FactoryTalk Batch Material Manager Getting

FactoryTalk Batch Material Manager Getting
Getting Results Guide
FactoryTalk Batch Material Manager
Important User Information
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Table of contents
Chapter 1
Introducing Material
Manager
What is Material Manager? .................................................................................................8
FactoryTalk Batch Components .......................................................................................9
FactoryTalk Batch Server ............................................................................................9
FactoryTalk Batch View ........................................................................................... 10
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor............................................................................ 11
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor ................................................................... 12
FactoryTalk Event Archiver ..................................................................................... 12
FactoryTalk Batch Network Editor ....................................................................... 13
FactoryTalk eProcedure Client ............................................................................... 13
FactoryTalk eProcedure Server ............................................................................... 13
FactoryTalk Batch Material Manager .................................................................... 14
Material data ....................................................................................................................... 14
Chapter 2
Introducing the Material
Server
Looking at the Material Server ........................................................................................ 15
Setting up the sample demonstrations ........................................................................... 17
Configuring the Network Editor ............................................................................ 17
Add sample FactoryTalk Security users ................................................................. 18
Configure sample permissions for FactoryTalk Security users ......................... 20
Configure the sample FactoryTalk Batch Server ................................................. 23
Rebuild the recipe directory ..................................................................................... 25
Starting the FactoryTalk Batch and Material Servers ................................................. 26
Start the sample FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator ................................................. 28
Verify PCD communications .......................................................................................... 29
Summary .............................................................................................................................. 30
Chapter 3
Introducing the Material
Editor
Starting the Material Editor ............................................................................................. 32
Adding material states ....................................................................................................... 34
Adding material types........................................................................................................ 36
Adding a material class ...................................................................................................... 37
Adding a material ............................................................................................................... 39
Adding containers .............................................................................................................. 40
Associating materials with containers ............................................................................ 42
Creating lots ........................................................................................................................ 43
Distributing lots to containers......................................................................................... 44
Exiting the Material Editor .............................................................................................. 45
Summary .............................................................................................................................. 46
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Table of contents
Chapter 4
Introducing
material-enabled phases
Opening the area model .................................................................................................... 47
Naming the area.................................................................................................................. 48
Viewing enumeration sets................................................................................................. 48
Creating material-enabled phases ................................................................................... 50
Adding material-enabled phase parameters .......................................................... 54
Adding material-enabled phase report parameters .............................................. 56
Defining equipment modules .................................................................................. 57
Restarting the FactoryTalk Batch server ....................................................................... 59
Setting material container priorities ............................................................................... 60
Programming a material-enabled phase ......................................................................... 61
Summary .............................................................................................................................. 62
Chapter 5
Introducing material-based
recipes
Creating a material-based operation............................................................................... 63
Creating recipe formula parameters ............................................................................... 66
Assigning formula values .................................................................................................. 67
Creating a unit procedure................................................................................................. 68
Enabling dynamic unit allocation ................................................................................... 70
Creating a procedure ......................................................................................................... 70
Linking phase groups ......................................................................................................... 76
Verifying the recipe ............................................................................................................ 77
Summary .............................................................................................................................. 78
Chapter 6
Running material-based
recipes
Running in simulation mode ........................................................................................... 79
Running a material-based recipe ..................................................................................... 80
Checking inventory levels................................................................................................. 81
Using manual phase control............................................................................................. 82
Binding a material-enabled phase manually .................................................................. 85
Handling split feeds ........................................................................................................... 86
Summary .............................................................................................................................. 87
Chapter 7
Using custom code insertion
points
4
When would I customize an insertion point? .............................................................. 89
What library can be customized? .................................................................................... 90
Creating a custom ramscustom.dll ................................................................................. 90
Material manager insertion points .................................................................................. 92
OnGenerateCustomLotName ........................................................................................ 93
OnGenerateCustomLabelName .................................................................................... 94
AfterSubLotInsert.............................................................................................................. 95
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AfterSubLotDelete ............................................................................................................ 96
AfterLotInsert..................................................................................................................... 97
AfterCombinedLotInsert ................................................................................................. 98
Chapter 8
Developing an
implementation plan
Determining the system requirements ........................................................................... 99
Configuration requirements .................................................................................... 99
Hardware and operating systems requirements ................................................. 100
Security requirements .............................................................................................. 100
Questions to ask about system requirements.............................................................. 101
Questions to ask about the material database............................................................. 102
Questions to ask about equipment data ...................................................................... 103
Questions to ask about master recipe data .................................................................. 103
Appendix A
Binding material-based
recipes
Legal Notices
Index
Unit binding...................................................................................................................... 107
Static binding ............................................................................................................ 107
Creation binding ...................................................................................................... 107
Dynamic unit allocation ......................................................................................... 108
Manual binding ........................................................................................................ 109
Material requirements ............................................................................................. 110
Material requirements: material .................................................................... 111
Material requirements: material and lot ...................................................... 112
Container type .................................................................................................. 113
Distributions ..................................................................................................... 114
Recipe phase binding ....................................................................................................... 115
Container binding type ........................................................................................... 116
Feed type .................................................................................................................... 116
Automatic container binding process .................................................................. 117
Summary ............................................................................................................................ 119
Legal Notices ..................................................................................................................... 121
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Chapter 1
Introducing Material Manager
FactoryTalk® Batch Material Manager is an integral part of Rockwell’s
FactoryTalk Batch suite of software components. As part of the FactoryTalk
family, the FactoryTalk Batch components increase overall plant efficiency by
delivering the visibility, control, and reporting you need to optimize
manufacturing. With coordinated execution, you can reduce scrap and rework and
improve product quality and consistency. Through real-time management of
equipment utilization, you can maximize your return on assets. By implementing
optimized recipes and procedures, you can increase your plant capacity. By using
electronic, paperless operations, you can improve your productivity. You also
reduce compliance costs by using electronic batch record implementation,
paperless manufacturing, and quality sign-offs. By lifting the compliance burden
from manufacturing, you reduce inventory levels and cycle times, which greatly
improves customer service.
The FactoryTalk Batch components ensure that plant floor operations are
optimized, giving you quick return on your net assets. New product definitions are
deployed quickly into manufacturing. Production order information is accurate.
Business and plant-level control systems are tightly coordinated and multiple sites
operate as a team. Our completely open, configurable set of products helps you
define, manage, monitor, and control manufacturing at local, remote, or
contractor plants. Best of all, you can deploy any of the FactoryTalk Batch
components wherever you need them — one at a time or all at once — to improve
productivity and plant control. The FactoryTalk Batch components include:
•
FactoryTalk Batch
•
FactoryTalk eProcedure®
•
FactoryTalk Batch Material Manager
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Chapter 1
Introducing Material Manager
What is Material Manager?
As one of the FactoryTalk Batch components, Material Manager provides
plant-level material management and tracking that is tied to corporate material
management systems. Material Manager manages and tracks the use of materials
by material type, lot, and sublot. It manages and tracks vessels, containers and
pallets, as well as permanent and transient storage. It also provides automatic
support for bulk containers with multiple lots either as composites or plug flow
separated.
Material Manager adds material definitions to the recipes, significantly reducing
the number of recipes needed for flexible storage facilities. Material consumption,
production, and association of materials to containers and vessels are automatically
logged, providing complete information for forward and backward material
tracking within and across process cells.
The material recipes, called material-based recipes, allow you to define recipes in
terms of materials used, not just by plant equipment. A material-based recipe uses
material-enabled phases, which are configured in the Equipment Editor and stored
in the area model. Material-enabled phases support the specification of a material
as a means to find appropriate equipment and bind to that equipment in a control
recipe.
The following figure is a conceptual diagram of the elements of the material-based
recipe function and illustrates the relationships among the functional
components.
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Introducing Material Manager
FactoryTalk Batch
Components
Chapter 1
FactoryTalk Batch comes with several components that interact with each other
to design, create, configure and run batch recipes.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Server on page 9
FactoryTalk Batch View on page 10
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor on page 11
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor on page 12
FactoryTalk Event Archiver on page 12
FactoryTalk Batch Server
The FactoryTalk Batch Server is the engine that runs FactoryTalk Batch. It is the
component that controls system information, phases and recipes. The server
allows integration with process-connected devices (PCDs) and third-party
software packages. Prior to opening FactoryTalk Batch View, the FactoryTalk
Batch Server must be running and remain active during all batch functions.
The FactoryTalk Batch Server operates as a Windows service, which means that
the FactoryTalk Batch Server can be configured to start automatically and that
control of the FactoryTalk Batch Server can be given to the Windows Service
Manager. Because the FactoryTalk Batch Server runs as a service, it does not
require an operator to log on to run. Therefore, logging on or off Windows during
operation does not disrupt the performance of the FactoryTalk Batch Server.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Components on page 9
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Introducing Material Manager
FactoryTalk Batch View
The FactoryTalk Batch View is the batch recipe initiation and execution program
used by the operator of the FactoryTalk Batch automation solution system. It is
used to initiate and control the batch process. It also displays a graphical
representation of a running batch and its associated data. The FactoryTalk Batch
View is intended to be used in conjunction with an HMI.
Each FactoryTalk Batch View window can be customized to suit the needs of a
specific station.
10
•
Specify the columns to display as well as the size of columns and rows.
•
Sort and filter on one field in certain windows, and set the font for each
FactoryTalk Batch View window.
•
Use the password protection option to limit the information that is
displayed, as well as specify the commands allowed at a particular station (If
the security is enabled for the View).
•
Respond to electronic signature requests that have been generated by report
and recipe parameter deviations or by a command execute request.
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Chapter 1
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor
The FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor is used to graphically create and configure
recipes.
•
The interface is based on IEC 61131-3 sequential function charts (SFC)
that graphically organizes recipes into procedures, unit procedures,
operations and phases along with any applicable comments.
•
In addition to the SFC view, the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor offers a
table view. Table-based recipes provide a mechanism for creating simple
recipes that do not require a complex recipe structure or elaborate transition
expressions. Additionally, you can view table-based recipes and edit all
recipe parameters without having to navigate between steps.
•
The FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor allows you to specify sequences of
phases. The actual phase logic must be configured in the process-connected
device (PCD) while the interface to the PCD must be configured in the
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor.
•
Recipe reports can be generated in SFC and/or descriptive format.
•
If Recipe Approvals are enabled in the underlying area model, approval
signoffs are executed in the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor.
•
When Recipe Version Control is enabled, a version of a recipe (a read-only,
numbered snapshot of a recipe) can be saved and protected from further
editing. New work-in-progress (WIP) copies of a version allow the recipe
author to continue to make changes and updates to a recipe. When a
versioned recipe no longer matches the underlying area model, or references
a deleted or non-existent sub-recipe, it is marked as obsolete.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Components on page 9
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Chapter 1
Introducing Material Manager
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment
Editor
The FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor is a graphical interface through which a
database of process equipment is defined and maintained. The components
defined in the Equipment Editor are used to interface with the process-connected
devices (PCDs) in the facility. During recipe configuration, the area model
provides a list of available units and phases. You can also configure phases and
commands to trigger an electronic signature request when a report or recipe
parameter is out of range (parameter deviation), or when specific commands are
executed on a batch (i.e. Abort Batch, Active Step Change, etc.). Later, during
recipe verification, it ensures that the designated equipment is capable of executing
the procedures. During recipe execution, resource arbitration functions use this
database to allocate equipment based on recipe and operator requests. The area
model is available to all other FactoryTalk Batch applications.
In addition to the area model, the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor allows
configuration of communication functions, equipment phases, enumeration sets,
data servers, and Batch Archiver functions.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Components on page 9
FactoryTalk Event Archiver
The FactoryTalk Event Archiver’s purpose is to translate the FactoryTalk Batch
tab-delimited ASCII electronic batch record files to a user-specified file type.
These electronic batch record files are maintained separately for each batch created
and viewed with a word processor or spreadsheet. Many plants have standardized
on one of the many commercially available Relational Database Management
System (RDBMS) software packages. We recommend using a high-performance
database, such as SQL Server, due to their superior robustness and performance.
The Archiver collects data from each electronic batch record file and stores it in
the specified RDBMS database format.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Components on page 9
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Introducing Material Manager
FactoryTalk Batch Network
Editor
Chapter 1
The FactoryTalk Batch Network Editor is a utility that indicates where other
FactoryTalk Batch and FactoryTalk Batch Material servers are located on the
network. This network configuration allows for ease of integration with other
FactoryTalk Batch components and simplifies the process of reconfiguring a
multi-computer system. If FactoryTalk Batch Material Manager is also installed
the FactoryTalk Batch Network Editor is also used to indicate the location of the
material database.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Components on page 9
FactoryTalk eProcedure Client
The FactoryTalk eProcedure Client computer uses Internet Explorer to enable
operators to run batch recipes.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Components on page 9
FactoryTalk eProcedure Server
The FactoryTalk eProcedure Server provides the services to the FactoryTalk Batch
Server to enable the use of HTML instruction files. Prior to opening FactoryTalk
eProcedure Client, FactoryTalk eProcedure Server must be running and remain
active during all batch functions.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Components on page 9
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Chapter 1
Introducing Material Manager
FactoryTalk Batch Material
Manager
FactoryTalk Batch Material Manager is used to track material consumption in
batch recipes. It consists of two components: Material Server and Material Editor.
The Material Editor provides an interface to help you create the material database,
which consists of material, lot, sublot, container, and storage location data. The
Material Server provides the communication between the material database and
the FactoryTalk Batch Server. During a batch run, information about available
containers is presented to the operator for binding decisions. Binding is the
process of mapping steps within a control recipe to actual equipment in a plant.
After a batch is run, quantities consumed or distributed are updated in the
material database for use in inventory tracking.
The Material Server consists of a group of components that work together to
service various applications. The primary applications that the Material Server
services are the Material Editor, FactoryTalk Batch Server, FactoryTalk Batch
Recipe Editor, FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor, and the Storage Container
ActiveX control. Any third-party application can also use custom solutions based
on the exposed Material Object Model (MOM).
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Components on page 9
Material data
To implement material-based recipes, you must configure three types of data:
•
Material Data
Use the Material Editor to add the materials, lots, sublots, and the
containers that hold them. This data is stored in the material database.
•
Equipment Data
Use the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor to create material-enabled
phases and then associate the resultant equipment module with a container.
