CueStation 4.5.1
USER GUIDE
CueStation 4.5.1
Matrix3 Audio Show Control System
Edition: 2006-11-09 for CueStation 4.5.1
LCS SERIES
Meyer Sound Laboratories Inc.
2832 San Pablo Avenue
Berkeley, CA 94702
www.meyersound.com
T: +1 510 486.1166
F: +1 510 486.8356
©2006
Meyer Sound Laboratories Inc.
© 2006 Meyer Sound. All rights reserved.
CueStation 4 User Guide
The contents of this manual are furnished for informational purposes only, are subject to change without
notice, and should not be construed as a commitment by Meyer Sound Laboratories Inc. Meyer Sound assumes no responsibility or liability for any errors or inaccuracies that may appear in this manual. Except as
permitted by applicable copyright law, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval
system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, recording or otherwise, without
prior written permission from Meyer Sound.
CueStation, CueConsole, LCS Series, Matrix3, WildTracks, VRAS and all alphanumeric product names are
trademarks of Meyer Sound. Meyer Sound and SpaceMap are registered trademarks of Meyer Sound
Laboratories Inc. (Reg. U.S. Pat. & TM. Off.). All third-party trademarks mentioned herein are the property
of their respective trademark holders.
Printed in the U.S.A.
Part Number: 05.164.005.01 rev.B
Table of Contents
Preface
ix
CueStation Documentation
What’s New in CueStation 4
User Guide Conventions
Meyer Sound Laboratories
Acknowledgments
Installation and Setup
25
CueStation and Matrix3 Overview
CueStation Quick Start
Matrix3 Mixer
Signal Flow
35
Overview
Inputs
Bus/Matrix
Outputs
Aux Outputs
PAFL Outputs
VRAS Sends
VRAS Returns
Mixer Controls
43
Fader Controls
Matrix Window
Signal Processing Controls
System Monitoring
53
CueStation Connection Status
Log Window
System Status Window
Signal Path
Meters
VirtualLX
59
Working Offline
Using VirtualLX as a Server
Virtual CueConsole
CueStation Automation
Building A Show
65
Automation Overview
Automation Signal Flow
Automation Basics
Channel Select
Capturing Cues
Building a Cue List
Running a Show
Editing Cues
Cue and Subcue Libraries
Externals Subcues
Custom Subcue Types
SpaceMaps
93
SpaceMaps Overview
Elements of a SpaceMap
Types of Nodes
SpaceMap Controls
Preface
v
Creating SpaceMaps
Creating Trajectories
Creating Trajectory Subcues
Creating Position Subcues
Creating SyncMap Subcues
SpaceMap Design
Wild Tracks
109
Importing Audio with AudioMove
Wild Tracks Window
Wild Tracks Entries
Wild Tracks Subcues
Optimizing Wild Tracks Playback
Regions, Loops, and Vamping
Wild Tracks Recording
Advanced Techniques
Using Wild Tracks Offline
VRAS: Variable Room Acoustics System
127
Introduction to VRAS
User Interface
VRAS Matrix Options
VRAS Subcues
VRAS Subcue Types
CueStation Workflow
File Management
137
Saving Files
Opening Files
Merging Projects
Customizing CueStation
141
Layouts
Custom Utility Buttons
Key Mappings Window
Project Notes and Reports
Chat and Paging
Access Policies
147
Creating Access Policies
Securing Your System
Recovering Lost Passwords
Hardware and Configuration
Mixer Configuration
153
Configuring the Matrix3
The Mixer Configuration Window
I/O Modules
Processing Modules
Communication Modules
Configuring Extensions
Configuring Wild Tracks
Wild Tracks Drive Setup
Configuring CobraNet
Configuring Loopbacks
Hardware Specifications
167
Frame Specifications
Power Requirements
Component Specifications
Frame Control Operations
vi
187
Wild Tracks
Frame Control Window
LX-300 Autostart
Matrix3 Web Pages
Firmware Updates
191
Before You Begin
Firmware Upload Procedures
Using LX-300 ID Codes to Erase Flash
Appendices
CueStation Networking
201
Client/Server Systems
CueStation 4 Background Processes
Using Samba
207
Common Internet File System (CIFS) with Macintosh OS-X
CIFS with Linux
CIFS with Microsoft Windows
Supported Audio File Types
Capture Window Advanced Mode
215
Advanced Mode Overview
Advanced Mode Example
CueStation 4 Default Hotkey Assignments
Glossary
Firmware Updates
219
227
vii
viii
Glossary
Preface
CueStation Documentation
ix
What’s New in CueStation 4
ix
User Guide Conventions xxi
Meyer Sound Laboratories xxii
Acknowledgments xxiii
Thank you for choosing Level Control Systems Matrix3.
CueStation is the software interface to Matrix3. It offers a graphic user interface that emulates a familiar mixing
console and combines it with a cue-based automation system that is designed to integrate easily into theatrical,
theme park, and other show control situations.
The CueStation 4 User Guide is a supplement to the CueStation classroom training course. The combination of
classroom training and this Users Guide will have you up and running quickly and effectively.
CueStation Documentation
CueStation is a comprehensive and exceptionally flexible cue programming system. To ensure that our customers
have the best possible experience with our products, we provide classroom-based training for new users, and support
via e-mail and telephone. On-site service is an available option.
This Users Guide does not replace the training program. Rather, it is your pre-course reading material, classroom
textbook, and post-course reference. Various sections of the document address the intricacies of CueStation through
different approaches: specific task outlines, conceptual overviews and analysis, and command references.
User Guide Chapters
This Preface (p. ix) introduces Level Control Systems, describes the conventions used in this Users Guide, and
provides details regarding your documentation and support options.
Installation and Setup (p. 25) describes how CueStation software and Matrix3 hardware work together to provide
a cue automation system, and provides a quick-start guide to getting your system up and running.
Matrix3 Mixer describes the signal flow through the Matrix3, and how the software controls the signal flow. It also
covers system monitoring topics such as metering and log messages, in addition to the VirtualLX program that is
used to simulate Matrix3 hardware offline.
CueStation Automation (p. 63) explains how to build and edit a show in CueStation using subcues, cues, and cue
lists, as well as SpaceMaps, Wild Tracks, and VRAS.
CueStation Workflow (p. 135) addresses several components of CueStation that are not directly related to the creation
and control of audio automation programs, such as file management, layouts, and access policies.
Hardware and Configuration (p. 151) describes how to configure a Matrix3 system in CueStation, and lists specification details for the LX-300 frame and hardware modules.
The Appendices (p. 199) contains reference information about operating systems, networks, and some advanced
automation topics, as well as a glossary of terms.
What’s New in CueStation 4
With CueStation 4, you have the choice of running Linux, Macintosh OSX, and Windows 2000/XP platforms.
CueStation’s new software design allows the application to run concurrently on multiple computers on a single network.
Project files are cross-platform compatible, and may be edited off line without the hardware present.
Cue capturing and subcue editing has been upgraded with extensive new functionality. The control windows have
also been improved, with more configurability, including custom layouts that will re-create your work environment
to your specifications. Many changes have been made to help you work more efficiently.
Preface
ix
In 4.5.0, we've added volume envelopes in Wild Tracks, custom utility buttons, improved window layouts, and
more.
LCS remains committed to the continuing development and evolution of our software and hardware. Please
send your suggestions for improvement to the software, hardware, and documentation to [email protected]
or post your comments at http://lcsforums.com .
CueStation 4.5.1 Release Notes, Dec 13 2006
CueStation 4.5.1-20061207 is a maintenance release. It includes fixes for several bugs encountered in version
4.5.0, along with some minor interface changes. Please read all notes and instructions before installing or upgrading to CueStation 4.5.1 Dec 7 2006 release.
IMPORTANT: CueStation 4 requires at least one LX-ELC module in the system for normal operation. The LXELC module must have a 128MB SODIM memory module. LX-ELC modules that were shipped before 2004 will
need a memory upgrade before they can be used with CueStation 4.
Notable Changes
Automation
• The Channel Selects field in subcues is now updated when editing Wild Tracks sends using the "Wild Tracks
Channel Assignments" boxes. (3901)
• The "Map OSC Controls" external's "Time Avg" feature now includes an update interval. (3907)
• Channel On/Off is now included in Channel Isolation. (3934)
• The fields in the SyncMaps subcue have been renamed to be more descriptive. (3879)
• Recalling a "Select Cue List" external for a nonexistent Cue List ID no longer causes the Transport window to
become unstable. (4022)
• OpenSoundControl UDP client subscriptions are no longer auto-cancelled after 60 seconds, as long as ping
messages are sent. (3957)
• When sending commands to anothercuelist.py through the "Send Command to Python Script" external, carriage
returns and other whitespace characters can now be included. (3929)
• A memory leak in the "Map Transporter Module" external has been fixed. (3996)
• The "Force Refresh DSP Mixer State" external has been removed, as it is no longer used. (3949)
• The sysex parser's buffer overflow error message has been changed to be more informative. (4029)
Interface and Layout
• The selection of subcue types in the Capture window is now consistent when closing and re-opening the window.
(3997)
• Wild Tracks subcues listed in the Project Report now use the same fields as those listed within the subcue
data, instead of alternate field names used internally. (3869)
• It is now possible to navigate the Input Bus Assigns using the arrow keys. (3913)
• The title bar in all CueStation windows now lists the name of the window followed by the IP address of the
server. (3889)
• Double-clicking in the Cue List window when it is not in focus no longer causes the highlighted cue to be recalled.
(3943)
• If CueStation windows are connected to multiple servers, closing the last window connected to a server no
longer causes CueStation to quit. (4013)
• In rare situations, the viewing range scroll bar would show a range of channels that was inconsistent with what
was actually displayed in the window. This has been fixed. (4050)
Wild Tracks
• Dragging a Wild Tracks Hold button into the Cue List or Cue Library window now creates a Mixer Settings
subcue. (3992)
• The "Deck" field in Wild Tracks subcues is now wide enough to contain a range of deck numbers. (4025)
• Disabled Wild Tracks entries in a Deck no longer cause audio dropouts in playback. (3945)
x
Preface
• Wild Tracks Deck subcues and Control Deck By Key external subcues can no longer affect decks isolated
from automation. (4015)
• Previously, in systems with six or more ELC modules, hard drives connected to the sixth ELC module could
not be mounted. This has been fixed. (4027)
• In some cases, when a Wild Tracks entry had a play offset of less than zero, envelope points could no longer
be edited. This has been fixed. (4055)
Known Issues
The following is a list of issues that are still active CueStation 4.5.1. They will be corrected in a future release.
• An error message appears after selecting Generate Report in the Projects menu, if the project is saved to a
directory path that includes either Chinese or Japanese characters. (3926)
• An error message appears after trying to save a layout to a directory path that includes either Chinese or
Japanese characters. (3838)
• Meter values for compression are calculated incorrectly. (3316)
CueStation 4.5.0 Release Notes, Sept 15 2006
CueStation 4.5.0 is a major release. The following is a list of all changes made since 4.4.0.
Notable Changes
Wild Tracks
• In the Wild Tracks window, you can now draw volume envelopes in the Deck timeline, and capture them as
part of the Wild Tracks Deck subcue. This allows greater control over level adjustments between tracks, and
reduces the number of additional cues required to make level changes. (2513)
• When editing waveform envelopes in the Wild Tracks window, you can select all or part of the file and rightclick on an envelope point to select "Adjust Selected Level Points" from the context menu to adjust all selected
points by the same amount. You can also hold down the Shift key when moving a point to only affect the gain,
or the Alt key to only affect the time. You can also use the Command key in combination with either of these for
finer control. (3651, 2513, 3393)
• There have been several improvements to the waveform-rendering functions. Waveforms for all files can now
be pre-rendered in the new "Waveform Rendering" pane of the Drive Setup dialog box. Additionally, whenever
a waveform is rendered, the results are cached so that viewing waveforms in the Wild Tracks window is more
persistent, even when paging between decks. Rendering waveforms will also take place in sections, with each
section becoming visible as soon as it is fully rendered. (3516, 3403, 3515, 3599)
• "Render All Track Waveforms" has been added to the context menu in the Wild Tracks timeline view. (3562)
• Wild Tracks waveform display no longer shows nonexistent spikes in the waveform after zooming in. (3804)
• There is now a Hold button in each Wild Tracks Deck, along with a global Hold button for each Wild Tracks
Unit. The Hold button is similar to a pause button, except that it does not affect the internal play/pause status
of each individual deck. Because of this, decks that were paused when the Hold is activated will remain paused
when the Hold is deactivated. (3379)
• Wild Tracks Decks that are locked to time code and stopped using the Hold button will catch up with the time
code once the hold is released. (3776)
• In Wild Tracks Deck subcues, there is an additional "On Recall" option: Play From Top. When this option is
selected, the "Deck Recall Position" is locked to the beginning of the deck, even if the subcue is edited by
Capture Differences. (3303)
• Wild Tracks Decks can now be controlled by "keys", which can be assigned as part of the Wild Tracks Deck
subcue. The Wild Tracks external "Control Decks by Key" allows you to send any of the following control messages
to any Decks with the same key: Play, Pause, Record, Stop, Isolate, Un-Isolate, Enable, Disable, Hold, Un-Hold,
Set Loop Count, and No Action. This is particularly useful for Deck subcues assigned to "Any Deck", which
cannot be consistently addressed by Mixer Settings subcues. (3231)
• It is possible to trigger a relative deck position move, with two additional options in the "Control Decks by Key"
external: "Skip Forward" and "Skip Backward", which both allow you to specify the amount of time to skip. (3666)
Preface
xi
• The external that allows you to control Wild Tracks Decks by a key also has an option to match a set of deck
ID numbers. (3667)
• The Wild Tracks window now has a "Drive Setup" button, which opens the Drive Setup dialog which was previously only accessible through the Mixer Configuration window. (3442)
• The "Rescan SCSI" button in the Drive Setup dialog has been replaced with two new buttons: "Unmount Drives"
and "Mount Drives". This was done to reduce the risk of corrupted data after swapping hard drives. (3573)
• Unrecognized Wild Tracks drives can now be formatted. (3722)
• The Wild Tracks background process has been re-designed to be more efficient at allocating resources, and
to have less latency between recalling a subcue and starting/stopping the audio associated with it. (3407, 3378,
3226, 3610)
• When recalling cues in a cue list, CueStation will "look ahead" and proactively pre-load Wild Tracks Deck
subcues into a buffer, for more immediate playback when the subcue is recalled. (3447)
• Playback of audio files in Wild Tracks Deck subcues will begin as soon as each track is halfway buffered instead
of fully buffered, to make the subcue recall time faster. (3623)
• Wild Tracks can now read SD2 (Sound Designer II) files correctly. (3463)
• Wild Tracks Deck subcue recalls are now faster, due to uncompressing subcue information when the project
is sent, rather than when the cue is recalled. (3633)
• If a Wild Tracks is recording to a previously existing file, it will always overwrite the file instead of appending
the new recording to the end. (3739)
• Audio dropout messages are no longer generated when deck playback continues past the end of a recording
entry. (3751)
• Files recorded using Wild Tracks will now be created with the number of tracks equal to the number of sends
specified. (3859)
• When adding files to a Wild Tracks Deck, you can now drag and drop them onto the meters at the top of the
window. The file will be added to the first displayed deck, and assigned to the channels corresponding to the
meters on which the file was dropped. (3625)
• The channel assignment function, utilized when files are added to a Wild Tracks Deck, has been rewritten to
prevent changing the assignments of previously added files. (3552)
• The Wild Tracks process now properly handles tracks assigned to a channel far outside the range of configured
Wild Tracks channels without going offline. (3694)
• Wild Tracks channel assignments will no longer appear in the Cue List or Transport window for cues that have
no Wild Tracks subcues. (3160)
• Cues and subcues within Wild Tracks Decks will now be recalled even when Wild Tracks is in offline mode.
(3367)
• A condition which previously caused Wild Tracks entries to be pasted into a subcue incorrectly has been fixed.
(3396)
• Right-clicking on the ID number of a Wild Tracks Deck subcue will now show a list of all Wild Tracks Deck
subcues, instead of only subcues assigned to the same deck. (3285)
• The Mixer Settings subcue created by dragging in the Play, Pause, or Stop Deck buttons would previously
reflect the current state of the deck rather than which button was dragged in. This has been fixed. (3644)
• The Deck Info section of the Wild Tracks window has a new layout to better display the deck options, and now
also includes the On Recall field, which was previously only accessible through the subcue detail view. (3527)
• In the Wild Tracks window, you can scroll the Deck timeline horizontally by clicking on the arrow buttons on
either side of the scroll bar. This will move the view by 10% of the current length of time displayed. (3774)
• Using Cmd-Arrow to snap files in the timeline previously included other files and the top of the deck as snapping
points; it is now possible to snap to the deck cursor as well. (3257)
• There is now an "Enable Track Position Dragging" option in the Display menu in the Wild Tracks window. When
this option is unchecked, the timeline in every deck is locked to prevent the accidental movement of tracks.
(3547)
• In order to select an entire file in the Wild Tracks timeline, you must now use Cmd-double-click instead of Cmdclick. (3395)
xii
Preface
• Wild Tracks signal generator entries now include sawtooth and triangle waves. (3286)
• An optional duty cycle percentage can be specified for the square wave, sawtooth wave, and triangle wave
entries, by adding a "duty=x" argument in the File Name column. (3306)
• Wild Tracks scripts can now be typed directly into a Wild Tracks Deck entry, instead of first creating a .bat file.
(3313)
• When adding files to a Wild Tracks Deck, the file names are edited to include escape characters for semicolons,
so that the file name is not interpreted as separate commands by mistake. (3315)
• A new Wild Tracks external, "Adjust Wild Tracks Path", lets you edit the contents of the File Search Path and
the Recording Path with a subcue. (3683)
• The Log will now show warning messages when Wild Tracks memory usage exceeds 30 MB, and again for
every additional 10 MB. (3372)
• The Wild Tracks audio dropout alerts in the log have been changed from Error (red) to Warn (yellow), and the
flashing in the Wild Tracks window has changed from red to yellow. (3426)
• In the Wild Tracks window, the I/O Error message displayed in the deck timeline no longer appears truncated.
(3431)
• The CPU and memory usage status bars are no longer manually editable. (3576)
• Non-zero values in the “File Offset” column would previously cause files to be displayed incorrectly in the
timeline view. This has been fixed. (3637, 3636, 3634)
• Previously, the "Level" value in the Wild Tracks window was off by a power of 2. This has been fixed. (3649)
• The "Lock to Time Code" function in Wild Tracks has been fixed. (3684)
• Wild Tracks file path lengths can now be up to 1024 characters in length, instead of 113. (3685)
Interface
• CueStation now has a "Show Signal Path" function, similar to the "Log Signal Trace" function in older versions
of CueStation, except that it displays the results in a small dialog box, which is updated in real time as the signal
path changes. (758)
• User-customizable soft buttons can now be added to the bottom of any CueStation window. (3539)
• It is now faster to view and edit subcues in the Cue Library and Cue List windows. For instance, if you are
viewing the details of an Input Levels subcue, and you select a different cue with another Input Levels subcue,
the details of that subcue will be displayed automatically without having to select the subcue. (3415)
• The control point data in the subcue detail view now has an edit-select column, to make it easier to select individual or multiple control points. (3209)
• You can now use the Tab key to access the Comment field in the Cue Library. (3183)
• The method for editing cue and subcue names and comments has changed. The new method is: Click on the
item once to select it. Hit the Backspace key to select all of the text in that column. At this point, you can type a
new name/comment, or use Cmd+V to paste in new text. (3543)
• Modifying control point address within a subcue will no longer change the value of the control point. (3778)
• In the Open/Save File dialog boxes, the list of most recently accessed files now supports selections of multiple
files. (3618)
• The Open/Merge Project dialog now includes checkboxes for SpaceMaps and Trajectories. Previously, these
items were automatically included when performing a merge operation. (3467)
• When opening or saving a project, the initial keyboard focus is on the "Open" or "Save" button for the Enter
key, or on the file name text box for any other key. (1910)
• All automation items now have columns to reflect the enabled/disabled state, and the locked/unlocked state.
(3503)
• The Lock and Unlock functions have been assigned hotkeys: Cmd+Shift+Period and Cmd+Shift+Comma, respectively. (3469, 3558)
• The keyboard shortcuts for Disable and Enable have been changed to Cmd+Period and Cmd+Comma, respectively. (3558)
• It is now no longer possible to edit the name (or other text fields) of a cue or subcue that is locked. (3471)
Preface
xiii
• The Enable and Disable commands in the Edit menu will now be individually greyed out, depending on the
state of the currently selected item(s). (3465)
• All CueStation windows now have a Log Alert indicator icon next to the Page icon in the lower right-hand corner.
This icon will flash whenever the log receives a Warn, Error, or Critical entry, and clicking on it will display the
Log window. (3569)
• The Log and Page icons are now enabled at all times, for easier access to the Log and Chat windows, respectively. (3578)
• The Log window now has an "Enter Log Comment" text field which can be used to easily enter comment lines
into the log. You can also specify the warning level of the comment entry. (3545)
• Clicking on the Log button would cause CueStation to think that the project had been changed. This has been
corrected. (3673)
• The Log entries reporting the type of SMPTE received have been edited to more accurately reflect the type
expected and received. (2459)
• The "QueryPerformanceCounter() is buggy" error message has been removed for being unnecessarily
alarming. (3700)
• The Log window will only autoscroll to include the most recent entries if the scroll bar is already at the bottom
of the window. (3796)
• The log window will no longer display the "cued's mixerd session is attempting reconnect to mixerd..." error
message on initial server connection. (3810)
• Typing the "End" key in the Log window will now result in scrolling to the bottom of the list of log entries. (3832)
• When Wild Tracks detects a shift in time code, it will now report the correct number of seconds shifted. (3835)
• Sometimes, merging or re-opening a project would cause the "References" value for subcues to be higher
than they should be. This has been fixed. (3487)
• Right-clicking in a "Refs" column will show a context menu, which lists the cues and subcues that reference
the item. (3570)
• When opening the "Refs" context menu, it would cause the currently active list to scroll to the top. This has
been fixed. (3571)
• If you opened a project while the Subcue Library was sorted by Refs, the sort order would become irreparably
broken until the window reconnected to the server. This has been fixed. (3489)
• It is now possible to force the deletion of a cue that is referenced by a cue list, or a subcue that is referenced
by a cue. (3542)
• Automation items highlighted by the "Select..." command (such as cues within a cue list) will also have their
text rendered in bold, so that the selection can be cleared without losing the search results. (3488)
• The "Select..." search function has been improved . (3590, 3580)
• "Select All" and "Select..." options are now disabled for the Transport window. (3745)
• It was previously possible to recall a cue or subcue by double-clicking on it when cue and subcue recalls were
disabled by an access policy. This has been fixed (3581)
• In the Processing windows, the Dynamics section now shows whether or not the dynamics are linked, and
what channel they are linked to. (1889)
• It is now possible to copy and paste EQ, Delay, and Dynamics settings, as well as control point addresses.
(1186, 1002)
• It is also possible to paste control point data into a processing window that only displays one channel. (3730)
• In the Processing windows, there is now a "Bypass" button for the delay settings. (3664)
• The current CueStation project file format has changed to version 8. (3677)
• In mixer windows, the widget that currently has focus will be highlighted in blue. (3746)
• Problems using F7 and F8 for scrolling have been fixed. (3390)
• Previously, the Edit menu would not update until it was displayed, which led to inconsistent behavior with
keyboard shortcuts. This has been fixed. (3468)
• The keyboard shortcut for "Send Mixer Configuration", Cmd+K, has been removed to prevent interference with
the "Connect to Server" command in Mac OS X. (3585)
xiv
Preface
• The Isolate button in the Bus Masters window has been re-positioned to be consistent with other mixer windows.
(3435)
• Renaming the CueStation executable to restrict the types of windows that could be opened would not work if
a default layout with additional windows had been saved. This has been fixed. (3661)
• Corrected a memory leak in the Cue List, Transport, and SpaceMap windows. (3693)
• The interface for the recent-files hotkeys has been improved. (3708)
• Dialog boxes will now open in front of the currently active window, even when using dual displays. (2671)
• The Windows menu has been adjusted to no longer automatically select an item as soon as the menu was
opened. (3653)
• The "Bypass Delay" text will no longer be wider than the button it appears on. (3732)
• Edit menu options are disabled when no control points are selected. (3738)
• Dragging an audio file to the end of a cue list would sometimes cause the new cue to be created at the secondto-last position, instead of at the end. This has been fixed. (3791)
• The Subcue Library will now retain the subcue type filter when the window is closed and reopened (3794)
• Previously, using Command-W to close the only remaining CueStation window would result in the program
exiting without prompting the user to save the project. This has been fixed. (3815)
• The CueStation client for Windows XP has been fixed to allow non-Unicode characters in the path to the
CueStation executable. (3838)
Display
• The Linux CueStation client can now save layouts whose windows span multiple desktops, and have the windows
restored to those desktops when the layout is opened. (682)
• All CueStation windows will now show the server IP in the title bar at the top of the window, instead of in the
status bar at the bottom. (3763)
• In any of the Meters windows, there is now a display option to show the numeric value of the signal represented
by each meter. (3650)
• Meters now include support for touch screen tablet PC's, with options accessible through the Display menu.
(3584)
• The Go button now turns into a progress bar when a cue is recalled, matching the time-remaining count down.
(3587)
• The Chat window now looks like the Log window, and the list of users has been moved to the top of the window.
(3125)
• The default sort order for the Log window is with the most recent entries at the bottom. The Log window will
now auto-scroll when new entries are added. (3544)
• In windows that show faders, there is a new display menu option to hide the fader and just show the numerical
values for levels. (3422)
• The fader knobs have been changed to dark grey to provide more visual contrast. (3760)
• The column width of all channels is now constant, regardless of which channel components are displayed.
(3354)
• The channel processing windows have been rearranged to accommodate extra controls and options. (3676)
• When using multiple monitors, sometimes the right-click menu for bus assigns would show up on the wrong
monitor. This has been fixed. (3699)
• The position of the scroll bars in the System Level window is now saved as part of the layout. (3486)
• The "Gain" label for dynamics processing has been changed to "Makeup Gain", as per industry standards.
(3326)
• The status bar in CueStation windows now shows the number of items selected. (3490)
• The DSP usage percentage in the System Status window has changed from a graphical status bar to text.
(3741, 3678)
• In the Transport window, hiding the Transport Controls will also make the Time Code Enable button inaccessible.
(3765)
Preface
xv
• In the Frame Control window, the text of the "Duplicate Entry" button has been changed to always read "Add
Entry". (3660)
• The layouts of the "Subcue Types" and "Control Point Sets" tabs within the Capture Window have been improved
to use screen space more efficiently. (3519)
• In the Cue List window, the position of the Display menu matches that of the other CueStation windows. (3783)
• When you right-click on a cue in the Cue List window, the pop-up menu is now a single scrolling column instead
of a screen-filling multi-column list. (3258)
• All columns of text now have a consistent horizontal alignment within that column. (3520)
• The size of the Signal Path display window has been increased. (3662)
• Fixed several spelling errors. (657)
Automation
• The Transport window and Transporter CueConsole module will now show the cue index number followed by
the cue name, for the active cue and cue-on-deck. (3328)
• Support has been added for the "EtherTracks/Recall Cue on Connection Group" and "External Control/Trigger
Cue..." externals to optionally trigger a subcue instead. (3462, 3459)
• All "Set Alias" externals now support referencing multiple IP addresses with the same name. You can also set
an alias to reference other aliases. (3540)
• The countdown time for cues is now calculated based on subcue durations, subcue wait times, and autofollow
wait times. (1384)
• You can now disable the buttons in the mixer windows by right-clicking on the master set of buttons along the
left side of the window. (3586)
• A new EtherTracks external type, "Send Raw Data", allows you to send raw data to a specified IP address
using user-specified port numbers. (3690)
• Wait and fade times and trims are now included in channel isolation. (3239, 3356)
• The “Set Selected Subcue Types” external subcue previously had a bug which prevented the intended subcue
types in the Capture window from being selected. This has been fixed. (3411)
• In the "Show Window By Type" external, both the SpaceMap ID and Trajectory ID now have a range of 0-512.
(3420)
• Matrix levels at points located outside of the Matrix window's visible rows and columns would previously not
be included when right-click-dragging a bus into the Subcue Library to create a Mixer Settings subcue. This has
been fixed. (3440)
• If a subcue is disabled globally within the Subcue Library, it will also appear disabled within any of the cues
that reference it, in the Cue Library and Cue List windows. (3470)
• In the cue list, if an autofollow cue is recalled manually, it will be cleared from the scheduler. Wait and fade
times internal to the cue will still be executed as programmed. (3538)
• The "Listen" functionality for VGroups now works correctly, and VGroup 1 Listen is no longer initially enabled
by default. (3556, 3559)
• Subcues in the Subcue Library window are now duplicated correctly. (3617)
• Self-referencing subcues can now be deleted. (3681)
• A "UseCount error" message would sometimes be printed to the log when editing a "Send Support File" subcue.
This has been fixed. (3682)
• The ALC Setup external subcue no longer causes the main DSP to fail. (1293)
• Sometimes the Cue List window would cache cue names even after the project was cleared. This has been
fixed. (3712)
• The "Map Controls to Cues" externals which contain disabled references to cues or subcues are not counted
in that cue's or subcue's "Refs" count. (3755)
• References to cues, subcues, index sets, and control point sets are now automatically removed when you do
a force-delete of those items. (3756)
• The "Stab Time Code" feature in the Cue List window no longer gives incorrect time values. (3784)
• The "Wild Tracks Set Driver Debug Enabled" external has been removed from CueStation. (3825)
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Preface
• Custom subcue types whose names start with a space character are now filtered correctly in the subcue library.
(3847)
SpaceMap
• When a trajectory node is selected, the duration is displayed in the status bar for faster reference. (3412)
• When editing trajectories, it is now possible to select segments by clicking on the line as well as the node.
(3413)
• The icons in the SpaceMap window toolbar have been improved to be more obvious as to which tool does
what, and more pronounced in which tool is active. (3534, 3535)
• In the SpaceMap window, all of the node types now have separate "Add Node" icons in the toolbar, for easier
access. (3566)
• In the SpaceMap window, link weights for derived nodes are now expressed in decibels, with a maximum value
of 0dB. (3629)
• A new SpaceMap external will generate a trajectory based on parametric equations entered by the user. (3723)
• Renaming a SpaceMap will now also update the title bar to reflect the new name. (3452)
• When renaming nodes in the SpaceMap window, the output number is no longer automatically added to the
end. (3453)
• In the SpaceMap window, the Silent nodes now have a thicker border, and the color of selected nodes has
been changed to a brighter red for better visibility. (3532)
• When editing the number of a SpaceMap node, using the backspace key would delete the node. This has been
fixed. (3533)
• If the SpaceMap window was cloned, there were some cases where control points changed in one window
would not be changed in the other. This has been corrected. (3603)
• SpaceMap node attenuation is no longer off by a power of two. (3626)
• SpaceMap nodes with attenuation can now reach values up to +10.0dB in the matrix. (3630)
New Windows and Dialogs
• In the Wild Tracks window, a dialog box will appear whenever files might be replaced unintentionally. (2629)
• The Find/Select functions have been expanded to enable searches by Enabled, Locked, Wild Tracks Channel
Assignments, and Control Points. (3032)
• In the Access Policies window, if you enter a password to "log in" to an access policy, there will be a dialog
box where you can choose whether to stay logged in "permanently" for your client ("Retain password until I
manually reset it"), or to log out when you exit CueStation ("Use password for this session only"). (3339)
• The Find dialog box now includes support for "Starts With", "Contains", "Equals", and "Ends With" when
searching for control points. (3531)
• The Open/Save file dialogs now have reprogrammable directory shortcut buttons, allowing faster access to
commonly used file locations. (3546)
• The Open Project dialog has a new checkbox to verify the presence of files referenced by Wild Tracks Deck
subcues. There is also a "Verify Subcues" button in the Drive Setup dialog, accessible through the Mixer Configuration window. (3548)
• The Open Project dialog now has an improved layout to minimize confusion. The red X, which previously signified "Remove Recently Used File from Recently Used List", has been replaced with a gray Eject icon, and the
text in the "Apply Custom Project Filter" has been edited for clarity. (3550)
CueConsole
• Client IP addresses can now be assigned aliases, using the Client Control/Set Client Address Aliases external.
(3325)
• The Go button on the Transporter module will now show the count-down timer, similar to the Go button in the
Transport window in CueStation. After the count-down is complete, the button will switch back to the Go button
graphic. (3329)
• The Transporter module will now display Time Code to the right of the cue-on-deck text. (3330)
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xvii
• The "Bind Module to Client" options have been expanded to allow binding CueConsole modules to more than
one CueStation client. (3341)
• There is an additional CueConsole external, Set Active Fader Menu Row, which you can use to page between
rows of menu buttons. (3493)
• The Mute buttons on CueConsole modules now show the mute status in the center line of text, even if the labels
have been mapped manually using Override Fader Labels. (2692)
• Labels on an LCD button will now be completely erased before new labels are applied. (3353)
• The Meter module can now properly display and edit the Scale value. (3443)
• Virtual CueConsole modules have been fixed to restore all controls properly after the window is minimized.
(3448)
• Using the "Don't Change" option for mapping a Fader or Transporter would previously unmap the module and
cause a spurious error in the Log. This has been fixed(3517)
• Mapping a CueConsole fader to a trajectory at a rate of 10,000% would previously result in a rate of only 100%.
This has been fixed. (3518)
• Unmapping a CueConsole Editor listen meter no longer generates an "Unexpected EOX" error message in
the log. (3818)
Hardware and Mixer
• For all physical input channels, you can now "patch" in audio from a different channel, as long as it is on the
same physical input module. (2851)
• New signal processing options are now available. In the Mixer Configuration window, you can specify one or
two bands of dynamics processing for each input and output module. In the Processing windows, there are four
types of dynamics processing available: Compressor, Expander, Limiter, and Gate. (2979)
• Stereo linking for dynamics has changed from being an external subcue to a control point in the "Dynamics"
type subcues. (3680)
• The Mixer Configuration window now includes text fields on every channel for a default label to be applied
every time the configuration is sent. (3593)
• The Load Balance function in the Mixer Configuration has been improved to be more efficient. (3501)
• If more than 400 HSB channels are allocated, the bar in the Mixer Configuration window will turn red to reflect
the fact that the system will be overloaded if the configuration is used. (3410)
• In the Mixer Configuration window, all instances of "Execute On:" have been replaced by "DSP:". (3229)
• It is no longer possible to send a configuration with more than the maximum number of buses, bus assigns,
and VGroups. (3439)
• Channels not configured with any EQ will no longer cause DMEM to become maxed out. (3444)
• Wild Tracks channels can now be processed on an EXP or remote DSP module. (3688)
• The samba server on the ELC module now supports connections from up to 50 clients, increased from 10.
(3437)
• The "Query Hardware for Configuration" function now returns the correct Subnet Mask and Gateway for ELC
modules. (3642)
• ELC firmware mismatches can now be detected, and will cause an error message to be printed to the log.
(3728)
• An ELC module configured with Wild Tracks will no longer be allocated more HSB channels than necessary.
(3416)
• If Wild Tracks was configured with metering but no plugins, additional unnecessary link channels would be allocated. This has been fixed. (3417)
• Previously, when sending a configuration with a new Subnet Mask, it would not get updated if the IP address
was not also changed. This has been fixed. (3702)
• LX-ALP modules can now be configured as 8-In or 8-Out only, in addition to the previously existing 8-in and
8-out configuration. (3686)
• The channel numbers on a Cobranet module will no longer change when the plugin type is changed. (3319)
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Preface
• When uploading firmware, you can now upload a .ZIP file, and the .csf firmware files will be extracted automatically. (3455)
• DSPs that are temporarily disconnected from a system will have the configuration automatically re-sent once
they are reconnected. (2492)
• Unique session ID numbers are now assigned based on the time instead of a random number. (3347)
• The lxcaslemu process no longer fails when an invalid value is entered for any EQ and processing control
points. (3670)
• The LX-300 firmware will continue to function if a mixer configuration is sent without specifying the number of
bands of dynamics processing. (3691)
• The Mixer Configuration window will now report the correct number of HSB channels used by Loopback extensions. (3701)
• Setting the dynamics release time to 0 no longer causes corrupt audio error messages. (3706)
• The ML8 preamp will no longer be set incorrectly when a configuration is sent. (3808)
• The delay tables have been updated to reflect signal processing changes. (3826)
• Meters now have peak hold indicators, with a user-configurable decay time defined per window. (3621)
• Meters can now display two bands of compression per channel. (3638)
• Compression metering has been improved to eliminate metering dropouts. (3428)
• Metering behavior has been fixed to no longer show clipping on all channels when it had only occurred in the
first channel. (3652)
• A firmware issue previously caused the LED meters on the front panel of the LX-300 meters to flicker every
several seconds. This has been fixed. (3173)
• Meters for Aux Sends are now included when the "Generate Simulated Meter Traffic" function is used. (3358)
• Input meters now work for VRAS returns. (3388)
• Metering is no longer disabled when the ELC module is configured with an incorrect netmask. (3689)
• Meters are no longer off by 5dB. (3703)
VRAS
• It is now possible to copy data from a spreadsheet and paste it into the VRAS window. (3591)
• The matrix levels for a VRAS ER setting zoned 4/4/4/4 have been adjusted; previously they were 20dB too
high. (3430)
• In the VRAS window, entering channel number 138 or larger would result in the number being automatically
changed to 137. This has been fixed. (3658)
• The speech detection function has been revised. (3833)
Network and Processes
• For the "System LowLevel Meter Server" setting, you can now optionally specify a netmask along with the IP
address. Additionally, metering now works for addresses in the 10.*.*.* range, as well as all class A, class B,
and class C addresses. (3457)
• With the new Ethertracks: Send Support File external, you can send a project file to an external device. You
can also specify the send and receive port settings, and the type of connection protocol. (3461, 3456)
• The default web page has been changed to improve reliability of triggering cues from the web page, for modern
web browsers. (3162)
• The 404 error page on the web server has been edited for clarity. (3482)
• The web server process will now fall back to port 8080 if 80 is not available, and will start automatically within
lxelcd. (3631)
• The status page created by the web server process was previously reporting incorrect values that did not match
the System Status window. This has been fixed. (3620)
• ELC firmware now includes a program called arpscan, as a tool for diagnosing network issues. (3768)
• The ELC Troubleshooting file no longer uses an incorrect time stamp. (3882)
Preface
xix
Python
• There is an additional python script now included in CueStation, named wildtrackspath.py. When this script is
running, you can send commands to it via the "Send Command to Python Script" external to add or remove directories from the File Search Path in the Wild Tracks window. (3494)
• There is a new python script called "minipage.py" included with CueStation which makes it easier to manage
paging on CueConsole modules. The python script handles the logic for maintaining the "state" of the module,
so fewer mapping subcues are required. (3513)
• A Python script for generating random numbers, random.py, is now available as part of the default included
Python modules. (3616)
• Python scripts can now access all CueStation project database objects, including cue lists, cues, subcues,
and SpaceMap items. (3720)
• There is now an external which allows you to run a Python script in the background, separate from the scripts
run in the Script Execution window. (3721)
• The Python files in the ELC firmware are now .pyo files instead of .py, which take up more space and are less
efficient. (3615)
• Sometimes when the server processes were running on the ELC module, some Python functions would not
work properly. This has been fixed. (3814)
OpenSoundControl
• Several new OpenSoundControl externals have been added to make it easier to map control points in CueStation to controls on an external device. With "Map OSC controls", you can map controls similar to CueConsole
mappings, including paging. "Set OSC Address Aliases" allows you to assign an alias to the IP address of an
OSC device. (3251, 3305, 3497)
• The OSC mapping externals also support mapping multiple devices to the same control points. (3304)
• You can now create aliases for names of OSC control sources. (3742)
• The implementation of OpenSoundControl has been expanded to include three new LCS-specific types of
messages, including "A" (ControlPointAddress), "M" (Message), and "C" (Config). (3314)
• Instead of mapping control points to controls on an external device, you can also map them to other Matrix3
control points using the same "Map OSC Controls" external. This allows you to do things like map a VGroup
fader to an EQ frequency. (3474)
• The new OSC mapping externals also include the option for filtering control messages as an average over
time. This works for both OSC and LCS mappings. (3502)
• You can now record a SpaceMap trajectory using an external OSC device, such as a Lemur, by mapping external controls to SpaceMap bus positions. (3507)
• There are two new OSC address patterns: /setwf and /setblockwf. These commands allow you to set the wait
and fade times for an individual channel, or a set of channels, respectively. (3601)
• A new OSC external allows you to set the warning level for OSC messages printed to the log. (3725)
• It is now possible to re-establish a connection with an OSC device using the "On Lemur Reboot" options in
the "Send Support File" external. (3506)
• Previously, mixerd would use all available CPU cycles when trying to map controls to IP address 0.0.0.1. This
has been fixed. (3800)
• Sometimes control points would be set to improper values when setting OSC mappings. This has been fixed.
(3839)
• It is now possible to use multiple Lemurs connected to the same server, even if they share controls and mappings. (3674)
• OSC commands sent to VirtualLX after power cycling the ELC module will no longer cause mixerd to stop
functioning. (3478)
VirtualLX
• VirtualLX now includes a web server process, which runs automatically when VirtualLX is started. If your project
includes .html files, you can view them offline by directing your web browser to
http://127.0.0.1:8080/filename.html . (3307)
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Preface
• Mac OS X clients are no longer disconnected from VirtualLX at 127.0.0.1 if the computer becomes disconnected
from the network. (3492)
• Previously, if background processes were migrated from VirtualLX to a Matrix3 frame, the processes within
VirtualLX would continue running. This would result in VirtualLX regaining control over the Matrix3 frame, if the
frame was power cycled. VirtualLX has now been changed to not re-connect automatically after a migration has
occurred. (3829)
• The Windows version of VirtualLX is no longer utilizing an unreliable Windows timing function, which would
previously cause VirtualLX to stop working after a certain amount of uptime. (3900)
AudioMove 1.14
• The open file dialog box in AudioMove has been changed to more closely resemble CueStation's dialog box,
with shortcut buttons and a list of most recently selected files. (3656)
• Previously, in Mac OS X, if Audiomove tried to write to a drive that had not yet been mounted, it would create
a new directory instead. This has been changed so that an error message appears instead. (3480)
• AudioMove will now re-normalize loud files to prevent snats in converted files. (3485)
• AudioMove will generate little-endian format WAV files instead of big-endian format files, which are unreadable
by Wild Tracks. (3579)
• The options in the bit depth menu within AudioMove have been changed to "32-bit fixed" and "32-bit float" for
clarity. (3668)
User Guide Conventions
Mouse Conventions
When you see this
Do this...
Click
Click the left mouse button, once.
Double-click
Click the left mouse button, twice in rapid succession, without moving the mouse.
Drag
Press the left mouse button, move the mouse, and then release the mouse button.
Right-click
Click the right mouse button, once.
Right-drag
Press the right mouse button, move the mouse, and then release the mouse button.
Select
Point the mouse cursor at the object, and then click the left mouse button, once.
Keyboard Conventions
Press F1
Press (and release) the F1 key on your keyboard.
Cmd+Shift+A
Hold the Cmd and Shift keys down and press the A key, then release the keys.
Type ping 127.0.0.1
Type the specified text.
Preface
xxi
Typographic Conventions
Label or name
Marks a label for a user interface object or menu command. Windows, buttons, menus, and menu commands
are indicated using this typeface.
Shortcut key
Indicates a shortcut key combination, usually requiring you to hold a control key and pressing another key.
ping 127.0.0.1
Indicates a value that you are to type into a value box.
Cross-reference
Indicates a cross-reference to information in this user guide.
Cross-reference
Indicates a cross-reference to another information source.
http://world.wide.web or [email protected]
Indicates an Internet link to another information source.
Important!
Provides an explanation or further detail that needs to be brought to your attention.
Tip:
Provides information that can help you work faster or better.
Caution:
Indicates a place where you have to be careful what you are doing.
Warning:
Indicates a place where extreme care must be taken: data corruption, personal injury, or death may occur.
Meyer Sound Laboratories
Meyer Sound Laboratories, Inc. designs and manufactures high quality sound reinforcement loudspeakers,
studio monitors, signal processors, and sound measurement tools for the professional audio industry. The LCS
Series contains multichannel digital audio mixing and processing products for theatrical productions and installations.
Founded in 1979 by John and Helen Meyer, the company has grown to become a leading worldwide supplier
of systems for theaters, arenas, stadiums, theme parks, convention centers and touring concert sound rental
operations. Meyer Sound’s main office and manufacturing facility are located in Berkeley, California, with field
offices and authorized distributors located throughout the USA and around the world.
More information is available at:
xxii
Preface
Tel: +1 (510) 486-1166 Fax: +1 (510) 486-8356 E-mail: [email protected] http://www.meyersound.com
Meyer Sound is a registered trademark of Meyer Sound Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved. Patents pending.
All other registered trademarks are property of their respective owners.
LCS Series Service and Support
Forums Support
Users who register at our website can access our free LCS Series support forums. These discussions focus on
users-helping-users: it's a great place to exchange tips, techniques, and information. Our technical service personnel will provide their expertise, as their schedules permit.
http://LCSforums.com
Web Site Support
Our product documentation (PDF format) is freely available on our website. Registered users can participate in
our free message forums. Software subscribers can obtain the latest versions of our software from the Software
Maintenance Program, SMP, on the LCSforums.
http://www.LCSaudio.com
http://LCSforums.com
Telephone Voice/Fax Support
Telephone support is available through the Meyer Sound Sierra Madre office at +1 (626) 836-0446 (voice) and
+1 (626) 836-4883 (fax). We are open Monday-Friday, standard business hours (Pacific Standard Time).
Before Contacting Support
Before contacting LCS Series Technical Support, please have the noted information available. This will help us
help you more quickly and effectively.
– A description of the problem.
– The firmware version used in your Matrix3 system.
– The components used in your Matrix3 system.
– The version of CueStation and support apps used in your Matrix3 system.
– The operating system version you are using on the computer running CueStation.
Training Program
Purchase of CueStation software entitles you to attend a training program. Meyer Sound conducts training
classes at its office in Sierra Madre, California, a short distance from Los Angeles. The standard course is three
days long.
If you are interested in training please contact us by telephone at +1 (626) 836-0446 ext. 1, or by e-mail,
[email protected] .
Acknowledgments
CueStation 4 was written by Jeremy Friesner. Special thanks to our beta testers and end users for their helpful
feedback that ultimately has driven our product development. We are thrilled to provide you with the world’s
best hardware and software sound automation system.
Preface
xxiii
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Preface
Installation and Setup
CueStation and Matrix3 Overview
CueStation Quick Start
25
26
CueStation 4 is a platform-neutral system which supports the simultaneous operation of multiple programming
computers in a system. If you have used earlier versions of CueConsole or CueStation software, many of the concepts
presented in version 4 will be familiar to you. There are also some extensions to CueStation. Subcue types, for example, can now be customized. In addition, the new architecture and hardware yields new control points, such as
PFL and AFL.
If you’ve never used CueStation or CueConsole before, you will find that we lay out mixer controls in a similar
fashion to a traditional theatrical mixing console. Automation is managed in a hierarchical fashion, similar to the way
you might organize files in folders in your computer operating system.
