System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide

System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide
System Management Services
(SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide
Sun Microsystems, Inc.
4150 Network Circle
Santa Clara, CA 95054 U.S.A.
650-960-1300
Part No. 816-5318-10
January 2003, Revision A
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Contents
Preface
xvii
Before You Read This Book
xvii
How This Book Is Organized
Using UNIX Commands
xviii
Typographic Conventions
Shell Prompts
xvii
xix
xix
Related Documentation
xx
Accessing Sun Documentation
xx
Sun Welcomes Your Comments
1.
xxi
Introduction to System Management Services
Sun Fire 15K/12K Server System
Redundant SCs
SMS Features
1
2
3
System Architecture
5
SMS Administration Environment
5
Network Connections for Administrators
SMS Operating Environment
▼
1
To Begin Using the SC
SMS Console Window
6
7
7
7
iii
▼
To Display a Console Window Locally
Tilde Usage
10
Remote Console Session
Sun Management Center
2.
11
11
SMS Security Options and Administrative Privileges
Security Options
14
Administration Privileges
15
Platform Administrator Group
Platform Operator Group
Platform Service Group
16
18
18
Domain Administrator Group
19
Domain Configuration Group
21
Superuser Privileges
All Privileges
3.
SMS Internals
Startup Flow
SMS Daemons
22
22
29
29
30
Capacity on Demand Daemon
Domain Configuration Agent
33
34
Domain Status Monitoring Daemon
Domain X Server
35
36
Environmental Status Monitoring Daemon
Failover Management Daemon
FRU Access Daemon
37
38
39
Hardware Access Daemon
40
Key Management Daemon
42
Management Network Daemon
iv
8
45
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
13
Message Logging Daemon
46
OpenBoot PROM Support Daemon
47
Platform Configuration Database Daemon
Platform Configuration
Domain Configuration
49
50
System Board Configuration
SMS Startup Daemon
Scripts
50
51
52
Spare Mode
53
Main Mode
53
Domain-Specific Process Startup
Monitoring and Restarts
SMS Shutdown
54
Environment Variables
SMS Configuration
54
55
57
Domain Configuration Units
58
Domain Configuration Requirements
DCU Assignment
54
54
Task Management Daemon
4.
48
58
59
Static Versus Dynamic Domain Configuration
Global Automatic Dynamic Reconfiguration
Configuration for Platform Administrators
Available Component List
▼
59
60
61
61
To Set Up the Available Component List
Configuring Domains
61
63
▼
To Name or Change Domain Names From the Command Line
▼
To Add Boards to a Domain From the Command Line
▼
To Delete Boards From a Domain From the Command Line
63
63
66
Contents
v
▼
To Move Boards Between Domains From the Command Line
▼
To Set Domain Defaults
▼
To Obtain Board Status
▼
To Obtain Domain Status
Virtual Time of Day
68
69
70
72
Setting the Date and Time
72
▼
To Set the Date on the SC
▼
To Set the Date for Domain eng2
▼
To Display the Date on the SC
▼
To Display the Date on Domain eng2
Configuring NTP
▼
73
73
73
74
77
Flashupdate Command
77
Configuration for Domain Administrators
Configuring Domains
78
78
▼
To Add Boards to a Domain From the Command Line
▼
To Delete Boards From a Domain From the Command Line
▼
To Move Boards Between Domains From the Command Line
▼
To Set Domain Defaults
▼
To Obtain Board Status
▼
To Obtain Domain Status
▼
To Obtain Device Status
Virtual Keyswitch
Setkeyswitch
78
84
85
85
86
87
87
▼
To Set the Virtual Keyswitch On in Domain A
▼
To Display the Virtual Keyswitch Setting in Domain A
Virtual NVRAM
vi
73
74
To Create the ntp.conf File
Virtual ID PROM
67
90
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
90
90
80
82
Setting the OpenBoot PROM Variables
▼
To Recover From a Repeated Domain Panic
▼
To Set the OpenBoot PROM Security Mode Variable in Domain A
▼
To See the OpenBoot PROM Variables
Degraded Configuration Preferences
Setbus
▼
▼
92
94
95
To Set All Buses on All Active Domains to Use Both CSBs
95
96
To Show All Buses on All Active Domains
Capacity on Demand
COD Overview
96
97
97
COD Licensing Process
98
COD RTU License Allocation
Instant Access CPUs
99
Resource Monitoring
100
Getting Started with COD
98
100
Managing COD RTU Licenses
101
▼
To Obtain and Add a COD RTU License Key to the COD License
Database 101
▼
To Delete a COD License Key From the COD License Database
▼
To Review COD License Information
Activating COD Resources
▼
102
102
104
To Enable Instant Access CPUs and Reserve Domain RTU Licenses
Monitoring COD Resources
▼
107
To Identify COD CPU/Memory Boards
COD Resource Usage
105
107
COD CPU/Memory Boards
▼
94
95
Showbus
5.
91
107
108
To View COD Usage By Resource
108
Contents
vii
▼
To View COD Usage by Domain
109
▼
To View COD Usage by Resource and Domain
Deconfigured and Unlicensed COD CPUs
Other COD Information
6.
Domain Control
Domain Boot
113
115
116
116
▼
To Power System Boards On and Off From the Command Line
▼
To Recover From Power Failure
Domain-Requested
Fast Boot
118
119
Automatic System Recovery (ASR)
119
120
Domain Abort/Reset
Hardware Control
120
121
Power-On Self-Test (POST)
Blacklist Editing
121
122
Platform and Domain Blacklisting
122
▼
To Blacklist a Component
▼
To Remove a Component From the Blacklist
ASR Blacklist
Power Control
Fan Control
Hot-Swap
127
129
129
Hot-Plug
130
130
SC Reset and Reboot
▼
123
128
Hot-Unplug
viii
113
115
Keyswitch On
Power
111
130
To Reset the Main or Spare SC
131
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
125
117
HPU LEDs
7.
131
Domain Services
135
Management Network Overview
I1 Network
136
I2 Network
138
135
External Network Monitoring
MAN Daemons and Drivers
Management Network Services
Domain Console
Message Logging
139
140
141
141
142
Dynamic Reconfiguration
143
Network Boot and Solaris Software Installation
SC Heartbeats
8.
144
Domain Status
145
Software Status
145
Status Commands
146
showboards Command
146
showdevices Command
146
showenvironment Command
showobpparams Command
147
showxirstate Command
149
Solaris Software Heartbeat
149
150
Hardware Configuration
Environmental Status
▼
146
147
showplatform Command
Hardware Status
143
150
151
To Display the Environment Status for Domain A
151
Contents
ix
Hardware Error Status
151
SC Hardware and Software Status
9.
SC Failover
Overview
152
155
156
Fault Monitoring
157
File Propagation
158
Failover Management
Startup
159
159
Main SC
159
Spare SC
159
Failover CLIs
160
setfailover Command
160
showfailover Command
Command Synchronization
cmdsync CLIs
161
163
164
initcmdsync Command
164
savecmdsync Command
164
cancelcmdsync Command
runcmdsync Command
165
showcmdsync Command
Data Synchronization
165
165
setdatasync Command
showdatasync Command
Failure and Recovery
164
165
166
166
Failover on Main SC (Main Controlled Failover)
168
Fault on Main SC (Spare Takes Over Main Role)
169
I2 Network Fault
170
Fault on Main SC (I2 Network Is Also Down)
x
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
170
Fault Recovery and Reboot
I2 Fault Recovery
171
171
Reboot and Recovery
171
Client Failover Recovery
Security
10.
172
173
Domain Events
Message Logging
175
175
Log File Maintenance
176
Log File Management
180
Domain Reboot Events
181
Domain Reboot Initiation
Domain Boot Failure
Domain Panic Events
Domain Panic
181
181
182
183
Domain Panic Hang
184
Repeated Domain Panic
184
Solaris Software Hang Events
185
Hardware Configuration Events
Hot-Plug Events
185
185
Hot-Unplug Events
186
POST-Initiated Configuration Events
Environmental Events
186
186
Over-Temperature Events
Power Failure Events
188
188
Out-of-Range Voltage Events
Under-Power Events
Fan Failure Events
Clock Failure Events
188
188
189
189
Contents
xi
Hardware Error Events
189
Domain Stop Events
191
CPU-Detected Events
Record Stop Events
191
191
Other ASIC Failure Events
SC Failure Events
11.
SMS Utilities
192
193
SMS Backup Utility
193
SMS Restore Utility
194
SMS Version Utility
195
Version Switching
▼
196
To Switch Between Two Adjacent, Co-resident Installations of
SMS 196
SMS Configuration Utility
UNIX Groups
197
197
Access Control List (ACL)
Network Configuration
MAN Configuration
A.
SMS man Pages
B.
Error Messages
197
198
199
201
205
Installing smshelp
205
▼
To Install theSUNWSMSjh Package
▼
To Start smshelp
Types of Errors
Error Categories
Glossary
xii
191
205
206
210
210
213
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Figures
17
FIGURE 2-1
Platform Administrator Privileges
FIGURE 2-2
Platform Operator Privileges 18
FIGURE 2-3
Platform Service Privileges 19
FIGURE 2-4
Domain Administrator Privileges 20
FIGURE 2-5
Domain Configurator Privileges 21
FIGURE 2-6
Superuser Privileges 22
FIGURE 3-1
Sun Fire 15K/12K Client Server Overview 31
FIGURE 3-2
CODD server client relationships
FIGURE 3-3
DCA Client Server Relationships 35
FIGURE 3-4
DSMD Client Server Relationships
FIGURE 3-5
DXS Client Server Relationships
FIGURE 3-6
ESMD Client Server Relationships 38
FIGURE 3-7
FOMD Client Server Relationships
FIGURE 3-8
FRAD Client Server Relationships 40
FIGURE 3-9
HWAD Client Server Relationships
FIGURE 3-10
KMD Client Server Relationships 45
FIGURE 3-11
MAND Client Server Relationships
FIGURE 3-12
MLD Client Server Relationships 47
FIGURE 3-13
OSD Client Server Relationships
FIGURE 3-14
PCD Client Server Relationships 49
34
36
37
39
42
46
48
xiii
xiv
FIGURE 3-15
SSD Client Server Relationships
51
FIGURE 3-16
TMD Client Server Relationships
55
FIGURE 7-1
Management Network Overview 136
FIGURE 7-2
I1 Network Overview of the Sun Fire 15K 137
FIGURE 7-3
I2 Network Overview
FIGURE 7-4
External Network Overview 139
FIGURE 9-1
Failover Fault Categories
138
167
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Tables
23
TABLE 2-1
All Group Privileges
TABLE 3-1
Daemons and Processes
TABLE 3-2
Example Environment Variables 56
TABLE 5-1
COD License Information 103
TABLE 5-2
setupplatform Command Options for COD Resource Configuration
TABLE 5-3
showcodusage Resource Information 109
TABLE 5-4
showcodusage Domain Information
TABLE 5-5
Obtaining COD Component, Configuration, and Event Information 114
TABLE 9-1
Failover Mechanisms 162
TABLE 10-1
SMS Log Type Information
TABLE 10-2
MLD Default Settings 180
TABLE B-1
Error Types
TABLE B-2
Error Categories 210
32
104
110
177
210
xv
xvi
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Preface
The System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide describes the SMS
software components of the Sun Fire™ 15K/12K server system product line.
Before You Read This Book
This manual is intended for the Sun Fire system administrator, who has a working
knowledge of UNIX® systems, particularly those based on the Solaris™ Operating
Environment. If you do not have such knowledge, read the Solaris User and System
Administrator documentation provided with this system, and consider UNIX system
administration training.
All members of the next-generation Sun Fire server family can be configured as
loosely coupled clusters. However, it is currently outside of the scope of this
document to address system management for Sun Fire 15K/12K cluster
configurations.
How This Book Is Organized
This guide contains the following chapters:
Chapter 1 introduces the System Management Services software and describes its
command line interfaces.
Chapter 2 introduces security on the domains.
Chapter 3 describes SMS domain internals and explains how to use them.
xvii
Chapter 4 describes domain configuration.
Chapter 5 describes capacity on demand (COD).
Chapter 6 describes the control functions.
Chapter 7 describes network services available and how to use them.
Chapter 8 describes status monitoring.
Chapter 9 describes system controller (SC) failover.
Chapter 10 describes event monitoring.
Chapter 11 describes SMS utilities for creating and restoring backups, configuring
networks and user groups and upgrading SMS software.
Appendix A provides a list of SMS man pages.
Appendix B describes SMS error messages.
Glossary is a list of words and phrases and their definitions.
Using UNIX Commands
This document might not contain information on basic UNIX commands and
procedures such as shutting down the system, booting the system, and configuring
devices.
See one or more of the following for this information:
xviii
■
Solaris Handbook for Sun Peripherals
■
Online documentation for the Solaris software environment
■
Other software documentation that you received with your system
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Typographic Conventions
Typeface or
Symbol
Meaning
Examples
AaBbCc123
The names of commands, files,
and directories; on-screen
computer output
Edit your .login file.
Use ls -a to list all files.
% You have mail.
AaBbCc123
What you type, when
contrasted with on-screen
computer output
% su
Password:
AaBbCc123
Book titles, new words or terms,
words to be emphasized.
Replace command-line
variables with real names or
values.
Read Chapter 6 in the User’s Guide.
These are called class options.
To delete a file, type rm filename.
Shell Prompts
Shell
Prompt
C shell
sc_name:sms-user:> or
domain_id:sms-user:>
C shell superuser
sc_name:# or domain_id:#
Bourne shell and Korn shell
>
Bourne shell and Korn shell superuser
#
Preface
xix
Related Documentation
Application
Title
Part Number
Reference (man pages)
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3
Reference Manual
816-5319-10
Installation
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3
Installation Guide
816-5320-10
Release Notes
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3
Release Notes
816-5321-10
Overview Guide
Sun Fire 15K/12K Software Overview
Guide
816-5322-10
Options
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3
Dynamic Reconfiguration User Guide
816-7723-10
Sun Fire 15K/12K Dynamic
Reconfiguration User Guide
816-5075-12
System Administration Guide: IP Services
806-4075-11
OpenBoot™ 4.x Command Reference
Manual
816-1177-10
Sun Fire 15K/12K System Site Planning
Guide
816-4278-10
Sun Fire Link™ Fabric Administrator’s
Guide
806-1405-10
Securing the Sun Fire 12K and 15K
System Controllers: Updated for SMS 1.3.
817-1358-10
Securing the Sun Fire 12K and 15K
Domains: Updated for SMS 1.3.
817-1357-10
Accessing Sun Documentation
You can view, print, or purchase a broad selection of Sun documentation, including
localized versions, at:
http://www.sun.com/documentation
xx
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Sun Welcomes Your Comments
Sun is interested in improving its documentation and welcomes your comments and
suggestions. You can email your comments to Sun at:
[email protected]
Please include the part number (816-5318-10) of your document in the subject line of
your email.
Preface
xxi
xxii
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
CHAPTER
1
Introduction to System
Management Services
This manual describes the System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 software that is
available with the Sun Fire 15K/12K server system.
This chapter includes the following sections:
■
■
■
■
■
Sun Fire 15K/12K Server System
SMS Features
System Architecture
SMS Administration Environment
Sun Management Center
Sun Fire 15K/12K Server System
The Sun Fire 15K/12K server is a member of the next-generation Sun Fire server
family.
The system controller (SC) in the Sun Fire 15K/12K is a multifunction, Nordicabased printed circuit board (PCB), which provides critical services and resources
required for the operation and control of the Sun Fire system. In this book, the
system controller is called the SC.
The Sun Fire 15K/12K system is often referred to as the platform. System boards
within the platform can be logically grouped together into separately bootable
systems called dynamic system domains, or simply domains.
1
Up to 18 domains on the Sun Fire 15K, and up to 9 domains on the Sun Fire 12K can
exist simultaneously on a single platform. (Domains are introduced in this chapter,
and are described in more detail in “SMS Configuration” on page 57.) The system
management services (SMS) software lets you control and monitor domains, as well
as the platform itself.
The following list is an overview of the many services the SC provides for the Sun
Fire system:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Manages the overall system configuration.
Acts as a boot initiator for its domains.
Serves as the syslog host for its domains; note that an SC can still be a syslog
client of a LAN-wide syslog host.
Provides a synchronized hardware clock source.
Sets up and configures dynamic domains.
Monitors system environmental information, such as power supply, fan, and
temperature status.
Hosts field-replaceable unit (FRU) logging data.
Provides redundancy and automated SC failover in dual SC configurations.
Provides a default name service for the domains based on virtual hostids, and
MAC addresses for the domains.
Provides administrative roles for platform management.
Redundant SCs
There are two SCs within Sun Fire platform. The SC that controls the platform is
referred to as the main SC, while the other SC acts as a backup and is called the
spare SC. The software running on the SC monitors the SCs to determine when an
automatic failover should be performed.
We strongly recommend that the two SCs have the same configuration. This
duplication includes the Solaris operating environment, SMS software, security
modifications, patch installations, and all other system configurations
The failover functionality between the SCs is controlled by the daemons running on
the main and spare SCs. These daemons communicate across private communication
paths built into the Sun Fire platform. Other than the communication of these
daemons, there is no special trust relationship between the two SCs.
SMS software packages are installed on the SC. In addition, SMS communicates with
the Sun Fire 15K/12K system over an Ethernet connection, see “Management
Network Services” on page 141.
2
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
SMS Features
SMS 1.3 supports Sun Fire 15K/12K servers running the Solaris 8 and Solaris 9
operating environments.
Note – SMS 1.3 is available for Solaris 8 02/02 software. That version will not run on
Solaris 9 software without replacing specific driver packages. Conversely, the Solaris
9 version of SMS 1.3 will not run on Solaris 8 02/02 software without replacing
specific driver packages. For more information contact your Sun service
representative.
SMS 1.3 is compatible with Sun Fire 15K/12K domains that are running the Solaris 8
02/02 through Solaris 9 operating environment. The commands provided with the
SMS software can be used remotely.
Note – Graphical user interfaces for many of the commands in SMS are provided by
Sun Management Center. For more information, see “Sun Management Center” on
page 11.
SMS enables the platform administrator to perform the following tasks:
■
■
■
■
■
■
Administrate domains by logically grouping domain configurable units (DCU)
together. DCUs are system boards such as CPU and I/O boards. Domains are able
to run their own operating systems and handle their own workloads. See “SMS
Configuration” on page 57.
Dynamically reconfigure a domain so that currently installed system boards can
be logically attached to or detached from the operating system while the domain
continues running in multiuser mode. This feature is known as dynamic
reconfiguration and is described in the System Management Services (SMS) 1.3
Dynamic Reconfiguration User Guide (A system board can be physically swapped in
and out when it is not attached to a domain, while the system continues running
in multiuser mode.)
Perform automatic dynamic reconfiguration of domains using a script. Refer to
the System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Dynamic Reconfiguration User Guide.
Monitor and display the temperatures, currents, and voltage levels of one or more
system boards or domains.
Monitor and control power to the components within a platform.
Execute diagnostic programs such as power-on self-test (POST).
In addition, SMS:
Chapter 1
Introduction to System Management Services
3
■
■
■
■
■
■
Warns you of impending problems, such as high temperatures or malfunctioning
power supplies.
Notifies you when a software error or failure has occurred.
Monitors a dual SC configuration for single points of failure and performs an
automatic failover from the main SC to the spare depending on the failure
condition detected.
Automatically reboots a domain after a system software failure (such as a panic).
Keeps logs of interactions between the SC environment and the domains.
Provides support for the Sun Fire 15K/12K system dual grid power option.
SMS enables the domain administrator to perform the following tasks:
■
■
■
■
■
■
Administrate domains by logically grouping domain configurable units (DCU)
together. DCUs are system boards such as: CPU and I/O boards. Domains are
able to run their own operating systems and handle their own workloads. See
“SMS Configuration” on page 57.
Boot domains for which the administrator has privileges.
Dynamically reconfigure a domain for which the administrator has privileges, so
that currently installed system boards can be logically attached to or detached
from the operating system while the domain continues running in multiuser
mode. This feature is known as dynamic reconfiguration and is described in the
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Dynamic Reconfiguration User Guide. (A
system board can be physically swapped in and out when it is not attached to a
domain, while the system continues running in multiuser mode.)
Perform automatic dynamic reconfiguration of domains using a script for which
the administrator has privileges. Refer to the System Management Services (SMS)
1.3 Dynamic Reconfiguration User Guide.
Monitor and display the temperatures, currents, and voltage levels of one or more
system boards or domains for which the administrator has privileges.
Execute diagnostic programs such as power-on self-test (POST) for which the
administrator has privileges.
The following features are provided in this release of SMS:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
4
Dynamic system domain (DSD) configuration
Configured domain services
Domain control capabilities
Capacity on demand (COD)
Domain status reporting
Hardware control capabilities
Hardware status monitoring, reporting, and handling
Hardware error monitoring, reporting, and handling
System controller (SC) failover
Configurable administrative privileges
Dynamic FRUID
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
System Architecture
SMS architecture is best described as distributed client-server. init(1M) starts (and
restarts as necessary) one process: ssd(1M). ssd is responsible for monitoring all
other SMS processes and restarting them as necessary. See FIGURE 3-1.
The Sun Fire 15K/12K platform, the SC, and other workstations communicate over
Ethernet. You perform SMS operations by entering commands on the SC console
after remotely logging in to the SC from another workstation on the local area
network. You must log in as a user with the appropriate platform or domain
privileges if you want to perform SMS operations (such as monitoring and
controlling the platform).
Note – If SMS is stopped on the main SC and the other SC is powered off, the
domains gracefully shutdown and the platform is powered down. If the remaining
SC is simply powered off without a shutdown of SMS, SMS won’t have time to
power off the platform and the domains will crash.
Dual system controllers are supported within the Sun Fire 15K/12K platform. One
SC is designated as the primary or main system controller, and the other is
designated as the spare system controller. If the main SC fails, the failover capability
automatically switches to the spare SC as described in “SC Failover” on page 155.
Most domain configurable units are active components and you need to check the
system state before powering off any DCU.
Note – Circuit breakers must be on whenever a board is present, including
expander boards, whether or not the board is powered on.
For details, see “Power Control” on page 128.
SMS Administration Environment
Administration tasks on the Sun Fire 15K/12K system are secured by group
privilege requirements. Upon installation, SMS installs the following 39 UNIX
groups to the /etc/group file.
■
■
platadmn - Platform administrator
platoper - Platform operator
Chapter 1
Introduction to System Management Services
5
■
■
■
platsvc - Platform service
dmn[A...R]admn - domain [domain_id|domain_tag] administrator (18)
dmn[A...R]rcfg - domain [domain_id|domain_tag] configurator (18)
smsconfig(1M) allows an administrator to add, remove, and list members of
platform and domain groups as well as set platform and domain directory privileges
using the -a, -r, and -l options.
smsconfig also can configure SMS to use alternate group names including NIS
managed groups using the -g option. Group information entries can come from any
of the sources for groups specified in the/etc/nsswitch.conf file (refer to
nsswitch.conf(4)). For instance, if domain A was known by its domain tag as the
"Production Domain," an administrator could create a NIS group with the same
name and configure SMS to use this group as the domain A administrator group
instead of the default, dmnaadmn. For more information, refer to the System
Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Installation Guide, “Administration Privileges” on
page 15, and refer to the smsconfig man page.
Network Connections for Administrators
The nature of the Sun Fire 15K/12K physical architecture, with an embedded system
controller, as well as the supported administrative model (with multiple
administrative privileges, and hence multiple administrators) dictates that an
administrator utilize a remote network connection from a workstation to access SMS
command interfaces to manage the Sun Fire 15K/12K system.
Caution – Shutting down a remote workstation while a tip session is active into a
Sun Fire 15K/12K SC will bring both SCs down to the OpenBoot OK prompt. This
will not affect the domains and after powering the remote system back on you can
restore the SCs by typing go at the OK prompt; however, you should end all tip
sessions before shutting down a remote workstation.
Since the administrators provide information to verify their identity (passwords)
and might possibly need to display sensitive data, it is important that the remote
network connection be secure. Physical separation of the administrative networks
provides some security on the Sun Fire 15K/12K system. Multiple external physical
network connections are available on each SC. SMS software supports up to two
external network communities.
For more information on Sun Fire 15K/12K networks, see “Management Network
Services” on page 141. For more information on securing the Sun Fire 15K/12K
system see “Security Options” on page 14.
6
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
SMS Operating Environment
You can interact with the SC and the domains on the Sun Fire 15K/12K system by
using SMS commands.
SMS provides a command-line interface to the various functions and features it
contains.
▼ To Begin Using the SC
1. Boot the SC.
For the examples in this guide, the sc_name is sc0 and sms-user is the user-name of
the administrator, operator, configurator, or service personnel logged onto the
system.
The privileges allotted to the user are determined by the platform or domain groups
to which the user belongs. In these examples, the sms-user is assumed to have both
platform and domain administrator privileges, unless otherwise noted.
For more information on the function and creation of SMS user groups, refer to the
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Installation Guide and see “Administration
Privileges” on page 15.
Note – This procedure assumes that smsconfig -m has already been run. If
smsconfig -m has not been run, you will receive the following error when SMS
attempts to start and SMS will exit.
sms: smsconfig(1M) has not been run. Unable to start sms services.
2. Log in to the SC and verify that SMS software startup has completed. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> showplatform
3. Wait until showplatform finishes displaying platform status.
At this point you can begin using SMS programs.
SMS Console Window
An SMS console window provides a command-line interface from the SC to the
Solaris operating environment on the domain(s).
Chapter 1
Introduction to System Management Services
7
▼ To Display a Console Window Locally
1. Log in to the SC, if you have not already done so.
Note – You must have domain privileges for the domain on which you wish to run
console.
8
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> console -d domain_indicator option
where:
-d
Specifies the domain using a domain_indicator:
domain_id - ID for a domain. Valid domain_ids are 'A'...'R' and are case
insensitive.
domain_tag - Name assigned to a domain using addtag(1M).
-f
Force
Opens a domain console window with "locked write" permission,
terminates all other open sessions, and prevents new ones from being
opened. This constitutes an "exclusive session.” Use it only when you need
exclusive use of the console (for example, for private debugging). To
restore multiple-session mode, either release the lock (~^) or terminate the
console session (~.).
-g
Grab
Opens a console window with "unlocked write" permission. If another
session has "unlocked write" permission, the new console window takes it
away. If another session has "locked" permission, this request is denied and
a read-only session is started.
-l
Lock
Opens a console window with "locked write" permission. If another
session has "unlocked write" permission, the new console window takes it
away. If another session has "locked" permission, the request is denied and
a read-only session is started.
-r
Read Only
Opens a console window in read-only mode
console creates a remote connection to the domain’s virtual console driver,
making the window in which the command is executed a "console window" for the
specified domain (domain_id or domain_tag).
If console is invoked without any options when no other console windows are
running for that domain, it comes up in exclusive “locked write” mode session.
If console is invoked without any options when one or more non-exclusive console
windows are running for that domain, it will come up in "read-only" mode.
Locked write permission is more secure. It can only be taken away if another console
is opened using console -f or if ~*(tilde-asterisk) is entered from another
running console window. In both cases, the new console session is an "exclusive
Chapter 1
Introduction to System Management Services
9
session", and all other sessions are forcibly detached from the domain virtual
console.
console can utilize either Input Output Static Random Access Memory (IOSRAM)
or the internal management network for domain console communication. You can
manually toggle the communication path by using the ~= (tilde-equal sign)
command. Doing so is useful if the network becomes inoperable, in which case the
console sessions appears to be hung.
Many console sessions can be attached simultaneously to a domain, but only one
console will have write permissions; all others will have read-only permissions.
Write permissions are in either "locked" or "unlocked" mode.
Tilde Usage
In a domain console window, a tilde ( ~ ) that appears as the first character of a line
is interpreted as an escape signal that directs console to perform some special action,
as follows:
Character
Description
~?
Status message
~.
Disconnects console session
~#
Breaks to OpenBoot™ PROM or kadb
[email protected]
Acquires unlocked write permission. See option -g
~^
Releases write permission
~=
Toggles the communication path between the network and IOSRAM
interfaces. You can use ~= only in private mode (see ~* ).
~&
Acquires locked write permission; see option -l . You may issue
this signal during a read-only or unlocked write session.
~*
Acquires locked write permission, terminates all other open
sessions, and prevent new sessions from being opened; see option
-f . To restore multiple-session mode, either release the lock or
terminate this session.
rlogin also processes tilde-escape sequences whenever a tilde is seen at the
beginning of a new line. If you need to send a tilde sequence at the beginning of a
line and you are connected using rlogin, use two tildes (the first escapes the
second for rlogin). Alternatively, do not enter a tilde at the beginning of a line
when running inside of an rlogin window.
10
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
If you use a kill -9 command to terminate a console session, the window or
terminal in which the console command was executed goes into raw mode, and
appears hung. Type CTRL-j, then stty sane, then CTRL-j to escape this
condition,
In the domain console window, vi(1) runs properly and the escape sequences (tilde
commands) work as intended only if the environment variable TERM has the same
setting as that of the console window.
For example:
sc0:sms-user:> setenv TERM xterm
If you need to resize the window, type:
sc0:sms-user:> stty rows 20 cols 80
For more information on domain console, see “Domain Console” on page 141 and
refer to the console man page.
Remote Console Session
In the event that a system controller hangs and that console cannot be reached
directly, SMS provides the smsconnectsc command to remotely connect to the
hung SC. This command works from either the main or spare SC. For more
information and examples, refer to the smsconnectsc man page.
Your other option is to connect to the hung SC using an external console connection
but you cannot run smsconnectsc and use an external console at the same time.
Sun Management Center
Sun Management Center for the Sun Fire 15K/12K is an extensible monitoring and
management tool that provides a system administrator with the ability to manage
the Sun Fire 15K/12K system. Sun Management Center integrates standard SNMP
based management structures with new intelligent and autonomous agent and
management technology based on the client/ server paradigm.
Chapter 1
Introduction to System Management Services
11
Sun Management Center is used as the GUI and SNMP manager/agent
infrastructure for the Sun Fire system. The features and functions of Sun
Management Center are not covered in this manual. For more information, refer to
the latest Sun Management Center documentation available at www.docs.sun.com.
12
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
CHAPTER
2
SMS Security Options and
Administrative Privileges
This chapter provides a brief overview of security and administrative privileges as
they pertain to SMS and the Sun Fire 15K/12K server system.
The Sun Fire 15K/12K platform hardware can be partitioned into one or more
environments capable of running separate images of the Solaris operating
environment. These environments are called dynamic system domains (DSD)s or
domains.
A domain is logically equivalent to a physically separate server. The Sun Fire
15K/12K hardware has been designed to enforce strict separation of the domain
environments. This means that, except for errors in hardware shared by multiple
domains, no hardware error in one domain affects another. In order for domains to
act like separate servers, Sun Fire software was designed and implemented to
enforce strict domain separation.
SMS provides services to all DSDs. In providing those services, no data obtained
from one client DSD is leaked into data observable by another. This is particularly
true for sensitive data such as buffers of console characters (including administrator
passwords) or potentially sensitive data such as I/O buffers containing client DSDowned data.
SMS limits administrator privilege to control the extent of damage that can occur
due to administrator error, as well as to limit the exposure to damage caused by an
external attack on a system password.
This chapter includes the following sections:
■
■
Security Options
Administration Privileges
13
Security Options
The following security options are available in SMS 1.3:
Strongly Recommended
■
■
Use Secure Shell (ssh) as an alternative transport for fomd (failover management
daemon).
Disable ARP (Address Resolution Protocol) on the I1 MAN network between the
SCs and domains.
Optional
■
Disable all IP traffic between the SC and a domain by excluding that domain from
the SC’s MAN driver.
By using ssh as an alternative transport for fomd, the SCs no longer require a
/.rhosts file. Secure Shell provides user authentication and encrypts all network
traffic; it prevents an intruder from being able to read an intercepted communication
or from spoofing the system.
To protect against ARP spoofing and IP-based attacks, We strongly recommend that
you disable ARP on the MAN network in all multi-domain configurations. For
systems where domain separation is critical, we also recommend disabling IP
connectivity between the SC and specific domains that require separation.
Before you implement the above security options, we strongly recommend that you
you modify (harden) your Solaris operating environment configurations on the SCs
and domains to improve overall system security. For details, refer to following Sun
BluePrints Online articles available at:
http://www.sun.com/security/blueprints
■
■
Solaris Operating Environment Security - Updated for Solaris 8 Operating
Environment
Solaris Operating Environment Security - Updated for Solaris 9 Operating
Environment
For step-by-step instructions on implementing the three options, which involve the
use of the Solaris Security Toolkit (SST, a/k/a JASS), and detailed description of all
security recommendations for Sun Fire 12K and 15K systems, refer to the following
Sun BluePrints Online articles available at:
http://www.sun.com/security/blueprints
■
■
14
Securing the Sun Fire 12K and 15K System Controllers: Updated for SMS 1.3
Securing the Sun Fire 12K and 15K Domains: Updated for SMS 1.3
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Administration Privileges
SMS splits domain and platform administrative privileges. It is possible to assign
separate administrative privileges for system management over each domain and for
system management over the entire platform. There is also a subset of privileges
available for platform operator and domain configurator-class users. Administrative
privileges are granted so that audits can identify the individual who initiated any
action.
SMS uses site-established Solaris user accounts and grants administrative privileges
to those accounts through the use of Solaris group memberships. This allows a site
considerable flexibility with respect to creating and consolidating default privileges.
For example, by assigning the same Solaris group to represent the administrator
privilege for more than one domain, groups of domains can be administered by one
set of domain administrators.
SMS also allows the site considerable flexibility in assigning multiple administrative
roles to individual administrators. A single user account with group membership in
the union of all configured administrative privilege groups can be set up.
The platform administrator has control over the platform hardware. Limitations
have been established with respect to controlling the hardware used by a running
domain, but ultimately the platform administrator can shut down a running domain
by powering off server hardware.
Each domain administrator has access to the Solaris console for that domain and the
privilege to exert control over the software that runs in the domain or over the
hardware assigned to the domain.
Levels of each type of administrative privilege provide a subset of status and
monitoring privileges to a platform operator or domain configurator.
SMS provides an administrative privilege that grants access to functions provided
exclusively for servicing the product in the field.
Administrative privilege configuration can be changed at will, by the superuser,
using smsconfig -g without the need to stop or restart SMS.
SMS implements Solaris access control list (ACL) software to configure directory
access for SMS groups using the -a and -r options of the smsconfig command.
ACLs restrict access to platform and domain directories providing file system
security. For information on ACLs, refer to the Solaris 9 System Administration Guide:
Security Services.
Chapter 2
SMS Security Options and Administrative Privileges
15
Platform Administrator Group
The group identified as the platform administrator (platadmn) group provides
configuration control, a means to get environmental status, the ability to assign
boards to domains, power control, and other generic service processor functions. In
short, the platform administrator group has all platform privileges excluding
domain control and access to installation and service commands (FIGURE 2-1).
16
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Configuration
control
Power
control
Platform
administrator
Reconfigure
bus traffic
Rename
domains
Display available
component list
Assign/display
boards
Display date
and time
Remove
domain info
Poweron/off
SC
Connect to
remote SC
Display
keyswitch
Add/delete
COD license
Reset main
or spare
Display COD
license and
usage
Update
FPROMs
Processor
functions
Blacklisting
Manage
failover
Environmental
status
FIGURE 2-1
Failover
scripts
Display
logs
Display
environment
Platform Administrator Privileges
Chapter 2
SMS Security Options and Administrative Privileges
17
Platform Operator Group
The platform operator (platoper) group has a subset of platform privileges. This
group has no platform control other than being able to perform power control.
