Schneider Electric MiCOM P849 User Guide | Manualzz

MiCOM P849

Input & Output Extension Device

P849/EN M/D33

Software Version B0

Hardware Suffix M

Technical Manual

Note The technical manual for this device gives instructions for its installation, commissioning, and operation. However, the manual cannot cover all conceivable circumstances or include detailed information on all topics. In the event of questions or specific problems, do not take any action without proper authorization. Contact the appropriate Schneider Electric technical sales office and request the necessary information.

Any agreements, commitments, and legal relationships and any obligations on the part of Schneider

Electric including settlements of warranties, result solely from the applicable purchase contract, which is not affected by the contents of the technical manual.

This device MUST NOT be modified. If any modification is made without the express permission of

Schneider Electric, it will invalidate the warranty, and may render the product unsafe.

The Schneider Electric logo and any alternative version thereof are trademarks and service marks of Schneider

Electric.

All trade names or trademarks mentioned herein whether registered or not, are the property of their owners.

This manual is provided for informational use only and is subject to change without notice.

© 2015, Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.

MiCOM P849

CONTENTS

Chapter

Safety Information

Chapter 1 Introduction

Chapter 2 Technical Data

Chapter 3 Getting Started

Chapter 4 Settings

Chapter 5 Operation

Chapter 6 Application Notes

Chapter 7 Using the PSL Editor

Description

Chapter 8 Programmable Logic

Chapter 9 Measurements and Recording

Chapter 10 Product Design

Chapter 11 Commissioning

Chapter 12 Test and Setting Records

Chapter 13 Maintenance

Chapter 14 Troubleshooting

Chapter 15 SCADA Communications

Chapter 16 Installation

Chapter 17 Connection Diagrams

Chapter 18 Cyber Security

Chapter 19 Dual Redundant Ethernet Board

Chapter 20 Parallel Redundancy Protocol (PRP) Notes

Chapter 21 High-availability Seamless Redundancy (HSR)

Chapter 22 Menu Maps

Chapter 23 Firmware and Service Manual Version History

Symbols and Glossary

Contents

Document ID

Px4x/EN SI/H12

P849/EN IT/D33

P849/EN TD/D33

P849/EN GS/D33

P849/EN ST/D33

P849/EN OP/D33

P849/EN AP/D33

Px4x/EN SE/D11

P849/EN PL/D33

P849/EN MR/D33

P849/EN PD/D33

P849/EN CM/D33

P849/EN RC/D33

Px4x/EN MT/H53

Px4x/EN TS/Hf7

P849/EN SC/D33

Px4x/EN IN/A02

P849/EN CD/D33

Px4x/EN CS/A03

Px4x/EN REB/F22

Px4x/EN PR/D22

Px4x/EN HS/B21

P849/EN MM/D33

P849/EN VH/D33

Px4x/EN SG/A09

P849/EN M/D33 Page-1

Contents

MiCOM P849

Date:

Products covered by this chapter:

Hardware Suffix:

Software Version:

Connection Diagrams:

08/2015

This chapter covers the specific versions of the MiCOM products listed below. This includes

only the following combinations of Software Version and Hardware Suffix.

M

B0

10P849xx (xx = 01 to 06)

Page-2 P849/EN M/D33

MiCOM Px4x

(SI) Safety Information

Px4x/EN SI/H12

SAFETY INFORMATION

CHAPTER SI

Page (SI)-1

(SI) Safety Information

MiCOM Px4x

Date:

Products covered by this chapter:

Software Version:

Hardware Suffix:

01/2014

This chapter covers the specific versions of the MiCOM products listed below. This includes

only the following combinations of Software Version and Hardware Suffix.

All MiCOM Px4x products

All MiCOM Px4x products

Page (SI)-2 Px4x/EN SI/H12

Contents

CONTENTS

1 Introduction

2 Health and Safety

3 Symbols and Labels on the Equipment

3.1

3.2

Symbols

Labels

4 Installing, Commissioning and Servicing

5 De-commissioning and Disposal

6 Technical Specifications for Safety

6.1

6.2

6.3

6.4

Protective Fuse Rating

Protective Class

Installation Category

Environment

(SI) Safety Information

Page SI-

9

12

13

13

13

13

13

5

6

8

8

8

Px4x/EN SI/H12 Page (SI)-3

(SI) Safety Information

Notes:

Contents

Page (SI)-4 Px4x/EN SI/H12

Introduction

1

(SI) Safety Information

INTRODUCTION

This guide and the relevant equipment documentation provide full information on safe handling, commissioning and testing of this equipment. This Safety Information section also includes reference to typical equipment label markings.

Documentation for equipment ordered from Schneider Electric is dispatched separately from manufactured goods and may not be received at the same time as the equipment.

Therefore this guide is provided to ensure that printed information which may be present on the equipment is fully understood by the recipient.

The technical data in this Safety Information section provides typical information and advice, which covers a variety of different products. You must also refer to the Technical

Data section of the relevant product publication(s) as this includes additional information which is specific to particular equipment.

WARNING Before carrying out any work on the equipment all people should be familiar with the contents of this Safety Information section and the ratings on the equipment’s rating label.

You also need to make reference to the external connection diagram(s) before the equipment is installed, commissioned or serviced.

Language-specific, self-adhesive User Interface labels are provided in a bag for some equipment.

Px4x/EN SI/H12 Page (SI)-5

(SI) Safety Information

2

Health and Safety

HEALTH AND SAFETY

The information in the Safety Information section of the equipment documentation is intended to ensure that equipment is properly installed and handled in order to maintain it in a safe condition.

People

Schneider Electric assume that everyone who will be associated with installing, commissioning or working on the equipment will be completely familiar with the contents of this Safety Information section, or the Safety Guide. We also assume that everyone working with the equipment will have sufficient knowledge and experience of electrical systems. We also assume that they will work with a complete understanding of the equipment they are working on and the health and safety issues of the location in which they are working.

Planning

We recommend that a detailed plan is developed before equipment is installed into a location, to make sure that the work can be done safely. Such a plan needs to determine how relevant equipment can be isolated from the electrical supply in such as way that there is no possibility of accidental contact with any electrical live equipment, wiring or busbars. It also needs to take into account the requirements for people to work with tools/equipment a safe distance away from any hazards.

Live and Stored Voltages

When electrical equipment is in operation, dangerous voltages will be present in certain parts of the equipment. Even if electrical power is no longer being supplied, some items of equipment may retain enough electrical energy inside them to pose a potentially serious risk of electrocution or damage to other equipment.

Important Remember that placing equipment in a “test” position does not normally isolate it from the power supply or discharge any stored electrical energy.

Warnings and Barricades

Everyone must observe all warning notices. This is because the incorrect use of equipment, or improper use may endanger personnel and equipment and also cause personal injury or physical damage.

Unauthorized entry should also be prevented with suitably marked barricades which will notify people of any dangers and screen off work areas.

People should not enter electrical equipment cubicles or cable troughs until it has been confirmed that all equipment/cables have been isolated and de-energised.

Electrical Isolation

Before working in the terminal strip area, all equipment which has the potential to provide damaging or unsafe levels of electrical energy must be isolated. You will need to isolate and de-energize the specific item of equipment which is being worked on.

Depending on the location, you may also need to isolate and de-energize other items which are electrically connected to it as well as those which are close enough to pose a risk of electrocution in the event of accidental physical or electrical contact.

Remember too that, where necessary, both load and line sides should be de-energized.

Before you make contact with any equipment use an approved voltage detection device to reduce the risk of electric shock.

Page (SI)-6 Px4x/EN SI/H12

Health and Safety

(SI) Safety Information

Risk of Accidental Contact or Arc Flash

Be aware of the risk of accidental contact with hands, long hair, tools or other equipment; and be aware of the possibility of the increased risk of arc flash from areas of high voltage.

Always wear appropriate shock and arc flash personal protective equipment while isolating and de-energizing electrical equipment and until a de-energized state is confirmed.

Temporary Protection

Consider to the use of temporary protective Grounding-Short Circuiting (G-SC). This is required to establish and maintain de-energization when electrical equipment operates at greater than 1000 volts or there is potential for back-feed at any voltage.

Temporary protective G-SC can be accomplished by installing cables designed for that purpose or by the use of intrinsic G-SC equipment. Temporary protective G-SC equipment must be able to carry maximum fault current available and have an impedance low enough to cause the applicable protective device to operate.

Restoring Power

To reduce the risks, the work plan should have a check list of things which must be completed and checks made before electrical power can be restored.

Be aware of the risk that electrical systems may have power restored to them at a remote location (possibly by the customer or a utility company). You should consider the use of lockouts so that the electrical system can be restored only when you unlock it. In any event, you should be aware of and be part of the process which determines when electrical power can be restored; and that people working on the system have control over when power is restored.

Inspect and test the electrical equipment to ensure it has been restored to a “safe” condition prior re-energizing.

Qualified Personnel

Proper and safe operation of the equipment depends on appropriate shipping and handling, proper storage, installation and commissioning, and on careful operation, maintenance and servicing. For this reason only qualified personnel may work on or operate the equipment.

Qualified personnel are individuals who:

Are familiar with the installation, commissioning, and operation of the equipment and of the system to which it is being connected;

Are able to safely perform switching operations in accordance with accepted safety engineering practices and are authorized to energize and de-energize equipment and to isolate, ground, and label it;

Are trained in the care and use of safety apparatus in accordance with safety engineering practices;

Are trained in emergency procedures (first aid).

Documentation

The equipment documentation gives instructions for its installation, commissioning, and operation. However, the manuals cannot cover all conceivable circumstances or include detailed information on all topics. In the event of questions or specific problems, do not take any action without proper authorization. Contact the appropriate Schneider Electric technical sales office and request the necessary information.

Px4x/EN SI/H12 Page (SI)-7

(SI) Safety Information

3

3.1

Symbols and Labels on the Equipment

SYMBOLS AND LABELS ON THE EQUIPMENT

For safety reasons the following symbols and external labels, which may be used on the equipment or referred to in the equipment documentation, should be understood before the equipment is installed or commissioned.

Symbols

Caution: refer to equipment documentation

Caution: risk of electric shock

Protective Conductor (*Earth) terminal

Functional/Protective Conductor (*Earth) terminal

Note: This symbol may also be used for a Protective Conductor

(Earth) Terminal if that terminal is part of a terminal block or sub-assembly e.g. power supply.

3.2

*CAUTION: The term “Earth” used throughout this technical manual is the direct equivalent of the North American term

“Ground”.

Labels

See Safety Guide (SFTY/4L M) for typical equipment labeling information.

Page (SI)-8 Px4x/EN SI/H12

Installing, Commissioning and Servicing

4

(SI) Safety Information

INSTALLING, COMMISSIONING AND SERVICING

Manual Handling

Plan carefully, identify any possible hazards and determine whether the load needs to be moved at all. Look at other ways of moving the load to avoid manual handling. Use the correct lifting techniques and Personal Protective Equipment to reduce the risk of injury.

Many injuries are caused by:

• Lifting heavy objects

• Lifting things incorrectly

• Pushing or pulling heavy objects

• Using the same muscles repetitively.

Follow the Health and Safety at Work, etc Act 1974, and the Management of Health and

Safety at Work Regulations 1999.

Equipment Connections

Personnel undertaking installation, commissioning or servicing work for this equipment should be aware of the correct working procedures to ensure safety.

The equipment documentation should be consulted before installing, commissioning, or servicing the equipment.

Terminals exposed during installation, commissioning and maintenance may present a hazardous voltage unless the equipment is electrically isolated.

The clamping screws of all terminal block connectors, for field wiring, using M4 screws shall be tightened to a nominal torque of 1.3 Nm.

Equipment intended for rack or panel mounting is for use on a flat surface of a Type 1 enclosure, as defined by Underwriters Laboratories (UL).

Any disassembly of the equipment may expose parts at hazardous voltage, also electronic parts may be damaged if suitable ElectroStatic voltage Discharge (ESD) precautions are not taken.

If there is unlocked access to the rear of the equipment, care should be taken by all personnel to avoid electric shock or energy hazards.

Caution Voltage and current connections shall be made using insulated crimp terminations to ensure that terminal block insulation requirements are maintained for safety.

Watchdog (self-monitoring) contacts are provided in numerical relays to indicate the health of the device. Schneider Electric strongly recommends that these contacts are hardwired into the substation's automation system, for alarm purposes.

To ensure that wires are correctly terminated the correct crimp terminal and tool for the wire size should be used.

The equipment must be connected in accordance with the appropriate connection diagram.

Protection Class I Equipment

• Before energizing the equipment it must be earthed using the protective conductor terminal, if provided, or the appropriate termination of the supply plug in the case of plug connected equipment.

• The protective conductor (earth) connection must not be removed since the protection against electric shock provided by the equipment would be lost.

• When the protective (earth) conductor terminal (PCT) is also used to terminate cable screens, etc., it is essential that the integrity of the protective (earth) conductor is checked after the addition or removal of such functional earth connections. For M4 stud PCTs the integrity of the protective (earth) connections should be ensured by use of a locknut or similar.

The recommended minimum protective conductor (earth) wire size is 2.5 mm² (3.3 mm² for North America) unless otherwise stated in the technical data section of the equipment documentation, or otherwise required by local or country wiring regulations.

Px4x/EN SI/H12 Page (SI)-9

(SI) Safety Information

Installing, Commissioning and Servicing

The protective conductor (earth) connection must be low-inductance and as short as possible.

All connections to the equipment must have a defined potential. Connections that are pre-wired, but not used, should preferably be grounded when binary inputs and output relays are isolated. When binary inputs and output relays are connected to common potential, the pre-wired but unused connections should be connected to the common potential of the grouped connections.

Pre-Energization Checklist

Before energizing the equipment, the following should be checked:

• Voltage rating/polarity (rating label/equipment documentation);

• CT circuit rating (rating label) and integrity of connections;

• Protective fuse rating;

• Integrity of the protective conductor (earth) connection (where applicable);

• Voltage and current rating of external wiring, applicable to the application.

Accidental Touching of Exposed Terminals

If working in an area of restricted space, such as a cubicle, where there is a risk of electric shock due to accidental touching of terminals which do not comply with IP20 rating, then a suitable protective barrier should be provided.

Equipment Use

If the equipment is used in a manner not specified by the manufacturer, the protection provided by the equipment may be impaired.

Removal of the Equipment Front Panel/Cover

Removal of the equipment front panel/cover may expose hazardous live parts, which must not be touched until the electrical power is removed.

UL and CSA/CUL Listed or Recognized Equipment

To maintain UL and CSA/CUL Listing/Recognized status for North America the equipment should be installed using UL or CSA Listed or Recognized parts for the following items: connection cables, protective fuses/fuseholders or circuit breakers, insulation crimp terminals and replacement internal battery, as specified in the equipment documentation.

For external protective fuses a UL or CSA Listed fuse shall be used. The Listed type shall be a Class J time delay fuse, with a maximum current rating of 15 A and a minimum d.c. rating of 250 Vd.c., for example type AJT15.

Where UL or CSA Listing of the equipment is not required, a high rupture capacity

(HRC) fuse type with a maximum current rating of 16 Amps and a minimum d.c. rating of

250 Vd.c. may be used, for example Red Spot type NIT or TIA.

Equipment Operating Conditions

The equipment should be operated within the specified electrical and environmental limits.

Current Transformer Circuits

Do not open the secondary circuit of a live CT since the high voltage produced may be lethal to personnel and could damage insulation. Generally, for safety, the secondary of the line CT must be shorted before opening any connections to it.

For most equipment with ring-terminal connections, the threaded terminal block for current transformer termination has automatic CT shorting on removal of the module.

Therefore external shorting of the CTs may not be required, the equipment documentation should be checked to see if this applies.

For equipment with pin-terminal connections, the threaded terminal block for current transformer termination does NOT have automatic CT shorting on removal of the module.

External Resistors, including Voltage Dependent Resistors (VDRs)

Where external resistors, including Voltage Dependent Resistors (VDRs), are fitted to the equipment, these may present a risk of electric shock or burns, if touched.

Page (SI)-10 Px4x/EN SI/H12

Installing, Commissioning and Servicing

(SI) Safety Information

Battery Replacement

Where internal batteries are fitted they should be replaced with the recommended type and be installed with the correct polarity to avoid possible damage to the equipment, buildings and persons.

Insulation and Dielectric Strength Testing

Insulation testing may leave capacitors charged up to a hazardous voltage. At the end of each part of the test, the voltage should be gradually reduced to zero, to discharge capacitors, before the test leads are disconnected.

Insertion of Modules and PCB Cards

Modules and PCB cards must not be inserted into or withdrawn from the equipment whilst it is energized, since this may result in damage.

Insertion and Withdrawal of Extender Cards

Extender cards are available for some equipment. If an extender card is used, this should not be inserted or withdrawn from the equipment whilst it is energized. This is to avoid possible shock or damage hazards. Hazardous live voltages may be accessible on the extender card.

External Test Blocks and Test Plugs

Great care should be taken when using external test blocks and test plugs such as the

MMLG, MMLB and MiCOM P990 types, hazardous voltages may be accessible when using these. *CT shorting links must be in place before the insertion or removal of

MMLB test plugs, to avoid potentially lethal voltages.

*Note: When a MiCOM P992 Test Plug is inserted into the MiCOM P991

Test Block, the secondaries of the line CTs are automatically shorted, making them safe.

Fiber Optic Communication

Where fiber optic communication devices are fitted, these should not be viewed directly.

Optical power meters should be used to determine the operation or signal level of the device.

Cleaning

The equipment may be cleaned using a lint free cloth dampened with clean water, when no connections are energized. Contact fingers of test plugs are normally protected by petroleum jelly, which should not be removed.

Px4x/EN SI/H12 Page (SI)-11

(SI) Safety Information

5

De-commissioning and Disposal

DE-COMMISSIONING AND DISPOSAL

De-Commissioning

The supply input (auxiliary) for the equipment may include capacitors across the supply or to earth. To avoid electric shock or energy hazards, after completely isolating the supplies to the equipment (both poles of any dc supply), the capacitors should be safely discharged via the external terminals prior to de-commissioning.

Disposal

It is recommended that incineration and disposal to water courses is avoided. The equipment should be disposed of in a safe manner. Any equipment containing batteries should have them removed before disposal, taking precautions to avoid short circuits.

Particular regulations within the country of operation, may apply to the disposal of the equipment.

Page (SI)-12 Px4x/EN SI/H12

Technical Specifications for Safety

6

6.1

6.2

6.3

6.4

(SI) Safety Information

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS FOR SAFETY

Unless otherwise stated in the equipment technical manual, the following data is applicable.

Protective Fuse Rating

The recommended maximum rating of the external protective fuse for equipments is 16A,

High Rupture Capacity (HRC) Red Spot type NIT, or TIA, or equivalent. Unless otherwise stated in equipment technical manual, the following data is applicable. The protective fuse should be located as close to the unit as possible.

DANGER CTs must NOT be fused since open circuiting them may produce lethal hazardous voltages.

Protective Class

IEC 60255-27: 2005

EN 60255-27: 2005

Class I (unless otherwise specified in the equipment documentation).

This equipment requires a protective conductor (earth) connection to ensure user safety.

Installation Category

IEC 60255-27: 2005

EN 60255-27: 2005

Installation Category III (Overvoltage Category III)

Distribution level, fixed installation.

Equipment in this category is qualification tested at 5 kV peak, 1.2/50 µs, 500 Ω, 0.5 J, between all supply circuits and earth and also between independent circuits.

Environment

The equipment is intended for indoor installation and use only. If it is required for use in an outdoor environment then it must be mounted in a specific cabinet of housing which will enable it to meet the requirements of IEC 60529 with the classification of degree of protection IP54 (dust and splashing water protected).

Pollution Degree

Altitude

Pollution Degree 2 Compliance is demonstrated by reference to safety standards.

Operation up to 2000m

Px4x/EN SI/H12 Page (SI)-13

(SI) Safety Information

Notes:

Technical Specifications for Safety

Page (SI)-14 Px4x/EN SI/H12

MiCOM P849

(IT) 1 Introduction

P849/EN IT/D33

INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER 1

Page (IT) 1-1

(IT) 1 Introduction

MiCOM P849

Date:

Products covered by this chapter:

Hardware Suffix:

Software Version:

Connection Diagrams:

08/2015

This chapter covers the specific versions of the MiCOM products listed below. This includes

only the following combinations of Software Version and Hardware Suffix.

M

B0

10P849xx (xx = 01 to 06)

Page (IT) 1-2 P849/EN IT/D33

Contents

CONTENTS

1 Documentation Structure

2 Introduction

3 Product Scope

3.1

3.1.1

3.1.2

3.2

3.2.1

Functional Overview

Auxiliary Voltage Rating Options

Communication Protocol Options

Ordering Options for P849

Information Required with Order

(IT) 1 Introduction

Page (IT) 1-

1

3

4

4

4

4

6

6

P849/EN IT/D33 Page (IT) 1-3

(IT) 1 Introduction

Notes:

Contents

Page (IT) 1-4 P849/EN IT/D33

Documentation Structure

(IT) 1 Introduction

1 DOCUMENTATION STRUCTURE

This manual provides a functional and technical description of this MiCOM device, and gives a comprehensive set of instructions for it’s use and application. A summary of the different chapters of this manual is given here:

Description

Chapter

Code

Px4x/EN SI Safety Information

A guide to the safe handling, commissioning and testing of equipment. This provides typical information and advice which covers a range of MiCOM Px4x products. It explains how to work with equipment safely.

1 Introduction

A guide to the MiCOM range of relays and the documentation structure. General safety aspects of handling Electronic Equipment are discussed with particular reference to relay safety symbols.

Also a general functional overview of the relay and brief application summary is given.

2 Technical Data

Technical data including setting ranges, accuracy limits, recommended operating conditions, ratings and performance data. Compliance with norms and international standards is quoted where appropriate.

3 Getting Started

A guide to the different user interfaces of the IED describing how to start using it. This chapter provides detailed information regarding the communication interfaces of the IED, including a detailed description of how to access the settings database stored within the IED.

4 Settings

P849/EN IT

P849/EN TD

P849/EN GS

P849/EN ST

List of all relay settings, including ranges, step sizes and defaults, together with a brief explanation of each setting.

5 Operation

A comprehensive and detailed functional description of all protection and non-protection functions.

6 Application Notes

This section includes a description of common power system applications of the relay, calculation of suitable settings, some typical worked examples, and how to apply the settings to the relay.

7 Using the PSL Editor

This provides a short introduction to using the PSL Editor application.

8 Programmable Logic

Overview of the Programmable Scheme Logic (PSL) and a description of each logical node. This chapter includes the factory default and an explanation of typical applications.

9 Measurements and Recording

Detailed description of the relays recording and measurements functions including the configuration of the event and disturbance recorder and measurement functions.

10 Product Design

Overview of the operation of the relay’s hardware and software. This chapter includes information on the self-checking features and diagnostics of the relay.

11 Commissioning

Instructions on how to commission the relay, comprising checks on the calibration and functionality of the relay.

12 Test and Setting Records

This is a list of the tests made and the settings stored on the MiCOM IED.

P849/EN OP

P849/EN AP

Px4x/EN SE

P849/EN PL

P849/EN MR

P849/EN PD

P849/EN CM

P849/EN RC

P849/EN IT/D33 Page (IT) 1-1

(IT) 1 Introduction

Documentation Structure

Description

13 Maintenance

A general maintenance policy for the relay is outlined.

14 Troubleshooting

Advice on how to recognize failure modes and the recommended course of action. Includes guidance on whom within Schneider Electric to contact for advice.

15 SCADA Communications

This chapter provides an overview regarding the SCADA communication interfaces of the relay.

Detailed protocol mappings, semantics, profiles and interoperability tables are not provided within this manual. Separate documents are available per protocol, available for download from our website.

16 Installation

Recommendations on unpacking, handling, inspection and storage of the relay. A guide to the mechanical and electrical installation of the relay is provided, incorporating earthing recommendations.

17 Connection Diagrams

A list of connection diagrams, which show the relevant wiring details for this relay.

18 Cyber Security

An overview of cyber security protection (to secure communication and equipment within a substation environment). Relevant cyber security standards and implementation are described too.

19 Dual Redundant Ethernet Board (DREB)

Information about how MiCOM products can be equipped with Dual Redundant Ethernet Boards

(DREBs) and the different protocols which are available. Also covers how to configure and commission these types of boards.

20 Parallel Redundancy Protocol (PRP) Notes

Includes an introduction to Parallel Redundancy Protocols (PRP) and the different networks PRP can be used with. Also includes details of PRP and MiCOM functions.

21 High-availability Seamless Redundancy (HSR)

Introduction to the High-availability Seamless Redundancy (HSR); and how it is implemented on

MiCOM-based products manufactured by Schneider Electric.

22 Menu Maps

This is a series of charts of the various menus which are contained in this IED. This shows you how to move from one menu option to another, if you are using the IED at the front panel.

23 Version History (of Firmware and Service Manual)

This is a history of all hardware and software releases for this product.

Symbols and Glossary

Chapter

Code

Px4x/EN MT

Px4x/EN TS

P849/EN SC

Px4x/EN IN

P849/EN CD

Px4x/EN CS

Px4x/EN REB

Px4x/EN PR

Px4x/EN HS

P849/EN MM

P849/EN VH

Px4x/EN SG

List of common technical terms, abbreviations and symbols found in this documentation.

Some of these chapters are Specific to a particular MiCOM product. Others are Generic – meaning that they cover more than one MiCOM product. The generic chapters have a Chapter Code which starts with Px4x.

Page (IT) 1-2 P849/EN IT/D33

Introduction

2

(IT) 1 Introduction

INTRODUCTION

About MiCOM Range

MiCOM is a comprehensive solution capable of meeting all electricity supply requirements. It comprises a range of components, systems and services from Schneider

Electric.

Central to the MiCOM concept is flexibility. MiCOM provides the ability to define an application solution and, through extensive communication capabilities, integrate it with your power supply control system.

The components within MiCOM are:

P range protection relays;

C range control products;

• M range measurement products for accurate metering and monitoring;

• S range versatile PC support and substation control packages.

MiCOM products include extensive facilities for recording information on the state and behaviour of the power system using disturbance and fault records. They can also provide measurements of the system at regular intervals to a control centre enabling remote monitoring and control to take place.

For up-to-date information, please see: www.schneider-electric.com

Note During 2011, the International Electrotechnical Commission classified the voltages into different levels (IEC 60038). The IEC defined LV, MV, HV and

EHV as follows: LV is up to 1000V. MV is from 1000V up to 35 kV. HV is from 110 kV or 230 kV. EHV is above 230 KV.

There is still ambiguity about where each band starts and ends. A voltage level defined as LV in one country or sector, may be described as MV in a different country or sector. Accordingly, LV, MV, HV and EHV suggests a possible range, rather than a fixed band. Please refer to your local

Schneider Electric office for more guidance.

P849/EN IT/D33 Page (IT) 1-3

(IT) 1 Introduction

3

3.1

3.1.1

3.1.2

Product Scope

PRODUCT SCOPE

The MiCOM P849 Input and Output extension device has been designed to increase the number of possible applications. The device includes a comprehensive range of features to aid with system diagnosis and fault analysis.

Functional Overview

The device contains a wide variety of communication functions and extension facilities which are summarized below:

P849 Overview

Input / Output (I/O) arrangements available: Digital inputs

Option A

Option B

32

48

Option C

Option D

Option E

Option F

32

16

64

32

Relay outputs

16

24

30

(16 high speed & high break relays)

60

16

46

Features

Function keys 10

Programmable tri-colour LEDs 18

Language: English, French, German, Spanish, Russian or Chinese

Auxiliary Voltage Rating Options

Three ordering options:

(i) Vx:

(ii) Vx:

(iii) Vx:

24 to 32 Vdc

48 to 110 Vdc,

110 to 250 Vdc, and 100 to 240 Vac (rms).

Communication Protocol Options

Communication protocols

K-Bus / Courier

MODBUS

VDEW (IEC 60870-5-103) (RS485 or Fibre Optic)

DNP3.0

IEC 61850 + Courier via rear RS485 port

IEC 61850 + IEC60870-5-103 via rear RS485 port

DNP3.0 over Ethernet and Courier via rear K-Bus/RS485

P849

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No for Software Version B0

Page (IT) 1-4 P849/EN IT/D33

Product Scope

(IT) 1 Introduction

The relay supports these relay management functions as well as the ones shown above.

• Measurement of all instantaneous & integrated values

Circuit breaker, status & condition monitoring

Programmable Scheme Logic (PSL)

Trip circuit and coil supervision (using PSL)

Alternative setting groups (model dependent)

Programmable function keys (model dependent)

Control inputs

Programmable allocation of digital inputs and outputs

Sequence of event recording

Comprehensive disturbance recording (waveform capture)

Fault recording

Fully customizable menu texts

Multi-level password protection

Power-up diagnostics and continuous self-monitoring of relay

Commissioning test facilities

Real time clock/time synchronization - time synchronization possible from IRIG-B input, opto input or communications

Password protection

• Read only mode

P849/EN IT/D33 Page (IT) 1-5

(IT) 1 Introduction

Product Scope

3.2 Ordering Options for P849

Note The following Cortec tables list the options available as of the date shown of this documentation. The most up-to-date Cortec versions of these tables can be found on our web site (www.schneider-electric.com). It may not be possible to select ALL of the options shown in this chart within a single item of equipment.

3.2.1 Information Required with Order

Order form

External I/O Box

Vx Aux Rating:

24 - 32 Vdc

48 - 110 Vdc

110 - 250 Vdc (100 - 240 Vac)

In/Vn Rating:

None

Hardware Options:

Standard : no options

IRIG-B (Modulated) only

Fibre Optic Converter only

IRIG-B (Modulated) & Fibre Optic Converter

Ethernet with 100Mbps fibre optic port

2nd Rear Comms port (Courier EIA232 / EIA485 / KBUS)

2nd Rear comms port (Courier EIA232 / EIA485 / KBUS) + IRIG-B (Modulated)

Ethernet (100Mbit/s) plus IRIG-B (Modulated)

Ethernet (100Mbit/s) plus IRIG-B (De-modulated)

InterMiCOM + Courier Rear Port

InterMiCOM + Courier Rear Port + IRIG-B modulated

Redundant Ethernet Self-Healing Ring, 2 multi-mode fibre ports + IRIG-B (Modulated)

Redundant Ethernet Self-Healing Ring, 2 multi-mode fibre ports + IRIG-B (Un-modulated)

Redundant Ethernet RSTP, 2 multi-mode fibre ports + IRIG-B (Modulated)

Redundant Ethernet RSTP, 2 multi-mode fibre ports + IRIG-B (Un-modulated)

Redundant Ethernet Dual-Homing Star, 2 multi-mode fibre ports + IRIG-B (Modulated)

Redundant Ethernet Dual-Homing Star, 2 multi-mode fibre ports + IRIG-B (Un-modulated)

Redundant Ethernet Parallel Redundancy Protocol (PRP), 2 multimode fibre ports + IRIG-B

(Modulated)

Redundant Ethernet Parallel Redundancy Protocol (PRP), 2 multimode fibre ports + IRIG-B

(Un-modulated)

Redundant Ethernet (100Mbit/s) PRP or HSR and Dual IP, 2 LC ports + 1 RJ45 port +

Modulated/Un-modulated IRIG-B

Redundant Ethernet (100Mbit/s) PRP or HSR and Dual IP, 3 RJ45 ports + Modulated/Unmodulated IRIG-B

Ethernet (100Mbit/s), 1 RJ45 port + Modulated/Un-modulated IRIG-B

Product Specific Options:

Size 16 Case, 32 optos + 16 Relays

G

H

E

F

J

A

B

7

8

K

L

M

1

4

6

2

3

N

MiCOM P849

P849 0

9

2

3

0

P

Q

R

S

A

Page (IT) 1-6 P849/EN IT/D33

Product Scope

(IT) 1 Introduction

Size 16 Case, 48 optos + 24 Relays

Size 16 Case, 32 optos + 14 Relays + 16 High Break Relays

Size 16 Case, 16 optos + 60 Relays

Size 16 Case, 64 optos + 16 Relays

Size 16 Case, 32 optos + 46 Relays

Protocol Options:

K-Bus

Modbus

IEC60870-5-103

DNP3.0

IEC61850 + Courier via rear RS485 port OR IEC 61850 Edition 1 and Edition 2 and Courier via rear K-Bus/RS485

IEC61850 + IEC60870-5-103 via rear RS485 port OR IEC 61850 Edition 1 and Edition 2 and

CS103 via rear port RS485

DNP3.0 Over Ethernet

Mounting Options:

Panel Mounting

Rack Mounting

Language Options:

English, French, German, Spanish

English, French, German, Russian

Chinese, English or French via HMI, with English or French only via Communications port

Software Version Options:

Unless specified the latest version will be delivered

Customisation:

Default

Customised

Design Suffix:

Extended Phase 3 CPU

Extended Phase 2 CPU

D

E

B

C

F

1

2

3

4

6

7

8

M

N

0

5

C

**

8

9

M

K

P849/EN IT/D33 Page (IT) 1-7

(IT) 1 Introduction

Notes:

Product Scope

Page (IT) 1-8 P849/EN IT/D33

MiCOM P849

(TD) 2 Technical Data

P849/EN TD/D33

TECHNICAL DATA

CHAPTER 2

Page (TD) 2-1

(TD) 2 Technical Data

MiCOM P849

Date:

Products covered by this chapter:

Hardware Suffix:

08/2015

This chapter covers the specific versions of the MiCOM products listed below. This includes

only the following combinations of Software Version and Hardware Suffix.

M

Software Version: B0

Connection Diagrams: 10P849xx (xx = 01 to 06)

Page (TD) 2-2 P849/EN TD/D33

Contents

(TD) 2 Technical Data

CONTENTS

Page (TD) 2-

1 MiCOM P849 Input & Output Extension Device

2 Mechanical Specification

2.1

2.2

2.3

Design

Enclosure Protection

Weight

3 Terminals

3.1

3.2

3.3

3.4

3.5

3.6

3.7

3.8

3.8.1

3.8.2

3.9

3.9.1

3.9.1.1

3.9.1.2

3.10

9

General Input/Output Terminals

Case Protective Earth Connection

Front Port Serial PC Interface

Front Download/Monitor Port

Rear Communications Port

Optional Second Rear Communication Port

Optional Rear IRIG-B Interface modulated or un-modulated

Optional Rear Ethernet Connection for IEC 61850

10 Base T / 100 Base TX Communications

100 Base FX Interface

Optional Rear Redundant Ethernet Connection for IEC 61850

100 Base FX Interface

Transmitter Optical Characteristics – 100 base FX Interface

Receiver Optical Characteristics – 100 base FX Interface

10

10

11

Fiber Defect Connector (Watchdog Relay) – Redundant Ethernet board 11

9

9

10

10

10

10

10

9

9

9

9

4 Power Supply

4.1

4.2

4.3

4.4

4.5

4.6

4.7

4.8

Auxiliary Voltage (Vx)

Operating Range

Nominal Burden

Power-up Time

Power Supply Interruption

Battery Backup

Field Voltage Output

Digital (“Opto”) Inputs

12

12

13

13

13

12

12

12

12

7

8

8

8

8

5 Output Contacts

5.1

5.2

5.3

5.4

5.5

Standard Contacts

Fast Operation and High Break Contacts

Watchdog Contacts

IRIG-B 12X Interface (Modulated)

IRIG-B 00X Interface (Un-modulated)

14

14

14

14

14

14

P849/EN TD/D33 Page (TD) 2-3

(TD) 2 Technical Data

Contents

6 Environmental Conditions

6.1

6.2

6.3

Ambient Temperature Range

Ambient Humidity Range

Corrosive Environments

7 Type Tests

7.1

7.2

7.3

7.4

Insulation

Creepage Distances and Clearances

High Voltage (Dielectric) Withstand

Impulse Voltage Withstand Test

8 Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC)

8.1

8.2

8.3

8.4

8.5

8.6

8.7

8.8

8.9

8.10

8.11

8.12

8.13

17

1 MHz Burst High Frequency Disturbance Test

100 kHz Damped oscillatory Test

Immunity to Electrostatic Discharge

Electrical Fast Transient or Burst Requirements

Surge Withstand Capability

Surge Immunity Test

Immunity to Radiated Electromagnetic Energy

Radiated Immunity from Digital Communications

Radiated Immunity from Digital Radio Telephones 18

Immunity to Conducted Disturbances Induced by Radio Frequency Fields

Power Frequency Magnetic Field Immunity

Conducted Emissions

Radiated Emissions

18

18

18

18

17

17

18

18

17

17

17

17

9 EU Directives

11

12

9.1

9.2

9.3

10.1

10.2

10.3

11.1

11.2

11.3

EMC Compliance

Product Safety

R&TTE compliance

10 Mechanical Robustness

Vibration Test

Shock and Bump

Seismic Test

IRIG-B and Real Time Clock

Modulated IRIG-B:

Un-modulated IRIG-B:

Performance Accuracy (for Modulated and Un-modulated versions)

Disturbance records

13 IEC 61850 Ethernet Data

13.1

10Base T /100Base TX Communications

20

20

20

20

19

19

19

19

21

21

21

21

22

23

23

16

16

16

16

16

15

15

15

15

Page (TD) 2-4 P849/EN TD/D33

Contents

13.2

13.2.1

13.2.2

13.3

100Base FX Interface

Transmitter Optical Characteristics

Receive Optical Characteristics

GOOSE Performances

14 Settings and Records List

14.1

14.2

14.3

14.4

14.5

14.6

14.6.1

14.6.2

14.6.3

14.6.4

14.6.5

14.6.6

14.6.7

14.7

14.8

14.9

14.10

Global Settings (System Data)

Date and Time

Configuration

Record Control

Disturb. Recording

Communications

Courier Protocol

IEC60870-5-103 Protocol

MODBUS Protocol

DNP3.0 Protocol

Ethernet Port, IEC61850 Protocol

Ethernet Port, DNP3.0 Protocol

Second Rear Port Connection Setting

Optional Second Rear Communication

Optional Ethernet Port

Commission Tests

Opto Configuration

15 Hotkeys and Control inputs

15.1

15.2

Control Inputs Operation (CTRL inputs menu)

Opto Input Labels (Opto I/P Labels menu)

16 Teleprotection (InterMiCOM comms)

17 InterMiCOM configuration

18 Function Keys and Labels

18.1

18.2

18.3

18.4

18.5

Function Keys

Opto Input Labels

Outputs Labels

IED Configurator (IEC61850)

IEC61850 GOOSE

(TD) 2 Technical Data

30

30

30

31

32

33

33

33

33

33

33

25

26

26

26

26

27

27

27

28

28

25

25

25

25

28

28

29

29

23

23

23

24

P849/EN TD/D33 Page (TD) 2-5

(TD) 2 Technical Data

Notes:

Contents

Page (TD) 2-6 P849/EN TD/D33

MiCOM P849 Input & Output Extension Device

1

(TD) 2 Technical Data

MICOM P849 INPUT & OUTPUT EXTENSION DEVICE

Input / Output (I/O)

32I/16O,

48I/24O,

32I/30O (16 high speed high break relays),

16I/60O,

64I/16O,

32I/46O.

Protocol options:

K-Bus

Modbus,

VDEW (IEC 60870-5-103)

DNP3.0

IEC61850 + Courier via rear RS485 port

IEC61850 + IEC 60870-5-103 via rear RS485 port

DNP3 over Ethernet with Courier rear port K-Bus/RS485 protocol

Hardware options:

IRIG-B input

Fibre optic converter (IEC60870-5-103)

IRIG-B input and Fibre optic converter (IEC60870-5-103)

Single Ethernet 100Mbit/s

Rear Comms + InterMiCOM

Rear Comms + IRIB-B + InterMiCOM

Single Ethernet (100Mbit/s) plus IRIG-B (Modulated)

Single Ethernet (100Mbit/s) plus IRIG-B (De-modulated)

IRIG-B (De-modulated)

InterMiCOM + Courier Rear Port *

InterMiCOM + Courier Rear Port + IRIG-B modulated *

Redundant Ethernet Self-Healing Ring, 2 multi-mode fibre ports + Modulated IRIG-

B

Redundant Ethernet Self-Healing Ring, 2 multi-mode fibre ports + Un-modulated

IRIG-B

Redundant Ethernet RSTP, 2 multi-mode fibre ports + Modulated IRIG-B

Redundant Ethernet RSTP, 2 multi-mode fibre ports + Un-modulated IRIG-B

Redundant Ethernet Dual-Homing Star, 2 multi-mode fibre ports + Modulated IRIG-

B

Redundant Ethernet Dual-Homing Star, 2 multi-mode fibre ports + Un-modulated

IRIG-B

Redundant Ethernet (100Mbit/s) PRP or HSR and Dual IP, 2 LC ports + 1 RJ45 port + Modulated/Un-modulated IRIG-B

Redundant Ethernet (100Mbit/s) PRP or HSR and Dual IP, 3 RJ45 ports +

Modulated/Unmodulated IRIG-B

Ethernet (100Mbit/s), 1 RJ45 port + Modulated/Un-modulated IRIG-B

P849/EN TD/D33 Page (TD) 2-7

(TD) 2 Technical Data

2

2.1

2.2

2.3

Mechanical Specification

MECHANICAL SPECIFICATION

Design

Modular MiCOM Px40 platform relay, Size 16“ case (80TE)

Mounting is front of panel flush mounting.

Enclosure Protection

Per IEC 60529:

• IP 52 Protection (front panel) against dust and dripping water.

• IP 50 Protection for the rear and sides of the case against dust.

• IP 10 Product safety protection for the rear due to live connections on the terminal block.

Weight

MiCOM P849: 10.5 kg

Page (TD) 2-8 P849/EN TD/D33

3.2

3.3

3.4

3.5

Terminals

3

3.1

3.6

(TD) 2 Technical Data

TERMINALS

General Input/Output Terminals

For power supply, opto inputs, output contacts and RP1, COM1 and optional COM2 rear communications.

Located on general purpose (grey) blocks:

Threaded M4 terminals, for ring lug/terminal connection.

Case Protective Earth Connection

Two rear stud connections, threaded M4.

Must be earthed (grounded) using the protective (earth) conductor for safety, minimum earth wire size 2.5mm

2

.

Front Port Serial PC Interface

EIA(RS)-232 DCE, 9 pin D-type female connector Socket SK1.

Courier protocol for interface to MiCOM S1 Studio software.

Isolation to SELV/ELV (Safety/Extra Low Voltage) level / PEB (Protective Equipotential

Bonded).

Maximum cable length 15m.

Front Download/Monitor Port

EIA(RS)-232, 25 pin D-type female connector Socket SK2.

For firmware and menu text downloads.

Isolation to SELV/PEB level.

Rear Communications Port

EIA(RS)-485 signal levels, two wire connections located on general purpose block, M4 screw.

For screened twisted pair cable, multidrop, 1000 m max.

For Courier (K-Bus), IEC-60870-5-103 (not for P746/P849), MODBUS (not for

P14x/P445/P44x/P54x/P547/P746/P841/P849) or DNP3.0 protocol (not for

P24x/P746/P849) (ordering options).

Isolation to SELV (Safety Extra Low Voltage) level. Ethernet (copper and fibre).

Optional Second Rear Communication Port

EIA(RS)-232, 9 pin D-type female connector, socket SK4.

Courier protocol: K-Bus, EIA(RS)-232, or EIA(RS)485 connection.

Isolation to SELV level.

Maximum cable length 15m.

P849/EN TD/D33 Page (TD) 2-9

(TD) 2 Technical Data

3.7

3.8

3.8.1

3.8.2

3.9

3.9.1

3.9.1.1

Terminals

Optional Rear IRIG-B Interface modulated or un-modulated

BNC socket

SELV* rated circuit.

50 ohms coaxial cable.

*: PEB = Protective equipotential bonded

*: SELV = Safety/Separated extra low voltage

Both PEB and SELV circuits are safe to touch after a single fault condition.

Optional Rear Ethernet Connection for IEC 61850

10 Base T / 100 Base TX Communications

Interface in accordance with IEEE802.3 and IEC 61850

Isolation:

Connector type:

1.5 kV

RJ45

Cable type: Screened Twisted Pair (STP)

Max. cable length: 100 m

100 Base FX Interface

Interface in accordance with IEEE802.3 and IEC 61850

Wavelength:

Fiber:

Connector type:

1310 nm multi-mode 50/125 µm or 62.5/125 µm

ST/LC Connector Optical Interface (depending on model)

Optional Rear Redundant Ethernet Connection for IEC 61850

100 Base FX Interface

Interface in accordance with IEEE802.3 and IEC 61850

Wavelength:

Fiber:

Connector type:

1310 nm multi-mode 50/125 µm or 62.5/125 µm

ST/LC Connector Optical Interface (depending on model)

Transmitter Optical Characteristics – 100 base FX Interface

Transmitter Optical Characteristics – 100 base FX interface

(T

A

= 0°C to 70°C, V

CC

= 4.75 V to 5.25 V)

Sym Typ. Parameter

Output Optical Power BOL: 62.5/125 µm,

NA = 0.275 Fiber EOL

Output Optical Power BOL: 50/125 µm,

NA = 0.20 Fiber EOL

P

OUT

P

OUT

–19

–20

–22.5

–23.5

Min.

–16.8

–20.3

Optical Extinction Ratio

Output Optical Power at Logic “0” State

P

OUT

(“0”)

BOL – Beginning of life EOL – End of life

Transmitter Optical Characteristics – 100 base FX interface

–14

Max

–14

10

–10

–45

Unit

dBm avg. dBm avg.

% dB dBm avg.

Page (TD) 2-10 P849/EN TD/D33

Terminals

3.9.1.2

3.10

(TD) 2 Technical Data

Receiver Optical Characteristics – 100 base FX Interface

Receiver Optical Characteristics – 100 base FX interface

(T

A

= 0°C to 70°C, V

CC

= 4.75 V to 5.25 V)

Parameter Sym

Input Optical Power Minimum at Window Edge P

IN

Min. (W)

Input Optical Power Minimum at Eye Center

Input Optical Power Maximum

P

IN

Min. (C)

P

IN

Max. –14

Min.

–33.5

Typ.

–34.5

–11.8

Receiver Optical Characteristics – 100 base FX interface

–31

–31.8

Max. Unit

dBm avg. dBm avg. dBm avg.

Fiber Defect Connector (Watchdog Relay) – Redundant Ethernet board

Connector (3 terminals):

Rated voltage:

Continuous current:

Short duration current:

Breaking capacity

Subject to maxima of 5 A and 250 V

2 NC contacts

250 V

5 A

30 A for 3 s

DC: 50 W resistive

DC: 25 W resistive

AC: 1500 VA resistive (cos φ = unity)

AC: 1500 VA inductive (cos φ = unity)

P849/EN TD/D33 Page (TD) 2-11

(TD) 2 Technical Data

4

4.1

4.2

4.3

4.4

4.5

Power Supply

POWER SUPPLY

Auxiliary Voltage (Vx)

Three ordering options:

(i) Vx:

(ii) Vx:

(iii) Vx:

24 to 32 Vdc

48 to 110 Vdc,

110 to 250 Vdc, and 100 to 240 Vac (rms).

Operating Range

(i) 19 to 38V (dc only for this variant)

(ii) 37 to 150V (dc),

(iii) 87 to 300V (dc), 80 to 265V (ac).

With a tolerable ac ripple of up to 15% for a dc supply, per EN / IEC 60255-11, EN / IEC

60255-26.

Nominal Burden

Quiescent burden:

Additions for energized binary inputs/outputs:

Per opto input:

Per energized output relay:

Per energized high break output relay:

12 W

0.09W…(24 to 54V),

0.12W...(110/125V),

0.19W...(220/250V).

0.13W

0.73W

Power-up Time

Main Processor including User Interface and front access port < 8 s.

Ethernet Communications <120 s.

Power Supply Interruption

Per IEC 60255-11, EN / IEC 60255-26

The relay will withstand a 20 ms interruption in the DC auxiliary supply, without deenergizing.

Per IEC 61000-4-11, EN / IEC 60255-26

The relay will withstand a 20 ms interruption in an AC auxiliary supply, without deenergizing.

Page (TD) 2-12 P849/EN TD/D33

Power Supply

4.6

4.7

4.8

(TD) 2 Technical Data

Note The use of a E124 extends these limits

In addition to IEC 60255-11 compliance, P746/P849 withstands:

24V

48V

110V

220V

DC Power supply voltage DC Power supply interruption

20ms

20ms with Vx ordering option (ii)

200ms with Vx ordering option (ii),

50ms with Vx ordering option (iii)

200ms

Battery Backup

Front panel mounted.

Type ½ AA, 3.6 V Lithium Thionyl Chloride (SAFT advanced battery reference LS14250).

Battery life (assuming relay energized for 90% time) >10 years.

Field Voltage Output

Regulated 48 Vdc

Current limited at 112 mA maximum output

Digital (“Opto”) Inputs

Universal opto inputs with programmable voltage thresholds. May be energized from the

48V field voltage, or the external battery supply.

Rated nominal voltage:

Operating range:

Withstand: 300Vdc.

Nominal pick-up and reset thresholds:

Pick-up:

Reset:

Recognition time:

24 to 250Vdc

19 to 265Vdc approx. 70% of battery nominal set, approx. 66% of battery nominal set.

7ms

P849/EN TD/D33 Page (TD) 2-13

(TD) 2 Technical Data

5

5.1

5.2

5.3

5.4

5.5

Output Contacts

OUTPUT CONTACTS

Standard Contacts

General purpose relay outputs for signalling, tripping and alarming:

Rated voltage:

Continuous current:

Short-duration current:

Making capacity:

Breaking capacity:

Response to command:

Durability:

300 V

10 A

30 A for 3 s

250A for 30 ms

DC: 50W resistive

DC: 62.5W inductive (L/R = 50ms)

AC: 2500VA resistive (cos φ = unity)

AC: 2500VA inductive (cos φ = 0.7)

< 5ms

Loaded contact: 10000 operations minimum,

Unloaded contact: 100000 operations minimum.

Fast Operation and High Break Contacts

Dedicated purpose relay outputs for tripping: Uses IGBT technology

Make and Carry:

Carry:

30 Amps for 3 sec, 30A @ 250V resistive

Continuous Carry: 10 Amps dc

Break Capacity:

Operating time:

250 Amps dc for 30ms

10 Amps @ 250V resistive (10,000 operations)

10 Amps @ 250V L/R=40ms

<200us & Reset time: 7.5ms

Watchdog Contacts

Non-programmable contacts for relay healthy or relay fail indication:

Breaking capacity: DC: 30 W resistive

DC: 15 W inductive (L/R = 40 ms)

AC: 375 VA inductive (cos φ = 0.7)

IRIG-B 12X Interface (Modulated)

External clock synchronization to IRIG standard 200-98, format B12x

Input impedance 6 kΩ at 1000 Hz

Modulation ratio: 3:1 to 6:1

Input signal, peak-peak: 200 mV to 20 V

IRIG-B 00X Interface (Un-modulated)

External clock synchronization to IRIG standard 200-98, format B00X.

Input signal TTL level

Input impedance at dc 10 kΩ

Page (TD) 2-14 P849/EN TD/D33

Environmental Conditions

6

6.1

6.2

6.3

(TD) 2 Technical Data

ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS

Ambient Temperature Range

Per IEC 60255-6: 1988

Operating temperature range:

Storage and transit:

-25°C to +55°C (or -13°F to +131°F).

-25°C to +70°C (or -13°F to +158°F).

Tested as per IEC 60068-2-1: 2007 -25°C (-13°F) storage (96 hours)

IEC 60068-2-2: 2007

-40°C (-40°F) operation (96 hours)

+85°C (+185°F) storage (96 hours)

Ambient Humidity Range

Per IEC 60068-2-78: 2001:

56 days at 93% relative humidity and +40°C

Per IEC 60068-2-30: 2005:

Damp heat cyclic, six (12 + 12) hour cycles, 93% RH, +25 to +55°C

Corrosive Environments

Per IEC 60068-2-60: 1995, Part 2, Test Ke, Method (class) 3

Industrial corrosive environment/poor environmental control, mixed gas flow test.

21 days at 75% relative humidity and +30°C

Exposure to elevated concentrations of H

2

S, NO

2

, Cl

2

and SO

2

.

P849/EN TD/D33 Page (TD) 2-15

(TD) 2 Technical Data

7

7.1

7.2

7.3

7.4

Type Tests

TYPE TESTS

Insulation

As for IEC 60255-27: 2005 (incorporating corrigendum March 2007):

Insulation resistance > 100 MΩ at 500 Vdc

(Using only electronic/brushless insulation tester).

Creepage Distances and Clearances

Per IEC 60255-27: 2005 Pollution degree 3 overvoltage category III impulse test voltage 5 kV

High Voltage (Dielectric) Withstand

EIA(RS)232 ports excepted.

Per IEC 60255-27: 2005, 2 kV rms AC, 1 minute:

Between all case terminals connected together, and the case earth.

Also, between all terminals of independent circuits.

1 kV rms AC for 1 minute, across open watchdog contacts.

1 kV rms AC for 1 minute, across open contacts of changeover output relays.

Per ANSI/IEEE C37.90-1989 (reaffirmed 1994):

1.5 kV rms AC for 1 minute, across open contacts of changeover output relays.

Impulse Voltage Withstand Test

Per IEC 60255-27: 2005

Front time:

Peak value:

1.2 µs, Time to half-value: 50 µs,

5 kV, 0.5 J

Between all terminals, and all terminals and case earth.

Page (TD) 2-16 P849/EN TD/D33

Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC)

8

8.1

8.2

8.3

8.4

8.5

8.6

(TD) 2 Technical Data

ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY (EMC)

1 MHz Burst High Frequency Disturbance Test

As for EN 60255-22-1: 2008, Class III,

Common-mode test voltage:

Differential test voltage:

Test duration:

Source impedance:

(EIA(RS)-232 ports excepted).

2.5 kV,

1.0 kV,

2 s

200 Ω

100 kHz Damped oscillatory Test

EN 61000-4-18: 2007:

Common mode test voltage:

Differential mode test voltage:

Level 3

2.5 kV

1 kV

Immunity to Electrostatic Discharge

Per IEC 60255-22-2: 1997, Class 4,

15kV discharge in air to user interface, display, and exposed metalwork.

Per IEC 60255-22-2: 1997, Class 3,

8kV discharge in air to all communication ports.

6kV point contact discharge to any part of the front of the product.

Electrical Fast Transient or Burst Requirements

Per IEC 60255-22-4: 2002 and EN 61000-4-4: 2004.

Test severity: Class III and IV:

Amplitude: 2 kV, burst frequency 5kHz (Class III),

Amplitude: 4 kV, burst frequency 2.5kHz (Class IV).

Applied directly to auxiliary supply, and applied to all other inputs. (EIA RS232 ports excepted).

Amplitude: 4 kV, burst frequency 5kHz (Class IV).

Applied directly to auxiliary supply.

Surge Withstand Capability

As for IEEE/ANSI C37.90.1: 2002:

4 kV fast transient and 2.5 kV oscillatory applied directly across each output contact, optically isolated input, and power supply circuit.

Surge Immunity Test

EIA(RS)232 ports excepted.

Per IEC 61000-4-5: 2005 Level 4.

Time to half-value: 1.2/50 µs.

Amplitude:

Amplitude:

4 kV between all groups and protective (earth) conductor terminal.

2 kV between terminals of each group.

P849/EN TD/D33 Page (TD) 2-17

(TD) 2 Technical Data

8.7

8.8

8.9

8.10

8.11

8.12

8.13

Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC)

Immunity to Radiated Electromagnetic Energy

Per IEC 60255-22-3: 2008, Class III:

Test field strength, frequency band 80 to 1000 MHz:

10 V/m,

Test using AM: 1 kHz / 80%,

Spot tests at 80, 160, 450, 900 MHz

Per IEEE/ANSI C37.90.2: 2004:

25MHz to 1000MHz, zero and 100% square wave modulated.

Field strength of 35V/m.

Radiated Immunity from Digital Communications

EN61000-4-3: 2010, Level 4:

Test field strength, frequency band 800 to 960 MHz, and 1.4 to 2.0 GHz: 30 V/m,

Test using AM: 1 kHz/80%.

Radiated Immunity from Digital Radio Telephones

EN 61000-4-3: 2002: 10 V/m, 900 MHz and 1.89 GHz.

Immunity to Conducted Disturbances Induced by Radio Frequency

Fields

EN 61000-4-6: 2008, Level 3, Disturbing test voltage: 10 V.

Power Frequency Magnetic Field Immunity

As for EN / IEC 61000-4-8, Level 5,

100 A/m applied continuously, 1000 A/m applied for 3 s.

As for EN / IEC 61000-4-9, Level 5,

1000 A/m applied in all planes.

As for EN / IEC 61000-4-10, Level 5,

100 A/m applied in all planes at 100 kHz and 1 MHz with a burst duration of 2 s.

Conducted Emissions

Per EN 55022:2006:2007 and EN 60255-25:2000:

0.15 – 0.5MHz, 79dBµV (quasi peak) 66dBµV (average)

0.5 – 30MHz, 73dBµV (quasi peak) 60dBµV (average).

Radiated Emissions

Per EN 55022:2006+A1:2007 and EN 60255-25:2000:

30 - 230MHz, 40dBµV/m at 10m measurement distance

230 – 1GHz, 47dBµV/m at 10m measurement distance.

Page (TD) 2-18 P849/EN TD/D33

EU Directives

9

9.1

9.2

9.3

(TD) 2 Technical Data

EU DIRECTIVES

EMC Compliance

2004/108/EC:

Compliance to the European Commission Directive on EMC is claimed via the Technical

Construction File route. Product Specific Standards were used to establish conformity:

EN 60255-26

Product Safety

2006/95/EC:

Compliance to the European Commission Low Voltage Directive. Compliance is demonstrated by reference to generic safety standards:

EN60255-27: 2005 (incorporating corrigendum March 2007)

R&TTE compliance

Radio and Telecommunications Terminal Equipment (R&TTE) directive 99/5/EC.

Compliance demonstrated by compliance to both the EMC directive and the Low voltage directive, down to zero volts.

Applicable to rear communications ports.

P849/EN TD/D33 Page (TD) 2-19

(TD) 2 Technical Data

10

10.1

10.2

10.3

MECHANICAL ROBUSTNESS

Vibration Test

Per EN / IEC 60255-21-1 Response Class 2

Endurance Class 2

Shock and Bump

Per EN / IEC 60255-21-2 Shock response Class 2

Shock withstand Class 1

Bump Class 1

Seismic Test

Per EN / IEC 60255-21-3: Class 2

Mechanical Robustness

Page (TD) 2-20 P849/EN TD/D33

IRIG-B and Real Time Clock

11

11.1

11.2

11.3

(TD) 2 Technical Data

IRIG-B AND REAL TIME CLOCK

Modulated IRIG-B:

Modulation ratio: 1/3 or 1/6

Input signal peak-peak amplitude: 200 mV to 20 V

Input impedance at 1000Hz:

External clock synchronization:

6000 Ω

Conforms to IRIG standard 200-98, format B

Un-modulated IRIG-B:

External clock synchronization to IRIG standard 200-98, format B00X.

Input signal TTL level

Input impedance at dc 10 kΩ

Performance Accuracy (for Modulated and Un-modulated versions)

Real time clock accuracy: < ±2 seconds/day

P849/EN TD/D33 Page (TD) 2-21

(TD) 2 Technical Data

12 DISTURBANCE RECORDS

Accuracy

Waveshape:

Duration:

Trigger position:

Reference conditions

Ambient temperature:

Comparable with applied quantities

± 2%

± 2% (minimum trigger 100ms)

20°C

Disturbance records

Page (TD) 2-22 P849/EN TD/D33

IEC 61850 Ethernet Data

13

13.1

13.2

13.2.1

(TD) 2 Technical Data

IEC 61850 ETHERNET DATA

10Base T /100Base TX Communications

Interface in accordance with IEEE802.3 and IEC 61850

Isolation:

Connector type:

1.5 kV

RJ45

Cable type: Screened Twisted Pair (STP)

Max. cable length: 100 m

100Base FX Interface

Interface in accordance with IEEE802.3 and IEC 61850

Wavelength:

Fiber:

Connector type:

1310 nm multi-mode 50/125 µm or 62.5/125 µm

ST/LC Connector Optical Interface (depending on model)

Transmitter Optical Characteristics

Transmitter Optical Characteristics – 100 base FX interface

(T

A

= 0°C to 70°C, V

CC

= 4.75 V to 5.25 V)

Sym Typ. Parameter

Output Optical Power BOL: 62.5/125 µm,

NA = 0.275 Fiber EOL

Output Optical Power BOL: 50/125 µm,

NA = 0.20 Fiber EOL

P

OUT

P

OUT

–19

–20

–22.5

–23.5

Min.

–16.8

–20.3

Optical Extinction Ratio

Output Optical Power at Logic “0” State

P

OUT

(“0”)

BOL – Beginning of life EOL – End of life

Transmitter Optical Characteristics – 100 base FX interface

–14

Max

–14

10

–10

–45

Unit

dBm avg. dBm avg.

% dB dBm avg.

13.2.2 Receive Optical Characteristics

Receiver Optical Characteristics – 100 base FX interface

(T

A

= 0°C to 70°C, V

CC

= 4.75 V to 5.25 V)

Parameter Sym

Input Optical Power Minimum at Window Edge P

IN

Min. (W)

Input Optical Power Minimum at Eye Center

Input Optical Power Maximum

P

IN

Min. (C)

P

IN

Max. –14

Min.

–33.5

Typ.

–34.5

–11.8

Receiver Optical Characteristics – 100 base FX interface

–31

–31.8

Max. Unit

dBm avg. dBm avg. dBm avg.

P849/EN TD/D33 Page (TD) 2-23

(TD) 2 Technical Data

13.3

GOOSE Performances

The follow data is the average value with 100 times test.

Subscribe 1 Virtual Input and publish 1 Virtual Output: < 4ms

Subscribe 1 Virtual Input and trigger 1 output relay: < 8ms

Subscribe 16 Virtual Inputs and publish 16 Virtual Outputs: < 8ms

Subscribe 16 Virtual Inputs and trigger 16 output relays: < 11ms

Subscribe 32 Virtual Inputs and publish 32 Virtual Outputs: < 16ms

Subscribe 32 Virtual Inputs and trigger 32 output relays: < 16ms

IEC 61850 Ethernet Data

Page (TD) 2-24 P849/EN TD/D33

Settings and Records List

14

14.1

14.2

14.3

14.4

(TD) 2 Technical Data

SETTINGS AND RECORDS LIST

Global Settings (System Data)

Global Settings (System Data)

Language:

Frequency:

English/French/German/Spanish/Chinese

50/60 Hz

Date and Time

IRIG-B Sync:

Battery Alarm:

Disabled/Enabled

Disabled/Enabled

Configuration

Setting Group:

Active Settings:

Setting Group 1:

Setting Group 2:

Setting Group 3:

Setting Group 4:

Select via Menu or Select via Opto

Group 1/2/3/4

Disabled/Enabled

Disabled/Enabled

Disabled/Enabled

Disabled/Enabled

Record Control:

Disturb recorder:

Measur't setup:

Comms setting

Visible/Invisible

Visible/Invisible

Visible/Invisible

Visible/Invisible

Commission tests: Visible/Invisible

Input Labels: Visible/Invisible

Visible/Invisible Output Labels:

Control inputs:

Ctrl I/P Config:

Direct Acces:

InterMiCOM

IEC Goose

Function key:

LCD Contrast:

Visible/Invisible

Visible/Invisible

Enabled/Disabled hotkey only/

CB cntrl only

Enabled/Disabled

Visible/Invisible

Visible/Invisible

(Factory pre-set)

RP1 Read Only:

RP2 Read Only:

NIC Read Only:

Disabled/Enabled

Disabled/Enabled

Disabled/Enabled

Record Control

Records for the last 512 events

P849/EN TD/D33 Page (TD) 2-25

(TD) 2 Technical Data

14.5

14.6

14.6.1

14.6.2

Settings and Records List

Disturb. Recording

Duration:

Trigger Position:

Trigger Mode:

32 Digital Inputs

Settable from 0.1 to 10.5s

0...100% (step 0.1%)

Single/Extended

Selected binary channel assignment from any DDB status point within the device (opto input, output contact, alarms, starts, trips, controls, logic…).

Sampling frequency: 1000Hz

Communications

Courier Protocol

Courier protocol:

RP1 Address:

Courier:

Modbus:

RP1 Inactiv timer:

Physical link:

RP1 Status

RP1 Port configuration:

RP1 comms mode:

RP1 Baud Rate:

IEC60870-5-103:

DNP3.0:

Protocol indicated

0 to 255 (step 1)

1 to 247 (step 1)

0 to 254 (step 1)

0 to 65534 (step 1)

1mn to 30 mn (step 1mn)

RS485, Fibre optic

Kbus/EIA(RS)485

IEC60870 FT1.2 10-Bit no parity

9600/19200/38400 bits/s

IEC60870-5-103 Protocol

IEC60870-5-103 protocol: Protocol indicated

RP1 Address:

RP1 Inactiv timer:

Baud Rate:

Measurement period:

CS103 blocking:

RP1 Status

RP1 comms mode:

RP1 Port configuration:

7 to 34 (step 1)

1mn to 30 mn (step 1mn)

9600/19200/38400 bits/s

1 to 60s (step 1s)

Disabled,

Monitor blocking,

Command blocking.

Kbus/EIA(RS)485

IEC60870 FT1.2 10-Bit no parity

RP1 Baud Rate: 9600/19200/38400 bits/s

IEC 103 over Ethernet should also be available

Page (TD) 2-26 P849/EN TD/D33

Settings and Records List

14.6.3

14.6.4

14.6.5

(TD) 2 Technical Data

MODBUS Protocol

Modbus protocol:

RP1 Address:

RP1 Inactiv timer:

Baud Rate:

Parity:

Physical link:

Date/Time Format:

RP1 Status

RP1 Port configuration:

RP1 comms mode:

RP1 Baud Rate:

Protocol indicated

7 to 34 (step 1)

1mn to 30 mn (step 1mn)

9600/19200/38400 bits/s

Odd/Even/None

RS485/Fibre optic

Enabled/Disabled

Kbus/EIA(RS)485

IEC60870 FT1.2 10-Bit no parity

9600/19200/38400 bits/s

DNP3.0 Protocol

DNP3.0 protocol:

RP1 Address:

RP1 Inactiv timer:

Baud Rate:

Parity:

Measurement period:

Physical link:

Time Synhronization:

Date/Time Format:

RP1 Status

RP1 Port configuration:

RP1 comms mode:

RP1 Baud Rate:

Scale Value indicated

Protocol indicated

7 to 34 (step 1)

1mn to 30 mn (step 1mn)

9600/19200/38400 bits/s

Odd/Even/None

1 to 60s (step 1s)

RS485/Fibre optic

Enabled/Disabled

Enabled/Disabled

Kbus/EIA(RS)485

IEC60870 FT1.2/10-Bit no parity

9600/19200/38400 bits/s

Message Gap:

DNP Need Time:

0 to 50ms (step 1ms)

1 to 30 (step 1)

DNP Application fragment size: 100 to 2048 (step 1)

DNP Application fragment timeout: 1s to 120s (step 1s)

DNB SBO timeout:

DNP link timeout:

1s to 10s (step 1s)

0 to 120s (step 1s)

Ethernet Port, IEC61850 Protocol

Ethernet port, IEC61850 protocol:

Protocol indicated

Protocol & Scale value indicated,

Network Interface Card (NIC) protocol: Courier/IEC60870-5-103/Modbus/DNP3.0

NIC MAC Adress indicated,

NIC tunnel timeout: 1 to 30mn (step 1mn)

P849/EN TD/D33 Page (TD) 2-27

(TD) 2 Technical Data

14.6.6

14.6.7

14.7

14.8

Settings and Records List

Ethernet Port, DNP3.0 Protocol

Ethernet port, DNP3.0 protocol:

Protocol, IP address, subnet mask, NIC MAC address and Gateway address indicated,

Ethernet port, IEC60870-5-103 protocol:

Protocol, Scale value, NIC protocol & NIC MAC address indicated, NIC tunnel timeout &

Link report

DNP time synchro:

DNP Meas scaling:

RP1 Address:

RP1 Inactiv timer:

Baud Rate:

Parity:

NIC tunnel timeout:

Enabled/Disabled

Primary/Secondary/Normalized

7 to 34 (step 1)

1mn to 30 mn (step 1mn)

9600/19200/38400 bits/s

Odd/Even/None

1 to 30mn (step 1mn)

Alarm/Even/None NIC Link Report:

SNTP parameters:

SNTP poll rate:

SNTP need time:

Primary and Secondary SNTP addresses displayed

64 to 1024s (step 1s)

1 to 30mn (step 1mn)

SNTP Application Fragment size: 100 to 2048 (step 1)

SNTP Application fragment timeout: 1s to 120s (step 1s)

SNTP SBO timeout: 1s to 10s (step 1s)

Second Rear Port Connection Setting

Second rear port connection setting:

Protocol and Status indicated

RP2 Port configuration:

RP2 comms mode:

RP2 Address:

RP2 Inactivity timer:

RP2 Baud Rate:

Kbus/EIA(RS)485/EIA RS232

IEC60870 FT1.2/10-Bit no parity

0 to 255 (step 1)

1 to 30mn (step 1mn)

9600/19200/38400 bits/s

Optional Second Rear Communication

RP2 Protocol:

RP2 Port Config:

RP2 Address:

Courier (fixed)

Courier over EIA(RS)232 / Courier over EIA(RS)485 / K-Bus

RP2 Comms. Mode: IEC60870 FT1.2 Frame / 10-Bit NoParity

0…255

RP2 InactivTimer: 1…30 mins

RP2 Baud Rate: 9600 / 19200 / 38400 bits/s

Note

RP2 Read Only:

If RP2 Port Config is K Bus the baud rate is fixed at 64 kbits/s

Disabled/Enabled

Optional Ethernet Port

NIC Tunl Timeout: 1...30 mins

NIC Link Report: Alarm/Event/None

NIC Link Timeout: 0.1...60 s

NIC Read Only: Disabled/Enabled

Page (TD) 2-28 P849/EN TD/D33

Settings and Records List

14.9

14.10

(TD) 2 Technical Data

Commission Tests

Opto I/P Status:

Rly O/P Status:

Test Port Status:

Monitor bit 1:

(up to):

Monitor bit 8:

Test Mode:

Test Pattern:

(data) indicates the status of the opto inputs.

(data) indicates the status of the output relays.

(data) indicates the status of monitor bits 1 to 8.

Binary function link strings, selecting which

DDB signals have their status visible in the

Commissioning menu, for test purposes

Disabled Test Mode Blocked Contacts

Configuration of which output contacts are to be energized when the contact test is applied

Contact test:

Autoreclose test:

Red or Green LED status visible:

No operation/Apply test/Remove test/LEDs test

No operation/ 3-pole test/Pole A, B or C test

DDB31-0 to DDB 2047-2016 status visible.

Opto Configuration

Opto input voltage range: 24-27V / 30-34V / 48-54V / 110-125V / 220-250V / Custom

Opto Input 1 (up to # = max. opto no. fitted)

Custom options allow independent thresholds to be set per opto, from the same range as above

P849/EN TD/D33 Page (TD) 2-29

(TD) 2 Technical Data

15

15.1

15.2

Hotkeys and Control inputs

HOTKEYS AND CONTROL INPUTS

Control Inputs Operation (CTRL inputs menu)

Status of control inputs indication,

Control inputs operation: Set/Reset/No operation

Control Inputs configuration (CTRL I/P config. Menu):

The control inputs can be individually assigned to the hotkeys by setting,

Control input configuration: Latched/Pulsed

Following text displayed in the hotkey menu can be set:

Set/Reset / In/Out /

Enabled/Disabled / On/Off

Opto Input Labels (Opto I/P Labels menu)

User defined text string to describe the function of the particular opto input.

Page (TD) 2-30 P849/EN TD/D33

Teleprotection (InterMiCOM comms)

16

(TD) 2 Technical Data

TELEPROTECTION (INTERMICOM COMMS)

Source Address: 1…10

Received Address: 1…10

Data Rate:

Loopback Mode:

Test Pattern:

600 / 1200 / 2400 / 4800 / 9600 / 19200 baud

Disabled/Internal/External

Configuration of which InterMiCOM signals are to be energized when the loopback test is applied.

Channels statistics:

Channel diagnostics:

Loopback status

User defined test pattern,

Visible/Invisible

Nbr of tripping messages received

Nbr blocking messages received,

Number of messages received: tripping, blocking, total and incorrect,

Lost messages,

Elapsed time,

Reset statistics: Yes/No

Visible/Invisible

“Data carrier detect” status,

Frame synchronization status,

Message status,

Channel status,

InterMiCOM hardware status.

P849/EN TD/D33 Page (TD) 2-31

(TD) 2 Technical Data

17

InterMiCOM configuration

INTERMICOM CONFIGURATION

IM Msg Alarm Level:

InterMiCOM Command Types:

0 to 100.0% (step 1%)

IM1, IM2, IM3 and IM4 Command types:

IM5 Cmd Type:

IM6, IM7 and IM8 Command types:

Fallback Mode:

Default Value:

Default/Latched

/1

Disabled/Direct/Blocking

Disabled/Permissive/Direct

Disabled/Permissive/Direct

Frame Synchronization Time: 10ms to 1.50s (step 10ms)

Page (TD) 2-32 P849/EN TD/D33

Function Keys and Labels

18

18.1

18.2

18.3

18.4

18.5

(TD) 2 Technical Data

FUNCTION KEYS AND LABELS

Function Keys

Fn. Key Status 1: Disable / Lock / Unlock / Enable

(up to):

Fn. Key Status 10

Fn. Key 1 Mode:

(up to):

Fn. Key 10 Mode:

Fn. Key 1 Label:

(up to):

Fn. Key 10 Label:

Toggled/Normal

User defined text string to describe the function of the particular function key

Opto Input Labels

Opto Input 1 to 64 (depending on the model): Input L1 to Input L64

User-defined text string to describe the function of the particular opto input.

Outputs Labels

Relay 1 to 60 (depending on the model): Output R1 to Output R60

User-defined text string to describe the function of the particular relay output contact.

IED Configurator (IEC61850)

Switch Conf. Bank: No Action/Switch Banks

IP Address 1

Subnet Mask 1

Gateway 1

0.0.0.0. The default IP address is encoded from the MAC address.

169.254.0.xxx, xxx = mod (The last byte of MAC1, 128) + 1.

255.255.255.0

169.254.0.250

IP Address 2 0.0.0.0. The default IP address is encoded from the MAC address.

169.254.1.yyy, yyy = mod (The last byte of MAC2, 128) + 1.

Subnet Mask 2

Gateway 2

255.255.255.0

169.254.1.250

IEC61850 GOOSE

Test Mode: Disabled/Pass Through/Forced

VOP Test Pattern: 0x00000000... 0xFFFFFFFF

Ignore Test Flag: No/Yes

GoEna: 0x0000000000000000(bin)... 0x1111111111111111(bin)

Pub.Simul.Goose: 0x0000000000000000(bin)... 0x1111111111111111(bin)

Sub.Simon.Goose: No/Yes

P849/EN TD/D33 Page (TD) 2-33

(TD) 2 Technical Data

Notes:

Function Keys and Labels

Page (TD) 2-34 P849/EN TD/D33

MiCOM P849

(GS) 3 Getting Started

P849/EN GS/D33

GETTING STARTED

CHAPTER 3

Page (GS) 3-1

(GS) 3 Getting Started

MiCOM P849

Date:

Products covered by this chapter:

Hardware Suffix:

08/2015

This chapter covers the specific versions of the MiCOM products listed below. This includes

only the following combinations of Software Version and Hardware Suffix.

M

Software Version: B0

Connection Diagrams: 10P849xx (xx = 01 to 06)

Page (GS) 3-2 P849/EN GS/D33

contents

(GS) 3 Getting Started

CONTENTS

1 Introduction to the Relay

1.1

1.2

1.2.1

1.2.1.1

1.2.1.2

1.3

1.4

User Interfaces and Menu Structure

Front Panel

LED Indications

Fixed Function

Programmable LEDs

Rear Panel

Connection and Power-Up

2 User Interfaces and Settings Options

3 Menu Structure

3.1

3.2

3.3

Protection Settings

Disturbance Recorder Settings

Control and Support Settings

4 Password Protection

4.1

4.2

4.3

Cyber Security Settings

Products with Cyber Security Features

Password Management

5 Relay Configuration

6 Front Panel User Interface (Keypad and LCD)

6.1

6.2

6.3

6.3.1

6.3.2

6.3.3

6.3.4

6.4

6.4.1

6.5

6.6

6.7

Default Display and Menu Time-Out

Navigating Menus and Browsing Settings

Navigating the Hotkey Menu

Setting Group Selection

Control Inputs - User Assignable Functions

CB Control

Hotkey Menu Navigation

Password Entry

Password Entry including Cyber Security

Reading and Clearing of Alarm Messages and Fault Records

Setting Changes

How to Logout (at the Front Panel)

7 Front Communication Port User Interface

7.1

Front Courier Port

8 MiCOM S1 Studio Relay Communications Basics

8.1

8.2

PC Requirements

Connecting to the Relay using MiCOM S1 Studio

Page (GS) 3-

16

17

18

18

19

19

19

19

20

20

21

21

22

22

13

13

14

15

23

25

26

26

28

10

11

12

12

12

5

5

5

7

7

7

7

8

P849/EN GS/D33 Page (GS) 3-3

(GS) 3 Getting Started

8.3

Off-Line Use of MiCOM S1 Studio

TABLES

Table 1 - Nominal and Operative ranges for dc and ac

Table 2 - Measurement information and relay settings

Table 3 - Access levels (with cyber security features)

Table 4 - Front port DCE pin connections

Table 5 - DTE devices serial port pin connections

Table 6 - Relay front port settings

FIGURES

Figure 1 - MiCOM P849 front view

Figure 2 - P849 – rear view 80TE

Figure 3 - Menu structure

Figure 4 - Front panel user interface

Figure 5 - Hotkey menu navigation

Figure 6 - Front port connection

Figure 7 - PC relay signal connection

Tables

28

Page (GS) 3-

8

10

14

23

23

24

Page (GS) 3-

11

17

6

8

20

23

24

Page (GS) 3-4 P849/EN GS/D33

Introduction to the Relay

1

(GS) 3 Getting Started

INTRODUCTION TO THE RELAY

Warning Before carrying out any work on the equipment, you should be familiar with the contents of the Safety

Information chapter/safety guide SFTY/4LM/C11 or later issue, the Technical Data chapter and the ratings on the equipment rating label.

1.1

1.2

User Interfaces and Menu Structure

The settings and functions of the MiCOM P849 input & output extension device can be accessed both from the front panel keypad and LCD, and via the front and rear communication ports. Information on each of these methods is given in this section to describe how to start using the relay.

Front Panel

The following figure shows the front panel of the relay; the hinged covers at the top and bottom of the front panel are shown open. An optional transparent front cover physically protects the front panel. With the cover in place, access to the user interface is readonly. Removing the cover allows access to the relay settings and does not compromise the protection of the product from the environment.

When editing relay settings, full access to the relay keypad is needed. To remove the front panel:

1. Open the top and bottom covers, then unclip and remove the transparent cover. If the lower cover is secured with a wire seal, remove the seal.

2. Using the side flanges of the transparent cover, pull the bottom edge away from the relay front panel until it is clear of the seal tab.

3. Move the cover vertically down to release the two fixing lugs from their recesses in the front panel.

P849/EN GS/D33 Page (GS) 3-5

(GS) 3 Getting Started

Fixed function LEDs

Serial NûModel

Nû andRatingsL

Introduction to the Relay

CD Topcover

Hotkeys

User programmable function LEDs (tri color)

U s e r p r o g r a m m

LED's (tri- color) a b l e f u cn it o n Battery compartment Front commsport D o w n l o a d / m o n ti o r p o r t Function keypad

Bottom cover

P0840ENb

Figure 1 - MiCOM P849 front view

The front panel of the relay includes the following, as shown in the previous figures:

• A 16-character by 3-line alphanumeric Liquid Crystal Display (LCD).

• A 9-key keypad with 4 arrow keys (, ,  and ), an enter key (), a clear key

(), a read key (), 2 hot keys ().

• 12 LEDs; 4 fixed function LEDs on the left hand side of the front panel and 8 programmable function LEDs on the right hand side.

Function Key Functionality:

• The relay front panel has control keys with programmable LEDs for local control.

Factory default settings associate specific relay functions with these 10 directaction keys and LEDs, e.g. Enable or Disable the auto-recloser function. Using programmable scheme logic, the user can change the default functions of the keys and LEDs to fit specific needs.

• Hotkey functionality:

SCROLL starts scrolling through the various default displays.

STOP stops scrolling the default display.

Under the top hinged cover:

• The relay serial number, and the relay’s current and voltage rating information

Under the bottom hinged cover:

Battery compartment to hold the 1/2 AA size battery which is used for memory back-up for the real time clock, event, fault and disturbance records

A 9-pin female D-type front port for communication with a PC locally to the relay

(up to 15m distance) via an EIA(RS)232 serial data connection

• A 25-pin female D-type port providing internal signal monitoring and high speed local downloading of software and language text via a parallel data connection

Page (GS) 3-6 P849/EN GS/D33

Introduction to the Relay

1.2.1

1.2.1.1

1.2.1.2

1.3

(GS) 3 Getting Started

LED Indications

Fixed Function

The Fixed Function LEDs on the left-hand side of the front panel show these conditions:

Trip (Red) indicates that the relay has issued a trip signal. It is reset when the associated fault record is cleared from the front display.