CueStation and Matrix3 Overview
This overview includes a description of the software interface and architecture.
The Software Interface
CueStation models the controls of a traditional analog mixing console in the graphical user interface. CueStation
includes faders, knobs, bus assignment buttons but unlike a mixing desk, it also has data entry boxes.
There are a number of CueStation control windows. Most of them fall into one of two categories: mixer programming
controls, which look more or less like a conventional mixer, and automation windows that support the creation and
organization of cues and cue lists.
The automation windows allow control over how the control surface settings are captured, the editing of the captured
settings, and putting these settings into a list of cues for a show.
Other windows, such as access policies or key mappings, provide an interface for configuring how you use CueStation.
CueStation Software Architecture
CueStation 4 uses a client-server software structure. The term client-server describes a certain relationship between
a set of computer programs. In this relationship the clients make requests, asking for information or action, to the
Installation and Setup
25
server, which then fulfills those requests. It is analogous to a restaurant scenario, in which the customers (clients)
ask the waiter (the server) for information (“Are there fries with that?”) or to do something for them (“Bring me
the combo plate.”); the server subsequently does fulfill the customer’s request. For more information about
networking and the client-server architecture, see CueStation Networking (p. 201) in the Appendix.
Matrix3 is a configurable mixer with inputs and outputs, equalization, dynamics, and delay processing, faders,
buses and channels, and the optional Wild Tracks hard disk playback and VRAS acoustic enhancement systems.
The inputs can be either physical inputs (analog, ADAT Lightpipe, AES/EBU, CobraNet), Wild Tracks playback
channels, or loopback or VRAS returns. The outputs can be either analog outputs (connected to the amplifiers
and loudspeakers or the main sound system), digital outputs (ADAT Lightpipe, AES/EBU, CobraNet), loopbacks
or auxiliary sends (connected to effects processors and/or monitor systems).
Between the inputs and outputs is a flexible, matrix-based signal-routing system with multiple control points for
dynamic mixing and distribution of the signals.
CueStation Quick Start
CueStation 4 is client software that requires server software to be running in order to function. With Matrix3 the
server can either run in the LX-300 frame EtherTracks module, or the VirtualLX application running under Linux,
Windows, or Mac.
Installing CueStation
If you have a CueStation 4 .ZIP file, unzip it to an easily accessible location on your computer's hard drive. This
can be accomplished on most operating systems by right-clicking on the .ZIP file and selecting "Extract files..."
or "Unzip Files..." and then choosing a directory where the files will be extracted to. After extracting the files,
you should have a directory that contains:
– The CueStation application. You can double-click on this to launch CueStation.
– VirtualLX, a program which simulates Matrix3 hardware for offline programming.
– csdo, which is a program that lets you control Matrix3 through a command line.
If you are using CueStation on Windows or Linux, you will also see:
– A templates directory, which contains additional files used by CueStation for use in creating Externals subcues.
And if you are using CueStation on Windows, you will also see:
– A file labeled cc3250mt.dll, which provides additional software support for various CueStation features.
CueStation may not run properly if cc3250mt.dll or the templates directory are moved or deleted from the
CueStation directory.
System Startup
Launch the application CueStation. If it is your first time running CueStation, you should see the Mixer Configuration window.
If you are not using an LX-300 frame with an EtherTracks module, select Network > Server > localhost
(127.0.0.1). This will automatically start up VirtualLX on your local computer. You can use it to simulate the
Matrix3 hardware for “offline” programming.
If you do have the appropriate Matrix3 hardware, turn it on and watch the front panel to see the IP address displayed during startup. If you have more than one frame in your system, turn all of the frames on. Each frame
should have a unique ID starting with 01, and are numbered sequentially.
When you see OK “twirlies” in the front panel of all frames, the hardware is ready to be connected to CueStation.
Select Network > Select Server > Specify Servers... to add an entry for the IP address of your system. Click
Add New Server and type a description of the system followed by its IP address. Or, click on Find Available
Servers to have CueStation automatically detect servers on your network. Next, select the server you will use,
and click on Connect to Selected Server.
26
Installation and Setup
At this point, CueStation 4 software is connected to the server. You should see the IP address of the server you
selected in the title bar of all CueStation windows. If you open the Inputs window (Ctrl+2), you will see that no
controls are displayed. This is because the system hasn’t been configured yet. The next step is to configure the
hardware (or virtual hardware if you are trying the software using VirtualLX.)
Configure the Mixer
Next, open the Mixer Configuration window from the Windows menu, and select Configuration > Query
Hardware for Configuration.... Click Use Hardware Config to accept this configuration. See the Mixer
Configuration (p. 153) chapter in the Hardware and Configuration (p. 151) section for more information about
setting up your hardware and configuring your system.
If you are using VirtualLX:
– Enable a frame by selecting the checkbox for Frame 1 on the left hand side of the window.
– Configure the frame for 16 inputs and 8 outputs by selecting Analog Input for the first and second slots, and
Analog Output for the third slot.
– Configure all inputs for four bands EQ and Dynamics, and all outputs for four bands EQ and Delay by enabling
the appropriate checkboxes at the bottom of the I/O module region. Accept the default assignment of local
DSP in the Execute On: box.
– Outputs can be configured to behave as matrix outputs, aux sends, PFLs, AFLs, or PAFLs. To keep it simple
for now, configure the first six outputs as type Output, and the last two outputs as type Aux M for mono aux
send. You can change the output type by clicking on the up and down arrows to the right of the Output label.
Once you have finished setting up the inputs and outputs, select Configuration > Renumber All Channels.
This will resolve any numbering conflicts for all inputs and outputs. Next, click Regenerate Default Labels at
the bottom of the Mixer Configuration window. This will cause CueStation to create default labels for all inputs,
outputs, and aux sends.
The bottom of the Mixer Configuration window presents you with options for the number of mix buses, bus assign
switches, and Virtual Groups. Accept the defaults for now, but feel free to revisit this window later and experiment
with other options, such as 8 bus assigns or 16 Virtual Groups.
If you are using VirtualLX, the window should look like this:
Installation and Setup
27
If you are connected to any Matrix3 frames, the configuration will vary depending on the modules installed.
When you are finished setting up a basic system configuration, select Configuration > Send Configuration
to Frames. This will bring the server up-to-date on the system configuration. You are now ready to start routing
audio from inputs to outputs.
Tour the Mixer Windows
Open the Inputs window. Now that the system has been configured, the mixer windows display various fader
controls.
28
Installation and Setup
If you are connected to a frame that has audio sources connected to the audio inputs you will see metering activity next to the faders. If you are not connected to audio, these meters will be black. The control types are labeled
on the left hand side of the window.
Although you have configured two aux sends, only one is displayed by default. If you wish to see both at once, press the +
Tip:
button in the upper right hand corner of the window. Alternatively,
if you wish to see just the second aux send, click the gray area
If you click on the shortest edge of a blue
below the vertical blue bar labeled 1. Similarly, a horizontal blue
scroll bar, you can click and drag it to
channel range bar at the bottom of the window can be used to
change the number of channels that will
specify which Inputs are displayed.
appear in the window.
Create a “Defaults” Cue
It is a good idea to create a “Defaults” cue that includes control point settings for the entire system in its default
state. Type F4 to open the Capture window. In the empty box to the right of (Create New Cue) type the name
Installation and Setup
29
Defaults. Click the Check All Subcue Types button to select all subcue types. At this point, the window
should look similar to this:
Depending on your configuration, you might see different subcue types greyed out or disabled. In the lower left
corner of the Capture window, put a checkmark in the box next to AutoHide Window. Click the Click to Capture
New button to create the cue. When you do this, a cue will be created with subcues for all specified types, and
the Capture window will disappear. This cue, named Defaults, will be added to the cue list.
Tip:
Press F4 to bring up the Capture window to create a new cue and insert it at the end of the current cue
list. Press F3 to create a new cue without placing it in the cue list.
Pass Inputs to Outputs
We will now configure the mixer windows to pass audio inputs 1 and 2 to outputs 1 and 2.
– Set Inputs 1 and 2 fader levels to unity by any of the following methods:
– Dragging the fader to Unity level.
– Clicking U, beside the fader.
– Typing 0 inside the Level box.
– Typing z (Zero) inside the Level box.
– Pan inputs 1 and 2 to hard left and hard right, respectively, by any of the following methods:
30
Installation and Setup
– Drag the pan control to the far left and right for the two inputs.
– Type n (Nada) and x (Xtreme) for hard left and hard right.
– Type -100 and +100 in the pan boxes.
– Type L100 and R100.
– Click the bus 1 and bus 2 buttons ON for both channels.
– Open the Matrix Window and select Matrix > Set Diagonal, Buses, Outputs. This will set all bus masters
and output masters, bus 1 to output 1, bus 2 to output 2, etc. to unity (0.0 dB).
– Open the System Level window, and set the System Level and Trim to unity.
At this point, audio connected to inputs 1 and 2 will be mixed to outputs 1 and 2.
Capture a “Basic Mix” Cue
Capture this new cue using the same procedure used for capturing the Default cue. This time, however, only
select those subcue types that correspond to control points you changed.
– Press F4, and type Basic Mix for the cue name.
– Click the Uncheck all Subcue Types to de-select the types. Then select the following subcue types: Input
Bus Assigns, Input Pans, Input Levels, Bus Levels, Matrix Levels, Output Levels, System Level, and
System Trim.
The window should look like this:
– Click Click to Capture New. The subcue will be placed in the cue list and cue library.
Test the Cues
Recall the cues using each of the following methods. Observe the controls in the mixer windows as they change.
– Open the Cue Library window and double-click the ID for the two cues.
– Open the Transport window and click the Go button to sequentially recall the two cues.
– Open the Cue List window and double-click the Index for the two cues.
Change the Cues
Set the fade time for the input levels 1 and 2 to one second.
Installation and Setup
31
– Recall the Basic Mix cue, using one of the techniques from Test the Cues (p. 31), immediately above.
– Open the Inputs window.
– Set the fade times for input channels 1 and 2 to one second by typing 1 in the Fade boxes for these channels
at the bottom of the Inputs window.
– Press F2 to Capture Differences
– Click Click to Capture Differences.
Test the cues again.
Change the Cues Again
Change the level for input channels 1 and 2, without recalling the cue.
– Open the Cue Library window.
– Select the Basic Mix cue, and notice the list of subcues in the right side of the window.
– Select the Input Levels subcue, which is most likely named "Basic Mix: Input Levels". Notice the list of control
points in the lower half of the window.
– In the drop-down box next to Display, select Expanded.
– In the Value column, change both values to -20.
Test the cue again, and watch the faders in the Inputs window fade to -20 over 1 second.
Save your work
– Select Projects > Save Project As....
– Provide a name for your project.
– Click Save.
You’ve just gone through the basic steps required to build an entire show. The following chapters will explain
each of these steps in more detail, in addition to other features such as Wild Tracks audio playback, SpaceMaps,
and VRAS.
32
Installation and Setup
Matrix3 Mixer
Signal Flow
Mixer Controls
System Monitoring
VirtualLX
35
43
53
59
Signal Flow
Overview
Inputs
Bus/Matrix
Outputs
Aux Outputs
PAFL Outputs
VRAS Sends
VRAS Returns
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
The audio signal flow in CueStation is very similar to that of a traditional analog console, with a few additional features.
The signal flow overview diagram on this page shows the overall flow of audio through the various CueStation windows,
and diagrams on subsequent pages cover each area in detail.
Overview
Output Modules
PFL/AFL/PAFL
Processing
CueStation 4.5.0 Signal Flow - Overview
2006.08.13
Input Modules
⌘ 3 Input
Processing
⌥ ⌘ 0 Mixer
Configuration
⌘ 2 Inputs
⌘ 4 Bus
Masters
⌘ 5 Matrix
256 in x 400 out
⌥ ⌘ 0 Mixer
Configuration
⌘ 9 Aux
Processing
Output Modules
⌘ 8 Aux Masters
⌥ ⌘ 0 Mixer
Configuration
⌘ 7 Output
Processing
Output Modules
⌘ 6 Output Masters
⌥ ⌘ 0 Mixer
Configuration
⌥ ⌘ 4 Wild Tracks
⌥ 5 Space Map
⌥ ⌘ 5 VRAS
⌥ option (alt on PC)
⌘ command (control on PC)
⌘ 0 Virtual Groups
⌘ 1 System
Level
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Signal Flow
35
Inputs
Inputs
Input Module
Meters on
LX-300
Input
Scale
CueStation
Meters
Mac Command Keys
⌘ 2 Inputs
EQ
Scale Adjustment
from Trim setting
Dynamics
Dynamics
Meters
⌘ 3 Input Processing
⌥ ⌘ 1 Input Meters
Windows Cmd Keys
Delay
Ctrl 2 Inputs
Send to
Wild Tracks
Ctrl 3 Input Processing
Polarity
Alt Ctrl 1 Input Meters
PreFader
Listen Send
Channel
ON / Off
Send to
VRAS Input
Trim
PreFader
Aux Send
Mute
Input
Fader
Post Fader
Aux Send
PAN
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Left Column
Bus Assign
Buttons
Right Column
Bus Assign
Buttons
To Buses
To Buses
Signal Flow
Bus/Matrix
Bus - Matrix
From Bus Assigns
Mac Command Keys
Bus 1
⌘ 4 Bus Masters
⌘ 5 Matrix
Polarity
Windows Cmd Keys
Trim
Ctrl 4 Bus Masters
Ctrl 5 Matrix
Mute
Bus Master 1
Fader
Matrix Level
Row 1
Col 1
Matrix Level
Row 1
Col 2
Matrix Level
Row 1
Col 400
Matrix Level
Row 256
Col 1
Matrix Level
Row 256
Col 2
Matrix Level
Row 256
Col 400
to
Output
Master 1
to
Output
Master 2
to
Output
Master 400
From Bus Assigns
Bus
256
Polarity
Trim
Mute
Bus Master 256
Fader
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Signal Flow
37
Outputs
From Matrix Column
Outputs
Main Outputs
Polarity
Trim
Mac Command Keys
⌘ 6 Output Masters
Mute
⌘ 7 Output Processing
Output
Fader
Windows Cmd Keys
Ctrl 6 Output Masters
System
Level
Ctrl 7 Output Processing
EQ
Dynamics
Meters
Delay
After Fader
Listen Send
Output
Scale
Output Module
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Signal Flow
Aux Outputs
From Input channels
Aux Sends
Aux Outputs
sum
Polarity
Mac Command Keys
Trim
⌘ 8 Aux Masters
⌘ 9 Aux Processing
Mute
Output
Fader
Windows Cmd Keys
Ctrl 8 Aux Masters
Ctrl 9 Aux Processing
System
Aux
MUTE
EQ
Dynamics
Meters
Delay
After Fader
Listen Send
Output
Scale
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Output Module
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Signal Flow
39
PAFL Outputs
PAFL Outputs
From one AFL
selection at a time
(Listen button)
Output Type
(set in Mixer
Configuration)
AFL
AFL has
precedence
over PFL
PAFL
select
From each PFL
selection
(Listen button)
PFL
sum
PFL HOLD Logic
HOLD ON :
multi-PFL selection
allowed.
HOLD Off:
Only one PFL selection at a
time.
EQ
The configuration for the output
module used for PFL/AFL/PAFL
must be set to match the maximum
EQ, Delay Time, and Dynamics
found on any channel in the system.
DSP Mirror of channel
for PFL/AFL
Dynamics
Delay
CueConsole
Editor Meters
Output Scale set by
an External Subcue.
CueStation 4.5.0
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Output
Scale
Output Module
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40
Signal Flow
VRAS Sends
Input Module
Input
Scale
Meters on
LX-300
VRAS sends
EQ
CueStation
Meters
Dynamics
Scale Adjustment
from Trim setting
Mac Command Keys
⌘ 2 Inputs
Delay
⌘ 3 Input Processing
⌥ ⌘ 1 Input Meters
⌥ ⌘ 5 VRAS Window
Polarity
Send to
VRAS
Processor
Windows Cmd Keys
Channel
ON / Off
Ctrl 2 Inputs
PreFader
Listen Send
Ctrl 3 Input Processing
Alt Ctrl 2 Input Meters
Trim
Alt Ctrl 5 VRAS Window
PreFader
Aux Send
Mute
Input
Fader
Post Fader
Aux Send
PAN
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Signal Flow
Left Column
Bus Assign
Buttons
Right Column
Bus Assign
Buttons
To Buses
To Buses
41
VRAS Returns
VRAS Returns
&
Loopback
Extension Returns
VRAS Return
- or Loopback
Extension Return
Mac Command Keys
⌘ 2 Inputs
Polarity
PreFader
Listen Send
⌥ ⌘ 5 VRAS Window
⌘ 6 Output Masters
Trim
CueStation
Meters
Windows Cmd Keys
Ctrl 2 Inputs
PreFader
Aux Send
Mute
Alt Ctrl 5 VRAS Window
Ctrl 6 Output Masters
Input
Fader
Post Fader
Aux Send
PAN
Left Column
Bus Assign
Buttons
Right Column
Bus Assign
Buttons
To Buses
To Buses
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Signal Flow
Mixer Controls
Fader Controls
Matrix Window
Signal Processing Controls
43
48
50
CueStation employs a mixer structure that is modeled after a traditional console, but with capabilities that go far
beyond. The following pages describe the CueStation interface for windows that control how audio is routed and
processed.
Fader Controls
The most complex and commonly-used control sets are in the various fader windows. These windows contain a
number of channel strips, and may contain master controls that affect all fader controls simultaneously.
There are five different fader windows: Inputs, Bus Masters, Output Masters, Aux Masters, and Virtual Groups.
Mixer Controls
43
Input Channel Strips
Input channel strips can have, depending on their configuration, the following components:
– A Channel Select button, labeled with its channel number (assigned
when you configured the system). This control has a function for both
automation and mixing. When capturing cues, the selection of channels
can be used to constrain the range of channels captured into subcues.
More information on using Channel Selects can be found in Channel
Select (p. 70), in the CueStation Automation (p. 63) section.
– A fader Label text box. Faders can be automatically labeled when configuring the mixer, or you can click inside the box and type a new label.
– An Auxiliary Send level or pan box, possibly with a Pre-Fader Listen
button. This control appears only when the mixer is configured for auxiliary sends and Display > Show Aux Sends is selected.
– An Analog Scale selector, which sets the signal scaling factor. This
control is only active for analog input or output channels. For more information about analog scale, see the Component Specifications (p. 169)
chapter in the Hardware and Configuration (p. 151) section.
– A Trim knob with a meter+value box below it. You can drag the knob or
drag the meter to adjust the value, or type a value directly. The adjacent
Unity button resets the control. These trims can be used to adjust the
relative levels of the automated mix during a performance without interfering with the overall contour of the automation.
– Bus Assign channel buttons, arranged in paired (left channel, right
channel) columns.
– A Pan control knob with a meter+value box below it. You can drag the
knob or drag the meter to adjust the value, or type a value directly. The
adjacent Center button resets the control. Panning an input channel all
the way to the left will result in signal being sent only to enabled bus
assigns listed in the left column, and panning an input channel all the
way to the right will send audio only to bus assigns in the right column.
– Wait and Fade timing boxes for the pan control. The Fade time specifies
how long it should take for the pan control to reach the desired position.
The Wait time specifies how much time will pass before the fade will
begin.
– A set of automation controls, supporting Mute, + Polarity, Flip (restores
Level control when swapped with Aux, Trim, etc.), Solo, EQ enaBle, and
Isolate. A master set of controls to the far left of the fader strips provides
global control, toggling or resetting all buttons simultaneously.
– The Fader level control, described in detail below.
Tip:
When mixing, holding down the Cmd key while changing a mixer control or pressing enter in the data entry
for a mixer control will result in all selected channels being affected. If no channels are selected, all channels
will be affected. This can be used effectively when EQ’ing a set of related inputs or outputs. Alternatively,
you can hold down the Shift key to affect changes in stereo pairs.
Fader Level Control
The fader control contains up to eight elements:
– A Signal Meter to the left of the fader slider.
44
Mixer Controls
– The Fader Slider, which can be dragged up and down to adjust the level.
– A Channel Number at the top-right of the control, corresponding to the channel number at the top of the
channel strip. Clicking on the channel number will disable the channel completely, similar to the channel on/off
function found on analog consoles.
– An EQ shortcut button, which opens the EQ window. This is enabled only when the system is configured to
allow signal processing.
– A Unity (0 dB) shortcut button.
– One or two Listen buttons. These are enabled only when a PFL, AFL, or PAFL output is configured. For PFL,
Listen is enabled for all Input channels. For AFL, Listen is enabled for Aux Masters and Output Masters. An
output configured as PAFL enables all Listen buttons.
– VGroup A and VGroup B boxes. When the channel is assigned to a VGroup, its fader will show a scaling
bar along the fader track, indicating the scaling factor being applied to the fader level. When using two VGroups,
the scaling factor is the product of the VGroup levels (multiplicative, not additive).
– An off (− dB) shortcut button.
– If the channel is part of a loopback circuit, a Loopback channel number will appear below the − dB button,
and displays the corresponding input or output channel.
– Level meter+value box, and Wait, and Fade value boxes. You can drag the meter or value, or type a value
directly.
Input Patching
For any physical input channel, the incoming audio signal can
be re-patched to a different logical input channel. This is useful
for mixing live microphones, when you might want to quickly
switch to a backup channel, while still using the pre-programmed
automation for the original channel. The only restriction is that
the backup channel must be on the same physical input module
(frame and slot) as the original channel.
To patch audio within the Inputs window:
– Right-click on the channel select button of the channel you
want to patch into.
– In the context menu, select Patch in Audio From >, and then
select the channel you want to patch from.
Input patches can also be captured into cues using the "Input Patch" subcue type. See Capturing Cues (p. 70)
for more information.
To permanently re-patch audio from a physical input to a different logical input channel, use the Mixer Configuration window to change the input channel numbering, and re-send the configuration to the frame(s) in your
system.
Global Controls
Along the far left of the control panel, adjacent to and outside the channel strips, are some controls and labels.
From top to bottom, with variations dependent on your mixer configuration, these include:
– A master Channel Select button. This (A) indicates whether any channel has been selected and (B) toggles
the Channel Select for all faders simultaneously.
– An Auxiliary Select button labeled with the Auxiliary Number, and a text box for the Auxiliary Label. These
controls appear only when the mixer is configured for auxiliary sends and Display > Show Aux Sends is
selected. Double-clicking the label flips the aux fader and channel fader controls.
– A Trim button which, when double-clicked, flips the trim and level controls. The label text changes to indicate
which type of control the adjacent pan pot adjusts.
– A master set of automation controls, including Mute, + Polarity, Flip (restores Level control when swapped
with Aux, Trim, etc.), Solo, EQ enaBle, and Isolate. These buttons allow the settings to be toggled globally
for all inputs.
Mixer Controls
45
– Two global Auxiliary Select buttons labeled with their Auxiliary Number. If the Aux Sends are flipped with
the level control, these buttons are used to select
– A CLEAR button which turns off any Listen buttons.
– A HOLD button. When enabled, multiple PFL buttons can be activated simultaneously. When disabled, only
one PFL can be activated at a time.
– A Loopback label, visible when loopbacks are enabled in the mixer configuration.
– The Levels label. When double-clicked, flips the trim and level controls. The label text changes to indicate
which type of control the adjacent pan pot adjusts.
Tip:
You can disable the global control buttons in the mixer windows by right-clicking within the master set of
buttons along the left side of the window. The Mute, Polarity, Solo, EQ Enable, and Isolate buttons can be
disabled for all channels.
Aux Flipping
The fader slider, because of its length and orientation, provides a finer level of mouse control than the rotating
control knobs. When you find yourself making many fine adjustments to a Trim or Aux Level control, you may
wish to “flip” it to the fader slider.
To flip a control for a single channel, click that channel’s Flip button. To restore normal fader control, click the
Flip button again.
To flip a control for all channels of that type, click the global Flip button (near the left hand side of the window).
To restore normal fader control for all channels, click the global Flip button again.
To flip all faders to a row of Aux Levels, double click the appropriate Aux Level row label (at the left edge of the
Aux Row you wish to edit). When you are done editing Aux Levels, double-click the Aux Sends label (at the left
hand edge of the window, just below the Loopbacks label) to return to normal Trim/Level flipping.
The F9 and F10 keys flip through auxiliary channel rows, backward and forward, respectively.
46
Mixer Controls
Bus Masters
The Bus Master faders control the audio signal mixed from the input channels
assigned to each bus before it reaches the matrix. Bus channel strips have
the following controls, from top to bottom:
– A Channel Select button, labeled with the bus number.
– A Bus Label text box. Bus labels also appear in the Matrix window.
– A Trim knob, with a button to reset it to unity.
– A set of automation controls, as explained in Input Channel Strips (p.
44), above.
– A set of fader controls, with a fader slider, unity button, Virtual Group assigns, and level, wait, and fade controls.
Output Masters
–
–
–
–
–
A Channel Select button, labeled with the output number.
An Output Label text box. Output labels also appear in the Matrix window.
An Analog Scale setting, to adjust the scale of the output signal.
A Trim knob, with a button to reset it to unity.
A set of automation controls, as explained in Input Channel Strips (p.
44), above.
– A set of fader controls, as described in Fader Level Control (p. 44) above.
Aux Masters
The Aux Masters window has the same controls as the Output Masters, described above.
Vgroups
The values of arbitrary groups of faders can be scaled by Virtual Group Faders. VGroups can be used like the
VCA Groups in an analog console. A single Virtual Group Fader can be assigned to control many types of faders
at the same time. You can assign any number Input faders, Bus Master faders, Output Master faders, and Aux
Master faders to the same Virtual Group fader. You can also assign any fader to two Virtual Groups, allowing
even more control. The Virtual Groups window has the following controls:
– A Channel Select button, labeled with the VGroup number.
– A VGroup Label text box.
– A Trim knob, with a button to reset it to unity.
– A set of automation controls, as explained in Input Channel Strips (p. 44), above.
– A set of fader controls, with a fader slider, Unity button, Listen button, and level, wait, and fade controls.
Signal Trace
In any Mixer window, you can right-click on a channel select button and select "Show Signal Path". This will
open a small status window which shows where the audio in that channel is coming from, and where it is being
routed to. The window is continuously updated in real time. It can be very helpful in troubleshooting why you
aren't hearing audio when you think you should, or vice-versa.
Special Commands
Affecting Changes for Multiple Channels
There are several ways to apply changes to more than one channel at a time.
– Shift-click when using the mouse to change a control point (such as a Bus Assign) to make changes in stereo
pairs.
Mixer Controls
47
– Use Shift-Enter after typing in a new control point value (such as a Fade time) to make changes in stereo
pairs.
– Control-click on control points to change all selected channels. If no channels are selected, then all channels
will be affected.
– Use Control-Enter after typing in control point values to change all selected channels.
– Control-middle-click to change all control points in that page view.
Display Menu
The display commands show or hide various control components. The Fader window will resize itself automatically to fit any changes in display. This command is particularly useful when you have limited screen space or
if you want to simplify the user interface.
Display > Show Aux Sends
Display > Show Analog Scale
Display > Show Trims
Display > Show Bus Assigns
Display > Show Pans
Display > Show Pan Wait/Fades
Display > Show Buttons
Display > Show Extra Labels
Display > Show Faders
Display > Show Levels
Display > Show Level Wait/Fades
Display > Show Meters
Display > Show Compression
Display > Show Peak Hold
Display > Set Peak Hold Duration...
Set the peak hold time for the meters in the Inputs window only.
Display > Show Page Group Controls
Keyboard
In addition to the regular menu shortcuts, fader control windows may also support:
F9 and F10 Aux Flipping (p. 46) as described above.
Ctrl+F toggles the master Flip button.
Mouse
Ctrl+drag to copy control values from one channel to another. This can be used on the entire channel, or just
on a particular section of the channel strip, such as the bus assigns or the fader level.
Matrix Window
The matrix in CueStation 4 is an adaptation of a matrix found on traditional analog consoles. It provides distribution
of input bus signal to output channels.
48
Mixer Controls
Bus and Output Controls
The Matrix is presented as a grid.
Rows correspond to bus input
and columns to output channels.
Along the left and top of the grid
are corresponding control strips
of Channel Select buttons. These
are labeled with their Bus Number or Output Channel Number
and names.
The rest of the matrix is devoted
to cross-point value boxes: these
correspond to the knobs on a
physical console matrix. These
value boxes can be adjusted by
typing in a value directly, or by
clicking inside a box and dragging
the value up and down. Levels
are measured in dB (0 dB = unity); Waits and Fades are measured as decimal seconds.
Special Commands
Display Menu
Display > Show Levels (Cmd+L)
Switches the Matrix window to show matrix level values.
Display > Show Waits (Cmd+J)
Switches the Matrix window to show matrix wait-time values (used when capturing subcues)
Display > Show Fades (Cmd+K)
Switches the Matrix window to show matrix fade-time values (used when capturing subcues)
Display > Show Page Group Controls
Shows or hides the page group controls at the bottom of the window.
Matrix Menu
Matrix > Clear Matrix
Sets all the values in the matrix’s current mode to their default value (− dB off) for Levels, or 0.0 for Waits
and Fades).
Matrix > Clear Displayed Region
Sets the displayed set of cross-points (those shown in the window) to their default value (− dB off) for Levels,
or 0.0 for Waits and Fades). Cross-points that are not shown in the window will not be affected. This is
particularly useful when combined with custom layouts, such that each view of the matrix corresponds to a
particular function set of cross-points.
Matrix > Set Diagonal
Available only when viewing the Levels set of cross-points. It sets the diagonal cross-points to unity, and
non-diagonal cross-points to − dB.
Matrix > Set Diagonal, Buses, Outputs
Sets the diagonal, as above, and also sets the associated bus and output channel faders to unity. This is
simply a convenient shortcut to doing it all by hand.
Mixer Controls
49
Signal Processing Controls
The input, output, and auxiliary signal processing controls are used to set equalization, delay, and compression.
These windows contain a graphic equalizer, various EQ setting controls, delay control, and various compression
setting controls.
Channel Strips
Channel strips can have the following components, from top to bottom:
– A Channel Select button, labeled with the Channel Number. Selecting a channel in the Processing window
is equivalent to selecting the channel in its corresponding fader window.
– A channel label box. Faders can be automatically named when configuring the mixer, or you can click the box
and type a name.
– A Graphic Equalizer with 20Hz-20kHz± 20 dB range and drag-able control points. The number of bands of
EQ is configurable in the Mixer Configuration window.
– A pair of meters to the left of the Graphic EQ.
– A Bypass All Bands button, which will disable EQ for the channel.
– EQ band controls, each with:
– A Bypass button. When selected, the corresponding equalizer control point is disabled.
– A EQ Shape Type selector, allowing you to choose various equalization algorithms. The options available
are Parametric, Low Shelf, High Shelf, Notch, Low Pass, High Pass, and Band Pass.
– Gain, Freq, and Q meter+value boxes. You can drag the meter or value, or type a value directly.
– One or two Dynamics band controls, each with:
– A Bypass button, for disabling each band.
– Selector buttons to choose the type of dynamics processing: Gate, Expander, Compressor, and Limiter.
50
Mixer Controls
– A Linked button. Right-click on the button to select which channel the band should be linked to. Left-click
on the button to toggle whether the link is enabled or not.
– The Threshold, Attack, Hold, Release, Ratio, and Makeup Gain value boxes can be adjusted by dragging
or by typing a value directly.
– Delay controls, with:
– A Bypass Delay button, to disable the delay on that channel.
– A Delay value box. Type 0 to disable delay for the channel, or a decimal value to set delay. The delay can
be set by time in milliseconds, distance in feet, or distance in meters.
Special Commands
Display Menu
Display > Show EQ Graph
Shows or hides the blue EQ frequency graph area.
Display > Show EQ Phase
Shows or hides the signal frequency phase graph. This graph is displayed in green, behind the EQ band
graph.
Display > Show EQ Band Settings
Shows or hides the EQ settings area (Band Bypasses, Type, Gain, and Q controls).
Display > Show Delay Settings
Shows or hides the Delay setting area.
Display > Show Delay Distances
Shows or hides the Delay Distances setting areas.
Display > Show Dynamics
Shows or hides the Dynamics setting area (Compressor toggle, Threshold, Attack, Release, Ratio, and Gain
controls)
Display > Show Meters
Shows or hides the Meter and Compression Meter controls.
Display > Show Peak Hold
Display > Set Peak Hold Duration...
Set the peak hold time for the meters in the current window only.
Display > Show Page Group Controls
Shows or hides the Page Group controls.
Keyboard
In addition to the regular menu shortcuts, the arrow and tab keys navigate the various value boxes. By holding
down Shift when changing values, you can make changes in stereo pairs.
Mouse
Ctrl+drag to copy control values from one channel to another.
Additional Notes: Compression
The dynamics processor provides both expansion and compression capabilities. When the ratio is set to less
than 1.0, expansion is provided. When the ratio is set to greater than 1.0, compression is provided. Up to 10 dB
of makeup gain may be specified.
The following table shows how much make-up gain is required to maintain unity level when full compression/expansion is being applied.
Function
Ratio
Makeup-gain
Expander
0.1
-19.9 dB
Mixer Controls
51
Function
Ratio
Makeup-gain
Expander
0.2
-13.9
Expander
0.3
-10.4
Expander
0.4
-7.9
Expander
0.5
-6
Expander
0.6
-4.4
Expander
0.7
-3.1
Expander
0.8
-1.9
Expander
0.9
-0.9
Compressor
1.5
+3.5 dB
Compressor
1.6
+4.0
Compressor
1.7
+4.6
Compressor
2.0
+6.9
Compressor
2.5
+8.0
Compressor
2.7
+8.6
Compressor
3.0
+9.5
52
Mixer Controls
System Monitoring
CueStation Connection Status
Log Window
System Status Window
Signal Path
Meters
53
54
55
57
57
CueStation provides several ways of monitoring the activity and health of the system, including connection status
indicators in the bottom corner of every window. There are also several windows dedicated to providing feedback
about the state of the system.
CueStation Connection Status
When CueStation is connected to a server, the IP address of that server will be displayed in the title bar of every
CueStation window, next to the window title: "192.168.0.101: System Level". This makes it easy to tell whether your
CueStation client is connected or not. One basic method of monitoring system activity exists at the bottom of every
CueStation window.
Starting on the left, you can see the following text: **
Project is Show_Project. The two asterisks (**)
indicate that the project has been changed since it was
last saved. The next part (Project is Show_Project)
shows the name of the current project file; in this case
the project file would be Show_Project.lcsProject.
You can override this and set your own project title by selecting Projects > Set Project Title... and entering a name.
The two arrows in the bottom right corner of the window will turn yellow or green when that window is sending or
receiving information to or from the server. When the arrows are grey, it does not mean that the window has lost
connection; just that there is no current network activity. If the window has not received a response from the server
for over 4 seconds the background of the download arrow will change color. If there is still no response after 10
seconds, then the entire CueStation window
background
color will
change.
Window
Connection
Status
Normal
MixerD
not responding
- RED background
CueD
not responding
- BLUE background
CueD and MixerD
not responding
- PINK background
If the client has not received a response from the server
process for over 4 seconds the background of the
download arrow will change color.
System Monitoring
If there is still no response after 10 seconds, then the entire
CueStation window background color will change.
MixerD is the "hotter" background process. CueD is the
53
MixerD is the "hotter" background process. CueD is the "cooler" process. On the display color wheel, Pink is
halfway between Red and Blue.
The color of the background is determined by which server background process is not responding. For more
information about the various background processes, see CueStation 4 Background Processes (p. 203), located
in the Appendices (p. 199).
Log Alert and Page Alert
To the left of the connection status arrows, there are two icons: a telephone and a "LOG" icon.
Whenever a log entry of Warning level or higher is printed to the log, the LOG icon will flash the corresponding
color on all connected CueStation windows. Clicking on the icon will open the Log window, and clear the flashing.
The telephone icon gives you quick access to the Chat window. When another user pages you, all of your
CueStation windows will flash cyan once, and the telephone icon will continue to flash until you open the Chat
window.
Clicking on either icon at any time will open its corresponding window.
Log Window
The Log records all important system messages, both from the CueStation software and the Matrix3 system. It
provides a useful tool for troubleshooting hardware issues, communication problems, configuration errors, and
cue automation issues.
Log Entries
Clicking a column heading will sort the log alphabetically by that heading; clicking the heading a second time
will sort it in reverse alphabetical order. The time+date format is compatible with alphabetical sorting.
The ID and Time columns show the order in which the messages were received. The Source column indicates
which software or hardware component sent the message, while the Level column shows the severity of the
message and the Description contains the message. You can annotate the log entry in the Comment column
space.
You may re-order the log entries using a right-click drag, dropping the entry at a new location. The index numbers
will be updated to reflect this new position.
Types of Log Entries
There are six levels of log messages that might appear in your log window.
Critical
This level indicates a critical system failure. These messages have a red background.
54
System Monitoring
Error
This level indicates that an error has taken place. Error messages do not necessarily mean that something
is wrong with the system; for example, small amounts of audio dropouts in Wild Tracks playback could
happen under normal conditions. These messages have a pink background.
Warn
The Warn level is for messages that are important to note, but do not necessarily indicate that an error has
occurred; for instance, if there is a version mismatch between the client and the server. These messages
have a yellow background.
Info
These messages contain information about normal system activity. This includes recalling a cue, or the
completion of certain processes such as track-from-top or saving a project to flash. These messages have
a white background.
Debug
Debug messages contain debugging information only, and do not usually appear in normal CueStation operation. These messages have a green background.
Trace
These messages are used to trace program execution, and do not usually appear in normal CueStation
operation. These messages have a cyan background.
Adding Log Entries
The Log window also has an "Enter Log Comment" text field which can be used to easily enter comment lines
into the log. The warning level of the comment entry can be set using the drop-down box to the right of the text
box.
Special Commands
Log Menu
Log > Clear Log
Clears the log listing.
Log > Save Log As...
Saves the log messages to a file. You will be prompted for a file name and location.
Log > Save Log...
Saves the log messages to a file, using the current save name. The previously-saved log messages will be
overwritten.
System Status Window
The System Status window provides a remote view of the Matrix3 system performance, ranging from processor
load to temperature and voltage checks.
System Monitoring
55
Recommended Maximums
– DSP for any frame should be kept below
100%. An overdriven frame is not capable of performing all its mixing tasks in
real-time, and audio problems will occur.
– Mem for any frame should be kept below
100%.
– Front and Back temperatures should remain below 40ºC (104ºF).
– Control Lag should remain below 15ms.
– Voltages should be near +5V, +3.3V,
+5V, +15V, and -15V respectively. Slight
variations of up to ±0.1V are acceptable.
– The WT (Wild Tracks) and Server CPU
Load and Memory Usage should both
remain well below 100%.
56
System Monitoring
Signal Path
It can sometimes be helpful to see the signal path to/from a particular channel. To this end, CueStation has a
signal path view which changes dynamically as the routing of a source changes.
To view the signal path for an input channel:
– Open the Inputs window (Cmd+2).
– Right-click on the channel number in the Channel Select button at the
top of the window.
– In the menu that appears, select Show Signal Path.
A window should appear similar to the ones shown at right.
You can also view the signal path in relation to an aux send, bus, or output
channel, by going to any other mixer window and right-clicking on the
channel select number.
Meters
The meters provide real-time metering of Input, Output, and Auxiliary signal. Input is scaled to trim levels.
The meters have a simple set of controls. From top to bottom:
– The Meter itself, showing signal in the range − dB to unity
(0 dB).
The meter scroll bars have several unique controls:
– The horizontal scroll bar has +/- buttons to add or remove
channel strips from the window, and </> buttons to scroll
through the strips when they don’t all fit in the window.
Additionally, clicking the maximize window button will expand
the window to the size that best accommodates the channel
strips.
The meter labels will flash red after peaking has occurred. Peaks can be cleared by clicking on the meter.
The meters also have peak hold indicators. In the Display menu, you can select Set Peak Hold Duration... to
change the peak hold time. There are also options to Show Peak Hold and Show Peak Hold Text, which displays
the current dB level of that channel in text above the meter.
Tablet Controls
The Meter windows have additional controls, accessible through the Display menu, for channel editing purposes.
These controls are particularly useful for tablet/touch screen displays, but can also be used with a regular mouse.
In the Display menu, if you enable Show Tablet Controls, you will see four buttons across the bottom of the
window. These buttons correspond to four different modes:
– SHOW EQ - If this button is active, touching or clicking on a meter will cause the corresponding channel processing window to open, allowing quick access to EQ, dynamics, and delay controls.
– MUTE - Selecting a meter will mute that channel.
– SHOW STRIP - Selecting a meter will open the corresponding mixer window, with the selected channel in
the first column.
– ISOLATE - Selecting a meter will isolate that channel.
Grey Meters
Sometimes, the meters will appear grey and show no signal. This can happen for the following reasons:
System Monitoring
57
– CueStation is connected to a VirtualLX that is running in "built-in simulator" mode. Switch VirtualLX to "TCP
Connection" and connect to a Matrix3 frame, or have CueStation connect to the frames directly.
If CueStation is connected to a Matrix3 frame:
– Your network might have a firewall which is preventing the transmission of UDP packets.
– The subnet mask on your computer may not be set up correctly. In most cases, it should be set to
255.255.255.0; you can also ask your network administrator what you should use.
UDP Metering
CueStation's default metering setting is UDP broadcast packets. UDP packets are broadcast by the Matrix3,
and all of the clients "listen" to receive the metering information. This allows the meters to update faster and be
more accurate. If you are experiencing network problems with metering, you can switch back to TCP metering
by de-selecting Enable UDP Broadcast Metering in the Network menu.
Special Commands
Display Menu
Display > Show Meter Levels
Display > Show Compression
Display > Show Labels
Display > Show Peak Hold
Display > Show Peak Hold Text
Display > Set Peak Hold Duration...
Set the peak hold time for the meters in the current window only.
Display > Show Tablet Controls
Adds four buttons (Show EQ, Mute, Show Strip, Isolate) to the bottom of the window, for quicker access to
channel editing.
Display > Show Page Group Controls
58
System Monitoring
VirtualLX
Working Offline
Using VirtualLX as a Server
Virtual CueConsole
59
61
61
VirtualLX is an alternative server component for CueStation 4 clients. In a client-server software design the server
is the main conduit for control and communication of and between the client components (i.e. the various window
components of CueStation).
Working Offline
The CueStation 4 client normally connects to the server running on an LX-ELC EtherTracks module installed in an
LX-300. There are times, however, when you may find it necessary to do your cue programming work without having
access to your hardware. In such cases, VirtualLX provides a simulation of the system. You connect to this server
through the Network > Select Server > localhost (127.0.0.1) command.
VirtualLX provides status information and a set of windows that allow control of specific server components.
Show Details
Selecting the Show Details checkbox expands the VirtualLX window to display various status information, five
window tabs, and various controls.
When not selected, the VirtualLX window is reduced to a minimum size.
Status Information
Near the top of the window, Status shows the version number and build date for VirtualLX.
At the bottom of the window, Ram Usage shows details regarding the memory usage of the VirtualLX server components.
Control Buttons
The five Virtual-LX window tabs have a set of control buttons. Two of these control the server component “background
processes”, program routines that are responsible for monitoring communications and status, and providing server
services.
VirtualLX
59
– Restart Daemon is enabled only when the background process associated with the selected page has been
“killed”. Killing and restarting a background process is basically equivalent to “rebooting” that component of
the server.
– Kill Daemon shuts down the background process associated with the selected page.
– Scroll Down moves the page’s scrollbar tab to the bottom of the message list.
– Clear Output removes all the messages from the selected page.
Project Database
The Project Database window lists system messages regarding the database background process, its communication with other background processes, and any project stored within the database. The database process
controls access to subcues, cues, cue lists, and other project components.
– Open Project... is equivalent to the CueStation Project > Open Project... command.
– Save Project... is equivalent to the CueStation Project > Save Project As... command.
– Cancel is enabled while a project is being opened, and cancels the project upload.
Mixer Control
The Mixer Control window lists system messages regarding the mixer background process, its communication
with other background processes, and the status of various signal mix paths. The mixer background process is
responsible for controlling and adjusting the signal mix.
DSP Simulator
The DSP Simulator window lists system messages regarding the DSP background process, its communication
with other background processes, and the status of its accessory components. The DSP simulator is responsible
for accurately emulating the digital signal processor used in Matrix3.
HSB Simulator
The HSB Simulator window lists system messages regarding the HSB background process, its communication
with other background processes. The HSB simulator is responsible for accurately emulating the high-speed
data bus, which transfers digital audio data from various inputs to the DSP, and from the DSP to various audio
outputs and the LX-300 data links.
The HSB Simulator page also identifies which simulated or physical high-speed bus will be used:
– Connect to LX-300 via specifies which hardware VirtualLX should try to control: its own local simulation of
hardware, or actual Matrix3 hardware running elsewhere on the network.
– Use built-in Simulator controls the internal (software-only) Virtual LX-300 emulation. This is the default
setting.
– Use TCP Connection selects a server on the network to control remotely. See the following section, Using
VirtualLX as a Server (p. 61), for more information on using VirtualLX as a server.
– COM3 selects communication using the LX-COS comm/sync serial connection. Remotely controlling a
system over a serial line is not recommended, due to the low bandwidth of the connection. This option is
typically used only in light-duty or recovery situations.
When using the COM3 or Use TCP connection option, a target IP address must be provided:
– [ip addr] (nominally 192.168.0.101) sets the IP address of the EtherTracks module that the HSB background process should connect to.
CueConsole
The CueConsole page has controls for the CueConsole background process. This process is not started automatically when VirtualLX starts. To start the process, use the Restart Daemon button. See the Virtual
CueConsole (p. 61) section for more details.
60
VirtualLX
Web Server
The Web Server page has controls for the Web Server process. This allows you to test web pages offline before
uploading them to a frame. You can add HTML files the same way, as described in Matrix3 Web Pages. To
view the web pages, direct your web browser to http://127.0.0.1:8080/filename.html .
Using VirtualLX as a Server
Most of the time, the background processes of the Matrix3 are running on an LX-ELC module. In systems with
many client programs, or in single frame systems that use Wild Tracks, system performance can become compromised if the LX-ELC module becomes overburdened. In order to maximize system resources, it is possible
for the background processes to run on a separate server computer, or even on a computer that is also running
a CueStation client. A version of VirtualLX that can be configured to run automatically on a Linux computer is
called lxelcd.
In order to use VirtualLX as a server, first make sure that your computer is on the same network as a Matrix3
frame. See CueStation Networking (p. 201) for information on how to set up your network.
– Open CueStation, and in the Network menu click on Select Server > localhost (127.0.0.1). This will automatically start VirtualLX.
– In VirtualLX, make sure the Show Details box is checked, and then click on the HSB Simulator tab.
– Near the bottom of the window there is a Connect to LX-300 via: label, followed by a drop-down box which
defaults to Use built-in Simulator, and a text entry box with an IP address. Change the IP address to that
of the Matrix3 frame you want to connect to, and then click on the drop-down box and select Use TCP Connection.
– A dialog box will ask for confirmation, click OK.
At this point, the background processes that control the Matrix3 frame are running on your computer, as part of
VirtualLX. In order for other client programs to connect to the frame, they must connect to the IP address of your
computer.
