WinControl Software

WinControl Software
WinControl Software
Operate your Lighting
Control System with
One Complete Tool
WinControl User’s Guide
New Features
n Advanced Analog Input Configuration
n Full Support for AS-100 Functions
n Multiple Occupancy Sensor Profiles
n Advanced Monitoring of Load State Priority Arrays
n Set-up BACnet Interface in Optional Weblink
WinControl User's Guide
Copyright © 2000-2010 Watt Stopper/Legrand
Table of Contents
1. License Information .......................................................................................................... 1
Software License Agreement .......................................................................................... 1
Copyright ................................................................................................................... 2
2. Introduction .................................................................................................................... 3
Watt Stopper/Legrand ................................................................................................... 3
Key features in WinControl ........................................................................................... 4
Requirements for WinControl ........................................................................................ 5
Starting WinControl .................................................................................................... 6
Questions and Answers ................................................................................................. 7
Contact Information ..................................................................................................... 9
WinControl Helper ..................................................................................................... 11
WinControl Toolbar .................................................................................................... 13
Troubleshooting ......................................................................................................... 15
WinControl Change History ......................................................................................... 18
3. Documenting Panels ........................................................................................................ 23
Creating Panels .......................................................................................................... 23
Documenting Panels - Basics ....................................................................................... 26
Documenting Panels - DL Card ............................................................................ 28
Documenting Panels - Relays ....................................................................................... 30
Documenting Panels - Contactors .................................................................................. 32
Documenting Panels - Channels (Group Switch Cards) ..................................................... 33
Why would I want a Group Switch Card? ............................................................... 33
Analog Inputs and LI-CC Panels ........................................................................... 36
Why would I want a Dataline Switch? ............................................................................ 39
Documenting Panels - Dataline Switches ........................................................................ 40
Documenting Dataline Switches ................................................................................... 41
4. Programming Basics ....................................................................................................... 42
Group Codes ............................................................................................................ 42
Phone Codes ............................................................................................................ 44
Common Area Relays ................................................................................................ 47
Programming Dataline Switches ................................................................................... 48
Using the AS-100 Automatic Switch with LI-CC Panels ................................................... 49
Using Occupancy Sensors with LI-CC Panels ................................................................. 52
5. Specify System Options ................................................................................................... 57
System Options ........................................................................................................ 57
6. Initialize Menu Options ................................................................................................... 59
Site Properties ........................................................................................................... 59
System Properties ...................................................................................................... 62
Go Online / Go Offline ............................................................................................... 64
Initialize - Security Features ......................................................................................... 65
Logon ..................................................................................................................... 70
Set PC Clock ............................................................................................................ 71
Set LINK Clock ......................................................................................................... 72
Set Time/Date Format ................................................................................................ 73
Astronomical Clock .................................................................................................... 74
WinControl Configuration ........................................................................................... 76
General ............................................................................................................ 76
WCServer ........................................................................................................ 77
Menus ............................................................................................................. 78
Polling ............................................................................................................. 79
WCAlarm ......................................................................................................... 80
iii
WinControl User's Guide
7. Programming Options ..................................................................................................... 82
Program - System - General ......................................................................................... 82
Program - System - Schedules ...................................................................................... 84
Program - System - Override Duration Schedules ............................................................. 87
Program - System - BACnet ......................................................................................... 90
Program - Panel - Special ............................................................................................ 92
Program - Relay - Options ........................................................................................... 95
Program - Relay - Schedules ........................................................................................ 96
Program - Relay - Override Duration ............................................................................. 97
Program - Relay - Behavior .......................................................................................... 98
8. Status Monitoring ......................................................................................................... 101
System Dataline ....................................................................................................... 101
Advanced Relay Status .............................................................................................. 102
Load Chart .............................................................................................................. 104
9. Dataline Switch Commissioning ...................................................................................... 106
Commissioning Process ............................................................................................. 106
Commission Dialog .................................................................................................. 108
Select Device to Commission ............................................................................. 109
Replace Malfunctioning Switch .................................................................................. 111
10. Transfer Data Options .................................................................................................. 112
11. Trend Reporting Overview ............................................................................................ 116
Activity Log Reporting .............................................................................................. 116
Archiving Activity Log Data ............................................................................... 125
Daily Runtime Reporting ........................................................................................... 127
Runtime Charting ..................................................................................................... 130
Automatic Retrieval of Log and Runtime Data ............................................................... 132
12. Reporting Options ....................................................................................................... 133
LCP Wiring Documentation ....................................................................................... 134
LCP Relay Cross Reference ....................................................................................... 135
Dataline Switches ..................................................................................................... 136
Group Codes .......................................................................................................... 137
Schedules ............................................................................................................... 138
Variable Override Duration ........................................................................................ 139
Contactors .............................................................................................................. 140
13. Generate DXF Diagram ................................................................................................ 141
DXF-Specifications .................................................................................................. 142
DXF-Typical Wiring Details ....................................................................................... 143
DXF-Riser Diagram .................................................................................................. 144
DXF-Panel Schedules ............................................................................................... 145
Viewing DXF Files ................................................................................................... 146
14. Application Quick Reference ......................................................................................... 147
Schedule Scenarios in WinControl ............................................................................... 147
Auto ON / Auto OFF ........................................................................................ 147
Manual ON / Auto OFF ..................................................................................... 148
Dusk to Dawn .................................................................................................. 149
Dusk to Arbitrary Time ...................................................................................... 150
Exterior Lighting Schedule with Photocell ............................................................ 151
Temporary Changes to Schedules in WinControl ............................................................ 152
WinControl's Six Switch Functions .............................................................................. 157
15. Windows Security Issues .............................................................................................. 160
Access Requirements ................................................................................................ 160
Site Data Storage Locations ........................................................................................ 161
Special Windows 7 and Windows Vista Issues ................................................................ 164
16. Conclusion ................................................................................................................. 165
iv
WinControl User's Guide
Glossary of WinControl and LI-CC Terms ............................................................................. 166
Index ............................................................................................................................. 170
v
List of Figures
2.1. Start WinControl ............................................................................................................ 6
2.2. WinControl Startup Wizard .............................................................................................. 6
2.3. New System Wizard ....................................................................................................... 8
2.4. Job Contact Information .................................................................................................. 9
2.5. Engineering Contact Information .................................................................................... 10
2.6. WinControl Helper ....................................................................................................... 11
2.7. WinControl Toolbar ...................................................................................................... 13
3.1. Panel Sizes ................................................................................................................. 23
3.2. New Panel Wizard ........................................................................................................ 24
3.3. Next Panel Wizard ........................................................................................................ 25
3.4. Contactors In Panels ..................................................................................................... 25
3.5. Panel (LCP) Document ................................................................................................. 26
3.6. Relay Cards ................................................................................................................ 27
3.7. DL Card Push Button .................................................................................................... 28
3.8. DL Card ..................................................................................................................... 28
3.9. Panel - Relay Documentation ......................................................................................... 30
3.10. Panel - Relay Documentation ........................................................................................ 95
3.11. Panel - Contactor Documentation .................................................................................. 32
3.12. Channel Documentation ............................................................................................... 33
3.13. Channel - Selecting Loads to Control ............................................................................. 34
3.14. Group Switch Card in Panel ......................................................................................... 35
3.15. Documenting Panels - Channels .................................................................................... 36
3.16. Analog Input Function ................................................................................................. 37
3.17. Analog Input Device Options ........................................................................................ 37
3.18. Analog Input Setpoint .................................................................................................. 38
3.19. Dataline Switches with LI-CC network ........................................................................... 39
3.20. Dataline Switches ..................................................................................................... 107
3.21. New Dataline Switch ................................................................................................... 40
3.22. Document Dataline Switch ........................................................................................... 41
4.1. Program Group Codes ................................................................................................... 43
4.2. Phone Code Create/Edit Dialog ....................................................................................... 44
4.3. Create a Phone Code ..................................................................................................... 45
4.4. Phone Code Editor ....................................................................................................... 46
4.5. Program Dataline Switch ............................................................................................... 48
4.6. Channel Function ......................................................................................................... 48
4.7. InteliSwitch® AS-100 Automatic Control Switch ............................................................... 49
4.8. Occupancy Sensor Wiring Diagram 60-601 ....................................................................... 53
5.1. System Options - PC Automation .................................................................................... 57
6.1. Initialize Menu Command ............................................................................................. 59
6.2. Site Info ..................................................................................................................... 60
6.3. System List ................................................................................................................. 60
6.4. Transfer Settings .......................................................................................................... 61
6.5. Initialize System Properties Dialog .................................................................................. 62
6.6. Initialize Menu Go Online / Go Offline (Connection) Command ........................................... 64
6.7. Security Dialog Box ..................................................................................................... 67
6.8. Security Edit Role ........................................................................................................ 68
6.9. Security Edit User ........................................................................................................ 69
6.10. Logon Command ........................................................................................................ 70
6.11. Set PC Clock Command .............................................................................................. 71
6.12. Set Link Clock ........................................................................................................... 72
6.13. Set Time/Date Format ................................................................................................. 73
vi
WinControl User's Guide
6.14. Astronomical Clock Location ........................................................................................ 74
6.15. Configuration - General ............................................................................................... 77
6.16. Configuration - WCServer ............................................................................................ 78
6.17. Configuration - Menus ................................................................................................ 79
6.18. Configuration - Polling ................................................................................................ 80
6.19. Configuration - WCAlarm ............................................................................................ 81
7.1. System Info ................................................................................................................ 82
7.2. Program - System - Schedule Selection Dialog .................................................................. 84
7.3. Create a Schedule ......................................................................................................... 85
7.4. Schedule Editor Dialog ................................................................................................. 86
7.5. Schedule Event Dialog .................................................................................................. 86
7.6. Program - System - Variable Override Schedule Selection Dialog .......................................... 88
7.7. Create an Override Duration Schedule .............................................................................. 88
7.8. Override Duration Schedule Editor Dialog ........................................................................ 89
7.9. BACnet Device Initialization .......................................................................................... 90
7.10. Panel Auto-initialization .............................................................................................. 91
7.11. Program LCP Special Settings ...................................................................................... 92
7.12. Program Relay Options ................................................................................................ 95
7.13. Relay Program Schedules ............................................................................................. 96
7.14. Relay Program Override Duration .................................................................................. 97
7.15. Program Relay Behavior ............................................................................................ 100
8.1. Show Monitor Dataline Screen ...................................................................................... 101
8.2. Monitor Dataline ........................................................................................................ 101
8.3. Advanced Relay Status Screen ...................................................................................... 102
8.4. ARP Status ................................................................................................................ 103
8.5. Load Chart ................................................................................................................ 104
9.1. Dataline Switches ....................................................................................................... 107
9.2. Discover Dataline Devices ........................................................................................... 107
9.3. Commission Dialog .................................................................................................... 108
9.4. Auto Create New Devices ............................................................................................ 109
9.5. Select Device to Commission ........................................................................................ 109
10.1. Transfer Menu .......................................................................................................... 113
10.2. Transfer All Menu ..................................................................................................... 114
10.3. Transfer Monitor ...................................................................................................... 115
11.1. Activity Log Report Parameters ................................................................................... 116
11.2. Log Report 1 ............................................................................................................ 122
11.3. Log Report 2 ............................................................................................................ 123
11.4. Log Report 3 ............................................................................................................ 124
11.5. Log Report 4 ............................................................................................................ 125
11.6. Archive Button ......................................................................................................... 126
11.7. Archive Dialog ......................................................................................................... 126
11.8. Daily Runtime Report Parameters ................................................................................ 127
11.9. Runtime Report 1 ..................................................................................................... 128
11.10. Exception Report .................................................................................................... 129
11.11. Runtime Import ...................................................................................................... 129
11.12. Runtime Chart Parameters ........................................................................................ 130
11.13. Runtime Chart ........................................................................................................ 131
12.1. Reports menu ........................................................................................................... 133
12.2. LCP Wiring Documentation ........................................................................................ 134
12.3. LCP Relay Cross Reference ........................................................................................ 135
12.4. Dataline Switches ..................................................................................................... 136
12.5. Group Codes ............................................................................................................ 137
12.6. Schedules ................................................................................................................ 138
12.7. Variable Override Duration ......................................................................................... 139
vii
WinControl User's Guide
12.8. Contactors ............................................................................................................... 140
13.1. Generate DXF Diagram ............................................................................................. 141
13.2. DXF Specifications ................................................................................................... 142
13.3. DXF Typical Wiring Details ........................................................................................ 143
13.4. DXF Riser Diagram .................................................................................................. 144
13.5. DXF Panel Schedules ................................................................................................ 145
14.1. Auto ON / Auto OFF Schedule .................................................................................... 148
14.2. Manual ON / Auto OFF ............................................................................................. 149
14.3. Dusk to Dawn .......................................................................................................... 150
14.4. Dusk to an Arbitrary Time .......................................................................................... 151
14.5. Holiday Schedules .................................................................................................... 152
14.6. Holiday Schedules .................................................................................................... 154
14.7. Phone Override with Duration ..................................................................................... 155
14.8. Relay Assignment Dialog ........................................................................................... 157
15.1. Sharing and Security ................................................................................................. 161
15.2. Shared Documents Properties ...................................................................................... 162
15.3. Shared Properties After Wizard .................................................................................... 162
viii
List of Tables
2.1. Toolbar Buttons ........................................................................................................... 14
9.1. Dataline Devices Grid ................................................................................................. 108
14.1. Summary of Override Options ..................................................................................... 155
ix
Chapter 1. License Information
Software License Agreement
End-User License Agreement
This End-User License Agreement constitutes a legal agreement between you – either an individual or
single entity – and Watt Stopper/Legrand, Inc. By installing, copying or otherwise using the software you
agree to be bound by the terms of this agreement.
Software Product License
This software product is protected by copyright laws and international copyright treaties, as well as other
intellectual property laws and treaties. The software product is licensed, not sold.
In grant of this license the agreement grants you the following rights:
• Software: You may install and use one copy of the software on a computer.
• Network Use: You may install a copy of the software on a computer to allow other computers to use
the software via an internal network: however, you must acquire and dedicate a license for the software
for each computer on which the software is used or to which it is distributed. This means the license for
the software may not be shared or used concurrently on different computers.
Other Rights And Limitations
You may not reverse engineer, decompile, or disassemble this software, except to the extent such activity
is expressly permitted by the applicable laws, notwithstanding this limitation.
• The component parts of the software may not be separated for use on more than one computer.
• You may not rent or lease the software.
• You may copy the printed materials accompanying the software only to the extent required to support
training and other activities directly associated with the use of the software consistent with this agreement
and the license provided.
• All title and copyrights in and to the software are owned by Watt Stopper/Legrand, Inc.
Limitation Of Liability
To the extent provided by law, any conditions or warranties imposed or implied by law are excluded.
1
License Information
Copyright
Watt Stopper/Legrand, reserves the right to revise this document for any reason, including, but not limited
to, conformity with standards promulgated by various government or regulatory agencies, exploitation of
advances in the state of the technical arts, or the reflection of changes in the design of any equipment,
techniques, or procedures described or referred to herein. LIABILITY TO ANYONE ARISING OUT OF
USE OR RELIANCE UPON ANY INFORMATION SET FORTH HEREIN IS EXPRESSLY DISCLAIMED, AND NO REPRESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, ARE
MADE WITH RESPECT TO THE ACCURACY OR UTILITY OF ANY INFORMATION SET FORTH
HEREIN.
This document is not to be construed as a suggestion to any manufacturer to modify or change any of its
products, nor does this document represent any commitment by Watt Stopper/Legrand to purchase any
product whether or not it provides the described characteristics.
Nothing contained herein shall be construed as conferring by implication, estoppel or otherwise, any license
or right under any patent, whether or not the use of any information herein necessarily employs an invention
of any existing or later issued patent.
Microsoft, Windows, and Windows NT are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
Intel , Pentium, Pentium II, and Pentium III are trademarks of Intel Corporation.
SaxBasic is a trademark of SaxSoft, Inc.
©2000-2010 Watt Stopper/Legrand – All Rights Reserved.
2
Chapter 2. Introduction
WinControl is a software program from Watt Stopper used to document, program, and operation a lighting
control system using Watt Stopper's Lighting Integrator Complete Control (LI-CC) relay based control
panels.
WinControl software adds online monitor and control, program transfer features, trending and analysis,
and diagnostics capabilities to our base WinControl Designer software.
WinControl is intended for use in operating lighting control systems based on the LI-CC family of relay
based control panels.
Please visit our WinControl web page at http://www.wattstopper.com/wincontrol for the latest news and
information and updates for WinControl.
Watt Stopper/Legrand
The primary goal of Watt Stopper/Legrand is to create energy savings through the use of controls. This
enables the user to save money on operating costs while positively impacting the environment. We focus
on educating the marketplace on what lighting and energy controls can do and what types are available.
By demonstrating how waste occurs and how to combat it, we help our customers make the best choices
for controls that will work best for them for years.
Contact Us
Visit us at our web site at http://www.wattstopper.com
Our design and tech support center is available at 800-879-8585, and 800-852-2778.
More information on WinControl Designer is available at our
WinControl Designer Home Page [http://www.wattstopper.com/designer]
More information on WinControl is available at our
WinControl Home Page [http://www.wattstopper.com/wincontrol]
3
Introduction
Key features in WinControl
• Question and Answer sequence to help select appropriate system options and default panel options for
a new job.
• Job contact information allows tracking of contact information from design to installation.
• New panel wizard to walk through creation of relay panels and selection of option cards.
• Automatic "save" feature.
• Relay schedules are editable in easy to use grid format.
• Simple Channel and Dataline Switch setup emulates the Smart Wiring features of the hardware.
• Reporting capabilities allow creation of hard copy of panel and switch schedules for non-Complete
Control field applications (when full WinControl is not used as the front end).
• CAD format (DXF) output of various data that can be loaded into AutoCAD, including the following
options:
• Project Specifications
• Riser Diagram (including front end, panels and network switches)
• Typical Wiring Diagrams
• Relay Panel Schedules
• Group Switch (Channel) Schedules
• Dataline Switch Schedules
• Send File to Watt Stopper feature to easily send file for factory review
• Ability to program off line and then transfer programs to system
• Trending features including log reports and runtime charting
• Monitor and control feature
4
Introduction
Requirements for WinControl
Before you begin installing WinControl make sure your computer meets the minimum recommended requirements:
• Mircosoft Windows 7 Professional/Ultimate - 32 and 64 bit OR
Microsoft Windows Vista Business - 32 and 64 bit OR
Microsoft Windows XP Professional - 32 bit only
• WinControl requires no memory (RAM) or storage (hard disk) above what is required for your selected
operating system; however, a minimum of one gigabyte of RAM is suggested.
• RS-232, 9 pin serial port (use with HLINK) OR
Ethernet network connection (use with WebLink)
• Software installation requires a CD ROM / DVD drive, a USB jump drive or a connection to the internet.
Licensing
WinControl is to be licensed after installation on your PC by calling Watt Stopper at 800-852-2778. You
will need to have your order information from your purchase of a WinControl license to receive a license
code. You will also need adminstrator access to your PC. WinControl will run for a 30 days without a license.
Once the 30 day grace period has expired, WinControl will only run as Designer. WinControl Designer
does not include communications capabilities.
5
Introduction
Starting WinControl
Figure 2.1. Start WinControl
When you launch WinControl , you are presented with the "WinControl Startup Wizard", which provides
you with the most common options for startup.
If this is the first time you have used WinControl , you will either Create a New Site, or perhaps Open the
Demonstration Site. Later, if you are coming back to WinControl, the default will be to Open an Existing
Site, which defaults to the last site you were working with. To start working on a new site simply select
Create a New Site and then click "Next".
To make WinControl default to open a certain site, see the section called “Menus” later in this document.
Figure 2.2. WinControl Startup Wizard
6
Introduction
Questions and Answers
To design a system with WinControl Designer, you should have documentation available as to the loads
that you would like to control, including such information as your breaker schedules and reflected ceiling
plans. You will be asked questions such as the following:
• Approximately how many control panels you expect to use?
Often, one control panel is used per lighting breaker panel, our largest control panels contain 48 relays.
Depending on the number of panels you enter, the appropriate automation and networking card that is
best suited to the system size will be selected.
• Do you want to network your panels together?
Networking panels together allows loads to be activated via time of day schedule, photocell, and switches
that may exist or be connected to a different control panel. If panels are not networked together, each
panel and its control points operated completely independently. When networking panels together, a
dataline wire (typically 4 conductor) must be installed that connects the panels.
Networking panels together requires a network capable automation card be installed in the panels, and
will be automatically included if you check the "Network panels together" box.
• Do you want to use network (dataline) switches?
Network switches are wall switches that are wired on a simple 4-wire network, with only one "home
run" required back to the lighting control panel. These devices can be programmed to control single or
multiple relays, and can be configured to control relay loads in different panels. If you would like to use
these switches, an automation card is required in the control panel, and will be included in panels added
to the system if you check the box labeled "Include support in panels for dataline switches".
• Approximately how many dataline switches per panel?
If you checked the box for the previous question, an estimate of the number of switches helps us determine
the appropriate networking card.
• Do you want to use a PC to monitor, control, and program your system?
In some applications it may be preferable to use a time clock, handheld programmer, or use only simple
grouping features that are driven by a separate device such as a BAS system than to use a PC.
In systems with multiple panels networked together, it is often desirable to have the ability to use a PC
to change programming information, monitor, and control the system. PC based communications requires
an additional complete control card in the control panel, and will be included in panels added to the
system if you check the "Support for optional PC front end" box.
After answering each question, click the Next button.
7
Introduction
Figure 2.3. New System Wizard
8
Introduction
Contact Information
WinControl Designer gives you a central location to record information about the various people involved
on the project. The job name is required to be entered and is used as the default file name for the project.
Other information such as job location, Electrical Engineer (specifier), Owner, Electrical Contractor, and
manufacturer's representative can be entered.
Figure 2.4. Job Contact Information
All data is saved in the site data file. After filling in any of these particular sets of data, you can choose to
save that information for future projects you design using the "Set As Default" button.
9
Introduction
Figure 2.5. Engineering Contact Information
10
Introduction
WinControl Helper
Figure 2.6. WinControl Helper
Once you have filled in the basic data to get started, you will see the "WinControl Helper" dialog. WinControl Helper is designed to provide a "jumping off" point to quickly access most of the features necessary
to design a basic system. When you become more proficient in WinControl Designer, you may elect to
close this helper. It can be reopened at any time from the View menu, WinControl Helper option, or by
clicking the appropriate the toolbar icon.
The options on the WinControl Helper allow the user to:
• Specify the Job Information and Contacts- See the section called “Contact Information” for more information.
• Create New Panels- This option allows you to add panels to a new or existing system. Create New
Panels allows you to ill in the panels id, name, location, capacity, the number of relays installed in the
panel, and if it will support Dataline Switches.
• Document Panel Schedules- This option allows you to fill in the individual load descriptions and circuit
assignments for the relays. You may also fill in the details for the Global Switch Inputs and optionally
add and define Dataline switches to individual panels.
• Specify System Options- This option allows you to select special features related to the type of system
you select. For Complete Control, you can select the options related to the software, network, and
computer options that will be used. For Automation Card systems, you can identify the number of telephone override devices, the photocell controller, or the scheduling device that will be used.