Therefore, this group is limited to platform power and status privileges (FIGURE 2-2).
Reconfigure
bus traffic
Configuration
control
Platform
operator
Display available
component list
Display
boards
Display date
and time
Display
COD license
and usage
Poweron/off
SC
Power
control
Processor
functions
Display
keyswitch
Environmental
status
FIGURE 2-2
Failover
scripts
Manage
failover
Display
logs
Display
environment
Platform Operator Privileges
Platform Service Group
The platform service (platsvc) group possesses platform service command
privileges in addition to limited platform control and platform configuration status
privileges (FIGURE 2-3).
18
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Reconfigure
bus traffic
Configuration
control
Display available
component list
Display date
and time
Display
boards
Poweron/off
SC
Power
control
Display
keyswitch
Platform
service
Reset main
or spare
Update
FPROMs
Processor
functions
Blacklisting
Failover
scripts
Manage
failover
Display
logs
Environmental
status
FIGURE 2-3
Display
environment
Platform Service Privileges
Domain Administrator Group
The domain administrator (dmn[domain_id]admn) group provides the ability to access
the console of its respective domain as well as perform other operations that affect,
directly or indirectly, the respective domain. Therefore, the domain administrator
group can perform domain control, domain status, and console access, but cannot
perform platform wide control or platform resource allocation (FIGURE 2-4).
Chapter 2
SMS Security Options and Administrative Privileges
19
There are 18 possible Sun Fire domains, A-R, identified by domain_id. Therefore,
there are 18 Domain Administrator groups, each providing strict access over their
respective domains.
Reconfigure
bus traffic*
Configuration
control
Manage
obpparams*
Display
devices*
Display available
component list
Manage/display
boards*~
Display date
and time
Remove
domain info*
Display
xirstate*
Domain
administrator
Connect to
console*
Control
keyswitch*
Power
control
Update
FPROMs*
Processor
functions
Poweron/off*
Reset
domain*
Blacklisting*
Display
failover
Environmental
status
Display
logs*
Display
environment*
* For own domain only
~ Board must be in the domain available component list
FIGURE 2-4
20
Domain Administrator Privileges
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Domain Configuration Group
The domain configuration (dmn[domain_id]rcfg) group has a subset of domain
administration group privileges. This group has no domain control other than being
able to power control boards in its domain or (re)configure boards into or from its
domain (FIGURE 2-5).
There are 18 possible Sun Fire domains identified by domain_ids. Therefore, there are
18 domain configuration groups, each allowing strict access over their respective
domains.
Reconfigure
bus traffic*
Display
devices*
Display available
component list
Manage/display
boards*~
Manage
obpparams*
Configuration
control
Display date
and time
Poweron/off*
Power
control
Display
keyswitch*
Domain
configurator
Blacklisting*
Processor
functions
Display
failover
Display
logs*
Environmental
status
Display
environment*
* For own domain only
~ Board must be in the domain available component list
FIGURE 2-5
Domain Configurator Privileges
Chapter 2
SMS Security Options and Administrative Privileges
21
Superuser Privileges
The superuser privileges are limited to installation, help, and status privileges
(FIGURE 2-6).
Backup
SMS
Configure
SMS
Configuration
control
Restore
SMS
Display
SMS version
Display
date
Superuser
Power
control
FIGURE 2-6
Display
keyswitch*
Superuser Privileges
All Privileges
The following is a list of all group privileges.
22
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
TABLE 2-1
Command
All Group Privileges
Group Privileges
Platform
Administrator
Platform
Operator
Domain
Administrator
Domain
Configurator
Platform
Service
Superuser
addboard
A user with
only platform
administrator
privileges can
perform only
the -c assign.
No
Users with
only domain X
administrator
privileges can
execute this
command on
their
respective
domain. If the
board(s) are
not already
assigned to the
domain, the
board(s) must
be in the
available
component list
of that
domain.
Users with
only domain X
configurator
privileges can
execute this
command on
their
respective
domain. If the
board(s) are
not already
assigned to the
domain, the
board(s) must
be in the
available
component list
of that
domain.
No
No
addcodlicense
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
addtag
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
cancelcmdsync
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
console
No
No
Yes (for own
domain)
No
No
No
Chapter 2
SMS Security Options and Administrative Privileges
23
TABLE 2-1
Command
All Group Privileges (Continued)
Group Privileges
Platform
Administrator
Platform
Operator
Domain
Administrator
Domain
Configurator
Platform
Service
Superuser
deleteboard
A user with
only platform
administrator
privileges can
perform -c
unassign only
if the board(s)
are in the
assigned state
and not active
in a running
domain.
No
Users with
only domain X
administrator
privileges can
execute this
command on
their
respective
domain. If the
board(s) are
not already
assigned to the
domain, the
board(s) must
be in the
available
component list
of that
domain.
Users with
only domain X
configurator
privileges can
execute this
command on
their
respective
domain. If the
board(s) are
not already
assigned to the
domain, the
board(s) must
be in the
available
component list
of that
domain.
No
No
deletecodlicense
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
deletetag
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
disablecomponent
Yes (platform
only)
No
Yes (for own
domain)
Yes (for own
domain)
No
No
enablecomponent
Yes (platform
only)
No
Yes (for own
domain)
Yes (for own
domain)
No
No
flashupdate
Yes
No
Yes (for own
domain)
No
No
No
help
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
initcmdsync
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
24
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
TABLE 2-1
Command
All Group Privileges (Continued)
Group Privileges
Platform
Administrator
Platform
Operator
Domain
Administrator
Domain
Configurator
Platform
Service
Superuser
moveboard
A user with
only platform
administrator
privileges can
perform the
-c assign only
if the board is
in the assigned
state and not
active in the
domain the
board is being
removed
from.
No
Users must
belong to both
domains
affected. If the
board(s) are
not already
assigned to the
domain the
board(s) are
being moved
into, the
board(s) must
be in the
available
component list
of that
domain.
Users must
belong to both
domains
affected. If the
board(s) are
not already
assigned to the
domain the
board(s) is
being moved
into, the
board(s) must
be in the
available
component list
of that
domain.
No
No
poweron
Yes
No
Yes (for own
domain)
Yes (for own
domain)
No
No
poweroff
Yes
No
Yes (for own
domain)
Yes (for own
domain)
No
No
rcfgadm
A user with
only platform
administrator
privileges can
perform-x
assign. The
user can
execute -x
unassign only
if the board(s)
are in the
assigned state
and not active
in a running
domain.
No
Users with
only domain X
administrator
privileges can
execute this
command on
their
respective
domain. If the
board(s) are
not already
assigned to the
domain, the
board(s) must
be in the
available
component list
of that
domain.
Users with
only domain X
configurator
privileges can
execute this
command on
their
respective
domain. If the
board(s) are
not already
assigned to the
domain, the
board(s) must
be in the
available
component list
of that
domain.
No
No
reset
No
No
Yes (for own
domain)
No
No
No
Chapter 2
SMS Security Options and Administrative Privileges
25
TABLE 2-1
Command
All Group Privileges (Continued)
Group Privileges
Platform
Administrator
Platform
Operator
Domain
Administrator
Domain
Configurator
Platform
Service
Superuser
resetsc
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
runcmdsync
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
savecmdsync
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
setbus
Yes
No
Yes (for own
domain)
Yes (for own
domain)
No
No
setdatasync
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
setdate
Yes
No
Yes (for own
domain)
No
No
No
setdefaults
Yes
No
Yes (for own
domain)
No
No
No
setfailover
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
setkeyswitch
No
No
Yes (for own
domain)
No
No
No
setobpparams
No
No
Yes (for own
domain)
Yes (for own
domain)
No
No
setupplatform
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
showboards
Yes
Yes
Yes (for own
domain)
Yes (for own
domain)
Yes
No
showbus
Yes
Yes
Yes (for own
domain)
Yes (for own
domain)
Yes
No
showcmdsync
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
showcodlicense
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
showcodusage
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
showcomponent
Yes
Yes
Yes (for own
domain)
Yes (for own
domain)
Yes
No
showdatasync
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
showdate
Yes (platform
only)
Yes
(platform
only)
Yes (for own
domain)
Yes (for own
domain)
Yes
(platform
only)
No
showdevices
No
No
Yes (for own
domain)
Yes (for own
domain)
No
No
showenvironment
Yes
Yes
Yes (for own
domain)
Yes (for own
domain)
Yes
No
26
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
TABLE 2-1
Command
All Group Privileges (Continued)
Group Privileges
Platform
Administrator
Platform
Operator
Domain
Administrator
Domain
Configurator
Platform
Service
Superuser
showfailover
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
showkeyswitch
Yes
Yes
Yes (for own
domain)
Yes (for own
domain)
Yes
No
showlogs
Yes (platform
only)
Yes
(platform
only)
Yes (for own
domain)
Yes (for own
domain)
Yes
(platform
only)
No
showobpparams
No
No
Yes (for own
domain)
Yes (for own
domain)
No
No
showplatform
Yes
Yes
Yes (for own
domain)
Yes (for own
domain)
Yes
No
showxirstate
No
No
Yes (for own
domain)
No
No
No
smsbackup
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
smsconfig
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
smsconnectsc
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
smsrestore
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
smsversion
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Chapter 2
SMS Security Options and Administrative Privileges
27
28
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
CHAPTER
3
SMS Internals
SMS operations are generally performed by a set of daemons and commands. This
chapter provides an overview of how SMS works and describes the SMS daemons,
processes, commands, and system files. For more information,5 refer to the System
Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Reference Manual.
Caution – Changes made to files in /opt/SUNWSMS can cause serious damage to
the system. Only very experienced system administrators should risk changing the
files described in this chapter.
This chapter includes the following sections:
■
■
Startup Flow
SMS Daemons
Startup Flow
The events that take place when the SMS boots are as follows:
1. User powers on the Sun Fire 15K/12K (CPU/disk and CD-ROM) platform. The
Solaris operating environment on the SC boots automatically.
2. During the boot process, the /etc/init.d/sms script is called. This script, for
security reasons, disables forwarding, broadcast, and multicasting over the MAN
network. It then starts the SMS software by invoking a background process,
which starts and monitors ssd. ssd is the SMS startup daemon responsible for
starting and monitoring all the SMS daemons and servers.
3. ssd(1M) in turn invokes: mld, pcd, hwad, tmd, dsmd, esmd, mand, osd, dca,
efe, codd and smnptd.
29
For more information, see “SMS Daemons” on page 30, and “Message Logging”
on page 175. For efe, refer to the latest Sun Management Center documentation
available at www.docs.sun.com.
4. Once the daemons are running, you can use SMS commands such as console.
SMS startup can take a few minutes during which time any commands run will
return an error message indicating that SMS has not completed startup. The
message “SMS software start-up complete” is posted to the platform log when
startup is complete and can be viewed using the showlogs(1M) command.
SMS Daemons
The SMS 1.3 daemons play a central role on the Sun Fire 15K/12K system. Daemons
are persistent processes that provide SMS services to clients using an API.
Note – SMS daemons are started by ssd and should not be started manually from
the command line. Issuing a kill command against any daemon will seriously
affect the robustness of SMS software and should not be done unless specifically
requested by Sun service personnel.
Daemons are always running, initiated at system startup, and restarted whenever
necessary.
Each daemon is fully described in its corresponding man page (with the exception of
efe, which is referenced separately in the Sun Management Center documentation).
This section looks at the SMS daemons, their relationship to one another, and
includes which CLIs (if any) access them.
FIGURE 3-1 illustrates the Sun Fire 15K/12K client server overview.
30
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
SMS
stratup
daemon
SMS CLI
commands
SU
Task
management
daemon
License
database
SU
Capacity on
Demand
daemon
SU
SU
Domain
status
monitoring
daemon
DEN
EHO
EEN
Environment
CCN
CCN
EEN
SU
CCN
From all
processes,
daemons,
servers
From all
processes,
daemons,
servers
Platform
configuration
database
daemon
DBA
SU
Message
logging
daemon
Config
database
Domain X
Interfaces
IPC (doors, mq, shm)
ioctl(2) calls
FIGURE 3-1
CCN
Domain X
server
OBP
service
daemon
SU
Hardware
access
daemon
SU
Glue EPLD
PCI device driver
Child process spawn
SU
DR service
process
Management
network
daemon
MAN
driver
File read/write
FRU
access
daemon
Failover
management
daemon
Domain X
Software Components
SU
Key
management
daemon
SU
SU
Platform
SU
Hardware lock/read/write
Environment
status
monitor
daemon
CCN
Domain
configuration
agent
SunMC
agent
daemon
SU
Handler
process
Interrupt notification
CCN
Envonmental
EEN event notification
SBBC driver
Transient process
Configuration
change notification
Sun Fire 15K/12K
SC Solaris user
Database
DBA access
Event
EHO hand-off
Sun Fire 15K/12K
SC Solaris kernel
Persistent process
Domain
DEN event notification
SU Startup
Sun Fire 15K/12K Client Server Overview
Chapter 3
SMS Internals
31
Note – The domain X server (dxs) and domain configuration agent (dca), while
not daemons, are essential server processes and included in the following table and
section. There is an instance of dxs and dca running for each domain up to eighteen
instances.
TABLE 3-1
32
Daemons and Processes
Daemon Name
Description
codd
The capacity on demand daemon monitors the COD resources being
used and verifies that the resources used are in agreement with the
licenses in the COD license database file.
dca
The domain configuration agent provides a communication
mechanism between the dca on the system controller and the
domain configuration server (dcs) on the specified domain. There is
a separate instance of the dca daemon for every domain up to 18
domains.
dsmd
The domain status monitoring daemon monitors domain status,
CPU reset conditions and the Solaris OE heartbeat for up to 18
domains on the Sun Fire 15K and up to nine on the Sun Fire 12K.
dxs
The domain X server provides software support for a domain
including dynamic reconfiguration (DR), hot-pluggable PCI I/O
assembly support, domain driver requests and events, and virtual
console support. There is a separate instance of the dxs daemon for
each domain up to 18 domains on the Sun Fire 15K and up to nine
on the Sun Fire 12K.
efe
The event front end daemon is part of Sun Management Center and
acts as an intermediary between the Sun Management Center agent
and SMS. It is not covered further in this manual. For more
information on efe, refer to the Sun Management Center 3.5
Supplement for Sun Fire 15K/12K Systems.
esmd
The environmental status monitoring daemon monitors system
cabinet environmental conditions, and fan tray and power supply
temperatures.
fomd
The failover monitoring daemon detects faults on the local and
remote SCs and takes appropriate action (directing or taking a
failover.)
frad
The FRU access daemon provides the mechanism by which SMS
daemons can access any field-replaceable unit (FRU) SEEPROM on
the Sun Fire 15K/12K system.
hwad
The hardware access daemon provides hardware access to SMS
daemons and a mechanism for all daemons to exclusively access,
control, monitor, and configure the hardware.
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
TABLE 3-1
Daemons and Processes (Continued)
Daemon Name
Description
kmd
The key management daemon manages the IPSec security
associations (SAs) needed to secure the communication between the
system controller (SC) and servers running on a domain.
mand
The management network daemon supports the MAN drivers,
providing required network configuration. The role played by mand
is specified by the fomd.
mld
The messages logging daemon provides message logging support
for the platform and domains.
osd
The OpenBoot PROM server daemon provides software support for
OpenBoot PROM process running on a domain through the mailbox
that resides on the domain. When the domain OpenBoot PROM
writes requests to the mailbox, the osd daemon executes those
requests. On the main SC is responsible for booting domains.
pcd
The platform configuration database daemon provides and manages
controlled access to platform, domain, and system board
configuration data.
ssd
The SMS startup daemon starts, stops, and monitors all the key SMS
daemons and servers.
tmd
The task management daemon provides task management services,
such as scheduling for SMS. setkeyswitch and other daemons use
tmd to schedule hardware power-on self test invocations.
wcapp
The optional wPCI application daemon implements Sun Fire Link
clustering functionality and provides information to the external Sun
Fire Link fabric manager server. It is not covered further in this
manual. For more information on wcapp, refer to the Sun Fire Link
Fabric Administrator’s Guide.
Capacity on Demand Daemon
The capacity on demand daemon (codd (1M)) is a process that runs on the main
system controller (SC).
This process does the following:
■
■
■
■
Monitors the COD resources being used and verifies that the resources used are in
agreement with the licenses in the COD license database.
Provides information on installed licenses, resource use, and board status.
Handles the requests to add or delete COD license keys.
Configures headroom quantities and domain right-to-use (RTU) license
reservations.
Chapter 3
SMS Internals
33
FIGURE 3-2 illustrates the CODD client server relationships to the SMS daemons and
CLI commands.
addcodlicense
deletecodlicense
hpost
setdefaults
setupplatform
showcodlicense
showcodusage
showplatform
DXS
DSMD
CODD
PCD
FRAD
setkeyswitch
FIGURE 3-2
CODD server client relationships
Domain Configuration Agent
dca(1M) supports remote dynamic reconfiguration (DR) by enabling communication
between applications and the domain configuration server (dcs) running on a
Solaris 8 or Solaris 9 domain. One dca per domain runs on the SC. Each dca
communicates with its dcs over the Management Network (MAN).
ssd(1M) starts dca when the domain is brought up. ssd restarts dca if it is killed
while the domain is still running. dca is terminated when the domain is shut down.
dca is an SMS application that waits for dynamic reconfiguration requests. When a
DR request arrives, dca creates a dcs session. Once a session is established, dca
forwards the request to dcs. dcs attempts to honor the DR request and sends the
results of the operation to the dca. Once the results have been sent, the session is
ended. The remote DR operation is complete when dca returns the results of the DR
operation.
FIGURE 3-3 illustrates the DCA client server relationships to the SMS daemons and
CLIs.
34
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
System controller
addboard
deleteboard
moveboard
rcfgadm
SSD
cfgadm
MLD
TCP
connection
KMD
DXS
FIGURE 3-3
DCS
DR
library
DR Driver
User
DCA
Kernel
PCD
Domain
DCA Client Server Relationships
Domain Status Monitoring Daemon
dsmd(1M) monitors domain state signatures, CPU reset conditions and Solaris
heartbeat for up to 18 domains on a Sun Fire 15K and up to nine on a Sun Fire 12K
system. It also handles domain stop events related to hardware failure.
dsmd detects timeouts that can occur in reboot transition flow and panic transition
flow, and handles various domain hung conditions.
dsmd notifies the domain X server (dxs(1M)) and Sun Management Center of all
domain state changes and automatically recovers the domain based on the domain
state signature, domain stop events, and automatic system recovery (ASR) Policy.
ASR Policy consists of those procedures which restore the system to running all
properly configured domains after one or more domains have been rendered
inactive. This can be due to software or hardware failures or to unacceptable
environmental conditions. For more information, see “Automatic System Recovery
(ASR)” on page 119 and “Domain Stop Events” on page 191.
FIGURE 3-4 illustrates DSMD client server relationships to the SMS daemons and
CLIs.
Chapter 3
SMS Internals
35
System Controller
SSD
showplatform
TMD
DSMD
SMS event
handling
ASR action
Domain signature
acquisition
State change
detection
DXS
MLD
HWAD
FIGURE 3-4
Changed
notification
PCD
EFE
CODD
DSMD Client Server Relationships
Domain X Server
dxs(1M) provides software support for a running domain. This support includes
virtual console functionality, dynamic reconfiguration support, and HPCI support.
dxs handles domain driver requests and events. dxs provides an interface for
getting and setting HPCI slot status. The slot status includes cassette presence,
power, frequency, and health of the cassette. This interface makes it possible to
power control HPCI cassettes for hot plug operations.
The virtual console functionality allows one or more users running the console
program to access the domain’s virtual console. dxs acts as a link between SMS
console applications and the domain virtual console drivers.
A Sun Fire 15K system can support up to 18 different domains. A Sun Fire 12K
system can support up to nine domains. Each domain may require software support
from the SC, and dxs provides that support. The following domain-related projects
require dxs support:
■
36
DR
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
■
■
HPCI
Virtual console
There is one domain X server for each Sun Fire 15K/12K domain. dxs is started by
ssd for every active domain, that is, a domain running OS software, and terminated
when the domain is shut down.
FIGURE 3-6 illustrates DXS client server relationships to the SMS daemons.
PCD
DSMD
DXS
KMD
System controller
SSD
Console
CODD
mbox
HWAD
I/O
SRAM
FIGURE 3-5
Virtual
console
(aka cvcd)
Domain
Unix
socket
MLD
DXS Client Server Relationships
Environmental Status Monitoring Daemon
esmd(1M) monitors system cabinet environmental conditions, for example, voltage,
temperature, fan tray, power supply and clock phasing. esmd logs abnormal
conditions and takes action to protect the hardware, if necessary.
See “Environmental Events” on page 186 for more information on esmd.
FIGURE 3-6 illustrates ESMD client server relationships to the SMS daemons.
Chapter 3
SMS Internals
37
System Controller
SSD
poweroff
poweron
setkeyswitch
showenvironment
DSMD
DXS
PCD
EFE
FRAD
ESMD
Action
Data
acquisition
Abnormal
condition
detection
Event
notification
Environment
SMS event
handling
HWAD
Persistent
object store
Handler
process
FIGURE 3-6
FOMD
MLD
ESMD Client Server Relationships
Failover Management Daemon
fomd(1M) is the core of the SC failover mechanism. fomd detects faults on the local
and remote SCs and takes the appropriate action (directing a failover or takeover).
fomd tests and ensures that important configuration data is kept synchronized
between both SCs. fomd runs on both the main and spare SCs.
For more information on fomd see “SC Failover” on page 155.
FIGURE 3-7 illustrates FOMD client server relationships to the SMS daemons.
38
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Main SC
setfailover
showfailover
cancel/init/savecmdsync
setdatesync
showdatasync
C network test
I2 network test
Available memory test
Available disk test
PCD
Console bus test
Failover
HASRAM test
manager
MLD
HWAD
Health monitor
EFE
ESMD
Event I/F
SSD
Heartbeat
MAND
System status
request/response
(RPC)
Spare SC
setfailover
showfailover
cancel/init/savecmdsync
setdatesync
showdatasync
C network test
I2 network test
Available memory test
Available disk test
PCD
Console bus test
Failover
HASRAM test
manager
MLD
HWAD
Health monitor
EFE
Event I/F
ESMD
SSD
Heartbeat
MAND
Applicable to main and spare
Suspended on spare
Not applicable to spare
FIGURE 3-7
FOMD Client Server Relationships
FRU Access Daemon
frad(1M) is the field-replaceable unit (FRU) access daemon for SMS. frad provides
controlled access to any serial electrically erasable programmable read-only memory
(SEEPROM) within the Sun Fire 15K/12K platform that is accessible by the SC. frad
Chapter 3
SMS Internals
39
supports dynamic FRUID which provides improved FRU data access using he
Solaris platform information and control library daemon (PICLD). FRU
identification is for Sun Service use only and transparent to the user.
frad is started by ssd.
FIGURE 3-8 illustrates FRAD client server relationships to the SMS daemons.
FRU event
plug-in
PICLD
SSD
FRU tree
plug-in
MLD
FRAD
ESMD
CODD
HWAD
FIGURE 3-8
FRAD Client Server Relationships
Hardware Access Daemon
hwad(1M) provides hardware access to SMS daemons and a mechanism for all
daemons exclusively to access, control, monitor, and configure the hardware.
hwad runs in either main or spare mode when it comes up. The failover daemon
(fomd(1M)) determines which role hwad plays.
On both the main and spare, hwad:
■
■
■
■
■
Opens all the drivers (sbbc, echip, gchip, and consbus) and uses ioctl(2)
calls to interface with them.
Configures the local system clock and sets the clock source for each board present
in the system.
Disables SC to SC interrupt.
Disables DARB interrupts by clearing SBBC system interrupt enable register.
Creates an echip interface, which waits for any interrupt coming from the Echip
driver. At startup this is the SC heartbeat interrupt.
On the main SC, hwad:
40
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
■
■
■
■
■
■
Reads the contents of the device presence register to identify the boards present in
the system and makes them accessible to the clients.
Takes control of I2C steering and initializes all board objects present in the
machine.
Checks that clocks are phase locked. If they are, hwad checks that all clock sources
are pointing to the main SC. If the clocks are not phase locked, hwad does not
change any clock sources and disables automatic clock switch.
Initializes the DARB interrupt, enables DARB interrupt, and enables PCI interrupt
generation. Disables clock failure interrupt in gchip, disables console bus error
interrupt in Echip, disables power supply failure interrupt in echip.
Initializes the interrupt handler for events and creates threads to service events
for mand, dsmd and each osd.
Creates the IOSRAM interfaces for 18 domains. This enables communication
between the SC and the domain.
On the Spare SC hwad:
■
Sets the spare SC clock to the main SC clock. Also sets the reference select to 0.
Initializes SC to SC interrupt.
hwad directs communication to the IOSRAM (tunnel switch) for dynamic
reconfiguration (DR).
hwad notifies dsmd(1M) if there is a dstop or rstop. It also notifies related SMS
daemon(s) depending on the type of the Mbox interrupt that occurs.
hwad detects and logs console bus and JTAG errors.
Hardware access to the Sun Fire 15K/12K system on the SC is done either by going
through the PCI bus or console bus. Through the PCI bus you can access:
■
■
■
SC BBC internal registers
SC local JTAG
Global I2C devices for clock and power control/status.
Through the Console bus you can access:
■
■
■
Various ASICs internal registers
Read/write chips
Local I2C devices on various boards for temperature and chip level power
control/status.
FIGURE 3-9 illustrates HWAD client server relationships to the SMS daemons and
CLIs.
Chapter 3
SMS Internals
41
poweroff setkeyswitch
poweron showplatform
reset showboards
resetsc showdevices
setbus showxirstate
smsconnectsc
Kernel OS space
User applications space
SSD
DSMD
ESMD
DXS
PCD
MAND
MLD
FOMD
OSD
HWAD
FRAD
Gchip
driver
CODD
Echip
driver
Solaris Operating Environment
device drivers
Console
bus driver
SBBC
driver
System controller
FIGURE 3-9
HWAD Client Server Relationships
Key Management Daemon
The key management daemon provides a mechanism for managing security for
socket communications between the SC and the domains.
The current default configuration includes authentication policies for the dca(1M)
and dxs(1M) clients on the SC, which connect to the dcs(1M) and cvcd(1M) servers
on a domain.
kmd(1M) manages the IPSec security associations (SAs) needed to secure the
communication between the SC and servers running on a domain.
kmd manages per-socket policies for connections initiated by clients on the SC to
servers on a domain.
42
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
At system startup, kmd creates a domain interface for each domain that is active. An
active domain has both a valid IOSRAM and is running the Solaris operating
environment. Domain change events can trigger creation or removal of a domain
kmd interface.
kmd manages shared policies for connections initiated by clients on the domain to
servers on the SC. The kmd policy manager reads a configuration file and stores
policies used to manage security associations. A request received by kmd is
compared to the current set of policies to ensure that it is valid and to set various
parameters for the request.
Static global policies are configured using ipsecconf(1M) and associated data file
(/etc/inet/ipsecinit.conf). Global policies are used for connections initiated
from the domains to the SC. Corresponding entries are made in the kmd
configuration file. Shared security associations for domain to SC connections are
created by kmd when the domain becomes active.
Note – In order to work properly, policies created by ipsecconf and kmd must
match.
The kmd configuration file is used for both SC-to-domain and domain-to-SC initiated
connections. The kmd configuration file resides in
/etc/opt/SUNWSMS/config/kmd_policy.conf.
The format of the kmd configuration files is as follows:
dir:d_port:protocol:sa_type:aut_alg:encr_alg:domain:login
where:
dir
Identified using the sctodom or domtosc strings.
d_port
The destination port.
protocol
Identified using the tcp or udp strings.
sa_type
The security association type. Valid choices are
the ah or esp strings.
auth_alg
The authentication algorithm. The authentication
algorithm is identified using the none or hmacmd5 strings or leaving the field blank.
Chapter 3
SMS Internals
43
encr_alg
The encryption algorithm. The encryption
algorithm is identified using the none or des
strings or leaving the field blank.
domain
The domain_id associated with the domain. Valid
domain_ids are integers 0–17, space Using a space
in the domain_id field defines a policy that applies
to all domains. A policy for a specific domain
overrides a policy applied to all domains.
login_name
The login name of the user affected by the policy.
Currently this includes sms-dxs, sms-dca, and
sms-mld.
For example:
# Copyright (c) 2002 by Sun Microsystems, Inc.
# All rights reserved.
#
# This is the policy configuration file for the SMS Key Management Daemon.
# The policies defined in this file control the desired security for socket
# communications between the system controller and domains.
#
# The policies defined in this file must match the policies defined on the
# corresponding domains. See /etc/inet/ipsecinit.conf on the Sun Fire 15K/12K
# domain.
# See also the ipsec(7P), ipsecconf(1M) and sckmd(1M) man pages.
#
# The fields in the policies are a tuple of eight fields separated by the pipe
’|’ # character.
#
#<dir>|<d_port>|<protocol>|<sa_type>|<auth_alg>|<encr_alg>|<domain>|<login>|
#
# <dir>
--- direction to connect from. Values: sctodom, domtosc
# <d_port>
--- destination port
# <protocol>
--- protocol for the socket. Values: tcp, udp
# <sa_type>
--- security association type. Values: ah, esp
# <auth_alg>
--- authentication algorithm. Values: none, md5, sha1
# <encr_alg>
--- encryption algorithm. Values: none, des, 3des
# <domain>
--- domain id. Values: integers 0 - 17, space
#
A space for the domain id defines a policy which applies
#
to all domains. A policy for a specific domain overrides
#
a policy which applied to all domains.
# <login>
--- login name. Values: Any valid login name
#
# ---------------------------------------------------------------------------sctodom|665|tcp|ah|md5|none| |sms-dca|
sctodom|442|tcp|ah|md5|none| |sms-dxs|
44
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
FIGURE 3-10 illustrates KMD client server relationships to the SMS daemons.
MLD
DSMD
KMD
IPSec
FIGURE 3-10
HWAD
PCD
Domain
System controller
SSD
I/O
SRSAM
KMD Client Server Relationships
Management Network Daemon
mand(1M) supports the Management Network (MAN). See “Management Network
Services” on page 141. By default, mand comes up in spare mode and switches to
main when told to do so by the failover daemon (fomd(1M)). fomd determines
which role mand plays.
At system startup, mand comes up in the role of spare and configures the SC-to-SC
private network. This information is obtained from the file
/etc/opt/SUNWSMS/config/MAN.cf, which is created by the smsconfig(1M)
command. The failover daemon (fomd(1M)) directs mand to assume the role of main.
In the main role mand:
■
■
■
■
■
Registers for domain change events from platform configuration database (pcd)
to track changes in the domain active board list.
Creates the mapping between domain_tag and IP address in the pcd,
Initializes the scman(7d) driver with the current domain configuration.
Registers for events from hwad to track active Ethernet information from the
dman(7d) driver.
Updates the scman driver and pcd, as appropriate.
Chapter 3
SMS Internals
45
■
Registers for domain keyswitch events to communicate system startup MAN
information to each domain when the domain is powered on (setkeyswitch
on). This information includes Ethernet and MAN IP addressing, and active board
list information used during the initial software installation on the domain.
FIGURE 3-11 illustrates MAND client server relationships to the SMS daemons.
MAN.cf
SSD
FOMD
MLD
Domain
Hardware System controller
MAND
FIGURE 3-11
PCD
scman
HWAD
I/O
SRSAM
dman
MAND Client Server Relationships
Message Logging Daemon
The message logging daemon, mld, captures the output of all other SMS daemons
and processes. mld supports three configuration directives: File, Level, and Mode, in
the /var/opt/SUNWSMS/adm/.logger file.
■
File—Specifies the default output locations for the message files. The default is
msgdaemon and should not be changed.
■
■
■
■
46
Platform messages are stored on the SC in
/var/opt/SUNWSMS/adm/platform/messages
Domain messages are stored on the SC in
/var/opt/SUNWSMS/adm/domain_id/messages
Domain console messages are stored on the SC
in/var/opt/SUNWSMS/adm/domain_id/console
Domain syslog messages are stored on the SC
in/var/opt/SUNWSMS/adm/domain_id/syslog.
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
■
■
Level—Specifies the minimum level necessary for a message to be logged. The
supported levels are NOTICE, WARNING, ERR, CRIT, ALERT, and EMERG. The
default level is NOTICE.
Mode—Specifies the verbosity of the messages. Two modes are available:
verbose and terse. The default is verbose.
mld monitors the size of each of the message log files. For each message log type,
mld keeps up to ten message files at a time, x.0 though x.9. For more information on
log messages, see “Message Logging” on page 175.
FIGURE 3-12 illustrates MLD client server relationships to the SMS daemons and CLIs.
Domain and
process message
SSD
showlogs
All SMS CLI
commands
UDP
PCD
Domain
System controller
MLD
Domain
console
messages
(18)
Platform
messages
(1)
Domain
syslog
messages
(18)
syslogd
(on domain)
Domain
messages
(18)
FIGURE 3-12
Domain
messages
(18)
Domain
console
messages
(18)
Domain
syslog
messages
(18)
MLD Client Server Relationships
OpenBoot PROM Support Daemon
osd(1M) provides support to the OpenBoot PROM process running on a domain.
osd and OpenBoot PROM communication is through a mailbox that resides on the
domain. The osd daemon monitors the OpenBoot PROM mailbox. When the
OpenBoot PROM writes requests to the mailbox, osd executes the requests
accordingly.
osd runs at all times on the SC even if there are no domains configured. osd
provides virtual TOD service, virtual NVRAM, and virtual REBOOTINFO for
OpenBoot PROM and an interface to dsmd(1M) to facilitate auto-domain recovery.
osd also provides an interface for the following commands: setobpparams(1M),
showobpparams(1M), setdate(1M), and showdate(1M). See also “SMS
Configuration” on page 57.
Chapter 3
SMS Internals
47
osd is a trusted daemon in that it will not export any interface to other SMS
processes. It exclusively reads and writes from and to all OpenBoot PROM
mailboxes. There is one OpenBoot PROM mailbox for each domain.
osd has two main tasks; to maintain its current state of the domain configuration,
and to monitor the OpenBoot PROM mailbox.
FIGURE 3-13 illustrates OSD client server relationships to the SMS daemons and CLIs.
setobpparams
showobpparams
setdate
showdate
SSD
OSD
MLD
Mbox
HWAD
FIGURE 3-13
OSD Client Server Relationships
Platform Configuration Database Daemon
pcd(1M) is a Sun Fire 15K/12K system management daemon that runs on the SC
with primary responsibility for managing and providing controlled access to
platform and domain configuration data.
pcd manages an array of information that describes the Sun Fire system
configuration. In its physical form, the database information is a collection of flat
files, each file appropriately identifiable by the information contained within it. All
SMS applications that want to access the database information must go through pcd.
In addition to managing platform configuration data, pcd is responsible for platform
configuration change notifications. When pertinent platform configuration changes
occur within the system, the pcd sends out notification of the changes to clients who
have registered to receive the notification.
FIGURE 3-14 illustrates PCD client server relationships to the SMS daemons and CLIs.
