Personal Protective Equipment at Workplace

Personal Protective Equipment at Workplace
LiV
Safe
!
Personal Protective Equipment at Workplace
Issue 28
Volume 1
January, 2016
LiVSafe is a conscious safety initiative of Liberty Videocon to help people live safer, secure lives through an education series of proactive
and preventative suggestions in the safety arena. This document does not purport to promote any product directly or indirectly.
Measures to augment safety of workers with proper personal protective equipment
Overview
Personal Protective Equipment, commonly referred to as ‘PPE’, are
equipment worn to minimize exposure to serious workplace injuries and
illnesses. It can include items such as safety helmets and hard hats, gloves,
safety goggles, earplugs, respirators, vests and full body suits. The hazards
addressed by protective equipment include physical, electrical, heat,
chemicals, biohazards, and airborne particulate matter.
The purpose of personal protective equipment is to reduce employee
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exposure to hazards when engineering and administrative controls are not Source:
2014/06/commitment-to-safety.jpg
feasible or effective to reduce these risks to acceptable levels. However, PPE
has the serious limitation that it does not eliminate the hazard at source and may result in employees being exposed to the hazard if
the equipment fails.
We at Liberty Videocon General Insurance value the importance of ensuring safety of your workers at your workplace; and intend to
suggest various PPE and their usage to augment the same. We sincerely hope that the measures suggested in this document will
help in achieving maximum safety and protection of the workers at your place of work.
The Requirement of PPE
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Care for, clean and maintain PPE.
Inform a supervisor of the need to repair or replace PPE.
To ensure the greatest possible protection for employees in the
Selection
workplace, cooperative efforts of both employers and
l All PPE clothing and equipment should be of safe design and
employees will help in establishing and maintaining a safe and
construction, and should be maintained in a clean and
healthful work environment.
reliable fashion.
l Employers should take the fit and comfort of PPE into
In general, employers are responsible for:
consideration when selecting appropriate items for their
l Performing a ‘hazard assessment’ of the workplace to
workplace.
identify and control physical and health hazards.
l PPE that fits well and is comfortable to wear will encourage
l Identifying and providing appropriate PPE for employees.
employee use of PPE.
l Training employees in the use and care of the PPE.
l Most protective devices are available in multiple sizes and
l Maintaining PPE, including replacing worn or damaged
care should be taken to select the proper size for each
PPE.
employee.
l Periodically reviewing, updating and evaluating the l If several different types of PPE are worn together, make
effectiveness of the PPE program.
sure they are compatible.
l If PPE does not fit properly, it can make the difference
In general, employees should:
between being safely covered or dangerously exposed. It
l Properly wear PPE.
may not provide the desired level of protection and may
l Attend training sessions on PPE.
discourage employee use.
clucking inside a building are about 105 dB and a
pig’s squeal can reach up to 130 dB. Hearing
protection should be worn if noise levels exceed
Noise-induced hearing loss is 100 per cent preventable. Once 85 dB.
acquired, this type of hearing loss is permanent and irreversible.
Therefore, prevention measures must be taken by employers Some types of hearing protection include:
and workers to ensure hearing protection at all times. Sound is l Single-use earplugs are made of waxed cotton, foam,
measured in decibels (dB). A normal conversation takes place at
silicone rubber or fiberglass wool. They are self-forming and,
about 60 dB, whereas a gunshot is above 130 dB. Most power
when properly inserted, they work as well as most molded
tools operate at between 90 and 120 decibels, chickens
earplugs.
Hearing Safety
Our Values
TRUST
DIGNITY & RESPECT
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AGILITY
COMMITMENT
For more Safety tips turn overleaf
The principles contained in this material are general in scope and, to the best of our knowledge, current at the time of publication.
Insurance is the subject matter of the solicitation.
IRDA Registration No. 150
Liberty Videocon General Insurance specifically disclaims all liability for damages or personal injury alleged to arise from reliance on
CIN : U66000MH2010PLC209656
the information contained in this document.
Trade Logo displayed above belongs to Liberty Mutual and used by the Liberty Videocon General Insurance Company Limited under license.
LiV
Safe
l
!
Pre-formed or molded earplugs must be individually fitted by
a professional and can be disposable or reusable. Reusable
plugs should be cleaned after each use.
Head Protection
A head injury can impair an employee for life or it can be fatal.
Wearing a safety helmet or hard hat is one of the easiest ways to
protect an employee's head from injury. Hard hats can protect
employees from impact and penetration hazards as well as from
electrical shock and burn hazards.
In general, protective helmets or hard hats should do the following:
Resist penetration by objects.