•
Recipe Data
Use the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor to define the materials and
amounts to use in a recipe.
There are two stages to configuring material data. First is the initial system
configuration which is the process of adding elements, such as material types,
materials, material storage containers, and storage locations that are unique to the
given installation. Once these initial elements are defined, configured, and tested,
the process of initial system configuration is considered complete. The second
stage is the on-going system upkeep, which is the process of day-to-day activities
that keep the material-based recipe system current and operational. An example of
the upkeep process is the addition or distribution of a new lot of a given material
to the database.
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Introducing the Material Server
For ease of understanding, and for tutorial purposes, this guide refers to
configuring and using the sample files that are installed with FactoryTalk® Batch.
The SampleDemo folders contain complete area models and recipes for a
simulated plant. Before running the demonstrations, you must configure the
Network Editor to recognize the material database, add a FactoryTalk Security
user, configure the FactoryTalk Batch Server to recognize the required project
directories, select the initialization path and file name, and then start the
FactoryTalk Batch Server and the FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator.
Tip:
Looking at the Material
Server
This guide outlines the configuration and use of the SampleDemo2 demonstration files. Because these files are
used as an example throughout the guide, it is recommended that you follow the directions for using this
demonstration step by step.
The FactoryTalk Batch Material Server is a group of components that work
together to service various client applications. The primary clients that the
Material Server services are the Material Editor, FactoryTalk Batch Server, Storage
Container ActiveX control, FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor, and FactoryTalk
Batch Equipment Editor. Also, any third-party application can use custom
solutions based on the exposed Material Object Model (MOM). The Material
Server also interacts with SQL Server to read to and write from the material
database.
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Chapter 2
Introducing the Material Server
The Material Server runs with the context of a COM+ component, which is an
extension to the Component Object Model (COM). This component resides on
the client workstations and provides a rich programming model. (See the
FactoryTalk Batch Material Server API Technical Reference for more information
about the material object model.)
The Material Server coordinates the following functions:
•
Records actions to the material database that occur during configuration
and run-time in the Activity Journal.
•
Loads the material and container lists from the material database to the
Batch Server at startup for population of the area model material and
container enumeration sets.
•
Loads the equipment module/container associations from the area model
into the material database.
•
Communicates with the FactoryTalk Batch Server during binding.
•
During Unit Binding, communicates with the FactoryTalk Batch Server to
determine if the required materials can be satisfied by the containers within
a unit.
•
During Phase Binding, communicates with the FactoryTalk Batch Server to
get a list of containers and equipment modules based on the material to be
added or distributed in the step. In Prompted Phase Binding, the Operator
selects the binding solution from a list of container-equipment pairs. In
Automatic Phase Binding, phases are selected based on current container
priority.
•
In Manual Phase Binding, communicates with the FactoryTalk Batch
Server to obtain a list of containers, lots and equipment modules that
support the required material. The list is presented to the operator for
selection of the equipment module to bind to the material step.
•
Updates the material database with actual amounts consumed or
distributed during a batch run. During an addition or distribution, when
the Feed Complete is true, the FactoryTalk Batch Server communicates the
actual amount to the Material Server. When the Feed Complete is not true,
the FactoryTalk Batch Server communicates the actual amount to the
Material Server, which in turn calculates the difference between the promise
amount and the actual amount and sends this back to the FactoryTalk
Batch Server. The FactoryTalk Batch Server uses this difference to update
the setpoint for the split feed.
Later in this guide, you learn about the different binding methods and how to
handle split feeds.
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Chapter 2
The installation process placed the SampleDemo1 and SampleDemo2 folders in
the BATCHCTL share on your hard drive. Within each of these SampleDemo
folders are four subfolders that contain the files for the area model. To run the
sample demonstrations, configure the Network Editor to locate the material
database, add a FactoryTalk Security user, configure the FactoryTalk Batch Server
to locate the area model, and then verify the recipes in the area model.
Setting up the sample
demonstrations
Important:
Configuring the Network Editor
The default databases MaterialBasedRecipe and SAMPLE2_Materials cannot be removed from SQL
Server. You are free to add another database and use it for production or test, but you must keep the
originally installed databases intact even though they are not being used.
You need to configure the Material Server with the location of the SQL database
that contains the materials for the SampleDemo2 recipes.
1. Click the Start button, point to All Programs > Rockwell Software
>FactoryTalk Batch Suite > Material Manager, and then click Network
Editor. The Network Editor window opens.
Important:
If running on Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008, you must run the Network Editor as an
administrator. Right-click Network Editor and select Run as administrator.
2. Select the Material Server.
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Chapter 2
Introducing the Material Server
3. Click the Configure button. The Configure Material Manager dialog box
opens.
4. In the Material Manager Database box, type SAMPLE2_MATERIALS,
and then click OK.
5. Click the Synchronize button.
6. From the File menu, select Exit, and then click Yes to exit the Network
Editor.
Add sample FactoryTalk
Security users
For the sample demonstrations file, create FactoryTalk user accounts for an
operator and an engineer. Create these user accounts in the FactoryTalk
Directory.
To add sample FactoryTalk Security users:
1. Select Start, point to All Programs > Rockwell Software, and then select
FactoryTalk Administration Console. The Select FactoryTalk
Directory dialog box opens.
Important:
On Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008, right-click FactoryTalk
Administration Console and select Run as administrator.
2. Select Network to add this user account to the FactoryTalk Network
Directory, and select OK.
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Chapter 2
3. If not already logged on to the FactoryTalk Network Directory, the Log On
to FactoryTalk dialog box opens. In User name, type the user name for the
Administrator that was configured when the FactoryTalk Services Platform
was installed.
4. In Password, type the password for the Administrator.
5. Verify the Directory and select OK. The FactoryTalk Administration
Console window opens and displays the specified FactoryTalk Directory.
6. Expand Users and Groups.
7. Right-click the Users folder, and select New > User to create a new
FactoryTalk Security user account in FactoryTalk Directory.
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8. The New User dialog box opens and displays the General tab. In the User
name box, type OPER.
9. In Full name, type Operator.
10. In Password, type password, and confirm it by re-entering password in the
Confirm Password box.
11. Select Create.
12. Repeat steps 7-11, but this time in the User Name field, enter ENG and in
the Full Name field, enter Engineer.
13. Keep the FactoryTalk Administration Console open to configure
permissions for these FactoryTalk Security users in the next exercise.
See also
Configure sample permissions for FactoryTalk Security users on page 20
Configure sample permissions
for FactoryTalk Security users
After creating the FactoryTalk security users, set up access modes for each
FactoryTalk Batch component to specify which users are permitted to view or
perform actions. Configure security settings in the FactoryTalk Administration
Console. To tighten security in the eProcedure Client, remove the All Users
group from the Full Edit policy setting.
To configure sample permissions for FactoryTalk Security users:
1. In the FactoryTalk Administration Console Explorer pane, navigate to
System > Policies > Product Policies > Batch > Equipment Editor >
Access Modes.
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Chapter 2
2. Right-click Access Modes, and then select Properties. The Access Modes
Properties dialog box opens.
3. In the Full Edit row, select the Configure Security browse button. The
Configure Securable Action dialog box opens.
4. Select Add. The Select User and Computer dialog box opens.
5. In the Filter Users box, select Show All.
6. In Users, select ENG.
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7. Select OK. The Configure Securable Action dialog box is updated,
showing ENG in the list of Users with the Allow check box selected.
8. Select OK to close the Configure Securable Action dialog box.
9. In the Access Modes Properties dialog box, select View Only.
10. In the View Only row, select the Configure Security browse button. The
Configure Securable Action dialog box opens.
11. Select Add. The Select User and Computer dialog box opens.
12. In the Filter Users box, select Show All.
13. In Users, select OPER.
14. Select OK. The Configure Securable Action dialog box is updated,
showing OPER in the list of Users with the Allow check box selected.
15. Select OK to close the Configure Securable Action dialog box.
16. Select OK to close the Access Modes Properties dialog box.
See the FactoryTalk Batch Administrator Guide for more information on security.
See also
Configure the sample Batch Server on page 23
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Configure the sample
FactoryTalk Batch Server
Chapter 2
To set up the sample demonstrations, configure the FactoryTalk Batch Server to
locate the folders that contain the demonstration files and to the \Restart and bin
folders where the FactoryTalk Batch Server writes data upon system failure.
Configure the FactoryTalk Batch Server in the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment
Editor.
To configure the sample FactoryTalk Batch Server:
1. Select Start, point to All Programs > Rockwell Software > FactoryTalk
Batch Suite > FactoryTalk Batch, and then select Equipment Editor. The
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor opens (log on to FactoryTalk if
prompted).
Important:
If running on Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008, right-click Equipment
Editor and select Run as administrator.
2. Select Options > Server Options. The Server Options dialog box opens to
the Project Settings tab.
3. In the Project Directories area, select the Primary Journal browse button.
The Select Directory dialog box opens.
4. From the Look in list, select the SampleDemo1\Journals folder, and then
select Open.
5. Select the Error Logging browse button. The Select Directory dialog box
opens.
6. From the Look in list, select the SampleDemo1\Logs folder, and then
select Open.
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7. Click the Instructions browse button. The Select Directory dialog box
opens.
Important:
In order for the eProcedure Server to start, you must define the instruction path and
an instruction file for each instruction-based phase in the area model. (See the
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor User Guide for instructions on defining
instruction-based phases.)
8. Select the Equipment Database browse button. The Select Equipment
Database dialog box opens.
9. From the Look in list, open the SampleDemo1\ Recipes folder, select the
ice_cream1.cfg file, and then select Open.
10. In the Store Recipes Using area, select Binary Files, and then select the
Recipe Directory browse button. The Select Directory dialog box opens.
11. From the Look in list, select the SampleDemo1\Recipes folder, and then
select Open.
12. Select the Restart Control tab.
13. Select the Primary Path browse button. The Select Directory dialog box
opens.
14. From the Look in list, select the SampleDemo1\Restart folder, and then
select Open.
15. Select the Secondary Path browse button. The Select Directory dialog box
opens.
16. From the Look in list, select the Bin folder.
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Chapter 2
17. Select the Batch Reporting tab. Leave Never (No Queue) as the default
reporting application.
18. Select OK to close the Server Options dialog box.
19. From the File menu, select Exit to exit the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment
Editor.
Tip:
Rebuild the recipe directory
These steps set up the FactoryTalk Batch Server to run the tutorial steps in this
manual. There are many other settings to consider when setting up the FactoryTalk
Batch system. (See the FactoryTalk Batch Administrator Guide for more information
on the Server Options dialog box.)
To run the demonstration recipes, you must rebuild the recipe directory and
verify the recipes in the area model using the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor.
Important:
If running on Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008, right-click Recipe Editor and select Run as
administrator.
To rebuild the recipe directory:
1. Select Start, select All Programs > Rockwell Software > FactoryTalk
Batch Suite > FactoryTalk Batch, and then select Recipe Editor. The
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor reads the area model.
2. If prompted, log on to FactoryTalk. If a message displays asking you to
verify the recipes, select Cancel.
3. From the File menu, select Rebuild Recipe Directory. When the rebuild is
complete, select OK, and then select Yes to verify the recipes.
4. When the recipe verification is complete, select Accept to save the recipes,
and then select Close.
5. From the File menu, select Exit to exit the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe
Editor.
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Chapter 2
Introducing the Material Server
Starting the FactoryTalk
Batch and Material Servers
The FactoryTalk Batch and Material Servers may start automatically when your
computer starts. By default, the FactoryTalk Batch Server starts in production
mode. If you did not activate FactoryTalk Batch, you can run the tutorial in demo
mode. While in demo mode, the FactoryTalk Batch Server runs for a two-hour
period and then stops.
Tip:
The FactoryTalk Batch Server does not start in production mode without activation. The Material Server starts
automatically when the FactoryTalk Batch Server starts. (See Activating Material Manager.)
1. Click Start, point to All Programs > Rockwell Software > FactoryTalk
Batch Suite > FactoryTalk Batch, and then click Batch Service Manager.
The FactoryTalk Batch Service Manager opens.
Important:
If running on Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008, right-click Batch Service Manager and
select Run as administrator.
2. If the FactoryTalk Batch Server is not already listed in the Service box,
select it from the drop down list.
3. If the FactoryTalk Batch Server is running, click the Stop button.
4. If the name of the computer where the FactoryTalk Batch Server is installed
does not display in the Computer box, click the Select Computer button.
The Select Computer dialog box opens.
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Chapter 2
5. In the "Enter the object name to select" area, type the name of the computer
where the Batch Server is installed (or click the Advanced button to search
for a computer). Click OK.
Tip:
The FactoryTalk Batch Service Manager must communicate with the Windows Service Manager of the
selected computer to determine what services are available. There may be a noticeable delay as
communications are established. If the Service Manager cannot communicate with the Windows Service
Manager of the selected computer, a message displays.
6. From the Service list, select FactoryTalk Batch Server.
Tip:
If No Batch Services displays in the list, the FactoryTalk Batch Server is not installed on the selected
computer. (See the FactoryTalk Batch Components Upgrade and Installation Guide for installation
instructions.)
7. If you want to start the FactoryTalk Batch Server in Demo mode, select
Allow Demo Mode.
8. Select the method to use for booting the server.
Cold Boot
Restarts the FactoryTalk Batch Server in a cold state. All journal data or recipe content is erased
upon startup.
Warm Boot
Restarts the FactoryTalk Batch Server, restoring the set of batches that were on the batch list
when the server previously terminated.
Warm All Boot
Restarts the FactoryTalk Batch Server only if it is able to restore all of the batches to the batch
list.
9. Click the Start/Continue button. The Service State area changes from
STOPPED to START PENDING. After a few moments, RUNNING
displays and the light changes to green. The Material Server starts
automatically with the FactoryTalk Batch Server.
The FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator may start automatically and open a
window. If so, minimize the window.
10. Click Close to close the FactoryTalk Batch Service Manager.
Tip:
If conversation becomes LOST while running in Demo mode, make sure that the Simulator is running and
try starting the server(s) again. (See Starting the FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator for more
information.)