Virtual CueConsole
The CueConsole window lists system messages regarding the CueConsole background process, its communication with other background processes, and the status of the CueConsole controller it is connected to. The
CueConsole background process is responsible for monitoring and controlling the movement of CueConsole
controls.
VirtualLX does not start the CueConsole background process automatically. To start the CueConsole process,
click on the CueConsole tab, and then click on Restart Daemon. This will allow you to test CueConsole mappings
offline.
In order to use the CueConsole emulator, open CueStation and connect to VirtualLX on localhost (127.0.0.1).
In the Subcue Library or Frame Control window, create an External of type CueConsole2, with a "Map Transporter
Module" command. When you recall the subcue or click on Do Selected, a new window will appear, containing
a virtual Fader module. All CueConsole2 modules are supported.
VirtualLX
61
62
VirtualLX
CueStation Automation
Building A Show
SpaceMaps
Wild Tracks
VRAS: Variable Room Acoustics System
65
93
109
127
Building A Show
Automation Overview
Automation Signal Flow
Automation Basics
Channel Select
Capturing Cues
Building a Cue List
Running a Show
Editing Cues
Cue and Subcue Libraries
Externals Subcues
Custom Subcue Types
65
67
69
70
70
73
76
78
80
85
86
Automation Overview
CueStation mixer automation is based on the movement of mixer controls over time. It provides dynamic automation,
which allows for fades and other changes over time, as compared to simple snapshot automation, which typically
sets all controls instantaneously.
CueStation offers a graphical interface for various mixer control points. A control point is any adjustable mixer control,
such as a fader, pan knob, or EQ setting. The values for a set of control points are contained in a subcue and a set
of subcues can be captured to create a cue. These cues can be placed in a cue list. During a show, the cues in the
cue list will be triggered manually, automatically in sequence, at a certain time point, or via a controller external to
the system.
The subcue, cue, and cue list structure provides a compact system for defining control automation. The complete
CueStation data hierarchy, from the bottom up, is as follows:
Control Points
A control point in CueStation is defined in a general sense as any parameter that can be adjusted manually or
by the automation system. As with physical consoles, a lot of the control points are associated with faders knobs
and switches. Some control points address signal-processing parameters, such as equalization and delay while
other control points, like isolate, affect the operation of the automation system itself.
For example, Input faders have three control points: Level, Wait, and Fade. Level sets the target fader value, and
Fade sets how long it will take to move the fader to the target value. Wait sets the delay between recalling the cue
and the start of the fader movement. This allows one to program a cue that, for example, starts a three-second fade
to unity one second after recall. All three control points are contained in each Input Level subcue.
Subcues
A Subcue is a collection of control points. The automation structure in CueStation is based on
absolute destinations, which means that the control points contained in subcues reflect the state the mixer will
be in when the recall of that subcue is complete, regardless of what those control point were set to initially. In
other words, it doesn't matter whether the fader for input channel 10 is at 0dB or − dB, if a subcue is recalled
with the information "Input 10 Level: -20.0dB Fade: 5 Wait: 0", the fader will move from wherever it was to -20dB
over 5 seconds. It also means that you cannot have control points with relative values, such as "5dB louder than
the previous cue"; you would have to set it yourself manually to the correct level.
Cues
A Cue in CueStation refers to a collection of subcues that will be recalled as a group. A cue could contain many
different types of subcues, or only one subcue. Cues do not contain any information about control points; a cue
only has references to subcues: it "points" to all of the subcues it contains. If a subcue has a wait time associated
with it, that information is also stored as part of the cue.
Building A Show
65
Cue Lists
A Cue List is an indexed collection of cues that are intended to be recalled in a certain order. Like a cue, a
cue list does not have any control point data in itself, it merely contains references to the cues associated
with it. A cue list can also have triggering and timing information associated with each cue; this is covered
in more detail later on in Building a Cue List (p. 73).
Project File
The Project File is the container which stores all automation data. A project file also contains the configuration
of the hardware, layout information, and network port settings. Any of the data in a project file can be "merged"
into another project; this provides a method for "importing" cues, cue lists, or any other automation data.
Project files can be saved to your client computer's hard drive, or to the flash memory inside a Matrix3 frame.
Projects saved to your hard drive will have a ".lcsProject" extension.
Subcues are like
letters:
Cues are like
words:
The basic building
block of written
language is a set of
letters.
Letters are used to
Words are used to
make words. The same
make sentences. The
letter can be used in a same word can be
number of different
used in any number of
words.
sentences.
a b c
e
q w
r k
f
d z
i n
s hy
j x
g t
m p o u
l v
words
the
blah
Drum
s
r
lette are
not number
same is hark
to
sound a
re
be a
or
Cue Lists are like
sentences:
To be or nt
o ot b.
e
Hark, a drum!
Jeremy Friesner
Cue-Based Automation
Control point settings are stored and organized through the automation editing windows. These windows support
the creation and management of subcues, cues, and cue lists. Subcues contain the control data for all mixer
functions and external device commands.
CueStation stores discrete states, target values, and time intervals, and calculates the continuous transformations
from cue to cue on the fly. Such efficiency is essential for large configurations. The flexibility of cue automation
is also critical in live performance where timing and order can not be accurately determined ahead of time.
Simulation and Synchronization
The server software component of Matrix3 includes many separate processes that have distinct tasks, related
to communication, CueConsole 2, and DSP emulation. Each DSP in the system runs a process that converts
the set of control points to a set of mix values for every input to every output maintained by the DSP. These
DSPs are synchronized through messaging on the High Speed Bus (HSB). Although most of the HSB is utilized
for audio data, some is reserved for control information as well. In addition to this mix processing taking place
on each DSP, it also is taking place in a mixer emulator process running within the server. The emulator runs
the same software as the DSPs, but instead of processing audio, its main task is to maintain a copy of the current
state of the mixing system, and communicate that state to CueConsole and CueStation when necessary.
Every time a cue is recalled, all DSPs and the DSP emulator in the server move through the dynamic processes
described in the cue data. The on-screen faders receive updates from the server, and thus will move at the
same time, and with the same rate, that signal levels are varied in the LX-300. If time code is received or generated by the LX-300, cues will be triggered as required in the cue list, and CueStation will display the changing
time code values and step from cue to cue in the Transport window.
This close coupling between client and server, and server and DSPs provides a path to the dynamic automation
in the LX-300 DSP modules. The automation system has been designed with multiple, concurrent real-time
processes in mind.
66
Building A Show
Automation Signal Flow
Signal Flow: Automation Overview
CueStation 4.3.1
Automation - Overview
2005.07.28
Input Modules
⌘ 3 Input
Processing
⌥ ⌘ 0 Mixer
Configuration
⌘ 2 Inputs
⌘ 9 Aux
Processing
Output Modules
⌘ 8 Aux Masters
⌥ ⌘ 0 Mixer
Configuration
⌘ 7 Output
Processing
⌘ 4 Bus
Masters
⌘ 5 Matrix
256 in x 400 out
Output Modules
⌘ 6 Output Masters
⌥ ⌘ 4 Wild Tracks
⌥ ⌘ 0 Mixer
Configuration
⌥ ⌘ 5 VRAS
⌘ 1 System
Level
Channel
ISOLATE From Automation
AUTOMATION
Control
Building A Show
⌘ 0 Virtual Groups
20051013
67
Signal Flow: Inputs Automation
CueStation 4.3.1 Automation - INPUTS
2005.07.28
Input
Scale
other input
controls
*
⌘ 2 Inputs
⌘ 3 Input Processing
EQ
⌘ 0 Virtual Groups
⌥ 1 Subcue Library
Dynamics
⌥ 2 Cue Library
⌥ 3 Cue List
Delay
Polarity
Channel
ISOLATE
From
Automation
Trim
PreFader
Listen Send
PreFader
Aux Send
AUTOMATION
Control
Mute
Virtual Group
A Assign
Virtual Group
B Assign
Solo-In-Place
Logic
Input
Fader
Fader Touch
ISOLATE
Post Fader
Aux Send
PAN
20050918
68
Left Column
Bus Assign
Buttons
Right Column
Bus Assign
Buttons
Building A Show
Automation Basics
This section will step through the process of capturing cues into a cue list. Each of these steps is explained in
more detail in subsequent sections.
1. Set Control Points
The first step in creating a cue is determining what the cue should do, and to set the control points on the mixer
accordingly. Remember that because of the way automation works in CueStation, you should set the mixer to
the state you would like it to be in once the cue is complete. For instance, if you wanted an input fader to fade
from 0 to -20dB over 5 seconds, you would set the fader to -20dB, and then set the fade time to 5. (The controls
of the mixer windows are covered in the Matrix3 Mixer section.)
2. Select Channels
Once you have set the mixer to the desired state, you can use Channel Select to filter which parts of the mixer
will be captured into the cue. For instance, if you want the level of input channels 5 and 6 to fade out, without
changing the level of the other input channels, you would only select channels 5 and 6.
3. Open Capture Window
When the control points have been set and the appropriate channels have been selected, type the F4 key to
open the Capture window. At the top is a text box where you can enter a name for your cue, and below it is another text box where you can enter a comment or short description about the cue.
4. Select Subcue Types
The next step is to determine which parts of the selected channels you wish to capture. In the middle of the
Capture window there are several lists of subcue types; place a checkmark next to each subcue type you want
to capture, and leave the other ones unchecked. If you want to capture the input levels but don't want the cue
to change the input labels, you would check the box next to Input Levels and uncheck the box next to Input
Labels.
5. Capture Cue
Once all the relevant subcue types have been selected, click on the button in the lower right corner labeled
Click to Capture New. A new cue will be created with the name you entered, referencing the subcues you selected, which contain information about the channels you selected.
The new cue will be appended to the current Cue List, and will also appear in the Cue Library. The new subcues
will appear in the Subcue Library.
6. Build a Cue List
After you have created some cues, you can organize them into a Cue List within the Cue List window. You can
add more cues from the Cue Library window by right-clicking and dragging them into the Cue List, or change
the order of the existing cues, again by right-clicking and dragging. The Cue List window is also where you set
whether a cue is triggered manually or by time code, or autofollows a previous cue by a certain length of time.
7. Edit Cues
If you find that you need to edit a cue after it has been captured, there are several ways of accomplishing this.
One way is through the Capture window, in Capture Differences mode. Instead of creating a new cue with the
selected control points, it will amend the changes to the most recently recalled cue, or any other cue you select.
Another way to change a cue is to edit the values of the control points manually, by viewing the contents of the
subcues. These methods are described more fully in Editing Cues (p. 78).
Building A Show
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Channel Select
In each of the mixer windows, you see a group of channels or controls that are all of the same type, whether
they are input channels, output channels, Wild Tracks Decks, or SpaceMap buses, etc. For each of those groups,
a subcue can capture information about all channels of that type (or Deck, etc), or, using Channel Select, only
the ones that need to change in a particular cue.
On a large console, for example, you usually wouldn’t need all sixty-four faders to simultaneously change value;
rather, you’d probably be fading only a few channels. As well, faders that are already in motion must be eliminated from subsequent cue triggering if they are to complete their movement uninterrupted.
The same thing applies to Wild Tracks Deck and SpaceMap trajectories: if you have a cue where a song starts
playing in one Deck, you wouldn't want to include in the cue that all the other Decks are stopped, because you
might have other sounds playing. So for this cue, you would only capture the Deck where the new song starts,
by selecting that Deck.
Using Channel Select
CueStation shows a labeled button at the top of or next to all
channel, bus, and virtual group controls (along with Wild Tracks
Decks, SpaceMap trajectories, etc). When you click this label
Channel Select is toggled, and the selected channels become
highlighted.
The Capture window has controls that further refine Channel
Select. You can see which channels will be captured by clicking
on the Use Channel Selects button. Each type of channel has
a checkbox next to it which you can deselect if you want to
capture all channels instead of just the selected ones.
When a cue that uses Channel Select is captured, the new
subcues that are created only contain information about those
controls that were selected. Later, when that cue is recalled,
only those channels that were selected will be affected. All
other controls will continue to do whatever they were doing: if
a channel was in mid-fade, it will continue to fade; if at rest, it
will remain at rest.
Follow Channel Selects
In the Mixer menu, there is a Follow Channel Selects option. If this is enabled, then whenever a cue with
Channel Selects is recalled, the channels selected in that cue will be automatically selected in the mixer windows.
This function is enabled only on a per-client basis. It is recommended that you leave this function off, as it can
sometimes cause you to capture more items into a cue than you intended.
Capturing Cues
The Capture window is where the actual cue and subcue creation takes place. The Capture window controls
make it easy to limit the control points and channels that will be captured, and to create a new set of subcues
corresponding to only those control points that have been changed.
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Capture Window Controls
The Capture window has four pages: Capture, Subcue Types, Control Point Sets, and Index Sets. The latter
three pages allow you to customize the set of control points captured for a subcue, or create new subcue types.
These pages are detailed in the Custom Subcue Types (p. 86) section.
The Capture page is your main working window for cue creation. There are five groups of controls:
– A Cue Selection area, which identifies the source cue for Capture Differences or shows (Create New Cue)
for Capture New. It also shows the new cue’s name and description.
– A Channel Selection area, where you can use Channel Select to identify which channels will be captured.
– Capture Differences controls, active in Capture Differences mode, where you can specify how new control
points will be integrated with the cue's current subcues.
– A Subcue Types Selection area, identifying the set of mixer component controls to be captured.
– A Capture Controls area, with options relating to the behavior of the Capture window, and how the cue will
be captured.
Cue Selection
The Cue Selection area provides a set of controls that allow you to create new cues, update existing cues, or
recall cue settings on which to base a new cue. This area contains:
– A Cue Selector box showing Create New Cue by default. If you select an existing cue from the drop-down
box, the subcues can be updated or replaced.
– A Cue Name text box showing Cue 0 or the name of the cue you selected. You can type in a name for the
new cue, or rename the selected cue.
– A Recall button, which triggers the cue, moving its control points to their previously-saved values.
– A Details button, which opens the Cue Library to show the current cue’s subcues.
– A Comment text box, in which you can type any comments regarding the cue.
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Channel Selection
The Channel Selection area controls
the selection of channels to be included in the cue. This area contains:
– A Use Channel Selects toggle
that specifies whether the captured
subcues will include values for all
channels, or only selected channels.
– One or more Channel Selection Range checkboxes to the right of Use Channel Selects. The channels selected via Channel Select are shown, and you can turn some of these sets off to further refine the channels
that will be included in the subcues.
– A Capture Isolated Channels button that specifies whether channels that are isolated are to be captured or
not.
– An Uncheck All Subcue Types button that unchecks all subcue types in the Subcue Types Selection area
below.
Capture Differences Controls
This section is only active for Capture Differences or Update Subcues, and controls how the intersection between
the new and old subcues will be handled. This area contains:
– Replace Mode and Amend Mode buttons, to toggle between the two most frequently used update options
– A Capture-Operator box with four options: New Control Points Only, Intersection, Union, and Old Control
Points Only.
– A Capture-Precedence box with three options: New Values Preferred, Old Values Preferred, and New
Values Always.
– A Venn Diagram showing a graphical description of how the subcues will be updated.
These controls are described in detail in Capture Window Advanced Mode (p. 215), located in the appendices.
Subcue Types Selection
The Subcue Types Selection area control the selection of subcue
types to be included in the cue. This is divided into sections by category, and each section contains:
– Category labels, such as Inputs or Trim. The labels are also buttons which select or deselect all the subcue checkboxes within
that category.
– A list of Subcue Types. Each selected subcue type will be included
in the cue.
The lists are grouped according to their subcue type category, as
defined on the Subcue Types page.
Capture Controls
At the bottom of the Capture window are additional controls that modify the behavior of the Capture operation.
– If the AutoHide Window checkbox is checked, then the Capture window will close automatically when the
Capture button is clicked. The window can be restored by typing the F4 key, or by selecting Windows >
Capture.
– The Persistent Subcue Select automatically selects the last subcue types captured the next time the Capture
window is opened.
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– An Add New Cue to Cue List checkbox and a Cue Lists selector. When the checkbox is enabled, the captured
cue will be added to the selected cue list in addition to the cue library.
– The Capture Type menu selects one of three capture types:
– Capture New captures a new cue according to the parameters you have set (cue name, channel automations,
and subcue types).
– Capture Differences, enabled when you have selected an existing cue in the Cue Selector box. This
causes new subcues of the same types included in the selected cue to be created and referenced in the
cue.
– Update Subcues is enabled when you have selected an existing cue in the Cue Selector box. This causes
the information in existing subcues to be changed, thus allowing global changes to be made.
The Capture Differences and Update Subcues functions are described in Editing Cues (p. 78).
Tip:
The F4 key is the easiest way to open the Capture window. However, when you use F4, it also sets some
of the capture controls automatically. You can also use F1, F2, and F3 to open the Capture window in
different modes:
F1 - Opens the Capture window in Update Subcues mode, with the last cue that was triggered selected.
F2 - Opens in Capture Differences mode, with the last cue triggered selected.
F3 - Opens in Capture New mode, but does not add the new cue to the cue list.
F4 - Opens in Capture New mode, and adds the cue to the cue list.
Building a Cue List
The Cue List is a sequence of cues that will be used in controlling the show. Each cue may be triggered manually, or automatically follow a previous cue, or be triggered by a time code value.
The Cue List Window
Cue list management is handled through the Cue List window. The Cue List area of the window shows an ordered
sequence of cues. These are the cues that will be triggered during show control. They are always sorted according
to their Index sequence. You may drag cues to the list from the Cue Library, or you may create a new cue entry
and right-click on it to select a cue. Note that you cannot create new cues in the Cue List window; you can only
create references to cues that already exist.
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The columns of the Cue List control a range of cue automation details. When you select a cue in the cue list,
the Subcue Library pane is displayed to the right. Selecting a subcue will cause the Control Point pane to be
displayed beneath the other two panes.
Creating a New Cue List
When you start a new project, a Default Cue List is created
automatically, and all newly captured cues will be added to this
list. To create another cue list, go to the Cue Lists menu within
the Cue List window, and select New Cue List.
Additional cue lists can be used to create speaker check cue
lists, or different versions of a show cue list for different performers, or even for system testing and diagnostics.
In the Cue Lists menu, you can also rename, duplicate, or delete
cue lists, and select the cue list you want to work on.
Adding Cues to a Cue List
There are several different ways of adding cues to your cue list.
Capture Window > Capture New
If you use the Capture Window to create a new cue, you can check the box next to the
Add New Cue To Cue List and then select the cue list the cue should be added to. The cue will be appended
to the end of the cue list you select.
Drag Cues from the Cue Library
Open the Cue List and Cue Library windows. Right-drag cues from the Cue Library directly into the Cue
List. A green line will show the position in the list where the cue will be added. You can also add multiple
cues at the same time, by selecting several cues in the Cue Library window and right-dragging them into
the Cue List window.
Cue Entries > New Cue Entry
In the Cue List window, you can use the New Cue Entry option in the Cue Entries menu to create an empty
cue entry. You can then right-click in the Cue ID column to select the cue you want to add.
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Reordering Cues
You can right-click on the Cue Index number of a cue and drag it to a different position in the list. This also works
when multiple cues are selected.
Cue List Timing and Automation
CueStation's cue automation allows you to set up timed sequences of cues that will trigger automatically, using
either autofollow or time code. This kind of automation is particularly useful when the timing of a sequence is
known and unchanging (to match video playback, for instance), allowing you to reduce the amount of manual
triggering required of the operator.
AutoFollow
AutoFollow is controlled by two parameters: the identity of the cue that will be automatically triggered, and the
time delay before this triggering happens. The automatically-triggered cue can be Next, which allows the creation
of linear sequences of cues; or it can point to any cue in the list, which allows a variety of looping and branching
strategies.
To set up a sequence of cues triggered by AutoFollow:
– Right-click in the AutoFollow column for the first cue in the
Tip:
sequence. This cue will still be triggered manually.
If you have a sequence of cues that you
– Choose Next, or the index value for the cue that will follow it.
would like to trigger all at the same time,
– Set a time in the Delay column. This is the time between the
you can set an AutoFollow of 0.0 seconds
triggering of the first cue and the second.
for each cue in the sequence.
– Repeat for subsequent sequential cues.
AutoFollow delays are cumulative, because AutoFollow cues are
organized in a sequential list. The time between the triggering of the first cue in a sequence and the last will be
the sum of all the AutoFollow delays. In a sequence of five linked AutoFollow cues with 1 second delays, the final
cue will be triggered four seconds after the first cue.
AutoFollow Techniques
AutoFollow can be used to loop a sequence of cues indefinitely by pointing the last cue in a sequence back to
the first cue (or back to itself in the minimal case). This can be useful for a “vamping” sort of structure, where a
sequence of events must repeat for an indeterminate period. It is always possible to break out of such a loop
by manually triggering a cue that is not in the loop. More information about vamping in CueStation can be found
in Regions, Loops, and Vamping (p. 122).
AutoFollow can also be useful if you prefer to build up automation sequences in functional “chunks” by defining
some cues as Console only, others as Matrix only, and so on. This is especially true for Externals subcues, like
the triggering of MIDI Machine Control Locate followed by a sequence of Play commands.
Time Code
Cues in a cue list can be set to be triggered by time code, whether it is generated internally by a Matrix3 frame
or read from an external source. For information on how to generate time code from a Matrix3 frame, see
Externals Subcues (p. 85).
To trigger a cue by time code:
– Right-click in the Trigger column for the cue and choose either Time Code or TC-Fwd ONLY.
– Enter the time code in the Time column for the cue.
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Cues triggered by time code can be arranged into very complex and
precisely timed sequences. Using Autofollow to create a sequence of
cues is useful for short sequences, or sequences where very exact
timing is not necessary, but it can be difficult to make timing changes in
longer, more complex sequences. Time code has the advantage of much
finer control over the timing of a sequence, down to hundredths of a
frame. Editing sequences in time code is also easier, because it is possible to change the timing of one cue without affecting the timing of all
of the subsequent cues. In CueStation 4, it is also possible to edit the
timing of blocks of cues by the same amount, while not affecting the
timing relationship among the selected cues.
Time Code in Forward Only Mode
There are two options for how cues are triggered by time code. The TC-Fwd ONLY option matches the original
design of the software: only those SMPTE cues after the current cue-on-deck in the Transport window will be
triggered by time code. The alternative option, labeled simply Time Code, is to allow any SMPTE cues in the
cue list to be recalled by time code, regardless of whether they are listed before or after the current cue-on-deck.
Running a Show
The Transport window provides a software-based controller for Matrix3.
Transport Window Overview
The Transport window displays the current active cue list, and provides controls for triggering cues and navigating
through the list. The columns shown are exactly the same as the ones in the cue list window, including the cue
index, id, name, and other details. The active cue and cue-on-deck are shown above the list. Below the cue list
is a time code display. At the bottom of the Transport window are five control buttons: Stop, rewind to the beginning (|<-), previous (<<), next (>>), and Go.
Selecting a Cue List
In CueStation 4, only one cue list can be active at a time. To switch to a different cue list, select the cue list you
want from the Cue Lists menu in the Transport window. To create or edit cue lists, use the Cue List window,
as described in Building a Cue List (p. 73).
Navigating the Cue List
At the top of the cue list window, the name of the active cue is displayed, along with its cue index number (reflecting its position in the cue list). Directly below it is the name of the cue-on-deck. The active cue is the cue
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that was most recently triggered, either by a Go button, time code, autofollow, or external control. The active
cue is highlighted with a green background in the Transport window.
The cue-on-deck is the cue that will be recalled when you click on the Go button. At that point, the cue-on-deck
will move to the active cue position, and the next cue in the list will become the cue-on-deck. The cue-on-deck
is highlighted with a yellow background.
You can also set the cue-on-deck by double-clicking on a cue in the Transport window.
The yellow buttons at the bottom of the window allow you to change the cue-on-deck without triggering cues.
Clicking on the rewind button (|<-) will set the first cue in the cue list to the cue-on-deck. The previous and next
buttons (<< and >>) allow you to skip forward or backwards one cue at a time.
The red Stop button will stop all Wild Tracks Decks, automation, autofollows, and generated time code.
Tip:
The Mixer > Silence! (Ctrl+Alt+Shift+S) command will mute the system instantly by setting the
System Trim off. Please note that this will not mute any Aux sends as they are not controlled by the
System Level or System Trim controls.
Recalling Cues
– Open the Transport window and select Cue Lists > [cue list]. The first entry in the list will be the cue-on-deck
by default.
– Click Go to fire the cue-on-deck. It will become the active cue, and the next cue in the list will become the
new cue-on-deck.
– If the cue has any wait or fade times associated with it, "Go" button will become a status bar, with the percent
complete matching the countdown (in seconds) on the Go button. The countdown time is based on subcue
durations, wait times, and autofollow wait times. Wild Tracks and SpaceMap Trajectory times are not included.
Time Code and Autofollow
Cues triggered by time code will be recalled automatically when the time code marker is reached. Below the
cue list is a time code display, which shows the current time and frame rate. The Time Code: button toggles
whether time code is online or offline. A message will appear in the Log window whenever this state changes.
If the Time Code: button is green, time code is enabled, and the frame(s) will generate and receive time code
normally.
If the Time Code: button is grey, then time code is disabled, and the frame(s) will ignore any time code it receives.
Generation of time code is not affected.
The time code display can be hidden by de-selecting Show Time Code in the Display menu. This will not affect
the online/offline state.
Track-From-Top
CueStation 4 has a Track-From-Top function similar to that used in many lighting consoles. Track-From-Top is
a powerful command that allows you to quickly skip to a different point in the cue list, and still have all of the
control points updated correctly. To use Track-From-Top:
– In the Transport window, double-click on the cue that you would like to trigger next. The cue will be highlighted
in yellow and the name will appear as the cue-on-deck.
– In the Mixer menu, select Track from Top (Ctrl+Alt+Shift+T). A dialog box will ask for confirmation, and then
CueStation will update all control points as if every previous cue had been triggered in order, with a few exceptions: - Wild Tracks Deck subcues will be loaded, but not played. - External subcues will not be triggered
unless specifically enabled (or keyed) for each subcue.
– A status window will show the progress of the track-from-top operation, as well as the status of each DSP.
– When the track-from-top is complete, the cue you originally selected will still be the cue-on-deck, ready to be
fired as needed.
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Track-from-top can be initiated from any window, but if the Cue List window is active, then track-from-top will
track to the cue selected in the cue list. Otherwise, track-from-top will use the cue-on-deck in the Transport
window.
Track-From-Top: Externals
For subcue types other than externals, the control point addresses act as a "key" so that only the last one in a
sequence is used. This makes Track-From-Top more efficient: instead of recalling hundreds of input level control
points at one time, only the most recent level for each channel is recalled. Externals have three different TrackFrom-Top settings, which are assigned default values automatically when they are created. These can be edited
by the user by right-clicking in the TrackFromTop column in the subcue detail section.
– Yes: The external will always be recalled during Track-From-Top.
– No: The external will never be recalled during Track-From-Top.
– Key: The external will only be recalled if it is the last external with the assigned key. For example, if cues 1,
3, and 5 each have an external that is assigned to Key: A and cues 2 and 4 each have an external that is
assigned to Key: B, only the externals in cues 4 and 5 will be recalled.
In the right-click menu, there is also a Reset option, which will reset the Track-From-Top setting back to the
default.
Externals saved in older projects will be assigned default Track-From-Top values.
Special Commands
Cue Lists Menu
Cue Lists > [...]
Loads a cue list into the Transport.
Keyboard
Home selects the first cue in the cue list (Top-Of-List).
End selects the last cue in the cue list.
Arrow keys select the previous or next cue in the cue list (step back and step forward)
Enter or Return trigger the Cue-on-Deck (Go)
Editing Cues
In the ever-changing environment of show control it is frequently necessary to revise cue settings; in cuttingedge design, there are times when you’ll also need to build cues “by hand.”
Using either of the Library windows, you can edit the contents of a subcue by hand, or update the subcue to the
current state of mixer controls.
Capture Window: Capture Differences
If a particular cue is not performing as needed, you can adjust the system controls and modify its subcues.
Other cues will continue to use the original subcue settings, while the modified cue will be given new subcues
that reflect changes to the system controls.
– Recall the cue you want to edit. Make the necessary adjustments to the control points you wish to change.
– Use the F2 key to open the Capture window in Capture Differences mode. Make sure that the correct cue is
listed in the top left drop-down box, otherwise the changes might be applied to the wrong cue.
– In the Control Point Set and Value Preference boxes, assisted by the Venn (overlapping circles) diagram,
choose the combination that will modify the correct set of subcue control points. Amend Mode is the default,
and is appropriate for most situations. These settings are explained in detail in Capture Window Advanced
Mode (p. 215).
– Select the types of subcues you want to change.
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– Click Click to Capture Differences. The cue will now use a new set of subcues based on the new settings,
while all other cues will continue to use the original set of subcues.
Tip:
The F2 shortcut key will Capture Differences in any control window.
Capture Window: Update Subcues
When you directly update a specific subcue using Update Subcues, all cues that reference that subcue will use
the new settings. This allows you to quickly and easily effect a global change. Use this with care: it also allows
you to quickly effect a global mistake!
– Trigger a cue that contains the subcue you want to change. Adjust control points as needed.
– Use the F1 key to open the Capture window in Update Subcues mode. Make sure the correct cue is listed in
the top left drop-down box.
– In the Control Point Set and Value Preference boxes, assisted by the Venn (overlapping circles) diagram,
choose the combination that will modify the correct set of subcue control points. Amend Mode is selected by
default. A detailed explanation of these settings is provided in Capture Window Advanced Mode (p. 215),
located in the Appendices.
– Select the types of subcues to be updated.
– Click Click to Update Subcues. The subcues will all be updated, but will retain their original name. All cues
that use this set of subcues will now use the updated settings.
Editing Shared Subcues: Copy-On-Write
A shared subcue is a subcue that is referenced by more than one cue. Updating a shared subcue in the Subcue
Library window will change that subcue globally, and all cues that reference it will now use the new control point
values. However, if you update a shared subcue within the Cue Library window, a new feature known as “CopyOn-Write”, or COW, is implemented, so that the control points for the current cue are changed, but all other cues
retain the original control point values.
COW affects the following changes when a subcue is updated in the Cue Library:
– A copy of the original subcue is created with a new ID number, and all other cues are edited to reference the
new subcue ID number.
– The original subcue (which is then no longer shared) is changed to reflect the new control point values.
It is important to remember this if your project includes Externals that trigger subcues, because the subcue ID
numbers stored in an External subcue will not be changed when this process occurs.
Editing Subcue Control Points
– Using either of the Library windows, select the subcue that needs to be updated. The control points associated
with the subcue will be shown in the lower pane.
– If you want to use the cue or subcue mixer control settings as a starting-point, “instant recall” the cue or subcue
by double-clicking on the ID number. The mixer controls will move to the settings specified by the subcue(s).
– Set the mixer controls to the desired settings.
– In the control point settings area of the window, click the Update All or Update Selected button as appropriate.
Update All will update all the control points in the subcue; Update Selected will update only those you selected.
Control point values in a subcue can also be edited by changing the values listed in the Value column. See the
following section for more information on editing control point values.
Adding/Removing Subcue Control Points
You can add or remove control points from a subcue. This is a particularly useful way of creating subcues that
contain combinations of control points that are not easily selected through the Capture window.
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Adding Control Points
– Click Add Entry. A new, blank control point will be added to the list.
– Type the exact name of the control point in the Control Points column. This name must correspond to an existing name in the Control Point Sets tab of the Capture window. You can add a channel range to the name.
You can separate channels with a space or comma, or select a range of channels by using a dash between
numbers (i.e. 1-4,6,7).
– Using either the CueStation graphical interface, or by typing values directly, set the value, wait, and fade parameters for the control point.
Removing Control Points
– Select the control point(s) and select Delete Selected.
Cue and Subcue Libraries
Subcue Library Window
The Subcue Library provides access to all the subcues that have been captured or built manually for the project,
and allows you to create new subcues. Selecting a subcue shows the control point values associated with it;
you can add, remove, or change the control points as needed.
There are two major components in the Subcue Library window.
Subcue List
This area has two control areas: a subcue filter selection box and a subcue list.
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Subcue Type Selection Box
The Show selection box allows you to limit the types of subcues
listed. You can choose All Subcue Types, which lists all known
subcues; or you can choose a specific type of subcue.
The subcue types are maintained using the Subcue Types tab
of the Capture window.
Subcue List
Tip:
If a specific type of subcue is selected,
then using Subcues > New Subcue
(Ctrl+N) will create a new subcue of that
same type. For instance, if you have selected Externals as your filter, then
Ctrl+N will create a new External subcue.
The subcues can be sorted by any of the column headings.
– ID is a system-assigned number and cannot be changed.
– Name is the subcue name. When subcues are created by
capturing they are given the same name as that of the cue,
with the subcue type appended to the name. The subcue can
be renamed; any cues that reference it will use the new name.
– Type identifies the subcue type. New subcue types can be created using the Capture window.
– Refs shows how many times the subcue is used (referenced) by a cue. Right-click in the Refs column to display
a list of all of the cues (or other subcues) which reference it.
– Comment provides a place to type a comment.
– Created is a convenience value indicating the date and time the cue was created.
– Enabled shows whether the subcue is enabled or not. Disabled subcues are also highlighted in pink.
– Locked shows whether or not the subcue is locked. Locked subcues are highlighted in grey.
Tip:
The keyboard shortcuts for Disable and Enable are Ctrl+Period and Ctrl+Comma, respectively. The Lock
and Unlock functions also have hotkeys: Ctrl+Shift+Period and Ctrl+Shift+Comma.
If a subcue is disabled globally within the Subcue Library, it will also appear disabled within any of the cues
that reference it, in the Cue Library and Cue List windows.
Subcue Parameters
When you select a subcue in the Subcue List window, the control points associated with it are listed on the right.
This area has two collections of controls:
Command Buttons
The command buttons create, remove, update, and analyze the control points.
– Add Entry adds a new, blank control point to the list. When you name the control point, that name must correspond exactly to an existing name in the Control Point Sets tab of the Capture window.
– Resolve Duplicates is enabled when you have selected one of a set of duplicated control points. All duplicates
of the selected control point will be deleted, and if there are other sets of duplicate entries, only the most recently created one will be saved.
– Delete Selected deletes a control point from the list.
– Update All sets the subcue’s control points to the values of the graphical mixer controls.
– Update Selected sets the selected control points to the values of the graphical mixer controls.
– The Display: determines how much detail is displayed in the Control Points list. The three options are:
– Compact makes the list as short as possible by combining control points with the same type and values
into one entry.
– Semicompact combines some control points of the same type and values into one entry.
– Expanded displays every control point on a separate line.
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– The Adjust Indices box has a list of all subcue types used in that subcue, and it allows you to change the
index for all types at the same time instead of having to edit each one by hand. Select the control points you
want to edit. Then choose the control point type from the Adjust Indices box, and for the Adjust by value,
type in the difference between the current value and the desired value. For instance, if the value is 4 and you
want it to be 6, you would type in 2. Click the Adjust Selected Indices button to make the changes you requested.
Control Point List
Clicking a column label will sort the entries alphabetically by the contents of that column, and clicking it again
will sort them in reverse order. The Control Points column is an exception in that clicking on the column label
will toggle between different sorting methods. The first method is the traditional way of sorting by type and then
by channel. An alternate method is by channel and then type. There are other sorting methods depending on
the type of control point.
– Control Points identifies a specific set of control points by name. These names correspond to those available
in the Control Point Sets tab of the Capture window. You can type a new name, but if it does not exactly correspond to an existing name it will not be valid. Use the Capture window to create new control point sets.
– Value sets the destination value for the control point. The values can be decibels, text labels, true/false, or a
few other types.
– Wait sets the delay between recalling the subcue and the actual start of movement for the control point. This
value is measured in seconds.
– Fade sets the length of time it will take the control point to reach its destination value. This value is measured
in seconds.
– Enabled shows whether the control point is enabled or not. Disabled control points are also highlighted in
pink.
If there are duplicate control points they will be highlighted in red. These conflicting control point value assignments
must be resolved: you can not set the same control point twice within a subcue. All but one of the control points
must be removed.
Creating New Subcues
– In the Subcue Library, select Subcues > New Subcue > [...] appropriately for the type of control points that
will be used.
– A name will be automatically created for the subcue depending on the type, and for some types, control points
will be automatically included as well.
– Add and update control points as needed.
Special Commands
Subcues Menu
Subcues > Recall Subcue (Cmd+R)
Recalls the selected subcue, respecting the wait and fade times associated with it.
Subcues > Instant Recall Subcue (Cmd+T)
Recalls the selected subcue, ignoring any wait and fade time settings.
Subcues > New Subcue > [subcue types]
Creates a new subcue of the selected type.
Subcues > Duplicate Subcue (Cmd+D)
Creates a copy of the selected subcue. The copy will have the same name, with a number appended (i.e.
“freep” will become “freep #2”).
Subcues > Delete Subcue (Del)
Deletes the selected subcue.
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Cue Library Window
The Cue Library provides access to the cues that have been captured or built “by hand” for the project. Selecting
a cue shows the subcues it references; selecting a subcue shows the control points it uses.
Cue Library
The Cue Library area of the window shows the set of all cues in the project. These can be sorted by any of the
column headings.
– ID is a unique number assigned to the cue. Show control systems recalling a cue must refer to it by its ID.
Tip:
– Name is the cue name. If you rename the cue the change will
also be seen in the Cue List.
In the Display menu, select Show Time
Code to display the current SMPTE time.
– Overlap indicates whether pending cue actions such as delayed subcues will be allowed to complete (Yes) or will be
cancelled (No) when the cue is triggered. Yes is the default
setting as of CueStation 4.4.
– Refs shows how many times the cue is referenced by a cue list. Right-click in the Refs column to see which
cue lists reference the cue.
– Comment provides a place to type a comment.
– Created is a convenience value indicating the date and time the cue was created.
– Wild Tracks Channel Assignments shows which channels are used by Wild Tracks in that cue, indicated
by a green background. Right-click and drag the numbers to change the channel assignments.
Subcue and Control Point Lists
When you select a cue in the Cue Library window, the subcues are listed on the right, and the control points are
listed in the lower pane of the window. For the most part, the subcue and control point areas of this window
function like those of the Subcue Library Window (p. 80), with the following exceptions:
– The Update All button does not change the subcue globally. If the subcue is referenced by other cues, Copyon-Write (COW) will be used instead. More information about this process can be found in Editing Cues (p.
78).
– Update Selected works similarly to Update All, but only for the selected control points.
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Building Cues
– In the Cue Library, select Cues > New Cue (Shift+Ctrl+N). A
new blank cue will be shown in the appropriate list.
– The cue will be created with the name Cue X automatically,
however, you can immediately type the name you want right
after the cue is created, without having to highlight it.
– Select Subcues > New Subcue Entry (Ctrl+N). Right-click in
the ID column of the subcue entry and select a subcue from
the list.
Searching Cues and Subcues
Tip:
You can add subcues to a cue by rightdragging them from the Subcue Library
into the Cue Library, and dropping them
in the subcue list area.
You can also create a cue by selecting
several subcues in the Subcue Library
and dropping them directly into the cue
list area.
In the Cue List, Cue Library, and Subcue Library, you can search
for cues and subcues using the Select... command in the Edit
menu. This will open a dialog box with the following controls:
– A drop-down box to choose between Select Only (to clear any current selections first) Select More (to add
to the current selection), or Deselect (to deselect items matching the search parameters).
– Another drop-down box to select the parameter type.
– A drop-down box to select between is or is not.
– A drop-down box to select the type of matching: Equal To, Containing, Less Than, etc.
– A text box to enter parameter terms, such as a subcue id number, or channel number.
– A Do it button to perform the search.
Items selected by the search will also have their text rendered in bold, so the selection can be changed without
losing the search results. To reset the text to normal, close and reopen the window.
Special Commands
Cues Menu
Cues > Recall Cue (Cmd+Shift+R)
Recalls the selected cue, respecting any wait and fade times associated with it or its subcues.
Cues > Instant Recall Cue (Cmd+Shift+T)
Recalls the selected cue, ignoring any wait or fade times associated with it or its subcues. If there are multiple subcue sequences, the last subcue in sequence will set the final control value.
Cues > New Cue
Creates a new cue. The cue will not have any subcue entries.
Cues > Duplicate Cue
Creates a copy of the selected cue. The copy will have the same name, with a number appended.
Cues > Delete Cue
Deletes the selected cue.
Subcues Menu
Subcues > Recall Subcue Entry (Ctrl+R)
Recalls the selected subcue, respecting the wait and fade times associated with it.
Subcues > Instant Recall Subcue Entry (Ctrl+T)
Recalls the selected subcue, ignoring any wait and fade time settings.
Subcues > New Subcue Entry (Ctrl+N)
Creates a new subcue entry.
Subcues > Duplicate Subcue Entry (Ctrl+D)
Creates a copy of the selected subcue entry. The copy will have the same name, with a number appended
(i.e. “freep” will become “freep #2”).
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Subcues > Delete Subcue Entry (Ctrl+Del)
Deletes the selected subcue entry.
Subcues > Capture Differences (Ctrl+I)
Captures the current state of the mixer into the existing subcue types, or creates new versions of the subcues
if they are referenced by other cues.
Subcues > Update Subcues (Ctrl+U)
Captures the current state of the mixer into the existing subcues, regardless of whether they are referenced
by other cues. This will affect all cues that reference the subcues.
Externals Subcues
The term “Externals” derives from the practice of controlling external devices—like hard disk playback units and
samplers—connected to Matrix3 hardware. The term has grown to encompass control of Matrix3 subsystems
that are external to the central mixing functions of Matrix3 hardware. Examples include Hardware Status checks
and CueConsole setup.
Externals Subcues are created from within the Subcue Library window using a step-by-step method. This is in
contrast to mixer subcues, in which you adjust the mixer until you like what you hear and then capture its state.
Externals range from simple MIDI commands to elaborate CueConsole 2 configuration settings.
Creating an Externals Subcue
–
–
–
–
Open the Subcue Library window.
Select Subcues > New Subcue > Externals.
In the area to the right, click Add Entry.
Right-click each of the Type, Command, Frame, and Port entries to select from a list of available options.
Type a Delay value as desired. The Type selection will affect the available Command selections.
– Type specifies the category of command.
– Command selects the specific command.
– Frame identifies the LX-300 DSP to which the command will be sent. Choices are All or Frame IDs 1–57.
(You can click this field and type a value, or right-click to choose from a list.)
– Port selects the communications port to which the command will be sent. Choices are BoxNet (for internal
system commands), A (RS-422), B (RS-422), C (RS-232), or MIDI.
– For some commands a command editor will be shown. The controls in this editor are labeled. Complete the
command by providing values for the data fields that remain. These fields vary dependent on the command
that you have specified.
Note:
A complete list of Externals commands is found in the Externals Reference, located in the CueStation 4 Command
Reference.
Beneath the list of subcue entries is a string of hexadecimal pairs. This is the byte sequence which will be
transmitted.
Externals Example
Having a Multi-Media Control (MMC) compatible video machine connected to the system by an RS-232 cable,
you wish to control it through the Transport as part of an overall audio-visual show. Specifically, you wish to
start the video at one point in the show and stop it at another point.
To create a pair of subcues for these commands:
– Create a new externals subcue and click Add Entry.
– For Type select MMC.
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–
–
–
–
–
For Command select Play.
In the Frame box, type the Frame ID to which the video machine is connected.
For Port select C (RS-232).
In the command editor, type the Device ID of the video machine.
In the left pane, name the subcue Play Video.
Repeat the above steps, but choose Stop as the command, and name the subcue Stop Video.
You can now add either subcue to a cue. When the cue is triggered (via the Transport, time code, CueConsole,
or other means), the MMC-aware video machine will start and stop the video. If it is a full-featured machine, you
might also create a subcue to be used at the start of the show during initialization, to rewind the video to the
start location.
Custom Subcue Types
This chapter is for advanced users who wish to create their own subcue types, for more customizable automation.
Creating custom subcue types is not necessary for normal CueStation operations, however, it can make some
advanced cue capture functions more accessible.
Control Point Addresses
In CueStation 4 every control point in the system is assigned a unique Control Point Address. This address unambiguously identifies that control with an intuitive, human-readable string. For example, the control point address
of the first input channel’s mute control is Input 1 Mute. The fader level of the third output channel is Output 3
Level.
To find out what a given control’s address is, make sure Layout > ToolTips Enabled has been selected. When
ToolTips are enabled, hovering the cursor over a control will display that control’s address.
A typical LX-300 system will have thousands or even hundreds of thousands of valid control point addresses.
Furthermore, you may want to capture the current state of all controls in the system, or just a few, or any of a
number of subsets of the controls. Because of this, the Capture Window has been made to be extremely flexible
in how it operates.
When capturing system state data into cues and subcues, the first problem that the Capture window must solve
is: “Which control points do you wish to capture?” The Capture Window determines which control points to
capture (and where to save the data) using a hierarchical system consisting of Subcue Types, Control Point
Sets, and Index Sets. Each of these is discussed below.
Index Sets
The simplest specifier is the Index Set. An index set is nothing more than a set of numbers and an Index Type
tag that indicates what sort of system parameter is related to those numbers. (The index type value is chosen
from a small, pre-defined set of possible values. These include Inputs, Outputs, Auxes, VGroups, and a few
other types.)
All the index sets known to the system can be viewed by opening the Capture window and choosing the Index
Sets page. You will see that the default project comes with twenty-three pre-defined, non-editable index sets.
Custom Index Sets
The default index sets are often all you need, but you are free to make your own custom index sets. For example,
you could create an index set that refers to the first eight inputs in your system by adding an entry in the index
sets table with the cells filled out as follows:
Name=”First Eight Inputs” Index Type=”Input” Default Indices=”1-8” Allowed Indices=”1-8”
Or you could create an index set that refers to just a few specific input indices (perhaps you want to specify just
the input channels of your three vocalists?):
Name=”The Three Tenors” Index Type=”Input” Default Indices=”23,47,59” Allowed
Indices=”23,47,59”
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You could even get fancy and create an index set that specifies both some values and some value-ranges:
Name=”A Fancy Index Set” Index Type=”Input” IndexValues=”3-7,23,40,42-47,59-62”
IndexValues=”3-7,23,40,42-47,59-62”
... and so on. An index set is really nothing more than a convenient way to assign a name and type to a group
of numbers.
By this point you may have noticed that the pre-defined entries in the index sets table don’t have any numeric
values in their Index Values field. Instead, they all have an asterisk. This asterisk has a special meaning: it
means “All valid channels of the given type in the system, as specified in the Mixer Configuration window”. For
example, in a 64-input, 32-output system, the asterisk in the All Channels/Input index set would be interpreted
to mean “1 through 64,” whereas the asterisk in the All Channels/Output index set would be interpreted to
mean “1 through 32” (both inclusive).
This special logic is very useful, because otherwise it would be necessary to re-define new index sets every
time the Mixer Configuration changed: this way, a single set of pre-defined index sets is sufficient to handle
most things.
Control Point Sets
The next specifier used in the Capture window is the Control Point Set. A control point set specifies one or more
“patterns” of control point addresses.
As with index sets, the default project comes with a number of pre-defined, non-editable control point sets, but
you are free to make your own if you choose to. The control point sets known to the system can be viewed by
opening the Capture window and choosing the Control Point Sets page.