• View Reports- This option will generate a hard copy of the panel documentation, panel schedules cards
for placement inside panel cover, and other filled in forms, including Group Switch input documentation
and assignments, and Dataline Switch documentation and assignments.
• Generate DXF Diagram- This option generates a DXF (AutoCAD compatible diagram). Sample diagrams
shown on pages that follow do not reflect new hardware which will be shown, and do not detail switch
assignments, which will be included for all network types.
• Exit WinControl- This option will exit the WinControl program. You will have an opportunity to save
the file if it has not yet been saved.
11
Introduction
The buttons displayed are organized in a sequence that you may follow to get your project fully defined.
After entering your project information, the next step is to "Create New Panels". After clicking this option,
proceed to the next step, Creating Panels.
12
Introduction
WinControl Toolbar
Figure 2.7. WinControl Toolbar
13
Introduction
Table 2.1. Toolbar Buttons
Toolbar Button
Icon
Function
New
Open a new file.
Open
Open an existing file.
Save
Save the file currently open and all changes to it.
WinControl Helper
Launch the WinControl Helper menu.
Print
Display Report printing options menu.
Generate CAD Drawings
Displays the CAD Generate DXF options menu
Program Relay Panel
Displays Select LCP Relay Dialog so you can select a LCP,
then displays Program LCP Relay Dialog
Program Time-of-Day Schedule
Displays Schedule Create/Edit Dialog.
Go Online / Go Offline
Toggles the online status for the current Active System.
Send New Data to Field Panels
Initiates transfer of data to field panels and displays the
Monitor Agent.
Control Group of Relays via Switch
Code
Displays Select Switch Code for Override Dialog for you to
make selection, then displays panel to toggle On or Off.
Select Active System
Displays the select Active System menu (for sites with
multiple systems)
System Properties
Displays the System Properties Dialog
Monitor Dataline
Displays the Monitor Dataline Dialog
Monitor Link Status
Displays the Monitor Link Status Dialog.
Test Field Panels
Displays Select LCP to Test Dialog then, after you make the
selection, generates a Test LCP Report
Start WinControl Graphics
Starts WinControl Graphics (if installed).
14
Introduction
Troubleshooting
1.
Cannot start WinControl Software.
When WinControl software is installed, it should appear on the "Start" menu. If not found, check
the "Watt Stopper" folder on your start menu. If still not found, make sure you have run the setup
(install) kit on the WinControl CD ROM.
Make sure you follow the setup instructions in the Getting Started chapter of this manual and that
your computer meets the minimum system requirements (See the section called “ Requirements for
WinControl ”).
2.
Cannot Connect to LCP or LINK Device (Direct wire connection)
Allow approximately 20 seconds for completion of connection.
Make the following checks:
• Check to insure the cable at the back of your PC is properly connected. Check to insure the 9-pin
connector is seated firmly in the receptacle.
• Check the end of the cable at the LCP or LINK to insure it is properly seated. Make sure the
modular connector is firmly held in the jack.
• The cable from the LCP or LINK to the PC is a special cable. You must use this cable. If your
computer has a 25-pin connector, use a HCABLE-C with adapter. If your computer has a 9-pin
connector, use the HCABLE-C.
• Are you using a compatible extension cable. You cannot use a standard telephone extension cord
to extend the cable. The cable requires that all 6 wires be extended in order to function; standard
telephone cables normally extend only 4 wires. Order the necessary length cable from Watt
Stopper, or locate the PC closer to the LCP or LINK device.
• Is your LCP or LINK powered up – ON ?
Make sure the power indicator is “ON” on the appropriate device. You cannot “CONNECT” to
a LCP or LINK if its power is “OFF”.
Verify the COM PORT specified under (Initialize) Site Parameters is correct. The software defaults
to COM 1 for direct connections. If you are using COM 2 you must change this setting. All
Complete Control computers are setup with COM1 for direct connect, and COM 2 for a modem
(if purchased).
3.
LCP does not respond to commands. Cannot send programs to LCP, or cannot turn relays ON or
OFF from the computer or by using overrides
Attempt to CONNECT from the Main Menu if you are not already connected. Was this operation
successful?
NO – Go to the Troubleshooting section concerning Connect in this chapter of this manual.
YES. Continue with next step.
Attempt to CONNECT from the Main Menu if you are not already connected. Was this operation
successful?
15
Introduction
NO. Go to the CONNECT discussion in this manual.
Enter the MONITOR LCP mode for the MONITOR/CONTROL menu. Are you able to enter the
MONITOR LCP mode?
NO. Go to the CONNECT discussion in this manual.
YES. Continue with next step.
Have you set the dial switches on the LCP to the appropriate number?
NO. Dial in the appropriate LCP number on the Controller card.
YES. Continue with next step.
Check panel status:
NO CLOCK: Use the INITIALIZE option from the main menu to set the LCP clock. If you have a
system with a LINK, the LINK should keep all clocks set and synchronized.
NO PROGRAM: Use the TRANSFER PROGRAMS option from the main menu to load the programs
for this LCP into the panel. Until this is done, the relays will not respond to any programmable
functions.
RELAY FAILURE: The panel has recorded a failure of a relay to change-to an ON or OFF state as
directed by the Controller card. This problem will not clear until the failed relay(s) are successfully
turned OFF and ON.
If the panel status is GOOD, confirm that the Relay Drivers are in place. The system will confirm
that the relay driver cards are properly installed in the relay driver slots. If the system reports a
DRIVER FAIL, then confirm that the driver card is properly seated. Replace the appropriate relay
driver card if necessary.
Select a relay to test. Turn the relay OFF and wait for it to change state on screen. Next turn the relay
ON and then OFF again: Does the relay turn ON and OFF?
NO
Proceed to the next section, TROUBLESHOOTING - RELAYS. If you have already followed that
section, have the system serviced.
4.
Cannot control relays in a Lighting Control Panel (LCP). No relays in LCP respond to computer
overrides.
Attempt to control the relays manually at the LCP panel. Touch a jumper wire from the WHITE to
the RED terminals for the problem relay. This should turn the relay ON. Touch the jumper from the
WHITE to BLACK terminals. This should turn the relay OFF.
Does the relay turn OFF and ON?
NO. Confirm that power to the LCP is present. When the LCP is properly powered up, the two power
indicators (red LEDs) will be illuminated (see figure below). These are located on the circuit board
below the termination point for relay 12.
If either of the power LEDs is not illuminated, confirm that proper line voltage is available at the
primary of the power supply in the left side of the LCP cabinet. The power supply must have the
16
Introduction
line voltage as specified on the power supply. If line voltage is correct and the LEDs are not illuminated, replace the power supply.
If the power LEDs are illuminated, but the relay still does not function, replace the relay. All relays
in the Complete Control cabinets are RR9P latching relays.
YES. Your basic low voltage controls are functioning properly. If you have a direct override switch
connected to the input for this relay which is not functioning, recheck the wiring.
If the relay can not be controlled from the computer, then continue with the section labeled
TROUBLESHOOTING LCP. (If you have already followed that section, then have the system serviced. Call Watt Stopper Field Tech Service at (800) 852-2778
5.
Fiber Optic Hop Delays.
The WinControl CC dataline is sometimes connected to fiber optic cable (for long runs, or when
traveling between buildings). Although fiber cable is very fast, the device that translates the fiber
signal to and from the CC dataline signal often is not. In order to compensate for these fiber hop
delays, sometimes it is necessary to increase the time that WinControl waits for a response from a
relay or panel.
Note
These are advanced settings to edit WinControl's wait for response time. They should only
be changed as directed by WattStopper technicians.
1. Open the registry editor "regedit" on the WinControl PC.
2. Using the device tree in the left panel, open the key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE/SOFTWARE/The
Watt Stopper/RLink. (There will probably be a subkey called Ports under RLink, but stop at the
RLink key.)
3. Create a new DWORD Value called ResponseWaitTime for this RLink key. If this DWORD
already exists, you can edit its value by double-clicking on it in the right panel.
4. Enter a decimal value greater than 800. The number entered is the number of milliseconds WinControl will wait for a response from a panel or relay. Enter 1000 for one second, 5000 for 5
seconds.
5. Close the registry editor.
17
Introduction
WinControl Change History
Version 4.06 – 10 June 2010
1. New: Added "Fiber Optic Hop Delays" to the trouble shooting section of the documentation.
2. Updated: DL card nomenclature has been updated in the code and documentation.
3. Fixed: Device tree icons are now displayed properly on high resolution monitors.
4. Fixed: ARP log entries are now displayed properly in the reports.
Version 4.05 – 16 February 2010
1. Updated: Documentation for commissioning dataline devices has been updated.
2. New: Pressing [F1] during the commissioning process now displays the commissioning help.
Version 4.04 – 15 January 2010
1. Fixed: When commissioning switches, all auto-discoved devices are now display in the list.
2. Fixed: When commissioning switches, the user can now start in "Manual" mode and switch to "Discover"
without encountering errors.
Version 4.03 – 18 December 2009
1. New: Transfer cache for LI and DL card programming messages has been added.
2. Updated: The transfer of new programming is now much faster.
3. Updated: Unlicensed WinControl gives a 30 day grace period instead of a nag screen.
4. Updated: Added DST or STD text to LAP Date/Time response.
5. Fixed: Astro calculations during daylight saving time are now working.
6. Fixed: General purpose groups no longer allow duplicate data, and are less prone to cause access violations.
Version 4.00 – 15 September 2009
• New:
1. Added native support for LI panel activity logs.
2. Custom queries can now be run on the activity log.
3. Activity log and runtime reports now also output XML data files for importing into other programs
such as Microsoft Excel.
4. Activity log data can now be archived and restored for faster report queries.
5. Analog input (photocell) logging can now be turned on and off with a user defined interval.
6. Analog input reports are now available.
7. BACnet configuration now supports a UDP port option.
18
Introduction
8. Added support for the DL card to panel document page, reports, drawings, device tree and transfers.
With a DL card the device tree will be able to show the composite state of group codes.
Note
The DL card has not yet been released.
• Updated:
1. Added new message details to the monitor dataline page.
2. Added Neuron Id to dataline switch report.
3. Added occupancy sensor behavior to ARP and relay cross reference reports.
4. Converted legacy runtime and activity log databases. New databases are faster and support more
features.
5. Now storing previous activity log and runtime report parameters including selected panels/relays.
6. Activity log and runtime reports are now output in HTML.
7. Improved speed of relay status property pages. WinControl no longer stops responding while trying
to update the status.
8. Can now run a panel status report directly from the panel documentation page.
• Fixed:
1. Corrected the maximum number of dataline switches. All 32 switches can now be documented and
programmed.
2. Improved auto-discovery of Dataline Switches. Invalid IDs are also now ignored.
3. Program transfer has been updated to prevent a crash that could occur if the link stopped communicating or if the analog input tables were very long.
Version 3.16 – 25 July 2008
1. New: Added support for WinControl to communicate with the CCBASE.
2. Fixed: Corrected minor issue authenticating with CCBASE and WebLink.
Version 3.12 – 30 January 2008
1. Updated: Support for a second GS card in 48 sized tubs for Automation (LW) only panels.
2. Fixed: Program transfers were unable to perform an optimized transfer following a program transfer to
a specific panel.
3. Fixed: LI panel programming issue with an ID equal to 999. This issue affected both GS Input as well
as Dataline Switch programming.
4. Fixed: Using the Learn feature in WinControl Graphics often caused crashes in WinControl while
GroupDevice updates were taking place.
19
Introduction
5. Fixed: Relay behavior settings were not displayed correctly for legacy (CC) panels. This affected both
the relay grid and the relay properties page.
6. Fixed: Dataline power supplies were automatically selected for non-Complete Control systems. Now
only Complete Control systems with more than one panel will have a dataline power supply automatically
installed in the first available and supported panel.
7. Updated: Peanut (LP) panels now support up to 8 GS inputs. Formally, these panels were limited to 4
inputs.
Version 3.11 – 31 October 2007
1. Update: This version (or later) of WinControl MUST be used with LI-CC firmware version 19 or
higher. This update may effect occupancy sensor and ARP behavior.
2. Fixed: New panels, by default, support Automatic Relay Packs (ARPs). Once the firmware version is
discovered to be an older, unsupported version then the ARP checkbox is disabled. If ARP support was
enabled prior to discovering an older firmware version then the ARP checkbox text becomes RED indicating an invalid setting. Clearing it will reset ARP relays to SPACE.
3. Fixed: Spurious error message when using Firefox to view reports. The error message has been removed.
Firefox can take longer than expected to launch depending on plugins installed.
4. Fixed: The older wiring schedule card report for legacy panels was no longer working. This report has
been fixed.
Version 3.10 – 21 September 2007
1. New: support for Automatic Relay Packs (ARPs) has been added to WinControl. Support includes
control, status and documentation plus a new report. See the updated documentation for more information
on ARP support, including programming restrictions.
2. New: relay panel documentation report for panel door sleeve. Best to print in landscape mode.
3. Improved: better support for multi-system site files. A default system is selected at startup but, when
needed, a prompt is provided to select the current system.
4. Improved: Astro schedules are now disabled if location and time zone are not set.
5. New: panel and card ROM versions are now persisted and displayed on the panel documentation property
page.
6. Updated: The device selection dialog box that normally comes up when running reports and other operations now automatically selects and performs the operation on the device if it is the only one device
is in the list.
7. Fixed: Panel coping with Dataline switches did not correctly copy panel IDs if the parent panel matched
the programmed panel ID for a button. For CC, the panel ID is always the parent ID and they are now
always reset to the new panel ID.
8. Fixed: BACnet documentation support has been added for RTR32 type panels.
9. Updated: The system summary report has been updated to support more system wide information.
10. Updated: report engine code has been updated to be more reliable for HTML based reports.
11. Fixed: now correctly hiding analog input status while running in Designer.
20
Introduction
Version 3.02 – 10 April 2007
1. Updated: Due to network security issues, temporary files are now saved in the site folder of the LI file.
2. Added: "System Options" to the "Initialize" menu
3. Added: WinControl file association is now automatically enabled during installation.
4. Updated Documentation:
• BACnet - added documentation support for BACnet with WebLink
• Security - new section on security in Windows
• Glossary - list of common Watt Stopper/Legrand lighting control terms and meanings
5. Fixed: Variable Override Duration (VOD) programming bug corrected. Requires program transfer for
VOD to be set correctly.
6. Updated: Panel copy now asks if Dataline Switch neuron IDs should also be copied (usually only needed
when renumbering panels).
7. Fixed: The "Sync Clock" button was not correctly enabled when direct connected to a panel. This has
been fixed.
8. Updated: Internal MSXML files are now using the latest DLLs from Microsoft. This was causing a
Windows Update message after installing WinControl.
9. Updated: WinControl connection procedure now waits for CTS to go high before attempting to connect
via serial port to panels or links.
10. Fixed: WinControl Graphics running under Windows Vista had a bug that caused the device ID to fail.
Version 3.01 – 2 March 2007
1. Updated: Documentation for both WinControl and Designer including more context sensitive help from
some new property pages.
2. New: Set State option for System, Panel and Relay to control large groups of relays to a specified state.
3. New: Set Mode option for System, Panel and Relay to quickly set and clear various modes such as
schedule occupancy and shed. Can also clear runtime data and activity logs.
4. Updated: Dataline Monitor now has some quick dataline request options at the bottom of the page.
Choose the panel and request type and hit 'Request'. The data will be decoded in the dataline monitor
list.
5. Fixed: Analog Input programming had some bugs with 'Advanced' and with using the correct default
values.
Version 3.00 – 5 February 2007
1. Added: Support for Photocells and Analog Inputs for LI-CC panels including up to 32 setpoints per
panel and several Photocell predefined
2. Added: Support for BACnet configuration for WebLink 2.0 including default BACnet IDs and MAC
addresses for supported devices. To enable BACnet support for LI-CC, open the WinControl Helper
21
Introduction
and select "Specify System Options". The BACnet page can be accessed by right clicking on the system
device and selecting "BACnet".
3. Added: New support for Occupancy Sensor behavior for LI-CC relays. Options include Auto On/Off,
On Only, Off Only and Disabled for both normal hours (scheduled) and after hours.
4. Fixed: Several bugs testing with Microsoft Windows Vista Business Edition have been fixed. Testing
will continue with Vista Business and XP Professional SP2.
5. Fixed: Running as restricted user has been improved. Administrative account only required for installation and licensing.
6. Fixed: Daylight Saving Time wasn't showing the correct dates for 2007 on the System property page.
It did use the correct dates when programming, however.
7. Updated: System summary report to include analog input documentation and programming
8. Updated: New Site Wizard hitting 'Finish' now takes user to last wizard page instead of immediately
to the 'Job Info and Contacts' page.
9. Updated: Added new 'custom' reports to better support paging. To access these new reports, select
'Other' from the report menu and look for files with "Paged" in the name.
10. Updated: Advanced relay page for LI-CC relays now performs better and offers easier commands to
control relays and set their mode
11. Updated: Dataline monitor now offers quick panel data requests
12. Updated: Panel test report shows more device information for failed relays and occupancy sensors detected sections
13. Updated: Graphics now correctly accepts the improved license system
14. Still some lingering issues with Windows Vista that are yet to be resolved
22
Chapter 3. Documenting Panels
This section describes the process of creating and documenting your lighting control panels.
Figure 3.1. Panel Sizes
Creating Panels
After clicking the "Create New Panels" option the New Panel Wizard appears for entering the specifics of
the panel.
Panel Id: All panels need to be assigned an "id" number. The system automatically assigns the next highest
number to the new panel, though you may select any unique id number within the specified range. For
Complete Control systems the panels may be numbered from 1-999 and for Automation Card systems the
panels may be numbered from 1-99. Some projects associate the id to a floor number, while others number
panels by floor skipping ten at a time, for example 10, 20, 30.
Panel Description: You may give the panel any description you like. The description will appear on the
system riser diagram and on the printed hard copy of any reports or panel schedules.
Location: This is typically the room name or number of the electrical room where the panel will be installed.
This information will appear on the system riser diagram, and on the printed hard copy of any reports and
panel schedules.
Riser Location: In this field you may enter a number that specifies the location on the riser diagram to
place this panel. A 1 is used for first floor, 2 for second floor, etc. If you have multiple panels on a single
floor, you may specify 1.1, 1.2 for instance to place them in a particular sequence. If you leave this field
blank, the Panel Id will be used instead to specify a riser location.
23
Documenting Panels
Figure 3.2. New Panel Wizard
Panel Capacity: You may choose the panel capacity based on the different panel sizes offered by Watt
Stopper (see Figure 3.1, “Panel Sizes”). Panels do not have to be fully populated with relays, so you will
want to pick the capacity that will provide room for the expansion that you require. You may specify a
lower number of installed relays to reduce cost yet maintain flexibility. Panels may optionally have contactors installed to provide control of multi-phase loads, such as parking lot lighting (see Figure 3.4,
“Contactors In Panels”).
Dataline Switch Support: This option is automatically pre-selected for you based on earlier answers.
When this option is selected, it automatically includes the necessary option card to support these switches.
Dataline switch support is optional for Complete Control. You only need to include this option if this particular panel will need to be a termination point for dataline switches. For example, if you have a panel
that is used to control lighting in a parking deck, and none of the dataline switches in the system will be
connected to that panel, then the panel does not need the dataline switch support.
After you have filled in the necessary information, click "Create" and the panel will be created for you.
When the panel is created, you will then have the opportunity to document the loads (panel schedules and
switches), create another panel, or end the create panel process. We recommend you document your
panel schedules at this time, if you have the information available.
24
Documenting Panels
Figure 3.3. Next Panel Wizard
Figure 3.4. Contactors In Panels
25
Documenting Panels
Documenting Panels - Basics
Documentation and hardward support for Watt Stopper/Legrand lighting panels.
Figure 3.5. Panel (LCP) Document
On this screen, you may fill in or modify:
• Description... you may enter text by which you would like to use to refer to this panel.
• Location... text which describes the physical location of this panel, such as electrical room number.
• Riser location... a decimal number referring to the location of this panel on the riser diagram (used by
DXF file). If more than one panel is on a certain level, specify sequence with a number after the
decimal point, e.g. 1.1, 1.2, 1.3.
• Panel type... Select LI for Lighting Integrator series, Legacy for pre-LI panels (only LI series supports
dataline switches).
• Interior size... capacity of the panel to hold relays, 8, 12, 24, 48 (12 is for Legacy only).
• Enclosure type... surface, flush, NEMA3, etc.
• Enclosure size... select enclosure size (smaller interiors can be installed in larger enclosures).
• Panel circuit... the circuit number that controls power to the panel.
• Power supply... power supply type installed in the panel.
26
Documenting Panels
• Relay Cards... click to select the relay driver cards installed in the panel.
Figure 3.6. Relay Cards
• Status... click to run a status report for the panel.
• Dataline switch support... check to support dataline switches in the panel via the Automation Card.
• ARP support... if the panel has Dataline Switch support then Automatic Relay Packs (ARPs) may be
used with the panel if the CC firmware is version 18 or higher. If an ARP is defined before the panel
firmware vesion is discovered and the discovered version is less than 18 then the checkbox will be red
indicating an error. Uncheck the ARP option and hit OK to clear the error.
• Contactor support... document contactors for this panel. Contactors are supported for all but LP (Peanut)
panels.
• Smartwired Programming... click "Manually in panel" if you would like to allow Smartwiring within
the panel itself. The default, "Remotely from WinControl", allows button programming to be performed
from WinControl. Local Smartwiring is ignored.
• DL Card... click to document the DL card (if any) installed in the panel (see the section called “Documenting Panels - DL Card”). DL cards can only be installed in LI panels with interior sizes greater than
eight.
Each LCP is identified with an "address" between 1 and 999 (99 for Automation Card). This address is
assigned when creating the LCP before you can make any entries for documentation of the LCP. The address
is used to refer to the LCP whenever programming the relays, or performing any monitor or control functions
for the relays in the LCP. The address is set on the intelligence card in the LCP. There are two or three red
rotary switches on the card used to set the appropriate number. In a system using CC cards, the CC card
determines the address with three rotary dials. With only an Automation Card (AC), the AC card has two
rotary dials to determine the address.
The minimum amount of documentation required for a LCP is the address and total number of relays
available in the panel.
After Documenting the basic info for the panel, you may document individual relays (see the section called
“Documenting Panels - Relays”).
27
Documenting Panels
Documenting Panels - DL Card
Note
The DL card has not yet been released.
DL cards are documented by pressing the DL Card push button on the panel (LCP) document page (see
the section called “Documenting Panels - Basics”).
Figure 3.7. DL Card Push Button
The DL card combines the function of the Dataline Power Supply and Link into a single card. In addition
to the legacy RS232 interface, it supports a USB connection (only one port can be active at a time). It also
provides a source of composite state information for the Dataline Switches or Group Switch Inputs that
will resolve the true global state based on the switch/group programming contained in all panels and the
state of all relays/ARPs in the network. Finally, the DL card provides a means for joining two separate
global networks (each with their own DL card), into one larger network via a RS232 based tunnel that will
support connection to standard RS232 to Fiber converters.
Figure 3.8. DL Card
On this screen, you may fill in or modify:
• DL card installed... check if a DL card is installed in this panel.
28
Documenting Panels
Note
DL cards can only be installed in LI panels with interior sizes greater than eight.
• DL card Id... each DL card on the dataline requires a unique address between 0 and 9. In order for the
composite switch state information to be processed, one DL card should be addressed as 1.
