refer to page 3-30 for OPX installation instructions.) When ordering a repeater unit, consult with the
supplier for ordering the proper mounting shelf and
power supply for the unit. Additional information on operating and adjusting the repeater unit is generally included with the product.
H. PLAYBACK DEVICES
4.76 A playback device is an answering machine that
answers the call, plays a message, and then disconnects
from the call. Playback devices are installed like siugleline sets, using three-pair twisted cable and six-conductor modular jacks (or, if desired, one-pair twisted cable
and four-conductor modular jacks). The device must be
capable of the following functions: detect ringing, provide ring trip, and automatically disconnect when the
announcement is completed.
4.77 Because most playback devices respond to AC
ring signals, they are attached to SLC circuits or IDC
circuits that are set for AC ringing. If the playback device responds to DC ring signals, an Inward Dialing
‘Card circuit that is set for DC ringing must be used. (Refer to page 3-95 for playback device installation instructions.)
NOTE: For optimal performance, it is recommended
automated attendant playback devices be installed on
IDC circuits rather than SLC circuits.
4.78 Hunt groups can have two special stations that
help process calls: announcement stations and overflow
stations. These stations can be equipped with station instruments or playback devices. Automated attendant
stations can also be equipped with playback devices.
(See FEKNRES, page 4-17.)
4.79 The playback device is programmed as a regular
single-line station and is assigned an extension number.
If the device is sensitive to camp-on tones and disconnects calls, the programmer can disallow the camp-on
tone for that station circuit (refer to PROGRAMMING,
page 5-30).
Page 2-30
“.,
?,
i
pERLz&cn
STALLATION & MAINTENANCE
. SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
5. ADDITIONAL SYSTEM
EQUIPMENT
A.
JO=DBp
JO pc/olJlPuT QE2s
2
PERSONAL COMPUTER (PC) FOR
ON-SITE OR STAND-ALONEIREMOTE
PROGRAMMlNG
3
7
5
5.1
The device used for on-site or stand-alone/remote
programming must be an IBM AT+ompatible PC with a
minimum: 5MB available memory on the hard disk
drive, Sy4-inch (1.2MB) or 3%~inch (1.44MB) double
sided/high density floppy disk drive, 640k RAM (with
minimum 512k available), MS-DOS 3.3, and an EGA
graphics monitor. A grogramming mouse is optional (if
used, install on au unassigned COM port). For remote
maintenance, a 3CKLbaudor 1200-baud modem is also
needed. (See PRCGRAMMIN G, page 5-3, for additional information on remote system maintenance.) To
connect the PC to the RCPU Card for on-site programming, refer to the following information.
A
6
8
20
53 The following cable can be created to connect one
of the DB9 ports on the RCPU Card to the DB9 port
found on some PCs and output devices.
JO PCK)uTpIJJ [email protected]
33. PROGRAMMINGPC AND SMDR/SMDA
OUTPUT DEVICE REQUIREMENTS
5.2 The on-site programming PC and the optional output device(s) for the Station Message Detail Recording
(SMDR) and Station Message Detail Accounting
(SMDA) features must have the characteristics described in the following paragraphs.
5.3 To connect a PC or an output device to one of the
DB9 serial ports (PGRT A or PORT B) on the RCPU
Card, one end of the cable between the two must have an
RS-232-G-compatible, female g-pin subminiature “D”
connector. The other end of the cable must be compatible with the output device. Consult the owner’s guide
for the device to verify that the pin functions are the
same as those shown in the following chart. Ifnecessary,
rewire the connector on the device to match the requirements.
FUNCTION
DataCarrierDetect(DCD)
Re&ve Data (RXD)
Transmit Dab (J-XD)
Data Terminal Ready (M-R)
Signal Ground
Data Set Ready (DSR)
Requti T o S e n d (RIB)
C l e a r T o S e n d (Cl-S)
Ring hiicator
Signal to 256
Darato256
Data hm 256
Signal 6vm 256
@ways me*)
Reference Ground
Signal to 256
SigmaI from 256
(always true*)
Signal to 256
Signal to 256
Ell!i
1
2
3
A
5
6
7
8
9
True = steady signal >+SV
5.4 The following cable can be created to connect one
of the DB9 ports on the RCPU Card to the DB25 port
found on some PCs and output devices.
5.6 When the system is in the default [email protected],
the 256 output device ports (PGRT A and PORT B) are
enabled for “software” handshaking. Most output devices are designed for software handshaking, which is
the use of “X-ON” and “X-OFF” characters to indicate
readiness to send or receive data. Refer to the device’s
operating manual to determine if it uses X-ON/x-OFF
characters.
5.7 If the device does not support X-GN/X-OFP characters, hardware handshaking may be enabled (see
PRGGRAMMING, page 5-169). When enabled for
hardware handshaking, signals are sent over the comrector pins to indicate readiness to send or receive data. The
256 DB9 port will send a logic true (>+!5V) on pin 4
(Data Terminal Ready) and pin 7 (Request To Send)
when it is ready to receive data. In addition, the 256 DB9
port will monitor pin 6 (Data Set Ready), pin 8 (Clear To
Send), or both (depending on how the 256 System is programmed) and will only send data if it receives a logic
true (>+5V) over the programmed pin(s). Ifthe 256 DB9
port receives a logic false (c-5V) to indicate that the
buffer on the attached device is full, it will not send data.
5.8 To meet Part 15 of FCC Regulations, all RS-232-C
cables must be equipped with ferrite beads. Two ferrite
“split” beads (two half beads) are installed on each cable
just below where the cable connects to the system. The
Page 2-31
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICE-S
IMX/GMX 256 INSWTlON & MAINTENANCE
beads help to reduce electromagnetic interference
(EMI) and radio frequency interference (RFI).
rating, which results in longer discharge rates; the voltage level remains the same as a single string.
NOTE: Each ferrite split bead, which is actually half of
a full bead, is ordered individually (see REPLACEMENT PARTS for the part number). Two split beads are
required to form one complete bead.
5.14 Batteries must be fully charged when installed.
Charge each individually using a constant-voltage, current-limited charger with less than three percent ripple.
The charge voltage per cell must be set according to the
manufacturer’s specifications. Be careful not to damage
the batteries by overcharging them. For example, new
Globe brand batteries require 25 days of float voltage or
25-30 discharge cycles to attain full capacity. Initial capacity might only be 80 percent of rated capacity.
5.9 The on-site programming PC and SMDR/SMDA
output devices must communicate at 110, 300, 600,
1290,2400,4800,9600, or 19200 baud. (NOTE: The
19200 baud rate is for outgoing data only. The maximum programming baud rate is 9600.) System baud
rates are set independently in database programming.
other specitications include:
0
0
0
0
The data format must be 8 bit standard ASCII.
Parity is off (ignored).
Communication is full duplex.
There is one start bit and one stop bit.
5.10 The output devices, whether used for SMDR or
SMDA, must be able to print reports with a width of 80
characters. The devices must not have cables longer
than 50 feet (15 meters).
5.15 All batteries should be of the same age and AH
rating. Some manufacturers date batteries by stamping
them with a date code. For example, Globe stamps their
batteries with a code such as 410-B, where 4 = the last
digit of year, 10 = the month, and B = the type of electrolyte. If a battery in a string needs to be replaced, the age
of the string will determine if a fresh battery can be added. If the string is two to three years old, adding a fresh
battery will reduce the life of the entire string. This is because a fresh battery will be overcharged, while the older batteries are undercharged.
5.11 To provide back-up power in the event of an AC
power failure or brownout condition, the 256 System
power supply can have optional battery back-up using a
customer-provided uninterruptable power supply (UPS)
unit or standby power supply (SPS) unit.
5.16 Batteries may give off explosive and/or corrosive
gases. To reduce the effects of this gas, place the batteries (or battery compartment) in a well-ventilated room
and coat the terminals with an anti-corrosive agent.
Avoid storing batteries; they will self-discharge and
their capacity decreases with age. If you must store batteries, recharge them every six months. Recharge time
may vary depending on the charger’s current limit and
the battery’s state of charge.
5.12 It is recommended that a power supply unit with
the following characteristics be installed:
D. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
C.
SYSTEM BATTERY BACK-UP
Sine wave output
Transfer time of less than 20 milliseconds
Output rating of 700 Watts (minimum needed for a
fully populated system; for smaller system requirements, contact Customer Support)
External or internal batteries
Low voltage cutoff circuit of 105VAC (minimum)
NOTE: Even if the power supply unit has the specifications listed above, it camrot be guaranteed that it will
work properly with the 256 System. Contact Customer
Support for a listing of approved IIPS/SPS power sup
plies and installation instructions.
5.17 If necessary, contact Inter-Tel Customer Support
for additional information on the optional equipment
listed below:
0 OPX Repeaters
0 LRAs and External Signaling Devices
0 Standby Power (system battery back-up)
0 Multi-Port Voice Mail
0 Facsimile Machine
0 Doorbox
0 Lightning and AC Surge Protection
0 Multiple External Paging Zones and Talkback
Speakers
5.13
Batteries comrected in series form a “string.“The
voltage of the string is equal to the sum of the individual
battery voltages. For example, five 6V batteries connected in series form a 30V battery pack. If desired, connect two strings in parallel to double the amp/hour
0 Headsets
a Playback Devices
l
Page 2-32
Power Failuxe Transfer
INTER-TELPRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 lNSTALLATION& MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 2-3.
EXECUTIVE DIGITAL KEYSET
HEARING AID-COMPATIBLE
(HAC) HANDSET
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
(also called Executive Digital Terminal)
LCD WlTH SIX
16-CHARACTER LINES
8 LCD MEtiU SELEG
TION KEYS
2 LCD FEATURE
DIRECTORY
SCROLL KEYS
14 FEATURE
KEYS
INTERNAL
SPEAKER
\
5 SPEED-DIAL
KEYS
\
12-KEY
PUSHBUTTON
KEYPAD
RING AND VOICE
VOLUME
CONTROLS
HANDSFREE
MICROPHONE
(underneath edge)
NOTE: The keys are shown as they appear in the default key map configuration.
Page 2-33
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1!394
IMXIGMX
INTER-TEL4PRACTICEs
256 INS-TION & MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 2-4. STANDARD DIGITAL KEYSET (also called Standard Digital Terminal)
HEARING AID-COMPATIBLE
(HAC) HANDSET
OPTIONAL LCD WlTH TWO
16-CHARAClER LINES
4 CALL KEYS
SPEEDrL KEYS
/
INTERNAL
SPEAKER
14 FEATURE
KEYS
F
EY PUSHDN KEYPAD
0
\
Y
I
RING AND VOICE
VOLUME
CONTROLS
HANDSFREE
MICROPHONE
(underneath edge)
NOTE: The keys are shown as they appear in the default key map configuration.
Page 2-34
INTEa-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
FIGURJZ
2-5.
HEARING AID-COMPATIBLE
(HAC) HANDSET
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
IMX 24-LINE KEYSET
4 CALL KEYS
OPTIONAL
32-CHARACTER LCD
10 SPEEDDIAL KEYS
INTERNAL
SPEAKER
\
RING AND VOICE
VOLUME
CONTROLS
(underneath edge)
/
8 STATION PRO-
GRAMMABLE
KEYS (5-12)
/
12 UNDEFINED
KEYS (13-24)
18 FEATURE
KEYS
12-KEY PUSHBU’lTON
I
KEYPAD
HANDSFREE
MICROPHONE
(underneath edge)
NOTE: The keys are shown as they appear in the default key map configuration.
Page 2-35
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
IMX/GMX
IMX 24-LINE AIM KEYSET
FIGURE 2-6.
HEARING AID-COMPATIBLE
(HAC) HANDSET
\
INTERNAL
SPEAKER
INTER-TELPRACTICES
256 INS-TION % MAINTENANCE
4 CALL KEYS
n
32-CHARACTER LCD
I
I
I
10 SPEEDDIAL KEYS
/
/
\
A
C
*’
12.KEY
PUSHBlJlTON
KEYPAD
-L
/
I
CEI
1
8 STATION PROGRAMMABLE
KEYS (5-12)
/
/
12 UNDEFINED
KEYS (13-24)
RING AND VOICE
VOLUME
CONTROLS
18 FEATURE
KEYS
HANDSFREE
MICROPHONE
(underneath edge)
NOTE The keys are shown as they appear in the default key map configuration.
Page 2-36
INTER-TELPRACTxcEs
IMX/GMX256INS~~ON & MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 2-7.
HEARING AID-COMPATIBLE
(HAC) HANDSET
SPECIJTICATIONS
Issue 1. November 1994
IMX 12LINE KEYSET
4 CALL KEYS
OPTIONAL
=-CHARACTER LCD
10 SPEEDDIAL KEYS
INTERNAL
SPEAKER
/
\
\
RING AND VOICE
VOLUME
CONTROLS
(underneath edge)
/
8 STATION PRO-
GRAMMABLE.
KEYS (5-12)
18 FEATURE
12XEY PUSHBUTTON
I
KEYS
KEYPAD
HANDSFREE
MICROPHONE
(underneath edge)
NOTE: The keys are shown as they appear in the default key map configuration.
Page 2-37
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTACLATION 81 MAIIWENANCE
SPEClF’ICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE 2-8.
HEAR11 ~G AID-COMPATIBLE
_
(1 AC) HANDSET
IMX 12-LINE AIM KEJYSET
4 .CALL KEYS
32-CHARACTER LCD
10 SPEEDDIAL KEYS
INTERNAL
SPEAKER
12-KEY
‘USHBUlTON
KEYPAD
El
ELI
lIEI
EEI
I
I
/
8 STATION PRO-
GRAMMABLE
KEYS (5-12)
RING AND VOICE
VOLUME
CONTROLS
18 FEATURE
KEYS
/
HANDSFREE
MICROPHONE
(underneath edge)
NOTE: The keys are shown as they appear in the default key map configuration.
Page 2-38
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INS~TION & MAI[NTENANcE
FIGURE 2-9.
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1. November 1994
IMX &LINE KEYSET
HEARING AID-COMPATIBLE
(HAC) HANDSET
4 CALL KEYS
INTERNAL
SPEAKER
\
\
RING AND VOICE
VOLUME
CONTROLS
(underneath
edge)
/
4 STATION PRO-
GRAMMABLE
KEYS (5-8)
14 FEATURE
KEYS
HANDSFREE
MICROPHONE
(underneath edge)
12-KEY PUSHBUTTON
KEYPAD
NOTE: The keys are shown as they appear in the default key map configuration.
Page 2-39
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATlON& MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 2-10.
,-- ‘\:i
:i
..I
IMX &LINE AIM KEYSET
HEARING AID-COMPATIBLE
(HAC) HANDSET
32-CHARACTER LCD
4 CALL KEYS
INTERNAL
SPEAKER
\
114 FEATURE
KEYS
4 STATION PRO-
GRAMMABLE
KEYS (5-8)
RING AND VOICE
VOLUME
CONTROLS
HANDSFREE
MICROPHONE
(underneath edge)
12-KEY PUSHBUTTON
KEYPAD
NOTE: The keys are shown as they appear in the default key map configuration.
Page 2-40
SPECIFTCATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE 2-U
INTER-TEL/DVK M-LINE KEYSET
HEARING AID-COMPATIBLE
- (HAC) HANDSET
4 CALL KEYS
OPTIONAL
32-CHARACTER LCD
8 STATION PROGRAMMABLE
KEYS (5-12)
/
12 UNDEFINED
KEYS (13-24)
INTERNAL
SPEAKER
18 FEATURE
KEYS
\
10 SPEED-DIAL
KEYS
RING AND VOICE
VOLUME
CONTROLS
12-KEY PUSHBUlTON HANDSFREE
KEYPAD
MICROPHONE
NOTE: The keys are shown as they appear in the default key map configuration.
Page 2-41
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INTEa-TELPRACTICES
IMWGMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINIENLINCE
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1. November 1994
FIGURE 213. INTER-TELJDVK
HEARING AID-COMPATIBLE
(HAC) HANDSET
4 CALL KEYS
&LINE KEYSET
OP riots
32-CHAl ACTER LCD
/
4 STATION PROGRAMMABLE
KEYS (5-8)
/
INTERNAL
SPEAKER
8 SPEED-DIAL
TS
14 FEATURE
KEYS
RING AND VOICE
VOLUME
CONTROLS
12-KEY
PUSHBUTTON
KEYPAD
HANDSFREE
MICROPHONE
NOTE: The keys are shown as they appear in the default key map configuration.
Page 2-43
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE 2-14.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INS-TION & MAINTENANCE
DIGITAL DIRECT STATION SELECTION/BUSY LAMP FIELD
(DWBLF) UNIT
60 DSS/BLF AND/OR
FEATURE KEYS
Page 2-M
3
INTER-TELPRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 2-15.
IMX DSS/J.tLF UNIT
60 DSSIBLF KEYS
Page 2-45
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
SPECJFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE 2-16.
INTER-TEL/INK DSS/BLF UNIT
60 DSS/BLF KJZYS AND/OR
FEATURE KEYS
Page 2-46
SF’ECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE 2-17.
ENHANCED SINGLELINE SET (ESLS)
HEARING AID-COMPATIBLE
(HAC) HANDSET
I
RING VOLUME
CONTROL
(underneath edge)
MESSAGE WAlTlNG
LAMP
\
TIMED HOOKFLASH
II
9 USERPROGRAMMABLE
FEATURE KEYS
\
12-KEY PUSHBUTTON
KEYPAD
NOTE: The keys are shown as they appear in the default key map configuration.
Page 2-47
SPECIFICATIONS
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 218.
SINGLELINE INSTRUMENT (SLl)
HEARING
AID-COMPATIBLE
(HAC) HANDSET
12-KEY PUSHBUTTON
KEYPAD
4 USERPROGRAMMABLE
FEATURE KEYS
\
RING VOLUME
CONTROL
(underneath edge)
I
I I
I
TIMED
HOOKFLASH
NOTE: The keys are shown as they appear in the default key map configuration.
Page 2-48
INTEFt-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INS-TION & MAINTENANCE
INf3lXLLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
INSTALLATION
CONTENTS
PAGE
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-2
2. System Installation Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
3. Pre-Installation Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-3
.
Establish Suitable Environmental Conditions For The System . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
B. Assemble The Necessary Tools Aud Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-3
.
Plan Station Locations And Types Of Station Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-4
D. Assemble The Optional Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-5.
4. Station Cabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
A Running Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
B. Terminating The Cables At Station Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-7
5. Assembling The Main Distribution Frame (MDF) Backboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
Connecting The Trunk Cables To The MDF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Connecting Tl Spans To The MDF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C . Connecting Station Cables To The MDF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. Station Loop Resistance Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E. Connecting Optional Off-Premises Extensions (OPXs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
Connecting The RCPU Card To The MDF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G. Connecting Optional Tl Alarm Relay Devices To The MDF . . . . . . . . . . . . .
H. Connecting ‘Dvo 256 Systems Together Using Tl Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6. Equipment Cabinet Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A. Unpack The Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Check The Equipment Cabinet Pre&sembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. Install The Power Supply Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. Install The Circuit Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E. Check The Circuit Card Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F . Complete The Equipment Cabinet Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7. Station Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
IMX 256 Digital Keyset Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. IMX 256 Analog Keyset Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C . GMX-256 Analog Keyset Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. IMX 256 Digital DSS/BLF Unit Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E. IMX 256 Analog DSS/BLF Unit Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
GMX-256 Analog DSS/BLF Unit Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G. Attendant Computer Console Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
H. Single-Line Set And Playback Device Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8. SMDR/SMDA Output Device Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9. External Paging Equipment Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10. External Music Source Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-9
3-H
3-17
3-21
3-29
3-30
3-30
3-33
3-34
3-35
335
3-35
3-39
3-44
3-61
3-61
3-62
3-62 1
3-71
3-81
3-90 m
3-92
3-93
3-93
3-95
3-98
3-98
3-99
11. Preventative Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-99
12.
Post-installation
Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-100
Page 3-l
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
1
.
INTER-TELPEACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
INTRODUCI’ION
1.1 This section describes the recommended procedures for installing the 256 System hardware. Refer to
SPBCIFICAlIONS for hardware descriptions.
2.
SYSTEM INS’WLLATION
(6)
Perform the station loop resistance test for each
station cable.
0
(8)
Assemble the equipment cabinet.
(9)
OUTLJNE
2.1 System installation is performed in the following
order. Detailed instructions and figures for each step are
located throughout the J.NSTAL,LAlTON section.
(1)
(2)
Plan the installation, including the equipment
cabinet and main distribution frame (MDF) location, station locations, cable runs, and optional
equipment.
Run cables to the keysets, analog Direct Station
Selection/Busy Lamp Field (DSWBLF) Units,
Attendant Computer Consoles, single-line sets,
and playback devices. Run wiring to any optional equipment, such as power failure transfer
equipmenf external paging equipment, general
signaling devices, music sources, etc.
(3)
Terminate the station cables on modular jack assemblies at the station locations.
(4)
Mount the MDF backboard and assemble the terminal blocks on the backboard. If any Tl spans
are to be installed, terminate them on eight-conductor modular jack assemblies at the MDF.
Install the circuit cards in the equipment cabinet
and connect them to the cables (or,line cords)
that run from the MDF blocks (or MDF modular
jack assemblies).
Install the station instruments and any optional
station equipment, such as headsets, handset amplifiers, and Data Port Modules.
(11)
Install any optional system equipment, such as
output device(s) for station message detail
recording (SMDR) and station message detail
accounting (SMDA), external paging network,
external music source(s), voice mail, etc.
(12)
Ensure that all equipment is working properly.
(13)
Refer to the PROG RAMMING section of this
manual to cont&ure and program the system.
NOTE: The Tl span is typically connected to
the standard R&X.! modular jack provided on
the Tl Card. However, in certain situations (e.g.,
when using an external CSU equipped with a
DB15 connector), it may be more convenient to
use the card’s optional DB15 connector instead.
Refer to page 3-20 for more information.
(5)
I&all the system power supply modules in the
power supply chassis.
Connect the trunks, station cables, and circuit
card cables to the corresponding terminal blocks
(or, for Tl, modular jack assemblies).
Page 3-2
NOTICE
This LUWGMX256 Installation and Fiekihiaintenance Manual inst~cts certified field technicians
on the proper installation practices for the 256 System. This manual does not provide stepby-step
instructions for premises wiring practices as dictated by the National Electrical Code, which includes, but is not limited to, cable layouts, cable
installation, AC power installation, proper AC
grounding, eliminating or preventing external interferences (including, but not limited to, RFI, EMI,
lightning, AC power disturbances, static discharge),
and other telephony practices standard within the industry. Cable installers, electricians, and field technicians are expected to be properly trained and, if
applicable, licensed in their trade practices. Omial
256 certijktion is required for technical assistance.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMNGMX 256 INSTALLATION & M4INTENANCE
3. PRE-INSTALLATION
INS-TION
Issue 1, November 1994
CHECKLIST
REQUlREMENTSINOPERATlON
3.1 To make installation easier, use the checklist on
the following pages when preparing to install the system. (Hardware specifications are included in the
SPEClFICAI’IONS section.)
A.
ESX4BLISHSIlI’k3LE
EI’MRONMENTAL CONDITIONS FOR
THE SYSTEM
- Select the equipment cabinet location to minimize
cable run length. Station instruments connected to
the system must not exceed the limits (using
24AWG wire) listed in the table on page 3-29. The
ohm values are loop measurements; feet (meter)values are the maximum one-way measurements from
the equipment cabinet.
- Do not expose the equipment cabinet location to direct sunlight, high humidity, heat, dust, or strong
magnetic fields (such as those generated by heavy
motors and large copy machines).
-40’ to 185’ F
-40°t08S0C
Temperahue Station Instruments
32” to 113’ F
O”t0 45°C
40” to 185” F
-40°t08S0C
Relative Humidity
(Nolbcondensing)
5% to 95%
5% to 95%
Altitude
up to 10,ooo ft.
(3.043 m.)
UptO40,ooOft.
(15192 m.)
From UL 1459, apnxakct safety specification govttming
telephone equipment:
- Never install telephone wiring during a lightning
storm.
- Never install telephone jacks in wet locations unless
the jack is specifically designed for wet locations.
- Never touch uninsulated telephone wires or terminals unless the telephone line has been disconnected
at the network interface.
- Use caution when installing or modifying telephone
lines.
B.
-
- The MDF requires a 4 x 8-foot (1.2 x 2.4meter),
x-inch plywood backboard. This should provide
sufficient room for all blocks and peripheral equip
ment.
- For cooling purposes, provide ample air space
around the equipment cabinet assembly (minimum
one foot on all sides). Other than the programming
PC, do not place or store items on top of the equip
ment cabinet.
32’ to 104” F
o”to 4o”c!
NOTE: It is recommended that the maximum operating temperature (as stated above) never be exceeded. Therefore, when installing the equipment
cabinet and station instruments, allow a sufficient
margin for error in case of air conditioning failure,
routine maintenance, plant shutdown, etc. As a general rule, if conditions are suitable for office personnel, they are also suitable for all equipment and
station instrument operation. A properly controlled
environment will help to extend the operating life of
the equipment.
- Locate the equipment cabinet within 5 feet (1.5 meters) of an isolated, dedicated, 105-125VAC,
57-63H2, 15A, single-phase commercial power
source.
NOTE: This musf be an isolated, dedicated AC circuit for proper operation. All three wires (power,
neutral, and ground) must be run separately from the
outlet to the breaker panel without being bonded to
any other wire or circuit. DO NOT plug any other
equipment into this outlet. To maintain the protection provided by the isolated, dedicated circuit, the
length of the AC power cord limits the distance between the power supply and the outlet; DO NOTuse
an extension cord. Also, to protect the system from
AC voltage surges, a surge/spike protector is
supplied with the system (refer to page 2-9 for specifications).
Temperature Equipment Cabiiet
ASSEMBLE THE NECESSARY TOOLS
AND SUPPLIES
Industry-standard, three-pair
(six-conductor)
twisted cable to run from the MDF to all station
instruments, including: keysets, analog DSS/BLF
Units, Attendant Computer Consoles, ESLSs, SLIs,
single-line DTMF sets, and playback devices. (For
exceptions, see the NOTE on page 3-6.)
- Six-conductor modular jack assemblies for all station instruments. (For exceptions, see the NOTE on
page 3-6.)
- The SMDR/SMDA output device(s) must not have
cables longer than 50 feet (15 meters).
- A high-impedance digital multimeter to check the
power supply and ensure correct wiring of the modular jack assemblies. Multimeter accuracy must be
H.5% or better.
- Locate the equipment in a climate-controlled room
with the following environmental conditions:
- Standard terminal blocks (66Ml-50 type) and bridging clips for constructing the MDF.
Page 3-3
INTER-TELPRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INSTACLATION & MAINTENANCE
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
- Industry-standard, 25pair cable for comtecting the
MDF terminal blocks to the circuit cards iu the
equipment cabinet.
- Industry-standard, cross-connect wire may be need-
ed for certain applications.
- 50-pin female amphenol-type connectors (with rec-
ommended non-conducting, plastic covers) and a
connecting machine.
- Ferrite beads for all station, trunk, and RS-232-C
cables. (Refer to SPECIFICATIONS, page 2-4.)
- Eight-conductor modular jack assemblies (one for
each Tl span installed).
- Four-pair, non-reversing, mod-to-mod line cords
(one for each Tl span installed).
- Tl cable -enough to extend from each telco termination to the MDF (see page 2-u) for cable specifications).
C.
- Gas discharge tubes with silicon avalanche suppres-
sors for lightning protection on the CO, DID, OPX,
andE&Mtrunks.
- Grounding terminal and 1OAWG wire for grounding
the equipment cabinet.
- Standard telephone hand tools and the mounting
hardware for the MDF backboard, trunk and station
blocks, modular jack assemblies, etc.
- Prepare a cable identification plan using station circuit numbers; do not use extension numbers (see
page 3-6 for details).
- Keysets: The IMX 256 System has the capacity for
up to 256 keysets if using the new digital keysets or
8-line IMX AIM keysets, which can be installed two
to a circuit. The GMX-256 System has the capacity
for up to 128 keysets. Refer to SPECIFICAI’IONS,
starting on page 2-21, for a listing of the available
keyset models and for more information on maximum station capacities. Excluding nondisplay only
models, all standard keysets can be converted to display keysets by installing optional Liquid Crystal
Display (LCD) Units (see REPLACEMENTPARTS
for part number).
(refer to page 2-31 for specifications).
3.2 Ifauy ‘II spans are to be installed: Depending on
the type of Tl terminationused by the telephone company (telco) and how close it is to the MDF, the following
tools and supplies are also needed.
NOTE: The Tl span is typically connected to the standard RJ48C modular jack provided on the Tl Card.
However, in certain situations (e.g., when using an external CSU equipped with a DB15 connector), it may be
more convenient to use the card’s optional DB15 connector instead. Refer to page 3-20 for more information.
I
NOTE: The equipment cabinet has 16 slots for station and trunk cards. The acmal number of stations
and trunks available depena3 on the number and
type of cam& station hsmmentts, and power supply
modides installed
- DSWBLF Units: Up to 50 keyset circuits can be
equipped with DSS/BLF Units. Digital units are
powered by their own AC transformers and do not
require a DKSC circuit that is separate from the keyset’s circuit. Each analog unit requires one KSC or
KSC-D circuit and its own cabling. As many as four
analog units can be installed on a single XSC.
- Four-pair, non-reversing, mod-to-mod line cords
(one for each Tl span installed).
For Tl spans terminated on RJ48C jacks away from
the MDF (see Figure 3-9 on page 3-18):
- Eight-conductor modular jack assemblies (two for
each Tl span installed).
PLAN STATION LOCATIONS AND TYPES
OF STATION INSTRUMENTS
NOTE: For information on the GX and GMX station
instruments, refer to appendixes A and B in the back of
this manual.
- [email protected] PC for customizing the database
For Tl spans terminated on RJ4SC jacks near the
MDF:
?i
For Tl spans terminated on an RI-type block (see
Figure 3-11 on page 3-19):
I
- Attendant Computer Consoles: If desired, up to
- Four-pair, non-reversing, mod-to-mod line cords
(two for each Tl span installed).
- Tl cable -enough to extend from each telco RJ48C
jack to the MDF (see page 2-20 for cable specifications).
Page 3-4
128 Attendant Computer Consoles can be installed
on the system. The consoles are connected to KSC or
KSC-D circuits.
NOTE: For additional information on the Attendant
Computer Console, along with detailed installation
and programming instructions, refer to the manual
included with the console.
. ‘:,
2’
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INS-TION & MAINTENANCE
INSTALLATION
Issue 1. November 1994
- Single-Line Sets: Up to 240 single-line sets can be
installed on the system. They can be Enhanced
Single-Line Sets @SLSs), Single-Line Instruments
(SLIs), or industry-standard, single-line DTMF sets.
- OPXrepeater(s) for amplifying voice volume levels,
if necessary. (Refer to page 2-30 for specifications.)
- PlaybackDevices:Playback devices can be used in
- External paging speakers and amplifier(s). (Refer to
the NOTE and CAUTION on page 2-6.)
place of single-line stations. They are especially
us&d as hunt group overflow/announcement stations and automated attendant stations. (Refer to
page 2-30 for specifications.)
D.
ASSEM$LE THE OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT
- Headsets for keyset stations and handset amplifiers
for keyset stations or single-line set stations.
- Digital keyset Personal Computer Data Port Modules (PCDPMs) for using Off-Hook Voice Announce
(OHVA) features, and for installing a digital DSS/
BLF Unit and/or an optional Modem Data PortModule.
- Digital keyset Modem Data Port Modules (MDPMs)
for connecting modem-equipped data devices or
single-line sets.
I
- Analog keyset Data Port Modules for hooking up
either modem-equipped data terminals or loud ringing adapters and external signaling devices.
- Up to two external music sources.
- General signaling devices.
- Power failure transfer equipment (customer-provided PFI’relay card, card mounting case, and external power source).
- Electronic equipment (alarms, lights, etc.) to connect to the night transfer relay and/or the Tl alarm
relays.
- For on-site or stand-alone/remote system programming, an IBM AT-compatible personal computer
with a minimum: 6 megabytes (MB) available
memory on the hard disk drive, [email protected] (1.2MB) or
3%~inch (l&MB) double sided/high density
floppy disk drive, 640k RAM (with minimum 512k
available), MS-DOS 3.3 (or 5.0,6-O, or 6.2), and an
EGA graphics monitor. A programming mouse is
optional (if used, install on an unassigned COM
port). For remote maintenance, a 300-, 1200-, or
2400-baud modem is also needed. (See page 5-3 for
more information.)
- SMDR/SMDA output device(s) must not have
cables longer than 50 feet (15 meters). (See page
2-31 for specifications.)
- Doorbox equipment. (Refer to page 2-32.)
- System battery back-up - uninterruptable power
supply or standby power supply. (Refer to page 2-32
for specifications.)
- Facsimile machine. (Refer page 2-32.)
- Voice mail equipment. (Refer to page 2-32.)
- Talkback speakers and external control unit. (Refer
to page 2-32.)
Page 3-5
I
I
I
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IlkWGMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
I
4. S’IXI’ION CABLING
A .
4.1 Floor plans should be developed to aid in proper
station cabling in a star (home run) configuration from
the equipment cabinet. The cables are run from the station locations to the station blocks at the MDF. Refer to
page 2-4 for cabling requirements.
NOTE: It is recommended that three-pair twisted cable
and six-conductor modular jacks be used for all station
connections. This allows the various types of station instruments to be easily interchanged, if necessary. However, digital keysets, ESLSs, SLIs, single-line IYIMF
sets, and playback devices can be installed using onepair twisted cable and four-conductor modular jacks. (If
three-pair cable is used for wiring digital keysets,
single-line sets, and playback devices as recommended,
extra terminal blocks and the use of crossconnect wiring techniques are required.)
4.2 Both ends of each cable should be labeled with the
station’s circuit number (hardware address). The circuit
number (X.Y) designates the card’s position in the
equipment cabinet (X = 1-16) and the circuit positionon
the card (Y = 1-16 for DKSCS, Y = l-8 for KSCs, KSClh, and IDES, Y = 1-16 for SLCs). For example, circuit
number 4.6 identifies the sixth circuit on the card installed in slot number four.
NOTE: When IMX 8-line dual-circuit keysets are installed two to a circuit, the circuit number is separated
into two parts (A and B) in database programming (e.g.,
circuit 4.6A and 4.6B).
I
4.6 From the MDF location, run industry standard,
three-pair (six-conductor) twisted (24AWG, level-l or
better) cable to keysets, analog DSS/BLF Units, Attendant Computer Consoles, single-line sets, and playback
devices. Follow these guidelines:
4 3 When the system is first powered up, the default
configuration is used to assign extensionnumbers to the
station circuits. On IMX 256 Systems, card slots l-4 are
considered KSCs or RSC-Ds, slots 5-6 are DKSCs, slots
7-8 are unassigned, slots 9-12 are SLCs, and slots
13-16 are LGCs. On GMX-256 Systems, card slots l-8
are considered KSCs or KSC-Ds, slots 9-12 are SLCs,
and slots 13-16 are LGCs. Changes to the default configuration can be made through database programming.
Refer to PROGRAMMIN G, page 5-170, for more information.
4.4 The system assigns extension number 100 to station circuit 1.1, extension number 101 to station circuit
1.2, and so on to match the initial configuration. Circuit
1.1 is equipped as the primary attendant’s keyset when
the system is in the default configuration. Through database programming the circuits can be assigned different extension numbers and/or be changed to four-digit
extension numbers. Refer to PROGRAMMING, page
5-58, for more information.
I
RUNNINGCABLE
Install proper type cable for the application according to the National Electrical Code and local building txnks.
Avoid cable runs parallel to fluorescent light fixtures
or AC lines not in conduit. If these obstacles are unavoidable, run the cables across them at right angles.
Do not run station cables inside electrical conduit already occupied by AC power cable. (To do so is a
violation of the National Electrical Code.)
Do not run cables near equipment with electric motors or through strong magnetic fields, such as those
generated by large copy machines, arc welding
equipment, heavy motors, etc.
Do not place station cables where they can be
stepped on or where they can be rolled over by office
furniture.
NOTE: “B” circuit 8-line IMXAlh4 keysets do not have
extension numbers until assigned one in database programminp.
Ifusingmulti-pair (e.g., 25-pair) cablerunstomultiple station locations, do not include AC-ringing
single-line sets, AC-ringing auxiliary equipment, or
trunks in a cable being used for analog keysets, Attendant Computer Consoles, or analog DSS/BLF
Units. Stations using analog keyset circuits should
be routed in separate multi-pair cable runs.
4.5 Each analog DSS/BLF Unit requires a KSC or
RX-D circuit and cabling that is separate from the keyset’s circuit and cabling. If50 keyset circuits are used for
analog DSS/BLF Units, 50 fewer analog keysets and/or
Attendant Computer Consoles can be installed. Up to
four units can be installed on a single Reyset Card.
Do not exceed the loop limit measurements (using
24AWG wire) for the station cable lengths as outlined in the table on page 3-29. The ohm values are
loop measurements; feet (meter) values are the maximum one-way measurements from the equipment
cabinet.
Page 3-6
INTEB-TELPBACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INS~TION & MAINTENANCE
4.7 Since the IMX 256 System utilizes digital voice
and data transmission between the digital keysets and
the equipment cabinet, there are some additional digital
keyset-only cabling requirements:
l
Do not use shielded cable, and do not use cable
smaller than 24AWG.
l
Do not parallel cables (i.e., do not “double up on the
COppX”).
0 Do not “bridge” or “Y” off the cable to another location.
l
Unlike analog keysets, the digital keysets do not
need to be routed in separate multi-pair cable runs.
For example, if using 25pair cable runs to multiple
station locations, it is acceptable to include singleline sets, auxiliary equipment, and trunks in a cable
being used for digital keysets.
FIGURE 3-l.
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
B.
TEBMINATING THE CABLES AT
S’l%I’ION LOCATIONS
Digital Keys&
4.8 Terminate the digital keyset station cables on fouror six-conductor modular jack assemblies at the station
lOC&iOIlS.
4.9 Do not mount the assemblies on the wall at this
time; they will be wall mounted later when the station
instruments are installed. Refer to Figure 3-l below for
a wiring diagram.
CAUTION
If the tip and ring is reversed when installing a
digital keyset, the keyset will not function.
DIGITAL KEYSET MODULAR JACK ASSEMBLY WIRING
RING
RING
I
I
TIP
FOR DIGITAL KEYSETS
USING FOUR-CONDUCTOR JACKS
FOR DIGITAL KEYSETS
USING SIX-CONDUCTOR JACKS
Page 3-7
INTER-TELlPRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
IlWTALUTION
Issue 1, November 1994
Analog
Station
Instruments
CAUTION
4.10
Terminate the analog keyset, analog DSS/BLF
Unit, Attendant Computer Console, single-line set, and
playback device station cables on six-conductor modular jack assemblies at the station locations. (For exceptions to this, refer to the NOTE following section A on
the previous page.)
If the power pair (W/BL, BL/W) is reversed, installing a keyset, Attendant Computer Console,
or DSS/BLF Unit will open the fuse or associated
thermistor on the Keyset Card. If the card has a
fuse, this affects operation of all station instruments connected to that card. If tip and ring (W/
BL, BL/W) is reversed for DC-ringing single-line
sets, the instrument may ring continuously.
4.I.l Do not mount the assemblies on the wall at this
time; they will be wall mounted later when the station
instruments are installed. Refer to Figure 3-2 below for
a wiring diagram.
FIGURE 3-2.
ANALOG SlATION MODULAR JACK ASSEMBLY WIRING
I
WlBL
w/o
WIG
I
BLMf
WI0
WIG
FOR ANALOG KEYSETS,
ATTENDANT COMPUTER CONSOLES,
AND ANALOG DSS/BLF UNITS
FOR SINGLE-LINE SETS
AND
PLAYBACK DEVICES
NOTE: The W/BL and BL/W conductors for the two types of stations are reversed. If the type of station
instrument is changed, the modular jack must be rewired.
Page 3-g
INTER-TELPRACTIcEs
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
5.
INSTALLATION
Issue 1. November 1994
ASSEMBLING THE MAIN
DISTRIBUTION FRAME (MDF’)
BACKBOARD
Cards (LGCs) and/or the Loop Start Cards
(Lscs)Up to 15 blocks for connecting DID trunks
and the 25pair cables for the Inward Dialing
~~0.
Up to 16 blocks for connecting station cables
and the 25pair cables for the station cards Digital Keyset Cards (DKSCs) for digital
keysets; Keyset Cards (KSCs or KSC-Ds) for
analog keysets, analog DSWBLF Units, and
Attendant Computer Consoles; Single-Line
Cards (SLCs) for single-line sets and playback devices; and Inward Dialing Cards
(ID&) for off-premises extensions and/or
on-premises single-line sets and playback
devices.
5.1 The main distribution frame (IUDF) is the point at
which the station instruments, trunks, and auxiliary system equipment are connected to terminal blocks (or, in
the case of Tl spans and optional Tl equipment, modular jack assemblies are used instead). These terminal
blocks (or modular jacks) are then connected to the 256
System. It is extremely important that the connections
be made careffilly and accurately.
NOTE: To simplify the MDF installation instructions,
this manual outlines basic one block to one card installation using bridging clips. However, it is quite acceptable, and in some situations more functional, to use
additional blocks and then moss connect between them.
5.2
(1)
(2)
NOTE: If, as recommended, three-pair cable
is used for wiring single-line sets and playback devices, extra terminal blocks and the
use of cross-connect wiring techniques are
required.
Assemble the MDF as follows:
Mount at least a 4 x 8-foot (1.2 x 2.4meter),
g-inch plywood backboard at the MDF location. (Depending on the number of stations and
trunks to lx installed, a larger backboard may be
necessary.)
Attach the 66Ml-Xl-type terminal blocks to the
plywood backboard. Refer to Figure 3-3 on the
next page for a sample MDF block layout and
cable assignments. Blocks include:
l
One block for connecting the RCPU Card
cable and cables for music sources, paging
equipment relay control, power failure transfer equipment, night transfer equipment,
general signaling devices, etc.
(3)
Up to 15 blocks for connecting CO trunks and
the 25pair cables for the Loop/Ground Start
Page 3-9
If any Tl spans or any optional Tl alarm signaling devices are to be installed, attach eight-conductor modular jack assemblies to the MDF as
required. (For complete information on installing Tl spans, refer to page 3-17.)
lN!3TALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE 3-3.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INS-TION & MAINTENANCE
SAMPLE MDF BLOCK LAYOUT AND CABLE ASSIGNMENTS
TO CENTRAL
OFFICE
LGC OR LSC
CO TRUNKS
l-8
-
i
f
E
L
:
-
LGC OR LSC
CO TRUNKS
9-16
1+
SLC
t
nl
m
IIt
DC
DID TRUNKS
l-8
14.16
KSC
I
3.8
KSC
I3.lC
-
14.1
28
3.1
13.1
SLC
21
EMC
E&M TRUNKS
1-4
SLC
-
KSC
TO STATIONS
SLC
Ki
ol
-
7.1
7.8
-
11.1
ll.lE
-
RCPU CARD
6.1
TO EXTERNAL
EQUIPMENT
8.8
Page 3-10
b
CABLES
TO 256
->*
.z-1
I
INS-TION
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATlON & MAINTENANCE
A.
CONNECTING THE TRUNK CABLES TO
TEEMDF
NOTE: Ferrite beads must be installed to meet
Part 15 of FCC regulations. Refer to REPLACEMENT PARTS for the part number.
c o lhmks
5.3 Connect the CO trunks and Loop/Ground Start
Card (LGC) and/or Loop Start Card (LX) cables as outlined below. Note that step 2 mentions two installation
methods. Although the first method is more flexible, the
second method can be used to minimize the number of
terminal blocks that are used. Refer also to Figures 3-5
and 3-6 on the following pages.
(1)
Cross connect the CO trunks from the telephone
company RJ-type blocks to the righz side of the
LGC/LSC blocks.
NOTE: For additional lightning protection, see
paragraph 5.6 on the next page.
(2)
Mefhod A: Using enough 25-pair cable to run
from the LGC/LSC blocks to the cards, make the
termination cables. Attach a %)-pin female amphenol-type connector to one end of each LGC/
LSC cable. Label each connector and cable end
with the appropriate slot number (for example,
SLOT-15). These oo~ectors will be attached to
the cards after they are installed in the equipment
cabinet.
Method B: Using enough 25pair cable to run
from the LGC/LSC blocks to the cards, make the
special termination cables. Attach up to three
%-pin female amphenol-type connectors to one
end of each LGC/LSC cable as shown in Figure
3-6. Connect CO trunks l-8 to one connector,
trunks 9-16 to another connector, trunks 17-24
to a third connector, and so on for each cable.
Label each connector with the appropriate slot
number (for example, SLOT-E). These connectors will be attached to the cards after they are installed in the equipment cabinet.
(3)
Using standard electrical tape, tape two ferrite
split beads around each 25-pair cable just below
the amphenol-type connector (as shown in Figure 3-4 on the next page).
(4)
Terminate the other end of each 25-pair cable on
the left side of the corresponding LGCZSC
block.
(5)
Install bridging clips to complete the connecti0I.B.
DID ‘D-u&
5.4 Connect the Direct Inward Dialing (DID) trunks
and Inward Dialing Card (RX!) cables as follows. Refer
to Figure 3-7 on page 3-15 and Figure 3-19 on page
3-28.
NOTE: Resides DID trunks, IDCs can also be used to
install single-line sets, playback devices, and offpremises stations. Any combination using the eight circuits on the card is possible. Refer to pages 3-21 to 3-28
for station installation instructions.
(1)
Cross connect the DID trunks from the telephone
company RJ-type blocks to the right side of the
IlX blocks.
NOTE: For additional lightning protection, see
paragraph 5.6 on the next page.
(2)
Using enough 25-pair cable to run from the IDC
blocks to the Inward Dialing Cards, make the termination cables. Attach a 50-pin female amphenol-type connector to one end of each IDC cable.
Label each connector and cable end with the ap
propriate slot number (for example, SLOT-16).
These connectors will be attached to the Inward
Dialing Cards after the circuit cards are installed
in the equipment cabinet.
(3)
Using standard electrical tape, tape two ferrite
split beads around each 25-pair cable just below
the amphenol-type connector (as shown in Figure 3-4 on the following page).
(4)
Terminate the other end of each 25-pair cable on
the Zej? side of the corresponding IDC block.
Q
Install bridging clips to complete the connec-
Page 3-11
tiOIlS.
INS~TION
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMWGMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
E&M’Ih&s
(4)
5.5 Connect E&M trunks and E&M Card @MC)
cables as follows. Refer to Figure 3-g on page 3-16.
Terminate the other end of each 25-pair cable on
the ZejI side of the corresponding EMC block.
(5)
Install bridging clips to complete the connec-
(1)
Cross comtect the E&M trunks from the telephone company RJ-type blocks to the right side
of the RMC blocks.
NOTE: For additional lightning protection, see
paragraph 5.6.
( 2 ) UsingenoughpaircabletorunfromtheEMC
blocks-to the EZ&M Cards, make the termination
cables. Attach a 50-pin female amphenol-type
connector to one end of each EMC cable. Label
each connector and cable end with the appropriate slot number (for example, SLQT-16). These
connectors will be attached to the -E&M Cards
after the telecommunication cards ‘are installed
in the equipment cabinet.
(3)
Using standard electrical tape, tape two ferrite
split beads around each 25pair cable just below
the amphenol-type connector (as shown in Figure 3-4 below).
FIGURE 3-4.
tiOIiS.
Lightning Protection
5.6 For additional lightning protection, install gas discharge tubes with silicon avalanche suppressors to
ground (grounding rod or copper, cold water pipe) on
each CO, DID, E&M, and OPXtrunk. This must be done
external to the system. Each gas discharge tube is installed directly between the telephone company RI-type
block and the system’s CO/DID/E&M/OPX input. This
protection should give energy absorption and filter lowlevel surge potentials. (For installation instructions and
specific recommendations, contact Customer Support.)
5.7 Also, in areas with frequent occurrences of lightning, it is recommended that the cable between the telephone company RJ-type blocks and the gas discharge
tubes be at least 75 feet long (the cable may be coiled up
if desired).
EXAMPLE OF FERRITE BEAD INSTALLATION
AMPHENOL-TYPE
CONNECTORS
25-PAIR CABLES
TO THE MDF
FERRITE
BEADS
Page 3-12
:‘!,
, ::
INTER-TELPRAcTICE!3
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 3-5.
LGC/LSC
INSTALIATION
Issue 1, November 1994
BLOCK CABLE TERMJNATIONS
(METHOD A)
LGC/LSC
1.1
RIUG-
1,-
T I P 1 2 r1
RING -
-
1
2
-
-
-
-
-
3
LOOP/GROUND
START CARD OR
LOOP START
CARD
r
AMPHENOLTYPE
CONNECTOR
66Ml-SO-TYPE
BLOCK
(PART OF MDF)
Page 3-13
TEE0
RJ
lNTER.TEJaPRAcTIcEs
IMX/GMX256 DKIXLLATION 2% MAINTENANCE
INS-TION
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE 3-6.
LGC/LSC
BLOCK CABLE TERMINATIONS (METHOD B)
FEMALE AMPHENOL-TYPE CONNECTORS
-
n
-
l-2
WraL-oRR
6-16
Rm-aw
17-24
TRUNK6
f&WV
17-24
25-PAIR
CABLE TO MDF
Page 3-14
LGWLSC
66Ml-50-TYPE BLOCK
(PART OF MDF)
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 3-7.
INS-mON
Issue 1, November 1994
IDC BLOCK CABLE TERMINATIONS
IDC
np
r 1
RING-
-
np -
.
1
-
-
1 . 2 I1 1
RINB-
.
2
-
TO
b TELCO
RJ
np
1.8
RING
RIO
NoTusED
.
INWARD
DIALING
CARD
-
-
-
-
-
-
R/BR
BRlR
.
-
Fm
I
-
SIR
BKBL
BL%K
AC ENABLE
.
1
.
1.8 -
1
-
1
1.1
-
~~-
AMPHENOLTYPE
CONNECTOR
66Ml-%-TYPE
BLOCK
(PART OF MDF)
NOTE: The AC Enable terminations shown above are used only when installing single-lines sets and playback devices, not DID trunks. For information on their use, refer to the following pages.
Page 3-15
IN-TION
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE 3-8.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
EMC BLOCK CABLE TERMINATIONS
EMC
TO
TELCO
RJ
.
E&M
CARD
H
r
AMPHENOLTYPE
CONNECTOR
,--Id U I
l-
TO
TELCO
RJ
66Ml-50-TYPE
BLOCK
(PART OF MDF)
NOTE: Depending on the area of the country and/or the specific type of E&M trunk ordered, one or more of
the cable pairs shown above may not always be needed. For each E&M trunk to be installed, terminate all
cable pairs provided by the telephone company, as shown in the pinout above.
Page 3-16
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INS-TION & MAIlQTNAlKl3
B.
CONNECTING Tl !3PANS TO TEEMDF
5.8 The installation procedure used to connect Tl
spans at the MDF is dependent on the type of termination used by the telephone company and how close it is
to the MDF. The Tl spans may be terminated on RJ48C
modular jacks or on RJ-type terminal blocks.
(1)
Mount one eight-conductor modular jack assembly next to each telephone company RJ48C jack.
(2)
For each modular jack assembly mounted in step
1, also mount a corresponding eightconductor
modular jack assembly on the MDF backboard.
(3)
To connect the modular jack assemblies
mounted in steps 1 and 2:
5.9 Follow one of the three Tl termination methods
(A, B, or C) outlined on the following pages.
a. Run Tl cable between the uuresponding
modular jack assemblies.
NOTE: The Tl span is typically connected to the standard RJ4gC jack provided on the Tl Card. However, in
certain situations (e.g., when using an external CSU
equipped with a DB15 connector), it may bc more convenient to use the card’s optional DB15 connector
instead. Refer to page 3-20 for more information.
NOTE: If the telephone company termination is more than 2000 feet from the MDF,
special Tl cable uzu.rf be used (see page 2-20
for cable specifications). For shorter distances, two lengths of standard two-pair voice-frequency cable (one cable for transmit
and one cable for receive) may be used instead.
Method A - Tl Spans Terminated On RJ4SC
Jacks Near The MDF
b . Wue each end of the cable onto their respectivemodular jack assemblies. Refer to Figure
3-10 on the next page for a diagram of the
wiring.
5.10 Install Tl spans terminated on RJ4gC jacks near
the MDF as outlined in below.
Plug one end of a four-pair, non-reversing
(straight through), mod-to-mod line cord into
each telephone company RJ48C jack. The other
end of each line cord will Zater be plugged into
the Tl jack on the corresponding Tl Card.
(4
NOTE: Make sure the connectors on the ends of
each line cord are properly attached. If any of the
wires are cracked or broken, Tl transmission
problems can occur.
At the telephone company termination, plug one
end of a four-pair, non-reversing (straight
through), mod-to-mod line cord into each RJ4gC
jack and plug the other end into the corresponding modular jack assembly next to it.
(5)
Method B - Tl Spans Terminated On RJSSC
Jacks Away Fom The MDF
At the MDF backboard, plug one end of a fourpair, non-reversing (straight through), mod-tomod line cord into each modular jack assembly.
The other end of each line cord will later be
plugged into the Tl jack on the correspondingT1
Card.
5.11 Install Tl spans terminated on RJ48C jacks away
from the MDF as outlined in the following steps. Refer
to Figure 3-9 on the next page for a diagram of the complete layout.
NOTE: Make sure the connectors on the ends of
each line cord are proFrly attached. Ifauy of the
wires are cracked or broken, Tl transmission
problems can occur.
Page 3-17
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INS’ICAUATON & MAINTENANCE
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE 3-9, Tl SPAN TERMINATIONS
FOUR-PAIR, NONREVERSING,
MOD-TO-MOD
LINE CORD
Tl CABLE
FOUR-PAIR, NONREVERSING,
MOD-TO-MOD
LINE CORD
EIGHT-CONDUCTOR
MODULAR JACK ASSEMBLIES
JACK
FIGURE 3-10.
.
FROM RJ4SC JACKS
MODULAR JACK ASSEMBLY WIRING FOR Tl SPANS
MODULAR JACK ASSEMBLY
FOUR-PAIR, NONREVERSING,
MOD-TO-MOD
LINE CORD
1
‘ 2
34 -56 - 76
RING
w-n
TIP1
(IN)
RING1
UN)
NOTE: OUT = transmit to network, IN = receive from network
Page 3-18
Tl CARD
RJ48C JACK
INTER-TEL+PBACTICES
IMNGMX
256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
Method C - Tl Spans Terminated On An
RJ-‘Qpe Block
cable for transmit and one cable for receive) may
be used instead.
5.12 Install the Tl spans as outlined in the following
steps. Refer to Figure 3-11 below for a diagram of the
complete layout.
a . Terminate one end of a six-pair cable on each
modular jack assembly. Refer to Figure 3-10
on the previous page.
(1)
(2)
b . Terminate the other end of the six-pair cable
on the right side of the Tl R&type terminal
block.
On the MDF backboard, mount one eight-conductor modular jack assembly for each Tl span
termination on the telephone company RJ-type
block(s).
Plug one end of a four-pair, non-reversing
(straight through), mod-to-mod line cord into
each modular jack assembly (mounted in step 1).
The other end of each line cord will later be
plugged into the Tl jack on the correspondingT1
Card.
Connect Tl cable between the telephone company terminations and the corresponding modular
jack assemblies as follows:
NOTE: If the telephone company termination is
more than 2000 feet from the MDF, special Tl
cable must be used (see page 2-20 for cable specifications). For shorter distances, two lengths of
standard two-pair voice-frequency cable (one
FIGURE 3-W
NOTE: Make sure the connectors on the ends of
each line cord are properly attached. If any of the
wires are cracked or broken, Tl transmission
problems can occur.
Tl SPAN TERMINATIONS FROM R&TYPE
Tl CABLE
TO
TELCO
BLOCKS
FOUR-PAIR, NONREVERSING,
MOD-TO-MOD
LINE CORD
EIGHT-CONDUCTOR
MODULAR JACK ASSEMBLY
Page 3-19
lNTER-TELPRACTIcEs
IMXIGMX 256 INS’rALLATION & MAINTENANCE
INS’lXLLAl”ION
Issue 1, November 1994
Using The Optional DBl5 Connector In Place Of
The RJ4SC Jack
5.13 The three Tl installation methods described on
the preceding pages show the Tl span being connected
to the RJ48C jack on the Tl Card. However, in certain
situations (e.g., when using an external CSU equipped
with a DB15 connector), the installer may wish to use
the card’s optional DB15 connector instead.
5.14 The pin functions of the Tl Card DB15 connector (U-pin subminiature “D” female connector) are as
follows:
-
FIGURE 3-12.
MALE
USING
5.15 To connect the DB15 connector on the Tl Card to
a DB15 connector coming from the Tl span, a flat,
28AWG, twisted-pair ribbon cable with a maximum
capacitance of 16pF/ft. may be used for distances of up
to 50 feet, as shown in the figure below. For distances
longer than 50 feet, use the special high-speed data
cable described in paragraph 3.91 on page 2-20.
THE Tl CARD’S OPTIONAL DB15 CONNECTOR
MALE
DB15 CONNECTOR
TO Ti SPAN
DB15 CONNECTOR
TOT1 CARD
1 -fiP(Out)
9 Ring (Out)
2
10
3 Tip 1 (in)
11 Ring 1 (in)
4
12
5
13
6
14
7
15
8
TP(Out) 1
Ring (Out) 9
2
10
lip 1 (In) 3
Ring 1 (In) 11
4
12
5
13
6
14
7
-15
8
NOTE: OUT = transmit to network, IN = receive from network
Page 3-20
INSTAUATION
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GM.X 256 INSTAlLLATION & MAINTENANCE
C.
mended), extra terminal blocks and the use of
cross-connect wiring techniques are required.
COlWECTlNG S’IATION CABLES TO THE
MDF
5.16 Each type of station instrument is comtected to a
specific station card. Digital keysets are connected to
I DKSCs. Analog keysets, analog DSS/BLF Units, and
Attendant Computer Consoles are comtected to KSCs or
KSC-Ds. Single-line sets and playback devices are connected to SLCs and/or IDCs.
NOTE: Resides single-line sets, playback devices, and
off-premises extensions, IDCa can also be used to install
DID trunks. Any combination using the eight circuits on
the card is Possible. Refer to pages 3-11 to 3-15 for DID
trunk installation instructions.
(3)
Using enough 25pair cable to run from each
block to each station card in the equipment cabinet, make the termination cables. Attach a
50-pin female amphenol-type connector to one
end of each cable. Label each connector and
cable end with the appropriate slot number (for
example, SLOT-2). These co~ectors will be attached to the station cards after the circuit cards
are installed.
(4
Using standard electrical tape, tape two ferrite
split beads around each 25-pair cable just below
the amphenol-type connector (as shown in Figure 3-12).
5.17 After the station cables are run, connect them and
the 25-pair cables to the station blocks on the MDF as
follows:
(1)
(2)
I
Ensure that both ends of each station cable are labeled with the circuit number of the associated
station instrument.
NOTE: Ferrite beads must be installed to meet
Part 15 of FCC regulations. Refer to REPLACEMENT PAWTS for the part number.
Q
Terminate each station cable on the right side of
the corresponding station block. Refer to Figures
3-13 through 3-19 on the following pages for
station cable terminations.
NOTE: For simplicity, Figures 3-13,3-17, and
3-18 show digital keysets, single-line sets, and
playback devices being installed using one-pair
cable and four-conductor modular jacks. Of
course, if three-pair cable and six-conductor
modular jacks are used instead (as is recom-
Terminate the other end of each 25-pair cable on
the Zefi side of the corresponding station block.
NOTE: lf necessary, any of the eight circuits on
an IDC can be enabled for AC ringing to be used
with off-premises extensions or on-premises
AC-ringing equipment. To do this, each circuit
can be strapped directly at the IDC terminal
block (as shown in Figure 3-18 on page 3-27) or
on the card itself (as described on page 3-51).
(6)
Page 3-21
DO NOT attach bridging clips until the loop re-
sistance tests have been performed (as described
on page 3-29).
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE 3-13.
IMXIGMX
DIG+ KSC BLOCK CABLE TERMINATIONS FOR KEYSETS
DKSC
RING -
np -
L
-
1
l-1.1.1
-
-
MODULAR
JACK
ASSEMBLY
A
121~,,~1.!21--‘RING --me
np
1.8.11 -
RING -
-
TO DIGITAL
KEYSET
Jy.8.1
TO DIGITAL
KEYSET
DIGITAL
KEYSET
CARD
AMPHENOLTYPE
CONNECTOR
INTER-TELPRACTICES
256INS~~ON &MAINTENANCE
np
1 ‘-&---I
66Ml-50-TYPE
BLOCK
(PART OF MDF)
NOTE: For simplicity, this figure shows keysets being installed using one-pair cable and four-conductor
modular jacks. Of course, if two-pair cable or three-pair cable is used instead, extra terminal blocks and the
use of cross-connect wiring techniques are required. Note that tip and ring are connected to the secondpuir of
terminals (black and yellow) on the modular jack.
Page 3-22
,.. \
/
INSTAz;LATION
Issue 1, November 1994
lNTER-TELPRACTIcEs
IMX’GMX 256INSTALIATION& lMMNTENANCE
FIGURE 3-14.
ANALOG KSC BLOCK CABLE TERMINATIONS
KSC
MODULAR
KEYSET
CARD
MODULAR
SLMIGMJ
olw ml
G/WSEC
JACK
I
I
ASSEMBLY
I
1
TO KEYSET,
ATTENDANT
CONSOLE,
OR DSSBLF
AMPHENOLTYPE
CONNECTOR
66Yl-S&TYPE
BLOCK
(PART OF MDF)
Page 3-23
I N - T I O N
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE 3-15.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256INsTALcATON & MAINTENANCE
INSTALLING S-LINE IMX AIM KEYSETS TWO TO A CIRCUIT
!
CIRCUIT 1 .lA
MDF
A
CIRCUIT 1.1A
MDF
BLOCK
CIRCUIT l.lA
KSC-D
CIRCUIT l.lB
C
NOTE: This illustration shows three common methods for installing two 8-line IMX AlM keysets on a single
KSC-D circuit. For a detailed wiring diagram of method A, refer to the following-page.
Page 3-24
\
i
;!
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMXGMX 256INSTAL.LA’TION & MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 3-16.
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
KSC-D BLOCK CABLE TERMINATIONS FOR &LINE IMX AIM
KEYSETS INSTALLED TWO TO A CIRCUIT
MODULAR
CIRCUIT 1 .lA
KSGD
I
I
I
--k-l-r
-fi I
BWOND
I
om PRI
WSEC
MODULAR
JACK
ASgEMBLY
1 CIRCUIT 1 .l B
I I
TO S-LINE
AIM KEYSET
66Ml-50-TYPE
BLOCK
(PART OF MDF)
I
WF;
SEC
I
NOTE: This illustration details one common method for wiring two Mine IMX Alh4 keysets to a single
KSC-D circuit. For a simple illustration of some alternative installation methods, refer to the previous page.
Page 3-25
INSTALLATION
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSI’AUATION & MAINTENANCE
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE 3-17.
SLC BLOCK CABLE TERMINATIONS
MODULAR
JACK
ASSEMBLY
0
Y
R
BK
TO SINGLELINE SET OR
PLAYBACK
DEVICE
w
SINGLELINE
CARD
wmnp
MODULAR
JACK
3
TO SINGLELINE SET OR
PLAYBACK
DEVICE
AMPHENOLTYPE
CONNECTOR
66Ml-W-TYPE
BLOCK
(PART OF MDF)
NOTE: For simplicity, this figure shows single-line sets and playback devices being installed using one-pair
cable and four-conductor modular jacks. Of course, if three-pair cable and six-conductor modular jacks are
used instead (as is recommended), extra terminal blocks and the use of cross-connect wiring techniques are
required.
Page 3-26
INTER-TEL4PRAcTICEs
IMX/GMX256 INSJALLA~ON & MAINTENANCE
INSTALCATLON
Issue 1, November 1994
IDC BLOCK CABLE TERMINATIONS
FIGURE 3-18.
IDC
np1.1 y
RING nP 1.21
RING-
-
WBL
..,-- TIP
RING
l-1.2----
wo
oIR+
FIBR
-
NOTUSED
m
sR!R
I
lus
.
S/R
BKlgL
BIAK
1.8 1 -
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
A-
AcEN4sLE
.
1.1
1
MODULAR
JACK
ASSEMBLY
-
bF%
nP
INWARD
DIALING
CARD
-
TO OFF PREMISES STATION,
SINGLE-LINE
sm. OR PlAY-
WBLTIP
MODULAR
JACK
ISES STATION,
SINGLE-LINE
SET, OR PlAYBACK DEVICE
1.1
1,-
-
ANY OF THE EIGHT IDC ClRCUlTS CAN BE
STRAPPED FOR AC-RINGING ElTHER HERE ON
\ THE BLOCK OR ON THE CARD lTSELF, IF
/ STRAPPED HERE. REMCIVE THE ASSOCIATED
STRAP(S) ON THEf CARD BEFORE INSTALLING.
AMPHENOLTYPE
CONNECTOR
66Ml-SO-TYPE
BLOCK
(PART OF MDF)
NOTE: For simplicity, this figure shows single-line sets and playback devices being installed using one-pair
cable and four-conductor modular jacks. Of course, if three-pair cable and six-conductor modular jacks are
used instead (as is recommended), extra terminal blocks and the use of cross-connect wiring techniques are
required.
Page 3-27
IN-TION
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE 3-19.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATlON& MAINTENANCE
STATION CABLE TERMINATIONS ON TIjIE STATION BLOCK
--.- .\
..\1
-2
DC or KSGP
26
1
27
2
28
3
W - BL
B L - w
w - o
0
w
W - G
G - W
CKTllIP
CKl-1RING
CKT2TxP
CKT2RING
CIcr3TlP
cKT3RING
CKr1+3oVDC
CKl-1GND
CKTlPRIMARYPArH
CKTlPRmARYPAm
CKT 1 SBCONDARY PATB
clcr 1 SBCONDARY PATH
CKTlTlP
CKTlRlNG
CKTzTlP
CRTZRING
CKT3TIP
cRT3RING
CKTlTlP
CKTlRING
CKT2TIP
cRT2RR’JG
CKT3TIP
CKT3RING
29
4
30
5
31
6
W B R w s
R B L -
CKT4TIP
CKT4RING
cKT5TlP
CKTSRING
CKT6TIP
CKT6RING
CKT2+3oVDC
CKT2GND
CKr2PRRdARYPAni
CKT2PRJhfARYPATH
CKT 2 SECONDARY PATH
cm 2 SECONDARY Pa-H
CKT4TlP
CKT4RING
cKT5TlP
CKTSRING
CKT6TIP
CKr6RlNG
CKr4TIP
cIcT4RlNG
CKTSTIP
CKTSRING
CKT6TIP
CKT6RING
32
7
33
8
34
9
R
- 0
0
- R
R : G
G - R
R - BR
BR- R
CKT7m
CKT7RING
CKT8TIP
CKT8RING
clcr9TlP
CKT9RlNG
CKT3+3oVDC
CKI’3GND
CKT3PRJ.MARYPATH
CKr3PRMARYPmH
cKT3 SECONDARY PATIi
cKr3 SECONDARY PATH
CIcr7m
CKT7RING
CKT8TR’
CKr8RING
cKr9TrP
CKT9RING
CKT7TIP
CKT7RING
CKTBTIP
CKT8RING
NOT USED
NOT USED
35
10
36
11
37
12
R
S
BK
BL
BK
0
CKrlOTIp
CKT 1ORJNG
CKTllTIP
CICT 11 RING
CKT12TIP
CKT 12RING
CKT4+3oVDC
CKT4GND
CKT4PRrMARYPATB
CKT4PRIMARYPAIH
CKT 4 SECONDARY PATB
CKT 4 SECONDARY PATH
CKrlOTlP
CKl. lORING
CKTllTlP
CKTllRING
CKT12TIP
CKT 12 RING
NOTUSED
NOT USBD
CKTIACBNABLB
CKTlACENABLB
CKl’2ACENABLE
CKT 2 AC ENABLE
3
13
39
14
40
15
8
BR
w
s
w
BL
R
-
S
R
- BL
- BK
- 0
- BK
BKG BK BR BK S
-
G
BK
BR
BK
S
BK
cIcr13TIP
CKl’13RING
CKT14TlP
CKT14RING
CKTlSTIP
CKTlSRING
CKT5+3OVDC
CKrsGND
CKT5PRIMARYPhsrH
CKT5PRlMARYPATH
CKTS SECONDARY PATH
CKTS SECONDARY PATH
cKT13TIP
CKT13RING
CKT14TIP
CRT 14RING
cRT15TIP
CKTlSRING
CKT3ACBNABLE
CKT3ACBNAB=
cRT4ACBNABLE
CKT4ACENABLE
CKTSACENABLE
CKT5ACENABLE
41
16
42
17
43
18
Y
BL
Y
0
Y
G
-
BL
Y
0
Y
G
Y
CKT16Tl.P
CKT16RING
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED
CKT6 t3OVDC
cKT6GND
CKT6PRMARYPATH
CKT 6 PRIMARY PATH
CKT 6 SECONDARY PATH
CKT 6 SECONDARY PATH
CKl’16TJP
CKT 16 RING
NOT USED
NOT USED
GROUND
GROUND
CKr6ACBNAB~
CKT6ACENABLE
CKT7ACENABLE
CKT7ACENABLB
CKT8ACBNABrx
CKT8ACENABLE
44
19
45
20
46
21
Y
BR
Y
S
V
BL
-
BR
Y
- s
- Y
- BL
- V
NOT
NOT
NOT
NOT
NOT
NOT
USED
USED
USED
USED
USBD
USBD
CKT7t3oVDC
CKT7GND
CKT7PRMARYPATH
CKr7PRMARYPATH
cm 7 SECONDARY PATH
CKT 7 SECONDARY PATH
GROUND
GROUND
GROUND
GROUND
GROUND
GROUND
GROUND
GROUND
GROUND
GROUND
GROUND
GROUND
47
22
48
23
49
24
V
0
V
G
V
BR
-
NOT
NOT
NOT
NOT
NOT
NOT
USBD
USED
USED
USED
USED
USED
CKT 8 t3OVDC
CKT8GND
CRT8PRJhiARYPATH
CKT8PRJhMRYPAIH
CKT 8 SECONDARY PATTI
CICF 8 SECONDARY PATH
GROUND
GROUND
GROUND
GROUND
GROUND
GROUND
GROUND
GROUND
GROUND
GROUND
-48
GROUNTI
50
25
V
s
-
NOT USED
NOT USED
-48V
-48V
-48V
GROUND
-
0
v
G
V
BR
- V
s
v
NOT USBD
NOT USED
Page 3-28
.
.,’
‘,
:>
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
IrJTER-TELPRACTICES
IM.X/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
D.
STATION LOOP RESISTANCE TEST
ing should not exceed the limits (for 24AWG
wire) listed in the chart below (ohm values are
the loop measurements; feet/meter values are the
maximum one-way measurements from the
equipment cabinet).
5.18 Perform the loop resistance test for each station
cable individually.
(1)
Ensure that bridging clips have not been
installed on the station blocks and that the station
instrument is not connected to the modular jack
assembly.
(2)
Place a short across the RED and GREEN wires
on the modular jack assembly.
(3)
At the -&DF, measure the resistance across the
WHlTE/BLUE and BLUE/WHITE wires on the
right (station) side of the station block. The read-
NOTE: Excessive and/or improperly made connections increase the resistance of a cable, which
reduces the allowable cable run length.
(4)
Remove the short after the test is complete.
(5)
Repeat this test for each station cable.
(6)
Iustall bridging clips on the station blocks to
complete the cable connections.
E OF INSDigital Keysets (both Standard and tiecutive, display and non-display) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 ohms/2000 ft. (609 m.)
DigitalKeysetswithattachedPCandModemDataPo~Modules
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103obms/2000ft.(609m.)
FIomModemDataPortModulestosinglc-linesets..
..............................
195ohms/3800ft.(1158m.)
IMX12-Lineand~eKeyse&(standardanddisplay).
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65ohms/l26Oft(384m.)
IMXlZLineand26iineKeysetswithDataPortModules.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected](295m.)
82 ohmsDS9Oft. (484 m.)
IMX 12-Line and D-Line AIM Keysets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IMXlZLineand24-LineAIMKeysetswithDataPoltModules..
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66ohms/l28Oft(39Om.)
lMX8LineKeysets.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
..75ohms/1460&(445m .)
IhiK S-Line Alhi Keysets (when installed one to a circuit) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 OhmsIXmO R (609 nl.)
IMX 8-Line AIM Keysets (when installed two to a circuit)* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 ohm/lSMl ft. (457 m.)*
Inter-Tel/DVK Keysets (standard and display) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
82 oh&l590 (484 m.)
I&r-Tel/DVKKcysctswithDataPortModules..
.................................
66oh&l28Oft.(39Om.)
IMXandInter-Tel/DVKDSS/BIZUnits
........................................
65ohms/l26Oft.(384m.)
BSEk(ACorDC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8OOohn&lS56Oft.(4742m.)
SLIs(ACorDC). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8OOohms/lS56Oft.(4742n~)
800 ohnW1556Oft. (4742 m.)
Playback Devices (AC or DC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IndustryStandard,SmgleLineDTMFSe~(ACorDC). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8OOohms/lU6OR(47421n.)
l
The actual loop limits for &line AlM keysets installed two to a circuit varies according to the type of ins&llation method used, asshown
inFi~e3-15onpage~24.LfmethodAisused(separatecabling~thelooplimitf~eachkeyset(asmeanuedfromtheequipmentcabinet
to the station location) must not exceed 77 ohms/l500 ft. (457 m.). If methods B or C are used (shared cabling), the loop Iimit for each
keyset is reduced to 51 ohms/l000 ft. (305 m.). Also note that if shielded cable is llsed for any type of non-digital keyset insta&tion, the
actual loop limit may be reduced by as much as 20% because the foil wrapped around the wires in the cable acts as a capacitor. Do not
use shielded cable for digital keyset instaHations. Longa loop lengths can be achieved by using heavier gauge cable, such as 22AWG.
(For additional station cabling requirements, refer to page 3-6.)
Page 3-29
INTER-TEL#PRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
E. CONNECTING OPTIONAL
OFF-PRFMISES EXTENSIONS (OPXs)
Information on operating and adjusting the repeater unit
is included with the product.
5.19 Off-premises extensions are remote ESLSs,
524 Install the off-Premises extensions as follows (refer to Figure 3-18 on page 3-27):
SLIS, or single-line DTMF sets that are connected to the
256 System through telephone company OPX circuits
(or customer-provided circuits). At the MDF, the circuits are connected to Inward Dialing Cards (IDCs).
(1)
NOTE: IDCs do not support message waiting applications. If single-line sets with message waiting lamps are
installed on IDCs, the lamps will not function.
At the MDF, terminate each telephone company
OPX circuit (or customer-provided circuit) on
the tight side of the appropriate IDC terminal
block.
(2)
Install bridging clips on the IDC block(s) to complete the connection.
5.20 Off-premises station instruments must be ACringer-equipped. The DC’s onboard high-voltage ringing
adapter (HVRA) provides isolation from the telephone
company OPX circuits as required by FCC regulations.
(3) At the off-premises location, terminate each
telephone company OPX circuit (or customerprovided circuit) on the appropriate single-line
set modular jack assembly.
5.21 Each DC can support up to eight off-premises
extensions. The individual DC circuits used for the
OPXS must be strapped for AC ringing. They can be
strapped directly at the IDC terminal block (as shown in
Figure 3-18 on page 3-27) or on the card itself (as described on page 3-51). (On premises, IDC circuits can
be used for installing AC or DC voice mail units, digital
attendants, etc.)
5.22 In certain off-premises applications, voice volume levels may not be acceptable. This degradation in
voice volume is due to the natural voice frequency range
limitations of the telephone company or customer-provided circuit. To increase the voice frequency range, installation of a 2-w&, negative impedance repeater unit
is recommended. (Refer to page 2-30 for specifications.)
5.23 The repeater unit is installed at the MDF between
the DC terminal block and the cabling to the off-premises single-line station. For proper installation with
the 256 System, the following are connected to the appropriate ,pins* on the repeater unit (refer to the manufacturer’s instructions for proper pin locations):
-Battery (-24 to -56VDC), Ground, System Tip, System Ring, OPXTip, and OPX Ring. For complete installation instructions, contact Customer Support.
F.
CONNECTING THE RCPU CARD TO THE
MDF
5.25 The RCPU Card is terminated at the MDF so that
it can be connected to a variety of optional equipment,
including: music sources, power failure transfer equip
ment, signaling devices, night transfer equipment, etc.
Connect the RCPU Card to the MDF as follows:
(1)
Using enough 25-pair cable to run from the
RCPU Card terminal block to the RCPU Card in
the equipment cabinet, make a termination
cable. Attach a %-pin female amphenol-type
connector to the RCPU Card end of the cable.
Label the connector “RCPU Card”. This connector will be attached to the RCPU Card after the
circuit cards are installed in the equipment cabinet.
(2)
Terminate the other end of the cable on the 2ef
side of the RCPU Card block.
(3)
Terminate the desired optional equipment on the
right side of the RCPU Card block as shown in
Figure 3-20 on the following two pages.
(4)
Install bridging clips on the RCPU Card block to
complete the installation.
Page 3-30
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 3-20.
RCPU CARD CABLE TERMINATIONS
RCPU
(PART OF MDF)
-
RCPU
CARD
41
Jr
r
A
Jr
-IIr
AMPHENOL-
1
CONz:TOR
1
1
1
3 6
.
RB-C
- 11
R2ENc
-
37
DGNC
12
NC
- - 3 8
NC
-
NC
,
-
13
-3S
DcxcJ
-
14
NC
0
NC
16
NC
-
4
-
L
66Mi40-TYPE
BLOCK
(CONTINUED
ON THE NEXT
PAGE)
Page 3-31
FJarusEc)
(NoTus=)
1
J
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
xNTER-TELPRAcTIcJ3s
IMX/GMX 256 INS~TION & MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 3-20.
RCPU CARD TERMINATIONS (CONT’D)
RCPU
(CONTINUED FROM
THE PREVIOUS
PAGE)
--L
42
NC
l--II,,
NC
-44
NC
- 10
NC
-1,
-
RCPU
CARD
25
r-l
I
AMPHENOLTYPE
CONNECTOR
66Ml-!5O=lYPE
BLOCK
(PART OF MDF)
Page 3-32
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
lNTER-TELPRfKTIcEs
IMX/GMX 256 INS-TION & MAINTENANCE
G.
CONNECTING OPTIONAL Tl ATARM
RELAY DEVICES TO TEE MDF
(3)
5.26 In addition to the Tl span connection (as outlined
on page 3-17), Tl Cards may also be connected to op
tional Tl alarm signaling devices.
NOTE: For information on Programming Tl
alarm relays, refer to page 5-129 in the PROGRAMMING section of the manual.
5.27 Terminate each Tl Card alarm relay on the MDF
as follows:
(1)
Run cable from the optional Tl alarm signaling
device(s) to the MDF.
(2)
At the MDF, mount an eight-conductor modular
jack assembly.
FIGURE 3-21.
(4) Plug one end of a four-pair, non-reversing
(straight through), mod-to-mod line cord into the
modular jack assembly. The other end of the line
cord will later be plugged into the alarm relay
jack on the corresponding Tl Card.
MODULAR JACK ASSEMBLY WIRING FOR OPTIONAL Tl
ALARM RELAYS
MODULAR JACK ASSEMBLY
RlA
RlA
R E S E T SET
RlB
SET
S E
FOUR-PAIR, NONREVERSING,
MOD-TO-MOD
LINE CORD
I
1
2
3
5 6
7
6
RlA
COMMON
Wire the cable(s) onto the modular jack. Refer to
Figure 3-21 below for a diagram of the wiring.
RlB
COMMON
CO;;ON
R2
RESET
Page 3-33
I
--
11 CARD ALARM
RELAY JACK
INTER-TELdPRACTICEs
lMX,‘GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
H.
CO-G TWO 256 SYSTEMS
TOGETHERU!SINGTlCARDS
and the cabling between them may be as long as 6000
feet.
5.28 Although most Tl interfaces will be with the
public network, it is possible to use Tl Cards to connect
two telephone systems together (e.g.,two 256 Systems).
To do this without CSUs, the two systems must be located in the same building and the cabling between them
must be less than 655 feet. If each system is equipped
with a CSU, they may be located in separate buildings
FIGURE 3-22.
5.29 In addition, when connecting two 256 Systems
together, the line cord (or cabling) between the two Tl
Cards must be wired so that the receive pair (tip1 in and
ring1 in) on each card is connected to the transmit pair
(tip out and ring out) on the other card, as shown in the
figure below. (Par information on programming various
types of Tl installations, refer to pages 5-122to 5-129.)
CONNECIING
TWO Tl CARDS TOGETHER
MODULAR JACK ASSEMBL’ I
IODULAR JACK ASSEMBLY
OR
Tl CARD
RJ48C JACK
Tl CARD
RJ45C JACK
OR
Tl CARD
DB15
CONNECTOR
Tl CARD
DB15
CONNECTOR
Page 3-34
INTER-TELPBACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTACLATION
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
& MAINTENANCE
6. EQUIPMENT CABINET
INSTALLATION
To remove the backpanel:
A. UNPACKTHEEQUIPMENT
b. Lift the panel up off of the supporting pins
and set the panel aside.
a . Turn the two locking screws on the panel and
allow the panel to open from the top.
6.1 Unpack the equipment and inspect the equipment
cabinet and all accompanying parts following these
guidelines:
(1)
(2)
NOTE: Aset of keys for the lock on the front
door is taped to the inside of the back panel.
Check the parts against the packing slip and inspect them for damage. If any item is missing or
damaged, contact Customer SupportimmediatelY*
To mnove the front &or:
a . Unlock the door, open it, and (if applicable)
unhook the wire cable or chain between the
cabinet and the door.
Check all circuit card assemblies as follows:
NOTE: The cards contain static-sensitive components. Handle all cards by the edges only;
however, avoid touching the gold contacts on the
side of the card that plugs into the equipment
cabinet. (For additional precautionary infonnation, refer to the CAUTION on page 3-44.)
c . Check each card to ensure there is no ship
ping foam or tape attached.
b . Pull/push the two spring-loaded retention
bars in the appropriate direction and slide the
door off. Set the door aside.
(3)
Check to see that the Telecom Motherboard is securely installed in the rear of the equipment cabinet (there should be 10 6-32 x s-inch screws
with self-locking star washers holding the card in
place).
(4)
Check to make sure that the metal power supply
chassis is securely installed in the equipment
cabinet (the bottom edge of the chassis fits under
a metal lip, and there should be three 8-32 X
j&nch screws with self-locking star washers
holding the chassis in place).
Q
Ensure that the Telecom Motherboard power
cable is securely attached to both the Telecom
Motherboard and the back of the power supply
chassis:
d . Inspect each card for shorted components.
e. Return all cards to their protective bags until
they are ready to be installed in the equip
ment cabinet.
B.
CHECK THE EQUIPMENT CABINET
PREASSEMBLY
6.2 The equipment cabinet is shipped partially
assembled. To ensure that none of the items have been
damaged or have become unattached during shipment,
follow the instructions below and refer to the drawings
on the following pages.
(1)
Position the equipment cabinet near the MDF
backboard.
(2)
If desired, the equipment cabinet front door and
back panel may be removed for easier access to
the internal structure.
Page 3-35
a. At the rear of the cabinet, contirm that the 26
small power cable connectors are attached to
the appropriate connectors on the Telecom
Motherboard. (Refer to Figures 3-23 and
3-24 on pages 3-36 and 3-37.)
b . At the rear of the cabinet, confitm that the
four large power cable connectors are
attached to the appropriate connectors on the
back of the power supply chassis. (Refer to
Figure 3-25 on page 3-38.)
,
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 lNSTALLATION& MAINTENANCE
lNS’E4LLATION
Issue 1. November 1994
FIGURE 3-23.
POWER CABLE CONNECTORS ON THE TELECOM
MOTHERBOARD
u/I\
BACK SIDE OF TELECOM MOTHERBOARD
I
-
CPCP
CPCN
ALARM
E
CPCp*
CPCXP
C
DGND
+5 SEN RTN
B
+5V
-12COM
AGND
BGND
RESV2*
+12v
D
+5 SEN
+5V
-12COMf
+5VA
+5VA
- -5VA
-5VA
AGND*
-48V
-45V
+3ov
- KGND
- RESVl*
RESVZ,
+12v
-
VRING
BGND
+3ov
KGND
-
DGND
RESVl*
Page 3-36
VRING*
INSTAWLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
mrER-TELPRAcTIcEs
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
FIGURE3-24.
CONNECTING THE POWER CABLE TO THE TELECOM
MOTHERBOARD
CONNFCTOR
-
ORANGE (18 GAUGE)
RED (18 GAUGE)
REsV2
DGND
tsv
-12COM
+12v
+3ov
tSVA
VRlNG
KGND
-5VA
-48V
RBSVl
-
PURPIE (14 GAUGE)
ORANGE&ED
(18 GAUGE)
NOTCURRENTLYUSED
BROWN (14 GAUGE)
GREEN/BLACK (18 GAUGE)
GREEN (18 GAUGE)
BLUE (18 GAUGE)
m/YELLOW
(18 GAUGE)
GRAY/BLACK (18 GAUGE)
ORANGE/BROWN (18 GAUGE)
WHITE/BROWN (18 GAUGE)
YELLOW (18 GAUGE)
ORANGB/YEUOW
(18 GAUGE)
NOTCURRENTLYUSED
+SSENRTN
+5 SEN
-
BLACK (22 GAUGE)
RED (22 GAUGE)
AGND
BGND
RESVZ
-12COM
+12v
+3ov
-
N O T CURREMZYUSED
ORANGE (14 GAUGE)
N O T CU- USED
NOTCURRENlZYUSELl
WHITE (18 GAUGE)
V (18 GAUGE)
YELLOW (14 GAUGE)
PURPLE, (18 GAUGE)
WHITE/BUCK (18 GAUGE)
N O T C - U S E D
W (18 GAUGE)
GRAY (18 GAUGE)
ORANGE/GREBN
(18 GAUGE)
N O T C - U S E D
-
ORANGE (22 GAUGE)
N O T C - U S E D
N O T CURREMZY USED
A
AGND
B
C
D
lWlRF -LO0
tsv
#LA
VRING
KGND
-5VA
-48V
REsVl
Page 3-37
I N - T I O N
Issue 1. November 1994
FIGURE 3-X
INTER-TELPRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALLAT’ION & MAINTENANCE
CABLE CONNECI’IONS
TO THE POWER SUPPLY CHASSIS
BACK SIDE OF POWER SUPPLY CHASSIS
NOT CURRENTLY USED
TO TELECOM
MOTHERBOARD
(Via the Telecom Motherboard Power Cable)
Page 3-38
---x.\
,j
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
c.
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
INSTALL THE POWER !xJPPLY
MODULES
All systems must be equipped with a Quad
Module and a Master 30V Module.
Dependingonthenumberandtypeofkeysets
to be installed, one or two Slave 30V Modules may also be needed (see page 2-8 for [email protected]
CAUTION
HIGH VOLTAGE. When the system power is
turned on, each module contains both 35OVDC and
11OVAC. Before inserting or removing the power
supply modules, make sure that the AC POWER
switch has been turned OFF for at least jive minures. Failure to allow the high voltage to dissipate
can cause bodily injury.
63
NOTE: If it is determined that two Slave
30V Modules are needed, a version C power
supply chassis and version C power supply
modules must be used.
If any AC-ringing single-line devices are to
be used, a Ring Generator Module must be
installed.
Install the power supply modules as follows:
NOTE: Refer to page 2-S in SPEClFICATIONS for information concerning chassis and module compatibili-
(1)
(2)
If any Single-Line Cards (SLCs), Inward
Dialing Cards (ID&), Loop/Ground Start
Cards (LGCs), or E&M Cards (EMCs) are
used, a -4SV Module must be installed.
Ensure that the system AC power cable is not
plugged in and the AC POWER switch on the
front of the power supply is OFF.
At the front of the cabinet, remove the screws to
the front cover of the power supply chassis, and
set the cover aside.
NOTI2 Loop Start Cards (LSCs) and Tl
Cards (TlCs) do not require a -48V Module.
(4)
NOTE For easier power supply module removal, each version C power supply chassis is
shipped with an extractor tool attached to the inside of the front cover. The extractor tool may be
used with version B and C modules only.
(3)
II
With the components facing tig&, insert the
power supply modules in the appropriate slots.
(Refer to Figure 3-26 on the next page for slot locations.) Note the following requirements:
CAUTION
Slide the front cover of the power supply chassis
into place and replace the screws.
Always,replace the front cover before turnmg on
(5)
I
When inserting the power supply modules, be sure
that each module is fully seated in the appropriate
slot. If a module is not securely seated when power
is turned on, the power supply and circuit cards
may be damaged.
Page 3-39
Ground the system according to the instructions
on page 3-41.
NOTE: DO NOT plug in the system AC power
cable until the power supply electrical test, as
outlined on page 3-42, has been performed.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE 3-26.
POWER SUPPLY MODULE INSTALLATION
: .-“,
/
FRONT SIDE OF POWER SUPPLY CHASSIS (COVER REMOVED)
9OVAC RING
GENERATOR
MODULE
(If Needed)
SLAVE 30V
MODULE
(If Needed)
MASTER 30V
MODULE
-48V MODULE
(If Needed)
l
QUAD MODULE*
QuadModulesupplies+5V,-5V,+12V,and-l2V
NOTE: With newer-version power supply chassis, there is more flexibility as to which type of power supply
module can be installed in which slot (e.g., some slots can be equipped with either a 30V Module or a -48V
Module). To ensure prope.r installation, refer to the slot labels provided on the chassis.
Page 3-40
-\
, “’
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTACLATON& MAINTENANCE
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
Grounding Requirpments
a. Au earth ground.
b. The ground lug on the back side of the
power supply chassis.
6.4 The equipment cabinet must be properly grounded
to an earth ground point. A copper, cold water pipe is
usually a good ground point.
NOTE: According to UL 1459, “an insulated grounding
conductor that is not smaller in size and equivalent in insulation material and thickness to the grounded and ungrounded branch-circuit supply conductors, except that
it is green with or without one or more yellow stripes, is
to be installed as part of the circuit that supplies the
product or system.” Also, “the attachment-plug receptacles in the vicinity of the product or system are all to be
of a grounding type, and the grounding conductors serving these receptacles are to be connected to earth ground
at the service equipment.”
6.5 The grounding wire should be 1OAWG or larger
and should not exceed 25 feet (7.5 meters) to help provide RFI/EMl protection, or should not exceed 10 feet
(3 meters) to help provide both RFI/EMl and lightning
protection.
6.6
To ground the system (see Figure 3-27 below):
(1)
Ensure that the system AC power cable is not
plugged into the AC outlet.
(2)
Mount a grounding [email protected] on the MDF backboard and connect it‘to:
FIGURE 3-27.
c. Battery compartments, if used.
d . Trunk gas discharge tubes, if used.