Alarm (Yellow) flashes when the relay has registered an alarm. This may be triggered by a fault, event or maintenance record. The LED will flash until the alarms have been accepted (read), after which the LED will change to constant illumination, and will extinguish, when the alarms have been cleared.

Out of Service (Yellow) is ON when the relay is not fully operational.

Healthy (Green) indicates that the relay is in correct working order, and should be on at all times. It will be extinguished if the relay’s self-test facilities show that there is an error with the relay’s hardware or software. The state of the healthy LED is reflected by the watchdog contact at the back of the relay.

To improve the visibility of the settings via the front panel, the LCD contrast can be adjusted using the “LCD Contrast” setting in the CONFIGURATION column. This should only be necessary in very hot or cold ambient temperatures.

Programmable LEDs

All the programmable LEDs are tri-colour and can be programmed to show red, yellow or green depending on the requirements. The eight programmable LEDs on the left are suitable for programming alarm indications. The 10 programmable LEDs physically associated with the function keys, are used to show the status of the associated key’s function. The default behaviour and mappings for each of the programmable LEDs are as shown in this table:

The default functions for the function keys are:

Function key 1: GOOSE testing mode (toggled mode. The yellow LED lit when ON)

Function key 6: send testing mode message (toggled mode. LED is controlled by other DDB)

• Function key 10: Trigger precise event recorder

The other Function keys are not assigned in the default configuration.

Rear Panel

Examples of the rear panel of the relay are shown in the following figure. All current and voltage signals, digital logic input signals and output contacts are connected at the rear of the relay. Also connected at the rear is the twisted pair wiring for the rear EIA(RS)485 communication port; the IRIG-B time synchronising input is optional, the Ethernet rear communication board with copper and fiber optic connections or the second communication are optional.

Refer to the wiring diagrams in the ‘Connection Diagrams’ chapter for further details.

P849/EN GS/D33 Page (GS) 3-7

(GS) 3 Getting Started

B

Introduction to the Relay

D

D E

E

F

F

G

G H

H

J

J

K

K

L

L

P3104xxa

A – IRIG B / Ethernet / COMMS

B – Opto

C – Opto

D – Opto

E – Relay \ Opto

F – Relay \ Opto

G – Relay \ Opto \ high break

Figure 2 - P849 – rear view 80TE

1.4

H – Relay \ Opto \ high break

J –

K –

Relay \ Opto \ high break

Relay \ Opto \ high break

L – Relay board

M – Relay board

N Power supply board

Connection and Power-Up

Before powering-up the relay, confirm that the relay power supply voltage and nominal ac signal magnitudes are appropriate for your application. The relay serial number, and the relay’s current and voltage rating, power rating information can be viewed under the top hinged cover. The relay is available in the auxiliary voltage versions shown in this table:

dc

24 – 32 V dc

Nominal Ranges ac

-

48 – 110 V dc -

110 – 250 V dc ** 100 – 240 V ac rms **

** rated for ac or dc operation

dc

19 - 38 V dc

37 - 150 V dc

87 - 300 V dc

Operative Ranges

-

-

ac

80 - 265 V ac

Table 1 - Nominal and Operative ranges for dc and ac

Page (GS) 3-8 P849/EN GS/D33

Introduction to the Relay

(GS) 3 Getting Started

Please note that the label does not specify the logic input ratings. These relays are fitted with universal opto isolated logic inputs that can be programmed for the nominal battery voltage of the circuit of which they are a part. See ‘Universal Opto input’ in the Product

Design (Firmware) section for more information on logic input specifications.

Note The opto inputs have a maximum input voltage rating of 300V dc at any setting.

Once the ratings have been verified for the application, connect external power capable of delivering the power requirements specified on the label to perform the relay familiarization procedures. Previous diagrams show the location of the power supply terminals - please refer to the

Installation and Connection Diagrams chapters for all the details, ensuring that the correct polarities are observed in the case of dc supply.

P849/EN GS/D33 Page (GS) 3-9

(GS) 3 Getting Started

2

User Interfaces and Settings Options

USER INTERFACES AND SETTINGS OPTIONS

The relay has these user interfaces:

• The front panel user interface via the LCD and keypad

The front port which supports Courier communication

The rear port which supports these protocols:

Courier

MODBUS

IEC 60870-5-103

DNP3

IEC 61850

• The optional Ethernet port which supports IEC 61850

The measurement information and relay settings that can be accessed from the different interfaces are shown in this table:

Display & modification of all settings

Digital I/O signal status

Display/extraction of measurements

Display/extraction of fault records

Extraction of disturbance records

Programmable scheme logic settings

Reset of fault & alarm records

Clear event & fault records

Time synchronization

Control commands

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Keypad or LCD

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Courier MODBUS IEC870-5-103 DNP3.0 IEC61850

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes Yes Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Table 2 - Measurement information and relay settings

Page (GS) 3-10 P849/EN GS/D33

Menu Structure

(GS) 3 Getting Started

3

Column Header

System data

View records

MENU STRUCTURE

The relay’s menu is arranged in a table. Each setting in the menu is referred to as a cell, and each cell in the menu may be accessed using a row and column address. The settings are arranged so that each column contains related settings, for example all the disturbance recorder settings are contained within the same column. As shown in the following diagram, the top row of each column contains the heading that describes the settings contained within that column. Movement between the columns of the menu can only be made at the column heading level.

Input labels

Output labels

Input labels

Up to 4 setting groups

Output labels

Input labels

Output labels

Input labels

Output labels

Column data settings

Control & Support Group 1 Group 2 Group 3

Repeated for groups 2, 3 and 4

Group 4

P3083ENa

Figure 3 - Menu structure

The settings in the menu fall into one of these categories:

• Protection Settings

• Disturbance Recorder settings

• Control and Support (C&S) settings.

Different methods are used to change a setting depending on which category the setting falls into.

• C&S settings are stored and used by the relay immediately after they are entered.

• For either protection settings or disturbance recorder settings, the relay stores the new setting values in a temporary ‘scratchpad’. It activates all the new settings together, but only after it has been confirmed that the new settings are to be adopted. This technique is employed to provide extra security, and so that several setting changes that are made within a group of protection settings will all take effect at the same time.

P849/EN GS/D33 Page (GS) 3-11

(GS) 3 Getting Started

3.1

3.2

3.3

Menu Structure

Protection Settings

The settings include the following items:

• Input and Output element settings

• Scheme logic settings

There are four groups of settings, with each group containing the same setting cells. One group of settings is selected as the active group, and is used by the configuration elements.

Disturbance Recorder Settings

The Disturbance Recorder (DR) settings include the record duration and trigger position, selection of analogue and digital signals to record, and the signal sources that trigger the recording.

Control and Support Settings

The control and support settings include:

• Configuration settings

Active setting group

Password & language settings

Communications settings

Event & maintenance record settings

User interface settings

Commissioning settings

Page (GS) 3-12 P849/EN GS/D33

Password Protection

4

4.1

(GS) 3 Getting Started

PASSWORD PROTECTION

The menu structure contains four levels of access. The level of access that is enabled determines which of the settings can be changed and is controlled by entry of two different passwords. The levels of access are summarised in the Access Levels (with

Cyber Security features)

table.

Cyber Security Settings

A detailed description of Schneider Electric Cyber Security features is provided in the

Cyber Security chapter.

Important We would strongly recommend that you understand the contents of the Cyber Security chapter before you use any cyber security features or make any changes to the settings.

Each MiCOM P40 IED includes a large number of possible settings. These settings are very important in determining how the device works.

A detailed description of the settings is given in the Cyber Security chapter.

P849/EN GS/D33 Page (GS) 3-13

(GS) 3 Getting Started

Password Protection

4.2

Level

0

1

2

3

Meaning

Read Some

Write Minimal

Read All

Write Few

Read All

Write Some

Read All

Write All

Products with Cyber Security Features

For products with cyber security features, the menu structure contains four levels of access, three of which are password-protected. These are summarized below:

Read Operation

SYSTEM DATA column:

Description

Plant Reference

Model Number

Serial Number

S/W Ref.

Access Level

Security Feature

SECURITY CONFIG column:

User Banner

Attempts Remain

Blk Time Remain

Fallback PW level

Security Code (UI only)

Password Entry

LCD Contrast (UI only)

Write Operation

All data and settings are readable.

Poll Measurements

All data and settings are readable.

Poll Measurements

All data and settings are readable.

Poll Measurements

All items writeable at level 0.

Level 1 Password setting

Select Event, Main and Fault (upload)

Extract Events (e.g. via MiCOM S1 Studio)

All items writeable at level 1.

Setting Cells that change visibility (Visible/Invisible).

Setting Values (Primary/Secondary) selector

Commands:

Reset Indication

Reset Demand

Reset Statistics

Reset CB Data / counters

Level 2 Password setting

All items writeable at level 2.

Change all Setting cells

Operations:

Extract and download Setting file.

Extract and download PSL

Extract and download MCL61850 (IED Config - IEC61850)

Extraction of Disturbance Recorder

Courier/Modbus Accept Event (auto event extraction, e.g. via A2R)

Commands:

Change Active Group setting

Close / Open CB

Change Comms device address.

Set Date & Time

Switch MCL banks / Switch Conf. Bank in UI (IED Config -

IEC61850)

Enable / Disable Device ports (in SECURITY CONFIG column)

Level 3 password setting

Table 3 - Access levels (with cyber security features)

Page (GS) 3-14 P849/EN GS/D33

Password Protection

4.3

(GS) 3 Getting Started

Password Management

Level management, including password description, management and recovery, is fully described in the Cyber Security chapter.

Each of the Password may be any length between 0 and 8 characters long which can contain any ASCII character in the range ASCII code 33 (21 Hex) to ASCII code 122 (7A

Hex) inclusive. The factory default passwords are blank for Level 1 and AAAA for Levels

2 and 3. Each password is user-changeable once it has been correctly entered. Entry of the password is achieved either by a prompt when a setting change is attempted, or by moving to the ‘Password’ cell in the ‘System data’ column of the menu. The level of access is independently enabled for each interface, that is to say if level 2 access is enabled for the rear communication port, the front panel access will remain at level 0 unless the relevant password is entered at the front panel. The access level enabled by the password entry will time-out independently for each interface after a period of inactivity and revert to the default level. If the passwords are lost an emergency password can be supplied - contact Schneider Electric with the relay’s serial number and security code (relays with Cyber Security features). The current level of access enabled for an interface can be determined by examining the 'Access level' cell in the 'System data' column, the access level for the front panel User Interface (UI), can also be found as one of the default display options.

P849/EN GS/D33 Page (GS) 3-15

(GS) 3 Getting Started

5

Relay Configuration

RELAY CONFIGURATION

The relay is a multi-function device that supports numerous different protection, control and communication features. To simplify the setting of the relay, there is a configuration settings column which can be used to enable or disable many of the functions of the relay. The settings associated with any function that is disabled are made invisible, i.e. they are not shown in the menu. To disable a function change the relevant cell in the

Configuration’ column from ‘Enabled’ to ‘Disabled’.

The configuration column controls which of the protection settings groups is selected as active through the ‘ Active settings’ cell. A protection setting group can also be disabled in the configuration column, provided it is not the present active group. Similarly, a disabled setting group cannot be set as the active group.

The column also allows all of the setting values in one group of protection settings to be copied to another group.

To do this firstly set the ‘Copy from’ cell to the protection setting group to be copied, then set the ‘Copy to’ cell to the protection group where the copy is to be placed. The copied settings are initially placed in the temporary scratchpad, and will only be used by the relay following confirmation.

To restore the default values to the settings in any protection settings group, set the

‘Restore defaults’ cell to the relevant group number. Alternatively it is possible to set the

‘Restore defaults’ cell to ‘All settings’ to restore the default values to all of the relay’s settings, not just the protection groups’ settings. The default settings will initially be placed in the scratchpad and will only be used by the relay after they have been confirmed. Note that restoring defaults to all settings includes the rear communication port settings, which may result in communication via the rear port being disrupted if the new (default) settings do not match those of the master station.

Page (GS) 3-16 P849/EN GS/D33

Front Panel User Interface (Keypad and LCD)

6

(GS) 3 Getting Started

FRONT PANEL USER INTERFACE (KEYPAD AND LCD)

When the keypad is exposed it provides full access to the menu options of the relay, with the information displayed on the LCD.

The , 

, 

and  keys which are used for menu navigation and setting value changes include an auto-repeat function that comes into operation if any of these keys are held continually pressed. This can speed up both setting value changes and menu navigation; the longer the key is held depressed, the faster the rate of change or movement becomes.

Date and

Time

System

Frequency

0 8

Other default displays

4 6

2

Plant reference

1

1

0

Alarm messages

Column 1

System Data

Column 2

View Records

4 6

Other column headings

Column n

Group 4

Output labels

Data 1.1

Language

Data 2.1

Select event

Data n.1

Relay 1

Data 1.2

Password

Data 2.2

Select Maint

0

Note:

The 0 key will return to column header from any menu cell

Data n.2

Relay 2

Other setting cells in

Column n

82

Other setting cells in

Column 1

82

Data 2.3

Reset

Indication

82

Data 1.n

Password level 2

Figure 4 - Front panel user interface

Data n.n

Relay 60

P3084ENa

P849/EN GS/D33 Page (GS) 3-17

(GS) 3 Getting Started

6.1

Front Panel User Interface (Keypad and LCD)

Default Display and Menu Time-Out

The front panel menu has a default display. To change the default display selection requires password level 3 and the following items can be selected by using the  and  keys:

User Banner

Date and time

Relay description (user defined)

Plant reference (user defined)

System frequency

3-phase voltage

3-phase and neutral current

Power

• Access permissions

If the user has got level 3 (or enters a level 3 password when prompted as above), then the IED will then inform the user that to move to another default display will make the IED non-NERC compliant, as follows:

DISPLAY NOT-NERC

COMPLIANT. OK?

‘Enter’ will move the default display to the next one, ‘Cancel’ will leave the display at the user banner display. The confirmation for non-NERC compliance will only be asked when moving off the user banner display. The request for level 3 password will always be asked for any change to the default display selection if the current level is not already 3.

Whenever the relay has an uncleared alarm (such as fault record, protection alarm, or control alarm) the default display is replaced by the following display.

Alarms/Faults

Present

Enter the menu structure of the relay from the default display, even if the display shows the Alarms/Faults present message.

6.2 Navigating Menus and Browsing Settings

Use the four arrow keys to browse the menu, following the menu structure shown above.

1. Starting at the default display, press the

key to show the first column heading.

2. Use the  and  keys to select the required column heading.

3. Use the  and  keys to view the setting data in the column.

4. To return to the column header, either hold the  key down or press the clear key

 once. It is only possible to move across columns at the column heading level.

5. To return to the default display, press the

key or the clear key the column headings. If you use the auto-repeat function of the

from any of

key, you cannot go straight to the default display from one of the column cells because the auto-repeat stops at the column heading.

6. Press the

key again to go to the default display.

Page (GS) 3-18 P849/EN GS/D33

Front Panel User Interface (Keypad and LCD)

6.3

6.3.1

6.3.2

6.3.3

(GS) 3 Getting Started

Navigating the Hotkey Menu

To access the hotkey menu from the default display:

1. Press the key directly below the HOTKEY text on the LCD.

2. Once in the hotkey menu, use the options, then use the hotkeys to control the function currently displayed.

If neither the  or 

and

keys to scroll between the available

keys are pressed within 20 seconds of entering a hotkey sub menu, the relay reverts to the default display.

3. Press the clear key menu.

to return to the default menu from any page of the hotkey

The layout of a typical page of the hotkey menu is as follows:

• The top line shows the contents of the previous and next cells for easy menu navigation

• The center line shows the function

• The bottom line shows the options assigned to the direct access keys

The functions available in the hotkey menu are listed in the following sections.

Setting Group Selection

The user can either scroll using <<NXT GRP>> through the available setting groups or

<<SELECT>> the setting group that is currently displayed.

When the SELECT button is pressed a screen confirming the current setting group is displayed for 2 seconds before the user is prompted with the <<NXT GRP>> or

<<SELECT>> options again. The user can exit the sub menu by using the left and right arrow keys.

For more information on setting group selection refer to “Setting group selection” section in the Operation chapter.

Control Inputs - User Assignable Functions

The number of control inputs (user assignable functions – USR ASS) represented in the hotkey menu is user configurable in the “CTRL I/P CONFIG” column. The chosen inputs can be SET/RESET using the hotkey menu.

For more information refer to the “Control Inputs” section in the Operation chapter.

CB Control

The CB control functionality varies from one Px40 relay to another. For a detailed description of the CB control via the hotkey menu refer to the “Circuit Breaker Control” section of the Setting chapter.

P849/EN GS/D33 Page (GS) 3-19

(GS) 3 Getting Started

Hotkey Menu Navigation 6.3.4

Default Display

MiCOM

P849

HOTKEY

Front Panel User Interface (Keypad and LCD)

<USR 32 STG GRP>

HOT KEY MENU

EXIT

<MENU USER 01>

SETTING GROUP 1

NXT GRP SELECT

<STG GRP USER 02>

CONTROL INPUT 1

EXIT ON

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

<USER 31 MENU>

CONTROL INPUT

32

EXIT ON

<MENU USER 01>

SETTING GROUP 2

NXT GRP SELECT

<MENU USER 02>

CONTROL INPUT 1

ON

Confirmation screen displayed for

2 seconds

Confirmation screen displayed for

2 seconds

<MENU USER 01>

SETTING GROUP 2

SELECTED

<MENU USER 02>

CONTROL INPUT 1

OFF EXIT

NOTE:

<<EXIT>> Key returns the user to the Hotkey Menu Screen

P1246ENm

Figure 5 - Hotkey menu navigation

6.4 Password Entry

The password entry method varies slightly depending on whether the product includes cyber security features or not.

Page (GS) 3-20 P849/EN GS/D33

Front Panel User Interface (Keypad and LCD)

6.4.1

(GS) 3 Getting Started

Password Entry including Cyber Security

1. When a password is required to edit a setting, this prompt appears.

Enter Password

2. A flashing cursor shows which character field of the password can be changed.

Press the  and  keys as needed.

3. Use the

and

keys to move between the character fields of the password.

Press the enter key  to confirm the password.

If an incorrect password is entered, the display shows an error message folowed by the Enter UI Pwd prompt again.

Otherwise, a message then appears indicating that the password is correct and what access has been unlocked. If this is sufficient to edit the selected setting, the display returns to the setting page to allow the edit to continue.

4. To escape from this prompt press the clear key password using

System data > Password.

. Alternatively, enter the

If the keypad is inactive for 15 minutes, the password protection of the front panel user interface reverts to the default access permissions.

5. To manually reset the password protection to the default permissions, select

System data > Password, then press the clear key instead of entering a password.

6.5 Reading and Clearing of Alarm Messages and Fault Records

One or more alarm messages appear on the default display and the yellow alarm LED flashes. The alarm messages can either be self-resetting or latched, in which case they must be cleared manually.

1. To view the alarm messages, press the read key . When all alarms have been viewed but not cleared, the alarm LED change from flashing to constantly ON and the latest fault record appears (if there is one).

2. Scroll through the pages of the latest fault record, using the  key. When all pages of the fault record have been viewed, the following prompt appears.

Press clear to reset alarms

3. To clear all alarm messages, press . To return to the display showing alarms or faults present, and leave the alarms uncleared, press .

4. Depending on the password configuration settings, you may need to enter a password before the alarm messages can be cleared. See the

How to Access the

IED/Relay section.

5. When all alarms are cleared, the yellow alarm LED switches OFF; also the red trip

LED switches OFF if it was switched ON after a trip.

6. To speed up the procedure, enter the alarm viewer using the  key, then press the  key. This goes straight to the fault record display. Press  again to move straight to the alarm reset prompt, then press  again to clear all alarms.

P849/EN GS/D33 Page (GS) 3-21

(GS) 3 Getting Started

6.6

Front Panel User Interface (Keypad and LCD)

Setting Changes

1. To change the value of a setting, go to the relevant cell in the menu, then press the enter key  to change the cell value. A flashing cursor on the LCD shows the value can be changed. If a password is required to edit the cell value, a password prompt appears.

2. To change the setting value, press the  or  keys. If the setting to be changed is a binary value or a text string, select the required bit or character to be changed using the  and  keys.

3. Press  to confirm the new setting value or the clear key  to discard it. The new setting is automatically discarded if it is not confirmed in 15 seconds.

4. For protection group settings and disturbance recorder settings, the changes must be confirmed before they are used by the relay.

5. To do this, when all required changes have been entered, return to the column heading level and press the  key. Before returning to the default display, the following prompt appears.

Update settings?

Enter or clear

6. Press  to accept the new settings or press  to discard the new settings.

Note If the menu time-out occurs before the setting changes have been confirmed, the setting values are also discarded.

Control and support settings are updated immediately after they are entered, without the

Update settings? prompt.

6.7 How to Logout (at the Front Panel)

If you have been configuring the IED, you should 'log out'. You do this by going up to the top of the menu tree. When you are at the Column Heading level and you press the Up button, you may be prompted to log out with the following display:

ENTER TO LOG OUT

CLEAR TO CANCEL

You will only be asked this question if your password level is higher than the fallback level.

If you confirm, the following message is displayed for 2 seconds:

LOGGED OUT

Access Level <x>

Where x is the current fallback level.

If you decide not to log out (i.e. you cancel), the following message is displayed for 2 seconds.

LOGOUT CANCELLED

Access Level <x>

Where x is the current access level.

Page (GS) 3-22 P849/EN GS/D33

Front Communication Port User Interface

7

(GS) 3 Getting Started

FRONT COMMUNICATION PORT USER INTERFACE

The front communication port is provided by a 9-pin female D-type connector located under the bottom hinged cover. It provides EIA(RS)232 serial data communication and is intended for use with a PC locally to the relay (up to 15m distance) as shown in the following diagram. This port supports the Courier communication protocol only. Courier is the communication language developed by Schneider Electric to allow communication with its range of protection relays. The front port is particularly designed for use with the relay settings program MiCOM S1 Studio (Windows 2000, Windows XP or Windows Vista based software package).

P849/EN GS/D33

Figure 6 - Front port connection

The IED is a Data Communication Equipment (DCE) device. The pin connections of the

9-pin front port are as follows:

Pin no. Description

2

3

Tx Transmit data

Rx Receive data

5

Table 4 - Front port DCE pin connections

0V Zero volts common

None of the other pins are connected in the relay. The relay should be connected to the serial port of a PC, usually called COM1 or COM2. PCs are normally Data Terminal

Equipment (DTE) devices which have a serial port pin connection as below (if in doubt check your PC manual):

Pin no. 2

Pin

3

25 Way

2

9 Way

Pin no. 3 2 3

Pin no. 5 7 5

Table 5 - DTE devices serial port pin connections

Description

Rx Receive data

Tx Transmit data

0V Zero volts common

Page (GS) 3-23

(GS) 3 Getting Started

Front Communication Port User Interface

For successful data communication, the Tx pin on the relay must be connected to the Rx pin on the PC, and the Rx pin on the relay must be connected to the Tx pin on the PC, as shown in the diagram. Therefore, providing that the PC is a DTE with pin connections as given above, a ‘straight through’ serial connector is required, i.e. one that connects pin 2 to pin 2, pin 3 to pin 3, and pin 5 to pin 5.

Note A common cause of difficulty with serial data communication is connecting

Tx to Tx and Rx to Rx. This could happen if a ‘cross-over’ serial connector is used, i.e. one that connects pin 2 to pin 3, and pin 3 to pin 2, or if the PC has the same pin configuration as the relay.

P0108ENd

Figure 7 - PC relay signal connection

Having made the physical connection from the relay to the PC, the PCs communication settings must be configured to match those of the relay. The relays communication settings for the front port are fixed as shown below:

Protocol Baud rate Courier address

Courier 19,200 bits/s 1

Message format

11 bit - 1 start bit, 8 data bits, 1 parity bit (even parity), 1 stop bit

Table 6 - Relay front port settings

The inactivity timer for the front port is set at 15 minutes. This controls how long the relay will maintain its password access on the front port. If no messages are received on the front port for 15 minutes then any password access that has been enabled will be revoked.

Page (GS) 3-24 P849/EN GS/D33

Front Communication Port User Interface

7.1

(GS) 3 Getting Started

Front Courier Port

The front EIA(RS)232 9-pin port supports the Courier protocol for one to one communication.

Note The front port is actually compliant to EIA(RS)574; the 9-pin version of

EIA(RS)232, see www.tiaonline.org

.

The front port is designed for use during installation and commissioning/maintenance and is not suitable for permanent connection. Since this interface will not be used to link the relay to a substation communication system, some of the features of Courier are not implemented. These are as follows:

• Automatic Extraction of Event Records:

Courier Status byte does not support the Event flag

Send Event/Accept Event commands are not implemented

• Automatic Extraction of Disturbance Records:

Courier Status byte does not support the Disturbance flag

Busy Response Layer: Courier Status byte does not support the Busy flag, the only response to a request will be the final data

Fixed Address:

Fixed Baud Rate:

The address of the front courier port is always 1, the

Change Device address command is not supported.

19200 bps

Note Although automatic extraction of event and disturbance records is not supported, this data can be manually accessed using the front port.

P849/EN GS/D33 Page (GS) 3-25

(GS) 3 Getting Started

8

8.1

MiCOM S1 Studio Relay Communications Basics

MICOM S1 STUDIO RELAY COMMUNICATIONS BASICS

The EIA(RS)232 front communication port is particularly designed for use with the relay settings program MiCOM S1 Studio. MiCOM S1 Studio is the universal MiCOM IED

Support Software and provide users a direct and convenient access to all stored data in any MiCOM IED using the EIA(RS)232 front communication port.

MiCOM S1 Studio provides full access to MiCOM Px10, Px20, Px30, Px40, Modulex series, K series, L series relays and MiCOM Mx20 measurements units

The MiCOM S1 Studio product is updated periodically. These updates provide support for new features (such as allowing you to manage new MiCOM products, as well as using new software releases and hardware suffixes). The updates may also include fixes.

Accordingly, we strongly advise customers to use the latest Schneider Electric

version of MiCOM S1 Studio.

PC Requirements

The minimum and recommended hardware requirements for MiCOM S1 Studio Suite

(v5.1.0) are shown below. These include the S1 Studio application and other tools which are included: UPCT, P746 RHMI, P740 Topology Tool:

Platform

Windows XP x86

Windows 7 x86

Windows 7 x64

Minimum requirements:

Processor RAM

1 GHz

1 GHz

1 GHz

512 MB

1 GB

2 GB

Windows Server 2008 x86 Sp1 1 GHz

Platform

512 MB

Recommended requirements:

Processor RAM

Windows XP x86 1 GHz 1 GB

Windows 7 x86

Windows 7 x64

1 GHz

1 GHz

Windows Server 2008 x86 Sp1 1 GHz

2 GB

4 GB

4 GB

HDD1

900 MB

900 MB

900 MB

900 MB

HDD1

900 MB

900 MB

900 MB

900 MB

HDD2

1,5 GB

1,9 GB

2,1 GB

1,7 GB

HDD2

1,5 GB

1,9 GB

2,1 GB

1,7 GB

Note 1 OS with Windows Updates updated on 2015/05.

Note 2 OS without Windows Updates installed.

Both configurations do not include Data Models HDD requirements.

Screen resolution for minimum requirements: Super VGA (800 x 600).

Screen resolution for recommended requirements: XGA (1024x768) and higher.

MiCOM S1 Studio must be started with Administrator privileges.

Page (GS) 3-26 P849/EN GS/D33

MiCOM S1 Studio Relay Communications Basics

(GS) 3 Getting Started

Component Type

Package

Package

Package

Package

Package

Package

Merge modules

Merge modules

Merge modules

Merge modules

Merge modules

Merge modules

Merge modules

Merge modules

Merge modules

Merge modules

Merge modules

Merge modules

Merge modules

Merge modules

MiCOM S1 Studio Additional components

The following components are required to run MiCOM S1 Studio and are installed by its installation package.

Component

.NET Framework 2.0 SP 1 (x64)

.NET Framework 2.0 SP 1 (x86)

.NET Framework 4.0 Client (x64)

.NET Framework 4.0 Client (x86)

Visual C++ 2005 SP1 Redistributable Package (x86)

Visual C++ 2008 SP1 Redistributable Package (x86)

DAO 3.50

MFC 6.0

MFC Unicode 6.0

Microsoft C Runtime Library 6.0

Microsoft C++ Runtime Library 6.0

Microsoft Component Category Manager Library

Microsoft Data Access Components 2.8 (English)

Microsoft Jet Database Engine 3.51 (English)

Microsoft OLE 2.40 for Windows NT and Windows 95

Microsoft Visual Basic Virtual Machine 6.0

MSXML 4.0 - Windows 9x and later

MSXML 4.0 - Windows XP and later

Visual C++ 8.0 MFC (x86) WinSXS MSM

Visual C++ 8.0 MFC.Policy (x86) WinSXS MSM

P849/EN GS/D33 Page (GS) 3-27

(GS) 3 Getting Started

8.2

8.3

MiCOM S1 Studio Relay Communications Basics

Connecting to the Relay using MiCOM S1 Studio

This section is a quick start guide to using MiCOM S1 Studio and assumes this is installed on your PC. See the MiCOM S1 Studio program online help for more detailed information.

1. Make sure the EIA(RS)232 serial cable is properly connected between the port on the front panel of the relay and the PC.

2. To start MiCOM S1 Studio, select Programs > Schneider Electric > MiCOM S1

Studio > MiCOM S1 Studio.

3. Click the Quick Connect tab and select Create a New System.

4. Check the Path to System file is correct, then enter the name of the system in the

Name field. To add a description of the system, use the Comment field.

5. Click OK.

6. Select the device type.

7. Select the communications port, and open a connection with the device.

8. Once connected, select the language for the settings file, the device name, then click Finish. The configuration is updated.

9. In the Studio Explorer window, select Device > Supervise Device… to control the relay directly.

Off-Line Use of MiCOM S1 Studio

MiCOM S1 Studio can also be used as an off-line tool to prepare settings, without access to the relay.

1. If creating a new system, in the Studio Explorer, select create new system. Then right-click the new system and select

New substation.

2. Right-click the new substation and select New voltage level.

3. Then right-click the new voltage level and select New bay.

4. Then right-click the new bay and select New device.

You can add a device at any level, whether it is a system, substation, voltage or bay.

5. Select a device type from the list, then enter the relay type. Click

Next.

6. Enter the full model number and click Next.

7. Select the Language and Model, then click Next.

8. If the IEC61850 protocol is selected, and an Ethernet board with hardware option

Q, R or S is selected, select IEC 61850 Edition:

IEC 61850 Edition 2 Mode or

IEC 61850 Edition 1 Compatible Mode.

9. Enter a unique device name, then click Finish.

10. Right-click the Settings folder and select New File. A default file 000 is added.

11. Right-click file 000 and select click Open. You can then edit the settings. See the

MiCOM S1 Studio program online help for more information.

Page (GS) 3-28 P849/EN GS/D33

MiCOM P849

(ST) 4 Settings

P849/EN ST/D33

SETTINGS

CHAPTER 4

Page (ST) 4-1

(ST) 4 Settings

MiCOM P849

Date:

Products covered by this chapter:

Hardware Suffix:

08/2015

This chapter covers the specific versions of the MiCOM products listed below. This includes

only the following combinations of Software Version and Hardware Suffix.

M

Software Version: B0

Connection Diagrams: 10P849xx (xx = 01 to 06)

Page (ST) 4-2 P849/EN ST/D33

Contents

CONTENTS

1 Introduction

2 Relay Settings

2.1

Default Settings Restore

3 Configuration Menu

4 Grouped Protection Settings

4.1

4.2

Input Labels

Output Labels

5 Control and Support Settings

5.9

5.10

5.11

5.12

5.13

5.14

5.1

5.2

5.3

5.4

5.5

5.6

5.7

5.8

System Data

Date and Time

Record Control

Disturbance Recorder Settings

Communications

Commissioning Tests

Opto Configuration

Control Inputs

Ctrl I/P Config.

InterMiCOM Communication Channel

InterMiCOM Configuration

Function Keys

IED Configurator

Control Input Labels

(ST) 4 Settings

Page (ST) 4-

7

9

9

13

18

47

53

54

58

60

61

29

34

40

45

18

20

22

25

5

6

6

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-3

(ST) 4 Settings

Notes:

Contents

Page (ST) 4-4 P849/EN ST/D33

Introduction

1

(ST) 4 Settings

INTRODUCTION

The relay must be configured to the system and the application by means of appropriate settings.

The sequence in which the settings are listed and described in this chapter will be the control and configuration settings and the disturbance recorder settings.

The relay is supplied with a factory-set configuration of default settings.

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-5

(ST) 4 Settings

2

2.1

Relay Settings

RELAY SETTINGS

The IED is a multi-function device that supports numerous different control and communication features. The settings associated with any function that is disabled are made invisible; i.e. they are not shown in the menu. To disable a function change the relevant cell in the ‘ Configuration’ column from ‘Enabled’ to ‘Disabled’.

To simplify the setting of the IED, there is a configuration settings column, used to enable or disable many of the IED functions. The aim of the configuration column is to allow general configuration from a single point in the menu.

The configuration column controls which of the four settings groups is selected as active through the ‘ Active settings’ cell. A setting group can also be disabled in the configuration column, provided it is not the present active group. Similarly, a disabled setting group cannot be set as the active group.

The column also allows all of the setting values in one group of settings to be copied to another group.

To do this firstly set the ‘ Copy from’ cell to the setting group to be copied, then set the

Copy to’ cell to the group where the copy is to be placed. The copied settings are initially placed in the temporary scratchpad, and will only be used by the IED following confirmation.

Default Settings Restore

To restore the default values to the settings in any protection settings group, set the

‘restore defaults’ cell to the relevant group number. Alternatively it is possible to set the

‘restore defaults’ cell to ‘all settings’ to restore the default values to all of the IEDs settings, not just the protection groups’ settings. The default settings will initially be placed in the scratchpad and will only be used by the IED after they have been confirmed.

Note Restoring defaults to all settings includes the rear communication port settings, which may result in communication via the rear port being disrupted if the new (default) settings do not match those of the master station.

Page (ST) 4-6 P849/EN ST/D33

Configuration Menu

(ST) 4 Settings

3 CONFIGURATION MENU

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

9 00 CONFIGURATION

9 01 Restore Defaults No Operation

No Operation, All Settings, Setting Group 1,

Setting Group 2, Setting Group 3 or Setting

Group 4

Setting to restore a setting group to factory default settings

9 02 Setting Group Select via Menu

Allows setting group changes to be initiated via Opto Input or via Menu.

Group 1 9 03 Active Settings

Selects the active setting group.

9 04

Saves all relay settings.

Save Changes No Operation

Select via Menu or Select via Optos

Group 1, Group 2, Group 3, Group 4

No Operation, Save, Abort

9 05 Copy From Group 1

Allows displayed settings to be copied from a selected setting group.

9 06 Copy To No Operation

Group 1, 2, 3 or 4

No Operation, Group 1, 2, 3 or 4

Allows displayed settings to be copied to a selected setting group (ready to paste).

9 07 Setting Group 1 Enabled Enabled or Disabled

If the setting group is disabled from the configuration, then all associated settings and signals are hidden, with the exception of this setting (paste).

9 08 Setting Group 2 Disabled Disabled or Enabled

If the setting group is disabled from the configuration, then all associated settings and signals are hidden, with the exception of this setting (paste).

9 09 Setting Group 3 Disabled Disabled or Enabled

If the setting group is disabled from the configuration, then all associated settings and signals are hidden, with the exception of this setting (paste).

9 0A Setting Group 4 Disabled Disabled or Enabled

If the setting group is disabled from the configuration, then all associated settings and signals are hidden, with the exception of this setting (paste).

9 25 Input Labels Visible

Sets the Input Labels menu visible further on in the settings menu.

Visible or Invisible

9 26 Output Labels Visible

Sets the Output Labels menu visible further on in the settings menu.

9 29 Record Control Invisible

Sets the Record Control menu visible further on in the settings menu.

Visible or Invisible

Invisible or Visible

9 2A Disturb Recorder Invisible Invisible or Visible

Sets the “Disturbance recorder” menu (formerly called the "Precise events recorder") visible further on in the settings menu.

9 2B Measure't Setup Invisible

Sets the Measurement Setup menu visible further on in the settings menu.

Invisible or Visible

9

9

2C

2D

Comms Settings Visible

Commission Tests Visible

Sets the Commissioning Tests menu visible further on in the settings menu.

Visible or Invisible

Sets the Communications Settings menu visible further on in the settings menu. These are the settings associated with the 1st and 2nd rear communications ports.

Visible or Invisible

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-7

(ST) 4 Settings

Configuration Menu

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

9 2F Control Inputs Visible Visible or Invisible

Activates the Control Input status and operation menu further on in the setting menu.

9 35 Ctrl I/P Config Visible Visible or Invisible

Sets the Control Input Configuration menu visible further on in the setting menu.

9 36 Ctrl I/P Labels Visible

Sets the Control Input Labels menu visible further on in the setting menu.

9 39 Direct Access Enabled

Visible or Invisible

Enabled/Disabled/Hotkey

Defines what CB control direct access is allowed. Enabled implies control via menu, hotkeys etc.

9 40 InterMiCOM Disabled Disabled or Enabled

To enable (activate) or disable (turn off) EIA (RS) 232 InterMiCOM (integrated teleprotection).

InterMiCOM - ZN0025 required in slot A

9 50 Function Key Visible

Sets the Function Key menu visible further on in the setting menu.

Visible or Invisible

9 FB RP1 Read Only Disabled Disabled or Enabled

Enable Remote Read Only Mode on RP1 courier or IEC60870-5-103 communication protocol.

9 FC RP2 Read Only Disabled

Enable Remote Read Only Mode on RP2 courier communication protocol.

Disabled or Enabled

9 FD NIC Read Only Disabled Disabled or Enabled

Enable Remote Read Only Mode on the Network Interface card (IEC 61850 tunneled courier).

9 FF LCD Contrast 11 0 to 31 step 1

Sets the LCD contrast.

Page (ST) 4-8 P849/EN ST/D33

Grouped Protection Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

4 GROUPED PROTECTION SETTINGS

4.1 Input Labels

The column GROUP x INPUT LABELS is used to individually label each opto input that is available in the relay. The text is restricted to 16 characters and is available if ‘Input

Labels’ are set visible under CONFIGURATION column.

The “Input Labels” column is visible when the “Input Labels” setting (“Configuration” column) = “visible”.

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

4A 00 INPUT LABELS

4A 01 Opto Input 1 Input L1 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 02 Opto Input 2 Input L2 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 03 Opto Input 3 Input L3 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 04 Opto Input 4 Input L4 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 05 Opto Input 5 Input L5 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 06 Opto Input 6 Input L6 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 07 Opto Input 7 Input L7 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 08 Opto Input 8 Input L8 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 09 Opto Input 9 Input L9 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 0A Opto Input 10 Input L10 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 0B Opto Input 11 Input L11 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 0C Opto Input 12 Input L12 16-character text

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-9

(ST) 4 Settings

Grouped Protection Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 0D Opto Input 13 Input L13 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 0E Opto Input 14 Input L14 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 0F Opto Input 15 Input L15 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 10 Opto Input 16 Input L16 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 11 Opto Input 17 Input L17 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 12 Opto Input 18 Input L18 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 13 Opto Input 19 Input L19 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 14 Opto Input 20 Input L20 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 15 Opto Input 21 Input L21 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 16 Opto Input 22 Input L22 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 17 Opto Input 23 Input L23 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 18 Opto Input 24 Input L24 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 19 Opto Input 25 Input L25 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 1A Opto Input 26 Input L26 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 1B Opto Input 27 Input L27 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 1C Opto Input 28 Input L28 16-character text

Page (ST) 4-10 P849/EN ST/D33

Grouped Protection Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 1D Opto Input 29 Input L29 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 1E Opto Input 30 Input L30 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 1F Opto Input 31 Input L31 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 20 Opto Input 32 Input L32 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 21 Opto Input 33 Input L33 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 22 Opto Input 34 Input L34 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 23 Opto Input 35 Input L35 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 24 Opto Input 36 Input L36 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 25 Opto Input 37 Input L37 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 26 Opto Input 38 Input L38 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 27 Opto Input 39 Input L39 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 28 Opto Input 40 Input L40 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 29 Opto Input 41 Input L41 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 2A Opto Input 42 Input L42 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 2B Opto Input 43 Input L43 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 2C Opto Input 44 Input L44 16-character text

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-11

(ST) 4 Settings

Grouped Protection Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 2D Opto Input 45 Input L45 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 2E Opto Input 46 Input L46 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 2F Opto Input 47 Input L47 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 30 Opto Input 48 Input L48 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 31 Opto Input 49 Input L49 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 32 Opto Input 50 Input L50 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 33 Opto Input 51 Input L51 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 34 Opto Input 52 Input L52 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 35 Opto Input 53 Input L53 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 36 Opto Input 54 Input L54 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 37 Opto Input 55 Input L55 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 38 Opto Input 56 Input L56 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 39 Opto Input 57 Input L57 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 3A Opto Input 58 Input L58 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 3B Opto Input 59 Input L59 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 3C Opto Input 60 Input L60 16-character text

Page (ST) 4-12 P849/EN ST/D33

Grouped Protection Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 3D Opto Input 61 Input L61 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 3E Opto Input 62 Input L62 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 3F Opto Input 63 Input L63 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4A 40 Opto Input 64 Input L64 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual opto-isolated input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the opto- isolated input.

4.2 Output Labels

The column GROUP x OUTPUT LABELS is used to individually label each output relay that is available in the relay. The text is restricted to 16 characters and is available if

‘Output Labels’ are set visible under CONFIGURATION column.

The “Output Labels” column is visible when the “Output Labels” setting

(“Configuration” column) = “visible”.

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

4B 00 OUTPUT LABELS

4B 01 Relay 1 Output R1 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 02 Relay 2 Output R2 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 03 Relay 3 Output R3 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 04 Relay 4 Output R4 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 05 Relay 5 Output R5 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 06 Relay 6 Output R6 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 07 Relay 7 Output R7 16-character text

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-13

(ST) 4 Settings

Grouped Protection Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 08 Relay 8 Output R8 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 09 Relay 9 Output R9 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 0A Relay 10 Output R10 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 0B Relay 11 Output R11 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 0C Relay 12 Output R12 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 0D Relay 13 Output R13 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 0E Relay 14 Output R14 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 0F Relay 15 Output R15 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 10 Relay 16 Output R16 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 11 Relay 17 Output R17 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 12 Relay 18 Output R18 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 13 Relay 19 Output R19 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 14 Relay 20 Output R20 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 15 Relay 21 Output R21 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 16 Relay 22 Output R22 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 17 Relay 23 Output R23 16-character text

Page (ST) 4-14 P849/EN ST/D33

Grouped Protection Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 18 Relay 24 Output R24 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 19 Relay 25 Output R25 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 1A Relay 26 Output R26 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 1B Relay 27 Output R27 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 1C Relay 28 Output R28 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 1D Relay 29 Output R29 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 1E Relay 30 Output R30 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 1F Relay 31 Output R31 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 20 Relay 32 Output R32 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 21 Relay 33 Output R33 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 22 Relay 34 Output R34 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 23 Relay 35 Output R35 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 24 Relay 36 Output R36 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 25 Relay 37 Output R37 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 26 Relay 38 Output R38 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 27 Relay 39 Output R39 16-character text

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-15

(ST) 4 Settings

Grouped Protection Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 28 Relay 40 Output R40 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 29 Relay 41 Output R41 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 2A Relay 42 Output R42 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 2B Relay 43 Output R43 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 2C Relay 44 Output R44 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 2D Relay 45 Output R45 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 2E Relay 46 Output R46 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 2F Relay 47 Output R47 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 30 Relay 48 Output R48 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 31 Relay 49 Output R49 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 32 Relay 50 Output R50 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 33 Relay 51 Output R51 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 34 Relay 52 Output R52 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 35 Relay 53 Output R53 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 36 Relay 54 Output R54 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 37 Relay 55 Output R55 16-character text

Page (ST) 4-16 P849/EN ST/D33

Grouped Protection Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 38 Relay 56 Output R56 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 39 Relay 57 Output R57 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 3A Relay 58 Output R58 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 3B Relay 59 Output R59 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

4B 3C Relay 60 Output R60 16-character text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed in the programmable scheme logic and event record description of the device output contact.

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-17

(ST) 4 Settings

Control and Support Settings

5 CONTROL AND SUPPORT SETTINGS

The control and support settings are part of the main menu and are used to configure the global configuration for the relay. It includes submenu settings as shown here:

Function configuration settings

Reset LEDs

Active setting group

Password & language settings

Communications settings

Record settings

User interface settings

Commissioning settings

5.1 System Data

This menu provides information for the device and general status of the device.

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

0 00 SYSTEM DATA

0 01 Language English

English, French, German, Russian or

Spanish

The default language used by the device. Selectable as English, French, German, Russian or Spanish

0 01 Language English

English, French, German, Russian,

Spanish or Chinese

The default language used by the device. Selectable as English, French, German, Russian, Spanish or Chinese.

0 02 Password AAAA 33 to 122 step 1

Default device password.

0 03 Sys Fn Links 0

Setting to allow the fixed function trip LED to be self-resetting.

0 04 Description MiCOM P849

16-character device description. This can be edited.

0 05 Plant Reference MiCOM

Associated plant description and can be edited.

0 06 Model Number Model Number

32 to 234 step 1

32 to 234 step 1

P849???????????M

Device model number. This display can not be edited.

0 08 Serial Number Serial Number

Device Serial Number. This display can not be edited.

0 09 Frequency 50 Hz

Relay set frequency. Settable between 50 and 60Hz.

0 0A Comms Level 2

Displays the conformance of the device to the Courier Level 2 comms.

6 digits + 1 letter

50 Hz to 60 Hz step 10 Hz

Data

0 0B Relay Address 255 0 to 255 step 1

This is the first rear port relay address. Note that the maximum number varies, depends on the protocol used. 255 is the maximum for Courier.

0 0B Relay Address 1 1 to 247 step 1

Page (ST) 4-18 P849/EN ST/D33

Control and Support Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

This is the first rear port relay address. Note that the maximum number varies, depends on the protocol used. 247 is the maximum for MODBUS.

0 0B Relay Address 1 0 to 254 step 1

0

0

This is the first rear port relay address. Note that the maximum number varies, depends on the protocol used. 254 is the maximum for IEC60870-5-103.

0 0B Relay Address 1 0 to 65534 step 1

This is the first rear port relay address. Note that the maximum number varies, depends on the protocol used. 65534 is the maximum for DNP3.0.

0C Plant Status Data

0D Control Status Data

0 0E Active Group 1

This setting displays the active settings group.

0 11 Software Ref. 1

0 16 ETH COMM Mode Dual IP

Set the FPGA type.

0 30 Opto I/P Status 00000000000000000000000000000000

Duplicate. This displays the status of opto-isolated inputs (L1 to L16 or L32)

Data

Data

This displays the device software version - including the protocol and device model.

0

0

12

15

Software Ref. 2

IEC61850 Edition Edition 2

Set the IEC61850 version (edition 1 or edition 2)

Data

This displays the device software version - including the protocol and device model. Applies to IEC61850 / UCA2 / DNP3oe builds only.

Edition 1 or Edition 2

Dual IP, PRP, HSR

Data

0 31 Opto I/P Status2 00000000

Duplicate. This displays the status of opto inputs (L33 to L48 or L64)

Data

0 40 Relay O/P Status 00000000 Data

Duplicate. Displays the status of the output relays (number of output relays depending on the model).

0 41 Relay O/P Status2 00000000 Data

Duplicate. Displays the status of the output relays (number of output relays depending on the model).

0 50 Alarm Status 1 00000000000000000000000000000000

This is a 32-bit field which gives the status of the first 32 alarms.

Data

0 51 Alarm Status 2

Next 32 alarm status defined.

0 52 Alarm Status 3

00000000000000000000000000000000 Data

00000000000000000000000000000000

Allows user to change password level 1.

0 D3 Password Level 2 AAAA

Data

Next 32 alarm status defined. Assigned specifically for platform alarms.

0 D0 Access Level Data

Displays the current access level (see the Getting Started chapter P849/EN GS for level description and access):

– Level 0 (No password required) = Read access to all settings, alarms, event records records

– Level 1(Password 1 or 2 required) = As level 0 plus: Control commands, e.g. circuit breaker open/close + Reset of alarm conditions + Reset LEDs, Clearing of event and

– Level 2 (Password 2 required) = as level 1 plus all other settings

0 D2 Password Level 1 AAAA 8 spaces

AAAA

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-19

(ST) 4 Settings

Control and Support Settings

Col Row Menu Text

Allows user to change password level 2.

0 D4 Password Level 3 AAAA

Allows user to change password level 3.

0 DF Security Feature

0 E1 Password

Entered Encrypted Password

0 E2 Password Level 1 AAAA

Allows user to change password level 1.

0 E3 Password Level 2 AAAA

Allows user to change password level 2.

0 E4 Password Level 3 AAAA

Allows user to change password level 3.

Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

AAAA

Data

8 characters

5.2 Date and Time

Displays the date and time as well as the battery condition.

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

8

8 00

01

DATE AND TIME

Date/Time

8 02 Date

Displays the devices current date (on the front panel)

8 03 Time

Displays the devices current time (on the front panel)

8 04 IRIG-B Sync Disabled

This enables IRIG-B time synchronization (with IRIG-B option)

Available Setting

Disabled or Enabled

8 05 IRIG-B Status

Card Not Fitted or Card Failed or Signal

Healthy or No Signal

Displays the status of IRIG-B (with IRIG-B option)

8 06 Battery Status Battery Healthy or not status

Displays whether the battery is healthy or not.

8 07 Battery Alarm Enabled Enabled or Disabled

This setting determines whether an unhealthy device battery condition ir alarmed or not.

8 13 SNTP Status

Disabled, Trying Server 1, Trying Server 2,

Server 1 OK, Server 2 OK, No response, No valid clock.

For Ethernet option only: Displays information about the SNTP time synchronization status

8 20 LocalTime Enable Disabled Disabled, Fixed or Flexible.

Page (ST) 4-20 P849/EN ST/D33

Control and Support Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

Setting to turn on/off local time adjustments.

Disabled - No local time zone will be maintained. Time synchronization from any interface will be used to directly set the master clock and all displayed (or read) times on all interfaces will be based on the master clock with no adjustment.

Fixed - A local time zone adjustment can be defined using the LocalTime offset setting and all interfaces will use local time except SNTP time synchronization and IEC61850 timestamps.

Flexible - A local time zone adjustment can be defined using the LocalTime offset setting and each interface can be assigned to the UTC zone or local time zone with the exception of the local interfaces which will always be in the local time zone and

IEC61850/SNTP which will always be in the UTC zone.

8 21 LocalTime Offset 0 mins -720 mins to 720 mins step 15 mins

Setting to specify an offset of -12 to +12 hrs in 15 minute intervals for local time zone. This adjustment is applied to the time based on the master clock which is UTC/GMT

Enabled or Disabled 8 22 DST Enable Enabled

Setting to turn on/off daylight saving time adjustment to local time.

8 23 DST Offset 60 mins 30 mins to 60 mins step 30 mins

Setting to specify daylight saving offset which will be used for the time adjustment to local time.

8 24 DST Start Last First, Second, Third, Fourth, Last

Setting to specify the week of the month in which daylight saving time adjustment starts

8 25 DST Start Day Sunday

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday,

Friday, Saturday, Sunday

Setting to specify the day of the week in which daylight saving time adjustment starts

8 26 DST Start Month March

January, February, March, April, May, June,

July, August, September, October, November,

December

Setting to specify the month in which daylight saving time adjustment starts

8 27 DST Start Mins 60 mins 0 mins to 1425 mins step 15 mins

Setting to specify the time of day in which daylight saving time adjustment starts. This is set relative to 00:00 hrs on the selected day when time adjustment is to start.

8 28 DST End Last First, Second, Third, Fourth, Last

Setting to specify the week of the month in which daylight saving time adjustment ends.

8 29 DST End Day Sunday

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday,

Friday, Saturday, Sunday

Setting to specify the day of the week in which daylight saving time adjustment ends

8 2A DST End Month October

January, February, March, April, May, June,

July, August, September, October, November,

December

Setting to specify the month in which daylight saving time adjustment ends

8 2B DST End Mins 60 mins 0 mins to 1425 mins step 15 mins

Setting to specify the time of day in which daylight saving time adjustment ends. This is set relative to 00:00 hrs on the selected day when time adjustment is to end.

8 30 RP1 Time Zone Local UTC or Local

Setting for the rear port 1 interface to specify if time synchronization received will be local or universal time coordinated

8 31 RP2 Time Zone Local UTC or Local

Setting for the rear port 2 interface to specify if time synchronization received will be local or universal time coordinated

8 32

DNPOE Time

Zone

Local UTC or Local

Setting for the DNP3.0 Over Ethernet interface to specify if time synchronization received will be local or universal time coordinated

8 33

Tunnel Time

Zone

Local UTC or Local

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-21

(ST) 4 Settings

Control and Support Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

With Ethernet option only: Setting to specify if time synchronisation received will be local or universal time co-ordinate when

‘tunnelling’ courier protocol over Ethernet.

5.3 Record Control

It is possible to disable the reporting of events from all interfaces that support setting changes. The settings that control the various types of events are in the Record Control column. The effect of setting each to disabled is as follows:

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

0B

0B

00

04

RECORD CONTROL

Alarm Event Enabled Enabled or Disabled

Disabling this setting means that all the occurrences that produce an alarm will result in no event being generated.

0B 05 Relay O/P Event Enabled Enabled or Disabled

Disabling this setting means that no event will be generated for any change in logic input state.

0B 06 Opto Input Event Enabled Enabled or Disabled

Disabling this setting means that no event will be generated for any change in logic input state.

0B 07 General Event Enabled Enabled or Disabled

Disabling this setting means that no General Events will be generated

0B 09 Maint Rec Event Enabled Enabled or Disabled

Disabling this setting means that no event will be generated for any occurrence that produces a maintenance record.

0B 0A Protection Event Enabled Enabled or Disabled

Disabling this setting means that no event will be generated for any occurrence that produces a Protection record.

11111111111111111111111111111111 0B 40 DDB 31 - 0 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 31 - 0

0B 41 DDB 63 - 32 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 63 - 32

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111 0B 42 DDB 95 - 64 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 95 - 64

0B 43 DDB 127 - 96 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 127 - 96

0B 44 DDB 159 - 128 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 159 - 128

0B 45 DDB 191 - 160 0xFFFFFFFF

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

This displays the status of the signals DDB 191 - 160

0B 46 DDB 223 - 192 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 223 - 192

0B 47 DDB 255 - 224 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 255 - 224

0B 48 DDB 287 - 256 0xFFFFFFFF

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

Page (ST) 4-22 P849/EN ST/D33

Control and Support Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

This displays the status of the signals DDB 287 - 256

0B 49 DDB 319 - 288 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 319 - 288

0B 4A DDB 351 - 320 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 351 - 320

0B 4B DDB 383 - 352 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 383 - 352

0B 4C DDB 415 - 384 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 415 - 384

0B 4D DDB 447 - 416 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 447 - 416

0B 4E DDB 479 - 448 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 479 - 448

0B 4F DDB 511 - 480 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 511 - 480

0B 50 DDB 543 - 512 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 543 - 512

0B 51 DDB 575 - 544 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 575 - 544

0B 52 DDB 607 - 576 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 607 - 576

0B 53 DDB 639 - 608 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 639 - 608

0B 54 DDB 671 - 640 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 671 - 640

0B 55 DDB 703 - 672 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 703 - 672

0B 56 DDB 735 - 704 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 735 - 704

0B 57 DDB 767 - 736 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 767 - 736

0B 58 DDB 799 - 768 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 799 - 768

0B 59 DDB 831 - 800 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 831 - 800

0B 5A DDB 863 - 832 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 863 - 832

0B 5B DDB 895 - 864 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 895 - 864

0B 5C DDB 927 - 896 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 927 - 896

0B 5D DDB 959 - 928 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 959 - 928

Available Setting

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-23

(ST) 4 Settings

Control and Support Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

0B 5E DDB 991 - 960 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 991 - 960

0B 5F DDB 1023 - 992 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1023 - 992

0B 60 DDB 1055 - 1024 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1055 - 1024

0B 61 DDB 1087 - 1056 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1087 - 1056

0B 62 DDB 1119 - 1088 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1119 - 1088

0B 63 DDB 1151 - 1120 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1151 - 1120

0B 64 DDB 1183 - 1152 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1183 - 1152

0B 65 DDB 1215 - 1184 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1215 - 1184

0B 66 DDB 1247 - 1216 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1247 - 1216

0B 67 DDB 1279 - 1248 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1279 - 1248

0B 68 DDB 1311 - 1280 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1311 - 1280

0B 69 DDB 1343 - 1312 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1343 - 1312

0B 6A DDB 1375 - 1344 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1375 - 1344

0B 6B DDB 1407 - 1376 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1407 - 1376

0B 6C DDB 1439 - 1408 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1439 - 1408

0B 6D DDB 1471 - 1440 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1471 - 1440

0B 6E DDB 1503 - 1472 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1503 - 1472

0B 6F DDB 1535 - 1504 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1535 - 1504

0B 70 DDB 1567 - 1536 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1567 - 1536

0B 71 DDB 1599 - 1568 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1599 - 1568

0B 72 DDB 1631 - 1600 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1631 - 1600

0B 73 DDB 1663 - 1632 0xFFFFFFFF

Available Setting

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

Page (ST) 4-24 P849/EN ST/D33

Control and Support Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1663 - 1632

0B 74 DDB 1695 - 1664 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1695 - 1664

0B 75 DDB 1727 - 1696 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1727 - 1696

0B 76 DDB 1759- 1728 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1759- 1728

0B 77 DDB 1791- 1760 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1791- 1760

0B 78 DDB 1823 - 1792 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1823 - 1792

0B 79 DDB 1855 - 1824 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1855 - 1824

0B 7A DDB 1887 - 1856 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1887 - 1856

0B 7B DDB 1919 - 1888 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1919 - 1888

0B 7C DDB 1951 - 1920 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1951 - 1920

0B 7D DDB 1983 - 1952 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 1983 - 1952

0B 7E DDB 2015 - 1984 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 2015 - 1984

0B 7F DDB 2047 - 2016 0xFFFFFFFF

This displays the status of the signals DDB 2047 - 2016

Available Setting

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

11111111111111111111111111111111

5.4

Col Row

Disturbance Recorder Settings

The disturbance recorder settings include the record duration and trigger position, selection of analog and digital signals to record, and the signal sources that trigger the recording.

The precise event recorder column (“Disturb. Recorder” menu) is visible when the

“Disturb recorder” setting (“Configuration” column) = “visible”.

Menu Text

Note In previous editions of this manual, this topic was described as the “Precise

Event Recorder Settings”.

Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

0C 00

DISTURB

RECORDER

DISTURBANCE RECORDER

0C 01 Duration 1.5 s

This sets the overall recording time.

0C 02 Trigger Position 33.3%

0.1s to 10.5s step 0.01s

0% to 100% step 0.10%

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-25

(ST) 4 Settings

Control and Support Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

This sets the trigger point as a percentage of the duration. For example, the default settings show that the overall recording time is set to 1.5s with the trigger point being at 33.3% of this, giving 0.5 s pre-fault and 1.0 s post event recording times.

0C 03 Trigger Mode Single Single / Extended

When set to single mode, if a further trigger occurs whilst a recording is taking place, the recorder will ignore the trigger.

0C 0D Digital Input 1 Relay 1

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

The relay 1 output digital channel is assigned to this channel. The digital channel will trigger the precise event recorder when the corresponding assigned precise event will occur. In this case, the digital recorder will trigger when the output R1 will change. Following lines indicate default signals for the 32 channels.

0C 0E Input 1 Trigger No Trigger No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

This digital channel will not trigger the precise event recorder. When “Trigger L/H” is selected, the channel will trigger the precise event recorder when changing from ‘0’ (low Level) to ‘1’ (High level). If “Trigger H/L” is selected, it will trigger when changing from ‘1’ (high level) to ‘0’ (low level).

The following rows give the default settings up to channel 32.

0C 0F Digital Input 2 Relay 2

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 10 Input 2 Trigger No Trigger No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Same as Input 1 Trigger

0C 11 Digital Input 3 Relay 3

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 12 Input 3 Trigger Trigger L/H

Same as Input 1 Trigger

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

0C 13 Digital Input 4 Relay 4

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 14 Input 4 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

0C 15 Digital Input 5 Relay 5

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 16 Input 5 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

0C 17 Digital Input 6 Relay 6

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 18 Input 6 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

0C 19 Digital Input 7 Relay 7

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 1A Input 7 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

0C 1B Digital Input 8 Relay 8

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 1C Input 8 Trigger No Trigger No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Page (ST) 4-26 P849/EN ST/D33

Control and Support Settings

Col Row Menu Text

Same as Input 1 Trigger

0C 1D Digital Input 9 Relay 9

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 1E Input 9 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

0C 1F Digital Input 10 Relay 10

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 20 Input 10 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

0C 21 Digital Input 11 Relay 11

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 22 Input 11 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

0C 23 Digital Input 12 Relay 12

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 24 Input 12 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

0C 25 Digital Input 13 Opto 1

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 26 Input 13 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

0C 27 Digital Input 14 Opto 2

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 28 Input 14 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

0C 29 Digital Input 15 Opto 3

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 2A Input 15 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

0C 2B Digital Input 16 Opto 4

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 2C Input 16 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

0C 2D Digital Input 17 Opto 5

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 2E Input 17 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

Default Setting

Description

P849/EN ST/D33

(ST) 4 Settings

Available Setting

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Page (ST) 4-27

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text

0C 2F Digital Input 18 Opto 6

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 30 Input 18 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

0C 31 Digital Input 19 Opto 7

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 32 Input 19 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

0C 33 Digital Input 20 Opto 8

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 34 Input 20 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

0C 35 Digital Input 21 Opto 9

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 36 Input 21 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

0C 37 Digital Input 22 Opto 10

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 38 Input 22 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

0C 39 Digital Input 23 Opto 11

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 3A Input 23 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

0C 3B Digital Input 24 Opto 12

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 3C Input 24 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

0C 3D Digital Input 25 Unused

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 3E Input 25 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

0C 3F Digital Input 26 Unused

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 40 Input 26 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

Default Setting

Description

Control and Support Settings

Available Setting

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Page (ST) 4-28 P849/EN ST/D33

Control and Support Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row

5.5

Menu Text

0C 41 Digital Input 27 Unused

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 42 Input 27 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

0C 43 Digital Input 28 Unused

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 44 Input 28 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

0C 45 Digital Input 29 Unused

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 46 Input 29 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

0C 47 Digital Input 30 Unused

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 48 Input 30 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

0C 49 Digital Input 31 Unused

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 4A Input 31 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

0C 4B Digital Input 32 Unused

Same as Digital Input 1

0C 4C Input 32 Trigger No Trigger

Same as Input 1 Trigger

Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Any O/P Contacts or Any Opto Inputs or

Internal Digital Signals

No Trigger, Trigger L/H, Trigger H/L

Communications

The communications settings apply to the rear communications ports only and will depend upon the particular protocol being used. Further details are given in the SCADA

Communications chapter.

Depending on the values stored, the available settings may change too. The applicability of each setting is given in the description or available setting cell. These settings are available in the menu ‘ Communications’ column and are displayed.

These settings potentially cover a variety of different protocols and ports, including:

• Settings for Courier Protocol

Settings for IEC60870-5-103

Settings for Modbus Protocol

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-29

(ST) 4 Settings

Control and Support Settings

Settings for DNP3.0 protocol

Settings for Ethernet port – IEC61850 protocol

Settings for Ethernet port – DNP3.0 Over Ethernet

Settings for Rear Port 2

The destination address on the master side do not need to configured for DNP3.0

Over Ethernet connection, and it is also not linked to the relay address. In Ethernet connection, it is the IP address that identifies the connection.

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

0E 00 COMMUNICATIONS

0E 01 RP1 Protocol

Courier, IEC60870-5-103, MODBUS or

DNP3.0

Indicates the communications protocol that will be used on the rear communications port.

0E 02 RP1 Address 255 0 to 255 step 1

This cell sets the unique address for the device such that only one relay is accessed by master station software. The range shown here applies to Courier

0E 02 RP1 Address 1 1 to 247 step 1

This cell sets the unique address for the device such that only one relay is accessed by master station software. The range shown here applies to Modbus

0E 02 RP1 Address 1 0 to 254 step 1

This cell sets the unique address for the device such that only one relay is accessed by master station software. The range shown here applies to IEC60870-5-103

0E 02 RP1 Address 1 0 to 65534 step 1

This cell sets the unique address for the device such that only one relay is accessed by master station software. The range shown here applies to DNP 3.0

0E 03 RP1 InactivTimer 15 mins 1 min to 30 mins step 1 min

This cell controls how long the device will wait without receiving any messages on the rear port before it reverts to its default state, including resetting any password access that was enabled. This range is for the Courier protocol.

0E 03 RP1 InactivTimer 15 mins 1 min to 30 mins step 1 min

This cell controls how long the device will wait without receiving any messages on the rear port before it reverts to its default state, including resetting any password access that was enabled. This range is for the MODBUS protocol.

0E 03 RP1 InactivTimer 15 mins 1 min to 30 mins step 1 min

This cell controls how long the device will wait without receiving any messages on the rear port before it reverts to its default state, including resetting any password access that was enabled. This range is for the IEC60870-5-103 protocol.

0E 04 RP1 Baud Rate 19200 bits/s 9600 bits/s, 19200 bits/s or 38400 bits/s

This cell controls the communication speed between device and master station. It is important that both device and master station are set at the same speed setting. This range is for the MODBUS protocol.

0E 04 RP1 Baud Rate 19200 bits/s 9600 bits/s or 19200 bits/s

This cell controls the communication speed between device and master station. It is important that both device and master station are set at the same speed setting. This range is for the IEC60870-5-103 protocol.

0E 04 RP1 Baud Rate 19200 bits/s

1200 bit/s, 2400 bits/s, 4800 bits/s, 9600 bits/s,

19200 bits/s or 38400 bits/s

This cell controls the communication speed between device and master station. It is important that both device and master station are set at the same speed setting. This range is for the DNP3.0 protocol.

0E 05 RP1 Parity None Odd, Even or None

This cell controls the parity format used in the data frames. It is important that both device and master station are set with the same parity setting. This range applies to the MODBUS protocol.

0E 05 RP1 Parity None Odd, Even or None

Page (ST) 4-30 P849/EN ST/D33

Control and Support Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

This cell controls the parity format used in the data frames. It is important that both device and master station are set with the same parity setting. This range applies to the DNP3.0 protocol.

0E 06 RP1 Meas Period 15s 1 s to 60 s step 1 s

This cell controls the time interval that the device will use between sending measurement data to the master station. This range applies to the IEC60870-5-103 protocol.

0E 07 RP1 PhysicalLink RS485 RS485/Copper or Fibre optic

This cell defines whether an electrical connection (“Copper”) or fiber optic connection is being used for communication between the master station and device. The optional fiber optic communications board will be required if ‘Fiber optic’ is to be selected.

With Non-Ethernet Builds, this is a replication of RP1 communication protocol, so the Fibre Optic board should be fitted

0E 08 RP1 Time Sync Disabled Disabled or Enabled

This setting enables or disables time synchronization with master Clock. This range applies to the DNP3.0 protocol.

0E 09 Modbus IEC Time Enabled Disabled or Enabled

This cell allows the user to set the “Modbus IEC Time and Date format” at the user interface and front/2nd port besides the

Modbus 1st rear port.

When ‘Disabled’ is selected, the “Standard IEC” time format complies with IEC 60870-5-4 requirements such that byte 1 of the information is transmitted first, followed by bytes 2 through 7.

When ‘Enabled’ is selected, the transmission of information is reversed (Reverse IEC time format).

0E 0A RP1 CS103Blcking Disabled Disabled, Monitor blocking, Command blocking

There are three settings associated with this cell:

Disabled No blocking selected.

Monitor Blocking When the monitor blocking DDB Signal is active high, either by energizing an opto input or control input, reading of the status information and precise event records is not permitted. When in this mode the device returns a

“termination of general interrogation” message to the master station.

Command Blocking When the command blocking DDB signal is active high, either by energizing an opto input or control input, all remote commands will be ignored (i.e. change setting group etc.). When in this mode the device returns a “negative acknowledgement of command” message to the master station.

These settings apply to the CS103 build.

0E 0B RP1 Card Status

This cell indicates the status of the rear communication board.

Data

0E 0C RP1 Port Config K-Bus KBus or EIA(RS)485

This cell defines whether an electrical KBus or EIA(RS)485 is being used for communication between the master station and device. This range applies to the Courier protocol.

0E 0D RP1 Comms Mode IEC60870 FT1.2 IEC60870 FT1.2 or 10-Bit No Parity

The choice is either IEC60870 FT1.2 for normal operation with 11-bit modems, or 10-bit no parity. This range applies to the

Courier protocol.

0E 0E RP1 Baud Rate 19200 bits/s

1200 bit/s, 2400 bits/s, 4800 bits/s, 9600 bits/s,

19200 bits/s or 38400 bits/s

This cell controls the communication speed between device and master station. It is important that both device and master station are set at the same speed setting. This range applies to the Courier protocol.

0E 0F Meas Scaling Primary Primary or Secondary

0E 10 Message Gap (ms) 0 ms 0 ms to 50 ms step 1 ms

This setting allows the master station to have an interframe gap. This range applies to the DNP3.0 protocol.

0E 11 DNP Need Time 10 1 to 30 step 1

Sets the time duration before next time synchronization request from the master.

0E 12 DNP App Fragment 2048 100 to 2048 step 1

Maximum message length (application fragment size) transmitted by the device.

0E 13 DNP App Timeout 2 1 to 120 step 1

Duration of time waited, after sending a message fragment and awaiting a confirmation from the master.

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-31

(ST) 4 Settings

Control and Support Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

0E 14 DNP SBO Timeout 10 s 1 s to 10 s step 1 s

Duration of time waited (Select Before Operate mode), after receiving a select command and awaiting an operate confirmation from the master.

0E 15 DNP Link Timeout 0 s 0 s to 120 s step 1 s

Duration of time that the device will wait for a Data Link Confirm from the master. A value of 0 means data link support disabled and 1 to 120 seconds is the timeout setting.

0E 1F ETH Protocol IEC61850 Data

IEC61850 (Ethernet) "Indicates the protocol used on the Network Interface Card. Build=IEC61850"

0E 22 MAC Addr 1 Ethernet MAC Address MAC address (Ethernet)

MAC address (Ethernet) "Shows the MAC address of the rear Ethernet port. Build=IEC61850"

0E 22 MAC Addr 2 Ethernet MAC Address MAC address (Ethernet)

MAC address (Ethernet) "Shows the MAC address of the rear Ethernet port. Build=IEC61850"

0E 64 ETH Tunl Timeout 5 mins 1 min to 30 mins step 1 min

0E 70 Redundancy Conf Sub-Heading

This is visible when Model no. hardware option (Field 7) = Q or R, Build = IEC 61850

0E 71 MAC Address NIOS MAC Addr Ethernet MAC Address

Indicates the MAC (Media Access Control) address of the rear Ethernet port. This address is formatted as a six-byte hexadecimal number, and is unique. This is visible when Model no. hardware option (Field 7) = Q or R, Build = IEC 61850

0E 72 IP Address 0.0.0.0 IP Address

Indicates the IP (Internet Protocol) address of the rear Ethernet port. This address is formatted as a six-byte hexadecimal number, and is unique. This is visible when Model no. hardware option (Field 7) = Q or R, Build = IEC 61850

0E 73 Subnet Mask 0.0.0.0 Subnet Mask

Displays the sub-network that the device is connected to. This is visible when Model no. hardware option (Field 7) = Q or R,

Build = IEC 61850

0E 74

0E 80

Gateway 0.0.0.0 Gateway Address

Displays the IP address of the gateway (proxy) that the device is connected to, if any. This is visible when Model no. hardware option (Field 7) = Q or R, Build = IEC 61850

REAR PORT2 (RP2)

0E 81 RP2 Protocol Courier Data

Indicates the communications protocol that will be used on the rear communications port.

0E 84 RP2 Card Status

This cell indicates the status of the rear communication board.

Data

0E 88 RP2 Port Config EIA232 (RS232) EIA RS232, EIA RS485 or Kbus

This cell defines whether an electrical EIA(RS)232, EIA(RS)485 or KBus is being used for communication.

0E 8A RP2 Comms Mode IEC60870 FT1.2 IEC60870 FT1.2 or 10-bit

The choice is either IEC60870 FT1.2 for normal operation with 11-bit modems, or 10-bit no parity.

0E 90 RP2 Address 255 0 to 255 step 1

This cell sets the unique address for the device such that only one relay is accessed by master station software.

0E 92 RP2 InactivTimer 15 mins 1 min to 30 mins step 1 min

This cell controls how long the device will wait without receiving any messages on the rear port before it reverts to its default state, including resetting any password access that was enabled.

0E 94 RP2 Baud Rate 19200 bits/s 9600 bits/s, 19200 bits/s or 38400 bits/s

This cell controls the communication speed between device and master station. It is important that both device and master station are set at the same speed setting.

Page (ST) 4-32 P849/EN ST/D33

Control and Support Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

0E A0 NIC Protocol DNP3.0 Data

The NIC (Network Interface Cards) protocol cell indicates that DNP3.0 will be used on the rear Ethernet port.

0E A1 IP Address 0.0.0.0 IP Address

Indicates the IP (Internet Protocol) address of the rear Ethernet port. This address is formatted as a six-byte hexadecimal number, and is unique.

0E A2 Subnet Address 0.0.0.0 Subnet Address

Displays the sub-network that the device is connected to.

0E A4 Gateway 0.0.0.0 Gateway Address

Displays the IP address of the gateway (proxy) that the device is connected to, if any.

0E A5 DNP Time Synch Disabled Disabled or Enabled

If set to ‘Enabled’, the DNP3.0 master station can be used to synchronize the time on the device. If set to ‘Disabled’ either the internal free running clock, or IRIG+B input are used.

0E A6 Meas Scaling Primary Primary or Secondary

0E A7 NIC Tunl Timeout 5 mins

Duration of time waited before an inactive tunnel to MiCOM S1 Studio is reset.

1 min to 30 mins step 1 min

0E A8 NIC Link Report Alarm

Configures how a failed/unfitted network link (copper or fiber) is reported:

Alarm - an alarm is raised for a failed link

Event - an event is logged for a failed link

None - nothing reported for a failed link.

Alarm, Event or None

0E A9 NIC Link Timeout 60 s 0.1 s to 60 s step 0.1 s

0E AA

SNTP

PARAMETERS

0E AB SNTP Server 1 0.0.0.0 SNTP server 1 Address

Time synchronization is supported using SNTP (Simple Network Time Protocol); this protocol is used to synchronize the internal real time clock of the devices. This cell displays the IP address of the primary SNTP server.

0E AC SNTP Server 2 0.0.0.0 SNTP server 2 Address

Time synchronization is supported using SNTP (Simple Network Time Protocol); this protocol is used to synchronize the internal real time clock of the devices. This cell displays the IP address of the secondary SNTP server.

0E AD SNTP Poll Rate 64 s 64 s to 1024 s step 1 s

Duration of SNTP poll rate in seconds.

0E B1 DNP Need Time 10 mins 1 min to 30 mins step 1 min

Sets the time duration before next time synchronization request from the master.

0E B2 DNP App Fragment 2048

Maximum message length (application fragment size) transmitted by the device.

100 to 2048 step 1

0E B3 DNP App Timeout 2 s 1 s to 120 s step 1 s

Duration of time waited, after sending a message fragment and awaiting a confirmation from the master.

0E B4 DNP SBO Timeout 10 s 1 s to 10 s step 1 s

Duration of time waited (Select Before Operate mode), after receiving a select command and awaiting an operate confirmation from the master.

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-33

(ST) 4 Settings

Control and Support Settings

5.6 Commissioning Tests

To help minimising the time required to test MiCOM relays the relay provides several test facilities under the ‘COMMISSION TESTS’ menu heading.

There are menu cells which allow the status of the opto-isolated inputs, output relay contacts, internal Digital Data Bus (DDB) signals and user-programmable LEDs to be monitored. Additionally there are cells to test the operation of the output contacts, userprogrammable LEDs.

This column is visible when the “Commission tests” setting (“Configuration” column) =

“visible”.

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

0F 00

COMMISSION

TESTS

0F 01

Opto I/P

Status

00000000000000000000000000000000 Data

This menu cell displays the status of the device’s opto-isolated inputs (L01 to L32) as a binary string, a ‘1’ indicating an energized opto-isolated input and a ‘0’ a de-energized one

0F 02

Opto I/P

Status2

00000000000000000000000000000000

As "Opto I/P Status" for opto-isolated inputs (L33 to L64).

0F 04

Relay O/P

Status2

00000000000000000000000000000000

As "Relay O/P Status" for output relays (R33 to R60).

Data

0F 03

Relay O/P

Status

00000000000000000000000000000000 Data

This menu cell displays the status of the digital data bus (DDB) signals that result in energization of the output relays (R01 to

R32) as a binary string, a ‘1’ indicating an operated state and ‘0’ a non-operated state.

When the ‘Test Mode’ cell is set to ‘Enabled’ the ‘Relay O/P Status’ cell does not show the current status of the output relays and hence can not be used to confirm operation of the output relays. Therefore it will be necessary to monitor the state of each contact in turn.

Data

0F 05

Test Port

Status

00000000 Data

This menu cell displays the status of the eight digital data bus (DDB) signals that have been allocated in the ‘Monitor Bit’ cells.

0F 07 Monitor Bit 1 640

Relay Label 01. This can be from 0 to 2047 - see the Programmable Logic chapter

(P849/EN PL) for details of digital data bus signals.

The eight ‘Monitor Bit’ cells allow the user to select the status of which digital data bus signals can be observed in the ‘Test Port

Status’ cell or via the monitor/download port.

0F 08 Monitor Bit 2 642

Relay Label 02. This can be from 0 to 2047 - see the Programmable Logic chapter

(P849/EN PL) for details of digital data bus signals.

The eight ‘Monitor Bit’ cells allow the user to select the status of which digital data bus signals can be observed in the ‘Test Port

Status’ cell or via the monitor/download port.

0F 09 Monitor Bit 3 644

Relay Label 03. This can be from 0 to 2047 - see the Programmable Logic chapter

(P849/EN PL) for details of digital data bus signals.

Page (ST) 4-34 P849/EN ST/D33

Control and Support Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

The eight ‘Monitor Bit’ cells allow the user to select the status of which digital data bus signals can be observed in the ‘Test Port

Status’ cell or via the monitor/download port.

0F 0A Monitor Bit 4 646

Relay Label 04. This can be from 0 to 2047 - see the Programmable Logic chapter

(P849/EN PL) for details of digital data bus signals.

The eight ‘Monitor Bit’ cells allow the user to select the status of which digital data bus signals can be observed in the ‘Test Port

Status’ cell or via the monitor/download port.

0F 0B Monitor Bit 5 648

Relay Label 05. This can be from 0 to 2047 - see the Programmable Logic chapter

(P849/EN PL) for details of digital data bus signals.

The eight ‘Monitor Bit’ cells allow the user to select the status of which digital data bus signals can be observed in the ‘Test Port

Status’ cell or via the monitor/download port.

0F 0C Monitor Bit 6 650

Relay Label 06. This can be from 0 to 2047 - see the Programmable Logic chapter

(P849/EN PL) for details of digital data bus signals.

The eight ‘Monitor Bit’ cells allow the user to select the status of which digital data bus signals can be observed in the ‘Test Port

Status’ cell or via the monitor/download port.

0F 0D Monitor Bit 7 652

Relay Label 07. This can be from 0 to 2047 - see the Programmable Logic chapter

(P849/EN PL) for details of digital data bus signals.

The eight ‘Monitor Bit’ cells allow the user to select the status of which digital data bus signals can be observed in the ‘Test Port

Status’ cell or via the monitor/download port.

0F 0E Monitor Bit 8 654

Relay Label 08. This can be from 0 to 2047 - see the Programmable Logic chapter

(P849/EN PL) for details of digital data bus signals.

The eight ‘Monitor Bit’ cells allow the user to select the status of which digital data bus signals can be observed in the ‘Test Port

Status’ cell or via the monitor/download port.

0F 0F Test Mode Disabled Disabled / Contacts blocked / Test Mode

The Test Mode menu cell enables a facility to directly test the output contacts by applying menu controlled test signals. To select test mode the Test Mode menu cell should be set to ‘Contact blocked’, which takes the relay out of service. It also causes an alarm condition to be recorded and the yellow ‘Out of Service’ LED to illuminate and an alarm message ‘Out of

Service’ is given. Once testing is complete the cell must be set back to ‘Disabled’ to restore the device back to service.

0F 10 Test Pattern 0000000000000000

0 = Not Operated

1 = Operated

This cell is used to select the output relay contacts (R01 to R32) that will be tested when the ‘Contact Test’ cell is set to ‘Apply

Test’.

0F 11 Test Pattern2 00000000

0 = Not Operated

1 = Operated

This cell is used to select the output relay contacts (R33 to R60) that will be tested when the ‘Contact Test’ cell is set to ‘Apply

Test’.

