fg8800 gas/fire product manual
FG8800 SYSTEM
ADDRESSABLE INDUSTRIAL GAS/FIRE SAFETY PANEL
FG8800 GAS/FIRE PRODUCT MANUAL
Fire and Gas System Integration
in a Single Enclosure
Touch Screen Operation
Open Architecture
Accommodates 19” Rack or
Panel Mount
810 russell palmer road, kingwood, texas 77339
p.o. box 6092 KINGWOOD, TEXAS 77325
PHONE: 281-359-1519 FAX: 281-359-2085
WEB: ALLESTEC.com EMAIL: [email protected]
Publication REV A
ALLESTEC FG8800 INDUSTRIAL
GAS / FIRE CONTROL PANEL
AUTOMATIC SUPPRESSION SYSTEM
RELEASE UPDATE VERSION 10/4/2012
OPERATIONS MANUAL PART NUMBER FG8800-5140A
ONGUARD® is a registered trade name and mark to Allestec Corporation
© 2012 ALLESTEC CORPORATION
The control panel as well as the
nodes carry the FM approval.
In addition to the FM approval, each node
carries the following ATEX approval.


THE CONTROL PANEL UTILITY MENU CODE VERSION
MUST MATCH THIS OPERATIONS MANUAL .
FOR CURRENT CODE UPDATES REFER TO ALLESTEC WEB SITE.
IMPORTANT: REFER TO SECTION 30 OF THIS MANUAL
FOR CODE INFORMATION.
CURRENT PRODUCTS
FIRMWARE VERSION
RELEASE DATE
ONGUARD APPLICATION PROGRAM
2.67
1/04/06
INPUT NODE FG8800-1060
2.00
3/15/05
4-20MA NODE FG8800-1700
2.01
8/04/05
SOM NODE FG8800-1705
2.00
3/15/05
RELAY NODE FG8800-1725
2.00
3/15/05
MASTER CONTROLLER (MC)
2.01
9/10/05
THIS MANUAL VERSION A
Department __________________________________________
Name ______________________________________________
Phone Number _______________________________________
Cell Number _________________________________________
Date _______________________________________________
2
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1. INTRODUCTION …………………………………………………..………...…………………… 8
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
UNDERSTAND AND READ THIS MANUAL COMPLETELY ...................................................
CONTROL PANEL DESCRIPTION.........................................................................................
SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE ...................................................................................................
REQUIRED PROGRAMMING TOOLS....................................................................................
INFORMATION ACCESSIBILITY ...........................................................................................
8
8
8
8
8
2. SYSTEM HARDWARE and INSTALLATION ........................................................... 11
2.1 INSTALLATION SUGGESTIONS ..........................................................................................
2.2 MOUNTING THE CONTROL PANEL .....................................................................................
2.3 PROPER WIRING TECHNIQUE.............................................................................................
2.4 POWER SUPPLY AND CONNECTIONS ...............................................................................
2.5 UTILIZING MORE THAN ONE POWER SUPPLY (PARALLEL CONNECTION) ....................
2.6 SOURCING EXTERNAL POWER TO THE SUPERVISORY OUTPUT MODULE (SOM) ........
2.7 BUS STYLE RESTRICTIONS ................................................................................................
2.8 BUS SPEED AND SYSTEM INTEGRITY................................................................................
2.9 MOUNTING THE ADDRESSABLE NODES…... .....................................................................
2.10 BUS POLLING TECHNIQUE ................................................................................................
2.11 DETERMINE CLASS A OR B WIRING .................................................................................
2.12 FIELD BUS WIRING .............................................................................................................
2.13 BUS COMMUNICATIONS AND WIRE SPECIFICATION ......................................................
2.14 ADDITIONAL WIRE REQUIREMENTS .................................................................................
2.15 END OF LINE (ELR) SUPERVISING RESISTORS (Supplied) ..............................................
2.16 CONNECTING NODES TO APPLIANCES ...........................................................................
2.17 EARTH GROUND and CHASSIS .........................................................................................
11
11
11
12
13
13
13
13
13
14
14
14
14
14
15
15
15
3. NODE SELECTION ......................................................................................................... 28
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
DETERMINE WHICH NODE TO UTILIZE ..............................................................................
INPUT NODE .........................................................................................................................
4-20mA NODE .......................................................................................................................
SUPERVISED OUTPUT MODULE (SOM) ..............................................................................
RELAY NODE .......................................................................................................................
STATUS LED’S ......................................................................................................................
28
28
28
28
28
29
4. HARDWARE INTERFACE AND PORTS ................................................................... 30
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
UTILIZING THE TOUCH SCREEN DISPLAY .........................................................................
CONNECTING PERIPHERALS TO THE CONTROL PANEL ..................................................
PRINTER ..............................................................................................................................
MODBUS PORT .....................................................................................................................
TCP/IP INTERFACE PORT ....................................................................................................
VGA MONITOR PORT ...........................................................................................................
USB PORTS ..........................................................................................................................
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
5. SYSTEM STARTUP.......................................................................................................... 33
5.1 CHECKLIST PROCEDURES..................................................................................................
5.2 SYSTEM INITIALIZING or RESTARTING ...............................................................................
5.3 ENABLING PASSWORDS .....................................................................................................
5.4 DISPLAY SCREEN BRIGHTNESS .........................................................................................
5.5 SELECTING BUS LOOP CONFIGURATION ..........................................................................
5.6 START OF LOOP Class B .....................................................................................................
5.7 LOOP BACK Class A.............................................................................................................
5.8 UNDERSTANDING FIELD NODE ID ADDRESSES ................................................................
5.9 NODE ADDRESS SEQUENCE ..............................................................................................
5.10 PROCURING FIELD NODE ID ADDRESSES ON A NEW INSTALLATION...........................
5.11 ADDITIONAL INPUT NODE INFORMATION ........................................................................
5.12 NODE ID FORMAT...............................................................................................................
5.13 NODE DEFAULT ADDRESS ................................................................................................
33
33
34
34
34
34
34
35
35
35
36
37
37
3
5.14 THE ADVANCED SECTION - REFER TO SECTION 25.1 .................................................... 37
5.15 OTHER NODE COMMON FUNCTIONS ............................................................................... 37
6. CONFIGURATION ARCHITECTURE ......................................................................... 39
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
6.7
6.8
INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................
THE SYSTEM DISK ...............................................................................................................
THE ONGUARDSETUP.DAT FILE .........................................................................................
CONFIGURATION OVERVIEW ..............................................................................................
THE CONFIGURATION FOLDER ..........................................................................................
MANAGING CONFIGURATIONS Refer to Section 24.............................................................
SAVE ALARM HISTORY REPORT Refer to Section 23.2 .......................................................
IMPORTANT- WHAT ACTIONS DISABLES THE SYSTEM FROM ALARMING ....................
39
39
39
39
40
40
40
40
7. BACKUP SYSTEM FILES ............................................................................................ 41
7.1 IMPORTANT .......................................................................................................................... 41
7.2 WHEN TO SAVE THE SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS ................................................................ 41
7.3 HOW TO SAVE AND BACKUP SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS .................................................. 41
8. LOADING NODE DATA TO PREPARE CONFIGURATIONS .............................. 42
8.1 GENERAL TEXT FIELD EDITING NOTES ............................................................................. 42
8.2 NODE COMMON ATTRIBUTES ............................................................................................. 42
8.3 PLANNING NODE SELECTION FOR ALARM ACTIONS........................................................ 42
9. INPUT NODE PREPARATION .................................................................................... 43
9.1
9.2
9.3
9.4
9.5
9.6
ADD/EDIT DETAILS ..............................................................................................................
ICON SELECTION ................................................................................................................
MEMO FIELDS.......................................................................................................................
SETTINGS SELECTION.........................................................................................................
RESETTING NODE LED’s .....................................................................................................
SELECTING DE-BOUNCE .....................................................................................................
43
44
44
45
45
45
10. 4-20mA NODE PREPARATION ............................................................................... 46
10.1
10.2
10.3
10.4
10.5
10.6
10.7
10.8
10.9
ADD/EDIT DETAILS ............................................................................................................
SETTINGS SELECTION.......................................................................................................
DEBOUNCE TIME ................................................................................................................
ENTER SET POINTS ...........................................................................................................
CALIBRATION .....................................................................................................................
RESET .................................................................................................................................
ALTERNATE CALIBRATION METHOD ................................................................................
GAS CONFIGURATION .......................................................................................................
PRINT NODE INFORMATION ..............................................................................................
46
46
46
46
47
47
48
48
48
11. SUPERVISED OUTPUT (SOM) PREPARATION ................................................. 49
11.1
11.2
11.3
11.4
11.5
11.6
11.7
ADD/EDIT DETAILS .............................................................................................................
SETTINGS SELECTION ......................................................................................................
ENABLED ............................................................................................................................
SHORT MONITORING .........................................................................................................
DEBOUNCE .........................................................................................................................
RESETTING NODE LED’s....................................................................................................
TESTING THE SOM FOR EXTINGUISHING ........................................................................
49
49
49
49
49
49
49
12. RELAY NODE PREPARATION .................................................................................... 50
12.1
12.2
12.3
12.4
12.5
ADD/EDIT DETAILS .............................................................................................................
SETTINGS SELECTION.......................................................................................................
RESET NODE LED’s ............................................................................................................
PRINT NODE INFORMATION .............................................................................................
UTILIZING THE RELAY NODE TO RESET 4-WIRE SMOKE DETECTORS .........................
50
50
50
50
50
4
13. DIRECT CONNECTION RELEASE Input node initializing ............................. 51
13.1 SELECTING AN INPUT NODE TO TRIP AN SOM OR RELAY NODE ...................................
13.2 SELECT INPUT NODE CHANNEL TO TRIP OUTPUT NODES ............................................
13.3 RESULTANT ........................................................................................................................
13.4 VOTING CHANNELS WITHIN THE INPUT NODES .............................................................
13.5 SAVE THE CONFIGURATION .............................................................................................
13.6 TESTING THE CONFIGURATION TO ALARM ON A DIRECT CONNECTION RELEASE ...
13.7 SYSTEM FIRE ALARM MENU .............................................................................................
13.8 FIRE ALARM MENU.............................................................................................................
13.9 DETAILS MENU ...................................................................................................................
13.10 VOTING SEQUENCING .....................................................................................................
13.11 SYSTEM FAULT ALARM MENU ........................................................................................
13.12 FAULT ALARM MENU........................................................................................................
51
51
52
52
53
53
53
53
54
54
55
55
14. DIRECT CONNECTION W/DELAY RELEASE Input node initializing .......... 56
14.1
14.2
14.3
14.4
14.5
14.6
14.7
SELECTING AN INPUT NODE TO TRIP AN SOM OR RELAY NODE ..................................
ENTER TIME DELAY ...........................................................................................................
VOTING ...............................................................................................................................
ABORT OPTION ..................................................................................................................
RESULTANT ........................................................................................................................
VOTING SEQUENCING .......................................................................................................
MORE CONFIGURATIONS ..................................................................................................
56
56
56
56
56
57
57
15. DIRECT CONFIGURATION RELEASE 4-20mA node initializing ................. 58
15.1
15.2
15.3
15.4
15.5
15.6
15.7
15.8
15.9
SELECTING A 4-20mA NODE FOR TRIPPING AN SOM OR RELAY NODE .......................
SELECT A GAS CHANNEL ..................................................................................................
SELECT A SET POINT THRESHOLD ..................................................................................
RESULTANT ........................................................................................................................
TESTING THE GAS NODE CONFIGURATION FOR AN ALARM .........................................
VIEW THE ALARM ...............................................................................................................
DETAILS DATA ....................................................................................................................
FAULT ANNUNCIATION ......................................................................................................
VOTING BETWEEN GAS CHANNELS ON THE SAME NODE .............................................
58
58
58
59
59
60
60
60
60
16. DUAL MODE RELEASE Input node initializing .................................................. 61
16.1 SELECTING AN INPUT NODE TO TRIP AN SOM OR RELAY NODE ..................................
16.2 CAUSE AND EFFECT RESULTS .........................................................................................
16.3 SELECT DEVICE INPUTS....................................................................................................
16.4 SELECT PRESSURE SWITCH INPUT .................................................................................
16.5 SELECT TIME DELAY .........................................................................................................
16.6 SELECT DEVICE OUTPUTS................................................................................................
16.7 SELECT 2nd SOLENOID .....................................................................................................
16.8 EXCEPTION BOXES............................................................................................................
16.9 SAVE THE CONFIGURATION .............................................................................................
16.10 TESTING THE DUAL MODE RELEASE CONFIGURATION FOR AN ALARM ....................
16.11 FIRE ALARM MENU ITEMS ...............................................................................................
16.12 PRESSURE SWITCH ACTIVATION ..................................................................................
16.13 VOTING SEQUENCING .....................................................................................................
16.14 LOCATING OTHER NODE CHANNELS IN THE SELECTED OUTPUT SCREEN ..............
61
61
62
62
62
62
63
63
63
63
63
64
64
64
17. WATER MIST (CYCLE) RELEASE ........................................................................... 66
17.1
17.2
17.3
17.4
17.5
17.6
17.7
17.8
APPLICATIONS ...................................................................................................................
OPERATION ........................................................................................................................
PRE-DISCHARGE DELAY ...................................................................................................
MIST ON TIME .....................................................................................................................
MIST OFF TIME ...................................................................................................................
PAUSE INTERVAL and CYCLE COUNT ..............................................................................
SELECT DEVICE INPUTS ...................................................................................................
SELECT MIST SOLENOID ..................................................................................................
66
66
66
66
66
66
67
67
5
17.9 SELECT OTHER NODE CHANNELS ...................................................................................
17.10 RESET ALLOWED .............................................................................................................
17.11 VOTING SEQUENCING .....................................................................................................
17.12 SAVING THE CONFIGURATION........................................................................................
17.13 TESTING THE CYCLE MIST RELEASE CONFIGURATION FOR AN ALARM ....................
17.14 RESET THE ALARM ..........................................................................................................
68
68
68
68
68
69
18. DEDICATED INPUT APPLIANCE RESET .................................................... 70
18.1
18.2
18.3
18.4
18.5
CREATE THE DEDICATED RESET .....................................................................................
TEST THE DEDICATED RESET ..........................................................................................
RESETTING THE STROBE (EXAMPLE) ..............................................................................
CONNECTING A SWITCH TO THE INPUT NODE ...............................................................
FAULT ALARM .....................................................................................................................
70
71
71
72
72
19. SILENCING AN AUDIBLE DEVICE AT THE CONTROL PANEL ..................... 73
19.1 RESULTANT - TESTING THE INPUT NODE CONFIGURATION FOR AN ALARM .............. 73
20. CONFIGURING ALARMS FOR HISTORY RECORDING ................................... 75
20.1 CREATING A DIRECT CONFIGURATION WITH THE INPUT NODE ................................... 75
20.2 CREATING A DIRECT CONFIGURATION WITH THE 4-20mA NODE.................................. 75
21. TESTING ALARM CONFIGURATIONS ..................................................................... 76
21.1
21.2
21.3
21.4
21.5
PRIOR TO TESTING CONFIGURATIONS ...........................................................................
TESTING CONFIGURATIONS .............................................................................................
DISABLING THE SYSTEM FROM AGENT RELEASING ......................................................
ROUTINE TESTING .............................................................................................................
ALARMS WHILE THE SYSTEM IS DISABLED .....................................................................
76
76
76
76
76
22. MULTIPLE ALARMS .............................................................................................. 77
22.1
22.2
22.3
22.4
SYSTEM ALARM MENU ......................................................................................................
SELECTING A SPECIFIC ALARM ........................................................................................
SELECTING THE DETAILS BUTTON WITH MULTIPLE ALARMS .......................................
HISTORY BUFFER .............................................................................................................
77
77
77
77
23. ALARM SEQUENCING, HISTORY and REPORTS .............................................. 78
23.1
23.2
23.3
23.4
23.5
23.6
23.7
ALARM SEQUENCING ........................................................................................................
SAVE TO PRINT OPTIONS..................................................................................................
ALARM REPORT FILE MANAGER ......................................................................................
REPORT FILE MANAGER SIZE...........................................................................................
PRINTING HISTORY FILES .................................................................................................
QUICK SELECT ALARM HISTORY ......................................................................................
CLEAR ALL ALARM HISTORY DATA ..................................................................................
78
78
78
78
79
79
79
24. MANAGE CONFIGURATIONS.................................................................................... 80
24.1
24.2
24.3
24.4
24.5
24.6
LOAD A CONFIGURATION ..................................................................................................
UNLOAD A CONFIGURATION ............................................................................................
PROCEDURE TO UNLOAD A CONFIGURATION ................................................................
EDIT A CONFIGURATION ..................................................................................................
REMOVE A CONFIGURATION ............................................................................................
ALARMS WHILE IN MANAGE CONFIGURATIONS..............................................................
80
80
80
82
82
82
25. ADDING, REMOVING, RESETTING and DETECTING NODES ........................ 83
25.1
25.2
25.3
25.4
25.5
25.6
ADVANCE MENU.................................................................................................................
NODE DETECTION DIAGNOSTIC .......................................................................................
NODE SETTINGS ...............................................................................................................
ADDING ONE NODE AT A TIME ..........................................................................................
ADDING MORE THAN ONE NODE TO THE SYSTEM .........................................................
CHANGE A NODE ADDRESS ..............................................................................................
83
83
83
83
84
84
6
25.7 RESETTING ALL NODE ADDRESSES WHILE CONNECTED TO THE BUS........................
25.8 RESETTING SELECTIVE NODE ADDRESSES WHILE CONNECTED TO THE BUS ...........
25.9 RESETTING A NODE ADDRESS THAT IS REMOVED FROM THE BUS .............................
25.10 REMOVING A NODE .........................................................................................................
84
84
84
85
26. REDEFINING A SYSTEM TO START OVER .......................................................... 86
26.1 PROPERLY SHUTDOWN THE SYSTEM ............................................................................. 86
27. ACCESSING THE UTILITY MENU ............................................................................. 87
27.1 MENU DESCRIPTION .........................................................................................................
1. SAVE NODE REPORT ..............................................................................................................
2. SAVE CONFIGURATION REPORT...........................................................................................
3. SAVE FIRE ALARM ONLY REPORT.........................................................................................
4. SAVE GAS ALARM ONLY REPORT ........................................................................................
5. SAVE WARNING ALARM ONLY REPORT................................................................................
6. SAVE FAULT ONLY REPORT .................................................................................................
7. SAVE ALL ALARM HISTORY REPORTS ..................................................................................
8. ALARM REPORT FILE MANAGER ...........................................................................................
9. CLEAR ALL ALARM HISTORY DATA .......................................................................................
10. SYNCHRONIZE ALL NODE LED’S .........................................................................................
11. NODE MANAGEMENT............................................................................................................
12. SYSTEM CONFIGURATIONS .................................................................................................
13. MANAGE CONFIGURATIONS ................................................................................................
14. MODBUS SETUP ....................................................................................................................
15. DIAGNOSTICS........................................................................................................................
16. BACKUP THE SYSTEM DATABASE.......................................................................................
17. USE ONGUARD AS THE SYSTEM SHELL .............................................................................
87
87
87
87
87
87
87
87
87
88
88
88
88
88
88
88
88
88
28. MODBUS Provided by Onguard on a separate document register
29. SYSTEM FAULTS .......................................................................................................... 89
29.1 COMMUNICATION FAILURE ...............................................................................................
29.2 COMMUNICATION FAULTS ON A TERMINATED BUS .......................................................
29.3 COMMUNICATION FAULTS ON A RETURN BUS ...............................................................
29.4 IMPROPER BUS SELECTION .............................................................................................
29.5 INPUT NODE FAULTS .........................................................................................................
29.6 SUPERVISORY MODULE FAULTS (SOM) ..........................................................................
29.7 4-20mA GAS NODE FAULTS ...............................................................................................
29.8 RELAY NODE ......................................................................................................................
29.9 EARTH GROUND FAULT ....................................................................................................
29.10 MASTER GOUND FAULT ..................................................................................................
29.11 ADMINISTER ASSERTED FAULTS ...................................................................................
29.12 CONFIGURATION FAULT..................................................................................................
29.13 NODE MANAGEMENT FAULT ..........................................................................................
29.14 MANAGE CONFIGURATION FAULT..................................................................................
29.15 UNLOAD ALL CONFIGURATIONS.....................................................................................
89
89
90
90
90
91
91
91
91
91
91
91
91
91
91
30. SOFTWARE and FIRMWARE UPDATES ............................................................... 92
30.1 SOFTWARE MIGRATION .................................................................................................... 92
30.2 SYSTEM CONTROL VERSION (ONGUARD.EXE) .............................................................. 92
30.3 NODE FIRMWARE .............................................................................................................. 92
31.
32.
33.
34.
MAINTENANCE and TROUBLESHOOTING ..........................................................
PART NUMBERS and ACCESSORIES ..................................................................
SPECIFICATIONS ........................................................................................................
WARRANTY and RETURN POLICY ........................................................................
93
93
95
96
7
1. INTRODUCTION
The Allestec ONGUARD FG8800 gas/fire panel provides continuous surveillance of system components by interrogating intelligent devices connected to the panel through an addressable configuration.
The powerful configuration manager emulates cause and effect logic processes enabling simple
programming techniques of all system components. The system is designed to allow personnel familiar
with conventional control panels to fully develop and utilize the features of the FG8800 without extensive
training or special schooling. The system uses an “open concept” of simple I/O building scripts for each
action of mapping a node. After several small scripts have been built, they can be mapped to other
scripts or overlaid on open scripts allowing a multifunction logical connection.