• Connected to... select the device the DL card is connected to. Typically this would be a PC, Weblink or
another DL card.
• Dataline power supply... select Included if this DL card will be part of the global dataline or Removed
if it will be isolated from the global dataline.
• Link mode... select Master if this is the master link in charge of keeping the panel clocks in sync or
Slave if this is a slave link. Only one link can be set as master.
• Network... select Normal for normal DL card applications or Bridge if this DL card is being used to
connect multiple datalines via a fiber optic bridge.
• The fourth switch is currently unused.
Note
The information on this dialog is for documentation purposes only.
29
Documenting Panels
Documenting Panels - Relays
The Relay tab provides a summary of relay documentation and programming for all relays within the current
panel.
Figure 3.9. Panel - Relay Documentation
Information for each relay may be easily edited including copy and paste features. The default relay Type
is "Pilot", however you may set them to Status Only, Non-Pilot, ARP or Space. ARP is only displayed if
ARP support is selected in the panel documentation page. Set some positions to "Space" if no relay is to
be installed in that position, saving room for later expansion. Detailed information includes the Circuit,
Description of load, information on (optional) low voltage switches (LV Switch) controlling the relay,
as well as an optional Comment. An additional field allows you to specify the total load (in watts) that is
connected to the relay.
By clicking on the relay number at the right of the window, a pop up window will appear to allow you to
edit some of the advanced properties.
30
Documenting Panels
Figure 3.10. Panel - Relay Documentation
The relay page offers an option that is not available on the panel relay page. The Occupancy Sensor Behavior effects how the relay responds to an occupancy sensor input depending whether the relay is currently
in Normal Hours (occupied) or After Hours (unoccupied).
Other tabs available for panels include the the section called “Documenting Panels - Channels (Group
Switch Cards)” and Dataline Switch pages as required.
31
Documenting Panels
Documenting Panels - Contactors
The Contactors tab is where details regarding the contactors installed in a panel may be recorded.
On this screen, you may add contactors to the documentation, by clicking on the "Add Contactor" option.
Further, to remove a contactor, choose the contactor and select "Delete Contactor". The coil voltage is
documented on this screen as well (the assumption is that all contactors share the same coil voltage). For
individual contactors, you may select either a Normally Open (N/O, the default), or Normally Closed (N/C)
contactor. Contactors may be installed in the panel (Internal) or may be documented as installed separately
in another enclosure (External) in the Location column. The controlling relay may be selected for each
contactor. Four pole contactors are the standard when ordered with your Lighting Integrator panel. For
each pole in the contactor, you may specify the circuit and description of the load controlled.
A report is available to that will list all of the contactors that you have documented your panels. See the
section called “Contactors”.
Figure 3.11. Panel - Contactor Documentation
32
Documenting Panels
Documenting Panels - Channels (Group Switch
Cards)
Why would I want a Group Switch Card?
Group Switch cards are for terminating low voltage inputs, such as wall switches, occupancy sensors inputs,
and photocells
Each group switch card provides 8 channel inputs, each of which can be configured to control any or all
relays within a panel. When used with the PC automation card, you can setup the channel input to be
connected to a photo sensor, which can be then programmed for various foot-candle set points. Each input
that is terminated to a channel requires 2, 3, or 4-conductor cable to be wired from the Channel to the input
device. Each channel supports 2 or 3 wire inputs, and a fourth wire can be used for a pilot feedback. For
systems with Complete Control, you also have the option to have the button control a group that includes
relays in multiple panels. Such a group can have a functional profile such as Master, Blink, Clean, Shed,
Force On, and Force Off.
Figure 3.12. Channel Documentation
In this example, we have setup Channel A to control relays 30 and 31 in panel 1, which correspond to
Room 101 and Room 102, and Channel B to control relays 16, 17, and 37:
Normally, channels default to the "On/Off" function, which means the relays are all controlled to either
an ON or an OFF state as a group, based on the state of the input connected to the Channel on the Group
Switch Card.
33
Documenting Panels
You may optionally choose to control some relays to an ON state and some to an OFF state based on the
activation of the Channel input. This is known as a Pattern, and you will specify the relays to control ON
and the relays to control OFF separately.
If you click on the "On/Off" or the "On" or "Off" button in the Loads Controlled area of the dialog, a pop
up window will display allowing you to pick the relays to control. There is a check box at the top of this
screen labeled "Pattern". This option is comparable to the Pattern button on the Group Switch Card when
Smart Wiring the device. Further, you can click on the buttons that display individual relay numbers. When
Pattern mode is not selected for the channel, click once to include the relay for "ON/OFF" control (displayed
in Red). Click again to remove the relay from control.
Figure 3.13. Channel - Selecting Loads to Control
If Pattern mode is selected, the first click will include the relay for ON control (displayed in Red), and a
second click will set the Relay for OFF control (and display the relay in Green). A third click will remove
the relay from control, and return it to the Grey color.
This selection process, as well as the color coding (Red and Green), matches the Smart Wiring process
when performing this programming at the panel.
34
Documenting Panels
Figure 3.14. Group Switch Card in Panel
The Channel page is the location to document and program the Group Switch card inputs known as
Channels. Each group switch card provides 8 channel inputs, and each channel can be Smartwired or programmed from the PC to control an individual or a group of relays. When used with Complete Control, a
channel input can be used to terminate an analog input (such as a photocell sensor). See the section called
“Analog Inputs and LI-CC Panels” for more information on programming analog inputs.
Programming the Channel inputs on the Group Switch card allows you to specify either directly ON/OFF
control or Pattern Control of a list of relays. In either case, all relays must be in the same panel as the
Channel input. In the case of Complete Control, each channel may optionally be setup to control a Group
Code. Group codes do allow the ability to control relays in any number of panels in the system.
You may select the relays by clicking on the On/Off button, or by typing in the list of relays in the "Loads
Controlled" field. The Description field is used to indicate the location or area of the switch connected to
a given channel. Use the Function drop down list to select the On/Off or Pattern option, as well as to choose
or create a Group Code. See the section called “ Group Codes ” for more information.
35
Documenting Panels
Figure 3.15. Documenting Panels - Channels
Analog Inputs and LI-CC Panels
Analog Input connections are supported in LI-CC panels with CC firmware versions 18 or higher when a
GS card is installed. These connections provide support for WattStopper/Legrand photocell sensors as well
as supported third party analog device termination. The analog input supports a voltage range from 0 to 4
volts and the output action is completely configurable from WinControl.
To setup an analog input, you will Program the Lighting Control panel in which the input is terminated.
Choose Program - LCP - Channels from the WinControl menu and choose the panel, or right click on the
panel in the tree view and choose Properties. When the panel information is displayed, choose the "Channels"
page. After locating the Channel to which the photocell is terminated, click the Function button to choose
the Analog Input as the type of device.
36
Documenting Panels
Figure 3.16. Analog Input Function
After choosing Analog Input, click the Options button to continue to the next stage of setup. You will need
to select the type of Analog Input device. Watt Stopper offers a number of different photocell sensors for
various applications. These devices will be presented in a selection list. Choose your particular device
type.
Figure 3.17. Analog Input Device Options
After selecting your input device, you will need to add a setpoint. Each analog input should have at least
one setpoint to define its use, which determines the level at which the controlled group will go ON and
OFF. A total of 32 setpoints may be added per panel, but one setpoint is typically used per input. After
clicking Add, a default setpoint will be added based on the device type selected above. The only other required step is to select the group to be controlled, using the Group Code selector.
37
Documenting Panels
Figure 3.18. Analog Input Setpoint
Using a single setpoint normally requires no adjustments to trigger levels or time delays. The system will
provide a default setpoint value and deadband range as well as delay and timers. An ON command to the
selected group is sent when below the setpoint, and an OFF command is sent when above the setpoint (a
small deadband is factored in). A short time delay is also used with the deadband to prevent false fast
triggers if sensor readings fluctuate. By default, the default On time delay is much shorter than the default
Off delay but this value is device dependent.
Advanced analog input programming allows for many more options for more complicated scenarios. The
High and Low actions may be reversed or disabled depending on the need. Any setpoints (with in range
of the analog device) can be used including minimizing the deadband. And the time delays may be customized from zero seconds up to 59 minutes and 59 seconds (nearly 1 hour).
Setpoint status may be read if WinControl is Online. The values displayed are only valid if the latest analog
program settings have been transferred to the panel. See Chapter 10, Transfer Data Options for more information on transferring your programs. The values are automatically updated when the Setpoint tab is
changed. Click the refresh button to request the latest values if actively monitoring analog device readings.
Multiple setpoints can be programmed for each input which allows for very powerful lighting control
scenarios to be easily handled. Each setpoint typically uses a unique Group Code however, they can be
the same. For example, using unique Group Codes allows a photocell sensor to shed lights more aggressively
as more daylight is available.
Note
The Unit of Measure is provided by the analog device database and indicates the type of reading
from the analog device. The value is based on the DC voltage from the device. These values
should be considered relative as they will vary based on sensor lens type and installation orientation.
38
Documenting Panels
Why would I want a Dataline Switch?
Dataline switches can have from 1 to 8 buttons on each device with built in status indicators. Unlike the
Group Switch card Channels, a separate home run is not required for each switch station. Multiple dataline
switches can exist on a single, 4 conductor cable, network bus thereby reducing the number of home runs
required. Each button can be programmed to control an individual relay, a group of relays (ON/OFF or
Pattern), or one of the Channels on the Group Switch Card. For Complete Control, you also have the option
to have the button control a group that includes relays in multiple panels. Such a group can have a functional
profile such as Master, Blink, Clean, Shed, Force On, and Force Off. The figure below shows Dataline
Switches connection in such a network.
Figure 3.19. Dataline Switches with LI-CC network
39
Documenting Panels
Documenting Panels - Dataline Switches
Figure 3.20. Dataline Switches
You can create, edit, delete or commission dataline switches from this "Dataline Switches" page.
You can create dataline switches by clicking "New". You may name each dataline switch according to
your own needs; the name of the dataline switch will appear on the riser diagram.
Figure 3.21. New Dataline Switch
After naming the switch, you will be allowed to document it (see the section called “Documenting Dataline
Switches”).
You can edit a dataline switch by selecting one and clicking "Properties", or you can edit one by just double
clicking on it (see the section called “Documenting Dataline Switches”).
You can delete a dataline switch by selecting one and clicking "Delete". All programming and documentation for this switch will be removed.
You can commission dataline switches by clicking "Commission" (see Chapter 9, Dataline Switch Commissioning).
40
Documenting Panels
Documenting Dataline Switches
Figure 3.22. Document Dataline Switch
Once you have created a dataline switch, you can specify the type of device. Available types include:
• One Button *
• Two Button *
• Four Button *
• Eight Button *
• Universal Switch Module
* One, two, four, and eight button switches may optionally be keylock switches.
A picture of the device will appear so you can see the physical configuration. Dataline Switches have DIP
switches on the back for configuring the device. By selecting the functional profile for the device on the
right, the display at the bottom right will show you how to set the DIP switches before the device is installed.
You may optionally create button lables for two, four, and eight button switches by checking the "Edit
Labels" check box. Once checked, edit boxes will be displayed over the appropriate buttons for you to label.
If no descriptions have been entered, on the "Program Dataline Switch" page (see the section called “Programming Dataline Switches”), these labels will be inserted as the default descriptions.
After selecting the basic documentation and setup for the dataline switch, you can click on the "Program
Dataline Switch" tab (see the section called “Programming Dataline Switches”) to setup the programming
for the switch.
41
Chapter 4. Programming Basics
The following options are advanced features of Complete Control that are used in common lighting scenarios.
Group Codes
Group Codes can be used to control relays in multiple panels. Once created, Group Codes can be assigned
to buttons on Dataline Switches, as well as to Channels on Group Switch cards. Group Codes have an id
number from 1-16000. Group Codes are setup with a function that defines how the control of the group is
processed. These functions are:
Master
The master function (the default) will simply turn all associated relays ON/OFF. When a master group
code is turned on, the associated relays come on, and when it is turned off, the relays turn off. No Blink
warning is provided. If time delays are enabled, scheduled off or turned off by a Blink Warn switch, then
turning this group code ON will start the time delay process specified for the relay. Master is typically
used for occupant override switches.
Blink Warn
Relays programmed for this group code (and specified as Blink enabled in relay properties) will Blink
when the group code is turned off, and then go off five minutes later. A group code setup as Blink Warn
will simulate the schedule scenario. When this group code is turned ON, the relay(s) come on. An ON action
on this group code will disable time delays, and an OFF action by this switch type will enable time delays
for any subsequent overrides (just as a scheduled action would do so). The 5 minute Blink window is adjustable on a panel basis. Blink Warn is typically used when you want to emulate schedule behavior from
an input, such as an external clock.
Cleaning
This group code is designed for cleaning crew operation. Relays controlled by a cleaning group code will
go on when requested, but the group code cannot turn off relays if the area is in Normal Hours mode (aka
occupied, or the relay is ON due to some other type of override actions). This function does initiate the
count down of time delays, and will Blink before off (due to time delay) if Blink is enabled. The cleaning
switch time delay defaults to the same as the relay time delay. The cleaning crew time delay may be specified
separately for each LCP. Cleaning is typically used with switches that are centrally located and used by
janitor services after hours.
Shed
The shed function is used for daylighting and demand shed scenarios. Relays associated with a shed group
code will track the operation of the switch (photo-switch/demand contact) when the area is in Normal
Hours mode. If an occupant overrides the shed off action, the shed function for his area is deactivated until
the next day. The shed override feature may be disabled on a per panel basis using Special Features for
the panel. Shed is typically used with daylighting or demand shed scenarios.
42
Programming Basics
Force ON
This feature on a group code allows you to setup a switch that when turned ON will Force ON the relays
in the group. When turned OFF, relays return to normal operation. Force ON may be useful as an input
from a security system to activate lights when an alarm is active.
Force OFF
This feature on a group code allows you to setup a switch that when turned ON will Force OFF the relays
in the group When turned OFF, relays return to normal operation. Force OFF may be useful to keep
lights OFF without allowing an occupant override (such as Shed allows).
Any relay in a Force mode will not be allowed to change state from schedules or other programmable
commands.
Figure 4.1. Program Group Codes
43
Programming Basics
Phone Codes
Phone Codes are code numbers that can be programmed in your Complete Control system. They are typically
activated by use of a Telephone Override Device (HPHONE). Phone Codes allow you to group multiple
relays and control the group with a single command. The Phone Code command is convenient to used for
occupant overrides. In addition to commands via Telephone Override, any Phone Code can be activated
via the Tree View portion of the WinControl software and from the available WinControl Graphics interface.
The Phone Code Create/Edit dialog allows you to view the list of all Phone Codes that have been programmed in the system. In addition to scrolling through the list of Phone Codes, Phone Codes can be
Created, Edited, or Deleted using this dialog.
Individual Phone Codes can be created and edited by:
• Selecting Program on the menu bar, then
• Left click the mouse on the System command
• Left click the mouse on Phone Codes on the submenu
The Phone Code Create/Edit dialog is displayed (see Figure 4.2, “Phone Code Create/Edit Dialog”)
Figure 4.2. Phone Code Create/Edit Dialog
The Phone Code Dialog is a simple to use approach to creating or editing the phone codes. You can Create
a new phone code doing the following:
• Left click the New button at the bottom-left portion of the dialog.
• Enter the new phone code in the specified 4-digit format.
44
Programming Basics
Figure 4.3. Create a Phone Code
• Click OK
The Phone Code Edit dialog displays (see Figure 4.4, “Phone Code Editor”). Enter a Description by:
• Pointing to the box to the right of the Description label,
• Left click the mouse, and
• Typing in the text description.
Similarly, you may Edit a group code by:
• Pointing to one of the codes in the displayed list,
• Left click the mouse to select it,
• Point to the Edit command and left click.
You may also select one of the displayed codes, then double left click to instantly display the Group Code
Create/Edit dialog.
The Phone Code Edit Dialog displays two lists. The list on the left side of the dialog includes all of the
available relays not currently part of the Phone Code group. The list on the right is the list of relays included
in the Phone Code group. WinControl offers you a number of options to simplify the maintenance of the
list:
• You may select a relay to include from the left list by pointing to it, left click the mouse, then point to
Add and left click to move the relay over to the Include list.
• Point to a relay on the Include list on the right, left click the mouse, then point to the Remove command
and left click to move the relay over to the Available list.
• Click on the LCP/Relay, Circuit, or Description column to sort the list by the corresponding field.
• Click on a relay, or shift + left click to select multiple relays, then Drag to the other list.
45
Programming Basics
Figure 4.4. Phone Code Editor
Click on a relay, or click using the Shift or Control keys to select multiple relays, and then Drag to
the other list.
46
Programming Basics
Common Area Relays
Common area relays function as follows:
• A relay designated as a "common area" is programmed with a list of relays that may include as few as
one, or as many as all other relays in the panel. The list of relays consists of those corresponding to
Occupant Areas. When any of the Occupant Area relays are turned ON, the Common Area relay will
be turned ON if it is not ON already. The common area relay status will show the relay ON due to interlock.
• When all relays listed as Occupant Areas for the Common Area relay are turned OFF, then the Common
Area relay will be turned OFF. If the Common Area relay is programmed with a time delay, then the
time delay will be counted down as an Egress Delay. The Egress Delay provides the last occupant with
common area lighting for the time specified. If Blink function is enabled for the Common Area relay,
the relay will Blink at the end of the Egress time delay period, then turn Off five minutes later if no occupants turn ON their relays.
• To program a relay as a Common Area relay, move the cursor to the row of the desired relay, and select
Common. Enter the list of relays to be designated as Occupant relays for this Common Area. Click OK
to keep the modifications. You will then return to the standard relay program options. Note that the
common area relay capability is only in LCP devices (HPCU48CC) with ROM version 1.4 or higher.
You may use the Test Field Devices function to determine your ROM version in each LCP. If you program
relays as common areas and the feature is not supported in your panel, you will see a warning message
when transferring the programs.
If you program a relay as a Common Area Relay, you will:
• Usually not schedule the relay,
• Not program switches or phone codes to control the common area relay.
Instead, you should allow common area relays to be controlled automatically by the Occupant relays. Occupant relays, in turn, are activated by schedules, switches, and phone codes. You must remember that if
a Common Area relay is scheduled or overridden directly, it defeats the common area capability.
A Common Area relay programmed with Blink Warn allows the relay to have an egress time delay.
47
Programming Basics
Programming Dataline Switches
After selecting the basic documentation and setup for the dataline switch (see the section called “Documenting Dataline Switches”), you can program the switch from this "Program Dataline Switch" tab.
Figure 4.5. Program Dataline Switch
Dataline switch button programming is very similar to group switch card channel input programming (see
the section called “Documenting Panels - Channels (Group Switch Cards)”) with the addition of the
channel function (see Figure 4.6, “Channel Function”). You can enter a description, function and the loads
controlled for each button.
The "Description" field is used to indicate the location or area controlled.
The "Function" drop down is used to determine how the loads are controlled. Possible functions include:
• Local On/Off - Controls the list of relays entered in the "Loads Controlled" field. For CC systems, the
relays must be in the local panel. For Automation systems, the relays can be in any one panel.
• Pattern - Applies a pattern to the list of relays entered in the "Loads Controlled" field. For CC systems,
the relays must be in the local panel. For Automation systems, the relays can be in any one panel.
• Channel - Activates the channel programming for the selected channel. For CC systems, channel programming in the local panel is activated. For Automation systems, channel programming in up to twelve
panels (or all panels) can be activated.
Figure 4.6. Channel Function
• Group Code - Controls the relays in the group code (see the section called “ Group Codes ”). Group
codes can span multiple panels, but they are only allowed in CC systems (not in Automation systems).
The "Loads Controlled" field lists the specific panels, relays and/or group codes that are to be controlled.
You may select the relays to be controlled by clicking on the On/Off button, or you may enter them in the
edit box.
48
Programming Basics
Using the AS-100 Automatic Switch with LI-CC
Panels
The AS-100 is an automatic wall switch from Watt Stopper that can be installed on a relay controlled circuit.
The AS-100 automatic control switch can be set up to receive on and off signals. A typical application
would have multiple AS-100 wall switches downstream from a single relay load. See the AS-100 installation
instructions for more detailed information http://www.wattstopper.com/getdoc/1149.pdf
Figure 4.7. InteliSwitch® AS-100 Automatic Control Switch
Occupant Operation:
• Manual on and off control at each switch is always available by pressing the ON/OFF button on the wall
switch.
Lighting Control Panel Operation:
• The lighting control panel sends power interrupt signals (using various length OFF pulse of the relay)
to turn the switch on, off or off after a five-minute time delay.
• The lighting control panel always restores the relay to the ON state to allow local occupant control.
Power Interrupt Signals::
All automatic commands to delay off, shut off or turn on the AS-100 come from interrupting power to the
switch for a specified time duration, listed here (resolution for timing must be +/- one-quarter of a second):
• Automatic-ON: 3 sec. Turns lights on (if Automatic-ON Setup Mode option is enabled, see AS-100
instructions).
• Automatic-OFF: 5 sec. Turns lights off.
• Automatic Delayed-OFF: 1 sec. Initiates a five - minute delay before shutting off lights.
Note
Note: During the Delayed-off setting, the lights flash once (when power is interrupted for 1
second); the center (red) locator LED begins to blink once every two (2) seconds; and an audible
beep will sound once every minute (if enabled, see AS-100 setup documentation). During the final
49
Programming Basics
minute, the LED will blink once every second and the beep will sound every five (5) seconds
until the lights are turned off. At any time, pushing the ON/OFF button before the lights turn off
will cancel the countdown and keep the lights on until the next control signal from the lighting
control panel, or until the AS-100 is manually turned off.
Using AS-100 devices with your LI-CC panel
The LI-CC panel has special handling routines for use with the AS-100 device. Setup is extremely simple.
On the Relay properties page, in the section labeled Relay Behavior is an option for selecting AS-100 operation. There are two settings available for AS-100 devices (see the section called “Program - Relay Behavior”):
• AS-100 Blink Warn (recommended)
This is the setting to use for most common applications. In this application, a schedule OFF (or a Blink
Warn group OFF) will result in a 1 second pulse, which starts the Automatic Delayed Off feature. In
addition, the schedule OFF signifies the start of a periodic OFF sweep.
• AS-100 No Blink Warn
This setting is typically only used when you know you don't want to activate the grace period feature
of the AS100. In this application, a schedule OFF (or a Blink Warn group OFF) will result in a 5 second
pulse, which specifies the Automatic Off feature of the AS100.
In addition to the behaviors listed above, other features also work differently when choosing AS-100 behavior. For instance, the Override Duration is used to specify a sweep effect that starts after scheduling OFF
the loads. These behaviors include:
• Override Duration is used to specify sweep interval that repeats after a Schedule OFF command.
• Schedule OFF commands (as well as Blink Warn Group OFF) result in a sweeping effect, repeating
the Automatic Delay Off command according to the Override Duration setting. The repeating sweeping
effect will stop at either a Schedule ON command, a Blink Warn Group ON command, or at the specified
Occupancy Time for the schedule.
• Occupancy Time on the relay's schedule is used to specify the time that the sweep effect process ends.
• Schedule ON (e.g. morning schedule), while not required, will force switches into the ON state. In fact,
any ON command results in the Automatic-ON 3 second pulse.