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Start the sample
FactoryTalk Batch Phase
Simulator
FactoryTalk Batch comes with a phase logic simulation program, referred to as the
FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator used to simulate the batch process without
connecting to a PCD. The Phase Simulator imitates the functionality of a data
server and can communicate with the FactoryTalk Batch Server using OPC
communication protocol. The Phase Simulator is a powerful tool for testing,
experimentation and demonstration purposes. In this guide, run the sample
demonstration using the Phase Simulator.
Tip:
If the Phase Simulator is required and OPC protocol is used for communications, the
FactoryTalk Batch Server automatically starts the Phase Simulator. Check the Windows
taskbar to see if the Phase Simulator is started.
To run the sample demonstration correctly, open the ice_cream1.sim file in the
Phase Simulator.
To start the sample FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator:
1. If the Phase Simulator is already running, maximize it from the Windows
taskbar. If the Phase Simulator is not running, select the Start button, point
to All Programs > Rockwell Software > FactoryTalk Batch Suite >
FactoryTalk Batch, and then select Simulator. The FactoryTalk Batch
Phase Simulator opens.
Important:
If running on Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008, right-click Simulator and select Run as
administrator.
2. Select File > Open. The Open Simulator Configuration File dialog box
opens.
3. From the Look in list, open the Program Files > Rockwell Software >
Batch > SampleDemo1 > Recipes folder. Select the ice_cream1.sim file,
and then select Open.
4. Minimize the FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator window.
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Verify PCD communications
Chapter 2
Use the following instructions to verify PCD communications.
Important:
If running on Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008, right-click Batch Service Manager and
select Run as administrator.
To verify PCD communications:
1. Select Start, point to All Programs > Rockwell Software > FactoryTalk
Batch Suite > FactoryTalk Batch, and then select Batch Service Manager.
The FactoryTalk Batch Service Manager opens.
2. Make sure FactoryTalk Batch Server is selected in the Service box.
3. Select the Server Statistics button. The FactoryTalk Batch Server
Statistics dialog box opens.
4. Select the PCD Communications tab. The Data Server Status area displays
the status of the conversation with the OPC_SIM data server (Phase
Simulator), which should be PHASES GOOD.
5. In the Tag Verify area, select the Start button to begin the verify process.
The tag verification process takes several minutes.
6. When the Status box shows COMPLETED, select OK to close the
FactoryTalk Batch Server Statistics dialog box.
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Chapter 2
Summary
Introducing the Material Server
In this chapter, you:
•
Set up the Network Editor and the FactoryTalk Batch Server to run the
sample demonstration
•
Started the FactoryTalk Batch Server in demo mode
•
Opened the .sim file in the FactoryTalk Batch Simulator to run the sample
demonstration
This chapter provided a brief overview of the capabilities of the Material Server.
(See the FactoryTalk Batch Administrator Guide for more information about the
FactoryTalk Batch Server. See the FactoryTalk Batch Material Manager
Administrator Guide for more information about the Material Server.)
The rest of this document is designed to give you a tour through Material Manager
using the sample demonstration. Follow the step-by-step instructions to learn how
to define and run material-based recipes using Material Manager and FactoryTalk
Batch software.
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Chapter 3
Introducing the Material Editor
The FactoryTalk® Batch Material Editor provides an interface to help you create
the material database, which consists of several tables of data that are stored in
Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 or SQL Server 2012. The Material Editor presents
the material database as two types of data:
•
Material configuration data, which defines the materials, consists of items
such as the material name, description, properties, minimum and maximum
quantity, and the default quantity.
•
Material storage configuration data, which defines the containers that
hold the materials, consists of items such as the container name, description,
type, properties, and capacity.
You also use the Material Editor to create relationships between the material and
container data by assigning materials to containers and distributing lots to the
containers.
In this chapter, you add new data to the SAMPLE2_MATERIALS.mdf database
that was created automatically when you installed Material Manager.
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Starting the Material Editor
1. Click the Start button, point to All Programs > Rockwell Software >
FactoryTalk Batch Suite > Material Manager, and then select Material
Editor.
Important:
If running on Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008, right-click Material Editor and select Run as
administrator.
2. Expand the Materials folder. The list of materials in the
SAMPLE2_MATERIALS material database displays in the left pane.
3. Click the Materials folder. The detailed list of materials displays in the right
pane.
A material is the logical representation of a recipe ingredient, such as cream
or sugar. For each material, you create lots, which are physical instances of a
material. For example, when a new shipment of cream arrives at the factory
you add a new lot to uniquely identify that shipment of cream. When you
distribute a lot to containers, the distributed portions become sublots,
which are the physical inventory that is stored in a container. For example,
your lot of cream may be divided into two sublots that are stored in two
separate containers.
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4. Collapse the Materials folder, expand the Locations folder, and then
expand the Independent Containers folder. The lists of storage locations
in the SAMPLE2_MATERIALS material database display. The detailed list
of materials remains in the right pane until you click another folder.
The Independent Containers folder displays a list of containers, which are
repositories for inventory. In Material Manager, you define associations
between materials and containers. In the area model, you define associations
between containers and equipment modules. The FactoryTalk Batch Server
uses these associations at runtime to find the container holding the
appropriate material and its associated equipment module to bind to a
material-enabled phase step.
The Locations folder contains storage locations, which are a grouping of
containers. Normally, containers assigned to a storage location have a short
life span; they might be created by one recipe and deleted by the next. This
is a common activity for a pre-weigh recipe that distributes measured
amounts of material onto pallets and then a mixing recipe that uses the
pallets as its source of material.
5. Collapse the Locations and Independent Containers folders.
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Adding material states
To be used in a batch, both the container and the materials within the container
must be in a Ready to Use state. Any other state prevents the material and
container from being used and provides you a means to identify offline equipment
and materials. For example, you could create a lot state called QATest and assign it
to a material lot to keep it from being used while it is being tested. To put the lot
and container into use again, you would change the state to Ready to Use.
In this exercise, you create a container state called Maintenance so you can keep a
container from being used while it is being repaired.
1. From the Edit menu, select States. The States Configuration dialog box
opens to the Lot tab, which shows the lot states defined in the
SAMPLE2_MATERIALS.mdf material database.
2. Select the Container tab. The container states defined in the
SAMPLE2_MATERIALS.mdf material database display.
3. Click the New State button. The Create Container State dialog box
opens.
4. In the Name box, type Maintenance.
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Chapter 3
5. In the Description box, type Out of service for maintenance.
6. Click OK. The new state is added to the list. Because you did not assign a
controller ID, the Material Editor automatically assigned the next available
number.
Controller IDs are used throughout the Material Editor to uniquely
identify items in the material database. A PCD programmer can use these
controller IDs to access pieces of data in the material database.
7. Click Close.
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Adding material types
Material types are used for informational and organization purposes and do not
affect the building or execution of material-based recipes. The material types
appear in a selection list when you define a material.
In this exercise, you create two new material types: Dry and Liquid.
1. From the Edit menu, select Material Types. The Material Types dialog
box opens.
The types defined in the SAMPLE2_MATERIALS.mdf material database
are finished, intermediate, and raw, which are the defaults (indicated by the
blue information icon) and not editable. You can add more material types,
which are editable.
2. Click the Add button. The Edit Material Type dialog box opens.
3. In the Name field, type Dry.
4. In the Description field, type Raw material in dry state.
Leaving Controller ID at zero forces the Material Editor to assign the next
available number.
5. Click OK. The Dry material type displays in the list.
6. Click the Add button. Add another type, Liquid, with the description Raw
material in liquid state.
7. Click OK, and then click Close.
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Adding a material class
Chapter 3
A material class defines a group of materials that are similar. For example, a
material class called Sweetener could contain materials such as Granulated Sugar
and Corn Syrup. Material classes are used for organizational purposes and do not
affect the execution of material-based recipes.
You can use material classes to simplify the assignment of materials to storage
containers. When you define a storage location, you must indicate the material(s)
that can be stored in the container. Using material classes, you can assign all of the
members of a class of materials to a container, instead of assigning the materials
individually.
In this exercise, you create a new material class for nonfat frozen yogurt products
and define properties to define the class of materials.
1. From the Edit menu, select Material Classes. The Material Classes dialog
box opens displaying the material classes defined in the
SAMPLE2_MATERIALS.mdf material database.
The material classes display in alphabetical order. Ungrouped is the system
default, indicated by the blue information icon, and therefore not editable.
2. Click Add. The Create Material Class dialog box opens to the General
tab.
3. In the Name box, type ICE_MILK_NON_FAT.
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Chapter 3
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4. In the Description box, type Ice Milk Products - Non Fat Frozen Yogurt.
Leaving Controller ID at zero forces the Material Editor to assign the next
available number.
5. Click Apply. The Edit Material Class dialog box opens to the General tab.
6. Select the Properties tab, and then click the New Property button.
7. In the Material Class Property box, type butterfat_content.
8. In the Minimum box, type 2.
9. In the Maximum box, type 7.
10. In the Default Value box, type 5.
11. In the EUs box, type Percent.
12. Leave Synchronize selected so the changes to the material class property are
propagated to all inherited material and lot properties.
13. Click OK, click Yes to propagate the change, and then click Close.
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Adding a material
Chapter 3
A material is an ingredient in a recipe. For each material, you specify lots, which
are instances of a material. When you distribute a lot to containers, the distributed
portions of the lot become sublots. A sublot is physical inventory that is stored in a
container.
You are going to add a new product to your line — Chocolate Hazelnut Ice
Cream. There is already a recipe for Triple Chocolate Ice Cream that uses the
same materials you need so you only have to add Hazelnuts (raw) and Chocolate
Hazelnut Ice Cream (finished) as materials.
1. Right-click the Materials folder, and then select New Material. The Create
Material dialog box opens to the General tab.
2. In the Name box, type HAZELNUT.
3. In the Description box, type Hazelnut pieces.
4. In the Engineering Units box, type KG.
5. From the Type list, select Raw, if necessary.
6. From the Class list, select NUT.
7. From the Default Lot State list, select Ready to Use, if necessary.
You can use Inventory Key to interface the material inventory with your
plant production processes. Leave Inventory Key blank for this exercise.
Leaving Controller ID at zero forces the Material Editor to assign the next
available number.
8. Click OK.
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9. In the same manner, add:
Adding containers
•
Name = IC_CHOCOLATE_HAZELNUT
•
Description = Chocolate Hazelnut Premium Ice Cream
•
Engineering Units = KG
•
Type = Finished
•
Class = ICE_CREAM_PREMIUM
•
Default Lot State = Ready To Use
Containers are repositories for inventory. In the Material Editor, you create
containers and then distribute lots of materials to them. When you run a batch,
the FactoryTalk Batch Server asks the Material Server to look for containers that
meet the material requirements of the step. That container is then selected for
binding to the batch if the total inventory of the container is greater than the
defined heel property. The type of container you associate with a material also
affects the binding process, which you will read more about in a later chapter.
Material Manager supports three different types of containers:
40
•
Composite Containers hold only one material and lot at a time. As new
sublots are created and linked to a composite container, the sublots are
combined within the container. An example of a composite container is a
tank that holds multiple sublots of milk. As each sublot is added to the
container they blend together making it impossible to distinguish between
the sublots. During binding the entire content of the container is
considered.
•
Plug-Flow Containers hold only one material, but can hold multiple
sublots. Each sublot remains distinct when added to the plug-flow
container. Sublots that are added to a plug-flow container are available for
use in a first-in/first-out fashion. The first sublot placed in the container is
the first sublot used, then the second sublot is used, and so on. Material
Manager tracks the usage of each sublot, and recognizes when each lot is
exhausted. During binding only the first-out sublot is considered.
•
Pallet Containers hold many different materials and many sublots of each
material. Each sublot can have a label, which is the only property unique to a
sublot. All other sublot properties are inherited from the lot properties. You
can use labels to distinguish between sublots that are unique. All sublots
added to a pallet container are available at any time. During binding, each
sublot on the pallet is considered.
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Chapter 3
In this exercise, you create two new independent containers to hold hazelnuts.
1. Expand the Material Storage Configuration folder, right-click the
Independent Containers folder, and then select New Material Storage
Container. The Create Material Storage Container dialog box opens.
2. In the Name box, type NUT_BIN3.
3. In the Description box, type Hazelnut storage.
4. In the Capacity box, type 10000.
5. In the Heel box, type 200.
6. In the Engineering Unit box, type KG.
7. In the Container Type area, select Plug Flow.
Leave the State at the default of Ready to Use and Controller ID at 0
(zero). Leaving Controller ID at zero forces the Material Editor to assign
the next available number.
8. Click OK.
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9. Add a second independent container:
•
Name: NUT_BIN4
•
Description: Hazelnut storage
•
Capacity: 10000
•
Heel: 200
•
Engineering Units: KG
•
State: Ready_to_Use
•
Container Type: Plug Flow
10. Click OK.
Associating materials with
containers
Now that you have defined the two new materials and containers, you need to
associate them with each other.
In this exercise, you associate the HAZELNUT material with two independent
containers and the IC_CHOCOLATE_HAZELNUT material with all the
containers in a storage location.
1. Expand the Materials folder, right-click HAZELNUT, and then select
Properties. The Edit Material dialog box opens to the General tab.
2. Select the Containers tab, expand the Independent Containers folder,
select NUT_BIN3, and then click the Add button.
3. Add NUT_BIN4 in the same manner.
4. Click OK.
5. Double-click IC_CHOCOLATE_HAZELNUT. The Edit Material
dialog box opens to the General tab.
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6. Select the Containers tab, select the DEEP_FREEZE storage location, and
then click the Add Location button. All the containers in the Deep_Freeze
storage location are added to the Configured Containers area.
7. Click OK.
Creating lots
The material that you created is merely a logical definition of a material. The
actual physical material is a lot. Each lot inherits the characteristics and properties
of the material and also includes a physical quantity and a controller ID to identify
the lot. There can be multiple lots of a single material. Each lot is uniquely
identified by its lot name.
In this exercise, you create a lot for the latest shipment of hazelnuts, which is
10,000 KG.
1. Expand the Materials folder, right-click HAZELNUT, and then select
Properties. The Edit Material dialog box opens to the General tab.
2. Select the Lots tab, and then click the New Lot button.
3. In the Lot Name box, type Hazelnut100.
4. In the Quantity box, type 10000.
Leave State at the default of Ready to Use and Controller ID at 0 (zero).
Leaving Controller ID at zero forces the Material Editor to assign the next
available number.