48
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Database
access
SSD
EFE
DXS
HWAD
PCD
KMD
ESMD
FOMD
MLD
All CLI commands
in particular:
- poweron/off
- rcfgadm
- add/delete/moveboard
- setkeyswitch
- setupplatform
- setdefaults
FIGURE 3-14
CODD
Configuration
database
- pcd database
change events
- Notification to
clients
PCD Client Server Relationships
Platform Configuration
The following information uniquely identifies the platform:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Platform type
Platform name
Chassis HostID
Cacheable address slice map
System clock frequency
System clock type
SC IP address
SC0 to SC1 IP address
SC1 to SC0 IP address
SC to SC IP netmask
COD instant access CPUs (headroom)
Chapter 3
SMS Internals
49
Domain Configuration
The following information is domain related:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
domain_id
domain_tag
OS version (currently not used)
OS type (currently not used)
Available component list
Assigned board list
Active board list
Golden IOSRAM I/O board
Virtual keyswitch setting for a domain
Active Ethernet I/O board
Domain creation time
Domain dump state
Domain bringup priority
IP host address
Host name
Host netmask
Host broadcast address
Virtual OpenBoot PROM address
Physical OpenBoot PROM address
COD RTU license reservation
System Board Configuration
The following information is related to system boards:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
50
Expander position
Slot position
Board type
Board state
Domain Identifier assigned to board
Available component list state
Board test status
Board test level
Board memory clear state
COD enabled flag
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
SMS Startup Daemon
ssd(1M) is responsible for starting and maintaining all SMS daemons and domain X
servers.
ssd checks the environment for availability of certain files and the availability of the
Sun Fire 15K/12K system, sets environment variables, and then starts esmd(1M) on
the main. esmd monitors environmental changes by polling the related hardware
components. When an abnormal condition is detected, esmd handles it or generates
an event so that the correspondent handlers take appropriate action and/or update
their current status. Some of those handlers are: dsmd, pcd and Sun Management
Center (if installed). The main objective of ssd is to ensure that the SMS daemons
and servers are always up and running.
FIGURE 3-15 illustrates SSD client server relationships to the SMS daemons.
SSD
Platform
(core)
daemons
MLD
Platform
(main only)
daemons
PCD
Domain
(main only)
daemons
DXS
TMD
HWAD
DSMD
DCA
ESMD
MAND
OSD
KMD
FRAD
EFE
CODD
FOMD
FIGURE 3-15
SSD Client Server Relationships
Chapter 3
SMS Internals
51
Scripts
ssd uses a configuration file, ssd_start to determine which components and in
what order to start up the SMS software. This configuration file is located in the
/etc/opt/SUNWSMS/startup directory.
Caution – This is a system configuration file. Mistakes in editing this file can render
the system inoperable. args is the only field that should ever be edited in this script.
Refer to the daemon man pages for specific options and pay particular attention to
syntax.
ssd_start consists of entries in the following format:
name:args:nice:role:type:trigger:startup_timeout:shutdown_timeout:uid:start_order:stop_ord
er
where:
52
name
The name of the program.
args
The valid program options or arguments. Refer to
the daemon man pages for more information.
nice
Specifies a process priority tuning value. Do not
adjust.
role
Specifies whether the daemon is platform or
domain specific.
type
Specifies whether the program is a daemon or a
server.
trigger
Specifies whether the program should be started
automatically or upon event reception.
startup_timeout
The time in seconds ssd will wait for the program
to startup.
stop_timeout
The time in seconds ssd will wait for the program
to shutdown.
uid
The user_id the associated program will run
under.
start_order
The order in which ssd will startup the daemons.
Do not adjust. Changing the default values can
result in the SMS daemons not working properly.
stop_order
The order in which ssd will shutdown the
daemons. Do not adjust. Changing the default
values can result in the SMS daemons not
working properly.
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Spare Mode
Each time ssd starts, it comes up in spare mode. Once ssd has started the
platform core daemons running, it queries fomd(1M) for its role. If the fomd query
returns with spare, ssd stays in this mode. If the fomd returns with main, then ssd
transitions to main mode.
After this initial query phase, ssd only switches between modes through events
received from the fomd.
When in spare mode, ssd starts and monitors all of the core platform role, auto
trigger programs in the ssd_start file. Currently, this list is made up of the
following programs.
■
■
■
■
■
mld
hwad
mand
frad
fomd
If, while in main mode, ssd receives a spare event, then ssd shuts down all
programs except the core platform role and auto trigger programs found in the
ssd_start file.
Main Mode
ssd stays in spare mode until it receives a main event. At that time, ssd starts and
monitors (in addition to the already running daemons) all of the platform role
(main only) event trigger programs, in the ssd_start file. This list is made up of
the following programs.
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
pcd
tmd
dsmd
esmd
osd
kmd
efe
codd
Finally, after starting all the platform role, event trigger programs, ssd queries
the pcd to determine which domains are active. For each of these domains, ssd
starts all the domain role, event trigger programs found in the ssd_start file.
Chapter 3
SMS Internals
53
Domain-Specific Process Startup
ssd uses domain start and stop events from pcd as instructions for starting and
stopping domain-specific servers.
Upon reception, ssd either starts or stops all of the domain role, event trigger
programs (for the domain identified) found in the ssd_start file.
Monitoring and Restarts
Once ssd has started a process, it monitors the process and restarts in the event the
process fails.
SMS Shutdown
In certain instances, such as SMS software upgrades, the SMS software needs to be
shut down. ssd provides a mechanism to shut down itself and all SMS daemons and
servers under its control.
ssd notifies all SMS software components under its control to shut down. After all
the SMS software components have been shut down, ssd shuts itself down.
Task Management Daemon
tmd(1M) provides task management services such as scheduling for SMS. This
reduces the number of conflicts that can arise during concurrent invocations of the
hardware tests and configuration software.
Currently, the only service exported by tmd is the hpost(1M) scheduling service. In
the Sun Fire 15K/12K system, hpost is scheduled based on two factors.
■
Restriction of hpost. When the platform first comes up and no domains have
been configured, a single instance of hpost takes exclusive control of all
expanders and configures the centerplane ASICs. All subsequent hpost
invocations wait until this is complete before proceeding.
Only a single hpost invocation can act on any one expander at a time. For a Sun
Fire 15K/12K system configured without split expanders, this restriction does not
prevent multiple hpost invocations from running. This restriction does come into
play however, when the machine is configured with split expanders.
■
54
System-wide hpost throttle limit. There is a limit to the number of concurrent
hpost invocations that can run at a single time without saturating the system.
The ability to throttle hpost invocations is available using the -t option in
ssd_startup.
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Caution – Changing the default value can adversely affect system functionality. Do
not adjust this parameter unless instructed by a Sun service representative to do so.
FIGURE 3-16 illustrates TMD client server relationships to the SMS daemons.
SSD
PCD
TMD
MLD
hpost
scheduling
FIGURE 3-16
TMD Client Server Relationships
Environment Variables
Basic SMS environment defaults must be set in your configuration files to run SMS
commands.
■
■
■
PATH to include /opt/SUNWSMS/bin
LD_LIBRARY_PATH to include/opt/SUNWSMS/lib
MANPATH to include /opt/SUNWSMS/man
Setting other environment variables when you log in can save time. TABLE 3-2
suggests some useful SMS environment variables.
Chapter 3
SMS Internals
55
TABLE 3-2
56
Example Environment Variables
SMSETC
The path to the /etc/opt/SUNWSMS directory containing
miscellaneous SMS-related files.
SMSLOGGER
The path to the /var/opt/SUNWSMS/adm directory containing
the configuration file for message logging, .logger.
SMSOPT
The path to the /opt/SUNWSMS directory containing the SMS
package binaries, libraries, and object files; configuration and
startup files.
SMSVAR
The path to the /var/opt/SUNWSMS directory containing
platform and domain message and data files.
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
CHAPTER
4
SMS Configuration
A dynamic system domain (DSD) is an independent environment, a subset of a server,
that is capable of running a unique version of firmware and a unique version of the
Solaris operating environment. Each domain is insulated from the other domains.
Continued operation of a domain is not affected by any software failures in other
domains nor by most hardware failures in any other domain.
The system controller (SC) supports commands that let you logically group system
boards into dynamic system domains, or simply domains, which are able to run their
own operating system and handle their own workload. Domains can be created and
deleted without interrupting the operation of other domains. You can use domains
for many purposes. For example, you can test a new operating system version or set
up a development and testing environment in a domain. In this way, if problems
occur, the rest of your system is not affected.
You can also configure several domains to support different departments, with one
domain per department. You can temporarily reconfigure the system into one
domain to run a large job over the weekend.
The Sun Fire 15K system allows up to 18 domains to be configured. The Sun Fire 12K
system allows up to nine domains to be configured.
Domain configuration establishes mappings between the domains and the server’s
hardware components. Also included in domain configuration is the establishment
of various system management parameters and policies for each domain. This
chapter discusses all aspects of domain configuration functionality that the Sun Fire
15K/12K system provides.
This chapter includes the following sections:
■
■
■
■
■
■
Domain Configuration Units
Domain Configuration Requirements
DCU Assignment
Configuration for Platform Administrators
Configuration for Domain Administrators
Degraded Configuration Preferences
57
Domain Configuration Units
A domain configuration unit (DCU) is a unit of hardware that can be assigned to a
single domain. DCUs are the hardware components from which domains are
constructed. DCUs that are not assigned to any domain are said to be in no-domain.
All DCUs are system boards and all system boards are DCUs. The Sun Fire 15K/12K
DCUs are:
■
■
■
■
■
CPU/memory board
Sun Fire HsPCI I/O assembly (HPCI)
Sun Fire HsPCI+ I/O assembly (HPCI+)
Sun Fire MaxCPU board (MCPU)
Sun Fire Link wPCI board (WPCI)
Sun Fire 15K/12K hardware requires the presence of at least one regular
CPU/Memory board, plus at least one of the I/O board types in each configured
domain. csb, exb boards, and the SC are not DCUs.
Note – MaxCPU boards do not contain memory. To set up a domain at least one
regular CPU board is required.
Domain Configuration Requirements
You can create a domain out of any group of system boards, provided the following
conditions are met:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
58
The boards are present and not in use in another domain.
At least one board has a CPU and memory.
At least one is an I/O board.
At least one board has a network interface.
The boards have sufficient memory to support an autonomous domain.
The name you give the new domain is unique (as specified in the addtag(1M)
command).
You have an idprom.image file for the domain that was shipped to you by the
factory. If your idprom.image file has been accidentally deleted or corrupted
and you do not have a backup, contact your Sun field support representative.
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
■
There must be at least one boot disk connected to one of the boards that will be
grouped together into a domain. Alternatively, if a domain does not have its own
disk, there must be at least one network interface so that you can boot the domain
from the network.
DCU Assignment
The assignment of DCUs to a domain is the result of one of three logical operations
acting on a DCU (system board):
■
■
■
Adding the board (from no-domain) to a domain
Removing the board from a domain (leaving the board in no-domain)
Moving the board from one domain to another
Static Versus Dynamic Domain Configuration
Although there are logically three DCU assignment operations the underlying
implementation is based upon four domain configuration operations:
■
■
■
■
Adding a board to an inactive domain
Removing a board from an inactive domain
Adding a board to an active domain
Removing a board from an active domain
The first two domain configuration operations apply to inactive domains, that is, to
domains that are not running OS software. These operations are called static domain
configuration operations. The latter two domain configuration operations apply to
active domains, that is, those running OS software and are called dynamic domain
configuration operations.
Dynamic domain configuration requires interaction with the domain’s Solaris
software to introduce or remove the DCU-resident resources such as CPUs, memory,
or I/O devices from Solaris operating environment control. The Sun Fire 15K/12K
dynamic reconfiguration (DR) project provides a capability called remote DR for an
external agent, such as the SC, to request dynamic configuration services from a
domain’s Solaris environment.
The SC command user interfaces utilize remote DR as necessary to accomplish the
requested tasks. Local automatic DR allows applications running on the domain to
be aware of impending DR operations and to take action, as appropriate, to adjust to
resource changes. This improves the likelihood of success of DR operations,
Chapter 4
SMS Configuration
59
particularly those which require active resources to be removed from domain use.
For more information on DR, refer to the System Management Services (SMS) 1.3
Dynamic Reconfiguration User Guide.
When a domain is configured for local automatic DR, remote DR operations initiated
from the SC benefit from the automation of DR operations for that domain. With
local automatic DR capabilities available in Sun Fire domains, simple scripts can be
constructed and placed in a crontab(1) file allowing simple platform
reconfigurations to take place on a time schedule.
SMS allows you to add boards to or remove boards from an active (running)
domain. Initiation of a remote DR operation on a domain requires administrative
privilege for that domain. SMS grants the ability to initiate remote DR on a domain
to individual administrators on a per-domain basis.
The remote DR interface is secure. Since invocation of DR operations on the domain
itself requires superuser privilege, remote DR services are provided only to known,
authenticated remote agents.
The user command interfaces that initiate DCU assignment operations are the same
whether the affected domain(s) have local automatic DR capabilities or not.
SMS provides for the addition or removal of a board from an inactive domain, such
as, static domain configuration using addboard, deleteboard, and moveboard.
For more information, refer to the System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Dynamic
Reconfiguration User Guide.
Global Automatic Dynamic Reconfiguration
Remote DR and local automatic DR functions are building blocks for a feature called
global automatic DR. Global automatic DR introduces a framework that can be used
to automatically redistribute the system board resources on a Sun Fire system. This
redistribution can be based upon factors such as production schedule, domain
resource utilizations, domain functional priorities, and so on. Global automatic DR
accepts input from customers describing their Sun Fire resource utilization policies
and then uses those policies to automatically marshal the Sun Fire 15K/12K
resources to produce the most effective utilization. For more information on DR,
refer to the System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Dynamic Reconfiguration User Guide.
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System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Configuration for Platform
Administrators
This section briefly describes the configuration services available to the platform
administrator.
Available Component List
Each domain (A-R) defaults to having a 0-board list of boards that are available to an
administrator or configurator to assign to their respective domain(s). Boards can be
added to the available component list of a domain by a platform administrator using
the setupplatform(1M) command. Updating an available component list requires
pcd to perform the following tasks.
■
■
■
■
Update the domain configuration available component list.
Update the available component list state for each board to show the domain to
which it is now available.
Notify dxs of boards added to their respective domain’s available component list.
dxs notifies the running domain of the arrival of an available board.
▼ To Set Up the Available Component List
setupplatform sets up the available component list for domains. If a domain_id or
domain_tag is specified, a list of boards must be specified. If no value is specified for
a parameter, it will retain its current value.
1. In an SC window, log in as a platform administrator.
Chapter 4
SMS Configuration
61
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> setupplatform -d domain_indicator -a location
where:
-a
Adds the slot to the available component list for the
specified domain.
-d domain_indicator
Specifies the domain using:
domain_id - ID for a domain. Valid domain_ids are A–R and
are not case sensitive.
domain_tag - Name assigned to a domain using
addtag(1M).
location
The board (DCU) location.
The following location forms are accepted:
Valid form for Sun Fire 15K
Valid form for Sun Fire 12K
SB(0...17)
IO(0...17)
SB(0...8)
IO(0...8)
The following is an example of making boards at SB0, IO1, and IO2 available to
domain A:
sc0:sms-user:> setupplatform -d A -a SB0 IO1 IO2
At this point the platform administrator can assign the board to domain A using
the addboard(1M) command or leave that up to the domain administrator.
A platform administrator has privileges for only the -c assign option of the
addboard command. All other board configuration requires domain privileges. For
more information refer to the addboard man page.
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System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Configuring Domains
▼ To Name or Change Domain Names From the Command
Line
You do not need to create domains on the Sun Fire 15K/12K system. Eighteen
domains have already been established (domains A–R, case insensitive). These
domain designations are customizable. This section describes how to uniquely name
domains.
Note – Before proceeding, see “Domain Configuration Requirements” on page 58. If
the system configuration must be changed to meet any of these requirements, call
your service provider.
1. Log in to the SC.
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> addtag -d domain_indicator new_tag
where:
-d domain_indicator
Specifies the domain using:
domain_id - ID for a domain. Valid domain_ids are A–R and
are not case sensitive.
domain_tag - Name assigned to a domain using
addtag(1M).
new_tag
The new name you want to give to the domain. It must be
unique among all domains controlled by the SC.
Naming a domain is optional.
The following is an example of naming Domain A to dmnA:
sc0:sms-user:> addtag -d A dmnA
▼ To Add Boards to a Domain From the Command Line
1. Log in to the SC.
Chapter 4
SMS Configuration
63
Note – Platform administrators are restricted to using the -c assign option and
only for available not active boards.
The system board must be in the available state to the domain to which it is being
added. Use the showboards (1M) command to determine a board’s state.
64
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> addboard -d domain_indicator -c assign location...
where:
-d domain_indicator
Specifies the domain using:
domain_id - ID for a domain. Valid domain_ids are A–R and
are not case sensitive.
domain_tag - Name assigned to a domain using
addtag(1M).
-c assign
Specifies the transition of the board from the current
configuration state to the assigned state.
location
The board (DCU) location. Multiple locations are
permitted.
The following location forms are accepted:
Valid form for Sun Fire 15K
Valid form for Sun Fire 12K
SB(0...17)
IO(0...17)
SB(0...8)
IO(0...8)
For example:
sc0:sms-user:> addboard -d C -c assign SB0 I01 SB1 I02
SB0, IO1, SB1 and IO2 have now gone from being available to domain C to being
assigned to it.
addboard performs tasks synchronously and does not return control to the user
until the command is complete. If the command fails the board does not return to its
original state. A dxs or dca error is logged to the domain and pcd reports an error
to the platform log file. If the error is recoverable you can retry the command. If it is
unrecoverable, you will need to reboot the domain in order to use that board.
Chapter 4
SMS Configuration
65
▼ To Delete Boards From a Domain From the Command Line
Note – Platform administrators are restricted to using the -c unassign option and
only for assigned not active boards.
1. Log in to the SC.
The system board must be in the assigned state to the domain from which it is being
deleted. Use the showboards (1M) command to determine a board’s state.
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> deleteboard -c unassign location...
where:
-c unassign
Specifies the transition of the board from the current
configuration state to a new unassigned state.
location
The board (DCU) location. Multiple locations are
permitted.
The following location forms are accepted:
Valid form for Sun Fire 15K
Valid form for Sun Fire 12K
SB(0...17)
IO(0...17)
SB(0...8)
IO(0...8)
For example:
sc0:sms-user:> deleteboard -c unassign SB0
SB0 has now gone from being assigned to the domain to being available to it.
If deleteboard fails, the board does not return to its original state. A dxs or dca
error is logged to the domain and pcd reports an error to the platform log file. If the
error is recoverable, you can retry the command. If it is unrecoverable, you need to
reboot the domain in order to use that board.
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System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
▼ To Move Boards Between Domains From the Command
Line
Note – Platform administrators are restricted to the -c assign option and only for
assigned not active boards.
1. Log in to the SC.
The system board must be in the assigned state to the domain from which it is being
deleted. Use the showboards (1M) command to determine a board’s state.
Chapter 4
SMS Configuration
67
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> moveboard -d domain_indicator -c assign location
where:
-d domain_indicator
Specifies the domain using:
domain_id - ID for a domain. Valid domain_ids are A–R and
are not case sensitive.
domain_tag - Name assigned to a domain using
addtag(1M).
-c assign
Specifies the transition of the board from the current
configuration state to an assigned state.
location
The board (DCU) location.
The following location forms are accepted:
Valid form for Sun Fire 15K
Valid form for Sun Fire 12K
SB(0...17)
IO(0...17)
SB(0...8)
IO(0...8)
moveboard performs tasks synchronously and does not return control to the user
until the command is complete. You can only specify one location when using
moveboard.
For example:
sc0:sms-user:> moveboard -d C -c assign SB0
SB0 has been moved from its previous domain and assigned to domain C.
If moveboard fails, the board does not return to its original state. A dxs or dca error
is logged to the domain and pcd reports an error to the platform log file. If the error
is recoverable, you can retry the command. If it is unrecoverable, you need to reboot
the domain the board was in when the error occurred, in order to use that board.
▼ To Set Domain Defaults
In the event you wish to remove all instances of a previously active domain, SMS
provides the setdefaults(1M) command.
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System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
1. Log in to the SC.
Platform administrators can set domain defaults for all domains, but only one
domain at a time. The domain must not be active and setkeyswitch must be set to
off.
setdefaults removes all pcd entries except network information and log files. This
includes removing the NVRAM and boot parameter data.
By default, you are asked whether you want to remove the NVRAM and boot
parameter data. If you say respond no, the data is preserved. If you use the -p
option you are not prompted and the data is automatically preserved.
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> setdefaults -d domain_indicator [-p]
where:
-d domain_indicator
Specifies the domain using:
domain_id - ID for a domain. Valid domain_ids are A–R and
are not case sensitive.
domain_tag - Name assigned to a domain using
addtag(1M).
-p
Preserves the NVRAM and boot parameter data without a
prompt.
For more information on setdefaults refer to the setdefaults man page or the
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Reference Manual.
▼ To Obtain Board Status
1. Log in to the SC.
Platform administrators can obtain board status for all domains.
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> showboards [-d domain_id|-d domain_tag]
The board status is displayed.
The following partial example, for the Sun Fire 15K system, shows the board
information for a user with platform administrator privileges. All domains are
visible. On a Sun Fire 12K nine domains would be shown.
Chapter 4
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69
sc0:sms-user:> showboards
Location
---SB0
SB1
SB2
SB3
SB4
SB5
SB6
SB7
SB8
SB9
SB10
SB11
SB12
SB13
SB14
SB15
SB16
SB17
IO0
IO1
IO2
IO3
IO4
IO5
IO6
IO7
IO8
IO9
IO10
IO11
IO12
IO13
IO14
IO15
IO16
IO17
Pwr Type
--- ---On
CPU
On
CPU
On
CPU
On
CPU
On
CPU
On
CPU
On
CPU
On
CPU
Off CPU
On
CPU
Off CPU
Off CPU
Off CPU
Empty
Off CPU
On
CPU
On
CPU
Empty
Empty
On
HPCI
On
MCPU
On
MCPU
On
HPCI+
Off HPCI+
On
HPCI
On
HPCI
On
WPCI
On
HPCI+
Off HPCI
Off HPCI
Off HPCI
Empty
Off HPCI+
On
HPCI
On
HPCI
Empty
Slot
Slot
Slot
Slot
Slot
Board Status
-----------Active
Active
Active
Active
Active
Active
Active
Active
Available
Active
Available
Available
Assigned
Available
Assigned
Active
Active
Assigned
Available
Active
Active
Active
Available
Assigned
Active
Active
Active
Assigned
Assigned
Assigned
Assigned
Available
Available
Active
Active
Assigned
Test Status
----------Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Unknown
Passed
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Failed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Degraded
Unknown
Passed
Passed
Passed
iPOST
Unknown
Failed
Uknown
Unknown
Passed
Passed
-
▼ To Obtain Domain Status
1. Log in to the SC.
Platform administrators can obtain domain status for all domains.
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System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Domain
-----domainC
A
A
engB
engB
engB
A
domainC
Isolated
dmnJ
Isolated
Isolated
engB
Isolated
domainC
P
domainC
dmnR
Isolated
A
engB
domainC
domainC
engB
A
dmnJ
Q
dmnJ
engB
engB
engB
Isolated
Isolated
P
Q
dmnR
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> showplatform -d domain_indicator
where:
-d domain_indicator
Specifies the domain using:
domain_id - ID for a domain. Valid domain_ids are A–R and
are not case sensitive.
domain_tag - Name assigned to a domain using
addtag(1M).
The status listing is displayed.
The following partial example, for the Sun Fire 15K system, shows the domain
information for a user with platform administrator privileges. All domains are
visible. On a Sun Fire 12K nine domains would be shown.
sc0:sms-user:> showplatform
...
Domain configurations:
======================
Domain ID Domain Tag
Solaris Nodename
A
newA
sun15-b0
B
engB
sun15-b1
C
domainC
sun15-b2
D
eng1
sun15-b3
E
sun15-b4
F
domainF
sun15-b5
G
dmnG
sun15-b6
H
sun15-b7
I
sun15-b8
J
dmnJ
sun15-b9
K
sun15-b10
L
sun15-b11
M
sun15-b12
N
sun15-b13
O
sun15-b14
P
sun15-b15
Q
sun15-b16
R
dmnR
sun15-b17
Domain Status
Powered Off
Keyswitch Standby
Running OBP
Loading Solaris
Running Solaris
Running Solaris
Running Solaris
Solaris Quiesced
Powered Off
Powered Off
Booting Solaris
Powered Off
Powered Off
Keyswitch Standby
Powered Off
Running Solaris
Running Solaris
Running Solaris
Chapter 4
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71
Virtual Time of Day
The Solaris environment uses the functions provided by a hardware time of day
(TOD) chip to support Solaris system date/time. Typically Solaris software reads the
current system date/time at boot using a get TOD service. From that point forward,
Solaris software either uses a high resolution hardware timer to represent current
date/time or, if configured, uses Network Time Protocol (NTP) to synchronize
current system date/time to a (presumably more accurate) time source.
The SC is the only computer on the platform that has a realtime clock. The virtual
TOD for domains is stored as an offset from that realtime clock value. Each domain
can be configured to use NTP services instead of setdate (1M) to manage the
running system date/time. For more information on NTP, see “Configuring NTP” on
page 74 or refer to the xntpd(1M) man page in the man Pages(1M): System
Administration Commands section of the Solaris 9 Reference Manual Collection.
Note – NTP is a separate package that must be installed and configured on the
domain in order to function as described. Use setdate on the domain prior to
installing NTP.
However system date/time is managed while Solaris software is running, an
attempt is made to keep the boot-time TOD value accurate by setting the TOD when
variance is detected between the current TOD value and the current system
date/time.
Since the Sun Fire 15K/12K hardware provides no physical TOD chip for Sun Fire
domains, SMS provides the time-of-day services required by the Solaris environment
for each domain. Each domain is supplied with a TOD service that is logically
separate from that provided to any other domain. This difference allows system
date/time management on a Sun Fire 15K/12K domain to be as flexible as that
provided by standalone servers. In the unlikely event that a domain needs to be set
up to run at a time other than real world time, the Sun Fire 15K/12K TOD service
allows that domain to be configured without affecting the TOD values supplied to
other domains running real world time.
Time settings are implemented using setdate(1M). You must have platform
administrator privileges in order to run setdate. See “All Privileges” on page 22
for more information.
Setting the Date and Time
setdate (1M) allows the SC platform administrator to set the system controller date
and time values. After setting the date and time, setdate(1M) displays the current
date and time for the user.
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▼ To Set the Date on the SC
1. Log in to the SC.
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> setdate 021210302000.00
System Controller: Tue Feb 12 10:30 2002 US/Pacific
Optionally, setdate(1M) can set a domain TOD. The domain’s keyswitch must be
in the off or standby position. You must have platform administrator privileges to
run this command on the domain.
▼ To Set the Date for Domain eng2
1. Log in to the SC.
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> setdate -d eng2 021210302000.00
Domain eng2: Tue Feb 12 10:30 2002 US/Pacific
showdate(1M) displays the current SC date and time.
▼ To Display the Date on the SC
1. Log in to the SC.
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> showdate
System Controller: Tue Feb 12 10:30 2002 US/Pacific
Optionally, showdate(1M) can display the date and time for a specified domain.
Superuser or any member of a platform or domain group can run showdate.
▼ To Display the Date on Domain eng2
1. Log in to the SC.
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73
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> showdate -d eng2
Domain eng2: Tue Feb 12 10:30 2002 US/Pacific
Configuring NTP
The NTP daemon, xntpd(1M) for the Solaris 9 operating environment, provides a
mechanism for keeping the time settings synchronized between the SC and the
domains. The OpenBoot PROM obtains the time from the SC when the domain is
booted, and NTP keeps the time synchronized on the domain from that point on.
NTP configuration is based on information provided by the system administrator.
The NTP packages are compiled with support for a local reference clock. This means
that your system can poll itself for the time instead of polling another system or
network clock. The poll is done through the network loopback interface. The
numbers in the IP address are 127.127.1.0. This section describes how to set the time
on the SC using setdate, and then to set up the SC to use its own internal time-ofday clock as the reference clock in the ntp.conf file.
NTP can also keep track of the drift (difference) between the SC clock and the
domain clock. NTP corrects the domain clock if it loses contact with the SC clock,
provided that you have a drift file declaration in the ntp.conf file. The drift file
declaration specifies to the NTP daemon the name of the file that stores the error in
the clock frequency computed by the daemon. See the following procedure for an
example of the drift file declaration in an ntp.conf file.
If the ntp.conf file does not exist, create it as described below. You must have an
ntp.conf file on both the SC and the domains.
▼ To Create the ntp.conf File
1. Log in to the main SC as superuser.
2. Change to the /etc/inet directory and copy the NTP server file to the NTP
configuration file:
sc0:# cd /etc/inet
sc0:# cp ntp.server ntp.conf
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System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
3. Using a text editor, edit the /etc/inet/ntp.conf file created in the previous
step.
The ntp.conf file for the Solaris 9 operating environment is located in
/etc/inet.
The following is an example of server lines in the ntp.conf file on the main SC, to
synchronize clocks.
server 127.127.1.0
fudge 127.127.1.0 stratum 13
driftfile /var/ntp/ntp.drift
statsdir /var/ntp/ntpstats/
filegen peerstats file peerstats type day enable
filegen loopstats file loopstats type day enable
filegen clockstats file clockstats type day enable
4. Save the file and exit.
5. Stop and restart the NTP daemon:
sc0:# /etc/init.d/xntpd stop
sc0:# /etc/init.d/xntpd start
6. Log in to the spare SC as superuser.
7. Change to the /etc/inet directory and copy the NTP server file to the NTP
configuration file:
sc1:# cd /etc/inet
sc1:# cp ntp.server ntp.conf
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75
8. Using a text editor, edit the /etc/inet/ntp.conf file created in the previous
step.
The ntp.conf file for the Solaris 9 operating environment is located in
/etc/inet.
The following is an example of server lines in the ntp.conf file on the spare SC, to
synchronize clocks.
server 127.127.1.0
fudge 127.127.1.0 stratum 13
driftfile /var/ntp/ntp.drift
statsdir /var/ntp/ntpstats/
filegen peerstats file peerstats type day enable
filegen loopstats file loopstats type day enable
filegen clockstats file clockstats type day enable
9. Stop and restart the NTP daemon:
sc1:# /etc/init.d/xntpd stop
sc1:# /etc/init.d/xntpd start
10. Log in to each domain as superuser.
11. Change to the /etc/inet directory and copy the NTP client file to the NTP
configuration file:
domain_id:# cd /etc/inet
domain_id:# cp ntp.client ntp.conf
12. Using a text editor, edit the /etc/inet/ntp.conf file created in the previous
step.
The ntp.conf file for the Solaris 9 operating environment is located in
/etc/inet.
For the Solaris 9 operating environment, you can add lines similar to the following
to the /etc/inet/ntp.conf on the domains:
server main_sc_hostname prefer
server spare_sc_hostname
13. Save the file and exit.
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14. Change to the initialization directory, and stop and restart the NTP daemon on the
domain:
domain_id:# /etc/init.d/xntpd stop
domain_id:# /etc/init.d/xntpd start
NTP is now installed and running on your domain. Repeat Step 10 through Step 14
for each domain.
For more information on the NTP daemon, refer to the xntpd(1M) man page in the
man Pages(1M): System Administration Commands section of the Solaris 9 Reference
Manual Collection.
Virtual ID PROM
Each configurable domain has a virtual ID PROM that contains identifying
information about the domain such as hostID and domain Ethernet address. The
hostID is unique among all domains on the same platform. The Ethernet address is
world unique.
Sun Fire 15K/12K system management software provides a virtual ID PROM for
each configurable domain containing identifying information that can be read, but
not written, from the domain. The information provided meets the requirements of
the Solaris environment.
Flashupdate Command
SMS provides the flashupdate(1M) command to update the Flash PROM in the
system controller (SC), and the Flash PROMs in a domain’s CPU and MaxCPU
boards after SMS software upgrades or applicable patch installation. flashupdate
displays both the current Flash PROM and the flash image file information prior to
any updates.
Note – Once you have updated the SC FPROM(s) you must reset the SC using the
reset-all command at the OpenBoot PROM (ok) prompt. No CLIs should be
executed on a system board while flashupdate is running on that board. Wait
until flashupdate completes before running any SMS commands involving that
system board.
For more information and examples, refer to the flashupdate man page.
Chapter 4
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77
Configuration for Domain
Administrators
This section briefly goes over the configuration services available to the domain
administrator.
Configuring Domains
The domain administrator has been given far more capability with regard to the
addboard, deleteboard, and moveboard commands.
▼ To Add Boards to a Domain From the Command Line
1. Log in to the SC as a domain administrator for that domain.
Note – In order for the domain administrator to add a board to a domain, that
board must appear in the domain available component list.
The system board must be in the available or assigned state to the domain to which
it is being added. Use the showboards (1M) command to determine a board’s state.
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System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> addboard -d domain_indicator -c function location
where:
-d domain_indicator
Specifies the domain using:
domain_id - ID for a domain. Valid domain_ids are A–R and
are not case sensitive.
domain_tag - Name assigned to a domain using
addtag(1M).
-c function
Specifies the transition of the board from the current
configuration state to a new configuration state.
location
The board (DCU) location.
Configuration states are:
assign
Assigns the board to the logical domain. The board
belongs to the domain but is not active.
connect
Transitions an assigned board to the
connected/unconfigured state. This is an intermediate
state and has no standalone implementation.
configure
Transitions an assigned board to the
connected/configured state. The hardware resources on
the board can be used by Solaris software.
If the -c function option is not specified, the default expected configuration state is
configure. For more detailed information on the configuration states refer to the
addboard(1M) manpage.
Multiple locations are accepted.
The following location forms are accepted:
Valid form for Sun Fire 15K
Valid form for Sun Fire 12K
SB(0...17)
IO(0...17)
SB(0...8)
IO(0...8)
Chapter 4
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79
For example:
sc0:sms-user:> addboard -d C -c assign SB0 I01 SB1 I02
SB0, IO1, SB1 and IO2 have now gone from being available to domain C to being
assigned to it.
addboard performs tasks synchronously and does not return control to the user
until the command is complete. If the board is not powered on or tested, specify the
-c connect|configure option, then the command will power on the board and
test it.
If addboard fails, the board does not return to its original state. A dxs or dca error
is logged to the domain and pcd reports an error to the platform log file. If the error
is recoverable, you can retry the command. If it is unrecoverable, you need to reboot
the domain in order to use that board.
▼ To Delete Boards From a Domain From the Command Line
1. Log in to the SC as a domain administrator for that domain.
The system board must be in the assigned or active state to the domain from which
it is being deleted. Use the showboards (1M) command to determine a board’s
state.
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2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> deleteboard -c function location
where:
-c function
Specifies the transition of the board from the current
configuration state to a new configuration state.
location
The board (DCU) location.
Configuration states are:
unconfigure
Transitions an assigned board to the
connected/unconfigured state. The hardware resources on
the board can no longer be used by Solaris software.
disconnect
Transitions an assigned board to the
disconnected/unconfigured state.
unassign
Unassigns the board from the logical domain. The board
no longer belongs to the domain and its state is changed
to available.
If the -c function option is not specified, the default expected configuration state is
unassign. For more detailed information on the configuration states refer to the
deleteboard(1M) manpage.
Multiple locations are accepted.
The following location forms are accepted:
Valid form for Sun Fire 15K
Valid form for Sun Fire 12K
SB(0...17)
IO(0...17)
SB(0...8)
IO(0...8)
For example:
sc0:sms-user:> deleteboard -c unassign SB0
SB0 has now gone from being assigned to the domain to being available to it.
