Low-level, Audio Frequency Conducted Emission Measurements

Low-level, Audio Frequency Conducted Emission Measurements
EMC
Low-level,
Audio Frequency
Conducted Emission
Measurements
Motivation and Method
BY KEN JAVOR
Control of low audio frequency magnetic fields from cables,
as required by some spacecraft EMI control standards, is
best implemented as a conducted emission measurement,
but these may require exceptionally efficient transducers
and techniques, which are discussed herein.
cleanliness requirement. Such platforms carry sensitive
magnetometers. A sample derivation of such a limit is
presented.
ommon-mode conducted emission (CMCE) limits
and measurements are often specified within
spacecraft EMI standards, such as the Space & Missile
Command’s SMC-S-008, EMC Requirements for Space
Equipment and Systems [1], and the NASA Goddard Space
Flight Center’s General Environmental Verification Standard
(GEVS) [2].
Consider the variable-mu magnetometer pictured in Figure 1.
While this is earthbound test equipment, it will be shown
that its sensitivity corresponds well with existing CMCE
requirements in references [1] and [2].
C
BACKGROUND
Above audio frequencies, the rationale for such control is
generally either the control of cable-to-cable crosstalk, and/
or indirect control of radiated emissions. Such control and
measurement is much more accurate and repeatable than
radiated measurements when the cable is electrically short.
At audio frequencies, effective cable design usually
precludes interference from crosstalk. There is no need to
control CMCE at audio frequencies unless an unusually lowlevel signal is carried by a cable, and/or there are restrictions
on the quality of shielding available, or the ability to twist a
signal with its return.
But there is a special case where the control of CMCE at
frequencies down to the very low end of the audio spectrum
is desirable, and that is when a platform has a magnetic
82 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Figure 1: Electro-Mechanics Company EMCO 6640 variable-mu
magnetometer (circa 1964).
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The EMCO 6640 has 50 kHz bandwidth and 60 dep’t
wideband sensitivity. An EMI receiver connected to its analog
output can tune in narrowband signals down to 13 dBpT (13
dBpT + 10 * log (50 kHz) = 60 dBpT).
EMC
An EMCO 6640 or similar device can measure the field from
a test sample and its interconnecting cables by specifying
a distance and configuration of the test set-up and sensor.
In fact, this has been done in the 1967 vintage RE04 MILSTD-461 requirement and MIL-STD-462 test method.
Figure 2: Existing spacecraft CMCE limits.
Such a control may be valuable for an equipment housing,
but since such fields fall off with the cube of distance (at
distances where the equipment dimensions are small relative
to the separation distance), it is most likely cables will
be the culprits. Also, an optimally designed platform will
separate magnetic sensors from localized magnetic hotspots,
but it may be more difficult to separate sensors from any
and all cables. Finally, magnetic emissions from cables fall
off directly with distance (or in the case of cables above a
conductive ground plane, as the square of distance) so that
cable CMCE, although nowhere near as “hot” as a motor or
transformer, may appear so at a distance.
In order to derive a CMCE limit from a magnetic flux
density limit such as 13 dBpT, it is helpful to convert from
units of flux density to magnetic field, assuming free space
permeability.
The basic relation B = mH converts to dBpT = dBuA/m + 2
dB uH/m in log-space. Hence, 13 dBpT is 11 dBuA/m.
Figure 3: Transfer impedances of typical EMI current probes
employed in the CE01/101 frequency range.
If a cable far from ground carries a current “I” causing a
circulating magnetic field “H”, that relationship is the familiar
H = I/2pr.
Assuming a separation of one meter between cable and
sensor and converting to log-space, an H-field of 11 dBuA/m
implies a common mode current on the cable of 27 dBuA.
However, the more common situation is that the cable is near
a conductive ground plane, and if the height above ground
“s” is small relative to the observation distance “r”, then the
relationship between the common mode current and resultant
circulating magnetic field is H = I (2s)/2pr2
For a typical case where “s” is 5 cm and “r” is 1 meter, the
above equation introduces a 20 dB relaxation in the allowable
cm current, which is then 47 dBuA rather than 27 dBuA.
The ground plane is our friend! Compare this computed value
of 47 dBuA with the Figure 2 CMCE low frequency plateau
limit in the two standards cited in the Introduction.
Figure 4: Degraded noise floor of HP 8566B spectrum analyzer
below 100 Hz: about 33 dBuV at 30 Hz.
84 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
The previous derivation does not prove that the low
frequency CMCE limits shown in Figure 2 are derived from
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L ow- level, A u d io F requency Conducted Emission Measureme nt s
As this is written (late 2011), the existing GEVS CMCE
requirement applies only to power lines. However, a revision
currently in process will extend applicability to all cables.
The new revision will also relegate the requirement below
150 kHz to those platforms with a specific need for magnetic
cleanliness, with the generally applicable limit above 150
kHz being based on crosstalk control. The 30 Hz to 50
MHz SMC limit applies to all platforms and all cables, with
possible extensions to both lower and higher frequencies on a
platform-dependent basis.
Finally, before moving on to CMCE test methods, it should
be noted that another common form of such control is
through design requirements mandating balanced aboveground circuits, or single-ended circuits, with dc isolation
between signal returns and ground. This is practical at audio
frequencies where uncontrolled parasitics will not perturb
basic circuit functions.
TEST EQUIPMENT – CURRENT PROBES
A preferred technique for making audio frequency CMCE
measurements is the legacy current probe-based CE02
measurement of MIL-STD-462 (1967). However, current
probes available in most EMI test facilities (Figure 3) are not
efficient enough to measure accurately at a level 6 dB below
50 dBuA (the Honeywell 3892 being a possible candidate,
but are long obsolescent and only available if the test facility
already owns one). To assess how efficient a transducer must
be, the noise floor of the EMI receiver or spectrum analyzer
must be known. Published specifications for the Rohde &
Schwarz EMI receivers and spectrum analyzers show a noise
floor at 30 Hz above 20 dBuV. Obsolescent machines such
as the HP8566, designed to be used above 100 Hz but often
“pushed” down to 30 Hz with resultant degraded noise floor,
show even higher noise levels at 30 Hz (Figure 4). If the goal
is to accurately measure a 30 Hz signal at 50 dBuA with a
noise floor at 20 dBuV, the current probe transfer impedance
cannot be less than -24 dB Ohm. None of the current probe
transfer impedances in Figure 3 are adequate for that task.
Traditional EMI test current probes are based on ferrite
cores. Cores constructed of other available materials, similar
to laminated transformer cores, have better low frequency
response. Transfer impedances of three such commercially
available low frequency probes are shown in Figure 5.
Comparison of Figures 3 and 5 reveals that the least efficient
Pearson probe is about 20 dB more efficient than any of
the Figure 4 probes except the obsolescent and very scarce
Honeywell probe. Additionally, all the Pearson probes are
more efficient than the Honeywell model below 60 Hz.
A current probe inserts impedance into the line around
which it is clamped. Generally, the inserted impedance is the
transfer impedance divided by the turns ratio. For the special
case when a resistor shunts the probe output, the inserted
impedance is the shunt resistance divided by the square of the
turns ratio. For the three Pearson probes discussed herein, the
inserted impedances are negligible:
Model
ZT, Ω Inserted Impedance*, mΩ
3525
0.1
0.2
4688
1
20
5101
0.5
5
* Source: Pearson Electronics
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2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 85
EMC
magnetic cleanliness requirements; the actual origin of the
GEVS limit is shrouded in the mists of time. The derivation
only goes to show that such a CMCE limit can be very useful
in controlling magnetic cleanliness. The SMC limit is a
GEVS derivative: it has no separate lineage. It differs from
the GEVS limit in that it applies to the total CMCE from
a unit, as opposed to just the power interface or individual
cables. The SMC limit is measured by lifting the unit off
ground, reattaching it via a wire, and measuring the CMCE
through that wire, or alternatively by clamping a current
probe around all the cables emanating from the unit.
Low- l eve l , Au dio Freq u en c y Co n d u cted Em ission Measurem ents
EMC
Figure 5: Transfer impedances of three Pearson
Electronics wideband current probes. (Note:
These probes are designed with 50 Ohm output
impedances, and the plotted curves were made
with a 50 Ohm network analyzer. If driving a 1
Megohm oscilloscope input, the plateau is
6 dB higher than shown. Thus, the Model 4688
is time domain spec’d as a 1 V/A probe with
a lower 3 dB frequency of 600 Hz, the Model
5101 is spec’d as a 0.5 V/A probe with a lower
3 dB point at 150 Hz, and the Model 3525 is
spec’d at 0.1 V/A, with a lower 3 dB point of
6 Hz. Source: the Pearson Electronics web site
at http://pearsonelectronics.com.
TEST EQUIPMENT –
CURRENT PROBE ALTERNATIVE
For measurements on power lines or between
a unit case and ground, the transformer
method pioneered by the Solar Electronics
Company can be adapted to provide even
more efficient low-level, low frequency
measurements. If measurements on individual
cable bundles are necessary, an efficient
current probe such as those discussed
previously, is necessary. Regardless, the
transformer method may still be helpful under
certain conditions.
Figure 6: The Solar 6220-1 audio frequency coupling transformer used as a
current probe (Source: Solar Electronics catalog application note).
Figure 7: Solar 6220-1 transfer impedance using various shunt resistors on
the primary side.
86 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
The transformer method is based on Solar
Application Note AN62201, which has been
around long enough that it was adopted by the
United States Army and included in the 1971
Notice 3 to MIL-STD-462 (the “pink notice”).
The application note, found in any edition of
the Solar Electronics Catalog relies on the fact
that a current probe is a type of transformer;
therefore, a different kind of transformer
may be substituted. The connection into
the circuit, shown in Figure 6, is the same
as for MIL-STD-461 CS01 or CS101. But
instead of driving the Model 6220-1 coupling
transformer with a power amplifier, the
transformer’s primary side is connected to an
EMI receiver or spectrum analyzer. A loading
resistor shunts the primary side to reflect a
resistance into the secondary. The resulting
transfer impedance has a flat asymptotic
plateau at frequencies where the transformer’s
reactance is higher than the shunt resistance.
The principle of operation is that the
secondary, unloaded on the primary side,
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L ow- level, A u d io F requency Conducted Emission Measureme nt s
Figure 8: Transfer impedance of a step-down 60 Hz power transformer with
primary shunted by 10 Ohms
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If even better low frequency sensitivity
is needed, say if the custodians of
SMC-S-008 extend their CMCE limit
below 30 Hz, an ordinary 50 or 60 Hz
power transformer can be of assistance.
A 60 Hz 120 V transformer primary
stepping down to 25.2 volts and 2
amp load current yielded the transfer
impedance shown in Figure 8, when the
primary was loaded by 10 Ohms and the
secondary was used to carry the current.
A large increase in sensitivity is attained,
acquired at the cost of inserting almost
0.5 Ohms in series with the circuitunder-test. Of course, the possibilities
here are only limited by access to the
power transformer of choice. It should
be noted that somewhere between
1 to 10 kHz the power transformer
performance deteriorated, and at 1 Hz
the measured current waveform was
distorted. A 50 Hz transformer could
be expected to work to a slightly lower
frequency, and the upper limit issue is
not a problem because the 6220-1 or a
current probe with adequate sensitivity is
available at and above 1 kHz.
EMC
has about 1.2 mH inductance. The
reactance of that inductance, shunted
by different resistors, yields a family of
curves as shown in Figure 7. Because
of the Model 6220-1 turns ratio of
2:1 primary to secondary, the transfer
impedance plateaus in Figure 7 are equal
to one-half the shunt resistor value in
the circuit of Figure 6. [3] Given the
1.2 milliohm secondary inductance, the
highest transfer impedance available
at 30 Hz is about -13 dB Ohm. That
value is obtained with no load, which is
inadvisable since that would insert the
entire 1.2 mH inductance into the powerline impedance. That is known to cause
switched mode power supply instability.
[4] The problem can be avoided using
a 1 Ohm shunt, reflecting 0.25 Ohm
into the power-line. Transfer impedance
degrades 1 dB to -14 dB Ohm, which
is the maximum practical transfer
impedance available with this technique.
This is 8 - 12 dB better than the various
Pearson probes achieve.
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 87
Low- l eve l , Au dio Freq u en c y Co n d u cted Em ission Measurem ents
EMC
COMMON MODE MEASUREMENTS
In addition to efficient transducer factors, a key property
of a current probe to be used for making pure differential
or pure common mode measurements (measurements that
involve multiple conductors passing through its window) is
adequate rejection of the undesired mode. The Pearson probes
all provide at least 80 dB of differential mode rejection
when used to measure common mode current up to 10 kHz.
Brand new models 4688 and 5101 measured upwards of
90 dB rejection, but EMC Compliance’s well-used Model
3525 measured just over 80 dB. The cases are identical in
Figure 9: CE01 and CECM limits for GEVS and SMC-S-008
Figure 10: CM measurement on left; dm measurement on right.
88 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
construction, so hard use accounts for the difference. Figure 9
is a plot of traditional CE01 limits superimposed on the
CMCE limit of Figure 2. The dm rejection of the cm test
method must exceed the difference between the CE01 limits
and the CECM limits. The 80+ dB rejection of the Pearson
probes more than suffices, except for the most relaxed GEVS
CE01 limit. In the new GEVS, that limit is replaced by
MIL-STD-461F CE101, with a low frequency plateau of 100
dBuA. For such a standard, the cited probes are a solution to
making these sensitive cm measurements.
To achieve maximum rejection of the undesired mode with
multiple wires penetrating the window,
it is necessary that the wires be tightly
coupled to each other and centered in
the window, so that capacitive coupling
between either wire and the grounded
current probe case is nearly equal.
This is normally achieved with a split
nonconductive dowel drilled down the
center to take the two wires. It must be
long enough so that wires clearing it drape
away from the current probe body, and
its diameter is just less than the probe
window.
Using a pair of Solar 6220-1s to
implement the transformer method in lieu
of current probes, Figure 10 transforms
into Figures 11 through 13 (pages 89 and
90). An important difference between
hinged current probes and transformers
is that a current probe may be opened
and closed and wires rearranged within
it without disturbing the flow of current
to the test sample. The same is not true
for a transformer. However, because the
primary side is isolated from the current
carrying secondary, the sense in which
the primaries are connected to each other
can be changed without disturbing the
flow of current to the test sample, which
is a blessing for any device which has
to “boot” and requires significant time
to reach proper operation subsequent
to power cycling. The only difference
between Figures 12 (cm measurement)
and 13 (dm measurement) is how the
bnc-to-banana adapters interconnect.
Connections to the secondaries, shown in
Figure 10, don’t change.
For optimal rejection of the undesired
mode, it is critical that the two
transformers have exactly identical
www.incompliancemag.com
L ow- level, A u d io F requency Conducted Emission Measureme nt s
Inspection of Figure 9 reveals that 40 dB
differential mode rejection is insufficient
to yield accurate cm measurements,
because the dm limit is much more than
40 dB above the cm limit. However, the
vast majority of electronic loads do not
EMC
transfer impedances. Of course, this
criterion is unachievable in practice,
and although this technique produces
more efficiency than the use of a current
probe, the use of a single current probe
to reject the undesired mode will always
be superior. Undesired mode rejection
is enhanced by using shunt resistors of
lower resistance than the reactance of the
transformers at the desired frequency. In
this investigation, each transformer was
shunted by 0.47 Ohms, for a net shunt
resistance of about 0.235 Ohms. That
compares favorably with the reactance
of 1.2 mH at 30 Hz being 0.22 Ohms.
Nevertheless, the maximum undesired
mode rejection was about 40 dB.
Figure 11: CM/DM measurements made using a pair of Solar 6220-1 coupling
transformers. The connection of the primaries (expanded on in Figures 12 and 13)
determines which mode is measured and which rejected.
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 89
EMC
Low- l eve l , Au dio Freq u en c y Co n d u cted Em ission Measurem ents
Figure 12: CM measurement connection close-up.
The EMI receiver connection shown in Figure 10 has been
removed for clarity.
Figure 13: DM measurement connection close-up. The EMI
receiver connection shown in Figure 10 is there, but the
connecting coaxial cable has been removed for clarity.
generate noise below the dc-dc converter frequency, and in
that case the 40 dB value will be perfectly adequate. Low
audio frequency conducted emissions are usually generated
by rotating machinery of one kind or another, so if the test
sample performs that sort of function, a current probe is a
must.
between test sample case and ground by raising the test
sample case above ground and connecting it to ground with a
wire, as shown in Figure 14.
There is a way around a low dm rejection ratio. This involves
a modification to the cm measurement as per SMC-S-008,
which requires measurement of total cm current, measured
The modification is to replace the current probe with the
6220-1 as per Figure 6, but instead of inserting a power
wire, its secondary is inserted in series with the ground
wire, effectively making the coupling transformer secondary
as shunted by the primary, a series element in the ground
connection (in Figure 15).
This technique measures only the
common mode current driven into ground,
and thus there is no need to reject the
undesired mode. It is ideal for working to
SMC-S-008, but it is overkill if working
to GEVS or any similar requirement that
controls CMCE on a per-cable basis.
Nevertheless, in the case of the unit that
doesn’t generate frequencies below that
of its electronic switching power supply,
there won’t be any significant CMCE. A
total summation of nothing is still nothing.
CONCLUSION
Figure 14: Total CMCE measurement per SMC-S-2008. The LISN represents a test
sample whose metal case is raised above ground and then connected to ground
via a wire.
90 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
For the test facility that finds itself rarely
working to one of these spacecraft EMI
requirements, if the requirement is to only
test the power interface, or if an SMClike total CMCE measurement is made
and the test sample generates no noise
at audio frequencies, the CS01 coupling
transformer technique is a handy way to
measure with existing assets and adequate
www.incompliancemag.com
L ow- level, A u d io F requency Conducted Emission Measureme nt s
EMC
sensitivity. If a test facility is going to be
making such measurements routinely, or
if the test sample has cable connections
beyond power that require individual
sampling and generates significant audio
frequencies, then the Pearson probes
or probes with similar performance are
preferable.
ACKNOWLEDGMENT
Mark Nave’s detailed review of the work
contributed greatly to the overall effort
and is deeply appreciated. The author
would like to thank Pearson Electronics
for the loan of Models 4688 and 5101
current probes in developing this article.
REFERENCES/NOTES
1. SMC-S-008, EMC Requirements For
Space Equipment And Systems, 13
June 2008.
Figure 15: Total CMCE measurement per SMC-S-2008, but using the CS01 coupling
transformer in lieu of a current probe.
2. Goddard Space Flight Center,
General Environmental Verification
Specification for STS & ELV Payloads,
Subsystems, and Components, Rev.A, June 1996.
3. This can be understood by recognizing that the
resistance shunting the primary reflects across
the windings by the square of the turns ratio.
That reflected value, multiplied by the current
flowing through it is converted on the primary
side by the turns ratio, so the end result is
that the effective shunted value is the primary
resistance divided by the turns ratio.
Ken Javor has worked in the EMC industry
for thirty years. He is a consultant to
government and industry, runs a precompliance EMI test facility, and curates the
Museum of EMC Antiquities, a collection of
radios and instruments that were important
in the development of the discipline, as well
as a library of important documentation.
Mr. Javor is an industry representative to the
Tri-Service Working Groups that write MIL-STD-464
and MIL-STD-461. He has published numerous papers
and is the author of a handbook on EMI requirements
and test methods. Mr. Javor can be contacted at
[email protected]
© 2008 Radiometrics Midwest Corp.
4. Javor, Ken, EMC Archaeology: Uncovering a
Lost Audio Frequency Injection Technique,
In Compliance Magazine, April 2011.
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2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 91
EMC
Low Frequency EMC
and Power Quality
Development of Standards Towards Convergence
BY DR. MAGNUS OLOFSSON
FIGHTING CLIMATE CHANGE MEANS MORE
ELECTRONICS
We see growth in the use of power electronics, as well as
electronics for information technologies.
Electrification clearly facilitates our progress toward a
resource-efficient and climate-friendly energy system. The
share of electricity in total energy demand is projected to
increase drastically in all the decarbonasation scenarios of
the recent European Union (EU) Energy Road Map 20501
(Figure 1).
One example of smart grid application is the possibility of
charging electric car batteries during hours with a surplus of
low cost renewable energy. When electricity price is high,
electric cars may feed energy back to the electrical network.
This can be achieved using a continuous transfer of electricity
price information with automatic control of the power flow
to and from the electric cars. The term smart grid is thus
enabling a ”smart” electrical system where the entire power
system, with networks as well as connected equipment, is
converting between electrical energy and other forms of
useful energy.
Wind and solar power are examples of expanding
technologies for renewable power. Germany now has 25
gigawatts of installed solar power2. Electric vehicles, light
emitting diode lamps and heat pumps are energy efficient
electrical technologies of importance when fighting climate
change. In virtually all such technologies, electrical energy is
passing power electronics.
In addition to power electronics, there is also an increased use
of electronics for supervision and control.
Smart Grid is More than Networks
The smart grid is a very topical issue. The term is widely
used by many, especially politicians. Now the International
Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) has defined the concept
of smart grid3. The definition states that the smart grid is an
electrical energy system that uses information technology.
The smart grid is thus not only related to electrical networks,
but to entire the power system. With smart grid technologies
as well as power technologies for renewables and improved
energy efficiency, there is an increased use of electronics.
92 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Smart Grid and the Concept of EMC
The physical characteristic of smart grid technologies, with
an increased incorporation of potentially sensitive electronics,
naturally has implications with respect to electromagnetic
compatibility (EMC). The satisfactory function of electrical
and electronic equipment with respect to electromagnetic
disturbances is the aim of EMC. The IEC defines4
electromagnetic compatibility as ”the ability of an equipment
or system to function satisfactorily in its electromagnetic
environment without introducing intolerable electromagnetic
disturbances to anything in that environment”. In the
European Union EMC Directive the ”equipment or system”
of IEC corresponds to the EU term “equipment”, where
equipment in turn is subdivided into apparatus and fixed
installation.
www.incompliancemag.com
Low F requency EMC and Power Q u a l i t y
EMC
Electromagnetic disturbances may be
radiated or conducted and electrical/
electronic equipment is potentially
sensitive to any or to both of these
types of disturbances. Disturbances
are in turn subdivided into a
number of low and high frequency
phenomena, where IEC defines low
frequency up to and including
9 kilohertz.
Field Experiences with Smart Grid
Technology
Examples of lack of EMC in relation
to evolving smart grid technologies
have been reported in Sweden.
Kilowatt-hour meters in households
sending data signals through power
lines have caused interference with,
for example, dimmer controlled lamps
and electrical appliances. There are
also cases reported where electrical
apparatuses in households have
interfered with electronic kilowatthour meters with adverse errors in
registration of energy. Power electronics
in wind power plants have emitted
disturbances interfering with transfer of
kilowatt-hour meter readings as signals
on power lines.
Power electronic-based photovoltaic
solar and wind energy equipment may
emit disturbances causing variations such
as voltage fluctuations and unbalance5.
However, with a proper design such
equipment may well improve voltage
quality, for instance by reducing depth of
voltage dips6.
VOLTAGE QUALITY AND EMC
Both IEC and EU define EMC to cover
electromagnetic phenomena from zero
hertz. Furthermore, the IEC defines the
following principal electromagnetic
conducted phenomena7:
Conducted low-frequency phenomena:
Figure 1: Share of electricity in final energy demand, according to the EU Energy Road
Map 2050
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2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 93
Low F re q u e n cy E MC a n d Power Qu ality
• voltage unbalance
• power frequency variations
• induced low-frequency voltages
• DC component in AC networks
EMC
Conducted high-frequency phenomena:
• induced voltages or currents
• unidirectional transients
• oscillatory transients
Voltage quality can be seen as an umbrella name for
deviations from ideal voltage conditions at a site in a
network8. This is equivalent to electromagnetic disturbances
of the voltage at the site. With no disturbances the voltage
quality is perfect, otherwise it is not. electromagnetic
disturbances are defined as electromagnetic phenomena
that may degrade the performance of equipment9.
Adequate voltage quality contributes to the satisfactory
function of electrical and electronic equipment in terms of
electromagnetic compatibility. Electromagnetic disturbances
as imperfect voltage quality at a site in a network can be
regarded as electromagnetic emission from the network10.
According to the EMC Directive, a network is equipment.
This is in line with the original name of the IEC Technical
Committee (TC) 77, which was EMC Between Electrical
Equipment Including Networks and is now simply EMC11.
The technical function of an electrical network is
electromagnetic energy transfer with adequate voltage
quality at its sites(connection points). Similarly, immunity
of an electrical network can be seen as the ability to absorb
disturbing emissions (such as distorted current) with adequate
voltage quality while transferring energy or, in other words,
with satisfactory function. For example, for low order
harmonics and voltage fluctuations, network strength is
relevant for network immunity12, 13.
Geomagnetically-induced current caused by space weather
is another example of the relevance of electromagnetic
immunity for keeping an electric grid14 functioning
satisfactorily.
The importance of voltage quality to achieve EMC is clearly
stated in a report from the Council of European Energy
Regulators (CEER)15: “Due to the nature of electricity,
voltage quality is affected by all the parties connected
to the power system. When voltage quality is too poor, a
Figure 2: Power system made-up of equipment
94 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
www.incompliancemag.com
Low F requency EMC and Power Q u a l i t y
When aiming for EMC in electrical power systems, it is
reasonable to apply the same reference for voltage quality
(emission) in electrical networks as for limits on immunity
of connected equipment. This is schematically indicated in
Figure 3, where a common compatibility level is applied
EMC
key question is whether the disturbance (e.g. a harmonic
disturbance) from a customer’s installation into the power
system is too big or whether the power system (the short
circuit power) at the point of connection is too weak. The
aim should be to have an electromagnetic environment
where electrical equipment and
systems function satisfactorily without
introducing intolerable electromagnetic
disturbances to other equipment.
This situation is referred to as
electromagnetic compatibility (EMC).”
EQUIPMENT-BASED POWER
SYSTEM MODEL
Power systems consist of electrical
equipment. Beyond safety, the
usefulness of electricity in power
systems relies on the function of
such equipment. Electromagnetic
compatibility is about the satisfactory
function of equipment with respect to
electromagnetic disturbances.
According to the EMC Directive,
Figure 3: Voltage Quality concepts with time statistics for a site within a network17
equipment are either apparatus or a
fixed installation. Apparatuses are part
of the EU system for CE marking, while
fixed installations are not. However,
protection requirements on emission and
immunity are enforced on all equipment.
Examples of fixed installations are16: power plants, power
supply networks, wind turbine stations, industrial plants and
railway infrastructures. According to the EMC Guide, the
classification of fixed installations is wide and the ”definition
covers all installations from the smallest residential
electrical installation through to national electrical and
telephone networks, including all commercial and industrial
installations”.
Applying the concept of fixed installations to power systems
may suggest a schematic illustration like Figure 2. As
indicated in the picture, various types of equipment are
connected to other types of equipment. Equipment for energy
conversion is normally connected to only one other type of
equipment, creating a network. Equipment for conveying
energy, such as networks, are normally connected to several
other types of equipment including networks.
COMPATIBILITY MARGINS AND PROTECTION
REQUIREMENTS
The objective of protection requirements for equipment,
including fixed installations such as electrical networks and
connected equipment, is the achievement of EMC.
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 95
Low F re q u e n cy E MC a n d Power Qu ality
The first thing to do when faced with an out-of-tolerance unit is to read through the calibration
EMC
certificate and data to get a firm understanding of what specifically failed calibration.
for voltage quality as well as for immunity of connected
equipment. Electromagnetic compatibility levels are defined
in the IEC 61000-2 series (IEC 61000-2/4/12 for use as
references for emission and immunity of equipment). For
very slow voltage variations, limits are given in the standard
IEC 60038. Network emission levels, which are essentially
voltage quality planning levels, are defined with a margin in
relation to compatibility levels, as indicated in Figure 3.
quality. The level of voltage distortion is dependent on
the network strength. Similarly, high frequency current
harmonics may cause voltage harmonics in the network.
Network strength in terms of short-circuit power or
fundamental frequency short-circuit impedance is less
essential for voltage quality at higher frequencies. The
geographical spread of higher frequency distortion is
normally relatively small.
PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS FOR
EQUIPMENT IN POWER SYSTEMS
Current harmonics may cause overheating of e.g. neutral
conductors and capacitors in three-phase systems. Voltage
harmonics may upset electronics, e.g. due to multiple zero
crossings. Loading capability of induction machines may be
reduced.
In the following example, application of protection
requirements on emission and immunity are illustrated for
selected principal electromagnetic phenomena.
HARMONICS AND INTERHARMONICS
Some sources of interharmonics are frequency converters and
transformers saturated during energizing.
Origins of low order harmonics are, for example, classical
line commutated diode and/or thyristors based rectifiers.
Examples of equipment emitting high order harmonics are
voltage source converters, such as transistors which are
switched at high frequency.
Suggested responsibilities for equipment’s accountable
parties are given in Table 1. Compatibility margins are found
in IEC 61000-2/4/12. A basis for apportionment of harmonic
disturbances in networks is available in IEC 61000-3-6.
Emission of low order harmonics can often be modeled as
current sources, while high order harmonics normally appear
as voltage sources. In between these two simplified models
there is naturally a more complex reality. Resonances may
increase the complexity further.
When harmonic current of low order is injected into a
network, the voltage is distorted which reduces voltage
Voltage Fluctuations
Voltage fluctuations may range from very slow voltage
variations to rapid voltage fluctuations. Very slow voltage
variations are equivalent to variations within voltage ranges,
i.e. voltage deviations from nominal values. If the nominal
voltage is 230 volt and the actual voltage is 240 volt, there is
a voltage variation of 10 volts, which is an electromagnetic
disturbance. However, a very slow variation causing an offset
Responsible
Emission
Immunity
Network operator
Voltage quality planning levels
Apportioning of distortion limits (except
at public low voltage), network strength
at lower frequencies
Equipment connected to
network (may be another
network)
Fulfillment of emission standards (e.g. within CE
marking system), as well as as well as fulfillment
of network operator apportioning levels
Fulfilling of immunity standards (e.g.
within CE marking system), as well as
consideration for EMC in own equipment
Table 1: Responsibility for protection requirements – harmonics and interharmonics
96 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
www.incompliancemag.com
Low F requency EMC and Power Q u a l i t y
Regardless of the phenomena, it is clear that a appropriate division of responsibilities for
networks and connected equipment is paramount.
Suggested responsibilities for controlling voltage fluctuations
within the network system are given in Table 2. Slow
voltage variations in a network are depending on a number
of technical issues ranging from design, maintenance and
operation.
Rapid voltage fluctuations may cause flickering of lights.
Source of disturbance may be electric arc furnaces that cause
rapid current fluctuations.
Suggested responsibilities for equipment’s accountable
parties are given in Table 2. A framework for apportioning of
distortion limits is given in IEC 61000-3-7.
CONVERGENCE OF STANDARDS
A smart grid enables more renewables and more efficient
use of electricity. The smart grid also is expected to boost
use of electronically based equipment in the electrical power
system.
To realize the smart grid, the following issues are important
to consider:
1. EMC is essential for a robust smart grid, both with respect
to radiated and to conducted disturbances.
2. Power quality is a means to achieve EMC between the
smart grid and connected equipment.
3. Electrical networks, including smart grids, are equipment.
4. Protection requirements, such as those for emission and
immunity, also are valid for electrical networks.
5. Protection requirements for networks and connected
equipment should be economically and fairly balanced.
6. A complete set of standards for EMC in power
systems, including power quality, is needed from the
standardization community.
7. Seeing EMC as a technical issue, where cost optimization
is to a large extent governed by the standardisation
community, regulatory frameworks should be designed
without links to market mechanisms, i.e. similar to the
handling of electrical safety.
CHANGING FOCUS IN
LOW FREQUENCY EMC OVER TIME
Over the years, focus has shifted between various
electromagnetic phenomena. During 1980s, low-order
harmonics were high on the agenda due to the introduction
of thyristor and diode based current stiff line commutated
power electronics. Similarly, voltage fluctuations causing
flickering lights were of great concern where arc furnaces
were the main source of disturbances. In the 1990s, the use
of variable speed drives for induction motors was introduced
Responsible
Emission
Immunity
Network operator
Voltage quality planning levels
Network strength, apportioning of distortion
limits (except at public low voltage)
Equipment connected to Fast changes in active and reactive power
network (may be another demand, generation kept within limits stated
by network operator
network)
Fulfilling of immunity standards (e.g. within
CE-marking system), as well as consideration
for EMC in own equipment
Table 2: Responsible for Protection Requirements – Rapid Voltage Fluctuations
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 97
EMC
of only 10 volts is, in practice, not expected to cause any
interference. Limits for very slow voltage variations are given
in IEC 60038 at supply terminals, i.e. the connection point
between the network and connected equipment.
Low F re q u e n cy E MC a n d Power Qu ality
EMC
on a large scale. Voltage dips were causing interruptions in
industrial processes due to inadequate immunity for those
drive systems.
Presently, there is an increased awareness of electromagnetic
disturbances in the frequency range 2 to 150 kilohertz.
This is due to switched converter technologies used over
time in an increasing number of apparatuses, from energy
efficient luminaries to charging units for electrical vehicles.
Due to connection of wind and solar power at the end of
weak feeders, the occurrence of temporary overvoltages
is a disturbance of increased concern. Regardless of
the phenomena, it is clear that a appropriate division of
responsibilities for networks and connected equipment is
paramount.
NOTES
1.
European Union Energy Roadmap 2050. Available:
http://ec.europa.eu/energy/energy2020/roadmap/
index_en.htm.
2.
“Germany Eyes Cutting Solar Incentives Faster”,
Reuters UPDATE 1.
Available: http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/01/25/
germany-solar-idUSL5E8CP43M20120125.
3.
International Electrotechnical Vocabulary (IEV),
IEC 600 50-121 Std.
Available: http://www.electropedia.org.
4.
International Electrotechnical Vocabulary (IEV),
IEC 600 50-121 Std.
Available: http://www.electropedia.org.
5.
Bollen, M. H. J. Gu, I. Y. H., and Wiley, Signal
Processing of Power Quality Disturbances,
IEEE Press, 2006.
6.
7.
8.
Martinez-Velasco, J.A., and Martin-Arnedo,
J.“Distributed Generation Impact on Voltage
Sags in Distribution Networks”, 9th International
Conference Electric Power and Distribution,
Barcelona, 9 – 11 October 2007. Available:
http://www.leonardo-energy.org/webfm_send/1085.
IEC Guide 107 Edition 3: Electromagnetic Compatibility
– Guide to the Drafting of Electromagnetic Compatibility
Publications, IEC, February 2009.
Olofsson, M. and Grape, U., “Voltage Quality in the
Context of EMC, Paper 21R4-4”, 2009 International
Symposium on Electromagnetic Compatibility, Kyoto,
Japan, 20 – 24 July 2009. Available:
http://www.elsakerhetsverket.se/PageFiles/450/
Voltage%20Quality%20in%20the%20context%20of%20
EMC%2021R4-4.pdf.
98 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
9.
International Electrotechnical Vocabulary (IEV),
IEC 600 50-161 Std.
Available: http://www.electropedia.org.
10. Olofsson, M. and Grape, U., “Framework for
Electromagnetic Compatibility in Electric Power
Systems”, VIII International Symposium and Exhibition
on Electromagnetic Compatibility and Electromagnetic
Ecology, St. Petersburg, Russia, 16 – 19 June 2009.
Available: http://www.elsakerhetsverket.
se/PageFiles/450/Framework%20for%20
Electromagnetic%20Compatibility%20in%20
Electric%20Power%20Systems.pdf.
11. Tokuda, M., “History and Recent Topics of IEC TC 77
(EMC Standards)”, Workshop at 2009 International
Symposium on Electromagnetic Compatibility, Kyoto,
Japan, 20 – 24 July 2009.
12. Norberg, P., Larsson, A., Sundell, M., Grape, U.,
“Introducing Network Strength to Handle Power Quality
in System Planning, Paper C4-118”, Cigré General
Session, Paris, France, 2008.
13. Lo Schiavo, L., Delfanti, M., Merlo, M.,
Pasquadieisceglie, M.S., Pozzi, M.,“Relating Power
Quality and Short Circuit Power: A Detailed Analysis
of Italian MV Networks, Paper 0898”, CIRED 19th
International Conference on Electricity Distribution,
Vienna, Italy, 21 – 24 May 2007.
14. Erinmez, I.A., Majithia, S., Rogers, C., Yasuhiro,
T., Ogawa, S., Swahn, H., Kappenman, J.G., Application
of Modeling Techniques to Assess Geomagnetically
Induced Current Risks on the NGC Transmission System,
CIGRE Paper 39-304/2002-03-26”, Cigré, 2002.
15. Council of European Energy Regulators, Electricity
Working Group Quality of Supply Task Force, 4th
Benchmarking Report on Quality of Electricity Supply,
Ref: C08-EQS-24-04 6 December 2008. Available:
http://www.energy-regulators.eu.
16. Guide for the EMC Directive 2004/108/EC, 8 February
2010. Available: http://ec.europa.eu/enterprise/
sectors/electrical/files/emc_guide__updated_20100208_
v3_en.pdf.
17. Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) – Part 3-6:
Limits – Assessment of emission limits for the connection
of distorting installations to MV, HV and EHV power
systems, IEC/TR 61000-3-6, Ed. 2.0, Febuary 2008.
Dr. Magnus Olofsson is an IEEE Senior
Member and chairman of the Technical
Committee TC 7 (Low Frequency EMC)
of the IEEE EMC Society. He is president
of Elforsk, which is the Swedish Electrical
Utilities’ R & D Company.
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EMC
Technology
Advancements in
Board Level Shields
for EMI Mitigation
Not Your Daddy's Metal Can
BY GARY FENICAL AND PAUL CROTTY
PC BOARD EMI
If properly done, PC board (PCB) design control techniques
can be the most cost effective means of resolving EMI issues.
The techniques involve:
• partitioning
• board stack-up
• use of isolating lines
• routing
• board level shields
Other techniques involving additional component costs
include high frequency grounding of the board and filtering
techniques. It is important to mention that if these techniques
are designed in at the initial stage, there will be minimal
impact to schedule and cost. Correct techniques begin with
component placement. Critical circuits (i.e. clock circuits,
clock driver, etc.) and functions should be grouped together,
providing the shortest trace lengths between components.
Engineers should consider the use of multi-layer boards,
having many ground planes, designing high-speed traces
(such as transmission lines), and employing proper and
adequate filtering and decoupling components. In addition,
designers should add placements for filtering components,
but place jumpers or “zero-ohm resistors” to hold them in
place and only add the real components if required to by the
test. Early board prototype testing can produce useful insight
100 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
into potential problem areas. Board areas with high radiation
and the measuring of interconnect cable noise currents are
indicators of potential system radiation sources.
Both radiated noise and conducted noise can be a problem in
these systems. For conducted noise issues, the use of ferrite
chokes and proper signal line layout can prevent a host of
issues when considered in the design phase rather than later
on.
It is a well-known fact in the EMC community that the closer
you are to the source of an EMI problem, the more efficient
and less expensive it is to fix. One cannot get any closer than
by using a board level shield (BLS). Having stated that, it
is important to mention that there is no substitute for proper
circuit design and layout.
Looking at a basic formula for RF emissions:
E = 1.316 AIF2/(DS)
where:
E = microvolts / meter
A = radiating loop area in cm2
I = current in amps
F = frequency in MHz
D = measurement distance in meters
S = shielding effectiveness ratio
www.incompliancemag.com
Tec h n o lo g y A d va n c ements in Board Level Shields for EMI Mitigat i on
EMC
Figure 1: Section through one of the perimeter via holes (Courtesy of Eur Ing Keith Armstrong C.Eng MIEE MIEEE,
Cherry Clough Consultants)
Figure 2: Courtesy of Eur Ing Keith Armstrong C.Eng MIEE MIEEE, Cherry Clough Consultants
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 101
EMC
Tec h n o l o g y Ad va n c ement s in Boa rd Level Shields for EMI Mitigation
Figure 3: Rigid corner technology
(US Pat 7,488,902 B2)
Figure 4: Eye-of-needle/compliant pin
Let’s examine the formula and
break it down to better understand
it. First we will eliminate 1.316 as it
is a constant. D is the measurement
distance specified by the standard
to which you are testing. D can
also represent the distance from
the device to an object with which
it may interfere. In any case, these
are factors beyond the control of
the device designer. If we further
examine this formula, we see that
emissions (E) increase linearly with
current and loop area but increases
exponentially with frequency. We
see that it is extremely important to
keep loop area as small as possible,
especially for high current and/or
high frequency circuits. We have
seen over many decades that the most
common cause of failure is caused
by excessive loop area. Whether
the excessive loop areas are caused
by poor layout or by the offensive
signal coupling into other circuits
with large loop areas, the result is the
same; failure to meet your mandatory
emissions requirements. PCB layout
software that does not include EMC
software will generally not consider
loop area. Therefore, the designer
must take control and lay out high
current and high frequency circuits
manually to be sure to minimize
loop area. Of course, if you cover the
entire loop area with a shield, there is
no loop area exposed and that value
goes to zero. Again, keeping the loop
area as small as possible allows for
the smallest possible shield.
Going back to the formula we see that
one term has not been addressed, S.
S is for shielding. Once the designer
has chosen the circuit components,
which will determine the frequency
and current, and has reduced the
loop area to the smallest possible
geometry, if the device does not
meet its requirements, there is only
one thing left to do. Shielding!
Looking tot the opening statement of
the article, the closer this shielding
design is to the problem, the better.
Allowing for proper BLS mounting
must be done at the PCB design
stage. It is essentially impossible to
properly mount a BLS after the board
has been laid out.
Consider this; the BLS supplier
only provides 5 sides of the required
6-sided Faraday cage you are
attempting to build. It is up to the
PCB designer to build into the PCB
the sixth side, usually an imbedded
ground plane. The designer must also
provide properly spaced mounting
pads, as well as determine if throughhole or surface mounted methods
will be used. Although BLS parts are
needed to manage EMI requirements
for both immunity (for product
performance) and regulatory needs
(FCC, EU etc.), the board shield
design is usually not the only factor
in EMI performance. As mentioned,
the sixth side of the Faraday cage is
the PCB ground plane, and the PCB
design itself has much influence on
overall EMI performance.
Remember that these same basic
design principles hold true for
susceptibility. Therefore, BLS works
equally well for emissions and/or
susceptibility.
Figure 5: Through-hole lock pin
102 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Board level shields are generally
categorized into four basic types:
www.incompliancemag.com
Tec h n o lo g y A d va n c ements in Board Level Shields for EMI Mitigat i on
1. one-piece
2. two-piece
3. drawn
4. one-piece with removable sections
PRODUCT REWORK
For some applications, it is important to have the capability
to rework areas on the PCB covered by the BLS. This may
be part of the initial manufacturing process or later work in
the field. Single piece BLS with simple rework capability is
required. One solution is the EZ Peel BLS with scored lid
(Figure 8, page 104). However, separate replacement covers
are required, and this can lead to inconsistent performance on
removal and replacement of the scored section.
BLS FLATNESS
As more fine pitch components are
utilized on a PCB, thinner solder paste
thicknesses are required to prevent
shorts or bridges. This has translated
into better flatness requirements for
SMT board level shields. Current
flatness requirements are typically
0.10mm to 0.05mm. Drawn shields
and rigid corner technology (US
Patent 7,488,902 B2 Figure 3) can
improve flatness capabilities by acting
as a stiffener for the whole shield.
Additionally, where acceptable,
through hole features can be utilized
to ensure a good mate exists between
the BLS and PCB during assembly
and reflow. Existing products and
solutions are eye-of-needle pins and
other compliant pins (Figure 4).
Figure 6: ReMovl pickup bridge BLS frame
A newly available product is the
through-hole lock pin (Figure 5),
which allows for precise and
repeatable fixturing of the BLS
(frame or single piece) to the PCB
for the subsequent reflow operation
(conformal to the PCB).
POST REFLOW INSPECTION/
TESTING
In the PCB manufacturing process,
there are often post reflow inspection
or testing requirements that need as
Figure 7: Bridge removed
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 103
EMC
A one-piece BLS is typically a stamped and formed sheet
metal can, often produced on high-speed presses. These are
usually the least expensive for high-volume production. A
two-piece BLS is also stamped, with individual fences and
covers. The two-piece BLS can be provided assembled, or as
individual components. These are often used where access
to PCB components is necessary for inspection, testing or
rework. One-piece with removable sections is a one-piece
BLS with removable areas that are scored for easy removal
and access to components for adjustment or repair. A separate
replacement cover is required. A drawn BLS is a one-piece
BLS that uses drawn stamping technology to produce a BLS
with no slits or apertures at the corners.
much open access to the PCB components as possible. For
SMT BLS frames, the pickup bridge can be in the way of this
inspection or testing requirement and must be removed. Post
installation/reflow access to PCB components under the BLS
pickup bridge is a common requirement. Manual removal of
the pickup bridge by cutting or bending has been a necessary,
labor-intensive step. A new product feature is the ReMovl
pickup bridge (Figure 6). It is a pre-cut bridge for easy
toolless removal or automated removal (Figure 7).
EMC
Tec h n o l o g y Ad va n c ement s in Boa rd Level Shields for EMI Mitigation
Original EZ Peel Can
After removal of scored section and
application of snap-in lid
After removal of scored section and
application of dish lid
Figure 8: EZ Peel BLS
An alternative to this solution is the ReCovr BLS, a good
alternative to the EZ Peel solution since it can reuse the
original cover (Figures 9 and 10). It has the advantages of
a two-piece BLS at a cost comparable to a one-piece BLS.
Recent enhancements to the latching features of this design
improve the cover retention force both as delivered, and after
removal and replacement. This feature allows for applications
where shock and vibration may be encountered.
LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE AND RELIABILITY
While many BLS applications have short product lifecycles,
there are also many longer-term applications in automotive,
industrial automation and military programs which require
sustained performance over many years. In these cases, both
corrosion concerns and tin whiskering must be considered in
the base material and plating choices.
MULTI-FUNCTIONAL BLS
Figure 9: ReCovr with lid removed
As relative PCB space continues to
shrink and power/heat generation per
unit area grows, more multi-functional
BLS and thermal products will be
needed. One potential solution exists
with BLS and integrated thermal pads.
If the frame assembly to PCB includes a
pickup bridge for automated placement,
this bridge needs to be removed to
allow for contact of thermal interface
material to the PCB component. The
Removl pickup bridge is an ideal option
for this application. The ReMovl pickup
bridge facilitates the manufacturing
process by simplifying the removal of
the pickup bridge.
CUSTOMER REQUIREMENTS/
INDUSTRY DRIVERS
Figure 10: ReCovr with lid in place
104 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Today, based on current customer
application needs for BLS products,
there are even more choices and
product features available. These
technology innovations were driven by
the application needs across multiple
www.incompliancemag.com
Tec h n o lo g y A d va n c ements in Board Level Shields for EMI Mitigat i on
industries. These additional design choices are summarized
in Figure 11.
CONCLUSION
Gary Fenical, EMC Technical Support
Engineer and NARTE Certified EMC
Engineer, has been with Laird Technologies
for 29 years. He is a specialist in RF
shielded enclosures and has been
responsible for the design and/or
measurement and quality control of
hundreds of large-scale shielded enclosures,
as well as a number of shielded equipment cabinets
Paul Crotty, Director of Engineering and
Product Development for EMI Metals, has
been with Laird Technologies for 15 years.
He holds a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering
from Rennselaer Polytechnic Institute and
has previously served as an officer in the
U.S Navy. Within Laird Technologies, he has
held various roles in tooling, engineering,
and product design and has been instrumental in establishing
the global resources for Laird Technologies EMI Metals
capabilities. He holds several patents related to board level
shield products with additional patents pending.
Figure 11
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 105
EMC
As you now see, board level shields are not just five-sided
metal boxes anymore. Today’s advanced BLS designs
provide solutions for many manufacturing, performance
and rework requirements. Understanding all the options and
utilizing the BLS design selection guide can help lead you to
the most efficient and cost effective solution. In addition to
the guide, remember that a trained field application engineer
may still be the best choice for proper BLS design and feature
selection.
and housings. He was instrumental in the design and
construction of Laird Technologies’ state-of-the-art World
Compliance Centers and has authored many articles on
EMC requirements for medical devices, mutual recognition
agreements and guidelines to meet the essential requirements
if the EU EMC Directive. He has also authored several
seminars, presented worldwide, on the EU EMC Directive,
international compliance, and designing for EMC and EMC
requirements for medical devices. He holds the patent for the
invention of heat-treated beryllium-copper knitted wire mesh
gasket. Other patents are pending.
EMC
The Evolution of EMC
Testing for Electrified
Powertrains in
Automotive Vehicles
A Brief History of Automotive EMC Testing
and Standards Development
BY ROB KADO, JIM MUCCIOLI, DALE SANDERS
AND TERRY NORTH
F
rom the time when automotive vehicles were
essentially mechanical with spark ignition the only
electrical system, through the many decades that
brought the development of electrical, electronic and
computer controlled automotive systems, the need for and
methods of automotive testing have evolved along with the
vehicles. At one time, electrical testing was sufficient. But
with the dawn of the digital computer era, compatibility
became a major issue. Those pesky clocked systems are
inherently noise producers and are also subject to immunity
issues. During the 70’s, industry experience included the
development of advanced fuel management systems, then
in progress to meet new exhaust emission standards, but the
technology at the time was limited to analog controls. By
the 80’s, however, the digital revolution was well underway,
bringing digitally controlled fuel injection systems and many
other applications that pushed the envelope of EMC concerns.