6.7 If AC power-related problems appear on the system while in operation, one of the following’three methods can be used to test the ground.
l
Use a digital multimeter to measure the difference of
potential between the equipment cabinet ground
point and the power neutral, and between the equipment cabinet ground point and the third wire ground.
Ifthe voltage measurement exceeds OSV, noise may
develop on the system. If this occurs, call an electrician.
l
Use a Megger to test the ground point. (A Megger
should be available through the local power company.) The reading should be 5 ohms or less.
0 Unplug the AC power cord from the outlet and insert
a ground isolation plug into the outlet. Plug the AC
power cord into the ground isolation plug. If the
problem ceases, call an electrician. When finished,
remove the ground isolation plug to restore ground
protection.
EQUIPMENT CABINET GROUNDING
POWER SUPPLY CHASSIS
GROUNDING
I
TERMINAL
I
#lO GROUND WIRE
- -
EARTH GROUND
Page 3-41
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATON & MAINTENANCE
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
Power Supply ElectricalTest
6.8 Perform the following electrical check on the
power supply.
(1)
(2)
(3)
Ensure that the system AC Power cable is not
plugged in and the AC POWER switch on the
front of the power supply is OFP.
Check the condition of the fuse located on the
front of the power supply chassis. It should be a
2!5OVAC, 10/l%, time-delay Buss SC- lo/15
(or equivalent).
Plug the surge/spike protector provided with the
system into a 10512SVAC, 57-63& lSA,
single-phase commercial power source.
NOTE: This MUST be an isolated, dedicated
circuit. Do NOT use an extension cord when installing the power supply. Also, Do NOT plug
any other equipment into the same AC outlet.
(4)
Plug the system AC Power cable into the surge/
spike protector and turn ON the AC POWER
switch.
0
Referring to Figure 3-23 on page 3-36, measure
the following system voltages on the back of the
Telecom Motherboard. A digital voltmeter of
&OS% accuracy is required. Use ground as a
reference. The measurements should be within
the limits listed in the following chart. (Ifnecesmy, remove each power cable connector one at
a time and measure the voltage inside the connector.)
YOl mGE
-5VDC
+WDC
.- .: j
gzE
-12vDc
+12vDc
+3OVDC
flf==
itlz&ov*c)
FWR ALARhf (+4.!wDc)
CFcP (+-VW
CFcFJ (-0svDc)
$zE
gzz
$zz
a==
NOTE: The CPCP measurement should be .7V
(fo.2OV) higher than the actual +5V measurement. The CPCN measurement should be .7V
(fo.2OV) lower than the actual ground measurement.
If the voltages are within the specified limiq
skip to step 8.
I
If voltage measurements are not within the specified limits, remove the Power cable(s) from the
power supply and check the voltages directly at
the individual connectors on the back of the power supply chassis. Refer to Figure 3-28 on page
3-43.
If the voltages at the i&idual connectors are
within the [email protected] limits, replace the defective
cable(s).
If voltage me.aswements at the indiv~l connectors are not within the specified limits, replace the defective power supply module(s)
and/or the Power supply chassis.
Turn OFF the AC POWER switch.
.~. : j\
.!
. 7’
Page 3-42
INfTIALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
lNTER-TELPRACTIcEs
IMX/GlWX 256 INSTALLA~ON & MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 3-28.
POWER SUPPLY CONNECTOR PINOUTS
TEST POINT LOCATIONS
AND VOLTAGE
BACK SIDE OF POWER SUPPLY CHASSIS
NOT USED
VFIING
BGND
BGND
-48V
-48V
NOTUSED
CONNECTORS TO
TEL .ECOM MOTHERBOARD
(\ria the Telecom Motherboard Power Cable)
+5V
COM
+sV SENSE
DGND
CPCP
PVVRALM
+sV SEN KIN
DGND
+12v
-5vANLG
+SV
+12v
AGND
+5VANLG
NOT USED
Page 3-43
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
D.
IMX/GMX
INSTALL THE CIRCUlTCARDS
6.9 With the exception of the RCPU Card (which is installed in the last slot -slot 17), the circuit cards can be
installed in any card slot. However, to facilitate installation and programming, it is recommended that the cards
be installed to match the default configuration as closely
as possible. (Refer to page 2-13 iu SPECIFICATIONS
for information on the default configuration.)
Figure 3-29 on page 3-46.) The notch (or small
dot in the comer indicating pin 1) on each component must match the notch of the outline silkscreened on the card -pinlonthechiptopinl
on the socket.
( 5 ) EusurethatthePAL,insocketU49islabeledwith
part number 827.1013 and the PAL in socket U90
is labeled with part number 827.1012.
(6)
CAUTION
The cards and components are static sensitive.
Handle the cards by the edges only and keep them
in their protective bags until they are to be installed. Do not bend or touch the pins of the components or subject them to a static charge. When
working with the cards, use a properly terminated
anti-static wrist strap and cover the work surface
with the bag that protected the card during ship
ping. Any static charge (no matter how small the
charge) must be discharged from the body before
touching the cards or components. The warranty
for this equipment does not cover damage caused
by static or mishundiing. Cards or components
damaged in such a manner will not be replaced
Check that all components are seated securely in
their sockets and that no pins are bent.
6.ll If desired, up to four additional DI’MF decoding
circuits (besides the four that already exist) can be added
to the RCPU Card. Refer to SPEClFICATIONS, page
2-11, for more information on MMF decoding circuits.
To install the DTMF Expansion Chips, follow the instructions included with the kit (refer to REPLACEMENT PARTS for part numbers).
6.12 Install the RCPU Card in the equipment cabinet
as follows. Refer to Figure 3-29 on page 3-46 for an illustration of the card.
ROM Central Processing Unit(RCPU) Card
(1)
Ensure that all integrated circuits and components on the card are seated securely in their
sockets and that no pins are bent.
(2)
If connecting one or two Qternal music soumq
place the associated music-on-hold (MOH)
jumper strap(s) (Port 1 or Port 2) on the RCPU
Card in the ON position (over the top two pins) to
enable music, or place the jumper strap(s) in the
OFF position (bottom two pins) to disable music.
If enabled, outside callers will hear music when
placed on hold. If disabled, outside callers will
not hear music when placed on hold.
6.10
Before installing the RCPU Card, install the PAL
(US) and the five ROMs (US%U89) that contain the
software.
(1)
INTER-TELPRACTICES
256 INS’HLLATION & MAINTENANCE
Check the part numbers on the labels of the software components. They must all be the same
number and should match the number of the software package the customer purchased. (Refer to
REPLACEMENT PARTS for part numbers.)
The five available software packages are:
a. MF-rated, Basic
b. MF-rated, Extended
c . Ml&rated, Extendedplus Tl and E&h4
d . RF-rated, Extendedplus Tl and E&U
e. MF-rated, Exzenddplus Tl, E&M, and GX
(m4x systelns only)
(2)
Check the socket numbers printed on the labels.
There should be one of each of the following:
U6, U85, U86, U87, U88, and U89.
(3)
Place the RCPU Card on a clean, flat, anti-static
surface.
(4)
Carefully install the software components in the
corresponding sockets on the RCPU Card. (See
NOTE: By entering a feature code, individual
keysct users can choose to listen to background
music from either music source. For the MusicOn-Hold feature, either music source can be assigned on a trunk groupby-trunk group basis.
(3)
Place the battery back-up (BATTERY) jumper
strap in the ON position (over the top two pins) to
enable database battery back-up. If the jumper
strap is placed in the OFF position (lower two
pins), the BATTERY OFF LED lights when the
card is installed and AC power is on.
NOTE: The BAL’TERY OFF LED will not light
if the jumper strap is missing.
(4)
Page 3-44
Ensure that the a-law/mu-law jumper strap is in
the MU position (over the right set of pins). See
page 2-11 for more information.
INTJmTELPRACTICES
INSTALLATION
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
(5)
(6)
Issue 1, November 1994
NOTE: The AC ring voltage (VFUNG) mea-
Makesurethepowersuppl~‘sACPO~Rswitch
is turned OFF. Installin& the RCPU Cani with
the power on may damage the pmcesso~
Install the RCPU Card with the componentsfacing right in the last (17th) card slot in the equip
ment cabinet.
sured on the RCPU Card is HI-J the actual power
supply ring voltage of 9OVAC.
(9) If the
voltages are within tolerance, proceed to
step 10. If the voltages are out of tolerance:
( 7 ) TurnONtheACPOWERswitchandobservethe
LEDs on the front edge of the card for the follotiing indications. If they are incomct, check the
system voltages as outlined in step 8 and then
contact Customer Support. (Refer to Figure 3-29
on page 346 for LED indicator locations.)
a . Turn OFF the AC POWER switch.
b . Take out the RCPU Card and check for
shorted components.
C.
ICATION
CPUACTI’IVE
FowEaALARM
MATOR ALARM
DALBASEERROR
MINOR ALARM
EXXCLOCKACXVE
BAKrmRY OFF
Lit (Green)
OE- ow
OF VW
OF @=9
OfP (Yellow)
off (Green)
d . If still out of tolerance, turn OFF the AC
POWER switch and replace the defective
RCPU Card.
[email protected]
*When a new system is installed, the DAIXBASE
ERROR LED remains lit until the system database has been initialized or programmed. The
MINOR ALARM LED may also be lit and can
later be cleared from an attendant station using
the Clear System Alarm feature code (default is
019).
(8)
Measure the following system voltages on the
RCPU Card. Adigital voltmeter of &OS% accuracy is required. Insert the “common” voltmeter
probe into the ground point (TPlO) and insert the
other probe into the desired voltage test point.
(Refer to Figure 3-29 on page 3-46 for system
voltage test point locations.)
JEST POINTS
TP1toTP10
TPztoTP10
Tp3toTPlO
TP4tolTlO
TPStoTPlO
TP6toTplO
TP7toTPlO
-5
+s
+12
-12
+30
-48
9
&2o%vDc
&20%vDc
&2o%VDC
s?o?mDC
&2o%vDc
5xl%vDc
&2Q%VAC
Re-insert the card, turn ON the AC POWER
switch, and check the voltages again.
(10)
While pressing the battery check button on the
RCPU Card, measure the database back-up battery voltage. The voltage test points (TP8 to
TP9) are located on the front edge of the card. Insert the ~common” voltmeter probe into the
ground point (lP9) and insert the other probe
into the voltage test point (TP8). Ifthe voltage is
not greater than 2SVDC, replace the battery.
(Refer to Figure 3-29 on the next page for backup battery voltage test point locations.)
NOTE: This procedure may be performed with
the AC power on or off.
(11)
Turn OFF the AC POWER switch.
(12)
After installing the RCPU Card, optional music
sources, power failure transfer equipment, signaling devices, etc. may be connected to the
RCPU Card terminal block at any time. Refer to
page 3-99 for external music source installation
illStIUCtiOltS.
Page 3-45
lNSTALJATION
Issue 1, November 1994
lNTER-~PRAcTIcEs
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 3-29.
RCPU
CARD
BATTERY CHECK
LED
INDICATORS
SYSTEM VOLTAGE TEST POINTS
-0vDc
+6vDc
l
LITHIUM BAlTERY MUSIC-ON-HOLD
(MOH) STRAPS
12VDC
-12vDc
.
-48mc
+asvAc
+0AllERY
-0AnERY
GROUND
AMPHENOL-TYPE
CONNECTOR
-
DB9 CONNECTORS
<,
DTMF EXPANSION
CHIP SOCKETS
RESET SWlTCH
1
Page 3-46
\.
-2’:I
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCX
Digital Keyset Cards (DKSCs)
pin 1 on each DSP must match the notch of
the outline silkscreened on the card.
6.13
Each DKSC comes equipped with one Digital
Signal Processo I (DSP) for shared speakerphone resources. If desired, a second DSP can be installed to provide additional speakerphone resources. Refer to
SPEClFICATIONS, page 2-12, for more information.
(2)
Check to see that all components on the cards are
seated securely in their sockets and that no pins
are bent.
(3)
Install the DKSCs one at a time in the slots to be
used for digital keysets. The component sides of
the cards must face right. Any type of card may
be installed in any slot, and slots may be skipped,
if desired. However, to facilitate installation and
programming, it is recommended that the cards
be installed to match the default configuration as
closely as possible. (Refer to page 2-13 for information on the default configuration.)
6.14 Install the cards as described below. The part
number is listed in REPLACEMENT Pm. Refer to
Figure 3-30 on page 3-48 for an illustration.
NOTE: Wheri inserting or removing the RCPU Card,
the system power must be turned off to prevent damage
to the card. However, station and truuk cards can be inserted or removed with power on. (After inserting a Tl
Card, wait ten seconds before inserting any other card.)
(1)
If the optional DSP is to be instalkd:
a . Place each DKSC on a clean, flat, anti-static,
non-conductive surface.
b: Carefully install the optional DSP in socket
U38. (See Figure 3-30 on page 3-48.) The
notch (or smaR dot in the corner) indicating
Page 3-47
NOTE: When powered up, the system configures the software to match the default card configuration. If the actual cards installed do not
exactly match the default configuration, adjustments must be made in database programming.
Circuit 1.1 is preset for the primary attendant (a
KSC circuit). If changing card types (e.g.,
changing from an SLC to a DKSC), refer to the
programming procedures on page 5-170 and to
the information on pages 3-6 to 3-8.
IN-TION
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELlPRJuxmxs
lTM.X/GMX 256 INSUTION & MAINTENANCE
FIG-
3-30.
e
LED INDICATORS
<
AMPHENOL-TYPE
CONNECTOR
DIGITAL KEYSET CARD (DKSC)
53
C
\Rb ACTIVE (GREEN)
I
cKT1,2
CKT 3,4
CKT 5,s
CKT. 7,8
CKT 9.10
CKT. 11,12
CKT. 13,14
: 15,18
.
OPTIONAL DlGlTAL
SIGNAL PROCESSOR
.
.--
Page 3-48
lNTER-TELPRAcTIcEs
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAlNTENANCE
INS’IXLLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
Keyset Cards (KSCs and KSC-Ds)
version KSCs have eight self-correcting thermistors (one for each circuit) instead of the fuse. If a
short circuit causes a thermistor to open, it will
automatically close when the short is removed.
6.15 Install the cards as described below. Part numbers are listed in REPLACEMENT PARTS. Refer to
Figure 3-31 on page 3-50 for an illustration.
NOTE: When inserting or removing the RCPU Card,
the system power must be turned off to prevent damage
to the card. However, station and trunk cards can be inserted or removed with power on. (After inserting a Tl
Card, wait ten seconds before inserting any other card.)
(1)
(4)
For all KSCs that will have any &line IMXALM
kqtiinstalld Check the part number and label silkscreened on the card. To install g-line
IMXAIM keysets rwo to a cinzuit, the new-dualcircuit” version Keyset Card (KSC-D) must be
used (see RF,PLACEMENT PARTS for the part
number). To install 8-line IMX AIM keysets one
to a circuit, either the RSC or the KSC-D can be
used.
(2)
Check to see that all components on the cards are
seated securely in their sockets and that no pins
are bent.
(3)
Check the fuses. Some KSCs have a 2A, 25OV,
AGC 2 (fast-acting) fuse. KSC-Ds and newer
Page 3-49
Jnstall the KSCa and/or KSC-Ds one at a time in
the slots to be used for analog keyset, analog
DSS/BLF Unit, and Attendant Computer Console connections. The component sides of the
cards must face right. Any type of card may be
installed in any slot, and slots may be skipped, if
desired. However, to facilitate installation and
prograxmning, it is recommended that the cards
be installed to match the default configuration as
closely as possible. (Refer to page 2-13 for information on the default configuration.)
NOTE: When powered up, the system configures the software to match the default card configuration. If the actual cards installed do not
exactly match the default configuration, adjustments must be made in database programming
Circuit 1.1 is preset for the primary attendant (a
KSC circuit). If changing card types (e.g.,
changing from an SLC to a KSC), refer to the
programming procedures on page 5-170 and to
the information on pages 3-6 to 3-8.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256INSTALLATION
& MAINTENANCE
INS’BLLATION
Issue 1. November 1994
[email protected] 3-31.
KEYSET CARD (KSC or KSC-D)
(GREEN)
LED INDICATORS
<
AMPHENOL-TYPE
CONNECTOR
.
FUSE
(Some cards do not have a
fuse; instead, they have 8 4
thermistors up behind the
amphenol-type connector)
.-
F
/
Page 3-50
..
.\
.. 1
INSTAz;LATION
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INS~TION & MAINTENANCE
Issue 1, November 1994
Single-Line Cards (SLCs) and Inward Dialing
cards mm
l
6.16
Install the cards as described below. Part nnmhers are listed in REPLACEMENT PARIITS. Refer to
Figures 3-32 and 3-33 on pages 3-52 and 3-53 for illustrations.
(4)
NOTE: When inserting or removing the RCPU Card,
the system power must be turned off to prevent damage
to the card. However, station and trunk cards can be inserted or removed with power on. (After inserting a Tl
Card, wait ten-seconds before inserting any other card.)
(1)
I
For each circuit on all IDCs: On older-version
IDCs, make sure the AC ENABLE jumper strap
is installed (either on the card or at the block) for
off-premises extensions and AC-ringing on-premises equipment. The strap must be removed for
DID trunks and DC-ringing on-premises equip
ment. Newer-version IDCs have a 3-pin RING
SELECT jumper strap that must be placed in the
AC/OPX position (over the bottom two pins) or
the DC/DID position (over the top two pins).
NOTE: When setting the jumper straps on either
version card, note the unique ordering of the IDC
circuits as shown in Figure 3-33 on page 3-53.
(2)
(3)
Check to see that all components on the cards are
seated securely in their sockets and that no pins
are bent.
Check the fuses:
l
Some SLCs have a fuse that cannot be replaced in the field (see page 2-12 for more information). Newer version SLCa have a
self-correcting thermistor instead of the fuse.
Page 3-51
Each IDC has 16 specially designed fuses
that camtot be replaced in the field (see page
2-15 for more information).
Install the cards one at a time. Any type of card
may be installed in any slot, and slots may be
skipped, if desired. However, to facilitate installation and programming, it is recommended that
the cards be installed to match the default configuration as closely as possible. (Refer to page
2-13 for information on the default uxrfiguration.)
.
NOTE: When powered up, the system configures the software to match the default card configuration. If the actual cards installed do not
exactly match the default configuration, adjustments must be made in database programming.
Circuit 1.1 is preset for the primary attendant (a
KSC circuit). If changing card types (e.g.,
changing from a KSC to an SLC), refer to the
programming procedures on page 5-170 and to
the information on pages 3-6 to 3-8.
For SLCs: Install SLCs in the slots to be used
for AC-ringing single-line set and AC playback device connections. The component
sides of the cards must face right.
For IDCs: Install IDCs in the slots to be used
for DID trunk, off-premises extension, single-line set, and playback device connections.
The component sides of the cards must face
right.
NOTE: lf installing off-premises extensions,
refer to page 3-30 before installing any
IDCS.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
I N - T I O N
Issue 1. November 1994
FIGURE 3-32.
SINGLELINE CARD (SLC)
;I
CARDACTIVE (GREEN)
LED
INDICATORS
AMPHENOL-TYPE .
CONNECTOR
’
4
,
FUSE
(Some cards do not have a
fuse; instead, they have a --a
thermistor up behind the
amphenol-type connector)
F
Page 3-52
.*
.-
\j
INTER-TELPRACTIcEs
IMWGMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
IfIG- 3-33.
6
lN!S’MLLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
INWARD DIATJNG CARD (IDC)
THESE NUMBERS ARE SILKSCREENED ON THE CARD
CARD ACTWE (GREEN)
LED INDICATORS
-
AC ENABLE
STRAPS
<
STRAP FOR
ClRCUlT 2
STRAP FOR
ClRCUlT 1
7
bAMPHENOL-TYPE
CONNECTOR
.
STFW FOR
ClRCUlT 8
6
FD-
STRAP FOR
ClRCUll7
5
b-
SlRAP FOR
ClRCUlT 8
.
FUSES
4
-=c
F
- STRAPFOR
ClRCUlT 5
NOTE: In place of the AC ENABLE jumper strap, newer-version lDCa have a 3-pin RING SELECT jumper strap that must
be placed in the AC/OPX position (over the bottom two pins) or
the DC/DID position (over the top two pins).
Page 3-53
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
Loop/Ground Start Card (I&C) and Loop Start
card WC)
NOTE: When setting the straps, note the unique
ordering of the LGC circuits as shown in Figure
3-34. For each LGC circuit, borh straps must be
in the proPer (LS or GS) Position. Ifthe strap settings are mixed, or if one or both of the straPs is
missing, the circuit will not function properly.
6.17 Install each LGC and LSC as described below
(see REPLACEMENT PARTS for the part number). Refer to Figures 3-34 and 3-35 on pages 3-55 and 3-56 for
an illustration.
NOTE: When inserting or removing the RCPU Card,
the system power must be turned off to prevent damage
to the card. However, station and trunk cards can be inserted or removed with Power on. (After inserting a Tl
Card, wait ten-seconds before inserting any other card.)
(1)
Check to see that all compcnents on the card are
seated securely in their sockets and that no pins
are bent.
(2)
Check the fuses. There are 16 speciallydesigned
fuses on each LGC and LSC that cannot be replaced in the field (see page 2-14 for more information).
(3)
For LGCs Only: Depending on the type of CO
trunk to be installed on each individual LGC circuit, place the associated two jumper straps in
the Proper loop start (LS) or ground start (GS)
position.
(4)
‘;\
:I
1;’
Install the LGCs and LSCs one at a time with the
components facing right. They may be installed
in any slot, and slots may be skipped, if desired.
However, to facilitate installation and programming, it is recommended that the cards be installed to match the default configuration as
closely as Possible. (Refer to page 2-13 for information on the default configuration.)
NOTE: When Powered up, the system configures the software to match the default card configuration. If the actual cards installed do not
exactly match the default configuration, adjustments must be made in database Programming.
If changing card types (e.g., changing from an
SLC to an LGC), refer to the programming procedures on page 5-170 and to the information on
pages 3-6 through 3-8.
\
/’
Page 3-54
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TEZPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INS-TION & MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 3-34. LOOP/GROUND STAiZT CARD (LGC)
.
THESE NUMBERS
ARE SILKSCREENED
ON THE CARD
STRAPS
2
STRAFS FOR
- CIRCUlT3
LED INDICATORS
Q
1
STRWS FOR
- CIRCUIT2
Q
0
STRAPS FOR
- ClRCUlT 1
7
STRAPS FOR
- CIRCUIT8
62
6
-
STRAF% FOR
ClRCUrr7
5
AMPHENOL-TYPE
CONNECTOR
- STRAPSFOR
ClRCUlT 6
.
Q
ff- STRAPSFOR
CIRCUIT 5
Q
Page 3-55
INTER-TELPRACTKES
IMX/GMX256 INS-TION & MAINTENANCE
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE
3-35. LOOP START CARD (LSC)
.
.:.
INDICATORS
6
<
AMPHENOL-TYPE
CONNECTOR
l *
0
f
CARD ACTIVE (GREEN)
l
FUSES
Page 3-56
,~..
?
j
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 lNSTAT.,LATION & MAINTENANCE
INS’IALJATION
Issue 1, November 1994
E&M Card (EMC)
6.18 Install each EMC as described below (see REPLACEMENT PARTS for the part number). Refer to
Figure 3-36 on page 3-58 for an illustration.
NOTE: When inserting or removing the RCPU Card,
the system power must be turned off to prevent damage
to the card. However, station and trunk cards can be inserted or removed with power on. (After inserting a Tl
Card, wait ten seconds before inserting any other card.)
(1)
Check to see that all components on the card are
seatedsecurely in their sockets and that no pins
are bent.
(2)
Check the fuses. There are 24 specially-designed
fuses on each EMC that cannot be replaced in the
field (see page 2-16 for more information).
(3)
Depending on the type of E&M trunk to be installed on each individual EMC circuit, place the
associated jumper plugs in the proper “signaling
type” (1,2,4, or 5) and “audio type” (2-wire or
4-wire) positions.
NOTE: When setting the jumper plugs, note the
unique ordering of the EMC circuits as shown in
Figure 3-36.
(4)
Page 3-57
Install the RMCs one at a time with the componentsfacing right. They may be installed in any
slot, and slots may be skipped, if desired. However, to facilitate installation and programming,
it is recommended that the cards be installed to
match the default configuration as closely as
possible. (Refer to page 2-13 for information on
the default configuration.)
NOTE: When powered up, the system configures the software to match the default card configuration. If the actual cards installed do not
exactly match the default configuration, adjustments must be made in database prograw.
If changing card types (e.g., changing from an
LGC to an EMC), refer to the programming procedures on page 5-170 and to the information on
pages 3-6 through 3-8.
INiSTALLA~ON
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMXEMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 3-36.
.‘\ .-‘,
,jl
E&M CARD (EMC)
SIGNALING TYPE
SELECTION JUMPERS
- e
THESE NUMBERS
ARE SILKSCREENED
ON THE CARD
4J
; JUMPERS FOR
ClRCUl7 2
LED INDICATORS
<
0
-
JUMPERS FOR
ClRCUlT1
3
JUMPERS FOR
- CIRCUIT4
AMPHENOL-TYPE CONNECTOR
JUMPERS FOR
CIRCUIT 3
AUDIO TYPE
SELECTION JUMPERS
MAKE-BUSY ,
SWlTCH
(RESERVED FOR
FUTURE USE)
FUSES
F
Page 3-58
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GM.X 256 INSTAUATION
INSTALLATION
Issue 1. November 1994
& MAINTENANCE
If the component is labeled with number
Tl card (lx!)
LAYWO, a jumper plug must be installed in
location J32.
6.19 Install each TlC as described below (see REPLACEMENT PARTS for the part number). Refer to
Figure 3-37 on page 3-60 for an illustration.
NOTE: Like the other station and trunk cards, Tl Cards
can be inserted or removed with the system power
turned on, as long as the Tl span is not connected to the
card. However, afier inserting a Tl Cad while thepower is on, wait at least ten seconds before inserting any
other card. Also, before removing a Tl Cani whilepowet is on, first pmss the make-busy switch on the card and
allow the system to “busy out” the Tl span, then unplug
the Tl span from the connector on the card (see page
2-18 for more information on the make-busy switch).
(1)
I
If installing the optional on-board Channel Service Unit (CSU), follow these steps:
NOTE: The on-board CSU can now be purchase-d directly from Inter-Tel using part
number 440.3004.
a . Carefully plug the CSU into the large socket
provided on the card (see Figure 3-37).
b. Place the DSX/CSU jumper plug in the CSU
(518) position.
C.
If the component is labeled with number
LXP602, a jumper plug must be installed in
location J33.
(3)
3l.uEmwPlNS
J14
J15
(4)
ova pins 2-5
over the top two pins
Check to see that all components on the card are
seated securely in their sockets and that no pins
are bent.
( 5 ) InstalltheTlCsoneatatime(waitingatleastten
seconds between installations if the systempower is on) with the components facing right. The
cards may be installed in any slot, and slots may
bc skipped, if desired.
NOTE: When powered up, the system configures the software to match the default card configuration (see page 2-13). If the actual cards
installed do not exactly match the default configuration, adjustments must be made in database
programming. If changing card types (e.g.,
changing from an LGC to a TlC), refer to the
prograxmning procedures on page 5-170 and to
the information on pages 3-6 through 3-8.
Depending on the distance to the nearest public network Tl repeater, place the line buildout (LBO) attenuation jumper plug in the
appropriate position: 15dB (J21) for O-1599
feet, 7SdB (J2O) for MOO-2999 feet, or OdB
(J19) for 3000-6000 feet.
If the optional on-board CSU is not installeri,
place the DSX/CSU jumper plug in the DSX
(517) position.
Check to make sure the remaining jumper straps
and plugs are installed in the following locations
on the card (see Figure 3-37 for card orientation):
(6)
(2) Check the part number of the component
installed in socket U45 (see Figure 3-37).
Page 3-59
After installing the TlCs, optional Tl alarm signaling devices may be connected to the cards at
any time. Refer to page 3-33 for more information.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMXIGMX 256IN-TlON & MAINTENANCE
RWlALLATlON
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE 3-37.
ClFlCUll-S
TlC CARD (Tic)
1-24 (w
LED INDICATORS &
DSX/CSU
SELECTION JUMPEF
ALARM RELAY JACKSERIAL PORT JACKNOT CURRENTLY USED
II
-
Tl SPAN JACK F
BANTAM TEST JACKS 4
Tl SPAN DB15 .
CONNECTOR
MAKE-BUSY SWlTCH
LINE BUILD-OUT
SELECTION JUMPER
Page 3-60
‘-j
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
E.
CHECK TEE CIRCUIT CARD
INSTALLATION
6.20 After all of the circuit cards have been installed
in the equipment cabinet, check the installation by performing the following steps.
I
(1)
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
ment and the CPCN measurement is at least OSV
lower than the actual ground measurement, the
voltages are within tolerance.
(4)
Turn ON the AC POWER switch and observe the
top (green) LED on each DKSC, KSC, KSC-D,
SLC, IDC, LGC, LSC, EMC, and TlC installed
in the cabinet. If the top LED on every card is &
proceed to step 2. If not, follow these steps:
a . While monitoriug the out-of-tolerance voltage, remove the station and trunk cards one at
a time.
a. Remove all station and trunk cards that do.
not have a lit green LED and check them for
shorted or loose components, bent pins, etc.
b. If the voltage returns to an acceptable level,
replace the defective card(s).
If the voltage remains out of tolerance, contact Customer Support.
NOTE: DO NOT remove the RCPU Card
with the system power turned on.
b. Re-insert the cards one at a time and check
the top LED again. If the LED is not lit afrer
15 seconds; replace the defective card.
(2)
Measure the following voltages on the RCPU
Card. A digital voltmeter of &OS% accuracy is
required. Insert the “common” voltmeter probe
into the ground point (TPlO) and insert the other
probe into the desired voltage test point. (Refer
to Figure 3-29 on page 3-46 for system voltage
test point locations.)
IliST PWJTS
TPltoTPlO
TPZtoTPlO
TP3toTPlO
TP4toTplO
TPStoTPlO
TP6toTplO
TP7toTP10
-5
+5.1
+125
-12
+30..5
-49
8.9
NOTE: The AC ring voltage (VRING) measured on the RCPU Card is Ho the actual power
supply ring voltage of 9OVAC.
(3)
CAUTION
Do NOT attempt to adjust the power supply voltages
without first contacting Customer Support. Damage
caused by unauthorized voltage adjustment is not
covered by the warranty.
F.
YOLTAGE
NOTE: Before connecting any Tl spans to the
Tl Cards in the cabinet, always make sure the
system power is turned on. All Tl spans should
always be disconnected from their cards before
turning the system power on or off.
JOI FRANCE
k.ofO.15VDC
~O.lsVDC
~0.1.5VDC
NOTE: As long as the CPCP measurement is at
least O.lV higher than the actual +5V measure-
Route the station and trunk cables (with attached
female amphenol-type comrectors or modular
jack/DBlS connectors) in through the bottom
rear of the cabinet, through the cable tray, and out
the front.
(2) Connect each labeled female amphenol-type
connector to the SO-pin male connector on the
corresponding card. For Tl trunks, connect each
labeled line cord or ribbon cable to the Tl jack or
DB15 connector on the corresponding Tl Card.
Referring to Figure 3-23 on page 3-36, measure
the following voltages on the back of the Telecorn Motherboard. Use ground as a reference.
PWR AlAFud (+4.7VDC)
CPa (+52vDc to +58vDc)
CPCN (-O.lVDC to -0.7VDq
PWR GOOD (+4.7VDCj
COMPLETE THE EQUIPMENT CABINET
INSTALLATION
6.21 Complete the equipment cabinet installation as
follows:
(1)
jgl.4VDC
jxLsVDC
&O.sVDC
~l.lVDC
*0.9vDc
&7.OVDC
kl3VAC
If the voltages are within tolerance, prouxd to
the next section. If any of the voltages are out of
tolerance+ isolate the defective card(s) by following these steps:
(3)
Secure each cable to the equipment cabinet with
a cable tie, leaving enough slack so that the card
can be removed or replaced if necessary.
(4)
Replace the equipment cabinet front door and
rear panel.
Page 3-61
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256INSTALIATION & MAINTENANCE
I N - T I O N
Issue 1, November 1994
7. STATION
INSTALLATION
7.1
I
Digital keysets are connected to Digital Keyset
Cards. Analog keysets, analog DSS/BLF Units, and Attendant Computer Consoles are connected to Keyset
Cards. ESLSs, SLIs, single-line MMF sets, and playback devices are connected to Single-Line Cards and/or
Inward Dialing Cards.
NOTE: For information on installing the GX and GIviX
station instruments, refer to appendixes A and B in the
back of this manual.
A.
IMX 256 DIGITAL KEYSET
INSTALLATION
7.2 Before installing the digital keysets, unpack each
one and check for damage. If items are damaged or
missing, contact Customer Support. Each keyset should
have the following:
l
Baseplate
One six-foot, three-pair line cord
0 One handset
l One four-conductor coiled handset cord
l Slide-out directory card (IMX version)
l Extra feature key templates
line (J2), microphone (J4), handset (JS), and, if
equipped, data port (J3). See Figure 3-38.
Disconnect the speaker wires (J6) from the keyset control board.
Remove the single screw securing the control
board and carefully flip the control board back to
expose the inside of the faceplate top housing.
Remove the dummy cover from the display
opening in the top housing of the faceplate by
pushing on the cover from the front of the keyset.
(On some models, it may also be necessary to remove tape that is securing the dummy cover
from the inside.)
From the inside of the faceplate top housing, insert the top edge of the clear plastic window into
the display opening and slide the window up into
place.
Remove the covering from the LCD unit and install as follows:
a . If not already connectf& slide open the bar of
the clamp connector on the back of the LCD
unit, insert one end of the ribbon cable into
the connector, and close the bar.
l
+
Optional Liquid Crystal Display (LCD)
7.3 All Executive Digital Keysets are equipped with
LCDs. Standard Digital Keysets are available in both
display and non-display models. Non-display keysets
can be converted to display keysets by installing an LCD
Kit (part number 828.1211) as outlined below.
7.4 To convert a non-display Standard Digital Keyset
to a display keyset, install the LCD Kit as outlined in the
following steps (refer to Figure 3-38 on page 3-63):
+
+R-+
t----l
OPEN
CLOSE
NOTE: The blue stripe on the near end of the
ribbon cable should be visible from the back
side of the LCD unit (see Figure 3-38). Also,
ensure that the metal strips on the end of the
ribbon cable are fully seated and properly
aligned in the connector.
b. Position the LCD unit on the clear plastic
window so that the screw holes in the LCD
unit align with the screw holes in the faceplate top housing. Install the four Phillipshead screws to hold the LCD unit in place.
c . Leaving the free end of the LCD ribbon cable
exposed, flip the control board back over,
place it in its original position, and re-insert
the single screw that held it in place.
(1)
Unpack the LCD kit. There should be a clear
plastic display window, an LCD unit, a ribbon
cable, and four small Phillips-head screws.
(2)
Remove the line cord and handset cord from the
keyset. Then loosen the four screws on the bottom of the keyset.
d. Slide open the bar of the LCD clamp comrector (Jl) on the control board (see Figure
3-38), insert the free end of the ribbon cable
into the connector, and close the bar.
(3)
Carefully open the keyset to expose the control
board. To fully open the keyset, disconnect the
following wires from the keyset control board:
NOTE: The blue stripe on the free end of the
ribbon cable should face down toward the
keyset control board. Also, make sure the
Page 3-62
INSTALLATION
Issue 1. November 1994
metal strips on the end of the cable are fully
seated and properly aligned in the connector.
I
(9)
Reconnect the line (J2), microphone (J4), handset (J5), speaker (J6), and, if equipped, data port
(J3) wires to the keyset control board.
(10)
Ensure that the ribbon cable connecting the keyset control board (57) to the board in the bottom
FIGURE 3-38.
,
,
,
l
(11)
Reattach the back of the keyset.
(12)
To ensure the LCD unit and keyset control board
are properly connectal and functioning, perform
the keyset self-test as described on page 3-64.
STANDARD DIGITAL KEYSET LCD INSTALLATION
\ I
CLAMP
CONNECTOR
.
of the faceplate housing is still fully seated and
properly aligned.
BLUE STRIPE MUST BE
VISIBLE FROM MIS SIDE
I
Jl
,
I
,
,
- LCD UNIT
_ LCDCLAMP
CONNECTOR
0
,
J2
0
c
FACEPLATE HOUSING (INSIDE VIEW)
Page 3-63
KEYSET
- CONTROL
BOARD
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IAWGMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Digital Keyset Installation
7.5
(1)
I
e . Lift and replace the handset. The keyset rings
momentarily and all of the LEDs go out.
(Display keysets show DKTS SELF TEST
KNMKL-RDCOO.)
Install all digital keysets as follows:
Before mounting the modular jack assembly and
connecting the keyset, measure the voltage on
the YELLOW terminal of the modular jack
assembly with respect to the BLACK terminal.
(The “common” probe of the voltmeter is placed
onthe BLACKterminal.) It must measure a positive voltage. If a negative voltage is measured,
check the cabling for a reversed pair.
f . One at a time, press each of the keys on the
keyset in any order. If the key is functioning
properly, a key tone (or a M’MF tone for
Executive keypad keys) is heard and, on display keysets, a specific code is shown. me
proper code for each key is diagrammed in
Figure 3-39 on the next page.) Ifthe signal is
not heard or the displayed code is incorrect,
the key is faulty; return the keyset for repair.
CAUTION
g. Lift and replace the handset. The speaker
tones are broadcast over the speakerphone
speaker. (Display keysets show DKTS SELF
TESTSPEAKERTUUES.)
If tip and ring are reversed, the keyset will not
function.
(2)
(3)
Mount the modular jack assembly on the wall.
(4)
Plug one end of the line cord into the wallmounted modular jack assembly. Plug the other
end into the line cord jack on the bottom of the
keyset.
h . Lift and replace the handset. Tones of various
volume levels, from softest to loudest, are
broadcast over the speakerphone speaker.
(Display keysets show DKTS SELF TEST
SPEAKER VOLUME.)
Attach the coiled handset cord to the handset and
to the handset jack on the bottom of the keyset.
Place the handset on hook.
i. Lift the handset, then press and release the
hookswitch. The handset tones are broadcast
over the handset receiver. (Display keysets
show DKI’S SELF TEST HANDSET
TONES.)
NOTE: To aid in installation/troubleshooting,
display keysets show their station circuit number, extension number, and assigned user name
for several seconds when power is turned on and
the line cord is first plugged in. This display also
appears after a system reset, and whenever the
line cord is removed and replaced while power is
on. Thestation identification displays for several
seconds, then the keyset changes to the appropriate display, depending on its current status.
j. Place the handset back in its cradle. The keyset rings momentarily and it takes approximately five seconds for the keyset to return to
normal operation. (Display keysets show
DKTS SELF TEST COMPLETED! for several seconds. Then, as described in the NOTE
to step 6, the keyset’s identification displays
for several seconds.)
NOTE: If the Keyset Watchdog timer fails,
the DKTS SELF TEST COMPLETED! display is followed by a DKTS SELF TEST
WAXXDOG ERROR display and eight
short bursts of ring tone. Replace the defective keyset.
Perform the digital keyset self-test:
a . While pressing the asterisk (*) and pound (#)
keys, unplug and replace the keyset line cord.
b. Release the keys. The keyset rings momentarily. (Display keysets show a dark display
- all pixels lit.)
c . Lift and replace the handset. The keyset rings
momentarily. (Display keysets show a blank
display - no pixels lit.)
d . Lift and replace the handset. The keyset rings
momentarily and all LED-equipped keys
light. (Display keysets show DKTS SELF
TESTLEDMXITUX.) If any of the LEDs do
not light, return the keyset for repair.
k . Replace the keyset if faulty.
(6)
Replace the existing slide-out directory card on
the bottom of the keyset with the IMX directory
card included iu the keyset’s box.
(7)
The keyset ring tone can be changed by performing the steps described in the m section on page 443.
(8)
If necessary, replace the keyset’s paper template
Page 3-64
with one labeled to match the programmed feature keys.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX
256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 3-39.
INSTALLATION
Issue 1. November 1994
DIGI’IAL KEYSET SELF-TEST KEY MATRIX
STANDARD DIGITAL
KEYSET
EXECUTIVE DIGITAL
KEYSET
,
Page 3-65
21m,,
29,,
31m,,
39,,
41=,,
4sg
INlmt-TELPRAcTIc~
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
lNfFE4LLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
Wall Mounting Digital Keysets
Optional Personal Computer Data Port Modules
WDpMd
7.6 To mount the keyset on a wall:
(1)
Remove the keyset baseplate from the top half of
the back of the keyset.
(2)
Rotate the baseplate 180” and attach it to the bottom half of the back of the keyset.
NOTE: If a PCDPM is already installed inside
the baseplate, first open the keyset and reroute
the PCDPM-to-key& interface cable through
the knockout in the bottom half of the keyset (see
Figure 3-40 on page 3-68).
7.tI For off-hook voice announce receive capability,
and to allow an optional digital DSS/BLFUnit and/or an
optional Modem Data Port Module to be installed, any
digital keyset may be equipped with an optional PC
Data Port Module (part no. 550.3014).
7.9 Install the PC Data Port Module as outlined below.
For diagrams of the installation, see Figures 3-40 and
3-41 on pages 3-68 and 3-69.
(1)
Unplug the keyset line cord from its modular
jack on the back of the keyset.
(2)
Remove the keyset baseplate.
(3)
On the back of the keyset, use a pair of cutting
pliers to remove the plastic knockout covering
the PC Data Port Module connector (53) on the
keyset control board (see Figures 3-40).
(3)
Using a ruler, mark the location of the keyset
mounting holes on the wall. (The centers of the
two perpendicular mounting holes on the back of
the keyset are four inches apart.)
(4)
Drive a screw into the center of each mounting
hole marking. Allow the head of the screw to
protrude approximately y4 inch.
(5)
In order to hold the handset in place while the
keyset is wall-mounted, slide the reversible
cradle hook out, rotate it 1800, and reinsert it.
(4)
Zf not already installed, attach one end of the
PCDPM-to-keyset interface cable to the comtector on the back of the PCDPM.
(6)
Position the keyset mounting holes over the
screws and slide the keyset into position on the
wall. (Jf necessary, adjust the screws to ensure
that the keyset is held firmly in place.)
(5)
Align the PC Data Port Module over the four
posts protruding from the inside of the baseplate
and insert the screws (do not over tighten).
(6)
Plug the free end of the PCDPM-to-keyset interface cable into connector J3 on the keyset control
board (where the plastic knockout was previously removed).
NOTE: Be careful not to let the plastic knockout
fall inside the keyset. If the keyset will be wall
mounted, use the knockout in the bottom half of
the keyset instead (see Figure 3-40).
Optional Headsets
7.7 Refer to SPEClFJCAI’IONS, page 2-22, for headset requirements. To attach a headset to a keyset:
(1)
Remove the coiled handset cord from the handset jack on the bottom of the keyset. Leave the
handset in the cradle.
(2)
Insert the headset modular plug into the jack.
Plug in the headset power source, if used.
NOTE: Use a pencil (eraser end) or other suitable rod-like instrument to press each end of the
cable connector into connector 53. Apply pressure until the connector clicks securely into
place, one end at a time.
Q
(3)
Jf the headset has an on/off switch, turn on the
headset.
(4)
On the keyset, press SPCL and enter the Headset
Enable feature code (default value is 315).
Q
To disable the he&et, press SPCL and enter the
Headset Disable feature code (default value is
316). Then unplug the headset and recomtect the
handset.
Page 3-66
Zf a DSSIBLF Unit will be attached to the PC
Data Port iUodule:
a. Attach one end of a PCDPM-to-DSS interface cable (or PCDPM-to-RS232C interface
cable) to the RS-232-C connector (J2) on the
module, as shown in Figure 3-40. (The other
end of the cable will later be attached to the
DSWBLF Unit after it is installed.)
NOTE: Pin 1 of the cable (indicated by the
stripe on the edge of the cable) must correspond to pin 1 on the RS-232-C conuector
(indicated by the notch silkscreened on the
module).
INSTAL.LA~ON
Issue 1, November 1994
b. Plug the AC transformer cable into the power
connector (Pl) on the module.
ule. (The other end of the cable will later be
attached to the Modem Data Port Module after it
is installed.)
NOTE: PCDPMs do not require AC transformers when they are used for off-hook
voice announce only or have attached
MDPMs. For a diagram of AC transformer
requirements, see Figure 2-2 on page 2-24.
c. Plug the main AC transformer unit into an
available AC power source. DO NOT use the
outlet for the equipment cabinet.
IfaiUodkmDataPortModulewillbeattachedto
the PC Data Port Module, plug the appropriate
end of the PCDPM-to-MDPM interface cable
into the SL Module connector (Jl) on the mod-
NOTE: Pin 1 of the cable (indicated by the stripe
on the edge of the cable) must correspond to pm 1
on the SL Module uxmector (indicated by the
notch silkscreened on the module).
(8)
Reattach the baseplate.
( 9 ) IfaModemDataPortModulewillbeattachedto
the PC Data Port Module, refer to the instructions on page 3-70.
Page 3-67
If a Modem Data Port Module will not be
attached to the PC Data Port Module, reconnect
the keyset line cord.
IIWULLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE 3-40.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
DIGI’ICAL
PC DATA PORT MODULE (PCDPM)
INSIDE OF BASEPLATE
INSTALLATION
BACK OF DIGITAL KEYSET
.&&
: : : : :y
Ii3
@
TOKSU
:..::...?:.&A:y.:;.:.
Q
‘Fgm
:.::::*:,
y::;::.:.:
.:.:p:..
8
-.
PCDPM-TO-KEYSET
INTERFACE CABLE
TO
HANDSE
.:::::.
.A.
Ii3
m
B
4
8
RS-232-C
CONNECTOR
MDPM
CONNECTOR
TO DSS/BLF UNIT
TO MODEM DATA
PORT MODULE
w
IF THE KJEYSET WILL BE WALL MOUNTED, OPEN
THE BACK OF THE KEYSET AND REROUTE THE
PCDPM-TO-KEYSET INTERFACE CABLE THROUGH
THIS KNOCKOUT OVERT0 CONNECTOR J3 ON THE
KEYSET CONTROL BOARD.
POWER CONNECTOR
@
TO AC TFiANSFORMER,
IF NEEDED
NOTE: PCDPMS require AC transformers when they are connected to DSS/BLF Units only. PCDPMs do not
require AC transformers when they are used for off-hook voice announce only or have attached h4DPh&. For
a diagram of AC transformer requirements, refer to Figure 2-2 on page 2-24.
Page 3-68
lNSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE 3-41.
SAMPLE DIGITAL PCDPM CABLE CONNECI’IONS
PCDPM-tc+MDPM
INTERFACE CABLE
(813.1585)
PCDPM-to-KEYSET
INTERFACE CABLE
(813.1587)
\
4
-
- -
-
-
-
-
-
-
w-
-1.
. .Fl
LIzi!
\
Jl
.
,
PC DATA PORT
MODEM DATA
PORT MODULE
9 (INSIDE OF BASEPLATE)
(TOP COVER REMOVED)
/
PCDPM-teDSS
W-IERFACE CABLE
(813.1595) ,
.
l
&S-to-DSS
INTERFACE CABLE
(813.1519)
1’
/-
BACK OF DIGITAL
KEYSET
1
b*
CONNECTOR
BOARD
(INSIDE OF BASEPLATE)
(INSIDE OF BASEPLATE)
l
BACK OF 1ST
DSS/BLF UNIT
\
52
.
BACK OF 2ND
DSWBLF UNIT
/
Same as the PCDPM-to-KEYSET
INTERFACE CABLE shown abve
(813.1587)
Page 3-69
I
DWTALLATION
INTER-TELPRACTICES
Issue 1, November 1994
IMX/GMX 256 INSmTION & MAINTENANCE
Optional Modem Data Port Modules (MDPMs)
7.10 Digital keysets equipped with PC Data Port
Modules may be equipped with optional Modem Data
Port Modules (part no. 550.3015). The MDPM contains
a four-conductor modular jack that can be used to connect a data device (such as a personal computer with a
direct-connect modem) or a single-line set to the keyset.
7.11 The data device can be used by the associated
keyset to communicate with remote data equipment
over voice channels being used for CO or intercom calls.
The data device’s modem must be externally Powered
(or capable of operating on 20mA of loop current) and
have an RJll CO trunk interface.
7.12 The data device can be activated by the associated keyset or by an autodial modem. (For more
details and an explanation of transferring the data connection, refer to page 4-101 in FEXWES). The data
device is disconnected whenever one of the following
occurs: the modem attached to the keyset disconnects
from the call, the called modem disconnects from the
call, or the data connection is transferred to the keyset’s
primary voice path and the call is disconnected.
7.13 Install the Modem Data Port Module and attach
the data device as outlined below. For diagrams of the
FIGURE 3-42.
installation, see Figure 3-41 on page 3-69 and see Figure 3-42 below.
(1)
Ensure that the keyset line cord is unplugged
from its modular jack on the back of the keyset.
(2)
Plug the free end of the PCDPM-to-MDPM interface cable into connector Jl on the Modem
Data Port Module. (The other end of the cable
was previously attached to the PC’ Data Port
Module; see page 3-66.)
(3)
Insert the modem line cord (which would normally be connected to a CO jack) into the modular jack (52) on the Modem Data Port Module.
(4)
Plug the AC transformer cable into the power
connector (Pl) on the Modem Data Port Module.
NOTE: MDPMs always require their own separate AC transformers. For a diagram of ACtransformer requirements, refer to Figure 2-2 on page
2-24.
(5)
Plug the main AC transformer unit into an available AC power source. DO NOT use the outlet
for the equipment cabinet.
(6)
Reconnect the keyset line cord.
DIGITAL MODEM DATA PORT MODULE (MDPM)
INSTALLATION
MODEM DATA PORT MODULE
(TOP COVER REMOVED)
Q
Q
Q
POWER CONNECTOR
-
LED
INDICATORS
.-,
TO AC TRANSFORMER
PCDPM CONNECTOR
TO PC DATA PORT MODULE
t
MODULAR JACK
TO DATA DEVICE
OR SL SET
Q
Q
Page 3-70
Q
I
~IggTICES
fCE4LLATION & MAINTENANCE
B .
IMX256ANALOGKEYSET
IIWMLTATION
(and Data Port Module wires, if attached) need to
be disconnected from the keyboard.
7.14 Before installing the IMX 24/12&line analog
keysets, unpack each one and check for damage. If items
are damaged or missing, contact Customer Support.
Each keyset should have the following:
Remove the cover from the display opening in
thetophousingofthekeysetbyreleasingthetabs
from the inside of the housing and pushing out
the cover.
From the front of the keyset, insert one end of the
clear plastic window in the display opening, with
the painted side of the black edging facing the inside of the keyset. Then slightly bend the window, insert the other end into the opening, and
ease the window into place.
Baseplate
Extra key caps
One six-foot, three-pair line cord
One handset
One four-conductor coiled handset cord
Remove the covering from the LCD and install
as follows:
Slide-out directory card
Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) Installation
7.15 All AIM keysets (24line, 12-line, and &line)
come equipped with LCDs. Standard 24-line and
12-line keysets can be converted to display keysets by
installing an LCD Kit as follows (see REPLACEMENT
PARTS for the part number):
(1)
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
Unpack the LCD Kit. There should be a clear
plasticdisplaywindow, anLCDunit, a foam pad,
a ribbon cable, and two small Phillips-head
screws.
(2)
Remove the keyset baseplate by removing the
retaining screw, pressing on the bottom edge of
the baseplate to release the tab, and pulling the
plate off.
(3)
Remove the line cord and handset cord from the
keyset. Then remove the four screws on the bottom of the keyset.
(4
Carefully open the keyset to expose the back of
the keyboard that has the LCD connector. (Refer
to Figure 3-43 on page 3-72.) To fully open the
keyset, the microphone and hookswitch wires
Page 3-71
a . Insert one end of the ribbon cable into the
black connector on the LCD unit. Ensure that
the metal strips on the ribbon cable make
contact with the metal tabs in the black connector.
b. With the LCD facing up, insert the other end
of the ribbon cable into the black connector
on the back of the keyboard. (Refer to Figure
3-43.)
C.
Place the foam pad over the plastic window
so that the opening in the pad matches the
window.
d . Position the LCD on the plastic window so
that the screw holes in the LCD unit and in
the keyset housing are aligned. Check that
the foam padding does not show through the
window. Install the screws to hold the LCD in
place.
Reassemble the keyset. (Before closing the two
halves of the keyset, remember to reconnect the
hookswitch and microphone control wires. Also,
if installed, reconnect the Data Port Module
wires.)
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE 3-43.
lNTJ3R-TELPRACTIcEs
IMX/GMX256INf4’iMAA~ON & MAINTENANCE
IMX 24/12LINE
KEYSET LCD INSTALLATION
DISPLAY
WINDOW
&-ILL
I
I-
LCD
CONNECTOR
RIBBON
CABLE
LCD UNIT
‘>
:i
Page 3-72
INTER-TELPRACTIcEs
IMXIGMX 256 INSTALLATION 81 MAINTENANCE
IMX 24/12/S-Line
7.16
(1)
INS-TION
Issue 1. November 1994
Keyset Installation
circuit selection switch (Sl) in the A (bottom)
position.
Iustall all IMX analog keysets as follows:
Before mounting the modular jack assembly and
connecting the keyset, measure the voltage on
the RED terminal of the modular jack assembly
with respect to the GREEN terminal. (I’he “common” probe of the voltmeter is placed on the
GRBBN terminal.) It must measure +3OVDC
(f2.0VDC). If -30VDC is measured, check the
cabling for a reversed pair.
(5)
Attach the coiled handset cord to the handset and
to the handset jack on the right side of the bottom
of the keyset. Place the handset on hook.
(6)
Plug one end of the line cord into the wallmounted modular jack assembly. Plug the other
end into the jack near the upper-left comer on the
bottom of the keyset.
NOTE: To aid in installation and troubleshooting, display keysets show their station circuit
number, extension number, and assigned user
name for five seconds when power is turned on
and the line cord is first plugged in. This display
also appears after a system reset, and whenever
the line cord is removed and replaced while power is on. The station identification displays for
five seconds, then the keyset changes to the ap
propriate display, depending on its current status.
CAUTION
If the power pair (W/BL, BL/W) is reversed, installing a keyset will open the fuse (or associated
thermistor) on the KSC or KSC-D. If the card has a
fuse, this affects operation of all keysets, DWBLF
Units, and Attendant Computer Consoles connected to that card.
(2)
Mount the modular jack assembly on the wall.
(3)
Remove the keyset baseplate by removing the
retaining screw, pressing on the bottom edge
(1Zline and 24line keysets) or the top edge
(&line keysets) of the baseplate to release the
tab, and pulling the plate off.
(4)
(7)
For b-line IMX AIM keysets that aw being installed two to a circuit: On the back of the keyset
(see Figure 344 on page 3-76), first place the
baud rate selection jumper strap (J9) in the 2400
position (over the left two pins). Then place the
circuit selection switch (Sl) in the appropriate A
(bottom) or B (top) position, depending on how
the keyset’s circuit will be designated in database programming. (See also page 2-23 for special line cord requirements.)
NOTE: When 8lineIMX AIM keysets are installed two to a circuit, the circuit number is sep
arated into two parts (A and B) in database
programming (e.g., circuit 4.6Aand 4.6B). Also,
“B” circuit 8-line IMX AIM keysets do not have
extension numbers until assigned one in database programming. If the switch selection does
not match the programming selection, the keyset, when installed, will display CONFLICTING
s;aTCHSETTING and all of the LEDs
.
For 8-line IMX ALU keysets that anz being installed one to a circuit: On the back of the keyset
(see Figure 3-44 on page 3-76), first place the
baud rate selection jumper strap (J9) in the 1200
position (over the right two pins). Then place the
Page 3-73
Perform the keyset self-test:
All non-AI’ Keysets:
a . While pressing the asterisk (*) and pound (#)
keys, unplug and replace the keyset line cord.
b. Release the keys. The keyset rings momentarily. (Display keysets show RTS SELFTBST HGGKSWlTCH.)
c . Lift and replace the handset to test the hookswitch. The LED-equipped keys light and the
keyset rings momentarily. (Display keysets
show ICI’S SELF-TEST LEDS.) If any of the
LEih do not light, return the keyset for repair.
d . Lift and replace the handset. The key&rings
momentarily and all of the LEDs go out.
(Display keysets show ICI’S SELF-TEST
KEYS.)
e . Press keys in the following order. A progress
tone is heard and the keyset rings momentarily if the key is functioning properly. If the signals are not heard, the key was either pressed
out of order or is faulty. Return the keyset for
repair if any key is faulty.
12-L& and 24-Line (non-AIM) Keysets:
1. The call keys, IWO speeddial (SD)
keys, and station programmable keys
from left to right: 1,2,3,4, SDl, SD6,5,
6,7,8,SD2, SD7,9,10, . . . . 21,22,23, and
24.
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTMxs
lMX/GMX 256 INS-TION & MAINTENANCE
NOTE: When testing a 12-line keyset, a
hookflash must be performed for each
missing station programmable key
(13-24). To do this, lift and replace the
handset each time a missing key (13-24)
is to be pressed.
2 . Feature keys in this order: REDlAL, SYS
SPD, ANSWER, OUTGOING, SPKR,
CNF, MUTE, FWD, DAB,DND, IC,
MSG, HOLD, XFR, PAGE, QUE, MUSIC, and SPCL.
3 . -Keypad keys in the following order: 1-9,
*, 0, and #.
8-Line (non-AIM) Kizysets:
1. The call keys and station programmable
keys from left to right: 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,
and 8.
2 . Feature keys in this order: SPKR, IC,
FWD, MSG, MUTE, CNF, DND, PAGE,
ANSWER, OUTGOING, HOLD, XFR,
QUE, and SPCL.
3 . Keypad keys in the following order: l-9,
*,O,and#.
f. After all the keys have been tested, it takes
about ten seconds for the keyset to return to
normal operation. (Display keysets show
KTS SELF-TEST DONE for about five seconds. Then, the keyset’s identification, as described in the NOTE to step 6 on page 3-73,
displays for about five seconds.)
g- Replace the keyset if faulty.
AIM Keysets (24&e, 12-line, and 8-line):
a . While pressing the asterisk (*) and pound (#)
keys, unplug and replace the keyset line cord.
b. Release the keys. The keyset rings momentarily. (Display shows a dark display - all
pixels lit.)
C.
Lift and replace the handset. The keyset rings
momentarily. (Display shows a blank display
-no pixels lit.)
d . Lift and replace the handset. The keyset rings
momentarily and all LED-equipped keys
light. (Display shows KTS SELF-TESTLED
MATRIX.) If any of the LEDs do not light,
return the keyset for repair.
e. Lift and replace the handset. The keyset rings
momentarily and all of the LEDs go out.
Page 3-74
(Display shows KTS SELF-TEST KEYMA=I
f . One at a time, press each of the keys on the
keyset in any order. A progress tone (or a
M’MF tone for keypad keys) is heard if the
key is functioning properly. If the signals are
not heard, the key is faulty. Return the keyset
for repair if any key is faulty.
g* Lift and replace the handset. The audio integrated module tones are broadcast over the
speakerphone speaker. (Display shows ICI’S
sELF-TEsTAlMTmEs.)
h . Lift and replace the handset. Audio integrated module tones of various volume levels, from softest to loudest, are broadcast
over the speakerphone speaker. (Display
shows KTS SELF-TEST AIM TONE VOLm-1
i. Lift and replace the handset. Tones of various
volume levels, from softest to loudest, are
broadcast over the speakerphone speaker.
(Display shows KTS SELF-TEST AIM SPK
VOLUME.)
Lift the handset, then press and release the
hookswitch. Tones of various volume levels,
from softest to loudest, are broadcast over the
handset receiver. (Display shows KTS
SELF-TEST AIM HS VOLUME.)
k . Press and release the hookswitch. A continuous tone is broadcast over the handset receiver using the primary voice path. (Display
shows KTS SELF-TEST AlM XMT/RCV
PRL)
1. Press and release the hookswitch. (If testing
an 8&e IMX AIM keyset, proceed to the
next step.) A continuous tone is broadcast
over the handset receiver using the secondary
voice path. (Display shows KTS SELFTEST AIM XMTRCV SEC.)
m. Press and release the hookswitch. The handset transmitter is connected to the handset receiver via the primary voice path. (Display
shows KTS SELF-TEST HOT HANDSET
PRI.)
n . While speaking into the handset transmitter,
determine that sidetone is being received
over the handset receiver.
0.
Press and release the hookswitch. (If testing
an 8-line IMX AIM keyset, proceed to step
q.) The handset transmitter is connected to
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
INS’E4LLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
the handset receiver via the secondary voice
path. (Display shows RX’S SELFTEST HOT
HANDSET SEC.)
s . Place the handset back in its cradle. The keyset rings momentarily and it takes about ten
seconds for the keyset to return to normal operation. (Display shows KI’S SELF-TEST
COMPLETED for about five seconds. Then,
the keyset’s identification, as described in the
NOTE to step 6 on page 3-73, displays for
about five seconds.)
While speaking into the handset transmitter,
determine that sidetone is being received
over the handset receiver.
Press and release the hookswitch. The speakerphone microphone is connected to the
handset receiver. (Display shows KTS
SELF-TEST SPKRPHONE MIC.)
While speaking into the speakerphone
microphone (or rubbing a finger over the
opening to the microphone), determine that
the sound is being broadcast over the handset
receiver.
t. Replace the keyset if faulty.
(8)
Replace the baseplate and the retaining screw.
(9)
The keyset ring tone can be changed by performing the steps described in the IWUVRES sec~ tion on page 4-48.
(10)
Page 3-75
If necessary, change the keycaps to match the
way the keyset will be programmed to work.
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE 3-44.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 lNS’TALLATION & MAINTENANCE
BOTTOM OF &LINE DUALCIRCUIT IMX AIM KEYSET
Q
CIRCUIT SELECTION
08
0Q
Q
‘:
_.,’
Page 3-76
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
INSXALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
Wall Mounting IMX 24/12BLIne Keysets
Optional Headsets
7.17
7.18 Refer to SPEClPICAI’IONS,
(1)
To mount the keyset on a wall:
Remove the keyset baseplate by removing the
retaining screw, pressing on the bottom edge
(12~line and 24-line keysets) or the top edge
(g-line keysets) of the baseplate to release the
tab, and pulling the plate off.
NOTE: To facilitate easy removal of the baseplate, the retaining screw on some keyset models
has been placed on the bottom of the keyset in
one of the holes used for the optional Data Port
Module (the hole nearest the identification label). When mounting the keysets on a wall, remove the screw and use it to secure the baseplate
to the bottom of the keyset.
(2)
Rotate the baseplate so that the mounting holes
are at the top. Then position the plate in the desired location on the wall.
(3)
Mark the location of the keyset mounting holes
on the wall. Set the baseplate aside.
(4)
Drive a screw into the center of each mounting
hole marking. Allow the head of the screw to
protrude approximately y4 inch.
page 2-22, for
headset requirements. To attach a headset to a keyset:
(1)
Remove the coiled handset cord from the handset jack on the base of the keyset. Leave the
handset in the cradle.
(2)
Insert the headset modular plug into the jack.
Plug in the headset power source, if used.
(3)
Press the SPCL key and enter the Headset Enable
feature code (default value is 315), using the
keyset keypad.
(4
To disable the headset, press SPCL and enter the
Headset Disable feature code (default value is
316). Unplug the headset and reconnect the
handset.
Optional Handset Amplifiers
7.19 Users may wish to have a handset amplifier installed. Typically, the amplifier is an external unit thatis
placed between the keyset and the handset (refer to page
2-22 for specifications).
7.20 To install such an amplifier:
(5)
Replace the baseplate on the keyset with the
mounting holes at the top.
(1)
Unplug the coiled handset cord from the keyset.
(6)
In order to hold the handset in place while the
keyset is wall-mounted:
(2)
Plug the coiled handset cord into the amplifier
jack labeled HANDSET.
(3)
Plug the amplifier line cord (coming from the
jack labeled TRLEPHONE) into the keyset
handset jack.
b . Locate the middle slot and slide the reversible cradle hook out, turn it over so that the
hook is facing up, and reinsert it.
(4)
Plug the amplifier power supply cord into an AC
outlet.
c . Replace the extension number tab.
Q
The handset volume can be increased or decreased, using the thumbwheel located on the
amplifier. Verify that the amplifier is functioning
correctly by placing a call and adjusting the volume from low to high.
a. Remove the clear plastic extension number
tab located underneath the handset.
Q
Position the mounting holes of the baseplate over
the screws and slide the keyset into position on
the wall.
Page 3-77
INTER-TELPRAcTICEg
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
INsTAI;LATION
Issue 1, November 1994
Optional Data Port Module
tions. Depending on how the Data Port Module
7.21 All IMX 1Zline and 24-line keysets may he
will be used, refer to one of the two possible settings outlined in Figure 3-45.
equipped with optional Data Port Modules (refer to RRPLACEkENT PARTS for the part number). The Data
Port Module contains a four-conductor modular jack
that can be used to connect either a data device (such as a
personal computer with a direct-connect modem) or an
LRA and an external signaling device (such as a loud
bell, horn, flashing light, etc.) to the keyset.
7.22 Install the Data Port Module as outlined below.
For a diagram,- see Figure 3-45 on page 3-79.
(1)
Remove the keyset baseplate by removing the
retaining screw, pressing on the bottom edge of
the baseplate to release the tab, and pulling the
plate off.
(2)
Unplug the line cord from its modular jack.
(3)
Remove the lo-pin shorting plug located on the
keyset control card.
(4
Q
NOTE: The back cover of the keyset does not
need to be removed in order to reach the shorting
plug.
Save the shorting plug by taping it to the bottom
cover of the keyset or to the inside of the baseplate. The plug must be replaced if the Data Port
Module is later removed.
Align the Data Port Module over the appropriate
scxew holes (see Figure 3-45) on the back cover
of the keyset and insert the screws (do not over
tighten).
(6)
Plug the Data Port Module cable into the pins on
the keyset control card (where the shorting plug
was previously located). Make sure the cable
connector is securely seated.
Q
Place jumper straps SPl, SP2, SP3, and SP4 on
the Data Port Module in the appropriate posi-
(8)
._
h,
_i
If connecting a mtnikm-equip,ped dizta device
refer to paragraphs 7.23 through 7.25.
If connecting a loud tinging adapter and an
extend signaling device, refer to paragraphs
7.26 through 7.28.
7.23 To connect a modem-equipped data device:
The optional Data Port Module can be used to connect a
data device (such as a personal computer) equipped with
a directconnection modem to a keyset. The data device
can be used with the keyset to communicate withremote
data equipment over voice channels being used for CO
or intercom calls. The data device’s modem must be externally powered (or capable of operating on 2omA of
loop current) and have an RJll CO trunk interface.
7.24 The data device can be activated using the keyset
or an auto-dial modem. (For more details and an explanation of monitoring or transferring the data connection,
refer to page 4-101 in FlMWRES). The data device is
disconnected whenever one of the following occurs: the
modem attached to the keyset disconnects from the call,
the called modem disconnects from the call, or the data
connection is transferred to the keyset’s primary voice
path and the call is disconnected.
7.25 Install the data device as follows:
(1)
Insert the modem line cord (which would normally be connected to a CO jack) into the modular jack on the keyset’s Data Port Module.
(2)
Ensure that the jumper straps on the Data Port
Module are set to the proper &a device positions. Refer to Figure 3-45.
(3)
Plug the keyset line cord into the keyset’s modular jack and reattach the baseplate.
,
Page 3-78
/
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 HWTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 3-45.
lNSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
IMX KEYSET DATA PORT MODULE INSTALLATION
STRAPS
MODULAI R
JACK
DATA POFIT
MODULE.
SHORTINt 3
PLUG
LOCATIOI v
L
SE-WING FOR
DATA DEVICE
Page 3-79
IN!STALLATION
INTER-TELPRACTICE-S
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Issue 1, November 1994
7.26 To connect a Loud Ringing Adapter (LRA):
on a modular jack assembly. Some devices require that polarity be observed between the LRA
input and the modular jack.
The optional Data Port Module can be used to connect
external signaling equipment such as loud bells, horns,
flashing lights, etc. to a keyset. This application is useful
in areas where the normal ring tone of the keyset cannot
be heard, such as warehouses and loading docks. The
signaling device follows the normal ringing patterns of
the keyset.
NOTE Since handsfree intercom calls may be difficult
to hear in noisy areas, keysets with LR& installed
should be programmed for handsfree disable so that users are alerted to incoming intercom calls by continuous
double ring tones. (Refer to FEHURES, page 4-55.)
7.27 An electromechanical LRA device is placed between the keyset Data Port Module and the external signaling equipment to provide the necessary interface
relay. Refer to page 2-23 for LR4 device specifications
and recommendations. A diagram of a typical set-up is
shown in Figure 3-46 below.
7.28
(1)
NOTE In order for the LRA device to operate
properly, the maximum resistance from the modular jack to the LRA should be kept under 100
OIlIllS.
(2)
Attach a mod-to-mod line cord to the modular
jack assembly and to the modular jack on the
keyset’s Data Port Module.
(3)
Ensure that the jumper straps on the Data Port
Module are set in the proper LRA positions. Refer to Figure 3-45 on the previous page.
(4)
Connect the LRA device output (contacts) to the
signaling device according to the manufacturer’s
instructions. Use the appropriate gauge wire for
handling the current/voltage rating of the signaling device.
(5)
Plug the keyset line cord into the modular jack on
the back of the keyset and reattach the baseplate.
Install the LRA as follows:
Using 24AWG wire, connect the LRA device input (coil circuit) to the RED and GREEN wires
FIGURE 3-46.
KEYSET DATA
PORT MODULE
IMX KEYSET LRA SET-UP
MODULAR JACK
ASSEMBLY
LRA DEVICE
(e.g., relay)
SIGNAL DEVICE
(e.g., bell)
NOTE Each time the keyset rings, the Data Port Module provides 20-26mA of loop current to the LRA. This
causes the LRA contacts to close and activates the signaling device. The LRA is not affected by the ring tone
or the ringer volume of the keyset. The LRA must be capable of operating on 2OmA current (approximately
2OVDC).
Page 3-80
INTKR-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX2!%INSTALIATION& MAINTENANCE
C.
GMX-2% ANALOG KEYSET
INSTALLATION
7.29 Before installing keysets, unpack each one and
check for damage. If items are damaged or missing, contact Customer Support. Each keyset should have the following:
INSTALLATION
Issue 1. November 1994
(3)
Remove the cover from the display opening in
thetophousingofthekeysetbyreleasingthetabs
from the inside and pushing the cover out.
(4)
From the inside of the keyset, insert one of the
top comers of the clear plastic window into the
side of the display opening.
NOTE: The small lips on the end of the window
should face to the inside of the keyset housing.
Also, the window is beveled on the top and the
bottom so that it will fit flush in only one direction.
Baseplate
Extra key caps
l
l
One six-foot, three-pair line cord
l Onehandset
0 One four-conductor coiled handset cord
l
l
(5)
While slightly bending the window, insert the
other top comer into the other side of the display
opening, and slide the window up until it snaps
into place.
(6)
Remove the covering from the LCD unit and install as follows:
Slide-out directory card
Optional Liquid Crystal Displays &CDs)
7.30 All Inter-Tel/DVK keysets @l-line, 12-line, and
8-line) are available in both standard and display models. Standard keysets can be converted to display keysets by installing the appropriate LCD Kit as outlined
below and on page 3-83.
a . Insert one end of the ribbon cable into the
black connector on the LCDunit. Ensure that
the metal strips on the ribbon cable make
contact with the metal tabs in the black connector.
731
Inter-Tel/DVK 24-Lime Keysets:To convert a
standard Inter-Tel/DVK 24-line keyset to a display keyset, install the large LCD Kit (part no. 828.1166) as outlined in the following steps:
(1)
Unpack the LCD kit. There should be a clear
plastic display window, an LCD unit, a ribbon
cable, and two small Phillips-head screws.
(2)
Remove the keyset baseplate to expose the control board that has the LCD connector. (Refer to
Figure 3-47 on the next page.)
b. With the LCD unit facing up, insert the other
end of the ribbon cable into the black connector on the control board (see Figure 3-47).
C.
(7)
Page 3-81
Turn the LCD unit over and position it on the
plastic window so that the screw holes in the
LCD unit align with the screw holes in the
keyset housing. Install the two Phillips-head
screws to hold the LCD unit in place.
Replace the keyset baseplate.
INSTALLA’llON
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELl?JMcTI~
lMX/GMX 256 INSllALLATION & MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 3-47. INTER-TEIJDVK
24-LINE KEYSET “LARGE” LCD INSTALLATION
KEYSET HOUSING (INSIDE VIEW)
_ DISPLAY
WINDOW
LCD
- CONNECTOR
-
RIBBON
CABLE
- LCDUNll
- CONTROL
BOARD
I
I I I I Ill
\
Page 3-82
-‘-“‘:\
1’
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
7.32 Inter-TeUDVK 12-Line and S-Line Keysets:
NOTE: The small lips on the end of the window
should face to the inside of the faceplate assembly. Also, the window is beveled on the top and
the bottom so that it will fit flush in only one direction.
To convert a standard Inter-Tel/DVK 12-line or 8-line
keyset to a display keyset, install the small LCD Kit
(part no. 828.1165) as outlined in the following steps:
0)
(2)
(3)
Unpack the LCD kit. There should be a clear
plastic display window, an LCD unit, a ribbon
cable, and two small Phillips-head screws.
Remove the keyset baseplate to expose the control board that has the LCD connector. (Refer to
Figure 3-48 on the next page.)
(9)
While slightly bending the window, insert the
other top comer into the other side of the display
opening, and slide the window up until it snaps
into place.
(10)
Remove the covering from the LCD unit and install as follows:
Remove the line cord, handset cord, and speaker
wires from their connectors on the control board.
(4)
On the back of the keyset, remove the two screws
that secure the faceplate assembly to the keyset
housing.
0
From the front of the keyset, release the tabs that
secure the top edge of the faceplate assembly to
the keyset housing.
(6)
Starting with the right side, carefully lift the entire faceplate assembly away from the keyset
housing.
a . Insert one end of the ribbon cable into the
black umnector on the LCD unit. Ensure that
the metal strips on the ribbon cable make
contact with the metal tabs in the black connector.
b. With the LCD unit facing up, insert the other
end of the ribbon cable into the black comtector on the control board (see Figure 3-48).
C.
Turn the LCD unit over and position it on the
plastic window so that the screw holes in the
LCD unit align with the screw holes in the
faceplate assembly. Install the two Phillipshead screws to hold the LCD unit in place.
NOTE: There is a small tab protruding from the
front, lower-left comer of the faceplate assembly
into the keyset housing. Be careful not to break
this tab when removing the faceplate assembly.
(11)
Remove the cover from the display opening in
the top of the faceplate assembly by releasing the
tabs from the inside and pushing the cover out.
Carefully replace the entire faceplate assembly
back in the keyset housing and replace the
screws that hold it in place.
(12)
From the inside of the faceplate assembly, insert
one of the top corners of the clear plastic window
into the side of the display opening.
Reconnect the line cord, handset cord, and
speaker wires to their connectors on the control
board.
(13)
Replace the keyset baseplate.
Page 3-83
INS-TION
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE 3-48.
INTER-TEIdPRAcTICEs
IMX/GMX 2 5 6 I N S - T I O N 8z MATNTENANCE
INTER-TEL/DVK
12/&LINE KEYSET “SMALL” LCD
INSTALLATION
FACEPLATE ASSEMBLY (INSIDE VIEW)
DISPLAY
WINDOW
LCD
CONNECTOR
RIBBON
CABLE
LCD UNIT
CONTROL
BOARD
Page 3-84
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INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMWGMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Keyset Installation
7.33
C.
Install all Inter-Tel/DVK keysets as follows:
NOTE: For information on installing the GX and GMX
keysets, see appendixes A and B in the back of this
manual.
(1)
Before mounting the modular jack assembly and
connecting the keyset, measure the voltage on
the RED terminal of the modular jack assembly
with respect to the GREEN terminal. (The “common” probe of the voltmeter is placed on the
GREEN terminal.) It must measure +3OVDC
(f2.OVDC). If -30VDC is measured, check the
cabling for a reversed pair.
I
CAUTION
If the power pair (W/BL, BL/W) is reversed, installing a keyset will open the fuse (or associated
thermistor) on the KSC-D. If the card has a fuse,
this affects operation of all keysets, DSWBLF
Units, and Attendant Computer Consoles connected to that card.
(2)
(3)
(4)
Lift and replace the handset. The keyset rings
momentarily. (Display keysets show a blank
display - no pixels lit.)
d . Lift and replace the handset. The keyset rings
momentarily and all LED-equipped keys
light. (Display keysets show KTS SELFTESTLEDMATRIX.)IfanyoftheLEDsdo
not light, return the keyset for repair.
e . Lift and replace the handset. The keyset rings
momentarily and all of the LEDs go out.
(Display keysets show KTS SELF-TEST
KEY-1
f. One at a time, press each of the keys on the
keyset in any order. A progress tone (or a
DlMF tone for keypad keys) is heard if the
key is functioning properly. If the signals are
not heard, the key is faulty. Return the keyset
for repair if any key is faulty.
Lift and replace the handset. The audio integrated module tones are broadcast over the
speakerphone speaker. (Display keysets
show KTS SELF-TEST AIM TONES.)
Mount the modular jack assembly on the wall.
Remove the keyset baseplate to expose the control board.
Attach the coiled handset cord to the handset and
to the handset jack (56) on the bottom of the keyset. Place the handset on hook.
Plug one end of the line cord into the wallmounted modular jack assembly. Plug the other
end into the line cord jack (Jl) on the bottom of
the keyset.
(6)
INSTALL.ATiON
Issue 1, November 1994
h . Lift and replace the handset. Audio integrated module tones of various volume levels, from softest to loudest, are broadcast
over the speakerphone speaker. (Display
keysets show KTS SELF-TEST AIM TONE
VOLUME.)
.
1 . Lift and replace the handset. Tones of various
volume levels, from softest to loudest, are
broadcast over the speakerphone speaker.
(Display keysets show KTS SELF-TEST
AIM SPK VOLUME.)
Lift the handset, then press and release the
hookswitch. Tones of various volume levels,
from softest to loudest, are broadcast over the
handset receiver. (Display keysets show KTS
SELF-TEST AIM HS VOLUME.)
NOTE: To aid in installation and troubleshooting, display keysets show their station circuit
number, extension number, and assigned user
name for five seconds when power is turned on
and the line cord is first plugged in. This display
also appears after a system reset, and whenever
the line cord is removed and replaced while power is on. The station identification displays for
five seconds, then the keyset changes to the ap
propriate display, depending on its current status.
i
Perform the Inter-Tel/DVK keyset self-test
1. Press and release the hookswitch. A continuous tone is broadcast over the handset receiver using the secondary voice path. (Display
keysets show KTS SELF-TEST AIM XMT/
RCV SEC.)
a. While pressing the asterisk (*) and pound (#)
keys, unplug and replace the keyset line cord.
b. Release the keys. The keyset riugs momentarily. (Display keysets show a dark display
- all pixels lit.)
Page 3435
k. Press and release the hookswitch. A unrtinuous tone is broadcast over the handset receiver using the primary voice path. (Display
keysets show KTS SELF-TEST AIM XMT/
RCV PRI.)
m. Press and release the hookswitch. The handset transmitter is connected to the handset re-
INTER-TELPRACTICES
JMWGMX 256 INSTALLATION & MATNTENANCE
lNSTAUATION
Issue 1, November 1994
ceiver via the primary voice path. (Display
keysets s h o w KTS SELFTEST H O T
lirANDsET PRI.)
Il.
0.
While speaking into the handset transmitter,
determine that sidetone is being received
over the handset receiver.
Press and release the hookswitch. The handset transmitter is connected to the handset receiver via the secondary voice path. (Display
keysets show KTS SELP-TEST HOT
HAyDsmSEC.)
P- While speaking into the handset transmitter,
determine that sidetone is being received
over the handset receiver.
Press and release the hookswitch. The speakerphone microphone is connected to the
handset receiver. (Display keysets show KTS
SELF-TEST SPKRPHONE MIC.)
T. While speaking into the speakerphone
microphone (or rubbing a finger over the
opening to the microphone), determine that
the sound is being broadcast over the handset
receiver.
S.
Place the handset back in its cradle. The keyset rings momentarily and it takes about ten
seconds for the keyset to return to normal operation. (Display keysets show KTS SELFTEST COMPLETED for about five seconds.
Then, the keyset’s identification, as described in the NOTE to step 5 on page 3-85,
displays for about five seconds.)
734 To mount the keyset on a wall:
(1)
Remove the keyset baseplate.
(2)
Rotate the baseplate so that the mounting holes
are at the top. Then position the plate in the desired location on the wall.
(3)
Mark the location of the keyset mounting holes
on the wall. Set the baseplate aside.
(4)
Drive a screw into the center of each mounting
hole marking. Allow the head of the screw to
protrude approximately y4 inch.
(5)
Replace the baseplate on the keyset with the
mounting holes at the top.
(6)
Position the mounting holes of the baseplate over
the screws and slide the keyset into position on
the wall.
(9)
‘,
.i
Optional Headsets
7.35 Refer to SPECIFICKI’IONS, page 2-26, for
headset requirements. To attach a headset to a keysetz
(1)
Remove the coiled handset cord from the handset jack on the bottom of the keyset. Leave the
handset in the cradle.
(2)
Insert the headset modular plug into the jack.
Plug in the headset power source, if used.
(3)
If the headset has an on/off switch, turn on the
headset.
Replace the baseplate.
(4)
The keyset ring tone can be changed by performing the steps described in the l%XWRES section on page 448.
On the keyset, press the SPCL key and enter the
headset enable feature code (default value is
315).
Q
To a&b&r the headset, press SPCL and enter the
t. Replace the keyset if faulty.
0
G-9
-..
Wall Mounting Keysets
If necessary, change the keycaps to match the
way the keyset will be programmed to work.
headset disable feature code (default value is
316). Unplug the headset and reconnect the
handset.
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Page 3-86
INS-TION
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
(8)
Optional Data Port Modules
7.36 All Inter-Tel/DVKkeysets maybe equipped with
optional Data Port Modules (refer to REPLACEMENT
PARIS for the part number). The Data Port Module contains a four-conductor modular jack that can be used to
connect eirher a data device (such as a persona1 computer with a direct-connect modem) or an LRA and an external signaling device (such as a loud bell, horn,
5ashing light, etc.) to the keyset.
7.37 Install the Data Port Module as outlined below.
For a diagram, see Figure 349 on page 3-88.
(1)
Remove the keyset baseplate.
(2)
Unplug the line cord from its modular jack.
(3)
Remove the lo-pin shorting plug located on the
keyset control board.
(4
Save the shorting plug by taping it to the inside of
the baseplate. The plug must be replaced if the
Data Port Module is later removed.
(5)
Align the Data Port Module over the three posts
protruding from the inside of the baseplate and
insert the screws (do not over tighten).
(6)
Plug the Data Port Module cable into the pins on
the keyset control board (where the shorting plug
was previously located). Make sure the cable
connector is securely seated.
(7)
Place jumper straps SPl, SP2, SP3, and SP4 on
the Data Port Module in the appropriate positions. Depending on how the Data Port Module
will be used, refer to one of the two possible settings outlined in Figure 3-49.
If connecting a mudem-qu?ppd%zta akvice, refer to paragraphs 7.38 through 7.40.
If connecting a loud ringing adapter and an ertfimal signding a&ce refer to paragraphs 7.41
through 7.43.
738
To connect a modem-equipped data device:
The optional Data Port Module can be used to connect a
data device (such as a personal computer) equipped with
a direct-connection modem to a keyset. The data device
can be used with the keyset to communicate with remote
data equipment over voice channels being used for CO
or intercom calls. The data device’s modem must be externally powered (or capable of operating on 2omA of
loop current) and have an RJll CO trunk interface.
7.39 The data device can be activated using the keyset
or an auto-dial modem. (For more details and an explanation of monitoring or transferring the data connection,
refer to page 4-101 in FEATUES). The data device is
disconnected whenever one of the following occurs: the
modem attached to the keyset disconnects from the call,
the called modem disconnects from the call, or the data
connection is transferred to the keyset’s primary voice
path and the call is disconnected.
7.40
Install the data device as follows:
(1)
Insert the modem line cord (which would normally be connected to a CO jack) into the modular jack on the keyset’s Data Port Module.
(2)
Ensure that the jumper straps on the Data Port
Module are set to the proper data device positions. Refer to Figure 349.
(3)
Plug the keyset line cord into the keyset’s modular jack and reattach the baseplate.
Page 3-87
INS’lXLJATION
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE 3-49.
lNTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
INTER-TEL/DVK
DATA PORT MODULE INS’ll4LLXI’ION
SITING FOR
DATA DEVICE
SETTING
FOR LRA
JUMPER
STRAPS
MODULAR
JACK
DATA PORT
MODULE
TO SHORTING
PLUG LOCATION
(on keyset control
b-4
Page 3-88
~‘\
2’ i
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
7.41
To connect a Loud Ringing Adapter (LRA):
on a modular jack assembly. Some devices require that Polarity be observed between the LRA
input and the modular jack.
The optional Data Port Module can be used to comtect
external signaling equipment such as loud bells, horns,
flashing lights, etc. to a keyset. This application isusefnl
in areas where the normal ring tone of the keyset cannot
be heard, such as warehouses and loading docks. The
signaling device follows the normal ringing patterns of
the keyset.
NOTE: Since handsfree intercom calls may be difficult
to hear in noisy areas, keysets with LRAs installed
should be programmed for handsfiee disable so that users are alerted to incoming intercom calls by continuous
double ring tones. (Refer to FEMVRES, page 4-55.)
7.42 An electromechanical LRA device is placed between the keyset Data Port Module and the external signaling equipment to provide the necessary interface
relay. Refer to page 2-26 for LRA device specifications
and recommendations. A diagram of a typical set-up is
shown in Figure 3-50 below.
7.43
(1)
NOTE: In order for the LRA device to operate
properly, the maximum resistance Corn the modular jack to the LRA should be kept under 100
O h .
(2)
Attach a mod-to-mod line cord to the modular
jack assembly and to the modular jack on the
keyset’s Data Port Module.
(3)
Ensure that the jumper straps on the Data Port
Module are set in the proper LRA positions. Refer to Figure 3-49 on the previous page.
(4)
Connect the LRA device output (contacts) to the
signaling device according to the manufacturer’s
instructions. Use the appropriate gauge wire for
handling the current/voltage rating of the signaling device.
Q
Plug the keyset line cord into the modular jack on
the back of the keyset and reattach the baseplate.
Install the LRA as follows:
Using 24AWG wire, comtect the LRA device input (coil circuit) to the RED and GREEN wires
FIGURE 3-50.
KEYSET DATA
PORT MODULE
INTER-TEL/DVK
MODULAR JACK
ASSEMBLY
LRA SET-UP
LRA DEVICE
(e.g., relay)
SIGNAL DEVICE
(e.g., bell)
0B K
NOTE: Each time the keyset rings, the Data Port Module provides 20-26mAof loop current to the LRA This
causes the LRA contacts to close and activates the signaling device. The LRA is not affected by the ring tone
or the ringer volume of the keyset. The LRA must be capable of operating on 2omA current (approximately
2OvDc).
Page 3-89
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMXIGMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
D.
IMX 256 DIGITAL DSS/BLF UNIT
INS-‘I’ION
(4)
7.44 Up to 50 digital keysets can be equipped with up
to four digital Direct Station Selection/Busy Lamp Field
(DSWBLF) Units each. Bach single DSS/BLF Unit has
60 keys for directly accessing up to 60 numbers. The
numbers can be station extension numbers, hunt group
pilot numbers, or other system features.
a. Plug one end of a DSS-to-DSS interface
cable into the secondary RS-232-C CoMector (J2) on the baseplate connector board in
the first unit.
b. Remove the baseplate on the back of the
second DSWBLF Unit.
NOTE: The system can have as many as 50 keyset circuits equipped with DSS/BLF Units. For example, there
could be a maximum of 50 digital keysets (i.e., DKSC
circuits) equipped with up to four digital DSS/BLF
Units each. Or, there could be a maximum of 50 KSC or
KSC-D circuits equipped with one analog DSS/BLF
Unit each. Or, there could be any combination of the two
using up to 50 keyset circuits.
c . Plug the other end of the DSS-to-DSS interface cable into the main RS-232-C connector
(11) on the baseplate connector board in the
second unit.
d . Plug the AC transformer cable into the power
connector (54) on the baseplate connector
board in the second unit. (The transformer
will later be plugged into an AC power
source.)
7.45 Digital DSWBLF Units are physically attached
to and programmed to be used with specific digital key
sets. The units are powered by their own ACtransformer
and do not require a DKSC circuit that is separate from
the keyset’s circuit. lf necessary, all 16 keysets connected to the same Digital Keyset Card can be equipped
with up to four digital DSWBLF Units each.
NOTE: Digital keysets cannot be equipped with analog
DSS/BLF Units. Likewise, analog keysets cannot be
equipped with digital DSWBLF Units.
7.46 Unpack and inspect the DSWBLF Units before
installing them.
NOTE: If multiple DSS/BLF Units are
installed, each individual unit must be
equipped with its own AC transformer. ln
addition, the PC Data Port Module on the
corresponding keyset must be equipped with
its own AC transformer.
(5)
To attach a third or fourth unit, repeat step 4.
(6)
Perform the DSS/BLF Unit self-test:
7.47 Install each digital DSWBLF Unit as outlined below. For diagrams of the installation, see Figures 3-41
and 3-51 on pages 3-69 and 3-91.
(1)
Remove the baseplate on the back of the DSS/
BLFUnit.
(2)
On the connector board located in the baseplate,
plug the free end of the PCDPM-to-DSS interface cable into the main RS-232-C connector
(Jl). (The other end of the cable was previously
attached to the PC Data Port Module on the corresponding keyset; see also Figure 3-41 on page
3-69.)
(3)
To attach a second DWBLF Unit to the first unit
(see Figure 3-41 on page 3-69):
Plug the AC transformer cable into the power
connector (J4) on the baseplate connector board.
(The transformer will later be plugged into an
AC power source.)
NOTE: DSS/BLF Units always require their
own separate AC transformers. For a diagram of
AC transformer requirements, refer to Figure
2-2 on page 2-24.
Page 3-90
a . While holding down the first two keys in row
one (extension numbers 100 and 101 in the
default database), plug the main AC transformer unit into an available AC power
source. (DO NOTuse the outlet for the equip
ment cabinet.) All the keys should light up. If
an LED does not light, unplug the AC transformer unit and plug it in while holding down
the first two keys in row one (ext. 100 and
101). If the test fails again, replace the DSS/
BLF Unit.
b. Press each key individually (in any order) to
remove the lit status. When finished, all keys
should be unlit. lf an LED does not go out,
unplug the AC transformer unit and repeat
steps a and b. If the test fails again, replace
the DSS/BLF Unit. After all the keys have
been tested, it takes approximately five seconds for the DSS/BLF Unit to return to normal operation.
c. Replace the baseplate on the back of the
DSSBLF Unit.