1.1 UNDERSTAND AND READ THIS MANUAL COMPLETELY
The administrator as well as any person that corresponds with the operation of this control panel
must read and understand completely the entire operations manual. It is essential that this
manual is READ COMPLETELY prior to implementing the examples contained herein. The
chapter sections listed in the table of contents are in a methodical order. It is recommend the
responsible administrator installing and operating the control panel start with this section and
subsequently proceed through each and every chapter. It is imperative that each configuration is
tested as described in section 21 prior to commissioning the system.
1.2 CONTROL PANEL DESCRIPTION
The panel consists of a proprietary internal computer interfaced to a master control module. The master
control module is internal to the control panel and is responsible for communicating between the
computer and the field nodes as well as local system output relays. The system control panel consists of
an EIA 19” rack, 3U in height, that measures 5.22” (132.5mm) high. The control panel’s functions are
controlled through a high quality color TFT touch screen and require no panel switches. All alarm
controls are accomplished through the touch screen display. Remote alarm reset can be implemented
through the addressable input nodes. The design criteria consist of hardware, software and firmware at
all levels of integrity. Although primarily designed for industrial installations, the FG8800 can be utilized
in commercial applications as well. A system consists of the FG8800 panel with the addition of any of
the four field modules. Software is included with the panel and can be updated as necessary. Refer to
drawing 1 for a complete overview and 2 to view an isometric view of the control panel.
1.3 SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
[] The ONGUARD FG8800 control panel serves as the central processor for the entire system. The
control panel connects to all field addressable nodes via a 4-wire bus (2 for power, and 2 for
communication) that is continuously monitoring the input detectors and output appliance devices.
[] The nodes are scanned from the control panel for alarms, faults, warnings and other types of activity.
A choice to monitor a class A or B bus configuration, is selectable.
[] All remote monitoring protocol devices such as Modbus and TCP/IP internet are connected directly to
the control panel as well as the configuration video monitor.
[] System 24VDC power is supplied directly to the control panel rear terminal strip. Output nodes that
power appliances can require their separate 24VDC input.
[] The control panel is very simple to setup. Just determine the amount of devices to connect to the input
and output nodes. Each node accommodates 4 inputs or outputs and can be utilized in many
configurations.
1.4 REQUIRED PROGRAMMING TOOLS
To program the control panel, a truly Windows compliant USB PC keyboard, USB mouse and a VGA
video monitor connect to the front control panel. The external VGA monitor is utilized only during the
configuration mapping of the nodes since this process requires a large screen. Once the control panel
has been configured and programmed, the data can be saved to a USB bus drive or local flash memory
and the connected peripherals can then be removed.
1.5 INFORMATION ACCESSIBILITY
All current events, configuration names, history information and other alarm events are easily accessible
from queuing the panel display. Most of this information may be viewed instantly on the screen or can be
printed on demand. Other protocol configurations are available through the standard Modbus output as
well as other methods such as the optional TCP/IP interface.
8
DRAWING 1
9
DRAWING 2
10
2. SYSTEM HARDWARE INSTALLATION
2.1 INSTALLATION SUGGESTIONS
Installation designers should design the location of all field devices as well as their input detectors and
output appliances prior to installing the system. A complete point-to-point wire diagram should be
available prior to programming to simplify procedurally how the system will come together. A node is the
addressable module that connects to the system bus to monitor inputs and activate appliances. The
word node is used interchangeably with module. Cause and effect charts can also assist in the ability to
convey proper configuration techniques. Understand how the field nodes are connected and how their
multi-channel inputs as well as outputs can be utilized to build the most efficient system.
This control panel is designed to indicate an alarm condition when the initiating devices connected to it
detect change in conditions. These conditions may or may not represent a life-threatening condition.
Also, evacuation of a building or area unnecessarily may subject individuals to an unnecessary hazard.
Therefore, it is most important that the building owner, manager or representative promulgate, distribute,
and/or post instructions describing steps to be taken when the gas/fire alarm control panel signals an
alarm condition. These instructions should be developed in cooperation and conformance with
representatives of the local authority having jurisdiction.
Along with the use of this instruction manual, the appropriate following standards and the manufacture’s
instructions for initiating and notification devices should be utilized to install and maintain a functioning
fire alarm signaling system:
 NFPA 70 Nations Electrical Code
 NFPA 72 National Fire Alarm Code
 NFPA 101 Life Safety
For other standards that may apply contact the local authority having jurisdiction.
WIRING SHALL BE PER PLAN WITH RESPECT TO CONDUCTOR SIZE, TYPE AND QUANTITY.
CONDUCTORS SHAL BE PERMANENTLY MARKED FOR FUTURE IDENTIFICATION. PERMANENT
WIRE MARKERS SHALL BE USED TO IDENTIFY THE TERMINATIONS OF ALL CONDUCTORS
WITHIN THE FACP, PULL BOXES AND OTHER PANELS (REF. NEC 760.10).
INSTALL EQUIPMENT AND CABLING IN A ORGANIZED AND WORKMANLIKE MANNER WHILE
MAINTAINING PROPER SUPPORT. CABLES THAT ARE EXPOSED ON THE SURFACE OF
CEILINGS AND SIDEWALLS MUST BE SUPPORTED BY THE STRUCTURE COMPONENTS OF A
BUILDING IN A MANNER THAT PREVENTS DAMAGE FROM NORMAL USE. CABLES CAN BE
SECURED TO STRUCTAL COMPONENTS BY STRAPS, STAPLES, HANGERS OR SIMILAR
FITTINGS DESIGNED AND INSTALLED SO AS TO NOT DAMAGE THE CABLE (REF. NEC 760.6,
UN760-08 760-0601.CDR).
2.2 MOUNTING THE CONTROL PANEL
Refer to drawing 3 to identify and mount the control panel in a standard EIA 19” high rack. Panel
mounting is also an option for mounting on a flat surface. First, open the control panel door with the key
provided. Utilize the supplied mounting hardware to mount the control panel. Install the panel in an
environment that is free of airborne particles, rain and condensation. The panel is designed to be
located in the interior of a building within a NEMA 1 classification.
2.3 PROPER WIRING TECHNIQUE
The use of stranded conductors is recommended in the installation of all connections. Stranded wires
are less susceptible to breakage as well as vibrating out from a connection. Any terminal requiring a wire
connection must be completely opened prior to inserting the wire. Strip wires so there is ¼” (6.35 mm)
insulation removed. It is imperative there are no conductors that are nicked or cut within a wire when it is
stripped. All bare wire strands must be twisted prior to inserting into the terminal strip. The terminal
blocks are high quality strips that employ a “boxed elevator” style wire clamp. After the twisted wire is
inserted into the terminal, hold it against the back of the terminal opening while tightening down on the
setscrew.
11
IMPORTANT: After stripping the outer insulator of a wire cable, make sure that the twisted pair of wires
from the cable remain twisted as much as possible to the terminal strip. This procedure retards reflected
waves in the cable assembly.
CAUTION: DO NOT USE DIFFERENT BUS WIRE SIZES IN THE INSTALLATION OF THE SYSTEM.
DOING SO WILL CAUSE IMPEDENANCE MISMATCH AND REFLECTIVE WAVES THEREBY REDUCING THE ABILITY OF THE PANEL TO DISCRIMINATE BETWEEN DIGITAL SIGNALS. ALL
BUS CONDUCTORS MUST BE OF THE SAME SIZE. DO NOT SPLICE THE BUS ANYWHERE
2.4 POWER SUPPLY AND CONNECTIONS
The control panel must be connected to a dedicated primary electrical source that has a high degree of
reliability and adequate capacity for this system as well as all connecting field devices. The only method
of disconnecting this power source shall be available only to authorized personnel and clearly marked
“Fire Alarm Circuit Control”. The control panel must be connected to a redundant 24VDC power
source that has enough capacity to properly operate the system for 24 or 60 (depending on system type)
hours standby and 5 minutes alarm, per NFPA 72 (Chapter 1). Batteries normally loose capacity with
age, temperature and duty cycle. Batteries must be replaced when they fail to provide the control panel
with the required standby and alarm power for performance at least two (2) times a year or more often if
local requirements dictate. Always remove the power from the backup batteries first, then remove the
primary power source. Wait at least 10 seconds to allow the supply voltages to decay before installing or
removing any node, cable or wiring.
CAUTION: DO NOT DISCONNECT THE POWER TO THE CONTROL PANEL WHILE THE
ONGUARD PROGRAM IS RUNNING OR ANY FILE IS OPENED. DOING SO COULLD RESULT IN
THE CORRUPT OF MEMORY FLASH DATA. REFER TO SECTION 26.1 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Refer to drawing 4 to connect power to the panel and drawing 13 and 14 to power the field nodes. The
panel operates from 18 to 30 VDC and requires a redundant 24V power source to comply with NFPA.
To correctly size the power supply for the system, add the current of each node as well as the current
supplied to all initiating and appliance devices, then add the current of the control panel into the figure.
After adding all the devices, take 25% of the total current demand and add it back to the result for headroom during appliance turn-on surges and other current requirements. If the ambient temperature of the
power supply is higher than 72 deg. F (22 deg. C), refer to the manufactures specifications to correctly
de-rate the power supply for a rise in ambient temperature. Allow enough headroom for power conductors to provide current under these adverse circumstances:
1. Long power wire runs have voltage drops thereby delivering less voltage to the intended nodes.
2. Higher temperatures lessen the efficiency of carrying current through power wires.
3. Improper wiring and termination (loose set screws) of conductors decrease the efficiency of the
power conductors, especially where vibration exists.
4. Aging conductors over time loose their ability to carry specified current.
5. Splicing wires is not recommended since it increases stray capacitance and inductance thereby impeding the performance of the data transfer.
6. Terminations with dissimilar connections will attribute to an electrolysis reaction thereby galvanizing
the connection and increasing contact resistance.
Do not apply power to the panel until there has been a through inspection of all field and local panel
wiring. The panel may be powered without connecting the bus to browse through the features.
CAUTION: DO NOT ATTEMPT TO CONNECT OR DISCONNECT ANY FIELD WIRING OR POWER
SOURCES WHILE THE SYSTEM IS ON LINE, DOING SO CAN CAUSE SYSTEM DAMAGE OR A
POSSIBLE AGENT RELEASE.
12
2.5 UTILIZING MORE THAN ONE POWER SUPPLY (PARALLEL CONNECTION)
On systems that utilize long enough lengths of cable to require a power supply at the middle or end of
the system, the following criteria must be met:
1.
2.
3.
4.
All power supplies must share a common negative.
Do not connect a switcher power supply to another switcher unless the manufacturer allows.
Some linear power supplies are capable of being connected in parallel.
All power supplies in the system connected in parallel MUST be turned on at the same time.
2.6 SOURCING EXTERNAL POWER TO THE SUPERVISORY OUTPUT MODULE (SOM)
Installations that accommodate appliances that exceed the current carrying capability of the bus power
load will require an external 24V source connection to the SOM. Most installations will require this
technique. Refer to drawing 11 and locate terminals TB4-1&2 on the SOM. Connect a 24V power and
negative wire here appropriately sized to accommodate the maximum current of all appliances when
they are turned on.
NOTE: The application of 24VDC at this connection will connect the control panel and external power
supply negative together.
Locate the shunt connected to J4 to the “SPARE” slot when utilizing the external 24V. This shunt
location isolates the bus positive 24V from the external 24V. The external 24V input is supervised for
power loss and will present a fault on loss of power. The SOM is capable of sourcing 24VDC @ 7.5
amps per channel. NOTE: The total maximum current the SOM can supply to all channels
simultaneously is 20 amps @ 72 deg. F. Locate the shunt at J4 across the #1,2 pins when powering the
SOM from the bus. The SOM utilizes a standard mini ATO series automotive fuse for each of the four
channels.
2.7 BUS STYLE RESTRICTIONS
NOTE: Node field wire configurations that consist of T-Tap (parallel wiring) or Star configurations are
prohibited. All addressable node circuits shall be continuous only.
2.8 BUS SPEED AND SYSTEM INTEGRITY
A design criteria dictates the maximum data transfer speed at the safest operating conditions for a given
length of bus cable. However, another influence dictates the same criteria and that is the law of physics.
The nominal polling rate is 25ms per node. An example is a system with 40 nodes will take 1 second to
scan the entire bus.
System bus monitoring ensures the integrity of the alarm and continuously communicates with all nodes.
The control panel will detect and report failure due to:
1. Broken or shorted wires.
2. Loss of node supply voltage.
3. Loss of communications with any node and will then subsequently issue a fault alarm.
A fault alarm notifies the administrator that broken or shorted wires exists so that a repair can be
completed as soon as possible, and the integrity of the alarm system will be restored in a timely manner.
The alarm integrity is assured by continuously communicating with every node in the system. The panel
will report any bus failure so that the problem can be repaired to continue the integrity of the alarm
system.
2.9 MOUNTING THE ADDRESSABLE NODES
Locate nodes in locations that have easy access and are able to easily connect to other nodes for the
system bus. Input nodes are small enough to fit into some manual pull boxes directly. Other methods of
mounting the nodes can include double gang switch boxes or 4” diameter round explosion proof junction
boxes. Adapters are also available to connect the nodes to a DIN rail mount. Nodes that are not
connected to a DIN connector are supplied with a round standoff to raise the assembly clear of its
mounting panel. Since mounting panels supplied by customers range in different thicknesses, the
mounting screws are not supplied. It is highly recommended to use stainless hardware when assembling
the nodes to their panels. As indicated in the node field wiring drawings, connect the supplied ring
terminal to a wire that terminates to earth ground. This connection ensures maximum surge protection
from transients. Refer to the accessory list for part numbers. Many nodes can also be mounted in a
single enclosure to connect to field devices creating a distributed configuration. These locations are
determined by the area classification of atmospheric hazards and must be adhered to such regulations.
The nodes shall be readily accessible where installed. All nodes in the field as well as system
drawings shall be clearly marked with the node ID.
13
Refer to drawing 7 to identify the spacing of the mounting holes for the input and 4-20ma node and
drawing 10 for the SOM and relay nodes. Each node accepts four 6-32 screws with a node mounting
depth of .25” (6.35MM).
The time delay between the activation of an initiating device and the automatic activation of a local fire
safety function shall not exceed 20 seconds. Effective January 1, 2002, the time delay between the activation of an initiating device and the automatic activation of a local fire safety function shall not exceed
10 seconds.
2.10 BUS POLLING TECHNIQUE
The system interrogates each node on the bus in numerical address sequence when polling. The nodes
responds to any alarm or fault conditions that may have occurred since the previous poll. If the node is
interrogated but does not respond, the system repeats the interrogation for a total of three attempts.
While in the Start of Loop bus mode (no return of the bus), if the node fails to respond for a total of three
interrogations, a communication fault is created for that node.
The bus polling can be configured to be either single ended as Start of Loop, or Loop Back mode, (class
A, refer to drawing 13, class B, refer to drawing 14). In the Loop Back mode, if the node fails to respond,
i.e., short, open, hardware failure, for a total of three consecutive interrogations on the Start of Loop bus,
a Loop Break fault is created and three interrogations are attempted on the End of Loop bus. If the node
responds on the End of Loop bus, monitoring alarms continues normally. If the node does not respond
to the End of Loop interrogation, a communication fault is created for that node. After issuing a communication fault, the system resets its configuration to interrogate the node on the Start of Loop bus on the
next scan. The process will be repeated on subsequent scans.
2.11 DETERMINE CLASS A OR B WIRING
Refer to drawing 13 to wire the control panel for class A and 14 for class B configuration. A 120 ohm
ELR (end of line resistor) will be required at the end of the last node as indicated on the drawing for a
class B configuration.
2.12 FIELD BUS WIRING
Drawing 13 is indicates a class A configuration for the system bus. The class A configuration allows redundant passage of alarm signals. In this technique if one of the field bus lines is severed it does not
interfere with the alarm signals. To properly operate this method the bus cable returning to the panel
must be located in a separate raceway. Drawing 14 shows the more common class B wiring technique
where the bus is connected utilizing a single terminating ELR. This bus wiring is the most common and
economical since it is not require to return back to the control panel.
2.13 BUS COMMUNICATIONS and WIRE SPECIFICATION
The communication cable is critical in that it must not be crimped or folded more than a 90 degree angle
without a radius at least twice its diameter. One type of recommended bus to wire the nodes is Alpha P/
N 2466C or equivalent and can be utilized for small installations. This cable consists of two twisted pairs
of wires that are 22 gage and a drain shield. The red and black is one twisted pair and the green and
white is the other twisted pair. Each twisted pair contain their own shield. The drain conductor serves as
a shield and is connected to earth ground only at one location whether class A or B is utilized. Refer to
drawing 13 and 14 for more information. All wire conductors will be stranded.
CAUTION: DO NOT CHANGE GAGE SIZE OF BUS WIRING WITHIN THE SAME RUN.
DO NOT UTILIZE SPLICING DEVICES ANYWHERE ON THE BUS. BUS CUTS ARE
ALLOWED ONLY AT THE TB1 TERMINAL.
2.14 ADDITIONAL WIRE REQUIREMENTS
Installations requiring high current capacity for driving notification appliance circuits are not to be powered through the bus resident power conductors but must be separately connected. Refer to drawing 11
to provide a separate power conductor to the supervise output module.
14
IMPORTANT: Systems requiring nodes demanding more current than the 4-wire bus can carry will be
required to utilize heavier power conductors separate from the signal bus. In this case, the bus will
contain two conductors with a shield wrapped in a PVC sheathe while the power conductor will contain
two conductors large enough to sustain the required current to satisfy the nodes as well as their
appliances.
2.15 CONNECTING NODES TO APPLIANCES
After a full system configuration has been designed, the nodes can be attached to their proper input and
outputs. Connect the node appliance as suggested in the typical field wiring as indicated drawings
8,9,11,and 12. Node appliances can be wired in now or added later, before or after all node ID’s have
been established. Adding node appliances later precludes any field wiring problems should they occur
and makes troubleshooting easier if a problem occurs.
2.16 EARTH GROUND and CHASSIS
Connect a wire (with 1 ohm or less) from the chassis ground terminal screw, located and indicated on
the rear of the control panel. Refer to article 760 of the National Electrical Code for more information.
2.17 END OF LINE (ELR) SUPERVISING RESISTORS (Supplied)
All end of line resistors are rated at least .25 watt for the input node and the supervised output module.
A carbon composition resistor is recommended because of its robust construction. All resistors must
have at least a 5% tolerance and be valued at 3.9K ohms. Refer to the figures relating to the nodes to
establish proper connection. The resistors serve as a purpose to pass a small supervisory current
through an open contact (relay or switch contact) to validate if an electrical connection has lost continuity
(exp. a severed wire). The communications loop resistor is different in only that its value is 120 ohms
and is only utilized once as indicated in drawing 14.
15
DRAWING 3
16
DRAWING 4
17
DRAWING 5
18
DRAWING 6
19
DRAWING 7
20
DRAWING 8
21
TB2
ONGUARD


TB1
DRAWING 9
22
TB2
ONGUARD


TB1
DRAWING 10
23
TB2
ONGUARD

TB3

TB1
DRAWING 11
24
TB4
TB2
ONGUARD


TB1
DRAWING 12
25
DRAWING 13
26
DRAWING 14
27
3. NODE SELECTION
3.1 DETERMINE WHICH NODE TO UTILIZE
In the context of this manual the terms node and module will be used interchangeable. Select the
module or node below which best describes the proper use and function for the required configuration.
At the printing of this manual there are currently 4 nodes.
3.2 INPUT NODE:
Refer to drawing 8. The 4-channel input node is designed to monitor normally open relay or switch dry
contacts. Examples of the use of these contacts consist of but are not limited to: optical detectors, 4-wire
smoke detectors, thermal detectors, pressure switches, personnel door contacts, agent discharge
confirmed, etc. Inputs are supervised and in the event of an open conductor, a fault is issued. In the
event of an alarm (contact closure), the node issues the alarm message to the control panel where
appropriate action is taken based on the configuration.
Voting - Voting may be restricted to one node or acquired through several nodes. A single node is
capable of voting up to four inputs.
Supervisory Resistors - This node requires 3.9K ohm supervisory resistors at each monitored input that
is utilized. Unconnected inputs can omit an ELR by disabling their inputs and selecting this option in the
F5 SETTINGS menu. Supervisory resistors must be located at the device contact and not at the node
input. This node can be selected to activate the relay or supervised output module.
Other Uses - The node can also be configured to accept an input and display the action on the alarm
screen but not activate any devices. An example is the system can monitor the contact of a pressure
switch or a door contact for its change then display and record its action on the alarm menu.
3.3 4-20mA NODE:
Refer to drawing 9. This 4-channel node is currently designed to monitor industrial gas transmitters that
source 4-20mA outputs with a reference calibration of high span of 50% LFL. The system interrogates
each loop and identifies the signal level to determine the level of alarm based on the threshold levels.
Each input has a high resolution power of 12 bits which equates to 4096 increments across the scale.
Calibration and threshold levels are easily accomplished in the program menu. Three distinctive set
points can be set up for each of the four channels. This node can be selected to activate the relay or
supervised output module.
Voting - Voting may be restricted to one node or acquired through several nodes. A single node is
capable of voting up to four inputs.
3.4 SUPERVISED OUTPUT MODULE (SOM):
Notification Appliance Activating The supervised output module (drawing 11) utilizes the reverse polarity
switching technique for field appliances. The SOM sources a supervisory current through the current
loop and switches polarity to the appliances and sources 24VDC on an alarm. This node also requires a
3.9K ohm end of line resistor for each channel output at the appliance location.