The automotive official equipment manufactures (OEM)
recognized this challenge and began to develop EMC testing
and evaluation capability. Initially, there were no applicable
standards tailored for vehicle EMC, so the OEMs developed
internal procedures that eventually became published as EMC
requirements for both vehicle and component validation.
Vehicles present a particularly challenging EMC immunity
profile as they are numerous and versatile, being able to reach
radio frequency (RF) exposure locations not accessible to
most other products. Where most consumer electronics may
be exposed to RF fields of a few volts per meter, vehicles
face much greater threats and must be validated accordingly.
106 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Over the years, automotive OEMs have made extensive use
of road trips to RF transmitter and other high RF field sites to
map the vehicle EMC environment, and have adapted their
requirements and test methods to effectively protect vehicle
electronics from these environmental threats.
One key example to illustrate this point is the introduction
of vehicle passive restraint systems in the 80’s. At that time,
not all automotive OEMs had full vehicle EMC test facilities,
however, they were aware of the potential immunity risks
that electro-explosive systems presented and were fully
committed to an exhaustive evaluation for EMC at both the
component and vehicle levels. In past experience, in order
to adequately validate this new technology, the standard
component test methodologies were implemented and several
new ones were developed in order to provide a greater
diagnostic capability to predict system performance before
the system was fully integrated. To evaluate the vehicle
immunity profile, use was made of the military facilities at
White Sands Missile Range, NM, which had the capability
of generating high-level RF fields over the electromagnetic
spectrum from long wave to microwave. On the test vehicles,
the electro-explosive devices that trigger the passive restraint
system deployment were instrumented with state-of-theart monitoring capability so the amount of coupled RF
current at each test frequency could be monitored. Due to
this exhaustive evaluation and the experience gained, it was
possible to establish good correlation between vehicle test
validation methods and corresponding component validation
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T h e Evo l u t i on o f E MC Test in g fo r Electrif ied Powertrains in Autom otive Vehi c l e s
VEHICLE EMC TESTING
An important element in the design and development of
today’s complex vehicles is assuring the compatibility of
the electrical system and its numerous subsystems with
itself and the environment in which it is used. To assure
electrical system compatibility, we must understand and
control the (RF) emission and immunity characteristics of all
components and systems in the vehicle. This also includes
fully characterizing these systems with regard to their
immunity to electrostatic discharge (ESD) and other transient
voltages. Furthermore, inductive components, such as motors
and solenoids, must be evaluated to determine their potential
to generate transient voltages within the vehicle’s electrical
system.
Vehicle EMC testing can be broken down to three major
categories: immunity, emissions, and ESD/transients. In the
following sections, we will describe in more detail how each
is tested and the types of facilities required.
only covers external sources or devices, but also the actual
in-vehicle electronics interfering with each other.
The general frequency range covered for immunity is 10
kHz – 4 GHz, with the capability of testing to 18 GHz when
known threats exist. Along with this, the capability exists
to generate the various types of modulation to simulate
modulation used by standard real-world devices.
For the lower frequency range of 10 kHz – 30 MHz, a
transverse electromagnetic mode (TEM) cell (Figure 1) or
transmission line system (TLS) is typically used. In both
cases, the field is created from an overhead structure and
kept uniform/homogenous around the vehicle while various
functions are monitored using shielded video cameras,
wheel speed sensors and fiber optics for vehicle bus traffic
and diagnostics. Both test methodologies are similar in that
power is created using an RF amplifier (usually 10kW power)
through a transmission line acting as an antenna radiating
an RF field up to 200 V/m, depending on the specification.
For the vehicle in the TEM cell shown in Figure 1, the metal
plate above the vehicle is the septum or radiating antenna. A
RF absorber is placed in specific locations in the TEM cell
to help mitigate high voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR)
situations.
For the mid to upper frequency range of 30 MHz – 800 MHz,
an anechoic chamber is used. The vehicle and, in some cases,
the antennae are on turntables as multiple sides of the vehicle
must be tested based on harness routing and module location.
RF Immunity
In the presence of high
electromagnetic fields
created by radio transmitters
(whether portable, mounted
on the vehicle or roadside
installations), the electronic
subsystems on the vehicle
could malfunction, cease
to function temporarily, or
experience a catastrophic
failure. Furthermore, as
electronics in general
increase in complexity and
the threat of interference
increases, today we have
much more spectral content
generated with respect to cell
phone use, radio/television
broadcast, aftermarket
electronics and the standard
electrical content of vehicles.
Testing for RF immunity not
Figure 1: A vehicle positioned in a vehicle TEM cell
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 107
EMC
procedures. This thorough analysis and evaluation led to a
successful launch of this new technology without the adverse
reactions that might have otherwise occurred. The EMC
test methodologies that were put in place by vehicle OEMs
became the basis for future EMC standards. Over the years,
the automotive OEMs have worked with SAE, ISO, CISPR
and IEC to develop workable EMC standards that reflect
the real world EMC environment and the need to provide
vehicles that can operate reliably in this environment. These
cooperative efforts are ongoing.
T he Evo l u t i on o f E MC Test in g fo r E lectrif ied Powertrains in Automotive Vehicl e s
EMC
As with all immunity testing, monitoring such as cameras
and fiber optics are used that are not affected by the RF being
applied. Figure 2 shows a typical anechoic chamber with
a vehicle on the turntable; note also that various antennae
can be used to apply the fields. For these frequency ranges,
depending on the equipment used, 1kW to 10kW is required
to generate fields up to 200 V/m.
For the high frequency range of 800 MHz – 18 GHz, an
anechoic or reverberation chamber is used. The advantage
of a reverb chamber is that a single sweep is performed and
testing is done; often with an anechoic chamber the testing
takes much longer as the high frequency causes a very narrow
beam width. The narrow beam width requires multiple
positions of testing to cover the entire vehicle and ensure
all areas are exposed to the RF field. In a reverb chamber,
the field is generated and stirred with paddles to provide full
exposure to the field surrounding the entire vehicle in a single
sweep. Figures 3 and 4 show a typical reverb chamber with a
vehicle and a closer shot of the paddles used for stirring the
field. Another advantage of a reverb chamber is that much
less power is required to create high field strengths of 200
V/m.
Another type of vehicle RF immunity testing is the testing
of on-board transmitters. This test simulates the effect of
radios being installed and used in a vehicle such as CBs,
ham radios and more common devices such as cell phones
or walkie-talkies. The testing consists of outfitting a vehicle
with the various antennae both internal and external to the
vehicle (e.g. roof top or bumper installation) and broadcasting
at the various frequency and power levels while monitoring
for disruption of normal vehicle operation. Figure 5 shows
an example of antennae placement for on-board transmitter
testing in a vehicle.
RF Emissions
The second major part of EMC testing is emissions;
measuring the amount of noise a component and its wiring/
apparatus puts out while in normal operation. This testing
reveals potential interference, not only with other onboard electronics, but also with adjacent vehicles and other
electronics/installations in the real world.
To protect for on-board receivers and other electronics,
testing is performed per CISPR 25. The vehicle is tested
in an anechoic chamber and the on-board antennae of the
vehicle are used to measure their applicable fields; for other
frequency bands, magnetic mount antennae are placed in the
standard installation locations and used for measurement.
Figure 6 shows an example of a vehicle in such an anechoic
chamber.
To protect for off-board receivers and installations, testing is
performed per CISPR 12; the main difference is the antennae
used are set at a 3 or 10m distance from the vehicle. This
testing is also performed either in an anechoic chamber or
open area test site (OATS).
To further validate these
results; especially for AM/
FM radio bands, radio
noise evaluation testing
is performed. During this
testing, levels of injected
power at the various
frequencies are broadcast
while the different
subsystems are operated to
evaluate reception.
Figure 2: Vehicle in an anechoic chamber
In addition to RF emissions
and as a result of new
electrified powertrain
vehicles, magnetic field
emissions testing is also
required. This testing
is performed using
special magnetic field
probes and tested per
International Commission
on Non-ionizing Radiation
Protection (ICNIRP) to
limit human exposure to
108 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
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EMC
Figure 3: Typical paddle/stirrer (left) in a reverb chamber and
two radiating antennae (right)
Figure 4: Example of a vehicle in a reverb chamber
such fields. The testing is performed in
various locations, mainly throughout the
interior of the vehicle where a human
being would be. Figure 7 shows an
example of a probe measuring magnetic
fields in the engine compartment of a
vehicle.
load such as a motor, solenoid or actuator
is switched. Finally, various electrical
tests are performed, such as load dump
and reverse battery, to simulate these
potential events.
Other Types of Vehicle EMC Testing
There are other various types of EMC
testing that occur on a vehicle such as
(ESD), conducted transient emissions
(CTE) and electrical tests. ESD is the
simulation of discharge that occurs
normally between a human and some
part of the vehicle; this can be from
entry, exit, or simply attempting to push
a button or reach for the door handle.
CTE is a measurement of the voltage
transient that occurs when an inductive
Figure 5: Example of on-board
transmitter testing
Figure 6: Vehicle in an anechoic chamber for RF emissions
testing
As can be seen, vehicle EMC testing
is very in-depth and costly. The photos
provided here are from the Chrysler
EMC Facility which is valued at over 30
Million USD. With electrified powertrain
emerging as a new technology in vehicles,
the challenges for EMC increase. With
such vehicles, new considerations such
as testing while the vehicle is plugged
into its charger, regenerative braking and,
finally, operation cycles on a charged
battery versus test time (some test
runs can take in excess of five hours)
are part of the validation process. The
specifications are evolving as well;
Figure 7: Example of magnetic field probe measurement
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 109
EMC
T he Evo l u t i on o f E MC Test in g fo r E lectrif ied Powertrains in Automotive Vehicl e s
Figure 8: Example of a vehicle set-up while plugged in for charging
Figure 8 shows a set-up diagram for an electric vehicle to
be tested while charging. As the specifications continue
to be established and evolve to meet changing product
requirements, the industry will adapt and evolve as well, as it
always has in the past.
AUTOMOTIVE COMPONENT/MODULE TESTING
Similar to vehicle EMC testing, automotive component
testing is categorically broken down into threetypes:
emissions, immunity and ESD/transients. EMC requirements
and test set-ups for automotive components are established
by International Standards and OEM specifications that have
been derived directly from vehicle testing and real-world
experiences/measurements. Components that undergo EMC
testing to established OEM component requirements provide
a high confidence level of EMC (emissions, immunity and
ESD/transients) performance when integrated into a vehicle
or into a vehicle system. This is a significant distinction from
other industries for several reasons:
1. All electronic products sold in the United States are
required by law to be compliant to FCC Part 15. However,
FCC Part 15 only addresses RF emission levels of an
electronic product. Automotive OEMs at both the vehicle
and component level require immunity and ESD/transient
testing, as well as emissions. It should also be noted that
automotive OEM emissions levels are much more severe
than FCC requirements.
2. Vehicle operating environments, thus their requirements,
are generally much harsher for automotive components
110 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
than other electronic products sold in other industries. For
example, vehicles are expected to operate safely in a wide
range of operating temperatures and different weather
conditions, as well as under exposure to varying sources of
electromagnetic fields (natural and manmade), all of which
impact electric components and design.
3. Automotive component EMC tests, conditions, setups and facilities have been developed specifically
for correlation to vehicle environments. Compliance
to automotive OEM component EMC requirements is
considered as a pre-qualification. Components must also
comply with vehicle EMC requirements when installed
in a vehicle. As such, automotive components are given
a functional and operational impact assignment as part
of the pass/fail test criteria. This assessment is similar to
what other safety critical industries are starting to adopt
using International Standards such as ISO 26262. See
Reference 1.
THE AUTOMOTIVE EMC DESIGN,
REQUIREMENTS, VERIFICATION, AND
VALIDATION PROCESS
The history and emphasis the automotive industry places on
EMC (emissions, immunity, ESD/transients), from vehicle
to individual components, requires a comprehensive process
which comprises a collaboration of OEM and tier suppliers,
as well as multiple engineering disciplines. To manage
the EMC design, requirements, verification and validation
process, a system engineering approach is typically used.
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T h e Evo l u t i on o f E MC Test in g fo r Electrif ied Powertrains in Autom otive Vehi c l e s
THE SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROCESS AS
APPLIED TO AUTOMOTIVE EMC
See References 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6.
The EMC system engineering process starts with OEMs and
tier suppliers defining the following concepts for components,
system architecture and vehicle integration:
• System – a set of components acting together to achieve a
set of common objectives via the accomplishment of a set
of tasks.
• System behavior – a sequence of functions or tasks, with
inputs and outputs, which must be performed to achieve a
specific objective.
• Requirements – mandates that something must be
accomplished, transformed, produced or provided. The
attributes of a good requirement are that it is unambiguous,
understandable, traceable, correct, concise, unique and
verifiable.
• Traceability – in reference to requirements; a requirement is
said to be traceable if one can identify its source. The source
may be a higher-level requirement or a source document
defining its existence. An example would be if a componentlevel requirement (weight, reliability) is traceable back to a
vehicle-level requirement
• Operational concept – an operational concept is a shared
vision from the perspective of the users and development
participants of how the system will be developed,
produced, deployed, trained, operated, maintained, refined
and retired to meet the operational needs and objectives.
It is recommended that a background study based on the
following questions should be considered in preparation for
the systems engineering process:
System requirements
• Has the need for the system or product been established
and justified?
• Has the overall system technical design approach been
justified through a feasibility analysis?
• Has the mission for the system been defined through
scenarios or profiles?
• Has the system or product lifecycle been defined (design,
development, test and evaluation, production and/or
construction, distribution, operational use, sustaining
support, retirement and disposal)?
• Has the planned operational deployment and distribution
been defined (customer requirements, quantity, distribution
schedule)?
• Has the operational environment been defined in terms
of temperature extremes, humidity, vibration and shock,
storage, transportation, and handling? A dynamic scenario is
desired.
System trade-off studies
• Have trade-off evaluations and analyses been accomplished
to support major design decisions?
• Have all feasible alternatives been considered in trade-off
studies?
• Have such analyses been accomplished with lifecycle
considerations in mind (decisions based on lifecycle
impacts)?
• Have system trade-off studies been adequately
documented?
•
Once the above concepts have been defined and the
background study performed, the six-step design process is
applied as illustrated in Figures 9, 10, 11 and 12.
Step 1 - Bound the system for EMC
• Identify all external items.
• Establish interactions.
• Create system context diagram.
Step 2 - Identify the source of requirements
• Collect requirements.
• Sort requirements by classification.
Step 3 - Discover and understand requirements
• Discover system-, subsystem- and component-level
requirements.
• Brainstorm scenarios.
• Benchmark competition.
• Use behavior models to:
o discover “hidden” interface requirements.
o resolve conflicts between models and scenarios.
Step 4 - Create alternatives
• List performance and operational objectives.
• Prioritize requirements with weighting factors.
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 111
EMC
The EMC systems engineering methodology integrates
all requirements and objectives; additionally it facilitates
the identification and specification of unknown or hidden
requirements leaving behind a traceable, repeatable,
documented path of engineering effort and decisions. Below
is a high-level description of this approach that is used in the
automotive industry.
• Have all basis system performance parameters been defined
(technical performance measures)?
T he Evo l u t i on o f E MC Test in g fo r E lectrif ied Powertrains in Automotive Vehicl e s
• Synthesize physical architecture to support each alternative.
• Perform trade-off between candidate architectural solutions
that satisfy the requirements.
• Collect the results in a derived set of requirements based on
the chosen solution.
• Compare the various alternatives, rank them and select the
best approach.
• Evaluate candidate architectures using measures of
effectiveness.
Step 5 - Select the best solution
EMC
• Compare proposed systems
implementation.
• Select the best solution.
Step 6 - Validate best solution
• Define validation plan
• Link to design requirements at each
level (vehicle, system, component)
• Verify all requirements. (mandatory)
• Plan for verification starting early
and continuosly at the system level.
• Requirements Trace requirements
forward to verification and link
verification back to the requirements
at all levels.
Figure 9: Six step system engineering process for EMC
• Verification methods are:
||inspection
Figure 10: Data is generated and linked throughout the process
112 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
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test
||demonstration
||analysis, which may include simulation
||
System engineering process summary
• The systems engineering process leaves behind a traceable,
repeatable, documented path of
engineering effort and decisions.
Elements of a good EMC test plan to consider for any deviceunder-test (DUT) (component or vehicle) should describe or
answer the following information:
1.
DUT part number and revision
2.
DUT subassemblies such as PCB, hardware and software
revision
THE IMPORTANCE
OF EMC TEST PLANS
AS GOVERNING
DOCUMENTATION
See References 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6.
As automotive engineers work
through the six-step design process,
many documents are generated.
For EMC, the most important
document is the EMC test plan.
Most OEM in North America
provide a template to follow when
generating this document. When
properly completed, the EMC test
plan provides a traceable link of
not just the EMC tests performed
and test parameters, but also
documentation of the operating
Figure 11
Figure 12: The “Big V” - validation and verification
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 113
EMC
• The EMC systems engineering process methodology
integrates all requirements and objectives, and facilitates
the identification and specification of unknown or hidden
requirements.
modes/states, justification of performance criteria, component
uses in vehicles and systems, a component’s mechanical
and electrical interfaces, as well as any deviations and
assumptions required for individual test circumstances.
T he Evo l u t i on o f E MC Test in g fo r E lectrif ied Powertrains in Automotive Vehicl e s
3.
DUT manufacturing/assembly location and suppliers
7.
Applicable EMC test standards (OEM or international)
4.
DUT customer and production release date
8.
EMC test facility, location, contact and accreditations
5.
DUT releasing/program engineer
9.
6.
DUT EMC test plan revision history
Type of EMC test report requested: engineering
development, sign-off design validation or sign-off
production verification
EMC
10. OEM/customer sign-off
(if applicable)
Figure 13: ESS bench setup for CISPR25 Radiated Emissions/ISO 11452-2 radiated immunity
11. DUT description and
intended use
a. DUT and DUT family
introduction and
functional description
b. DUT description and
sample selection
c. DUT electrical
and mechanical
schematics, layout
and diagrams
d. DUT software
functional description
of operation
e. DUT bill-of-materials
(BOM)
f. DUT operating
modes
g. DUT electrical and
mechanical inputs,
outputs, power
requirements, loads
and monitoring
requirements
h. DUT calibration
procedures
12. Required loads, harness
and support equipment
needed to operate DUT
Figure 14: ESS (close-up) on a copper ground plane for CISPR25 radiated emissions/ISO 11452-2
radiated immunity testing
114 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
13. For each individual EMC
test, the following should
be noted or referenced:
a. test modes
b. environmental
conditions
c. grounding schemes
and requirements
d. harness requirements
e. applicable loads
and monitoring
equipment
f. power supply and
signals
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T h e Evo l u t i on o f E MC Test in g fo r Electrif ied Powertrains in Autom otive Vehi c l e s
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
functional and operational requirements
test deviations
pass/fail criteria
instructions if an anomaly is observed
any DUT safety precautions or procedures
See References 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6.
As test standards evolve and adapt to new technologies in
the automotive industry, the overall vehicle requirement
remains essentially the same. For example, the emerging
electrified powertrain technology has not had a substantial
impact for vehicle EMC emissions, immunity and transient
requirements; however, it has increased the importance of the
EMC test plan for systems such as the energy storage system
(ESS) which is a large part of the electrified powertrain
architecture. ESSs have come to encompass several
competing electric vehicle (EV) and hybrid electric vehicle
(HEV) architectures. In turn, the ESS contains multiple subsystems in addition to just battery cells.
The ESS and its sub-systems include design variables such
as high-voltage DC-to-DC power converters, battery cell
charging/discharging schemes, varying numbers of battery
cells, shapes and technology, cooling schemes (liquid and/
or air), diagnostic sensors (thermal, voltage, current, etc.),
overall ESS physical
shapes, sizes and
weight, as well as
on-board vehicle
orientations.
When writing an EMC
test plan for ESS,
collaboration with the
EMC test facility is
a good idea. The size
and weight of the ESS
alone can cause an
issue when testing. For
example, an ESS can
range from 8 cubic feet
to more than 64 cubic
feet in size and weigh
700 to 2500 or more
pounds. EMC test
facility chambers and
ground planes need to
be able to handle the
weight as well as be
able to safely move the
ESS in and out of the
Another aspect the EMC test plan should clearly specify is
the monitoring requirements of the ESS. It is not uncommon
that input/output requirements to monitor an ESS are double
or triple that of a normal automotive component and may
require special software that interfaces to software running
the EMC test, so when/if an observed anomaly occurs during
a test cycle, the test parameters are known.
Finally, with regards to the ESS, the EMC test plan should
note the high-voltage (HV) power requirements, charging
procedure and safety operation procedure for working with
the HV. The goal of the EMC test plan is to provide for safe
operation, reduced test down-time and a traceable document
for future testing and product development.
SUMMARY
The authors have presented a brief history of the development
of methodologies by automotive OEM to effectively validate
new technologies and the cooperative role OEM have
played in the generation of new EMC standards, including
an overview of vehicle and component EMC testing. The
advantage of the system engineering process in providing
an organized and traceable method to meet the challenges
Figure 15: ESS CISPR25 radiated emissions/ISO 11452-2 radiated immunity bench setup with
bi-conical antenna
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 115
EMC
THE EMC TEST PLAN AND
ELECTRIFIED POWER-TRAIN TECHNOLOGY
chamber. Also, thought should be given to the orientations
of the ESS needed for emissions and immunity testing, with
consideration given to maintaining minimum clearances per
the international or OEM standards used for testing. Some
examples are shown in Figures 13, 14 and 15.
EMC
T he Evo l u t i on o f E MC Test in g fo r E lectrif ied Powertrains in Automotive Vehicl e s
of validating new technologies was presented, along with
a practical approach to apply this method to a particular
product. The importance of EMC test plans, particularly for
complicated systems and new technologies, was stressed
along with some useful guidelines for developing an effective
test plan. Finally, the need for an EMC test plan to meet the
particular challenges of validating electrified powertrain
technology was described.
REFERENCES
1. Jody J. Nelson, William Taylor and Robert Kado, “Impact
on EMC for Electrical Powertrains with Respect to
Functional Safety: ISO 26262”; In Compliance Magazine,
May 2012.
2. James Muccioli, Dale Sanders, Terry North, “Automotive
EMC Testing – The Challenges of Testing Battery
Systems for Electric and Hybrid Vehicles”; IEEE
Electromagnetic Compatibility Magazine, Volume 1, 1st
Qtr 2012.
3. James Muccioli, Dale Sanders, “Automotive EMC
Testing – The Challenges of Testing Battery Systems
for Electric and Hybrid Vehicles: Part 1 - Defining the
Test Methodology using System Engineering”, 2011
IEEE International Symposium on Electromagnetic
Compatibility, Long Beach, CA, August 2011.
4. Dale Sanders, James Muccioli, Steve English,
“Automotive EMC Testing – The Challenges of Testing
Battery Systems for Electric and Hybrid Vehicles: Part
2 - Test Laboratory Practical Implementation” 2011
IEEE International Symposium on Electromagnetic
Compatibility, Long Beach, CA, August 2011.
5. James Muccioli, Dale Sanders, “EMC System
Engineering of Hybrid and Electric Vehicles” Presentation
to the Southeastern Michigan IEEE EMC Society Chapter,
Dearborn, MI, 2010.
6. James Muccioli, Dale Sanders, “EMC System Engineering
of the Hybrid Vehicle Electric Motor and Battery Pack”
IEEE International Symposium on Electromagnetic
Compatibility, Austin, TX, August 2009.
Rob Kado is the EMC Manager and
Senior Technical Specialist for Chrysler
Group LLC; his responsibilities include
Component/Vehicle Validation, Research
and Development, Specifications, and
Operations. Rob is a member of several
SAE/ISO EE/EMC Groups and, more
specifically, a United States Delegate to
CISPR/ISO.
116 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
James P. Muccioli is an EMC consultant
and owner of Jastech EMC Consulting
LLC (over 25 years). Additionally, he has
worked for X2Y Attenuators, Chrysler
and United Technologies. Mr. Muccioli
has taught EMC undergraduate courses
and professional education seminars at
Lawrence Technological University, the
University of Michigan-Dearborn and the University of
Michigan. He is an iNARTE certified EMC, ESD and Master
EMC Design Engineer, and a member of SAE J-1113, SAE
J-551 and the SAE IC EMC Task Force (chairperson). Mr.
Muccioli received an IEEE Fellow in 1998 for contributions
to integrated circuit design practices to minimize
electromagnetic interference and has also served on the IEEE
EMC Society Board of Directors (1993-1998 & 2001-2003).
Dale Sanders is an Independent EMC
Consultant for Jastech EMC Consulting
LLC and owner of eM Design Concepts
LLC. His experience includes EMC design,
analysis, and testing. Mr. Sanders serviced
in the U. S. Marine Corps and holds a
BSEE from the University of MichiganDearborn. Mr. Sanders has guest lectured
on EMC topics at the University of Michigan-Dearborn
and University of Detroit-Mercy, as well as developed EMC
course criteria, topics, projects and lab experiments. Mr.
Sanders is a senior member of the IEEE and active member
in the IEEE EMC Society, NDIA, and SAE. He has authored
numerous EMC technical papers and application notes on
EMC test methodologies, EMC design solutions and filter
products.
Terry M. North is an independent EMC
consultant for Jastech EMC Consulting,
LLC. His early experience includes service
with the U. S. Army in RF communications
and with Ford Motor Company in advanced
fuel systems design. Over the more than
20 years that he was with Chrysler, he
contributed to the development of a worldclass, in-house automotive EMC capability and assisted in
the overall advancement of the automotive industry in EMC.
Mr. North was also involved in the EMC development and
qualification of passive restraints systems. He was a major
contributor in the development of Chrysler corporate EMC
standards and served as a consultant on EMC and E/E
systems issues. Mr. North is a senior member of the IEEE.
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EMC
As-Found:
Out-of-Tolerance
What to do next?
BY PHIL MISTRETTA
W
hen calibrated test equipment is found in an outof-tolerance condition, there is additional risk to
all products on which it was used. It is important
to understand the magnitude of the potential risk because it
can lead to dangerous consumer situations and additional
business costs.
Typically quality systems have a procedure for handling
non-conforming material, however, this is non-conforming
instrumentation used in a process, not material produced by
a process. There is little guidance available describing how
to evaluate out-of-tolerance conditions leaving engineering
and quality personnel to develop their own process. When
faced with an As-Found: Out-Of-Tolerance (OOT) condition,
a systematic approach to identify what the out-of-tolerance
values were, when, where and how the OOT unit was used,
will help concentrate your efforts to identify those areas that
will need further analysis.
NON-COMPLIANCE
What does out-of-tolerance mean? Calibration is a
comparison of a metrology laboratory’s standard, with a
known value and uncertainty, to the unknown behavior
of a unit submitted for calibration. When the unit under
test (UUT) does not meet the expected test limits, it is
considered to be Out-of-Tolerance. The type of measurement
data and calibration information provided can vary widely,
depending on the type of metrology laboratory performing
the calibration. For instance, at the National Metrology
Institutes (NMI), such as NIST, the metrology laboratory
may provide the comparison data only and not utilize any
test limits and not make any statement of compliance. It is
up to the instruments’ owner to perform any analysis and
determine the compliance status of each individual piece of
calibrated equipment. For the typical NMI customer, this
process is relatively easy to handle because they are staffed
with highly knowledgeable metrology professionals who are
responsible for a limited quantity of lab standards. However,
if this is the only information received by a manufacturing
environment customer, who has significant quantities of test
and measurement equipment, monitoring the behavior of
each individual piece of equipment is impractical at best!
Fortunately, the manufacturers of test equipment have done
most of the analysis work. This is accomplished through
the manufacturers’ published specifications which describe
what type of behavior can be expected for the majority
of the units manufactured, following a typical calibration
interval. It is from the Original Equipment Manufacturers’
(OEM) published specifications that purchasing decisions
are made. It is also from these published specifications that a
commercial calibration provider will most likely determine the
allowable tolerances, or test limits for the calibration process.
Many commercial calibration providers offer a default service
that uses the OEM’s published specifications; however, it is
the responsibility of both the customer and the calibration
lab (internal or external), to agree upon the specifications
which will be used in the calibration process. A customer
can request their equipment to be calibrated against any
specification they provide. Once the calibration specifications
have been agreed upon, the laboratory can calculate the test
limits against which the laboratory results can be compared
and a statement of compliance can be determined.
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 117
A s -Fo u n d : O u t- o f-To leran c e - W h at to do nex t?
The first thing to do when faced with an out-of-tolerance unit is to read through the calibration
EMC
certificate and data to get a firm understanding of what specifically failed calibration.
STATEMENT OF COMPLIANCE
Most commercial calibration customers are looking for the
calibration laboratory to make a statement of compliance for
the As-Found condition of the Unit Under Test (UUT). On
the surface, making this determination appears rather straight
forward and simple, however, upon closer examination, it
becomes more complex; there are no perfect instruments
and no perfect measurements. All measurements have some
degree of uncertainty and how to deal with these uncertainties
with respect to making a statement of compliance differs
greatly. There are several different approaches which could
be used when making compliance statements. Some labs
will not make a statement at all; some labs will mark the
data that does not meet the limits with an asterisk or some
other means, but not make a compliance statement; still other
labs will make a compliance statement, quantify the results
with an uncertainty value and provide additional consumer
risk information. In any case, it is critical for the customer
to understand the decision rules used by the laboratory in
making any compliance statements.
The statement As-Found: In-tolerance is generally
assumed to mean that the entire instrument, all functions,
parameters, ranges and test points - are within the calibration
specifications at the time of calibration, for the stated
conditions at the location where the calibration took place.
An As-found: in-tolerance condition is a good indication
the UUT was performing within expectations since the last
calibration was completed. For the commercial calibration
customer who has hundreds or thousands of calibrated items,
the statement of compliance may be the single most important
piece of information on a calibration certificate. In essence
the metrology laboratory, staffed with measurement experts,
has completed an initial data evaluation and concluded the
unit to be performing within the agreed upon specifications
so the customer does not have to spend very much additional
time reviewing the calibration. Likewise an As-Found:
Out-Of-Tolerance (OOT) condition indicates that at least
one data point in the data report drifted or shifted beyond
the allowable tolerance limits and the measurements it was
providing may not have been accurate at some point since
the previous calibration. Again, the laboratory measurement
experts have indicated that this unit had a problem and needs
further analysis by the customer. The As-Found: Out-OfTolerance statement of compliance is the flag or trigger for
118 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
many quality or manufacturing engineering departments to
start an investigation, evaluation or analysis.
THE PROCESS
The object of the OOT evaluation process is to identify the
at risk products the Out-of-Tolerance units touched. The
following approach is not very difficult and follows a logical
thought process; however there are a few pitfalls to be aware
of and to avoid. This is an investigation; I caution against
having the end result already in mind. It is tempting to want
the conclusion to show that there were no at risk products
because of the work involved. The answers to the questions
in the process will lead you to the appropriate conclusion.
The approach here is to eliminate products without risk and to
narrow down the pool of at risk products.
WHAT IS OUT-OF-TOLERANCE?
The first thing to do when faced with an out-of-tolerance unit
is to read through the calibration certificate and data to get
a firm understanding of what specifically failed calibration.
A complete set of As-Found and As-Left calibration
measurement data is essential for a proper out-of-tolerance
evaluation. A Calibration Certificate without data is never
a good idea, but when faced with an out-of-tolerance unit,
the lack of measurement data will significantly impact the
ability to conduct an analysis and quantify any potential risk.
If the metrology laboratory provides an out-of-tolerance
report that only shows the out-of-tolerance data you have
something on which to conduct an evaluation, but even this
limited information does not provide a complete picture. A
review of all the calibration data should be done to identify
what functions, parameters, ranges and test points were found
out-of-tolerance. For example, let’s say a voltmeter has a full
scale range of 1000 V, a resolution of 1 V, and an accuracy
of ± 5 V, and the unit was found to read 1006 V at full scale
(out-of-tolerance) and in-tolerance at all the other readings
which were taken every 200 V. This means that during the use
of the voltmeter, over its most recent calibration cycle, any
measurements between 800 V and the full scale 1000 V were
likely giving erroneous values to the user of the meter for
the measurements taken. Again, a full set of data will be very
helpful at this point in answering questions like: how many
points within a range were out-of-tolerance; was the entire
range out of tolerance; were all the ranges even checked; was
there a linearity issue; was only the zero out-of-tolerance;
www.incompliancemag.com
As-Found: Out-of-Tolerance - What to do n ext ?
The quality of the calibration and quantity of data available can have a tremendous impact on
narrowing the scope of the evaluation at this point.
WHEN DID IT HAPPEN?
The next step should be to identify the time frame during
which questionable measurements may have been taken. This
objective is to identify a specific time when the instrument
was last known to be taking correct measurements. Often,
this is going to be the previous calibration date; the historical
calibration certificate will have this date. Basically, the
unit was known to be measuring correctly when it left the
metrology lab through its As-Left measurement data on
the most recent calibration certificate. This will provide
a starting point to work from, and most likely the longest
period to examine. If you are fortunate to have a well
developed measurement assurance program, you might
have collected additional data during the period in question
which can reduce the evaluation time frame. Most metrology
laboratories follow good metrology practices (GMetP) and
conduct mid-cycle checks, tests, and inter-comparisons,
also called cross-checks, to determine the “health” of their
measurement processes and provide confidence in the quality
of the measurement process. If these checks are documented
and have measurement data, you may be able to reduce the
period of questionable measurements. For example, let’s say
the voltmeter in a production cell was found out-of-tolerance
during its annual calibration, but you have a process where a
precision voltage source is used to verify the performance of
the voltmeter every quarter. A review of this data may allow
you to conclude the voltmeter was performing accurately 3
months ago, so the questionable period is only going to be
the last 3 months instead of 12 months which significantly
reduces the pool of potential at risk products. A schedule of
cross-checks and inter-comparisons is often developed for
critical measurements or high volume processes in order to
reduce risk, liability, and evaluation time.
WHERE IS IT USED?
The objective at this point is to identify where this instrument
has been used during the questionable period. This is where
the really big challenges can start. Typically, this is where the
last link in the chain of traceability is often broken, linking
the actual calibrated instrument to the processes, products and
services provided. The ease of identifying potential impacted
product depends upon the design of the end users processes
and systems. In a large facility test equipment can move
around without tracking its location. This is especially true of
handheld instruments and bench level instruments. A robustly
designed system with strict instrument control procedures
will be able to identify exactly where any given instrument
was located for any given time frame. Nearly all companies
have a system that assigns an identification number to each
instrument, and some even track its assigned department or
location, but few systems track the movement of equipment
within the facility and even fewer log the date and use of
instrumentation. The maintenance of such an instrument
movement log must be strictly followed, any hole or missing
location data will bring any evaluation to a halt. Imagine
a facility with 50 identical instruments that move around
different production cells without any control. It would be
impossible to identify what measurements or products it
touched and what errors went undetected. With a robust
tracking system that indicates if and when this instrument
moved, you should be able to identify where this instrument
was at any given time.
HOW IS IT USED?
The last step in the out-of-tolerance information gathering
process is to identify how the out-of-tolerance instrument
was being used. Determine exactly what measurements
were being made at a given location, during the time frame
in question. This information will likely be found in the
end users procedures, or the operator’s work instructions,
or an engineering specification. The objective at this step is
to determine whether the out-of-tolerance instrument could
have affected any of the products manufactured or services
provided by this instrument, in this time frame, in this
location, for these measurements. This can be accomplished
by reviewing the process documentation, and all revisions
that were in effect during the time frame in question, for the
out-of-tolerance measurements that were identified in the first
step. Were any of the out-of-tolerance functions, parameters,
ranges and test points used to make the measurements
listed in the process documentation? If the answer is no,
congratulations, your evaluation has ruled out the potential
risk to product. Now you just have to completely document
the steps you have taken, your conclusion and justification, as
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EMC
or only the full scale reading out of tolerance; were other
relevant test points close to or at their limits? The quality
of the calibration and quantity of data available can have a
tremendous impact on narrowing the scope of the evaluation
at this point.
A s -Fo u n d : O u t- o f-To leran c e - W h at to do nex t?
Due to the wide variety of applications and situations possible, a few sample cases will be used
EMC
to illustrate the analysis process for common situations likely to occur.
any auditor will tell you, if it isn’t written, it didn’t happen,
you must produce objective evidence.
ANALYZING THE IMPACT
If the process documentation indicates that measurements
were taken using any of the out-of-tolerance functions or
ranges, then you have to go further and quantify the severity
of the impacted products or services. Now comes the most
difficult part of the process, quantifying the impact on
products and services. In order to effectively complete this
analysis, a thorough understanding of the affected process
is necessary and a working understanding of tolerances and
the application of uncertainties is extremely helpful. Due to
the wide variety of applications and situations possible, a few
sample cases will be used to illustrate the analysis process for
common situations likely to occur.
Case 1: No Impact
Let’s say the process documentation states that the voltmeter
is used to measure a 600 V on a product with a process
tolerance of ± 10 V. Since our process measurement was not
in the out-of-tolerance portion of the meter (800 V to 1000
V), we can conclude with reasonable confidence that no
product was affected.
Case 2: Impact Evaluation Using Ratios
In Case 2 we will use accuracy ratios in our analysis. An
analysis by ratios can help quantify the potential impact by
a rough order of magnitude, but may not be sufficient. For
instance, a ratio change from 100:1 to 80:1 may be fairly
insignificant, but a ratio change from 4:1 to 2:1 could have
quite the impact on the end products. A ratio analysis may be
a quick way to rule out potential recalls if the ratios involved
are sufficiently high. However, if the ratios are low, then
additional evaluation becomes necessary. This method may
also be the only option available if there isn’t any historical
process measurement data to review. For example in this
case, the process documentation states that the voltmeter
is used to measure a 1000 V on a product with a process
tolerance of ± 50 V. Since our process measurement was in
the out-of-tolerance portion of the meter (800 V to 1000 V),
product might have been negatively impacted. We need to
go a step further and compare our process tolerance to the
magnitude of the out-of-tolerance data. The process tolerance
120 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
in this case was ± 50 V, so our process limits are 9950 V
to 1050 V. The accuracy of the meter was ± 5 V which
means the meter is 10 times more accurate than our process
tolerance giving us a Process Accuracy Ratio (50 V / 5 V) of
10:1. Now the calibration report stated the meter was reading
1008 V when the calibration lab injected a precision 1000
V into the meter, which basically means the meter behaved
as if it had an accuracy of ± 8 V which drops our Process
Accuracy Ratio (50 V/ 8 V) to 6.25:1. Is the risk due to a
reduced process ratio acceptable? That comes down to a
business decision.
Case 3: Impact Evaluation Using As-Found
Calibration Data
In this case, the process documentation states that the
voltmeter is used to measure a 1000 V on a product with a
process tolerance of ± 50 V. Since our process measurement
was in the out-of-tolerance portion of the meter (800 V to
1000 V), product might have been negatively impacted. We
need to go a step further and compare our process tolerance
to the magnitude of the out-of-tolerance data. The process
tolerance in this case was ± 50 V, so our process limits are
9950 V to 1050 V. The out-of-tolerance data indicated that the
meter was reading 1008 V, or out of specification, beyond the
upper tolerance limit of 1005 V, by +3 V. This additional 3
Volt error is well below our ± 50 V process tolerance, so there
wasn’t a problem…. or was there? You might want to jump
to that conclusion, and you would be correct as long as your
process stayed centered on 1000 V, but what if your process
moved around and didn’t stay centered? Isn’t that why
process tolerances are created to begin with! To figure out
what is going on here, go back to the fact that the meter was
reading high by +8V; the meter has a total +8 V bias or offset.
The meter was actually delivering process limits of 9958 V to
1058 V. Which means any measurements greater than 1042 V
during the time frame in question actually exceeded the upper
process limit. With this information, you should review any
historical process measurement data you have and identify
any products that had measurements greater than 1042 V. You
have now identified the specific units that might have been
impacted by the out-of-tolerance unit and may have to be
recalled. But wait, there’s more! Remember, no measurement
is perfect, so what about the metrology labs measurement
data, doesn’t that have some error in it too? Why yes, yes it
does….
www.incompliancemag.com
As-Found: Out-of-Tolerance - What to do n ext ?
All this evaluation and analysis is a tremendous amount of work. However, it does not have
to be difficult. A well thought out electronic system linking instrumentation to processes and
product traceability as part of a measurement assurance program can ease the burden.
Continuing with Case 3 information, let’s say the metrology
lab reported their uncertainty for the measurement: 1008 V
± 7.1 mV. That means the value they report lies somewhere
between 1007.9929 V and 1008.0071 V. This additional
uncertainty will carry on down to the process tolerance
calculation. So in the worst case the meter was actually
delivering process limits of 9957.9929 V to 1058.0071 V,
which in our case is insignificant because the resolution of
the meter is not sensitive enough to see this small difference
in voltage. It is interesting to note that in this situation
the metrology lab had an uncertainty of ±7.1 mV for the
calibration against the unit’s tolerance of ± 5 V which
provides a calibration Test Uncertainty Ratio of 704:1 (5 V /
7.1 mV) meaning the calibration lab standards were over 704
times more accurate than the meter being calibrated. Here is
where the value of that pesky Test Uncertainty Ratio those
metrology guys are always talking about comes into play.
Had the metrology laboratory’s uncertainty been ± 1.25 V,
their reported measurement would have been 1008 V ± 1.25
V, and the TUR would have been 4:1 (5 V/ 1.25 V) meaning
the meter would have actually been delivering process limits
of 9957.675 V to 1059.25 V, which when rounded by the
resolutions of the meter become 9958 V to 1059 V. Now
this additional count might not seem like a big deal, but it
does increase the size of the potential recall and increase the
potential risk and cost.
Again, here is where a complete calibration report with AsFound and As-Left data becomes very helpful. This is also
the point where the Test Uncertainty Ratio (TUR) and the
Uncertainty of the Calibration Laboratory come into play and
why all calibrations should include uncertainties for every
measurement. The laboratory’s uncertainty information on the
measurements they provide will give you the information to
further refine your evaluation and subsequent analysis. Every
bit of measurement information at your disposal allows you
to make additional distinctions, observations, calculations
and improves the quality and confidence in your conclusions
and recommendations for further actions. The cost of a single
product recall will far exceed the additional cost associated
with a complete calibration which includes As-Found and AsLeft data with uncertainties.
As cases 2, 3, and 4 illustrate, an out-of-tolerance instrument
that could affect the end product or service can lead to a
tremendous amount of work because the analysis will need
to be completed for each product or service identified. This
could lead to hundreds or thousands of calculations! As you
can imagine, any effort spent in the four steps (what, when,
where, and how) in the evaluation process which eliminates
additional products to be analyzed is well worth the time.
When faced with an As-Found: Out-Of-Tolerance (OOT)
condition, a systematic approach to identify what the out-oftolerance values were, when, where and how the OOT unit
was used, will help concentrate your efforts to identify those
areas that will need further analysis. The objective is to filter
out as many possible items that do not need closer analysis
so you can get to the ones where detailed analysis is required
in order to quantify the impact to the products or services
provided.
All this evaluation and analysis is a tremendous amount
of work. However, it does not have to be difficult. A well
thought out electronic system linking instrumentation to
processes and product traceability as part of a measurement
assurance program can ease the burden of out-of-tolerance
evaluations and analysis. A measurement assurance program
is more than a calibration program; it is a thought process to
link and relate measurements through the entire produce life
cycle, from concept to end product. Hopefully this approach
and general guidelines will ease the burden to solving one of
the most dreaded situations in the measurement world: the
evaluation of an out-of-tolerance instrument and its potential
impact.
Phil Mistretta is a Metrology Manager
for Transcat Inc. in Rochester, NY. He has
a background in EMC/EMI compliance
testing, lean manufacturing engineering
and over 25 year of experience in the field
of Metrology. He is member of IEEE and
ASQ and is an ASQ-Certified Calibration
Technician. He is a graduate of Central
Texas College and pursuing a BS in Engineering Physics at
the University of Buffalo New York on a part time basis.
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 121
EMC
Case 4: Impact Evaluation Using As-Found
Calibration Data and the Lab’s Uncertainty
EMC
EMC in
Military Equipment
BY DARYL GERKE, PE, AND BILL KIMMEL, PE
M
ilitary EMC design can be particularly vexing.
Multiple environments combined with multiple
threats lead to multiple requirements. The threat
levels, and the resulting requirements, are usually more
stringent than found in the commercial world.
Furthermore, military systems are often subjected to multiple
threats. These threats are typically more severe than in
commercial environments. Here are some examples of five
general environments and their associated threats, and how
they contrast with nonmilitary environments.
As a result, commercial design techniques are often woefully
inadequate for military applications. This can lead to
frustration for those moving into military EMC from other
areas. It can also lead to frustration to those wishing to use
COTS (commercial off the shelf) equipment in military
environments.
Fixed Land Based - This environment includes residential
and office buildings. For commercial electronics, these are
considered relatively benign in terms of EMC. As an aside,
this is the primary EMC environment for most commercial
electronics.
MULTIPLE ENVIRONMENTS WITH
MULTIPLE THREATS
The emissions concerns are moderate, and are aimed at
protecting nearby television receivers. The susceptibility
concerns are a bit more challenging, and include threats
such as RF (radio frequency) energy from nearby hand
held radio transmitters, human ESD (electrostatic discharge),
and power disturbances such as lightning or EFT (electrical
fast transients.)
Unlike commercial equipment, military systems may need to
work in a wide range of environments. These can range from
the arctic to the desert, and from the bottom of the ocean to
outer space. Fortunately, most systems only need to operate
in selected environments, rather than in every potential
situation. This leads to subsets of requirements, and even
tailoring in select cases.
These same buildings on a military base, however,
may pose much more severe conditions, particularly for
radiated emissions and susceptibility. Both field levels
and frequency ranges can be much higher than
commercial environments. Due to radar systems,
those frequencies can extend to 40 GHz or more,
In this article, we’ll explore some of the unique EMC
challenges presented by military electronics, and how they
differ from those of the commercial world.
122 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
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EMC in Militar y Equipm e nt
well above the typical 1 - 5 GHz upper limits for
commercial equipment. Also, many military systems are
designed to include protection against EMP (electromagnetic
pulse) effects from nuclear weapons, which adds another
level of complexity.
Mobile Land Based - These environments include cars, trucks,
buses, etc. Even for commercial vehicular electronics, these
can be quite harsh. The emissions concerns are severe, and
usually aimed at protecting entertainment radios (AM/FM),
with secondary concerns for protecting land mobile VHF/UHF
radios. The susceptibility concerns are also severe, and include
RF, ESD, and a range of power transients and other power
disturbances unique to vehicles.
Military vehicles share these same concerns, but as with
fixed systems, the frequencies and amplitudes may be well
above commercial levels. Nevertheless, commercial vehicular
electronics can be expected to do fairly well in military
environments, but may need some additional protection for
radar and EMP.
Due to their experience working with harsh environments,
we’ve found that commercial vehicular EMC engineers often
have a relatively easy time making the transition to military
electronics.
Marine Based - These environments include large surface
ships, submarines, and even smaller water craft. Ships with
metal hulls have vastly different EMC concerns depending
on whether the equipment is located above deck (outside) or
below deck (inside).
For both the military and commercial environment,
emissions concerns are severe and are aimed at protecting
communications and navigation receivers, including radar.
Susceptibility concerns are also severe, and include RF and
power disturbances. Since most military ships have multiple
communications and radar transmitters, the levels and
frequencies can be much higher than for commercial ships.
A classic tale of military EMC at sea was the sinking of
the HMS Sheffield in the Falkland Islands War in 1982. It
turns out there was a compatibility problem between the
satellite communications and a defensive radar system. The
One bit of good news is that ESD is usually not a big concern
for marine applications, due to high humidity conditions.
A notable exception is helicopter ESD, which has resulted
in special requirements for both helicopters and electronics
equipment (and ordnance) that might be located near a
helicopter landing pad. Lightning and EMP, of course, are
major concerns for all military naval vessels.
Air based - These environments include all aircraft, and
include small aircraft, helicopters, fighters, bombers, and
more. Like ships, EMC concerns vary depending on whether
the electronics are located inside or outside the aircraft. An
emerging concern is the use of composite material rather than
aluminum, which can affect overall shielding performance.
The commercial and military EMC environments are actually
quite similar. In fact, the predominant commercial avionics
requirements (RTCA DO-160) are derived from the military
requirements (MIL-STD-461). The commercial requirements
are even a bit more comprehensive, and include very specific
lightning and power quality requirements.
Additional military concerns include HIRF (high intensity RF)
and EMP. The former can come from radar exposure which
may be quite high in a tactical situation, or as a weapons
effect. ESD is also a big concern, particularly for helicopters
transporting materials or munitions.
Magnetic field emissions are a unique concern for
antisubmarine warfare (ASW) aircraft. One way of
locating submarines is to look for low level magnetic field
perturbations. The sub hunters need to maintain clean
electronic environments so they can detect the perturbations.
Space - This is probably the most unique and varied of
military environments. There has been very little commercial
space electronics, although this may be starting to change.