INTER-TELPRAcTKJ3s
IMX/GMX256 INS1’ALLATION & MAINTENANCE
INsTALLATlON
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE 3-51. BACK OF DIGITAL DSS/BLF
m-232-c
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Page 3-91
B
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
E.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMJUGMX 256 INS~TION & MAINTENANCE
IMX 256 ANALOG DSS/BLF UNIT
INSTALIATION
m 7.49 Up to 50 lMX Direct Station Selection/Busy
Lamp Field @SS/BLF) Units can be installed on the
IMX 256 System. A Keyset Card (KSC or KSGD) can
support up to four analog units. Each DSS/BLF Unit has
60 keys for directly-accessing up to 60 numbers. The
munbtxs can be station extension numbers, hunt group
pilot numbers, or other system features.
NOTE: The system can have as many as 50 keyset circuits equippedwith DSS/BLFUnits. For example, there
could be a maximum of 50 KSC or KSC-D circuits
equipped with one analog DSS/BLF Unit each. Or, there
could be a maximum of 50 digital keysets (i.e., DKSC
circuits) equipped with up to four digital DSS/BLF
Units each. Or, there could be any combination of the
I two using up to 50 keyset circuits.
7.49 As with keysets, analog DSS/BLP Units require
three-pair cabling. After they are installed, the DSS/
BLP Units must be assigned in database programming
to be used along with designated keysets. As many of the
units as desired can be assigned to one keyset.
(1)
Before connecting the DSWBLF Unit to the
appropriate Keyset Card, measure the voltage on
the RED terminal of the modular jack assembly
with respect to the GREEN terminal. (The “common” probe of the voltmeter is placed on the
GREEN terminal.) It must measure +3OVDC
(f2.OVDC). If -3OVDC is measured, check the
cabling for a reversed pair.
(2)
Mount the modular jack assembly on the wall.
(3)
Perform the DSS/BLF Unit self-test:
NOTE: Analog keysets cannot be equipped with digital
DSS/BLF Units. Likewise, digital keysets cannot be
I equipped with analog DSS/BLF Units.
7.50 Unpack and inspect the DSS/BLF Units before
installing them. Each DSS/BLF Unit is shipped with a
7-foot line cord.
751
Install each IMX DSS/BLP Unit as follows:
CAUTION
If the power pair (W/BL, BL/W) is reversed, installing a DSS/BLF Unit will open the fuse (or associated thermistor) on the KSC or KSC-D. If the card
has a fuse, this affects operation of all keysets, DSS/
BLF Units, and Attendant Computer Consoles connected to that card.
Page 3-92
a. Plug the line cord into the modular jack
assembly.
b . While holding down the key at the top of column one and the key at the top of column two,
plug the line cord into the KSU jack on the
bottom of the DSS/BLP Unit. All the keys
should light up. If an LED does not light, remove and replace the line cord. If the test
fails again, replace the DSS/BLF Unit.
c . Press each key individually (in any order) to
remove the lit status. When finished, all keys
should be unlit. If an LED does not go out, remove and replace the line cord and repeat
steps b and c. If the test fails again, replace
the DSWBLP Unit. After all the keys have
been tested, it takes approximately 10 seconds for the DSS/BLF Unit to return to normal operation.
‘-\ 1
j’
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
lNTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
F.
GMX-2!% ANALOG DSS/BLF UNIT
INSTALLATION
(4)
Remove the four screws on the bottom of the
DSS/BLF Unit and remove the bottom cover.
u 7.52 Up to 50 single or tandem Direct Station Selection/Busy Lamp Field (DSVBLF) Units can be installed
on the system. A Keyset Card can support up to four
units. Each single DSS/BLF Unit has 60 keys for directly accessing up to 60 numbers. The numbers can be either station extension numbers or hunt group pilot
numbers. The numbers can be station extension num1 bets, hunt group pilot numbers, or other system features.
(5)
Locate the strap (J2) in the lower-right comer of
the control board (see Figure 3-52 on page
3-94).
(6)
If the unit will be u&g the programmed key
arrangement for DSSIBLF 1, place the strap in
the DSSl position (over the right two pins). If the
unit will be using the programmed key arrangement for DSSIBLF 2, place the strap in the DSS2
position (over the left two pins).
753 As with keysets, DWBLF Units require threepair cabling. After they are installed, the DSS/BLP
Units must be assigned in database programminn to be
used along with designated keysets. As many of the
units as desired can be assigned to one keyset.
NOTE: Tandem units should have one unit set
for DSSl and one unit set for DSS2. If tandem
units have the same strap settings, there will be
erroneous indications on the DSWBLF Units and
the keyset, and there may be errors throughout
the system.
NOTE: For information on installing the GX and GMX
DSWBLF Units, refer to appendixes A and B in the back
of this manual.
7.54 Unpack and inspect the DSS/BLP Units before
installing them. Each DSS/BLF Unit is shipped with a
7-foot line cord.
(‘7)
a . Plug one end of the line cord into the modular
jack on the unit’s control board.
7.55 Install each Inter-Tel/DVKDSS/BLFUnit as follows:
(1)
If installing a fadem unit, connect a second
modular jack assembly in parallel with the existing modular jack assembly. One jack will be used
for the first DSS/BLF Unit, while the other jack
will bc used for the second DSWBLF Unit.
(2)
Before connecting the DSS/BLF Unit to the ap
propriate Keyset Card, measure the voltage on
the RED terminal of the modular jack assembly
with respect to the GREEN terminal. (The “common” probe of the voltmeter is placed on the
GREEN terminal.) It must measure +3OVDC
(f2.OVDC). If -30VDC is measured, check the
cabling for a reversed pair.
b. While holding down keys 100 and 110 (default), plug the other end of the line cord into
the appropriate modular jack assembly. All
the keys should light up. If an LED does not
light, remove and replace the line cord while
holding down keys 100 and 110 (default). If
the test fails again, replace the DSS/BLF
unit.
c . Press each key individually (in any order) to
remove the lit status. When finished, all keys
should be unlit. Ifan LED does not go out, remove and replace the line cord and repeat
steps a and b. If the test fails again, replace
the DSWBLF Unit. After all the keys have
been tested, it takes approximately 10 seconds for the DSS/BLF Unit to return to normal operation.
CAUTION
If the power pair (W/BL, BL/W) is reversed, installing a DSWBLF Unit will open the fuse (or associated thermistor) on the KSC-D. If the card has
a fuse, this affects operation of all keysets, DSS/
BLF Units, and Attendant Computer Consoles
connected to that card.
13)
Perform the DWBLF Unit self-test:
d. Reassemble the DSS/BLF Unit.
G.
Mount the appropriate modular jack assembly on
the wall.
AYITENDANT COMPUTER CONSOLE
INSTALLATION
7.56 For complete information on the Attendant Computer Console, along with detailed installation and programming instructions, refer to the manual included
with the console.
Page 3-93
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE
3-52.
INTER-TELPRAcTICE!3
IMX/GMX256 DWMLLATION& MAINTENANCE
INTER-TELJDVK
DSS/BLF
Page 3-94
UNIT CONTROL BOARD
INSTALLATION
Issue 1. November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
H.
SINGLE-LINE SET AND PLAYBACK
DEVICE lNSTALLATION
Single-Line Sets
7.57 Single-line sets can be connected to either Single-Line Cards (SLCs) or Inward Dialing Cards @DC’s).
If connected to SLCs, single-line sets must be equipped
with AC ringers. If connected to IDCs, off-premises
single-line sets must be equipped with AC ringers, while
on-premises single-lines sets may be equipped with either AC or DC ringers. Jumper straps on the IDC circuits
can be set for AC-ringing or DC-ringing. Refer to Figure
3-33 on page 3-53 for strap locations.
NOTE: To use SLCs and IDCs, a -4SV Module must be
installed in the power supply chassis. To use AC-ringing
single-line devices, a Ring Generator Module must also
be installed.
7.58 Enhanced Single-Lime Sets (ESLSs) and Siile-Line Instruments (SLIs): An internal jumper strap
can be moved to set the ringer for AC or DC. (An AC
ringer is required if the phone is used on an SLC or as an
off-premises extension on an IDC.) Be sure the strap is
set correctly for the installation; incorrect installation
will cause damage to the phone. ESLSs also have a selectable ring tone jumper strap (HI or LO) located on the
control board.
NOTE: IDCs do not support message waiting applications. If single-line sets with message waiting lamps are
installed on lDCs, the lamps will not function.
overflow stations. Either type of station can be equipped
with a station instrument that operates as a regular station or with a playback device that answers the call, then
disconnects to transfer it back to the hunt group. Refer to
FEMURES, page 4-17, for more information.
7.62 With the Exfemikd and Emnddplus Tl and
EdWsoftware packages, playback devices may also be
used in conjunction with the automated attendant feature. In this situation, the playback device answers the
call and plays a prerecorded message. After the message, the caller is disconnected from the automated attendant and hears pure system dial tone. During or after
the message, the caller may dial an extension number or
a hunt group pilot number. Refer to FEAWRES, page
4-12, for more information.
NOTE: For optimal performance, it is recommended
that voice mail units and automated attendant playback
devices be installed on IDC circuits rather than SLC circuits.
Single-Line Set And Playback Device Installation-
7.63 Inspect the ESLSs and SLIs before installing
them. If any parts are damaged or missing, contact Customer Support.
7.64
(1)
NOTE: The back cover of the ESLS does not
have to be opened to reach the straps.
b . Place the AC/DC jumper strap in the desired
position. Also, on ESLSs, place the Hl/LG
(selectable ring tone) jumper strap in the desired position. (Refer to Figures 3-53 and
3-54 on the following pages.)
Playback Devices
7.61 Playback devices may be used with hunt groups
to speed call processing. Hunt groups can have two
types of special stations: announcement stations and
If installing an ESZS or SLI:
a . Remove the baseplate and open the phone to
expose the control board.
759 Industry-standard single-line DTMF sets: If
equipped with AC ringers, they may bc installed on either SLCs or IDCs. If equipped with DC ringers, they
must be installed on IDCs (and they must be used onpremises).
7.60 Playback devices can be used in place of singleline sets on SLC or IDC circuits. These devices answer
an incoming call, play a recorded message, and automatically disconnect from the call. They are installed
like single-line sets, using the same cabling and modular
jack assemblies. If the playback device responds to AC
ring signals and is installed on an IDC circuit, the circuit
must be strapped for AC ringing; if the device responds
to DC ring signals, the jumper strap must be set for DC
ringing. (Refer to Figure 3-33 on page 3-53.) A playback device uses the extension number that is associated
with its station circuit.
To install a single-line set or a playback device:
NOTE: On ESLSs, do not move the JMP3
jumper strap from the NORM position.
C.
Reassemble the phone.
(2)
Before connecting a single-line set or playback
device to the system, measure the voltage on the
RED terminal of the modular jack assemblywith
respect to the GREEN terminal. (The common
probe of the voltmeter is placed on the GREEN
terminal.) It must measure -4ovDc (*2VDC).
If +40 is measured, check the cabling for a reversed pair.
(3)
Mount the modular jack assembly on the wall.
Page 3-95
INTER-TELPRACTICES
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
(4)
IMI4GM.X 256 INS~TION & MAINTENANCE
Plug one end of the line cord intd the modular
jack assembly and plug the other end into the
jack on the single-line set or playback device.
FIGURE 3-53.
(5)
To wall mount an ESLS or SLI, refer to the instructions given for wall mounting keysets on
page 3-77.
SLI CONTROL BOARD
Page 3-96
’ .-)
.A
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICE!3
lMX/GMX 256 INSTAz,LATION 81 MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 3-54.
BOTTOM OF ESLS
Q
8
AC/DC RINGER STRAP 1
0Q
[email protected]
RING TONE STRAP
08
[email protected]
Page 3-97
INSlYALLA~ON
Issue 1, November 1994
8.
IM.X/GMX
SMDRfSMDA OUTPUT DEVICE
INS’ll4LLATION
9.
8.1 The output device(s) for the Station Message Detail Recording (SMDR) and Station Message Detail Accounting (SMDA) features must meet the requirements
and match the RS-232-C DB9 pinouts described in
SPECIFICATIONS on page 2-31. The cables for the device(s) must not be longer than 50 feet (15 meters).
8.2 To connect an output device to the RCPU Card in
the equipment cabinet:
(1)
Match the baud rates on the output device and the
serial port to which it will be attached (PGRT A
or PORT B). Refer to page 2-32 for the proper
baud rate settings.
(2)
Turn on the AC power to both the device and the
system befox connecting the DB9 cable to the
RCPU Card. This prevents any electrical surges
from being transmitted by the interface.
(3)
Carefully connect the DB9 interface cable from
the device to the appropriate connector (PORT A
or PORT B) on the RCPU Card.
(4)
Using standard electrical tape, tape two ferrite
split beads around the interface cable just below
where the cable connects to the RCPU Card. (See
Figure 3-4 on page 3-12 for an example of ferrite bead installation).
NOTE: Ferrite beads must be installed to meet
Part 15 of FCC regulations. Refer to REPLACEMENT PARTS for the part number.
(5)
INTER-TELPRACITCES
256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
EXTERNAL PAGING EQUIPIHENT
INS’IXLLATION
9.1 Gptional external paging equipment can be connected to an available SLC, LGC, or LSC circuit. Install
the external paging equipment as follows:
NOTE: When installing external paging equipment on
an LGC or LX circuit, use a paging amplifier that provides talk battery. When installing external paging
equipment on an SLC circuit, use a paging amplifier that
DOES NOT provide talk battery.
CAUTION
Using a paging amplifier with talk battery on an
SLC circuit will damage the card.
(1)
Cut a length of shielded speaker cable to run
from the paging amplifier to the MDF backboard.
(2)
At the MDF, terminate one end of the cable onto
tip and ring of an available SLC, LGC, or LSC
circuit.
(3)
Connect the other end of the cable to the amplifier high-impedance input according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
(4)
Connect the paging speaker(s) to the amplit?er
using speaker cable.
(9
Plug in the amplifier’s AC power cord. DONOT
use the outlet for the equipment cabinet or the
auxiliary outlets on the back of the power supply.
(6)
Set the amplifier volume control to the lowest
setting and turn on the amplifier.
8
From a station location, make a page by lifting
the handset, pressing the PAGE key (or dialing 7 .
- the default Page feature code), and dialing a
zone code that includes the external paging zone.
Adjust the amplifier to the desired level while
placing the page.
To set the parameters for the SMDR and SMDA
outputs, refer to PROGRAMMING.
Page 3-98
.
INSTALLATION
Issue 1, November 1994
10. EXTERNAL MUSIC SOURCE
INS’IALLATION
10.1 If desired, up to two external music sources (Port
1 and Port 2) may be connected to the system. The first
two pair of wires on the RCPU Card terminal block (see
Figure 3-20 on page 3-31) are the inputs for the optional
external music sources (radio, tape player, etc.). If two
music sources are connected, keyset users have the op
tion of having background music from either music
source. For the Music-On-Hold feature, either music
source (or silence, or tick-tones) can be assigned on a
trunk groupby-trunk group basis. For more information, see SPECIFICATIONS, page 2-10.
NOTE: In some circumstances, there may be broadcast
restrictions associated with the music. Check with the
music’s original distributor and/or the radio station for
copyright and broadcast restrictions concerning background music and music-on-hold.
10.2 Ifusiug a radio as a music source, place it 5 to 10
feet away from the equipment cabinet to avoid RFI generated by the equipment cabinet. If the radio is placed
more than 10 feet away from the equipment cabinet, use
twisted-pair cable. For better reception, a radio with an
external antenna is recommended.
103
(1)
Plug in the AC power cord for the music source.
DO NOT use the outlet for the equipment cabinet
or the auxiliary outlets on the back of the power
supply.
(6)
Turn on the AC power to the music source.
8
From a keyseu
EITHER, select a trunk and dial the telephone
number of one of the other trunks to call back
into the system. Put the call on hold to hear the
music.
OR, place an intercom call to another station.
Put the call on hold to hear the music.
(8)
While listening to music-on-hold, adjust the volume on the music source to a level within the
range of the automatic gain control circuit
(slightly past the point where the volume level no
longer increases). The optimal input level is
0.775VRMS (OdB).
(9)
If installing a second music source, repeat these
steps.
To install the external music source:
l l . PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE
On the RCPU Card, ensure that the appropriate
music-on-hold (MOH) jumper strap (Port 1 or
Port 2) is iu the ON position (over the top two
pins). When outside calls on trunk groups assigned to this port are placed on hold, the caller
hears music.
(2)
Cut a 5 to IO-foot (1.5- to 3.0-meter) length of
shielded speaker cable to run from the external
music source to the RCPU Card terminal block.
(3)
At the MDF, terminate one end of the cable onto
the Port 1 pair (W/BL-BL/W) or the Port 2 pair
(W/O-O/W) of the RCPU Card terminal block.
(4)
(5)
11.1 For optimal system performance, periodically
conduct the following preventative maintenance rout&S:
EITHER, connect the other end of the cable to
the speaker output terminals of the music source.
OR, if the music source has an earphone jack, attach an J&inch miui phone plug (or other specified connector) to the other end of the cable, and
plug it into the earphone jack on the music
source.
NOTE: If the earphone jack is “padded” so that
the optimal volume level cannot be reached, the
EITHER procedure may be more effective.
Page 3-99
Clean and Dust -To ensure proper air circulation
and reduce excess heat, clean and dust the ventilation slots on the equipment cabinet, the mesh screen
on the power supply chassis, and the components on
the circuit cards.
Check Component Connections -Ensure that all
components on the circuit cards are seated securely
in their sockets and that no pins are bent.
Check Card Connections -Ensure that all,circuit
cards are seated securely in their appropriate card
slots.
Check Cable Connections - Ensure that all sys-
tem power and interface cables are properly connected.
Check System Voltages - Ensure that all system
power supply voltages are within tolerance, as outlined on page 3-61.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
llbWGMX2S6INsTAwLATION & MAINTENANCE
JNS’lXLIAmON
Issue 1, November 1994
12. POST-INSTALLATION CHECKLIST
12.1 TotnsurethatthesystemhasbeeninstallcdpIop
erly, review the installation outline on page 3-2. Then
review the items in the following list as a final check.
- Equipment cabinet, MDF, and station locations, and
cable runs meet environmental requirements and
cable lengths are within loop limits.
Ferrite beads are installed on all station, trunk, and
ES-232-C cables.
Bridging clips are installed where required on all
h4DF blocks.
Gas discharge tubes with silicon avalanche suppressors are installed on the trunks for lightning protection. Also, if extra protection is desired, the cable
between the telephone company RJ-type block(s)
and the gas discharge tubes is at least 75 feet long.
If off-premises extensions are used, OPX or customer-provided circuits, and OPXrepeaters (if needed),
are connected at the MDF.
The equipment cabinet is attached to an approved
earth ground.
- The system power supply is plugged into an isolated,
dedicated AC outlet, and no other equipment has
been plugged into the same outlet. An extension
cord was not used. Avoltage surge/spike protector is
installed to reduce the effects of AC voltage surges
and spikes that can cause system malfunctions, false
logic, and/or damage to the electronic components.
- Power supply voltages are in tolerance.
- Amphenol-type connectors, modular jack connec-
tors, and station instrument line cords are all connected securely. All keyset, DSSBLF Unit,
Attendant Computer Console, single-line, and playback device stations are working properly.
- All optional equipment is properly installed and
working cmrectly (for example, printer has paper
and nibon, radio is tuned to a station, etc).
- CO dial tone is present and calls can be placed and
received using all trunks. (Refer to FEAWRES and
PROGRAhfMlNG for con&uring the system and
for programming outgoing access, allowed answer,
and ring in.)
- After programming the system, the database is
saved. (Refer to the PROGRAMMING section for
details.)
!‘
i
Page 3-100
lNrER-TELPRACTICES
WGMX 2% INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
FEATURES
CONzrmvTS
I-AGE
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2. Accessing The Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
FeatureCodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Feature Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C SPCL And FLASH Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. Trunk Access Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E. General Feature Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
Keyset-Only Feature Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G. Attendant Feature Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
H. Extension Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3. System Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A Flexible Attendant Arrangements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Optional Automated Attendant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C Tenant Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. Hunt Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E. Voice Mail/Voice Computer Hunt Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4. Trunk Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
Dual-Tone Multi-Frequency (DTMF) Or Dial-Pulse Signaling . . . . . . . . . .
B. Outgoing-Access, Allowed-Answer, And Ring-In Assignments . . . . . . . . . .
C. Ring-In/Answer Patterns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. Ring Zones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E. Signal Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
Day And Night Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G. Trunk Restriction And Station Toll Restriction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
H. Optional Weekly Toll Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I. Trunk Group Assignments And Automatic Answer/Select . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
J. Least-Cost Routing (LCR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
E&MThmks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
L. Tl Spans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
M. Direct Inward Dialing (DID) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
N . Loop And Ground Start ‘Dunks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
0. Dunk Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
Direct Inward System Access @ISA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5. Station Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
k Keysets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Single-Line Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C. Direct Station Selection/Busy Lamp Field @SS/BLF) Units . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. Attendant Computer Consoles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6. User-Programmable Feature Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7 . Automatic Call Access (Keysets Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8. Music-On-Hold And Background Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-4
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4-4
4-4
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4-8
4-10
4-11
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4-12
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4-15
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4-21
4-24
4-24
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4-51
4-52
4-53
1
1
INTER-TELPRAcmCEs
81 MAINTENANCE
IMX/GMX 256 INSX4LLATION
CONTENTS
/
9. Signals And Tones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. Ring Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Call Processing Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10. Intercom Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
Programming For Private Intercom Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Station-To-station Calling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C Intercom Camp On And Busy Station Callback (Queue) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ll. Inter-Station Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..-. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. Leaving Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Responding To Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12. Off-Hook Voice Announce (OHVA) . . . . . . . . . . ..e.......................
13. Outside Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. Placing Outside Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Receiving Outside Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C Keyset On-Hook Dialing And Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. Dunk Camp On And Busy ‘Dunk Callback (Queue) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E. Account Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14. Placing Calls On Hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. Individual Hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. System Hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C Consultation Hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. Call Splitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E. Hold Recall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. Microphone Mute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15. Call Waiting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16. Call Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
Transfer To An Extension Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Transfer To Hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C. Transfer Recalls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. Transfer To An Outside Number Or E&M Destination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17. Reverse ‘Dansfer And Group Call Pick-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. Reverse Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Group Call Pick-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18. Call Privacy And Privacy Release . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19. Barge (Keysets Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20. Conference Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
Placing A Conference Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B . Add Parties To A Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C. Exiting A Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21. System Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-54
4-54
4-54
4-55
4-55
4-55
4-57
4-58
4-58
4-59
4-61
4-62
4-62
4-64
4-64
4-65
4-66
4-67
4-67
4-67
4-68
4-68
4-68
4-68
4-69
4-70
4-70
4-71
4-71
4-72
4-73
4-73
4-73
4-74
4-75
4-76
4-76
4-77
4-77
4-79
22. Call Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . ..~.......................................
4-82
Page 4-2
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,’
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Issue 1. Nov%z
23. Speed Dialing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A System Speed Dialing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Station Speed Dialing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24. Optional System Directory - Intercom And Outside (Keysets Only) . . . . . . . .
. Intercom Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Outside Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
25. House Phone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
26. Redialing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
27. Paging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
28. Remove From Paging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29. Do-Not-Disturb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
30. Hookflash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
31. Cancel Miscellaneous Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
32. Reminder Messages (Keysets Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
33. Optional Station Exchange Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
34. Optional Data Device Attachments (Keysets Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
35. Attendant Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
Using The DSS/BLF Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Attendant Recall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C Placing The System In Night Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. Programming Specific Station Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E. Programming System Reminder Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
Programming System Do-Not-Disturb Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G. Setting Time Of Day And Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
H. Remote Hunt Group Remove/Replace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I. Remote Station Feature Cancel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
J. Generating An SMDA Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
Paging Speaker Background Music (Primary Attendant Only) . . . . . . . . .
L. System Alarm Reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
M. Placing A ‘Dunk Out Of Service For Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36. Record Keeping And Maintenance Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. Call Cost Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Station Message Detail Accounting (SMDA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C . Station Message Detail Recording (SMDR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. System Error Reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E. Power Failure Capabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Page 4-3
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4-95
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1
4-101
4-103
4-103
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4-109
4-ll0
4-ill
4-ill I
4-111
4-W
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4-125
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INS’lXLLATION & MAINTENANCE
FEA-
Issue 1, November 1994
1. INTRODUCTION
2.
1.1
A. FEATURECODES
The 256 System, in addition to its sleek, modular
appearance and easy installation and programming,
provides many user-friendly features. To describe the
system features, this l?EKNRBsection has been divided into the following sections:
Accessing the Features: This section contains a list
of the feature codes and their definitions.
System Organization: This section describes pos-
sible attendant arrangements, automated attendants,
tenant groups and hunt groups.
ACCESSING THE FEATURES
2.1 Each of the station features is assigned a feature
code. Using the station’s keypad, these codes are entered to access trunks, process calls, and use special features. Complete explanations of the features and
instructions for using them are covered later in this section of the manual.
2.2 The codes shown on the following pages are the
values that are assigned when the system is in the default
state. If desired, they can be changed in database programming to any one- to four-digit value.
‘lhmk FeatureszThis section explains the trunk
functions and programmable features, including:
dual-tone multi-frequency (DUW) or dial-pulse
signaling; outgoing access, allowed-answer, and
ring-in assignmenta; day and night modes of operation; trunk and toll restriction; trunk group assignments; Least-Cost Routing &CR); Tl; E&M, Direct
Inward Dialing (DID); Direct Inward System Access @ISA); trunk maintenance; and loop and
ground start trunks.
Station Instruments: This section describes the station instruments of the 256 System. Available station instruments include keysets, single-line sets,
Direct Station Selection/Busy Lamp Field @SS/
BLF) Units, and Attendant Computer Consoles.
Intercom, Outside, and General Call Processing
Features: Several sections explain the use of the sta-
tion features that are available to all station users, including intercom call features, outside call features,
and general call processing features.
Attendant Features: This section explains the spe-
cial attendantonly features and the use of the DSS/
BLFUnit. Attendant Computer Console instructions
are covered in the manual included with the Attendant Computer Console unit
Record Keeping and Maintenance Features: For
record keeping purposes, the 256 System offers Sta-
tion Message Detail Recording (SMDR) and Station
Message Detail Accounting (SMDA). A system error reporting feature provides self-diagnostic information to make the system more reliable and easier to service.
Changing a feature code may affect the accessibility
B. FEATUREKEYS
2.3 Keysets, Enhanced Single-Line Seta (ESLSs), and
Single-Line Instruments (SLJs) have feature keys that
allow one-key dialing of feature codes. Information is
programmed in the database to determine the arrangement of the feature keys and their default values. If desired, some of the keyset feature keys can be designated
as user-programmable keys. All ESLS and SLI feature
keys (except the FLASH key) are user-programmable.
C .
SPCLANDFIASHKEYS
2.4 In some instances, feature codes are entered immediately after lifting the handset or pressing the SPKR
key. Other times, the user must signal the system by
pressing a designated key before entering the feature
code. Keyset users signal the system by pressing the
SPCL key. ESLS and SLI users press the FLASH key,
and single-line DTMF set users perform a hookflash
(press and release the hookswitch quickly). If the user
does not enter a code or begin dialing before the Dial Initiation timer expires, the system sends reorder tones.
2.5 There is a system-wide option that, if enabled,
allows keyset users to dial trunk access codes and
feature codes without lifting the handset or pressing the
SPKR or SPCL key. This programmable feature is
called “hot dial pad” to indicate that the dial pad keys
are always activated.
Page 4-4
FEATuREs
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
D.
TRUNK ACCESS CODES
2.6 The feature codes used to access trunks are listed below.
FAmP’= NAME
Automatic Trunk Selection
89
Answers the call that has been ringing or holding the
longest at that station. Refer to page 4-31 for the priority
list. Or, if no call is ringing or holding, the highest-numbered available auto trunk is selected for an outgoing
call. (Keysets use the ANSWER key)
Least-Cost Routing
9
Allows the system to select the desired route for placing
a call, as programmed in the database. (Keysets use the
OUTGOlNG key or a call key, ESLSs use the OUT key,
and SLIs use the LCR key)
Select Trunk Croup 1-47
801-847
Selects an available trunk from a programmed group of
trunks for placing an outside call.
E.
GENElUL FEATURE CODES
2.7 The following pages list the general feature codes. These feature codes may be use.d at any station. When a default feature key can be used in place of the feature code, it is indicated at the end of the explanation. Refer to pages
4-46 and 4-49 for listings of the default feature keys.
Automatic Trunk Answer
350
Station users with allowed answer can pick up trunks
that are ringing into the system, but are not actuallyringing at the stations themselves. This feature does not pick
up transferred calls or recalls that are ringing at the station.
Background Music Channel
Selection
318
Allows the keyset user to select the music channel
that will be heard when background music is enabled at
the station, or when placed on hold by another station
user. Allows single-line set user to select the music
channel that will be heard when the station is placed on
hold by another user.
Call Forward - All Calls
355
Immediately forwards all calls to another station or to an
outside telephone number. (Keysets use the FWD key)
Call Forward - If Busy
357
Immediately forwards all calls to another station or to an
outside telephone number when the station is in use.
(Can be assigned to the keyset FWD key)
Call Forward - If No Answer
356
Forwards all calls to another station or to an outside telephone number if not answered within a predetermined
time. (Can be assigned to the keyset FWD key)
Call Forward - If No Answer/Busy
358
Forwards all calls to another station or to an outside telephone number if not answered within a predetermined
amount of time, or immediately if the station is in use..
(Can be assigned to the keyset FWD key)
Call Forward -Cancel
359
Cancels any call forward request.
337
Allows the single-line station user to return to calls on
individual hold, in the order they were placed on hold.
(Keysets use the call and/or individual trunk keys and
the HOLD key)
Any
Call Splitting (Single-Line)
Page4-5
INTER-TELPFtACTICEs
lMX/GMX 256 INS~TION & MAINTFMANCE
DF~NQlQN
This single feature code cancels Do-Not-Disturb, Hunt
Group Remove, Page Remove, Call Forwarding, Disable Handsfree, Background Music, and Queue Request
features.
Cancel Misc. Operations
395
Conference
5
Connects from three to eight parties in a conference. A
conference consists of at least two stations and an outside caller, one station and two outside callers, or three
stations. (Keysets and ESLSs use the CNP key)
Do-Not-Disturb
Do-Not-Disturb Cancel
Do-Not-Disturb Mode On/Off
370
371
372
Halts all intercom calls, transferred calls, and
pages to the station. The cane1 code returns the
station to normal operation. The on/off code can be
used to turn Do-Not-Disturb on or off. (Keysets use
the DND key)
Feature Key Default
Feature Key Display
Feature Key Programming
325
326
327
Keysets, RSLSs, and SLIs have user-programmable
feature keys that can be set to access feature codes.
The keys can be set to the defined default values or
they can be programmed individually. Display keyset
users can view key assiguments.
Hold - Individual
336
Places a call on hold so that it can be directly accessed
only at that station or accessed through a reverse transfer
from any other station. (HOLD key)
Hookflash
330
Sends a timed hookflash over the trunk while on an outside call.
Hunt Group Remove
Hunt Group Replace
Hunt Remove/Replace On/Off
322
323
324
Removes the station from the hunt group or places it in
again. Does not affect non-hunt group calls. The on/off
feature code can be used to toggle the feature on or 06
and it can be assigned to a single feature key.
Message
365
Message - Cancel
366
This feature code is used for leaving and retrieving a
message waiting indication at a called station or the
called station’s message center. Depending on how the
message was left, the called station user can retrieve the
message from his/her message center or from the station
that left the message. (Keysets and HSLSs use the MSG
key)
Allows the station user to cancel a message waiting indication that he or she left at another station.
Message - Silent
378
Leaves a message waiting indication at a station without
first placing an intercom call.
Cancel Current Message
379
Cancels a message waiting indication that is waiting at
the station without requiring the user to respond to it.
(Keysets use the asterisk [*] key)
Optional Account Code
390
Allows the station user to enter an optional account code
for SMDR and SMDA reports during an outside call.
Also used for entering a class-of-service account code
before placing a call (if class-of-service account codes
are enabled).
Page
When followed by a paging zone code, it allows announcements to be made through keyset speakers and/or
external paging speakers. (Keysets use the PAGE key)
Page 4-6
.+TT
:)
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,I
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
LF~NWi?ld
Private Co Call
369
Allows station users to invoke call privacy on an outside
call when privacy release is enabled system wide.
Queue Request
Queue Request Cancel
6
376
Redial
380
Reverse Transfer (Call Pick-Up)
4
Ring Intercom Always
Ring Intercom Always Cancel
Ring Intercom Always WOff
367
368
377
Requests an automatic callback when a busy trunk
or station becomes available. The cancel code removes
a queue request. (Keysets and ESLSs use the QUE key)
Redials the last outside telephone number dialed or
saved at the station (up to 48 digits). Also used to save
numbers at keysets programmed for last number saved.
(Keysets and ESLSs use the REDIAL key, SLIs use the
REDL key)
Picks up a call ringing or holding at another station. Also
used for the Croup Call Pick-Up feature to pick up calls
that are ringing at a hunt group pilot number or hunt
group station.
Programs the station to always place private (nonhand&e) intercom calls. The cancel code allows the
station to again place handsfree calls. The on/off feature
code can be used to toggle the feature on or off, and it can
be assigned to a single feature key.
Software Version Number
385
Station Exchange
303
Station Speed Dial
Station Speed Dial Programming
382
383
System Speed Dial
381
Transfer CO Call
345
Transfer Intercom Call
346
Transfer to Hold
347
(Can be entered by a Voice Computer DliUF single-line
port only) If MMF feedback and extended DTMF tones
are enabled, this generates a fourdigit DTMP code that
indicates the last four digits of the software part number.
It is used by voice processing software to ensure that the
system software is compatible with the voice processing
features.
Allows a station user to perform an exchange between
two station circuits by swapping their extension numbers. All database and station programming follows the
extension numbers. A password is required when this
feature is used.
Dials/programs one of the 10 station speed-dial phone
numbers when followed by a location code (O-9).
(Keysets have IC/CQ Speed-Dial [SD] keys, ESLSs
have PGM STN and STN SPD keys, SLIs have STN SPD
key)
Dials one of the 400 system or tenant-specific speed-dial
telephone numbers when followed by a location code
(000-399). Also used for reviewing system or tenantspecific speeddial numbers at stations and for programming speed-dial numbers at the designated keyset. (Digital keysets, IMX 12/24-line keysets, 24line DVKs, and I
ESLSs have SYS SPD key)
Transfers an outside call to another station or to an outside telephone number. (Keysets use XFR key)
Transfers an intercom callto another station or to an outside telephone number.
Transfers a call to another station and places it on individual hold so that it does not ring or send call waiting
signals while holding (but will ring at the station when
recalling).
Page 4-7
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
F.
IMX/GMX
lNTER-TELPRACTIcE!?
256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
KEYSET-ONLY FEATURE CODES
3
2.8 The following pages list the keyset-only feature codes. Most ofthem can be used at any keys& station; however,
some codes require a display and some require a Data Port Module.
I
Digital, AIM, DVK Keyset Default Volume
394
Sets the volume levels on the audio interface module of
the digital, AIM, and DVK keysets to the databasedefined default values.
Automatic Intercom Access
Automatic Intercom Access Cancel
Automatic Intercom Access On/Off
362
363
364
Allows the keyset user to determine how ringing
intercom calls will be answered: simply by lifting the
handset (automatic access), or by lifting the handset and
pressing the IC key. The on/off feature code can be used
to toggle the feature on or off and it can be assigned
to a single feature key.
Automatic Trunk Access
Automatic Trunk Access Cancel
Automatic Trunk Access On/Off
360
361
374
Allows the keyset user to determine how ringing
outside calls will be answered: simply by lifting the
handset (automatic access), or by lifting the handset and
pressing a call key, individual trunk key or the
ANSWER key. The on/off feature code can be used to
toggle the feature on or off and it can be assigned to a
single feature key.
Background Music On/Off
313
Turns on and off background music heard through the
keyset speaker. (MUSIC key)
Barge
397
Connects the keyset user to an ongoing call at the called
station, if the Barge option is enabled.
Call Splitting (Keyset)
338
When transferring a call, the keyset user can toggle between the call being transferred and the called party by
entering this code.
Data
340
Allows operation of a data device attached to a keyset
with an installed Data Port Module. Requires a Data Port
Module and a modem- equipped data device. (DATA
key)
Data Port Monitor
341
Permits the keyset user to lift the handset and monitor a
data transmission when the data port is in use, without
affecting the transmission. Requires a Data Port Module
and a modem-equipped data device.
Date and Time Display
300
Displays the system date and time, user name, and extension number during a call or when other displays are
shown.
Do-Not-Disturb
373
If enabled in the database, allows the keyset user to
break through another station’s do-not-disturb mode to
place an intercom call to the station that is in
do-not-disturb.
310
311
319
Disables/enables the keyset’s handsfree intercom
answering. Incoming intercom calls ring as private
calls if handsfree answering is disabled. The on/off
feature code can be used to toggle the feature on or off,
and it can be assigned to a single feature key.
Override
Handsfree Disable
Handsfiee Enable
Handsfree On/Off
Page 4-8
,* ;>
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
JMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Headset Enable
Headset Disable
Headset Mode On/Off
315
316
317
The enable code signals the system that a headset has
been connected to the keyset. The disable code returns
the keyset to normal operation. The on/off feature code
canbeusedtotogglethefeatureonoroff,anditcanbe
assigned to a single feature key.
Hold - System
33s
Places an outside call on system hold. It can be picked up
directly at any keyset that has an individual trunk key for
that trunk or by the station that placed it on hold (by
pressing the flashing call or individual trunk key). The
hold flash can only be seen at other stations if they have
an individual trunk key for that truuk. (Cannot be used
on intercom calls. Ifused on cotierence calls, the system
places the parties on individual hold.)
Microphone Mute On/Off
314
Turns the microphone on or off during a call. If off
(muted), the keyset user can hear the other party, but the
party cannot hear the keyset user. (MUTE key)
Page Remove
Replace
Page Remove/Replace On/Off
332
333
334
Halts pages through the keyset speaker or allows Page
them to be received again. The on/off feature can be used
to toggle the feature on or off, and it can be used to assign
the feature to a single feature key.
Redial Mode - Last Number Dialed
Redial Mode - Last Number Saved
320
321
Programs the keyset redial mode to store either the
last outside telephone number dialed or the last outside
telephone number saved.
Release
339
If on a speakerphone call (intercom or outside), entering
this feature code disconnects the call and returns the
keyset to the idle state. Ifusing the handset, entering this
code disconnects the call and returns the keyset to dial
tone.
Reminder Message
Reminder Message Cancel
305
306
The keyset user can set reminder messages that signal
the station at specific times. Or, the user can cancel all
reminder messages for the station.
Ring Tone Selection
328
Selects the type of ringing alert tone that will be heard
from the keyset.
Speakerphone On/Off
312
Turns the keyset speakerphone on or off for on-hook
dialing, conversation, and monitoring. (SPKR key)
Station
396
Allows a designated hunt group supervisor to monitor a
station-to-outside call of anyone in the associated hunt
group.
Allows display keyset users to search for system extension numbers and user names. The number can then be
dialed, if desired.
Monitoring
System Directory - Intercom
307
System Directory - Outside
308
Allows display keyset users to search for system and/or
tenant specific speed-dial numbers and names. The
number can then be dialed, if desired.
System Feature Directory
309
This feature code is entered when an Executive Keyset
user Presses the OTHER FE&IUUB menu key. It
displays a list of features that can then be selected by
pressing the associated menu keys.
Page 4-9
I
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IhEUGMX256INsZ4UATION & MAINTENANCE
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
G. AlTENDANTFEATCJRE
CODES
-.” 3
2.9 The following feature codes may be used only at designated attendant stations. Non-attendant station users bear
reorder tones if they attempt to use these feature codes.
I
Cancel All DND Requests
Cancel All Station FWD Requests
Cancel All Station DNDE’WD
Requests
Cancel Station DND Request
Cancel Station FWD Request
Cancel Station DND/FWD Request
Clear System Alarm
Database Programmiug Enable
012
013
014
Feature Directory
009
Night Ring On/Off
010
Paging Speaker Music On/Off
018
Program Station Data
022
Program System DND Messages
024
Program System Reminder
Messages
023
Program System Speed Dial
020
Rograms system-wide or tenant-specific speed-dial
numbers when followed by location codes (009-399).
(Also accessed by the SYS SPD key - feature code
381.)
Remote Hunt Croup Replace
Remote Hunt Group Remove
Set Time of Day
032
033
021
Removes a station from its assigned hunt group(s) or
places it in the hunt group(s) again.
Rograms system time, date, and day of week.
SMDA
025
Generates a station message detail accounting (SMDA)
report.
Trunk Maintenance
027
Removes a trunk from operation to allow service personnel to test and perform maintenance on the trunk. Can
also be used to place the trunk back in service if the
attendant has an individual trunk key for that trunk.
Remove All Trunks From
Maintenance
028
Returns all trunks to operation that have been
removed using the Trunk Maintenance feature.
015
016
017
019
029
2
Cancels Do-Not-Disturb and/or Call Forwarding feature
for all stations or individual stations that are served by
that attendant, depending on the feature code used.
Cancels a system alarm display.
Allows the weekly toll limit information to be programmed in the database.
This feature code is entered when an Executive Keyset
user presses the ADMIN FEKHHES menu key. It
displays a list of features that can then be selected by
pressing the associated menu keys.
Places system or tenant group in night mode or cancels
nightmode.Whileinnightmode,thenighttoll andtrunk
restriction lists are used.
(primary Atrendan~ OnZy) Turns background music on
or off to the external paging speaker(s). After the code is
entered, the desired zone is indicated by entering a port
number (l-9) or 0 to turn off all ports.
NOTE: To help avoid confusion between zone and port
numbers, program external port 1 into zone 1, external
port 2 into zones 2, etc.
Reprograms specific station data, including user name,
tenant group and department, and serving attendant.
Reprograms up to 19 of the 20 system do-not-disturb
messages.
Reprograms any or all of the 20 system reminder
messages.
Page 4-10
\,
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INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
H.
EXTENSIONNUMBERS
2.10 Extension numbers are recognized as feature codes by the system. When the system is iu the default state, the
extension numbers are assigned as follows:
Attendant
stations
Hunt groups
Modems:
Bell 202 (300 baud)
Bell 202 (1200 baud)
CCl’IT (300 baud)
CCI’IT (1200 baud)
0
100-227
231-250
270
271
272
273
Page 4-11
INTEB-~PBACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 BWJALLATION & MAINTENANCE
EFember1994
3. SYSTEM ORGANIZATION
3.1 The 256 System is designed to allow organization
of the stations into tenant groups and hunt groups for
easier call processing and record keeping.
A .
FLEXIBLEATTENDANT
ARRANGEMENTS
3.2 Attendants provide the following services for the
stations they serve:
Accessed by dialing “0”
access to stations and for constant station/hunt group
status indications. Or, attendant stations can be
equipped with Attendant Computer Consoles.
One-Attendant
Operation
3 5 One attendant (generally designated as the primary attendant) has control of all the attendant features
listed in paragraphs 3.2 and 3.3. All trunks (except private trunks) are usually programmed to ring in at this attendant’s station.
Multiple-Attendant
Central operators for incoming calls (if
programmed for ring in)
Operation
3.6 The system can be assigned as many attendants as
needed (up to 128 if all keyset circuits are used for single
keysets, 256 if all keyset circuits are used for dual keysets). For example, there may be one or more attendants
to serve each tenant group. Trunk groups are programmed to ring at any or all attendant stations. One
attendant is designated as the primary attendant. With
this arrangement, either the primary attendant can serve
as the only system alarm station, or every attendant can
receive alarm messages.
Message centers (if programmed)
Recall stations for unanswered calls (day mode)
Clear displayed system alarms
Able to cancel Do-Not-Disturb and/or Call
Forwarding for the stations they seme
Program specific station information
Program system do-not-disturb messages
B .
Program system reminder messages
NOTE: This feature is available only in the Exfe&&
and Emdedplus Tl and E&M software packages.
Program tenant-specific and system-wide
speed-dial numbers
Place the tenant group in night mode or day mode
Set the system time of day, date, and day of week
Place trunks out of service for maintenance
purposes, and return them to service
3.3 In addition to the capabilities listed above, one
attendant can be designated as the primary attendant
who can:
Place the entire system in night mode or day mode
Program all system speeddial numbers (including
tenant-specific numbers), unless this ability has
been assigned to another keyset
Receive unsupervised outside call and hunt group
recalls
Turn background music on or off for the external
paging speakers
3.4 All attendant stations should be equipped with display keysets to show system alarms and recall sources. If
desired, each attendant’s keyset can also be used with
one or more DSS/BLF Units for one-key intercom
OITIONALAUTOMATEDATlIWDANT
3.7 The Automated Attendant is a programmable feature that can be used to provide some of the services normally handled by an attendant. It allows an outside party
to dial into the system and automatically access (or be
transferred to) an automated attendant station, which is
generally a playback device with a prerecorded message. After hearing the message, the caller is disconnected from the automated attendant and hears system
dial tone. The caller may then directly dial a station extension number or hunt group pilot number.
3.8 Automated attendant stations are designated in
database programming and can be assigned direct ring
in for specific trunk groups. There can be up to 248 automated attendant stations.
NOTE: Due to the natural characteristics of the trunk,
the volume level of DIMP tones transmitted over the
trunk may be substantially reduced before reaching the
256 System. This natural degradation in tone volume
may adversely affect the reliability of the Automated
Attendant feature. Other factors which can affect automated attendant performance are trunk noise, the quality of the playback device, and the quality and strength of
the DTMF tones generated by the off-premises phone itself.
Page 4-12
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INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Automated Attendant Applications
3.9 There are a number of different uses for this feature. For example, direct ring-in calls to a busy attendant
could be forwarded to an automated attendant (using
one of the Forwarding features). Another option is to
have calls ring in directly to an automated attendant station when the system is in day and/or night mode. Or, a
group of automated attendant stations could be assigned
to one hunt group. In this situation, a call would ring in
or be transferred to the hunt group pilot number where it
would circulate until an available automated attendant
station answers the call.
3.10 Another possibility is to assign an automated
attendant station as an announcement or overflow station in an existing hunt group. Unlike standard announcement or overflow stations, the caller hears system dial tone after being disconnected, rather than being
returned to the hunt group, and can dial an extension
number.
Automated Attendant Call Processing
3.l.l When a station receives a call that has been
routed through the automated attendant, the call rings as
a transferred call (but the display shows CALL RINGING IN ON TRNK GRP XX). If ringback tones are enabled, the caller hears ringing while the call is being
transferred. If riugback is not enabled, the caller hears
music (refer to PROGRAMMIN G, page 5-67).
3.12 Ifthe called station is forwarded, the call follows
the programmed forward. If the called station is busy or
does not answer, the call is transferred to the automated
attendant’s designated recall station after the appropriate Transfer timer expires. If the designated recall station does not answer the call, it is disconnected after the
Abandoned Call timer expires. If the automated attendant does not have a designated recall station, the call
transfers to the called party’s attendant after the ap
propriate Transfer timer expires.
3.13 When a hunt group pilot number receives a call
that has been routed through the automated attendant,
the call rings or circulates according to how the hunt
group is programmed (i.e., linear, distributed, or all
ring). The call is displayed as a direct ring-m call; however, the system actually processe sthecallasatransferred call. Refer to page 4-16 for more information on
hunt group calls.
3.14 The caller cannot access trunks or any other feature through the automated attendant station. An attempt to do so automatically transfers the call to the
automated attendant’s attendant.
P E A -
Issue 1. November 1994
3.15 To avoid possible camp-on tone interruptions
during calls, it is recommended that camp-on tones be
disallowed for the automated attendant station.
3.16 Intercom calls to an automated attendant station
are handled the same as normal intercom calls. After
hearing the message, the caller is disconnected from the
automated attendant and is returned to intercom dial
tone. Intercom callers cannot use the automated attendant features.
Playback Devices
3.17 Playback devices are generally used at the automated attendant station(s). When an outside call rings in
or is forwarded to an automated attendant, the playback
device plays a message (giving dialing instructions) and
then disconnects from the call. The caller hears system
dial tone. Ifusing a DTMP telephone, the caller can dial
a station extension number or hunt group pilot number
to access the desired station or hunt group, or dial “0” for
the automated attendant’s attendant. If an invalid number is dialed or the DTMF decoders are busy, the call is
immediately transferred to the automated attendant’s
attendant. If using a rotary telephone or if unsure of the
extension number, the caller can wait for the automated
attendant’s attendant to automatically be called after the
SL Dial Initiation timer expires.
3.18 Playback device installation is described iu
INST-ON on page 3-95. Trunk ring-in programming is described on page 5-106. Trunks should
not be programmed to ring in to multiple playback devices. Use the Call Forwarding or Hunt Group feature if
multiple playback devices are to be used.
NOTE: If the automated attendant does not have an assigned attendant, calls normally routed to the automated
attendant’s attendant will instead go to the primary
attendant.
User-Operated Automated Attendant Station
3.19 If desired, a user-operated station can also be
designated as an automated attendant station. In this
situation, when a direct ring-in or transferred outside
call is received, the station user answers the call, gives
the necessary dialing information, and hangs up. The
caller hears system dial tone and has the same options as
described in paragraph 3.17. Instead of disconnecting
from the call, the automated attendant station user can
choose to transfer it, place it on hold, or use other call
processing features. Simply hanging up on the call does
not terminate it from the system.
Page 4-13
Ete~ember
wrER-TRLPRACTIcEs
IMWGMX 256 lNSTAL,LATION & MAINTENANCE
1994
Dialing During Recordii
3.20 A database option allows the programmer to determine if the system will accept a caller’s DTMF tones
(dialed extension numbers or hunt group pilot numbers)
while the automated attendant station is giving dialing
instructions (rather than having to wait until they hear
system dial tone after the automated attendant hangs
up). Ifthe option is enabled, callers who know the extension number of the station or hunt group they wish to call
can dial the number any time after the automated attendant answers the call.
NOTE: The reliability of allowing callers to dial during
the instructions may be affected by the voice characteristics of the person givingthe instructions, the quality of
the playback device, the trunk noise levels, the DIMF
tone levels, etc. If frequent problems occur, this option
should be disabled.
Automated Attendant Do-Not-Disturb
BlWktllroIIgb
3.21
I
Direct ring-in calls are not blocked by Do-NotDisturb; they ring at the called station. However, the
database contains an option that allows or disallows
automated attendant (and DISA and voice mail) calls to
break through Do-Not-Disturb on a station-by-station
basis.
l
If do-not-disturb breakthrough is allow& an unan-
swered call is transferred to the automated attendant’s designated recall station after the appropriate
Transfer timer expires.
l
I
calls
through the automated attendant to a station in
do-not-disturb are immediately sent to the automated attendant’s designated recall station (or, if
one does not exist, the called party’s attendant).
If do-not-disturb breakthrough is disalloweci,
3.22 Allowing a voice computer acting as an automated attendant to transfer calls to stations in do-not-
disturb permits the voice computer to disconnect from
the call and then make a page announcement to alert the
called party, if the unit has that capability. (MMF
feedback and extended DTMP tones must be enabled to
use this option.)
I
Digit lkanslation
3.23 The Automated Attendant feature allows outside
callers to access the system and directly dial extension
numbers or hunt group pilot numbers. To simplify this
process and to help prevent the system from having
problems recognixing digits (due to trunk noise levels,
DTMF tone levels, etc.), a feature called Digit Translation may be used. Digit translation allows callers to dial
a single digit to access a designated extension number or
hunt group pilot number. Up to ten digit translation storage locations (O-9) are available in database programming (refer to PROGRAMMIN G, page 5-38).
3.24 To use digit translation, the programmer enters
an extension number or hunt group pilot number in the
desired translation [email protected]). Acaller accessingthe
system through the automated attendant can then dial
the singledigit location number to reach the designated
extension number or hunt group pilot number. For example, if the pilot number for a customer support group
was entered in translation location number 3, the automated attendant’s message would read something like:
“Dial 3 for customer support.“This is easier than dialing
a three-digit number, leaves less room for user error, and
helps to prevent trunk noise from causing the system to
make digit recognition errors.
3.25 To allow callers to dial zero for the attendant or
dial station extension numbers, it is recommended that
translation location numbers 0 and 1 be left blank. For
example, if location 1 is assigned pilot number 231, any
automated attendant caller attempting to dial a station
extension number that begins with a 1 will instead bc
transferred to 231.
Page 4-14
-‘A
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INTER-TELPRACTrCE!s
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTRNANCE
C. TENANTGROUPS
3.26 Tenant service allows the customized distribution of trunk groups and DID groups among multiple
users sharing a common system and allows the attendant
for each tenant group to place the associated trunk
groups in day or night mode. (The primary attendant can
place a!Z trunk groups in day or night mode.) Trunk
groups are assigned to the attendants on a tenant-by-tenant basis.
3.27 This form of partitioning is ideal in instances
where several small businesses share a 256 System, or
departments within a larger company wish to operate as
separate identities for such purposes as account billing
or budgeting. Along with the multiple tenant arrangements, each tenant group may be further divided into departments.
3.23 Eight tenant groups can be established in the system, with up to 10 departments in each tenant group.
Each station must be assigned to one (and only one) tenant group and one (and only one) department. When the
system is in the default state, all stations are in tenant
group 1, department 1. Assigning groups of stations to
different departments can be useful for comparing the
number and estimated cost of calls that each department
makes and receives. See SMDA, page 4-115, for details.
3.29 In database programming, each system speeddial number can be programmed for use by stations in a
single tenant group or by all stations in the system. The
attendant for each tenant group can then program the
associated tenant-specific and system-wide speed-dial
numbers.
3.30 Traffic (communication) between tenant groups
can be allowed or denied in database programming. If
cross-tenant conversations are denied, a station can only
call other stations within its tenant group and calls cannot be transferred or forwarded between tenant groups.
Therefore, if cross-tenant traffic is denied, each tenant
group should be assigned its own attendant. Attendants
can always call any station regardless of the cross-tenant
traffic option selected. Hunt groups with stations in
more than one tenant group are also not affected by the
cross-tenant traffic designation when an outside call
rings in or is transferred to the hunt group. However, an
intercom call that rings in or is transferred to the hunt
group will only circulate to the stations that are within
the same tenant group as the intercom caller.
Page 4-15
INTER-TELPRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
D. HUNTGROUPS
base. Astation can appear in a single list more than once
3.31 The Hunt Croup feature permits calls to be
placed to a group of stations and to be automatically
transferred to an available station within the group. Up
to 20 hunt groups can be programmed in the database
(there is no limit to the number of stations per hunt
group, as long as there are no more than 480 hunt group
stations per system). Stations in these groups are accessed by dialing a special extension number called a pilot number (defaults to 231-250). Individual stations
within the hunt group can be accessed using their assigned extension numbers.
and it can appear in multiple hunt group lists, if desired.
Hunt Group Call Processing
3.35 Hunt group stations receive the followingindications on individual trunk keys when a call is ringing in
(call keys will not show indications):
I
If an outside call is ringing, each of the available
hunt group stations in an all-ring hunt group or the
designated station in a linear or distributed hunt
group shows ring flash on the associated individual
trunk key until the call is answered.
If all stations are busy, an intercom or outside call
will camp on and cause the system to send camp-on
tones and display messages to all stations in the hunt
group; the associated trunk key flashes. As soon as
one station is available, the camp-on tone and message end, and the available station receives ringing
(if the hunt group is set for linear or distributed ringing, the individual trunk key stops flashing at all other stations). Camped-on calls follow the recall route
as described in paragraph 3.51.
3.32 Each hunt group is designated as one of the
following two types:
l
Station hunt groups: These hunt groups contain
keyset and/or single-line stations.
l
Voice mail/voice computer hunt groups: Voice
computer hunt groups contain single-line circuits
which are designated as voice mail/voice computer
stations. These hunt groups can be assigned special
dial rules that signal the voice computer unit to perform such tasks as dialing a voice mail aczss number or the called station’s mailbox number (refer to
page 4-21 for more information on voice mail
groups).
If every station in a linear or distributed hunt group,
(or CI tin& station in an all-ring hunt group), is in
do-not-disturb or has hunt group remove enabled, an
incoming call will flash on the associated individual
trunk key. If all stations in an all-ring hunt group are
in do-notdisturb, the trunk key flashes, but the stations do not ring. If all stations in an all-ring hunt
group are forwarded, the call rings and the trunk key
flashes.
Hunt Group Call Distribution
333 When an intercom or outside call is transferred or
rings in to the pilot number, it either rings at all stations
in the hunt group (all-ring) or circulates through the hunt
group in linear or distributed order until answered, as
described below.
Au-ring: Incoming calls ring simultaneously at all
stations in the hunt group. If any station is busy, the
call camps on to that station and sends call waiting
signals while ringing at the other stations.
Linear order: Incoming calls always start circulat-
ing by ringing at the first station on the list that is
stored in the database. If that station is busy, or if
there is no answer before the No Answer Advance
timer expires, the call goes to the next station on the
list.
336 Trunk groups (and DID numbers) can be programmed to ring in directly to either a pilot number or
extension number(s). If assigned to a pilot number, ring
in for the trunk group (or DID number) cannot be assigned to any other extension number(s).
3.37 Stations within the hunt group can receive direct
trunk and DID ring-in, intercom, forwarded, or transferred calls to their individual extension numbers without affecting other stations in the hunt group.
3.38 Hunt group programming affects the Call Forwarding feature in the following ways:
Distributed order: To even out the call load, dis-
If a station in a hunt group is in call forward mode,
the station will still receive hunt group calls.
tributed order shifts the starting point of each call.
When a station user receives a call, the next station
on the listreceives thenext incoming call. If a station
is busy, or if there is no answer before the No Answer
Advance timer expires,. the call goes to the next
station on the list.
e If an announcement or overflow station has call forward enabled, hunt group calls will not follow the
forward, but will remain at the station. (An exception to this occurs when hunt groups are programmed with multiple announcement stations; refer to paragraph 3.47 on the next page.)
3.34 The order in which hunt group stations receive
incoming calls is determined by a list stored in the data-
l
l
Page 4-16
Stations can forward calls to a hunt group’s pilot
number.
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INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Issue 1. No”%=
3.39 If cross-tenant traffic is denied, hunt group stations not in the same tenant group as an intercom caller
do not receive the incoming intercom call.
unanswered calls are handled.) An announcement station can have the following fypes of devices:
3.40 If an outside call rings in or is transferred to a pilot number that does not have hunt group station assignments, the call is sent to the primary attendant. If a station user attempts to transfer an intercom call to an
invalid pilot number, the call is placed on transfer hold;
the intercom call can be re-accessed on a keyset by
pressing IC key, or on a single-line set by hanging up to
allow the call to recall and then lifting the handset again.
A station user attempting to place an intercom call to an
invalid pilot number will hear reorder tones.
call, plays a greeting and message, and then disconnects from the call. The call continues ringing in the
hunt group while the playback device is handlingthe
call. If a hunt group station answers the ringing call
while it is at the playback device, the call will immediately leave the playback and be comtected to
the hunt group station.
3.41 When a DISA call or a call routed through the
automated attendant rings at a hunt group member’s station, it is displayed as a direct ring-in call; however, the
system actually processes the call as a transferred call.
0 Playback Device: A playback device answers the
l - Station, Hunt Group, or Voice Computer Hunt
Group: At this type of announcement station, a user
greets the caller and, if desired, may return the call to
the hunt group using the Call Transfer feature. The
cali will not at&nna&aUy return to the hunt group
from a statioh hunt group, or voice wmputer hunt
group announcement station.
l
3.42 Hunt groups can be assigned as message centers
and/or alternate message sources for individual stations.
Announcement And Overflow Stations
3.43 Two types of special stations can be programmed
to help calls circulate through the hunt group more efficiently: hunt group announcement stations and hunt
group overflow stations.
3.44 Announcement and overflow stations are not included in the hunt group list; they are individual stations
or hunt group that receive unanswered calls when all of
the hunt group stations are unavailable. Announcement
and overflow stations can be assigned to separate stations/hunt groups or they can be the same station/hunt
group. Also, each of the hunt groups can have the same
announcement and overflow stations or they can be assigned different stations.
3.45 When the database is in the default state, all
unanswered direct ring-in outside calls to the hunt
group go first to the announcement station and then to
the overflow station. Unanswered calls that were
transferred to the hunt group, by default, go only to the
overflow station. However, there is a system option that
can be enabled to send uZf unanswered hunt group calls
fust to the announcement station and then to the
overflow station. See page 5-68 in PROGRAMMING.
3.46 Announcement Stations: When the hunt group
receives a call (direct ring-in and/or transfer, depending
on programming), it rings at all stations or circulates in
linear or distributed order until it is answered or the Announcement timer expires. If the timer expires, the unanswered call is sent to one of up to three designated announcement stations. (Paragraph 3.51 explains how
Automated Attendant: An automated attendant
playback device announcement station will answer
the call, play its message, and then send the call to
the extension or pilot number selected by the caller.
Each direct ring-in call will transfer to the announcement station(s) only once.
3.47 To handle heavy incoming traffic, each hunt
group can be programmed with up to three amrouncement stations (or a single hunt group as the armouncement station). With multiple amrouncement stations, an
unanswered call is sent to the fust announcement station
on the list (after the Announcement timer expires). Ifthe
first announcement station is unavailable (no answer or
busy), the call is forwarded to the second announcement
station, and so on. C&e the call reaches the last announcement station on the list, it remains there until the
Forward No Answer timer expires. It then forwards to
the first announcement station on the list and starts the
process over again until it reaches an available announcement station. (The No Answer Advance timer
determines how long a call will ring unanswered at an
announcement station before moving to the next announcement station.)
NOTE: If a keyset or single-line set (rather than a playback device) is part of a multiple aunouncement station
list, all calls to the station are processed according to the
programmed forward condition. The station user cannot
cancel the forward unless the station is removed from
the multiple announcement station list in database programming; any manual call forwarding at the station
will be overridden.
3.48 Overflow Stations: When an outside call is
transferred to a hunt group by the announcement station
(or any attendant, an automated attendant, DISA, or any
station, if programmed to bypass the announcement station), it rings at all stations or circulates in linear or dis-
Page 4-17
INTER-TELPRACTKES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
PEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
tributed order until it is answered or the Overflow timer
expires. If unanswered when the timer expires, the call
is sent to an overflow station. The overflow station can
use the following types of devices:
Hunt Group, Voice Computer Group, or Station:
The overflow station be another hunt group, a voice
computer group, or a station not in the group. If the
overflow station is a hunt group, voice computer
group, or a station, the call can only ring at or circulate through the hunt group once, unless the overflow station transfers it back using the Call Transfer
feature.
Playback Device: If the overflow station is a play-
hunt group (unanswered) before being sent to the
hunt group’s overflow station. The default value is
72 seconds. It can be programmed for 10-255 seconds.
Unanswered Hunt Group Calls
331
The path that an unanswered hunt group call follows is determined by the configuration of the hunt
group, as outlined in the following paragraphs. Note that
intercom calls (direct or transferred) will not transfer to
the announcement or overflow stations, and transferred
intercom calls will not recall.
l
back device, the programmer can determine the
number of times (1-127 or unlimited) that the call
will be allowed to transfer back to the hunt group and
then return to the overflow station. (After the determined number of returns, the call becomes a recall.)
A playback device answers the call, plays a greeting
and message, and then disconnects from the call.
The call continues ringing in the hunt group while
the playback device is handling the call. If a hunt
group station answers the ringing call while it is at
the playback device, the call will immediately leave
the playback and be connected to the hunt group station. .
- Wrth a playback device amwuntmmt station:
When a call rings in to a hunt group, it circulates
through the hunt group until it is answered or the
Announcement timer expires. When this timer
expires, the unanswered call is picked up by the
designated playback device announcement station that answers the call and plays a message.
Meanwhile, the call continues circulating
through the hunt group (unless it has been sent to
a voice computer station). If it is answered by an
available hunt group station while the announcement station is connected to the call, the call will
leave the announcement station. Each call will
transfer to the amtouncement station only once.
If it remains unanswered when the Overflow
timer expires, the call will be sent to the overflow
station. Or, if there is no overflow station, the call
will be sent to the recall destination station when
the Recall timer expires.
3.49 A hunt group with a playback device overflow
station can be programmed, using an overflow count of
0, so that overflow calls are sent directly back to the
transferring station when the Overflow,timer expires.
This option is set by designating that the hunt group has
a playback device overflow station, then programming
the overflow for immediate recall, or not assigning an
overflow station.
- With a non-playback announcement station:
When an unanswered direct ring-in call is sent to
a non-playback announcement station (after the
hunt group Announcement timer expires), the
call remains at the announcement station until it
is answered or the caller hangs up. After the announcement station user answers, the call is processed as a normal outside call (if desired, the
call can be manually transferred back to the hunt
group using the Call Transfer feature).
Hunt Group Timers
3.50 Three timers are programmed on a hunt group
by-hunt group basis: No Answer Advance timer, Announcement timer, and Overflow timer.
0 No Answer Advance: Determines the amount of
time a call will ring at a hunt group station (unanswered) before advancing to the next station on the
list. The default value is 18 seconds. It can be prog-rammed for 3-255 seconds.
0 Announcement: This determines the amount of
time a direct ring-in call will remain unanswered before it is sent to the hunt group’s announcement station(s). The default value is 18 seconds. It can be
programmed for 10-255 seconds.
l
Direct ring-in outside calls:
- Wthout an announcement station A direct ringin call rings at or circulates through the hunt
group until answered or the caller hangs up; it is
not sent to the overflow station, nor does it recall
any attendant.
l
Overflow: This determines the amount of time a
transferred outside call will circulate through the
Page 4-18
Transferred outside calls (unless transfers are programmed to go to the announcement station as described in paragraph 3.45 on page 4-17):
- With a playback device overflow station: If the
call is unanswered when the Overflow timer I
‘T.i
-.. 2
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INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMx/GMx 256 INSTACLATION & MAINTENANCE
expires, the call is picked up by a playback
device overflow station that answers the call and
plays a message. Meanwhile, the call continues
circulating through the hunt group (unless it has
been sent to a voice computer station). If the call
is answered by an available hunt group station
while the overflow station is connected to the
call, the call will leave the overflow station. If
the call remains unanswered after returning from
the overflow station for the last time, the call
returns to the hunt group until the Overflow
timer expires, and then recalls the transferring
station.
- Wuh a non-playbackoverjbwmtio~ When an
unanswered transferred outside call is sent to a
non-playback overflow station, the call remains
at the overflow station until it is answered or until the Recall timer expires; it then recalls the
transferring station. If the call still remains unanswered, it recalls the transferring station’s attendant.
- without an overjlow station: An unanswered
transferred call circulates until the hunt group
Overflow timer expires and then returns to the
transferring station. If the call still remains unanswered, it recalls the transferring station’s attendant.
NOTE: In all cases, if the transfer came from the
announcement station or an automated attendant, it recalls the primary attendant.
l
To avoid the Recall timers:
I
Remote Hunt Group Replace feature code. See page
4-111.
355
When the Hunt Group Remove feature is enabled, the user will not hear ringing or receive the camp
on message display for calls to the hunt group unless it is
in an all-ring hunt group. In linear and distributed hunt
groups, the individual trunk key flashes only if all other
hunt group members are unavailable - busy, in
do-not-disturb, with calls forwarded, or with Hunt
Group Remove enabled. (Ihe station continues to receive calls placed to its extension number.) All-ring
hunt group stations will receive ring flash but no display
while in Do-Not-Disturb or Hunt Group Remove mode.
Hunt group overflow and announcement stations cannot
block hunt group calls.
3 . 5 6 lVREbfOK’lORREl?L4CEl~ON’S~GROUP
CALLS:
(1)
Keyset: While on or off hook, press SPCL.
Single-Line Set: Lift the handset.
(2) Enter the Hunt Group Remove feature code
(322) to halt hunt group calls or enter the Hunt
Group Replace feature code (323) to return the
station to its hunt group(s). Keyset users hear a
confirmation tone, single-line sets users hear
dial tone. (Or use the Hunt Group Remove/Replace On/Off feature code [324] to toggle the
hunt group mode on or off.)
(3)
If off hook; hang up.
Station Call Monitoring
- A hunt group can be assigned as its own overflow
station. The call will circulate through the hunt
group until it is answered or the caller hangs up.
I
FxATuREs
Issue 1, November 1994
3.52 If a station that receives a recalling hunt group
call chooses to transfer the call back to the hunt group,
the call retains its original queue position in the hunt
group. That is, it will be answered ahead of any calls that
were received by the hunt group while the call was
recalling. It will not go back to the end of the queue.
Hunt Group Remove/Replace And Do-Not-Disturb
353 Hunt group stations can temporarily halt hunt
group calls by entering the Hunt Group Remove feature
code as described below. Also, the Do-Not-Disturb feature can bc used to block all incoming hunt group calls to
a station. Announcement stations and overflow stations
cannot block hunt group calls using the Do-Not-Disturb
or Hunt Group Remove features.
3.54 The Hunt Group Remove/Replace feature can
also be controlled Corn the attendant’s station using the
357 This feature allows hunt group supervisors to
monitor the outside calls of anyone in a specified hunt
group. It can be useful in training or in evaluating the
performance of hunt group members.
NOTE: As a courtesy, hunt group members should be
notified in advance that their calls may be monitored. In
addition, a programmable option can be enabled that
sends a tone to the station being monitored whenever the
hunt group supervisor joins an ongoing call. (Note that
call monitoring may be illegal in some locations. It is up
to the end user to ensure that use of this feature is in compliance with local laws.)
3.58 In database programming, each hunt group can
have one keyset assigned as the hunt group supervisor.
This can be any keyset, even if it is not a member of the
hunt group. If the supervisor is a member of the hunt
group, the Hunt Group Remove/Replace feature can be
used at any time without affecting the station monitor
ability. If desired, one keyset can be assigned as the supervisor for more than one hunt group.
Pace 4-19
I
INTER-TELdPRACTICEs
IMXh2M.X 256 INS’IXLLATION & MAINTENANCE
3.59 To monitor a hunt group member’s call, the
supervisor enters the Station Call Monitoring feature
code and dials the desired extension number. The supcrvisor is then connected to the ongoing call and can hear
both parties, but CaMot be heard by either one. Ifusing a
display keyset, the top line of the supervisor’s display
shows the hunt group member’s extension number (or
user name) and trunk number (or trunk identification).
The bottom line of the supervisor’s display shows the
hunt group member’s call cost information Gust as it is
on the hunt group member’s display). If the monitored
call is terminated, transferred, or placed on hold by the
hunt group member, the monitor function is tetminated.
3.60 III the associated hunt group, the supervisor may
monitor any active CO-to-intercom call (both hunting
and non-hunting), including incoming, outgoing, and
DISA-to-intercom calls. Conference calls and calls that
do not involve hunt group members camtot be monitored. Also, if privacy release is enabled system-wide
and another keyset user joins an ongoing CO-to-intercom call that is being monitored (i.e., joins it by lifting
the handset and pressing the busy individual trunk key),
the call monitoring function is terminated.
3.62 lV MONllOR A HUNT GROUP CALL (Dh-SIGNAl?X’
SUPERVISOR Om:
(1)
To use the speakerphone: While on hook, press
SPCL and enter the Station Call Monitoring feature code (396). You hear a confirmation tone
and the SPKR key lights.
To use the handset: Lift the handset and enter
the station Call Monitoring feature code (396).
You hear a confirmation tone.
(2)
Dial the extension number (or press the lit SD or
DSS/BLP key) of the station to be monitored.
You are automatically connected to the call and
the display shows the intercom identification,
trunk identification, and the monitored station’s
call cost information. The MUTE key lights.
(3) To monitor another hunt group member’s
3.61 If the supervisor attempts to monitor a station
that is already being monitored or one that is not on an
active CO-to-intercom call, the system sends reorder
tones and allows the supervisor to dial another extension
number. If the supervisor attempts to monitor a station
that is not in the hunt group or an idle station in the hunt
group, the system sends reorder tones and cancels the
monitor feature.
Call:
EITHER, Press SPCL, enter the Station Call
Monitoring feature code (396), and dial the extension number (or press the SD key).
OR, Press the DSS/BLP key for another station
without pressing SPCL or entering a feature
code.
I
To terminate the monitor feature: If offhook
i
hang up. If on hook press the SPKR key.
To place or receive a talk press the IC key or an
individual trunk or call key (or the ANSWER or
OUTGOING key).
.I
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INTER-TELPRACrICEs
IMX/GMX256 NTIALLATION & MAINTENANCE
E.
VOICE lUlI.JVOICECOMPUTER HUNT
GROUPS
3.63 Any hunt group can be designated as a voice
computer hunt group. These hunt groups can be
assigned special dial rules that signal the voice mail unit
to perform such tasks as dialing a voice mail access
number or the called station’s mailbox number. (See
page 4-16 for more information about hunt groups.)
3.64 The order in which the voice mail stations
receive incoming calls (intercom, transferred, direct
ring-in, and DISA calls) is determined by a list stored in
the database. A station can appear in a single list more
than once and it can appear in multiple lists, if desired.
The station list is always checked in linear order.
Voice Mail/Computer Do-Not-Disturb
BlYAhWgh
3.69 Calls through the voice computer (and DISA and
automated attendants) can be allowed to ring at the
station if it is in do-not-disturb. If disallowed, such calls
will immediately transfer to the designated recall
destination (or to the primary attendant, if no recall
destination is specified).
3.70 Allowing voice mail/computers to transfer calls
to stations in do-not-disturb permits the voice mail/
computer to disconnect from the call and then make a
page announcement to alert the called party, if the voice
computer has that capability.
Voice Mail/Computer Dial Rules
3.65 If a call is not answered by the first station on the
list before the No Answer Advance timer expires, the
call is sent to the next station on the list. If the call
remains unanswered when the Recall timer expires, it
will recall the designated recall designation (or the
primary attendant, if there is no recall destination
specified in the database).
The 256 System has the ability to support voice
computers that can process codes which give detailed
information about the status, origin, and destination of
the call, and can dial feature codes. Refer to the manual
provided with your voice computer to determine the dial
rules most suited to your specific unit, The dial rules and
codes are as follows.
Recalls
3.72 Dial rule 1-Originating extension: Dials the
intercom number of the individual who initiated the
call. For example, if extension 200 called a voice
computer hunt group that used dial rule 1, the system
would send “200” to the voice mail unit. This is a
general purpose dial rule; it can be used for things such
as automatically dialing the caller’s mailbox, etc.
3.66 Arecall destination is assigned to voice computer hunt groups. The recall destination can be a station or
another hunt group. If a call is transferred to a station by
the voice computer, and the applicable Transfer timer
expires, the call is sent to the designated recall
destination. If a call is transferred to a hunt group by the
voice computer, and the Overflow timer expires, the call
is sent to the designated recall destination. (Ifthere is no
recall destination, it is sent to the primary attendant.)
DTMF Feedback Tones
3.71
3.73
Dial rule 2 - Controlling extension: This dial
rule is meant for use with voice computer conference
features not yet developed. It dials the intercom number
of the station user that brought the voice computer into
the conference. For example, if extension 200 is talking
to extension 201 and extension 200 brings a voice
computer hunt group that uses dial rule 2 into the call
using the conference feature, the system would send
“200” to the voice computer. The call could then be
recorded in mailbox number 200 so that it can be
replayed and/or transcribed later.
3.67 If a station is designated for voice mail and is
connected to a voice computer, the progress tones that
are normally sent to the voice mail station can be
replaced with MMF “feedback” tones. These tones can
.be utilized by the voice computer to determine call
3.74 Dial rule 3 -Destination extension: This dial
status such as whether the call is ringing, has been
rule has two purposes: (1) It dials the extension of the
answered, has been disconnected, or if the called station
station that is forwarded to the voice computer hunt
is in do-not-disturb, busy, or forwarded to an outside
group. For example, if extension 201 calls extension
telephone number. If the voice mail unit cannot interpret 1 202 and extension 202 forwards the call to extension
the MMF feedback tones, normal progress tones / 200 who forwards the call to a voice computer hunt that
should be kept enabled.
uses dial rule 3, the system would send “200” to the
I
voice mail unit whenever a call was forwarded through
3.68 If feedback tones are enabled, the “extended” set : the chain. This dial rule is useful for installations in
of feedback tones can also be enabled in system-wide
which only a few extensions in a building have
programming. These extended tones include codes for
mailboxes. Assuming that only an extension that had a
indicating when a station is forwarded to another station
voice mailbox would forward to a voice computer, the
system should dial the extension that would most likely
and when the calling party hangs up.
Page 4-21
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INST4LLATION& DANCE
ii!EyEember 1994
have a voice mailbox. (2) It dials the intercom number of
a station when a call is transferred to the voice mail unit.
For example, if extension 100 transferred a call to a
voice computer hunt group that used dial rule 3 and
entered “200” in response to the system-generated
prompt, the system would dial ‘200” when it transferred
the call to the voice computer.
3.75
Diai rule 4 -Original Destination Extension:
This dial rule dials the original destination of the call.
For example: If extension 200 dials a voice computer
hunt group that uses dial rule 4, the system would not
dial anything for this dial rule because there was not a
“destination.” However, if extension 201 dialed extension 200, which was forwarded to extension 202 which
was forwarded to a voice computer hunt group that used
dial rule 4, the system would dial “200.” Similarly, if
extension 100 transferred a call to a voice computer hunt
group that used dial rule 4 and entered “200” in response
to the system-generated prompt, the system would dial
“200” when it transferred the call to the voice computer.
3.76 Dial rule 5 -Reserved for future use
3.80. Dial rule 9 - Associied Department Num-
ber: This dial rule tells the voice computer which
department the originating extension is in. For example,
if extension 200 is in department number 1 and it calls a
voice computer hunt group that uses dial rule 9, the
system will send “1” to the voice computer. This dial
rule can be used in conjunction with dial rule 8.
3.81 Dial rule 10 - Associated Day/Night Fiag:
This dial rule will dial a “1” if the originating
extension’s tenant group is in day mode. Otherwise, it
will dial “0.” This dial rule is useful for determining
when the system is in night mode and indicating that the
attendant station is therefore unavailable.
3.82
3.83 Diai rule 12 - Call ‘Qpe (K/CO): This dial
rule will identify the type of call. If the call is an
intercom call, the system will dial a“1” for this dial rule.
Otherwise, this dial rule will dial a “2.”
3.84
3.77 Dial rule 6 - Other IC/ControiiingIC: This
dial rule is meant for conferencing features not implemented at this time. It is the opposite of dial rule 2. Where
dial rule 2 would dial the intercom number of the station
that brought the voice computer hunt group into the
conference, this dial rule will dial the other intercom
number that is involved in conference. This dial rule is
meant to be used only during two-party calls. It is useful
for features such as a “wake-up message” in which an
operator in a hotel would receive a call from someone
wanting a wake-up call. The operator could then invoke
the “wake-up” feature and enter a time for the other
person while in a conference on a call.
3.78 Dial rule 7 -Hunt Group Number: This dial
rule tells the voice computer which hunt group it serves
(as an amtouncement or overflow station). For example,
if a call overflows from hunt group 1 into a voice
computer hunt group that uses dial rule 7, the system
will send “01” to the voice computer. This dial rule is
meant to be used for the voice computer performing
announcement or overflow functions for one or more
hunt groups.
3.79 Dial rule 8 - Associated Tenant Group
Number: This dial rule tells the voice computer which
tenant group the originating extension is. in. For
example, if extension 200 is in tenant group 1 and it calls
a voice computer hunt group that uses dial rule 8, the
system will send “1” to the voice computer.
Dii ruie 11 -Associated Account Code: This
dial rule will dial the account code, if any, that was
previously assigned to a call.
Diiruie13 - Hunt Group Queue Position:
This dial rule will identify the queue position the call
was in (first, second, third...) while waiting for the hunt
group. For example, if there was one other call ahead of
this call when it overflowed to a voice computer hunt
group that uses dial rule 13, the system would dial “2”
for this dial rule. This dial rule is designed for future
features such as hunt-group overflow processing in
which the recording tells the caller, “There are five calls
ahead of your call.” This is especially useful for
processing hunt group calls since the call does not lose
its position in the hunt group when it is sent to the
overflow station.
3.85 Dial rule 14 - Hunt Group Overflow Count:
This dial rule will dial the number of times that the call
has been sent to the overflow station. If a call overflows
to a voice computer hunt group with dial rule 14, the
system will dial “1” the first time, “2” the second time,
etc. This is useful for features such as hunt-group
overflow processing in which the voice computer plays
different messages or performs different types of
processing depending upon the number of times a caller
receives an overflow message.
3.86 Dial rule 15 - RecaliSource: This dial rule
dials the intercom number of the station that received a
transfer recall. The basic operation is the same as dial
rule 4, except.that this rule is intended for entering the
voice mail system through a recall and dial rule 4 is for
entry through direct dialing. It is useful for automated
attendant applications to make the call transfer appear
supervised.
Page 4-22
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMWGMX 256 INS’IXLIATION
d!k MAINTENANCE
I MAL RULE
IC-TO-VOICE COMPUTER CALl
11
Originating Extension
it
Controlling Extension
Destination Extension
Originating station’s intercom number No code sent
Originating station’s intercom number No code sent
31
41
e1
Original Destination
Extension
Intercom number of last non-voice mail
station to forward the call if a chain of
stations is forwarded to voice mail or
voice mail transfer mailbox number
CO-TO-VOICE COMPUTER CALL
Intercom number of last non-voice mail
station to forward the call if a chain of
stations is forwarded to voice mail or
voice mail transfer mailbox number
Intercom number of the first non-voice Intercom number of the first non-voice
mail station to forward the call if a chain mail station to forward the call if a chain
of stations is forwarded to voice mail of stations is forwarded to voice mail
Other IC/Controlling IC
Originatiug station’s intercOrn number No code sent
Receiving hunt groups or voice mail Receiving hunt group or voice mail
Hunt Croup Number
group number
group number
e1
Associated Tenant Croup Originating station’s tenant group num- No code sent
Number
ber
s1
Associated
Department Originating station’s department num- No code sent
Number
ber
1 10 Associated Day/Night Flag If system is in day mode = 1
If system is in day mode = 1
If system is in night mode = 0
If system is in night mode = 0
1 11 Associated Account Code
No code sent
Account code, if entered
1 12 Call Type &!/CO)
Intercom call: code = 1
Outside call: code = 2
1 1s Hunt Group Queue Posi- No ccxie sent
Number of calls waiting ahead of this
tion
call for the hunt group
1 14 Hunt Croup
Overflow No code sent
The number of times this call has been
sent through the hunt group
Count
1 15 Recall Source
Intercom number of the station that re- No code sent
ceived a transferred call which recalls.
This applies even if the receiving station is forwarded; it uses the intercom
number that was dialed to make the
transfer, not the final destination.
7’
Page 4-23
FEATURES
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Issue 1, November 1994
4.
TRuNKFEATuREs
sets and M’MP single-line sets can be used on either
type of trunk.
4 . 1 The256Systemcancontainupto184trunks.This
section explains the trunk functions and programmable
features. Trunk capacities are explained in SPEClPICHTONS on page 2-2.
NOTE REGARDING TRUNK SECURITY
While this system is designed to be reasonably secure against CO trunk misuse by outside callers,
there is no implied warranty that it is invulnerable to
unauthorixed intrusions and toll fraud. If the central
office does not provide supervision, and disconnect
the call when one party hangs up, it is possible for a
caller to remain connected to a CO trunk circuit. If
this happens, and the caller begins dialing, the call
could be placed through the 256 System and would
then be billed to the system’s owner. The system
cannot check this type of call for toll restriction and
may not register the call in SMDR This problem
could arise when a call is connected to a station,
when a call is in an unsupervised conference, when
a call is forwarded or transferred to the public network, or when DISA is used for placing outgoing
CalIS.
To determine if disconnect supervision exists on a
trunk, disable “standard” tones for trunks in the
database. Then place a call to an outside party using
the trunk to be tested and have the called party hang
up while you remain off hook. If there is disconnect
supervision, you will hear 256 dial tone within 30
seconds. If you hear telephone company dial tone,
there is no supervision. If supervision does not exist,
contact the telephone company to determine if it
can be enabled. Centrex and loop start trunks tiequently do not provide disconnect supervision. To
make a loop start trunk more secure, a looptoground start converter can be installed. Each trunk
should be checked when it is first installed and periodically rechecked to reduce the probability that the
trunk will be used for unauthorized calls.
A . DUALTONE M-UIXI-F’REQUENCY
@TMFJ OR DIAL-PULSE SIGNALING
4.2 Trunks can be designated for MMF or dial-pulse
signaling through database programming (see PROGlb%IMlNG, page 5-103).
4.3 A digital code is generated by the keysets and decoded by the system to be sent as either a DTMP or dialpulse signal, depending on the trunk designation. Key-
-1 .:
4.4 A non-AIM/nondigital/non-DVK keyset user or 1
M’MP single-line set user can switch from dial-pulse to
M’MP signals, while using a dial-pulse trunk, by pressing the pound (#) or asterisk (*) keys. After the pound or
asterisk key is pressed, all digits that follow during that
call are sent out as M’MP tones. (This is useful when
calling computerized services that require a DIM? telephone, such as automated banking.)
NOTE: Inter-Tel AIM keysets and digital keysets do not 1
require this procedure; DTMP is enabled once the call
has been established. Inter-Tel/DVK keysets send both
digital code and lYIMP tones; therefore, this procedure
is also not required when using a DVK keyset.
B. OUTGOING-ACCESS, ALLOWEDANSWER, AND RING-IN ASSIGNMENTS
4.5 Each trunk group has programmed lists of stations
for outgoing-access, allowed-answer, and ring-in assignments for day and night modes.
0 Outgoing-access assignment for a particular trunk
group permits the station user to place calls using
trunks in that trunk group.
0 Allowed-answer assignment for a particular trunk
group permits the station user to answer incoming
calls on the trunks in that trunk group. Although the
call can be answered, it does not ring or flash at the
user’s station.
l
Ring-in assignment for a particular trunk group permits the station user to receive direct ring-in calls on
trunks in that trunk group. The station rings and, on
keysets, the individual trunk or call key flashes. Allowed answer for the trunk group is automatically
assigned to a station with ring in.
4.6 When keyset stations have outgoing-access or
ring-in assignments, the associated individual trunk
keys show the status of their trunks. Stations that do not
appear on any of the lists cannot place or directly receive
outside calls; they are limited to intercom calls, conferences, transferred calls, and retrieving calls on system
hold. (A call on system hold can only be picked up at the
station that placed it on hold or at a station with an individual trunk key for the trunk.)
4.7 A private trunk group (with one or more trunks)
can be established by programming outgoing-access,
ring-in, and allowed-answer assignments for the trunk
group to only one station.
Page 4-24
.\‘3
j
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMx/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
C .
RlNGlN/ANSWER PATI’ERNS
4.8 Trunk groups, DID numbers, and auto ring-in
E&M trunks can be assigned to ring in to one of the following:
l A single station extension number
0 A hunt group pilot number
. DISA
0 Multiple stations in a programmed ring-in/
answer pattern
4 3 Up to 40 ring-in/answer patterns can be set up and
assigned to the trunk groups, DID numbers, and auto
ring-in E&M trunks (when the groups are not designated
for ring-in to a single station, a hunt group, or DISA).
These patterns designate the stations that will receive
direct ring-in, and/or have allowed-answer permission
for the trunks.
D. RINGZONES
4.10 The system power supply’s ring generator can
provide ring voltage to ring up to 20 AGringktg singleline stations simultaneously without any noticeable
change in the ring tone. To preserve the ring tone quality,
single-line stations should be divided into ring zone
groups.
4.ll Most central office ring signals follow a 2 second
on/4 second off pattern that could be represented by this
drawing:
2
4
2
4
Ring zones 1,2, and 3 use this pattern, but the
“on” times are shifted so that only one xone is ringing at
a time.
f--l
ZONE3
4.13 The system is constantly cycling through this
timing pattern. When a call rings in, the zone that will
receive ringing first depends on where the system is in
the cycle. For example, if a call rings when the system is
three seconds into the cycle (as shown below), the stations in zone 3 would begin ringing one second later.
Zone 1 would ring three seconds after the call was received, and xone 2 would ring after 5 seconds.
mm1
I
ml3
I
ZONE2
--r-Is
I
ZONE3
CALL
REcElvED
4.15 If there are fewer than 20 AC-ringing single-line
sets that would ring at once, they can all be placed in the
immediate ring zone. If there are more than 20, they
should be removed from the immediate zone and divided up among zones 1-3 so that no more than 20 sets
ring at once. Be sure to check all ring-in patterns in day
and night modes to ensure that ring zone assignments do
not allow more than 20 AC-ringing single-line sets to
ring at once.
E. SIGNAL DEVICES
4.16 The ROM Central Processing Unit (RCPU) card
contains a relay that can be used to activate an external
signaling device when a call rings in on one of the assigned trunks. The signal follows the 2 seconds on/4 seconds off pattern. Ring-in can be programmed for day
and/or night modes by placing the relay in the desired
ring-in/answer pattern(s). For more information, refer
to page 2-11 in SPEClFICATIONS.
F.
DAY AND NIGRT MODES
4.17
4.12
ZONE1
4.14 There is an immediate-ring option that provides
ringing as soon as the call is received, regardless of the
cycling described above. When the system is in the
default state, all single-line sets are set for immediate
ringing.
There are separate lists in the database for toll restriction, outgoing-access, allowed-answer, and ring-in
assignments for day and night modes. When an attendant enters the Night Mode feature code, the associated
tenant group uses the night lists. When the primary
attendant enters the Night Mode feature code, all tenant
groups are placed into night mode. When the primary
attendant cancels night mode, all tenant groups are in
day mode.
4.18 There is no attendant recall during night mode. A
call will recall the station that transferred it or put it on
hold and will ring there until the Recall and Abandoned
Call timers expire; then the system will disconnect the
call.
Night Switch Relay
4.19 The Central Processor (RCPU) card relay can be
l-i
programmed as a night switch relay that is activated
when the system is placed in night mode. It can be used
for controlling lights, alarm systems, or other electrical
devices. The night relay is programmed in the database
(see page 5-73 in PROGRAMMING, and page 2-10 in
SPEClFICATIONS for more information).
Page 4-25
PEAIssue 1, November 1994
G.
INTEX-TELPRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
TRUNK RESTRICTION AND STATION
TOLL RESI’RICTION
4.20 Trunks and stations can be toll restricted using
several methods. Trunks can be “subject to toll restriction” or “unrestricted.” They can also be identified to allow equal access dialing and/or to absorb digits. Stations
can be toll restricted using a combination of eight station
class of service (SCOS) restrictions and/or they can be
restricted from accessing specific trunk groups. Each of
the trunk and station restrictions is described separately
in the following paragraphs.