5. Click Apply.
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Distributing lots to
containers
Now that you have defined the containers and the lots, you need to distribute the
lots to the containers. When you distribute a lot, you create a sublot that is
identified by a label.
•
A sublot is a quantity of a lot stored in a container. Sublots inherit the
properties and values from lots. The sublot is the basis for tracking all
material movement, production and consumption.
•
A label is the only property unique to a sublot. Generally, a label is thought
of as a barcode, assigned to a specific sublot. The concept is easy to follow on
a pallet that holds many pre-measured bags (sublots) of a material, each with
an identifying barcode (label).
In this exercise, you distribute the lot of hazelnuts into two sublots that are stored
in two separate containers.
1. With the Edit Material dialog box still open, select the Inventory tab. The
lot you added in the previous exercise displays as undistributed.
2. Click the row number to select the lot record, and then click the Distribute
button. The Distribute Lot dialog box opens.
3. In the Label box, type Hazelnut100_1.
4. In the Quantity box, type 5000.
5. Expand the Independent Containers folder. All independent containers
that are possible storage locations for hazelnuts display.
6. Select NUT_BIN3.
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Chapter 3
7. Click OK. One-half of the lot is distributed and the remainder appears on a
new line as undistributed.
8. Distribute the remaining lot of hazelnuts to NUT_BIN4 with the label of
Hazelnut100_2.
9. Click OK.
Exiting the Material Editor
You have entered the information necessary to build your new recipe, so exit the
Material Editor. From the File menu, select Exit. Click Yes to confirm the exit.
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Chapter 3
Summary
Introducing the Material Editor
In this chapter, you:
•
Started the Material Editor
•
Added Material States
•
Added Material Types
•
Added a Material Class
•
Added a Material
•
Added Containers
•
Associated Materials with Containers
•
Created Lots
•
Distributed Lots to Containers
•
Exited the Material Editor
This chapter provided a brief overview of the capabilities of the Material Editor.
(See the FactoryTalk Batch Material Editor User Guide for more information on
the Material Editor.)
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Chapter 4
Introducing material-enabled phases
After you define the material and either the container or storage location
information, you are ready to reconfigure your area model to accommodate
material-enabled phases. A material-enabled phase is a phase that is enabled to
support the specification of a material as a means to find the appropriate
equipment and then bind to that equipment in a control recipe.
In this chapter, you modify the icecream_2.cfg file to accommodate the new
containers you added.
Opening the area model
1. Start the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor (Start > All Programs >
FactoryTalk Batch Suite > FactoryTalk Batch > Equipment Editor).
Important:
If running on Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008, right-click Equipment
Editor and select Run as administrator.
2. From the File menu, select Open.
3. From the Open dialog box, navigate to SampleDemo2\Recipes, select
ice_cream2.cfg, and then click Open. The area model opens with the
WEST_PARLOR and NORTH_PARLOR process cells displayed.
•
The WEST_PARLOR process cell is a standard FactoryTalk Batch
configuration with recipes that create different flavors of ice cream.
•
The NORTH_PARLOR process cell demonstrates the application of
material tracking to create the same ice cream flavors.
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Chapter 4
Introducing material-enabled phases
Naming the area
At startup, the FactoryTalk Batch Server clears the information in the Material
Server database according to the Area name specified for the area model that is
selected in the Server Options dialog box. If there are multiple FactoryTalk Batch
Servers in your system, it is very important that you assign unique Area names.
Important:
If you have duplicate Area names in a system with multiple FactoryTalk Batch Servers, you could
experience batch failures. Each Area name must be unique.
The default Area name is AREA1, you need to change it to a unique name.
1. From the Edit menu, select Area. The Edit Area dialog box opens.
2. In the Name field, type ICECREAM_1.
3. Click OK.
Viewing enumeration sets
Material Manager automatically creates three enumeration sets: MATERIALS,
CONTAINERS, and MATERIAL CLASSES that represent the configured
materials, containers, and material classes and their respective controller IDs
within the material database. The Material Server populates these enumeration
sets when you start the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor, FactoryTalk Batch
Recipe Editor and FactoryTalk Batch Server.
You can view the MATERIALS, CONTAINERS, and MATERIAL CLASSES
enumeration sets from within the Equipment Editor but you must use the
Material Editor to make any changes.
Tip:
Some changes to the area model requires that you validate all recipes and then restart the FactoryTalk
Batch Server, especially if it is set to Cold Restart. Since the MATERIALS, CONTAINERS, and MATERIAL
CLASSES enumeration sets originate from data in the material database, any change you make in the
Material Editor that affects the enumeration sets also requires that you validate all recipes and then restart
the Batch Server. For this reason, it is very important that you design your material database to require as
little maintenance as possible.
1. From the Edit menu, select Enumeration Sets. The Create Enumeration
Sets and Enumerations dialog box opens.
2. Select MATERIALS. The list of materials displays in the Enumerations
box in numerical order by Controller ID.
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Chapter 4
3. Scroll down to see the two materials you added in the Material Editor.
Tip:
The NULL_CONTAINER and NULL_MATERIAL enumerations are default values assigned to each
enumeration set by the Equipment Editor. The other listed enumerations belong to the ice_cream2.cfg
area model.
4. Select CONTAINERS. The list of containers displays in the
Enumerations box.
The CONTAINERS enumeration set contains only independent
containers and storage locations, not containers within storage locations. In
this way, changes made to containers within storage locations do not change
the area model.
5. Select MATERIAL_CLASSES. The list of material classes displays in the
Enumerations box.
6. Click OK to close the dialog box.
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Introducing material-enabled phases
Creating material-enabled
phases
Without Material Manager, you need to create a phase for each material in a
recipe. In this example, phases are needed for each material used in the recipe:
ADD_CREAM, ADD_EGG, ADD_SUGAR, and ADD_MILK.
It is even more complicated if there is more than one container for each material.
For example, if cream is stored in five different containers, you would need five
phases, five equipment modules, and five recipes to get cream from the appropriate
container. The operator then has to choose the recipe to run based on where the
cream is stored. Imagine the permutations of recipes required when sugar, eggs and
milk are stored in different containers as well.
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Chapter 4
With Material Manager, you can replace all of these phases with one
material-enabled phase. In this case, these material-enabled phases move material
into the process cell and are therefore designated as material additions. The other
type of material-enabled phase moves material away from the process cell and are
therefore designated as material distributions. It is possible for a material-enabled
phase to support both actions.
Tip:
Material Manager currently tracks the transfer of materials on Addition and Distribution Feeds. Material enabled
phases do not track material transfers between units or phases.
1. Double-click NORTH_PARLOR. The unit level displays. The
NORTH_PARLOR process cell contains two units, which are identical.
Units that contain material-enabled phases are configured the same as
standard units — create a unit class and then create instances of the unit
class.
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2. Double-click NP_MIXER1. The equipment phases and modules display.
3. Select NP_ADDDAIRY_M1, select NP_ADDSWEET_M1, and then
select NP_ADDEGG_M1. Notice how the MBR_ADD phase is selected
for each instance.
With Material Manager, you can create multiple equipment modules from a
single phase. Notice that the phases ADD_CREAM, ADD_SUGAR,
ADD_EGG and ADD_MILK from the previous example are replaced by a
single material-enabled phase, MBR_ADD. The selection of the correct
equipment module is determined as the batch runs, based on the
configuration of the step in the recipe.
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4. In the Phases list, double-click MBR_ADD. The Edit Phase dialog box
opens to the General tab.
Selecting Material Based Recipes marks the phase as supporting materials
and automatically configures the parameters and reports needed to run a
material-enabled phase. It also implies that equipment modules based on
this phase must be programmed to follow a protocol so the FactoryTalk
Batch and Material Servers can track material usage. (See Programming a
material-enabled phase for more information.)
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Adding material-enabled phase
parameters
Material Manager automatically adds two parameters to each material-enabled
phase: MATERIAL and AMOUNT. There are three optional parameters built in
to Material Manager: CONTAINER, LOT, and LABEL. Custom parameters can
also be created and used.
1. Select the Parameters tab.
•
The MATERIAL parameter defines the minimum material
specification required to query the material database for containers to
consider as binding candidates for a material-enabled phase.
•
The AMOUNT parameter is the set point, or target, for the quantity of
MATERIAL for the equipment module. Material additions are
expressed as zero or a positive value. Material distributions are expressed
as zero or a negative value. The minimum/maximum range of valid
values should reflect the possible use of the phase. If the phase is to
handle both a material addition and distribution, the range should span
positive and negative values.
2. Select Add Optional Material Parameters, and then click Yes. The
optional material parameters display.
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•
The CONTAINER parameter has the FactoryTalk Batch Server store
the container to which a material phase step is bound at run time,
which makes the container value available for downloading to the phase
logic.
•
The LOT parameter for material additions is part of the material
specification used to query the material database for containers to be
considered as binding candidates for a material phase. For material
distributions, it is the name of the lot assigned to the inventory to be
distributed.
•
The LABEL parameter for material additions is part of the material
specification used to query the material database for containers to be
considered as binding candidates for a material phase. For material
distributions, it is the name of the label assigned to the inventory to be
distributed.
•
The MATERIAL_CLASS parameter has the FactoryTalk Batch
Server present a dialog box to the operator when a batch is added to the
batch list so the operator can select the material to use in the recipe.
•
All Material Manager parameters support the Automatic
Upload/Download functionality.
3. Disable Add Optional Material Parameters, and then click Yes.
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Adding material-enabled phase
report parameters
Each material-enabled phase has two required material report parameters:
ACTUAL_AMOUNT and FEED_COMPLETE. You also can create custom
report parameters.
1. Select the Reports tab.
•
The ACTUAL_AMOUNT report parameter holds the amount of
material the equipment module consumed (material addition) or
produced (material distribution). Material additions are expressed as
zero or a positive value. Material distributions are expressed as zero or a
negative value.
•
The ACTUAL_AMOUNT does not have to equal the AMOUNT
parameter value but should have a sign that agrees with the feed type of
the recipe phase step.
•
The FEED_COMPLETE report parameter is a signal to the
FactoryTalk Batch Server that the addition or distribution completed
successfully. A lack of material, lack of storage capacity, phase failure, or
stopping a phase could all result in the interruption of a material
addition or distribution. When this occurs, the phase logic sets
FEED_COMPLETE to false, so that batch execution is held until the
phase can rebind to another container.
All Material Manager report parameters support the Automatic
Upload/Download functionality.
2. Click Cancel.
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Defining equipment modules
Chapter 4
You can create multiple equipment modules from a single material-enabled phase.
The material specification, material, and optionally, the lot and label are
configured on a material-enabled phase step in the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe
Editor. The FactoryTalk Batch Server uses this information to find containers and
the associated equipment modules to bind to a recipe.
In this exercise, you associate the two new containers with the existing
NP_ADDNUT_F1 and NP_ADDNUT_F2 equipment modules.
1. Click the Go Up button to return to the unit level.
2. Double-click NP_FREEZER1. The equipment phases and modules
display.
3. Double-click NP_ADDNUT_F1. The Edit Equipment Module dialog
box opens to the General tab.
4. Select the Containers tab, and then expand the Containers folder. The
Containers and Storage Location Associations box lists the containers in
the material database. The area on the right displays the containers
associated with the phase.
5. Select NUT_BIN3, and then click the ADD button.
6. To indicate this container adds material to the recipe, select the check box
in the Addition column.
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7. Add NUT_BIN4 in the same manner.
Now the NP_ADDNUT_F1 equipment module is associated with the four
containers that hold nuts in this plant. If any of these containers is holding
inventory that matches the material specification of an MBR_ADD phase
in a recipe, the equipment module could then be bound as the means for
getting that inventory added to the batch.
8. Click OK.
9. Click the Go Up button.
10. Add NUT_BIN3 and NUT_BIN4 with addition feed types to the
NP_ADDNUT_F2 equipment module in NP_FREEZER2.
11. Save the ice_cream2.cfg file, and then exit the Equipment Editor. If you are
prompted to enter comments for auditing, type Updated material
containers, and click OK.
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Restarting the FactoryTalk
Batch server
Chapter 4
Since you have made modifications to the area model, you must restart the
FactoryTalk Batch Server.
1. Click Start, point to All Programs > Rockwell Software > FactoryTalk
Batch Suite > FactoryTalk Batch, and then select Batch Service Manager.
The FactoryTalk Batch Service Manager opens.
Important:
If running on Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008, right-click Batch Service Manager and
select Run as administrator.
2. From the Service list, select FactoryTalk Batch Server.
3. Click the Stop button. Wait until the Service State area displays
STOPPED.
4. Click the Start/Continue button. The Service State area changes from
STOPPED to START IS PENDING. After a few moments, RUNNING
displays and the light changes to green.
5. Click Close to close the FactoryTalk Batch Service Manager.
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Setting material container
priorities
Container priorities define the order in which containers are considered as
candidates for binding a specific material. For example, a container holding the
oldest material may need to be used before containers with newer quantities.
You want hazelnuts added to the batch from NUT_BIN3 as long as there is
enough material to fulfill the material requirements. Only when the inventory in
NUT_BIN3 is depleted should the batch pull from NUT_BIN4. To achieve this
configuration, set the priority for NUT_BIN3 to a smaller number than
NUT_BIN4 to indicate that NUT_BIN3 has a higher priority.
1. Start the Material Editor.
2. Expand the Materials folder, and then double-click HAZELNUT. The
Edit Material dialog box opens.
3. Select the Priorities tab. The containers you added to the area model
display.
4. In the Priority boxes for NUT_BIN3, type 10.
5. In the Priority boxes for NUT_BIN4, type 20.
6. Click OK.
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Programming a
material-enabled phase
Chapter 4
To maintain inventory levels within the material database and record inventory in
the Batch Event Journal, follow this protocol when writing phase logic.
•
The phase logic must request a download of the AMOUNT parameter
from the FactoryTalk Batch Server.
•
The phase logic must upload the ACTUAL_AMOUNT and
FEED_COMPLETE report parameters to the FactoryTalk Batch Server
before entering a terminal state (COMPLETE, STOPPED or
ABORTED).