0F 12 Contact Test No Operation No Operation, Apply Test, Remove Test

When the ‘Apply Test’ command in this cell is issued the contacts set for operation (set to ‘1’) in the ‘Test Pattern’ cell change state. After the test has been applied the command text on the LCD will change to ‘No Operation’ and the contacts will remain in the Test State until reset issuing the ‘Remove Test’ command. The command text on the LCD will again revert to ‘No

Operation’ after the ‘Remove Test’ command has been issued.

Note When the ‘Test Mode’ cell is set to ‘Enabled’ the ‘Relay O/P Status’ cell does not show the current status of the output relays and hence can not be used to confirm operation of the output relays. Therefore it will be necessary to monitor the state of each contact in turn.

0F 13 Test LEDs No Operation No Operation or Apply Test

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-35

(ST) 4 Settings

Control and Support Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

When the ‘Apply Test’ command in this cell is issued the eighteen user-programmable LEDs will illuminate for approximately 2 seconds before they extinguish and the command text on the LCD reverts to ‘No Operation’.

0F 15

Red LED

Status

000001000100000000 Data

This cell is an eighteen bit binary string that indicates which of the user-programmable LEDs on the device are illuminated with the Red LED input active when accessing the device from a remote location, a ‘1’ indicating a particular LED is lit and a ‘0’ not lit.

0F 16

Green LED

Status

000001000100000000 Data

This cell is an eighteen bit binary string that indicates which of the user-programmable LEDs on the device are illuminated with the Green LED input active when accessing the device from a remote location, a ‘1’ indicating a particular LED is lit and a ‘0’ not lit.

0F 20 DDB 31 - 0 00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 31 - 0

Data

0F 21 DDB 63 - 32 00000000000000000000000000000000 Data

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 63 - 32

0F 22 DDB 95 - 64 00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 95 - 64

0F 23 DDB 127 - 96 00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 127 - 96

0F 24

DDB 159 -

128

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 159 - 128

0F 25

DDB 191 -

160

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 191 - 160

0F 26

DDB 223 -

192

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 223 - 192

0F 27

DDB 255 -

224

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 255 - 224

0F 28

DDB 287 -

256

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 287 - 256

0F 29

DDB 319 -

288

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 319 - 288

0F 2A

DDB 351 -

320

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 351 - 320

0F 2B

DDB 383 -

352

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 383 - 352

0F 2C

DDB 415 -

384

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 415 - 384

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Page (ST) 4-36 P849/EN ST/D33

Control and Support Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

0F 2D

DDB 447 -

416

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 447 - 416

0F 2E

DDB 479 -

448

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 479 - 448

0F 2F

DDB 511 -

480

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 511 - 480

0F 30

DDB 543 -

512

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 543 - 512

0F 31

DDB 575 -

544

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 575 - 544

0F 32

DDB 607 -

576

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 607 - 576

0F 33

DDB 639 -

608

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 639 - 608

0F 34

DDB 671 -

640

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 671 - 640

0F 35

DDB 703 -

672

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 703 - 672

0F 36

DDB 735 -

704

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 735 - 704

0F 37

DDB 767 -

736

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 767 - 736

0F 38

DDB 799 -

768

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 799 - 768

0F 39

DDB 831 -

800

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 831 - 800

0F 3A

DDB 863 -

832

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 863 - 832

0F 3B

DDB 895 -

864

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 895 - 864

0F 3C

DDB 927 -

896

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 927 - 896

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

(ST) 4 Settings

Available Setting

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-37

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

0F 3D

DDB 959 -

928

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 959 - 928

0F 3E

DDB 991 -

960

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 991 - 960

0F 3F

DDB 1023 -

992

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1023 - 992

0F 40

DDB 1055 -

1024

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1055 - 1024

0F 41

DDB 1087 -

1056

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1087 - 1056

0F 42

DDB 1119 -

1088

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1119 - 1088

0F 43

DDB 1151 -

1120

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1151 - 1120

0F 44

DDB 1183 -

1152

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1183 - 1152

0F 45

DDB 1215 -

1184

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1215 - 1184

0F 46

DDB 1247 -

1216

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1247 - 1216

0F 47

DDB 1279 -

1248

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1279 - 1248

0F 48

DDB 1311 -

1280

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1311 - 1280

0F 49

DDB 1343 -

1312

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1343 - 1312

0F 4A

DDB 1375 -

1344

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1375 - 1344

0F 4B

DDB 1407 -

1376

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1407 - 1376

0F 4C

DDB 1439 -

1408

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1439 - 1408

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Control and Support Settings

Available Setting

Page (ST) 4-38 P849/EN ST/D33

Control and Support Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

0F 4D

DDB 1471 -

1440

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1471 - 1440

0F 4E

DDB 1503 -

1472

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1503 - 1472

0F 4F

DDB 1535 -

1504

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1535 - 1504

0F 50

DDB 1567 -

1536

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1567 - 1536

0F 51

DDB 1599 -

1568

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1599 - 1568

0F 52

DDB 1631 -

1600

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1631 - 1600

0F 53

DDB 1663 -

1632

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1663 - 1632

0F 54

DDB 1695 -

1664

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1695 - 1664

0F 55

DDB 1727 -

1696

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1727 - 1696

0F 56

DDB 1759-

1728

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1759- 1728

0F 57

DDB 1791-

1760

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1791- 1760

0F 58

DDB 1823 -

1792

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1823 - 1792

0F 59

DDB 1855 -

1824

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1855 - 1824

0F 5A

DDB 1887 -

1856

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1887 - 1856

0F 5B

DDB 1919 -

1888

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1919 - 1888

0F 5C

DDB 1951 -

1920

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1951 - 1920

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

(ST) 4 Settings

Available Setting

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-39

(ST) 4 Settings

Control and Support Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

0F 5D

DDB 1983 -

1952

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 1983 - 1952

0F 5E

DDB 2015 -

1984

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 2015 - 1984

0F 5F

DDB 2047 -

2016

00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of DDB signals DDB 2047 - 2016

0F FF Unused

Data

Data

Data

Available Setting

5.7 Opto Configuration

This menu is used to set the opto-isolated inputs.

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

11 00 OPTO CONFIG

11 01

Global Nominal

V

48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V, Custom

Sets the nominal battery voltage for all opto inputs by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings. If Custom is selected then each opto input can individually be set to a nominal voltage value.

11 02 Opto Input 1 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 03 Opto Input 2 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 04 Opto Input 3 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 05 Opto Input 4 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 06 Opto Input 5 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 07 Opto Input 6 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

Page (ST) 4-40 P849/EN ST/D33

Control and Support Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

11 08 Opto Input 7 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 09 Opto Input 8 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 0A Opto Input 9 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 0B Opto Input 10 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 0C Opto Input 11 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 0D Opto Input 12 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 0E Opto Input 13 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 0F Opto Input 14 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 10 Opto Input 15 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 11 Opto Input 16 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 12 Opto Input 17 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 13 Opto Input 18 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 14 Opto Input 19 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-41

(ST) 4 Settings

Control and Support Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 15 Opto Input 20 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 16 Opto Input 21 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 17 Opto Input 22 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 18 Opto Input 23 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 19 Opto Input 24 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 1A Opto Input 25 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 1B Opto Input 26 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 1C Opto Input 27 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 1D Opto Input 28 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 1E Opto Input 29 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 1F Opto Input 30 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 20 Opto Input 31 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

Page (ST) 4-42 P849/EN ST/D33

Control and Support Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

11 21 Opto Input 32 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 22 Opto Input 33 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 23 Opto Input 34 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 24 Opto Input 35 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 25 Opto Input 36 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 26 Opto Input 37 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 27 Opto Input 38 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 28 Opto Input 39 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 29 Opto Input 40 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 2A Opto Input 41 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 2B Opto Input 42 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 2C Opto Input 43 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 2D Opto Input 44 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-43

(ST) 4 Settings

Control and Support Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 2E Opto Input 45 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 2F Opto Input 46 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 30 Opto Input 47 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 31 Opto Input 48 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 32 Opto Input 49 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 33 Opto Input 50 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 34 Opto Input 51 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 35 Opto Input 52 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 36 Opto Input 53 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 37 Opto Input 54 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 38 Opto Input 55 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 39 Opto Input 56 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

Page (ST) 4-44 P849/EN ST/D33

Control and Support Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

11 3A Opto Input 57 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 3B Opto Input 58 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 3C Opto Input 59 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 3D Opto Input 60 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 3E Opto Input 61 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 3F Opto Input 62 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 40 Opto Input 63 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 41 Opto Input 64 48/54V

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V,

220/250V

Sets the nominal battery voltage for the relevant opto input by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings.

11 50 Opto Filter Cntl 11111111111111111111111111111111

0 = Disable Filtering or 1 = Enable filtering

This menu is used to control the device’s opto-isolated inputs L1 to L32. A ‘1’ indicates an energized and operating device, a ‘0’ indicates a de-energized

11 51 Opto Filter Cntl2 11111111

0 = Disable Filtering or 1 = Enable filtering

Controls the next device’s opto-isolated inputs.

11 80 Characteristic Standard 60%-80%

Standard 50% - 70 % / Standard

60%-80%

Controls the changement of state of opto-isolated inputs, according to the nominal voltage value.

5.8 Control Inputs

The control inputs column displays the control inputs status. It can be used to set, or reset individually each control input.

The “CTRL INPUTS” column is visible when the “Commission tests” setting

(“Configuration” column) = “visible”.

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-45

(ST) 4 Settings

Control and Support Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

12

12

00 CONTROL INPUTS

01 Ctrl I/P Status 00000000000000000000000000000000

Displays the status of the opto-isolated inputs from L1 (last digit) to L32 (first digit): “0” = Reset and “1” = Set.

The control inputs can also be set and reset by setting a “1” to set or “0” to reset a control input.

12 02 Control Input 1 No Operation Set / Reset / No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 1 individually.

12 03 Control Input 2 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 2 individually.

12 04 Control Input 3 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 3 individually.

12 05 Control Input 4 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 4 individually.

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation 12 06 Control Input 5 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 5 individually.

12 07 Control Input 6 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 6 individually.

12 08 Control Input 7 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 7 individually.

12 09 Control Input 8 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 8 individually.

12 0A Control Input 9 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 9 individually.

12 0B Control Input 10 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 10 individually.

12 0C Control Input 11 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 11 individually.

12 0D Control Input 12 No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 12 individually.

12 0E Control Input 13 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 13 individually.

12 0F Control Input 14 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 14 individually.

12 10 Control Input 15 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 15 individually.

12 11 Control Input 16 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 16 individually.

12 12 Control Input 17 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 17 individually.

12 13 Control Input 18 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 18 individually.

12 14 Control Input 19 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 19 individually.

12 15 Control Input 20 No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Page (ST) 4-46 P849/EN ST/D33

Control and Support Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text

Sets or resets Control Input 20 individually.

12 16 Control Input 21 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 21 individually.

12 17 Control Input 22 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 22 individually.

12 18 Control Input 23 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 23 individually.

12 19 Control Input 24 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 24 individually.

12 1A Control Input 25 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 25 individually.

12 1B Control Input 26 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 26 individually.

12 1C Control Input 27 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 27 individually.

12 1D Control Input 28 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 28 individually.

12 1E Control Input 29 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 29 individually.

12 1F Control Input 30 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 30 individually.

12 20 Control Input 31 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 31 individually.

12 21 Control Input 32 No Operation

Sets or resets Control Input 32 individually.

Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

Set / Reset / No Operation

5.9 Ctrl I/P Config.

The control inputs function as software switches that can be set or reset either locally or remotely. These inputs can be used to trigger any function that they are connected to as part of the PSL.

This column is visible when the “Control I/P Config” setting (“Configuration” column) =

“visible”.

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

13 00 CTRL I/P CONFIG

13 01 Hotkey Enabled 11111111111111111111111111111111

Setting to allow the control inputs to be individually assigned to the “Hotkey” menu by setting ‘1’ in the appropriate bit in the

“Hotkey Enabled” cell. The hotkey menu allows the control inputs to be set, reset or pulsed without the need to enter the

“CONTROL INPUTS” column

13 10 Control Input 1 Latched Latched, Pulsed

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-47

(ST) 4 Settings

Control and Support Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 11 Ctrl Command 1 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 14 Control Input 2 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 15 Ctrl Command 2 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 18 Control Input 3 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 19 Ctrl Command 3 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 1C Control Input 4 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 1D Ctrl Command 4 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 20 Control Input 5 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 21 Ctrl Command 5 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 24 Control Input 6 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 25 Ctrl Command 6 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 28 Control Input 7 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

Page (ST) 4-48 P849/EN ST/D33

Control and Support Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

13 29 Ctrl Command 7 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 2C Control Input 8 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 2D Ctrl Command 8 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 30 Control Input 9 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 31 Ctrl Command 9 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 34 Control Input 10 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 35 Ctrl Command 10 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 38 Control Input 11 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 39 Ctrl Command 11 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 3C Control Input 12 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 3D Ctrl Command 12 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 40 Control Input 13 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 41 Ctrl Command 13 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-49

(ST) 4 Settings

Control and Support Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 44 Control Input 14 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 45 Ctrl Command 14 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 48 Control Input 15 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 49 Ctrl Command 15 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 4C Control Input 16 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 4D Ctrl Command 16 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 50 Control Input 17 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 51 Ctrl Command 17 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 54 Control Input 18 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 55 Ctrl Command 18 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 58 Control Input 19 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 59 Ctrl Command 19 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 5C Control Input 20 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Page (ST) 4-50 P849/EN ST/D33

Control and Support Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 5D Ctrl Command 20 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 60 Control Input 21 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 61 Ctrl Command 21 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 64 Control Input 22 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 65 Ctrl Command 22 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 68 Control Input 23 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 69 Ctrl Command 23 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 6C Control Input 24 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 6D Ctrl Command 24 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 70 Control Input 25 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 71 Ctrl Command 25 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 74 Control Input 26 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-51

(ST) 4 Settings

Control and Support Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

13 75 Ctrl Command 26 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 78 Control Input 27 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 79 Ctrl Command 27 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 7C Control Input 28 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 7D Ctrl Command 28 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 80 Control Input 29 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 81 Ctrl Command 29 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 84 Control Input 30 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 85 Ctrl Command 30 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 88 Control Input 31 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 89 Ctrl Command 31 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

13 8C Control Input 32 Latched Latched, Pulsed

Configures the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for

10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

13 8D Ctrl Command 32 SET/RESET

Set/Reset, ON/OFF, Enabled/Disabled,

IN/OUT

Page (ST) 4-52 P849/EN ST/D33

Control and Support Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

Allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON / OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

5.10 InterMiCOM Communication Channel

The “INTERMICOM COMMS” column contains all the information to configure the communication channel and also contains the channel statistics and diagnostic facilities.

The InterMiCOM communication can be enabled or disabled in the “Configuration” column.

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

15 00

INTERMICOM

COMMS

15 01 IM Input Status 00000000

This cell displays the InterMiCOM Input status.

15 02 IM Output Status 00000000

Data

Data

This cell displays the InterMiCOM Output status.

15 10 Source Address 1 1 to 10 step 1

The “source” and “receive” addresses are used to synchronize remote and local devices. Both relays must be programmed with a unique pair of addresses that correspond with each other in the “Source Address” and “Receive Address” cells

15 11 Received Address 2 1 to 10 step 1

The “source” and “receive” addresses are used to synchronize remote and local devices. Both relays must be programmed with a unique pair of addresses that correspond with each other in the “Source Address” and “Receive Address” cells

15 12 Baud Rate 9600 600 / 1200 / 2400 / 4800 / 9600 / 19200

This cell controls the communication speed between device and master station. It is important that both device and master station are set at the same speed setting.

15 20 Ch Statistics Invisible Invisible or Visible

Activates or hides the channel statistics. When visible is selected, the following menus are displayed. Otherwise, next menu is

“Ch Diagnostics”.

15 21 Rx Direct Count

Number of Permissive messages received with the correct message structure.

Data

15 22 Rx Perm Count

Number of Blocking messages received with the correct message structure.

15 23 Rx Block Count

Number of Blocking messages received with the correct message structure.

15 24 Rx NewDataCount

Number of different messages received.

15 25 Rx ErroredCount

Data

Data

Data

Data

Number of incomplete or incorrectly formatted messages received.

15 26 Lost Messages

Number of messages lost within the previous time period set in “Alarm Window” cell.

Data

15 30 Elapsed Time Data

Time in seconds since the InterMiCOM channel statistics were reset.

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-53

(ST) 4 Settings

Control and Support Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

15 31 Reset Statistics No

Reset channel statistics command.

15 40 Ch Diagnostics Invisible

No or Yes

Invisible or Visible

Reset channel statistics command.

15 41 Data CD Status OK / Fail / Card Not Fitted / Unavailable

Indicates when the “Data Carrier Detect” (DCD) line (pin 1) is energised.

OK = DCD is energised, FAIL = DCD is de-energised, Absent = InterMiCOM board is not fitted, Unavailable = hardware error present

15 42 FrameSync Status OK / Fail / Card Not Fitted / Unavailable

Indicates when the message structure and synchronisation is valid. OK = valid message structure and synchronisation ,FAIL = synchronisation has been lost, Card Not Fitted = InterMiCOM board is not fitted, Unavailable = hardware error present

15 43 Message Status OK / Fail / Card Not Fitted / Unavailable

Indicates when the percentage of received valid messages has fallen below the “IM Msg Alarm Lvl” setting within the alarm time period.

OK = acceptable ratio of lost messages, FAIL = unacceptable ratio of lost messages, Card Not Fitted = InterMiCOM board is not fitted, Unavailable = hardware error present

15 44 Channel Status OK / Fail / Card Not Fitted / Unavailable

Indicates the state of the InterMiCOM communication channel

OK = channel healthy, FAIL = channel failure, Card Not Fitted = InterMiCOM board is not fitted, Unavailable = hardware error present

15 45 IM H/W Status OK / Fail / Card Not Fitted / Unavailable

Indicates the state of the InterMiCOM hardware

OK = InterMiCOM hardware healthy, Read Error = InterMiCOM hardware failure, Write Error = InterMiCOM hardware failure,

Card Not Fitted = InterMiCOM board is either not fitted or failed to initialise

15 50 Loopback Mode Disabled Disabled / Internal / External

By selecting “Loopback Mode” to “Internal”, only the internal software of the device is checked whereas “External” will check both the software and hardware used by InterMiCOM (In the latter case, it is necessary to connect the transmit and receive pins together and ensure that the DCD signal is held high).

15 51 Test Pattern 11111111 00000000 to 11111111 step 1

A test pattern can be entered which is then transmitted through the software and/or hardware.

15 52 Loopback Status OK / Fail / Card Not Fitted / Unavailable

Providing all connections are correct and the software is working correctly, the “Loopback Status” cell will display “OK”. An unsuccessful test would be indicated by “FAIL”, whereas a hardware error will be indicated by “UNAVAILABLE”.

5.11

Col Row

16 00

Menu Text

INTERMICOM

CONF

InterMiCOM Configuration

The “INTERMICOM CONF” column selects the format of each signal and its fallback operation mode.

InterMiCOM provides 8 commands over a single communications link, with the mode of operation of each command being individually selectable within the “IM# Cmd

Type” cell (# = 1 to 8).

Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

Page (ST) 4-54 P849/EN ST/D33

Control and Support Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

Note

Setting choices are different from IM2 to IM8 (see IM1 Cmd type). When Cmd Type is enabled, Fallback Mode is enabled.

Default values and frameSync type are settable when fallback mode selection is “latched”.

16 01 IM Msg Alarm Lvl 25% 0% to 100% step 1%

The “IM ¨Msg Alam Lvl” sets the level of invalid messages received compared to the total number of messages that should have been received. If this value exceeds the selected level, an alarm will be raised.

16 10 IM1 Cmd Type Direct Disabled/ Blocking/ Direct

“Blocking” mode provides the fastest signalling speed (available on commands 1 – 4), “Direct Intertrip” mode provides the most secure signalling (available on commands 1 – 8) and “Permissive” mode provides the most dependable signalling (available on commands 5 – 8).

Each command can be disabled so that it has no effect in the logic of the device.

16 11 IM1 FallBackMode Default Default/ Latched

Visible if “IM1 Cmd type” ≠ “Disabled”

When “Latched”, during periods of extreme where the synchronization of a message structure is lost or is cannot be decoded, the last good command can be maintained until a new valid message is received.

When “Default”: if the synchronisation is lost, after a time period, a known fallback state can be assigned to the command.

In this latter case, the time period will need to be set in the “IM# FrameSynTim” cell and the default value will need to be set in

“IM# DefaultValue” cell. As soon as a full valid message is seen by the device all the timer periods are reset and the new valid command states are used. An alarm is provided if the noise on the channel becomes excessive.

0 to 1 step 1 16 12 IM1 DefaultValue 0

Visible if “IM1 Fallback Mode” = “Default”

Sets the default value to assign to the command after a time period.

16 13 IM1 FrameSyncTim 1500 ms 10 ms to 1500 ms step 10 ms

Visible if “IM1 Fallback Mode” = “Default”

Sets the time period to assign the known default value to the device.

16 18 IM2 Cmd Type Direct Disabled/ Blocking/ Direct

“Blocking” mode provides the fastest signalling speed (available on commands 1 – 4), “Direct Intertrip” mode provides the most secure signalling (available on commands 1 – 8) and “Permissive” mode provides the most dependable signalling (available on commands 5 – 8).

Each command can be disabled so that it has no effect in the logic of the device.

16 19 IM2 FallBackMode Default Default/ Latched

Visible if “IM2 Cmd type” ≠ “Disabled”

When “Latched”, during periods of extreme where the synchronization of a message structure is lost or is cannot be decoded, the last good command can be maintained until a new valid message is received.

When “Default”: if the synchronisation is lost, after a time period, a known fallback state can be assigned to the command.

In this latter case, the time period will need to be set in the “IM# FrameSynTim” cell and the default value will need to be set in

“IM# DefaultValue” cell. As soon as a full valid message is seen by the device all the timer periods are reset and the new valid command states are used. An alarm is provided if the noise on the channel becomes excessive.

0 to 1 step 1 16 1A IM2 DefaultValue 0

Visible if “IM2 Fallback Mode” = “Default”

Sets the default value to assign to the command after a time period.

16 1B IM2 FrameSyncTim 1500 ms 10 ms to 1500 ms step 10 ms

Visible if “IM2 Fallback Mode” = “Default”

Sets the time period to assign the known default value to the device.

16 20 IM3 Cmd Type Direct Disabled/ Blocking/ Direct

“Blocking” mode provides the fastest signalling speed (available on commands 1 – 4), “Direct Intertrip” mode provides the most secure signalling (available on commands 1 – 8) and “Permissive” mode provides the most dependable signalling (available on commands 5 – 8).

Each command can be disabled so that it has no effect in the logic of the device.

16 21 IM3 FallBackMode Default Default/ Latched

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-55

(ST) 4 Settings

Control and Support Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

Visible if “IM3 Cmd type” ≠ “Disabled”

When “Latched”, during periods of extreme where the synchronization of a message structure is lost or is cannot be decoded, the last good command can be maintained until a new valid message is received.

When “Default”: if the synchronisation is lost, after a time period, a known fallback state can be assigned to the command.

In this latter case, the time period will need to be set in the “IM# FrameSynTim” cell and the default value will need to be set in

“IM# DefaultValue” cell. As soon as a full valid message is seen by the device all the timer periods are reset and the new valid command states are used. An alarm is provided if the noise on the channel becomes excessive.

0 to 1 step 1 16 22 IM3 DefaultValue 0

Visible if “IM3 Fallback Mode” = “Default”

Sets the default value to assign to the command after a time period.

16 23 IM3 FrameSyncTim 1500 ms 10 ms to 1500 ms step 10 ms

Visible if “IM3 Fallback Mode” = “Default”

Sets the time period to assign the known default value to the device.

16 28 IM4 Cmd Type Direct Disabled/ Blocking/ Direct

“Blocking” mode provides the fastest signalling speed (available on commands 1 – 4), “Direct Intertrip” mode provides the most secure signalling (available on commands 1 – 8) and “Permissive” mode provides the most dependable signalling (available on commands 5 – 8).

Each command can be disabled so that it has no effect in the logic of the device.

16 29 IM4 FallBackMode Default Default/ Latched

Visible if “IM4 Cmd type” ≠ “Disabled”

When “Latched”, during periods of extreme where the synchronization of a message structure is lost or is cannot be decoded, the last good command can be maintained until a new valid message is received.

When “Default”: if the synchronisation is lost, after a time period, a known fallback state can be assigned to the command.

In this latter case, the time period will need to be set in the “IM# FrameSynTim” cell and the default value will need to be set in

“IM# DefaultValue” cell. As soon as a full valid message is seen by the device all the timer periods are reset and the new valid command states are used. An alarm is provided if the noise on the channel becomes excessive.

0 to 1 step 1 16 2A IM4 DefaultValue 0

Visible if “IM4 Fallback Mode” = “Default”

Sets the default value to assign to the command after a time period.

16 2B IM4 FrameSyncTim 1500 ms 10 ms to 1500 ms step 10 ms

Visible if “IM4 Fallback Mode” = “Default”

Sets the time period to assign the known default value to the device.

16 30 IM5 Cmd Type Direct Disabled/ Permissive/ Direct

“Blocking” mode provides the fastest signalling speed (available on commands 1 – 4), “Direct Intertrip” mode provides the most secure signalling (available on commands 1 – 8) and “Permissive” mode provides the most dependable signalling (available on commands 5 – 8).

Each command can be disabled so that it has no effect in the logic of the device.

16 31 IM5 FallBackMode Default Default/ Latched

Visible if “IM5 Cmd type” ≠ “Disabled”

When “Latched”, during periods of extreme where the synchronization of a message structure is lost or is cannot be decoded, the last good command can be maintained until a new valid message is received.

When “Default”: if the synchronisation is lost, after a time period, a known fallback state can be assigned to the command.

In this latter case, the time period will need to be set in the “IM# FrameSynTim” cell and the default value will need to be set in

“IM# DefaultValue” cell. As soon as a full valid message is seen by the device all the timer periods are reset and the new valid command states are used. An alarm is provided if the noise on the channel becomes excessive.

0 to 1 step 1 16 32 IM5 DefaultValue 0

Visible if “IM5 Fallback Mode” = “Default”

Sets the default value to assign to the command after a time period.

16 33 IM5 FrameSyncTim 1500 ms 10 ms to 1500 ms step 10 ms

Visible if “IM5 Fallback Mode” = “Default”

Sets the time period to assign the known default value to the device.

16 38 IM6 Cmd Type Direct Disabled/ Permissive/ Direct

Page (ST) 4-56 P849/EN ST/D33

Control and Support Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

“Blocking” mode provides the fastest signalling speed (available on commands 1 – 4), “Direct Intertrip” mode provides the most secure signalling (available on commands 1 – 8) and “Permissive” mode provides the most dependable signalling (available on commands 5 – 8).

Each command can be disabled so that it has no effect in the logic of the device.

16 39 IM6 FallBackMode Default Default/ Latched

Visible if “IM6 Cmd type” ≠ “Disabled”

When “Latched”, during periods of extreme where the synchronization of a message structure is lost or is cannot be decoded, the last good command can be maintained until a new valid message is received.

When “Default”: if the synchronisation is lost, after a time period, a known fallback state can be assigned to the command.

In this latter case, the time period will need to be set in the “IM# FrameSynTim” cell and the default value will need to be set in

“IM# DefaultValue” cell. As soon as a full valid message is seen by the device all the timer periods are reset and the new valid command states are used. An alarm is provided if the noise on the channel becomes excessive.

16 3A IM6 DefaultValue 0 0 to 1 step 1

Visible if “IM6 Fallback Mode” = “Default”

Sets the default value to assign to the command after a time period.

16 3B IM6 FrameSyncTim 1500 ms

Visible if “IM6 Fallback Mode” = “Default”

Sets the time period to assign the known default value to the device.

16 40 IM7 Cmd Type Direct

10 ms to 1500 ms step 10 ms

Disabled/ Permissive/ Direct

“Blocking” mode provides the fastest signalling speed (available on commands 1 – 4), “Direct Intertrip” mode provides the most secure signalling (available on commands 1 – 8) and “Permissive” mode provides the most dependable signalling (available on commands 5 – 8).

Each command can be disabled so that it has no effect in the logic of the device.

16 41 IM7 FallBackMode Default Default/ Latched

Visible if “IM7 Cmd type” ≠ “Disabled”

When “Latched”, during periods of extreme where the synchronization of a message structure is lost or is cannot be decoded, the last good command can be maintained until a new valid message is received.

When “Default”: if the synchronisation is lost, after a time period, a known fallback state can be assigned to the command.

In this latter case, the time period will need to be set in the “IM# FrameSynTim” cell and the default value will need to be set in

“IM# DefaultValue” cell. As soon as a full valid message is seen by the device all the timer periods are reset and the new valid command states are used. An alarm is provided if the noise on the channel becomes excessive.

0 to 1 step 1 16 42 IM7 DefaultValue 0

Visible if “IM7 Fallback Mode” = “Default”

Sets the default value to assign to the command after a time period.

16 43 IM7 FrameSyncTim 1500 ms 10 ms to 1500 ms step 10 ms

Visible if “IM7 Fallback Mode” = “Default”

Sets the time period to assign the known default value to the device.

16 48 IM8 Cmd Type Direct Disabled/ Permissive/ Direct

“Blocking” mode provides the fastest signalling speed (available on commands 1 – 4), “Direct Intertrip” mode provides the most secure signalling (available on commands 1 – 8) and “Permissive” mode provides the most dependable signalling (available on commands 5 – 8).

Each command can be disabled so that it has no effect in the logic of the device.

16 49 IM8 FallBackMode Default Default/ Latched

Visible if “IM8 Cmd type” ≠ “Disabled”

When “Latched”, during periods of extreme where the synchronization of a message structure is lost or is cannot be decoded, the last good command can be maintained until a new valid message is received.

When “Default”: if the synchronisation is lost, after a time period, a known fallback state can be assigned to the command.

In this latter case, the time period will need to be set in the “IM# FrameSynTim” cell and the default value will need to be set in

“IM# DefaultValue” cell. As soon as a full valid message is seen by the device all the timer periods are reset and the new valid command states are used. An alarm is provided if the noise on the channel becomes excessive.

16 4A IM8 DefaultValue 0 0 to 1 step 1

Visible if “IM8 Fallback Mode” = “Default”

Sets the default value to assign to the command after a time period.

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-57

(ST) 4 Settings

Control and Support Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

16 4B IM8 FrameSyncTim 1500 ms

Visible if “IM8 Fallback Mode” = “Default”

Sets the time period to assign the known default value to the device.

Available Setting

10 ms to 1500 ms step 10 ms

5.12 Function Keys

The lock setting allows a function key output that is set to toggle mode to be locked in its current active state. In toggle mode a single key press will set/latch the function key output as high or low in programmable scheme logic. This feature can be used to enable/disable relay functions. In the normal mode the function key output will remain high as long as the key is pressed. The Fn. Key label allows the text of the function key to be changed to something more suitable for the application.

The “Function keys” column is visible when the “Function key” setting (“Configuration” column) = “visible”.

Col Row Menu Text

17 00 FUNCTION KEYS

17 01 Fn Key Status 0000000000

Displays the status of each function key.

17 02 Fn Key 1 Unlocked

Default Setting

Description

Data

Available Setting

Disabled, Locked, Unlock

Setting to activate function key. The ‘Lock’ setting allows a function key output that is set to toggle mode to be locked in its current active state.

17 03 Fn Key 1 Mode Toggled Toggled, Normal

Sets the function key in toggle or normal mode. In ‘Toggle’ mode, a single key press will set/latch the function key output as

‘high’ or ‘low’ in programmable scheme logic. This feature can be used to enable/disable device functions. In the ‘Normal’ mode the function key output will remain ‘high’ as long as key is pressed.

17 04 Fn Key 1 Label Function Key 1

Allows the text of the function key to be changed to something more suitable for the application.

17 05 Fn Key 2 Unlocked Disabled, Locked, Unlock

Setting to activate function key. The ‘Lock’ setting allows a function key output that is set to toggle mode to be locked in its current active state.

17 06 Fn Key 2 Mode Normal Toggled, Normal

Sets the function key in toggle or normal mode. In ‘Toggle’ mode, a single key press will set/latch the function key output as

‘high’ or ‘low’ in programmable scheme logic. This feature can be used to enable/disable device functions. In the ‘Normal’ mode the function key output will remain ‘high’ as long as key is pressed.

17 07 Fn Key 2 Label Function Key 2

Allows the text of the function key to be changed to something more suitable for the application.

17 08 Fn Key 3 Unlocked Disabled, Locked, Unlock

Setting to activate function key. The ‘Lock’ setting allows a function key output that is set to toggle mode to be locked in its current active state.

17 09 Fn Key 3 Mode Normal Toggled, Normal

Sets the function key in toggle or normal mode. In ‘Toggle’ mode, a single key press will set/latch the function key output as

‘high’ or ‘low’ in programmable scheme logic. This feature can be used to enable/disable device functions. In the ‘Normal’ mode the function key output will remain ‘high’ as long as key is pressed.

17 0A Fn Key 3 Label Function Key 3

Page (ST) 4-58 P849/EN ST/D33

Control and Support Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

Allows the text of the function key to be changed to something more suitable for the application.

17 0B Fn Key 4 Unlocked Disabled, Locked, Unlock

Setting to activate function key. The ‘Lock’ setting allows a function key output that is set to toggle mode to be locked in its current active state.

17 0C Fn Key 4 Mode Normal Toggled, Normal

Sets the function key in toggle or normal mode. In ‘Toggle’ mode, a single key press will set/latch the function key output as

‘high’ or ‘low’ in programmable scheme logic. This feature can be used to enable/disable device functions. In the ‘Normal’ mode the function key output will remain ‘high’ as long as key is pressed.

17 0D Fn Key 4 Label Function Key 4

Allows the text of the function key to be changed to something more suitable for the application.

17 0E Fn Key 5 Unlocked Disabled, Locked, Unlock

Setting to activate function key. The ‘Lock’ setting allows a function key output that is set to toggle mode to be locked in its current active state.

17 0F Fn Key 5 Mode Normal Toggled, Normal

Sets the function key in toggle or normal mode. In ‘Toggle’ mode, a single key press will set/latch the function key output as

‘high’ or ‘low’ in programmable scheme logic. This feature can be used to enable/disable device functions. In the ‘Normal’ mode the function key output will remain ‘high’ as long as key is pressed.

17 10 Fn Key 5 Label Function Key 5

Allows the text of the function key to be changed to something more suitable for the application.

17 11 Fn Key 6 Unlocked Disabled, Locked, Unlock

Setting to activate function key. The ‘Lock’ setting allows a function key output that is set to toggle mode to be locked in its current active state.

17 12 Fn Key 6 Mode Normal Toggled, Normal

Sets the function key in toggle or normal mode. In ‘Toggle’ mode, a single key press will set/latch the function key output as

‘high’ or ‘low’ in programmable scheme logic. This feature can be used to enable/disable device functions. In the ‘Normal’ mode the function key output will remain ‘high’ as long as key is pressed.

17 13 Fn Key 6 Label Function Key 6

Allows the text of the function key to be changed to something more suitable for the application.

17 14 Fn Key 7 Unlocked Disabled, Locked, Unlock

Setting to activate function key. The ‘Lock’ setting allows a function key output that is set to toggle mode to be locked in its current active state.

17 15 Fn Key 7 Mode Normal Toggled, Normal

Sets the function key in toggle or normal mode. In ‘Toggle’ mode, a single key press will set/latch the function key output as

‘high’ or ‘low’ in programmable scheme logic. This feature can be used to enable/disable device functions. In the ‘Normal’ mode the function key output will remain ‘high’ as long as key is pressed.

17 16 Fn Key 7 Label Function Key 7

Allows the text of the function key to be changed to something more suitable for the application.

17 17 Fn Key 8 Unlocked Disabled, Locked, Unlock

Setting to activate function key. The ‘Lock’ setting allows a function key output that is set to toggle mode to be locked in its current active state.

17 18 Fn Key 8 Mode Normal Toggled, Normal

Sets the function key in toggle or normal mode. In ‘Toggle’ mode, a single key press will set/latch the function key output as

‘high’ or ‘low’ in programmable scheme logic. This feature can be used to enable/disable device functions. In the ‘Normal’ mode the function key output will remain ‘high’ as long as key is pressed.

17 19 Fn Key 8 Label Function Key 8

Allows the text of the function key to be changed to something more suitable for the application.

17 1A Fn Key 9 Unlocked Disabled, Locked, Unlock

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-59

(ST) 4 Settings

Control and Support Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

Setting to activate function key. The ‘Lock’ setting allows a function key output that is set to toggle mode to be locked in its current active state.

17 1B Fn Key 9 Mode Normal Toggled, Normal

Sets the function key in toggle or normal mode. In ‘Toggle’ mode, a single key press will set/latch the function key output as

‘high’ or ‘low’ in programmable scheme logic. This feature can be used to enable/disable device functions. In the ‘Normal’ mode the function key output will remain ‘high’ as long as key is pressed.

17 1C Fn Key 9 Label Function Key 9

Allows the text of the function key to be changed to something more suitable for the application.

17 1D Fn Key 10 Unlocked Disabled, Locked, Unlock

Setting to activate function key. The ‘Lock’ setting allows a function key output that is set to toggle mode to be locked in its current active state.

17 1E Fn Key 10 Mode Normal Toggled, Normal

Sets the function key in toggle or normal mode. In ‘Toggle’ mode, a single key press will set/latch the function key output as

‘high’ or ‘low’ in programmable scheme logic. This feature can be used to enable/disable device functions. In the ‘Normal’ mode the function key output will remain ‘high’ as long as key is pressed.

17 1F Fn Key 10 Label Function Key 10

Allows the text of the function key to be changed to something more suitable for the application.

5.13 IED Configurator

The contents of the IED CONFIGURATOR column (for IEC 61850 configuration) are mostly data cells, displayed for information but not editable. To edit the configuration, you need to use the IED (Intelligent Electronic Device) configurator tool within the Schneider

Electric MiCOM S1 Studio software.

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

19 00

IED

CONFIGURATOR

19 05 Switch Conf.Bank No Action No Action, Switch Banks

Setting which allows the user to switch between the current configuration, held in the Active Memory Bank (and partly displayed below), to the configuration sent to and held in the Inactive Memory Bank.

19 0A Restore Conf. No Action No action / Restore MCL

Used to restore data from Conf. binary file. Conf. files are specific, containing a single devices IEC61850 configuration information, and used for transferring data to/from the MiCOM IED.

19 10 Active Conf.Name Not Available Data

The name of the configuration in the Active Memory Bank, usually taken from the SCL file.

19 11 Active Conf.Rev Not Available Data

Configuration Revision number of the Active Memory Bank, used for version management.

19 20 Inact.Conf.Name Not Available Data

The name of the configuration in the Inactive Memory Bank, usually taken from the SCL file.

19 21 Inact.Conf.Rev Not Available Data

Configuration Revision number of the Inactive Memory Bank, used for version management.

19 30 IP PARAMETERS

19 31 IP address 1 0.0.0.0 Data

Page (ST) 4-60 P849/EN ST/D33

Control and Support Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Displays the unique network IP address that identifies the device.

19 32 Subnet mask 1 0.0.0.0

Displays the sub-network that the device is connected to.

19 33 Gateway 1 0.0.0.0

Displays the IP address of the gateway (proxy) that the device is connected to.

19 34 IP address 2 0.0.0.0

Displays the unique network IP address that identifies the device.

19 35 Subnet mask 2 0.0.0.0

Displays the sub-network that the device is connected to.

19 36 Gateway 2 0.0.0.0

Displays the IP address of the gateway (proxy) that the device is connected to.

19 40

SNTP

PARAMETERS

19 41 SNTP Server 1 0.0.0.0

Displays the IP address of the primary SNTP server.

19 42 SNTP Server 2 0.0.0.0

Displays the IP address of the secondary SNTP server.

19 50 IEC 61850 SCL

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Data

Available Setting

19 51 IED Name Not Available Data

8 character IED name, which is the unique name on the IEC 61850 network for the IED, usually taken from the SCL

(Substation Configuration Language for XML) file.

19 60 IEC 61850 GOOSE

19 70 GoEna 00000000 00000000 to 11111111 step 1

GoEna (GOose ENAble) is a setting to enable GOOSE (Generic Object Orientated Substation Event, for high-speed interdevice messaging) publisher settings. This setting enables (“1”) or disables (“0”) GOOSE control blocks from 08 (1st digit) to 01

(last digit).

Pub.Simul.Goose 0X00000000 0 to 2 step 1 19 71

19 73 Sub.Simul.Goose No 0 to 2 step 1

5.14

Col Row

00

Control Input Labels

The “CTRL I/P Labels” column is visible when the “Control I/P Labels” setting

(“Configuration” column) = “visible”.

Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

CTRL I/P LABELS 29

29 01 Control Input 1 Control Input 1 16 Character Text

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-61

(ST) 4 Settings

Control and Support Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 02 Control Input 2 Control Input 2 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 03 Control Input 3 Control Input 3 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 04 Control Input 4 Control Input 4 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 05 Control Input 5 Control Input 5 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 06 Control Input 6 Control Input 6 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 07 Control Input 7 Control Input 7 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 08 Control Input 8 Control Input 8 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 09 Control Input 9 Control Input 9 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 0A Control Input 10 Control Input 10 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 0B Control Input 11 Control Input 11 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 0C Control Input 12 Control Input 12 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 0D Control Input 13 Control Input 13 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 0E Control Input 14 Control Input 14 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 0F Control Input 15 Control Input 15 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 10 Control Input 16 Control Input 16 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 11 Control Input 17 Control Input 17 16 Character Text

Page (ST) 4-62 P849/EN ST/D33

Control and Support Settings

(ST) 4 Settings

Col Row Menu Text Default Setting

Description

Available Setting

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 12 Control Input 18 Control Input 18 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 13 Control Input 19 Control Input 19 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 14 Control Input 20 Control Input 20 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 15 Control Input 21 Control Input 21 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 16 Control Input 22 Control Input 22 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 17 Control Input 23 Control Input 23 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 18 Control Input 24 Control Input 24 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 19 Control Input 25 Control Input 25 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 1A Control Input 26 Control Input 26 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 1B Control Input 27 Control Input 27 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 1C Control Input 28 Control Input 28 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 1D Control Input 29 Control Input 29 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 1E Control Input 30 Control Input 30 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 1F Control Input 31 Control Input 31 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

29 20 Control Input 32 Control Input 32 16 Character Text

Setting to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the programmable scheme logic.

P849/EN ST/D33 Page (ST) 4-63

(ST) 4 Settings

Notes:

Control and Support Settings

Page (ST) 4-64 P849/EN ST/D33

MiCOM P849

(OP) 5 Operation

P849/EN OP/D33

OPERATION

CHAPTER 5

Page (OP) 5-1

(OP) 5 Operation

MiCOM P849

Date:

Products covered by this chapter:

Hardware Suffix:

Software Version:

08/2015

This chapter covers the specific versions of the MiCOM products listed below. This includes

only the following combinations of Software Version and Hardware Suffix.

M

B0

Connection Diagrams: 10P849xx (xx = 01 to 06)

Page (OP) 5-2 P849/EN OP/D33

Contents

CONTENTS

1 Operation of Functions

1.1

1.1.1

1.1.2

1.2

1.3

1.4

1.5

1.6

1.7

1.8

1.9

1.9.1

1.9.1.1

1.9.1.2

1.9.1.3

1.9.1.4

1.9.1.5

1.9.2

1.9.3

1.9.3.1

1.9.3.2

Programmable Scheme Logic

Level Settings

Accuracy

IRIG-B Signal Only

Trip LED Logic

Function Keys

Setting Groups Selection

Control Inputs

Real Time Clock Synchronization via Opto-Inputs

Enhanced Opto Time Stamping

InterMiCOM Teleprotection

Protection Signalling

Communications Media

General Features and Implementation

Physical Connections

Direct Connection

Modem Connection

Functional Assignment

InterMiCOM Settings

Setting Guidelines

InterMiCOM Statistics & Diagnostics

1.9.4

1.9.4.1

1.10

Testing InterMiCOM

InterMiCOM Loopback Testing & Diagnostics

Read Only Mode

1.10.1 Protocol/Port Implementation

1.10.1.1

IEC 60870-5-103 Protocol on Rear Port 1

1.10.1.2

Courier Protocol on Rear Port 1/2 and Ethernet

1.10.1.3

IEC 61850

1.10.2 Courier Database Support

2 Operation of Recording Facilities

2.1

2.2

2.3

Real Time Clock, Time Synchronization

Standard Event Recording Facilities

Precise Event Recording

(OP) 5 Operation

Page (OP) 5-

5

6

7

5

5

5

5

5

9

10

12

13

13

13

10

10

10

11

14

15

7

8

15

15

17

17

17

17

18

18

19

19

19

19

P849/EN OP/D33 Page (OP) 5-3

(OP) 5 Operation

FIGURES

Figure 1 - Direct connection within the local substation

Figure 2 - InterMICOM teleprotection via a MODEM link

Figure 3 - Connections for External Loopback mode

TABLES

Table 1 - Setting group active on activation of DDB signals

Table 2 - Control inputs

Table 3 – CTRL. I/P Config

Table 4 – Time of Sync and Corrected Time

Table 5 – Record Control

Table 6 - InterMICOM D9 port pin-out connections

Table 7 - Recommended Frame Synchronism Time settings

Figures

Page (OP) 5-

12

13

16

Page (OP) 5-

9

12

15

8

9

7

7

Page (OP) 5-4 P849/EN OP/D33

Operation of Functions

1

1.1

1.1.1

1.1.2

1.2

(OP) 5 Operation

OPERATION OF FUNCTIONS

Programmable Scheme Logic

Level Settings

Time delay t

Name

0-14400000ms

Range

Table 1 - Time delay settings

Accuracy

Output conditioner timer

Dwell conditioner timer

Pulse conditioner timer

Setting ±2% or 50ms whichever is greater

Setting ±2% or 50ms whichever is greater

Setting ±2% or 50ms whichever is greater

1ms

Step Size

Table 2 - Accuracy timings

IRIG-B Signal Only

If a satellite time clock signal conforming to IRIG-B is provided and the relay has the optional IRIG-B port fitted, the satellite clock equipment should be energised.

In the event of the auxiliary supply failing, with a battery fitted in the compartment behind the bottom access cover, the time and date will be maintained. Therefore, when the auxiliary supply is restored, the time and date will be correct and not need to be set again.

1.3 Trip LED Logic

The trip LED can be reset when the flags for the last fault are displayed or via dedicated

DDBs. The flags are displayed automatically after a trip occurs, or can be selected in the fault record menu. The reset of trip LED and the fault records is performed by pressing the  key once the fault record has been read.

P849/EN OP/D33 Page (OP) 5-5

(OP) 5 Operation

1.4

Operation of Functions

Function Keys

The relay offers users 10 function keys for programming any operator control functionality via PSL. Each function key has an associated programmable tri-colour LED that can be programmed to give the desired indication on function key activation.

These function keys can be used to trigger any function that they are connected to as part of the PSL. The function key commands can be found in the ‘Function Keys’ menu

(see the Settings chapter). In the ‘Fn. Key Status’ menu cell there is a 10-bit word which represent the 10 function key commands and their status can be read from this 10-bit word.

In the programmable scheme logic editor 10 function key signals, which can be set to a logic 1 or On state, as described above, are available to perform control functions defined by the user.

The “Function Keys” column has ‘Fn. Key n Mode’ cell which allows the user to configure the function key as either ‘Toggled’ or ‘Normal’. In the ‘Toggle’ mode the function key

DDB signal output will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, by activating the function key on the next key press. In the ‘Normal’ mode, the function key

DDB signal will remain energized for as long as the function key is pressed and will then reset automatically.

A minimum pulse duration can be programmed for a function key by adding a minimum pulse timer to the function key DDB output signal.

The “Fn. Key n Status” cell is used to enable/unlock or disable the function key signals in

PSL. The ‘Lock’ setting has been specifically provided to allow the locking of a function key thus preventing further activation of the key on consequent key presses. This allows function keys that are set to ‘Toggled’ mode and their DDB signal active ‘high’, to be locked in their active state thus preventing any further key presses from deactivating the associated function. Locking a function key that is set to the “Normal” mode causes the associated DDB signals to be permanently off. This safety feature prevents any inadvertent function key presses from activating or deactivating critical relay functions.

The “Fn. Key Labels” cell makes it possible to change the text associated with each individual function key. This text will be displayed when a function key is accessed in the function key menu, or it can be displayed in the PSL.

The status of the function keys is stored in battery backed memory. In the event that the auxiliary supply is interrupted the status of all the function keys will be recorded.

Following the restoration of the auxiliary supply the status of the function keys, prior to supply failure, will be reinstated. If the battery is missing or flat the function key DDB signals will set to logic 0 once the auxiliary supply is restored.

Note The relay will only recognize a single function key press at a time and that a minimum key press duration of approximately 200msec. is required before the key press is recognized in PSL. This deglitching feature avoids accidental double presses.

Page (OP) 5-6 P849/EN OP/D33

Operation of Functions

1.5

1.6

(OP) 5 Operation

Setting Groups Selection

The setting groups can be changed either via opto inputs, via a menu selection, via the hotkey menu or via function keys. In the Configuration column if 'Setting Group - select via optos' is selected then any opto input or function key can be programmed in PSL to select the setting group as shown in the table below. If 'Setting Group - select via menu' is selected then in the Configuration column the 'Active Settings - Group1/2/3/4' can be used to select the setting group.

The setting group can be changed via the hotkey menu providing ‘Setting Group select via menu’ is chosen.

Two DDB signals are available in PSL for selecting a setting group via an opto input or function key selection. The following table illustrates the setting group that is active on activation of the relevant DDB signals.

1

0

0

DDB 1122 ‘SG Select x1’

1

0

0

1

1

DDB 1123 ‘SG Select 1x’

1

2

3

4

Selected setting group

Table 3 - Setting group active on activation of DDB signals

Control Inputs

The control inputs function as software switches that can be set or reset either locally or remotely. These inputs can be used to trigger any function that they are connected to as part of the PSL. There are three setting columns associated with the control inputs that are: “CONTROL INPUTS”, “CTRL. I/P CONFIG.” and “CTRL. I/P LABELS”. The function of these columns is described below:

Menu Text

Ctrl I/P Status

Control Input 1

Control Input 2 to 32

Default Setting Setting Range

CONTROL INPUTS

00000000000000000000000000000000

No Operation No Operation, Set, Reset

No Operation No Operation, Set, Reset

Step Size

Table 4 - Control inputs

The Control Input commands can be found in the ‘Control Input’ menu. In the ‘Ctrl. Ι/P status’ menu cell there is a 32 bit word which represent the 32 control input commands.

The status of the 32 control inputs can be read from this 32-bit word. The 32 control inputs can also be set and reset from this cell by setting a 1 to set or 0 to reset a particular control input. Alternatively, each of the 32 Control Inputs can be set and reset using the individual menu setting cells ‘Control Input 1, 2, 3’ etc. The Control Inputs are available through the relay menu as described above and also via the rear communications.

In the programmable scheme logic editor 32 Control Input signals, DDB 800 – 831, which can be set to a logic 1 or On state, as described above, are available to perform control functions defined by the user.

P849/EN OP/D33 Page (OP) 5-7

(OP) 5 Operation

1.7

Operation of Functions

Menu Text

Hotkey Enabled

Control Input 1

Ctrl Command 1

Control Input 2 to 32

Ctrl Command 2 to 32

Default Setting Setting Range

CTRL. I/P CONFIG.

11111111111111111111111111111111

Latched Latched, Pulsed

SET/RESET

Latched

Step Size

SET/RESET, IN/OUT,

ENABLED/DISABLED, ON/OFF

Latched, Pulsed

SET/RESET

Default Setting

SET/RESET, IN/OUT,

ENABLED/DISABLED, ON/OFF

Setting Range Step Size Menu Text

CTRL. I/P LABELS

Control Input 1

Control Input 2 to 32

Control Input 1 16 character text

Control Input 2 to 32 16 character text

Table 5 – CTRL. I/P Config

The “CTRL. I/P CONFIG.” column has several functions one of which allows the user to configure the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energized for 10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

In addition to the latched/pulsed option this column also allows the control inputs to be individually assigned to the “Hotkey” menu by setting ‘1’ in the appropriate bit in the

“Hotkey Enabled” cell. The hotkey menu allows the control inputs to be set, reset or pulsed without the need to enter the “CONTROL INPUTS” column. The “Ctrl. Command” cell also allows the SET/RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as

“ON/OFF”, “IN/OUT” etc.

The “CTRL. I/P LABELS” column makes it possible to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the PSL.

Note With the exception of pulsed operation, the status of the control inputs is stored in battery backed memory. In the event that the auxiliary supply is interrupted the status of all the inputs will be recorded. Following the restoration of the auxiliary supply the status of the control inputs, prior to supply failure, will be reinstated. If the battery is missing or flat the control inputs will set to logic 0 once the auxiliary supply is restored.

Real Time Clock Synchronization via Opto-Inputs

In modern protective schemes it is often desirable to synchronize the relays real time clock so that events from different relays can be placed in chronological order. This can be done using the IRIG-B input, if fitted, or via the communication interface connected to the substation control system. In addition to these methods the Px4x range offers the facility to synchronize via an opto-input by routing it in PSL to DDB 1131 ('Time Sync.').

Pulsing this input will result in the real time clock snapping to the nearest minute. The recommended pulse duration is 20ms to be repeated no more than once per minute. An example of the time sync. function is shown.

Page (OP) 5-8 P849/EN OP/D33

Operation of Functions

1.8

(OP) 5 Operation

Time of “Sync. Pulse”

19:47:00 to 19:47:29

19:47:30 to 19:47:59

Table 6 – Time of Sync and Corrected Time

19:47:00

19:48:00

Note

Corrected time

The above assumes a time format of hh:mm:ss

To avoid the event buffer from being filled with unnecessary time sync. events, it is possible to ignore any event that generated by the time sync. opto input. This can be done by applying the following settings:

Menu text

Opto Input Event

DDB 63 – 32 (Opto Inputs)

Value

RECORD CONTROL

Enabled

Set “Time Sync.” associated opto to 0

Table 7 – Record Control

To improve the recognition time of the time sync. opto input by approximately 10 ms, the opto input filtering could be disabled. This is achieved by setting the appropriate bit to 0 in the Opto Filter Cntl cell in the OPTO CONFIG column.

Disabling the filtering may make the opto input more susceptible to induced noise.

Fortunately the effects of induced noise can be minimized by using the methods described in the Product Design chapter.

Enhanced Opto Time Stamping

Each opto-input sample are time stamped with respect to the relay’s Real Time Clock.

These time stamps are utilized for the opto event logs and for the Precise event recorder.

The relay needs to be synchronized accurately to an external clock source such as the

GPS clock and the synchronization shall consist of IRIG-B and SNTP through Ethernet communication.

For both the filtered and unfiltered opto inputs, the time stamp of an opto change event is the sampling time at which the opto change of state has occurred. If a mixture of filtered and unfiltered optos changes state at the same sampling interval, these state changes is reported as a single event. The enhanced opto event time stamping is consistent across all the implemented protocols. The GOOSE messages is published in a timely manner and is not delayed by any event filtering mechanisms that is used to align the event time stamps.

P849/EN OP/D33 Page (OP) 5-9

(OP) 5 Operation

1.9

Operation of Functions

InterMiCOM Teleprotection

InterMiCOM is a protection signalling system that is an optional feature of MiCOM Px40 relays and provides a cost-effective alternative to discrete carrier equipment. InterMiCOM sends eight signals between the two relays in the scheme, with each signal having a selectable operation mode to provide an optimal combination of speed, security and dependability in accordance with the application. Once the information is received, it may be assigned in the Programmable Scheme Logic to any function as specified by the user’s application.

1.9.1 Protection Signalling

In order to achieve fast fault clearance and correct discrimination for faults anywhere within a high voltage power network, it is necessary to signal between the points at which protection relays are connected. Two distinct types of protection signalling can be identified:

1.9.1.1

1.9.1.2

Communications Media

Note The MiCOM P849 devices only use electrical connections (EIA(RS)232, port SK5)

InterMiCOM can transfer up to 8 commands over one communication channel. Due to recent expansions in communication networks, most signaling channels are now digital schemes usinf multiplexed fiber optics. For this reason, InterMiCOM provides a standard

EIA(RS)232 output using digital signaling techniques. This digital signal can be converted using suitable devices to any communications media as required. The

EIA(RS)232 output may alternatively be connected to a MODEM link.

Regardless of whether analogue or digital systems are being used, all the requirements of teleprotection commands are governed by an international standard IEC60834-1:1999 and InterMiCOM is compliant with the essential requirements of this standard. This standard governs the speed requirements of the commands as well as the probability of unwanted commands being received (security) and the probability of missing commands

(dependability).

General Features and Implementation

InterMiCOM provides 8 commands over a single communications link, with the mode of operation of each command being individually selectable within the “

IM# Cmd Type” cell.

Blocking” mode provides the fastest signaling speed (available on commands 1 - 4),

Direct Intertrip” mode provides the most secure signaling (available on commands 1 -

8) and “ Permissive” mode provides the most dependable signaling (available on commands 5 - 8). Each command can also be disabled so that it has no effect in the logic of the relay.

Page (OP) 5-10 P849/EN OP/D33

Operation of Functions

1.9.1.3

(OP) 5 Operation

Since many applications will involve the commands being sent over a multiplexed communications channel, it is necessary to ensure that only data from the correct relay is used. Both relays in the scheme must be programmed with a unique pair of addresses that correspond with each other in the “ Source Address” and “Receive Address” cells.

For example, at the local end relay if we set the “ Source Address” to 1, the “Receive

Address” at the remote end relay must also be set to 1. Similarly, if the remote end relay has a “ Source Address” set to 2, the “Receive Address” at the local end must also be set to 2. All four addresses must not be set identical in any given relay scheme if the possibility of incorrect signaling is to be avoided.

It must be ensured that the presence of noise in the communications channel isn’t interpreted as valid messages by the relay. For this reason, InterMiCOM uses a combination of unique pair addressing described above, basic signal format checking and for “ Direct Intertrip” commands an 8-bit Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) is also performed. This CRC calculation is performed at both the sending and receiving end relay for each message and then compared in order to maximize the security of the

Direct Intertrip” commands.

Most of the time the communications will perform adequately and the presence of the various checking algorithms in the message structure will ensure that InterMiCOM signals are processed correctly. However, careful consideration is also required for the periods of extreme noise pollution or the unlikely situation of total communications failure and how the relay should react.

During periods of extreme noise, it is possible that the synchronization of the message structure will be lost and it may become impossible to decode the full message accurately. During this noisy period, the last good command can be maintained until a new valid message is received by setting the “

IM# FallBackMode” cell to “Latched”.

Alternatively, if the synchronization is lost for a period of time, a known fallback state can be assigned to the command by setting the “ IM# FallBackMode” cell to “Default”. In this latter case, the time period will need to be set in the “ IM# FrameSynTim” cell and the default value will need to be set in “ IM# DefaultValue” cell. As soon as a full valid message is seen by the relay all the timer periods are reset and the new valid command states are used. An alarm is provided if the noise on the channel becomes excessive.

When there is a total communications failure, the relay will use the fallback (failsafe) strategy as described above. Total failure of the channel is considered when no message data is received for four power system cycles or if there is a loss of the DCD line.

Physical Connections

InterMiCOM on the Px40 relays is implemented using a 9-pin ‘ D’ type female connector

(labeled SK5) located at the bottom of the 2nd Rear communication board. This connector on the Px40 relay is wired in DTE (Data Terminating Equipment) mode, as shown in the EIA(RS)232 Physical Connections table:

P849/EN OP/D33 Page (OP) 5-11

(OP) 5 Operation

1.9.1.4

Operation of Functions

8

9

4

5

6

7

2

3

1

Pin Acronym

DCD

RxD

TxD

DTR

GND

Not used

RTS

Not used

Not used

InterMiCOM Usage

“Data Carrier Detect” is only used when connecting to modems otherwise this should be tied high by connecting to terminal 4.

“Receive Data”

“Transmit Data”

“Data Terminal Ready” is permanently tied high by the hardware since

InterMiCOM requires a permanently open communication channel.

-

-

“Signal Ground”

-

“Ready To Send” is permanently tied high by the hardware since

InterMiCOM requires a permanently open communication channel.

Table 8 - InterMICOM D9 port pin-out connections

Depending upon whether a direct or modem connection between the two relays in the scheme is being used, the required pin connections are described below.

Direct Connection

The EIA(RS)232 protocol only allows for short transmission distances due to the signalling levels used and therefore the connection shown below is limited to less than

15m. However, this may be extended by introducing suitable EIA(RS)232 to fiber optic convertors, such as the CILI 204. Depending upon the type of convertor and fiber used, direct communication over a few kilometres can easily be achieved.

This type of connection should also be used when connecting to multiplexers that have no ability to control the DCD line.

Px40 Relay with InterMiCOM

DCD –

RxD –

TxD –

DTR -

GND –

RTS –

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Px40 Relay with InterMiCOM

1

2

3

4

7

8

5

6

9

- DCD

- RxD

- TxD

- DTR

- GND

- RTS

P1150ENa

Figure 1 - Direct connection within the local substation

Page (OP) 5-12 P849/EN OP/D33

Operation of Functions

1.9.1.5

(OP) 5 Operation

Modem Connection

For long distance communication, modems may be used in which the case the following connections should be made.

This type of connection should also be used when connecting to multiplexers that have the ability to control the DCD line. With this type of connection it should be noted that the maximum distance between the Px40 relay and the modem should be 15m, and that a baud rate suitable for the communications path used should be selected.

1.9.2

1.9.3

Figure 2 - InterMICOM teleprotection via a MODEM link

Functional Assignment

Even though settings are made on the relay to control the mode of the intertrip signals, it is necessary to assign interMiCOM input and output signals in the relay Programmable

Scheme Logic (PSL) if InterMiCOM is to be successfully implemented.

It should be noted that when an InterMiCOM signal is sent from the local relay, only the remote end relay will react to this command. The local end relay will only react to

InterMiCOM commands initiated at the remote end. InterMiCOM is thus suitable for teleprotection schemes requiring Duplex signaling.

InterMiCOM Settings

The settings necessary for the implementation of InterMiCOM are contained within two columns of the relay menu structure. The first column entitled “INTERMICOM COMMS” contains all the information to configure the communication channel and also contains the channel statistics and diagnostic facilities. The second column entitled “INTERMICOM

CONF” selects the format of each signal and its fallback operation mode. The following tables show the relay menus including the available setting ranges and factory defaults.

Once the relay operation has been confirmed using the loopback test facilities, it will be necessary to ensure that the communications between the two relays in the scheme are reliable. To facilitate this, a list of channel statistics and diagnostics are available in the

InterMiCOM COMMS column:

P849/EN OP/D33 Page (OP) 5-13

(OP) 5 Operation

1.9.3.1

Operation of Functions

Setting Guidelines

The settings required for the InterMiCOM signalling are largely dependant upon whether a direct or indirect (modem/multiplexed) connection between the scheme ends is used.

Direct connections will either be short metallic or dedicated fiber optic (using CILI204) based and hence can be set to have the highest signalling speed of 19200b/s. Due to this high signalling rate, the difference in operating speed between the direct, permissive and blocking type signals is so small that the most secure signalling (direct intertrip) can be selected without any significant loss of speed. In turn, since the direct intertrip signalling requires the full checking of the message frame structure and CRC checks, it would seem prudent that the “IM# Fallback Mode” be set to “Default” with a minimal intentional delay by setting “IM# FrameSyncTim” to 10msecs. In other words, whenever two consecutive messages have an invalid structure, the relay will immediately revert to the default value until a new valid message is received.

For indirect connections, the settings that should be applied will become more application and communication media dependent. As for the direct connections, it may be appealing to consider only the fastest baud rate but this will usually increase the cost of the necessary modem/multiplexer.

In addition, devices operating at these high baud rates may suffer from “data jams” during periods of interference and in the event of communication interruptions, may require longer re-synchronization periods.

Both of these factors will reduce the effective communication speed thereby leading to a recommended baud rate setting of 9600b/s. It should be noted that as the baud rate decreases, the communications become more robust with fewer interruptions, but that overall signalling times will increase.

Since it is likely that slower baud rates will be selected, the choice of signalling mode becomes significant. However, once the signalling mode has been chosen it is necessary to consider what should happen during periods of noise when message structure and content can be lost.

If “Blocking” mode is selected, only a small amount of the total message is actually used to provide the signal, which means that in a noisy environment there is still a good likelihood of receiving a valid message. In this case, it is recommended that the “IM#

Fallback Mode” is set to “Default” with a reasonably long “IM# FrameSyncTim”.

If “Direct Intertrip” mode is selected, the whole message structure must be valid and checked to provide the signal, which means that in a very noisy environment the chances of receiving a valid message are quite small. In this case, it is recommended that the “IM#

Fallback Mode” is set to “Default” with a minimum “IM# FrameSyncTim” setting i.e. whenever a non-valid message is received, InterMiCOM will use the set default value.

If “Permissive” mode is selected, the chances of receiving a valid message is between that of the “Blocking” and “Direct Intertrip” modes. In this case, it is possible that the “IM#

Fallback Mode” is set to “Latched”. The table below highlights the recommended “IM#

FrameSyncTim” settings for the different signalling modes and baud rates:

Page (OP) 5-14 P849/EN OP/D33

Operation of Functions

(OP) 5 Operation

Baud

Rate

600

Minimum Recommended “IM# FrameSyncTim” Setting

Direct Intertrip Mode

100

1200 50

2400 30

4800 20

250

130

70

40

Blocking Mode

9600 10

19200 10

20

10

Minimum

Setting

100

50

30

20

10

10

Maximum

Setting

1500

1500

1500

1500

1500

1500

Table 9 - Recommended Frame Synchronism Time settings

Note No recommended setting is given for the Permissive mode since it is anticipated that “Latched” operation will be selected. However, if “Default mode” is selected, the “IM# FrameSyncTim” setting should be set greater than the minimum settings listed above. If the “IM# FrameSyncTim” setting is set lower than the minimum setting listed above, there is a danger that the relay will monitor a correct change in message as a corrupted message.

A setting of 25% is recommended for the communications failure alarm.

1.9.3.2

1.9.4

1.9.4.1

InterMiCOM Statistics & Diagnostics

It is possible to hide the channel diagnostics and statistics from view by setting the “

Ch

Statistics” and/or “Ch Diagnostics” cells to “Invisible”. All channel statistics are reset when the relay is powered up, or by user selection using the “ Reset Statistics” cell.

Testing InterMiCOM

InterMiCOM Loopback Testing & Diagnostics

A number of features are included within the InterMiCOM function to assist a user in commissioning and diagnosing any problems that may exist in the communications link.

“Loopback” test facilities, located within the INTERMICOM COMMS column of the relay menu, provide a user with the ability to check the software and hardware of the

InterMiCOM signalling.

By selecting “Loopback Mode” to “Internal”, only the internal software of the relay is checked whereas “External” will check both the software and hardware used by

InterMiCOM. In the latter case, it is necessary to connect the transmit and receive pins together (pins 2 and 3) and ensure that the DCD signal is held high (connect pin 1 and pin 4 together). When the relay is switched into “Loopback Mode” the relay will automatically use generic addresses and will inhibit the InterMiCOM messages to the

PSL by setting all eight InterMiCOM message states to zero. The loopback mode will be indicated on the relay frontplate by the amber Alarm LED being illuminated and a LCD alarm message, “IM Loopback”.

P849/EN OP/D33 Page (OP) 5-15

(OP) 5 Operation

Operation of Functions

Px40 Relay with

InterMiCOM

DCD

RxD

TxD

DTR

GND

RTS

-

-

-

-

-

7

8

5

6

9

3

4

1

2

P1343ENa

Figure 3 - Connections for External Loopback mode

Once the relay is switched into either of the Loopback modes, a test pattern can be entered in the “Test Pattern” cell which is then transmitted through the software and/or hardware. Providing all connections are correct and the software is working correctly, the

“Loopback Status” cell will display “OK”. An unsuccessful test would be indicated by

“FAIL”, whereas a hardware error will be indicated by “UNAVAILABLE”. Whilst the relay is in loopback test mode, the “IM Output Status” cell will only show the “Test Pattern” settings, whilst the “IM Input Status” cell will indicate that all inputs to the PSL have been forced to zero.

Care should be taken to ensure that once the loopback testing is complete, the

“Loopback Mode” is set to “Disabled” thereby switching the InterMiCOM channel back in to service. With the loopback mode disabled, the “IM Output Status” cell will show the

InterMiCOM messages being sent from the local relay, whilst the “IM Input Status” cell will show the received InterMiCOM messages (received from the remote end relay) being used by the PSL.

Once the relay operation has been confirmed using the loopback test facilities, it will be necessary to ensure that the communications between the two relays in the scheme are reliable. To facilitate this, a list of channel statistics and diagnostics are available in the

InterMiCOM COMMS column – see section 10.2. It is possible to hide the channel diagnostics and statistics from view by setting the “Ch Statistics” and/or “Ch Diagnostics” cells to “Invisible”. All channel statistics are reset when the relay is powered up, or by user selection using the “Reset Statistics” cell.

Another indication of the amount of noise on the channel is provided by the communications failure alarm. Within a fixed 1.6 second time period the relay calculates the percentage of invalid messages received compared to the total number of messages that should have been received based upon the “Baud Rate” setting. If this percentage falls below the threshold set in the “IM Msg Alarm Lvl” cell, a “Message Fail” alarm will be raised.

Page (OP) 5-16 P849/EN OP/D33

Operation of Functions

1.10

(OP) 5 Operation

Read Only Mode

With IEC 61850 and Ethernet / Internet communication capabilities, security has become a pressing issue. The Px40 relay provides a facility to allow the user to enable or disable the change in configuration remotely. This feature is available only in relays with Courier,

Courier with IEC 60870-5-103, Courier with IEC 61850 and Courier with IEC 60870-5-103 and IEC 61850 protocol options. It has to be noted that in IEC 60870-5-103 protocol,

Read Only Mode function is different from the existing Command block feature.

1.10.1

1.10.1.1

Protocol/Port Implementation

IEC 60870-5-103 Protocol on Rear Port 1

The protocol does not support settings but the indications, measurands and disturbance records commands are available at the interface.

Allowed:

Poll Class 1 (read spontaneous events)

Poll Class 2 (read measurands)

GI sequence (ASDU7 'Start GI', Poll Class 1)

Transmission of Disturbance Records sequence (ASDU24, ASDU25, Poll Class 1)

Time Synchronization (ASDU6)

General Commands (ASDU20), namely:

INF23 activate characteristic 1

INF24 activate characteristic 2

INF25 activate characteristic 3

INF26 activate characteristic 4

Blocked:

Write parameter (=change setting) (private ASDUs)

General Commands (ASDU20), namely:

INF16 auto-recloser on/off

INF19 LED reset

Private INFs (e.g CB open/close, Control Inputs)

1.10.1.2 Courier Protocol on Rear Port 1/2 and Ethernet

Allowed:

Read settings, statuses, measurands

Read records (event, fault, disturbance)

Time Synchronization command

Change active setting group command

P849/EN OP/D33 Page (OP) 5-17

(OP) 5 Operation

1.10.1.3

1.10.2

Operation of Functions

Blocked:

Write settings

All controls, including:

Reset Indication (Trip LED)

Operate Control Inputs

CB operations

Auto-reclose operations

Reset demands

Clear event / fault / maintenance / disturbance records

Test LEDs & contacts

IEC 61850

Allowed:

Read statuses, measurands

Generate Reports

Extract Disturbance Records

Time Synchronization

Change active setting group

Blocked:

All controls, including:

Operate Control Inputs

Reset LEDs

Courier Database Support

Three new settings, one for each remote communications port at the back of the relay are created to support the enabling and disabling of the read only mode at each port.

The

NIC Read Only setting will apply to all the communications protocols (including the

Tunnelled Courier) that are transmitted via the Ethernet Port. Their default values are

‘Disabled’.

The Modbus and DNP3 communications interfaces that do not support the feature will ignore these settings.

The remote read only mode is also available in the PSL via three dedicated DDB signals:

• RP1 Read Only

• RP2 Read Only

• NIC Read Only

Through careful scheme logic design, the activations of these read only signals can be facilitated via Opto Inputs, Control Inputs and Function Keys.

These DDBs are available in every build, however they are effective only in Courier, IEC

60870-5-103 build and in latest IEC 61850. The setting cells are not available in Modbus and DNP3.0.

Page (OP) 5-18 P849/EN OP/D33

Operation of Recording Facilities

2

2.1

2.2

2.3

OPERATION OF RECORDING FACILITIES

(OP) 5 Operation

The MiCOM P849 contains the following recording facilities:

• Real time clock for time synchronization

• Standard and precise event recording facilities.

Real Time Clock, Time Synchronization

The MiCOM P849 provides real time clock and time synchronisation.

The time synchronisation is available through:

IRIG-B port,

Serial communication port,

Ethernet port,

Opto (opto time synchr)

Time synchronization uses Courier, Modbus, IEC60850-5-103, DNP3 or IEC61850 protocols.

Publishing GOOSE does not contain time stamp. Events are time stamped at reception at the other end (for example when it is received by P746).

Standard Event Recording Facilities

A sequence of time-tagged events is available. The product provides up to 512 nonvolatile event records.

The following list items are stored as events:

Recognition of change of state of logic (optically isolated) inputs,

Recognition of change of state of output relays,

Alarms,

Maintenance records,

Settings changes (local and remote).

Precise Event Recording

The product stores precise events in non-volatile memory. Each precise event recording contains 32 digital data channels.

P849/EN OP/D33 Page (OP) 5-19

(OP) 5 Operation

Notes:

Operation of Recording Facilities

Page (OP) 5-20 P849/EN OP/D33

MiCOM P849

(AP) 6 Application Notes

P849/EN AP/D33

APPLICATION NOTES

CHAPTER 6

Page (AP) 6-1

(AP) 6 Application Notes

MiCOM P849

Date:

Products covered by this chapter:

Hardware Suffix:

Software Version:

08/2015

This chapter covers the specific versions of the MiCOM products listed below. This includes

only the following combinations of Software Version and Hardware Suffix.

M

B0

Connection Diagrams: 10P849xx (xx = 01 to 06)

Page (AP) 6-2 P849/EN AP/D33

Contents

(AP) 6 Application Notes

CONTENTS

1 Application of the MiCOM P849 Device

1.1

1.1.1

1.1.2

1.1.3

1.2

1.2.1

Protection Application

Definition

MiCOM P746 and P849 Use Cases

GOOSE Testing Mode

Control Application

Definition

2 Application of MiCOM P849 Functions

2.1

2.2

2.3

2.3.1

2.3.2

2.3.3

Function Keys

Opto Inputs Configuration

Hotkeys / Control Inputs

Control Inputs

Control I/P Configuration

Control I/P Labels

TABLES

Table 1 – Opto-Config Threshold Levels

FIGURES

Figure 1 – P849 opto inputs and outputs

Figure 2 – P849 Ethernet communications

Figure 3 – P746/P849 Phases A, B and C

Figure 4 - P746 Three Box and P849 Use Case

Figure 5 – P746 & P849 Redundant Ethernet Communications

Figure 6 - P746 3 Box and Several P849 Use Case

Figure 7 – GOOSE Testing Mode

Figure 8 – GOOSE Testing mode in case of P746 one box mode

Figure 9 - GOOSE Testing mode in case of P746 three box mode

Figure 10 – P849 reports and serial communications

Page (AP)6-

13

Page (AP)6-

10

10

9

9

8

8

6

7

5

6

Page (AP)6-

11

11

12

13

13

13

14

5

5

5

6

9

10

10

P849/EN AP/D33 Page (AP) 6-3

(AP) 6 Application Notes

Notes:

Figures

Page (AP) 6-4 P849/EN AP/D33

Application of the MiCOM P849 Device

1

(AP) 6 Application Notes

APPLICATION OF THE MICOM P849 DEVICE

MiCOM P849 Input & Output Extension device combines solutions to provide ‘Protection

Application’ (section 1.1) and ‘Control Application’ (section 1.2) with the standard benefits

of the MiCOM Px40 platform.

This section describes how MiCOM P849 can be used within ‘Protection application’ and

‘Control Application’

1.1

1.1.1

Figure 1 – P849 opto inputs and outputs

Protection Application

Definition

The protection application is characterised by the ability of the device to communicate

IEC61850-8.1 over either a single Ethernet network or a redundant Ethernet network.

The MiCOM P849 enable to extend the number of IO of any device at all voltage levels

(from MV up to HV transmission), regardless of manufacturer (IEC61850 communication through GOOSEs and Reports).

P849/EN AP/D33 Page (AP) 6-5

(AP) 6 Application Notes

Application of the MiCOM P849 Device

1.1.2

1.1.2.1

Figure 2 – P849 Ethernet communications

MiCOM P746 and P849 Use Cases

P849 is an opportunity to increase the number of inputs and outputs of MiCOM P746 in one box mode as well as in three box mode.

P746 One Box and P849 Use Case

Page (AP) 6-6

Figure 3 – P746/P849 Phases A, B and C

In this use case, the P849 can be used to transmit the status of switchgear to the P746 through GOOSE messages.

P849 can also be used to open a Circuit Breaker based on a command sent from P746 through GOOSE message.

P849/EN AP/D33

Application of the MiCOM P849 Device

1.1.2.2

(AP) 6 Application Notes

The inter-device communication can also be done through InterMiCOM proprietary protocol.

P746 Three Box and P849 Use Case

Figure 4 - P746 Three Box and P849 Use Case

In this use case P849 can be as well used to mount to P746 devices though GOOSEs the status of some switchgear.

P849 can also be used to open a Circuit Breaker based on a command sent from P746 through GOOSE message.

Note The inter-device network is also used for Inter P746 communications.

The most recommended architecture for this use case is to use redundant Ethernet network as described hereafter.

It is recommended that GOOSE messages are exchanged between P746 protection relays and P849 over a Redundant Ethernet network.

P849/EN AP/D33 Page (AP) 6-7

(AP) 6 Application Notes

Application of the MiCOM P849 Device

1.1.2.3

Figure 5 – P746 & P849 Redundant Ethernet Communications

P746 3 Box and Several P849 Use Case

Page (AP) 6-8

Figure 6 - P746 3 Box and Several P849 Use Case

The number of P849 that can be connected to device or a system of devices is not limited.

The number of P849 used will depend of customer application and more precisely on the corresponding required number of digital inputs and digital outputs by the application.

P849/EN AP/D33

Application of the MiCOM P849 Device

1.1.3

(AP) 6 Application Notes

GOOSE Testing Mode

An inbuilt GOOSE Testing Mode is provided to facilitate IEC61850 commissioning.

From front panel of the device the user will be able to process GOOSE Testing mode.

This function is performed through PSL and can be customized to some particular application cases if required. The demonstration example below is based on P746.

It is supposed that he connected P746 is also in GOOSE Testing Mode or has got adequate PSL to answer P849 GOOSEs.

It consists in sending and receiving Test GOOSEs and check that they are correctly sent and received.

1.1.3.1

Figure 7 – GOOSE Testing Mode

To activate GOOSE Testing Mode press Function key 1

To send a testing GOOSE message press Function key 6.

LED A, B and C are used to check that the P849 receives correctly GOOSEs.

GOOSE Testing mode in case of P746 one box mode:

P849/EN AP/D33

Figure 8 – GOOSE Testing mode in case of P746 one box mode

Page (AP) 6-9

(AP) 6 Application Notes

1.1.3.2

Application of the MiCOM P849 Device

GOOSE_A and GOOSE_B are test GOOSE messages (please refer to default PSL for more detail) LED A on the relay lights on as soon as GOOSE_B is received by P849

GOOSE Testing Mode in Case of P746 Three Box Mode:

1.2

1.2.1

Figure 9 - GOOSE Testing mode in case of P746 three box mode

GOOSE_A and GOOSE_B are test GOOSE messages (please refer to default PSL for more detail) LED A on the P849 lights on as soon as GOOSE_B1 is received by P849. It proves that GOOSEs are correctky echanged between P849 and P746-Box1.

In the same manner LED B on the P849 lights on as soon as GOOSE_B2 is received by

P849.

In the same manner LED C on the P849 lights on as soon as GOOSE_B3 is received by

P849.

Control Application

Definition

MiCOM P849 will be able to communicate with usual legacy protocols and thus will behave as Remote Terminal Unit (Communication to Digital Control System).

Page (AP) 6-10

Figure 10 – P849 reports and serial communications

P849/EN AP/D33

Application of MiCOM P849 Functions

2

2.1

(AP) 6 Application Notes

APPLICATION OF MICOM P849 FUNCTIONS

Warning Before carrying out any work on the equipment, you should be familiar with the contents of the Safety

Information chapter/safety guide SFTY/4LM/C11 or later issue, the Technical Data chapter and the ratings on the equipment rating label.

The non-protection features for the scheme are summarised below:

Standard event and precise event recording – Comprehensive analysis available via standard event lists, and precise event records which can be accessed locally via the relay LCD or remotely via the serial communication link.

Real time clock/time synchronisation – Time synchronisation available via IRIG-B input.

Four settings groups – Independent remotely selectable setting groups to allow for customer specific applications.

Commissioning test facilities.

Continuous self monitoring – extensive self checking routines to ensure maximum reliability.

Graphical Programmable Scheme Logic (PSL) – allowing user control logic to be tailored to the specific application.

Function Keys

These function keys can be used to trigger any function that they are connected to as part of the PSL. The function key commands can be found in the ‘Function Keys’ menu.

In the ‘Fn. Key Status’ menu cell there is a 10 bit word which represent the 10 function key commands and their status can be read from this 10 bit word. In the programmable scheme logic editor 10 function key signals, DDB 676 – 685, which can be set to a logic 1 or On state are available to perform control functions defined by the user.