Chapter 4
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81
Note – A domain administrator can unconfigure and disconnect a board but is not
allowed to delete a board from a domain unless the deleteboard [location] field
appears in the domain’s available component list.
If deleteboard fails, the board does not return to its original state. A dxs or dca
error is logged to the domain and pcd reports an error to the platform log file. If the
error is recoverable, you can retry the command. If it is unrecoverable, you need to
reboot the domain in order to use that board.
▼ To Move Boards Between Domains From the Command
Line
Note – You must have domain administrator privileges for both domains involved.
1. Log in to the SC as a domain administrator for that domain.
The system board must be in the assigned or active state to the domain from which
it is being deleted. Use the showboards (1M) command to determine a board’s
state.
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2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> moveboard -d domain_indicator -c function location
where:
-d domain_indicator
This is the domain to which the board is being moved.
Specifies the domain using:
domain_id - ID for a domain. Valid domain_ids are A–R and
are not case sensitive.
domain_tag - Name assigned to a domain using
addtag(1M).
-c function
Specifies the transition of the board from the current
configuration state to an new configuration state.
location
The board (DCU) location.
Configuration states are:
assign
Unconfigures the board from the current logical domain.
Moves the board out of the logical domain by changing its
state to available. Assigns the board to the new logical
domain. The board belongs to the new domain but is not
active.
connect
Transitions an assigned board to the
connected/unconfigured state. This is an intermediate
state and has no standalone implementation.
configure
Transitions an assigned board to the
connected/configured state. The hardware resources on
the board can be used by Solaris software.
If the -c option is not specified, the default expected configuration state is
configure. For more detailed information on the configuration states refer to the
moveboard(1M) manpage.
The following location forms are accepted:
Chapter 4
SMS Configuration
83
Valid form for Sun Fire 15K
Valid form for Sun Fire 12K
SB(0...17)
IO(0...17)
SB(0...8)
IO(0...8)
moveboard performs tasks synchronously and does not return control to the user
until the command is complete. If the board is not powered on or tested specify -c
connect|configure, then the command will power on the board and test it. You
can only specify one location when using moveboard.
If moveboard fails, the board does not return to its original state. A dxs or dca error
is logged to the domain and pcd reports an error to the platform log file. If the error
is recoverable, you can retry the command. If it is unrecoverable, you need to reboot
the domain the board was in when the error occurred, in order to use that board
▼ To Set Domain Defaults
In the event you wish to remove all instances of a previously active domain, SMS
provides the setdefaults(1M) command.
1. Log in to the SC.
Domain administrators can set domain defaults for all domains, but only one
domain at a time. The domain must not be active and setkeyswitch must be set to
off. setdefaults removes all pcd entries except network information, log files
and, optionally, NVRAM and boot parameter data.
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> setdefaults -d domain_indicator
where:
-d domain_indicator
Specifies the domain using:
domain_id - ID for a domain. Valid domain_ids are A–R and
are not case sensitive.
domain_tag - Name assigned to a domain using
addtag(1M).
For more information on setdefaults refer to the setdefaults man page or the
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Reference Manual.
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System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
▼ To Obtain Board Status
1. Log in to the SC.
Domain administrators can obtain board status only for those domains for which
they have privileges.
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> showboards [-d domain_id|domain_tag]
The board status is displayed.
The following partial example shows the board information for a user with domain
administrator privileges for domain A.
sc0:sms-user:> showboards -d A
Location
------SB1
SB2
IO1
Pwr
----On
On
On
Type
---CPU
CPU
HPCI
Board Status
-----------Active
Active
Active
Test Status
----------Passed
Passed
Passed
Domain
-----A
A
A
▼ To Obtain Domain Status
1. Log in to the SC.
Domain administrators can obtain domain status only for those domains for which
they have privileges.
Chapter 4
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85
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> showplatform -d domain_indicator
where:
-d domain_indicator
Specifies the domain using:
domain_id - ID for a domain. Valid domain_ids are A–R and
are not case sensitive.
domain_tag - Name assigned to a domain using
addtag(1M).
The status listing is displayed.
The following partial example shows the domain information for a user with
domain administrator privileges for domains newA, engB, and domainC.
sc0:sms-user:> showplatform
...
Domain configurations:
======================
Domain ID Domain Tag
Solaris Nodename
A
newA
sun15-b0
B
engB
sun15-b1
C
domainC
sun15-b2
Domain Status
Powered Off
Keyswitch Standby
Running OBP
▼ To Obtain Device Status
1. Log in to the SC.
Domain administrators can obtain board status only for those domains for which
they have privileges.
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System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> showdevices [-d domain_id|domain_tag]
The device status is displayed.
The following partial example shows the device information for a user with domain
administrator privileges for domain A.
sc0:sms-user:> showdevices IO1
IO Devices
---------domain location
A
IO1
A
IO1
A
IO1
A
IO1
A
IO1
device
sd3
sd3
sd3
sd3
sd3
resource
/dev/dsk/c0t3d0s0
/dev/dsk/c0t3s0s1
/dev/dsk/c0t3s0s1
/dev/dsk/c0t3d0s3
/var/run
usage
mounted filesystem "/"
dump device (swap)
swap area
mounted filesystem "/var"
mounted filesystem "/var/run"
Virtual Keyswitch
Each Sun Fire 15K/12K domain has a virtual keyswitch. Like the Sun Enterprise
servers physical keyswitch, the Sun Fire 15K/12K domain virtual keyswitch controls
whether the domain is powered on or off, whether increased diagnostics are run at
boot, and whether certain operations (for example, flash PROM updates and domain
reset commands) are permitted.
Only domains configured with their virtual keyswitch powered on are booted,
monitored, and subject to automatic recovery actions, should they fail.
Virtual keyswitch settings are implemented using setkeyswitch(1M). You must
have domain administrator privileges for the specified domain in order to run
setkeyswitch. See “All Privileges” on page 22 for more information.
Setkeyswitch
setkeyswitch (1M) changes the position of the virtual key switch to the specified
value. pcd (1M) maintains the state of each virtual key switch between power cycles
of the SC or physical power cycling of the power supplies.
Chapter 4
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87
setkeyswitch(1M) is responsible for loading all the configured processors’
bootbus SRAM. All the processors are started, with one processor designated as the
boot processor. setkeyswitch(1M) loads OpenBoot PROM into the memory of the
Sun Fire 15K/12K system domain and starts OpenBoot PROM on the boot processor.
The primary task of OpenBoot PROM is to boot and configure the operating system
from either a mass storage device or from a network. OpenBoot PROM also provides
extensive features for testing hardware and software interactively.
The setkeyswitch(1M) command syntax follows:
sc0:sms-user:> setkeyswitch -d domain_indicator [-q -y|-n]
on|standby|off|diag|secure
where:
-d domain_indicator
Specifies the domain using:
domain_id - ID for a domain. Valid domain_ids are A–R and
are not case sensitive.
domain_tag - Name assigned to a domain using
addtag(1M).
-q
Quiet. Suppresses all messages to stdout including
prompts. When used alone -q defaults to the -n option
for all prompts. When used with either the -y or the -n
option, -q suppresses all user prompts, and automatically
answers with either Y or N based on the option chosen.
-n
Automatically answers no to all prompts. Prompts are
displayed unless used with -q option.
-y
Automatically answers yes to all prompts. Prompts are
displayed unless used with -q option.
The following operands are supported:
■
on
From the off or standby position, on powers on all boards assigned to the
domain (if not already powered on). Then the domain is brought up.
From the diag position, on is nothing more than a position change and does not
affect a running domain.
From the secure position, on restores write permission to the domain.
■
88
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System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
From the on, diag, or secure position, standby optionally displays a
confirmation prompt. If you answer ‘yes’ then it determines if the domain is in a
suitable state to be reset and deconfigured (for example, the OS is not running).
If the domain is in a suitable state to be reset and deconfigured, then
setkeyswitch resets and deconfigures all boards assigned to the domain.
If not, then prior to the reset and deconfiguration setkeyswitch gracefully
shuts down the domain.
From the off position, standby powers on all boards assigned to the domain (if
not already powered on).
■
off
From the on, diag, or secure position, off optionally displays a confirmation
prompt. If you answer ‘yes’ then it determines if the domain is in a suitable state
to be powered off (for example, the OS is not running).
If the domain is in a suitable state to be powered off, then setkeyswitch powers
off all boards assigned to the domain.
If not, then setkeyswitch aborts and logs a message to the domain log.
From the standby position, off powers off all the boards in the domain.
■
diag
From the off or standby position, diag powers on all boards assigned to the
domain (if not already powered on). Then the domain is brought up just as in the
on position, except that POST is invoked with verbosity and diag levels set to, at
least, their defaults.
From the on position, diag is nothing more than a position change, but upon
automatic system recovery (ASR) of the domain, POST is invoked with verbosity
and the diag level set to, at least, their defaults.
From the secure position, diag restores write permission to the domain and
upon ASR, POST is invoked with verbosity and the diag levels set to their
defaults.
For more information on ASR, see “Automatic System Recovery (ASR)” on page
119.
■
secure
From the off or standby position, secure powers on all boards assigned to the
domain (if not already powered on). Then the domain is brought up just as in the
on position, except that the secure position removes write permission to the
domain. For example, flashupdate and reset will not work.
From the on position, secure removes write permission to the domain (as
described above). From the diag position, secure removes write permission to
the domain (as described above).
Chapter 4
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89
▼ To Set the Virtual Keyswitch On in Domain A
1. Log in to the SC.
Domain administrators can set the virtual keyswitch only for those domains for
which they have privileges.
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> setkeyswitch -d A on
showkeyswitch (1M) displays the position of the virtual keyswitch of the specified
domain. The state of each virtual keyswitch is maintained between power cycles of
the SC or physical power cycling of the power supplies by the pcd (1M). Superuser
or any member of a platform or domain group can run showkeyswitch.
▼ To Display the Virtual Keyswitch Setting in Domain A
1. Log in to the SC.
Domain administrators can obtain keyswitch status only for those domains for
which they have privileges.
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> showkeyswitch -d A
Virtual keyswitch position: ON
Virtual NVRAM
Each domain has a virtual NVRAM containing OpenBoot PROM data such as the
OpenBoot PROM variables. OpenBoot PROM is a binary image stored on the SC in
/opt/SUNWSMS/hostobjs which setkeyswitch downloads into domain memory
at boot time. There is only one version of OpenBoot PROM for all domains.
SMS software provides a virtual NVRAM for each domain and allows OpenBoot
PROM full read/write access to this data.
For most NVRAM variables, the only interface available to read or write them is
OpenBoot PROM. The exceptions are those OpenBoot PROM variables which must
be altered in order to bring OpenBoot PROM up in a known working state or to
diagnose problems that hinder OpenBoot PROM bring up. These variables are not a
replacement for the OpenBoot PROM interface.
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These limited number of OpenBoot PROM variable values in the domain NVRAM
are readable and writable from SMS using setobpparams(1M). You must have
domain administrator privileges to run set/showobpparams. If you change
variables for a running domain, you must reboot the domain in order for the
changes to take effect.
Note – Only experienced system administrators, familiar with OpenBoot PROM
commands and their dependencies should attempt to use setobpparams in any
manner other than that described.
Setting the OpenBoot PROM Variables
setobpparams(1M) sets and gets a subset of a domain’s virtual NVRAM variables
and REBOOTINFO data using the following syntax.
sc0: sms-user:> setobpparams -d domain_indicator param=value...
where:
-d domain_indicator
Specifies the domain using:
domain_id - ID for a domain. Valid domain_ids are A–R and
are not case sensitive.
domain_tag - Name assigned to a domain using
addtag(1M).
param=value is:
Chapter 4
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91
Variables
=
Default Value
Comment
diag-switch?
=
false
When set to false, the default boot device is
specified by boot-device and the default
boot file by boot-file. If set to true,
OpenBoot PROM runs in diagnostic mode
and you need to set either diag-device or
diag-file to specify the correct default
boot device or file. These default boot
device and file settings cannot be set using
setobpparams. Use setenv(1) in
OpenBoot PROM.
auto-boot?
=
false
When set to true, the domain boots
automatically after power-on or reset-all.
The boot device and boot file used are
based on the settings for diag-switch (see
above). Neither boot-device nor boot
file can be set using setobpparams. In
the event the OK prompt is unavailable,
such as a repeated panic, use
setobpparams to set auto-boot? to
false. When the auto-boot? variable is
set to false using setobpparams, the
reboot variables are invalidated, the system
will not boot automatically and will stop in
OpenBoot PROM where new NVRAM
variables can be set. See “To Recover From
a Repeated Domain Panic” on page 92.
security-mode
=
none
Firmware security level. Valid variable
values for security-mode are:
• none - No password required (default).
• command - All commands except for
boot(1M) and go require the password.
• full - All commands except for go
require the password.
use-nvramrc?
=
false
When set to true, this variable executes
commands in NVRAMRC during system
start-up.
fcode-debug?
=
false
When set to true, this variable includes
name fields for plug-in device FCodes.
The following is an example of how setobpparams can be useful.
▼ To Recover From a Repeated Domain Panic
Say domain A encounters repeated panics caused by a corrupted default boot disk.
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1. Log in to the SC with domain administrator privileges.
2. Stop automatic reboot:
sc0:sms-user:> setkeyswitch -d A standby
sc0:sms-user:> setobpparams -d A ’auto-boot?=false’
Note – Most, but not all, shells require using single quotes around the variable
values to prevent the question mark from being treated as a special character.
3. Repost the domain:
sc0:sms-user:> setkeyswitch -d A off
sc0:sms-user:> setkeyswitch -d A on
4. Once the domain has come up to the OK prompt set NVRAM variables to a new
uncorrupted boot-device.
ok setenv boot-device bootdisk_alias
where:
bootdisk_alias
A user-defined alias you created. The boot device must correspond
to the a bootable disk on which you have installed the operating
environment.
5. Now that you have set up a new alias for your boot device, boot the disk by
typing:
ok boot
For more information on OpenBoot variables refer to the OpenBoot 4.x Command
Reference Manual.
Chapter 4
SMS Configuration
93
▼ To Set the OpenBoot PROM Security Mode Variable in
Domain A
1. Log in to the SC.
Domain administrators can set the OpenBoot PROM variables only for those
domains for which they have privileges.
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> setobpparams -d A security-mode=full
security-mode has been set to full. All commands except go require a password
on domain A. You must reboot a running domain in order for the change to take
effect.
▼ To See the OpenBoot PROM Variables
1. Log in to the SC.
Domain administrators can set the OpenBoot PROM variables only for those
domains for which they have privileges.
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> showobpparams -d domain_indicator
where:
-d domain_indicator
Specifies the domain using:
domain_id - ID for a domain. Valid domain_ids are A–R and
are not case sensitive.
domain_tag - Name assigned to a domain using
addtag(1M).
SMS NVRAM updates are supplied to OpenBoot PROM at OpenBoot PROM
initiation (or domain reboot time). For more information refer to the OpenBoot PROM
4.x Command Reference Manual.
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Degraded Configuration Preferences
In most situations, hardware failures that cause a domain crash are detected and
eliminated from the domain configuration either by POST or OpenBoot PROM
during the subsequent automatic recovery boot of the domain. However, there can
be situations where failures are intermittent or the boot-time tests are inadequate to
detect failures that cause repeated domain failures and reboots. In those situations,
Sun Fire 15K/12K system management software uses configurations or
configuration policies supplied by the domain administrator to eliminate hardware
from the domain configuration in an attempt to get a stable domain environment
running.
The following commands can be run by either platform or domain administrators.
Domain administrators are restricted to the domains for which they have privileges.
Setbus
setbus(1M) dynamically reconfigures bus traffic on active expanders in a domain to
use either one centerplane support board (CSB) or both. Using both CSBs is
considered normal mode. Using one CSB is considered degraded mode.
setbus resets any boards that are powered on but not active. Any attach-ready state
is lost. For more information on attach-ready states refer to the System Management
Services (SMS) 1.3 Dynamic Reconfiguration User Guide.
You must have platform administrator privileges or domain privileges for the
specified domain in order to run setbus.
This feature allows you to swap out a CSB without having to power off the system.
Valid buses are:
■
■
■
a - configures the address bus
d - configures the data bus
r - configures the response bus
▼ To Set All Buses on All Active Domains to Use Both CSBs
1. Log in to the SC.
Domain administrators can set the bus only for those domains for which they have
privileges.
Chapter 4
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95
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> setbus -c CS0,CS1
For more information on reconfiguring bus traffic, refer to the setbus(1M) man
page.
Showbus
showbus(1M) displays the bus configuration of expanders in active domains. This
information defaults to displaying configuration by slot order. Any member of a
platform or domain group can run showbus.
▼ To Show All Buses on All Active Domains
1. Log in to the SC.
Domain administrators can set the bus only for those domains for which they have
privileges.
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> showbus
For more information on reconfiguring bus traffic, refer to the showbus(1M) man
page.
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CHAPTER
5
Capacity on Demand
Sun Fire 15K/12K systems are configured with processors (CPUs) on CPU/Memory
boards. These boards are purchased as part of your initial system configuration or as
add-on components. The right to use the CPUs on these boards is included with the
initial purchase price.
The Capacity on Demand (COD) option provides additional processing resources
that you pay for when you use them. Through the COD option, you purchase and
install unlicensed COD CPU/Memory boards in your system. Each COD
CPU/Memory board contains four CPUs, which are considered as available
processing resources. However, you do not have the right to use these COD CPUs
until you also purchase the right-to-use (RTU) licenses for them. The purchase of a
COD RTU license entitles you to receive a license key, which enables the appropriate
number of COD processors.
You use COD commands included with the SMS software to allocate, activate, and
monitor your COD resources.
This chapter covers the following topics:
■
■
■
■
■
COD Overview
Getting Started with COD
Managing COD RTU Licenses
Activating COD Resources
Monitoring COD Resources
COD Overview
The COD option provides additional CPU resources on COD CPU/Memory boards
that are installed in your system. Although your Sun Fire 15K/12K system system
comes configured with a minimum number of standard (active) CPU/Memory
97
boards, your system can have a mix of both standard and COD CPU/Memory
boards installed, up to the maximum capacity allowed for the system. At least one
active CPU is required for each domain in the system.
If you want the COD option, and your system is not currently configured with COD
CPU/Memory boards, contact your Sun sales representative or authorized Sun
reseller to purchase COD CPU/Memory boards. Your salesperson will work with
your service provider to install the COD CPU/Memory boards in your system.
The following sections describe the main elements of the COD option:
■
■
■
■
COD Licensing Process
COD RTU License Allocation
Instant Access CPUs
Resource Monitoring
COD Licensing Process
COD RTU licenses are required to enable COD CPU resources. COD licensing
involves the following tasks:
1. Obtaining COD RTU license certificates and COD RTU license keys for COD
resources to be enabled.
You can purchase COD RTU licenses at any time from your Sun sales
representative or reseller. You can then obtain a license key (for the COD
resources purchased) from the Sun License Center.
2. Entering the COD RTU license keys in the COD license database.
The COD license database stores the license keys for the COD resources that you
enable. You record this license information in the COD license database by using
the addcodlicense(1M) command. The COD RTU licenses are considered as
floating licenses and can be used for any COD CPU resource installed in the
system.
For details on completing the licensing tasks, see “To Obtain and Add a COD RTU
License Key to the COD License Database” on page 101.
COD RTU License Allocation
With the COD option, your system is configured to have a certain number of COD
CPUs available, as determined by the number of COD CPU/Memory boards and
COD RTU licenses that you purchase. The COD RTU licenses that you obtain are
handled as a pool of available licenses.
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System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
When you activate a domain containing a COD CPU/Memory board or when a
COD CPU/Memory board is connected to a domain through a dynamic
reconfiguration (DR) operation, the following occurs automatically:
■
The system checks the current installed COD RTU licenses.
■
The system obtains a COD RTU license (from the license pool) for each CPU on
the COD board.
The COD RTU licenses are allocated to the CPUs on a “first come, first serve” basis.
However, you can allocate a specific quantity of RTU licenses to a particular domain
by using the setupplatform(1M) command. For details, see “To Enable Instant
Access CPUs and Reserve Domain RTU Licenses” on page 105.
If there is an insufficient number of COD RTU licenses and a license cannot be
allocated to a COD CPU, the COD CPU is not configured into the domain and is
considered as unlicensed. A COD CPU is considered to be unused when it is
assigned to a domain but the CPU is not active.
If a COD CPU/Memory board does not have sufficient COD RTU licenses for its
COD CPUs, the system will fail the COD CPU/Memory board during the
setkeyswitch on operation. For additional details and examples, see
“Deconfigured and Unlicensed COD CPUs” on page 113.
When you remove a COD CPU/Memory board from a domain through a DR
operation or when a domain containing a COD CPU/Memory board is shut down
normally, the COD RTU licenses for the CPUs on those boards are released and
added to the pool of available licenses.
You can use the showcodusage command to review COD usage and COD RTU
license states. For details on showcodusage and other commands that provide COD
information, see “Monitoring COD Resources” on page 107.
Note – You can move COD boards between Sun Fire systems (Sun Fire 15K, 12K,
6800, 4810, 4800, and 3800 servers), but the associated license keys are tied to the
original platform for which they were purchased and are non-transferable.
Instant Access CPUs
If you require COD CPU resources before you complete the COD RTU license
purchasing process, you can temporarily enable a limited number of resources called
instant access CPUs (also referred to as headroom). These instant access CPUs are
available as long as there are unlicensed COD CPUs in the system. The maximum
number of instant access resources available on Sun Fire 15K/12K systems is eight
CPUs.
Chapter 5
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99
Instant access CPUs are disabled by default on Sun Fire 15K/12K systems. If you
want to use these resources, you activate them by using the setupplatform(1M)
command. Warning messages are logged on the platform console, informing you
that the instant access CPUs (headroom) used exceeds the number of COD licenses
available. Once you obtain and add the COD RTU license keys for instant access
CPUs to the COD license database, these warning messages will stop.
For details on activating instant access CPUs, see, “To Enable Instant Access CPUs
and Reserve Domain RTU Licenses” on page 105.
Resource Monitoring
Information about COD events, such as the activation of instant access CPUs
(headroom) or license violations, are recorded in the platform log and can be viewed
by using the showlogs command.
Other commands, such as the showcodusage(1M) command, provide information
on COD components and COD configuration. For details on obtaining COD
information and status, see “Monitoring COD Resources” on page 107.
Getting Started with COD
Before you can use COD on Sun Fire 15K/12K systems, you must complete certain
prerequisites. These tasks include the following:
■
Installing the same version of the SMS software on both the main and spare
system controller (SC).
For details on upgrading the software, refer to the System Management Services
(SMS) 1.3 Installation Guide.
Note – SMS software versions before SMS 1.3 will not recognize COD
CPU/Memory boards.
■
Contacting your Sun sales representative or reseller and doing the following:
■
■
■
100
Signing the COD contract addendum, in addition to the standard purchasing
agreement contract for your Sun Fire 15K/12K system.
Purchasing COD CPU/Memory boards and arranging for their installation.
Performing the COD RTU licensing process as described in “To Obtain and Add a
COD RTU License Key to the COD License Database” on page 101.
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Managing COD RTU Licenses
COD RTU license management involves the acquisition and addition of COD RTU
licenses keys to the COD license database. You can also remove COD RTU licenses
from the license database if needed.
▼
To Obtain and Add a COD RTU License Key to
the COD License Database
1. Contact your Sun sales representative or authorized Sun reseller to purchase a
COD RTU license for each COD CPU to be enabled.
Sun will send you a COD RTU License Certificate for each CPU license that you
purchase. The COD RTU license sticker on the License Certificate contains a right-touse serial number used to obtain a COD RTU license key.
2. Contact the Sun License Center and provide the following information to obtain a
COD RTU license key:
■
■
The COD RTU serial number from the license sticker on the COD RTU License
Certificate.
Chassis HostID, which uniquely identifies the platform.
You can obtain the Chassis HostID by running the command
showplatform -p cod as platform administrator.
For instructions on contacting the Sun License Center, refer to the COD RTU License
Certificate that you received or check the Sun License Center web site:
http://www.sun.com/licensing
The Sun License Center will send you an email message containing the RTU license
key for the COD resources that you purchased.
3. Add the license key to the COD license database by using the addcodlicense
(1M) command. In an SC window, log in as a platform administrator and type:
sc0:sms-user:> addcodlicense license-signature
where license-signature is the complete COD RTU license key assigned by the Sun
License Center. You can copy the license key string that you receive from the Sun
License Center.
Chapter 5
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101
4. Verify that the specified license key was added to the COD license database by
running the showcodlicense -r command (see “To Review COD License
Information” on page 102).
The COD RTU license key that you added should be listed in the
showcodlicense(1M) command output.
▼
To Delete a COD License Key From the COD
License Database
1. In an SC window, log in as a platform administrator and type:
sc0:sms-user:> deletecodlicense license-signature
where :
license-signature is the complete COD RTU license key to be removed from the COD
license database.
The system verifies that the license removal will not cause a COD RTU license
violation, which occurs when there is an insufficient number of COD licenses for the
number of COD resources in use. If the deletion will cause a COD RTU license
violation, the SC will not delete the license key.
Note – You can force the removal of the license key by specifying the -f option
with the deletecodlicense(1M) command. However, be aware that the license
key removal could cause a license violation or an over commitment of RTU license
reservations. An RTU license over commitment occurs when there are more RTU
domain reservations than RTU licenses installed in the system. For additional
details, refer to the deletecodlicense(1M) command description in the System
Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Reference Manual.
2. Verify that the license key was deleted from the COD license database by running
the showcodlicense -r command, described in the next procedure.
The deleted license key should not be listed in the showcodlicense output.
▼
To Review COD License Information
1. In an SC window, log in as a platform administrator and type one of the following
to display COD license information:
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System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
■
To view license data in an interpreted format, type:
sc0:sms-user:> showcodlicense
For example:
sc0:sms-user:> showcodlicense
Description
----------PROC
Lic
Ver
--01
Expiration
----------NONE
Count
----16
Status
------GOOD
Cls
--1
Tier
Num Req
--- --1
0
TABLE 5-1 describes the COD license information in the showcodlicense output.
TABLE 5-1
COD License Information
Item
Description
Description
Type of resource (processor)
Lic Ver
Version number of the license
Expiration
None. Not supported (no expiration date)
Count
Number of RTU licenses granted for the given resource
Status
One of the following states:
• GOOD – Indicates the resource license is valid
• EXPIRED – Indicates the resource license is no longer valid
Cls
Not applicable.
Tier Num
Not applicable.
Req
Not applicable.
■
To view license data in raw license key format, type:
sc0:sms-user:> showcodlicense -r
The license key signatures for COD resources are displayed. For example:
sc0:sms-user:> showcodlicense -r
01:5014936C37048:45135285:0201000000:8:00000000:0000000000000000000000
Chapter 5
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103
Note – The COD RTU license key listed above is provided as an example and is not
a valid license key.
For details on the showcodlicense(1M) command, refer to the command
description in the System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Reference Manual.
Activating COD Resources
To activate instant access CPUs and allocate COD RTU licenses to specific domains,
use the setupplatform command. TABLE 5-2 describes the various
setupplatform command options that can be used to configure COD resources
TABLE 5-2
setupplatform Command Options for COD Resource Configuration
Use setupplatform Command Options
To...
setupplatform -p cod
Enable or disable instant access CPUs
(headroom) and allocate domain COD
RTU licenses
setupplatform -p cod headroom-number
Enable or disable instant access CPUs
(headroom)
setupplatform -p cod -d domainid RTUnumber
Reserve a specific quantity of COD RTU
licenses for a particular domain
For details on the setupplatform command options, refer to the command
description in the System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Reference Manual.
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System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
▼
To Enable Instant Access CPUs and Reserve
Domain RTU Licenses
1. In an SC window, log in as a platform administrator and type:
sc0:sms-user:> setupplatform -p cod
You are prompted to enter the COD parameters (headroom quantity and domain
RTU information). For example:
sc0:sms-user:> setupplatform -p cod
PROC RTUs installed: 12
PROC Headroom Quantity (0 to disable, 8 MAX) [0]:0
PROC RTUs reserved for domain A (12 MAX) [0]: 4
PROC RTUs reserved for domain B (8 MAX) [2]: 4
PROC RTUs reserved for domain C (4 MAX) [0]: 0
PROC RTUs reserved for domain D (4 MAX) [0]:?
PROC RTUs reserved for domain E (4 MAX) [0]?
PROC RTUs reserved for domain G (4 MAX) [0]?
PROC RTUs reserved for domain H (4 MAX) [0]?
PROC RTUs reserved for domain I (4 MAX) [0]?
PROC RTUs reserved for domain J (4 MAX) [0]?
PROC RTUs reserved for domain K (4 MAX) [0]?
PROC RTUs reserved for domain L (4 MAX) [0]?
PROC RTUs reserved for domain M (4 MAX) [0]?
PROC RTUs reserved for domain N (4 MAX) [0]?
PROC RTUs reserved for domain O (4 MAX) [0]?
PROC RTUs reserved for domain P (4 MAX) [0]?
PROC RTUs reserved for domain Q (4 MAX) [0]?
PROC RTUs reserved for domain R (4 MAX) [0]?
Note the following about the prompts displayed:
■
Instant access CPU (headroom) quantity
The text in parenthesis indicates the maximum number of instant access CPUs
(headroom) allowed. The value inside the brackets is the number of instant access
CPUs currently configured.
To disable the instant access CPU (headroom) feature, type 0. You can disable the
headroom quantity only when there are no instant access CPUs in use.
■
Domain reservations
The text in parenthesis indicates the maximum number of RTU licenses that can
be reserved for the domain. The value inside the brackets is the number of RTU
licenses currently allocated to the domain.
Chapter 5
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105
2. Verify the COD resource configuration by running the showplatform(1M)
command:
sc0:sms-user:> showplatform -p cod
For example:
sc0:sms-user:> showplatform -p cod
COD:
====
Chassis HostID : 5014936C37048
PROC RTUs installed: 8
PROC Headroom Quantity: 0
PROC RTUs reserved for domain A
PROC RTUs reserved for domain B
PROC RTUs reserved for domain C
PROC RTUs reserved for domain D
PROC RTUs reserved for domain E
PROC RTUs reserved for domain F
PROC RTUs reserved for domain G
PROC RTUs reserved for domain H
PROC RTUs reserved for domain I
PROC RTUs reserved for domain J
PROC RTUs reserved for domain K
PROC RTUs reserved for domain L
PROC RTUs reserved for domain M
PROC RTUs reserved for domain N
PROC RTUs reserved for domain O
PROC RTUs reserved for domain P
PROC RTUs reserved for domain Q
PROC RTUs reserved for domain R
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Note – The Chassis HostID is used for COD licensing purposes. If the Chassis
HostID is listed as UNKNOWN, you must power on the centerplane support boards
to obtain the Chassis HostID. In this case, allow up to one minute before rerunning
the showplatform command to display the Chassis HostID.
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System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Monitoring COD Resources
This section describes various ways to track COD resource use and obtain COD
information.
COD CPU/Memory Boards
You can determine which CPU/Memory boards in your system are COD boards by
using the showboards(1M) command.
▼ To Identify COD CPU/Memory Boards
1. In an SC window, log in as platform administrator and type:
sc0:sms-user:> showboards -v
The information displayed shows board assignments and test status. COD CPU
boards are identified as CPU (COD).
Chapter 5
Capacity on Demand
107
For example:
sc0:sms-user:> showboards -v
Location
Pwr
Type of Board
---------------------SC0
On
SC
SC1
On
SC
PS0
On
PS
PS1
On
PS
.
.
.
SB0
Off
CPU
SB1
Empty Slot
SB2
Off
CPU
SB3
Empty Slot
SB4
On
CPU (COD)
SB5
Empty Slot
SB6
On
CPU (COD)
SB7
Empty Slot
SB8
Empty Slot
SB9
Empty Slot
SB10
Empty Slot
SB11
Empty Slot
SB12
Off
CPU (COD)
.
.
.
Board Status
-----------Main
Spare
-
Test Status
-----------
Domain
------
Available
Available
Available
Available
Assigned
Available
Active
Available
Available
Available
Available
Available
Assigned
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Passed
Unknown
Isolated
Isolated
Isolated
Isolated
A
Isolated
B
Isolated
Isolated
Isolated
Isolated
Isolated
C
COD Resource Usage
To obtain information on how COD resources are used in your system, use the
showcodusage(1M) command.
▼ To View COD Usage By Resource
1. In an SC window, log in as a platform administrator and type:
sc0:sms-user:> showcodusage -p resource
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System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
For example:
sc0:sms-user:> showcodusage -p resource
Resource:
=========
Resource
In Use Installed Licensed
---------- ------ --------- -------PROC
4
12
12
Status
-----OK: 8 available
TABLE 5-1 describes the COD resource information displayed by the
showcodusage(1M) command.
TABLE 5-3
showcodusage Resource Information
Item
Description
Resource
The COD resource (processor)
In Use
The number of COD CPUs currently used in the system
Installed
The number of COD CPUs installed in the system
Licensed
The number of COD RTU licenses installed
Status
One of the following COD states:
• OK – Indicates there are sufficient licenses for the COD CPUs in
use and specifies the number of remaining COD resources
available and the number of any instant access CPUs (headroom)
available
• HEADROOM – The number of instant access CPUs in use
• VIOLATION – Indicates a license violation exists. Specifies the
number of COD CPUs in use that exceeds the number of COD
RTU licenses available. This situation can occur when you force
the deletion of a COD license key from the COD license database,
but the COD CPU associated with that license key is still in use.
▼ To View COD Usage by Domain
1. In an SC window, log in as a platform or domain administrator and type:
sc0:sms-user:> showcodusage -p domains -v
Chapter 5
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109
The output includes the status of CPUs for all domains. For example:
sc0:sms-user:> showcodusage -p domains -v
Domains:
========
Domain/Resource In Use Installed Reserved
--------------- ------ --------- -------A - PROC
0
4
4
SB4 - PROC
0
4
SB4/P0
SB4/P1
SB4/P2
SB4/P3
B - PROC
4
4
4
SB6 - PROC
4
4
SB6/P0
SB6/P1
SB6/P2
SB6/P3
C - PROC
0
4
0
SB12 - PROC
0
4
SB12/P0
SB12/P1
SB12/P2
SB12/P3
.
.
.
Status
------
Unused
Unused
Unused
Unused
Licensed
Licensed
Licensed
Licensed
Unused
Unused
Unused
Unused
TABLE 5-4 describes the COD resource information displayed by domain.
TABLE 5-4
110
showcodusage Domain Information
Item
Description
Domain/Resource
The COD resource (processor) for each domain. An unused
processor is a COD CPU that has not yet been assigned to a domain.
In Use
The number of COD CPUs currently used in the domain
Installed
The number of COD CPUs installed in the domain
Reserved
The number of COD RTU licenses allocated to the domain
Status
One of the following CPU states:
• Licensed – The COD CPU has a COD RTU license.
• Unused -The COD CPU is not in use.
• Unlicensed - The COD CPU could not obtain a COD RTU license
and is not in use.
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
▼ To View COD Usage by Resource and Domain
1. In an SC window, log in as a platform administrator and type:
sc0:sms-user:> showcodusage -v
The information displayed contains usage information by both resource and domain.