Each control point set consists of one or more Control Point Address Patterns, which look a lot like the control
point addresses described in Control Point Addresses (p. 86), above, except that some parts of the addresses
may be left unspecified. For an example, switch to the Control Point Sets page and select the Input EQs control
point set. The area to the right of the list will show the following control point address patterns:
Input
Input
Input
Input
*
*
*
*
EQ
EQ
EQ
EQ
*
*
*
*
Frequency
Level
Q
Type
As you can see, these patterns refer to control point addresses relevant to the EQ portion of the Input Processing
window, but the numeric portions of the addresses have been replaced by asterisks. Like the asterisks on the
Index Sets page, these asterisks have a special meaning. Here, they mean that it is up to the system to figure
out the numbers to place there. When capturing a cue, the asterisks will be expanded out to concrete numbers,
for example:
Input
Input
Input
Input
1-8
1-8
1-8
1-8
EQ
EQ
EQ
EQ
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-4
Frequency
Level
Q
Type
But how does the Capture window know what numbers to replace the asterisks with? The control point set, by
itself, doesn’t have enough information to do that. Which leads us to the next level of specifier, the Subcue Type.
Subcue Types
A Subcue Type is the top-level specifier in the Capture window. Its job is to correlate a group of control point
sets with the appropriate index sets in such a way that together there is enough information to fully specify the
set of control point addresses to capture into a subcue. As always, the default project comes with a number of
pre-defined, read-only subcue types, but you are free to create your own subcue types as well.
Let’s look at the Matrix Levels subcue type. To view this subcue type, open the Capture window, choose the
Subcue Types page, and select the Matrix Levels entry. The area to the right of the list will show you the contents
of the Matrix Levels subcue type.
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The center list, labeled Control Point Sets, tells you which control point sets are specified by this subcue type.
The Matrix Levels subcue type specifies only one control point set, the Matrix Levels control point set. (In fact,
most of the pre-defined subcue types contain only one control point set.)
The area on the right contains a list of index sets used by the subcue type. The column headings for this list are
Index Type, Index Set, and Index Values. The Capture window automatically determines which types of index
set are relevant to the subcue type.
In this example, our Matrix Levels subcue type specifies only the Matrix Levels control point set, and the Matrix
Levels control point set contains only the following Address Pattern:
Bus * Output * Level
The Capture window knows that to expand the asterisks in that pattern, it is going to need one index set with
IndexType=“Bus”, and one index set with IndexType=“Output”.
These items appear in the right sub-pane, in the Index Type column. The first item describes how to expand
asterisks that represent buses, and the second describes how to expand asterisks that represent Outputs. As
you can see, they are currently set to “All Buses” and “All Channels”, respectively. The corresponding Index
Values entries show the actual interpretation of these values: that for Buses, the asterisk represents channels
1–32, and for Outputs, the asterisk represents channels 1–8.
This rather complex, detailed analysis of the address pattern can be simply interpreted thus:
Bus 1-32 Output 1-8 Level
Which is to say that the subcue will capture the complete state of the Matrix.
If the subcue type were editable, you could modify it to specify other index sets instead of “All Buses” and “All
Channels”. If you’d like to try doing that now, click Duplicate (near the upper left of the Subcue Types page) to
create an editable subcue type, then right-click in the Index Set column of the window area on the right to choose
a new index set for buses and/or outputs. Note that there is also a Manual option, which lets you type in indices
directly instead of referencing a pre-defined index set.
Lastly, each subcue type has attributes called Category, Display Order, and Comment. These attributes can
be viewed and/or edited via the table at the left-hand side of the Subcue Types page. Note that these attributes
do not affect which control point addresses will be captured: the only thing they affect are how the subcue types
appear on the Capture page.
In the Capture page, each subcue type’s name appears with a checkbox next to it. Subcue types are grouped
separately by category—for example, in the default project all the Input subcue types get grouped together in
one area of the Capture page, and the subcue types in the outputs category get their own separate section. You
are free to create your own categories if you wish.
Display Order gives you some measure of control over the order in which subcue types will be listed within
their category in the Capture page. Subcue types with a smaller Display Order values will always appear before
subcue types with larger Display Order values.
The Comment field provides a place for you to enter a comment about the subcue type. This will not appear
on the Capture page.
Tip:
While reading this chapter, it will be helpful to follow along with a running CueStation 4 system. If Matrix3
hardware is not available, you can run off-line using the following technique:
– Launch VirtualLX.
– Launch CueStation and connect it to VirtualLX (i.e. localhost).
– Open the Mixer Configuration window. Create a simple one-frame system with one Analog Input module
in slot A, and one Analog Output module in Slot B, and 32 buses.
– Select Configuration > Send Configuration To Frames.
– Press F4 to open the Capture window.
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The Subcue Types Page
The Subcue Types page lists a number of basic subcue types and any custom subcue types you have designed.
We strongly recommend that you not modify the basic subcue types. Instead, use the Duplicate button to
modify a copy of a basic type.
Each of the standard subcue types captures a single control point set for all applicable channels: the Input
Level subcue captures the Input Level control set, the Aux Sends subcue captures the Aux Sends control set,
and so on.
You can create your own specialized subcue types that capture any combination of control point settings on
any number of channels. This is an advanced task, accomplished through the use of control point sets and index
sets.
This page has four main components: a set of command buttons, a list of subcue types, a list of control point
sets, and a list of index sets.
Command Buttons
The command buttons create or delete subcue types.
– New (Ctrl+N) creates a new subcue type from scratch. You can then name the subcue type, choose its category, select its control point sets, and define its index sets.
– Duplicate (Ctrl+D) creates a new subcue type based on the selected subcue. You can then name the subcue
type and fine-tune its category, parameter, and index sets.
– Delete (Del) deletes the selected subcue type. Any subcues that made use of this subcue type will be changed,
which in turn will affect all cues that use that subcue.
Subcue Types List
Clicking a column label will sort the entries alphabetically by the contents of that column. Clicking it again will
sort them in reverse order. The format of the ID and Creation dates are compatible with alphabetical sorting.
– The ID label is a system-assigned number and can not be changed.
– The subcue Name can be changed. Select it and type a new name. Subcues that used this subcue type will
show this change.
– The Category lets you sort the names according to type. Right-click the entry to select from the available
types, or type a new name to create a new category.
– The Display Order number determines the order that the subcues will be displayed on the Capture page.
– The Comment box can contain anything you wish to type.
– The Created label is a convenience and can not be changed.
Control Point Set List
The Control Point Set list can be viewed by selecting a subcue type. The control point sets to be included in the
subcue can be selected by clicking their associated checkboxes. The actual definitions for the control point sets
are found on the Control Point Sets page.
Index Sets List
For each control point set that is selected, its index set will be listed. The column labels for this list can be clicked
to sort the list alphabetically.
Right-clicking an Index Set entry allows you to choose between Manual and any applicable custom index sets
you have defined.
When you have selected a Manual index set, you can type a list of channels in the Channels entry. You can
separate channels with a space or comma, or select a range of channels by using a dash between numbers
(ie. 1-4,6,7). To select all channels, use an asterisk (*).
The Control Point Sets Page
The Control Point Sets page lists the fifty-five standard preset control point sets and any custom control point
sets you have designed. Again, we strongly recommend you not modify the standard presets and instead use
the Duplicate button to modify a copy of the preset.
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The Control Point Set is used by Subcue Types to identify which CueStation mixer components will be captured
in a subcue. The standard control point sets cover every common combination of components: Input Levels, for
instance, captures the channel invert, input level, and input mute settings.
You can create your own specialized Control Point sets that capture any imaginable combination of controls.
This page has three main components: a set of command buttons, a list of Control Point sets, and a list of mixer
control points.
Command Buttons
The command buttons create or delete control point sets.
– New (Ctrl+N) creates a new control point set from scratch. You can then rename the new control point set
and modify its list of Address Patterns.
– Duplicate (Ctrl+D) creates a new control point set based on the selected subcue. You can then rename the
new control point set and modify its list of Address Patterns.
– Delete (Ctrl+Del) deletes the selected control point set.
When a control point set is selected, you can add or remove Address Patterns from it:
– Add Pattern adds a new Address Pattern to the list. Right-click the entry to select from an extensive list of
common Address Patterns.
– Delete Selected Patterns removes any selected Address Patterns from the list.
Control Point Sets List
Clicking a column label will sort the entries by the contents of that column. Clicking it again will sort them in reverse
order.
– The ID label is a system-assigned number and can not be changed.
– The subcue Name can be changed. Select it and type a new name.
– The Comment box can contain anything you wish to type.
– The Created label is a convenience and can not be changed.
Control Points List
When a control point set is selected, the Address Patterns associated with it will be listed to its right.
Right-clicking an Address Patterns entry allows you to choose from an extensive list of commonly-used patterns.
The command buttons above this are described in Command Buttons, above.
The Index Sets Page
The Index Sets window shows a list of twenty-three common index sets and any custom index sets you have
designed. When customizing your subcues it is best to use the Duplicate command to modify a copy of a preset.
The Index Set is used by Subcue Types to identify which channels of a particular Control Point Set to capture.
Each of the standard index sets captures all channels for a particular mixer component.
You can create your own specialized index sets that limit the subcue capture to a specific set channels for any
of the CueStation mixer components.
This page has two components: a set of command buttons and a list of index sets.
Command Buttons
The command buttons create or delete index sets.
– New (Ctrl+N) creates a new index set from scratch. You can then name the index set and define the mixer
component and channels it uses.
– Duplicate (Ctrl+D) creates a new index set based on the selected subcue. You can then rename the index
set and fine-tune its mixer component and channels.
– Delete (Ctrl+Del) deletes the selected index set. Any subcues that made use of this index set will be
changed, which in turn will affect all cues that use that subcue.
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Index Sets List
Clicking a column label will sort the entries alphabetically by the contents of that column. Clicking it again will
sort them in reverse order. The format of the ID and Creation dates are compatible with alphabetical sorting.
– The ID label is a system-assigned number and can not be changed.
– The index set Name can be changed. Select it and type a new name. Subcues that used this index set will
show this change.
– Right-click the Index Type box to select the mixer component used by this index set.
– Type a list of channels in the Default Indices box to select the default subset of channels for this index set.
You can separate channels with a space or comma, or select a range of channels by using a dash between
numbers (i.e.. 1-4,6,7). To select all channels, use an asterisk (*).
– The Allowed Indices box lets you constrain the indices to a particular range. For instance, if you only wanted
your index set to include the first four Input channels, then you would enter 1-4. Otherwise, use an asterisk
(*). To select no channels, type “None”.
– The Comment box can contain anything you wish to type.
– The Created label shows the time stamp as a convenience and can not be changed.
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Building A Show
SpaceMaps
SpaceMaps Overview
Elements of a SpaceMap
Types of Nodes
SpaceMap Controls
Creating SpaceMaps
Creating Trajectories
Creating Trajectory Subcues
Creating Position Subcues
Creating SyncMap Subcues
SpaceMap Design
93
94
95
98
100
102
103
104
104
104
In 1986, sixteen loudspeakers suspended overhead in a geodesic dome provided the inspiration for the SpaceMap
algorithm. Nearly twenty years later, sound designers’ work with this novel control continues to yield inspiring results
in venues around the world.
SpaceMaps Overview
SpaceMaps provide multi-dimensional control of sound, enabling you to place and move sound through space using
a graphical interface. This chapter contains definitions of the elements that make up a SpaceMap, instructions for
integrating SpaceMap automation, and design guidelines for using SpaceMaps in various applications.
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93
Introduction
The SpaceMap window provides a visual interface for creating custom panning surfaces. Traditional pan controls
for stereo sound are one-dimensional: they shift sound along a line between two points, left and right. A SpaceMap,
on the other hand, is two-dimensional and can even be used for three-dimensional work. It can position sound
on any plane, or, by panning between planes, anywhere in space.
Elements of a SpaceMap
A SpaceMap is constructed from two basic elements: Nodes and Trisets. Nodes commonly represent the positions
of loudspeakers or groups of speakers, and may be of several types. Trisets link any three nodes in a SpaceMap,
providing the means to distribute signal proportionally between them. A Trajectory is the path along which the
spatial pan control will travel.
Nodes
Nodes are the points that audio is panned to within a SpaceMap. They can represent physical speakers
(Speaker nodes) or simulate an output location (Virtual node). Nodes can also derive their audio from other
nodes (Derived nodes), or discard their audio completely (Silent nodes). These types are defined more fully in
Types of Nodes (p. 95).
Trisets
Trisets are triangular panning surfaces defined by three nodes. Like the panning law used by a conventional
pan pot, but for two dimensions, a triset ensures a smooth pan without a drop in the signal at any point. Just as
two points are the minimum required to define a line, three points are the minimum required to define a plane.
Trisets can not overlap one another: signal distribution would be unpredictable within the overlapped areas.
The physical dimensions of the triangle are not critical because the power-preserving panning law is proportional
rather than absolute. It is based on the relative distance between the spatial pan control and each of the three
surrounding nodes, rather than the actual “physical” distance within the grid.
Trajectories
The path along which a sound moves is called a Trajectory. A trajectory may be recorded, edited and reshaped,
and then mapped to an input bus and recalled as part of a SpaceMap Trajectory subcue.
Trajectories can create the illusion of a moving sound, can be used to fade sounds in and out, or can control a
variety of other effects depending on the design of the SpaceMap. The relative position of the spatial pan control
within a triset determines the proportion of signal sent to each of the nodes in the triset. The actual signal levels
can be seen in the Matrix window, along the row of the input bus assigned to the control.
Each trajectory is an entirely independent entity, with no absolute relationship to any one SpaceMap. You can
also have one map with several different trajectories, or one trajectory for several different SpaceMaps. Several
trajectories can be active at once (one per bus), and there can be an arbitrary number of trajectories (and
SpaceMaps) in a project file.
Additionally, a trajectory can be played back with real-time modifications, such as the number of repetitions,
rate, orientation, scaling and offset in both X and Y dimensions. Several copies of the same trajectory could be
assigned to different buses and performed simultaneously with different modifiers on each.
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Types of Nodes
Speaker nodes
Speaker nodes represent the physical outputs in the Matrix3
system. Each node is assigned to a single output. Outputs can
be connected to speakers, effects processors, or any other devices. You may even assign multiple nodes to the same output,
should that be useful.
When a triset contains three speaker nodes, the audio is distributed amongst the nodes as determined by the location of the bus
or trajectory within the triset, and the relative distance between
the nodes.
Virtual nodes
A Virtual node simulates a physical output in space by distributing
its signal to the Speaker nodes to which it is linked. By default
the signal will be divided equally among all the linked Speaker
nodes, but you can define proportional link weights that change
the balance of the distribution.
In this example, the Virtual node is linked to the four Speaker
nodes so that any signal that is assigned to it will be equally distributed among the surrounding speakers. Thus a trajectory traveling around the perimeter of the map will pan linearly from one
speaker to the next, but a trajectory that moves toward the Virtual
node at the center of the map will cause the signal to spread out
to all four speakers gradually. This proportional distribution method
creates a convincing phantom image throughout the panning area.
This equal distribution was not possible using just two trisets
without a Virtual node: a sound moving diagonally across both
trisets would have started at one speaker, then spread equally to the three in the first triset, then suddenly
dropped out of its starting speaker as it crossed the triset line. Entering the second triset it would reverse this
process. At no point would it appear in all four speakers, nor in both the starting and ending speakers at the
same time.
However, despite improving the multichannel panning with a Virtual node, our simple model still suffers a flaw:
any panning path that extends beyond the trisets causes the sound to stop abruptly. Fading would be preferable,
and the solution is to use “Silent” nodes.
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Silent nodes
A Silent node takes part in a triset in place of a Speaker
node but it is not associated with an output. Signal panned
toward a Silent node simply disappears, providing an easy
way to create fade-in and fade-out effects.
This feature also solves the signal dropout problem that
exists when a trajectory strays outside the panning area
defined by a triset of Speaker nodes. Since the area outside
our SpaceMap is currently undefined, the signal abruptly
drops out. By surrounding the SpaceMap with Silent nodes,
we can create a perimeter of “fadeout” trisets and guard
against unintended loss of signal.
To complete our model place four Silent nodes, one outside
each side. Create trisets, each with two Speaker and one
Silent node, or two Silent and one Speaker node. The end
result will have the Speaker nodes entirely enclosed within
trisets. Sound panning will now be gap-free.
Derived nodes
The Derived node provides a way to send a signal to a
secondary output whenever that signal is also being sent
to a set of Speaker nodes. Like a Virtual node it is linked
to one or more Speaker nodes, but the logic of the signal
routing is reversed. Whereas a Virtual node divides a signal
proportionally among its linked Speaker nodes, the Derived
node receives a sum of the signals from its linked Speaker
nodes. The Derived node will generally not be part of a
triset. If they happen to be in a triset, they participate as a
silent node, discarding any signal proportioned to them.
Derived nodes are commonly used for subwoofer sends,
fill mixes, balconies, and other cases where a secondary
mix-down of a multichannel mix is required. For example,
a Derived node feeding a single subwoofer would be linked
to all the main channels, so that even if the source signal
is being panned the subwoofer will receive a constant feed.
Virtual Weights
By default, Virtual and Derived nodes distribute and receive, respectively, an equal proportion of the signal of
their linked nodes. Virtual Weights allow you to alter these proportions.
When you choose a link, you can change its weight using the Set Link Weight command.
Link weights for Derived nodes are expressed in decibels, with a maximum value of 0dB. Since Derived nodes
are essentially the result of a Y-cable, with signal going directly to physical outputs, it is easier to express the
difference in signal using decibels.
Link weights for Virtual nodes are expressed as a ratio. The weight values are not absolute: they represent ratios
between the amounts of signal related to each Speaker node. You can represent a ratio of 2:1 by weights of
2.0 and 1.0, 1.0 and 0.5, 30.0 to 15.0, or any other equivalent.
As you change the weighting values, remember that signal levels are measured in decibels, and that +3 dB is
equivalent to a 2:1 ratio between two signals (just as -3 dB represents a 1:2 ratio). Similarly, a 6 dB difference
can be achieved with a 4:1 or 1:4 ratio between weights.
Take for example, an L-C-R SpaceMap that is set up so that a hard pan Left or Right causes the signal to be 3
dB down in the Center speaker, and a pan to the Center causes the signal to be 6 dB down in each of the Left
and Right speakers (the combined L+R signal is 3 dB below the Center, so the overall level is the same.) This
is achieved by using Virtual nodes for the Left, Center, and Right positions. The weights for the Left and Right
Virtual speakers are (1.0, 0.5) so that the Center receives half the power (-3 dB) of either side speaker. For the
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Center the ratio is doubled to (2.0, 0.5, 0.5) to achieve an additional 3 dB difference between the Center and
each side speaker.
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SpaceMap Controls
The SpaceMap window is largely devoted to a layout grid in which one places nodes representing loudspeakers
and other audio distribution controls, and then defines a trajectory through which to move the spatial pan control.
Control Buttons
Along the left of the SpaceMap grid are six buttons:
Changes the cursor to Select mode. You
can then select nodes, links, or trajectory paths.
The selected components can be moved or
modified, as described in Creating SpaceMaps
(p. 100).
Changes the cursor to Add Speaker Nodes
mode. Clicking on the map will create new
speaker nodes, numbered sequentially.
Changes the cursor to Add Virtual Nodes
mode. Clicking on the map will create new virtual
nodes.
Changes the cursor to Add Derived Nodes
mode. Clicking on the map will create new derived nodes, numbered sequentially.
Changes the cursor to Trisets mode. As you move across the SpaceMap, the three nodes nearest the cursor
will be highlighted and joined by a triset triangle. Clicking inside the triangle will create or remove the triset.
Changes the cursor to Test mode. When you click or drag across the SpaceMap, signal from the selected
Input Bus (refer to the “bus” icon, below) will be sent to outputs via the SpaceMap.
Changes the cursor to Record mode. When you click or drag across the SpaceMap, a spatial pan control
trajectory path will be drawn. The icon will flash red while record mode is active. Move the mouse outside the
window to stop recording.
Selects the Input Bus used by the trajectory or by the Test mode cursor. The bus number is shown inside
the icon.
SpaceMap Drawing Area
Most of the SpaceMap window is devoted to a drawing area. Here, you can place nodes, link them, create trisets,
test the SpaceMap, and draw a trajectory.
Tip:
You can zoom the scale of the window using the Cmd+[ and Cmd+] keys. The display can be re-centered
using the scrollbars.
Bus Information
When enabled via Display > Show Bus Info, the bottom of the SpaceMap window shows information about
the input buses
The vertical scrollbar has +/- buttons to add or remove input bus information strips from the window, and </>
buttons to scroll through the strips when they don’t all fit in the window.
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The amount of information displayed in this area is controlled with the Display > Show Advanced Bus Info
menu item.
Special Features
Right-click is used extensively to provide commands to change node types, link settings, and so on.
Special Commands
Display Menu
Display > Show Bus Info
Display > Show Advanced Bus Info
Display > Show Bus Positions
Display > Show Bus Labels
Display > Show Grid
Display > Show Labels
Display > Show Links
Display > Show Nodes
Display > Show Trajectories
Display > Show Trisets
Display > Show Images
Display > Fill Trisets
Display > Maximum Update Rate > [update time intervals]
Sets the frequency at which the spatial pan control is updated on the display. In bandwidth-limited situations
(i.e. when there is a heavy Ethernet traffic load or you are using a serial connection), you may wish to use
a lower update rate.
SpaceMaps Menu
SpaceMaps > New SpaceMap
Creates a new SpaceMap.
SpaceMaps > Lock SpaceMap (Cmd+L)
Prevents changes to the SpaceMap. When locked, nodes can not be moved or otherwise changed. This is
particularly useful when drawing and editing trajectories.
SpaceMaps > Rename SpaceMap
Changes the name of the current SpaceMap.
SpaceMaps > Duplicate SpaceMap
Creates a copy of the current SpaceMap. The copy will have the same name, with an appended number.
SpaceMaps > Delete SpaceMap
Deletes the current SpaceMap.
SpaceMaps > Zoom Out (Cmd+[)
Shrinks the view of the current SpaceMap. This can make it easier to see the entirety of a complex or large
SpaceMap, especially when combined with the various show/hide commands.
SpaceMaps > Zoom In (Cmd+])
Enlarges the view of the current SpaceMap. This can make it easier to work on a portion of a very complex
SpaceMap or to precisely adjust the position of nodes or trajectory points. This command does not actually
change the SpaceMap, only the display of it.
SpaceMaps > Reset Zoom (Cmd+=)
Sets the view of the displayed SpaceMap to standard size.
SpaceMaps > Previous Bus (F7)
Selects the previous bus as the spatial pan control input.
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99
SpaceMaps > Next Bus (F8)
Selects the next bus as the spatial pan control input.
SpaceMaps > Insert Triset (Cmd+T)
Creates a triset using the three selected nodes.
SpaceMaps > Insert Image... (Cmd+I)
Allows you to place a background image on the SpaceMap.
SpaceMaps > [SpaceMap name]
Selects another SpaceMap for display.
Trajectories Menu
Trajectories > New Trajectory
Creates a new trajectory.
Trajectories > Play Trajectory (Cmd+R)
Moves the spatial pan control along the current trajectory, at the velocity specified by the trajectory settings.
Trajectories > Halt Playback (Cmd+K)
Stops movement of the spatial pan control.
Trajectories > Lock Trajectory (Cmd+J)
Locks the selected trajectory from further changes.
Trajectories > Rename Trajectory
Renames the selected trajectory.
Trajectories > Duplicate Trajectory
Creates a copy of the selected trajectory. The copy will have the same name, with a number appended.
Trajectories > Delete Trajectory
Deletes the selected trajectory.
Trajectories > [trajectory name]
Selects another trajectory for editing.
Creating SpaceMaps
Adding Nodes
–
Click the
(Add Speaker Node) button, the
(Add Virtual Node) button, the
(Add Derived Node)
button, or the
(Add Silent Node) button.
– Add the nodes by clicking on the map grid.
Select other types of nodes
Speaker nodes and Derived nodes are numbered with the corresponding output channel.
Modifying Nodes
–
Click the
(Select) button.
– Select the nodes you wish to modify. Select a single node by clicking on it, or select several nodes by holding
down the Shift key while clicking on them. You can also select multiple nodes by dragging a selection box
around them.
You may:
– Drag the node(s) to a new position.
– Change the node(s) types. Right-click the selected node(s), choose Set Nodes Types, and select Speaker,
Virtual, Derived, or Silent.
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– Delete the node(s). Use the Delete key, or right-click on one of the selected node(s) and choose Delete
Nodes.
– Link or Unlink the connection between virtual or derived nodes and their associated speaker nodes. Rightclick the selected node(s) and choose Link Virtual/Derived Nodes or Unlink Virtual/Derived Nodes.
– Change the output channel for a single node. Select a node and type the number of the output you wish to
change it to. Or, right-click a node, select the Set Output submenu, and choose an output channel number.
– Give a single node a name. Right-click a node and choose Rename. The name will be displayed beside the
node.
Creating Trisets
–
Click the
(Add Triset) button.
– Move the pointer to the middle of any three nodes. A light green line shows the triset that will be formed. Click
to create that triset.
– Clicking an existing triset using the Add Triset tool will remove that triset.
Alternatively, you can shift+select three nodes, right-click on one of them, and select Add Triset.
Trisets should not overlap.
Trisets are named automatically using sequential numbers. If you prefer to use names, right-click the triset and
choose Rename Triset.
Deleting Trisets
–
Click the
(Add Triset) button.
– Click a triset to remove it.
Alternatively, using the Select tool, right-click a triset and choose Delete Triset.
If you delete a node that is part of a triset, the triset will be deleted as well.
Testing Trisets
– Set your mix control points to provide signal to a specific bus.
–
In the SpaceMaps window, click the
(Bus) button and select that bus.
–
Click the
(Test) button.
– Drag the spatial pan control through your SpaceMap. If your speaker nodes are sending to functioning
speakers you will hear the sound pan through the trisets.
If you watch the Matrix window you can observe the output signal distribution changing as you move the spatial
pan control.
Tip:
The spatial pan control is represented as a small yellow circle. Its label corresponds to its input bus assignment.
Linking Nodes
– Select the virtual or derived node, plus the other nodes to which it will be linked. For virtual nodes these will
be nodes that receive signal from the virtual node; for derived nodes, these will be nodes that send signal to
the derived node.
Hold down the Shift key and click on each node that you wish to have linked.
– Right-click one of the selected nodes and choose Link Virtual/Derived Nodes.
Each link will be labeled with its “link weight”, a value representing the proportion of signal it sends.
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Unlinking Nodes
– To unlink all the links for a virtual or derived node, right-click the node and choose Unlink Virtual/Derived
Nodes.
– To unlink all the links for a particular speaker node, right-click the node and choose Unlink Virtual/Derived
Nodes.
Setting Link Weights
– To change a link’s “weight”, right-click its weight value and choose Set Link Weight. Provide a new value.
The proportion of signal that a link distributes is equal to the proportion of its link weight versus the sum of link
weights for its associated virtual or derived node.
Creating Trajectories
When you are satisfied with your triset layout you can create a SpaceMap Trajectory that can be used in a cue.
Creating a Trajectory
To create a SpaceMaps trajectory:
– Select Trajectories > New Trajectory.
–
Click the
(Record) button. It will start flashing red.
– Draw the trajectory on the SpaceMap by clicking its start position, and then clicking at several discrete locations
along the desired trajectory path. CueStation will automatically connect the dots. The time interval between
dots initially corresponds to the time between clicks, but you can edit this later.
Alternatively, you can click on the start position and drag the mouse through the desired path. The speed of the
trajectory will be based on the speed you drag the mouse.
–
Click
(Record) button again to stop recording.
You may re-record the trajectory by clicking Record again and drawing a new path. This will clear the trajectory
you have already recorded.
Modifying a Trajectory
To adjust a SpaceMaps trajectory:
–
Click the
(Select) button.
– Select points on the trajectory. Multiple points can be selected using the Shift key or by dragging a selection
box around them.
You may:
– Drag points to new positions.
– Delete points by right-clicking a selected point and choosing
Tip:
Delete TrajectoryNodes.
When a trajectory node is selected, the
– Insert points by right-clicking a selected point and choosing
duration is displayed in the status bar for
Insert TrajectoryNodes.
quick reference.
– Adjust the duration by right-clicking a selected point or line
segment and choosing Modify Duration. If multiple trajectory
points have been selected, the change in duration will be distributed in proportion to the ratio of each segment’s duration to the sum duration of the selected segments.
– Adjust the offset of an individual segment by right-clicking the line segment and choosing Modify Offset.
While one can change the offset for multiple-selected segments, the result will also change the durations of
the segments. It is better to change their offsets by changing the overall duration.
– Name the trajectory point by right-clicking the point and choosing Rename TrajectoryNode.
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Testing a Trajectory
SpaceMap trajectories can be tested by playing them:
–
Click the
(Bus) button and choose an input bus.
– Select the Trajectories > Play Trajectory command.
The trajectory will be played repeatedly.
To stop playback, select Trajectories > Halt Playback.
Tip:
Observing the Matrix window while panning (by dragging the test control or by playing a trajectory) will
help you identify missing trisets and awkward transition zones.
If there are audible “glitches” check that the trisets are seamless and consider using virtual nodes to provide
a smooth fade-out zone for panning areas beyond the speaker output sets.
A trajectory that crosses any part of the SpaceMap window that is not inside a triset will result in a complete
dropout of the signal. It is a useful practice to surround the main part of your SpaceMap with a “safety
zone” of trisets that include one or two Silent nodes, with these Silent nodes along the perimeter of the
window. This will result in the sound fading as the pan control moves away from the edge nodes.
Creating Trajectory Subcues
After you have created and fine-tuned your trajectories (you can have more than one trajectory for a map, although
only one can be displayed at a time):
– Make sure that Display > Show Bus Info and Display > Show Advanced Bus Info are both enabled.
The SpaceMap Parameters area provides the following controls:
– Bus Select chooses whether the selected bus will be included in the SpaceMap Trajectory Subcue if Use
Channel Selects is enabled in the Capture Window.
– Enabled toggles whether the trajectory playback is enabled for the given bus. Disabling trajectory playback
will “pause” that bus’s position until playback is re-enabled again.
– Audition plays the selected trajectory on the specified bus.
– Trajectory chooses the trajectory that is used by the subcue.
– SpaceMap A and SpaceMap B are used by the Pan control, as described below.
– Initial Position % specifies an initial offset position into the trajectory at the beginning of playback.
– Repetitions sets the number of times the trajectory will be played when triggered. Typing in (infinite) causes
the trajectory to repeat endlessly until interrupted by a SpaceMap or Matrix Row subcue, or a Cancel Trajectories command.
The following values are not cumulative: they are not added (or multiplied) each time the trajectory repeats, but
are applied only once and then maintained for all iterations of the trajectory.
– X Scale and Y Scale enlarges or shrinks the trajectory from its original size. A value of ‘50%’ would reduce
its size by half along that axis; a value of ‘200%’ would double its size. Negative values invert the trajectory.
– X Offset and Y Offset shift the trajectory from its original position. Positive values move it up or to the right;
negative values, down or to the left.
– Rate adjusts the playback rate as a ratio of its original speed. A value of ‘50%’ plays the trajectory at halfspeed; a value of ‘200%’ plays it at double-speed.
– Level scales the fader level for the trajectory. A value of ‘100%’ represents unity level, while ‘0%’ is off.
– Pan sets the trajectory interpolation value between the Primary SpaceMap (SpaceMap A) and Secondary
SpaceMap (SpaceMap B). A value of ‘A100’ makes use of the primary SpaceMap exclusively; a value of
‘B100’ uses only the secondary SpaceMap. The default value, ‘C’, is right in the middle and balances the effects
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of the two SpaceMaps evenly. Intermediate values use a proportional interpolation of the two SpaceMaps.
With care, three-dimensional sound motion can be achieved by panning between two SpaceMaps.
– Divergence distributes a portion of the signal to the triset and the rest of the signal to all the other nodes in
the SpaceMap. For example, a setting of ‘33%’ “leaks” one-third of the signal to all the nodes in the map,
while the other two-thirds will be distributed by the spatial pan control. A setting of ‘0%’ doesn’t leak at all; a
setting of ‘100%’ distributes the signal to every speaker equally, effectively disabling the spatial pan control.
To create a SpaceMap Trajectory subcue, open the Subcue Library window and select Subcues > New Subcue
> SpaceMap Trajectory. A SpaceMap Trajectory subcue will be created for those buses specified with the
Channel Select control.
Creating Position Subcues
The SpaceMap Position subcue contains positional information only for the selected bus or buses. This subcue
can be used to create a static surround mix with a given SpaceMap. If the SpaceMap is later adjusted, the surround
mix will change to reflect the new mapping.
To create a SpaceMap Trajectory subcue, open the Subcue Library window and select Subcues > New Subcue
> SpaceMap Position. A SpaceMap Position subcue will be created for those busses specified with the Channel
Select control.
Creating SyncMap Subcues
The SyncMap Subcue allows you to map one or more Trajectories to a set of busses with a predetermined time
offset between them. This set of trajectories is mapped as a SyncMap Group to a specified Time Code value.
This subcue can only be created within the Subcue Library window, by selecting Subcues > New Subcue >
SyncMap.
– Add Entry adds an entry to the SyncMap Group.
– Delete Selected deletes the selected entry or entries from the SyncMap Group.
Group Parameters include:
– A Group ID box, which sets the ID of the set of Trajectories.
– A Time Code box, in which you set the SMPTE start time for the group of trajectories
– An Enabled checkbox. When selected, the Group is active.
Parameters for each entry are the same as described in Creating Trajectory Subcues (p. 103).
To create a SyncMap sequence:
– Click the Add Entry button.
– For the entry that appears in the list, enter a time in the Time Offset column, then right-click in the Trajectory
and SpaceMap columns to select the trajectory and SpaceMaps.
– Right-click in the Bus column to select the bus that will be used.
Add more entries to create a sequence.
There is also a SpaceMap type external for enabling or disabling SyncMaps by Group ID, since SyncMap automation is triggered by Time Code. See the Command Reference manual for more information about externals.
SpaceMap Design
A SpaceMap is a very flexible control mechanism, and can be used in many different applications. Here are
some guidelines for various ways to design and implement SpaceMap automation.
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General Design Guidelines
Unlike surround-sound pan controls optimized for cinema sound in the 5.1, 6.1, or other “standard” formats, the
SpaceMap interface has been designed to be extremely general and adaptable to any conceivable speaker
configuration. This means that there is no absolutely correct way to design a SpaceMap, though there are some
“ill-advised” methods and also some recommended procedures.
SpaceMap “Do”s
– Do analyze both your venue and system configuration and your sound design needs before embarking on an
elaborate SpaceMap design.
– Do create “sub-maps” of portions of a large configuration rather than trying to represent it all in one map. You’ll
gain more detailed control of trajectories if you have more room to draw them.
– Do surround your SpaceMap with a perimeter of trisets involving Silent nodes to guard against sudden dropouts.
– Do define links for all Virtual and Derived nodes.
SpaceMap “Don’t”s
– Don’t leave any parts of a SpaceMap undefined or you’ll suffer signal dropouts.
– Don’t get hung up on designing a SpaceMap as a literal representation of your physical speaker layout:
sometimes the most creative and useful applications will be more abstract.
Design Guidelines for Simple Systems
Although we just advised you against getting hung-up on using a SpaceMap as a literal representation, this is
still the easiest way to get started. With simple speaker configurations it may be all you really need to do.
The first step in creating a simple SpaceMap is to place a set of Speaker nodes in a configuration that represents
the physical layout of the loudspeakers. This arrangement doesn’t necessarily need to be exactly to scale. After
all, your physical system configuration may have to be designed for a room that doesn’t have the same proportions
as the virtual space you are trying to simulate. How you accommodate to this situation will depend on too many
particulars to provide any general rules. Try to keep in mind that you’ll always be striving for a compromise between
physical space and perceptual space.
Learn by doing: experiment with the system and you’ll learn quickly.
Similarly, no hard rules can determine your Speaker node layout, though typical configurations serve particular
types of venues and shows. One common design is for the creation of a soundscape framed by the proscenium,
as in a crowded street scene. Some speakers may be placed at the level of the stage and others suspended
higher up, forming a panorama that has both width and height. A SpaceMap for such a design would be drawn
as a front view of the stage, from the audience’s perspective. Other configurations might employ surround
speakers encircling the audience, possibly even including some overhead speakers. Here the SpaceMap would
represent an overhead view, looking down on the audience.
Once the Speaker nodes have been laid out it is necessary to connect them into trisets. Most of the time you
will also need to create some Virtual nodes to “tie together” the Speaker nodes. As a rule of thumb, it is common
to place a Virtual node at the center of a group of four Speaker nodes, creating smooth panning transitions from
any location to any other. Virtual nodes are also handy when speakers are laid out in a linear array, so that they
don’t enclose a space in which to form a triset. A Virtual node can provide the essential third vertex of the triangle.
Once you have a set of Speaker nodes and Virtual nodes connected neatly by trisets, you’ll want to create a
“buffer zone” around the perimeter. This will usually be done with Silent nodes. The easiest way to do this is to
place Silent nodes near the edge of the window, positioned to form trisets between each pair of outer-edge
Speaker or Virtual nodes. This will ensure that any trajectory that slips outside the main trisets will not drop out
abruptly. It also provides a way to fade signals in and out. Another common effect is to include Speaker nodes
functioning as reverb sends. This can allow a sound to move from the inner “dry” region of the map, out to a
“distant” reverberant zone, and finally to silence.
Your finished SpaceMap should be neatly laid out and should represent your venue and speaker configuration
in a clear and intuitive fashion. All areas of the map should be defined by trisets and there should be no
boundaries where signal drops off abruptly from one side to another. Check your work in Test mode by moving
the pan controller inside and between trisets while monitoring the smoothness of the pan. Test the edges of the
map to be sure that the signal fades smoothly in and out.
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If possible, do all your testing in the venue itself, from the audience’s perspective and with loudspeakers on. If
this isn’t possible, you can at least check the SpaceMap’s basic functionality by placing the Matrix window in
the same workspace as the SpaceMap window and watching the behavior of the crosspoint values as you move
the spatial pan control.
Design Guidelines for Complex Systems
Most systems that are large enough to invite the use of SpaceMaps are also complicated enough to require
SpaceMap design that goes beyond simple mirroring of speaker locations. The first stage of abstraction is to
subdivide the speaker system into zones, each with its own map or set of maps. Such subdivisions may be obvious (such as creating one map for surround sound environmental effects and another for a virtual pit orchestra)
or subtle (such as maps that cover the same physical region but incorporate different groups of speakers).
When starting to venture beyond simple physical mapping, it is important to fully absorb the ideas that:
– A SpaceMap is not one comprehensive representation of a sound system configuration,
– Multiple SpaceMaps can operate simultaneously,
– SpaceMaps can function together, can overlap to some extent, or can be entirely independent.
One reason to use multiple SpaceMaps is to reduce complexity: if a given Trajectory will use only a few speakers,
there is no need to map all the speakers; they just add complexity and unnecessary design overhead that cannot
benefit you.
Another reason for subdivision can be found in larger surround configurations, where a trajectory moves from
one part of a room to another. In such cases you might build a chained sequence of SpaceMap Subcues, each
using a different but connected SpaceMap and Trajectory. For example, a sound will be flown across the stage
and then to the right wall, across the back, up the left wall, and back to the stage. One can set up a separate
SpaceMap for each surface, reducing the complexity of the maps. When using this technique, particular care
must be taken to “smooth the joints” where a trajectory crosses from one zone to the next.
Non-theater applications, like theme park attractions and outdoor installations, may consist of multiple independent
spaces and will require completely independent SpaceMaps. Again, there can be a great deal of variation in
design. A set of adjoining rooms that are acoustically isolated would have entirely independent sound fields and
therefore distinct SpaceMaps. On the other hand, an outdoor soundscape is more likely to have “bleed” from
one area to another, requiring adjoining SpaceMaps to share their edge nodes.
Design Guidelines for Trajectories
As always, it’s a good idea to plan ahead before recording your trajectories. It helps to imagine your sound environment, both aurally and visually, before designing the SpaceMap. If possible, sit in the venue and picture
how your sounds will move around the space. Consider the audience’s perspective from various seating areas.
Make sketches. Think about timing. Take a stopwatch to rehearsals and time how long certain stage actions,
music cues, and scene changes take so you can plan your sound cues objectively. Do this as early as possible:
you may find that part of your spatial design must be done before you even approach SpaceMap and Trajectory
creation.
Once you have a clear idea of how your sounds need to move through space you can design an appropriate
SpaceMap or set of SpaceMaps. It may also help to spend some time listening to moving sounds in the real
world. It is often surprising how many wrong assumptions we make about our own perceptions.
Be sure to take advantage of the Trajectory editing features. Trajectories can be created segment by segment,
and the paths along these segments will be smoothly interpolated.
Details regarding the creation and editing of trajectories are found in Creating SpaceMaps (p. 100).
Advanced Design: The Z-Axis
The simple examples we’ve looked at are immediately useful as the basis for spatial panning in a planar array
of speakers, but what about installations with width, depth, and height? The Z-axis may be the orphan child of
cinematic surround sound, but in many larger theatrical and theme park installations the perception of height is
crucial to convincing sonic illusions. Matrix3 can easily handle this, but the current SpaceMap window uses a
strictly two-dimensional interface which tends to limit one’s ability to think in three dimensions.
The trick to getting out of this box is to think about the box in various and novel ways. The simplest technique
is to deconstruct your three-dimensional speaker array into its component planes. If we expand our previous
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SpaceMaps
four-speaker example and think about a cubic configuration with eight speakers we find that we can visualize
this three-dimensional arrangement as six two-dimensional quad arrays, each representing a face of the cube.
Sound can be navigated across any one of these surfaces by using a rectangular SpaceMap similar to the one
we designed previously. If we want to move the sound from one face to another, we can change from one
SpaceMap to another at the point where the trajectory crosses from one face of the cube to another, using two
SpaceMap subcues in succession.
An alternative to this could be to create one SpaceMap that contains both panning surfaces, so that we could
use just one continuous trajectory for the entire sound path. This is where the process gets really fun (or really
confusing), because there really is no end to the topological games you can play with a SpaceMap. If you think
of SpaceMap design in the light of cartography, you will see that you are faced with similar problems of deconstruction and unfolding that map-makers face when they want to represent our spherical Earth on the flat pages
of an atlas.
The core problem is also akin to those faced in mechanical drawing and architecture. You can view any three
dimensional object in many ways: front, side, or overhead; in perspective; exploded component view; unfolded
box; whatever you can imagine. It’s a bit of a mental stretch perhaps, but we’ve seen many ingenious solutions
to the flat earth problem in mathematics, engineering, visual art, and literature (recommended readings: Flatland,
books on topology, M.C. Esher, origami, cartography, engineering drawing, cubism.)
Using Degrees of Abstraction
It is possible to design a SpaceMap with trisets that are composed entirely of Virtual nodes. One practical application of this is in the type of large environmental sound installation that uses repeating zones or “cells” of
loudspeakers to cover a wide area with surround sound effects.
The Fremont Street Experience in Las Vegas and the annual New Year’s Eve celebration in Times Square are
examples. In both cases a single rectangular SpaceMap controls multiple quad arrays of speakers (at Fremont
Street a total of 52 channels!). The corners of the rectangle are formed by Virtual nodes linked to corresponding
speakers in the various cells (the stereo orientation alternates from one to the next). This SpaceMap is used
with an alternative map made up of individual Speaker nodes. This provides for “fly-though” effects that span
all the individual zones.
Such a strategy can be applied to other complex installations where many speaker channels are individually
controllable but must be re-zoned dynamically. In such cases you can duplicate a single SpaceMap made up
of Virtual nodes, and then redefine the linked Speaker nodes for each copy of the map. This saves on drawing
many similar maps and it presents intriguing possibilities for dynamic sound transformations that may not be
imagined by one working with a more conventional one-to-one representation.
Using SpaceMap Subcues
Before a Trajectory can be used for playback in a cue or cue list, it must be incorporated in a SpaceMap Subcue.
The mapping of Trajectory and SpaceMap parameters to each bus is displayed at the bottom of the SpaceMap
window. There are three types of SpaceMap Subcues. Two of these, SpaceMap Trajectory and SpaceMap
Position, are captured like other mixer subcues in the system. The third, SyncMap subcue, is created in the
Subcue Library only.
The SpaceMap Trajectory subcue allows the binding of a trajectory to a pair of SpaceMaps, with several modifier parameters to reshape the path of the trajectory and govern its performance. The trajectory can be made
to repeat a fixed number of times, or indefinitely. It may be rotated, scaled and/or offset in X and Y dimensions,
and panned between two SpaceMaps. Its playback rate and its signal level can be scaled.
A parameter called Divergence causes a certain amount of the signal to be spread evenly throughout all the
Speaker nodes in the map. This is used to counterbalance the “sweet spot” limitations that plague surround
sound for larger audiences. It may reduce the strength of the panning effect, but it keeps the signal from being
lost to some listeners as the sound pans away from them.
These modifiers can be used in various ways, ranging from simple adjustment of trajectory performance to an
efficient way to “multiply” a single trajectory and to use it in several guises. For instance, a single figure-8 shaped
trajectory could be used in several simultaneous SpaceMap subcues, with a variety of rotation settings, to create
a precisely choreographed swarming of sounds. Several sounds could be made to chase each other along a
single path just by putting time offsets between their subcues.
The view can be simplified to show the most common parameters (trajectory, SpaceMap, and iterations) by deselecting Display > Show Advanced Bus Info.
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SpaceMap Position subcues contain the position of the bus and designated SpaceMap only. These can be used
to create static surround mixes.
SyncMap subcues are used to map trajectory playback to time code ranges. If time code starts in the middle of
a range the trajectory will be automatically started at the appropriate position along the path.
Subcue parameter details are found in the Creating SpaceMaps (p. 100) section.
Automatic Trajectory Generation
CueStation can auto-draw a trajectory based on a parametric equation. To access this function, open the Frame
Control window and add a SpaceMap entry. Change the Command to AutoDraw Trajectory. Then enter the
values and functions to generate the X and Y coordinates, duration, pan, divergence, and level for each point.
Click on Do Selected to have the trajectory drawn automatically.
This external can also be used in a subcue.
See Also
The following books contain information on spatial hearing:
Begault, D., 3-D Sound for Virtual Reality and Multimedia. A clear and comprehensive presentation of 3-D audio
principles and current technology. Unfortunately, this book is now out-of-print. (You may find it at
http://human-factors.arc.nasa.gov/ihh/spatial/papers/pdfs_db/Begault_2000_3d_Sound_Multimedia.pdf
) ISBN 0120847353.
Blauert, J., Spatial Hearing: The Psychophysics of Human Sound Localization. The standard reference on the
psychophysics of three-dimensional hearing. (See Mills (1972) for a shorter overview.) ISBN 0262024136.
Bregman, A. S., Auditory Scene Analysis: The Perpetual Organization of Sound. A massive description of experiments by the author and his students on the factors that influence the formation and segregation of sound
streams. The first and last chapters are readable by nonspecialists, but see Handel (1989) or Yost (1991) for
an easier introduction. ISBN 0262521954.
Carlile, Simon, Ed., Virtual Auditory Space: Generation and Applications. An excellent survey of the psychophysics
of spatial hearing and the generation for spatial audio. Highly recommended. ISBN 1570593418.
Handel, S., Listening: An Introduction to the Perception of Auditory Events. A recommended general introduction
to the psychology of hearing; includes a good summary chapter on neurophysiology. ISBN 0262081792.
Stern, R. M., Jr., An overview of models of binaural perception. A useful survey paper directed at models that
attempt to explain all known psychoacoustic phenomena. Available in Proc. 1988 National Research Council
CHABA Symposium.
Yost, W. A., and G. Gourevitch, Eds., Directional Hearing. The most important collection of research contributions
since Blauert’s book. Includes results of direct measurements of head-related transfer functions. ISBN
0387964932.
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SpaceMaps
Wild Tracks
Importing Audio with AudioMove
Wild Tracks Window
Wild Tracks Entries
Wild Tracks Subcues
Optimizing Wild Tracks Playback
Regions, Loops, and Vamping
Wild Tracks Recording
Advanced Techniques
Using Wild Tracks Offline
110
111
117
117
121
122
123
123
126
Wild Tracks is the audio playback and recording system for Matrix3. It uses SCSI hard drives to store audio files.
The SCSI drives connect to an LX-300 frame via an LX-ELC EtherTracks module. Only one LX-ELC module may
be installed in an LX-300 frame. Each additional LX-300 frame with an LX-ELC module adds more tracks of playback
and record.
There can be up to five frames in a single Matrix3 system with an LX-ELC module installed, and each module provides
one Wild Tracks Unit. Each Wild Tracks Unit gives you control over 32 separate Decks. The Wild Tracks Window
(p. 111) section explains the interface for working with Wild Tracks Decks.
Each Deck is a collection of entries that share the same set of play, pause, and stop commands. These entries can
be arranged in time to create complex multitrack sequences, and then captured into a Wild Tracks Deck subcue.
This process is explained in Wild Tracks Subcues (p. 117).
A Wild Tracks entry can be playback of an audio file, recalling a cue or subcue, a tone generator, and a few other
types. These are covered in Wild Tracks Entries (p. 117).
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109
Importing Audio with AudioMove
In order to play audio files using Wild Tracks Deck subcues, the files must be in the correct format and located
on the Wild Tracks hard drive(s). Wild Tracks can read a variety of different file types, including WAV and AIFF.
All files must have a sample rate of 48k, but there is no requirement for the bit depth.
A complete list of supported file formats can be found in
Supported Audio File Types (p. 211).
Note:
In order to access files on Wild Tracks hard drives, you must first
mount them as samba drives within your operating system. See
The latest version of AudioMove is 1.14.
Using Samba (p. 207) in the Appendices for more information on
You can download it from:
how to set this up.
http://www.lcscanada.com/audiomove/
AudioMove
AudioMove is a free program developed by LCS that will convert your files to the correct format.
Once you have mounted the samba drives, open AudioMove. Click on Destination Folder: and navigate to the
wtrxaudio directory. The location varies by operating system and is explained in Using Samba (p. 207).
Once you have selected the destination folder, make sure the output settings are configured correctly.
– The Output Format has three different settings .WAV and .AIFF will convert the files into those formats, and
Source will keep the original file format.
– Rate determines the bit rate setting. Audio files that are to be used in Wild Tracks must be 48kHz.
– Width determines the bit depth setting.
– Quality determines the conversion quality. Good is sufficient for most uses, and is also the fastest setting.
– If your computer has more than one processor, you can set Threads to the number of processors your computer has. In most cases, this can be set to 1.
Tip:
Wild Tracks is most efficient when playing 32-bit floating point mono AIFF files.
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Wild Tracks
At this point, you can click on Add Files... to import files for conversion, or you can drag files in directly from
your operating system.
Once the files have been converted, you will see them listed in the Wild Tracks drive. From there, you can drag
them into the Wild Tracks window, or directly into the Cue List window to create Wild Tracks Deck subcues.
Caution:
Transferring files to the Wild Tracks hard drives is a CPU-intensive task. It is recommended that you do
not transfer files during show conditions.
Wild Tracks Window
The Wild Tracks window is where you can setup and control each Wild Tracks Deck. Each Wild Tracks Unit has
32 decks.
A Wild Tracks Deck is a collection of Wild Tracks entries which all share the same timeline, and transport
controls. Decks can be triggered individually, or in groups.
If you are familiar with multitrack audio editing programs, you can think of each deck as a separate multitrack
session, each of which can be captured into a cue and recalled independently. Each deck has a timeline,
transport controls, and a list of entries (usually audio files) associated with it. Capturing a deck into a cue captures
all of the information about the entries, including timing placement within the deck, volume envelopes, and loops,
in addition to information about the deck as a whole, such as cursor placement or time code locking.
Wild Tracks entries can be audio files, tone generators, or even a cue recall. Entries that have audio associated
with them can be assigned to any of the Wild Tracks channels, as configured in the Mixer Configuration (p.
153) window. You can even assign multiple entries to the same channel.
The Wild Tracks window has four areas, each of which can be turned on or off via the Display menu. These are
Meters, Deck Info, Deck Graphics, and File Path.
Meters
The Meters area of the Wild Tracks window shows the audio playback activity for all channels, as well as global
Wild Tracks controls. This section includes:
– Global Select buttons. Units Selected toggles channel select for all Wild Tracks Units. Decks Selected toggles
channel select for all Wild Tracks Decks.
– A Unit ID number. Click on this number to select the entire Wild Tracks Unit.
– A Drive Setup button, which opens the Drive Setup dialog box.
– A Wild Tracks Unit label, which will flash yellow whenever audio dropouts are detected.
– Meters showing Wild Tracks DSP and memory usage.
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111
– A global Hold button. Clicking the Hold button will "hold" all decks, effectively pausing all currently playing
decks. Clicking the Hold button again will "unhold" all decks, and decks which were previously in "play" mode
will resume.
– A global Isolate button, to toggle Isolate for all Decks.
– Metering for each channel of playback. The number of channels is configured in the Mixer Configuration
window.
– Above the meters, a set of Deck Indicator buttons are shown. If audio is playing on a channel, the button will
display the number of the deck in use. This button is a shortcut to display the deck that is playing audio on
that channel.
– Below each meter is a PFL button, which is labeled with the Wild Tracks Send channel number. To use this
feature, you must have at least one output configured as a PFL or PAFL.
Deck Graphics
This displays a graphic representation of the relative position of the Wild Tracks entries included in that deck.
The controls for this area are as follows:
– Transport controls for moving the playback cursor within the Deck timeline.
– Zoom controls: Zoom In, Zoom to Selection, and Zoom Out.
– Three time code numbers, which define the length of time currently displayed in the timeline.
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Wild Tracks
– If there are any Wild Tracks elements enabled on the Deck, they will be represented by green bar in the
timeline view. You can click and drag the audio files in the timeline view to change the time when that file will
start playing.
If you right-click on one of the elements within the timeline view, you will see a context menu with the following
options:
Render Track Waveform ([length])
This allows you to view the waveform of the track you are using,
similar to many multitrack editing
programs. In order to preserve processing power, only the portions of
the files that are currently visible
within the deck are rendered.
Render All Track Waveforms ([length])
Selecting this will cause all waveforms in the deck to be rendered.
Cancel Waveform Rendering
Stops rendering the selected file.
Cancel All Waveform Rendering
Stops all rendering.
Clear Waveform Image
Clears the waveform rendered on the selected track.
Clear All Waveform Images
Clears the waveforms rendered on all tracks.
Set Track Loop Region
If you have highlighted a region of the track (using ctrl+click and drag), this command will automatically set
the Loop Start and Loop End values to define that region. If no region is highlighted, the Loop Start and End
values will be set to the length of the file.
Clip Track to Selection
This option is only available if a region is selected, and it will set the File Offset, Play Offset, and Play Length
values to correspond with that region of the file.
Make Batch File from Track
This will make a batch file of the track you have selected, which can then be used in other subcues.
The rest of the menu options are explained in the next section, Wild Tracks Envelopes (p. 114).
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113
Tip:
Use Ctrl+[Arrow key] when a file is selected in the timeline to have it 'snap' to the nearest edge of
another file, the top of the deck, or the cursor.
Wild Tracks Envelopes
In the Wild Tracks window, you can draw volume envelopes in the Deck timeline, and capture them as part of
the Wild Tracks Deck subcue. This allows greater control over level adjustments between tracks, and reduces
the number of additional cues required to make level changes.
There are several items in the context menu that appears when you right-click on an entry in the timeline view,
which relate to envelopes.
– Adjust Envelope Levels in Selected Range will adjust all selected points by the same amount. This is only
enabled when a region of the entry is selected.
– Convert Envelope to `Simple/Loop-Aware Envelope Type` - There are two types of envelope types: Simple
and Loop-Aware. Loop-Aware envelope points will repeat with looped regions, whereas Simple ones will not.
– Clear Envelope Points in Selected Range to clear all of the envelope points in the selection.
Tip:
When editing envelope points in the Wild Tracks window, you can hold down the Shift key when dragging
to only affect the time (horizontal movement), or the Alt key to only affect the gain (vertical movement).
Hold down the Control (Command) key for fine control of point movement when zoomed out.
Deck Info
The Deck Info area has two sections. The top section has options and controls that relate to the entire Deck.
The lower section contains a list of all Wild Tracks elements.
Deck Controls
This section of the Deck Info area includes:
– A Deck ID number, on the far left. Click on this number to select a Deck for capturing subcue information.
– The Deck Label displays the ID number of the subcue recalled for that Deck, the name of the file assigned
to that Deck, and the Wild Tracks and Deck ID numbers.
– The Deck Playback Position shows the current cursor position within the timeline of that Deck.
– Transport buttons: Play, Pause, Stop, and Record.
– A Total Play Length label.
– A Hold button, which acts similar to a pause button, but does not affect the playing/stopped status of the deck.
– An Isolate button. When active (yellow), the Deck will not be affected by cue automation.
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Wild Tracks
– Add Entry allows you to add a Wild Tracks element to the Deck. This can include a file for playback, a tone
or noise generator, or a few other types; these are listed in the Wild Tracks Entries (p. 117) section.
– Choose Files... brings up a dialog box to add audio files to the Deck. You can also add files by dragging them
into the Deck Info area from a directory listing.
– Replace File Names... allows you to switch out the selected file for a different one.
– Delete Selected removes the selected element from the list.
– The Deck Play Offset indicates the point on the Deck timeline where playback will start. The default is the
beginning of the Deck.
– The Lock to Time Code checkbox and Time Code field are used to lock the Deck playback to SMPTE time
code. Playback will stop when the Time Code stops, or the Deck reaches the end of the playback range.
– Deck Enabled is normally selected, activating the subcue. When this box is unchecked, the subcue will not
play back when triggered. If you are programming a sequence of overlapping Wild Tracks Deck cues, this
allows you to listen to only the subcues you are working on.
– The Any Deck checkbox, if checked, signifies that the Wild Tracks subcue does not explicitly specify which
Deck should be used for that subcue. In this case, when the subcue is recalled, CueStation assigns it to a
Deck that is currently not in use, starting with the highest number available. If Any Deck is NOT checked,
then every time the subcue is recalled, it will use the same Deck.
– A Deck Key: text box, to set a key for the deck. More information about using deck keys can be found in
Advanced Techniques (p. 123).
– An On Recall: drop-down box, to select which state the deck should be in when recalled by a subcue.
Wild Tracks Entries List
The next area within the Deck Info section is a list of all the elements included within the Wild Tracks Deck
subcue. Clicking on a column heading will sort the elements alphabetically by the contents of that column.
Clicking it again will sort them in reverse order.
– Type shows the type of element, and also determines what kind of information is listed in the File Name column.
Right-click in the Type column to change the type of element. See Wild Tracks Entries (p. 117) for a full description of these types.
– File Name identifies the name of the file, if the entry is a Playback type. If it is a Record entry, File Name indicates the name of the file that will be written to.
– Sends specifies a list of Wild Tracks sends to which the audio should be routed.
– Loops allows you to replay the file or file region repeatedly. Set this value to -1 to loop indefinitely.
– Level specifies the volume level (in dB) of the file or tone generator.
– Play Length (hh:mm:ss:fr:sf) specifies the duration of playback. Note that this can be set to a value shorter
than the actual length of the file to play back a region of the file.
– Loop Start sets the start time of the region to be looped. The default is the start of the file, but you can create
smaller regions within the file to be looped.
– Loop End sets the end time of the region to be looped.
– File Offset specifies the point within the file where playback should begin. This, combined with Play Length,
allows you to play back a region of the file.
– Play Offset (hh:mm:ss:fr:sf) is the point in the Deck timeline where the file will start playing.
– File Format displays the format of the file, for recording entries.
– ID sets a unique ID for the file entry.
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115
File Path
File Search Path is the default directory string through which Wild Tracks searches for audio files on the Wild
Tracks disk(s).
Recording Path is the default directory where Wild Tracks will record audio.
Tip:
When you are using multiple Decks, it can be difficult to keep track of which decks are playing. One helpful
technique is to open an additional Wild Tracks window using the Windows > Clone Window command,
and turn off all display options. This will result in only the deck label, deck playback position, transport
buttons being shown for each deck.
Special Commands
Display Menu
Display > Make Bars Shorter (Ctrl+[)
Display > Make Bars Taller (Ctrl+])
Display > Reset to Default Bar Height (Ctrl+=)
Display > Show Per-Track Display Mode
Display > Show Track Labels
Display > Show Level Envelopes
Display > Show Level Envelope Handles
Display > Show Deck Info
Display > Show Deck Graphics
Display > Show File Search Path
Display > Enable Track Position Dragging
Display > Show Meters
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Wild Tracks
Display > Show Meter Levels
Display > Show Compression
Display > Show Meter Labels
Display > Show Peak Hold
Display > Set Peak Hold Duration...
Set the peak hold time for the meters in the current window only.
Display > Time Code Display Format > ...
Wild Tracks Entries
– The Playback type has an audio file associated with it, which will be played according to the offset and loop
values. The file will be listed in the File Name column.
– Record indicates that when the subcue is triggered, recording will begin on that Deck, on the channel(s) listed
in the Sends column. See Wild Tracks Recording (p. 123) for more information.
– Sine Wave will generate a Sine Wave for an infinite length of time. The default frequency is 261.63 Hz (middle
C), but you can specify any frequency between 1Hz-24kHz by typing the number into the File Name column.
– White Noise will generate white noise, on infinite loop.
– Pink Noise will generate an infinite amount of pink noise.
– Square Wave will generate a square wave of infinite length, and you can also specify the frequency in the
File Name column.
– Triangle Wave generates a triangle wave.
– Sawtooth Wave generates a sawtooth wave.
Tip:
The tone generating Wild Tracks entries have an optional "duty cycle" argument that can be added to the
File Name column after the frequency, for more control over the tone coloration.
– Recall Cue allows you to trigger a cue within the Deck timeline. The cue ID is specified in the File Name column.
This is useful if you always want a cue triggered at a specific point during a song, and the graphical interface
allows you to place it easily within the timeline, instead of trying to figure out the exact wait time for an autofollow.
– Recall Subcue is very similar to Recall Cue, except it recalls a subcue instead of a cue. The subcue ID is
specified in the File Name column. It is recommended that you use Recall Cue when possible, because
subcue ID's can be changed by copy-on-write.
– Train Silence is used in VRAS systems to train for silence recognition.
– Train Speech is used in VRAS systems to train for speech recognition.
– Train Music is used in VRAS systems to train for music recognition.
– Voice Detect will detect speech, silence, or music on the channel(s) listed in the Sends column.
Wild Tracks Subcues
Wild Tracks Deck subcues contain a variety of information about playback (or recording) of audio files, including
the files to be played, the channel(s) each file should be assigned to, and the point in time along the Deck at
which the file should start playing. Each subcue corresponds to a single Wild Tracks Deck, which can contain
up to 24 tracks of audio playback. You can specify the deck number explicitly, or set it to "Any Deck" to let
CueStation choose a deck that is not already in use at the moment when the subcue is recalled.
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117
There are two main methods of creating a Wild Tracks subcue. The easiest and fastest method is by dragging
audio files into the Cue List window. The alternative method is to create them in a fashion similar to other subcues,
by setting control points and using the Capture window.
Creating a Wild Tracks Subcue in the Cue List Window
This is the quickest way to create Wild Tracks subcues. In CueStation, open the Cue List (or Cue Library) window.
Then, in your operating system, open a file browser window, and navigate to the wtrxaudio directory (You will
need to have the SCSI drives mounted as samba drives in order to do this). Click on an audio file and drag it
directly into the list of cues section of the Cue List window. CueStation will automatically create a cue that contains
one Wild Tracks Deck subcue with the following information:
– The subcue will be a playback type Wild Tracks Deck subcue,
with the file offset, play offset, level, loop count, and playback
Tip:
position set to defaults.
– CueStation will automatically detect how many tracks are in
If you shift-click to select multiple audio
the audio file and assign it the appropriate number of sends.
files and then drag them into the Cue List
window, CueStation will create one sub– In the subcue, the Deck field will be set to an asterisk, which
cue with all the files on the same deck,
signifies "Any Deck". When the cue is recalled, CueStation will
with the sends assigned sequentially.
automatically assign it to the first available Deck, starting with
the highest number. For instance, if you have 32 Decks, the
cue will be assigned to Deck 32, unless that Deck is already
in use, in which case it will be assigned to Deck 31.
At this point, if you recall the cue, you can then set the input levels, pans, and other settings appropriately, and
then use Capture Differences to add these control points into the same cue.
Or, you can edit the subcue directly within the Cue List window. If you want to change the Deck number, for instance, that can only be done by editing the Deck field in the subcue.
Creating a Wild Tracks Subcue in the Wild Tracks Window
This method of creating Wild Tracks Deck subcue is useful for creating more complex multitrack sequences.
– Open the Wild Tracks window, and locate a Deck that is not
in use. Drag in audio files from the SCSI drives, and playback
Tip:
entries will be created for them automatically. Alternatively,
you can click on Choose Files... to add audio files.
When dragging in files, you can also drop
– For each file dragged into the Deck, the Sends are assigned
them on to the meters at the top of the
automatically starting with the lowest channel number not yet
window. Dropping a file onto a meter will
in use by that Deck. The sends can be changed by clicking in
result in that file being automatically asthe Sends column and typing in the desired channel numbers.
signed to the channel corresponding to
It is possible to assign multiple Wild Tracks files to the same
that meter.
channels.
– As you add files, you will see them appear in the timeline view
as green bars. Click and drag on the green bars to move them forwards or backwards in time within the deck.
– You can fine-tune the timing by editing the Play Offset value for each file. This value determines the point in
the deck's timeline where the file will start playing.
– The Level is set to 0 dB by default, this can also be edited to
balance out the mix within that Deck. Additionally, you can
assign a different gain for each track in the audio file, separating the values with commas; for instance: -10,-5.
– If you only want to play part of a file, change the File Offset
value to the time within the file that you want playback to start.
The Play Length is set automatically to the length of the file,
minus the File Offset time. If you want the file to stop playing
before the end of the track, edit Play Length to the length of
time you want the file to play.
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Tip:
Right-click on one of the green bars and
choose Render All Track WaveForms
to see the waveform of the files you are
adjusting.
Wild Tracks
– If you would like to loop part or all of a file, set the Loops value to the number of times you want the file to be
looped, or type -1 for infinite looping. See the Regions, Loops, and Vamping (p. 122) section for more information.
– Once you have finished adding files and arranging them in the Deck timeline, select the Deck by clicking on
the deck number button on the left side of the window. If you want the deck to start playing from the beginning
of the timeline when the cue is recalled, make sure the deck cursor is at 0.
– Type F4 to open the Capture window. The deck you selected should be listed in the Channel Selects area.
If the deck is the only thing you are capturing into the cue, make sure that all other subcues types are
unchecked, and then click on the checkbox next to Wild Tracks Deck. Click on Click to Capture New to
capture the cue.
If no decks are selected, the default is that Deck 1 on
Wild Tracks Unit 1 will be captured.
When the subcue is recalled, the Deck Label is automatically set to the name of the subcue, as shown.
Wild Tracks parameters captured by CueStation can be
directly edited in the subcue window.
Wild Tracks subcues can also be created entirely within
the Subcue Library. Use Subcues > New Subcue > Wild Tracks Deck to create a new subcue. Most controls
work the same as described in Wild Tracks Window (p. 111), but there are several additional options. The following values constrain the operation of the entire deck:
• Deck Enabled is normally selected, activating the Deck. When not selected, the Deck will not respond to
automation. This allows you to easily skip specific subcues while designing your list.
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119
• WTRX ID specifies the Wild Tracks Unit used by the subcue.
• Deck ID specifies the Wild Tracks Deck within that Unit. Enter an asterisk (*) to signify "Any Deck".
• Deck Recall Position (hh:mm:ss:fr:sf) specifies the point along the deck timeline at which the deck cursor
will begin playback.
• On Recall selects one of six values:
• Continue will load in the new Deck info, without affecting the playback status of the Deck. If the Deck was
paused before the subcue was recalled, then it will remain paused.
• Stop stops the deck when the subcue is recalled.
• Play loads the start of the file into the playback buffer, and then starts playing audio.
• Play from Top works similarly to Play, except that the Deck Recall Position is ignored and playback always
starts from the beginning of the deck.
• Play Now starts playing audio immediately, even before the buffer is completely loaded. This option is
deprecated and should not be used for normal playback operation.
• Record lets you record audio from an input channel to a file on the Wild Tracks drive. See Wild Tracks
Recording (p. 123) for more information.
• Record Now is the same as Play Now, except that recording is enabled.
Assigning Sends to Multitrack Files
Track assignments are made in the order listed in the Sends column. The first track of a multi-track file is mapped
to the first send listed, the second track to the second send listed, and so forth.
For example you could specify 8,1,6,2-4, so that the file's first track will play on channel 8, the second on
channel 1, the third track on channel 6, the fourth on channel 2, the fifth on channel 3, and the sixth track on
channel 4.
Descending ranges are also permitted. For example, a multi-track audio file can be mapped to sends 16-1.
The first track of the audio file is routed to the 16th channel, the second track is routed to the 15th channel, and
so on.
Playing Individual Tracks
You can extract tracks out of a multi-track file by making a null assignment of the unwanted tracks. If you specify 0 (zero) as a send value, the track will not be played.
For example, to play only the right-hand stream of a stereo file, you can specify the send as 0,1.
To send only the right channel of a stereo file to several different input channels, you could specify 0,1,0,2,0,3.
For the left channel only, it would be 1,0,2,0,3,0.
Or if you wanted to do the normal round-robin assignment mapping, but you want to start the assignments with
the second stream, you could prepend a zero to the sends. For example, 0,1-16 would cause channel 1 to
play the right-hand stream, channel 2 to play the left-hand stream, channel 3 the right-hand stream, and so on.
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Wild Tracks
Recalling Wild Tracks Subcues
When traversing through a cue list, CueStation will "look ahead" and proactively pre-load Wild Tracks Deck
subcues into a buffer. When the cue is recalled, the playback of audio files will begin as soon as each track is
halfway buffered, for more immediate playback when the subcue is recalled.
Optimizing Wild Tracks Playback
In CueStation 4.5, the Wild Tracks engine was reprogrammed to be more efficient and powerful. This section
will describe different ways of getting the best performance from your EtherTracks module.
File Type and Format
Wild Tracks supports many different formats of audio files (see Supported Audio File Types (p. 211) for a
complete list), and all files must have a 48kHz sample rate. However, Wild Tracks is most efficient when using
the following formats:
– Using mono files instead of stereo can save up to 33% CPU usage.
– Using AIFF instead of WAV saves 20% CPU usage.
– Files with 32-bit floating point bit depth will use 23-34% less CPU than other bit depths.
In conclusion, 32-bit floating point mono AIFF files are handled most efficiently.
Server Location
The location of the server processes also has a significant impact on the CPU usage on the EtherTracks module.
By default, the server processes will start up on the EtherTracks module in the frame with the lowest ID number
in the system. If there is only one EtherTracks module in the system, and it is also handling the Wild Tracks
processing, it can easily get overloaded in high-stress performance situations.
In this kind of system, or in systems where all EtherTracks modules are used for Wild Tracks, you can improve
performance by running the server on a separate computer, using either VirtualLX or lxelcd. See Using VirtualLX
as a Server (p. 61) for more information on setting up VirtualLX.
In systems where more than one frame has an EtherTracks module, the server processes can be run on the
first EtherTracks module, and other EtherTracks modules can be dedicated to Wild Tracks playback.
Deck Recall Time
For a Wild Tracks Deck subcue, the length time between when the subcue is recalled and when the deck starts
playing can longer than desired, especially if there are many audio files to be loaded. Therefore, it can be very
beneficial to load the deck (without playback) at a time before playback is required.
When recalling cues in a cue list, CueStation will "look ahead" at the next cue and automatically pre-load up to
four Wild Tracks Deck subcues. These subcues will not be visible in the Wild Tracks window; they are loaded
in the background. This can reduce time-until-playback by up to 98%.
Another way to decrease deck recall time even more is to manually control when decks are loaded. For this
method, you will need two cues per Wild Tracks playback: one cue to load the deck, and another cue to start
playback.
– Create a Wild Tracks Deck subcue as you normally would, except change "Play from Top" to "Stop". This will
prevent the deck from playing when it is loaded.
– Take note of which deck the subcue will use.
– Add this subcue to a cue in your cue list before the cue where you want to trigger playback.
– Arrange your CueStation windows so you can see both the Wild Tracks window and the Cue List window,
and select the cue where you would like to trigger playback
– Right click + drag the "Play" button in the Wild Tracks window into the list of subcues of the cue you selected
in the Cue List window. This will create a new Mixer Settings subcue, which should have the following information: WildTracks 1 Deck 1 Status ... Play. Make sure the Wild Tracks unit and deck number
match the Wild Tracks Deck subcue you created earlier.
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121
At this point your cue list will have a sequence of two cues to initiate Wild Tracks playback. The first cue loads
the files into a deck, and the second cue triggers playback. This can significantly reduce the trigger time when
recalling the second cue. However, note that if you recall the second cue without first recalling the loading cue,
playback may not work as desired. For instance, if there are other files loaded into that deck, then those files
will be played instead of the ones you were expecting.
You can also Control Decks by Key (p. 123) as described in a later section to control the playback of a
preloaded deck.
Regions, Loops, and Vamping
In Wild Tracks, you can create regions within an audio file. These regions allow you to loop a section of a file
infinitely, or a certain number of times, and you can also change the number of remaining loops while the deck
is playing to create a "vamp until triggered" effect.
By control-dragging on a green bar in the Wild Tracks window, you can specify a section of the playback region.
The specified section will be highlighted in blue. Once the selection is made, you can control-drag on either end
of the blue selection-bar to adjust the area it covers. You can also make the blue selection area match the entire
length of the audio track by control-clicking on the green bar.
Loops
In Wild Tracks you can loop an entire file, or a region within a file. To create a loop:
– Create a region by control-dragging the mouse over the part of the file you want to loop. The region will be
highlighted in blue.
– Right-click on the region and select Set Track Loop Region. This command will change the Loop Start and
Loop End times for the selected file to match the region you created. You can also edit these values manually
to fine-tune the timing of your regions.
– Change the Loops value to the number of times you want the region to loop. Or, if you want the region to loop
infinitely, enter -1.
Vamping
Vamping is used to loop a region of an audio file continuously until it is triggered to continue, at which point it
will finish playing the current region and then continue on to the next region.
To accomplish this in Wild Tracks, use the following procedure:
– Create a region as described in the previous section.
– Set Loops to infinite by typing -1 or inf in the Loops column.
– Capture the Deck into a cue called “Start Vamp”. This will be the “setup” cue that starts the vamping sequence.
Note the Deck number, and the ID for the looping playback entry. The Any Deck option cannot be used for
vamping, because the Deck number will be referenced later.
– Open the Subcue Library and create a new Externals subcue with a Wild Tracks type entry. Right-click in the
Command column and select Set Loop Counter.
– For Target Deck:, enter the number of the Deck used in the Wild Tracks subcue. For Target Track:, enter
the ID number of the Wild Tracks playback entry.
– Create a new cue that includes the Externals subcue, and name it “End Vamp”. Add both cues to the Cue
List. The “Start Vamp” cue will begin Wild Tracks playback, and loop indefinitely until “End Vamp” is recalled.
Note:
If the “End Vamp” cue is triggered less than five seconds before the end of the region, an extra loop will be
played. This is because part of the next loop has already been loaded into the Wild Tracks audio buffer. If the
looped region is less than five seconds, it could result in several extra loops after the loop counter is reset.
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Wild Tracks
Wild Tracks Recording
In CueStation 4 it is possible to record audio files using Wild Tracks. To set up a Wild Tracks Deck for recording:
– Open the Wild Tracks window and locate a deck that is not in use.
– Click on Add Entry to add a new Wild Tracks element. Right-click in the Type column and select Record.
– In the File Name column, enter a name for the audio file that will be created. The file will be stored at the location indicated by the Recording Path, displayed at the bottom of the Wild Tracks window.
– In the Sends column, select the channel(s) that Wild Tracks will record from. Recording sends are pre-fader,
so it is not necessary to set a level on the input channel.
– Change the Play Length if you only want to record for a specific length of time, otherwise leave it on infinite.
– Right-click on the File Format column to change the file type and bit depth. Files will be recorded at a bit rate
of 48kHz.
Once you have finished setting up the deck, click on the red Record button to start recording. As the cursor
moves along the deck timeline, you should see it flash between red and blue.
After recording is complete, the file will appear on the Wild Tracks hard drive, in the wtrxaudio directory.
Recording File Names
The File Name value for a Wild Tracks recording can contain a number of tokens that will be replaced by the
date or time when the file is created. The tokens are: %Y for current year, %M for current month, %D for current
date, %h for hour, %m for minute, %s for second, %r for a random number, and %t for a complete date/time
stamp. For instance, if your file name was OffstageVoices-%M-%D.wav, then the recorded file would be named
OffstageVoices-08-12.wav, depending on the date.
Advanced Techniques
This section lists some advanced techniques for using or controlling Wild Tracks.
Mixer Settings Subcues
Mixer Settings subcues can be used to control transport actions on a deck, or set of decks. Mixer Settings subcues
can be created for any control point in CueStation, by right-clicking on the control and dragging it into the cue
or subcue library. For example:
– Open the Wild Tracks window and the Cue Library window, so that you can see both of them.
– In the Wild Tracks window, in Deck 1, right-click on the Stop button, and drag it into the cue library. A new
cue will be created, containing a Mixer Settings subcue. If you click on the subcue, you will see "WildTracks
1 Deck 1 Status" in the Control Points column. You can change the value of the deck, for example, "...Deck
1-5...", to stop a range of decks at the same time. In the Value column, you will see the word "Stop". This can
be changed to Play, Pause, etc. The Wait and Fade times are not valid for this type of control point, and the
Enabled column shows whether or not the control point(s) are enabled.
Control Decks by Key
Mixer Settings subcues can only control decks if you know which decks will be in use. For subcues assigned to
"Any Deck", the deck number may vary depending on which other decks are in use. However, it is still possible
to automate control of these decks, using deck keys. There is a Wild Tracks external subcue, "Control Decks
by Key", which allows you to control a set of Wild Tracks Decks that share the same pre-assigned key. To use
this feature:
– Create a Wild Tracks Deck subcue with a sine wave entry, and set it to "Any Deck". For the Deck Key, type
"cue1" (without quotes).
– In the Subcue Library window, create a new Externals subcue, and name it "Pause cue1 Decks". Change the
Type to "WildTracks", and change the Command to "Control Decks by Key". There are several options for
this external:
– A Deck Key: text box, for entering the deck key. Type "cue1" (again without quotes).
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123
– An Action: drop-down box, for selecting the action to perform on the deck. For this example, select "Pause".
There are two other options: Set Deck Position, for setting the position of the deck cursor, and Match Only
These Decks:, to confine the control to a certain set of decks.
– Recall the Wild Tracks Deck subcue, and check the Wild Tracks window to see that it is playing, most likely
on deck 32.
– In the Subcue Library window, recall the "Pause cue1 Decks" subcue. The deck used by the Wild Tracks
subcue should now be paused.
You can even change the deck number in the subcue, and the "Pause" subcue will still work. If you create more
Wild Tracks Deck subcues with the same key, then the "Pause" subcue will pause all of those decks, if they
have been loaded when the subcue is recalled.
Batch Files
Wild Tracks 4 supports the use of batch files. Batch files are script files for the Wild Tracks processor.
Here are the contents of an example batch file:
# This batch file appears in WTRX window like any other audio file
file=makehaste.wav
# Play this first
file=BirdOwl.wav
# Then this
file=Congo.wav loops=5
# then play this one in a loop 5
times
file=PalindromicMessage.aiff backwards
# Play the palindromic message
backwards(!)
source=tone pitch=440 length=1s
# generate 440Hz tone for 1 second
file=Romeo.wav loops=10 offset=1m length=2m
# play 1-minute segment, 10 times
file=another_batch_file.bat loops=3
# you can even do "subroutines"
file=yet_another_batch_file.bat random
# execute batch file in random
order(!)
When the user specifies a batch file in the Wild Tracks window, it will work like an audio file that is the concatenation of all the items specified in the batch script. So to span drives, you could write a batch file like this:
# This is a batch file that lets us span drives
file=/mnt/scsi1/wtrxaudio/FirstPartOfReallyLongFile.wav
file=/mnt/scsi2/wtrxaudio/SecondPartOfReallyLongFile.wav
file=/mnt/scsi3/wtrxaudio/ThirdPartOfReallyLongFile.wav
Of course, if you didn't want to have to specify hard-coded SCSI IDs for each drive, you could just put the file
names in the batch file instead (assuming they are unique):
# Same as above, but works with any SCSI IDs
file=FirstPartOfReallyLongFile.wav
file=SecondPartOfReallyLongFile.wav
file=ThirdPartOfReallyLongFile.wav
This would enable failover/SafetyNet functionality also. Or, if that is still too much typing...
# Using wildcards...
file=First*
file=Second*
file=Third*
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Wild Tracks
Tip:
Batch file scripts can also be typed directly into a Wild Tracks Deck Playback entry, without the need to
create an external file.
Changing the File Path with a Subcue
The LX-ELC module is a Linux computer. The file search path defines where it will look for the files specified
by a Wild Tracks subcue.
The default path is /tmp/supportfiles:/mnt/*/wtrxaudio:/tmp/flashfiles:/wtrxaudio
There are four sections each separated by a colon (:). Each section represents a search path. A search path is
a list of directories each separated by a slash (/).
Media Path Subcue
It is possible to use an Externals subcue to change the File Search Path in the Wild Tracks window. Create a
new Externals subcue, change the type to "WildTracks", and set the command to "Adjust WildTracks Media
Path". There are several options for this external:
– Path to Modify is a drop-down menu to select File Search Path or File Record Path.
– Action: is another drop-down menu, to choose among Set Path Clauses, Add Path Clauses, or Remove Path
Clauses.
– The Path Clauses text box is where you can enter the paths to be added or removed.
Understudy Voice Over
Since you can use the Externals subcue to change the File Search Path, it is possible to have a setup cue that
changes what version of a file will be used for a show without having to create duplicate Wild Tracks subcues
with different file versions.
For example, if you had offstage voice-overs that were delivered by a principal character, and there were two
understudies for that part, then you need to match the actor for the performance to the specific voice-over files.
Since understudies often go in with short notice, it would be good to automate the selection so that a change
was not missed in a voice over cue.
The simple way to do this is to put the voice over files for each actor in a separate directory. These directories
need to be located on the Wild Tracks drives at the same level as the /wtrxaudio directory and not inside the
wtrxaudio directory where you would typically put files.
Let's say our actors names are Alfred, Bob, and Carole. Alfred is the principal and Bob and Carole are the two
understudies. On the Wild Tracks drive we create three directories, VO_Alfred, VO_Bob, and VO_Carole.
So for the scsi0 drive example in the preceding section on file search path, you would see a list of directories
for the drive that would include:
– wtrxaudio
– VO_Alfred
– VO_Bob
– VO_Carole
In each directory we put the voice over files for that actor. These might be named with the voice over number
and the actors name. Perhaps VO1-Alfred.wav, VO1-Bob.wav, and VO1-Carole.wav.
In order to make it possible to use the same Wild Tracks cue work for any of the actors we have two choices.
1. We can manually enter a file name with a wild card. For our example the first voice over would have a file
name of VO1*.wav.
2. We could duplicate each of the actors files and use the same name for the duplicate. For our example we
could name each of the duplicates VO1.wav.
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125
The advantage of the second method is you can use the drag-and-drop method of creating a Wild Tracks subcue
file entry without having to edit the file name. This may be faster for most users.
For this to work, all we have to do is add a file search path that includes the directory for the chosen actor. If
Bob is going on, we add a file search path to the VO_Bob directory. This can be added as another entry to the
path:
– In the "Adjust WildTracks Media Path" external, set the Path to Modify to File Search Path.
– For the Action: field, select Add Path Clauses.
– In the Path Clauses: field, type "/mnt/*/VO_Bob" (without quotes).
At the end of the system check-out cue list we could insert three cues that set the path for each of the three
actors: Alfred, Bob, and Carole. When we know which actor will be going on, the cue for that actor is executed
and the file search path will be set to use that actors files for all voice overs.
Using Wild Tracks Offline
In CueStation 4, it is now possible to edit Wild Tracks Deck subcues without a connection to the hard drives or
frames, in "offline" mode.
– First, you will need to create a "virtual disk", better known as an .lcsDisk file, which will contain information
about the files and directories on the hard drive you are using. This can be accomplished two different ways:
– In CueStation, while connected to the frame(s), open the Mixer Configuration window. In the EtherTracks
section, click on the Drive Setup button. Highlight the drive you wish to use, then click on Create Virtual
Drive File. Save this file in the same directory as your VirtualLX program.
– Alternatively, you can mount the drive using Samba, and then open AudioMove. Click on the Destination
Folder button and navigate to the wtrxaudio directory. Next, click on the Create .lcsDisk button.
– In CueStation, connect to 127.0.0.1. VirtualLX will automatically use the .lcsDisk file(s) within the same directory.
Note:
VirtualLX can only use .lcsDisk files named wtrx-X-scsi-Y.lcsDisk, where X is the Wild Tracks Unit ID
number and Y is the SCSI ID number.
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Wild Tracks
VRAS: Variable Room Acoustics System
Introduction to VRAS
User Interface
VRAS Matrix Options
VRAS Subcues
VRAS Subcue Types
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129
131
133
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Introduction to VRAS
Variable Room Acoustics System (VRAS) is an acoustic enhancement system used to electronically alter the
acoustics of a room. VRAS can provide enhancement to reverberance, envelopment, warmth, and intelligibility
through the application of VRAS Reverberation and VRAS Early Reflections processing. VRAS is used both to enhance
both acoustic and reinforced sound as well as dramatic effect in theatre.
VRAS is an optional component of Matrix3, and requires the LX-VRA VRAS DSP module.
VRAS Reverberation
Reverberation (late) enhancement increases envelopment and immerses the listeners in the performance. The
physical room is coupled to the “electronic room” (the VRAS reverberation algorithm) using multiple microphones
to pick up the natural reverberant field. The energy enhancements generated by the electronic room are then distributed to multiple loudspeakers. The qualities of the reverberator and the overall system gain combine to alter the
natural acoustic of the room
The VRAS Reverberator achieves power gain by employing a Unitary Reverberator. This has the advantage of
constant power gain over all frequencies, allowing for maximum gain before feedback. To attain this quality, a small
amount of direct signal is matrixed from the inputs to the outputs along with the reverberant sound. In order to ensure
that direct sound does not reach a listener through a VRAS reverberation microphone-loudspeaker combination
more quickly than the natural path of the sound in the room, strategies for zoning the direct sound can be followed.
VRAS can be configured, for example, such that direct sound from inputs 1-8 is only sent to VRAS outputs 1-8 while
direct sound from inputs 9-16 is only sent to VRAS outputs 9-16. Techniques for zoning are described later in this
chapter.
VRAS ER
VRAS-ER (early reflection) enhances the early energy produced from sound sources (typically on the stage) by
generating a large number of discrete delays. Multiple microphones are placed close to the direct field with respect
to the sound sources. VRAS generates delayed signals from each of these microphones and matrixes them to
loudspeakers close to the direct field of the listeners.
Tuning the ER system requires setting the delays and matrixing the early reflections to the system loudspeakers.
These settings must be made such that the sound energy supplied by VRAS arrives to listeners within 20-80ms of
the arrival of the direct sound.
When setting up VRAS ER delays, take particular care to ensure that the direct signals reach the audience before
the generated reflections. Take into consideration:
– Minimum and maximum microphone-to-sound source distances.
– Minimum and maximum loudspeaker-to-listener distances.
– Minimum and maximum VRAS ER delay settings.
Example
Consider a set of stage microphones that range from 6 to 10m from stage sound sources. Standard sound reinforcement system design techniques have been applied. Directional loudspeakers have been used such that
overlapping coverage is minimized, and the loudspeakers have been time-aligned to the direct sound from the
stage.
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127
The time for sound to travel from sound source to microphone and microphone through the internal processing
of Matrix3, will provide a minimum delay of 6m × 3.3ms/m + 3ms = 23ms, and the longest delay will be 10m
× 3.3ms/m + 3ms = 36ms. Thus, with VRAS set to 0ms delay, the min-max delay values range from 23-36ms.
To benefit the listener the most, the generated early reflections should arrive in the 37ms-97ms time window.
Therefore, the delay range set in VRAS should be 37 - 23 = 14ms minimum to 97 - 36 = 61ms maximum.
If you are using the same loudspeakers for VRAS Reverb, do not apply the system delays used for time
alignment to the reverberation signals. Use CueStation’s loop-back extension: loop the (delayed, time-aligned)
VRAS ER back to the CueStation console, and mix them with (non-delayed) VRAS Reverb. If you use this
technique, you will need one loop-back extension for every eight system outputs shared by ER and Reverb.
This technique is described in Configuring Loopbacks (p. 166).
A less intensive DSP-processing alternative to time alignment with loop-back extensions is to use the VRAS
alternative output matrices in the ER algorithm. The default matrix (16×16) cross-couples all sixteen delay
outputs to all sixteen VRAS outputs. The 8/8 option cross-couples the first eight delays entered to the first
eight VRAS outputs only, and the last eight delays to the last eight VRAS outputs only.
For example, if you selected the 8/8 setting and entered the sequence:
7, 8, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 27, 7, 19, 27, 43, 51, 55, 61, 71
all system microphones would be mixed to delays 7, 8-27, and then matrixed to VRAS outputs 1-8 only; and
all system microphones would be mixed to delays 7, 19-71, and then matrixed to VRAS outputs 9-16 only.
You would then be assign outputs 1-8 to loudspeakers more distant from listeners, and outputs 9-16 to
loudspeakers near to listeners.
Explore the 8/8 option if you want to experiment with less-dense ER. Try using the first set of eight outputs
for half the echo density. Similarly, the 12/4 option generates different amounts of density in the ER.
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VRAS: Variable Room Acoustics System
User Interface
Configuring VRAS
VRAS is configured in the Mixer Configuration
window by selecting Extensions at the bottom
of the frames list, and then selecting either 8Channel VRAS Extension or 16-Channel VRAS
Extension from the drop-down box in the first
empty Extension module. Usually, the sixteenchannel version should be specified. The eightchannel version should only be used in very
large systems when the limit of 400 High Speed
Bus (HSB) channels is being approached. The
eight returns from the eight-channel version
are identical to outputs 9-16 of the sixteenchannel version.
Parameters
The VRAS window shows all current parameter
values for each instance of VRAS configured
in the system.
Label
Sets the name for the VRAS instance.
Type
Reverberation or Early Reflection.
Reverberation Parameters
Inputs
Specifies the input cross-coupling matrix.
Selection of this matrix controls the distribution of direct signals from the VRAS inputs to the VRAS outputs.
All matrix options maintain the same amount of total power at all outputs. Therefore, while the option “Inputs
1-16” can be selected with only input 1 active, this will result in less power output than if the “Inputs Channel
1” option is selected. A full table of Input options is provided later in this chapter.
Max Reverb Time (0-10 seconds)
Adjusts the reverberation time. The Time/Frequency graph provides a visual model of the setting.
Unitary Level (0-100%)
Adjusts the unitary property of the reverberator. True unity is set at 100.0, which is recommended for normal
operation.
As the unitary level is reduced, the amplitude response of the reverberator will vary, gain levels will decrease,
and the system will behave more like a conventional electronic reverb unit. This may be useful if VRAS is
used as an in-line “effects” reverberator.
A recent experiment showed that setting the Direct Level to 0% reduced the gain before feedback by 6 dB.
Delta Maximum (0.7-0.9999)
The higher the delta maximum, the more echo density. However, the amount of direct energy in the reverberator increases proportionately to delta maximum, so there is a trade off between echo density and direct
to reverberant levels.
Delta maximum will always be less than 1.0. As you reduce the Delta maximum value, (decreasing echo
density), you will notice that the knee in the Time/Frequency graph moves higher.
VRAS: Variable Room Acoustics System
129
Note:
The Delta maximum control interacts with the Shape factor control. When you go outside of the normal operating
envelope the graph in the VRAS Editor will not be drawn.
Shape Factor (2-20)
Shape factor is the ratio of the longest to the shortest delay. Low shape factors produce similar internal delay
times across channels, while high settings produce a wide spread of delay times.
The shape factor also defines how quickly the direct levels drop as the channel numbers rise. A high shape
factor will give you a rapid drop in loop gains and direct levels.
High Frequency Damping Frequency (0.02-20KHz)
This is the corner frequency for the reverberator damping. You will see the results of your setting on the
Time/Frequency graph.
You can simultaneously adjust High Frequency Damping frequency and amount by clicking and dragging
directly in the Time/Frequency graph.
High Frequency Damping (0-100%)
This is the amount of damping applied to the reverberator at high frequencies (above the damping frequency).
You will see the results of your setting on the Time/Frequency graph.
You can simultaneously adjust High Frequency Damping frequency and amount by clicking and dragging
directly in the Time/Frequency graph.
Mid/Low Frequency Damping Type (Mid/Low)
As of CueStation v4.1, VRAS includes a second damping filter that can be configured as a mid or low band
damping. This control sets the type of the filter. Use “Low” if you need low frequency damping to compensate
for an excessively “boomy” room.
Mid/Low Frequency Damping Frequency (0.02-20KHz)
This is the corner frequency for the reverberator damping. You will see the results of your setting on the
Time/Frequency graph.
You can simultaneously adjust Mid/Low Damping frequency and amount by clicking and dragging directly
in the Time/Frequency graph.
Mid/Low Frequency Damping (0-100%)
This is the amount of damping applied to the reverberator at high frequencies (above the damping frequency).
You will see the results of your setting on the Time/Frequency graph. You can simultaneously adjust Mid/Low
Damping frequency and amount by clicking and dragging directly in the Time/Frequency graph.
Channel (1-280)
Specifies up to sixteen inputs to the VRAS Reverberation processor.
Attenuation (dB)
Specifies an attenuation to the input of VRAS from the channel specified to the immediate left of the entry
box.
The combination of reverb time, delta max, and shape factor affect how the hardware memory is allocated and
used. Some combinations may exceed the memory capacity of the VRAS DSP, truncating some of the reverberator delays and creating distinct echoes. The LX-300 DSP will warn you with messages in the log Window when
you enter values that exceed the memory capacity of the DSP.