The “Function Keys” column has ‘Fn. Key n Mode’ cell which allows the user to configure the function key as either ‘Toggled’ or ‘Normal’. In the ‘Toggle’ mode the function key

DDB signal output will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, by activating the function key on the next key press. In the ‘Normal’ mode, the function key

DDB signal will remain energized for as long as the function key is pressed and will then reset automatically.

A minimum pulse duration can be programmed for a function key by adding a minimum pulse timer to the function key DDB output signal. The “Fn. Key n Status” cell is used to enable/unlock or disable the function key signals in PSL. The ‘Lock’ setting has been specifically provided to allow the locking of a function key thus preventing further activation of the key on consequent key presses. This allows function keys that are set to

‘Toggled’ mode and their DDB signal active ‘high’, to be locked in their active state thus preventing any further key presses from desactivating the associated function. Locking a function key that is set to the “Normal” mode causes the associated DDB signals to be permanently off. This safety feature prevents any inadvertent function key presses from activating or deactivating critical relay functions. The “Fn. Key Labels” cell makes it possible to change the text associated with each individual function key. This text will be displayed when a function key is accessed in the function key menu, or it can be displayed in the PSL.

P849/EN AP/D33 Page (AP) 6-11

(AP) 6 Application Notes

2.2

Application of MiCOM P849 Functions

The status of the function keys is stored in battery backed memory. In the event that the auxiliary supply is interrupted the status of all the function keys will be recorded.

Following the restoration of the auxiliary supply the status of the function keys, prior to supply failure, will be reinstated. If the battery is missing or flat the function key DDB signals will set to logic 0 once the auxiliary supply is restored. The relay will only recognise a single function key press at a time and that a minimum key press duration of approximately 200msec. is required before the key press is recognised in PSL. This deglitching feature avoids accidental double presses.

DDB: ‘

Function Key 1’ (see P849/EN PL)

The activation of one of the ten function key will drive an associated DDB signal.

The DDB signal will remain active depending on the programmed setting i.e. toggled or normal. Toggled mode means the DDB signal will remain latched or unlatched on key press and normal means the DDB will only be active for the duration of the key press.

DDB: ‘

FnKey LED 1 Red

Ten programmable tri-colour LEDs associated with each function key are used to indicate the status of the associated pushbutton’s function. Each LED can be programmed to indicate red, yellow or green as required. The green LED is configured by driving the green DDB input. The red LED is configured by driving the red DDB input. The yellow LED is configured by driving the red and green DDB inputs simultaneously. When the LED is activated the associated DDB signal will be asserted. For example, if FnKey Led 1 Red is activated, DDB will be asserted.

DDB ‘

FnKey LED 1 Grn

The same explanation as for Fnkey 1 Red applies.

DDB ‘

LED 1 Red

Eight programmable tri-colour LEDs that can be programmed to indicate red, yellow or green as required. The green LED is configured by driving the green DDB input. The red LED is configured by driving the red DDB input. The yellow LED is configured by driving the red and green DDB inputs simultaneously. When the LED is activated the associated DDB signal will be asserted. For example, if Led 1 Red is activated, DDB #640 will be asserted.

DDB ‘

LED 1 Grn

The same explanation as for LED 1 Red applies.

Opto Inputs Configuration

The MiCOM P849 is fitted with universal opto-isolated logic inputs (opto inputs) that can be programmed for the nominal battery voltage of the circuit of which they are a part i.e. thereby allowing different voltages for different circuits e.g. signalling. They can also be programmed as Standard 60% - 80% or

50% - 70% to satisfy different operating

constraints (

Dual Opto).

Threshold levels are as follows:

Nominal Battery

Voltage (Vdc)

Standard 60% - 80% 50% - 70%

24 / 27

30 / 34

48 / 54

110 / 125

No Operation

(logic 0) Vdc

<16.2

<20.4

<32.4

<75.0

Operation

(logic 1) Vdc

>19.2

>24.0

>38.4

>88.0

No Operation

(logic 0) Vdc

<12.0

<15.0

<24.0

<55.0

Operation

(logic 1) Vdc

>16.8

>21.0

>33.6

>77.0

Page (AP) 6-12 P849/EN AP/D33

Application of MiCOM P849 Functions

2.3

2.3.1

2.3.2

(AP) 6 Application Notes

Nominal Battery

Voltage (Vdc)

Standard 60% - 80%

220 / 250

No Operation

(logic 0) Vdc

<150.0

Operation

(logic 1) Vdc

>176.0

Table 1 – Opto-Config Threshold Levels

50% - 70%

No Operation

(logic 0) Vdc

<110

Operation

(logic 1) Vdc

>154

This lower value eliminates fleeting pickups that may occur during a battery earth fault, when stray capacitance may present up to 50% of battery voltage across an input.

Each input also has selectable filtering which can be utilised. This allows use of a pre-set filter of ½ cycle which renders the input immune to induced noise on the wiring: although this method is secure it can be slow. This can be improved by switching off the ½ cycle filter in which case one of the following methods to reduce ac noise should be considered. The first method is to use double pole switching on the input, the second is to use screened twisted cable on the input circuit.

Hotkeys / Control Inputs

Control Inputs

The control inputs function as software switches that can be set or reset either locally or remotely. These inputs can be used to trigger any function that they are connected to as part of the PSL.

This column is visible when the “Control I/P Config” setting (“Configuration” column) =

“visible”.

There are three setting columns associated with the control inputs which are: “CONTROL

INPUTS”, “CTRL I/P CONFIG” and “CTRL I/P LABELS”. The function of these columns is described below.

The Control Input commands can be found in the ‘Control Input’ menu. In the ‘Ctrl I/P status’ menu cell there is a 32 bit word which represent the 32 control input commands.

The status of the 32 control inputs can be read from this 32 bit word. The 32 control inputs can also be set and reset from this cell by setting a 1 to set or 0 to reset a particular control input. Alternatively, each of the 32 Control Inputs can be set and reset using the individual menu setting cells ‘Control Input 1, 2, 3’ etc. The Control Inputs are available through the relay menu as described above and also via the rear communications.

The two hotkeys in the front panel can perform a direct command if a dedicated PSL has been previously created using DDB: '

CONTROL INPUT' cells (see P849/EN PL). The

MiCOM P849 offers 32 control inputs which can be activated by the Hotkey manually or by the IEC 103 remote communication.

Control I/P Configuration

The “CTRL I/P CONFIG” column has several functions one of which allows the user to configure the control inputs as either ‘latched’ or ‘pulsed’. A latched control input will remain in the set state until a reset command is given, either by the menu or the serial communications. A pulsed control input, however, will remain energised for 10ms after the set command is given and will then reset automatically (i.e. no reset command required).

In addition to the latched / pulsed option this column also allows the control inputs to be individually assigned to the “Hotkey” menu by setting ‘1’ in the appropriate bit in the

“Hotkey Enabled” cell. The hotkey menu allows the control inputs to be set, reset or pulsed without the need to enter the “CONTROL INPUTS” column. The “Ctrl Command”

P849/EN AP/D33 Page (AP) 6-13

(AP) 6 Application Notes

2.3.3

Application of MiCOM P849 Functions cell also allows the SET / RESET text, displayed in the hotkey menu, to be changed to something more suitable for the application of an individual control input, such as “ON /

OFF”, “IN / OUT” etc.

Control I/P Labels

The “CTRL I/P LABELS” column makes it possible to change the text associated with each individual control input. This text will be displayed when a control input is accessed by the hotkey menu, or it can be displayed in the PSL.

Note With the exception of pulsed operation, the status of the control inputs is stored in battery backed memory. In the event that the auxiliary supply is interrupted the status of all the inputs will be recorded. Following the restoration of the auxiliary supply the status of the control inputs, prior to supply failure, will be reinstated. If the battery is missing or flat the control inputs will set to logic 0 once the auxiliary supply is restored

Page (AP) 6-14 P849/EN AP/D33

MiCOM Px4x

(SE) 7 Using the PSL Editor

Px4x/EN SE/C11

USING THE PSL EDITOR

CHAPTER 7

Page (SE) 7-1

(SE) 7 Using the PSL Editor

MiCOM Px4x

Date: 08/2014

Products covered by this chapter:

Hardware Suffix:

Software Version:

Connection Diagrams:

This chapter covers the specific versions of the MiCOM products listed below. This includes

only the following combinations of Software Version and Hardware Suffix.

All MiCOM Px4x products

All MiCOM Px4x products

10P141xx (xx = 01 to 07)

10P142xx (xx = 01 to 07)

10P143xx (xx = 01 to 07)

10P145xx (xx = 01 to 07)

10P241xx (xx = 01 to 02)

10P242xx (xx = 01)

10P243xx (xx = 01)

10P342xx (xx = 01 to 17)

10P343xx (xx = 01 to 19)

10P344xx (xx = 01 to 12)

10P345xx (xx = 01 to 07)

10P44303 (SH 01 and 03)

10P44304 (SH 01 and 03)

10P44305 (SH 01 and 03)

10P44306 (SH 01 and 03)

10P445xx (xx = 01 to 04)

10P44600

10P44601 (SH 1 to 2)

10P44602 (SH 1 to 2)

10P44603 (SH 1 to 2)

10P54302 (SH 1 to 2)

10P54303 (SH 1 to 2)

10P54400

10P54404 (SH 1 to 2)

10P54405 (SH 1 to 2)

10P54502 (SH 1 to 2)

10P54503 (SH 1 to 2)

10P54600

10P54604 (SH 1 to 2)

10P54605 (SH 1 to 2)

10P54606 (SH 1 to 2)

10P54702xx (xx = 01 to 02)

10P54703xx (xx = 01 to 02)

10P54704xx (xx = 01 to 02)

10P54705xx (xx = 01 to 02)

10P642xx (xx = 1 to 10)

10P643xx (xx = 1 to 6)

10P645xx (xx = 1 to 9)

10P740xx (xx = 01 to 07)

10P746xx (xx = 01 to 07)

10P8401

10P8402

10P8401

10P8402

10P8403

10P849xx (xx = 01 to 06)

Page (SE) 7-2 Px4x/EN SE/C11

Contents

CONTENTS

1 Overview

2 MiCOM S1 Studio PSL Editor

2.1

2.2

2.3

2.4

2.5

2.6

How to Obtain MiCOM S1 Studio Software

To Start the MiCOM S1 Studio

To Open a Pre-Existing System

To Start the PSL Editor

How to use MiCOM PSL Editor

Warnings

3 Toolbar and Commands

3.1

3.2

3.3

3.4

3.5

3.6

3.7

3.8

Standard Tools

Alignment Tools

Drawing Tools

Nudge Tools

Rotation Tools

Structure Tools

Zoom and Pan Tools

Logic Symbols

4 PSL Logic Signals Properties

4.8

4.9

4.10

4.11

4.12

4.13

4.14

4.15

4.1

4.2

4.2.1

4.3

4.4

4.5

4.6

4.7

4.16

4.17

4.18

Signal Properties Menu

Link Properties

Rules for Linking Symbols

Opto Signal Properties

Input Signal Properties

Output Signal Properties

GOOSE Input Signal Properties

GOOSE Output Signal Properties

Control In Signal Properties

InterMiCOM Output Commands Properties

InterMiCOM Input Commands Properties

Function Key Properties

Fault Recorder Trigger Properties

LED Signal Properties

Contact Signal Properties

LED Conditioner Properties

Contact Conditioner Properties

Timer Properties

Gate Properties

Px4x/EN SE/C11

(SE) 7 Using the PSL Editor

Page (SE) 7-

15

18

19

19

19

17

17

18

18

16

16

17

17

15

15

16

16

20

20

21

9

11

12

12

13

9

10

10

11

5

6

6

6

6

6

7

8

Page (SE) 7-3

(SE) 7 Using the PSL Editor

4.19

SR Programmable Gate Properties

5 Making a Record of MiCOM Px40 Device Settings

5.1

5.2

5.3

Using MiCOM S1 Studio to Manage Device Settings

Extract Settings from a MiCOM Px40 Device

Send Settings to a MiCOM Px40 Device

FIGURES

Figure 1 - Example of a PSL editor module

Figure 2 - Link properties

Figure 3 - Red, green and yellow LED outputs

Figure 4 - Contact conditioner settings

Figure 5 - Timer settings

Figure 6 - Gate properties

Figure 7 - SR latch component properties

TABLES

Table 1 - SR programmable gate properties

Page (SE) 7-

7

15

19

20

20

21

22

Page (SE) 7-

22

Figures

22

23

23

23

24

Page (SE) 7-4 Px4x/EN SE/C11

Overview

1

(SE) 7 Using the PSL Editor

OVERVIEW

The purpose of the Programmable Scheme Logic (PSL) is to allow the relay user to configure an individual protection scheme to suit their own particular application. This is achieved through the use of programmable logic gates and delay timers.

The input to the PSL is any combination of the status of opto inputs. It is also used to assign the mapping of functions to the opto inputs and output contacts, the outputs of the protection elements, e.g. protection starts and trips, and the outputs of the fixed protection scheme logic. The fixed scheme logic provides the relay’s standard protection schemes.

The PSL itself consists of software logic gates and timers. The logic gates can be programmed to perform a range of different logic functions and can accept any number of inputs. The timers are used either to create a programmable delay, and/or to condition the logic outputs, e.g. to create a pulse of fixed duration on the output regardless of the length of the pulse on the input. The outputs of the PSL are the LEDs on the front panel of the relay and the output contacts at the rear.

The execution of the PSL logic is event driven; the logic is processed whenever any of its inputs change, for example as a result of a change in one of the digital input signals or a trip output from a protection element. Also, only the part of the PSL logic that is affected by the particular input change that has occurred is processed. This reduces the amount of processing time that is used by the PSL; even with large, complex PSL schemes the relay trip time will not lengthen.

This system provides flexibility for the user to create their own scheme logic design.

However, it also means that the PSL can be configured into a very complex system; hence setting of the PSL is implemented through the PC support package MiCOM S1

Studio.

Px4x/EN SE/C11 Page (SE) 7-5

(SE) 7 Using the PSL Editor

2

2.1

2.2

2.3

2.4

MiCOM S1 Studio PSL Editor

MICOM S1 STUDIO PSL EDITOR

The PSL Editor software can be used from within MiCOM S1 Studio or directly.

This chapter assumes that you are using the PSL Editor from within MiCOM S1 Studio.

If you use it from MiCOM S1 Studio, the S1 Studio software will be locked whilst you are using the PSL editor software. The S1 Studio software will be unlocked when you close the PSL Editor software.

The MiCOM S1 Studio product is updated periodically. These updates provide support for new features (such as allowing you to manage new MiCOM products, as well as using new software releases and hardware suffixes). The updates may also include fixes.

Accordingly, we strongly advise customers to use the latest Schneider Electric

version of MiCOM S1 Studio.

How to Obtain MiCOM S1 Studio Software

The MiCOM S1 Studio software is avilable from the Schneider Electric website:

• www.schneider-electric.com

To Start the MiCOM S1 Studio

To Start the MiCOM S1 Studio software, click the Start > Programs > Schneider

Electric > MiCOM S1 Studio > MiCOM S1 Studio menu option.

To Open a Pre-Existing System

Within MiCOM S1 Studio, click the File + Open System menu option.

Navigate to where the scheme is stored, then double-click to open the scheme.

To Start the PSL Editor

The PSL editor lets you connect to any MiCOM device front port, retrieve and edit its PSL files and send the modified file back to a suitable MiCOM device.

Px30 and Px40 products are edited different versions of the PSL Editor. There is one link to the Px30 editor and one link to the Px40 editor.

To start the PSL editor for Px40 products:

Highlight the PSL file you wish to edit, and then either:

Double-click the highlighted PSL file,

Click the open icon or

In the MiCOM S1 Studio main menu, select Tools > PSL PSL editor (Px40) menu.

The PSL Editor will then start, and show you the relevant PSL Diagram(s) for the file you

have opened. An example of such a PSL diagram is shown in Figure 1.

Page (SE) 7-6 Px4x/EN SE/C11

MiCOM S1 Studio PSL Editor

(SE) 7 Using the PSL Editor

2.5

P0280ENa

Figure 1 - Example of a PSL editor module

How to use MiCOM PSL Editor

The MiCOM PSL editor lets you:

Start a new PSL diagram

Extract a PSL file from a MiCOM Px40 IED

Open a diagram from a PSL file

Add logic components to a PSL file

Move components in a PSL file

Edit link of a PSL file

Add link to a PSL file

Highlight path in a PSL file

Use a conditioner output to control logic

Download PSL file to a MiCOM Px40 IED

Print PSL files

For a detailed discussion on how to use these functions, please refer to MiCOM S1

Studio Users Manual.

Px4x/EN SE/C11 Page (SE) 7-7

(SE) 7 Using the PSL Editor

2.6

MiCOM S1 Studio PSL Editor

Warnings

Before the scheme is sent to the relay checks are done. Various warning messages may be displayed as a result of these checks.

The Editor first reads in the model number of the connected relay, then compares it with the stored model number. A "wildcard" comparison is used. If a model mismatch occurs, a warning is generated before sending starts. Both the stored model number and the number read from the relay are displayed with the warning. However, the user must decide if the settings to be sent are compatible with the relay that is connected. Ignoring the warning could lead to undesired behavior of the relay.

If there are any potential problems of an obvious nature then a list will be generated. The types of potential problems that the program attempts to detect are:

One or more gates, LED signals, contact signals, and/or timers have their outputs linked directly back to their inputs. An erroneous link of this sort could lock up the relay, or cause other more subtle problems to arise.

Inputs to Trigger (ITT) exceeds the number of inputs. If a programmable gate has its ITT value set to greater than the number of actual inputs; the gate can never activate. There is no lower ITT value check. A 0-value does not generate a warning.

Too many gates. There is a theoretical upper limit of 256 gates in a scheme, but the practical limit is determined by the complexity of the logic. In practice the scheme would have to be very complex, and this error is unlikely to occur.

Too many links. There is no fixed upper limit to the number of links in a scheme.

However, as with the maximum number of gates, the practical limit is determined by the complexity of the logic. In practice the scheme would have to be very complex, and this error is unlikely to occur.

Page (SE) 7-8 Px4x/EN SE/C11

Toolbar and Commands

3

3.1

(SE) 7 Using the PSL Editor

TOOLBAR AND COMMANDS

There are a number of toolbars available for easy navigation and editing of PSL.

Standard Tools

For file management and printing.

Blank Scheme Create a blank scheme based on a relay model.

Default

Configuration

Open

Save

Create a default scheme based on a relay model.

Open an existing diagram.

Save the active diagram.

Print

Undo

Redo

Display the Windows Print dialog, enabling you to print the current diagram.

Undo the last action.

Redo the previously undone action.

Redraw Redraw the diagram.

Number of

DDBs

Calculate

CRC

Display the DDB numbers of the links.

Calculate unique number based on both the function and layout of the logic.

Compare Files Compare current file with another stored on disk.

Select Enable the select function. While this button is active, the mouse pointer is displayed as an arrow. This is the default mouse pointer. It is sometimes referred to as the selection pointer.

Point to a component and click the left mouse button to select it.

Several components may be selected by clicking the left mouse button on the diagram and dragging the pointer to create a rectangular selection area.

Px4x/EN SE/C11 Page (SE) 7-9

(SE) 7 Using the PSL Editor

3.2

3.3

Toolbar and Commands

Alignment Tools

To align logic elements horizontally or vertically into groups.

Align Top

Align Middle

Align all selected components so the top of each is level with the others.

Align all selected components so the middle of each is level with the others.

Align Left

Align Centre

Align Right

Align all selected components so the leftmost point of each is level with the others.

Align all selected components so the centre of each is level with the others.

Align all selected components so the rightmost point of each is level with the others.

Drawing Tools

To add text comments and other annotations, for easier reading of PSL schemes.

Rectangle

Ellipse

Line

Polyline

Curve

Text

Image

When selected, move the mouse pointer to where you want one of the corners to be hold down the left mouse button and move it to where you want the diagonally opposite corner to be. Release the button. To draw a square hold down the SHIFT key to ensure height and width remain the same.

When selected, move the mouse pointer to where you want one of the corners to be hold down the left mouse button and move until the ellipse is the size you want it to be. Release the button. To draw a circle hold down the SHIFT key to ensure height and width remain the same.

When selected, move the mouse pointer to where you want the line to start, hold down left mouse, move to the position of the end of the line and release button. To draw horizontal or vertical lines only hold down the

SHIFT key.

When selected, move the mouse pointer to where you want the polyline to start and click the left mouse button. Now move to the next point on the line and click the left button. Double click to indicate the final point in the polyline.

When selected, move the mouse pointer to where you want the polycurve to start and click the left mouse button. Each time you click the button after this a line will be drawn, each line bisects its associated curve.

Double click to end. The straight lines will disappear leaving the polycurve. Note: whilst drawing the lines associated with the polycurve, a curve will not be displayed untileither three lines in succession have been drawn or the polycurve line is complete.

When selected, move the mouse pointer to where you want the text to begin and click the left mouse button. To change the font, size or colour, or text attributes select Properties from the right mouse button menu.

When selected, the Open dialog is displayed, enabling you to select a bitmap or icon file. Click Open, position the mouse pointer where you want the image to be and click the left mouse button.

Page (SE) 7-10 Px4x/EN SE/C11

Toolbar and Commands

3.4

3.5

(SE) 7 Using the PSL Editor

Nudge Tools

To move logic elements.

The nudge tool buttons enable you to shift a selected component a single unit in the selected direction, or five pixels if the SHIFT key is held down.

As well as using the tool buttons, single unit nudge actions on the selected components can be achieved using the arrow keys on the keyboard.

Nudge Up

Nudge Down

Nudge Left

Nudge Right

Shift the selected component(s) upwards by one unit. Holding down the SHIFT key while clicking on this button will shift the component five units upwards.

Shift the selected component(s) downwards by one unit. Holding down the SHIFT key while clicking on this button will shift the component five units downwards.

Shift the selected component(s) to the left by one unit. Holding down the SHIFT key while clicking on this button will shift the component five units to the left.

Shift the selected component(s) to the right by one unit. Holding down the SHIFT key while clicking on this button will shift the component five units to the right.

Rotation Tools

To spin, mirror and flip.

Free Rotate

Rotate Left

Rotate Right Rotate the selected component 90 degrees to the right.

Enable the rotation function. While rotation is active components may be rotated as required. Press the ESC key or click on the diagram to disable the function.

Rotate the selected component 90 degrees to the left.

Flip Horizontal Flip the component horizontally.

Flip Vertical Flip the component vertically.

Px4x/EN SE/C11 Page (SE) 7-11

(SE) 7 Using the PSL Editor

3.6

3.7

Toolbar and Commands

Structure Tools

To change the stacking order of logic components.

Bring to Front Bring the selected components in front of all other components.

Send to Back Bring the selected components behind all other components.

Bring Forward Bring the selected component forward one layer.

Send

Backward

Send the selected component backwards one layer.

Zoom and Pan Tools

For scaling the displayed screen size, viewing the entire PSL, or zooming to a selection.

Zoom In Increases the Zoom magnification by 25%.

Zoom Out Decreases the Zoom magnification by 25%.

Zoom

Enable the zoom function. While this button is active, the mouse pointer is displayed as a magnifying glass. Right-clicking will zoom out and leftclicking will zoom in. Press the ESC key to return to the selection pointer.

Click and drag to zoom in to an area.

Zoom to

Selection

Pan

Display at the highest magnification that will show the selected component(s).

Enable the pan function. While this button is active, the mouse pointer is displayed as a hand. Hold down the left mouse button and drag the pointer across the diagram to pan. Press the ESC key to return to the selection pointer.

Page (SE) 7-12 Px4x/EN SE/C11

Toolbar and Commands

3.8

(SE) 7 Using the PSL Editor

Logic Symbols

This toolbar provides icons to place each type of logic element into the scheme diagram.

Not all elements are available in all devices. Icons will only be displayed for those elements available in the selected device. Depending on the device, the toolbar may not include Function key or coloured LED conditioner/signal or Contact conditioner or SR

Gate icons.

P2718ENa

Link

Create a link between two logic symbols.

Opto Signal

Create an opto signal.

Input Signal

Create an input signal.

Output Signal

Create an output signal.

GOOSE In

Create an input signal to logic to receive a UCA2.0 or IEC 61850 GOOSE message transmitted from another IED.

GOOSE Out

Create an output signal from logic to transmit a UCA2.0 or IEC 61850 GOOSE message to another IED.

Control In

Create an input signal to logic that can be operated from an external command.

Integral Intertripping In/InterMiCOM In

Create an input signal to logic to receive a MiCOM command transmitted from another

IED. InterMiCOM is not available for all products.

Integral Intertripping Out/InterMiCOM Out Create an output signal from logic to transmit a MiCOM command to another IED. InterMiCOM is not available for all products.

Function Key

Create a function key input signal.

Trigger Signal

Create a fault record trigger.

LED Signal

Create an LED input signal that repeats the status of the LED.

The icon colour shows whether the product uses mono-colour or tri-color LEDs.

Contact Signal

Create a contact signal.

Px4x/EN SE/C11 Page (SE) 7-13

(SE) 7 Using the PSL Editor

Toolbar and Commands

LED Conditioner

Create a LED conditioner.

The icon colour shows whether the product uses mono-colour or tri-color LEDs.

Contact Conditioner

Create a contact conditioner. Contact conditioning is not available for all products.

Timer

Create a timer.

AND Gate

Create an AND Gate.

OR Gate

Create an OR Gate.

Programmable Gate

Create a programmable gate.

SR gate

Create an SR gate.

S

R

O

Page (SE) 7-14 Px4x/EN SE/C11

PSL Logic Signals Properties

4

4.1

4.2

(SE) 7 Using the PSL Editor

PSL LOGIC SIGNALS PROPERTIES

The logic signal toolbar is used for the selection of logic signals.

This allows you to link signals together to program the PSL. A number of different properties are associated with each signal. In the following sections these are characterized by the use of an icon from the toolbar; together with a signal name and a

DDB number. The name and DDB number are shown in a pointed rectangular block, which includes a colour code, the icon, the name, DDB No and a directional pointer. One example of such a block (for P54x for Opto Signal 1 DDB No #032) is shown below:

Input 1

DDB #032

More examples of these are shown in the following properties sections.

Important The DDB Numbers vary according to the particular product and the particular name, so that Opto Signal 1 may not be DDB No

#032 for all products. The various names and DDB numbers illustrated below are provided as an example.

You need to look up the DDB numbers for the signal and the specific MiCOM product you are working on in the relevant

DDB table for your chosen product.

Signal Properties Menu

The logic signal toolbar is used for the selection of logic signals. To use this:

Use the logic toolbar to select logic signals.

This is enabled by default but to hide or show it, select

View > Logic Toolbar.

Zoom in or out of a logic diagram using the toolbar icon or select View > Zoom Percent.

Right-click any logic signal and a context-sensitive menu appears.

Certain logic elements show the Properties… option. Select this and a Component

Properties window appears. The Component Properties window and the signals listed vary depending on the logic symbol selected.

The following subsections describe each of the available logic symbols.

Link Properties

Links form the logical link between the output of a signal, gate or condition and the input to any element.

Any link that is connected to the input of a gate can be inverted. Right-click the input and select

Properties…. The Link Properties window appears.

Figure 2 - Link properties

Px4x/EN SE/C11 Page (SE) 7-15

(SE) 7 Using the PSL Editor

4.2.1

4.3

4.4

4.5

PSL Logic Signals Properties

Rules for Linking Symbols

An inverted link is shown with a small circle on the input to a gate. A link must be connected to the input of a gate to be inverted.

Links can only be started from the output of a signal, gate, or conditioner, and can only be ended at an input to any element.

Signals can only be an input or an output. To follow the convention for gates and conditioners, input signals are connected from the left and output signals to the right. The

Editor automatically enforces this convention.

A link is refused for the following reasons:

An attempt to connect to a signal that is already driven. The reason for the refusal may not be obvious because the signal symbol may appear elsewhere in the diagram.

Right-click the link and select Highlight to find the other signal. Click anywhere on the diagram to disable the highlight.

An attempt is made to repeat a link between two symbols. The reason for the refusal may not be obvious because the existing link may be represented elsewhere in the diagram.

Opto Signal Properties

Each opto input can be selected and used for programming in PSL. Activation of the opto input drives an associated DDB signal.

For example, activating opto Input L1 asserts DDB 032 in the PSL for the P14x, P34x,

P44y, P445, P54x, P547, P74x, P746, P841, P849product.

Input 1

DDB #032

DDB Nos “Input 1 DDB #064” applies to: P24x, P64x.

“Opto Label DDB #064” applies to: P44x.

Input Signal Properties

Relay logic functions provide logic output signals that can be used for programming in

PSL. Depending on the relay functionality, operation of an active relay function drives an associated DDB signal in PSL.

For example, DDB 671 is asserted in the PSL for the P44y, P547 & P841 product if the active earth fault 1, stage 1 protection operate/trip.

IN>1 Trip

DDB #671

Output Signal Properties

Relay logic functions provide logic input signals that can be used for programming in

PSL. Depending on the relay functionality, activation of the output signal will drive an associated DDB signal in PSL and cause an associated response to the relay function.

For example, if DDB 409 is asserted in the PSL for the P44y, P54x, P547 and P841 product, it will block the sensitive earth function stage 1 timer.

ISEF>1 Timer Blk

DDB #409

Page (SE) 7-16 Px4x/EN SE/C11

PSL Logic Signals Properties

4.6

4.7

4.8

4.9

(SE) 7 Using the PSL Editor

GOOSE Input Signal Properties

The PSL interfaces with the GOOSE Scheme Logic using 32 virtual inputs. The Virtual

Inputs can be used in much the same way as the Opto Input signals.

The logic that drives each of the Virtual Inputs is contained within the relay’s GOOSE

Scheme Logic file. It is possible to map any number of bit-pairs, from any enrolled device, using logic gates onto a Virtual Input (see MiCOM S1 Studio Users Manual for more details).

For example DDB 224 will be asserted in PSL for the P44y, P54x, P547 & P841 product should virtual input 1 operate.

Virtual Input 1

DDB #224

GOOSE Output Signal Properties

The PSl interfaces with the GOOSE Scheme Logic using of 32 virtual outputs. Virtual outputs can be mapped to bit-pairs for transmitting to any enrolled devices.

For example if DDB 256 is asserted in PSL for the P44y, P54x, P547 and P841 product,

Virtual Output 32 and its associated mappings will operate.

Virtual Output 1

DDB #256

Control In Signal Properties

There are 32 control inputs which can be activated via the relay menu, ‘hotkeys’ or via rear communications. Depending on the programmed setting i.e. latched or pulsed, an associated DDB signal will be activated in PSL when a control input is operated.

For example operate control input 1 to assert DDB 192 in the PSL for the P44y, P54x,

P547 and P841 product.

Control Input 1

DDB #192

InterMiCOM Output Commands Properties

Important This does not apply to these products: P24x, P34x, P44x, P64x,

P547, P74x, P746, P841 & P849.

There are 16 InterMiCOM outputs that could be selected and use for teleprotection, remote commands, etc. “InterMiCOM Out” is a send command to a remote end that could be mapped to any logic output or opto input. This will be transmitted to the remote end as corresponding “InterMiCOM In” command for the P14x, P44y, P445 & P54x product.

IM64 Ch1 Output1

DDB #112

Px4x/EN SE/C11 Page (SE) 7-17

(SE) 7 Using the PSL Editor

4.10

4.11

4.12

PSL Logic Signals Properties

InterMiCOM Input Commands Properties

Important This does not apply to these products: P24x, P34x, P44x, P64x,

P547, P74x, P746, P841 & P849.

There are 16 InterMiCOM inputs that could be selected and use for teleprotection, remote commands, etc. “InterMiCOM In” is a received signal from remote end that could be mapped to a selected output relay or logic input for the P14x, P44y, P445 & P54x, product.

IM64 Ch1 Input1

DDB #096

Example:

Relay End A

Relay End B

At end A, InterMiCOM Output 1 is mapped to the command indication “Clear Statistics” (issued at end A).

At end B, InterMiCOM Input 1 is mapped to the command “Clear

Statistics”.

Upon receive of IM64 1 from relay at end A, the relay at end B will reset its statistics.

Clear Stats Cmd

DDB #1020

IM64 Ch1 Output1

DDB #112

P2688ENa

IM64 Ch1 Input1

DDB #096

IM64 Ch1 Output1

DDB #112

P2689ENa

Function Key Properties

Each function key can be selected and used for programming in PSL. Activation of the function key will drive an associated DDB signal and the DDB signal will remain active depending on the programmed setting i.e. toggled or normal. Toggled mode means the

DDB signal will remain latched or unlatched on key press and normal means the DDB will only be active for the duration of the key press.

Function Key 1

DDB #1096

For example, operate function key 1 to assert DDB 1096 in the PSL for the P44y, P54x,

P547 or P841 product.

Fault Recorder Trigger Properties

The fault recording facility can be activated, by driving the fault recorder trigger DDB signal.

For example assert DDB 702 to activate the fault recording in the PSL for the P44y,

P54x, P547 or P841 product.

Fault REC TRIG

DDB #702

Page (SE) 7-18 Px4x/EN SE/C11

PSL Logic Signals Properties

4.13

4.14

4.15

(SE) 7 Using the PSL Editor

LED Signal Properties

All programmable LEDs will drive associated DDB signal when the LED is activated.

For example DDB 1036 will be asserted when LED 7 is activated for the P44y, P54x,

P547 or P841 product.

LED7 Red

DDB #1036

Contact Signal Properties

All relay output contacts will drive associated DDB signal when the output contact is activated.

For example DDB 009 will be asserted when output R10 is activated for all products.

Output R10

DDB #009

LED Conditioner Properties

1. Select the LED name from the list (only shown when inserting a new symbol).

2. Configure the LED output to be Red, Yellow or Green.

Configure a Green LED by driving the Green DDB input.

Configure a RED LED by driving the RED DDB input.

Configure a Yellow LED by driving the RED and GREEN DDB inputs simultaneously.

1

Non -

Latching

FnKey LED1 Red

DDB #1040

FnKey LEDGm

DDB #1041

LED Output Red

1

Non -

Latching

FnKey LED1 Red

DDB #1040

FnKey LEDGm

DDB #1041

LED Output Green

1

Non -

Latching

FnKey LED1 Red

DDB #1040

FnKey LEDGm

DDB #1041

LED Output Yellow

P2610ENa

Figure 3 - Red, green and yellow LED outputs

3. Configure the LED output to be latching or non-latching.

DDB #642 and DDB #643 applies to these products: P14x, P44x, P74x, P746 and P849.

DDB #1040 and DDB #1041 applies to these products: P24x, P34x, P44y, P54x, P547,

P64x and P841.

Px4x/EN SE/C11 Page (SE) 7-19

(SE) 7 Using the PSL Editor

4.16

PSL Logic Signals Properties

Contact Conditioner Properties

Each contact can be conditioned with an associated timer that can be selected for pick up, drop off, dwell, pulse, pick-up/drop-off, straight-through, or latching operation.

Straight-through means it is not conditioned in any way whereas Latching is used to create a sealed-in or lockout type function.

4.17

Figure 4 - Contact conditioner settings

1. Select the contact

name from the Contact Name list (only shown when inserting a new symbol).

2. Choose the conditioner type required in the Mode tick list.

3. Set the Pick-up Time (in milliseconds), if required.

4. Set the

Drop-off Time (in milliseconds), if required.

Timer Properties

Each timer can be selected for pick up, drop off, dwell, pulse or pick-up/drop-off operation.

Page (SE) 7-20

Figure 5 - Timer settings

1. Choose the operation mode from the

Timer Mode tick list.

2. Set the Pick-up Time (in milliseconds), if required.

3. Set the Drop-off Time (in milliseconds), if required.

Px4x/EN SE/C11

PSL Logic Signals Properties

4.18

(SE) 7 Using the PSL Editor

Gate Properties

A Gate may be an AND, OR, or programmable gate.

An AND gate requires that all inputs are TRUE for the output to be TRUE.

An OR gate requires that one or more input is TRUE for the output to be TRUE.

A Programmable gate requires that the number of inputs that are TRUE is equal to or greater than its ‘Inputs to Trigger’ setting for the output to be TRUE.

, OR

Figure 6 - Gate properties

1. Select the Gate type AND, OR, or Programmable.

2. Set the number of inputs to trigger when Programmable is selected.

3. Select if the output of the gate should be inverted using the Invert Output check box. An inverted output is indicated with a "bubble" on the gate output.

Px4x/EN SE/C11 Page (SE) 7-21

(SE) 7 Using the PSL Editor

4.19

PSL Logic Signals Properties

SR Programmable Gate Properties

For many products a number of programmable SR Latches are added. They are configured by an appropriate version of PSL Editor (S1v2.14 version 5.0.0 or greater) where an SRQ icon features on the toolbar.

Each SR latch has a Q output. The Q output may be inverted in the PSL Editor under the

SR Latch component properties window. The SR Latches may be configured as

Standard (no input dominant), Set Dominant or Reset Dominant in the PSL Editor under the SR Latch component properties window. The truth table for the SR Latches is given below.

A

Programmable SR gate can be selected to operate with these latch properties:

S input R input O - Standard

O – Set input dominant

O – Rest input dominant

1

1

0

0

0

1

0

1

1

0

0

0

Table 1 - SR programmable gate properties

1

1

0

0

1

1

0

0

Page (SE) 7-22

S

R

O

Figure 7 - SR latch component properties

Select if the output of the gate should be inverted using the Invert Output check box. An inverted output is indicated with a "bubble" on the gate output.

Px4x/EN SE/C11

Making a Record of MiCOM Px40 Device Settings

5

5.1

5.2

(SE) 7 Using the PSL Editor

MAKING A RECORD OF MICOM PX40 DEVICE SETTINGS

Using MiCOM S1 Studio to Manage Device Settings

An engineer often needs to create a record of what settings have been applied to a device. In the past, they could have used paper printouts of all the available settings, and mark up the ones they had used. Keeping such a paper-based Settings Records could be time-consuming and prone to error (e.g. due to being settings written down incorrectly).

The MiCOM S1 Studio software lets you read from or write to MiCOM devices.

Extract lets you download all the settings from a MiCOM Px40 device. A summary

is given in Extract Settings from a MiCOM Px40 Device below.

Send lets you send the settings you currently have open in MiCOM S1 Studio. A

summary is given in Send Settings to a MiCOM Px40 Device below.

In most cases, it will be quicker and less error prone to extract settings electronically and store them in a settings file on a memory stick. In this way, there will be a digital record which is certain to be accurate. It is also possible to archive these settings files in a repository; so they can be used again or adapted for another use.

Full details of how to do these tasks is provided in the MiCOM S1 Studio help. A quick summary of the main steps is given below. In each case you need to make sure that:

Your computer includes the MiCOM S1 Studio software.

Your computer and the MiCOM device are powered on.

• You have used a suitable cable to connect your computer to the MiCOM device

(Front Port, Rear Port, Ethernet port or Modem as available).

Extract Settings from a MiCOM Px40 Device

Full details of how to do this is provided in the MiCOM S1 Studio help.

As a quick guide, you need to do the following:

1. In MiCOM S1 Studio, click the Quick Connect… button.

2. Select the relevant Device Type in the Quick Connect dialog box.

3. Click the relevant port in the Port Selection dialog box.

4. Enter the relevant connection parameters in the Connection Parameters dialog box and click the Finish button

5. MiCOM S1 Studio will try to communicate with the Px40 device. It will display a connected message if the connection attempt is successful.

6. The device will appear in the Studio Explorer pane on the top-left hand side of the interface.

7. Click the + button to expand the options for the device, then click on the Settings folder.

8. Right-click on Settings and select the Extract Settings link to read the settings on the device and store them on your computer or a memory stick attached to your computer.

9. After retrieving the settings file, close the dialog box by clicking the Close button.

Px4x/EN SE/C11 Page (SE) 7-23

(SE) 7 Using the PSL Editor

5.3

Making a Record of MiCOM Px40 Device Settings

Send Settings to a MiCOM Px40 Device

Full details of how to do this is provided in the MiCOM S1 Studio help.

As a quick guide, you need to do the following:

1. In MiCOM S1 Studio, click the Quick Connect… button.

2. Select the relevant Device Type in the Quick Connect dialog box.

3. Click the relevant port in the Port Selection dialog box.

4. Enter the relevant connection parameters in the Connection Parameters dialog box and click the Finish button

5. MiCOM S1 Studio will try to communicate with the Px40 device. It will display a connected message if the connection attempt is successful.

6. The device will appear in the Studio Explorer pane on the top-left hand side of the interface.

7. Click the + button to expand the options for the device, then click on the Settings link.

8. Right-click on the device name and select the Send link.

Note When you send settings to a MiCOM Px40 device, the data is stored in a temporary location at first. This temporary data is tested to make sure it is complete. If the temporary data is complete, it will be programmed into the

MiCOM Px40 device. This avoids the risk of a device being programmed with incomplete or corrupt settings.

9. In the Send To dialog box, select the settings file(s) you wish to send, then click the

Send button.

10. Close the the Send To dialog box by clicking the Close button.

Page (SE) 7-24 Px4x/EN SE/C11

MiCOM P849

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

P849/EN PL/D33

PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC

CHAPTER 8

Page (PL) 8-1

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

MiCOM P849

Date:

Products covered by this chapter:

Hardware Suffix:

Software Version:

Connection Diagrams:

08/2015

This chapter covers the specific versions of the MiCOM products listed below. This includes

only the following combinations of Software Version and Hardware Suffix.

M

B0

10P849xx (xx = 01 to 06)

Page (PL) 8-2 P849/EN PL/D33

Contents

CONTENTS

1 Overview

2 Description of the Logic Nodes

3 Factory Default Programmable Scheme Logic

4 Viewing and Printing Default PSL Diagrams

4.1

4.2

Typical Mappings

Download and Print PSL Diagrams

5 Programmable Scheme Logic

TABLES

Table 1 – Logic nodes sorted by DDB number

Table 3 – Model numbers, inputs and outputs

FIGURES

Figure 1 – Virtual inputs / relay outputs

Figure 2 – Goose testing mode

Figure 3 – Opto inputs / virtual outputs

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

Page (PL) 8-

27

28

28

28

5

6

29

Page (PL) 8-

26

27

Page (PL) 8-

29

30

31

P849/EN PL/D33 Page (PL) 8-3

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

Notes:

Figures

Page (PL) 8-4 P849/EN PL/D33

Overview

1

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

OVERVIEW

The purpose of the Programmable Scheme Logic (PSL) is to allow the user to configure an individual protection scheme to suit their own particular application. This is achieved through the use of programmable logic gates and delay timers.

The input to the PSL is any combination of the status of opto inputs. It is also used to assign the mapping of functions to the opto inputs and output contacts, the outputs of the protection elements, e.g. protection starts and trips, and the outputs of the fixed protection scheme logic. The fixed scheme logic provides the relay’s standard protection schemes.

The PSL itself consists of software logic gates and timers. The logic gates can be programmed to perform a range of different logic functions and can accept any number of inputs. The timers are used either to create a programmable delay, and/or to condition the logic outputs, e.g. to create a pulse of fixed duration on the output regardless of the length of the pulse on the input. The outputs of the PSL are the LEDs on the front panel of the relay and the output contacts at the rear.

The execution of the PSL logic is event driven; the logic is processed whenever any of its inputs change, for example as a result of a change in one of the digital input signals.

Also, only the part of the PSL logic that is affected by the particular input change that has occurred is processed. This reduces the amount of processing time that is used by the

PSL. This means that even with large, complex PSL schemes the device trip time will not lengthen.

This system provides flexibility for the user to create their own scheme logic design. It also means that the PSL can be configured into a very complex system, hence setting of the PSL is implemented through the PC support package MiCOM S1 Studio.

How to edit the PSL schemes is described in the “Using the PSL Editor” chapter.

This chapter contains details of the logic nodes which are specific to this product, together with any PSL diagrams which we have published for this product.

P849/EN PL/D33 Page (PL) 8-5

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

Description of the Logic Nodes

2 DESCRIPTION OF THE LOGIC NODES

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

19

20

21

22

15

16

17

18

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

6

7

4

5

2

3

0

1

The following table shows the available DDB Numbers, a Description of what they are and which products they apply to. Where a range of DDB Numbers apply to a consecutively-numbered range of related items, the DDB

Number range is shown. For example, DDB No 0 to 11 to cover Output Relay 1 to Output Relay 11; or 2nd

Harmonic A to C to cover 2nd Harmonic A, 2nd Harmonic B and 2nd Harmonic C).

If a DDB Number is not shown, it is not used in this range of products.

DDB No Description English Text

Output Relay 1

Output Relay 2

Output Relay 3

Output Relay 4

Output Relay 5

Output Relay 6

Output Relay 7

Output Relay 8

Output Relay 9

Output Relay 10

Output Relay 11

Output Relay 12

Output Relay 13

Output Relay 14

Output Relay 15

Output Relay 16

Output Relay 17

Output Relay 18

Output Relay 19

Output Relay 20

Output Relay 21

Output Relay 22

Output Relay 23

Output Relay 24

Output Relay 25

Output Relay 26

Output Relay 27

Output Relay 28

Output Relay 29

Output Relay 30

Output Relay 31

Output Relay 32

Output Relay 33

Output Relay 34

Output Relay 35

Output Relay 36

Output Relay 37

Output Relay 38

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Source

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Page (PL) 8-6 P849/EN PL/D33

Description of the Logic Nodes

64

65

66

67

60

61

62

63

53

54

55

56

57

58

59

49

50

51

52

45

46

47

48

38

39

40

41

42

43

44

75

76

77

78

79

80

81

68

69

70

71

72

73

74

DDB No

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Source

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Output Relay 39

Output Relay 40

Output Relay 41

Output Relay 42

Output Relay 43

Output Relay 44

Output Relay 45

Output Relay 46

Output Relay 47

Output Relay 48

Output Relay 49

Output Relay 50

Output Relay 51

Output Relay 52

Output Relay 53

Output Relay 54

Output Relay 55

Output Relay 56

Output Relay 57

Output Relay 58

Output Relay 59

Output Relay 60

DDB_UNUSED

DDB_UNUSED

DDB_UNUSED

DDB_UNUSED

Opto Isolator Input 1

Opto Isolator Input 2

Opto Isolator Input 3

Opto Isolator Input 4

Opto Isolator Input 5

Opto Isolator Input 6

Opto Isolator Input 7

Opto Isolator Input 8

Opto Isolator Input 9

Opto Isolator Input 10

Opto Isolator Input 11

Opto Isolator Input 12

Opto Isolator Input 13

Opto Isolator Input 14

Opto Isolator Input 15

Opto Isolator Input 16

Opto Isolator Input 17

Opto Isolator Input 18

Description

P849/EN PL/D33

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

English Text

Page (PL) 8-7

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

104

105

106

107

108

109

110

111

97

98

99

100

101

102

103

93

94

95

96

89

90

91

92

82

83

84

85

86

87

88

DDB No

119

120

121

122

123

124

125

112

113

114

115

116

117

118

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Source

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Opto Isolator Input 19

Opto Isolator Input 20

Opto Isolator Input 21

Opto Isolator Input 22

Opto Isolator Input 23

Opto Isolator Input 24

Opto Isolator Input 25

Opto Isolator Input 26

Opto Isolator Input 27

Opto Isolator Input 28

Opto Isolator Input 29

Opto Isolator Input 30

Opto Isolator Input 31

Opto Isolator Input 32

Opto Isolator Input 33

Opto Isolator Input 34

Opto Isolator Input 35

Opto Isolator Input 36

Opto Isolator Input 37

Opto Isolator Input 38

Opto Isolator Input 39

Opto Isolator Input 40

Opto Isolator Input 41

Opto Isolator Input 42

Opto Isolator Input 43

Opto Isolator Input 44

Opto Isolator Input 45

Opto Isolator Input 46

Opto Isolator Input 47

Opto Isolator Input 48

Opto Isolator Input 49

Opto Isolator Input 50

Opto Isolator Input 51

Opto Isolator Input 52

Opto Isolator Input 53

Opto Isolator Input 54

Opto Isolator Input 55

Opto Isolator Input 56

Opto Isolator Input 57

Opto Isolator Input 58

Opto Isolator Input 59

Opto Isolator Input 60

Opto Isolator Input 61

Opto Isolator Input 62

Description

Page (PL) 8-8

Description of the Logic Nodes

English Text

P849/EN PL/D33

Description of the Logic Nodes

148

149

150

151

152

153

154

155

141

142

143

144

145

146

147

133

134

135

136

137

138

139

140

126

DDB No

127

128

129

130

131

132

163

164

165

166

167

168

169

156

157

158

159

160

161

162

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

Source

SW

SW

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

Opto Isolator Input 63

Opto Isolator Input 64

Relay Conditioner 1

Relay Conditioner 2

Relay Conditioner 3

Relay Conditioner 4

Relay Conditioner 5

Relay Conditioner 6

Relay Conditioner 7

Relay Conditioner 8

Relay Conditioner 9

Relay Conditioner 10

Relay Conditioner 11

Relay Conditioner 12

Relay Conditioner 13

Relay Conditioner 14

Relay Conditioner 15

Relay Conditioner 16

Relay Conditioner 17

Relay Conditioner 18

Relay Conditioner 19

Relay Conditioner 20

Relay Conditioner 21

Relay Conditioner 22

Relay Conditioner 23

Relay Conditioner 24

Relay Conditioner 25

Relay Conditioner 26

Relay Conditioner 27

Relay Conditioner 28

Relay Conditioner 29

Relay Conditioner 30

Relay Conditioner 31

Relay Conditioner 32

Relay Conditioner 33

Relay Conditioner 34

Relay Conditioner 35

Relay Conditioner 36

Relay Conditioner 37

Relay Conditioner 38

Relay Conditioner 39

Relay Conditioner 40

Relay Conditioner 41

Relay Conditioner 42

Description

P849/EN PL/D33

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

Relay Cond 25

Relay Cond 26

Relay Cond 27

Relay Cond 28

Relay Cond 29

Relay Cond 30

Relay Cond 31

Relay Cond 32

Relay Cond 33

Relay Cond 34

Relay Cond 35

Relay Cond 36

Relay Cond 37

Relay Cond 38

Relay Cond 39

Relay Cond 40

Relay Cond 41

Relay Cond 42

English Text

Relay Cond 1

Relay Cond 2

Relay Cond 3

Relay Cond 4

Relay Cond 5

Relay Cond 6

Relay Cond 7

Relay Cond 8

Relay Cond 9

Relay Cond 10

Relay Cond 11

Relay Cond 12

Relay Cond 13

Relay Cond 14

Relay Cond 15

Relay Cond 16

Relay Cond 17

Relay Cond 18

Relay Cond 19

Relay Cond 20

Relay Cond 21

Relay Cond 22

Relay Cond 23

Relay Cond 24

Page (PL) 8-9

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

192

193

194

195

196

197

198

199

185

186

187

188

189

190

191

177

178

179

180

181

182

183

184

170

DDB No

171

172

173

174

175

176

207

208

209

210

211

212

213

200

201

202

203

204

205

206

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

PSL

PSL

PSL

SW

SW

SW

SW

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

Source

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Relay Conditioner 43

Relay Conditioner 44

Relay Conditioner 45

Relay Conditioner 46

Relay Conditioner 47

Relay Conditioner 48

Relay Conditioner 49

Relay Conditioner 50

Relay Conditioner 51

Relay Conditioner 52

Relay Conditioner 53

Relay Conditioner 54

Relay Conditioner 55

Relay Conditioner 56

Relay Conditioner 57

Relay Conditioner 58

Relay Conditioner 59

Relay Conditioner 60

DDB_UNUSED

DDB_UNUSED

DDB_UNUSED

DDB_UNUSED

Tri-LED - 1 - Red

Tri-LED - 1 - Green

Tri-LED - 2 - Red

Tri-LED - 2 - Green

Tri-LED - 3 - Red

Tri-LED - 3 - Green

Tri-LED - 4 - Red

Tri-LED - 4 - Green

Tri-LED - 5 - Red

Tri-LED - 5 - Green

Tri-LED - 6 - Red

Tri-LED - 6 - Green

Tri-LED - 7 - Red

Tri-LED - 7 - Green

Tri-LED - 8 - Red

Tri-LED - 8 - Green

Tri-LED - 9 - Red

Tri-LED - 9 - Green

Tri-LED - 10 - Red

Tri-LED - 10 - Green

Tri-LED - 11 - Red

Tri-LED - 11 - Green

Description

Page (PL) 8-10

Description of the Logic Nodes

Relay Cond 58

Relay Cond 59

Relay Cond 60

LED1 Red

LED1 Grn

LED2 Red

LED2 Grn

LED3 Red

LED3 Grn

LED4 Red

LED4 Grn

English Text

Relay Cond 43

Relay Cond 44

Relay Cond 45

Relay Cond 46

Relay Cond 47

Relay Cond 48

Relay Cond 49

Relay Cond 50

Relay Cond 51

Relay Cond 52

Relay Cond 53

Relay Cond 54

Relay Cond 55

Relay Cond 56

Relay Cond 57

LED5 Red

LED5 Grn

LED6 Red

LED6 Grn

LED7 Red

LED7 Grn

LED8 Red

LED8 Grn

FnKey LED1 Red

FnKey LED1 Grn

FnKey LED2 Red

FnKey LED2 Grn

FnKey LED3 Red

FnKey LED3 Grn

P849/EN PL/D33

Description of the Logic Nodes

263

264

265

266

267

268

269

270

256

257

258

259

260

261

262

214

DDB No

215

216

217

218

219

220

221

222

223

224

225

226

227

228 to 255

278

279

280

281

282

283

284

271

272

273

274

275

276

277

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Source

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

Description

Tri-LED - 12 - Red

Tri-LED - 12 - Green

Tri-LED - 13 - Red

Tri-LED - 13 - Green

Tri-LED - 14 - Red

Tri-LED - 14 - Green

Tri-LED - 15 - Red

Tri-LED - 15 - Green

Tri-LED - 16 - Red

Tri-LED - 16 - Green

Tri-LED - 17 - Red

Tri-LED - 17 - Green

Tri-LED - 18 - Red

Tri-LED - 18 - Green

DDB_UNUSED

Tri-LED Conditioner - 1 - Red

Tri-LED Conditioner- 1 - Green

Tri-LED Conditioner - 2 - Red

Tri-LED Conditioner - 2 - Green

Tri-LED Conditioner - 3 - Red

Tri-LED Conditioner - 3 - Green

Tri-LED Conditioner - 4 - Red

Tri-LED Conditioner - 4 - Green

Tri-LED Conditioner - 5 - Red

Tri-LED Conditioner - 5 - Green

Tri-LED Conditioner - 6 - Red

Tri-LED Conditioner - 6 - Green

Tri-LED Conditioner - 7 - Red

Tri-LED Conditioner - 7 - Green

Tri-LED Conditioner - 8 - Red

Tri-LED Conditioner - 8 - Green

Tri-LED Conditioner - 9 - Red

Tri-LED Conditioner - 9 - Green

Tri-LED Conditioner - 10 - Red

Tri-LED Conditioner - 10 - Green

Tri-LED Conditioner - 11 - Red

Tri-LED Conditioner - 11 - Green

Tri-LED Conditioner - 12 - Red

Tri-LED Conditioner - 12 - Green

Tri-LED Conditioner - 13 - Red

Tri-LED Conditioner - 13 - Green

Tri-LED Conditioner - 14 - Red

Tri-LED Conditioner - 14 - Green

Tri-LED Conditioner - 15 - Red

P849/EN PL/D33

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

LED1 Con R

LED1 Con G

LED2 Con R

LED2 Con G

LED3 Con R

LED3 Con G

LED4 Con R

LED4 Con G

LED5 Con R

LED5 Con G

LED6 Con R

LED6 Con G

LED7 Con R

LED7 Con G

LED8 Con R

English Text

FnKey LED4 Red

FnKey LED4 Grn

FnKey LED5 Red

FnKey LED5 Grn

FnKey LED6 Red

FnKey LED6 Grn

FnKey LED7 Red

FnKey LED7 Grn

FnKey LED8 Red

FnKey LED8 Grn

FnKey LED9 Red

FnKey LED9 Grn

FnKey LED10 Red

FnKey LED10 Grn

LED8 Con G

FnKey LED1 ConR

FnKey LED1 ConG

FnKey LED2 ConR

FnKey LED2 ConG

FnKey LED3 ConR

FnKey LED3 ConG

FnKey LED4 ConR

FnKey LED4 ConG

FnKey LED5 ConR

FnKey LED5 ConG

FnKey LED6 ConR

FnKey LED6 ConG

FnKey LED7 ConR

Page (PL) 8-11

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

355

356

357

358

359

360

361

362

327

328

329

330 to 351

352

353

354

285

DDB No

286

287

288

289

290

291

292 to 319

320

321

322

323

324

325

326

370

371

372

373

374

375

376

363

364

365

366

367

368

369

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

SW

SW

SW

SW

PSL

PSL

PSL

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Source

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

SW

SW

Description

Tri-LED Conditioner - 15 - Green

Tri-LED Conditioner - 16 - Red

Tri-LED Conditioner - 16 - Green

Tri-LED Conditioner - 17 - Red

Tri-LED Conditioner - 17 - Green

Tri-LED Conditioner - 18 - Red

Tri-LED Conditioner - 18 - Green

DDB_UNUSED

Function Key 1

Function Key 2

Function Key 3

Function Key 4

Function Key 5

Function Key 6

Function Key 7

Function Key 8

Function Key 9

Function Key 10

DDB_UNUSED

Auxiliary Timer in 1

Auxiliary Timer in 2

Auxiliary Timer in 3

Auxiliary Timer in 4

Auxiliary Timer in 5

Auxiliary Timer in 6

Auxiliary Timer in 7

Auxiliary Timer in 8

Auxiliary Timer in 9

Auxiliary Timer in 10

Auxiliary Timer in 11

Auxiliary Timer in 12

Auxiliary Timer in 13

Auxiliary Timer in 14

Auxiliary Timer in 15

Auxiliary Timer in 16

Auxiliary Timer out 1

Auxiliary Timer out 2

Auxiliary Timer out 3

Auxiliary Timer out 4

Auxiliary Timer out 5

Auxiliary Timer out 6

Auxiliary Timer out 7

Auxiliary Timer out 8

Auxiliary Timer out 9

Page (PL) 8-12

Description of the Logic Nodes

Timer in 12

Timer in 13

Timer in 14

Timer in 15

Timer in 16

Timer out 1

Timer out 2

Timer out 3

Timer out 4

Timer out 5

Timer out 6

Timer out 7

Timer out 8

Timer out 9

English Text

FnKey LED7 ConG

FnKey LED8 ConR

FnKey LED8 ConG

FnKey LED9 ConR

FnKey LED9 ConG

FnKey LED10 ConR

FnKey LED10 ConG

Function Key 1

Function Key 2

Function Key 3

Function Key 4

Function Key 5

Function Key 6

Function Key 7

Function Key 8

Function Key 9

Function Key 10

Timer in 1

Timer in 2

Timer in 3

Timer in 4

Timer in 5

Timer in 6

Timer in 7

Timer in 8

Timer in 9

Timer in 10

Timer in 11

P849/EN PL/D33

Description of the Logic Nodes

419

420

421

422

423

424

425

426

412

413

414

415

416

417

418

377

DDB No

378

379

380

381

382

383

384

385

386

387

388 to 408

409

410

411

434

435

436

437

438

439

440

427

428

429

430

431

432

433

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

PSL

PSL

PSL

Source

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

Description

Auxiliary Timer out 10

Auxiliary Timer out 11

Auxiliary Timer out 12

Auxiliary Timer out 13

Auxiliary Timer out 14

Auxiliary Timer out 15

Auxiliary Timer out 16

DDB_UNUSED

DDB_UNUSED

Setting Group via opto invalid

Test Mode Enabled

DDB_UNUSED

User definable Self Reset Alarm 1

User definable Self Reset Alarm 2

User definable Self Reset Alarm 3

User definable Self Reset Alarm 4

User definable Self Reset Alarm 5

User definable Self Reset Alarm 6

User definable Self Reset Alarm 7

User definable Self Reset Alarm 8

User definable Self Reset Alarm 9

User definable Self Reset Alarm 10

User definable Self Reset Alarm 11

User definable Self Reset Alarm 12

User definable Self Reset Alarm 13

User definable Self Reset Alarm 14

User definable Self Reset Alarm 15

User definable Self Reset Alarm 16

User definable Self Reset Alarm 17

User definable Manual Reset Alarm 18

User definable Manual Reset Alarm 19

User definable Manual Reset Alarm 20

User definable Manual Reset Alarm 21

User definable Manual Reset Alarm 22

User definable Manual Reset Alarm 23

User definable Manual Reset Alarm 24

User definable Manual Reset Alarm 25

User definable Manual Reset Alarm 26

User definable Manual Reset Alarm 27

User definable Manual Reset Alarm 28

User definable Manual Reset Alarm 29

User definable Manual Reset Alarm 30

User definable Manual Reset Alarm 31

User definable Manual Reset Alarm 32

P849/EN PL/D33

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

English Text

Timer out 10

Timer out 11

Timer out 12

Timer out 13

Timer out 14

Timer out 15

Timer out 16

SG-opto Invalid

Blocked/faulty

SR User Alarm 1

SR User Alarm 2

SR User Alarm 3

SR User Alarm 4

SR User Alarm 5

SR User Alarm 6

SR User Alarm 7

SR User Alarm 8

SR User Alarm 9

SR User Alarm 10

SR User Alarm 11

SR User Alarm 12

SR User Alarm 13

SR User Alarm 14

SR User Alarm 15

SR User Alarm 16

SR User Alarm 17

MR User Alarm 18

MR User Alarm 19

MR User Alarm 20

MR User Alarm 21

MR User Alarm 22

MR User Alarm 23

MR User Alarm 24

MR User Alarm 25

MR User Alarm 26

MR User Alarm 27

MR User Alarm 28

MR User Alarm 29

MR User Alarm 30

MR User Alarm 31

MR User Alarm 32

Page (PL) 8-13

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

459

460

461

462

463

464

465

451

452

453

454

455

456

457

458

441

DDB No

442

443

444 to 447

448

449

450

466

524

525

526

527

528

529

517

518

519

520

521

522

523

467

468

469 to 511

512

513

514

515

516

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Source

PSL

PSL

PSL

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Description

User definable Manual Reset Alarm 33

User definable Manual Reset Alarm 34

User definable Manual Reset Alarm 35

DDB_UNUSED

Battery Failure Alarm

Field Voltage Failure

Rear Comms Failed

GOOSE IED Absent Alarm

Ethernet card not fitted Alarm

Ethernet card not responding Alarm

Ethernet card fatal error Alarm

Ethernet card software reload Alarm

Bad TCP/IP Configuration Alarm

Bad OSI Configuration Alarm

If this location DST is in effect now

Main card/Ethernet card software mismatch Alarm

IP Address conflict Alarm

InterMiCOM Loopback Fail

InterMiCOM Message Fail

InterMiCOM Data CD Fail

InterMiCOM Channel Fail

Backup settings in use' Alarm

Invalid IEC 61850 Configuration Alarm

Test Mode Activated Alarm

Contacts Blocked Alarm

DDB_UNUSED

User Control 1

User Control 2

User Control 3

User Control 4

User Control 5

User Control 6

User Control 7

User Control 8

User Control 9

User Control 10

User Control 11

User Control 12

User Control 13

User Control 14

User Control 15

User Control 16

User Control 17

User Control 18

Description of the Logic Nodes

Test Mode Alm

Contacts Blk Alm

Control Input 1

Control Input 2

Control Input 3

Control Input 4

Control Input 5

Control Input 6

Control Input 7

Control Input 8

Control Input 9

Control Input 10

Control Input 11

Control Input 12

Control Input 13

Control Input 14

Control Input 15

Control Input 16

Control Input 17

Control Input 18

English Text

MR User Alarm 33

MR User Alarm 34

MR User Alarm 35

Battery Fail

Field volts fail

Rear Comm 2 Fail

GOOSE IED Absent

NIC Not Fitted

NIC No Response

NIC Fatal Error

NIC Soft. Reload

Bad TCP/IP Cfg.

Bad OSI Config.

DST status

NIC SW Mis-Match

IP Addr Conflict

IM Loopback

IM Msg Fail

IM DCD Fail

IM Chan Fail

Backup Setting

Invalid Config.

Page (PL) 8-14 P849/EN PL/D33

Description of the Logic Nodes

583

584

585

586

587

588

589

590

576

577

578

579

580

581

582

530

DDB No

531

532

533

534

535

536

537

538

539

540

541

542

543

544 to 575

613

614

615

616

617

618

619

591

592 to 607

608

609

610

611

612

User Control 19

User Control 20

User Control 21

User Control 22

User Control 23

User Control 24

User Control 25

User Control 26

User Control 27

User Control 28

User Control 29

User Control 30

User Control 31

User Control 32

DDB_UNUSED

InterMiCOM in 1

InterMiCOM in 2

InterMiCOM in 3

InterMiCOM in 4

InterMiCOM in 5

InterMiCOM in 6

InterMiCOM in 7

InterMiCOM in 8

InterMiCOM out 1

InterMiCOM out 2

InterMiCOM out 3

InterMiCOM out 4

InterMiCOM out 5

InterMiCOM out 6

InterMiCOM out 7

InterMiCOM out 8

DDB_UNUSED

Virtual Output 01

Virtual Output 02

Virtual Output 03

Virtual Output 04

Virtual Output 05

Virtual Output 06

Virtual Output 07

Virtual Output 08

Virtual Output 09

Virtual Output 10

Virtual Output 11

Virtual Output 12

SW

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Source

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

SW

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

Description

P849/EN PL/D33

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

English Text

Control Input 19

Control Input 20

Control Input 21

Control Input 22

Control Input 23

Control Input 24

Control Input 25

Control Input 26

Control Input 27

Control Input 28

Control Input 29

Control Input 30

Control Input 31

Control Input 32

InterMiCOM in 1

InterMiCOM in 2

InterMiCOM in 3

InterMiCOM in 4

InterMiCOM in 5

InterMiCOM in 6

InterMiCOM in 7

InterMiCOM in 8

InterMiCOM out 1

InterMiCOM out 2

InterMiCOM out 3

InterMiCOM out 4

InterMiCOM out 5

InterMiCOM out 6

InterMiCOM out 7

InterMiCOM out 8

Virtual Output 1

Virtual Output 2

Virtual Output 3

Virtual Output 4

Virtual Output 5

Virtual Output 6

Virtual Output 7

Virtual Output 8

Virtual Output 9

Virtual Output10

Virtual Output11

Virtual Output12

Page (PL) 8-15

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

Virtual Output 13

Virtual Output 14

Virtual Output 15

Virtual Output 16

Virtual Output 17

Virtual Output 18

Virtual Output 19

Virtual Output 20

Virtual Output 21

Virtual Output 22

Virtual Output 23

Virtual Output 24

Virtual Output 25

Virtual Output 26

Virtual Output 27

Virtual Output 28

Virtual Output 29

Virtual Output 30

Virtual Output 31

Virtual Output 32

Virtual Output 33

Virtual Output 34

Virtual Output 35

Virtual Output 36

Virtual Output 37

Virtual Output 38

Virtual Output 39

Virtual Output 40

Virtual Output 41

Virtual Output 42

Virtual Output 43

Virtual Output 44

Virtual Output 45

Virtual Output 46

Virtual Output 47

Virtual Output 48

Virtual Output 49

Virtual Output 50

Virtual Output 51

Virtual Output 52

Virtual Output 53

Virtual Output 54

Virtual Output 55

Virtual Output 56

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

Source

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

642

643

644

645

646

647

648

649

635

636

637

638

639

640

641

627

628

629

630

631

632

633

634

620

DDB No

621

622

623

624

625

626

657

658

659

660

661

662

663

650

651

652

653

654

655

656

Description

Page (PL) 8-16

Description of the Logic Nodes

English Text

Virtual Output13

Virtual Output14

Virtual Output15

Virtual Output16

Virtual Output17

Virtual Output18

Virtual Output19

Virtual Output20

Virtual Output21

Virtual Output22

Virtual Output23

Virtual Output24

Virtual Output25

Virtual Output26

Virtual Output27

Virtual Output28

Virtual Output29

Virtual Output30

Virtual Output31

Virtual Output32

Virtual Output33

Virtual Output34

Virtual Output35

Virtual Output36

Virtual Output37

Virtual Output38

Virtual Output39

Virtual Output40

Virtual Output41

Virtual Output42

Virtual Output43

Virtual Output44

Virtual Output45

Virtual Output46

Virtual Output47

Virtual Output48

Virtual Output49

Virtual Output50

Virtual Output51

Virtual Output52

Virtual Output53

Virtual Output54

Virtual Output55

Virtual Output56

P849/EN PL/D33

Description of the Logic Nodes

Virtual Output 57

Virtual Output 58

Virtual Output 59

Virtual Output 60

Virtual Output 61

Virtual Output 62

Virtual Output 63

Virtual Output 64

DDB_UNUSED

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

PSL

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Source

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

749

750

751

752

753

754

755

756

742

743

744

745

746

747

748

664

DDB No

665

666

667

668

669

670

671

672 to 735

736

737

738

739

740

741

764

765

766

767

768

769

770

757

758

759

760

761

762

763

Description

P849/EN PL/D33

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

Virtual Input 7

Virtual Input 8

Virtual Input 9

Virtual Input 10

Virtual Input 11

Virtual Input 12

Virtual Input 13

Virtual Input 14

Virtual Input 15

Virtual Input 16

Virtual Input 17

Virtual Input 18

Virtual Input 19

Virtual Input 20

Virtual Input 21

English Text

Virtual Output57

Virtual Output58

Virtual Output59

Virtual Output60

Virtual Output61

Virtual Output62

Virtual Output63

Virtual Output64

Virtual Input 1

Virtual Input 2

Virtual Input 3

Virtual Input 4

Virtual Input 5

Virtual Input 6

Virtual Input 22

Virtual Input 23

Virtual Input 24

Virtual Input 25

Virtual Input 26

Virtual Input 27

Virtual Input 28

Virtual Input 29

Virtual Input 30

Virtual Input 31

Virtual Input 32

Virtual Input 33

Virtual Input 34

Virtual Input 35

Page (PL) 8-17

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Source

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

793

794

795

796

797

798

799

800

786

787

788

789

790

791

792

778

779

780

781

782

783

784

785

771

DDB No

772

773

774

775

776

777

808

809

810

811

812

813

814

801

802

803

804

805

806

807

Page (PL) 8-18

Description

Description of the Logic Nodes

Virtual Input 51

Virtual Input 52

Virtual Input 53

Virtual Input 54

Virtual Input 55

Virtual Input 56

Virtual Input 57

Virtual Input 58

Virtual Input 59

Virtual Input 60

Virtual Input 61

Virtual Input 62

Virtual Input 63

Virtual Input 64

Virtual Input 65

English Text

Virtual Input 36

Virtual Input 37

Virtual Input 38

Virtual Input 39

Virtual Input 40

Virtual Input 41

Virtual Input 42

Virtual Input 43

Virtual Input 44

Virtual Input 45

Virtual Input 46

Virtual Input 47

Virtual Input 48

Virtual Input 49

Virtual Input 50

Virtual Input 66

Virtual Input 67

Virtual Input 68

Virtual Input 69

Virtual Input 70

Virtual Input 71

Virtual Input 72

Virtual Input 73

Virtual Input 74

Virtual Input 75

Virtual Input 76

Virtual Input 77

Virtual Input 78

Virtual Input 79

P849/EN PL/D33

Description of the Logic Nodes

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Source

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

837

838

839

840

841

842

843

844

830

831

832

833

834

835

836

822

823

824

825

826

827

828

829

815

DDB No

816

817

818

819

820

821

852

853

854

855

856

857

858

845

846

847

848

849

850

851

P849/EN PL/D33

Description

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

Virtual Input 95

Virtual Input 96

Virtual Input 97

Virtual Input 98

Virtual Input 99

Virtual Input100

Virtual Input101

Virtual Input102

Virtual Input103

Virtual Input104

Virtual Input105

Virtual Input106

Virtual Input107

Virtual Input108

Virtual Input109

English Text

Virtual Input 80

Virtual Input 81

Virtual Input 82

Virtual Input 83

Virtual Input 84

Virtual Input 85

Virtual Input 86

Virtual Input 87

Virtual Input 88

Virtual Input 89

Virtual Input 90

Virtual Input 91

Virtual Input 92

Virtual Input 93

Virtual Input 94

Virtual Input110

Virtual Input111

Virtual Input112

Virtual Input113

Virtual Input114

Virtual Input115

Virtual Input116

Virtual Input117

Virtual Input118

Virtual Input119

Virtual Input120

Virtual Input121

Virtual Input122

Virtual Input123

Page (PL) 8-19

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

881

882

883

884

885

886

887

888

874

875

876

877

878

879

880

866

867

868

869

870

871

872

873

859

DDB No

860

861

862

863

864

865

896

897

898

899

900

901

902

889

890

891

892

893

894

895

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Source

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Description

GOOSE Virtual input 1 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 2 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 3 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 4 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 5 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 6 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 7 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 8 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 9 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 10 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 11 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 12 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 13 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 14 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 15 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 16 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 17 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 18 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 19 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 20 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 21 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 22 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 23 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 24 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 25 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 26 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 27 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 28 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 29 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 30 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 31 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 32 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 33 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 34 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 35 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 36 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 37 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 38 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 39 publisher bit

Page (PL) 8-20

Description of the Logic Nodes

English Text

Virtual Input124

Virtual Input125

Virtual Input126

Virtual Input127

Virtual Input128

PubPres VIP 1

PubPres VIP 2

PubPres VIP 3

PubPres VIP 4

PubPres VIP 5

PubPres VIP 6

PubPres VIP 7

PubPres VIP 8

PubPres VIP 9

PubPres VIP 10

PubPres VIP 11

PubPres VIP 12

PubPres VIP 13

PubPres VIP 14

PubPres VIP 15

PubPres VIP 16

PubPres VIP 17

PubPres VIP 18

PubPres VIP 19

PubPres VIP 20

PubPres VIP 21

PubPres VIP 22

PubPres VIP 23

PubPres VIP 24

PubPres VIP 25

PubPres VIP 26

PubPres VIP 27

PubPres VIP 28

PubPres VIP 29

PubPres VIP 30

PubPres VIP 31

PubPres VIP 32

PubPres VIP 33

PubPres VIP 34

PubPres VIP 35

PubPres VIP 36

PubPres VIP 37

PubPres VIP 38

PubPres VIP 39

P849/EN PL/D33

Description of the Logic Nodes

925

926

927

928

929

930

931

932

918

919

920

921

922

923

924

910

911

912

913

914

915

916

917

903

DDB No

904

905

906

907

908

909

940

941

942

943

944

945

946

933

934

935

936

937

938

939

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Source

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Description

GOOSE Virtual input 40 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 41 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 42 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 43 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 44 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 45 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 46 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 47 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 48 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 49 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 50 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 51 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 52 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 53 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 54 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 55 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 56 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 57 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 58 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 59 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 60 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 61 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 62 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 63 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 64 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 65 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 66 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 67 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 68 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 69 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 70 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 71 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 72 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 73 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 74 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 75 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 76 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 77 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 78 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 79 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 80 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 81 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 82 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 83 publisher bit

P849/EN PL/D33

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

English Text

PubPres VIP 40

PubPres VIP 41

PubPres VIP 42

PubPres VIP 43

PubPres VIP 44

PubPres VIP 45

PubPres VIP 46

PubPres VIP 47

PubPres VIP 48

PubPres VIP 49

PubPres VIP 50

PubPres VIP 51

PubPres VIP 52

PubPres VIP 53

PubPres VIP 54

PubPres VIP 55

PubPres VIP 56

PubPres VIP 57

PubPres VIP 58

PubPres VIP 59

PubPres VIP 60

PubPres VIP 61

PubPres VIP 62

PubPres VIP 63

PubPres VIP 64

PubPres VIP 65

PubPres VIP 66

PubPres VIP 67

PubPres VIP 68

PubPres VIP 69

PubPres VIP 70

PubPres VIP 71

PubPres VIP 72

PubPres VIP 73

PubPres VIP 74

PubPres VIP 75

PubPres VIP 76

PubPres VIP 77

PubPres VIP 78

PubPres VIP 79

PubPres VIP 80

PubPres VIP 81

PubPres VIP 82

PubPres VIP 83

Page (PL) 8-21

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

969

970

971

972

973

974

975

976

962

963

964

965

966

967

968

954

955

956

957

958

959

960

961

947

DDB No

948

949

950

951

952

953

984

985

986

987

988

989

990

977

978

979

980

981

982

983

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Source

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Description

GOOSE Virtual input 84 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 85 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 86 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 87 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 88 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 89 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 90 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 91 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 92 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 93 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 94 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 95 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 96 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 97 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 98 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 99 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 100 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 101 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 102 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 103 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 104 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 105 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 106 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 107 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 108 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 109 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 110 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 111 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 112 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 113 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 114 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 115 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 116 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 117 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 118 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 119 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 120 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 121 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 122 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 123 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 124 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 125 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 126 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 127 publisher bit

Page (PL) 8-22

Description of the Logic Nodes

English Text

PubPres VIP 84

PubPres VIP 85

PubPres VIP 86

PubPres VIP 87

PubPres VIP 88

PubPres VIP 89

PubPres VIP 90

PubPres VIP 91

PubPres VIP 92

PubPres VIP 93

PubPres VIP 94

PubPres VIP 95

PubPres VIP 96

PubPres VIP 97

PubPres VIP 98

PubPres VIP 99

PubPres VIP 100

PubPres VIP 101

PubPres VIP 102

PubPres VIP 103

PubPres VIP 104

PubPres VIP 105

PubPres VIP 106

PubPres VIP 107

PubPres VIP 108

PubPres VIP 109

PubPres VIP 110

PubPres VIP 111

PubPres VIP 112

PubPres VIP 113

PubPres VIP 114

PubPres VIP 115

PubPres VIP 116

PubPres VIP 117

PubPres VIP 118

PubPres VIP 119

PubPres VIP 120

PubPres VIP 121

PubPres VIP 122

PubPres VIP 123

PubPres VIP 124

PubPres VIP 125

PubPres VIP 126

PubPres VIP 127

P849/EN PL/D33

Description of the Logic Nodes

1013

1014

1015

1016

1017

1018

1019

1020

1006

1007

1008

1009

1010

1011

1012

998

999

1000

1001

1002

1003

1004

1005

991

DDB No

992

993

994

995

996

997

1028

1029

1030

1031

1032

1033

1034

1021

1022

1023

1024

1025

1026

1027

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Source

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Description

GOOSE Virtual input 128 publisher bit

GOOSE Virtual input 1 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 2 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 3 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 4 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 5 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 6 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 7 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 8 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 9 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 10 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 11 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 12 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 13 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 14 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 15 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 16 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 17 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 18 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 19 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 20 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 21 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 22 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 23 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 24 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 25 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 26 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 27 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 28 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 29 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 30 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 31 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 32 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 33 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 34 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 35 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 36 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 37 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 38 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 39 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 40 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 41 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 42 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 43 Quality bit

P849/EN PL/D33

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

Quality VIP 15

Quality VIP 16

Quality VIP 17

Quality VIP 18

Quality VIP 19

Quality VIP 20

Quality VIP 21

Quality VIP 22

Quality VIP 23

Quality VIP 24

Quality VIP 25

Quality VIP 26

Quality VIP 27

Quality VIP 28

Quality VIP 29

English Text

PubPres VIP 128

Quality VIP 1

Quality VIP 2

Quality VIP 3

Quality VIP 4

Quality VIP 5

Quality VIP 6

Quality VIP 7

Quality VIP 8

Quality VIP 9

Quality VIP 10

Quality VIP 11

Quality VIP 12

Quality VIP 13

Quality VIP 14

Quality VIP 30

Quality VIP 31

Quality VIP 32

Quality VIP 33

Quality VIP 34

Quality VIP 35

Quality VIP 36

Quality VIP 37

Quality VIP 38

Quality VIP 39

Quality VIP 40

Quality VIP 41

Quality VIP 42

Quality VIP 43

Page (PL) 8-23

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

1057

1058

1059

1060

1061

1062

1063

1064

1050

1051

1052

1053

1054

1055

1056

1042

1043

1044

1045

1046

1047

1048

1049

DDB No

1035

1036

1037

1038

1039

1040

1041

1072

1073

1074

1075

1076

1077

1078

1065

1066

1067

1068

1069

1070

1071

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Source

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Description

GOOSE Virtual input 44 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 45 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 46 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 47 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 48 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 49 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 50 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 51 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 52 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 53 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 54 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 55 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 56 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 57 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 58 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 59 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 60 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 61 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 62 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 63 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 64 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 65 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 66 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 67 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 68 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 69 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 70 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 71 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 72 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 73 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 74 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 75 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 76 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 77 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 78 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 79 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 80 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 81 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 82 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 83 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 84 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 85 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 86 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 87 Quality bit

Page (PL) 8-24

Description of the Logic Nodes

Quality VIP 74

Quality VIP 75

Quality VIP 76

Quality VIP 77

Quality VIP 78

Quality VIP 79

Quality VIP 80

Quality VIP 81

Quality VIP 82

Quality VIP 83

Quality VIP 84

Quality VIP 85

Quality VIP 86

Quality VIP 87

Quality VIP 59

Quality VIP 60

Quality VIP 61

Quality VIP 62

Quality VIP 63

Quality VIP 64

Quality VIP 65

Quality VIP 66

Quality VIP 67

Quality VIP 68

Quality VIP 69

Quality VIP 70

Quality VIP 71

Quality VIP 72

Quality VIP 73

English Text

Quality VIP 44

Quality VIP 45

Quality VIP 46

Quality VIP 47

Quality VIP 48

Quality VIP 49

Quality VIP 50

Quality VIP 51

Quality VIP 52

Quality VIP 53

Quality VIP 54

Quality VIP 55

Quality VIP 56

Quality VIP 57

Quality VIP 58

P849/EN PL/D33

Description of the Logic Nodes

1101

1102

1103

1104

1105

1106

1107

1108

1094

1095

1096

1097

1098

1099

1100

1086

1087

1088

1089

1090

1091

1092

1093

DDB No

1079

1080

1081

1082

1083

1084

1085

1116

1117

1118

1119

1120

1121

1122

1109

1110

1111

1112

1113

1114

1115

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Source

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

PSL

PSL

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Description

GOOSE Virtual input 88 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 89 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 90 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 91 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 92 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 93 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 94 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 95 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 96 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 97 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 98 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 99 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 100 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 101 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 102 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 103 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 104 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 105 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 106 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 107 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 108 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 109 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 110 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 111 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 112 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 113 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 114 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 115 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 116 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 117 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 118 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 119 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 120 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 121 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 122 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 123 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 124 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 125 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 126 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 127 Quality bit

GOOSE Virtual input 128 Quality bit

Provides the "Unused" selection in G32

Initiate Test Mode

Binary coded setting group selector 1

P849/EN PL/D33

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

Quality VIP 103

Quality VIP 104

Quality VIP 105

Quality VIP 106

Quality VIP 107

Quality VIP 108

Quality VIP 109

Quality VIP 110

Quality VIP 111

Quality VIP 112

Quality VIP 113

Quality VIP 114

Quality VIP 115

Quality VIP 116

Quality VIP 117

English Text

Quality VIP 88

Quality VIP 89

Quality VIP 90

Quality VIP 91

Quality VIP 92

Quality VIP 93

Quality VIP 94

Quality VIP 95

Quality VIP 96

Quality VIP 97

Quality VIP 98

Quality VIP 99

Quality VIP 100

Quality VIP 101

Quality VIP 102

Quality VIP 118

Quality VIP 119

Quality VIP 120

Quality VIP 121

Quality VIP 122

Quality VIP 123

Quality VIP 124

Quality VIP 125

Quality VIP 126

Quality VIP 127

Quality VIP 128

Test Mode

SG Select x1

Page (PL) 8-25

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

1130

1131

1132

1133

1134

1135

1136

1137

DDB No

1123

1124

1125

1126

1127

1128

1129

1138

1139

1140

SW

SW

SW

1141

1142

SW

SW

1143 SW

1144 to 1215 SW

1216 to 1515 PSL

1516 to 2047 SW

PSL

PSL

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

SW

Source

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

PSL

SW

Table 1 – Logic nodes sorted by DDB number

Description

Binary coded setting group selector 2

Remote Read Only 1 DDB

Remote Read Only 2 DDB

Remote Read Only NIC DDB

Monitor Block

Command Block

Provides the "Unused" selection in G32

Reset Latched Relays & LED’s

Time synchronise to nearest minute on 0-1 change

Logic 0 for use in PSL (Never changes state!)