Chapter 5
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111
For example:
sc0:sms-user:> showcodusage -v
Resource:
=========
Resource In Use Installed Licensed Status
-------- ------ --------- -------- -----PROC
4
4
16 OK: 12
Domains:
========
Domain/Resource In Use Installed Reserved
--------------- ------ --------- -------A - PROC
0
0
0
B - PROC
0
0
0
SB6 - PROC
0
0
SB6/P0
SB6/P1
SB6/P2
SB6/P3
C - PROC
0
0
0
SB12 - PROC
0
0
SB12/P0
SB12/P1
SB12/P2
SB12/P3
D - PROC
4
4
0
SB4 - PROC
4
4
SB4/P0
SB4/P1
SB4/P2
SB4/P3
SB16 - PROC
4
4
SB16/P0
SB16/P1
SB16/P2
SB16/P3
E - PROC
0
0
0
F - PROC
0
0
0
G - PROC
0
0
0
.
.
.
R - PROC
0
0
0
Unused - PROC
0
0
12
112
available
Status
------
Unused
Unused
Unused
Unused
Unused
Unused
Unused
Unused
Licensed
Licensed
Licensed
Licensed
Unused
Unused
Unused
Unused
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Deconfigured and Unlicensed COD CPUs
When you activate a domain that uses COD CPU/Memory boards, any COD CPUs
that cannot obtain a COD RTU license are identified as deconfigured or unlicensed.
You can determine which COD CPUs are deconfigured or unlicensed by reviewing
the following items:
■
Message output for a setkeyswitch on operation
Any COD CPUs that did not aquire a COD RTU license are identified as
deconfigured. If all the COD CPUs on a COD CPU/Memory board are
deconfigured, the setkeyswitch on operation will fail the COD CPU/Memory
board, and the setkeyswitch on operation also fails, as the next example
shows:
sc0:sms-user:> setkeyswitch -d A on
.
.
.
Acquiring licenses for all good processors...
Proc SB03/P0
deconfigured: no license available.
Proc SB03/P2
deconfigured: no license available.
Proc SB03/P3
deconfigured: no license available.
Proc SB03/P1
deconfigured: no license available.
No minimum system left after Check CPU licenses (for COD)! Bailing out!
.
.
.
Deconfigure Slot0: 00008
Deconfigure EXB:
00008
POST (level=16, verbose=40, -H3.0) execution time 3:08
# SMI Sun Fire 15K POST log closed Fri Jul 26 15:15:53 2002
■
showcodusage(1M) command output
To obtain the status of COD CPUs for a domain, see “To View COD Usage by
Domain” on page 109. The Unlicensed status indicates that a COD RTU license
could not be obtained for the COD CPU and that the CPU is not being used by
the domain.
Other COD Information
TABLE 5-5 summarizes the COD configuration and event information that you can
obtain through other system controller commands. For further details on these
commands, refer to their descriptions in the System Management Services (SMS) 1.3
Reference Manual.
Chapter 5
Capacity on Demand
113
TABLE 5-5
114
Obtaining COD Component, Configuration, and Event Information
To...
Use This Command
Display information about COD events, such as license
violations or headroom activation, that are logged on the
platform console
showlogs
Display the current COD resource configuration:
• Number of instant access CPUs (headroom) in use
• Domain RTU license reservations
• Chassis HostID
showplatform -p cod
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
CHAPTER
6
Domain Control
This chapter addresses the functions that provide control over domain software as
well as server hardware. Control functions are invoked at the discretion of an
administrator. They are also useful to SMS for providing automatic system recovery
(ASR).
Domain control functionality provides control over the software running on a
domain. It includes those functions that allow a domain to be booted and
interrupted. Only the domain administrator can invoke the domain control
functions.
This chapter includes the following sections:
■
■
Domain Boot
Hardware Control
Domain Boot
This section describes the various aspects of booting the Solaris operating
environment in a domain running SMS software.
setkeyswitch(1M) is responsible for initiating and sequencing a domain boot. It
powers on the domain hardware as required and invokes POST to test and configure
the hardware in the logical domain into a Sun Fire 15K/12K physical hardware
domain. It downloads and initiates OpenBoot PROM as required to boot the Solaris
operating environment on the domain.
Only domains that have their virtual keyswitch set appropriately are subject to boot
control. See “Virtual Keyswitch” on page 87.
OpenBoot PROM boot parameters are stored in the domain’s virtual NVRAM.
osd(1M) provides those parameter values to OpenBoot PROM, which adapts the
domain boot as indicated.
115
Certain parameters, in particular those that may not be adjustable from OpenBoot
PROM itself when a domain is failing to boot, can be set by setobpparams(1M) so
that they take effect at the next boot attempt.
Keyswitch On
The domain keyswitch control (“Virtual Keyswitch” on page 87) manually initiates
domain boot.
setkeyswitch boots a properly configured domain when its keyswitch control is
moved from the off or standby position to one of the on positions. This takes
approximately 20 minutes.
setobpparams(1M) provides a method by which a manually initiated (keyswitch
control) domain boot sequence can be stopped in OpenBoot PROM. For more
information see “Setting the OpenBoot PROM Variables” on page 91 and refer to the
setobpparams man page.
Power
SMS boots all properly configured domains when the Sun Fire 15K/12K chassis is
powered on using the poweron(1M) command. SMS shuts down all properly
configured domains when the chassis is powered off using the poweroff command.
SMS checks the power state of components to determine if they are on or off and
enables or disables console bus ports (where appropriate) when boards are powered
on/off. poweron checks to see if a component is physically present. poweroff
unconfigures DCUs from the expander and changes the expander from split-slot to
nonsplit-slot when appropriate. poweroff unconfigures the expander from the
centerplane when the expander is powered off and checks for voltage reading
tolerances to help determine if the board is on or off.
The following components can be power controlled using the poweron and
poweroff commands.
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
116
Bulk power supply
Fan tray
Centerplane support board
Expander board
CPU/Memory board
Standard PCI board
Hot-pluggable PCI and PCI+ assemblies
MaxCPU board
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
■
■
wPCI board
System controller (spare only; poweroff only. resetsc is used to power on the
spare.)
▼ To Power System Boards On and Off From the Command
Line
Platform administrators are allowed to power control the entire system and can
execute these commands without a location option. Domain administrators can
power control any system board assigned to their domain(s). Users with only
domain privileges must supply the location option.
1. To power on a system component, type:
sc0:sms-user:> poweron location
where
location
The location of the system component you wish to power on and,
if you are a domain administrator, for which you have privileges.
For more information, refer to the poweron(1M) man page.
2. To power off a system component, type:
sc0:sms-user:> poweroff location
Chapter 6
Domain Control
117
Note – If you are powering off a component to replace it, use the poweroff(1M)
command. Do not use the breakers to power off the component; this can cause a
Domain Stop.
where:
location
The location of the system component you wish to power off and,
if you are a domain administrator, for which you have privileges.
For more information, refer to the poweroff(1M) man page.
If you try to power off the system while any domain is actively running the
operating system, the command will fail and display a message in the message panel
of the window. In that case, issuing a setkeyswitch domain_id standby
command for the active domain(s) will gracefully shut down the processors. Then,
you can reissue the command to power off.
If the platform loses power due to a power outage, pcd records and saves the last
state of each domain before power was lost.
▼ To Recover From Power Failure
If you lose power only to the SC, switch on the power to the SC. Sun Fire 15K/12K
domains are not affected by the loss of power to one SC. If you lose power to both
the SC and the domains, use the following procedure to recover from the power
failure. For switch locations refer to the Sun Fire 15K/12K System Site Planning Guide.
Note – Losing power to both SCs without shutting down SMS, will crash the
domains.
1. Manually switch off the bulk power supplies on the Sun Fire 15K/12K system as
well as the power switch on the SC.
This prevents power surge problems that can occur when power is restored.
2. After power is restored, manually switch on the bulk power supplies on the Sun
Fire 15K/12K system.
3. Manually switch on the SC power.
This boots the SC and starts the SMS daemons. Check your SC platform message file
for completion of the SMS daemons.
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4. Wait for the recovery process to complete.
Any domain that was powered on and running the Solaris operating environment
returns to the operating environment run state. Domains at OpenBoot PROM
eventually return to an OpenBoot PROM run state.
The recovery process must finish before any SMS operation is performed. You can
monitor the domain message files to determine when the recovery process has
completed.
Domain-Requested
SMS reboots domains upon request from the domain software (Solaris software or
dsmd). The domain software requests reboot services in the following situations.
■
■
■
Upon execution of a user reboot request, for example, Solaris reboot(1M) or the
OpenBoot PROM boot command, reset-all.
Upon Solaris software panic.
Upon trapping the CPU-detected RED_mode or Watchdog Reset conditions.
Automatic System Recovery (ASR)
Automatic system recovery (ASR) consists of those procedures that restore the
system to running all properly configured domains after one or more domains have
been rendered inactive due to software or hardware failures or due to unacceptable
environmental conditions.
SMS software supports a software-initiated reboot request as part of ASR. Every
domain that crashed is automatically rebooted by dsmd.
Situations that require ASR are domain boots requested by domain software upon
detecting failures that crash the domain (for example, panic).
There are other situations, such as detection of domain software hangs as described
in “Solaris Software Hang Events” on page 185, where SMS initiates a domain boot
as part of the recovery process.
dsmd ignores the OpenBoot PROM parameter, auto-boot?, which on systems
without a service processor can prevent the system from automatically rebooting in
power-on-reset situations. dsmd does not ignore keyswitch control. If the keyswitch
is set to off or standby, the keyswitch setting will be honored in determining
whether a domain is subject to ASR reboot actions.
Chapter 6
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119
Fast Boot
In general a fast domain reboot is possible in situations where:
■
■
No serious error has been attributed to hardware since the last boot.
No failures have occurred which would cause SMS to question the reliability of
the existing set of domain resources.
Because SMS is responsible for monitoring the hardware, detecting, and
responding to errors, SMS decides whether or not to request a fast reboot based
upon its record of hardware errors since the last boot.
Because POST controls the hardware configuration based upon a number of
inputs including, but not limited to, the blacklist data, POST decides whether or
not the hardware configuration has changed so as to preclude a fast reboot. If
system management has requested a fast reboot, POST will verify that the
hardware configuration implied by its current inputs matches the hardware
configuration used for the last boot; if it does not, POST will fail the fast-POST
operation. The system management software is prepared to recover from this type
of POST failure by requesting a full-test (slow) domain boot.
Sun Fire 15K/12K system management software minimizes the elapsed time taken
by the part of the domain boot process that it can control.
Domain Abort/Reset
Certain error conditions can occur in a domain that require aborting the domain
software or issuing a reset to the domain software or hardware. This section
describes the domain abort/reset functions that are provided by dsmd.
dsmd provides a software-initiated mechanism to abort a domain Solaris OS,
requesting that it panic to take a core image. No user intervention is needed.
SMS provides the reset(1M) command to allow the user to abort the domain
software and issue a reset to the domain hardware.
Control is passed to OpenBoot PROM after the reset command is issued. In the
case of a user-interface-issued reset command, OpenBoot PROM uses its default
configuration to determine whether the domain is booted to the Solaris environment.
In the case of a dsmd-issued reset command, OpenBoot PROM provides
parameters that force the domain to be booted to the Solaris operating environment.
reset normally sends a signal to all CPU ports of a specified domain. This is a hard
reset and clears the hardware to a clean state. Using the -x option, however reset
can send an XIR signal to the processors in a specified domain. This is done in
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System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
software and is considered a soft reset. An error message is given if the virtual key
switch is in the secure position. An optional Are you sure? prompt is given by
default. For example:
sc0:sms-user:> reset -d C
Do you want to send RESET to domain C? [y|n]:y
RESET to processor 4.1.0 initiated.
RESET to processor 4.1.1 initiated.
RESET initiated to all processors for domain: C
For more information refer to the reset man page.
For information on resetting the main or spare SC see “SC Reset and Reboot” on
page 130.
SMS software illuminates or darkens the indicator LEDs on LED-equipped hotpluggable units (HPU) as necessary to reflect the correct state when the HPU is
given a power-on reset.
Hardware Control
Hardware control functions are those that configure and control the platform
hardware. Some functions are invoked on the domain.
Power-On Self-Test (POST)
System management services software invokes POST in two contexts.
1. At domain boot-time, POST is invoked to test and configure all functional
hardware available to the domain.
POST eliminates all hardware components that fail self-test and attempts to build
a bootable domain from the functionally working hardware.
POST provides extensive diagnostics to report hardware test results to help
analyze failures. POST may be requested only to verify a domain configuration,
and not test it, in situations where the domain is being rebooted with no
indications that a hardware failure was the cause.
2. Before a DR operation to add a system board to a domain begins, POST is
invoked to test and configure the system board components.
Chapter 6
Domain Control
121
If POST indicates that the candidate system board is functional, the DR operation
can safely incorporate the system board into the physical (hardware) domain.
Although POST is generally invoked automatically, there are user visible interfaces
that affect automatic POST invocations:
■
■
The level of diagnostics testing that is performed by POST is increased from a
nominal to maximum level using domain keyswitch control, setkeyswitch(1M)
as described in “Virtual Keyswitch” on page 87.
You can add or remove components that you want POST to exclude from the
hardware configuration by using blacklist files. These editable files are described
in “Blacklist Editing” on page 122.
This gives you finer-grained control over the hardware components that are used
in a domain than is allowed by the standard domain configuration interfaces that
operate on DCUs, such as system boards.
■
■
■
setkeyswitch invokes POST to test and configure a domain. Nominal and
maximum diagnostic test level settings are provided for use in booting the
domain.
addboard and moveboard invoke POST to test and configure a system board in
support of a DR operation to add that board to a running Solaris domain.
LED-equipped FRUs with components that fail POST will have the fault LED
illuminated on the FRU.
Blacklist Editing
SMS supports three blacklists: one for the platform, one for the domains; and the
internal automatic system recovery (ASR) blacklist.
Platform and Domain Blacklisting
The editable blacklist files specify that certain hardware resources are to be
considered unusable by POST. They will not be probed for, tested, or configured in
the domain interconnect.
Usually these blacklist files are empty, and are not required to be present.
Blacklist capability in this context is used for resource management purposes.
Blacklisting temporarily limits the system configuration to less than all the hardware
present. This has several applications, such as benchmarking, limiting memory use
to make DR detach of the board faster, and varying the configuration for
troubleshooting.
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System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Sun Fire 15K/12K POST supports two editable canonical blacklist files, one for the
platform, one for the domain, located in:
/etc/opt/SUNWSMS/config/platform/blacklist
and
/etc/opt/SUNWSMS/config/domain_id/blacklist
The two files are considered logically concatenated.
Note – The blacklist file specifies resources based on physical location. If the
component is physically moved, any corresponding blacklist entries must be
changed accordingly.
Blacklist specifies blacklisted components logically, for example, by specifying their
position and the blacklist remains on the component position through a hot-swap
operation rather than following a specific component.
▼ To Blacklist a Component
1. Log in to the SC.
You must have platform administrator, or domain administrator, or configurator
privileges to edit the blacklist files.
Chapter 6
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123
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> disablecomponent [-d domain_indicator] location
where:
-d domain_indicator Specifies the domain using one of the following:
domain_id – ID for a domain. Valid domain_ids are A–R and are
not case sensitive.
domain_tag – Name assigned to a domain using addtag(1M).
location
List of component locations comprised of:
board_loc/proc/bank/logical_bank
board_loc/proc/bank/all_dimms_on_that_bank
board_loc/proc/bank/all_banks_on_that_proc
board_loc/proc/bank/all_banks_on_that_board
board_loc/proc
board_loc/cassette
board_loc/bus
board_loc/paroli_link
If no domain_indicator is specified, the platform blacklist is edited. All component
locations are separated by forward slashes. The location forms are optional and are
used to specify particular components on boards in specific locations.
Multiple location arguments are permitted separated by a space.
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System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Location
Valid Form for Sun Fire 15K
Valid Form for Sun Fire 12K
board_loc
SB(0...17)
IO(0...17)
CS(0|1)
EX(0...17)
SB(0...8)
IO(0...8)
CS(0|1)
EX(0...8)
Processor/Processor Pair
(proc)
P(0...3)
PP(0|1)
P(0...3)
PP(0|1)
bank
B
B
logical_bank
L(0|1)
L(0|1)
all_dimms_on_that_bank
D
D
all_banks_on_that_proc
B
B
all_banks_on_that_board
B
B
HsPCI cassette
C(3|5)V(0|1)
C(3|5)V(0|1)
HsPCI+ cassette
C3V(0|1|2) and C5V0
C3V(0|1|2) and C5V0
bus
ABUS|DBUS|RBUS (0|1)
ABUS|DBUS|RBUS (0|1)
paroli_link
PAR(0|1)
PAR(0|1)
Processor locations indicate single processors or processor pairs. There are four
possible processors on a CPU/Memory board. Processor pairs on that board are
procs 0 and 1, and procs 2 and 3.
Note – If you blacklist a single CPU/mem processor in a processor pair, neither
processor is used.
The MaxCPU has two processors, procs 0 and 1, and only one proc pair (PP0).
disablecomponent exits and displays an error message if you use PP1 as a
location for this board.
The HsPCI and HsPCI+ assemblies contain hot-swappable cassettes.
There are three bus locations: address, data, and response.
▼ To Remove a Component From the Blacklist
1. Log in to the SC.
Chapter 6
Domain Control
125
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> enablecomponent [-d domain_indicator] location
where:
-d domain_indicator Specifies the domain using one of the following:
domain_id – ID for a domain. Valid domain_ids are A–R and are
not case sensitive.
domain_tag – Name assigned to a domain using addtag(1M).
location
List of component locations comprised of:
board_loc/proc/bank/logical_bank,
board_loc/proc/bank/all_dimms_on_that_bank
board_loc/proc/bank/all_banks_on_that_proc
board_loc/proc/bank/all_banks_on_that_board
board_loc/proc
board_loc/cassette
board_loc/bus
board_loc/paroli_link
If no domain_indicator is specified the platform blacklist is edited. All component
locations are separated by forward slashes. The location forms are optional and are
used to specify particular components on boards in specific locations.
Multiple location arguments are permitted separated by a space.
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System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Location
Valid Form for Sun Fire 15K
Valid Form for Sun Fire 12K
board_loc
SB(0...17)
IO(0...17)
CS(0|1)
EX(0...17)
SB(0...8)
IO(0...8)
CS(0|1)
EX(0...8)
Processor/Processor Pair
(proc)
P(0...3)
PP(0|1)
P(0...3)
PP(0|1)
bank
B
B
logical_bank
L(0|1)
L(0|1)
all_dimms_on_that_bank
D
D
all_banks_on_that_proc
B
B
all_banks_on_that_board
B
B
HsPCI cassette
C(3|5)V(0|1)
C(3|5)V(0|1)
HsPCI+ cassette
C3V(0|1|2) and C5V0
C3V(0|1|2) and C5V0
bus
ABUS|DBUS|RBUS (0|1)
ABUS|DBUS|RBUS (0|1)
paroli_link
PAR(0|1)
PAR(0|1)
Processor locations indicate single processors or processor pairs. There are four
possible processors on a CPU/Mem board. Processor pairs on that board are: procs 0
and 1, and procs 2 and 3.
Note – If you blacklist a single CPU/mem processor in a processor pair, neither
processor is used.
The MaxCPU has two processors,: procs 0 and 1, and only one proc pair (PP0).
disablecomponent exits and displays an error message if you use PP1 as a
location for this board.
The HsPCI and HsPCI+ assemblies contain hot-swappable cassettes.
There are three bus locations: address, data and response.
For more information, refer to the enablecomponent(1M) and
disablecomponent(1M) man pages.
ASR Blacklist
Hardware that has failed repeatedly, perhaps intermittently, needs to be excluded
from subsequent domain configurations for many reasons. It may be some time
before the component can be physically replaced. The failed component might be a
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127
subcomponent such as one processor on a CPU board. You do not want to lose the
services of the rest of the component by powering it down until it can be replaced. If
the hardware is broken, you do not want to waste time having POST discover that
every time it runs. If the failure is intermittent, you do not want POST to pass it,
only to have it fail when the OE is running.
To this end, esmd creates and edits a separate ASR blacklist file. Components that
have been powered off due to environmental conditions are automatically listed and
excluded from POST. poweron, setkeyswitch, addboard, and moveboard query
the ASR blacklist and you are prompted for action when an excluded component is
found. If the excluded component has been replaced or repaired, you can choose to
remove it from the blacklist and continue bringing up the component. For more
information refer to the enablecomponent(1M), disablecomponent(1M,)and
showcomponent(1M) man pages.
Power Control
The main SC has power control over the following components in the Sun Fire
15K/12K rack:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Sun Fire 15K/12K system boards
HsPCI adaptor slots on the Sun Fire 15K/12K HsPCI I/O assembly
HsPCI+ adaptor slots on the Sun Fire 15K/12K HsPCI+ I/O assembly
CPU pairs
System controllers (power off only)
Centerplane support boards
wPCI boards
Expander boards
48V power supplies
AC bulk power modules
Fan trays
See “HPU LEDs” on page 131 for a description of power control in the Sun Fire
15K/12K I/O racks.
SMS supports the domain Solaris command interface (cfgadm(1M)) by providing
the rcfgadm(1M) command to request power on or off of the HPCI adaptor slots in
a Sun Fire 15K/12K HsPCI I/O assembly. For more information refer to the
rcfgadm man page.
The keyswitch control interface, setkeyswitch, as described in “Virtual
Keyswitch” on page 87 allows the user to power on or off the hardware assigned to
a domain.
All power operations are logged by the power control software.
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The power control software conforms to all hardware requirements for powering on
or off components. For example, SMS checks for adequate power available before
powering on components. The power control interfaces will not perform a userspecified power on or power off operation if it violates a hardware requirement.
Power operations that are performed contrary to hardware requirements or
hardware recommended procedures are noted in the message logs.
By default, the power control software refuses to perform power operations that will
affect running software. The power control user interfaces include methods to
override this default behavior and forcibly complete the power operation at the cost
of crashing running software. The use of these forcible overrides on power
operations are noted in the message logs.
As described in “HPU LEDs” on page 131, SMS illuminates or darkens the indicator
LEDs on LED-equipped HPUs, as necessary, to reflect the correct state when the
HPU is powered on or off.
Fan Control
esmd provides the fan speed control for Sun Fire 15K/12K fans. In general, fan
speeds are set to the lowest speed that provides adequate cooling so as to minimize
noise levels.
Hot-Swap
Hot-swap refers to the ability to physically insert or remove a board from a
powered-on platform, actively running one or more domains without affecting those
domains. During a hot-swap operation, the board is isolated from all domains.
The term for a hardware component that may be hot-swapped is hot-pluggable unit
(HPU). The OK to remove indicator LED on an HPU is illuminated when it can be
safely unplugged; see “HPU LEDs” on page 131 for more information about the OK
to remove LEDs. Board presence registers indicate whether an HPU is present or
absent and sense an HPU plug or unplug.
The Sun Fire 15K/12K HsPCI and HsPCI+ I/O assemblies are equipped with OK to
remove indicator LEDs associated with the slots into which HsPCI and HsPCI+ I/O
assemblies are plugged. Each slot is equipped with a hot-plug controller that
controls power to the slot and can detect presence of an adaptor in the slot.
However, unlike SMS support for other Sun Fire 15K/12K HPUs, the software that
controls hot-swap for the HsPCI and HsPCI+ I/O assemblies is part of the Solaris
environment on the domain.
SMS allows you to power on and off the adaptor slots.
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SMS software provides software interfaces, invocable from the domain, to control
hardware devices associated with the adaptor slots on I/O boards.
For the purposes of the remaining hot-swap discussion in this section, HPUs do not
include hot-swappable I/O adaptors.
SMS software provides support as necessary to allow hot-swap servicing of all HPUs
in the Sun Fire 15K/12K rack.
Once an HPU is isolated from all domains the only software support required for
hot-swap is power-off control.
Dynamic reconfiguration (DR) is used to isolate DCUs (system boards) from a
domain by DR detaching the DCU.
Hot-Unplug
When an HPU is unplugged, the presence indicator for the HPU detects its absence
resulting in a change in hardware configuration status as described in “Hardware
Configuration” on page 150.
The expected mode of user interaction during hot-unplug is as follows:
Go directly to the HPU you wish to unplug. If the HPU indicator LEDs show that it
is notOK to remove, request that the HPU be powered off using the poweroff
command. If the power-off function discovers that the HPU is in use by a domain,
the power-off function will fail, indicating that you first must use DR to remove the
HPU from active use. Refer to the System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Dynamic
Reconfiguration User Guide for more information.
Hot-Plug
The presence of a newly inserted HPU will be detected and reported as a change in
hardware configuration status as described in “Hardware Configuration” on page
150.
SC Reset and Reboot
The SC supports software-initiated resets for the main and spare, providing the same
functionality as external reset buttons on the system controller. Typically, an SC
might be reset after failover. It is possible for the main SC software to reset the spare
SC, if present, and vice versa. An SC cannot reset itself.
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▼ To Reset the Main or Spare SC
resetsc (1M) sends a reset signal to the other SC. If the other SC is not present,
resetsc exits with an error.
1. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> resetsc
“About to reset other SC. Are you sure you want to continue?” (y
or [n])? y
For more information, refer to the resetsc man page.
HPU LEDs
The LEDs reflect the status of the hot-pluggable units (HPU). LEDs come in groups
of three:
■
■
■
The operating indicator LED is illuminated when power is on.
The OK to remove LED is illuminated when an HPU can be unplugged.
The fault LED is illuminated when a hardware fault has been discovered in an
HPU.
This section describes the LED control policies that are followed by SMS software for
the HPUs.
Except for the system controllers, all Sun Fire 15K/12K HPUs are powered on and
tested under control of the SMS software that runs on the main system controller.
To a certain extent, the design of the LEDs, especially their initial state upon poweron-reset, is based upon the assumption that POST is automatically initiated at
power-on-reset. The only Sun Fire 15K/12K HPUs that meet this assumption are the
system controllers. Powering on a system controller causes the processor to begin
executing SC-POST code from PROM.
For all other HPUs, some are tested by POST and some are tested (or monitored) by
SMS software, and although it is generally the case that testing follows shortly after
power on, it is not always so.
Furthermore, it is possible that POST can be run multiple times on a power-on HPU
that is being dynamically reconfigured from one domain to another. It is also
possible that POST and SMS can both detect faults on the same physical HPU. These
differences in power and test control between the system controllers and other Sun
Fire 15K/12K HPUs result in different policies proposed to manage them.
The system controller provides three sets of HPU LEDs:
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131
■
■
■
The state of the SC as a whole
The state of the CP1500 slot
The state of the SC spare slot
When the Sun Fire 15K/12K rack is powered on, power is supplied to the system
controllers. The operating indicator LED, and the OK to remove indicator LEDs
are, appropriately, initialized by the hardware. All three fault LEDs are illuminated
so that the fault LEDs correctly reflect a fault, should there be a problem that
prevents SC-POST from running.
SMS software, upon powering off the spare system controller, extinguishes the
operating indicator LED, and illuminates the OK to remove indicator LEDs on the
spare system controller. SMS software cannot adjust the operating indicator or OK
to remove indicator LEDs after powering off the main SC, where the software is
running.
SC-POST does the following:
■
■
■
Upon completing testing, the SC with no faults found, extinguishes the SC fault
indicator LED.
Upon completing testing the HPCI slot with no faults found, SC-POST
extinguishes the SC spare slot fault LED.
Upon completing testing the control board with no faults found at the control
board, the SC main, or the SC spare slot, SC-POST extinguishes the SC fault LED.
SC-OpenBoot PROM firmware and SMS software illuminate the proper fault LED(s)
on the system controller after detecting a hardware error.
The following policies are used to manage LEDs on HPUs other than the system
controllers.
■
■
On every LED-equipped non-SC HPU within the Sun Fire 15K/12K rack, SMS
assures that the operating indicator LED is steadily illuminated when power is
applied to the HPU.
On every LED-equipped non-SC HPU within the Sun Fire 15K/12K, SMS assures
that the OK to remove indicator LED is steadily illuminated only when the
HPU can be safely unplugged. Safety considerations apply both to the person
unplugging the HPU and to preserving the correct and continuing operation of
Sun Fire 15K/12K hardware and any running software.
Note – The Sun Fire 15K/12K system correctly illuminates the operating indicator
LED and correctly darkens the OK to remove indicator LEDs when HPUs are
powered on or given a power-on-reset.
■
The management of the fault LEDs and their user-visible behavior differs most
between the SC and non-SC HPUs.
On the SC, the fault LEDs are illuminated at power on, maintained on during
testing, and then extinguished if no fault is found.
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Faults detected after SC-POST can cause later fault LED illumination.
So, except for the brief period when the SC is being tested by POST, the fault
LEDs on the SC indicate that a fault has occurred since power on. The same holds
true (an illuminated fault LED indicates that a fault has been detected since
power on) for non-SC HPUs. Every LED-equipped non-SC HPU within the Sun
Fire 15K/12K system, SMS, upon power on or power on reset applied to that
HPU, ensures that the fault indicator LED is extinguished.
■
When directed to do so by POST, “Power-On Self-Test (POST)” on page 121, or
the hardware monitoring software, “Environmental Events” on page 186,
“Hardware Error Events” on page 189, and “SC Failure Events” on page 192, SMS
steadily illuminates the fault indicator LED on an HPU. The fault indicator
remains illuminated until the next power on or power-on-reset clears it, as
described above in “HPU LEDs” on page 131.
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CHAPTER
7
Domain Services
Sun Fire 15K/12K system hardware incorporates internal, private point-to-point
Ethernet connections between the SC and each domain. This network, called the
Management Network (MAN), is used to provide support services for each domain.
This chapter describes those services.
This chapter includes the following sections:
■
■
Management Network Overview
Management Network Services
Management Network Overview
The Management Network (MAN) function maintains the private point-to-point
network connections between the SC and each domain. No packets addressed to one
domain can be routed along the network connection between the SC and another
domain (FIGURE 7-1).
135
sman0
SC1-I1
SC1-Cx
External
network
SC1-I2
sman1
Domain R
I1 network
sman0
SC0-I1
I2 network
Domain A
dman0
DC-I1
sman1
SC0-I2
dman0
DC-I1
SC0-Cx
External network communities
Main SC
External
network
(IPMP)
Spare SC
FIGURE 7-1
Management Network Overview
I1 Network
The hardware built into the Sun Fire 15K/12K chassis to support MAN is complex.
It includes 18 network interfaces (NICs) on each SC that are connected in a point-topoint fashion to NICs located on each of the 18 expander I/O slots on the Sun Fire
15K and on each of the nine expander I/O slots on the Sun Fire 12K system. Using
this design, the number of point-to-point Ethernet links between an SC and a given
DSD vary based on the number of I/O boards configured in that DSD. Each NIC
from the SC connects to a hub and NIC on the I/O board. The NIC is an internal
part of the I/O board and not a separate adapter card. Likewise, the Ethernet hub is
on the I/O board. The hub is intelligent and can collect statistics. All of these pointto-point links are collectively called the I1 network. Since there can be multiple I/O
boards in a given domain, multiple redundant network connections from the SC to a
domain are possible.
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Main SC
scman0
eri0 I/O board Exp0
0
eri2
eri3
eri1 I/O board Exp1
1
eri4
2
eri0 I/O board Exp0
Domain A
Domain B
eri18
eri19
I2 network
scman0
eri2
eri3
eri4
16
eri18
eri19
17
eri0 I/O board Exp0
Domain R
eri1 I/O board Exp1
Spare SC
Hub, physically located
on the I/O board
FIGURE 7-2
I1 Network Overview of the Sun Fire 15K
Note – The I1 MAN network is a private network, not a general purpose network.
No external IP traffic should be routed across it. Access to MAN is restricted to the
system controller and the domains.
On the SC, MAN software creates a meta-interface for the I1 network, presenting to
the Solaris operating environment a single network interface, scman0. For more
information refer to the Solaris scman(1M) man page.
MAN software detects communication errors and automatically initiates a path
switch, provided an alternate path is available. MAN software also enforces domain
isolation of network traffic on the I1 network. Similar software operates on the
domain side.
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137
I2 Network
There is also an internal network between the two system controllers consisting of
two NICs per system controller. This network is called the I2 network. It is a private
SC-to-SC network and is entirely separate from the I1 network.
MAN software creates a meta-interface for the I2 network as well. This interface is
presented to the Solaris software as scman1. As with the I1 network, I2 has a
mechanism for detecting path failure and switching paths, providing an alternative
is available.
Main SC
scman1
hme1
eri0
I2 network
hme1
eri0
scman1
Spare SC
FIGURE 7-3
I2 Network Overview
The virtual network adapter on the SC presents itself as a standard network adapter.
It can be managed and administered just like any other network adapter (for
example, qfe, hme). The usual system administration tools such as ndd(1M),
netstat(1M), and ifconfig(1M), can be used to manage the virtual network
adapter. Certain operations of these tools (for example, changing the Ethernet
address) should not be allowed for security reasons.
MAN operates and is managed as an IP network with special characteristics (for
example, IP forwarding is disallowed by the MAN software). As such, the MAN
operation is the same as any other IP network, with the noted exception documented
above. Domains can be connected to your network depending on your site
configuration and security requirements. Connecting domains is not within the
scope of this document; refer to the System Administration Guide: Resource
Management and Network Services.
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External Network Monitoring
External Network Monitoring for the Sun Fire 15K/12K system provides highly
available network connections from the SCs to customer networks called
communities. This feature is built on top of the IP Network Multipathing (IPMP)
framework provided in Solaris 9. For more information on IPMP refer to the System
Administration Guide: IP Services.
External networks consist of up to two communities. You can have zero, one or two.
Zero communities means external networks are not monitored. During installation,
user communities are connected by physical cable to the RJ45 jacks on the SC
connecting a node to the network.
For more information on connecting external networks, refer to the Sun Fire 15K/12K
System Site Planning Guide.
External network communities
IPMP
controlled
Main SC
hme0
eri1
I2 network
hme0
eri1
Spare SC
FIGURE 7-4
External Network Overview
The term community refers to an IP network at your site. For example, you may have
an engineering community and an accounting community. A community name is used
as the interface group name. An interface group is a group of network interfaces that
attach to the same community.
Configuring External Network Monitoring requires allocating several additional IP
addresses for each system controller.
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139
The addresses can be categorized as follows:
■
Test Addressees - These IP addresses are assigned to the external network interfaces
on each system controller (hme0 and eri1). Each IP test address is used to test
the health of the particular network interface to which it is assigned. There is one
IP test address assigned to each network interface. They are permanently
associated with a particular network interface. If the network interface fails, the IP
test address associated with the network interface becomes unreachable.
Note – In the case of IPv6, test addresses are not used. The link local address is used.
■
Failover Addresses - There are two types of failover addresses:
■
SC Path Group Specific Addresses - These IP addresses are assigned to a
particular interface group on each system controller. These IP addresses are
used to provide highly available IP connectivity to a particular system
controller for a given community. The SC path group specific address is
reachable as long as one or more network interfaces in the interface group is
functioning.
Note – An SC path group specific address is not needed if there is only one network
interface in an interface group. Since there is no other network interface in the group
to failover to, only the test addresses and the community failover addresses are
required.
■
Community Failover Addresses- These IP addresses are assigned to a particular
community on the MAIN SC (that is, Community C1). They are used to
provide IP connectivity to the MAIN SC, either SC 0 or SC1.
All external software should reference the community failover address when
communicating with the SC. This address will always connect to the MAIN SC.
That way, if a failover occurs, external clients do not need to alter their
configuration to reach the SC. For more information on SC failover, see “SC
Failover” on page 155.
MAN Daemons and Drivers
For more information on the MAN daemon and device drivers, refer to the
mand(1M), and Solaris scman(1M) and dman(1M) man pages. See also “Management
Network Daemon” on page 45.