Absorb the shock of a blow.
l
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Foot and Leg Protection
Employees who face possible foot or leg injuries from falling or
rolling objects, or from crushing or penetrating materials, should
wear protective footwear. If an employee's feet may be exposed to
electrical hazards, non-conductive footwear should be worn. On the
other hand, workplace exposure to static electricity may
necessitate the use of conductive footwear.
Eye and Face Protection
l
Earmuffs require a perfect seal around the ear. Glasses, facial
hair, long hair or facial movements such as chewing may reduce
the protective value of earmuffs.
l
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Be water-resistant and slow burning.
Have clear instructions explaining proper
adjustment and replacement of the suspension and
headband.
Hard hats with any of the following defects should be removed
from service and replaced:
l Perforation, cracking, or deformity of the brim or shell.
l Indication of exposure of the brim or shell to heat, chemicals or
ultraviolet light and other radiation (in addition to a loss of
surface gloss, such signs include chalking or flaking).
Examples of situations in which an employee should
wear foot and/or leg protection include:
l When heavy objects such as barrels or tools might
roll onto or fall on the employee's feet.
l Working with sharp objects such as nails or spikes that could
pierce the soles or uppers of ordinary shoes.
l Exposure to molten metal that might splash on feet or legs.
l Working on or around hot, wet or slippery surfaces.
l Working when electrical hazards are present.
surrounding the eyes and provide protection from
impact, dust and splashes.
Welding Shields: Made up of vulcanized fiber or
fiberglass and fitted with a filtered lens, welding
shields protect eyes from burns caused by infrared or intense
radiant light. They also protect both the eyes and face from
flying sparks, metal spatter and slag chips produced during
welding, brazing, soldering and cutting operations.
Face Shields: These transparent sheets of plastic extend from
the eyebrows to below the chin and across the entire width of
the employee’s head. Face shields used in combination with
goggles or safety spectacles will provide additional protection
against impact hazards.
l
Employees eyes and face may be exposed to hazards from flying
particles, chemicals, acids or caustic liquids, gases or vapors,
infected material, molten metal, light radiation etc.
Most common types of eye and face protection include the following:
Safety Eyeglasses: These have safety frames constructed of
metal or plastic and impact-resistant lenses. Side shields in some
eyeglasses offers better protection.
l Goggles: These are tight-fitting eye protection that completely
cover the eyes, eye sockets and the facial area immediately
l
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Hand and Arm Protection
If a workplace hazard assessment reveals that
employees face potential injury to hands and arms that
cannot be eliminated through engineering and work
practice controls, employers must ensure that employees
wear appropriate protection. Potential hazards include
skin absorption of harmful substances, chemical or thermal burns,
electrical dangers, bruises, abrasions, cuts, punctures, fractures and
amputations. Protective equipment includes gloves, finger guards
and arm coverings or elbow-length gloves.
Some Statistics
Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, USA show:
Hard hats were worn by only 16% of those workers who
sustained head injuries, although two-fifths were required to
wear them for certain tasks at specific locations.
l Only 1% of approximately 770 workers suffering face injuries
were wearing face protection.
l Only 23% of the workers with foot injuries wore safety shoes or
boots.
l About 40% of the workers with eye injuries wore eye protective
equipment.
l
Trivia
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The first fire helmet had a high crown and broad brim and was
invented by Jacobus Turck in the 1730s. The helmet was made
of leather. A more modern-looking helmet was created in 1836
by Henry T. Gratacap. It was a reinforced, dome-shaped
leather helmet with a front shield and a brim that rolled to a long
back tail.
Ray and Cecilia Benner invented the first mouldable pure
silicone ear plugs in 1962. The earplugs were valued by
swimmers, as well as those trying
to avoid harmful noise, for their
waterproof qualities.
The people inhabiting the polar
regions carved snow goggles
from deer skull, wood, and shell to
help prevent snow blindness. The
Inuit goggles were curved to fit the
user’s face and had a large
groove cut in the back to allow for
the nose. In the early 20th
century, goggles were worn by
drivers of uncovered cars to
prevent irritation of the eyes by Source: http://oculos.blog.br/wp-content/
dust or wind.
uploads/2011/04/esquimo.jpg
Liberty Videocon General Insurance Company Limited
10th Floor, Tower A, Peninsula Business Park, Ganpatrao Kadam Marg, Lower Parel, Mumbai - 400 013
Phone: +91 22 6700 1313 Fax: +91 22 6700 1606 Email: [email protected]
www.libertyvideocon.com
The principles contained in this material are general in scope and, to the best of our knowledge, current at the time of publication.
Insurance is the subject matter of the solicitation.
IRDA Registration No. 150
Liberty Videocon General Insurance specifically disclaims all liability for damages or personal injury alleged to arise from reliance on
CIN : U66000MH2010PLC209656
the information contained in this document.
Trade Logo displayed above belongs to Liberty Mutual and used by the Liberty Videocon General Insurance Company Limited under license.
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