Network Interface Card link 1 fail indication

Network Interface Card link 1 fail indication

Network Interface Card link 1 fail indication bit 0 of the level access for HMI interface bit 1 of the level access for HMI interface bit 0 of the level access for the front port interface bit 1 of the level access for the front port interface bit 0 of the level access for the rear port 1 interface bit 1 of the level access for the rear port 1 interface bit 0 of the level access for the rear port 2 interface bit 1 of the level access for the rear port 2 interface

DDB_UNUSED

DDB_UNUSED

Description of the Logic Nodes

English Text

SG Select 1x

RP1 Read Only

RP2 Read Only

NIC Read Only

103 MonitorBlock

103 CommandBlock

Reset Relays/LED

Time Synch

Logic 0 Ref.

ETH Link 1 Fail

ETH Link 2 Fail

ETH Link 3 Fail

HMI Access Lvl 1

HMI Access Lvl 2

FPort AccessLvl1

FPort AccessLvl2

RPrt1 AccessLvl1

RPrt1 AccessLvl2

RPrt2 AccessLvl1

RPrt2 AccessLvl2

Page (PL) 8-26 P849/EN PL/D33

Factory Default Programmable Scheme Logic

3

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

FACTORY DEFAULT PROGRAMMABLE SCHEME LOGIC

The following table details the default settings of the PSL.

The MiCOM P849 models are as follows:

Model Logic Inputs Relay Outputs relays Total

P849xxxA

P849xxxB

P849xxxC

P849xxxD

P849xxxE

P849xxxF

32

48

32

16

64

32

16

24

30

60

16

46

Table 2 – Model numbers, inputs and outputs

16

24

14

60

16

46

--

--

16

--

--

--

High break relays

P849/EN PL/D33 Page (PL) 8-27

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

4

4.1

4.2

Viewing and Printing Default PSL Diagrams

VIEWING AND PRINTING DEFAULT PSL DIAGRAMS

Typical Mappings

It is possible to view and print the default PSL diagrams for the device. Typically, these diagrams allow you to see these mappings:

• Opto Input Mappings

Output Relay Mappings

LED Mappings

Start Indications

Phase Trip Mappings

System Check Mapping

Download and Print PSL Diagrams

To download and print the default PSL diagrams for the device:

1. Close MiCOM S1 Studio.

2. Select Programs > then navigate through to > MiCOM S1 Studio > Data Model

Manager.

3. Click Add then Next.

4. Click

Internet then Next.

5. Select your language then click Next.

6. From the tree view, select the model and software version.

7. Click Install. When complete click OK.

8. Close the Data Model Manager and start MiCOM S1 Studio.

9. Select Tools > PSL Editor (Px40).

10. In the PSL Editor select File > Open. The downloaded psl files are in C:\Program

Files\ directory located in the \MiCOM S1\Courier\PSL\Defaults sub-directory.

11. Highlight the required psl diagram and select File > Print.

Page (PL) 8-28 P849/EN PL/D33

Programmable Scheme Logic

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

5

Virtual Input 6

DDB #741

Virtual Input 7

DDB #742

Virtual Input 8

DDB #743

Virtual Input 9

DDB #744

Virtual Inpu t 10

DDB #745

Virtual Inpu t 11

DDB #746

Virtual Inpu t 12

DDB #747

Virtual Inpu t 13

DDB #748

Virtual Inpu t 14

DDB #749

PROGRAMMABLE SCHEME LOGIC

Virtual Inputs / Relay Outputs

Function Key 1

DDB #320

Virtual Input 1

DDB #736

Virtual Input 2

DDB #737

Virtual Input 3

DDB #738

Virtual Input 4

DDB #739

1

Virtual Input 5

DDB #740

Virtual Inpu t 16

DDB #751

Figure 1 – Virtual inputs / relay outputs

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Output R1

DDB #000

Output R2

DDB #001

Output R3

DDB #002

0

Output R4

DDB #003

0

Output R5

DDB #004

0

Output R6

DDB #005

0

0

0

Output R7

DDB #006

Output R8

DDB #007

Output R9

DDB #008

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Output R15

DDB #014

Output R16

DDB #015

0

Output R10

DDB #009

Output R11

DDB #010

Output R12

DDB #011

Output R13

DDB #012

Output R14

DDB #013

&

&

&

&

&

&

&

&

&

&

&

&

&

&

&

&

P849/EN PL/D33 Page (PL) 8-29

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

P849GOOSETESTINGMODE

&

Programmable Scheme Logic

Function Key 6

DDB #325

Virtual Input 3

DDB #738

&

&

&

&

Virtual Input 15

DDB #750

Figure 2 – Goose testing mode

&

&

&

FnKey LED6 Grn

DDB #219

LED1 Grn

DDB #193

LED3 Red

DDB #196

LED3 Grn

DDB #197

Page (PL) 8-30 P849/EN PL/D33

Programmable Scheme Logic

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

Opto Inputs / Virtual Outputs

Function Key 1

DDB #320

Function Key 6

DDB #325

Input L1

DDB #064

Input L2

DDB #065

Input L3

DDB #066

Input L4

DDB #067

Input L5

DDB #068

Input L6

DDB #069

Input L7

DDB #070

Input L8

DDB #071

Input L9

DDB #072

Input L10

DDB #073

Input L11

DDB #074

Input L12

DDB #075

Input L13

DDB #076

Input L14

DDB #077

Input L15

DDB #078

Input L16

DDB #079

Figure 3 – Opto inputs / virtual outputs

&

1

1

1

1

1

Virtual Output 1

DDB #60 8

Virtual Output 2

DDB #60 9

Virtual Output 4

DDB #61 1

Virtual Output 6

DDB #61 3

Virtual Output 8

DDB #61 5

Virtual Output 9

DDB #61 6

Virtual Output10

DDB #61 7

Virtual Output11

DDB #61 8

Virtual Output12

DDB #61 9

Virtual Output13

DDB #62 0

Virtual Output14

DDB #62 1

Virtual Output15

DDB #62 2

Virtual Output16

DDB #62 3

P849/EN PL/D33 Page (PL) 8-31

(PL) 8 Programmable Logic

Notes:

Programmable Scheme Logic

Page (PL) 8-32 P849/EN PL/D33

MiCOM P849

(MR) 9 Measurements and Recording

MEASUREMENTS AND RECORDING

CHAPTER 9

P849/EN MR/D33 Page (MR) 9-1

(MR) 9 Measurements and Recording

MiCOM P849

Date:

Products covered by this chapter:

Hardware Suffix:

Software Version:

Connection Diagrams:

08/2015

This chapter covers the specific versions of the MiCOM products listed below. This includes

only the following combinations of Software Version and Hardware Suffix.

M

B0

10P849xx (xx = 01 to 06)

Page (MR) 9-2 P849/EN MR/D33

Contents

(MR) 9 Measurements and Recording

CONTENTS

1 Recording

1.1

1.2

1.2.2

1.2.3

1.2.4

Introduction

Standard Event Recorder

Resetting of Precise Event Records

Viewing Event Records via MiCOM S1 Studio

Event Filtering

2 Disturbance Recorder

3 Measurements

TABLES

Table 1 – View records

Table 2 – Examples of alarm conditions

Table 3 – Alarm status

Table 4 – Menu text and actions

Table 5 – Menu text and actions

FIGURES

No table of figures entries found.

Page (MR)9-

10

12

5

5

5

8

8

9

Page (MR)9-

8

9

6

7

10

Page (MR)9-

P849/EN MR/D33 Page (MR) 9-3

(MR) 9 Measurements and Recording

Notes:

Figures

Page (MR) 9-4 P849/EN MR/D33

Recording

1

1.1

1.2

P849/EN MR/D33

(MR) 9 Measurements and Recording

RECORDING

Introduction

The relay is equipped with integral measurements, event, fault and disturbance recording facilities suitable for analysis of complex system disturbances.

The relay is flexible enough to allow for the programming of these facilities to specific user application requirements. These requirements are discussed in the sections which follow.

Important The MiCOM P849 does not produce measurements.

Standard Event Recorder

The relay records and time tags up to 250 or 512 events (only up to 250 events in the

P24x and P44x) and stores them in non-volatile (battery-backed up) memory. This lets the system operator establish the sequence of events that occurred in the relay following a particular power system condition or switching sequence. When the available space is used up, the oldest event is automatically overwritten by the new one (i.e. first in, first out).

The relay’s real-time clock provides the time tag to each event, to a resolution of 1 ms.

The event records can be viewed either from the front plate LCD or remotely using the communications ports (using any available protocols, such as Courier or MODBUS).

For local viewing on the LCD of event, fault and maintenance records, select the

VIEW

RECORDS menu column.

For extraction from a remote source using communications, see the SCADA

Communications chapter or the MiCOM S1 Studio instructions.

For a full list of all the event types and the meaning of their values, see the Menu

Database document.

VIEW RECORDS

LCD Reference

Select Event

Menu Cell Ref

Time & Date

Record Text

Record Value

Description

Setting range from 0 to 511. This selects the required event record from the possible 512 that may be stored. A value of 0 corresponds to the latest event and so on.

Self reset alarm active

Self reset alarm inactive

Relay event

Opto event

Protection event

Platform event

Fault logged event

Maintenance Record logged event

Time & Date Stamp for the event given by the internal Real Time Clock.

Up to 32 Character description of the Event (refer to following sections).

Up to 32 Bit Binary Flag or integer representative of the Event (refer to following sections).

Page (MR) 9-5

(MR) 9 Measurements and Recording

1.2.1.1

1.2.1.2

Recording

VIEW RECORDS

LCD Reference

Select Maint

Description

Setting range from 0 to 4. This selects the required maintenance record from the possible 5 that may be stored. A value of 0 corresponds to the latest event and so on.

Maint Text

Maint Type

Maint Data

The following cells show all the starts etc. associated with the event.

Reset Indication

Either Yes or No. This serves to reset the trip LED indications provided that the relevant element has reset, to reset all LED and relays latched in the PSL, and to reset the latched alarms.

Table 1 – View records

Types of Event

An event may be a change of state of a control input or output relay, an alarm condition, or a setting change. The following sections show the various items that constitute an event:

Change of State of Opto-Isolated Inputs

If one or more of the opto (logic) inputs has changed state since the last time the protection algorithm ran, the new status is logged as an event. When this event is selected to be viewed on the LCD, three cells appear, as in shown here:

Time & date of event

“LOGIC INPUTS1”

“Event Value 0101010101010101”

The Event Value is a multi-bit word (see note) showing the status of the opto inputs, where the least significant bit (extreme right) corresponds to opto input 1. The same information is present if the event is extracted and viewed using a PC.

Note For P24x or P44x the Event Value is an 8 or 16 bit word.

For P34x or P64x it is an 8, 12, 16, 24 or 32-bit word.

For P445 it is an 8, 12 or 16-bit word.

For P44y, P54x, P547 or P841, it is an 8, 12, 16 or 24-bit word.

For P74x it is a 12, 16, 24 or 32-bit word.

For P746 or P849 it is a 32-bit word.

Page (MR) 9-6 P849/EN MR/D33

Recording

(MR) 9 Measurements and Recording

1.2.1.3 Change of State of One or More Output Relay Contacts

If one or more of the output relay contacts have changed state since the last time the protection algorithm ran, the new status is logged as an event. When this event is selected to be viewed on the LCD, three cells appear, as shown here:

Time and Date of Event

Output Contacts

Event Value 010101010101010101010

The Event Value is a multi-bit word (see Note) showing the status of the output contacts, where the least significant bit (extreme right) corresponds to output contact 1, etc. The same information is present if the event is extracted and viewed using a PC.

Note For P24x the Event Value is is a 7 or 16-bit word.

For P34x or P64x it is an 7, 11, 14, 15, 16, 22, 24 or 32-bit word.

For P445 it is an 8, 12 or 16-bit word.

For P44x it is a 7, 14 or 21 bit word.

For P44y, P54x, P547 or P841, it is an 8, 12, 16, 24 or 32 bit word.

For P74x it is a 12, 16, 24 or 32 bit word.

For P746 or P849 it is a 24-bit word.

1.2.1.4 Device Alarm Conditions

Any alarm conditions generated by the relays are logged as individual events. The following table shows examples of some of the alarm conditions and how they appear in the event list:

Alarm Condition

Setting group via optos invalid

Protection disabled

Event Text (‘System Data / Alarms Status 1” menu)

SG-opto Invalid

Prot'n Disabled

Table 2 – Examples of alarm conditions

Event Value

Bit position 3 in 32 bit field

Bit position 4 in 32 bit field

The previous table shows the abbreviated description given to the various alarm conditions and a corresponding value between 0 and 31. This value is appended to each alarm event in a similar way to the input and output events described previously. It is used by the event extraction software, such as MiCOM S1 Studio, to identify the alarm and is therefore invisible if the event is viewed on the LCD. ON or OFF is shown after the description to signify whether the particular condition has become operated or has reset.

1

2

3

Bit

Alarm Status 1

Text

Unused

Unused

SG-opto Invalid

4

5 to 25

26 to 32 SR User Alarm 1 (to 7)

Prot'n Disabled

Unused

Bit

1 to 4

Alarm Status 2

Text

Unused

5 to 14 SR User Alarm 8 tp 17

15 to 32 MR User Alarm 18 to 35

4

5

6

8

9

1

2

3

10

12

13

Bit

Alarm Status 3

Text

Battery Fail

Field Volt Fail

Comm2 H/W FAIL

GOOSE IED Absent

NIC Not Fitted

NIC No Response

NIC Soft. Reload

Bad TCP/IP Config.

Bad OSI Config.

NIC SW Mis-Match

IP Addr Conflict

P849/EN MR/D33 Page (MR) 9-7

(MR) 9 Measurements and Recording

Recording

Bit

Alarm Status 1

Text

Table 3 – Alarm status

1.2.1.5

1.2.1.6

1.2.2

1.2.3

Bit

Alarm Status 2

Text

14

15

16

17

18

19

Bit

20 to 32

Alarm Status 3

Text

IM Loopback

IM Message Fail

IM Data CD Fail

IM Channel Fail

Backup Setting

Bad DNP Setting

Unused

General Events

A number of events come under the heading of ‘General Events’. The following list items are stored as events.

Recognition of change of state of logic (optically isolated) inputs

Recognition of change of state of output relays

Alarms

Maintenance records

• Settings changes (local and remote)

A complete list of the ‘General Events’ is given in the Device Menu Database (P849/EN

MD), which is a separate document.

Setting Changes

Changes to any setting within the device are logged as an event.

Note Control/Support settings are settings which are not duplicated within the four setting groups. When any of these settings are changed, the event record is created simultaneously. However, changes to precise or standard event recorder settings will only generate an event once the settings have been confirmed at the ‘setting trap’.

Resetting of Precise Event Records

To delete the event, fault or maintenance reports, use the RECORD CONTROL column.

Viewing Event Records via MiCOM S1 Studio

When the event records are extracted and viewed on a PC they look slightly different than when viewed on the LCD.

The first line gives the description and time stamp for the event, while the additional information displayed below may be collapsed using the +/– symbol.

For further information regarding events and their specific meaning, refer to the Relay

Menu Database document. This standalone document not included in this manual.

Page (MR) 9-8 P849/EN MR/D33

Recording

1.2.4

(MR) 9 Measurements and Recording

Event Filtering

Event reporting can be disabled from all interfaces that support setting changes. The settings that control the various types of events are in the RECORD CONTROL column.

The effect of setting each to disabled is in shown in the following table:

Note Some occurrences can result in more than one type of event, e.g. a battery failure will produce an alarm event and a maintenance record event.

If the Protection Event setting is Enabled, a further set of settings is revealed which allow the event generation by individual DDB signals to be enabled or disabled.

For further information on events and their specific meaning, see the Relay Menu

Database document .

The following changes are stored as events:

• change of state logic (opto-isolated) inputs change of state of output relays

Alarms

• Maintenance records

• Settings changes (local and remote)

The effect of setting each to disabled is as follows:

Menu text

Clear Events

Clear Maint

Alarm Event

Relay O/P Event

Opto Input Event

General Event

Maint. Rec Event

Clear Dist Recs

Action

To clear the existing event log. An event will be generated indicating that the events have been erased

To erase the existing maintenance.

Disabled = all the occurrences that produce an alarm will result in no event being generated.

Disabled = no event generated for any change in logic input state.

Disabled = no event generated for any change in logic input state.

Disabled = no General Events generated

Disabled = no event generated for any occurrence that produces a maintenance record.

To clear the existing records. An event will be generated indicating that the records have been erased.

Table 4 – Menu text and actions

P849/EN MR/D33 Page (MR) 9-9

(MR) 9 Measurements and Recording

2

Disturbance Recorder

DISTURBANCE RECORDER

The integral enhanced disturbance recorder has an area of memory specifically set aside for record storage. The number of records that may be stored by the relay is dependent on the selected recording duration and the installed software release.

The relay can typically store a pre-set minimum number of records, each of a pre-set duration. These may vary between different MiCOM products.

Disturbance records continue to be recorded until the available memory is exhausted, at which time the oldest record(s) are overwritten to make space for the newest one.

The recorder stores actual samples that are taken at a rate of pre-defined number of samples per cycle. Again, this may vary between different MiCOM products.

Each disturbance record consists of a number of analog data channels and digital data channels.

The relevant CT and VT ratios for the analog channels are also extracted to enable scaling to primary quantities. If a CT ratio is set less than unity, the relay will choose a scaling factor of zero for the appropriate channel.

This device can typically store a minimum of 50 records, each of 1.5 seconds duration.

Each disturbance record consists of up to 32 digital data channels.

Menu Text

Duration

Trigger Position

Trigger Mode

Action

This sets the overall recording time

This sets the trigger point as a percentage of the duration

Sets Single or Extended trigger mode.

Digital input xx (with xx = 1 to 32)

Any relay output digital channel, any Opto-isolated inputs or Internal digital signals can be assigned to this channel. The digital channel will trigger the precise event recorder when the corresponding assigned event will occur.

Digital trigger xx (with xx = 1 to 32)

When “Trigger L/H” is selected, the channel will trigger the precise event recorder when changing from ‘0’ (low Level) to ‘1’ (High level). If “Trigger

H/L” is selected, it will trigger when changing from ‘1’ (high level) to ‘0’ (low level).

Table 5 – Menu text and actions

The pre and post fault recording times are set by a combination of the Duration and

Trigger Position cells. Duration sets the overall recording time and the Trigger

Position sets the trigger point as a percentage of the duration.

• For example, the default settings show that the overall recording time is set to 1.5 s with the trigger point being at 33.3% of this, giving 0.5 s pre-fault and 1 s post-fault recording times.

Page (MR) 9-10 P849/EN MR/D33

Disturbance Recorder

(MR) 9 Measurements and Recording

If a further trigger occurs while a recording is taking place, the recorder ignores the trigger if the

Trigger Mode is set to Single. However, if this is set to Extended, the post-trigger timer is reset to zero, extending the recording time.

As can be seen from the menu, each of the analog channels is selectable from the available analog inputs to the relay. The digital channels may be mapped to any of the opto isolated inputs or output contacts, in addition to several internal relay digital signals, such as protection starts and LEDs. The complete list of these signals may be found by viewing the available settings in the relay menu or using a setting file in MiCOM S1

Studio. Any of the digital channels may be selected to trigger the disturbance recorder on either a low-to-high or a high-to-low transition, using the Input Trigger cell. The default trigger settings are that any dedicated trip output contacts, such as relay 3, trigger the recorder.

It is not possible to view the disturbance records locally using the LCD; they must be extracted using suitable software such as MiCOM S1 Studio. This process is fully explained in the SCADA Communications chapter.

P849/EN MR/D33 Page (MR) 9-11

(MR) 9 Measurements and Recording

3

Measurements

MEASUREMENTS

The MiCOM P849 device does not acquire any analogue value. The "Measurements

SETUP" (when visible) does not display measurements.

Page (MR) 9-12 P849/EN MR/D33

MiCOM P849

(PD) 10 Product Design

P849/EN PD/D33

PRODUCT DESIGN

CHAPTER 10

Page (PD) 10-1

(PD) 10 Product Design

MiCOM P849

Date:

Products covered by this chapter:

Hardware Suffix:

Software Version:

Connection Diagrams:

08/2015

This chapter covers the specific versions of the MiCOM products listed below. This includes

only the following combinations of Software Version and Hardware Suffix.

M

B0

10P849xx (xx = 01 to 06)

Page (PD) 10-2 P849/EN PD/D33

Contents

(PD) 10 Product Design

CONTENTS

1 Relay System Overview

1.1

1.2

1.3

1.4

1.5

1.5.1

1.6

1.6.1

1.6.2

1.6.3

1.6.4

1.7

1.8

1.9

1.10

1.11

1.11.1

1.11.2

Hardware Overview

Mechanical Layout

Processor Board

Internal Communication Buses

Input Module

Universal Opto Isolated Logic Inputs

Power Supply Module (including Output Devices)

Power Supply Board (including EIA(RS)485 Communication Interface)

Auxiliary Power Supply

Output Relay Board

High Break Relay Board

Product Specific Options

IRIG-B Modulated or Unmodulated Board (Optional)

Second Rear Comms and InterMiCOM Board Board (Optional)

Second Rear Communications

Ethernet and Redundant Ethernet Boards

Input and Output Boards

Power Supply Module

2 Relay Software

2.1.1

2.2

2.3

2.4

2.4.1

2.4.2

2.4.3

2.5

2.5.1

2.5.2

2.5.3

2.5.4

2.5.5

Real-Time Operating System

Real-Time Operating System

System Services Software

Platform Software

Record Logging

Settings Database

Database Interface

Protection and Control Software

Signal Processing

Programmable Scheme Logic (PSL)

Function Key Interface

Event and Maintenance Recording

Precise Event Recorder

3 Self-Testing and Diagnostics

3.1

3.1.1

3.1.2

3.1.3

3.2

Start-Up Self-Testing

System Boot

Initialization Software

Platform Software Initialization and Monitoring

Continuous Self-Testing

Page (PD) 10-

16

19

20

20

20

20

20

21

21

21

16

18

19

19

23

23

23

24

24

24

5

6

7

8

9

9

8

9

5

5

6

6

10

10

11

11

12

14

14

P849/EN PD/D33 Page (PD) 10-3

(PD) 10 Product Design

Figures

FIGURES

Page (PD) 10-

Figure 1 - Relay modules and information flow

Figure 2 - Main input board

Figure 3 - High break contact operation

Figure 4 - Rear comms. port

Figure 5 - Ethernet board connectors (3 RJ45 or 2 LC + RJ45 or 1 RJ45)

Figure 6 – Relay software structure

Figure 7 - Device modules and information flow

Figure 8 - Device software structure

14

16

17

18

10

12

5

7

TABLES

Table 1 – Setting ranges

Table 2 - Power supply options

Table 3 - Input and output boards

Page (PD) 10-

7

8

14

Page (PD) 10-4 P849/EN PD/D33

Relay System Overview

1

1.1

(PD) 10 Product Design

RELAY SYSTEM OVERVIEW

Hardware Overview

The relay is based on a modular hardware design where each module performs a separate function. This section describes the functional operation of the various hardware modules. Some modules are essential while others are optional depending on the user’s requirements (see Product Specific Options and Hardware Communications Options).

All modules are connected by a parallel data and address bus which allows the processor board to send and receive information to and from the other modules as required.

There is also a separate serial data bus for transferring sample data from the input module to the processor. See the following Relay modules diagram.

1.2

P849/EN PD/D33

Figure 1 - Relay modules and information flow

Mechanical Layout

The relay case is pre-finished steel with a conductive covering of aluminum and zinc. This provides good earthing at all joints with a low impedance path to earth that is essential for shielding from external noise. The boards and modules use multi-point grounding

(earthing) to improve immunity to external noise and minimize the effect of circuit noise.

Ground planes are used on boards to reduce impedance paths and spring clips are used to ground the module metalwork.

Heavy duty terminal blocks are used at the rear of the relay for the current and voltage signal connections. Medium duty terminal blocks are used for the digital logic input signals, output relay contacts, power supply and rear communication port. A BNC connector is used for the optional IRIG-B signal. 9-pin and 25-pin female D-connectors are used at the front of the relay for data communication.

Inside the relay the boards plug into the connector blocks at the rear, and can be removed from the front of the relay only. The connector blocks to the relay’s CT inputs have internal shorting links inside the relay. These automatically short the current transformer circuits before they are broken when the board is removed.

The front panel consists of a membrane keypad with tactile dome keys, an LCD and 12 or

22 LEDs (depending on the model) mounted on an aluminum backing plate.

Page (PD) 10-5

(PD) 10 Product Design

1.3

1.4

1.5

Relay System Overview

Processor Board

The processor board performs all calculations for the relay and controls the operation of all other modules in the relay. The processor board also contains and controls the user interfaces (LCD, LEDs, keypad and communication interfaces).

The relay is based around a TMS320VC33-150MHz (peak speed), floating-point, 32-bit

Digital Signal Processor (DSP) operating at a clock frequency of half this speed. This processor performs all of the calculations for the relay, including the protection functions, control of the data communication and user interfaces including the operation of the LCD, keypad and LEDs.

The processor board is directly behind the relay’s front panel. This allows the LCD and

LEDs and front panel communication ports to be mounted on the processor board. These ports are:

The 9-pin D-connector for EIA(RS)232 serial communications used for MiCOM S1

Studio and Courier communications.

The 25-pin D-connector relay test port for parallel communication.

All serial communication is handled using a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA).

The main processor board has:

2 MB SRAM for the working area. This is fast access (zero wait state) volatile memory used to temporarily store and execute the processor software.

4 MB flash ROM to store the software code, text, configuration data, default settings, and present settings.

• 4 MB battery-backed SRAM to store disturbance, event, fault and maintenance records.

Note With hardware revisions L and M, the SRAM size has changed from 2MB to

8MB; and the Flash size has changed from 4MB to 8MB.

Internal Communication Buses

The relay has two internal buses for the communication of data between different modules. The main bus is a parallel link that is part of a 64-way ribbon cable. The ribbon cable carries the data and address bus signals in addition to control signals and all power supply lines. Operation of the bus is driven by the main processor board that operates as a master while all other modules in the relay are slaves.

The second bus is a serial link that is used exclusively for communicating the digital sample values from the input module to the main processor board. The DSP has a built-in serial port that is used to read the sample data from the serial bus. The serial bus is also carried on the 64-way ribbon cable.

Input Module

The input module provides the interface between the processor board and the digital signals coming into the device.

As shown in the Main input board diagram, the input board provides the circuitry for the digital input signals. The digital input signals are opto isolated on this board to prevent excessive voltages on these inputs causing damage to the device's internal circuitry.

Page (PD) 10-6 P849/EN PD/D33

Relay System Overview

(PD) 10 Product Design

Figure 2 - Main input board

1.5.1

P849/EN PD/D33

Universal Opto Isolated Logic Inputs

Menu Text Default Setting

OPTO CONFIG.

Global Nominal V 48/54V

Opto Input x 48/54V

Table 1 – Setting ranges

Setting Range

Min. Max.

Step Size

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V, 220/250V, Custom

24/27V, 30/34V, 48/54V, 110/125V, 220/250V, Custom

Page (PD) 10-7

(PD) 10 Product Design

1.6

1.6.1

Relay System Overview

This lower value eliminates fleeting pickups that may occur during a battery earth fault, when stray capacitance may present up to 50% of battery voltage across an input. Each input has filtering of 7ms. This renders the input immune to induced noise on the wiring: although this method is secure it can be slow.

In the Opto Config. menu the nominal battery voltage can be selected for all opto inputs by selecting one of the five standard ratings in the Global Nominal V settings. If Custom is selected then each opto input can individually be set to a nominal voltage value.

Power Supply Module (including Output Devices)

The power supply module contains two boards, one for the power supply unit and the other for the output relays. It provides power to all of the other modules in the relay, as well as the EIA(RS)485 electrical connection for the rear communication port. The second board of the power supply module contains the relays that provide the output contacts.

Power Supply Board (including EIA(RS)485 Communication Interface)

One of three different configurations of the power supply board can be fitted to the relay.

This will be specified at the time of order and depends on the nature of the supply voltage that will be connected to the relay. The options are shown in the following table:

24 - 32 V dc

Nominal dc range

48 - 110 V dc

110 - 250 V dc

Nominal ac range

dc only dc only

100 - 240 V ac rms

Table 2 - Power supply options

The output from all versions of the power supply module are used to provide isolated power supply rails to all of the other modules in the relay. Three voltage levels are used in the relay: 5.1 V for all of the digital circuits, ±16 V for the analog electronics such as on the input board, and 22 V for driving the output relay coils. All power supply voltages including the 0 V earth line are distributed around the relay through the 64-way ribbon cable. The power supply board also provides the 48 V field voltage. This is brought out to terminals on the back of the relay so that it can be used to drive the optically-isolated digital inputs.

The two other functions provided by the power supply board are the EIA(RS)485 communications interface and the watchdog contacts for the relay. The EIA(RS)485 interface is used with the relay’s rear communication port to provide communication using one of either Courier, MODBUS, IEC60870-5-103, or DNP3.0 protocols. The EIA(RS)485 hardware supports half-duplex communication and provides optical isolation of the serial data that is transmitted and received. All internal communication of data from the power supply board is through the output relay board connected to the parallel bus.

The watchdog facility has two output relay contacts, one normally open and one normally closed. These are driven by the main processor board and indicate that the relay is in a healthy state.

The power supply board incorporates inrush current limiting. This limits the peak inrush current, during energization, to approximately 10 A.

Page (PD) 10-8 P849/EN PD/D33

Relay System Overview

1.6.2

1.6.3

1.6.4

(PD) 10 Product Design

Auxiliary Power Supply

In the relay the power supply module contains a main power supply and an auxiliary power supply. The auxiliary power supply adds power on the 22 V rail for up to seven communication boards within the relay.

The three input voltage options are the same as for main supply. The relay board is provided as a standalone board.

Output Relay Board

The output relay board has eight relays, six normally open contacts and two changeover contacts.

The relays are driven from the 22 V power supply line. The relays’ state is written to or read from using the parallel data bus.

High Break Relay Board

The output relay board holds four relays, all normally open. The relays are driven from the 22V power supply line. The relays’ state is written to or read from using the parallel data bus.

This board uses a hybrid of MOSFET Solid State Devices (SSD) in parallel with high capacity relay output contacts. The MOSFET has a varistor across it to provide protection which is required when switching off inductive loads because the stored energy in the inductor causes a reverse high voltage which could damage the MOSFET.

When there is a control input command to operate an output contact, the miniature relay is operated at the same time as the SSD. The miniature relay contact closes in nominally

3.5 ms and is used to carry the continuous load current; the SSD operates in <0.2 ms and is switched off after 7.5 ms. When the control input resets to open the contacts, the SSD is again turned on for 7.5 ms. The miniature relay resets in nominally 3.5 ms before the

SSD so the SSD is used to break the load. The SSD absorbs the energy when breaking inductive loads and so limits the resulting voltage surge. This contact arrangement is for switching dc circuits only. As the SSD comes on very fast (<0.2 ms) these high break output contacts have the added advantage of being very fast operating. See the High

break contact operation diagram below:

P849/EN PD/D33 Page (PD) 10-9

(PD) 10 Product Design

Databus control input on

1.7

1.8

off

Relay System Overview

MOSFET operate 7ms on

MOSFET reset

7ms on

Relay contact closed

3.5ms + contact bounce

3.5ms

Load current

P1981ENa

Figure 3 - High break contact operation

Product Specific Options

Product Specific Options may mean that an additional board may be present if it was specified when the relay was ordered. The product specific options commonly allow a choice of IRIG-B, different numbers of Optos, Relays (including High Break relays).

These options are shown in the Ordering Options section in Chapter 1 – Introduction.

IRIG-B Modulated or Unmodulated Board (Optional)

The optional IRIG-B board is an order option that can be fitted to provide an accurate timing reference for the relay. This can be used wherever an IRIG-B signal is available.

The IRIG-B signal is connected to the board with a BNC connector on the back of the relay. The timing information is used to synchronize the relay’s internal real-time clock to an accuracy of 1 ms. The internal clock is then used for the time tagging of the event, fault maintenance and disturbance records. The IRIG-B board can also be specified with a fiber optic or Ethernet rear communication port.

The modulated or unmodulated IRIG-B board, which is optional, can be used where an

IRIG-B signal is available to provide an accurate time reference for the device. There is also an option on this board to specify: a fibre optic rear communication port, for use with IEC60870 communication only. a second rear port designed typically for dial-up modem access by engineers/operators (see the Second Rear Comms and InterMiCOM Board Board

(Optional)

section).

Page (PD) 10-10 P849/EN PD/D33

Relay System Overview

1.9

1.10

(PD) 10 Product Design

All modules are connected by a parallel data and address bus which allows the processor board to send and receive information to and from the other modules as required. There is also a separate serial data bus for conveying data from the input module to the processor. The Software Overview section shows the modules of the device and the flow of information between them.

The IRIG-B board is controlled by the main board.

Second Rear Comms and InterMiCOM Board Board (Optional)

The optional second rear port is designed typically for dial-up modem access by engineers/operators, when the main port is reserved for SCADA traffic. Communication is via one of three physical links; K-Bus, EIA(RS)485 or EIA(RS)232. The port supports full local or remote control access by MiCOM S1 V2 or MiCOM S1 Studio software. The second rear port is also available with an on board IRIG-B input.

The optional board also houses port “SK5”, the InterMiCOM teleprotection port.

InterMiCOM permits end-to-end signalling with a remote device. Port SK5 has an

EIA(RS)232 connection, allowing connection to a MODEM, or compatible multiplexers.

Second Rear Communications

On ordering this board within a relay, both 2nd rear communications and InterMiCOM will become connection and setting options. The user may then enable either one, or both, as demanded by the installation.

For relays with the Courier protocol on the first rear communications port there is the hardware option of a second rear communications port (which also runs the Courier language). This can be used over one of three physical links: twisted pair K-BUS (nonpolarity sensitive), twisted pair EIA(RS)485 (connection polarity sensitive) or EIA(RS)232.

The second rear comms. board, Ethernet and IRIG-B boards are mutually exclusive since they use the same hardware slot. For this reason two versions of second rear comms. and Ethernet boards are available; one with an IRIG-B input and one without. The second rear comms. board is shown in the following diagram.

P849/EN PD/D33 Page (PD) 10-11

(PD) 10 Product Design

1.11

Relay System Overview

IRIG-B:

Modulated option or

Unmodulated option

Language: Courier always

Courier Port

(EIA232/EIR485)

SK4

Physical links:

EIA232

Or

EIA 485 (polarity sensitive)

Or

K-Bus (non-polarity sensitive)

InterMiCOM

(EIA232)

SK5

Physical links are s/w selectable

P2083ENb

Figure 4 - Rear comms. port

Ethernet and Redundant Ethernet Boards

This is a mandatory board for IEC 61850 enabled relays. It provides network connectivity through either copper or fiber media at rates of 10Mb/s (copper only) or 100Mb/s. There is also an option on this board to specify IRIG-B board port (modulated or unmodulated). This board, the IRIG-B board mentioned in the Hardware Communications

Options section and second rear comms. board mentioned in the IRIG-B Board section are mutually exclusive as they all utilize slot A within the relay case.

All modules are connected by a parallel data and address bus that allows the processor board to send and receive information to and from the other modules as required. There is also a separate serial data bus for conveying sample data from the input module to the processor. The relay modules and information flow diagram shows the modules of the relay and the flow of information between them.

This optional board is required for providing network connectivity using IEC 61850. There are a variety of different boards which provide Ethernet connectivity.

Important The choice of communication board options varies according to the Hardware Suffix and the Software Version of the MiCOM product. These are shown in the Ordering Options section in

Chapter 1 – Introduction,

Page (PD) 10-12 P849/EN PD/D33

Relay System Overview

(PD) 10 Product Design

By way of example, the board options may include:

• single-port Ethernet boards (which use 10/100 Mbits/s Copper and modulated/unmodulated IRIG-B connectivity) single-port Ethernet boards (which use 100MBits/s optical fibre connectivity)

Redundant Ethernet Self-Healing Ring with one or more multi-mode fibre optic ports and modulated/unmodulated IRIG-B connectivity

Redundant Ethernet RSTP with one or more multi-mode fibre optic ports and modulated/unmodulated IRIG-B connectivity

Redundant Ethernet Dual Homing Star with one or more multi-mode fibre optic ports and modulated/unmodulated IRIG-B connectivity

Redundant Ethernet Parallel Redundancy Protocol (PRP) with one or more multimode fibre optic ports and modulated/unmodulated IRIG-B connectivity

Redundant Ethernet with PRP/HSR/Dual IP and a mixture of LC/RJ45 ports and modulated/unmodulated IRIG-B connectivity

Some of these options are mutually exclusive as they all use slot A in the relay case.

Note Each Ethernet board has a unique MAC address used for each Ethernet communication interface. The MAC address is printed on the rear of the board, next to the Ethernet sockets.

Note The 100 Mbits/s Fiber Optic ports use ST/LC type connectors and are suitable for 1310 nm multi-mode fiber type.

Copper ports use RJ45 type connectors. When using copper Ethernet, it is important to use Shielded Twisted Pair (STP) or Foil Twisted Pair (FTP) cables, to shield the IEC

61850 communications against electromagnetic interference. The RJ45 connector at each end of the cable must be shielded, and the cable shield must be connected to this

RJ45 connector shield, so that the shield is grounded to the relay case. Both the cable and the RJ45 connector at each end of the cable must be Category 5 minimum, as specified by the IEC 61850 standard.

It is recommended that each copper Ethernet cable is limited to a maximum length of 3 m and confined to one bay or cubicle.

When using IEC 61850 communications through the Ethernet board, the rear EIA(RS)485 and front EIA(RS)232 ports are also available for simultaneous use, both using the

Courier protocol.

One example of an Ethernet board is shown in this Ethernet board connectors diagram:

P849/EN PD/D33 Page (PD) 10-13

(PD) 10 Product Design

Relay System Overview

MAC ADDRESS/

SOFTWARE REF.

LABEL TO BE FITTED

AT FINAL TEST TO

ETHERNET COMMS

ONLY.

RJ45 port

(10/100

Base-TX)

MAC ADDRESS/

SOFTWARE REF.

LABEL TO BE FITTED

AT FINAL TEST TO

ETHERNET COMMS

ONLY.

2 RJ45 ports

(10/100

Base-TX)

RJ45 port

(10/100

Base-TX)

2 LC ports

(100

Base-FX)

RJ45 port

(10/100

Base-TX)

MAC ADDRESS/

SOFTWARE REF.

LABEL TO BE FITTE

AT FINAL TEST TO

ETHERNET COMMS

ONLY.

1.11.1

1.11.2

Page (PD) 10-14

3 RJ45 Ports

Ethernet Board

(2072071A01)

2LC + 1RJ45 Ports

Ethernet Board

(2072069A01)

1 RJ45 Port

Ethernet Board

(2072101A01)

2072071A01

2072069A01

2072101A01

DRG00000001

Doc.Rev. B Sheet 1/1

Note: The 3 RJ45 and the 2LC+1RJ45 port versions provide redundant Ethernet functions . The 1RJ45 port

version does not provide redundant Ethernet functions . It is shown for illustration purposes only.

Figure 5 - Ethernet board connectors (3 RJ45 or 2 LC + RJ45 or 1 RJ45)

P1980ENe

Input and Output Boards

Model Opto-inputs

P849xxxA 32 x UNI

(1)

P849xxxB 48 x UNI

(1)

P849xxxC 32 x UNI

(1)

16 (12 N/O, 4 C/O)

24 (18 N/O, 6 C/O)

Device outputs

14 (6 N/O, 8 C/O) + 16 high break devices

P849xxxD 16 x UNI

(1)

P849xxxE 64 x UNI

(1)

60 (36 N/O, 24 C/O)

16 (12 N/O, 4 C/O)

P849xxxF 32 x UNI

(1)

(1)

46 (30 N/O, 16 C/O)

Universal voltage range opto inputs N/O – normally open C/O – change over

Table 3 - Input and output boards

Power Supply Module

The power supply module provides a power supply to all of the other modules in the relay, at three different voltage levels.

P849/EN PD/D33

Relay System Overview

(PD) 10 Product Design

The power supply board also provides the EIA(RS)485 electrical connection for the rear communication port.

On a second board, the power supply module contains:

• relays which provide the output contacts (P742 and P743),

• an auxiliary power supply (P741).

The power supply module also provides a 48V external field supply output to drive the opto isolated digital inputs (or the substation battery may be used to drive the optos).

P849/EN PD/D33 Page (PD) 10-15

(PD) 10 Product Design

2

Relay Software

RELAY SOFTWARE

The relay software was introduced in the overview of the relay at the start of this chapter.

The software can be considered to be made up of these sections:

• The real-time operating system

The system services software

The platform software

• The protection and control software

These four elements are all processed by the same processor board.This section describes in detail the platform software and the protection and control software, which between them control the functional behavior of the relay. The following Relay

software structure

diagram shows the structure of the relay software.

Control software

Programmable & fixed scheme logic precise event recorder task

Signal processing & saturation detection

Records

Topology algorithms

Settings database

Platform software

Event,

Maintenance record logging.

Settings

Sample data,

Logic inputs &

Outputs contacts

Front panel interface

(LCD & Keypad)

Local & remote communications interface - Courier

Control of Interfaces to keypad,

LCD, LEDs, Front & Rear Comm. ports

System services software

2.1.1

Device hardware

P3095ENa

Figure 6 – Relay software structure

Real-Time Operating System

The real-time operating system provides a framework for the different parts of the relay’s software to operate in.

The software is split into tasks; the real-time operating system is used to schedule the processing of the tasks to ensure that they are processed in the time available and in the desired order of priority. The operating system is also responsible in part for controlling the communication between the software tasks through the use of operating system messages.

Page (PD) 10-16 P849/EN PD/D33

Relay Software

(PD) 10 Product Design

P849/EN PD/D33

Figure 7 - Device modules and information flow

P3086ENa

Page (PD) 10-17

(PD) 10 Product Design

Relay Software

Control Software

Measurements and Event,

Disturbance Records

Disturbance Recorder task

Programmable & Fixed Scheme

Logic

Sample data & digital logic inputs

Supervisor task

Protection & Control

Settings

Platform Software

Event, Disturbance,

Maintenance

Record Logging

Remote

Communications

Interface –

IEC60870-5-103

Setting

Database

Remote

Communications

Interface -

MODBUS

Control of output contacts and programmable

LEDs

Front Panel

Interface – LCD &

Keypad

Control of interfaces to Keypad, LCD,

LEDs, Front and Rear Comms Ports.

Self-checking Maintenance Records

Local & Remote

Communications

Interface - Courier

System Service software

2.2

Device Hardware

P3088ENa

Figure 8 - Device software structure

Real-Time Operating System

The real-time operating system provides a framework for the different parts of the relay’s software to operate in.

The software is split into tasks; the real-time operating system is used to schedule the processing of the tasks to ensure that they are processed in the time available and in the desired order of priority. The operating system is also responsible in part for controlling the communication between the software tasks through the use of operating system messages.

As explained in the hardware overview, each relay contains one main board and one coprocessor board. These two boards use two different operating systems:

• For main board software: a real time operating system provides a framework for the different parts of the relay’s software to operate within. To this end, the software is split into tasks. The real-time operating system is responsible for scheduling the processing of these tasks such that they are carried out in the time available and in the desired order of priority.

• For coprocessor board software: a sequencer manages all the functions implemented on the coprocessor board. Each function is executed at a fixed frequency. Consequently the CPU load of the coprocessor is fixed and independent of the network’s frequency.

The real-time operating system is responsible for scheduling the processing of these tasks such that they are carried out in the time available and in the desired order of priority. The operating system is also responsible for the exchange of information between tasks, in the form of messages.

Page (PD) 10-18 P849/EN PD/D33

Relay Software

2.3

2.4

2.4.1

(PD) 10 Product Design

System Services Software

As shown in the above Relay software structure diagram, the system services software provides the low-level control of the relay hardware. It also provides the interface between the relay’s hardware and the higher-level functionality of the platform software and the protection and control software.

For example, the system services software provides drivers for items such as the LCD display, the keypad and the remote communication ports. It also controls the boot of the processor and downloading of the processor code into SRAM from non-volatile flash

EPROM at power up.

Platform Software

The platform software has these main functions:

• To deal with the management of the relay settings.

To control the logging of all records that are generated by the protection software, including alarms and event, fault, disturbance and maintenance records.

To store and maintain a database of all of the relay’s settings in non-volatile memory.

• To provide the internal interface between the settings database and each of the relay’s user interfaces. These interfaces are the front panel interface and the front and rear communication ports, using whichever communication protocol has been specified (Courier, MODBUS, IEC60870-5-103 and DNP3.0). The platform software converts the information from the database into the format required.

The platform software notifies the protection and control software of all settings changes and logs data as specified by the protection and control software.

Record Logging

The logging function is provided to store all alarms, events, faults and maintenance records. The records for all of these incidents are logged in battery backed-up SRAM in order to provide a non-volatile log of what has happened. The relay maintains four logs: one each for up to 32 alarms, 512 event records, 5 fault records and 5 maintenance records. The logs are maintained such that the oldest record is overwritten with the newest record.

The logging function can be initiated from the protection software or the platform software, and is responsible for logging of a maintenance record in the event of a relay failure. This includes errors that have been detected by the platform software itself or error that are detected by either the system services or the protection software functions.

See also the section on Self-Testing and Diagnostics later in this section.

P849/EN PD/D33 Page (PD) 10-19

(PD) 10 Product Design

2.4.2

2.4.3

2.5

2.5.1

2.5.2

Relay Software

Settings Database

The settings database contains all of the settings and data for the relay, including the protection, disturbance recorder and control and support settings. The settings are maintained in non-volatile memory. The platform software’s management of the settings database make sure that only one user interface modifies the database settings at any one time. This feature is used to avoid confusion between different parts of the software during a setting change. For changes to protection settings and disturbance recorder settings, the platform software operates a ‘scratchpad’ in SRAM memory. This allows a number of setting changes to be made in any order but applied to the protection elements, disturbance recorder and saved in the database in non-volatile memory, at the same time. If a setting change affects the protection and control task, the database advises it of the new values.

The database is directly compatible with Courier communications.

Database Interface

The other function of the platform software is to implement the relay’s internal interface between the database and each of the relay’s user interfaces. The database of settings and measurements must be accessible from all of the relay’s user interfaces to allow read and modify operations. The platform software presents the data in the appropriate format for each user interface.

Protection and Control Software

The protection and control software interfaces with the platform software for settings changes and logging of records, and with the system services software for acquisition of sample data and access to output relays and digital opto-isolated inputs. It also performs the calculations for all of the protection algorithms of the relay. This includes digital signal processing such as Fourier filtering and ancillary tasks such as the disturbance recorder.

The protection and control software task processes all of the protection elements and measurement functions of the relay. It has to communicate with both the system services software and the platform software, and organize its own operations. The protection software has the highest priority of any of the software tasks in the relay, to provide the fastest possible protection response. It also has a supervisor task that controls the startup of the task and deals with the exchange of messages between the task and the platform software.

Signal Processing

The sampling function filters the digital input signals from the opto-isolators and tracks the frequency of the analog signals. The digital inputs are checked against their previous value over a period of half a cycle. Therefore a change in the state of one of the inputs must be maintained over at least half a cycle before it is registered with the protection and control software.

Programmable Scheme Logic (PSL)

The Programmable Scheme Logic (PSL) allows the relay user to configure an individual protection scheme to suit their own particular application. This is done with programmable logic gates and delay timers.

Page (PD) 10-20 P849/EN PD/D33

Relay Software

2.5.3

2.5.4

2.5.5

P849/EN PD/D33

(PD) 10 Product Design

The input to the PSL is any combination of the status of the digital input signals from the opto-isolators on the input board, the outputs of the protection elements such as protection starts and trips, and the outputs of the fixed PSL. The fixed PSL provides the relay’s standard protection schemes. The PSL consists of software logic gates and timers. The logic gates can be programmed to perform a range of different logic functions and can accept any number of inputs. The timers are used either to create a programmable delay or to condition the logic outputs, such as to create a pulse of fixed duration on the output, regardless of the length of the pulse on the input. The outputs of the PSL are the LEDs on the front panel of the relay and the output contacts at the rear.

The execution of the PSL logic is event driven: the logic is processed whenever any of its inputs change, for example as a result of a change in one of the digital input signals or a trip output from a protection element. Also, only the part of the PSL logic that is affected by the particular input change that has occurred is processed. This reduces the amount of processing time that is used by the PSL. The protection and control software updates the logic delay timers and checks for a change in the PSL input signals every time it runs.

This system provides flexibility for the user to create their own scheme logic design.

However, it also means that the PSL can be configured into a very complex system, and because of this setting of the PSL is implemented through the PC support package

MiCOM S1 Studio.

Function Key Interface

The ten function keys interface directly into the PSL as digital input signals and are processed based on the PSLs event-driven execution. However, a change of state is only recognized when a key press is executed, on average for longer than 200 ms. The time to register a change of state depends on whether the function key press is executed at the start or the end of a protection task cycle, with the additional hardware and software scan time included. A function key press can provide a latched (toggled mode) or output on key press only (normal mode) depending on how it is programmed and can be configured to individual protection scheme requirements. The latched state signal for each function key is written to non-volatile memory and read from non-volatile memory during relay power up, allowing the function key state to be reinstated after power-up if the relay power is lost.

Event and Maintenance Recording

A change in any digital input signal or protection element output signal is used to indicate that an event has taken place. When this happens, the protection and control task sends a message to the supervisor task to show that an event is available to be processed. The protection and control task writes the event data to a fast buffer in SRAM that is controlled by the supervisor task. When the supervisor task receives either an event or fault record message, it instructs the platform software to create the appropriate log in battery backed-up SRAM. The supervisor’s buffer is faster than battery backed-up SRAM, therefore the protection software is not delayed waiting for the records to be logged by the platform software. However, if a large number of records to be logged are created in a short time, some may be lost if the supervisor’s buffer is full before the platform software is able to create a new log in battery backed-up SRAM. If this occurs, an event is logged to indicate this loss of information.

Precise Event Recorder

The analog values and logic signals are routed from the protection and control software to the disturbance recorder software. The platform software interfaces with the disturbance recorder to allow the stored records to be extracted.

Page (PD) 10-21

(PD) 10 Product Design

Relay Software

The disturbance recorder operates as a separate task from the protection and control task. It can record the waveforms for up to 8 analogue channels and the values of up to

32 digital signals. For peripheral unit the recording time is user selectable up to a maximum of 10 seconds and for central unit the record duration is fixed to 600ms. The disturbance recorder is supplied with data by the protection and control task once per cycle. The disturbance recorder collates the data that it receives into the required length disturbance record. It attempts to limit the demands it places on memory space by saving the analogue data in compressed format whenever possible. This is done by detecting changes in the analogue input signals and compressing the recording of the waveform when it is in a steady-state condition. The disturbance records can be extracted by

MiCOM S1 that can also store the data in COMTRADE format, thus allowing the use of other packages to view the recorded data.

Page (PD) 10-22 P849/EN PD/D33

Self-Testing and Diagnostics

3

3.1

3.1.1

(PD) 10 Product Design

SELF-TESTING AND DIAGNOSTICS

The relay includes several self-monitoring functions to check the operation of its hardware and software when it is in service. These are included so that if an error or fault occurs in the relay’s hardware or software, the relay is able to detect and report the problem and attempt to resolve it by performing a reboot. The relay must therefore be out of service for a short time, during which the Healthy LED on the front of the relay is OFF and, the watchdog contact at the rear is ON. If the reboot fails to resolve the problem, the relay takes itself permanently out of service; the Healthy LED stays OFF and watchdog contact stays ON.

If a problem is detected by the self-monitoring functions, the relay stores a maintenance record in battery backed-up SRAM.

The self-monitoring is implemented in two stages:

• firstly a thorough diagnostic check that is performed when the relay is booted-up

• secondly a continuous self-checking operation that checks the operation of the relay’s critical functions while it is in service.

Start-Up Self-Testing

The self-testing that is carried out when the relay is started takes a few seconds to complete, during which time the relay’s protection is unavailable. This is shown by the

Healthy LED on the front of the relay which is ON when the relay has passed all tests and entered operation. If the tests detect a problem, the relay remains out of service until it is manually restored to working order.

The operations that are performed at start-up are:

System Boot

Initialization Software

Platform Software Initialization and Monitoring

System Boot

The integrity of the flash memory is verified using a checksum before the program code and data are copied into SRAM and executed by the processor. When the copy is complete the data then held in SRAM is checked against that in flash memory to ensure they are the same and that no errors have occurred in the transfer of data from flash memory to SRAM. The entry point of the software code in SRAM is then called which is the relay initialization code.

P849/EN PD/D33 Page (PD) 10-23

(PD) 10 Product Design

3.1.2

3.1.3

3.2

Self-Testing and Diagnostics

Initialization Software

In the initialization process the relay checks the following.

• The status of the battery

• The integrity of the battery backed-up SRAM that stores event, fault and disturbance records

The voltage level of the field voltage supply that drives the opto-isolated inputs

The operation of the LCD controller

• The watchdog operation

When the initialization software routine is complete, the supervisor task starts the platform software.

Platform Software Initialization and Monitoring

In starting the platform software, the relay checks the integrity of the data held in nonvolatile memory with a checksum, the operation of the real-time clock, and the IRIG-B board if fitted. The final test that is made concerns the input and output of data; the presence and healthy condition of the input board is checked and the analog data acquisition system is checked through sampling the reference voltage.

At the successful conclusion of all of these tests the relay is entered into service and the protection started-up.

Continuous Self-Testing

When the relay is in service, it continually checks the operation of the critical parts of its hardware and software. The checking is carried out by the system services software (see section on relay software earlier in this section) and the results reported to the platform software.

The functions that are checked are as follows:

• The flash EPROM containing all program code and language text is verified by a checksum

The code and constant data held in SRAM is checked against the corresponding data in flash EPROM to check for data corruption

The SRAM containing all data other than the code and constant data is verified with a checksum

The non-volatile memory containing setting values is verified by a checksum, whenever its data is accessed

The battery status

The level of the field voltage

The integrity of the digital signal I/O data from the opto-isolated inputs and the relay contacts, is checked by the data acquisition function every time it is executed.

The operation of the analog data acquisition system is checked by the acquisition function every time it is executed. This is done by sampling the reference voltage on a spare multiplexed channel

The operation of the IRIG-B board is checked, where it is fitted, by the software that reads the time and date from the board

If the Ethernet board is fitted, it is checked by the software on the main processor board.

If the Ethernet board fails to respond, an alarm is raised and the board is reset in an attempt to resolve the problem

Page (PD) 10-24 P849/EN PD/D33

Self-Testing and Diagnostics

(PD) 10 Product Design

In the unlikely event that one of the checks detects an error in the relay’s subsystems, the platform software is notified and it will attempt to log a maintenance record in battery backed-up SRAM. If the problem is with the battery status or the IRIG-B board, the relay continues in operation. However, for problems detected in any other area the relay shuts down and reboots. This result in a period of up to 5 seconds when protection is unavailable, but the complete restart of the relay including all initializations should clear most problems that could occur. An integral part of the start-up procedure is a thorough diagnostic self-check. If this detects the same problem that caused the relay to restart, the restart has not cleared the problem and the relay takes itself permanently out of service. This is indicated by the

Healthy LED on the front of the relay which goes OFF, and the watchdog contact that goes ON.

P849/EN PD/D33 Page (PD) 10-25

(PD) 10 Product Design

Notes:

Self-Testing and Diagnostics

Page (PD) 10-26 P849/EN PD/D33

MiCOM P849

(CM) 11 Commissioning

P849/EN CM/D33

COMMISSIONING

CHAPTER 11

Page (CM) 11-1

(CM) 11 Commissioning

MiCOM P849

Date:

Products covered by this chapter:

Hardware Suffix:

08/2015

This chapter covers the specific versions of the MiCOM products listed below. This includes

only the following combinations of Software Version and Hardware Suffix.

M

Software Version: B0

Connection Diagrams: 10P849xx (xx = 01 to 06)

Page (CM) 11-2 P849/EN CM/D33

Contents

CONTENTS

1 Introduction

2 Setting Familiarisation

3 Equipment Required for Commissioning

3.1

3.2

Minimum Equipment Required

Optional Equipment

4 Product Checks

4.1

4.1.1

4.1.2

4.1.3

4.1.4

4.1.5

4.2

4.2.1

4.2.2

4.2.3

4.2.4

4.2.5

4.2.6

4.2.7

4.2.8

With the Device De-Energised

Visual Inspection

Insulation

External Wiring

Watchdog Contacts

Auxiliary Supply

With the Device Energised

Watchdog Contacts

Date and Time

Light Emitting Diodes (LED’s)

Field Voltage Supply

Input Opto-Isolators

Output Relays

Rear Communications Port

Second Rear Communications Port

5 Commissioning Tools

5.1

5.2

5.3

5.4

5.5

5.6

5.7

5.8

5.9

5.10

5.11

5.12

Opto I/P Status

Relay O/P Status

Test Port Status

LED Status

Monitor Bits 1 to 8

Test Mode

Test Pattern

Contact Test

Test LEDs

Test Auto-Reclose

Red LED Status and Green LED Status

Using a Monitor/Download Port Test Box

6 Setting Checks

6.1

6.2

Apply Application-Specific Settings

Check Application Settings

P849/EN CM/D33

(CM) 11 Commissioning

Page (CM)11-

5

8

9

9

9

10

10

11

11

12

12

12

13

15

16

17

17

13

13

14

15

20

21

22

22

23

20

21

21

21

23

23

23

23

24

24

25

Page (CM) 11-3

(CM) 11 Commissioning

7 Final Checks

Contents

26

Page (CM) 11-4 P849/EN CM/D33

Introduction

1

(CM) 11 Commissioning

INTRODUCTION

About MiCOM Range

MiCOM is a comprehensive solution capable of meeting all electricity supply requirements. It comprises a range of components, systems and services from Schneider

Electric.

Central to the MiCOM concept is flexibility. MiCOM provides the ability to define an application solution and, through extensive communication capabilities, integrate it with your power supply control system.

The components within MiCOM are:

P range protection relays;

C range control products;

M range measurement products for accurate metering and monitoring;

S range versatile PC support and substation control packages.

MiCOM products include extensive facilities for recording information on the state and behaviour of the power system using disturbance and fault records. They can also provide measurements of the system at regular intervals to a control centre enabling remote monitoring and control to take place.

For up-to-date information, please see: www.schneider-electric.com

Note During 2011, the International Electrotechnical Commission classified the voltages into different levels (IEC 60038). The IEC defined LV, MV, HV and

EHV as follows: LV is up to 1000V. MV is from 1000V up to 35 kV. HV is from 110 kV or 230 kV. EHV is above 230 KV.

There is still ambiguity about where each band starts and ends. A voltage level defined as LV in one country or sector, may be described as MV in a different country or sector. Accordingly, LV, MV, HV and EHV suggests a possible range, rather than a fixed band. Please refer to your local

Schneider Electric office for more guidance.

P849/EN CM/D33 Page (CM) 11-5

(CM) 11 Commissioning

Introduction

The MiCOM P40 range of products includes various devices which have different functions. This chapter includes information related to the Commissioning of one or more of these devices. Many, although not all, of the commissioning tasks are common to these products.

This chapter applies to the MiCOM P40 products shown on the second page of this chapter. Where a particular section or paragraph relates only to one of more of the products, this is stated in the heading or at the beginning of the paragraph or section. If this states “Applicability: All”, this means the following information relates to all the products in shown on the second page of this chapter. Otherwise the Applicability statement will list the MiCOM P40 products which the information covers.

When using this chapter, you (i.e. in your role as the Commissioning Engineer), need to be aware of:

The MiCOM product number you are commissioning

The features associated with that MiCOM product number

The subset of features which have been enabled for the specific piece of equipment you are commissioning

Any work instructions which determine how the equipment should be installed and which of its functions have been enabled and how they should relate to other equipment

You will then be able to select which of the following sections/subsections you need to follow. Some of these sections will not be relevant for the particular commissioning tasks you are performing. By way of example, if the MiCOM device you are commissioning has an Auto-Reclose function you need to refer to the sections which cover Auto-Reclose, otherwise you can ignore them.

You should start using this chapter at the beginning and work your way through to the end. At key points in the chapter, you will have to know what technical functions have been enabled, as you will be asked to omit certains sections of this chapter if they are not relevant for your current commissioning task.

Page (CM) 11-6 P849/EN CM/D33

Introduction

(CM) 11 Commissioning

MiCOM P40 relays are fully numerical in their design, implementing all protection and non-protection functions in software. The relays use a high degree of self-checking and give an alarm in the unlikely event of a failure. Therefore, the commissioning tests do not need to be as extensive as with non-numeric electronic or electro-mechanical relays.

To commission numeric relays, it is only necessary to verify that the hardware is functioning correctly and the application-specific software settings have been applied to the relay. It is considered unnecessary to test every function of the relay if the settings have been verified by one of the following methods:

Extracting the settings applied to the relay using appropriate setting software

(preferred method)

• Using the operator interface

To confirm that the product is operating correctly once the application-specific settings have been applied, perform a test on a single protection element.

Unless previously agreed to the contrary, the customer is responsible for determining the application-specific settings to be applied to the relay and for testing any scheme logic applied by external wiring or configuration of the relay’s internal programmable scheme logic.

Blank commissioning test and setting records are provided within this manual for completion as required.

As the relay’s menu language is user-selectable, the Commissioning Engineer can change it to allow accurate testing as long as the menu is restored to the customer’s preferred language on completion.

To simplify the specifying of menu cell locations in these Commissioning Instructions, they are given in the form [courier reference: COLUMN HEADING, Cell Text]. For example, the cell for selecting the menu language (first cell under the column heading) is in the System Data column (column 00) so it is given as [0001: SYSTEM DATA,

Language].

P849/EN CM/D33 Page (CM) 11-7

(CM) 11 Commissioning

2

Setting Familiarisation

SETTING FAMILIARISATION

When first commissioning a relay, allow sufficient time to become familiar with how to apply the settings.

The Relay Menu Database document and the Introduction or Settings chapters contain a detailed description of the menu structure of Schneider Electric relays. The relay menu database is a separate document which can be downloaded from our website: www.schneider-electric.com

With the secondary front cover in place, all keys except the  key are accessible. All menu cells can be read. LEDs and alarms can be reset. However, no protection or configuration settings can be changed, or fault and event records cleared.

Removing the secondary front cover allows access to all keys so that settings can be changed, LEDs and alarms reset, and fault and event records cleared. However, to make changes to menu cells, the appropriate user role and password is needed.

Alternatively, if a portable PC with suitable setting software is available (such as MiCOM

S1 Studio), the menu can be viewed one page at a time, to display a full column of data and text. This PC software also allows settings to be entered more easily, saved to a file for future reference, or printed to produce a settings record. Refer to the PC software user manual for details. If the software is being used for the first time, allow sufficient time to become familiar with its operation.

Page (CM) 11-8 P849/EN CM/D33

Equipment Required for Commissioning

3

3.1

3.2

(CM) 11 Commissioning

EQUIPMENT REQUIRED FOR COMMISSIONING

Minimum Equipment Required

The minimum equipment needed varies slightly, depending on the features provided by each type of MiCOM product. The list of minimum equipment is given below:

Multifunctional dynamic current and voltage injection test set.

Multimeter with suitable ac current range, and ac and dc voltage ranges of 0 -

440V and 0 - 250V respectively.

Continuity tester (if not included in multimeter).

Phase angle meter.

Phase rotation meter.

Note Modern test equipment may contain many of the above features in one unit.

Fiber optic power meter.

Fiber optic test leads (type and number according to application).

P594 Commissioning Instructions. If the scheme features P594 time synchronizing devices, these will need commissioning. Separate documentation containing commissioning instructions is available for the P594.

Overcurrent test set with interval timer

110 V ac voltage supply (if stage 1 of the overcurrent function is set directional)

100 Ω precision wire wound or metal film resistor, 0.1% tolerance (0°C ±2°C)

Optional Equipment

Multi-finger test plug type MMLB01 (if test block type MMLG is installed)

An electronic or brushless insulation tester with a dc output not exceeding 500 V

(for insulation resistance testing when required)

A portable PC, with appropriate software (enabling the rear communications port to be tested, if this is to be used, and saves considerable time during commissioning)

KITZ K-Bus to EIA(RS)232 protocol converter (if the first rear EIA(RS)485 K-Bus port or second rear port configured for K-Bus is being tested and one is not already installed)

EIA(RS)485 to EIA(RS)232 converter (if first rear EIA(RS)485 port or second rear port configured for EIA(RS)485 is being tested)

A printer, for printing a setting record from the portable PC

P849/EN CM/D33 Page (CM) 11-9

(CM) 11 Commissioning

4

Product Checks

PRODUCT CHECKS

These product checks cover all aspects of the relay that need to be checked to ensure that:

• it has not been physically damaged before commissioning

• it is functioning correctly and

• all input quantity measurements are within the stated tolerances

If the application-specific settings have been applied to the relay before commissioning, it is advisable to make a copy of the settings to allow their restoration later.

If Programmable Scheme Logic (PSL) (other than the default settings with which the relay is supplied) has been applied, the default settings should be restored before commissioning. This can be done by:

Obtaining a setting file from the customer. This requires a portable PC with appropriate setting software for transferring the settings from the PC to the relay.

Extracting the settings from the relay itself. This requires a portable PC with appropriate setting software.

• Manually creating a setting record. This could be done by stepping through the front panel menu using the front panel user interface.

If password protection is enabled, and the customer has changed password 2 that prevents unauthorized changes to some of the settings, either the revised password 2 should be provided, or the customer should restore the original password before testing is started.

Note If the password has been lost, a recovery password can be obtained from

Schneider Electric by quoting the serial number of the relay. The recovery password is unique to that relay and will not work on any other relay.

4.1 With the Device De-Energised

The following group of tests should be carried out without the auxiliary supply applied to the relay and with the trip circuit isolated.

Before inserting the test plug, refer to the scheme diagram to ensure this will not cause damage or a safety hazard. For example, the test block may be associated with protection current transformer circuits. Before the test plug is inserted into the test block, make sure the sockets in the test plug which correspond to the current transformer secondary windings are linked.

Page (CM) 11-10 P849/EN CM/D33

Product Checks

4.1.1

4.1.2

(CM) 11 Commissioning

Warning The current and voltage transformer connections must be isolated from the relay for these checks. If a P991 or

MMLG test block is provided, insert the test plug type

P992 or MMLB01, which open-circuits all wiring routed through the test block.

Danger Never open-circuit the secondary circuit of a current transformer because the high voltage produced may be lethal. It could also damage insulation.

If a test block is not provided, isolate the voltage transformer supply to the relay using the panel links or connecting blocks. Short-circuit and disconnect the line current transformers from the relay terminals. Where means of isolating the auxiliary supply and trip circuit (such as isolation links, fuses and MCB) are provided, these should be used. If this is impossible, the wiring to these circuits must be disconnected and the exposed ends suitably terminated to prevent them from being a safety hazard.

Visual Inspection

Caution Check the rating information under the top access cover on the front of the relay. Check that the relay being tested is correct for the protected line or circuit. Ensure that the circuit reference and system details are entered onto the setting record sheet. Double-check the CT secondary current rating, and be sure to record the actual CT tap which is in use.

Carefully examine the relay to see that no physical damage has occurred since installation.

Ensure that the case earthing connections, at the bottom left-hand corner at the rear of the relay case, are used to connect the relay to a local earth bar using an adequate conductor.

Insulation

Insulation resistance tests are only necessary during commissioning if it is required for them to be done and they have not been performed during installation.

Isolate all wiring from the earth and test the insulation with an electronic or brushless insulation tester at a dc voltage not exceeding 500V. Terminals of the same circuits should be temporarily connected together.

The main groups of device terminals are: a) Auxiliary voltage supply b) Field voltage output and opto-isolated control inputs c) Device contacts d) Case earth

The insulation resistance should be greater than 100MΩ at 500V.

On completion of the insulation resistance tests, ensure all external wiring is correctly reconnected to the device.

P849/EN CM/D33 Page (CM) 11-11

(CM) 11 Commissioning

4.1.3

4.1.4

4.1.5

Product Checks

External Wiring

Caution Check that the external wiring is correct to the relevant relay diagram and scheme diagram. Ensure as far as practical that phasing/phase rotation appears to be as expected. The relay diagram number appears on the rating label under the top access cover on the front of the relay.

Schneider Electric supply the corresponding connection diagram with the order acknowledgement for the relay.

If a P991 or MMLG test block is provided, check the connections against the wiring diagram. It is recommended that the supply connections are to the live side of the test block (colored orange with the odd numbered terminals 1, 3, 5, 7, and so on). The auxiliary supply is normally routed through terminals 13 (supply positive) and 15 (supply negative), with terminals 14 and 16 connected to the relay’s positive and negative auxiliary supply terminals respectively. However, check the wiring against the schematic diagram for the installation to ensure compliance with the customer’s normal practice.

Watchdog Contacts

Using a continuity tester, check that the watchdog contacts are in the states shown in the

Watchdog contact status table for a de-energized relay.

N11 – N12

N13 – N14

Terminals

Relay De-energized

Closed

Contact State

Relay Energized

Open

Open

Table 1 - Watchdog contact status

Closed

Auxiliary Supply

Caution The relay can be operated from either a dc only or an ac/dc auxiliary supply depending on the relay’s nominal supply rating. The incoming voltage must be within the operating range specified in the following table.

Without energizing the relay, measure the auxiliary supply to ensure it is within the operating range.

Note The relay can withstand an ac ripple of up to 12% of the upper rated voltage on the dc auxiliary supply.

Nominal Supply Rating dc ac

24 - 32V dc

48 - 110V dc

-

-

19 - 38V dc

dc

37 - 150V dc

110 - 250V dc 100 - 240V ac rms 87 - 300V dc

Table 2 – Operational range of auxiliary supply VX.

Operating Ranges ac

-

-

80 - 265V ac

Page (CM) 11-12 P849/EN CM/D33

Product Checks

4.2

4.2.1

4.2.2

(CM) 11 Commissioning

Caution

Caution

Do not energize the relay using the battery charger with the battery disconnected as this can irreparably damage the relay’s power supply circuitry.

Energize the relay only if the auxiliary supply is within the operating range. If a test block is provided, it may be necessary to link across the front of the test plug to connect the auxiliary supply to the relay.

With the Device Energised

The following group of tests verify that the relay hardware and software is functioning correctly and should be carried out with the auxiliary supply applied to the relay.

Watchdog Contacts

Using a continuity tester, check that the watchdog contacts are in the states shown in the

Watchdog contact status table for an energized relay.

Date and Time

Before setting the date and time, ensure that the factory-fitted battery isolation strip that prevents battery drain during transportation and storage has been removed. With the lower access cover open, the presence of the battery isolation strip can be checked by a red tab protruding from the positive side of the battery compartment. Lightly pressing the battery to prevent it falling out of the battery compartment, pull the red tab to remove the isolation strip.

The data and time should now be set to the correct values. The method of setting depends on whether accuracy is being maintained through the optional inter-range instrumentation group standard B (IRIG-B) port on the rear of the relay.

P849/EN CM/D33 Page (CM) 11-13

(CM) 11 Commissioning

4.2.2.1

4.2.2.2

4.2.3

Product Checks

With an IRIG-B Signal

Note For P741 the IRIG-B signal may apply to the Central Unit only.

If a satellite time clock signal conforming to IRIG-B is provided and the relay has the optional IRIG-B port fitted, the satellite clock equipment should be energized.

To allow the relay’s time and date to be maintained from an external IRIG-B source cell

[DATE and TIME, IRIG-B Sync.] must be set to Enabled.

Ensure the relay is receiving the IRIG-B signal by checking that cell [DATE and TIME,

IRIG-B Status] reads Active.

Once the IRIG-B signal is active, adjust the time offset of the universal coordinated time

(satellite clock time) on the satellite clock equipment so that local time is displayed.

Check the time, date and month are correct in cell [0801: DATE and TIME, Date/Time].

The IRIG-B signal does not contain the current year so needs to be set manually in this cell.

If the auxiliary supply fails, with a battery fitted in the compartment behind the bottom access cover, the time and date is maintained. Therefore, when the auxiliary supply is restored, the time and date are correct and need not be set again.

To test this, remove the IRIG-B signal, then remove the auxiliary supply from the relay.

Leave the relay de-energized for approximately 30 seconds. On re-energization, the time in cell [DATE and TIME, Date/Time] should be correct. Then reconnect the IRIG-B signal.

Without an IRIG-B Signal

Note For P741 the IRIG-B signal may not apply to the Central Unit only. For the

P742/P743 it may apply to the Peripheral Unit only.

If the time and date is not being maintained by an IRIG-B signal, ensure that cell [0804:

DATE and TIME, IRIG-B Sync.] is set to Disabled.

Set the date and time to the correct local time and date using cell [0801: DATE and TIME,

Date/Time].

If the auxiliary supply fails, with a battery fitted in the compartment behind the bottom access cover, the time and date are maintained. Therefore when the auxiliary supply is restored, the time and date are correct and need not be set again.

To test this, remove the auxiliary supply from the relay for approximately 30 seconds. On re-energization, the time in cell [0801: DATE and TIME, Date/Time] should be correct.

Light Emitting Diodes (LED’s)

On power-up, the green LED should switch on and stay on, indicating that the relay is healthy. The relay has non-volatile memory which stores the state (on or off) of the alarm, trip and, if configured to latch, user-programmable LED indicators when the relay was last energized from an auxiliary supply. Therefore, these indicators may also switch on when the auxiliary supply is applied.

If any of these LEDs are on, reset them before proceeding with further testing. If the LED successfully resets (the LED switches off), there is no testing required for that LED because it is known to be operational.

Note It is likely that alarms related to the communications channels will not reset at this stage.

Page (CM) 11-14 P849/EN CM/D33

Product Checks

4.2.3.1

4.2.3.2

4.2.3.3

4.2.4

4.2.5

(CM) 11 Commissioning

Testing the Alarm and Out Of Service LED’s

The alarm and out of service LEDs can be tested using the

COMMISSIONING TESTS menu column. Set cell [0F0D: COMMISSIONING TESTS, Test Mode] to

Contacts

Blocked. Check that the out of service LED is on continuously and the alarm LED flashes.

It is not necessary to return cell [0F0D: COMMISSIONING TESTS, Test Mode] to

Disabled at this stage because the test mode will be required for later tests.

Testing the Trip LED

The trip LED can be tested by initiating a manual circuit breaker trip from the relay.

However, the trip LED will operate during the setting checks performed later. Therefore, no further testing of the trip LED is required at this stage.

Testing the User-Programmable LEDS

To test the user-programmable LEDs set cell [0F10: COMMISSIONING TESTS, Test

LEDs] to Apply Test. Check that all the programmable LEDs on the relay switch on.

In the MiCOM P741, P743, P746 & P849:

• The ‘Red LED Status’ cell is an 18-bit binary string that indicates which of the userprogrammable LEDs on the device are illuminated when accessing the device from a remote location, a ‘1’ indicating a particular Red LED is lit.

• The ‘Green LED Status’ cell is an 18-bit binary string that indicates which of the user-programmable LEDs on the device are illuminated when accessing the device from a remote location, a ‘1’ indicating a particular Green LED is lit.

If a ‘Red LED Status’ cell AND the same ‘Green LED Status’ cell are at ‘1’ the particular LED is lit Orange

If a ‘Red LED Status’ cell AND the same ‘Green LED Status’ cell are at ‘0’ the particular LED is not lit.

Field Voltage Supply

The relay generates a field voltage of nominally 48 V that can be used to energize the opto-isolated inputs (alternatively the substation battery may be used).

Measure the field voltage across terminals 7 and 9 on the terminal block shown in the following table. Check that the field voltage is in the range 40 V to 60 V when no load is connected and that the polarity is correct.

Repeat for terminals 8 and 10

Supply Rail

+ve

–ve

N7 & N8

N9 & N10

Table 3 - Field voltage terminals

Terminals

Input Opto-Isolators

This test checks that all the opto-isolated inputs on the relay are functioning correctly.

P849/EN CM/D33 Page (CM) 11-15

(CM) 11 Commissioning

4.2.6

Product Checks

The opto-isolated inputs should be energised one at a time, see the Connection

Diagrams chapter for terminal numbers. Ensuring correct polarity, connect the field supply voltage to the appropriate terminals for the input being tested.

Note The opto-isolated inputs may be energised from an external dc auxiliary supply (e.g. the station battery) in some installations. Check that this is not the case before connecting the field voltage otherwise damage to the relay may result.

The status of each opto-isolated input can be viewed using either cell [SYSTEM DATA,

Opto I/P Status] or [COMMISSION TESTS, Opto I/P Status], a ‘1’ indicating an energised input and a ‘0’ indicating a de-energised input. When each opto-isolated input is energised one of the characters on the bottom line of the display will change to indicate the new state of the inputs.

Output Relays

This test checks that all the output relays are functioning correctly.

See external Connection Diagrams Chapter (P849/EN IN) for terminal numbers.

Ensure that the cell [xxxx: COMMISSIONING TESTS, Test Mode] is set to

Contacts

Blocked. (xxxx = 0F0E for P44x/P44y, 0F0D for P14x, P24x, P34x, P54x, P547, P64x or

P841).

The output relays should be energized one at a time. To select output relay 1 for testing, set cell [xxxx: COMMISSIONING TESTS, Test Pattern] to

00000000000000000000000000000001. (xxxx = 0F0F for P44x/P44y, 0F0E for P14x,

P24x, P34x, P445, P54x, P547, P64x or P841).

Connect a continuity tester across the terminals corresponding to output relay 1 as shown in the relevant external connection diagram in the Installation chapter.

To operate the output relay, set cell [xxxx: COMMISSIONING TESTS, Contact Test] to

Apply Test. Operation is confirmed by the continuity tester operating for a normally open contact and ceasing to operate for a normally closed contact. Measure the resistance of the contacts in the closed state. (xxxx = 0F11 for P44x, 0F0F for P14x, P24x, P34x,

P44y, P445, P54x, P547, P64x or P841).

Reset the output relay by setting cell [xxxx: COMMISSIONING TESTS, Contact Test] to

Remove Test. (xxxx = 0F11 for P44x, 0F0F for P14x, P24x, P34x, P44y, P445, P54x,

P547 or P64x).