Nevertheless, we expect to see the commercial space
designers closely follow military design practices.
Due to the expense of launching hardware into space, the
EMC requirements are often highly tailored. Extensive
engineering efforts are made to optimize (and not over
design) for EMC. Extensive testing is performed to assure
EMC is achieved. After all, if something doesn’t work, it is
almost impossible to fix (the Hubble telescope being one very
expensive exception.)
Space electronics are subjected to several environments that
must be considered. For example, during pre-launch, precau-
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 123
EMC
As such, commercial emissions requirements may not
be adequate to protect nearby military communications
receivers, which can be much more sensitive that a television
receiver. Commercial susceptibility requirements may also
be inadequate, due to radio and radar transmitters with higher
radiated field levels, and EMP. The little bit of good news is
that commercial levels for ESD and power disturbances are
often still adequate.
“solution” was to disable the radar when communicating via
satellite. Unfortunately, the launch of an enemy missile went
undetected during one of these radar blackouts, and the ship
was lost due to an EMC problem.
EM C i n M i l i ta r y Eq u ip ment
Another unique space requirement is “magnetic cleanliness.” This is often a requirement for
satellites that employ magnetometers for navigation. Even small magnetic fields, from either
tions must be taken to prevent damage due to human ESD.
During launch, precautions must be taken to prevent damage
due to triboelectric charging and also due to high RF levels
from tracking radar, etc. In a tactical situation, the RF may
also include antimissile efforts. Once on-orbit, space electronics are subjected to “space charging,” and also cumulative
degradation from ionizing radiation present in space.
Another unique space requirement is “magnetic cleanliness.”
This is often a requirement for satellites that employ
magnetometers for navigation. Even small magnetic
fields, from either permanent magnetization or from power
electronics, can interfere with the on orbit navigation.
Of course, nuclear weapons effects (such as EMP and
ionizing radiation) are a also a major concern for military
space electronics.
MILITARY EMC REQUIREMENTS
These various environments and threats have resulted in
specific EMC requirements. Although these have evolved
over the years, we now have two major military EMC
requirements, MIL-STD-461 and MIL-STD-464.
Source: MIL-STD-461F
EMC
permanent magnetization or from power electronics, can interfere with the on orbit navigation.
124 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
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EMC in Militar y Equipm e nt
Most commercial designs focus on circuit board design, and then apply shielding as needed.
Military systems, however, take the opposite approach, emphasizing shielding (and other
systems design issues) over the circuit boards.
CE - Conducted Emissions
CS - Conducted Susceptibility
RE - Radiated Emissions
RS - Radiated Susceptibility
These are further subdivided into specific tests, with a
three number designator, such as RE101. As an aside,
older versions of MIL-STD-461 (A,B, and C) used the
same nomenclature but with two number designators, such
as CS06. This distinction is important, as legacy systems
may still be using the older versions of MIL-STD-461 for
qualification purposes. For more details, see MIL-STD-461F,
Table IV.
Note that not all tests are required for all equipment. Rather,
different tests and different levels are recommended for
various situations. These recommendations are based on
anticipated environments and threats. For more details, see
MIL-STD-461F, Table V (page 126).
Note that requirements may vary among the different services
for similar equipment. For example, the electric field radiated
emissions (RE102) differ for Army, Air Force, and some
Navy aircraft. Since Air Force and most Navy aircraft rarely
use radios below the 2 MHz, they have no recommended
requirements at the lower frequencies, while the Army goes
down to 10 kHz.
Special cases may deserve special attention. For example,
Navy aircraft used for antisubmarine warfare extend their
electric field emissions (RE102) down to 10 kHz. They also
include magnetic field emission requirements (RE101) that
are not recommended for other Navy aircraft. The reason is
that hunting for submarines often means detecting low
level magnetic fields at low frequencies. In order to detect
these fields, the local environment must be clean at those low
frequencies.
There are two important philosophical differences between
MIL-STD-461 and commercial requirements. First,
MIL-STD-461 can be tailored as needed. Second, test failures
can be waived. Of course, both require the customer to agree.
We feel both of these options should be considered as needed,
as they often yield good EMC systems engineering solutions.
One caveat on MIL-STD-461. It is not a guarantee of
ultimate EMC, but rather it increases the overall probability
of success. You still need to plug everything together and see
if it works.
MIL-STD-464, the second common EMC requirement, is
applied at the systems or platform level. This document
supersedes a number of older documents, and addresses
grounding, bonding, lightning, EMP, HIRF, and more. Since
this requirement applies to the platform level, it is often of
secondary concern to the box/module designer.
Unlike MIL-STD-461, the actual test methods are not well
defined in MIL-STD-464. This makes sense, as these are
platform requirements, and platforms can vary widely. But as
a result, these requirements can be difficult if not impossible
to validate at the box level.
In spite of the system emphasis, we have seen increasing
attempts by the platform designers to “flow down” their
system requirements to the box designer. Since systems level
testing is not appropriate at the box level, the result is often
a request for engineering analysis. This is certainly prudent
early in the design, but should not be a substitute for testing
later at the full system/platform level.
DESIGN SOLUTIONS – SYSTEMS ENGINEERING
OVER CIRCUIT BOARDS
This is an area where commercial and military systems differ
in their EMC approaches. Most commercial designs focus
on circuit board design, and then apply shielding as needed.
Military systems, however, take the opposite approach,
emphasizing shielding (and other systems design issues) over
the circuit boards.
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 125
EMC
MIL-STD-461 is applied at the module (box) level.
The current revision level is MIL-STD-461F, and should be
applied to new procurements. Existing equipment may use
earlier versions, so it is important to be sure you are using the
correct version when dealing with updates or legacy systems.
MIL-STD-461F provides both recommended test levels and
the test procedures for a number of different tests. These are
divided into four broad categories:
We’ve seen this subtle difference cause frustration for
designers moving from commercial to military electronics.
We recall one young EMC engineer who was questioning
why his new company even hired him. As he said, “All they
worry about here is grounding, shielding, and cables. They
aren’t even using my circuit board experience.” He felt much
better after we assured him that his EMC experience was
indeed very valuable – only the focus was different.
Most military systems are already in metal enclosures. Thus,
shielding becomes a key EMC design approach. Furthermore,
many military systems use embedded controllers, and don’t
need the latest and greatest speeds and raw performance. As a
result, there is more emphasis on systems design, and less on
circuit board design. (We still recommend good EMC circuit
board design practices for military electronics.)
The systems design solutions often revolve around interfaces.
These include the following:
Power - This is an energy interface. Design protection of
this interface typically combines passive circuits (filters and
transient protection) with active power supply circuits.
The goal is to provide clean regulated output power under
varying input conditions. Since the bandwidth for power is
low, the input power wiring is often unshielded.
Signal - This is an information interface. Design protection
of this interface typically includes a combination of passive
circuits (filters and transient protection) with active I/O
circuit design. Due to bandwidth requirements, filtering is
often traded off with external cable shielding or even fiber
optics. Thus, cables and connectors also become an important
part of this interface, along with the specific I/O circuits.
Grounding - This is primarily a safety interface, but it also
affects the power and signal interfaces. The primary strategy
here is topology control. Single point grounds are preferred
for low frequency circuits, such as analog sensors and input
power. Multi-point grounds are preferred for high frequency
circuits, such as digital and RF circuits. Hybrid grounding
approaches (using capacitors and inductors to make
grounding paths and connections frequency dependent) are
often used when both types of circuits or threats are present.
Source: MIL-STD-461F
EMC
EM C i n M i l i ta r y Eq u ip ment
126 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
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EMC in Militar y Equipm e nt
In addition to interfaces, risk management is an important
aspect for EMC systems design. This is accomplished
several ways:
Design reviews - Most military programs follow a detailed
design procedure that includes formal design reviews at
critical junctures. Additional design checkpoints may also
be employed. We often recommend dedicated EMC reviews.
These can be brief, yet can be helpful in uncovering potential
EMC problems early in the design process.
Engineering tests and analysis - Many military programs
depend on test and analysis throughout the design process to
validate design approaches. We certainly encourage this.
Documentation - Most military programs have mandatory
documentation requirements. These typically include an
EMC Control Plan, and EMC Test Plan, and an EMC Test
Report. All three are used to document the process, and as
communications tools between the contractor and customers.
Yes, we know that most engineers don’t like documentation,
but this is a very important part of the EMC systems
design process.
MISSION SUCCESS TRUMPS COST
All this design effort, analysis, test, and documentation costs
money, which can lead to complaints about $100 hammers or
$400 toilet seats. In spite of carping by politicians, the extra
costs are usually justified. Furthermore, since most military
systems have relatively low volumes, there are fewer units
over which to amortize the extra engineering and test costs.
Military equipment must operate as designed and when
needed. Reliability is crucial. For example, you can’t power
down or push the reset button on a missile or torpedo after it
has been launched. Furthermore, you don’t want them turning
around and coming back home.
The true bottom line is not cost, but mission success.
Remember, lives are often at stake. Our servicemen and
women who go in harm’s way deserve the absolute best
engineering we can deliver – EMC and otherwise!
CONCLUSIONS
1. Military EMC is different from commercial EMC. There
are multiple environments to consider, with multiple
threats. Those are usually much more severe than
commercial threats.
2. Complex military systems require systems engineering
approach. The focus is often on interfaces, rather than
on circuit boards. Design reviews and documentation are
critical to keep everyone in the loop and on schedule.
3. Mission success trumps costs, and reliability is key.
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Daryl Gerke and William Kimmel, “Focus on Military
EMC,” Kimmel Gerke Bullets, Spring 2002.
Daryl Gerke and William Kimmel, “Military EMC and
the Revival of EMC Systems Engineering,” Interference
Technology, 2003 Annual Guide.
William Kimmel and Daryl Gerke, “Military EMC: A New
Ball Game,” Compliance Engineering, 2003 Annual Guide.
Daryl Gerke and William Kimmel, “EMC in Space,”
Interference Technology, 2005 Annual Guide.
William Kimmel and Daryl Gerke, “Addressing EMC in
Harsh Environments,” Compliance Engineering, 2005
Annual Guide.
Daryl Gerke, PE and Bill Kimmel, PE are
the founding partners of Kimmel Gerke
Associates, Ltd. The firm specializes in
EMC consulting and training, and has
offices in Minnesota and Arizona. The firm
was founded in 1978 and has been in full
time EMC practice since 1987.
Daryl and Bill have solved or prevented
hundreds of EMC problems in a wide range
of industries - computers, medical, military,
avionics, industrial controls, vehicular
electronics and more. They have also
trained over 10,000 designers through their
public and in-house EMC seminars.
Daryl and Bill are both degreed Electrical Engineers,
registered Professional Engineers, and NARTE Certified
EMC Engineers. Between them, they share over 80 years of
industry experience. For more information and resources,
visit their web site at www.emiguru.com.
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 127
EMC
Shielding - This is an electromagnetic field interface.
This is usually bi-directional, and designed to contain
internal electromagnetic fields (emissions) while providing
protection against external electromagnetic fields
(susceptibility.) Design strategies include metallic enclosures,
and then sealing any penetrations or discontinuities with
gasket, screening, and filters.
Product Design
How to Get the Design Right the First Time
Product Safety
BY CHERIE FORBES
Y
ou spend months, or even years, designing a product.
After it’s all ready to be shipped to your customer,
you find out that you need a safety certification
mark. So in a panic, you send the product off to a test lab
for evaluation. The shipment is sitting in your loading bay
waiting for the final certification to arrive and then the bad
news arrives. Your test lab tells you that it fails! This is not
only heartbreaking, but time, effort and money are wasted
in redesign. Not to mention the delay in shipping your
product to the customer! Everyone is looking at you and
wondering why it wasn’t initially designed correctly. If only
you had a manual entitled “Things I need to know to design
my product to ensure that it will pass safety testing”! Oh
wait…you do! It’s called a safety standard. It may have been
published by the IEC, UL or CSA, but it contains everything
you need to know, right there, in black and white.
If designers have access to safety standards, why is it that
most products submitted for certification have a flaw of some
sort that causes the product to fail the safety evaluation?
Sometimes these flaws are minor in nature (e.g. missing
label, wrong wire color used) which don’t take much
time to fix. But sometimes the flaws require a complete
redesign (e.g. replace the power supply, redesign circuit
boards, redesign the enclosure). Why don’t designers pay
more attention to the requirements? A variety of reasons
come to mind: lack of time to research the requirements,
lack of knowledge that the safety standard exists,
miscommunication within the design team, etc. Even if the
designer doeslook at the standards, it is often difficult to
128 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
understand the requirements (if you can find them). Anyone
who has read a safety standard will agree that they are not
easy to understand, and tend to bring on lengthy discussions
when it comes to interpretation of the requirements.
What is a designer to do? There are a variety of steps that the
designer can take to help insure against costly redesigns.
DETERMINE THE MARKET WHERE THE
PRODUCT WILL BE SOLD
The first thing to find out is exactly where your company
will want to sell this product. Your marketing department
may have already determined this (but may not have shared
this with the design team). North American manufacturers
will often focus on sales in North America, only later to
be surprised when they find out the extent of the redesign
required to comply with European requirements. Knowing
the target market may affect many aspects of the design:
voltage ratings, component selection, wiring methods, etc.
For example, selecting an auto-ranging power supply (100240V) will allow your product to be used in Europe (220240V), Japan (100V) and North America (120V). If you’ve
designed for the North American market only, you may
have neglected the other voltage options, resulting in a
costly redesign.
© 2009 IEEE. Reprinted with permission from the author and the IEEE
from the 2009 Symposium on Product Compliance Engineering Proceedings
www.incompliancemag.com
P ro d u c t Design: How to Get the Design Right the F irst Ti m e
Some countries, such as Japan, have a list of products that
need to be certified. Any product not on this list does not
need to be evaluated for safety. It’s important to look into this
beforehand so you can learn the requirements (if any) before
designing your product.
DETERMINE THE CORRECT SAFETY STANDARD
FOR THE PRODUCT
Now that you know where your product will be sold and
the certification marks required for each market, you can
determine the safety standard(s) that apply to your product. If
you are designing Information Technology Equipment (ITE),
you are fortunate because many countries have adopted the
same safety standard (IEC 60950-1) [1] and only tweaked it
slightly to meet with their National Electrical Codes. Often
meeting the requirements for one country will meet the
requirement of other countries sharing the same standard.
Some products are not so lucky and have different standards
in each country. For example, Industrial Control Equipment
has a standard in the United States (UL 508) [2], a very
Product Safety
Now that you know what countries you will be targeting,
determine what safety related marks are required. The United
States and Canada have a variety of options available; many
certifiers (e.g. CSA, UL, TUV Rheinland, etc.) are accredited
by both the Standards Council of Canada (SCC) and the
Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) as a
Nationally Recognized Test Lab (NRTL). Knowing that you
can talk to a single certifier to gain simultaneous marks for
both countries will make things much easier.
Europe uses a self-evaluation method called the CE Mark.
The CE Mark declares compliance to all the directives
applicable to the product (e.g. Low Voltage Directive, EMC
Directive, and Machinery Directive). Because it is a selfevaluation mark, manufacturers can evaluate the product
themselves (with a high level of risk to the manufacturer),
or use an agency to evaluate the product on their behalf
(low level of risk). Europe has some extra requirements to
consider, namely the RoHS and WEEE directives, which
have specific restrictions on toxins (mercury, lead commonly
used in solder, etc.) and requirements for disposal methods.
Many component manufacturers have lead-free alternates to
be selected for European markets.
P ro d u ct D e s i g n : How to Get t h e De sign R ight the F irst Tim e
different standard in Canada (CSA C22.2 No. 14) [3], and a
completely different standard in Europe (EN 61010-1) [4]. In
circumstances such as this, you may need to design with three
different standards in mind!
Product Safety
Knowing what the applicable standards are will allow you to
purchase them, review their requirements, and use your new
knowledge in the design of your product.
SELECT COMPONENTS THAT ARE SUITABLE
FOR THE STANDARD
Most safety standards contain a list of component standards
that are acceptable for compliance. Use these when selecting
components! The safety standards generally allow for
two choices: (1) evaluate the component to the applicable
component standard (as listed in the standard), or (2) evaluate
the component to the product’s safety standard. If the
component is already certified to the applicable component
standard, you can be assured that the component is suitable
and will not require additional testing. An uncertified
component (including CE marking because it is self-declared)
will require additional testing. In general, this testing is at an
additional cost and will extend the amount of time allotted for
certification.
Keep in mind that each standard may have different
requirements for components. For example, the ITE standard
for the United States will list many UL standards that need
to be met. Since UL standards are used in the United States
only, these certifications alone will not be suitable for the
European market.
OBTAIN COMPONENT LICENSES
Many component datasheets and catalogues state the safety
certification marks and safety standards that the components
have been evaluated to. Don’t believe them. The marketing
teams that produce these datasheets and catalogues make
mistakes, incorrect assumptions, or use outdated information.
You need to collect proof that each component is certified
according to their claims.
Some agencies, such as UL, CSA and TUV Rheinland, have
powerful databases on their webpage that allow you to search
for licenses. Use these online tools for all your components!
Now that you are sure that the certifications are valid,
you need to ensure that you are using the component
according to its ratings. Often these ratings are listed on the
agency websites and are easy to check. However, for some
components, finding the listing on the agency website is not
enough. Sometimes the certification record is vague, doesn’t
list the exact standard, doesn’t include things like current and
130 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
voltage ratings, etc. The only practical way to be sure that the
component will be acceptable is to get the licenses from the
manufacturer. Component licenses will sometimes include
an important section entitled “Conditions of Acceptability”,
because the component evaluation is not a complete
product evaluation. The Conditions of Acceptability include
conditions that will need to be met in the end-use product
(e.g. enclosure requirements, wiring details) and assumptions
that were made during certification (e.g. required airflow,
fusing). UL provides this for every component certification
in their UL Recognition Program. Other certifiers may
provide the conditions, but not always. It is crucial to obtain
the Conditions of Acceptability for key components such as
power supplies, dc-dc converters and transformers.
Read the Conditions of Acceptability and license and ask
yourself “Am I using this component according to its
rating?” If you will be using a power supply in a 60°C
environment, but the license states a rating of 40°C, then you
are using that supply outside its ratings. Never mind that the
manufacturer may have provided a derating curve in their
datasheet. If it hasn’t been evaluated by a certifying agency,
consider it to be unproven and therefore unreliable. Using a
component outside of its ratings will void the certification
of the component and result in retesting of the component
in your specific equipment. This is an extra cost and hassle
that should be avoided if possible. One simple way of correct
this is to source a more suitable component with the correct
ratings or adjust your equipment ratings.
Also ask yourself if you are meeting all the conditions stated
in the Conditions of Acceptability. If the Conditions of
Acceptability state that there must be airflow over the power
supply, make sure you are providing that same airflow. If the
Conditions of Acceptability state that a terminal block is not
for field wiring, you cannot use that terminal for field wiring!
You must evaluate these Conditions of Acceptability as they
apply to your product with a critical eye!
One more thing to consider is to make sure the licenses you
receive from the manufacturer are current! Manufacturers are
eager to send you agency licenses that show compliance to
old standards or cancelled certificates. Always double check
that the component is still certified (confirm on the agency
website), and ensure that the standard (and the edition of
the standard) used for compliance is listed in your product’s
safety standard.
Remember, even if the component is certified, if it’s not
certified to the correct component standard, used outside of
its ratings, or certified to an older version of the standard,
consider it to be uncertified. If you include that component
into your design, you will have increased certification costs to
cover the extra evaluation and testing.
www.incompliancemag.com
Austin, TX
Call for Papers, Workshops, and Tutorials
The IEEE Product Safety Engineering Society seeks original, unpublished
papers and tutorials on all aspects of product safety and compliance
engineering within the following scheduled tracks:
Forensics Track
Leadership Track
ITE Product Compliance Track
Medical Devices Track
Risk Assessment Track
Author’s Schedule:
All dates require that the
associated documents be loaded
into EDAS by the due date
Abstract/Draft Formal Paper
Presentation Submission
May 21, 2013
General Track - Papers and presentations in the General
Track will include:
Notification of Abstract Acceptance
June 7, 2013
 Product Specific
 Hazard Specific
 EMC / RF
 Components
 Certification
 Standards Activities
 Research
 Environmental
 Demonstration Papers
Final Paper/Presentation submission
July 19, 2013
Acceptance of Papers
August 16, 2013
Please go to the Author page of the ISPCE web for comprehensive
submission instructions including paper templates on the Authors tab
at: www.psessymposium.org
ISPCE 2013 will be held at the Westin Austin at the Domain
Single/Double Rate: $149
**Keynote Speaker**
Joe Bhatia
President and CEO of ANSI
(American National Standards Institute)
P ro d u ct D e s i g n : How to Get t h e De sign R ight the F irst Tim e
DESIGN A SUITABLE ENCLOSURE
Product Safety
There are many things to look for when designing an
enclosure for your product. Not only does it have to match
the “look” that your marketing department desires, but it has
to be functional and pass the tests of the appropriate safety
standard. There are a variety of things to look at, including
material selection, material thickness, openings (including
ventilation) and sturdiness necessary to pass the tests of the
standard.
Material Selection
Are you considering a plastic enclosure or metal enclosure?
Plastic enclosures have some additional requirements to
consider, such as flammability ratings of the plastic. These
details are described in the safety standard. Consider the
plastic to be a component and look it up on the agency
website (UL has an excellent online database for plastics).
Make sure the specific plastic you are using is listed there,
with the appropriate flammability rating and in the correct
color. If your plastic is not listed on this website, not only will
you be required to have flammability testing conducted, but
annual confirmation tests will also be required (at additional
cost to you).
Material Thickness
Plastics that are certified will have been tested at a specific
thickness. Often the flammability rating will differ depending
on the thickness of the plastic. Making sure that the minimum
thickness in your enclosure is greater than that listed on the
agency certification is critical.
Openings
Tests
Enclosure tests are commonly conducted in safety
evaluations. The enclosure must be sturdy enough that it
won’t allow a hazard to occur after falling, being leaned on,
stood on, impacted, heated, cooled, exposed to UV radiation,
or any other foreseeable situation that may affect the safety
of the product. You need to consider all the possible tests that
will be conducted, as described in the safety standard, and
design accordingly.
DETERMINE THE REQUIRED SPACINGS
Knowing what spacings are required between different types
of circuits, or between a circuit and an accessible part (i.e.
the enclosure) is critical. Planning and designing your wiring
boards when you know what is required will save you much
time and effort, and will avoid that costly redesign.
Identification of Circuits
The first step is to identify different circuits and accessible
parts (i.e. mains circuit, unearthed secondary circuit, earthed
enclosure, floating enclosure, etc.).
Create a Block Diagram
Each of these circuits and parts can be considered (and drawn
as) a block. Include components that bridge these different
blocks (i.e. a transformer, capacitor, relay, etc.). Litter your
block diagram with arrows between blocks to indicate where
insulation is required. See Figure 1 for a sample block diagram.
Determine the Level of Insulation Required
Referencing the safety standard, determine the type of
insulation required between each of the blocks identified with
an arrow. Examples of insulation include: basic insulation,
reinforced insulation, and supplementary insulation.
Openings in the enclosure, generally for ventilation
purposes, create a few
challenges: (1) if they are too
big the user may be able
to touch the circuit inside,
creating a shock hazard, (2)
if the enclosure is providing
a fire enclosure the openings
may allow flaming particles
to exit or enter the enclosure,
thereby defeating the purpose
of the fire enclosure, and (3)
large openings that house
a fan or moving part could
introduce pinch hazards
without suitable shielding.
Ensure that all your openings
comply with the requirements
of the standard.
Figure 1: Sample block diagram
132 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
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P ro d u c t Design: How to Get the Design Right the F irst Ti m e
Using Tables in the Standard
Determine the creepage distances and clearances required
for each of the locations indicated with an arrow. These
requirements are found in the safety standard, generally in
tables. The required distances will differ depending on the
working voltage and the type of circuit.
SINGLE FAULT EXAMINATION
Knowing what single fault tests will be conducted on your
product will help immensely during your design. You need to
design your product so it can withstand the fault applied and
remain safe. A fire or a shock hazard is unacceptable. Single
fault tests include shorting and overloading transformer
windings, short circuiting or open circuiting components
(i.e. capacitors, legs of optocouplers, transistors, resistors,
etc.), blocking air ventilation openings and stalling fans.
Anticipating these faults and designing protection devices
(such as fuses) into your design will be extremely beneficial.
It’s critical to know the market your product will be shipped
to before the product design is started. Once you know this,
you can use the appropriate safety standards when designing
your product. Using consultants to assist with understanding
the safety standard is another option to be considered.
If you are unfamiliar with the appropriate safety standards
that will be used to evaluate your product during safety
certification testing, your design will most likely fail. Your
components may not be suitable, your enclosure may be
inadequate, your circuits may need to be redesigned, etc.
When your product fails during safety certification, you
will be charged more for extra evaluation. Furthermore,
certification failure significantly delays your time to market
while you spend time and effort to fix the problems.
Designing to meet the safety standard is the smartest thing
you can do!
REFERENCES
1. IEC 60950-1: 2005, Information Technology Equipment –
Safety – Part 1: General Requirements.
OTHER STANDARD REQUIREMENTS
2. UL 508, Seventeenth Edition, UL Standard for Safety for
Industrial Control Equipment.
Every safety standard is different. You, as the designer,
need to thoroughly go through the standard to make sure all
requirements are met. There will be clauses about earthing
methods and bonding tests, requirements for the sizes of wire
used, disconnect devices, fusing requirements, touch current
requirements, electric strength testing requirements, etc.
Knowledge of these requirements will improve your design.
3. CAN/CSA-C22.2 No. 14-05, Tenth Edition, Industrial
Control Equipment.
USING CONSULTANTS WHO UNDERSTAND THE
REQUIREMENTS OF YOUR SAFETY STANDARDS
Consultants familiar with your safety standard can be a
genuine asset for your design team. They have experience
with the safety standard and agencies. They know what
requirements you need to consider and can identify common
pitfalls. They can advise you on the suitability of the
components selected and assist with the design of your
product (i.e. enclosure design, circuit board layout, etc.).
Relying on a consultant will allow you to focus on other
aspects of the design, feeling confident that the design
will not result in failures during safety certification and
evaluation.
4. EN 61010-1: 2001, Safety Requirements for Electrical
Equipment for Measurement, Control, and Laboratory Use –
Part 1: General Requirements.
Cherie Forbes is an electrical engineer
focused on helping manufacturers gain
safety certifications such as UL and CSA.
She has worked in the product safety
industry for fifteen years and is currently
an independent consultant at CertAssist
Consulting Inc. She was formerly Manager
of Engineering for Lamothe Approvals and
has published numerous articles and conducted seminars to
aid manufacturers with product design. She is currently a
member of IEEE Product Safety Engineering Society (PSES),
Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME), Professional
Engineers of Ontario (PEO) and Silicon Halton. She can be
reached at [email protected] or www.linkedin.com/
in/forbescherie.
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 133
Product Safety
After determining the required spacings, ensure you are
applying these when laying out printed wiring boards.
Also consider clearances between boards and enclosures or
between adjacent boards.
SUMMARY
Product Safety
Occupational Hazards of
the Safety Engineer
OSHA Meets UL
BY TED ECKERT
T
he job of the product safety engineer is to reduce
the risks associated with a product to an acceptably
low level. The product safety engineer is interested
in protecting the life and health of the customer who
will use the product. However, the testing involved in
safety engineering can entail some risks of its own. The
environment for safety testing itself needs to be designed to
provide an adequate level of safety for the person performing
the test. This requires appropriate test equipment, properly
designed environment, well documented procedures, personal
protective equipment, training and monitoring of personnel
who have access to the test lab.
There are numerous potential risks in the safety test lab,
and these typically are similar to the potential risks we test
for in our products. There are electrical hazards including
shock and arc blast. There are thermal hazards including
burns and the risk of flame. Mechanical hazards include
risks from hazardous moving parts or from heavy objects
crushing body parts. High energy lasers can be exposed in
testing, and electrical arcs will generate significant amounts
of UV light creating a risk of cataract formation in the eye.
Medical products may generate ionizing radiation. There are
even chemical exposure hazards for some testing. All of these
potential risks need to be properly addressed and mitigated.
INJURY STATISTICS
It is difficult to find statistics for injuries in the product
safety testing profession. As a profession, the number of
134 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
practitioners is small and it doesn’t warrant its own category
by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). However, the
BLS does record injuries as a rate per 100 workers, and it
is reasonable to put product safety engineering in the same
category as electrical manufacturing. For the most part, the
types of hazards are similar. While the time spent at a desk
will lessen the product safety engineer’s total exposure time
to hazards, it also reduces their experience and practice.
An analogous situation would be comparing a professional
carpenter versus a weekend woodworker. The professional
may be exposed to the risk of injury for 40 hours a week,
but this gives them the practice and experience to do the
work right. The weekend woodworker may spend only 4
hours a week with a table saw, but their lack of experience
significantly raises the risk of injury.
The BLS keeps records of reportable injuries, which are
injuries severe enough to require medical treatment. The
most recent BLS statistics are for 2009 where there were
3.5 reportable injuries per 100 workers in the electrical
equipment, appliance and component manufacturing
industry [1]. This is the most appropriate recorded category
to extrapolate for product safety engineering and it shows a
real risk of injury. Product safety testing is too small of an
industry to be broken out separately by BLS, and it is likely
that many injuries sustained during safety testing are not
reported as worker compensation claims.
© 2011 IEEE. Reprinted, with permission, from the proceedings of the
2011 IEEE International Symposium on Product Compliance Engineering.
www.incompliancemag.com
Occupational Hazards of the Safety Engin e e r
The rate of fatalities is a harder to extrapolate as the total
number is lower and doesn’t allow the BLS to categorize
fatalities by narrow industry sectors. The total for 2009 in the
United States was 4,551 out of approximately 130 million
workers [2]. The fatality rate for the manufacturing sector
was only about two thirds the overall rate for private industry,
and this represents about one fatality per 1500 injuries in the
electrical manufacturing sector. I do not have sufficiently
specific data and I will not extrapolate to the product safety
testing industry.
Product safety testing laboratories must comply with the
applicable occupational health and safety regulations of the
jurisdiction in which they are located. The general principles
of regulations are generally similar between North America
and Europe. The application of these principles and the level
of enforcement may be more variable in other jurisdictions,
but I will address
The United States
and Canada
specifically and
Europe in general.
The governing
authority in the
United States is
the Occupational
Safety and Health
Administration
(OSHA) under
the Department of Labor [3]. The OSHA rules apply to
almost all employees in the private sector. Although there
is a common belief that small employers are exempt from
OSHA rules, this is a misunderstanding. The enforcement
procedures may differ depending on the employer’s size, and
although OSHA will rarely audit a company with ten or fewer
workers, these companies are still subject to the regulations.
The OSHA regulations cover general work practices and
some specific work situations. However, the requirements
are NFPA and ANSI standards which are incorporated into
OSHA regulations by reference [4]. The OSHA directly
covers requirements for training, monitoring and reporting of
injuries along with safety practices common among different
work environments.
While OSHA is reviewing and adoption NFPA 70E for
electrical safety, it is currently a reference document not
carrying mandatory requirements. Following NFPA 70E will
demonstrate due diligence should an OSHA inspector arrive
at a facility. NFPA 70E is not to be confused with NFPA
70. Whereas NFPA 70 covers the rules for the installation
of electrical equipment, NFPA 70E covers the rules for
safe work practices around exposed hazardous voltages.
Additional applicable standards referenced by OSHA are
The regulations for Canada are similar in their technical
requirements. The regulations are governed by Health
Canada under the Canada Occupational Health and Safety
Regulations [5][6]. Many specific requirements are covered
by referenced standards including the Food and Drugs Act,
Hazardous Products Act, Nuclear Safety and Control Act,
Radiation Emitting Devices Act and Controlled Products
Regulations [7-11]. The Controlled Products Regulation
for example specifically covers the marking and warning
requirements for chemicals and hazardous materials. The
specific requirements are very similar to those called out by
OSHA in the United States.
European requirements will vary from country to country.
The European Union does set some standards since the
EU is intended to allow the movement of workers across
borders without problems. The body setting policy at the
European Union level is the European Agency for Safety
at Work [12]. As with product safety regulations, there are
EU Directives regarding occupational safety that member
bodies are required to incorporate into national law. The
framework is established in Directive 89/391 with additional
Directives written to cover physical hazards, noise, radiation
exposure, personal protective equipment, hazardous material
handling and marking and many more potential hazards [13]
[14]. These Directives in turn may have specific applicable
standards. For example, EN 50191 covers the installation
and use of electrical test equipment and EN 60825-4 covers
guarding and protection when there is exposure to Class 3
or Class 4 lasers. Each country must adopt these regulations
as a minimum standard, but individual countries may
choose to enact stricter regulations. The policy regarding the
enforcement of regulations is handled at the national level
and is not determined by the European Commission.
BASIC PRINCIPLES
Many product safety engineers will groan when they think
about OSHA looking at their lab, but the general approach
espoused by Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S)
professionals can be implemented with minimal hassle
and significant benefits. A six step approach can be used;
eliminate the risk, provide adequate guarding and protection,
use proper personal protective equipment (PPE), provide
proper hazard marking and warning, train the affected
employees and use continuous improvement. Although the
final item isn’t always included in some safety programs, it
is important. Proper analysis is required whenever there is an
injury or even a “near miss”. Continuous improvement allows
you to better focus a general safety program to the narrow
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 135
Product Safety
APPLICABLE REGULATIONS
numerous and include, but are not limited to, ANSI standards
such as ANSI Z87.1-89 for eye protection, ANSI Z87.2 for
respiratory protection and ANSI A14.2-56 for metal ladder
use. Additional regulations will apply for specific risks such
as laser and X-ray testing.
Oc c u p at i o n a l Ha zard s o f t h e S afet y Engineer
field of hazards and issues found in safety certification
testing. These issues are determined by systematic causal
analysis of incidents that have occurred.
Product Safety
ELIMINATING RISK
Product safety testing involves abusing products to make
sure that they fail in a safe manner. This may mean that
the product safety engineer will be exposed to hazards,
but the exposure can be controlled through the use of safe
work practices. For example, measurements of hazardous
voltages can be made without exposing personnel to those
voltages by applying test probes using clip-on leads while
the equipment under test (EUT) is disconnected from power.
The test engineer should use enough test leads and meters
to simultaneously record necessary voltages at once. Power
can then be applied after all test leads are secured. This
eliminates the risk of electrical shock by placing the hands
close to hazardous voltages, and it reduces the risk of an arc
flash from a test probe accidentally shorting out terminals
as it is inserted into live equipment. Another example
of risk reduction is the addition of outriggers during the
stability testing of large, heavy equipment. The outriggers
will stop the fall of equipment if it should start to tip over
when subjected to the test force. Alternately, a large test jig
can be used that will arrest the fall of equipment when it
reaches a tilt of 12º, allowing a 10º tip test without the risk
of equipment falling over onto personnel. Consider requiring
more than one person be present in the laboratory when any
potentially hazardous testing is performed. The second person
should be clear of the area where the test is being performed
so that they will not be put at risk should something go wrong
with the test.
PHYSICAL LABORATORY DESIGN
The test laboratory should be designed
with the assumption that problems may
occur and will need to be addressed.
Safety test laboratories should have two
means of egress where possible, with
the two doorways placed at opposite
ends of the room. Security and other
design concerns will typically result in
doors that swing into the laboratory. If
possible have one door that opens out
and that has panic hardware that allows
the door to be opened without the use
of hands, such as a push-bar across the
door. Each test area should have an
egress route at least 1.25 meters wide.
Practice good housekeeping to keep
these aisles clear of test equipment and
storage boxes. The laboratory should
have adequate lighting, exit signage
and emergency lighting. Make sure
136 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
the lab has adequate cooling to handle the heat load that will
be generated by the EUT. I once tested a 12 kW load in a
room with 4 kW of cooling, and the room temperature finally
stabilized at 46° C. This would have been an unacceptable
environment had somebody been required to work in the
room constantly during the testing. Eyewash stations and
showers may be required depending on the chemicals that are
used in the laboratory.
GUARDING AND PROTECTION
The next step is to provide adequate guarding and protection.
Flammability testing should be done in a fume hood that
will safely extract the combustion gasses from the room.
The same fume hood can be used for other tests where
volatile chemicals may be used or testing where there may
be toxic gasses released into the air. The room itself should
have a sprinkler system to protect in the event that a fire
does start and get out of control. Hand-held fire suppression
equipment should be available should materials ignite during
fault testing. Sand or fire blankets can be used for small
fires allowing for an easier cleanup. Special fire suppression
equipment may be needed depending on the materials being
tested, particularly with alkali metals such as lithium.
Some fault testing can result in flying debris, such as testing
fuses at high fault currents. Current limiting devices can
fail catastrophically when exposed to currents beyond their
interrupt ratings. Plexiglas guards can be used to provide a
barrier between equipment and personnel during fault testing
if there is a risk of debris flying.
Flammable chemicals should be stored in an approved
flammable storage cabinet. Chemicals should be stored in
their original containers. If smaller volumes of chemicals
are moved to another container, that
container must be properly marked with
the appropriate chemical properties.
If the EUT generates radiation, shields
against that radiation need to be
provided for the test engineer. This
applies for both ionizing radiation and
nonionizing radiation such as a laser.
Wearable monitors may be required
depending on the type of radiation.
Figure 1: Rolling platform ladder
Additional equipment may depend on
the type of testing being performed. If
your laboratory staff must work with
tall equipment, consider providing
personnel with a rolling platform ladder
(Figure 1). This will provide a large
and stable work surface for working
above ground level and is preferable to
a step ladder. Provide lifting equipment
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Occupational Hazards of the Safety Engin e e r
and hoists if personnel must handle heavy equipment or
components. The personnel who use this equipment must be
trained in its use. (See section entitled “Training”.)
ELECTRICAL DESIGN
Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCIs) are required for
outlets in close proximity to sources of water. However,
GFCI should not be used in other locations for supplementary
protection. GFCIs are susceptible to nuisance tripping due to
the leakage current of ITE, and they can be impractical in the
laboratory environment. Safe work practices are required to
reduce the risk of exposing personnel to fault current. AFCIs
are susceptible to tripping during abnormal condition testing
and could terminate testing prematurely. Arc Fault Circuit
Interrupters (AFCIs) also should not be used in a safety
laboratory to provide supplementary protection. AFCI’s
intended purpose is to shut off power when arcing can go
undetected in a residential environment where there are lots
of flammable materials. AFCIs are not used in commercial
environments in general and would provide few benefits in
the safety laboratory.
If you perform fault testing that will
result in tripping a branch circuit
breaker, you need to take additional
precautions. Circuit breakers are not
designed for repeated tripping. Their
detents and internal components will
weaken slightly with each trip. Ground
faults are especially hard on circuit
breakers and significantly shorten their
operating lives. Instead of depending on
the branch circuit breaker to terminate
a test, insert overcurrent protection
between the EUT and the branch circuit
breaker. This supplementary overcurrent
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
All personnel who use the lab need to be issued the proper
personal protective equipment (PPE) for the type of work
that they do. The type of PPE should be based on the
testing performed and the risks to which the personnel will
be exposed. It is also important to note that “personal” is
part of PPE. Each employee who works in the laboratory
should be issued their own PPE. It is not to be shared among
employees. PPE needs to be chosen in the correct size and
type for the employee and they need to be trained in its
proper use. Employees need to understand that if they don’t
have the proper PPE, they should forego the test until it can
be done safely.
Safety glasses should be worn in almost any safety test
laboratory as they will be recommended for many types
of tests. Physical tests, ranging from drop tests to impact
tests, may result in flying debris. Abnormal condition tests
can have unpredictable results that can also result in flying
debris. In the United States, NFPA 70E requires safety glasses
be worn whenever working around exposed hazardous
voltages. Electrical arcs generate intense ultraviolet light
which can contribute to cataract growth in the eyes, so the
glasses should provide UV protection in additional to impact
protection.
PPE will be needed as physical protection for a number of
risks possible in the test laboratory. Hearing protection may
be required if testing will involve loud equipment. Safety
shoes should be worn when working with heavy equipment
to protect feet from crush injuries. These shoes should also
have electrically insulating soles to reduce the shock hazard.
Protective gloves may be required for
some types of tests (Figure 2). Different
gloves may be needed for protection
against thermal burns, sharp edges or
chemical hazards. Chemical exposure
may also dictate the use of respirators.
If so, the respirators need to be fitted
properly, the filters need to be selected
based on the hazard and the employee
needs to be medically evaluated and
well trained in the use of the respirator.
Figure 2: Electrical gloves
NFPA 70E imposes fairly strict
requirements for PPE for working
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 137
Product Safety
The safety laboratory needs to be designed with the proper
electrical connections for the type of equipment to be tested.
This may mean providing a variety of outlets of different
ratings. One technique is to provide a higher current multiphase outlet, and then to use adapter boxes that provide
specific outlets, each with the proper overcurrent protection.
Consider installing an Emergency Power Off (EPO) button
that shuts off selected power in the room. The EUT gets
connected to a protected outlet, and if there is a problem of
such severity that the test engineer cannot easily disconnect
power, the EPO can be used to shut off power to the EUT.
The EPO can also be used to disable the door lock via
an electronic strike plate, allowing entry by emergency
responders should there be a situation in the lab requiring fire
or medical personnel. In such cases, an indicator light should
be placed outside the door to the laboratory to indicate that
the EPO has been activated. Please note that the EPO should
not turn off lights in the laboratory.
protection must be of a type and rating such that it will
open before the branch breaker, and it should be installed
in such a way that it can be easily and safely replaced. The
supplementary protector can be replaced as it degrades
preventing the need to replace circuit breakers in an electrical
panel. This protection can be installed in the previously
mentioned adapter boxes. The box can then be unplugged and
safely disassembled to replace the supplementary protector.
Product Safety
Oc c u p at i o n a l Ha zard s o f t h e S afet y Engineer
with exposed hazardous voltages, so it is best to eliminate
the need for the test engineer to place their hands in the
equipment while it is live. If this must be done, NFPA 70E
will require differing levels of protection depending on the
voltages present. This protection includes electrical gloves
with leather protectors, safety glasses, face shields and flame
resistant clothing. The PPE required for testing a 120 V hand
mixer may be simple, but much more would be required for
testing a 250 kW, 480 V uninterruptible power supply. Do not
rely on the practice of keeping one hand in your pocket. This
may reduce the risk of hazardous current running through
your heart, but you still run the risk of creating an accidental
short circuit. This could still allow hazardous current to run
through your hand resulting in significant burns. In higher
power equipment, it can result in an arc flash or arc blast that
can do even more damage.
Make it easy for employees to keep their PPE in or adjacent
to the laboratory. Even if the employee’s office isn’t far
away, there can be the temptation to just run a quick test
even if they forgot to bring their PPE. Lockers or cubbies
allow easy storage of safety glasses, lab coats, safety shoes,
ear protection and other PPE. Provide additional PPE if you
have regular visitors to the laboratory. Safety glasses and ear
plug dispensers can easily be placed immediately outside the
laboratory area allowing the quick outfitting of visitors when
needed.
MARKING AND WARNING
Marking and warning should be used where hazards cannot
be eliminated, guarded or controlled below safe levels.
Chemicals should be properly
marked where they must be used
and the Material Safety Data
Sheets (MSDS) must be available
to personnel to provide them
with the proper warnings, PPE
requirements and information
(Figure 3). Mark areas where
there will be exposed hazardous
voltages. The test engineer may be
aware of the exposed voltages, but
there may also be a possibility of
others entering the lab without such
knowledge. These people need to
be able to see the proper warning
signs to know the hazard is present.
Similar marking should be used for
hot surfaces or exposed hazardous
moving parts. The National
Electrical Code prohibits placing
any object in front of an electrical
panel, so mark the proper exclusion
area around the panel. Use floor
Figure 3: MSDS station
138 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
marking for areas used for storage of large items to clearly
delineate storage areas from aisles.
Certain hazards will require additional marking. There will
need to be marking on the door into the laboratory if there are
radiation hazards, whether they are ionizing or nonionizing.
Specific information about lasers in the laboratory will need
to be marked including the laser class and the wavelength.
Signs on the door should indicate the required PPE if there is
ongoing testing dictating specific PPE be used at all times.
TRAINING
All affected employees need the proper training to reduce
their risk of injuries. Affected employees include not only
those performing the testing, but those with access to the
laboratory area while testing is being performed. Personnel
unfamiliar with specific testing may enter the lab and these
people need the training to be able to assess and handle the
risks present. It is important to document which employees
have been trained and what hazards they have been trained
to handle. An employee not trained to handle a specific
hazard should not be permitted to perform testing where
that hazard may be present. Training needs to be repeated
periodically both as a refresher and to ensure new standards
and requirements are well communicated.
The various regulating agencies, such as OSHA, mandate
the training. Employees must be trained in the use of PPE
before they can perform the tasks that require the PPE. If
special equipment is required to perform a task, the affected
employees must be trained to use the equipment. Employees
must be trained in proper
ergonomics, lifting techniques and
use of hoists if their job requires
them to lift heavy loads.
Training on its own has a limited
benefit if there isn’t enforcement
of the rules. Enforcement need not
be draconian, but it does need to
provide an incentive to follow safe
work practices. Laboratory safety
needs to be part of the corporate
culture, and the laboratory manager
is responsible for the safety of the
employees in the lab. It is important
that the managers cultivate a culture
of safety so that they can act as
guides, not policemen.
CONTINUOUS
IMPROVEMENT
Any laboratories safety program
should include continuous
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Occupational Hazards of the Safety Engin e e r
improvement. Work practices may need to be tailored to the
specific testing performed. If there is an incident, update the
workplace practices for the laboratory to address appropriate
corrective actions for the issue. Look for near misses and use
them as an opportunity for improving work practices. Work
with your employer’s Environmental Health and Safety group
to help minimize risks in the laboratory.
CONCLUSION
The risk of injury in the safety test laboratory may seem
low, but there are real hazards that do result in injuries and
even a risk of death. The proper design of the laboratory
along with good training and the proper use of protective
equipment can significantly reduce the risk of injuries. The
implementation of proper safety can be done cost effectively
if designed into a laboratory program. These costs can pay for
themselves by eliminating possible higher expenses ranging
from noncompliance fines from the Occupational Safety
and Health authority, withdrawal of an occupancy permit
for unsafe condition, lost time from injured workers and
increased workers compensation costs.
ACKNOWLEDGMENT
I would like to thank Lauri Johns-Andersch, Microsoft’s
Employee Safety and Health Program Manager, for help
reviewing this paper and teaching me the details of the legal
requirements of OSHA compliance.
REFERENCES
1.
Workplace Injuries and Illnesses for 2009, Bureau of
Labor Statistics, 2010, www.bls.gov/news.release/
archives/osh_10212010.pdf.
2.
Revisions to the 2009 Census of Fatal Occupational
Injuries (CFOI) Counts, Bureau of Labor Statistics, May
2011, www.bls.gov/iif/oshwc/cfoi/cfoi_revised09.pdf.
3.
29 CFR 1910 – Occupational Safety and Health
Standards, United States Department of Labor.
www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?
p_table=STANDARDS&p_id=9697.
4.
29 CFR 1910.6 – Occupational Safety and Health
Standards, Incorporation by Reference, United States
Department of Labor. www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/
owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&
p_id=9702.
Health Canada – Environmental and Workplace Health.
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/occup-travail/index-eng.php
6.
Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations,
Canada Department of Justice, May 2009.
http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/
SOR-86-304/.
7.
Food and Drugs Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. F-27), Canada
Department of Justice, 2008. http://laws-lois.justice.
gc.ca/eng/acts/F-27/index.html.
8.
Hazardous Products Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. H-3), Canada
Department of Justice, December 2010.
http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/H-3/index.html.
9.
Nuclear Safety Control Act
(S.C. 1997, c. 9), Canada Department of Justice, 2010.
http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/N-28.3/index.html.
10. Radiation Emitting Devices Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. R-1),
Canada Department of Justice, October 2010.
http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/R-1/index.html.
11. Controlled Products Regulations (SOR/88-66), Canada
Department of Justice, February 2010.
http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-88-66/
index.html.
12. European Agency for Safety and Health at Work.
http://osha.europa.eu/en.
13. Directive 89/391 on the introduction of measures to
encourage improvements in the safety and health of
workers at work, European Commission, June 1989.
http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?
uri=CONSLEG:1989L0391:20081211:EN:PDF.
14. European Directives regarding Occupational Health and
Safety. http://osha.europa.eu/en/legislation/directives.
Ted Eckert is currently a compliance
engineer for Microsoft Corporation where
he is responsible for products including
video game systems and tablet computers
and where he serves as Microsoft’s
representative to the U.S. National
Committee for TC108. Previously, he was
a Staff Compliance Engineer at APCMGE, a division of Schneider Electric. Over his career as a
product safety engineer, Ted has tested industrial electronics,
power distribution products, air conditioners, information
technology equipment and toys.
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 139
Product Safety
Continuous improvement should not be just a top-down
program. All of the laboratory personnel should be involved.
Suggestions that come from the workers in the lab are more
likely to be easy to implement than programs dictated from
management alone. Track incidents to determine if changes
are having the intended effect.
5.
Safety Considerations
for Smart Grid Technology Equipment
Product Safety
BY DON GIES
O
ne of the biggest frontiers in electrical engineering in
this early part of the 21st century is the development
and implementation of smart grid technology.