Solenoid Activating This node is designed to also activate solenoids as configured in the program menu.
Solenoids and appliances can reside on the same node simply by dedicating these devices to their
proper output in the program menu. It is imperative that inductive kick-back diodes or MOV’s are
properly utilized to prevent high voltage discharge from being induced into nearby wires. Refer to
drawing 11 on how to connect solenoids to the module.
3.5 RELAY NODE:
Refer to drawing 12. Applications requiring auxiliary control or other relay functions can utilize this node.
The relay node contains four independent SPDT form C dry contacts rated at 10 Amps each, 30VDC, or
125VAC. Dampers, fans, auxiliary equipment can be connected to this node.
The relay node is also utilized in configurations that allow 4-wire smoke detectors to be reset from the
control panel. Refer to section 12.5.
CAUTION: IF ANY DEVICE CONNECTED TO THE RELAY NODE IS INDUCTIVE, SUCH AS
ANOTHER RELAY OR SOLENOID, INDUCTIVE KICK-BACK DIODES OR MOV’S (METAL OXIDE
VARISTORS), MUST BE LOCATED DIRECTLY ACROSS THE COIL OF THE DEVICE OR DAMAGE
TO THE RELAY NODE CONTACTS CAN OCCUR.
28
3.6 STATUS LED’s
Nodes contain LED’s to provide indication on what their status is. The LED’s also indicate when inputs are closed on the
input node. It is imperative that the sections relating to disabling channels are read to fully understand their intent.
LED STATUS
INPUT NODE
4-20mA GAS NODE
SOM
RELAY NODE
1 FPS
CHANNEL ENABLED
POWER OK
CHANNEL FAULT
ENABLED
RELAY OFF
1 FLASH EVERY 3S
CHANNEL DISABLED
CHANNEL FAULT
DISABLED
4 FPS
INPUT OPEN
* OUTPUT SHORTED
OR TURNED ON
STEADY ON
INPUT CLOSED
RELAY ON
RELAY ON
STEADY OFF
NO POWER
NO POWER
NO POWER
NO POWER
* OUTPUT SHORTED IN QUIESCENT MODE
29
4. HARDWARE INTERFACE AND PORTS
4.1 UTILIZING THE TOUCH SCREEN DISPLAY
Alarm acknowledging, silencing, resetting and other commands are implemented through the touch
screen display. The display is designed to be used intuitively instead of analytically thereby reducing
decision-making time by the administrator. Lightly touch a button or command line on the touch screen
to invoke the command. If a finger is too large, a non-metallic object like a closed pen can be used as a
stylus to touch the screen. Do not use an instrument that is sharply pointed as it will scratch the surface
and do not drag any object across the surface. Use a household glass cleaner to clean the surface of
the screen when the system is not on line.
4.2 CONNECTING PERIPHEARLS TO THE CONTROL PANEL
Refer to drawing 15 on where to connect a VGA monitor, USB compliant keyboard and mouse to the
control panel. The external peripherals are not required during activity condition and can remain
disconnected until they are required for programming. During normal quiescent mode of the control
panel, alarm modes and utility issues can be fully operated utilizing only the touch screen of the control
panel. An external monitor is utilized only when a configuration is implemented, starting at selection #13.
This section requires a large viewing area to make it easier to map the nodes. When an external monitor
is utilized for other menu options, include a mouse to navigate easier. Both the external monitor and
touch screen will function simultaneously. The Windows platform will be visible during non-programming
modes on the attached monitor. The actual program is a 1/4 VGA format and will be displayed on the
additional large monitor until the configuration menu is entered.
4.3 PRINTER
Prior to bringing the system on line, print reports to verify the system is in compliance with the manner it
was programmed. The Onguard software supports different model Epson printers that are able to print
through the USB drive. For more details refer to section 23.
4.4 MODBUS PORT
The Modbus connection utilizes a standard EIA DB9 connector and supplies an ASCII format. There are
variations of this protocol since customers tend to utilize their own communication terminology. The
Modbus directive is covered under a separate manual provided by Allestec.
4.5 TCP/IP INTERFACE PORT
This optional connection allows Internet connection to the control panel. The use of this connection
requires custom software. The control panel cannot be remotely controlled utilizing this option but can
be remotely viewed as indicated in NFPA directive.
4.6 VGA MONITOR PORT
Refer to drawing 15 to identify the monitor connector. The monitor is required when utilizing menu
section #12, SYSTEM CONFIGURATION to allow efficient use of the programming menu. The monitor
is also required to manage files in the control panel.
4.7 USB PORTS
The USB port supports the USB compliant keyboard and mouse. These two devices are connected to
the ports when configuring a system. The USB port is also utilized for copying data for storage from the
panel as well as updating software versions.
CAUTION: LIKE ANY OTHER COMPUTER SYSTEM, DO NOT REMOVE USB DRIVE WHILE IT IS
BEING READ FROM OR WRITTEN TO, DOING SO WILL CORRUPT THE SYSTEM FILES! VERIFY
THAT THE DATA TRANSFER LED HAS STOPPED BLINKING BEFORE REMOVING THE BUS
DRIVE.
30
DRAWING 15
31
DRAWING 16
32
5. SYSTEM STARTUP
5.1 CHECKLIST PROCEDURES
1. First completely read and fully understand this manual.
2. Install the panel as indicated in drawing 3.
3. Verify that the power supply is correctly connected as indicated in drawing 5.
3. Verify that the system bus is correctly wired as indicated in drawing 13 or 14.
4. Verify all node dipswitches are in the OFF position.
5. Verify all appliances and their ELR is correctly installed. This procedure will prevent any faults
when the node channels are enabled.
6. Attach a VGA monitor to prepare for configurations and a printer for reports.
7. Attach a USB compliant keyboard and mouse to the panel.
8. Apply 24VDC power to the control panel and allow it time to initialize. The menu below will
appear after preliminary initialization of the system which takes approximately 1 minute.
FIGURE 5. System main screen during node scanning.
5.2 SYSTEM INITIALIZING or RESTARTING
Anytime the system powers up or when the system initializes for whatever reason, it will execute the
following instructions in this order:
1. Look for the onguardsetup.dat file on the flash \DiskC Drive
2. Is the file located?
YES
1. Load the onguardsetup.dat file into RAM.
2. Display nodes previously detected, if any.
3. Bus detects correct styles and current nodes, 0….N or if one fails.
THEN
NO
1. Indicates that the onguardsetup.dat file is not
found.
2. Continues to detect nodes on the bus.
3. Creates the onguardsetup.dat file when the
SAVE and CLOSE button is selected on the
F5 menu.
If the number of nodes detected on the bus equals
the number of nodes stored in the onguardsetup.dat
file, the system reloads active configurations and
starts polling and monitoring alarms.
If the number of nodes detected on the bus does not
equal the number of nodes stored in the onguardsetup.dat file the system displays a warning message, “SYSTEM NOT CONFIGURED” appears and
does not load any configurations or monitor alarms.
33
5.3 ENABLING PASSWORDS
The control panel comes with the administrator password number 2222 installed. A keyboard must be
connected to change passwords. Enter the F10 key and enter a default password that will be utilized
within the program. Now enter and confirm the new password. A “backdoor” password 1793 overrides
any existing passwords in case the user password is lost or it can remain as the dominant password.
Other passwords than the two indicated here enables a more frequent beckon of the keypad.
5.4 DISPLAY SCREEN BRIGHTNESS
When the panel is powered up and initializes, the display is at a maximum brightness (maybe 10 seconds). Once the polling of the nodes begins the panel dims approximately 15% to extend the life of the
CCFT. The display remains in this reduced power state until any alarms occur or the polling is suspended by an administrator, then it will restore to maximum brightness. Once an alarm is cleared or polling resumes, the display will return to its low brightness state after 15 minutes.
5.5 SELECTING BUS LOOP CONFIGURATION
The panel is capable of monitoring the bus by scanning a terminated configuration or continuous loop.
Refer to section 2.11 for more details.
5.6 START OF LOOP Class B
Select the Start of Loop button for a class B configuration to control devices connected to TB2, A&B line
connection (most common). Select OK. This single ended bus line requires the ELR as indicated in
drawing 14.
5.7 LOOP BACK Class A
Select the LOOP BACK button for devices to
be controlled from TB2 A&B line and END
LOOP A&B connection. Select OK. This class
A configuration requires both ends of the bus
line to terminate at the control panel as indicated in drawing 13.
FIGURE 5.1 Selecting bus loop options as described
in section 5.5.
34
5.8 UNDERSTANDING FIELD NODE ID ADDRESSES
After completing the wiring of a system the second step is to acquire node address so the control panel
can communicate to unique addresses. If the nodes are installed, the administrator must physically go to
each node and set their ID switch as they are entered into the system. It is advantageous to establish
programming on a bench next to the control panel prior to installation. The node ID switch located on
each node enables the search program to identify the next node ID to increment. Refer to Drawing 17 to
properly select the node ID switch. The first node identified will be assigned the address 0, then 1,2 etc.
Select a node that is best suited for the starting number (0) and turn ON its acquire address switch, SW1
-1 ON, SW1-2 OFF, as identified in drawing 17. After the node is identified, return SW1-1 to the OFF
position and proceed to discover the next node and repeat. Nodes can have their ID number change if
desired as indicated in section 25.6. Once a node is identified, it cannot be removed from the bus
unless it is disabled in the menu. Refer to section 25 for more information. All nodes must have an ID
address of 255 prior to starting section 5.8. New nodes are shipped with the ID address of 255. To
change a node address to 255 refer to section 25.
FIGURE 5.2 Enter a password.
FIGURE 5.3 Ready to search nodes. NOTE:
Only buttons pertaining to the startup procedure will appear until the first node is discovered and located in the above menu.
5.9 NODE ADDRESS SEQUENCE
It makes no difference where the nodes are physically located on the bus when procuring their ID. In
special applications where alarm response time in milliseconds is critical, assign the input and gas
nodes with the lowest address by procuring their ID first. Assign the SOM and relay node their address
next. The system bus works by starting the scan with the lowest ID to the highest.
NOTE: The FIND NEXT NODE button in this menu searches nodes that are numerically in order and
does not locate address which skip a number.
5.10 PROCURING FIELD NODE ID ADDRESSES ON A NEW INSTALLATION
1. When the display is in the quiescent mode, (ONGUARD) displayed, double tap the touch
screen. No menu activity will return the ONGUARD display back.
2. In the utility menu select line #13, NODE MANAGEMENT, enter a password if it asks, then
select the SELECT MENU ITEM button.
3. In figure 5.3 the blank screen display indicates there are currently 0 nodes attached to the bus.
4. Now, based on how the node addresses are to be incremented, select the first node on the
system that is to be assigned ID #0 and locate the address ID switch (drawing17) to the ON
position.
5. Now click on the FIND NEXT NODE button utilizing the mouse.
6. The panel will search the bus for the ONE node that has its ID switch ON. The node with the ID
switch ON will appear in the menu screen with its 4 open channels “opened”, in this case, the
input node. Refer to figure 5.4.
7. Now, return the ID switch back to its OFF position.
8. To physically identify this node later, label its ID on the node.
35
CAUTION: NO ALARMS CAN OCCUR UNTIL THE INDIVIDUAL CHANNELS ARE ENABLED IN THE
SETTINGS MENU AND A CONFIGURATION FILE IS CREATED, #14 SYSTEM CONFIGURATION,
OR F8 IS UTILIZED.
NOTE: If two or more ID switches are ON, the next searched node WILL NOT BE FOUND and the message “NO MORE NODES FOUND” will appear.
9. The node in figure 5.4 appears with its 4 channels “open”. Click on the COLLAPSE button to close
the node, if desired.
10. Repeat this search procedure for all other nodes, remembering to turn ON the ID switch for only
one node at a time to be addressed, then turn the switch back OFF.
11. Select the SAVE and CLOSE button to exit the node menu.
12. After identifying all nodes connected to the system, data can be entered into each node to identify
its characteristics.
13. Figure 5.5 shows 4 nodes that have been selected for illustration purposes.
5.11 ADDITIONAL INPUT NODE INFORMATION
All field devices that contain a dry switch or relay contacts can connect to the input node as described
below. All examples below can be completed in the system configuration.
1. Optical detectors connect to the input node and any time delays or voting will be addressed.
2. Manual pulls connect to the input node and the option to add or override time delays are addressed.
NOTE: Alarm verification or timers are not permitted on manual alarm activation devices.
3. Four wire smoke detectors connect to the input node.
4. An audible remote silence switch connects to the input node and is addressed.
5. Door or other contacts connect to the input node. The option for the contact closure to proceed to an
action alarm or remain as a message on the screen is addressed.
6. For systems employing a reserve extinguish tank to trip on a post fire or first tank fail condition, connect the pressure switch to the input node.
36
FIGURE 5.4 Input node open indicating its
four undefined channels.
FIGURE 5.5 All four node channels collapsed.
5.12 NODE ID FORMAT
Node ID’s are identified with the first digit indicating the node number and the second the channel. A
node may have an address of 5-1 which indicates this node is number 5 and channel 1 is identified. All
nodes follow the same formation. Nodes that have one or more of the four channels unused still have a
node ID address.
5.13 NODE DEFAULT ADDRESS
All nodes are factory supplied with a factor default ID address of 255. When starting up a new system or
adding nodes, they must always contain the default address of 255 or the search node command will
produce no results as performed in this section. To reset a module to factory address of 255, refer to
section 25.9.
5.14 The ADVANCED section is described in section 25.1.
5.15 OTHER NODE COMMON FUNCTIONS
[] Select item #13, NODE MANAGEMENT, in the utility menu or select F5 on the keyboard.
[] Click on the + sign to open a specific node tree. The default node name as well as its ID is indicated.
Opening a node tree allows a complete view of all four channels.
[] The node(s) can also be “collapsed” by pushing the collapse button or clicking on the (-) icon
thereby indicating only the module name.
[] Select the sort button to numerically locate all nodes in numeric order.
[] Click on the scroll bar on the right side of the menu and scroll to any node desired.
[] All four channels of the different nodes are identical. It is up to the installer to decide which of the four
inputs to connect to input devices. Unused inputs do not require a supervisory resistor and are disabled
as desired.
37
DRAWING 17
38
6. CONFIGURATION ARCHITECTURE
CAUTION: UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES, DO NOT ALLOW ANY ADMINISTRATOR, PROGRAMMER, TECHNICIAN OR ANYONE TO CIRCUMVENT, ADD OR MODIFY THE ARCHITUCTURE OR
PROGRAM OF THE SYSTEM UNLESS THIS ADMINISTRATOR HAS FULLY READ AND UNDERSTANDS THIS MANUAL. DOING SO WILL RESULT IN THE INABILITY OF THE SYSTEM TO PERFORM PER THE MANUFACTURES SPECIFICATIONS.
CAUTION: IMPROPER CONFIGURATION(S) CAN RESULT IN UNDEFINED SYSTEM PERFORMANCE
6.1 INTRODUCTION
Prior to creating configurations, it is imperative the administrator reads this section as well as the entire
manual. The administrator must understand the structure of files and folders that reside in memory to
alleviate any misunderstanding of process and techniques of operating the system. It is important that
the administrator can navigate through Windows menu structures, folders and files effectively without
impeding the system.
6.2 THE SYSTEM DISK
The control panel program, configurations and node information all reside in non-volatile flash memory
called disk C. After the panel is powered and initializes, the necessary data that resides on disk C is
then transferred to a RAM bank where it remains running the system.
6.3 THE ONGUARDSETUP.DAT FILE
The onguardsetup.dat is the node configuration file. This file contains all data the administrator inserts
into the node (F5 menu) fields such as, name, location and edit fields. This file relates directly to how
many nodes and their respective ID numbers are as they exist in the field. Changing this file with a
different version can invalidate the response of the panel. In other words, the onguardsetup.dat file
MUST match the quantity of nodes, their style and address.
When the system is powered and the external monitor is connected, click the mouse on the START button, go to Programs, then select EXPLORER. The folders currently visible are located in the flash memory. Double click on the Disk C and there are more files and folders. Towards the bottom of the file
names will reside the onguardsetup.dat. If the Onguardsetup.dat data has been removed or is not available, the system will create this file from detected nodes. Refer to section 5.2 for more details.
6.4 CONFIGURATON OVERVIEW
To create configurations, the intended input node channel(s) is selected and located in an input window
(SELECTED INPUT) and the connecting output node is located in the output window (SELECT OUTPUT). During a configuration all nodes attached to the system appear on the menu. The configuration is
then saved and LOADED with a unique file name that can later be UNLOADED. Try to name a configuration consistent with its application or keep a separate note pad eluding to the configuration name. A
new configuration can then be created utilizing unused channels of the same or different nodes, or other
channels can be selected that already are configured. EXAMPLE: An input for an optical detector can be
mapped to an output horn. The identical input for the optical can be mapped to a strobe in another configuration. The provision exists to UNLOAD a configuration utilizing one input of a node. Another configuration totally different can then be loaded utilizing the identical node input but create a complete different action. Configurations can be very simple (manual pull tripping a single tank) to complex operations (a cycle release configuration running at the same time as a dual tank release). It is imperative that
the administrator establishing the configurations understands the consequences of cross zoning, voting,
and adding time delays to nodes. There are currently 5 selections of configurations to choose from
which incorporate specific tasks to perform common functions of the control panel. Go to the utility menu
and select item #12 then select the correct configuration that best represents a node connection. Each
configuration is described in detail starting with section 13.
NOTE: Configurations that are created and saved are not mapped together. They each reside independently in the MANAGE CONFIGURATIONS menu; however, they may SHARE a common node channel
as just described above.
39
6.5 THE CONFIGURATION FOLDER
The configuration folder contains all configurations that the administrator creates under utility menu #14,
SYSTEM CONFIGURATION. When a configuration is created for the very first time, another file called
mainconfigfile.txt is also created simultaneously and located into the configuration folder. The mainconfig.txt file contains the names of the configurations that are loaded. When a configuration is unloaded, its
name is removed from the mainconfig.txt file then selectively located in the same folder. Configuration
files are automatically copied into this .txt file and as more configurations are created, they are also included, increasing the file size. The unloaded .txt file can be copied to a USB bus drive and brought to a
computer with notepad and be observed. On system initialization, only LOADED .txt files are loaded into
memory ready for alarms. The purpose of viewing this information is so the administrator can have an
understanding how files are stored. To view these files while the external monitor is connected, click the
mouse on the START button, go to Programs, then select Explorer. The folders currently visible are located in the flash memory. Double click on the Disk C and there are more files and folders. Click on the
configuration folder to view files created in the configuration section #13-18. If the system is new, no files
are in the folder. Under normal circumstances the administrator does not have to access this folder but it
is being pointed out for information purposes. Exit out of the configuration folder back to the \Disk C directory.
6.6 MANAGE CONFIGURATIONS - UTILITY MENU SELECTION #13
Refer to section 24.
6.7 SAVE ALL ALARM HISTORY REPORTS UTILITY MENU SELECTION #7
Refer to section 23.2.
6.8 IMPORTANT - WHAT ACTIONS DISABLES THE SYSTEM FROM ALARMING
It is important to understand the procedures that prevent the system from alarming. Anytime the system
stops polling there will be a FAULT relay action. Disabling a channel in the F5 SETTINGS section does
not cause a system fault because this feature is intended to disable an unused channel. The following
events below are basically set-up procedures and are intended to occur when an authorized personnel
starts up or services the system.
1. Entering the SETTINGS in any node and not ENABLING the check-off box for a valid channel.
2. UTILITY MENU #11, NODE MANAGEMENT (F5) MENU - Whenever this selection is entered into
the polling of the nodes suspends to allow modification.
3. UTILITY MENU #13, MANAGE CONFIGURATIONS: When this selection is selected the program
suspends the polling of the nodes to allow modification of the configurations and EDITING
capabilities.
4. UTILITY MENU #13, MANAGE CONFIGURATIONS: When a loaded configuration is UNLOADED it
is DISABLED and will not function.
5. UTILITY MENU #12, SYSTEM CONFIGURATIONS or selecting F8.
6. The ONGUARD program is not loaded.
7. The system is not powered up.
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7. BACKUP SYSTEM FILES
7.1 IMPORTANT
It is imperative that the administrator has knowledge in copying files and navigating through
Windows Explorer to perform the following tasks properly.
Do not power down the system unless proper protocol has been established or the LOSS OF
DATA will result. Refer to section 26.1 to correctly power down the system.
7.2 WHEN TO SAVE THE SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS (Onguardsetup.dat)
1. After completing configuration(s) selected from the UTILITY MENU #14 SYSTEM CONFIGURATIONS.
2. Anytime a node is physically removed or added to the system. Refer to section 25 for this information.
3. To save changes made to the node configuration file select the SAVE and CLOSE button when exiting the F5 menu.
7.3 HOW TO SAVE AND BACKUP THE SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS
The control panel allows the administrator to make a backup of the onguardsetup.dat file on the DISK C
through the utility program. Whenever there is a change in the system, the backup file should be updated to reflect the actual onguardsetup.dat file. Backing up the onguardsetup.dat file through the UTILITY MENU automatically overwrites the existing file with the new one. The backup file remains on the
DISK C flash drive. The system files should also be stored on two separate medias at two different
physical locations to be the safest.
FIRST - BACKUP THE ONGUARDSETUP.DAT FILE ON THE LOCAL C DRIVE:
1. After node setup, configuration commitments and testing have been established and the system is in
complete compliance, proceed with the following:
2. Make the backup file just prior to putting the system on line for monitoring use.
3. Navigate to the utility menu and select #16, BACKUP THE SYSTEM DATABASE, then select the
SELECT MENU ITEM button.