Note Ensure that the thermal ratings of anything connected to the output relays during the contact test procedure are not exceeded by the associated output relay being operated for too long. Keep the time between application and removal of contact test to a minimum.

Repeat the test for the rest of the relays (the numbers depend on the model).

Return the relay to service by setting cell [0F0D: COMMISSIONING TESTS, Test Mode] to Disabled.

Page (CM) 11-16 P849/EN CM/D33

Product Checks

4.2.7

4.2.7.1

4.2.8

(CM) 11 Commissioning

Rear Communications Port

This test should only be performed where the relay is to be accessed from a remote location and varies depending on the communications standard adopted.

It is not the intention of the test to verify the operation of the complete system from the relay to the remote location, just the relay’s rear communications port and any protocol converter necessary.

A variety of communications protocols may be available. For further details, please see whichever of these sections are relevant for the device you are commissioning:

Courier Communications

If a K-Bus to EIA(RS)232 KITZ protocol converter is installed, connect a portable PC running the appropriate software (such as MiCOM S1 Studio or PAS&T) to the incoming

(remote from relay) side of the protocol converter.

If a KITZ protocol converter is not installed, it may not be possible to connect the PC to the relay installed. In this case a KITZ protocol converter and portable PC running appropriate software should be temporarily connected to the relay’s first rear K-Bus port.

The terminal numbers for the relay’s first rear K-Bus port are shown in the following table.

However, as the installed protocol converter is not being used in the test, only the correct operation of the relay’s K-Bus port will be confirmed.

Ensure that the communications baud rate and parity settings in the application software are set the same as those on the protocol converter (usually a KITZ but could be a

SCADA RTU). The relays courier address in cell [COMMUNICATIONS, Remote Access] must be set to a value between 6 (P741) and 34. Check that communications can be established with this relay using the portable PC.

Check that, using the Master Station, communications with the relay can be established.

Note: The first rear communication port (terminal N17-18) can be either K-Bus or

EIA(RS)485.

Second Rear Communications Port

This test should only be performed where the relay is to be accessed from a remote location and varies depending on the communications standard being adopted.

It is not the intention of the test to verify the operation of the complete system from the relay to the remote location, just the relay’s rear communications port and any protocol converter necessary.

A variety of communications protocols may be available. For further details, please see whichever of these sections are relevant for the device you are commissioning:

P849/EN CM/D33 Page (CM) 11-17

(CM) 11 Commissioning

4.2.8.1

4.2.8.2

4.2.8.3

Product Checks

K-Bus Configuration

If a K-Bus to EIA(RS)232 KITZ protocol converter is installed, connect a portable PC running the appropriate software (MiCOM S1 Studio or PAS&T) to the incoming (remote from relay) side of the protocol converter.

If a KITZ protocol converter is not installed, it may not be possible to connect the PC to the relay installed. In this case a KITZ protocol converter and portable PC running appropriate software should be temporarily connected to the relay’s second rear communications port configured for K-Bus. The terminal numbers for the relay’s K-Bus port are shown in the following table. However, as the installed protocol converter is not being used in the test, only the correct operation of the relay’s K-Bus port is confirmed.

Pin*

4

7

EIA(RS)485 - 1 (+ ve)

EIA(RS)485 - 2 (- ve)

* All other pins unconnected.

Connection

Table 4 - Second rear communications port K-Bus terminals

Ensure that the communications baud rate and parity settings in the application software are set the same as those on the protocol converter (usually a KITZ but could be a

SCADA RTU). The relay’s Courier address in cell [0E90: COMMUNICATIONS, RP2

Address] must be set to a value between 1 and 254. The second rear communication’s port configuration [0E88: COMMUNICATIONS RP2 Port Config.] must be set to K-Bus.

Check that communications can be established with this relay using the portable PC.

EIA(RS)485 Configuration

If an EIA(RS)485 to EIA(RS)232 converter (Schneider Electric CK222) is installed, connect a portable PC running the appropriate software (MiCOM S1 Studio) to the

EIA(RS)232 side of the converter and the second rear communications port of the relay to the EIA(RS)485 side of the converter.

The terminal numbers for the relay’s EIA(RS)485 port are shown in the Second rear

communications port EIA(RS)232 terminals table .

Ensure that the communications baud rate and parity settings in the application software are the same as those in the relay. The relay’s Courier address in cell [0E90:

COMMUNICATIONS, RP2 Address] must be set to a value between 1 and 254. The second rear communications port’s configuration [0E88: COMMUNICATIONS RP2 Port

Config.] must be set to EIA(RS)485.

Check that communications can be established with this relay using the portable PC.

EIA(RS)232 Configuration

Connect a portable PC running the appropriate software (MiCOM S1 Studio) to the rear

EIA(RS)232 port of the relay. This port is actually compliant with EIA(RS)574; the 9-pin version of EIA(RS)232, see www.tiaonline.org

.

The second rear communications port connects using the 9-way female D-type connector

(SK4). The connection is compliant with EIA(RS)574.

Page (CM) 11-18 P849/EN CM/D33

Product Checks

(CM) 11 Commissioning

Pin

1

2

3

4

No Connection

RxD

TxD

DTR

#

7

8

5

6

Ground

No Connection

RTS

#

CTS

#

9 No Connection

#

These pins are control lines for use with a modem.

Connection

Table 5 - Second rear communications port EIA(RS)232 terminals

Connections to the second rear port configured for EIA(RS)232 operation can be made using a screened multi-core communication cable up to 15 m long, or a total capacitance of 2500 pF. Terminate the cable at the relay end with a 9-way, metal-shelled, D-type male plug. The terminal numbers for the relay’s EIA(RS)232 port are shown in the previous table.

Ensure that the communications baud rate and parity settings in the application software are set the same as those in the relay. The relay’s Courier address in cell [0E90:

COMMUNICATIONS, RP2 Address] must be set to a value between 1 and 254. The second rear communication’s port configuration [0E88: COMMUNICATIONS RP2 Port

Config] must be set to EIA(RS)232.

Check that communications can be established with this relay using the portable PC.

P849/EN CM/D33 Page (CM) 11-19

(CM) 11 Commissioning

5

5.1

Commissioning Tools

COMMISSIONING TOOLS

Menu Text

Opto I/P Status

Relay O/P Status

Test Port Status

LED Status

Monitor Bit 1

Monitor Bit 2

Monitor Bit 3

Monitor Bit 4

Monitor Bit 5

Monitor Bit 6

Monitor Bit 7

Monitor Bit 8

Test Mode

Test Pattern

Contact Test

Test LEDs

Test Auto-reclose

Red LED Status

Green LED Status

To help minimize the time needed to test MiCOM relays the relay provides several test facilities under the ‘

COMMISSION TESTS’ menu heading. There are menu cells which allow the status of the opto-isolated inputs, output relay contacts, internal Digital Data

Bus (DDB) signals and user-programmable LEDs to be monitored. Additionally there are cells to test the operation of the output contacts, user-programmable LEDs and, where available, the auto-reclose cycles.

The following table shows the relay menu of commissioning tests, including the available setting ranges and factory defaults. Each of the main menu tests are described in more detail in the following sections.

-

COMMISSION TESTS for P849

Default Setting

-

-

-

-

256 - (LED 1)

-

-

-

0 to 2047

258 - (LED 2)

260 - (LED 3)

262 - (LED 4)

264 - (LED 5)

266 - (LED 6)

268 - (LED 7)

270 - (LED 8)

0 to 2047

0 to 2047

0 to 2047

0 to 2047

0 to 2047

0 to 2047

0 to 2047

Disabled

All bits set to 0

No Operation

-

-

No Operation

No Operation

Settings

Disabled, Test Mode, Contacts Blocked

0 = Not Operated, 1 = Operated

No Operation, Apply Test, Remove Test

-

-

No Operation, Apply Test

No Operation, 3 Pole Test

Note See Relay Menu Database for details of DDB signals

Table 6 - Commission Tests

Opto I/P Status

This menu cell displays the status of the relay’s opto-isolated inputs as a binary string, a

1’ indicating an energized opto-isolated input and a ‘0’ a de-energized one. If the cursor is moved along the binary numbers the corresponding label text will be displayed for each logic input.

It can be used during commissioning or routine testing to monitor the status of the optoisolated inputs whilst they are sequentially energized with a suitable dc voltage.

Page (CM) 11-20 P849/EN CM/D33

Commissioning Tools

5.2

5.3

5.4

5.5

(CM) 11 Commissioning

Relay O/P Status

This menu cell displays the status of the Digital Data Bus (DDB) signals that result in energization of the output relays as a binary string, a ‘ 1’ indicating an operated state and

0’ a non-operated state. If the cursor is moved along the binary numbers the corresponding label text will be displayed for each relay output.

The information displayed can be used during commissioning or routine testing to indicate the status of the output relays when the relay is ‘ in service’. Additionally fault finding for output relay damage can be performed by comparing the status of the output contact under investigation with it’s associated bit.

Note When the ‘ Test Mode’ cell is set to ‘Enabled’ this cell will continue to indicate which contacts would operate if the relay was in-service, it does not show the actual status of the output relays.

Test Port Status

This menu cell displays the status of the eight Digital Data Bus (DDB) signals that have been allocated in the ‘

Monitor Bit’ cells. If the cursor is moved along the binary numbers the corresponding DDB signal text string will be displayed for each monitor bit.

By using this cell with suitable monitor bit settings, the state of the DDB signals can be displayed as various operating conditions or sequences are applied to the relay. Thus the

Programmable Scheme Logic (PSL) can be tested.

As an alternative to using this cell, the optional monitor/download port test box can be plugged into the monitor/download port located behind the bottom access cover. Details of the monitor/download port test box can be found in the Using a Monitor/Download Port

Test Box section of this chapter.

LED Status

The ‘ LED Status’ is an eight bit binary strings that indicate which of the userprogrammable LEDs on the relay are illuminated when accessing the relay from a remote location, a ‘ 1’ indicating a particular LED is lit and a ‘0’ not lit.

Monitor Bits 1 to 8

The eight ‘ Monitor Bit’ cells allow the user to select the status of which digital data bus signals can be observed in the ‘

Test Port Status’ cell or via the monitor/download port.

Each ‘ Monitor Bit’ is set by entering the required Digital Data Bus (DDB) signal number from the list of available DDB signals in the Programmable Logic chapter. The pins of the monitor/download port used for monitor bits are given in the following table. The signal ground is available on pins 18, 19, 22 and 25.

Monitor bit

Monitor/download port pin

1

11

2

12

The required DDB signal numbers are 0 – 2047.

3

15

4

13

5

20

6

21

7

23

8

24

Table 7 - Monitor bit pins

P849/EN CM/D33 Page (CM) 11-21

(CM) 11 Commissioning

Commissioning Tools

5.6 Test Mode

The Test Mode menu cell (in the COMMISSION TESTS column) is used to allow secondary injection testing to be performed on the relay.

To select test mode set the Test Mode menu cell to ‘

Test Mode’. It causes an alarm condition to be recorded, the yellow ALARM LED to light and an alarm message ‘

Test

Mode Alm’ to be generated.

Test Mode freezes any information stored in the CB CONDITION column and (in

IEC60870-5-103 builds) changes the Cause Of Transmission (COT) to Test Mode. For relays supporting IEC 61850 Edition 2, the test bit for data quality attribute shall set to

TRUE, and the Logical Device Mode will set to test.

Test mode can also be enabled by energizing an opto mapped to the Test Mode signal.

To enable testing of output contacts set the Test Mode cell to Contacts Blocked. It causes an alarm condition to be recorded, the yellow ALARM LED to light and an alarm message ‘ Contacts Blk Alm’ to be generated.

In

Contact Blocked mode, the protection function still works but the contacts will not operate. Also the test pattern and contact test functions are visible, which can be used to manually operate the output contacts. For relays supporting IEC 61850 Edition 2, the test bit for data quality attribute shall set to TRUE, and the Logical Device Mode will set to test/blocked.

Contacts Blocked can also be enabled by energizing an opto mapped to the Contacts

Blocked signal.

Once testing is complete the cell must be set back to ‘ Disabled’ to restore the relay back to service.

5.7

Page (CM) 11-22

Test Pattern

The ‘ Test Pattern’ cell is used to select the output relay contacts that will be tested when the ‘

Contact Test’ cell is set to ‘Apply Test’. The cell has a binary string with one bit for each user-configurable output contact which can be set to ‘

1’ to operate the output under test conditions and ‘ 0’ to not operate it.

P849/EN CM/D33

Commissioning Tools

5.8

5.9

5.10

5.11

5.12

(CM) 11 Commissioning

Contact Test

When the ‘ Apply Test’ command in this cell is issued the contacts set for operation (set to ‘ 1’) in the ‘Test Pattern’ cell change state. After the test has been applied the command text on the LCD will change to ‘ No Operation’ and the contacts will remain in the Test State until reset issuing the ‘ Remove Test’ command. The command text on the

LCD will again revert to ‘ No Operation’ after the ‘Remove Test’ command has been issued.

Note When the ‘

Test Mode’ cell is set to ‘Enabled’ the ‘Relay O/P Status’ cell does not show the current status of the output relays and hence can not be used to confirm operation of the output relays. Therefore it will be necessary to monitor the state of each contact in turn.

Test LEDs

When the ‘ Apply Test’ command in this cell is issued the eight/eighteen userprogrammable LEDs will illuminate for approximately 2 seconds before they extinguish and the command text on the LCD reverts to ‘ No Operation’.

Test Auto-Reclose

Where the relay provides an auto-reclose function, this cell will be available for testing the sequence of circuit breaker trip and auto-reclose cycles with the settings applied.

Issuing the command ‘ 3 Pole Trip’ will cause the relay to perform the first three-phase trip/reclose cycle so that associated output contacts can be checked for operation at the correct times during the cycle. Once the trip output has operated the command text will revert to ‘

No Operation’ whilst the rest of the auto-reclose cycle is performed. To test subsequent three-phase auto-reclose cycles repeat the ‘ 3 Pole Trip’ command.

Note The factory settings for the relay’s programmable scheme logic has the ‘

AR

Trip Test’ signal mapped to relay 3. If the programmable scheme logic has been changed, it is essential that this signal remains mapped to relay 3 for the ‘ Test Auto-reclose’ facility to work.

Red LED Status and Green LED Status

The Red LED Status and Green LED Status cells are 18-bit binary strings that show which of the user-programmable LEDs on the relay are ON when accessing the relay from a remote location. 1 indicates a particular LED is ON and a 0 OFF. When the status of a particular LED in both cells is 1, this means the LED is yellow.

Using a Monitor/Download Port Test Box

A monitor/download port test box containing 8 LEDs and a switchable audible indicator is available from Schneider Electric, or one of their regional sales offices. It is housed in a small plastic box with a 25-pin male D-connector that plugs directly into the relay’s monitor/download port. There is also a 25-pin female D-connector which allows other connections to be made to the monitor/download port whilst the monitor/download port test box is in place.

Each LED corresponds to one of the monitor bit pins on the monitor/download port with

Monitor Bit 1’ being on the left hand side when viewing from the front of the relay. The audible indicator can either be selected to sound if a voltage appears on any of the eight monitor pins or remain silent so that indication of state is by LED alone.

P849/EN CM/D33 Page (CM) 11-23

(CM) 11 Commissioning

6

Setting Checks

SETTING CHECKS

The setting checks ensure that all of the application-specific relay settings (both the relay’s function and Programmable Scheme Logic (PSL) settings) for the particular installation have been correctly applied to the relay.

6.1 Apply Application-Specific Settings

There are different methods of applying the settings:

Transferring settings from a pre-prepared setting file to the relay using a portable

PC running the appropriate software (such as MiCOM S1 Studio). Use the front

EIA(RS)232 port (under the bottom access cover), or the first rear communications port (Courier protocol with a KITZ protocol converter connected), or the second rear communications port. This is the preferred method for transferring function settings as it is much faster and there is less margin for error. If PSL other than the default settings with which the relay is supplied is used, this is the only way of changing the settings.

If a setting file has been created for the particular application and provided on a memory device, the commissioning time is further reduced, especially if application-specific PSL is applied to the relay.

Enter the settings manually using the relay’s operator interface. This method is not suitable for changing the PSL.

Page (CM) 11-24 P849/EN CM/D33

Setting Checks

6.2

(CM) 11 Commissioning

Check Application Settings

Carefully check applied settings against the required application-specific settings to ensure they have been entered correctly. However, this is not considered essential if a customer-prepared setting file on a memory device has been transferred to the relay using a portable PC.

There are two methods of checking the settings:

Extract the settings from the relay using a portable PC running the appropriate software (MiCOM S1 Studio) using the front EIA(RS)232 port, under the bottom access cover, or the first rear communications port (Courier protocol with a KITZ protocol converter connected), or the second rear communications port. Compare the settings transferred from the relay with the original written application-specific setting record (for cases where the customer has only provided a printed copy of the required settings but a portable PC is available).

Step through the settings using the relay’s operator interface and compare them with the original application-specific setting record.

Unless previously agreed to the contrary, the application-specific PSL is not checked as part of the commissioning tests.

Due to the versatility and possible complexity of the PSL, it is beyond the scope of these commissioning instructions to detail suitable test procedures. Therefore, when PSL tests must be performed, written tests that satisfactorily demonstrate the correct operation of the application-specific scheme logic should be devised by the engineer who created it.

These tests should be provided to the Commissioning Engineer with the memory device containing the PSL setting file.

P849/EN CM/D33 Page (CM) 11-25

(CM) 11 Commissioning

7

Final Checks

FINAL CHECKS

The tests are now complete.

Caution Remove all test or temporary shorting leads. If it has been necessary to disconnect any of the external wiring from the relay to perform the wiring verification tests, make sure all connections are replaced according to the relevant external connection or scheme diagram.

Ensure that the relay is restored to service by checking that cell [0F0F:

COMMISSIONING TESTS, Test Mode] is set to Disabled.

(0F0D (not 0F0F) for P14x/P24x/P34x/P341/P44y/P54x/P841).

If the menu language was changed to allow accurate testing, it should now be restored to the customer’s preferred language.

If a P991/MMLG test block is installed, remove the P992/MMLB01 test plug and replace the MMLG cover so that the protection is put into service.

Ensure that all event records, fault records, disturbance records, alarms and LEDs have been reset before leaving the relay.

If applicable, replace the secondary front cover on the relay.

Page (CM) 11-26 P849/EN CM/D33

MiCOM P849

(RC) 12 Test and Settings Records

TEST AND SETTINGS RECORDS

CHAPTER 12

P849/EN RC/D33 Page (RC) 12-1

(RC) 12 Test and Settings Records

MiCOM P849

Date:

Products covered by this chapter:

Hardware Suffix:

Software Version:

08/2015

This chapter covers the specific versions of the MiCOM products listed below. This includes

only the following combinations of Software Version and Hardware Suffix.

M

B0

Connection Diagrams: 10P849xx (xx = 01 to 06)

Page (RC) 12-2 P849/EN RC/D33

Contents

(RC) 12 Test and Settings Records

CONTENTS

1 Test Record

1.1

1.2

1.3

1.4

1.5

Date

Front Plate Information

Test Equipment Used

Checklist

Engineer Details

2 Creating a Setting Record

2.1

2.2

Extract Settings from a MiCOM Px40 Device

Send Settings to a MiCOM Px40 Device

Page (RC)12-

5

5

6

5

5

12

13

13

14

P849/EN RC/D33 Page (RC) 12-3

(RC) 12 Test and Settings Records

Notes:

Contents

Page (RC) 12-4 P849/EN RC/D33

Test Record

(RC) 12 Test and Settings Records

1 TEST RECORD

1.1 Date

Date:

Station:

VT Ratio: ……… / ……… V

Engineer:

Circuit:

System Frequency: ……… Hz

CT Ratio (tap in use): ……… /A

1.2

Relay type

Model number

Serial number

Rated current In

Rated voltage Vn

Auxiliary voltage Vx

Front Plate Information

MiCOM P…………

1.3 Test Equipment Used

This section should be completed to allow future identification of protective devices that have been commissioned using equipment that is later found to be defective or incompatible but may not be detected during the commissioning procedure.

Overcurrent test set

Injection test set

Phase angle meter

Phase rotation meter

Optical power meter

Insulation tester

Setting software:

Model:

Serial No:

Model:

Serial No:

Model:

Serial No:

Model:

Serial No:

Model:

Serial No:

Model:

Serial No:

Type:

Version:

P849/EN RC/D33 Page (RC) 12-5

(RC) 12 Test and Settings Records

Test Record

1.4

4

4.1

4.1.1

4.1.2

4.1.3

4.1.4

4.1.5

Checklist

Have all relevant safety instructions been followed? Yes No

In the following Complete or delete as appropriate (na = Not Applicable, nm = Not Measured).

Refer to the Connection Diagrams chapter for "Normally open" and "Change over" output relays location

Product Checks

With the device de-energised

Visual inspection

Device damaged?

Rating information correct for installation?

Case earth installed?

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

Current transformer shorting contacts close? Yes No Not checked

Yes No Not tested

Insulation resistance >100MΩ at 500V dc

External Wiring

Wiring checked against diagram?

Test block connections checked?

Watchdog Contacts (auxiliary supply off)

Terminals 11 and 12 Contact closed?

Contact resistance

Terminals 13 and 14 Contact open?

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

Not measured

No

N/A

4.1.6

4.2

4.2.1

Measured auxiliary supply

With the device energised

Watchdog Contacts (auxiliary supply on)

Terminals 11 and 12 Contact open?

Contact closed? Terminals 13 and 14

Contact resistance

4.2.2 Date and time

Clock set to local time?

Time maintained when auxiliary supply removed?

4.2.3 Light Emitting Diodes

4.2.3.1 Alarm (yellow) LED working?

Out of service (yellow) LED working?

4.2.3.2 Trip (red) LED working?

4.2.3.3 All 8 programmable LED’s working?

V ac/dc*

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

Not measured

No

No

No

No

No

No

Page (RC) 12-6 P849/EN RC/D33

Test Record

4.2.4

4.2.5

Field supply voltage

Value measured between terminals 7 and 9

Value measured between terminals 8 and 10

Input opto-isolators

Opto input 1 working?

Opto input 2 working?

Opto input 3 working?

Opto input 4 working?

Opto input 5 working?

Opto input 6 working?

Opto input 7 working?

Opto input 8 working?

Opto input 9 working?

Opto input 10 working?

Opto input 11 working?

Opto input 12 working?

Opto input 13 working?

Opto input 14 working?

Opto input 15 working?

Opto input 16 working?

Opto input 17 working?

Opto input 18 working?

Opto input 19 working?

Opto input 20 working?

Opto input 21 working?

Opto input 22 working?

Opto input 23 working?

Opto input 24 working?

Opto input 25 working?

Opto input 26 working?

Opto input 27 working?

Opto input 28 working?

Opto input 29 working?

Opto input 30 working?

Opto input 31 working?

Opto input 32 working?

Opto input 33 working?

Opto input 34 working?

Opto input 35 working?

Opto input 36 working?

Opto input 37 working?

Opto input 38 working?

Opto input 39 working?

P849/EN RC/D33

(RC) 12 Test and Settings Records

V dc

V dc

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Page (RC) 12-7

(RC) 12 Test and Settings Records

4.2.6

Opto input 40 working?

Opto input 41 working?

Opto input 42 working?

Opto input 43 working?

Opto input 44 working?

Opto input 45 working?

Opto input 46 working?

Opto input 47 working?

Opto input 48 working?

Opto input 49 working?

Opto input 50 working?

Opto input 51 working?

Opto input 52 working?

Opto input 53 working?

Opto input 54 working?

Opto input 55 working?

Opto input 16 working?

Opto input 57 working?

Opto input 58 working?

Opto input 59 working?

Opto input 60 working?

Opto input 61 working?

Opto input 62 working?

Opto input 63 working?

Opto input 64 working?

Output relays

Relay 1 Working?

Contact resistance

Relay 2 Working?

Contact resistance

Relay 3 Working?

Contact resistance

Relay 4 Working?

Contact resistance

Relay 5 Working?

Contact resistance

Relay 6 Working?

Contact resistance

Relay 7 Working?

Contact resistance

(N/O)

(N/C)

(N/O)

(N/C)

(N/O)

(N/C)

(N/O)

(N/C)

Page (RC) 12-8

Test Record

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

Not measured

No

Not measured

No

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

na

na

na

na

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

P849/EN RC/D33

Test Record

(RC) 12 Test and Settings Records

Relay 8 Working?

Contact resistance (N/O)

(N/C)

Relay 9 Working?

Contact resistance

Relay 10 Working?

Contact resistance

Relay 11 Working?

Contact resistance (N/O)

(N/C)

Relay 12 Working?

Contact resistance

Relay 13 Working?

Contact resistance

Relay 14 Working?

Contact resistance

(N/O)

(N/C)

(N/O)

(N/C)

(N/O)

(N/C)

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Next output relays are only present in the models with with options A, B, D, E and F

Relay 15 Working? Yes No

Contact resistance (N/O)

Ω Not measured

(N/C)

Relay 16 Working?

Contact resistance (N/C)

Yes

Not measured

No

Not measured

(N/O)

Ω Not measured

Next output relays are only present in the models with options B, D and F

Relay 17

Relay 18

Working?

Contact resistance

Working?

Contact resistance (N/O)

(N/C)

Yes

Relay 19 Working?

Contact resistance

Relay 20 Working?

Contact resistance

(N/O)

(N/C)

(N/O)

(N/C)

Yes

Yes

Relay 21

Relay 22

Working?

Contact resistance

Working?

Contact resistance

(N/O)

(N/C)

(N/O)

Yes

Yes

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

No

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

na

na

na

na

na

na

na

na

na

na

na

na

P849/EN RC/D33 Page (RC) 12-9

(RC) 12 Test and Settings Records

Test Record

Relay 23 Working?

Contact resistance

Relay 24 Working?

Contact resistance

(N/C)

(N/O)

(N/C)

(N/O)

(N/C)

Yes

Yes

Next output relays are only present in the models with options D and F

Relay 25 Working? Yes

Contact resistance (N/O)

(N/C)

Relay 26

Contact resistance

Relay 27

Working?

Working?

Contact resistance

(N/O)

(N/C)

(N/O)

(N/C)

Yes

Yes

Relay 28 Working?

Contact resistance (N/O)

(N/C)

Yes

Relay 29 Working?

Contact resistance

Relay 30

Contact resistance

Relay 31

Working?

(N/O)

(N/C)

Working?

Contact resistance

(N/O)

(N/C)

Yes

Yes

Yes

Relay 32

Relay 33

Relay 34

Working?

Contact resistance

Working?

Contact resistance

Working?

Contact resistance

Yes

Yes

Yes

Relay 35 Working?

Contact resistance

Relay 36 Working?

Contact resistance

Relay 37 Working?

Contact resistance

(N/O)

(N/C)

(N/O)

(N/C)

(N/O)

(N/C)

Relay 38 Working?

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

na

na

na

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

na

na

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

na

na

na

na

Not measured

No na

Not measured

No na

Not measured

No na

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

na

na

na

Page (RC) 12-10 P849/EN RC/D33

Test Record

(RC) 12 Test and Settings Records

Relay 39

Contact resistance

Working?

Contact resistance

(N/O)

(N/C)

Relay 40

Relay 41

Relay 42

Working?

Contact resistance

Working?

Contact resistance

Working?

Contact resistance

Relay 43 Working?

Contact resistance

Relay 44 Working?

Contact resistance

Relay 45 Working?

Contact resistance

(N/O)

(N/C)

(N/O)

(N/C)

(N/O)

(N/C)

Relay 46 Working?

Contact resistance (N/O)

(N/C)

Next output relays are only present in the model with option D.

Relay 47 Working?

Contact resistance

Relay 48

Relay 49

Working?

Contact resistance

Working?

Contact resistance

Relay 50 Working?

Contact resistance

Relay 51 Working?

Contact resistance (N/O)

(N/C)

Relay 52

Contact resistance

Relay 53

Working?

Working?

Contact resistance

(N/O)

(N/C)

Relay 54

Relay 55

Relay 56

Working?

Contact resistance

Working?

Contact resistance

Working?

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

No

Not measured

No

Not measured

No

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

na

na

na

na

na

No

Not measured

No

Not measured

No

Not measured

No

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

No

Not measured

No

Not measured

No

na

P849/EN RC/D33 Page (RC) 12-11

(RC) 12 Test and Settings Records

Relay 57

Contact resistance

Working?

Contact resistance

Relay 58 Working?

Contact resistance

Relay 59 Working?

Contact resistance (N/O)

(N/C)

Relay 60 Working?

Contact resistance (N/O)

(N/C)

1.5

Commissioning Engineer

Date:

Engineer Details

Test Record

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Not measured

No

Not measured

No

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

No

Not measured

Not measured

na

na

Customer Witness

Date:

Page (RC) 12-12 P849/EN RC/D33

Creating a Setting Record

2

(RC) 12 Test and Settings Records

CREATING A SETTING RECORD

You often need to create a record of what settings have been applied to a device. In the past, you could have used paper printouts of all the available settings, and mark up the ones you had used. Keeping such a paper-based Settings Records can be timeconsuming and prone to error (e.g. due to being settings written down incorrectly).

The MiCOM S1 Studio software lets you read from or write to MiCOM devices.

Extract lets you download all the settings from a MiCOM Px40 device. A summary is given in Extract Settings from a MiCOM Px40 Device below.

Send lets you send the settings you currently have open in MiCOM S1 Studio. A summary is given in Send Settings to a MiCOM Px40 Device below.

The MiCOM S1 Studio product is updated periodically. These updates provide support for new features (such as allowing you to manage new MiCOM products, as well as using new software releases and hardware suffixes). The updates may also include fixes.

Accordingly, we strongly advise customers to use the latest Schneider Electric

version of MiCOM S1 Studio.

In most cases, it will be quicker and less error prone to extract settings electronically and store them in a settings file on a memory stick. In this way, there will be a digital record which is certain to be accurate. It is also possible to archive these settings files in a repository; so they can be used again or adapted for another use.

Full details of how to do these tasks is provided in the MiCOM S1 Studio help.

A quick summary of the main steps is given below.

In each case you need to make sure that:

• Your computer includes the MiCOM S1 Studio software.

Your computer and the MiCOM device are powered on.

You have used a suitable cable to connect your computer to the MiCOM device

(Front Port, Rear Port, Ethernet port or Modem as available).

2.1 Extract Settings from a MiCOM Px40 Device

Full details of how to do this is provided in the MiCOM S1 Studio help.

As a quick guide, you need to do the following:

1. In MiCOM S1 Studio, click the Quick Connect… button.

2. Select the relevant Device Type in the Quick Connect dialog box.

3. Click the relevant port in the Port Selection dialog box.

4. Enter the relevant connection parameters in the Connection Parameters dialog box and click the Finish button

5. MiCOM S1 Studio will try to communicate with the Px40 device. It will display a connected message if the connection attempt is successful.

6. The device will appear in the Studio Explorer pane on the top-left of the interface.

7. Click the + button to expand the options for the device, then click on the Settings folder.

8. Right-click on Settings and select the Extract Settings link to read the settings on the device and store them on your computer or a memory stick.

9. After retrieving the settings file, close the dialog box by clicking the Close button.

P849/EN RC/D33 Page (RC) 12-13

(RC) 12 Test and Settings Records

2.2

Creating a Setting Record

Send Settings to a MiCOM Px40 Device

Full details of how to do this is provided in the MiCOM S1 Studio help.

As a quick guide, you need to do the following:

1. In MiCOM S1 Studio, click the Quick Connect… button.

2. Select the relevant Device Type in the Quick Connect dialog box.

3. Click the relevant port in the Port Selection dialog box.

4. Enter the relevant connection parameters in the Connection Parameters dialog box and click the Finish button

5. MiCOM S1 Studio will try to communicate with the Px40 device. It will display a connected message if the connection attempt is successful.

6. The device will appear in the Studio Explorer pane on the top-left of the interface.

7. Click the + button to expand the options for the device, then click on the Settings folder.

8. Right-click on Settings and select the Extract Settings link to read the settings on the device and store them on your computer or a memory stick.

9. After retrieving the settings file, close the dialog box by clicking the Close button.

Page (RC) 12-14 P849/EN RC/D33

MiCOM Px4x

(MT) 13 Maintenance

Px4x/EN MT/H53

MAINTENANCE

CHAPTER 13

Page (MT) 13-1

(MT) 13 Maintenance

MiCOM Px4x

Date:

Products covered by this chapter:

Hardware suffix:

Software version:

Connection diagrams:

08/2014

This chapter covers the specific versions of the MiCOM products listed below. This includes

only the following combinations of Software Version and Hardware Suffix.

All MiCOM Px4x products

All MiCOM Px4x products

P14x (P141, P142, P143, P144 & P145):

10P141/2/3/4/5xx (xx = 01 to 07)

P24x (P241, P242 & P243):

10P241xx (xx = 01 to 02)

10P24201

10P24301

P341:

10P341xx (xx = 01 to 12)

P34x (P342, P343, P344, P345 & P391):

10P342xx (xx = 01 to 17)

10P343xx (xx = 01 to 19)

10P344xx (xx = 01 to 12)

10P345xx (xx = 01 to 07)

10P391xx (xx = 01 to 02)

P445:

10P445xx (xx = 01 to 04)

P44y:

10P44303/4/5/6 (SH 01 and 03)

10P44600

10P44601/2/3 (SH 1 to 2)

P54x (P543, P544, P545 & P546):

10P54302/3xx (xx = 01 to 02)

10P54400

10P54402/3xx (xx = 01 to 02)

10P54502/3xx (xx = 01 to 02)

10P54600

10P54602/3xx (xx = 01 to 02)

10P54603xx (xx = 01 to 02)

P547:

10P54702/3/4/5xx (xx = 01 to 02)

P64x (P642, P643 & P645):

10P642xx (xx = 01 to 10)

10P643xx (xx = 01 to 6)

10P644xx (xx = 01 to 9)

P74x 10P740xx (xx = 01 to 07)

P746:

10P746xx (xx 01 to 07)

P841:

10P84100

10P841012/3/4/5 (SH 1 to 2)

P842:

10P842xx (xx = 01 to 02)

P849:

10P849xx (xx = 01 to 06)

Page (MT) 13-2 Px4x/EN MT/H53

Contents

CONTENTS

1 Maintenance Period

2 Maintenance Checks

2.1

2.2

2.3

2.4

Alarms

Opto-Isolators

Output Relays

Measurement Accuracy

3 Method of Repair

3.1

3.2

Replacing the Complete Equipment IED/Relay

Replacing a PCB

4 Re-Calibration

5 Changing the Battery

5.1

5.2

5.3

Instructions for Replacing the Battery

Post Modification Tests

Battery Disposal

6 Cleaning

(MT) 13 Maintenance

Page (MT) 13-

5

6

6

6

6

6

7

8

9

10

11

11

11

11

12

Px4x/EN MT/H53 Page (MT) 13-3

(MT) 13 Maintenance

Notes:

Contents

Page (MT) 13-4 Px4x/EN MT/H53

Maintenance Period

1

(MT) 13 Maintenance

MAINTENANCE PERIOD

Warning Before inspecting any wiring, performing any tests or carrying out any work on the equipment, you should be familiar with the contents of the Safety Information and

Technical Data sections and the information on the equipment’s rating label.

It is recommended that products supplied by Schneider Electric receive periodic monitoring after installation. In view of the critical nature of protective and control equipment, and their infrequent operation, it is desirable to confirm that they are operating correctly at regular intervals.

Schneider Electric protection and control equipment is designed for a life in excess of 20 years.

MiCOM relays are self-supervizing and so require less maintenance than earlier designs.

Most problems will result in an alarm so that remedial action can be taken. However, some periodic tests should be done to ensure that the equipment is functioning correctly and the external wiring is intact.

If the customer’s organization has a preventative maintenance policy, the recommended product checks should be included in the regular program. Maintenance periods depend on many factors, such as:

The operating environment

The accessibility of the site

The amount of available manpower

The importance of the installation in the power system

The consequences of failure

Px4x/EN MT/H53 Page (MT) 13-5

(MT) 13 Maintenance

2

2.1

2.2

2.3

2.4

Maintenance Checks

MAINTENANCE CHECKS

Although some functionality checks can be performed from a remote location by using the communications ability of the equipment, these are predominantly restricted to checking that the equipment, is measuring the applied currents and voltages accurately, and checking the circuit breaker maintenance counters. Therefore it is recommended that maintenance checks are performed locally (i.e. at the equipment itself).

Warning Before carrying out any work on the equipment, you should be familiar with the contents of the Safety

Information chapter/safety guide SFTY/4LM/C11 or later issue, the Technical Data chapter and the ratings on the equipment rating label.

Warning If a P391 is used, you should also be familiar with the ratings and warning statements in the P391 technical manual.

Alarms

The alarm status LED should first be checked to identify if any alarm conditions exist. If so, press the read key () repeatedly to step through the alarms.

Clear the alarms to extinguish the LED.

Opto-Isolators

The opto-isolated inputs can be checked to ensure that the equipment responds to energization by repeating the commissioning test detailed in the Commissioning chapter.

Output Relays

The output relays can be checked to ensure that they operate by repeating the commissioning test detailed in the Commissioning chapter.

Measurement Accuracy

If the power system is energized, the values measured by the equipment can be compared with known system values to check that they are in the approximate range that is expected. If they are, the analog/digital conversion and calculations are being performed correctly by the relay. Suitable test methods can be found in the

Commissioning chapter.

Alternatively, the values measured by the equipment can be checked against known values injected via the test block, if fitted, or injected directly into the equipment terminals.

Suitable test methods can be found in the Commissioning chapter. These tests will prove the calibration accuracy is being maintained.

Page (MT) 13-6 Px4x/EN MT/H53

Method of Repair

3

(MT) 13 Maintenance

METHOD OF REPAIR

If the equipment should develop a fault whilst in service, depending on the nature of the fault, the watchdog contacts will change state and an alarm condition will be flagged.

Due to the extensive use of surface-mount components, faulty Printed Circuit Boards

(PCBs) should be replaced, as it is not possible to perform repairs on damaged PCBs.

Therefore either the complete equipment module or just the faulty PCB (as identified by the in-built diagnostic software), can be replaced. Advice about identifying the faulty PCB can be found in the Troubleshooting chapter.

The preferred method is to replace the complete equipment module as it ensures that the internal circuitry is protected against electrostatic discharge and physical damage at all times and overcomes the possibility of incompatibility between replacement PCBs.

However, it may be difficult to remove installed equipment due to limited access in the back of the cubicle and the rigidity of the scheme wiring.

Replacing PCBs can reduce transport costs but requires clean, dry conditions on site and higher skills from the person performing the repair. If the repair is not performed by an approved service center, the warranty will be invalidated.

Warning Before carrying out any work on the equipment, you should be familiar with the contents of the Safety

Information chapter/safety guide SFTY/4LM/C11 or later issue, the Technical Data chapter and the ratings on the equipment rating label.

This should ensure that no damage is caused by incorrect handling of the electronic components.

Px4x/EN MT/H53 Page (MT) 13-7

(MT) 13 Maintenance

3.1

Method of Repair

Replacing the Complete Equipment IED/Relay

The case and rear terminal blocks have been designed to facilitate removal of the

IED/relay should replacement or repair become necessary without having to disconnect the scheme wiring.

Warning Before working at the rear of the equipment, isolate all voltage and current supplies to the equipment.

Note The MiCOM range has integral current transformer shorting switches which will close when the heavy duty terminal block is removed.

1. Disconnect the equipment’s earth, IRIG-B and fiber optic connections, as appropriate, from the rear of the device.

There are two types of terminal block used on the equipment, medium and heavy duty, which are fastened to the rear panel using crosshead screws. The P64x range also includes an RTD/CLIO terminal block option. These block types are shown in the Commissioning chapter.

Important The use of a magnetic bladed screwdriver is recommended to minimize the risk of the screws being left in the terminal block or lost.

2. Without exerting excessive force or damaging the scheme wiring, pull the terminal blocks away from their internal connectors.

3. Remove the screws used to fasten the equipment to the panel, rack, etc. These are the screws with the larger diameter heads that are accessible when the access covers are fitted and open.

Warning If the top and bottom access covers have been removed, do not remove the screws with the smaller diameter heads which are accessible. These screws secure the front panel to the equipment.

4. Withdraw the equipment carefully from the panel, rack, etc. because it will be heavy due to the internal transformers.

To reinstall the repaired or replacement equipment, follow the above instructions in reverse, ensuring that each terminal block is relocated in the correct position and the case earth, IRIG-B and fiber optic connections are replaced. To facilitate easy identification of each terminal block, they are labeled alphabetically with ‘A’ on the lefthand side when viewed from the rear.

Once reinstallation is complete, the equipment should be re-commissioned using the instructions in the Commissioning chapter.

Page (MT) 13-8 Px4x/EN MT/H53

Method of Repair

3.2

(MT) 13 Maintenance

Replacing a PCB

Replacing PCBs and other internal components must be undertaken only by Service

Centers approved by Schneider Electric. Failure to obtain the authorization of Schneider

Electric after sales engineers prior to commencing work may invalidate the product warranty.

Warning Before removing the front panel to replace a PCB, remove the auxiliary supply and wait at least 30 seconds for the capacitors to discharge.

We strongly recommend that the voltage and current transformer connections and trip circuit are isolated.

Schneider Electric support teams are available world-wide. We strongly recommend that any repairs be entrusted to those trained personnel. For this reason, details on product disassembly and re-assembly are not included here.

Px4x/EN MT/H53 Page (MT) 13-9

(MT) 13 Maintenance

4

Re-Calibration

RE-CALIBRATION

Re-calibration is not required when a PCB is replaced

unless it happens to be one of

the boards in the input module; the replacement of either directly affects the calibration.

Warning Although it is possible to carry out re-calibration on site, this requires test equipment with suitable accuracy and a special calibration program to run on a PC. It is therefore recommended that the work be carried out by the manufacturer, or entrusted to an approved service center.

Page (MT) 13-10 Px4x/EN MT/H53

Changing the Battery

5

(MT) 13 Maintenance

CHANGING THE BATTERY

Each relay/IED has a battery to maintain status data and the correct time when the auxiliary supply voltage fails. The data maintained includes event, fault and disturbance records and the thermal state at the time of failure.

This battery will periodically need changing, although an alarm will be given as part of the relay’s/IED’s continuous self-monitoring in the event of a low battery condition.

If the battery-backed facilities are not required to be maintained during an interruption of the auxiliary supply, the steps below can be followed to remove the battery, but do not replace with a new battery.

Warning Before carrying out any work on the equipment, you should be familiar with the contents of the Safety

Information chapter/safety guide SFTY/4LM/C11 or later issue, the Technical Data chapter and the ratings on the equipment rating label.

5.1

5.2

5.3

Instructions for Replacing the Battery

1. Open the bottom access cover on the front of the equipment.

2. Gently extract the battery from its socket. If necessary, use a small, insulated screwdriver to prize the battery free.

3. Ensure that the metal terminals in the battery socket are free from corrosion, grease and dust.

4. The replacement battery should be removed from its packaging and placed into the battery holder, taking care to ensure that the polarity markings on the battery agree with those adjacent to the socket.

Note Only use a type ½AA Lithium battery with a nominal voltage of 3.6 V and safety approvals such as UL (Underwriters Laboratory), CSA (Canadian

Standards Association) or VDE (Vereinigung Deutscher

Elektrizitätswerke).

5. Ensure that the battery is securely held in its socket and that the battery terminals are making good contact with the metal terminals of the socket.

6. Close the bottom access cover.

Post Modification Tests

To ensure that the replacement battery will maintain the time and status data if the auxiliary supply fails, check cell [0806: DATE and TIME, Battery Status] reads ‘Healthy’.

If further confirmation that the replacement battery is installed correctly is required, the commissioning test is described in the Commissioning chapter, ‘Date and Time’, can be performed.

Battery Disposal

The battery that has been removed should be disposed of in accordance with the disposal procedure for Lithium batteries in the country in which the equipment is installed.

Px4x/EN MT/H53 Page (MT) 13-11

(MT) 13 Maintenance

6

Cleaning

CLEANING

Warning Before cleaning the equipment ensure that all ac and dc supplies, current transformer and voltage transformer connections are isolated to prevent any chance of an electric shock whilst cleaning.

The equipment may be cleaned using a lint-free cloth moistened with clean water. The use of detergents, solvents or abrasive cleaners is not recommended as they may damage the relay’s surface and leave a conductive residue.

Page (MT) 13-12 Px4x/EN MT/H53

MiCOM Px4x

(TS) 14 Troubleshooting

Px4x/EN TS/If7

TROUBLESHOOTING

CHAPTER 14

Page (TS) 14-1

(TS) 14 Troubleshooting

MiCOM Px4x

Date:

Products covered by this chapter:

Hardware Suffix:

Software Version:

Connection Diagrams:

11/2014

This chapter covers the specific versions of the MiCOM products listed below. This includes

only the following combinations of Software Version and Hardware Suffix.

P14x (P141, P142, P143 & P145)

P241

P242/P243

P342

P343/P344/P345

P391

P445

P44x (P441, P442 & P444)

P44y (P443 & P446)

J

J

K

J

K

A

J

J/K

K

P547 K

P54x (P543, P544, P545 & P546) K

P642

P643

P645

P74x (P741, P742 & P743)

P746

P841

P849

K

K

K

J/L

K/M

K/M

J/K

P14x (P141, P142, P143 & P145)

P24x (P241, P242 & P243):

P342, P343, P344, P345 & P391

P445

P547

P54x (P543, P544, P545 & P546)

P64x (P642, P643 & P645)

P74x (P741, P742 & P743)

P746

P841

P849

P44x (P441, P442 & P444)

P44y (P443 & P446)

P14x (P141, P142, P143 & P145):

10P141xx (xx = 01 to 07)

10P142xx (xx = 01 to 07)

10P143xx (xx = 01 to 07)

10P145xx (xx = 01 to 07)

P24x (P241, P242 & P243):

10P241xx (xx = 01 to 02)

10P242xx (xx = 01)

10P243xx (xx = 01)

P34x (P342, P343, P344, P345 & P391):

10P342xx (xx = 01 to 17)

10P343xx (xx = 01 to 19)

10P344xx (xx = 01 to 12)

10P345xx (xx = 01 to 07)

10P391xx (xx =01 to 02)

P445:

10P445xx (xx = 01 to 04)

P44y:

10P44303 (SH 01 and 03)

10P44304 (SH 01 and 03)

10P44305 (SH 01 and 03)

10P44306 (SH 01 and 03)

10P44600

10P44601 (SH 1 to 2)

10P44602 (SH 1 to 2)

10P44603 (SH 1 to 2)

43, 44 & 46

57

36

35 & 36

C7.x, D4.x, D5.x & D6.x

55

57

45 & 55

04, A0, B1

51, A0 & B1

A0

45 & 55

A0

P54x (P543, P544, P545 & P546):

10P54302 (SH 1 to 2)

10P54303 (SH 1 to 2)

10P54400

10P54404 (SH 1 to 2)

10P54405 (SH 1 to 2)

10P54502 (SH 1 to 2)

10P54503 (SH 1 to 2)

10P54600

10P54604 (SH 1 to 2)

10P54605 (SH 1 to 2)

10P54606 (SH 1 to 2)

P547:

10P54702xx (xx = 01 to 02)

10P54703xx (xx = 01 to 02)

10P54704xx (xx = 01 to 02)

10P54705xx (xx = 01 to 02)

P64x (P642, P643 & P645):

10P642xx (xx = 1 to 10)

10P643xx (xx = 1 to 6)

10P645xx (xx = 1 to 9)

P74x

10P740xx (xx = 01 to 07)

P746:

10P746xx (xx = 00 to 21)

P841:

10P84100

10P84101 (SH 1 to 2)

10P84102 (SH 1 to 2)

10P84103 (SH 1 to 2)

10P84104 (SH 1 to 2)

10P84105 (SH 1 to 2)

P849:

10P849xx (xx = 01 to 06)

Page (TS) 14-2 Px4x/EN TS/If7

Contents

CONTENTS

1 Introduction

2 Initial Problem Identification

3 Power Up Errors

4 Error Message/Code on Power-up

5 Out of Service LED illuminated on Power Up

6 Error Code During Operation

7 Mal-Operation of the Relay during Testing

7.1

7.2

7.3

7.4

7.4.1

7.4.2

Failure of Output Contacts

Failure of Opto-Isolated Inputs

Incorrect Analog Signals

PSL Editor Troubleshooting

Diagram Reconstruction after Recover from Relay

PSL Version Check

8 Repair and Modification Procedure

REPAIR/MODIFICATION RETURN AUTHORIZATION FORM

TABLES

Table 1 - Problem identification

Table 2 - Failure of relay to power up

Table 3 - Power-up self-test error

Table 4 - Out of service LED illuminated

Table 5 - Failure of output contacts

(TS) 14 Troubleshooting

Page (TS) 14-

6

7

8

9

11

Page (TS) 14-

7

8

9

10

11

11

11

12

12

12

12

5

6

13

15

Px4x/EN TS/If7 Page (TS) 14-3

(TS) 14 Troubleshooting

Notes:

Tables

Page (TS) 14-4 Px4x/EN TS/If7

Introduction

1 INTRODUCTION

(TS) 14 Troubleshooting

The purpose of this chapter of the service manual is to allow an error condition on the relay to be identified so that appropriate corrective action can be taken.

If the relay has developed a fault, it should be possible in most cases to identify which relay module requires attention. The Maintenance chapter advises on the recommended method of repair where faulty modules need replacing. It is not possible to perform an on-site repair to a faulted module.

In cases where a faulty relay/module is being returned to the manufacturer or one of their approved service centers, completed copy of the Repair/Modification Return

Authorization Form located at the end of this chapter should be included.

Px4x/EN TS/If7 Page (TS) 14-5

(TS) 14 Troubleshooting

2

Initial Problem Identification

INITIAL PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION

Consult the following table to find the description that best matches the problem experienced, then consult the section referenced to perform a more detailed analysis of the problem.

Symptom

Relay fails to power up

Relay powers up - but indicates error and halts during powerup sequence

Relay Powers up but Out of Service LED is illuminated

Error during normal operation

Mal-operation of the relay during testing

Refer To

Power-Up Errors section

Error Message/Code On Power-Up section

Out of Service LED illuminated on

Power Up section

Error Code During Operation section

Mal-Operation of the Relay during

Testing section

Table 1 - Problem identification

Page (TS) 14-6 Px4x/EN TS/If7

Power Up Errors

3

(TS) 14 Troubleshooting

POWER UP ERRORS

If the relay does not appear to power up then the following procedure can be used to determine whether the fault is in the external wiring, auxiliary fuse, power supply module of the relay or the relay front panel.

1

Test

2

3

Check

Measure auxiliary voltage on terminals

1 and 2; verify voltage level and polarity against rating the label on front.

Terminal 1 is –dc, 2 is +dc

Do LEDs/and LCD backlight illuminate on power-up, also check the N/O watchdog contact for closing.

Check Field voltage output

(nominally 48V DC)

Action

If auxiliary voltage is present and correct, then proceed to test 2. Otherwise the wiring/fuses in auxiliary supply should be checked.

If they illuminate or the contact closes and no error code is displayed then error is probably in the main processor board (front panel). If they do not illuminate and the contact does not close then proceed to test 3.

If field voltage is not present then the fault is probably in the relay power supply module.

Table 2 - Failure of relay to power up

Px4x/EN TS/If7 Page (TS) 14-7

(TS) 14 Troubleshooting

Error Message/Code on Power-up

4 ERROR MESSAGE/CODE ON POWER-UP

1

Test

2

3

4

5

During the power-up sequence of the relay self-testing is performed as indicated by the messages displayed on the LCD. If an error is detected by the relay during these selftests, an error message will be displayed and the power-up sequence will be halted. If the error occurs when the relay application software is executing, a maintenance record will be created and the relay will reboot.

Check

Is an error message or code permanently displayed during power up?

Action

If relay locks up and displays an error code permanently then proceed to test 2.

If the relay prompts for input by the user proceed to test 4.

If the relay re-boots automatically then proceed to test 5.

Record displayed error, then remove and reapply relay auxiliary supply.

Error code Identification

Following text messages (in English) will be displayed if a fundamental problem is detected preventing the system from booting:

These messages indicate that a problem has been detected on the main processor board of the relay (located in the front panel).

Bus Failaddress lines

SRAM Fail

FLASH Fail

FLASH Fail

Code Verify data lines format error checksum

Fail

These hex error codes relate to errors detected in specific relay modules:

Record whether the same error code is displayed when the relay is rebooted. If no error code is displayed then contact the local service center stating the error code and relay information. If the same code is displayed proceed to test 3.

0c140005/0c0d0000

0c140006/0c0e0000

Last 4 digits provide details on the actual error.

Relay displays message for corrupt settings and prompts for restoration of defaults to the affected settings.

Relay resets on completion of power up - record error code displayed

Input Module (inc. Opto-isolated inputs)

Output Relay Cards

Other error codes relate to problems within the main processor board hardware or software. It will be necessary to contact Schneider Electric with details of the problem for a full analysis.

The power up tests have detected corrupted relay settings, it is possible to restore defaults to allow the power-up to be completed. It will then be necessary to re-apply the application-specific settings.

Error 0x0E080000, Programmable Scheme Logic (PSL) error due to excessive execution time. Restore default settings by performing a power up with  and  keys depressed, confirm restoration of defaults at prompt using () key. If relay powers up successfully, check PSL for feedback paths.

Other error codes will relate to software errors on the main processor board, contact Schneider Electric.

Table 3 - Power-up self-test error

Page (TS) 14-8 Px4x/EN TS/If7

Out of Service LED illuminated on Power Up

5

(TS) 14 Troubleshooting

OUT OF SERVICE LED ILLUMINATED ON POWER UP

1

Test

2

Check

Using the relay menu confirm whether the Commission Test/Test Mode setting is Contact Blocked. Otherwise proceed to test 2.

Select and view the last maintenance record from the menu (in the View

Records).

Action

If the setting is Contact Blocked then disable the test mode and, verify that the Out of Service LED is extinguished.

Check for H/W Verify Fail this indicates a discrepancy between the relay model number and the hardware; examine the “ Maint. Data”, this indicates the causes of the failure using bit fields:

Bit Meaning

0 The application type field in the model number does not match the software ID

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

The application field in the model number does not match the software ID

The variant 1 field in the model number does not match the software ID

The variant 2 field in the model number does not match the software ID

The protocol field in the model number does not match the software ID

The language field in the model number does not match the software ID

The VT type field in the model number is incorrect (110V VTs fitted)

The VT type field in the model number is incorrect (440V VTs fitted)

The VT type field in the model number is incorrect (no VTs fitted)

Table 4 - Out of service LED illuminated

Px4x/EN TS/If7 Page (TS) 14-9

(TS) 14 Troubleshooting

6

Error Code During Operation

ERROR CODE DURING OPERATION

The relay performs continuous self-checking, if an error is detected then an error message will be displayed, a maintenance record will be logged and the relay will reset

(after a 1.6 second delay). A permanent problem (for example due to a hardware fault) will generally be detected on the power up sequence, following which the relay will display an error code and halt. If the problem was transient in nature then the relay should reboot correctly and continue in operation. The nature of the detected fault can be determined by examination of the maintenance record logged.

There are also two cases where a maintenance record will be logged due to a detected error where the relay will not reset. These are detection of a failure of either the field voltage or the lithium battery, in these cases the failure is indicated by an alarm message, however the relay will continue to operate.

If the field voltage is detected to have failed (the voltage level has dropped below threshold), then a scheme logic signal is also set. This allows the scheme logic to be adapted in the case of this failure (for example if a blocking scheme is being used).

In the case of a battery failure it is possible to prevent the relay from issuing an alarm using the setting under the Date and Time section of the menu. This setting ‘

Battery

Alarm’ can be set to 'Disabled' to allow the relay to be used without a battery, without an alarm message being displayed.

In the case of an RTD board failure, an alarm "RTD board fail" message is displayed, the

RTD protection is disabled, but the operation of the rest of the relay functionality is unaffected.

Page (TS) 14-10 Px4x/EN TS/If7

Mal-Operation of the Relay during Testing

7

7.1

7.2

(TS) 14 Troubleshooting

MAL-OPERATION OF THE RELAY DURING TESTING

Failure of Output Contacts

An apparent failure of the relay output contacts may be caused by the relay configuration; the following tests should be performed to identify the real cause of the failure.

1

Test

2

3

4

Note The relay self-tests verify that the coil of the contact has been energized, an error will be displayed if there is a fault in the output relay board.

Check Action

Is the Out of Service LED illuminated? Illumination of this LED may indicate that the relay is Contact Blocked or that the protection has been disabled due to a hardware verify error

(see the Out of service LED illuminated table..

Examine the Contact status in the

Commissioning section of the menu.

If the relevant bits of the contact status are operated, proceed to test 4, if not proceed to test 3.

Verify by examination of the fault record or by using the test port whether the protection element is operating correctly.

If the protection element does not operate verify whether the test is being correctly applied.

If the protection element does operate, it will be necessary to check the PSL to ensure that the mapping of the protection element to the contacts is correct.

Using the Commissioning/Test mode function apply a test pattern to the relevant relay output contacts and verify whether they operate (note the correct external connection diagram should be consulted). A continuity tester can be used at the rear of the relay for this purpose.

If the output relay does operate, the problem must be in the external wiring to the relay. If the output relay does not operate this could indicate a failure of the output relay contacts (note that the self-tests verify that the relay coil is being energized). Ensure that the closed resistance is not too high for the continuity tester to detect.

Table 5 - Failure of output contacts

Failure of Opto-Isolated Inputs

The opto-isolated inputs are mapped onto the relay internal signals using the PSL. If an input does not appear to be recognized by the relay scheme logic the Commission

Tests/Opto Status menu option can be used to verify whether the problem is in the optoisolated input itself or the mapping of its signal to the scheme logic functions. If the optoisolated input does appear to be read correctly then it will be necessary to examine its mapping within the PSL.

Ensure the voltage rating for the opto inputs has been configured correctly with applied voltage. If the opto-isolated input state is not being correctly read by the relay the applied signal should be tested. Verify the connections to the opto-isolated input using the correct wiring diagram and the correct nominal voltage settings in any standard or custom menu settings. Next, using a voltmeter verify that 80% opto setting voltage is present on the terminals of the opto-isolated input in the energized state. If the signal is being correctly applied to the relay then the failure may be on the input card itself. Depending on which opto-isolated input has failed this may require replacement of either the complete analog input module (the board within this module cannot be individually replaced without re-calibration of the relay) or a separate opto board.

Px4x/EN TS/If7 Page (TS) 14-11

(TS) 14 Troubleshooting

7.3

7.4

7.4.1

7.4.2

Mal-Operation of the Relay during Testing

Incorrect Analog Signals

The measurements may be configured in primary or secondary to assist. If it is suspected that the analog quantities being measured by the relay are not correct then the measurement function of the relay can be used to verify the nature of the problem. The measured values displayed by the relay should be compared with the actual magnitudes at the relay terminals. Verify that the correct terminals are being used (in particular the dual rated CT inputs) and that the CT and VT ratios set on the relay are correct. The correct 120 degree displacement of the phase measurements should be used to confirm that the inputs have been correctly connected.

PSL Editor Troubleshooting

A failure to open a connection could be because of one or more of the following:

• The relay address is not valid (note: this address is always 1 for the front port).

Password is not valid

Communication Set-up - COM port, Baud rate, or Framing - is not correct

Transaction values are not suitable for the relay and/or the type of connection

Modem configuration is not valid. Changes may be necessary when using a modem

The connection cable is not wired correctly or broken. See MiCOM S1 connection configurations

The option switches on any KITZ101/102 that is in use may be incorrectly set

Diagram Reconstruction after Recover from Relay

Although the extraction of a scheme from a relay is supported, the facility is provided as a way of recovering a scheme in the event that the original file is unobtainable.

The recovered scheme will be logically correct, but much of the original graphical information is lost. Many signals will be drawn in a vertical line down the left side of the canvas. Links are drawn orthogonally using the shortest path from A to B.

Any annotation added to the original diagram (titles, notes, etc.) are lost.

Sometimes a gate type may not be what was expected, e.g. a 1-input AND gate in the original scheme will appear as an OR gate when uploaded. Programmable gates with an inputs-to-trigger value of 1 will also appear as OR gates.

PSL Version Check

The PSL is saved with a version reference, time stamp and CRC check. This gives a visual check whether the default PSL is in place or whether a new application has been downloaded.

Page (TS) 14-12 Px4x/EN TS/If7

Repair and Modification Procedure

8

(TS) 14 Troubleshooting

REPAIR AND MODIFICATION PROCEDURE

Please follow these steps to return an Automation product to us:

1. Get the Repair and Modification Authorization Form (RMA).

A copy of the RMA form is shown at the end of this section.

2. Fill in the RMA form.

Fill in only the white part of the form.

Please ensure that all fields marked (M) are completed such as:

Equipment model

Model No. and Serial No.

Description of failure or modification required (please be specific)

Value for customs (in case the product requires export)

Delivery and invoice addresses

Contact details

3. Receive from local service contact, the information required to ship the product.

Your local service contact will provide you with all the information:

Pricing details

RMA No

Repair center address

If required, an acceptance of the quote must be delivered before going to next stage.

4. Send the product to the repair center.

Address the shipment to the repair center specified by your local contact.

Ensure all items are protected by appropriate packaging: anti-static bag and foam protection.

Ensure a copy of the import invoice is attached with the unit being returned.

Ensure a copy of the RMA form is attached with the unit being returned.

E-mail or fax a copy of the import invoice and airway bill document to your local contact.

Px4x/EN TS/If7 Page (TS) 14-13

(TS) 14 Troubleshooting

Notes:

Repair and Modification Procedure

Page (TS) 14-14 Px4x/EN TS/If7

REPAIR/MODIFICATION RETURN AUTHORIZATION FORM

FIELDS IN GREY TO BE FILLED IN BY SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC PERSONNEL ONLY

Reference RMA:

Repair Center Address (for shipping) Service Type

Retrofit

Warranty

Paid service

Under repair contract

Wrong supply

Schneider Electric - Local Contact Details

Name:

Telephone No.:

Fax No.:

E-mail:

IDENTIFICATION OF UNIT

Fields marked (M) are mandatory, delays in return will occur if not completed.

Model No./Part No.: (M)

Manufacturer Reference: (M)

Serial No.: (M)

Software Version:

Quantity:

FAULT INFORMATION

Site Name/Project:

Commissioning Date:

Under Warranty:

Additional Information:

Customer P.O (if paid):

Date:

LSC PO No.:

Yes No

Type of Failure

Hardware fail

Mechanical fail/visible defect

Software fail

Other:

Fault Reproducibility

Fault persists after removing, checking on test bench

Fault persists after re-energization

Intermittent fault

Found Defective

During FAT/inspection

On receipt

During installation/commissioning

During operation

Other:

Px4x/EN TS/If7 Page (TS) 14-15

Description of Failure Observed or Modification Required - Please be specific (M)

FOR REPAIRS ONLY

Would you like us to install an updated firmware version after repair?

CUSTOMS & INVOICING INFORMATION

Required to allow return of repaired items

Value for Customs (M)

Customer Invoice Address ((M) if paid)

Yes

Customer Return Delivery Address

(full street address) (M)

Part shipment accepted

OR Full shipment required

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

Contact Name:

Telephone No.:

Fax No.:

E-mail:

REPAIR TERMS

Contact Name:

Telephone No.:

Fax No.:

E-mail:

1. Please ensure that a copy of the import invoice is attached with the returned unit, together with the airway bill

document. Please fax/e-mail a copy of the appropriate documentation (M).

2. Please ensure the Purchase Order is released, for paid service, to allow the unit to be shipped.

3. Submission of equipment to Schneider Electric is deemed as authorization to repair and acceptance of quote.

4. Please ensure all items returned are marked as Returned for ‘Repair/Modification’ and

protected by appropriate

packaging (anti-static bag for each board and foam protection).

Page (TS) 14-16 Px4x/EN TS/If7

MiCOM P849

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

P849/EN SC/D33

SCADA COMMUNICATIONS

CHAPTER 15

Page (SC) 15-1

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

MiCOM P849

Date:

Products covered by this chapter:

Hardware Suffix:

Software Version:

Connection Diagrams:

08/2015

This chapter covers the specific versions of the MiCOM products listed below. This includes

only the following combinations of Software Version and Hardware Suffix.

M

D0

10P849xx (xx = 01 to 06)

Page (SC) 15-2 P849/EN SC/D33

Contents

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

CONTENTS

Page (SC) 15-

1 Introduction

2 Connections to the Communications Ports

2.1

2.2

2.2.1

2.2.2

2.2.3

2.2.4

Rear Communication Port - EIA(RS)-485

EIA(RS)-485 Bus

EIA(RS)-485 Bus Termination

EIA(RS)-485 Bus Connections & Topologies

EIA(RS)-485 Biasing

Courier Communication

3 Configuring the Communications Ports

3.1

3.2

3.3

3.4

3.5

3.6

3.7

12

Configuring the First Rear Courier Port (RP1)

Configuring the MODBUS Communication

12

13

Configuring the IEC 60870-5 CS 103 Rear Port, RP1 15

Configuring the DNP3.0 Rear Port, RP1 and Optional DNP3.0 over Ethernet16

Configuring the DNP3.0 Communication Rear Port, RP1 17

Configuring the Second Rear Communication Port SK4 (where fitted) 18

Configuring the Ethernet Communication (option) 19

4 Courier Interface

4.1

4.2

4.3

4.4

4.4.1

4.4.2

4.5

4.5.1

4.5.2

4.5.3

4.5.4

4.6

4.7

Courier Protocol

Supported Command Set

Courier Database

Setting Changes

Relay Settings

Setting Transfer Mode

Event Extraction

Automatic Event Extraction

Event Types

Event Format

Manual Event Record Extraction

Disturbance Record Extraction

Programmable Scheme Logic (PSL) Settings

5 MODBUS Interface

5.1

5.1.1

5.1.2

5.1.3

5.2

5.3

Serial Interface

Character Framing

Maximum MODBUS Query and Response Frame Size

User Configurable Communications Parameters

Supported MODBUS Query Functions

MODBUS Response Code Interpretation

21

21

22

22

23

23

23

23

23

24

24

24

25

25

26

26

26

26

26

27

27

7

8

9

11

9

9

8

8

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-3

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

5.4

5.4.1

5.5

5.5.1

5.5.2

5.5.3

5.6

5.6.1

5.6.2

5.7

5.7.1

5.7.2

5.7.3

5.7.4

5.8

5.9

5.9.1

5.9.2

Register Mapping

Conventions

Event Extraction

Manual Extraction Procedure

Automatic Extraction Procedure

Record Data

Disturbance Record Extraction

Interface Registers

Extraction Procedure

Setting Changes

Password Protection

Control and Support Settings

Protection Settings

Scratchpad Management

Date and Time Format (Data Type G12)

Power and Energy Measurement Data Formats (G29 & G125)

Data Type G29

Data Type G125

6 IEC60870-5-103 Interface

6.1

6.2

6.3

6.4

6.5

6.6

6.7

6.8

6.9

6.10

Physical Connection and Link Layer

Initialization

Time Synchronization

Spontaneous Events

General Interrogation (GI)

Cyclic Measurements

Commands

Test Mode

Disturbance Records

Blocking of Monitor Direction

7 DNP3.0 Interface

7.1

7.2

7.3

7.4

7.5

7.6

7.7

7.7.1

7.7.2

7.7.3

DNP3.0 Protocol

DNP3.0 Menu Setting

Object 1 Binary Inputs

Object 10 Binary Outputs

Object 20 Binary Counters

Object 30 Analog Input

DNP3.0 Configuration using MiCOM S1 Studio

Object 1

Object 20

Object 30

8 IEC 61850 Ethernet Interface

8.1

Introduction

Contents

47

48

48

48

48

47

47

47

48

48

49

28

28

30

30

31

32

35

35

36

41

42

42

43

43

43

45

45

46

50

53

53

53

54

54

54

50

50

51

51

55

55

Page (SC) 15-4 P849/EN SC/D33

Figures

8.2

8.2.1

8.2.2

8.3

8.3.1

8.3.2

8.4

8.5

8.6

8.6.1

8.6.2

8.6.3

8.7

8.7.1

8.7.2

8.7.3

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

What is IEC 61850?

Interoperability

Data Model

IEC 61850 in MiCOM Relays

Capability

IEC 61850 Configuration

Data Model of MiCOM Relays

Communication Services of MiCOM Relays

Peer-to-Peer (GSE) Communications

Scope

Simulation GOOSE Configuration

High Performance GOOSE

Ethernet Functionality

Ethernet Disconnection

Redundant Ethernet Communication Ports (optional)

Loss of Power

FIGURES

Figure 1 - EIA(RS)-485 bus connection arrangements

Figure 2 – K-bus remote communication connection arrangements

Figure 3 – Ethernet connection example

Figure 4 – Ethernet connection example

Figure 5 – Redundant ethernet board connection

Figure 6 - Automatic event extraction procedure

Figure 7 - Manual selection of a disturbance record

Figure 8 - Automatic selection of a disturbance - option 1

Figure 9 - Automatic selection of a disturbance - option 2

Figure 10 - Extracting the COMTRADE configuration file

Figure 11 - Extracting the COMTRADE binary data file

Figure 12 - Behavior when control input is set to pulsed or latched

Figure 13 - Data model layers in IEC 61850

TABLES

Page (SC) 15-

20

32

37

38

10

11

19

20

39

40

41

52

56

Table 1 – Supported protocols

Table 2 - MODBUS query functions supported by the product

Table 3 - MODBUS response code interpretation

Table 4 - MODBUS "memory" pages reference and application

Page (SC) 15-

7

27

27

28

57

59

60

60

55

55

56

57

61

61

62

62

62

62

63

63

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-5

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

Table 5 – MODBUS Event record extraction registers

Table 6 - Maintenance record types

Table 7 - Disturbance record extraction registers

Table 8 - Disturbance record status register (3x934) values

Table 9 - G12 date & time data type structure

Table 10 - DNP3.0 menu in the Communications column

Table 11 - DNP3.0 over Ethernet option settings

TablesIntroduction

33

34

36

36

44

50

51

Page (SC) 15-6 P849/EN SC/D33

Introduction

1

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

INTRODUCTION

This chapter describes the remote interfaces of the MiCOM relay in enough detail to allow integration in a substation communication network. The relay supports a choice of one of a number of protocols through the rear 2-wire EIA(RS)485 communication interface, selected using the model number when ordering. This is in addition to the front serial interface and second rear communications port, which supports the Courier protocol only.

According to the protocol and hardware options selected, the interface may alternatively be presented over an optical fiber interface, or via an Ethernet connection.

The supported protocols include:

• Courier

IEC-60870-5-103

DNP3.0

MODBUS

• IEC 61850 Ethernet Interface

Table 1 – Supported protocols

The implementation of both Courier and IEC 60870-5-103 on RP1 can also, optionally, be presented over fiber as well as EIA(RS)485.

The DNP3.0 implementation is available via the EIA(RS)485 port.

The rear EIA(RS)-485 interface is isolated and is suitable for permanent connection whichever protocol is selected. The advantage of this type of connection is that up to 32 relays can be daisy-chained together using a simple twisted-pair electrical connection.

Note The second rear Courier port and the fiber optic interface are mutually exclusive as they occupy the same physical slot.

An outline of the connection details for each of the communications ports is provided here. The ports are configurable using settings - a description of the configuration follows the connections part. Details of the protocol characteristics are also shown.

For each of the protocol options, the supported functions and commands are listed with the database definition. The operation of standard procedures such as extraction of event, fault and disturbance records, or setting changes is also described.

The descriptions in this chapter do not aim to fully describe the protocol in detail. Refer to the relevant documentation protocol for this information. This chapter describes the specific implementation of the protocol in the relay.

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-7

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

2

2.1

2.2

Connections to the Communications Ports

CONNECTIONS TO THE COMMUNICATIONS PORTS

Rear Communication Port - EIA(RS)-485

The rear EIA(RS)-485 communication port is provided by a 3-terminal screw connector on the back of the relay. See the Connection Diagrams chapter for details of the connection terminals. The rear port provides K-Bus/EIA(RS)-485 serial data communication and is intended for use with a permanently-wired connection to a remote control center. Of the three connections, two are for the signal connection, and the other is for the earth shield of the cable.

If the IEC60870-5-103, or the DNP3.0 protocols are specified as the interface for the rear port, then connections conform entirely to the EIA(RS)485 standards outline below. If, however, the Courier protocol is specified as the rear port protocol, the interface can be set either to EIA(RS)485 or K-Bus. The configuration of the port as either EIA(RS)485 or

K-Bus is described later together with K-Bus details, but as connection to the port is affected by this choice, you should note these points:

• Connection to an EIA(RS)485 device is polarity sensitive, whereas K-Bus connection is not. In all other respects (bus wiring, topology, connection, biasing, and termination) K-Bus can be considered the same as EIA(RS)485.

• Whilst connection to or between an EIA(RS)485 port and an EIA(RS)232 port on a

PC can be implemented using a general purpose EIA(RS)485 to EIA(RS)232 converter. However, connection between an EIA(RS)232 port and K-Bus requires a

KITZ101, KITZ102 or KITZ201.

The protocol provided by the relay is indicated in the relay menu in the Communications column. Using the keypad and LCD, first check that the Comms. settings cell in the

Configuration column is set to Visible, then move to the Communications column. The first cell down the column shows the communication protocol that is being used by the rear port.

Note Unless the K-Bus option is chosen for the rear port, correct polarity must be observed for the signal connections. In all other respects (bus wiring, topology, connection, biasing and termination) K-Bus can be considered the same as EIA(RS)485.

EIA(RS)-485 Bus

The EIA(RS)-485 two-wire connection provides a half-duplex fully isolated serial connection to the product. The connection is polarized and while the product’s connection diagrams show the polarization of the connection terminals, there is no agreed definition of which terminal is which. If the master is unable to communicate with the product and the communication parameters match, make sure the two-wire connection is not reversed.

EIA(RS)-485 provides the capability to connect multiple devices to the same two-wire bus. MODBUS is a master-slave protocol, so one device is the master, and the remaining devices are slaves. It is not possible to connect two masters to the same bus, unless they negotiate bus access.

Page (SC) 15-8 P849/EN SC/D33

Connections to the Communications Ports

2.2.1

2.2.2

2.2.3

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

EIA(RS)-485 Bus Termination

The EIA(RS)-485 bus must have 120 Ω (Ohm) ½ Watt terminating resistors fitted at either end across the signal wires, see the EIA(RS)-485 bus connection arrangements diagram below. Some devices may be able to provide the bus terminating resistors by different connection or configuration arrangements, in which case separate external components are not needed. However, this product does not provide such a facility, so if it is located at the bus terminus, an external termination resistor is needed.

EIA(RS)-485 Bus Connections & Topologies

The EIA(RS)-485 standard requires each device to be directly connected to the physical cable that is the communications bus. Stubs and tees are expressly forbidden, as are star topologies. Loop bus topologies are not part of the EIA(RS)-485 standard and are forbidden by it.

Two-core screened cable is recommended. The specification of the cable depends on the application, although a multi-strand 0.5 mm

2

per core is normally adequate. Total cable length must not exceed 1000 m. The screen must be continuous and connected at one end, normally at the master connection point. It is important to avoid circulating currents, especially when the cable runs between buildings, for both safety and noise reasons.

This product does not provide a signal ground connection. If the bus cable has a signal ground connection, it must be ignored. However, the signal ground must have continuity for the benefit of other devices connected to the bus. For both safety and noise reasons, the signal ground must never be connected to the cable’s screen or to the product’s chassis.

EIA(RS)-485 Biasing

It may also be necessary to bias the signal wires to prevent jabber. Jabber occurs when the signal level has an indeterminate state because the bus is not being actively driven.

This can occur when all the slaves are in receive mode and the master is slow to switch from receive mode to transmit mode. This may be because the master purposefully waits in receive mode, or even in a high impedance state, until it has something to transmit.

Jabber causes the receiving device(s) to miss the first bits of the first character in the packet, which results in the slave rejecting the message and consequentially not responding. Symptoms of this are poor response times (due to retries), increasing message error counters, erratic communications, and even a complete failure to communicate.

Biasing requires that the signal lines are weakly pulled to a defined voltage level of about

1 V. There should only be one bias point on the bus, which is best situated at the master connection point. The DC source used for the bias must be clean, otherwise noise is injected. Some devices may (optionally) be able to provide the bus bias, in which case external components are not required.

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-9

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

Connections to the Communications Ports

6-9V DC

180 Ohm Bias

Master

120 Ohm

0V

180 Ohm Bias

Slave Slave

120 Ohm

Slave

P1622ENa

Figure 1 - EIA(RS)-485 bus connection arrangements

It is possible to use the product’s field voltage output (48 V DC) to bias the bus using values of 2.2 k Ω (½W) as bias resistors instead of the 180 Ω resistors shown in the above EIA(RS)-485 bus connection arrangements diagram. Note the following warnings apply:

Warnings It is extremely important that the 120 Ω termination resistors are fitted. Otherwise the bias voltage may be excessive and may damage the devices connected to the bus.

As the field voltage is much higher than that required,

Schneider Electric cannot assume responsibility for any damage that may occur to a device connected to the network as a result of incorrect application of this voltage.

Ensure the field voltage is not used for other purposes, such as powering logic inputs, because noise may be passed to the communication network.

Page (SC) 15-10 P849/EN SC/D33

Connections to the Communications Ports

2.2.4

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

Courier Communication

Courier is the communication language developed to allow remote interrogation of its range of protection relays. Courier uses a master and slave. EIA(RS)-232 on the front panel allows only one slave but EIA(RS)-485 on the back panel allows up to 32 daisychained slaves. Each slave unit has a database of information and responds with information from its database when requested by the master unit.

The relay is a slave unit that is designed to be used with a Courier master unit such as

MiCOM S1 Studio, MiCOM S10, PAS&T or a SCADA system. MiCOM S1 Studio is compatible is specifically designed for setting changes with the relay.

To use the rear port to communicate with a PC-based master station using Courier, a

KITZ K-Bus to EIA(RS)-232 protocol converter is needed. This unit (and information on how to use it) is available from Schneider Electric. A typical connection arrangement is shown in the K-bus remote communication connection arrangements diagram below. For more detailed information on other possible connection arrangements, refer to the manual for the Courier master station software and the manual for the KITZ protocol converter. Each spur of the K-Bus twisted pair wiring can be up to 1000 m in length and have up to 32 relays connected to it.

Twisted pair ‘K-Bus’ communications link

Micom relay Micom relay Micom relay

RS232 K-Bus

Public

Switched

Telephone

Network

(PSTN)

Modem

PC

PC

Serial

Port

KITS protocol converter

Courier master station e.g. substation control room

PC

Remote Courier master station

e.g. area control centre

Modem

Figure 2 – K-bus remote communication connection arrangements

P0109ENe

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-11

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

3

3.1

Configuring the Communications Ports

CONFIGURING THE COMMUNICATIONS PORTS

Configuring the First Rear Courier Port (RP1)

Once the physical connection is made to the relay, configure the relay’s communication settings using the keypad and LCD user interface.

1. In the relay menu, select the Configuration column, then check that the Comms.

settings cell is set to Visible.

2. Select the Communications column. Only two settings apply to the rear port using

Courier, the relay’s address and the inactivity timer. Synchronous communication uses a fixed baud rate of 64 kbits/s.

3. Move down the

Communications column from the column heading to the first cell down. This shows the communication protocol.

Protocol

Courier

4. The next cell down the column controls the address of the relay. As up to 32 relays

can be connected to one K-Bus spur (see Figure 2), each relay must have a

unique address so messages from the master control station are accepted by one relay only. Courier uses an integer (from 0 to 254) for the relay address that is set with this cell. Important: no two relays should have the same Courier address. The master station uses the Courier address to communicate with the relay.

RP1 Address

255

5. The next cell down controls the inactivity timer.

RP1 Inactiv timer

15 mins.

The inactivity timer controls how long the relay waits without receiving any messages on the rear port before it reverts to its default state, including revoking any password access that was enabled. For the rear port this can be set between 1 and 30 minutes.

The next cell down controls the physical media used for the communication.

RP1 Physical link

Copper

The default setting is to select the copper electrical EIA(RS)-485 connection. If the optional fiber optic connectors are fitted to the relay, this setting can be changed to

Fiber optic. This cell is also invisible if a second rear comms. port is fitted because it is mutually exclusive to the fiber optic connectors.

6. As an alternative to running Courier over K-Bus, Courier over EIA(RS)-485 can be selected. The next cell down indicates the status of the hardware.

RP1 Card status

EIA(RS)-232 OK

7. The next cell allows you to configure the port for EIA(RS)-485 or K-Bus.

RP1 Port config.

EIA(RS)-232

Page (SC) 15-12 P849/EN SC/D33

Configuring the Communications Ports

3.2

P849/EN SC/D33

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

8. If using EIA(RS)-485, the next cell selects the communication mode. The choice is either IEC60870 FT1.2 for normal operation with 11-bit modems, or 10-bit no parity.

RP1 Comms. Mode

IEC60870 FT1.2

9. If using EIA(RS)-485, the next cell down controls the baud rate. For K-Bus the baud rate is fixed at 64 kbits/second between the relay and the KITZ interface at the end of the relay spur. Courier communications is asynchronous. Three baud rates are supported by the relay, 9600 bits/s, 19200 bits/s and 38400 bits/s.

RP1 Baud rate

19200

Note For K-Bus, the baud rate is fixed at 64kbit/second between the relay and the

KITZ interface at the end of the relay spur. Courier communications is asynchronous.