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Management Network Services
The primary network services that MAN provides between the SC and the domains
are:
■
■
■
■
■
Domain consoles
Message Logging
Dynamic Reconfiguration (DR)
Network boot/Solaris installation
System Controller (SC) heartbeats
Domain Console
The software running in a domain (OpenBoot PROM, kadb, and Solaris software)
uses the system console for critical communications.
The domain console supports a login session and is secure, since the default
configuration of the Solaris environment allows only the console to accept
superuser logins. Domain console access is provided securely to remote
administrators over a possibly public network.
The behavior of the console reflects the health of the software running in the
domain. Character echo for user entries are nearly equivalent to that of a 9600 baud
serial terminal attached to the domain. Output characters that are not echoes of user
input are typically either the output from an executed command, a command
interpreter, or unsolicited log messages from the Solaris software. Activity on other
domains or SMS support activity for the domain do not noticeably alter user entry
echo response latency.
You can run kadb on the domain’s Solaris software from the domain console.
Interactions with OpenBoot PROM running on a domain use the domain console.
The console can serve as the destination for log messages from the Solaris software;
refer to syslog.conf(4). The console is available when software (Solaris, OpenBoot
PROM, kadb) is running on the domain.
You can open multiple connections to view the domain console output. However,
the default is an exclusive locked connection.
For more information see “SMS Console Window” on page 7.
A domain administrator can forcibly break the domain console connection held by
another.
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141
You can forcibly break into OpenBoot PROM or kadb from the domain console,
however it is not recommended. (This is a replacement for the physical L1-A or
STOP-A key sequence available on a Sun SPARC® system with a physical console.)
SMS captures console output history for subsequent analysis of domain crashes. A
snapshot of the last console output for every domain is available in
/var/opt/SUNWSMS/adm/domain_id/console.
The Sun Fire 15K/12K system provides the hardware to either implement a sharedmemory console or implement an alternate network data path for console. The
hardware utilized for a shared-memory console imposes less direct latency upon
console data transfers, but is also used for other monitoring and control purposes for
all domains, so there is a risk of latency introduced by contention for the hardware
resources.
MAN provides private network paths to securely transfer domain console traffic to
the SC, see “Management Network Services” on page 141. The console has a dualpathed nature so that at least one path provides acceptable console response latency
when the Solaris software is running. The dual-pathed console is robust in the face
of errors. It detects failures on one domain console path and fails over to the other
domain console path automatically. It supports user-directed selection of the domain
console path to use.
smsconfig(1M) is the SC configuration utility that initially configures or later
modifies the hostname, IP address, and netmask settings used by management
network daemon, mand(1M). See “Management Network Daemon” on page 45.
mand initializes and updates these respective fields in the platform configuration
database (pcd).
mand is automatically started by ssd. The management network daemon runs on
the main SC in main mode and on the spare SC in spare mode.
For more information, refer to the SMS console(1M), mand(1M), and
smsconfig(1M) man pages and the Solaris dman(1M), and scman(1M) man pages.
Message Logging
When configured to do so, MAN transports copies of important syslog messages
from the domains to disk storage on the SC in order to facilitate failure analysis for
crashed or unbootable domains. For more information, see “Log File Maintenance”
on page 176.
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Dynamic Reconfiguration
Support for automatic network reconfiguration for a DR operation that removes the
I/O board network connection endpoint from the domain, is initiated from the SC.
The MAN software layer is used to simplify the interface to the MAN hardware.
MAN software handles the aspects of dynamic reconfiguration (DR) used by a DSD
without requiring network configuration work by the domain or platform
administrator.
Software in the domains using MAN need not be aware of which SC is currently the
main SC. For more information on dynamic reconfiguration, refer to the System
Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Dynamic Reconfiguration User Guide.
Network Boot and Solaris Software Installation
The SC provides network Solaris boot services to each domain.
Note – This is not intended to imply that diskless Sun Fire 15K/12K domains can be
supported entirely by network services from the SC; the SC network boot service is
intended primarily for recovery after a catastrophic disk failure on the domain.
When Solaris software is first installed on a domain, the network interface
connecting it to the MAN is automatically created for subsequent system reboots.
There are no additional tasks required by the domain administrator to configure or
use MAN.
MAN is configured as a private network. A default address assignment for the
management network is provided using the IP address space reserved for private
networks. You can override the default address assignment for MAN to handle the
case where the Sun Fire 15K/12K is connected to a private customer network that
already uses the selected MAN default IP address range.
The SC supports simultaneous network boots of domains running at least two
different versions of Solaris software.
The SC provides software installation services to, no more than one domain at a
time.
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143
SC Heartbeats
The I2 network is the intersystem controller communication. This is also called the
heartbeat network. SMS failover mechanisms on the main use this network as one
means of determining the health of the spare SC. For more information see, “SC
Failover” on page 155.
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CHAPTER
8
Domain Status
Status functions return measured values that characterize the state of the server
hardware or software. As such, these functions are used both to provide values for
status displays and input to monitoring software that periodically polls status
functions and verifies that the values returned are within normal operational limits.
Monitoring and event detection functions that use the status functions are described
in this chapter.
This chapter includes the following sections:
■
■
■
Software Status
Hardware Status
SC Hardware and Software Status
Software Status
The software state consists of status information provided by the software running
in a domain. The identity of the software component currently running (for example,
POST, OpenBoot PROM, or Solaris software) is available. Additional status
information is available (booting, running, panicking).
SMS software provides the following command(s) to display the status of the
software, if any, currently running in a domain.
■
■
■
■
■
■
showboards
showdevices
showenvironment
showobpparams
showplatform
showxirstate
145
Status Commands
showboards Command
showboards(1M) displays the assignment information and status of the DCUs.
These include the following: Location, Power, Type of board, Board status, Test
status, and Domain.
If no options are specified, showboards displays all DCUs including those that are
assigned or available for the platform administrator. For the domain
administrator or configurator, showboards displays only those DCUs for those
domains for which the user has privileges, including those boards that are
assigned or available and in the domain’s available component list.
If domain_indicator is specified, this command displays which DCUs are assigned
or available to the given domain. If the -a option is used, showboards displays
all boards including DCUs.
For examples and more information, see “To Obtain Board Status” on page 69 and
refer to the showboards manpage.
showdevices Command
showdevices(1M) displays configured physical devices on system boards and the
resources made available by these devices. Usage information is provided by
applications and subsystems that are actively managing system resources. The
predicted impact of a system board DR operation may be optionally displayed by
performing an offline query of managed resources.
showdevices gathers device information from one or more Sun Fire 15K/12K
domains. The command uses the dca(1M) as a proxy to gather the information from
the domains.
For examples and more information, see “To Obtain Device Status” on page 86 and
refer to the showdevices manpage.
showenvironment Command
showenvironment(1M) displays environmental data including: Location, Device,
Sensor, Value, Unit, Age, Status. For fan trays, Power, Speed, and Fan Number are
displayed. For bulk power, the Power, Value, Unit, and Status are shown.
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If a domain domain_indicator is specified, environmental data relating to the domain
is displayed, providing that the user has domain privileges for that domain. If a
domain is not specified, all domain data permissible to the user will be displayed.
DCUs (for example, CPU, I/O) belong to a domain and you must have domain
privileges to view their status. Environmental data relating to such things as fan
trays, bulk power, or other boards are displayed without domain permissions. You
can also specify individual reports for temperatures, voltages, currents, faults, bulk
power status, and fan tray status with the -p option. If the -p option is not present,
all reports will be shown.
For examples and more information, see “Environmental Status” on page 151 and
refer to the showenvironment man page.
showobpparams Command
showobpparams(1M) displays OpenBoot PROM bringup parameters.
showobpparams allows a domain administrator to display the virtual NVRAM and
REBOOT parameters passed to OpenBoot PROM by setkeyswitch(1M).
For examples and more information, see “Setting the OpenBoot PROM Variables” on
page 91 and refer to the showobpparams man page.
showplatform Command
showplatform(1M) displays the available component list and domain state of each
domain.
A domain is identified by a domain_tag if one exists. Otherwise it is identified by the
domain_id, a letter in the set A–R. The letter set is case insensitive. The Solaris
hostname is displayed if one exists. If a hostname has not been assigned to a domain,
Unknown is printed.
The following is a list of domain statuses:
Status
Description
Unknown
The domain state could not be determined or for Ethernet
addresses, it indicates the domain idprom image file does
not exist. You need to contact your Sun service
representative.
Powered Off
The domain is powered off.
Keyswitch Standby
The keyswitch for the domain is in STANDBY position.
Running Domain POST
The domain power-on self-test is running.
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Domain Status
147
Loading OBP
The OpenBoot PROM for the domain is being loaded.
Booting OBP
The OpenBoot PROM for the domain is booting
Running OBP
The OpenBoot PROM for the domain is running.
In OBP Callback
The domain has been halted and has returned to the
OpenBoot PROM.
Loading Solaris
The OpenBoot PROM is loading the Solaris software
Booting Solaris
The domain is booting the Solaris software
Domain Exited OBP
The domain OpenBoot PROM exited.
OBP Failed
The domain OpenBoot PROM failed.
OBP in sync Callback to OS
The OpenBoot PROM is in sync callback to the Solaris
software.
Exited OBP
The OpenBoot PROM has exited.
In OBP Error Reset
The domain is in OpenBoot PROM due to an error reset
condition.
Solaris Halted in OBP
Solaris software is halted and the domain is in OpenBoot
PROM.
OBP Debugging
The OpenBoot PROM is being used as a debugger
Environmental Domain
Halt
The domain was shut down due to an environmental
emergency.
Booting Solaris Failed
OpenBoot PROM running, boot attempt failed.
Loading Solaris Failed
148
OpenBoot PROM running, loading attempt failed.
Running Solaris
Solaris software is running on the domain.
Solaris Quiesce In-Progress
A Solaris software quiesce is in progress.
Solaris Quiesced
Solaris software has quiesced.
Solaris Resume In-Progress
A Solaris software resume is in progress
Solaris Panic
Solaris software has panicked, panic flow has started.
Solaris Panic Debug
Solaris software panicked, and is entering debugger mode.
Solaris Panic Continue
Exited debugger mode and continuing panic flow.
Solaris Panic Dump
Panic dump has started.
Solaris Halt
Solaris software is halted.
Solaris Panic Exit
Solaris software exited as a result of a panic.
Environmental Emergency
An environmental emergency has been detected
Debugging Solaris
Debugging Solaris software; this is not a hung condition.
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Solaris Exited
Solaris software has exited.
Domain Down
The domain is down and the setkeyswitch in the ON,
DIAG, or SECURE position.
In Recovery
The domain is in the midst of an automatic system
recovery.
Domain status reflects two cases. The first is that dsmd is busy trying to recover the
domain and the second is that dsmd has given up trying to recover the domain. In
the second case you always see “Domain Down.” In the first case you see either see
“Domain Down” or some other status. To recover from a “Domain Down” in either
case, use setkeyswitch off, setkeyswitch on.
sc0:sms-user:> setkeyswitch off
sc0:sms-user:> setkeyswitch on
For examples and more information, see “To Obtain Domain Status” on page 70 and
refer to the showplatform man page.
showxirstate Command
showxirstate(1M) displays CPU dump information after sending a reset pulse to
the processors. This save state dump can be used to analyze the cause of abnormal
domain behavior. showxirstate creates a list of all active processors in that
domain and retrieves the save state information for each processor.
showxirstate data resides, by default, in
/var/opt/SUNWSMS/adm/domain_id/dump.
For examples and more information, refer to the showxirstate man page.
Solaris Software Heartbeat
During normal operation, the Solaris environment produces a periodic heartbeat
indicator readable from the SC. dsmd detects the absence of heartbeat updates for a
running Solaris system as a hung Solaris. Hangs are not detected for any software
components other than the Solaris software.
Note – The Solaris software heartbeat should not be confused with the SC-to-SC
(hardware) heartbeat or the heartbeat network, both used to determine the health of
failover. For more information see, “SC Heartbeats” on page 144.
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149
The only reflection of the Solaris heartbeat occurs when dsmd detects a failure to
update the Solaris heartbeat of sufficient duration to indicate that the Solaris
software is hung. Upon detection of a Solaris software hang, dsmd conducts an ASR.
Hardware Status
The hardware status functions report information about the hardware configuration,
hardware failures detected, and platform environmental state.
Hardware Configuration
The following hardware configuration status is available from the Sun Fire 15K/12K
system management software:
■
■
■
■
■
Hardware components physically present on each board (as detected by POST)
Hardware components not in use because they failed POST
Presence or absence of all hot-pluggable units (HPUs) (for example, system
boards)
Hardware components not in use because they were on the blacklist when POST
was invoked (see “Power-On Self-Test (POST)” on page 121)
Contents of the SEEPROM for each FRU including the part number and serial
number
Note – The hardware configuration status available to SMS running on the SC is
limited to presence /absence. It includes no information about the I/O
configuration; such as, where I/O adaptors are plugged in and what devices are
attached to those I/O adaptors. Such information is available only to the software
running on the domain that owns the I/O adaptor.
The hardware configuration supported by functions described in this section
excludes I/O adaptors and I/O devices. showboards displays all hardware
components that are present.
As described in “Blacklist Editing” on page 122, the current contents of the
component blacklist(s) can always be viewed and altered.
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Environmental Status
The following hardware environmental measurements are available:
■
■
■
■
■
Temperatures
Power voltage and amperage
Fan status (stopped, low-speed, high-speed, failed)
Power status
Faults
showenvironment displays every environmental measurement that can be taken
within the Sun Fire 15K/12K rack.
▼ To Display the Environment Status for Domain A
1. Log in to the SC.
Platform administrators can view any environment status on the entire platform.
Domain administrators can see the environment status only for those domains for
which they have privileges.
2. Type:
sc0:sms-user:> showenvironment -d A
As described in “HPU LEDs” on page 131, the operating indicator LEDs on Sun Fire
15K/12K HPUs visibly reflect that the HPUs are powered on and the OK to
remove indicator LEDs visibly reflect those that can be unplugged.
Hardware Error Status
dsmd monitors the Sun Fire 15K/12K hardware operational status and reports
errors. The occurrence of some errors are directly reported to the SC (for example,
the error register(s) in every ASIC propagate to the SBBC on the SC that provides an
error summary register). Although the occurrence of some errors is indicated by an
interrupt delivered to the SC, some error states may require the SC to monitor
hardware registers for error indications. When a hardware error is detected, esmd
follows the established procedures for collecting and clearing the hardware error
state.
The following types of errors can occur on Sun Fire 15K/12K hardware:
■
Domain stops, fatal hardware errors that terminate all hardware operations in a
domain
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151
■
■
■
Record stops that cause the hardware to stop collecting transaction history when
a data transfer error (for example, CE ECC) occurs
SPARC processor error conditions such as RED_state/watchdog reset
Nonfatal ASIC-detected hardware failures
Hardware error status is generally not reported as a status. Rather, event handling
functions perform various actions when hardware errors occur such as logging
errors, initiating ASR, and so forth. These functions are discussed in “Domain
Events” on page 175.
Note – As described in“HPU LEDs” on page 131, the fault LEDs, after POST
completion, identify Sun Fire 15K/12K HPUs in which faults have been discovered
since last powered on or submitted to a power on reset.
SC Hardware and Software Status
Proper operation of SMS depends upon proper operation of the hardware and the
Solaris software on the SC. The ability to support automatic failover from the main
to the spare system controller requires properly functioning hardware and software
on the spare. SMS software running on the main system controller must either be
functioning sufficiently to diagnose a software or hardware failure in a manner that
can be detected by the spare or it must fail in a manner that can be detected by the
spare.
SC-POST determines the status of system controller hardware. It tests and configures
the system controller at power-on or power-on reset.
The SC does not boot if the SC fails to function.
If the control board fails to function, the SC boots normally, but without access to the
control board devices. The level of hardware functionality required to boot the
system controller is essentially the same as that required for a standalone SC.
SC-POST writes diagnostic output to the SC console serial port (TTY-A).
Additionally, SC-POST leaves a brief diagnostics status summary message in an
NVRAM buffer that can be read by a Solaris driver and logged and/or displayed
when the Solaris software boots.
SC firmware and software display information to identify and service SC hardware
failures.
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SC firmware and software provide a software interface that verifies that the system
controller hardware is functional. This selects a working system controller as main in
a high-availability SC configuration.
The system controller LEDs provide visible status regarding power and detected
hardware faults as described in “HPU LEDs” on page 131.
Solaris software provides a level of self-diagnosis and automatic recovery (panic and
reboot). Solaris software utilizes the SC hardware watchdog logic to trap hang
conditions and force an automatic recovery reboot.
There are four hardware paths of communication between the SCs (two Ethernet
connections, the heartbeat network, and one SC-to-SC heartbeat signal) that are used
in the high-availability SC configuration by each SC to detect hangs or failures on
the other SC.
SMS practices self-diagnosis and institutes automatic failure recovery procedures,
even in non-high-availability SC configurations.
Upon recovery, SMS software either takes corrective actions as necessary to restore
the platform hardware to a known, functional configuration or reports the inability
to do so.
SMS software records and logs sufficient information to allow engineering diagnosis
of single-occurrence software failures in the field.
SMS software takes a noticeable interval to initialize itself and become fully
functional. The user interfaces behave predictably during this interval. Any
rejections of user commands are clearly identified as due to system initialization
with advice to try again after a suitable interval.
SMS software implementation uses a distributed client/server architecture. Any
errors encountered during SMS initialization, due to attempts to interact with a
process that has not yet completed initialization, are dealt with silently.
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CHAPTER
9
SC Failover
SC failover maximizes Sun Fire 15K/12K system uptime by adding high availability
features to its administrative operations. A Sun Fire 15K/12K system contains two
SCs. Failover provides software support to a high-availability two SC system
configuration.
The main SC provides all resources for the entire Sun Fire 15K/12K system. If
hardware or software failures occur on the main SC or on any hardware control path
(for example, console bus interface or Ethernet interface) from the main SC to other
system devices, then SC failover software automatically triggers a failover to the
spare SC. The spare SC then assumes the role of the main and takes over all the main
SC responsibilities. In a high-availability two SCs system configuration, SMS data,
configuration, and log files are replicated on the spare SC. Active domains are not
affected by this switch.
This chapter includes the following sections:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Overview
Fault Monitoring
File Propagation
Failover Management
Failover CLIs
Command Synchronization
Data Synchronization
Failure and Recovery
Security
155
Overview
In the current high-availability SC configuration, one SC acts as a “hot spare” for the
other.
Failover eliminates the single point of failure in the management of the Sun Fire
15K/12K system. fomd identifies and handles as many multiple points failure as
possible. Some failover scenarios are discussed in “Failure and Recovery” on page
166.
At anytime during SC failover, the failover process does not adversely affect any
configured or running domains except for temporary loss of services from the SC.
In a high-availability SC system:
■
■
If a fault (software or hardware) is detected on the main SC, fomd automatically
fails over to the spare SC.
If the spare SC detects that the main SC has stopped communicating with it, it
initiates a takeover and assumes the role of main.
The failover management daemon (fomd(1M)) is the core of the SC failover
mechanism. It is installed on both the main and spare SC.
The fomd daemon performs the following functions:
■
■
■
■
■
■
Determines an SC’s role; main or spare.
Requests the general health status of the remote SC hardware and software in the
form of a periodic health status message request sent over the SMS management
network (MAN) that exists between the two SCs.
Checks and/or handles recoverable and unrecoverable hardware and software
faults.
Makes every attempt to eliminate the possibility of split-brain condition between
the two SCs. (A condition is considered split-brain when both the SCs think they
are the main SC.)
Provides a recovery time from a main SC failure of between five and eight
minutes. The recovery time includes the time for fomd to detect the failure, reach
an agreement on the failure, and assume the main SC responsibilities on the spare
SC.
Logs an occurrence of an SC failover in the platform message log.
Services that would be interrupted during a SC failover include:
■
■
■
156
All network connections
Any SC-to-domain and domain-to-SC IOSRAM/Mailbox communication
Any process running on the main SC
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
You do not need to know the hostname of the main SC in order to establish
connections to it. As part of configuring SMS (refer to the smsconfig(1M) man
page), a logical hostname was created which will always be active on the main SC.
Refer to the Sun Fire 15K/12K System Site Planning Guide and the System Management
Services (SMS) 1.3 Installation Guide for information on the creation of the logical
hostnames in your network database.
Operations interrupted by an SC failover can be recovered after the failover
completes. Reissuance of the interrupted operation causes the operation to resume
and continue to completion.
All automated functions provided by fomd resume without operator intervention
after SC failover. Any recovery actions interrupted before completion by the SC
failover will restart.
Fault Monitoring
There are three types of failovers:
1. Main initiated
A main initiated failover is where the fomd running on the main SC yields control
to the spare SC in response to either an unrecoverable local hardware/software
failure or an operator request.
2. Spare initiated (takeover)
In a spare initiated failover (takeover), the fomd running on the spare determines
that the main SC is no longer functioning properly.
3. Indirect triggered takeover
If the I2 network path between the SCs is down and there is a fault on the main,
then the main switches itself to the role of spare and upon detecting this, the
spare SC assumes the role of main.
In the last two scenarios, the spare fomd eliminates the possibility of a split-brain
condition by resetting the main SC.
When a failover occurs, either software controlled or user forced, fomd deactivates
the failover mechanism. This eliminates the possibility of repeatedly failing over
back and forth between the two SCs.
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File Propagation
One of the purposes of the fomd is propagation of data from the main SC to the
spare SC through the interconnects that exist between the two SCs. This data
includes configuration, data, and log files.
The fomd daemon performs the following functions:
■
■
■
■
Propagates all native SMS files from the main to the spare SC at startup. These
include all the domain data directories, the pcd configuration files, the
/etc/opt/SUNWSMS/config directory, the /var/opt/SUNWSMS/adm platform
and domain files, and the .logger files. Any user-created application files are
not propagated unless specified in the cmdsync scripts.
Only propagates files modified since the last propagation cycle.
In the event of a failover, propagates all modified SMS files before the spare SC
assumes its role as main.
The I2 network must be operative for the transfer of data to occur.
Note – Any changes made to the network configuration on one SC using
smsconfig -m must be made to the other SC as well. Network configuration is not
automatically propagated.
Should both interconnections between the two SCs fail, failover can still occur
provided main and spare SC accesses to the high-availability srams (HASram)
remain intact. Due to the failure of both interconnections, propagation of SMS data
can no longer occur, creating the potential of stale data on the spare SC. In the event
of a failover, fomd on the new main keeps the current state of the data, logs the state
and provides other SMS daemons/clients information of the current state of the
data.
When either of the interconnects between the two SCs is healthy again, data is
pulled over depending on the timestamp of each SMS files. If the timestamp of the
file is earlier than the one on the now spare SC, it gets transferred over. If the
timestamp of the file is later than the one on the spare SC, no action is taken.
Failover cannot occur when both of the following conditions are met:
■
■
Both interconnects between the two SCs fail
Access to both HASrams fail
This is considered a quadruple fault, and failover will be disabled until at least one
of the links is restored.
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Failover Management
Startup
For the failover software to function, both SCs must be present in the system. The
determination of main and spare roles are based in part on the SC number. This slot
number does not prevent a given SC from assuming either role, it is only meant to
control how it goes about doing so.
If SMS is started on one SC first, it will become main. If SMS starts up on both SCs
at essentially the same time, whichever SC first determines that the other SC either is
not main or is not running SMS will become main.
There is one case during start-up where, if SC0 is in the middle of the start-up
process, and it queries SC1 for its role and the SC1 role cannot be confirmed, SC0
tries to become main. SC0 will reset SC1 during this process. This is done to prevent
both SCs from assuming the main role; a condition known as split brain. The reset
occurs even if the failover mechanism is deactivated.
Main SC
Upon startup, the fomd running on the main SC begins periodically testing the
hardware and network interfaces. Initially the failover mechanism is disabled
(internally) until at least one status response has been received from the remote
(spare) SC indicating that it is healthy.
If a local fault is detected by the main fomd during initial startup, failover occurs
when all of the following conditions are met:
1. The I2 network was not the source of the fault.
2. The remote SC is healthy (as indicated by the health status response).
3. The failover mechanism has not been deactivated.
Spare SC
Upon startup, fomd runs on the spare SC and begins periodically testing the
software, hardware, and network interfaces.
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159
If a local fault is detected by the fomd running on the spare SC during initial startup,
it informs the main fomd of its debilitated state.
Failover CLIs
setfailover Command
setfailover modifies the state of the SC failover mechanism. The default state is
on. You can set failover to:
State
Definition
on
Enables failover for systems that previously had failover disabled due to a
failover or an operator request. This option instructs the command to attempt
to re-enable failover only. If failover cannot be re-enabled, subsequent use of
the showfailover command indicates the current failure that prevented the
enable.
off
Disables the failover mechanism. This prevents a failover until the mechanism
is re-enabled.
force
Forces a failover to the spare SC. The spare SC must be available and healthy.
Note – In the event a patch must be applied to SMS 1.3, failover must be disabled
before the patch is installed. Refer to the System Management Services (SMS) 1.3
Installation Guide.
For more information and examples refer to the setfailover man page.
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showfailover Command
showfailover allows you to monitor the state and display the current status of the
SC failover mechanism. The -v option displays the current status of all monitored
components.
sc0:sms-user:> showfailover -v
SC Failover Status:
ACTIVE
HASRAM Status (by location):
HASRAM (CSB at CS0): .........................Good
HASRAM (CSB at CS1): .........................Good
Status of sun15k-sc0:
Role:............................MAIN
System Clock: ...........................................Good
X1 Network:
hme0: . .................................................Good
I2 Network: .............................................Good
System Memory: ..........................................0.5%
Disk Status:
/: ......................................................1.4%
Console Bus Status:
EXB at EX3: .............................................Good
EXB at EX6: .............................................Good
EXB at EX12: ............................................Good
EXB at EX15: ............................................Good
Status of sun15k-sc1:
Role: ............................SPARE
System Clock: ...........................................Good
X1 Network:
hme0: ...................................................Good
I2 Network: .............................................Good
System Memory: ..........................................0.6%
Disk Status:
/: .....................................................1.4%
Console Bus Status:
EXB at EX3: ............................................Good
EXB at EX6: ............................................Good
EXB at EX12: ...........................................Good
EXB at EX15: ...........................................Good
The -r option displays the SC role: main, spare or unknown. For example:
sc0:sms-user:> showfailover -r
MAIN
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161
If you do not specify an option, then only the state information is displayed:
sc0:sms-user:> showfailover
SC Failover Status: state
The failover mechanism can be in one of four states: ACTIVATING, ACTIVE,
DISABLED, and FAILED.
TABLE 9-1
Failover Mechanisms
State
Definition
ACTIVATING
The failover mechanism is preparing to transition to the ACTIVE
state. Failover becomes active when all tests have passed and files
have been synchronized.
ACTIVE
The failover mechanism is enabled and functioning normally.
DISABLED
The failover mechanism has been disabled due to the occurrence of
a failover or an operator request (setfailover off)
FAILED
Identifies that the failover mechanism has detected a failure that
prevents a failover from being possible or failover has not yet
completed activation.
In addition showfailover displays the state of each of the network interface links
monitored by the failover processes. The display format is as follows:
network i/f device name: [GOOD|FAILED]
showfailover returns a failure string describing the failure condition. Each failure
string has a code associated with it. The following table defines the codes and
associated failure strings.
162
String
Explanation
None
No failure.
S-SC EXT NET
The spare SC external network interface has failed.
S-SC CONSOLE BUS
A fault has been detected on the spare SC console
bus path(s).
S-SC LOC CLK
The spare SC local clock has failed.
S-SC DISK FULL
The spare SC system is full.
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
String
Explanation
S-SC IS DOWN
The spare SC is down and/or unresponsive. If this
message results from the I2 network/HASRAMs
being down then the spare SC could still be running.
Login to the spare SC to verify.
S-SC MEM EXHAUSTED
The spare SC memory/swap space has been
exhausted.
S-SC SMS DAEMON
At least one SMS daemon could not be
started/restarted on the spare SC.
S-SC INCOMPATIBLE SMS
VERSION
The spare SC is running a different version of SMS
software. Both SCs must be running the same
version.
I2 NETWORK/HASRAM DOWN
Both interfaces for communication between the SCs
are down. The main cannot tell what version of SMS
is running on the spare nor what its state is. It
declares the spare down and logs a message to that
effect. Dependent services including file propagation
are unavailable.
For examples and more information, refer to the showfailover man page.
Command Synchronization
If an SC failover occurs during the execution of a command, you can restart the
same command on the new main SC.
All commands and actions do the following:
■
■
■
Mark the start of a command or action.
Remove or indicate the completion of a command or action.
Keep any state transition and/or pertinent data which SMS can use to resume the
command.
fomd provides:
■
■
Command sync support for dsmd(1M) to automatically resume ASR reboots of
any or all affected domain(s) after a failover.
Command sync support for all SMS DR related daemons and CLIs to restart the
last DR operation after a failover.
The four CLIs in SMS that require command sync support are addboard,
deleteboard, moveboard, and rcfgadm.
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cmdsync CLIs
The cmdsync commands provide the ability to initialize a script or command with a
cmdsync descriptor, update an existing cmdsync descriptor execution point, or
cancel a cmdsync descriptor from the spare SC’s list of recovery actions. Commands
or scripts can also be run in a cmdsync envelope.
In the case of an SC failover to the spare, initialization of a cmdsync descriptor on
the spare SC allows the spare SC to restart or resume the target script or command
from the last execution point set. These commands only execute on the main SC, and
have no effect on the current cmdsync list if executed on the spare.
Commands or scripts invoked with the cmdsync commands when there is no
enabled spare SC results in a no-op operation. That is, command execution proceeds
as normal, but a log entry in the platform log indicates that a cmdsync attempt has
failed.
initcmdsync Command
initcmdsync(1M) creates a cmdsync descriptor. The target script or command and
its associated parameters are saved as part of the cmdsync data. The exit code of the
initcmdsync command provides a cmdsync descriptor that can be used in
subsequent cmdsync commands to reference the action. Actual execution of the
target command or script is not performed. For more information, refer to the
initcmdsync (1M) man page.
savecmdsync Command
savecmdsync(1M) saves a new execution point in a previously defined cmdsync
descriptor. This allows a target command or script to restart execution at a location
associated with an identifier. The target command or script supports the ability to be
restarted at this execution point, otherwise the restart execution is at the beginning
of the target command or script. For more information, refer to the savecmdsync
(1M) man page.
cancelcmdsync Command
cancelcmdsync(1M) removes a cmdsync descriptor from the spare restart list.
Once this command is run, the target command or script associated with the
cmdsync descriptor is not restarted on the spare SC in the event of a failover. Take
care to ensure that all target commands or scripts contain a initcmdsync command
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sequence as well as a cancelcmdsync sequence after the normal or abnormal
termination flows. For more information, refer to the cancelcmdsync (1M) man
page.
runcmdsync Command
runcmdsync(1M) executes the specified target command or script under a cmdsync
wrapper. You cannot restart at execution points other than the beginning. The target
command or script is executed through the system command after creation of the
cmdsync descriptor. Upon termination of the system command, the cmdsync
descriptor is removed from the cmdsync list, and the exit code of the system
command returned to the user. For more information, refer to the runcmdsync (1M)
man page.
showcmdsync Command
showcmdsync(1M) displays the current cmdsync descriptor list. For more
information, refer to the showcmdsync (1M) man page.
Data Synchronization
Customized data synchronization is provided in SMS by the setdatasync(1M)
command. setdatasync enables you to specify a user-created file to be added to or
removed from the data propagation list.
setdatasync Command
The setdatasync list identifies the files to be copied from the main to the spare
system controller (SC) as part of data synchronization for automatic failover. The
specified user file and the directory in which it resides must have read and write
permissions for you on both SCs. You must also have platform or domain privileges.
The data synchronization process checks the user-created files on the main SC for
any changes. If the user-created files on the main SC have changed since the last
propagation, they are repropagated to the spare SC. By default, the data
synchronization process checks a specified file every 60 minutes; however, you can
use setdatasync to indicate how often a user file is to be checked for
modifications.
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You can also use setdatasync to propagate a specified file to the spare SC without
adding the file to the data propagation list.
Using setdatasync backup can slow down automatic fomd file propagation.
The time required to execute setdatasync backup is proportional to the number
of files being transferred. Other factors that can affect the speed of file transfer
include: the average size of files being transferred, the amount of memory available
on the SCs, the load (CPU cycles and disk traffic) on the SCs, and whether the I2
network is functioning.
The following statistics assume an average file size of 200KB:
On a lightly loaded system with a functioning I2 network, FOMD can transfer about
750 files per minute.
On a lightly loaded system with no functioning I2 network, FOMD can transfer
about 250 files per minute.
Note – There are repropagation constraints you should be aware of before using this
command. For more information and examples, refer to the setdatasync (1M) man
page.
showdatasync Command
showdatasync provides the current status of files being propagated (copied) from
the main SC to its spare. showdatasync also provides the list of files registered
using setdatasync and their status. Data propagation synchronizes data on the
spare SC with data on the main SC, so that the spare SC is current with the main SC
if an SC failover occurs.
For more information, refer to the showdatasync (1M) man page.
Failure and Recovery
In a high-availability configuration, fomd manages the failover mechanism on the
local and remote SCs. fomd detects the presence of local hardware and software
faults and determines the appropriate action to take.
fomd is responsible for detecting faults in the following categories:
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a
All relevant hardware buses that are local to the SC Control board (CB)/CPU
board.
b
The external network interfaces.
c
The I2 network interface between the SCs.
d
Unrecoverable software failures. This category is for those cases where an
SMS software component (daemon) crashes and cannot be restarted after
three attempts; the file system is full; the heap is exhausted and so forth.
FIGURE 9-1 illustrates the failover fault categories.
External network communities
(b)
FIGURE 9-1
Main SC
(a)
(d)
SMS
(c)
I2 network
(b)
Spare SC
(a)
(d)
SMS
Failover Fault Categories
The following table illustrates how faults in the categories affect the failover
mechanism. Assume that the failover mechanism is activated.
Failure
Point
Main
SC
a
X
a
b
Spare
SC
X
X
Failover
Notes
X
Failover to spare occurs.
Disables
No effect on the main SC, but the spare SC has
suffered a hardware fault so failover is disabled.
Failover to spare.
Chapter 9
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167
Failure
Point
Main
SC
b
Spare
SC
Failover
Notes
X
No
effect
The fact that the spare SC external network interfaces
have failed does not affect the failover mechanism.
No
effect
Main and spare SC log the fault.
X
Failover to the spare SC assuming that it is healthy.
Disables
Failover is disabled because the spare SC is deemed
unhealthy at this point.
c
d
d
X
X
Failover on Main SC (Main Controlled Failover)
The following lists events for the main fomd during SC failover in order.
1. Detects the fault.
2. Stops generating heartbeats.
3. Tells the remote failover software to start a takeover timer. The purpose of this
timer is to provide an alternate means for the remote (spare) SC to takeover if for
any reason the main hangs up and never reaches Number 10.
4. Starts the SMS software in spare mode.
5. Removes the logical IP interface.
6. Enables the console bus caging mechanism.
7. Triggers propagation of any modified SMS files to the spare SC/HASrams.
8. Stops file propagation monitoring.
9. Shuts down main-specific daemons and sets its role to UNKNOWN.
10. Logs a failover event.
11. Notifies remote (spare) failover software that it should assume the role of main. If
the takeover timer expires before the spare is notified, the remote SC will takeover
on its own.
The following lists the order of events for the spare fomd during failover.
1. Receives message from the main fomd to assume main role, or the takeover timer
expires. If the former is true, then the takeover timer is stopped.