4. Enter a valid password if the system asks then select the OK button.
5. An exact duplicate file of the onguardsetup.dat has been created in the same directory and is named
onguardsetupbak.dat.
6. Copy the onguardsetupbak.dat to Disk C and rename it to onguardsetup.dat to restore the saved
configuration.
SECOND- BACKUP THE CONFIGURATION FOLDER TO AN EXTERNAL USB BUS DRIVE:
CAUTION: THE FOLLOWING BACKUP WILL TEMPORARILY DISRUPT SURVEILANCE.
DURING THIS TIME UNTIL THE PROGRAM IS BROUGHT BACK ON LINE.
Use the external monitor to backup this file. While the ONGUARD screen is displayed, with the mouse
RIGHT CLICK on the ONGUARD taskbar located at the bottom at the screen. Now left click on the
“close window sign”. The ONGUARD application will close. Now click on the START button, go to PROGRAMS, click on windows explorer. Insert a USB Bus drive in the connector. Wait approximately 10
seconds and the “HARD DISK” icon will appear. DOUBLE CLICK ON the Disk C folder. Copy the CONFIGURATION folder to the BUS drive. Wait 5 seconds after the BUS drive LED stops blinking then remove it from the panel. Go back to DISK C and double click on the ONGUARD word to bring the system
back up. After the screen is visible with the time and date go to the far upper right side of the monitor
screen and click on the X to close Windows Explorer.
THIRD - BACKUP TO THE SAME USB BUS DRIVE THE CONFIGURATION FOLDER LOCATED IN
DISK C.
41
8. LOADING NODE DATA TO PREPARE CONFIGURATIONS
NOTE: Nodes must be configured with text and control data prior to mapping to other
nodes to identify their personalities.
CAUTION: NODES MUST BE ENABLED OR THEY WILL NOT RESPOND TO AN ALARM. THE RELAY NODE IS ALWAYS ENABLED.
8.1 GENERAL TEXT FIELD EDITING NOTES
All editable fields in this system adhere to the Windows standard of editing. The fields may be highlighted then deleted. In some cases, the fields can be cut and pasted into another section. These editing
procedures are not covered in this manual and it is imperative that administrators of this system are familiar with Windows techniques of editing.
Each node contains fields that allow data to be entered to identify the unique characteristics such as
location and other pertinent data. Figure 5.5 shows the four nodes we searched and their names appear. These names can be edited but the ID is fixed.
The HORN ICON is the only icon that affects the operation of the configuration on the F5 Node menu.
Refer to section 19 for more details. Solenoids are captured in the F8 configuration menu and do not
relate to the solenoid node icon.
NOTE: To simplify the following examples, the Input, Gas, Relay and SOM are the only nodes on the
bus for this demonstration and will appear in the configuration windows.
8.2 NODE COMMON ATTRIBUTES
The nodes store some information in their local memory and do not get saved to the system. The items
that are stored in each node’s nonvolatile memory are the node ID number, the de-bounce time and the
enable/disable flags. The 4-20ma node also stores its set-points locally. Based on this information, a
node cannot be removed from one system and installed into another system without resetting the address and referring to section 25.
8.3 PLANNING NODE SELECTION FOR ALARM ACTIONS
Figure 9 indicates a typical menu to label nodes for alarm identifications. The objective in all configuration selections is to locate any channel from any input node to the SELECTED INPUT menu then locate
any four channels from any output node to the SELECTED OUTPUT menu. With all configurations,
there are exceptions, voting, time delays, etc. that can be mapped to the configuration. When all selected inputs and outputs are located in the bottom menu screens, any confirmed input will trip ALL
OUTPUTS based on the exceptions.
After a configuration is completed and assigned a file name, the same node channel(s) can be utilized to
trip other output devices under a different file name. After the nodes have been filled out with their pertinent information, they can now be mapped to activate other nodes through the configuration menus.
There are five different configurations to select from. Select #12, SYSTEM CONFIGURATION, in the
UTILITY MENU then choose the configuration.
42
9. INPUT NODE PREPARATION
The four nodes that were scanned for ID addresses in
section 5.10 will now be loaded with data to identify
their functional characteristics. For demonstration purposes node fields have been filled in as indicated in
figure 9 and will be utilize as examples throughout
this manual.
9.1 ADD/EDIT DETAILS
[] With the ONGUARD main menu displayed, select
the F5 on the keyboard to bring up the node screen.
[] Highlight the input node then click the ADD/EDIT
DETAILS button. The following menu appears as indicated in figure 5.4. The ADD/EDIT DETAILS menu is
identical to all four nodes.
[] The NODE NAME text field in figure 9 is automatically displayed when the search has identified it. The
node name field can have text entered, but always
retain the original name (Input Module) in the text field
so the node can be identified.
FIGURE 9. ADD/EDIT DETAILS
[] Enter a name, location or other identification characteristic of each input in the ALARM LOCATION
box as indicated in figure 9. Applications where the input node has unused inputs do not require any
data in this field and can remain undefined.
CAUTION: BECAUSE OF THE FLEXIBILITY OF THE SYSTEM, IN THE NODE NAME FIELD, ANY
NAME CAN BE APPLIED TO ACCOMMODATE THE FUNCTION.
[] Figure 13.6 indicates how the ALARM LOCATION field reflects the data that entered in the Add/Edit
LOCATION. This ALARM LOCATION field appears to the right of the DEVICE NAME during an alarm.
Enter pertinent data in reference to the alarm location or device as necessary. There are several examples for illustration purposes in figure 9. The ALARM LOCATION, such as the example turbine optical,
can also be utilized as the device type as indicated in figure 9.
43
9.2 ICON SELECTION
[] Referring back to figure 9 to the far left, are icons in boxes that represent the device name. Select an
icon that best represents the alarm style. When an alarm occurs, the name to the right of the icon in
figure 9.1 or 9.2 will appear in the DEVICE NAME column as indicated in figure 13.7.
[] Proceed to click on an icon for each channel as well as the master node icon (top box).
[] The APPLY TO REST button simply fills the same information in the remaining lower boxes.
FIGURE 9.1 Icon Upper Menu
FIGURE 9.2 Icon Lower Menu
9.3 MEMO FIELDS
[] The EDIT button just below the COMMENT column allows a message for this node as indicated in
figure 9.3. During an alarm this EDIT box can be quickly viewed at the alarm screen. The remaining
four EDIT buttons to the right of the ALARM LOCATION allows messages (figure 9.4) for each of the
four channels or any other relative information; however, this data is for reference storage and can be
viewed by selecting the F5 key to enter the node screen. Each field can accommodate up to 256 characters. Unused channels do not require filling in the fields and can be left undefined.
[] For illustration purposes, the EDIT button was selected for channel 1 of the input node, indicating the
turbine optical detector is located at ID address 0-1 (node #0, channel #1).
[] After inserting the input node EDIT DETAILS information, select the OK then APPLY button to save
the information.
[] Now click on the SETTINGS button and refer to figure 9.5.
FIGURE 9.3 EDIT box for global node name.
FIGURE 9.4 EDIT box for channel 1.
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9.4 SETTINGS SELECTON
[] With the input node still highlighted select the SETTINGS button.
[] Now check off a box to ENABLE the channel(s) that
will be utilized in a configuration.
CAUTION: A CHANNEL THAT IS NOT ENABLED
WILL NOT ALARM.
[] The disable can be used to temporarily turn off a
channel for a service routine.
[] Disable a channel if it is unused OR A FAULT WILL
OCCUR AFTER A CONFIGURATION IS MADE.
[] After node SETTING has been completed, it is
ready to be expanded to show all channels and inserted the configuration window later.
FIGURE 9.5 SETTINGS menu
CAUTION: IF THERE ARE INPUT NODES VOTING, THE DE-BOUNCE TIME MUST BE EXPIRIED
ON ANY VOTED NODES PRIOR FOR AN ALARM ACTION TO TAKE PLACE.
CAUTION: INCREMENTING THE DE-BOUNCE TIME ADDS TIME TO THE ALARM RESPONSE.
9.5 RESETTING NODE LED’s
[] Click on the RESET NODE LED’s to reset the input node blinking LED’s after an alarm or fault has
occurred. For resetting LED’s on all the nodes in a system simultaneously, select menu option #10 on
the UTILITY MENU.
9.6 SELECTING DE-BOUNCE
[] The DE-BOUNCE feature has been designed to prevent false alarms in electrically noisy installations.
De-bounce time utilizes a digital filter and allows the administrator to select the amount of time before
the node responds to an alarm signal to trip the control panel. Example: If the de-bounce time is set for
1024 milliseconds, the input signal (closure of a switch or sensor signal) has to remain steady for the
entire 1024 milliseconds before an alarm is considered valid. If there is a disruption of the signal anytime
during the 1024 milliseconds de-bounce period, the de-bounce starts over from zero. Example: An alarm
(could be noise) occurs and the signal is present for 875 milliseconds of the 1024 millisecond period. An
alarm will not occur. Once the De-bounce has expired, the alarm signal is then forwarded to the system
bus.
The de-bounce is based on a formula: de-bounce time/62.5ms = 5 timer periods required for the signal
to remain steady for a valid alarm. The default setting is 320 milliseconds. This time can be only set at
intervals of 62.5ms.
Another use for the de-bounce is to add time for UV only detectors to shunt out erroneous alarms from
lighting or other UV emissions. Another use serves as a deterrent for false alarms by allowing the administrator to intelligently select a time delay appropriate for the task. The minimum de-bounce time is
64 milliseconds, the maximum is 16.32 seconds and applies to all four channels of the node.
[] After inserting the information in the settings menu, click on the APPLY button to proceed.
[] Click on the SAVE and CLOSE button to return to the main menu to proceed to continue with other
nodes.
45
10. 4-20mA NODE PREPARATION
[] Referring to figure 5.5, highlight and click the gas
module name on the upper left menu.
10.1 ADD/EDIT DETAILS
[] This form is identical to the input node. Follow sections 9.1 through 9.6 for filling out field information
then click on the APPLY button. Notice that the
NODE NAME was edited to accept the %LFL text.
Figure 10 contains examples. After filling out the
fields, select the APPLY button to proceed.
[] Select the SETTINGS button.
FIGURE 10. ADD/EDIT DETAILS
10.2 SETTINGS SELECTON
[] Check off a box to ENABLE the channel(s) that will
be utilized in a configuration.
[] Notice in figure 10.1 channel 4 was not enabled
because in figure 10 example it was not used.
CAUTION- A CHANNEL THAT IS NOT ENABLED
WILL NOT ALARM.
[] The disable can be used to temporarily turn off a
channel for a service routine
[] Disable a channel if it is unused OR A FAULT
COULD OCCUR AFTER A CONFIGURATION IS
MADE.
10.3 DEBOUNCE TIME
Refer to section 9.6 for details.
10.4 ENTER SET POINTS
[] Refer to figure 10.1 and select the SET PT button
to enter threshold settings.
[] The bar graph in figure 10.2 is out of alignment until
fully calibrated.
[] For each of the three alarm set points on this channel click on the arrow ▲ to increase or ▼ decrease
the alarm set point.
[] The factory defaults are 30-40-50.
[] The use of all three set points is not required.
[] The channel does not have to be calibrated to select set points.
NOTE: Set points are prevented from interfering with
adjoining values.
NOTE: Per Factory Mutual restrictions, the HIGH and
HIGH HIGH alarms are not allowed to increment
above 60% LFL.
[] The REAL TIME window displays the input current
in milliamps for this channel and is not influenced by
calibration.
[] The percent value is a correct representation of the
current AFTER calibration is completed.
[] Select the esc key on the keyboard anytime to cancel this procedure.
FIGURE 10.1 SETTINGS
FIGURE 10.2 Adjust Set Points
46
10.5 CALIBRATION
[] Referring to the field wiring diagram of drawing 9, a 4-20mA constant current source is required to
connect to TB2 of the channel to calibrate.
[] As indicated in figure 10, channel #1 of node #1 was selected in the example and the name that was
inserted for demonstration purposes, METER VALVE appears for this menu. This entire menu is only for
channel one. The message NOT CALIBRATED appears until a successful calibration has been completed.
[] The tall blue bar to the far left in the graph on figure 10.4 and 10.3 represents the REAL TIME current
being measured by the control panel and is also displayed in the REAL TIME window. This current is not
affected by the calibration.
[] The green bar (shown at 5%) represents the low set point, yellow (15%) is for the HIGH and red (25%)
is for the HIGH HIGH.
FIGURE 10.3 SET ZERO menu before SET
0% button is pushed with 4mA applied to input.
FIGURE 10.4 SET SPAN menu with 20.01 mA
applied to same input.
[] Select the CALIBRATE button (figure 10.2) after the set point data has been entered.
[] Apply 4mA of current to this channel by reading the REAL TIME figures then click on the SET 0% button as indicated in figure 10.3.
[] Now apply 20mA to this channel as indicated in figured 10.4 and click on the SET 50% button for the
span.
[] NOTE: If the current applied to the gas node is not within the applicable range, the message “THE
50% SETTING MUST BETWEEN 8 AND 25 MILLIAMPS appears.
[] Reduce the input current back to at least below the LOW threshold then select the CAL. DONE button
to save the data. Now select the OK button.
[] After inserting the information, click on the APPLY button to proceed.
[] Click on the Cal. DONE button to save the data.
[] After channel one has been calibrated, use the same procedure to continue and calibrate the other
three channels, if utilized.
10.6 RESET
The RESET button returns the calibration settings back to the DEFAULT level. The default level is Low =
30, High = 40, HIGH HIGH = 50. Use the RESET if a new gas sensor has been installed and then requires to be calibrated or if the calibration is restarted. Resetting the calibration requires that any active
sensor on line to be recalibrated.
47
10.7 ALTERNATE CALIBRATION METHOD
Manufactures of gas sensors instruct different methods for obtaining local or remote calibration. In some
cases calibration gas is utilized to connect to a gas sensor and then the 4-20mA node can then be calibrated. This method is called remote calibration and requires a administrator applying the gas at the
sensor while someone else is setting the zero and span at the control panel. In a correctly installed 420mA system the current will not change due to field wiring. If the resistance of the wire connecting a 420mA sensor is so high that the sensor cannot deliver the voltage to drive the current through the loop,
then the sensor can only be considered defective or incorrectly installed.
The use of 2.5% calibration gas is recommended for calibration. In this instance when the channel is
properly calibrated the 2.5% gas flow will indicate 50% (blue bar) or half of the scale. The calibration
method utilized here is based on the fact that the 2.5% gas concentration represents 50% of the 4-20mA
scale, or 12mA sourced into the 4-20mA node.
10.8 GAS CONFIGURATION
While in the F5 menu there is no alarm monitoring. Gas configuration is allowed ONLY in the direct connection mode as indicated in section 10. When a node is calibrated, the calibration data remains in the
onguardsetup.dat file. Changing the node’s ID does not affect the calibration or set points. All of the
threshold levels and calibration settings are stored in the onguardsetup.dat file for the node.
10.9 SAVE NODE INFORMATION
Item #1 in the UTILITY MENU, SAVE NODE REPORT, can be selected to summarize the information
related to this Gas Node.
48
11. SUPERVISE OUTPUT (SOM) NODE PREPARATION
[] Referring back to figure 5.5, highlight the output
module name on the menu.
11.1 ADD/EDIT DETAILS
[] This menu is similar to the input node. Follow sections 9.1 thru 9.6 for filling out field information then
click on the APPLY button. Figure 11 contains examples of field devices.
[] After the data in figure 11 has been filled click on
the APPLY then the SETTINGS button.
11.2 SETTINGS SELECTON
Select the SETTINGS button to enter the menu of
figure 11.1.
11.3 ENABLED
[] As indicated in figure 11.1, check the boxes to ENABLE the channel(s) that will be utilized in a configuration.
CAUTION - A CHANNEL THAT IS NOT ENABLED
WILL NOT ALARM.
FIGURE 11. ADD/EDIT DETAILS
11.4 SHORT MONITORING
If enabled the monitoring will create a fault if the field
wires that are connected to an appliance are shorted
together.
If a channel is being utilized for a solenoid (as in this
example) or other type of coil, disable the short monitoring to prevent the system from announcing a fault.
Under certain conditions, Allestec can assist in applications requiring a solenoid short supervision.
11.5 DEBOUNCE
The de-bounce time here is utilized exclusively for
the output relays of this node and influences only the
fault detection. Refer to section 9.6 for more details.
11.6 RESETING NODE LED’s
[] Click on the RESET NODE LED’s to selectively
reset the SOM blinking LED’s after an alarm or fault
has occurred. For resetting LED’s on all the nodes
simultaneously, select menu option #10 on the UTILITY MENU.
[] Click on the APPLY button when finished.
FIGURE 11.1 SETTINGS
11.8 PRINT NODE INFORMATION
Item #1 in the UTILITY MENU, SAVE NODE
REPORT, can be selected to summarize the
information related to this node.
11.7 TESTING THE SOM FOR EXTINGUISHING
When disconnecting the extinguishing system discharge circuit for testing or maintenance, the extinguishing system must be isolated mechanically. Disconnecting the extinguishing system solely by software or electrically is not in compliance with Factory
Mutual.
49
12. RELAY NODE PREPARATION
[] While in the UTILITY MENU, select #11, NODE
MANAGEMENT, then highlight the relay node and
then select the ADD/EDIT button.
[] Collapse or leave open the node tree then click
once on the name to highlight it.
12.1 ADD/EDIT DETAILS
[] This form is identical to the input node. Follow
sections 9.1 through 9.6 for filling out field information then click on the APPLY button. Figure 12 contains examples of field devices.
[] After the data in figure 12 has been filled click on
the SETTINGS button.
12.2 SETTINGS SELECTION
[] The relay node remains always ENABLED.
[] The relay nodes do not affiliate with de-bounce
times as the other nodes.
Figure 12. ADD/EDIT Details
12.3 RESET NODE LED’s
[] Click on the RESET NODE LED’s to reset the input node blinking LED’s after an alarm has occurred. For resetting LED’s on all the nodes in a
system simultaneously, select menu option #10 on
the UTILITY MENU.
[] Click on the APPLY button when finished.
[] Click on the SAVE and CLOSE button to return to
the main to print out the information or proceed to
continue with other nodes.
12.4 PRINT NODE INFORMATION
Item #1 in the UTILITY MENU, SAVE NODE REPORT, can be selected to summarize the information related to this node.
FIGURE 12.1 SETTINGS
12.5 UTILIZING THE RELAY NODE TO RESET 4-WIRE SMOKE DETECTORS
Some installations require a method to reset the 24V powering 4-wire smoke detectors when the control
panel is reset. An unused channel that has a relay node attached to the bus can supply a dry contact to
open the power path to the smoke detector. (The relay must be wired with the 24V power through the
N.C. contact then to the smoke detector power). A configuration does not have to be made for this option. Select F5, highlight the relay node selected for the reset function then select the Add/Edit details
button. Now click on the “Not Used” box on the relay channel for the reset function and scroll down until
the smoke detector icon is found and click on it with the mouse. Save the change. When this box is selected for this relay, the relay will energize for 5 seconds then reset any time the FIRE or WARNING
alarm is reset from the panel. The relay node channel LED will also turn on for the duration of the reset.
NOTE: The selected relay channel of the relay node must be exclusive for this reset function.
50
13. DIRECT CONNECTION RELEASE
Input node initializing
CAUTION: ENTERING INTO ANY CONFIGURATION DISABLES THE SYSTEM FROM RESPONDING TO ALARMS. THE FAULT RELAY WILL TRIP UNTIL THE CONFIGURATION IS EXITED.
13.1 SELECTING AN INPUT NODE TO TRIP AN SOM OR RELAY NODE
This selection allows configuring nodes without any time delays or logic exceptions. It is basically a
“straight through connection” from input nodes to output nodes. The nodes that were previously scanned
for an ID number in section 5.10 and loaded with data in sections 9 through 12 appear in two windows.
The input style of nodes are on located on the left and output are on the right side of the screen. The
nodes in either window can be expanded by clicking on the + to display each of the four channels or collapsed by clicking on the - sign.
[] The first step in establishing node mapping is to connect the channels of all
nodes, one at a time, to an
icon that best represents the
intended action as indicated
back in section 9.2 . Refer to
figure 13 and highlight the
Input Node and click on the
+ to expand the node tree.
Notice the node name and
alarm location data fields are
visible from previous sections. The following example
will illustrate the technique
for mapping an Input node to
a Relay and SOM.
[] The SORT button locates
the nodes in numeric order.
FIGURE 13 . Direct connection release - node trees are collapsed.
13.2 SELECT INPUT NODE
CHANNEL TO TRIP OUTPUT NODES
[] Figure 13.1 shows the
menu prior to clicking on a
channel to locate it in the
SELECTED INPUT screen.
[] The channel(s) on the left
screen are prepared to map
to the channel(s) on the right
screen.
[] Now determine which input
node channel to map to an
output node on the right.
[] Double click on any input
node channel to locate it in
the lower box to prepare to
map it to another node.
FIGURE 13.1 Input and output node trees are expanded open.
51
FIGURE 13.2
[] The channel that was selected will now be copied to
the SELECTED INPUT box
below but can be unselected
by double clicking on it.
[] Now select the FIRE
ALARM box then ACCEPT.
FIGURE 13.3 Selecting input nodes to trip outputs.