Development of greener technologies and alternative fuels
has become a global economic priority, so smart grid technology has the potential to be one of the next great technological
waves. It can jump-start stagnated economies, and can fundamentally change the way power is delivered to consumers
of electricity worldwide. The environmental benefits that
smart grid technology can deliver are collectively demanded
by most of Earth’s inhabitants at this time, and the decrease
in dependence on fossil fuels and other nonrenewable power
sources is also sought through this new technology.
Smart grid technology can be viewed as a merging of power
systems, information technology, telecommunications,
switchgear, and local power generation, along with other
fields that were once electrical technologies of separated
industries. As these separate technologies become merged,
much of the safety considerations will have to be merged
and reconciled as well, particularly at interfaces. In some
cases, new insight may have to be given to safety that was not
necessary in the past.
This article provides a brief overview of smart-grid
technology, and then explores the safety considerations that
should be addressed in the design of smart grid technology
equipment, particularly in low-voltage AC power applications
operating below 1000 V AC. It recognizes smart-grid
140 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
technology as the merger of power generation, distribution,
metering and switching equipment with communication,
information technology, and with new user applications.
Then, it suggests a modular approach of evaluating the safety
of smart-grid technology based on the safety requirements
of the individual merged technologies. In addition, examples
of some likely smart-grid applications and the safety
considerations that would need to be addressed are discussed.
It also points out known safety issues with localized electric
power generation systems that will be more enabled by smart
grid technology.
WHAT IS A SMART GRID?
A smart grid combines the existing electrical infrastructure
with digital technologies and advanced applications to
provide a much more efficient, reliable and cost effective
way to distribute energy. The main function of a smart grid
is to manage power consumption in optimal ways, providing
the network with more flexibility in case of emergencies.
Within the context of smart grids, there are different kinds of
supporting technologies, such as smart meters that can help
monitor energy consumption and promote more effective
distribution. [1]
SMART GRID: WHAT TO EXPECT
Power industry experts look to the smart grid in much
the same manner as computer and telecommunications
© 2010 IEEE. Reprinted, with permission, from 2010 IEEE
Product Safety Engineering Society Symposium Proceedings
www.incompliancemag.com
S afet y Co n siderations for Sm art Grid Technology Equipm e nt
experts looked at the advent of the internet, or “information
superhighway” less than a generation ago. It is viewed as
the necessary next step in order to modernize the power
distribution grids, but there is no single view on what shape
or format the smart grid will take.
ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL
VS. THOMAS EDISON
A popular comparison that points out the magnitude of
change in the telecommunication industry as opposed to
that of the power industry is to hypothetically transport
Alexander Graham Bell and Thomas Edison to the 21st
century, and allow them to observe the modern forms of
the telecommunications and power industries that they
helped create. It is said that Alexander Graham Bell would
not recognize the components of modern telephony – fiber
optics, cell phones, texting, cell towers, PDA’s, the internet,
etc. – while Thomas Edison would be totally familiar with
the modern electrical grid [2]. Thus, with smart grid, there is
the potential to modernize and advance the architecture of the
power systems technology in the 21st century, as the newer
technology has already advanced the telecommunications
technology.
Still, Mr. Edison would be just as astonished as Mr. Graham
Bell with the present power grid technology as it is today.
The century-old power grid is the largest interconnected
machine on earth. In the USA, it consists of more than 9,200
electric generating units with more than 1 million megawatts
of generating capacity connected to more than 300,000 miles
of transmission lines.[2] Mr. Edison would not be familiar
with nuclear power plants or photovoltaic cells, as these
technologies were developed after his death in 1931.
To celebrate the beginning of the 21st century, the National
Academy of Engineering set out to identify the single most
important engineering achievement of the 20th century. The
Academy compiled a list of twenty accomplishments that
have affected virtually everyone in the world. The internet
took thirteenth place on this list, “highways” were ranked
eleventh, but sitting at the top of the list as the most important
engineering achievement of the 20th century was the
development of the present electric power grid.
Since smart grids will involve the merger of new and familiar
technologies, it would make sense to take a
modular approach to safety. The best way to approach
this new, merged technology is to break it down into
its component technologies, then use existing or new
standards to evaluate safety issues involving the component
technologies. That is, rather than develop a single standard
for, say, a new electrical service equipment with intelligence,
for a smart meter, it would make sense to continue to use
the base product safety standard for meters, but plug-in the
additional telecommunications and information technology
safety modules. Likewise, other product applicable safety
modules, such as requirements for outdoor equipment, can
serve as supplements or overlays to the base meter standard
in this case.
Hazard-Base Safety Engineering Standard IEC 62368-1
IEC 62368-1 is the new hazard-based safety engineering
standard covering audio/video, information and
communication technology equipment. This state-of-theart safety standard classifies energy sources, prescribes
safeguards against those energy sources, and provides
guidance on the application of, and requirements for those
safeguards. It uses the “three-block” model for pain and
injury from the energy source to the person, with the middle
block covering the safeguarding necessary to prevent or limit
the harmful energy to a person. [3]
If we agree to take a modular approach to evaluating
the safety of the smart-grid technology equipment, then
IEC 62368-1 will be well-suited for providing the plugin modules for evaluating the safety of the information
technology and communication circuitry portion of the smart
grid equipment.
For example, if we have a smart meter with integral
information technology and telecommunication interfaces,
you could use the international or locally-adopted safety
standard for power meters, then use IEC 62368-1 to evaluate
the type of personnel that would require access to the smart
meter (“skilled,” “instructed,” or “ordinary”), [3] and then
determine the level of safeguarding necessary in such areas
as isolation from the power equipment, isolation from the
telecommunication equipment, construction of the enclosure
as a safeguard against accessibility to shock and containment
of fire, and so forth.
IEC 60950-1 Continued Use
For the near term, we would expect to use IEC 60950-1 to
evaluate smart grid equipment with communication and
information technology circuitry for safety, as well as the
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 141
Product Safety
Without a doubt, the expectation from the power generation
and transmission industry is realization of efficiencies.
Better sampling of usage and understanding demand patterns
should allow the electric utilities to lower the use of powergeneration plants, possibly saving millions of dollars by
not having to build new plants to meet increases in power
demand. Many of these plants burn coal and other fossil
fuels that are non-renewable and greenhouse-gas producing
sources of energy, and they are increasingly becoming more
scarce and expensive.
A MODULAR APPROACH TO
SMART-GRID SAFETY
S afet y C o n s i d erat io n s fo r S ma r t Grid Technology Equipment
required protection and separation
from other circuits that they require.
[4] This would be until IEC 62368-1
becomes adopted by national standards
committees.
Product Safety
IEC 60950-22 for Outdoor
Information Technology and
Communication Circuits
As both IEC 60950-1 and IEC 62368-1
standards reference IEC 60950-22
as a supplemental standard for
equipment installed outdoors. We
should expect this standard to be used
extensively for smart-grid equipment.
This standard provides requirements
and considerations for enclosure
construction, overvoltage category
consideration, and pollution degrees
(environmental exposure) associated with information
technology and communications equipment installed
outdoors.[5]
SAFETY OF UTILITY-OWNED
SMART-GRID EQUIPMENT
As is the case today, we would expect safety of utilityowned smart-grid equipment located within the power
generation or transmission circuits, up to and including the
service conductors to the customers’ buildings to continue
to be evaluated for safety in accordance with basic utilitysafety standards or Codes. These standards include IEEE
C2, “National Electrical Safety Code,” and CSA C22.3,
“Canadian Electrical Code, Part III.”
EXAMPLES OF SMART-GRID TECHNOLOGY
Automatic Metering Infrastructure (AMI)
Automatic Metering Infrastructure (AMI) is an approach to
integrating electrical consumers based upon the development
of open standards. It provides utilities with the ability to
detect problems on their systems and operate them more
efficiently.
AMI enables consumer-friendly efficiency concepts like
“Prices to Devices.” With this, assuming that energy is priced
on what it costs in near real-time, price signals are relayed
to “smart” home controllers or end-consumer devices like
thermostats, washer/dryers, or refrigerators, typically the
major consumers of electricity in the home. The devices, in
turn, process the information based on consumers’ learned
wishes and power accordingly. [2]
142 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Safety Concerns of AMI-Enabled
Equipment
We could reasonably expect to see
some form of communication interfaces
and information technology in some
appliances that traditionally would
never have had such interfaces (washer/
dryers, refrigerators, etc.). With this,
we should expect a modular approach
in evaluating the safety of these
appliances, whereby we evaluate the
communication subsystems as we
would for communication equipment
and information technology equipment
(ITE), while the bulk of the appliance is
evaluated in accordance with the basic
safety standard that normally applies to
such appliances. This would mean that
either IEC 60950-1 or IEC 62368-1
are used to evaluate the communications and information
technology subsystems, and communication links would be
classified TNV, limited-power circuits, or the like if metallic,
and other non-metallic communication technologies such as
optical or wireless would be evaluated accordingly.
EXAMPLE: ELECTRIC VEHICLE POWERING
Email was arguably the “killer app” that most enabled
the propagation of high-speed internet. It is not yet known
what the smart-grid “killer app” is going to be, but like
pre-season predictions of who is going to win the Super Bowl
or the World Cup, some think that it is going to be plug-in
hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and possibly full electric
vehicles (EVs).
As plug-in electric vehicles replace gasoline-only burning
vehicles on the market, parking lots will need to be equipped
with outdoor charging stations. We would not expect any
commercial or government establishments to give away
free electricity, so we should expect to see the rise of payfor-use charging stations, integrating technologies such
as electrical metering, switching, information technology,
telecommunications, and currency-handling technology.
A pay-for-use charging station might involve the following
technologies:
A. An AC-power outlet receptacle to plug in the vehicle for
charging;
B. Electric power metering to measure electricity use;
C. Switchgear to switch charging circuits on or off, once
enabled by information technology, and provide overcurrent
protection or active shutdown in the event of a short-circuit
fault in the vehicle’s or the charging circuit’s circuitry;
www.incompliancemag.com
S afet y Co n siderations for Sm art Grid Technology Equipm e nt
D. Information technology
equipment to process the
sale, timing, and user
interface to purchase
electrical charge, and to
enable/disable the charging
switchgear;
F. Currency handling technology, which might involve direct
input of paper or coin currency, credit-card transactions,
smartcard or wireless interface, or, quite possibly, cellphone enabled transactions; and
G. The equipment would be located outdoors and be installed
in a weatherproof housing.
Higher Overvoltage Category for Information
Technology in Charging Station
The meter safety standard and switchgear standards may
assume that these components are installed in Overvoltage
Category IV or III environments, but the information
technology equipment standard expect equipment to be
installed nominally in Overvoltage Category II environments.
According to IEC 62368-1, Annex I (also IEC 60950-1,
Annex Z), electricity meters and communications ITE for
remote electricity metering are considered to be examples
of Overvoltage Category IV equipment, or equipment that
will be connected to the point where the mains supply enters
the building. “Power-monitoring equipment” is listed as
examples of Category III equipment, or equipment that
will be an integral part of the building wiring. In these
higher overvoltage categories (IV and III), the value of the
mains transient voltages is higher than it would be expected
for general indoor-use Category II AC-mains connected
appliances. This translates into a need for much greater
creepage and clearance isolation distances, as well as much
higher electric-strength withstand voltages.
Information technology equipment, on the other hand, is
generally utilized in Overvoltage Category II environments,
or connected to outlets on branch circuits a safe distance
away from the service equipment. Also, as the amount of offtheshelf, commercially-available ITE sub-components
Protection of Communications Circuits
Metallic connections to a telecommunication network would
need to be evaluated in accordance with IEC 62368-1 or
IEC 60950-1.
Additionally, intra-campus communication conductors, such
as those used for intra-system communications or status
alarms, will also need to be protected like telecommunication
conductors in accordance with the local electrical code
or practices. This may mean putting telecommunication
protectors—primary (voltage) or secondary (power-cross)-- at
each end of a campus-run communication conductor where
there exist an exposure to lightning or to accidental contact
with electric power conductors.
User Accessibility
Additionally, the charging station terminal where the user
pays for and plugs in his electric vehicle needs to be made
safe so that unskilled persons may use the station. This would
require the highest levels of guarding against intentional
access to hazardous voltages.
ENERGY STORAGE SAFETY
Locally-generated electrical energy, such as that from
photovoltaic systems, needs to be stored during accumulation
cycles for use during peak demand cycles. In most cases, this
will be achieved by use of DC storage batteries that invert the
electrical energy to AC for local use or for sale back to the
electric company. Battery technologies such as lithium ion or
valve-regulated lead acid batteries are the most likely present
technologies to be used, though advanced batteries such as
sodium batteries may be considered.
The size and capacity of these battery storage systems would
historically have been found in commercial or industrial
installations where only service personnel would have access.
Now as part of smart grid and green-power initiatives, you
can expect to see such systems in residential locations where
anyone might have access.
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 143
Product Safety
E. Telecommunications to
communicate the sale
and power use back
to the electrical power
retailer. We might expect
to have campus-type
communications from the charging station to a central
control station, and then have a trunk telecommunication
connection to the network;
increases in the charging
station, it becomes more
infeasible to simply increase
the spacings or the quality of
insulation. It may be necessary
to use surge protection
devices, either integral to
the equipment, or externally
connected to limit transient
voltages from Overvoltage
Category III and IV to
Overvoltage Category II.
S afet y C o n s i d erat io n s fo r S ma r t Grid Technology Equipment
3. Ventilation of batteries that outgas explosive gases, such
as hydrogen from lead-acid batteries.
good approach to the safety evaluation of this merged
technology is to take a modular approach, and evaluate the
merged technologies for safety as components. Furthermore,
IEC 62368-1, the new international hazard-based safety
engineering standard for audio/video, information and
communication technology is well-suited for use in this
modular-safety approach.
4. Containment of batteries capable of producing excessive
heat during breakdown or thermal runaway.
REFERENCES
Safety issues to be considered include:
1. Prevention of access to live parts at high electrical energy
levels;
Product Safety
2. Prevention of access to live parts at shock potentials;
5. For outdoor applications, suitably housing the batteries
in an outdoor enclosure that, if equipped with lead-acid
batteries, is well ventilated in accordance with IEC 6095022 to prevent the accumulation of explosive gases.
1. B. Metallo, “Smart Grid. Smart Decision,” 2010,
unpublished internal Alcatel-Lucent article.
OTHER SAFETY CONCERNS – LOCAL POWER
GENERATION
3. IEC 62368-1, Edition 1.0, 2010-01, “Audio/Video,
Information and Communication Technology
Equipment – Part 1: Safety Requirements,” International
Electrotechnical Commission.
Local power generation systems, such as photovoltaic
systems, generators, fuel-cell systems, and the like, for which
the smart grid will permit the sale of power back to the utility,
involve the following safety concerns:
Synchronization
The frequency of the locally-generated power has to be
synchronized with that of the main grid.
Islanding
Islanding is a condition in which a portion of an electric
power grid, containing both load and generation, is isolated
from the remainder of the electric power grid. When an island
is created purposely by the controlling utility—to isolate
large sections of the utility grid, for example—it is called an
intentional island. Conversely, an unintentional island can
be created when a segment of the utility grid containing only
customer-owned generation and load is isolated from the
utility control.
Normally, the customer-owned generation is required to sense
the absence of utility-controlled generation and cease energizing the grid. However, if islanding prevention fails, energized
lines within the island present a shock hazard to unsuspecting
utility line workers who think the lines are dead.[6]
CONCLUSION
The smart grid promises to bring on a new age of
distributing electricity in more efficient and greener ways,
while enabling the developing of new ways to efficiently
utilize and control power.
In many ways, it will take the form of a merger of power
generation, distribution, switching, and metering technology
with communications and information technology, along
with other applications of electrical energy. As such, a
144 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
2. “The Smart Grid: An Introduction,” prepared for the U.S.
Department of Energy by Litos Strategic Communications
under contract No. DE-AC2604NT41817, Subtask 560.01.04.
4. IEC 60950-1, Edition 2.0, 2005-12, “Information
Technology Equipment – Safety- Part 1: General
Requirements,” International Electrotechnical
Commission.
5. IEC 60950-22, Edition 1.0, 2005-10, “Information
Technology Equipment – Safety- Part 22: Equipment to
be Installed Outdoors,” International Electrotechnical
Commission.
6. IEC 62116, Edition 1.0 2008-09, “Test Procedure Of
Islanding Prevention Measures For Utility-Interconnected
Photovoltaic Inverters, ” International Electrotechnical
Commission.
Don Gies has been a product compliance
engineer for over 25 years. Since 1989,
Mr. Gies has worked at AT&T-Bell
Laboratories/Lucent Technologies/AlcatelLucent as a product safety engineer,
responsible for obtaining product safety
certifications for his company’s telephone
and information processing equipment from
domestic and international product safety organizations.
Mr. Gies has become a leading subject matter expert for his
company in the field of global product safety compliance,
working primarily with Alcatel-Lucent's wireless base station
equipment. He is a member of the Alcatel-Lucent Technical
Academy. Prior to working at AT&T, Mr. Gies was a Tempest
engineer for Honeywell-Signal Analysis Center, where he
worked on various secure communications projects for the
US Army Communications -Electronics Command.
Mr. Gies graduated from Rutgers University - College of
Engineering as an electrical engineer. He is an iNARTE
Certified Product Safety Engineer.
www.incompliancemag.com
Thermal Testing
A Primer
Product Safety
BY HOMI AHMADI
T
hermal testing, also known as heat testing, is one
of the most critical tests required by the majority of
regulatory safety standards in determining the safety
of a product. Excessive heat is the number one enemy in
any electrical or electronic circuit. Designers are perpetually
trying to improve the way to reduce heat or partially cool
their products because they are being asked to design
products with higher power density into smaller sizes, while
operating temperatures of components or devices have not
changed greatly over the past few decades. This means that
component temperatures must be well controlled to avoid any
failure and to increase the reliability of the product.
This article will cover basic fundamentals for thermal
measurement and provide some of the methodology used to
arrive at accurate measurements.
CHOOSING A THERMOCOUPLE
Accurate temperature measurement of components can be
challenging. An important tool used in thermal measurement
is the thermocouple, one of the most
accurate and repeatable.
Although there are many devices or methods
used for measuring temperature, thermocouples are one of the simplest and most
commonly used sensors. Having said that,
using an infrared camera can quickly help
identify any hot spot.
Thermocouples consist of two wires of dissimilar metals,
joined near the measurement point or junction (Figure 1).
The output is a small DC voltage measured between the
two wires. This differential voltage is then converted to a
temperature using specially designed equipment such as a
chart recorder or data logger.
There are over a dozen different types of thermocouples
commonly used in various industries. Most of these have
been given internationally recognized letter designator types,
such as B, C, D, E, G, J, K, L, M, N, P, R, S, T, and U.
Types J, K, and T are among the most commonly used
thermocouple types in the electronic industry due to their ease
of use, low cost, and availability. Each thermocouple has its
own temperature range and accuracy. For example, the range
for type J thermocouples is –210°C to +750ºC, while for type
T the range is –100°C to +350ºC; for this reason, they are
used for different applications. These temperature ranges are
approximate because manufacturers state slightly different
Figure 1: Thermocouple composition
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 145
T he rm a l Te st ing : A P r imer
numbers. They also have different color codes. For example,
in North America a type J is white and red, but in the rest of
the world a type J is typically black and white.
The following is a list of recommendation that must be
considered before taking any thermal measurements:
Product Safety
• Choose the thermocouple based on your application —
expected temperature, environment, abrasion, oil, etc. For
example, if you are measuring temperature of a component
in a furnace, it is best to use a type C thermocouple.
• Ensure that the chart recorder or data logger is compatible
with the thermocouple wiring. If you are using type
K, ensure that the data logger is also set to type K. An
incorrect setting will result in measurement errors.
• Visually and physically check the outer jacket for any
obvious damage by running the thermocouple wires
through your hand and feeling for any possible damage.
• Visually check the tip. The smaller the weld tip, the
more accurate the results will be. Figure 2 illustrates two
different weld tips.
• A good weld has a small tip with a very small amount of
wire stripped, whereas a poor weld shows the opposite.
• Check each thermocouple for its functionality. Valuable
time can be wasted if the thermocouple is damaged or is
not functioning correctly after it is affixed to a component.
One of the easiest methods is to hold each thermocouple
between your thumb and index finger for a few seconds.
The thermocouple should read your body temperature
(37ºC).
• Take care when using thermocouples in a noisy
environment or when attaching them to windings of a
transformer. Thermocouples typically have no shielding
and can be susceptible to EMI noise. Measuring magnetic
temperature can be tricky, in particular when measuring
switching transformers. The closer the thermocouple tip is
to the windings, the more accurate the results are. However,
it is best if the thermocouple tip is not touching the magnet
wires directly since some of the windings carry high
voltages and this may damage the data logger if it comes
in contact with the thermocouple. The safest approach is
placing the thermocouple tip on insulation tape, which
covers the winding. One of the best ways to overcome
an electrical noise problem is to use a thermocouple with
shielded leads and connectors or to rout it away from noisy
circuits.
• Ensure that a thermocouple is calibrated.
• When repairing and welding a thermocouple, it is critical
that the weld tip is carefully checked to ensure the weld is
secure and that the thermocouple is recalibrated prior to
use.
• Avoid using a thermocouple with long lead length.
High resistance in the wire may lead to errors. Use an
appropriate extension wire and adapter, if longer length is
needed.
• Avoid performing thermal testing in an uncontrolled
environment, high traffic area, or areas exposed to any airconditioning. Excessive air movement will impact the final
results.
MEASURING TECHNIQUES
The following factors may affect the final results:
• Position of the thermocouple: Critical when measuring
temperature on the winding of a choke or transformer. The
results are more accurate the closer the thermocouple is
placed to the windings.
• Use of excessive glue or cement: Extra volume and mass
can assist heat transfer, in particular when temperatures are
close to their limits. Use an exact dose of adhesive. When
using adhesive, ensure that the adhesive possesses a high
thermal conductivity.
• Obstruction of the airstream around the thermocouple
wires.
• Equipment voltage: Temperature results usually vary as the
input voltage to the equipment changes. For example, some
units run hotter at 90 Vac, while others may run hotter at
264 Vac. It is recommended that the input voltage source is
as stable as practical. Any small variations in input voltage
will result in variations in temperature. Ensure voltage
tolerances are taken into consideration, as each safety
standard uses different tolerance percentages.
• Equipment load: Equipment load plays a crucial role in
the final thermal results. In the majority of the cases, the
higher the load, the higher the temperature on individual
Figure 2: Good weld vs. poor weld
146 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
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Thermal Testing: A Pri m e r
components. Most product safety standards require the
equipment under test (EUT) to be loaded to its maximum
normal operating load during the heating test.
Before publishing the final results, take the following steps:
• Review the raw data to ensure that nothing unusual stands
out. Use engineering judgment. For example if the body
temperature of an metallic oxide varistor (MOV) is lower
than that of the printed circuit board (PCB) on which it is
mounted, the data should be checked again.
Product Safety
• Local ambient conditions: As mentioned before, it is
important that the thermal test is performed in a controlled
environment. If there is excessive air movement, then the
final results cannot be considered as accurate. One of the
simplest solutions is to conduct tests in a corner of the lab
where there is less traffic and there is no air-conditioning
blowing cold air directly on the
EUT.
DOCUMENTING THE RESULTS
• Stabilization or thermal
equilibrium: In certain
instances, engineers record the
final data after a certain time,
such as after one or two hours
of operation. Since different
products behave differently
and reach their maximum
temperature at different times,
it is important to record the
final data ONLY after the
EUT has reached thermal
equilibrium.
It would be helpful to explain
what thermal stability is. A
temperature is determined to
be constant or stabilized when
the graph on a chart recorder
or data logger is shown to be
flat without any temperature
rise and shows three successive
readings are within 1°C of each
other when taken at 30-minute
intervals. Unfortunately, there
is no harmonized standard that
defines thermal stability and each
standard has its own definition.
The most important point to bear
in mind is that temperature rise
is always an exponential curve.
Therefore the easiest method is
to use a chart recorder or data
logger simply because the curve
as temperature becomes stable is
readily visible.
Figures 3 and 4 illustrate
respectively measurements where
thermal equilibrium has been
achieved and where complete
thermal stability has not been
achieved.
Figure 3: Example showing thermally stable measurements
Figure 4: Example showing unstable temperatures
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 147
T he rm a l Te st ing : A P r imer
• Compare the test data to previous test data that has been
done on the same product to find out if they all follow
similar patterns.
Product Safety
• For almost each measurement of data, there is a limit to
which the data is compared. These limits can be derived
from verifiable sources such as product safety standards,
component manufacturer data sheets, internal procedures,
etc.
Tables 1 and 2, from IEC 60950-1, show the limits for some
components.
• Prepare the final report by tabulating the data, correcting
it to the corresponding Tmra (manufacturer recommended
ambient), and include the limits for each component where
possible.
• Prepare a complete report and ensure that all details (such
as input voltage, load condition, amount and direction
of any forced airflow, duration of test, and any other
parameters that may be beneficial to the reader) are clearly
documented.
COMPUTING TEMPERATURES
Typically manufacturers market their products much higher
than 25ºC. Based on the manufacturer’s recommended
ambient temperature, also known as Tmra, either the limits or
the measured temperatures must be corrected accordingly.
The formula below shows how to make the adjustment:
T < Tmax+Tamb-Tma
Part
Insulation, including winding insulation:
– of Class 105 material (A)
– of Class 120 material (E)
– of Class 130 material (B)
– of Class 155 material (F)
– of Class 180 material (H)
– of Class 200 material
– of Class 220 material
– of Class 250 material
Rubber or PVC insulation of internal and external wiring, including power supply cords:
– without temperature marking
– with temperature marking
Other thermoplastic insulation
Terminals, including earthing terminals for external earthing conductors of STATIONARY
EQUIPMENT, unless provided with a NON-DETACHABLE POWER SUPPLY CORD
Maximum temperature (Tmax) °C
100 a b c
115 a b c
120 a b c
140 a b c
165 a b c
180 a b
200 a b
225 a b
75 d
Temperature marking
See e
85
Parts in contact with a flammable liquid
See 4.3.12
Components
See 1.5.1
a If the temperature of a winding is determined by thermocouples, these values are reduced by 10 °C, except in the case of
– a motor, or
– a winding with embedded thermocouples.
b For each material, account shall be taken of the data for that material to determine the appropriate maximum
temperature.
c The designations A to H, formerly assigned in IEC 60085 to thermal classes 105 to 180, are given in parentheses.
d If there is no marking on the wire, the marking on the wire spool or the temperature rating assigned by the wire
manufacturer is considered acceptable.
e It is not possible to specify maximum permitted temperatures for thermoplastic materials, due to their wide variety.
These shall pass the tests specified in 4.5.5.
Table 1: Temperature, limits, materials, and components
148 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
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Thermal Testing: A Pri m e r
Where:
T = measured temperature
Tmax = maximum limit allowed
Tamb = local ambient
Tma = maximum ambient temp permitted by the manufacturer.
Example
Using the above formula:
63 < 105+23-50
63 < 78
The component meets its permitted limit.
• Testing it on the bench in the lab and then mathematically
correcting the temperatures as shown using the formula
above
• Testing the product in an elevated environment, such as a
heating oven
An oven is used when there is a specific request or the
lab environment is unstable. When testing in an oven,
accurately document the oven air temperature, level of
oven air circulation, oven humidity, and sample placement.
Additionally, an oven is used when the product is temperature
controlled as stated in Clause 1.4.12.2 of IEC 60950-1, 2nd
Ed. Most test agencies and standards allow both methods.
If the Tmra is 50°C or less, it is recommended that the testing
is done on the bench. If the Tmra is higher than 50°C, then it is
recommended that the testing is done in an oven.
Parts in
OPERATOR ACCESS ARE AS
Maximum temperature (Tmax) °C
Metal
Glass, porcelain and
vitreous material
Plastic
and rubber b
Handles, knobs, grips, etc., held or touched for short periods only
60
70
85
Handles, knobs, grips, etc., continuously held in normal use
55
65
75x
External surfaces of equipment that may be touched a
70
80
95
Parts inside the equipment that may be touched c
70
80
95
a Temperatures up to 100 °C are permitted on the following parts:
− areas on the external surface of equipment that have no dimension exceeding 50mm, and that are not likely to be
touched in normal use; and
− a part of equipment requiring heat for the intended function (for example, a document laminator), provided
that this condition is obvious to the USER. A warning shall be marked on the equipment in a prominent position
adjacent to the hot part.
The warning shall be either
• the symbol (IEC 60417-5041 (DB:2002-10)):
• or the following or similar wording
WARNING
HOT SURFACE DO NOT TOUCH
b For each material, account shall be taken of the data for that material to determine the appropriate maximum
temperature.
c Temperatures exceeding the limits are permitted provided that the following conditions are met:
– unintentional contact with such a part is unlikely; and
– the part has a marking indicating that this part is hot. It is permitted to use the following symbol (IEC 604175041 (DB:2002-10)) to provide this information.
Table 2: Touch temperature limits
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 149
Product Safety
An electrolytic capacitor is measured to be 63°C at a room
ambient of 23°C. The capacitor is rated for 105°C and the
manufacturer needs to qualify this product to 50°C operation.
Does this component meet the required limits?
If the Tmra is higher than 25ºC, then the manufacturer has the
choice of:
T he rm a l Te st ing : A P r imer
Testing in an oven is typically exponential, where testing on
the bench is typically linear when mathematically corrected.
Product Safety
Table 3 shows the temperature results of an information
technology equipment (ITE) product that was tested both on
a bench as well as in an oven.
Looking at Table 3, it is clear that testing on the bench
and then mathematically correcting the values to the
manufacturer’s stated Tmra is much harsher than when it is
tested in a heating oven that was set to Tmra.
DETERMINING LINEAR FEET PER MINUTE
Another issue that designers sometimes face relating to
thermal testing is the terminology used in some of power
supply specifications. Some power supply manufacturers use
the term cubic feet per minute (CFM), while others may use
linear feet per minute (LFM) when a supply requires forced
air cooling. CFM is a measurement of volume while LFM
is a measurement of velocity. Most fan manufacturers use
CFM, while board designers prefer to use LFM as this makes
calculating thermal derating curve or power dissipation much
easier.
TC
Locations
Bench °C
Bench Adjusted
to 50°C
Oven at
50°C
T3 windings
78.48
105.61
92.57
L24 winding
99.16
126.29
112.1
PCB next to
Q9
91.36
118.73
104.56
CR32
63.84
90.97
77.73
PCB next to
U19
50.02
77.15
65.59
Q40 body
77.40
104.53
91.19
Ambient
22.87
48.98
Table 3: Bench vs. Oven testing
LFM is equivalent to CFM divided by the cross-sectional
area of interest.
The larger the cross-sectional area, the smaller the LFM for a
given CFM, as shown in the formula below:
LFM = CFM/area (ft²)
Where:
area is the cross-sectional area of the opening which typically
happens to be the fan box size in square feet.
if the fan is square, then the cross-sectional area is L x W.
if the fan is circular, then the cross-sectional area is πr².
Example:
A fan measures 40 x 40 mm and has
a CFM of 5.2, then the LFM is calculated as:
1 mm = 0.00328 ft.
40 mm = 0.1312 ft.
40 mm² = 0.0172 ft²
LFM = 5.2/0.0172
LFM = 302
REFERENCES
1. 60950-1: 2005 Information Technology Equipment Safety - Part 1: General Requirements,
http://www.omega.com
150 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Homi Ahmadi is the Compliance
Engineering Manager at Extron
Electronics in Anaheim, CA and has
responsibility for Extron global regulatory
compliance affairs. He has extensive
background in compliance which includes
product safety, EMC and environmental.
He is a Sr member of IEEE and iNARTE
product safety engineer. He has published numerous articles
and conducted seminars both in the US as well as UK to
aid manufacturers with product design and compliance
activities. He is currently a member of IEEE Product Safety
Engineering Society (PSES). He received his Bachelor’s
Degree in Engineering from the University of MidGlamorgan in Wales-UK. He held the position of program
chair at IEEE PSES in Orange County from 2008-2010.
www.incompliancemag.com
Applied Safety Science
and Engineering
Techniques (ASSET™)
Product Safety
Taking HBSE to the Next Level
BY THOMAS LANZISERO
H
azard Based Safety Engineering (HBSE) principles
have been used to better understand product safety
and to help guide the design and evaluation of
appropriate safegards through analysis of sources, causes
and mechanisms of harm. UL Applied Safety Science and
Engineering Techniques (ASSETTM) takes HBSE to the next
level. ASSET leverages the strength of HBSE principles by
expanding and integrating them with other established safety
science and engineering techniques, including elements
of risk management, systems and reliability engineering,
functional safety and human factors. This paper outlines the
expansion and integration of these principles and techniques,
and demonstrates the potential of taking HBSE to the next
level.
ASSET addresses diverse forms of harm, hazardous sources
and objects of harm (persons, property, environment, critical
operations), across a broad range of products, systems,
services and applications, based on safety science. An
asset in any organization is an item of value, a resource
that provides advantage, such as a product realization
design process that achieves safety by design. The design
and evaluation of safety requires a systematic, methodical
process. The effective use of a complete set of suitable,
consistent design and evaluation techniques can help
demonstrate that reasonable care and due diligence was
exercised in the safety of a design.
The HBSE concepts initially conceived by engineers at
HP/Agilent targeted typical types of hazards and forms of
injury involving electronics products, such as information
technology and office equipment. The HBSE concepts and
tools have been further developed and applied with the
support of research engineers at Underwriters Laboratories.
UL University has been serving as the principal instructional
organization for HBSE workshops. UL uses HBSE and
applied safety science and engineering techniques in
many facets of its work, such as research, development
and interpretation of standards, and risk assessment with
hazard and failure analysis of new and emerging products,
applications and technologies. Applied safety science and
engineering techniques will be briefly introduced in the
context of safety and risk, and outlined in the context of
other technical and managerial processes.
SAFETY
Safety and protection address the risk of harm. Safety
has many meanings, applications, levels and contexts.
Generally speaking, we can consider safety as freedom from
unacceptable risk of harm. (IEC/ISO Guide 51). But let’s
consider the qualifiers in this statement.
© 2010 IEEE. Reprinted, with permission, from the proceedings of the
2010 IEEE International Symposium on Product Compliance Engineering.
© 2012 UL LLC. All rights reserved.
This document may not be reproduced or distributed without authorization.
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 151
A pp l i e d S afet y S c ien c e an d E n g in ee ring Techniques (ASSET™): Part 1
Safety and protection address the risk of harm. Harm can include unwanted effects or consequences,
including injury or damage to health of persons (or animals including livestock and pets), damage to
Product Safety
property or the environment, or interruption in essential commercial operations.
Harm can include unwanted effects or consequences,
including injury or damage to health of persons (or animals
including livestock and pets), damage to property or the
environment, or interruption in essential commercial
operations. This harm may be the result of a variety of
factors, independently or in combination or sequence,
involving hazardous situations and circumstances. Risk
of harm is based on probability and severity, that is,
the likelihood of harm occurring and the severity of its
consequences if it occurs.
Unacceptable risk of harm is a level that is not tolerated. The
degree of tolerance varies in accordance with many factors,
including specific applications, situations and circumstances
of product use, misuse and exposure. Risk attitudes and
appetites vary among individuals, companies, industries,
cultures, etc. Levels of unacceptable risk may be defined,
for example, by regulatory bodies, authorities having
jurisdiction, standards development bodies, etc., with input
from others involved or affected.
Freedom from unacceptable risk of harm is a beneficial
condition. But like many other freedoms that we enjoy,
this freedom also comes at a cost. To achieve safety is no
small task. It requires comprehensive, systematic review
of all potential harm from hazards, and the prioritization
of mitigating safeguards throughout the entire product
lifecycle, considering all manners of exposure. Safety is
relative, posing a challenge in product realization to balance
with other design requirements, factors and constraints.
This balance may be addressed, for example, by risk-benefit
analysis, cost-benefit analysis or other techniques.
Safety is not without any risk, but with risk reduced to
an acceptable level – by design, analysis and validation,
including evaluation and testing for certification. It is said
that safety is no accident. It is the practical manifestation
of suitable design concepts, applied consciously and
conscientiously.
Risk Management
There are a variety of means to assess, reduce and manage
risk of harm. Risk analysis involves hazard identification
and risk estimation in terms of likelihood of the occurrence
of harm and the severity of its consequences should it occur.
152 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Risk evaluation involves judgment of acceptability of risk.
This leads to analysis of options to accept or reduce this
risk, and then maintain or control it at an acceptable level. In
some cases, this risk level may be considered to be As Low
As Reasonably Practicable (ALARP), typically used in riskbenefit analysis for medical devices having health benefits to
balance the risk of harm
But risk is not necessarily a simple or straightforward
combination of probability and severity rankings. Weighting
factors may be applied to rankings, and scales may be
nonlinear or contain discontinuities. Other factors may
also need consideration, such as frequency, exposure,
vulnerability, etc. In estimating and evaluating risk, it is
important to consider that when the severity of consequences
is very high (serious harm, death), then the likelihood
must be demonstrated or known to be reliably low. This
approach would be more conservative (safe) than an initial
assumption of very low probabilities, resulting in trivializing
(even unintentionally) the importance of potentially severe
consequences.
Risk Management Publications
Many publications address various aspects and applications
of risk management, including international guides,
standards and series published by organizations such as
the IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission) and
ISO (International Standardization Organization), ranging
from general-use to industry-, product-, hazard-, harm- and
safeguard-specific categories. Basic references, some with
very recent publications, include ISO IEC Guide 51 (Safety
aspects), ISO 31000 (Risk management — Principles and
guidelines), IEC/ISO 31010 (Risk management – Risk
assessment techniques), IEC Guide 116, Guidelines for safety
related risk assessment and risk reduction for low voltage
equipment, IEC 60300-3-9 (Dependability management),
and Risk Assessment Guidelines for Consumer Products (in
Official Journal of the European Union, referencing GPSD,
General Product Safety Directive and RAPEX, Community
Rapid Information System).
Additional IEC and/or ISO Guides cover more specialized
aspects such as terminology (73), vulnerability (50, 71),
applications (37, 63, 78, 110, 112), environment (64, 106, 114),
and procedural matters (2, 75, 104, 108).
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Ap p lied S afet y S c ien c e and Engineering Techniques (ASSET™): Pa r t 1
Many publications address various aspects and applications of risk management, including
international guides, standards and series published by organizations such as the IEC (International
Electrotechnical Commission) and ISO (International Standardization Organization).
ASSET and Risk Management
ASSET integrates the current IEC/ISO body of knowledge
on risk management, and addresses specific aspects
including appropriate risk and hazard identification,
risk reduction and risk control. For example, guidelines
are provided for a suitable assessment of the scope of
the analysis, including general characteristics, intended
use and users, environment, installation, operation,
maintenance, repair, shipping, storage, and reasonably
foreseeable unintended use and misuse conditions. Then
for hazard identification, additional steps help identify
sources and possible conditions for harm. Risk estimation
is supplemented with guidance to estimate and express
risk. Risk evaluation is aided by steps to define and apply
tolerable risk criteria for decisions. Risk reduction is guided
by steps to analyze protective measures that reduce and/
or control risk via safeguard attributes. Reassessment of
residual risk is supplemented by steps to monitor and apply
field data.
Strategies are presented to identify, prioritize and validate
appropriate safeguards that are suited to any product,
including usage scenarios and exposure conditions. Such
strategies help identify essential safeguard characteristics:
those safety-critical functions relied upon under all
conditions, including duress, throughout the product life.
Relevant analysis techniques include Fault Tree Analysis
(FTA) and Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA),
which address failures and other conditions that may lead
to system faults, as well as the need for, and the effects of,
suitable protective mechanisms.
Safety Engineering Management Processes
Technical processes include the expansion and adaptation
of HBSE, hazard analysis and risk assessment concepts, as
well as application of techniques such as FTA and FMEA.
Managerial processes include risk management, but the
more overarching common element is “management” itself.
Safety engineering management not only involves risk
management, but also asset-, enterprise-, quality systems(incl. quality assurance and continuous improvement),
process- (design, mfg), document-, decision-, systems
engineering- and system safety-, product safety-, projectand project risk-, design-, concurrent engineering-, design
review-, configuration-, change control-, supply chain-,
dependability-, life cycle model-, data(records), information
security-, knowledge-, learning-, incident/recall- and
disaster/emergency- management. As for risk management,
these additional safety engineering management aspects are
also addressed in many IEC, ISO and other publications.
Document references are available upon request.
Safety Strategy
The strategy to meet safety objectives begins with applied
safety science and engineering techniques. This helps to
identify and prioritize research, and apply these findings to
develop safety requirements and test methodologies that are
appropriate, proactive, focused and consistent. This can then
lead to safety attributes that are properly identified, validated
and controlled for all scenarios, conditions, and lifecycle
stages, both up and down the supply chain. The result is a
demonstrated degree of safety and improvement.
Hazard Based Requirements
Hazard-based safety standards can offer clear safety
objectives and various means to meet them. A hazard-based
approach serves to reduce risk of harm by addressing each
hazard. This approach would determine which undesirable
effects are to be avoided, the susceptibility to them, their
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 153
Product Safety
Certain industries, such as medical devices and machinery
have developed a tiered structure of risk publications.
Publications covering medical devices range from guides
on safety aspects (ISO Guide 51) and drafting of safety
standards (ISO/IEC Guide 63) to risk management for
medical devices (EN ISO 14971), quality management
systems for regulatory purposes (ISO 13485), to more
specific standards on basic safety and essential performance
(IEC 60601-1), followed by a series of collateral standards
(IEC 60601-1-1 to IEC 60601-112), particular standards (IEC
60601-2-1 to IEC 60601-2-54) and essential performance
requirements (IEC 60601-3 (-1)). Likewise, publications
covering machinery range from guides on safety aspects
(ISO Guide 51) and drafting of safety standards (ISO Guide
78) to general standards on risk assessment principles (EN/
ISO 14121-1), practical guidance and examples (-2), to more
specific standards on design concepts with terminology,
methodology (EN/ISO 12100-1) and technical principles (-2),
and electrical equipment of machines (EN 60204-1).
A pp l i e d S afet y S c ien c e an d E n g in ee ring Techniques (ASSET™): Part 1
Product Safety
conditions and causes, and appropriate protection against
them. A hazard-based standard would identify the objectives
of protecting against each specific undesirable effect, and
directly relate them to appropriate protection requirements
and limits. HBSE principles have also formed the foundation
of hazard-based requirements in product standards such as
IEC 62368-1, Audio/video, information and communication
technology equipment – Part 1: Safety requirements.
ASSET EXPANSION OF HBSE CONCEPTS
AND TOOLS
ASSET expands the basic HBSE concepts and analysis tools
in ways that include the following, as shown in Figure 1.
HBSE Premise
The HBSE Premise for Injury is a 3-block model based on
energy transfer, which outlines the 1) hazardous source and
2) transfer mechanism to 3) a body/part that is subject to
injury. Injury can occur when the magnitude and duration
of energy transfer exceeds the body/part susceptibility, or its
inability to withstand it.
Examples include mechanical forms of energy that may
cause various types of physical injury; thermal energy (heat)
that may cause skin burn injury; electrical energy that may
cause “electric shock” or unwanted physiological (including
lethal) effects; and electrically caused fire that may cause
injury and property damage. This model can forewarn of
injury if its elements can be quantified, in terms of the
characteristics of the energy source and rate and degree of
transfer (delivered and received), and the inability of a body/
part to withstand it (susceptibility).
However, this simple model can be expanded in a variety of
ways, adapted to address other types of hazards, transfers
and harm. For example, the hazardous source (1) can
involve other forms of energy, including acoustic noise,
pressure (sonic/ultrasonic/fluid/gas), explosion/implosion,
arc flash/blast, radiation (visible, UV, IR, ionizing (gamma)/
non-ionizing (laser)), vibration, fields (electric/magnetic/
electromagnetic), unintended motion or activation, as well
as potential energy (suspended masses, support failures) or
stored energy (springs, capacitors) that may be converted to
other forms.
In addition, the hazardous source (1) can also be in the form
of matter. This could include an object (person contributes
to transfer), involving a sharp edge (laceration) or small part
(choking) or long part (strangulation), where other factors
of the harm mechanism need also be considered. This could
also include a harmful substance, such as chemical (toxic/
carcinogenic) or biological (bacteria) material. Recall the
RoHS (Restriction of Hazardous Substances) directive that
curtails the use of materials such as lead, mercury, cadmium,
hexavalent chromium, PBB and PBDE to infinitesimal levels
(parts per million).
The transfer mechanism (2) can cause harm in a direction to
the body (e.g., applied force), as well as away from it (e.g.,
extracted heat), or even involve a reduction or restriction
of transfer (energy or substance) that is needed to maintain
health (e.g., air restriction due to small-part choking hazard).
And in addition to injury to persons (3), other forms and
objects of harm can be addressed. Such harm may also
involve damage to health or welfare of persons, injury
to animals (livestock, pets), and damage to property, the
environment or essential commercial operations.
Figure 1: HBSE Premise, 3-block energy transfer model for injury, expanded
154 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
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Ap p lied S afet y S c ien c e and Engineering Techniques (ASSET™): Pa r t 1
Other factors must also be considered. For example
regarding environmental harm, lifecycle issues of electrical
and electronic products raise additional safety concerns.
With concern for PBTs (Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxins),
is the hazard persistent, taking a relatively long time to break
down in the environment? Is it bioaccumulative, whereby
substances collect in living organisms and ultimately end
up in the food chain and persons? Is it toxic, with known
potential for harm, whether acute (immediate) or chronic
(longer-term)? By what means is it transferred, and in what
amounts and durations, and to what degree?
HBSE Process
The HBSE Process is a flow diagram that considers all
sources (hazardous energy) associated with a product, how
they may cause harm by transfer, and how this transfer can
be reduced to protect against injury. It helps us to analyze
specific protective mechanisms (safeguards) having features
and properties that are needed to protect against specific
harm mechanisms.
The product may have been evaluated to perform all design
functions as intended (do what intended). But have all
reasonably foreseeable conditions been anticipated? Has
the product been evaluated to suitably and safely respond
to all these conditions, combinations and sequences and
at least fail-safe (NOT do what NOT intended)? Has this
performance been validated by test? Have the safeguards,
and their specific properties, relied on for this performance
been evaluated and controlled?
For the next step (3), “Identify Means by which Energy can
be Transferred to a Body Part”, consideration is also needed
for direction and/or restriction of transfer, whether to, from,
or blocked (if needed) from the person (body part) or other
object of harm (property, environment, etc.).
This simple model can also be expanded in a variety of
ways. For the first HBSE Process step (1), “Identify Energy
Source”, consideration is needed for all sources (energy/
substance) that are supplied to, contained within, converted
by, used by or associated with the product.
For the next step (2), “Is Source Hazardous”, consideration
is needed for whether the source is capable of causing harm.
These steps need to conducted for each type of source,
transfer means/mechanism, potential for harm and entity
subject to harm. Is the source hazardous with respect to
the product function, application, environment, uses, users
and others involved, exposed, having access, or otherwise
affected?
Is this an unacceptable risk of harm? How is an acceptable
level of risk determined? What factors may this depend on
(use, users, environment, values, etc.)? What conditions
make the source hazardous or its transfer harmful? Can this
occur in normal operation and intended, normal use? Or
does it require an abnormal or unintended condition? Must
other unwanted or fault conditions have occurred in the past
or exist in the present?
Are these conditions of omission (inaction) or commission
(action/ reaction)? Do they involve hardware, software and
external influences (environment, human interaction and
Figure 2: HBSE Process with expansion notes
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 155
Product Safety
Other functional aspects such as incorrect outputs can
also lead to harm, involving energy or substance, due to
hardware, software or human interface factors, resulting
from incorrect control, timing, duration, sequence, etc.
These aspects are more closely associated with functional
safety, addressed separately.
error, etc.)? Are these conditions reasonably foreseeable? It’s
been said that all conditions are foreseeable (which may not
necessarily require action), but following an incident a jury
may decide what is reasonable (what actions should have
been taken).
Product Safety
A pp l i e d S afet y S c ien c e an d E n g in ee ring Techniques (ASSET™): Part 1
For the next step (4), “Design Safeguard Which Will Prevent
Energy Transfer to a Body Part”, consideration is also
needed for preventive safeguards that reduce, control or
eliminate the source (total amount), as well as mitigating
safeguards that reduce, control or eliminate the transfer
(transferred rate, duration and amount). The hierarchy of
protection should be to first eliminate the hazard (design it
out), then guard against the hazard (reduce the source and
then the transfer), then warn about the hazard (relying on
personal responsibility and other factors for avoidance). In
some cases it may also be possible to reduce susceptibility to
a hazard by increasing the resistance to the source, such as
through material properties including resistance to ignition.
For the next steps (5), “Measure Safeguard Effectiveness”
and (6) “Is Safeguard Effective”, much additional
consideration is needed to properly understand and apply this
“effectiveness” measure, which involves safeguard attributes.
Which specific properties of safeguards are relied upon for
each protective function? Under what conditions must they
function effectively? What conditions may tend to degrade
this performance or render it ineffective? How well do these
attributes hold up under each of these conditions, including
combinations and sequences? Just as in evaluating risk,
when the severity of consequences is high (i.e., safeguard
failure), the likelihood must be demonstrated or known to be
reliably low.