You can use the Automatic Upload/Download functionality in
FactoryTalk Batch to meet this protocol requirement. The FactoryTalk
Batch Server downloads the AMOUNT parameter before the equipment
module is commanded to start and uploads the ACTUAL_AMOUNT and
FEED_COMPLETE report parameters after the phase logic runs to a
terminal state.
•
The sign of the value in the ACTUAL_AMOUNT report parameter must
match the configured feed type. Additions are positive or zero.
Distributions are negative or zero.
This figure illustrates the sequence of events that occur when a material-enabled
phase is executed within a recipe.
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Summary
Introducing material-enabled phases
In this chapter, you:
•
Opened an area model
•
Named an area model
•
Viewed enumeration sets
•
Created a material-enabled phase
•
Restarted the FactoryTalk Batch Server
•
Set container priorities
This chapter provided a brief overview of the capabilities of the Equipment Editor.
(See the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor User Guide for more information.)
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Chapter 5
Introducing material-based recipes
Once you have defined your material data and modified your area model, you can
begin to modify your master recipes in the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor. The
process of creating material-based recipes is not too different than creating
standard recipes. In fact, material-enabled phase steps are added to an operation as
standard phase steps.
In this chapter, you create a new material-based operation that adds cocoa and
hazelnuts to the sweet cream mixture, which is the basis for all the ice cream
produced in the plant.
Creating a material-based
operation
1. Start the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor (Start > All Programs >
FactoryTalk Batch Suite > FactoryTalk Batch > Recipe Editor). If the
Recipes Requiring Verification dialog box opens, click No.
Important:
If running on Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008, right-click Recipe Editor and select Run as
administrator.
2. From the File menu, select New Top Level. The New dialog box opens.
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3. Select Operation, and then click OK. The Unit Requirement dialog box
opens.
You want the recipe to run on both units in the process cell.
4. Select Class-Based, select MBR_FREEZER_CLS, and then click OK. The
initial and final steps of the new operation display in the SFC View.
5. Select the initial step, and then click the Add Step button, select
MBR_ADD, and then click OK.
6. Click the Add Parallel button, select RECIRC, and then click OK.
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7. Select the last transition, click the Add Step button, select TEMP_CTL,
and then click OK.
8. Click the Add Parallel button, select RECIRC, and then click OK.
9. Select the last transition, click the Add Step button, select MBR_ADD,
and then click OK.
10. Click the Add Parallel button, select RECIRC, and then click OK.
11. Select the last transition, click the Add Step button, select MBR_DUMP,
and then click OK.
12. From the Recipe menu, select Header Data, and then enter the following:
•
Procedure Identifier: MCLS_CHOCOLATE_HAZELNUT_OP
•
Author: Your Name
•
Product Name: CHP-100
•
Batch Size Default: 5000
•
Batch Size Max: 10000
•
Units of Measure: KG
•
Estimated Duration: 55
•
Procedure Description: Chocolate Hazelnut Premium Ice Cream
13. Click OK, and then click Proceed. If prompted, enter auditing comments,
if desired, and then click OK.
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Creating recipe formula
parameters
Because you want to defer the amounts of the materials at this level in the recipe,
you need to add formula parameters. You will enter default amounts at the
procedure level and the operator will have an opportunity to change the amount
when the batch is added to the batch list.
1. From the Recipe menu, select Recipe Parameters/Reports. The
Procedure Properties dialog box opens.
2. Click the Add Parameter button.
3. In the Name box, type COCOA_AMT.
4. In the Max box, type 500.
5. In the Enum/EU box, type KG.
6. Select Scalable.
7. Click the New button, and then add HAZELNUT_AMT with the same
values.
8. Click OK.
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Assigning formula values
Chapter 5
For this recipe, you defer the actual amounts of the materials and enable
automatic binding.
1. Select MBR_ADD:1, and then click the Value Entry button. The
Parameter Value Entry/Report Limit Entry dialog box opens.
2. For AMOUNT, select Defer from the Origin list, and then select
COCOA_AMT from the Value list.
3. For MATERIAL, select COCOA from the Value list, and enable Display.
Container Binding is set to Automatic, which is the default. You set the
Feed Type to Addition in the Equipment Editor.
4. Click OK. The SFC is updated to show COCOA MATERIALS for
MBR_ADD:1.
5. Enter formula parameters for the remaining steps as indicated in this table.
Use the default values for all other entries.
Step
Parameter
Origin
Value
Display
RECIRC:1
RECIRC_RATE
Value
50
Yes
TEMP_CTL:1
HOLD_TIME
Value
5
No
TEMP_SP
Value
25
Yes
RECIRC:2
RECIRC_RATE
Value
30
Yes
MBR_ADD:2
AMOUNT
Defer
HAZELNUT_AMT
No
MATERIAL
Value
HAZELNUT
Yes
RECIRC:3
RECIRC_RATE
Value
20
Yes
MBR_DUMP:1
AMOUNT
Value
-5000
Yes
MATERIAL
Value
IC_CHOCOLATE_HAZELNUT
No
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6. From the View menu, select Table. Your finished operation should be
similar to this.
7. From the View menu, select SFC.
8. Save the operation.
Creating a unit procedure
The next step to creating the chocolate hazelnut recipe is to create a unit
procedure, which is going to have only one operation.
1. From the File menu, select New Top Level. The New dialog box opens.
2. Select Unit Procedure, and then click OK. The Unit Requirement dialog
box opens.
3. Select Class Based, select MBR_FREEZER_CLS, and then click OK. The
initial and final steps of the new unit procedure display in the SFC View.
4. Select the initial step, and then click the Add Step button. The Operation
Select dialog box opens.
5. Select MCLS_CHOCOLATE_HAZELNUT_OP, and then click OK.
6. From the Recipe menu, select Recipe Parameters/Reports. The
Procedure Properties dialog box opens. Enter recipe formula parameters as
indicated in this figure.
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7. Select MCLS_CHOCOLATE_HAZELNUT_OP, click the Formula
Values button, and then enter formula values as shown in this figure.
8. From the Recipe menu, select Header Data, and then enter the following:
•
Procedure Identifier: MCLS_CHOCOLATE_HAZELNUT_UP
•
Author: Your Name
•
Product Name: CHP-100
•
Batch Size Default: 5000
•
Batch Size Max: 10000
•
Units of Measure: KG
•
Estimated Duration: 55
•
Procedure Description: Chocolate Hazelnut Premium Ice Cream
9. Click OK, and then click Proceed. If prompted, enter auditing comments,
if desired, and click OK.
10. Save the unit procedure. If prompted, enter auditing comments, if desired,
and click OK.
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Enabling dynamic unit
allocation
To support the flexibility of the two units within NORTH_PARLOR process
cell, you want to enable dynamic unit allocation, which will provide more binding
options.
1. From the View menu, select Options. The Options dialog box opens.
2. If necessary, enable Support Dynamic Unit Allocation, and then click
Apply.
3. Save the unit procedure. If prompted, enter auditing comments, if desired,
and click OK.
Creating a procedure
The last step in building your recipe is to create a procedure. Because Dynamic
Unit Allocation is enabled, you must define the equipment requirements and
binding method before you can build the recipe procedure.
1. From the File menu, select New Top Level. The New dialog box opens.
2. Select Procedure, and then click OK. The Procedure - Unit
Requirements dialog box opens.
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3. Click the Add Unit Requirement button. The Add Unit Requirement
dialog box opens.
4. In the Name box, type FREEZER.
The unit requirement Name is a label and acts like a lookup table for the
FactoryTalk Batch Server. When a recipe is put on the Batch List and the
FactoryTalk Batch Server encounters the unit requirement name, the Server
looks up all the unit classes or instances that are mapped to the unit
requirement name.
North_Parlor has two units that can make chocolate hazelnut ice cream. In
the area model, there are two unit instances (NP_MIXER_1 and
NP_MIXER_2) based on the MBR_MIXER_CLS unit class and two unit
instances (NP_FREEZER_1 and NP_FREEZER2) based on the
MBR_FREEZER_CLS unit class. You want the operator to select which
mixer and freezer to use when the batch is created. To achieve this, you need
to create a unit requirement name (MIXER) that is configured to the
MBR_MIXER_CLS unit class and a unit requirement name (FREEZER)
that is configured to the MBR_FREEZER_CLS unit class. You also want to
select the batch creation binding method.
5. If the Class Based section is not enabled, select the Class Based option.
6. From the Class Based area, select MBR_FREEZER_CLS from the Unit
Class list, and then click OK.
7. Select Alias_MIXER_CLS from the Procedure - Unit Requirements
dialog box, and then click the Edit Unit Requirement button.
8. In the Name box, type MIXER.
9. From the Class Based list, select MBR_MIXER_CLS.
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10. In the Available Downstream Units box, select FREEZER, and then click
the right-arrow button.
11. Click OK.
When the recipe is put on the Batch List, the FactoryTalk Batch Server
encounters the MIXER unit requirement name, which specifies the
equipment required for the recipe, looks for all unit instances of the unit
class with the MIXER unit requirement name, and then prompts the
operator to select either NP_MIXER_1 or NP_MIXER_2. The same
process occurs for the FREEZERunit requirement name.
12. Click Close.
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13. From the Recipe menu, select Header Data, and then enter the following:
•
Procedure Identifier: MCLS_CHOCOLATE_HAZELNUT
•
Author: Your Name
•
Product Name: Chocolate Hazelnut Premium
•
Product Code: CHP-100
•
Batch Size Min: 3000
•
Batch Size Default: 5000
•
Batch Size Max: 7000
•
Units of Measure: KG
•
Estimated Duration: 55
•
Procedure Description: Chocolate Hazelnut Premium - class
based/material based
14. Enable Released to Production so this recipe displays when adding a batch
to the batch list in the FactoryTalk Batch View.
15. Click OK.
16. Enter recipe formula parameters as indicated in this figure.
These default values are presented to the operator during batch creation.
Since the formula values are deferred, the operator can change the default
values.
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17. Select the initial step, and then click the Add Step button. The Unit
Procedure Select dialog box opens.
18. From the Unit Requirements Name list, select MIXER.
19. From the Recipe Name list, select MCLS_SWEETCREAM_UP, and
then click OK.
20. Add MCLS_TRANSFER_OUT_UP in the same manner.
So far you have placed the ingredients into the mixer to produce the sweet
cream base for the ice cream and added the step to transfer the mixture out
of the mixer. Next, you add the step to transfer the sweet cream base into
the freezer.
21. Click the Add Parallel button. The Unit Procedure Select dialog box
opens.
22. From the Unit Requirements Name list, select FREEZER.
23. From the Recipe Name list, select MCLS_TRANSFER_IN_UP, and
then click OK.
24. Select the final transition, click the Add Step button, and then add
MCLS_CHOCOLATE_HAZELNUT_UP with FREEZER as the
equipment requirement.
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Your recipe should be similar to the following figure.
25. Select MCLS_SWEETCREAM_UP:1, click the Formula Values button,
add formula values as shown in this figure, and then click OK.
26. Select MCLS_CHOCOLATE_HAZELNUT_UP:1, click the Formula
Values button, and then add formula values as shown in this diagram.
The origin of the formula values is deferred so the parameters display when
a batch is added to the batch list to give the operator a chance to enter the
values.
27. Save the procedure. If prompted, enter auditing comments, if desired, and
click OK.
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Linking phase groups
Use phase link groups to identify phases that communicate and work together,
such as the XFR_OUT and XFR_IN phases that transfer the sweet cream
mixture from the mixer to the freezer. In the Equipment Editor, both the
XFR_OUT and XFR_IN phases are configured with one message partner, which
indicates that these phases must communicate with one other phase to work
properly.
Equipment Editor: Phase Message Partners
In the Recipe Editor, you must create a phase link group at the procedure level to
complete the association.
1. Select XFR_IN:1 in either the Procedure Hierarchy or the SFC view.
2. From the Link menu, select Link Groups. The Phase Link Group dialog
box opens.
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3. Click the Group 1 column heading to select the Group 1 column, and then
click the Add button.
4. Click OK.
5. Click XFR_OUT:1.
6. From the Link menu, select Link Groups. The Phase Link Group dialog
box opens.
7. Select the Group 1 column, click the Add button, and then click OK.
Verifying the recipe
Once you have added all the material-enabled phases to the recipe, verify the
recipe before the recipe is ready to run.
1. From the File menu, select Verify All Recipes.
If you are prompted to save, click Yes.
2. When the verification is complete, click Accept, and then click Close. If
prompted, enter auditing comments, if desired, and click OK.
3. Exit the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor.
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Chapter 5
Summary
Introducing material-based recipes
In this chapter, you:
•
Created a material-based operation
•
Created recipe formula parameters
•
Assigned formula values
•
Created a unit procedure
•
Linked phase groups
This chapter provided a brief overview of the capabilities of the Recipe Editor
when used with Material Manager. (See the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor User
Guide for more information on creating material-based recipes, unit binding, and
linking phase groups.)
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Chapter 6
Running material-based recipes
Running a material-based control recipe offers more flexibility in the binding
process and the capability to track inventory. The FactoryTalk Batch Server and
FactoryTalk Batch Material Server work together to pull the necessary
information from the material database so either FactoryTalk Batch or the
operator can select the appropriate containers to supply materials to the recipe.
In this chapter, you run a material-based recipe using the FactoryTalk Batch Phase
Simulator. The Phase Simulator supplies the ACTUAL_AMOUNT and
FEED_COMPLETE parameters to enable the batch to run. This data normally is
supplied by the phase logic in the process-connected device (PCD).
Running in simulation
mode
Running a recipe in simulation mode is a good way to test the recipe. In this
section, you use the .sim file for the ice_cream2.cfg file, which is already
configured to run the Chocolate Hazelnut recipe.
1. Start and maximize the Phase Simulator (Start > All Programs >
FactoryTalk Batch Suite > FactoryTalk Batch > Simulator).
Important:
If running on Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008, right-click Simulator and select Run as
administrator.
2. From the File menu, select Open. The Open Simulator Configuration
File dialog box opens.
3. From the Look in list, open the c:\Program Files\RockwellSoftware\
Batch\SampleDemo2\ Recipes folder. Select the ice_cream2.sim file, and
then click Open.
4. Minimize the Phase Simulator window.
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Running material-based recipes
Running a material-based
recipe
1. Start the FactoryTalk Batch View (Start > All Programs > FactoryTalk
Batch Suite > FactoryTalk Batch > View).