Incompatible Features
Certain intelligent scenarios of the LI-CC system are not practical in combination with the AS100 feature. The following functions and features do not function as intended when used with
AS-100 type loads, and thus are not recommended:
• Common Area
• Clean
• Shed
• Force ON
• Force OFF
50
Programming Basics
• Activity Log and Run Time (not capable of reflecting local switch activity)
• Relay State (will always indicate ON, not the state of the connected AS-100 load)
51
Programming Basics
Using Occupancy Sensors with LI-CC Panels
Watt Stopper makes a full line of Occupancy Sensors. Our Lighting Integrator CC panel may be used with
most of our sensors that provide a low voltage contact closure (Note that some sensors offered are a line
voltage based device for switching purposes, and are not compatible as described in this section). The 24
volt signal contact closure on Watt Stopper Occupancy Sensors is automatically detected by the LI-CC
panel as an Occupancy Sensor input, and the LI panel adjusts its operation accordingly. Occupancy Sensors
are automatically detected as such when connected to the Red, Black, and White wires on the RD (Relay
Driver) board in an LI-CC panel. In addition, an Occupancy Sensor is also automatically detected in the
same way when connected to the Red, Black, and White terminals on the GS (Group Switch) board in an
LI-CC panel.
A wiring diagram for connecting our sensors to the LI CC panel is shown below. This link will take you
directly to a variety of Wiring Diagrams on our CAD Resource Center for our Lighting Integrator panels
http://www.wattstopper.com/products/cad-resource.html?doctype=136.
For an index of all wiring diagrams by document id, you may go to: http://www.wattstopper.com/products/wiring-diagrams.html
A more detailed version of this wiring diagram as well as many others are available on our CAD Resource
Center [http://www.wattstopper.com/products/cad-resource.html].
52
Programming Basics
Figure 4.8. Occupancy Sensor Wiring Diagram 60-601
LI CC Occupancy Sensor Processing
Multiple Sensor Tracking
The LI-CC panel will track up to four sensors controlling a single relay. Sensors are associated directly to
a relay simply by terminating the sensor to the relay contacts on the RD (Relay Driver) board. Sensors
may also be terminated to GS inputs, and configured to directly control a single relay or multiple relays
in the panel. When an Occupancy Sensor is connected in this way, the panel logic will allow multiple
sensors to control the relay load. The first sensor to detect occupant activity will cause the load to turn ON,
and the last sensor to signal a lack of occupancy will turn the load OFF. This ability to manage multiple
sensors is an automatic feature and applies to RD terminated sensors as well as sensors terminated to the
GS input and programmed to control relays directly. The list of sensors tracked is associated with the relay
load itself, and sensors that are in the ON state controlling the relay load can be reviewed in the LI Advanced
53
Programming Basics
Relay Status screen. A side effect of this feature is that in order for a sensor to turn a load OFF it must
have first sent an ON signal via contact closure.
Manual and Automatic Modes
Normally by connecting a sensor to a relay load it seems a reasonable assumption that you will want the
load to turn ON when occupancy is sensed and OFF when there is no occupancy. This behavior is in fact
the default for our LI CC panels, and is referred to as "Auto On / Auto Off". We do offer other types of
operation for a sensor, and the operation mode may be different depending on normally scheduled (or
'normal occupancy' time) vs after hours or non-schedule time (non occupied time).
Note that Auto On refers to the concept that the lights will turn ON when the sensor detects activity. You
may optionally decided whether you want the load to go On automatically at a predetermined time via a
schedule. In this context, Auto On refers only to the sensor activation of the load.
Note that Auto Off refers to the concept that the lights will turn OFF when sensor activity is no longer
detected. You may optionally decided whether you want the load to go Off automatically at a predetermined
time via a schedule. In the case where you schedule a load Off at a certain time, the load will not go Off
if any of the sensors continue to detect activity (the sensor has priority over the schedule Off). In this
context, Auto Off refers only to the sensor control of the load.
Important items to remember regarding sensor operation:
• Default operation is Auto On / Auto Off if the relay load does not follow a schedule
• Default operation is Auto On / Manual Off if the relay load follows a schedule and is currently scheduled
ON or in a Normal Hours mode.
• Occupied and Unoccupied Sensor operation is adjustable
• Manual On / Auto Off mode has automatic grace period of 1 minute in case of a False Off Trigger
• Sensor activity is tracked with a unique Priority Array slot assignment.
• Sensor time delay may be set to minimum on sensor device and programmed to a longer time in WinControl
Note
Automatic sensor detection and logic only applies to sensors connected the RD input or GS input.
Furthermore, if you use a group code with a function profile such as Master, Blink, Clean, Shed,
Force ON, or Force OFF, these function profiles cause non-sensor logic to be applied.
Occupant Operation:
Occupancy Sensor Operation
When an Occupancy Sensor is detected, it is processed with special handling.
There is a reserved position in the Priority Array for occupancy sensors.
By default, Occupancy Sensor activity is handled in an "Auto ON" and "Auto OFF" configuration when
connected to an individual relay. This means that when the Sensor detects and occupant in the room, the
relay will be controlled ON, and when there is a lack of activity, the relay will be controlled to the OFF
state.
54
Programming Basics
Furthermore, there is additional processing that is done if the relay in a mode indicated by the Occupancy
status. Occupancy status is automatically set to "Normal Hours" (or Occupied) at 3:01 AM by default if
the relay is scheduled. By default during Normal Hours, a relay will go on automatically when occupant
activity is detected (Auto ON) and will NOT go OFF when there is a lack of occupant activity detected
(Manual OFF). During "After Hours", the behavior for a relay controlled by a sensor is Auto ON and Auto
OFF.
These settings are overridable in WinControl. The following options are available for Normal Hours as
well as for After Hours modes: Auto ON Auto OFF
Currently, the implementation of Sensor overrides is such that the system performs Auto ON and Auto
OFF during if load is in Normal Hours mode, and does Auto ON and Manual OFF if After Hours mode.
The intent would be to have four enumerated types for the Sensor definition, for each of the Normal Hours
and After Hours modes. Examples would be Auto ON/Auto OFF, Auto ON/Manual OFF (most occupant
friendly), and Manual ON/Auto OFF (most energy efficient). This would require 4 bits of data storage for
the properties. The following summarizes the four sensor control definitions, and should be available as a
separate setting for each of Normal Hours mode and After Hours mode.
• Auto On / Auto Off
This scenario is the most typically considered for sensor control. Load automatically turns ON when
motion is sensed, and OFF when no motion is sensed at end of a pre-determined period of elapsed time.
Note
This is the behavior for a sensor used in CC Legacy panels for occupancy sensor inputs, regardless of Normal or After Hours mode. This is used in LI panels for occupancy sensor inputs
during times outside of normal occupancy hours (which is this default if the relay does not
follow a schedule).
• Auto On / Manual Off
This scenario is generally the most occupant friendly, while least energy efficient. Load automatically
turns ON when motion is sensed, and is not turned OFF even when activity is no longer detected. This
scenario could be used during Normal Hours, allowing lights to stay on once activated during the normal
expected time of occupancy. This scenario would not be desirable without a local override switch to
turn the lights off.
Note
This is used in current LI panels for occupancy sensor inputs when the current status is considered as 'normal occupied' time. This will be true for relays scheduled on or for relays following
a schedule that incorporate a default occupancy time of 3:00 AM and before any OFF schedule
event.
• Manual On / Automatic Off
This scenario is generally the most energy efficient, but not as occupant friendly. The load must be
manually activated via a switch. The load automatically turns OFF when no motion is sensed during a
pre-determined period of elapsed time. This scenario would only make sense when a local override
switch is available.
55
Programming Basics
Note
Note that when an Automatic OFF is executed, the system will monitor the Occupancy Sensor
for any ON activity during the "Blink Warn" time if Blink is enabled. We recommend using
"Blink Warn" enabled on the relay to allow this extra level of occupant sensitivity, which helps
prevent a false Off from keeping lights Off when Manual On is selected.
• Manual On / Manual Off
This scenario is typically not used with a sensor because it completely defeats the automatic control aspects
of the sensor. This scenario would not be desirable without some type of local override device.
Note
Not likely to be used, this could be used if you wanted to disable the Occupancy Sensor completely during either an Normal Hours or After Hours mode.
56
Chapter 5. Specify System Options
The system options will vary based on whether the system you are designing supports a PC and software
for programming and control. Complete Control Card (CC) systems are designed exclusively for use with
WinControl as the front end, thus the options described here are for Complete Control only.
System Options
The following image shows the various system and front end options available for an LI-CC based system.
These options may be accessed via the WinControl Helper by choosing the System option.
Figure 5.1. System Options - PC Automation
The options you select will be included on the Riser Diagram of the Lighting Control system. These features
are as follows:
• Software Options
By choosing this option the WinControl Graphics software package is added to WinControl to provide
graphical floor plan display of the project. The graphical display has the ability to have real time updates
and control.
• Network Options
Link: A Link device is typically located near the PC to provide RS-232 connectivity from the PC to the
Global Dataline of the Lighting Control system.
WebLink: The WebLink device offers Internet based connectivity to the Lighting Control system. The
WebLink acts as a type of router between the lighting control network and the customer's LAN. With
WebLink in place, WinControl can communicate through the customers network rather than require a
Link connection direct to the PC. In addition, the following WebLink options are available:
• 365-day Scheduler
57
Specify System Options
Allows schedule configurations from anywhere on the LAN using a standard web browser, with
ability to setup repeating schedules, and ability to easily override schedules in advance.
• BACnet
BACnet is an ASHRAE standard for connectivity to Building Automation Systems. Watt Stopper
offers a BACnet add-on to WebLink that allows a BACnet capable BAS system to interface to the
Lighting Control system.
• Modem
Allows remove dialup access to WebLink over a phone line when a network connection is not available.
• MyLights
Allows occupant control of lighting from their desktop PC, either through a web page or via the
automatic desktop override feature.
• Computer Options: You may specify the type of computer front end that should be included on the
Riser diagram.
58
Chapter 6. Initialize Menu Options
Use the mouse to point to the Initialize on the menu bar and left click the mouse. The Initialize menu appears
with the following commands:
• Select Active System For sites with multiple lighting control systems in a common file, you may use
this option to select the Active system
• My Profile Allows you to specify information about yourself that is carried into site files when you
create or update files. This is very useful if you will be sending your files to Watt Stopper for review.
Figure 6.1. Initialize Menu Command
Site Properties
The Site Properties options are available by right clicking with your mouse on the Site option in the tree
view.
There are three tabs with options as described below.
• Site Info Display site name and number of relays in the system.
59
Initialize Menu Options
Figure 6.2. Site Info
• System List Provides a button from which you can access the various lighting control systems in the
site.
Figure 6.3. System List
• Transfer Settings Provides a number of options that you can modify that affects the transfer of data to
the various systems in the site.
60
Initialize Menu Options
Figure 6.4. Transfer Settings
By default, the Transfer settings are enabled to transfer activity log data every day at 12:38am. This can
be changed or disabled on this screen. In addition, there are settings here that allow you to specify a
specific computer that is allowed to do transfers of programs and/or historical data. This may be of interest
in situations with multiple computers, in which you want to make sure that only one computer acts as
the master computer. The Program Machine Name indicates the computer that is allowed to transfer
program information. The Logging Machine Name indicates the computer that is allowed to transfer
historical data. Because transfer of log history removes that data from the panels, you normally only
want a specific computer to do such transfers. The default for both machine settings is to allow any
computer to do the transfer.
See Chapter 11, Trend Reporting Overview for more information on historical data and Trend reporting
options.
See Chapter 10, Transfer Data Options for more information on the transfer of historical data.
61
Initialize Menu Options
System Properties
This option allows input or edit of overall system parameters.
Figure 6.5. Initialize System Properties Dialog
This dialog allows you to set the communications port the system will use, the baud rate (rate of transfer
of data) of the port, and the mode of the simulator. The simulator mode determines the extent to which the
system will emulate the physical controls for test and offline use.
• System Name is available for a user defined text field to describe this lighting control system. Each individual network of lighting control panels is designated as a system. The only higher level on the hierarchy is the 'Site' which also has a name field. Often there is a one to one correlation of one system per
site, but in fact you may have multiple lighting control systems in a single site.
• System Type is used to designate the type of lighting control panels that make up a network. Different
types of communications and automation are available for lighting control panels from Watt Stopper.
Our newest generation of panels is the Lighting Integrator series, and LI with Complete Control Card
is used to designate this system type.
• System Code format is used to designate whether 'group codes' used in the system should be in a Group
Code (single number) format of 1-16000 (recommended for LI CC) or Switch Code format of xxx/yy,
(where xxx is 0-999 and yy is 1-16) recommended for our legacy CC panels.
• Connection Information allows you to specify how WinControl will communicate with this lighting
control system. The most common connection is a Serial connection type on COM1, using the HCABLEC, at 19200 baud rate. Other options include using the WebLink device, which will require you to change
to Socket communicates with a designated IP address, on port 3001. In this case, baud rate is not used.
Another option is to 'simulate' a system by setting Simulator to Full. This is useful for demonstrations.
62
Initialize Menu Options
• Daylight Savings Time options allow you to configure the dates that the clock in your lighting control
system is set forward and backward due to Daylight Savings. WinControl 2.50 introduces new algorithms
to automatically support the new daylight savings rules that go into affect in 2007. Lighting Integrator
panels support these changes in WinControl and will automatically adjust the clock with the new dates.
Legacy panels are also will work with the new WinControl options, but will require a program transfer
at least every two years to ensure the proper dates are set for DST.
63
Initialize Menu Options
Go Online / Go Offline
• Go Online Connect to the system.
• Go Offline Disconnect from system.
Point to the Go Online or Go Offline command allows you to connect or disconnect communications with
the field panels using a simple click of the left mouse button (see Figure 6.6, “Initialize Menu Go Online
/ Go Offline (Connection) Command”) . You must select Go Online to allow the system to communicate
with the field panels. The connection must be made to:
• Test the hardware
• Transfer program changes to the hardware and have them take affect.
• Perform control functions or determine status of devices.
If the Go Online command is selected and the connection is made a green ON will appear on the Tree View
at the System branch. If the Go Offline command is selected and the system is not connected a red OFF
will appear at the System branch.
Figure 6.6. Initialize Menu Go Online / Go Offline (Connection) Command
64
Initialize Menu Options
Initialize - Security Features
This option allows you to Create or edit WinControl system security options.
WinControl's security features are designed to meet current and emerging security requirements for control
systems.
Note
We recommend you resist the temptation to make this one of the first areas you explore.
Activating security does not make the system easier to use, and greatly increases the likelihood
that a particular feature will not work for a particular user when needed. (e.g. proper roles were
not given to the user, or the user has forgotten the user id or password). Therefore we strongly
suggest planning and testing the security setup with a 'test' site separately from your primary site
file before you 'go live' with your security configuration.
The security component in WinControl is based on:
• Privileges,
• Roles,
• A unique User Identification (UserId), and
• User Password.
A Privilege is a permission category, which allows a specified user to perform a given function or functions.
Users are granted privileges to do things within the system based on need, so different users will have
different privileges. For example, for a User to turn a relay on requires the relay control privilege. The
LCP Description function requires the user to have the Document Write privilege. You cannot create new
privileges or alter the required privilege for a given function within the security system.
A Role is an end user defined collection of privileges. The end user can create as many roles as they like
and assign any combination of the privileges that have meaning in their organization. The same privilege
can be assigned to more than one role. A "SuperUser" role should be establish that includes all of the
available privileges.
A User of WinControl will be assigned a unique UserID and password. Each user is assigned a single role.
This completes the security profile. A User is assigned a role, which is granted zero or more privileges
which that user may perform in WinControl. The System Administrator can, at any time, grant or limit a
user's access in WinControl as may be needed.
WinControl provides for two different ways to implement user authentication. The default method, WinControl Logon, requires that a user log in with user id and password when opening the Site file. This
method uses a user id and password that is stored as part of the site file (in an encrypted way). WinControl
is responsible for the authentication process (i.e. the user enters the proper password).
The second method is enabled via the checkbox Use Windows Logon. With this option, WinControl uses
the currently logged on user id in the Windows environment as the user id. In this case, the authentication
of password is done by the Windows operating system. In this scenario, the password stored by WinControl
is NOT RELEVANT. The password is set via normal Windows user id and setup processes. This means
also that the user is NOT authenticated when the site is opened, but credentials (roles) are validated according
to the Windows user. In this scenario you must still do all of the user id setup and role configuration, the
65
Initialize Menu Options
only difference from a setup perspective is that the password is unused, and user ids and passwords must
be setup in the Windows operating system security.
A typical scenario to establish WinControl might be as follows:
• Define Users and privileges needed
• Joe: System Administrator. Super User.
• Sam: Facility Engineer. All privileges and Super User (Backup SysAdmin)
• Elaine: Operator. Should be able to control relays and Switches and run diagnostics.
• Natia: Event Manager. Control event sound and lighting.
• Jim: Accountant. Needs to be able to turn on his own lights.
• Solution: Create 5 roles as follows:
• SuperUser: Granted all privileges
• Supervisor: Granted all privileges except 'Administer Security'
• Maintenance: Control Relays, Control Switches, Run Diagnostics, General Access
• General: General Access privileges as required.
• Technician: Create Devices, Diagnostics, Document Write, Program Write, General Access
Create a user account for each person and assign the Roles.
Security Setup
This is the initial dialog box for establishing you system's security. When you have completed setting up
your site security, this screen will display both the roles and users permitted for your system (see Figure 6.7,
“Security Dialog Box”).
This series of dialogs allows you to establish the level of system security you deem appropriate, or is required
at your site. You define who the system users are and what role they will have when using the system. As
you identify the users you must:
• Assign their respective roles,
• Set their passwords to control access (unless using Windows logon), and
• Specify what each user will be allowed to do by assigning privileges .
The roles and users are displayed in the respective text boxes.
66
Initialize Menu Options
Figure 6.7. Security Dialog Box
When you select Edit on the menu bar the menu provides a New Role and New User command option. If
you select New Role, the Edit Role dialog is displayed (see Figure 6.8, “Security Edit Role”). This dialog
allows you to identify specific roles and user for the system. You enter:
• The name of the new role,
• A description for the role, then
• Specify the users you want to have the role.
At least one person must be assigned the Administer Security privilege for the system. Only staff members
with this privilege are permitted to assign roles and privileges. Assign a Security Administrator first, before
identifying other users and access.
To assign users, point to the Assign Users command button, left click on it, then:
• Point to the Name text box and left click.
• Enter the Name of the new role.
• Point to the Description text box and left click
• Enter you description for the new role.
• Point to the Assign Users command button and left click.
67
Initialize Menu Options
• Point to the Assigned Privileges list box, point to the privilege to be assigned, left click the mouse to
highlight it, then use the arrows between the two list boxes to add the privilege. You can select more
than one privilege for a user by repeating the selection/add step.
• Click on OK.
Figure 6.8. Security Edit Role
Selecting the New User command displays the Edit User dialog, Figure 6.9, “Security Edit User”. To add
a user:
• Point to the Name text box and left click.
• Type in the name of the user.
• Point to the User Description text box and left click.
• Type in the user description.
• Point to the Password text box, left click, then enter the user's password.
• Point to Role text box down arrow and select a role from options in the list box.
• Point to OK and left click.
68
Initialize Menu Options
Figure 6.9. Security Edit User
69
Initialize Menu Options
Logon
Selecting this command allows you to Logon on to the system for the selected site. You are only prompted
to Logon only if WinControl Security has been enabled using the Security option
See the section called “Initialize - Security Features” for more information on enabling security.
Figure 6.10. Logon Command
70
Initialize Menu Options
Set PC Clock
This command provides direct access to the Windows clock dialog where you can set the date and time
information for the PC. The time set in the PC is available to synchronize the Link clock. Figure shown
may differ for your version of Windows.
Figure 6.11. Set PC Clock Command
71
Initialize Menu Options
Set LINK Clock
This command allows you to set the clock functions and synchronize times for the Link (Figure 6.12, “Set
Link Clock”). Selecting the Sync Clock button on this dialog institutes a command to synchronizes the
Link timing with the PC system timing. If you are plugged directly into a panel, this option will set the
clock in the panel only.
The Refresh button invokes a command to "refresh" the displayed status and time information.
The Link Status box displays the current status of various link components and portions of the Complete
Control system.
Figure 6.12. Set Link Clock
72
Initialize Menu Options
Set Time/Date Format
The Set Date/Time format option brings up the operating system Regional Options dialog. This allows
you to set the various format options for date and time for your selected region. The format selected is
used by WinControl to format the display of time and date in user input dialogs. This option also provides
features to define decimal places for numbers and currency data (not used by WinControl) as part of your
operating system. Figure shown may differ for your version of Windows.
Figure 6.13. Set Time/Date Format
73
Initialize Menu Options
Astronomical Clock
Figure 6.14. Astronomical Clock Location
The astronomical clock feature in WinControl allows you to specify your geographical location so that the
system can accurately estimate sunrise and sunset times. This feature lets the system allow the use of natural light in your area without use of a photocell. By setting up the astronomical clock you can also specify
in your schedules that devices will be turned On or Off at sunset or sunrise, as well as offsets from that
time using a variable number of minutes. The feature thus contributes to insure the schedule-dependent
features of the system actually work in a way that is consistent with the natural (available) light in your
time zone. See the section called “Program - System - Schedules” for more information on using sunrise
/ sunset times in your schedules.
When you select the Astronomical Clock command from the menu, the Edit Astro Clock Location Info
dialog is displayed (Figure 6.14, “Astronomical Clock Location”). You may enter your location information
directly if you know the geographic coordinates (latitude and longitude) of your location, or use the
Lookup feature.
To enter location information directly, use a mouse click to set the cursor to the Latitude, Degrees text
box. The 0 will be highlighted blue. Enter the number of degrees, then touch the Tab key. The cursor will
move to the Minutes text box and highlight 0. Enter the number of minutes. You must now select North
or South by pointing to one or the other of the options and left clicking the mouse. Repeat this procedure
to enter the Longitude of your location.
If you do not know the geographic coordinate information for your site, WinControl provides a convenient
lookup feature. On the Astronomical Clock Dialog (see Figure 6.14, “Astronomical Clock Location”) use
the mouse to point to the Lookup button, left click the mouse, and the location dialog appears.
74
Initialize Menu Options
• Point to the Region drop down arrow (right end of the text box), select one of the region options by
pointing to it, then left click the mouse,
• Point to the State/Province/Country drop down arrow, make a selection and left click the mouse,
• Point to the drop down arrow for the city, make a selection by pointing to it, then left click the mouse.
• When you've made your selections left click on OK. The system will return you to the Edit Astro Clock
Location Info screen and fill in the information derived from your selections.
75
Initialize Menu Options
WinControl Configuration
This option allows you to customize this installation of WinControl by modifying which options are displayed on the menu, in addition to other configuration options.
See the following topics...
WinControl Config Options
the section called “General”
the section called “WCServer”
the section called “Menus”
the section called “Polling”
the section called “WCAlarm”
General
Access this screen via "Initialize" then "WinControl Config". On this screen you may fill in or modify:
• Time in minutes to automatically save changes... you may enter the number of minutes that WinControl
will wait before automatically saving changes. This could help in the event of a power outage to prevent
changes or new data from being lost since the last save. If you do not wish to automatically save changes,
enter 0 in this field.