Important If you modify protection and disturbance recorder settings using an on-line editor such as PAS&T, you must confirm them.

To do this, from the Configuration column select the Save changes cell. Off-line editors such as MiCOM S1 Studio do not need this action for the setting changes to take effect.

Configuring the MODBUS Communication

Important MODBUS is not available for all MiCOM products. MODBUS availability is shown in the Supported Protocols table.

MODBUS is a master/slave communication protocol that can be used for network control.

In a similar way to Courier, the master device initiates all actions and the slave devices

(the relays) respond to the master by supplying the requested data or by taking the requested action. MODBUS communication uses a twisted pair connection to the rear port and can be used over a distance of 1000 m with up to 32 slave devices.

To use the rear port with MODBUS communication, configure the relay’s communication settings using the keypad and LCD user interface.

1. In the relay menu, select the Configuration column, then check that the Comms.

settings cell is set to Visible.

2. Select the Communications column. Four settings apply to the rear port using

MODBUS that are described below. Move down the Communications column from the column heading to the first cell down. This shows the communication protocol.

Protocol

MODBUS

3. The next cell down controls the MODBUS address of the relay.

RP1 MODBUS address

23

Up to 32 relays can be connected to one MODBUS spur, therefore it is necessary for each relay to have a unique address so that messages from the master control station are accepted by one relay only. MODBUS uses an integer between 1 and

247 for the relay address. It is important that no two relays have the same

Page (SC) 15-13

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

Configuring the Communications Ports

MODBUS address. The MODBUS address is then used by the master station to communicate with the relay.

4. The next cell down controls the inactivity timer.

RP1 Inactiv timer

10.00 mins.

The inactivity timer controls how long the relay waits without receiving any messages on the rear port before it reverts to its default state, including revoking any password access that was enabled. For the rear port this can be set between 1 and 30 minutes.

5. The next cell down the column controls the baud rate to be used.

RP1 Baud rate

19200 bits/s

MODBUS communication is asynchronous. Three baud rates are supported by the relay, 9600 bits/s, 19200 bits/s and 38400 bits/s. It is important that whatever baud rate is selected on the relay is the same as that set on the MODBUS master station.

6. The next cell down controls the parity format used in the data frames.

Parity

None

The parity can be set to be one of None, Odd or Even. It is important that whatever parity format is selected on the relay is the same as that set on the

MODBUS master station.

Note The ‘Parity’ cell is used to determine how the parity bit will be set in each character. If either Even or Odd Parity is specified, the quantity of ‘1’ bits will be counted in the data portion of each character. The parity bit will then be set to a 0 or 1 to result in an Even or Odd total of 1 bits. When the message is transmitted, the parity bit is calculated and applied to the frame of each character. The device that receives counts the quantity of 1 bits and sets an error if they are not the same as configured for that device.

7. The next cell down controls the physical media used for the communication.

RP1 Physical link

Copper

The default setting is to select the copper electrical EIA(RS)-485 connection. If the optional fiber optic connectors are fitted to the relay, this setting can be changed to

Fiber optic. This cell is also invisible if a second rear comms. port is fitted because it is mutually exclusive to the fiber optic connectors.

8. The next cell down controls the format of the Date/Time (software 30 or later).

MODBUS IEC Time

Standard IEC

The format can be selected as either Standard (as for IEC60870-5-4 ‘Binary Time 2a’) which is the default, or to Reverse for compatibility with MICOM Px20 and Px30 product ranges. For more information see the Date and Time Format section.

Page (SC) 15-14 P849/EN SC/D33

Configuring the Communications Ports

3.3

P849/EN SC/D33

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

Configuring the IEC 60870-5 CS 103 Rear Port, RP1

The IEC specification IEC 60870-5-103: Telecontrol Equipment and Systems, Part 5:

Transmission Protocols Section 103 defines the use of standards IEC 60870-5-1 to

IEC 60870-5-5 to perform communication with protection equipment. The standard configuration for the IEC 60870-5-103 protocol is to use a twisted pair connection over distances up to 1000 m. As an option for IEC 60870-5-103, the rear port can be specified to use a fiber optic connection for direct connection to a master station. The relay operates as a slave in the system, responding to commands from a master station. The method of communication uses standardized messages which are based on the VDEW communication protocol.

To use the rear port with IEC 60870-5-103 communication, configure the relay’s communication settings using the keypad and LCD user interface.

1. In the relay menu, select the Configuration column, then check that the Comms.

settings cell is set to Visible.

2. Select the Communications column. Four settings apply to the rear port using IEC

60870-5-103 that are described below.

Move down the Communications column from the column heading to the first cell down. This shows the communication protocol.

RP1 Protocol

IEC 60870-5-103

3. The next cell down controls the IEC 60870-5-103 address of the relay.

RP1 address

162

Up to 32 relays can be connected to one IEC 60870-5-103 spur, therefore it is necessary for each relay to have a unique address so that messages from the master control station are accepted by one relay only. IEC 60870-5-103 uses an integer number between 0 and 254 for the relay address. It is important that no two relays have the same IEC 60870-5-103 address. For products such as the P74x –

P741, P742 P743, you may need to use a star coupler if you are using more than 8 units. The IEC 60870-5-103 address is then used by the master station to communicate with the relay.

4. The next cell down the column controls the baud rate to be used.

RP1 Baud rate

9600 bits/s

IEC 60870-5-103 communication is asynchronous. Two baud rates are supported by the relay, ‘9600 bits/s’ and ‘19200 bits/s’. It is important that whatever baud rate is selected on the relay is the same as that set on the IEC 60870-5-103 master station.

5. The next cell down controls the period between IEC 60870-5-103 measurements.

RP1 Meas. Period

30.00 s

The IEC 60870-5-103 protocol allows the relay to supply measurements at regular intervals. The interval between measurements is controlled by this cell, and can be set between 1 and 60 seconds.

6. The following cell is not currently used but is available for future expansion.

RP1 Inactiv timer

Page (SC) 15-15

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

3.4

Configuring the Communications Ports

7. The next cell down the column controls the physical media used for communication.

RP1 Physical link

Copper

The default setting is to select the copper electrical EIA(RS)-485 connection. If the optional fiber optic connectors are fitted to the relay, this setting can be changed to

Fiber optic. This cell is also invisible if a second rear comms. port is fitted because it is mutually exclusive to the fiber optic connectors.

8. The next cell down can be used for monitor or command blocking.

RP1 CS103 Blcking

There are three settings associated with this cell; these are:

• Disabled

No blocking selected.

Monitor Blocking

When the monitor blocking DDB Signal is active high, either by energizing an opto input or control input, reading of the status information and disturbance records is not permitted. When in this mode the relay returns a “Termination of general interrogation” message to the master station.

Command Blocking

When the command blocking DDB signal is active high, either by energizing an opto input or control input, all remote commands are ignored, such as CB

Trip/Close or change setting group. When in this mode the relay returns a

negative acknowledgement of command message to the master station.

Configuring the DNP3.0 Rear Port, RP1 and Optional DNP3.0 over

Ethernet

Important DNP3.0 is not available for all MiCOM products. DNP3.0 availability is shown in the Supported Protocols table.

The DNP3.0 protocol is defined and administered by the DNP User Group. Information about the user group, DNP3.0 in general and protocol specifications can be found on their website: www.dnp.org

The DNP3.0 implementation in the MiCOM P841 can be presented on an EIA(RS)485 physical layer, and/or on an Ethernet connection according to the options selected.

The relay operates as a DNP3.0 slave and supports subset Level 2 of the protocol plus some of the features from Level 3.

The settings applicable to the EIA(RS)485 implementation are described in section 3.5.

The settings applicable to the Ethernet implementation are described in section 5 -

MODBUS Interface.

Page (SC) 15-16 P849/EN SC/D33

Configuring the Communications Ports

3.5

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

Configuring the DNP3.0 Communication Rear Port, RP1

Important DNP3.0 is not available for all MiCOM products. DNP3.0 availability is shown in the Supported Protocols table.

The DNP3.0 protocol is defined and administered by the DNP User Group. Information about the user group, DNP3.0 in general and protocol specifications can be found on their website: www.dnp.org

The relay operates as a DNP3.0 slave and supports subset level 2 of the protocol plus some of the features from level 3. DNP3.0 communication is achieved using a twisted pair connection to the rear port and can be used over a distance of 1000 m with up to 32 slave devices.

1. To use the rear port with DNP3.0 communication, configure the relay’s communication settings using the keypad and LCD user interface.

2. In the relay menu, select the Configuration column, then check that the Comms.

settings cell is set to Visible.

3. Four settings apply to the rear port using IEC 60870-5-103 that are described below.

4. Move down the Communications column from the column heading to the first cell down. This shows the communication protocol.

RP1 Protocol

DNP3.0

5. The next cell controls the DNP3.0 address of the relay.

RP1 Address

232

Up to 32 relays can be connected to one DNP3.0 spur, therefore it is necessary for each relay to have a unique address so that messages from the master control station are accepted by only one relay. DNP3.0 uses a decimal number between 1 and 65519 for the relay address. It is important that no two relays have the same

DNP3.0 address. The DNP3.0 address is then used by the master station to communicate with the relay.

6. The next cell down the column controls the baud rate to be used.

RP1 Baud rate

9600 bits/s

DNP3.0 communication is asynchronous. Six baud rates are supported by the relay 1200bits/s, 2400bits/s, 4800bits/s, 9600bits/s, 19200bits/s and 38400bits/s. It is important that whatever baud rate is selected on the relay is the same as that set on the DNP3.0 master station.

7. The next cell down the column controls the parity format used in the data frames.

RP1 Parity

None

The parity can be set to be one of None, Odd or Even. It is important that whatever parity format is selected on the relay is the same as that set on the

DNP3.0 master station.

8. The next cell down the column controls the physical media used for the communication.

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-17

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

3.6

Page (SC) 15-18

Configuring the Communications Ports

RP1 Physical link

Copper

The default setting is to select the copper electrical EIA(RS)-485 connection. If the optional fiber optic connectors are fitted to the relay, this setting can be changed to

Fiber optic. This cell is also invisible if a second rear comms. port is fitted because it is mutually exclusive to the fiber optic connectors.

9. The next cell down the column sets the time synchronization request from the master by the relay.

RP1 Time sync.

Enabled

The time sync. can be set to either enabled or disabled. If enabled it allows the

DNP3.0 master to synchronize the time.

Configuring the Second Rear Communication Port SK4 (where fitted)

For relays with Courier, MODBUS, IEC60870-5-103 or DNP3.0 protocol on the first rear communications port there is the hardware option of a second rear communications port, which runs the Courier language. This can be used over one of three physical links: twisted pair K-Bus (non-polarity sensitive), twisted pair EIA(RS)-485 (connection polarity sensitive) or EIA(RS)-232.

The settings for this port are immediately below those for the first port. See the

Connection Diagrams chapter.

1. Move down the settings until the following sub heading is displayed.

Rear Port2 (RP2)

2. The next cell down indicates the language, which is fixed at Courier for RP2.

RP2 Protocol

Courier

3. The next cell down indicates the status of the hardware.

RP2 Card status

EIA(RS)-232 OK

4. The next cell allows port to be configured for EIA(RS)-232, EIA(RS)-485 or K-Bus.

RP2 Port config.

EIA(RS)-232

5. For EIA(RS)-232 and EIA(RS)-485, the next cell selects the communication mode.

The choice is either IEC60870 FT1.2 for normal operation with 11-bit modems, or

10-bit no parity.

RP2 Comms. Mode

IEC60870 FT1.2

6. The next cell down controls the comms. port address.

RP2 Address

255

Since up to 32 relays can be connected to one K-Bus spur, as indicated in Figure 2

each relay must have a unique address so that messages from the master control station are accepted by one relay only. Courier uses an integer between 0 and 254

P849/EN SC/D33

Configuring the Communications Ports

3.7

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

for the relay address that is set with this cell. It is important that no two relays have the same Courier address. The Courier address is then used by the master station to communicate with the relay.

7. The next cell down controls the inactivity timer.

RP2 Inactivity timer

15 mins.

The inactivity timer controls how long the relay waits without receiving any messages on the rear port before it reverts to its default state, including revoking any password access that was enabled. For the rear port this can be set between 1 and 30 minutes.

8. For EIA(RS)-232 and EIA(RS)-485, the next cell down controls the baud rate.

For K-Bus the baud rate is fixed at 64 kbit/second between the relay and the KITZ interface at the end of the relay spur.

RP2 Baud rate

19200

Courier communications is asynchronous. Three baud rates are supported by the relay, 9600 bits/s, 19200 bits/s and 38400 bits/s.

Configuring the Ethernet Communication (option)

For the P746 or P849 product, it is also possible to use the IEC 61850-8.1 protocol.

P849/EN SC/D33

Figure 3 – Ethernet connection example

Using Ethernet hardware options, high-speed communication exchanges are possible through an Ethernet network.

Page (SC) 15-19

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

Configuring the Communications Ports

Figure 4 – Ethernet connection example

Redundant Ethernet connections are performed with Redundant Ethernet (Self Healing,

Dual homing or Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol) options (refer to Px4x/EN REB user guide).

Page (SC) 15-20

Figure 5 – Redundant ethernet board connection

P849/EN SC/D33

Courier Interface

4

4.1

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

COURIER INTERFACE

Courier Protocol

Courier is a Schneider Electric communication protocol. The concept of the protocol is that a standard set of commands is used to access a database of settings and data in the relay. This allows a generic master to be able to communicate with different slave devices. The application-specific aspects are contained in the database rather than the commands used to interrogate it, so the master station does not need to be preconfigured.

The same protocol can be used through two physical links K-Bus or EIA(RS)-232.

K-Bus is based on EIA(RS)-485 voltage levels with HDLC FM0 encoded synchronous signaling and its own frame format. The K-Bus twisted pair connection is unpolarized, whereas the EIA(RS)-485 and EIA(RS)-232 interfaces are polarized.

The EIA(RS)-232 interface uses the IEC60870-5 FT1.2 frame format.

The relay supports an IEC60870-5 FT1.2 connection on the front-port. This is intended for temporary local connection and is not suitable for permanent connection. This interface uses a fixed baud rate, 11-bit frame, and a fixed device address.

The rear interface is used to provide a permanent connection for K-Bus and allows multidrop connection. Although K-Bus is based on EIA(RS)-485 voltage levels, it is a synchronous HDLC protocol using FM0 encoding. It is not possible to use a standard

EIA(RS)-232 to EIA(RS)-485 converter to convert IEC60870-5 FT1.2 frames to K-Bus.

Also it is not possible to connect K-Bus to an EIA(RS)-485 computer port. A protocol converter, such as the KITZ101, should be used for this purpose.

For a detailed description of the Courier protocol, command-set and link description, see the following documentation:

R6509 K-Bus Interface Guide

R6510

R6511

R6512

IEC60870 Interface Guide

Courier Protocol

Courier User Guide

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-21

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

4.2

4.3

Courier Interface

Supported Command Set

The following Courier commands are supported by the relay:

Protocol Layer:

Reset Remote Link

Poll Status

Poll Buffer*

Setting Changes:

Enter Setting Mode

Preload Setting

Abort Setting

Execute Setting

Reset Menu Cell

Set Value

Control Commands:

Select Setting Group

Change Device Address*

Set Real Time

Low Level Commands:

Send Event*

Accept Event*

Send Block

Store Block Identifier

Store Block Footer

Menu Browsing:

Get Column Headings

Get Column Text

Get Column Values

Get Strings

Get Text

Get Value

Get Column Setting Limits

Note Commands marked with an asterisk

(*) are not supported through the front Courier port.

Courier Database

The Courier database is two-dimensional. Each cell in the database is referenced by a row and column address. Both the column and the row can take a range from 0 to 255.

Addresses in the database are specified as hexadecimal values, for example, 0A02 is column 0A (10 decimal) row 02. Associated settings or data are part of the same column.

Row zero of the column has a text string to identify the contents of the column and to act as a column heading.

The Relay Menu Database document contains the complete database definition for the relay. For each cell location the following information is stated:

• Cell Text

Cell Data type

Cell value

Whether the cell is settable, if so

Minimum value

Maximum value

Step size

Password Level required to allow setting changes

String information (for Indexed String or Binary flag cells)

Page (SC) 15-22 P849/EN SC/D33

Courier Interface

4.4

4.4.1

4.4.2

4.5

4.5.1

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

Setting Changes

Relay Settings

There are three categories of settings in the relay database:

Control and support

Disturbance recorder

Protection settings group

Setting changes made to the control and support settings are implemented immediately and stored in non-volatile memory. Changes made to either the Disturbance recorder settings or the Protection Settings Groups are stored in a ‘scratchpad’ memory and are not immediately implemented by the relay.

To action setting changes stored in the scratchpad the Save Changes cell in the

Configuration column must be written to. This allows the changes to either be confirmed and stored in non-volatile memory, or the setting changes to be aborted.

Setting Transfer Mode

If it is necessary to transfer all of the relay settings to or from the relay, a cell in the

Communication System Data column can be used. This cell (location BF03) when set to 1 makes all of the relay settings visible. Any setting changes made with the relay set in this mode are stored in scratchpad memory, including control and support settings. When the value of BF03 is set back to 0, any setting changes are verified and stored in nonvolatile memory.

Event Extraction

Events can be extracted either automatically (rear port only) or manually (either Courier port). For automatic extraction all events are extracted in sequential order using the standard Courier event mechanism, this includes fault/maintenance data if appropriate.

The manual approach allows the user to select events, faults, or maintenance data at random from the stored records.

Automatic Event Extraction

(See Chapter 7 Courier User Guide, publication R6512).

This method is intended for continuous extraction of event and fault information as it is produced. It is only supported through the rear Courier port.

When new event information is created, the Event bit is set in the Status byte. This indicates to the Master device that event information is available. The oldest, unextracted event can be extracted from the relay using the Send Event command. The relay responds with the event data, which is either a Courier Type 0 or Type 3 event. The Type

3 event is used for fault records and maintenance records.

Once an event has been extracted from the relay, the Accept Event can be used to confirm that the event has been successfully extracted. If all events have been extracted, the event bit is reset. If there are more events still to be extracted, the next event can be accessed using the Send Event command as before.

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-23

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

4.5.2

4.5.3

4.5.4

Courier Interface

Event Types

Events are created by the relay under these circumstances:

• Change of state of output contact

Change of state of opto input

Protection element operation

Alarm condition

Setting change

Password entered/timed-out

Fault record (Type 3 Courier Event)

Maintenance record (Type 3 Courier Event)

Event Format

The Send Event command results in these fields being returned by the relay:

• Cell reference

Time stamp

Cell text

Cell value

The Relay Menu Database document for the relevant product, contains a table of the events created by the relay and indicates how the contents of the above fields are interpreted. Fault records and Maintenance records return a Courier Type 3 event, which contains the above fields with two additional fields:

Event extraction column

Event number

These events contain additional information that is extracted from the relay using the referenced extraction column. Row 01 of the extraction column contains a setting that allows the fault/maintenance record to be selected. This setting should be set to the event number value returned in the record. The extended data can be extracted from the relay by uploading the text and data from the column.

Manual Event Record Extraction

Column 01 of the database can be used for manual viewing of event, fault, and maintenance records. The contents of this column depend on the nature of the record selected. It is possible to select events by event number and to directly select a fault record or maintenance record by number.

Event Record selection (Row 01)

This cell can be set to a value between 0 to 511 to select from 512 stored events. 0 selects the most recent record and 511 the oldest stored record. For simple event records, (Type 0) cells 0102 to 0105 contain the event details. A single cell is used to represent each of the event fields. If the event selected is a fault or maintenance record (Type 3), the remainder of the column contains the additional information.

Maintenance Record Selection (Row F0)

This cell can be used to select a maintenance record using a value between 0 and

4. This cell operates in a similar way to the fault record selection.

If this column is used to extract event information from the relay, the number associated with a particular record changes when a new event or fault occurs.

Page (SC) 15-24 P849/EN SC/D33

Courier Interface

4.6

4.7

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

Disturbance Record Extraction

The stored disturbance records in the relay are accessible in a compressed format through the Courier interface. The records are extracted using column B4. Cells required for extraction of uncompressed disturbance records are not supported.

Select Record Number (Row 01)

This cell can be used to select the record to be extracted. Record 0 is the oldest unextracted record, already extracted older records are assigned positive values, and negative values are used for more recent records. To help automatic extraction through the rear port, the Disturbance bit of the Status byte is set by the relay whenever there are unextracted disturbance records.

Once a record has been selected, using the above cell, the time and date of the record can be read from cell 02. The disturbance record can be extracted using the block transfer mechanism from cell B00B. The file extracted from the relay is in a compressed format. Use MiCOM S1 Studio to decompress this file and save the disturbance record in the COMTRADE format.

As has been stated, the rear Courier port can be used to extract disturbance records automatically as they occur. This operates using the standard Courier mechanism, see

Chapter 8 of the Courier User Guide. The front Courier port does not support automatic extraction although disturbance record data can be extracted manually from this port.

Programmable Scheme Logic (PSL) Settings

The Programmable Scheme Logic (PSL) settings can be uploaded from and downloaded to the relay using the block transfer mechanism defined in the Courier User Guide.

These cells are used to perform the extraction:

• B204 Domain

• B208 Sub-Domain

Used to select either PSL settings (upload or download) or PSL configuration data (upload only)

Used to select the Protection Setting Group to be uploaded or downloaded.

B20C Version

B21C Transfer Mode

Used on a download to check the compatibility of the file to be downloaded with the relay.

Used to set up the transfer process.

• B120 Data Transfer Cell Used to perform upload or download.

The PSL settings can be uploaded and downloaded to and from the relay using this mechanism. If it is necessary to edit the settings, MiCOM S1 Studio must be used because the data is compressed. MiCOM S1 Studio also performs checks on the validity of the settings before they are downloaded to the relay.

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-25

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

5

5.1

5.1.1

5.1.2

5.1.3

MODBUS Interface

MODBUS INTERFACE

The MODBUS interface is a master/slave protocol and is defined by: www.modbus.org

MODBUS Serial Protocol Reference Guide: PI-MBUS-300 Rev. E

Serial Interface

The MODBUS interface uses the first rear EIA(RS)-485 (RS485) two-wire port “RP1” (or converted fiber optic port). The port is designated “EIA(RS)-485/K-Bus Port” on the external connection diagrams.

The interface uses the MODBUS RTU communication mode rather than the ASCII mode since it provides for more efficient use of the communication bandwidth and is in widespread use. This communication mode is defined by the MODBUS standard.

Character Framing

The character framing is 1 start bit, 8 data bits, either 1 parity bit and 1 stop bit, or 2 stop bits. This gives 11 bits per character.

Maximum MODBUS Query and Response Frame Size

The maximum query and response frame size is limited to 260 bytes in total. (This includes the frame header and CRC footer, as defined by the MODBUS protocol.).

User Configurable Communications Parameters

The following parameters can be configured for this port using the product’s front panel user interface (in the communications sub-menu):

• Baud rate: 9600, 19200, 38400 bps

Device address:

Parity:

Inactivity time:

1 - 247

Odd, even, none.

1 - 30 minutes

Note The inactivity timer is started (or restarted) whenever the active password level is reduced when a valid password is entered, or when a change is made to the setting scratchpad. When the timer expires, the password level is restored to its default level and any pending (uncommitted) setting changes on the scratch pad are discarded. The inactivity timer is disabled when the password level is at its default value and there are no settings pending on the scratchpad. See the Setting Changes section.

The MODBUS interface communication parameters are not part of the product’s setting file and cannot be configured with MiCOM S1 Studio.

Page (SC) 15-26 P849/EN SC/D33

5.3

MODBUS Interface

5.2

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

03

04

06

07

08

11

12

16

Supported MODBUS Query Functions

The MODBUS protocol provides numerous query functions, of which the product supports the subset in the following table. The product responds with exception code 01 if any other query function is received by it.

Query function code

01

MODBUS query name

Read Coil Status

Application / Interpretation

02 Read Input Status

Read Holding Registers

Read Input Registers

Preset Single Register

Read Exception Status

Diagnostics

Fetch Communication Event Counter

Fetch Communication Event Log

Preset Multiple Registers (127 max)

Read status of output contacts (0x addresses)

Read status of opto-isolated status inputs

(1x addresses)

Read setting values (4x addresses)

Read measurement values (3x addresses)

Write single setting value (4x addresses)

Read relay status, same value as register 3x1

Application defined by the MODBUS protocol specification

Write multiple setting values (4x addresses)

Table 2 - MODBUS query functions supported by the product

MODBUS Response Code Interpretation

Code

01

02

03

04

05

06

MODBUS response name

Product interpretation

Illegal Function Code The function code transmitted is not supported.

Illegal Data Address

The start data address in the request is not an allowable value.

If any of the addresses in the range cannot be accessed due to password protection, all changes in the request are discarded and this error response is returned.

Note If the start address is correct but the range includes non-implemented addresses, this response is not produced.

Illegal Value

Slave Device Failure

Acknowledge

Slave Device Busy

A value referenced in the data field transmitted by the master is not in range. Other values transmitted in the same packet are executed if they are in the range.

An exception arose during the processing of the received query that is not covered by any of the other exception codes in this table.

Not used.

The write command cannot be implemented due to the product’s internal database being locked by another interface.

This response is also produced if the product is busy executing a previous request.

Table 3 - MODBUS response code interpretation

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-27

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

5.4

5.4.1

5.4.1.1

5.4.1.2

Register Mapping

Conventions

MODBUS Interface

Memory Pages

The MODBUS specification associates a specific register address space to each query that has a data address field. The address spaces are often called memory pages because they are analogous to separate memory devices. A simplistic view of the queries in MODBUS is that a specified location in a specified memory device is being read from or written to. However, the product’s implementation of such queries is not as a memory access but as a translation to an internal database query (see Note).

Note One consequence of this is that the granularity of the register address space (in the 3x and 4x memory pages) is governed by the size of the data item being requested from the internal database. Since this is often more than the 16 bits of an individual register, not all register addresses are valid.

See the Register Data Types section for more details.

Each MODBUS memory page has a name and an ID. The MODBUS “memory” pages

reference and application table provides a summary of the memory pages, their Ids, and their application in the product.

It is common practice to prefix a decimal register address with the page ID and generally this is the style used in this document.

Memory page ID

0xxxx

1xxxx

MODBUS memory page name

Coil Status

Input Status

Product application

3xxxx

4xxxx

6xxxx

Input Registers

Holding Registers

Extended Memory File

Read and write access of the Output Relays.

Read only access of the Opto-Isolated Status Inputs.

Read-only data access, such as measurements and records.

Read and write data access, such as product configurations settings and control commands.

Not used or supported.

Note xxxx represents the addresses available in the page (0 to 9999).

Table 4 - MODBUS "memory" pages reference and application

MODBUS Register Identification

The MODBUS convention is to document register identifiers with ordinal values (first, second, third…) whereas the actual protocol uses memory-page based register addresses that begin with address zero. Therefore the first register in a memory page is register address zero, the second register is register address 1 and so on. In general, one must be subtracted from a register’s identifier to find its equivalent address. The page number notation is not part of the address.

Page (SC) 15-28 P849/EN SC/D33

MODBUS Interface

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

Example:

Task:

Obtain the status of the output contacts from the Schneider Electric MiCOM Pxxx device at address 1.

The output contact status is a 32-bit binary string held in input registers 3x8 and 3x9 (see the

Binary Status Information section).

Select MODBUS function code 4 “Read input registers” and request two registers starting at input register address 7. Note the register address is one less than the required register ordinal.

The MODBUS query frame is:

01 04 00 07 00 02 C0 0A

Device

Address

Function

Code

Start

Register

Register

Count

Check

Sum

Address

P2700ENa

Note that the following frame data is shown in hexadecimal 8-bit bytes.

The frame is transmitted from left to right by the master device. The start register address, register count and check sum are all 16-bit numbers that are transmitted in a high byte - low byte order.

The query may elicit the following response:

4

01 04 04 00 00 10 04 F7 87

Device

Address

Function

Code

Data Field

Length

First

Register

Second

Register

Check

Sum

P2701ENb

The frame was transmitted from left to right by the slave device. The response frame is valid because the eighth bit of the function code field is not set. The data field length is 4 bytes since the query was a read from two 16-bit registers. The data field consists of two pairs of bytes in a high byte - low byte order with the first requested register’s data coming first. Therefore the request for the 32-bit output contact status starting at register 3x8 is 00001004h

(1000000000100b), which shows that outputs 3 and 13 are energized and the remaining outputs are de-energized.

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-29

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

MODBUS Interface

5.5

5.5.1

Page (SC) 15-30

Event Extraction

The product can store up to 512 event records in battery backed-up memory. An event record consists of a time stamp, a record type, and a set of information fields. The record type and the information fields record the event that occurred at the time captured by the time stamp.

The product has several classes of event record:

Alarm events

Opto-isolated status input events

Relay contact output events

Protection/DDB operation events

Fault data capture events

General events

The Relay Menu Database document specifies the available events. The product provides an “event filtering” feature that may be used to prevent specific events from being logged. The event filter is configured in the Record Control section of the product’s menu database in the MiCOM S1 Studio configuration tool.

The product supports two methods of event extraction providing either automatic or manual extraction of the stored event, fault, and maintenance records.

The product stores event, fault, and maintenance records in three separate queues. As entries are added to the fault and maintenance queues, a corresponding event is added to the event queue. Each queue is of different length and each queue may be individually cleared – see the Event Record Delection section. It is therefore possible to have a fault event or a maintenance event entry in the event queue with no corresponding entry in the associated queue because it has been overwritten or deleted.

The manual extraction procedure (see the Manual Extraction Procedure section) allows each of these three queues to be read independently.

The automatic extraction procedure (sss the Automatic Extraction Procedure section) reads records from the event queue. If the event record is a fault or a maintenance record, the record’s extended data is read also, if it is available from their queues.

Note Version 31 of the product introduced a new set of 3x registers for the presentation of the event and fault record data. These registers are used throughout the text of the following sub-sections. For legacy compatibility, the original registers are still provided. These are described as previous

MODBUS addresses in the Relay Menu Database document. They should not be used for new installations. See the

Legacy Event Record Support section for additional information.

Manual Extraction Procedure

There are three registers used to manually select stored records. For each of these registers, zero represents the most-recent stored record. For example:

• 4x00100 - Select Event, 0 to 511.

511 was 249 in P24x software version 57, P34x/P64x software versions 01, 02, 03,

04, 05, 06, & 07, since they only stored 250 event records.

4x00101 - Select Fault, 0 to 4

4x00102 - Select Maintenance Record, 0 to 4

P849/EN SC/D33

MODBUS Interface

5.5.2

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

The following registers can be read to indicate the numbers of the various types of record stored.

30100 - Number of stored records

30101 - Number of stored fault records

• 30102 - Number of stored maintenance records

Each fault or maintenance record logged causes an event record to be created by the relay. If this event record is selected the additional registers allowing the fault or maintenance record details will also become populated.

Automatic Extraction Procedure

Automatic event-record extraction allows records to be extracted as they occur. Event records are extracted in sequential order, including any fault or maintenance data that may be associated with an event.

The MODBUS master can determine whether the product has any events stored that have not yet been extracted. This is done by reading the product’s status register

3x00001 (G26 data type). If the event bit of this register is set, the product contains event records that have not yet been extracted.

To select the next event for sequential extraction, the master station writes a value of one to the record selection register 4x00400 (G18 data type). The event data, plus any fault or maintenance data, can be read from the registers specified in the Record Data section.

Once the data has been read, the event record is marked. This is done by writing a value of 2 to register 4x00400. The G18 data type consists of bit fields. Therefore it is also possible to both mark the current record as read and automatically select the next unread record. This is done by writing a value of 3 to the register.

When the last (most recent) record is accepted, the event flag in the status register

(3x00001) resets. If the last record is accepted by writing a value of 3 to the record selection register (4x00400), a dummy record appears in the event-record registers with an “Event Type” value of 255. Selecting another record when none are available gives a

MODBUS exception code 3, “Invalid value” (see the MODBUS Response Code

Interpretation section).

One possible event record extraction procedure is shown in the following Automatic event

extraction procedure diagram.

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-31

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

MODBUS Interface

Start

Read event flag in status register 3x1

Event flag set?

No End

Yes

Write 1 to record select register 4x400

Read event record register set

30103 to 30112

Register

30112=1?

No

Register

30112=2?

Yes

Read fault record data register set

30120 to 30199

Yes

Read maintenance record register set

3x36 to 3x39

No

Write 2 to record select register 4x400

P1646ENb

Figure 6 - Automatic event extraction procedure

5.5.3

Description

Time Stamp

Event Type

Event Value

30103

Record Data

The location and format of the registers used to access the record data is the same whether they have been selected using manual or automatic extraction mechanisms, see the Manual Extraction Procedure and Automatic Extraction Procedure sections.

Register

4

Length

(registers)

Comments

30107

30108

1

2

See G12 data type in the Relay Menu Database document.

Indicates the type of the event record. See G13 data type in the Relay Menu

Database document (a value of 255 indicates that the end of the event log has been reached).

Contains the associated status register value as a string of binary flags for relay-contact, opto-input, alarm, and protection events. Otherwise it has a value of zero.

When a status value is supplied, the value represents the recorded value of the event types associated register pair, as indicated by the Event Origin value (see Note 1).

Page (SC) 15-32 P849/EN SC/D33

MODBUS Interface

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

Description

Event Origin

Event Index

Additional Data

Present

Note 1

Note 2

Note 3

Register

30110

30111

30112

1

1

1

Length

(registers)

Comments

The Event Original value indicates the MODBUS Register pair where the change occurred (see Note 2). Possible values are:

30011: Alarm Status 1 event

30013: Alarm Status 2 event

30015: Alarm Status 3 event

30723: Relay contact event (2 registers: DDB 0-31 status)

30725: Status input event (2 registers: DDB 32-63 status)

30727 to 30785:

Protection events (Indicates the 32-bit DDB status word that was the origin of the event)

For General events, Fault events, and Maintenance events, a value of zero is returned.

The Event Index value is used to distinguish between events with the same

Event Type and Event Origin.

The registers value depends on the type of the event:

For protection events, the value is the ID of the DDB that caused the event.

For alarm events, the value is the ID of the alarm that caused the event.

In both cases, the value includes the direction of the state transition in the

Most Significant Bit. This direction bit is 1 for a 0-1 (low to high) change, and

0 for a 1-0 (high to low) change.

For all other types of events, it has a value of zero.

1:

2:

Indicates whether the record has additional data.

0: Indicates that there is no additional data.

Indicates that fault record data can be read from

3x10020 to 3x10999 (see Note 3).

Indicates that maintenance record data can be read from registers 3x36 to 3x39.

The protection-event status information is the value of the DDB status word that contains the protection

DDB that caused the event.

Subtracting 3000 from the Event Origin value results in the MODBUS 3x memory-page register ID,

subtracting one from this results in the MODBUS register address - see section 5.4.1.2. The resultant

register address can be used in a function code 4 MODBUS query.

The exact number of fault record registers depends on the individual product - see Relay Menu

Database.

Table 5 – MODBUS Event record extraction registers

If a fault record or maintenance record is directly selected using the manual mechanism, the data can be read from the fault or maintenance data register ranges specified in the

Maintenance record types table. The event record data in registers 3x10003 to 3x10012 is not valid.

See the Relay Menu Database document for the record values for each event.

The general procedure for decoding an event record is to use the value of the

Event

Type field combined with the value of the Event Index field to uniquely identify the event.

The exceptions to this are event types 4, 5, 7, 8, & 9.

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-33

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

MODBUS Interface

Event types 4 Relay Contact Output Events and 5 Opto-Isolated Status Input Events only provide the value of the input or output status register (as indicated by the Event

Origin value) when the event occurred. If event transition information for each input or output is required, it must be deduced by comparing the event value with the previous event value (for identically-typed events records).

Event type 7 General Event events are solely identified by their Event Value.

Event types 8 Fault Record and 9 Maintenance Record require additional registers to be read when the associated additional data is available (see Note). The Fault record registers in the range 30120 to 30199 (the exact number of registers depends on the individual product) are documented in the 3x register-map in the Relay Menu Database

document. The two additional 32-bit maintenance record register-pairs consist of a maintenance record type (register pair 3x36/7) and a type-specific error code (register pair 3x38/9). The Maintenance record types table lists the different types of maintenance record available from the product.

Note As noted at the beginning of the Event Extraction section, it should not be assumed that the additional data is available for fault and maintenance record events.

Maintenance record

Power on test errors (non-fatal)

Watchdog 1 failure (fast)

Battery fail

Battery-backed RAM failure

Field voltage failure

Ribbon bus check failure

Watchdog 2 failure (slow)

Continuous self-test errors

SRAM bus failure

SRAM cell failure

Flash EPROM checksum failure

Program code verify failure

Battery-backed RAM failure

Battery fail

Field Voltage failure

EEPROM failure

Fatal software exception

Incorrect hardware configuration

Software exception (typically nonfatal)

Analog module failure

Ethernet card error

Front panel text

Fast W'Dog Error

Battery Failure

BBRAM Failure

Field Volt Fail

Bus Reset Error

Slow W'Dog Error

SRAM Failure Bus

SRAM Failure Blk.

FLASH Failure

Code Verify Fail

BBRAM Failure

Battery Failure

Field Volt Fail

EEPROM Failure

Software Failure

H/W Verify Fail

Non Standard

Ana. Sample Fail

NIC Soft Error

Table 6 - Maintenance record types

16

17

18

11

12

13

14

15

5

6

7

8

9

10

3

4

1

2

0

Record type 3x00036

Page (SC) 15-34 P849/EN SC/D33

MODBUS Interface

5.6

5.6.1

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

Disturbance Record Extraction

The product provides facilities for both manual and automatic extraction of disturbance records. The two methods differ only in the mechanism for selecting a disturbance record; the method for extracting the data and the format of the data are identical.

Records extracted are presented in IEEE COMTRADE format. This involves extracting two files: an ASCII text configuration file, and a binary data file.

Each file is extracted by repeatedly reading a data-page until all of the file’s data has been transferred. The data-page is made up of 127 registers; providing a maximum of

254 bytes for each register block request.

Interface Registers

The following set of registers is presented to the master station to support the extraction of uncompressed disturbance records:

Register Name

3x00001 Status register

3x00800

3x00801

4x00250

4x00400

3x00930 to

3x00933

3x00802

3x00803 to

3x00929

Number of stored disturbances

Unique identifier of the oldest disturbance record

Manual disturbance record selection register

Record selection command register

Record time stamp

Number of registers in data page

Data page registers

Description

Provides the status of the product as bit flags: b0 b1 b2 b3 b4 b5 b6 b7 b8 to b15

Out of service

Minor self test failure

Event

Time synchronization

Disturbance

Fault

Trip

Alarm

Unused

A ‘1’ in bit “b4” indicates the presence of one or more disturbance records.

Indicates the total number of disturbance records currently stored in the product, both extracted and unextracted.

Indicates the unique identifier value for the oldest disturbance record stored in the product. This is an integer value used with the Number of stored disturbances value to calculate a value for manually selecting records.

This register is used to manually select disturbance records.

The values written to this cell are an offset of the unique identifier value for the oldest record. The offset value, which ranges from 0 to the N o

of stored disturbances - 1, is added to the identifier of the oldest record to generate the identifier of the required record. b2 b3 b4 b5

This register is used during the extraction process and has several commands. These are: b0 b1

Select next event

Accept event

Select next disturbance record

Accept disturbance record

Select next page of disturbance data

Select data file

These registers return the timestamp of the disturbance record.

This register informs the master station of the number of registers in the data page that are populated.

These 127 registers are used to transfer data from the product to the master station.

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-35

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

5.6.2

5.6.2.1

MODBUS Interface

Register

3x00934

4x00251

Note

Name

Disturbance record status register

Data file format selection

Description

The disturbance record status register is used during the extraction process to indicate to the master station when

data is ready for extraction. See Table 9.

This is used to select the required data file format. This is reserved for future use.

Register addresses are provided in reference code + address format. E.g.

4x00001 is reference code 4x, address 1 (which is specified as function code 03, address 0x0000 in the MODBUS specification).

Table 7 - Disturbance record extraction registers

The Disturbance Record status register reports one of these values:

Idle

Busy

State

Page ready

Configuration complete

Record complete 4

Disturbance overwritten 5

No unextracted disturbances

Not a valid disturbance 7

Command out of sequence

6

8

Description

This is the state reported when no record is selected; such as after power-on or after a record has been marked as extracted.

The product is currently processing data.

The data page has been populated and the master can now safely read the data.

All of the configuration data has been read without error.

All of the disturbance data has been extracted.

An error occurred during the extraction process where the disturbance being extracted was overwritten by a new record.

An attempt was made by the master station to automatically select the next oldest unextracted disturbance when all records have been extracted.

An attempt was made by the master station to manually select a record that did not exist in the product.

The master station issued a command to the product that was not expected during the extraction process.

Table 8 - Disturbance record status register (3x934) values

Extraction Procedure

The following procedure must be used to extract disturbance records from the product.

The procedure is split into four sections:

1. Selection of a disturbance, either manually or automatically.

2. Extraction of the configuration file.

3. Extraction of the data file.

4. Accepting the extracted record (automatic extraction only).

Manual Extraction Procedure

The procedure used to extract a disturbance manually is shown in the following Manual

selection of a disturbance record diagram. The manual method of extraction does not allow for the acceptance of disturbance records.

Page (SC) 15-36 P849/EN SC/D33

MODBUS Interface

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

Start

Get number of disturbances from register 3x00800

Are there any disturbances?

Yes

Get oldest disturbance ID from register 3x00801

No

Select required disturbance by writing the ID value of the required record to register 4x00250

Extract Disturbance Data

Get Disturbance Time stamp from registers

3x00930-3x00933 (optional)

End

Figure 7 - Manual selection of a disturbance record

P1460ENa

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-37

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

5.6.2.2

MODBUS Interface

Automatic Extraction Procedure - Option 1

There are two methods that can be used for automatically extracting disturbances. The procedure for the first method is shown in the Automatic selection of a disturbance -

option 1 diagram. This also shows the acceptance of the disturbance record once the extraction is complete.

Start

Read Status word from register 3x00001

Is disturbance bit

(Bit 4) set?

No

Error

Yes

Select next Oldest unextracted Record by writing 0x04 to register 4x00400

Extract Disturbance Record

Send command to accept record by writing

0x08 to register 4x00400

P1461ENa

Figure 8 - Automatic selection of a disturbance - option 1

Page (SC) 15-38 P849/EN SC/D33

MODBUS Interface

5.6.2.3

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

Automatic Extraction Procedure - Option 2

The second method that can be used for automatic extraction is shown in the Automatic

selection of a disturbance - option 2 diagram. This also shows the acceptance of the disturbance record once the extraction is complete.

Start

FirstTime = TRUE

Read Status word from register 3x00001

FirstTime

= TRUE

Is disturbance bit

(Bit 4) set?

No

FirstTime

= FALSE

FirstTime

= TRUE

Yes

Select next Oldest unextracted Record by writing 0x04 to register

4x00400

Yes

Is FirstTime

= TRUE

No

Error

Extract Disturbance

Record

Send command to accept and select next record by writing 0x0C to register 4x00400

Figure 9 - Automatic selection of a disturbance - option 2

P1462ENa

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-39

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

5.6.2.4

MODBUS Interface

Extracting the Disturbance Data

Extraction of a selected disturbance record is a two-stage process. This involves first reading the configuration file, then the data file. The Extracting the COMTRADE

configuration file diagram shows how the configuration file is read and the Extracting the

COMTRADE binary data file diagram s hows how the data file is extracted.

Start

(Record Selected)

To parent procedure

Configuration

Complete

Read DR status value from register 3x00934

Read Status word from register 3x00001

Busy

Check DR Status for

Error conditions or

Busy status

Error

What is the value of DR status?

Other

Page Ready

Read number of registers in data page from address 3x00802

Read data page registers starting at 3x00803

Store data to ASCII file in the order the data was received

Send ‘Get Next Page of Data’ to register 4x00400

Configuration Complete

(Begin extracting data file)

Figure 10 - Extracting the COMTRADE configuration file

P1463ENa

Page (SC) 15-40 P849/EN SC/D33

MODBUS Interface

5.7

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

Record

Complete

Start

(Configuration

Complete)

Send ‘Select Data File’ to register 4x00400

Read DR status value from register 3x00934

Busy

To parent procedure

Check DR Status for Error conditions or Busy status

Error

What is the value of DR status?

Other

Page Ready

Read number of registers in data page from address 3x00802

Read data page registers starting at 3x00803

Store data to BINARY file in the order the data was received

Send ‘Get Next Page of Data’ to register 4x00400

Record Complete (Mark record as extracted, automatic extraction only)

P1464ENa

Figure 11 - Extracting the COMTRADE binary data file

During the extraction of a COMTRADE file, an error may occur that is reported in the disturbance record status register, 3x934. This can be caused by the product overwriting the record that is being extracted. It can also be caused by the master issuing a command that is not in the bounds of the extraction procedure.

Setting Changes

The relay settings can be split into two categories:

• Control and support settings

• Disturbance record settings and protection setting groups

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-41

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

5.7.1

5.7.2

MODBUS Interface

Changes to settings in the control and support area are executed immediately. Changes to the protection setting groups or the disturbance recorder settings are stored in a temporary ‘scratchpad’ area and must be confirmed before they are implemented. All the product settings are 4xxxx page registers; see the Relay Menu Database document. The following points should be noted when changing settings:

Settings implemented using multiple registers must be written to using a multiregister write operation. The product does not support write access to sub-parts of multi-register data types.

The first address for a multi-register write must be a valid address. If there are unmapped addresses in the range that is written to, the data associated with these addresses are discarded.

If a write operation is performed with values that are out of range, an “illegal data” response code is produced. Valid setting values in the same write operation are executed.

• If a write operation is performed attempting to change registers that require a higher level of password access than is currently enabled, all setting changes in the write operation are discarded.

Password Protection

The product’s settings can be subject to Password protection. The level of password protection required to change a setting is indicated in the 4x register-map table in the

Relay Menu Database document. Level 2 is the highest level of password access, level 0 indicates that no password is required.

The following registers are available to control password protection:

Models without Cyber Security

40001 & 40002 Password entry

40022 Default password level

40023 & 40024 Setting to change password level 1

40025 & 40026 Setting to change password level 2

30010 Can be read to indicate current access level

Models with Cyber Security

420008 - 420011 Setting to change password level 1

420016 - 420019 Setting to change password level 2

420024 - 420027 Setting to change password level 1

Control and Support Settings

Control and support settings are committed immediately when a value is written to such a register. The MODBUS registers in this category are:

4x00000-4x00599

4x00700-4x00999

4x02049 to 4x02052

• 4x10000-4x10999

Page (SC) 15-42 P849/EN SC/D33

MODBUS Interface

5.7.2.1

5.7.3

5.7.4

5.8

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

Time Synchronization

The value of the product’s real time clock can be set by writing the desired time (see the

Date and Time Format (Data Type G12) section) to registers 4x02049 through 4x02052.

These registers are standard to Schneider Electric MiCOM products, which makes it easier to broadcast a time synchronization packet, being a block write to the time setting registers sent to slave address zero.

When the product’s time has been set using these registers, the Time Synchronized flag in the MODBUS Status Register (3x1: type G26) is set. The product automatically clears this flag if more than five minutes has elapsed since these registers were last written to.

A “Time synchronization” event is logged if the new time value is more than two seconds different to the current value.

Protection Settings

Scratchpad Management

Register 4x00405 can be used to either confirm or abort the setting changes in the scratchpad area. In addition to the basic editing of the protection setting groups, these functions are provided:

Default values can be restored to a setting group or to all of the product settings by writing to register 4x00402.

It is possible to copy the contents of one setting group to another by writing the source group to register 4x00406 and the target group to 4x00407.

The setting changes performed by either of these two operations are made to the scratchpad area. These changes must be confirmed by writing to register 4x00405.

Date and Time Format (Data Type G12)

The date-time data type G12 allows real date and time information to be conveyed down to a resolution of 1 ms. The data-type is used for record time-stamps and for time synchronization (see the Time Synchronization section).

The structure of the data type is shown in the following table and complies with the

IEC60870-5-4 Binary Time 2a format.

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-43

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

MODBUS Interface

Byte

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

W

D

Where: m

I

H

M

=

=

=

=

=

= m

7 m

15

7

IV

SU

W

2

R

R m

6 m

14

R

R

W

1

R

Y

6

6

0…59,999ms

0…59 minutes

0…23 Hours

1…7 Day of week;

Monday to Sunday,

0 for not calculated

1…31 Day of Month

1…12 Month of year;

January to December m

5 m

13

5

I

5

R

W

0

R

Y

5

I

4

H

4

D

4 m

4 m

12

Bit Position

4 3

m m

3

11

R

Y

4

I

3

H

D

3

3

M

3

Y

3

IV

Y

R

SU range =

=

=

=

= m

2 m

10

2

I

2

H

2

D

2

M

2

Y

2 m

1 m

9

I

1

H

1

D

1

M

1

Y

1

1

0…99 Years (year of century)

Reserved bit = 0

Summertime:

0=standard time,

1=summer time

Invalid value:

0=valid,

1=invalid

0ms…99 years m

0 m

8

I

0

H

0

D

0

M

0

Y

0

0

Table 9 - G12 date & time data type structure

The seven bytes of the structure are packed into four 16-bit registers. Two packing formats are provided: standard and reverse. The prevailing format is selected by the

G238 setting in the Date and Time menu column or by register 4x306 (Modbus IEC

Time).

The standard packing format is the default and complies with the IEC60870-5-4 requirement that byte 1 is transmitted first. This is followed by byte 2 through to byte 7, followed by a null (zero) byte to make eight bytes in total. Since register data is usually transmitted in big-endian format (high-order byte followed by low-order byte), byte 1 is in the high-order byte position followed by byte 2 in the low-order position for the first register. The last register contains just byte 7 in the high-order position and the low-order byte has a value of zero.

The reverse packing format is the exact byte transmission order reverse of the standard format. The null (zero) byte is sent as the high-order byte of the first register and byte 7 as the register’s low-order byte. The second register’s high-order byte contains byte 6 and byte 5 in its low order byte.

Both packing formats are fully documented in the Relay Menu Database document for the

G12 type.

The principal application of the reverse format is for date-time packet format consistency when a mixture of MiCOM Px20, Px30, and Px40 series products are being used. This is especially true when there is a requirement for broadcast time synchronization with a mixture of such MiCOM products.

The data type provides only the value for the year of the century. The century must be deduced. The century could be imposed as 20 for applications not dealing with dates stored in this format from the previous (20th) century. Alternatively, the century can be calculated as the one that produces the nearest time value to the current date. For example: 30-12-99 is 30-12-1999 when received in 1999 & 2000, but is 30-12-2099 when received in 2050. This technique allows 2-digit years to be accurately converted to 4 digits in a ±50 year window around the current datum.

Page (SC) 15-44 P849/EN SC/D33

MODBUS Interface

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

5.9

5.9.1

P849/EN SC/D33

The invalid bit has two applications:

It can indicate that the date-time information is considered inaccurate, but is the best information available.

Date-time information is not available.

The summertime bit is used to indicate that summertime (day light saving) is being used and, more importantly, to resolve the alias and time discontinuity which occurs when summertime starts and ends. This is important for the correct time correlation of time stamped records.

Note The value of the summertime bit does not affect the time displayed by the product.

The day of the week field is optional and if not calculated is set to zero.

This data type (and therefore the product) does not cater for time zones so the end user must determine the time zone used by the product. UTC (universal co-ordinated time) is commonly used and avoids the complications of daylight saving timestamps.

Power and Energy Measurement Data Formats (G29 & G125)

The power and energy measurements are available in two data formats, G29 integer format and G125 IEEE754 floating point format. The G125 format is preferred over the older G29 format.

Data Type G29

Data type G29 consists of three registers. The first register is the per-unit power or energy measurement and is of type G28, which is a signed 16-bit quantity. The second and third registers contain a multiplier to convert the per-unit value to a real value.

The multiplier is of type G27, which is an unsigned 32-bit quantity. Therefore the overall value conveyed by the G29 data type must be calculated as G29 = G28 × G27.

The product calculates the G28 per unit power or energy value as

G28 = ((measured secondary quantity) / (CT secondary) × (110 V / (VT

secondary)).

Since data type G28 is a signed 16-bit integer, its dynamic range is constrained to

±32768. This limitation should be borne in mind for the energy measurements, as the

G29 value saturates a long time before the equivalent G125.

The associated G27 multiplier is calculated as

G27 = (CT primary) × (VT primary / 110 V) when primary value measurements are selected, and as

G27 = (CT secondary) × (VT secondary / 110 V) when secondary value measurements are selected.

Due to the required truncations from floating point values to integer values in the calculations of the G29 component parts and its limited dynamic range, the use of the

G29 values is only recommended when the MODBUS master cannot deal with the G125

IEEE754 floating point equivalents.

Note The G29 values must be read in whole multiples of three registers. It is not possible to read the G28 and G27 parts with separate read commands.

Page (SC) 15-45

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

5.9.2

MODBUS Interface

Example:

For A-Phase Power (Watts) (registers 3x00300 - 3x00302) for a 110 V nominal,

In = 1 A, VT ratio = 110 V:110 V and CT ratio = 1 A : 1 A.

Applying A-phase 1A @ 63.51V

A-phase Watts = ((63.51 V × 1 A) / In=1 A) × (110/Vn=110 V) = 63.51 Watts

The G28 part of the value is the truncated per unit quantity, which is equal to 64 (40h).

The multiplier is derived from the VT and CT ratios set in the product, with the equation ((CT

Primary) × (VT Primary) / 110 V)). Therefore the G27 part of the value equals 1 and the overall value of the G29 register set is 64×1 = 64 W.

The registers would contain:

3x00300 - 0040h

3x00301 - 0000h

3x00302 - 0001h

Using the previous example with a VT ratio = 110,000 V:110 V and CT ratio = 10,000 A : 1 A the

G27 multiplier would be 10,000 A × 110,000 V / 110 = 10,000,000. The overall value of the G29 register set is 64 × 10,000,000 = 640 MW. (Note that there is an actual error of 49 MW in this calculation due to loss of resolution).

The registers would contain:

3x00300 - 0040h

3x00301 - 0098h

3x00302 - 9680h

Data Type G125

Data type G125 is a short float IEEE754 floating point format, which occupies 32 bits in two consecutive registers. The most significant 16 bits of the format are in the first (low order) register and the least significant 16 bits in the second register.

The value of the G125 measurement is as accurate as the product’s ability to resolve the measurement after it has applied the secondary or primary scaling factors as required. It does not suffer from the truncation errors or dynamic range limitations associated with the

G29 data format.

Page (SC) 15-46 P849/EN SC/D33

IEC60870-5-103 Interface

6

6.1

6.2

6.3

P849/EN SC/D33

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

IEC60870-5-103 INTERFACE

The IEC60870-5-103 interface is a master/slave interface with the relay as the slave device. The relay conforms to compatibility level 2; compatibility level 3 is not supported.

These IEC60870-5-103 facilities are supported by this interface:

Initialization (Reset)

Time Synchronization

Event Record Extraction

General Interrogation

Cyclic Measurements

General Commands

Disturbance Record Extraction

Private Codes

Physical Connection and Link Layer

Two connection options are available for IEC60870-5-103, either the rear EIA(RS)-485 port or an optional rear fiber optic port. If the fiber optic port is fitted, the active port can be selected using the front panel menu or the front Courier port. However the selection is only effective following the next relay power up.

For either of the two connection modes, both the relay address and baud rate can be selected using the front panel menu or the front Courier port. Following a change to either of these two settings a reset command is required to re-establish communications, see the description of the reset command in the Initialization section.

Initialization

Whenever the relay has been powered up, or if the communication parameters have been changed, a reset command is required to initialize the communications. The relay responds to either of the two reset commands (Reset CU or Reset FCB). However, the

Reset CU clears any unsent messages in the relay’s transmit buffer.

The relay responds to the reset command with an identification message ASDU 5. The

Cause Of Transmission (COT) of this response is either Reset CU or Reset FCB depending on the nature of the reset command. For information on the content of

ASDU 5 see section IEC60870-5-103 in the Relay Menu Database document.

In addition to the ASDU 5 identification message, if the relay has been powered up it also produces a power-up event.

Time Synchronization

The relay time and date can be set using the time synchronization feature of the

IEC60870-5-103 protocol. The relay corrects for the transmission delay as specified in

IEC60870-5-103. If the time synchronization message is sent as a send / confirm message, the relay responds with a confirm. Whether the time-synchronization message is sent as a send / confirm or a broadcast (send / no reply) message, a time synchronization Class 1 event is generated.

If the relay clock is synchronised using the IRIG-B input, it is not possible to set the relay time using the IEC60870-5-103 interface. If the time is set using the interface, the relay creates an event using the current date and time from the internal clock, which is synchronised to IRIG-B.

Page (SC) 15-47

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

6.4

6.5

6.6

6.7

6.8

6.9

IEC60870-5-103 Interface

Spontaneous Events

Events are categorized using the following information:

• Function Type

• Information Number

The IEC60870-5-103 profile in the Relay Menu Database document, contains a complete listing of all events produced by the relay.

General Interrogation (GI)

The General Interrogation (GI) request can be used to read the status of the relay, the function numbers, and information numbers that are returned during the GI cycle. See the

IEC60870-5-103 profile in the Relay Menu Database document.

Cyclic Measurements

The relay produces measured values using ASDU 9 cyclically. This can be read from the relay using a Class 2 poll (note ADSU 3 is not used). The rate at which the relay produces new measured values can be controlled using the Measurement Period setting.

This setting can be edited from the front panel menu or the front Courier port and is active immediately following a change.

The measurands transmitted by the relay are sent as a proportion of 2.4 times the rated value of the analog value.

Commands

A list of the supported commands is contained in the Relay Menu Database document.

The relay responds to other commands with an ASDU 1, with a Cause of Transmission

(COT) indicating ‘negative acknowledgement’.

Test Mode

Using either the front panel menu or the front Courier port, it is possible to disable the relay output contacts to allow secondary injection testing to be performed. This is interpreted as ‘test mode’ by the IEC60870-5-103 standard. An event is produced to indicate both entry to and exit from test mode. Spontaneous events and cyclic measured data transmitted while the relay is in test mode has a COT of ‘test mode’.

Disturbance Records

For Software Releases prior to B0 (i.e. 57 and earlier):

The disturbance records are stored in uncompressed format and can be extracted using the standard mechanisms described in IEC60870-5-103.

Note IEC60870-5-103 only supports up to 8 records.

Page (SC) 15-48 P849/EN SC/D33

IEC60870-5-103 Interface

6.10

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

For Software Release B0 - A & B:

The disturbance records are stored in uncompressed format and can be extracted using the standard mechanisms described in IEC60870-5-103. The Enhanced Disturbance

Recorder software releases mean the relay can store a minimum of 15 records, each of

1.5 seconds duration.

Using relays with IEC 60870-5 CS 103 communication means they can store the same total record length. However, the IEC 60870-5 CS 103 communication protocol dictates that only 8 records (of 3 seconds duration) can be extracted via the rear port.

For Other Software Releases:

The disturbance records are stored in uncompressed format and can be extracted using the standard mechanisms described in IEC60870-5-103.

Where available, the Enhanced Disturbance Recorder software releases mean the relay can store a minimum of 15 records, each of 3.0 seconds duration.

Using relays with IEC 60870-5 CS 103 communication means they can store the same total record length. However, the IEC 60870-5 CS 103 communication protocol dictates that only 8 records (of 3 seconds duration) can be extracted via the rear port.

Blocking of Monitor Direction

The relay supports a facility to block messages in the Monitor direction and in the

Command direction. Messages can be blocked in the Monitor and Command directions using the menu commands, Communications - CS103 Blocking -

Disabled / Monitor Blocking / Command Blocking or DDB signals Monitor Blocked and

Command Blocked.

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-49

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

DNP3.0 Interface

7 DNP3.0 INTERFACE

7.1 DNP3.0 Protocol

The DNP3.0 protocol is defined and administered by the DNP Users Group. For information on the user group, DNP3.0 in general and the protocol specifications, see www.dnp.org

The descriptions given here are intended to accompany the device profile document that is included in the Relay Menu Database document. The DNP3.0 protocol is not described here, please refer to the documentation available from the user group. The device profile document specifies the full details of the DNP3.0 implementation for the relay. This is the standard format DNP3.0 document that specifies which objects; variations and qualifiers are supported. The device profile document also specifies what data is available from the relay using DNP3.0. The relay operates as a DNP3.0 slave and supports subset level 2 of the protocol, plus some of the features from level 3.

DNP3.0 communication uses the EIA(RS)-485 communication port at the rear of the relay. The data format is 1 start bit, 8 data bits, an optional parity bit and 1 stop bit. Parity is configurable (see menu settings below).

7.2 DNP3.0 Menu Setting

The following settings are in the DNP3.0 menu in the Communications column.

Setting Range

Remote Address 0 - 65534

Baud Rate

Parity

DNP3.0 address of relay (decimal)

Description

1200, 2400, 4800,

9600, 19200, 38400 Selectable baud rate for DNP3.0 communication

None, Odd, Even Parity setting

Time Sync. Enabled, Disabled

RP1 Physical Link Copper or Fiber Optic

Enables or disables the relay requesting time sync. from the master using IIN bit 4 word 1

This cell defines whether an electrical EIA(RS)485 or fiber optic connection is being used for communication between the master station and relay. If

Fiber

Optic is selected, the optional fiber optic communications board is required.

Meas Scaling

Message Gap

Primary, Secondary or Normalized

0 - 50 msec

Setting to report analog values in terms of primary, secondary or normalized (with respect to the CT/VT ratio setting) values.

Setting to allow the master station to have an interframe gap.

DNP Need Time 1 - 30 mins

DNP App Fragment 1 - 2048 bytes

DNP App Timeout 1 -120 s

DNP SBO Timeout 1 - 10 s

DNP Link Timeout 0 - 120 s

The length of time waited before requesting another time sync from the master.

The maximum message length (application fragment size) transmitted by the relay.

The length of time waited after sending a message fragment and waiting for a confirmation from the master.

The length of time waited after receiving a select command and waiting for an operate confirmation from the master.

The length of time the relay waits for a Data Link Confirm from the master. A value of 0 means data link support disabled and 1 to 120 seconds is the timeout setting.

Table 10 - DNP3.0 menu in the Communications column

Page (SC) 15-50 P849/EN SC/D33

DNP3.0 Interface

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

Setting

IP Address

Subnet mask

-

-

NIC MAC Address -

Gateway -

If the DNP3.0 over Ethernet option is selected, further settings are shown in this table.

Range Description

Indicates the IP (Internet Protocol) address of the rear Ethernet port. This address is formatted as a six-byte hexadecimal number, and is unique.

Displays the sub-network that the relay is connected to.

Indicates the MAC (Media Access Control) address of the rear Ethernet port. This address is formatted as a six-byte hexadecimal number, and is unique.

Displays the IP address of the gateway (proxy) that the relay is connected to, if any.

If set to Enabled the DNP3.0 master station can be used to synchronize the time on the relay. If set to Disabled, either the internal free running clock or the IRIG-B input are used.

Meas Scaling

Primary,

Secondary or

Normalized

NIC Tunl Timeout 1 - 30 mins

Setting to report analog values in terms of primary, secondary or normalized values, with respect to the CT/VT ratio setting.

NIC Link Timeout 0.1 - 60 s

Time waited before an inactive tunnel to a master station is reset.

Configures how a failed or unfitted network link (copper or fiber) is reported:

Alarm - an alarm is raised for a failed link

Event - an event is raised for a failed link

None - nothing reported for a failed link

Time waited, after failed network link is detected, before communication by the alternative media interface is attempted.

Table 11 - DNP3.0 over Ethernet option settings

7.3

7.4

Object 1 Binary Inputs

Object 1, binary inputs, contains information describing the state of signals in the relay, which mostly form part of the Digital Data Bus (DDB). In general these include the state of the output contacts and input optos, alarm signals and protection start and trip signals.

The ‘DDB number’ column in the device profile document provides the DDB numbers for the DNP3.0 point data. These can be used to cross-reference to the DDB definition list.

See the Relay Menu Database document. The binary input points can also be read as change events using object 2 and object 60 for class 1-3 event data.

Object 10 Binary Outputs

Object 10, binary outputs, contains commands that can be operated using DNP3.0.

Therefore the points accept commands of type pulse on [null, trip, close] and latch on/off as detailed in the device profile in the Relay Menu Database document and execute the command once for either command. The other fields are ignored (queue, clear, trip/close, in time and off time).

There is an additional image of the control inputs. Described as alias control inputs, they reflect the state of the control input, but with a dynamic nature.

If the Control Input DDB signal is already SET and a new DNP SET command is sent to the Control Input, the Control Input DDB signal goes momentarily to RESET and then back to SET.

If the Control Input DDB signal is already RESET and a new DNP RESET command is sent to the Control Input, the Control Input DDB signal goes momentarily to SET and then back to RESET.

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-51

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

DNP3.0 Interface

DNP Latch

ON

DNP Latch

ON

DNP Latch

OFF

DNP Latch

OFF

Control Input

(Latched)

Aliased Control

Input

(Latched)

Control Input

(Pulsed)

Aliased Control

Input

( Pulsed)

'Behaviour of Control Inputs

Existing with Pulsed/Latched Setting

Aliased Control Inputs with Pulsed/Latched Setting

Note: The pulse width is equal to the duration of one protection iteration (½ cycle for P14x/P341, ¼ cycle for P342/3/4/5, P64x)'

P4218ENi

Figure 12 - Behavior when control input is set to pulsed or latched

Many of the relay’s functions are configurable so some of the object 10 commands described in the following sections may not be available. A read from object 10 reports the point as off-line and an operate command to object 12 generates an error response.

Examples of object 10 points that maybe reported as off-line are:

Activate setting groups

CB trip/close

Ensure setting groups are enabled

Ensure remote CB control is enabled

Reset NPS thermal

Reset thermal O/L

Reset RTD flags

Control inputs

Ensure NPS thermal protection is enabled

Ensure thermal overload protection is enabled

Ensure RTD Inputs is enabled

Ensure control inputs are enabled

Page (SC) 15-52 P849/EN SC/D33

DNP3.0 Interface

7.5

7.6

7.7

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

Object 20 Binary Counters

Object 20, binary counters, contains cumulative counters and measurements. The binary counters can be read as their present ‘running’ value from object 20, or as a ‘frozen’ value from object 21. The running counters of object 20 accept the read, freeze and clear functions. The freeze function takes the current value of the object 20 running counter and stores it in the corresponding object 21 frozen counter. The freeze and clear function resets the object 20 running counter to zero after freezing its value.

Binary counter and frozen counter change event values are available for reporting from object 22 and object 23 respectively. Counter change events (object 22) only report the most recent change, so the maximum number of events supported is the same as the total number of counters. Frozen counter change events (object 23) are generated whenever a freeze operation is performed and a change has occurred since the previous freeze command. The frozen counter event queues store the points for up to two freeze operations.

Object 30 Analog Input

Object 30, analog inputs, contains information from the relay’s measurements columns in the menu. All Object 30 points can be reported as 16 or 32-bit integer values with flag, 16 or 32-bit integer values without flag, as well as short floating point values.

Analogue values can be reported to the master station as primary, secondary or normalized values (which takes into account the relay’s CT and VT ratios) and this is settable in the DNP3.0 Communications Column in the relay. Corresponding deadband settings can be displayed in terms of a primary, secondary or normalized value.

Deadband point values can be reported and written using Object 34 variations.

The deadband is the setting used to determine whether a change event should be generated for each point. The change events can be read using Object 32 or Object 60.

These events are generated for any point which has a value changed by more than the deadband setting since the last time the data value was reported.

Any analog measurement that is unavailable when it is read is reported as offline. For example, the frequency when the current and voltage frequency is outside the tracking range of the relay or the thermal state when the thermal protection is disabled in the configuration column. All Object 30 points are reported as secondary values in DNP3.0

(with respect to CT and VT ratios).

DNP3.0 Configuration using MiCOM S1 Studio

A PC support package for DNP3.0 is available as part of MiCOM S1 Studio to allow configuration of the relay’s DNP3.0 response. The PC is connected to the relay using a serial cable to the 9-pin connector on the front of the relay, see the Introduction chapter.

The configuration data is uploaded from the relay to the PC in a block of compressed format data and downloaded to the relay in a similar manner after modification. The new

DNP3.0 configuration takes effect in the relay after the download is complete. To restore the default configuration at any time, from the

Configuration column, select the Restore

Defaults cell then select All Settings.

In MiCOM S1 Studio, the DNP3.0 data is shown in three main folders, one folder each for the point configuration, integer scaling and default variation (data format). The point configuration also includes screens for binary inputs, binary outputs, counters and analogue input configuration.

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-53

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

7.7.1

7.7.2

7.7.3

DNP3.0 Interface

Object 1

For every point included in the device profile document there is a check box for membership of class 0 and radio buttons for class 1, 2 or 3 membership. Any point that is in class 0 must be a member of one of the change event classes 1, 2 or 3.

Points that are configured out of class 0 are by default not capable of generating change events. Furthermore, points that are not part of class 0 are effectively removed from the

DNP3.0 response by renumbering the points that are in class 0 into a contiguous list starting at point number 0. The renumbered point numbers are shown at the left-hand side of the screen in S1 and can be printed out to form a revised device profile for the relay. This mechanism allows best use of available bandwidth by only reporting the data points required by the user when a poll for all points is made.

Object 20

The running counter value of object 20 points can be configured to be in or out of class 0.

Any running counter that is in class 0 can have its frozen value selected to be in or out of the DNP3.0 response, but a frozen counter cannot be included without the corresponding running counter. As with object 1, the class 0 response will be renumbered into a contiguous list of points based on the selection of running counters. The frozen counters will also be renumbered based on the selection; note that if some of the counters that are selected as running are not also selected as frozen then the renumbering will result in the frozen counters having different point numbers to their running counterparts. For example, object 20 point 3 (running counter) might have its frozen value reported as object 21 point 1.

Object 30

For the analog inputs, object 30, the same selection options for classes 0, 1, 2 and 3 are available as for object 1. In addition to these options, which behave in exactly the same way as for object 1, it is possible to change the deadband setting for each point. The minimum and maximum values and the resolution of the deadband settings are defined in the device profile document; MiCOM S1 will allow the deadband to be set to any value within these constraints.

Page (SC) 15-54 P849/EN SC/D33

IEC 61850 Ethernet Interface

8

8.1

8.2

8.2.1

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

IEC 61850 ETHERNET INTERFACE

Introduction

IEC 61850 is the international standard for Ethernet-based communication in substations.

It enables integration of all protection, control, measurement and monitoring functions in a substation, and provides the means for interlocking and inter-tripping. It combines the convenience of Ethernet with the security which is essential in substations today.

The MiCOM protection relays can integrate with the PACiS substation control systems, to complete Schneider Electric's offer of a full IEC 61850 solution for the substation. The majority of MiCOM Px3x and Px4x relay types can be supplied with Ethernet, in addition to traditional serial protocols. Relays which have already been delivered with UCA2.0 on

Ethernet can be easily upgraded to IEC 61850.

What is IEC 61850?

IEC 61850 is a 14-part international standard, which defines a communication architecture for substations. It is more than just a protocol and provides:

Standardized models for IEDs and other equipment in the substation

Standardized communication services (the methods used to access and exchange data)

• Standardized formats for configuration files

• Peer-to-peer (for example, relay to relay) communication

The standard includes mapping of data onto Ethernet. Using Ethernet in the substation offers many advantages, most significantly including:

• High-speed data rates (currently 100 Mbits/s, rather than tens of kbits/s or less used by most serial protocols)

Multiple masters (called “clients”)

Ethernet is an open standard in every-day use

Schneider Electric has been involved in the Working Groups which formed the standard, building on experience gained with UCA2.0, the predecessor of IEC 61850.

Interoperability

A major benefit of IEC 61850 is interoperability. IEC 61850 standardizes the data model of substation IEDs which simplifies integration of different vendors’ products. Data is accessed in the same way in all IEDs, regardless of the vendor, even though the protection algorithms of different vendors’ relays may be different.

IEC 61850-compliant devices are not interchangeable, you cannot replace one device with another (although they are interoperable). However, the terminology is predefined and anyone with knowledge of IEC 61850 can quickly integrate a new device without mapping all of the new data. IEC 61850 improves substation communications and interoperability at a lower cost to the end user.

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-55

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

8.2.2

IEC 61850 Ethernet Interface

Data Model

To ease understanding, the data model of any IEC 61850 IED can be viewed as a hierarchy of information. The categories and naming of this information is standardized in the IEC 61850 specification. stVal

Pos

LN1 (XCBR)

PhA

A

LN2 (MMXU)

Logical Device (IED1)

Data Attribute

Data Object

Logical Node

(1 to n)

Logical Device

(1 to n)

Physical Device

Physical Device (network address)

P1445ENb

Figure 13 - Data model layers in IEC 61850

The levels of this hierarchy can be described as follows:

• Physical Device Identifies the actual IED in a system. Typically the device’s name or IP address can be used (for example Feeder_1 or

10.0.0.2).

Logical Device Identifies groups of related Logical Nodes inthe Physical

Device. For the MiCOM relays, five Logical Devices exist:

Control, Measurements, Protection, Records, System.

Wrapper/Logical Node Instance

Identifies the major functional areas in the IEC 61850 data model. Either 3 or 6 characters are used as a prefix to define the functional group (wrapper) while the actual functionality is identified by a 4 character Logical Node name, suffixed by an instance number. For example,

XCBR1 (circuit breaker), MMXU1 (measurements),

FrqPTOF2 (overfrequency protection, stage 2).

Data Object

Data Attribute

This next layer is used to identify the type of data presented. For example,

Pos (position) of Logical Node type XCBR.

This is the actual data (such as measurement value, status, and description). For example, stVal (status value) indicates the actual position of the circuit breaker for Data

Object type Pos of Logical Node type XCBR.

Page (SC) 15-56 P849/EN SC/D33

IEC 61850 Ethernet Interface

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

8.3

8.3.1

P849/EN SC/D33

IEC 61850 in MiCOM Relays

IEC 61850 is implemented in MiCOM relays by use of a separate Ethernet card. This card manages the majority of the IEC 61850 implementation and data transfer to avoid any impact on the performance of the protection.

To communicate with an IEC 61850 IED on Ethernet, it is necessary only to know its IP address. This can then be configured into either:

An IEC 61850 client (or master), for example a PACiS computer (MiCOM C264) or

HMI, or

An MMS browser, with which the full data model can be retrieved from the IED, without any prior knowledge

Capability

The IEC 61850 interface provides these capabilities:

• Read access to measurements

All measurands are presented using the measurement Logical Nodes, in the

‘Measurements’ Logical Device. Reported measurement values are refreshed by the relay once per second, in line with the relay user interface.

• Generation of unbuffered reports on change of status/measurement

Unbuffered reports, when enabled, report any change of state in statuses and measurements (according to deadband settings).

• Support for time synchronization over an Ethernet link

Time synchronization is supported using SNTP (Simple Network Time Protocol).

This protocol is used to synchronize the internal real time clock of the relays.

GOOSE peer-to-peer communication

GOOSE communications of statuses are included as part of the IEC 61850 implementation. See Peer-to-Peer (GSE) Communications for more details.

Disturbance record extraction

Disturbance records can be extracted from MiCOM relays by file transfer, as ASCII format COMTRADE files.

Controls

The following control services are available:

Direct Control

Direct Control with enhanced security

Select Before Operate (SBO) with enhanced security

Controls are applied to open and close circuit breakers using XCBR.Pos and

DDB signals ‘Control Trip’ and ‘Control Close’.

System/LLN0. LLN0.LEDRs are used to reset any trip LED indications.

Reports

Reports only include data objects that have changed and not the complete dataset.

The exceptions to this are a General Interrogation request and integrity reports.

Buffered Reports

Eight Buffered Report Control Blocks, (BRCB), are provided in SYSTEM/LLN0 in

Logical Device ‘System’.

Buffered reports are configurable to use any configurable dataset located in the same Logical device as the BRCB (SYSTEM/LLN0).

Unbuffered Reports

Sixteen Unbuffered Report Control Blocks (URCB) are provided in SYSTEM/LLN0 in Logical Device ‘System’.

Unbuffered reports are configurable to use any configurable dataset located in the same Logical device as the URCB (SYSTEM/LLN0).

Page (SC) 15-57

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

IEC 61850 Ethernet Interface

Configurable Data Sets

It is possible to create and configure datasets in any Logical Node using the IED

Configurator. The maximum number of datasets will be specified in an IED’s ICD file. An IED is capable of handling 100 datasets.

Published GOOSE message

Eight GOCBs are provided in SYSTEM/LLN0.

Uniqueness of control

The Uniqueness of control mechanism is implemented to be consistent with the

PACiS mechanism. This requires the relay to subscribe to the OrdRun signal from all devices in the system and be able to publish such a signal in a GOOSE message.

Select Active Setting Group

Functional protection groups can be enabled or disabled using private mod/beh attributes in the Protection/LLN0.OcpMod object. Setting groups are selectable using the Setting Group Control Block class, (SGCB). The Active Setting Group can be selected using the System/LLN0.SP.SGCB.ActSG data attribute in Logical

Device ‘System’.

Quality for GOOSE

It is possible to process the quality attributes of any Data Object in an incoming

GOOSE message. Devices that do not support IEC61850 quality flags send quality attributes as all zeros. The supported quality attributes for outgoing GOOSE messages are described in the Protocol Implementation eXtra Information for

Testing (PIXIT) document.

Address List

An Address List document (to be titled ADL) is produced for each IED which shows the mapping between the IEC61850 data model and the internal data model of the

IED. It includes a mapping in the reverse direction, which may be more useful. This document is separate from the PICS/MICS document.

Originator of Control

Originator of control mechanism is implemented for operate response message and in the data model on the ST of the related control object, consistent with the

PACiS mechanism.

Metering

MMTR (metering) logical node is implemented in P14x products. All metered values in the MMTR logical node are of type BCR. The actVal attribute of the BCR class is of type INT128, but this type is not supported by the SISCO MMSLite library. Instead, an INT64 value will be encoded for transmission.

A SPC data object named MTTRs has been included in the MMTR logical node.

This control will reset the demand measurements. A SPC data object named

MTTRs is also included in the PTTR logical node. This control will reset the thermal measurements.

Scaled Measurements

The Unit definition, as per IEC specifies an SI unit and an optional multiplier for each measurement. This allows a magnitude of measurement to be specified e.g. mA, A, kA, MA.

The multiplier will always be included in the Unit definition and will be configurable in

SCL, but not settable at runtime. It will apply to the magnitude, rangeC.min & rangeC.max attributes. rangeC.min & rangeC.max will not be settable at runtime to be more consistent with Px30 and to reduce configuration problems regarding deadbands.

Setting changes, such as changes to protection settings, are done using MiCOM S1

Studio. These changes can also be done using the relay’s front port serial connection or the relay’s Ethernet link, and is known as “tunneling”.

Page (SC) 15-58 P849/EN SC/D33

IEC 61850 Ethernet Interface

8.3.2

8.3.2.1

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

IEC 61850 Configuration

One of the main objectives of IEC 61850 is to allow IEDs to be directly configured from a configuration file generated at system configuration time. At the system configuration level, the capabilities of the IED are determined from an IED capability description file

(ICD), which is provided with the product. Using a collection of these ICD files from different products, the entire protection of a substation can be designed, configured and tested (using simulation tools) before the product is even installed into the substation.

To help this process, the MiCOM S1 Studio Support Software provides an IEC61850 IED

Configurator tool. Select

Tools > IEC61850 IED Configurator. This tool allows the preconfigured IEC 61850 configuration file (SCD or CID) to be imported and transferred to the IED. The configuration files for MiCOM relays can also be created manually, based on their original IED Capability Description (ICD) file.

Other features include the extraction of configuration data for viewing and editing, and a sophisticated error-checking sequence. The error checking ensures the configuration data is valid for sending to the IED and ensures the IED functions correctly in the substation.

To help the user, some configuration data is available in the IED CONFIGURATOR column of the relay user interface, allowing read-only access to basic configuration data.

Configuration Banks

To promote version management and minimize down-time during system upgrades and maintenance, the MiCOM relays have incorporated a mechanism consisting of multiple configuration banks. These configuration banks are categorized as:

• Active Configuration Bank

• Inactive Configuration Bank

Any new configuration sent to the relay is automatically stored in the inactive configuration bank, therefore not immediately affecting the current configuration. Both active and inactive configuration banks can be extracted at any time.

When the upgrade or maintenance stage is complete, the IED Configurator tool can be used to transmit a command to a single IED. This command authorizes the activation of the new configuration contained in the inactive configuration bank, by switching the active and inactive configuration banks. This technique ensures that the system down-time is minimized to the start-up time of the new configuration. The capability to switch the configuration banks is also available using the IED CONFIGURATOR column.

For version management, data is available in the IED CONFIGURATOR column in the relay user interface, displaying the SCL Name and Revision attributes of both configuration banks.

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-59

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

8.3.2.2

8.4

8.5

IEC 61850 Ethernet Interface

Network Connectivity

Note This section presumes a prior knowledge of IP addressing and related topics. Further details on this topic may be found on the Internet (search for

IP Configuration) and in numerous relevant books.

Configuration of the relay IP parameters (IP Address, Subnet Mask, Gateway) and SNTP time synchronization parameters (SNTP Server 1, SNTP Server 2) is performed by the

IED Configurator tool. If these parameters are not available using an SCL file, they must be configured manually.