Important:
If running on Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008, right-click View and select Run as
administrator.
2. Click the Add Batch button, select
MCLS_CHOCOLATE_HAZELNUT, and then click OK. The Batch
Creation dialog box opens.
The deferred the formula parameters display in the Batch Creation dialog
box with the default settings. You can change the values if you need to
adjust the recipe.
In the Unit Binding area, the two alias names you defined are displayed.
You can select which units to bind to the recipe. Because there is enough
material in all the containers you are presented with both units.
3. In the Unit Binding area, select NP_MIXER1 and NP_FREEZER1 if not
already selected.
4. In the Batch ID box, type BATCH101, and then click the Create button.
5. Select the batch, click the Start Batch button, and then click Yes to start
the batch.
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Chapter 6
6. Click the Procedure as SFC button. Adjust the panes, if necessary so you
can see the Container column to watch as the FactoryTalk Batch Server
binds to containers.
7. When the recipe reaches MBR_ADD:2 under
MCLS_CHOCOLATE_HAZELNUT_OP:1 notice that the batch binds
to NUT_BIN3 and the priority of 10 shows in the Index column. After the
phase is complete, the Container setting changes to
NULL_CONTAINER.
8. Let the batch run to completion.
Checking inventory levels
When a batch is complete, the FactoryTalk Batch Server sends the inventory
consumed or distributed to the Material Server where it is then added to the
material database. You can view the inventory levels in the Material Editor. If the
Material Server goes down and you are forced to run a material-based recipe
without it, you must update the inventory in the material database manually.
In this exercise you view the inventory consumed during a batch and then verify
that consumption in the Material Editor.
1. When the batch is complete, click the Event Journal button, and then click
the Journal button. The Event Data Files dialog box opens.
2. Select BATCH101, and then click OK.
3. In the Column 1 box, select Description, type Material Addition in the
Filter 1 box, and then click Refresh.
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You have to collapse a few columns to get this display, otherwise you can
scroll left and right to see which containers were selected for binding for
each material and how much was consumed.
4. Start the Material Editor, expand the Materials folder, double-click
Hazelnut, and then select the Inventory tab. The Material Editor shows
that 250 KG was consumed out of NUT_BIN3.
To update the inventory levels manually, select the lot, and then click the
Edit Distribution button. The View Lot Distribution dialog box opens.
Change the inventory level in the Quantity box, and then click OK.
Using manual phase control
You can use manual phase control to test your material-enabled phases. Select and
acquire the phase, and then start the phase. You are prompted to indicate the feed
type, select a material, and select a container. The material selection is not limited
to valid materials for the phase so you must know the correct material. You run
the manual phase like any standard phase.
1. Back in FactoryTalk Batch View, click the Phase Control button. The
Phase Control view opens and displays the process cell.
2. Double-click the NORTH_PARLOR icon to view the units within the
NORTH_PARLOR process cell.
3. Click the NP_FREEZER1 icon. A list of the phases in NP_FREEZER1
display in the Phases section. You may need to move the vertical split bars to
the right or left so your window appears as shown in step 4.
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Chapter 6
4. Select the NP_ADDNUT__F1 icon, and then click the Acquire command
button. Click Yes to confirm the acquisition of the phase. Notice the green
operator (Opr) light, which indicates that the NP_ADDNUT__F1 phase is
now owned by the operator.
5. Click the Start command button, and then click Yes to start the
NP_ADDNUT_F1 phase. The Phase Control Feed Type and Material
Selection dialog box opens.
6. From the Material list, select HAZELNUT.
7. Click OK. The Phase Control dialog box opens.
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8. In the Enter Batch ID box, type TEST_1, and then select NUT_BIN4 as
the container to bind to the phase.
9. Click OK. After running for a few seconds, the Unacknowledged Prompts
button on the toolbar starts flashing yellow
10. Click the Unacknowledged Prompts button; AMOUNT HAZELNUT
displays in the Unacknowledged Prompts list.
11. Double-click the AMOUNT HAZELNUT row. The Acknowledge dialog
box opens showing the default value as 0. The allowable range of values is 0
to 5000.
12. Type 40, and then click the Acknowledge button. The phase continues to
run.
As the phase runs, you can use the command buttons to Hold, Restart,
Abort, Stop, Pause, or Resume the phase.
13. When the phase completes, click the Reset command button, and then
click Yes to confirm the reset.
14. You can run this phase as many times as necessary to test it. When you are
done testing, release control back to FactoryTalk Batch so the phase can run
as part of a recipe.
15. Click the Release command button, and then click Yes to confirm the
release.
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Chapter 6
Binding a material-enabled
phase manually
You set up your system to pull hazelnuts from NUT_BIN3 before NUT_BIN4
by setting the container priorities. If for some reason you want to pull material
from NUT_BIN4 you can accomplish this easily by manually binding a phase
when the recipe is running. This is the same procedure you follow to handle a split
feed situation.
1. Add another batch of MCLS_CHOCOLATE_HAZELNUT, and then
switch to SFC view.
2. Select MBR_ADD:2 at the bottom of the Procedure Hierarchy under
MCLS_CHOCOLATE_HAZELNUT_OP:1
3. Click the Bind command button, and then click Yes. The Prompt to Bind
a Material Phase Step dialog box opens.
4. Select NUT_BIN4, and then click OK. NUT_BIN4 displays in the
Container column. The other MBR_ADD phases display
NULL-CONTAINER since they are bound as the recipe executes.
5. Switch to Batch List view, and then start the batch. The batch runs to
completion and pulls material from NUT_BIN4 instead of NUT_BIN3.
Tip:
If you need to perform an active step change on a material-enabled phase, you must first bind the phase
manually using this procedure.
6. Send all completed batches to the Trash, and then exit the FactoryTalk
Batch View.
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Handling split feeds
Split feeds occur when a material phase step does not add or distribute all of the
material configured by the step. By default, the batch is HELD and the Material
Server calculates and sends new AMOUNT parameters to the FactoryTalk Batch
Server. To resume processing, the operator must perform an active step change
away from the unfinished step, manually rebind the unfinished step, perform an
active step change back, and then restart the batch.
If you want the batch to automatically process a split feed, change Hold on Split
Feed on the Material Policies tab in the Server Options dialog box (in the
Equipment Editor) to No and create a loop in the recipe so that the binding
process can select another container for material additions. You can easily add a
material loop to your recipe with the Create Material Loop button in the
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor.
For material distributions, the Material Server does not attempt to decide whether
or not a container might be full. To use the same recipe loop, you need an
independent application to update the container selection priority so that a full
container is not selected again.
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Summary
Chapter 6
In this chapter, you:
•
Ran a material-based recipe
•
Checked inventory levels
•
Used manual phase control
•
Bound a phase manually
(See Binding material-based recipes in this guide, or the FactoryTalk Batch View
User Guide for more information on running material-based recipes.)
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Chapter 7
Using custom code insertion points
Insertion points are function calls that a product makes into a customizable
function library. FactoryTalk Batch Material Manager uses insertion points to
support customization by making the standard processing call code, which users
can change.
When would I customize an
insertion point?
For material tracking, insertion points are provided in three general areas of
processing performed by the Material Server:
•
Combining sublots inside a composite container
•
Updating inventory quantities
•
Initializing lots as they are created
Combining sublots inside a composite container can require customization.
Without customization, sublots added into a composite container already holding
a sublot of a different lot will become part of that other lot. Often it is more
appropriate for a new lot to be created. If this is the case, how should a new lot
name be selected? This question can be applied to the label of the sublots as well as
the attributes of the sublots. The correct processing can be dependent on many
factors that are specific to a plant or process.
Updating inventory quantities can require customization. As sublots are produced
and consumed, customers can find it useful to trigger other applications to
perform processing. Insertion points provide a place for users to create points of
integration between applications. For example, insertion points added around
inventory quantity updates are used by one application to help manage container
selection priorities for binding. When a sublot within a container is changed, the
container selection priorities get recalculated.
Initializing lots as they are created can require customization. Creation of a new
lot can involve standard operating procedures that are specific to one site.
Insertion points allow for custom initialization of lot attributes and the
calculation of a lot state.
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Using custom code insertion points
What library can be
customized?
The RAMSCustom.dll is the compiled version of the insertion point DLL for
the Material Server and is where custom rules are defined. RAMSCustom.dll is
required for operation of the Material Server, resides in the Batch\bin directory,
and is registered during the installation of Material Manager.
A Visual Basic project is provided on the FactoryTalk Batch Material Manager
installation CD, in a folder called Custom, so you can create a custom version of
the RAMSCustom.dll.
Creating a custom
ramscustom.dll
1. Copy the entire Custom folder, including all subdirectories, to the local
hard drive, leaving the structure intact.
The following files are contained in the Custom folder:
•
Ramscustom.vbp
The Visual Basic project file.
•
Ramaterialservercustom.cls
The Visual Basic class module that implements the custom interface.
Located in the Custom\Classes folder.
2. Open Ramaterialservercustom.cls using a text Editor such as NotePad.
3. Modify the code as needed. (See Material manager insertion points.)
4. Save the file and then exit the text editor.
5. Double-click RAMSCustom.vbp. The Visual Basic project opens. If you
see message boxes, click Yes through all until you see the message that Visual
Basis is unable to set the version compatible component. Click OK.
6. From the Project menu, select References. The References dialog box
opens.
7. There are several files that are required for references used in the Visual
Basic project. These references must be set manually within the Visual Basic
IDE.
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8. From the Available References list, select the following references:
•
COM+ Services Type Library
The COM+ Runtime library, COMSVCS.dll, that is needed for
COM+ functionality. If this file is not on your system use MTXAS.dll.
•
Microsoft ActiveX Data Objects 2.0 Library
The Microsoft Active Data Object support DLL, MSADO20.tlb, that
is used for any database functionality implemented in the insertion
DLL.
•
OLE Automation
The OLE Automation support DLL, STDOLE32.tlb, which is usually
a standard Visual Basic reference.
9. Click OK.
10. From the Project menu, select RAMSCustom Properties. The Project
Properties dialog box opens.
11. Select the Component tab, and then select Binary Compatibility.
12. Click the browse button, locate Program Files/Rockwell
Software/Batch/bin/RAMSCustom.dll, and then click Open.
13. Click OK.
14. From the File menu, select Make RAMSCustom.dll. The Make Project
dialog box opens.
15. Click OK. A message box displays a compile error stating the user-defined
type is not defined. For the project to compile successfully, you need to
select one other reference that was not available previously when you
selected references.
16. Click OK, and then close the project window.
17. From the Project menu, select References. The References dialog box
opens.
18. From the References list, select materialserverinsertion 1.0 Type Library,
and then click OK. Your project should now compile successfully.
19. From the File menu, select Make RAMSCustom.dll. The Make Project
dialog box opens.
20. Click OK.
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Material manager insertion
points
92
The following sections present the customizable FactoryTalk Batch Material
Manager insertion points. Each section explains why you might want to customize
that routine. Information on how and when the routine is used by the Material
Server is included.
•
OnGenerateCustomLotName on page 93
•
OnGenerateCustomLabelName on page 94
•
AfterSubLotInsert on page 95
•
AfterSubLotDelete on page 96
•
AfterLotInsert on page 97
•
AfterCombinedLotInsert on page 98
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OnGenerateCustom
LotName
Chapter 7
Problem to be solved
Composite containers can hold only one sublot at a time. If the composite
container holds a sublot of LOT_A and a sublot of LOT_B is added to the
container, the sublots are assumed to be mixed together and become a single
sublot. What lot should the mixture belong to?
This insertion point allows you to define the lot to which a sublot formed by
combining sublots of different lots will belong. This can be an existing lot or a new
lot.
Specifics about this routine
This insertion point is only called when sublots of different lots are being
combined by a composite container. These are the parameters for this function:
Param Name
Data Type
Direction
Description
DistributionAmount
Double
In
Amount of the distribution
MaterialName
String
In
Name of Material
DistributionLotName
String
In
Lot name given to the distribution
AreaName
String
In
Area Name
StepName
String
In
Step Name
ProcessCell
String
In
Process Cell
UnitName
String
In
Unit Name
BatchID
String
In
Batch ID
EqModule
String
In
Equipment Module
RecipePath
String
In
Recipe Path
ContainerName
String
In
Container name of the distribution
ExistingLotName
String
In
Lot name that exists in the Container
CustomLotName
String
Out
Returned value from the event
This value represents what the custom Lot
name will be based on in the insertion code.
Related insertion points
Other insertion points that could work with this function include:
•
OnGenerateCustomLabelName
•
AfterSublotDelete
•
AfterSublotInsert
•
AfterCombinedLotInsert
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OnGenerateCustom
LabelName
Problem to be Solved
Composite containers can hold only one sublot at a time. If the composite
container holds a sublot with the label "LABEL_1" and a sublot with the label
"LABEL_2" is added to the container, the sublots are assumed to be mixed
together and become a single sublot. What label should the mixture be assigned?
This insertion point allows the customer to define the label to be assigned to a
sublot when two sublots with different labels are combined by a composite
container.
Specifics About this Routine
This insertion point is only called when sublots with different labels are being
combined by a composite container. These are the parameters to this function:
Param Name
Data Type
Direction
Description
DistributionAmount
Double
In
Amount of the distribution
MaterialName
String
In
Material Name
DistributionLabelName
String
In
Label name given to the distribution sublot
AreaName
String
In
Area Name
StepName
String
In
Step Name
ProcessCell
String
In
Process Cell Name
UnitName
String
In
Unit Name
BatchID
String
In
Batch ID
EqModule
String
In
Equipment Module
RecipePath
String
In
Recipe Path Name
ContainerName
String
In
Container name of the distribution
ExistingLabelName
String
In
Label name that exists in the Container
CustomLabelName
String
Out
Returned value from the event
This value represents what the custom Label
name will be based on the business rules in the
insertion code.
Related insertion points
Other insertion points that could work with this function include:
94
•
OnGenerateCustomLotName
•
AfterSublotDelete
•
AfterSublotInsert
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AfterSubLotInsert
Chapter 7
Problem to be solved
How can an external application be notified that a new sublot has been created?
This insertion point is a signal that a new sublot has been created and has been
inserted into the database. Customers can code any notifications they need to
their own applications within this insertion point.
For example, an application that could use this insertion point is a service that
monitors inventory levels and characteristics and adjusts container selection
priorities. A new sublot added to a container is a trigger to reevaluate the current
priorities.
Specifics about this routine
This insertion interface is called after the insertion of a new sublot into the
database. These are the parameters to this function:
Param Name
Data Type
Description
Area
String
Area Name
ProcessCell
String
Process Cell Name
Unit
String
Unit Name
MaterialID
Long
Material ID of the Material this SubLot is derived from
ContainerID
Long
Container ID of the Container this SubLot is stored in
SubLotID
Long
Pkid of the SubLot record in the database
This is provided so the customer can retrieve the record by ID for
further processing.
The values Area, ProcessCell, and Unit will not be attainable in every instance
from which these insertion calls are made. If these values are not available, a
wildcard value (represented by %ALL%) is substituted for any solid value.
Related insertion points
Other insertion points that could work with this function include:
•
AfterSublotDelete
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AfterSubLotDelete
Problem to be solved
How can an external application be notified that a new sublot has been deleted?
This insertion point is a signal that a sublot has been deleted from the database.
For example, an application that could use this insertion point is a service that
monitors inventory levels and characteristics and adjusts container selection
priorities. A sublot being deleted from a container is a trigger to reevaluate the
current priorities.
Specifics about this routine
This insertion interface is called after the deletion of a sublot from the database.
These are the parameters to this function:
Param Name
Data Type
Description
Area
String
Area Name
ProcessCell
String
Process Cell Name
Unit
String
Unit Name
MaterialID
Long
Material ID of the Material this SubLot is derived from
ContainerID
Long
Container ID of the Container this SubLot is stored in
SubLotID
Long
Pkid of the SubLot record in the database
The values Area, ProcessCell, and Unit will not be attainable in every instance
from which these insertion calls are made. If these values are not available, a
wildcard value, represented by %ALL%, is substituted for any solid value.
Related insertion points
Other insertion points that could work with this function include:
•
96
AfterSublotInsert
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AfterLotInsert
Chapter 7
Problem to be solved
This insertion point provides a way for the customer to initialize properties and
attributes of a new lot. For example, the assignment of an initial lot state could
involve a calculation of several variables. This insertion point provides a place to
do this calculation to assign the correct lot state.
Specifics about this routine
This insertion interface is called after a new lot is created in the database, with the
exception of a new lot created as the result of combining sublots of different lots in
a composite container. These are the parameters to this function:
Param Name
Data Type
Description
LotName
String
Lot Name
CreationDate
Date
Creation Date of the Lot
MaterialID
Long
Material ID for the Material this Lot is derived
LotID
Long
Pkid of the Lot record in the database
This event is not fired for the insertion of a lot when a lot combination event
occurs. In that event the AfterCombinedLotInsert event is fired. This event is
only called when a plain generic insertion of Lot is performed.
Related insertion points
Other insertion points that could work with this function include:
•
AfterCombinedLotInsert
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AfterCombinedLotInsert
Problem to be solved
A composite container can only hold one sublot at a time. When two different
sublots of two different lots are combined within this type of container the
OnGenerateCustomLotName insertion point is called. Assume that a new lot
name is returned. The Material Server will create a new lot, but how should the lot
attributes and custom properties be initialized?
A different insertion point is provided for initializing this new lot to provide an
initialization routine that has access to the data of the two lots being combined.
Specifics about this routine
This insertion point is called when sublots of different lots are combined within a
composite container and the name of the lot for the new sublot does not exist
within the database.
These are the parameters for this function:
Param Name
Data Type
Description
DistributedLotName
String
Lot Name specified for the distribution
ExistingLotName
String
Lot Name of existing Lot in the Composite Container
CombinedLotName
String
Custom Lot Name derived from the OnGenerateCustomLotName
insertion call
LotMaterialName
String
Material Name that the Lot is derived from
LotMaterialID
Long
Material ID for the Material
This is provided so the insertion code author has the fully qualified key
to retrieve the Lot information (LotName + MaterialID).
This event is fired only during the execution of the DistributeSubLot and
MaterialDistributionComplete methods. These are the only two places within
the Material Server that a combination of Lot and/or Label can occur.
Related insertion points
Other insertion points that could work with this function include:
98
•
OnGenerateCustomLotName
•
AfterLotInsert
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Chapter 8
Developing an implementation plan
Planning is crucial to the success of the FactoryTalk Batch Material Manager
implementation. This section provides an overview of the subjects that can be
included within a Material Manager implementation plan. Use this as a starting
point for your own implementation plan, adding and/or removing sections as
required.
You should address the following subjects in your Material Manager
implementation plan:
Determining the system
requirements
•
System Requirements
•
Configuring Material Manager
•
Configuring FactoryTalk Batch
The system requirements for a Material Manager implementation are determined
by the FactoryTalk Batch system configuration. A FactoryTalk Batch system is a
group of networked computers on which one or more FactoryTalk Batch
components run. Material Manager can be implemented in a number of different
configurations: with FactoryTalk Batch, with eProcedure, and with various
combinations of each of these. Each of these configurations represents a
FactoryTalk Batch system.
The system requirements will include the number and type of computers you
need, operating systems required on each computer, and the security scheme to be
implemented.
Configuration requirements
There are some constraints in the way the FactoryTalk Batch components can be
combined in a FactoryTalk Batch system. For example, you cannot install the
Material Manager Server components on the FactoryTalk Batch Server computer,
but you can install the Material Client components on the FactoryTalk Batch
Server computer. You need to review the configuration constraints and decide on
the most appropriate configuration for your purpose.
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Developing an implementation plan
Hardware and operating
systems requirements
There are restrictions on the hardware and operating systems that can be used in a
FactoryTalk Batch system. All computers in a FactoryTalk Batch system must be
running Microsoft® Windows™ Server 2008 (32-bit), Service Pack 2, Microsoft
Windows Server 2008 (64 bit), R2, Service Pack 1, Windows XP™ Professional
(32-bit), Service Pack 3, or Windows 7 (64-bit), Service Pack 1 (Windows Vista is
not supported in FactoryTalk Batch 11.01). The FactoryTalk Batch Servers, such
as the Material Server, must be installed on a computer running Microsoft
Windows Server 2008 (32-bit), Service Pack 2, Microsoft Windows Server 2008
(64 bit), R2, Service Pack 1. The FactoryTalk Batch clients can run on either
Microsoft Windows Server 2008 (32-bit), Service Pack 2, Microsoft Windows
Server 2008 (64 bit), R2, Service Pack 1, Windows XP Professional (32-bit),
Service Pack 3, or Windows 7 (64-bit), Service Pack 1.
Security requirements
The FactoryTalk Batch components have been developed to take advantage of
Windows’ built-in security features. Material Manager supports two types of
security schemes – Domain or Workgroup. Each of these schemes are also
supported in the security defined within the Material Server’s database security
scheme. There are a number of procedures involved in the implementation of
Material Manager security, some of which must be performed prior to the
installation and implementation of Material Manager. Review your facility’s
security requirements and determine the most appropriate security scheme for
your implementation. You should include a detailed list of security requirements
within your implementation plan. (Refer to the FactoryTalk Batch Material
Manager Administrator Guide for complete information on supported security
schemes.)
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Questions to ask about
system requirements
Chapter 8
Some of the questions you will want to answer before you move forward in the
planning phase are:
1. Which FactoryTalk Batch components will be included in the Material
Manager implementation?
•
FactoryTalk Batch
•
FactoryTalk eProcedure
2. How many computers will be required to support the selected FactoryTalk
Batch system configuration?
3. Do you already own the computers, or will you need to buy more?
4. Which operating systems will need to be installed on each computer?
5. On which computers will you install each of the FactoryTalk Batch
components?
6. What security scheme will be used?
•
Domain
•
Workgroup
7. Which Users and/or User Groups need to be added to the new Material
Manager User Groups?
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Developing an implementation plan
Questions to ask about the
material database
Some of the questions you will want to answer before you move forward in the
planning phase are:
1. Does the current material data include the following characteristics?
•
States
•
Types
•
Classes
•
Materials
•
Properties
•
Lots/Sublots
•
Locations
•
Independent containers
2. How will the data fields be mapped from the existing data to the material
database?
3. In what form is the material data?
•
Doesn’t exist
•
Paper
•
Electronic
4. Will the data be entered manually or programmatically?
5. What method of synchronization will be used?
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Questions to ask about
equipment data
Chapter 8
1. Are there phases that move inventory into or out of a process cell? These
could be modeled as material-enabled phases.
2. Do you have the need for people to manually add or distribute inventory?
These could be instruction-based equipment modules and Material
Manager can be used to tell them what container to be drawing materials
from or moving materials into.
3. Will your phase logic need to be able to download an identifier for the
container that a material addition or distribution is working with? If so, you
will want to add the optional Material Manager parameters to that phase.
4. Will you ever need to specify the exact lot or barcode of some inventory that
will be used in a batch? If so, you will want to add the optional Material
Manager parameters to that phase.
5. What are the associations between containers and equipment modules?
6. What feed type, addition (adding inventory to a batch) or distribution
(moving inventory out of a batch) will the equipment module be supporting
for each container with which it is associated?
Questions to ask about
master recipe data
1. What material will be used by each material-enabled phase step?
2. What feed type, if selectable, is required for each material-enabled phase
step?
3. What type of binding will each material-enabled phase step require?
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Appendix A
Binding material-based recipes
Before running a material-based recipe, we should review the binding process that
FactoryTalk Batch uses to find equipment and materials to use in a batch. When a
material-based recipe is placed on the batch list, the FactoryTalk Batch Server
makes a request to the Material Server for containers that can support the
material requirement. The Material Server then returns a list of binding
candidates based upon the following rules for binding. If any rule fails, the
container is not selected as a binding candidate.
Rule
Applied To
Rule Description
1
Containers
The container must have a state of READY_TO_USE.
2
Containers
The material specification of an appropriate sublot within a container must match the
material specification of a recipe phase step’s material requirement.
For composite containers, the appropriate sublot is the only sublot in the container.
For plug-flow containers, the appropriate sublot is the lowest ordinal sublot in the
container.
For pallet containers, the appropriate sublot can be any sublot in the container.
3
Lot
The lot and sublot must have a state of READY_TO_USE.
4
Containers
For material additions, the total quantity of inventory in a container must exceed the
heel property value of the container. For example, if the heel property value for a plug
flow container is 100 gallons and the total inventory of the container is 85 gallons, the
container is considered empty and is not considered as a binding candidate.
5
Rules
All rules for selecting a binding candidate must be true.
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Appendix A
Binding material-based recipes
Together the FactoryTalk Batch and Material Servers apply these rules in a
two-step process to bind a material-based recipe automatically or to prepare the
list of binding candidates from which the operator can select.
1. Unit Binding
The type of unit binding you select affects how units are selected for
binding. Also, the FactoryTalk Batch Server analyzes the material
requirements presented by the Material Server to select a unit that can
satisfy all the requirements. The material requirement is based upon the
material, the feed type (addition or distribution) and, optionally, the lot and
label.
2. Recipe Phase Binding
Once a unit is selected, the FactoryTalk Batch Server further analyzes the
status of the containers and equipment modules available within the unit to
determine which containers and equipment modules can supply the
material to satisfy the recipe’s material requirements.
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Binding material-based recipes
Appendix A
Unit binding
The type of unit binding that you select can affect which units are selected for
running a recipe. There are four types of unit binding: Static, Creation, Dynamic
Unit Allocation, and Manual.
Static binding
If when creating a new operation or unit procedure in the Recipe Editor you select
Instance Based in the Unit Requirement dialog box, you must specify a specific
unit to use. During binding, the recipe must bind to that unit. Since the
North_Parlor process cell has two units, you do not want to restrict the batch to
only one unit so this would not be a good type of unit binding to use.
Creation binding
If you select Class Based, then you can select a class of units from which a unit
may be selected for binding. In the North_Parlor process cell there are two units.
Selecting MBR_FREEZER_CLS enables the FactoryTalk Batch Server or the
operator to choose from either NP_FREEZER1 or NP_FREEZER2.
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Appendix A
Binding material-based recipes
Dynamic unit allocation
108
If you enable dynamic unit allocation (also referred to as Late Binding) in the
Recipe Editor, there are more options available for unit binding when you create a
procedure. First, you will assign a unit requirement name to all unit instances of a
specific unit class. When a recipe is put on the Batch List and the server
encounters the unit requirement name, it looks up all the unit classes or instances
that are mapped to the unit requirement name. You assign a binding type that
applies to each unit instance assigned to the unit requirement.
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Binding material-based recipes
Manual binding
Appendix A
•
First Available
While the batch is running, the FactoryTalk Batch Server allocates the first
available legal unit to the recipe. Binding occurs when the first unit
procedure mapped to the unit requirement name is ready to run. For
material phases, if there are multiple equipment modules associated with a
container, the first available equipment module is selected. If multiple
equipment modules are available, the one with the lowest controller ID is
selected. First available binding is also dependent on any binding
requirements or preferences in the recipe.
•
Prompt
While the batch is running, the operator is prompted to bind to a specific
unit when the first unit procedure mapped to the unit requirement name is
ready to run. For material-based recipes, the operator is prompted to select a
material or lot when a recipe phase is about to run.
•
At Batch Creation
When the batch is created, the operator binds the recipe to a specific unit.
•
Operator Choice
When the batch is created, the operator can choose to bind the recipe to a
specific unit or choose either the Prompt or First Available binding method.
Manual binding is the process of binding a unit or rebinding a previously bound
unit to a step within a class-based recipe without the operator being prompted.
Manual binding is done in the Procedure as SFC or Table window in the
FactoryTalk Batch View while a batch is running.
With material-based recipes, the operator can direct a material-based recipe phase
to:
•
Bind to a material source or a material destination
•
Rebind to a different material source or material destination
•
Unbind from a material source or material destination
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Appendix A
Binding material-based recipes
Material requirements
When using material-based recipes, the FactoryTalk Batch Server also looks at the
material requirements when selecting equipment to bind to a recipe. For example,
if there are two units (Unit_1 and Unit_2) in the area model and only Unit_1 can
draw from a container that holds vanilla, then the FactoryTalk Batch Server selects
Unit_1 over Unit_2 for any recipe requiring vanilla.