• Show accessible relays only... if this box is checked, relay slots that are empty or lack a driver card will
not be displayed in the device tree. If this box is unchecked, all relays will be displayed. If you modify
this option, you will have to refresh the tree view in order to see the changes. To refresh the tree view
select View->Refresh from the main WinControl menu.
• Clear... if you wish to clear the files listed in the most recently used list, press this button. The most recently used file list is located near the bottom of the File menu.
• Default root site location... specifies where you want you site files stored. You can enter the directory
location or browse for it.
• Samples folder... specifies where the samples folder is located. The samples folder contains sample site
files that display a variety WinControl features. You can enter the directory location or browse for it.
76
Initialize Menu Options
Figure 6.15. Configuration - General
• OK... saves all information entered on the WinControl Configuration dialog and then closes the dialog.
• Cancel... closes the dialog without saving any changes.
WCServer
WCServer is the runtime engine that performs background processing for WinControl. It runs as a separate,
hidden application and its behavior can be configured from WinControl. Access this screen via "Initialize"
then "WinControl Config". On this screen you may fill in or modify:
• Use Windows Login
Allows you to use the Windows Logon instead of logging into WinControl each time a site file is opened.
Using Windows Logon requires that users be setup in the security database BEFORE enabling security.
Disabling Windows Logon authentication requires users to login each time a WinControl site file is
opened. The default is disabled.
• Enable DCOM
Allows WinControl to communicate across network boundaries. An instance of the server, WCServer,
could be running on one machine, and an instance of the user interface, WinControl, could be running
on another.
• Connect to Local WinControl
Tells WinControl to connect to WCServer locally. This option is disabled if Enable DCOM is disabled.
• Connect to Remote WinControl
Tells WinControl to connect to WCServer remotely. This option is disabled if Enable DCOM is disabled.
• Machine Name
Tells WinControl which machine to connect to in order to locate WCServer. This option is disabled
if Enable DCOM is disabled or if Connect to Local WinControl is selected.
77
Initialize Menu Options
• DCOM Config
Launches dcomcnfg.exe if this file is in the path. This option is disabled if Enable DCOM is disabled.
Figure 6.16. Configuration - WCServer
• OK... saves all information entered on the WinControl Configuration dialog and then closes the dialog.
• Cancel... closes the dialog without saving any changes.
Menus
• Show wizard at startup... if you wish to see the startup wizard (See the section called “ Starting WinControl
”) every time you launch WinControl, you should check this box. The startup wizard helps guide you
through creating or opening a site. Note this option is mutually exclusive with "Automatically open last
loaded file".
• Automatically open last loaded file... if you wish to bypass the site file selection process and just open
the last loaded site, you should check this box. Note this option is mutually exclusive with "Show wizard
at startup".
• Menu Options
• Dataline options panel... check this box if your site will have dataline options panels. Dataline options
panels provide power to the dataline, and they can contain global switch cards and phone override
devices.
• Global switch annunciator... check this box if your site will have global switch annunciators/cards.
Global switch annunciators/cards are installed in dataline options panels, and they allow for single
switch inputs to control multiple relays or switch/system codes.
• Phone override... check this box if your site will have phone override devices. Phone override devices
are installed in dataline options panels, and they allow users to control relays via the telephone.
• Switch panel... check this box if your site will have switch panels (aka PSS panel). Switch panels
provide extra switch inputs. Each switch input generates a switch/system code. Because these devices
are no longer in production, this option defaults to disabled.
78
Initialize Menu Options
• Dataline switches... check this box if your site will have dataline switches (See the section called
“Why would I want a Dataline Switch?”). Dataline switches are only available with LI panels, and
they are different from other switches in that they do not require a home run for each switch station.
• Legacy panel creation... check this box if you need to create legacy panels for your site. Legacy panels
are the old style panels with 12 relay driver cards, as compared to LI panels which were introduced
in 2006, and have a relay driver card for every 4 relays.
• Store scheduler... check this box if your site will be programmed with a store schedule. A store
schedule provides a convenient way to build schedules around the opening and closing of a store.
• Variable override duration... check this box if your site will use variable override duration schedules.
Relays can be programmed for a specific override duration, or they can be programmed to follow a
schedule for their override duration. This schedule can vary the override duration based on the day
of the week or holiday.
Figure 6.17. Configuration - Menus
• OK... saves all information entered on the WinControl Configuration dialog and then closes the dialog.
• Cancel... closes the dialog without saving any changes.
Polling
Access this screen via "Initialize" then "WinControl Config". Polling is a process of checking each of the
lighting control panels (LCPs)in the system whenever you are 'connected' or 'on-line'. During the polling
process, each LCP is queried to verify that the device is responding. This is helpful because without periodic polling, you might not be aware of a non-responsive panel. Each LCP automatically sends out information when its status changes, such as relay changes or a loss of programs, but a panel that is no longer
communicating is not able to tell you that, thus we offer the polling feature. Normally you will not need
to change any of these parameters. Note that the values below are set in a way to quickly check all panels
after first connecting, and then reverting to a slower sequence that generates less activity over time. On
this screen you may fill in or modify parameters that affect the polling routines.:
• Polling Enabled... check this box if you want to enable polling for this site. If not checked, panels will
not be periodically queried. The default is Enabled
79
Initialize Menu Options
• Initial Poll Interval... This is the amount of time that must elapse after first connecting before the system
begins to poll the LCP devices. The default is 5 seconds after connecting. This means 5 seconds after
connecting, panels will start being queried, one at a time.
• Poll Interval... This is the amount of time after completing an entire polling sequence of all LCP devices
before another poll sequence will begin. The default is 1 hour and 30 minutes. If this is set to a shorter
interval it will cause more dataline activity.
• Initial Device Interval... This is a time in seconds that must elapse before a query to the next LCP in the
list of devices is performed. This value is used only on the initial poll sequence after connecting. The
default is 2 seconds, meaning that two seconds will elapse between checking each panel on the initial
polling sequence after connecting.
• Device Interval... This is a time in seconds that must elapse before a query to the next LCP in the list of
devices is performed. This value is used only after the initial poll sequence has been completed after
connecting, which would be approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes after connecting. The default is 5
seconds, meaning that five seconds will elapse between checking each panel on the polling sequences
after the initial (faster) sequence.
• OK... saves all information entered on the WinControl Configuration dialog and then closes the dialog.
• Cancel... closes the dialog without saving any changes.
Figure 6.18. Configuration - Polling
WCAlarm
WCAlarm monitors the lighting control system via an icon in the Windows system tray. Access this screen
via "Initialize" then "WinControl Config". On this screen you may fill in or modify:
• WCAlarm Startup Settings... WCAlarm alarms the user when relay failures occur.
• Do not automatically start... if you do not wish to automatically run WCAlarm, select this radio button.
• Start when Windows starts... if you wish to automatically run WCAlarm when Windows starts, select
this radio button. This will place WCAlarm in the StartUp folder.
• Start when WinControl site is opened... if you wish to automatically run WCAlarm when a WinControl
site is opened, select this option.
80
Initialize Menu Options
• Start Now... if you wish to start WCAlarm now, select this option.
Figure 6.19. Configuration - WCAlarm
• OK... saves all information entered on the WinControl Configuration dialog and then closes the dialog.
• Cancel... closes the dialog without saving any changes.
81
Chapter 7. Programming Options
When you have finished documenting your devices, there are a number of programming options that allow
you to configure how your system will operate, including
• Scheduling of loads ON and OFF according to time of day
• Choosing which loads should blink before a scheduled OFF
• Selecting which loads are controlled by specific switch inputs
• Creating groups to easily control multiple loads with a single command
• Choosing how long a load should stay ON after hours when overridden by the occupant
The above is a summary of some of the common programming options that are selected. There are many
additional options that are also available that are used less frequently, but are described in the sections that
follow.
Program - System - General
The System Info page allows system level options to be set. For non-Complete Control based systems, this
and the 'Name' are the only options available.
Figure 7.1. System Info
For LI-CC and Legacy CC systems, a variety of connection options exist. Generally you can type in the
connection string and the Connection type is automatically determined.
82
Programming Options
• Serial - via COM port or USB-COM adapter. BAUD rate should default to 19200.
• Modem - connect to a TAPI supported modem attached to the computer. Phone number of remote modem
with the HLink is required.
• Pipe - rarely used. Connections to legacy HServer product, socket communication is used instead by
the newer WebLink device.
• Socket - connections to WebLink or other Internet IP socket connection. Supports IP address or hostname.
Also included in connection information is a Simulator option. This is useful when you would like to test
different lighting scenarios without actually controlling occupant lighting. Full simulator mode is very
helpful when working with WinControl Graphics. Partial simulation allows for some panels to respond
and others to be simulated. This mode is typically useful for sales demonstrations.
In 2007, the Daylight Saving Time schedule has changed for most of North America and with it we have
added a more flexible way to update the actual DST schedule. By default, DST is enabled and follows the
schedule shown. For regions that do not observe DST, uncheck the DST checkbox. The DST can also be
manually set for regions that do not follow the same DST schedule as North America. In these cases, you
may set the month, week of the month, day of the week and the hour that your region starts and stops DST.
Global Hardware Settings allows the dataline power supply and the master clock to be documented. Only
LI-24 and LI-48 panels support an internal DL card (with 1 per system), otherwise a Dataline Options
panel is required to power the dataline. The master clock broadcasts the current time to all panels. Usually
the HLink provides this feature but LI-CC panels can also be programmed to broadcast the clock as well.
Only one device should be allowed to broadcast the time.
83
Programming Options
Program - System - Schedules
Schedules Overview
WinControl uses numbers to identify schedules and relies on a “system wide” approach to defining them.
A specific schedule defines an entire week, Sunday through Monday, plus three optional holiday schedules.
Schedules are defined at the system level, and then are referenced by individual relays. There is a limit in
that you cannot use more than 24 of these system wide schedules in a single panel, and there is a system
maximum of 999 schedules.
The Program - System - Schedules selection dialog Figure 7.2, “Program - System - Schedule Selection
Dialog” can be used to either create a new schedule or edit one currently in your system.
To Create a schedule:
• Click the New button in the Selection dialog.
• Enter the new schedule number (1-9999), and click OK (see Figure 7.3, “Create a Schedule”).
• WinControl displays the Schedule Editor shown in Figure 7.4, “Schedule Editor Dialog”.
• Enter the Time and Action applicable for the new schedule for all events in each day by pointing and
clicking on the new label in the day. Enter your schedule time and the appropriate action.
• Verify your entries are correct, then select either Apply to save the information, or OK to complete the
task. If you select Apply, you will then have to select OK to complete the session.
Figure 7.2. Program - System - Schedule Selection Dialog
84
Programming Options
Figure 7.3. Create a Schedule
To Edit a schedule:
• From the Create/Edit dialog select the appropriate schedule by using the mouse to point to it, then left
click to select it.
• The schedule you selected will highlight.
• Point to the Edit command button using the mouse and left click.
• The Schedule Editor will display Figure 7.4, “Schedule Editor Dialog”.
• Enter the Time and Action applicable for the schedule changes for each day by point to the day with the
mouse and left clicking to select the box. Enter your schedule information and the appropriate action.
• Occupancy time is used in a "Manual On/Scheduled Off" scenario. Check the Occupancy time check
box to enable manual on and set a time for the scheduled relay to become occupied. Time delays are
disabled for relays during occupied periods. Schedules using the Occupancy time should have a scheduled
off event for each of the schedule days, including Holidays. Generally, no automatic On events are
scheduled providing the most energy efficient control solution.
• Verify your entries are correct, then select either Apply to save the information, or OK to complete the
task. If you select Apply, you will then have to select OK to complete the session.
85
Programming Options
Figure 7.4. Schedule Editor Dialog
Schedule Event
The Schedule Event Dialog Figure 7.5, “Schedule Event Dialog”. allows you to select the time of day for
a relay to be controlled ON or OFF. Normal time of day entry (specific time) as well as Astronomical
values (relative to sunrise or sunset) are allowed. For Astronomical events, the user can specify either before
or after sunrise or sunset, and can specify an offset of up to 8:00 (8 hours and 0 minutes).
Figure 7.5. Schedule Event Dialog
86
Programming Options
Program - System - Override Duration Schedules
Override Duration Schedules allow for differing duration overrides depending on the day of the week.
Override Duration Schedule is also known as Variable Override Duration (VOD).
WinControl uses numbers to identify override duration schedules and relies on a “system wide” approach
to defining them. A specific override duration schedule defines an entire week, Sunday through Monday,
and Holidays. Override Duration Schedules are defined at the system level, and then are referenced by individual relays. There is a limit in that you cannot use more than 4 of these system wide schedules in a
single panel, and there is a system maximum of 99 override duration schedules.
Override Duration Schedules are considered “in use” when a particular relay in a panel is programmed to
follow that Override Duration schedule number.
The Variable Duration Override Create/Edit Dialog Figure 7.8, “Override Duration Schedule Editor Dialog”
can be used to either create a new schedule or edit one that you have in your system.
VOD allows you to create a schedule of weekdays and specify an override duration for each day of the
week. For instance, if you want overrides to last one hour on weekdays and two hours on weekends, you
specify these time durations on the VOD dialog. Later, you program individual relays to follow the VOD
schedule.
The Program - System - Schedules selection dialog Figure 7.2, “Program - System - Schedule Selection
Dialog” can be used to either create a new schedule or edit one currently in your system.
To Create a schedule:
• Click the New button in the Selection dialog.
• Enter the new override duration schedule number (1-99), and click OK (see Figure 7.7, “Create an
Override Duration Schedule”).
• WinControl displays the Override Duration Schedule Editor shown in Figure 7.8, “Override Duration
Schedule Editor Dialog”.
• Enter the Description for the new VOD by pointing to the Description box using the mouse and left
clicking to select the box. The blinking cursor bar will display. Enter the description.
• ·Use the mouse to point to the appropriate day(s), left click to select it, then enter the time(s)
• Verify your entries are correct, then select either Apply to save the information, or OK to complete the
task. If you select Apply, you will then have to select OK to complete the session.
87
Programming Options
Figure 7.6. Program - System - Variable Override Schedule Selection Dialog
Figure 7.7. Create an Override Duration Schedule
To Edit a schedule:
• From the Create/Edit dialog select the appropriate schedule by using the mouse to point to it, then left
click to select it.
• The schedule you selected will highlight.
• Point to the Edit command button using the mouse and left click.
• The Override Duration Schedule Editor will display Figure 7.8, “Override Duration Schedule Editor
Dialog”.
• Enter the Override Time applicable for the each day by pointing with the mouse and left clicking to select
the box. Enter your override duration desired for that day.
• Verify your entries are correct, then select either Apply to save the information, or OK to complete the
task. If you select Apply, you will then have to select OK to complete the session.
88
Programming Options
Figure 7.8. Override Duration Schedule Editor Dialog
89
Programming Options
Program - System - BACnet
WinControl provides a convenient interface to initialize and assign BACnet Device IDs and MAC addresses
used with WebLink 2.0. By default, no device IDs are assigned but they can be easily initialized by clicking
the Initialize button and clicking OK on the Initialize dialog.
Figure 7.9. BACnet Device Initialization
The BACnet device values that can be set are listed below. The default values are shown in parenthesis.
See notes below on how these values are used to initialize the BACnet system for Complete Control.
1. Virtual Network Number (86) - valid range is from 0 to 65534
2. Network Type (BACnet-IP) - only value allowed
3. WebLink Device ID (86000) - valid range is from 0 to 4194303
4. UDP port (47808) - valid range is from 1 to 65535
5. Virtual Group Codes Device ID (86999) - valid range is from 0 to 4194303
6. Virtual Group Codes MAC address (9599) - valid range is from 0 to 65534
If the Initialize dialog is used, the panels will have their values automatically set based on the System Information given. The virtual panel Device IDs are assigned values based on the panel ID plus the WebLink
Device ID. The panel virtual MAC addresses are assigned based on the default MAC address seed value
in the Initalize dialog plus the panel ID. Both of these values can be changed in the Initialize dialog.
90
Programming Options
Figure 7.10. Panel Auto-initialization
All Device IDs and MAC addresses must be unique and red text will be displayed when duplicate values
are found. These values should be corrected before transfering to the WebLink (via program transfer).
To remove all BACnet related device values from the system, click the Clear button. All BACnet values
are removed from the site data file and will be cleared from the WebLink on the next program transfer.
The BACnet property page may be hidden by clearing the values in this screen and removing "BACnet"
from the WebLink System Options. See the section called “ System Options ” for more information
91
Programming Options
Program - Panel - Special
Figure 7.11. Program LCP Special Settings
Certain special functions are adjustable on a per panel basis. These include:
• Adjustable Blink Warn Courtesy Time
The Blink Warn courtesy time (grace period) defaults to 5 minutes, but is adjustable from 3 to 99 minutes.
• Cleaning Crew switch Time Delay
By default, the override duration time delay used for cleaning crew overrides is the same as the override
duration programmed for each individual relay. You have the option of programming a specific duration
just for cleaning crew overrides.
• Adjustable Pulse Relay Pulse Time
When using the pulse output relay option, you may specify per panel how many seconds the pulse will
last. This is adjustable from 1 to 60 seconds. Note that a there is also a special feature specifically for
AS-100 type loads, which does not use this parameter. The default is 5 seconds.
• Automatic Relay Failure Reporting
Normally a relay failure is automatically transmitted on the dataline. You may disable this feature here.
Note
There is rarely any need to change this setting, which defaults to enabled.
• Automatic Relay State Reporting
92
Programming Options
Normally a relay state change is automatically transmitted on the dataline. You may disable this feature
here.
Note
There is rarely any need to change this setting, which defaults to enabled.
• Manual override capability for Shed switches
The shed function is used for daylighting and demand shed scenarios. Relays associated with a shed
switch will track the operation of the switch (photo-switch/demand contact) when the load is ON. If an
occupant overrides the shed off action, the shed function for his area is deactivated until the next day.
The feature that allows an occupant to override the shed function may be disabled on a per panel basis.
The default is to allow an occupant to override the Shed feature.
• One minute 2nd blink warn
The Blink warn feature provides a five minute default window of relay ON after a blink warn. A 'second'
blink warn with 1 minute remaining may be enabled by clicking this option. This option defaults to
disabled.
• Alternate Schedule
A begin date and resume date may be entered on a per panel basis to specify when the Alternate schedule
assigned to individual relays should be in effect. If no resume date is specified, the alternate schedule
will stay in effect once the begin date is reached or passed. If the current date is not in range of the begin
and resume date specified, the Normal schedule assigned to the relay will be used.
• Force Switches
Only one Force ON and one Force OFF switch code or group code may be referenced in a panel (See
the section called “ Group Codes ”). This field allows you to see the value of any such reference. (to
change you must edit the switch code or group code shown).
• Test / Transfer Options
• Simulated Panel
This option is only used in conjunction with demonstration sites, and will not be selected for normal
applications. It specifies to WinControl that the software should respond to commands in a simulated
manner for demonstration purposes.
• Offline panel
This settings is used to indicate that no transfer of data to the panel should be performed. This is
useful if the panel is not available, or if it is a 'phantom' panel used in special applications.
• Extended logging
This feature allows LI-CC panels to provide more extensive logging. Only enable at the request of service
technicians, as it can cause the log to overflow more quickly.
• Analog Input Logging
This feature allows LI-CC panels with CC firmware versions 18 or higher to log analog inputs at a user
determined interval. If the interval box is checked (enabled), then all analog inputs (See the section
93
Programming Options
called “Analog Inputs and LI-CC Panels”) will record their voltages in the activity log at the specified
time interval. For example if you have five analog inputs with a fifteen minute polling interval, you will
generate five analog input activity log messages every 15 minutes (or 480 messages per day). This can
cause the log to overflow more quickly, so normally this option is only turned on to calibrate a photocell,
and then it is turned back off again.
Note
The "Send" button is a handy way to immediately update the logging interval. Alternatively
you could transfer the entire programming for this LCP (See Chapter 10, Transfer Data Options).
94
Programming Options
Program - Relay - Options
Relays have multiple programming options as follows:
• the section called “Program - Relay - Schedules”
• the section called “Program - Relay - Override Duration”
• the section called “Program - Relay - Behavior”
Log Tracking
By default, On/Off activity for each relay is tracked in the activity log in the panel. Because the
activity log is shared among all relays in each panel, and because the panel has a finite capacity
in the log, you may want to disable Log Tracking for relays generating an unusual amount of
activity. Though not typically necessary, you may uncheck this option in such a special circumstance.
Figure 7.12. Program Relay Options
95
Programming Options
Program - Relay - Schedules
Typically you will want to schedule relay loads to turn ON and/or OFF during the day. Each relay may be
programmed to follow one of the system wide schedule numbers. While you can define as many schedules
as you may need, each relay can follow only one schedule except for an alternate schedule during a prespecified date range. For information on creating Schedules for your system, see the section called “Program
- System - Schedules”.
If no schedule is selected for a relay, then that relay will have no scheduled ON and OFF activity, and will
only respond to overrides of some type. If a relay is not programmed to follow a schedule, then Override
Durations will always be enabled if programmed for the relay (see the section called “Program - Relay Override Duration”). If a relay is programmed to follow a schedule, then Override Durations are automatically disabled for that relay according to the Occupancy Time for the numbered schedule. See the section
called “Program - System - Schedules” for more information on Occupancy Time.
Figure 7.13. Relay Program Schedules
The normal schedule features provided in the LI-CC system will probably meet your general needs.
However, there may be occasions where you need the system to operate on a different schedule for a specified or predetermined amount of time, then return to normal schedule. As an example, a winter break for
a school, or during the holiday shopping season in a shopping mall. Other examples might include construction periods, or tax season for an accounting office. In these situations, you might like to define an entirely
different schedule that you would like to be in effect between two specific dates. The LI-CC alternate
schedule feature provides this capability.
An alternate schedule is programmed by selecting a schedule to be followed per relay during the panels
override alternate schedule period. You can do this by selecting an existing schedule number in the Alternate
Schedule column. Note that the alternate schedule period is defined on a per panel basis, on the Special
options page for a panel. See the section called “Program - Panel - Special”. You will specify the beginning
and ending dates for running the alternate schedule. On and between these two dates, relays will follow
the alternate schedule.
Notes and Limitations
The Normal and Alternate buttons on this page will allow you make changes to the schedule selected. Other relays may be programmed to follow the same schedule, so be aware editing the
schedule may impact other relays. Also, in order to create new schedules, you must use the Program
- System - Schedules option on the WinControl menu.
Although you may define up to 999 system wide schedules, each panel is limited to referencing
no more than 24 different schedules, including both normal and alternate schedules. This limit is
automatically monitored by the software. You will be provided a warning when you reach this
limit.
If no Alternate Schedule is selected for a specific relay, it will follow its normal schedule between
the Alternate Schedule Dates. After the override date end is completed, all relays revert to their
normal schedules.
96
Programming Options
Program - Relay - Override Duration
Each relay may be programmed for an override duration of up to 23 hours and 59 minutes. This refers to
a timer feature that turns loads OFF automatically after a preset amount of time (following an override).
Override Duration is used by the system to turn the relay OFF after the relay has been overridden to ON
by the occupant. Override Duration may be disabled automatically by the system at the time specified
(Occupancy Time) for the schedule selected for each relay. See the section called “Program - System Schedules” for information on setting the Occupancy Time, which is associated with the relay via its
schedule.