2. Resets the old main SC.
3. Notifies hwad, frad, and mand to configure itself in the main role.
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4. Assumes the role of main.
5. Starts generating heartbeat interrupts.
6. Configures the logical IP interface.
7. Disables the console bus caging mechanism.
8. Starts the SMS software in main mode.
9. Prepare the darbs to receive interrupts.
10. Logs a role reversal event, spare to main.
11. The spare SC is now the main and fomd deactivates the failover mechanism.
Fault on Main SC (Spare Takes Over Main Role)
In this scenario the spare SC takes main control in reaction to the main SC going
away. The most important aspect of this type of failover is the prevention of the
split-brain condition. Another assumption is that the failover mechanism is not
deactivated. If this is not the case, then no takeover can occur.
The spare fomd does the following:
■
Notices the main SC is not healthy.
From the spare fomd perspective, this phenomenon can be caused by two
conditions; the main SC is truly dead, and/or the I2 network interface is down.
In the former case, a failover is needed (provided that the failover mechanism is
activated) while in the latter it is not. To identify which is the case, the spare fomd
polls for the presence of heartbeat interrupts from the main SC to determine if the
main SC is still up and running. As long as there are heartbeat interrupts being
received, and/or the failover mechanism is deactivated and/or disabled, no
failover occurs.
In the case where no interrupts are detected, but the failover mechanism is
deactivated, the spare fomd does not attempt to take over unless the operator
manually activates the failover mechanism using the CLI command,
setfailover. Otherwise, if the spare SC is healthy, the spare fomd proceeds to
take over the role of main as listed.
■
Initiates a takeover by resetting the remote (main) SC.
The following lists the events for the spare fomd, in order, during failover:
1. Reconfigures itself as main. This includes taking over control of the I2C bus,
configuring the logical main SC IP address, and starting up the necessary SMS
software daemons.
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169
2. Starts generating heartbeat interrupts.
3. Configures the logical IP interface.
4. Disables console bus caging.
5. Starts the SMS software in main mode.
6. Configures the DARB interrupts.
7. Logs a takeover event.
8. The spare fomd, now the main, deactivates the failover mechanism.
I2 Network Fault
The following lists the events, in order, that occur after an I2 network fault.
1. The main fomd detects the I2 network is not healthy.
2. The main fomd stops propagating files and checkpointing data over to the spare
SC.
3. The spare fomd detects the I2 network is not healthy.
From the spare fomd perspective, this phenomenon can be caused by two
conditions; the main SC is truly dead, and/or the I2 network interface is down. In
the former case, the corrective action is to fail over, while in the latter it is not. To
identify which is the case, the fomd starts polling for the presence of heartbeat
interrupts from the main SC to determine if the main SC is still up and running. If
heartbeat interrupts are present, then the fomd keeps the spare as spare.
4. The spare fomd clears out the checkpoint data on the local disk.
Fault on Main SC (I2 Network Is Also Down)
The following lists the events, in order, that occur after a fault on the main SC.
1. The main fomd detects the fault.
If the last known state of the spare SC was good, then the main fomd stops
generating heartbeats. Otherwise failover does not continue.
If the access to the console bus is still available, main failover software finishes
propagating any remaining critical files to HASram and flushes out any or all
critical state information to HASram.
2. The main fomd reconfigures the SMS software into spare mode.
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3. The main fomd removes the logical main SC IP address.
4. The main fomd stops generating heartbeat interrupts.
Fault Recovery and Reboot
I2 Fault Recovery
The following lists the events, in order, that occur during an I2 network fault
recovery.
1. The main fomd detects the I2 network is healthy.
If the spare SC is completely healthy as indicated in the health status response
message, the fomd enables failover and, assuming that the failover mechanism
has not been deactivated by the operator, does a complete re-sync of the log files
and checkpointing data over to the spare SC.
2. The spare fomd detects the I2 network is healthy.
The spare fomd disables failover and clears out the checkpoint data on the local
disk.
Reboot and Recovery
The following lists the events, in order, that occur during a reboot and recovery. A
reboot and recovery scenario happens in the following two cases.
Main SC Receives a Master Reset or Its UltraSPARC® Receives a Reset
1. Assume SSCPOST passed without any problems. If SSCPOST failed and OE
cannot be booted, the main is inoperable.
2. Assume all SSC Solaris drivers attached without any problems. If the SBBC driver
fails to attach, see “Fault on Main SC (Spare Takes Over Main Role)” on page 169,
if any other drivers fail to attach, see “Failover on Main SC (Main Controlled
Failover)” on page 168.
3. The main fomd is started.
4. If the fomd determines that the remote SC has already assumed the main role,
then see Number 5 in “Spare SC Receives a Master Reset or Its UltraSPARC
Receives a Reset” on page 172. Otherwise proceed to Number 5 in this list.
Chapter 9
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171
5. The fomd configures the logical main IP address and starts up the rest of the SMS
software.
6. SMS daemons start in recovery mode if necessary.
7. Main fomd starts generating heartbeat interrupts.
8. At this point, the main SC is fully recovered.
Spare SC Receives a Master Reset or Its UltraSPARC Receives a Reset
1. Assume SSCPOST passed without any problems. If SSCPOST failed and OE
cannot be booted, the spare is inoperable.
2. Assume all SSC Solaris drivers attached without any problems. If the SBBC driver
fails to attach, or any other drivers fail to attach, the spare SC is deemed
inoperable.
3. The fomd is started.
4. The fomd determines that the SC is the preferred spare and assumes spare role.
5. The fomd starts checking for the presence of heartbeat interrupts from the remote
(initially presumed to be main) SC.
If after a configurable amount of time no heartbeat interrupts are detected, then
the failover mechanism state is checked. If enabled and activated, fomd initiates a
take over. Now refer to Number 5 of “Main SC Receives a Master Reset or Its
UltraSPARC® Receives a Reset” on page 171. Otherwise, fomd continues
monitoring for the presence of heartbeat interrupts and the state of the failover
mechanism.
6. The fomd starts periodically checking the hardware/software and network
interfaces.
7. The fomd configures the local main SC IP address.
8. At this point, the spare SC is fully recovered.
Client Failover Recovery
The following lists the events that occur during a client failover recovery. A recovery
scenario happens in the following two cases.
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Fault on Main SC—Recovering From the Spare SC
Clients with any operations in progress are manually recovered by checkpointing
data unless they are non-recurring.
Fault on Main SC (With I2 Network Down)—Recovering From the
Spare SC
Since the I2 network is down, all checkpointing data are removed. Clients cannot
perform any recovery.
Reboot Main SC (With Spare SC Down)
Same as “Fault on Main SC—Recovering From the Spare SC” on page 173.
Reboot of Spare SC
No recovery necessary.
Security
All failover specific network traffic (such as health status request/response messages
and file propagation packets) are sent only over the interconnect network that exists
between the two SCs.
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CHAPTER
10
Domain Events
Event monitoring periodically checks the domain and hardware status to detect
conditions that need to be acted upon. The action taken is determined by the
condition and can involve reporting the condition or initiating automated
procedures to deal with it. This chapter describes the events that are detected by
monitoring and the requirements with respect to actions taken in response to
detected events.
This chapter includes the following sections:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Message Logging
Domain Reboot Events
Domain Panic Events
Solaris Software Hang Events
Hardware Configuration Events
Environmental Events
Hardware Error Events
SC Failure Events
Message Logging
SMS logs all significant events, such as those that require taking actions other than
logging or updating user monitoring displays in message files on the SC. Included in
the log is information to support subsequent servicing of the hardware or software.
SMS writes log messages for significant hardware events to the platform log file
located in /var/opt/SUNWSMS/adm/platform/messages.
175
The actions taken in response to events that crash domain software systems include
automatic system recovery (ASR) reboots of all affected domain(s), provided that the
domain hardware (or a bootable subset thereof) meets the requirements for safe and
correct operation.
SMS logs all significant actions other than logging or updating user monitoring
displays taken in response to an event. Log messages for significant domain
software events and their response actions are written to the message log file for the
affected domain located in /var/opt/SUNWSMS/adm/domain_id/messages.
SMS writes log messages to /var/opt/SUNWSMS/adm/domain_id/messages for
significant hardware events that can visibly affect one or more domains of the
affected domain(s).
SMS also logs domain console, syslog, post, and dump information and 444manages
sms_core files.
Log File Maintenance
SMS software maintains SC-resident copies of logs of all server information that it
logs. Use the showlogs(1M) command to access log information.
The platform message log file can be accessed only by administrators for the
platform using:
sc0:sms-user:> showlogs
SMS log information relevant to a configured domain can be accessed only by
administrators for that domain. SMS maintains separate log files for each domain
using:
sc0:sms-user:> showlogs -d domain_indicator
where:
-d domain_indicator
Specifies the domain using:
domain_id - ID for a domain. Valid domain_ids are A–R and
are not case sensitive.
domain_tag - Name assigned to a domain using
addtag(1M).
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SMS maintains copies of domain syslog files on the SC in
/var/opt/SUNWSMS/adm/domain_id/syslog. syslog information can be accessed
only by administrators for that domain using:
sc0:sms-user:> showlogs -d domain_indicator -s
Solaris console output logs are maintained to provide valuable insight into what
happened before a domain crashed. Console output is available on the SC for a
crashed domain in /var/opt/SUNWSMS/adm/domain_id/console. console
information can be accessed only by administrators for that domain using:
sc0:sms-user:> showlogs -d domain_indicator -c
XIR state dumps, generated by the reset command, can be displayed using
showxirstate. For more information refer to the showxirstate man page.
Domain post logs are for service diagnostic purposes and are not displayed by
showlogs or any SMS CLI.
The /var/tmp/sms_core.daemon files are binaries and not viewable.
The availability of various log files on the SC supports analysis and correction of
problems that prevent a domain or domains from booting. For more information
refer to the showlogs man page.
Note – Panic dumps for panicked domains are available in the /var/crash logs on
the domain and not on the SC.
The following table lists the SMS log information types, and their descriptions.
TABLE 10-1
SMS Log Type Information
Type
Description
Firmware versioning
Unsuitable configuration of firmware version at firmware
invocation is automatically corrected and logged.
Power-on self test
LED fault; Platform and domain messages detailing why a fault
LED was illuminated.
Power control
All power operations are logged.
Power control
Power operations that violate hardware requirements or hardware
recommended procedures.
Power control
Use of override to forcibly complete a power operation.
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177
TABLE 10-1
178
SMS Log Type Information (Continued)
Type
Description
Domain console
Automatic logging of console output to a standard file.
Hardware
configuration
Part numbers are used to identify board type in message logs.
Event monitoring
and actions
All significant environmental events (those that require taking
action).
Event monitoring
and actions
All significant actions taken in response to environmental events.
Domain event
monitoring and
actions
All significant domain software events and their response actions.
Event monitoring
and actions
Significant hardware events written to the platform log.
Event monitoring
and actions
All significant clock input failures, clock input switch failures, and
loss or gain of phase lock.
Domain event
monitoring and
actions
Significant hardware events that visibly affect one or more domains
are written to the domain(s) log.
Domain boot
initiation
Initiation of each boot and the passage through each significant
stage of booting a domain is written to the domain log.
Domain boot failure
Boot failures are logged to the domain log.
Domain boot failures
All ASR recovery attempts are logged to the domain log.
Domain panic
Domain panics are logged to the domain log.
Domain panic
All ASR recovery attempts are logged to the domain log.
Domain panic hang
Each occurrence of a domain hang and its accompanying
information is logged to the domain log.
Domain panic
All ASR recovery attempts after a domain panic and hang are
logged to the domain log.
Repeated domain
panic
All ASR recovery attempts after repeated domain panics are logged
to the domain message log.
Solaris OS hang
events
All operating environment hang events are logged to the domain
message log.
Solaris OS hang
events
All operating environment hang events result in a domain panic in
order to obtain a core image for analysis of the Solaris hang. This
information and subsequent recovery action is logged to the
domain message log.
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
TABLE 10-1
SMS Log Type Information (Continued)
Type
Description
Solaris OS hang
events
SMS monitors for the inability of the domain software to satisfy the
request to panic. Upon determining noncompliance with the panic
request, SMS aborts the domain and initiates an ASR reboot. All
subsequent recovery action is logged to the domain message file.
Hot-plug events
All HPU insertion events of system boards to a domain are logged
in the domain message log.
Hot-unplug events
All HPU removals are logged to the platform message log.
Hot-Unplug Events
All HPU removals from a domain are logged to the domain
message log.
POST-initiated
configuration events
All POST-initiated hardware configuration changes are logged in
/var/opt/SUNWSMS/adm/domain_id/post.
Environmental
events
All sensor measurements outside of acceptable operational limits
are logged as environmental events to the platform log file.
Environmental
events
All environmental events that affect one or more domains are
logged to the domain message log.
Environmental
events
Significant actions taken in response to environmental events are
logged to the platform message log.
Environmental
events
Significant actions taken in response to environmental events within
a domain are logged to the domain message log.
Hardware error
events
Hardware error and related information is logged to the platform
message log.
Hardware error
events
Hardware error and related information within a domain is logged
to the domain message file.
Hardware error
events
Log entries about hardware error for which data was collected
include the name of the data file(s).
Hardware error
events
All significant actions taken in response to hardware error events
are logged to the platform message log.
Hardware error
events
All significant actions taken in response to hardware error events
affecting a domain(s) are logged to the domain(s) message log.
SC failure events
All SC hardware failure and related information is logged to the
platform message log.
SC failure events
The occurrence of an SC failover event is logged to the platform
message log.
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179
Log File Management
SMS manages the log files, as necessary, to keep the SC disk utilization within
acceptable limits.
The message log daemon (mld) monitors message log size, file count per directory,
and age every 10 minutes. mld executes the first limit to be reached.
TABLE 10-2
MLD Default Settings
File Size (in Kb)
File Count
Days to Keep
Platform messages
2500
10
0
Domain messages
2500
10
0
Domain console
2500
10
0
Domain syslog
2500
10
0
Domain post
20000*
1000
0
Domain dump
20000*
1000
0
sms_core.daemon
100000
20
0
* total per directory not
file
Assuming 20 directories, the defaults represent approximately 4Gbytes of stored
logs.
Caution – The parameters shown above are stored in
/etc/opt/SUNWSMS/config/mld_tuning. For any changes to take effect, mld must
be stopped and restarted. Only an administrator experienced with system disk
utilization should edit this file. Improperly changing the parameters in this file could
flood the disk and hang or crash the SC.
■
When a log message file reaches the size limit mld does the following:
Starting with the oldest message file x.X, it moves that file to x.X+1, except when
the oldest message file is message.9 or core file is sms_core.daemon.1, then it
starts with x.X-1.
For example, messages becomes messages.0, message.0 becomes
messages.1 and so on up to messages.9. When messages reaches 2.5MB then
messages.9 is deleted and all files are bumped up by one and a new empty
messages file is created.
■
180
When a log file reaches the file count limit mld does the following:
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
When messages or sms_core.daemon reaches its count limit, then the oldest
message or core file is deleted.
■
■
When a log file reaches the age limit mld does the following:
When any message file reaches x days, it is deleted.
Note – By default, the age limit (*_log_keep_days) is set to zero and not used.
■
When a postdate.time.sec.log or a dump_name.date.time.sec file reaches the file
size, count, or age limit, mld deletes the oldest file in the directory.
Note – Post files are provided for service diagnostic purposes and not intended for
display.
For more information, refer to the mld and showlogs man pages, and see “Message
Logging Daemon” on page 46.
Domain Reboot Events
SMS monitors domain software status (see “Software Status” on page 145) to detect
domain reboot events.
Domain Reboot Initiation
Since the domain software is incapable of rebooting itself, SMS software controls the
initial sequence for all domain reboots. In consequence, SMS is always aware of
domain reboot initiation events.
SMS software logs the initiation of each reboot and the passage through each
significant stage of booting a domain to the domain-specific log file.
Domain Boot Failure
SMS software detects all domain reboot failures.
Upon detecting a domain reboot failure, SMS logs the reboot failure event to the
domain-specific message log.
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181
SC resident per-domain log files are available for failure analysis. In addition to the
reboot failure logs, SMS can maintain duplicates of important domain-resident logs
and transcripts of domain console output on the SC as described in “Log File
Maintenance” on page 176.
Domain reboot failures are handled as follows:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
The response to reboot or reset requests is always a fast bringup procedure.
The first attempt to recover a domain from software failure uses a quick reboot
procedure.
The first attempt to recover domain from hardware failure uses the reboot
procedure. The POST default diagnostic level is used in the reboot procedure.
If the domain recovery fails during the POST run, dsmd retries POST at the
default diagnostic level for up to six consecutive domain recovery failures after
the first recovery attempt fails.
If the domain recovery fails during the IOSRAM layout, OpenBoot PROM
download and jump, OpenBoot PROM run, or Solaris software boot, dsmd reruns
POST at the default diagnostic level. For subsequent failures of this type, for each
recovery, dsmd runs POST at a test diagnostic level higher than the previous level.
dsmd retries domain recovery domain at the default level for up to six attempts
after the first recovery attempt fails. (All in all, dsmd tries domain recovery
attempts at most seven times).
Once the system has been recovered and Solaris software has been booted, any
domain failures within four hours is treated as repeated domain failure and is
recovered by running POST at higher diagnostic level.
If there are no domain failures within four hours of Solaris software running, then
the domain is considered successfully recovered and healthy.
A subsequent domain hardware failure is handled by the reboot procedure.
A subsequent domain software failure is handled by quick reboot procedure, and
the reboot or reset request is handled by the fast bringup procedure.
SMS tries all ASR methods at its disposal to boot a domain that has failed booting.
All recovery attempts are logged in the domain-specific message log.
Domain Panic Events
When a domain panics, it informs dsmd so that a recovery reboot can be initiated.
The panic is reported as a domain software status change (see “Software Status” on
page 145.
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Domain Panic
dsmd is informed when the Solaris software on a domain panics.
Upon detecting a domain panic, dsmd logs the panic event to the domain-specific
message log.
SC resident per-domain log files are available to assist in domain panic analysis. In
addition to the panic logs, SMS can maintain duplicates of important domainresident logs and transcripts of domain console output on the SC as described in
“Log File Maintenance” on page 176.
In general, after an initial panic where there has been no prior indication of
hardware errors, SMS requests that a fast reboot be tried to bring up the domain. For
more information, see “Fast Boot” on page 120.
dsmd handles a panic event as follows:
■
■
■
■
If the domain recovery fails during the POST run, dsmd retries POST at the
default diagnostic level for up to six consecutive domain recovery failures after
the first recovery attempt fails.
If the domain recovery fails during the IOSRAM layout, OpenBoot PROM
download and jump, OpenBoot PROM run, or Solaris software boot, dsmd reruns
POST at the default diagnostic level. For subsequent failures of this type, for each
recovery, dsmd runs POST at a test diagnostic level higher than the previous level.
dsmd retries domain recovery domain at the default level for up to six attempts
after the first recovery attempt fails. (All in all, dsmd tries domain recovery
attempts at most seven times).
Once the system has been recovered and Solaris software has been booted, any
domain failures within four hours is treated as repeated domain failure and is
recovered by running POST at higher diagnostic level.
If there are no domain failures within four hours of Solaris software running, then
the domain is considered successfully recovered and healthy.
A subsequent domain hardware failure is handled by the reboot procedure.
A subsequent domain software failure is handled by quick reboot procedure, and
the reboot or reset request is handled by the fast bringup procedure.
This recovery action is logged in the domain-specific message log.
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183
Domain Panic Hang
The Solaris panic dump logic has been redesigned to minimize the possibility of
hangs at panic time. In a panic situation, Solaris software may operate differently
either because normal functions are shut down or because it is disabled by the panic.
An ASR reboot of a panicked Solaris domain is eventually started, even if the
panicked domain hangs before it can request a reboot.
Since the normal heartbeat monitoring (see “Solaris Software Hang Events” on page
185) of a panicked domain may not be appropriate or sufficient to detect situations
where a panicked Solaris domain will not proceed to request an ASR reboot, dsmd
takes special measures as necessary to detect a domain panic hang event.
Upon detecting a panic hang event, dsmd logs each occurrence including
information, to the domain-specific message log.
Upon detection of a domain panic hang (if any), SMS aborts the domain panic (see
“Domain Abort/Reset” on page 120) and initiates an ASR reboot of the domain.
dsmd logs these recovery actions in the domain-specific message log.
SC resident log files are available to assist in panic hang analysis. In addition to the
panic hang event logs, dsmd maintains duplicates of important domain-resident logs
and transcripts of domain console output on the SC as described in “Log File
Maintenance” on page 176.
Repeated Domain Panic
If a second domain panic is detected shortly after recovering from a panic event,
dsmd classifies the domain panic as a repeated domain panic event.
In addition to the standard logging actions that occur for any panic, the following
action is taken when attempting to reboot after the repeated domain panic event.
With each successive repeated domain panic event, SMS attempts to run POST at a
higher diagnostic test level to boot against the next untried administrator-specified
degraded configuration (see “Degraded Configuration Preferences” on page 95).
After all degraded configurations have been tried, successive repeated domain panic
events will continue full-test-level boots using the last specified degraded
configuration.
Upon determining that a repeated domain panic event has occurred, dsmd tries the
ASR method at its disposal to boot a stable domain software environment. dsmd logs
all recovery attempts in the domain-specific message log.
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Solaris Software Hang Events
dsmd monitors the Solaris heartbeat described in “Solaris Software Heartbeat” on
page 149 in each domain while Solaris software is running (see “Software Status” on
page 145). When the heartbeat indicator is not updated for a period of time, a Solaris
software hang event occurs.
dsmd detects Solaris software hangs.
Upon detecting a Solaris hang, dsmd logs the hang event including information, to
the domain-specific message log.
Upon detecting a Solaris hang, dsmd requests the domain software to panic in order
to obtain a core image for analysis of the Solaris hang (“Domain Abort/Reset” on
page 120). SMS logs this recovery action in the domain-specific message log.
dsmd monitors the inability of the domain software to satisfy the request to panic.
Upon determining noncompliance with the panic request, dsmd aborts the domain
(see “Domain Abort/Reset” on page 120) and initiates an ASR reboot. dsmd logs
these recovery actions in the domain-specific message log.
Although the core image taken as a result of the panic is only available for analysis
from the domain, SC resident log files are available to assist in domain hang
analysis. In addition to the Solaris hang event logs, dsmd can maintain duplicates of
important domain-resident logs and transcripts of domain console output on the SC.
Hardware Configuration Events
Changes to the hardware configuration status are considered hardware
configuration events. esmd detects the following hardware configuration events on
the Sun Fire 15K/12K system.
Hot-Plug Events
The insertion of a hot-pluggable unit (HPU) is a hot-plug event. The following
actions take place:
■
SMS detects HPU insertion events and logs each event and additional information
to a platform message log file.
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■
If the inserted HPU is a system board in the logical configuration for a domain,
SMS also logs its arrival in the domain’s message log file.
Hot-Unplug Events
The removal of a hot-pluggable unit (HPU) is a hot-unplug event. The following
actions take place:
■
■
Upon occurrence of a hot-unplug event, SMS makes a log entry recording the
removal of the HPU to the platform message log file.
A hot unplug event that detects the removal of a system board from a logical
domain configuration logs it to that domain’s message log file.
POST-Initiated Configuration Events
POST can run against different server components at different times due to domainrelated events such as reboots and dynamic reconfigurations. As described in
“Hardware Configuration” on page 150, SMS includes status from POST and
identifying failed-test components. Consequently, changes in POST status of a
component are considered to be hardware configuration events. SMS logs POSTinitiated hardware configuration changes to the platform message log.
Environmental Events
In general, environmental events are detected when hardware status measurements
exceed normal operational limits. Acceptable operational limits depend upon the
hardware and the server configuration.
esmd verifies that measurements returned by each sensor are within acceptable
operational limits. esmd logs all sensor measurements outside of acceptable
operational limits as environmental events to the platform log file.
esmd also logs significant actions taken in response to an environmental event (such
as those beyond logging information or updating user displays) to the platform log
file.
esmd logs significant environmental event response actions that affect one or more
domain(s) to the log file(s) of the affected domain(s).
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esmd handles environmental events by removing from operation the hardware that
has experienced the event (and any other hardware dependent upon the disabled
component). Hardware can be left in service, however, if continued operation of the
hardware will not harm the hardware or cause hardware functional errors.
The options for handling environmental events are dependent upon the
characteristics of the event. All events have a time frame during which the event
must be handled. Some events kill the domain software; some do not. Event
response actions are such that esmd responds within the event time frame.
There are a number of responses esmd can make to environmental events, such as
increasing fan speeds. In response to a detected environmental event, which requires
a power off, esmd undertakes one of the following corrective actions:
■
■
■
■
esmd uses immediate power off if there is no other option that meets the time
constraints.
If the environment event does not require immediate power off and the
component is a MaxCPU board, esmd attempts to DR the endangered board out
of the running domain and power it off.
If the environment event does not require immediate power off and the
component is a centerplane support board (CSB), esmd attempts to reconfigure
the bus traffic to use only the other CSB and power the component off.
Where possible, if the environment event does not require immediate power off
and the component is any type of board other than a MaxCPU or CSB, esmd
notifies dsmd of the environment condition and dsmd sends an "orderly
shutdown" request to the domain. The domain flushes uncommitted memory
buffers to physical storage.
If the software is still running and a viable domain configuration remains after the
affected hardware is removed, dsmd will attempt to recover the domain.
If either of the last two options takes longer than the allotted time for the given
environmental condition, esmd immediately powers off the component regardless of
the state of the domain software.
SMS illuminates the fault indicator LED on any hot-pluggable unit that can be
identified as the cause of an environmental event.
So long as the environmental event response actions do not include shutdown of the
system controller(s), all domain(s) whose software operations were terminated by an
environmental event or the ensuing response actions are subject to ASR reboot as
soon as possible.
ASR reboot begins immediately if there is a bootable set of hardware that can be
operated in accordance with constraints imposed by the Sun Fire 15K/12K system to
assure safe and correct operation.
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Note – Loss of system controller operation (for example, by the requirement to
power both SCs down) eliminates all possibility of Sun Fire 15K/12K platform selfrecovery actions being taken. In this situation, some recovery actions can require
human intervention. So although an external monitoring agent may not be able to
recover the Sun Fire 15K/12K platform operation, that monitoring agent may serve
an important role in notifying an administrator about the Sun Fire 15K/12K
platform shutdown.
The following sections provide a little more detail about each type of environmental
event that can occur on the Sun Fire 15K/12K system.
Over-Temperature Events
esmd monitors temperature measurements from Sun Fire 15K/12K hardware for
values that are too high. There is a critical temperature threshold that, if exceeded, is
handled as quickly as possible by powering off the affected hardware. High, but not
critical, temperatures are handled by attempting slower recovery actions such as a
graceful shutdown or DR for the MCPU boards.
Power Failure Events
There is very little opportunity to do anything when a full power failure occurs. The
entire platform, domains as well as SCs, are shut off when the plug is pulled without
the benefit of a graceful shut down. The ultimate recovery action occurs when power
is restored (see “Power-On Self-Test (POST)” on page 121).
Out-of-Range Voltage Events
Sun Fire 15K/12K power voltages are monitored to detect out-of-range events. The
handling of out-of-range voltages follows the general principles outlined at the
beginning of “Environmental Events” on page 186.
Under-Power Events
In addition to checking for adequate power before powering on any boards, as
mentioned in “Power Control” on page 128, the failure of a power supply could
leave the server inadequately powered. The system is equipped with power supply
redundancy in the event of failure. esmd does not take any action (other than
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logging) in response to a bulk power supply hardware failure. The handling of
under power events follows the general principles outlined at the beginning of
“Environmental Events” on page 186.
Fan Failure Events
esmd monitors fans for continuing operation. Should a fan fail, a fan failure event
occurs. The handling of fan-failures follows the general principles outlined at the
beginning of “Environmental Events” on page 186.
Clock Failure Events
esmd monitors clocks for continuing operation. Should a clock fail, esmd logs a
message every 10 minutes. It also turns on manual override so the clock selector on
that board never automatically starts using that clock. If the clock returns to good
status, esmd turns off manual override and logs a message.
When phase lock is lost esmd turns on manual override on all the boards and logs
one message. When phase lock is back, esmd turns off manual override on all the
boards and logs a message.
Hardware Error Events
As described in “Hardware Error Status” on page 151, the occurrence of Sun Fire
15K/12K hardware errors is recognized at the SC by more than one mechanism. Of
the errors that are directly visible to the SC, some are reported directly by PCI
interrupt to the UltraSPARC IIi processor on the SC, and others are detected only
through monitoring of the Sun Fire 15K/12K hardware registers.
There are other hardware errors that are detected by the processors running in a
domain. Domain software running in the domain detects the occurrence of those
errors in the domain, which then reports the error to the SC. Like the mechanism by
which the SC becomes aware of the occurrence of a hardware error, the error state
retained by the hardware after a hardware error is dependent upon the specific error.
dsmd performs the following functions:
■
■
■
Implements the mechanisms necessary to detect all SC-visible hardware errors.
Implements domain software interfaces to accept reports of domain-detected
hardware errors.
Collects hardware error data and clears the error state.
Chapter 10
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189
■
■
Logs the hardware error and related information as required, to the platform
message log.
Logs the hardware error to the domain message log file for all affected domain(s).
If data collected in response to a hardware error is not suitable for inclusion in a log
file, the data can be saved in uniquely named file(s) in
/var/opt/SUNWSMS/adm/domain_id/dump on the SC.
SMS illuminates the fault indicator LED on any hot-pluggable unit that can be
identified as the cause of a hardware error.
The actions taken in response to hardware errors (other than collecting and logging
information as described above) are twofold. First, it may be possible to eliminate
the further occurrence of certain types of hardware errors by eliminating from use
the hardware identified to be at fault.
Second, all domains that crashed either as a result of a hardware error or were shut
down as a consequence of the first type of action are subject to ASR reboot actions.
Note – Even in the absence of actions to remove from use hardware identified to be
at fault, the ASR reboot actions are subject to full POST verification. POST eliminates
any hardware components that fail testing from the hardware configuration.
In response to each detected hardware error and each domain-software-reported
hardware error, dsmd undertakes corrective actions. ASR reboot with full POST
verification is initiated for each domain brought down by a hardware error or
subsequent actions taken in response to that error.
Note – Problems with the ASR reboot of a domain after a hardware error are
detected as domain boot failure events and subject to the recovery actions described
in “Domain Boot Failure” on page 181.
dsmd logs all significant actions, such as those beyond logging information or
updating user displays taken in response to a hardware error in the platform log file.
When a hardware error affects one or more domains, dsmd logs the significant
response actions in the message log files of the affected domain(s).
The following sections summarize the types of hardware errors expected to be
detected and handled on the Sun Fire 15K/12K system.
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Domain Stop Events
Domain stops are uncorrectable hardware errors that immediately terminate the
affected domain(s). Hardware state dumps are taken before dsmd initiates an ASR
reboot of the affected domain(s). These files are located in
/var/opt/SUNWSMS/adm/domain_id/dump
dsmd logs the event in the domain log file.
CPU-Detected Events
A RED_state or Watchdog reset traps to low-level domain software (OpenBoot
PROM or kadb), which reports the error and requests initiation of ASR reboot of
the domain.
An XIR signal (reset -x) also traps to low-level domain software (OpenBoot
PROM or kadb), which retains control of the software. The domain must be
rebooted manually.
Record Stop Events
Correctable data transmission errors (for example, CE ECC errors) can stop the
normal transaction history recording feature of Sun Fire 15K/12K ASICs. SMS
reports a transmission error as a record stop. SMS dumps the transaction history
buffers of the Sun Fire 15K/12K ASICs and re-enables transaction history recording
when a record stop is handled. dsmd records record stops in the domain log file.
Other ASIC Failure Events
ASIC-detected hardware failures other than domain stop or record stop include
console bus errors which may or may not impact a domain. The hardware itself does
not abort any domain but the domain software might not survive the impact of the
hardware failure and may panic or hang. dsmd logs the event in the domain log file.
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191
SC Failure Events
SMS monitors the main SC hardware and running software status as well as the
hardware and running software of the spare SC, if present. In a high-availability SC
configuration, SMS handles failures of the hardware or software on the main SC or
failures detected in the hardware control paths (for example, console bus, or internal
network connections) to the main SC by an automatic SC failover process. This cedes
main responsibilities to the spare SC and leaves the former main SC as a (possibly
crippled) spare.
SMS monitors the hardware of the main and spare SCs for failures.
SMS logs the hardware failure and related information to the platform message log.
SMS illuminates the fault indicator LED on a system controller with an identified
hardware failure.
For more information, see “SC Failover” on page 155.
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CHAPTER
11
SMS Utilities
This section discusses the SMS backup, configuration, restore, and version utilities.
For information and examples of these utilities, refer to the System Management
Services (SMS) 1.3 Reference Manual and online man pages.
This chapter includes the following sections:
■
■
■
■
SMS
SMS
SMS
SMS
Backup Utility
Restore Utility
Version Utility
Configuration Utility
SMS Backup Utility
smsbackup creates a cpio(1) archive of files that maintain the operational
environment of SMS.
Note – This utility runs on the SC and does not replace the need for routine and
timely backups of SC and domain operating systems; and domain application data.
Whenever changes are made to the SMS environment, for example, by adding
boards to or removing boards from a domain, you must run smsbackup again in
order to maintain a current backup file for the system controller.
The name of the backup file is smsbackup.X.X.cpio - where X.X represents the
active version from which the backup was taken.
smsbackup saves all configuration, platform configuration database, SMS, and log
files. In other words, SMS saves everything needed to return SMS to the working
state it was in at the time the backup was made.
193
Backups are not performed automatically. Whenever changes are made to the SMS
environment, a backup should be performed. This process can be automated by
making it part of root cron job run at periodic intervals depending on your site
requirements.
The backup log file resides in /var/sadm/system/logs/smsbackup. You must
specify the target location when running smsbackup.
Note – The target location must be a valid UFS file system directory. You cannot
perform smsbackup to a tmp file system directory.
Whenever you run smsbackup, you receive confirmation that it succeeded or be
notified that it failed.
You must have superuser privileges to run smsbackup. For more information and
examples, refer to the smsbackup man page.
Restore SMS backup files using the smsrestore(1M) command.
SMS Restore Utility
smsrestore restores the operational environment of the SMS from a backup file
created by smsbackup(1M). You can use smsrestore to restore the SMS
environment after the SMS software has been installed on a new disk or after
hardware replacement or addition. Failover should be disabled and SMS stopped
before smsrestore is performed. Refer to the “Stopping and Starting SMS” section
of the System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Installation Guide.
If any errors occur, smsrestore writes error messages to
/var/sadm/system/logs/smsrestore.
Note – This utility runs on the SC and does not restore SC operating system,
domain operating system or domain application data.
smsrestore cannot restore what you have not backed up. Whenever changes are
made to the SMS environment, for example, by shutting down a domain, you must
run smsbackup in order to maintain a current backup file for the system controller.
You must have superuser privileges to run smsrestore. For more information and
examples, refer to the smsrestore man page.
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SMS Version Utility
smsversion(1M) administers adjacent, co-resident installations of SMS under the
same operating environment. Adjacent meaning you can use smsversion to switch
between version SMS1.1 and SMS1.2 or SMS 1.2 and SMS 1.3 (assuming all are
installed), but you cannot use smsversion to switch between SMS1.1 and SMS 1.3.
When you switch between sequential releases of SMS (for example, 1.3 to 1.2), SMS
must be stopped before running smsversion. Refer to “Stopping and Starting SMS”
in the System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Installation Guide. smsversion backs up
important system and domain information and switches to the target SMS version.