‘lhmk Restriction
4.21 Trunk group access is programmed on a stationby-station basis. Individual stations can be allowed or
denied access to each trunk group separately for day and
night modes. In addition, each trunk group can also be
designated as “subject to toll restriction” or “unrestricted” in database programming. (All trunks are subject to toll restriction when the system is in the default
state.) When a station user selects a tnmk that is designated as subject to toll restriction, the system checks the
database for that station’s SCOS. When an unrestricted
trunk is chosen, the station’s SCOS is not checked (except LCR-Only restriction) and dialing is not required to
hold the trunk.
4.22 Trunk groups are often programmed as
I
nnratricted to allow station users to have access to
reduced-cost long distance carriers, or to use ringdown
lines, dictaphones, voice mail systems, and other auxiliary equipment, When the installer is programming unrestricted trunks, one of four call cost factors can be
selected to designate calls as free, local, ten-digit toll, or
operator/international. The selected call cost is then
used for all calls that are placed using that trunk.
‘Ihmk Group Exemption From LCR Only
4.23 The trunk group may be designated as “exempt
from Least-Cost Routing (LCR) only.” This allows
users with SCOS 6 (LCR Only) to directly access specified trunk groups by pressing the appropriate trunk
group keys (or the ANSWER key for auto trunks) or by
entering the appropriate trunk group access feature
codes. This feature is required if trunks are connected to
auxiliary equipment, such as voice mail, dictation, or
ringdown equipment. When such trunks are designated
as exempt from LCR Only, stations with SCOS 6 and allowed access can use the special facilities.
4.24 Designating a trunk group as exempt from LCR
Only also allows LCR-Only stations to use the call forward to the public network feature. To do this, station
users can enter a trunk group access code when programming the call forward number.
4.25 The default assignment for all trunks is not
exempt from LCR Only. It is a system-wide designation.
That is, if a trunk group is subject to LCR Only, all stations with SCOS 6 are denied direct access to the trunks.
Absorbed
Digits
4.26 Restricted trunk groups can be programmed to
“absorb” or ignore the first digit(s) dialed so that only
the remaining digits are checked for toll restriction and
call cost purposes. There are two applications for this
feature: PBX (E&M network) installations and installations in areas where part of the local office code is absorbed by the central office.
4.27 When using a dial-repeating E&M trunk, a 256
station user must dial an E&M trunk access code to
reach the other telephone system, then that system’s
trunk access code to place a call using its trunks. The
256 System must absorb the second code (the one that
accesses the other system’s trunk) to allow proper toll
restriction. Without absorbed digits, the 256 System
.zamtot perform the toll restriction and call cost functions. However, with absorbed digits, the 256 System
absorbs the other system’s trunk access codes, checks
the remaining digits for toll restriction, and calculates
call cost.
4.28 When a number is dialed that does not match one
of the absorbed digit strings (up to 50 strings, with a
maximum of 12 digits in each string), it is considered to
be an intercom call in the other telephone system, toll
restriction is passed, and the call is designated as a free
call (000) in the SMDR report. When redialing or using
call forward, the system automatically inserts a short
pause after the E&M trunk access code (which is entered
as part of the call forward number.) When speed dialing,
the speed-dial number must include the other system’s
trunk access code and a pause before the telephone number.
4.29 In some rural areas, specific digits (dialed as all
or part of the local exchange) are absorbed by the central
office, thus reducing the number of digits required to
dial local calls. These digits may also be “repeatable.”
That is, they are absorbed if dialed more than once. To
determine if a central office absorbs digits and whether
they are repeatable, contact the telephone company.
Page 4-26
STALLATON & MAINTENANCE
~E&cncEs
430 lf the system is not programmed to recognize the
absorbed digits, two problems may arise. One problem
is that a telephone number of fewer than seven digits,
that is dialed at a toll-restricted station, is notrecoguixed
as a valid telephone number and the call is dropped. The
other problem is that toll restriction can be defeated by
dialing the absorbed digits before dialing a toll number.
However, when programmed to recognixe a single
string of absorbed digits (with up to 12 digits in the
string), the system checks the remaining digits for toll
restriction and processes numbers with fewer than seven
digits as local calls (except 411 calls, which are considered seven-digit toll calls). If the first non-absorbed
digit is “1” or “O”, SCOS 1,2, and/or 8 are enforced immediately (see SCOS, beginning in paragraph 4.34).
Absorbed digits appear in the SMDR record when
dialed if they are not repeatable or suppressed.
4.31 The absorbed-digit designations are programmed on a trunk groupby-trunk group basis. No
trunk groups are designated for absorbed digits when the
system is in the default state. See page 5-113 in PROGRAMMING for more information.
Equal Access
Issue 1, No”%=
CAUTION
REGARDlNGEMERGENCYNUMBERS
In areas where the emergency number is 1911, be
sure that toll-restricted stations have SCOS 8 (Enable AL,D) and that 911 is in the allowed long distance number list. Otherwise, toll-restricted users
may not be able to find a station that is permitted to
dial “l+” numbers. Note that 911 is allowed at every
station regardless of toll restriction, but 1911 requires this special programming.
435
SCOS 1 -Operator restriction: Calls that begin with a “0” are restricted. This also restricts intemational calls.
NOTE: If this restriction is not set, and a user dials “0”
as the first digit when placing a call, only SCOS 3 is
checked; no other toll restriction is checked.
436
Station Class of Service (SCOS)
4.34 SCOS is programmed on a station-by-station basis and each station can have different restrictions for
day and night modes. A station can be completely unrestricted (SCOS 0) or can have any combination of the
following restrictions.
SCOS 2-Toll access restriction: Thisrestricts
calls that begin with “1” unless they are on the allowed
long distance number list and the station has SCOS 8.
437
4.32 with equal access, the customer must choose a
primary long distance carrier. This is the carrier that will
automatically be accessed when the user dials a long
distance telephone number. Customers may also select a
secondary carrier or use several secondary carriers.
These secondary carriers are accessed by dialing the
equal access prefix (10 or 101) and a three- or four digit
code assigned to the desired carrier (XXX or XXXX)
before dialing the telephone number. When using a secondary carrier, the telephone number is dialed as usual
after the equal access code -including the toll field (1,
0, or 01) and the area code, if needed.
433 A restricted trunk group that does not have equal
access designation prevents the system from providing
accurate toll restriction and call cost information when
1 “10XxX” or “101xxxx” is dialed on a trunk in that
trunk group. When programmed for equal access, the
system ignores the equal access code and checks the remaining digits for toll restriction. Equal access designation is programmed on a trunk group-by-trunk group basis. All trunk groups are designated for equal access
when the system is in the default state. To limit access to
specific secondary carriers, the stations can be restricted
to using LCR Only.
J
SCOS 3 -International call Ipstriction:
Calls
that begin with “01” are restricted.
NOTE: If international calls are allowed (SCOS 1 and
SCOS 3 are not set) and the user dials “01” as the first
digits when placing a call, no other toll restriction is
checked.
438 SCOS 4 - Eiitdigit call restriction: Cdls
are not permitted if they are over seven digits in length,
unless they are in the allowed long distance number list
and the station has SCOS 8. Users with this SCOS must
dial a valid telephone number before the appropriate Interdigit timer expires; otherwise the connection will be
dropped and the user will hear reorder tones.
4 3 9 scos 5 - Area/office code restriction: This
restriction is divided into eight user groups to allow different area/office code restriction tables for each of the
user groups. This is useful for reducing restrictions for
some of the station users while increasing restrictions
for others. Each station is assigned to a user group in
database progr amming. Within each user group, area
codes can be designated as restricted, allowed, or extended. Restricting an area code prevents users from
placing calls to that area code. Allowing an area code
also allows all 05ce codes within that area code. Allowing an area code also allows all office codes within that
area code. Designating an area code as extended allows
the programmer to determine which office codes (up to
800) are allowed or restricted within that area code. For
each user group, 160 area codes can be marked as allowed or restricted in the database list, and up to four
area codes may be marked as extended.
Page 4-27
INTER-TELPRACTICES
JMX/GMX 256 INSllALLATxON & MAINTENANCE
FEATmEs
Issue 1, November 1994
4.40 SCOS 6 -LCR Only: Calls can only be placed
using the Least-Cost Routing (LCR) feature when this
restriction is assigned. The user will hear reorder tones
when attempting to place a call using any other method.
A restricted user can still access individual trunk groups
if the trunk groups are are designated as “exempt from
LCR Only” (as described on page 4-26), or if the calls
weretransferred, were placed on hold, or are recalling or
ringing. LCR-Only stations access only the facility
groups assigned (see page 4-33 for more details). Trunk
restriction determines which trunk groups in the facility
group can be a ccessed by the station. Because stations
with this SCOS can use only LCR, they cannot forward
calls to outside telephone numbers (unless they are
using a trunk group designated as exempt from LCR
Only). For more information on LCR, refer to page
4-32.
4.41 SCOS 7 -Alternate carrier number restriction: Calls can not be placed to any of the numbers on
the alternate carrier number list if the station is given
this restriction. (For example, to restrict 411 at certain
stations, enter the number in the alternate canier list and
give the stations SCOS 7.) There can be up to 20 alternate carrier numbers with up to 10 digits each. The mnnbers should not contsinthe toll field, but can contain
equal access digits (e.g., do not enter 1+ or 0-1 numbers,
except 10xXx and 101xXxX numbers). An “X” in a
number represents any digit O-9.
NOTE: Allowed long distance numbers override alternate carrier number restrictions. Also, numbers are only
restricted if they exactly match the number on the alternate carrier list. For this reason, alternate carrier numbers can have a plus (+) added to the end of the number
to restrict users from bypassing toll restriction by dialing extra digits after dialing the alternate carrier number. For example, 976+ restricts all calls that begin with
976.
Class-of-Service Account Codes
4.43
SCOS can be programmed to be associated with
account codes. This permits a user to place a call from
any station using his class of service account code to enable his usual SCOS. When a class-of-service account
code is entered, the system checks the associated station
and applies its SCOS to the call being made (line access
permission and LCR advance class-of-service are not
applied). When the call is completed, the programmed
SCOS for the station being used goes back into effect.
The call appears in the SMDR report as being placed
from the station being used, and the account code will
appear unless an optional account code is entered later
(during the call).
Speed-Dial Override of Toll Restriction
4.44 System speed-dial numbers can be programmed
to bypass SCOS restrictions on a system-wide basis. If
the option is not enabled, all system speed-dial munbers
are subject to toll restriction.
North American Numbering Plan (NANP)
4.45 The growth of telecommunications services has
created an increasing demand for more telephone numbers. To meet the demand, Bellcore has prepared a longrange North American Numbering Plan (NANP) to provide additional telephone numbers. The plan expands
the capacity of the current numbering system by making
area and office codes interchangeable. That is, numbering patterns formerly reserved for office codes can be
used as new area codes, and office codes within existing
area codes can have the same pattern as other area codes.
4.46 ‘with interchangeable codes, switching systems
lose the ability to distinguish between 7- and lo-digit
numbers by examining the first three digits. To address
this, three methods have been proposed:
l
The Refix method requires a 1 before a lo-digit
number, and does not allow 1 before 7digit numbers.
l
The Tinning method requires the switch to wait
approximately four seconds after seven digits have
been dialed to see if additional digits are received.
4.42 SCOS 8 - Allowed long distance number:
Stations with this SCOS are allowed access to numbers
in the allowed long distance number list. There can be
up to 20 numbers of up to 10 digits each. Calls placed to
these numbers are not subject to SCOS restrictions 2 and
4-7. Operator-assisted and international calls (SCOS 1
and 3) are not checked against this list. An “X” in the
number represents any digit O-9, for example,
xXx-555-1212 allows users to dial directory informationusing any area code. Aplus (+) in the number allows
any number that begins with the designated sequence
(for example, 800+ allows any 800 number to be
dialed). The numbers should not include the toll field.
0 The Hybrid method requires timing only if a 0 or 1 is
dialed before a 7digit number that begins with three
digits that could be an area or office code (use the
NXX pattern described below).
4.47 The former dialing pattern required an area code
to be in the “NZX” format, where N=2-9,ZzO or 1, and
X=0-9. The new numbering plan allows the area code
format “m” which is the current office code format.
Therefore, with the new numbering plan, more area and
office codes will overlap.
Page 4-28
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMXIGMX 256 INSTALLATION
4.48 The following chart illustrates the difference between the new Nun&zing Plan Analysis (NPA) and
each of the overlap flags. In the chart, N=2-9,Z=O or 1,
and X=0-9.
AREA CODES
CAN BE:
FGEz-;\SB
NZXor
MEA CODES AS Nn
OFFICE CODES
N X X
F-EATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
& MAINTENANCE
OFFICE CODES
CAN BE:
N X X
NXXorNZX
4.49
In order to properly process the new NPA, four
flags have been added to the system database. During
database programming, the programmer can specify the
following non-standard numbering plan information:
Offi~CodesUsedasAreaCodes:Anareacodein
another location uses an Nxx pattern that matches
an oflk code within the system site’s area code.
(This flag defaults to no.)
Area Codes Used as Office Codes: One or more office codes within the system site’s area code use an
NZX pattern that is the same as an area code in
another area. (This flag defaults to no unless you are
converting a database that has the “Overlap Area/
Office Code flag enabled.)
Toll Digit Allowed On Toll Local Calls: This op
tion applies only ifthe area and office codes overlap.
Callers in the site’s area code usually dial a 1 when
placing a call within the local area code(s). (This
flag defaults to no.)
Toll Digit Required On Toll Long Distance Calls:
This option applies only if the area and office codes
overlap. Callers in the site’s area code must dial a 1
when placing a call outside of the local area code(s).
(This flag defaults to yes.)
4.50 The programming prompts affected by the
NANP changes are shown on the next page.
4.51 Area code lists in the database, for toll restriction
and LCR, include all 800 possible area codes. All area
codes are allowed in toll restriction and are included in
LCR Route Croup 1 when the software is in the default
state. (In upgrades, only the new area codes default to
allowed in toll restriction, and they are iucZr&donly in
Route Croup 1. All other area codes remain as programmed.)
NOTE: Toll restriction SCOS 4 (Restrict Eight-Digit
Calls) is affected by the area/office code database flags
and toll digit flags. The area/office code flags must be
set properly on the system in order for toll restriction to
work correctly for the given site. The system must know
whether the area and office codes overlap and whether
toll digits will be dialed to properly detect end of dialing
and apply toll restriction. For example, if you have the
system set to look for a toll digit (1) on toll long distance
calls on a system where area and office codes overlap,
and the station user placing a call does not dial the 1
(dials 213-555-1234 instead of l-213-555-1234), the
system will allow the call and will consider end-ofdialing to be after the seventh digit, as if the user was dialing
a local non-toll call. However, if the station user dials
1-213-555-1234, the call will be restricted as usual after eight digits are dialed.
Home And Local Area Codes
4.52 In many areas, the telephone company has
created call-cost arrangements that refer to “home” and
“local” area codes. The home area code is the area code
within which the system resides. The local area codes
are additional area codes that, when called, use the local
or toll local call-cost rate instead of the long distance
rate. Up to three local area codes can be programmed
and then extended within toll restriction programming
to provide proper call costing.
4.53 The local area codes can be programmed as “Extended” area codes to allow or restrict specific office
codes within them and to label the office codes’ call cost
as “local” or “seven-digit toll.” If the home or local
codes are extended in User Croup 1, the system will use
the call cost designations for that extended area code
whenever a station (in any user group) places a call using that area code.
Page 4-29
DITER-TELPRACTICE!s
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
H.
OPTIONAL WEEKLY TOLL JJMlT!S
NOTE: This feature is available only iu the Extended
package and is enabled only by Inter-Tel Services personnel. The system must have a modem that allows remote access.
4.54 When enabled, the Weekly Toll Limit feature
keeps track of the accumulated call cost for specified
types of toll calls. The feature can monitor 7- and
lOdigit toll calls and/or operator-assisted~mtemational
calls that are placed by station and DISA users.
4.55 The database is programmed with a weekly
dollar limit for each type of call being monitored. This
value can range from $0-$65,000. Each time a monitored call is placed, the call cost is added to the total.
4.56 Ifthe total cost of monitored calls reaches 80% of
the weekly limit, the system sends an alarm message to
alarm stations and the SMDR that states TOLL
SECURlTY LlMlT Al- 80%.
457 When the weekly limit is reached, the system
sends another alarm message that states ‘I’LL SE
CURlTY LIMIT EXCEEDED. The monitored types of
calls (7/lOdigit or operator/international) will not be
allowed until one of the following occurs:
0 The weekly limit is set to a higher value through database programming, as described on page S-97.
l
The weekly accumulated total is reset to zero
through programming, as described on page S-97.
l
The weekly accumulated total automatically resets
to zero at the end of the week (1201 am Sunday).
4.58 If a station is forwarded to a toll number that is
being disallowed due to the weekly limit being exceeded, calls will be handled as follows:
l
An intercom caller hears busy tones.
0 A direct ring-in outside call rings at the station until
the Transfer Available or Transfer Busy timer expires before being sent to the primary attendant.
0 Calls through DISA or an automated attendant riug
at the station until the Transfer Available timer expires before being sent to the appropriate recall destination.
0 Transferred calls remain at the transferring station.
0 Calls from a voice computer are sent to the attendant.
459 Weekly toll limit information can be changed
only after the Database Programming feature code (029)
has been entered at an attendant station. The programming privilege will remain in effect until the end of the
programming session. When the data has been changed,
a system alarm shows Tou SECURITY DATA
CHANGED at alarm stations and in SMDR. For
programming information, refer to page 5-97 in
PRGGRAMhfING.
NOTE: If the “Remaining Days” value is 0, weekly toll
limit database information cannot be updated.
4.60 The Weekly Toll Limit feature is enabled by
Inter-Tel Services personnel. The database contains a
prompt that indicates the remaining days that the
weekly toll limits will be in effect. This value automatically decreases by one each day. When the “Remaining
Days” value reaches 0, the Weekly Toll Limit feature is
disabled and calls are no longer monitored. A system
alarm indicates TOLL SECURlTY FEATURE EXPIRED. Users trying to place monitored calls will see a
display that says CALL FATLED - TOLL LIMlT
EXCEEDED. To enable the feature again, Inter-Tel
Services Personnel must reset the “Remaining Days”
value. (See page 6-41.)
NOTE: If a system database restore is performed, the
Remaining Days value of the Toll Security Weekly Limit feature is reset to 0. It is not restored to its previous value.
Page 4-30
PEATuREs
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
I.
TRUNK GROUP ASSIGNMENTS AND
AUTOMATIC ANSWER/SELECT
4.62 Automatic lhmk Answer: If a station is pro-
4.61 Each trunk is assigned to one of 47 possible trunk
groups. Trunk groups are assigned to speciGc tenant
groups to determine which attendants will place the
trunk groups in night mode. A trunk group can also be
designated for auto trunk selection (using the ANSWER
key as described in paragraph 4.63) for a tenant group.
l
l
Trunk group feature codes and trunk group keys are
usedtoselecta~inoneoftheprogrammedtrunk
Pups - up to 47 groups. Each trunk must be assigned to a trunk group. For example, all local trunks
could be in one group, while another group contains
WATS trunks that are used for long distance calling.
Unused trunks can be placed in a single trunk group
that is labeled “unused.” Trunk group feature codes
are necessary when forwarding calls to outside telephone numbers.
grammed with allowed-answer assignment only (no
ring-in) for a trunk group, direct ring-in calls on that
trunk group can be answered by entering the Automatic
Trunk Answer feature code (350) or pressing the flashing individual trunk key.
4.63
Automatic ‘Ikunk Select: For calls that are ringingorholdingatthestation,theusermayentertheAutomatic Trunk Selection feature code (89) or press the
ANSWER key. When more than one call is ringing or
holding, the following priority list determines which
call is answered tlrst:
Auto trunks are incoming or outgoing trunks (any or
all trunks installed can be auto trunks) that are accessed by entering the Automatic Trunk Selection
feature code (89) or by pressing the ANSWER key.
Page 4-31
Ringing outside calls (ring ins, recalls, callbacks, or
transfers) are answered in the order they were received.
Then calls on individual hold are answered (not calls
on system hold, conference hold, or being transferred). Calls are picked up in the order they were
placed on hold.
If no calls are ringing or holding, an available outgoing auto trunk is selected (unless the station is restricted to using Least-Cost Routing Only or is restricted from the trunk group).
INTEX-TELPRACTK!~
IMXIGMX 256 INSTXLLATION & MAINTENANCE
J.
LEAST-COST
ROUTING (LCR)
4.64 LCR is a money-saving feature that allows the
system to be programmed to select the least expensive
route for placing outgoing calls. It can be used for
placing outgoing calls or transferring calls to outside
telephone numbers, but cannot be used for forwarding
calls to outside numbers. Stations canbe programmed to
use LCR only for placing outgoing calls.
NOTE: The Least-Cost Routing (LCR) feature cannot
be used in the RF-rated system. If a user attempts to enter the LCR feature code or presses an LCR key, the system sends reorder tones. Programmable feature keys on
keysets and single-lines are defaulted to LCR in a KFrated system and should be changed.
drop the area code. The modified telephone number
can contain up to 48 digits.
0 Checksfor toll restrictions: Once the number has
all of the necessary digits added or deleted, the system checks the SCOS and trunk group restrictions
for the station to determine whether the call is allowed. If allowed, the system continues to the next
step. If not allowed, the system selects another facility group. If the station is restricted from all of the
facility groups in the route group, the system sends
reorder tones and the call is dropped without being
- dialed.
NOTE: If more than one trunk group is assigned to a
facility group, only the highest numbered trunk
group is checked for toll restriction. That trunk
group’s toll restriction programming is applied to all
other trunk groups in the facility group. Therefore,
to restrict calls, ensure that the highest numbered
trunk group in the facility group has the desired toll
restrictioll programming. Toll restriction is checked
each time a new facility group is accessed, allowing
individual facility groups within each route group to
have different toll restrictions.
4.65 When LCR is selected, the user dials the number
(including the area code, if needed), and the system does
the following:
l
l
Checks the ana code and/or office code: The database contains up to 19 lists of area and office codes
called route groups. The system checks the route
groups in numerical order (1-19) and selects the first
group that contains the area and/or ofice code that
was dialed. Special route groups are included in the
software for handling calls that begin with 0, 01, and
011.
0 Diils the modiied telephone number: If the num-
ber is allowed, the system seizes an idle trunk in the
selected trunk group, waits for the Dial Tone Wait
timer to expire (unless DT detect is enabled), and
then dials. The user hears a single progress tone and
outside dial tone. If the system DTME tones are not
muted and the station is not programmed for “transparent LCR” the user also hears the dialing sequence
while the call is being placed.
Check the time of day: Each route group has three
time blocks: day (8:oO AM - 459 PM), evening
(590 PM - 1059 PM), and night (11:oO PM - 759
AM and weekends).
0 Selects a facility group: Each time block contains
l
up to 24 programmed groups of up to 47 trunk groups
each, called facility groups. The groups should be
programmed so that the least-expensive group of
trunks is checked and, if available, is selected first. If
the least-expensive group is not available and the
station has LCR camp-on permission, the station
camps on until a trunk is available or the LCR Advance timer expires. If the timer expires, the user
hears a progress tone and the system checks the next
facility group.
4.66
NOTE: The system advances only as far as each station’s assigned LCR advance limit allows.
4.67 The Least-Cost Routing feature has special route
groups to handle calls that begin with “0” (operator assisted calls), “01” (operator assisted international calls),
and “011” (station-to-station international calls).
Adds or deletes digits according to the facility
group chosen: Each facility group has a pro-
grammed set of dial rules that tell the system what to
dial. (The system can have up to 32 dial rules - 28
of which are programmable. Each facility group can
use 1 to 32 dial rules.) For example, if the selected
facility group requires that the number contain “1,”
but no area code, the dial rules include the “1” and
‘;‘\
.,Y
When LCR is used, the station user hears a single
confirmation tone when a call key, the LCR key, the
OUT key, or the OUTGOING key is pressed or when the
feature code is entered. The user does not hear dial tone,
but will hear the digits being sent on the trunk. The user
is connected to the trunk once the system has completed
dialing the call and the call appears under an available
call key.
Operator-&siiedAnternational LCR
4.68 Each of these special route groups contains three
time blocks (day, evening, and night/weekend) and each
time block contains an ordered list of facility groups.
Country codes, area codes, and office codes are not
checked; all calls that begin with”0,” “01,” or “011” are
automatically sent to the appropriate route group.
Page 4-32
,
.I
_ ’.I
INTER-~PFLACTICES
IMWGMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
4.72 Before assigning an LCR advance limit, deter-
‘ItansparentLcR
4.69 Transparent LCR mode is a station option that
changes what the user hears so that an LCR call sounds
like an outside call placed using direct trunk group
access. With this mode, dial tone is heard when a call
key or the LCR, OUT, or OUTGOING key is pressed or
when the feature code is entered. Dial tone stops when
the user begius dialing. No tones are heard by the user
while the system is dialing the number out on the trunk.
When the system is in the default state, this feature is enabled.
I
LCR-Only Forced Account Codes
4.70 Forced account codes for toll calls can be
programmed for stations with LCR-Only toll restriction
in day andnight modes. When this account code type is
enabled, the user only has to enter an account code if the
system detects that a toll call has been dialed when LCR
is used. See pages 4-63 and 4-66 in FEKWRES, and
page 5-54 in PRGG RAhMING for more information.
LCR Advance Liiit
4.71
Issue 1, No”%=
In addition, stations are assigned day and night
mode LCR advance limits that determine the number of
facility groups that the call may advance through when
LCR is used. (When facility groups are busy or unavailable, LCR is generally programmed to advance fromthe
least expensive facility group to the more expensive facility groups.)
minations should be made as to exactly how many facility groups a station user may be allowed to advance
through, should the less expensive facility group trunks
be busy. Consideration should be given as to how important it is that the call go out immediately, or whether it is
more important that the caller wait for a less expensive
trunk to become available.
4.73
An LCR advance limit is assigned to each station, even those not assigned LCR Only (SCOS 6). Each
station is given an advance limit of 1 to 22, “unlimited,”
or %o advance.” The l-22 designations indicate the
mrmber of facility groups through which the station can
advance. Stations with “no advance” will not advance
past the first facility group in each route group, stations
with “1” may advance once (to the next programmed facility group), and so on. Stations with the “un.Emited”
designation may advance through all programmed facility groups in each route group. The default designation
for all stations is “unlimited.”
4.74 If a station is restricted from the trunks in a facility group or if the LCR-modified telephone number is
toll restricted due to its station class of service, the system will immediately proceed to the next facility group
and will count this as one advancement.
NOTE LCR advance limit assignment applies to all
route groups and all time blocks.
Page 4-33
INTER-TELPRACTICES
JMX/GMX 256 INSTACLATON & MAINTENANCE
K .
E&MTRUNK!S
mediate-dial). The programmer can also determine
whether the caller will hear dial tone (defaulted with
dial tones enabled) and whether reorder tones will be
presented as a burst of tones or continuous tones (defaults to burst of tone).
NOTE: This feature is available only in the Extended
plus Tl and E&U software packages.
4.75 F&M trunks, also called “tie” lines, are special
trunks that tie two distant telephone systems together.
They allow the users of either telephone system transparent access to the users and resources of the other telephone system, often for less than what it would cost to
use normal long distance service.
Incoming E&M Calls
4.76 There are two modes of ring-in for E&M trunkx
auto ring-in and dial-repeating.
Auto ring-in E&M trunks, like standard trunks, may
be programmed to ring in to individual stations, multiple stations, or hunt groups or as a DISA call. (If
programmed to ring in at a single station, the E&M
call will follow any programmed forward.)
Dial-repeating E&M trunks perform a “handshake”
with the other telephone system and allow the callers
to dial an extension number or a trunk access code
for placing an outgoing call. The handshake can be
immediate-dial, delayed-start, or wink-start, depending on the E.&M trunk installed (defaults to im-
Outgoing E&M Calls
4.77 E&M trunk groups are programmed for day and
night mode outgoing access like standard trunk groups.
4.78 E&M trunks can be assigned to LCR facility
groups to route outgoing calls through the other telephone system. This is useful when a call that is placed
from one telephone system would be a local call on the
other system. The “long distance” call could be placed
using LCR, routed through the E&M trunk group, and
go out of the other telephone system as a local call. (The
LCR facility group would have to have dial rules programmed to dial the other telephone system’s trunk
access code as well as sending the dialed telephone
number.)
4.79 When the system is in the default configuration,
all E&M trunks are configured for DTMF signaling. If
necessary, some or all of the trunks can be reprogrammed for dial-pulse signaling through database proI f ? - -
Page 4-34
INTER-TELPRACITCES
IMWGMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
L
TlsPANs
NOTE: This feature is available only in the Etiendd
plus Tl and E&M software packages.
4.80 The term “Tl” refers to a specific digital method
of transmitting voice and data; it is the basic 24-channel
time-division multiplex, pulse code modulation system
used in the United States. Since each Tl span actually
consists of 24 individual circuits (or channels) multiplexed together, it is often less expensive to purchase a
single Tl trunk than it is to purchase multiple individual
trunks.
4.81 Fractional Tl (FIT) that uses fewer than the standard 24 circuits, can be used on the 256 System. JfFJ’l is
used, the unused circuits of the TlC must be unequipped. Refer to PROG RAMMING, page 5-172, for
details.
4.82 Although most Tl interfaces will be with the
public network, it is possible to use a Tl trunk to connect
two telephone systems together (e.g., two 256 Systems
in the same building or in two buildings and connected
with a repeater). Refer to Figure 4-l on the next page for
examples of Tl applications. Also refer to PROGRAMMING, page 5-122, for special procedures required for
each type of installation.
4.83
When purchasing a Tl span, there are several
variables involved, depending on the Tl application required. (Refer to SPECIFICAI’IONS, page 2-17, for details.) The variables include the following:
Card type: The type of framing scheme used by the
Tl trunks connected to the card can be D4 Superframe (normally used for voice transmissions) or
Extended Superframe @SF is usually used for data
transmissions).
Zero code suppression scheme: The Tl trunk xerosuppression scheme (that limits the numbef of consecutive xeroes in transmissions) for the trunks on
the Tl card can be AMI (Bit 7), Bipolar Eight Zero
Substitution (BfZS), or “None.”
PCM encoding law: In pulse code modulation
(FCMJ systems, there are two primary methods of
encoding analog signals (sampled audio wave-
Page 4-35
Issue 1, No”==
forms) into digital signals. In North America and Japan, the “mu-law” (p-law) method is normally used.
In other places like Europe, the “A-law” method is
widely used. The programmer must select both the
transmit and receive method of encoding used by the
Tl Card. In the United States, this will almost always be mu-law to mu-law.
Relay activation: If desired, you can enable one or
both of the two relays on the Tl Card. If enabled, you
can attach a signaling device (such as a light or
alarm) and select whether the relay is activated for a
“Tl line error” or to indicate “Tl line OK”
Channel service unit (CSUJ or DSX-1 Interface:
In some applications, an optional on-board CSU is
installed on the Tl Card. In other applications, a
DSX-1 Interface will be used. Figure 4-l shows several possible applications.
- Line build-out (LBO): Ifthe optional on-board
CSU is installed, the LB0 attenuation of the Tl
trunk connected to the card must be designated in
programming. This value is determined by the
distance to the nearest public network Tl repeater.
- DSX-1 line length: If the optional on-board
CSU is nor installed, the length of the cabling between the Tl Card and the external CSU, or between the Tl Card and the other telephone system to which it is connected must be designated
inprogramming.
Reference clock programming: If the Tl Card is
connected to the public network, the card is automatically designated as a slave clock (the publicnetwork always acts as the master clock and the first
slave clock provides the 256 System reference
clock; all other slave clocks act as backups). If the
card is not connected to the public network, but is
instead connected to another Tl Card or a card in another telephone system, it can be a master clock or a
slave clock (in relation to the card on the other end).
If the card is a master, the card’s on-board oscillator
can be the source of the clock or it can rely on an external clock.
INTER-TELPRAcTICEs
IMWGMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 4-l.
256-to-CO
with external CSU
Tl SPAN APPLICATIONS
In this application, the TlCs are connected to the central office using an external
In this application, the TlCs are connected directly to the central office and optional
o n - b o a r d Csus are used. The line buildout is programmed to match the distant to
the CO (or nearest repeater), up to 6000 feet. Both cards draw reference clock from
the public network and are slave clocks One card is designated as the system referenceclock.
256-b-256 DSX-1 with qeater(s)
Here, two 256 Systems are connected through a Tl repeater. Both TlCs have the
DSX-1 Interface enabled. The length of cabling to the repeater (up to 655 feet) is
work’> Both TlCs are programmed as reference cl& for their 256 Systems
256-to-256
DSX-1 without qcatcr
Ew---$l
in this example, the two 2.56 Systems are connected directly. Both TlCs have the
ESX-1 Interface enabled and the length of cabling between the two systems (up to
6ssf~)~~~t~iqpmgramming.~e~d~~~~~~e~cla(r
(which does not receive reference clock from the public network) and the other is
the slave clock (that recewes reference from the master clock actmg a s t h e ‘pubhc
n e t w o r k ” ) . Both TlCs are programmul as reference clocks for their 256 Systems
In this application, two 256 Systems are connected through a Tl repeater. Both TlCs
have the on-board Csu enabled and the line buildout is programmed to match the
~totheTlrepeata(ppto6000feet)foreachTlCOnecardisdwignatedas
the master clock (which does not receive reference clock from the public network)
and the other is the slave clock (that receives reference from the master clock acting
as the “public network”). One card is designated as the mastet clock and the other as
256-to-256
CSU without repeater
Sample Tl Netwoxic
In this application, two 266 Systems are connected directly to each other. The TlCs
both have on-board C3Js enabled and the line buildout is programmed to match the
dii between the 256 Systems (up to 6C0l feet) for each TlC One card is designated as the master clock (which d o e s n o t receive
reference clock from the public
In a Tl network that involves multiple CO and TIC connections, the CSWDSX-1
variable is determmed by each connection. In the example shown here, the two
T1C.s connected to the CO receive reference clock from the public network and are
slave clocks The two that are connecting the 256 Systems do not draw reference
from the public network. TlC #2 on 256 Xl is the master clock and TlC #l on 256
Page 4-36
\
j
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
M . DIRECTINWARDDIAIJNG(DID)
4.&t Direct inward dialing (DID) allows an outside
party to dial into the system without attendant intervention. To gain direct access to the system, an outside party
dials a mmtber that was assigned by the telephone company to the DID trunks installed on the 256 System. The
system then provides ring signal to the station, stations,
or hunt group according to the programmed ring-in/answer pattern for that DID number.
415 There can be up to 400 DID numbers in the system and they can be divided among 11 DID trunkgroups
(as many numbers as desired per trunk group until the
system total of 400 is reached). Each DID trunk group is
assigned the following parameters:
Tenant group de&nation: A DID trunk group
must be assigned to a specific tenant group.
Music-on-hold selection: The DID trunks can use
music channel 1 or 2, or they can use tick-tones or
silence.
Start type: The “start type.” of the DID groups can
be immediate, wink, or delay, depending on the type
of DID trunks ordered from the telephone company.
DISA codes: Individual DID trunk groups can be
designated for DISA use; however, the security
codes are the same for all DID trunks in the group.
‘Ihmk list: Each DID trunk must be assigned to a
DID group.
Base number: The base number is the 3- to 6digit
number that is not dialed into the system by the central office. For example, in the number %l-9CKQ if
the base number was 9619, the central office would
send only 000 into the system. The system then
sends the call tothe ring-in designation associated
with %l-9ooo.
4.86 Each DID number is individually programmed
with ring-in designations for day and night modes. The
calls can ring in to a single station, a ring/answer pattern,
a hunt group, or as DISA calls. If the number is not assigned one of these designations, it will always ring at
the primary attendant’s station.
N.
LOOP AND GROUND START TRUNKS
487 The 256 System can use both loop and ground
start trunks. In database programming, the trunks are
designated as loop or ground start on a trunk-by-trunk
basis.
4.g8 In unsupervised trunk-to-trunk calls (such as unsupervised conferences and forward to an outside number) if either outside party is using a loop start trunk, the
Unsupervised CO timer is activated. When this timer
expires, both parties receive a burst of dial tone. Either
partycanresetthetimerbypressinganyDTMFkey(before the Single-Line Dial Initiation timer expires). If the
timer is not reset, the call recalls the primary attendant
who can determine whether the trunks are still in use or
if the call should be disconnected. If the trunk co~ections are ground start or DID trunks, this timer is not
needed as they supply reliable disUume&XI signals.
419 The Hookflash feature (feature code 330) can be
enabled or disabled for loop and/or ground start trunks
on a trunk group-by-trunk group basis.
0 .
TRUNKMAINTENANCE
4.90 Attendants can place individual trunks out of service by entering a feature code. This unequips the trunk,
but does not block incoming calls on the trunk. To outside callers, the trunk will appear to be functioning and
they will hear ringing. However, station users will not
hear ringing or see a flashing trunk key and cannot
access the trunk for receiving or placing calls until the
attendant places the trunk back into service by entering
another feature code. The advantage of using this feature instead of unequipping the trunk in the database, is
that all progr amming for the trunk is preserved and the
trunk returns to complete functionality as soon as it isreturned to service and no additional progmmmmg is required. Instructions for placing a trunk out of service are
located on page 4-113 . This feature applies to all trunks,
including DID trunks.
4.91 Each TlC is equipped with a “make busy” switch
for removing all circuits on the card from service and
placing them back in again, and do not require use of this
feature. Pressing the switch will light its LE,D and begin
the process of “busying out” each circuit not in use. The
circuits that are in use are then busied out as soon as the
users hangs up.
NOTE: If the trunk that is being placed out of service is
part of a telco rotary hunt, the central office will detect
that trunk as being available and will not bypass it for
incoming calls.
Page 4-37
INTER-TRLPRACTICRS
IMX/GMX2S6INS’IALLATION & MAINTENANCE
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
P.
DIRECT INWARD SYSTEM ACCESS
@ISA)
DISA Calls In SMDA Reports
4.92 DISA is a programmable feature that allows an
outside party to dial into the system from an external
DTMF telephone and then access the following system
resources: extension numbers for placing calls to stations; trunks groups or auto trnnks for placing outgoing
calls; hunt group pilot numbers; and, if equipped, a modem extension number for remote system programming
or report generation.
493 Toll restriction is not checked on DISA calls
when an outgoing trunk is accessed. DISA users cannot
access LCR, specific individual trunks (unless they are
the only trunk in a trunk group), or paging.
4.94 Any of the trunk groups can be programmed to
receive incoming DISA calls in day and/or night mode.
When not in use for DISA, the trunk can be used by system users for placing outgoing calls (unless designated
as an incoming-only trunk).
NOTE: Due to the natural characteristics of the trunk,
the volume level of DTMF tones transmitted over the
tnmk may be substantially reduced before reaching the
256 System. This natural degradation in tone volume
may adversely affect the reliability of the DISA feature.
Other factors which can affect DISA performance are
trunk noise and the quality and strength of the DTMF
tones generated by the off-premises phone itself.
4.95 When a DISA user calls a station extension number, the call rings as a direct ring-in call, even if the
called station is busy or in do-notdisturb. The DISA
caller hears music (if enabled) until the appropriate
Transfer timer expires; then if the call is not answered it
recalls the called station’s attendant. Ifthe called station
is forwarded, the call follows the programmed forward.
4.96 When a DISA caller is using or accesses a loop
start trunk, the Unsupervised CO timer is activated.
When the timer expires, both parties hear a burst of dial
tone. Either party may reset the timer by pressing any
DTMF key. If the timer is not reset, the call recalls the
attendant. Ifthe attendant does not answer the recall before the Recall and Abandoned Call timers expire, the
call is disconnected. (This is not applicable to ground
start trunks.)
NOTE: There may be some reduction in voice volume
when a DISA caller accesses an outside trunk.
4.97 When a hunt group pilot number receives a call
through DISA, the call rings or circulates according to
how the hunt group is programmed (i.e., linear, distributed, or all ring). The call is displayed as a direct ring-in
call; however, the system actually processes the call as a
transferred call. Refer to page 4-16 for more infomtation on hunt group calls.
4.98 DISA call information is included in the System
Summary SMDA report. See page 4-115.
Blocked DISA Calls in SMDR Reports
4.99 Whenever an outgoing DISA call is denied,
either by toll restriction or weekly toll limits, the SMDR
reportwill shows a call record for the DISAcall and then
another line with the abbreviation “BLK” (for
“blocked”). See page 4-123 for details.
DISA Do-Not-Disturb Breakthrough
4.100 Under normal circumstances, direct ring-in
calls are not blocked by do-not-disturb. However, the
database contains an option that allows or disallows donotdisturb breakthrough for DISA (and automated
attendant and voice mail/computer) calls on a stationby-station basis. If do-not-disturb breakthrough is disallowed, DISA calls to a station in do-not-disturb are
immediately sent to the station’s attendant. If the attendant does not answer the call, it is disconnected after the
Abandoned Recall timer expires.
Security codes
4.101
DISAtrunks can be assigned security codes that
must be entered before the caller has access to the
system and/or the CO trunks. In the Etiended software
package, codes can be 4-7 digits long (using any
combination of digits O-9, *, and #). All other software
packages use 4digit security codes. The installer can
program separate codes for each DISA trunk to be used
during day and/or night modes.
4.102 In the Exfen&d software package, a DISA
caller will have three opportunities to enter a valid
security code. If the caller fails three times, the failure
will generate a system alarm on alarm stations and in
SMDR that says “DISA SECURITY LIMIT EXCEEDED” and the system will not answer that DISA trunk
again for five minutes. (Any other DISA trunks will be
unaffected.)
DISA Toll Restriction
4.103 In the Extended software packages, DISA
trunks can be given day and/or night mode toll
restrictions like those described on page 4-27 for
individual stations (except LCR-Only). When a DISA
caller dials an outgoing call, the call is checked against
the DISA trunk’s toll restriction. If the call is disallowed, the DISA caller is sent to the primary attendant.
4.194 If the Weekly Toll Limit feature is enabled,
calls through DISA will be subject to monitoring as
described on page 4-30.
NOTE: While DISA is designed to be reasonably
secure against misuse by outside callers, there is no im-
Pace 4-38
mTER-TJsLPRACTIcEs
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
plied warranty that it is invulnerable to unauthorized intrusions. The installer and owner of the system should
ensure that proper security measures have been taken to
prevent outside callers from accessing and misusing
outgoing truuks for unauthorized calls. Also, ifthe central office does not provide supervision and disconnect
the call when one party hangs up, it is possible for a
caller to remain connected to a CO trunk circuit. If this
happens, and the caller begins dialing, the call could be
placed through the 256 System and would then be billed
to the system’s owner. The system cannot check this
type of call for toll restriction and may not register the
call in SMDR This problem could arise when a call is
connected to a station, when a call is forwarded or transferred to the public network, or when DISA is used for
placing outgoing calls.
Using DISA
4.106 TO USE DISA IFA SECURllYCODE IS REQUIRED FOR
HTERCOM, MODEM, AM3 TRUNKACCESS:
(2)
a . For placing an outside call: Dial a truuk
access code. You hear outside dial tone; place
your call.
b . For remote system programming: Dial the
extension number assigned to the desired
modem (270-273). Refer to PRGGRAMMING, page 5-9, for complete remote programming instructions.
C . Forphcing an intenzom call: Dial an extension number or hunt group pilot number. (If
calling the attendant, dial the extension number, not 0.) You hear music until the call is answered.
ToUSEDISAIFASECURlTYCODEISREQUlREDFOR
lRUN?LWD MODEMACCESS ONLY..
(1) From a IYIMP telephone, dial the telephone
number of the DISA trunk.
(2)
n, USEDISAIFA SECURllYCODE IS NOTREQUIRED:
(1) From a DTMF telephone, dial the telephone
number of the DISA trunk.
(2) When the call is answered by the system and you
hear system intercom dial tone, do one of the following:
a. For placing an outside call: Dial a trunk
access code. You then hear outside dial tone
and can place your call.
b. For remote system programming Dial the
extension number assigned to the desired
modem (defaults to 270-273). Refer to PROGRAMMING, page 5-9, for complete remote programming instructions.
c . Forplacing an intercom call: Dial an extension number or a hunt group pilot number (if
calling the attendant, dial the extension number, not 0). You hear music until the call is answered.
(1)
When you hear dial tone, do one of the following:
4.107
NOTE: DISA calls are not answered unless the necessary resources (a DTMF decoder and a voice channel)
are available. If you hear a busy signal followed by music, the trunk you tried to access is busy. You have
camped on and will be connected to the desired trunk as
soon as it is available. If you call an extension number,
you will hear music (if enabled) until the appropriate
Transfer timer expires; then if your call is not answered
it recalls the called station’s attendant.
4.105
(3)
From a M’MF telephone, dial the number of the
DISA trunk.
When the call is answered by the system and you
hear a single progress tone, enter the appropriate
(day or night) DISA security code.
When the system answers the call and you hear
dial tone, do one of the following:
a . For placing an outside call: Dial a trunk
access code. When you hear a single progress
tone, enter the appropriate (day or night)
DISA security code. You hear outside dial
tone when the system recognizes the security
code and if a trunk is available.
b . For remote systemprvgrammin~ dial the extension number of the desired modem
(270-273). When you hear a single progress
tone, enter the appropriate (day or night)
DISA security code. You hear modem tone
when the system recognizes the security
code. Refer to PRGGUh4MIN G, page 5-9,
for complete remote programming instructiOll.9.
C.
Forplacing an intexom call: Dial an extension number or hunt group pilot number. (If
calling the attendant, dial the extension number, not 0.) You hear music until the call is answered.
NOTE: If you enter an invalid security code, the call is
dropped. If you enter an invalid feature code or extension number, or dial an invalid number, you hear reorder
tones and then system dial tone. You may try again. If
you dial a valid hunt group pilot number that has no
members assigned to it, the call automatically rings at
the primary attendant station until the appropriate
Transfer and Abandoned Call timers expire (this occurs
in both day and night modes). If the attendant does not
answer before the Abandoned Call timer expires, the
call is disconnected.
Page 4-39
INTER-TELlPRACTICES
lMNGMX 2% INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
5.
STATION INSTRUMENTS
5.1 To allow system flexibility and cost efficiency, a
variety of station instruments can be used on the 256
System. They are:
JMX 256 Digital And Analog Station htmments
I
I
0
Standard Digital Keysets - standard and display
Executive Digital Keysets - display only
IMX 12/24-Line Keysets - display and standard
0
lMX S-Line Keyset -non-display only
l
IMX 8/12f&Line AIM Keysets - display only
0
Enhanced Single-Line Set (ESLS)
0
Single-Line Instrument (SLI)
0
Industry-standard, single-line, dual-tone multi-frequency (MM?) set
0
DigitalDSS/BLFUllits -single or in string of up to
four Units (attached to a digital keyset)
IMX DSS/BLF Units (on separate circuits from
associated keysets)
Attendant Computer Console
0
0
0
0
NOTE: With the proper software package, the Inter-Tel
GX station instruments can also be installed on the system. Refer to Appendix A in the back of the manual for
complete information.
GMX-256 Analog Station Instruments
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Inter-Tel/DVK 24Line Keyset -standard and display
Inter-TeVDVK 12-Line Keyset -standard and display
Inter-Tel/DVK S-Line Keyset - standard and display
GMX 24Line Keyset - standard and display
GMX 12-Line Keyset - non-display only
GX 24Line Keyset -standard and display
Attendant Computer Console
Inter-Tel/DVK DSS/BLF Unit - single or tandem
GMX DSS/BLF Unit - single only
GX DSS/BLF Unit - single or tandem
GMX/GX Single-Line Iustrument (SLI)
Industry-standard single-line, dual-tone multi-frequency (DThJF) set
NOTE: For more information on the GX and GMX station instruments, refer to appendixes A and B in the back
of this manual.
5.2 The Inter-Tel AIM keysets, digital keysets, and
DVK keysets contain audio-integrated modules that allows the user to adjust volume levels independently for
pages, calls, ring tones, etc.
53 Keyset Cards (KSCs and KSC-Ds) and Digital
Keyset cards (DKSCs) are used to support keyset stations. Single-Line Cards (SLCs) are used to support
single-line stations. Inward Dialing Cards (IDCs) canbe
installed to support AC-ringing off-premises single-line
stations, on-premises single-line sets, DC-ringing
single-line devices for special applications, or DID
trunks.
5.4 The IMX S-line dual-circuit AIM keysets can be
installed IWO to a circuit, if desired. To do this, single
KSC-D circuits are designated as “dual” circuits in System Configuration programming. (Other keyset models
cannot be installed two to a circuit.) The designated dual
circuit actually becomes two circuits that can be programmed individually (X.XA and XXB, where XX is
the circuit number).
5.5 System software will support any [email protected] of
station instruments with the limitation that there must be
a minimum of one Keyset Card. The actual configuration is defined by the type of cards and the number of circuits in use on the system. As many as 128 keysets can
be installed (256 if S-line AIM keysets are installed two
to a circuit), or 24Osingle-line sets, depending on station
and trunk card installation.
A .
KEYSETS
5.6 Keyset design features are described in the following paragraphs.
Handsfree Speakerphone
5.7 All keyset stations allow the user to dial while on
hook. In addition, the keyset speaker may provide background music (if an external music source is installed)
and is used to receive pages.
5.8 IMX Keysetsand Inter-Tel/DVK Keysetshave a
built-in, integrated speakerphone that allows handsfree
operation on outside calls and inside (intercom) calls.
5.9 Digital Keysets have a built-in speaker and
microphone that allow the user to answer intercom calls
handsfree, dial while on hook, monitor calls, and listen
to background music. Speakerphone resources are provided by Digital Signal processors (DSPs) on the Digital
Keysets Card (DKSC). A DKSC can have up to two
DSPs. Each DSP supports up to 12 speakerphones
simultaneously. Each time a digital keyset user presses
the SPKR key while on hook, the speakerphone function
is activated and the speakerphone resource is assigned
to that phone for the length of the call. If more than 12
speakerphones are enabled on a DKSC with one DSP
and a thirteenth digital keyset user requests the speaker-
Pace 4-40
INTER-TELPRAcITcEs
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
I
phone function, the user will hear reorder tones and the
display will show NO SPKRPHN AVAIL STAY OFF
HOOK If the user attempts to change to the speakerphone and hangs up during a call when speakerphones
are unavailable, the user will be forced into a monitoronly mode. The user will be able to hear the other party
but will not be allowed to transmit to them. In this mode,
the user’s MUTE key will be lit and the display shows
NO SPKRPHN AVAIL COME OFF HOOK Pressing
the lit MUTE key will result in a burst of reorder tone;
you must lift the handset to speak.
5.10 A programming option can be enabled that disables the speakerphone (as described on page 4-55) or
the user can disable the speakerphone using a feature
code. This prevents the station from using the speakerphone on outgoing intercom calls and all outside calls. If
the option is enabled, the speakerphone can still be used
for receiving handsfree intercom calls, but the user must
lift the handset to speak when placing intercom calls and
when placing or receiving outside calls. The h4UTE key
is lit when the speaker is activated for outside calls or
outgoing intercom calls. Call monitoring and on-hook
dialing are not affected.
NOTE: On certain handsfree-to-handsfree intercom
calls, voice volume levels may cause feedback to occur.
If this happens, one station user should pickup the handset.
Liquid Crystal Display (LCD)
5.11
Several keyset types are available in standard or
display models. The difference is that there is a liquid
crystal display (LCD) on the display keyset. Standard
keysets can be converted to display keysets by installing
LCD Units (refer to REPLACEMENT PARTS for unit
part numbers). Installation instructions are in the
INSTALLATION section of the manual.
5.12 The LCD has two 16character display lines.
When the keyset is not in use, the LCD shows the date
and the time of day (and, if enabled, the station extension number and user name). Other displays include: reminder messages, do-notdisturb messages, numbers
dialed, call sources, elapsed time of calls, current call
costs, error messages, station status, programming messages, etc. The displayed information is described
throughout the instructions in this section of the manual.
5.13 Executive Digital Keysets have four additional
display lines with keys on both sides (eight keys) that are
used for selecting features from the menu display
instead of pressing feature keys or entering feature
codes. Pressing the key on either side of a display line
selects the option shown on that line. The following
menu options are available on the Executive Digital
Keyset display:
FEATURES
Issue 1. November 1994
l
ADMIN F+EATTJRE!S: (This appears only if the station is programmed as an attend&t.) This option
displays a menu of attendant features.
l
IC DIRECTORY: This allows quick access to the
intercom directory.
0 CO DIRECTORY: This option provides quick ac-
cess to the Co (system speed-dial) directory.
l
OTHRR FEATURES: This displays a list of features in alphabetical order.
5,14 Under the display are six “display-oriented” feature keys. PREVIOUS and NEXT are used for scrolling
through screens. The BACKSPC, FORWARD,
CLEAR, and CANCEL keys do not have a function on
the lMX 256 System.
Keyset Identification Displayed
5.15 If this option is enabled in the database (refer to
PROGRAMMING, page [email protected], the extension number
and assigned user name appear on the top line of the keyset display, and the time and date appear on the bottom
line when the keyset is idle. If the option is not enabled,
the display shows date and time only, unless the user
presses the SPCL key and enters the Display Date And
Time feature code (300) to read the full display.
Date, Time, User Name, And Extension Number
Display
5.16
When a display keyset is idle, the date and time
(and, if enabled, user name and extension number) are
displayed. While on an outside call, in do-not-disturb, or
unconditionally forwarded, other displays are shown. In
these circumstances, use the following procedure to redisplay the date, time, name, and extension number for
five seconds.
5.17 TO DISPiXYTHEDAlE, ZIME, USER NW, AiXDEXlENSIONNUbiBER:
Press the SPCL key and enter the Display Date
And Time feature code (300). The date, time,
user name, and extension number are displayed
for five seconds.
Circuit Number On Power-Up
5.18 To aid in installation and troubleshooting procedures, display keysets show their station identification
for five seconds when power is turned on, when the system is reset, or when the keyset line cord is first plugged
in (or removed and replaced). The extension number
and assigned user name appear on the top line of the display, and the circuit number appears on the bottom line.
After the five-second identification display, the keyset
returns to the appropriate display, depending on its current status.
Page 4-41
lNTER-TELPRAcTIcES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATlON& MAINTENANCE
“Hot” Dial Pad Keys
5.19 There is a system-wide option that, if enabled,
the forwarding code used by the key can be changed
by the keyset user.
allows keyset users to dial trunk access codes and
feature codes without lifting the handset or pressing the
SPKR or SPCL key. This programmable feature is
called “hot dial pad” to indicate that the dial pad keys
are always activated.
Hunt Group key: Like a DSWBLF key, this key
Key Maps
with one trunk each. They can be used for placing
outgoing calls, picking up calls on system hold, and
answering incoming calls on that trunk. If call privacy is disabled system-wide, a busy individual trunk
key can be pressed to join a non-private call.
5.20 There can be up to 20 different keyset key map
groups. Refer to PROGRAMMIN G, pages 5-44 and
5-177, for more details. (There is also one map each for
ESLSs and SLIs and 12 maps for DSS/BLF Units.)
5.21
Each keyset is assigned to a programmed key
map group that determines the layout of the keys for all
the stations assigned to that group, including the following:
Call key: Up to 10 call keys can be assigned in each
key map. These keys are used for outside call access.
They are not associated with specific trunks.
Instead, they are assigned to calls in the order that
the calls are placed or received. For example, if a
user has three call keys and places a call using a
trunk group feature code, call key 1 will light to
show the current call status. If another call rings in
while the first call is still in progress, it will cause
call key 2 to flash. If one more call rings in, or if the
user places the first call on hold and places another
call, call key 3 will be used (and call key 1 will flutter). If there are more calls in progress than there are
call keys (e.g., if yet another call rings in to the keyset in the example), the newest call would camp on
to the station until a call key became available. If
LCR is programmed, pressing an idle call key will
access the LCR feature for outgoing calls. NOTE:
All key maps should have at least one call key if
there is not an individual trunk key for every trunk.
Secondary call key: See page 4-44 for explanation.
dials a hunt group pilot number and, if assigned to a
key with a lamp, will show the status of that hunt
group*
Individual l’hmk key: These keys are associated
IC, SPKR, and SPCL keys: All keysets must have
an IC key, a SPKR key, and a SPCL key.
WC0 Speed-Dial (SD) keys: Each key map can
have up to 10 IC/CO speed-dial keys. Each SD key
can be programmed by the keyset user to dial one extension number and one outside number. If assigned
to a key with a lamp, the lamp will show the status of
the station associated with that key.
Station Programmable key: Up to eight keys can
be designated as station-programmable in the key
map. Then the functions are assigned on a stationby-station basis in the Station Programmable Key
Programming window (Page 5-35 of PROGRAMMING). They cannot be changed by the keyset user
(unless designated as user-programmable).
Station programmable keys can have any of the following functions:
- Call key or Secondary call key (if all 10 available
call keys have not been assigned in the key map)
- DSS/BLF key
- Feature key
- Forward key (can be programmed by the user to
access any of the Call Forwarding feature codes)
DSS/BLF key: A DSS/BLF key will dial the
- Hunt group key
associated extension number when pressed. If assigned to a key with a lamp, it will also show status of
the associated station as described for DSWBLF
Units on page 4-50. DSS/BLF keys cannot be
changed by the station user.
- Individual trunk key
Feature hey: These are programmed with feature
- Intercom (IC) key (if not already assigned in the
key map>
codes, The feature code appears in the same key
location on all stations assigned to the key map and
cannot be changed by the keyset user.
Forward key: The forward key can be programmed
with any of the Call Forwarding feature codes and
Page 4-42
- ICE0 Speed-dial (SD) key (if all 10 available
speed-dial keys have not been assigned in the
key map)
- SPCL key (if not already assigned in key map)
- Trunk group key
- Undefined
yT&R=R=&~mcTIcEs
FEAW
STALLATION 81 MAlNTENANCE
- User programmable key (if all available userprogrammable keys have not been assigned in
the key map)
0
0
‘IIunk Group key: These keys are associated with
specific trunk group access codes and are used for
placing outgoing calls on trunks in the selected trunk
group. If assigned to a key with a lamp, the lampwill
be lit if all trunks in the trunk group are in use.
SPEClFIC~ONS, page 2-22, when selecting a headset for use on the keyset.
5.23
User-Programmable key: Up to nine user-programmable keys canbe designated and given default
values in the key map. They can then be reprogrammed to access any of the trunk group access
codes or feature codes by the individual keyset users
as desired.
Connecting A Headset
5.22 For convenience, a headset can be used at any
keyset station. The SPKR key is used to connect and disconnect calls when, the headset is attached. Refer to
TOCOhWXTAH
(1)
Disconnect the handset by unplugging the coiled
handset cord from the base of the keyset. Leave
the handset in the cradle.
(2)
Jnsert the headset plug into the vacant handset
jack.
(3)
Press the SPCL key and enter the Headset Enable
feature code (315) or the Headset Mode On/Off
feature code (317).
Undefined key: The key can be left undefined if it
will not be needed.
0
Issue 1, November 1994
524
TODISCOMVECTlHEH
(1)
Disconnect the headset by unplugging the headset cord from the base of the keyset.
(2)
Plug the coiled handset cord into the base of the
keyset.
(3)
While on hook, press the SPCL key and enter the
Headset Disable feature code (316) or the Headset Mode On/Off feature code (317).
Page 4-43
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Secondary Call Keys
associated with Station X using the window shown
on page 5-37 in PROGRAMMING.
5.25 This feature is very useful for call screening ap
plications in which one person places and receives calls
for someone else. The following terms will be used in
describing this feature:
-- 3,
/:
The keys are associated as follows:
Call Key: This refers to a standard call key that
shows the status of calls intended for that station (up
to 10 per station).
STATIONX
STATION Y
Callkeyl . . . . . . . . . .
CaIlkey2 . . . . . . . . . .
Callkey . . . . . . . . . .
Noassociatedkey . . . .
Key A (Secondary call key 1)
Key B (Secondary call key 2)
Key C (Secondary call key 3)
Key D (Secondary call key 4)
1
Secondary Call Key: A special call key that shows
the status of calls intended for a primary station (up
to 16 per station).
ih-1 2 3
Call Keys
Primary Station: A station that has its primary call
keys defined at up to 10 secondary stations.
mo
A B C D
Secondary Keys
STATON Y
STATlON X
The call keys are assigned to the secondary call keys
in numerical order. That is, the first secondary call
key that is associated with the primary station is assigned to Station X’s call key 1. The next secondary
call key associated with Station X is associated with
call key 2, and so on.
Secondary Station: A station that has secondary
call keys defined on it.
NOTE: A station can be both a primary and a secondary
station.
5.26 When a call rings in at the primary station, any
secondary station with the corresponding secondary call
key will also have a flashing call key. The secondary station(s) or the primary station can answer the call.
If a secondary call key is deleted (programmed as
another type of key) at Station Y, the remaining secondary call keys do not change physical position on
the keyset. However, their association with Station
5.27 Each secondary station can have ring and flash
signals or only flash signals on an individual secondary
call key-by-secondary call key basis. If the secondary
station is programmed for ring and flash, the display
shows CALL RINGING IN ON GRP#XX for calls ringing in on a secondary call key; note that there is no distinction between primary or secondary calls on the display. In other words, the display will not indicate that the
call is actually ringing for the primary station.
5.28 One or more of the primary station’s call keys can
be associated with secondary call keys on secondary stations. For example, if the primary station has four call
keys, the secondary station can have up to four
associated secondary call keys for that primary station.
If the secondary station has only three secondary call
keys and a call rings in on the primary station’s fourth
call key (that is not associated with a secondary call
key), the secondary station will not have any indication
of the ringing call.
5.29 The following example explains how secondary
call keys are assigned:
l
Station X is a primary station and has three call keys.
l
Station Y is a secondary station and has been assigned a key map that contains four secondary call
keys. (Key map programming is explained on page
5-44 in PRGGRAMMIN G) The keys were then
X’s call keys are shifted relative to one another. For
example, if Key A in the previous list is no longer a
secondary call key, Key B becomes secondary call
key 1 and the list appears as follows:
SIXTIONX
SFATION Y
Callkeyl . . . . . . . . . . Key B (Secondaxycall key 1)
Callkey . . . . . . . . . . Key C (Secondary call key 2)
Callkey . . . . . . . . . . Key D (Secondary call key 3)
6I
I
I
*
I
I
tlob
q m-el
B C D
1 2 3
Call Keys
I
SecondaryKeys
1
STATION X
I
I
STATlON Y
5.30 A secondary station can have call keys for more
than one primary station. The primary station corresponding to each key is determined during programming. However, each time a secondary call key is
associated with a primary station, the call keys are assigned in numerical order, as shown in the following example:
l
Station X is a primary station with three call keys.
l
Station Z is a primary station with three call keys.
l
Station Y is a secondary station and has been assigned to a key map that has five secondary call keys.
Page 4-44
.‘.
.>’
FEATuREs
INTER-TELPRACTICB
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALIATION & MAINTENANCE
l
The keys are associated as follows:
SlXlTONKALL KEY
SlYATION
Station X/Call key 1 . . . . . .
Station X/Call key 2 . . . . . .
Station Z/Call key 1 . . . . . .
Station z/call key 2 . . . . . .
Station X/Call key 3 . . . . . .
Key A (Secondary key 1)
Key B (Secondary key 2)
Key C (Secondary key 3)
Key D (Secondary key 4)
Key E (Secondary key 5)
5.31 If a secondary station user presses a secondary
call key to place a call, that secondary station’s SCOS
and trunk restrictions are checked, not the primary station’s, and the call will appear in the Sh4DR report as
originating at the secondary station.
Y
5.32 If a secondary station haa call forward enabled,
only calls made directly to that station will follow the
forward. Calls on the secondary call keys will not be forwarded.
I
STATION X
STATION Z
STATION Y
Again, the call keys are assigned in numerical order
for each primary station. When Key C (secondary
call key 3) was associated with Station 2, it was assigned to station Z’s call key 1. Then Key D (secondary call key 4) was assigned to Station Z’s call key 2.
The programmer then associated Key E (secondary
call key 5) to Station X, which assigned it to Station
X’s call key 3. (Kit had been associated with Station
Z, it would have been assigned to Station Z’s call key
3-I
0 The programmed list of associated stations for secondary call keys does not change when a secondary
call key is deleted. In the example above, secondary
call keys 1, 2, and 5 (Keys A, B, and E) are
associated with Station X and secondary call keys 3
and 4 (Keys C and D) are associated with Station Z.
If one call key is deleted, the remaining keys are renumbered, and any keys that change number assume
the association assigned to that number. For example: If Key C is no longer a secondary call key, Key D
becomes secondary call key 3 and Key E becomes
secondary call key 4. (Secondary call key 5 is no
longer associated with a key on Station Y.) Therefore, the list appears as shown below:
STATION/CALL
ICEY
Station X/Call key 1 . . . . . .
Station X/Call key 2 . . . . . .
Station z/Call key 1 . . . . . .
Station Z/Call key 2 . . . . . .
Station X/Call key 3 . . . . . .
Sl-ATION Y
Key A (Secondary key 1)
Key B (Secondary key 2)
Key D (Secondary key 3)
Key E (Secondary key 4)
No secondary call key
I
1 Call Keys
STATION X
7 FT
Lp
STATON Z
A B
I
STATlON Y
Issue 1, November 1994
5.33 Ifthe primary station has immediate call forward
(all calls or if busy) enabled, calls will be forwarded and
will not cause the secondary call keys to flash at the secondary stations. If call forward no answer is enabled, the
secondary call keys will flash until the Call Forward No
Answer timer expirea and the forward is completed.
5.34 The ANSWER key will still answer ringing calls
in the order that they were received by that station. Even
if a call comes in on a secondary call key and then another call comes in on a primary call key, the call on the
secondary call key will be answered first. (The
ANSWER key cannot be used to answer flash-only
calls.)
5.35 If Automatic Trunk Answer is enabled at a
secondary station, calls on the secondary call keys cannot be answered by simply lifting the handset. The secondary station user must press the desired secondary call
key, or the ANSWER key to access the call.
5.36 If the primary station or any secondary station
puts a call on system hold, all associated primary and
secondary call keys flutter to show that a call is on hold.
If the call is placed on individual hold, the station that
placed it on hold will have a flashing call key and all
associated standard and secondary call keys will be lit
(to indicate that the call key is in use). Only the station
that placed the call on individual hold can access the
call.
5.37 If a call on a secondary call key is placed on hold
and the call recalls, the call will ring and the recall display (GRP#XX RECALL FROM cstation thatplacedit
on hold>) will appear at the primary station and any applicable secondary stations set for ring and flash. All
associated standard and secondary call keys will flash to
indicate ringing. If the call is not answered, it will recall
the primary station’s attendant (the display then shows
the primary station as the source of the recall).
5.38 If a call on a secondary call key is transferred, and
the call recalls, it goes back to the station that transferred
it. The recall will appear under a standard call key at that
station.
Page 4-45
IMXIGMX
539 If the primary station transfers a call that recalls,
all associated secondary call keys will flash to indicate
that the recall is ringing. Secondary stations programmed for ringing will also see the recall display.
5.40 When a primary station receives a queue callback, the corresponding secondary call key at the secondary station(s) will be lit (to indicate that the call key
is in use). The secondary station(s) will not be able to
answer the queue callback.
5.41 If a secondary station user requests a queue callback while using a secondary call key, the queue callback will appear under one of that station’s standard call
keys and will not appear at the primary station or any of
its other secondary stations.
5.42 Although calls on system hold cannot usually be
reverse transferred, a call on a standard call key at the
primary station or any secondary call key that has been
placed on system hold can be picked up, using reverse
transfer, at any station. If reverse transferred calls are
not automatically connected, the call will be placed on
individual hold at the reverse transferring keyset.
(Single-line sets will automatically be connected to the
call.)
5.43 When a direct ring-in trunk can be accessed (allowed-answer or ring-in assignment) by both a secondary call key and an individual trunk key on a secondary
station, both keys will show the ring-in by flashing. (If a
primary station has an individual trunk key, calls on that
trunk will not appear under a call key and, therefore,
cannot be answered at secondary stations.)
5.44 If a call is answered using an individual trunk
key, the system assumes that the secondary station is answering the call for itself and places the call on the individual trunk key. AR of the primary station’s call keys
and any other secondary station’s secondary call keys
for that trunk stop flashing and remain unlit.
5.45 If a call is answered using a secondary call key,
that secondary call key flashes and all other associated
call keys for that trunk stop flashing. The individual
trunk key on the answering station is lit to indicate that
the trunk is busy.
5.46 If privacy release is enabled, a secondary station
user can join an ongoing call by lifting the handset and
pressing the busy secondary call key. If privacy release
is not enabled, the user will hear reorder tones if the lit
secondary call key is pressed.
ing feature keys. Not all keys indicated below appear on
all keysets, as indicated below. Feature code descrip
tions start on page 4-5.
KEY
FUNCTION
ANSWER
Automatic Trunk Selection (89)
CNF
Conference (5)
DAI’A
Data (340) - On digital, LMX 12/24&e,
and DVK keyse-ts only
Do-Not-Disturb On/Off (372)
DND
FWD
HOLD
IC
h4sG
MUSIC
Call Forward All Calls (355) -This feature key may be reprogrammed with any
of the call forward options (however,
other feature codes may not be used).
Pressing a lit FWD key has the same effect as the cancel any call forward feature
code (359).
Individual hold (336)
Selects a voice channel or picks up a
holding or camped-on intercom call.
Message (365) - Also retrieves messages when the flashing MSG key is
pressed.
Background Music On/Off (313) - On
digital, IMX 12/24-l& and 24-l& DVK
kqsets only
Microphone Mute On/Off (314)
OUTGOING
Selects a trunk for placing an outgoing
call using the Least-Cost Routing (LCR)
feature (9).
PAGE
Page 8
QuJ3
Busy Trunk/Station Callback (Queue)
Request (6) and Cancel Queue (376).
Redial(380) - On dinitak IMX
12/24-l& hnd DVK &y&ts only. When
the system is in the default state, the
mode of the redial feature code is last
outside number dialed (320). Users may
reprogram the mode to last outside muuber saved (321).
Signals the system to expect a feature
code.
Speakerphone On/Off (312)
System Speed Dial (381) - On digital,
IMX 12124~line, and 24-line DVKkeysets
only
REDIAL
SPCL
SPKR
SYS SPD
Default Keyset Feature Keys
5.47 When the system is in the default state, all keysets are in the same key map group and have the follow-
INTER-TELPRACTICES
256 INSTALCATON & MAINTENANCE
XFR
Page 4-46
Transfer CO Call (345) and reverse transfer (4)
I ?,
_:
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
lNTER-TELPRAcTIcE!3
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION % MAINTENANCE
Keyset Lit-Emitting Diode (LED) Indications
SAS The keyset call keys, trunk keys, IC/CO speed-dial (SD) keys, hunt group keys, and some of the feature keys
contain light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The LED flash rates, shown below, indicate the status of the stations, trunks, and
features. The rates are shown in interruptions per minute (PM).
DATA
STEADY
SLOW
0 IPM
30 IPM
Auto-dial
Data call is
modem is
being
dialing; data port monitored
cannot be accessed
MEDIUM
120 IPM
Recalling
intercom call
iscampedon
Intercom call
iSG3IIpiOIl
Intercom call is
on hold
Speakerphone is
on or ready for
use
Conference is
in progress
CNF
MUTE
Microphone is
muted
FWD
Calls are being
forwarded
Conference is
recalling station
Initiator left
conference in
progress; or
calf. party is
on conference
wait hold
Message is
waiting
MSG
DND
Your station is in
do-notdisturb
SD
Station is busy
or unplugged
HUNT
GROUP
All stations in
hunt groups are
unavailable
CALL
TRUNK
FLUlTER
W/960 IPM
Datacallisin
progress;
continuous =
data device is
off hook
IC
SPKR
FAST
240 IPM
Trunkisinuse
at another
station or
unplugged
Station is in donot-disturb
Station has a
call ringing in
Continuous = sta
tion left off hook
Hunt group has
a call camped
on
Trunkisinuse
at your station
TrllIlkis
recalling from
hold or
transfer
Trnnkisringing Trunkison
in or camped on hold
(waiting); or
busy trunk
callback
TmtlkisinuSe
at your station
Trunk is
recalling from
hold or
transfer
Trunk is ringing Trunk is on
in or camped on hold
zing); or busy
callback
Page647
INTER-TEL PRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Ee~ember1994
Volume Controls
h. To change speakerphone progress tone
volume: Press the desired key while listening to intercom dial tone through the speakerphone.
5.49 On some keysets, speaker volume and ring tone
volume are controlled by two thumbwheels on the righthand side of the keyset.
I
5.50 On Inter-Tel AIh4 keysets, digital keyseta, and
DVK keysets, volume is controlled by pressing volume
control feature keys (labeled UP and DOWN) on the
keyset.
I
531
To CHANGE VOWB ONANAIb¶,
DIGDXL,
(2)
OR DVK
iC!XYIZ
(1)
Press the UP key to raise the volume or press the
DOWN key to lower the volume, while performing one of the following. A confirmation tone
will alert you when you have reached the highest
or lowest possible volume. On display keysets,
the display shows the level as it is raised or lowered.
a . To change handset intercom voice volume:
Press the desired key while on an off-hook
(handset) intercom call.
b. To change handsfree intercom voice
volume: Press the desired key while on an
on-hook (speakerphone) intercom call.
C.
To change handset outside call voice
volume: Press the desired key while on an
off-hook (handset) outside call.
To save the setting: Ress both the UP and
DOWN keys at the same time. If this step is not
performed, the keyset will return to the previous
volume level when the call, tone, or music ends
(except for the ringing alert tone volume, which
is automatically saved at the most current
volume level).
552
To RETURNANAIM,
FAlZTVOWbfE-:
DIGllXL,
OR DVKMEYSET
To DE- 1
While on or off hook, press the SPCL key and enter the Default Volume feature code (394).
Selectable Ring Tone
5.53 Keyset users can select the type of ringing alert
tone to be heard at theirrespective keysets. This is useful
in open office settings where phones are close together
and it is difficult to tell which one is ringing. Eight distinctive ring tone settings are available (1-S) or ring
tones can be disabled at the keyset (setting 0).
554 Disabling ring tones does not affect lamp status
or displays. A ringing call will still cause ring flash on
the trunk key and display keyseta will show the ap
propriate display for an incoming call.
d . To change handsfree outside call voice
volume: Press the desired key while on an
on-hook (speakerphone) outside call.
5.55 Ifring tones are disabled as described below, they
can be re-enabled by repeating the procedure and entering any ring tone selection 1-S.
I
e. To change background music volume:
Ress the desired key while listening to background music through the keyset speaker.
5.56
f . To change alerting tone (ring tone)
volume: Ress the desired key while the keyset is ringing. OR, while on hook, press both
keys to hear the currently programmed
volume, then press the desired key to adjust it
up or down.
(1)
While on hook, press SPCL and enter the Select
King Tone feature code (328). (Displays
SELECT RING TONE.)
(2)
EITHER, Enter a number l-8 to select the desired ring tone, or enter 0 to disable ring tones.
OR, Press the asterisk (*) key or the pound (#)
key to scroll through tones l-g. You cannot
scroll to 0.
NOTE: The selected alert tone volume level
is automatically saved.
g- To change handset progress tone volume:
Ress the desired key while listening to intercom dial tone through the handset.
TOCHANGEKEYSETRINGT
OR, Enter 9 to repeat the selected tone.
(3)
Page 4-48
Lift and replace the handset, or allow the Long
Interdigit timer to expire. The last tone selected
will now be in effect when the keyset rings.
I
lmATuREs
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
B. SINGLELINE S E T S
5.57 There are three types of single-line se.& Eu-
band Single-Line Sets (ESLSs), Single-Line Instruments (SLIs), and industry-standard single-line DTMP
sets. Any of these single-line instrument types can also
be used as an off-premises extension (OPX).
Enhanced Single-Line Sets (ESLSs)
5.5% The ESLS has nine user-programmable feature
keys for one-key dialing of feature codes and a FLASH
key that sends a timed hookflash to signal the systembefore a code is entered. It also has a neon message waiting
lamp that lights (like a keyset MSG key) when a message is received. The default values of the feature keys
are defined in a key map in database programming (refer
to PROGRAMMING, page 544, for details). They are
user-programmable feature or trunk group keys. They
can be assigned any of the general feature codes or trunk
access codes listed on pages 4-5 through 4-11. When
the system is in the default state, the feature codes assigned to the keys are as follows:
to PROGRAMMING, page 5-44, for details). They are
user-programmable feature or trunk group keys. They
can be assigned any of the general feature codes or trunk
access codes listed on pages 4-5 through 4-11. When
the system is in the default state, the feature codes assigned to the keys are as follows:
KEY
FUNCTION
STN
Station Speed Dial (382)
REDL
La
Redial(380)
Least-Cost Routing (9)
HOLD
Individual Hold (336).
SPD
Single-Line DTMF Sets
5.60 Single-line MMP set users access the features
by hookflashing (pressing and releasing the hookswitch
quickly) and entering feature codes.
Off-Premises Stations
5.61 SLIs, ESLSs, or any AC-ringing DTMP singleline sets can be used as off-premises stations. They are
placed at a remote location and are connected to the 256
System through a telephone company OPX circuit or a
customer-provided circuit. The circuits are connected to
an Inward Dialing Card (DC). (Refer to INS’fALUTION, page 3-30, for details.)
5.62
Off-premises station users access the features by
hookflashing (pressing and releasing the hookswitch
quickly) and entering feature codes.
5.63 IDCs do not support message waiting applications. If single-line sets with message waiting lamps are
installed on ID&, the lamps will not function.
Ring Zones
Single-Line Instruments (SLIs)
5.59 The SLI has four user-programmable feature
keys for one-key dialing of feature codes and a PLASH
key that sends a timed hookflash to signal the systembefore a feature code is entered. The default values of the
feature keys are defined in database programming (refer
5.64 The system power supply can provide power to
ring up to 20 AC-ringing single-line stations simultaneously without any noticeable change in the ring tone.
To preserve the ring tone quality, single-line stations
should be divided into ring zone groups.
5.65 If more than 20 AC-ringing single-line sets are in
the same ring-in pattern, they should be divided among
the three ring zones so that no more than 20 ring at a
time. Refer to page 4-25 for more information.
Page 4-49
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
C.
DIRECT STATION SELECTION/BUSY
LA&w FIELD (Dss/BLF) UNlTS
1 5.66 There can be a maximum of 50 DSS/BLFequipped keyset stations on the system.
l
I
0 System Speed-Dial Keys: The keys on a DSSfBLF
Unit can be programmed as system speed-dial keys
for dialing the system speed-dial numbers that are
programmed through the attendant station or programming terminal. These keys function as follows:
IMX and Inter-Tel/DVK DSWBLF Units are programmed to be used with specific keysets, but are
not physically attached to the keysets. Each unit requires separate cabling and a separate Keyset Card
(KSC) circuit. For each DSS/BLFUnit installed, one
fewer keysct can be installed.
- Pressing the key while your station is idle will
display the associated speeddial number on the
keyset display.
- Pressing the key while on an intercom call will
cause reorder tones.
0 Digital DSS/BLP Units are connected to digital keysets using a PC Data Port Module (PCDPM) attached to the keysct. Up to four digital DSWBLF
Units can be connected in series to one PCDPM.
- Ifan extension number is stored in the speed-dial
location, pressing the key while listening to dial
tone dial the extension number. (These keys will
not show busy lamp status for the station. They
are used only for speed dialing.)
5.67 Each DSS/BLFUn.it has 60 keys. The keys can be
programmed a one of the following types:
I
0 DSS/BLF Keys: DSS/BLP keys provide one-key
access to extension numbers. Together, the lamps in
the DSS/BLF keys create a busy lamp field that indicates the status of each station or hunt group assigned to the keys. The LED indicator in the key is
solidly lit when the associated station is busy, flashes
slowly when the station is in do-not-disturb, flashes
fast when the station has a call ringing in, or flutters
continuously if the station is causing a STmON
OFF-HOOK system alarm. If assigned to a hunt
group, the LED indicator is solidly lit when all stations in the hunt group are unavailable (busy, in
do-not-disturb, or removed from the hunt group) and
it flashes fast when a call is camped on to a busy hunt
group.
0 Feature Keys: The keys on the DSS/BLP Unit can
be programmed in the database to be feature keys.
Feature keys provide one-key dialing of selected
feature codes. The DSS/BLF Unit feature keys can
be used just like keyset feature keys.
- If an outside number is stored in the speed-dial
location, pressing the key while listening to
outside dial tone will dial the number.
5.68 The key arrangements for the DSS/BLF Units are
programmed in up to eight different arrangements using
the key maps in the database.
D.
ATI’ENDANT COMPUTER CONSOLES
5.69 The Attendant Computer Console is an IBMcompatible personal computer that is connected to an
available Keyset Card (KSC) circuit. (It cannot be
installed on KSC-D circuits programmed for “dual” op
eration.) It is primarily designed for use by attendants of
larger 256 System installations where the use of DSS/
BLP Units would be difficult because of the number of
users. However, it also provides enhanced call processing features, such as electronic text messaging and directory dialing, that would be useful in 256 Systems of
all sizes. (Refer to the manual provided with the Attendant Computer Console for more information.)
Page 4-50
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMWGMX 256 INSTALLATION
& MAINTENANCE
Issue 1. Nov%z
Single-Line Set: Lift the handset, enter the Feature Key Default feature code (325~ and hang
UP.
6. USER-PROGRAMMABLE
FEATURE KEYS
6.1 Individual keyset keys can be designated as “userprogrammable” in the key maps during database programming All ESLS and SLI feature keys except the
FLASH key are user-programmable. The installer programs the default feature codes (see PROGRAMMING,
page 5-44) and the station user can reprogram the feature codes as desired.
l
6.4
(1)
Keyset: (Default feature codes are shown on page
4-46.) Up to nine user-programmable keyset keys
can be programmed to access any of the general feature wdes (except Single-Line Call Splitting-337,
which is a single-line feature code). The FWD key
can also be programmed with any of the four Call
Forwarding feature codes.
(1)
(2)
CUR~~TKEYEN~UES
(ONA
(2)
Press the desired feature key. (Display keysets
show the feature currently assigned to the key.)
(3)
Enter the feature code to be stored under that key.
Keyset users hear a single progress tone when the
programminn is complete& single-line sets return to intercom dial tone. (Display keysets show
the newly programmed feature.) An invalid code
causes repeating reorder tones and does not
change the feature code assigned to the key. (Display keysets show ERROR! FEAIURE CODE
INVALID.)
DISPLAY
While on hook, press the SPCL key and enter the
Feature Key Display feature code (326). (Display keysets show DISPLAY FEAIURE KEY
PROGRAMMING.)
NOTE: If you do not enter a feature code, the
programming mode times out when the Long In&digit timer expires and you hear reorder tones;
the feature code assigned to the key remains unchanged.
Press the feature key(s) to be displayed. (Display
keysets show the current feature assigned, as the
keys are pressed.)
6 3
(4)
?ORETURNlFLTKEBTolXEVXLUESlX4TAREPROGRAWiEDLNlEEDAXUiASE:
Keyset: While on hook, press the SPCL key and
enter the Feature Key Programming feature code
(327). (Display keysets show NOW PROGRAMMINGFEAWREKEY.)
Single-Line Set: Lift the handset and enter the
Feature Key Programming feature code (327).
0 Single-Line Set: (Default values are shown on page
449.) ESLS and SLI feature keys can be programmed to access any of the general feature codes.
6.2 TO DISPLWlHE
ISYSEZ):
lV PROGRAMlHEKEYS:
Key&: While on or off hook, press the SPCL
key and enter the Feature Key Default feature
code (325).If off hook, hang up.
Page 4-51
Keyset: Wait 5 seconds for the display to return
to date and time, or lift and replace the handset.
To program other keys, repeat the procedure.
Single-Line Set: Hang up. Rogram other keys
by repeating the procedure.
lNTER=TzLPRAcrIcES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
E~ember1994
7.
AUTOMATIC CALL ACCESS
(KEYSETS ONLY)
7.1 This feature allows a keyset user to determine the
way incoming calls are answered. Feature codes are entered by the users to select the type of call access. The
four variations are as follows:
The user hears intercom dial tone when the handset
is lifted and must press a call or individual trunk key
(or the ANSWER key) to access an outside call, or
press the IC key to access an intercom call.
The user can answer ringing intercom calls by simply lifting the handset, but outside calls must be answered by pressing a call or individual trunk key or
the ANSWER key. (When the system is in the default state, all keysets have this type of call access.)
and the outside call camps on. The intercom call also
camps on when the handset is lifted. The user can then
choose between the camped on calls by pressing either
the IC key or the call or individual tnmk key (or
ANSWER key).
75 The automatic call access options outlined below
can be programmed at keyset stations only. Single-line
sets are already designed to automatically answer ringing intercom and outside calls by lifting the handset.
7.6 lV PROGRAM OVlSiBE CXLL ACCESS:
(1)
While on hook, press the SPCL key.
(2)
Select the option:
a . If you wish to automatically answer ringing
outside calls by lijiing the ha* enter the
Automatic Trunk Access feature code (360).
You hear a confirmation tone.
The user can answer ringing outside calls by lifting
the handset, but ringing intercom calls must be answered by pressing the IC key.
b.
C.
NOTE: In any of the above variations, keyset users may
still receive handsfree intercom calls (if enabled).
7 3 When programmed for automatic trunk access, a
station user with allowed answer, but without ring in, for
a trunk must always press an individual trunk key (or
press SKL and enter the Automatic Trunk Answer feature code - 350) to answer a non-ringing call. Transferred ringing calls and recalls can be answered by lifting the handset.
If you wish to access outside calls by prwsing
the call key, individwl trunk key, or
ANSWER key, enter the Cancel Automatic
Trunk Access feature code (361). You hear a
confirmation tone.
The user can answer any ringing call by lifting the
handset. If no call is ringing, the user hears intercom
dial tone when the handset is lifted. (This option is
the way single-line sets work.)
7.2 The selected option determines how all types of
riuging intercom or outside calls (direct calls, transferred calls, recalls, etc.) are answered. Ifmore than one
call is ringing at the station, the first call received is the
first answered.
’
7.7
To change the current option to its opposite
(toggle on or off), enter the Automatic Trunk
Access On/Off feature code (374). You hear a
contIrmation tone.
To PROGRAMNIERCOM
CALL ACCESS:
(1)
While on hook, press the SPCL key.
(2)
Select the option:
7.4 Camped-on calls cannot be answered by simply
lifting the handset or pressing the SPKR key. For example, a station is programmed to automatically answer
ringing outside calls, but requires pressing the IC key to
answer ringing intercom calls. If a private intercom call
rings in and is immediately followed by an outside call
ringing in, the display shows the intercom call message
Page 4-52
a . If you wish to automatically answer ringing
intercom calls by lifing the ham&a enter the
Automatic Intercom Access feature code
(362). You hear a confirmation tone.
b. If you wish to access ringing intercom calls
bypressing the IC key, enter the Cancel Automatic Intercom Access feature code (363).
You hear a confirmation tone.
C.
To change the curtent option to its opposite
(toggle on or off), enter the Automatic Intercom Access On/Off feature code (364). You
hear a confirmation tone.
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
lNTER-TELPRACTIcEs
IMX/GMX256 INWTION& MAINTENANCE
8. MUSIC-ON-HOLD AND
BACKGROUND MUSIC
8.1 The Music-On-Hold feature not only makes waiting on hold as pleasant as possible, but it assures the
holding party that the call is still connected.
tion basis in the database. Station music channel programming can be changed by the user by entering a
feature code. The music channel used by system MusicOn-Hold and paging speaker background music is set in
the database.
85
8.2 Keyset users can choose to listen to background
music by entering the Background Music feature code
(313) or pressing the MUSIC key. The primary attendant
can enable background music for the optional external
paging speakers by entering a feature code (see page
4-111).
83 The system can be equipped with one or two optional external music sources for the Music-On-Hold
and Background Music features. An optional external
music source can be a customer-provided radio, tape
player, or other device connected to the ROM Central
Processing Unit (RCPU) card in the equipment cabinet.
When a music source is installed, Music-On-Hold is enabled by placing the MOH straps on the RCPU card in
the ON position. It can be disabled by placing its straps
in the OFF position. If music is not desired, the system
can be programmed for tick-tones or silence on hold.
NOTE: In some circumstances, there may be broadcast
restrictions associated with the music heard by callers
on hold. Check with the music’s original distributor and/
or the radio station for copyright and broadcast restrictions concerning Music-On-Hold.
8.4 Station users can select a music chclnnel that determines which of the two music sources they wish to listen
to when camped onto a system resource, when placed on
hold by another station, and for keyset background music. The music channels are assigned on a station-by-sta-
Keyset: While on hook, press SPCL and enter
the Background Music Channel Selection feature code (318). The music channel will change
between channels one and two each time the
code is entered.
Single-Line Set: Lift the handset, enter the
Background Music Channel Selection feature
code (318) and hang up. The music channel will
change between channels one and two each time
the code is entered.
8.6 The music channel heard by outside callers is determined on a trunk group-by-trunk group basis in the
database.
8.7 Throughout the instructions in this section of the
manual, the term “music” refers to the selected option:
music, tick-tones, or silence, depending on what is enabled.
8.8
Background music is interrupted for pages. Music
over keyset speakers is also interrupted for calls, keysct
programming, ami ringing.
8.9
Page 4-53
TO TURNKEYSETRACKGROUND
MUSIC ON OR OFi?:
While on or off hook, press the MUSIC key (or
press the SPCL key and enter the Background
Music On/Off feature code - 313). If off hook
hang up.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 BWIALLATION & MAINTENANCE
9.
._
SIGNALS AND TONES
9.1 There are several distinct signals and tones on the 256 System. The installer can choose to use these tones (pure
system tones), or dial tones and busy tones similar to those of the telephone company (standard tones), by selecting an
option in the database (see PROGRAMMING, page 5-69).
A .
9.2
RINGSIGNALS
The system signals and tones generated by the ringer or keyset speaker are as follows.
TYPE OF CALL
SIGNAL
Outside call
Intercom call or off-hook voice
announce call
Queue callback
Siile long tone every 6 seconds
?tKo short tones and a pause
(repeats for private calls)
A repeating signal of three
short tones and a long pause
A repeating signal of four short
tones and a long--pause
1 Eight short tones
Recall from transfer or hold
Reminder message
B.
CALL
PROCESSING
F
I
SIGNALS
9.3 The following signals and tones are heard through the handset or keyset speaker.
SIGNAL
ACTION
intercom dial tone
Handset lifted or SPKR or IC key pressed.
r
Double tones (called station mm
receives the same signal)
Intercom busy signal
- slow repeating tones
(until camp on)
r
I
I
Intercom call -repeats for private call or
call to non-handsfree station; one double
tone for handsfiee call.
1
Called station or selected trunk is busy.
I
A repeating signal of four
fast tones and a pause
UL
Reorder tones - fast tones
(may be four tones or
continuous)
System busy signal - reorder
tones followed by music
Single progr~ tone
Called station is in do-not-disturb.
Number or feature code was not
accepted, number did not pass toll
restriction, or dialing timer expired.
m
r
All resources are busy, station is
camped on.
1
Camp-on tone - single
tone every 15 seconds
(programmable)
I
1
Feature procedure completed, or
something needs to be entered.