Override duration is disabled automatically when a relay is scheduled ON, or when it is turned ON with
a Blink Warn switch. Override Duration is enabled again when a relay has been scheduled OFF (or turned
OFF) by a switch that has been defined as Blink Warn. If a relay does not have a schedule number specified,
the Override Duration is not automatically disabled at a specific time each day.
In some cases it may be desirable to impose a different (variable) Override Duration based on the day of
the week. WinControl allows you to select Override Duration schedules for particular relays. You may
create up to 99 different Override Duration schedules in your system. For information on creating Variable
Override Duration schedules for your system, see the section called “Program - System - Override Duration
Schedules”. To use a Variable Override Duration rather than a fixed override time, simply select an
Override Duration schedule using the "drop down" arrow in the Variable Override Duration column.
Limit of four Override Duration schedules per panel
Although you may define many Override Duration schedules, each panel is only able to reference
four unique such schedules among all of the relays in the panel. If you exceed this limit, you will
receive an error message.
ARP Support
Variable Override duration is not supported for ARP relays.
Figure 7.14. Relay Program Override Duration
97
Programming Options
Program - Relay - Behavior
Relays may be programmed with certain behaviors, based on the type of connected load, and desired performance characteristics. The behaviors described here are adjustable on a per relay basis. Additional settings
are adjustable on a per panel basis, see the section called “Program - Panel - Special”.
Common Area
A relay may be designated as a "common area". It is programmed with a list of relays that may include as
few as one, or as many as all other relays in the panel. The list of relays consists of those corresponding
to Occupant Areas. When any of the Occupant Area relays are turned ON, the Common Area relay will
be turned ON if it is not ON already. The common area relay status will show the relay ON due to common
area.
When all relays listed as Occupant Areas for the Common Area relay are turned OFF, then the Common
Area relay will be turned OFF. If the Common Area relay is programmed with an override duration, then
the override duration will be counted down as an Egress Delay. The Egress Delay provides the last occupant
with common area lighting for the time specified. If Blink is enabled for the Common Area relay, the relay
will Blink at the end of the Egress duration period, then turn Off five minutes later (if no occupants turn
ON their relays).
Common and Blink Warn Enable
For Common Area Relays, Blink Warn enable is meaningful only when an Override Duration
(Egress) time is programmed.
To program a relay as a Common Area relay, click the Edit button to the right of the Common label. In the
editor, choose relays to be designated as Occupant relays for this Common Area. Think of the common
area relay as the relay that will 'watch' the occupant area relays. When an occupant has his area occupied,
the common area should be illuminated as well. If you program a relay as a Common Area Relay, you
will:
• Usually not schedule the relay,
• Not program switches or phone codes to control the common area relay. Instead, you should allow
common area relays to be controlled automatically by the Occupant relays. Occupant relays, in turn, are
activated by schedules, switches, and phone codes. You must remember that if a Common Area relay
is scheduled or overridden directly, it defeats the common area capability.
Available Settings for behavior are dependent on the panel capabilities, those listed here are for our LI-CC
lighting control panels
Relay Behavior Settings
• Blink Warn
Blink Warn is a feature that prevents an immediate OFF due to schedule or override duration timeout.
If a relay is ON and Blink Warn is enabled for that relay, the relay will turn OFF for 1 second, then back
ON in the following situations:
• When it is scheduled OFF,
• When it is turned off by a BLINK WARN group or switch code , or
• When it reaches the end of an override duration timeout.
98
Programming Options
This feature allows the system to provide the occupant a warning that the lights will be turned off in 5
minutes (the grace period). The occupant may override the system by applicable override, such as switch,
phone, or PC. The duration of the grace period is adjustable per panel.
• No Blink Warn
If No Blink Warn is selected, OFF commands due to schedule, and OFF at the end of an override duration
timeout cause an immediate OFF command.
• AS-100 Blink Warn
See the section called “ Using the AS-100 Automatic Switch with LI-CC Panels ” for more information.
• AS-100 No Blink Warn
See the section called “ Using the AS-100 Automatic Switch with LI-CC Panels ” for more information.
• HID
HID is similar to Blink Warn in that an extra 5 minute grace period is allowed at an OFF due to schedule
or override duration timeout. However, unlike Blink Warn, the relay does NOT go OFF at all, until the
grace period expires. Therefore, it is best to have some other load that is Blink Warn enabled and visible
to the occupant to provide the visual blink warning. As it's name implies, HID is typically used with
HID type loads.
• Pulse N/O
When a relay is defined as Pulse N/O (normally open contact), the relay may be turned ON (manually,
or through any switch or program command), but it will turn itself OFF (open) automatically after 5
seconds. This is useful for connection to contactors that require a momentary pulse (such as mechanically
held contactors).
• Pulse N/C
A relay defined as Pulse N/C (normally closed contacts) will only turn OFF for 5 seconds in response
to an OFF command. The relay will automatically revert to the ON-state after 5 seconds have elapsed.
This type of program may be used with a device known as a Sentry Switch. Watt Stopper offers the AS100 as a smarter alternative to the Sentry Switch, see the section called “ Using the AS-100 Automatic
Switch with LI-CC Panels ” for more information.
Pulse time is adjustable per panel
The time of 5-second pulse is adjustable per panel. See the section called “Program - Panel Special”
ARP Support
The Pulse and AS/100 options are not supported for ARP relays.
99
Programming Options
Figure 7.15. Program Relay Behavior
100
Chapter 8. Status Monitoring
There are a variety of ways to monitor and control your lighting system via WinControl. The device tree
is displayed after a site file is opened. If a connection is made then the states of the relays can be seen directly. For a more in-depth understanding of the current status of your system, the following items may
assist you.
System Dataline
Low level system activity can be monitored from the Dataline Monitor screen. To access the Dataline
Monitor, select MonitorControl then Monitor Dataline on the menu (or, click the "Ear" on the WinControl
toolbar).
Figure 8.1. Show Monitor Dataline Screen
From here, you can monitor current activity on the dataline including relay changes of state, Group Codes
(Switch Codes), Phone Codes, program transfers and other activity.
Figure 8.2. Monitor Dataline
101
Status Monitoring
Advanced Relay Status
The Advanced Relay Status page provides information as to why the given relay is in the state that it is.
Often times a relay may appear to be 'stuck' either On or Off and this page can tell the reason for its current
state.
Figure 8.3. Advanced Relay Status Screen
The table near the top of the screen reveals the internal Priority Array state of the relay which is similar to
a BACnet priority array. Typically, a relay is On due to a Master override, by schedule, or by sensor. Each
of these On commands use a different priority slot and higher priority (lower numbered) slots 'override'
lower priority commands. These 'slots' are numbered from 1 to 16, with 1 being the highest priority. The
highest priority (or current) slot is listed at the top of the table. The highest commands that CC supports
are the Force commands with Force On at slot 2 and Force Off at slot 3.
The page will automatically refresh whenever it detects a change of relay state (On or Off) but you can
click 'Refresh' to read current values and monitor the Timers.
The other status items show:
1. Time stamp: time of last event
2. Mode: Indicates whether the relay is in Normal Hours (Occupied) or After Hours (Unoccupied) related
to time schedules.
3. Sensor List: the list, of up to 4, sensors that control this relay.
4. Shed Status: 'Inactive' indicates normal relay behavior. 'Active' indicates the relay has been Shed Off
(slot 4). 'Warned' indicates that the relay has been overridden by Master once, blinked and turned back
102
Status Monitoring
off. 'Exempted' indicates the relay has been overridden a second time by Master and can be kept On.
Shed Exemption is a panel programming feature.
Set state allows the relay to be commanded to a specific slot state. This can be a very powerful command
and should be used with care. Setting the mode is also available and allows various properties of the relay
to be set or cleared including Normal/After Hours, shed, runtime data, and relay failures.
ARP Relay Status
An ARP (Automatic Relay Pack) is defined as having 2 small, independent relays that act as one relay for
control purposes.
Figure 8.4. ARP Status
This screen shows the current state of each of the relays and what the current occupancy mode is. The
current slot indicates the active priority array slot for each relay as well. Other lower priority slots may
also be active but that data is not available from the ARP. The status information is not as full featured as
a normal LI-CC relay.
The status page also shows the Group Code that last controlled this ARP and the current count down timer
value, if it is in effect. The switch type indicates the current DIP switch settings inside the ARP that defines
the type of switch attached to the ARP inputs.
The Refresh button may be pressed at any time to get the latest status of the ARP, however, any time the
ARP changes state the screen should automatically update. Set State will set the priority level and state of
both relays in the ARP. Set Mode also sets or clears various internal modes of the ARP, both relays, including
shed and occupancy.
103
Status Monitoring
Load Chart
Real time load charting is available for both panels and systems.
Figure 8.5. Load Chart
Simply click the "Load Chart" tab when viewing the panel properties or the system properties, and if you
are connected you will see a real time load chart for that device. Select a polling freqency of between two
seconds and one hour, and the chart will automatically be updated on that interval.
If the "Log to file" check box is checked, all data displayed on the chart will also be logged to a commaseparated values (CSV) file. This file will be located in the site's "Report" folder, and it will be named after
the device it is logging. For the example above, this file would be named "RelayPanel524Load.csv", and
it would contain values as seen below:
104
Status Monitoring
"2010/01/07
"2010/01/07
"2010/01/07
"2010/01/07
"2010/01/07
"2010/01/07
"2010/01/07
"2010/01/07
"2010/01/07
"2010/01/07
"2010/01/07
"2010/01/07
"2010/01/07
"2010/01/07
"2010/01/07
"2010/01/07
"2010/01/07
"2010/01/07
15:49:16",
15:50:16",
15:51:16",
15:52:16",
15:53:16",
15:54:16",
15:55:16",
15:56:16",
15:57:16",
15:58:16",
15:59:16",
16:00:16",
16:01:16",
16:02:16",
16:03:16",
16:04:16",
16:05:16",
16:06:16",
20
40
60
150
210
570
790
1310
1690
1310
1480
1560
3000
2760
2550
2160
1890
1560
Note
The load is calculated by adding up all of the documented circuit loads for all of the relays that
are currently turned On in the device. If no circuit loads have been documented or if they are all
set to 0, then this chart will have nothing to display (see the section called “Documenting Panels
- Relays”).
105
Chapter 9. Dataline Switch
Commissioning
Unlike Lighting Control Panels and Relays, Dataline Switches do not have a physical address id that is set
on the device. Instead, each Dataline Switch has an internal identifier (a 'neuron id') much like a serial
number which allows each device to be uniquely identified. Because this internal address is not visible to
the user, it is necessary to perform a 'commissioning' process for all dataline switches that will allow the
user to connect WinControl documentation and programming to the physical device installed in the field.
This section describes how this process is performed using WinControl.
The commissioning process is normally only performed once, at time of installation of the dataline switch
devices. Dataline Switch commissioning is done on a 'per panel' basis, for each panel installed in the system
that has dataline switch devices installed.
Depending on the situation, you may handle the commissioning in different ways. Here are some common
scenarios:
• New Installation... Dataline Switches are documented and programmed in WinControl.
• New Installation... Dataline Switches are not documented in WinControl, but have been smartwired and
are function.
• Existing Installation... A Dataline Switch needs to be replaced in the field.
• Existing Installation... A new Dataline Switch is added to the system.
Commissioning Process
To start the commissioning process, the user first selects the panel to commission and then chooses the
Dataline Switches property page.
106
Dataline Switch Commissioning
Figure 9.1. Dataline Switches
At the bottom of the page is the "Commission" button. This button is always enabled and allows the user
to commission dataline switches whether or not they are already documented.
When the user clicks the "Commission" button, they will be asked if they would like to discover dataline
devices.
Figure 9.2. Discover Dataline Devices
If the user answers "Yes" to this question, the "Commission" dialog will displayed in "Discover" mode,
and the discovery process will start automatically. If the user answers "No", the "Commission" dialog will
be displayed in "Manual" mode, and dataline switches will be discovered when they are manually activated.
In either mode, a list of discovered devices (if any) will be displayed to the user. (see the section called
“Commission Dialog”)
107
Dataline Switch Commissioning
Commission Dialog
The commission dialog is used to match up the documented devices with the actual devices found on the
dataline. This dialog initially contains a grid with two commissioning modes, "Discover" and "Manual",
plus a couple of check boxes and buttons.
Figure 9.3. Commission Dialog
Commission Dialog Controls
• Advanced - This check box adds the two commissioning modes "Bindings" and "WinControl" (see
Commissioning Modes) to the dialog.
• Show all discovered devices - This check box is only available when the "Discover" tab has been selected.
When checked all discovered devices are displayed, when unchecked only uncommissioned devices are
displayed.
• Dataline Devices Grid
Table 9.1. Dataline Devices Grid
Column
Description
ID
Discovery table slot id (not persisted)
Time
The time that device was discovered. During manual operation, this time shows when the
device's SmartWire pin was pressed.
Type
"Single", "Dual", "Quad", "Octal", or "USM" (Single, Dual, Quad and Octal may optionally
be keylock switches)
Neuron Id Each device on the dataline should have a unique neuron id.
Status
"Commissioned" indicates a discovered devices has been associated with a documented
device and has been assigned a slot. "Activated" indicates the SmartWire button was pressed
but still NOT commissioned. "Not Commissioned" indicates the device has not been commissioned yet.
Name
The name assigned to the switch. Typically the user assigns names during the switch documentation phase (see the section called “Documenting Dataline Switches”), but the switch
could have automatically been assigned a name during automatic discovery (see Figure 9.4,
“Auto Create New Devices”).
Version
Displays internal dataline device version information.
Slot
Displays the assigned slot (1 to 63) for the dataline device. Any devices with a slot of 0
have not yet been commissioned.
• Commission... - This button allows the user to commission the selected dataline device (see the section
called “Select Device to Commission”).
• Properties... - This button allows the user to edit the documentation and programming for the selected
device (see the section called “Documenting Dataline Switches”).
108
Dataline Switch Commissioning
Commissioning Modes
• Discover - Devices are automatically discovered and displayed in the grid. If any new undocumented
devices are found at the end of this auto discovery process, the user will be asked if they wish to automatically create and commission them.
Figure 9.4. Auto Create New Devices
• Manual - Devices are discovered and displayed when they are manually activated. To commission the
dataline switches in this mode, the user must visit each switch and press the SmartWire button. This
button is covered by the switch plate, so it will need to be removed for this process. As each button is
pressed, the table fills with the information for that switch including the time the button was pressed
(computer time).
• Bindings - Displays information from the panel's perspective by querying the slots on the Automation
card. This tab is only available when the "Advanced" check box is checked (see Commission Dialog
Controls).
• WinControl - Displays the information known by and stored in WinControl (site data file). This tab is
only available when the "Advanced" check box is checked (see Commission Dialog Controls).
This dialog will attempt to automatically commissions switches that have a type that is unique within the
panel. For example, if there is only one Quad defined and it is discovered, then the documented switch is
automatically bound to the discovered switch. If, on the other hand, there are multiple Quads defined, then
the user will have to manually identify and bind the switches by using the "Commission..." button (see the
section called “Select Device to Commission”). Up to 63 dataline devices per panel are supported.
Note
Any of the information entered on screen is stored in the memory (RAM) of the computer. This
information must be permanently saved by selecting File from the Menu Bar, then selecting Save.
This will save the new data as part of the site data file on the PC.
Also for this commissioning to take effect, the programming must be transferred into the panel.
(see Chapter 10, Transfer Data Options).
Select Device to Commission
This dialog is used to individually match a device found on the dataline with a documented device. To
access this dialog, the user first selects a discovered switch from the Commission Dialog (see Figure 9.3,
“Commission Dialog”), and then presses the "Commission..." button.
Figure 9.5. Select Device to Commission
This dialog will display different switches based on the check boxes below.
• Only Show Not Commissioned - When checked, only uncommissioned switches are displayed in the
list. This is the default, and it helps narrow down the available choices for commissioning a new switch.
109
Dataline Switch Commissioning
When unchecked, commissioned and uncommissioned switches are displayed. This allows for re-commissioning switches that were incorrectly commissioned or to replace malfunctioning switches. Selecting
a previously commissioned switch and pressing "OK" will overwrite the previous commissioning data.
• Matching Types Only - When checked, only switches of the same type (Single, Dual, Quad, Octal, USM
or Keylock) are displayed in the list. This is the default, and it helps ensure that the documented switch
type matches the actual switch type. When unchecked, switches of any type are displayed in the list.
To commission the switch, the user selects the appropriate documented device from the list, and clicks
"OK". If the desired device is not listed, the user can uncheck one or more check boxes, or the user can
press "New" to document a new switch. If "New" is pressed, the user will be asked to name the switch (see
Figure 3.21, “New Dataline Switch”), and then the switch will automatically be created (based on the
current button count) and commissioned.
110
Dataline Switch Commissioning
Replace Malfunctioning Switch
To replace a malfunctioning switch and commission it, enter commissioning mode (see the section called
“Commissioning Process”). When the discovery process is complete, select the newly installed switch
(there should only be one) which is the one that is not commissioned. Press the "Commission" button to
enter the "Select Device to Commission" dialog (see the section called “Select Device to Commission”).
Uncheck "Only Show Not Commissioned", select the documented switch that is being replaced, and press
"OK" to overwrite the old commission data.
Note
For this commissioning change to take effect, the programming must be transferred into the panel
again. (see Chapter 10, Transfer Data Options).
111
Chapter 10. Transfer Data Options
Select Transfer from the Menu Bar to display the transfer options (see Figure 10.1, “Transfer Menu”).
Note that the All Data and the Historical Data options have submenus (see Figure 10.2, “Transfer All
Menu”).
• New Program Data
• All Program Data
• Historical Data
Any of the information you enter on screen is stored in the memory (RAM) of your computer. This information must be permanently saved by selecting File from the Menu Bar and selecting Save.
The New Data option is the preferred method for sending all of the device programming information you
enter using the software and PC to the field hardware (LCP, Global Switch, and Phone Override devices).
By selecting this command you send your data over the communications link to the field hardware. Until
you transfer the data to the devices, the lighting control system will not operate according to the program
information you entered to the system.
For any transfer operation, a list box will display the status of the transfer as well as any errors. LCP devices
hold the most information and will require the most time to update. A progress bar will show the progression
of the transfer for individual panels.
See the section called “Site Properties” for more information on transferring your programs with multiple
computers as well as automatically transferring historical data.
112
Transfer Data Options
Figure 10.1. Transfer Menu
If any problems are encountered during the transfer processing, such as devices not responding, the
Transfer Agent dialog will display the information. Be sure to scroll through the Transfer Agent Dialog
after completion of the transfer to determine if there were any noted errors.
New Data
Use the Transfer New Data to insure update of all devices.
The New Data command sends all of the device programming information you enter to the PC to the field
hardware (LCP, Global Switch, and Phone Override devices). By selecting this command you send your
data over the communications link to the field hardware. Until you transfer the data to the devices, the
lighting control system devices will not operate according to the program information you entered to the
system
All Data
The (Transfer) All Data command allows you to send all data to the field hardware, whether or not the information has changed. Point to All Data. A sub-menu is displayed (Figure 10.2, “Transfer All Menu”).
Slide the pointer over to the sub-menu, point to the option you want to use, left click the mouse. Use this
option if you want to update a single device or particular devices only.
113
Transfer Data Options
Figure 10.2. Transfer All Menu
• To LCPs Option
This option transfers all LCP programming information to all selected LCPs. If you are connected directly
to an LCP then only that LCP will be updated.
To select multiple panels in the "Select Device" dialog, hold down the Shift key and left click on devices
selected consecutively. If the devices are not in order, hold down the Ctrl key and left click the devices.
Each device you select will highlight.
• To Global Switch Annunciators
This option transfers both new information to the selected GSAs, or any modifications you have made
to existing GSA.
• Phone Override Devices
Transfers both new or changed information to the selected Phone Override devices.
Historical Data
The (Transfer) Historical Data command allows you to retrieve historical data from the field hardware,
and store it on the PC. There are various types of historical data available through the Options - Trend reporting menu. There are also options to automatically retrieve this data, see the section called “Automatic
Retrieval of Log and Runtime Data” for more information. These options include Activity Log and Run
Time data.
• Get All History
This transfer option is recommended, as it retrieves all data from the field devices, including both runtime
and historical activity log data, for all panels. See systems for information on automatically retrieving
history data.
• Get Log Data
This option transfers log data collected by the LCPs to the computer, thus allowing you to create a permanent record of the activity log information. When you transfer the log data to your computer the
system clears the log in the panel. The activity log information can be accessed through the Trend reporting
options.
• Get Run Time
This transfer option transfers relay run-time data for a LCP. The information is stored on disk and can
be used by the Trend option.
Transfer Monitor
During the transfer process, of either programs or historical data, the Transfer Monitor window will display.
This window is a convenient and expedient way to monitor the status of the transfer that is being performed
114
Transfer Data Options
by WinControl. It provides a real-time view of the steps being performed by the application at two levels
of detail. Checking the Details box displays a step-by-step accounting of the action being performed by
the system, at the device level. By default, only major events are shown
Figure 10.3. Transfer Monitor
115
Chapter 11. Trend Reporting Overview
Demonstration based on Sample Trends Data in Sample Site
Full data for date range 6/11/00 to 6/15/00 on panel 911 is available for both activity log and daily runtime
in a sample site. To access the trend reporting features, open the demonstration site 1 - Demo Sampler with
Graphics and Trends, and select Options/Trends on the WinControl main menu.
Activity Log Reporting
The activity log shows detailed on/off activity for each relay including the time, why it was controlled and
what initiated the new state.
Select the following options for an Activity Log report. First select the start and end date ranges. Then select
the panel of interest under “Device Selection”. In this case we are only interested in Panel 911. Select Relays
1 thru 6 which represent typical office workers.
Figure 11.1. Activity Log Report Parameters
116
Trend Reporting Overview
Then click “Run” to execute the report. If an error was made in your selections, you can click “Stop” to
halt processing and correct the report parameters. The progress indicator will roughly indicate how far
along report execution is. Other parameters of interest include:
• Report Header – The information to be displayed at the top of the report.
• Title – The title of the report.
• Author – The author of the report.
• Company – The company.
• Standard Report – Select this option to run a standard predefined report.
• Date Range – Select the dates and times for the report. The dates and times are inclusive, meaning
any activity on or after the Start date/time and on or before the End date/time will be included in the
report.
• Sort By – When multiple devices are selected, you may choose to see activity by Date or by Device.
• Activity Details – Determines the type of report to run.
• Analog Inputs – Show voltage and converted footcandles for all analog inputs documented for the
panel.
Note
This report requires the user to select panels not relays. If a relay is selected, its parent
panel will be used as the selected panel.
• Detailed – Show all activity for period.
• Failures Only – Show only devices that have failed for period.
• No Clean – Exclude devices activated by clean command.
• Phone Codes Only – Show only devices activated by phone codes.
• Show Panel Messages – Show panel messages such as relay states or power failures (only if sorted
by Date).
• Show Diagnostics – Show messages generated by WinControl such as log retrieval date, time and
count (only if showing panel messages).
• Device Selection – Select the device(s) upon which to run the report.
• Select the device type for the report. Choices include general purpose groups, dual devices, panels
(LCPs), or relays in a specific panel.
• Select the specific device(s) in the list below the type selection.