If the assigned IP address is duplicated elsewhere on the same network, the remote communications do not operate in a fixed way. However, the relay checks for a conflict at power up and every time the IP configuration is changed. An alarm is raised if an IP conflict is detected.

Use the Gateway setting to configure the relay to accept data from networks other than the local network.

Data Model of MiCOM Relays

The data model naming adopted in the Px30 and Px40 relays has been standardized for consistency. The Logical Nodes are allocated to one of the five Logical Devices, as appropriate, and the wrapper names used to instantiate Logical Nodes are consistent between Px30 and Px40 relays.

The data model is described in the Model Implementation Conformance Statement

(MICS) document, which is available separately. The MICS document provides lists of

Logical Device definitions, Logical Node definitions, Common Data Class and Attribute definitions, Enumeration definitions, and MMS data type conversions. It generally follows the format used in Parts 7-3 and 7-4 of the IEC 61850 standard.

Communication Services of MiCOM Relays

The IEC 61850 communication services which are implemented in the Px30 and Px40 relays are described in the Protocol Implementation Conformance Statement (PICS) document, which is available separately. The PICS document provides the Abstract

Communication Service Interface (ACSI) conformance statements as defined in Annex A of Part 7-2 of the IEC 61850 standard.

Page (SC) 15-60 P849/EN SC/D33

IEC 61850 Ethernet Interface

8.6

8.6.1

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

Peer-to-Peer (GSE) Communications

The implementation of IEC 61850 Generic Substation Event (GSE) sets the way for cheaper and faster inter-relay communications. The generic substation event model provides fast and reliable system-wide distribution of input and output data values. The generic substation event model is based on autonomous decentralization This provides an efficient method of allowing simultaneous delivery of the same generic substation event information to more than one physical device, by using multicast services.

The use of multicast messaging means that IEC 61850 GOOSE uses a publishersubscriber system to transfer information around the network*. When a device detects a change in one of its monitored status points, it publishes (sends) a new message. Any device that is interested in the information subscribes (listens) to the data message.

Note* Multicast messages cannot be routed across networks without specialized equipment.

Each new message is retransmitted at user-configurable intervals until the maximum interval is reached, to overcome possible corruption due to interference and collisions. In practice, the parameters which control the message transmission cannot be calculated.

Time must be allocated to the testing of GSE schemes before or during commissioning; in just the same way a hardwired scheme must be tested.

Scope

A maximum of 64 virtual inputs are available within the PSL which can be mapped directly to a published dataset in a GOOSE message (Configurable dataset is supported).

Each GOOSE signal contained in a subscribed GOOSE message can be mapped to any of the 64 virtual inputs in the PSL. The virtual inputs allow the mapping to internal logic functions for protection control, directly to output contacts or LEDs for monitoring.

The MiCOM relay can subscribe to all GOOSE messages but only the following data types can be decoded and mapped to a virtual input:

BOOLEAN

BSTR2

INT16

INT32

INT8

UINT16

UINT32

UINT8

The MiCOM relay also can subscribe analogue GOOSE messages with Float32 data type. The received analogue values can not apply to any application function, these values will be stored only on the IEC 61850 data mode.

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-61

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

8.6.2

IEC 61850 Ethernet Interface

Simulation GOOSE Configuration

From MiCOM S1 Studio select Tools > IEC 61850 IED Configurator (Ed.2). Make sure the configuration is correct as this ensures efficient GOOSE scheme operation.

The relay can be set to publish/subscribe simulation/test GOOSE; it is important that this setting is returned to publish/receive normal GOOSE messages after testing to permit normal operation of the application and GOOSE messaging.

The relay provides a single setting to receive Simulated GOOSE, however it manages each subscribed GOOSE signal independently when the setting is set to simulated

GOOSE. Each subscription (virtual input) will continue to respond to GOOSE messages without the simulation flag set; however once the relay receives a GOOSE for a subscription with the simulation flag set, it will respond to this and ignore messages without the simulation flag set. Other subscriptions (virtual inputs) which have not received a GOOSE message with the simulation flag will continue to operate as before.

When the setting is reset back to normal GOOSE messaging the relay will ignore all

GOOSE messages with the simulation flag set and act on GOOSE messages without the simulation flag.

8.6.3

8.7

8.7.1

Page (SC) 15-62

High Performance GOOSE

In addition, the Px40 device is designed to provide maximum performance through an optimized publishing mechanism. This optimized mechanism is enabled so that the published GOOSE message is mapped using only the data attributes rather than mapping a complete data object. If data objects are mapped, the GOOSE messaging will operate correctly; but without the benefit of the optimized mechanism.

A pre-configured dataset named as "HighPerformGOOSE" is available in Ed.2 ICD template, which include all data attributes of all virtual outputs. We recommend using this dataset to get the benefit of better GOOSE performance. The optimized mechanism also applies to Ed.1 but without such a pre-configured dataset.

Ethernet Functionality

Settings relating to a failed Ethernet link are available in the ‘COMMUNICATIONS’ column of the relay user interface.

Ethernet Disconnection

IEC 61850 ‘Associations’ are unique and made to the relay between the client (master) and server (IEC 61850 device). If the Ethernet is disconnected, such associations are lost and must be re-established by the client. The TCP_KEEPALIVE function is implemented in the relay to monitor each association and terminate any which are no longer active.

P849/EN SC/D33

IEC 61850 Ethernet Interface

8.7.2

8.7.3

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

Redundant Ethernet Communication Ports (optional)

For information regarding the Redundant Ethernet communication ports, refer to the stand alone document Px4x/EN REB/B11.

Loss of Power

If the relay's power is removed, the relay allows the client to re-establish associations without a negative impact on the relay’s operation. As the relay acts as a server in this process, the client must request the association. Uncommitted settings are cancelled when power is lost. Reports requested by connected clients are reset and must be reenabled by the client when the client next creates the new association to the relay.

P849/EN SC/D33 Page (SC) 15-63

(SC) 15 SCADA Communications

Notes:

IEC 61850 Ethernet Interface

Page (SC) 15-64 P849/EN SC/D33

MiCOM Px4x

(IN) 16 Installation

Px4x/EN IN/A02

INSTALLATION

CHAPTER 16

Page (IN) 16-1

(IN) 16 Installation

MiCOM Px4x

Date (month/year):

Products covered by this chapter:

Hardware suffix:

Software version:

Connection diagrams:

08/2014

This chapter covers the specific versions of the MiCOM products listed below. This includes

only the following combinations of Software Version and Hardware Suffix.

J & K & L & M

P14x

P241

P242

P243

P342

P343

P344

P345

P44x

P44y

J

J

K

K

J

K

K

K

J / K

K / M

P445

P54x

P547

P642

P643

P645

P74x

P746

P841

P849

J / L

K / M

K

J / L

K / M

K / M

J / K

K

K

K

All MiCOM Px4x products

10P54400

10P54404 (SH 01 to 02)

10P54405 (SH 01 to 02)

10P54502 (SH 01 to 02)

10P54503 (SH 01 to 02)

10P141xx (xx = 01 to 07)

10P142xx (xx = 01 to 07)

10P143xx (xx = 01 to 07)

10P145xx (xx = 01 to 07)

10P241xx (xx = 01 to 02)

10P242xx (xx = 01)

10P243xx (xx = 01)

10P342xx (xx = 01 to 17)

10P343xx (xx = 01 to 19)

10P344xx (xx = 01 to 12)

10P345xx (xx = 01 to 07)

10P391xx (xx = 01 to 02)

10P44303 (SH 01 and 03)

10P44304 (SH 01 and 03)

10P44305 (SH 01 and 03)

10P44306 (SH 01 and 03)

10P445xx (xx = 01 to 04)

10P44600

10P44601 (SH 01 and 03)

10P44602 (SH 01 and 03)

10P44603 (SH 01 and 03)

10P54302 (SH 01 to 02)

10P54303 (SH 01 to 02)

10P54600

10P54604 (SH 01 to 02)

10P54605 (SH 01 to 02)

10P54606 (SH 01 to 02)

10P54702xx (Sh 1 to 2)

10P54703xx (Sh 1 to 2)

10P54704xx (Sh 1 to 2)

10P54705xx (Sh 1 to 2)

10P642xx (xx = 01 to 10)

10P643xx (xx = 01 to 06)

10P645xx (xx = 01 to 09)

10P740xx (xx = 01 to 07)

10P746xx (xx = 01 to 07)

10P84100

10P84101 (Sh 1 to 2)

10P84102 (Sh 1 to 2)

10P84103 (Sh 1 to 2)

10P84104 (Sh 1 to 2)

10P84105 (Sh 1 to 2)

10P849xx (xx = 01 to 06)

Page (IN) 16-2 Px4x/EN IN/A02

Contents

(IN) 16 Installation

CONTENTS

1 Introduction to MiCOM Range

2 Receipt, Handling, Storage and Unpacking Relays

2.1

2.2

2.3

2.4

Receipt of Relays

Handling of Electronic Equipment

Storage

Unpacking

3 Relay Mounting

3.1

3.2

Rack Mounting

Panel Mounting

4 Relay Wiring

4.1

4.2

4.3

4.4

4.5

4.6

4.7

4.7.1

4.7.2

4.8

4.9

Medium and Heavy Duty Terminal Block Connections

EIA(RS)485 Port

Current Loop Input Output (CLIO) Connections (if applicable)

IRIG-B Connections (if applicable)

EIA(RS)232 Port

Optical Fiber Connectors (when applicable)

Ethernet Port for IEC 61850 and/or DNP3.0 (where applicable)

Fiber Optic (FO) Port

RJ-45 Metallic Port

RTD Connections (if applicable)

Download/Monitor Port

4.10

Second EIA(RS)232/485 Port

4.10.1 Connection to the Second Rear Port

4.10.1.1

For IEC 60870-5-2 over EIA(RS)232/574

4.10.1.2

For K-bus or IEC 60870-5-2 over EIA(RS)485

4.11

4.12

4.12.1

Earth Connection (Protective Conductor)

P391 Rotor Earth Fault Unit (REFU) Mounting

Medium Duty Terminal Block Connections

5 Case Dimensions

5.1

5.2

5.3

40TE Case Dimensions

60TE Case Dimensions

80TE Case Dimensions

Page (IN) 16-

8

9

11

5

6

6

6

7

7

12

13

14

14

14

14

15

16

12

13

13

13

16

16

16

17

17

18

18

20

21

22

23

Px4x/EN IN/A02 Page (IN) 16-3

(IN) 16 Installation

TABLES

Table 1 – Products, sizes and part numbers

Table 2 - Blanking plates

Table 3 - IP52 sealing rings

Table 4 - M4 90° crimp ring terminals

Table 5 - Signals on the Ethernet connector

Table 6 - Description needed

Table 7 - Description needed

Table 8 – Products and case sizes

FIGURES

Figure 1 - Location of battery isolation strip

Figure 2 - Rack mounting of relays

Figure 3 - 40TE Case Dimensions

Figure 4 - 60TE Case Dimensions

Figure 5 - 80TE Case Dimensions

Tables

Page (IN) 16-

14

16

17

20

8

10

11

12

Page (IN) 16-

9

10

21

22

23

Page (IN) 16-4 Px4x/EN IN/A02

Introduction to MiCOM Range

1

(IN) 16 Installation

INTRODUCTION TO MICOM RANGE

About MiCOM Range

MiCOM is a comprehensive solution capable of meeting all electricity supply requirements. It comprises a range of components, systems and services from Schneider

Electric.

Central to the MiCOM concept is flexibility. MiCOM provides the ability to define an application solution and, through extensive communication capabilities, integrate it with your power supply control system.

The components within MiCOM are:

• P range protection relays;

C range control products;

M range measurement products for accurate metering and monitoring;

• S range versatile PC support and substation control packages.

MiCOM products include extensive facilities for recording information on the state and behaviour of the power system using disturbance and fault records. They can also provide measurements of the system at regular intervals to a control centre enabling remote monitoring and control to take place.

For up-to-date information, please see: www.schneider-electric.com

MiCOM Px4x Products

The MiCOM Px4x series of protection devices provide a wide range of protection and control functions and meet the requirements of a wide market segment.

Different parts of the Px4x range provide different functions. These include:

P14x Feeder Management relay suitable for MV and HV systems

P24x Motors and rotating machine management relay for use on a wide range of synchronous and induction machines

P34x Generator Protection for small to sophisticated generator systems and interconnection protection

P44x Full scheme Distance Protection relays for MV, HV and EHV systems

P54x Line Differential protection relays for HV/EHV systems with multiple communication options and phase comparison protection for use with PLC

P74x Numerical Busbar Protection for use on MV, HV and EHV busbars

P84x Breaker Failure protection relays

Note During 2011, the International Electrotechnical Commission classified the voltages into different levels (IEC 60038). The IEC defined LV, MV, HV and

EHV as follows: LV is up to 1000V. MV is from 1000V up to 35 kV. HV is from 110 kV or 230 kV. EHV is above 230 KV.

There is still ambiguity about where each band starts and ends. A voltage level defined as LV in one country or sector, may be described as MV in a different country or sector. Accordingly, LV, MV, HV and EHV suggests a possible range, rather than a fixed band. Please refer to your local

Schneider Electric office for more guidance.

Px4x/EN IN/A02 Page (IN) 16-5

(IN) 16 Installation

2

2.1

2.2

Receipt, Handling, Storage and Unpacking Relays

RECEIPT, HANDLING, STORAGE AND UNPACKING

RELAYS

Receipt of Relays

Protective relays, although generally of robust construction, require careful treatment prior to installation on site.

Upon receipt, relays should be examined immediately to ensure no external damage has been sustained in transit. If damage has been sustained, a claim should be made to the transport contractor and Schneider Electric should be promptly notified.

Relays that are supplied unmounted and not intended for immediate installation should

be returned to their protective polythene bags and delivery carton. Section 2.3 gives more

information about the storage of relays.

Handling of Electronic Equipment

Warning Before carrying out any work on the equipment, you should be familiar with the contents of the Safety

Information chapter/safety guide SFTY/4LM/C11 or later issue, the Technical Data chapter and the ratings on the equipment rating label.

A person’s normal movements can easily generate electrostatic potentials of several thousand volts. Discharge of these voltages into semiconductor devices when handling electronic circuits can cause serious damage which, although not always immediately apparent, will reduce the reliability of the circuit. This is particularly important to consider where the circuits use Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductors (CMOS), as is the case with these relays.

The relay’s electronic circuits are protected from electrostatic discharge when housed in the case. Do not expose them to risk by removing the front panel or Printed Circuit

Boards (PCBs) unnecessarily.

Each PCB incorporates the highest practicable protection for its semiconductor devices.

However, if it becomes necessary to remove a PCB, the following precautions should be taken to preserve the high reliability and long life for which the relay has been designed and manufactured.

Before removing a PCB, ensure that you are at the same electrostatic potential as the equipment by touching the case.

Handle analogue input modules by the front panel, frame or edges of the circuit boards. PCBs should only be handled by their edges. Avoid touching the electronic components, printed circuit tracks or connectors.

Do not pass the module to another person without first ensuring you are both at the same electrostatic potential. Shaking hands achieves equipotential.

Place the module on an anti-static surface, or on a conducting surface which is at the same potential as yourself.

• If it is necessary to store or transport printed circuit boards removed from the case, place them individually in electrically conducting anti-static bags.

In the unlikely event that you are making measurements on the internal electronic circuitry of a relay in service, it is preferable that you are earthed to the case with a

Page (IN) 16-6 Px4x/EN IN/A02

Receipt, Handling, Storage and Unpacking Relays

2.3

2.4

(IN) 16 Installation

conductive wrist strap. Wrist straps should have a resistance to ground between 500kΩ to

10MΩ. If a wrist strap is not available you should maintain regular contact with the case to prevent a build-up of electrostatic potential. Instrumentation which may be used for making measurements should also be earthed to the case whenever possible.

More information on safe working procedures for all electronic equipment can be found in

IEC 61340-5-1. It is strongly recommended that detailed investigations on electronic circuitry or modification work should be carried out in a special handling area such as described in the aforementioned Standard document.

Storage

If relays are not to be installed immediately upon receipt, they should be stored in a place free from dust and moisture in their original cartons. Where de-humidifier bags have been included in the packing they should be retained. The action of the de-humidifier crystals will be impaired if the bag is exposed to ambient conditions and may be restored by gently heating the bag for about an hour prior to replacing it in the carton.

To prevent battery drain during transportation and storage a battery isolation strip is fitted during manufacture. With the lower access cover open, presence of the battery isolation strip can be checked by a red tab protruding from the positive side.

Care should be taken on subsequent unpacking that any dust which has collected on the carton does not fall inside. In locations of high humidity the carton and packing may become impregnated with moisture and the de-humidifier crystals will lose their efficiency.

Prior to installation, relays should be stored at a temperature of between -40°C to +70°C

(-13°F to +158°F).

Unpacking

Care must be taken when unpacking and installing the relays so that none of the parts are damaged and additional components are not accidentally left in the packing or lost.

Make sure that any user’s CDROM or technical documentation is NOT discarded, and accompanies the relay to its destination substation.

Note With the lower access cover open, the red tab of the battery isolation strip will be seen protruding from the positive side of the battery compartment.

Do not remove this strip because it prevents battery drain during transportation and storage and will be removed as part of the commissioning tests.

Relays must only be handled by skilled persons.

The site should be well lit to facilitate inspection, clean, dry and reasonably free from dust and excessive vibration. This particularly applies to installations which are being carried out at the same time as construction work.

Px4x/EN IN/A02 Page (IN) 16-7

(IN) 16 Installation

3

Relay Mounting

RELAY MOUNTING

MiCOM relays are dispatched either individually or as part of a panel/rack assembly.

Individual relays are normally supplied with an outline diagram showing the dimensions for panel cut-outs and hole centres. This information can also be found in the product publication.

Secondary front covers can also be supplied as an option item to prevent unauthorised changing of settings and alarm status. They are available in sizes 40TE and 60TE. The

60TE cover also fits the 80TE case size of the relay.

P14x

P24xxxxxxxxxxxA

P24xxxxxxxxxxxC

P24xxxxxxxxxxxJ

P24xxxxxxxxxxxK

P34xxxxxxxxxxxA

P34xxxxxxxxxxxC

P34xxxxxxxxxxxJ

P34xxxxxxxxxxxK

P44x

P44y

P445

P54x

P547

P74x

P74x

P746

P841

P849

Product

P64xxxxxxxxxxxA/B/C

P64xxxxxxxxxxxJ/K

40TE

60TE / 80TE

60TE / 80TE

60TE / 80TE

40TE

60TE / 80TE

40TE

60TE / 80TE

40TE

60TE

40TE

60TE

60TE / 80TE

40TE

60TE / 80TE

40TE

60TE / 80TE

Size

40TE

60TE / 80TE

40TE

60TE / 80TE

40TE

60TE / 80TE

40TE

60TE / 80TE

40TE

60TE / 80TE

60TE / 80TE

GN0037001

GN0038 001

GN0038 001

GN0038 001

GN0037 001

GN0038 001

GN0242 001

GN0243 001

GN0037 001

GN0038 001

GN0037 001

GN0038 001

GN0038 001

GN0037 001

GN0038 001

Part No

GN0037 001

GN0038 001

GN0037 001

GN0038 001

GN0242 001

GN0243 001

GN0037 001

GN0038 001

GN0242 001

GN0243 001

GN0037 001

GN0038 001

GN0038 001

Note The Part Numbers suitable for rack-mounting have an “N” as the 10 th

The Part Numbers suitable for panel-mounting have an “M” as the 10

digit.

digit.

Table 1 – Products, sizes and part numbers

The design of the relay is such that the fixing holes in the mounting flanges are only accessible when the access covers are open and hidden from sight when the covers are closed.

If a P991 or MMLG test block is to be included with the relays, we recommend that you position the test block on the right-hand side of the associated relays (when viewed from the front). This minimises the wiring between the relay and test block, and allows the correct test block to be easily identified during commissioning and maintenance tests.

Page (IN) 16-8 Px4x/EN IN/A02

Relay Mounting

(IN) 16 Installation

3.1

P0146ENc

Figure 1 - Location of battery isolation strip

If you need to test correct relay operation during the installation, the battery isolation strip can be removed but should be replaced if commissioning of the scheme is not imminent.

This will prevent unnecessary battery drain during transportation to site and installation.

The red tab of the isolation strip can be seen protruding from the positive side of the battery compartment when the lower access cover is open. To remove the isolation strip, pull the red tab whilst lightly pressing the battery to prevent it falling out of the compartment. When replacing the battery isolation strip, ensure that the strip is refitted as

shown in Figure 1, i.e. with the strip behind the battery with the red tab protruding.

Rack Mounting

Virtually all MiCOM relays (apart from P445) can be rack mounted using single tier rack

frames (part number FX0021 101), see Figure 2. These frames have dimensions in

accordance with IEC 60297 and are supplied pre-assembled ready to use. On a standard 483 mm rack this enables combinations of case widths up to a total equivalent of size 80TE to be mounted side-by-side.

The two horizontal rails of the rack frame have holes drilled at approximately 26 mm intervals and the relays are attached via their mounting flanges using M4 Taptite selftapping screws with captive 3 mm thick washers (also known as a SEMS unit). These fastenings are available in packs of 5 (part number ZA0005 104).

Note Conventional self-tapping screws, including those supplied for mounting

MiDOS relays, have marginally larger heads which can damage the front cover molding if used.

Px4x/EN IN/A02 Page (IN) 16-9

(IN) 16 Installation

Relay Mounting

Warning Risk of damage to the front cover moulding. Do not use conventional self-tapping screws, including those supplied for mounting MiDOS relays because they have slightly larger heads.

Once the tier is complete, the frames are fastened into the racks using mounting angles at each end of the tier.

Page (IN) 16-10

P0147ENd

Figure 2 - Rack mounting of relays

Relays can be mechanically grouped into single tier (4U) or multi-tier arrangements by the rack frame. This enables schemes using products from the MiCOM and MiDOS product ranges to be pre-wired together prior to mounting.

Use blanking plates if there are empty spaces. The spaces may be for future installation of relays or because the total size is less than 80TE on any tier. Blanking plates can also

be used to mount ancillary components. Table 2 shows the sizes that can be ordered.

Note Blanking plates are only available in black.

Further details on mounting MiDOS relays can be found in publication R7012, “MiDOS

Parts Catalogue and Assembly Instructions”.

Case size summation

5TE

10TE

15TE

20TE

25TE

30TE

35TE

40TE

Table 2 - Blanking plates

Blanking plate part number

GJ2028 101

GJ2028 102

GJ2028 103

GJ2028 104

GJ2028 105

GJ2028 106

GJ2028 107

GJ2028 108

Px4x/EN IN/A02

Relay Mounting

3.2

(IN) 16 Installation

Panel Mounting

The relays can be flush mounted into panels using M4 SEMS Taptite self-tapping screws with captive 3 mm thick washers (also known as a SEMS unit). These fastenings are available in packs of 5 (part number ZA0005 104).

Note Conventional self-tapping screws, including those supplied for mounting

MiDOS relays, have marginally larger heads which can damage the front cover molding if used.

Warning Risk of damage to the front cover molding. Do not use conventional self-tapping screws, including those supplied for mounting MiDOS relays because they have slightly larger heads.

Alternatively tapped holes can be used if the panel has a minimum thickness of 2.5 mm.

For applications where relays need to be semi-projection or projection mounted, a range of collars are available from the Schneider Electric Contracts Department.

If several relays are mounted in a single cut-out in the panel, mechanically group them together horizontally or vertically to form rigid assemblies prior to mounting in the panel.

Note Fastening MiCOM relays with pop rivets is not advised because this does not allow easy removal if repair is necessary.

Rack-mounting panel-mounted versions: it is possible to rack-mount some relay versions which have been designed to be panel-mounted. The relay is mounted on a single-tier rack frame, which occupies the full width of the rack. To make sure a panelmounted relay assembly complies with BS EN60529 IP52, fit a metallic sealing strip

between adjoining relays (Part No GN2044 001) and a sealing ring from Table 3 around

the complete assembly.

45TE

50TE

55TE

60TE

65TE

70TE

75TE

80TE

10TE

15TE

20TE

25TE

30TE

35TE

40TE

Width Single tier

GJ9018 002

GJ9018 003

GJ9018 004

GJ9018 005

GJ9018 006

GJ9018 007

GJ9018 008

GJ9018 009

GJ9018 010

GJ9018 011

GJ9018 012

GJ9018 013

GJ9018 014

GJ9018 015

GJ9018 016

Double tier

GJ9018 018

GJ9018 019

GJ9018 020

GJ9018 021

GJ9018 022

GJ9018 023

GJ9018 024

GJ9018 025

GJ9018 026

GJ9018 027

GJ9018 028

GJ9018 029

GJ9018 030

GJ9018 031

GJ9018 032

Table 3 - IP52 sealing rings

For further details on mounting MiDOS relays, see publication R7012, “MiDOS Parts

Catalogue and Assembly Instructions”.

Px4x/EN IN/A02 Page (IN) 16-11

(IN) 16 Installation

4

Relay Wiring

RELAY WIRING

This section serves as a guide to selecting the appropriate cable and connector type for each terminal on the MiCOM relay.

Warning Before carrying out any work on the equipment, you should be familiar with the contents of the Safety

Information chapter/safety guide SFTY/4LM/C11 or later issue, the Technical Data chapter and the ratings on the equipment rating label.

4.1 Medium and Heavy Duty Terminal Block Connections

Key:

Heavy duty terminal block: CT and VT circuits, terminals with “D” prefix

Medium duty: All other terminal blocks (grey color)

Loose relays are supplied with sufficient M4 screws for making connections to the rear mounted terminal blocks using ring terminals, with a recommended maximum of two ring terminals per relay terminal.

If required, Schneider Electric can supply M4 90° crimp ring terminals in three different

sizes depending on wire size (see Table 4). Each type is available in bags of 100.

Part number

ZB9124 901

ZB9124 900

ZB9124 904

Wire size

0.25 – 1.65mm

2

(22 – 16AWG)

1.04 – 2.63mm

2

(16 – 14AWG)

2.53 – 6.64mm

2

(12 – 10AWG)

Insulation colour

Red

Blue

Uninsulated*

Note * To maintain the terminal block insulation requirements for safety, fit an insulating sleeve over the ring terminal after crimping.

Table 4 - M4 90° crimp ring terminals

The following minimum wire sizes are recommended:

Current Transformers 2.5mm

2

Auxiliary Supply Vx 1.5mm

2

RS485 Port

Other circuits

See separate section

Rotor winding to P391 1.0mm

2

1.0mm

2

Due to the limitations of the ring terminal, the maximum wire size that can be used for any of the medium or heavy duty terminals is 6.0mm

2

using ring terminals that are not preinsulated. Where it required to only use pre-insulated ring terminals, the maximum wire size that can be used is reduced to 2.63mm

2 at the relay.

per ring terminal. If a larger wire size is required, two wires should be used in parallel, each terminated in a separate ring terminal

The wire used for all connections to the medium and heavy duty terminal blocks, except the RS485 port, should have a minimum voltage rating of 300Vrms.

It is recommended that the auxiliary supply wiring should be protected by a 16A High

Rupture Capacity (HRC) fuse of type NIT or TIA. For safety reasons, current transformer

Page (IN) 16-12 Px4x/EN IN/A02

Relay Wiring

4.2

4.3

4.4

4.5

(IN) 16 Installation

circuits must never be fused. Other circuits should be appropriately fused to protect the wire used.

Note The high-break contacts optional fitted to P44y (P443/P446) and P54x relays are polarity sensitive. External wiring must respect the polarity requirements which are shown on the external connection diagram to ensure correct operation.

Each opto input has selectable filtering. This allows use of a pre-set filter of ½ cycle which renders the input immune to induced noise on the wiring: although this method is secure it can be slow, particularly for intertripping. This can be improved by switching off the ½ cycle filter in which case one of the following methods to reduce ac noise should be considered. The first method is to use double pole switching on the input, the second is to use screened twisted cable on the input circuit. The recognition time of the opto inputs without the filtering is <2 ms and with the filtering is <12 ms.

EIA(RS)485 Port

Connections to the first rear EIA(RS)485 port use ring terminals. 2-core screened cable is recommended with a maximum total length of 1000m or 200nF total cable capacitance.

A typical cable specification would be:

Each core:

Nominal conductor area:

16/0.2mm copper conductors. PVC insulated

0.5mm

2

per core

Screen: Overall braid, PVC sheathed

See the SCADA Communications chapter for details of setting up an EIA(RS)485 bus.

Current Loop Input Output (CLIO) Connections (if applicable)

Where current loop inputs and outputs are available on a MiCOM relay, the connections are made using screw clamp connectors, as per the RTD inputs, on the rear of the relay which can accept wire sizes between 0.1 mm

2

and 1.5 mm

2

. It is recommended that connections between the relay and the current loop inputs and outputs are made using a screened cable. The wire should have a minimum voltage rating of 300 Vrms.

IRIG-B Connections (if applicable)

The IRIG-B input and BNC connector have a characteristic impedance of 50Ω. It is recommended that connections between the IRIG-B equipment and the relay are made using coaxial cable of type RG59LSF with a halogen free, fire retardant sheath.

EIA(RS)232 Port

Short term connections to the RS232 port, located behind the bottom access cover, can be made using a screened multi-core communication cable up to 15m long, or a total capacitance of 2500pF. The cable should be terminated at the relay end with a 9-way, metal shelled, D-type male plug. The Getting Started chapter of this manual details the pin allocations.

Px4x/EN IN/A02 Page (IN) 16-13

(IN) 16 Installation

4.6

4.7

4.7.1

4.7.2

Relay Wiring

Optical Fiber Connectors (when applicable)

Warning LASER LIGHT RAYS: Where fibre optic communication devices are fitted, never look into the end of a fiber optic due to the risk of causing serious damage to the eye.

Optical power meters should be used to determine the operation or signal level of the device. Non-observance of this rule could possibly result in personal injury.

If electrical to optical converters are used, they must have management of character idle state capability (for when the fibre optic cable interface is "Light off").

Specific care should be taken with the bend radius of the fibres, and the use of optical shunts is not recommended as these can degrade the transmission path over time.

The relay uses 1310nm multi mode 100BaseFx and BFOC 2.5 - (ST/LC according to the

MiCOM model) connectors (one Tx – optical emitter, one Rx – optical receiver).

Ethernet Port for IEC 61850 and/or DNP3.0 (where applicable)

Fiber Optic (FO) Port

The relays can have 100 Mbps Ethernet port. Fibre Optic (FO) connection is recommended for use in permanent connections in a substation environment. The

100 Mbit port uses a type ST/LC connector (according to the MiCOM model), compatible with fiber multimode 50/125 µm or 62.5/125 µm to 1310 nm.

Note The new LC fiber optical connector can be used with the Px40 Enhanced

Ethernet Board.

RJ-45 Metallic Port

The user can connect to either a 10Base-T or a 100Base-TX Ethernet hub; the port will automatically sense which type of hub is connected. Due to possibility of noise and interference on this part, it is recommended that this connection type be used for shortterm connections and over short distance. Ideally, where the relays and hubs are located in the same cubicle.

The connector for the Ethernet port is a shielded RJ-45. Table 5 shows the signals and

pins on the connector.

Pin Signal name

1

2

3

4

7

8

5

6

TXP

TXN

RXP

-

-

-

-

RXN

Table 5 - Signals on the Ethernet connector

Signal definition

Transmit (positive)

Transmit (negative)

Receive (positive)

Not used

Not used

Receive (negative)

Not used

Not used

Page (IN) 16-14 Px4x/EN IN/A02

Relay Wiring

4.8

Px4x/EN IN/A02

(IN) 16 Installation

RTD Connections (if applicable)

Where RTD inputs are available on a MiCOM relay, the connections are made using screw clamp connectors on the rear of the relay that can accept wire sizes between

0.1 mm

2

and 1.5 mm

2

. The connections between the relay and the RTDs must be made using a screened 3-core cable with a total resistance less than 10 Ω. The cable should have a minimum voltage rating of 300 Vrms.

A 3-core cable should be used even for 2-wire RTD applications, as it allows for the cable’s resistance to be removed from the overall resistance measurement. In such cases the third wire is connected to the second wire at the point the cable is joined to the

RTD.

The screen of each cable must only be earthed at one end, preferably at the relay end and must be continuous. Multiple earthing of the screen can cause circulating current to flow along the screen, which induces noise and is unsafe.

It is recommended to minimize noise pick-up in the RTD cables by keeping them close to earthed metal casings and avoiding areas of high electromagnetic and radio interference.

The RTD cables should not be run adjacent to or in the same conduit as other high voltage or current cables.

A typical cable specification would be:

Each core:

Nominal conductor area:

7/0.2 mm copper conductors heat resistant PVC insulated

0.22 mm

2

per core

Screen: Nickel-plated copper wire braid heat resistant PVC sheathed

The extract below may be useful in defining cable recommendations for the RTDs:

Noise pick up by cables can be categorized in to three types:

Resistive

Capacitive

• Inductive

Resistive coupling requires there to be an electrical connection to the noise source.

So assuming that the wire and cable insulation is sound and that the junctions are clean then this can be dismissed.

Capacitive coupling requires there to be sufficient capacitance for the impedance path to the noise source to be small enough to allow for significant coupling. This is a function of the dielectric strength between the signal cable on the noise source and the potential (i.e. power) of the noise source.

Inductive coupling occurs when the signal cable is adjacent to a cable/wire carrying the noise or it is exposed to a radiated EMF.

Standard screened cable is normally used to protect against capacitively coupled noise, but in order for it to be effective the screen must only be bonded to the system ground at one point, otherwise a current could flow and the noise would be coupled in to the signal wires of the cable. There are different types of screening available, but basically there are two types: aluminum foil wrap and tin-copper braid.

Foil screens are good for low to medium frequencies and braid is good for high frequencies. High-fidelity screen cables provide both types.

Protection against magnetic inductive coupling requires very careful cable routing and magnetic shielding. The latter can be achieved with steel-armored cable and the use of steel cable trays. It is important that the armor of the cable is grounded at both ends so that the EMF of the induced current cancels the field of the noise source and hence

Page (IN) 16-15

(IN) 16 Installation

4.9

4.10

4.10.1

4.10.1.1

Relay Wiring shields the cables conductors from it. (However, the design of the system ground must be considered and care taken to not bridge two isolated ground systems since this could be hazardous and defeat the objectives of the original ground design). The cable should be laid in the cable trays as close as possible to the metal of the tray and under no circumstance should any power cable be in or near to the tray. (Power cables should only cross the signal cables at 90 degrees and never be adjacent to them).

Both the capacitive and inductive screens must be contiguous from the RTD probes to the relay terminals.

The best types of cable are those provided by the RTD manufactures. These tend to be three conductors (a so call "triad") which are screened with foil. Such triad cables are available in armored forms as well as multi-triad armored forms.

Download/Monitor Port

Short term connections to the download/monitor port, located behind the bottom access cover, can be made using a screened 25-core communication cable up to 4m long. The cable should be terminated at the relay end with a 25-way, metal shelled, D-type male plug.

The Getting Started and Commissioning chapters this manual details the pin allocations.

Second EIA(RS)232/485 Port

Relays with Courier, MODBUS, IEC 60870-5-103 or DNP3 protocol on the first rear communications port have the option of a second rear port, running Courier language.

The second rear communications port can be used over one of three physical links:

• twisted pair K-Bus (non-polarity sensitive),

• twisted pair EIA(RS)485 (connection polarity sensitive) or

• EIA(RS)232. This EIA(RS)232 port is actually compliant to EIA(RS)574; the 9-pin version of EIA(RS)232, see www.tiaonline.org

.

Connection to the Second Rear Port

The second rear Courier port connects via a 9-way female D-type connector (SK4) in the middle of the card end plate (in between IRIG-B connector and lower D-type). The connection is compliant to EIA(RS)574.

For IEC 60870-5-2 over EIA(RS)232/574

Pin

3

4

5

1

2

No Connection

RxD

TxD

DTR#

Ground

8

9

6

7

No Connection

RTS#

CTS#

No Connection

# - These pins are control lines for use with a modem.

Connection

Table 6 - Description needed

Page (IN) 16-16 Px4x/EN IN/A02

Relay Wiring

4.10.1.2

4.11

(IN) 16 Installation

Connections to the second rear port configured for EIA(RS)232 operation can be made using a screened multi-core communication cable up to 15 m long, or a total capacitance of 2500 pF. The cable should be terminated at the relay end with a 9-way, metal shelled,

D-type male plug. The table above details the pin allocations.

For K-bus or IEC 60870-5-2 over EIA(RS)485

Pin*

4

7

EIA(RS)485 - 1 (+ ve)

EIA(RS)485 - 2 (- ve)

* - All other pins unconnected.

Connection

Note Connector pins 4 and 7 are used by both the EIA(RS)232/574 and

EIA(RS)485 physical layers, but for different purposes. Therefore, the cables should be removed during configuration switches.

For the EIA(RS)485 protocol an EIA(RS)485 to EIA(RS)232/574 converter will be required to connect a modem or PC running MiCOM S1 Studio, to the relay. A Schneider Electric CK222 is recommended.

EIA(RS)485 is polarity sensitive, with pin 4 positive (+) and pin 7 negative (-).

The K-Bus protocol can be connected to a PC via a KITZ101 or 102.

It is recommended that a 2-core screened cable be used. To avoid exceeding the second communications port flash clearances it is recommended that the length of cable between the port and the communications equipment should be less than 300 m. This length can be increased to 1000 m or 200nF total cable capacitance if the communications cable is not laid in close proximity to high current carrying conductors. The cable screen should be earthed at one end only.

Table 7 - Description needed

A typical cable specification would be:

Each core:

Nominal conductor area:

16/0.2 mm copper conductors PVC insulated

0.5 mm

2

per core

Screen: Overall braid, PVC sheathed

Earth Connection (Protective Conductor)

Every relay must be connected to the local earth bar using the M4 earth studs in the bottom left hand corner of the relay case. The minimum recommended wire size is

2.5mm

2

and should have a ring terminal at the relay end.

Due to the limitations of the ring terminal, the maximum wire size that can be used for any of the medium or heavy duty terminals is 6.0mm

2

per wire. If a greater cross-sectional area is required, two parallel connected wires, each terminated in a separate ring terminal at the relay, or a metal earth bar could be used.

Note To prevent any possibility of electrolytic action between brass or copper earth conductors and the rear panel of the relay, precautions should be taken to isolate them from one another. This could be achieved in a number of ways, including placing a nickel-plated or insulating washer between the conductor and the relay case, or using tinned ring terminals.

Px4x/EN IN/A02 Page (IN) 16-17

(IN) 16 Installation

4.12

4.12.1

Relay Wiring

Warning Before carrying out any work on the equipment, you should be familiar with the contents of the Safety

Information chapter/safety guide SFTY/4LM/C11 or later issue, the Technical Data chapter and the ratings on the equipment rating label.

P391 Rotor Earth Fault Unit (REFU) Mounting

Under rotor earth fault conditions, DC currents of up to 29mA can appear in the earth circuit. Accordingly, the P391 must be permanently connected to the local earth via the protective conductor terminal provided.

This section serves as a guide to selecting the appropriate cable and connector type for each terminal on the P391 unit.

Caution You must be familiar with all safety statements listed in the Commissioning chapter and the Safety Information section SFTY/4LM/G11 (or later issue) before undertaking any work on the P391.

Caution Under no circumstances should the high voltage DC rotor winding supply be connected via MMLG or P990 test blocks. Both MMLG and P990 test blocks are not rated for continuous working voltages greater than 300 Vrms.

These test blocks are not designed to withstand the inductive EMF voltages which will be experienced on disconnection or de-energization of the DC rotor winding supply.

Medium Duty Terminal Block Connections

Information about the medium duty terminal block connections is described in section 4.1.

Caution Wiring between the DC rotor winding and the P391 shall be suitably rated to withstand at least twice the rotor winding supply voltage to earth. This is to ensure that the wiring insulation can withstand the inductive Electro

Motive Force (EMF) voltage which will be experienced on disconnection or de-energization of the DC rotor winding supply.

Due to the limitations of the ring terminal, the maximum wire size that can be used for any of the medium terminals is 6.0 mm

2

using ring terminals that are not pre-insulated

(protective conductor terminal (PCT) only). All P391 terminals, except PCT shall be preinsulated ring terminals, the maximum wire size that can be used is reduced to 2.63 mm per ring terminal.

2

Wiring between the DC rotor winding and the P391 shall be suitably rated to withstand at least twice the rotor winding supply voltage to earth. The wire used for other P391 connections to the medium duty terminal blocks should have a minimum voltage rating of

300 Vrms.

Page (IN) 16-18 Px4x/EN IN/A02

Relay Wiring

(IN) 16 Installation

The dielectric withstand of P391 injection resistor connections (A16, B16, A8, B8) to earth is 5.8 kV rms, 1 minute.

It is recommended that the auxiliary supply wiring should be protected by a High Rupture

Capacity (HRC) fuse of type NIT or TIA, rated between 2 A and 16 A. Other circuits should be appropriately fused to protect the wire used.

Px4x/EN IN/A02 Page (IN) 16-19

(IN) 16 Installation

5

Case Dimensions

CASE DIMENSIONS

Product

P542

P543

P544

P545

P546

P547

P642

P441

P442

P443

P444

P445

P446

P541

P643

P645

P741

P742

P743

P746

P841

P849

P141

P142

P143

P145

P241

P242

P243

P341

P342

P343

P344

P345

Table 8 – Products and case sizes

The MiCOM range of products are available in a series of different case sizes.

The case sizes available for each product are shown in the following table:

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Case Size

60TE

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

40TE

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

80TE

Page (IN) 16-20 Px4x/EN IN/A02

Case Dimensions

5.1 40TE Case Dimensions

(IN) 16 Installation

Px4x/EN IN/A02

Figure 3 - 40TE Case Dimensions

P1647ENe

Page (IN) 16-21

(IN) 16 Installation

5.2 60TE Case Dimensions

Case Dimensions

P1616ENi

Figure 4 - 60TE Case Dimensions

Page (IN) 16-22 Px4x/EN IN/A02

Case Dimensions

5.3 80TE Case Dimensions

(IN) 16 Installation

P1616ENj

Figure 5 - 80TE Case Dimensions

Px4x/EN IN/A02 Page (IN) 16-23

(IN) 16 Installation

Notes:

Case Dimensions

Page (IN) 16-24 Px4x/EN IN/A02

MiCOM P849

(CD) 17 Connection Diagrams

P849/EN CD/D33

CONNECTION DIAGRAMS

CHAPTER 17

Page (CD) 17-1

(CD) 17 Connection Diagrams

MiCOM P849

Date:

Products covered by this chapter:

Hardware Suffix:

Software Version:

Connection Diagrams:

08/2015

This chapter covers the specific versions of the MiCOM products listed below. This includes

only the following combinations of Software Version and Hardware Suffix.

M

B0

10P849xx (xx = 01 to 06)

Page (CD) 17-2 P849/EN CD/D33

Contents

(CD) 17 Connection Diagrams

CONTENTS

1 Communication Options

2 P849 Hardware

FIGURES

Page (CD) 17-

5

7

Figure 1 - Comms. Options MiCOM Px40 platform

Figure 2 - External Communications Options MiCOM Px40 platform

Figure 3 - P849 (80TE) – Hardware description

Figure 4 - P849 (80TE) – Rear View

Figure 5 - P849 –P849xxxA (Connection Diagram No P84901)

Figure 6 - P849 –P849xxxB (Connection Diagram No P84902)

Figure 7 - P849 –P849xxxC (Connection Diagram No P84903)

Figure 8 - P849 –P849xxxD (Connection Diagram No P84904)

Figure 9 - P849 –P849xxxE (Connection Diagram No P84905)

Figure 10 - P849 –P849xxxF (Connection Diagram No P84906)

Page (CD) 17-

10

11

12

13

5

6

7

8

14

15

P849/EN CD/D33 Page (CD) 17-3

(CD) 17 Connection Diagrams

Notes:

Figures

Page (CD) 17-4 P849/EN CD/D33

Communication Options

1 COMMUNICATION OPTIONS

(CD) 17 Connection Diagrams

SERIAL PORT

FIBRE OPTIC COMMUNICATION (OPTIONAL

KBUS PORT

16 SCN

CONNECTION REFER TO RELEVANT EXTERNAL CONNECTION DIAGRAM

Figure 1 - Comms. Options MiCOM Px40 platform

P849/EN CD/D33

DOWNLOAD COMMAND

P1727ENb

Page (CD) 17-5

(CD) 17 Connection Diagrams

Communication Options

Figure 2 - External Communications Options MiCOM Px40 platform

10Px4001_2_A

P1727ENh

Page (CD) 17-6 P849/EN CD/D33

P849 Hardware

2 P849 HARDWARE

(CD) 17 Connection Diagrams

Figure 3 - P849 (80TE) – Hardware description

P849/EN CD/D33 Page (CD) 17-7

(CD) 17 Connection Diagrams

P849 Hardware

A – IRIG B / Ethernet / COMMS (1)

B – Opto input board

C – Opto input board

(2)

(2)

D – Opto input board (2)

E – Relay \ Opto

F – Relay \ Opto

(2)

(2)

Figure 4 - P849 (80TE) – Rear View

G – Relay \ Opto \ High Break (2)

H – Relay \ Opto \ high break (2)

J – Relay \ Opto \ high break

(2)

K – Relay \ Opto \ high break

L – Relay board

M – Relay board

(2)

(2)

N – Power supply board

(2)

(1) Hardware options:

− Standard version

− IRIG-B Only (Modulated)

− Single Ethernet 100Mbit/s fibre optic port

− Second Rear Comms (Courier EIA232 / EIA485 / KBUS)

− Second Rear Comms (Courier EIA232 / EIA485 / KBUS) + IRIG-B modulated

− Single Ethernet (100Mbit/s) plus IRIG-B (Modulated)

− Single Ethernet (100Mbit/s) plus IRIG-B (De-modulated)

− IRIG-B (De-modulated)

− InterMiCOM + Courier Rear Port

− InterMiCOM + Courier Rear Port + IRIG-B modulated

− Redundant Ethernet Self-Healing Ring, 2 multi-mode fibre ports + Modulated IRIG-B

− Redundant Ethernet Self-Healing Ring, 2 multi-mode fibre ports + Un-modulated IRIG-B

− Redundant Ethernet RSTP, 2 multi-mode fibre ports + Modulated IRIG-B

− Redundant Ethernet RSTP, 2 multi-mode fibre ports + Un-modulated IRIG-B

− Redundant Ethernet Dual-Homing Star, 2 multi-mode fibre ports + Modulated IRIG-B

− Redundant Ethernet Dual-Homing Star, 2 multi-mode fibre ports + Un-modulated IRIG-B

− Redundant Ethernet (100Mbit/s) PRP or HSR and Dual IP, 2 LC ports + 1 RJ45 port +

Modulated/Un-modulated IRIG-B

− Redundant Ethernet (100Mbit/s) PRP or HSR and Dual IP, 3 RJ45 ports +

Modulated/Unmodulated IRIG-B

− Ethernet (100Mbit/s), 1 RJ45 port + Modulated/Un-modulated IRIG-B

(2) Models:

– P849×××A – (32 Opto-inputs, 16 output relays)

B: empty

C: Opto input board (2071960A22)

D: Opto input board (2071960A22)

E: Opto input board (2071960A22)

F: Opto input board (2071960A22)

G: empty

H: empty

J: empty

K: empty

L: Relay board (8 relays – 2071962A01)

P849xx1

P849xx2

P849xx6

P849xx7

P849xx8

P849xxA

P849xxB

P849xxC

P849xxE

P849xxF

P849xxG

P849xxH

P849xxJ

P849xxK

P849xxL

P849xxM

P849xxQ

P849xxR

P849xxS

Page (CD) 17-8 P849/EN CD/D33

P849 Hardware

M: Relay board (8 relays – 2071962A01)

– P849×××B – (32 Opto-inputs, 16 output relays)

B: empty

C: Opto input board (2071960A22)

D: Opto input board (2071960A22)

E: Opto input board (2071960A22)

F: Opto input board (2071960A22)

G: Opto input board (2071960A22)

H: Opto input board (2071960A22)

J: empty

K: Relay board (8 relays – 2071962A01)

L: Relay board (8 relays – 2071962A01)

M: Relay board (8 relays – 2071962A01)

P849×××C – (32 Opto-inputs, 30 output relays (16 high break relays))

B: Opto input board (2071960A22)

C: Opto input board (2071960A22)

D: Opto input board (2071960A22)

E: Opto input board (2071960A22)

F: empty

G: High break relay board (ZN0042-001)

H: High break relay board (ZN0042-001)

J: High break relay board (ZN0042-001)

K: High break relay board (ZN0042-001)

L: Relay board (7 relays – ZN0031-001)

M: Relay board (7 relays – ZN0031-001)

– P849×××D – (16 Opto-inputs, 60 output relays)

B: empty

C: Opto input board (2071960A22)

D: Opto input board (2071960A22)

E: Relay board (7 relays – ZN0031-001)

F: Relay board (7 relays – ZN0031-001)

G: Relay board (7 relays – ZN0031-001)

H: Relay board (7 relays – ZN0031-001)

J: Relay board (8 relays – 2071962A01)

K: Relay board (8 relays – 2071962A01)

L: Relay board (8 relays – 2071962A01)

M: Relay board (8 relays – 2071962A01)

– P849×××E – (32 Opto-inputs, 16 output relays)

B: empty

C: Opto input board (2071960A22)

D: Opto input board (2071960A22)

E: Opto input board (2071960A22)

F: Opto input board (2071960A22)

G: Opto input board (2071960A22)

H: Opto input board (2071960A22)

J: Opto input board (2071960A22)

K: Opto input board (2071960A22)

L: Relay board (8 relays – 2071962A01)

M: Relay board (8 relays – 2071962A01)

– P849×××F – (32 Opto-inputs, 16 output relays)

B: empty

C: Opto input board (2071960A22)

D: Opto input board (2071960A22)

E: Opto input board (2071960A22)

F: Opto input board (2071960A22)

G: Relay board (8 relays – 2071962A01)

H: Relay board (8 relays – 2071962A01)

J: Relay board (8 relays – 2071962A01)

K: Relay board (8 relays – 2071962A01)

L: Relay board (7 relays – ZN0031-001)

M: Relay board (7 relays – ZN0031-001)

(CD) 17 Connection Diagrams

P849/EN CD/D33 Page (CD) 17-9

(CD) 17 Connection Diagrams

P849 Hardware

Figure 5 - P849 –P849xxxA (Connection Diagram No P84901)

Page (CD) 17-10 P849/EN CD/D33

P849 Hardware

(CD) 17 Connection Diagrams

Figure 6 - P849 –P849xxxB (Connection Diagram No P84902)

P849/EN CD/D33 Page (CD) 17-11

(CD) 17 Connection Diagrams

P849 Hardware

Figure 7 - P849 –P849xxxC (Connection Diagram No P84903)

Page (CD) 17-12 P849/EN CD/D33

P849 Hardware

(CD) 17 Connection Diagrams

Figure 8 - P849 –P849xxxD (Connection Diagram No P84904)

P849/EN CD/D33 Page (CD) 17-13

(CD) 17 Connection Diagrams

P849 Hardware

Figure 9 - P849 –P849xxxE (Connection Diagram No P84905)

Page (CD) 17-14 P849/EN CD/D33

P849 Hardware

(CD) 17 Connection Diagrams

Figure 10 - P849 –P849xxxF (Connection Diagram No P84906)

P849/EN CD/D33 Page (CD) 17-15

(CD) 17 Connection Diagrams

Notes:

P849 Hardware

Page (CD) 17-16 P849/EN CD/D33

MiCOM Px4x

18. Cyber Security

Px4x/EN CS/A01b

CYBER SECURITY

CHAPTER 18

Page (CS) 18-1

18. Cyber Security

MiCOM Px4x

Page (CS) 18-2 Px4x/EN CS/A01b

Contents

CONTENTS

1 Overview

2 The need for Cyber Security

3 Standards

3.1

3.1.1

3.1.2

3.1.3

3.1.4

3.1.5

3.1.6

3.1.7

3.1.8

3.2

NERC Compliance

CIP 002

CIP 003

CIP 004

CIP 005

CIP 006

CIP 007

CIP 008

CIP 009

IEEE 1686-2007

4 Px40 Cyber Security Implementation

4.1

4.1.1

4.1.2

4.1.3

4.2

4.3

4.3.1

4.4

4.5

4.5.1

4.5.2

4.6

4.6.1

4.6.2

4.7

4.8

4.9

Four-level Access

Default Passwords

Password Rules

Access Level DDBs

Password Strengthening

Password Validation

Blank Passwords

Password Management

Password Recovery

Entry of the Recovery Password

Password Encryption

Port Disablement

Disabling Physical Ports

Disabling Logical Ports

Logging Out

Events

Cyber Security Settings

Px4x/EN CS/A01b

18. Cyber Security

Page (CS) 18-

7

7

10

10

9

9

9

9

8

8

10

5

6

11

13

14

14

15

16

16

16

17

12

12

13

13

17

17

18

18

20

Page (CS) 18-3

18. Cyber Security

TABLES

Table 1 - Standards applicable to cyber security

Table 2 - NERC CIP standards

Table 3 - Password levels

Table 4 - Password blocking configuration

Table 5 - Security event values

Table 6 - Security cells summary

Tables

Page (CS) 18-

12

15

7

8

19

21

Page (CS) 18-4 Px4x/EN CS/A01b

Overview

1

18. Cyber Security

OVERVIEW

In the past, substation networks were traditionally isolated and the protocols and data formats used to transfer information between devices were more often than not proprietary.

For these reasons, the substation environment was very secure against cyber attacks.

The terms used for this inherent type of security are:

• Security by isolation (if the substation network is not connected to the outside world, it can’t be accessed from the outside world).

• Security by obscurity (if the formats and protocols are proprietary, it is very difficult, to interpret them.

The increasing sophistication of protection schemes coupled with the advancement of technology and the desire for vendor interoperability has resulted in standardization of networks and data interchange within substations. Today, devices within substations use standardized protocols for communication. Furthermore, substations can be interconnected with open networks, such as the internet or corporate-wide networks, which use standardized protocols for communication. This introduces a major security risk making the grid vulnerable to cyber-attacks, which could in turn lead to major electrical outages.

Clearly, there is now a need to secure communication and equipment within substation environments. This chapter describes the security measures that have been put in place for Schneider Electric's range of Intelligent Electronic Devices (IEDs).

Px4x/EN CS/A01b Page (CS) 18-5

18. Cyber Security

2

The need for Cyber Security

THE NEED FOR CYBER SECURITY

Cyber-security provides protection against unauthorized disclosure, transfer, modification, or destruction of information and/or information systems, whether accidental or intentional. To achieve this, there are several security requirements:

• Confidentiality (preventing unauthorized access to information)

Integrity (preventing unauthorized modification)

Availability / Authentication (preventing the denial of service and assuring authorized access to information)

Non-Repudiation (preventing the denial of an action that took place)

Traceability/Detection (monitoring and logging of activity to detect intrusion and analyze incidents)

The threats to cyber security may be unintentional (e.g. natural disasters, human error), or intentional (e.g. cyber attacks by hackers).

Good cyber security can be achieved with a range of measures, such as closing down vulnerability loopholes, implementing adequate security processes and procedures and providing technology to help achieve this.

Examples of vulnerabilities are:

• Indiscretions by personnel (e.g. users keep passwords on their computer)

Bypassing of controls (e.g. users turn off security measures)

Bad practice (users do not change default passwords, or everyone uses the same password to access all substation equipment)

Inadequate technology (e.g. substation is not firewalled)

Examples of availability issues are:

• Equipment overload, resulting in reduced or no performance

• Expiry of a certificate prevents access to equipment.

To help tackle these issues, standards organizations have produced various standards, by which compliance significantly reduces the threats associated with lack of cyber security.

Page (CS) 18-6 Px4x/EN CS/A01b

Standards

3

3.1

18. Cyber Security

STANDARDS

There are several standards, which apply to substation cyber security (as shown below).

Country

NERC CIP (North American

Electric Reliability Corporation) USA

BDEW (German Association of

Energy and Water Industries)

Germany

ANSI ISA 99 USA

Framework for the protection of the grid critical

Cyber Assets

Requirements for Secure Control and

Telecommunication Systems

ICS oriented then Relevant for EPU completing existing standard and identifying new topics such as patch management

IEEE 1686

IEC 62351 International Power system data and Comm. protocol

ISO/IEC 27002

NIST SP800-53 (National

Institute of Standards and

Technology)

CPNI Guidelines (Centre for the

Protection of National

Infrastructure)

USA

UK

Complete framework for SCADA SP800-82and

ICS cyber security

Clear and valuable good practices for Process

Control and SCADA security

The standards currently applicable to Schneider Electric IEDs is NERC and IEEE1686.

Table 1 - Standards applicable to cyber security

NERC Compliance

The North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) created a set of standards for the protection of critical infrastructure. These are known as the CIP standards (Critical

Infrastructure Protection). These were introduced to ensure the protection of Critical

Cyber Assets, which control or have an influence on the reliability of North America’s bulk electric systems.

These standards have been compulsory in the USA for several years now. Compliance auditing started in June 2007, and utilities face extremely heavy fines for non-compliance.

The group of CIP standards is listed shown below.

Px4x/EN CS/A01b Page (CS) 18-7

18. Cyber Security

3.1.1

3.1.2

Standards

CIP standard Description

CIP-003-1 Security

Management Controls

CIP-004-1 Personnel and

Training

CIP-005-1 Electronic Security

CIP-006-1 Physical Security

CIP-007-1 Systems Security

Management

CIP-008-1 Incident Reporting and Response Planning

CIP-009-1 Recovery Plans

Define and document the Security Management Controls required to protect the Critical Cyber Assets

Define and Document Personnel handling and training required protecting Critical Cyber Assets

Define and document logical security perimeter where Critical

Cyber Assets reside and measures to control access points and monitor electronic access

Define and document Physical Security Perimeters within which

Critical Cyber Assets reside

Define and document system test procedures, account and password management, security patch management, system vulnerability, system logging, change control and configuration required for all Critical Cyber Assets

Define and document procedures necessary when Cyber

Security Incidents relating to Critical Cyber Assets are identified

Define and document Recovery plans for Critical Cyber Assets

Table 2 - NERC CIP standards

The following sections provide further details about each of these standards, describing the associated responsibilities of the utility company and where the IED manufacturer can help the utilities with the necessary compliance to these standards.

CIP 002

CIP 002 concerns itself with the identification of:

• Critical assets, such as overhead lines and transformers

• Critical cyber assets, such as IEDs that use routable protocols to communicate outside or inside the Electronic Security Perimeter; or are accessible by dial-up.

Power utility responsibilities:

Create the list of the assets

Schneider Electric's contribution:

We can help the power utilities to create this asset register automatically.

We can provide audits to list the Cyber assets

CIP 003

CIP 003 requires the implementation of a cyber security policy, with associated documentation, which demonstrates the management’s commitment and ability to secure its Critical Cyber Assets.

The standard also requires change control practices whereby all entity or vendor-related changes to hardware and software components are documented and maintained.

Power utility responsibilities:

To create a Cyber Security Policy

Schneider Electric's contribution:

We can help the power utilities to have access control to its critical assets by providing centralized Access control.

We can help the customer with its change control by providing a section in the documentation where it describes changes affecting the hardware and software.

Page (CS) 18-8 Px4x/EN CS/A01b

Standards

3.1.3

3.1.4

3.1.5

3.1.6

18. Cyber Security

CIP 004

CIP 004 requires that personnel having authorized cyber access or authorized physical access to Critical Cyber Assets, (including contractors and service vendors), have an appropriate level of training.

Power utility responsibilities:

To provide appropriate training of its personnel

Schneider Electric's contribution:

We can provide cyber security training

CIP 005

CIP 005 requires the establishment of an Electronic Security Perimeter (ESP), which provides:

The disabling of ports and services that are not required

Permanent monitoring and access to logs (24x7x365)

Vulnerability Assessments (yearly at a minimum)

Documentation of Network Changes

Schneider Electric's contribution: Power utility responsibilities:

To monitor access to the ESP

To perform the vulnerability assessments

To document network changes

To disable all ports not used in the IED

To monitor and record all access to the IEDthe access at all access points of the ESP

CIP 006

CIP 006 states that Physical Security controls, providing perimeter monitoring and logging along with robust access controls, must be implemented and documented. All cyber assets used for Physical Security are considered critical and should be treated as such:

Schneider Electric's contribution: Power utility responsibilities:

Provide physical security controls and perimeter monitoring.

Ensure that people who have access to critical cyber assets don’t have criminal records Schneider Electric's contribution.

Schneider Electric cannot provide additional help with this aspect.

CIP 007

CIP 007 covers the following points:

Test procedures

Ports and services

Security patch management

Antivirus

Account management

Monitoring

An annual vulnerability assessment should be performed

Px4x/EN CS/A01b Page (CS) 18-9

18. Cyber Security

3.1.7

3.1.8

3.2

Standards

Power utility responsibilities:

To provide an incident response team and have appropriate processes in place

Schneider Electric's contribution:

Test procedures; We can provide advice and help on testing.

Ports and services; Our devices can disable unused ports and services.

Security patch management; We can provide assistance.

Antivirus; We can provide advise and assistance.

Account management; We can provide advice and assistance.

Monitoring; Our equipment monitors and logs access.

CIP 008

CIP 008 requires that an incident response plan be developed, including the definition of an incident response team, their responsibilities and associated procedures.

Power utility responsibilities:

To provide an incident response team and have appropriate processes in place.

Schneider Electric's contribution:

Schneider Electric cannot provide additional help with this aspect.

CIP 009

CIP 009 states that a disaster recovery plan should be created and tested with annual drills.

Power utility responsibilities:

To implement a recovery plan

Schneider Electric's contribution:

To provide guidelines on recovery plans and backup/restore documentation

IEEE 1686-2007

IEEE 1686-2007 (often referred to only as IEEE 1686) is an IEEE Standard for substation

IEDs cyber security capabilities. It proposes practical and achievable mechanisms to achieve secure operations.

The following features described in this standard apply to Schneider Electric Px40 relays:

• Passwords are 8 characters long and can contain upper-case, lower-case, numeric and special characters.

Passwords are never displayed or transmitted to a user.

IED functions and features are assigned to different password levels. The assignment is fixed.

Record of an audit trail listing events in the order in which they occur, held in a circular buffer.

Records contain all defined fields from the standard and record all defined function event types where the function is supported.

No password defeat mechanism exists. Instead a secure recovery password scheme is implemented.

Unused ports (physical and logical) may be disabled.

Page (CS) 18-10 Px4x/EN CS/A01b

Px40 Cyber Security Implementation

4

18. Cyber Security

PX40 CYBER SECURITY IMPLEMENTATION

The Schneider Electric IEDs have always been and will continue to be equipped with state-of-the-art security measures. Due to the ever-evolving communication technology and new threats to security, this requirement is not static. Hardware and software security measures are continuously being developed and implemented to mitigate the associated threats and risks.

This section describes the current implementation of cyber security, valid for the release of platform software to which this manual pertains. This current cyber security implementation is known as Cyber Security Phase 1.

At the IED level, these cyber security measures have been implemented:

• Four-level Access

Password strengthening

Disabling of unused application and physical ports

Inactivity timer

Storage of security events (logs) in the IED

NERC-compliant default display

External to the IEDs, the following cyber security measures have been implemented:

• Antivirus

• Security patch management

Px4x/EN CS/A01b Page (CS) 18-11

18. Cyber Security

Px40 Cyber Security Implementation

4.1

Level

0

1

2

3

Meaning

Read Some

Write Minimal

Read All

Write Few

Read All

Write Some

Read All

Write All

Four-level Access

For products with cyber security features, the menu structure contains four levels of access, three of which are password-protected. These are summarized below:

Read Operation

SYSTEM DATA column:

Description

Plant Reference

Model Number

Serial Number

S/W Ref.

Access Level

Security Feature

SECURITY CONFIG column:

User Banner

Attempts Remain

Blk Time Remain

Fallback PW level

Security Code (UI only)

Password Entry

LCD Contrast (UI only)

Write Operation

All data and settings are readable.

Poll Measurements

All data and settings are readable.

Poll Measurements

All data and settings are readable.

Poll Measurements

All items writeable at level 0.

Level 1 Password setting

Select Event, Main and Fault (upload)

Extract Events (e.g. via MiCOM S1 Studio)

All items writeable at level 1.

Setting Cells that change visibility (Visible/Invisible).

Setting Values (Primary/Secondary) selector

Commands:

Reset Indication

Reset Demand

Reset Statistics

Reset CB Data / counters

Level 2 Password setting

All items writeable at level 2.

Change all Setting cells

Operations:

Extract and download Setting file.

Extract and download PSL

Extract and download MCL61850 (IED Config - IEC61850)

Extraction of Disturbance Recorder

Courier/Modbus Accept Event (auto event extraction, e.g. via A2R)

Commands:

Change Active Group setting

Close / Open CB

Change Comms device address.

Set Date & Time

Switch MCL banks / Switch Conf. Bank in UI (IED Config -

IEC61850)

Enable / Disable Device ports (in SECURITY CONFIG column)

Level 3 password setting

Table 3 - Password levels

4.1.1 Default Passwords

Default passwords are blank for Level 1 and AAAA for Levels 2 and 3.

Page (CS) 18-12 Px4x/EN CS/A01b

Px40 Cyber Security Implementation

4.1.2

4.1.3

4.2

18. Cyber Security

Password Rules

Passwords may be any length between 0 and 8 characters long

Passwords may or may not be NERC compliant

Passwords may contain any ASCII character in the range ASCII code 33 (21 Hex) to ASCII code 122 (7A Hex) inclusive

Only one password is required for all the IED interfaces

Access Level DDBs

In additional to having the 'Access level' cell in the 'System data' column (address 00D0), the current level of access for each interface is also available for use in the Programming

Scheme Logic (PSL) by mapping to these Digital Data Bus (DDB) signals:

• HMI Access Lvl 1

HMI Access Lvl 2

FPort AccessLvl1

FPort AccessLvl2

RPrt1 AccessLvl1

RPrt1 AccessLvl2

RPrt2 AccessLvl1

RPrt2 AccessLvl2

Where: HMI is the Human Machine Interface.

Each pair of DDB signals indicates the access level as follows:

• Lvl 1 off, Lvl 2 off = 0

Lvl 1 on, Lvl 2 off = 1

Lvl 1 off, Lvl 2 on = 2

Lvl 1 on, Lvl 2 on = 3

Password Strengthening

NERC compliant passwords result in a minimum level of complexity, and include these requirements:

• At least one upper-case alpha character

At least one lower-case alpha character

At least one numeric character

At least one special character (%,$...)

At least six characters long

Px4x/EN CS/A01b Page (CS) 18-13

18. Cyber Security

4.3

4.3.1

Px40 Cyber Security Implementation

Password Validation

The IED checks for NERC compliance. If the password is entered through the front panel then this is reflected on the panel Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) display.

If the entered password is NERC compliant, the following text is displayed

NERC COMPLIANT

P/WORD WAS SAVED

The IED does not enforce NERC compliance. It is the responsibility of the user to ensure that compliance is adhered to as and when necessary. In the case that the password entered is not NERC-compliant, the user is required to actively confirm this, in which case the non-compliance is logged.

If the entered password is not NERC compliant, the following text is displayed:

NERC COMPLIANCE

NOT MET CONFIRM?

On confirmation, the non-compliant password is stored and the following acknowledgement message is displayed for 2 seconds.

NON-NERC P/WORD

SAVED OK

If the action is cancelled, the password is rejected and password entry appeared again.

If the password is entered through a communications port using Courier or Modbus protocols the IED will store the password, irrespective of whether it is or isn’t NERCcompliant, and then uses appropriate response codes to inform the client that the password was NERC-compliant or not. The client then can choose if he/she wishes to enter a new password that is NERC-compliant or leave the entered one in place.

Blank Passwords

A blank password is effectively a zero-length password. Through the front panel it is entered by confirming the password entry without actually entering any password characters. Through a communications port the Courier and Modbus protocols each have a means of writing a blank password to the IED. A blank password disables the need for a password at the level that this password applied.

Blank passwords have a slightly different validation procedure. If a blank password is entered through the front panel, the following text is displayed, after which the procedure is the same as already described:

BLANK PASSWORD

ENTERED CONFIRM

Blank Passwords cannot be configured if lower level password is not blank.

Blank Passwords affect fall back level after inactivity timeout or logout.

The ‘fallback level’ is the password level adopted by the IED after an inactivity timeout, or after the user logs out. This will be either the level of the highest level password that is blank, or level 0 if no passwords are blank.

Page (CS) 18-14 Px4x/EN CS/A01b

Px40 Cyber Security Implementation

4.4

18. Cyber Security

Password Management

The user is locked out temporarily, after a defined number of failed password entry attempts. The number of password entry attempts, and the blocking periods are configurable. These settings are shown in the Password blocking configuration table.

The first invalid password entry sets the attempts count (actual text here) to 1 and initiates an 'attempts timer'. Further invalid passwords during the timed period increments the attempts count. When the maximum number of attempts has been reached, access is blocked. If the attempts timer expires, or the correct password is entered before the

'attempt count' reaches the maximum number, then the 'attempts count' is reset to 0.

Once the password entry is blocked, a 'blocking timer' is initiated. Attempts to access the interface whilst the 'blocking timer' is running results in an error message, irrespective of whether the correct password is entered or not. Only after the 'blocking timer' has expired will access to the interface be unblocked, whereupon the attempts counter is reset to zero.

Attempts to write to the password entry whilst it is blocked results in the following message, which is displayed for 2 seconds.

NOT ACCEPTED

ENTRY IS BLOCKED

Appropriate responses achieve the same result if the password is written through a communications port.

The attempts count, attempts timer and blocking timer can be configured, as shown here:

Setting

Attempts Limit

Attempts Timer

Blocking Timer

Cell col row

25 02

25 03

25 04

Units

Minutes

Minutes

Table 4 - Password blocking configuration

2

2

5

Default Setting Available Setting

0 to 3 step 1

1 to 3 step 1

1 to 30 step 1

Px4x/EN CS/A01b Page (CS) 18-15

18. Cyber Security

4.5

4.5.1

4.5.2

Px40 Cyber Security Implementation

Password Recovery

Password recovery is the means by which the passwords can be recovered on a device if the customer should mislay the configured passwords. To obtain the recovery password the customer must contact the Schneider Electric Contact Center and supply two pieces of information from the IED – namely the Serial Number and its Security Code. The

Contact Centre will use these items to generate a Recovery Password which is then provided to the customer.

The security code is a 16-character string of upper case characters. It is a read-only parameter. The IED generates its own security code randomly. A new code is generated under the following conditions:

On power up

Whenever settings are set back to default

On expiry of validity timer (see below)

When the recovery password is entered

As soon as the security code is displayed on the LCD display, a validity timer is started.

This validity timer is set to 72 hours and is not configurable. This provides enough time for the contact centre to manually generate and send a recovery password. The Service

Level Agreement (SLA) for recovery password generation is one working day, so 72 hours is sufficient time, even allowing for closure of the contact centre over weekends and bank holidays.

To prevent accidental reading of the IED security code the cell will initially display a warning message:

PRESS ENTER TO

READ SEC. CODE

The security code will be displayed on confirmation, whereupon the validity timer will be started. Note that the security code can only be read from the front panel.

Entry of the Recovery Password

The recovery password is intended for recovery only. It is not a replacement password that can be used continually. It can only be used once – for password recovery.

Entry of the recovery password causes the IED to reset all passwords back to default.

This is all it is designed to do. After the passwords have been set back to default, it is up to the user to enter new passwords appropriate for the function for which they are intended, ensuring NERC compliance, if required.

On this action, the following message is displayed:

PASSWORDS HAVE

BEEN SET TO DEFAULT

The recovery password can be applied through any interface, local or remote. It will achieve the same result irrespective of which interface it is applied through.

Password Encryption

The IED supports encryption for passwords entered remotely. The encryption key can be read from the IED through a specific cell available only through communication interfaces, not the front panel. Each time the key is read the IED generates a new key that is valid only for the next password encryption write. Once used, the key is invalidated and a new key must be read for the next encrypted password write. The encryption mechanism is otherwise transparent to the user.

Page (CS) 18-16 Px4x/EN CS/A01b

Px40 Cyber Security Implementation

4.6

4.6.1

4.6.2

Port Disablement

18. Cyber Security

Disabling Physical Ports

It is possible to disable unused physical ports. A level 3 password is needed to perform this action.

To prevent accidental disabling of a port, a warning message is displayed according to whichever port is required to be disabled. For example if rear port 1 is to be disabled, the following message appears:

Disable RP1?

ENTER or CLEAR

There are between two and four ports eligible for disablement:

Front port

Rear port 1

Rear port 2 (not implemented on all models)

Ethernet port (not implemented on all models)

Note It is not possible to disable a port from which the disabling port command originates.

Disabling Logical Ports

It is possible to disable unused logical ports. A level 3 password is needed to perform this action.

Note The port disabling setting cells are not provided in the settings file.

If it is not desirable to disable the Ethernet port, it is possible to disable selected protocols on the Ethernet card and leave others functioning.

Three protocols can be disabled:

IEC61850

DNP3 Over Ethernet

Courier Tunnelling

Note If any of these protocols are enabled or disabled, the Ethernet card will reboot.

Px4x/EN CS/A01b Page (CS) 18-17

18. Cyber Security

4.7

Px40 Cyber Security Implementation

Logging Out

If you have been configuring the IED, you should 'log out'. You do this by going up to the top of the menu tree. When you are at the Column Heading level and you press the Up button, you may be prompted to log out with the following display:

ENTER TO LOG OUT

CLEAR TO CANCEL

You will only be asked this question if your password level is higher than the fallback level.

If you confirm, the following message is displayed for 2 seconds:

LOGGED OUT

Access Level <x>

Where x is the current fallback level.

If you decide not to log out (i.e. you cancel), the following message is displayed for 2 seconds.

LOGOUT CANCELLED

Access Level <x>

Where x is the current access level.

4.8 Events

The implementation of NERC-compliant cyber security necessitates the generation of a range of Event records, which log security issues such as the entry of a non-NERCcompliant password, or the selection of a non-NERC-compliant default display. The following table lists all Security events.

Event Value

PASSWORD LEVEL UNLOCKED

PASSWORD LEVEL RESET

PASSWORD SET BLANK

PASSWORD SET NON-COMPLIANT

PASSWORD MODIFIED

PASSWORD ENTRY BLOCKED

PASSWORD ENTRY UNBLOCKED

INVALID PASSWORD ENTERED

PASSWORD EXPIRED

USER LOGGED IN

ON <int> LEVEL <n>

Display

USER LOGGED OUT

ON <int> LEVEL <n>

P/WORD SET BLANK

BY <int> LEVEL <p>

P/WORD NOT-NERC

BY <int> LEVEL <p>

PASSWORD CHANGED

BY <int> LEVEL <p>

PASSWORD BLOCKED

ON <int>

P/WORD UNBLOCKED

ON <int>

INV P/W ENTERED

ON <int>

P/WORD EXPIRED

ON <int>

RECOVERY PASSWORD ENTERED

IED SECURITY CODE READ

RCVY P/W ENTERED

ON <int>

IED SEC CODE RD

ON <int>

Page (CS) 18-18 Px4x/EN CS/A01b

Px40 Cyber Security Implementation

18. Cyber Security

Event Value

IED SECURITY CODE TIMER EXPIRED

PORT DISABLED

PORT ENABLED

DEF. DISPLAY NOT NERC COMPLIANT

PSL SETTINGS DOWNLOADED

DNP SETTINGS DOWNLOADED

TRACE DATA DOWNLOADED

IEC61850 CONFIG DOWNLOADED

USER CURVES DOWNLOADED

PSL CONFIG DOWNLOADED

SETTINGS DOWNLOADED

PSL SETTINGS UPLOADED

DNP SETTINGS UPLOADED

TRACE DATA UPLOADED

IEC61850 CONFIG UPLOADED

USER CURVES UPLOADED

PSL CONFIG UPLOADED

SETTINGS UPLOADED

EVENTS HAVE BEEN EXTRACTED

ACTIVE GROUP CHANGED

CS SETTINGS CHANGED

DR SETTINGS CHANGED

SETTING GROUP CHANGED

POWER ON

SOFTWARE_DOWNLOADED

Table 5 - Security event values

IED SEC CODE EXP

-

Display

PORT DISABLED

BY <int> PORT <prt>

PORT ENABLED

BY <int> PORT <prt>

DEF DSP NOT-NERC

PSL STNG D/LOAD

BY <int> GROUP <grp>

DNP STNG D/LOAD

BY <int>

TRACE DAT D/LOAD

BY <int>

IED CONFG D/LOAD

BY <int>

USER CRV D/LOAD

BY <int> GROUP <crv>

PSL CONFG D/LOAD

BY <int> GROUP <grp>

SETTINGS D/LOAD

BY <int> GROUP <grp>

PSL STNG UPLOAD

BY <int> GROUP <grp>

DNP STNG UPLOAD

BY <int>

TRACE DAT UPLOAD

BY <int>

IED CONFG UPLOAD

BY <int>

USER CRV UPLOAD

BY <int> GROUP <crv>

PSL CONFG UPLOAD

BY <int> GROUP <grp>

SETTINGS UPLOAD

BY <int> GROUP <grp>

EVENTS EXTRACTED

BY <int> <nov> EVNTS

ACTIVE GRP CHNGE

BY <int> GROUP <grp>

C & S CHANGED

BY <int>

DR CHANGED

BY <int>

SETTINGS CHANGED

BY <int> GROUP <grp>

POWER ON

-

S/W DOWNLOADED

-

Px4x/EN CS/A01b Page (CS) 18-19

18. Cyber Security

Px40 Cyber Security Implementation

4.9

Parameter

Password

Access Level

Password Level 1

Password Level 2

Password Level 3

Security Feature

SECURITY CONFIG

Use Banner

Attempts Limit

Attempts Timer

Blocking Timer

Front Port

Rear Port 1

Rear Port 2

Ethernet Port*

Courier Tunnel*†

Where: int is the interface definition (UI, FP, RP1, RP2, TNL, TCP) prt is the port ID (FP, RP1, RP2, TNL, DNP3, IEC, ETHR) grp is the group number (1, 2, 3, 4) crv is the Curve group number (1, 2, 3, 4) n is the new access level (0, 1, 2, 3) p is the password level (1, 2, 3) nov is the number of events (1 – nnn)

Each event is identified with a unique number that is incremented for each new event so that it is possible to detect missing events as there will be a ‘gap’ in the sequence of unique identifiers. The unique identifier forms part of the event record that is read or uploaded from the IED.

Note It is no longer possible to clear Event, Fault, Maintenance, and Disturbance

Records.

Cyber Security Settings

Cyber Security is important enough to warrant its own IED column called SECURITY

CONFIG, located at column number 25. In addition to this new group, settings are affected in the SYSTEM DATA, COMMS SYS DATA and VIEW RECORDS columns.

A summary of the relevant columns is shown in the following table. A complete listing of the settings criteria is described in the Settings and Records chapter.

Cell col row

00 02

00 D0

00 D2

00 D3

00 D4

00 DF

25 00

25 01

25 02

25 03

25 04

25 05

25 06

25 07

25 08

25 09

Default

Setting

Available Setting

ASCII 33 to 122

0 = Read Some,

1 = Read All,

2 = Read All + Write Some,

3 = Read All + Write All

ASCII 33 to 122

ASCII 33 to 122

ASCII 33 to 122

All

All

All

All

1

Interface

Applicability

All

In Setting file?

Yes,

~~~~~~~~

All

All

Yes, Not

Settable

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes, Not

Settable

Yes

2

2

5

ACCESS ONLY FOR

AUTHORISED USERS ASCII 32 to 163

Enabled

Enabled

Enabled

Enabled

0 to 3 step 1

1 to 3 step 1

1 to 30 step 1

0 = Disabled or

1 = Enabled

0 = Disabled or

1 = Enabled

0 = Disabled or

1 = Enabled

0 = Disabled or

1 = Enabled

Enabled

0 = Disabled or

1 = Enabled

All

All

All

All

All

All

All

All

All

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

No

Page (CS) 18-20 Px4x/EN CS/A01b

Px40 Cyber Security Implementation

18. Cyber Security

Parameter

IEC61850*†

DNP3 OE*†

Cell col row

25 0A

25 0B

Enabled

Enabled

Default

Setting

Available Setting

0 = Disabled or

1 = Enabled

0 = Disabled or

1 = Enabled

Interface

Applicability

All

All

In Setting file?

No

No

Attempts Remain

Blk Time Remain

25 11

25 12

All

All

Yes, Not

Settable

Yes, Not

Settable

Fallbck PW Level 25 20 0

0 = Password Level 0,

1 = Password Level 1,

2 = Password Level 2,

3 = Password Level 3

All

Yes, Not

Settable

Security Code

Evt Unique Id

(Normal Extraction)

25 FF

01 FE

Evt Iface Source ±

(Bits 0 – 7 of Event State)

01 FA

Evt Access Level ±

(Bits 15 – 8 of Event State) 01 FB

Evt Extra Info 1 ± (Bits

23 – 16 of Event State)

Evt Extra Info 2 ±Ω (Bits

31 – 24 of Event State)

01 FC

01 FD

Table 6 - Security cells summary

UI Only

All

All

All

All

All

No

No

No

No

No

No

Where:

* - These cells will not be present in a non-Ethernet product

†- These cells will be invisible if the Ethernet port is disabled.

± - These cells invisible if event is not a Security event

Ω – This cell is invisible in current phase as it does not contain any data. Reserved for futu