Safeguards attributes are properties of protective features
and mechanisms, which need to be specifically identified,
evaluated and validation tested under all reasonably
anticipated conditions, and controlled in design and
manufacturing. These attributes can be summarized in the
descriptive term DURESS (Durability, Usability, Reliability,
Efficacy, Suitability, Scalability), which helps describe the
needed characteristics:
Durability – protective characteristics should be able to
withstand, and not be adversely affected by conditions,
circumstances and scenarios of use (reasonably foreseeable
use, unintended use, misuse or abuse)
Usability – protection should function as needed, without
interfering with normal, intended product functions (so as
not to invite defeating of safeguards)
Reliability – protection should maintain its essential
performance throughout its entire design life, in all
conditions and stages of the product lifecycle (cradle-tograve)
Efficacy – protection should be able to effectively perform
the needed safety function, without introducing or increasing
other hazards (fix one problem but create another)
156 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Suitability – protection should be provided to a degree
appropriate for the application, based on the level of risk
with a suitable safety factor that demonstrates the degree to
which tested performance limits exceed minimum thresholds
of harm
Scalability – protection should perform as needed in the
intended scale of use, properly interacting with other
materials, components, systems and environments (smallscale properties appropriate for large-scale applications and
conditions)
HBSE Fault Tree for Injury
Fault Tree Analysis (FTA), a deductive, graphical, topdown analytical method in which the top event is a fault,
such as harm or other undesirable event. It outlines the
necessary and sufficient conditions and logical relationships
for this harm to occur, in order to determine the most likely
contributors (root causes on critical paths) and the most
effective safeguard strategies.
The HBSE fault tree for injury outlines conditions leading
to the injury top event, with initial necessary and sufficient
conditions of hazardous energy and exposure of (for transfer
to) a susceptible body part. This fault tree model can be
expanded to include other types of hazards and harm. It can
also depict the order of priority for safeguards, to eliminate,
guard or warn about the hazard. Such FTA models have been
successfully used in analysis of fire scenarios, including
those caused by lithium ion batteries.
FTA AND FMEA/FMECA
To complement the deductive, top-down FTA, one can use
an inductive, bottom-up analysis method such as Failure
Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) or Failure Modes
and Effects Criticality Analysis (FMECA), which more
directly considers the effect of severity and risk rankings.
This method begins at the “bottom”, with individual
items (components, materials) and their functions (in
each operating mode). Failure modes, effects, severities,
likelihoods and other factors are determined, and then
potential causes, recommended actions, and resulting
effects are analyzed methodically. Integrated FTA/FMECA
techniques have also been successfully applied to fire risk
involving lithium ion batteries, as we presented at the latest
NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop (2009).
SYSTEMS ENGINEERING
Elements of the systems engineering approach address scope
and context, from concept through all product lifecycle
stages (cradle-to-grave), from design through prototyping,
manufacturing, assembly, packaging, transport, storage,
installation, commissioning, operation, maintenance, repair,
decommissioning, reuse to disposal.
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Ap p lied S afet y S c ien c e and Engineering Techniques (ASSET™): Pa r t 1
Specific properties of materials and components, including
hardware, software and human elements, need to be
compatible with the needs, influences and interfaces of
subsystems and the overall system, including external
systems and the environment (micro and macro). Functions,
characteristics and properties need to be considered for
materials, components, devices, circuits, subsystems,
systems and processes, as contributing to harm or to
protection.
Reliability engineering elements address the criticality of
safety-critical functions and features, and the conditions
under which they must continue to perform effectively.
Reliability approaches such as probability of failure,
circuit redundancy and fail-safe modes are also used in
techniques such as FTA and FMEA, and addressed by a
number of related disciplines, including system safety and
dependability management.
FUNCTIONAL SAFETY
Functional safety is a special field that specifically
addresses electrical, electronic and programmable systems.
Similar to other types of safeguards, reliance is placed on
specific functions or characteristics of a product, requiring
certain attributes. But a safeguard in functional safety is
HUMAN FACTORS
Elements of human factors address many aspects, including
anthropometry, physiological responses and susceptibility
to energy and substance transfer, behavior (product use,
misuse, abuse or hazard avoidance), human error, interaction,
and other human characteristics including performance,
limitations, etc. related to aspects of a product or system,
such as design, manufacturing, operation, maintenance, etc.
SUMMARY
ASSET integrates these elements to leverage the strengths of
HBSE, risk management, and other techniques, to optimize
the value of our resources and assets: our individual and
Figure 3: HBSE Fault Tree for Injury, expanded
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 157
Product Safety
RELIABILITY ENGINEERING
considered to be the essential performance of hardware
and software controls that manage safety-critical functions.
Some functional safety aspects may be directly protective
by design (life safety). Functional safety aspects in other
applications address functions for which failure may lead
to increased risk of harm (immediate or imminent), loss
of a required level of protection, or other reduced ability
to protect against harm. In “single-fault” analysis, the
conditions that rely upon protective mechanisms to operate
should be considered as given conditions, and any failure
or inadequacy of this protection would be considered as the
fault condition.
A pp l i e d S afet y S c ien c e an d E n g in ee ring Techniques (ASSET™): Part 1
Product Safety
collective safety knowledge, experience and expertise. The
application of safety science and engineering techniques to
any hazard is based on examining the types and mechanisms
of harm in order to consider appropriate mechanisms
for protection. This analysis includes the conditions and
circumstances that must be present, first for harm to occur,
and then for protection against it. It’s a basic but robust
approach, in which simple tools can be applied, with
appropriate subject matter expertise, to simple or complex
scenarios in a consistent, repeatable manner, an asset to any
organization.
“The great liability of the engineer compared to men of other
professions is that his works are out in the open where all
can see them. His acts, step by step, are in hard substance.
He cannot bury his mistakes in the grave like the doctors.
He cannot argue them into thin air or blame the judge like
the lawyers. He cannot, like the architects, cover his failures
with trees and vines. He cannot, like the politicians, screen
his shortcomings by blaming his opponents and hope the
people will forget. The engineer simply cannot deny he did
it. If his works do not work, he is damned.” - Herbert Hoover
(1874 - 1964).
ACKNOWLEDGMENT
The author wishes to acknowledge the HP/Agilent authors of
the initial HBSE concepts, including R. Nute, R. Corson, J.
Barrick and D. Adams, as well as UL Research, Engineering
and UL University staff including R. Davidson and D.
Bejnarowicz for their valuable technical contributions toward
this material.
REFERENCES
1. Hazard Based Safety Engineering, Student Guide, 2nd Ed
(B.03), Hewlett-Packard Company, Agilent Technologies,
Inc., Underwriters Laboratories Inc., 2001.
2. Hazard Based Safety Engineering (HBSE) UL Supplement,
Underwriters Laboratories Inc., 2003.
3. Safety aspects, Guidelines for their inclusion in standards,
ISO IEC Guide 51, Second edition, 1999.
4. Risk management — Principles and guidelines, ISO 31000,
First edition, 2009-11-15.
5. Risk management – Risk assessment techniques, IEC ISO
31010, Edition 1.0, 2009-11.
6. Guidelines for safety related risk assessment and risk
reduction for low voltage equipment, IEC Guide 116
(C/1614/DV, 2010-01-22).
7. Risk Assessment Guidelines for Consumer Products, Official
Journal of the European Union: OJ L22 Vol 53, 26 January
2010, Part IV, Appendix 5.
8. Dependability Management, Part 3 Application Guide Section 9 Risk Analysis of Technological Systems, IEC
60300-3-9, First Edition.
158 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
9. Fault Tree Handbook, NUREG-0492, Nuclear Regulatory
Commission, Washington D.C., 1981.
10. Fault Tree Handbook with Aerospace Applications, NASA,
Washington D.C., 2002.
11. Potential Failure Mode and Effects Analysis in Design
(Design FMEA), SAE J1739, 2009.
Thomas Lanzisero is a Sr. Research
Engineer and Distinguished Member of
Technical Staff at UL LLC (Underwriters
Laboratories, Melville, NY) with nearly
30 years of applied practice in safety
engineering. He is a registered Professional
Engineer (P.E.) and principal instructor
and practitioner of Hazard Based Safety
Engineering (HBSE). He has led development of Applied
Safety Science and Engineering Techniques (ASSET™),
including the ASSET Safety Management Process for
informed decisions to achieve, maintain and continuously
improve safety as a design objective. This work has recently
been recognized with a 2011 IEEE Region 1 Award for
Technological Innovation.
This and related hazard analysis and risk assessment work
has been extensively published and presented, including
keynote presentation on the safety of consumer electronics
into the future at the 2012 International Conference on
Consumer Electronics (ICCE) by the IEEE CES, 2012
Advanced Product Safety Management course at St. Louis
University, 2010 and 2011 International Symposium on
Product Compliance Engineering by the IEEE Product Safety
Engineering Society, 2011 IEEE Chicago Argonne National
Laboratories Technical Conference, International Consumer
Product Health and Safety Organization (ICPHSO 2011),
Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), Asia
Pacific Economic Cooperation - Joint Regulatory Advisory
Council (APEC JRAC Risk Assessment Workshop), American
Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE) and NASA (2009 NASA
Aerospace Battery Workshop).
An IEEE Senior Member, Tom is Founding Chair of the
Long Island, NY Chapter of the IEEE Product Safety
Engineering Society (PSES) and Vice Chair of the IEEE
Risk Assessment Technical Committee (RATC). He serves as
technical expert in committees for electric shock protection
and risk management, including US National Committee
Technical Advisory Groups (USNC TAGs), the International
Electrotechnical Commission (IEC TC64 MT4) and the
International Organization for Standardization (ISO 31000
/ ANSI Z690). He can be contacted at +1.631.546.2464 or
[email protected]
ASSET is trademark of UL LLC
ASSET and HBSE workshops are available through UL.
www.incompliancemag.com
Applied Safety Science
and Engineering
Techniques (ASSET™)
Product Safety
The Evolution of Hazard Based Safety
Engineering into the Framework of a
Safety Management Process
BY THOMAS LANZISERO
A
pplied Safety Science and Engineering Techniques
(ASSET) merge hazard based safety engineering and
safety science principles in an overall framework
of a safety management process to achieve, maintain and
continuously improve safety. The ASSET process has been
synthesized from current, industry-standard risk assessment
and risk management guidelines, including recent ISO, IEC
and ANSI publications.
Basic relationships are explored among hazards, exposure
and harm to persons, property and the environment. Various
potential approaches to protect against harm are then
explored in the framework of safety management, systems
engineering, quality management systems, concurrent
engineering, human factors and other relevant principles.
This ASSET Safety Management process has potential
application in virtually any industry and product segment to
support informed decisions on solutions to difficult safety
issues, using sound safety science and engineering experience
and judgment. This article for the 2011 IEEE PSES
symposium covers the ASSET safety management process,
its guiding principles and objectives.
ASSET OBJECTIVE
The objective of the ASSET Process of Safety Management
is to utilize Applied Safety Science and Engineering
Techniques (ASSET™), together with existing standards,
codes and regulations, to achieve, maintain and continuously
improve the safety of products, processes and services for
safer living and working environments. ASSET™ (Applied
Safety Science and Engineering Techniques) is a trademark
of Underwriters Laboratories Inc.
BACKGROUND
This article follows the introductory article Applied Safety
Science and Engineering Techniques (ASSET™): Taking
HBSE to the Next Level (In Compliance, Novmber 2012)
which was presented at the 2010 ISPCE of the IEEE Product
Safety Engineering Society, and had established the case and
set the stage for ASSET.
A similar article was published by the American Society
of Safety Engineers in their SH&E (Safety Health and
Environment) Standards Digest, a publication of their
Engineering Practice Specialty. ASSET also reflects concepts
of the ANSI/ASSE Z690 series, the US national adoption
of ISO 31000, ISO/IEC 31010 and ISO Guide 73, initiating
membership on the ISO TAG on Risk Management.
Certain ASSET principles have been applied and presented
in recent conferences including the 2009 NASA Aerospace
Battery Workshop (“FTA {Fault Tree Analysis}/FMEA
{Failure Modes and Effects Analysis} Safety Analysis
© 2011 IEEE. Reprinted, with permission, from the proceedings of the
2011 IEEE International Symposium on Product Compliance Engineering.
© 2012 UL LLC. All rights reserved.
This document may not be reproduced or distributed without authorization.
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 159
Product Safety
A pp l i e d S afet y S c ien c e an d E n g in ee ring Techniques (ASSET™): Part 2
Model for Lithium-ion Batteries”), ASEAN/ ACCSQ
2010 (“ASEANUS Enhanced Partnership Workshop on
Hazard-Based Engineering Principles for the Electrical
and Electronic Equipment: A Risk-Based Approach Applied
to Li-Ion Battery (LIB) Hazards”), as well as ICPHSO
2011 (International Consumer Product Health and Safety
Organization, “Hazard Analysis: Hazard Based Safety
Engineering & Fault Tree Analysis”). The ASSET Safety
Management process will also be presented for the IEEE
and Argonne National Lab, 2011 Today’s Engineering
Challenges – Tomorrow’s Solutions Technical Conference
and Exhibition, November in Chicago.
With essential technical input and development of Bob
Davidson and strategic leadership of Dan Bejnarowicz,
ASSET was developed in the safety management process
framework. Notification has just been made that this ASSET
work has earned a 2011 IEEE Region 1 Award (Northeastern
US) in the category of “Technological Innovation (Industry
or Government): For significant Patents, for discovery of
new devices, development of applications or exemplary
contributions to industry or government.”
ASSET is now the subject of a 2-day workshop to put your
skills to the test by applying ASSET analysis to example
products and prepare to address difficult safety issues using
a multi-disciplined, team-oriented approach, supported by
science as well as your own experience and judgment.
ASSET APPLICATION
The ASSET process has application in areas including the
development of safety standards, codes, and regulations,
and the design, evaluation, compliance, certification and
safety management of products, processes and services.
As such, ASSET applies to functions and responsibilities
including safety designers, regulatory compliance, product
safety certifiers, standards/codes developers and product
and program safety managers. ASSET can also help to
integrate and address the needs of various stakeholders
including regulators, AHJs, standards developers, trade and
professional organizations, consumer groups, government
agencies and the public.
For example, relevant safety requirements are generally
determined by first establishing the scope of the product,
process, or service in question. This scope is then compared
to the scope of identified standards, codes and/or regulations
that may potentially apply. The scope and context of the
assessment itself is also established, including boundaries,
and scope alignment on all three counts is sought. In this
early stage and throughout the process, potential gaps need to
be identified and bridged. A gap may exist for example, if a
product, process or service – in the context of its application
– does not fall completely within the scope of existing safety
standards. Another gap may exist whereby a product, process
160 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
or service falls within the scope of a safety standard, but
involves features, functions, technologies or applications that
may (a) introduce a safety hazard, and (b) not be anticipated
or addressed by the requirements in the standard.
ASSET AND STANDARDS
ASSET provides a process and methodology for
(a) complementing existing standards in evaluating the
safety of products, processes or services, (b) assisting in
the evaluation of products, processes or services not within
the scope of existing standards, (c) evaluating product
features (materials, constructions), functions, technologies
or applications not anticipated or covered by existing
standards. In these situations, ASSET can be applied to (1)
help identify hazards not anticipated or covered by existing
standards and the need for additional requirements to meet
the safety objective (intent) of the standards, and (2) help
identify alternative protective measures not anticipated by the
standard but which can achieve an equivalent level of safety
to the protective measures specified in the standard, thereby
meeting the safety objective (intent) of the standard.
In fact, the ASSET process stages include repeated “specchecks”, whereby the initially identified requirements are
assessed at each stage.
ASSET SAFETY MANAGEMENT PROCESS
The ASSET process of safety management was developed
as the evolution of hazard-based safety engineering
principles and safety science into an overall framework
of a safety management process. Hazard Based Safety
Engineering (HBSE) was originally conceived by HP/
Agilent, and targeted typical types of hazards and forms of
injury involving electronics products, such as information
technology and office equipment.
The ASSET process is based on a number of acknowledged
risk management/risk assessment principles and processes,
for example those found in publications including but not
limited to ISO/IEC Guide 51, IEC Guide 116, ISO 31000,
ISO/IEC 31010, ISO 14121, ISO 14971, IEC 60300-3-9 and
ANSI/ASSE Z690.
This process involves stages to (a) formulate the right types
of questions to identify the scope of the product, system or
service to be evaluated for potential harm, (b) identify and
analyze hazards (potential sources of harm), (c) identify,
analyze and evaluate protective measures to reduce the risk
of harm (e.g., risk of injury from products), (d) assist in the
determination of whether or not an acceptable level of safety
is achieved, (e) understand and apply methods to maintain
and continuously improve safety. This can help explain,
apply and enhance existing requirements, and help address
emerging technologies, products and applications.
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Ap p lied S afet y S c ien c e and Engineering Techniques (ASSET™): Pa r t 2
This ASSET process was developed to address a broad
spectrum of applications, and each stage has different needs
and significance for the assessment of different products,
processes, services in different applications. The following
provides a brief look at each ASSET process stage and its
objectives.
Determine Scope/Context
The goal of this stage is to determine whether protective
measures are adequate and effective by (a) evaluating
whether and how protective measures meet specific safety
objectives, (b) identifying safety attributes that are being
relied upon and need to be controlled, and (c) evaluating
those safety attributes. In order to determine if the goal of this
stage is achieved, key questions are asked which include the
following:
• Have all the hazards been identified?
• Have the safety (risk reduction) objectives been
determined?
• Have the protective measures intended to address the
hazards and achieve the safety objectives been identified
and designed?
• Have tests and evaluations been conducted to demonstrate
that the protective measures are capable of achieving the
safety objectives with acceptable results?
• Have the constructions, components and materials that are
relied upon for the protective measure to meet the safety
objectives been identified?
Identify/Analyze Hazards
The goals of the stage are to (a) identify
potential types and sources of harm (hazards),
(b) determine how harm can occur (hazardous
situations, hazardous and harmful events) and the
severity of the harm, (c) sort consequences by the
level of severity (initial consequence evaluation
akin to worst case scenario, with guidance on
severity factors, and consideration of extent
and exposure of harm), and (d) determine if the
applicable standards, codes and/or regulations
address the identified hazards, or if there are gaps
that need to be addressed.
Specify/Identify/Design Protective
Measures
In this stage, protective measures are specified,
identified or designed, depending on the given
function and responsibility being fulfilled. For
example, a protective measure may be specified
by developers of standards, codes and regulations,
designed by a manufacturer or identified by an
evaluator. This stage has goals to (a) establish
the safety objective(s), (b) determine the need
for protective measures, (c) identify the potential
protective measure strategies, categories and
mechanisms, (d) analyze and prioritize protective
measures, and (e) specify, design and implement
the protective measures.
Figure 1: ASSET Process of Safety Management
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 161
Product Safety
The goals of this stage are to determine and attempt to
align the scope and context of the following: the product,
process or service to be assessed, the assessment itself and
the initially identified requirements. Relevant topics include
(a) the subject of the assessment, including systems aspects
of materials, components, subsystems, environment and
boundaries with interfaces and interactions, (b) intended
implementation, operation, use, users and others affected
(c) conditions and requirements for installation, (d)
recommended procedures for maintenance and repair,
(e) potential effects of packing, shipping and storage,
(f) reasonably foreseeable misuse (using a sub-process
developed to determine degrees of reasonable foreseeable
misuse and associated guidance) , (g) other conditions or
factors of potential impact, and (h) applicable standards,
codes and/or regulations.
Evaluate Protective Measures
A pp l i e d S afet y S c ien c e an d E n g in ee ring Techniques (ASSET™): Part 2
• Have their safety-related characteristics (safety attributes),
factors which may degrade those characteristics, and the
tests and evaluations needed to determine their adequacy
been identified?
Product Safety
• Have the necessary evaluations/tests been performed with
acceptable results?
Through this point in the ASSET process, these stages
generally involve activities such as hazard based safety
engineering, safety research, safety design, conformity
assessment and new standards development. It is also noted
that the evaluation of certain protective measures, including
life safety devices, may effectively begin at this stage.
Decision Gate: Acceptable Level of Safety Achieved?
There are two basic outcomes of this safety decision. If it
is determined that an acceptable level of safety has been
achieved, then there is a need to control, monitor and review
to maintain safety. However, if an acceptable level of safety
has not been achieved, there is a different need to assess and
decide on action. This may involve revisiting earlier process
stages or discontinuing.
This point of the ASSET process generally involves
conformance and compliance activities.
Control/Monitor/Review to Maintain Safety
At this stage, if determined that an acceptable level of safety
has been achieved, the goal is to ensure that safety is then
maintained by (a) establishing controls throughout the life
cycle, up the supply chain, to ensure that safety is maintained,
(b) monitoring field performance down the supply chain
and factors that may impact safety by means of surveillance
and follow up, and (c) periodically reviewing and assessing
results and deciding on appropriate actions.
Decision Gate: Present Level of Safety Maintained?
Similar to the prior decision gate, there are also two basic
outcomes of this safety decision. If determined that the
present level of safety is being maintained, then there is a
need to continue to control, monitor, and review. However, if
the present level of safety is not being maintained, there is a
different need to assess and decide on action. Again, this may
involve revisiting earlier process stages or discontinuing.
This point of the ASSET process generally involves activities
including certification, market and conformity surveillance,
follow-up for certification mark integrity, updates in regulations, standards and codes, and assessment of new/emerging
technologies that may either benefit or threaten safety.
162 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Identify Opportunities for Improvement
The goal of this stage is to monitor and identify the opportunity, or the need, for improvement in (a) safety and safety
standards and (b) the processes, methods and tools used to
determine whether and how safety is achieved and maintained. These opportunities are then assessed to decide on action, which may involve revisiting earlier process stages.
Activities involved in this stage of the ASSET process
include improvements in regulations, standards and codes,
as well as improvements in safety assessment processes,
methods and tools.
MEETING THE OBJECTIVE
The stated objective of the ASSET Process of Safety
Management is to utilize Applied Safety Science and
Engineering Techniques (ASSET™), together with existing
standards, codes and regulations, to achieve, maintain and
continuously improve the safety of products, processes and
services for safer living and working environments.
By this we mean to a) achieve an acceptable level of safety
(once determined, based on specific safety objectives),
b) maintain that present level of safety (throughout the
entire lifecycle of the product, process or service, under all
anticipated conditions, considering upstream (suppliers)
and downstream (users and all affected) the supply chain),
and c) continually seek and assess opportunities for
improvement (based on the availability, need or demand for
improvements).
ASSET stresses the importance of assessing the sources,
causes and conditions of harm (as did HBSE before it),
as well as the risk of harm (severity, likelihood, extent,
exposure). ASSET also addresses different forms of potential
harm to various entities, including persons (injury or health
risk), property, the environment and even continuity of
critical operations and functions. Sources are categorized in
terms of energy or matter/substance that may be harmful,
from different sources in various forms, conversions or
conditions. The standard HBSE tools (3-block energy transfer
model for injury, HBSE process to evaluate a safeguard and
standard injury fault tree) are adapted and expanded.
Then the most effective protective measure strategies can
be determined, with appropriate identification, evaluation
and control of safety attributes -the very properties and
characteristics of protective measures relied upon to achieve,
maintain and improve this level of safety.
The ASSET process supports informed decisions using the
best available information, data and other resources, based on
the best available knowledge and experience, at progressive
stages of development. This can help identify the degree of
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Ap p lied S afet y S c ien c e and Engineering Techniques (ASSET™): Pa r t 2
confidence in the decision and the relative need and value
of additional inputs or analysis. ASSET can also serve as a
tool for effective communication and interaction to share
information, as needed by various stakeholders.
13. Fault Tree Handbook, NUREG-0492, Nuclear
Regulatory Commission, Washington D.C., 1981
ACKNOWLEDGMENT
15. Potential Failure Mode and Effects Analysis in Design
(Design FMEA), SAE J1739, 2009
The author wishes to acknowledge the indispensable
technical and strategic contributions of Robert J. Davidson,
Jr. and Daniel E. Bejnarowicz of UL University.
1.
Risk management - Principles and guidelines,
ISO 31000, First edition, 2009-11-15
2.
Risk management - Risk assessment techniques, IEC
ISO 31010, Edition 1.0, 2009-11
3.
Risk management - Vocabulary, ISO Guide 73, First
Edition, 2009
4.
Risk Management Series: ANSI/ASSE Z690.1-2011
Vocabulary for Risk Management (identical national
adoption of ISO Guide 73:2009); ANSI/ASSE Z690.22011 Risk Management -Principles and Guidelines
(identical national adoption of ISO 31000:2009);
ANSI/ASSE Z690.32011 Risk Assessment Techniques
(identical national adoption of ISO/IEC 31010:2009)
5.
Safety aspects, Guidelines for their inclusion in
standards, ISO IEC Guide 51, Second edition, 1999
6.
Guidelines for safety related risk assessment and risk
reduction for low voltage equipment, IEC Guide 116,
Edition 1.0, 2010-08
7.
Hazard Based Safety Engineering, Student Guide,
2nd Ed (B.03), Hewlett-Packard Company, Agilent
Technologies, Inc., Underwriters Laboratories Inc., 2001
8.
Hazard Based Safety Engineering (HBSE) UL
Supplement, Underwriters Laboratories Inc., 2003
9.
Risk Assessment Guidelines for Consumer Products,
Official Journal of the European Union: OJ L22 Vol 53,
26 January 2010, Part IV, Appendix 5
10. Dependability Management, Part 3 Application Guide Section 9 Risk Analysis of Technological Systems, IEC
60300-3-9, First Edition
11. Safety of machinery - Risk assessment - Part 1:
Principles, ISO 141211:2007 Medical devices Application of risk management to medical devices, EN
ISO 14971
12. W. Hammer, Product Safety Management and
nd
Engineering, 2 ed, 1993
Thomas Lanzisero is a Sr. Research
Engineer and Distinguished Member of
Technical Staff at UL LLC (Underwriters
Laboratories, Melville, NY) with nearly
30 years of applied practice in safety
engineering. He is a registered Professional
Engineer (P.E.) and principal instructor
and practitioner of Hazard Based Safety
Engineering (HBSE). He has led development of Applied
Safety Science and Engineering Techniques (ASSET™),
including the ASSET Safety Management Process for
informed decisions to achieve, maintain and continuously
improve safety as a design objective. This work has recently
been recognized with a 2011 IEEE Region 1 Award for
Technological Innovation.
This and related hazard analysis and risk assessment work
has been extensively published and presented, including
keynote presentation on the safety of consumer electronics
into the future at the 2012 International Conference on
Consumer Electronics (ICCE) by the IEEE CES, 2012
Advanced Product Safety Management course at St. Louis
University, 2010 and 2011 International Symposium on
Product Compliance Engineering by the IEEE Product Safety
Engineering Society, 2011 IEEE Chicago Argonne National
Laboratories Technical Conference, International Consumer
Product Health and Safety Organization (ICPHSO 2011),
Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), Asia
Pacific Economic Cooperation - Joint Regulatory Advisory
Council (APEC JRAC Risk Assessment Workshop), American
Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE) and NASA (2009 NASA
Aerospace Battery Workshop).
An IEEE Senior Member, Tom is Founding Chair of the
Long Island, NY Chapter of the IEEE Product Safety
Engineering Society (PSES) and Vice Chair of the IEEE
Risk Assessment Technical Committee (RATC). He serves as
technical expert in committees for electric shock protection
and risk management, including US National Committee
Technical Advisory Groups (USNC TAGs), the International
Electrotechnical Commission (IEC TC64 MT4) and the
International Organization for Standardization (ISO 31000/
ANSI Z690). He can be contacted at +1.631.546.2464 or
[email protected]
ASSET is trademark of UL LLC
ASSET and HBSE workshops are available through UL.
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 163
Product Safety
REFERENCES
14. Fault Tree Handbook with Aerospace Applications,
NASA, Washington D.C., 2002
ESD Electronic Design
Automation Checks
Part 1: Outlining the essential requirements of
the ESD verification flow
ESD
BY MICHAEL G. KHAZHINSKY
T
he verification of electrostatic discharge (ESD)
protection in a complex integrated circuit (IC) design
is extremely challenging. Leading-edge designs
have many supply domains and voltage levels for different
functional parts like radio frequency (RF), digital and high
voltage blocks, making ESD checking a complex and error
prone task. Relying on manual verification alone poses a
significant risk of missing design flaws, which can be very
costly during manufacturing and in the field. Consequently,
automated ESD checking is highly desired in today’s design
flow. This article outlines the essential
requirements of the ESD verification
flow as defined by the ESD Association
(ESDA) Electronic Design Automation
(EDA) Tool Working Group [1].
PRODUCT DEFINITION PHASE
The ESD performance specifications usually follow
commonly accepted standards. However, depending on the
field of application, they can be modified by marketing teams
and IC customers. Product design specifications and required
ESD performance dictate specifications of ESD components
and ESD cells. Based on these functional requirements,
suitable ESD cells are defined per each pin application node
(signal, power, and ground). Typically the ESD cells are
made accessible to the designer in a dedicated ESD library.
Figure 1 illustrates the timeline and
main stages for an example design
flow. The IC product design flow (top
row) needs to be synchronized with an
ESD development and implementation
flow (middle row). The latter needs to
be supported by an ESD check flow
(bottom row).
The following sections describe the
main IC development phases and give
examples of different ESD checks
relevant for these phases.
164 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Figure 1: A simple ESD verification flow mapped to sample IC design flow.
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ESD Electronic Design Autom ation Checks: Pa r t 1
In a situation when a mature semiconductor technology
is used with already developed ESD libraries, only placement and product specific modifications of the existing ESD
components and ESD cells need to be verified. For a new
IC product that uses a new semiconductor process, an ESD
library may not be available and no specific cell level ESD
checks can be executed. However, performance specifications
of the needed ESD library could still be defined, together
with the IC customer, based on the available ESD technology
development data and ESD EDA data from other products/
technologies.
Based on the available design data in this design phase, the
following ESD checks can be performed:
• Protected device checks to verify that the available ESD
library cells can provide the required safe operating
conditions for the protected components at each pin, for the
given design functional requirements.
MODULE AND FULL IC DESIGN PHASE CHECKS
This is the main design activity phase, involving complex
interaction between all product teams. It can be divided into
three sub-stages.
The first stage is the floorplanning of the chip architecture
modules and the standard digital I/O and power banks.
The ESD checks that could be done at this design stage are
limited to top-level verification of the ESD network within
the digital I/O banks and ESD connectivity between the
different modules, the related I/O banks in the different power
domains and the package level ESD connections. These
checks include:
• Protected device checks for the digital modules.
• Cell-level checks for the new ESD library cells.
• Intra-power domain checks for the digital intellectual
property (IP).
• Floor plan/top-level ESD checks for the power and ground
domain bus crossing.
• Package-level checks to determine, for example, expected
peak charged device model (CDM) currents, as well as
package and die specifications to meet CDM performance
specifications.
• Basic packagelevel checks.
Due to the nature of these data, a simple check of the ESD
compliance can be done based on the ESD characteristics of
the ESD cells in a design database. The following is an ESD
EDA check example performed during product definition.
An early analysis of the integrity of I/O cell, bus placement
and the overall ESD robustness is one of the essential
factors of a successful chip design. An ESD floorplanning
checker for the chip could enforce the ESD design rules to be
verified while planning I/O cell and power bus placement. In
particular, the checker could verify the existence
of an ESD cell/device between pads, estimate
parasitic resistance between pad and ESD cell/
device, and give a rough estimate of the chip
ESD robustness by predicting pad voltage
(Figure 2).
The second stage is the design of IP modules and analog I/O
pad rings. At this design stage, the analog (and RF) modules
and the related I/O banks are physically designed. In many
cases, the analog IP module team is different from the I/O and
power/ground cell design team, which is often responsible
for integrating the ESD library cells. The module team may
not have detailed information about the ESD components
used at cell level and special attention is needed when
checking the overall ESD implementation. A certain level
of co-design between the analog modules and the dedicated
ESD protection cells may be needed as well. Based on the
available design data, the following ESD checks could be
performed:
CHIP ARCHITECTURE PHASE
At this design stage, the functional/behavioral
level of chip architecture is defined and the
required ESD components and library cells
are identified. No circuit or layout level IC
description is available in this phase. Similar
to the previous section, cell level checks and
protected device checks can be performed.
The available design data are similar to those
described in the previous section.
Figure 2: A sample I/O assembly checked with an ESD floor plan checker.
Tool output flags missing ESD protection devices and large resistances in
the ESD current path.
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 165
ESD
• Cell-level checks on the existing
ESD cells.
ESD E l e ct ro n i c Desig n A u to mat io n Checks: Part 1
• Cell-level checks for the analog pin ESD library cells (can
be newly developed, e.g. for custom analog form factors or
in-module/off- pad ring placement).
• Intra-power domain checks for analog pad rings.
• Intra-power domain checks for each analog module.
• Inter-power domain checks (if there are several power
domains in one analog module).
• Protected device checks for the individual modules.
ESD
• Special ESD rule checks on specific analog/RF blocks/IP’s
– e.g., differing ESD target levels.
Specific tool functionality is needed for the cases where the
ESD protection cells are placed in the analog pad ring, which
is not available to the team performing the ESD checks at
module level. Such tool functionality can be extended to
allow verification of module ESD robustness against crosspower domain or cross-IP stress events. This is especially
useful when the counter pins are not available physically but
some information about the involved ESD network (ESD
cells, connectivity) is present in the design database. This
can be considered a “virtual chip integration” where only
a particular module design is physically available to the
team running the check. This situation also applies to the
verification of a given module involving evaluation of ESD
performance of third party IP (“black box”).
The third stage is full-chip IP and I/O integration, including
package. This is the final level of ESD checks applied to the
whole IC. The main purpose is to verify the integration of the
individual IP ESD circuits at top IC level, to check for the new
cross-IP integration ESD violations and parasitic devices, and
to verify that the protected components at each individual IP
module are still operating in their ESD safe operating area
(SOA) for stress combinations including other IP.
Based on the available desicgn data, the following ESD
checks could be executed:
• Inter-power domain checks.
• Package-level checks.
• Protected device checks for the full IC.
For certain classes of designs (e.g., some digital designs), it
might be possible to implement certain hierarchy of checks
so that at the full chip level the individual design blocks are
considered as “black boxes” and only the integration of the
blocks is verified.
The following is an example of ESD checks of the module
and full IC design phase aimed at identifying potential
ESD weaknesses of I/O assemblies (rings or arrays). An
I/O assembly could be checked at this stage with an ESD
verification tool covering both the layout checks and the
electrical checks. The layout checks could ensure that the
predefined ESD rules are strictly followed. In particular,
the checker could flag input buffer gates and output buffer
drains without adequate ESD protection, parasitic bipolars,
violations of minimum ESD metal width, etc. The electrical
checks of I/O assembly at this stage can vary in complexity:
they can use simplified I/O netlists only or include detailed
models of ESD protection elements and parasitics. The
verification of primary ESD current path existence and
checking of alternative current paths for each pin-to-pin
combination is the main objective of the check at this stage
[2]. The checker could flag the situation where no ESD
current path exists or where an unintended parallel path
with weak devices becomes preferred during an ESD event.
Basic checks can be done using an extracted netlist from
the schematic for all pin-to-pin combinations. This can then
be followed by a more detailed analysis for selected pins
using the netlist extracted from the layout. Figure 3 shows
part of an I/O ring with primary and alternate current paths
for a given pin stress combination. An appropriate check of
these two current paths would involve high speed static and
dynamic simulations on the large netlist of interconnect and
ESD relevant components.
DESIGN QUALIFICATION PHASE
In this phase, final design audits and ESD performance
assessments are executed using the verification results
from the previous phases. This is often done based on a
custom, company-defined standard practice methodology,
summarized in an “ESD check list” or other document. The
goal is to confirm that all required ESD verification activities
have been performed.
Figure 3: Check of an ESD path in an I/O ring. An appropriate
check of these two current paths would involve high-speed
static and dynamic simulations on the large netlist of
interconnect and ESD relevant components.
166 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
EDA tool functionality at this design stage is mostly related
to reporting and documenting the results of the checks
executed earlier and storing the results in a suitable database
for further analysis. Such analysis is usually needed for
product ESD troubleshooting during IC qualification.
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ESD Electronic Design Autom ation Checks: Pa r t 1
In practical design cases involving complex IC products
and ESD solutions, there could be situations in which some
ESD violations may still be reported when an IC is sent for
manufacturing due to limitations of the ESD verification tools
or due to non-ESD-related product development priorities.
However, under all circumstances, the result of the formal
ESD EDA check runs could allow for easy product ESD
troubleshooting. The ESD EDA checker output could help
with relating possible ESD test failures with identified ESD
design marginalities.
The ESD checks of the final IC verification phase are most
extensive. They are similar to the checks which have been
performed during earlier design phases. However, ESD EDA
tools could be capable of operating on much larger netlists,
including full chip resistance, capacitance, and package
information. The following are a few ESD EDA check
examples performed during this phase.
After completion of the initial IC integration, critical
cross-domain boundaries between different supply voltage
networks on a chip could be identified. The high voltage
drop across these boundaries during an ESD stress makes
them more prone to ESD damage than the devices placed
within the same power domain. The increasing number of
different supply voltage domains in today’s generation of
chips necessitates an automated check to find devices that
would be impacted during an ESD event. Depending on the
acceptable voltage stress level for the specific devices at the
domain interface, ESD design weaknesses could be identified
by an EDA tool after checking thousands of possible interface
connections. In addition, protection measures already
implemented at power domain boundaries (diodes connected
to an interface gate oxide, etc.) have to be taken into account
as well when analyzing ESD robustness of devices at power
domain boundaries. Figure 5 (page 168) gives an example of
a cross-domain level shifter, where a gate connected to node
1 could be overstressed during an ESD event.
CONCLUSIONS
In this article the, essential requirements of an effective ESD
EDA verification flow were described. These requirements
are aligned within the IC design community ESD verification
needs. The proposed verification flow offers a systematic
approach to check ESD robustness across all IC blocks at
Figure 4: Example of the final chip-level checker output. Simulated voltage potentials and currents at each path node are shown.
Bus parasitics are included in simulations.
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 167
ESD
A final ESD IC check could include verification of all
designated ESD current paths using an EDA tool. To achieve
better accuracy for a given pad stress combination, more
than one ESD path could be found and analyzed since ESD
current flow may not be limited to the shortest path identified
earlier. A report from such a tool will include calculated
node voltages and currents and can be used for the ESD
signoff before the tape-out. Figure 4 shows an example of
the final chip-level checker output, where three distinctive
ESD paths for a chosen pair of pads (IO_D2 and IO_ANA)
were found. Voltages and currents along ESD paths have
been found by running DC simulations where an HBM 1.33A
current has been forced between the two pads. Simulated
voltage potentials and currents at each path node are shown
in Figure 4. Bus parasitics have been included in simulations.
For example, the voltage difference between nodes V2
(7.76V) and V3 (5.35V) is coming from both the diode D1
voltage drop (2.39V) and VSSIO bus resistance voltage drop
(0.01V). Voltage stresses across most sensitive devices are
being monitored to ensure that while the total voltage drop
between stressed pads may be high (16.48V), devices are not
being stressed in excess of their failure limits. In particular,
voltage between VDD and VSS in this example does not
exceed the 0.68V, and the IC core can be considered ESD
robust.
ESD E l e ct ro n i c Desig n A u to mat io n Checks: Part 1
ESD
Figure 5: Power domain boundary-crossing check. Due to
increased Rbus, the primary ESD current path (thick line)
becomes less attractive, resulting in stressed gates at node 1.
different phases of design flow. This approach allows for the
avoidance of many ESD design flaws, reducing the overall
design cycle time. The ESD EDA tools would improve the
ESD predictive capabilities by generating extended netlists
(including ESD device, resistance, capacitance and package)
and retiring an approach of crude “back of the envelope”
extractions, manual/visual checks and resource-intensive
SPICE simulations. Another important benefit of these tools
is the possibility to use them for systematic ESD design
optimization. The ESD EDA check requirements outlined in
this article could be the basis for additional effort by the EDA
vendors to adapt their tools and to make a comprehensive
ESD verification flow feasible.
REFERENCES
1. M. Khazhinsky, et al., “ESD Electronic Design
Automation Checks,” ESDA Technical Report ESD
TR18.0-01-11, pp. 1-75, 2011.
2. N. Trivedi, et al., “Two Approaches for Design
Verification for ESD,“ IEW, pp. 408-418, 2007.
More details on the proposed ESD EDA verification flow can
be found in the ESDA Technical Report ESD TR18.0-01-11
[1], which is available for as a free download at
http://www.esda.org/standards.html. At the time of the
writing, the ESDA EDA Working Group consisted of the
following members: Michael Khazhinsky (Silicon Labs),
Fabrice Blanc (ARM), Gianluca Boselli (Texas Instruments),
Shuqing (Victor) Cao (Global Foundries),
Norman Chang (Ansys), Dan Clement (On Semiconductor),
Rosario Consiglio (Impulse Semiconductor),
Maxim Ershov (Silicon Frontline), Melanie Etherton
(Freescale Semiconductor), Eleonora Gevinti (ST),
Harald Gossner (Intel), Matthew Hogan (Mentor Graphics),
Larry Horwitz (Synopsys), Kelvin Hsueh (ESD Consultant),
Mujahid Muhammad (IBM), Louis Thiam (Cadence),
Nitesh Trivedi (Infineon), and Vesselin Vassilev (Novorell).
168 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Founded in 1982, the ESD Association is a professional
voluntary association dedicated to advancing the theory and
practice of electrostatic discharge (ESD) avoidance. From
fewer than 100 members, the Association has grown to more
than 2,000 members throughout the world. From an initial
emphasis on the effects of ESD on electronic components,
the Association has broadened its horizons to include areas
such as textiles, plastics, web processing, cleanrooms and
graphic arts. To meet the needs of a continually changing
environment, the Association is chartered to expand ESD
awareness through standards development, educational
programs, local chapters, publications, tutorials, certification
and symposia.
Michael G. Khazhinsky is currently an
ESD staff engineer/designer at Silicon
Labs’ Broadcast Products Division in
Austin, Texas. Prior to joining Silicon
Labs, he worked at Motorola and Freescale
Semiconductors where he was in charge
of the TCAD development for the new
and emerging CMOS and NVM process
technologies, as well as the development of ESD, latch-up
and I/O physical architecture design solutions with a focus
on SOI and ESD EDA. Michael earned the M.S. degrees
in Electrical Engineering and Physics from Moscow State
Institute of Electronic Engineering and the Ph.D. degree
in Physics from Western Michigan University. Michael
is a Senior Member of IEEE and the ESD Association.
Michael served as a member of the IRPS, IPFA and EOS/
ESD Symposium Technical Program Committees, as well as
a Workshop Chair and Technical Program Chair of EOS/
ESD Symposium. He currently serves on the Management
Committee and as the Vice General Chair of the 2011 EOS/
ESD Symposium. Michael co-authored over 30 external
papers and gave a number of invited talks on ESD, process/
device TCAD, and photonic crystals. He was a co-recipient
of six EOS/ESD Symposium and SOI Symposium “Best
Paper” and “Best Presentation” awards. Michael currently
holds fifteen patents on ESD design, with additional patents
pending.
www.incompliancemag.com
ESD Electronic Design
Automation Checks
Part 2: Implementing ESD EDA Checks in
Commercial Tools
BY MATTHEW HOGAN
ESD rules for ICs with multiple power domains, IP reuse,
and system integration require greater complexity to avoid
device damage. Design hierarchy also comes into play where
some rules are applied on a top cell and/or top pads, but
others are applied between internal blocks that cross multiple
power domains. Tracking the rules and the nets to which they
ESD
E
lectrostatic discharge (ESD) design rules verification
has grown in volume and complexity as integrated
circuit (IC) designs have become more complex
and added significantly more power domains. With each
additional power domain, verification of the signals that
cross these domains becomes more difficult (particularly in
the identification of inadvertent paths), as well as the check
of interactions between circuit blocks that may result in
many potential ESD discharge current paths [1]. While not
strictly related to ESD, designs that incorporate multiple
power domain checks are particularly susceptible to subtle
design errors that are difficult to identify in the simulation
space or with traditional PV techniques. Often, these subtle
reliability errors don’t result in immediate part failure, but in
performance degradation over time. Effects such as negative
bias temperature instability (NBTI) can lead to the threshold
voltage of the PMOS transistors increasing over time,
resulting in reduced switching speeds for logic gates [2-4].
At the same time, hot carrier injection (HCI), which alters
the threshold voltage of NMOS devices over time [5], and
soft breakdown (SBD) [5] also contribute as time-dependent
failure mechanisms, adding to the degradation effects of gate
oxide breakdown.
apply is by no means a trivial task when performed manually.
Automation is necessary to effectively and efficiently cope
with these requirements.
As a result, multiple methods have been developed
using modeling or simulation to perform chip-level ESD
verification [6-8]. However, while simulation-based ESD
verification methods, to verify compliance to human
body model (HBM) and charged device model (CDM)
requirements, are effective, they do not necessarily check
all elements in the design for ESD violations. In particular,
internal interfaces between different supply domains are not
explicitly checked. Additionally, getting device models for
simulation at these extreme conditions is often problematic.
Part 1 of this series, “Outlining the Essential requirements
of the ESD Verification Flow”, provided an overview of the
essential requirements of an effective ESD EDA verification
flow [14]. This article (Part 2) discusses a well-established
topological methodology for checking ESD design rules.
The ESDA Technical Report 18, “ESD Electronic Design
Automation Checks” (TR18) [13], provides an overview
of recommended ESD checks that should be performed
to validate appropriate ESD protection structures within a
design. We will focus our effort on TR18 rule 5.1.3, which
applies to internal interfaces between power or ground
domains, a requirement that has been recently highlighted
[9-11]. Rather than modeling or simulating, the methodology
uses the device netlist topology to check all domain crossing
interfaces and associated ESD devices in the entire design,
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 169
ESD E l e ct ro n i c Desig n A u to mat io n Checks: Part 2
and is realized using the Calibre® PERC™ tool from Mentor
Graphics. Although internal interfaces may span many levels
in the design hierarchy, checking is done hierarchically by
utilizing a novel technique for topology-aware verification.
In addition to performing topology checking, at times there is
the need to include both topology and physical information to
create a more comprehensive checking environment. Such an
environment is required to perform ESD layout verification
checks [12].
The following sections cover the targeted ESD rules, the new
hierarchical algorithm, ESD rule variations. and verification
results.
ESD
THE ESD RULE
Transistors’ gates can be exposed to direct ESD events. This
is particularly common in input receivers, although many
other topologies can expose a gate oxide to an ESD discharge
path. Since gate oxides (by virtue of their small capacitance)
cannot shunt any significant amount of current, they have
to be considered voltage pulse driven as far as their failure
mechanism is concerned. It is irrelevant whether the gate
oxide is connected to signal, ground, or supply. The failure
criteria will depend on the actual combination exercised and
whether a soft vs. hard oxide breakdown sets the failure limit
(application-dependent) [13].
ESDA TR18, check 5.1.3 [13] is intended to verify presence
of protections on signals that cross a power domain boundary.
As shown in Figure 1, when the pad VDD1 is struck with
respect to VSS2, a high voltage could be developed across the
gate-source oxide of the NMOS in the VDD2 power domain.
To define our rule, we begin by identifying the ESD
protection strategy; to protect this component we need to
ensure that the voltage across it does not exceed the set
failure level. A simplified overview of the check that needs to
be performed to ensure the gate oxide is adequately protected
is as follows:
For each net in design,
IF net connects driver and receiver THEN
check power domains of driver and receiver
IF different power domains
THEN
check for anti-parallel diodes
IF anti-parallel diodes do not exist THEN
ESD error
Drivers and receivers are determined by net connectivity, as
are the different power domains. Because this is an interface,
the pieces of the circuit that must be checked are usually
distributed between different levels of the design hierarchy,
so it is not obvious how to check the rule independently on
a cell-by-cell basis. However, using a flat approach does not
provide sufficient capacity to run larger chips. For scalability
reasons, it becomes necessary to develop a hierarchical
topological approach to efficiently solve this issue. We
present here such a method that performs hierarchical
verification.
HIERARCHICAL VERIFICATION
Overview
The first requirement is a SPICE netlist, which can be either
a schematic netlist or a netlist extracted from the layout. In
the latter case, the LVS-like runset used for extraction must
ensure that all ESD protection devices are extracted (Note:
parasitics are not extracted, just intentional devices). While
the netlist must contain the proper text names for device
pins (so that power and ground domains can be established),
in general, texting in the netlist is not used extensively for
verification (see Figure 2).
The second input is an ESD rule
deck. It specifies the ESD design
rules to be checked, and the list of
power and ground domain names.
Power and ground names are not
generated automatically; they must
be specified in the rule deck per the
design specification. This rule deck is
essential for making the verification
method generic. For ease of discussion,
however, we will describe the method
in the context of the ESD design rule
formulated above.