• Edit Groups – Press this button to create or edit a general purpose group. General purpose groups
can span multiple relay panels.
• Build Custom – Press this button to build a custom SQL query string using the information selected
for the standard report. You can edit this string in the Custom Report section below.
117
Trend Reporting Overview
• Custom Report – Select this option to run a custom SQL query against the database. Output from a
custom query will be displayed in a grid format. You can build a starting query string by pressing the
Build Custom button above.
The following columns are defined for the PanelActivityLog table:
• System (integer)
• EventTime (datetime)
• Type (integer)
• 00 = empty entry - all bytes zeroed
• 01 = normal panel relay event
• 02 = debug/detail panel relay event
• 03 = power fail and power restore times
• 04 = clock set
• 10 = event output
• 11 = process minute timer (diagnostic)
• 12 = ARP command
• 13 = ARP change of state
• 14 = relay failures
• 15 = relay states
• 16 = analog input reading (stored in analoginputactivitylog table)
• 27 = resent a drive command to a relay
• 256 = diagnostic entry generated by wincontrol (not the panel)
• Panel (integer)
• Relay (integer)
• Value (integer)
• GroupCode (integer)
• Slot (integer)
• 01 = priority 1 (highest priority slot)
• 02 = force on
• 03 = force off
• 04 = priority 4
118
Trend Reporting Overview
• 05 = warn
• 06 = shed
• 07 = priority 7
• 08 = master
• 09 = sensor
• 10 = common area
• 11 = egress
• 12 = schedule (blink)
• 13 = priority 13
• 14 = clean
• 15 = priority 15
• 16 = grace
• IsLastActive (1 = yes; 0 = no)
• IsOccupied (1 = yes; 0 = no)
• IsFailed (1 = yes; 0 = no)
• Shed (character)
• 'A' = Active
• 'E' = Exempt
• 'I' = Inactive
• 'W' = Warned
• Initiator (integer)
• 00 = local/none
• 01 = PSS
• 02 = phone
• 03 = network event CC
• 04 = network event LW
• 05 = schedule
• 06 = interlock (common area) relay
• 07 = occupancy sensor
119
Trend Reporting Overview
• 08 = slot 1 timeout
• 09 = slot 2 timeout
• 10 = slot 3 timeout
• 11 = slot 4 timeout
• 12 = slot 5 timeout
• 13 = slot 6 timeout
• 14 = slot 7 timeout
• 15 = master timeout
• 16 = slot 9 timeout
• 17 = slot 10 timeout
• 18 = egress timeout
• 19 = slot 12 timeout
• 20 = slot 13 timeout
• 21 = clean timeout
• 22 = slot 15 timeout
• 23 = grace timeout
• 24 = local button
• 25 = RD input
• 26 = GS input
• 27 = RD sensor input
• 28 = GS sensor input
• 29 = relay override
• 30 = RD relay state - read during reset all
• 31 = grace
• Message (text string)
The following columns are defined for the AnalogInputActivityLog table:
• System (integer)
• EventTime (datetime)
• Panel (integer)
120
Trend Reporting Overview
• Chanel (character 'A' thru 'P')
• VoltageReading (integer)
• InputType (integer)
• ConvertedValue (text string)
• Select the specific device(s) in the list below the type selection.
• Edit Groups – Press this button to create or edit a general purpose group. General purpose groups can
span multiple relay panels.
• Archive or Import – Click this button to archive or import database records (see the section called
“Archiving Activity Log Data”). If you have legacy data that you have not imported into the new format,
this button will read “Import”. Reports cannot be run against legacy data until it has been imported into
the new format. If no legacy data exists or once the data has already been imported, this button will read
“Archive”. Archiving will speed up report query time by moving unneeded old records into an archive
database. If later you wish to run reports on data that you previously archived, that is not a problem because you can use the archive function again to move them back into the active database.
Note
The active database file is named "LiLog.wdb", and the archive database file is named "LiLogArchive.wdb". These files are located in the same directory as the site file.
Here is the resulting report.
121
Trend Reporting Overview
Figure 11.2. Log Report 1
The report includes a standard header bearing the name of the site and the date. The subheading shows the
report information that the user entered in the report dialog including devices selected, date range and how
it is to be sorted. Each item that is enumerated shows its device information, date and time the event
happened and the event details themselves.
In this example, these relays are only scheduled off so the users must override their lights when they come
into the office. On Sunday, the relays show only the schedule off which is what we would expect. During
the week we see normal office operations starting around 8 am and concluding sometime around 5:30 pm.
Additional overrides are logged after the security system is armed which forces these lights off (as a backup
feature).
For the next report example, select Relay 14 which controls the copy room, a common area. You will get
the following report. It shows how the common area lighting stays on when there is at least one person
occupying the building. Notice that on Tuesday, someone stopped by at 4:50 am and left at 5:08 am
(probably picking up a briefcase on the way to the airport).
122
Trend Reporting Overview
Figure 11.3. Log Report 2
Now, for a more interesting report, we will select relays that are attached to occupancy sensors. To do this
(on Panel 911), select Relay 19 (men’s bathroom) as you normally would and then hold down the Ctrl key
to add other selections. Click on Relays 22 (women’s) and 40 (warehouse), scrolling as needed. Change
the start and end date to 6/12/2000 and the start time to 12am and the end time to 11:59pm (so it covers
just one entire day).
123
Trend Reporting Overview
Figure 11.4. Log Report 3
In order to see more details about how occupants are using their lights we can choose to view only relays
overridden using phone codes. For this report enter 6/12/2000 as on the previous report. Select Sort by
Device and show Phone Codes Only. For device selection choose LCP List and below select LCP 911.
The report produces the following output.
124
Trend Reporting Overview
Figure 11.5. Log Report 4
Here again we see typical office workers overriding their lights on in the morning (the lights are scheduled
off in the evening). Some more frugal workers may even turn off their lights during their lunch break.
Archiving Activity Log Data
Activity log data can be archived (or restored) by pressing the Archive push button on the Activity Log
Reporting screen (see the section called “Activity Log Reporting”).
125
Trend Reporting Overview
Figure 11.6. Archive Button
Activity log data can be archived to improve performance. When a report is run, the entire active database
is queried to find the relevant matching records. If older unneeded records can be moved from the active
database to the archive database, the reports will run faster. Archived records can also be restored from
this dialog. If you accidentally archived too much data, or if you wish to run a report on some older records,
you can restore the records you need here.
Figure 11.7. Archive Dialog
The stats for both the Current Active Database and the Archived (Inactive) Database are displayed at the
top of the screen. To archive or restore records, simply enter or select an "Archive date", and then click
the "Archive / Restore Records" push button. All records before (older than) the archive date will be
archived. All records on or after (same date or newer than) the archive date will be restored. If you wish
to stop the archive/restore process while in progress, you can press the "Stop" button.
126
Trend Reporting Overview
Daily Runtime Reporting
Daily runtime reports show the total On time for each day and device selected. Comparisons can be made
with other selected relays (part of an automatically created group) based on a specific runtime, mean
runtime or number of standard deviations from the mean. In this way, relays with exceptional runtimes
(generally on to long) can be revealed while ignoring “average” or expected runtimes.
To run a daily runtime report, select Runtime Reports from the Trends menu and select the dates and other
items as shown. For device selection, click Relays 1, 14, and 40.
Figure 11.8. Daily Runtime Report Parameters
This report yields the following results:
127
Trend Reporting Overview
Figure 11.9. Runtime Report 1
Again we see the differences between a typical office worker (Relay 1), a common area (Relay 14) and an
occupancy controlled relay (40). On Monday, Relay 1 runs for 9 hours. Relay 14 is a common area relay
and we expect it to stay on as long as the building is occupied which on this day was 11 hours. The warehouse light is the most interesting, though, here we see only 2½ hours of runtime because it only comes
on as needed thus saving energy.
To see what relays are using the most energy we run an exception report. In this case we wish to see any
runtimes greater than 1 standard deviation from the mean for the week of 6/11/2000. Here we show Tuesday
and Wednesday runtimes and mostly the common area relays show up which is what we expect. We could
create a group of relays that excluded common area relays to find relays with runtimes that could be reduced.
128
Trend Reporting Overview
Figure 11.10. Exception Report
Note
The “Import” button – Click this button to import legacy database records. If you have legacy
data that you have not imported into the new format, an “Import” button will be displayed next
to the “Run” button. If no legacy data exists or once the data has already been imported, this
button will not be displayed. Reports cannot be run against legacy data until it has been imported
into the new format. The runtime database file is named "LiDailyRT.wdb", and it is located in
the same directory as the site file.
Figure 11.11. Runtime Import
129
Trend Reporting Overview
Runtime Charting
Another new and feature in WinControl is Runtime Charting. Runtime charting takes the data we saw in
the Daily Runtime Reports and produces a graphical equivalent. The difference is that we may want to
compare the overall panel mean with selected relays to show how they might standout. To do this, select
LCP List and on the left and select LCP 911. Then click the right facing arrow to make the whole panel
one of the charting series. Then select LCP 911 in the drop down selector and again select Relays 1, 14
and 40 and make them additional series as shown. Be sure to use mean runtime when referencing the
panel and total runtime for the individual relays. That way the total relay runtime can be compared to the
mean panel runtime. Also, be sure that series is displayed by device so that they can be compared to one
another. Click OK to display the chart.
Figure 11.12. Runtime Chart Parameters
The chart displays runtimes from Sunday to Thursday for Panel 911 together with our 3 relays. Notice that
Relay 1 and 14 usually run ahead of the Panel mean runtime while the warehouse relay has much less
runtime. Charting gives you another way to see exceptional runtimes where energy could be saved.
130
Trend Reporting Overview
Figure 11.13. Runtime Chart
Charts can also be resized and printed (either in color or black and white). The style of chart can also be
changed to a variety of different types including pie, line and area charts.
131
Trend Reporting Overview
Automatic Retrieval of Log and Runtime Data
WinControl has two options for automatically downloading History data. One option is to keep WinControl
running all the time, and using the default settings for automatic history transfer. See the section called
“Site Properties” for more information on transferring historical data automatically while WinControl is
running.
WinControl also has a special utility called WCRetriever that enables a scheduler program to automatically
retrieve log and runtime of panel data. If the program is run standalone, you can select the WinControl site
file and what data to retrieve. You should disable the automatic transfer described earlier when using
WCRetriever. The command line arguments for running WCRetriever are displayed in the ‘About’ box.
To schedule retrieval of panel data, go to “Scheduled Tasks” in Windows Explorer (usually near Control
Panel). Double click “Add Scheduled Task” and click Next. In the list of applications, scroll down and
select “WinControl Retriever” and click Next again. Type in a name for this scheduled job such as “Weekly
Panel 7 Log Retrieval” or “Monthly WinControl Runtime Retrieval” for example. Then select the retrieval
frequency you desire. Beware, busy 48 tub relay panels can fill the logs up in a matter of days so nightly
retrievals may be necessary. Click “Next” and enter when the retrieval should take place. Depending of
what operating system you are using, you may see a login dialog. Enter the user ID and password for the
account you want this task to run under. Normally, this is the same user that typically runs WinControl.
On the last dialog there is a checkbox for opening the advanced properties dialog. Check it and click Finish.
By default, the wizard enters short file names that can be difficult to read. You will need to add some
command line entries for WCRetriever to use. The first parameter is the full path and file name to your
site file. Then at least one of the following parameters must follow the file name:
• AllTypes – gets daily runtime, activity log, total on-time and cycle counts
• Activity – gets activity log only
• Daily – gets daily runtime totals only
Without additional parameters, WCRetriever defaults to getting data from all panels in the system. If you
wish to limit retrieval to a specific panel then use “ Panel” followed by the panel number. For example “
Panel 7” to get panel 7 data only. You may only specify one panel on the command line. If you wish to
download several specific panels, you will need one task scheduler entry for each panel.
Sample Command Lines
Sample command line with spaces in directory or file names to get activity log for one specified panel.
Filenames with spaces require quotation marks (ignore line wrap):
"C:\Program Files\WinControl\bin\WCRetriever.exe"
“D:\Program Files\WinControl\Site\File.li” –Panel 22 –Activity
Sample command line without spaces in directory or file names to get all data from all panels:
C:\Programs\WinControl\Bin\WCRetriever.exe
D:\Programs\WinControl\Site\File.li –AllTypes
132
Chapter 12. Reporting Options
WinControl provides a number of reports that allow you to review your documentation and programming
in a number of consolidated formats. In this section, we provide examples of many of the most common
reports. Reports are generated in a format known as HTML, which is capable of being displayed by a
standard web browser, typically Microsoft's Internet Explorer. When generating a report, WinControl will
save the report as an HTML formatted file, and then automatically have it displayed using your default
web browser.
The View Menu provides the reports option with a sub-menu listing the primary reports available from
WinControl. Other reports are available, but generally used less frequently or with optional software. The
process of generating most of the reports involves first selecting a report from the menu, then selecting the
devices to be included in the report. For most reports, you can choose a single device, all devices, or a
particular combination of devices. To select all devices, simply click on the "Do All" button on the device
selection dialog. To select a single device, just click once with the left mouse button, and then click OK.
In addition, if you want a particular selection of multiple devices, you can hold down the Shift key while
selecting a device, and then click another device while holding down the shift key. This will select all
devices in the range selected. To pick a non-connective list, hold down the Control key while selecting
devices. Each device clicked (selected) will be included. Press OK when you have completed your selection
and WinControl will begin processing the report.
When generated, reports are stored in the My Documents folder ( unless you have changed your WinControl
Configuration. A summary of the most commonly used reports follows. The reports shown in the examples
are from various sample sites included in the standard WinControl installation.
Figure 12.1. Reports menu
133
Reporting Options
LCP Wiring Documentation
Figure 12.2. LCP Wiring Documentation
134
Reporting Options
LCP Relay Cross Reference
Figure 12.3. LCP Relay Cross Reference
135
Reporting Options
Dataline Switches
Figure 12.4. Dataline Switches
136
Reporting Options
Group Codes
Figure 12.5. Group Codes
137
Reporting Options
Schedules
Figure 12.6. Schedules
138
Reporting Options
Variable Override Duration
Figure 12.7. Variable Override Duration
139
Reporting Options
Contactors
Figure 12.8. Contactors
140
Chapter 13. Generate DXF Diagram
Figure 13.1. Generate DXF Diagram
When you have finished specifying the requirements of your Lighting Control system; you are now ready
to generate drawings that can be used for bid documents. Click the "Generate DXF Diagram" option.
You may choose to include all options on the drawings, or selectively generate drawings one option at a
time. WinControl Designer is provided with a free DXF viewer program so that you can see the drawings
generated. If you would like to Print or Edit these drawings, you will need to provide your own CAD
program such as AutoCAD for this purpose.
Once the file is generated, the drawing viewer will automatically be launched to display the drawing. If
you want to use your own CAD package rather than the basic viewer included with WinControl Designer,
use the Settings button to select to use your PC's default program for viewing CAD DXF files. If you want
to select a specific name and location for the DXF file generated, click the "Save" button rather than View.
If you don't have AutoCAD or a compatible drawing viewer capable of viewing DXF files, see the section
called “Viewing DXF Files” for available free viewers. These tools can display the DXF files generated
by WinControl Designer. Note these third party sites are not affiliated with Watt Stopper/Legrand.
Examples of various portions of the drawings based on the above selections are shown in the sections that
follow...
• Specifications
• Typical Wiring
• Riser Diagram
• Panel Schedules
• Switch Schedules
Settings allows you configure additional options, including the viewer.
141
Generate DXF Diagram
DXF-Specifications
Figure 13.2. DXF Specifications
142
Generate DXF Diagram
DXF-Typical Wiring Details
Figure 13.3. DXF Typical Wiring Details
143
Generate DXF Diagram
DXF-Riser Diagram
Figure 13.4. DXF Riser Diagram
144
Generate DXF Diagram
DXF-Panel Schedules
Figure 13.5. DXF Panel Schedules
145
Generate DXF Diagram
Viewing DXF Files
DXF Files are CAD format files that are compatible with AutoCAD or a compatible drawing package.
Please visit our WinControl Designer web page at http://www.wattstopper.com/designer for the latest information on available CAD viewing tools.
WinControl / Designer does not come with a CAD program or CAD viewing capabilities. We expect that
you will already have a CAD package on your computer; however, if you don't, you have several free options...
• eDrawings [http://www.solidworks.com/pages/products/edrawings/eDrawings.html] DXF/DWG viewer/printer from Solidworks [http://www.solidworks.com] (approx 6MB).
• Autodesk DWF Viewer [http://www.autodesk.com/dwfviewer-download] DXF/DWG/DWF viewer/printer
from AutoDesk [http://www.autodesk.com] (caution - approx 110MB).
• Free DWG Viewer [http://www.infograph.com/products/dwgviewer] DXF/DWG/DWF viewer only
from Informative Graphics [http://www.infograph.com] (approx 10MB). Be aware this free program
expires after a period of time, and does not allow printing. See the Brava desktop below for a version
with printing features.
All of these tools can display the DXF files generated by WinControl Designer.
Additional fee based options available (many more CAD solutions are available, these are just a few options):
• Purchase the Brava! Desktop (DWG Version) program from Informative Graphics www.infograph.com/products/dwgviewer [http://www.infograph.com/products/dwgviewer]. This tool can display
and Print the DXF files generated by WinControl Designer.
• Purchase IntelliCAD from CADopia. Visit the CADopia website at www.cadopia.com
[http://www.cadopia.com] for pricing.
• Purchase AutoCAD or AutoCADLT from AutoDesk. These programs allow full featured CAD file
editing. Visit the AutoDesk web site at www.autodesk.com [http://www.autodesk.com] for more information.
Note
These sites are not affiliated with Watt Stopper / Legrand.
146
Chapter 14. Application Quick Reference
Schedule Scenarios in WinControl
This is a quick review of how Lighting may be scheduled in WinControl. This does not cover an "Always
ON" or "Always OFF" schedule, since these are rarely used.
See the following topics...
the section called “Auto ON / Auto OFF”
the section called “Manual ON / Auto OFF”
the section called “Dusk to Dawn”
the section called “Dusk to Arbitrary Time”
the section called “Exterior Lighting Schedule with Photocell”
Auto ON / Auto OFF
Turns ON the lighting automatically in the morning, and turns the lighting OFF automatically at night.
Note that for every scheduled ON command, there is an OFF command later that evening. Because of that,
there is NO NEED for the "Occupancy Time" to be checked.
Time Delays will automatically occur on any day that does not have a scheduled ON/OFF time (like
weekends and holidays).
147
Application Quick Reference
Figure 14.1. Auto ON / Auto OFF Schedule
Manual ON / Auto OFF
Tenants need to turn ON lighting manually (via a switch or telephone call) in the morning, but lights are
automatically turned OFF at night.
Because there is no "ON" command in the morning to disable the Time Delays, the "Occupancy Time"
must be checked. This means that there must be an "Off" command every day sometime after the Occupancy Time.
If one does not schedule an OFF command every day after the Occupancy Time, any overridden light will
stay ON all Saturday, Sunday and/or Holiday.
You may choose to change the Occupancy Time from the default 3:01 AM to 5:01 AM (as shown) to increase
their energy savings.
148
Application Quick Reference
Figure 14.2. Manual ON / Auto OFF
Dusk to Dawn
Dusk to Dawn:
Based on the location setting (Choose “Initialize” on the main menu, then choose “Astronomical Clock”
to see the current location), the panel’s microprocessor will calculate the next day’s Sunrise and Sunset
time every evening at midnight. This allows “Sunrise” and “Sunset” to be set like any other time setting.
Since the times are calculated at midnight, note that an Astro-based schedule WILL NOT work the first
evening after it is initially transferred.
Note that since there is an OFF command every day, the Occupancy Time is not checked
Also, most users do not program a Time Delay for Exterior Lights.
149
Application Quick Reference
Figure 14.3. Dusk to Dawn
Dusk to Arbitrary Time
This is a logical extension of the above examples – a mixture of Astro-based and standard times. Offsets
can also be used to control Lights some desired time before or after an Astro event (usually no more than
30 minutes).
The Occupancy Time is not needed, so it should be unchecked.
Some users will also want the lights turned back on in the morning an hour before sunrise. In this case use
the offset setting of the Astro feature to turn lights ON 1 hour before Sunrise, then turn them OFF at Sunrise.
The trouble with using an early ON command at a fixed time (say 7:00am) is that if the daily “OFF at
Sunrise” command happens before the fixed time event turns lights ON (i.e. 7:00am), the exterior lights
will be ON all day.
150
Application Quick Reference
Figure 14.4. Dusk to an Arbitrary Time
Exterior Lighting Schedule with Photocell
With a combination of a photocell and a regular time schedule, exterior lights can be kept on only when
necessary. First, create a Group Code with shed and assign the exterior lighting relays. Second, create a
regular time schedule for when the exterior area is expected to be used. For example, you might choose
6am to 10pm for a parking lot. With the photocell properly configured to send the shed Group Code, the
exterior lighting relays will stay off when there is plenty of sunlight. After sunset, the Group Code sends
a shed restore which 'allows' the lights to go on. At 10pm, the schedule will turn the lights off followed by
a scheduled on at 6am the next morning. The photocell either keep the lights off or allow them to be turned
on by the schedule.
151
Application Quick Reference
Temporary Changes to Schedules in WinControl
Tenants often ask for temporary changes to their normal lighting schedules due to special events. With
WinControl there are at least 4 different options that a user can use to override the standard schedules.
1. Use the Holiday Schedules:
WinControl provides three possible Holiday schedules in every individual schedule template. The
reason three options are provided is that the facility manager might want to use Holiday 1 for limited
hours (similar to many Saturday schedules), Holiday 2 for days with no ON hours (similar to many
Sundays), and Holiday 3 for days when people start at a normal time but leave earlier than normal.
Despite the multiple options, most sites simply use Holiday 1.
The thing to remember about Holiday schedules is that they are system wide. When identifying a day
as a holiday (by choosing “Program” from the main menu, then selecting “System” and “Holidays”)
every schedule switches over to the Holiday schedule. Using this method affects all schedules for the
entire building – not something you want to use when just a small area needs to be kept on longer than
normal.
Figure 14.5. Holiday Schedules
2. Change the normal schedule that is assigned to the relay:
Changing the normal schedule for a relay is very easy to do. Just go into the property screen for a relay
panel (right-click on the panel in the tree view, choose "Properties", and go to the "Relays" tab),
change the schedule for all the relays that you want to override temporarily to a new schedule, and
152
Application Quick Reference
transfer the schedule to the relays. This method requires that there is an existing schedule that meets
the temporary requirements, or else a new schedule will have to be created.
This method requires that the user remember to change the schedule back to the original schedule once
the temporary override is no longer needed.
3. Use an Alternate Schedule Function:
This option if useful when somebody asks to have their schedules changes for a range of days, i.e. if
the financial group needs to keep their lights ON longer than normal during tax season. However, tenants
rarely come back at the end of the special project and let the facility manager know to change the
schedule back. This can be taken care of automatically by an alternate schedule – the facility manager
can assign a specific date to start a new schedule, and the last day to run the alternate schedule before
switching back to the normal schedule.
There are two items that must be programmed for the Alternate Schedule to work properly. First, an
Alternate Schedule must be set up in the relays tab of the panel properties screen.