Another station has camped on to this station.
A message is waiting at this single-line
station.
Message waiting tone six tones followed by
intercom dial tone after lifting
the handset or hookflashing
Page 4-54
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IhWGMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
103
NOTE FOR SINGLE-LINE SET USERS: When
the procedures tell you to hookflash, quickly press
and release the hookswitch. If you press the
hookswitch to hang up, hold it down until the SL
Hookflash Maximum timer expires (default value is
0.7 seconds); otherwise, the system recognizes it as
a hookflash. If using an SLI or ESLS, use the
PLASH key to perform a hookflash. If using an
ESLS, you do not need to hookflash when using one
of the programmed feature keys.
lDCAhVELRlNGIh’l?BCOMALW~:
Keyset: While on hook, press the SPCL key and
enter the Cancel Ring Intercom Always feature
code (368) or the Ring Intercom Always On/Off
feature code (377).
Single-Lime Set: Lift the handset. Enter a Cancel
Ring Intercom Always feature code (368 or 377)
and hang up.
I
10. INTERCOM CALLS
10.1 The intercom can be used to place station-to-station calls that can be answered handsfree. Or, it can be
used to place private (non-handsfree) calls. A station
user that reaches a busy station can camp on, request a
callback (queue), leave a message, or use the Off-Hook
Voice Announce feature (if enabled). Other features that
apply to both outside and intercom calls, as described
later in this section of the manual, include placing calls
on hold, call waiting, call transfer, reverse transfer, and
call forwarding.
NOTE: Integrated speakerphones, which allow handsfree operation on outside calls and intercom calls, are
standard on keysets. ESLSs and SLIS do not have speakerphones.
A .
FEAW
Issue 1, November 1994
PROGRAMMING FOR PRIVATE
HWERCOM CALLS
Keyset HandsfreeEnable/Disable
10.6 A keyset user can always receive private calls by
disabling the keyset handsfree answering feature using
the disable handsfiee feature code, as described in the
following paragraph. The keyset user hears repeating
double tones when receiving an inter-m call and must
lift the handset (or press the SPKR and/or IC key) to
answer while this feature is enabled.
10.7 n, PROGRAM lHE SlAlTON To ALWAYS RECEIVE PRIvm~coMcALIs(~oNLy):
While on hook, press the SPCL key and enter the
Disable Handsfree feature code (310) or the
Handsfree On/Off feature code (319).
lo.8
TORESlDRElHEHAN.VKZRLVG~:
While on hook, press the SPCL key and enter the
Enable Handsfree feature code (311) or the
Handsfree On/Off feature code (319).
Private Intercom Override
10.2 A station user can place private (non-ha&free)
intercom calls by pressing the pound (#) key before dialing the extension number. Or, the station can be programmed to always send and/or receive private calls
using “ring intercom always” or “handsfree disable.”
Riug Intercom Always
10.3 A station user can always place private calls by
programming the station with the Ring Intercom Always feature code. While this feature is enabled, the
called party hears repeating double tones and must lift
the handset (or press the SPKR key or IC key) to answer.
10.4 TOPROGRAMZFIESTAlTONTOALW~PL4CEPRlKXli%
Lh’TERCOiU CALL7 (RlNGIh’lERCObiALW~):
10.9 If a keyset station is programmed with the Private
Intercom Override flag, the user can place a handsfree
call even if handsfree mode is disabled or ring intercom
always is enabled. The caller simply presses * or # while
listening to the repeating ring signal of a private call (see
the complete procedures for placing an intercom call on
the next page). This feature will not work for non-handsfree message replies, system forwards, or transferred
calls.
I
B .
S’IXI’ION-TO-STATION
CALTJNG
Receiving Intercom Calls
lo.10 TOREC~ANWTERCOMCALC ONAk7iXET:
Keyset: While on hook, press the SPCL key and
enter the Ring Intercom Always feature code
(367) or the Ring Intercom Always On/Off feature code (377).
Single-Line Set: Lift the handset. Enter a ring
Intercom Always feature code (367 or 377) and
hang up.
Page 4-55
If you hear a double tone and a call announce-
ment (ham call), and the SPKR key is lit, respond handsfiee or lift the handset. (Display keysets show INTERCOM CALL PROM EX XXX
[or user name] to identify the sonrce of the call.
The source identification remains on the display
until the user picks up the handset or presses the
SPKR or IC key.)
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMXIGMX 256 INSWTlON & MAINTENANCE
FYEATTJRES
Issue 1, November 1994
If you hear repeating double tones (j&ate call),
lift the handset, or press the SPKR or IC key to
respond handsfree. (Display keysets show INTERCOM CALL FROM Ex 2fXX [or user
name] to identify the source of the call. The
source identification remains on the display until
the user answers the call.)
1o.n
ShT
lORECElVEAN~COMCALCONAS,?NGLE-m
When you hear repeating double tones, lift the
handset.
lo.12
ToRECEfC?E
A l7Uh’S l?ERR.D-TO-HOLD
When you hear a page announcing that a call is holding
at your station:
Keyset: When the IC key is fluttering, lift the
handset and press the IC key. Or, while on hook,
press the IC key to speak handsfree. You are connected to the caller.
Single-Line Set: Lift the handset and press the
HOLD key or enter the Individual Hold feature
code (336). You are connected to the caller.
Placing Intercom Calls
NOTE: When placing an intercom call, begin dialing
before the Dial Initiation timer expires. If the timer expires, the system drops the connection and sends repeating reorder tones. This prevents a voice channel from
being tied up accidentally.
la P~cEmnulERcoM
a. If calling a hand$ee kyset station, speak
after you hear a double tone.
b. If calling a single-line statioq a hunt group,
or a kzyset with ham&j& d&bled, you hear
repeating double tones until the call is answered. NOTE: If your station has the Private Intercom Override feature enabled, you
can press * or # when you are calling a keyset
station from another keyset and want the call
to ring through handsfree.
I
C.
INlEUCOMCALLATAh’Y~ON:
10.13
terdigit timer may expire and you will hear repeating reorder tones.
c4LL:
( 1 ) Keyset:
To use the handset: Lift the handset.
To use the speakerphone: While on hook,
press the SPKR key or the IC key. The SPKR
key lights.
Single-Lime Set: Lift the handset. (If the MMF
decoders are busy, you hear silence. Hang up and
try again.)
(2)
If you want to place a private (nomhana5jke)
calf to a keyset, Press the pound (#) key.
(3)
Dial an extension number. The number can be 0
for the attendant, a station extensionnumber, or a
hunt group pilot number. (Display keysets show
the number dialed.) If you dial too slowly, the Iu-
Page 4-56
If piking a private call, you hear repeating
double tones until the call is answered.
d . If you dial an invalid nun&q you hear
repeating reorder tones.
e. If the calkd station is busy, you have the
following options:
1. Disconnect: Hang up and try later. If
dialing ham&free (keysetsonly), press the
SPKR key to disconnect.
2 . Camp on: Do not hang up, your call
camps on. When the called station is
available, a Private call is placed. Refer to
paragraph 10.14 for details.
3 . Request a busy station callback
(queue): This is similar to camping on
except that you hang up and wait for the
busy station to be available. For more information, refer to paragraph 10.17.
f . If you hear a repeating signal of four fasr
tones and a pause, the station is in
do-not-disturb. You can use the Busy Station
Callback feature or, if enabled on your keyset, use the Do-Not-Disturb Override feature
by pressing SPCL and entering the Do-NotDisturb Override feature code (373).
8. If the calledstation is busy, in &not-d.sturb,
or there is Ito answeq you can leave a message waiting indication with the station itself
or with the station’s message center. For details, refer to page 4-58.
h. If the calkd station is a busy digitaZ, IMX 1
12124~line, or DW keyset and if all the necessary conditions for OHKA are enablerl, you
can announce the call using the Off-Hook
Voice Amrounce feature. For a complete explanation of this feature, refer to page 4-61.
~ .’ “1
-:i
/’
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
mTER-TELPR4CTIcES
IMx/GMx 256 INSTALLA’TION & MAINTENANCE
C.
swered, the queue is cancelled. If the station is busy
when called back, the queue request is placed behind
any other waiting queue requests.
INTERCOM CAMP ON AND BUSY
STATION CALLBACK (QUEUE)
Camp On
10.14 When a station user calls a busy station or hunt
group, the system sends a busy signal. The caller can
wait off hook to camp on (after the CamPUn timer expires) and hear music while waiting until the called station is available. The system periodically sends call
waiting signals to the busy station(s). Up to 255 stations
can camp on to the same extension number.
10.19 To QUETJEASlXTON:
(1) Keysetz When you hear a busy signal or
do-not-disturb signal (a repeating signal of four
fast tones and a pause) when calling an extension
mrmber, Press the QUE key (or Press SPCL and
enter the Queue Request feature code - 6) and
hang up*
10.15 If a station enables do-not-disturb while an intercom call is camped on, the caller is removed from the
camped on state and receives do-not-disturb indications
(see page 4-69). Intercom callers cannot camp on to a
station that is in do-not-disturb.
10.16
Single-Line Set: When you hear a busy signal or
do-not-disturb signal when calling an extension
number, Press the ESLS QUE key, or Press the
FLASH key (hookflash) and enter the Queue Request feature code (6). Then hang up.
To CAMP ON TOANEXlENSIONNU..ER:
If you hear a busy signal when calling an extension mmtber and wish to camp on, do not hang
up. You hear music (if enabled) while camPed
on. When the station is available, a Private call is
automatically placed and you hear repeating
double tones until the call is answered.
(2)
When the queued station is available, you hear a
repeating signal of three tones and a long pause.
(Display keysets show EX XXX [or user name]
IS NOW AVAILABLE.) Lift the handset. A private call is automatically placed to the queued
station.
10.20 TO CANCEL A QUEUE REQUEST (BEFORE THE
Busy Station Callback (Queue)
QUEUW SZUi’ON BECOMES AVAILABLE):
10.17 When a called station is busy or in do-notdisturb, the caller can request a callback (queue) and
hang up until the station is available. This can be done
before or after the call camps on. Each station can have
only one active queue request at a time.
10.18 Queue callbacks must be answered before the
Queue Callback timer expires. If a callback is not an-
Page 4-57
Keyset: While on hook, Press the QUE key (or
press the SPCL key and enter the Cancel Queue
Request feature code - 376).
Single-Line Set: Lift the handset, enter the Cancel Queue Request feature code (376), and hang
UP.
Ee~elnber
1994
ll. INTER-ST4TION
IMX/GMX
INTKK-TELPKACTICES
256lNSTALLATION
&MAINTENANCE
A. LEAVING MESSAGES
MESSAGES
11.1 If a station is busy, there is no answer, or it is in
do-not-disturb, intercom callers may leave a message
waiting indication. The called station’s MSG key
flashes (and display keysets show the message source).
There are two message options:
(1)
Keyset: Press the MSG key or press SPCL and
enter the Message feature code (365).
Have the coIled party return your call. (Display
keysets show the source of the message.) When the
called party responds to the message indication, a
call is automatically placed to your station.
Leave a message with the called party’s message
center. (Display keyseta show that a message was
left with the keyset user’s assigned message center.)
When the called party responds to the message indication, a call is automatically placed to his or her
message center.
Single-Line Set: Press the ESLS MSG key, or
press the FLASH key (hookflash) and enter the
Message feature code (365).
(2)
To have the called party call you: Hang up or
press a trunk acccsa key or the IC key to disconnect before the Message timer expires. The station will receive a message waiting indication.
(Display keysets show MESSAGE RECEIVED
FROM [your station].)
To leave the message with the called party’s
message center: Do not hang up. When the Message timer expires, a private call is automatically
placed to the called party’s message center. (If
the message center is a voice mail system, the
called party’s mailbox is automatically dialed
after the voice mail system answers the call.)
Leave your message with the message center and
hang up. The called station receives message
waiting indications. (Display keysets show
MESSAGE RECEIVED FROM [message center].) If the message center doea not answer the
call (that is placed after the timer expires), the
station will still be directed to the message center
when retrieving the message.
11.2 To signal that a message is waiting, a called keyset’s MSG key flashes aud the display shows the message source. ESLSs are equipped with message waiting
lamps that, if enabled iu the database, light when the station receives a message. For single-line sets, a system
programming option can be enabled that sends six short
message waiting tones when the user lifts the handset or
presses the hookswitch.
ll.3 Any station or hunt group can be designated as
the message center for a station. However, a station cannot be programmed as ita own message center.
11.4 If the designated message center is a voice mail
system, the voice mail system is called after the Message (At Message Center) timer expires. When the voice
mail system answers the call, the called party’s “mailbox” ia automatically dialed. The caller can then leave a
message in the mailbox. The called party’s MSG key
flashes and the display shows MESSAGE RECEIVED
FROM [voice Mail].
Il.5 Each station user can leave message waiting indications at more than one station, but only one per station. Astation can receive up to 120 messages, and there
can be a maximum of 120 waiting messages in the system.
When calling a station, if you hear a busy signal,
do-not-disturb signal (repeating signal of four
fast tones and a pause), or the call is not answered:
NOTE: If the station you are calling does not
have a designated message center or if the station
happens to be your message center, you will hear
dial tone immediately after pressing the MSG
key. The station will receive a message waiting
indication.
Silent Messages
11.9 Silent messages can be placed while on or off
hook without making an intercom call to the station.
11.10
11.6 When a station is forwarded or has system forwarding, and a caller leaves a message waiting indication after calling the forwarded station, the message indication appears at the original station instead of the
station that received the forwarded call.
11.7 On display keysets, the messages can be viewed
in the order they were received and answered as desired.
Page 4-58
TOLEAVEASIENTMESSAGE:
Keyset: Press SPCL or lift the handset and enter
the Silent Message feature code (378). Then dial
the extension number of the desired station. Ifoff
hook, hang up.
Single-Line Set: Lift the handset and enter the
Silent Message feature code (378). Then dial the
extension number of the desired station and hang
UP-
-‘\
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMWGMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Issue 1, No”%=
Canceling A Message Waiting Indication That You
Left
is idle, press the MSG key. Depending on how
the message was left, an intercom call is placed
to either the station that left the message or your
message center.
ll.ll Occasionally, you may wish to cancel a message
waiting indication that you left before the station user
responds to the message. If the message was left with the
station’s message center, you camtot cancel the message
waiting indication; only the message center can cancel
the message using the procedure outlined below.
1l.12
To t2NCEL AbfESAGE
Other Single-Line Sets: If you hear message
waiting tones (six tones) after lifting the handset
or hookflashing when the station is idle, enterthe
Message feature code (365). Depending on how
the message was left, an intercom call is placed
to either the station that left the message or your
message center.
YOULEFT:
( 1 ) Atyourstation,presstheSPCLkey(FLASHkey
on single-line sets) and enter the Cancel Message
feature code (366). (Display shows CANCEL
MESSAGE ON EXT #).
NOTE: If the called station does not answer, is
busy, or is in do-notdisturb, you may hang up or
leave a message at that station before hanging
up. When the handset is lifted again you will hear
message waiting tones, and/or the ESLS message waiting lamp will remain lit (unless you left
a message while attempting to retrieve the message or canceled the message after hanging up).
The message waiting indications are cancelled
when you are actually connected with the called
station.
( 2 ) Entertheextensionnumberofthestationthathas
the message indication that you wish to cancel.
You hear intercom dial tone if off hook, or confirmation tone if on hook. (If a message was not
present at the called station, you hear reorder
tones).
B.
BESPONDING TO MESSAGES
(2)
Answering Messages
ll.13
(1)
To ANSWER-GESATAliZYSEll:
If your MSG key is flashing (display shows
MESSAGE RECEIVED FROM RX XXX [or
user name]), lift the handset and press the MSG
key. Depending on how the message was left, an
intercom call is placed to either the station that
left the message or your message center.
NOTE: If, after pressing the flashing MSG key,
the called station is unavailable (does not answer
a private call, is busy, or is in do-notdisturb),
your message key continues to flash (and the display indicates a waiting message) unless you immediately leave a message before hanging up or
cancel the message after hanging up. The message waiting indications are cancelled automatically when you are actually connected with the
called station.
(2)
(1)
Canceling A Waiting Message
u.15 To CANCEL AbQXSAGE MlHOVTAh?9i%!ERlNGATA
KliBEll:
(1)
If the MSG key is flashing (display shows message), remain on hook and press the asterisk (*)
key. The message is cancelled.
(2)
If the MSG key continues to flash, there is
another message (display shows the next message). Either respond to it or cancel it.
11.16 TO CANCEL AMESSAGE Wl7iOVTAh’~GATA
SINGLIXLW~:
(1)
If you receive message waiting tones and/or the
ESLS message waiting lamp is lig enter the Cancel Current Message feature code (379). The
message is cancelled.
(2)
If you hear message waiting tones after hookflashing or when the handset is lifted again (or if
the ESLS message waiting lamp remains lit),
there is another message. Either respond to it or
cancel it.
If the MSG key continues to flash, there is
another message (display shows the next message). Repeat step 1.
n.14 lVANSWERb4ESSAGESATASLNGLE-Llh?ESET:
If you hear message waiting tones after hookflashing or when the handset is lifted again (or if
the ESLS message waiting lamp remains lit),
there is another message. Repeat from step 1.
ESLS: If your message lamp is lit and/or you
hear message waiting tones (six tones) after lifting the handset or hookflashing when the station
Page 4-59
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Viewing Waiting Messages
11.17
(1)
(2)
To WEWRECEIVEDbfES.UGE.L4TADISPL4Y~:
lf your MSG key is flashing, one or more
messages are waiting. While on hook, press the
MSG key repeatedly to view waiting messages.
If desk& you can answer or cancel a message
while it is displayed.
Alternate Message Source
ll.18 The Alternate Message Source feature was developed to enable a voice mail system to leave messages
through a station or hunt group that is designated as its
alternate message source. When a message is left on the
voice mail system for a station user that has an assigned
mailbox, the voice mail unit automatically dials the
Message feature code (365) and then dials the extension
number of the called station. The called station receives
the message waiting indications. Ifit is a display keyset,
the display shows MESSAGE RECEIVED PROM [alternate message source] rather than from the voice mail
circuit. An actual intercom call has not been placed;
only the message waiting indications are affected.
When the station user retrieves the message, an intercom call is placed to the alternate message source.
11.19 ‘Ikvo possible applications for this feature arc:
routing messages through a trunk card circuit to allow
keysets (other than AIM, digital, or DVK keysets) to use m
DTMF tones to retrieve messages, and routing message
through a hunt group to make efficient use of voice mail
resources. These applications are described below.
11.20
Routing messages tbugh a trunk card cir-
cuit: To achieve this function, an unused single-line circuit is programmed as the alternate message source for
the voice mail circuits and is then programmed to automatically forward calls to a trunk card circuit that is connected to the voice mail unit. When a user responds to a
message left by a voice mail port, the alternate message
Source station is accessed and the call is automatically
forwarded to the trunk card circuit. This leaves the voice
mail ports available to receive messages through intercom channels while the trunk card circuit is in use.
11.21 Routing messages through a hunt group: To
make efficient use of multi-port voice mail units, the
ports are placed in a voice mail hunt group and the voice
mail hunt group’s pilot number is assigned as the alternate message source for each of the individual voice
mail ports. When a user responds to a message left by
one of the voice mail ports, the pilot number is automatically dialed and the call circulates through the hunt
group until a voice mail port is available. Without the alternate message source hunt group, the call would return
only to the port that left the message and would not circulate through the hunt group.
Page 4-60
.-x.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMx/GMx 256 INS‘JALLATION & MMNTENANCE
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
12. OFF-HOOK VOICE ANNOUNCE
(OHVA)
you are automatically connected to the called
party’s speakerphone.
12.1 The Off-Hook Voice Announce (OHVA) feature
allows an intercom caller (either single-line or keyset)
to establish voice contact with the called keyset user,
even though the user already has a call in progress on the
handset. The called keyset user can then talk freely on
both connections, using the handset for the original call
and the speakerphone for the OHVAintercom call. Note
that the caller on the handset call wiZ2 be able to hear the
OHVA call.
I
I
12.2 A PC Data Port Module (PCDPM) must be
installed on digital keysets to provide the secondary
voice path needed for the OHVA feature. The IM?f 12and 24line keysets and Inter-Tel/DVK keysets do not
require any additional equipment.
123 The OHVA option must be enabled in the database. (When the system is in the default state, the system
flag for this feature is enabled.) Each digital keyset,
lMX 12/24&e keyset, and DVK keyset can be programmed forplacing and/or nzceiving OHVA calls, and
each eight-line keyset and single-line set can be programmed for pIacing OHVA calls, as desired. (Eightline keysets and single-line sets cannot receive OHVA
calls since they do not have secondary voice path circuitry.) For example, all attendants may be allowed to
make, but not receive, OHVA calls, while all other stations are allowed to receive, but not place, OHVA calls.
Any combination is available through database progr ammina.
12.4 OHVA calls cannot be processed if the secondary
voice path or the speakerphone of the called keyset is not
available. This occurs when the keyset has a different
OHVA call in progress, has an active data call in progress, is on an active handst?ee ix&corn or outside call,
has handsfree disabled, has a headset enabled, or is in
do-not-disturb. Also, OIIVA calls are not possible if the
caller is placing a forced private intercom call.
12.5
I
To PLACE AN OFF-HOOK VOICE ANNOUNCE CQLL
NOTE: This method can only be used if the database
has been programmed to allow keysets with attached
DSWBLF Units to bypass the camp-on and OHVA
Screening timers. See page 5-54 in PROGRAMMING.
This is a useful option for attendant stations.
(1)
When an intercom call is placed (using the DSSI
BLF key) to a busy OHVA-enabled keyset, do
not hang up.
(2)
Press the DWBLF key for that keyset again. If
the keyset’s secondary voice path is available,
you are immediately uumected and may speak.
12.7
To RECm AN O FF-HOOK VOICE ANNOUNCE CALL
(OHVA-EhXBLED
(1)
KEYSETS ONL;y):
While on a call using the handset, you hear-a
campon tone (display shows CALL
ANNOUNCE FROM EX XXX [or user name]).
Do nothing. When the OHVA Screening timer
expires, you hear a double tone (display shows
INTERCOM CALL FROM EX XXX [or user
name]). You are coMected with the intercom
caller via the speakerphone. Your original call
remains connected on the handset.
NOTE: If you press the MUTE key while speaking to the caller on the speakerphone, the handset
microphone will be muted and the caller on the
handset will not hear the OHVA call. Press
MUTE again to enable the handset.
(2)
To terminate the OHVA talk Press the lit
SPKR key or have the OHVA caller hang up. If
you terminate the original call by hanging up the
handset, you remain connected to the OHVAcall
in the handsfree intercom mode.
12.8 TO BLOCK AN OFF-HOOK VOICE ANNOviWE CALL
(OHKA-ENABLED KEYSETS Om:
To PLACE Ah’ OFF-HOOK VOICE ANNOUNCE CALL:
(1) When an intercom call is placed to a busy
OHVA-enabled keyset, do not hang up. You hear
busy signals until the Camp-On and OHVA
Screening timers expire. (If you hear music after
the Camp-On timer expires, conditions for an
OHVA call were not met and you are camped-on.
See page 4-57.)
(2)
12.6
(- WllHDSSlBLF UNllS ONL;Y):
(1)
While on a call using the handset, you hear a
camp-on tone (displays CALL ANNOUNCE
FROM EX XXX [or user name]). To cause the
intercom call to camp on, press the SPKR or
DND key. The IC key flashes.
(2)
If you wish to send do-notdisurb signals to the
camped-on call, press the DND key two more
times if the DND key was used in step 1, or press
the DND key once if the SPKR key was used in
step 1.
When the OHVA Screening timer expires (and if
the keyset’s secondary voice path is available),
Page 4-61
INTER-TELPRACTICEs
lMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
EcyEtember1994
Single-Lime Set: Select a line using one of the
13. OUTSIDE CALLS
following methods:
13.1 When a trunk is selected for receiving or placing
an outside call, the voice channel is seized and camtot be
used by any other station (unless privacy release is
enabled, see page 4-74, or the Conferencing feature is
used, see page 4-76). If the desired trunk is busy, the
station user can camp on or request a callback (queue).
Other features that apply to both outside and intercom
calls are d’rscussed later in this section of the manual.
They include placing calls on hold, call waiting, call
transfer, reverse transfer, conferencing, and call forwarding. Refer to page 4-24 for an explanation of
outgoing-access, allowed-answer, and ring-in assiguments. Refer to page 4-31 for an explanation of trunk
groups, auto trunks, and the use of the automatic trunk
answer and selection feature codes.
A.
b. Enter a Select Trunk Croup feature code
(SOl-S47) or press a trunk group key.
c . Refer to the Least-Cost Routing (LCR) procedure on the next page.
(3)
NOTE: When placing a call, begin dialing before the
Dial Initiation timer expires. If the timer expires, the
system drops the trunk connection and sends repeating
reorder tones. This prevents a trunk from being tied up
accidentally.
13.2 TO PLACEANOUWDE CALL:
Lift the handset. (Keyset users can dial on hook.
Refer to page 4-64.)
(2)
Select an outgoing trunk, using one of the methods below. The associated individual trunk or
call key flashes slowly. (If on hook, the SPKR
key is lit.)
ii
a. Enter the automatic trunk selection feature
code (89).
PLACING OUTSIDE CALL.23
(1)
--y
NOTE: You must have outgoing access to a
trunk to seize it.
You hear one of the following signals:
a . Outside dial tone: If you wish to use your
class-of-service accountcodqpms SPCL or
FLASH (hookflash) and enter the Optional
Account Code feature code (390) then enter
your account code. Your usual SCOS is enabled for this call. To dial, manually dial,
speed dial, or redial the desired telephone
number. (Display keysets show the numbers
dialed. When the Valid Call timer expires,
the display shows the elapsed time and call
cost.) If you hear repeating EO?d?Y tones,
you dialed a restricted number. Also, if you
dial too slowly and the Interdigit timers expire, the call may be dropped, and you will
hear repeating reorder tones. If using a keyset
that is on bk, you may lift the handset to
speak privately. Go to the next step. On keysets, an individual trunk or call key flashes
slowly.
b . Single progress tone: Enter a forced account
code (refer to page 4-66). The display shows
ACCX#. You hear outside dial tone when the
code is accepted. On keysets, an individual
trunk or call key flashes slowly. If you entered your class-of-service account code,
your usual SCOS is enabled for this call. Go
to the next step.
Keyset: Select a line using one of the following
methods:
C.
a. Press an individual trunk key for direct
access.
b. Enter the automatic trunk selection feature
code (89) or press the ANSWER key. If no
call is ringing or holding, the system selects
the highest-numbered available auto trunk.
c. Enter a select trunk group feature code
(801-%7)orpressatruukgroupkey.Thisselects a trunk in the chosen trunk group.
d. Refer to the Least-Cost Routing (LCR) procedure on the next page.
Page 4-62
Repeating reorder tones: You are restricted
from the trunk group chosen; choose another
trunk group. Or, you are restricted to using
LCR only; try again using LCR (see next
page). If your call has been blocked because
the weekly toll limit has been exceeded, the
display shows CALL FAILED - TOLL LIMlT EXCEEDED.
I
d . Intercom dial tone: You have accessed a
dial-repeating E&M trunk. You can dial an
extension number to reach a station on the
other telephone system. Or, you can enter a
valid trunk access code (determiued by the
other telephone system) and dial and outside
telephone number, if allowed.
\ -!
.I
., AS
INTER-TELPRACXXES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
e. Ring signal: You have accessed an auto ring-
and ifLCR is not transpalpnt): Your call is
in E&M trunk. When the station user answers, you can ask to be transferred to the desired extension number or to an outside
telephone number.
being placed. The associated individual
trunk or call key flashes slowly.
f . Busy signal: The chosen trunk, trunk group,
or E&M destination is busy. Camp on (see
page 4-57), use the Busy Trunk Callback
(Queue) feature (see page 4-57), or select another trunk or trunk group.
13.3
Issue 1, No”!=
b . Busy signals, then music: All of the trunks
in the least-expensive facility group are busy.
Do one of the following:
1. To wait for the next facility group: Continue to wait off hook. Ifprogrammed, the
next facility group is checked for an
available trunk after the LCR Advance
timer expires (you hear a progress tone
and remain camped on if your station is
programmed for LCR facility group
camp-on). When the system accesses a
trunk, you hear dial tone (and possibly
digits being dialed). The associated individual trunk or call key flashes slowly on
keysets.
lV PLACE A CALL USING LRAST~OSiROVl7NG:
(1)
Lift the handset.
(2)
Key&z Enter the Least-Cost Routing feature
code (9), or press a call key, the OUTGOING
key, or the LCR key. You hear a single progress
tone followed by silence if LCR is not “transparent.” You hear dial tone if LCR is transparent.
Single-Line Set: Ress the SLI LCR key, the
ESLS OUT key, or enter the Least-Cost Routing
feature code (9). You hear a single progress tone
followed by silence if LCR is not “transparent.”
You hear dial tone if LCR is transparent.
2. To request a callback (queue): If your
station is enabled with LCR facility
group camp-on, request a busy trunk callback (refer to paragraph 13.11). The system places your station in a queue for a
trunk in the least-expensive facility
group. When you hear a repeating signal
of three tones and a long pause (and display shows GRP #XX [or group name] IS
NOW AVAILABLE), lift the handset;
keyset users must also press the fast flashingcallkeyorindividualtrunkkey(orthe
ANSWER key). You hear dial tone and
digits being dialed. The associated individual trunk or call key flashes slowly.
NOTE: Ifrequired, enter a forced account code.
(Display keysets show ACCIX) You hear a
progress tone when the code is accepted. Ifyour
enter your ckss-of-service account c* your
usual SCOS will be enabled for this call.
(3)
Dial the telephone number. Use the MUTE key
to backspace if you make a mistake. Include the
area code, if needed. If ah+& press the pound
(#) or asterisk (*) key after dialing to immediately proceed; otherwise there is a slight delay. You
hear one of the following signals.
NOTE: When dialing 911 or 1911 emergency
numbers, always press #or * after dialing so that
the call is processed as quickly as possible.
a . Single program tone (followed by dial tone
and digits being dialed, if programmed
Page 4-63
C.
Repeating -order tones: You are restricted
from the number dialed or from using the
route selected. If your call has been blocked
because the weekly toll limit has been exceeded, the display shows CALL FATLED ‘K&L LIh4lT EXCEEDED.
lNTER-TELPRAcTIcES
IM.X/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
B.
RECEIVING OUTSIDE CALLS
C.
13A loREc~ANoulsmEcALL:
Keysetz
(1) When one of the following occurs, lift the handset
a . Repeating long tones and a call key or indi-
KEYSET ON-HOOK DIALING AND
MONITORING
7 x.,-/
.i
../.i
13.6 A keyset user can dial numbers while on hook,
monitor the call (listen to a recorded message, wait for
the call to be answered, or wait on hold), and then speak
handsfree when answered.
vidual tmnkkey is flashing at the fast ratez
A call is ringing in. (Display keysets show
CALLRJNGINGINONGRP#IXX[~~~T~~~
name].)
b. Intercom call or page annonncinga call
13.7
(1)
andacaUkeyorindividualtmnkkeyis
fb.&ingatthe&stratezAcallhasbeen
transferred to your station. (Display keysets
the fast-flashing individual trunk key as described below or enter the Automatic Trunk
Answer feature code (350). me ANSWER
key cannot be used to answer these calls.)
Skip step 2.
(2) Press the fast-flashing individual trunk or call
key or press the ANSWER key. The individual
trunk or call key flashes slowly during the call.
Single-Lime Set:
access code (9,89 or 801434’7). The SPKR key
(2)
Begin dialing the telephone number before the
Trunk Pre-Select timer expires. Then press the
pound (#I) or asterisk (*) key to signal the system
to begin sending the dialed digits, or wait for the
Short Interdigit timer to expire. (Display keysets
show number dialed, after the Valid Call timer
expires, it shows elapsed time and call cost.)
(3)
To ose the speakerphone: Speak handsfree
when the party answers.
To use the handset for privacy: Lift the handset
If you hear a page announcing a transfer and/or
nqeazing Zong tonq a call is ringing in. Lift the
handset; you are connected to the caller.
If you hear a call ringing in on another station
and you have allowed answe5 lift the handset
and enter the Automatic Trunk Answer feature
code (350). You are connected to the lowestnumbered trunk riuging in for which you have allowed answer.
While on hook, press an available individual
trunk key or trunk group key, the OUTGOING
key, or the ANSWER key. Or, enter a trunk
lights, you hear outside dial tone (unless using
LCR), and the associated call key or individual
trunk key flashes slowly.
show GRP #XX [or group name] TRANSFER FROM EX XXX [or user name].)
c . An individual trunk key is flashing at the
fast rate, there is no ring signal, and you
have allowed answer for the trunk. You
may hear ringing on another keyset: Press
lODL4.LONHOOK:
and speak. The SPKR key goes off. You may later transfer back to the speakerphone by pressing
the SPKR key and hanging up.
(4)
138
To terminate the call: Ifon hook-, disconnect by
pressing the SPKR key. If off Iwok hang up.
To USE ON-HOOKMOh?lTOR:
(1)
While on a call, press the SPKR key and hang up.
Ifyou do not wanf to be head press the MUTE
key or press SPCL and enter the Microphone
Mute On/Off feature code (314). You can hear
the other party (if the microphone is muted, you
cannot be heard). The SPKR key is lit (and the
MUTE key is lit if the microphone was muted).
(2)
To return to the conversation: You may lift the
handset or speak handsfree. (If the microphone
was muted, press the lit MUTE, key to speak. The
MUTE key goes off.)
When you hear a page announcing that an outside call is
holding at your station (a call key or individual trunk key
is fluttering):
Keyset: Lift the handset and press the fluttering
call key or individual trunk key, or press the
ANSWER key. You are connected to the caller.
Single-Lime Set: Lift the handset and press the
HOLD key or enter the Individual Hold feature
code (336). You are connected to the caller.
Page 4-64
‘*,
,:
INTER-TKLPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INS~TION & MAINTENANCE
l?Emums
Issue 1, November 1994
D. TBUNKCAMPONANDBUSYTRUNK
CALLBACK (QUEUE)
the QUE key (or press the SPCL key and enter
the Queue Request feature code - 6) and hang
UP.
camp On
Single-Line Set: When you hear a busy signal
13.9
When a station user attempts to access a busy
outgoing trunk or trunk group, the system sends a busy
signal. The station user can wait off hook to camp on until the trunk is available.
while selecting a trunk or if you are camped on,
press the ESLS QUE key; or press the FLASH
key (hookflash) and enter the Queue Request
feature code (6). Hang up.
13.10 TOf2bfPONlDANOUTGOINGlRU..GROUl?:
(1)
When you hear a busy signal after selecting an
outgoing trunk, do not hang up. You camp on and
hear music until a truuk in the trunk group is
available.
(2)
When you hear a single progress tone and outside
dial tone, dial the desired telephone number. The
associated call key or individual trunk key
flashes slowly.
(2)
Your station rings (a repeating signal of three
tones and a long pause) when the queued trunk is
available. (Display keysets show GRF’ #XX [or
group name] IS NOW AVAILABLE.)
(3)
Keyset: Lift the handset, press the fast-flashing
call key, individual trunk key, or the ANSWER
key, and dial the desired telephone number. The
associated call key or individual trunk key
flashes slowly. If LCR was used when the call
was placed originally, the number is dialed automatically.
Busy Thmk Callback (Queue)
13.ll If you attempt to access a busy outgoing trunk
group and hear a busy signal or if you camp on, you can
request a callback (queue) and hang up until the system
signals your station that a trunk in the trunk group is
available. Each station can place only one queue request
at a time. If a second request is made, the first request is
cancelled and replaced by the second request.
13.12 Queue callbacks must be answered before the
Queue Callback timer expires. If a callback is not answered, the queue is cancelled. If the station is busy
when a trunk in the queued trunk group becomes available, the queue request is placed at the end of the queue
list.
13.13
(1)
To QUEUE A BUSYOUTWING
Single-Line Set: Lift the handset and dial the desired number. If all DTMF decoders are busy
when your station is called back, the system
sends repeating reorder tones instead of dial tone
and the queue is cancelled. If LCR was used
when the call was placed originally, the number
is dialed automatically.
13.14
TRUNK:
Keyset: When you hear a busy signal while
selecting a trunk or if you are camped on, press
Page 4-65
To CANCEL A QUEUE BEFORE THE CALLBACK-
Keyset: While on hook, press the QUE key (or
press the SPCL key and enter the Cancel Queue
Request feature code - 376).
Single-Line Set: Lift the handset. Press the
ESLS QIE key or enter the Cancel Queue Request feature code (376). Hang up.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INS’lYALIATlON & MAINTENANCE
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
E. ACCOUNT CODES
then check the station circuit that is associated with
that account code and apply the appropriate SCOS
(itwillnotapplythetrunkaccesspermissionorLCR
advance class of service). The class-of-service
account code can be entered when the system
requests a forced account code (as described in paragraph 13.2 on page 4-62) or by using the Optional
Account Code feature code (described below). The
SCOS is enabled for one call only. When the call is
completed, the station’s normal SCOS goes back
into effect.
13.15 There are four types of account codes in the 256
System. All account codes are assigned the same character length (4-S characters) in database programming.
The three types are as follows:
0
Standard account codes automatically appear in
the Sh4DR report (if programmed) to identify the
station that answered or initiated the call. Up to 128
standard account codes can be defined for the
system. Stations can then be assigned one of the 128
account codes during station programming.
0
0
I
Forced account codes are programmed
on a
station-by-station basis. If required, a forced account code must be entered before the station user is
given access to a selected outgoing trunk group
(refer to page 4-62, step 3 for procedures). Up to 256
forced account codes can be assigned in the database
programming. The account code entered by the
station user must match any one of the programmed
forced account codes before trunk access is granted.
The forced account code appears in the SMDR
account code field.
Forced account codes for toll calls only can be pro-
grammed for stations with LCR-Only toll restriction
in day und night modes. When this account code
type is enabled, the user only has to enter an account
code if the system detects that a toll call has been
dialed when LCR is used.
0
0
Optional account codes are used to identify calls to
and from customers for billing purposes. They can
be entered at any time during a call. These userdefined codes are not preprogrammed, but must be the
same length as the standard and forced account
codes. If entered, optional account codes are printed
in the SMDR/SMDA report for that call in place of
standard or forced codes that may have been used.
13.16 Forced account codes can be validated or
non-validated.
l
Validated: If the entered code matches one of the
pre-programmed forced account codes in the database, the call is allowed. If the code does not match,
the call is blocked.
l
Non-Validated: The code is not checked against any
lists and the call is allowed as soon as the code is entered.
I
13.17 l0 ENTER
ANOUISIDECALL:
(1)
AN OPlIONAL
ACCOUNT CODE WtIILE
ON
Keyset: Press the SPCL key and enter the Optional Account Code feature code (390). (Display keysets show ACCT#.) The outside party
does not hear you enter the code.
Single-Line Set: Press FLASH and enter the Optional Account Code feature code (390). The
outside party hears music until step 2 is completed.
(2)
Class-of-service account codes: If the system-wide
class-of-service account code option is enabled, individual stations can be assigned account codes that
the users can enter at other stations to enable their
usual SCOS. When a user is at a station other than his
own, he can enter the class of service a-urn code
before placing an outgoing call. The system will
Page 4-66
Enter the account code using the keypad; keyset
users may press an SD key to enter an account
code number that has been stored in an outside
speed-dial number location. (Display keysets
show numbers.) You hear a single progress tone
when the code is accepted. Single-line users are
reconnected when the system accepts the account code. (If an account code is entered that
has fewer than the programmed number of
digits, single-line users will return to the call
after the Short Interdigit timer expires. Keyset
users will hear reorder tones. The code will not
appear in the Sh4DR)
FEATmm3
Issue 1, November 1994
JNTER-TELPBACTICES
IMXGMX 256 INSTALLATION 81 MAINTENANCE
14. PLACING CALLS ON HOLD
A
14.1
14.3 To PL4CE AN INlZRCOM OR OVlSLDE CALL O N
IivDMmJAL HOLD:
There are several ways to place intercom and
outside calls on hold. While on hold, the caller hears
music (if equipped). There are five hold applications in
the 256 System:
(1)
Individual hold places the call on hold at one sta-
tion. It can then be picked up directly at that station
or it can be picked up at another station using the Reverse Transfer feature.
System hold places the call on hold so that it can
then be picked up directly at any keyset station that
has an individual trunk key for the associated trunk
or at the station that placed it on hold using the individual trunk key or call key. (Single-line set users
cannot place calls on system hold or pickup calls already on system hold.) Attempting to place a conference on system hold will place the caller(s) on individual hold. Intercom calls cannot be placed on
system hold.
Consultation hold allows a single-line set user to
pause during a call, use other system features, and
then return to the caller by pressing the FLASH key
(hookflashing). If a single-line set user attempts to
hang up after placing a call on consultation hold, the
call recalls the station.
SLI:PresstheFLASHkey(hooknash).Pressthe
HOLD key or enter the Individual Hold feature
code (336). You hear intercom dial tone.
Other Single-Line Sets: Hookflash and enter
the Individual Hold feature code (336). You hear
intercom dial tone.
(2)
Hang up or place another call.
14.4
Keyset: Lift the handset. Ress the fluttering IC
key for intercom calls, or press the fluttering call
key or individual trunk key (or the ANSWER
key) for outside calls.
Single-Lime Set: Lift the handset and press the
HOLD key or enter the Individual Hold feature
Skate-to-hold, if enabled in the database, allows
14.2 If an outside call remains on hold until the Hold
timer expires, it recalls the station. If it is still unanswered when the Recall timer expires, it recalls the station’s attendant. If the attendant does not answer the recall before the Abandoned Call timer expires, the call is
disconnected by the system. (If the station does not have
an attendant, or the system is in night mode, the call recalls the station that placed it on hold until the Abandoned Call timer expires and the call is disconnected.)
Intercom calls do not recall the attendant.
While on the call:
Keys& Ress the HOLD key (or press the SFCL
key and enter the Individual Hold feature code
- 336). You hear intercom dial tone and the call
key, individual trunk key, or IC key flutters.
NOTE: If the system is programmed with the
skate-to-hold option, pressing another key will
place the call on hold.
KSLS: Press the HOLD key. You hear intercom
dial tone.
Call splitting allows a station user to place two or
more calls on individual hold and then easily split
between the calls.
keyset users to place calls on individual hold when
another key is pressed during a call (instead of pressing the HOLD key). When the system is in the default state, pressing another key disconnects calls
(skate-todiscomtei.
INDIVIDUALHOLD
code (336).
B. SYSTJZM HOLD
NOTE: Intercom calls cannot be placed on system hold.
If you attempt to do so, you will hear reorder tones.
145
ToPLACEANOUlSDECXLLON.SXXEbfHOLD:
(1)
While on a call, press the SPCL key and enter the
System Hold feature code (335). You hear intercom dial tone and the associated call key or individual trunk key flutters.
(2)
Hang up or place another call.
14.6
NOTE: Keyset users can avoid the Hold timer by
muting the microphone during a call instead of placing
the call on hold. If this is done, the caller will not hear
music-on-hold and will not recall the station.
Page 4-67
At any keyset that shows a fluttering individual
trunk key for the call or at the station that placed
the call on hold that shows a fluttering individual
trunk or call key, lift the handset and press the
fluttering key.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
lMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION % MAINTENANCE
FEA-
Issue 1, November 1994
C. CONSIJLTATION
14.7
HOLD
To U S E C O N S - O N H O W
(SINGLE-Llm
SETS
ONiyk
(1)
(2)
(3)
D .
code (337). That call is placed on hold and you
are connected to the first call that was placed on
hold in the first step.
While on a call, press the PLASH key (hookflash) to place the call on uxrsultation hold. You
hear two short tones followed by dial tone.
You can call another station or enter a feature
code. If you attempt to access an outgoing trunk,
you will hear reorder tones.
NOTE: If you hang up while the call is on consultation hold, the call will immediately recall
your station. If you hang up after dialing an
extension number, the call will transfer to that
station.
Return to the caller on hold by pressing the
FLASH key (hookflashing).
(3)
Press the FLASH key (hookflash) and enter the
Call Splitting feature code (337) every time you
wish to be connected to the next holding call.
The current call returns to the end of the list.
After pressing the PLASH key, wait at least 2 seconds before pressing it again.
(4
Hang up to disconnect the current call and cancel
call splitting. You can then place or receive calls
or return to any remaining calls on hold by lifting
the handset and pressing the HOLD key (or entering the Individual Hold feature code - 336).
E. HOLDRECALL
14.10
CALLSPLITI’ING
To Ah’SlWR
AHOW
RECALL
When you hear a repeating signal of four tones
and a pause (display shows HOLD RECALL
PROM RX XXX [or user name] or GP #XX [or
group name]), lift the handset. Single-line sets
are automatically connected; keyset users may
need to press the flashing call or individual trunk
key.
NOTE: The feature code named Keyset Call Splitting
(338) is used only in the Call Transfer feature. To split
between calls on individual hold, use the following procedure. Refer to the call transfer instructions on page
4-70.
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
14.9
(1)
When two or more calls are on hold, access the
first call on hold by pressing the fluttering call
key, individual trunk key, or IC key.
If the system is programmed to place calls on
hold when another key is pressed, skip this step.
Place the call back on hold by pressing the
HOLD key (or pressing the SPCL key and entering the Individual Hold feature code - 336).
You hear intercom dial tone and the key flutters
again.
Acuss the next call by pressing another fluttering call key, individual trunk key, or the IC key.
Steps 2 and 3 can be repeated as desired.
SiWGLE-L&E
SET CALL SPLlllTNG:
Place one or more calls on hold:
ESLS: Press the HOLD key for each call.
While on the last call, go to the next step.
SLI and Other Single-Lime Sets: Press the
(2)
FLASH key (hookflash). Then press the
HOLD key or enter the Individual Hold feature code (336) for each call. While on the
last call, go to the next step.
While on the last call, when you are ready to split
between calls on hold, press the FLASH key
(hookflash) and enter the Call Splitting feature
F’. MICROPHONE MUTE
143 Whether handsfree or using the handset, you
can temporarily turn off your microphone while on a
call. The call is still connected; you can hear the other
party, but they cannot hear you. Since the call is not
placed on hold, no timer is activated. The MUTE key is
lit when the microphone is muted; the light will go off
when you press the MUTF, key to re-enable the microphone.
14.12 If you press the MUTE key while speaking to an
off-hook voice announce caller on the speakerphone,
the handset microphone will be muted and the caller on
the handset will not hear the OHVA call. When you
press MUTE again, the handset microphone is re-enabled.
14.13
hiUlWG l7fE KEYSh’TbflCROPIiOhE
(1)
To temporarily turn off your microphone while
on a call, press the MUTE key (or press SPCL
and enter the Microphone Mute On/Off feature
code [314]). The MUTE key is lit. Zf off hook do
not hang up (unless you press the SPKR key
first).
(2)
Press the lit MUTE key or enter the feature code
to turn the microphone on. The MUTE key goes
Page 4-68
Off.
?
i
JNTER-TELPRACIICES
IMX/GMX256 IN!3TALLATION % MAINTENANCE
15. CALL WAITING
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
(1)
15.1 While a station is in use, incoming intercom and
outside calls camp on until the busy station is available.
The busy party hears a single camp-on tone every 15 seconds (unless the Camp-On Tone timer is changed or
camp on tones are disabled at the station). Three station
prqgmmmiq~ flags allow camp-on tones to be enabled
or disabled for incoming intercom and outside calls,
E&M calls, and/or DID calls.
15.2
(1)
If you wish to place the current call on ho4 do
the following. You will be connected with the
waiting caller.
ESLS: Press the HOLD key. You are connected with the waiting caller.
SLI and Other Single-Line Sets: Ress the
FLASH key (hookflash), Then the HOLD
key or enter the Individual Hold feature code
(336). You are connected with the waiting
caller.
TORESR2~TOAW~GCUSLNGAKEKShX:
If, while on a call, you hear a single camp-on tone and
see the IC key or a call key or individual trunk key flashing fast, you have a call waiting. (Display keysets show
CALL RINGING IN ON GRP ##XX [or group name] or
INTERCOM CALL FROM EX XXX [or user name] or
F.X XXX [or user name] TRANSFER FROM EX Xxx
[or user name] or XXX RECALL FROM XXX each
time you hear the tone.) Do one of the following:
(2)
To return to the first call on hold:
If you wish to end the cum call, hang up. Return to the holding call by lifting the handset and
pressing the HOLD key or entering the Individual Hold feature code (336).
If you wish toplace the cummt call on hold and
connect with the original call:
If you wish to end the cumznt call, hang up. A
waiting outside call rings as an incoming call; an
intercom call rings as a private call. Answer as
usual.
(2)
If you wish to end the current call, hang up. The
call rings at your station. Lift the handset.
ESLS: Press the HOLD key twice.
SLI and Other Single-Lime Sets: Ress the
FLASH key (hookflash). Then the HOLD
key or enter the Individual Hold feature code
(336) twice.
Ifyou wish toplace the current call on ho& press
the HOLD key (or press the SFCL key and enter
the Individual Hold feature code - 336). The
call or individual trunk key or IC key flutters (unless an intercom call is camped on; the IC key
flashes fast until the camped on call is picked up,
then the IC key flutters). Access the waiting call
by pressing the flashing call or individual trunk
key or IC key.
15.4 To MOVE A CQMPED-ON INTERCOM CALL TO
DO-NOT-DISTURB:
To return to the holdii call: Press the flutter-
Disturb feature code (370 or 372). The DND key
lights. The intercom caller is no longer camped
on and receives do-not-disturb indications.
While on a call, you hear call waiting signals:
ing individual trunk key, call key, or IC key.
15.3 IVRES~NDTOACALL
SET..
WAITWGUSLVGAS
When you hear a single camp-on tone every 15 seconds
while you are on a call, another call is waiting. Do one of
the following.
Page 4-69
Keyset: Ress the DND key or enter a Do-Not-
Single-Line Set: Press the FLASH key (hookflash) and enter a Do-Not-Disturb feature code
(370 or 372). The intercom caller is no longer
camped on and receives do-not-disturb indications. Ress the FLASH key (hookflash) again to
return to the current call.
INTEK-TKLPRACTICES
IMWGMX 256 INSTALLAT.tON & MAINTENANCE
16. CALL TRANSFER
For an outside call, press the call key or individual trunk key.
16.1 There are several feature codes for transferring
intercom and outside calls to other stations or to outside
telephone numbers. The call transfer options are as follows:
b. ‘hnsfer to voice mail: You hear a single
tone and the system waits for you to enter the
mailbox number (display shows ENTER
VOICE MAILBOX #). Enter the desired
mailbox number.
0 Tkansfer CO call: You can transfer outside calls to
another station or to an outside telephone number.
If you do not enter a mailbox number befoE
you hang up, the caller will be connected to
the voice mail unit and must enter the mailbox number after listening to the introductory voice prompts.
0 lhnsfer intercom call: Intercom calls can be transferred to another station or to an outside telephone
number.
0 Wansfer to hold: Either intercom or outside calls
can be transferred to another station and placed on
hold using this feature.
If the system is checking for a valid mailbox
number and you enter a valid m&box number; the transfer is completed to voice mail
(display shows CALL TRANSFERRED To
VOICE MAIL).
16.2 In addition, transfer-to-park locations can be set
up by the installer. A transfer-to-park location is a station circuit with an extension number that is not
equipped with a station instrument. Calls can be transferred to these locations and then reverse transferred by
any station user. If all station circuits are equipped, you
camtot assign a transfer-to-park location.
A .
TRANSFEKTOANKKTENSIONNUMBER
16.3
TOlRANSFERACXLLTOAN,5XlENSIONNU..ER:
Keys&
If on an outside cay press the XFR key (or press
the SPCL key and enter the Transfer CO Call feature code - 345). You hear intercom dial tone.
(1)
If the system is checking for a valid mailbox
number and the number you entered is invalici, you hear reorder tones (display shows INVALID MAILBOX NUMBER ENTERED)
and you must enter the correct number.
If the system is not checking for a validmailbox rwmbex hang up to complete the transfer.
C.
fer-to-park location, hang up to complete the
transfer, or transfer the call to hold as described in the second part of step 5. Then
page the desired party and anuounce the call.
The party must reverse transfer the call. Note
that if the call is not answered, it will recall
your station if transferred directly or will recall the called transfer-to-park location’s
attendant if transferred to hold.
If on an intercom call, press the SFCL key and
enter the Transfer Intercom Call feature code
(346). You hear intercom dial tone.
Single-Lie Set: While on a call, press the
FLASH key (hookflash). You hear two short
tones followed by intercom dial tone.
(2)
Dial the desired extension number or press a
SPD/BLF key. The number can be a station extension number, 0 for the attendant, a hunt group
pilot number, the voice mail system access number, or a transfer-to-park location number.
a. lkansfer to a station that is forwarded to
voice mail: You hear repeating double tones
and the display shows DEST FORWARDED
To VOICE MAIL. You can then hang up to
complete the transfer, or return to the caller
on transfer hold by doing one of the following:
lhnsfer-to-park If transferring to a trans-
d . mnsfer to a hunt group: If transferring the
call to a hunt group, the transfer is automatically completed when you dial the pilot number. Hang up.
(3)
For an outside or intercom call, Fess the
XFR key twice (or press the SPCL key once
and enter theTransfer Call feature code [345]
t w i c e ) .
Page 4-70
If [email protected] wait for an answer and announce the
call. One of the following occurs:
a . If the call is accept& go to the next step.
b . If the call is reficsecl, return to the caller:
Keyset: Do one of the following:
For an outsiak or intenzom call, press the
XFR key twice (or press the SPCL key
once and enter the Transfer Call feature
code [345] twice).
For an outside call, press the call key or
individual trunk key.
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MMNTJDIANCE
Single-Line Set: press the FLASH key
@ookflash) once to disconnect the call (or
wait for the other party to hang up). Then
press the PLASH key again (hookflash) to return to the caller on transfer hold.
c. If the station is busy or then? is no answer:
To return to the caller: Refer to step b
above.
To try another station: press the XFR key
(or press the SPCL key and enter the Transfer
CO feature code -345, or the Transfer Intercom feature code - 346) and dial another
extension number.
B.
16.4 Acalltransferred to hold at a station does not ring
or send a display message while holding. After the Hold
timer expires, the station rings or sends call waiting signals. Also, calls transferred to hold do not recall the
transferring party; they recall the receiving party’s
attendant if unanswered after the Hold and Recall timers
expire. Besides the Procedure listed below, keyset users
have an alternative method for transferring calls to hold;
refer to step 5 in the Previous procedure.
l&5
0)
(KEYSETS 0NL.v If it becomes necessary to
@it between the called party and the caller
waiting to be tran$& you may use the Keyset Call Splitting feature code as follows:
a . Press the SPCL key and enter the Keyset Call
Splitting feature code (338). The station
waiting to receive the transfer is placed on
hold and you are comtected to the party waiting to be transferred.
(3)
If desireri, wait for an answer and announce the
call.
(4)
Hang up to complete the transfer.
16.6
To transfer the call to hold, then make a page
(KEYSETS ONLY): Ress the PAGE key. The
call will automatically be transferred to hold at
the called station and you will be connected to
the paging network. Enter the desired paging
zone code and make your announcement before
the Paging timer exPires.
TOPICKUPAG4LLlX4TW~llUNSi?ERRWTOHOLk-
If a call was transferred to hold at your station:
Keyset: When your IC key or a call key or individual trunk key is fluttering, lift the handset and
press the fluttering key (or the ANSWER key for
an outside call). You are conuected to the caller.
Single-Line Set: Lift the handset and press the
HOLD key or enter the individual Hold feature
code (336). You are connected to the call.
(5) To disconnect and complete the transfer:
ONLY): Ress the HOLD key (or press the SPCL
key and enter the Individual Hold feature code
- 336) to place the call on hold at the called station. The call will not ring or send call waiting
signals until the Hold timer expires.
enter the Transfer To Hold feature code (347).
Dial the desired extension number.
c . Hang up to complete the transfer.
To transfer the call to hold (KEYSETS
Keyset: While on a call, press the SPCL key and
(2)
b. Press the SPCL key and enter 338 again to
speak to the station user waiting to receive
the transfer and place the party to be transferred on hold.
Hang up, press another call key, or press the IC
key to complete the transfer. The call will ring at
the station. (Receiving station’s display shows
XXX TRANSFER PROM XXX or GRP #XX
TRANSFER FROM XXX.) If the station is busy,
the call camps on and sends call waiting signals.
lVllUNS~ACAUlOHOLV:
Single-Line Set: While on a call, press the
PLASH key (hookflash) and enter the Transfer
To Hold feature code (347).
To complete the transfer: Skip to step 5.
Then page the party to amtounce the transfer.
(4)
TRANSFER TO HOLD
c .
TR4NsFERREcALLs
16.7 If an outside call is transferred to another station
and is not answered before the Transfer-Available or
Transfer-busy timer expires (and if it was not transferred
to hold), the call recalls the transferring station and rings
until the Recall timer expires. If still unanswered after
the Recall timer expires, it recalls the transferring
party’s attendant. If the attendant does not answer before the Abandoned Call timer expires, the call is disconnected by the system. If the transferring station has
no attendant, the call recalls at the transferring station
until the Recall and Abandoned Call timers expire and
the call is disconnected by the system. Transferred intercom calls will not recall the transferring station or the
attendant.
1 6 . 8 TOANSEERAlXANSFERREChLL:
Page 4-71
Keyset: If you hear a repeating signal of four
tones and a pause (display shows GRP #XX [or
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSlALLATION& MAINTENANCE
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
groupname]lWXLLPROMHXXXX[oruser
name]), lift the handset. Press the medium-flashing call key or individual trunk key, or press the
ANSWER key if the call is not automatically
connected.
While on an intenzom ca11, press the SPCL
key and enter the Transfer Intercom Call feature code (346).
Single-Line Seti While on a call, Press the
FLASH key (hookflash) and enter the Transfer
CO Call feature code (345) or the Transfer Intercom Call feature code (346).
Single-Line Set: If you hear a repeating signal of
four tones and a pause, lift the handset. You are
immediately connected.
D.
(2)
TRANSF’ERTOANOUTSIDENUMBRR
OR E&M DESTINATION
NOTE: There may be some reduction in voice volume
when an outside call is transferred to an outside telephone number depending on the quality of the trunks beingused.
16.9 When a loop start trunk is being used by either
outside party, the duration of an outside call that is transferred to outside telephone numbers is limited by the
Unsupervised CO timer. When this timer expires, the
outside parties hear a burst of dial tone. They may then
press any MMF key (before the SL Set Dial Initiation
timer expires) to reset the timer. Ifthe timer is not reset,
the unsupervised call recalls the primary attendant. If
the attendant does not answer the recall before the
Abandoned Call timer expires, the call is disconnected
by the system.
Keyset: Press the fluttering call key or individu-
al trunk key for an outside call; for an outside or
intercom call, press the Xl% key twice (or press
the SPCL key once and enter the Transfer Call
feature code [345] twice).
Single-Line Set: Press the FLASH key (hookflash) twice.
(3)
NOTE: While this system is designed to be reasonably
secure against CO trunk misuse by outside callers, there
is no implied warranty that it is invulnerable to unauthorized intrusions. Ifthe central office does not provide supervision and disconnect the call when one party hangs
up, it is possible for a caller to remain connected to a CO
trunk circuit. If this happens, and the caller begins dialing, the call could be placed through the 256 System and
would then be billed to the system’s owner. The system
cannot check this type of call for toll restriction and may
not register the call in SMDR This problem could arise
when a call is connected to a station, when a call is in an
unsupervised conference, when a call is forwarded or
transferred to the public network, or when DISA is used
for placing outgoing calls.
16.10
TO TRANaSFER
Select an outgoing trunk group or E&M trunk
group, and continue to the next step. If you hear a
busy signal, select another trunk group or camp
on and wait for a trunk. or, return to the caller as
follows:
A CALL TO AN OUlXWE lELEPHOh?E
NUAUBM:
Zfusing an outgoing truk Dial the desired telephone number.
Zf using an E&U trunk Do one of the following:
Zf you hear ringing wait for the other telephone system to answer. Depending on how
the call is answered, ask to be transferred to
the desired station or outside telephone number or dial the extension number or trunk access code.
Zf you hear dial tone and wish to transfer the
call to an extension number on the other telephone system, dial the desired extension
number.
Zf you hear dial tone and wish to transfer the
call to an outside telephone number, dial the
other telephone system’s trunk access code
and the desired telephone number.
One of the following occurs:
a. Zf an.swe& announce the call. Hang up,
press another call key or individual trunk key,
or press the IC key to complete the transfer.
b. Zfthenumberisbusyorthe~isnoanswqreturn to the caller as described in step 2.
( 1 ) Keyset:
while on an outside cult press the XEX key.
Or press the SPCL key and enter the Transfer
CO Call feature code (345).
Page 4-72
c. Zf you hear wpeating reorder tones; you
dialed a restricted telephone number. Return
to the caller as described in step 2.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & lMMNTRNANCE
Issue 1, Novfz
17. REVERSE TRANSFER AND GROUP
CALL PIcKalP
17.1 Calls ringing or recalling at a station, a hunt
group, or a transfer-to-park location can be picked up at
any other station, using these features. Calls on hold can
also be picked up from stations and from transfer-topark locations.
A.
1. Outside calls
a. direct ring-in calls
b. transferred and camped-on calls
c. recalls
d. calls on individual hold
Press the XFR key (or press the SFCL key and
enter the Transfer CO Call feature code - 345).
(3)
Ifthe system is notprogramnd to automatically
connect reverse transfbwdcalls, press the flashing or fluttering call, individual trunk, or IC key.
(For outside calls that are ringing or holding, the
ANSWER key may be used instead.)
Ii.
GROUP CALL PICK-UP
17.5 A call ringing in to a hunt group or one of its stations can be picked up at any other station. Users can enter the Reverse Transfer feature code (4) and dial a hunt
group’s pilot number to pick up a call that is ringing in to
the hunt group’s pilot number or to any station within
that hunt group.
17.6 The system follows the priority list shown below
to determine which call is picked up. The system follows the hunt group list (always beginning with the first
station on the list) to check each station in the hunt group
and then the overflow station for one type of call at a
time. If there is more than one call of the same type at the
selected station, the call that was received by the station
first is picked up. Camped-on calls, holding calls, and
queue callbacks cannot be picked up.
2. Intercom calls
a. ringing calls (incoming, transferred, or
recalling)
b. holding calls
1 7 3 To RhTERSE
lRAhWER A CALL FROM A SZ4lTON OR
lHE lRAhWER-m---ON:
(2)
(2)
REVERSETRANSF’ER
17.2 If more than one call is ringing or holding at the
station, a priority list determines which call is reverse
transferred. Calls are selected in the following order,
and if more than one call of the same type is at the station, the calls are picked up in the order they were received:
(1)
sion number of the station where the call is ringing or holding.
Lift the handset and enter the Reverse Transfer
(Call Rick-Up) feature code (4). You hear a progress tone.
Dial the extension number of the station where
the call ia ringing or holding.
1. Ringing outside calls
a. direct ring-in calls
b. transferred calls
c. recalls
2 . Ringing intercom calls (incoming, transferred,
or recalling)
17.7
To PICKUPACALL
lFL4TISRLVGLUGATAHlLVl’
GROUP:
(3)
Keyset: If the system is not programmed for
direct connection of reverse tran#ened calls,
press the flashing call, individual trunk, or IC
key for a ringing call, or press the fluttering call,
individual trunk, or IC key for a call on hold. (For
outside calls that are ringing or holding, the
ANSWER key may be used instead.)
Single-Line Set: You are automatically connected to the caller.
(1)
NOTE: This feature cannot be performed using the
XFR key.
(1)
Lift the handset and enter the Reverse Transfer
feature code (4). You hear a single progress tone.
(2)
Dialthepilotnumberofthehuntgroupwherethe
call is ringing.
(3)
Keysek If the system is programmed for direct
connection of reverse transfer& callq you are
immediately connected.lf mc, press the flashing
call or individual trunk key or IC key.
To pick up a call that is ringing or holding at another station, lift the handset and dial the exten-
Page 4-73
Single-Line Set: You are automatically connected to the call.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INSTAUATION & MAINTENANCE
18. CALL PRIVACY AND PRIVACY
RELEASE
versation), a station user must remain on hook and press
the busy individual trunk key.
18.1
Call privacy restricts voice channel access to one
station at a time. When a voice channel is selected, no
other station user can gain access to the channel. However, access to and control of a channel can be passed to
another station using the Conference or Transfer features.
18.2
In addition, the database contains an installerprogrammable option that can be set to enable call privacy on all trunks or to allow keyset users to join an
ongoing call by pressing the lit individual trunk key (see
PROGRAMMING, page 5-54). Single-line set users
cannot join calls, but keyset users can join a call that
involves a single-line station. When the system is in the
default state, calls on all tnmks are private and any user
attempting to access a busy trunk will hear busy tones.
_--. .1
-I
,/
18.4 Even when privacy release is enabled systemwide, an individual station user can restore call privacy
during an outside call by entering the Private Call feature code or by placing the station in do-not-disturb.
(Note that the station must be placed in do-not-disturb
during the call to enable privacy; if do-not-disturb is enabled before the call, privacy is not enabled.) The call
then cannot be joined by other people unless the Conferencing feature is used. If the call is transferred or placed
on system hold, the Privacy Restore feature is canceled.
Privacy is retained if the call is put on individual hold.
18.5 There is a programmable option that enables or
disables a signal tone (barge congrmation tone) that is
heard by the parties on the call whenever another user
joins the call.
18.6
18.3
When the Privacy Release feature is enabled, any
keyset user may join an ongoing outside call by lifting
the handset (or pressing the SPKR key) and pressing the
lit individual trunk key (cannot use a call key or trunk
group key). Exceptions to this are established conterence calls, data calls, calls on individual hold, DISA
calls, and calls forced private by the user. If desired, as
many as seven stations can participate in one call. When
a station user hangs up, only that user is disconnected;
all other parties remain connected. (Par an explanation
of feature restrictions on multi-party calls, refer to the
conferencing section on page 4-76.) To queue or camp
on to a busy individual trunk (rather than join the con-
To RESTORE PRIEACYONA
NON-PRlWZE
lRUNKt
Keyset: While on an outside call, press the SPCL
key and enter the Private CO Call feature code
(369), or place the station in do-not-disturb by
pressing the DND key or pressing SPCL and
entering a Do-Not-Disturb feature code (370 or
372).
Single-Line: While on an outside call, press the
FLASH key (hookflash) and enter the Private
CO Call feature code (369), or place the station
in do-not-disturb by pressing the FLASH key
and entering a Do-Not-Disturb feature code (370
or 372).
‘I
Page 4-74
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
JNTER-TEL4PRACTIcEs
IMX/GMX256 lNS’JXLL4~ON & MAINTENANCE
19. BARGE (KEYSETS
ONLY)
19.1
lfthe Barge feature is enabled system-wide, keyset stations can be programmed (on a station-by-station
basis) to use the Barge feature. This permits the keyset
user to join an ongoing call by entering the Barge feature
code. Another option is available on a station-by-station
basis that prevents other stations from barging into calls
on the station.
19.2
Only keysets can use the Barge feature to join the
conversation of any station (keyset or single-line set) to
which the keyset user may make a call. The keyset user
may never barge into a station that he or she could not
othenvise call, such as a cross-tenant station when the
system does not allow cross-tenant traffic.
193 A hunt group supervisor may barge on any call
that it can monitor; this could conceivably be a station
that he or she could not otherwise call.
I
I
19.6 A barge call will be received as a conference with
the ongoing call if the secondary voice path is not available or the keyset user is on one of the following types of
Calls:
0 An intercom call.
0 A conference that does not exceed the maximum capacity of parties.
0 An outside call using the speakerphone or headset.
19.7 A barge cannot be completed on data calls or
calls on conference wait hold. Nor can a barge be completed if the conference resources or voice channels are
not available.
19.8 When a keyset party joins a conference call, the
parties in the ongoing call hear a single tone (barge confirmationtone). The call then continues as a conference.
19.9
19.4 Barge is not a&cted by do-not-disturb mode, the
call privacy and private call features, or ring intercom
always. If any of these are programmed on the receiving
station, barge will override them.
19.5 A barge call will be received through the secondary voice path as an off-hook voice announce call if the
station being called is an OWA-enabled digital keyset,
Ih4.X 12/24&e keyset, or DVK keyset and the user is
using the handset (using the speakerphone or a headset
would block the secondary voice path). Although it uses
the secondary voice path, barge cuu be used if OHVA is
not enabled system-tide; the receiving keyset does not
have to be programmed to receive OHMS
Page 4-75
TOJOXN(BARGE)ANONW~GCALLFlZOMA~:
If the nxeiving station does not have an available seconhy voicepath: When placing an intercom call or while monitoring a call, if you
hear busy signals press SPCL and enter the Barge
feature code (397). The parties in the ongoing
call hear a single tone and you are conferenced
with all parties.
If the receiving station has an available secondary voice path: When you hear busy signals
while placing an intercom call, press SPCL and
enter the Barge feature code (397). You are connected to the keyset user through the secondary
voice path (speakerphone) as if you were placing
an off-hook voice announce call.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
E~emher 1994
20. CONFERENCE CALLS
Conference feature code (5). The party is on conference wait hold (hears music).
20.1 Station users can establish a three- to eight-party
conference without operator assistance. A station user
can initiate one cotierence at a time and the system can
maintain up to 32 parties in conference calls of up to
eight parties each. In addition to the initiating station,
the conference can include any combination of up to
seven intercom and/or outside calls. The initiating station is considered one of the conferencing parties.
NOTE: If you hear a busy signal followed by
music, all conference resources are busy. Do one
of the following:
To wait for the resources: Remain off hook
until you hear intercom dial tone. Then place
the second call.
To return to the call:
20.2 If a conference is terminated using the Hold feature, the remaining callers hear music while they are
waiting. The station user must return to the callers one at
a time. If the Hold timer expires, the calls on hold recall
the station that placed them on hold in the order they
were placed. If still unanswered after the Recall timer
expires, they recall the station’s attendant.
203 While a conference call is in progress, the inside
parties cannot dial numbers, enter hookflashes, or use
the Call Transfer features. Also, if any inside party exits
the conference by pressing the CNP key, the remaining
inside parties may not use the conference wait or hold
features to exit or terminate the conference.
Keyset: Press the CNF key.
ESLS: Ress the HOLD key.
SLI or Other Single-Line Set: Ress the
FLASH key (hookflash) and press HOLD
or enter the Individual Hold feature code
- 336.
(2)
20.4 Unlike the call privacy release option (page
4-74) where station users can join an ongoing call by
lifting the handset and pressing a busy individual trunk
key, conferences are private and station users attempting to join an ongoing conference call by pressing a busy
individual trunk key will hear busy tones, and may camp
on to the trunk.
NOTE: During a conference, some reduction in voice
volume may be noticed, depending on CO trunk quality.
A.
20.5
(1)
PLACINGACONFERENCE CALL
To PIACE A CONFERENCE CALL:
While on a call:
Keysetz Press the CNP key. The party is on conference wait hold (hears music) and the CNP key
flutters. The call key is unlit, or the individual
trunk key is lit.
Single-Line Set: Press the ESLS CNF key, or
press the FLASH key (hookflash) and enter the
Page 4-76
Place intercom or outside calls to (or access existing calls with) the other parties to be included
in the conference and place them on conference
wait hold as described in the first step. Call keys
are unlit and individual trunk keys are lit.
If connecting the final party, the conference is
connected automatically when the CNP key is
pressed or when the conference feature code is
entered to connect the final party.
If the confewnce is to consist of fewer than the
ma.ximm llumber of parties:
Keyset: When all parties are on conference
wait hold, press the CNP key again. All parties are connected. (Display keysets show the
extension number or trunk identification of
up to four of the parties connected in the conference.) The CNP key flashes slowly; call
keys are unlit and individual trunk keys are
lit.
Single-Line Set: When all parties are on
conference wait hold, press the ESLS CNP
key, or press the FLASH key (hookflash) and
enter the Conference feature code (5). All
parties are connected.
-_ .:
.:1
lv!lAw
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-~PRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
B.
ADD PARTIES TO A CONFERENCE
C.
20.6
To ADD IMUlES To AN EXlSl7NG CONFERENCE (ANY
ItLSLDE R4Rl-Y):
NOTE: Only one party in the conference can perform
this prwedure at a time. This procedure cannot be performed if the maximum number of conference participants has been reached.
Keysetz
(1)
(2)
During the conference, press the CNP key. The
other parties remain connected. The CNP key
flutters.
20.7
0 End the conference by hanging up. The other parties
remain connected as long as one is a station (inside
party). Ifthere are no stations remaining, the conference is disconnected.
Place all parties on individual hold (refer to
paragraph 20.8). The conference is terminated. You
must return to the callers one at a time. To re-estab- lish the conference, repeat the procedures in paragraph 20.5.
l
NOTE: If a keyset user attempts to place a conference call on system hold, all parties will be placed on
individual hold. If a single-line set user attempts to
place the conference call on system hold, the user
hears reorder tones and the call continues.
l
voh& all of them are connected in a conference.
If fewer than the muximm allowed number of
parties areinvobed:
To connect all parties in a conference:
Press the CNP.key again.
To add another Party: Repeat steps 1 and 2
again.
Single-Lime Set:
(1)
During the conference, press the FLASH key
(hookflash). The other parties remain connected.
(2)
Place an intercom or outside call to (or access an
existing call with) the other party to be included
in the conference. Press the ESLS CNP key, or
press the FLASH key (hookflash) and enter the
Conference feature code (5).
There are several options for leaving the confer-
ence:
Place an intercom or outside call to (or access an
existing call with) the other party to be included
in the conference and press the CNP key.
Ifthema.ximumnumberofallowedpa&sa~in-
EXITING A CONFERENCE
Leave the conference and allow the outside parties
to remain connected (refer to paragraph 20.9). You
can return to the conference at any time.
NOTE: While this system is designed to be reasonably
secure against CO trunk misuse by outside callers, there
is no implied warranty that it is invulnerable to unauthorized intrusions. Ifthe central office does not provide supervision and disconnect the call when one party hangs
up, it is possible for a caller to remain connected to a CO
trunk circuit. If this happens, and the caller begins dialing, the call could be placed through the 256 System and
would then be billed to the system’s owner. The system
cannot check this type of call for toll restriction and may
not register the call in Sh4DR This problem could arise
when a call is connected to a station, when a call is in an
unsupervised conference, when a call is forwarded or
transferred to the public network, or when DISA is used
for placing outgoing calls.
20.8
(1)
Ifthemaximum nwnber ofallowedparties an5z in-
voh~& all of them are connected in a conference.
If faver than the maximum allowed number of
parties are invobed:
To connect all parties in a conference:
PresstheESLSCNPkey,orpressthePLASH
key (hookflash) and enter the Conference
feature code (5) again.
To add another party: Repeat steps 1 and 2
again.
Page 4-77
TO PlACE lHE OTHER PARllE ONHOLD:
During a conference call:
Keyset: Press the HOLD key (or press the SPCL
key and enter the Individual Hold feature code
- 336). The conference is terminated; the IC
and/or call or individual trunk keys flutter and
the CNP key goes off. The parties hear music
while waiting.
ESLS: Ress the HOLD key. The conference is
terminated and the parties hear music while
waiting.
!&I or Other Single-Lime Set: Ress the
FLASH key (hookfIash) and then press the
HOLD key or enter the Individual Hold feature
code - 336. The conference is terminated and
the parties hear music while waiting.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IM.X/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MATNTENANCE
(2)
Return to the parties one at a time:
NOTE: If all remaining parties are outside parties and the Conference Hold timer expires while
you are out of the conference, one of the parties
may reset the timer by pressing any IYI’MP key.
Ifthetimerisnotreset,thepartiesrecallyourstation. You hear recall tones (four tones and a
pause) and the CNP key flashes at the medium
rate (display shows CONFERENCE HOLD RRCALL). Press the CNF key to return to the conference. If the recall is not answered before the
recall and Abandoned Call timers expire, the
conference will be disconnected; it will not recall the attendant.
Keysetz Access one party by pressing the flutter-
ing call or individual trunk key or IC key. Then
you can place it on hold, disconnect it, or re-establish the conference (following the procedures
in paragraph 20.5). Repeat this step to access the
secondparty.
Siie-LineSet: Access one party by pressing
the ESLS HOLD key or by pressing the FLASH
(hookflash) key and then pressing the HOLD key
(or entering the Individual Hold feature code 336). Then you can place it on hold, disconnect
it, or reestablish the conference (following the
procedures in paragraph 20.5). Repeat this step
to access the second party.
Single-Line Set:
2 0 . 9 TOEY~T~CO
(1)
During the conference, press the PLASH key
(hookflash) and hang up.
NOTE: Only one party in the conference can perform
this procedure at a time.
(2)
To return to the conference: Lift the handset
h?FERWCEAh?VLEATGlHEOlHER
I?iRllESCOh!iVE~(ANy~E~:
Keyset:
(1)
During the conference, press the CNP key and
hang up. The CNP key flutters. The call keys are
unlit, but individual trunk keys remain lit to indicate the outside calls that remain in the conference. If a station remains connected in the conference, the IC key does not light to indicate that
a station is involved.
(2)
To return to the conference: Lift the handset
and press the CNP key again.
Page 4-78
and press the ESLS CNP key or enter the Conference feature code (5).
NOTE: If the Conference Hold timer expires
while you are out of the conference, one of the
outside parties may reset the timer by pressing
any MMF key. If the timer is not reset, the parties recall your station. You hear recall tones
(four tones and a pause). Lift the handset to
answer the recall. If the recall is not answered before the Recall and Abandoned Call timers expire, the conference will be disconnected; it will
not recall the attendant.
. .:.-:,
3
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
21. SYSTEM FORWARDING
l
21.1 System forwarding provides the ability to program the system so that calls ringing at a station will follow a database-programmed “forwarding path” that
routes the call based on the type of call and the status of
the intended station. (“Manual” Call Forwarding can
also be used at stations with system forwarding.) Several terms will be used to describe this feature, including:
l
- NoAnswer: Ifthe call is not answered at the principal station before the System Forwarding Initiate timer expires, the system advances the call to
the forwarding path.
- Busy: If the principal station is busy, the system
immediately advances the call to the forwarding
path. Both “No Answer” and “Busy” can be
selected together to form a “Not Available” status.
Principal Station: Original station being called.
0 Forwarding Point: A destination (station, voice
mail port, or hunt group) to which the call is directed
when the principal station is unavailable. Each forwarding path can contain up to four forwarding
points.
- Do Not L%sturb: If the principal station is in
do-not-disturb, the system immediately sends
the call to the forwarding path.
0 Forwarding Path: The sequence of forwarding
points to which the call will be sent. Forwarding
paths are programmed in the database. Up to ux)
unique paths can be programmed. Each station can
have up to three forwarding paths.
21.2
Two system timers are used with this feature:
0 System Forwarding Advance: When the forward-
ing point is a station, this timer determines how long
the call will ring (unanswered) before moving to the
next forwarding point. The default value is 15 seconds and the range is 2-255 seconds. (If the forwarding point is a hunt group, the hunt group Overflow timer is used.)
213 For each forwarding path assigned to the station,
the system checks the following three criteria to determine if and when a call should be forwarded:
l
- Immediate: The system immediately sends the
call to the forwarding path. The principal station
user cannot answer an immediately forwarded
call, but can reverse transfer it.
l
0 System Forwarding Initiate: This timer determines how long a call will ring (unanswered) at the
principal station before moving to the first forwarding point. The default value is 15 seconds and the
range is 2-255 seconds.
Type of incoming call: Up to seven different types
of calls can be programmed to be sent to the forwarding path. They are:
- Ringing outside calls
- Transferred outside calls
- Recalling outside calls
- DISA/automated attendant calls
- DID calls
- E&M calls
- Intercom calls
Station status: The systemrecognixes four different
types of station status.
Day-mode/night-mode status of the station’s
tenant group: The mode of a station’s tenant group
is used to determine if a forwarding path is taken. Either day mode, night mode, or both may be specified.
21.4 For example, during the day, the “principal” may
want direct ring-in or transferred calls to ring at his station. If he does not answer them, the calls would follow
the forwarding path to a forwarding point hunt group. If
the hunt group does not answer his calls, the calls would
continue on the forwarding path and go to his voice
mailbox (another forwarding point).
21.5 If the principal station is a keyset, the “ring principal on& option can be set that will signal the principal station when a call begins to follow the forwarding
path. The signal to the principal station consists of a display (xxxxxxxSENT TO FWD PAD-I) and a single
burst of ring tone. The call cannot be answered at the
principal station, but can be reverse transferred.
21.6 If a call rings in to multiple stations, and one or
more of those stations has system forwarding, the call
will not follow any of the forwarding paths.
21.7 If a principal station or a station forwarding point
is a member of a hunt group, calls placed to the hunt
group’s pilot number are unaffected by system forwarding. The hunt group calls will be received at the station
as usual and will not enter the system forwarding path.
Page 4-79
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 lNST4LL.4TION& MAINTENANCE
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
HanclsfmeAnnounce System Forward Option
21.ll
21.8
When the a call is transferred to the principal
station by another station user and the princi&al station%systemforwardiksetforthe %oanswer”station
[email protected], a system-wide option determines what the caller
hears. If the “handsfree announce system forward” option is enabled, the transferring station user will place a
handsfree call to the principal station and can amrounce
the transfer; the System Fonvaniing Initiate timer does
not start until the transfer is completed. (An exception to
this is if intercom calls are programmed to be sent to the
forwarding path, in which case the handsfree announce
option is overridden and the intercom call from the
transferring station enters the forwarding path.) If the
option is disabled, the intercom call from the transferring station automatically enters the forwarding path,
the station user hears ringing and can announce the call
only ifit is answered. Regardless of the option setting, if
the transfer is sent to a hunt group forwarding point, the
transfer will be completed automatically and the transferring station user will hear intercom dial tone. If the
transfer follows the system forward path to a voice mail
station, the transfer is completed immediately and the
principal station’s mailbox number is automatically
dialed.
Individual Station Forwarding Points
21.9 The ringing duration at each station forwarding
point is determined by the System Forwarding Advance
timer (defaults to 15 seconds). If the station forwarding
point is busy, the call will camp-on until the Forwarding
Advance timer expires and then it moves to the next forwarding point.
21.10 If the station forwarding point is in
do-not-disturb, the forwarding path will bypass that station and immediately send the call to the next forwarding point.
A station forwarding point can place calls or
transfer calls to the principal.
Hunt Group Forwarding Points
21.12
If a forwarding point is a hunt group, a call following the forwarding path will not be sent to the announcement station or ovefflow station; it will advance
to the next forwarding point if not answered before the
hunt group Overflow timer expires.
21.13 The ringing duration within hunt group forwarding points is determined by the No Answer Advance timer.
21.14 If all stations in a hunt group forwarding point
have Do-Not-Disturb or Hunt Croup Remove enabled,
the call will camp on until the Overflow timer expires.
The call will then be sent to the next forwarding point.
The call will not be sent to the hunt group’s overflow or
announcement station.
Call Forwardii And System Forwarding
21.15 A call follows only the forwarding path of the
principal, even if a forwarding point has call forward enabled or has a forwarding path of its own. The call that
originated at the principal station will follow only the
principal station’s forwarding path.
21.16 If the principal station has call forward enabled
(using the FWD key or one of the Call Forwarding feature codes), the call forward overrides system fonvarding*
21.17 If the principle station receives a manually forwarded call (not a system forward), that call will follow
the priucipal station’s system forwarding path.
21.18 Ifan infinite forward loop results from the combination of forwards and system forwarding paths, the
station that was originally intended to receive the call
will ring, even if the station is in do-not-disturb.
Page 4430
.-- .
-1
:\
,i
INTER-TEiLPRACmCEs
IMx/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Unanswered Calls
21.19 If a call that is following a system forwarding path is not answered or all forwarding points are in
do-not-disturb or busy, its final destination depends on the type of call as shown below.
TYPE OF
CALL
Intercom
ALL FWD POINTS ARE BUSY OR DO NOT
ANSWER
ALL FWD POINTS ARE IN DO-NOT-DISTURB
Rings at the last forwarding point until it is answered or the caller hangs up.
Call never leaves the principal station. Caller
hears do-not-disturb signals if immediate forwarding is enabled. If 1t0 answer or if busy is
enabled, caller hears ringing.
Direct ring-in Returns to the principal station and rings until
it is answered or the caller hangs up.
Transfer from Recalls the transferring station when the Sysa station
tern ForwardingAdvance timer expires at the
last forwarding point.
Transfer via
Recalls the automated attendant’s recall desautomated
tination when the System Forwarding Advance
attendant
timer expires at the last forwarding point.
Rings at the principal station until it is answered or the caller hangs up.
Recalls the transferring station when the System Forwarding Initiate timer expires.
Page 4-81
Recalls the automated attendant’s recall destination when the Systm Forwarding Initiate
timer exoires.
INTER-TELPRACTICE!J
lMX/GMX 256IIWhLLATION & MAINTENANCE
22. CALL FORWARDING
22.1
with call forwarding, a station user can route incoming intercom and outside calls (including direct
ring-in calls and DID calls) to another station, to a hunt
group, or to an outside telephone number, if allowed by
toll and trunk restrictions. The four forwarding options
iUC
Forward aU cak All incoming calls are immedi-
ately forwarded.
Forward if no answer: Incoming calls are
forwarded if they are not answered before the Forward No Answer timer expires.
Forward if busy: Incoming calls are immediately
forwarded if the station is busy.
Forward if no answer or busy: Incoming calls are
forwarded immediately if the station is busy, or forwarded if calls are not answered before the Forward
No Answer timer expires.
22.2 If forward all calls is enabled, display keysets
show the call forwarding status and destination until the
request is cancelled. If one of the conditional forwards is
enabled (no answer, busy, or no answer/busy), display
keysets show the forward status for five seconds and
then return to normal. If the station receiving the for-.wa&is,a display keyset, it shows XXX FORWARD
FROM EXXXX [or user name] for each forwarded call
received.
22.3 Station users can chain forwards from station to
station providing the forwards do not form a loop. The
conditional forward features (if busy, if no answer, if
busy/no answer) may form a loop that the system cannot
detect until a call is placed to the forwarding station. For
example, if two station users forward their calls to each
other using the forward if busy feature, the system accepts the requests. However, if a call rings in while both
stations are busy, the forwards create an illegal loop. In
this case, the call camps on to the called station.
22.4 If more than one station has ring in for a trunk
group, direct ring-in calls on that trunk group will forward to extension numbers, but not outside numbers or
voice mail ports. The display of the keyset receiving the
forwarded call will show it as a direct ring-in call, not as
a forwarded call, and the call or individual trunk key
flashes to show ring in. (The individual trunk key also
flashes on the keyset that is being forwarded.)
22.5 Calls cannot be forwarded to restricted outside
telephone numbers or stations in do-notdisturb. If the
station that is programmed to receive your forwarded
calls is later placed in do-not-disturb, intercom callers
will see the receiving station’s do-not-disturb
but the call will be forwarded.
display,
22.6 If your station is in do-not-disturb and you have
call forwarding programmed, the call is still forwarded.
If you enabled call forward no answer, intercom callers
will see the do-not-disturb display that you programmed
before the call is forwarded.
22.7
Call forwarding overrides system call forwardiug at the principal station.
22.8 Queue callbacks and recalls do not forward, except that a recall at an attendant’s station will forward to
another station.
FWD Key
22.9 Keyset users may program their FWD key with
any of the four options listed in paragraph 22.1. Iu the
default configuration, the FWD key is programmed to
forward all calls.
22.10 A keyset’s FWD key is lit when the station is
programmed for call forwarding.
Forwardii To An Outside Number Or E&M
Destination
22.11
When programming a station for call forward to
an outside telephone number or E&M destination, a
select trunk group feature code is programmed before
the telephone number. If the station is called while the
selected trunk group is busy, the call will not be forwarded. An intercom caller will hear busy signals. An
outside call will riug at the forwarded station until the
call is answered or the caller hangs up.
22.12 The forwarding station’s (not the intercom caller’s) trunk and toll restrictions are checked when the call
is forwarded to an outside number.
NOTE: While this system is designed to bc reasonably
secure against CO trunk misuse by outside callers, there
is no implied warranty that it is invulnerable to unauthorized intrusions. Ifthe central office does not provide supervision and disconnect the call when one party hangs
up, it is possible for a caller to remain connected to a CO
trunk circuit. If this happens, and the caller begins dialing, the call could be placed through the 256 System and
would then be billed to the system’s owner. The system
cannot check this type of call for toll restriction and may
not register the call in SMDR This problem could arise
when a call is connected to a station, when a call is in an
unsupervised conference, when a call is forwarded or
transferred to the public network, or when DISA is used
for placing outgoing calls.
22.13
If using an E&M trunk that is
connected to an-
other telephone system, and forwarding to an outside
Page 4-82
;’
.,
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
number through the other system, the E&M trunk access
code is entered, followed by the other system’s trunk
access code (which the 256 System has been programmed to absorb as described on page 4-26), and the
telephone number. Then, when a call is forwarded, the
system automatically pauses after the E&M trunk
access code, for the duration of the Pause Digit timer,
before dialing the rest of the number.
22.14 When an outside call is forwarded to an outside
number using a loop start trunk, the Unsupervised CO
timer is activated. When the timer expires, both parties
hear a burst of dial tone. Either party can reset the timer
by pressing any M’MF key. If the timer is not reset, the
call recalls the attendant. If the attendant does not
answer the recall before the Abandoned Call timer expires, the call is disconnected.
following feature codes. rf on boos the SPKR
key is lit. (Display keysets show PROGRAM
FORWARD.)
a. Call Forward All Calls (355)
b. Call Forward If No Answer (356)
c. Call Forward If Busy (357)
d . Call Forward If No Answer Or Busy (358)
Single-Line Set: Lift the handset enter one of the
feature codes listed above.
(2)
NOTE: There may be some reduction in voice volume
when an outside call is forwarded to an outside telephone number, depending on central office trunk qualiv
If forwarding to an outside telephone number,
dial a trunk access code (801-847 or 89) and then
the desired telephone number. If you entered an
invalid trunk group feature code or dialed a restricted number, you hear repeating reorder
tones. (Display keysets show FORWARD To
FEsTRIcrEDTRuNK)
22.15 Ifthe Weekly Toll Limit feature is enabled and a
station is forwarded to a toll number that is being
disallowed due to the weekly limit being exceeded, calls
will be handled as follows:
0 An intercom caller will hear reorder tones and see a
CALL FAILED - TOLL LlMIT EXCEEDED display.
l A direct ring-in outside call will ring at the station
until it is answered or the caller hangs up.
Ifforwarding to an outsiak telephone number via
an E&Mm&, dial the E&Mtrunk group feature
code, then dial the other system’s trunk access
code and the desired outside telephone number.