You can switch back to the next sequential SMS version (for example, 1.2 to 1.3) at a
later time. smsversion permits two-way SMS version-switching between
sequential co-resident installations on the same operating environment but with the
following understanding:
Condition
Explanation
New features
The features supported in the newer version of SMS
may not be supported in the older version, for
example COD. Switching to an older version of SMS
can result in the loss of those features. Also, the
settings for the new features might be erased.
Flash PROM differences
Switching versions of SMS requires reflashing the
CPU flash PROMs with the correct files. These files
can be found in the
/opt/SUNWSMS/<SMS_version>/firmware
directory. Use flashupdate(1M) to reflash the
PROMs after you have switched versions. Refer to
the flashupdate man page and System Management
Services (SMS) 1.3 Installation Guide for more
information on updating flash PROMs.
Note – Switching between non-sequential releases is not supported. Switching
between sequential SMS versions across Solaris operating environments (for
example, Solaris 8 and Solaris 9) is not supported. Once you upgrade from Solaris 8:
SMS 1.1, SMS 1.2 or SMS 1.3 to Solaris 9: SMS 1.3 you cannot go back without also
re-installing the earlier operating system version.
Without options, smsversion displays the active version and exits when only one
version of SMS is installed.
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If any errors occur, smsversion writes error messages to
/var/sadm/system/logs/smsversion.
You must have superuser privileges to run smsversion. For more information and
examples, refer to the smsversion man page.
Version Switching
▼ To Switch Between Two Adjacent, Co-resident Installations
of SMS
On the Main SC:
1. Make certain your configuration is stable and backed up using smsbackup.
Being stable means the following commands should not be running: smsconfig,
poweron, poweroff, setkeyswitch, cfgadm, rcfgadm, addtag, deletetag,
addboard, moveboard, deleteboard, setbus, setdefaults, setobpparams,
setupplatform, enablecomponent, or disablecomponent.
2. Deactivate failover using setfailover off.
On the Spare SC:
3. Run /etc/init.d/sms stop.
4. Run smsversion.
5. Run smsrestore.
6. If necessary, run smsconfig -mand reboot.
Only run smsconfig -m if you changed your network configuration using
smsconfig -m after creating the smsbackup you just restored.
On the Main SC:
7. Stop SMS using /etc/init.d/sms stop.
On the Spare SC:
8. Ifsmsconfig -m was run, reboot otherwise run /etc/init.d/sms start.
When the SC comes up, it becomes the main SC.
9. If necessary, update the CPU flash PROMs using flashupdate.
On the Former Main SC:
1. Repeat steps 4-6 and 8.
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On the New Main SC:
1. Activate failover using setfailover on.
For more information refer to the System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Installation
Guide.
SMS Configuration Utility
smsconfig configures the MAN networks, modifies the hostname and IP address
settings used by the MAN daemon, mand(1M) and administers domain directories
access control lists (ACLs).
UNIX Groups
smsconfig configures the UNIX groups used by SMS to describe user privileges.
SMS uses a default set of UNIX groups installed locally on each SC. smsconfig
allows you to customize those groups using the -g option. smsconfig allows you
to add users to groups using the -a option and remove users from groups using the
-r option.
For information and examples on adding, removing, and listing authorized users,
refer to the System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Installation Guide and the
smsconfig(1M) man page.
Access Control List (ACL)
Traditional UNIX file protection provides read, write, and execute permissions for
the three user classes: file owner, file group, and other. In order to provide protection
and isolation of domain information, access to each domain’s data is denied to all
unauthorized users. SMS daemons, however, are considered authorized users and
will have full access to the domain file systems. For example:
■
■
■
sms-esmd—needs to read the blacklist files in each domain directory
$SMSETC/config/[A-R]
sms-osd—needs to read from and write to the bootparamdata file in each
domain: $SMSVAR/data/[A-R]
sms-dsmd—needs to write to hpost logs for every domain
$SMSVAR/adm/[A-R]/post
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smsconfig sets the ACL entries associated with the domain directories so that the
domain administrator has full access to the domain. A plus sign (+) to the right of
the mode field indicates the directories that have ACL defined.
domain_id:sms-user:> ls -al
total 6
drwxrwxrwx
2 root
bin
drwxrwxr-x 23 root
bin
-rw-rw-r--+ 1 root
bin
512 May 10 12:29 .
1024 May 10 12:29 ..
312 May 4 16:15 blacklist
To add a user account to the ACL, the user must already belong to a valid SMS
group as described in the System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Installation Guide.
Note – UFS file system attributes, such as the ACL, are supported in UFS file
systems only. If you restore or copy directories with ACL entries into the /tmp
directory, all ACL entries will be lost. Use the /var/tmp directory for temporary
storage of UFS files and directories.
Network Configuration
For each network, smsconfig can singularly set one or more interface designations
within that network. By default, smsconfig steps through the configuration of all
three internal, enterprise networks.
To configure an individual network, append the net_id to the command line.
Management networks net_ids are designated I1, I2, and C.
Configure a single domain within an enterprise network by specifying both the
desired domain and its net_id. A domain can be excluded from the I1 management
network by using the word NONE as the MAN hostname.
Note – Once you have configured or changed the configuration of the MAN
network you must reboot the SC in order for the changes to take effect.
You must have superuser privileges to run smsconfig. For more information and
examples, refer to the System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Installation Guide,
smsconfig man page and see “Management Network Services” on page 141.
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System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
MAN Configuration
smsconfig -m does the following:
1. Creates /etc/hostname.scman[01].
2. Creates /etc/hostname.hme0 and/or /etc/hostname.eri1 according to
inputs to the External Network(s) prompts of smsconfig.
3. Updates /etc/netmasks and /etc/hosts.
4. Sets OpenBoot PROM variable local-mac-address?=true (default is false).
For more information on smsconfig refer to the smsconfig(1M) man page and see
“Management Network Services” on page 141.
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APPENDIX
A
SMS man Pages
The SMS man pages are in the System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Reference
Manual portion of your Sun Fire 15K/12K system documentation set as well as
online (after you have installed the SMS packages.)
The following is a list of SMS man pages:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
addboard(1M) - Assigns, connects, and configures a board to a domain.
addcodlicense(1M) - Adds a Capacity on Demand (COD) right-to-use (RTU)
license key to the COD license database.
addtag(1M) - Assigns a domain name (tag) to a domain.
cancelcmdsync(1M) - Removes a command synchronization descriptor from the
command synchronization list.
codd(1M)- Capacity on Demand daemon.
console(1M) - Access the domain console.
dca(1M) - Domain configuration agent.
deleteboard(1M) - Unconfigures, disconnects, and unassigns a system board
from a domain.
deletecodlicense(1M) - Removes a COD RTU license key from the COD
license database.
deletetag(1M) - Removes the domain name (tag) associated with the domain.
disablecomponent(1M) - Adds the specified component from the ASR blacklist.
dsmd(1M) - Domain status monitoring daemon.
dxs(1M) - Domain X server.
enablecomponent(1M) - Removes the specified component from the ASR
blacklist.
esmd(1M) - Environmental status monitoring daemon.
flashupdate(1M) - Update system board FROMs.
fomd(1M) - Failover management daemon.
frad(1M) - FRU access daemon.
help(1M) - Displays help information for SMS commands.
hpost(1M) - Sun Fire 15K/12K power-on self test (POST) control application.
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■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
202
hwad(1M) - Hardware access daemon.
initcmdsync(1M) - Creates a command synchronization descriptor that
identifies the script to be recovered.
kmd(1M) - Key management daemon.
mand(1M)- Management network daemon.
mld(1M) - Message logging daemon.
moveboard(1M) - Moves a system board from one domain to another.
osd(1M) - OpenBoot PROM server daemon.
pcd(1M) - Platform configuration database daemon.
poweroff(1M) - Controls power off.
poweron(1M) - Controls power on.
rcfgadm(1M) - Remote configuration administration.
reset(1M) - Sends reset to all ports (CPU or I/O) of a specified domain.
resetsc(1M) - Sends reset to the spare SC.
runcmdsync(1M) - Prepares a specified script for recovery after a failover.
savecmdsync(1M) - Adds a marker that identifies a location in the script from
which processing can be resumed after a failover.
setbus(1M) - Performs dynamic bus reconfiguration on active expanders in a
domain.
setdatasync(1M) - Modifies the data propagation list used in data
synchronization.
setdate(1M) - Sets the date and time for the system controller or a domain.
setdefaults(1M) - Removes all instances of a previously active domain.
setfailover(1M) - Modifies the state of the SC failover mechanism.
setkeyswitch(1M) - Changes the position of the virtual keyswitch.
setobpparams(1M) - Sets up OpenBoot PROM variables.
setupplatform(1M) - Sets up the available component list for domains.
showboards(1M) - Shows the assignment information and status of the system
boards.
showbus(1M) - Displays the bus configuration of expanders in active domains.
showcmdsync(1M) - Displays the current command synchronization list.
showcodlicense(1M) - Displays the current COD RTU licenses stored in the
COD license database.
showcodusage(1M) - Displays the current usage statistics for COD resources.
showcomponent(1M) - Displays ASR blacklist status for a component.
showdatasync(1M) - Displays the status of SMS data synchronization for
failover.
showdate(1M) - Displays the date and time for the system controller or a
domain.
showdevices(1M) - Displays system board devices and resource usage
information.
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
showenvironment(1M) - Displays the environmental data.
showfailover(1M) - Displays SC failover status or role.
showkeyswitch(1M) - Displays the position of the virtual key switch.
showlogs(1M) - Displays message log files.
showobpparams(1M) - Displays OpenBoot PROM bringup parameters.
showplatform(1M) - Displays the board available component list for domains.
showxirstate(1M) - Displays cpu dump information after sending a reset pulse
to the processors.
smsbackup(1M) - Backs up the SMS environment.
smsconfig(1M) - Configures the SMS environment.
smsconnectsc(1M) - Access a remote SC console.
smsrestore(1M) - Restores the SMS environment.
smsversion(1M) - Displays the active version of SMS software.
ssd(1M) - SMS startup daemon.
tmd(1M) - Task management daemon.
wcapp(1M) - wPCI application daemon.
Appendix A
SMS man Pages
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APPENDIX
B
Error Messages
This section discusses user-visible error messages for SMS. The types of errors and
the numerical ranges are listed. To view individual errors, you must install the
SMSHelp software package (SUNWSMSjh). This section contains installation
instructions for SUNWSMSjh, if it was not already been installed during the SMS
software installation.
Each error in SMSHelp contains the error ID, the text of the message, the meaning of
the message, references for further information in the System Management Services
(SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guideif applicable, and recovery action to take or suggested
steps for further analysis.
This chapter includes the following sections:
■
■
■
Installing smshelp
Types of Errors
Error Categories
Installing smshelp
This section explains how to manually install the SUNWSMSjh package using the
standard installation utility, pkgadd.
▼
To Install theSUNWSMSjh Package
1. Log in to the SC as superuser.
205
2. Load the SUNWSMSjh package on the server:
# pkgadd -d . SUNWSMSjh
The software briefly displays copyright, trademark, and license information for each
package. Then it displays messages about pkgadd(1M) actions taken to install the
package, including a list of the files and directories being installed. Depending on
your configuration, the following messages may be displayed:
This package contains scripts which will be executed
with superuser permission during the process of installing this
package.
Do you want to continue with the installation of this
package [y,n,?]
3. Type y at each successive prompt to continue.
When this portion of the installation is complete, the SUNWSMSjh package has been
installed and the superuser prompt is displayed.
4. Remove the Sun Computer Systems Supplements CD from the CD-ROM drive, if
applicable:
# cd /
# eject cdrom
5. Log out as superuser.
▼
To Start smshelp
1. Log in to the SC as a user with platform or domain group privileges.
2. In any terminal window, type:
sc0:sms-user:> smshelp &
The smshelp browser appears. You can resize the panes if necessary, by placing your
cursor to the right of the vertical scroll bar, pressing the left mouse button, and
dragging the cursor to the right.
206
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
3. Choose an error message.
Error messages are recorded in the platform and domain logs.
The message format follows the syslog(3) convention: (relevant parts of the
message are in bold)
timestamp host process_name [pid]: [message_code
hight_res_timestamp level source_code_file_name
source_code_line_num] message_text
For example:
Feb 2 18:36:14 2002 xc17-sc0 dsmd[117469]-B(): [2517
16955334989087 WARNING EventHandler.cc 121] Record stop has been
detected in domain B.
Using the message_code, you can either do a quick search using the magnifying
glass at the top of the browser or you can scroll through the Table of Contents.
To do a quick search, click on the magnifying glass and enter the error message
number and press Return as shown in the follow example.
Appendix B
Error Messages
207
4. To scroll the Table of Contents, left click on the message folder containing your
error message, in this case DSMD Error Messages, 2500 through 2599, then left
click on error 2517 as shown in the following example.
208
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Appendix B
Error Messages
209
Types of Errors
This section describes the six types of errors reflected in the error messages in
smshelp.
TABLE B-1
Error Types
Error
Description
EMERG
Panic conditions that would normally be broadcast to all users.
ALERT
Conditions that should be corrected immediately, such as a corrupted
system database.
CRIT
Warnings about critical conditions, such as hard device failures.
ERROR
All other errors.
WARNING
Warning messages.
NOTICE
Conditions that are not error conditions but may require special
handling.
Error Categories
The following table shows the different error categories in SMS. Nonsequential
numbering is due to error messages reserved for internal or service use.
TABLE B-2
210
Error Categories
Error Numbers
Message Group
0-499
Reserved for DEBUG, INFO and POST messages
500-699
Reserved for SMS Foundation Library messages
700-899
Reserved for SMS Application Framework messages
900-1099
Reserved for SMSEvent IF Library messages
1100-1299
Reserved for HWAD daemon and library messages
1300-1499
Reserved for ssd messages
1500-1699
Reserved for flashupdate messages
1700-1899
Reserved for pcd messages
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
TABLE B-2
Error Categories (Continued)
Error Numbers
Message Group
1900-2099
Reserved for esmd messages
2500-2699
Reserved for dsmd messages
2700-2899
Reserved for addtag messages
2900-3099
Reserved for deletetag messages
3100-3299
Reserved for Permissions messages
3300-3499
Reserved for domain_tag messages
3500-3699
Reserved for addboard messages
3700-3899
Reserved for tmd messages
4100-4299
Reserved for showkeyswitch messages
4300-4499
Reserved for dca messages
4500-4699
Reserved for libscdr plugin messages
4700-4899
Reserved for osd messages
4900-5099
Reserved for dxs messages
5100-5299
Reserved for deleteboard messages
5300-5499
Reserved for setkeyswitch messages
5500-5699
Reserved for libdrcmd messages
5700-5899
Reserved for moveboard messages
5900-6099
Reserved for setupplatform messages
6100-6299
Reserved for power command messages
6300-6499
Reserved for xir library messages
6500-6699
Reserved for showplatform messages
6700-6899
Reserved for help messages
6900-7099
Reserved for reset messages
7100-7299
Reserved for showboards messages
7300-7499
Reserved for libshowboards messages
7500-7699
Reserved for autolock messages
7700-7899
Reserved for mand messages
7900-8099
Reserved for showenvironment messages
8100-8299
Reserved for resetsc messages
8300-8499
Reserved for dynamic bus reconfiguration messages
Appendix B
Error Messages
211
TABLE B-2
212
Error Categories (Continued)
Error Numbers
Message Group
8500-8699
Reserved for fomd messages
8700-8899
Reserved for kmd messages
8900-9099
Reserved for setdefaults messages
9100-9299
Reserved for mld messages
9300-9499
Reserved for showdevices messages
9500-9699
Reserved for showxirstate messages
9700-9899
Reserved for COD messages
9900-10000
Reserved for frad messages
10100-10299
Reserved for fruevent messages
10300-10499
Reserved for smsconnectsc messages
10700-10899
Reserved for EFE messages
11100-11299
Reserved for rcfgadm messages
11300-11499
Reserved for datasync messages
50000-50099
Reserved for SMS generic messages
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Glossary
A
ACL
access control list
(ACL)
active board
active board list
active domain
ADR
application specific
integrated circuit
(ASIC)
arbitration stop
ASIC
See access control list (ACL).
Access control list (ACL) provides greater control over file and folder
permissions. ACL enables you to define file or folder permissions for the
owner, owner’s group, others, and specific users and groups, and default
permissions for each of these categories.
A board is considered active when it is in the connected/unconfigured
state.
List of components that are in use in a domain. The pcd(1M) keeps the state of
this list.
A domain running operating system (OS) software.
See Automated dynamic reconfiguration (ADR).
In the Sun Fire systems, any of the large main chips in the design, including
the UltraSPARC processor and data buffer chips.
A condition that occurs when one of the Sun Fire 15K/12K system ASICs
detects a parity error or equivalent fatal system error. Bus arbitration is frozen,
so all bus activity stops.
See application specific integrated circuit (ASIC).
Glossary-213
assigned board list
ASR
auto-failover
Automated dynamic
reconfiguration
(ADR)
automatic system
recovery (ASR)
available component
list
AXQ
List of components that have been assigned to a domain by a domain
administrator/configurator privileged user. The pcd(1M) keeps the state of
this list.
Automatic System Recovery.
The process by which the SMS daemon, fomd, automatically switches SC
control from the main SC to the spare in the event of hardware or software
failure on the main.
The dynamic reconfiguration of system boards accomplished through
commands that can be used to automatically assign/unassign,
connect/disconnect and configure/unconfigure boards, and obtain
board status information. You can run these commands interactively or in shell
scripts.
Procedures that restore the system to running all properly configured domains
after one or more domains have been rendered inactive due to software or
hardware failures or due to unacceptable environmental conditions
List of available components that can be assigned to a domain by a domain
administrator/configurator privileged user. The pcd(1M) keeps the state of
this list. setupplatform(1M) updates it.
An ASIC in the Sun Fire 15K/12K system that is on the expander board.
B
BBC
BBSRAM
Glossary-214
Bootbus controller. An ASIC used on the CPU & I/O boards (also system
controller boards), that connects the Bootbus to the PROM bus and the console
bus.
See bootbus SRAM (BBSRAM).
blacklist
A text file that hpost(1M) reads when it starts up. The blacklist file specifies
the Sun Fire system components that are not to be used or configured into the
system. Platform and domain blacklist files can be edited using the
enablecomponent and disablecomponent commands. The ASR blacklist is
created and edited by esmd.
bootbus
A slow-speed, byte-wide bus controlled by the processor port controller ASICs,
used for running diagnostics and boot code. UltraSPARC starts running code
from bootbus when it exits reset. In the Sun Fire 15K/12K system, the only
component on the bootbus is the BBSRAM.
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
bootbus SRAM
(BBSRAM)
A 256-Kbyte static RAM attached to each processor PC ASIC. Through the PC,
it can be accessed for reading and writing from JTAG or the processor. Bootbus
SRAM is downloaded at various times with hpost(1M) and OpenBoot PROM
startup code, and provides shared data between the downloaded code and the
SC.
C
Capacity on Demand
cacheable address slice
map (CASM)
CASM
checkpoint data
CLI
cluster
community
community name
CMR
cmdsync
CPU
Capacity on Demand (COD) is an option that provides additional processing
resources (CPUs) when you need them. These additional CPUs are provided
on COD CPU/Memory boards that are installed on Sun Fire 15K/12K systems.
You can access the COD CPUs after you purchase the COD right-to-use (RTU)
licenses for them.
A table in the AXQ that directs cacheable addresses to the correct expander.
See cacheable address slice map (CASM).
A copy of the state an SC client is in at a specific execution point that is
periodically saved to disk.
Command-line interface.
A cooperative collection of interconnected computer systems, each running a
separate OS image, utilized as a single, unified computing resource.
An IP network at a customer site that is physically separate from any other
networks.
A string identifier that names a particular community. In the context of
External Network Monitoring for Sun Fire 15K/12K system, it is used as the
interface group name. See interface group name.
Coherent Memory Replication.
Command synchronization. Commands that work together to control recovery
during SC failover. For example, cancelcmdsync, initcmdsync, and
savecmdsync.
Central processing unit.
Glossary-215
D
DARB
DARB interrupt
DCU
An ASIC on the Sun Fire 15K/12K centerplane that handles data arbitration.
An interrupt of the SC processor initiated by a signal from either or both DARB
ASIC on the Sun Fire 15K/12K centerplane. DARB asserts this interrupt signal
in response to three kinds of events: Dstops, Recordstops, and non-error
requests for attention initiated by domain processors writing to a system
register in the AXQ ASIC.
See domain configuration unit (DCU).
DHCP
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol.
DIMM
See dual in-line memory module (DIMM).
dstop
See domain stop.
disk array
A collection of disks within a hardware peripheral. The disk array provides
access to each of its housed disks through one or two Fibre Channel modules.
disk array controller
A controller that resides on the host system and has one or two Fibre Channel
modules.
disk array port
A Fibre Channel module that can be connected to a disk array controller that is
serviced by a driver pair; for example, soc/pln for SSAs.
domain
A set of one or more system boards that acts as a separate system capable of
booting the OS and running independently of any other domains. A machine
environment capable of running its own OS. There are up to eighteen domains
available on the Sun Fire 15K/12K system. Domains that share a system are
characteristically independent of each other.
domain configuration
unit (DCU)
domain_id
A unit of hardware that can be assigned to a single domain. Domains are
configured from DCUs. CPU/Memory, PCI I/O, hsPCI I/O, and hsPCI+ I/O
are DCUs. csb, exb boards, and the SC are not.
Domain ID of a domain.
domain_tag
Domain name assigned using addtag (1M).
domain stop
An uncorrectable hardware error that immediately terminates the affected
domain.
DR
DRAM
Glossary-216
See dynamic reconfiguration (DR).
See dynamic RAM(DRAM).
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
drift file
DSD
dual in-line memory
module (DIMM)
dynamic
reconfiguration (DR)
dynamic
RAM(DRAM)
The name of the file used to record the drift (or frequency error) value
computed by xntpd. The most common name is ntp.drift.
Dynamic System Domain. See Domain.
A small printed circuit card containing memory chips and some support logic.
Enables you to logically attach and detach system boards to and from the
operating system without causing machine downtime. DR is used in
conjunction with hot-swap, which is the process of physically removing or
inserting a system board. You can use DR to add a new system board, reinstall
a repaired system board, or modify the domain configuration on the Sun Fire
system.
Hardware memory chips that require periodic rewriting to retain their
contents. This process is called “refresh”. In the Sun Fire 15K/12K system,
DRAM is used only on main memory SIMMs and on the control boards.
E
ECC
Ecache
EEPROM
Environmental
Monitoring
Ethernet address
external cache
(Ecache)
external network
Error Correction Code.
See external cache (Ecache).
Electrically Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory.
Systems have a large number of sensors that monitor temperature, voltage, and
current. The SC daemons esmd and dsmd poll devices in a timely manner and
makes the environmental data available. The SC shuts down various
components to prevent damage.
A unique number assigned to each Ethernet network adapter. It is a 48-bit
number maintained by the IEEE. Hardware vendors obtain blocks of numbers
that they can build into their cards. See also, MAC address.
8Mbyte synchronous static RAM second-level cache local to each processor
module. Used for both code and data. This is a direct-mapped cache.
A network that requires a physical cable to connect a node to the network. In
the context of the Sun Fire 15K/12K system, it is the set of networks connected
to the RJ45 jacks located on the front of each Sun Fire 15K/12K system. See
external network interface.
Glossary-217
external network
interface
One of the RJ45 jacks located on the front of each Sun Fire 15K/12K System
Controller.
F
Fibre Channel
module
Fireplane
FPROM
FRU
An optical link connection (OLC) module on a disk array controller that can be
connected to a disk array port.
Centerplane in the Sun Fire 15K/12K system.
Flash programmable read-only memory.
Field replaceable unit.
G
GDCD
global domain
configuration descriptor
(GDCD)
GUI
See global domain configuration descriptor (GDCD).
The description of the single configuration that hpost(1M) chooses. It is part
of the structure handed off to OpenBoot PROM.
Graphical user interface.
H
HA
HASRAM
High availability SRAM.
headroom
See instant access CPUs.
heartbeat interrupt
Glossary-218
High availability.
Interruption of the normal Solaris operating environment indicator, readable
from the SC. Absence of heartbeat updates for a running Solaris system usually
indicates a Solaris hang.
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
hpost
Host POST is the POST code that is executed by the SC. Typically this code is
sourced from the SC local disk.
HPCI
Hot-pluggable PCI I/O assembly.
HPU
HsPCI
Hot-Pluggable Unit. A hardware component that can be isolated from a
running system such that it can be cleanly removed from the system or added
to the system without damaging any hardware or software.
See HPCI.
I
I1 Network
I2C
There are 18 network interfaces (NICs) on each SC. These are connected in a
point-to-point fashion to NICs located on each of the Sun Fire 15K 18 expander
I/O slots or nine are connected on each of the Sun Fire 12K nine expander I/O
slots. All of these point-to-point links are collectively called the I1 network.
Inter-IC Bus. This two-wire bus is used throughout various systems to run
LEDs, set system clock resources, read thermcal information, and so on.
I2 Network
There is an internal network between the two system controllers consisting of
two NICs per system controller. This network is called the I2 network. It is not
a private network and is entirely separate from the I1 network.
IDPROM
Identification PROM. Contains information specific to the Sun Fire 15K/12K
internal machine, such as machine type, manufacturing date, Ethernet address,
serial number and host ID.
instant access CPUs
Unlicensed COD CPUs on COD CPU/Memory boards installed in Sun Fire
15K/12K systems. You can access up to a maximum of eight COD CPUs for
immediate use while you are purchasing the COD right-to-use (RTU) licenses
for the COD CPUs. Also referred to as headroom.
interface group
interface group name
A group of network interfaces that attach to the same community.
A string identifier that names a particular interface group. In the context of
External Network Monitoring for Sun Fire 15K/12K system, it is the name
associated with a particular community.
ioctl
A control device. This function performs a variety of control functions on
devices and STREAMS. For non-STREAMS, the functions performed by this
call are device-specific control functions.
IP link
A communication medium over which nodes communicate at the link layer.
The link layer is the layer immediately below IPv4/IPv6. Examples include
Ethernets (simple or bridged) or ATM networks.
Glossary-219
IPv4
Internet Protocol version 4.
IPv6
Internet Protocol version 6. IPv6 increases the address space from 32 to 128
bits. It is backwards compatible with IPv4.
IOSRAM
IPMP
Input-Output Static Random-Access Memory.
IP Network Multipathing. Solaris software that provides load spreading and
failover for multiple network interface cards connected to the same IP link, for
example, Ethernet.
J
JTAG
JTAG+
A serial scan interface specified by IEEE standard 1149.1. The name comes from
Joint Test Action Group, which initially designed it.
An extension of JTAG, developed by Sun Microsystems Inc., which adds a
control line to signal that board and ring addresses are being shifted on the
serial data line. Often referred to simply as JTAG.
K
kadb
kadb is an interactive kernel debugger with a user interface. For more
information refer to the kadb(1M) Solaris man page.
L
LCD
Liquid crystal display.
LED
Light emitting diode.
M
MAC address
Glossary-220
Worldwide unique serial number assigned to a network interface. IEEE
controls the distribution of MAC addresses. See also Ethernet address.
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
mailbox
MAN
MaxCPU
Mbox
MIB
metadisk
metanetwork
See Mbox.
SMS Management Network.
Dual CPU board.
Message passing mechanism between SMS software on the SC and OpenBoot
PROM and the Solaris operating environment on the domain.
Management Information Base.
A disk abstraction that provides access to an underlying group of two physical
paths to a disk.
A network abstraction that provides access to an underlying group of two
physical paths to a network.
N
network interface card
(NIC)
network time protocol
(NTP)
NIC
NIS+
no-domain
NTP
Network adapter which is either internal or a separate card that serves as an
interface to an IP link.
Network Time Protocol. Supports synchronization of Solaris time with the time
service provided by a remote host.
See network interface card (NIC).
Network Information Service Plus. A secure, hierarchical network naming
service.
Describes the state of a board (DCU) that is not assigned to any domain.
See network time protocol (NTP).
O
OBP
OpenBoot PROM
OS
See OpenBoot PROM.
A layer of software that takes control of the configured Sun Fire 15K/12K
system from hpost(1M), builds some data structures in memory, and boots the
operating system. IEEE 1275-compliant OpenBoot PROM.
Operating system.
Glossary-221
OSR
Operating system resource.
P
path group
physical path
platform
POR
POST
power-on self-test
(POST)
PROM
A set of two alternate paths that provide access to the same device or set of
devices.
The electrical path from the host to a disk or network.
A single physical computer.
Power-on-reset.
See power-on self-test (POST).
A test performed by hpost(1M). This program takes uninitialized Sun Fire
15K/12K hardware and probes and tests its components, configures what
seems worthwhile into a coherent initialized system, and hands it off to
OpenBoot PROM. In the Sun Fire 15K/12K POST is implemented in a
hierarchical manner with the following components: lpost, spost, and
hpost.
Programmable Read Only Memory.
R
RAM
RARP
rstop
Record Stop
RPC
Random access memory.
Reverse Address Resolution Protocol.
See Record Stop.
A correctable data transmission error.
Remote procedure call.
S
SBBC
Glossary-222
See BBC.
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
SC
SEEPROM
System controller. The Nordica board that assists in monitoring or controlling
the system.
Serial EEPROM.
SMP
Symmetric multi-processor.
SMS
System Management Services software. The software that runs on the Sun Fire
15K/12K SC and provides control/monitoring functions for the Sun Fire
15K/12K platform.
SNMP
split-brain condition
SRAM
static RAM (SRAM)
System Board
Simple Network Management Protocol.
When both SCs think they are the main SC.
See static RAM (SRAM).
Memory chips that retain their contents as long as power is maintained.
For next-generation Sun Fire servers, there are five types of system boards,
four of which can be found in the Sun Fire 15K/12K system. The system
boards are the CPU/Memory board, the I/O board, the WCI board, the Sun
Fire 15K/12K PCI controller board, and the Sun Fire 15K/12K compact PCI
controller board.
T
TCP/IP
TOD
tunnel switch
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol.
Time of day.
The process of moving the SC/Domain communications tunnel from one IO
board to another in a domain. Typically occurring when a the IO board with
the tunnel is being dynamically reconfigured out.
U
URL
UltraSPARC
Uniform Resource Locator.
The UltraSPARC processor is the processor module used in the Sun Fire
15K/12K system.
Glossary-223
V
virtual keyswitch
The SC provides a virtual keyswitch for each domain which controls the
bringup process for each domain. The setkeyswitch(1M) command controls
the position of the virtual keyswitch for each domain. Possible positions are:
on, off, standby, diag, and secure.
W
wPCI
Sun Fire Link I/O assembly.
X
XIR
Glossary-224
eXternally Initiated Reset. Sends a “soft” reset to the CPU in a domain. It does
not reboot the domain. After receiving the reset, the CPU drops to the
OpenBoot PROM prompt.
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
Index
A
addboard, 63, 78
addcodlicense, 101
adding domains, 63, 78
addtag, 63
available component list, 61
B
blacklist
platform and domain, 122, 127
C
cancelcmdsync, 164
Capacity on Demand (COD), 97
Chassis HostID, 106, 114
instant access CPUs (headroom), 99
prerequisites, 100
resources
configuring, 104
CPU status, 110, 113
monitoring, 100, 107, 109
right-to-use (RTU) licenses, 98
allocation, 99
certificates, 98
keys, 101, 103
obtaining, 101
Chassis HostID, 106, 114
codd, 33
commands
addboard, 63, 78
addcodlicense, 101
addtag, 63
cancelcmdsync, 164
console, 7, 9, 141
deleteboard, 66, 80
deletecodlicense, 102
disablecomponent, 123
enablecomponent, 125
flashupdate, 77
initcmdsync, 164, 165
moveboard, 67, 82
poweroff, 117
poweron, 117
reset, 120
resetsc, 131
runcmdsync, 165
savecmdsync, 164
setbus, 95
setdate, 72
setdefaults, 68, 84
setfailover, 160
setkeyswitch, 87, 90, 94, 113
setobpparams, 90, 91
setupplatform, 61, 104
showboards, 69, 85, 146
showbus, 96
showcmdsync, 165, 166
showcodlicense, 103
showcodusage, 108
showdate, 72
showdevices, 86, 146
showenvironment, 146
225
showfailover, 161
showkeyswitch, 151
showlogs, 114, 176
showobpparams, 90, 147
showplatform, 70, 85, 114, 147
showxirstate, 149
smsbackup, 193
smsconfig, 197
smsconnectsc, 11
smsrestore, 194
smsversion, 195
console, 7, 9
control board, 5
D
daemons, 30
codd, 33
dca, 34
dsmd, 35
dxs, 36
esmd, 37
fomd, 38
frad, 39
hwad, 40
kmd, 42
man, 45
mld, 46
osd, 47
pcd, 48
ssd, 51
tmd, 54
dca, 34
DCU, 3, 4, 58, 59
assignment, 59
Degraded Configuration Preferences, 95
deleteboard, 66, 80
deletecodlicense, 102
disablecomponent, 123
domain configurable units
DCU, 3, 4
Domain Configuration Units, 58
domain configuration units, 59
domain console, 141
domains, 1
addtag, 63
226
console, 141
dsmd, 35
dual control boards, 5
dxs, 36
dynamic reconfiguration
global automatic, 60
dynamic system domains, 1
E
enablecomponent, 125
environment variables
SMSETC, 56
SMSLOGGER, 56
SMSOPT, 56
SMSVAR, 56
esmd, 37
F
files
ntp.conf, 74
fomd, 38
frad, 39
G
global automatic DR, 60
H
hwad, 40
I
initcmdsync, 164, 165
K
kmd, 42
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
L
logs
file maintenance, 176
information types, 177
log file management, 180
message, 142, 175
command line, 66, 67, 80, 82
reset, 120
resetsc, 131
runcmdsync, 165
S
M
man, 45
message logging, 142, 175
messages
logging, 142, 175
mld, 46
moveboard, 67, 82
N
naming domains
command line, 63
network interface card, 136
network time protocol daemon
configuring, 74
NIC, 136
ntpd
configuring, 74
NVRAM, 90
O
OBP See OpenBoot PROM
osd, 47
P
pcd, 48
poweroff, 117
poweron, 117
R
removing domains
savecmdsync, 164
setbus, 95
setdate, 72
setdefaults, 68, 84
setfailover, 160
setkeyswitch, 87, 90, 94, 113
setobpparams, 90
setupplatform, 61, 104
showboards, 69, 85, 146
showbus, 96
showcmdsync, 165, 166
showcodlicense, 103
showcodusage, 108
showdate, 72
showdevices, 86, 146
showenvironment, 146
showfailover, 161
showkeyswitch, 151
showlogs, 114
showobpparams, 90, 147
showplatform, 70, 85, 114, 147
showxirstate, 149
SMS
daemons, 30
features, 3, 4
SMS daemons, 30
smsbackup, 193
smsconfig, 197
smsconnectsc, 11
SMSETC, 56
SMSLOGGER, 56
SMSOPT, 56
smsrestore, 194
SMSVAR, 56
smsversion, 195
solaris heartbeat, 149
Index
227
ssd, 51
Static Versus Dynamic Domain Configuration, 59
status of domains
domain status, 70, 85
system controller, 1
T
tilde usage, 10
tmd, 54
To Set Up the ACL, 61
X
xntpd
configuring, 74
228
System Management Services (SMS) 1.3 Administrator Guide • January 2003
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