Tip:
You can copy and paste in data from an Excel spreadsheet, or other spreadsheet applications.
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VRAS: Variable Room Acoustics System
Early Reflections Parameters
Inputs
Specifies the input cross-coupling matrix. Selection
of this matrix controls the distribution of direct signals
from the VRAS inputs to the VRAS outputs. A full
table of Input options is provided later in this chapter.
Output Matrix
Specifies the output cross-coupling matrix. Selection
of this matrix controls the distribution of user-specified
delays to VRAS outputs. Two or four independent
ER “sub-zones” can be specified using appropriate
Input and Output Matrix options. For instance, if set
to “Outputs16” then all sixteen delays will be matrixed
to all sixteen outputs. If set to “Outputs 8/8”, the first
eight delays will be matrixed to the first eight outputs,
and the last eight delays to the last eight outputs. All
options are described further below.
Cutoff Frequency (0.0-20 KHz)
Adjusts the cutoff frequency of the included low pass
filter applied to VRAS inputs.
High Frequency Attenuation (0-100%)
Adjusts the amount of attenuation of the high frequencies in the low pass filter.
Channel Assignments (1-280)
Specifies up to sixteen inputs to the VRAS ER processor.
Attenuation (dB)
Specifies an attenuation to the input of VRAS from the channel specified to the immediate left of the entry
box.
ER Delay 1...16 (ms)
Delay time, milliseconds for each of the sixteen delays included with VRAS ER.
VRAS Matrix Options
In Reverberation mode, the input configurations have the following effect on the direct signals components in
the VRAS outputs (returns to Console):
OPTION
TO VRAS
DIRECT SIGNALS
Inputs 1-8
Inputs 1-8
Outputs 1-8
Inputs 1-12
Inputs 1-12
Outputs 1-12
Inputs 1-16
Inputs 1-16
Outputs 1-16
Inputs 1-16
(zoned 8/8)
Inputs 1-8 Inputs 9-16
Outputs 1-8 Outputs 9-16
Inputs 1-8
(ER delays 1-16)
Inputs 1-8
Outputs 1-16
Input 1
Input 1
Output 1
Input 2
Input 2
Output 2
Input 3
Input 3
Output 3
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131
OPTION
TO VRAS
DIRECT SIGNALS
Input 4
Input 4
Output 4
Inputs 1-16
(zoned 8/8 odd/even)
Inputs 1,3,5...15 Inputs 2,4,6...16 Outputs 1,3,5...15 Outputs
2,4,6...16
Inputs 1-16
(zoned 4/4/4/4)
Inputs 1-4 Inputs 5-8 Inputs 9-12 Outputs 1-4 Outputs 5-8 Outputs
Inputs 13-16
9-12 Outputs 13-16
Inputs Identity 16
Input 1 Input 2 Etc...
Output 1 Output 2 Etc...
Note: Inputs Identity 16 is included for testing purposes only, and should not be used in normal VRAS operation.
For instance, if Inputs 1-8 are selected, then only inputs 1-8 will send signals into the VRAS algorithm. Outputs
1-8 will include some direct energy from these inputs.
In Early Reflections mode, the input configurations have the following effect on the delays:
OPTION
TO VRAS
DELAY SIGNALS
Inputs 1-8
Inputs 1-8
Delays 1-8
Inputs 1-12
Inputs 1-12
Delays 1-12
Inputs 1-16
Inputs 1-16
Delays 1-16
Inputs 1-16
(zoned 8/8)
Inputs 1-8 Inputs 9-16
Delays 1-8 Delays 9-16
Inputs 1-8
(ER delays 1-16)
Inputs 1-8
Delays 1-16
Input 1
Input 1
Delay 1
Input 2
Input 2
Delay 2
Input 3
Input 3
Delay 3
Input 4
Input 4
Delay 4
Inputs 1-16
(zoned 8/8 odd/even)
Inputs 1,3,5...15 Inputs 2,4,6...16 Delays 1,3,5...15 Delays
2,4,6...16
Inputs 1-16
(zoned 4/4/4/4)
Inputs 1-4 Inputs 5-8 Inputs 9-12 Delays 1-4 Delays 5-8 Delays 9Inputs 13-16
12 Delays 13-16
Therefore, if you select “Inputs 1-8”, then only Delays 1-8 will be used. For maximum density with 8 inputs, use
the “Inputs 1-8 (ER delays 1-16)” option. In this case, all sixteen delays will be applied to each of the eight inputs.
The ER Output matrix option specifies the following:
OPTION
DELAYS
TO OUTPUTS
Outputs 16
Delays 1-16
Outputs 1-16
Outputs 12/4
Delays 1-12 Delays 13-16
Outputs 1-12 Outputs 13-16
Outputs 8/8
Delays 1-8 Delays 9-16
Outputs 1-8 Outputs 9-16
Outputs 1-16
(zoned 4/4/4/4)
Delays 1-4 Delays 5-8 Delays Outputs 1-4 Outputs 5-8 Outputs
9-12 Delays 13-16
9-12 Outputs 13-16
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VRAS: Variable Room Acoustics System
Using One VRAS Processor to Create Two Independent ER Zones
You can create two independent eight-channel ER algorithms by using sixteen microphones, and selecting “Inputs
1-16 (zoned 8/8)” along with Output matrix “8/8”. In this case, the first eight microphones will be delayed using
the first eight delays, and the resulting eight channels with eight delays each will be transmitted using VRAS
outputs (returns to Inputs) 1-8. Microphones 9-16 will be delayed using delays 9-16, and transmitted using VRAS
outputs 9-16. A similar approach can be taken to create four ER zones with four inputs, four delays, and four
outputs each using the “4/4/4/4” option.
Using One VRAS Processor to Create Two ER Zones Using the Same Inputs
The 8/8 option also provides a way to create two sets of ERs from one set of inputs. For instance, consider the
case where you have eight stage microphones and a very large room. Normally, you would create one set of
ER delays and then time-align them from the stage to the back of the room. However, you may not have sufficient
DSP in your system for the required loopback processing. As an alternative to time aligning the ER, you can
create two sets of ER, one for the front/middle of the room, and one for the middle/back of the room. Use “Inputs
1-8 (ER Delays 1-16)” so that all delays are excited by the eight microphones, and then output matrix “8/8” so
that the first set of eight delays get applied to the first eight outputs, and the second set of eight delays to the
second eight outputs. Then enter longer delay settings for this second set of delays.
If you are using eight or fewer microphones, we recommend mixing VRAS outputs 9-16 to your system outputs.
If using nine to twelve microphones, mix VRAS outputs 5-16 to your system outputs.
If using sixteen microphones, use all VRAS outputs but mix more than one VRAS output to each system output.
However, we suggest you try mixing only the last 12-14 VRAS outputs, and compare the result with a matrix
setting that uses all VRAS outputs. In most cases, we recommend that you avoid using the first VRAS output
because of the low amount of reverberation it contains.
VRAS Subcues
VRAS parameters are captured like other subcues in the system, using the Capture window. Subcue types for
VRAS Reverberation and VRAS Early Reflections are provided.
Defining VRAS Inputs Subcues
When using VRAS Reverberation, you will probably want to leave the end user with a preset that turns VRAS
off. One way of doing this is to create a cue that includes a System Level subcue that sets the System Level to
− dB. However, the effect of recalling this Cue may be somewhat jarring, as the reverberant tail will be abruptly
cut off. A better way of doing this is to set the attenuation of the inputs to VRAS to − dB. This way the existing
tail will decay naturally when the cue is recalled and the effect will not be so abrupt. However, there are no
subcue types that effect only VRAS input attenuation. CueStation 4 includes the facility to define your own
Subcue Types. We will go through the steps necessary to define a VRAS Inputs subcue:
– Open the Capture window and select the Control Point Sets page.
– Select the VRAS Reverberation control point set.
– Click Duplicate. A new control point set named Copy of VRAS Reverberation will be created.
– In the Name box, type VRAS Input Levels.
–
–
–
–
Enable only the VRAS * Channel * Attenuation pattern on the right side.
Select the Subcue Types page.
Click New to create a new subcue type.
In the Name box, type VRAS Input Levels.
– Select the VRAS category.
– In the Control Point Set column, select VRAS Input Levels.
– Confirm your addition by selecting the Capture page. You will see the new VRAS Input Levels subcue type
on the far right.
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VRAS Subcue Types
Depending on how you work, you may want to organize sets of subcue types differently than how CueStation
4 presents them. For instance, you may wish to create a “VRAS” category that includes the two system provided
VRAS subcue types as well as our newly defined subcue type.
– Select the Subcue Types page.
– Select both VRAS Early Reflection and VRAS Reverberation by holding the Shift key and clicking each
in turn.
– Select Edit > Unlock Subcue Types.
– For each of these subcue types, click the word Internal in the Category field and type VRAS.
– Confirm your change by selecting the Capture page. You will see a VRAS category on the far right with the
three subcue types.
Note:
If you create a cue that turns input levels to VRAS off (or reduces them) make sure that the operator knows
which cue to recall to restore them to their full values. VRAS Reverberation and VRAS Early Reflections subcue
types also include these attenuation values.
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VRAS: Variable Room Acoustics System
CueStation Workflow
File Management 137
Customizing CueStation 141
Access Policies 147
File Management
Saving Files 137
Opening Files 138
Merging Projects 139
CueStation 4 has several LCS-specific file types associated with it that store project data, layouts, and configurations.
In addition to saving these files to your computer's hard drive, you can also save projects to flash within the Matrix3,
with the option to have them loaded automatically when the frame(s) boot up. CueStation can also save default
versions of project and layout files.
This chapter will explain how to save and open these files, as well as the Merge Project function, which allows you
to "import" cue lists, cues, subcues, and other automation data from other projects.
Saving Files
This section will show you how to save files locally to your computer's hard drive, backup projects, and save projects
to the user flash memory inside the Matrix3.
Saving Files Locally
Project files, layout files, and mixer configuration files can be saved locally to your computer's hard drive. The
Projects menu has several different options for saving the current project.
– The Save Project... (Ctrl+S) option is available if you have not yet saved a new project. Selecting this option will
bring up a dialog box where you type a name for your project and decide where to save it.
– The Save Project to <project name> (Ctrl+S) option is available if you have opened an existing project file. This
option will automatically overwrite that project file with any changes you have made since the last save.
– The Save Project as... (Ctrl+Shift+S) command will let you save the project under a different file name, or in a
different location.
Save As Default
The Save As Default function lets you save a default project or layout file. If a default layout file is saved on your
client computer, then CueStation will automatically open that layout file when CueStation is started. See the next
section, Layouts (p. 141), for more information on setting up custom window layouts.
Default layout and project files are saved to the CueStation_Settings directory, and are named Default.lcsLayout
and Default.lcsProject.
Backup Project
The Backup Project (Ctrl+B) command saves a copy of the current project as a backup. Backup projects are saved
to CueStation_SettingsLCS_Backups, with an automatically generated name that includes a time and date stamp,
in this format: Backup_year_month_day_hour_min_sec.lcsProject.
Since saving a project as a backup does not prompt you for a location and file name to save to, backup project files
can be used to take a quick "snapshot" of the state of the system throughout a programming session, which can
later be recalled if accidental changes are made that cannot be easily undone.
Saving Projects to Flash
Projects can be saved to the flash memory in the Matrix3 frame. Projects saved to flash can be retrieved automatically on startup by configuring the LX-300 Autostart settings, as described in LX-300 Autostart (p. 189).
To save a project to flash, select Projects > Save Project to Flash. A message in the log window will indicate when
the operation is complete.
Another benefit of saving a project to flash is that it can be opened by any client on any computer that is connected
to the Matrix3, without needing to have the project already saved on a local hard drive.
File Management
137
The Save File Dialog Box
At the top of the window is a drop-down box, with the name of the current directory. The buttons directly to the
right are:
– Back to the previous location.
– Up to a higher level directory.
– New Directory within the current directory.
– List Mode for viewing files.
– Details Mode to see details for each file in the list.
Next, there is a list of the files in the current directory, followed by a File name: text entry box. Enter the name
of the file you would like to save to, and then click Save to close the dialog and save the file.
Directory Shortcut Buttons
Below those controls are five directory shortcut buttons. These buttons are by default mapped to commonly
used locations. To remap a button:
– Navigate to the directory you would like a shortcut to.
– Right-click on the button you would like to remap, and select Reassign Button to [directory name].
You can always reset a button back to its original mapping by right-clicking on it and selecting Reset Button to
[directory].
Recent Files
In the lower half of the Save file dialog boxes, there is a list of the five most recently accessed files. These files
also have hotkeys associated with them, for easier access. In order to use the hotkeys, hold down the Control
key (or Command key, for Mac users) and then type the number of the file twice. The selected file will then be
overwritten.
If you want to remove a file from the list, simply click on the grey eject icon to the right of the file.
Opening Files
The options for opening files in CueStation are similar to those for saving files. A project file is divided into four
categories of information: Automation data, configuration settings, layout information, and port settings. When
you open a project, any project information currently in the server will be cleared and replaced by the new project.
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File Management
The Open Project Dialog Box
In the top left corner, there are controls for navigating to different directories, and a list of files in the current directory. To open a project, select the project you want and click the Open button.
The directory shortcut buttons and Recent Files list work as described in Saving Files (p. 137), above.
Open Project Options
Below the list of recently used files are six checkboxes to toggle different options for opening projects:
– Load Project lets you select whether to load the project database. You can uncheck this box if you only want
to load the configuration, or the layout.
– Load Layout toggles whether the layout saved with the project will be loaded. You can uncheck this box if
you would rather keep your current layout.
– The Send Configuration checkbox toggles whether or not the configuration stored in the project is sent to
the frame(s). If this box is unchecked, the configuration will be opened and visible in the Mixer Configuration
window, but it will not be sent to the frame(s).
– Load Port Settings is for network connection settings, and is only enabled when Load Layout is checked.
– Apply Custom Project Filter is an option that lets you choose specifically which parts of the automation data
you would like to load. See Custom Project Filter (p. 139), below, for more information.
– Verify Wild Tracks Subcues is a function that will read through all of the Wild Tracks Deck subcues, and
verify that the files they reference can be located on the connected Wild Tracks SCSI drives. If a file is not
found, an error message will be printed to the log.
Custom Project Filter
These options can be accessed in the Open Project dialog using the Apply Custom Project Filter checkbox.
If this box is checked, the window will expand to let you choose which parts of the automation data you would
like to import. For instance, you could choose to not load in Key Mappings if you would rather use ones you
have already created. Or, if you only wanted to load in one SpaceMap, you would uncheck all of the boxes except
for the one next to SpaceMaps, and then replace (all) with the ID number of the SpaceMap you wanted to use.
Merging Projects
In CueStation 4, it is possible to merge automation data from one project to another. This provides a method to
import cue lists, cues, subcues, or other automation data in a selective way. Merged elements will also include
all referenced elements, for example, importing a cue list will also cause the cues in the cue list to be imported,
as well as those cues' subcues, and so on.
The Merge Project dialog box has all of the same controls as The Open Project Dialog Box (p. 139), as explained
above.
The difference between opening a project and merging a project is that during a project merge, the current
project data is not cleared from the server.
File Management
139
140
File Management
Customizing CueStation
Layouts
Custom Utility Buttons
Key Mappings Window
Project Notes and Reports
Chat and Paging
141
142
144
145
145
This chapter will show you how to improve your workflow when using CueStation, through saved layouts, keyboard
shortcuts, project notes and reports, and communication between clients.
Layouts
CueStation 4 allows you to save your own custom layouts, or arrangements of windows on your screen. It can be
very convenient to have several saved layouts with different purposes, and be able to switch between layouts
quickly. For instance, if you are running a show, then you might a "performance" layout that displays the Transport,
Log, System Status, and Meter windows. If you are editing a show, then you might a "Rehearsal" layout that displays
the Cue List, Cue Library, and Subcue Library windows.
CueStation layouts are saved as .lcsLayout files. You can also save a "Default" layout, which will be opened automatically whenever CueStation is launched. To save a default layout, select Layout > Save Layout As Default.
In addition to window selection and placement, a layout file also includes client connection information. For example,
if your client is connected to a frame at 192.168.1.101 when you save a layout as default, then whenever you launch
CueStation, it will automatically try to connect to the frame at 192.168.1.101.
In order to save a custom layout, move your CueStation windows into a convenient arrangement, and then select
Layout > Save Layout As... You can then select a name for this layout, which can be re-opened to restore the arrangement at any time.
Mapping Layouts to Hotkeys
CueStation 4 has an "Open Layout" external subcue, which makes it possible to open a layout using a custom key
mapping. See the next chapter for more information about creating key mappings. To assign a saved layout to a
hotkey combination:
– First, open the Support Files window. Add the .lcsLayout file to the list of support files. This can be done by
dragging the file directly into the window. The layout file must be included in the support files in order for it to be
accessed by CueStation.
– Open the Subcue Library window and create a new Externals subcue. Take note of the Subcue ID.
– Add a Client Control > Open Layout entry.
– Uncheck the "Any Client" checkbox, and enter the IP address of your client. Enter the name of the layout file in
the "Layout File Name:" text box. If you would like to simulate the Open More Layout... command, uncheck the
box next to "Close Existing Windows First:".
– Open the Key Mappings window (Ctrl+Alt+8) and create a new key mapping (Ctrl+N). Use the CueStation
4 Default Hotkey Assignments (p. 219) list in the Appendices to find a key mapping that is not already used by
CueStation.
– Set the Action to "Recall", and the Target Type to "Subcue". For the Target ID, enter the ID number of the Open
Layout external subcue you created previously.
You have now created a key mapping that opens a saved layout. You can create additional key mappings that open
different layouts using the same procedure.
Example Layouts
In the Matrix window, you can configure the matrix to provide several "zones" of control. One might configure a submatrix of fill mixes, a sub-matrix for SpaceMap control, and so on.
Customizing CueStation
141
In such cases the Window > Clone Window... and Windows > Rename Window... commands can be used
to create separate views into these sub-matrices. The Layout > Save command can then be used to save the
window sizes and scroll positions, and the Layout > Load command to restore the custom Matrix windows.
Custom Utility Buttons
User Buttons
User-customizable utility buttons can now be added to the bottom of any CueStation window. These buttons
can be mapped to cue or subcue recalls, control points, or cue/subcue updates.
To add a utility button to one of your
CueStation windows:
– Select Layout > Add Custom
Utility Button... (Ctrl+'). A dialog
box will appear.
– Type a new label for the button.
The default name is "New Button".
– Select an On Click: action: Do
Nothing, Recall, Update, or Set
Value.
– If you selected Recall or Update,
select the cue or subcue to be affected.
– You can alter the color of the button
in its normal and active modes.
– If you selected Set Value, type the
name of the control point in the
Control Address text box, and
then in the Target Value(s) text
box, enter the value you want the
control point set to.
Utility Button Example
Here is an example of one use for the custom utility buttons. Let's say that in the Transport window, you want
a way to easily switch between cue lists. In this example project, there are three cue lists: One speaker check
cue list, and two show cue lists.
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Customizing CueStation
– Open the Transport window. Type Ctrl+', or select Add Custom Utility Button in the Layout menu. The
Utility Button dialog box should appear.
– Change the label from "New Button" to "Speaker Check".
– In the On Click: menu, select Set Value.
– For the Control Address, enter "Automation Active CueList ID".
– For Target Value, enter "0", which in this project is the ID of the Speaker Check cue list.
– In the next line, select Value is, Equal To, and enter "0".
At this point, the dialog box should look like this:
– Click Accept to create the first button.
For the other two buttons, these options will mostly stay the same, except:
– The button label should reflect the name of the cue list.
– The Target Value will be the ID of the Cue List.
When you are done, you should have three buttons at the bottom of the Transport window, and clicking on them
should switch the active cue list.
Customizing CueStation
143
Key Mappings Window
The Key Mappings window provides an area to bind a key or keys to cue and subcue recalls and updates. Remember that Client Control Externals subcues can be used to bring any window to the front, complete with a
specification for the page to display. By using Key Mappings in conjunction with this subcue, you can create a
set of custom key mappings to show you particular sets of windows.
Multiple simultaneous mappings may be configured. Each mapping is represented by a row in the window. Each
row consists of several fields, described below:
– ID is read-only and is a unique index for the mapping.
– Modifiers lets you select which combination of modifiers are to be pressed for this mapping. The available
set of modifiers will be displayed in a pop-up menu by right-button clicking on top of this field.
– Key lets you select the key to be pressed in conjunction with the modifiers for this mapping. The available set
of keys will be displayed in a pop-up menu by right-button clicking on top of this field.
– Action specifies whether to Recall or Update the specified target cue or subcue.
– Target Type specifies whether Target ID refers to a cue or subcue.
– Target ID specifies the ID of the target cue or subcue.
– Client IPs is either the IP address of a particular computer running CueStation, or Any computer running
CueStation detected on the network.
– Comment is an editable text field for a comment.
Note:
A complete list of the default key mappings can be found in CueStation 4 Default Hotkey Assignments (p.
219), in the Appendix.
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Customizing CueStation
Special Commands
Mappings Menu
Mappings > New Mapping
Places a new, blank key mapping in the list.
Mappings > Duplicate Mapping
Copies the selected key mapping, which you can then adjust.
Mappings > Delete Mapping
Deletes the selected key mapping from the list.
Project Notes and Reports
The Project Notes window provides an area to type free-form unformatted text. This text is stored within the
project file. Project Notes are a convenient place to store information about the configuration of the system, the
purpose of certain cues, or other useful information related to the project.
Special Commands
Notes Menu
Notes > Clear Notes
Clears all notes from the project.
Notes > Save Notes As...
Saves the project notes messages to a file. You will be prompted for a file name and location.
Notes > Save Notes
Saves the project notes to a file, using the current save name. The previously-saved project notes will be
overwritten.
Generate Report
In the Projects menu, there is a Generate Report... function. This will create a text file that includes information
about the project, including project notes, mixer configuration, cue lists, cues, subcues, and control points. This
report is useful for archival purposes, or for transforming the information into a different format, such as a
spreadsheet or database.
Chat and Paging
The Chat window lets you communicate with other members of your cue-programming team.
Customizing CueStation
145
The window provides three panels of information:
– A Member Log, listing the Name, IP Address, ID, and Status for each member of the team.
– A Chat Log, containing the chat messages with a date+time stamp and the sender’s name.
– A Message Entry area, providing Name, Status, and chat text entry boxes.
– A Send Page To... button, for paging members of your team.
To send a message to your team, type your name in the (smaller) Name box and your message in the Message
box. Press Enter and your message will be displayed in the Chat Log panel of your team members’ Chat windows.
To page another user, click on the Send Page To... button, and select the IP address of the person you wish
to page. On the paged person's screen, all CueStation windows will flash cyan once, and the telephone icon
will flash continuously until the page is answered.
Special Commands
Chat Menu
Chat > Clear Chat
Clears the messages from the Chat Log window.
Chat > Save Chat As...
Saves the chat messages to a file. You will be prompted for a file name and location.
Chat > Save Chat...
Saves the chat messages to a file, using the current save name. The previously-saved chat messages will
be overwritten.
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Customizing CueStation
Access Policies
Creating Access Policies 147
Securing Your System 149
Recovering Lost Passwords 149
As of version 4.4.0, CueStation has an Access Policies window, which allows you to set up different levels of access
permissions or restrictions. The access policies implementation in CueStation 4 was designed to be as transparent
as possible: it is not necessary to configure access policies before using the software or hardware. The Access
Policies feature was created as a way to prevent accidental or unauthorized changes to the system if necessary,
while allowing full unrestricted access in the default state.
Creating Access Policies
Access policies can be configured to restrict or allow access to everything from changing control points to changing
the configuration of the system. This simple example will demonstrate how to restrict unauthorized access to certain
control points.
– Open the Access Policies window.
– In the Access Policies menu, select New Access Policy. Change the name from "Access Policy 0" to "Input 1
Restricted".
– Double click in the Password column and add a password.
– Right-click in the Apply by Default column and select "Yes". The background of the access policy will change to
yellow, this means it is invoked. At this point, however, nothing is restricted yet, because nothing in this access
policy has been selected.
– To the right of the list of access policies, there is a list of all of the possible actions that can be restricted or allowed.
Locate the checkbox for Set Control Points, and click on it twice. There should now be a red X in the checkbox.
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– In the box to the right of Set Control Points, enter "Input 1 Level", without quotes. If you open the Inputs window
(Ctrl+2) you will see that the fader for input 1 is grayed-out.
– In the Access Policies window, create a new access policy, and rename it "Input 1 Allowed". Click in the
Password column and type an easy-to-remember password.
– Right-click in the Priority column, and select 1.00. Now, this access policy has priority over "Input 1 Restricted".
– In the list to the right, click once on the checkbox next to Set Control Points. There should now be a green
check mark in the box. Then enter "Input 1 Level" in the box to the right.
– In the Access Policies menu, select Reset All Access Policies. This will clear the "cookies" for the passwords
you entered, so that anyone using your CueStation client will have to re-enter the passwords to gain access
to restricted items.
At this point, input 1 is restricted for all CueStation clients, and this setting will be saved with the project, since
it is applied by default.
To regain access to input 1:
– In the Access Policies window, select "Input 1 Allow", and then in the Access Policies menu, select "Invoke
Selected Access Policies".
– A dialog box will appear and ask for the password. There will also be options to Retain password until I manually reset it or Use password for this session only.
– Enter the password and click one of the login options. The background of "Input 1 Allow" will turn green to
show that it is invoked, but not applied by default.
Note:
Access Policies that are not applied by default are applied on a per-client basis. For instance, after invoking
"Input 1 Allow", your client is now permitted to change the level of input 1, but the permissions of other clients
are not affected.
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Access Policies
Securing Your System
Access Policies in CueStation 4 were not designed to provide complete security from malicious attacks. However,
there are a few things you can do to prevent other users from accidently gaining access to restricted items:
– Create an access policy that has Edit Access Policies restricted. Without this invoked, it is possible to delete
access policies, change the priority, or change the password.
– If Set Control Points is restricted, control points cannot be changed by users, but they can be changed by
recalled cues and subcues. For instance, if you have an access policy that restricts access to Input 1, other
users cannot change Input 1 directly, but it would be possible to create a subcue that changes the fader level,
or bus assigns, etc. Therefore, your access policy restricting control points should also restrict Edit Subcues.
When Edit Subcues is restricted, it is possible to capture new cues using the capture window, but editing the
subcues is disabled.
– If there is more than one person using the same CueStation client, make sure to use the Reset All Access
Policies function when you have finished editing to reset the "cookies" for the password(s) you entered.
Recovering Lost Passwords
If you are the administrator of your Matrix3 system and have lost the password(s) to your access policies or
have been locked out of your system with access policies, there is a password recovery feature available. To
regain access to your system:
– In the Access Policies window, select Recover Lost Password... in the Access Policies menu. A dialog box
will appear with instructions and an access code.
– Write down the access code, or click Copy Access Code to Clipboard if you want to paste it into an email.
– Contact LCS technical support and provide the access code. You will be given a new password with which
you can override the access policies in place and regain access to your system.
Note:
The access code and recovery password are only valid until the system is rebooted. This prevents users who
know one recovery password from accessing other systems.
Access Policies
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Access Policies
Hardware and Configuration
Mixer Configuration
Hardware Specifications
Frame Control Operations
Firmware Updates
153
167
187
191
Mixer Configuration
Configuring the Matrix3
The Mixer Configuration Window
I/O Modules
Processing Modules
Communication Modules
Configuring Extensions
Configuring Wild Tracks
Wild Tracks Drive Setup
Configuring CobraNet
Configuring Loopbacks
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155
157
159
159
160
161
163
164
166
Your Matrix3 system can be configured using the Mixer Configuration window. Every time you start a new project,
you will want to configure your Matrix3 system appropriately with the required amount of EQ, delay, and dynamics
processing, and to re-balance the DSP usage as needed. The Mixer Configuration window is also where you specify which I/O modules represent which channels, EtherTracks/Wild Tracks options, and VRAS and Loopback extensions.
When you save a project file, the configuration is saved with it. Configurations can also be saved separately as .lcsConfig files.
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CueStation has been designed to make the configuration as transparent as possible, after the initial set up. In
the software, once you have configured the system, you never have to worry about which channel is on which
module, or routing signal from one frame to another. The entire system works as one complete unit.
Configuring the Matrix3
Every time the LX-300 frames are turned on or power-cycled, they must receive a valid configuration before
audio will be processed. A configuration contains the following information:
– The number of frames in the system.
– The type of module in each slot of every frame.
– The number of buses, bus assigns, and VGroups.
– For I/O modules:
– The range of channels the module will use, and in some cases, the type and number of channels.
– The processing (EQ, delay, dynamics) required for the channels on the module.
– The DSP module that will handle the processing.
Optionally, your system configuration may also include:
– Custom labels for I/O channels.
– VRAS and/or Loopback extensions.
A valid configuration will also follow these rules:
– The load for each DSP should not exceed 100%.
– The number of HSB channels used should not exceed the maximums.
– No duplicate channel numbers per channel type (i.e., you can not map two inputs to channel 10).
A configuration can be loaded automatically on power up, if a project is saved to flash memory inside the frame.
A configuration can also be sent from a CueStation client, either included as part of a project file, or by itself
from within the Mixer Configuration window.
If one frame within a larger system goes offline, it will automatically have the configuration re-sent once it has
reconnected.
The following section will describe how to configure your system using the Mixer Configuration window. The
next section, The Mixer Configuration Window (p. 155), will explain the details of the configuration interface.
Configuring Frames and Modules
To configure your system:
– Open CueStation, and connect to the system you will be configuring.
– Open the Mixer Configuration (Ctrl+Alt+0) window. If you are running CueStation for the first time, the
Mixer Configuration is the default startup window.
– The easiest way to start configuring the system is to have CueStation automatically detect what hardware is
installed. In the Configuration menu, select Query Hardware for Configuration... and a dialog box will appear
with a list of discovered frames. Click on Use Hardware Config to accept the new configuration.
Note:
The Mixer Configuration window is unique from other CueStation windows, in that changes made in this window
are not automatically sent to the DSP's. Similarly, if changes are made in the Mixer Configuration window by
another client, your window will not be updated automatically.
If you are working offline with VirtualLX, you will have to add the frames and modules by hand. For every frame
in your system, beginning with Frame 1, click in the checkbox next to the frame in the list to enable that frame.
Then, use the drop-down menus in each slot to select the correct module.
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Mixer Configuration
Once you have set up the frames and modules, the next step is to configure how the audio is processed by the
DSP's.
Configuring DSP
For every set of eight channels, you can configure delay, one or two bands of dynamics, and up to 8 bands of
EQ. You can also decide which DSP will handle the processing, using the Execute On: drop-down menu.
At the bottom of the window are several status bars that show the number of HSB channels and the DSP load
for the configuration you are working on. The load for any one DSP should not exceed 100%.
A quick way of balancing DSP usage is with the Load Balance... command, located in the Configuration menu.
This will bring up a dialog box, which will cycle through different changes in the DSP assignments and attempt
to balance out DSP usage. Click Accept to accept the changes.
After you have configured DSP usage, there are a couple more options to configure.
Other Configuration Options
Below the DSP status bars are several more configuration options:
– # Buses is the total number of bus sends. Buses each have a master fader and a matrix row. The maximum
number of buses allowed is 256.
– # Assigns is the number of bus assign buttons that will appear in each input channel column. The maximum
number of bus assigns is 16.
– # VGroups is the number of Virtual Groups. Virtual Groups are similar to VCA's. You can configure up to 256
VGroups.
Send Configuration
Once you have finished configuring your Matrix3 system, you must then send the configuration to the frame(s).
In the Configuration menu, select Send Configuration to Frames. You will see notification in the Log window
that the configuration has been sent.
The CueStation mixer windows should now show faders and other controls corresponding to the configuration.
The Mixer Configuration Window
The Mixer Configuration window has four main areas.
Frame/Extensions Selection area
This area, along the left side of the window, contains a list of the active
LX-300 frames and system extensions. Click on the checkbox to enable
or disable a frame in the configuration. Click on the name of an enabled
frame to configure its modules. The frame number in the Mixer Configuration window must match the number on the System DSP module.
At the end of the list of frames is an Extensions option. See Configuring
Extensions (p. 160) for more information about using Extensions.
Module Configuration area
This area, to the right of the frame/extensions selection area, contains selectors to configure input, output, and
processing modules, set the signal processing requirements, and designate processing DSPs.
Each slot has a drop-down menu, initially set to "Empty", where you can select the type of module in that slot,
and for some modules, the number and type of channels in use, as well.
For I/O and Wild Tracks modules, you can configure the channel numbers, enter channel labels, enable signal
processing, and decide which DSP module will process the audio.
Each module has a different set of controls, see I/O Modules (p. 157) and Processing Modules (p. 159) for detailed
information about these controls.
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High Speed Bus (HSB) Allocation/DSP Load display
This display shows how many primary and total HSB channels are in use in the current configuration, and the
maximum processing load expected for each DSP. The processing load is determined by the number of modules
assigned to the DSP, and the kinds of processing enabled on each of those modules.
Warning:
Do not configure systems to use more than 100% of any System DSP, Expansion DSP, or VRAS DSP.
Miscellaneous Controls
At the bottom of the window, there is a row of controls for setting the # Buses, # Assigns and # VGroups.
Special Commands
Configuration > Open Configuration File
Opens a previously-saved mixer configuration file.
Configuration > Save Configuration File As...
Saves the current mixer configuration to a file. You will be prompted for a file name and location.
Configuration > Save Configuration File...
Saves the current mixer configuration using the current save name. The previously-saved configuration will
be overwritten.
Configuration > Generate Report...
Creates a text file detailing the mixer configuration. You will be prompted for a file name and location.
Configuration > Send Configuration to Frames
Sends the current mixer configuration to Matrix3 hardware. In some cases you may need to power-cycle
the frames (i.e. for IP address changes).
Configuration > Retrieve Configuration from Server
Retrieves the current Matrix3 mixer configuration data from the server (useful if you have made changes in
the window’s displayed configuration, but want to discard your changes and start again)
Configuration > Query Hardware for Configuration...
Surveys the Matrix3 hardware for its modules and ports. CueStation must be connected to operating Matrix3
hardware.
Configuration > Clear Displayed Frame (Ctrl+G)
Removes all settings for the current frame.
Configuration > Renumber All Channels
Renumbers the channel assignments for all analog and digital I/O channels, removing all conflicts. The
numbering proceeds sequentially starting with the first module in the lowest-ID frame.
Configuration > Load Balance...
Attempts to balance the DSP load for all frames. The Execute On settings for some modules may change
after the operation is completed.
Configuration > Show Delays Table...
Displays a summary of the input-output latency for the signal paths throughout the system.
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Mixer Configuration
Configuration > LX-300 Auto Start...
Provides a window with controls that allow you to save the current project and startup information to nonvolatile flash memory in the LX-300. Options are presented to control automatic cue triggering on system
power-on, default cue list selection, delay before startup, and completion message.
Configuration > Test Network Performance...
Provides a window with options that allow you to test the network performance between the client and the
server.
Configuration > Force Daemon Migration...
Presents warning instructions that must be followed. You can then select an EtherTracks card on which the
server background processes will be run.
Configuration > Go to Backup Communication Method...
Forces a communication failover on the computer running the server.
Configuration > Upload Firmware...
Presents warning instructions that must be followed. You can then select a firmware update file. This file
will be sent to the LX-300 frames, updating the operating firmware.
Configuration > Upload HTML Archive...
You can then select a zip file that includes HTML and other files you would liked to have the LX-ELC serve
on its web server. EtherTracks will unzip this on startup. If you want to include Wild Tracks files in the RAM
disk (presumably these would be .bat files, since non-trivial audio files will almost certainly not fit), include
a directory named “wtrxaudio” in your .zip file that contains the .bat files. wtrxd has /html/wtrxaudio in its
default media path, so it will look for files in that folder.
I/O Modules
Common Controls
The following configuration options are common to signal I/O modules.
I/O Channel Assignments
Sets the channel number used within CueStation to refer to the specific physical inputs or outputs associated
with the module. Channel numbers are referenced throughout CueStation, and are fundamental to controlling
your signal flow. Channel assignments do not have to be sequential. They should not be duplicated within
the system.
Duplicate channel numbers will be highlighted in pink and should be fixed before sending the configuration
to the frames.
Channel Label
Allows you to enter a label that will be sent with the configuration.
Channel Type (Output channels only)
Click the buttons next to individual output channel labels to choose Output, Auxiliary Output, Pre-Fader
Level, After-Fader Level, or Pre-Fader/After-Fader Level (the latter four in mono, left, or right channel).
EQ
Select to enable EQ for each group of eight channels. You may have up to eight bands of parametric
equalization.
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157
Delay
Select to enable delay. A maximum delay value (ms) is specified here. The larger this value is, the more
memory the DSP will need to allocate for the delay, so only make this value as large as you need it to be.
Dynamics
Select to enable dynamics processing. There are two types of dynamics processing available: Original
(available in CueStation 4.4 and earlier) and Type 2 (introduced in CueStation 4.5). See
Signal Processing Controls (p. 50) for more information on the differences between these two types. In
the drop-down menu next to the Dynamics checkbox, there are three options:
– Original is the same processing as used in CueStation 4.4 and earlier.
– Type 2 (Single) is a single band of dynamics, using Type 2 processing.
– Type 2 (Dual) is two bands of dynamics, using Type 2 processing.
Meter On
Selects which display panel, on this frame, will be used to display metering for this group of inputs or outputs.
Mix Point Limit
This specifies the maximum amount of mixing power that the DSP can provide to the outputs. As this value
is increased the workload on the DSP increases. The DSP mixes by dynamically allocating 8 in × 1 out
mixers. Each of these “octa-mixers” uses eight mix points.
A good way to estimate the number of mix points required is to look at the range of inputs that may be mixed
to the eight outputs of this module. Multiply this number of inputs by eight for the maximum number of mix
points required.
DSP
Specifies which DSP in the system will be used to process the module’s audio channels. By default the
processing will take place in the same frame.
If the DSP for this frame is overloaded you can choose an Expansion DSP module or a DSP in another
frame. This allows the work load to be balanced between multiple DSPs in a system. Use the
Configuration > Load Balance... command to redistribute the DSP loads automatically.
Tip:
Click the > button between the input channel boxes to automatically sequence the numbers.
Analog Input (Slots A, B)
Channel Assignments, EQ, Delay, Dynamics, Meter On, and Execute On settings are described in Common
Controls (p. 157), above.
Analog Output (Slots A, B, C)
Channel Assignments, Output Channel Type, EQ, Delay, Dynamics, Meter On, Execute On, and Mix Point
Limit settings are described in Common Controls (p. 157), above.
ADAT Lightpipe (Slots A, B)
Clock Source
Choose Internal 48kHz or External ADAT Input.
Channel Assignments, Output Channel Type, EQ, Delay, Dynamics, Meter On, Execute On, and Mix Point
Limit settings are described in Common Controls (p. 157), above.
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Mixer Configuration
AES/EBU (Slots A, B)
Output Clock Source
Choose Internal 48kHz, First AES Pair, or Each AES Pair.
Channel Assignments, Output Channel Type, EQ, Delay, Dynamics, Meter On, Execute On, and Mix Point
Limit settings are described in Common Controls (p. 157), above.
AES/EBU - input only (Slots A, B)
Channel Assignments, Output Channel Type, EQ, Delay, Dynamics, Meter On, Execute On, and Mix Point
Limit settings are described in Common Controls (p. 157), above.
AES/EBU - output only (Slots A, B, C)
Output Clock Source
Choose Internal 48kHz, First AES Pair, or Each AES Pair.
Channel Assignments, Output Channel Type, EQ, Delay, Dynamics, Meter On, Execute On, and Mix Point
Limit settings are described in Common Controls (p. 157), above.
CobraNet (Slot C)
Please refer to Configuring CobraNet (p. 164), below.
IP Address
The IP address for the module.
Recv Bundle # and Xmit Bundle #
CobraNet data is transmitted in “bundles” of channels tagged with the device’s unique Bundle ID.
Channel Assignments, Output Channel Type, EQ, Delay, Dynamics, Meter On, Execute On, and Mix Point
Limit settings are described in Common Controls (p. 157), above.
Processing Modules
System DSP (Slot 0)
DSP ID
This ID number determines the Frame ID. Each frame must have a unique ID.
Expansion DSP (Slots 1, 2, 3, 4)
DSP ID
This is the ID for the Expansion DSP and must be a unique number, not used by another frame, Expansion
DSP, or Expansion VRAS module.
Expansion VRAS (Slots 1, 2, 3, 4)
DSP ID
This is the ID for the Expansion VRAS DSP and must be a unique number, not used by another frame, Expansion DSP, or Expansion VRAS module.
Communication Modules
EtherTracks (Slots 1, 2, 3, 4)
Please refer to Configuring Wild Tracks (p. 161), below.
IP Address
The IP address for the module. The default is 192.168.0.n, where n is 100 + the Frame ID.
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159
Gateway
Use the default setting, or leave blank.
Netmask
Set to 255.255.255.0. Sets the type of addressing used by the network.
Send
If you have changed the EtherTracks settings, select Send to include the changes when the new configuration
is sent to the frames.
Link (Slots 1, 2, 3, 4)
There are no settings for link modules.
Comm/Sync (Slot Comm/Sync)
There are no settings for comm/sync modules.
Configuring Extensions
At the bottom of the frames list, in the left-hand pane, is a System Extensions entry. System Extensions are
software extensions to the core mixing functions of the System, Expansion, and VRAS DSP modules.
VRAS
VRAS Extension ID
A unique ID identifying the VRAS extension.
Channel Assignments and Execute On settings are described in Common Controls (p. 157), above.
Loopback
Loopback allows you to route CueStation outputs back into CueStation inputs without using I/O modules. This
provides a way to do inter-matrix delays and group signal processing and manipulation.
Returns
This creates a set of 8 input modules in the Inputs window that will be used for the Loopback return. The
default name for the input will include the word “Loop” and the source Output channel will be shown with
red lettering to the right of the fader.
Sends
This creates output channels that are used to send a signal back to the Loopback return in the Inputs window.
A Loopback send channel looks like a regular output except that the default name contains the word “Loop”
and the console return channel number is shown in green next to the fader.
Channel Assignments, Output Channel Type, EQ, Delay, Dynamics, Meter On, Execute On, and Mix Point
Limit settings are described in Common Controls (p. 157), above.
Caution:
The system will allow you to route a Loopback Return to the same Loopback Send, creating a feedback
loop that will oscillate at full volume.
Individual Module Settings
For systems that involve live dynamic fader moves, the DSP load meters shown at the bottom of the window
should ideally not exceed 90%, which corresponds to a 30ms control lag (75% load gives about 15ms lag, and
100% load a 40ms lag).
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Mixer Configuration
CASL tick performance is degraded above 100% capacity, and frames with 110% or greater workload will not
perform the mixing and processing assigned to them.
Configuring Wild Tracks
To use Wild Tracks with Matrix3 you will need an LX-ELC Ether Tracks module installed as well as at least one
Wild Tracks hard disk drive.
The Wild Tracks drive connects directly to the EtherTracks module via SCSI. The EtherTracks module connects
via Ethernet to the computer running CueStation.
LCS-provided WTX-HD Hard Disk drives do not have internal termination. A SCSI terminator must be used at
the last WTX-HD at the end of the SCSI chain.
Configuration Notes
While connecting the Wild Tracks hardware, please keep the following points in mind:
SCSI ID
• Do not use SCSI ID 7, as it is reserved for the LX-ELC EtherTracks module.
• Valid SCSI IDs are 0 to 6 and 8 to 15.
Safety Net
If two Wild Tracks drives are connected to the EtherTracks module, the system will automatically search for a
matching file name if the primary drive can not be found.
Wild Tracks can do a full drive copy of the primary drive to the Safety Net drive when both are attached to an
LX-ELC module.
Ethernet connection
Connect an Ethernet cable from the LX-ELC module to the computer that is running CueStation 4. If you are
using a single computer and a single LX-ELC module you can use an Ethernet “crossover” cable (computer-tocomputer Ethernet cable). When using more than one LX-ELC module there must be a connection from each
of them to the network.
IP Address
To use Wild Tracks you need to set the IP address of the LX-ELC EtherTracks module. In CueStation 4 you
can have up to five EtherTracks modules running Wild Tracks. Each module must have a unique IP address.
You can only install one LX-ELC EtherTracks module per frame. For each frame containing an EtherTracks
module used for Wild Tracks:
– Choose EtherTracks w/Wild Tracks for the appropriate slot.
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While the LX-ELC can be installed in any of the expansion slots (Slot 1, 2, 3, or 4) it is usually placed in slot 1
or slot 3. This is to allow easy access to the RJ-45 Ethernet connector on frames that have an LX-LNK Link
module.
– In the IP Address box, type 192.168.0.n, where n is 100 + the Frame ID. Note that the first three digits of
the IP address and the netmask must conform to the address ranges assigned to other devices on the network.
– Leave the Gateway box blank.
– In the NetMask box, type 255.255.255.0.
– Select the Send checkbox.
– Wild Tracks drives can be password protected. If desired, select Require CIFS Login and provide a Username
and Password.
– Select Configuration > Send Configuration to Frames, then power-cycle the frame(s). This will assign the
new IP addresses to the EtherTracks modules.
Tip:
EtherTracks and CobraNet modules can use the same IP addresses as long as they are on separate networks.
The IP and Subnet addresses given above are generally suitable for simple Matrix3 configurations. If your
system is complex—using multiple networks, for example—you may need to use other addresses.
– Set Mix Points, EQs, Delay, Dynamics, Meter On, and Execute On as appropriate. These options apply to
groups of eight Wild Tracks channels.
The playback signals from Wild Tracks appear in the Console window the same as any other input to the system.
The model for the Wild Tracks user interface is a set of multi-track tape machines, so the playback signal is
mapped to an Input of a fader in the Inputs window.
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Wild Tracks Drive Setup
In the EtherTracks w/Wild Tracks module there is a Drive Setup button. Pressing it will open the Setup Drives
window for the selected frame.
This button can also be found in the Wild Tracks window.
The Drive Setup dialog box has two pages.
SCSI Drive Setup
The SCSI Drive Setup page lists the SCSI ID, Drive Status, the size of the drive, and the number of bytes used.
The buttons at the bottom of the window perform the following functions:
Close
This closes the window without making any further changes.
Mount Drives
This control causes the LX-ELC module to scan the SCSI bus looking at each ID for drives that have been
added. It can take up to ten seconds for this operation to complete.
Unmount Drives
This control unmounts the SCSI drives so that they can be safely removed without causing any file corruption.
Important!
Mounting and unmounting SCSI drives will stop all Wild Tracks playback. You will get a warning box
and a chance to cancel the operation.
Verify Subcues
CueStation can examine the contents of the drive and compare them with the Wild Tracks Deck subcues
in the current project. If any of the referenced files are missing, a warning message will appear in the Log.
Create Virtual Drive File
This option will create a virtual drive file, for programming Wild Tracks Deck subcues offline when using
VirtualLX.
Backup Drive
If you select a SCSI drive, the Backup Drive button will be enabled for that drive. Pressing it opens a window
that allows you to chose a destination drive for the backup.
Important!
All data on the chosen destination drive will be erased and replaced with the files from the selected
drive that is being backed up.
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Format Drive
If you select a SCSI drive, the Format Drive button will be enable for that drive. Pressing it opens a window
that allows you to format the selected drive.
Important!
Wild Tracks playback will be stopped. All the data on the selected Wild Tracks drive will be erased.
Batch Waveform Rendering
The Batch Waveform Rendering page contains controls for making waveform rendering more efficient.
Click on Add Jobs... to add files to render. The waveform data processing will start automatically when files are
added.
Use the Pause button to pause processing.
The Render All Files button will add all files on the drive.
Once a file has been processed, CueStation will create small 'helper' files on the drive to speed up rendering
the waveforms within the Wild Tracks window.
Using Drive Operations
When you unmount drives and then remount them, if the operation is successful, then your log will report:
WTRX 1
Info Unmounting Wild Tracks drives...
WTRX 1
Info Unmounted (Drive 0 Partition 1) from /mnt/scsi0
WTRX 1
Info Unmounted (Drive 1 Partition 1) from /mnt/scsi1
WTRX 1
Info Successfully unmounted 2 drives
WTRX 1
Info Mounted (Drive 0 Partition 1) as /mnt/scsi0
WTRX 1
Info Mounted (Drive 1 Partition 1) as /mnt/scsi1
WTRX 1
Info Successfully mounted 2 drives
If there is an error, then your log will report something like:
WTRX 1
Info Unmounting Wild Tracks drives...
WTRX 1
Info Unmounted (Drive 0 Partition 1) from /mnt/scsi0
WTRX 1
Info Unmounted (Drive 1 Partition 1) from /mnt/scsi1
WTRX 1
Info Successfully unmounted 2 drives
WTRX 1
Error Unable to mount any drives!
A successful Backup Drive operation will generate log messages similar to these:
WTRX 1
Info Beginning drive copy from Wild Tracks disk 0 to disk 1, please wait...
WTRX 1
Info Now copying files from disk 0 to disk 1...
WTRX 1
Info Drive backup from disk 0 to disk 1 is complete.
Configuring CobraNet
CobraNet provides 20bit/48kHz digital audio data transmission over Ethernet networks. It is a common networking
standard for interconnecting commercial digital audio products.
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Configuration
– For each frame containing an LX-CBR CobraNet interface module, select it in the left-hand pane. For Slot C
of that frame, choose a CobraNet configuration type: 0, 8, or 16 inputs, and 0, 8, or 16 outputs.
– Configure the module:
– Assign an IP address to the module. While CobraNet does not require an IP address to work, most administration software will require a unique IP for each module.
We suggest numbering the modules using 192.168.0.n, where n equals 200 + the Frame ID.
– Select the Channel Assignments and Channel Type for the module.
– Assign Bundle Assignment # numbers to each set of eight channels. Refer to Bundle Assignments (p.
165), below.
– Set Mix Points, EQs, Delay, Dynamics, Meter On, and Execute On as appropriate.
Tip:
CobraNet modules do not have to be connected to a CobraNet to be configured by CueStation.
The IP and Subnet addresses suggested above are generally suitable for simple Matrix3 configurations.
If your system is complex—using multiple networks, for example—you may need to use other addresses.
Bundle Assignments
Digital audio data is transmitted in the CobraNet network in “bundles” of up to eight channels. Each bundle is
assigned a unique identification number.
Hub-Based Networks
Due to compromises in network performance, we do not recommend using hub-based networks for CobraNet.
Switch-Based Networks
The advantage and challenge of CobraNet on a switch-based network is the amount of data that you can distribute.
By using the point-to-point addressing of Unicast and careful layout of the network you can have large numbers
of channels available.
On a 100base-T network you should have no more than four multicast bundles. This is because by definition a
Multicast will be sent to all nodes on a network, potentially swamping the network. Multicast bundles are usually
assigned IDs of 1 to 255.
Tip:
A bundle ID of 0 is used to turn off a Transmitter or a Receiver.
Using Unicast you can send a bundle from a Transmitter to a specific number of receivers. Normally Unicast is
one Tx/Rx pair, but it is possible to have multiple receivers for a single Transmitter by defining the number of
receivers permitted access to the Transmitter. Unicast bundles are usually assigned an ID in the range 25665279. Both the transmitter and receiver(s) will have the same bundle ID number.
If you have more than the defined number of Unicast Receivers for a Transmitter bundle, the connections will
be made according to the order that the receivers were detected on the network. If a receiver is removed and
there is a receiver with a duplicate bundle ID, the network will start sending the bundles to that receiver.
It is also possible to set more than one Transmitter to the same bundle ID. The Conductor will only allow one
Transmitter to be active at a time, but should that Transmitter be removed from the network, the redundant
Transmitter will be made active.
Mixer Configuration
165
Control of Transmitters and Receivers is done by the CobraNet Conductor. Any CobraNet device can be a
Conductor. CobraNet will determine which devices have priority and will use one device until it is removed from
the network, at which point the Conductor status will be renegotiated and a new Conductor established automatically. It is possible to rank devices in the order that you would like them to be used as Conductors using the
Conductor Priority field. The Conductor with the highest priority is the one used by the network. You can have
duplicate priority settings and the network will automatically choose a Conductor.
Tip:
A wealth of CobraNet information can be found at the Peak Audio website, listed in
Additional CobraNet Information (p. 166), below.
Using CobraNet
Once configured, CobraNet is transparent to the CueStation user. Console input and output channels work as
expected, and can be used in the mix just as ordinary analog signals would be used.
Additional CobraNet Information
Peak Audio originated the CobraNet protocol, and their web site is the best place to find both basic and detailed
information on using CobraNet. The following addresses were correct during the writing of the manual; if there
have been changes to the structure of the site, start at the home page.
Peak Audio home page: http://www.peakaudio.com/
Quick overview: http://www.peakaudio.com/CobraNet/Background.html
Frequently asked questions: http://www.peakaudio.com/CobraNet/FAQ.html
Bundle assignments: http://www.peakaudio.com/CobraNet/licensee/Bundle_Assignments.html
Network design: http://www.peakaudio.com/CobraNet/Network_Design.html
Installation support: http://www.peakaudio.com/CobraNet/Support_Install.html
Configuring Loopbacks
Loopbacks are typically used if you need to send a mix with no delay to some outputs, and also a different mix
with delay to the same outputs. For instance, consider the situation where you want to send VRAS reverberation
to side-fill loudspeakers (not delayed) and regular program material delayed to the stage. Loopbacks provide
this capability by allowing you to create an eight channel submix that is returned to the inputs. In the example
cited, delays are applied to the loopback channels and not to the outputs.
Following is a step by step procedure for configuring and using loopback channels for this purpose. Consider
that you want to send input 1 to output 1 with no delay, and input 2 to output 1 with 300 ms delay.
– In the Mixer Configuration window, click Extensions.
– Select Loopback Extension and allocate Delay processing for this extension. For the purposes of this discussion, physical outputs 1-8 are output channels 1-8, and loopback outputs 1-8 use output channels 9-16.
Loopback returns in the Inputs window use channels 17-24.
– Choose Send Configuration to Frames.
– Set input 1 to bus 1, bus 1 to output 1, and output 1 delay to 0 ms.
– Set input 2 to bus 2, bus 2 to output 9, and output 9 delay (corresponding to the first loopback channel) to
300 ms.
The final step is to merge the returns from the loopback channels to physical output 1.
– Set input 17 (corresponding to the first loopback channel return) to bus 3, and bus 3 to output 1.
Using loopbacks, we have sent delayed and non-delayed signals to a single output.
166
Mixer Configuration
Hardware Specifications
Frame Specifications 167
Power Requirements 168
Component Specifications 169
This chapter presents detailed electrical, mechanical and physical specifications for Matrix3 frames and cards.
Frame Specifications
This illustration shows a typical Matrix3 back panel. The valid slot assignments are provided below.
LX-300 Chassis Slot Assignments
Slot
Cards Allowed in this Slot (* indicates exclusivity)
A
•
•
•
•
LX-AI8 analog audio input
LX-ADAT digital audio input/output*
LX-AO8 analog audio output*
LX-AES digital audio input/output*
B
•
•
•
•
LX-AI8 analog audio input
LX-ADAT digital audio input/output
LX-AO8 analog audio output
LX-AES digital audi input/output
C
• LX-CBR CobraNet audio interface
• LX-AO8 analog audio output*
0
• LX-DSP system processor
1, 2, 3, 4
•
•
•
•
X
• LX-COS communications/synchronization
LX-LNK frame link interconnect
LX-EXP expansion DSP (max. 3)
LX-ELC EtherTracks/Wild Tracks
LX-VRA VRAS expansion
Operating Environment
0 to 40°C (32 to 100°F). 5 to 95% humidity, non-condensing. Low dust levels.
Hardware Specifications
167
Storage Environment
0 to 80°C (32 to 175°F). 5 to 95% humidity, non-condensing.
Power Consumption
AC, 47–70Hz, 100–250V, single phase. 150W maximum power required.
Fuse
2.5A, 240V slow-blow, 5x20mm.
Dimensions
435×127×348mm W×H×D (17.126×5×13.7 inches).
Weight
8.2kg (18lb) base configuration, with LX-DSP system card and AC power cord. Approximately 11kg (25lb)
maximum weight with cards.
Shock/Vibration
20G omni-directional.
Heat Dissipation
150W maximum.
Racks/Enclosures
Standard 19” rack mount. All four mounting points on the front panel must be secured. Minimum 10cm (2.5 inch)
unobstructed air space behind and in front of each frame. No air space requirements above and below each
frame. Racks shall be secured to floor and ceiling, to prevent tip-over, grounded against electrical shorts, and
rated for support of a minimum 150% of the weight of the equipment mounted on the rack.
Power Requirements
The power supply must be capable of supporting the total power requirements of the system and must provide
proper grounding of the equipment. Each frame requires an AC power source within 2m of the frame. The receptacles must have three-prong grounding, with ground connected to protective earth. The power supply must
provide 100–250V, 47–70Hz, single-phase AC power. The power supply must be protected by a 20A circuit
breaker. It is recommended that the power supply be EMI/RFI filtered, and protected against power surges. An
Uninterruptible Power Supply is recommended. It is further recommended that the overall power supply system
be Ground Fault Interrupt protected, as further precaution against electrical shock. The LX-300 chassis uses a
standard IEC power connector.
LX-300 IEC AC Power Connector
Pin
Name
1
Hot
2
Gnd
3
Neutral
168
Hardware Specifications
Component Specifications
LX-ML8 Mic/Line Analog Audio Input
The LX-ML8 provides eight balanced XLR audio inputs with software-controlled
microphone and line level gain settings. The analog audio is converted to
24bit/48kHz digital data for processing by the LX-DSP. Up to two analog input
cards (for a total of sixteen input channels) can be used in a single frame. The
cards must be installed in Slots A or B.
Channels
Eight analog mic/line inputs.
Frequency Response
20Hz —20kHz (+/- 0.5dB)
Sampling
24bit/48kHz
Dynamic Range
109 dB (+26dBu, 20 kHz BW)
THD+N
<0.001% (+26dBu, 20-20kHz)
EIN
-125dBu (22kHz BW, max gain, Rs=150 ohms)
Crosstalk
-110dB (20-20kHz, +26dBu, channel-channel)
CMRR
-60dB (20-20kHz, -57dBu)
Input Load Impedance
9.2k ohms (balanced line-to-line)
Gain Settings for Full Scale
+26dBU, +16dBU to -57dBU in 1dB steps
Phantom Power
+48VDC at 10mA, switched per channel
Pin-outs: LX-ML8 Balanced Female XLR
Pin
Name
Use
1
GND
Shield
2
Signal+
+Analog balanced input
3
Signal-
-Analog balanced output
Hardware Specifications
169
LX-Ai8 Analog Audio Input
Provides eight balanced-XLR analog audio signal inputs. Performs 24bit/48kHz
digital conversion with three conversion scaling settings.
Channels
Eight analog inputs.
Frequency Response
20Hz —20kHz.
Sampling
24bit/48kHz.
Dynamic Range
98dB.
S/N Ratio
-74dB.
THD
<0.005% THD from 20Hz - 20KHz at +26dBu
Input Load Impedance
7.5k ohms (balanced line-to-line)
Pin-outs: LX-Ai8 Balanced Female XLR
Pin
Name
Use
1
GND
Shield
2
Signal+
+Analog balanced input
3
Signal-
-Analog balanced output
170
Hardware Specifications
ADA Scale: Inputs
A to D Scale Settings
CueStation INPUTS window
20050929
Digital Signal Level
Input Scale Setting
Input Signal
dBu
+6
+16
+26
+6 dBu = 1.55 Vrms
2.2 V p-p
0 dBfs
+16 dBu = 4.9 Vrms
6.9 V p-p
CLIP
0 dBfs
-10 dBfs
+26 dBu = 15.5 Vrms
21.9 V p-p
CLIP
CLIP
0 dBfs
-10 dBfs -20 dBfs
0dBu=.775Vrms
+4dBu=1.23Vrms
dBu = (20log)E1/E2
dBfs is dB full scale
IEEE Standard 754 32 bit floating point format
Hardware Specifications
171
LX-Ao8 Analog Audio Output
Provides eight balanced-XLR analog audio signal outputs. Performs 24bit/48kHz
digital conversion with three conversion scaling settings.
Channels
Eight analog outputs.
Frequency Response
20Hz —20kHz.
Sampling
24bit/48kHz.
Dynamic Range
98dB.
S/N Ratio
-74dB.
THD
<0.005%
Output Load Impedance
600 ohms (balanced line-to-line)
Pin-out: LX-Ao8 balanced male XLR
Pin
Name
Use
1
GND
Shield
2
Signal+
+Balanced analog output
3
Signal–
–Balanced analog output
172
Hardware Specifications
ADA Scale: Outputs
D to A Scale Setting
CueStation OUTPUTS window
20050929
Analog Output
Signal Level
Output Scale Setting
+6
+16
+26
Digital Signal Level
0 dBfs
+ 6 dBu
+16 dBu
+26 dBu
- 2 dBfs
+ 4 dBu
+14 dBu
+24 dBu
-10 dBu
- 0 dBu
+10 dBu
-16 dBfs
+6 dBu
1.55 Vrms
+16 dBu
4.9 Vrms
+26 dBu
15.5 Vrms
Hardware Specifications
173
LX-CBR CobraNet Audio Interface
Provides CobraNet 20bit/48kHz digital audio data transmission over Ethernet
networks. Please refer to the Peak Audio website for details:
http://www.peakaudio.com/
Pin-out
CobraNet communications: Use standard CAT5 cabling.
LED Status Indicator
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Link
Watchdog
Conductor
Fault
RX Data
RX Error
TX Data
TX Error
Green LED indicates normal operation. Red LED indicates a fault or error condition.
174
Hardware Specifications
LX-AES
LX-AES Module
word clock selection and routing
Input 1/2
Output Clock Selection
First AES Pair
Each AES Pair
Internal 48KHz
Output 1/2
Input 3/4
Output Clock Selection
First AES Pair
Each AES Pair
Internal 48KHz
Output 3/4
Input 5/6
Output Clock Selection
First AES Pair
Each AES Pair
Internal 48KHz
Output 5/6
Input 7/8
Output Clock Selection
First AES Pair
Each AES Pair
Internal 48KHz
Output 7/8
LX-AES_Clocking 20050725
Hardware Specifications
175
LX-AES Module
word clock detail
Input
Output
From First AES Pair
Output Clock Selection
First AES Pair
Each AES Pair
Internal 48KHz
Sample Rate
Converter
Sample Rate
Converter
Internal
48kHz
Clock
Matrix 3
LX-300
Digital Signal Processing
Output Clock Selection sets the reference used by the output sample rate converter.
First AES Pair setting uses the clock from the first AES input on the LX-AES
module.
Each AES Pair setting uses the clock from the matching AES input on the LX-AES
module. e.g. Output 3 uses the clock from Input 3.
Internal 48KHz setting uses the internal LX-300 clock.
LX-AES_Clock_Details 20050803
176
Hardware Specifications
LX-ALP
More information coming soon.
Hardware Specifications
177
LX-DSP System Processor Card
Performs matrix mixing automation and control, using the TI-TMS320C6701 Digital Signal Processor. This DSP card also holds 32MB SDRAM and 8MB Flash memory, allowing stand-alone operation once programmed with an automation cue list. The DSP is also interfaced to four relay contact
outputs, four digital sensor inputs and two analogue sensor inputs for control and reading of external
devices.
Channels
Maximum 160/512 audio I/O channels
Dynamic Range
192dB
Digital Logic Inputs
LX-DSP cards with serial numbers 0000–0688 require an external pull-up resistor to use the Digital
Logic Inputs. Connect a 1/4W 2K2 resistor between the Digital Logic Input terminal and the +5V
reference voltage. One resistor is required for each Digital Logic Input.
Special Frame ID Numbers
The ID switch on an LX-DSP module can be set to force the frame to erase the flash memory. This is not required
in normal operation. To erase flash memory:
– Start with the LX-300 powered off.
– Set the ID switch to one of the following codes:
ID Action
83 Erase LX-ELC Flash
87 Erase System Flash
88 Erase NV RAM (also erases EtherTracks boot and configuration)
89 Erase User Flash
– Power the LX-300 on.
– You will see the System Status window on the front of the LX-300 display one of the following:
– *EET (Erase EtherTracks) for ID 83
– *ESF (Erase System Flash) for ID 87
– NVRM (Erase Non Volatile RAM) for ID 88
– *EUF (Erase User Flash) for ID 89
– After an Erase has completed, the status display will show REBO.
– Power off the frame.
– Set the frame ID back to the original setting (01 to 32 depending on the frame ID)
– Power the LX-300 back on.
If you have erased the System Flash, the system status display will show /EP/ indicating that the frame is running
from the EPROM. You must reload the main DSP firmware to use the LX-300 frame.
LX-DSP Pin-outs: LX-DSP Sensor I/O Terminal Block
Pin
Name
Signal
Use
1
+5V ref
+5V
Reference voltage
23
ADC1 ADC2
0-5V
Analog sensor input
4
D1
-TTL (active low with internal 2K2 pull- Digital logic input
up resistor)
178
Hardware Specifications
Pin
Name
Signal
Use
5
D2
6
D3
7
D4
8
GND ref
GND
Reference ground
9
R1
[email protected] max
Relay N/O dry contact
10
11
R2
12
13
R3
14
15
R4
16
Hardware Specifications
179
LX-EXP Expansion DSP
The expansion DSP card provides additional processing power for the frame.
180
Hardware Specifications
LX-VRA Variable Room Acoustics System DSP
The VRAS DSP provides reverb, and early and late reflections capabilities for the Matrix3.
Hardware Specifications
181
LX-ELC Ethernet/Wild Tracks
Provides Ethernet communications link between external hardware and the Matrix3 system. Also
provides a SCSI hard drive interface for use with Wild Tracks playback.
– Ethernet connection is IEEE 802.3 and is 100 base T. Wiring must conform to EIA.TIA 568
standard with CAT-5 or better cable.
– Each LX-ELC module that is used for Wild Tracks requires a network connection to transfer
audio files.
– LCS provided Wild Tracks drives do not have internal termination. An external terminator must
be used. LVD Ultra 160 active termination is provided.
– Do not connect more than one LX-ELC to a SCSI bus. The LX-ELC is a SCSI controller and
uses SCSI ID 7. There can be only one controller on a SCSI bus.
Pin-out
Ethernet: Use standard CAT5 cabling.
SCSI disk connection: Ultra-SCSI. Use standard SCSI cabling. The connector is an Ultra2/SCSI VHDCI.
182
Hardware Specifications
LX-LNK Frame Interconnect
Provides a high-speed connection between frames. Carries command data and 24bit/48kHz digital
audio data. An optional optical transceiver module extends the maximum transmission range.
– Use only LCS provided Link cables. These are Fibre Channel cables that have been qualified
for high speed data use. They have a yellow label at each end that is marked "LX-Link".
– Systems must be connected in a ring. The Next output of the LX-LNK module is connected to
the Previous input of the following frame.
– Connections must be made in order of Frame ID. Frame 1 NEXT connects to Frame 2 PREVIOUS. Frame 2 NEXT connects to Frame 3 PREVIOUS, and so on.
– The last Frame in a system must loop back to the first Frame. Connect the NEXT output on the
last frame to Frame ID 01 PREVIOUS input.
– The Frame Status window on the front of the LX-300 will show green lights for Next and Previous
when the cables are properly connected to a frame.
Transmission Range
Up to 30m (100 feet) using copper cable. Up to 500m (1000 feet) using multimode fiber optic cable and the optional fiber optic driver module.
Pin-outs
The link cable is a standard Fibre Channel™ cable. These have precision matched conductors. Please do not
try to build these without the required tooling and test equipment.
Hardware Specifications
183
LNK-OPTIC Connections
Location 1 (Front-of-House)
ID 01
PREVIOUS
LNKOPTIC
NEXT
PREVIOUS
ID 02
NEXT
Fiber Optic Cable
ID 03
PREVIOUS
Fiber Optic Cable
le
Fiber Optic Cab
Location 2 (backstage)
Fiber Optic Cable
LNKOPTIC
LNKOPTIC
NEXT
PREVIOUS
ID 04
NEXT
ID 05
PREVIOUS
NEXT
PREVIOUS
ID 06
NEXT
LNKOPTIC
Link_to_FiberOptic 20041217
184
Hardware Specifications
LX-COS Comm/Sync Card
Provides a communications link to the CueStation host computer system (or the
computer hosting your custom control software), a SMPTE Time Code signal generator and receiver, and MIDI i/o.
Ports
RS232 serial, RS422 serial, MIDI In/Out, XLR SMPTE In/Out
LX-COS Pin-outs: nine-pin Male RS232 serial port (DTE)
Pin
Name
Use
1
–
–
2
RX
Receive data
3
TX
Transmit data
4
–
–
5
GND
Reference ground
6
–
–
7
RTS
Ready to send (not required)
8
CTS
Clear to send (not required)
9
–
–
LX-COS nine-pin female RS422 serial port (DTE)
Pin
Name
Use
1
GND
Shield
2
—
—
3
GND
Shield
4
TX+
Transmit data
5
TX–
Transmit data
6
—
—
7
—
—
8
RX+
Receive data
9
RX–
Receive data
LX-COS five-pin DIN female MIDI In
Pin
Name
Use
1
—
—
2
–
–
3
—
—
4
RD+
Receive data
5
RD–
Receive data
Hardware Specifications
185
LX-COS five-pin DIN female MIDI Out
Pin
Name
Use
1
—
—
2
GND
Shield
3
—
—
4
+5V
Reference current
5
Data
Send data
LX-COS XLR female SMPTE In
Pin
Name
Use
1
GND
Shield
2
+data
+Balanced analog input
3
-data
–Balanced analog input
LX-COS XLR male SMPTE Out
Pin
Name
Use
1
GND
Shield
2
+data
+Balanced analog output
3
-data
–Balanced analog output
186
Hardware Specifications
Frame Control Operations
Frame Control Window 188
LX-300 Autostart 189
Matrix3 Web Pages 189
This chapter explains the functions and operations that control how the Matrix3 frame behaves.
The following diagram is a map of the location of the EPROM, flash memory and RAM (random access memory).
It shows the flow of information during the system startup procedure, and where the firmware and automation files
are stored.
ELC
COS
LX-ELC
EtherTracks
Ethernet Port
LX-COS
ComSync
Serial Ports
PPC
DSP
EPROM
1.6.1
ELC
RAM
ELC Boot
Flash
TI
320C6701
DSP
DSP
RAM
ELC
Operating System
Flash
ELC
IP Address
Flash
DSP
Operating System
Flash
User Boot Script
Flash
User Project
Flash
1. EPROM uncompresses OS from
Flash and loads it into DSP RAM and
then re-boots the DSP.
2. DSP uncompresses ELC OS from the
ELC Flash memory and loads it into ELC
RAM
3. The DSP then starts the ELC
Matrix3 Boot Sequence
LX-300_Boot 20060704
Frame Control Operations
4. If a User Boot Script is present and
set to Auto Start, the DSP loads the
project from User Flash and runs it.
Note: If there is no OS in the DSP Flash,
then the EPROM will monitor the Serial
Ports on the COS module waiting for an
OS file to load into DSP Flash.
187
Frame Control Window
Frame Control enables you to easily write your own custom Matrix3 control commands. The structure of these
commands is similar to that of External Subcues. It uses a point-and-click interface that automatically generates
the appropriate control byte-strings.
The Frame Control window can be used to initiate commands that could also be contained in an External
Subcue. However, Frame Control is convenient as it provides a way to build up a short sequence of entries and
try them quickly, with less visual overhead than doing the same task in the Subcue Library window.
Think of Frame Control as a sketchpad to keep track of commands that you want to use “on the fly.”
Command Buttons
The three command buttons
are self-explanatory:
– Do Entry triggers the selected custom command.
– Add Entry adds a copy of
the selected entry or, if no
entry is selected, adds a
new, blank entry to the list
of custom commands.
– Delete Selected deletes the
selected custom command
from the list.
Command List
Entries
The command entry boxes are
all controllable through the use
of right-click menu selections.
– Type selects from fourteen
components of a fullyequipped Matrix3 system.
– Command selects from a variable list of commands as appropriate to the selected component Type. It will
also control the display of command options, which are presented below the custom commands list.
– Frame controls whether the command will be sent to a single frame or all frames.
– Wait sets the Wait time for the command. This can be typed into the box or selected using the right-click
menu.
– Port selects the communications port through which the command will be sent.
– Comment is a place to type a note regarding the entry.
Command Option Area
For many commands the middle section of the Frame Control window will display the options and settings
available to the command. These vary with the component Type and Command that has been selected.
These options are documented fully in the CueStation 4 Command Reference manual.
Command String
The bottom part of the Frame Control window contains a hex-encoded string corresponding to the command
you have constructed using the point-and-click interface. It is shown for your reference and can not be directly
changed. You can select and copy the string for use in your own custom programming.
188
Frame Control Operations
LX-300 Autostart
The LX-300 Auto Start window provides the controls to set the LX-300 frames to automatically load the project
file saved in the frame user flash memory. Startup instructions on what to do after the project is loaded are set
and saved to the internal non-volatile flash memory.
To access the LX-300 Auto Start window, open the Mixer Configuration window, and then select Configuration
> LX-300 Auto Start...
– The On Power Up: drop-down menu specifies
whether or not the system should automatically load
the project file that is stored in the user area of the
flash memory.
– If Auto Start Project in Flash is selected, then when
the LX-300 is powered on, the project file stored in
the user area of flash will be loaded. And then the rest
of the Auto Start settings will be applied.
– If Special Auto Start - No ELC is selected, then when
the LX-300 is powered on, the project file stored in
the user area of flash will be loaded. IMPORTANT: This is a special mode that does not require the CS4
background processes to be running. This allows frames without an LX-ELC module to be setup to automatically startup and run a project. HOWEVER, because the project is not being run from a background process,
there will not be a way to retrieve the project file from the frame.
– If Do Not Auto Start is selected, then the LX-300 will power on but will not load the project saved in the frame
flash memory.
– Startup Delay (seconds) specifies how long the system should wait after bootup before recalling the startup
cue. It’s important that this value be large enough that all frames have time to come online and link before
the cue is fired, as any frame that comes on line after the recall command is sent will not recall the startup
cue. Generally speaking, any value greater than 30 is safe for most configurations. When running Wild Tracks,
the value should be set to 45.
– Recall Cue ID on Startup specifies the Cue ID to recall on startup, or (None) if no cue should be recalled.
– Set Cue List ID on Startup specifies the Cue List ID to select on startup, or (None) if no cue should be selected.
– AutoStart if selected specifies that the first entry of the selected Cue List should be recalled on startup. This
control will only be enabled if a startup cue list is specified.
– Completion Message specifies a text message in all LX-300 front panel displays and the Log Window that
will be displayed after the startup procedure is complete.
– Save Settings causes all startup information specified to be sent to the Matrix3 hardware and stored in LXDSP flash memory.
– Cancel causes the LX-300 Auto Start window to be closed.
Matrix3 Web Pages
Matrix3 frames can store custom HTML web pages in flash memory, which can be accessed by any standard
web browser. There is a default web page which provides links to special system status pages, and provides
examples for how user-created web pages can serve as a minimal custom interface to the LX-300 frames.
Matrix3 URLs
To view the web pages currently stored on the frames, direct your favorite web browser to the IP address of the
LX-ELC module. If no custom web pages have been created, then the default web page will appear. There are
also a few special URLs which can display current information about the frames:
– http://ip.add.r.ess/status will check the status of the frame(s). To check the status of a particular frame, use
/status?X where X is the ID of the frame. To view the status of all frames, use /status?all.
Frame Control Operations
189
– http://ip.add.r.ess/smallstatus will show a less verbose version of the information at /status. The ?X and
?all parameters can also be added.
– http://ip.add.r.ess/sysex ? followed by a sysex string will send a sysex command to the frame(s). For example,
the string 1F,7E,11,3F,1E,00,00 will send a "Recall Cue 0" command to the frame.
– http://ip.add.r.ess:8000 will show the current contents of the system log.
Uploading Custom Web Pages
Once you have created your custom web page(s), there are two options for how to store them in the Matrix3. If
you want to overwrite the default web page, make sure to name your file index.html.
The first option is to save your HTML files within the project file, so that whenever the project is loaded, its associated HTML files will be accessible through the Matrix3's web server. For this option, simply drag your HTML
files into the Support Files window, and then save the project. If your web pages use images, the image files
must also be added to the Support Files.
The second option is to upload an HTML archive to flash. With this option, the web pages will always be accessible, regardless of which project is loaded, unless a project has HTML files associated with it, in which case
the project's web pages will take precedence.
In order to upload your web pages to flash:
– Add all of your HTML and associated files into one ZIP file. In most operating systems, you can do this by
highlighting the files you want to add, and then right-click on the selected files and select "Add to Archive..."
– In the Mixer Configuration window, select Configuration > Upload HTML Archive...", locate the ZIP file,
and click :label:`Open.
These files will remain stored in flash until they are over-written, or user flash is reformatted.
190
Frame Control Operations
Firmware Updates
Before You Begin 191
Firmware Upload Procedures 192
Using LX-300 ID Codes to Erase Flash 195
The LX-DSP, LX-ELC, LX-VRA, and LX-EXP modules load operating system files into RAM during power-on. These
files are stored in flash memory on each of the modules. Because these files are stored in the module, they are referred
to as “firmware”. The version number for the firmware files and CueStation must match. If you upgrade to a new
version of CueStation, you must also upgrade all firmware files.
Firmware files are sent from the Mixer Configuration window in CueStation using the “Upload Firmware” command.
CueStation 4 requires an ethernet connection to an LX-ELC module. If the flash memory of the LX-ELC module has
been erased you will need an LX-COS comm/sync module and Virtual LX in order to upload firmware.
In a multiple frame system connected with LX-LNK Link modules, all frames are upgraded simultaneously.
Before You Begin
Please read the following:
Note:
There is always the chance that the procedures in this document may be superseded with a newer release of
CueStation. Please check the release notes that shipped with your hardware. These may be on CD. Also check the
LCS Forums at http://lcsforums.com and the LCS web site at www.lcsaudio.com for the latest information.
Important!
Wait Until Complete!
DO NOT power-off before the update is complete! Firmware files are automatically transferred to the appropriate
LX-300 modules. The transfer will take from a few seconds to several minutes. For serial transfers of the the
LX-ELC Ethertracks files the time required can be over 15 minutes for each file.
DO NOT POWER-OFF THE FRAMES UNTIL *ALL* FRAMES HAVE UPDATED *ALL* FIRMWARE FILES
During the transfer the LX-300 Frame Status will display XFRx, with the value of x incrementing as the transfer
progresses. It will then display WAIT as it updates the firmware and checks that the update was successful.
The update is complete ONLY when the Frame Status displays ...FILE... GOOD.... It may take several minutes
to reach this point and there may be a delay between the words FILE and GOOD.
Several firmware flash files may be contained in each firmware file sent from the computer.
The Log window will show the progress of the firmware updates. As each file update is completed a message will
be displayed: [INFO] Write to FLASH file succeeded (Changes will take effect after the
frame is power cycled).
Please allow ten seconds between power-off and power-on when power cycling a frame.
Failed Transfers
Under some circumstances the firmware transfer may appear to stall. The LX-300 Frame Status will display XFRx,
WAIT, or -OK-, but the display will be frozen. This is a normal part of the firmware update. If this state continues
longer than four minutes, the system may have actually stalled. If that is the case and the stall occurred before
Firmware Updates
191
transfer was complete, you may be able to power cycle the frame and recover. If the frame does power up correctly and you are able to connect, you should use the Erase Flash command to clear the flash memory and
then try uploading the file again. If you use the Erase Flash command for the Ethertracks module and then switch
off the frame (or power fails), You will have to use Virtual LX and a serial connection to an LX-COS module to
recover.
If part of the erase procedure had been started by the frame, the flash memory could be corrupted or incomplete
and the frame will not start up properly. To remedy this situation you must force an erase of the problem firmware
file using the LX-DSP module ID switch. See Using LX-300 ID Codes to Erase Flash (p. 195).
Firmware Upload Procedures
A. Upgrading a Matrix3 system running CueStation 4
1. Download Firmware Files
The most recent version of the firmware is available at http://www.lcsforums.com , or by contacting
[email protected] .
When downloading firmware files, you will have either one .zip file containing all firmware files, or four separate
.zip files. Save them to an easily accessible location on a computer running a CueStation client. You can either
unzip them and upload the .csf files, or upload the .zip file(s).
2. Connect CueStation to the LX-300
Start CueStation and connect to the server of the system you wish to upgrade. You can use a newer version of
CueStation 4 to upload new firmware to the frames. You may get an alert message in the log when you connect,
warning you that the version numbers do not match. As long as all you are doing is uploading firmware, you can
proceed. If you are trying to upgrade a system running CueStation 3 firmware, please see section C. Upgrading
a system running CueStation 3.
Open the Mixer Configuration window. Save the current project and configuration if you haven't yet done so.
3. Disable LX-300 Auto Start
As part of uploading firmware, the system will need to be power cycled. If an Auto Start project is enabled, it is
best to disable it before proceeding:
– Select LX-300 Auto Start... from the Configuration menu.
– In the dialog box that appears, open the first drop-down menu, labeled "On Power Up:", and select Do Not
Auto Start.
– Click on the Save Settings button, and then close the dialog box. The log will then report "Boot Script save
to disk SUCCEEDED".
At this point, you should power cycle all frames in the system.
4. Select Firmware Files to Upload
After the frames have finished the startup procedure and are displaying the -OK- twirlies on the front panel
display, open the Mixer Configuration window. In the Configuration menu, select Upload Firmware... You will
see a warning like this:
192
Firmware Updates
After you click OK, a blank configuration will be sent to the frames. This is to prevent audio processing while
firmware is uploaded.
Another dialog box will appear, allowing you to locate the firmware file(s).
All modules should be using the same firmware version as CueStation. There are five firmware files in each release.
lx300_vx_x_x_xx.csf (where x_x_x_xx is the version number)
et_boot_v_x_x_x_xx.csf
etrx1_x_x_x_xx.csf
etrx2_x_x_x_xx.csf
lx300exp_vx_x_x_xx.csf
The lx300___.csf file has two firmware files for the LX-DSP module.
The et_boot___.csf file is a very small file that is the first of 3 files needed for the LX-ELC module.
The etrx1___.csf and etrx2___.csf files are very large and are the rest of the files needed for the LX-ELC module.
All three of these must be sent to the ELC module or it will not run correctly. If only part of them are sent, you
may have to force an erase of the ELC module and upload via a serial connection to an LX-COS module in order
to recover. (See LX-300 ID Codes)
The lx300exp___.csf file is used to upgrade the firmware in both LX-EXP Expansion DSP modules, and for LXVRA VRAS modules.
Make sure to select all five files when uploading firmware, or one .zip file that contains all files. Hold down the
Shift key to select multiple files at once.
Tip:
When uploading firmware, you can select a .zip file, or multiple .zip files, and the .csf firmware files will be
extracted automatically.
5. Upload Firmware Files
When you have selected the files you wish to upload, click Open to upload them to the frames.
You can watch the progress on the front of the LX-300 as the files are transfered over to the frame. You must
wait for all files to complete the transfer and be written into flash memory. If you shut off frame power before the
process has completed the frame will not operate correctly. If this happens you may have to use the special
DSP module ID codes to erase flash memory and then connect using a serial cable to an LX-COS module in
order to recover. See the following part B.
6. Confirm Upload Success
Once the firmware upload is complete, there will be File Complete... messages in the log. If you uploaded all
five firmware files, you should see six File Complete messages: one for each DSP in your system, plus an additional one from the main DSP. All DSP's should now be online.
7. Power Cycle Frames
Power cycle all frames in the system. When the frames finish powering up, there should be messages in the
log reporting the firmware version, so you can double-check that the firmware upload succeeded.
Unsuccessful Upload
If the firmware upload was unsuccessful, you may have to erase the flash memory in the frames, and upload
the firmware over a serial connection. See the following section for details.
Firmware Updates
193
B. Upgrading a system from EPROM mode (/EP)
EPROM to CueStation 4
this section is incomplete, e-mail [email protected] if you need details
This assumes that the firmware in the LX-DSP and LX-ELC has been completely erased. You must have an
LX-COS Communication / Synchronization module in your system since the EPROM in the LX-DSP module is
only able to connect to a serial port.
Important!
If there is an LX-EXP module in the system with an ID set higher than 32, it will not accept firmware while
in EPROM mode. Change the ID to a number less than 32 before beginning the firmware upload.
For newer computers without an RS-232 serial port, we have used the Keyspan USB to Serial adapter. p/n USA19QW on Macintosh laptops. Other adapters have been used successfully. Check the LCS forums for up to
date listings.
www.keyspan.com
id 87 *ESF
DONE
REBO
Frame booted into EP and scrolled MISSING MAIN ETHERTRACKS FILE. PLEASE SEND FILE
Even if the LX-ELC still has valid firmware, you will not be able to connect to the DSP. It is best to start with a
known good state.
If you are in EPROM mode, the Frame Status display on the LX-300 will show -EP- and the Watchdog LED
will flash red and green.
Connect the serial port of your laptop to a serial port on the LX-COS. For this example we will use the RS-232
port (Port C). The communication rate is 38.4kbs, 1 stop bit and no parity.
Upload firmware. You will not see any log messages on completion, you must look at the Frame Status display
for File Good
Note: You can also verify that the file transfer has finished by looking at the Frame Control led on the LX300. It displays serial activity. If is dark then CueStation has finished sending the file. Please be aware that any
serial activity will light the Frame Control led, so if there is a RIF-108 or other device connected to any of the
serial ports they can cause the Frame Control led to light independently of the file transfer.
(note, ethertracks main firmware will take between 15 and 20 minutes per file to upload on a serial connection)
C. Upgrading a system running CueStation 3
This information is only needed if you are upgrading an older Matrix3 system running BeOS and CueStation 3.
CueStation 3.2.2 to CueStation 4.3
CueStation 4 requires an LX-ELC Ethertracks module with 128MB of memory. Systems with older LX-ELC
modules must upgrade the 64MB SODIMM to an LCS approved 128MB SODIMM.
Important: there are two different physical memory mappings of the 128MB SODIMM. Only a two bank type
setup as 8MB by 16b will work with the LX-ELC module. The minimum speed is PC-100. Please use only LCS
provided memory modules.
CueStation 4 client can not directly connect to a frame running CueStation 3. To make a connection you must
use Virtual LX. On your computer open Virtual LX and then start CueStation 4 client.
In CueStation 4, select Network > Server > localhost (127.0.0.1).
After CS4 has connected the first window, you can use Network > Reconnect All to set all other windows to
the same server.
In Virtual LX, enable Show Details.
In Virtual LX, select the HSB Simulator tab.
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Firmware Updates
At the bottom of the window there is a drop down menu and a data entry box. In the data entry box, enter the
IP address of the LX-ELC module. This is the IP address that the LX-300 frame displays on power up in the
Frame Status display.
In the drop-down menu, select Use TCP Connection. An alert box will open with a System Reset Warning.
This is a normal caution. Click Yes.
In CueStation 4 open the Mixer Configuration window.
Select Configuration > Upload Firmware.
Make sure that you comply with the instruction in the alert box that opens and then click OK.
A file requester window will open. Navigate to the location with the CS4 firmware files.
Note: files can be sent in any order as long as all of them are sent before power-cycling the frame. The order
listed here goes from the shortest file to the longest.
Select the first file: et_boot-yyyymmdd.csf
This is a very small file and will upload to the frame in only a few seconds. If possible watch the front of the LX300 frame for the acknowledgment File Good.
CueStation 4 will display an Alert box cautioning you to wait for file upload to complete. Click OK.
CS3 will not be able to send a message to CS4 so you will not see an acknowledgment in the log window that
the file upload was successful.
Note: While it is not necessary, if you have a BeOS computer connected to the Matrix3 system during this upgrade,
you will see the CS 3 messages that confirm when Write to FLASH has succeeded.
Select the second file: lx300-yyyymmdd.csf
This file will take longer to upload and it has two parts that must report File Good. You must wait for both
File Good messages.
If you have an Expansion DSP module, LX-EXP, or a VRAS module, LX-VRA you need to select lx300expyyyymmdd.csf as your third file.
The next files that need to be uploaded are the main firmware for the LX-ELC module. With Wild Tracks 4, the
size of the firmware file has grown to the point where it had to be split into two parts.
The first part is etrx1--2.4.23-yyyymmdd.csf. This will take some time to upload. Once you see File Good on
the frame, upload the second part.
The second part is etrx2--2.4.23-yyyymmdd.csf. This will take some time to upload. You must wait for File Good
to be displayed and this will be a number of minutes, often several times longer than the wait for the first part
of the main EtherTracks firmware. Once you see File Good, there is only one more file to upload.
The last file that has to be uploaded must be created. In the Mixer Configuration window, select Frame 1.
Set the Slot that has the LX-ELC Ethertracks module installed to EtherTracks. Note that the (Master) setting is
used for an LX-ELC module in frame id 01, while the (Slave) setting is used for any module that is in a frame
with a higher id.
Enter the IP address for the module. Check the Send box. Then choose Configuration > Send Configuration
to Frames.
Once Configuration has been sent, go to Virtual LX and change the Connection to LX-300 in the drop-down
menu to use the built-in simulator. If you don’t do this, then when the LX-300 frame is re-started, Virtual LX will
take over the firmware running in the LX-ELC module.
You can now power-cycle the frames to boot into CS4. Remember to leave the frame power off for at least 10
seconds before switching it back on again.
Using LX-300 ID Codes to Erase Flash
The ID switch on an LX-DSP module may be used to force the frame to erase flash memory areas in the DSP,
EXP, and ELC modules. You may need to do this if flash memory has become corrupted or if there is a problem
after uploading system flash. Both situations are rare. You should try the Erase Flash commands first as they
will allow you to erase and then replace flash files without requiring a serial connection to re-load system and
ELC flash files. Erasing flash memory is not required in normal operation.
Firmware Updates
195
It is important to know that the operating system for the DSP, EXP, and ELC modules is loaded into RAM during
startup. You can erase the flash memory and the frame will continue to run until power is switched off. IF the
firmware files are not in flash, the next time the frame is powered up, there will be no operating system to load
and the system status display will show “/EP” to indicate that the frame is operating from diagnostic code in the
EPROM. Normal operation will not be possible until the operating system has been re-loaded into flash memory
and the frame power cycled.
There is also a diagnostic setting of the ID to force the frame to run from EPROM. If you set the frame ID switch
to 00, flash memory will be bypassed during the frame startup and you will be running in EPROM mode. To restore
normal operation, return the switch to the proper ID and power cycle the frame.
Caution:
If you erase the LX-ELC flash you must upload replacement firmware files to the LX-ELC module before
it will work again. You will need an LX-COS module for serial connection to the frame or a connection to
an LX-ELC module on another frame in the system that has not been erased. In CueStation 4 you will have
to use Virtual LX in order to connect to a frame with an erased ELC module.
If you erase the System Flash you must upload replacement firmware for the main DSP before the frame
will work again. You will need a network connection to an LX-ELC module on the system or a serial connection to an LX-COS module on the system.
There are four flash file locations that can be erased with an ID code setting on the LX-DSP module.
LX-ELC Flash System Flash NV RAM settings User Flash
The LX-ELC Flash is the operating system for the Embedded Linux Computer that is the heart of the EtherTracks
module. When this is erased, you will not be able to make a network connection to the LX-ELC module. With
CueStation 4 there are four files that must be uploaded for the LX-ELC module to work. These are et-boot, etrx1,
etrx2, and a valid mixer configuration containing an Ethernet address. If any of these files are missing, the frame
status window will scroll a message listing the missing file.
The System Flash is the operating system for the frame and is in the LX-DSP module. If the system flash is
missing, the frame will display /EPin the frame status display and the Watchdog LED will blink red and green.
Please note that if the ID switch is set to 00 or to an invalid id you will also get the /EPdisplay. The system flash
file is lx300. This setting will also erase the operating system files in the LX-EXP and LX-VRA modules. The
system flash file for both of these modules is the lx300exp file.
NV RAM is where some of the system flags are stored. These include the boot-from-flash flag. The erase command may not have an effect on systems running CueStation 4. Please check the LCS Forums for updated information.
User Flash is where the Auto Start project file is saved. You may need to erase this if there is a large project
file that has been saved to the frame and you wish to upload a new project file that will not fit until the old one
is erased. There is an external subcue that will erase this area that should be tried first.
Erasing Flash Memory
– Start with the LX-300 powered off.
– On the rear of the LX-300 frame locate the LX-DSP module. It is in slot 0. Make note of the Frame ID, so that
it can be returned it to the original setting after this procedure. Valid ID settings for the LX-DSP module are
in the range of 01 to 32.
Set the LX-DSP module ID switch to one of the following codes depending on the action desired.
ID
Action
83
Erase LX-ELC Flash
87
Erase System Flash
88
Erase NV RAM
89
Erase User Flash
196
Firmware Updates
ID
Action
– Power the LX-300 on.
You will see the System Status window on the front of the LX-300 display one of the following messages:
Message
Meaning
*EET
Erase EtherTracks Flash (ID 83)
*ESF
Erase System Flash (ID 87)
*ENV
Erase Non-volatile RAM (ID 88)
*EUF
Erase User Flash (ID 89)
After the Erase has completed, the status display will show REBO (for ReBoot).
– Power off the frame.
– Set the Frame ID back to the original setting (01 to 32 depending on the frame ID)
– Power the LX-300 on.
If you have erased the System Flash, the system status display will show /EP/ indicating that the frame is running
from the minimum operating system in the EPROM. You must reload the main DSP firmware to use the LX-300
frame.
If you have erased the LX-ELC Flash, the system status display a series of messages listing the missing ELC
flash files. You must upload the missing files as well as sending a mixer configuration with the IP Address Send
checked in order to load an IP address into the module. The default IP address is set to 192.168.0.(100+frame
ID), so frame ID 01 would have a default IP address of 192.168.0.101.
Firmware Updates
197
198
Firmware Updates
Appendices
CueStation Networking
Using Samba
Capture Window Advanced Mode
CueStation 4 Default Hotkey Assignments
Glossary
201
207
215
219
227
CueStation Networking
Client/Server Systems 201
CueStation 4 Background Processes 203
Client/Server Systems
A Client-Server system is one that uses a central program to keep track of data and which is designed to pass the
data to other programs when requested.
The program that manages the data is called a server. The programs requesting data are called clients. A server
can support requests from many clients.
An analogy of this can be found in a restaurant looking at the waiters and the kitchen. Waiters take the customers
orders to the kitchen. The kitchen responds with the food that was ordered for the waiters to take back to the customers. In this way one kitchen can serve many customers.
Client / Server Systems
Diners, Waiters, & Kitchen
1
2
3
4
1. Diners place order at table
2. Waiters take orders to the kitchen
5
3. Cook reads orders and prepares food
4. Waiters take food back to diners at table
5. Diners receive the food they ordered
In the Matrix3, there are Server programs that manage the automation, the mixer settings, Wild Tracks, CueConsole
and the user interface. These programs start automatically and can be run either in the LX-ELC module, or as Virtual
LX in another computer. The program CueStation is a client.
20051106.2
CueStation Networking
201
LX-300
Hardware
CueStation
Client
Software
CueStation
Client
Software
LX-300
Hardware
Local ETHERNET
switch (or switches)
CueConsole
Hardware
CueConsole
Hardware
CueStation
Client
Software
CueStation Server
Server Software
Can be running in LX-ELC
Ethertracks Module, or on
External computer
Matrix 3 Client / Server Connections
typical Matrix3 system
20051031
There are many advantages to a Client Server system for a sound mixing and automation system.
Redundant control is possible. Since there can be more than one client, you can have a backup computer connected and running at the same time without the need for any special software or hardware.
There is a natural ease of connection between all elements in the system. Since all parts of the system communicate with the server a well designed system will make it easy to connect everything.
202
CueStation Networking
Multiple users can work on the same system at the same time and everyone sees what controls are being
changed as the changes are made.
Backup of the automation data is simple since each connected client can save the project file locally.
Accurate indication of control settings is guaranteed for all users since all clients are connected to the same
server that is responsible for the control of the audio.
IP Addresses
Each device on an internet must have a unique address. The address is shown as four sets of numbers in the
range of 0 to 255. These are used to pass messages from one device to another and are interpreted in order
much like a mailing address.
Subnet Mask and Gateway
The Subnet Mask is used to set the boundaries for the local address. Any messages for addresses outside of
the local boundary will be sent to the gateway. Messages pass to the local area through holes in the mask (zero's).
The subnet mask is in binary, but for humans is shown in four sets of decimal numbers in the range 0-255, the
same way as IP addresses are shown.
The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) has reserved the following four blocks of the IP address space
for private internets.
IP Start
To IP End
10.0.0.0
–
10.255.255.255 (10/8 prefix)
169.254.0.0
–
169.254.255.255 (Bonjour)
172.16.0.0
–
172.31.255.255 (172.16/12 prefix)
192.168.0.0
–
192.168.255.255 (192.168/16 prefix)
CueStation 4 Background Processes
CueStation 4 uses a set of background processes that may run on the LX-ELC EtherTracks module and/or a
standalone computer. Many of these are implemented as servers that maintain and provide automation and
mixing system information to client software or, in the case of CueConsole, hardware modules.
CueStation Networking
203
Servers and Background Processes
cued
This server holds the current project database (cue lists, cues, subcues, spacemaps, etc.), and sends sysexes
to the DSPs and lxcaslemu to make sure that they all have the latest version of the database as well. All
CueStation 4 windows connect to cued, and cued connects to lxtcpcomd and to mixerd. There must be
exactly one cued process present in a system. cued can run on an ELC card or as part of VirtualLX.
mixerd
This server manages setting, getting, and subscribing to all control points in the system. All CueStation 4 windows
connect to mixerd and mixerd connects to lxtcpcomd. There must be exactly one mixerd process present
in a system. mixerd can run on an ELC card or as part of VirtualLX.
lxcaslemu
This server is running the same CASL software that runs on the DSP cards. lxcaslemu emulates a DSP’s
behavior. This is useful because mixerd can monitor lxcaslemu’s state and notify CueStation 4 clients about
changes to the mixer state without needing to communicate with the real DSPs. lxcaslemu communicates
with mixerd and cued indirectly, by forwarding sysexes through lxtcpcomd. There must be exactly one lxcaslemu process running in a system. lxcaslemu can run on an ELC card or as part of VirtualLX.
ccd
This server handles communications with CueConsole2 modules. When running on the ELC card, ccd is integrated into the mixerd process for better efficiency. When running in VirtualLX, ccd is run as its own separate
process. ccd connects to cued, mixerd, and lxtcpcomd. There must be exactly one ccd process running in
a system.
lxtcpcomd
This server acts as a kind of virtual serial port, to give bi-directional shared access to the High Speed Bus. Sysexes sent via TCP to lxtcpcomd are placed onto the HSB, and sysexes received from the HSB are sent to
some or all of the connected clients (depending on the clients’ filtering preferences). One lxtcpcomd process
should always be running on every ELC card. VirtualLX also contains an lxtcpcomd process, which is used
to forward sysexes from the VirtualLX computer to the ELC card’s lxtcpcomd process.
wtrxd
This handles Wild Tracks v4 operations, including SCSI disk access, sound file reading, and delivery of audio
data to the High Speed Bus. One wtrxd process should always be running on every ELC card. wtrxd connects
to lxtcpcomd. Because wtrxd requires direct access to the HSB, wtrxd cannot be run anywhere except on
an ELC card.
webserve
This is a trivial web server process. Used to provide simple status pages to web browsers, as well as to serve
user-provided HTML pages.
smbd
Provides Samba/CIFS/Windows Networking access to any attached Wild Tracks SCSI drives. Used primarily
to import and export audio files to and from the Wild Tracks drives.
nmbd
Samba’s name server background process. It’s purpose it to make sure that the ELC card shows up in the
“Network Neighborhood” or equivalent share-directories of client computers.
ftpd
File Transfer Protocol background process. A slightly less user-friendly alternative to Samba/CIFS.
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CueStation Networking
telnetd
This is the telnet background process and allows us to open a shell on the ELC card and run commands there.
hostd
This is the host background process. This background process is different from the other background processes
in that it is part of the CueStation 4 binary and runs only on the client computers. A hostd process is automatically started in the background by the client when CueStation 4 is first launched, and it runs until about 15 seconds
after all CueStation windows have been closed. hostd is responsible for coordinating behavior amongst the
various CueStation windows on a given client computer. It also holds the current state of any client-specific
control points (e.g. Channel Selects). All CueStation 4 windows connect to hostd.
Background Processes on the EtherTracks module
The following diagram illustrates which background processes communicate with each other when operating
on the EtherTracks module.
Figure 6.1: EtherTracks Background Processes
Of these processes, wtrxd runs at the highest priority. Therefore, on a system that is configured to run all processes on a single EtherTracks module including wtrxd, the responsiveness of meter, CueConsole, and
CueStation 4 windows will suffer. There are two solutions to this. One is to run Wild Tracks on a dedicated
EtherTracks module, and the second is to run many of the background processes on VirtualLX.
Background Processes in VirtualLX
The following diagram illustrates which background processes communicate with each other when operating
on the VirtualLX. Note that the same set of background processes operate in both operational scenarios. How-
CueStation Networking
205
ever, when using VirtualLX, cued, ccd, cued, mixerd, and lxcaslemu will run within VirtualLX and not in the
EtherTracks module.
Figure 6.2: VirtualLX Background Processes
VirtualLX is recommended for use with systems that include CueConsole, and also single frame systems that
are running Wild Tracks and require a responsive CueStation 4 user interface. Note that single frame systems
that are configured for standalone Wild Tracks playback and are controlled via an external control system or
time code can be configured to run all background processes on the EtherTracks module.
206
CueStation Networking
Using Samba
Common Internet File System (CIFS) with Macintosh OS-X
CIFS with Linux
CIFS with Microsoft Windows
Supported Audio File Types
207
208
210
211
Common Internet File System (CIFS) with Macintosh OS-X
Mount Disk
To mount a disk over the Network in Mac OS X, press Cmd+K. You will be asked for the IP address of the EtherTracks
module, preceded by smb://, as shown below.
You will then be asked to select the volume to mount over the network.
If you have configured Wild Tracks to require a password, you will be prompted for your user name and password.
Next, click OK.
Your mounted drive can then be accessed via a Finder Window like any other volume in your system, as shown
below.
Using Samba
207
Audio files should be stored in the wtrxaudio directory of the volume. Files can be dragged from this view directly into a Wild Tracks Deck.
Renaming a Wild Tracks File
OS X can show files displayed as icons, list, or list with columns. This is set with the View buttons in a finder
window. The left view button shows icons. The middle button shows lists. The right view button shows the column
view.
When in column view, you have an option to “Preview” audio files. This is enabled with a triangle next to the
word “Preview” which is just above the file name in the right-most column.
If Preview is enabled (triangle pointing down and playback bar showing) you will not be able to edit the name.
Click the triangle to close Preview.
The reason rename doesn’t work is because Preview is an application and it is active when the triangle is down.
CIFS with Linux
Mount Disk
To mount a disk over the Network with SUSE/KDE, select Create New > File > Link to Location (URL). You
will be asked to provide a file name and URL. Leaving the file name blank, click the file folder button to the right
of the URL box.
Using the file selector window, select the Network button and choose the Windows Network entry; next, locate
the wtrxaudio file on the desired Wild Tracks SCSI device.
208
Using Samba
If you have configured Wild Tracks to require a password, then enter user name and password at this time. If
you have not, then click OK.
Your mounted drive can then be accessed via a Finder Window like any other volumes in your system, as shown
below.
Audio files should be stored in the wtrxaudio directory of the volume. Files can be dragged from this view directly into a Wild Tracks Deck.
Using Samba
209
CIFS with Microsoft Windows
Mount Disk
To mount a disk over the Network with Microsoft Windows XP, open the File Explorer and select Tools > Map
Network Drive.... You will be asked to provide a drive name and folder location. Leaving the drive name as-is,
click the Browse button to the right of the Folder box.
Using the file selector window, choose the Microsoft Windows Network entry; next, locate the wtrxaudio
folder on the desired Wild Tracks SCSI device.
If you have configured Wild Tracks to require a password, you will need to provide them to gain access to the
drive.
Click OK.
Your mounted drive can then be accessed via File Explorer like any other volumes in your system, as shown
below. Audio files should be stored in the wtrxaudio directory of the volume. Files can be dragged from this
view directly into a Wild Tracks Deck.
210
Using Samba
Supported Audio File Types
The following file formats and encodings are supported for use with both AudioMove and Wild Tracks.
Microsoft WAV
Unsigned 8 bit PCM
Signed 16 bit PCM
Signed 24 bit PCM
Signed 32 bit PCM
32 bit float
64 bit double precision
u-law encoding
A-law encoding
IMA ADPCM
MS ADPCM
GSM 6.10
G721 ADPCM 32kbps
SGI/Apple AIFF/AIFC
Unsigned 8 bit PCM
Signed 8 bit PCM
Signed 16 bit PCM
Signed 24 bit PCM
Signed 32 bit PCM
32 bit float
64 bit double precision
u-law encoding
A-law encoding
GSM 6.10
12 bit DWVW
16 bit DWVW
24 bit DWVW
Sun/DEC/NeXT AU/SND
Signed 8 bit PCM
Signed 16 bit PCM
Signed 24 bit PCM
Signed 32 bit PCM
32 bit float
64 bit double precision
u-law encoding
A-law encoding
Using Samba
211
G721 ADPCM 32kbps
G723 ADPCM 24kbps
G723 ADPCM 40kbps
Header-less RAW
Unsigned 8 bit PCM
Signed 8 bit PCM
Signed 16 bit PCM
Signed 24 bit PCM
Signed 32 bit PCM
32 bit float
64 bit double precision
u-law encoding
A-law encoding
GSM 6.10
12 bit DWVW
16 bit DWVW
24 bit DWVW
Ok Dialogic ADPCM
Paris Audio File PAF
Signed 8 bit PCM
Signed 16 bit PCM
Signed 24 bit PCM
Commodore Amiga IFF/SVX
Signed 8 bit PCM
Signed 16 bit PCM
Sphere Nist WAV
Signed 8 bit PCM
Signed 16 bit PCM
Signed 24 bit PCM
Signed 32 bit PCM
u-law encoding
A-law encoding
IRCAM SF
Signed 16 bit PCM
Signed 24 bit PCM
Signed 32 bit PCM
32 bit float
u-law encoding
A-law encoding
Creative VOC
Unsigned 8 bit PCM
Signed 16 bit PCM
u-law encoding
A-law encoding
Soundforge W64
Unsigned 8 bit PCM
Signed 16 bit PCM
Signed 24 bit PCM
212
Using Samba
Signed 32 bit PCM
32 bit float
64 bit double precision
u-law encoding
A-law encoding
IMA ADPCM
MS ADPCM
GSM 6.10
GNU Octave 2.0 MATLB 4.2
Signed 16 bit PCM
Signed 32 bit PCM
32 bit float
64 bit double precision
GNU Octave 2.1 MATLAB 5.0
Unsigned 8 bit PCM
Signed 16 bit PCM
Signed 32 bit PCM
32 bit float
64 bit double precision
Portable Voice Format PVF
Signed 8 bit PCM
Signed 16 bit PCM
Signed 32 bit PCM
Fasttracker2
8 bit DPCM
16 bit DPCM
HMM Tool Kit HTK
Signed 16 bit PCM
Apple CAF
Signed 8 bit PCM
Signed 16 bit PCM
Signed 24 bit PCM
Signed 32 bit PCM
32 bit float
64 bit double precision
u-law encoding
A-law encoding
Using Samba
213
214
Using Samba
Capture Window Advanced Mode
Advanced Mode Overview 215
Advanced Mode Example 216
Advanced Mode Overview
If the basic cue capturing options do not provide what you need, there are additional Advanced Mode options that
will give you detailed control over how the capturing process works.
Advanced Mode is only enabled for the Capture Differences and Update Subcues modes. These controls will only
affect the capture process if they are visible when the capture operation is executed. Advanced mode controls operate
as follows:
Replace Mode/Amend Mode
These buttons provide shortcuts to the most commonly used settings. When the Capture window is opened, Amend
Mode is selected by default.
– Replace Mode: Sets Capture-Operator to New Control Points Only, and sets Capture-Precedence to New
Values Preferred.
– Amend Mode: Sets Capture-Operator to Union, and sets Capture-Precedence to New Values Preferred.
Capture-Operator and Capture-Precedence Boxes and the Venn Diagram
These boxes specify how the newly-captured data should be combined with the data that is already present data
inside subcues during Capture Differences and Update Subcues operations. These controls are not relevant during
Capture New operations and are therefore disabled when Capture New (F3 or F4) is selected.
In the following description, we deal with two sets of control point addresses:
– The first set, which we will refer to as the NEW set, is the set specified by the Subcue Type definition, the currentlyselected Channel Selects, etc. In other words it is the set of control point addresses values which are to be captured
from the current state of the system. The NEW set is represented in the Venn Diagram by the red circle on the
left.
– The second set, which we will refer to as the OLD set, is the set of control point addresses that are already present
in the pre-existing subcue. This set may be equivalent to the NEW set, or it might not be (the sets could be different
if, for example, the OLD set was captured while a different set of Channel Selects was active than are currently
active during this Capture operation.)
The Capture-Operator box (the second box, just below the Channel-Select-Operator box) specifies which control
point addresses should end up in the resulting subcue. It has four possible states:
– New Control Points Only which entirely discards the OLD set of control point addresses and replaces them with
the control point addresses from the NEW set. This is the logic used when Advanced Mode is not active.
– Intersection which retains only those control point addresses that are present in both the OLD and NEW sets.
Control point addresses appearing in only one of the two sets will not be present in the resulting subcue.
– Union retains the control point addresses that exist in the OLD set and adds the control point addresses from the
NEW set.
– Old Control Points Only replaces the existing OLD set of control point addresses with the corresponding NEW
set, discarding all NEW control point addresses that were not already present in OLD set.
The Capture-Precedence box (the third box, just below the Capture-Operator box) specifies what should happen
when the NEW set and the OLD set both specify the same control point address. In this (common) case of “overlapping
sets” we have a decision to make: we have a single control point address and two values that correspond to it (the
old value in the existing subcue and the new value that we just captured). Since a subcue can only hold one value
Capture Window Advanced Mode
215
per control point address we have to decide which of these two values to keep, and which to throw away. The
Capture-Precedence box has the following possible states:
– New Values Preferred replaces the existing value with the corresponding NEW value. This is the most
commonly used setting and is the logic used when Advanced Mode is not active.
– Old Values Preferred retains the OLD set’s value, discarding the NEW value. This mode is useful if you want
to “fill in” additional control point addresses in your subcue without changing any of the subcue’s existing
values.
– New Values Always is especially interesting, because it affects not only how value-conflicts are resolved,
but also which control point addresses are captured. In this mode every specified control point address will
be updated with a newly-captured value including control point addresses that are only part of the OLD set(!)
Advanced Mode Example
Because the various modes specified by Capture Operator and Capture Precedence are often hard to understand
by description alone, we present an example update-subcue scenario and the results you would get from the
operation with each possible combination of Capture-Operator and Capture-Precedence settings.
For this example, we will look at just a single very simple subcue type: Input Mute.
Let’s assume our pre-existing cue contains an Input Mute subcue, and this subcue contains the following data:
(Input 1–6 Mute = false)
For convenience, I introduce a convention of expressing the mute values graphically, like this:
OLD: [ffffff..] (i.e. the subcue specifies input mutes 1–6 as false and does not contain mutes 7–8)
Now let’s say we’ve used the Channel Select feature to specify that we want to capture Input Mutes 3–8 only,
and that all the system’s Input Mutes are active (muted) at the time we do the capture. Our newly captured data
set would look like this:
(Input 3–8 Mute = true)
or graphically:
NEW: [..TTTTTT] (i.e. captured data specifies mutes 3–8 as true, and does not contain mutes 1–2)
Since Capture-Operator has four possible states and Capture-Precedence has three possible states, a total of
twelve operations is possible. Each combination and its resulting subcue data is shown below:
New Control Points Only
[Operator = “New Control Points Only”] [Precedence=“New Values Preferred”]
Set
Value
Interpretation
OLD
[ffffff..]
(Input 1–6 Mute = false)
NEW
[..TTTTTT]
(Input 3–8 Mute = true)
RESULT
[..TTTTTT]
(Input 3–8 Mute = true)
1
[Operator = “New Control Points Only”] [Precedence=“Old Values Preferred”]
Set
Value
Interpretation
OLD
[ffffff..]
(Input 1–6 Mute = false)
NEW
[..TTTTTT]
(Input 3–8 Mute = true)
RESULT
[..ffffTT]
(Input 3–6 Mute = false; Input 7–8 Mute = true)
[Operator = “New Control Points Only”] [Precedence=“New Values Always”]
216
Capture Window Advanced Mode
Set
Value
Interpretation
OLD
[ffffff..]
(Input 1–6 Mute = false)
NEW
[..TTTTTT]
(Input 3–8 Mute = true)
RESULT
[..TTTTTT]
(Input 3–8 Mute = true)
1
1
Note: these two modes are equivalent.
Intersection
[Operator = “Intersection”] [Precedence=“New Values Preferred”]
Set
Value
Interpretation
OLD
[ffffff..]
(Input 1–6 Mute = false)
NEW
[..TTTTTT]
(Input 3–8 Mute = true)
RESULT
[..TTTT..]
(Input 3–6 Mute = true)
2
[Operator = “Intersection”] [Precedence=“Old Values Preferred”]
Set
Value
Interpretation
OLD
[ffffff..]
(Input 1–6 Mute = false)
NEW
[..TTTTTT]
(Input 3–8 Mute = true)
RESULT
[..ffff..]
(Input 3–6 Mute = false)
[Operator = “Intersection”] [Precedence=“New Values Always”]
Set
Value
Interpretation
OLD
[ffffff..]
(Input 1–6 Mute = false)
NEW
[..TTTTTT]
(Input 3–8 Mute = true)
RESULT
[..TTTT..]
(Input 3–6 Mute = true)
2
2
Note: these two modes are equivalent.
Union
[Operator = “Union”] [Precedence=“New Values Preferred”]
Set
Value
Interpretation
OLD
[ffffff..]
(Input 1–6 Mute = false)
NEW
[..TTTTTT]
(Input 3–8 Mute = true)
RESULT
[ffTTTTTT]
(Input 1–2 Mute = false; Input 3–8 Mute = true)
[Operator = “Union”] [Precedence=“Old Values Preferred”]
Set
Value
Interpretation
OLD
[ffffff..]
(Input 1–6 Mute = false)
NEW
[..TTTTTT]
(Input 3–8 Mute = true)
RESULT
[ffffffTT]
(Input 1–6 Mute = false; Input 7–8 Mute = true)
[Operator = “Union”] [Precedence=“New Values Always”]
Capture Window Advanced Mode
217
Set
Value
Interpretation
OLD
[ffffff..]
(Input 1–6 Mute = false)
NEW
[..TTTTTT]
(Input 3–8 Mute = true)
RESULT
[TTTTTTTT]
(Input 1–8 Mute = true)
Old Control Points Only
[Operator = “Old Control Points Only”] [Precedence=“New Values Preferred”]
Set
Value
Interpretation
OLD
[ffffff..]
(Input 1–6 Mute = false)
NEW
[..TTTTTT]
(Input 3–8 Mute = true)
RESULT
[ffTTTT..]
(Input 1–2 Mute = false; Input 3–6 Mute = true)
[Operator = “Old Control Points Only”] [Precedence=“Old Values Preferred”]
Set
Value
Interpretation
OLD
[ffffff..]
(Input 1–6 Mute = false)
NEW
[..TTTTTT]
(Input 3–8 Mute = true)
RESULT
[ffffff..]
(Input 1–6 Mute = false)
3
[Operator = “Old Control Points Only”] [Precedence=“New Values Always”]
Set
Value
Interpretation
OLD
[ffffff..]
(Input 1–6 Mute = false)
NEW
[..TTTTTT]
(Input 3–8 Mute = true)
RESULT
[TTTTTT..]
(Input 1–6 Mute = true)
3
This mode is useless, since it doesn’t actually change anything! For that reason, this mode is disabled in the
Capture Window.
218
Capture Window Advanced Mode
CueStation 4 Default Hotkey Assignments
Here is a complete list of the default hotkey assignments in CueStation 4.
F1: Summon Capture Window (Update Subcue Mode)
F2: Summon Capture Window (Capture Differences Mode)
F3: Summon Capture Window (Capture New Mode)
F4: Summon Capture Window (Capture New into Cue List Mode)
F5: Page Up (Mixer Windows)
F6: Page Down (Mixer Windows)
F7: Page Left (Mixer Windows)
SpaceMaps > Previous Bus (SpaceMap Window)
F8: Page Right (Mixer Windows)
SpaceMaps > Next Bus (SpaceMap Window)
F9: Move Flip Row Up (Inputs Window)
F10: Move Flip Row Down (Inputs Window)
F11: Switch to Previous Window
F12: Switch to Next Window
Control+A: Edit > Select All
Control+B: Projects > Backup
Control+C: Edit > Copy
Control+D: Edit > Duplicate
Control+E: Files > Export Selected Files (SupportFilesWindow)
Control+F: Edit > Select...
Control+G: Cue Entries > Stab Time Code (CueListWindow)
Configuration > Send Configuration to Frames (MixerConfigWindow)
Control+H: Windows > Hide All Windows
Control+I: Subcue Entries > Capture Differences (CueLibraryWindow)
Subcue Entries > Capture Differences (CueListWindow) SpaceMaps > Insert Image (SpaceMapWindow) Access
Policies > Invoke Selected Access Policies (AccessPoliciesWindow) Files > Import Selected Files (SupportFilesWindow)
Control+J: Display > Show Waits (MatrixWindow)
SpaceMaps > Lock Trajectory (SpaceMapWindow)
Control+K: Display > Show Fades (MatrixWindow)
Configuration > Send Configuration to Frames (MixerConfigWindow)
Control+L: Display > Show Levels (MatrixWindow)
Display > Lock SpaceMap (SpaceMapWindow) Log > Add Comment Line (LogWindow)
Control+M: Windows > Maximize Window
Control+N: Edit > New
Control+O: Projects > Open...
Control+P: Mixer > Pause Fades
Control+Q: Network > Quit
CueStation 4 Default Hotkey Assignments
219
Control+R: Subcue Entries > Recall Subcue Entry (CueLibraryWindow)
Subcue Entries > Recall Subcue Entry (CueListWindow) Subcues > Recall Subcue (SubcueLibraryWindow)
SpaceMaps > Recall Trajectory (SpaceMapWindow) Access Policies > Rescind Selected Access Policies
(AccessPoliciesWindow)
Control+S: Projects > Save
Control+T: Subcue Entries > Instant Recall Subcue Entry (CueLibraryWindow)
Subcue Entries > Instant Recall Subcue Entry (CueListWindow) Subcues > Instant Recall Subcue (SubcueLibraryWindow) SpaceMaps > Insert Triset (SpaceMapWindow)
Control+U: Subcue Entries > Update Subcues (CueLibraryWindow)
Subcue Entries > Update Subcues (CueListWindow)
Control+V: Edit > Paste
Control+W: Windows > Close Window
Control+X: Edit > Cut
Control+Y: Edit > Redo
Control+Z: Edit > Undo
Control+0: Windows > Virtual Groups
Control+1: Windows > System Level
Control+2: Windows > Inputs
Control+3: Windows > Input Processing
Control+4: Windows > Bus Masters
Control+5: Windows > Matrix
Control+6: Windows > Output Masters
Control+7: Windows > Output Processing
Control+8: Windows > Aux Masters
Control+9: Windows > Aux Processing
Control+[: SpaceMaps > Zoom Out (SpaceMapWindow)
Display > Track Display Height > Make Bars Shorter (WildTracksWindow)
Control+]: SpaceMaps > Zoom In (SpaceMapWindow)
Display > Track Display Height > Make Bars Taller (WildTracksWindow)
Control+-: Layout > Open Layout... (7/22/2005)
Control+=: SpaceMaps > Reset Zoom (SpaceMapWindow)
Display > Track Display Height > Reset to Default Bar Height (WildTracksWindow)
Control+: Mixer > Cancel Trajectories
Control+;: Mixer > Finish Fades
Control+': Edit > Disable
Control+,: Edit > Enable
Control+.: SpaceMaps > Halt Playback (SpaceMapWindow)
Control+/: Mixer > Cancel Fades
Control+`:
Control+Delete: Edit > Delete
Control+F1:
Control+F2:
Control+F3:
Control+F4:
Control+F5:
Control+F6:
Control+F7:
220
CueStation 4 Default Hotkey Assignments
Control+F8:
Control+F9:
Control+F10:
Control+F11:
Control+F12:
Alt+A:
Alt+B:
Alt+C:
Alt+D:
Alt+E:
Alt+F:
Alt+G:
Alt+H:
Alt+I:
Alt+J:
Alt+K:
Alt+L:
Alt+M:
Alt+N:
Alt+O:
Alt+P:
Alt+Q:
Alt+R:
Alt+S:
Alt+T:
Alt+U:
Alt+V:
Alt+W:
Alt+X:
Alt+Y:
Alt+Z:
Alt+0: Windows > Log
Alt+1: Windows > Subcue Library
Alt+2: Windows > Cue Library
Alt+3: Windows > Cue List
Alt+4: Windows > Capture
Alt+5: Windows > SpaceMap
Alt+6: Windows > Transport
Alt+7: Windows > Frame Control
Alt+8: Windows > System Status
Alt+9: Windows > Chat
Alt+-:
Alt+=:
Alt+[:
Alt+]:
Alt+:
CueStation 4 Default Hotkey Assignments
221
Alt+;:
Alt+':
Alt+,:
Alt+.:
Alt+/:
Alt+`:
Alt+Delete:
Alt+F1:
Alt+F2:
Alt+F3:
Alt+F4:
Alt+F5: Step Up (Mixer Windows)
Alt+F6: Step Down (Mixer Windows)
Alt+F7: Step Left (Mixer Windows)
Alt+F8: Step Right (Mixer Windows)
Alt+F9:
Alt+F10:
Alt+F11:
Alt+F12:
Control+Shift+A:
Control+Shift+B:
Control+Shift+C:
Control+Shift+D: Cues > Duplicate Cue (CueLibraryWindow)
Cue Entries > Duplicate Cue Entry (CueListWindow)
Control+Shift+E:
Control+Shift+F:
Control+Shift+G:
Control+Shift+H:
Control+Shift+I:
Control+Shift+J:
Control+Shift+K:
Control+Shift+L:
Control+Shift+M: Windows > Zoom Window
Control+Shift+N: Cues > New Cue (CueLibraryWindow)
Cue Entries > New Cue Entry (CueListWindow)
Control+Shift+O:
Control+Shift+P: Mixer > Resume Fades
Control+Shift+Q:
Control+Shift+R: Cues > Recall Cue (CueLibraryWindow)
Cue Entries > Recall Cue Entry (CueListWindow) Access Policies > Reset Selected Policies (AccessPolicesWindow)
Control+Shift+S: Projects > Save As...
Control+Shift+T: Cues > Instant Recall Cue (CueLibraryWindow)
Cue Entries > Instant Recall Cue Entry (CueListWindow)
Control+Shift+U:
Control+Shift+V:
222
CueStation 4 Default Hotkey Assignments
Control+Shift+W:
Control+Shift+X:
Control+Shift+Y:
Control+Shift+Z:
Control+Shift+0:
Control+Shift+1:
Control+Shift+2:
Control+Shift+3:
Control+Shift+4:
Control+Shift+5:
Control+Shift+6:
Control+Shift+7:
Control+Shift+8:
Control+Shift+9:
Control+Shift+-: Layout > Open More Layout...
Control+Shift+=:
Control+Shift+[:
Control+Shift+]:
Control+Shift+:
Control+Shift+;:
Control+Shift+':
Control+Shift+,:
Control+Shift+.:
Control+Shift+/: Mixer > Clear Scheduler
Control+Shift+`:
Control+Shift+Delete: Cues > Delete Cue (CueLibraryWindow)
Cue Entries > Delete Cue Entry (CueListWindow)
Control+Shift+F1:
Control+Shift+F2:
Control+Shift+F3:
Control+Shift+F4:
Control+Shift+F5:
Control+Shift+F6:
Control+Shift+F7:
Control+Shift+F8:
Control+Shift+F9:
Control+Shift+F10:
Control+Shift+F11:
Control+Shift+F12:
Alt+Control+Shift+A:
Alt+Control+Shift+B:
Alt+Control+Shift+C:
Alt+Control+Shift+D:
Alt+Control+Shift+E:
Alt+Control+Shift+F:
Alt+Control+Shift+G:
CueStation 4 Default Hotkey Assignments
223
Alt+Control+Shift+H:
Alt+Control+Shift+I:
Alt+Control+Shift+J:
Alt+Control+Shift+K:
Alt+Control+Shift+L:
Alt+Control+Shift+M:
Alt+Control+Shift+N:
Alt+Control+Shift+O:
Alt+Control+Shift+P:
Alt+Control+Shift+Q:
Alt+Control+Shift+R:
Alt+Control+Shift+S: Mixer > Silence!
Alt+Control+Shift+T: Mixer > Track From Top
Alt+Control+Shift+U:
Alt+Control+Shift+V:
Alt+Control+Shift+W:
Alt+Control+Shift+X:
Alt+Control+Shift+Y:
Alt+Control+Shift+Z:
Alt+Control+Shift+0:
Alt+Control+Shift+1:
Alt+Control+Shift+2:
Alt+Control+Shift+3:
Alt+Control+Shift+4:
Alt+Control+Shift+5:
Alt+Control+Shift+6:
Alt+Control+Shift+7:
Alt+Control+Shift+8:
Alt+Control+Shift+9:
Alt+Control+Shift+-:
Alt+Control+Shift+=:
Alt+Control+Shift+[:
Alt+Control+Shift+]:
Alt+Control+Shift+:
Alt+Control+Shift+;:
Alt+Control+Shift+':
Alt+Control+Shift+,:
Alt+Control+Shift+.:
Alt+Control+Shift+/:
Alt+Control+Shift+`:
Alt+Control+Shift+Delete:
Alt+Control+Shift+F1:
Alt+Control+Shift+F2:
Alt+Control+Shift+F3:
Alt+Control+Shift+F4:
Alt+Control+Shift+F5:
224
CueStation 4 Default Hotkey Assignments
Alt+Control+Shift+F6:
Alt+Control+Shift+F7:
Alt+Control+Shift+F8:
Alt+Control+Shift+F9:
Alt+Control+Shift+F10:
Alt+Control+Shift+F11:
Alt+Control+Shift+F12:
Alt+Control+A:
Alt+Control+B:
Alt+Control+C:
Alt+Control+D:
Alt+Control+E:
Alt+Control+F:
Alt+Control+G:
Alt+Control+H:
Alt+Control+I:
Alt+Control+J:
Alt+Control+K:
Alt+Control+L:
Alt+Control+M:
Alt+Control+N:
Alt+Control+O:
Alt+Control+P:
Alt+Control+Q:
Alt+Control+R:
Alt+Control+S:
Alt+Control+T:
Alt+Control+U:
Alt+Control+V:
Alt+Control+W:
Alt+Control+X:
Alt+Control+Y:
Alt+Control+Z:
Alt+Control+0: Windows > Mixer Configuration
Alt+Control+1: Windows > Input Meters
Alt+Control+2: Windows > Output Meters
Alt+Control+3: Windows > Aux Meters
Alt+Control+4: Windows > Wild Tracks
Alt+Control+5: Windows > VRAS
Alt+Control+6: Windows > Support Files
Alt+Control+7: Windows > Script Execution
Alt+Control+8: Windows > Key Mappings
Alt+Control+9: Windows > Project Notes
Alt+Control+-: Windows > Access Policies
Alt+Control+=:
Alt+Control+[:
CueStation 4 Default Hotkey Assignments
225
Alt+Control+]:
Alt+Control+:
Alt+Control+;:
Alt+Control+':
Alt+Control+,:
Alt+Control+.:
Alt+Control+/:
Alt+Control+`:
Alt+Control+Delete:
Alt+Control+F1:
Alt+Control+F2:
Alt+Control+F3:
Alt+Control+F4:
Alt+Control+F5:
Alt+Control+F6:
Alt+Control+F7:
Alt+Control+F8:
Alt+Control+F9:
Alt+Control+F10:
Alt+Control+F11:
Alt+Control+F12:
226
CueStation 4 Default Hotkey Assignments
Glossary
ALC
Automatic Level Control, a system that automatically adjusts the gain to maintain a relatively constant level of
sound output.
archive
operating system
A method of packing many files into a single file, in preparation for a file transfer.
AutoFollow
CueStation
A method to trigger cues in sequence, without user intervention. When a cue is triggered, its AutoFollow entry
is triggered at the same time (or after a specified wait period). AutoFollow wait times are cumulative, but the
wait times for the cues they reference are not cumulative.
automation
The process whereby system settings may be stored and retrieved, with automatic interpolation between successive value where appropriate.
automation solo
An operation mode that allows a selected channel or channels to be automation-enabled while non-selected
channels are not.
Aux
Short for “auxiliary send.” A signal bus that allows routing directly from the Input Console to an output, without
passing through the Matrix section of the mix architecture.
bandwidth
network
The data-carrying capacity of a network connection.
boot
Matrix3, workstation
To start-up an electronic device. When a device boots, it loads its basic operating software, usually checks its
component status, and then loads an advanced operating system or other software.
bundle
CobraNet
The basic data unit used by CobraNet. Up to eight audio channels may be carried in a bundle, and bundles may
be addressed to a specific device, or to all devices.
bus assigns
Control points used to direct input signals to particular buses of the matrix. Designed to emulate a set of on-off
push buttons in the Inputs window.
capture
CueStation
A command that retrieves the current values of control points and saves them into a set of subcues.
CD-ROM
workstation
Compact Disc Read-Only Memory. A computer file storage device, and the compact disc media that it uses.
channel
An audio signal path, or more generally any signal path.
Glossary
227
client
network, workstation
See client-server.
client-server
network
Describes a relationship between computer applications, in which one program (the client) makes service
requests to another program (the server), which fulfills the request. As used by CueStation, the client-server
communications model allows several automation programmers to work simultaneously on a single project.
CobraNet
Matrix3, network
A data protocol that permits real-time distribution of uncompressed, multi-channel digital audio signal over
an Ethernet network.
context menu
operating system
A menu that contains appropriate commands for an object or item that has been right-clicked. Often quicker
than using the menu bar.
control point
Any parameter value that may be varied by either manual or automation control.
control surface
A hardware interface that allows direct manipulation of control parameters by means of multiple physical
controls such as faders and knobs, used in lieu of mouse and keyboard data entry.
cue
A data structure, or “bundle” of control data that is used to store and recall the state of the mixer, and which
also may contain commands to control external devices.
cueconsole
A modular control surface for the Matrix3 system.
cuelibserver
The server software that mediates between the CueStation application and its family of Helper Applications.
CueMixer
A small hardware control surface for the Matrix3 system, with eight motorized faders and 32 buttons. Model
RIF-108
cue-on-deck
The next cue in a cue list, in position to be triggered by the next “GO” command.
CueStation
The principal programming software for the Matrix3 system.
debugger
A system tool used to troubleshoot software.
derived node
SpaceMap
A special type of node.
dialog
operating system
A pop-up window that requests information or confirmation before finishing a command. The Save As window
is an example.
directory
operating system
A special kind of file, which is used to organize other files. Its useful to imagine directories as file folders,
capable of holding files and other directories.
228
Glossary
DSP
Matrix3
Digital Signal Processor. The heart and soul of the Matrix3, the DSP performs complex math transformations
on digital data in real-time.
dynamic
Having the ability to change over time.
embedded automation
A control system that is built into a device, so that it does not require external control from another device.
EQ
Equalization. Frequency-dependent gain control of an audio signal, allowing the shaping of the audio
spectrum.
Ethernet
network
A local-area network protocol that uses a bus (one device connected to the next, connected to the next,
and so on) or star (all devices connected to a hub or switch) topology.
external devices
Any devices that are not an integral part of a Matrix3 system but which may be interfaced to it as part of a
show control system.
Externals subcue
A subcue type that contains commands to control devices outside of the basic mix architecture. The controlled
devices may be entirely external devices, or they may be Matrix3 options such as Wild Tracks.
Fade time
The length of time that it takes a fader, pan, or matrix crosspoint to change continuously from one programmed
value to the next in a sequence of cues.
fire
CueStation
To trigger a cue manually, either by pressing the Go button, or by double-clicking a cue.
firmware
Matrix3
Programs or data written to read-only memory, and which are used by the operating system.
flash memory
Matrix3
A special type of read-only memory, which can be completely erased and reprogrammed.
folder
operating system
A file directory; usually used when referring to file system management through the graphic interface.
frame
Matrix3
An LX-300 rack-mount enclosure, the basic hardware building block of a Matrix3 system. Each LX-300 frame
may contain a variety of plug-in modules for audio I/O, communications, audio playback, etc.
FTP
operating system
File Transfer Protocol. A communications protocol for sending files over TCP/IP.
gain
A measure of the difference in signal level induced by a level control point.
Glossary
229
gateway
network
A combination of hardware and software that acts as an intermediary between two different networks, performing data and protocol translation, and other functions.
Helper Apps
CueStation
Applications that work in conjunction with the core CueStation program to provide additional automation
programming functionality.
host computer
network, workstation
A computer that is accessed through a network connection, by a user working at a remote system. The host
computer generally acts as the server.
hub-based network
network
The hub provides a common connection point for devices in the network. The hub sends incoming data to
all connected devices; the devices are responsible for determining whether the data should be accepted.
import
To access a file that was not created by the application you are currently using.
IP address
network
An identifier for a device on a TCP/IP network. The IP address is rather like a telephone number or street
address: it identifies the sender or recipient for a data package.
isolate
A control mode which allows a selected channel to be removed from automation control.
L-C-R
Left–Center–Right, describing speaker positions.
legacy application
A software application that is a relic of an earlier stage of computer software evolution.
LFE
Low frequency effects. Strictly speaking, a supplementary subwoofer channel that supplements a number
of full-range channels in a surround sound system. Derives from cinema sound practice.
linked cues
Cues in a cue list that form a timed sequence, with one cue automatically recalling the next in the list.
link
SpaceMap
To connect a virtual or derived node, and its associated speaker nodes, so that signal can be distributed
to/from the nodes.
local-area network
network
A network that covers a relatively small area (a single building or just a few buildings).
loop-back
network
Data communication in which the receiving device sends the data back to the transmitting device. Mainly
used in troubleshooting.
Matrix
A fader/patch control that allows any number of buses to be assigned to any number of outputs.
meta-controller
A controller of controllers. A “super controller.”
230
Glossary
MIDI
Musical Instrument Digital Interface. A serial protocol used for controlling a variety of equipment, most particularly including synthesizers and other musical devices, but also extended to the control of audio, video,
lighting, and other equipment.
mult
Short for “multiple.” A means of splitting one signal into several parallel branches or “legs.”
multed
Short for “multiplied.” Refers to a signal that has been split into parallel branches by the use of a “mult.”
multicast
network
Data communication between a single transmitting device, and multiple receiving devices.
multitasking
operating system
To do more than one thing at a time. When a computer multitasks, it switches between programs so rapidly
that it seems all of them are running at the same time.
mute
To shut off a signal at a particular point in the signal path. Used as both a noun and a verb.
network
network
A group of two or more interconnected computers. See also: local-area network, hub-based network, switchbased network.
forum
network
An on-line discussion forum available through the Internet. Requires the use of a browser.
node
One of the points that define a the geometry of a SpaceMap. Nodes may represent loudspeaker positions,
groups of speakers, or points of silence.
on-line
network
You are on-line when you are connected to a data network.
off-line
network
You are off-line when you are not connected to a data network.
parameter
One of the individual elements that define the state of a system.
parent cue
A term sometimes used when describing the relationship between subcues and the cues that contain them
(the cue is the parent of the subcues, the subcues are the children of the cue, and the subcues are siblings
to each other).
passband
A frequency region of signal that is acted upon by a band-pass filter.
PDF
operating system
Portable Document Format, a standard file format for sharing documents between computers. The files are
viewable using Adobe Acrobat Reader. There are alternative viewers available: for BeOS, use BePDF.
ping
operating system
Packet Internet Groper, a utility used to determine if a given IP address is accessible over a network.
Glossary
231
port
A place of access to a system, typically that input or output connector where digital data cables are attached
to connect pieces of equipment.
protocol
network
A standard that determines the format for sharing data between devices. Protocols generally determine the
data type, error correction, compression technique, and acknowledgment signals that the devices will use.
proxy server
network
A server that acts as an intermediary between clients and a real server. If the proxy can fulfill a server request,
it does; if it can not, it passes the request on to the real server. See client-server.
real-time
Matrix3
A system which responds to changes immediately, without interruption or pause.
recall
To retrieve the data stored in a cue or subcue and to set system parameters to those stored values.
receiver
CobraNet
A device which is accepting CobraNet data.
reverse-engineering
Simulation of the performance of a piece of equipment or a software application without benefit of the original
schematics or code specification.
roll-back
To restore a former, working set of files.
server
network, workstation
See client-server.
shortcut
operating system
Keyboard equivalent to a mouse command.
signal path
The route a particular signal takes through the mixer architecture. In conventional analog mixers the signal
path follows physical audio circuit connections, but in a digital mixer the signal path is modeled mathematically.
SMPTE
Society of Motion and Television Engineers: a reference standards organization. Sometimes used as
shorthand for “SMPTE Time Code.”
SpaceMap
A graphic programming interface for the CueStation matrix, using a visual “map” of the loudspeaker layout
and allowing recording and playback of moving sound trajectories.
spatial pan control
SpaceMap
A two-dimensional pan control. In traditional consoles, the pan control is one-dimensional: it scales along
a line between two points (left-right, up-down, front-back). The spatial pan control scales along an area between three points. From an audience perspective, spatial pan control gives a three dimensional sound effect.
stack crawl
Part of the output of the debugger. It looks indecipherable, but our programmers can make sense of it.
232
Glossary
subcue
A data structure, or “bundle” of control data that is used to store and recall the state of one subsystem of
the mixer, and which also may contain commands to control external devices.
subcue librarian
A CueStation Helper Application used to organize subcues of various types, and to mediate between the
various Subcue Editors and CueStation.
switch-based network
network
The switch (a form of hub) provides a common connection point for devices in the network. The switch sends
incoming data to the device it is addressed to. This reduces the amount of data being transferred over the
network, making better use of its bandwidth.
TCP/IP
network
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol. A set of communications protocols used to connect devices
over a network.
telnet
network
A terminal emulation program for use on TCP/IP-based networks. Provides a command-line interface to a
server.
Terminal
operating system
Provides a command-line interface to BeOS. Used to issue some esoteric commands which have no
graphical equivalent.
ToolTips
operating system
Pop-up help that appears when you hover your mouse cursor over certain controls.
topology
network
The layout of a network: common topologies include bus topology, in which the devices are connected oneafter-another; ring topology, in which the devices are connected one-after-another, with the last computer
linked back to the first; and star topology, where the devices are connected directly to a hub device.
transmitter
CobraNet
A device which is sending CobraNet data.
trajectory
SpaceMap
The path which the spatial pan control will follow through the SpaceMap.
trigger
To activate by means of a command. Often used synonymously with “recall.”
trim
A signal level control point that may be manually regulate and cannot be automated. Used as a manual
override or scaling control for the automation system.
triset
SpaceMap
A triplet of nodes. Each node will receive a proportion of the input bus signal, as distributed by the spatial
pan control. The closer the spatial pan control is to a node, the greater the proportion of signal received by
that node.
Glossary
233
unity, unity-gain, unity-level
Used to refer to a control point value that does not alter the signal level passing through it.
unlink
SpaceMap
To disconnect the signal distribution path between a virtual or derived node, and its associated speaker
nodes.
unmount
operating system
To (virtually) disconnect a file storage device from the system. See also mount, volume.
vamping
Repeating a musical phrase for an unspecified length of time, typically while waiting for a performer to
complete an improvisation.
VFader
See Virtual Group Fader.
VGroups
Virtual Groups. Sets of control points that may be controlled as a group by assigning them to a Virtual Group
Fader.
Virtual Group Fader
A CueStation fader that can simultaneously control several parameters that have been assigned to it.
volume
operating system
A file storage device. Typical volumes include hard drives, CD-ROM drives and floppy drives. By default,
only the BeOS boot hard drive is directly accessible by the user. To access other volumes, they must first
be mounted. Note: with floppy drives, you must unmount the floppy when you eject it, and mount it when
you insert it. BeOS will not automatically detect a floppy disk change. See also mount, unmount.
VRAS
Variable Room Acoustics System. Specialized hardware developed by LCS to
Wait time
The time interval between the moment a cue or subcue is recalled and the moment an individual control
point begins its automated movement.
Wild Tracks
The integrated hard disk playback option for the LX-300 mixer, allowing independent instant-start playback
of up to 16 tracks per Wild Tracks module.
workspace
operating system
Workspaces are multiple virtual monitors. You move between workspaces using Alt+F1 through Alt+F9,. If
you click on an application title bar while doing this, the application will be moved to the new workspace.
workstation
network
A computer connected to a local-area network. Except for the host computer, workstations generally act as
the client in a client-server relationship.
zip
operating system
A nickname for archive, a method of packing many files into a single meta-file.
234
Glossary
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