The system automatically enters a pause and the
display keysets show an “S” to indicate a short
pause. If you entered an invalid E&M trunk
group feature code or dialed a restricted number,
you hear repeating reorder tones. (Display keysets show FORWARD ‘IO RESTRICTED
J-R-1
If forwarding to an extension on the other telephone system via an E&M murk, dial the E&M
trunk group feature code and then the desired extension number. If you entered an invalid E&M
trunk group feature code or dialed a restricted
number, you hear repeating reorder tones. (Display keysets show FORWARD To RESTRICl-EDTRUNK)
0 Calls through DISA or an automated attendant will
ring at the station until the Transfer Available timer
expires before being sent to the appropriate recall
destination.
0 Transferred calls will remain at the transferring station.
l
Calls from a voice computer will be sent to the attendant.
Forwarding Calls To An Extension Or Outside
Number, Or E&M Destination
22.16 m FORWARDCAUP
( 1 ) Keyset:
Ifforwding to an intercom number; dial the extension number of the station to receive the calls,
the voice mail access number, or 0 for the attendant. (Or, keysets can press the MSG key to forward calls to the assigned message center.) If you
dialed an invalid extension number, your display
showsFORWARD’IGlNVALIDNUMBERand
you hear reorder tones.
(3)
To use the FWD key: While on or off hook,
press the FWD key to forward calls according to
FWD key programming. If on Jrook the SPKR
key is lit. (Display keysets show PROGRAM
FORWARD.)
To we a call forward feature code: While on or
off hook, press the SPCL key and enter one of the
Page 4-83
Keyset:Ifoffh.ookz, hangup.Ifonhook pressthe
SPRR key (SPKR key goes off). You hear a progress tone and the FWD key is lit (display shows
FWD [condition] To X?OCX). If you attempted
to forward calls to a station that is unconditionally forwarded to your station, your display shows
SYSIEM DETECTED FORWARD LOOP and
you hear repeating reorder tones.
Single-Lime Set: Hang up.
INTER-TELPR4cTIcES
I.MX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Se~ember 1994
22.17
To CAhVELAhYCALL
[condition] To EX XXX [or user name]). If on
hook press the lit SPKR key (the key goes off). If
FORWARD REQUEST:
Keyset:PressthelitFWDkey(thekeygoesofQ
If on hook, press the lit SPKR key (the key goes
off), or if offhook hang up. You hear a progress
tone. (Display keysets show CANCEL ANY
CALL FORWARD.)
Single-Line Set: Lift the handset., enter the cancel any Call Forward feature code (359), and
hang up.
Forwarding To The Message Center
22.18 Keysct users have a simple method for fonvarding calls to their designated message center. The user
presscs the FWD key and then the MSG key. Calls forwarded through the keyset are then sent to the keyset’s
designated message center.
22.19 To QUKRLX FORWARD CL4L.U TO YOUR biE.!SAGE
c-(-oNL;y):
While on or off hook, press the FWD key and
then the MSG key. (Display keysets show FWD
offho& hang up.
Forwarding To Voice Mail
22.20 If the station is forwarded to the voice mail unit
or if the message center is a voice mail unit, the keyset
user’s “mailbox” is automatically dialed when the voice
mail unit answers the forwarded call. In fact, whenever
any station (keyset or single-line) is forwarded to a designated voice mail unit, the station’s assigned “mailbox” is automatically dialed when the voice mail unit
answers the forwarded call.
22.21 If a chain of forwarded stations ends in voice
mail, the mailbox of the first station in the chain will be
selected when the voice mail unit answer the call.
NOTE: If a trunk group is assigned direct ring in to multiple stations, and one of those stations is forwarded to a
voice mail unit, incoming calls on that trunk group are
not forwarded to the voice mail unit.
Page 444
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
23. SPEED DIALING
23.1 Three 256 System features provide speeddialing. They are as follows:
System Speed Dialing: Up to 400,[email protected] system
or tenant-specific speed-dial numbers can be stored
in system memory.
Station Speed Dii: Each station user csn program individual speed-dial numbers. Single-line set
users can store up to 10,[email protected] numbers. Keyset
users can store 10 outside telephone numbers (up to
16 digits each) and 10 extension numbers (up to four
digits each).
System Diiry (Intercom and Outside): The
intercom directory enables display keyset users to
“look up” intercom extension numbers and user
names. The outside directory enables display keyset
users to “look up” system speed-dial numbers and
associated names. (This feature is available only in
the Extended and Exiended plus Tl and E&M
software packages.)
A.
SYSTEM SPEED DIALING
23.2 Speed dialing allows station users to dial stored
telephone numbers quickly. Up to 400,[email protected] system
or tenant-specific speed-dial numbers can be stored in
system memory. Through database programming or the
designated speed-dial programming station, each individual number can be designated in the database as
available to all stations (tenant group 0) or available
only to stations within a certain tenant group. If desired,
an identifying name can also be stored with each speeddial number. (See also the System Directory feature on
page 4-90.)
233 To keep system speed-dial numbers confidential,
some or all of them can be programmed as non-display
numbers (see PROGRAMMIN G, page 5-75). Nondisplay numbers can be used by any station user (as long as
the number is assigned to the user’s tenant group), but
can only be displayed on the programming station’s
keyset. (Non-display numbers cannot be redialed or
saved as station speed-dial numbers.) Nondisplaynumbers will appear in the SMDR report when dialed.
23.4 System speed-dial numbers are subject to toll restriction unless a system-wide option has been enabled
that allows any station to dial any system speed-dial
number regardless of that station’s SCOS.
23.5 The system speed-dial numbers are stored using
location codes (000-399). When dialed, the numbers
appear on a display keyset unless they have been programmed as non-display numbers. Display keyset users
can also view system speed-dial numbers and names
without dialing (unless the numbers are designated for
another tenant group or designated as non-display);
however, with non-display numbers only the name is
displayed.
23.6 The system speed-dial numbers and names are
stored in battery-backed RAM and will not be erased in
the event of a power failure.
Programming System Speed Dial Numbers
23.7 The system speed-dial numbers and names are
programmed by the installer or at any attendant station.
However, attendants can only program or view numbers
that are accessible system wide or in their particular tenant group. In addition to the attendant stations, one display keyset can be designated as the system speed-dial
programming station to program or view all system
speed-dial numbers and all tenant-specific speed-dial
numbers. When the system is in the default state, theprimary attendant station is the designated system speeddial programming station.
23.g The system speeddial numbers can contain up to
32 digits each and can include hookflashes and/or short
or long pauses for dialing a series of numbers. For example, the speed-dial number can contain an SCC local
number, a pause, an access code, and the telephone
number. For using E&M trunks, the other systems’ trunk
access codes, followed by a pause, may be included in
speed-dial numbers. The lengths of the hookflash and
the pause are determined by the programmable CO
Hookflash and Pause Digit timers.
23.9 To program system speed-dial numbers, use one
of the following methods:
l Use the keypad to manually dial the number. If you
make a mistake, press the MUTE key to backspace.
l
Press the REDIAL key to enter the last number
dialed or saved at the station (up to 32 digits).
l
Press one of the SD keys on the keyset to enter the
outside telephone number (up to 16 digits) programmed under that key.
23.10 To program speed-dial names, keypad keys are
used to enter the desired letters, numbers, and punctuation. The number of times a key is pressed determines
which character is entered. For example, 77776444844
would enter “SMITH.” When adjoining characters are
located under the same key, press the FWD key once to
advance to the next character. For example, 5666 FWD
66337777 would enter “JONES.” Refer to the chart on
the next page to program speed-dial names. (Note that
letters correspond to the letters printed on the keypad
keys.)
Page 4-85
INTER-~PRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INSmTION 2% MAINTENANCE
once for a hookflash (F), twice for a short pause
(S), and three times for a long pause Q. You
may not exceed 32 digits.
(5) Press any tnmk access key (call, individual
trunk, ANSWER, or OUTGOING) to save the
number. You hear a single Progress tone when
the number is accepted. (Display keysets show
PROGRAM SYSTEM SPEED DIAL.)
(6)
-
23.n TOPROGRAM OR CHANGE .WYlEbfSPERD-DL4LNuM
BRRSAND NAMES @.llENVANlSAh’D lFiEDESIGN~ SYSlE.MSPEED-DLALPROGRAMMN
GKEYSETOW:
NOTE: If you make a mistake, use the MUTE key to
backspace. Or, lift and replace the handset (the name
and number in memory remains unchanged); then start
23.12 TORRASESYS3EMSPEED-DL4LNAMESANDlORNUbiBERS (2llENDANl.S AND lX.E DmGNAlED SYSlEM SPRWDLdLPROGRAMbfW GKEYSETONLY):
(1)
While on hook, press the SYS SPD key (or press
SPCL and enter the program System Speed-Dial
feature code - 020). (Display keysets show
PROGRAM SYSTEM SPEED DIAL.)
(2)
Enter the speed-dial location code (000- 399).
(The MSG key is lit and the display shows the
name and number.)
(3)
You may erase the name only, the number only,
or both:
a. If you wish to erase the name, press the
MUTE key repeatedly until the name is
erased.
over.
(1)
(2)
(3)
While on hook, Press the SYS SPD key (or press
SPCL and enter the program System Speed-Dial
feature code - 020). (Display keysets show
PROGRAM SYSTEM SPEED DIAL.)
Euter the speed-dial location code (OOO- 399).
(The MSG key is lit and the display shows the
name and number or, if one does not exist, NO
OUTSIDE #.) If you do not continue to the next
step, the display times out after the Long Interdigit timer expires and you must start over.
Ifyou wish toprogram a name or change the existing name, enter or change the name for the
speeddial number using your keypad. Refer to
the chart on this page. If necessary, use the
MUTE key to back up and erase existing characters.
If the existing name is correct, or you do not wish
to program a name, proceed to the next step.
(4
Press the MSG key (it will go out and the cursor
will move to the top line). Enter or change the
number (up to 32 digits) to be stored using the
keypad, one of the SD keys, or the REDIAL key.
If necessary, use the MUTE key to back up and
erase existing numbers. (Display keysets show
the number as it is entered.) To includepauses or
hook)lashes in the nurnbe~ press the SPCL key
To enter or change additional numbers: Repeat steps 2 through 5 for each number to be entered or changed.
To end the programming session: Lift and
replace the handset or wait for the display to return to the date and time (when the Long Interdigit timer expires).
b. If you wish to erase the nunzbe~ press the
MSG key, then press the MUTE key repeatedly until the number is erased.
(4) Press any trunk access key (call, individual
trunk, ANSWER, or OUTGOING). You hear a
single progress tone when accepted. (Display
keysets show PROGRAM SYSTEM SPEED
DIAL.)
(5)
Page 4-86
To enter or change additional numbers: Re-
peat steps 2 through 4 for each number to be
erased.
To end the programming session: Lift and
replace the handset or wait for the display to return to the date aud time (when the Long Iuterdigit timer expires).
lmNuREs
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMWGMX256 lNS’E4LLATION & MAINTENANCE
Viewing System Speed-Dial Numbers
Using a DSS/BLF Unit with Speed-Dial Keys:
23.13 TOKEW.!TSlEM~~-D~~~~N~
ATAllENDAh’TSANDWD~GN~SPEED-DU
PROGRAbibfWG SlXllON:
NOTE: If you make a mistake, lift and replace the handset; then start over.
(1)
While on hook, press the desired speed-dial key.
(2)
Enter the desired location code (000-399). (Display keysets show the programmed name and
number. Or, ifit is a non-display number, the display shows the name and NON DISPLAY #.)
(3)
Wait for the display to return to the date and time
(when the Long Interdigit timer expires) or lift
and replace the handset. Then repeat the procedure for each number to be viewed.
Using the Keyset:
a. While on hook, press the SYS SPD key (or
press SPCL and enter the System Speed-Dial
feature code - 381). (Display keysets show
PROGRAM SYSTEM SPEED DIAL.) You
hear a confirmation tone.
b. Enter the desired location code (OfKl-499).
(Ihe display shows the programmed name
and nmbcr.)
Dialing System Speed-Diil Numbers
a.15
(1)
Enter the desired location code (000-399). me
display shows the programmed name and number.)
(3)
Wait for the display to return to the date and time
(when the Long Interdigit timer expires) or lift
and replace the handset. Then repeat the procedure for each number to be viewed.
b. Enter the location code (000499) for the desired number. The number is automatically
dialed. (Display keysets show the number
dialed unless it is a non-display number.) If
you hear reorder tones, your station is restricted from dialing the selected number.
DSS/BLFUnitwith Speed-DialKeys: Press the
desired speed-dial key. The number is automatically dialed. (Display keysets show the number
dialed unless it is a nondisplay number.) If you
hear reorder tones, your station is restricted from
dialing the selected number.
2 3 . 1 4 TonEwSYSlEMSPEED-DLALNUMB~Ah’DNAMEs
ATAh’YDISPLAYK
(1)
Using the Keyset:
a . While on hook, press the SYS SPD key (or
press SPCL and enter the System Speed-Dial
feature code - 381). (Display keysets show
REVIEW SYSTEM SPEED DIAL.) You
hear a confumation tone.
Lift the handset and select an outgoing trunk.
a . Press the SYS SPD key (or press SPCL and
enter the System Speed-Dial feature code 381). You hear a confImtation tone.
While on hook, press the desired speed-dial key.
(2)
To DIAL SYSTEMSPEED-DIAL NUbtBERS:
( 2 ) Keysek
Using a DSS/BLFUnit with Speed-Dial Keys:
I
I
Single-Line Set: Press the ESLS SYS SPD key,
or press the PLASH key (hookflash) and enter
the System Speed-Dial feature code (381). You
hear a confirmation tone.
(3)
b. Enter the desired location code (000-499).
(Display keysets show the programmed
name and number. Or, if it is a non-display
number, the display shows the name and
NON DISPLAY #.)
F’age 4-87
Enter the location code (000-399) for the desired
number. The number is automatically dialed.
(Display keysets show the number dialed unless
it is a non-display number.) If you hear reorder
tones, your station is restricted from dialing the
selected number.
I
INTER-TELPBACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INS~~ON & MAINTENANCE
Eze~ember 1994
B.
STATION SPEED DIALING
23.16 For convenience, each station user can program
individual speed-dial numbers. Single-line set users can
store up to 10,[email protected] numbers using speed-dial location codes (O-9). Keyset users can store 10 outside telephone numbers (up to 16 digits each) and 10 extension
numbers (up to four digits each; see paragraph 23.18 below), using ICE0 speed-dial (SD) keys or location
codes O-9. Together, the lamps in the keyset SD keys
create a busy lamp field that indicates the status of the
stations programmed under the keys (refer to the lamp
status chart on page 447). Extension numbers can be
either station extension numbers or hunt group pilot
numbers.
Pmgmmming Station Speed-Dial Numbers
23.17 When entering the outside telephone numbers,
use one of the following methods:
23.20 If desired, station speed-dial numbers can be
used for dialing the voice mail unit password code. Store
the code in an outside number location. Then, after the
call to the voice mail unit is connected, dial the outside
location that contains the password code.
23.21
The station speed-dial mrmbers are stored on
the hard disk and will not be erased by unplugging the
station instrument or by a power failure.
23.22
NOTE: If you make a mistake, lift and replace the handset; then start over. The munber in memory remains unchanged. Or, use the MUTE key to backspace.
(1)
On a keyset, press the REDIAL key to enter the last
number (up to the first 16 digits) dialed or saved at
the station.
23.19 Station users can also program pauses and/or
hookflashes into the stored outside telephone numbers.
For example, the number can contain an SCC local number, a pause, and an access code. For using Fi&M trunks,
speed-dial numbers may contain the other system’s
trunk access code if it is followed by a pause. When programming speeddialnumbers, each hookflash and each
pause is considered one digit. The durations of the hookflash and the pause are determined by the programmable
CO Hookflash and Pause Digit timers.
Keysets with SD keys: While on hook, press the
SD key to be programmed. (Display keysets
show PROGRAM STATION SPEED DIAL. #
and the key number.)
Keysets without SD keys: While on hook, press
SPCL and enter the Station Speed-Dial Programming feature code (383). You hear a progress
tone Then dial the speeddial location code
(O-9). (Display keysets show PROGRAM STATION SPEED DIAL, # and the key number.)
(2)
Dial the extension number (up to four digits) or
telephone number (up to 16 digits, including
pauses and hookflashes) to be stored. Refer to
paragraph 23.17. (Display key&s show the
number.) To includ+zpauses or hoo&la.sh in an
outside telephone numbe.q press the SPCL key
once for a hookflash (F), twice for a short pause
(S), and three times for a long pause Q. You
may not exceed 16 digits. Do not program hookflashes or pauses in extension numbers, or you
will receive reorder tones when trying to dial
them.
(3)
If you ented an emnsion numbq press the IC
key. You hear a single progress tone when the
system has accepted the number. (Display keysets show both numbers stored under the SD
key-1
Ifyou entendan outside telephone numbeG Fess
any call or individual trunk key. You hear a single
progress tone when the system has accepted the
number. (Display keysets show both numbers
stored under the SD key.)
(4)
Wait five seconds for the display to return to the
date and time. Repeat steps 1 through 3 for each
additional number to be stored.
23.18
A three-digit station extension number can be
preceded with a pound (#) to always speed dial private
intercom calls to the station. Or, a “4” may be entered
before a three-digit station extension number or hunt
group pilot number to quickly reverse transfer (pick up)
calls from that station or hunt group. If either of these
options is used, normal handsfree intercom calls cannot
be placed using that station speed-dial location or SD
key. Also, when an extension number is preceded by a
“4”, the SD key will not show the station’s status. This
option cannot be used if the system has four-digit extension numbers.
UmG
Gne extension mtmber and one outside telephone number can be stored under each of the 10 SD keys/location
codes.
Use the keypad to manually dial the number.
On a keyset, press the SYS SPD key and enter the
system speed-dial location code (000-399) to store
one of the system speed-dial numbers in a station
speed-dial location. (Ifthe number is over 16 digits,
only the first 16 digits are stored.) Non-display system speed-dial numbem cannot be stored in keyset
station speed-dial locations.
To PROGRAbf STAlTONSPEED-DI4LNUMBERS
AKEYSE;:
Page 4-88
INTER-TELPRACTICE!J
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Viewing Station Speed-Dial Numbers
23.23
lVPROGRAbfSZtlTONSP~-DIALNZUBERSUSANG
ASLVGLE-LlNESET:
Up to 10 numbers can be stored using speed-dial location codes O-9. If you make a mistake, hang up and start
(1)
Lift the handset and enter the Station Speed-Dial
Programming feature code (383) or press the
E-SLS PGM SPD key. You hear a confirmation
tone.
(2)
Dial the speeddial location code (O-9). You hear
a confirmation tone.
(3)
Dial the telephone number (up to 16 digits, including pauses and hookflashes) to be stored and
hang up. To include pauses or hookjlashes in the
uru&q press the FLASH (hookflash) key once
for a hookflash (P), twice for a short pause (S),
and three times for a long pause Q. Each pause
or hookfIash counts as one digit. Wait 2 seconds
after pressing the FLASH key before pressing it
again, the system only recognizes one FLASH
every 2 seconds.
(4)
Hang up.
Q
Repeat steps 1 through 4 for each numbef to be
stored.
=.%d
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
23.25
sn):
To lC!hWTHE
SlDRRDNU~ERS
(ONADISPLWKEY-
(1)
While on hook, press the desired SD key twice
(Display keysets show the currently stored numbers.)
(2)
If desid press other SD keys once to view their
numbers. (Ifthe date and time displays, the program has timed out; repeat the first step.)
Dialing Station Speed-Dial Numbers
2326
(1)
Lift the handset.
(2)
If placing an outside call, select an outgoing
(3)
Keysetswith SD keys: Press the SD key of the
TOERASEASLiQnONSPEED-DIALNUMBER:
Repeat the programming procedures, but do not
dial a number (skip step 2 in the keyset instructions, or step 3 in the single-line instructions).
Page 4-89
trunk or use LCR If placing an intercom call,
skip this step.
desired number. The number is dialed. (Display
keysets show the number.)
Keysets without SD keys: Press the SPCL key,
enter the Station Speed-Dial feature code (382).
You hear a confirmation tone. Then enter the
location code (O-9). The number is dialed.
ESLS: Press the SIN SPD key. You hear a confirmation tone. Then dial the location code
(O-9). The number is dialed.
Other Single-Line Sets: Ress the PLASH key
(hookflash) and then press the SLI STN SPD key
or enter the Station Speed-Dial feature code
(382). You hear a conGrmation tone. Then dial
the location code (O-9). The number is dialed.
lNrER-TELPRACTICES
IMNGMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
24. OPTIONAL SYSTEM DIRECI’ORY
- INTERCOM AND OUTSIDE
(KEYSETS ONLY)
I
I
NOTE: This feature is available only in the Extended
and Ertendedplus Tl andE&U software.
24.1 The intercom directory enables display keyset
users to “look up” intercom extension numbers and user
names. The outside directory enables display keyset
users to “look up” system speed-dial numbers and
associated names.
24.2 Ona the desired extension number/name or system speeddial number/name has been selected, the user
may automatically dial the number, store the number in
a station speed-dial location, select a different number/
name, terminate the directory routine, or switch to the
other directory. A directory search can be performed
when a call is waiting on conference or transfer hold at
the station, if necessary.
NOTE: The character values for key number 1 above
are not the same as those used for custom programming
do-not-disturb messages (see page 4-95). This is due to
the loss of the pound (#) key and asterisk (*) key character values.
A DWERCOM DIRECTORY
24.3 The intercom directory is automatically updated
whenever user names and/or extension number information is reprogrammed (see PRCIGRAMMING
pages S-28 and 5-58). The outside directory is updated
whenever a system speed-dial number or name is reprogrammed (see PRGGRAMMIN G page 5-76).
24.4 To use the directory, the user enters a letter, a
string of letters, or a valid extension number. If searching for a name, the full name need not be entered. The
system will find the closest match and show the number
and its associated name on the keyset display. Or, the
user can press the asterisk (*) or pound (#I) keys to scroll
backward or forward alphabetically through the stored
list of names. (It is not possible to scroll through the extensions by number.)
24.5 Keypad keys are used to enter the desired letters,
numbers, and punctuation. The station user can switch
between numeric and alphanumeric modes. (Numeric
mode = MSG key unlit; alphanumeric mode = MSG key
lit.) In alphanumeric mode, the number of times a key is
pressed determines which character is entered. For example, 77776444S44 would enter “SMJTH.” When adjoining characters are located under the same key, press
the FWD key once to advance to the next character. For
example, 5666 FWD 66337777 would enter “JONES.”
Refer to the following chart. The letters correspond to
the letters printed on the keypad keys.
24.6
m PERFORMANIh’lERCOMDLRECTORYSEARCH:
(1)
While on or off hook, press SPCL and enter the
System Intercom Directory feature code (307).
The MSG key lights (and the SPKR key lights if
on hook) and the display shows lNTERCOM
NAME: on the top line, while the cursor is located on the bottom line.
(2)
Enter up to seven alpha and/or numeric characters for the extension number or user name. If
searching for a name, the whole name does not
have to be entered. You may switch between
modes by pressing the MSG key (lit = alphanumeric, unlit = numeric).
a . In numeric mode (MSG key unlit): Press the
keypad keys to enter a valid extension number. Press MUTE to backspace, if necessary.
b . In alphanumeric mode (MSG key l+): Press
the keypad keys to enter the desired characters. Refer to the chart above. Press FWD
once to advance or twice to leave a space.
Press MUTE to backspace.
(3)
If desired, press the pound (#) key to scroll forward alphabetically through the directory or
press the asterisk (*) key to scroll backward. If
this method is used, skip step 4 and proceed to
step 5.
?,
;,’
Page 4-90
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMx/GMx 256 INS’IALLATION & MAINTENANCE
(4)
(5)
(6)
IJRS the pound (#) or asterisk (*) key to begin
the search. The closest match will be displayed
on your keyset. If you entered an invalid extension number, you will hear reorder tones. Repeat
step 2.
([email protected] store the selected extension number in
a station speeddial location by pressing the desired SD key. You hear confirmation tone when
the number is accepted.
advance or twice to leave a space. Press the
MUTE key to backspace.
To scroll through the dikctory: Ress the
pound (#) key to ~~1011 forward alphabetically
through the directory or press the asterisk (*) key
to scroll backward. If this method is used, skip
step 3 and proceed to step 4.
(3)
Fkxs either the pound (#) or asterisk (*) key to
begin searching. The closest match will be displayed on your keyset. If you selected a nondisplay number, NON DISPLAY # will appear on
the top line and the name (if assigned) will ap
pear on the bottom line; the number is not displayed.
(4)
If desk& store the selected system speed-dial
To automatically dial the extension number:
Press the IC key. If an intercom call is camped on
and the IC key is lit, pressing the IC key accesses
the waiting call and terminates the directory feature.
To search for a ditrerent extension number or
user name: Repeat steps 2 and 4.
number in a station speed-dial location by pressing the desired SD key. You hear a confirmation
tone when the number is accepted.
To terminate the directory routine: Ifoffhook,
hang up. Ifon bk press the SPKR key.
NOTE: If the system speed-dial number is longer than 16 digits, only the first 16 digits will be
stored in the station speed-dial location. Also, if
the number is a non-display numbex, it cannot be
stored.
To switch to the outside directory: Press a non-
flashing call or individual trunk key or the
ANSWER or OUTGOING key. (Outside directory instructions are given below.) If a call is
ringing in or holding on the selected trunk, pressing the flashing call key, flashing individual
trunk key, or ANSWER key will answer the call
and terminate the directory function.
B. OUTSIDE
24.7
(1)
(2)
(5)
DIRECTORY
TO PERFORMANOuTslDE DlRECTORYSEARCH:
To automatically dial the speed-dial number:
Ress an individual trunk key, the OUTGOING
or ANSWER key, or a trunk group key. Zf off
hook, lift the handset when the call is answered.
If a call is ringing in or holding on the selected
trunk, pressing the flashing individual trunk key
or the ANSWER key will answer the call and terminate the directory function.
While on or off hook, press SPCL and enter the
System Outside Directory feature code (308).
The MSG key lights (and the SPKR key lights if
on hook) and the display shows OUTSIDE
NAME: on the top line, while the cursor is located on the bottom line.
To search for a diierent system speed-dial
number: Repeat steps 2 and 3.
To enter a name: Enter alphanumeric characters
IC key. (Intercom directory iustructions are given on page 4-90.) If an intercom call is camped
on and the IC key is flashing, pressing the IC key
accesses the waiting call and terminates the directory feature.
(up to 16) for the speed-dial name. You do not
have to enter the whole name. Press the keypad
keys to enter the desired characters. Refer to the
chart on page 4-90. Press the PWD key once to
Page 4-91
To terminate the directory routine: If offhoos
hang up. If on hook, press the SPKR key.
To switch to the intercom directory: Ress the
INTER-TEL4PRAcTIcEs
AIX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION 81 MAINTENANCE
iIf%-~ember1994
25. HOUSE PHONE
25.1 This feature provides users with the ability to
place a predesignated intercom or outside call simply
by lifting the handset (or pressing the SPKR key if it is a
keyset) on a designated house phone. There are several
applications for this feature, such as:
Courtesy paging phone: Visitors hear pages
instructing them to pick up the house phone (such as
the paging phones used in airport terminals). When
they lift the handset, they are connected to a pre-programmed station user who can give them a message
or connect them to a call.
Emergency phoue: The house phone can be pro-
grammed to automatically place a call to an emergency number (such as 911). This could save time in
an emergency.
Service phone: Customers can use the house
phone(s) to place orders or receive special services
from the lobby. For example, the house phone would
automatically dial the extension number of a service
representative (or hunt group number of the service
department).
Intercom network: House phones could be placed
in specific locations throughout a building (such as
examination rooms in a doctor’s office) and could be
programmed to access a specific station or group of
stations (such as a nurses’ station).
25.2 Any station may be designated as a house phone
in database programming (see PROGRAMMING, page
5-38), however this feature is usually assigned to
single-line sets. The primary attendant should not he a
house phone, nor should any Attendant Computer Console station.
2X3 The number dialed by the house phone is
determined by the station’s speed-dial programming.
The number programmed through the database or in
station speed-dial location 1 is automatically dialed
during day mode, and the number in location 2 is dialed
during night mode. This number can be either an
extension number or an outside telephone number. If it
is an outside number, it must be preceded with a select
trunk group feature code (and a pause if necessary).
25.4 If the house phone is a keyset, speed-dial programming should be terminated by pressing a call key,
or individual trunk, or trunk key as if an outside number
was being stored, even when storing an extension number. Other station information (such as user name, extension number, SCOS, etc.) for the house phone is programmed as usual.
25.5 Once the house phone status has been programmed, the speed-dial number can only be changed
while on hook (if it is a keyset) or through database programming because lifting the handset will cause the station to dial the designated number.
25.6 Incoming calls take precedence over outgoing
calls. If using a single-line set or a keyset programmed
for automatic trunk access (see page 4-52), any ringing
call is automatically answered when the handset is lifted
or the SPKR key is pressed.
Page 4-92
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INS-TION & MAINTENANCE
26. REDIAJJNG
26.1 The Redial feature stores the last telephone number dialed at the station (manually or speed-dialed numbtxs up to 48 digits). If the station user reaches a busy
number or is disconnected, or if there is no answer, the
number cart be redialed easily.
26.2 only one telephone number can be stored in the
station’s redial memory at one time. With keysets, this
number can be stored in one of two ways, depending on
keceyset programming.
0 Last number dialed: The last number manually
dialed or speed dialed is automatically stored. It
changes every time the user dials a telephone number. The number is redialed using the procedure in
paragraph 26.10. This is the default value of the Redial feature and the RFDlAL key.
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
dant, or other purposes can be suppressed so that only
the telephone number digits are displayed and stored in
&dial memory. Suppressing the extra digits prevents
entries, such as PIN numbers and other codes, from
being displayed when they are dialed. (See page 5-69 in
PRGGRAMMlNG.)
26.7 If the system is installed behind a PBX, the Redial feature remembers the PBX access code and automatically inserts a pause after the code when it is redialed.
26.8
NOTE: When in the default state, the keyset redial
mode is programmed for last number redial(320).
(1)
While on hook, press the SPCL key.
(2)
Enter the feature code to program Last Number
Dialed (320) or Last Number Saved (321) redial
mode. You hear confirmation tone.
0 Last number saved: The last number dialed is
manually stored by the keyset user. Dialing other
numbers does not change the number saved. It only
changes when a new number is saved, using the procedure in paragraph 26.9. The number is redialed
using the procedure in paragraph 26.10. This is programmed with the Last Number Saved feature code.
26.3 There are three feature codes that affect the Redial feature. The Redial feature code (380) performs the
redial function (on keysets and ESLSs, this code is programmed under the REDIAL key; on SLIs the code is
under the RRDL key.) The Program Redial Mode feature codes (320 and 321) determine the mode of the redial feature code for keysets (Last Number Dialed Or
Last Number Saved). The ESLS and SLI REDIAL, key
mode camtot be changed; it is always last number
dialed.
26.4 System speeddial numbers cannot be redialed at
any station if they have been programmed as nondisplay numbers.
TO??ROGRAMl’HEiiEBETREDIALMODE:
26.9 TO SAVE A NUMBER ON A Kl?XSET PROG- FOR
L4STNU..ER SAVED (321):
NOTE The saved number is replaced each time you repeat this procedure.
(1)
When you wish to save an outside telephone
number, hang up to disconnect the call.
(2)
Remain on hook and press the REDIAL key (or
press SPCL and enter the Redial feature code 380). You hear a confirmation tone.
(3)
26.10
To dial the number: Use the procedure iu the
next paragraph.
lDREDL4LANUMBER:
0)
Lift the handset and select an outgoing trunk.
(2)
Keyset: Press the REDLAL key (or press SPCL
and enter the Redial feature code - 380). The
number is dialed and displayed.
26.5 If using an E&M trunk, the Redial feature remembers the other system’s trunk access code and automatically inserts a pause after the code when it is redialed.
26.6 A system programming flag allows the programmer to specify whether all dialed digits or just the digits
that make up the valid call are displayed and stored in
the redial buffer. If desired, the “extra” digits used for
I dial-up banking machine, voice mail, automated atten-
Page 4-93
ESLS: Press the RRDlAL key. The number is
dialed.
SLI: Press the FLASH key and then the REDL
key or enter the Redial feature code (380). The
number is dialed.
Other Single-Line Set: Hookflash and enter the
Redial feature code (380). The number is dialed.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMYUGMX 2% INS~TXON & MAINTENANCE
27. PAGING
(3) Enter the zone code (O-9) for the desired zone.
27.1 The Page feature allows announcements to be
made through keyset internal speakers. Optional paging
equipment (amplifiers and paging speakers) may also be
installed on external paging ports or relays to provide
paging for an external area, such as a warehouse or loading dock (see INSTAUATION, page 3-98).
(4)
After the single progress tone, make your page
before the Paging timer expires. If you hear reorder tones, there are no stations or external xones
in the selected page zone, the necessary system
resources are busy, or the paging xone is being
used by another station. Users cannot camp on to
or queue the paging system.
0
Hangup.
273 External paging circuitry is available byconverting up to nine unused single-line (SLC) or trunk circuits.
Trunk and single-line circuits can be converted for external paging use in the Page Zones window (Page 5-70
in PROGRAMMING).
27.3 There can be up to 10 paging zones. When the
system is in the default state, all keysets are assigned to
paging zone 1 to provide an all-page zone. Keysets and
external paging ports/relays can be assigned to any, all,
or none of the paging zones, as desired.
27.4 Pages are not heard if the keyset has been
removed from paging (using the feature code as
described in paragraph 28.2), is in do-not-disturb, is
ringing, or is in use. Also, keyset background music and
external speaker music are interrupted for pages.
27.5
lVb&KEAI#GE:
(1)
Lift the handset.
(2)
Keyset: Press the PAGE key (or enter the Page
feature code - 7).
Siie-Line set: Enter the Page feature code (7).
28.
REMOVE FROM PAGING
28.1 A keyset user can prevent the keyset from receiving pages or allow it to receive pages again using these
feature codes. If the keys& is assigned to more than one
page zone, all zones are removed or replaced; the user
camtot toggle individual xones.
28.2
(1)
While on or off hook, press SPCL.
(2)
Enter the page Remove feature code (332) toprevent the keyset from receiving pages or enter the
Page Replace feature code (333) to allow the
keyset to receive pages. You hear a confitmation
tone. (Or use the Page Remove/Replace On/Off
feature code [334] to toggle the pages on or off.)
(3)
If off hook, hang up.
Page 4-94
,j
FEATmu
Issue 1. November 1994
INTER-TELPRACIICES
IMxlGMx 256 INSTALLATION 8~ MAINTENANCE
29. DO-NOT-DISTURB
29.1 Placing a station in do-not-disturb halts all pages,
incoming intercom calls, camped-on calls, and transferred calls to that station. Queue callbacks, recalls, and
direct ring-in calls are not blocked. Another user calling
the station while it is in do-notdisturb hears a repeating
signal of four fast tones and a pause (display keysets
show the do-not-disturb message); the user cannot camp
on, but can queue or leave a message at the station.
29.2 If desired, individual stations can be prevented
from using do-not-disturb by disabling the do-notdisturb option in the database (see PROGRAMMING,
page 5-28). Another option concerns do-not-disturb
breakthrough. Normally, calls to a station through
DISA, the automated attendant, or a voice computer are
not blocked by placing the station in do-notdisturb. If
desired, individual stations can be set to prevent these
calls from breaking through do-notdisturb (see PROGFtkMMNG, page 5-28).
29.3 If a hunt group station is in do-not-disturb, calls
to the user’s hunt group do not cause the keyset to ring,
but the individual trunk key will flash ifall other stations
in the hunt group are busy, forwarded, have hunt group
remove enabled, or are in do-not-disturb. Hunt group
announcement stations and overflow stations cannot
block hunt group calls by using do-not-disturb.
29.4 Keyset stations may be given do-not-disturb
override permission. These stations, when reaching a
station in do-notdisturb, can enter the Do-Not-Disturb
Gverride feature code (373) and place an intercom call.
Single-line stations cannot be enabled to use the DoNot-Disturb Override feature.
29.5 When a station is placed in do-notdistnrb, the
user may select one of 20 system-stored messages that
will appear on the top line of the display (unless do-notdisturb is enabled while the user is on a call or off hook,
in which case message 1 is automatically selected). An
attendant can reprogram messages 02-20 with messages, up to 16 characters each. When a station in donot-disturb is called by a display keyset user, the caller
sees the selected message.
29.6 Default do-notdisturb messages are programmed as follows:
01 DO-NOT-DISTURB
02 INhiEEllNGUNTIL
03 INhEEIDIG
04 ON VACM’ION TL
OS ONVACATION
06 CALLMEAl07cALLhiEAFrER
08 AWAY AT
09 ONBREAK
10 OUTOFTOWN’TIL
11 OUT OF OFFICE
12 OUTUNTIL
13 WITHACLIENT
14WlTHAGUEST
15 WEHAPATENT
16 UNAVAILABLE
17 INCONFERENCE
18 AWAY FROM DESK
19 GONEHOME
20 OuTluLuNcH
29.7 The second line of the message can be customized with a numeric/alphanumeric message of up to 16
characters. The customized message is entered as described in the following paragraphs.
29% When programming a customixed do-not-disturb
message, the station is automatically in numeric mode.
The keypad keys are used to enter numbers O-9, the
pound (#) key is used for entering a hyphen (-), and the
asterisk (*) key is used for entering a colon (:). For example, l*OO would enter “1:OO” in numeric mode.
29.9 Keyset users can enter alphanumeric mode by
pressing the MSG key (the key lights). Keypad keys are
used to enter the desired letters, numbers, and puuctuation. The number of times a key is pressed determines
which -character is
entered.
For example,
33377744432999 would enter “FRIDAY.” When adjoining characters are located under the same key, press
the FWD key once to advance to the next character. For
example, 6 FWD 666 FWD 6632999 would enter
“MONDAY.” Refer to the chart below to program messages in alphanumeric mode. (Note that letters correspond to the letters printed on the keypad keys.)
I
I
l
l
#
p
(
I!
1,
I*
1
-
29.10 When using either mode, keyset users may use
the SD keys (digits stored in the outside number location) and/or the REDIAL key to enter stored numbers or
messages. Speed-dial numbers can be chained together
when entering messages that require more that 16 keystrokes to create the desired message. When programming a message in speed-dial memory (outside number
location), use the SPCL key in place of the FWD key to
advance or insert spaces.
Page 4-95
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTAUATION & MAINTENANCE
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
29.11
To ENABLE DO-NOT-DIISTURB MODE AT YOUR SZL
TION:
(1)
Keyset: While on book, press the DND key (or
press SFCL and enter a Do-Not-Disturb feature
code - 370 or 372). The DND key lights. (Display keysets show SELECT DND MESSAGE.)
(4
Single-Lime Set: Lift the handset and enter the
Do-Not-Disturb feature code (370) or the DoNot-Disturb Gn/Off feature code (372). You hear
a progress tone.
(2)
To select message 01 (DO-NOT-DISTURB):
Keyset: Press the SPKR key, lift and replace
the handset, or allow the programming mode
to time out.
Single-Line Set: Hang up, press the FLASH
key, or allow the programmiq mode to time
out.
_
,3
To CAhVEL DO-NOT-DIISTURB:
Keyset: While on hook, press the lit DND key
(or press SPCL and enter the Cancel Do-NotDisturb feature code - 371 or Do-Not-Disturb
On/Off feature code - 372). The key goes off
and the display returns to date and time.
Single-Line Set: Lift the handset, enter the Cancel Do-Not-Disturb feature code (371) or the DoNot-Disturb On/Off feature code (372), and hang
UP.
To select any of the 20 pre-programmedmes-
(3)
.-- .b
Single-Line Set: Hangup, press the FLASH key,
or allow the programming mode to time out.
29.12
sages: Enter the desired number (01-20). Display keyset users may scroll through the messages by pressing the pound (#) key to go forward
or the asterisk (*) key to go backward (the display shows the selected message). lf you enter an
invalid message number, you will hear reorder
tones and must try again.
mode, press one of the SD keys, and/or press
the REDIAL key to enter the stored characters. You may chain numbers together.
Terminate programming:
Keyset: Press the SPKR key, lift and replace the
handset,orallowtheprogrammingmodetotime
out. (Display keysets show selected message.
Date and time appear on the second line if there
is no customized message.)
29.13
To PLACE YOUR BllSY.TlXUON IN DO-NOT-DISTURB
JiWLEACALLISCAbPEDON:
If, while on a call, you hear call waiting signals and you
wish to let the caller know you do not want to be disturbed:
Keyset: Press the DND key (or press SPCL and
To terminate programming:
enter a Do-Not-Disturb feature code - 370 or
372). The key lights. The intercom caller is no
longer camped on and receives do-not-disturb
Keysetz Press the SPKR key, lift and replace the
handset, or allow the programming mode to time
out.
indications.
Single-Line Set: (This pmcedm will intmpt
your call in pmgmss.) Ress the FLASH key
(hookflash) and enter the Do-Not-Disturb feature code (370) or the Do-Not-Disturb Mode Gn/
Off feature code (372). The intercom caller is no
longer camped on and receives do-not-disturb
indications. Ress the FLASH key (hookflash)
again to return to the current call.
Single-LineSetrHangup,presstheFLGSHkey,
or allow the programming mode to time out.
To customize the second line of the message:
Use any combination of the following methods.
a. Remain in numeric mo&: Ress the keypad
keys to enter the desired number. Use the
pound key (#/) for a hyphen (-) and the asterisk key (*) for a colon (:). Keyset users can
press the FWD key once to leave a space, or
press the MUTE key to backspace.
b. Change to alphanumeric mode (keysets
only): Press the MSG key (the key lights),
then enter the desired characters. Refer to the
chart on the previous page. Keyset users can
press the FWD key once to advance or twice
to leave a space, or press the MUTE key to
backspace.
c. Use speed-dial and/or dial numbers (keysets only): In either numeric or alphanumeric
29.14 DO-NOT-DISTURB 0-E(m wmIlzfIs
i?EL4TuREENmLwoNL;y):
If your keyset is enabled for Do-Not-Disturb Override
and you hear do-notdisturb tones when placing an intercom call, you may use the following procedure to break
through do-not-disturb and complete the call.
Page 4-96
When you hear do-not-disturb tones while placing an intercom call, press the SPCL key and enter the Do-Not-Disturb Override feature code
(373). Ifthe called station is idle, the call rings as
.
.
a prrvate mtercom call. If the called station is
busy, your call camps on.
. -,
:’
INTER-TELPEACTICES
WGMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
30. HOOKFLASH
30.1 Single-line set users are required to hookflash to
access some system resources. Or, a hookflash may be
required for keyset and single-line users to access certain telephone company features, such as call waiting.
The duration of the hookflash can be changed by reprogramming the CO Hookflash timer (default value is
-1.
30.2
The Hookflash feature can be enabled or disabled on a trunk group-by-trunk group basis.
Issue 1. No”%=
31. CANCEL MISCELLANEOUS
OPERATIONS
31.1 A station user can cancel Do-Not-Disturb,
Handsfree Disable, Call Forward, Queue Request, Page
Remove, Hunt Croup Remove, and Background Music
features all at once by entering a single feature code.
31.2
NOTE: The ESLS and SLI FLASH key does not generate a hooknash over trunks. You must use this procedure.
Keys& Press the SPCL key and enter the Hookflash feature code (330).
Single-Line Set: Press the FLASH key (hookflash) and enter the Hookflash feature code
(330).
Page 4-97
To cANcELbixscELL4NEous
OPERAUONS:
Keys& While on or off hook, press the SPCL
key and enter the Cancel Miscellaneous Operations featnre code (395). You hear a confirmation
tone. Zf off hook hang up.
Single-Line Set: Lift the handset, enter the Cancel Miscellaneous Operations feature code
(395). You hear dial tone. Hang up.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
To scroll through the messages: View the available messages by pressing the pound (#I) key to
scroll forward or pressing the asterisk (*) key to
scroll backward. Each message displays for one
second before another can be selected.
32. REMINDER MESSAGES (KEYSETS
ONLY)
32.1
Reminder messages are set, like an alarm clock,
to signal a keyset station at a specified time. The user
can select the message and time up to 24 hours in advance. %enty different reminder messages are available. These messages can be reprogrammed by the installer or any attendant. Up to 120 reminder messages
can be requested per system.
While the desired message is displayed, enter the
time that you wish to receive the message:
a . Enter the hour and minutes (e.g., 900 for
9:oo).
32.2 At the programmed time, the reminder message
signals the station with eight short tones. A display keyset shows the message until it is cancelled; a non-display
keyset receives tones only. If the station is busy, the user
still hears the tones and the message displays for 10 seconds during the call, then the display returns after the
user hangs up. (Reminder displays interrupt, but do not
affect, programming.)
32.3 Messages can be changed by the installer or any
attendant, if desired. They are limited to 16 characters.
The default messages are:
01 MEETING
02 SIAFFMEEI’ING
03 SALJSMEETING
04 CANCELMEETING
osAPI?o06 PIACECAIL
07cALLcLImT
08 cAmcusroh.5R
09 CALLHOME
10 cALLcORPORAIE
32.4 To
11 CALLENGINEERING
12 CALL-G
13 CAILACCOUNTING
14 CANCELDND
15 cxK!ELcAuFwD
16 TAKEhiEDICXION
17 MAKEFESERVmON
18 REVEW!XHEDULE
19 LUNCH
2oREhmDER
b . Press the asterisk (*) key for AM or press the
pound (#) key for PM. You hear a progress
tone when it is accepted.
NOTE: If an invalid time is entered, you hear reorder tones and the message request is caruxlled.
(Display keysets show ERROR! INWLID
TIME ENTERED.)
32.5
RlZbfWDER MlSSAGE:
At the selected time, you hear eight short tones and the
message displays.
(1)
Ifvorcr station is idle, go to the next step.
If you are on a call, the message will display for
10 seconds. After you hang up, the reminder
message returns and must be cleared.
If you are programming
REQUESTREbfIhDERbiESSAGES:
(2)
(1)
While on hook, press the WCL key.
(2)
Enter the Reminder Message feature code (305).
(Display keysets show PROGRAM REMINDER MESSAGE.)
your keyser, the pro-
gramming function is interrnpted. The message
will display for 10 seconds. After programming
is completed, the reminder message will return
and must be cleared.
NOTE: Lift and replace the handset to stop the process
without selecting a message.
(3)
lVRECEItlEA
To clear the message: Remain on hook and
press the asterisk (*) key.
32.6
TO
CANCEL ALL OF
YOUR
REMlhDER biESSAGE RE-
QilTESlS:
To select a specific message: Enter the twodigit
message code (01-20). (Display keysets show
selected message.)
Page 4-98
While on hook, press the SPCL key and enter the
Cancel Reminder Message feature code (306).
You cannot view or cancel individual messages.
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
33. OPTIONAL STATION EXCHANGE
FEATURE
33.1 This programmable station feature allows a station user to exchange the extension numbers of two station circuits. This swaps the database and user programmed features of the extension numbers between
two station circuits without the need for database programming. The circuit number of the station locations
are unchanged, but the extension numbers are changed,
as illustrated below.
33.4 Exchanges can be made only between similar
stations. That is, digital keysets of any size can exchange with other digital keysets of any size, analog
keysets of any size can exchange with other analog keysets of any size, and single-line stations can exchange
with other single-line stations. Examples of allowed and
disallowed station exchanges include the following:
Allowed Exchanges:
0 Standard Digital Keyset station with an Executive
Digital Keyset station
l
BEFORE STATION EXCHANGE
lMX 24-Line Keyset (or Inter-TelDVK 24-Line
Keyset) station with an lMX &Line Keyset (or InterTelDVK g-Line Keyset) station
0 lb0 Single-Line stations
Disallowed
Exchanges:
0 Any Digital Keyset station with any Analog Keyset
station
03.61 is pro&nod as Extan&n Number 200.
0 Any Keyset station with any Single-Line station
AFrl
I STATION EXCHANGE
CIRCUIT
01.02
EXIENSION
NUMBER a00
-
Circuit Number 01.02 hecomes Extendi Number 200.
Circuit Number 03.01 becomesExbnsiiNum~101.
33.2 All database-programmed station features (such
as, DSS/BLF Unit assignment, trunk access, station
flags, toll restriction, usemame, etc.) as well as all user
programm& (speed-dial numbers, call forwarding, donot-disturb, reminder messages, etc.) will stay with the
extension number during an exchange.
33.5 DSS/BLF Units follow the same analog-toanalog and digital-to-digital exchange rule as keysets. If
one station in the exchange is equipped with a DSS/BLF
and the other is not the exchange is allowed and the
DSS/BLF Unit will remain operational at its assigned
station circuit. Any DSS/BLF Units involved in an exchange will retain their key map assignments, but will
be associated with their keyset’s new extension number.
That is, the DSWBLF key maps will not be exchanged
when the keyset extension numbers change.
333 Any station that will be involved in a station exchange must have the Station Exchange station flag enabled and a programmed Station Exchange Password. If
a station user attempts an exchange in which one or both
extension numbers do not have the flag enabled, the exchange will not be allowed. If the user does not enter a
valid password after entering the Station Exchange feature code, the exchange will not be allowed. Refer to
pages 5-28 and 5-31 in PROGRAMMING.
NOTE: Programmers should use extension numbers
and not station circuit numbers when programming stations. Because the Station Exchange feature can be used
to change the extension numbers of station circuits, circuit numbers are not reliable references.
Page 4-99
DSS UNITS BEFORE STATION EXCHANGE
ASSOCIATED
ASSOCIATED
EXTENSION
NUMBER 101
NUMBER 200
AFIER STATION EXCHANGE
DSS ClRCUlT
01.03
DSS ClRCUlT
03.04
ASSOCIATED
Only assodded
ASSOCIATED
s t a t i o n c h a n g e s wm-i
w EXlENSlON
a
NUMBER 101
ENSION
NUMBER 200
DSS MAP 1
DSS Maps do
DSSMAP2
not change .
I
INTER-~PRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Et~ember1994
33.6 Examples of allowed and disallowed DSS/BLF
Unit exchanges include the following:
exchange again to place his extension number back
in the park position and return the default extension
to the office. The next worker would then bring in his
or her individual extension.
Allowed Exchanges:
. Digital Keyset with Digital DWBLF Unit with
another Digital Keyset with or without a Digital
DSWBLF Unit
l
Analog Keyset with Analog DSS/BLF Unit with
another Analog Keyset with or without an Analog
DWBLF Unit
Disallowed
.
Exchanges:
ADigital Keyset with Digital DSS/BLFUnit with an
Analog Keyset with or without an Analog DSS/BLF
unit
33.7 Attendant Computer Console stations can be exchanged with other Console stations or with Analog
Kcyset stations. They cannot exchange with Digital
%q’set stations or Single-Line stations. NOTE: Exchanges between a console and keyset station will cause
the keyset to lose station speed-dial locations l-3. This
is because those locations are automatically modified
by the system for use by the console. Speeddial locations l-3 will remain functional at the console station.
33.8 One of the station circuits used in the station exchange can be a “park” location (a circuit that is not
equipped with a circuit card or phone). However, this is
not required; two fully equipped stations can be exchanged as long as they meet the programming and station-type criteria discussed above. NOTE: Park locations are included in the system port count even if they
are not physically connected to a station circuit.
0 A user who changes offices periodically: If a work-
er spends a portion of the day in one location and
then moves to another location, he or she csn use the
Station Exchange feature to take his or her station
programming to the new location. The user can either move the extension in and out of a park location,
or simply exchange the two locations each time he or
- she changes.
NOTE: If a database save/restore is performed on the
system, stations that have been exchanged are not returned to their original programmed state. The exchange remains in effect.
33.a
(1)
(2)
Enter the extension number you wish to bring to
the station you are using. You hear a confirmation tone. The display shows the number you
dialed.
You will hear reorder tones and must start over if
any of the following occur:
- You entered an invalid extension number
- The extension number that you entered is not
programmed for Station Exchange
- You entered an extension number of mismatched station device type (digital vs. analog, or keyset vs. single-line)
33.10 Two possible applications for this feature include the following:
- You entered an extension number of a station
that is not idle
Multiple users of one station location: When sev-
eral people use the same phone, each person can
have his or her own station programming. For example, if three workers on different shifts use the same
office they can use their own extension numbers during their shifts. At the beginning of the shift, the
worker would enter the Station Exchange feature
code and password to swap the office’s default extension number with his own, which is kept in a park
position. During his shift, he can program and use his
phone as desired. At the end of the shift, he would
To bring a new extension number to your present
location, press SPCL and enter the Station Exchange feature code (303). You hear a confirmation tone. The display shows STN EXCHANGE
wlTHE2m
If the station you are using imwtprogranmedfor
Station Erchange, you hear reorder tones and the
station returns to’ idle state.
33.9 Neither station involved in the exchange can
have a call in progress, ringing, or recalling when an exchange is attempted. There can be calls on hold or hunt
group calls can be camped on, recalling, or ringing. If
the exchange is denied, the user hears reorder tones.
l
To EXCHANGE .?imli’ONS:
(3)
Page 4-100
Enter the Station Exchange Password for the extension number entered in step 2. When the password is accepted, you hear a confirmation tone.
Thestationyouareusingisresettoreflectthedatabase and user programming of the extension
number selected in step 2.
If you enteml an invalidpassword,
order tones and must start over.
you hear re-
FEATUEES
INTER-TELPRACTIcEs
IMX/GM.X 256 INS~TION & MAINTENANCE
Issue 1. November 1994
34. OPTIONAL DATA DEVICE
ATWCHMENTS (KEYSETS ONLY)
34.1 Acustomer-provided, modem-equipped data device (such as a data terminal or a personal computer)
may be attached to any IMX 12/24&e keyset or any Inter-Tel/DVK keyset that has an optional Data Port Module installed. A data device may also be attached to any
digital keyset with a PC Data Port Module (PCDPM)
and a Modem Data Port module (MDPM) installed. (See
SPECIPICATIONS, page 2-23, and INSTALLATION,
pages 34, 3-70, and 3-78, for more information.)
IMX 8-line keysets cannot have data device attachments because this feature requires a secondary voice
path which is only available on digital keysets, IMX
12./X-line keysets, and Inter-Tel/DVK keysets.
play shows the call cost and elapsed time of the
call.
(3)
When you hear modem tone, press the DATA
key. The call key is unlit or the individual trunk
key is lit. If using the speakmpho~ the SPKR
key goes off, the DATA key flutters, and the display returns to date and time. If using the handset, the DATA key flashes slowly.
(4
If using the ham&et,
(5)
Operate the data device according to the
manufacturer’s instructions.
NOTE: Because incoming calls must be transferred to
the data path by pressing the DATAkey, the auto-answer
feature on modems camtot be used to answer data calls
to a keyset.
34.2 Data calls can be placed to an intercom or outside
number using the keyset or a keyboard attached to the
data device. Ifusing a keyboard, the voice channel is automatically connected to the data device when it comes
off hook. Ifusing the keyset to place the call, the keyset
user presses the DATA key to comrect the trunk or intercom voice channel to the data device. By entering a feature code, data calls may be monitored through the
handset without interfering with the data transmission
(the microphone is muted).
343 Data calls are transmitted over the keyset’s secondary voice path (the MDPM voice path on digital keysets). This leaves the primary voice path available for
normal keyset operation. Receiving off-hook voice announce (OHVA) calls during a data call is not possible
since the data call is using the secondary voice path.
If you wish to return the data call to the primary
voicepath, press the DATA key. The call or indi-
vidual trunk key is lit and the call cost and
elapsed time are displayed.
34.6
(1)
(2)
Select an outside trunk and dial the telephone
number of the data device to be accessed. The
call or individual trunk key flashes and the dis-
To use the handset: Lift the handset.
To use the speakerphone: While on hook, press
the SPKR key.
(2)
Dial the extension number of the data device to
be accessed.
(3)
Notify the receiving party that you wish to connect the data device. When the called party activates the remote data device by pressing the
DAIA key, you hear modem tone. Or, if the extension number you dialed accesses an auto-answer modem connected to a single-line circuit,
you will hear modem tone immediately.
NOTE: If the receiving party wishes to transfer
the call to another party, the transfer must be
completed before the caller completes the next
step.
(4)
Press your DATA key. If using the speakerphone,
the SPKR key goes off and the DATA key flutters. If using the handset, the DATA key flashes
slowly.
0
If using the handset, hang up. The DNA key
(6)
Operate the data device according to the
manufacturer’s instructions.
To use the handset: Lift the handset.
To use the speakerphone: While on hook, press
the SPKR key.
TOACCESSAREMOllZDAZ4DEKtCEUSlNGlHEINlER-
COM:
34.4 The modem-equipped data device is connected
to the keyset by plugging the data device’s line cord
(normally intended for connection to a standard trunk)
into the modular jack on the keyset’s optional Data Port
Module or PCDPM.
(1)
hang up. The call key
remains unlit or the individual trunk key remains
lit, the DATA key flutters, and the display returns
to date and time.
Page 4-101
flutters.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
34.7
(1)
(2)
(3)
When you hear modem tone, press the DmA
key. (If on an outside call, the call key is unlit or
theindividualtrunkkeyissolidly lit).Ifusingthe
speakerphone, the SPKR key goes off and the
DKPA ke y flutters (and, if on an outside call, the
display returns to date and time). If using the
handset, the DATA key flashes slowly.
Ifusing the ha& hang up. (If on an outside
call, the call key is unlit or the individual trunk
key is solidly lit). The DATAkey flutters (and, if
on an outside call, the display returns to date and
time).
34.9
To ACCESS A REbfOlE
DAlX DEVICE USING AN
Al’ZXHW M O D E M - E Q U I P P W DA324 DEVICE:
TOMONll0RADATACALLINPROGRESS:
(1)
While a data transmission is active, lift the handset, press SPCL, and enter the Data Port Monitor
feature code (341). The DAPA key flashes slowly. (If connected to a trunk, the call key remains
unlit or the individual trunk key remains lit and
the display shows the call cost and elapsed time
of the call.)
(2)
You may listen to the data call without interfering with the data trausmission (the handset
microphone is muted). Hang up to discontinue
monitoring the data transmission; the data call is
still in progress and the DAfA key flutters.
Operate the data device according to the
manufacturer’s instructions.
34.8
(1)
NOTE: You cannot access system features (other than intercom and trunk access) by entering
feature codes through the data device keyboard.
34.10 lolERMlhtAlE
Following the procedures of your data device’s
cmnmunications software, instruct the device to
dial an extension number, or a trunk access code
and a telephone number, of the data device to be
accessed. The call will be processed as though
dialed from the keyset and will be automatically
connected when answered. The DmA key is lit
until dialing is completed, then it flutters. If the
resources are busy, the data device will not camp
on, but will receive continuous busy tones.
(2) Operate the data device according to the
manufacturer’s instructions.
Page 4-102
DAZ4 DEVICE CONA?EmON:
To have the data device disconnect the talk
Using the appropriate commands for the data device, instruct it to discommct from the call.
To use the keyset before discomectiug the
call: While on or off hook:
a . Press the lit DKfA key. The DMA key goes
off. If aksireci, speak to the party at the site of
the remote data device. This can onl y be done
if the modem at the site of the remote data device can be tuned off without disconnecting
the trunk.
b . To disconnect: If off hook hang up. If on
hook, press the SPKR key.
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICE!s
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
35. ATTENDANTFEATURES
35.5 IlltANS-GG:
35.1 This section describes the attendant-only
features including the functions of the Direct Station
Selection/Busy Lamp Field @SS/BLF) Unit. (Attendant Computer Console instructions are located in the
manual that is provided with the unit.)
(1)
35.2 All attendant stations must be equipped with
keysets and should have displays in order to identify
ring-in and recall sources. Also, for increased call-processing capabilities, attendant stations are generally
equipped with optional DSS/BLF Units or Attendant
Computer Consoles. DSS/BLF Units are described below, for Attendant Computer Console intormation, refer to the manual provided with the unit.
35.3 See page 4-50 for a complete description of
DSS/BLF Units. For DSS/BLF Units with speed-dial
I keys, see page 4-87 for operating instructions.
NOTE: Keyset stations do not have to be assigned as
attendant stations in order to use a DSS/BLF Unit. However, all keysets with DSS/BLF Units need to be identified in database progmmmmg (see PROGRAMMING,
page 5-132 ).
A.
If on an intenzom call, press the SFCL key and
enter the Transfer Intercom Call feature code
(346). Then press the desired DSS/BLF key (or
dial a station or voice mail extension number, a
hunt group pilot number, or a transfer-to-park
location number).
a . lkansfer to a station that is forwarded to
voice mail. If transfkning to a station that is
forwarded to voice mail, you hear repeating
double tones and the display shows DEST
FORWARDED To VOICE MAIL. You can
then hang up to complete the transfer, or return to the caller on transfer hold by doing
one of the following:
For an outside or in&corn call, press the
XFR key twice (or press the SPCL key once
and enter the Transfer Call feature code [345]
tWiCe).
For an outside call, press the call key or individual trunk key.
USING THE DSWBLF UNlT
If calling a kzyset with handsjke answering
enabled, you are immediately connected.
b . mfer to voice mail: If transferring to the
voice mail unit, you hear a single tone and the
system waits for you to enter the mailbox
number (display shows ENTER VOICE
MAILBOX #). Enter the desired mailbox
number.
If you do not enter a mailbox number before
you hang up, the caller will bc connected to
the voice mail unit and must enter the mailbox number after listening to the introductory voice prompts.
Ifpiking aprivate call, calling a hunt group,
calling a single-line set, or calling a keyset
with the hanakfke feature disabled, you hear
repeating double tones until the call is answered.
If the system is checking for a valid mailbox
number and you enter a valid mailbox numk the transfer is completed to voice mail
(display shows CALL TRANSFERRED To
VOICE h&IL).
35.4 PUCIIfGANINlERCOMCXLL
USINGA DSSREF UMT:
(1)
Lift the handset or press the SPKR key.
(2)
If you wish to place a private call to a keyset,
press the pound (#) key.
(3)
Press the desired DSS/BLF key.
(4)
If on an outside call, press the desired DSSIBLF
key (or press the XFR key and dial a station or
voice mail extension number, a hunt group pilot
number, or a transfer-to-Park location number).
The call is placed on transfer hold.
Ifthe system is enabled for immediate DSS/BLF
Unit off-hook voice announce, do not hang up
when calling a busy keyset. Press the DSS/BLF
key again. If the keyset’s secondary voice path is
available, you are immediately connected for an
off-hook voice announce call and may speak.
(For more information concerning the Off-Hook
Voice Announce feature, refer to page 4-61.)
Psge 4-103
If the system is checking for a valid mailbox
number and the number you entd is
invalti you hear reorder tones (display
shows INVALIDMAlLBOXNUhJBERENTERED) and you must enter the correct number.
If the system is not checking for a valid mailbox uruubq hang up to complete the transfer.
lNTER-TELPRACTIcEs
EeEember1994
IMX/GMX 256 INST4LLATION& MAINTENANCE
c. Wansfer-to-park:If transferring to a trans-
fer-to-park location, hang up to complete the
transfer, or transfer the call to hold as described in the second part of step 4. Then
page the desired party and announce the call.
The party must reverse transfer the call. Note
that if the call is not answered, it will recall
your station if transferred directly or will recall the called transfer-to-park location’s
attendant if transferred to hold.
hold and you are connected to the party waiting to be transferred.
b. Press the SPCL key and enter 338 again to
speak to the station user waiting to receive
the transfer and place the party to be transferred on hold.
c . Hang up to complete the transfer.
(4)
If d&r& wait for an answer and announce the
To transfer the call to hold: Press the HOLD
call. One of the following occurs:
key (or press the SPCL key and enter the Individual Hold feature code - 336) to place the call on
hold at the called station. The call will not ring or
send call waiting signals until the Hold timer exp&S.
a. If the call is accept& continue to step 3.
b. If the call is refuseri, the station is busy or
there is no answer: Skip to step 4 or do one of
the following.
To complete the transfer and then make a
To return to the caller: Do one of the fol-
page: Press the PAGE key. The call will automatically be transferred to hold at the called station and you will be connected to the paging network. Enter the desired paging zone code and
make your announcement before the Paging
timer expires.
lowing.
For an outside or intercom call, press
the XFR key twice (or press the SPCL
key once and enter the Transfer Call
feature code [345] twice).
For an outside call, press the call key or
individual trunk key.
(3)
To complete the transfer: Hang up, press an-
other call key, or press the IC key to complete the
transfer. The call will ring at the station. (Receiving station’s display shows XXK TRANSPER
PROM XXX or GRP #XX TRANSFER PROM
XXX.) If the station is busy, the call camps on
and sends call waiting signals.
d . lkansfer to a hunt group: Iftransferringthe
call to a hunt group, the transfer is automatically completed when you dial the pilot number. Hang up.
(2)
:
‘3
2
_
35.6 TOREVERSE
llUhWER(PICKUP)ACALLRLNGINGOR
HOLLWGATANOlHERSlM7ON:
To try another station: Rcss the XFS key
(1)
Lift the handset or press the SPKR key.
(or press the SPCL key and enter the Transfer
CO feature code -345, or the Transfer Intercom feature code - 346) and dial another
extension number.
(2)
EITHER, Press the DSS/BLP key of the station
where the call is ringing or holding and then
press the XFR key.
If it becomes necessary to split between the
calledparty and the caller waiting to be transfizr& you may use the Ke.yset Call Splitting
feature code as follows:
OR, Enter the Reverse Transfer feature code (4)
and then press the DSS/BLP key of the station
where the call is ringing.
(3)
a . Press the SPCL key and enter the Keyset Call
Splitting feature code (338). The station
waiting to receive the transfer is placed on
Page 4-104
Ifthe system is not programmed to automatically
connect reverse transfers, press the call or individual trunk key or IC key. The key is fluttering if
the call was on hold or flashing if the call was
ringing.
.;
:.’
INTEIt-TELPBACTIcE!3
IMX/GMX256lN~TION & MAINTENANCE
B .
ATl’ENBANTBFCALL
35.7 When a call is placed on hold .or is transferred
from one station to another, certain system timers limit
the amount of time the call may remain unattended.
After that time, the call recalls the station that transferred.it or placed it on hold. If the call remains unanswered at the station until the Recall timer expires, it recalls the station’s attendant If the attendant station is
busy, the call camps on and the display shows the source
of the recall. Ifthe call is not answered before the Abandoned Call timer expires, the system disconnects the
call.
35.8 If a station user transfers or forwards an outside
call to an outside telephone number and a loop start
trunk is involved (this does not apply to ground start
trunks), the call is limited by the Unsupervised CO
timer. When the timer expires, one of the outside parties
can reset the timer by pressing any M’MF key. If the
timer is not reset, the call recalls the primary attendant
station and causes the CNF key to flash. (Display keysets show UNSUPERVISED CO RECALL.) This
serves two purposes:
l
FEATUBES
Issue 1, November 1994
When you see a hold or transfer recall display (HOLD
RECALL FROM GRP #XX [or group name] RECALL
FROM EX XXX [or user namel) and hear a recall ring
signal (a repeating signal of four tones and a pause):
(1)
(2)
Lift the handset or press the SPKR key.
press the medium-flashing call key or individual
trunk key or press the ANSWER key. If more
than one trunk is recalling, pressing the
ANSWER key accesses the outside call indicated on the display.
35.12 TOANSWERAHOLVRECAU~OM~
INlERcobf CALL:
When you see a hold recall display (HOLD RECALL
FROM XXX) and hear a recall ring signal (a repeating
signal of four tones and a pause):
EIlHER,Lift the handset or press the SPKR
key, then press the IC key.
OR, For quick handsfree operation, simply press
the IC key.
NOTE: If you are busy when the intercom call
recalls, it will camp on. The IC key flashes at the
medium rate, but you do not hear recall ring signals.
It allows the attendant to monitor the length of COto-CO calls. When a CO-to-CO call recalls, the
attendant can disconnect the call or allow it to continue.
35.13 To ANSWER AN UNSUFERVl~ OVlWDE GILL REl
If the callers hang up before the attendant re.&ves
the recall, the system may not have disconnected the
trunks because a disconnect was not received from
the central office. The attendant must disconnect the
call.
35.9 Arecall signals the attendant’s station with a display message, a recall ring signal (a repeating signal of
four tones and a pause), and a call or individual trunk
key flashing at the medium rate. If there is no attendant,
or if the system is in night mode, the call recalls the station that transferred the call or placed it on hold until the
Abandoned Call timer expires; then the call is disconnected.
CALL
When you see the unsupervised recall display (UNSUPERVISED CO RECALL), hear a recall ring signal (a
repeating signal of four tones and a pause), and see the
CNF key flashing at the medium rate:
(1)
Lift the handset and press the CNF key to connect with both trunks. (If you have automatic CG
call access, you do not need to press the CNF
key.) The CNF key flashes slowly and the display
shows CONFERENCE WITH GRP #xX GRP
#XX.
(2)
Check to see if the trunk is still beii used.
(3)
If the parties am still talking, press the CNF key
again and hang up to return the parties to their
conversation. The CNF key flutters. You can enter the conference at any time by pressing the
fluttering CNF key. When the Conference-Hold
timer expires, the conference recalls your station
again.
35.10 If the attendant has calls forwarded, recalls
from stations follow internal call forward requests. Recalls do not forward to outside telephone numbers, but
recall the attendant’s station until they are answered or
the Abandoned Call timer expires. Placing the attendant’s station in do-not-disturb does not block recalls or
direct ring-in calls.
Page 4-105
If the parties have hung up, hang up to disconnect the call.
INTER-TEL4PRAcTICJsS
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
C.
PLACING THE SYSTEM IN NIGHT MODE
35.14 Each attendant can place the associated tenant
group in night mode to change the allowed-answer and
ring-in assignments to the night lists. The primary attendant can place the entire system (all tenant groups) in
day or night mode. There is no hold or transfer attendant
recall during night mode. Hold and transfer recalls ring
at the station that transferred them or placed them on
hold. If a recall is not answered before the Abandoned
Call timer expires, the call is disconnected. Unsupervised call recalls and unassigned DIDtrunks will continue to ring at the primary attendant’s station in night
mode.
night relay is programmed in the database (see page
5-73 in PROGRAMMIN G, and page 2-10 in SPECIFICKI’IONS for more infomation).
35.16
35.15 The night switch relay, if programmed, is activated when the system is placed in night mode and
turned off when the system is placed in day mode. The
Page 4-106
lV TUWNIGHTMODE ON OR Ol?F:
While on hook, press the SPCL key and enter the
Night Ring On/Off feature code (010). You hear
a single confirmation tone. Ifplacing the system
in night mode, the display shows SYSTEM IS
NOW IN NIGHT RING until the night mode is
canceled (this appears on all attendant’s displays
if the primary attendant placed the system in
night mode). If placing the system in day mode,
your display shows SYSTEM IS NOW IN DAY
RING for five seconds (if the primary attendant
placed the system in day mode the night mode
display is cleared at all other attendant stations).
FEATURFS
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSWLLATlON& MAINTENANCE
D. PROG RAMMING SPECIFIC STATION
INFORMATlON
35.20 TO PROGRAM SPECIFIC SlXlTONINFORbUl7ON:
Due to employee movement, change of status,
turnover, etc., certain specific station information, such
as user name, tenant group, department number, and
serving attendant may need to be changed. This can be
done from any attendant station. When programming
numbers, the attendant’s station is automatically in numeric mode; when programming the user name, the station is automatically in alphanumeric mode. Press the
MSG key to switch back and forth between alphanumeric and numeric mode.
(1)
While on hook, press the SPCL key and enter the
Program Station Data feature code (922). (Display keysets show PROGRAMMING EX’R.)
(2)
Enter the extension number (do not use the DSS/
BLF key) of the station that is to be reprogrammed and press SPCL. You will hear a continnation tone and the display shows
USERNAIvE% EX XXX (or the user name if it
exists).
[email protected]
To enter a new user name: Use one of the fol-
35.17
a . Arphanumeric mode (MSG key lit): Press the
keypad keys to enter the desired characters.
(Refer to the chart.) You may press the FWD
key once to advance or twice to leave a space.
Press the MUTE key to backspace.
35.18 In numeric mode, the keypad keys are used to
enter numbers O-9, the pound (#) key is used for entering a hyphen (-j, and the asterisk (*) key is used for entering a colon (:). For example, l*OO would enter “1:W’
in numeric mode.
b . Numeric mode (MSG kzy unlit): Press the
keypad keys to enter the desired number. Use
the pound key (#) for a hyphen (-) and the asterisk key (*) for a colon (:). Press the FWD
key once to leave a space, or press the MUTE
key to backspace.
35.19 In alphanumeric mode, keypad keys are used to
enter the desired letters, numbers, and punctuation. The
number of times a key is pressed determines which character is entered. For example, 533266 would enter
“JEAN.” When adjoining characters are located under
the same key, press the FWD key to advance to the next
character. For example, 66FWD6667776 would enter
“NORM.” Refer to the chart below to program information in alphanumeric mode. (Note that letters correspond to the letters printed on the keypad keys.)
1
To erase the current name: Repeatedly press
the MUTE key until the lower portion of the display shows NONE.
To leave the information the same: Proceed to
the next step.
(4)
Ress the SPCL key to update the database and
advance to the next prompt. You will hear a confirmation tone and the display shows TENANT
GROUP X (and, if programmed, the tenant
group name will display on the second line).
0
To enter a new tenant group number: Ress the
pound (#) key to scroll forward through the list or
the asterisk (*) key to scroll backward.
1
KEY
lowing methods.
[email protected]
To leave the information the same: Proceed to
the next step.
(6)
Page 4- 107
Press the SPCL key to update the database and
advance to the next prompt. You will hear a confirmation tone and the display shows DEPARTMENT XX (and, if programmed, the department
name will display on the second line).
lNTER-TELPRAcTIcEs
IMX/GMX256 INST4LLATION& MAINTENANCE
Ete~emher 1994
(7)
(9)
To enter a new department number: Press the
To erase the current attendant: Repeatedly
pound (#) key to scroll forward through the list or
the asterisk (*) key to scroll backward.
press the MUTE key until the lower portion of
the display shows NONE.
To leave the information the same: Proceed to
To leave the information the same: Proceed to
the next step.
the next step.
Press the SPCL key to update the database and
advance to the next prompt. You will hear a confirmation tone and the display shows
ATI’ENDNT: EX XXX (or NONE).
(10)
Press the SPCL key to update the database and
advance to the next prompt. You will hear a confirmation tone and the display shows PROGIUMMINGEXT:.
NOTE: This display will not appear if the station
being programmed is an attendant.
cw
To program another station: Repeat the pro-
cess with another extension number.
To enter a new serving attendant number:
To terminate the programming sequence: Lift
Enter the number using the keypad (it is automatically in the numeric mode).
and replace the handset or allow the timer to expire. The display will return to date and time.
Page 4-108
lNTEx-TELPRACTIcES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
E. PROGRAMMING SYSTEM
MESSAGES
35.21
REMINDER
35.25
The stored system reminder messages can be
changed from any attendant’s keyset. (See page 4-98 for
information concerning their use.) When the system is
in the default state, the 20 reminder messages listed below are programmed. Attendants can delete them or
change them to any other value (up to 16 characters).
01 MEETING
02SlXFFMEEllNG
03 SALE.SMEETING
04 CANCELMEETING
05APPoIImaNT
06 PucEcAIL
07cALLcLIENT
08 cALLcLJsroMER
09 CALLHOME
10 CAUCORFO~
Issue 1, No”==
11 CALLENGJNEERING
1 2
C A L L - G
13 CAUACCOUNTING
14 CANCELDND
15 cANcELcAu.FwD
16 TAKEMEDICXITON
17 MAKERESERVAl-lON
18 REVIEWSCHEDULE
19 LUNCH
2oREhfINDER
TOPROGRAMA REbfINDER
bfiLSSAGE:
NOTE: Lift and replace the handset to stop the Process
without selecting a message.
0)
While on hook, Press the SPCL key and enter the
Program System Reminder Messages feature
code (023). Display shows PROGRAM REMINDER MESSAGE.
(2)
To select a specific message: Enter the two-digit
message code (01-20). Display shows selected
message.
To scroll through the messages: press the
35.22 When programming, the attendant’s station is
automatically in alphanumeric mode. Press the MSG
key to switch back and forth between alphanumeric and
numeric mode.
pound (#) key to scroll forward or press the asterisk (*) key to scroll backward. Each message displays for one second before another can be
selected.
(3)
35.23 In numeric mode, the keypad keys are used to
enter numbers O-9, the Pound (#) key is used for enteriug a hyphen (-), and the asterisk (*) key is used for entering a colon (:). For example, l*OO would enter “l:OO”
in numeric mode.
35.24 In alphanumeric mode, keypad keys are used to
enter the desired letters, numbers, and punctuation. The
number of times a key is pressed determines which character is entered. For example, 33377744432999 would
enter ‘FRIDAY.” When adjoining characters are located under the same key, press the FWD key once to advance to the next character. For example, 6 FWD 666
FWD 6632999 would enter “MONDAY.” Refer to the
following chart to Program information in alphanumeric mode. (Note that letters correspond to the letters
Printed on the keypad keys.)
To enter a new message: Use one of the follow-
ing methods.
a . Alphummeti mo& (MSG key lit): Press the
keypad keys to enter the desired characters.
Refer to the chart. You may press the FWD
key once to advance or twice to leave a space.
Press the MUTE key to backspace.
b. Numeric mode (MSG key unlit): Press the
keypad keys to enter the desired number. Use
the pound key (#) for hyphen (-) and the
asterisk key (*) for colon (:). Ress the FWD
key once to leave a space, or press the MUTE
key to backspace.
To erase the current message: Ress the MUTE
key repeatedly until the display shows NONE.
To leave the message the same: Lift and replace
the handset. (You will exit the programming sequence and your display will return to date and
time.)
Ress the SPCL key to update the database. You
will hear a confnmation tone and the display
shows PROGRAM REMlNDER MESSAGE.
To program another message: Repeat steps 2
through 4 for another message.
To terminate the programming sequence: Lift
*
l
,
#
#
*
S
and replace the handset, allow the timer to expire, or press the SPKR key, IC key, or any trunk
access key. (Display returns to date and time.)
(
>
-
Page 4-109
FEAIssue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
F. P R O GRAMMING SYSTEM
DO-NOT-DISTURB MESSAGES
3530
35.26 The stored system do-not-disturb messages can
be changed from any attendant station. (See page 4-95
for information concerning their use.) When the system
is in the default state, the 20 do-notdisturb messages
listed below are programmed. Attendants can delete or
change messages 02-20 to any other desired value (up to
16 characters). Message 01 @ND) camtot be changed.
01 DO-NOT-DISNRB
02 INhiETlNGUNTlL
03 INMEEllNG
04 ON VACXTION ‘TIL
O S ONVACM-ION
06 CAILMEAr
1 1 OUTOFOFFICE
1 2 OUTUNTIL
1 3 WITHAUJENT
14WlTHAGLJEST
1 5 WiTHAPM-JENT
1 6 UNAVAILABLE
1 7 lNamFERFacE
18 AWAY FROM DESK
19 GONEHOME
07 cAuMEAFl-m
03 AWAYM
09 ONBREAK
10 OUTOFTOWN’TIL
NOTE. If you make a mistake while programming, lift
and replace the handset to stop the process without selecting a message. Then, stsrt over.
(1)
While on hook, press the SFCL key and enter the
Program System Do-Not-Disturb Messages feature code (024). (Display keysets show PROGRAM DND MESSAGE.)
(2)
To select a specificmessage: Enter the two-digit
message code (02-20). Display shows selected
message.
To scroll through the messages: press the
pound (#) key to scroll forward or press the asterisk (*) key toscroll backward. Each message displays for one second before another can be
selected.
20 0uTToLuNcH
35.27 When programming, the attendant’s keyset is
automatically in alphanumeric mode. Press the MSG
key to switch back and forth between modes.
35.28 In numeric mode, the keypad keys are used to
enter numbers O-9, the pound (#) key is used for entering a hyphen (-), and the asterisk (*) key is used for entering a colon (:). For example, l*OO would enter“l:OO”
in numeric mode.
NOTE: DND message number 01 (DO-NOTDISTURR) cannot be changed.
(3)
b. Numeric me& (MSG key dir): Ress the
keypad keys to enter the desired number. Use
the pound key (#) for hyphen (-) and the
asterisk key (*) for colon (:). Press the FWD
key once to leave a space, or press the MUTE
key to backspace.
To erase the current message: Press the MUTE!
key repeatedly until the display shows NONE.
nuumffnyEsKEywpREssm
1
2
9
4
To enter a new message: Use one of the following methods.
a. Alphunumeric mode (MSG key lit): Press the
keypad keys to enter the desired characters.
Refer to the chart. You may press the FWD
key once to advance or twice to leave a space.
Press the MUTE key to backspace.
35.29 In alphanumeric mode, keypad keys are used to
enter the desired letters, numbers, and punctuation. The
numbeI of times a key is pressed determines which character is entered. For example, 33377744432999 would
enter “FRIDAY.” When adjoining characters are located under the same key, press the FWD key once to advance to the next character. For example, 6 FWD 666
FWD 6632999 would enter “MONDAY.” Refer to the
following chart to program information in alphanumeric mode. (Note that letters correspond to the letters on
the keys.)
KEY
To PROGRAMA DO-NOT-DISTURB bfE!SAGE:
To leave the message the same: Lift and replace
the handset. (You will exit the programming sequence and your display will return to date and
time.)
5
(4)
Ress the SPCL key to update the database. You
will hear a confirmation tone and the display
shows PROGRAM DND MESSAGE.
(9
To program another message: Repeat steps 2
through 4 for another message.
To terminate the programming sequence: Lift
and replace the handset, allow the timer to expire, or press the SPKR key, IC key, or any trunk
access key. (Display returns to date and time.)
Page 4-110
INTER-TELPRACTICES
WGMX 256 INS’JXLLATION & MAINTENANCE
‘I
G.
SE’ITING TIME OF DAY AND DATE
(3)
3531 Occasionally, the system time or date needs to
be reset (for example, for daylight-saving time). Any
attendant can change the date and time message that ap
pears on all display keysets and in the SMDA and
SMDR reports.
35.32
T~SETTHE TME OFDAYAMI DATE:
NOTE: If you make a mistake, lift and replace the handset, then start over. If an invalid date or time is entered,
the keyset displays ERROR! INVALID TME/DTE HNTERED; you must start over.
(1)
Use the keypad keys to enter the time in hours
and minutes. Then press the asterisk (*) key for
AM or the pound (#) key for PM. For example,
enter 900* for 9:OOAM or 230# for 2:3OPM.
(Display keysets show SET DATE MM-DD=I
(3)
Use the keypad keys to enter the month, day, and
year. For example, press 01011990 for
01-01-1990. You may backspace to correct entries by pressing the MUTE key. (When finished,
display shows SET DAY OF WEEK SUN.)
Select the day of week by scrolling through the
selections. Press the pound (#) key to go forward
or the asterisk (*) key to go backward. When the
desired day is displayed, press the SPKR key or
lift and replace the handset to terminate programming. Check the date and time of day on the
display.
(4)
3534
CAZLS:
(2)
35.35 An attendant can cancel Call Forward and/or
Do-Not-Disturb for any or all stations that have dialxero access to that attendant’s station.
3536
locANcELFE4TuREs:
(1)
While on hook, press the SPCL key.
-(2)
Enter one of the following feature codes:
a. Cancel all station do-not-disturb requests
(012)
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
To REMOK OR REPLXE A SZKZION’S
HUNT GROUP
While on hook, press the SPCL key.
Enter one of the following feature codes:
a . Remote Hunt Group Replace (032) to restore
hunt group calls.
b. Remote Hunt Group Remove (033) to halt
hunt group calls.
Cancel
Cancel
Cancel
Cancel
Cancel
all station forward requests (013)
all station DND/FWD requests (014)
station do-not-disturb request (015)
station forward request (016)
station DND/FWD request (017)
If clearing an individual station (using code 015,
(3)
016, or 017), dial the extension number or press
the DSS/BLF key after entering the feature code.
J.
GENERATING AN SMDAREPORT
3 5 3 7 Aprogramming option can be enabled that allows the attendant to generate an SMDA report on demand. The content of the report is determined by the
programmed SMDAformat as described on page 4-115.
Printing reports using this method does not clear the accumulated data.
35.38
T O GEhWbilZANSMDAREmRT:
While on hook, press SPCL and enter the Attendant SMDA feature code (025). The report bereprinting via the port designated in the data.
REMOTE HUNT GROUP
REMOVE/REPLACE
35.33 An attendant can temporarily halt (or restore)
hunt group calls for any or all stations that have dial-zero
access to that attendant’s station. The at&dam uses the
Remote Hunt Group Remove/Replace feature codes as
described below.
(1)
REMOTE STATION FEATURE CANCEL
While on hook, press the SPCL key and enter the
Set Time Of Day feature code (021). (Display
keysets show SET TIME OF DAY.)
(2)
H.
I.
Dial the extension number or press the DWBLF
key of the desired station.
K.
PAGING SPEAKER BACKGROUND
MUSIC (PRIMARY A’ITENDANT ONLY)
35.39 The primary attendant can turn background music on and/or off for the external paging speakers. Music
is interrupted by pages. The music channel for the external paging speakers is set in database programming (refer to page 5-67 in PROGRAMMING).
35.40
page 4-111
TO TURNRACKGROUND
MUSIC ON OR OFF:
While on hook, press the SPCL key and enter the
Paging Speaker Background Music feature code
(018). Enter the desired external port number
(l-9) to toggle the music on or ofE, or enter 0 to
turn off all ports.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
L. SYSTEM ALARMREPORTING
NOTE: Calls being transmitted over the secondary voice path are not affected or interrupted by an off-hook alarm condition.
35.41 The system’s alarm reporting feature detects
equipment failures, determines the impact, and classifies the problem as a major or minor alarm. Minor
alarms are indicated on the primary attendant’s station
display and can be programmed to appear on all attendants’ keysets. Roth major and minor alarms are printed
in the error report printout. Major alarm messages appear on all display keysets. Attendants using Attendant
Computer Consoles will receive an ALARM STXTUS
DISPLAY (refer to the manual supplied with the unit).
b . #/02, ##03, or #O4 PRINTER TlMEOU’X: The
indicated printer is not functioning properly.
Check that the cable and the power cord are
connected and that it has paper and ribbon.
c. #30 TOLL SECURITY FEATURE EXPIRED: This alarm indicates that the Weekly
Toll Limit feature is no longer in effect. It can
be re-enabled only by Inter-Tel Services personnel.
35.42 The first four minor alarms indicate problems
that can be corrected without calling service personnel.
AR other minor alarms require attention from service
personnel. Refer to page 6-8 in TROUBLRSHOOTING
for a listing of the possible alarms and their meanings.
d. #31 TOLL SECURITY LIMlT EXCEEDED
and #34 TOLL SECURITY LIMIT AT 80%:
The weekly limit for one or both types of
monitored calls is 80% or 100% depleted.
The programmer can set the limit to a higher
value or reset it to zero. (When either of these
alarms is displayed, any further alarms will
not overwrite the display.)
35.43 lORESFOND TOAbfINORSYSTEMALARMFROMANY
AUltbfDISPUYSZ4lTON:
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
I
When a minor alarm indication appears
(WARNING! SYSTEM ALARM #XX), write
down the alarm number, alarm message, date,
and time.
e. #32 TOLL SECURITY DAZd CHANGED:
This indicates that the weekly toll limit information has been changed in the database.
While on hook, clear the message displayed by
pressing the SPCL key and entering the Clear
System Alarm feature code (019).
f. #33 DISA SECVRITY LMlT EXCEEDEDED:
This indicates that a DISA caller has entered
an invalid password three consecutive times.
DISAwill not answer that trunk for five minutes after the third invalid password has been
entered.
If the alam message is #OS or #IO or highec contact service personnel.
If the alarm message is #KU -04, cometthepmbhl:
a . #01 SZXI7ON Xxy OFF-HOOK: The indicated station remained off hook and inactive
until the Inactivity Alarm timer expired. The
SMDR also indicates which station is off
hook. The station’s key on DSS/BLP Units
and on other stations’ SD keypads flutters
continuously. Have the station user replace
the handset in the cradle. The alarm will automatically clear when the station user hangs
UP.
35.44 A major alarm message, WARNING! MAJOR
ALARM, appears on all display keysets in the event of a
major system reset. If the major alarm appears on on a
group of keysets, the associated KSC board has failed.
(Or dual-circuit 8-line AIM keysets have been installd
on KSC-D circuits that are not programmed as “dual”
circuits.) The warning might also appear on a single
keyset if the keyset is defective. Major alarms require
immediate attention from sedce personnel.
Page 4-112
INTER-TELPRACTICES
WGMX 256 INSTACLATION
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
& MAINTENANCE
M. PLACING A TRUNK OUT OF SERVICE
FOR MAINTENANCE
35.48
lV PLACE A lRUhX OUT OF SERWCE FOR bMh?lENMCE USLNGGANIhllMDUAL lRUUKKEY~ONHO0~:
35.45 Ifrequested to do so by service personnel, attendants can place individual trunks out of service by entering a feature code. This temporarily unequips the trunk
in database programming, but does not affect incomiug
signals on the trunk. To outside callers, the trunk will ap
pear to be functioning and callers will hear ringing.
However, users cannot access the trunk for receiving or
placing calls until the attendant places the trunk back
into service by entering another feature code.
35.46 The advantage of using this feature instead of
removing the trunk in the database, is that all programming for the trunk is preserved and the trunk returns to
complete functionality as soon as it is returned to service
and no additional programming is required.
NOTE: Each TIC is equipped with a “make busy”
switch for removing all circuits on the card from service
and placing them back in again. Pressing the switch will
light its LED and begin the process of “busying out”
each circuit not in use. The circuits that are in use are
then busied out as soon as the users hangs up.
35.47 If the attendant has an individual trunk key for
the trunk, the CO Trunk Maintenance feature code can
be used to place the trunk out of and into service. Ifthe
attendant does not have an individual trunk key, the
trunk can only be placed out of service while the attendant is connected to that trunk and a call key is used. The
call key camtot be used to place the trunk back in service. All trunks that were placed out of service can be
returned to service at once by entering the Remove All
TN& From Maintenance feature code.
(1)
While on hook, press SPCL and enter the CO
Trunk Maintenance feature code (027). The display shows SPECIFY TRUNK FOR MAINTENANCE.
(2)
Press the individual trunk key associated with
the circuit you wish to remove from service. (If
the programmiq~ mode times out before you
press a key, the display shows TRUNK
IMPROPERLY SPECIFIED and you must start
over.)
35.49
To PLiCE A ZWNKLVSERWCE AGAIN USCNG ANLU-
DMDUAL WUh!KKEY(lKWLE ONHOOK):
(1)
While on hook, press SPCL and enter the CO
Trunk Maintenance feature code (027). The display shows SPECIFY TRUNK FOR MAINTENANCE.
(2)
Press the associated individual trunk key for the
trunk to be returned to service.
35.50
l0 PLACE A lRUNK OUT OF SERWCE FOR bfk%lENANCE USING A CALL KEy(lYHlLE ONA CALL):
(1)
While on a call, press SPCL and enter the CO
Trunk Maintenance feature code (027).
(2)
Hang up. The trunk is placed out of service.
35.51
Page 4-113
To PIACEALL liXJN?SINSERWCE:
While on hook, press SPCL and enter the Remove All Trunks From Maintenance feature
code (028).
lNTER-TELPRAcTIcEs
IMWGMX 256 lNSTALLAT.ION & MAINTENANCE
call types for call cost calculation (call cost type is programmed in the database).
36. RECORD KEEPING AND
MAINTENANCEFEATURES
0 Free
A.
CALL COST ACCOUNTING
. Local
36.1 The Call Cost Accounting feature estimates the
cost of outgoing and incoming calls, displays it on the
keysets, and prints it in the SMDR reports. The cost is
based on the type of call, telephone number dialed, the
elapsed time of the call, the day of the week, and the
time ofday. Atable in the database supplies the rates for
all types of calls, including multiplicative factors for
evening and weekend rate changes on outgoing calls.
The equation for calculating call cost is:
Daytime Rate X Multiplicative FactorX Connect Time.
36.2 The multiplicative factor adjusts the daytime
per-minute call cost for evening and weekend rates of
outgoing calls. For example, the evening call cost multiplier is 0.65 if calls are 35% less expensive after
5:OOPM. The daytime rate (II), evening Q multiplicative factor, and night/weekend (N/W) multiplicative
factors are used on the following schedule:
. Toll Local
. Toll Long Distance
0 Operator/Jntemational
36.5 When a trunk that is subject to toll restriction is
used, call cost type is determined according to the digits
dialed, as follows:
Free: Any call within a PBX (a trunk access code is
not dialed) is a free call.
Local: The following calls are classified as local
Calls:
- Calls to Nil or lN11 (where N is 2-9), except
411 or 1411
- Any call to area code 800
- All 7digit or lOdigit calls within a home area
code to office codes that are allowed in User
Group 1
- Any call that does not begins with 1, and does not
fall into any of the other call cost categories
TollLocal: The following calls are classified as toll
local calls:
- Any calls to 411 or 1411
NOTE: The 256 System’s Call Cost Accounting feature
is intended to provide a cost estimate that is applied to
the various classes of calls. Due to the wide variation in
charges among network carriers, the system’s call cost
calculation cannot be used as a prediction of actual
charges. This feature can only be used as a management
tool to estimate call cost.
363 If call cost is set to zero, call cost will not display
during the call and the SMDR printout will show
$00.00.
36.4 All outgoing calls using a trunk that is not s&jfzct
to toll restriction are classified as one of the following
Page 4-114
- All 7digit or [email protected] calls within a home area
code to office codes that are restricted in User
Group 1
- Any call that begins with 1, that does not fall into
any of the other call cost categories
Toll Long Disrauce: Any call to an ares code other
than a home area code is classified as a toll long distance call.
Operator/International: Any call starting with 0 or
containing only 0 is classified as operatorlintcmational (0, 0+, Ol+, Oil+).
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
B.
STATION ME!%AGE DETAIL
ACCOUNTING (SMDA)
Issue 1, No”%=
System: SMDAprinta call information for the entire
system, including:
NOTE: This feature is available only in the Extended
and Extend&plus Tl and E&M software packages.
Station Message Detail Accounting (SMDA) is a
system feature that provides management and accounting records for estimating the telephone company’s
charges. This information can be used to analyze system
traffic and employee productivity.
36.6
36.7 This data can be recorded on a customer-provided printer or alternate device, such as a magnetic tape
or floppy disk. The device is connected to the peripheral
connector panel on the back of the equipment cabinet
and must be placed within 50 feet (15 meters) of the
equipment cabinet. It can be the same device used for
the SMDR report. If so, the SMDR information is buffered (up to 427 records) while the SMDA report prints.
Refer to SPEClFICKTIONS, page 2-31, for details.
36.8 Each of the 16 SMDA reports divides incoming
and outgoing calls and can be automatically generated
daily, weekly, or monthly. They can also be generated on
demand through the attendant station using the attendant SMDA feature code or through database programming (refer to page 5-138 in PROGRAMMING). Reports can include the information outlined in the
following sections.
Account Code Reports
36.9 Call information can be printed for up to 255 account codes. Each time a standard, forced, or optional
account code is used, the system opens a “record” for
that code. Every time a call is placed that uses that code,
the call data is added to the record for that account code.
If more than 255 codes are used, the last record (number
256) is used for the overflow record. That is, if 262 different codes are used, call data for the last six will be
combined in record 256. For each account code, information includes the total number of calls handled, total and average duration of calls, and the total and average cost of calls.
- Number of transfers and recalls
- Average answer time
- Number of unanswered calls
- Average ring time (unanswered)
- Number of equipped trunks
- DISA calls
Hunt groups: Total number of calls, total ringing
call duration, and average ringing duration are
shown for calls to each hunt group. The ringing duration is the amount of time the call spent circulating
(unanswered) through the hunt group. If a call recalls and then is transferred back to the hunt group, it
is not counted as an additional call, but it will add to
the ringing duration figure. A call sent to the hunt
group by any station other than a recall destination
will add to the call count.
Tenant pups: Call information is printed sepa-
rately for each tenant group.
Tenants and departments: Call information for
each tenant group is divided into departments.
Detailed Reports
36.11 These reports can show call information for all
users, listed by system, tenant group, or tenant/department. Separate reports are also available by tenant/department, individual stations, or trunks. The following
call information can be requested:
System, tenant, or tenant/department by call
cost: Total and average cost of calls for users in the
selected group of stations, including:
- Station circuit numbers
Summary Reports
36.10 Call information can be selected for the system
units listed below. Information includes the total number of calls handled, number of incoming and outgoing
calls, total and average duration of incoming and outgoing calls, total and average cost of incoming and outgoing calls, and number of users.
Page 4-115
- Extension numbers
- User names
System, tenant, or tenant/department by call
duration: Total and average duration of calls for the
selected group of stations, including:
- Station circuit numbers
- Extension numbers
- User names
INTER-TELPRACTICES
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
IMX/GMX 2545 INSmTlON & MAINTENANCE
System, tenant, or tenant/department by number
of calls: Total number of calls for the selected group
of stations, including:
- Station circuit numbers
- Extension numbers
- User names
- station circuit mmlbers
0 Listed by selected trunk: Includes the following for
- Extension mrmbers
selected tnmks:
- User names
- Trunk circuit number
Tenant/department listed by station number: In-
- Number of incoming and outgoing calls
cludes the following for all stations in each department of each tenant group.
- Average answer time
- Number of calls
- Number of unanswered calls
- Incoming and outgoing call duration
- Average ring time for unanswered calls
- Incoming and outgoing call cost
- Total cost and duration of incoming and outgoing calls
- Number of users
- Average duration and cost of incoming and outgoing calls
- Station circuit numbers
- Extension numbers
- User names
Listed by selected station: Includes the following
for selected stations:
- Number of calls
- Inccming and outgoing call duration
- Incoming and outgoing call cost
- Number of users
36.12 When progre the output, the installer can
choose to clear the SMDA information after each report
or let it remain in the memory to be accumulated and included in all later reports. This gives the customer the
option of having limited or comprehensive reports.
36.13 The SMDA output reports are printed in the format shown in the following figures. Figure 4-2 on the
next page shows the account code report format, Figure
4-3onpage4-118showsthesummaryreportformat, and
Figure 4-4 on page 4-120 shows the detailed report. All
reports are 80 characters wide. The number of days included in each report is set during programming.
:’
Page 4-116
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INS’lALLATION & MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 4-2.
SMDA ACCOUNT CODE REPORT FORMAT
Detailed Account Code Report
Data Collection Period Began
0O:OO Man-Ol-Jan-1990
0O:OO Mon-Ol-Jan-1990
Inter-Tel 256
Report by Account Code
Reports listed by Account Number
l-. Account Code [number or overflow record]
Total Number of Calls Handled
Number of Incoming Calis
Number of Outgoing Calls
Total Duration of,Calls Handled
Duration of Incoming Calls
Ave. Duration of Incoming Calls
Duration of Outgoing Calls
Ave. Duration of Outgoing Calls
Total Cost of Calls Handled
Cost of Incoming Calls
Ave. Cost of Incoming Calls
Cost of Outgoing Calls
Ave. Cost of Outgoing Calls
x,-r==
X=,X=
=,=
H,HHH:MM:SS
HHH:MM:SS
H:MM:SS
HHH:MM:SS
H:MM:SS
$X,xXx.xX
$XXX.XX
$XX.XX
$XXX.XX
$XX.XX
NOTE: When a maximum value has been reached (65,535 records per account code, 4,660 hours, and/or $167,772.15)
the value starta over at 0.
Page 4-117
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMJUGMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 4-3.
SMDA SUMMARY REPORT FORMAT
Station Message Detail Accounting
Data Collection Period Began
0O:OO Mon-Ol-Jan-1990
0O:OO Mon-Ol-Jan-1990
Inter-Tel 256
System Summary Report
Total Number of Calls
Number of Incoming Calls
Number of Outgoing Calls
Number of Transfers/Retialls
Average Answer Time
Number of Unanswered Calls
Average Ring Time -- Unanswered
XI==,==
==I==
=X,=
X=,X=
H:MM:SS
=,=
H:MM:SS
Total Duration of Calls
Duration of Incoming Calls
Ave. Duration of Incoming Calls
Duration of Outgoing Calls
Ave. Duration of Outgoing Calls
H,HHH:MM:SS
HHH:MM:SS
H:MM:SS
HHH:MM:SS
H:MM: SS
Total
Cost
Ave.
Cost
Ave.
Cost of Calls
of Incoming Calls
Cost of Incoming Calls
of Outgoing Calls
Cost of Outgoing Calls
$X,xXx.xX
$XXX.XX
$XX.XX
-$XXX.XX
$XX.XX
Total
Total
Ave.
Total
Ave.
Number of DISA Calls
Duration of DISA Calls
Duration of DISA Calls
Cost of DISA Calls
Cost of DISA Calls
x,=,x=
H,HHH:MM:SS
H:MM:SS
$X,xXx.xX
$XX.XX
Number of Users
Number of Equipped CO Trunks
xxx
xx
Station Message Detail Accounting
Data Collection Period Began
0O:OO Mon-01-Jan-1990
0O:OO Mon-Ol-Jan-1990
Summary Report for Hunt Group
Hunt Group 01:
Total Number of Calls Handled
Total Duration of Ringing Calls
Ave. Duration of Ringing Calls
Hunt Group 02:
Page4-118
X,~,xxx
H,HHH:MM:SS
H:MM:SS
FEATmEs
INTER-TELPRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & lWUNTENANCE
Issue 1, November 1994
FIGURE 4-3. SMDA SUMMAR Y REPORT FORMAT (CONT’D)
Station Message Detail Accounting
Data Collection Period Began
0O:OO Mon-Ol-Jan-1990
0O:OO Mon-Ol-Jan-1990
Inter-Tel 256
Summary Report for
Tenant
Tenant 01: [tenant name]
Total Number of Calls Handled
Number of Incoming Calls
Number of Outgoing Calls
Total Duration of Calls Handled
Duration of Incoming Calls
Ave. Duration of Incoming Calls
Duration of Outgoing Calls
Ave. Duration of Outgoing Calls
Total
Cost
Ave.
Cost
Ave.
Cost of Calls Handled
of Incoming Calls
Cost of Incoming Calls
of Outgoing Calls
Cost of Outgoing Calls
x,-t=
xXx,=
xXx,=
H,HHH:MM:SS
HHH:MM:SS
H:MM:SS
HHH:MM:SS
H:MM:SS
$X,xXx.xX
$XXX.XX
$XX.XX
$XXX.XX
$XX.XX
Number of Users
xxx
Inter-Tel 256
Report for Tenant/Department
Summary
Tenant 01: [tenant name]
Department 01: [department
name]
Total Number of Calls Handled
Number of Incoming Calls
Number of Outgoing Calls
Total Duration of Calls Handled
Duration of Incoming Calls
Ave. Duration of Incoming Calls
Duration of Outgoing Calls
Ave. Duration of Outgoing Calls
Total
Cost
Ave.
Cost
Ave.
Cost of Calls Handled
of Incoming Calls
Cost of Incoming Calls
of Outgoing Calls
Cost of Outgoing Calls
02:
$X,xXx.xX
$XXX.XX
$XX.XX
$XXX.XX
$XX.XX
xxx
Number of Users
Department
H,HHH:MM:SS
HHH:MM:SS
H:MM:SS
HHH:MM:SS
H:MM:SS
[department
name]...
Page 4-119
FEATURES
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELf PRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INS-TION & MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 4-4.
SMDA DETAILED REPORT FORMAT
Station Message Detail Accounting 0O:OO Mon-Ol-Jan-1990
Data Collection Period Began
0O:OO Mon-Ol-Jan-1990
Detailed System Report
or, Detailed Report for Tenant
or, Detailed Report for Tenant/Department
Sorted by Total Cost
1. Station Circuit XX.Y. EXXX {user name]
Total Cost of Calls Handled
Cost of Incoming Calls
Ave. Cost of Incoming Calls
Cost of Outgoing Calls
Ave. Cost of Outgoing Calls
$X,xXx.xX
$XXX.XX
$XX.XX
$XXX.XX
$XX.XX
or, Sorted by Total Duration
1. Station Circuit XX.Y EXXX [user name]
Total Duration of Calls Handled
Duration of Incoming Calls
Ave. Duration of Incoming Calls
Duration of Outgoing Calls
Ave. Duration of Outgoing Calls
H,HHH:MM:SS
HHH:MM:SS
H:MM:SS
HHH:hlM:SS
H:MM:SS
or, Sorted by Number of Calls
1. Station Circuit XX.Y EXXX [user name]
Total Number of Calls Handled
Number of Incoming Calls
Number of Outgoing Calls
Page4-120
x,-t=
=,=
-,xXx
-“;
$
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IM.X/GMX
256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 4-4.
SMDA DETAILED REPORT FORMAT (CONT’D)
Station Message Detail Accounting 0O:OO Mon-Ol-Jan-1990
Data Collection Period Began
0O:OO Mon-Ol-Jan-1990
Detailed
Inter-Tel 256
Report for Tenant/Department
Listed by Station Number
Tenant 01: [tenant name]
Department 01: [department name]
1. Station Circuit XX.Y EXXX [user name]
Total Number of Calls Handled
Number of Incoming Calls
Number of Outgoing Calls
Total Duration of Calls Handled
Duration of Incoming Calls
Ave. Duration of Incoming Calls
Duration of Outgoing Calls
Ave. Duration of Outgoing Calls
Total
Cost
Ave.
Cost
Ave.
x,xXx,xXx
=,=
=,=
H,HHH:MM:SS
HHH:MM:SS
H:MM:SS
HHH:MM:SS
H:MM:SS
Cost of Calls Handled
of Incoming Calls
Cost of Incoming Calls
of Outgoing Calls
Cost of Outgoing Calls
$X,xXx.xX
$XXX.XX
$XX.XX
$XXX.XX
$XX.XX
Detailed Report for Selected Stations
Stations Listed By Circuit Number
1. Station Circuit XX.Y EXXX [user name]
Total Number of Calls Handled
Number of Incoming Calls
Number of Outgoing Calls
Total Duration of Calls Handled
Duration of Incoming Calls
Ave. Duration of Incoming Calls
Duration of Outgoing Calls
Ave. Duration of Outgoing Calls
Total
Cost
Ave.
Cost
Ave.
Cost of Calls Handled
of Incoming Calls
Cost of Incoming Calls
of Outgoing Calls
Cost of Outgoing Calls
F’age 4-121
xl=,=
=,=,=X
H,HHH:MM:SS
HHH:MM:SS
H:MM:SS
HHH:MM:SS
H:MM:SS
$x,xxx.xx
$XXX.XX
$XX.XX
$XXX.XX
$XX.XX
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION % MAINTENANCE
FIGURE 4-4.
SMDA DETAILED REPORT FORMAT (CONT’D)
Station Message Detail Accounting 0O:OO Mon-Ol-Jan-1990
Data Collection Period Began
0O:OO Mon-Ol-Jan-1990
Detailed Report for Selected CO Trunks
CO Trunks Listed by Circuit Number
1. CO Circuit XX.Y
Total Number of Calls
Number of Incoming Calls
Number of Outgoing Calls
Average Answer Time
Number of Unanswered Calls
Average Ring Time -- Unanswered
xl-I=
xXx,=
=,=
H:MM:SS
=,=
H:MM:SS
Total Duration of Calls
Duration of Incoming Calls
Ave. Duration of Incoming Calls
Duration of Outgoing Calls
Ave. Duration of Outgoing Calls
H,HHH:MM:SS
HHH:MM:SS
H:MM:SS
HHH:MM:SS
H:MM:SS
Total Cost of Calls
Cost of Incoming Calls
Ave. Cost of Incoming Calls
Cost of Outgoing Calls
Ave. Cost of Outgoing Calls
Page4-122
$X,xXx.xX
$XXX.XX
$XX.XX
$XXX.XX
$XX.XX
’ -a
jj
lNrER-TELPRACTIcES
I.MX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
C.
STATION MESSAGE DETAIL
RECORDING (SMDR)
36.14 Station Message Detail Recording (SMDR) is a
system feature that provides a detailed record of outgoing calls and can include incoming calls. An outgoing
call lasting longer than the programmed Valid Call timer
is recorded; however, if the call was transferred to a station or placed on hold, the Valid Call timer is not
checked and the call is recorded. The Valid Call timer
does not affect incoming calls, if the incoming call op
tion is selected in the database, all incoming calls are recorded.
36.15 Station call data can be recorded on a customerprovided printer or an alternate device, such as a magnetic tape or floppy disk. This output device is connected to the peripheral connector panel on the back of
the equipment cabinet and must be placed within 50 feet
(15 meters) of the equipment cabinet. It can be the same
device used for SMDA. If so, the SMDR information is
buffered (up to 427 messages) while the SMDA report
prints. Refer to SPEClFICAlYIONS, page 2-31, for details.
36.16 Selectable SMDR options can include any combination of the following:
0
Incoming calls
0
Outgoing non-toll local calls (including “free” calls
on unrestricted trunks and internal E&M calls)
0
Outgoing toll calls (7digit, lo-digit, operatorassisted, or international calls)
0
DISA calls
I.
Blocked DISA calls (gtiended software package)
0
DID calls
0
Conference calls
0
System ring-in messages that show how long calls
ring before being answered
36.17 A programming flag is included in the SMDR
report programming prompts that allows the prograrnmer to specify whether all dialed digits or just the digits
that make up the valid call appear in the SMDR report. If
desired, the “extra” digits used for dial-up banking
machine, voice mail, automated attendant, or other
purposes can be suppressed so that only the telephone
number digits are recorded in the report. (This flag is not
affected by the system-wide flag that suppmsses digits
for the keyset displays and redial buffer, described on
page 5-69.)
I
36.18 The programmer can determine whether
absorbed digits and toll field digits appear in the SMDR
printout. As an example, assume the following number
was dialed: 89 (other system’s trunk access code) 10288 (equal access) - 1 (toll field) - 602 (area code) %l-9000 (seven-digit number). The absorbed digits
(the other system’s trunk access code) can be suppressed
so that only 102881-602- 961-9000 appears. Or, all but
the first digit in each toll field can be suppressed to print
89-11-602- %l-9000. The absorbed digits and the toll
fields can all be suppressed to show 11-602-%l-9000.
36.19 Aprogramming flag is included in the SMDR
report programming prompts that allows the programmer to specify whether all dialed digits or just the digits
that make up the valid call appear in the SMDR report
and are stored in the redial buffer. If desired, the “extra”
digits (dialed after the end of dialing the telephone number) used for dialing banking machine, voice mail, automated attendants, or other purposes can be suppressed
so that only the telephone number digits are recorded in
the report and stored in redial memory.
36.20 The programmer can determine which
equipped station(s) will be included in the report. However, if DISA calls, conference calls, and ring-in diagnostics options are enabled, all are recorded (even when
they involve stations not selected in the database for recording).
36.21 To allow SMDR to give a more accurate representation of elapsed time, an option can be enabled that
records the elapsed time of calls in seconds instead of
minutes. For calls up to 999 seconds (about 16.67 minutes) long, the ELAPSED TIME field will show
“S=XXX” &XX represents the number of seconds).
For calls lasting longer than 999 seconds, ELAPSED
TIME will show “HHMM” (hours and minutes rounded
up to the nearest minute).
345.22 The SMDR output report is printed as shown in
Figure 4-5 on the following page. A page heading (with
the day of the week, date, month, year and column headings) is generated at midnight, when the clock cycles
from 2359 to 0000 hours (international time).
Page 4-123
INTER-TELPRArnCES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MMNTENANCE
FIGURE 4-5.
TYP
EXW
XxXxXx
USRNAMETRUNK
AAAAAAA xX.x
SMDR REPORT FORMAT
DIALEDDIGITS
xx. . . . . . . . . . . . . . xx
START
HHMM
ELPST COST ACCTCODE
HH:MM
$xx.xxxxmaxxx
Call type abbreviations for:
l Inwmingcalls (IN)
.
outgoing local calls
(LOC)
0 Outgoing “free” calls (000)
l Sevendigit outgoing toll calls 07)
0 Ten-digit outgoing toll calls (TlO)
0 Operator-assisted/international calls (I’DI)
0 DISA calls (DSA) and Conference calls (CNF)
. Blocked DISA calls (BLK)
l Ring in (blank field)
The extension number m of the last station to handle the call. For a CO-to-CO call, this field
shows the second trunk involved (XXJQ For a ring-in record, it shows the extension number of the
station that answered, or it shows * * * * if the call was unanswered. For a blocked DISA call, it shows
the primary attendant’s extension number if the call was answered by the attendant or the DISAcaller hung up; if the call was reverse-transferred from the attendant, it shows the station that picked up
the call.
W3RNAM.E
User’s name as programmed. This field is blank if no user name is programmed.
TRUNK
The circuit number of the trunk used during the call.
DIALED
DIGITS
The first 28 digits of the telephone number dialed, including hyphens between the toll
field, area code, office code, etc. An asterisk (*) at the end of the dialed digits field indicates that
either there was a long enough break in loop current to disconnect the call (the ICC0 disconnect or
CO-CO Disconnect timer expired), or the outside party hung up before the station user hung up.
Some digits may be suppressed (see the previous page for an explanation). “RING” appears for a
ring-in record. If a call is blocked by weekly toll limits, the record will show only those digits that
determined that it was a blocked call type. For example, if 1-602-961-xXxX is a blocked number,
only l-602-961 will appear in the record.
START
Time the call was placed or answered is shown in 24hour time (00~00 - 2359) rounded up to the
nearest minute.
ELPST
Call length from the beginning of the call until disconnect. Elapsed time is rounded up to the nearest
minute to show hours and minutes. If the option is enabled that shows call duration in seconds, calls
up to 999 seconds (about 16.67 minutes) long appears as S=XXX (XXX represents the number of
seconds) and calls lasting longer than 999 seconds appear as HEIMM (hours and minutes rounded up
to the nearest minute). For ring-in records, S=xxX indicates the ring-in time in seconds.
COST
Approximate cost of the call (XJXXX), based on the database information, rounded to the nearest
cent.
ACCT
CODE
A standard, forced, class-of-service, or optional account code (4-8 digits). A class-of service
or optional account code overrides installer-programmed standard or forced account codes. The
field is blank if no account code was used.
Page 4-124
? -.,>
FEAIssue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACIKES
Ih4X/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
D.
SYSTEM ERROR REPORTING
KM TOLL SECURITY FEATUREEXPIRED:
This alarm indicates that the Weekly Toll Limit feature is no longer in effect. It can bc re-enabled only
by Inter-Tel Services personnel.
36.23 The system has a selfdiagnostic feature that
checks for minor and major faults within the central and
peripheral equipment. When a failure is detected, the
software determines the impact of the problem and classifies it as a major or minor alarm. A major alann requires immediate attention from service personnel; the
system is not operable. A minor alarm can be as simple
as a loose printer cable or power cord, or the printer running out of paper or ribbon.
#31 TOLL SECURITY LlMITEXCEEDEDand
#34 TOLL SECURITY LIMIT AT 80%: The
weekly limit for one or both types of monitored calls
is 80% or 100% depleted. The programmer can set
the limit to a higher value or reset it to zero. (When
either of these alarms is displayed, any further
alarms will not overwrite the display.)
36.24 A minor alarm sends a message to the system
attendant(s) programmed to receive alarms and to the
error message port (if programmed). Roth minor and
major alarms are recorded through the serial ports (ifthe
ports are connected to output devices). A fault history
report is available on demand to service personnel
through database programming (however, minor alarms
#Ol - #CM do not appear in the history report).
36.25 Minor alarm messages print in the format
shown below. The message indicates the time the error
message was printed, the type and number of the alarm,
and an explanation of the error.
+++ MWOMl.NORALARM#xX
[32-character message]
* * * 00.40 /Field Service Diag~~&s message]
- - - 0O:oO [Engineering Diagmsdcs message]
36.26
l
I
User-serviceable minor alarms are:
#l EXT XXX STATION OFF-HOOK: A station
remained off hook and inactive until the Inactivity
Alarm timer expired. Replace the handset in its
cradle at the station indicated.
NOTE: This message will appear only if the database option that broadcasts station off-hook alarms
is enabled.
.
MJ2SMDRPRTNlER TIMEOUT, #03 ERROR
PRINTERTIMEOUT, or#O4 SMDAPRINTER
TIMEOUT: The printer possibly has a loose cable
or power cord, or it has run out of ribbon or paper.
402 TOLL SECURITY DATA CHANGED: This
indicates that the weekly toll limit information has
been changed in the database.
#33 DISA SECURITY LIMITEXCEEDED:This
indicates that a DISA caller has entered an invalid
password three consecutive times. DISAwill not answer that trunk for five minutes after the third invalid
password has been entered.
36.27 All other minor alarms, which require attention
from service personnel, field service diagnostics, and
engineering diagnostics are explained in TROUBLESHOOTING, beginning on page 6-g.
36.28 A major alarm occurs when a problem has
caused a malfunction. The message appears on all display keysets affected and, the designated serial port. A
complete list of error messages is located in the
TROUBLESHOOTING section.
E.
POWER FAILURE CAPARIIXI’UB
36.29 The Central Processor (RCPU) Card contains
relay contacts that can be used for power failure transfer
which allows one or more single-line sets to access predetermined trunks in the event of a processo r board failure or a power failure. Additional equipment is required.
Refer to SPECRXAI’IONS, page 2-10, for more information.
Page 4-125
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 DWTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
PROGRAMMING
coNmNTls
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A System Software Packages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Plan The Programming Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2 . System Set-Up For Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
Initial Installation Of Stand-Alone/Remote Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Upgrading A 256 System Database For Stand-Alone Programming . . . . . .
. Beginning An Off-Site Stand-Alone Programming Session . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. Installing A Printer Driver For Stand-Alone Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E. Connecting The Remote Programming Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3. Session Timer And Screen Saver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4. Microsoft Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5 . How To Use The Programming Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. Text Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. List Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C Command Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. Option Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E. Check Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
Items That Cannot Be Selected - Gray Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G. HourgIass Symbol Cursor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
H. Update To Database - Exit Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6. Applications Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7. Default Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A, Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Attendant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C Stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. Trunks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E. Toll Restriction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E Miscellaneous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8. Station Programming - Individual Station Information (STN) . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
Station To Be Reviewed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. User Name And Area To Be Reviewed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C Miscellaneous Flags Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. Miscellaneous Information Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E. Outgoing Access - Day Or Night . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F . Programmable Key Programming Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G. Secondary Call Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
H. Special Purpose Station Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I. System Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
J. Toll Restriction Information Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9 . Station Programming - Batch Programming Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. Key Assignments (KEY) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Ring Zone Programming (ZONE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C. Station Features (SFEA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Page 5-l
PAGE
5-3
5-3
53
5-3
5-4
5-7
5-7
5-8
5-9
5-11
5-11
5-12
5-12
5-12
5-13
5-13
5-13
5-14
5-14
5-14
5-15
5-24
5-24
5-24
5-24
5-24
5-24
5-24
5-25
5-25
5-28
5-30
5-32
5-34
5-35
5-37
5-38
5-41
5-42
5-44
5-44
5-51
5-52
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
lNTER-TELPRAcTxcRs
IMX/Gh&6lNsTAlLLATION & MAINTENANCE
CONTENTS
10. System-Wide Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. Account Code Information (ACCT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. DND And Reminder Messages (MESG) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C Extensions, Usernames, And Feature Codes (EXT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. Hunt Groups (HUNT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E. Miscellaneous System-Wide Information (MISC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. Page Zones (PAGE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G. Relay Programming (RLAY) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
H. System Forwarding (SFWD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I. System Speed Dial (SSPD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
J. Timers (TIMR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. Tenants And Departments (TNT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-54
5-54
5-57
5-58
5-61
5-67
5-70
5-73
5-74
5-75
5-77
5-85
ll. Toll Restriction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
Alternate Carriers And Allowed Long Distance (ALT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Area/Office Codes Allowed/Restricted (AREA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C SCOS Information (SCOS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. Toll Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I
12. Least-Cost Routing (LCR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. Dial Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Route Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C Facility Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-88
5-88
5-90
5-95
5-97
5-98
5-99
5-100
5-101
13. ‘Ihmk Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. Individual ‘lhnk (INDT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. ‘lhnk Groups, DID Groups, And Ring-In/Answer Patterns (TRNK) . . . .
C . Tl PRogramming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-103
5-103
5-106
5-122
14. Attendants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. Attendant’s Console (CONS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Aiias Programming (ALSS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C DSS/BLF Assignment (DSS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-132
5-132
5-133
5-135
15. Station Message Detail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
k Call Cost Factors (COST) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. SMDA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C SMDR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-137
5-137
5-138
5-142
16. Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
Error Message Programming (ERR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Hybrid Balance (HYBR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. Maintenance Programming (MAIN) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. Passwords (PASS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E. Report Programming (REP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F. Customized Report Programming (CREP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G. Save/Restore (SAVE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
H. Serial Port Configuration (PORT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I. System Configuration (CONF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-145
5-146
5-147
5-148
5-149
5-150
5-152
5-167
5-169
5-170
Page 5-2
.
INTER-TELPRACTICE!s
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
IMX/GMX 256INSTALLATlON& MAINTENANCE
1 . INTRODUCI’ION
B. PLANTBEPROGRAMMING
1.1
15 Determine the features that need to be programmed to meet the customer’s needs. Then refer to
the specific programs and program plamting sheets. For
example, if the customer wants to use the Hunt Group
feature, refer to the programming information on page
5-61 and the program planning sheet on page 5-202.
This section of the 256 System manual explains
how to program the system. The 256 System is fully
functional when defaulted and only requires programming to meet the customer’s special needs. Programming functions are divided among several “windows”
so that specific features can be programmed easily.
NOTE: Programmers must be properly certified on the
256 System to receive technical support.
A.
SYSTEM SOFTW’ PACKAGES
1.2 Software is available in five “packages” that provide different combinations of features. The available
software packages include the following:
I
0 MF-Rated Basic: This package includes all basic
features, including Least-Cost Routing (LCR), Hunt
Groups, and Direct Inward Dialing (DID). It does
not include Toll Security features, intercom/outside
Directory, Automated Attendant, Station Message
Detail Accounting (SMDA), Tl, or E&M.
0 M&Rated Extended: This package provides every
feature in this manual except Tl and E&M.
0 M&Rated Extended Plus Tl and E&M: This
package provides every feature described in this
manual including Tl and E&M.
0 RF-Rated Extended Plus Tl and E&M: This
package has all of the features described in this manual except Least-Cost Routing (LCR). Also, users
are limited to accessing only the trunk group’s highest numbered trunk when a trunk group key is
pressed or a trunk group access code is entered.
When programming a RF-rated system, LCR will
still appear in the Applications Menu (shown on
page S-15), but if selected, an error message is presented to remind the programmer of its absence. The
LCR feature code and description have not been removed from any screens but, the system ignores any
reference to LCR.
1.3 The IMX 256 has an additional software package
that has all of the features described in this manual, plus
it allows the GX station instruments to be installed on
the system. (Refer to Appendix A in the back of the
manual for complete information.)
1.4 To determine which software package is installed,
press the ALT key and the SPACE BAR while viewing
anyscreen. “About...” will appear in reverse video at the
top of the screen. Then press RFZURN. A window ap
pears that shows the part number of the software. To exit
from that window, press RHTHRN again.
SESSION
2. SYSTEM SET-UP FOR
PROGRAMMING
2.1 There are three methods that can be used for programming the 256 System.
l
On-site programming with an attached personal
computer
0 Programming using a stand-alone personal computer
0 Remote programming using a modem connection
2.2 Each is described separately in the following
pages. only one programming session should be in op
eration at a time.
2.3 For on-site, remote, or stand-alone programming;
the computer must be an IBM AI-compatible* personal
computer (PC) with a minimum of: MS-DOS 3.3,300or 1200-baud modem, 5 megabytes memory available
on the hard disk drive, 640k RAM (with minimum 512k
available), and a 1.2-megabyte, SJ&inch or 1.44-megabyte, 3.5~inch floppy disk drive (double sided/high density) and an EGA* graphics monitor. A mouse is
optional.
*IBM and AI are registered trademarks and EGA is a
trademark of International Business Machines Corporation.
2.4 The PC used for stand-alone or remote programming must have the appropriate Stand-Alone/Remote
Programming software installed. Ifused for stand-alone
programming, the PC must also have a default database
loaded on the hard drive (the system database information is later transferred to the 256 System using Save/
Restore via modem comtection or direct on-site
connection). The software version on the remote or
stand-alone PC must match the version of the system
database being programmed.
NOTE: The programming PC must have a configsys
file with the following command lines: “buffers=30”
and “files=20”. Also, when installed, the new system
software automatically includes the command “device=c:\dos\ setver.exe” in the con&.sys file, which is
required for proper MS-DOS 5.0/6.0/6.2 operation. If
the software is installed on a system that still uses MS- I
Page 5-3
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION 81 MAINTENANCE
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
DOS 3.3, an error message (stating an invalid config.sys
command has been detected) is displayed during the
power-up sequence. The message can be ignored; the
software is compatiile with all four versions of DOS.
2.8
0
Initial installation of Stand-Alone/Remote software
(see paragraph 2.10 on this page)
On-Site Programming
0
Connecting the remote programming session (refer
to page 5-9)
25 For on-site programming, the PC is connected
directly to the 256 System. An RS-232-C cable is connected to one of the RS-232-C connectors on the 256
RCPU Card and COM 1 or COM 2 on the PC. The default baud rate for the system RS-232-C connectors is
9600 baud.
NOTE: Do not wnuect the programming tezminal to an
RS-232-C port that has been programmed for output
(SMDR, SMDA, or error reports). In the default state,
the RS-232-C ports are non programmed for output.
Stand-Alone Programming
2.6 A Personal computer (PC) can be used for programming the 256 System. To use a PC in this manner,
the Stand-Alone/Remote Programming software must
be loaded on drive C. The system database information
is stored on double-sided/high density floppy disks and
is later transferred to the 256 System using Save/Restore. This section includes the following instructions
that apply to stand-alone programming:
This section includes the following instructions
that apply to remote programming:
2.9 The desired modem can be accessed using one of
the following methods:
l
Have the system attendant, automated attendant, or
a station user transfer remote programming calls to
the desired modem extension.
l
Set up a direct ring-in to the modem extension on
one trunk for day and/or night modes.
l
Set up a DID number that rings the modem extension
in day and/or night modes.
l
Use a DISA trunk and dial the modem extension
number.
A.
INlTIAL INSTALLATION OF
STAND-ALONE/REMOTE SOFIW’
(1)
Insert the Installation Disk (disk 1) in the floppy
disk drive.
Initial installation of Stand-Alone/Remote software
(see paragraph 2.10 on this page)
(2)
At the C:b prompt, type “a:” and press the RETURN (or ENTER) key. (The monitor displays
the A drive programming prompt “A\>“.)
Upgrade of a 256 System database for stand-alone
programming (refer to page 5-7)
(3)
Installing a printer driver for stand-alone report
printing (refer to page 5-S)
At the AZ:\> prompt, type “setup” and press RETURN. (The monitor displays information concerning the setup program.)
(4
After reading the information, press RETURN.
(The monitor displays the default directory name
“CXINTZ630” or “C:\GMX25620”.)
I
NOTE: Ifusing MS-DOS 5.0 with the extended
memory (himemsys) file set up for use with
another application, the monitor displays a message about reconfiguring the PC to optimize system performance. Disregard the message and
continue with the installation.
(5)
Press REZURN to accept the default directory
name, or edit the name as desired and then press
RETURN. (The monitor displays a list of PC
types.)
Use the up or down arrow keys to highlight the
type of PC being used and then press RETURN.
(The monitor displays the determined hardware
configuration for the programming PC.)
Beginning the stand-alone programming session
(refer to page 5-7)
Remote Programming Using A Modem
2.7 For modem connection, the Central Processing
Card contains two modems: a Bell 300/1200 baud modem, and a CCITT 300/1200 baud modem. Each modem has separate extension numbers for the different
baud rates. The default extension numbers are as follows:
Bell 300 baud = 270
Bell 1200 baud = 271
CCIlT 300 baud = 272
CCIIT 1200 baud = 273
(6)
Page 5-4
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICEg
IMX/GMX 256 INS’lALLATION % l&UNTENANCE
If the ha&are configuration is cOrrect as
di.r&y~usetheupordownarrowkeystohighlight “No Change” and then press RETURN.
(Ihe monitor displays an extended memory op
tion.)
d.
If the hatmvare configuration is notcornx~ or if
you wish to change the displayed configuration:
a.
Use the up or down arrow keys to highlight
the item you wish to change and then press
RETURN. (I’he monitor displays a list of
types of that item.)
b.
Use the up or down arrow keys to highlight
the appropriate type and then press RF+
TURN. (I’he monitor again displays the
hardware configuration.)
C.
To change additional items, repeat steps 7a
and 7b. Once the configuration is correct as
displayed, use the up or down arrow keys to
highlight “No Change” and then press RETURN. (The monitor displays an extended
memory option.)
(10)
Use the up or down arrow keys to highlight “N”
(for do not update) and then press RETURN.
(The monitor displays a copy default database
option.)
01)
If you do not wish to cow the new &fault system
database onto the PC, iype ‘TN” (for do not copy
default database) and press REIURN. (‘Ihe files
from the Installation Disk are copied onto the
hard disk drive. When finished, the monitor displays “Insert the Applications getup Disk [2] in
the following drive:“)
If you wish to copy the new default system database onto the PC, type “C” (for copy default database) and press RETURN. The default system
database will be copied from the Applications
Default Database (disk 4) when it is inserted later
in step 14b. (The files from the Installation Disk
are copied onto the hard disk drive. When finished, the monitor displays “Insert the Applications Setup Disk [2] in the following drive:“)
NOTE: If installing a mouse on the PC, ensure
that the COM port assigned to the mouse is not
being used by any other device.
(8)
(9
Use the up or down arrow keys to highlight “N”
(for no extended memory) and then press RRTURN. (The monitor displays a printer/plotter
installation option.)
If you &I not wish to install a special printer-1
plotter drive5 use the up or down arrow keys to
highlight ‘C” (for continue setup) and then press
RETURN. (The monitor displays an option to
update the current database.)
NOTE: For stand-alone programming, the PC
must have a system database installed (either an
qxIated database or the new default database).
For remote programming or direct on-site connection, the PC does not need to have a system
database installed.
(12)
If you wish to install a qecial printerlplotter
driver:
a.
To install additional printer/plotter drivers,
repeat steps 9a through 9c. When all of the
desired printer/plotter drivers are installed,
use the arrow keys to highlight “C” (for continue setup) and then press RETURN. (The
monitor displays an option to update the current database.)
Use the up or down arrow keys to highlight
“I” (for install a printer or plotter) and then
press RETURN. (The monitor displays a list
of printers/plotters.)
Remove the Installation Disk, then insert the Applications Setup Disk (disk 2) in the floppy disk
drive and press RETURN. (The files from the
Applications getup Disk are copied onto the hard
disk drive. When finished, the monitor displays
“Insert the Applications Software Disk [3] in the
following drive:“.)
NOTE: Do not change the displayed drive (A).
b. Use the up or down arrow keys to highlight
the printer/plotter type that most closely
matches your printer/plotter and then press
RETURN. (The monitor displays a list of
P-4
(13)
Remove the Applications getup Disk, then insert
the Applications Software Disk (disk 3) in the
floppy disk drive and press RRTURN. (The files
from the Applications Software Disk are copied
onto the hard disk drive.)
c.
(14)
If the copy defmlt database option was notpreviously selected (back in step 11), remove the
Applications Software Disk.
Use the arrow keys to highlight the port on
which your printer/plotter is installed and
then press FtETURN. (The monitor again
displays a printer/plotter installation option.)
Page 5-5
If the copy &fault database option waspreviously selected (back in step II), the monitor displays
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMXIGMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAJNTEXANCE
“Insert the Applications Default Database [4] in
the following drive:“.
a.
Remove the Applications Software Disk.
b. Insert the Applications Default Database
(disk 4) in the floppy disk drive and press
RBTURN. (The files from the Applications
Default Database disk are copied onto the
hard disk drive.)
c.
05)
b.
(16) To allow the installation sofiwam to automutitally uphe or create the AVTOEX?EBATflle,
use the up or down arrow keys to highlight ‘Y”
(for yes) and then press RETURN. (l%e monitor
displays “SETUP HAS NOW BEEN COMPLETED SUCCESSPUTLY.“)
To manually updute or cteate the AVTOEXECBATjile, read the information displayed
on the monitor, use the up or down arrow keys to
highlight “N” (for no), and then press RETURN.
(The monitor displays “SETUP HAS NOW
BEEN COh4PLETED SUCCESSFULLY.“) Edit
or create the AUTOEXEC.BAI’ tile to include:
Remove the Applications Default Database
disk.
If the special printer/plotter driver installation
option was notpnzviously selected (in step 9), the
monitor displays an AUTGEXEC.BAT file up
date option.
a. Cm630 or C:\GMX25620 (or other 1
directory name if used) with the [email protected]
paths in the PAlIf environment variable.
If the special printerfplotter driver instalhion
option was prwiously selected (in step 9), the
monitor displays “Insert the Printer Driver Disk
[5] in the following drive:“.
b .
a.
c .
Insert the Printer Driver Disk (disk 5) in the
floppy disk drive and press RETURN. (The
files from the Printer Driver Disk are copied
onto the hard disk drive. When finished, the
monitor displays an AUlIEXEC.BAP file
update option.)
Remove the Printer Driver Disk.
SET DBDPm = C:VNTZ5630 o r
(or other directory name if I
used).
C:\GMX25620
(17)
Page 5-6
SEX DBFPKEf = C\ INT25630 o r
(or other directory name if I
C:\Gh4X?5620
used).
Reboot the programming PC. (The monitor displays the C drive programming prompt “C:\>“.)
:>
_~ A>
;i’
INTER-~PRACTICES
IMx/GMx 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
B.
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1. November 1994
UPGRADING A 256 SYSTEM DATABASE
FOR S’IXND-ALONE PROGRAMMING
several minutes and the monitor eventually displays “A\>“.)
Remove the Installation Disk, insert a properly
formatted floppy disk, and type “copy c:\temp
(or other directory name if used)\*.* a:” and
press RETURN to save the new, updated database. (The monitor displays the names of the
files as they are copied and eventually displays
“AI\>“.)
23 Previous versions of 256 System databases can
be updated for stand-alone programming. (This procedure is not required if the new software is being loaded
directly into the 256 System; it is only used for standalone programming.)
2.12 Previous versions of 256 System databases can
be updated for stand-alone programming with the new
version software. (This procedure is not required if the
new softwareis being loaded dire&ly into the 256 System; it is only used for stand-alone programming.)
2.13 To UPDAlE AN EZ!XlNG
ALOh’EPROGRAbMLUG:
(1)
(2)
(3)
D-
F O R
03)
Remove the floppy disk and label it “IMX256 (or
GMXZ6) System Database” along with the
software part number and the current date. This
new disk can now be used for stand-alone or syst=progre-
(9)
Ifyou no longer wish to keep the new &tabase on
the PC’S hard disk drive:
- -
Insert the floppy disk containing the saved database into the stand-alone PC’s floppy disk drive.
a.
At the C:k (or CNNT256~ or C:\jGMx256>)
prompt, type “md c:\temp (or some other dinxtory name)” and press RETURN to create a temporary directory on the PC’s hard disk drive.
(The monitor again displays “C:\“.)
Type “copy a:\*.* c:\temp (or other directory
name if used)and press RETURN to copy the database to the temporary directory. (The monitor
displays the names of the files as they are copied
and eventually “GE\“.)
(4)
Remove the database disk and insert the Installation Disk (disk 1) into the floppy drive.
(9
Type “a:” and press RETURN. (The monitor displays the A drive programming prompt “A\>“.)
(6)
At the AZ:\> prompt, type “update22 c:\temp db
(or other dimxtory name if used)” and press RRTURN to update the existing database for use
with the new svstem software. (The undate takes
Type “de1 c:\temp\*.*” and press RETURN
to delete all of the files in the temporary directory. (The monitor displays “Are you
sure Y/N?“)
b . Qpe “I”’ (for yes) and press RETURN.
(The monitor displays “A\>“.)
C.
C.
Type“rd c:\temp” and press RFXURN to
remove the temporary directory. (The monitor displays “A:\>“.)
BEGINNING AN OFF-SITE STAND-ALONE
PROGRAMMJNG SESSION
2.14 To begin the programming session, type INT256
or GMX256 and press RETURN . When the logo screen
is displayed, press the M key. Or, press ALT-D to access
the DB Progr amming pull-down menu and then select
Rogramming Session by highlighting it (use the up or
down arrow key, if necessary) and pressing RETURN.
The 256 System Applications Menu appears. All programming can then be completed as described in the following pages.
Page 5-7
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
D .
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMWGMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
INSTALLING APRINTERDRIVER’FOR
STAND-ALONE REPORTS
your printer or contact the manufacturer if
unsure.)
2.15 To print customized reports or Tl error reports,
the stand-alone PC must have the proper printer driver
installed. Contact your PC and/or printer manufacturer
for the printer driver information for your system. Then
follow these steps for installing the driver on the PC:
(1)
(2)
Press &T and SPACE BAR to access a pulldown menu that includes the options “Run...”
and “About...”
(8)
Select the Add Command button.
(9)
When the window asks for a destination director y = - , press RETURN to accept the directory
name shown. (It should be CUP or the applications software directory name you, selected in
step 5 on page 5-4).
(10)
When copying is completed, press ALT-S to access the Setup pull-down menu. (Or, if you will
be assigning printer drivers to more than one
port/file destination, repeat steps 5-9, as needed.)
(11)
While viewing the Setup menu, press RETURN
to select Connections. The following window
appears:
Press R to select “Run...” The following window
appears:
1
R u n P r o g r a m ~I
0
0
Control eanel
&ter
Monitor
:
LPT2
LpT3
COMl
coM2
EPT
None
[ok]
Press ACT-P to select Control Panel. The Control Panel window displays. The top edge of the
window has three options: Installation, Setup,
and Preferences.
Press &T-I to select the Installation pull-down
menu.
While viewing the Installation menu, press the
RETURN (or ENTER) key to select Add New
Printer. A window appears that asks you to identify the drive or directory that contains the printer driver software.
(12)
Place the highlight bar on the printer driver to be
programmed in the Printer list box.
(13)
Ress TAB to move to the Comtections list box.
Then move the highlight bar to the file or port assignment for the selected printer driver.
Insert Applications Software Disk 5, which contains the printer driver software, in the disk drive.
(Or, if you have previously saved the printer
drivers on your hard disk, enter the path name for
their directory.) Enter the drive or directory
name in the text box. Then select the OK command button.
(14)
If you have another printer driver to be programmed, press TAB again to return to the Printer list box and repeat steps 12 and 13.
(15)
When the printer driver programming is as desired, select the OK command button.
06)
When the Control Panel window returns, press
&T-I to access the Installation pull-down
menu. Then press X (or press the down arrow key
to scroll to the Exit option and press RETURN).
The Inter-Tel 256 logo screen returns.
When the list of printer drivers appears, select
the option that most closely matches your printer
type. Or, if you will be saving to a file, select Genericflext Only. (Refer to the owner’s guide for
Page 5-8
-a,
;j
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INS’IXLLATION
Hardware Information
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
& MAINTENANCE
-
Communications Method
@ COML 0 COMZ
Baud Rate
Modem Information
I
[pzz)
E.
(-xi-)
CONNECTING THE REMOTE
PROGRAMMING SESSION
or down arrow key to move the highlight bar to the
desired baud rate.
2.16 The screen shown above can be accessed in one
of the three following ways:
l
l
- If using a modem, select the rate that matches the
baud rate of the modem extension that will be
used.
Type INT256 or GMX256 at the C:\ prompt. Then
press F5 when the Inter-Tel 256 logo screen appears.
- If using a direct connection and the system is not
set for “autobazu$ n select the rate that matches
the RCPU RS-232-C port.
If the Inter-Tel 256 logo screen is displayed, press
F5.
0 If the Inter-Tel 256 logo screen is displayed, press
ALT-D and then select “Connect Remote” from the
pull-down menu.
2.17 You can then set the correct session information
as described in the following paragraphs.
2.18 HARDWARE INFORMATION: This section
is used for indicating the communications parameters
used by your PC.
0 COM 1 or COM 2: Indicate which COM port your
PC is using for the RS-232-C connection. Press the
TAB key until one of the COM options is highlighted, then use the left or right arrow key to move
the dot to the correct circle. Or, press &T-l for
COM 1 or AUT-2 for COM 2.
l
pi&i-]
- If using a ditect connection and autobaud is enabl& select the highest rate your PC can use.
2.19 COMMUNICATIONS METHOD: Indicate
whether this is a modem connection or a direct co~ection. Press TAB until one of the options is highlighted,
then use the left or right arrow key to move the dot to the
correct circle. Or, press ALT-M for modem connection
or ALT-D for direct connection.
2.20 MODEM INFORMATION: If the communications method is “modem connection,” enter the following information:
l
LOCATION: Press the TAB key until the cursor appears in the Location text box or press ALT-L. Then
type the name of the 256 System site.
l
PHONE: Ress the TAB key until the cursor appears
in the Phone text box or press &T-P. Then type the
desired telephone number (you can use a comma for
a pause in the number, if necessary).
BAUD RATE: Indicate the baud rate at which your
PC will be operating. Press the TAB key to select the
Baud Rate list box or press ALT-B. Then use the up
Page 5-9
lNTER-TELPRACTicRS
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
2.21 SAVE: When the information appears as desired,
select the Save command button. Press TAB until Save
is highlighted and then press the SPACE BAR. Or, press
ACT-S. This replaces the default values with the new information so that you do not have to repeat this procedure each time you log in.
2.25 ‘Ibo command buttons allow you the options of
CANCEL: To exit this screen without connecting a programming session, press TAB until Cancel is
highlighted and then press the SPACE BAR. Or, press
&T-A The Inter-Tel 256 logo screen appears.
cancelling the connection or redialing the mtmber if
problems arise If the software is unable to communicate with the modem, select the Cancel command button and check the connection between the modem and
the PC. Also verify that the modem is connected to the
proper port. To select Cancel, press TAB until it is highlighted and then press the SPACE BAR. Or, press
&T-C. To select Redial, press TAB until it is highlighted and then press the SPACE BAR. Or, press
&T-R.
2.23 CONNECT: When the session information is
2.26
2.22
correct, begin the programming session by selecting the
Connect command button. Press TAB until Connect is
highlighted and then press the SPACE BAR. Or, press
ALT-C. The following window appears.
I
Bedial
CoMect Type:
Location:
sion, press the F3 key. Or, press &T-D to access the DB
programming pull-down menu and then select Programming Session by highlighting it (use the up or down
arrow key, if necessary) and pressing RETURN. The
256 System Applications Menu appears.
2.27 The 256 System will prompt you for a password.
Enter the password, if one is required, or press RETURN, if a password is not required. A copy of the 256 I
System software begins loading onto the PC. This process takes 3-5 minutes at 1200 baud. When finished, the
256 main menu displays on the PC monitor screen. All
programming can then be completed as described in the
following pages.
Comm Port:
Baud Rate:
When the comtection is completed, the Inter-Tel
256 logo screen appears. To beginthe programmingses-
(-Z=-
NOTE: If used, Save/Restore will take longer to perform via modem than with a direct connection due to the
slower (300 or 1200) baud rate. If the Restore function is
used, the associated system reset will disconnect all
calls including the modem connection.
Number:
2.24 The window shows the information as it was programmed in the window on the previous page, including
the COM port, baud rate, modem/direct connection
type, 256 System site location, and telephone number.
The “Status” line indicates when the PC is [email protected]
the modem, dialing, and waiting for a connection.
2.28 If modem connection is lost during the programming session, allow a minute for the 256 modem to reset, then reestablish the call using the procedure given
above. All changes that were saved by a system update
before the connection was lost will be retained in the 256
System’s memory.
Page 5-10
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
3.
SESSION TIMER AND SCREEN
SAVER
standard look and feel to the 256 System Database Programming and all other Windows applications.
3.1 %JO timers have been built into the system that go
into effect when the programming terminal remains idle
for lengthy periods. They are the session timeout and
screen saver timers.
4.2 The 256 System Database programming package
contains all the software necessary to run 256 System
Database Programming. You can also run 256 System
Database Rogramming under Micmsofi Wbdows version 2.1 or higher.
3.2
4 3 - Wti Micmsofiwindows, you can take advantage
Whenever the programmingsession remains idle
(no input) for more than five minutes, a screen saver feature will cause the monitor display to go blank. When
this occurs, the programmer can press any key or move
the mouse to restore the video display. The display itself
will not change unless the session has also timed out,
then the Inter-Tel 256 logo is displayed.
of these additional features of the IEndows environment:
Running multiple applications: You can run several
applications under Wz&ws at one time and easily
switch between them, creating an integrated work
environment.
NOTE: If your PC has an independent screen saver feature (in addition to the 256 System screen saver), you
may need to clear both screen savers to return to progr=me-
Data exchange between applications: You can transfer data between 256 System Database Rogramming and other standard DOS applications as well as
other Wndows applications.
amming session remains idle for more
3 3 lftheprogr
than 20 minutes while a programming window is displayed, the system terminates the session.
4 .
W%U&WS control of the DOS environment: From the
W&ws environment you can easily access all windows and non-Windows applications, files, directories, and disks, and control all DOS-related tasks
such as directory or file management and formatting
disks.
MIcRosoFT~wINDows
NOTE: The following information is provided by
Microsoft, regarding their licensing policies.
4.1 The 256 System Database programming operates
in a graphics environment called Micmsofi l%abws,
created by Microsoft Corporation. An extension of the
MS-DOS operating system, Micmwjl Windows gives a
4.4 The Microsoft windows applications associated
with 256 System programming camtot be used to run
other W~WAIWS related functions. To run 256 System
Database Programming with other applications under
Micmsofl IEU&IWS, you need to license and install Micrvsoft lVhdows version 2.1 or higher.
Page 5-11
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
5.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
HOW TO USE THE
PROGRAMMING WINDOWS
5.7 To correct mistakes made while entering information or to erase existing information, back up using the
backspace or delete key and retype the entry.
5.1
The database is divided up into %indows” that
permit the programmer to view and change the system
programming one section at a time. Each of the programmin~ windows contains boxes and/or buttons for
selecting and entering specific information. These include: Text Boxes, List Boxes, Command Buttons, Op
tion Buttons, and Check Boxes. Samples of each are
shown in the following paragraphs.
53 To move among items in a window, you may use
the TAB or ALT key, as follows:
Using the ‘MB key: Press the TAB key repeatedly
5.8 To delete the entire contents of a text box, highlight the box. Then, press the backspace or delete key.
B .
LISTBOX
ExAMPm
Least-Cost Routing
Trunk Programming...
until the desired area is highlighted by a gray box
and a dark outline or filler. To move in reverse, press
the SHIFT and TAB keys at the same time.
Using the ALT key: Pressing a combination of the
ALT key and the underlined character allows you to
move directly to the desired area. (For example, in
the following sample Text Box, you would use
ALT-D because the “D” in Description is underlined).
5.9 The list box is used for several purposes, as
follows:
5 3 When using a stand-alone PC, a mouse can be used
for selecting items. To select an item, simply point the
mouse cursor at the desired item and click the left button.
Main Menu selections: In the main menu list box
shown above, selecting a listed item that is followed
by an ellipsis (...) causes other selections to appear
below it. For example, selecting Station Programming will expand the list to show additional items.
However, Least-Cost Routing does not have an ellipsis and selecting it will lead directly to a programming window.
‘Qped information: When programming items
A .
such as do-not-disturb and reminder messages, the
list box shows the current values. Selecting one line
of the list box causes a smaller window with a text
box (like the one shown above paragraph 5.4) to ap
pear. After the information is entered in the text box
and you exit from the small window, the list box
shows the new information.
TEXTBOX
5.4 A text box is used when the requested information
requires typing. The vertical line is the cursor that indicates where text will be inserted. As you type, the line
moves to the right, pushing any existing text to the right.
The line can be moved right or left using the arrow keys
on the keyboard or by pointing the mouse cursor at the
desired place and clicking the left button once.
5.5 To move the cursor to a text box, follow the
instructions in paragraph 5.2. When the cursor appears
in the box, you can begin typing.
5.6 The system recognizes both upper- and lower-case
characters. When typing, you may use either case or a
combination.
Page 5-12
Enable/Disable and Yes/No listsz Items such assystern features have only two states: enabled or disabled. When these appear in a list box, selecting the
item changes the state of that item. For example, if
the station feature “CO Reseize” is enabled and you
wish to disable it, you would select the line containing “CO Reseize” to change the status to “DISABLED” by pressing the SPACE BAR (see page
5-30 for an illustration).
Include/Exclude lists: Some programs require you
to list the stations or trunks that are on “iuclude” or
“exclude” lists. To move an item from one list to the
other, select the desired item. It is automatically
moved to the other list.
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMXIGMX 256 INS~TION & MAINTENANCE
5.10 There are several methods for selecting a line in a
list box. They are as follows:
l
Arrow keys: Use the up or down arrow key to move
the highlight bar. Press the SPACE BAR to select an
item while it is highlighted.
l
HOME, END, PAGE UP and PAGE DOWN
keys: You can use the HOME key to move directly to
the top of the list, or the END key to move directly to
the bottom. The PAGE UP and PAGE DOWN keys
move up or down the list one screen at a time.
l
l
First letter or digit of desired item: When a list is
presented in alphabetical or numerical order, you
can quickly move to the first item begimting with a
specific letter or number by entering that character.
For example, when in a list of stations by name, you
can move to names that begin with “C” by pressing
the C key.
Scroll bar: Along the right edge of the list box is a
band with an arrow at each end and a white box (as
shown in the List Box sample on the previous page).
This is a scroll bar and it is used, with the mouse cursor, to move through the list. Point the cursor at either of the arrows and click the left button to move
one line at a time, or point the cursor at the white box
and hold down the left button. Moving the mouse
“drags” the box up or down and scrolls through the
list. When the desired item is highlighted, press the
SPACE BAR or click the left mouse button to select
it.
5.12 Frequently, a command button is highlighted by
a dark border while you are programming in a window.
If so, pressing the RE$TURN key will execute that command automatically. You do not need to TAB to the button first.
D. OPTION BUTTON
00 S e r i a l 1
0 Serial 2.
5.13 Option buttons are used when there are two or
more options for a feature and you must choose only
one. The options are listed in a box and the buttons are
located along the left. Selecting the desired button
places a dot in it to show which option was chosen.
5.14 Option buttons can be selected using one of the
following methods:
0 TAB by: Use the TAB key to advance to the box
surrounding the buttons, and the- up or down arrow
key to move the dot to the desired button.
0 ALT key: Press the ALT key plus the underlined
character (in the sample above, you would use
&T-l or ALT-2).
E .
CHECKBOX
EXAMPLE2
lxl
C. COMMAND BUTTON
&ea and Offke Cc&s Overlap
5.15
EXAMPLE4
/
1
\
,
Exit
1
I
Check boxes are used when a single option is
available that has only two states (on/off, enabled/disabled, or yes/no). When the box is selected, an X is
placed inside it to indicate an affirmative state (on, enabled, or yes). Selecting a box that already contains an
X, removes the X (off, disabled, or no).
5.11 Selecting a command button executes a single
command. To select a command button, do one of the
following:
5.16 Check boxes can be selected using one of the following methods:
TAB key: Use the TAB key to advance to the command button and to highlight it. Then press the
SPACE BAR to select it.
0 TAB key: Use the TAB key to advance to the check
box to highright it. Then press the SPACE BAR to
select it.
0 AIJT key: Press the ACT key plus the underlined
character. (In the sample above, you would use
ALT-X to execute the Exit command).
0 ALT key: Press the ALT key plus the underlined
character. (In the sample above, you would use
ALT-A).
l
Page 5-13
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
F.
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IlkWGMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
ITEM!3 THAT CANNOT BE SELECTED GRAY JTEMS
5.17 Ifan item in a window appears in a light gray color, it camtot be selected unless an associated item is
highlighted. For example, in the System Configuration
window, the command button for Configuration cannot
be selected unless a line in the list box with “KSC
Board,” “TlC,” or “lDC Board” is highlighted, because
only these cards require special configuration programming. But, when the proper line is highlighted, the command button appears in black and selecting it displays
the configuration window.
G.
H.
UPDAm TO DATABASE -EXIT SCREEN
5.19 The following screen appears when an Exit cornmand button is selected. It offers the options of saying
the changes that were made in the associated window
and exiting to the Applications Menu (select Yes), exiting to the Applications Menu without saving the
changes (select No), or returning to the programming
window.to continue making changes (select Cancel).
HOURGLASS SYMBOL CURSOR
Perform Update to Database?
5.18 Occasionally, the system will change the cursor
to an “hourglass” shape. This indicates that the system is
performing an internal operation and cannot respond to
input. Wait for the cursor to return to normal before entering more information.
Page 5-14
‘.- >\
i.
,i’
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
&tions
setup E x i t
System-wide Features...
Toll Restriction...
Least Cost Routing
Trunk Prograniming...
Attendants...
Station Message Detail...
service...
command:
(xi-)
6. APPLICATIONS MENU
6.1 The first window that is shown when you start a
programming session contains a list box with the
Applications menu which introduces the eight major
programming sections: Station Programming, Systemwide Features, Toll Restriction, Least Cost Routing,
Trunk Programming, Attendants, Station Message Detail, and Service The window appears as shown above.
NOTE: The header in this window indicates that the active session is remote (direct connection or modem) as
shown above. If the active session is a stand-alone, the
word “Remote” does not appear in the header. Note that
during a stand-alone session, data is written to a database in the PC and not directly to the 256 System. The
stand-alone database must be transferred to the 256 System using the Save/Restore function. Direct and modem
connections will write information dire&y to the 256
System database.
6.2 When programming a KF-rated system, LCR will
still appear in the Applications Menu, but when selected, an error message is presented to remind the programmer that it is not available.
dicate that it contains submenus. These submenus ap
pear when the main menu line is selected. Selecting a
submenu line leads to a programrniq window.
6.4
COMMAND: Each of the options listed on the
following pages can be accessed directly by entering a
three- or four-letter command in the Command text box.
Select the text box using the mouse, the TAB key, or
ALT-C, type the desired command, and press RETURN. Then refer to the appropriate page in this section
for instructions on using the selected window.
6.5 EXIT: When programming is completed, select
the Exit command button. The following window
appears. Select the OK wmmand button to end the programming session, or select the Cancel command button to return to the Applications menu.
AThis will end your programming session
6.3 LIST BOX: Each item in the list box, except
Least-Cost Routing, is followed by an ellipsis (...) to in-
Page 5-15
(7-j
(-xq
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMXIGMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1. November 1994
6.6 The f’ull list of available menus, with the‘abbreviated access commands and a brief description of their purposes
are as follows:
MAIN MENU ITEM
FUBMENU
PROGRAMMING
ndividual Station Information (SIN)
Continued on nextpage)
Copy to Another Station
OPTIONS
Station Review Window:
Full Name And Usemame
Secondary Stations
MisceilaneousFiags Window:
Allow Private Intercom Override
Auto Att/VM/DISA Do-Not-Disturb Breakthrough
Automatic Answer CO or IC
Barge Initiate or Receive
Camp-On Tones
CO Reseize
Dial Pulse
DID Camp-On Tones
Do-Not-Disturb Allowed
Do-Not-Disturb Override
DTMF Feedback Enabled
E&M Camp-On Tones
Handsfiee
Headset
LCR Facility Group Camp-On
Message Lamp
Music Channel Onemo
Off-Premises Extension
OHVA Receiveflransmit
Page Remove/Replace
Redial Mode
Ring Cadence
Ring Intercom Always
Ring Type for Off-Premises Extension
Transparent LCR
Miscellaneous Information Window:
Attendant
Message Center
Alternate Message Source (single-line station only)
Tenant Group And Department
Account Code Type/Index/Validate Account Code
Class-Of-Service Account Code
Ring Zones (single-line station only)
Receive/rransmit Gain (OPX only)
Day/N&&t Outgoing Access
Programmable Key Programming Window:
GY Map
Station Programmable Keys
Secondary Call Key Window:
Secondary Call Keys
Primary Station
Enable Ring Cadence
Special Purpose Station Window:
Attendant/Stations Served
Automated Attendant/Recall Dest. & Digit Translation
FAX Station/FAX Message Center
House Phone/Day & Night Numbers
Message Center/Stations Served
Voice Mail Station
Page 5-16
PROGRAMMJNG
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TRLPRACTICRS
lMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
WIN MENU ITEM
SUBMENU
PROGRAMMING OPTIONS
MiOll
Individual Station Information
System Forwarding Window:
?rogramming...
(Conlid)
Forwarding Paths
Forward Call Types
Station Conditions
System Conditions
Ring Principal Once
‘CoPlrid)
Toll Restriction Information Widow:
Day/Night Station Class Of Service (SCOS)
Day/Night Mode Toll Restriction User Croup
Day/Night Mode LCR Advance Limit
Keyset Key Assiientsz
Key Assignments (KEY)
Keyset Map View Types
Keyset Map Groups
Station List
User Programmable Keys
Default Sets
DSS/BLF Unit Key Assiients:
DSS Map Descriptions
DSS Map Croups
DSS Station List
Digital DSS Map View
Ring Zone Programming (ZONE)
Station Features (SFEA)
Page 5-17
Single-Line Set Key Maps
Key Type Rogramminn
Station Lists
Allow Private Intercom Override
Auto AttendanWISADo-Not-Disturb Breakthrough
Automatic Answer On CO Calls (keysets)
Automatic Answer On IC Calls (keysets)
Barge Receive Enabled
Barge Transmit Enabled (keysets)
Camp-On Tones Disabled
CO Reseize Enabled (keysets)
Dial Pulse Enabled (single-line stations)
DID Camp-On Tones Disabled
Do-Not-Disturb Allowed
Do-Not-Disturb Override Allowed (keysets)
DTMF Feedback Enabled (single-line stations)
E & M Camp-On Tones Disabled
Handsfree Enabled (keysets)
Headset Enabled (keysets)
LCR Facility Croup Camp-On Allowed
Message Lamp Enabled (single-line stations)
Music Channel One Enabled
Off-Hook Voice Announce Receive Enabled (keysets)
Off-Hook Voice Announce Transmit Enabled
Off-Premises Extension (single-line stations)
Page Remove Enabled (keysets)
Redial Mode - Last Number Dialed (keysets)
Ring Cadence Extended (single-line stations)
Ring Intercom Always Enabled
Ring Type For OPX -- DC (single-line stations)
Transparent LCR Enabled
lNTER-TELPRACTIcES
I.MX/GMX 256 INS’J.ALL4’l’ION & MAINTENANCE
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1. November 1994
BAIN MENU ITEM
UBMENU
‘ROGRAMMING OPTIONS
; ystem-Wide
;eatures
iccount Code Information (ACCT)
4ccount Code Length
-.
standard, Forced, LCR Toll, & None Station Lists
3atch Station Lists (Forced, Standard, LCR Toll, Validated)
~lass-Of-Service Account Codes
IND and Reminder Messages
MESG)
ktensions, Usernames, and
‘eature Codes @XT)
jtati0nS
3unt Groups
rnmk Groups
?eature Codes
Set Extensions/Clear Extensions (Batch Load)
Station Lists
Voice Mail Hunt Group
Voice Computer Group
btomated Attendant Hunt Group
Dial Rules
Recall Destination
Gmt Groups (HUNT)
Bunt Group Extended Data Window:
Hunt Group Name
Description
Supervisor
Hunt Group Search Type
Timer Programming Window:
No Answer Advance Timer
Announcement Timer
Overflow Timer
Default Timers
Announcement Station Data Window:
Announcement Stations
Announcement Types
Overflow Station Data Window:
Overflow Device
Overflow Station
Overflow Qpe
Overflow Count
Page 5-18
INTRR-TETAPRACTICES
IMX,‘GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
system Wide
Teatures...
‘Conti~)
Miscellaneous System-Wide
Information (MISC)
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
Primary Attendant Station
Call Termination Digits
System Flags:
Allow Cross-Tenant IC Traffic
Allow Cross-Tenant Voice Mail/Computer Traffic
Account Code Class-Of-Service
Audible Message Indication for SL Sets
Auto Attendant - Dial During Recording
Auto Attendant - Enable Ringback Tone
Barge
Barge Confirmation Tone
Broadcast Alarms to All Attendants
Broadcast Station Off-Hook Alarms
Drop Incomplete Outgoing Call
Extended DTMF Feedback Digits
External Paging Music Channel
Handsfiee Announce System Forward Transfer
Hot Dial Pad Keys
Hunt Group Transferred Call Type
Keyset Identification Display
Music-On-Hold for IC Calls
OHVA DSS Immediate Transmit
OWA System-Wide
Privacy Release
Reverse Transfer Immediate Connection
Standard Tones (CO Trunks, Keysets, and Single-Lines)
Station DTMF Digit Mute
Station Monitoring Tone
Suppress All Displayed Digits After End Of Dialing
System “Skate” Type
System Speed-Dial Override SCOS
Validate Voice Mailbox Numbers
Page Zones (PAGE)
Page Zones
Relays And External Ports
Keysets
Convert Ports
Relay Progre 0
System Forwarding (SFWD)
System Speed Dial (SSPD)
System Timers (I7M.R)
Page 5-19
Forwarding Paths
Path Description
Forwarding Point(s)
Name
Tenant
Number
Number Of Displayed Speed-Dial Numbers
Speed Dial Number Programming Station
Number Of Digits in Bin Number
Value
Default
Raw
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1. November 1994
IMXIGMX
INTER-TELPRACTICES
256INSTALLATION
& MAINTENANCE
WIN MENU ITEM
SUBMENU
PROGRAMMING OPTIONS
;ystem Wide
‘eatures...
Conlinued)
Tenants and -Departments (TNT)
Tenant Groups
Description
Departments
Ihnk Group For Auto Feature
3
StAiOIlS
rmnk Groups
DID Groups
roll Restriction...
Alternate Carriers/Allowed
Distance (ALT)
Area/Office Codes
Allowed/Restricted
Long
(AREA)
SCOS Information (SCOS)
Toll Security
kast-Cost Routing
FR)
Alternate Carrier Numbers
Allowed Long Distance Numbers
Area And 05ce codes Overlap
User Croups
Day/Night Station Lists
Area Codes (Allowed, Restricted, or Extended)
05ce Codes (Allowed or Restricted)
Station Class-Of-Service Programming
Day/Night Lists
Day/Night LCR Advances
7110 Digit Enabled
Operator/International Enabled
Weekly Toll Limit
Clear Accumulated Total
Remaining Days
Dial Rules
Route Groups:
Descliption
Area Code Table
05ce Code Table
Day, Evening, & Night Time Blocks (Facility Groups)
Facility Groups:
Description
Dial Rules
Trunk Groups
Page 5-20
I
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
Individual Trunk (INDT)
Group Number
Receive Gain
Transmit Gain
Hybrid Balance
E&M Interface
Start Type
Current DT Detect
Relaxed Ring Detect
DTMF Signaling
Ignore Answer Supervision
Trunk Groups, DID Groups, And
Ring-In/Answer Patterns (TRNK)
Trunk Group Programming Wmdow
Trunk Group Description & Name
Tenant Group
E & M Trunk Group:
Call Routing (Auto Ring-In/Dial Repeating)
Reorder Tone (Continuous or Burst)
Handshaking (Immediate, Delayed, Gr Wink)
Return Dial Tone
DID Digit Translation
Enable Hookflash
One-Way Incoming only
Music-On-Hold
Day/Night Gutgoing Access Station List
Day/Night Ring-In (Single, Hum, Multiple, or DISA DISA can have toll restriction)
Trunk List
Toll Restriction:
Subject To Toll Restrict
Exempt From LCR only
Call Cost (Free, Local, [email protected]& Operator)
Equal Access
Absorbed Digits
Absorbed Digits Applications (PBX or Local)
Absorbed Digits Repeatable
Absorbed Strings
DID Group Programming Window:
Description
Tenant Group
Base Number
Trunk List
Music On Hold
Start Type (Immediate, Wink, Delay)
Add/Delete Entry
Day/Night Ring-In (Single, Hunt, Multiple, or DISA)
~DISA Codes
~Set Ring-in (Batch Load)
Ring-In/Answer Patterns Window:
Pattern Title
Ring-In Station List
Answer Station List
Relay Lists
Page 5-21
lNTJ3R-TELPRAcTIcEs
XMWGMX 256 INSTAWLATION & MAINTENMCE
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
WN MENU ITEM
vtendants...
btion Message
)etail...
WBMENU
VIOGRAMMING OPTIONS
r1 Progrem
3rror Threshold Programmiug
Dialing Feedback C&Quration:
DTMF Dialing Feedback Gain
Dial Pulse Feedback Gain
Dial Pulse Tone Selection
Backup Clock
Tl Card Programming Window:
FCM Encoding Law
Relay Activation
ZardType(D4orESF)
Zero Code Suppression Scheme (AMI, BSZS, or None)
Channel Service Unit (On-Board or DSX-1)
Line Build-out (LBO) if On-Board CSU
DSX-1 Line Length if DSX-1
rest Tone
Reference Clock Rogramming
Clock Rogramming Window:
Tl From public Network
Provides Reference Clock For System
Master/Slave Loop Operation
Source Of Reference Clock
Error Diagnostics Window:
Output Type (Table or Graph/Hour or Day)
UPdate
Current Errors
Port/File & Print Location
Designate/Format Destination
Create Database
Attendant’s Console (CONS)
Alias Programming (ALSS)
Add Alias
List Current Aliases
DSS/BLF Assignment (DSS)
Description
DSSIBLF Associated Keyset
DSSIBLF Keymap
Daytime Rates In Dollars Per Minute
Evening/Night/Weekend Multiplicative
Xl Cost (COST)
SMDA (SMDA)
Factors
output Port
Reporting Interval (Attendant, Daily, Weekly, Monthly)
Clear SMDA Data
Print Report
Review Format Window:
Account Code Reports
Clear Account Code Data Following Report
Summary Reports
Select Device Reports
Detailed Reports
Clear Station/I’m&/Hunt Data Following Report
Selected Device Reports:
stations
Trunks
Hunt Groups
Page 5-22
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMI4GM.X 256 INsTAlLLATON & MAINTENANCE
MAIN MENU ITEM
SUBMENU
PROGRAMMING OPTIONS
Station Message
Detail...
SMDR (SMDR)
SMDR Output Port
SMDR Output Active
SMDR Report Format
station List
service...
Error Message Programming (ERR)
Error Output Port
Error Output Active
Report Contents
Hybrid Balance (HYBR)
Circuits
Hybrid Balance
Test Line
Break Dial-Tone Digit
Maintenance Programming @4&W)
Devices
CO Trunks In Maintenance/Available
Passwords (PASS)
Applications Restricted/Unrestricted
On-Line Monitor Restricted/Unrestricted
(continued)
Select Output Port
Station Report
Area/Office Code Report
Least Cost Routing Data Report
Customized Report Programming
(CREP)
Reports:
Area/Office Codes
Detailed Station
DID
General Station
Hunt Croup
GY Maps
LCR
Phone List
Special Purpose Flags
System Speed Dial
Timers
Trunk Croup
Port/File
Save/Restore (SAVE)
Format Disk
Save Database
Restore Database
Save CVH Database (not currently supported)
Copy Error File
File Destination/Source
Serial Port ConfQuration
(PORT)
System Configuration (CONP)
Page 5-23
Enable DSR Handshaking
Enable CTS Handshaking
Baud Rate
Reset Ports
Time & Date
Home Area Code/Local Area Codes
System Board Types
+3OVDC Modules Required
Non-Blocking For Voice Channels
Configuration For KSC, TlC, & DID
Clock Adjustment (on-line only)
Move Board (stand-alone PC only)
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMWGMX 256 INSTACLATION & MAINTENANCE
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
7. DEFAULT VALUES
7.1 The default values of the features are specified
throughout this section of the manual. They are also specifiedontheprogramplanningsheetsthatbeginonpage
5-174. Asummary of the default system values is as follows:
A.
0
All single-line seta are in the “immediate” ring zone.
0
All stationshave CO reseize disabled.
D.
TRUNKS
0 All trunks are programmed for MMF signaling.
0 System-wide call privacy is enabled.
0 All trunks are subject to toll restrictions All trunks
CONFIGURATION
accept equal access dialing. None absorb digits.
e On Ih4X 256 Systems, card slots l-4 are considered
KSCs or KSC-Ds, slots 5-6 are DKSCs, slots 7-g are
unassigned, slots 9-12 are SLCs, and slots 13-16 are
LGCs. On GMX-256 Systems, card slots l-g are
considered KSCs or RSC-Ds, slots 9-12 are SLCs,
and slots 13-16 are LGCs.
I
I
B.
No trunks are associated with hunt groups.
0 All trunks are assigned to trunk group 1, which is
named “All Lines.”
E
TOLL RE!STRICTION
0 Area and office codes do not overlap. All area codes
AlTENDANT
0 There is one attendant for all stations (circuit 1.1).
This station serves as the primary attendant, system
alarm station, and message center for all stations. It
is also the system speed-dial programming station
and it can be used to place the system in night mode.
The circuit is equipped and configured for a keyset.
0 Circuit 1.1 receives ring-in and can answer all trunks
during day mode and night mode.
C.
a
and office codes are unrestricted.
0 The allowed long distance numbers are SOO-XXXXxXx and 911. There are no alternate carrier numbers.
F.
MISCELLANEOUS
0 The system is in day mode.
0 No system or station speed-dial numbers are pro-
grammed.
STATIONS
0 None of the system speed-dial locations are identi-
fied as nondisplay numbers. All are assigned for use
by all tenant groups.
0 Stations are not toll restricted.
0 All stations have ring-in assignment and can answer
all trunks when the system is in night mode. Users
have outgoing access on all trunks.
0 Intercom numbers are assigned in order beginning
l
Speed-dial M’MF tones are not muted.
0
Speed-dial numbers are subject to toll restriction.
l
Least-Cost Routing (LCR) is programmed as “transparent” to the users.
0
No hunt groups, hunt group supervisors, or
announcement or overflow stations are assigned.
0
No account codes are assigned. Account code
default length is four digits. Class-of-service
account codes are not enabled.
0
The system is programmed to disconnect calls (not
place them on hold) when a user presses another
trunk key during a call.
0
Cross-tenant intercom traffic is allowed.
0
System alarms are sent to all attendants.
0
Reverse transfers to keyset stations are connected
immediately, the user does not need to press the
flashing trunk or IC key.
0
Passwords are not required to gain access to the database programs or the on-line monitor.
with circuit 1.1 (intercom number 100).
0 All stations are in tenant group 1, department 1.
0 All keysets are in paging zone 1. External paging
ports are not enabled.
0 Camp-on tones are heard at all stations.
0 No headsets are equipped.
0 No user names are assigned.
0 There are no DSWBLF stations, automated atten-
dants, message centers (other than the primary attendant), or house phones.
0 Off-hook voice announce is enabled. Barge is not
enabled.
0 Keyset LCD identification is enabled full time.
0 All stations have do-notdisturb capability, but none
have DND override enabled.
Page 5-24
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION % MAINTENANCE
1Actions
Setm Exit
Station to be Reviewed:
I
I
I
Review
1
Press F2 for List of
Stations
[
8.
Exit
S?‘ATION PROGRAMMING INDIVIDUAL STATION
INFORMATION (SIN)
end of the circuit number to designated which station is
being programmed.) Then press RETURN to select the
Review command button and display the window
shown on page 5-28.
8.1
When Station Progfamming is selected Corn the
Applications Menu window, the menu expands to show
the following options:
station Programming...
Individual Station Information
Key Assignments
Ring Zone Rogramming
Station Features
8.2 The Individual Station Information option and the
windows it accesses are described in the following
pages. The remaining options apply to batch programming and are described beginning on page S-44.
A.
]
NOTE Programmers should use exter&on numbers
and not station circuit numbers when programming stations. Because the StationExchange feature can be used
to change the extension programming of the station circuit numbers, circuit numbers are not reliable references to the extension numbers.
85 F2 FOR LIST OF STATIONS: To view a list of
the stations, press the F2 key. The following window ap
pears. To select a station, scroll through the lit box until
the desired station is highlighted.
E x t Ckt
STATION TO BE REVIEWED
8.3 The first window in the Individual Station programmirg area is shown above. It can be accessed by selecting Individual Station from the Station
Programming menu or entering the SIN command.
There are two methods for selecting the station to be
programmed as described in the following paragraphs.
8.4 STATION TO BE REVIEWED: Select the Station to be Reviewed text box and enter a circuit or extension number to program the station features for an
individual station. (If programming an 8-line IMX AIM
keyset that is installed on a dual circuit, add Aor B to the
101
102
103
104
Name
01.02
01.03
01.04
01.05
0 OK or CANCEL: Select the OK command button
Page 5-25
or press RETURN. To exit from the window without
selecting a station, select the Cancel command button.
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
l
JNTER-TELPRACTICES
IlkWGMX 256 INST4LLATION & MAINTENANCE
SORT: To sort the stations and list them numerically
by extension number or circuit number, or to list
them alphabetically by name, select the Sort -cornmand button. The window appears as shown here.
Choose the desired sorting method by selecting the
corresponding option button. Then select the OK
command button. When the list of stations returns,
the list box will show the stations in the selected order. To exit without changing the sorting method,
select the Cancel command button.
- Ordering
0l
0
0
By &tension
By Circuit
By &me
8.6 COPY: To copy attributes from the station shown
in the StationTo BeReviewed text box to other stations,
enter the sours station’s extension or circuit number in
the text box and then select the Copy command button.
The window shown at the bottom of this page appears.
0 SELECT COPIED AlTRIRU7W: To determine
which attributes will be copied, place an X in the box
for each desired attribute. To place and X in a box,
highlight it and then press SPACE BAR. To remove
the X, highlight it and press SPACE BAR again.
0 STATIONS: To determine which stations will receive the copied information, select the Stations
command button. The window shown on the next
page appears.
0 EXIT: When all of the attributes have been selected
(or if you wish to exit without copying information),
select the Exit command button. A small window
appears that asks if you wish to update the database.
If you select the Yes command button, the information will be copied as specified. If you select the No
command button, the Individual Station window
(shown on the previous page) will return. If you select the Cancel command button, the Copy
-. window
(shown below) will return.
Select Copied Attributes
Cl Attendant
c] Message Center
q
Account @de Settings
0 Tenant Group and Dept.
Ring zone (Single Line)
q
0 M&ellaneous Features
c l Station Class of Service
q
c l Least Cost Routing
0 By Map Number
q Softkey
Programming
III System Forwarding
0 Eage Zones
q Outgoing
user Group
Page 5-26
Access
.
INTER-TELPRACTIcE.S
IMWGMX 256 INS~TION & MAINTENANCE
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
and record your changes or select the Cancel
command button to exit without saving changes.
bclude
1001 elm-stationundeth?d
- SORT: To sort the stations and list them numeri-
(-Ez]
tally by extension number or circuit number, or
to list them alphabetically by name, select the
Sort command button. The window appears as
follows. Choose the desired sorting method by
selecting the corresponding option button. Then
select the OK command button. When the list of
stations returns, the list box will show the stations in the selected order. To exit without changing the sorting method, select the Cancel
command button.
I
100902.02'Stati0n Undetied
[email protected]'Stati0n Undetined
101102.04'Stati0n Undefined
[F)
[TJ
- INCLUDE or EXCLUDE: To include a station,
Ir Ordering
0l
0
locate it on the Exclude list and select it by pressing the SPACE BAR; it will automatically move
to the Include list. To remove a station, select it in
the Include list to move it to the Exclude list.
- ALL or NONE: To include all stations, select
the All command button. To delete all stations,
select the None command button.
- OK or CANCEL: When the station lists appear
as desired, select the OKcommand button to exit
II 0
By &tension
p-]
By Circuit
I
By &me
8.7 EXIT? (Shown onpage 5-2.5.) When kishedprogramming station information, select the Exit command
button to retum to the Applications menu.
Page 5-27
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 DWJXLLATION & MAINTENANCE
&ll Name: 71
Username:
((
station Exchange Password:
&ea to be Reviewed
Secondary Stations
Miscellaneous Information
Outgoing Access - Day
Outgoing Access - Night
Programmable Keys
Secondary Call Key Assignments
Special Purpose Station
System Forwarding
B.
nounce, etc. A complete list of the flags is given on
page 5-30.
USERNAMEANDAREATOBE
REVIEWED
8.8 The “subwindows” that are accessed through this
window are used to enter specific information about the
selected individual station. The program planning sheet
in Figure 5-4, on page 5-174, may be helpful.
8.9 PULL NAME and USERNAME: The full name
of the station user can be up to 20 characters, and the abbreviated user name, that will appear on display keysets
in the “idle” display (if the option is enabled) and in several call processing displays,can have up to seven characters. To program the names, select the desired text box
and type the entry.
I
8.10 STATION EXCHANGE PASSWORD: (This
is not available unless the Station Exchange flag in Miscellaneous Flags is ended Seepage 5-31.) Enter the
desired password, up to four digits, to be used for this extension number (not circuit number) for the Station Rxchange feature. See page 4-99 in FEAWFES for more
information on the Station Exchange feature.
8.11 AREA TO BE REVIEWEDz This list box is
used for gaining access to the following programming
areas:
l
MISC. FLAGS: The window that appears when this
line is selected appears on page 5-30. It is used for
programming several station-specific features such
as Do-Not-Disturb Allowed, Off-Hook Voice An-
0 MISC. INFORMATION: Selecting this line in the
Area to be Reviewed list box, causes another programming window to appear (as shown on page
5-33). This window is used for programming the
station’s attendant, message center, accOunt code
type and index, class-of-service account code, tenant group, and department. Also used for programming ring zones for single-line sets.
l
OUTGOING ACCESS DAY/NIGETz Select this
line to determine the trunk group(s) to which the station will have access for placing outgoing calls during day and night modes. The window appears as
shown on page 5-34.
l
PROGRAMMABLE KEYS: This option dim not
appear for single-line stations. Select this line to
choose the key map that will be used by the station
and, for keysets, to assign the values for the station
programmable keys. The window appears as shown
on page 5-35.
. SECONDARY CALL KEY ASSIGNMENT!%
This option does not appear for single-line stations.
If the station will have secondary call keys, select
this line. The programming window appears on page
5-37.
Page 5-28
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
wrER-TELPRAcTIcES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
0
SPECIAL PURPOSE STATION: This option is
selected to program the stations as an attendant,
automated attendant, FAX station, house phone,
message center, or voice mail station. The window
for this option is shown on page 5-38.
SYSTEM FORWARDINGSelect this line to
assign the system forwarding path(s) and forwarding
conditions for the station. The window for this option appears on page 5-41.
TOLL RE!$IRICTION:
This line is selected to
program the station’s toll restriction user group,
LCR advance limit, and SCOS restrictions. A window appears as shown on page 5-43.
8.12 SECONDARY STATIONS: This list box appears gray for singMine sthns. If the station being
programmed is a primary station and one or more secondary stations have secondary call keys associated
with its call keys, the secondary stations are listed in this
box for reference.
8.13 EXIT: When finished programming through this
window, select the Exit command button. A window appears that asks “Perform Update to Database?” To update the database and exit, select the Yes button. Or
select the No command button to exit without saving
any changes. To return to this programming window,
select the Cancel button.
Page 5-29
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 2!%INSTALLATION&MAINTENANCE
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
Auto AttLDISA DND Breakthru
Automatic Answer CO
Automatic Answer IC
Camp-on Tones
CO Reseize
DID Camp-on Tones
Do-Not-Disturb Allowed
Do-Not-Disturb Override
E&M Camp-on Tones
Halhfr~
Headset
c
.
MISCELLANE
OUS FLAGS WINDOW
8.14
Determine the desired status for each of the following features. Refer to l&CURES for more information on each of these features. The program planning
sheet for this window is located in Figure 5-4 on page
5-174.
8.15 LIST BOX: Each of the items in the list box has
only two states (enabled/disabled, on/off, etc.). Scroll
throughthelisttoverifythattheyareprogrammed asdesired. To change the status of a flag, select it.
l
Allow Private Intercom Override: (K&et only)
This option, when enabled, allows the caller to press
the pound (#) key to break through handsfree when
calling a keyset station that is programmed to receive only private calls. In the default state, it is
disabled
0 Automated
Atten&Ult/VM/DISA DO-NOtDisturb Breakthrough: This option determines
whether calls received through the automated attendant, voice mail, or DISA will break through DoNot-Disturb mode. If the option is enabled, the
station receives DISA, voice mail, or automated attendant calls even when in Do-Not-Disturb. If disabled, the call is sent to the station’s attendant. In the
default state, it is enabled
0 Automatic Answer CO or IC: (Kzyset only) The
Automatic Answer feature can lx enabled so that
ringing outside and/or intercom calls are answered
by simply liftii the handset. If automatic answer is
disabled, the user must press a key to answer the call.
Page 5-30
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Disabled
Enabled
Enabled
Disabled
Enabled
Enabled
Disabled
I
I
(This can also be programmed by the station user.) In
the default state, automatic access for both IC and
CO are enabled
Barge Initiate or Receive: (llispmnpt appears
only if the system-wide jlag for Barge is enabled
Barge Initiate appears for kysets only.) A keyset
station can be given barge permission and/or any station can be programmed to receive or block barges.
In the default state, barge is disabled.
CampOn Tones: The tone that signals a user when
a call has camped on can be enabled or disabled.
(This flag does not apply to DID or E&M calls.
Those are programmed separately as described below.) In the default state, the tones are enabhd
CO Reseize: (Keyser only) The ability to immediately reseize. a trunk after discomtecting from a
call can be enabled. In the default state, it is
disabled
Dial pulse: (Single-line station only) Single-line
sets can be permitted to use pulse-dialing signals.
This feature enables or disables that option. Iu the
default state, this feature is set to no.
DID Camp-On Tones: The tone that signals the user
that a DID call has camped on can be enabled or disabled. In the default state it is enabled.
Do-Not-Disturb Allowed: This option designates
whether the station can be placed in do-notdisturb.
In the default state, it is enabled
Do-Not-Disturb Override: (Keyset only) The station can be given do-not-disturb override privilege
that allows the user to place an intercom call to a sta-
lNTER~TELPRACTIcES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
tion in do-not-disturb. In the default state, ‘it is disabled
DTMF Feedback The progress tones that are normally sent to a voice computer can be replaced with
DTMF “feedback” tones. These tones determine
call status such as whether the call is ringing, has
been answered, has been disconnected, or if the
called station is in do-not-disturb, busy, or forwarded to an outside telephone number. If the voice
computer cannot interpret the IYIMP feedback
tones, progress tones should be kept enabled. Iffeedback tones are enabled, the “extended” set of feedback tonea can also be enabled in system-wide
programming (see page 5-68). These extended
tones include codes for indicating when a station is
forwarded to another station and when the calling
party hangs up. In the default state, feedback tones
are set to disabled
E&M Camp-On Tones: The tone that signals the
user that an E&M call has camped on can be enabled
or disabled. In the default state it is enabled.
Off-Premises Extension: (Single-line IDC cinxits
only) This option appears for single-line IDC circuits that have been designated as OPX stations in
the System Con&uration window. It defaults to yes
to increase gain by +3dB to compensate for the normal loss in OPX cabling between the 256 System
and the off-premises site. If the station will actually
be used on premises (e.g., connected to a voice mail
unit), this option should be set to “no” to prevent
IYIMF digit recognition errors.
Page Remove/Replace: (Keyset only) If desired, the
station can be removed from its page zone(s), or
placed in again through Programming or by the keyset user. In the default state, the stations are in replace mode.
Redial Mode: (Keyse~only) Keyset users can use
lcrst number dialed or last number saved redial
modes. This option can be programmed using this
window, or at the keyset. In the default state, the stations are set for dialed mode.
Ring Cadence: (Single-line station only) Ring cadence can be set for normal or extended. The
extended setting lengthens the duration of the ring
signal to meet the requirements of OPX and/or repeater applications. The default setting is rwmal.
Handsfree:(Keysset only) The station can be pro-
0
grammed to receive intercom calls handsfree, or
handsfree answering can be disabled. (This can also
be programmed at the keyset.) In the default state,
hands&e answering is enabld
Headset: (Keyset only) If a headset will be used on
the keyset, it can be enabled through programming
or by the keyset user. In the default state, it is a%ablait
Ring Intercom Always: When this feature is enabled, all calls placed to keysets from this station are
received as private calls. The feature can be enabled
or disabled through Programming or by the keyset
user. In the default state, this feature is a%abZed
LCRFacility Group Camp-On: Determine wheth-
er the station will be allowed to camp-on to busy facility groups when the Least-Cost Routing feature is
used. In the default state, it is enabled
Ring Type for Off-Premises Extension: (Single-
he I. circuits only) This option appears for
single-line IDC circuits that have been designated as
OPX stations in the System Configuration window.
Determine whether the OPXuses AC or DC ringing,
then select the appropriate option. (Refer to the card
strapping information on page 3-95 in INSIWLATION.) The default setting is AC.
Message Lamp: (Single-line station only) Single-
line sets can be equipped with a message waiting
lamp. This feature enables or disables that option. In
the default state, this option is set to no.
Music Channel One/lko: This option selects the
Station Exchange: This option, if enabled, allows, a
station user to enter a feature code and a password
(see page 5-28) to exchange the extension numbers
and station programmiug of two station circuits. See
page 4-99 in PlWWRES for details. In the default
state this is disabled
music-on-hold channel that will be used by this station. The chosen music channel is used for background music to the station, and for music-on-hold
when the user is placed on hold by another station or
camps on to a resource. This can also be programmed by the station user. In the default state,
channel one is selected.
l
tinsparent LCR: If this option is enabled, the user
will hear dial tone while the LCR feature is selecting
the line. If disabled, the user hears a progress tone,
then digits being dialed. In the default state, this feature is enableaT
OHS?A Receive/Wansmit:(OHVA Receive ap-
pears for keys+) Any station can be programmed to
place off-hook voice announcements. Keysets can
also be programmed to receive off-hook voice announce calls. In the default state, receive and transmit are enabled, but the system-wide flag must also
be enabled to allow the feature to be used.
8.16
OK: When finished, select the OK command
button to return to the Station Programming window.
Page 5-31
I
I
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
lNTER-~PRACTicES
IMX/GMX256 INSZ’ALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Account Code Dpe
Attendant: II
Message Center.
-0
A&. Message Source:
I
Tenant Group: 1
0
- Qepartment: 1
I.3
Rgceive Gain:
Account code Index:
Class-of-Service Account Code:
Ring zone
0 dB
Transmit Gain:
D .
MISCELLANEOUS
WINDOW
INFORMATION
0 Account code type/index: The station can be
assigned a standard, forced, or LCR toll account
code, or none. Ifit is a standard code, indicate which
code by noting its code index (W-127). me actual
code is assigned in the Account Code window on
page 5-54.)
8.17
Determine the following information for each
station. Refer to FEHURES for more information on
each of these features. The program planning sheet for
this window is located in Figure 5-4 on page 5-174.
l
l
Attendant station: Determine which station (if any)
will serve as the attendant for each station.
0 Message center: Determine which station or hunt
group (if any) will be assigned as message center for
each station. The message center will receive messages after the Message timer expires.
0 Alternate Message Source: (Single-line station
only) Determine which station or hunt group (if any)
will be assigned as the alternate message source for
each single-line station. The alternate message
source was developed primarily for voice mail use.
It allows voice mail ports to leave message waiting
indications at stations, but when the station user retrieves the message the call is sent to the alternate
message source hunt group rather than the specific
voice mail port.
0 Tenant group and department: There can be up to
eight tenant groups with up to ten departments each.
Every station must be assigned to a tenant group and
department.
Validate account code: Forced account codes can
be validated or non-validated. If they are validated
and the entered code inatches one of the pre-programmed forced account codes in the database, the
call is allowed. If the code does not match, the call is
blocked. If forced account codes are not validated,
the code is not checked against any lists and the call
is allowed as soon as the code is entered.
0 Class-of-service account code: Assign the account
code that this station user will enter (if using another
station) to use his or her station’s usual SCOS. It
must match the programmed account code length
(4-8 digits) and must be a unique account code that
does not match any existing standard, forced, or
class-of-service code.
0 Ring zones: (Single-line station only) The system
power supply’s ring generator can provide ring voltage to ring up to 20 AC-ringing single-line stations
simultaneously without any noticeable change in the
ring tone. To preserve the ring tone quality, singleline stations should be divided into ring zones l-3.
All single-line sets are in the “immediate” ring zone
in the default state.
Page 5-32
‘-I
;
PROGRAMMING
Issui 1, November 1994
l
Receive/Transmit gain: (OPX stations bnly) Receive and transmit gain can be adjusted on an OPXby-OPX basis if voice transmit or voice receive
volume problems occur. You can adjust the receive
gain and/or the transmit gain for individual circuits.
Receive and transmit are measured from the perspective of the central office. Receive and transmit
are measured from the perspective of the central office. That is, receive gain adjusts the signal that is
sent to the CO from the256 System The signal that is
transmittedfrom the CO is affected by adjusting the
transmit gain on the 256 System.
8.18 ATTENDANT: Sclcct the Attendant text box
and type the circuit or extension number of the station
that will serve as this station’s attendant.
8.19 MESSAGE CENTER: To program a message
center for the station, select the Message Center text box
and type the desired station circuit or extension number,
or hunt group number.
8.24 VALlDATE ACCOUNT CODE: To program
the system to validate forced account codes, place an X
in the Validate Account Code check box by pressing the
SPACE BAR or simultaneously pressing the ALT and V
keys. (Repeat this process the remove the X.)
8.25 CIA!33 OF SERVICE ACCOUNT CODE: To
enter the class of service account code, select the text
box and enter the desired code. It must match the programmed account code length (4-8 digits) and must bc a
unique account code that does not match any existing
standard, forced, or class-of-service code.
I
8.26 RING ZONE: When programming a single-line
set, a list box will appear in the lower right comer to allow you to program the ring zone, as shown below.
Scroll the highlight bar to the desired ring zone to assign
the single-line set to that zone.
Ring Zone
8.20 ALTERNATE MESSAGE SOURCE: To program an alternate message source for a single-line station, select the Alternate Message Source text box and
enter the desired alternate message source’s extension
number.
8.21 TENAN’WDEPARTMENTz The station must
be assigned to a tenant group and a department. Select
the Tenant Croup text box and type the desired tenant
group number (l-8). Then select the Department text
box and enter the desired department number (l-10).
8.27 RECEIVE GAIN When programminf~ an OPX,
the receive gain may need to be adjusted. To set the receive gain, enter the gain amount in the Receive Gain
text box (non-T1 trunks can be -9dB to +3dB, Tl range
is -15dB to +15dB).
8.22 ACCOUNT CODE TYPE Highlight and select
the desired account code type in the list box. If a standard code type was assigned, the account code index
text box changes from gray to black.
8.28 TRANSMIT GAIN When programming an
OPX, the transmit gain may need to be adjusted. To set
the transmit gain, enter the gain amount in the Transmit
Gain text box (-3dB to +6dB for non-T1 trunks; -15dB
to +15dB for Tl trunks).
8.23 ACCOUNT CODE INDEX: Standard account
codes require an index. To enter one, select the Account
Code Index text box and type the index number
(ooo-127).
8.29 OK: When finished with this window, select the
OK command button to return to the Station Programming window.
Page 5-33
I
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICEs
IMX/GMX256 INS~TION & MAINTENANCE
include
Exclude
E.
OUTGOING ACCESS -DAY OR NIGHT
8.30 Outgoing-access assignments can be made on a
station-by-station basis for day and night modes. The
program planning sheet for this window is located in
Figure 5-4 on page 5-174.
8.31 INCLUDE or EXCLUDE: To determine the
trunk groups to which the station will have outgoing
access, place the desired trunk groups in the Include lit
box. To include a trunk group, locate it on the Exclude
list and select it by pressing the SPACE BAR, it will au-
tomatically move to the Include list. To remove a trunk
group from the list, locate it on the Include list and select
it by pressing the SPACE BAR; it will automatically
move to the Exclude list
832 ALL or NONE: To allow outgoing access to all
trunk groups or none, select the All or None command
button.
833
OR: When the outgoing access list appears as
desired, select the OK command button to return to the
Station Programming window.
Page 5-34
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TExdPRACTrcEs
IMXIGMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Key Map
UL
03
04
05
06
07
Key3
Key 4
GY5
Key 6
GY7
Kev8
-
08
Undefined Key
(71
F.
PROGRAMMABLE KEY PROGRAMMING
WINDOW
8.34 The database can contain up to 20 maps of default values for the database-programmable feature
keys. Determine the preferred key map for each station,
and the default values of the keyset station programmable keys. The program planning sheet for this window is located in Figure 5-5 on page 5-177.
8 3 5 KEYMAPzToprogramthekeymapthatwillbe
used by this station, select the Key Map list box, and
scroll to the desired map number (01-20). The highlighted line indicates the selected map.
8.36 STATION PROGRAMMAR LE KEYS: (Kkysets only) Determine the function of each of the station
programmable keys for this station. Then, scroll through
the list, selecting (by pressing the SPACE BAR) and assigning each key (l-8) using the window shown on the
next page.
837 OR: When finished with station programmable
key progr amming, select the OK command button to return to the Station Programming window.
Page 5-35
INTER-TELPRACIWES
IhlX/GMX 256 INS’IXLLATION & MAINTENANCE
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
selection
[ok]
(x-z-]
8.38 Each station programmable key can be assigned
one of the following Key Types. When the Key Type is
highlighted, the bottom half of the screen changes as follows:
l
Call Key: A list box appears (as shown above)
which allows you to indicate the call key (l-10) that
will be assigned (according to the chosen key map).
l
DSS/BLFKey: The following text box and message
appear. Enter the circuit or extension number of the
station that will appear under the selected DSS/BLF
key or press F2 to select the station from a list.
Extension:
Press F2 for a list
of available extensions.
l
Feature Key: A list box (similar to the one shown
above) appears which permits you to select the feature that will be accessed by this key.
e Forwanl Key: If this key will be used for the Call
Forwarding feature (FWD key), highlight this line.
Nothing appears in the lower half of the window.
0 Individual ‘IhmkKey: Alist box (similar to the one
shown above) appears which permits you to select
the individual trunk that will be accessed by this key.
l Intercom (IC) Key: lfthis key will be used as the IC
key, highlight this line. Nothing appears in the lower
half of the window.
l Secondary Call Key: To create a secondary call
key, highlight this line. A list box appears (similar to
the one shown above) which allows you to indicate
the secondary call key that will be assigned. The station associated with the key is assigned as described
on page 5-37.
l SPCL Key: lf this key will be used as the SPCL key,
highlight this line. Nothing appears in the lower half
of the window.
0 lhmk Group Key: A list box (similar to the one
shown above) appears which permits you to select
the trunk group (l-47) that will be accessed by this
key.
0 Undefined Key: Use this selection if the key will not
be used. Nothing appears in the lower half of the
window.
0 User Programmable Key: A list box (similar to the
one shown above) appears which allows you to indicate the user-programmable key (l-9) that will be
assigned.
0 Hunt Group Key: A text box and message appear,
like the one shown above for DSS/BLF keys. Enter
the pilot number of the desired hunt group or press
F2 to select the hunt group from a list.
0 IC/CO Speed Dial Key: A list box (similar to the
one shown above) appears which allows you to indicate the IC/CO speeddial key (l-10) that will be assigned.
8.39 OK or CANCEL: When finished with station
programmable key programming, select the OK command button to return to the Station Programmable Key
window. Or select the Cancel command button to exit
without changing the key assignments.
Page 5-36
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
Warning:
Stations may .be assigned to secondary call keys
even though no secondary call keys exist in the
keymap or as station programmable keys.
Secondary Qll Keys
q
G.
SECONDARY CALL KEYS
8.40 Secondary call keys are first created in a key map
in the Key Assignments window of Station Programming (page 5-44) and the secondary station is assigned
to that key map. Or, if the key map for the secondary station contains station programmable keys, those keys can
be designated as secondary call keys using the Programmable Key window on page 5-35. The window shown
above is used to determine which primary station is
associated with each secondary call key and whether the
secondary station will ring when receiving a call on that
secondary call key. A program planning sheet for this
window is located in Figure 5-4 on page 5-174. For a
full explanation of secondary call keys, refer to FEATURES, page 4-44.
8.41 SECONDARY CALLKEY: To select a secondary call key for programming, highlight the desired secondary call key number in the list box. You can then
assign the associated primary station and/or enable ring
cadence. To delete a secondary call key entry, highlight
the entry to be deleted and press the SPACE BAR.
8.42 STATION: While the desired secondary call key
is highlighted, press TAB to select the Station text box.
Enable Ring Cadence
Type the extension number of the primary station that
will be associated with this key. (If this is the first secondary call key associated with that station, it corresponds to call key #l at the primary station; if this is the
second key associated with that same station, it corresponds to call key #2 at the primary station; and so on.)
Press RETURN. The primary station’s extension number, circuit number, and description are shown next to
the secondary call key number in the list box.
8.43 ENABLE RING CADENCE: To determine
whether the secondary station will ring when receiving a
call on the secondary key, highlight the desired secondary call key in the list box and then press TAB until the
Enable Ring Cadence check box is highlighted. If the
station should not ring, leave the box blank (or remove
the X by pressing the SPACE BAR). To program the station to ring when receiving a call on the secondary key,
place an X in the box by pressing the SPACE BAR or simultaneously pressing the AJLT and E keys.
8.44 OK: When all secondary keys have been programmed for this station, select the OK command button to return to the Station Programming window.
Page 5-37
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 lNSTALLATlON& MAINTENANCE
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
Station TvDe
House Phone
Message Center
H.
No
No
SPECIAL PURPOSE STATION WINDOW
8.45 The window shown above is an example of one
that would appear for a keyset station. If a single-line
station was being programmed, the options would be:
Automated Attendant, FAX Station, House Phone, Message Center, and Voice Mail Station. Stations can be
programmed to serve the following functions. Refer to
FlZMUBSfor more details on these special purpose
stations. The program planning sheet for this window is
located in Figure 54 on page 5-174.
l
Attendant (keyseta only): A keyset station can be
designated as an attendant and assigned a list of stations that it will serve.
0 Automated attendant: If using Extended sofhmre,
the station can be designated as an automated attendant. The recall destination and digit translation
table for the automated attendant can also be programmed.
Page 5-38
FAX station (single-line stations only): A singleline station can be designated as a FAX station if the
station circuit will be connected to a facsimile machine. The FAX message station can also be assigned.
House phone: The station can be designated as a
house phone that automatically dials a predetermined number when the handset is lifted. The
assigned day number is dialed when the system is in
day mode and the assigned night number is dialed
when the system is in night mode. The day/night
house phone numbers can also be programmed using
the house phone station speed-dial locations.
Message center: A station can be designated as a
message center and assigned a list of stations that it
will serve.
Voice Mail Station (single-line stations only): A
single-line station can be designated as a voice mail
station if the circuit is connected to a voice mail unit.
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
IrVTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
8.46
STATION TYPE: Select the Station ‘rLpe list
box, then select the desired option to change the Yes/No
to list them alphabetically by name, select the
Sort command button. The window appears as
follows. Choose the desired sorting method by
selecting the corresponding option button. Then
select the OK command button. When the list of
stations returns, the list box will show the stations in the selected order. To exit without changing the sorting method, select the Cancel
command button.
StatUS.
0 ATI’ENDANT: When Attendant status is “Yes,” a
Stations Served command button appears to the
right of the list box as shown above. Select this command button to assign the stations (if any) that will
be served by this attendant. The following window
appears.
Include
r Ordering
0l
0
0
103 01.04 ‘Station Undefmcd
104 01.05 -station undefined
Exclude
109 02.03
110
02.02 ‘Station
-Station Undctined
Undefined
11102.Ckt
‘Station Und&incd
112 02.05 ‘Station Undefined
,’
By Extension
By Circuit
By Name
pq
0 Automated Attendant: (EtienaW sojiware
ELI
- INCLUDE or EXCLUDE: To include a station,
locate it on the Exclude list and select it by pressing the SPACE BAR, it will automatically move
to the Include list. To remove a station, select it in
the Include list to move it to the Exclude list.
NOTE: A station can only be served by one
attendant. Including a station in an attendant’s
list removes it from its previous attendant’s list.
- ALL or NONE: To include all stations, select
the All command button. To exclude all stations,
select the None command button.
Recall Destination:
Digit
Translation
6:
I
7f-j
- OK or CANCEL: When the station lists appear
as desired, select the OKcommand button to exit
and record your changes or select the Cancel
command button to exit without saving changes.
8:
- SORT: To sort the stations and list themnumeritally by extension number or circuit number, or
0:
Page 5-39
only)
When the Automated Attendant status is “Yes,” a
text box labeled “Recall Destination” appears as
shown below. Select this text box and enter the extension or circuit number of the station that will receive this automated attendant station’s recalls.
Also, text boxes for the Digit Translation feature are
given. Select the text box for the desired digit and
type the extension number that will be dialed when a
caller enters that digit.
9:
I
I
I
xNTRR-TELPRAcTIcES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
0 FAX Station: (Single-line station only) When the
FAX Station status is changed to “Yes,” a text box
appears, as shown below, that is used for designating
the station that will receive a message indication
whenever a FAX is received. Select the Message
Center box and type the circuit or extension number
of the desired FAX message station.
&ssage Center:
l
I
I
House Phone: When the House Phone status is
“Yes,” two text boxes appear as shown below. Select
the “Day Number” box to enter the extension or outside number (up to 16 digits) that will be dialed when
the house phone is used during the day. Select the
“Night Number” text box to enter the number (up to
16 digits) that will be accessed when the system is
placed in night mode. (These numbers can also be
programmed at the house phone station by entering
the day number in the outside number location of
station speed-dial location 1 and the night number in
the outside number location of station speed-dial
location 2.) When entering an outside number, enter
a trunk group access code (default is 801-847) or the
LCR code (default is 9) before the telephone number. In numbers that am routed through a trunk
group, you can enter a short pause by entering an S, a
long pause by entering an L, or a hookflash by entering anF.
NOTE: If a station is programmed as both a house
phone and an automated attendant, the numbers programmed in speed-dial locations 1 and 2 will also
appear as digit translations 1 and 2. The house phone
programming overrides the automated attendant
programming for the first two speed-dial locations.
0 Message Center: When Message Center status is
“Yes,” a Stations Served command button appears to
the right of the list box as shown on page 5-38.
Select this command button to assign the stations
that will be served by this station. A station list window appears as shown for attendant programming.
To assign the stations to the message center, use the
methods as described for attendant stations on the
preceding page.
0 Voice Mail Station: (Single-line station only) If the
single-line station circuit will be connected to a
voice mail unit, change the status to “Yes.” No additional information is requested in this window.
NOTE: When a voice mail unit is connected to an
RX! circuit, the off-premises extension option described on page 5-3 1 must be set to “no” to prevent
IYlMF digit recognition errors.
8.47 OK: When finished with special purpose station
programming, select the OK command button to return
to the Station Programming window.
Day Number:
Night Number:
Page 5-40
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
- System Conditions
q
Day Mode
w
Ring Principal once
I.
q
Night Mode
- System Conditions
Day Mode
Night Mode
System Conditions
0 Day Mode c] Night Mode
0 Ring Principal once
0
q
q
SYSTEM FORWARDING
8.48 The forwarding path assigiunent is made on a station-by-station basis. Refer to FEAWRES, page 4-79
for more details on system forwarding. The program
plamting sheet for this window is located in Figure 5-4
on page 5-174.
8.49 FORWARDING PATHS: To select the forwarding path to be Programmed for the station, move
the highlight bar in the list box to the desired path number. You now have two programming options for that
Forwarding Path number:
l To assign, delete, or change a forwarding path for
this path number, highlight the path number in the
list box and press the SPACE BAR. A list box will
appear that shows “Ooo No Forwarding Path” and a
list of forwarding path numbers. To delete the path,
highlight the “tKW’ line and press the SPACE BAR
to select it. To change the path, highlight the desired
path and press the SPACE BAR.
0 If a forwarding path has not been assigned to that
number, the Forwarding Path column (1,2, or 3) in
the lower half of the window is grey; assign a path as
described above to change the column to black.
When the column is black, programming can be performed as described in the following paragraphs.
8.50 FORWARD CALL TYPES: Determine the
types of calls that will follow the forwarding path by
highlighting each desired call type and pressing the
Ring Principal once
SPACE BAR to place an X in the check box. In the sample shown above, calls through DID, DISA, or an automated attendant will be sent to the forwarding path. In
the default state, all but Recalls and IC calls are selected.
8.51 STATION CONDITIONS: Determine which
station conditions will cause the calls to follow the forwarding path by highlighting the desired station condition(s) and pressing the SPACEBAR to place anX in the
desired check box(es). In the sample shown above, calls
will be sent to the forwarding path immediately. In the
default state, all but Immediate are selected. Note that if
any condition other than Immediate is selected, Immediate will appear gray and camtot be selected.
852 SYSTEM CONDITIONS: Indicate whether
calls will follow the forwarding path in day and/or night
mode by highlighting the desired system condition(s)
and pressing the SPACE BAR to place an X in the desired check box(es). In the sample, calls are forwarded
during both day and night modes. In the default state,
both day and night mode are selected.
8.53 RING PRKNCIPAL ONCE: Ifthe principal station is a keyset and the user wishes to hear a single ring
signal each time a call enters the forwarding path, select
the Ring Principal Once check box to place an X in it. In
the default state, this is not selected.
8.54 OK: When all forwarding paths are programmed, select the OK command button to exit to the
System Forwarding window.
Page 5-41
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
SCOS Restrictions
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMWGMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Day Night
(3) International Access
(4) Eight Digit Access
(5) Area/Office Code
q
Alternate Carriers
user Group
LCR Advance Limit
Night Follow Day
f--x-l
\
I
Day Mode
Night Mode
J.
TOLL RESTRICTION INFORMATION
WINDOW
CAUTION
REGARDING EMRRGENCY NUMBERS
8.55 Determine the following toll restriction information for each station. Refer to FEAWRES, page 4-27,
for a full explanation of toll restrictions. The program
planning sheet for this window is located in Figure 54
on page 5-174.
l
In areas where the emergency number is 1911,
be sure that toll-restricted stations have SCOS
8 (Enable ALD) and that 911 is in the allowed
long distance number list. Otherwise, toll-restricted users may not be able to find a station
that is petitted to dial “l+” numbers. Note
that 911 is allowed at every station regardless
of toll restriction, but 1911 requires this special
pIogra=WZ-
Station class of service (SCOS): Determine which
SCOS designations the station will have during day
and night modes.
0 Day/night mode toll restriction user group: Deter-
mine which user group the station is assigned to in
day and night modes.
0 Day/night mode LCR advance limit: When a call
is placed using LCR the most economical facility
groups are accessed first. The LCR advance limit
(O-22 or unlimited) sets the number of facility group
levels the station will access. Determine the number
of advances the station will be allowed during day
and night modes.
836 SCOS RESTRICTIONS: This list box contains
all of the possible SCOS restrictions. Determine the
SCOS restrictions that should be assigned to the station
for day and night modes. To program the day and/or
night mode SCOS, use a combination of the Toggle
command buttons, the Night Follow Day check box, and
the list box as described below:
0 To change only the day mu& SCOS: Highlight the
desired line in the list box and press the SPACE
BAR. OR, highlight the desired line in the list box
and then select the Toggle Day Mode command but-
Page 542
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Yes and No. (The Toggle Night Mode command button will not function, and selecting the Toggle Day
Mode command button will change both day and
night modes, when this option is enabled.)
ton. The day mode will toggle between Yes and No
each time the SPACE BAR is pressed or the command button is selected.
To change only the night mude SCOS: Highlight the
desired line in the list box and then select the Toggle
Night Mode command button. The night mode will
toggle between Yes and No each time the command
button is selected.
To match the day and night mode SCOS settings and
change them simultaneously: Place an X in the Night
Follow Day check box by highlighting it and pressing the SPACE BAR (pressing SPACE BAR again
will remove the X). Then highlight the desired line
in the SCOS Restrictions list box and press the
SPACE BAR. If the day and night modes were not
the same, only the day mode status will change. If
day and night modes match, each time you press the
SPACE bar the status of both will toggle between
8.57 USER GROUP DAY/NIGECTt Determine the
toll restriction user group for the station being programmed. Then select the User Croup list box and highlight the desired user group number. The black line
indicates the selected user group.
858 LCR ADVANCE LIMIT DAY/NIGHT: To
program how many levels of facility groups the station
will be permitted to access when LCR is used, select the
LCR Advance Limit list box and scroll to the desired
number (Unlimited, No Advance, or l-30 Advances).
The black line indicates the selected advance limit.
8.59 OK: When finished, select the OK command
button to return to the Station Programming window.
Page 5-43
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATlON& MAINTENANCE
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
9.
S’IXI’ION PROGRAMMING BATCH PROGRAMMING OPTIONS
9.1 When Station Progmmmhg is selected from the
Applications Menu window, the menu expands to show
the following options:
station Programming...
Individual Station Information
Key Assignments
Ring Zone Rogramming
Station Features
9.2 The Individual Station Information option is described beginning on page S-25. The remaining options
apply to batch programming of key assignments, ring
zones, and station features. They are described in the
following pages.
A .
KEYAMIGNMENTS(KEY)
9.3 The window shown below is a sample from the
IMX System. The Key Assignments window can be
reached by selecting Key Assignments from the Station
Programming menu or entering the KEY command.
The program planning sheets are in Figure 5-5 on page
5-177. The window is used for performing the followingprwamming tasks for keysets, DSWBLP Units, and
single-line sets:
0 Naming the key maps.
0 Determining the layout of the keys for the station
instrument(s) that will use each key map. Note that
when a key is designated on one type of keyset or
single-line set, it will appear on the corresponding
key on all stations in that key map.
0 Assigning the station that will use each map.
0 Determining the default values for the uscrprogrammable keys and, if desired, updates selected
stations.
9.4 There can be up to 20 keyset map groups and 8
DSWBLP map groups in the system.
Actions setup Exit
- Byset Map Groups
Keyset Map New T)pe
- DSS
- Map Groups
r Single Line Map Programming -
Default Sets
u Digital DSS Map View
.
,
.
[ DSS 1&Z List 1 ( DSS s&4 List. 1
[
DSSDesq.
j
Page 5-44
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMJUGMX 256 INSTALLATON& MAINTENANCE
9.5 Refer to the proper page for the type of station
instrument you wish to program:
l Keyset programming begins on the next page.
0 DSS/BLF programming begins on page 5-47.
l
Single-line set programming begins on page 5-48.
NOTE: For more information on the GX and GMX station instruments, see appendixes A and B in the back of
this manual.
To Program Keyset Key Assignments
9.6 The keyset programming procedures are described in the following paragraphs.
9.7 KEYSET DESCR: To enter a keyset map group
’ name (or change a previously programmed name), highlight the desired line in the Keyset Map Groups list box
and then select the Keyset Descr command button. The
following window appears. Type the name in the text
box and select the OK command button to accept the
change. Select the Cancel command button to exit without saving any changes.
To viav a key, highlight it. Its current value ap
pears in the box at the bottom of the map.
To program a key, select it. The Key Programming window shown on page 5-49 appears.
NOTE: Key assignments within a key map are common
to all keyset types in that map. Modifying a key changes
that key assignment for ALL keysets assigned to that
map, regardless of keyset type. For example, if the top
left key is changed to a user-programmable key for IMX
24-line keysets in Keyset Map Group 1, the top left key
will also be user-programmable on IMX 1Zline and
S-line keysets in Keyset Map Group 1.
9.9 SlXI’ION LIST: To assign the stations to a key
map, highlight the desired map in the Keyset Map
Groups list box and then select the Station List
command button. A window with Include and Exclude
station list boxes appears (as shown below) to allow you
to select the stations that will use the keyset map that you
have programmed.
bclude
I
1I
,
&scription:
103 01.04 -Station Undetined
(OkJ
(z&z-)
[F]
109 02.03
110
02.02 -Station
‘Station Undetined
Undefined
9.8 KEYSET MAP GROUPS and KEYSETMAP
VIEW TYPE: To assign the common keys for the
instruments in the map group perform the following
steps. The default values of the keysets are represented
in the illustrations at the end of SPECIFICATIONS and
in the program planning sheets that begin on page
5-177.
(1)
Select the Keyset Map View ‘ljpe box and scroll
the highlight bar to the desired keyset type.
(2)
Select the Keyset Map Group box and choose the
map group by highlighting it and pressing the
SPACE BAR. A map of the selected keyset type
appears.
(3)
I
Locate the key(s) to be programmed. The keys
are grouped together according to location on the
keyset.
11102.04 -Station Undefined
112 02.05 -Station Undefined
l
INCLUDE or EXCLUDE: To include a station in
the keyset map group, locate that station on the Exclude list and select it by pressing the SPACE BAR;
it will automatically move to the Include list. To remove a station from the keyset map group, you must
exit and select another keyset map group and include
the station there. This procedure ensures that a keyset is always assigned to a map group.
l
ALLr To include all stations in the keyset map
group, select the All command button. (The None
button camtot be used in this window.)
l
OK or CANCEL: When the station lists appear as
desired, select the OK command button to accept the
change. To exit from the window without saving
changes, select the Cancel command button.
To move from group to group, use the TAB key.
To move within the group, use the arrow keys.
Page 5-45
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
l
TINTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GM.X 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
SORT: To sort the stations and list them numerically
by extension number or circuit number, or to list
them alphabetically by name, select the Sort command button. The following window appears.
Choose the desired sorting method by selecting the
corresponding option button. Then select the OK
command button. When the list of stations returns,
the list box will show the stations in the selected order. To exit without changing the sorting method,
select the Cancel command button.
0
0
9.11 DEFAULT SETS: (Command button shown in
the window on page 544.) When user-programmable
key values have been changed, you can allow the users
to update their own stations by entering the Feature Key
Default feature code (325), or you can use the Default
Sets command button to update stations in selected key
maps. When the Default Sets command button is
selected, the following window appears. Select the desired map groups as described below. The stations in the
selected maps will be updated with the new default values when you exit from the Key Assignments window
and perform the database update.
&OUD wate
Map Group &k List
By C&uit
List
(X=-)
By &me
9.10 USERPRG KEYS: (Command button shown in
the window on page 544.) Select this command button
to assign the default value of the user-programmable
keys in each keyset map; the following window appears.
When the desired key is selected, the procedure for assigning the key value is the same as described for keyset
map keys on page 549, except that the options include
only: Feature key, Trunk Group key, or Undefined key.
The new values will be assigned to the keys when the
user enters the Feature Key Default feature code (325)
or the programmer selects the Default Set command
button shown on page 544 and described in the next
paragraph.
yset hfap Group 07
[p%J
.
(p--j
(None)
MAP GROUPS PICK L&ST and MAP GROUP
UPDATE LIST: Select the map groups to be
updated in the pick list. They automatically move to
the update list. The pick list includes all 20 keyset
maps and the single-line map.
0 ALL or NONE: To include all key map groups in
the update list, select the All command button. To
exclude all key map groups, select the None command button.
User Programmable Key 4
User Rogrammable Key 5
User Programmable Key 6
0 OK: When all of the desired map groups are in the
update list, select the OK command button. This list
will remain as programmed until an update to the
database is performed. The Key Assignments window returns.
User Programmable Key 7
Page 546
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
those circuits that have been designated as DSWBLF
stations in Attendant Programming (see page 5-132 ).
TO Program DSS/RLF Unit Key Assiienti
- DSS Map Groups
Exclude
0 Digital DSS Map View
\
DSS l&2 List
,
/
\
I
DSS 3824 List
.
9.13 DSS MAP GROUPS: While the DSS mapgroup
is highlights all other programming pertains to that
map group. When a map is selected from the DSS Map
Groups list, an illustration of the DSS key layout ap
pears. Select the key for which you wish to assign a new
value, and refer to the Key Programming window on
page 5-49.
9.14 DIGITAL DSS MAP VIEW Placing an X in
this box changes the DSS Map display to the Digital
DSS layout (6 rows, 10 columns) instead of the Analog
DSS layout (10 rows, 6 columns). To place an X in the
check box, highlight it and press the SPACE BAR
(pressing SPACE BAR again will remove the X).
9.15 DSS DESCR: Select the DSS Descr button to enter a name for the DSS map group. The following window appears. Type the name in the text box and select
the OK button. To exit without saving any changes,
select the Cancel button.
1 Qescription:
I
.
1
1
pJ
I
9.12 The DSS/BLF programming portion of the Key
Assignments window (from page 5-44) is shown above.
The programming procedures are as follows.
I
02.01
0 INCLUDE or EXCLUDE: To include a DSS station in the DSS map group, locate the circuit number
on the Exclude list and select it by pressing the
SPACE BAR; it will automatically move to the Include list. To remove a station from the DSS map
group, you must exit and select another map group
and include it there. This procedure ensures that a
DSS is always assigned to a map group.
0 ALL: To include all DSS circuits in the DSS map
group, select the All command button. (The None
command button cannot be used in this window.)
0 OK or CANCEL: When the DSS lists appear as desired, select the OK command button. To exit without saving changes, select the Cancel button.
0 SORT: To sort the stations and list them numerically
by extension number or circuit number, or to list
them alphabetically by name, select the Sort command button. The following window appears.
Choose the desired sorting method by selecting the
corresponding option button. Then select the OK
command button. When the list of stations returns,
the list box will show the stations in the selected order. To exit without changing the sorting method,
I
I’ II
9.16 DSS LISTS: When the DSS l&2 List or DSS
3&4 List command button is selected, the following list
boxes appear which allow you to select the DSS station(s) that will use the map. The list box contains only
Page 5-47
. Ordering
0l ByBy Extension
Circuit
0 By &me
0
r-G=l
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
To Program Single-Line Set Key Assignmeids
9.18 SINGLE-LINE MAP PROGRAMMINGz
9.17
Select the SLI or ESLS key map from the Single-Line
Programming list box. A map of the station type you
have selected appears. When you select the key you
wish to program from the map, the key programming
window shown on the next page appears. The new values will be assigned to the keys when the user enters the
Feature Key Default feature code (325) or the programmer selects the Default Set command button shown on
page 5-44 and described in the paragraph 9.11.
The single-line set programming portion of the
Ke.y Assiguments window (from page 5-44) is shown
below.
c----------------------------I
I
Single Line programming
;
1
~~~~~~~~~~
::. “““‘:“p
. . . . . .._.. .~ .,,,
~
,... :j::j:::: ..__ ..::::.. %. ..%..A%.
. . .
I
.
Page 5-48
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
Key Pqramming Screen
- Individual Trunk key for direct access to a single
9.19 KEY TYPE Key type options are described below. Different options are available for keysets, singleline sets, and DWBLF Units.
- Intercom (IC) key for intercom channel access
- Secondary Call key that is associated with a primary station (see page 5-37)
0 Keysets: The available options for keyset keys are
as follows. All keysets must have a SPCL key, an IC
key, and a SPKR key.
- SPCL key for signaling the system before a feature code is entered
- Station Programmable key for feature code dialing (individually programmed in the database
for each keyset, but cannot be changed by user)
- Call key for call access
- DWBLF key for one-key dialing of an extension or pilot number and, if the key has a lamp,
provides a busy lamp field status of the station or
hunt group
- Trunk Croup key for one-key dialing of a trunk
group access code and, if the key has a lamp, it
will light if all trunks in the group are busy
- Feature key for one-key dialing of feature codes
(cannot be programmed by the user and is the
same for all stations in the key map)
- Forward key that can be programmed by the user
to access any of the Call Forward feature codes
- Hunt Group key for one-key dialing of a hunt
group pilot number and, if the key has a lamp,
shows the status of the hunt group
- Undefined key for unused key
- User Programmable key for feature code access
(individually programmed for each keyset and
cau bc changed by user)
0 Single-Line Sets: The available options for singleline sets are as follows. All keys are programmed the
same for all single-line sets in the map and can be
changed by the users.
- IC/CO Speed-Dial (SD) key for one-key dialing
of one extensionnumber and one outside number
and, if the key has a lamp, shows the status of the
extension programmed in the intercom portion
of the key
Page 5-49
- Feature key for feature code auxss
- Trunk Croup key for one-key dialing of a trunk
group access code
- Undefined key for unused key
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRAClTcES
IMX/GMX 256 INS’EtLLATION & MAINTENANCE
IfForward, IC, or SPCL key is selected, the function
is assigned to the key.
0 DSS: For DSS/BLF keys, the choices are:
- DSS/HLF key for one-key dialing of an extension or pilot number and provides a busy iamp
field status of the station
If IC/CO Speed-Dial key is selected, the list box
shows the available keys. Select the desired IC/CO
speed-dial key number (O-9) to assign to that key.
- Feature key for one-key dialing of feature codes
(cannot be programmed by the user and is the
same for all DSS/BLF Units in the key map)
If Secondary Call key is selected, the next available
secondary call key (1-16) is assigned to that key.
- System Speed Dial key for one-key dialing of
system speed-dial numbers.
I
‘--b
P
If Station Programmable key is selected, the list box
shows the available keys. Select the desired station
programmable key number (l-g) to assign to that
key.
- Hunt Croup key for one-key dialing of a hunt
group pilot number and shows the status of the
hunt group
- Undefined key
If System Speed Dial key is selected, the list box
shows the available keys. Select the desired system
speed dial location number (000499) to assign to
that key.
I
9.20 To determine the key assignment:
0
If Call key is selected, the next available call key
number (l-10) is assigned to that key.
0
If DSWHLF key is selected, the following text box
and message appear. Enter the circuit or extension
number of the station that will appear under the
selected DSWBLF key or press F2 to select the station from a list.
If User Programmable key is selected, the list box
shows the available keys. Select the desired user
programmable key number (l-9) to assign to that
key.
If the key will not be used, highlight the Undefined
key line in the list box.
Extension:
1
Press F2 for a list
of available extensions.
0
0
.’
If a Feature, Individual Trunk, or Trunk Croup key is
selected, a list box appears (as shown on the previous
page) that gives the options for that key. Select the
feature, trunk, or trunk group as desired.
If a Hunt Croup key is selected, the following text
box and message appear. Enter the pilot number of
the desired hunt group or press F2 to select the desired hunt group from a list.
Extension:
Press F2 for a list
of available extensions.
NOTE: Be careful not to assign the same key in two different locations, such as the SPKR, IC, or feature key,
unless the users have a specific application that requires
it.
9.21 OK or CANCEL: When the key has been programmed as desired, select the OK command button.
Or, to leave the key unchanged, select the Cancel command button.
9.22 EXIT (Shown in the window on page 5-44.)
When finished with all key map programming, select
the Exit command button. A window appears that asks
“Perform Update to Database?” To update the database
and exit to the Applications Menu window, select the
Yes button. Or select the No command button to exit
without saving any changes. To return to the window on
page 5-44, select the Cancel button.
Page 5-50
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 JNS’MLIATION & MAINTENANCE
Actions setup Exit
Ring Zone Group Three
B.
RING ZONE PROGRAMMlNG (ZONE)
9.23 The power supply’s ring generator can provide
power to ring up to 20 AC-ringer equipped single-line
stations simultaneously without any noticeable change
in the ring tone. If there are more than 20 AC-ringer
equipped single-line sets that would ring at the same
time, they should be removed from the immediate xone
and divided up among zones l-3 so that no more than 20
sets ring at once. This window can be reached by selecting Ring Zone programming in the Station Progmmming menu or entering the ZONE command. The
program planning sheet is in Figure 5-6 on page 5-188.
For more information regarding the ring zones, refer to
page 4-25 in FEHURES.
9.24 RING ZONES: Select the ring xone you wish to
program. A list box appears as shown below that contains only single-line stations.
hclude
move a station from the ring zone group, you must
exit and select another ring xone group and include
the station there. This procedure ensures that a station is always assigned to a ring zone group.
0 ALL: To include all stations in the ring zone group,
select the All command button. (The None command button cannot be used in this window.)
l OK or CANCEL: When the station lists appear as
desired, select the OK command button. To exit
from the window without saving changes, select the
Cancel command button.
0 SORT: To sort the stations and list them numerically
by extension or circuit number, or to list them alphabetically by name, select the Sort command button.
The window appears as shown on the next page.
Choose the desired sorting method by selecting the
corresponding option button. Then select the OK
command button. When the list of stations returns,
the list box shows the stations in the selected order.
To exit without changing the order, select the Cancel
command button.
- Ordering
0 By Extension
0
0 By Circuit
Exclude
179 10.1 ‘Station Undefined
0 By Name
180 10.2 -Station Undefined
18110.3 ‘Station Undefined
182 10.4 -Station Undefined
183 10.5 ‘Station Undefined
0 INCLUDE or EXCLUDE: To include a station in
the ring xone group, locate that station on the Exclude list and select it by pressing the SPACE BAR,
it will automatically move to the Include list. To re-
9.25 EXIT: When finished programming, select the
Exit command button shown in the window on the previous page. A window appears that asks “Perform Up
date to Database?“To update the database and exit to the
Applications Menu window, select Yes. Or, select No to
exit without saving any changes. To return to the Ring
Zones programming window, select the Cancel button.
Page 5-51
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INS’lYALIATION & MAINTENANCE
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1. November 1994
Actions setup E x i t
Auto Att/VM/DISA DND Breakthrough
Automatic Answer On CO Calls
Automatic Answer On IC Calls
Barge Receive Enabled
Barge Transmit Enabled
CampOn Tones Disabled
CO Reseize Enabled
Dial Pulse Enabled
DID Camp-on Tones Disabled
Do-Not-Disturb Allowed
Do-Not-Disturb Override Allowed
DTMF Feedback Enabled
C.
STATION FEATURES (SFEA)
DID Camp-on Tones Enabled
0 Do-Not-Disturb Allowed
l
9.26 The window shown above is used to assign a station feature to a group of stations. It is accessed by selecting Station Features from the Station Programminn
menu or entering the SFEA command. Station features
included in this program are the same as most of those in
the Miscellaneous Flags window of Individual Station
programming as described on page 5-30. Determine
which station will use each of the following features.
Note that some are keyset only or single-line set only
features. The program planning sheet is in Figure 5-7 on
page 5-189.
0 Do-Not-Disturb Override Allowed (keysets only)
0 MMF Feedback Enabled
l E&M Camp-on Tones Enabled
l Handsfree Enabled (keysets only)
_’
I
0 Headset Enabled
0 LCR Facility Croup Camp-on Allowed
0 Message Lamp Enabled (single-line stations only)
0 Music Channel One Enabled
I
0 Allow Private intercom Override
0 Auto Attendant/VM/DISA Do-Not-Disturb Breakthrough
l
Auto Attendant/DISA Do-Not-Disturb Breakthrough
0 Automatic Answer On CO Calls (keysets only)
l Automatic Answer On IC Calls (keysets only)
l Barge Receive Enabled
0 Barge Transmit Enabled (keysets only)
o Camp-on Tones Disabled
l
l
CO Reseize Enabled (keysets only)
Dial Pulse Enabled (single-line stations only)
0 Off-Hook Voice Announce Receive Enabled (keysets only)
l
Off-Hook Voice Announce Transmit Enabled
Page Remove Enabled (keysets only)
0 Redial Mode -Last Number Dialed (keysets only)
l
0 Ring Intercom Always Enabled
0 Station Exchange Enabled
0 Transparent LCR Enabled
9.27 STATION FEATURES: Highlight and select
the station feature you wish to assign to a group of stations. A station list box appears as shown on the next
page.
Page 5-52
I
INTER-TEJ.aPRAcTIcES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
dow (see previous page) reappears after either of
these command buttons is selected.
Include
0 SORT: To sort the stations and list themnumerically
by extension number or circuit number, or to list
them alphabetically by name, select the Sort command button. The following window appears.
Choose the desired sorting method by selecting the
corresponding option button. Then select the OK
command button. When the list of stations returns,
the list box will show the stations in the selected order. To exit without changing the sorting method,
select the Cancel command button.
102 01.03 ‘Station Undefined
103 01.04 -Station Undefined
104 01.05 -station Undetincd
Exclude
110 02.03 ‘Station Undefined
11102.04 -Station Undefined
112 OZ.05 -Station UndcEned
l
INCLUDE or EKCLUDE: To add to the list of stations with that feature, locate the desired station on
the Exclude list and select it by pressing the SPACE
BAR, the station will automatically move to the Include list. To remove a station from the list, select
the station in the Include list to move it to the Exclude list.
l
ALL or NONE: To include all stations in the list of
stations with that feature, select the All command
button. To exclude all stations, select the None command button.
l
OK or CANCEL: When the station lists appear as
desired, select the OK command button. To exit
from the window without saving changes, select the
Cancel command button. The station features win-
9.28 EXIT: When finished programming, select the
Exit command button (shown on the preceding page). A
window appears that asks “Perform Update to Database?” To update the database and exit to the Applications Menu window, select Yes. Or, select No to exit
without saving any changes. To return to the Station
Features programming window, select the Cancel button.
Page 5-53
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
Actions
INTER-TELPRACTICB
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
&tup E x i t
WARNING: Changing the Account Code
Length Erases All Previously Defined
Account Codes.
Current Account Code Length: 4
Program Length
Station Lists
standard
~~,~~~~~I +
: . . . . . . . . . . . i 9, . : . ,. . .: . . . . : . . . . . . . . ,. .,. . . . .:.
001
I
002
003
004
f
Fgced
S-mdard
LCR Toll
Class-of-service
10. SYSTEM-WIDE FEATURES
10.1 When System-wide Features is selected Corn the
Applications Menu window, the menu expands to show
the following options:
System-Wide Features...
Account Code Information
DND and Reminder Messages
Extensions, Usernames, and Feature Codes
Hunt Groups
Miscellaneous System-Wide Information
Page Zones
Relay Programmiq
System Forwarding
System Speed Dial
System Timers
Tenants and Departments
Npne
of-service account codes. Account code length can be 4
to 8 digits; all codes have the same length. The program
planning sheet is in Figure 5-8 on page 5-190.
.10.4 To program account codes, select Account Code
Information from the System-Wide Features menu or
enter the ACCT command. The programming window
appears as shown above.
10.5 PROGRAM LENGTH: To change the length
of all account codes, select the Program Length
command button. The following window appears. Enter
the desired account code length (4-8) and select the OK
command button. Note the warning that states that
changing the account code length will erase all existing
account codes.
10.2 Each of these programs is explained in detail on
the following pages.
&cant Code Length:
A.
>
ACCOUNT CODE INFORMATION (ACCT)
103 There can be up to 128 standard account codes
(numbered 000-127) and up to 256 forced account codes
(numbered 000255). Up to 256 stations can have class-
(ok)
q
‘*
:,
Page 5-54
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1. November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INS~TION & MAINTENANCE
10.6 STANTWRD and FORCED LIST BOXES:
The Standard and Forced list boxes are used for assign-
signed only to the highlighted account code. To
program other account codes, repeat this procedure.
ing the account codes. When the desired account code is
selected, the following window appears. Enter the account code in the text box and select the OK command
button.
l
LCRTOLL COMMAND BUTTOW To assign
LCR toll account codes to multiple stations, select
the LCR Toll command button. A list of stations
appears as shown on this page. Select the desired stations as described in paragraph 10.10.
. VALIDATED COMMAND BUlTONz To pro-
gram the system to validate the account codes of
multiple stations, select the Validated command button. A list of stations appears as shown on this page.
Select the desired stations as described in paragraph
10.10.
&u3unt code:
(nk]
. NONECOMMAND BUTI’ON: To determine the
stations that will not have account codes, select the
None command button and use the list of stations as
described in paragraph 10.10.
10.7 If you attempt to add an account code that has already been assigned, the following error message ap
pears. The system has selected a unique number. If you
wish to use that number, select the Yes command button.
If you wish to enter a different number, select the No
command button to return to the Account Code window
shown above.
NOTE: Each station can be assigned one of account
code type (forced, standard, or LCR toll account
code) in addition to being enabled for class-ofservice account codes. If you select a station for
standard, forced, or LCR toll account code that had a
previously programmed account code, the previous
account code is replaced by the new code (the previous code is deleted if the station is selected for
“None”).
Every account code must be unique.
“XXXX” is unique! Would you like to
use this number?
I
*
,
,
6
I
10.10 Assign stations to the account code batch lists
using the list box as follows.
10.8 Ifthe account code is not the programmed length,
an error message will display that reminds you to program the correct number of digits in the account code. If
this message appears, press the RETURN key and then
re-enter the correct account code.
102 01.03 -Station Undefined
103 01.04 ‘Station UndeEoed
104 01.05 -Station Undefined
10.9 STATION LISTS: To determine which stations
will use forced, standard or neither type of account
codes, select the desired command button as follows:
. FORCED COMMAND
forced account codes to multiple stations, select the
Forced command button. A list of stations appears as
shown below. Select the desired stations as described in paragraph 10.10.
.
109 02.02 -Station Undefined
BU’ITONz To assign
110 02.03 -Station Undefined
l
sTANDARDcoMMAND BU’ITOON: To assign a
standard account code to multiple stations, highlight
the desired account code in the Standard list box.
Then select the Standard conun~nd button The stations that are selected for the station list will be as-
Page 5-55
INCLUDE or EXCLUDE: To include a station in
the selected list, locate that station on the Exclude
list and select it by pressing the SPACE BAR, it will
automatically move to the Include list. To remove a
station from the list, select the station in the Include
list to move it to the Exclude list.
INTER-TELaPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTAUATION & MAINTENANCE
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
o ALL or NONE: To include all stations in the list,
select the All command button. To exclude all stations, select the None command button.
0 OK or CANCEL: When the station lists appear as
desired, select the OK command button. To exit
from the window without saving changes, select the
Cancel command button.
l
SORT: To sort the stations and list them numerically
by extension number or circuit number, or to list
them alphabetically by name, select the Sort command button. The following window appears.
Choose the desired sorting method by selecting the
corresponding option button. Then select the OK
command button. When the list of stations returns,
the list box will show the stations in the selected order. To exit without changing the sorting method,
select the Cancel command button.
lect the Class-of-Service command button. A window
containing a list box appears.
0 CLASS-OF-SERVICE ACCOUNT CODE: The
list box contains a list of all stations. To assign a
class-of-service account code to a station, locate that
station in the list and press the SPACEBAR. The following window appears. Enter the account code
(000455) in the text box and select the Ok cornmand button. (If the account code is entered incorrectly, the error messages described on the previous
page may appear.)
&count Code:
- Ordering
0l By Extension
By Circuit
0 By &me
0
0 OK: When class-of-service account codes have
been assigned as desired, select the Ok command
button to return to the Account Code Information
Programming window.
10.11 CLASS-OF-SERVICE:
This option can be
used only if the class-of-service account codes option is
enabled in System Information. To determine the stations that will have class-of-service account codes, se-
10.12 EXIT: When finished programming, select the
Exit command button. A window appears that asks
“Perform Update to Database?” To update the database
and exit to the Applications Menu window, select Yes.
Or, select No to exit without saving any changes. To return to the Account Code Information programming
window, select the Cancel button.
Page 5-56
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMXIGMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Actions
Setup
&it
Reminder Messages
_~
0 2 STAFF MEETING
0 3 SALES MEETING
0 4 CANCEL MEETING
0 5 APPOINTMENT
0 6 PLACE CALL
107 CALL CLIENT
08 CALL CUSTOMER
0 9 CALL HOME
110 CALL CORPORATE
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
B. DNDAND REMINDER MESSAGES
10.13 You can reprogr& any or all of the 20 reminder
messages and/or do-not-disturb messages 02-20 with a
new message of up to 16 characters. (Do-notdisturb 01
message cannot be changed). The program planning
sheet is in Figure 5-9 on page 5-195. The default messages are as follows:
01 Meeting
02 staffh4ee.ting
03 SalesMeeting
04 cancelMeeting
OS Appointment
06Placecall
07 CallClient
08 CallCustomer
09 CallHome
10 callcolporate
11
12
13
14
1s
16
17
18
19
20
DO-NO’GDISI’URB MESSAGES:
01 Do-Not-Disturb
11
02 InMedng Until
12
03 InMeeting
13
04 On Vacation Til
14
OS On Vacation 15 With a Patient
06 CallMeAt
16
07 CaUMeAfter
17
08 Away At
18
09 OnBreak
19
20
10 Out Of Town ‘Til
CallEngineering
CallMarketing
call Accomlting
CancelDND
cancclcallFwD
TakeMedication
Make Reservation
Review Schedule
Lunch
Reminder
OutofOfsce
Out Until
WithaClient
WithaGue&
Unavailable
InConference
Away From Desk
GoneHome
Out To Lamch
IN MEETING UNTIL
IN MEETING
ON VACATION ‘TIL
ON VACATION
CALL ME AI’
CALL ME AFTER
AWAY AT
ON BREAK
H
n
10.14
(MESG)
REMIND~MESSAGES:
QND Messages
When you select DND and Reminder Messages
from the System-wide Features menu or enter the
MESG command, the programming window appears as
shown above.
10.15 REMINDER MESSAGES or DND MESSAGES: Scroll through the desired list box until the
message to be re-programmed is highlighted. When the
message is sclcc~&-a smaller window appears in the
middle of the screen as shown below. Type any 16-character message in the text box and select the OK command button. Or select the Cancel command button to
leave the message unchanged.
&.ssage:
[-x-j (pii-]
10.16 EXIT: When finished programming, select the
Exit command button. A window appears that asks
“Perform Update to Database?” To update the database
and exit to the Applications Menu window, select Yes.
Or, select No to exit without saving any changes. To return to the DND and Reminder Messages programming
window, select the Cancel button.
Page 5-57
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION 81 MAINTENANCE
Actions setup Exit
Extension Programming mpe
Selected Name/Number of Item
[-xG-)
C.
(Z)
EXTENSIONS, USERNAMES, AND
FEATURE CODES (EXT)
10.17 To reprogram station extension numbers, hunt
group pilot numbers, trunk group access codes, or feature codes, select Extensions, Usernames, and Feature
Codes from the System-wide Features menu or enter the
EXT command. The programming window appears as
shown above.
10.18 Make a list of feature codes, extension numbers, hunt group pilot numbers, and trunk group access
codes, as well as names and descriptions for the users,
hunt groups, modems, and trunks. The program planning sheet in Figure 5-10 on page 5-197 lists the default
values of all the extensions, hunt group numbers, tnmk
group access codes, feature codes, and modems.
10.19 To “unequip” a station or trunk group, remove
the extension number/access code using the Extensions,
Usernames, and Feature Codes window. Without an
access code, the trunk group or station cannot be accessed by the station users by entering a feature code.
However, the trunk group can still be assigned to an individual trunk group key.
10.20 EXTENSION PROGRAMMING TYPE:
This list box allows you to choose one of the following
programming areas. When you select the desired op
tion, the bottom list box shows the available stations,
hunt groups, trunk groups, or feature codes. Highlighting one of the items in the lower list box, causes the current value of that item to appear below the list box. (For
(TJ
example, if the first station is highlighted, the circuit
number, description, and extension number appear.)
When the item is selectd the following window ap
P-=
Extension:
Press F2 for List
I of Extensions
IJescription:
user Name:
0 Stations: Enter the extension number, user’s full
name (description), and abbreviated user name. If
you wish to see a list of available extension numbers,
press IQ. When finished, select the OK command
button. Note that “dual” keyset circuits will not have
a default extension number assigned to the “B” station. (For example, l.lAwould be extension 100,
but l.lBwould not have a default extension number.) Dual keysets circuits are programmed in the
SystemConfigurationwindowshownonpage5-170.
If an Attendant Computer Console will be used on
the system, enter the user name with the last name
first, followed by a comma and the first name (e.g.,
Smith, John). This will allow the Attendant Computer Console directory to sort the names alphabetically
by last name.
Page 5-58
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
0 Hunt Groups: Enter the pilot number (extension),
the hunt group name (description), and abbreviated
user name. If you wish to see a list of available numbers, press F2. When finished, select the OK command button.
gramming Type list box and then select the Set Ext
command button. The following window appears.
Eaension List
0 ‘hunk Groups: Enter the access code (extension),
the description of the trunk group, and an abbreviated trunk name (user name). If you wish to see a
list of available codes, press F2. When finished,
select the OK command button.
Bck List
l
Features: Enter the feature code (extension). If you
wish to see a list of available codes, press F2. When
finished, select the OK command button.
02.01
WARNING The requested extension conflicts
with the following extensions:
02.03 ‘Station Undefined
02.04 -Station Undefined
&eginniiExtension:
1 1 @me1
-I\
Press F2 for List
l of Extensions
BEGINNING EXTENSION: Begin progriunmiq
by entering the Begiuning Extension number in the
text box at the bottom of the window. This will be the
extension number assigned to the first station, hunt
group, or trunk group in the Extension list. (If you
wish to select from a list of available extension numbers, press F2. When the list box appears, scroll to
the desired number and select the OK command button. Or, select the Cancel command button to return
to the Set Extensions window.)
l
EXTENSION LIST/PICK LIST: The Pick List
box contains a list of stations, hunt groups, or trunk
groups that do not have assigned numbers. Scroll
through the Pick List box to find the entries for
which you wish to assign numbers. Locate and select
the entries (by pressing the SPACE BAR) in the desired order to move them to the Extension List box.
The first entry will be assigned the BeginningExtension number shown in the text box. All others will be
assigned numbers in consecutive order as they appear in the Extension list box. For example, if the beginning extension is 100, and three stations are
selected, the first station will be extension 100, the
second will be 101. and the third will be 102.
1
10.22 The abbreviation FE in the example above indicates that the number is a feature code. Additional abbreviations that may appear include ST for stations, HG
for hunt groups, MD for modems, and TG for trunk
PUPS.
c
.
300 FE Date and Time Display
305 FE Reminder Message
306 FE Cancel Reminder
1 Qverride
Undefined
02.02 -station undefined
0 Modems: Enter the desired extension number, description, and user name. If you wish to see a list of
available extension numbers, press F2. When finished, select the OK command button.
10.21 The feature codes and extension numbers are
preset to carefully selected default values. Changing the
codes or numbers can cause existing assignments to be
erased. For example, if 300,305, and 306 are assigned as
feature codes and you attempt to assign 30 as another
feature code, 30 would not be accepted, because 3 and 0
make up part of existing codes. Instead, a warning will
appear, as shown below. You can then choose to make
the change and erase the conflicting codes (override), or
cancel the change and select another code.
‘Station
0 CLEAR LIST: To clear the Extension List, select
the Clear List command button.
l
10.23 SET EXTENSIONS: To batch load extension
numbers, hunt group pilot numbers, or trunk group numbers, highlight the desired line in the Extension ProPage 5-59
0KlCANCEI.z To leave the window without saving
any changes, select the Cancel command button.
When all programming appears as desired, select the
OK command button.
lNTRR-TRLPItA~cES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
10.24 CLEAR EXTENSION: To erase several extension numbers, hunt group pilot numbers, or trunk
group numbers, highlight the desired line in the Extension Programming ‘Qpe list box and then select the
Clear Ext command button. The following window ap
pea=-
Egtension List
0 SORT: To sort the entries and list them numerically
by extension number or circuit number, or to list
them alphabetically by name, select the Sort command button. The following window appears.
Choose the desired sorting method by selecting the
corresponding option button. Then select the OK
command button. When the list returns, the list box
will show the entries in the selected order. To exit
without changing the sorting method, select the
Cancel command button.
02.03 ‘Station Undefined
02.04 -Station Undefined
- Ordering
02.05 ‘Station Undctined
0 By Circuit
0 By &me
0
l
tick List
l
l
EXTENSION LIST/PICK LIST: The Pick List
box contains a list of stations, hunt groups, or trunk
groups that have assigned numbers. Scroll through
the Pick List box to find the entries for which you
wish to erase numbers. Scroll to the entries and
select them (by pressing the SPACE BAR) to move
them to the Extension List box.
ALL or NONE: To include all entries in the Extension List box, select the All command button. To
clear the Extension List, select the None command
button.
By &tension
[-T-j
[-GZ--)
0 OK/CANCEL: To leave the window without saving
any changes, select the Cancel command button.
When all programming appears as desired, select the
OK command button.
10.25 EMT: When finished programming, select the
Exit command button. A window appears that asks
“Perform Update to Database?” To update the database
and exit to the Applications Menu window, select Yes.
Or, select No to exit without saving any changes. To return to the Extensions, Usernames, and Feature Codes
programming window, select the Cancel button.
Page 5-60
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCY
D.
HUNT GROUPS (HUNT)
- voice Computer Hunt Group: The single-line
station circuits in this group are connected to
voice mail computers.
10.26
Several items must be determined before programming hunt groups, as follows. Refer to Figure
5-11, page 5-202, for a program planning sheet that lists
hunt groups. Refer to page 4-16 in FEAPURB for more
details.
l
l
- Voice Computer Automated Attendant Hunt
Group: The single-line circuits in this group are
connected to a voice computer that uses them as
automated attendants.
I
Stations: Prepare a list of up to 20 hunt groups and
the stations to be included in them (each hunt group
can have as many stations as desired, providing the
system-wide total does not exceed 480 stations assigned to hunt groups). If desired, a station can ap
pear more than once in a hunt group list. A station
can also be in more than one hunt group.
Overflow and announcement stations: A hunt
group can have an overflow station and/or up to
three announcement stations. If a call rings in directly to the hunt group and is not answered before the
hunt group Announcement timer expires, the call
automatically transfers to the announcement station(s). If a call is transferred to the hunt group and is
not answered before the hunt group Overflow timer
expires, the call automatically transfers to the overflow station. Do not include these stations in the hunt
group distribution list.
Hunt group descriptions and names: Descriptions
can contain up to 20 characters and hunt group
names can contain up to seven characters.
l
l
- Ovefflow and announcement stations can be
user-operated stations, or they can be playback
devices that answer calls and automatically return the calls to the hunt group.
Riug order: Determine whether the calls are sent to
the stations in all-ring, linear, or distributed order.
AR-ring order means that the call rings at all stations
in the hunt group simultaneously. Linear order
means that the call is sent to the first station on the
list and moves down the list until it reaches an available station. With distributed order, the call is sent to
the station that appears on the list after the last station to receive a call (even if the call was not answered).
- If an overflow station is a playback device, you
can determine the number of times calls will be
permitted to return to the overflow station (overflow count). The overflow count can be 1-127,
unlimited (-l), or 0 (to bypass the overflow station).
Hunt group supervisor: Each group can have one
display keyset assigned as a hunt group supervisor.
The assigned supervisor has the option of using the
Station Monitor feature code to monitor an active
outside call of any station in the hunt group.
Voice mail hunt group: Indicate if the hunt group
contains all single-line circuits that have been desig
nated as voice mail ports.
0
I
Voice computer group/Automated attendant
hunt group: Indicate if the hunt group contains only
single-line circuits connected to a voice mail computer. Voice computer groups can also be programmed as automated attendant hunt groups.
10.27 Select Hunt Groups in the System-Wide Features menu or enter the HUNT command to program up
to 20 hunt groups. The window appears as shown on the
next page.
Page 5-61
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TEL4PRAcTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Hunt Groups
H4
H5
H6
H7
H8
Hunt Group Station List
2003
2004
2005.
2006
2007
n Voice Mail Hunt Group
c l Voice &muter Group
Altomated Attendant Hunt Group
o
[Z](RecallDest.)
(Announce](Ovemow][Z]
10.28 HUNT GROUPS: Begin programming by
highlighting the desired hunt group number in the Hunt
Groups list box. If you select the highlighted line, a
smaller window appears as shown on the next page to allow you enter extended data. If you do not select it, but
leave it highlighted, the other boxes in this window can
be used to program other aspects of that hunt group as
described below.
10.29 HUNT GROUP STATION LIST/PICK
LIST: These list boxes are used for placing stations in
the hunt group list or removing stations from the list.
The stations should be programmed in the order in
which calls will circulate through the hunt group. To
place a station in the list, scroll to the desired position in
the Hunt Group Station List (the location of the highlight bar indicates where the station will be included in
the list). Then scroll through the Pick List box to locate
the station to be added and select it. It moves to the Hunt
Group Station List box above the station that is highlighted in the station list box. Continue locating and selecting stations in the desired order until the list is
complete. To remove a station from the list, highlight
and select it in the Station List.
Pick List
i..
.,.,.,.,. i’,.~.;+:.~.~,. . . :.~.~.~, . :.: : . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
~~~~~14.
.:.:.:.s ._, ._. . _. .__..__ z? .,._.,.,_.,’. . . . . . . . . . . . . ..._..............................
...
II..<<. ..->
100101.02 -Station Undefined
I
1002 01.03 ‘Station Undefined
1003 01.04 ‘Station Undefined
1004 01.05 ‘Station Undefined
1005 01.06 ‘Station Undefined
1006 01.07 -Station Undefined
1030 CLEAR: If you wish’to clear the Hunt Group
Station List, select the Clear command button.
1031 VOICE MAIL HUNT GROUP/VOICE
COMPUTER GROW: To designate the hunt group as
a voice mail hunt group or voice computer hunt group,
highlight the desired check box and press SPACE BAR
to place an X in the box. The following warning appears.
If you do not want to change the hunt group, select the
Cancel command button. To make the hunt group a
voice mail or computer hunt group, select the OK command button. You can also assign dial rules and a recall
destination as described on the next page.
W All keysets in the station list will be
leted, and all SL sets will be flagged as
I
Page 5-62
-
voice mail ports, Continue?
[cancel]
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICRS
IMX/GMX256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCY
10.32 If you later remove the voice mail designation
from the hunt group, the following window appears:
Card command button to exit without changing the
dial rules.
Specific digits: If the system must dial specific digits, such as a control or command code, enter those
digits surrounded by quotes (for example: “*l”).
l
8 Preset dial rules: Enter one or more of the preset dial
rule numbers, shown in the chart below, without using quotes (for example: 1,2,3).
033 AUTOMATED
A’lTENDh H U N T
:ROUP: If the hunt group is flagged as a voice comput-
r group, the Automated Attendant Hunt Croup check
DX is available. Check this box if the stations in the
Dice computer hunt group will serve as automated atndants.
pial R u l e s
I
Reference
(71
li 034
DIAL RULES: When you select this command
Destination Extension
Original Destination Extension
blutton, the following window appears. Enter any comb:ination of specific digits and/or preset dial rules, as deSt xibed below. Separate the numbers with commas (for
e: sample: 1,3,12). The Reference list box contains a list
01F all available dial rules. (Par complete definitions of
tlie dial rules, refer to page 4-21 in PEAWRES.) When
finished, select the OK command button. Or, select the
DIAL
-___ RULE
1
2
3
67
89
E
10
11
12
13
14
1IC-TO-VOICE COMPUTER CALL
Other IC/Controlling IC
1CO-TO-VOICE COMPUTER CALL
I
Originating station’s intercom number
Originating station’s intercom number
No code sent
No code sent
I
Intercom number of last non-voice mail station to Intercom number of last non-voice mail station to
forward the call if a chain of stations is forwarded to forward the call if a chain of stations is forwarded to
1voice mail or voice mail transfer mailbox number voice mail or voice mail transfer mailbox number
Intercom number of the first non-voice mail station Intercom number of the first non-voice mail station
in a chain of stations that is forwarded to voice mail in a chain of stations that is forwarded to voice mail
Originating station’s intercom number
No code sent
Receiving hunt groups or voice mail group number Receiving hunt group or voice mail group number
Originating station’s tenant group number
No code sent
Originating station’s department number
No code sent
1If system is in day mode = 1; If in night mode = 0 I lf system is in day mode = 1; If in night mode = 0
1No code sent
I Account code, if entered
I
Intercom call: code = 1
Outside call: code = 2
No code sent
Number of calls waiting ahead of this call
I
I
No code sent
The number of times this call has been sent through
the hunt group
15
Intercom number of the station that received a recal- No code sent
t ling transferred (even if the station is forwarded)
Page 5-63
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALL4TION & MAINTENANCE
1035 RECALL DJZSTINATION:When you select
this command button, the following window appears.
Enter the extension or circuit number of the station that
will serve as the recall destination for this voice computer hunt group. When finished, select the OK command
button. Or, select the Cancel command button to exit
without changing the recall destination.
Recall Destination:
(ok)
10.40 When you select a hunt group from the Hunt
Croup list box shown on the previous page, the following window appears.
10.41 HUNT NAME: Select the Hunt Name text box
and enter the name for the hunt group (up to seven characters) that will appear on keyset displays for calls
associated with the hunt group.
10.42 DESCRIPTION: To enter a descriptive name
for the hunt group (such as Field Service, or Order Processing), select the Description text box and type the desired name with up to 20 characters.
I-
(Y=-)
10.36 ANNOUNCE: To assign announcement
stations to the hunt group, select the Announce command button and refer to the window shown on page
5-65.
10.43 SUPERVISOR: A station can be assigned as
the hunt group supervisor for monitoring purposes. To
assign a supervisor to the hunt group, select the Supervisor text box and type the supervisor station’s circuit or
extension number.
10.44 HUNT GROUP SEARCH TYPE To determine whether the hunt group will receive calls in linear,
distributed, or all-ring order, select the desired option
button. The selected button will have a dark circle in the
center. (Voice mail/computer hunt groups are always
linear and cannot be changed.)
10.37 OVERFLOW: To assign an overflow station to
the hunt group, select the Overflow command button
and refer to the window on page 5-66.
10.38 ‘FIMEXS: To program the timer for the hunt
group, select the Timer command button and refer to the
window on page 5-65.
10.39 RXlTz When finished programming, select the
Exit command button. A window appears that asks
“Perform Update to Database?” To update the database
and exit to the Applications Menu window, select Yes.
Or, select No to exit without saving any changes. To return to the Hunt Croups programming window, select
the Cancel button.
Hunt Name: 71
Hunt Group Extended Data Window
i0.45 OK: When finished, select the OK command
button to return to the Hunt Croups programming window. If you have changed the search type to or from “all
ring” and there is currently a call ringing or camped on at
the hunt group, a warning window will appear. If you
select the OK button, those calls will be disconnected. If
you select Cancel, the Extended Data screen reappears
to allow you to change the type back or try again.
Dscription: 71
&qmvisor:
r Hunt Group Search ‘Qpe
09 Linear Search 0 al Ring
0 Qistributed Search
Page 5-64
El
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 INS’lXLlATION81 MAINTENANCE
No Answer Advance: p[ sec.
_Apnouncement:
OXerflOW:
18 sec.
I
Default 18: Range lo-255
72 s e c .
I
Default 72: Range lo-255
Timer Programming Window
10.48 OK: When the timers have been programmed
as desired, select the OK command button.
10.46 TIMERS: When you select the Timer com-
mand button shown on page 5-62, the window above is
displayed. To change the timer values, select the desired
text boxes and type the new value. The timer functions
are as follows:
0 No Answer Advance Timer: This is the length of
time a call can remain unanswered at a hunt group
station before moving to the next station in the hunt
groupl
Announcement Timer: This determines how long a
direct ring-in call will remain unanswered before being automatically transferred to the hunt group’s announcement station(s).
l
Overflow Timer: This determines how long a trans-
ferred CO call will circulate through the hunt group
(unanswered) before being automatically transferred to the hunt group’s overflow station.
10.47
Default 18: Range 3-255
DEFAULT: To set all three timers to default
values, select the Default command button.
Announcement Station Data Window
10.49 ANNOUNCEMENT STATIONS: When you
select the Amtounce command button shown on page
5-62, the window below is displayed. To assign up to
three announcement stations for the hunt group, select
the text box(es) and enter the desired intercom number
or pilot number. (If a hunt group is assigned as the announcement station, there can be only one amtouncement station. If individual stations circuits are assigned,
there can be up to three announcement stations.) Announcement stations receive calls in numerical order.
Therefore, enter the extension numbers in the order you
wish to have the announcement stations accessed.
10.50 ANNOUNCEMENT TYPE!% To determine
whether the announcement stations are user stations
(stations or a hunt group) or playback devices, select the
desired option button.
1031 OR: When programming is complete, select
the OK command button to return to the Hunt Croup
programming window.
r Announcement I)rpes 7
Announce 1:
0l
0
I
Announce 2:
Announce 3:
=
(ok)
Page 5-65
station Devices
Playback Devices
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTAtLATION & MAINTENANCE
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
- Overflow Count
Overflow Station:
Overflow aunt: cl
I
Overflow Station Data Window
10.52 OVERFLOW DEVICE: Select the appropriate option button to determine whether the overflow station will be a station or a hunt group.
10.53 OVERFLOW STATION: Select the Overflow
Station text box and enter the circuit or extension number of the desired overflow station or the pilot number of
the desired hunt group.
10.54 OVERFLOW TYPE: If a station will be used
as the overflow device, determine whether it will be
equipped with a station instrument or a playback device
by selecting the appropriate option button.
10.55 OVERFLOW COUNT: If a playback device is
used, determine if the call will be sent to the overflow
station or immediately recall the primary attendant or
the transferring station. If it will circulate, determine
how many times the call will be sent to the overflow station or if the count will be “unlimited.” Do one of the
following:
l
Select the Overflow Count text box and enter the
count number (l-127).
0 If the count is unlimited, select the Unlimited (-1)
command button.
l
If calls are to recall to the primary attendant or the
transferring station immediately when the Overflow
timer expires (rather than being sent to an overflow
station), select the Immediate (0) button.
10.56 OK: When programming is complete, select
the OK command button to return to the Hunt Group
programming window.
Page S-66
PROGRAMMING
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INS’lALLATION 81 MAIlWENAbKX
Issue 1, November 1994
Actions setup Exit
111000
rrimary Attendant Station:
011 Termination Digits:
I
System Flags
Audible message indication for SL sets
Auto attendant - dial during recording
Auto attendant - enable ringback tone
Barge
I
Enabled
YeS
Disabled
Disabled
Exit
I
E. MISCELLANE OUS SYSTEM-WIDE
INFORMATION (MISC)
10.57 Select Miscellaneous System-wide Information from the System-Wide Features menu or enter the
MISC command to display the window shown above. (If
desired, use the program planning sheet in Figure 5-12
on page 5-203.)
the system checks the SCOS programming for the
station that is associated with that account code.
When the call is completed, the station’s normal
SCOS goes back into effect. In the default state, this
is disabled.
0 Allow Cross-Tenant ‘D-affic: Determine whether
stations that are in different tenant groups will be allowed to place intercom calls, forward intercom
calls, or transfer intercom or outside calls to one another. If disallowed, intercom calls placed to a hunt
group are routed only to the hunt group stations that
are in the same tenant group as the caller. Outside
calls that are transferred to the hunt group are routed
to all stations in the group. Recalls are not blocked,
even if the attendant is not in the hunt group’s tenant
group. In the default state, this is set to yes(allowed).
10.58 PRIMARY ATTENDANT STATION: Select
the Primary Attendant Station text box and enter the circuit or extension number of the primary attendant for the
system.
10.59 CALL TERMINATION DIGITS: (This cun
be programmed only if Etiended DTMF Feedback Digits are enabled) Enter the desired call termination digits. This is the code used by a voice computer to indicate
that the caller has hung up. You can use any combination
I of up to eight # and * digits. Default is ##I******.
10.60
0 Allow Cross-Tenant Voice Mail/Computer Traf-
SYSTEM FLAGS: To program a feature sys-
tem-wide, scroll to the desired feature and select it. The
status will change each time the SPACE BAR is pressed.
The system nags include the following:
0 Account Code Class-Of-Service: If this option is
enabled, account codes can be programmed to be
associated with station class of service (SCOS). This
permits a user to place an outgoing call at any strrtion
using the SCOS that is programmed for the user’s
own station. When the user enters an account code,
Page 5-67
fic: Determine whether voice mail units and voice
mail computers will be allowed to place intercom
calls, forward intercom calls, or transfer intercom or
outside calls to stations that are in different tenant
groups. Ifdisallowed, intercom calls placed to a hunt
group are routed only to the hunt group stations that
are in the same tenant group as the voice mail/cornputer. Outside calls that are transferred to the hunt
group are routed to all stations in the group. Recalls
are not blocked, even if the attendant is not in the
hunt group’s tenant group. In the default state, this is
set to yes (allowed).
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 IlwmLLA’l’ION & MAINTENANCE
0 Audible Message Indication For SL ‘Sets: If
enabled, single-line sets will receive message waiting indications (six tones before dial tone) when a
message is waiting. In the default state, this is enabled.
tern from processing the information that would be
required to support the keys and speed up system
performance. In the default state, this flag is set to
enabled
l
0 Auto attendant -Dial During Recording: To al-
back tones are enabled in station programming (see
page 5-31), the “extended” set of feedback tones can
also be enabled. These extended tones include codes
for indicating when a station is forwarded to another
station and when the calling party hangs up. In the
default state, extended feedback digits are set to nc
(disabled).
low callers to dial extension numbers while the automated attendant message is playing, enable this
option by setting it to “yes.” In the default state, this
issettoyes.
0 Auto Attendant - Enable Rhgback Tone: If
ringback tones are enabled, callers will hear ringing
instead of music on hold when being transferred to a
station through the automated attendant (or an E&M
circuit or DISA). In the default state, this is set to&abled.
l
Barge: This system option can be enabled so that
stations may be given barge permission and/or
receive or block barges. In the default state, barge is
disabled.
0 External Paging M&c Channel: This option
selects the music-on-hold channel (one or two) that
will he used by external paging speakers for
background music. In the default state, this is set to
channel one.
l
hear a tone when another user enters a call through
the Barge or Privacy Release feature. In the default
state, this is enabled.
0 Broadcast Alarms To All Attendants: Determine
l
0 Broadcast Station Off-Hook Alarms: Determine
whether station off-hook alarms display on any
attendant stations. If not, they will only be sent to the
designated serial port. In the default state, this is set
to no.
l
Drop Incomplete Outgoing Calls: Occasionally, a
station user will seize a trunk at the exact time a call
is coming in on that trunk and the user will be connected to the incoming call instead of dial tone.
(This is called “glare.“) If the Drop Incomplete Outgoing Calls option is enabled (set to yes), the resulting call on that trunk will be dropped, just as it would
be if the station user did not dial a valid telephone
number. If the option is disabled (set to no), the call
will remain connected regardless of the number of
digits dialed, if any. In the default state, this is set to
yes.
l
Hands&e Announce System Forward ‘D-ansfer:
When a station user transfers a call to the principal
station of a forwarding path, this option determines
what the caller will hear. If enabled (yes), the caller
will place a handsfree call to the principal station
and can announce the transfer (the call does not enter
the forwarding path). If the option is disabled, the
transferring station user will hear ringing and canannounce the call only if it is answered by the principal
station or one of the forwarding points. This defaults
to no.
0 Barge Confirmation Tone: If enabled, users will
whether system alarms display on all attendant stations (set to “yes”). If not, they will display only at
the primary attendant’s station (set to “no”). In the
default state, this is set to yes.
Extended DTMF FeedbackDigits:If DTMF feed-
Hot Dial Pad Keys: If this option is enabled, keyset
users can dial trunk access codes and feature codes
without lifting the handset or pressing the SPKR or
SPCL key. This programmable feature is called “hot
dial pad” to indicate that the dial pad keys are always
activated. In the default state, this is set to yes (enabled).
0 Hunt Group ‘IYansferred Call ‘Qpe: When the da-
tabase is in the default state, all unanswered direct
ring-in outside calls to the hunt group go first to the
announcement station and then to the overflow station. Unanswered calls that were transferred to the
hunt group, by default, go only to the overflow station. However, if this system option is set for “Ann/
Overflow,” the system &I1 send &unanswered hunt
group calls first to the Bnnouncement station and
then to the overflow station. This defaults to overP ow.
0 Keyset Identification Display: Determine whether
DSS Feature Key Lamp Status: If the system does
not have any DSS keys programmed as feature keys,
this flag can be set to “disabled” to prevent the sys-
Page 5-6S
the keyset identification display (user name and extension number) should appear on display keysets
always (enabled) or only on keyset power up (disabled). This defaults to enabled.
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTRR-TELPRACIICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTRNANCE
0
Music-On-Hold For IC Calls: This option determines whether a user hears music on hold when
placed on hold by another station or camps on to a
resource. In the default state, this is enabled.
supervisor uses the Station Monitoring feature to listen to a call. In the default state, this is enabled.
Suppress AU Displayed Digits After End-Of-Dial-
enabled.
ing: When this option is enabled, any digits dialed
after the valid number has been dialed will not be
displayed. This prevents digits, such as PINnumbers
and other codes, from being displayed when they are
dialed. If the digits are not displayed, they will also
not be included if the number is redialed using the
Redial feature. In the default state, this option is dirabled (This flag is not affected by the SMDR digit
suppression flag described on page 5-142.)
Privacy Release: Determine whether users will be
System %kate” Type: Determine whether the sys-
OIIVA DSS Immediate ‘Datumit: Determine if
DSS-equipped keysets will have immediate offhook voice announce capability enabled. In the default state, this is disabled.
OIIVA System-Wide: Determine whether the OffHook Voice Announce (OHVA) feature will be enabled system-wide. In the default state, this is
allowed to join ongoing CO calls (privacy release is
enabled) or if CO calls will be limited to one station
unless the Conference feature is used (Privacy Release is disabled). In the default state, Privacy Release is disabled.
0
tem will place a call on hold when the user presses
another trunk key or the IC key while on a call
(skate-to-hold) or will drop the call when another
trunk key or the IC key is pressed (skate-todisconnect). Skate-to-hold does not affect the procedure
for reseizing a trunk. In the default state, this is set to
Reverse’ ‘DansferImmediate Connection: Deter-
skate-to-disconnect.
mine whether reverse-transferred calls are connected to keysets automatically (set to “yes”). If not,
the user must press the flashing trunk key or the IC
key to be connected (set to “no”). In the default state,
this is set to yes.
System Speed-Dial Override SCOS: If this option
is enabled, the system speed-dial numbers can be
dialed at any station regardless of toll restrictions. If
disabled, all system speed-dial numbers are subject
to toll restriction. In the default state, this is dis-
Standard Tones For CO ‘Skunks, Keysets, And
Single-Lime Sets: The busy tones and dial tones can
abled
Validate Voice Mailbox Numbers: This feature affects calls transferred to a voice mail unit. Ifall mail-
be pure system tones (as described in FEATURES,
page 4-54) or they can be changed to more closely
match the telephone company’s standard tones. In
the default state, this is set to no for trunks (allowing
256 System tones) and yes for keysets and singleline sets (allowing standard telephone company type
tones).
0
Station DTMF Digit Mute: Determine whether
IYIMP tones will be heard (not muted) when numbers are speed dialed (using redial, station speed
dial, system speed dial, etc.), or if they will be
muted. In the default state, this is set to nc (not
muted).
0
box numbers match extension numbers, the option
should be enabled to allow the system to check that
the mailbox number entered by the transferring
party is valid. If there are mailbox numbers that do
not match an extension number, there is no need to
validate and this option should be disabled. In the
default state, this is set to no (disabled).
Station Monitoring Tone: If enabled, hunt group
members will hear a tone whenever the hunt group
10.61
EXIT: When finished programming, select the
Exit command button. A window appears that asks
“Perform Update to Database?” To update the database
and exit to the Applications Menu window, select Yes.
Or, select No to exit without saving any changes. To return to the System Flags programming window, select
the Cancel button.
Page S-69
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Actions setup Exit
Page ones
00
0
Relays
&&ma1 Ports
(pi&Z-)
(S)
pissigned Ports/Relays
F.
PAGE ZONES (PAGE)
10.62 To prepare for page zone programming, make a
list of the keysets and/or the external paging network(s)
that are included in up to 10 paging zones. Keysets and
the external paging network(s) can be in more than one
page zone. (Refer to the program planning sheet in Figure 5-13, page 5-204, when making the list.) In the default state, all keysets are assigned to page zone 1.
10.63 To define the page zones, select from the System-wide Features menu or enter the PAGE command
to display the window shown above. Programming is
described below.
10.64 PAGE ZONES: Begin programming by highlightingthe desired page zone in the Page Zones list box.
When the highlight bar is on a specific page zone, all
other programming applies to that zone. When the page
zone is selected, the following window appears. Enter a
description of the page zone in the text box and select the
OK command button (or select the-Cancel command
button to leave the description unchanged).
10.65 RELAYS and EXTERNAL PORTS: To program relays or external ports for the selected page zone,
select the desired option button. The list boxes at the
bottom of the window will show the ports/relays that
have been assigned to the page zone, and the ports/relays that are available. To move a port/relay from the
available list to the assigned list, select the desired port/
relay in the available box. It will move automatically. To
move a port/relay out of the assigned list, selecting it
will move it back to the available list. To erase the Assigned list, select the Clear command button.
NOTE: External firts must be converted in the window
shown on page 5-72 before they will appear in the
Available list. External page relays must first be
equipped in the Relay Programming window (on page
5-73) before they will appear in the Available list.
Page 5-70
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
10.66 KJZYSE’IS: To assign the keysets that will be in
the page zone, select the Keysets command button. A
station list window appears as shown below.
ltlc: lude
on undefined
on Undefined
103 01.04 -Station Undefined
104 01.05 -Station Undefined
I
0 SORT: To sort the stations and list them numerically
by extension number or circuit number, or to list
them alphabetically by name, select the Sort command button. The following window appears.
Choose the desired sorting method by selecting the
corresponding option button. Then select the OK
command button. When the list of stations returns,
the list box will show the stations in the selected order. To exit without changing the sorting method,
select the Cancel command button.
I .J
Exclude
108 02.01 -Station Undefined
109 02.02 -Station Undefined
110 02.03 -Station Undetincd
11102.04 ‘Station Undefined
0 By &me
0
By Circuit
0 INCLUDE or MCLUDE: To include a station in
that page zone, locate the station on the Exclude list
and select it by pressing the SPACE BAR; it will automatically move to the Include list. To remove a
station from the list, select the station in the Include
list to move it to the Exclude list.
0 ALL or NONE: To include all stations in the page
zone, select the All command button. To exclude all
stations, select the None command button.
[cancel)
0 OK or CANCEL: When the station lists appear as
desired, select the OK command button. To exit
from the window without saving changes, select the
Cancel command button. The Page Zones window
(see previous page) reappears after either of these
command buttons is selected.
Page 5-71
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTRR-TELPRACTICES
IMX/GMX256 DWIALLATION& MAINTENANCE
Available Devices
(ok)
Individual CO TNII~
Individual CO TN&
Individual CO Trunk
10.67 CONVERT PORTS: To convert CO trunk or
SLI circuits to external paging ports, select the Convert
Ports command button (shown in window on page
5-70). The window shown above appears.
. EXTERNAL PAGE PORT!S/AVAILARLE
DE
VICE!% To convert an available device to an enternal paging port, locate the desired device on the
Available Devices list and select it. It will automatically appear on the External Page Ports list. There
can be up to nine external page ports.
0 DELETE: To delete an external paging port and
convert it back to its original use (trunk or single-line
circuit), select the desired port in the External Page
Ports list box and then select the Delete command
button. It will move back to the available devices list
for the appropriate type of device.
l
OK: When programming is complete, select the OK
command button to return to the Page Zones programming window (shown on page 5-70).
10.68 EXIT: When all page zone programming is finished, select the Exit cotumand button. A window ap
pears that asks “Perform Update to Database?” To
update the database and exit to the Applications Menu
window, select Yes. Or, select No to exit without saving
any changes. To return to the Page Zones programming
window, select the Cancel button.
-\
.!
Page 5-72
INTER-TELPRACTICES
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
IMX/GMX 256 INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE
Actions
&tup Exit
Belays
Available Relay ‘l’jqm
Signal Device Relay
Tenant Group
G.
RELAY PROGRAMMING @LAY)
10.69 One of the Central Processing (RCPU) Card relays can be designated for external paging, night switch
(which is activated when the system or associated tenant
group is placed in night mode), power-fail, or signal device relay. Relay 1 is preprogrammed as the power-failure signal device and cannot be changed. The program
planning sheet is in Figure 5-14 on page 5-204.
10.72 TENANT GROUP: If Night Switch Relay is
selected, a tenant group must be assigned to the relay.
The following window appears which permits you to
make the necessary assignment. Enter the desired tenant
group number and select the OK command button to
continue programming. If you wish to change the tenant
group designation for an existing relay, highlight that
relay in the Relays list box and then select the Tenant
Croup command button to gain access to this window.
10.70 To program RCPU Card external relay function, select Relay Programming from the System-Wide
Features menu or enter the RLAY command. The window shown above appears.
Tenant Group:
10.71
RELAY and AVAILABLE RELAYTYPES:
To program the relay type of the RCPU Card relay, place
the highlight bar on relay number 02 in the Relays list
box and select it. The highlight bar will automatically
move to the Relay Types list box. Scroll to and select the
desired type of relay. The selected relay type will automatically appear next to relay number 02 in the Relays
list box.
NOTE: Once a relay type has been programmed, it cannot be made into an “Unknot Relay Type.” If the relay
is assigned a function, but no further programming is
done, it is considered “unused” by the system.
I
(ok]
10.73 EXlTz When all relay programming is finished,
select the Exit command button. Awindow appears that
asks “PerformUpdate to Database?” To update the database and exit to the Applications Menu window, select
Yes. Or, select No to exit without saving any changes. To
return to the Relay programminn window, select the
Cancel button.
Page 5-73
PROGRAMMING
Issue 1, November 1994
INTER-TELPRACTICES
JMX/GMX 256 ~STALLATION & M