Tip:
If dynamic unit allocation is enabled, the actual material does not have to exist but the capability of meeting the
material requirement must exist.
The following examples use the class-based recipe and area model shown in this
diagram to explore the different factors that help the FactoryTalk Batch Server
determine if material is available.
Tip:
110
In the following examples, all lots and containers are in a Ready to Use state and the container priorities are all
equal. Also, it is assumed that there is only one area model. If there is more than one FactoryTalk Batch Server
interacting with the Material Server, it is vastly important that the AREA name be unique in each .cfg file.
Rockwell Automation Publication BWMTR-GR011D-EN-P - February 2017
Binding material-based recipes
Material requirements: material
Appendix A
The unit selected to run the recipe can vary depending on the material
requirement.
Example
•
MBR_ADD:1 requires an addition of Material_1.
•
MBR_ADD:2 requires an addition of Material_2.
•
MBR_DUMP:1 has no material requirements.
Since Unit_2 does not have the ability to make an addition of Material_2, Unit_1
is selected to bind to the batch.
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Appendix A
Binding material-based recipes
Material requirements: material
and lot
The use of lots in the material requirement further narrows down the unit and
equipment modules selected for binding.
Example
•
MBR_ADD:1 requires an addition of Material_1, Lot_5.
•
MBR_ADD:2 requires an addition of Material_3, Lot_4.
•
MBR_DUMP:1 has no material requirements.
Unit 1 is selected because it can draw from the specified lots. Unit_2 can satisfy
the materials but not the specified lots.
Container_3 is a plug-flow container so the controller IDs determine which sublot
is drawn from the container. Lot_4 has a smaller controller ID than Lot_8 so
Lot_4 must be used first.
112
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Binding material-based recipes
Container type
Appendix A
The container type can limit the unit and equipment modules selected for
binding. Plug-flow containers can hold multiple lots of the same material but lots
must be used in the order they were added to the container (first-in/first-out
order). Pallet containers also can hold multiple lots of the same material but the
order they were added to the container is not considered.
Example
•
MBR_ADD:1 requires an addition of Material_1.
•
MBR_ADD:2 requires an addition of Material_3, Lot_3.
The recipe binds to Unit_2 because it is the only unit capable of drawing Lot 3.
Container_6 is not selected because it is a plug-flow container and Lot_1 must be
depleted before Lot_3 can be used. Container_5 is selected because it is a pallet
container and lots are available regardless of the order they were added to the
pallet. Material_1 is pulled from Container_6 because Equipment Module 4 is
pulling material from Container_5.
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113
Appendix A
Distributions
Binding material-based recipes
If a lot and label are specified in the material requirement for a distribution, the
values of the lot and label specification are ignored at unit binding but are assigned
to the distributed sublot.
Example
•
MBR_ADD:1 requires an addition of Material_1, Lot_5.
•
MBR_ADD:2 requires an addition of Material_3, Lot_4.
•
MBR_DUMP:1 requires a distribution of Material_6, Lot_1, Label_234.
Unit 1 is selected because it can draw the materials with the specified lots. The lot
and label for MBR_DUMP:1 are ignored until the material is distributed to
Container_7. The lot and label are then assigned to the material.
114
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Binding material-based recipes
Recipe phase binding
Appendix A
After a unit is selected for binding, the FactoryTalk Batch Server looks for more
material specifications to select which container and equipment module to use for
binding. This level of binding is referred to as Recipe Phase Binding.
In this area model example, you can see that each container is linked to more than
one equipment module. The recipe phase binding process involves identifying a
container that can supply or receive the material identified in the recipe, and then
selecting an equipment module that is linked to the container and satisfies the
recipe. Material Phases can bind to an equipment module/container pair
automatically or the operator can be prompted to make a selection.
The material database keeps track of the container used given the unit, material
and whether you are adding or distributing material.
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115
Appendix A
Binding material-based recipes
Container binding type
Feed type
The type of container binding is configured in the Recipe Editor on each
material-enabled phase of a recipe. There are two types of container binding,
Automatic and Prompt.
•
If Prompt container binding is selected, the operator is prompted just
before the phase runs to select from a list of all containers that meet the
material requirement.
•
If Automatic container binding is selected, the FactoryTalk Batch Server
selects the container based on several criteria just before the phase runs.
If Automatic container binding is selected, the container feed type adds to the
criteria used to select containers for binding. You configured the container feed
type (Addition or Distribution or both) in the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment
Editor when you linked a container to an equipment module.
It is possible to have a container/equipment module pair configured for both
addition and distribution. If this is the case, you configure the phase in the Recipe
Editor for an addition or distribution as appropriate.
116
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Binding material-based recipes
Automatic container binding
process
Appendix A
When Automatic container binding is selected, the FactoryTalk Batch Server
selects the container/equipment module based on the recipe’s material
requirement. If there is more than one container that meets the material
requirement, binding is based first on the container priority, second on the total
inventory for additions or the available space in the container for distributions,
and third on the container controller ID.
Here are examples to illustrate how a container is selected when there are multiple
containers available that satisfy the material requirement.
•
Container Priority (Additions or Distributions)
If all containers meet the material requirement, the container with the
lowest priority is selected.
Example: The recipe requires 2,000 KG of material, which all three
containers can supply. Container_3 is selected because it has a priority of
20, which is the lowest of the three containers.
Container Name
•
1st
2nd
3rd
Priority
Total Inventory
Controller ID
Container_1
100
4,500
62
Container_2
50
5,000
63
Container_3
20
6,000
64
Total Inventory (Additions only)
If priorities are identical, the container with the greatest amount of
inventory is selected. If the Heel value is greater than the total inventory, the
container is not considered for binding.
Example: The recipe requires 2,000 KG of material, which all three
containers can supply. The Heel value is less than the total inventory for all
three containers. Both Container_2 and Container_3 have a priority of 20.
Container_3 is selected because it has more available material (6,000).
Container Name
1st
2nd
3rd
Priority
Heel
Total
Inventory
Controller ID
Container_1
100
100
4,500
62
Container_2
20
100
5,000
63
Container_3
20
100
6,000
64
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117
Appendix A
Binding material-based recipes
•
Available Space in the Container (Distributions only)
If priorities are identical, the container with the most amount of available
space is selected. To calculate available space, subtract the total inventory
from the capacity of the container. The Heel value is not applicable to
material distributions so it is not involved in determining the available
space in the container.
Example: The recipe requires 2,000 KG of material, which all three
containers can supply. Both Container_1 and Container_3 have a
priority of 20. Container_3 is selected because it has more available space
(15,000 - 6,000 = 9,000) than Container_1 (10,000-4,500 = 5,500).
Container Name 1st
•
2nd
3rd
Priority
Capacity
Available Space
Total
Inventory
Controller ID
Container_1
20
10,000
4,500
5,000
62
Container_2
50
15,000
5,000
10,000
63
Container_3
20
15,000
6,000
9,000
64
Container Controller ID (Additions or Distributions)
If both the priority and material amount/container space are identical, the
container with the lowest controller ID is selected.
Example: The recipe requires 2,000 KG of material, which all three
containers can supply. Container_2 and Container_3 both have a priority
of 20 and an amount of 5000. Container_2 is selected because its controller
ID is lower than Container_3 (64).
Container Name 1st
118
2nd
3rd
Priority
Amount of Material
Controller ID
Container_1
100
4,500
62
Container_2
20
5,000
63
Container_3
20
5,000
64
Rockwell Automation Publication BWMTR-GR011D-EN-P - February 2017
Binding material-based recipes
Summary
Appendix A
This chapter provided a brief overview of binding material-based recipes. (See the
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor User Guide, FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor
User Guide, and FactoryTalk Batch View User Guide for more information on unit
binding.)
Rockwell Automation Publication BWMTR-GR011D-EN-P - February 2017
119
Legal Notices
Legal Notices
Copyright notice
© 2017 Rockwell Automation Technologies, Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in
USA.
This document and any accompanying Rockwell Software products are
copyrighted by Rockwell Automation Technologies, Inc. Any reproduction
and/or distribution without prior written consent from Rockwell Automation
Technologies, Inc. is strictly prohibited. Please refer to the license agreement for
details.
End User License Agreement (EULA)
You can view the Rockwell Automation End-User License Agreement ("EULA")
by opening the License.rtf file located in your product's install folder on your hard
drive.
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Any Rockwell Automation software or hardware not mentioned here is also a
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For a complete list of products and their respective trademarks, go to:
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Rockwell Automation Publication BWMTR-GR011D-EN-P - February 2017
121
Legal Notices
Warranty
This product is warranted in accordance with the product license. The product’s
performance may be affected by system configuration, the application being
performed, operator control, maintenance, and other related factors. Rockwell
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procedure, or process described, nor do they provide directions for meeting every
possible contingency during installation, operation, or maintenance. This
product’s implementation may vary among users.
This document is current as of the time of release of the product; however, the
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Customer Support Telephone — 1.440.646.3434
Online Support — http://www.rockwellautomation.com/support/
122
Rockwell Automation Publication BWMTR-GR011D-EN-P - February 2017
Index
A
active step change 85
actual_amount report parameter 56
adding
containers 40
material 39
material class 37
material states 34
material types 36
material-enabled phase parameters 54
material-enabled phase report parameters 56
AfterCombinedLotInsert 98
AfterLotInsert 97
AfterSubLotDelete 96
AfterSubLotInsert 95
alias name. See unit requirement name 70
amount parameter 54
area model
opening 47
assigning
formula values 67
automatic binding
container binding 116
phase binding 15
B
Batch Server 9
restarting 59
starting in demo mode 26
stopping 26
Batch View 10
BATCHCTL 17
binding 105
automatic container binding 116
automatic phase binding 15
container binding type 116
creation binding 107
dynamic unit allocation 70, 108
late binding 108
manual binding 109
manual phase binding 15
material requirements 110
material-based recipes 105
phase 15
prompt container binding 116
prompted phase 15
recipe phase binding 105, 115
static binding 107
unit binding 15, 105, 107
boot
cold 26
warm 26
warm-all 26
C
cold boot 26
COM+ 15
composite container 40
configuring
sample demonstrations 17
container binding
automatic 116
prompt 116
types 116
container feed type 116
container heel property 40, 105
container parameter 54
containers
adding 40
associate with material 42
composite 40
distributing lots 44
independent 32
pallet 40
plug-flow 40
types of 40
controller ID 34
creating
lots 43
material-based recipes 63
material-enabled phases 50
procedure 70
recipe formula parameters 66
unit procedure 68
creation binding 107
Rockwell Automation Publication BWMTR-GR011D-EN-P - February 2017
123
Index
D
demo mode
starting the Batch Server 26
distributing
lots to containers 44
dynamic unit allocation 108
enabling 70
E
enabling
dynamic unit allocation 70
enumeration sets
viewing 48
eProcedure Client 13
eProcedure Server 13
equipment data 103
Equipment Editor 12
exiting
Material Editor 45
insertion points
AfterCombinedLotInsert 98
AfterLotInsert 97
AfterSubLotDelete 96
AfterSubLotInsert 95
OnGenerateCustomLabelName 94
OnGenerateCustomLotName 93
L
label 44
parameter 54
late binding 108
first available 108
operator choice 108
prompt 108
linking
phase groups 76
lots 32, 39
creating 43
distributing to containers 44
parameters 54
F
FactoryTalk Batch components 7
FactoryTalk Batch modules 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14
feed complete 15
feed type 116
feed_complete report parameter 56
first available binding
binding prompt 108
formula value
assigning 67
H
heel property 40, 105
I
independent containers 32
124
M
manual binding 109
manual phase binding 15
manual phase control 82
material 32
adding 39
associate with container 42
material class
adding 37
material database 31
configuring Network Editor 17
Material Editor 31
exiting 45
starting 32
material object model (MOM) 15
material parameters 54
Rockwell Automation Publication BWMTR-GR011D-EN-P - February 2017
Index
material requirements 110
Material Server 15
material states
adding 34
material types
adding 36
material_class parameter 54
material-based recipes 8
binding 105
creating 63
material-enabled phases 8, 56
adding parameters 54
adding report parameters 56
binding 105
creating 50
programming 61
MOM (material object model) 15
N
Network Editor 13
configuring material database 17
configuring sample demonstrations 17
North_Parlor process cell 47
O
OnGenerateCustomLabelName 94
OnGenerateCustomLotName 93
OPC (OLE for Process Control)
communication protocol 28
opening
area model 47
simulator demonstration file 28
P
pallet container 40
parameters
amount 54
container 54
label 54
lot 54
material 54
material-class 54
material-enabled parameters 54
recipe formula 66
report 56
actual_amount 56
feed_complete 56
phase binding 15
phase link groups 76
phase logic 61
phase logic simulation 28
Phase Simulator 28
starting 28
plug-flow container 40
procedure
creating 70
programming
material-enabled phases 61
prompt container binding 116
prompted phase binding 15
R
recipe data 103
recipe formula parameters
creating 66
recipe phase binding 115
recipes 77
material-based 63
report parameters
actual_amount 56
adding 56
feed_complete 56
restarting
Batch Server 59
S
sample demonstrations 17
servers
Batch Server 9
eProcedure 13
Material Server 15
SQL Server 15
simulation mode 79
simulator 28
opening sample demonstration files 28
SQL Server 15
starting
Material Editor 32
Phase Simulator 28
Rockwell Automation Publication BWMTR-GR011D-EN-P - February 2017
125
Index
static binding 107
stopping
Batch Server 26
storage locations 32
sublots 32, 39, 44
system requirements 99
U
unacknowledged prompts 82
unit binding 15, 105, 107
unit procedure
creating 68
unit requirement name 70
V
verifying 77
recipes 77
View 10
viewing
enumeration sets 48
W
warm all boot 26
warm boot 26
West_Parlor process cell 47
Windows Service Manager 26
126
Rockwell Automation Publication BWMTR-GR011D-EN-P - February 2017
Rockwell Automation support
Rockwell Automation provides technical information on the web to assist you in using its products. At
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Installation assistance
If you experience a problem within the first 24 hours of installation, review the information that is contained in this manual. You can contact
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Rockwell Automation Publication BWMTR-GR011D-EN-P - February 2017
Supersedes Publication BWMTR-GR011C-EN-P
Copyright © 2017 Rockwell Automation Technologies, Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.
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