Figure 1: Typical signal cross-domain ESD issue (source: EDA Tool Working Group
(2011), from ESD Electronic Design Automation Checks (ESD TR18.0-01-11) [13]
170 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Conceptually, the hierarchical
algorithm runs in two steps:
1) initialization, and 2) rule-checking.
www.incompliancemag.com
ESD Electronic Design Autom ation Checks: Pa r t 2
In the initialization step, the algorithm gathers ESD-related
topology information from each cell and propagates it
throughout the design. In the second step, the algorithm
checks ESD design rules independently, cell by cell, as each
cell now has access to the entire ESD protection scheme
propagated from all other cells.
interface check can be dependent on properties of the supply
protections. As an example, in the case shown in Figure 1
where the driver and receiver have separate VDDs and VSSs,
we are able to make a determination of the checks to be
performed and determine the need for the specific protection
circuit specified (in this case, anti-parallel diodes).
ESD Rule-Checking
RESULTS
Once net connectivity is defined, we can check the ESD
design rule cell by cell. Since a net’s path through devices
is, in general, instance-dependent, we cannot just check each
cell once. Instead, we find a list of representative instances
with unique net connectivity for each cell. Depending on
the amount of regularity in the design, the list of instance
representatives can be orders of magnitude smaller than the
list of all instances for a cell. This greatly improves the speed
of the tool compared to checking a flat netlist and is done
while preserving any instance specific configurations.
ESD rule decks have been written using this technique
and have been verified in production design flows for both
large blocks and complete chips. We will review the results
in terms of functionality (How well did it identify real
problems?) and reporting (How easy is it for users to manage
and correct errors?).
Rule Deck Coding Considerations
The rules should include checking of properties of the
ESD protection devices, such as ESD components widths.
Also, the rules should handle different protection types. For
example, the ESD protection circuit in Figure 1 could be a
dynamic or static clamp or diodes.
In practice, designs with multiple power and ground domains
often involve hundreds or thousands of crossings that need
to be verified. In addition to determining what signals
require ESD clamps for protection, the crossing audit is also
needed to determine which ground domains need interface
protections.
In one example, for noise isolation purposes, a PLL was
designed with separate ground domains for the core and
1.8V circuits. Traditionally, crossings between domains
were checked manually to see if ESD clamps were present.
However, crossings can be very difficult to find, since
the connections may need to be traced through multiple
schematics and there can be hundreds, if not thousands, of
crossings. Using the PLL example, the hierarchical ESD
audit identified all 133 crossings in just a few seconds. The
crossing audit also successfully caught missed instances of
clamps in the preliminary design.
Similarly, the drivers and receivers in real circuits are not
necessarily simple inverters. They can be
NANDs, NORs, etc. However, this does not
need special attention from the rule-writing
point of view. The tool automatically handles
different types of logic gates.
Moreover, the tool can recognize multiple
drivers/receivers on an interface net—for
instance, a driver with a fan-out to three
inverters (in the same domain or in different
domains). The rules should take advantage
of this ability and report all drivers/receivers
associated with a violation.
At the global level, a robust rule deck should
also include other ESD checks. For example,
the parameters used in the domain crossing
Figure 2: Hierarchical verification flow
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 171
ESD
Given the diversity in ESD rules, it is important to develop a
robust rule deck that will not miss real violations. Within the
framework of our method, there are two basic approaches:
one is to code a new rule for each variation, and the other
is to code a single general purpose rule that covers all
variations. The tradeoff is speed vs. rule complexity. The first
approach is simpler but slower, as each net will be checked
multiple times (once for each rule). The second approach is
faster but obviously more complex.
Functionality
ESD E l e ct ro n i c Desig n A u to mat io n Checks: Part 2
Reporting
The output from the rule deck lists all the crossing nets
and is organized by hierarchy (Figure 3). For each net, the
MOSFETs on both sides of the interface, together with
the associated grounds, are shown. This output can be
customized as desired, and Calibre PERC provides a results
viewing environment (Calibre RVE) to highlight devices in
the schematic and/or layout when they are selected in the
report. All 133 results are displayed in the graphical tree view
shown in Figure 3. Analysis of these results will identify the
specific details for each failure.
The schematic representation in the results viewer
can provide a different perspective of an error
(Figure 4) This often provides a holistic view of the
connectivity, enabling much easier debugging than
the original schematic. Of course, as these results
are displayed in Calibre RVE, highlighting back to
the original schematic is also supported.
Because you can specify nets, devices, pins, etc.,
and create “groupings” for testing conditions, the
tool can use these conditions to determine how to
evaluate a design.
CONCLUSION
ESD
In this paper, we presented a well-established,
topologically-driven hierarchical verification
methodology that has been developed to automate
ESD rule-checking. It can handle large ICs
and check ESD protection rules on the original
design without netlist reduction. The hierarchical
algorithm uses a novel topology-aware concept,
allowing for verification of chip-level ESD design
rules. The presented method has been extensively
verified and is being used in production to
significantly improve ESD quality.
Until now, there has been a clear gap in EDA
solutions to address the demands of circuit and
electrical verification. The ability to use both
netlist and layout
(GDS) information
simultaneously to
perform electrical checks
enables designers to
address both reliability
concerns arising from
crossing multiple power
domains and catastrophic
failures from ESD that
can have large effects
on yield and reliability.
In addition, this method
can employ topological
constraints to verify that
the correct structures are
in place wherever circuit
design rules require them.
Figure 4: Schematic image from results viewing, identifying all the circuitry elements affected by
Figure 3: Results for an entire design showing an ESD protection error on
net 2767, involving one receiver and three drivers
the error: Net 2767, Receiver: X1/M62, Drivers: X2/M331, X2/M341, X2/M366, Ground nets VSS
and VSSIO
172 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
www.incompliancemag.com
ESD Electronic Design Autom ation Checks: Pa r t 2
An automated solution that verifies circuits at both the
schematic and layout phase can reduce cost and time to
market, while improving yield and device reliability.
REFERENCES
1.
M. Ker, C. Wu, H. Chang, and T. Wu, “Whole Chip
ESD Protection Scheme for CMOS Mixed-mode IC’s in
Deep-submicron CMOS Technology”, Proceedings of
the IEEE Custom Integrated Circuits Conference, 1997,
pp. 31-34.
H. Abrishami, et al., “NBTI-aware Flip-flop
Characterization and Design”, GLSVLSI’08,
May 4–6, 2008.
3.
B.C. Paul, K. Kang, H. Kuflouglu, M. A. Alam, and K.
Roy, “Impact of NBTI on the Temporal Performance
Degradation of Digital Circuits”, Electron Device Letter,
Vol. 26, No. 8, Aug. 2005, pp. 560-562.
4.
Hong Luo, et al., “Modeling of PMOS NBTI Effect
Considering Temperature Variation”, 8th International
Symposium on Quality Electronic Design
(ISQED’07), 2007.
5.
Jin Qin, et al., “SRAM Stability Analysis Considering
Gate Oxide SBD, NBTI and HCI”, IIRW Final
Report, 2007.
6.
J. Lee, K. Kim and S. Kang, “VeriCDF: A New
Verification Methodology for Charged Device Failures”,
Proceedings of the 39th Design Automation Conference,
2002, pp. 874-879.
7.
H. Qian, J.N. Kozhaya, S.R. Nassif, and S.S. Sapatnekar,
“A Chip-level Electrostatic Discharge Simulation
Strategy”, Proceedings of the IEEE/ACM International
Conference Computer Aided Design, 2004,
pp. 315-318.
8.
M. Baird and R. Ida, “Verify ESD: A Tool for Efficient
Circuitlevel ESD Simulations of Mixed-signal ICs”,
Proceedings of the EOS/ESD Symposium, 2000,
pp. 465-469.
9.
J. Willemen and L. Cerati, “ESD Design in High Voltage
Technologies”, Private Communication, May 14, 2012.
10. Shih-Hung Chen, Ming-Dou Ker, and Hsiang-Pin
Hung, “Active ESD Protection Design for Interface
Circuits Between Separated Power Domains Against
Cross-power-domain ESD Stresses”, IEEE Transactions
On Device And Materials Reliability, Vol. 8, No. 3,
September 2008, pp 549-560.
11. J. Lee and E. Rosenbaum, “Voltage Clamping
Requirements for ESD Protection of Input in 90nm
CMOS Technology”, Proceedings of the 30th EOS/ESD
Symposium, 2008, pp. 50-58.
13. EDA Tool Working Group. ESD Electronic Design
Automation Checks (ESD TR18.0-01-11),
New York: Electrostatic Discharge Association, 2011.
www.esda.org/Documents.html
14. M. Khazhinsky, “ESD Electronic Design Automation
Checks”, In Compliance Magazine, August 2012.
At the time of writing, the ESDA EDA Working Group
consisted of the following members: Michael Khazhinsky
(Silicon Labs), Fabrice Blanc (ARM), Gianluca Boselli
(Texas Instruments), Shuqing (Victor) Cao (Global
Foundries), Norman Chang (Ansys), Dan Clement (On
Semiconductor), Rosario Consiglio (Impulse Semiconductor),
Maxim Ershov (Silicon Frontline), Melanie Etherton
(Freescale Semiconductor), Eleonora Gevinti (ST), Harald
Gossner (Intel), Matthew Hogan (Mentor Graphics), Larry
Horwitz (Synopsys), Kelvin Hsueh (ESD Consultant),
Mujahid Muhammad (IBM), Louis Thiam (Cadence), Nitesh
Trivedi (Infineon), Vesselin Vassilev (Novorell).
Founded in 1982, the ESD Association is a professional
voluntary association dedicated to advancing the theory and
practice of electrostatic discharge (ESD) avoidance. From
fewer than 100 members, the Association has grown to more
than 2,000 members throughout the world. From an initial
emphasis on the effects of ESD on electronic components,
the Association has broadened its horizons to include areas
such as textiles, plastics, web processing, cleanrooms and
graphic arts. To meet the needs of a continually changing
environment, the Association is chartered to expand ESD
awareness through standards development, educational
programs, local chapters, publications, tutorials, certification
and symposia.
Matthew Hogan is a Calibre Marketing
Engineer for Mentor Graphics, with over
15 years of design and field experience.
He is an active member of the ESD
Association involved with the EDA working
group and Symposium technical program
committee. Matthew is a Senior member
of IEEE and member of ACM. He holds a
Bachelor of Engineering from the Royal Melbourne Institute
of Technology and an MBA from Marylhurst University. He
is actively working with customers who have an interest in
Calibre PERC and 3D-IC. Matthew Hogan can be reached at
[email protected]
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 173
ESD
2.
12. T. Smedes, N. Trivedi, J. Fleurimont, A.J. Huitsing, P.C.
de Jong, W. Scheucher, and J. van Zwol, “A DRC-based
Check Tool for ESD Layout Verification”, Proceedings
of the EOS/ESD Symposium, 2009.
Discontinuing Use of
the Machine Model
for Device ESD Qualification
ESD
BY CHARVAKA DUVVURY, ROBERT ASHTON,
ALAN RIGHTER, DAVID EPPES,
HARALD GOSSNER, TERRY WELSHER,
AND MASAKI TANAKA
T
he machine model (MM) test, as a requirement for
component electrostatic discharge (ESD) qualification,
is being rapidly discontinued across the industry. This
article is intended to illustrate why MM evaluation is not
necessary for qualification. The following major conclusions
can be made about MM in general:
•
MM is redundant to the human body model (HBM)
at the device level since it produces the same failure
mechanisms, and the two models generally track each
other in robustness and in failure modes produced.
•
MM testing has more variability than HBM due to MM’s
greater sensitivity to parasitic effects in the tester circuitry.
•
There have not been any significant engineering studies
(with verified data) which could be used to establish
required passing level.
•
The test method was incorrectly given the name “machine
model”, though no firm unique connection between the
model and actual machine-induced device failures was
ever established. In fact, the model was developed as a
“low-voltage HBM”.
•
The charged device model (CDM) does a better job of
screening for fast metal-to-metal contact events than MM.
•
The vast majority (>99%) of electrical failures in
manufacturing correlate to CDM and electrical overstress
(EOS), and not to MM.
•
MM testing has not shown any additional failures not
explained by CDM, HBM or EOS.
174 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
•
MM testing consumes resources and creates time-tomarket delays while only providing failure modes or
protection strategies that HBM and CDM already cover.
It is important to understand the scope of this article. It
summarizes what has been learned about the test method
only. The information summarized here in no way diminishes
the importance of adequately grounding any metal which
may come in contact with ESD-sensitive devices nor the
importance of avoiding hard metal-metal discharges.
BACKGROUND TO THE ISSUE
As will be explained below, the machine model is a widely
misunderstood component ESD qualification test method. It
continues to generate confusion for both original equipment
manufacturing (OEM) customers and their integrated circuit
(IC) suppliers during ESD qualification. Many companies
and design organizations continue to use MM, mostly as a
legacy “required” practice, despite the fact that it has been
downgraded by three standards bodies and is no longer
recommended for qualification testing in accordance with
JEDEC JESD47. The automotive industry, a longtime user of
this method, no longer requires it in their AEC-Q100 list of
qualification tests. The scopes of the JEDEC (JESD22-A115)
and ESDA (ANSI/ESD STM5.2) test method documents
have also been changed to reflect this status. There are a
number of reasons for these changes, as outlined below. The
continued use of MM for qualification based solely on legacy
requirements has no technical merit given the information
www.incompliancemag.com
D iscont in u in g Use o f t he Machine Model for Device ESD Q ualif icat i on
that has been gathered over the last few years. Those
companies who continue to use MM take on an unnecessary
and burdensome business approach. The reasons against use
of the MM are given below.
1. Historically speaking, the 200pF, “0 ohm” model, which
later became known as the machine model, originated
with several Japanese semiconductor corporations as a
worst-case representation of the human body model. The
model was later presumed by some, because of the lower
discharge impedance, to simulate abrupt discharge events
caused by contact with equipment and empty sockets
(functional testing, burn-ins, reliability testing, pick and
place operations, etc.). This happened at a time when the
very fast rise time of metal-metal discharges was not wellunderstood. Since that time, the charged device model has
been proven to quite adequately cover these events.
3. In the early days of ESD device testing, there was also a
desire to avoid the high pre-charging voltages of the HBM
test (2kV and higher). The 200pF and low impedance
of MM was thought to be an equivalent but safe lower
voltage test to address the same failure mechanisms as
HBM. However, establishment of a single translation from
MM voltage to HBM voltage has been difficult to achieve.
Protection design has traditionally been focused on
meeting the HBM requirement, but MM testers are
susceptible to parasitic circuit elements; these parasitics
from relay switching networks in the simulators cause more
variation in the MM waveform than waveforms from HBM
testers. In spite of this and without any supporting data,
200V MM became established as a de facto requirement. It
was thought to be the safe level for handling, and that this
level had to be simultaneously met along with the de facto
2kV HBM standard. In reality a device with a 2kV HBM
withstand voltage might have an MM withstand voltage
anywhere from 100 to 300V, depending on the device
characteristics and the MM tester parasitics. This led to
4. The next important reason for discontinuing MM is that
fast discharges to or from a metal surface are not correctly
represented by the MM. The characteristics of the MM
rising pulse were not established based on comparison
to measurements on machine pulses, but rather were
determined by characteristics of the already developed
HBM simulators. The fast rising leading edge of metal-tometal discharges are actually more effectively simulated
using the current standard CDM test methods. This is
known today because of the development of high speed
oscilloscopes. However, during the 1980s there was a
misunderstanding that MM was a good representation for
CDM. This misunderstanding actually delayed the eventual
development and acceptance of the CDM standards
used today. Later in the 1990s, with much improved and
accurate test for CDM and wider recognition that the fast
discharges are covered by CDM alone, the test for MM
frequently became replaced with CDM.
MM VS. HBM AND CDM
The waveforms for HBM, MM and CDM are compared
in Figure 1 (page 176). The HBM and MM have similar
ranges of rise time (2-10ns). Therefore any thermal heating
in silicon taking place in this time period leads to the same
failure mechanisms for both models. This holds true for all
technologies, including advanced technology nodes. This
early part of the waveform determines where protection
circuits must be deployed in design. With similar rise time
characteristics, HBM and MM encourage the same protection
designs. For CDM, on the other hand, the rise time is much
faster (0.1 – 0.5 ns) and often leads to a unique failure
mechanism like oxide breakdown. Even more important,
the observed ESD field failures are dominated by oxide
breakdown when the CDM level is not adequate. Thus, a
different set of protection strategies are generally needed
for CDM. This makes it even more critical to focus on
CDM qualification, instead of duplicating the HBM test
information by using the MM. In Figure 1, we also show the
observed failure modes for the same I/O pin after stressing
with HBM, MM and CDM. It is clear that with HBM and
MM the damage sites were the same in the protection diode,
but with CDM stress the damage site corresponds to oxide
breakdown in the output transistor. This also illustrates the
fact that meeting high levels of MM does not improve CDM
performance until the right effective design techniques are
employed.
Commercial MM testers have inductors built into the MM
stimulus circuit. These inductors must be present to produce
the oscillatory waveform required in the MM test method.
The inductors, however, actually slow down the MM
waveform (Figure 1), and therefore MM cannot represent
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 175
ESD
2. Recently, M. Tanaka-san (Renesas Electronics) at the
September 2011 JEITA meetings [3] presented rationale
and data supporting the elimination of the MM test.
According to his historical account, the so-called ”machine
model” originated at Hitachi (now Renesas Electronics)
about 45 years ago and was introduced to Japanese
semiconductor customers as a test case to represent the
HBM test in their IC product test report. This test method
spread widely to the Japanese customer base and was later
established as an ESD test standard by the EIAJ in 1981.
Around 1985, some people began mistakenly to refer to
the test as the machine model. Then, starting in 1991,
ESDA, JEDEC and IEC adopted the model and its name
as a new test standard. As use of the model increased, it
was realized that the machine model name caused a lot of
misunderstanding that needed to be clarified.
much of the confusion associated with specifying both
HBM and MM specification levels.
Di s cont i n u i n g Use o f t h e Ma c h in e Model for Device ESD Qualif ication
very fast metal-to-metal contact discharge as CDM does.
On the other hand, the CDM test is directly represented by
elevating the package potential and directly grounding the
pin to produce the fast discharge. MM cannot be relied on
to accurately model fast metal to metal contact discharges,
which are known to occur in the field.
ESD
METAL DISCHARGE VERSUS CDM DISCHARGE
The analysis of M. Tanaka [2] is shown here to demonstrate
that a metal discharge from a small metallic object to a device
is similar to the commonly used CDM test. Tanaka considers
small objects because large machines (typically >10 pF) are
almost always grounded for reasons beyond ESD and thus
pose little practical threat for these events. On the other hand,
tools and small machines are difficult to ground and may
lead to charging effects where the capacitance of the metal
object is related to surface area and distance. These values
can range from <1pF to nearly 10 pF. For example, this value
could be as much as 1pF for a small metal object of 10 cm2
at a distance of 0.5 cm. Both the small metal discharge and
the CDM discharge can be represented by the same set of
equations for I(t), and thus both can be expected to generate
the same discharge event if the values of the parameters are
similar. Figure 2 illustrates the case for a small object of 10
pF for both metal discharge and CDM discharge.
The above analysis is confirmed by measurements as shown
in Figure 3, [2] where the discharge in (A) from a charged
tweezer to IC pin is the same as the direct discharge from
metal as shown in (B), and both are similar to the generated
CDM discharge in (C). The time scale for both metal
discharge and CDM discharge are indeed the same, clearly
indicating that CDM is a good representation of the metal
discharge in the Electrostatic Protected Area (EPA).
• Metal discharge events are well represented by the
CDM test.
• Most of the field failure returns for ESD have been
replicated by the CDM test, but none with MM testing that
are not also produced by HBM.
The Industry Council on ESD Target Levels has studied
HBM and MM results on a wide variety of designs in many
technologies and concluded that MM is intrinsically related
to HBM, with a correlation factor range that is dependent on
the HBM design level [3]. This data is represented in Figure 4
(page 178). However, the most important conclusion of the
Figure 1: Comparison of HBM, MM and CDM waveforms
176 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
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D iscont in u in g Use o f t he Machine Model for Device ESD Q ualif icat i on
ESD
Figure 2: Discharge current equation for metal discharge or CDM discharge [1]
Figure 3: Comparison of measured waveforms for metal discharge and CDM discharge events [2]: (A) discharge from a charged
tweezer on pin, (B) direct discharge from metal and (C) CDM test discharge
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 177
Di s cont i n u i n g Use o f t h e Ma c h in e Model for Device ESD Qualif ication
study was that MM is a redundant
test and a sufficient level of MM
robustness is automatically included
in an adequate HBM design. This also
includes the bipolar nature of the MM
stress. Any oscillatory waveform which
might be measured during discharges
in the field is sufficiently covered if
the part is proven to have an adequate
HBM design.
ESD
This minimum design value, as
measured by a MM tester, is well
above any voltage remaining on all
properly grounded machines in an ESD
protected manufacturing environment.
In essence, meeting a safe value for
HBM (and CDM) is sufficient for
production of ICs without needing
to evaluate MM as an additional
qualification.
Figure 4: Correlation between HBM and MM measured on the same devices
• The machine model test method specification to qualify ICs
does not model or advance the real world ESD protection
of IC products.
• IC evaluation with MM does not give any additional
information as to how to address machine ESD control.
• While MM is an unnecessary qualification test, it is
important to emphasize that control of voltage on machine
parts that might contact device pins in accordance with
ESD programs specifications such as S20.20 programs is
still important.
FIELD DATA ANALYSIS
The work from the Industry Council has shown that most of
the overstress field returns exhibit failure signatures of higher
energy EOS, and that the level of HBM ESD from 500V to
2000V (shown as the HBM Failure Analysis Return (FAR)
window in Figure 2) on 21 billion shipped units did not show
a correlation to the customer field return rates. Similarly,
these very same shipped units (500V to 2kV HBM) also had
MM levels in a range between 50-300V, as also seen from
Figure 2. Therefore it can be concluded that the EOS field
returns are indeed not related to this range of intrinsic MM
levels. That is, it does not matter if a shipped device has a
measured MM value of 50V or 300V.
• Devices with various measured MM levels have shown no
correlation to real world EOS failure returns.
STANDARDS BODIES AND POSITIONS ON MM
During the last two decades, the electronics industry’s
standards bodies have changed their viewpoint with regard
to MM and its requirement for IC qualification. At present,
178 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
JEITA in Japan does not recommend MM. The Automotive
Electronics Council’s AEC Q100 standard gives a choice
between HBM and MM, but does require CDM. In recent
years, JEDEC has strongly recommended discontinuing use
of the MM for ESD qualification because of its test variability
and non-correlation to real-world failure modes. In general,
standards bodies have come to recognize that:
• IC Qualification to HBM and CDM provides all the
necessary ESD test requirements.
• MM testing of ICs is redundant to HBM and does not
reflect unique real-world component ESD failure modes.
• Billions of IC components have been shipped worldwide
and qualified using HBM and CDM testing only. No field
failures have been found that would have been prevented
by additional MM qualification.
The following statements are from the JEDEC web site:
• “JESD22-A115B is a reference document; it is not a
requirement per JESD47G (Stress Test Driven Qualification
of Integrated Circuits).”
• “Machine Model as described in JESD22-A115B should
not be used as a requirement for IC ESD Qualification.”
• “Only human body model (HBM) and charged device
model (CDM) are the necessary ESD Qualification test
methods as specified in JESD47G.”
The ESD Association has downgraded the MM document
from a Standard (S5.2) to a Standard Test Method (STM5.2)
[4] and has adopted the following position:
• The ESD Association does not recommend using MM
ESD as described in STM5.2 for IC qualification. IC
Qualification should be done using the current standard
HBM and CDM methods.
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D iscont in u in g Use o f t he Machine Model for Device ESD Q ualif icat i on
CONCLUSIONS
REFERENCES
The information in this document supports the
discontinuation of MM as part of IC qualification. The most
important point to note is that a wide range of products,
having only HBM and CDM testing performed, are being
shipped today at volume levels in the billions with no field
returns due to ESD. These products, passing at or above the
recommended minimum HBM and CDM levels, are being
routinely shipped by major suppliers and are accepted by
major OEMs. No increase in field return rates has been
observed with MM removed from qualification for these
products.
1. M. Tanaka, JEITA/JEDEC Meetings, Tokyo,
September 2011.
The confusion generated by MM has persisted in the industry
for over two decades. The presumed need for this test is
causing additional qualification delay due to an extraordinary
consumption of design/test resources, added delays in
time-to-market and, in some cases, an impact on IC speed
and performance. Maintaining safe HBM and CDM levels
is sufficient to meet all IC manufacturing, handling and
assembly needs.
Different customer sectors may feel that they need enhanced
ESD requirements for specific reasons. For example, some
automotive customers have more consistently required MM
model testing; the impression being that an independent and
redundant test provides enhanced safety, improved quality
and reduced defectivity. However, industry experience has
shown that passing a redundant (to HBM) MM qualification
test does not help automotive manufacturers achieve these
goals. Meeting current industry standard HBM/CDM will
insure that a product can be safely handled with sufficient
margin to prevent ESD damage and maintain the quality/
reliability of the product as shipped from the component
manufacturer. Since many suspected ESD failures turn out to
be higher energy EOS in nature, methods to prevent electrical
overstress during manufacturing will also help maintain
product reliability.
COMMON GOALS
We have presented evidence and arguments that the MM
test of ICs is redundant and there is no proof that devices
have failed in the field because MM evaluation was not
done. We strongly recommend that this test be discontinued
for ESD qualification. This will save the semiconductor
industry a tremendous and an unnecessary burden by greatly
reducing the routine characterization that is done to support
the qualification process. The ESD robustness designed into
integrated circuits to survive HBM and CDM testing will
provide protection against any MM-like stress. Eliminating
MM testing of ICs has no deleterious effects and will free up
resources for more important engineering challenges.
3. JEP155, “Recommended Target Levels for HBM/MM
Qualification,” at www.jedec.org and at
www.esdtargets.blogspot.com.
4. ESDA, standards document definitions and hierarchy
summarized at www.esda.org/Documents.html.
Founded in 1982, the ESD Association is a professional
voluntary association dedicated to advancing the theory and
practice of electrostatic discharge (ESD) avoidance. From
fewer than 100 members, the Association has grown to more
than 2,000 members throughout the world. From an initial
emphasis on the effects of ESD on electronic components, the
Association has broadened its horizons to include areas such
as textiles, plastics, web processing, cleanrooms and graphic
arts. To meet the needs of a continually changing environment,
the Association is chartered to expand ESD awareness through
standards development, educational programs, local chapters,
publications, tutorials, certification
and symposia.
Charvaka Duvvury is a Texas Instruments
Fellow working in the Silicon Technology
Development Group. His current work is
on development and company wide support
on ESD for the nanometer submicron
CMOS technologies. Charvaka has made
numerous international presentations on
ESD phenomena and protection design. He
received his Ph.D. in Engineering Science from the University of
Toledo. After working as a Post-Doctoral Fellow in Physics at
the University of Alberta in Canada, he joined Texas Instruments
in 1977. He has published over 140 papers in technical journals
and conferences and holds 65 patents. He has co-authored books
on hot carriers, modeling of electrical overstress, and ESD
reliability phenomena and protection design. (John Wiley &
Sons, 1995, and 2nd Edition in 2002).
He is a recipient of the Outstanding Contributions Award
from the EOS/ESD Symposium (1990), Outstanding Mentor
Award from the SRC (1994), numerous Best Paper and Best
Presentation awards from the EOS/ESD Symposium. He has
served as the General Chairman both in 1994 and in 2005. He is
a contributing Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Device and
Materials Reliability (TDMR). Charvaka has been a member of
the ESD Association Board of Directors since 1997, promoting
university education and research in ESD. He is a co-chair of
the Industry Council on ESD Target Levels. Charvaka is also a
Fellow of the IEEE.
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 179
ESD
EPILOGUE
2. M. Tanaka, K. Okada, and M. Sakimoto, “Clarification
of Ultra-high-speed Electrostatic Discharge and
Unification of Discharge Model,” EOS/ESD Symposium,
pp, 170-181, 1994.
Effectiveness of
Multilayer Ceramic
Capacitors
for Electrostatic Discharge Protection
ESD
BY CYROUS ROSTAMZADEH,
FLAVIO CANAVERO, FERAYDUNE KASHEFI
AND MEHDI DARBANDI
A
simple technique to deal with ESD can be achieved
by mounting multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCC)
at the PCB I/O connector pins that is the ESD entry
point. EMC engineers recommend using 0603 MLCC’s
placed at close proximity to each connector pin, mandating
low-inductance mounting strategy associated with the PCB
traces and vias. When selecting surface-mount techonology
(SMT) MLCC for ESD protection of I/O pins, engineers
specify the ESD capacitor value, its DC voltage rating,
and a choice of technology (X7R or C0G). MLCC, as an
ESD bypass or shunt device, is used to divert the ESD
current to ground. ESD protection devices should perform
ESD mitigation and should not exhibit degradation, while
maintaining ESD robustness throughout the life span of
a product. Nevertheless, post-ESD examination of small
foot-print 0603 MLCC’s reveals serious structural damage,
manifesting itself electrically in a dramatic change in the
impedance characteristics. This is a major departure from a
pre-ESD capacitor, thus resulting in excessive low frequency
leakage and functional misbehavior.
BACKGROUND
Electrostatic discharge (ESD) is one of the most important
reliability problems in the electronic circuit industry.
Typically in the integrated circuit (IC) industry, one-third
to one-half of all field failures (customer returns) are due to
ESD. As ESD damage has become more prevalent in newer
technologies due to the higher susceptibility of smaller
180 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
circuit components, there has been a corresponding increase
in efforts to understand ESD failures through modeling
and analysis. Manufacturers of integrated circuits provide
ESD test information. However, the ESD data on IC level
standards (human body model (HBM), charged device model
(CDM), machine model (MM) and latch-up-to-the-system
testing) is often confusing.
Design of robust ESD circuits remains challenging because
ESD failure mechanisms become more acute as critical
circuit dimensions continue to shrink. Circuit board designers
are further constrained by the ability to design highly
congested PCB’s and meet ESD requirements. HBM provides
much insight into device behavior during an ESD event [1,2].
An ESD event is the transfer of energy between two bodies
at different electrostatic potentials, either through contact or
via an ionized ambient discharge (a spark). This transfer has
been modeled in various standard circuit models for testing
the compliance of device targets. The models typically use a
capacitor charged to a given voltage and then some form of
current-limiting resistor (or ambient air condition) to transfer
the energy pulse to the target.
In order to meet the module level ESD tests, various
methods and techniques on printed circuit boards have been
implemented and investigated. One effective technique is
to add discrete noise-decoupling components or filters into
www.incompliancemag.com
Effec t iven ess o f Multilayer Ceramic Capacitors for ESD Protec t i on
complex CMOS based IC products to decouple, bypass,
or absorb the electrical transient voltage (energy) under
the system-level ESD test [3]. Various types of noise filter
networks can be employed to improve system-level ESD
stress tests, including capacitor filters, ferrite bead, transient
voltage suppressor (TVS), metal oxide varistor (MOV), and
2nd order LC filter or 3rd order π-section filters.
MLC CAPACITOR AS AN ESD PROTECTION
DEVICE
Multilayer ceramic capacitors are designed for use where
a small physical size with comparatively large electrical
capacitance and high insulation resistance is required. The
general purpose 0603 (1.6 mm x 0.5 mm) class II, type
X7R (-55oC to +125 oC) is a popular choice for automotive
electronic control module design. Therefore, it is a common
practice to apply X7R MLCC’s as an ESD protection
component at all I/O pins.
Figure 1 illustrates a horizontal grind of the 0603 MLCC
(magnification X 100) with plates spaced at 21 mm apart for
a 10 nF, X7R type II capacitor. A higher value capacitor is
designed with an increased number of plates. This will result
in a narrow dielectric thickness, a possible drawback for high
voltage transients. At the present time (May 2012), capacitor
values for a type II X7R 0603 (100 V) range from 180 pF to a
maximum value of 39 nF. However, the capacitor value range
for the same technology but with larger physical size (0805)
varies from 220 pF to a maximum value of 120 nF. This can
be an important factor if ESD protection capacitor value is
determined to exceed the maximum value of 39 nF available
in 0603 package.
MLCCs used as a protective device or mechanism
should consider the voltage, peak power and energy
as the key components of an ESD threat. It is thus
necessary to fully characterize the amplitude and
timing of ESD components. Therefore, protection
structure should reduce the voltage, peak power and
energy threats by shunting the stress currents away
from fragile portions of the microcontrollers and
other ICs [4].
To solve ESD problems, MLC capacitors employed
as ESD bypass or filter component on printed
circuit boards (PCB), must shunt the ESD transient
current safely to ground. It is important that MLC
capacitors, employed as bypass components,
absorb the ESD voltage and current safely and
protect the device under test with no degradation.
In addition, the MLC capacitor must remain within
Figure 1: Standard 0603 MLCC (magnification x100)
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 181
ESD
Multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCC) are employed as an
ESD bypass mechanism at the connector pins of electronic
control modules. An automotive control module may require
the use of a single high-density connector with pin density
in excess of 200. In a typical application, a connector may
present the designer with a matrix of 4 x 50 (4 rows of 50
pins at each row) in a tightly congested PCB real estate. To
accommodate the ESD protection for each and every I/O
pin at the connector of highly congested PCB real estate,
design engineers recommend the use of 0603 style MLC
capacitors. In most applications, MLC capacitors used for
ESD protection are rated for 100 V stress level. However,
post-ESD characteristics of MLCC’s are often ignored or
misunderstood. In reality, MLCC’s exposed to ESD stress
exhibit a dramatic shift in characteristic impedance behavior.
Careful examination of MLCC’s reveals permanent structural
damage resulting in excessive low frequency leakage. PostESD behavior of MLCC’s results in a functional deviation
for the control module, and it is fundamentally unsafe to
use the product for its intended application. It is suggested
that low profile 0603 capacitors should not be used for ESD
protection, as reported in this paper. Alternative
solutions can be met by the use of low profile
transient voltage suppressors (TVS) or fast metal
oxide varistors (MOV). However, 0805 style
MLCCs with high value capacitance (> 47 nF)
provide a good solution and are safe to be used as
an ESD bypass element.
its parametric tolerance for it to be considered a reliable
protection mechanism.
Ef fe ct i ve n e s s o f Mu lt ilayer Ceramic Capacitors for ESD Protection
Figure 2 illustrates two different styles of MLCC technology
with respect to the design of conductive plates. Capacitor
manufacturers recognize the over-voltage stress concern
and have provided an ESD-enhanced MLCC product. Close
examination of Figure 2 demonstrates the style B MLCC is
an ESD-enhanced design.
Figure 3 illustrates a horizontal grind of an ESD-enhanced
MLCC at x100 magnification. Comparison with Figure 1
demonstrates the differences in plate geometry design.
Printed circuit board designers with fundamental EMC
training are required to ascertain the optimum mounting
strategy for ESD capacitors. EMC engineers verify a
“Y-connection” topology for all of ESD capacitors at every
I/O pin of the connector. MLCC must be placed in close
proximity to the I/O pin (< 1cm) with a short trace (<
1cm) to the PCB return plane. In this manner, added PCB
parasitic trace inductance and its degradation effect on the
effectiveness of the ESD bypass capacitor is minimized. The
general concern is to limit the added inductance due to PCB
mounting inductance, and thus provide a low-impedance path
for ESD current flow to return plane.
ESD
Another limitation would be to use the lowest value capacitor
available, where it is most effective at higher frequencies.
ESD would result in an RF current with a bandwidth in
excess of 330 MHz. The choice between a 1 nF and 680 pF
would easily be reduced to the latter one. However, ESD
HBM consists of a 150 pF capacitance, thus a higher value
MLC capacitor is preferred. A voltage divider network
is established by the combination of HBM capacitor and
MLCC. The voltage developed across a larger value MLCC,
would lower the voltage developed across an integrated
circuit, as indicated in Equation 1.
Figure 2: ‘Standard’ vs. ‘ESD-enhanced’ 0603 MLCC
Figure 3: ESD-enhanced 0603 MLCC
182 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Eq. 1
Figure 4: Improved electrical model of MLC capacitors
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Effec t iven ess o f Multilayer Ceramic Capacitors for ESD Protec t i on
Therefore, where VMLCC << VESD, it is required that
CMLCC >> CHBM.
MLC CAPACITOR ELECTRICAL MODEL
Several electrical models of capacitors are available in
textbooks and RF publications used by the EMC/RF
community to describe the electrical behavior of MLC
capacitors. A simple series RLC network is commonly
used to provide accurate behavior for most applications.
However, simple RLC model fails to provide the additional
technical insight required for analysis of MLCC’s exposed
to ESD pulse. The modified model presented in Figure 1
has additional elements to describe the behavior of MLC
capacitors exposed to ESD stress. In fact, the model described
here is an accurate electrical description, necessary to account
for the various physical attributes found within a capacitor.
ESD is a high frequency pulse with a rise time of less than
one nano second, resulting in spectral content in excess of
330 MHz. Hence, the choice of ESD capacitor is reduced
to a smaller value MLCC, as seen in Figure 2. Closer
examination of Figure 2 reveals a lower impedance for a
680 pF (1.71 Ω at f = 330 MHz) compared with a 10 nF
(3.97 Ω at f = 330 MHz). Another consideration may be
the result of capacitive loading of certain I/O signals, i.e.,
CAN bus, where a limited capacitance can be added to the
communication bus.
The requirements of a lower value ESD capacitor, as in the
previous paragraph, may suggest the use of the lowest value
MLCC available to the industry. In addition, there is a third
factor that is outlined in Table 1; R3 (insulation resistance)
that may add additional incentive for the use of the lowest
1. L1 is the series parasitic inductance
associated with plate connections.
2. L2 is the equivalent series inductance.
It is also known as LESL.
ESD
3. R1 is the equivalent series resistance
(also known as RESR) and represents
the actual ohmic resistance of the
plates. This value is typically very
low. It causes a power loss of I2R1. Its
contribution to the total dissipation
factor is D1 = 1/(wR1C1).
4. C1 is the nominal capacitance.
5. R2, the dielectric loss, is a parallel
resistance arising from two
phenomena; molecular polarization
and interfacial polarization (dielectric
absorption). Dielectric loss is a
complex phenomenon that can change
with frequency in most any manner
that is not abrupt. Its contribution
to the total dissipation factor can be
approximated
by D3 ~ 1/(wR2C2).
6. C2 is the parallel dielectric absorption
capacitor.
7. R3, the leakage resistance or insulation
resistance, is a parallel resistance due
to leakage current in the capacitor.
This value is typically very high.
It causes a power loss of V2/R3. Its
contribution to the total dissipation
factor is D2 = 1/(wR3C1).
The impedance characteristics of type II
(0603, X7R MLC) capacitors for a 680 pF
and 10 nF is illustrated in Figure 5.
Figure 5: Pre-ESD impedance characteristics
Nominal Value @ 1 kHz
680 pF
10 nF
L1
49 pH
91 pH
L2
931 pH
1.730 nH
C1
680 pF
10 nF
C2
4.10 pF
4.10 pF
R1
5.15 kΩ
0.329 kΩ
R2
753.73 Ω
34.57 Ω
R3
1.471 x 1012Ω
.01 x 1012Ω
Table 1: MLCC 0603 capacitor model components
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 183
Ef fe ct i ve n e s s o f Mu lt ilayer Ceramic Capacitors for ESD Protection
value MLCC. However, further insight is required to
distinguish the apparent easy choice.
In Table 1, all nominal and parasitic elements for both
capacitors are listed as per MLCC supplier A.
ESD
Figure 6: ESD air-discharge to 0603 MLCC
Figure 7: Measured pre-ESD and post-ESD (MLCC 680 pF)
It is important to note that the insulation resistor R3 is
an order of magnitude higher in value for smaller value
capacitor (Table 1). As more plates are stacked up to
accommodate higher value capacitance in the same physical
volume of the 0603-style package, the dielectric thickness is
reduced by a factor of 14.7. Therefore, as a consequence of
thinner dielectric material between
the capacitor plates, the insulation
resistor for higher value capacitor is
reduced by the same ratio (capacitor
ratio: 10 nF/680 pF = 14.7, insulation
resistor ratio: 0.1 x 1012 Ω/
14.7 x 1012 Ω = 1/147. It is clear that
a higher value capacitor will sustain
a dielectric breakdown in lower ESD
voltages. It was suggested by this
argument, for ESD applications, only
necessary to consider lower-value
capacitors with higher insulation
resistance in order to protect for
dielectric breakdown, i.e., 680 pF
vs. 10 nF. Further investigation was
required to address the accuracy of
aforementioned statement.
If a smaller capacitor presents a
higher insulation resistance as shown
above, it is important to examine the
behavior of the insulation resistance
after ESD tests. For further insight,
it is important to evaluate the impact
of ESD stress on 680 pF and 10 nF
capacitors by characteristic impedance
of post-ESD capacitors.
HUMAN BODY ESD TEST
ESD tests for automotive applications
are derived and based on a human
body model specified by original
equipment manufacturers (OEM)
[5,6,7,8,9].
Figure 8: Measured pre-ESD and post-ESD (MLCC 10 nF)
184 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
A typical HBM discharge network
consists of a 150 pF capacitor with
a 2 kΩ resistor. The HBM capacitor
can be charged up to 25 kV for an
air-discharge test. The static charge
accumulated on the 150 pF discharge
network capacitor (charged to 25 kV)
would amount to 3.75 mC. ESD is
www.incompliancemag.com
Effec t iven ess o f Multilayer Ceramic Capacitors for ESD Protec t i on
a high-frequency, high-voltage and high current event that
can deposit 46.875 mJ of energy in the protection device in a
relatively short time duration.
HBM provides much insight into device behavior during an
ESD event. Although the HBM stress is characterized by a
certain charging voltage, VHBM, the 2 kΩ series resistor of
the circuit is usually much larger than the impedance of the
device under test, so we think of the HBM tester as current
sources, with the peak HBM current equal to 12.5 A. (VHBM =
25 kV, air-discharge).
PRE-ESD AND POST-ESD MEASUREMENTS
In order to evaluate the impact of ESD stress on 0603
MLCCs, two different types of tests were performed. Since
a populated electronic control module is the intention of a
realistic test, it is important to evaluate the impact of ESD
stress per OEM ESD test techniques. In another method, a
0603 MLCC network was prepared, as shown in Figure 6,
with two short wires (< 1 cm) at each end. Terminal 1 was
connected to a ground plane where an ESD gun return
wire would normally be connected. The ESD discharge tip
was slowly approached to the floating terminal until an air
discharge was achieved.
Pre-ESD and post-ESD characteristics of the 0603 capacitor
were recorded using an Agilent 4294A impedance analyzer
(40 Hz – 110 MHz) with the help of an Agilent 16034G test
fixture.
Capacitors were removed from test PCB or ESD network
wires, and mounted inside the 16034G test fixture for
impedance characterization.
Figure 7 illustrates the impact of the ESD pulse at +/-15kV
level for the 680 pF capacitor. Figure 8 illustrates the impact
of the ESD pulse at +/-15kV level for a 10 nF capacitor.
Post-ESD capacitor dielectric damage is illustrated in
Figures 9 through 11 (horizontal grind) on a magnification
scale of 100. The physical damage to X7R and C0G
technologies are shown.
Figure 9: Dielectric damage for post-ESD MLCC
Figure 10: Dielectric damage for post-ESD X7R MLCC
Figure 11: Dielectric damage for post-ESD C0G MLCC
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 185
ESD
It was decided to apply an ESD pulse to a fully populated
automotive electronic control module as designed with
rigorous EMC guidelines. As OEM ESD requirements
provides guidelines [7,8,9] for remote I/O access ESD stress
tests. An HBM model with discharge network as outlined in
section IV was calibrated and ESD voltage levels from +/- 4
kV up to +/- 25 kV were applied in successive order. After
each discharge, the MLCC was removed and analyzed on an
impedance analyzer as per the previous method.
Ef fe ct i ve n e s s o f Mu lt ilayer Ceramic Capacitors for ESD Protection
In Figure 12, a modified electrical model represented as per
Figure 4, was used to illustrate post-ESD effects on both
capacitors. In the electrical model per Table 1, R3
was replaced with a 500 Ω resistor to represent the nominal
pre-ESD value provided by MLCC manufactures in Table 1
(14.7 x 1012 Ω).
It is important to note that the 10 nF capacitor developed
severe leakage from 40 Hz up to 20 kHz, and for 680 pF the
upper frequency is approximately 200 kHz. The impedance
of both capacitors registers a 500 Ω resistive value in the
aforementioned frequency range. It is thus concluded that
ESD has caused non-recoverable, permanent damage to the
MLCCs. Post-ESD behavior suggests physical damage to
dielectric material due to metallization of capacitor plates.
In reference to Figure 4, it is clear that R3 has shifted from
its pre-ESD nominal value as per Table 1 (for 680 pF,
R3 = 1.471 x 1012Ω, or for a 10 nF, R3 = 0.1 x 1012Ω to an
extremely low value of 500 Ω).
ESD
The issue of why the 680 pF
MLCC has a 500 Ω leakage up to
200 kHz, whereas 10 nF shows the
ill-effect only up to 20 kHz, can be
explained as follows: the circuit of
Figure 4 simplifies to the parallel
of C1 and R3 at low frequencies,
and the knee of the impedance
curve appears for f ~ 1/2p R3C1.
For post-ESD, the 680 pF MLCC
is dominated by R3 from DC to ~
300 kHz, whereas R3 contributes
only up to 20 kHz for the 10 nF
capacitor. Figure 13 illustrates
the post-ESD leakage resistance
degradation.
Figure 12: Simulated post-ESD impedance characteristics, R3 = 500 Ω
It is clear that smaller size MLCC
will suffer extreme leakage to a
much higher frequency range.
Use of higher value MLCCs is
recommended, in contradiction to
previous recommendations.
As an extension to exposure of
0603 MLC capacitors to ESD
stress, additional ESD tests were
performed on modules populated
with larger 0805 MLC capacitors.
Figure 14 illustrates the impact of
+/- 25 kV HBM ESD stress on a
4.7 nF capacitor. It is clear that a
4.7nF 0805 capacitor would fail
the ESD requirements. However,
extending the capacitor size (value)
in an 0805 package to 10 nF results
in ESD compliance.
CONCLUSION
Figure 13: Post-ESD impedance behavior
186 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
This study is an examination of
the physical damage to the 0603
MLC capacitors exposed to ESD
transients. It shows that permanent
damage to dielectric material
www.incompliancemag.com
Effec t iven ess o f Multilayer Ceramic Capacitors for ESD Protec t i on
resulted for ESD voltages in excess of 15 kV. The use of 0603
MLC capacitors for I/O connector pins, as an ESD bypass
mechanism, is not recommended and should be avoided.
However, in larger footprints, 0805
MLCCs will meet the ESD stress
for 25 kV requirements, provided
the capacitor size exceeds 10 nF,
and is rated for 100 V applications.
A preferred ESD bypass solution
would use a low capacitance
transient voltage suppressor (TVS,
CTVS < 100 pF) or a fast metal oxide
varistor (MOV).
Figure 14: Measured post-ESD for a 4.7 nF 0805 capacitor
REFERENCES
7. Ford Motor Company, EMC-CS-2009, September 2009.
1. Y. Fukuda, et al., “ESD Protection Network Evaluation by
HBM and CDM (Charge packaged Method)”, EOS/ESD
Symposium Proceedings, pp. 193 – 199, 1986.
8. General Motors Corporation, GMW3097 Rev. 5, May
2006.
2. Warren Boxleitner, Peter Richman, Geoff Well,
“Characterizing the Stress applied to ICs by different ESD
Testers”, EOS/ESD Symposium Proceedings, 1990.
3. Ming-Dou Ker, Cheng-Cheng Yen, Pi-Chia Shih, “OnChip Transient Detection Circuit for System-Level
ESD Protection in CMOS Integrated Circuits to Meet
Electromagnetic Compatibility Regulation”, IEEE
Transactions on Electromagnetic Compatibility, Vol. 50,
No. 1, pp. 13 – 21, 2008.
4. Warren Boxleitner, “ESD Stress on PCB Mounted ICs
Caused by Charged Boards and Personnel”, EOS/ESD
Symposium Proceedings, 1990.
5. ISO10605:2008, Road Vehicles Test Method for Electrical
Disturbances from Electrostatic Discharge, February 2008.
6. IEC61000-4-2, “Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC)
– part 4-2: Testing and Measurement Techniques –
Electrostatic Discharge Immunity Test”,
EN 61000-4-2:1995, Amendment 1:1998,
Amendment 2:200, 1995.
9. Chrysler/Fiat Group LLC, CS-11979, April 2010.
Cyrous Rostamzadeh
Senior IEEE Member
Senior EMC Technical Specialist,
Robert Bosch LLC, Plymouth, MI, USA
[email protected]
Professor Flavio Canavero
IEEE Fellow
Politcnico di Torino, Italy
[email protected]
Professor Feraydune Kashefi
IEEE Member
Department of Electrical Engineering at Azad University,
Shabestar, Iran
[email protected]
Mehdi Darbandi
School of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Tehran
University, [email protected]
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 187
ESD
However, I/O pin ESD capacitors
in the range of 1 nF to 100 nF are
often utilized as an input RF filter
at the connector pins. The ESD
capacitors provide a bypass element
for the induced RF currents on the
module harness due to impinging
electromagnetic fields. Low value
TVS capacitance is insufficient to
provide the required filter across
the 1 MHz – 200 MHz frequency
bandwidth. Use of a TVS in parallel with a 0603 capacitor
(10 nF – 100 nF) is recommended, where permissible.
International Wireless
Registrations
Overview for Medical Manufacturers
Telecom/Wireless
BY MICHAEL CASSIDY
A
s medical devices go wireless, medical manufacturers
face a new set of regulatory requirements and
restraints. In addition to medical registration,
wireless medical devices must receive radio spectrum
approval. While the devices vary greatly, the wireless aspects
are relatively uniform. That is to say, there are seemingly
unlimited healthcare applications but only finite methods
of sending data and, of course, limited RF spectrum. Thus,
the wireless aspects of even a cutting edge medical device
generally fall into familiar categories for international
communications and radio spectrum authorities.
In my experience, international wireless compliance
is often new territory for medical device manufacturers.
Most countries, however, have had regulatory regimes
in place for years and have well-established wireless
regulations. Certain rules or restrictions may change, but
the international process as a whole maintains fundamental
characteristics and common pitfalls. Here are a few things to
keep in mind before going global with a wireless medical (or
any wireless) device.
CHECK OPERATING FREQUENCY AND
APPLICATION EARLY AND OFTEN
A manufacturer should never assume commonalties
between radio spectrum allocations across countries. Yes,
commonalities exist, such as for certain ISM bands. However,
one should always verify this and should also note the
188 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
allowable output power. Many regulatory agencies publish
frequency allocations on their website. Further, in some
countries, certain RF technologies, such as ultra-wide band,
may not be allowed at all.
MINIMIZE WORK AND COSTS
Medical manufacturers often purchase wireless components,
from WLAN modules to GPRS modems, from an external
vendor. So a radio module may already be approved in a
given country. This ‘modular’ approval might be sufficient
for the entire medical device, or it could reduce the cost,
in-country testing, or paperwork needed for the regulating
communications agency. Many countries require a local
representative or license holder for a wireless certification.
Manufacturers who have gone through medical registration
and distribution with local partners should try to use their
existing in-country network to fulfill any local representative
requirements.
DON’T FORGET THE EXTRAS
In addition to the RF modules used in the device, medical
products or systems may have supplemental components.
Items such as power supplies, access points, or notebooks
will likely need in-country certification. Medical
manufacturers should speak with their vendors early and
present them with a list of documents they will need. If, for
example, a medical device works with a wireless access
point, the AP vendor may need to provide block diagrams,
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Inte rn at i o n a l Wireless Reg ist rat io ns
authorizations forms, and even schematics. Presenting the
vendor with this type of list at the last minute may cause
delays, and it is best to know if the vendor is unwilling
or unable to provide any necessary materials as early as
possible.
KNOW THE TIMELINE
Telecom/Wireless
Those who have dealt with medical registrations may already
intuit the often bureaucratic process of product registrations.
While it is important to have the good connections on the
ground and an understanding of a country’s process, the
lead-time for applicants is often fixed. Some countries, for
example, require local testing at an approved lab before
the application goes into review with the communications
authority. Given this restraint, the applicant faces a minimum
lead-time of several weeks. This is due to the time it takes to
review documents, test the product, write the test report, and
have the regulator review everything. Failing tests or having
samples stuck in customs will, of course, cause unnecessary
delays to the project. Knowing the common pitfalls and
causes for delays in a given country will reduces the risk of
falling behind schedule.
While the applicant should not be overly optimistic on the
lead-time for approval, he should also be wary of lead-times
that are too long. If the manufacturer is using a third party
agent, that agent may want to ‘under-promise and overdeliver’. The agent may state the lead-time for RF registration
is twelve weeks, knowing that it usually takes only nine
weeks. A medical manufacturer, new to international wireless
approvals, may then think the agent has come in ahead of
schedule. In fact, such sandbagging doesn’t help the applicant
plan his or her schedule. Therefore, one should err on the
side of caution, as lead-times can vary depending on the
regulators queue and other factors such as political unrest,
natural disasters, etc. But, of course, the principal goal is
having a realistic timeline for completion, as the whole team
needs to know when they can enter a market. And medical
manufacturers have the dual burden of dealing with two time
lines for approval.
CONCLUSIONS
International wireless approvals add a new and independent
dimension to the compliance picture for medical
manufacturers. In the United States, for example, the FDA
and FCC have issued a joint press release and the FDA has
published recommendations relating to compliance. This
suggests some overlap between the organizations on this issue.
As In Compliance Magazine reported, the FCC has recently
authorized the use of medical body area networks (MBANs) in
the 23600-2400 MHz range. Medical manufacturers, however,
will find that the communications authority ultimately dictates
190 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
the parameters for use of a country’s RF spectrum. Indeed, the
FDA has officially ‘suggested’ that medical devices using RF
adhere to all FCC regulations. In a 2007 publication, the FDA
recommended RF medical devices undergo safety, EMC, and
wireless testing. This is for the purpose of better anticipating
how the device will function in a medical environment and
ensuring crucial data transmissions do not fail. While these are
valid points, the FDA recommendations are requirements for
the FCC. Internationally, one generally sees communications
agencies function autonomously. Exemptions to a RF-related
regulation on the grounds that a device is medical are rare.
Thus the manufacturer enters another jurisdiction.
Employees of medical manufacturers who have dealt with
the FDA and its international counterparts may not end up
handling the international wireless approval projects for the
same devices. This task could go to an EMC, safety, or RF
engineer. As mentioned, existing in-country networks, formed
from distributors or medical compliance partners, can benefit
the wireless process. Yet, since the regulatory agencies
function separately, the employee managing international
wireless submittals may not need an understanding of the
medical registration process as it exists in each country
(assuming someone has that covered). As the use of wireless
medical technology accelerates, we may see the regulatory
landscape evolve throughout the world. For now, medical
manufacturers will join the IT, telecommunications, and
many other industries in facing the world of international
wireless compliance.
Michael Cassidy is the founder of MC
Global Access. His company provides
product certifications throughout the
world and advises clients on regulatory
requirements. Michael was a project
manager at Intertek’s Global Market Access
Program before TUV Rheinland recruited
him. At TUV Rheinland, Michael worked
in the International Approvals group as an international
specialist and was promoted to operations manager.
He has obtained hundreds of product certifications in
countries across the globe for a variety of manufacturers.
Michael lives in the San Diego area with his wife Sara. When
he is not working on international product certifications,
he enjoys surfing and traveling. Michael can be reached at
[email protected]
www.incompliancemag.com
Recent Changes to
GR-63-CORE
BY CLAYTON FORBES
The first change you will notice is the reactivation of Section 3. Going back to the Issue 2 version of the specification
in 2002, Section 3 was a look forward to generic framework
requirements. In the Issue 3 release of 2006, this section was
deleted from the document and was left dormant. For the Issue 4 release, the section is activated and renamed as “Equipment Spatial Design Requirements for Frames and Chassis”.
Activating this section allows for segregation between the
office space planning requirements (Rs) and objectives (Os)
and equipment spatial Rs and Os. In Section 4, some of the
technical changes that will be reviewed include a new operational high temperature requirement based on the airflow
of the equipment under test (EUT), new energy efficiency
requirements, and an optional operational random vibration
test, to name a few. Some tests remain unchanged and will be
skipped in this recap. These include surface temperature, mix
flowing gas, hygroscopic dust, and acoustics.
SECTION 2 - FACILITY AND SPACE PLANNING
REQUIREMENTS
In previous issues of the document, space planning
requirements and objectives were intertwined with test
requirements throughout Section 4. In the latest version, the
Section 4 Rs and Os dealing with building layouts, such as
Central Office Lighting Requirement R4-98 and Objective
O4-99, are moved to Section 2 and relabeled as R2-31 and
O2-32. Other requirements and objectives that are moved
around in the document can be tracked between the versions
by using their absolute number, which is the bracketed
number in the Rs or Os. By doing this, Sections 3 and 4
have become much cleaner and easier to follow for both
manufacturers and laboratories.
SECTION 3 - EQUIPMENT SPATIAL DESIGN
REQUIREMENTS FOR FRAMES AND CHASSIS
Section 3 now defines the spatial requirements for frames
and chassis. The section includes most of the original Rs and
Os from Section 2 and thirteen new Rs and Os. The thirteen
new Rs and Os include R3-4 and R3-5 say that access to
anchoring bolts is needed when shelves are installed in a
frame. R3-7 is that a frame must have the ability to join to
an adjacent frame at the top. R3-8 states that a dimensional
drawing of the equipment must be supplied and enclosed in
the test report. R3-29 demands that the mounting holes for a
chassis be a closed slot.
TEMPERATURE TESTING
For the three storage temperature tests (low-temperature
exposure and thermal shock, high relative humidity exposure,
and high-temperature exposure and thermal shock) there is
no change to the testing. The specification does clarify that
testing the units in an unpackaged state is an acceptable test
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 191
Telecom/Wireless
T
elcordia recently released GR-63-CORE Issue 4
“Physical Protection Requirements for Network
Telecommunications Equipment”, with a total of 27
new requirements (Rs) and objectives (Os). It has been six
years since the document was updated and, as in previous
releases, the specification has numerous technical changes.
Rece nt C h a n ge s to GR- 63- CO RE
method. It also allows for slower ramp rates during the high
humidity exposure test. The slower ramp rates allow the test
to remain non-condensing for larger systems.
The operating temperature test has undergone significant
changes. An ongoing issue with equipment being supplied
to end-users is the airflow cooling pattern they use.
Equipment with airflow patterns that deviate from the
required preferential pattern of R4-34 or O4-35 will now
be tested to a higher operational temperature. The high
operational temperature test is performed at either 50ºC or
55ºC depending on whether the equipment under test (EUT)
is frame level equipment or shelf (chassis) level. Now if the
equipment has a non-preferential air intake, i.e. not in the
front of the EUT, the maximum operating temperature rises
to 60ºC or 65ºC depending whether it is a rack or a shelf.
These new high temperature requirements are from Table
5-1 and 5-2 of the specification (Figure 1). Equipment with
the non-preferential air intake can still be tested to the lower
temperature levels if it is supplied and tested with an air
deflector or air baffle that changes its air intake to the front
of the equipment as stated in O4-36. Another change to the
operating temperature profile was done to align the test with
the requirements of ETSI EN 300 019-2-3 Class 3.2. During
the 96 hour humidity dwell, the temperature and humidity are
raised from 28ºC, 90% RH to 30ºC, 93% RH.
ALTITUDE, TEMPERATURE MARGIN, FAN
COOLED EQUIPMENT
Altitude testing remains essentially the same with two
exceptions. The temperatures for the test are raised to align
with the changes in the operational temperature and humidity
test. These temperature changes are also shown in Table 5-1
and 5-2 (Figure 1). The second change is to the alternate
altitude test method using temperature compensation. In
Issue 3, if the equipment met the configuration criteria to
apply the temperature compensation method, it could be
used. This entailed adding 1ºC/1000 feet to the operational
temperature. For a shelf level product, the test temperature
was 61ºC, 55ºC for the operational requirement, and 6ºC to
simulate the 6000 feet from Objective 04-11. Objective 04-12
from Issue 3 is met by default since its required temperature
for a shelf product is 58ºC. In Issue 4, the altitude of the test
site can be considered and subtracted from the temperature
compensation. If the test site is 3000 feet above sea level, the
test will be performed at 58ºC, 55ºC from Objective 04-10
and 3ºC for the altitude compensation ([6,000 feet- 3000 feet
Telecom/Wireless
Table 5.1 Variable Test Temperatures for Frame-level Products
Operating Tests
Effective Air Inlet
Location
Operating Temperature
and Humidity
Operating Altitude
TAL=300C
Front aisle or none
TOH=500C
TAM=400C
Operation with Fan Failure
Temperature Margin
Determination
TFH=400C
TML=500C
TFH=500C
TML=600C
TAH=500C
TAL=400C
All others
TOH=600C
TAM=500C
TAH=600C
Table 5.2 Variable Test Temperatures for Shelf-level Products
Operating Tests
Effective Air Inlet
Location
Operating Temperature
and Humidity
Operating Altitude
TAL=350C
Front aisle or none
TOH=550C
TAM=440C
Operation with Fan Failure
Temperature Margin
Determination
TFH=400C
TML=550C
TFH=500C
TML=650C
TAH=550C
TAL=450C
All others
TOH=650C
TAM=550C
TAH=650C
Figure 1: Tables 5.1 and 5.2 from the GR-63-CORE
192 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
www.incompliancemag.com
Recent Changes to GR -63-CO R E
(lab ambient)]/1000 feet/1ºC). Objective O4-11 will still be
met as well.
Temperature margin testing remains unchanged for
equipment with front air intakes or equipment with air
diverters as previously described. For equipment with air
intakes other than the front face, the starting temperature is
increased to 60ºC or 65ºC as listed in Table 5-1 or Table 5-2.
The fan-cooled equipment criteria changes involve removing
the humidity requirement from R4-14. Testing is now
performed at either 40ºC or 50ºC, depending on airflow,
with un-monitored humidity. The other change in the section
moves the fan filters requirements from paragraph 4.5.4 in
Issue 3 to 4.1.5.2 in Issue 4.
HEAT DISSIPATION, AIRFLOW AND ENERGY
EFFICIENCY
The next section in the document with changes is equipment
airflow. A large part of the telecommunication service providers (TSP) cost is energy usage for environmental control of
their equipment space. One of the major contributors to the
high cost is a mixture of equipment with contrasting airflow
patterns; hot air exhausting into the cool air aisle. To standardize equipment airflow in the equipment space, the objectives
in this section are turned into requirements. As mentioned
above, if the EUT deviates from the acceptable airflow pattern, operating temperature testing is performed 10ºC higher
than the previous standard. If an air baffle is used during the
qualification to redirect the air to the proper pattern, then the
test can be performed at the lower high temperature levels.
FIRE RESISTANCE
After the major changes that fire resistance went through for
the Issue 3 update, including scaling of the line burner, the
changes in Issue 4 are relatively small but still significant.
The first change in the section deals with high velocity fans
internal to the EUT. It’s not uncommon during full scale
MECHANICAL TESTING
The Category “A” packaged drop test is updated to change
the required (1) edge and (2) corners the packaged product
is dropped on. The change was performed to align with
shipping industry standards .The number of drops remained
at a total of 13.
The unpackaged drop is the key change in this section for
equipment weighing less than 25 kg. The traditional free fall
flat drops onto a non-yielding surface (concrete) from 3.9
inches or 3 inches, depending on its weight, remains, but
the number of flat drops was increased to all possible rest
surfaces. The two corner drops and two edge drops were
changed to pivot drops. These pivot drops, known in the
industry as a bench handling, were adopted from MIL-STD810G Procedure VI of Method 516. The new test procedure
is to place the unpackaged, unpowered equipment onto a
wooden bench surface or non-yielding surface on its normal
rest face. While using one edge as a pivot point, the opposite
edge is lifted 4 inches or 45º, whichever is less. The elevated
edge is then allowed to free fall onto the bench top. This
procedure is then repeated for the pivot edge and the two
adjacent edges along the bottom. The drop sequence is then
repeated for any other surface the unit could be rested on
normally. If your item is able to be rested on a bench top on
any of the surfaces, the number of drops would increase from
the five required in Issue 3 to 30 in Issue 4. The 30 drops
would include six free fall drops, one of each face, and 24
pivot drops, four on each face’s edge.
Seismic testing has a clarification on which bolt the load cell
should be placed on during the test if concrete anchors are
omitted from the testing. The load cell is placed on the bolt at
the innermost position, if the framework allows for a variety
of anchor locations. In the test cases that were analyzed, this
position was found to have the highest loads relative to the
other mounting bolts locations. The second clarification is for
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 193
Telecom/Wireless
Heat dissipation remains as it was in Issue 3. Some
guidance on how to perform the calculations is added
by stepping through an example in paragraph 5.1.6. This
provides consistency between manufacturers on how to
report the value. Along with the standard heat dissipation
calculation, there is a new requirement R4-31 for energy
efficiency. The requirement directs you to use the Alliance
for Telecommunication Industry Solutions ATIS-0600015.
The document listed is a general requirement document and
one of seven documents presently in that ATIS family. Based
on the type of equipment being tested, you default to one
of those documents (listed at the end of the article). If your
equipment does not fit in one of those categories, you default
to a telecommunications carrier document such as Verizon’s
VZ.TPR.9205 and then to an industry standard document.
fire resistance testing for the line burner to consistently selfextinguish due to the high velocity airflow. Once the protocol
of ATIS-0600319.2008 has been completed and the EUT
has complied due to the line burner self-extinguishing, one
additional burn for that location will need to be performed.
That burn will be done with the fans in a non-operating mode
in accordance with two new objectives 04-44 for frames or
O4-50 for shelves. The second change deals with printed
circuit boards (PCBs) having a distance to each other equal
to or greater than 25 mm. Under Issue 3, varying distances
between the adjacent cards caused no change in the burn
profile. The new Issue 4 protocol for adjacent PCBs greater
than 25mm away, is to leave the PCB in place and insert the
line burner through the faceplate on the component side of
the card. The line burner peak flow rate is then calculated in
the same way as other burns, using the vertical height of the
card and adjusted to 50% of the calculated flow rate.
Telecom/Wireless
Rece nt C h a n ge s to GR- 63- CO RE
testing of multiple shelves in a single frame. In accordance
with the specification, units weighing less than 23 kg have
to be placed at the top of the rack. In order to allow multiple
units to undergo seismic testing in a single frame, direction
is given that the smallest unit is to be placed at the top of the
rack at the highest location. However. the lowest unit still has
to be within the top 20% of the frame.
ATIS-0600015.2009- Energy Efficiency for Telecommunication
Equipment: Methodology for Measurement and Reporting –
General Requirements.
Office vibration has an additional test option to use a random
vibration profile in lieu of the traditional 0.1 g sine sweep.
The random vibration curve was adopted from the Class
4M5 requirements of EN ETSI 019-2-4 to align testing
with European requirements. The issue with this alignment,
done to reduce testing, will be the fixture requirements from
each of the documents. GR-63-CORE has the requirement
that shelf level products are placed at a specified height in
a telecom frame depending on their weight. ETSI EN 300
019-2-4 requires that the test article be placed in a rigid
fixture per IEC 60068-2-47, which telecom two-post frames
do not comply to. However since European requirements for
weather-protected equipment is performed to Class 3.2 of
EN ETSI 019-2-3, the Issue 4 test curve is +3 dB higher as
shown below (Figure 2). Based on this difference, a response
accelerometer can be placed at the mounting location of the
EUT in the telecom frame to verify it envelopes the Class
3.2 requirements. If it does not, separate tests will need to be
performed for each of the documents.
ATIS-0600015.02.2009- Energy Efficiency for
Telecommunication Equipment: Methodology for Measurement
and Reporting – Transport Requirements.
The final change in the document in the acoustic section is the
removal of the acceptance criteria for unattended locations.
ATIS-0600319.2008- Equipment Assemblies—Fire
Propagation Risk Assessment Criteria.
REFERENCES
MIL-STD-810G October 31, 2008- Department of Defense Test
Method Standard Environmental Engineering Considerations
and Laboratory Tests.
ETSI EN 300 019-2-3 v2.2.2 (2003-04) – Environmental
Conditions and environmental tests for telecommunications
equipment; Part 2-3: Specification of environmental tests;
Stationary use at weatherprotected locations.
ETSI EN 300 019-2-4 v2.2.2 (2003-04) – Environmental
Conditions and environmental tests for telecommunications
equipment; Part 2-4: Specification of environmental tests;
Stationary use at non-weatherprotected locations.
ATIS-0600015.01.2009-Energy Efficiency for
Telecommunication Equipment: Methodology for Measurement
and Reporting -- Server Requirements.
ATIS-0600015.03.2009- Energy Efficiency for
Telecommunications Equipment: Methodology for
Measurement and Reporting for Router and Ethernet Switch
Products.
ATIS-0600015.04.2010- Energy Efficiency for
Telecommunication Equipment: Methodology for Measurement
and Reporting DC Power Plant – Rectifier Requirements.
ATIS-0600015.05.2010- Energy Efficiency for
Telecommunication Equipment: Methodology for Measurement
and Reporting Facility Energy Efficiency.
ATIS-0600015.06.2011- Energy Efficiency for
Telecommunication Equipment: Methodology for Measurement
and Reporting of Radio Base Station Metrics.
VZ.TPR.9305 Issue 4, May 2011- Verizon NEBSTM
Compliance: NEBS Compliance Requirements for
Telecommunications Equipment.
VZ.TPR.9205 Issue 5, October 2011- Verizon NEBSTM
Compliance: Energy Efficiency Clarification Document.
Clayton Forbes has been working in
the testing industry for 30 years, 24 of
those years with NTS. Currently he is the
Operations manager for NTS’ Northeast
Division and was a member of the GR-63CORE re-write committee. Clayton has
served as a technical advisor on various
committees in both the commercial and
military industries He is presently serving his second term
as Vice Chair for the ATIS STEP-NPP committee and also
participate on the SC-135 committee who’s responsibilities
include RTCA/160 specification.
Figure 2
194 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
www.incompliancemag.com
PRODUCT Showcase
Your Source for Product and Service Solutions
ANNUAL VENDORS’ NIGHT
• One-stop-shopcoveringglobalsafety,emc,
hygienic,energyefficiency,environmental,
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[email protected]
www.goglobalcompliance.com
IEEE Milwaukee Section
presents the
2013 EMC Seminar
with Kenneth Wyatt
(free for attendees, must RSVP by April 1)
9:30 PM . . Exhibition Hall Closes
Visit as many as 50 Booths
featuring the latest in EMC and
Safety Compliance .
For information & reservations,
please visit
www.nepss.net
te
Save the Da
r 17, 2013
Tuesday, Septembe
ent
Minnesota EMC Ev
Tuesday, March 19, 2013
Crowne Plaza Milwaukee Airport Hotel
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
This year’s program is focused on
Developing a Personal EMC Trouble
Shooting Kit that will meet today’s
challenges of tight engineering
budgets. The assembly of your own
EMC Troubleshooting Kit will keep the
“Focus of EMC” at the forefront of
your designs. Mr. Kenneth Wyatt has
developed an outstanding approach
that can be implemented for less
than $5,000.00 (including spectrum
analyzer)! Those attending will greatly
benefit from Ken’s tutorials and
classroom experimentation of these
recommended tools.
This Annual Event will be held at the
Ramada Mall of America in Bloomington,
MN – a major suburb of Minneapolis. The
Hotel is located five minutes from the
Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport.
The Annual Event will have three technical
tracks; EMC and Medical Devices, EMC
Standards (commercial and military), and
Test Labs for EMC. Interested speakers
may contact Dan Hoolihan for more
details at [email protected]
A Vendors table-top show will be held
in conjunction with the three technical
tracks. For further details on exhibiting at
the MN EMC Event, contact Dan Hoolihan
at [email protected]
For more information
contact Jim Blaha at
[email protected]
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 195
Product Showcase
GoGlobalCompliance,Inc.provides
globalengineeringandcertification
servicesforelectrical/electronic
productstomorethan150countries
andcovering6continents.
CONSULTANTS
Consultants
Consultants
Directory
Patrick G. André
iNARTE Certified Engineer and Consultant in
Electromagnetic Compatibility and Electrostatics
iNARTE Master Design Engineer in EMC
[email protected]
http://andreconsulting.com
206.406.8371 phone
425.485.8153
fax
973-992-1793
FAX: 973-533-1442
Henry W. Ott, President
Henry Ott COnsultants
EMC CONSULTING & TRAINING
www.hottconsultants.com
48 Baker Road
Livingston, NJ 07039-2502
[email protected]
HOC
ELECTROMAGNETIC
COMPATIBILITY
Andre Consulting, Inc.
206-406-8371
www.andreconsulting.com
Don HEIRMAN Consultants
732-741-7723
www.DonHEIRMAN.com
Henry Ott Consultants
973-992-1793
www.hottconsultants.com
Hoolihan EMC Consulting
651-213-0966
www.emcxpert.com
Kimmel Gerke Associates, Ltd.
888-EMI-GURU
www.emiguru.com
Montrose Compliance Services
408-247-5715
www.montrosecompliance.com
RTF Compliance
949-813-6095
www.RTFComp.com
Wyatt Technical Services, LLC
877-443-9275
www.emc-seminars.com
196 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
www.incompliancemag.com
CONSULTANTS
KIMMEL GERKE ASSOCIATES, LTD.
Consulting Engineers
EMI DESIGN & TROUBLESHOOTING
• EMI Design and Systems Consulting
Consultants
— Regulations — Emissions — RFI — ESD — Power Disturbances
• EMI Seminars
— Design — Systems — Custom — Public and Private
• EMI Design Reviews
— Circuit Boards — Cables — Power — Grounding — Shielding
• EMI — Toolkit® — An EMI Software “Reference Handbook”
Daryl Gerke, PE
William Kimmel, PE
2256 W. Lidner Ave #31
628 LeVander Way
Mesa, AZ 85202
South St. Paul, MN 55075
www.emiguru.com • 1-888-EMI-GURU
RoHS / REACH
Consulting and
Services
Complete Environmental Compliance Solutions
• Product BOM Analysis • Data Collection
• IPC-1752
• JGPSSI • IBM PCD
• In-House Solutions
• Customer Reporting
(949) 813-6095
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ts
oom/S
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ontrol
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tection
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2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 197
Product/Service
Spotlights
Spotlights
AK-40G Antenna Kit
A.H. Systems AK-40G Antenna
kit with a
frequency
range of
20 Hz –
40 GHz
provides all
the reliable
antennas,
current
probes, and
cables needed
to satisfy a wide array of customer
requirements. Each kit contains a
tripod, azimuth and elevation head
and a tripod carrying case. All with
next-day, on-time delivery. Visit our
web site at www.AHSystems.com
A.H. Systems, Inc.
tel: 818-998-0223
[email protected]
www.ahsystems.com
198 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Meet Compliance
with A2LA
A2LA is a private, non-profit membership association, whose primary
mission is to provide comprehensive
internationally recognized accreditation for laboratories, inspection
bodies, proficiency testing providers, reference
materials
producers
and product
certification
bodies.
Assessments
are conducted using international
standards and specific requirements
developed in cooperation with
specifiers.
A2LA – American Association for
Laboratory Accreditation
tel: 301-644-3248
www.A2LA.org
www.incompliancemag.com
PRODUCT/SERVICE SPOTLIGHTS
Rent EMC Compliance
Test Equipment
AR’s new MultiStar Multi-Tone Tester
is a stateof-the-art
system
designed
to test RF
Radiated
Immunity
faster
than ever
before. The MT06000 system
allows users to test multiple
frequencies (tones) simultaneously,
and contains all the instruments
needed to perform radiated
immunity testing from 80MHz-6GHz
for IEC 61000-4-3.
MIL-STD-188-125
HEMP Filters
Captor HEMP filters enhance
our proven and reliable lines of
EMI filters, TEMPEST filters and
Feedthru capacitors. Captor HEMP
filters have been tested and
meet the requirements of
MIL-STD-188-125-1 and -2.
Call Captor to discuss the solution to
your EMI/EMP problems.
Advanced Test Equipment Rentals
tel: 888-544-2832
[email protected]
www.atecorp.com
For more information visit
www.arww-rfmicro.com/
html/18200.asp?id=1109
Captor Corporation
tel: 937-667-8484
[email protected]
www.captorcorp.com
Chomerics Releases New
Web Resources
Regulatory Compliance
Testing
EMC Simulation Software
from CST
Parker Chomerics is a manufacturer
of EMI shielding, thermal
management, optical display
enhancement and protection, and
engineered thermoplastics. EMI
shielding products include gaskets,
coatings, compounds, vents,
windows, conductive plastic, tapes,
and microwave absorbers. Thermal
products include insulator pads,
gap fillers, adhesive tapes, grease,
flexible heat spreaders and phase
change materials.
Full Compliance Testing Services for
Audio/Video Consumer
Medical, Telecommunications,
Laboratory, Marine, ITE, Security and
Wireless Products. Dedicated to
Quality Service. Accurate and
Efficient Testing. Specialists in
Wireless and Telecom Testing.
Test Locally Sell Globally!
FCC - Wireless - Telecom - CE Marking
Pre-compliance Testing
Product Safety
Chomerics
a Division of Parker Hannifin
tel: 781-939-4791
www.chomerics.com
Compliance Worldwide, Inc.
tel: 603-887-3903
[email protected]
www.ComplianceWorldwide.com
CST is a world leader in computer
simulation of radiated emissions
and susceptibly. CST STUDIO SUITE®
provides powerful solutions for
complex EMC analysis including
coupled simulations which enable
large system
analysis and
installed
performance
studies.
Many years
of in-house
expertise
support the
tools and give customers confidence
in simulation results.
CST of America
tel: 508-665 -400
[email protected]
www.cst.com
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 199
Spotlights
Advanced Test Equipment Rentals
offers a wide range of EMC test
systems up to 40 GHz. Applications
for product testing, power quality,
automotive, communications and
aerospace are supported. Test
standards
include
MIL-STD 461,
DO160, IEC
61000, and
ISO7637.
Next day
delivery and
technical
support are
available for most equipment.
AR’s new MultiStar MultiTone Tester
PRODUCT/SERVICE SPOTLIGHTS
Spotlights
ED&D – Certified Product
Safety Equipment
ED&D,
incorporated in
1990, is a
worldleading
manufacturer
of industrial test equipment for
product safety applications. Products
are made in accordance with many
national or international standards,
such as IEC, CE, CSA, UL, VDE, MIL,
EN, ASTM. In addition, our ISO 17025
calibration services fully certify our
products and recalibrations.
Reliable Testing Services
Located in Kanata, Ontario and
operating since 1988 as a product
certification test lab, we offer
a broad range of electronics
testing and certification services.
We provide high quality and
reliable testing services to the
electronics, telecommunications,
medical, military, aeronautical and
automotive industries.
Educated Design &
Development, Inc. (ED&D)
Domestic: 800-806-6236
International: 1-919-469-9434
[email protected]
www.productsafet.com
Electronics Test Centre
tel: 613-599-6800
fax: 613-599-7614
[email protected]
www.etc-mpb.com
Calibration PlusTM
Saves Time and Money
Axos – Compact
Immunity Test System
Manage calibration and repair
of your antennas, probes, LISNs
and more, with ETS-Lindgren’s
Calibration Plus!TM You get a
customized
program
with
priority
scheduling,
special
pricing,
signed Certificates of Conformance,
and archived records. All work is
performed in
our A2LA accredited lab. Details:
www.ets-lindgren.com/maintenance
The new AXOS5 compact immunity
test system integrates all of the best
features of our stand alone test
systems into one single economic
solution. It combines 5 kV Burst/
EFT, Surge combination wave, AC/
DC Dips & Interrupts, along with an
integrated single-phase coupling/
decoupling network into one
compact test system.
ETS-Lindgren
tel: 512-531-6400
[email protected]
www.ets-lindgren.com
200 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Hipotronics Inc
tel: 845-230-9240
[email protected]
Load Dump 200N200
Stand alone LD Simulator for
DUT supply up to 200 A
Hightlights of EM TEST LD Simulators:
Built-in coupling filter for 100A or
200A. Pre-programmed routines:
according to ISO, SAE, JASO, Crysler,
Ford, MBN, Nissan, Scania. Freestylemode with
individual
rise time
and pulseduration
settings.
Manual
and remote
operation via
GPIB-/ USBInterface.
EM TEST USA
tel: 858-699-1685
[email protected]
www.emtest.com
New 5kV EFT Capability
HV TECHNOLOGIES has announced
the TRA3000 Immunity Tester now
offers the ability to test to 5kV EFT
pulses as new product standards
have added this requirement. The
enhanced EFT module with the same
physical footprint fits directly into
the existing TRA3000 mainframes
allowing users to extend test
capabilities with on-site upgrades to
5kV EFT pulses.
HV TECHNOLOGIES, Inc.
tel: 703-365-2330
www.hvtechnologies.com
www.incompliancemag.com
PRODUCT/SERVICE SPOTLIGHTS
Keep Informed
www.incompliancemag.com/
subscribe
MuShield Custom Magnetic
Shielding Enclosures
For over
50 years,
The
MuShield
Company,
Inc. has
been a
leading
manufacturer of custom magnetic
shielding enclosures. An ISO9001:2008 certified company,
MuShield guarantees a high quality
manufactured product which will
meet or exceed your requirements
for EMI Shielding and design.
The MuShield Company, Inc.
tel: 603-666-4433 x 21
fax: 603-666-4013
[email protected]
www.mushield.com
MuMetal® Alloy for
Electromagnetic Shielding
LCR provides shielded room
filters for commercial and military
applications. The 057 series
High Performance Filters serve
commercial
customers
for shielded
enclosures,
EMC test
laboratories
and anechoic
chambers.
Our Military filters include F1960
Facility/Shielded Room Power Line
Filter Cabinets which meet MILSTD-220. The F15000 Filters and
Enclosures comply with MIL-F-15733
and our Tubular Filters comply with
MIL-F-15733.
MuMetal® is the most recognized
brand of magnetic shielding alloy,
worldwide.
Unknown
by many,
MuMetal®
is not a
generic
name it is a
registered
brand and exclusively available from
Magnetic Shield Corp., Bensenville,
IL USA. Specify MuMetal® in your
design and have us prototype,
qualify and manufacture to your
specifications.
LCR Electronics, Inc.
tel: 610 278-0840
www.lcr-inc.com
OKAYA New Products LV & SV
Electrical characteristics:
• Max. Discharge Current 5000A (8/20μs)
• Voltage protection level 1500V max
(at AC250VProduct)
• Surge Current Life 1000A (8/20μs)
Approx 500 times
• UL1449-3 Type 2 (permanent connect)
• cUL: C22.2 No8 IEC61643-1
EN61643-11
Applications:
• Motion control
• Inverter or servomotor control
• Industrial machine
• Robot
• And more
Okaya Electric America, Inc.
tel: 219-477-4488
www.okaya.com
®
Magnetic Shield Corporation
Mr. Brad Friestedt
tel: 630-766-7800
[email protected]
www.magnetic-shield.com
HYB-NF High Performance
Fireproof Absorber
HYB-NF is a hybrid absorber
manufactured from a fire proof,
fibrous composite, impedance
matched to ferrite tiles. Designed
for use in EMC, FREE SPACE and MIL
Test Chambers, the hybrid allows
broadband testing from 26 MHz
up to 60 GHz, and withstands field
strengths greater than 300V/m.
Exclusively from Panashield.
Panashield, Inc.
tel: 203-866-5888
fax: 203-866-6162
[email protected]
www.panashield.com
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 201
Spotlights
Keep informed as we monitor compliance activities, product news and
events throughout the world. The
World In Compliance e-newsletter
reports on industry developments
and trends,
standards
developments,
emerging
technologies, and
other
pertinent
developments
in the
world of compliance. The e-Product
Showcase offers the latest industry
products and events. Sign up today!
Commercial & Military
Shielded Room Filters
Spotlights
PRODUCT/SERVICE SPOTLIGHTS
Bringing Products
To Market
EESeal - Instant Retrofit
EMI Filter
Reliant EMC
Your Compliance Source!
Professional Testing (EMI), Inc. is
a NVLAP accredited full service
test laboratory providing EMC,
Product Safety,
Reliability and
Hazardous
Location testing
and consulting
services. Our
team of experts
can assist
you at almost
any stage of
your product
development
cycle: from
design assistance to beyond the final
product test report.
Quell’s EESeal adds an EMI filter to
YOUR connector in seconds; the thin
elastomeric insert easily slips onto
the pins, no soldering. It connects
capacitors/
components
between
selected
pins and the
connector
shell. It’s
a proven,
reliable,
permanent
solution. FREE custom samples
typically ship within 2-3 days.
ISO9001 & AS9100 Certified.
Reliant EMC, your EMC compliance
source, offers World Class
Emissions and Immunity test
instrumentation from York EMC,
Laplace Instruments, Spitzenberger
& Spies and OnFILTER, which
enables you to reduce cost and
time by Pre-Compliance or SelfCertifying
your
products
for EMC.
Reliant
EMC
supports
the
Americas for your Electromagnetic
Compliance needs.
Professional Testing (EMI), Inc.
tel: 800-695-1077
[email protected]
www.ptitest.com
NEW EMI/Environmental
Connector-Seal
Spira’s NEW
ConnectorSeal gaskets
now come in
a Front-Mount
configuration,
providing
excellent EMI/
Environmental
protection! Our unique patent-pending
design includes a rigid layer between
either silicone or fluorosilicone sealing,
and includes our patented spiral gasket
for excellent EMI shielding. Provides
extremely durable and reliable one
atmosphere environmental sealing for
flange-mounted connectors. Contact
us for information and a free sample!
Spira Manufacturing Corporation
tel: 818-764-8222
fax: 818-764-9880
[email protected]
www.spira-emi.com/whatsnew
202 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Quell Corporation
contact: Paul Miller
tel: 505-243-1423
[email protected]
www.eeseal.com
FM Approved Retractable
Telescoping Fire Sprinkler
Sprinkler Innovations manufactures
the only FM
Approved
Retractable
Telescoping
Fire Sprinkler
for
Anechoic
Chambers.
For more
information,
check out our
website at
www.sprinklerinnovations.com,
or contact our office for a free
DVD of our sprinkler head.
Call Jim Beers at 800-850-6692.
Sprinkler Innovations
tel: 800-850-6692
[email protected]
www.sprinklerinnovations.com
Reliant EMC LLC
tel: 408-600-1472
www.reliantemc.com
TDK Model VC-06
Video Camera
The new VC-06 hi-definition, all
digital, color video camera was
developed
for remote
monitoring
of equipment
during EMC
testing in
a shielded
room or
anechoic
chamber. Designed to operate
in harsh electromagnetic
environments, it is ideal for anechoic
chamber monitoring, shielded access
control, and test action archiving.
Contact TDK for more information.
TDK RF Solutions
tel: 512-258-9478
[email protected]
http://tdkrfsolutions.com
www.incompliancemag.com
PRODUCT/SERVICE SPOTLIGHTS
Teseq’s Calibration
Laboratory Renews A2LA
Accreditation
Battery Testing Whitepapers
and Webinar from TÜV SÜD
Teseq
tel: 732- 417-0501
[email protected]
www.teseq.com
TÜV SÜD America Inc.
toll-free: 800-TUV-0123
[email protected]
www.TUVamerica.com
Custom, Time-to-Market
Solutions
Safety is evolving. So is UL. Today,
UL’s technical engineering experts
ask manufacturers what their timeto-market needs are. Understanding
that one size doesn’t fit all, UL works
collaboratively
throughout the
certification
process,
providing
customized
solutions
to meet
manufacturer’s unique needswithout jeopardizing safety, quality
or integrity for speed.
UL
tel: 877-UL-HELPS (877-854-3577)
fax: 360-817-6278
[email protected]
www.ul.com/appliances
No Job Too Large or Too Small!
Shielding the World Since 1972
Celebrating Our 40th Year Anniversary
• Offering Complete Turn-Key
Solutions for the EMC Industry
• Pre-fabricated design allows
rapid installation
• Solutions are fully customizable
to meet the needs of clients
Universal Shielding Corp.
20 West Jefryn Blvd.
Deer Park, NY 11729
tel: 800-645-5578
[email protected]
www.universalshielding.com
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 203
Spotlights
Teseq’s calibration laboratory gained
renewed accreditation to the international standard ISO/IEC 17025
in an assessment by the American
Association for Laboratory Accreditation (A2LA). In addition to its
renewal, Teseq has added several RF
parameters
to its
scope of
accreditation
and is now
accredited
to calibrate
CDNs, ISNs
and compact immunity generators.
TÜV SÜD America, a leading global
expert in testing
battery cells,
modules, and
packs now offers
two new battery
whitepapers,
“The EV Battery
Conundrum,”
and “Nail
Penetration Testing: Critical
Sensitivities,” and a new webinar,
“General Overview of Battery
Testing Requirements.” Download
these complimentary items at
http://www.tuv-sud-america.com/
whitepapers or http://www.tuv-sudamerica.com/training.
P ro d u ct / S e r v ic e Direc tor y
I n d ex
Associations,
Education & Training . . . . .207
Injection Clamps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209
Cabinets/Enclosures . . . . . . . . . . .213
Sensors/Transducers, RF Field . . .209
Cable Assemblies . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
Associations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207
Shielded Buildings . . . . . . . . . . . . .209
Circuit Breakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207
Shielded Rooms/Chambers . . . . . .209
Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
EMI/EMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Turntables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209
Couplers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
ESD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Consulting & Services . . . .209
Electronic Cooling Fans . . . . . . . . .213
Codes, Standards
and Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207
Calibration & Repair Services . . . . .209
Fuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
Conductive Painting Services . . . .210
Grounding Rods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
Consultants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210
Impedance Matching Networks . . .213
Cleanroom/Static Control . . . . . . . . . 210
Inductors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207
Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207
Product/Service Directory
Diodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
Product Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Training Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207
EMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210
Videos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207
EU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210
Chambers,
Antennas & Accessories . .207
Absorbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207
EMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Honeycomb RF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Low Frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Microwave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
GOST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210
Lightning Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210
Medical Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210
Product Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
Quality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
Telecom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
Tempest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
EMI/RFI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Surface Mount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Swtichmode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Integrated Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
LEDs and Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
Liquid Crystal Display Modules . . .213
Military (MIL-SPEC) Connectors . .213
Oscillators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
Transients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
Potentiometers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
VCCI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
Resonators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
Antenna Couplers . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208
Design Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .212
RF Frequency Converters . . . . . . .213
Antenna Masts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208
Equipment Rental & Leasing . . . . .212
Solid State Relays . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
Antennas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208
Manufacturers’ Representatives . . .212
Surge Suppressors . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
Shielded Enclosure Design,
Relocation Services . . . . . . . . . . . .212
Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .214
Broadband . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
EMI Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Site Attenuation Testing Services . .212
Thyristors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .214
Horn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Site Survey Services . . . . . . . . . . . .212
Transformers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .214
Anechoic Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . .208
Biconical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Log Periodic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Loop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Terminal Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .214
Power Line Isolation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Nonionizing Radiation Hazard . . . . . 208
Electrical &
Electronic Components . . .212
Rod . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .212
Tunable Dipole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Air Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .212
Whip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
EMI Air Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
Cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208
Shielded Air Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
GTEM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Arrestors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .212
TEM & Strip Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Attenuators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .212
Chambers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209
EMC/EMI Control . . . . . . . .214
Backplanes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .212
Anechoic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Air Cooling Systems . . . . . . . . . . . .214
Backshells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .212
Architectural Shielding Products . .214
Bluetooth Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
Arrestors, Lightning and Surge . . . .214
Breakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
Braid, Bonding, and Grounding
Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .214
Reverberation/Mode-Stirred . . . . . . . 209
Fire Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Helmholtz Coils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209
204 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Signal Line Isolation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Telecommunications . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Third-Party Approved, EU . . . . . . . . 214
Third-Party Approved, US/Canada . 214
Toroidal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Varistors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .214
www.incompliancemag.com
Index
Product/Ser vice Director y
Capacitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .214
Shielded Enclosures . . . . . . . . . . . .216
Insulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .218
Ceramic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Shielded Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . .216
Powders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .218
Decoupling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Shielded Tubing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .216
Resins and Compounds . . . . . . . . .218
Electrolytic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Shielded Wire and Cable . . . . . . . .217
Sealants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .218
Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Shielding Coatings . . . . . . . . . . . . .217
Silicone Conductive Sponge . . . . .218
Shielding Compounds . . . . . . . . . .217
Thermally Conductive
Silicone Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . .218
Mains (X and Y) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Planar Array . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Tantalum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Chokes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .214
Conductive Materials . . . . . . . . . . .214
Additives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Adhesive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Epoxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
EMI/RFI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Magnetic Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Shielding, Board-Level . . . . . . . . . .217
Suppressors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .217
Suppressors, Transient . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Laminates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
ESD Equipment &
Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .217
Lubricants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Air Ionizers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .217
Plastics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Connector Fingers . . . . . . . . . . . . .215
Cord Sets, EMI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .215
Ferrite Beads, Rods and Forms . . .215
ESD Tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .217
Meters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .217
Static Charge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Simulators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .217
Thermoplastic Components . . . . . .218
Thermoplastics and
Thermoplastic Materials . . . . . . . . .218
Power &
Power Management . . . . .219
Constant Voltage Regulators . . . . .219
Converters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .219
Cord Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .219
Electronic Loads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .219
Interrupters, AC Power . . . . . . . . . .219
Isolators, Power/Signal Line . . . . . .219
Line Cords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .219
Motors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .219
Filter Coils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .215
EMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Filter Pins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .215
ESD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Multiple Outlet Strips . . . . . . . . . . .219
Filtered Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . .215
Lightning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Overcurrent Protection . . . . . . . . . .219
Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .215
Static Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .218
Overvoltage Protection . . . . . . . . . .219
Absorptive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Containers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Power Amplifier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .219
Antenna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Flooring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Power Converters . . . . . . . . . . . . . .219
EMC and RFI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Footwear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Power Cords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .219
EMC Test Chamber . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Garments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Power Distribution Systems . . . . . .219
Power Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Mats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Power Entry Modules . . . . . . . . . . .219
RF and Microwave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Monitoring Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Shielded Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Power Generators . . . . . . . . . . . . .219
Packaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Shielded Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Workstations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Power Line Conditioning
Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .219
Signal Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Wrist Straps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Power Rectifier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .219
Third-Party Approved, EU . . . . . . . . 216
Transient Detectors and
Suppressors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .218
Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .219
Materials,
Adhesives & Coatings . . . .218
Switching Power Supplies . . . . . . .220
Third-Party Approved, US/Canada . 216
Finger Stock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .216
Foils, Shield Tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . .216
Gaskets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .216
Resistors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .216
Shielded Cable Assemblies and
Harnesses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .216
Absorbing Materials . . . . . . . . . . . .218
Adhesives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .218
Alloys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .218
Shielded Conduit . . . . . . . . . . . . . .216
Coatings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .218
Shielded Connectors . . . . . . . . . . .216
Foams and Foam Materials . . . . . .218
Switch Mode Power Supply . . . . . .220
Safety and
Protective Equipment . . . .220
Safety and Warning Labels . . . . . .220
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 205
Product/Service Directory
Foam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Shielding Material . . . . . . . . . . . . . .217
P ro d u ct / S e r v ic e Direc tor y
Software Suppliers . . . . . .220
Gaussmeters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .223
Temperature Cycling Systems . . . .225
3D Simulation Software . . . . . . . . .220
Generators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .223
Used & Refurbished
Test Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .225
Anechoic Chamber Software . . . . .220
EMC Simulation Software . . . . . . .220
EMC/EMI Software . . . . . . . . . . . . .220
ESD, Static Control Software . . . . .220
Product Safety Software . . . . . . . .220
Signal Integrity and
EMC Analysis Software . . . . . . . . .220
Wireless Propagation Software . . .220
Product/Service Directory
I n d ex
Arbitrary Wave Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
ESD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Fast/Transient Burst . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Testing Services . . . . . . . . .225
Impulse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Accredited Registrar . . . . . . . . . . . .225
Interference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
CE Competent Body . . . . . . . . . . .225
Lightning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
CE Notified Body . . . . . . . . . . . . . .225
Signal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Environmental Testing and Analysis
Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .226
Surge Transient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Ground Bond Testers . . . . . . . . . . .223
Homologation Services . . . . . . . . .226
Standards Suppliers . . . . .220
Ground Resistance Testers . . . . . .223
Pre-Assessments . . . . . . . . . . . . . .226
Hipot Testers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .223
Test & Measurement
Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . .220
Meters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .224
Product and Component
Testing Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .226
Amplifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .220
Field Strength . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
Low Noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
Magnetic Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
Radiation Hazard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
BSMI Compliant
Certification Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
RF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
RF Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
CB Test Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
Analyzers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .221
Static Charge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
CE Marking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
EMI/EMC Spectrum . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
Static Decay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
China Compulsory Certification . . . . 228
Flicker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
Monitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .224
Electrical Safety Testing . . . . . . . . . . 228
Harmonics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
Current . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
EMC Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228
Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
EMI Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
Energy Efficiency Testing . . . . . . . . . 229
Power Quality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
ESD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
Environmental Simulation Testing . . 229
Telecom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
Ionizer Balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
EuP Directive Compliance . . . . . . . . 230
Automatic Test Sets . . . . . . . . . . . .221
Static Voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
GOST R certification . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230
Avionics Test Equipment . . . . . . . .222
Oscilloscopes and
Transient Recorders . . . . . . . . . . . .224
Green Energy Compliance . . . . . . . . 230
Probes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .224
Halogen Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230
Current/Magnetic Field . . . . . . . . . . . 224
Lithium-Ion Battery Testing . . . . . . . 230
Electric Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
Marine Electronics Testing . . . . . . . . 230
Voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
Nationally Recognized Testing
Laboratory (NRTL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230
Buildings, EMC Testing . . . . . . . . .222
Burn-in Test Equipment . . . . . . . . .222
Calibration & Repair Services . . . . .222
Current Leakage Testers . . . . . . . .222
Data Acquisition Monitoring
Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .222
Dielectric Strength Testers . . . . . . .222
Electrical Safety Testers . . . . . . . . .222
EMC Testers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .222
EMP Simulators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .222
Environmental Chambers . . . . . . . .222
Megohmmeters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
Receivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .224
EMI/EMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
RF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225
Tempest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225
RF Leak Detectors . . . . . . . . . . . . .225
Safety Test Equipment . . . . . . . . . .225
ESD Test Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . .223
Shock & Vibration
Testing Shakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .225
Fiber-Optic Systems . . . . . . . . . . . .223
Susceptiblity Test Instruments . . . .225
Flow Meters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .223
Telecom Test Equipment . . . . . . . .225
206 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Testing Laboratories . . . . . . . . . . . .227
Accelerated Stress Testing . . . . . . . . 227
Acoustical Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
GS Mark Certification . . . . . . . . . . . . 230
Network Equipment Building
System (NEBS) Testing . . . . . . . . . . . 230
Product Pre-Compliance Testing . . . 231
Product Safety Testing . . . . . . . . . . . 231
Radio Performance &
Functionality Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
RoHS Directive Compliance . . . . . . . 232
Standards Council of Canada
Certification Body . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
Telecommunication Certification
Approval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
www.incompliancemag.com
Associations, Education & Training – Chambers, Antennas & Accessories
Associations, Education &
Training
Associations
A2LA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-644-3204
ESD Association . . . . . . . . . . . 315-339-6937
iNARTE at RABQSA International
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-89-NARTE
NTS Albuquerque . . . . . . . . . 505-821-4740
RABQSA International . . . . . . 888-722-2440
Trace Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . 410-584-9099
Books
Books, EMI/EMC
Books, ESD
D . C . Smith Consultants . . . . 800-323-3956
Books, Product Safety
Phoenix Technical Group . . . 919-535-3662
Codes, Standards and
Regulations
Abstraction Engineering Inc . 408-258-3282
Aum Electro Technology Pvt Ltd
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 00912512871365
Clarion Safety Systems . . . . . 800-748-0241
Don HEIRMAN Consultants732-741-7723
Eisner Safety Consultants . . . 503-244-6151
Lewis Bass International . . . . 408-942-8000
MC Global Access . . . . . . . . . 760-696-3700
VEROCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 954-990-7544
Education
Agilent Technologies . . . . . 800-829-4444
American Certification Body, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-847-4700
Clarion Safety Systems . . . . . 800-748-0241
D . C . Smith Consultants . . . . 800-323-3956
Eisner Safety Consultants . . . 503-244-6151
ESD Association . . . . . . . . . . . 315-339-6937
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
iNARTE at RABQSA International
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-89-NARTE
Jastech EMC Consulting LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-876-4810
Montrose Compliance Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-247-5715
Oxford University Technology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 (0)1865 286958
RMV Technology Group, LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 650-964-4792
Publications
Agilent Technologies . . . . . 800-829-4444
ESD Association . . . . . . . . . . . 315-339-6937
In Compliance Magazine . . . 978-486-4684
Montrose Compliance Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-247-5715
Same Page Publishing, LLC . . 508-488-6274
Training Courses
A2LA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-644-3204
Agilent Technologies . . . . . 800-829-4444
André Consulting, Inc. . . . . 206-406-8371
ANDRO Computational Solutions
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315-334-1163
ARC Technical Resources, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-263-6486
BestESD Technical Services . 831-824-4052
CKC Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . . 800-500-4362
Compatible Electronics, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 650-417-EMC1 (3621)
CST of America . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-665-4400
D . C . Smith Consultants . . . . 800-323-3956
D .L .S . Electronic Systems, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-537-6400
Don HEIRMAN Consultants732-741-7723
Eisner Safety Consultants . . . 503-244-6151
EMCC DR . RASEK . . . . . . . . . . 49-9194-9016
ESD Association . . . . . . . . . . . 315-339-6937
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
F2 Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-405-1580
G&M Compliance, Inc . . . . . . 714-628-1020
Henry Ott Consultants . . . . 973-992-1793
Hoolihan EMC Consulting . 651-213-0966
Jastech EMC Consulting LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-876-4810
Kimmel Gerke Associates, Ltd.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-EMI-GURU
Montrose Compliance Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-247-5715
Narda Safety Test Solutions . 631-231-1700
NCEE Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-567-6860
NTS Pittsfield . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-270-2516
Oxford University Technology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 (0)1865 286958
Phoenix Technical Group . . . 919-535-3662
Prostat Corporation . . . . . . . . 630-238-8883
Reliant EMC LLC . . . . . . . . . . . 408-600-1472
Retlif Testing Laboratories
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-737-1500 x111
RMV Technology Group, LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 650-964-4792
RTF Compliance . . . . . . . . . . 949-813-6095
SIEMIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-526-1188
SILENT Solutions LLC . . 603-578-1842 x203
Spectrum EMC Consulting, LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 651-688-0634
Stephen Halperin & Associates
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630-238-8883
TestingPartners .com . . . . . . . 862-243-2329
Trace Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . 410-584-9099
TÜV SÜD America Inc. . . . . 800-888-0123
UL Knowledge Services . . . . . 888-503-5536
Van Doren Company . . . . . . . 573-341-4097
Washington Laboratories . 301-216-1500
Wyatt Technical Services LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-443-9275
Videos
Agilent Technologies . . . . . 800-829-4444
D . C . Smith Consultants . . . . 800-323-3956
Espresso Engineering . . . . . . 703-847-4700
Chambers, Antennas &
Accessories
Absorbers
EMC Absorbers
ARC Technologies, Inc. . . . 978-388-2993
Braden Shielding Systems . . 918-624-2888
Cuming-Lehman Chambers, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 717-263-4101
DJM Electronics . . . . . . . . . . .866-DJM-ELEC
DMAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0031-(0)715012526
Electronic Instrument Associates
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630-924-1600
EMC Technologists . . . . . . . . 732-919-1100
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
Microwave Vision Group . . . 678-797-9172
Panashield, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 203-866-5888
TDK Corporation . . . . . . . . . . 512-258-9478
TechDream, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-800-7362
Honeycomb RF Absorbers
ARC Technologies, Inc. . . .