Note
The Alternate Schedules column is normally viewable in the data entry grid when the "Program" or "All" viewing options are selected. However, if the Alternate Schedules column is
not there, the facility manager will need to use the "Configure" button on the Relay tab of
the panel properties screen to add that column back
Once the Alternate Schedules has been entered for all the proper relays, switch to the Special tab of the
panel property screen. It’s in this tab that the specific dates for the Alternate Schedule are assigned.
Once the new info is transferred to the panel, the alternate schedule will automatically start running on
the date defined as a “Begin Date”, and run up to and including the date defined as the “End Date”.
After that, the relays will automatically revert to their normal schedule.
Note that the Alternate Schedules and the dates for running the Alternate Schedule need to be defined
each panel individually. While this does offer the flexibility of having different Alternate Schedules
running in different panels, this complexity might prove more confusing than helpful.
153
Application Quick Reference
Figure 14.6. Holiday Schedules
4. Telephone Override with Duration:
Note
This feature requires WinControl version 1.5.6.1 or higher.
For those instances where a specific area has to stay on several hours longer than normal, and when the
area already has a telephone code set up for the area’s relays, this option may save a lot of time. Also,
people who aren’t comfortable programming the system can easily take care of keeping an area ON
longer than normal. This option uses a telephone code assign the relays a time delay mode that can be
significantly longer than the time delay that’s normally assigned to the relays (which is usually 1-2
hours).
Make sure the system is on-line. Then from the main menu choose “Test”, then “Simulate”, and then
“Phone Override with Duration”.
In the pop up box that appears, enter the phone code that you want to override, in the next box choose
“ON”, and in the final box enter the total amount of time in hours and minutes you want the lights
overridden. Remember to enter the total amount of time based on when you enter the override.
For instance, if it’s 5:00pm, and the lights should remain ON till 11:30pm, enter 6:30 (6 hours, 30
minutes). A maximum of 24 hours can be entered.
To check that the relays are using the new time delay, pull up the properties of an overridden relay (right
click on the relay in the tree view) and check the time delay shown on the Status tab. It should be the
time delay entered.
154
Application Quick Reference
Figure 14.7. Phone Override with Duration
Table 14.1. Summary of Override Options
Temporary Schedule Override Affects
Method
Holiday Override
Change Normal
Schedule
Must be Programmed
Best Used For
All Relays in Sys- 1) Holiday Fields in All Sched- Holidays that can be set up
tem
ules 2) Holiday Dates
in advance.
Chosen Relays
1) Relay’s Normal Schedule
Temporary Override for an
unknown number of days
2) New Schedule if one doesn’t
exist
Alternate Schedule Chosen Relays per
Panel
1) Relay’s Alternate Schedule
Temporary Override for a
specific date range
2) New Schedule if one doesn’t
exist
3) Range of Dates (in each panel’s Special Tab)
Telephone Override
with Duration
Telephone Code
1) Telephone Code
One time delay of OFF
sweep for just that night.
One other possibility:
In a space that requires constantly changing schedules, Watt Stopper does have another solution, although
it requires a new piece of hardware. Watt Stopper has a device called WebLink that provides remote access
to the Lighting Control system using Ethernet wiring. The WebLink also acts as a Web Server which
anyone on the network in the building can monitor and control any relay. All that is needed is a web browser
such as Internet Explorer or Firefox
155
Application Quick Reference
There is an optional software package that can be loaded on the WebLink, which will provide a true 365
day schedule programmer. The schedules are actually setup with actions in an interface that looks similar
to Outlook, or any other daily scheduling program. Using this software, a schedule can be changed at any
time, and every day can be completely unique. The 365 day scheduler is ideal for places like arenas, museums, and spaces that rent out areas to the public.
156
Application Quick Reference
WinControl's Six Switch Functions
WinControl's goal is to make programming your lighting control system as easy as possible. Sometimes
however an “easy to use” feature requires a little patience in the beginning to learn how it is used. For instance, some people don’t realize how valuable the six different functions that can be assigned to a programmable switch can be.
Assigning the relays that will be controlled by a switch input is straightforward – bring up “Properties”
for the panel where the switch is terminated and select the “Switches” tab. Once you get the dialog below,
provide a location / description for the switch you’re programming.
After you’ve entered a description, click the “Program” button. Up comes the relay assignment dialog
box…
Figure 14.8. Relay Assignment Dialog
From here, choose the relays you want the switch to control using any of the following methods:
• Double-click on a relays “LCP/Rly” info to quickly add it to the included relays, or
• Select relays (using Shift-Click for sequential relays or Control-Click for separate relays), then drag
from the Available Relays to the Included Relays, or
• Select relays (using Shift-Click for sequential relays or Control-Click for separate relays), then click the
“Add” button.
157
Application Quick Reference
If you don’t see all the info you need, expand or contract the field info by dragging your cursor in the field
headers. Once you’ve assigned the relays you want, you need to select a switch “Function”. This choice
identifies how you want the switch to operate.
The possible “Functions” are:
1. Master
When a switch is assigned a Master function (the default), it will simply turn all associated relays
ON/OFF, just as if you had pressed a directly wired switch. When a master switch is pressed on, the
associated relays come on; when it is pressed off, the relays turn off. No Blink warning is provided. If
time delays are enabled (after a Scheduled Off event for instance), then turning a master switch ON
will start the time delay process specified for the relay. Most switches used for occupant overrides are
Master switches.
2. Blink Warn
Blink Warn switches are used if you want another system (BAS, HVAC, etc…) to schedule Relays ON
and OFF.
Before using a Blink Warn switch, relays controlling Incandescent and Fluorescent Lamps should be
set to Blink by choosing “Blink Warn” in the relay’s “Settings” field. HID Lamps or Mechanical
equipment should not be set to Blink. If a “Blink Warn” switch is pressed OFF, it will Blink its assigned
relays OFF then back ON, and then turn them off five minutes later. Relays that are not set as “Blink
Warn” will turn OFF immediately.
Note
Note that a Blink Switch pressed ON will turn ON its relays AND it will disable their time
delays. A Blink Switch pressed OFF turns its relays OFF (either immediately or after five
minutes) AND will enable their time delays.
3. Cleaning
This function is designed for switches used by cleaning crews. Relays controlled by a cleaning switch
will go ON when the switch is pressed ON, but the switch cannot turn off relays if the area is in Normal
Hours mode (aka occupied, or the relay is ON due to any other type of override actions). This function
acts like other temporary overrides, at the end of a time delay the relays it controls will turn OFF (with
a warning if Blink is enabled). The cleaning switch time delay defaults to the same as the relay time
delay, although the cleaning crew time delay can be set to a different delay for each LCP.
Note: The Cleaning function is sometimes used when a switch is in a hallway or publicly accessible
area, since it prevents people from turning OFF a relay that has been scheduled ON by the system.
4. Shed
The shed function is used for interior daylighting zones and load shedding. Relays programmed with a
shed group code will track the operation of the photocell or demand contact switch, but only after
something else (switch, schedule, etc…) has turned the relays ON. If nothing else turns the relays ON,
a Shed switch will do nothing.
If an occupant wants to override a Shed OFF action, they must override it two times. The first time they
override it, the relays will turn back OFF. The second time they override it, the relay will stay ON. (This
shed override feature may be disabled on a per panel basis using Special Features for the panel).
5. Force ON
158
Application Quick Reference
This function allows you to setup a switch that when turned ON will Force ON the relays in the group.
While in a Force ON condition, nothing can turn the relays off, not even a schedule or another network
command. A direct wired switch will override a relay OFF for about 2 seconds; but then the system
will turn it back ON. When the Force ON switch is turned OFF, relays return to normal operation. Force
ON is sometimes used for contacts from a security system, so lights can’t be turned OFF after an alarm
is triggered.
6. Force OFF
A Force OFF switch is the opposite of a Force ON switch. Force OFF allows you to setup a switch that
when turned ON will Force OFF the relays in the group. When the switch is turned OFF, relays return
to normal. Force OFF may be useful to keep lights OFF without allowing an occupant override (such
as Shed allows).
159
Chapter 15. Windows Security Issues
Higher levels of security are now required by IT departments and as each update of Windows comes out,
security has been tightened. WinControl 3.0 has been updated to work with higher IT and Windows security
requirements. Here we try to provide tips and best practices for WinControl when running with tougher
security requirements in Windows XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7.
Tip: Before making any changes to your site folder, backup the entire site folder to a medium off of the
computer such as CD/DVD, USB Drive, server or tape backup.
Access Requirements
User Access Requirements
Traditionally, Windows users typically were setup to run as Administrator of their own machine where
they were allowed to install software and make machine level changes to their systems. Now, due to the
threat of viruses and the need for IT to manage installed software, most users can no longer configure their
own machines. For these reasons, most users now run as a “restricted” or “standard” user. Any software
run by these users must not attempt to edit machine level settings on the computer. Most software must be
updated to run under these restricted security conditions.
WinControl has been updated in version 3.0 to run with restricted access to the machine. Most functions
work normally including documentation, programming, program transfer, log transfer and other WinControl
activities.
Administrative Access Requirements
The only functions in WinControl that require Administrative access include:
1. Installation
2. Automatic Updating
3. Licensing
To perform these functions, the user must either elevate their privileges or request IT to perform the function
as an administrator. If the user has the option to elevate their privileges then they will either need to log
in as an administrative user or they can launch the application by a special sequence. By holding down the
Shift key while right clicking the application, a special menu option “Run As…” where you may login
temporarily as a privileged user without having to logoff. See the section called “Special Windows 7 and
Windows Vista Issues” for more details on shortcuts to running with elevated permissions.
160
Windows Security Issues
Site Data Storage Locations
By default, WinControl stores site data under the current user’s “My Documents\WinControl” folder. A
subfolder is created for each project with the same name as the project. Due to enhanced security requirements, we strongly discourage storing any user data in the “Program Files” folder. This folder requires
Administrator access and will force WinControl to be run with those higher privileges. We recommend
moving the site folder to either “My Documents\WinControl” or “Shared Documents\WinControl” as soon
as it is convenient.
Sharing Documents on the Same Machine
Typically, only one user accesses WinControl LI site files and, by default, they are stored under “My
Documents\WinControl”. However, if more than one user logs in and needs access to the same files then
they must be stored in a common location. “Shared Documents” is used for this reason except there are
security issues with sharing files for write access. By default, files copied to Shared Documents are only
writable by the owner or creator of the document. You may test this out by creating a simple text document
using Notepad and saving it to “Shared Documents”. Then, log in as a different user (other than an administrator) to see if you can make any changes to that file.
To enable read/write access for all users on the local machine, Shared Documents security must be modified.
Also, if the machine is running XP Pro or Vista while logged onto a Domain (or Active Directory) then
Shared Documents will not be displayed under My Computer in File Explorer. It can, however, be found
under “Documents and Settings\All Users\Documents”.
Figure 15.1. Sharing and Security
Right click on the folder “Shared Documents” and click the “Sharing and Security…” item (see menu
screen shot above). Click the “Network Setup Wizard” and choose the defaults. This wizard changes the
options on the “Sharing” page to allow “Shared Documents” to be shared for read/write access.
161
Windows Security Issues
Figure 15.2. Shared Documents Properties
On the updated “Sharing” page, check “Share this folder on the network” and “Allow network users to
change my files”. The “Share name” can be left as default.
Figure 15.3. Shared Properties After Wizard
162
Windows Security Issues
For more information regarding the “Shared Documents” folder, please visit: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/304040
Sharing Documents from a Network File Share
If configuring WinControl to access files via a network share, the IT department must be consulted in order
to open up the shares. Access and security requirements differ across organizations. We recommend access
to the WinControl site files to be read-only across a network to minimize accidental data loss. Treat the
WinControl data files as you would any other data files like Word or Excel files. If the WinControl file is
allowed write access then the user that performs the last write will overwrite changes by anyone else with
the file already open.
For projects that utilize devices such as touch screens, we recommend that the site files be copied locally
upon start up to improve performance. Generally, the startup procedures for touch screen panels will
automatically pull the latest data files from a network file share and launch WinControl Graphics full
screen.
163
Windows Security Issues
Special Windows 7 and Windows Vista Issues
Windows 7 and Windows Vista have a much higher level of security enforcement while also trying to
maintain backwards compatibility with older software. One of the new security features that is hidden to
most users is a virtualized area of the registry for Local Machine data. This enables legacy applications to
run with restricted user privileges. However, changes to this virtual area are not seen by other users of the
computer, causing some software to behave in odd ways when run by a user other than the one that installed
the application. For this reason, installation, updating and licensing of WinControl must always be performed
while running as an Administrator. If WinControl is licensed while running as a normal user then only that
user will be licensed. If another user logs in and runs WinControl, they will get a warning that they are not
yet licensed. If this happens, rerun licensing as an Administrator and re-request the license.
Some links for more information on Windows 7 and Windows Vista security:
• http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa965884.aspx
• http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc507844.aspx
• http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd560691.aspx
Note
Administrative Logon Tip - To run as Administrator for either XP or Vista is to right click on the
program shortcut while holding down the shift key. This will bring up an extended context menu
which will include “Run as…” or “Run as Administrator”. Selecting this option allows you to
temporarily run the application at a higher security level. Both XP and Vista will prompt for an
administrative user ID and password while allowing you to remain logged in as a normal user.
This allows the software to perform the administrative tasks and then exit.
164
Chapter 16. Conclusion
WinControl allows you to design and document a system of lighting controls for a new facility, as well as
transfer the operating data to the system, and providing ongoing monitoring, control, and troubleshooting
functions, taking advantage of the specific product features necessary to meet the owner's needs and desires.
WinControl is an extension of our WinControl Designer tool, adding the ability to provide online communication, data transfer, and a host of other features for day to day operation of our LI CC based lighting
control panels. WinControl includes all of the functionality of our WinControl Designer product as well.
As with WinControl Designer, WinControl provides the framework for setting up the programming of the
system, so you are assured that the components you select can be programmed for the features required.
Hard copy documentation is generated which can be used by the contractor or startup technician for applications where is a PC front end is not of interest or applicable.
Please visit our WinControl web page at http://www.wattstopper.com/wincontrol for the latest news and
information and updates for WinControl.
165
Glossary of WinControl and LI-CC Terms
B
Blink
A “Blink” is the process of turning off a relay for 1 second, then turning it back
on to warn an occupant, via the blink of his/her lights, that the lights will be automatically shut off in 5 minutes. This feature is enabled by setting the “Blink Warn”
parameter to “Yes” for individual relays. Relays that are already OFF are not affected by the Blink Warn function. Blink Warn is programmable on a per relay
basis.
Blink Warn Function
This is one of six different switch functions. Blink Warn is a function that can be
selected on a per switch basis for programmable switches. When a switch is of a
type “Blink Warn”, then turning off the switch will activate a Blink on the loads
controlled.
C
CC
This is an acronym for Complete Control, and is also the catalog number for the
intelligent module installed inside a Lighting Integrator panel. The CC card is
capable of storing the programs for up to 48 relays and controlling their function.
The card is designed to retain programs in the even of a power failures, and has
an internal clock to keep schedules functioning even though there may be a power
outage, or dataline or PC failures.
Clean Function
This is one of six different switch functions. A switch that has been programmed
with the Clean function cannot turn off the lights while they are scheduled ON,
and cannot turn off the lights if a non-Clean function has turned them ON. A Clean
switch is often used for support of janitorial staff, but may serve as an interface
with security systems when it is necessary to get all lights on. If the security system
is activated the relay needs to be able to restore the previous state when the alarm
is cleared.
COM Port
COM port is computer jargon for communications port. A COM port is a connection
on a personal computer that provides an interface to other devices, such as the
Complete Control system. The standard COM port is an RS-232 serial communications port. In the Complete Control system, it is connected at the PC to the CDID
interface device via an HCABLE-C.
Complete Control
The Complete Control option for Lighting Integrator panels is distinguished by
the controller card and the use of WinControl programming the system. All LI-CC
systems are programmed from a PC. Each panel in an LI-CC system has an CC
controller card, in addition to one or more Relay Driver (RD) cards. The CC card
executes all programmable switching and scheduling functions in a fully distributed
manner. This manual is devoted to the use of WinControl with the LI-CC family
of products.
Controller
The Controller is an electronic board (CC Controller Card) installed in a Lighting
Integrator LCP. It contains all of the operating programs for an individual LCP.
Each Controller has an internal clock that keeps track of the current date and time
166
Glossary of WinControl and LI-CC
Terms
so schedules can be tracked within each panel. This feature allows fully distributed
control within the system.
D
Dataline Options Panel
The Dataline Options Panel is used to provide power to the dataline, as a mounting
box for the Phone Override Card , and as a mounting box for the Global Switch
Annunciator card. When set to the Master Mode it acts as the dataline power supply.
Dataline Power Module
This is a small card that installs inside of a Lighting Integrator panel. This cards
provides the necessary dataline power for panels to communicate over the network.
Only one panel needs a DP module installed.
F
Force Off Function
This is one of six different switch functions. When a switch is programmed as
Force OFF, any of the relays that are programmed to respond to the switch will
be Forced OFF when the switch is set to the ON position. The ON state of the
switch indicates the overridden state for the relays, and Force OFF will turn the
relay OFF, and keep the relay in that position, regardless of schedules or other
override commands. Turning the switch OFF will restore the relays to their nonforce state.
Force On Function
This is one of six different switch functions. When a switch is programmed as
Force ON, any of the relays that are programmed to respond to the switch will be
“Forced ON” when the switch is set to the ON position. The ON state of the switch
indicates the overridden state for the relays. Force ON will turn the relay ON and
keep the relay in that position regardless of schedules or other override commands.
Turning the switch OFF will restore the relays to their non-force state.
G
Graphical User Interface
A User Interface is a collection of techniques and mechanisms to interact with the
computer. A Graphical User Interface provides a collection of elements (called
objects) visible to the user that are used to perform actions. The actions include
accessing and modifying by pointing, selecting, and manipulating using a pointing
device (mouse).
Group Code
A Group Code is a user selectable group of relays that has a predefined function
scenario in addition to the collection of relays. A group code is often used to provide
an easy way to control multiple loads, either in one or multiple lighting control
panels. A Group Code can be associated with Channel inputs in a Group Switch
(GS) card, as well as with individual buttons on a dataline switch. Group Codes
are identified by their id, which is a number from 1-16000. Available function
scenarios include Master, Blink, Clean Shed, Force ON and Force OFF.
H
HCABLE-C
This is a cable required to connect a PC computer to either an HLINK device or
directly to a LCP. To connect to a LCP an CC module must be installed.
167
Glossary of WinControl and LI-CC
Terms
HCABLE-M
This is the required cable for connecting a modem to an HLINK device.
HDR
This relay model is Watt Stopper's exclusive Heavy Duty relay for switching
lighting loads. Unlike other relays, this device has a visual state indicator, as well
as ability to provide a manual override, even when power is not available to drive
the relay coil. The HDR has a special plug-in connector for connection to the LI
Relay Driver (RD) board.
HLINK
This communications devices allows you to connect your PC to a dataline network,
then communicate to multiple panels. The HLINK provides clock synchronization
functions, and an alarm contact for failure annunciations.
L
LCP
Lighting Control Panel. This is a complete assembly which includes a Tub, Interior,
Cover, and Power Supply, with Controller Cards and Relay Driver Cards installed.
Lighting Integrator
This terms describes Watt Stopper's line of Lighting Control Panels.
M
Master Function
This is one of six switch functions. The Master switch function can be selected on
a per switch basis. Master switches can directly control relays, without regard for
current mode. A Master switch programmed with a override duration will initiate
a countdown.
Modem
A modem is a device used to access remote computers or lighting control systems
using telephone lines.
O
Override Duration
Override Duration is a term used to describe the process of counting down a predetermined interval of time after an override. Overrides are initiated by an ON
command via Phone Code, Master Switch, or Clean switch, as well as direct
override switch. At the end of the pre-programmed time delay period, the load will
be turned OFF, or blinked if Blink is enabled. Another override before the end of
the time delay re-starts the counter.
R
Relay
This is the basic point of control for the Lighting Integrator panel system. All
ON/OFF control of loads occurs by toggling a relay, which is normally mounted
inside a Lighting Integrator Lighting Control Panel (LCP). Relays may also be
mounted remotely. A LCP may hold as many as 48 relays.
Relay Driver
Relay Driver (RD) cards handle the control of up to 4 relays. A 48 relay panel
contains as many as 12 RD cards. These must be installed in a panel for the system
to be able to check status and control relays.
168
Glossary of WinControl and LI-CC
Terms
S
Shed Function
Shed is one of six possible switch functions. A switch that has been programmed
with the Shed function cannot turn on the lights if they were not previously turned
off via the shed function. A Shed switch is often used in daytime lighting applications, or for demand savings in conjunction with a building automation system.
T
Transfer Programs
This is the process of sending new operating parameters such as schedules, phone
codes, and time delays to the field LCPs after programming in the PC via the
WinControl program. You can transfer programs from your computer to the field
devices, or in special circumstances, you can also transfer programs from the field
devices back to your computer. The latter is normally only necessary if you have
more than one front end computer.
V
Variable Override Duration
The term used in WinControl for assorted time delays and associated schedule
variations. See Time Delay above.
W
WinControl
WinControl is the Windows-based Complete Control software for Lighting Integrator panels from Watt Stopper. WinControl is the software installed on PCs delivered with a LI-CC system. This software is designed to support programming
of a LI-CC, and provide monitor and control functions for any points in the system.
The software does not have to run unless you need to make changes to the system,
or have special monitoring requirements.
169
Index
A
Analog Input, 36
Applications, 147
Archive, 125
ARP, 27, 103
AS-100 Automatic Switch, 49, 99
Astronomical Clock
Setup, 74
Usage-Dusk to Dawn, 149
Usage-On at Dusk, 150
L
License Agreement, 1
Load Chart, 104
M
Mechanically Held Contactor, 99
O
Occupancy Sensors, 52
P
BACnet, 90
Panel Sizes, 23
Photocell, 33, 36
Astronomical Clock, 151
Priority Array, 102
Priority Slot, 102
C
R
Change History, 18
Commissioning
Dataline Switch, 106
Configuration
General, 76
Menus, 78
Polling, 79
WCAlarm, 80
WCServer, 77
Contactors In Panels, 25
Copyright, 2
Create New Panels, 11
Relay
Status, 102
Reports
Contactors, 140
Dataline Switches, 136
Group Codes, 137
LCP Relay Cross Reference, 135
LCP Wiring Documentation, 134
Schedules, 138
Variable Override Duration, 139
D
Dataline Switches, 39
Commissioning, 106
Documenting, 40, 41
Programming, 48
Daylight Savings Time, 62
DL Card, 27, 28
Schedules
Auto ON / Auto OFF, 147
Dusk ON Schedule OFF, 150
Dusk to Dawn, 149
Manual ON / Auto OFF, 148
Security, 65, 160
Sentry Switch, 99
Setpoint, 37
G
T
Generate DXF Diagram, 141
Group Code Function
Blink Warn, 42
Cleaning, 42
Force OFF, 43
Force ON, 43
Master, 42
Shed, 42
Group Switch Card, 35
Toolbar, 13
Transfer, 112
Trends, 116
Activity Log Reporting, 116
Automatic History Download, 132
Daily Runtime Reporting , 127
Runtime Charting, 130
B
S
V
Variable Override Duration, 87
170
Index
W
WCRetriever, 132
WebLink, 155
WinControl Helper, 11
171
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement