Personal Protective Equipment Program

Personal Protective Equipment Program

Personal Protective Equipment Program

November 11, 2016

Personal Protective Equipment Program

Table of Contents

I.

Introduction ............................................................................................................................. 1

A.

Scope ................................................................................................................................ 1

B.

Application ....................................................................................................................... 1

II.

Responsibility ......................................................................................................................... 1

III.

Hazard Assessment ................................................................................................................. 2

IV.

PPE Selection, Use, and Maintenance .................................................................................... 3

A.

General PPE Requirements .............................................................................................. 3

B.

Eye and Face Protection ................................................................................................... 3

1.

Protection Against Light Radiation .............................................................................. 4

2.

Protection Against Hazardous Materials Splash .......................................................... 4

3.

Protection Against Flying Particles (including sparks) ................................................ 4

4.

Protection against Glare, Heat, and Molten Metal ....................................................... 4

C.

Respiratory Protection ...................................................................................................... 5

D.

Head Protection ................................................................................................................ 5

1.

Protection against Impact (Class A, B, and C) ............................................................. 5

2.

Protection against Exposed Electrical Conductors (Class A and B) ............................ 5

E.

Hearing Protection............................................................................................................ 5

F.

Foot Protection ..................................................................................................................... 5

1.

Protection from Impact and Compression .................................................................... 6

2.

Protection from Puncture Wounds ............................................................................... 6

3.

Protection from Electrical Conduction ......................................................................... 6

4.

Protection from Heat, Molten Metal, and Sparks ......................................................... 6

G.

Hand Protection ................................................................................................................ 6

1.

Protection from Cuts, Lacerations, Abrasions, Punctures ............................................ 7

2.

Protection from Heat, Molten Metal and Sparks .......................................................... 7

3.

Protection from Hazardous Materials ........................................................................... 8

H.

Body Protection (arms, legs, torso) .................................................................................. 8

I.

Electrical Protective Equipment .......................................................................................... 8

V.

Training ................................................................................................................................... 8

VI.

Payment for Protective Equipment ......................................................................................... 9

Appendix A: Hazard Assessment Forms ...................................................................................... 10

Appendix B: Filter Lenses for Protection against Radiant Energy .............................................. 16

Appendix C: Glove Selection Guide for Protection against Hazardous Materials ...................... 17

ii

I. Introduction

A. Scope

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires employers to protect their employees from workplace hazards such as machines, work procedures, and hazardous substances that can cause injury.

The preferred way to do this is through engineering controls or work practice and administrative controls, but when these controls are not feasible or do not provide sufficient protection, an alternative or supplementary method of protection is to provide workers with personal protective equipment (PPE) and the know-how to use it properly.

This document serves as the written guide for Dickinson College compliance to 29 CFR 1910.132, titled, “Personal Protective Equipment” and the personal protective equipment program requirements contained therein.

B. Application

Personal protective equipment shall be provided, used, and maintained in a sanitary and reliable condition wherever environmental, chemical, radiological, or mechanical hazards or irritants may injure or impair employees through absorption, inhalation, or physical contact. Dickinson College shall institute all feasible engineering, work practice, and administrative controls to eliminate or reduce hazards below the permissible exposure limits before using

PPE to protect employees against hazards.

II. Responsibility

A. The President of Dickinson College has ultimate responsibility for occupational safety within the institution. General oversight responsibility is assigned to the VP Finance & Administration.

B. The Director of Compliance & Enterprise Risk Management will be responsible for administering the Dickinson College Personal Protective

Equipment Program. This includes:

• working with administrators and other employees to develop and implement the appropriate personal protective equipment policies and practices

• assisting supervisors in assessing workplace hazards

• advising on administrative and engineering controls that reduce hazard exposure

• recommending proper personal protective equipment

• maintaining hazard assessments and training records

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Personal Protective Equipment Program

• periodically reviewing the Personal Protective Equipment Program

• conducting safety audits

C. The Supervisor has a primary responsibility for implementing the Dickinson

College Personal Protective Equipment Program in the workplace. This includes:

• assessing workplace hazards through written certification

• ensuring that workers know and follow the personal protective equipment program

• implementing administrative and engineering controls where possible to reduce hazard exposure

• ensuring that the proper personal protective equipment is available and in working order

• ensuring employees are trained on the proper use, care, and maintenance of their PPE

• enforcing the use of PPE

• providing for the safety of visitors in the workplace

D. The Employee will be responsible for maintaining a thorough understanding of the Dickinson College Personal Protective Equipment Program and conducting each operation in accordance with the program. This includes:

• following safe work practices to eliminate or reduce hazardous exposure

• attending required training

• wearing and maintaining the appropriate PPE

• reporting changes in the workplace that affect hazard exposure to their supervisor

F. All Employees of the College are responsible for ensuring that they follow the procedures and faithfully implement the appropriate responsibilities put forth in the personal protective equipment program. Failure to do so is a serious breach of college policy and subject to disciplinary action that might include termination of employment at the college. The procedures to be followed in the event of such action shall be in keeping with existing guidelines as stated in the appropriate handbook for faculty, administrators, or staff.

III. Hazard Assessment

Hazard assessment is a process (required by OSHA) of identifying the hazards associated with a particular task, job title, or work location, and the personal protective equipment that must be used to ensure exposure does not exceed OSHA

2

Personal Protective Equipment Program permissible limits. Each hazard assessment shall be performed by the Director of

Compliance and Enterprise Risk Management and certified in writing.

Appendix A contains Hazard Assessment Certification Forms specific to task, job title, and work location. Supervisors may choose to use any one or a combination of these forms.

A copy of each hazard assessment performed shall be maintained at the workplace and a copy shall be sent to the Department of Compliance & Enterprise Risk

Management.

IV. PPE Selection, Use, and Maintenance

A. General PPE Requirements

• All personal protective equipment (PPE) shall be of safe design and construction for the work to be performed, and shall be maintained in a sanitary and reliable condition.

• Where employees provide their own PPE, Dickinson College shall assure its adequacy, including proper maintenance and sanitation.

• PPE which ensures a level of protection greater than the minimum required to protect employees from the hazards shall be selected.

• Careful consideration shall be given to comfort and fit. PPE that fits poorly will not afford the necessary protection. Continued wearing of the device is more likely if it fits the wearer comfortably. Protective devices are generally available in a variety of sizes or with adjustable features.

Care should be taken to ensure that the right size is selected.

B. Eye and Face Protection

Dickinson College shall ensure that employees use appropriate eye or face protection when exposed to eye or face hazards, including, but not limited to:

• dust or flying particles

• molten metal

• acids/caustics or other chemical liquids

• chemical gas or vapors

• blood or other potentially infectious body fluids that might splash, spray, or splatter

• potentially injurious light radiation such as that created by welding arcs or lasers

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Personal Protective Equipment Program

General Requirements a. Protective eye and face devices shall comply with ANSI Z87.1,

“American National Standard Practice for Occupational and

Educational Eye and Face Protection.” b. Employees who wear prescription lenses (including contact lenses) shall have their prescription incorporated into the eye protection or wear eye protection that can be worn over the prescription lenses without disturbing the proper position of the prescription lenses or the protective lenses. c. Eye and face protection shall be distinctly marked to identify the manufacturer. d. Emergency eyewash facilities meeting the requirements of 29 CFR

1910.151(c) shall be provided in all areas where employees may be exposed to corrosive materials.

1. Protection Against Light Radiation

Employees exposed to hazardous light radiation shall use filter lenses that have a shade number appropriate for the work being performed. A listing of appropriate shade numbers for various operations can be found in 29

CFR 1910.133, “Eye and Face Protection” and Appendix B.

Employees exposed to hazardous light emitted by lasers shall use safety goggles specifically designed to protect their eyes from the specific intensity of light produced by the laser. For guidance refer to the

Dickinson College Laser Safety Program.

2. Protection Against Hazardous Materials Splash

Employees exposed to chemical and biological hazards that may splash in the eye shall use chemical splash goggles with indirect venting. For severe exposure, a face shield shall be worn in addition to splash goggles.

3. Protection Against Flying Particles (including sparks)

Employees exposed to flying particles shall use either impact-resistant spectacles with side shields or impact-resistant goggles. For severe exposure, a face shield shall be worn in addition to spectacles or goggles.

4. Protection against Glare, Heat, and Molten Metal

Employees exposed to glare, heat, and molten metal shall use welding goggles with tinted lenses. For severe exposure, a face shield shall be worn in addition to welding goggles.

4

Personal Protective Equipment Program

C. Respiratory Protection

REFER TO THE DICKINSON COLLEGE RESPIRATORY PROTECTION

PROGRAM

D. Head Protection

Dickinson College shall ensure that each affected employee wears an appropriate protective helmet when working in areas where there is a potential for injury from falling objects or when exposed electrical conductors could contact the head.

Protective helmets shall comply with ANSI Z89.1, “American National Standard for Personal Protection-Protective Headwear for Industrial Workers-

Requirements.”

1. Protection against Impact (Class A, B, and C)

OSHA has three classifications of head protection. All three head protectors

(helmets) are designed to provide protection from impact and penetration hazards caused by falling objects.

2. Protection against Exposed Electrical Conductors (Class A and B)

In addition to providing protection from impact and penetration, head protection is also available which provides protection from electrical shock and burn. Class A helmets provide electrical protection from low-voltage conductors (they are proof tested to 2,200 volts). Class B helmets provide electrical protection from high-voltage conductors (they are proof tested to

20,000 volts).

E. Hearing Protection

REFER TO THE DICKINSON COLLEGE HEARING CONSERVATION

PROGRAM

F. Foot Protection

Dickinson College shall ensure that each affected employee uses protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects, or objects piercing the sole, and when the use of protective footwear will protect the affected employee from an electrical hazard, such as a static-discharge or electric-shock hazard, that remains after the employer takes other necessary protective measures.

Protective footwear shall comply with ANSI Z41, “American National Standard for Personal Protection-Protective Footwear,” ASTM F-2412-2005, "Standard

Test Methods for Foot Protection," and ASTM F-2413-2005, "Standard

5

Personal Protective Equipment Program

Specification for Performance Requirements for Protective Footwear," and ASTM

D-2047 “Standard Test Method for Static Coefficient of Friction.”

Protective footwear worn by housekeeping and dining personnel must be cut resistant* with slip resistant soles meeting ASTM standards in black or white.

Protective footwear worn by trades and grounds personnel must be cut resistant* with slip resistant soles and toe protection meeting ASTM standards in black, brown or tan.

*cut resistant is defined as leather or cloth upper covering the entire foot

1. Protection from Impact and Compression

Employees exposed to impact or compression hazards from objects falling or rolling onto their toes, or weight pressing on their toes shall use protective footwear with toe guards. When the dorsum of the foot is exposed to impact or compression hazards, the employee shall use metatarsal guards in addition to toe guards.

2. Protection from Puncture Wounds

Employees exposed to puncture wounds due to sharp objects piercing the sole shall use protective footwear with metal insoles.

3. Protection from Electrical Conduction

a. Electrically Conductive Footwear

Employees exposed to explosive atmospheres shall use protective footwear designed to be electrically conductive to prevent the buildup of static electricity by grounding the employee.

b. Electrically Nonconductive Footwear

Employees exposed to electrical conductors shall use protective footwear designed to be electrically nonconductive

4. Protection from Heat, Molten Metal, and Sparks

Employees exposed to heat, molten metal, and sparks shall use foundry shoes and leggings.

G. Hand Protection

Dickinson College shall select and require employees to use appropriate hand protection when employees’ hands are exposed to hazards such as those from skin absorption of harmful substances, severe cuts or lacerations, severe abrasions, punctures, chemical burns, thermal burns, and harmful temperature extremes.

6

Personal Protective Equipment Program

OSHA does not incorporate by reference ANSI standards for glove selection.

Dickinson College shall base the selection of the appropriate hand protection on an evaluation of the performance characteristics of the hand protection relative to the task(s) to be performed, conditions present, duration of use, and hazards and potential hazards identified. ANSI/ISEA 105 may be used as a reference document.

1. Protection from Cuts, Lacerations, Abrasions, Punctures

Employees exposed to cuts, lacerations, abrasions, or punctures shall use a glove that guards against these hazards. Choices include:

a. Fabric Gloves

These gloves protect against dirt, slivers, chafing, and abrasion but do not provide sufficient protection to be used with rough, sharp, or heavy materials.

b. Plastic Coated Fabric Gloves

Adding a plastic coating to fabric gloves strengthens them and offers slip-resistant qualities. These gloves can be used for handling bricks or wire rope for example.

c. Metal Mesh Gloves and Some Synthetic Gloves

These gloves provide protection against sharp objects such as knives.

d. Leather Gloves

These gloves provide protection against rough objects. They also protect against sparks and moderate heat.

2. Protection from Heat, Molten Metal and Sparks

Employees exposed to heat, molten metal, and sparks shall use a glove that guards against these hazards. Choices include:

a. Leather Gloves

These gloves provide protection against sparks and moderate heat.

They also protect against rough objects.

b. Aluminized Gloves

These gloves usually are used for welding, furnace, and foundry work because they provide reflective and insulating protection against heat.

7

Personal Protective Equipment Program

c. Aramid Fiber Gloves (and other synthetic materials)

These gloves protect against heat and cold. They may also be cut- and abrasive-resistant.

3. Protection from Hazardous Materials

Employees exposed to hazardous materials including chemicals and infectious substances shall use a glove that guards against these hazards. Many

“chemically resistant” gloves exist. To select an appropriate glove employees should refer to the safety data sheet for the hazardous material to which they are exposed. Additionally, a sample glove selection guide can be found in

Appendix C of this document. Chemically resistant glove selection guides are available from all major manufacturers.

H. Body Protection (arms, legs, torso)

Dickinson College shall select and require employees to use other appropriate body protection when parts of the employees’ bodies (other than those previously covered) are exposed to hazards such as those from skin absorption of harmful substances, severe cuts or lacerations, severe abrasions, punctures, chemical burns, thermal burns, and harmful temperature extremes.

Body protection may include: vests, jackets, aprons, coveralls, surgical gowns, full body suits

Like gloves, body protection comes in a variety of materials each suited to a particular hazard. To select an appropriate body protector refer to the safety data sheet for the hazardous material or contact the Director of Compliance &

Enterprise Risk Management for guidance.

I. Electrical Protective Equipment

Dickinson College shall ensure that the design requirements for electrically protective equipment including rubber insulating blankets, rubber insulating matting, rubber insulating covers, rubber insulating line hose, rubber insulating gloves, and rubber insulating sleeves are met per 29 CFR 1910.137 and as outlined in the Dickinson College Electrical Safety Program.

V. Training

Dickinson College shall provide training to each employee who is required to use

PPE. Training shall include at least the following:

• when PPE is necessary

• what PPE is necessary

• how to properly don, doff, adjust, and wear PPE

8

Personal Protective Equipment Program

• the limitations of PPE

• the proper care, maintenance, useful life, and disposal of PPE

Employees must demonstrate an understanding of their training and the ability to use the PPE properly, before being allowed to perform work requiring the use of PPE.

When supervisors have reason to believe that an employee who has been trained does not have the understanding and skill required to use PPE properly, the employee must be retrained. Circumstances where retraining is required include, but are not limited to, situations where:

• changes in the workplace render previous training obsolete

• changes in the type of PPE to be used render previous training obsolete

• inadequacies in an employee’s knowledge or use of assigned PPE indicate that the employee has not retained the requisite understanding and skill

(such as not wearing or improperly wearing PPE)

VI. Payment for Protective Equipment

Protective equipment, including personal protective equipment, shall be provided by

Dickinson College at no cost to the employee, except as provided below. Dickinson

College must pay for replacement PPE, except when the employee has lost or intentionally damaged the PPE.

• Dickinson College is not required to pay for non-specialty safety-toe protective footwear (including steel-toe shoes or steel-toe boots) and nonspecialty prescription safety eyewear, provided that the employer permits such items to be worn off the job-site.

• When Dickinson College provides metatarsal guards and allows the employee, at his or her request, to use shoes or boots with built-in metatarsal protection, the employer is not required to reimburse the employee for the shoes or boots.

• Dickinson College is not required to pay for everyday clothing, such as longsleeve shirts, long pants, street shoes, and normal work boots;

• Dickinson College is not required to pay for ordinary clothing, skin creams, or other items, used solely for protection from weather, such as winter coats, jackets, gloves, parkas, rubber boots, hats, raincoats, ordinary sunglasses, and sunscreen.

Where an employee provides adequate protective equipment he or she owns, the employer may allow the employee to use it and is not required to reimburse the employee for that equipment; however, Dickinson College shall be responsible to assure its adequacy, including proper maintenance, and sanitation of such equipment.

9

Personal Protective Equipment Program

Appendix A: Hazard Assessment Forms

Appendix A1

Certification of Hazard Assessment by Task

Assessment Date: _______________________ Department: _______________________

Description of Task:____________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

HAZARDS PPE REQUIRED

Eye and Face

___ Light Radiation

___ Hazardous Materials Splash

___ Flying Particles

___ Glare, Heat, Molten Metal

Respiratory

Filter Lenses (See Appendix B)

Chemical Splash Goggles

(add face shield for severe exposure)

Impact Spectacles with Side Shields or Impact

Goggles

(add face shield for severe exposure)

Welding Goggles with Tinted Lenses

(add face shield for severe exposure)

See Dickinson College Respiratory Protection

Program

Head

___ Impact and Penetration

___ Electricity (under 2200 Volts)

___ Electricity (2200—20,000 Volts) Class B Helmet

Hearing See Dickinson College Hearing Conservation

Program

Feet

___ Impact and/or Compression

Class A, B, or C Helmet

Class A Helmet

___ Puncture Wounds

___ Working in Explosive

Safety Shoes with Toe Guards (add metatarsal guards when dorsum of foot is exposed)

Safety Shoes with Metal Insoles

Electrically Conductive Safety Shoes

Atmosphere

___ Electricity Electrically Nonconductive Safety Shoes

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Personal Protective Equipment Program

___ Heat, Molten Metal, Sparks

Hand

___ Cuts, Lacerations, Abrasions,

Punctures

___ Heat, Molten Metal, Sparks

___ Hazardous Materials

Foundry Shoes and Leggings

Choose most appropriate (Fabric, Plastic coated fabric, Metal mesh, synthetic, or leather gloves)

Choose most appropriate (Leather, Aluminized,

Aramid fiber, or synthetic glove)

Choose most appropriate (latex, nitrile, butyl, vinyl, neoprene, fluoroelastomer)

Body (arms, legs, torso)

___ Cuts, Lacerations, Abrasions,

Punctures, Heat, Molten Metal,

Sparks, Hazardous Materials

Electrical Protection Equipment

Choose most appropriate (vest, jacket, apron, coverall, surgical gown, fully body suit)

See Dickinson College Electrical Safety Program

Other Control Measures: _______________________________________________________

CERTIFICATION: I certify this hazard assessment was conducted in accordance with the provisions of the Dickinson College Personal Protective Equipment Program.

___________________________________ ______________________________

Date Supervisor Name

Distribution: Department File

Department of Compliance & Enterprise Risk Management

11

Personal Protective Equipment Program

Appendix A2

Certification of Hazard Assessment by Job Title

Assessment Date:_______________________Department:_______________________

Job Title:_______________________________________________________________

Eye and Face Hazard Task PPE Required

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

Respiratory Hazard

Refer to Dickinson College Respiratory Protection Plan

Head Hazard Task

PPE Required

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

Hearing Hazard Refer to Dickinson College Hearing Conservation

Program

Foot Hazard Task PPE Required

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

12

Personal Protective Equipment Program

Hand Hazard Task PPE Required

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

Body Hazard Task PPE Required

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

Electrical Hazard Task PPE Required

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

Other Control Measures: _______________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

CERTIFICATION: I certify this hazard assessment was conducted in accordance with the provisions of the Dickinson College Personal Protective Equipment Program.

___________________________________

Supervisor Name

______________________________

Date

Distribution: Department File

Department of Compliance & Enterprise Risk Management

13

Personal Protective Equipment Program

Appendix A3

Certification of Hazard Assessment by Location

Assessment Date: _______________________ Department: _______________________

Building: ______________________________Room: ____________________________

Eye and Face Hazard Task PPE Required

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

Respiratory Hazard

Refer to Dickinson College Respiratory Protection Plan

Head Hazard Task

PPE Required

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

Hearing Hazard Refer to Dickinson College Hearing Conservation

Program

Foot Hazard Task PPE Required

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

14

Personal Protective Equipment Program

Hand Hazard Task PPE Required

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

Body Hazard Task PPE Required

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

Electrical Hazard Task PPE Required

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

___________________________ _____________________ __________________

Other Control Measures: _______________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

CERTIFICATION: I certify this hazard assessment was conducted in accordance with the provisions of the Dickinson College Personal Protective Equipment Program.

___________________________________

Supervisor Name

______________________________

Date

15

Personal Protective Equipment Program

Appendix B: Filter Lenses for Protection against Radiant Energy

Operations

Shielded metal arc welding

Gas metal-arc welding and flux-cored arc welding

Gas tungsten-arc welding

Air carbon arc cutting

Plasma arc welding

Plasma arc cutting

Torch blazing

Torch soldering

Carbon arc welding

Gas welding:

Light

Medium

Heavy

Oxygen cutting:

Light

Medium

Heavy

Source: 29 CFR 1910.133(a)(5).

Electrode size in

1/32” (0.8mm)

<3

3-5

5-8

>8

(light)

(heavy)

(light)**

(medium)**

(heavy)**

<1/8

1/8-1/2

>1/2

<1

1-6

>6

Arc current

<60

60-160

160-250

250-550

<60

60-160

160-250

250-500

<50

50-150

150-500

<500

500-1,000

<20

20-100

100-400

400-800

<300

300-400

400-800

<3.2

3.2-12.7

>12.7

<25

25-150

>150

Minimum* protective

shade

3

4

5

14

4

5

6

8

9

10

3

2

8

8

10

10

11

6

8

10

11

7

8

10

11

7

10

10

10

*As a rule of thumb, start with a shade that is too dark to see the weld zone. Then go to a lighter shade which gives sufficient view of the weld zone without going below the minimum. In ox fuel gas welding or cutting where the torch

produces a high yellow light, it is desirable to use a filter lens that absorbs the yellow or sodium line in the visible light of

the (spectrum) operation.

** These values apply where the actual arc is clearly seen. Experience has shown that lighter filters may be used when the

arc is hidden by the workpiece.

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Personal Protective Equipment Program

Appendix C: Glove Selection Guide for Protection against Hazardous

Materials

Chemical resistant gloves are an important aspect of protection against hazardous materials. It is critical that users select the correct glove material based on the chemicals used and the glove’s permeation data. Inappropriate use of glove material may actually injure a worker as chemicals can quickly permeate the barrier. Please review the manufacturer, test data, and glove usage recommendations. Together the information will allow you to select the best glove material for your application. If you have any questions on glove selection, contact the Director of

Compliance & Enterprise Risk Management at 717-245-1495.

Chemical Family

Butyl

Rubber

Neoprene

PVC

(Vinyl)

Nitrile

Natural

Latex

G NR NR NR NR

G

E

E

E

E

E

E

E

E

E

Acetates

Acids, inorganic

Acids, organic

Acetonitrile,

Acrylonitrile

Alcohols

Aldehydes

Amines

Bases, inorganic

Ethers

Halogens (liquids)

Inks

Ketones

Nitro compounds

(Nitrobenzene,

Nitromethane)

Oleic Acid

Phenols

Quinones

Solvents, Aliphatic

Solvents, Aliphatic

G

G

G

G

E

E

E

S

E

G

E

NR

E E

E E

NR E

NR NR

NR NR

E

G

NR

E

F

NR

E

G

G S E

NR E E

NR S* NR

NR F

E E

NR

E

NR E

F E

NR

NR

E S F

NR NR G

NR NR NR

F E NR

NR NR G

G E E

F

F

G

F

NR

NR

S - Superior, E - Excellent, G - Good, F - Fair, NR - Not Recommended.

*Not recommended for Acetaldehyde, use Butyl Rubber

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Personal Protective Equipment Program

The performance of gloves depend on their thickness and conditions of manufacture, as well as their material of construction. It is best to consult the manufacturers' glove selection guides. A few companies are listed below.

Ansell-Edmont

- Ansell Industrial, 1300 Walnut St., Coshocton, OH 43812.

From the AnsellPro.com Home Page link to the

Chemical Resistance Guide: Permeation and

Degradation Data

, a .pdf file, or, SpecWare , Ansell's interactive chemical resistance and glove recommendations guide to nearly 200 industrial chemicals and mixtures. Links to toxicology information, for thousands of chemicals from the National Library of Medicine database, is also provided.

MAPA Professional

- 85 85 Innsbruck Drive, Buffalo, NY 14227.

Permeation, Degradation and Breakthrough Rates

- for 116 chemicals against their

Stansolv® Nitrile and StanzoilÆ Neoprene gloves. http://www.mapaglove.com/content/ChemChart.htm

Honeywell Safety Products USA

- 900 Douglas Pike, Smithfield, RI 02917

From the Honeywell Safety website, one can search for gloves according to hazard or by type of glove on the Hand and Arm Protection page. http://www.honeywellsafety.com/USA/Product_Catalog/Gloves.aspx

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