NOTE: About figure 13.2 – The SELECT ALARM TYPE box appears to enforce the decision by the administrator that the node channel chosen is indeed the correct one. The fire and gas alarm check boxes
have no logic control on the system. The reset function is described in later sections does have control
to how the system handles the input channel.
[] Now open the SOM tree on the right menu by clicking on the + sign.
Double click on the node channel(s) that will be activated by the SELECTED OUTPUT channel.
[] Figure 13.3 illustrates that relay node channel 3 was selected for this example. SOM channels 1 and 2
were also selected.
13.3 RESULTANT
[] Based on the example, when input node 0-1 is activated all three channels in the SELECTED OUTPUT menu will immediately activate. Refer to figure 13.6 for the alarm action.
13.4 VOTING CHANNELS WITHIN THE INPUT NODES
When 2 or more inputs are located into the SELECTED INPUT screen, the ENABLE VOTING box appears (not shown). Select the quantity of inputs required from the left menu to satisfy an output alarm on
the right menu. The number of input nodes to vote MUST be in alarm for their de-bounce time period
plus 300 milliseconds (simultaneously) for the alarm to be confirmed. Voting can be conducted between
channels as well as nodes.
CAUTION: THE PROCESS OF VOTING BETWEEN ALARM CHANNELS WILL SLOW THE ALARM
RESPONSE TIME DOWN.
52
13.5 SAVE THE CONFIGURATION
[] After completing the required configuration, click on
the SAVE and CLOSE button to bring up the configuration menu. Notice the rectangle box is empty. As soon
as a configuration is created,
it will be inserted into this
box as well as future configurations.
[] Type a file name that can
later be mapped to this configuration. Notice in figure
13.6 this configuration name
appears during an alarm.
FIGURE 13.4 Creating and saving a configuration.
[] Now click on the OK button to save the configuration.
NOTE: When a configuration is created, it is automatically LOADED or “ready for an action”
[] Refer to section 24 to LOAD, UNLOAD and EDIT configurations.
13.6 TESTING THE CONFIGURATION TO ALARM ON A DIRECT CONNECTION RELEASE
13.7 SYSTEM FIRE ALARM MENU
Once a configuration has been created it is immediately loaded in the configuration file folder and is
ready for use. Based on the configuration that was just completed, when channel 1 of node 0 turns on
the output channels that were located into the SELECTED OUTPUT screen activate. Trip channel one
of the input node to put it into alarm. The following screen will appear in figure 13.5. Select the fire alarm
button on the touch screen, the local audible alarm will turn off and the menu appears as in figure 13.6.
The local fire alarm signal will silence. Notice the configuration name for the group of devices appears.
FIGURE 13.5 Fire alarm button
FIGURE 13.6 Fire alarm menu
13.8 FIRE ALARM MENU
[] The SILENCE MENU allows audible appliances to be silenced. Reoccurring alarms on the same channel will activate the audible devices again. Refer to section 19.
[] The DETAILS brings up the menu in figure 13.8. It indicates and records when the highlighted alarm in
the menu has occurred, been reset or silenced for this #1 event. Select the OK button to go back to the
FIRE ALARM menu then select the SYSTEM MENU BUTTON.
[] Any subsequent fire alarm configurations will be located in this menu on the next line item.
53
[] Select the VIEW INPUTS button as indicated in figure 13.7 to view the node details as well as any
other input alarms associated with this configuration. Selecting the VIEW INPUTS allows individual viewing of each input node contained in the configuration.
[] Select EXIT to return to the previous menu.
[] Select the RESET button to clear the alarm. If the
alarm has not been cleared, it will reappear.
[] To view the alarm history, go to figure 27 and select the FIRE DISPLAY button.
[] To erase the alarm history, refer to section 27, #9.
[] The DEVICE NAME and ALARM LOCATION is
the data that was placed in the ADD/EDIT DETAILS
field back in figure 9.1. Remember, the DEVICE
NAME was an icon selection.
[] The STATUS column indicates the real time activity of this channel and the ‘A” indicates the alarm is
active and “R” indicates the alarm has been cleared.
FIGURE 13.7 Node data and status.
13.9 DETAILS MENU
The data in figure 13.8 comes from the ADD/EDIT
details that was entered in figure 9.4.
[] The #0 Input Node is the editable field located in
the NODE NAME field . #0 indicates the node ID 0.
[] The #0-1 TURBINE OPTICAL is from the ALARM
LOCATION field. #0-1 indicates node ID #0, channel
1.
FIGURE 13.8 Details menu
13.10 VOTING SEQUENCING
As described in section 13.4, if the amount of initiating devices selected to vote is not attained, a
WARNING message will occur to indicate there is a
potential for an alarm that must be investigated.
Also, if initiating alarms enter the input node sequentially, the first alarm(s) will be a WARNING followed by the FIRE menu when the voting is satisfied. Only when a voted alarm receives all its alarms
simultaneously will the WARNING be omitted and
the FIRE menu will appear. The warning alarm sequencing allows events to be recorded in the order
they are received. Voting menus must be reset as
well as the fire alarm menu to reset the panel. The
WARNING alarm on any configuration trips the
WARNING relay on the panel is indicated in drawing
6.
FIGURE 13.9 Warning on a first alarm when
voting.
54
13.11 SYSTEM FAULT ALARM MENU
The input alarm circuit on the node ID 0, channel 1
is opened to demonstrate a fault. Select the FAULT
ALARM button in figure 13.10 to bring up the FAULT
ALARM in figure 13.11. Figure 13.11 shows the
FAULT ALARM menu.
[] To silence the panel audible alarm, select the silence button. If the fault alarm remains unattended,
the audible alarm will resound within 30 minutes.
[] The DETAILS button brings up the fault menu. It
indicates and records when the fault occurred and
has been silenced or reset.
FIGURE 13.10 Fault alarm button
13.12 FAULT ALARM MENU
The FAULT ALARM menu identifies that node ID
#0, channel 1 has a SUPERVISION FAIL and the
STATUS indicates the fault is Active. A supervision
fail is when an ELR is not installed or a conductor on
that channel has become loose.
FIGURE 13.11 Fault menu
55
14. DIRECT CONNECTION W/DELAY RELEASE Input node initializing
14.1 SELECTING AN INPUT NODE TO TRIP AN SOM OR RELAY NODE This configuration is identical to the DIRECT CONNECTION RELEASE except this menu expects a time
delay to be entered in the SECONDS window. Select input channels to map to output channels as demonstrated in section 13. This configuration should be used only with devices that contain a solenoid.
When the configuration is complete, give it a unique file name.
14.2 ENTER TIME DELAY
[] Refer to figure 14 and type in the time in seconds or use the ▲ or ▼ arrow to adjust the time. Enter up
to 9999 seconds. When this time expires the solenoid will turn on.
[] Enter from 10 to 9999 seconds for a solenoid on time. After this time expires, the solenoid will turn off.
14.3 VOTING Refer to section 13.4, Voting channels
within the input nodes.
14.4 ABORT OPTION
In section 9.1 channel 2 of
the input node was named
abort. Any of the 4 fields
could have been named
abort but once it is selected
as indicated in figure 14.1, it
then becomes associated
with that configuration. Now
when the Pre-Discharge Delay is counting down and the
abort switch is pushed, the
timer will stop counting as
long as the switch is held in
and the word ABORT ACTIVE will appear as indicated
in figure 14.4. Releasing the
abort switch will commence
the timing. The abort does
not influence the solenoid on
time.
CAUTIION: UTILIZING THE
ABORT WILL AFFECT THE
TIME REQUIRED FOR EXTINGUISHING.
14.5 RESULTANT
Once any initiating device
from the SELECTED INPUT
window enters into alarm,
the Pre-Discharge time in
the SECONDS window will
commence and when t =
zero, the selected devices in
the SELECTED OUTPUT
window will initiate at the
same time and remain ON
for the duration of the Solenoid On Time. Follow the
example menus in figures
13.1 through 13.6 to configure this menu.
FIGURE 14. Direction connection with delay.
FIGURE 14.1. Loading the configuration with data.
56
[] Select the DELAY button to view the
counter as indicated in figure 14.4.
NOTE: If the time delay is short and the
menu is entered late, the time may have already expired.
[] During alarm time countdown, the FIRE
STATUS indicator will read ACTIVE as long
as this channel is in alarm, however the
alarm will continue in progress.
14.6 VOTING SEQUENCING Refer to section 13.10.
14.7 MORE CONFIGURATIONS
[] Configurations can be made utilizing the
same nodes but in a different logic. An example is a DIRECT CONNECTION with time
delay and unique file name has an optical
detector tripping a solenoid in 30 seconds.
Now, there is a manual pull from a different
node address connected to the same solenoid but through a DIRECT CONNECTION
W/O delay and has its unique file name. So
when the optical commences the time delay
starts, then if the manual pull is tripped, the
manual pull will instantly override the time
delay and trip the solenoid. It is “building
blocks” like these two configuration files that
can create more complex logic.
FIGURE 14.2. Naming the configuration.
FIGURE 14.3 Creating the alarm.
FIGURE 14.4 Selecting Delay times button
and pushing the abort switch.
57
15. DIRECT CONNECTION RELEASE
4-20mA node initializing
15.1 SELECTING A 4-20mA NODE FOR TRIPPING AN SOM OR RELAY NODE
This configuration is similar as selecting the input node in section 13 except the gas node is selected
here. NOTE: This is the only configuration allowed to utilize the gas node selection.
15.2 SELECT A GAS CHANNEL
[] Refer to figure 15 and select the + on the gas node
tree to open the 4 channels to
prepare for configurations.
[] This example illustrates one
gas node but it is possible
there could be more.
[] Double click on one or more
of the four channels of the
gas node to locate it in the
SELECTED INPUT screen. In
this example two gas channels were selected. The SELECT ALARM TYPE menu in
figure 15.1 appears.
[] If the selection of the gas
node channel was not correct,
simply double click on it to
locate it where it originated.
[] Check mark the GAS
ALARM box then the ACCEPT box.
15.3 SELECT A SET POINT
THRESHOLD
[] The SELECT THRESHOLD
box appears as indicated in
figure 15.2 and it is at this
location to check off the alarm
set point box for this channel.
Then select the ACCEPT button.
[] For this example channel 1,
METER VALVE LOW alarm
was selected along with the
control valve. Note back in
figure 10.3 the low alarm of
this channel was set at 5%
LFL.
NOTE: To alarm on the other
two set points for this same
channel, a complete new configuration would have to be
made. If a new configuration
is made, the same or different
appliances can be selected.
[] In this example, channel 3
was chosen to trip on the
HIGH alarm. This channel
was selected to trip at 15%
LFL.
FIGURE 15. Direction connection from gas to relay node.
FIGURE 15.1 Select the gas
alarm box .
FIGURE 15.2 Select
the threshold level.
FIGURE 15.3
Error message when
trying to select an input node for gas.
58
[] Now select output appliances to trip from the gas inputs. In this example the SOM ID node #2, channel
1 and the relay node ID #3 channels 1 & 3 were selected.
[] Upon completion of mapping the node channels, click on the SAVE and CLOSE button to bring up the
CONFIGURATION screen. In this example the configuration was named “TURBINE ROOM - GAS”.
[] At this point the configuration was loaded in the CONFIGURATION folder and can be viewed by going
to the UTILITY MENU and selecting #13 MANAGE CONFIGURATIONS. The configuration is ready for
use.
15.4 RESULTANT
When a LOW alarm on
channel1 or HIGH alarm on
channel 3 occurs in the SELECTED INPUT screen, all
three devices will activate in
the SELECTED OUTPUT
screen. Notice in figure 15
that on the gas alarm SELECTED INPUT both channels identify the THRESHOLD level.
FIGURE 15.4 Create a configuration.
FIGURE 15.5 Select gas alarm button.
FIGURE 15.6 Gas alarm menu.
15.5 TESTING THE GAS NODE CONFIGURATION FOR AN ALARM
Slowly increase the current entering into the input of
the gas node under observation. In this example,
channel 1 is what was named the meter valve.
When the current (gas concentration) level is equal
to or exceeds the SETPOINT level (LOW ALARM =
5%), the alarm will occur. Refer to figure 15.5 and
select on the “GAS ALARM PRESS HERE” button.
The menu in figure 15.6 appears and allows further
investigation of the alarm. If there is an audible appliance configured, select the silence menu
(described in detail in section 19). Notice the 2 inputs in figure 15.7 that were included in this configuration. Also note that input 1-1 is in alarm. To further investigate this alarm select the GAS LEVEL
button.
FIGURE 15.7 VIEW INPUTS selected.
59
15.6 VIEW THE ALARM
After selecting the GAS LEVEL button the graph in figure 15.8 appears. It is formatted as the original
menu where the SET POINTS are entered. The menu is color on the monitor so to identify the colors for
this manual the REAL TIME bar is the left side, then LO THRESHOLD and HIHI. Notice the REALTIME
DATA is 9% and the LOW THRESHOLD is at the setting of 5%. The REAL TIME DATA is the actual
current represented in % of the scale.
NOTE: It may take a few seconds after selecting the GAS CHART button before the bar graph can construct the data and appear.
15.7 DETAILS DATA
After viewing the bar graph, return the input current below the alarm threshold, select the DONE button
then the DETAILS button to bring up the message screen as shown in figure 15.9. This menu indicates
the time of the alarm as well as the note field from the EDIT menu in the SETTINGS section. Notice the
GAS MODULE %LFL text in figure 15.9 which was inserted back in figure 10. The #1 is identifying node
ID #1. Select the OK button to return back to the GAS ALARM MENU then RESET the alarm.
FIGURE 15.8 Gas chart alarm screen
FIGURE 15.9 Details screen
15.8 FAULT ANNUNCIATION
If the 4-20mA loop is opened or the current drops
below –9% of the scale, a fault message will occur.
Select the FAULT ALARM button and the FAULT
ALARM menu will appear. A fault was created for this
channel and under the STATUS name is the letter
“A” (active) indicating the fault input current is still
below the –9%. The STATUS letter will change to an
“R” (reset) if the fault input current is brought back to
normal operating limits. Next to the STATIUS is #1-1
which indicated node ID #1, channel 1. The FAULT
DESCRIPTION identifies that the loop current fell
below the –9% range. This description can also identify a short or open in the 4-20mA loop.
FIGURE 15.10 Fault alarm screen
15.9 VOTING BETWEEN GAS CHANNELS
If more than one channel of the gas node is located in the SELECTED INPUT box as indicated in figure
15, the VOTING box appears. Select the voting quantity to satisfy the alarm condition. When alarm(s)
appear but do not satisfy the voting condition, a WARNING alarm will occur as indicated in figure 13.9.
Select the WARNING button and then the DETAILS button to acquire the node channel address. As
other alarms appear which do not attain the voting requirement, use the scroll buttons (figure 15.6) to
view and select the specific alarm. Once the voting has been attained, the GAS ALARM button (figure
15.5) will appear. Select this button and proceed to any of the alarms appearing on the menu to view the
GAS CHART. Alarms must return below their set point to be reset and the WARNING alarms must be
reset.
NOTE: Gas warning menus after selecting figure 13.9 currently do not indicate gas concentration levels
but indicate which sensor is in alarm.
60
16. DUAL MODE RELEASE
Input node initializing
16.1 SELECTING AN INPUT NODE TO TRIP AN SOM OR RELAY NODE
The dual mode release is a configuration that requires two solenoids, two releasing agents and a line
pressure switch. This configuration utilizes a second tank as a backup mode in the event the pressure
switch does not function or if the fire is too large in magnitude for the first release to extinguish the fire.
The cause and effect for this configuration is described in detail below.
16.2 CAUSE AND EFFECT RESULTS
When receiving an alarm from the input node:
There are various sequence of operations that can be executed depending on the real time status of a
fire. The options that are listed below account for when this release configuration is utilized.
A. CAUSE
The SOM is activated, the MAIN solenoid timing starts, but the fire is manually extinguished prior to the
MAIN cycle time expiring.
B. EFFECT
The display will start counting down from its pre-selected time until the time expires. The display will
continue to count down unless the alarm is reset (providing the proper exception is checked off, figure
16) or the configuration is committed to the release of the first tank.
C. CAUSE
The SOM is activated, the MAIN solenoid timing starts, the fire remains until the countdown expires and
the MAIN solenoid trips thereby extinguishing the fire. The pressure switch changes state within 7 seconds.
D. EFFECT
The MAIN agent release is sufficient enough to extinguish the fire and the RESERVE solenoid is
never activated.
E. CAUSE
The SOM is activated, the MAIN circuit timing starts and counts down to zero, the pressure switch
changes state within 7 seconds. The fire is of sufficient magnitude to continue after the MAIN solenoid
trips.
F. EFFECT
The display commences its second timing sequence on the RESERVE solenoid and upon the expiration
of the timing, the RESERVE solenoid trips.
G. CAUSE
The SOM is activated, the MAIN circuit timing starts, the pressure switch does not change state within 7
seconds.
H. EFFECT
The RESERVE solenoid will automatically turn on.
61
Figure 16 displays the dual
release mode configuration
menu prior to mapping the
nodes or making exceptions.
Select the CANCEL button
to exit if this menu is not the
correct.
16.3
SELECT DEVICE INPUTS
[] The first step is to expand
the input node by clicking on
the + symbol and then double click on the specific
channels required to trip the
release.
[] For the alarm device and
pressure switch check the
fire alarm box in the SELECT ALARM TYPE menu
(figure 13.2).
[] Figure 16.1 indicates one
optical detector on channel 1
as well as a pressure switch
(required) on channel 3 were
selected for the two inputs.
FIGURE 16. Dual release menu - preparing to configure.
16.4 SELECT PRESSURE
SWITCH INPUT
[] Now highlight the pressure
switch in the SELECTED
INPUT screen then click on
the SELECT PRESSURE
SWITCH button. Notice in
figure 16.1 the pressure
switch is displayed below the
SELECT
PRESSURE
SWITCH button. The pressure switch can also be selected from another node.
16.5 SELECT TIME DELAY
[] Enter the time for the PREDISCHARGE DELAY and
the RESERVE RELEASE
DEALY solenoids. This time
can be up to 9999 seconds
as long as the second delay
is 7 seconds longer than the
PRE-DISCHARGE timer.
FIGURE 16.1 Input / output node mapping and selecting exceptions.
NOTE: The two time delays are independent of each other and both commence countdown simultaneously.
16.6 SELECT DEVICE OUTPUTS
[] Now expand the SOM on the other side and double click on two solenoids (required).
[] For this example, relay node ID #3, channel 2 was also selected.
NOTE: If other devices are located in the SELECTED OUTPUT box, they too will turn on as soon as the
PRE-DISCHARGE DELAY times down to 0 seconds.
62
16.7 SELECT 2nd SOLENOID
[] Highlight the second solenoid channel then click on the SELECT SECOND SOLENOID button. Notice
that the solenoid is displayed below the SELECT SECOND SOLENOID button.
16.8 EXCEPTION BOXES
[] Check the exception boxes if required:
[] VOTING - Refer to section 13.4, Voting channels within the input nodes.
[] RESERVE RELEASE TIMER WILL CONTINUE
If left unchecked, the time sequence will continue even though the input node alarm has gone away. If
the box is checked and the alarm goes away during countdown, the RESERVE countdown will stop and
hold until reset, never tripping.
[] MAIN RELEASE TIMER CAN BE RESET
If checked, the main release cannot be reset prior to the 1st discharge if the input node alarm clears. If
voting, none of the inputs can be reset.
[] Click on the SAVE and CLOSE button after verifying the correct configuration map is established.
[] Just type a file name that is windows appropriate in the bottom configuration field then click the OK
button.
16.9 SAVE THE CONFIGURATION
[] SAVING CONFIGURATIONS A configuration file name can contain up to 128 characters and cannot
contain \ / : * ? “ | characters.
[] The configuration file has been located in the configuration folder and is armed.
16.10 TESTING THE DUAL
MODE RELEASE CONFIGURATION FOR AN
ALARM
Once a configuration has
been created it is immediately loaded in the configuration file folder and is ready
for use. For this example,
node ID #0, channel 1 will be
set into alarm by shorting
across channel one of the
input node. The FIRE
ALARM menu appears as
indicated in figure 13.5. Select the FIRE ALARM button
to bring up the FIRE ALARM
menu. This menu operates
similar to previous menus.
FIGURE 16.2 Saving the configuration. In this example the configuration file name is called “dual release”.
16.11 FIRE ALARM MENU ITEMS (FIGURE 16.4)
[] The DEVICE NAME and ALARM LOCATION is the data that was placed in the ADD/EDIT DETAILS
field back in figure 9.2.
63
[] The STATUS column indicates the real time activity
of this channel and the “A” indicates the alarm is active. The device in alarm is no longer active after the
RESET ALARM button is selected, then the letter “R”
will appear.
[] As other alarms appear, they will be located in time
occurrence order. Use the scroll arrows to the right of
the alarm window if to many alarms fill the screen and
the lower rows are out of view.
[] When the DETAILS button is selected, the menu in
figure 9.3 appears. Remember back in section 16.5,
20 seconds was entered in the PRE-DISCHARGE
DELAY window and 45 seconds in the RESERVE RELEASE DELAY.
[] The fire status ACTIVE sign (figure 16.5) turns to
INACTIVE if the alarm device contacts open. The timers will continue to count based on the exceptions located in the check boxes and the real-time device in
alarm.
[] Select the RETURN TO ALARM MENU to go back
to figure 16.5.
16.12 PRESSURE SWITCH ACTIVATION
[] Figure 16.4 indicates when the first timer expired. If
the pressure switch does not change state within 7
seconds, the second time is truncated and the reserve
tank trips. In this example, the pressure switch is connected to node ID #0, channel 3, figure 9, and is activated shortly after the first timer expires. At this point
in time, this action is recorded as a second alarm input. The reserve timer will continue to countdown until
T=0 and the second tank trips.
16.13 VOTING SEQUENCING Refer to section 13.10
FIGURE 16.3 Fire alarm menu
FIGURE 16.4 Input status menu indicating two
alarm inputs from the configuration named
“Dual Release”.
16.14 LOCATING OTHER NODE CHANNELS IN THE SELECTED OUTPUT SCREEN
[] As indicated in figure 16.1, this example loaded relay node ID #3, channel 2 in the SELECT OUTPUT
SCREEN. Any node channel(s) loaded into this screen will activate IMMEDIATELY upon expiration of the
FIRST timer and are precluded from any timing issues. If the administrator does not want to complicate a
configuration by adding another output device, a separate configuration can be made in the DIRECT
CONNECTION with delay, section #13.
64
FIGURE 16.5 Dual time count down
FIGURE 16.6 Pressure switch monitor
65
17. WATER MIST (CYCLE) RELEASE
Selection #14 of the UTILITY MENU allows the use of mist systems that correspond to NFPA 750. This
configuration allows variable time delays for the mist on/off cycling as well as pause modes. Notice in
figure 17 the center of the menu designates this is a CYCLE MIST release.
NOTE: For the proper real-time function of this configuration to work properly, the device in alarm must
be NON-LATCHING.
17.1 APPLICATIONS
The water mist configuration can be programmed to cycle the mist delivery to obtain maximum effectiveness in fire suppression while utilizing a minimal amount of water. Applications include industrial electrical equipment, flammable liquid pumping and storage facilities, co-generation power plants, oil refineries, etc.
17.2 OPERATION
The water mist configuration is designed to operate in fire systems that utilize non-latching detectors.
The control panel monitors the detector(s) fire relay status and determines if a continued mist application
is necessary, should the fire continue.
Upon receiving a confirmed fire signal from the input node, the pre-discharge delay timing sequence will
commence until its time expires. During this time the program counts down to initiate its first discharge
cycle. The mist solenoid will cycle on and off in a timing sequence pre-programmed by the administrator.
There is a provision to stipulate the quantity of complete cycles. After the pre-programmed cycle counts
(mist on & mist off) have been satisfied, the program will enter into a pause mode, maintaining the count
down in seconds. After the expiration of the pause mode, the program will suspend its timing sequences
if the fire has been extinguished. If the fire persists, the node will enter into its second timing sequence.
The number of timing sequences is usually determined by the capacity of the water supply and selected
in the CYCLE COUNT window. Select a timing sequence that will deplete the water supply should the
fire persists.
17.3 PRE-DISCHARGE DELAY
Refer to figure #17.1 and enter a time of up to 999 seconds in the PRE-DISCHARGE DELAY window.
This initial timing allows for other functions and activity to take place such as audible alarms before the
actual release is committed. No release action occurs during this event until the MIST ON TIME initiates.
If other devices are also located into the SELECTED OUPUT box they will also not be activated and remain on continuously whether all the delays expire or if the alarm is reset.
17.4 MIST ON TIME
Enter a time of up to 999 seconds in the MIST ON TIME window that corresponds to a correct delay.
Upon expiration of the PRE-DISCHARGE DELAY, the MIST ON TIME initiates the solenoid while the
count down time progresses.
17.5 MIST OFF TIME
Enter a time of up to 999 seconds in the MIST OFF TIME window that corresponds to a correct delay.
Upon expiration of the MIST ON TIME the solenoid deactivates while the count down time progresses.
17.6 PAUSE INTERVAL and CYCLE COUNT
After the pre-programmed quantity of mist on/off cycles have completed, the following events will occur:
The program enters into a PAUSE INTERVAL mode based on the amount of time inserted into the window (up to 999 seconds). Subsequent actions are taken based on the two following scenarios:
A. During the PAUSE INTERVAL, if the fire input signal is no longer valid, (indicating the fire is extinguished) then at the end of the time delay, the program will terminate at the first cycle.
B. If the fire remains after the pause mode time expires, the program will continue to sequence starting
with the MIST ON TIME and MIST OFF TIME based on how many counts are inserted into the
CYCLE COUNT window.
Note that there are time selections in the example of figure 17.1. The maximum amount of CYCLE
COUNTS is 999.
66
Figure 17 displays the cycle
mist configuration prior to
mapping the nodes or making exceptions. Figure 17.1
displays exception boxes
that were filled.
17.7 SELECT DEVICE INPUTS
[] The first step is to expand
the input node menu and
double click on any channel
required to trip the mist release.
[] Figure 17.1 shows that a
turbine optical for the SELECTED INPUT was selected. If a selection is mistakenly loaded, simply double click on it to undo the
operation.
17.8 SELECT MIST SOLENOID
Because other outputs can
be located in the same SELECTOR OUTPUT screen,
the solenoid must be discretely selected as shown at
the bottom of the screen in
figure 17.1.
Highlight the solenoid then
select the SELECT MIST
SOLENOID button.
FIGURE 17. Preparing to configure the cycle mist release.
FIGURE 17.1 Selecting node channel inputs and outputs.
67
17.9 SELECT
OTHER
NODE CHANNELS
For this example, the SOM
ID #2, channel 1 and the
RELAY node ID #3, channel
2 was also entered into the
SELECTED
OUTPUT
screen in lieu of creating another configuration.
17.10 RESET ALLOWED
To prevent the CYCLE RELEASE timing from being
reset once it has started,
click on this box.
FIGURE 17.2 Naming the mist configuration.
17.11 VOTING SEQUENCING Refer to section 13.8.
17.12 SAVING THE CONFIGURATION
Refer to figure 17.2 and in this example the file name “Mist Release” is given to the configuration. A configuration file name can contain up to 128 characters and cannot contain \ / : * ? “ | characters.
[] The configuration file has been located in the configuration folder.
[] Refer to section 24 for details on configuration management.
17.13 TESTING THE CYCLE MIST RELEASE
CONFIGURATION FOR AN ALARM
Once a configuration has been created it is immediately loaded in the configuration file folder and is
ready for use. For this example, node ID #0, channel
1 will be set into alarm by shorting across the input.
The FIRE ALARM menu appears (figure 13.5). Select
the FIRE ALARM button to bring up the FIRE ALARM
menu. This menu operates like the previous menus.
[] Select the VIEW INPUTS to see all inputs associated with this configuration.
[] To view the dynamic time screen select the DELAY
button and the menu in figure 17.5 appears.
[] When the PRE-DISCHARGE time commences to
0, the SELECT MIST SOLENOID from section 17.8
will start to cycle.
[] The other two devices selected in section 17.9 will
turn on but will not be included in the cycle.
FIGURE 17.3 Selecting the fire menu.
FIGURE 17.4. Selecting the view inputs button.
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[] Based on the data entered in figure 17.1 the alarm
will commit to the delays and reset boxes until all
events have completed.
[] The FIRE STATUS indicator in figure 17.5 indicates the real-time of the alarm input.
17.14 RESET THE ALARM
If manual intervention takes over the alarm in countdown, it can be reset by pressing the RETURN TO
ALARM DISPLAY button then pressing the RESET
ALARM button. Reset the WARNING alarm if it has
occurred.
FIGURE 17.5 Time sequence menu.
FIGURE 17.6 Mist release details.
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18. DEDICATED APPLIANCE RESET
Select F8 to choose the
DEDICATED INPUT RESET
configuration. A dedicated
input from the input node
allows appliance(s) that are
loaded into the SELECTED
OUTPUT window of a configuration to be remotely reset. First, there must be a
configuration utilizing an output device in order to turn it
off. The SOM or relay node
can be utilized to trip appliances but the SOM provides
line supervision. To demonstrate this configuration, a
DIRECT CONFIGURATION
RELEASE is selected from
section 13.2 where the TURBINE OPTICAL alarm trips
three appliances, including a
STROBE. A DEDICATED
INPUT RESET configuration
(figure 18) will be created to
turn off the strobe after the
alarm input initiates it.
FIGURE 18. Dedicated Appliance Reset Configuration. Utilizing channel 4 of the input node to reset the strobe in the SELECTED OUTPUT.
Channel 4 was named reset strobe back in the ADD/EDIT DETAILS in
section 9 knowing it would be used in this example.
Once the input node channel one is activated, the alarm will occur to turn on the
HORN, STROBE and VENT FAN as the
configuration of figure 13.3 indicates. In
order to implement the remote strobe reset, a second configuration is created as
indicated in figure 18. Channel four of the
input node will include a momentary
pushbutton switch to turn off the strobe.
NOTE: The initiating device connected to
the input node can be latching or nonlatching.
18.1 CREATE THE DEDICATED RESET
[] In this example, after selecting the
DEDICATED INPUT RESET configuration, open the input node and double click
the channel named RESET STROBE to
copy it into the SELECTED INPUT box.
[] Select the RESET FUNCTION box.
[] Open the SOM node and double click
the SKID STROBE channel to copy it into
the SELECTED OUTPUT box.
NOTE: Any device located in the SELECTED OUTPUT window will be RESET
utilizing this configuration and cannot be
alarmed again until the input alarm condition has been reset.
[] Assign an appropriate configuration
name similar to figure 18.3 and save it.
FIGURE 18.1 Select the
reset function box.
FIGURE 18.2 This message appears if the selected input
node channel has been utilized in another configuration.
The configuration to reset the strobe is DEDICATED and
therefore should be the only function assigned to this node
input.
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[] Both configurations are armed and
ready for commands.
18.2 TEST THE DEDICATED RESET
[] Tripping channel one of the input
node, TURBINE OPTICAL, will activate the SOM channel one (SKID
STROBE) and channel two (SKID
HORN). The relay node, VENT FAN
channel will also activate.
[] The FIRE ALARM button appears.
Select the button to review the FIRE
ALARM menu, figure 18.4.
[] The two SOM and one relay node
channels activate based on the configuration in figure 13.3.
[] If there was data inserted in the
EDIT field, the DETAILS button can
be selected to review the data.
[] At this time the alarm can be reset
if the TURBINE OPTICAL input is
cleared.
[] But in this example the STROBE
on channel one of the SOM will be
reset.
FIGURE 18.3 Creating a configuration and naming it remote
reset.
18.3 RESETING THE STROBE (EXAMPLE)
[] Now trip channel four of the input node to turn off
the STROBE.
[] Both alarms are ACTIVE as indicated under the
STATUS column but the STROBE has been turned
off.
[] Since this is a multiple alarm, to view data in the
line #2 alarm, use the scroll button then select the
appropriate button to view the DETAILS or RESET.
[] Technically there are two alarms in the FIRE
ALARM menu. Each alarm will have to be RESET
individually by scrolling to the intended alarm and
resetting it.
FIGURE 18.4 First, the turbine optical on node
0-1 was tripped, then the remote reset button
on node 0-4 was pushed to reset the strobe.
NOTE: The original configuration that created the
alarm will be required to initiate again to turn the
strobe back on after the alarms have been reset.
FIGURE 18.5 Selecting the view inputs of the
turbine room configuration from figure 18.4.
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18.4 CONNECTING A SWITCH TO THE INPUT NODE
Knowing which inputs are not utilized on an input node for other initiating devices, connect a momentary N.O. pushbutton switch with a supervising resistor to an UNUSED channel. Wire the pushbutton into one of the four channels as indicated in Drawing 8, utilizing a 3.9K ELR .
18.5 FAULT ALARM
If the connection to the input node REMOTE RESET channel is opened when the fire panel is in the quiescent mode, a
system fault will be created.
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19. SILENCING AN AUDIBLE DEVICE AT THE CONTROL PANEL
This section explains the procedure to silence an audible device locally at the control panel. There must
already be configuration(s) that trips an audible device. The configuration utilized in figure 13.3 will be
tripped into alarm to demonstrate this feature. This configuration required the HORN ICON to be selected as indicated in figure 19.1. The TURBINE OPTICAL will trip the horn which can be silenced. In
this example a horn is utilized for the device to be silenced; however, any type of audible device can be
utilized but the HORN ICON must be selected (AT THE SOM). When an alarm occurs, the horn can be
silenced at the touch screen and will reactivate on any successive alarms mapped to this device.
FIGURE 19. Add/Edit details of the input node.
19.1 RESULTANT - TESTING THE INPUT NODE
CONFIGURATION FOR AN ALARM
Upon activation of NODE ID#0-1, TURBINE OPTICAL, channels one and two of the SOM immediately
alarm. Channel three of the relay node also activates because it was also included in the configuration.
[] Select the fire alarm button and the menu 19.2
appears indicating the initiating alarm action.
[] Select the DETAILS button to view any data that
was entered in previous sections.
[] The alarm can be totally reset at this time by pushing the RESET ALARM button.
[] Select the VIEW INPUTS button to observe any
input devices associated with this configuration.
[] EXIT.
[] Select the SILENCE MENU button in figure 19.2
to enter the OUTPUT DEVICES screen as indicated
in figure 19.4.
[] The STATUS indicates that this device is: A = ON,
(default on alarm) or S = SILENCED.
[] The DEVICE NAME appears and indicates node
ID #2, channel 2 is the SKID HORN.
[] If more audible devices were selected in the Configuration, they would appear in the same menu and
can be selectively highlighted using the scroll bars.
[] After selecting a device name with the scroll bars,
select the SILENCE SINGLE DEVICE button to silence it.
FIGURE 19.1 Add/Edit details of the SOM.
FIGURE 19.2 Creating the alarm.
FIGURE 19.3 Selecting the view inputs button.
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[] If the administrator wants to manually reinstate the
audible device, select the TURN ON SLENCED DEVICE button. These buttons toggle the highlighted
device on & off.
[] Notice in figure 19.5 the STATUS indicates the device is off.
[] If there are more than one audible devices in alarm
in this configuration, the SILENCE ALL DEVICES
can be selected.
NOTE: Any incoming alarm will re-initialize the appliance based on the configuration created.
[] Select the DONE button to go back to the FIRE
ALARM menu.
[] An audible device can be reset first without silencing it if the initiating alarm has cleared.
[] Another configuration could be mapped to this
same skid horn turning it on if it was already silenced.
FIGURE 19.4 Silence menu selected indicating the horn is turned on.
NOTE: The horn icon must be select at
the SOM PRIOR to creating the configuration or the device name will not display the
horn data.
FIGURE 19.5 Silence single device button is
selected thereby turning the horn off.
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20. CONFIGURING ALARMS WITH NO OUTPUT ACTION
NOTE: This section will be included in later software releases.
Configurations can be created for applications that utilize the GAS or DIRECT CONNECTION RELEASE where the local panel is alarmed but there is no output node action taken. This style of configuration is useful for recording input actions that will not result in activating an output node but the administrator can acknowledge the alarm. After an alarm has been activated it will follow the standard procedures of bringing up the gas or fire alarm display and enabling the administrator to reset it. Once reset,
go to the appropriate alarm box at the bottom of the UTILITY menu and select the proper button to view
the recorded action.
20.1 CREATING A DIRECT CONFIGURATION WITH THE INPUT NODE
Go to the F8 menu and select the DIRECT CONNECTION RELEASE configuration menu. Open the
input node window and select the input(s) which will be necessary to trip the control panel. After selecting the desired input(s), select the SAVE AND CLOSE button then give the configuration a filename to
save it to the folder. Test the alarm sequence for integrity.
20.2 CREATING A DIRECT CONFIGURATION WITH THE 4-20mA NODE
Go to the F8 menu and select the DIRECT CONNECTION RELEASE configuration menu. Open the gas
node window and select input(s) which will be necessary to trip the control panel. Select the set point
level at which point to trip a local alarm. After selecting the desired input(s), select the SAVE AND
CLOSE button. Give the configuration a name to save it to the configuration folder. Test the alarm sequence for integrity.
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21. TESTING ALARM CONFIGURATIONS
21.1 PRIOR TO TESTING CONFIGURATIONS
At the end of each configuration section is an example on how to test it. Although there are examples
throughout, the administrator must follow procedures then go back to each configuration to test.
21.2 TESTING CONFIGURATIONS
To test configurations refer to section 24 and follow instructions for LOADING and UNLOADING configurations. UNLOAD all configurations except the one(s) to test. It is recommended that each configuration
is tested by itself and not when other unrelated configurations are LOADED. This procedure allows the
administrator to focus on the specific task. More complex configurations that share common nodes can
then be tested as a group after selectively testing each one independently. When a configuration is
ready for testing, activate the associated node and verify proper operations of all devices. Proceed to
UNLOAD the tested configuration and LOAD the next one to be tested. The administrator has the option
to test all configurations after independently testing each one. REMEMBER to LOAD configurations that
are to be utilized when the system is in monitoring mode. It is OK to leave configurations UNLOADED
when the system is in monitoring mode as long as the administrator is aware of the situation. An UNLOADED configuration is the same as never creating it in the first place.
CAUTION: REMOVE SOLENOID(S) FROM THEIR TANKS PRIOR TO TESTING THE SYSTEM TO
PREVENT ACCIDENTAL AGENT DISCHARGE. Refer to section 21.3 if the administrator chooses
to disable a configuration with a solenoid.
21.3 DISABLING THE SYSTEM FROM AGENT RELEASING
There are several techniques to disable the system from tripping the suppression agent. Based on the
local authority having jurisdiction, select one or more of the procedures to disable the system.
1. MECHANICAL—The most secure method is to physically remove the solenoid from the release
tank. Make sure the solenoid pin is reset after testing prior to connecting back to
the release tank.
WARNING — THE SYSTEM DOES NOT KNOW IF A SOLENOID IS REMOVED FROM A RELEASE TANK.
2. ELECTRICAL— Insert a block valve in series with the solenoid circuit as indicated in drawing 11.
When the block valve is opened, the current path to the solenoid is interrupted
and at the same time a fault is created for that channel.
3. ELECTRONIC— Entering UTILITY MENU #13, MANGE CONFIGURATONS, and UNLOAD a
configuration with a solenoid is another option as described in section 24.2.
21.4 ROUTINE TESTING
Establish a standard testing routine based on the authority having jurisdiction or more frequently if the
situation demands.
21.5 ALARMS WHILE THE SYSTEM IS DISABLED
As always, precautionary measures should be kept in place whenever a system is in a disable mode.
The local authority having jurisdiction will have procedures to follow.
As indicated in section 6.8, while in the MANAGE CONFIGURATION menu, #13, the polling is suspends, a fault is created and therefore no alarms will result; however, due to the characteristics of the
nodes, the following events will occur when exiting the manage configuration menu.
1. If a gas configuration is LOADED, the following events will occur: If there is a gas alarm that occurred then went away and then the menu is then exited, the alarm will not be detected.
2. If a fire configuration is LOADED (input, or SOM node is utilized), the following events will occur: If
there is an alarm that occurred then went away and then the MANAGE CONFIGURATION is then
exited, the alarm will be detected.
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22. MULTIPLE ALARMS
22.1 SYSTEM ALARM MENU
The SYSTEM ALARM menu is a template with corresponding alarm buttons which do not change location
on the menu. Anytime there is an alarm the FIRE,
GAS, WARNING and FAULT button will remain in the
same location on the menu.
If multiple alarms occur from different style nodes
as indicated in figure 22, it is up to the administrator
attending the event to select the proper style of alarm
(gas, fire, warning, fault). If no action is taken, the
system will continue to execute the configurations based on their timely occurrences.
After selecting an alarm button, the current menu will
indicate MORE ALARMS as indicated in the example
of figure 22.1 to remind the administrator to go back
to the SYSTEM ALARM menu and select other active
alarm(s).
FIGURE 22. Two simultaneous alarms.
The MORE ALARMS button will appear whether the
new alarm is from an input or 4-20mA node. The RETURN TO ALARM MENU button will appear if new
alarms occur within the same or different node.
22.2 SELECTING A SPECIFIC ALARM
In example 22.1, if more than one alarm appears in
the same window, use the scroll bars to the right of
the alarm window to highlight the desired alarm action then select the proper submenu button to proceed with other detailed events.
22.3 SELECTING THE DETAILS BUTTON WITH
MULTIPLE ALARMS
During an alarm, the DETAILS button can be selected for the device initiating the alarm. On multiple
alarms be aware of the specific alarm to scroll to on
the FIRE ALARM menu prior to entering the DETAILS menu. The menu indicates what the node
name is as well as its ID.
22.4 HISTORY BUFFER
The data available on the alarm screens can be reviewed at a later time because the events were recorded. Refer to section 23.2 for more information. It
is important to be aware that the information in these
fields remains there and subsequent alarms will appear below old entries. To erase the alarm buffer
navigate to the UTILITY MENU and select #9 CLEAR
ALL HISTORY DATA. The GAS, FIRE, WARNING or
FAULT menus allow subsequent alarms to be recorded in the alarm window as they occur.
FIGURE 22.1 Viewing the fire alarm menu
when another alarm arrives.
FIGURE 22.2 Selecting the more alarms button from figure 22.1.
NOTE: The control panel allows the ability to
toggle between the different current alarms.
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23. ALARM SEQUENCING, HISTORY and REPORTS
23.1 ALARM SEQUENCING
Every alarm is tagged with an accending number representing which order it occurred. When menu
number 9 is selected, CLEAR ALL ALARM HISTORY DATA, all the alarm tags in the color display buttons are reset to 0. Example: After resetting the alarm history data, and then if there is a fire alarm, it is
tagged number 1. If a fault alarm happens to occur next, it is tagged with number 2. The system tags
alarms in order based on their occurrences, not their style. This sequence of tagging is important to allow alarms to be tracked in the order they occur. This order establishes a telltale of events which can be
backtracked to the initiating alarm while not discriminating on its style. Style is referred to whether the
alarm is a fire, gas, warning or fault. To observe this action, refer to figure 13.6 where a fire alarm was
demonstrated. The FIRE ALARM is tagged as number 1. Referring to figure 13.9 and the FAULT
ALARM is tagged number 2 because it was the second event to occur.
23.2 SAVE TO PRINT OPTIONS #1 through 7
UTILITY MENU selections #1 through 7 saves the
indicated report files to the REPORTS folder in
DISK C and the file names can be viewed by selecting #8, ALARM REPORT FILE MANAGER. Figure 23.1 has some examples of reports that were
saved and can be distinguished by their similar
name in the UTILITY MENU, figure 23. Reports
that are selected again will retain the same name
but their time stamp will be later.
The history file was created by selecting #7, SAVE
ALL ALARM HISTORY REPORTS. This report provides an overview of all reports.
NOTE: Each additional file created in the REPORT
FILE MANAGER window contains only the latest
events since the previous save.
Select these options whenever a backup is to be
made or preparing to copy the files to a USB bus
drive. An example of one of the file structures is as
follows:
HISTORY_20051107145154
This number can be broken down as follows:
YEAR DATE MILITARY TIME
2005 1107 14:51:54
FIGURE 23. Save report selections.
NOTE: When UTILITY MENU number 9 is selected, CLEAR ALL ALARM HISTORY DATA, only
the history recorded in the DISPLAY buttons in figure 23 are erased.
23.3 ALARM REPORT FILE MANAGER #8
The ALARM REPORT FILE MANAGER assimilates the files from menu selections #1-7. These
files can be managed with the following selections.
FIGURE 23.1 Seven saved history reports.
Refer to section 23.6 on how to transfer the following reports to a USB bus drive and print them out.
SAVE ALL- this option prepares all files from #1 through 7 to be copied to the USB bus drive.
SAVE SELECTED - this option allows specific files to be saved.
DELETE ALL- prepares all files in the report file manager to be deleted.
DELETE SELECTED - deletes the selected files.
DONE - Return to the UTILITY MENU.
23.4 REPORT FILE MANAGER FILE SIZE
To the right of each file saved is their file size.
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23.5 PRINTING HISTORY FILES
CAUTION: IT IS RECOMMENDED TO TRANSFER FILES OR PRINT DOCUMENTS DURING SYSTEM SETUP TO AVOID ANY INTEFERENCE WITH THE CONTROL PANEL.
There are three methods to obtain the reports generated from the program and all reports end with a .txt
suffix for the availability of printing on text editors.
DIRECT VIEWING (CONNECT A VGA MONITOR TO THE CONTROL PANEL)
1. Bring up Microsoft WordPad which resides on the control panel Desktop and view the prints in the
word editor. Navigate up to the Disk C then to the REPORTS folder. Make sure the TYPE of file is a .txt
(text format) then select the report to open and view it.
2. PRINT THE REPORTS FROM A PERSONAL COMPUTER
Copy the reports from the REPORT folder, residing on DISK C to a USB drive then print it out on a text
editor from a computer. Refer to section 23.4 to navigate through the ALARM REPORT FILE MANAGER then place a USB bus drive in one of the ports to transfer the reports.
3. PRINT THE REPORTS DIRECTLY FROM THE CONTROL PANEL
Connect an Epson® printer to the USB port to print directly from the panel. It is beyond the scope of this
manual to teach how to set up PC printers. Refer to the printer documentation for more information.
Bring up the information to print as indicated in paragraph 1. To print the file from paragraph #1 utilizing
WordPad, when the FILE is selected to print the selection of LPT1 must be utilized. Proceed to print the
document. The included Epson driver 1.2.5.2 supports the following Epson printers below and are supported by the FG8800 control panel:
4 Ink Cartridge Color Models:
Stylus Color 440, 640, 670, 740, 740i, 760, 777 and 777i
Stylus C20UX, C20SX, C40UX, C40S, C40SX, C41UX, C41SX, C41Plus, C42UX, C42SX, C42S,
C42Plus, C43UX, C43SX, C44UX, C44Plus, C45, C46, C60, C61, C62, C63, C64, C65, C66, C80, C82,
C83, C84, C85, C86
Stylus CX3100, CX3200, CX4500, CX4600, CX5100 CX5200, CX5300, CX5400, CX6300, CX6400,
CX6500, CX6600
6 Ink Cartridge Color Models:
Stylus Photo 780, 790, 820, 825, 890, 900, 915, 950, 960, 1280
Stylus Photo R200, R210, R300, R310, R320, RX500, RX510, RX600
23.6 QUICK SELECT ALARM HISTORY
The four styles of alarms, FIRE, GAS, WARNING or
FAULT can be viewed while in the UTILITY MENU.
During standard operations and procedures as event
data accumulates, the old data will be instantly available by navigation to the UTILITY MENU and selecting one of the four color display buttons, as indicate
in figure 23.2.
23.7 CLEAR ALL ALARM HISTORY DATA #9
This selection deletes the history in these four DISPLAY buttons; however, the data file is also automatically saved prior to deleting as indicated in section 23.3.
▲
▲
▲
▲
FIGURE 23.2 Select the FIRE, GAS,
WARNING or FAULT button to view historical
alarm events that were available during an
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24. MANAGE CONFIGURATIONS
The selection #13 in the UTILITY MENU, MANAGE CONFIGURATIONS allows each unique configuration that was created from the UTILITY MENU #12, SYSTEM CONFIGURATION to be enabled or disabled. Figure 24 shows six configurations with four files UNLOADED. When a configuration file is
LOADED, it is considered enabled and ready for use. When a configuration is UNLOADED it is disabled.
If there are other LOADED configurations mapped to the same node, they will still operate. Each time a
configuration is created, given a file name and the DONE button is selected, the configuration is then
recorded to the CONFIGURATION FILE MANAGEMENT menu. When the configuration enters this
menu, it is automatically in the “LOADED” mode which is the term utilized to identify this configuration is
active and CAN ALARM. REMEMBER, the node channels which are utilized in a configuration must be
ENABLED (refer to the F5 SETTINGS section). The following items describe the function of each button.
CAUTION: UNLOADING A CONFIGURATION DISABLES THE FUNCTION FROM EXECUTING THE
INTENDED TASK.
24.1 LOAD A CONFIGURATION
When a configuration is completed and saved, it is
automatically LOADED in this menu and is currently
ready for use. To LOAD configurations which are
UNLOADED use the scroll arrows to the right of the
menu, highlight the desired configuration and select
the LOAD button. Loading a configuration activates
its properties.
24.2 UNLOAD A CONFIGURATION
When a configuration is UNLOADED it is taken out of
service through the software but can be LOADED
anytime when the panel is in the quiescent mode. If
there are other configurations mapped to the same
node, they will not be affected. Use the scroll bar to
highlight a configuration to UNLOAD then select the
UNLOAD button. Use the UNLOAD to temporarily
disable a configuration. UNLOADING any configuration trips the DISABLE relay located at TB3 as long
as ANY configuration is unloaded.
FIGURE 24. Five configurations from previous examples, four unloaded.
NOTE: When all configurations are UNLOADED, the node polling is suspended and the fault relay trips.
NOTE: When LOADING or UNLOADING a configuration, the highlight bar descends to the next lower
configuration
NOTE: Configurations that are created and saved are not mapped together. They each reside independently in the MANAGE CONFIGURATIONS menu. However, they may SHARE a common node channel
if they were mapped to it. An example is where a configuration is completed then another configuration
is created utilizing the same channel on the target node.
24.3 PROCEDURE TO UNLOAD A CONFIGURATION
Because UNLOADING a configuration disables an intended function, there is an automatic fault created
and a decision must be made. This process requires the administrator to select one of two items when
unloading a configuration:
1. Reset a beckoning FAULT disable warning and confirm the configuration will never be utilized again.
An example here is where a release zone is physically removed from operation.
2. Allow the beckon command to continue as a reminder that the configuration is DISABLED and some
time later the configuration will be LOADED again.
Refer to figure 24 and highlight a configuration to be UNLOADED.
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[] Select the UNLOAD button.
[] The message in figure 24.1 will appear.
NOTE: If this message is left unattended for more
than 30 seconds, the system will automatically commit and UNLOAD the configuration. The UNLOAD
will occur even if the configuration is LOADED again
without exiting the menu.
[] Click on OK to UNLOAD the configuration to continue and select the EXIT button.
[] More configurations can also be unloaded.
[] The FAULT relay located at TB3 trips and THE
SYSTEM SUSPENDS NODE POLLING.
[] When the EXIT is selected from the MANAGE
CONFIGURATIONS menu the FAULT ALARM
menu automatically appears as shown in figure
13.10.
[] The DISABLE relay located at TB3 trips.
[] When the FAULT ALARM button is selected
(figure 13.10), the FAULT ALARM menu appears as
shown in figure 24.2.
[] Select the SILENCE button and the “A” turns to a
“S”, the FAULT relay remains in the same condition,
the audible alarm silences, the FAULT and DISABLE RELAY remains ON.
[] If the FAULT ALARM screen was to be left unattended, this menu would remain and accumulate
alarms every 30 minutes unless a field device alarm
comes in. Each time another unattended DISABLE
alarm is received, it is located onto the next lower
text line in the menu.
[] When the RESET button is selected the menu in
figure 24.3 appears with the DISABLE ALARM REMINDER note.
The system requires the administrator to make
a decision at this point:
FIGURE 24.1 This message appears after selecting unload.
FIGURE 24.2 A fault alarm is created. Reoccurring alarms will appear every 30 minutes
unless further action is taken.
(A) Selecting the CONTINUE button will resume the
fault condition every 30 minutes. The configuration remains UNLOADED. Select the STOP
ALARMS button to finish and commit to the disable.
(B) To stop alarms:
Select STOP ALARMS button.
.
FIGURE 24.3 Select the reset function box.
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[] The reminder message in figure 24.4 appears and
selecting the OK button will remove the beckon message screen of the selected configuration(s). The
configuration(s) will be UNLOADED. The fault will be
removed as well as the disable relay action. The
UTILITY menu will return.
NOTE: If the message in figure 24.4 is left unattended for more than 30 seconds the system will
automatically commit to the disable configuration and
the UTILITY menu will return.
[] If the MANAGE CONFIGURTION menu is reviewed the selected configuration is DISABLED.
NOTE: Do not reload the configuration until the
STOP ALARMS button has been selected to complete the DISABLE. It will take 30 minutes for the
menu in figure 24.4 to reappear to proceed with the
disable, then it is safe to go to the MANAGE CONFIGURATIONS menu and load the configuration
again.
FIGURE 24.4 Select the reset function box.
24.4 EDIT A CONFIGURATION
Highlight the configuration with the scroll arrows that requires editing. Select the EDIT button. The configuration is brought back to the point just prior to saving. Add or delete channels, change timing or other
related functions to the configuration menu as required. After completing the modifications select the
DONE button. The configuration file name will rename the same.
24.5 REMOVE A CONFIGURATION
Highlight a configuration to be removed. Then unload it if it is loaded. Proceed to remove it. If this configuration is utilized in conjunction with another configuration a warning message will occur.
24.6 ALARMS WHILE IN MANAGE CONFIGURATIONS MENU
As always, precautionary measures should be kept in place whenever a system is in a disable mode.
While in MANAGE CONFIGURATIONS, the node polling is suspended, a fault is created and therefore
no alarms will result; however, due to the characteristics of the nodes, the following events will occur
when exiting the manage configuration menu.
1. While in the MANAGE CONFIGURATIONS MENU and a gas configuration is LOADED, the following events will occur: If there is a gas or fault alarm that occurred then went away and then the
MANAGE CONFIGURATION is then exited, the alarm will not be detected.
2. While in the MANAGE CONFIGURATIONS MENU and a fire configuration (input, or SOM node is
utilized) is LOADED, the following events will occur: If there is an alarm or fault that occurred then
went away and then the MANAGE CONFIGURATION is then exited, the alarm will be detected.
3. When an input or SOM node configuration is UNLOADED, the nodes will still detect faults.
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25. ADDING, REMOVING, RESETTING and DETECTING
NODES
25.1 ADVANCE MENU
Select the F5 on the keyboard or UTILITY MENU #11 to enter into the node menu. Select the ADVANCE button. This menu allows diagnostics of the field nodes for their presence and gives the ability to
change node addresses.
25.2 NODE DETECTION DIAGNOSTIC
This menu allows the system to scan all the nodes
that are physically connected to the bus independent of their enable or loaded status. The results will
return their status as indicated in figure 25. Select
the NODE DETECTION DIAGONISTIC button and
the system will scan all nodes in the field and report
their status. After the initial node ID’s have been
located on the bus and are displayed, click the
STOP button and the system automatically checks
to verify nodes with address 255. Example 25 indicates the four nodes attached to the bus. The node
diagnostic can be utilized in the class A or B configuration, although the actual detection is executed
on the START LOOP scan.
NOTE: If more than one node contains a duplicate
address (such as 255) the diagnostic will not correctly detect them.
FIGURE 25 Advance menu
25.3 NODE SETTINGS
The report displays a global status of the SETTINGS menu. The first column is the node ID then
the style of node. The next column indicates the Enable status followed by a 0 or 1 for each channel, 0
indicating disable and 1, enabled. The last column is
the de-bounce time selected.
25.4 ADDING ONE NODE AT A TIME
Adding a node requires that the system be turned
off to electrically connect the node to the bus. The
node may be inserted anywhere in the bus during
system shutdown time. When utilizing the ADVANCE feature, both poles of SW1 on the node
must be off. If the node is added to the end of a single ended terminated configuration, the ELR must
be moved to that new node.
After the node is securely in place and wired correctly, turn on the system power. The system will
initialize and will continue to discover only the original nodes. When a new node is added to the bus,
the system will not detect a skip in a node address.
Remember, a new node must have an ID address of
255.
After the system initializes, select F5 button and enter the ADVANCE menu.
[] Select the NODE DETECTION DIAGNOSTIC button and allow the count to reach 255. In the example
of Figure 25.1 an SOM was detected.
FIGURE 25.1 Detecting an added node.
FIGURE 25.2 Changing an SOM ID from
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NOTE: Unlike the FIND NEXT NODE button, this search does not look for the nodes to be in sequential
numerical order. This search indicated the actual node count in the field.
[] Now refer to CHANGE A NODE ADDRESS menu and type in the next node ID, in this case, number
4. Choose the correct style of node, in this case an SOM, then select the CHANGE button.
[] The newly installed SOM now has been reassigned from ID 255 to 4.
[] To synchronize the new node with the onguardsetup.dat file, the system must be closed and restarted
as described in section 26.1.
[] Return to the SETTINGS and ADD/EDIT details of this node and fill in the necessary information.
NOTE: If more than one node was added utilizing the ADVANCE feature, the NODE DETECTION would
indicate each of their address as 255. This identical address is OK as long as each node is a different
style. If the nodes are the same style (like two input nodes) then when the address is change for one the
other will also change. Again, refer to section 5.10 when more than one is added to the bus.
25.5 ADDING MORE THAN ONE NODE TO THE SYSTEM
Since the ADVANCE NODE DETECTION DIAGONISTIC cannot seek more than one node with an address of 255, the administrator will need to add nodes with their default address 255 to the system. After this task is complete refer to section 5.10 for initializing the newly installed nodes.
25.6 CHANGE A NODE ADDRESS
Refer to FIGURE 25.2 and select the TYPE of node to change the address and insert the new node address in the FROM and TO window then select the CHANGE button. If a successful CHANGE was implemented the message “THE OPERATION WAS SUCCESSFUL” will occur. If an incorrect entry is
made into the FROM box the message ”THERE IS NO NODE OF THAT TYPE WITH THAT FROM ADDRESS” will appear. If an incorrect entry is made into the TO box the message ”THERE IS ALREADY A
NODE WITH THAT TO ADDRESS” will appear. Now select the CLOSE button then select the SAVE
and CLOSE button to save this new field address to the onguardsetup.dat file.
25.7 RESETTING ALL NODE ADDRESSES TO DEFAULT ID 255 WHILE CONNECTED TO THE
BUS
The selection in the ADVANCE menu resets all nodes and data on the bus to their factory default 255.
This procedure may be selected if the administrator would like to start over to change all node ID addresses simultaneously. If this is the case, then the nodes must be rediscovered by returning to section
5.10 of this manual.
25.8 RESETTING SELECTIVE NODE ADDRESS TO DEFAULT ID 255 WHILE CONNECTED TO
THE BUS
All nodes are shipped with their default address of 255 so they can be assigned an ID address. If nodes
are connected on their bus, power down the system as described in section 26.1.
Resetting nodes to ID #255 through power up reset:
If nodes are currently connected to the control panel, the panel must be shutdown and power turned off
as indicated in section 26.1. Locate SW1-1 ON, SW1-2 to the ON position of the node(s) requiring address reset. Turn on the control panel power for only 5 seconds then turn it off. The nodes reset the address during the 5 second power-up stage. RETURN ALL NODE SW1 SWITCHES BACK TO OFF. Now
apply power back to the control panel. The control panel will now search for all nodes with their ID’s and
omit nodes with factory setting address of 255. Refer to section 5.10 to scan for the nodes with address
of 255. They will then be assigned the next ID number above the last active ID.
25.9 RESETTING A NODE ADDRESS TO DEFAULT ADDRESS 255 THAT IS REMOVED FROM
THE BUS
To selectively reset a node ID that is removed from the system, simply locate the SW1-1 and SW1– 2
on, apply 24VDC to the power input (observing polarity) for 5 seconds, then remove the power. Now
return both switch poles of SW1 to OFF.
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25.10 REMOVING A NODE
To remove a node from the system, first verify that there are not other configurations targeting this node.
Go to the UTILITY MENU and select #1, SAVE NODE REPORT and review any other configurations
that may be mapped to this node. To remove a node, any relating configurations must be first
UNLOADED in the MANAGE CONFIGURATIONS menu. If there are other configurations mapped to
this node they must be re-mapped as the administrator requires.
CAUTION: NOT REMOVING ALL ASSOCIATED CONFIGURATIONS TO THIS NODE CAN RESULT
IN A SYSTEM MALFUNCTION.
1. Remove any configuration(s) that are mapped to this node in the MANAGE CONFIGURATIONS
menu.
2. Go to the node to be removed and locate the SW1 switch. Carefully turn ON SW1-1 (Acquire address setting).
3. While in the ONGUARD main screen, select F5 on the keyboard to bring up the node menu, highlight the node to remove, then select the REMOVE NODE button to proceed.
5. Shutdown the system and bus power as described in section 26.1 then physically remove the node.
6. Restart the system then go into the MANAGE CONFIGURATIONS menu and verify the configurations that should be LOADED.
7. Test the system to ensure the integrity is correct.
NOTE: Removing a node leaves an ID address void. This void is OK. If installing a new node later on,
change its ID to the removed node ID.
NOTE: When the REMOVE NODE button is selected, the system automatically sets this node address
to 255.
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26. REDEFINING A SYSTEM TO START OVER
CAUTION: THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURES DISABLE THE CONTROL PANEL FROM DETECTING
ALARMS
Under special circumstances the administrator may want to revert back to where the system was prior to
implementing any activity. It is important to note that all data stored in the system will be eliminated and
should be backed up, if necessary. To proceed with this process, it is apparent that all necessary precautions have been made to protect any areas this control panel has supervised. Connect a VGA monitor and mouse to its port located on or behind the front panel. If the ONGUARD screen is active, rightclick on the mouse then click on the close icon. Click on the START then navigate to PROGRAMS, then
click on WINDOWS EXPLORER. Double click on the DISKC.
1. Highlight the Onguardsetup.dat file, right click the mouse, click on Delete, then YES. This is the file
that contains all node entry data.
2. Highlight the onguardsetupbak.dat file, right click the mouse, click on Delete, then YES. This is the
backup of the file above created in section 7.3.
3. Delete the CONFIGURATION folder and all files in this folder. This folder is the location of all the
configurations that are created.
4. Delete the REPORTS folder and delete all files in this folder.
5. Now, select the X box to exit out of the Explorer menu to go back to the Windows CE.net screen.
6. To also reset the nodes, refer to section 25. The nodes are not required to be reset if the same node
ID’s are utilized.
7. Proceed with section 26.1
CAUTION: THE PROCESS OF SIMPLY REMOVING POWER FROM AN ACTIVE PROGRAMMED
CONTROL PANEL WITHOUT PROPER PROCEDURES COULD RESULT IN THE LOSS OF ALL
STORED DATA AND, OR THE ACTIVATION OF OUTPUT APPLIANCES.
26.1 PROPERLY SHUT DOWN THE SYSTEM
1. Verify the system is in its quiescent mode as indicated in figure 5.
A: To continue the purge as in section 26, go to START, Suspend, then click OK to restart the system
for a reinitialize. All data in reference to the control panel has be reset.
B: Or to turn off the system, go to START, then click suspend, wait for the screen to go black, then turn
off power.
CAUTION: IF THE SYSTEM IS SHUT DOWN FOR ANY REASON, THEN OTHER CONFIGURATIONS
OR ANY OTHER TYPE OF FILE FROM AN EXTERNAL SOURCE IS LOADED, THE CORRECT OPERATION OF THE SYSTEM IS NOT GUARANTEED TO FUNCTION PROPERLY.
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27. ACCESSING THE UTILITY MENU
While the ONGUARD screen Is displayed, tap twice
quickly and firmly anywhere on the touch screen to
recall the utility menu. Press the CLOSE MENU button
to return to the main display. Refer to figures 27
through 27.2 for the menu selections. Use the scroll
arrows or a mouse navigate to the desired selection.
27.1 MENU DESCRIPTION
Utility menu selections are described below. Other
menu selections which require more information are
referred to other areas of this manual. Scroll through
the menu to become familiar with its contents. All
other utility menu selections will be covered in following sections.
NOTE: Refer to drawings 4 and 15 for USB printer
port connection.
FIGURE 27 Top view of menu.
Refer to section 23.2 on managing files #1-7.
1. SAVE NODE REPORT
Procures data from menu #11 and copies the data the
administrator wrote for node descriptions and locations to the ALARM REPORT MANAGER. This information is stored in a file called onguardsetup.dat and
is described in detail in section 6.3.
2. SAVE CONFIGURATION REPORT
Procures data from configuration menu #12 and copies it to the ALARM REPORT FILE MANAGER.
3. SAVE FIRE ALARM ONLY REPORT
Procures fire alarm reports and copies them to the
ALARM REPORT FILE MANAGER.
4. SAVE GAS ALARM ONLY REPORT
Procures gas alarm reports and copies them to the
ALARM REPORT FILE MANAGER.
5. SAVE WARNING ALARM ONLY REPORT
Procures warning alarm reports and copies them to
the ALARM REPORT FILE MANAGER. These are
configurations that voted and did not meet the requirement of a voted alarm.
6. SAVE FAULT ONLY REPORT
Procures fault alarm reports and copies them to
ALARM REPORT FILE MANAGER.
7. SAVEL ALL ALARM HISTORY REPORTS
Provides a complete overview of alarms in selections
#1-6 and copies them to the ALARM REPORT FILE
MANAGER. Refer to section 23.3.
8. ALARM REPORT FILE MANAGER
Insert a USB bus drive in the connector of the alarm
panel prior to entering this selection. All alarms that
are created are saved to this menu with a .txt extension. These files can be copied to a USB bus drive
and read from a text editor such as a word processor
program. Refer to section 23.4 for more detail.
FIGURE 27.1 Mid view of menu.
FIGURE 27.2 Bottom view of menu.
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9. CLEAR ALL ALARM HISTORY DATA
Deletes all data in the UTILITY MENU four DISPLAY buttons at the bottom of the screen and saves the
reports per section 23.7.
10. SYNCHRONIZE ALL NODE LED’S
Synchronizes out-of-order blinking LED’s on the nodes after change of activity.
11. NODE MANAGEMENT
Node data settings and parameters are entered in this menu.
12. SYSTEM CONFIGURATIONS
Maps input nodes to output nodes.
13. MANAGE CONFIGURATIONS
Allows editing of established configurations. Configurations can be activated (loaded) or unloaded. A
command allows unused configurations to be deleted.
14. MODBUS SETUP
Allows the baud rate and other port configurations. This option is described in detail in a separate document.
15. DIAGNOSTIS
This section allows the administrator the ability to record events for evaluation. This selection is only utilized in conjunction with an Allestec representative.
16. BACKUP THE SYSTEM DATABASE
Allows the system configurations to backup the data in case the primary file gets corrupted. This command creates a file from the onguardsetup.dat file (see section 7) and calls the new file copyofonguardsetup.dat. NOTE: Fully understand the operation of the system prior to utilizing this command.
17. USE ONGUARD AS THE SYSTEM SHELL
After a complete system has been tested and backed up, select this menu item. The complete system
will restart and initialize displaying only the ONGUARD menu. This process enables any items related to
the CE operating system to be omitted from the full-sized menu. When this function is complete, there
will be no user interface interaction between the control panel and the Windows CE operating system.
This procedure of disabling the CE user interface prevents unauthorized entry into the CE operating system.
CAUTION: DURING THE RESETTING OF THE PANEL TO THE ONGUARD SHELL, THERE WILL
BE NO ALARM MONITORING (APPROXIMATELY 30 SECONDS).
18. USE WINDOWS AS A DEFAULT SHELL
Selecting this option restores the control panel to its level of operation prior to selecting #17.
CAUTION: DURING THE RESTORING OF THE PANEL TO THE WINDOWS SHELL, THERE WILL
BE NO ALARM MONITORING (APPROXIMATELY 30 SECONDS).
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29. SYSTEM FAULTS
Any fault occurring in the system will bring up the fault menu as indicated in figure 29 and identify the
style of fault. The failsafe fault relay located at the SYSTEM ALARM TB3 terminal will change state. Refer to drawing 6. Select the fault alarm button to enter the FAULT ALARM menu. Select the SILENCE
button to silence the fault. The audible fault alarm will occur every 30 minutes until the problem has been
resolved. Locate and resolve the fault problem in a timely manner.
If fault condition occurs and displayed on the menu,
the fault can be reset if the problem has been resolved. The HIDE FAULT button can also be selected. When HIDE FAULT is selected, the fault
menu will go back to the Onguard main screen and
continue polling of the nodes. The fault still exists but
the menus can now be navigated as needed. During
the hide fault incident, the fault relay on the control
panel will remain in fault condition because there is
still a fault. Also, the “Monitoring Alarms Active” message on the Onguard screen will alternate between
blue and yellow instead of blue and green. To resume normal operation, fix the fault problem and reset the fault menu. If the panel is left unattended during a fualt, the fault menu will pop up every 4 hours
until the problem is resolved.
FIGURE 29. Select the fault button.
29.1 COMMUNICATION FAILURE
If there is a communication failure, the inability to
properly scan a node, the problem is recorded as
indicated in figure 29.1, the error message is as follows: The bus utilizes the first channel of a non communicating node to convey the address of the problem node. In example figure 29.1 the bus was severed just before the SOM and fault nodes. The
FAULT alarm records the fault as node 3-1 and 2-1
indicating nodes 3 & 2 are not responding. This indication does NOT indicate channel one of each node
because the COMMUNICATION FAILURE note is
visible.
If the bus interrogation function receives a failure it
does not immediately report a fault. The failure is
analyzed to assure the safest method to eliminate
false alarms at the fastest speed allowed. An ID 255
communication error is a bus loop problem.
FIGURE 29.1 Communication failure as described in sections 29.2.
29.2 COMMUNICATION FAULTS ON A TERMINATED CLASS B BUS (Selecting the Start of Loop
when invoking Ctrl-F7).
BUS SHORT:
A direct short between the A and B bus lines will result in all nodes to report their ID and name to the
FAULT ALARM menu. The alarm menu will be similar to figure 29.1 except in our example the FAULT
ALARM will indicate all 4 nodes that are attached to
the bus.
FIGURE 29.2. Loop break failure as described in sections 29.3.
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A OR B LINE OPEN:
Since the nodes are scanned starting from the lowest
ID address to the highest and regardless where they
are located physically on the bus, the following action
will take place: A bus open anywhere on the A or B
conductor will result in faults for all nodes located
after the open (between the open and the terminating
resistor. The FAULT DESCRIPTION field will indicate
a communication error for all nodes unable to report
their presence on the bus.
24VDC LOSS:
A loss of power to the bus will result in all nodes to
report their faults to the menu. If the power loss occurs down line from the panel, then all nodes after
that power loss will report their fault status. The
FAULT DESCRIPTION field will indicate a communication error for all nodes unable to report their presence on the bus.
FIGURE 29.3 Fault alarm menu indicating
channel 1 of the gas node is below 9%.
29.3 COMMUNICATION FAULTS ON A RETURN CLASS A BUS (Selecting Loop back mode when
invoking Ctrl-F7).
If the system is unable to poll a node in loop back mode, a fault is issued and below are examples that
may occur.
BUS SHORT:
A bus short creates unreasonable circumstances that may omit some nodes to report their ID. It is apparent that this problem be resolved in the utmost timely manner. The system will attempt to display any
messages that get through and report their fault to the menu.
A OR B LINE OPEN:
Upon detecting an open in the loop A or B conductor, a fault will be issued and will indicate loop break
failure(s), example figure 29.2. All nodes after the bus break to the TB2 end loop will report their ID’s to
the FAULT ALARM menu. At this point the fault can be cleared but the ONGUARD menu will now indicate: Loop Break: Alarms active.
Once the fault is cleared it will not return unless another malfunction occurs. After resetting the fault, a
file is recorded to a memory array that indicates the current location of nodes in respect to the bus
break. The system now monitors part of the nodes on the START loop then returns to the END loop to
monitor at that location. The system is now capable of operating actions correctly but the bus is in need
of a immediate repair. Close the ONGUARD program and turn off the control panel as described in section 26.1 then proceed to repair the bus condition. Upon initialization, the system will search all node
locations and eliminate the Loop Break message. Verify that the Ctrl-F7 menu is selecting the Loop
Back mode. NOTE: Anytime the ONGUARD menu indicates a Loop Break, the fault relay will change
state.
29.4 IMPROPER BUS SELECTION
If the bus (refer to figure 5.1) is selected that does not match a field wired loop as indicated in drawing
12, a fault alarm will occur.
29.5 INPUT NODE FAULTS
The input node will create a fault if an input field wire is open or the ELR is not installed. Line supervision
integrity is monitored by sending a small current through the input loop. While in MANAGE CONFIGURATIONS and a configuration is LOADED utilizing this node: If there is a fault that occurred and went
away and then the menu is exited, the fault will be detected. The fault will not be created if the channel is
disabled whether a configuration is loaded or unloaded.
90
29.6 SUPERVISORY OUTPUT NODE (SOM) FAULTS
The SOM monitors for a field short (across the ELR) or open conductor in the appliance loop. Checking
the box that indicates SHORT MONITORING in the SETTINGS menu will ENABLE the channel to monitor for shorts. Refer to section 11.4 for more details. If the external 24VDC is removed from the SOM
and J4 is located in the SPARE slot or absent, drawing 11, a fault will occur to indicate a loss of the external 24VDC.
When in MANAGE CONFIGURATIONS and a configuration is LOADED utilizing this node: If there is a
fault that occurred and went away and then the menu is exited, the fault will be detected. While the control panel is in quiescent mode and an SOM node configuration is UNLOADED, the node will still detect
faults. The fault will not be created if the channel is disabled whether a configuration is loaded or
unloaded.
29.7 4-20mA GAS NODE FAULTS
If the 4-20mA loop is opened or the current drops below –9% of the scale, a fault message will occur.
While in the MANAGE CONFIGURATIONS MENU and a gas configuration is LOADED; if there is a gas
fault alarm that occurred then went away and then the MANAGE CONFIGURATION is then exited, the
alarm will not be detected. The fault will not be created if the channel is disabled whether a configuration
is loaded or unloaded. Refer to section 15.8 for more details.
29.8 RELAY NODE
The relay node has dry relay contact outputs and are not monitored for supervision. However, the node
is monitored for integrity.
29.9 EARTH GROUND FAULT
The system, including the field nodes, will detect and report an Earth ground fault under these circumstances: If any devices 24V power comes in contact with Earth ground which includes a resistance of
100K ohms or less. Or: If any devices power supply negative comes in contact with Earth ground which
includes a resistance of 11K ohms or less. These ground faults can be caused by but not limited to water condensing in junction boxes, insects building nests where the apparatus resides, debris such as
corrosion or particles coming in contact with the apparatus, improper wiring (connecting power supply
negative to Earth ground), etc.
29.10 MASTER GROUND FAULT
This message occurs in the fault menu when there is any field device that has less than 11K ohm resistance per section 29.9. The fault ID will indicate address 254-1 and does not refer to any specific node.
29.11 ADMINISTRATOR ASSERTED FAULTS BELOW TRIP THE FAULT RELAY
29.12 CONFIGURATION FAULT - Selecting F8 or line #12 in the utility menu
The fault relay changes state when entering into the configuration menu. The FAULT returns to normal
when completing a configuration or exiting a configuration. On entering the configuration mode ALL
ALARMS ARE IGNORED AND THE PANEL STOPS MONITORING THE BUS so an alarm function will
not activate until leaving the configuration mode.
29.13 NODE MANAGEMENT FAULT- Selecting F5 or line #11 in the utility menu
When selecting the NODE MANAGEMENT menu, the node polling stops because dynamic changes are
expected from the administrator. The FAULT relay changes state as long as this menu is serviced. Upon
exiting the menu the polling will resume and the FAULT relay will resume normal condition.
29.14 MANAGE CONFIGURATION FAULT- Selecting line #13 in the utility menu or Ctrl F11
When selecting the MANAGE CONFIGURATION menu there is a FAULT issued and polling is suspended. The node polling stops because dynamic changes are expected from the administrator.
Refer to section 24.6 for more information.
29.15 UNLOAD ALL CONFIGURATIONS
When in the MANAGE CONFIGURATIONS menu and if ALL configurations are UNLOADED, the
FAULT relay will remain changed even after exiting this menu. If one or more configurations are loaded,
the fault relay resumes normal mode.
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30. SOFTWARE AND FIRMWARE UPDATES
30.1 SOFTWARE MIGRATION
Software and operating systems have been improving towards a more refined and efficient method of
performing computing tasks. To keep in compliance with technology, codes, and improvements, there
will be periodic software and firmware updates available from Allestec. It is possible to upgrade firmware
versions and not software, or vice versa. A revision in the operations manual does not necessarily indicate there will be a change in the code versions, or vice versa. Depending on the upgrade of software,
charges may be incurred to the customer. Instructions will be included with any upgrades as necessary.
Refer to the Allestec website and navigate to the FG8800 control panel for any information relating to
upgrades. Since this system is scaleable, there will be updates as necessary.
30.2 SYSTEM CONTROL VERSION (ONGUARD.EXE)
To identify the system main version code, select the UTILITY menu and the box at the lower part of the
screen (figure 23) to identify the version number, in this case OG 2.67. This code is the main operating
program that the administrator interfaces with and executes programs. The MC code version below this
number indicates the master controller code which resides on the mother board.
30.3 NODE FIRMWARE
Each node has a unique code version and is available by selecting #11, NODE MANAGEMENT, of the
UTILITY MENU or selecting F5 on the keyboard. When in the node screen highlight the node to view
and select the SETTINGS button for that node. Select the APPLY button when finished. The firmware
versions are stated at this location. NOTE: this code is upgradeable only by sending the node to Allestec.
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31. MAINTENANCE and TROUBLESHOOTING
Although the FG8800 was designed to last, like any electronic instrument, there is always the possibility
that something can fail. Therefore a regular test program should be followed and documented to make
sure that each part of the system is tested as described in section 7 of the NFPA 72 or more often if dictated by local code requirements. Malfunctioning units must be replaced or repaired immediately by factory authorized service personnel in order to insure continued safe and reliable operation of the control
alarm system. Periodic inspection and testing should be performed in accordance with local applicable
codes and standards.
If the system is connected to the fire department, etc., or actuates an internal system, disarm the appropriate outputs before servicing to prevent agent actuation. (Refer to Operation for procedures). Notify the
fire department and personnel at the facility that a system test is being performed so that any alarm
sounding can be ignored during the test. Notify the fire department before resetting the system. Inspecting, testing and maintenance of the fire alarm panel should be performed in accordance with NFPA 72,
The Nation Fire Alarm Code and all applicable local codes.
THE FOLLOWING STATEMENTS ASSIST IN LOCATING PROBLEMS:
•
•
•
•
Alarms do not execute as configured.
The configuration in question is UNLOADED.
The initiating or notification devices are not correctly wired.
The node channel is not ENABLED.
There was no configuration made for the appropriate node.
When alarms occur, a bus fault is presented on the screen.
• Most likely this problem is due to the power supply not providing enough power to its intended field
devices. When the alarm occurs, the voltage is brought to a level that is unacceptable to the control
panel. Another problem associated with this fault is the wires carrying current to the field devices are too
small. Also, some low-cost notification appliances contain large capacitors that can instantaneously
lower the power supply voltage at the onset of an alarm. To test these problems, go to the last device on
the bus and measure the voltage at that device while it is in alarm. The voltage should not be below
18V.
Unexplainable faults or errors occur in the system intermittently.
• The power supply is inducing noise on the system power grid.
• There could be loose terminal screw connections.
• Incorrect styles of communications bus cables were used in the system or splices were installed
between nodes.
• The ELR for the bus is not there or improperly installed.
When searching for nodes the system cannot find them.
• The node has not had its ID reset to 255 or the ID switch is not on. Refer to section 25.
Any suspected problems or product manual discrepancies should be submitted to Allestec by email at
[email protected] Please state your company name, your name and phone number. For the control
panel issues state the number of nodes attached to the system, terminated or continuous loop configuration and any other information to help diagnose the system. It is important to list the version release as
stated in section 30.
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32. PART NUMBERS AND ACCESSORIES
SYSTEM COMPONENTS
PART NUMBER
24VDC CONTROL PANEL WITH SOFTWARE [DISPLAY UPWARD VIEWABLE]
FG8800-1-24V
24VDC CONTROL PANEL WITH SOFTWARE [DISPLAY DOWNWARD VIEW- FG8800-2-24V
ABLE]
4 CHANNEL INPUT NODE
8800-1060
4 CHANNEL 4-20MA NODE
8800-1700
4 CHANNEL SUPERVISE OUTPUT MODULE
8800-1705
4 CHANNEL RELAY NODE
8800-1725
ACCESSORIES
OPERATIONS MANUAL
8800-5140-REV A
TERMINAL STRIP SCREWDRIVER
8800-2614
END OF LINE RESISTOR - BUS 120 OHMS, 5%
8800-1309
END OF LINE RESISTOR - FIELD DEVICES 3.9K OHMS, 5%
8800-1211
35MM DIN MOUNTING ADAPTER [INPUT AND 4-20MA NODE]
8800-5121
35MM DIN MOUNTING ADAPTER [SOM AND RELAY NODE]
8800-5139
STANDOFF SPACER TO RAISE NODE FROM MOUNTING SURFACE
8800-1398
USB COMPLIANT KEYBOARD
8800-2718
USB MOUSE
8800-2720
VARISTOR [FOR SOLENOID VALVE]
8800-1270
DIODE - POLARITY SENSITIVE [FOR SOLENOID VALVE]
8800-1236
FUSE - 4A CONTROL PANEL
8800-1721
FUSE - 15A SYSTEM POWER FOR FIELD BUS
8800-1722
NOTICE: When ordering additional components for the system,
provide the code versions as indicated in section 30.2 and 30.3.
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33. SPECIFICATIONS
ELECTRICAL
SYSTEM OPERATING VOLTAGE,
CONTROL PANEL MAXIMUM CURRENT
18 30 VDC REDUNDANT POWER REQUIRED
1.0 AMP @ 24 VDC
NO ATTACHED DEVICES OR LOCAL RELAYS
8800 1060 INPUT NODE:
24 VDC
20 mA QUIESCENT, 35 mA ALARMED
8800 1700 4-20MA GAS NODE:
24 VDC
14 mA QUIESCENT, 14 mA ALARMED
8800 1705 SUPERVISED OUTPUT MODULE
24 VDC
23 mA QUIESCENT, 108 mA
8800 1725 RELAY NODE
24 VDC
9 mA QUIESCENT, 94 mA ALARMED
FOUR DRY RELAY CONTACTS, ONE PER
CHANNEL
10A @ 30 VDC RESISTIVE, 250 VAC RESISTIVE
MECHANICAL
DIMENSIONS REFER TO DRAWINGS
CONTROL PANEL NET WEIGHT
13 lbs, 5.89 kg
ENVIRONMENT
FIELD NODE OPERATING TEMPERATURE
0 degrees F TO 150 degrees F
-17 degrees C TO 65 degrees C
CONTROL PANEL OPERATING TEMPERATURE 32 degrees F TO 130 degrees F
0 degrees C TO 55 degrees C
PACKAGING AND ENVIRONMENTAL EXPO-
NEMA 1
95
34. WARRANTY AND RETURN POLICY
TERMS AND AGREEMENT
Allestec Corporation warrants the components and labor for three years from control date stamped on
the system identification label. Allestec identifies each system by their unique serial number stamped on
the components as well as an electronic serial number. Allestec will repair any component found by us
to be defective in workmanship or materials. This warranty does not apply to any part or product that has
been subjected to misuse, improper installation, transfer of ownership, or any type of alterations.
Items under warranty sent to Allestec just to “check out” will be charge for diagnosing something there
may not be. This procedure prevents customers from sending units in on an as needed basis for us to
verify operation. If a product is in warranty it will be repaired at no charge.
There are no implied warranties of merchantability, fitness or other implied warranties or representations
for any of Allestec's products except the warranty specified herein. In no event shall Allestec be liable for
any consequential, special or other damages attributable to our product except as specified herein. The
foregoing obligations are in lieu of all other obligations and liabilities including negligence, and of all warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose or otherwise, express, or implied, in fact or in
law, and state Allestec's entire and exclusive liability and buyer's exclusive remedy for any claim of damages in connection with the sale of furnishing of the products, their design, suitability for use, installation,
or operation. Buyer is solely responsible for the proper installation, maintenance and use of the components and Allestec will in no event be liable for any special, incidental or consequential damages whatsoever.
It is agreed that when a customer, distributor, representative, end user purchases any of the FG8800
systems or components that it is their responsibility to send back the product under warranty. The product under warranty is to be returned to Allestec or its distributor, pre-paid by the entity returning the product. Under no circumstances Allestec will send a product to a customer then wait for the warranty item to
return. Allestec will return the warranty item by its selected carrier on a standard delivery time. If the customer requires to accelerate the process, the customer agrees to pay any additional expediting costs
relating to the transaction.
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