Braden Shielding Systems . .
EMC Technologists . . . . . . . .
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . .
Panashield, Inc. . . . . . . . . . .
TDK Corporation . . . . . . . . . .
978-388-2993
918-624-2888
732-919-1100
512-531-6400
203-866-5888
512-258-9478
Low Frequency Absorbers
ARC Technologies, Inc. . . . 978-388-2993
Cuming-Lehman Chambers, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 717-263-4101
DJM Electronics . . . . . . . . . . .866-DJM-ELEC
EMC Technologists . . . . . . . . 732-919-1100
Microwave Vision Group . . . 678-797-9172
Panashield, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 203-866-5888
TDK Corporation . . . . . . . . . . 512-258-9478
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 207
Product/Service Directory
D . C . Smith Consultants . . . . 800-323-3956
Henry Ott Consultants . . . . 973-992-1793
Montrose Compliance Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-247-5715
Phoenix Technical Group . . . 919-535-3662
Wurth Electronics Midcom . . 800-643-2661
UL Knowledge Services . . . . . 888-503-5536
Wurth Electronics Midcom . . 800-643-2661
Zone Safe Solutions . . . . . . . 775-622-0400
Product/Ser vice Director y
P ro d u ct / S e r v ic e Direc tor y
Microwave Absorbers
ARC Technologies, Inc. . . . 978-388-2993
Cuming-Lehman Chambers, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 717-263-4101
DJM Electronics . . . . . . . . . . .866-DJM-ELEC
DMAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0031-(0)715012526
EMC Technologists . . . . . . . . 732-919-1100
Microwave Vision Group . . . 678-797-9172
Panashield, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 203-866-5888
TDK Corporation . . . . . . . . . . 512-258-9478
Product/Service Directory
Anechoic Materials
Braden Shielding Systems . . 918-624-2888
Cuming-Lehman Chambers, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 717-263-4101
DMAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0031-(0)715012526
EMC Technologists . . . . . . . . 732-919-1100
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
Microwave Vision Group . . . 678-797-9172
Panashield, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 203-866-5888
TDK Corporation . . . . . . . . . . 512-258-9478
TechDream, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-800-7362
Antenna Couplers
TDK Corporation . . . . . . . . . . 512-258-9478
Teseq Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732-417-0501
Antenna Masts
ARC Technologies, Inc. . . . 978-388-2993
Braden Shielding Systems . . 918-624-2888
Com-Power Corporation . . . 714-528-8800
Electronic Instrument Associates
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630-924-1600
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
Innco Systems GmbH .0049 9435 301659 0
Lionheart Northwest . . . . . . . 425-882-2587
Sunol Sciences Corporation . 925-833-9936
Antennas
Biconical Antennas
A.H. Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . 818-998-0223
Com-Power Corporation . . . 714-528-8800
EM Software & Systems-S .A .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 21 831 1500
EMC Technologists . . . . . . . . 732-919-1100
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
Microwave Vision Group . . . 678-797-9172
Sunol Sciences Corporation . 925-833-9936
TDK Corporation . . . . . . . . . . 512-258-9478
Teseq Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732-417-0501
Broadband Antennas
A.H. Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . 818-998-0223
Applied EM Technology . . . . 410-326-6728
AR RF/Microwave Instrumentation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-933-8181
ARC Technical Resources, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-263-6486
208 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Chambers, Antennas & Accessories
Com-Power Corporation . . . 714-528-8800
EM Software & Systems-S .A .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 21 831 1500
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
Microwave Vision Group . . . 678-797-9172
Reliant EMC LLC . . . . . . . . . . . 408-600-1472
Teseq Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732-417-0501
Test Equipment Connection . 800-615-8378
EMI Test Antennas
A.H. Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . 818-998-0223
Applied EM Technology . . . . 410-326-6728
AR RF/Microwave Instrumentation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-933-8181
dB Instruments Co . . . . . . . . . 508-238-1303
Electronic Instrument Associates
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630-924-1600
EM Software & Systems-S .A .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 21 831 1500
EMC Technologists . . . . . . . . 732-919-1100
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
Fil-Coil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-467-5328
Lionheart Northwest . . . . . . . 425-882-2587
Microwave Vision Group . . . 678-797-9172
Noise Laboratory Co (NoiseKen)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 (0) 42 712 2051
Sunol Sciences Corporation . 925-833-9936
TDK Corporation . . . . . . . . . . 512-258-9478
TechDream, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-800-7362
Teseq Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732-417-0501
Horn Antennas
A.H. Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . 818-998-0223
AR RF/Microwave Instrumentation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-933-8181
Com-Power Corporation . . . 714-528-8800
EM Software & Systems-S .A .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 21 831 1500
EMC Technologists . . . . . . . . 732-919-1100
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
Fil-Coil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-467-5328
Instruments For Industry, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-467-8400
Lionheart Northwest . . . . . . . 425-882-2587
MI Technologies . . . . . . . . . 678-475-8345
Microwave Vision Group . . . 678-797-9172
Sunol Sciences Corporation . 925-833-9936
TDK Corporation . . . . . . . . . . 512-258-9478
TechDream, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-800-7362
Teseq Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732-417-0501
Log Periodic Antennas
A.H. Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . 818-998-0223
AR RF/Microwave Instrumentation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-933-8181
ARC Technical Resources, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-263-6486
Com-Power Corporation . . . 714-528-8800
EM Software & Systems-S .A .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 21 831 1500
EMC Technologists . . . . . . . . 732-919-1100
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
Instruments For Industry, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-467-8400
MI Technologies . . . . . . . . . 678-475-8345
Reliant EMC LLC . . . . . . . . . . . 408-600-1472
Sunol Sciences Corporation . 925-833-9936
TDK Corporation . . . . . . . . . . 512-258-9478
Teseq Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732-417-0501
Loop Antennas
A.H. Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . 818-998-0223
ARC Technical Resources, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-263-6486
Com-Power Corporation . . . 714-528-8800
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
Reliant EMC LLC . . . . . . . . . . . 408-600-1472
Teseq Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732-417-0501
Nonionizing Radiation Hazard
Antennas
EM Software & Systems-S .A .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 21 831 1500
Rod Antennas
A.H. Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . 818-998-0223
Com-Power Corporation . . . 714-528-8800
EM Software & Systems-S .A .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 21 831 1500
Fair-Rite Products Corp. . . 888-324-7748
Reliant EMC LLC . . . . . . . . . . . 408-600-1472
Tunable Dipole Antennas
A.H. Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . .
Com-Power Corporation . . .
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . .
MI Technologies . . . . . . . . .
Microwave Vision Group . . .
Teseq Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
818-998-0223
714-528-8800
512-531-6400
678-475-8345
678-797-9172
732-417-0501
Whip Antennas
A.H. Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . 818-998-0223
Com-Power Corporation . . . 714-528-8800
EM Software & Systems-S .A .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 21 831 1500
Laird Technologies . . . . . . . . 636-898-6215
Cells
Cells, GTEM
AR RF/Microwave Instrumentation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-933-8181
ARC Technical Resources, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-263-6486
EMC Technologists . . . . . . . . 732-919-1100
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
Reliant EMC LLC . . . . . . . . . . . 408-600-1472
www.incompliancemag.com
Chambers, Antennas & Accessories – Consulting & Services
Cells, TEM & Strip Line
ARC Technical Resources, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-263-6486
Instruments For Industry, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-467-8400
Chambers
Chambers, Anechoic
Fire Protection
Cuming-Lehman Chambers, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 717-263-4101
EMC Technologists . . . . . . . . 732-919-1100
Microwave Vision Group . . . 678-797-9172
Panashield, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 203-866-5888
Sprinkler Innovations . . . . . 800-850-6692
Helmholtz Coils
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
Injection Clamps
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
Mag Daddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-719-5600
Sensors/Transducers, RF Field
Test Equipment Connection . 800-615-8378
Shielded Buildings
Audivo GmbH . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 9435 5419 0
Braden Shielding Systems . . 918-624-2888
Cuming-Lehman Chambers, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 717-263-4101
Fil-Coil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-467-5328
Microwave Vision Group . . . 678-797-9172
Panashield, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 203-866-5888
Raymond EMC Enclosures Ltd .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-362-1495
Shielded Rooms/Chambers
TÜV SÜD America Inc. . . . . 800-888-0123
Universal Shielding . . . . . . . . 800-645-5578
Chambers, Reverberation/
Mode-Stirred
Audivo GmbH . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 9435 5419 0
Braden Shielding Systems . . 918-624-2888
EM Software & Systems-S .A .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 21 831 1500
Select Fabricators, Inc . . . . . . 888-599-6113
TDK Corporation . . . . . . . . . . 972-409-4519
Universal Shielding . . . . . . . . 800-645-5578
ARC Technical Resources, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-263-6486
Audivo GmbH . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 9435 5419 0
Braden Shielding Systems . . 918-624-2888
Cuming-Lehman Chambers, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 717-263-4101
DJM Electronics . . . . . . . . . . .866-DJM-ELEC
Electronic Instrument Associates
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630-924-1600
EMC Technologists . . . . . . . . 732-919-1100
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
Magnetic Shield Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-766-7800
MI Technologies . . . . . . . . . 678-475-8345
Microwave Vision Group . . . 678-797-9172
NTS Rockford . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-270-2516
NTS Tinton Falls . . . . . . . . . . . 732-936-0800
Panashield, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 203-866-5888
Raymond EMC Enclosures Ltd .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-362-1495
Turntables
Braden Shielding Systems . . 918-624-2888
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
Innco Systems GmbH . . . 49 9435 301659 0
Mag Daddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-719-5600
NTS Newark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
Sunol Sciences Corporation . 925-833-9936
Consulting & Services
Calibration & Repair Services
Aum Electro Technology Pvt Ltd
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 00912512871365
Dynamic Sciences International
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-966-3713
Ergonomics, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-862-0102
ESDEMC Technology LLC . . . 877-864-8479
eti Conformity Services . . . . . 877-468-6384
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
HCT Co ., Ltd . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82-31-645-6454
Liberty Labs, Inc. . . . . . . . . . 712-773-2199
Noise Laboratory Co (NoiseKen)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 (0) 42 712 2051
Prostat Corporation . . . . . . . . 630-238-8883
Reliant EMC LLC . . . . . . . . . . . 408-600-1472
Restor Metrology . . . . . . . . . . 877-220-5554
SE Laboratories . . . . . . . . . . . 800-939-CALS
Teseq Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732-417-0501
Thermo Fisher Scientific
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-275-0800 x2302
World Cal, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . 712-764-2197
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 209
Product/Service Directory
ARC Technical Resources, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-263-6486
Audivo GmbH . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 9435 5419 0
Braden Shielding Systems . . 918-624-2888
Cuming-Lehman Chambers, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 717-263-4101
DMAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0031-(0)715012526
Electronic Instrument Associates
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630-924-1600
EMC Technologists . . . . . . . . 732-919-1100
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
Innco Systems GmbH . . . 49 9435 301659 0
Lionheart Northwest . . . . . . . 425-882-2587
MI Technologies . . . . . . . . . 678-475-8345
Microwave Vision Group . . . 678-797-9172
NTS Fremont . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
NTS Rockford . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-270-2516
NTS Tinton Falls . . . . . . . . . . . 732-936-0800
Panashield, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 203-866-5888
Raymond EMC Enclosures Ltd .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-362-1495
TDK Corporation . . . . . . . . . . 512-258-9478
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
Lionheart Northwest . . . . . . . 425-882-2587
Microwave Vision Group . . . 678-797-9172
NTS Rockford . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-270-2516
Panashield, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 203-866-5888
Sunol Sciences Corporation . 925-833-9936
Universal Shielding . . . . . . . . 800-645-5578
Product/Ser vice Director y
P ro d u ct / S e r v ic e Direc tor y
Conductive Painting Services
Protective Industrial Polymers
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-361-3331
Staticworx Flooring . . . . .888-STATICWORX
Consultants
Consultants, Cleanroom/Static Control
BestESD Technical Services . 831-824-4052
Stephen Halperin & Associates
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630-238-8883
Product/Service Directory
Consultants, EMC
Advanced ESD Services + . . . 607-759-8133
Alion Science and Technology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 610-825-1960
American Certification Body, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-847-4700
André Consulting, Inc. . . . . 206-406-8371
ARC Technical Resources, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-263-6486
Atlas Compliance & Engineering
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-573-9742
BestESD Technical Services . 831-824-4052
Braden Shielding Systems . . 918-624-2888
CKC Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . . 800-500-4362
Compatible Electronics, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 650-417-EMC1 (3621)
Compliance & More, Inc . . . 303-663-3396
Compliance Management Group
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-281-5985
D . C . Smith Consultants . . . . 800-323-3956
D .L .S . Electronic Systems, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-537-6400
Dayton T . Brown, Inc . . . . . . . 800-TEST-456
Design Chain Associates, LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .866-322-7676 x2
DNB Engineering, Inc . . . . . . . 714-870-7781
Don HEIRMAN Consultants732-741-7723
Electronics Test Centre . . . . 613-599-6800
Elite Electronic Engineering . . 800-ELITE-11
EMC Compliance . . . . . . . . . . 256-650-5261
EMC Testing Laboratories, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770-475-8819
EMCC DR . RASEK . . . . . . . . . . 49-9194-9016
EMCplus LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303-663-3396
EMI Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-206-9960
ESDEMC Technology LLC . . . 877-864-8479
F2 Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-405-1580
G&M Compliance, Inc . . . . . . 714-628-1020
Garwood Laboratories . . . . . 888-427-4111
Go Global Compliance Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-416-3772
H .B . Compliance Solutions . . 480-684-2969
Henry Ott Consultants . . . . 973-992-1793
Hoolihan EMC Consulting . 651-213-0966
International Certification Services, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-286-6888
IQS, a Division of CMG . . . . . 508-460-1400
Jastech EMC Consulting LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-876-4810
210 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Consulting & Services
JDM LABS LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-630-2769
Kimmel Gerke Associates, Ltd.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-EMI-GURU
LCR Electronics, Inc. . . . . . . 800-527-4362
Lewis Bass International . . . . 408-942-8000
LS Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262-375-4400
Montrose Compliance Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-247-5715
NCEE Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-567-6860
Nemko Canada . . . . . . . . . . . 613-737-9680
NexTek, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-486-0582
NTS - Corporate HQ . . . . . . 800-270-2516
NTS Newark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
NTS Northeast . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-723-2687
NTS Rockford . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-270-2516
NTS Tinton Falls . . . . . . . . . . . 732-936-0800
Oxford University Technology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 (0)1865 286958
Phoenix Technical Group . . . 919-535-3662
Pulver Laboratories Inc . . . . . 800-635-3050
Raymond EMC Enclosures Ltd .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-362-1495
RTF Compliance . . . . . . . . . . 949-813-6095
SIEMIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-526-1188
SILENT Solutions LLC . . 603-578-1842 x203
Spectrum EMC Consulting, LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 651-688-0634
Telcron LLC
Test Site Services Inc . . . . . . . 508-962-1662
TestingPartners .com . . . . . . . 862-243-2329
Van Doren Company . . . . . . . 573-341-4097
Versus Global Certifications Pty Ltd .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 83 5140709
WEMS Electronics . . . . . . . . . 310-962-4410
Wyatt Technical Services LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-443-9275
Consultants, EU
Alberi EcoTech . . . . . . . . . . . . 702-677-6923
Atlas Compliance & Engineering
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-573-9742
Compliance & More, Inc . . . 303-663-3396
Compliance Management Group
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-281-5985
CQC Co LTD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 509959591
CSIA, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503-489-8006
D .L .S . Electronic Systems, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-537-6400
Design Chain Associates, LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .866-322-7676 x2
EMC Testing Laboratories, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770-475-8819
EMCplus LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303-663-3396
Ergonomics, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-862-0102
H .B . Compliance Solutions . . 480-684-2969
International Certification Services, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-286-6888
IQS, a Division of CMG . . . . . 508-460-1400
LS Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262-375-4400
Montrose Compliance Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-247-5715
NCEE Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-567-6860
NTS Rockford . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-270-2516
O'Brien Compliance Management
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-970-0525
Phoenix Technical Group . . . 919-535-3662
Pulver Laboratories Inc . . . . . 800-635-3050
SIEMIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-526-1188
Spectrum EMC Consulting, LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 651-688-0634
Technology Forecasters Inc .
TestingPartners .com . . . . . . . 862-243-2329
Versus Global Certifications Pty Ltd .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 83 5140709
Wyatt Technical Services LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-443-9275
Consultants, GOST
American Certification Body, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-847-4700
CQC Co LTD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 509959591
CSIA, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503-489-8006
G&M Compliance, Inc . . . . . . 714-628-1020
Go Global Compliance Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-416-3772
MC Global Access . . . . . . . . . 760-696-3700
Nemko Canada . . . . . . . . . . . 613-737-9680
TestingPartners .com . . . . . . . 862-243-2329
Versus Global Certifications Pty Ltd .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 83 5140709
Consultants, Lightning Protection
American Certification Body, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-847-4700
André Consulting, Inc. . . . . 206-406-8371
D . C . Smith Consultants . . . . 800-323-3956
Dayton T . Brown, Inc . . . . . . . 800-TEST-456
DNB Engineering, Inc . . . . . . . 714-870-7781
Elite Electronic Engineering . . 800-ELITE-11
EMI Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-206-9960
Garwood Laboratories . . . . . 888-427-4111
NTS Northeast . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-723-2687
NTS Pittsfield . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-270-2516
Spectrum EMC Consulting, LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 651-688-0634
WEMS Electronics . . . . . . . . . 310-962-4410
Consultants, Medical Device
Alberi EcoTech . . . . . . . . . . . . 702-677-6923
American Certification Body, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-847-4700
CertifiGroup Inc . . . . . . . . . . . 800-422-1651
CKC Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . . 800-500-4362
Compliance Management Group
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-281-5985
D .L .S . Electronic Systems, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-537-6400
Design Chain Associates, LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .866-322-7676 x2
DNB Engineering, Inc . . . . . . . 714-870-7781
Eisner Safety Consultants . . . 503-244-6151
www.incompliancemag.com
Product/Ser vice Director y
Consulting & Services
Consultants, Product Safety
Abstraction Engineering Inc . 408-258-3282
CSIA, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503-489-8006
D .L .S . Electronic Systems, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-537-6400
Dayton T . Brown, Inc . . . . . . . 800-TEST-456
Design Chain Associates, LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .866-322-7676 x2
DNB Engineering, Inc . . . . . . . 714-870-7781
Eisner Safety Consultants . . . 503-244-6151
EMC Testing Laboratories, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770-475-8819
EMCplus LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303-663-3396
Ergonomics, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-862-0102
F2 Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-405-1580
G&M Compliance, Inc . . . . . . 714-628-1020
Garwood Laboratories . . . . . 888-427-4111
Go Global Compliance Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-416-3772
IQS, a Division of CMG . . . . . 508-460-1400
Lewis Bass International . . . . 408-942-8000
Montrose Compliance Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-247-5715
NCEE Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-567-6860
Nemko Canada . . . . . . . . . . . 613-737-9680
NTS Newark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
NTS Northeast . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-723-2687
O'Brien Compliance Management
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-970-0525
Phoenix Technical Group . . . 919-535-3662
Product Safety Consulting . . 877-804-3066
Pulver Laboratories Inc . . . . . 800-635-3050
RTF Compliance . . . . . . . . . . 949-813-6095
SIEMIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-526-1188
Telcron LLC
Test Site Services Inc . . . . . . . 508-962-1662
TestingPartners .com . . . . . . . 862-243-2329
Trace Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . 410-584-9099
Versus Global Certifications Pty Ltd .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 83 5140709
Consultants, Quality
Alberi EcoTech . . . . . . . . . . . . 702-677-6923
American Certification Body, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-847-4700
CASE Forensics . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-736-1106
CertifiGroup Inc . . . . . . . . . . . 800-422-1651
Compliance & More, Inc . . . 303-663-3396
Compliance Management Group
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-281-5985
Alberi EcoTech . . . . . . . . . . . . 702-677-6923
American Certification Body, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-847-4700
CASE Forensics . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-736-1106
Design Chain Associates, LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .866-322-7676 x2
Eisner Safety Consultants . . . 503-244-6151
Ergonomics, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-862-0102
NTS Newark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
O'Brien Compliance Management
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-970-0525
Pulver Laboratories Inc . . . . . 800-635-3050
Trace Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . 410-584-9099
Unitek, A Division of NQA . . 800-998-9395
Consultants, Telecom
CSIA, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503-489-8006
CV DIMULTI . . . . . . . . . . . . .6212132608337
D . C . Smith Consultants . . . . 800-323-3956
D .L .S . Electronic Systems, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-537-6400
Elite Electronic Engineering . . 800-ELITE-11
EMC Testing Laboratories, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770-475-8819
Garwood Laboratories . . . . . 888-427-4111
Go Global Compliance Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-416-3772
MC Global Access . . . . . . . . . 760-696-3700
Nemko Canada . . . . . . . . . . . 613-737-9680
NTS - Corporate HQ . . . . . . 800-270-2516
NTS Newark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
SIEMIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-526-1188
Test Site Services Inc . . . . . . . 508-962-1662
Versus Global Certifications Pty Ltd .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 83 5140709
Consultants, Tempest
American Certification Body, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-847-4700
André Consulting, Inc. . . . . 206-406-8371
Braden Shielding Systems . . 918-624-2888
Dayton T . Brown, Inc . . . . . . . 800-TEST-456
General Dynamics C4 Systems
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 480-441-5321
NexTek, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-486-0582
Raymond EMC Enclosures Ltd .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-362-1495
Consultants, Transients
American Certification Body, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-847-4700
BestESD Technical Services . 831-824-4052
D . C . Smith Consultants . . . . 800-323-3956
D .L .S . Electronic Systems, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-537-6400
DNB Engineering, Inc . . . . . . . 714-870-7781
Kimmel Gerke Associates, Ltd.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-EMI-GURU
NexTek, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-486-0582
Pulver Laboratories Inc . . . . . 800-635-3050
SILENT Solutions LLC . . 603-578-1842 x203
Spectrum EMC Consulting, LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 651-688-0634
WEMS Electronics . . . . . . . . . 310-962-4410
Consultants, VCCI
American Certification Body, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-847-4700
Atlas Compliance & Engineering
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-573-9742
Compliance & More, Inc . . . 303-663-3396
Compliance Management Group
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-281-5985
CSIA, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503-489-8006
D .L .S . Electronic Systems, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-537-6400
EMCplus LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303-663-3396
Go Global Compliance Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-416-3772
H .B . Compliance Solutions . . 480-684-2969
Nemko Canada . . . . . . . . . . . 613-737-9680
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 211
Product/Service Directory
Elite Electronic Engineering . . 800-ELITE-11
EMC Testing Laboratories, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770-475-8819
F2 Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-405-1580
G&M Compliance, Inc . . . . . . 714-628-1020
Garwood Laboratories . . . . . 888-427-4111
Go Global Compliance Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-416-3772
International Certification Services, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-286-6888
Kimmel Gerke Associates, Ltd.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-EMI-GURU
Montrose Compliance Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-247-5715
The MuShield Company Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-669-3539
NCEE Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-567-6860
Nemko Canada . . . . . . . . . . . 613-737-9680
NTS Newark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
NTS Northeast . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-723-2687
O'Brien Compliance Management
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-970-0525
Product Safety Consulting . . 877-804-3066
Pulver Laboratories Inc . . . . . 800-635-3050
SILENT Solutions LLC . . 603-578-1842 x203
Test Site Services Inc . . . . . . . 508-962-1662
Trace Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . 410-584-9099
Versus Global Certifications Pty Ltd .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 83 5140709
P ro d u ct / S e r v ic e Direc tor y
Product/Service Directory
Design Services
American Certification Body, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-847-4700
BestESD Technical Services . 831-824-4052
Bittele Electronics . . . . . . . . . 416-800-7540
CKC Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . . 800-500-4362
D .L .S . Electronic Systems, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-537-6400
DDB Unlimited, Inc . . . . . . . . 800-753-8459
DNB Engineering, Inc . . . . . . . 714-870-7781
EMC Compliance . . . . . . . . . . 256-650-5261
F2 Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-405-1580
High Voltage Maintenance . 866-486-8326
IQS, a Division of CMG . . . . . 508-460-1400
Jastech EMC Consulting LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-876-4810
K-Form, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-450-4401
Keystone Compliance . . . . . . 724-657-9940
LCR Electronics, Inc. . . . . . . 800-527-4362
LS Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262-375-4400
MAJR Products, Inc . . . . . . . . . 877-625-7776
Montrose Compliance Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-247-5715
NCEE Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-567-6860
Nexlogic Technologies, Inc . . 866-845-1197
NexTek, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-486-0582
NTS Albuquerque . . . . . . . . . 505-821-4740
NTS Northeast . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-723-2687
Pulver Laboratories Inc . . . . . 800-635-3050
SILENT Solutions LLC . . 603-578-1842 x203
TestingPartners .com . . . . . . . 862-243-2329
Vermillion, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305-968-5981
VEROCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 954-990-7544
WEMS Electronics . . . . . . . . . 310-962-4410
Equipment Rental & Leasing
Dynamic Sciences International
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-966-3713
EMCC DR . RASEK . . . . . . . . . . 49-9194-9016
Ergonomics, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-862-0102
Thermo Fisher Scientific
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-275-0800 x2302
Manufacturers’ Representatives
Comply Tek, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-674-6155
Shielded Enclosure Design,
Relocation Services
André Consulting, Inc. . . . . 206-406-8371
ARC Technical Resources, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-263-6486
DDB Unlimited, Inc . . . . . . . . 800-753-8459
K-Form, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-450-4401
Magnetic Shield Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-766-7800
MAJR Products, Inc . . . . . . . . . 877-625-7776
Microwave Vision Group . . . 678-797-9172
The MuShield Company Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-669-3539
212 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Consulting & Services – Electrical & Electronic Components
Raymond EMC Enclosures Ltd .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-362-1495
Universal Shielding . . . . . . . . 800-645-5578
Site Attenuation Testing Services
Alion Science and Technology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 610-825-1960
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
Raymond EMC Enclosures Ltd .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-362-1495
Retlif Testing Laboratories
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-737-1500 x111
TestingPartners .com . . . . . . . 862-243-2329
Universal Shielding . . . . . . . . 800-645-5578
Air Filters
EMI Air Filters
Alco Technologies, Inc . . . . . . 310-328-4770
JEMIC Shielding Technology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 717-232-1030
MAJR Products, Inc . . . . . . . . . 877-625-7776
Shielded Air Filters
Alco Technologies, Inc . . . . . . 310-328-4770
Site Survey Services
Alion Science and Technology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 610-825-1960
ARC Technical Resources, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-263-6486
D . C . Smith Consultants . . . . 800-323-3956
Dayton T . Brown, Inc . . . . . . . 800-TEST-456
DNB Engineering, Inc . . . . . . . 714-870-7781
eti Conformity Services . . . . . 877-468-6384
F2 Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-405-1580
Garwood Laboratories . . . . . 888-427-4111
High Voltage Maintenance . 866-486-8326
Magnetic Shield Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-766-7800
Raymond EMC Enclosures Ltd .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-362-1495
Retlif Testing Laboratories
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-737-1500 x111
RMV Technology Group, LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 650-964-4792
Stephen Halperin & Associates
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630-238-8883
TestingPartners .com . . . . . . . 862-243-2329
Electrical & Electronic
Components
Adapters
Admired Services Components
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 727-346-5157
Americor Electronics Ltd . . . . 800-830-5337
Conec Corporation . . . . . . . . 919-460-8800
Global Test Equipment . . . . . 866-409-0400
Instruments For Industry, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-467-8400
Murata Electronics . . . . . . . . . 800-554-4070
Power Dynamics, Inc . . . . . . . 973-560-0019
Sabritec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-250-1244
JEMIC Shielding Technology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 717-232-1030
MAJR Products, Inc . . . . . . . . . 877-625-7776
Arrestors
CITEL, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Okaya Electric America, Inc . .
TDK-EPC Corporation . . . . . .
Texas Spectrum Electronics .
800-248-3548
800-852-0122
800-888-7728
972-296-3699
Attenuators
BMI Surplus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-871-8868
Global Test Equipment . . . . . 866-409-0400
Instruments For Industry, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-467-8400
Backplanes
Schurter Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-848-2600
Backshells
Admired Services Components
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 727-346-5157
Conec Corporation . . . . . . . . 919-460-8800
Power Dynamics, Inc . . . . . . . 973-560-0019
Sabritec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-250-1244
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Product/Ser vice Director y
Electrical & Electronic Components
Bluetooth Modules
Laird Technologies . . . . . . . .
LS Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mag Daddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Murata Electronics . . . . . . . . .
636-898-6215
262-375-4400
847-719-5600
800-554-4070
Breakers
Clarion Safety Systems . . . . . 800-748-0241
eti Conformity Services . . . . . 877-468-6384
Mag Daddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-719-5600
Cabinets/Enclosures
Clarion Safety Systems . . . . . 800-748-0241
DDB Unlimited, Inc . . . . . . . . 800-753-8459
K-Form, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-450-4401
Cable Assemblies
Circuit Breakers
Bittele Electronics . . . . . . . . .
eti Conformity Services . . . . .
Interpower Corporation . .
Schurter Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Texas Spectrum Electronics .
Diodes
Admired Services Components
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 727-346-5157
André Consulting, Inc. . . . . 206-406-8371
Mag Daddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-719-5600
Sabritec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-250-1244
Electronic Cooling Fans
Americor Electronics Ltd . . . . 800-830-5337
Mag Daddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-719-5600
Fuses
Admired Services Components
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 727-346-5157
eti Conformity Services . . . . . 877-468-6384
Interpower Corporation . . 800-662-2290
Schurter Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-848-2600
Grounding Rods
Mag Daddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-719-5600
416-800-7540
877-468-6384
800-662-2290
800-848-2600
972-296-3699
Connectors
Admired Services Components
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 727-346-5157
Amphenol Canada Corp . . . . 416-754-5688
API Technologies Corp . . . . . 855-294-3800
ARC Technologies, Inc. . . . 978-388-2993
Conec Corporation . . . . . . . . 919-460-8800
EMI Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-206-9960
eti Conformity Services . . . . . 877-468-6384
Global Test Equipment . . . . . 866-409-0400
Interpower Corporation . . 800-662-2290
LCR Electronics, Inc. . . . . . . 800-527-4362
Mag Daddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-719-5600
Power Dynamics, Inc . . . . . . . 973-560-0019
Sabritec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-250-1244
Schurter Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-848-2600
Wurth Electronics Midcom . . 800-643 2661
Couplers
AR RF/Microwave Instrumentation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-933-8181
BMI Surplus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-871-8868
Conec Corporation . . . . . . . . 919-460-8800
Impedance Matching Networks
AR RF/Microwave Instrumentation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-933-8181
Inductors
EMI/RFI Inductors
Americor Electronics Ltd . . . .
André Consulting, Inc. . . . .
API Technologies Corp . . . . .
Fair-Rite Products Corp. . .
LCR Electronics, Inc. . . . . . .
TDK-EPC Corporation . . . . . .
WEMS Electronics . . . . . . . . .
Wurth Electronics Midcom . .
BMI Surplus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-871-8868
Global Test Equipment . . . . . 866-409-0400
Nexlogic Technologies, Inc . . 866-845-1197
LEDs and Displays
Admired Services Components
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 727-346-5157
Audivo GmbH . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 9435 5419 0
Mag Daddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-719-5600
Okaya Electric America, Inc . . 800-852-0122
Liquid Crystal Display (LCD)
Modules
Mag Daddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-719-5600
Military (MIL-SPEC) Connectors
Admired Services Components
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 727-346-5157
André Consulting, Inc. . . . . 206-406-8371
API Technologies Corp . . . . . 855-294-3800
BMI Surplus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-871-8868
EMC Technologists . . . . . . . . 732-919-1100
LCR Electronics, Inc. . . . . . . 800-527-4362
Mag Daddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-719-5600
Oscillators
API Technologies Corp . . . . . 855-294-3800
Applied EM Technology . . . . 410-326-6728
Giga-tronics Incorporated . . 800-277-9764
Potentiometers
API Technologies Corp . . . . . 855-294-3800
Global Test Equipment . . . . . 866-409-0400
Murata Electronics . . . . . . . . . 800-554-4070
Resonators
800-830-5337
206-406-8371
855-294-3800
888-324-7748
800-527-4362
800-888-7728
310-962-4410
800-643 2661
Surface Mount Inductors
Fair-Rite Products Corp. . . 888-324-7748
TDK-EPC Corporation . . . . . . 800-888-7728
Wurth Electronics Midcom . . 800-643 2661
Swtichmode Inductors
TDK-EPC Corporation . . . . . . 800-888-7728
Wurth Electronics Midcom . . 800-643 2661
Integrated Circuits
Admired Services Components
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 727-346-5157
Admired Services Components
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 727-346-5157
TDK-EPC Corporation . . . . . . 800-888-7728
RF Frequency Converters
API Technologies Corp . . . . . 855-294-3800
Global Test Equipment . . . . . 866-409-0400
Oak-Mitsui Technologies . 518-686-4961
Test Equipment Connection . 800-615-8378
Solid State Relays
Americor Electronics Ltd . . . . 800-830-5337
Global Test Equipment . . . . . 866-409-0400
Surge Suppressors
CITEL, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-248-3548
Fil-Coil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-467-5328
Fischer Custom Communications
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310-303-3300
Murata Electronics . . . . . . . . . 800-554-4070
Okaya Electric America, Inc . . 800-852-0122
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 213
Product/Service Directory
Americor Electronics Ltd . . . . 800-830-5337
Bittele Electronics . . . . . . . . . 416-800-7540
CMD Ltd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .441709829511
Global Test Equipment . . . . . 866-409-0400
Lionheart Northwest . . . . . . . 425-882-2587
Mag Daddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-719-5600
Michigan Scientific Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-685-3939 x111
Vermillion, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305-968-5981
EM TEST USA . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-450-0085
Instruments For Industry, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-467-8400
Murata Electronics . . . . . . . . . 800-554-4070
Reliant EMC LLC . . . . . . . . . . . 408-600-1472
TDK Corporation . . . . . . . . . . 512-258-9478
Teseq Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732-417-0501
P ro d u ct / S e r v ic e Direc tor y
Surge Suppressors continued
TDK-EPC Corporation . . . . . . 800-888-7728
Texas Spectrum Electronics . 972-296-3699
WEMS Electronics . . . . . . . . . 310-962-4410
Switches
Admired Services Components
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 727-346-5157
eti Conformity Services . . . . . 877-468-6384
Interpower Corporation . . 800-662-2290
The MuShield Company Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-669-3539
Schurter Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-848-2600
Wurth Electronics Midcom . . 800-643 2661
Product/Service Directory
Terminal Blocks
Americor Electronics Ltd . . . .
Curtis Industries . . . . . . . . . . .
eti Conformity Services . . . . .
Global Test Equipment . . . . .
Interpower Corporation . .
Mag Daddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Texas Spectrum Electronics .
Wurth Electronics Midcom . .
800-830-5337
800-657-0853
877-468-6384
866-409-0400
800-662-2290
847-719-5600
972-296-3699
800-643 2661
Thyristors
Admired Services Components
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 727-346-5157
Transformers
Transformers, Power Line Isolation
Clarion Safety Systems . . . . . 800-748-0241
Elna Magnetics . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-553-2870
Wurth Electronics Midcom . . 800-643 2661
Transformers, Signal Line Isolation
Elna Magnetics . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-553-2870
Wurth Electronics Midcom . . 800-643 2661
Transformers, Telecommunications
Wurth Electronics Midcom . . 800-643 2661
Transformers, Third-Party Approved,
EU
Americor Electronics Ltd . . . . 800-830-5337
Clarion Safety Systems . . . . . 800-748-0241
Transformers, Third-Party Approved,
US/Canada
Americor Electronics Ltd . . . . 800-830-5337
Clarion Safety Systems . . . . . 800-748-0241
eti Conformity Services . . . . . 877-468-6384
Transformers, Toroidal
The MuShield Company Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-669-3539
214 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Electrical & Electronic Components
Pearson Electronics, Inc . . . 650-494-6444
Wurth Electronics Midcom . . 800-643 2661
Varistors
BMI Surplus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-871-8868
TDK-EPC Corporation . . . . . . 800-888-7728
Wurth Electronics Midcom . . 800-643 2661
Capacitors, Mains (X and Y)
3Gmetalworx Inc . . . . . . . . . . .
Americor Electronics Ltd . . . .
Captor Corporation . . . . . . . .
LCR Electronics, Inc. . . . . . .
Okaya Electric America, Inc . .
WEMS Electronics . . . . . . . . .
888-965-3634
800-830-5337
937-667-8484
800-527-4362
800-852-0122
310-962-4410
Capacitors, Planar Array
EMC/EMI Control
3Gmetalworx Inc . . . . . . . . . . . 888-965-3634
Amphenol Canada Corp . . . . 416-754-5688
Oak-Mitsui Technologies . 518-686-4961
Air Cooling Systems
3Gmetalworx Inc . . . . . . . . . . . 888-965-3634
DDB Unlimited, Inc . . . . . . . . 800-753-8459
HM Cragg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-672-7244
Parker Hannifin, Chomerics Div
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-935-4850
Architectural Shielding Products
3Gmetalworx Inc . . . . . . . . . . . 888-965-3634
Fil-Coil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-467-5328
Arrestors, Lightning and Surge
NTS Pittsfield . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-270-2516
Okaya Electric America, Inc . . 800-852-0122
Texas Spectrum Electronics . 972-296-3699
Braid, Bonding, and Grounding
Accessories
DDB Unlimited, Inc . . . . . . . . 800-753-8459
Chokes
3Gmetalworx Inc . . . . . . . . . . .
Adams Magnetic Products . .
André Consulting, Inc. . . . .
Captor Corporation . . . . . . . .
Corcom/Tyco Electronics . . .
Elna Magnetics . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fair-Rite Products Corp. . .
LCR Electronics, Inc. . . . . . .
Murata Electronics . . . . . . . . .
Schaffner EMC Inc .
Schurter Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TechDream, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . .
WEMS Electronics . . . . . . . . .
Wurth Electronics Midcom . .
888-965-3634
800-275-6312
206-406-8371
937-667-8484
847-573-6504
800-553-2870
888-324-7748
800-527-4362
800-554-4070
800-848-2600
408-800-7362
310-962-4410
800-643 2661
Conductive Additives
Capacitors, Ceramic
André Consulting, Inc. . . . . 206-406-8371
API Technologies Corp . . . . . 855-294-3800
LCR Electronics, Inc. . . . . . . 800-527-4362
Capacitors, Decoupling
937-667-8484
518-686-4961
505-243-1423
512-258-9478
408-800-7362
Capacitors, Electrolytic
3Gmetalworx Inc . . . . . . . . . . . 888-965-3634
LCR Electronics, Inc. . . . . . . 800-527-4362
Parker Hannifin, Chomerics Div
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-935-4850
Conductive Adhesive
Parker Hannifin, Chomerics Div
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-935-4850
Conductive Epoxy
3Gmetalworx Inc . . . . . . . . . . . 888-965-3634
Parker Hannifin, Chomerics Div
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-935-4850
Protective Industrial Polymers
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-361-3331
VTI Vacuum Technologies, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-482-1941
Conductive Foam
Capacitors, Filter
3Gmetalworx Inc . . . . . . . . . . .
Americor Electronics Ltd . . . .
André Consulting, Inc. . . . .
API Technologies Corp . . . . .
LCR Electronics, Inc. . . . . . .
Solar Electronics Company .
WEMS Electronics . . . . . . . . .
3Gmetalworx Inc . . . . . . . . . . . 888-965-3634
Conductive Materials
Capacitors
Captor Corporation . . . . . . . .
Oak-Mitsui Technologies .
Quell Corporation . . . . . . . .
TDK Corporation . . . . . . . . . .
TechDream, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . .
Capacitors, Tantalum
888-965-3634
800-830-5337
206-406-8371
855-294-3800
800-527-4362
800-952-5302
310-962-4410
3Gmetalworx Inc . . . . . . . . . . . 888-965-3634
JEMIC Shielding Technology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 717-232-1030
Leader Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-TECH EMI
Orbel Corporation . . . . . . . . . 610-829-5000
Parker Hannifin, Chomerics Div
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-935-4850
Tech-Etch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-747-0300
www.incompliancemag.com
Product/Ser vice Director y
Electrical & Electronic Components
Conductive Laminates
JEMIC Shielding Technology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 717-232-1030
Conductive Lubricants
Parker Hannifin, Chomerics Div
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-935-4850
Conductive Plastics
Filter Coils
Parker Hannifin, Chomerics Div
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-935-4850
Connector Fingers
Cord Sets, EMI
888-965-3634
800-830-5337
937-667-8484
732-919-1100
800-527-4362
973-560-0019
800-848-2600
Ferrite Beads, Rods and Forms
Adams Magnetic Products . . 800-275-6312
André Consulting, Inc. . . . . 206-406-8371
Dexter Magnetic Technologies
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800 317 2537
Elna Magnetics . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-553-2870
Fair-Rite Products Corp. . . 888-324-7748
Captor Corporation . . . . . . . .
Fil-Coil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LCR Electronics, Inc. . . . . . .
Texas Spectrum Electronics .
WEMS Electronics . . . . . . . . .
Filters, EMC Test Chamber
Captor Corporation . . . . . . . . 937-667-8484
Corcom/Tyco Electronics . . . 847-573-6504
DJM Electronics . . . . . . . . . . .866-DJM-ELEC
Panashield, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 203-866-5888
Spira Manufacturing Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-98-SPIRA
TDK Corporation . . . . . . . . . . 512-258-9478
Filters, Power Line
937-667-8484
631-467-5328
800-527-4362
972-296-3699
310-962-4410
Filter Pins
EMI Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-206-9960
Quell Corporation . . . . . . . . 505-243-1423
Filtered Connectors
EMI Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-206-9960
Quell Corporation . . . . . . . . 505-243-1423
Filters
Filters, Absorptive
Captor Corporation . . . . . . . . 937-667-8484
Captor Corporation . . . . . . . .
Corcom/Tyco Electronics . . .
Curtis Industries . . . . . . . . . . .
DNB Engineering, Inc . . . . . . .
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . .
Genisco Filter Corp . . . . . . . .
LCR Electronics, Inc. . . . . . .
Murata Electronics . . . . . . . . .
NexTek, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Okaya Electric America, Inc . .
OnFILTER, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Panashield, Inc. . . . . . . . . . .
Reliant EMC LLC . . . . . . . . . . .
Schaffner EMC Inc .
Schurter Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Texas Spectrum Electronics .
Tri-Mag, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
WEMS Electronics . . . . . . . . .
937-667-8484
847-573-6504
800-657-0853
714-870-7781
512-531-6400
858-565-7405
800-527-4362
800-554-4070
978-486-0582
800-852-0122
831-824-4052
203-866-5888
408-600-1472
800-848-2600
972-296-3699
559-651-2222
310-962-4410
Filters, Antenna
Captor Corporation . . . . . . . .
Murata Electronics . . . . . . . . .
Oak-Mitsui Technologies .
WEMS Electronics . . . . . . . . .
937-667-8484
800-554-4070
518-686-4961
310-962-4410
Filters, EMC and RFI
André Consulting, Inc. . . . . 206-406-8371
API Technologies Corp . . . . . 855-294-3800
Curtis Industries . . . . . . . . . . . 800-657-0853
DJM Electronics . . . . . . . . . . .866-DJM-ELEC
EMI Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-206-9960
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
Filconn Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 480 222 3565
Genisco Filter Corp . . . . . . . . 858-565-7405
Jastech EMC Consulting LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-876-4810
LCR Electronics, Inc. . . . . . . 800-527-4362
NexTek, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-486-0582
Oak-Mitsui Technologies . 518-686-4961
Parker Hannifin, Chomerics Div
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-935-4850
Schaffner EMC Inc .
Schurter Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-848-2600
Solar Electronics Company . 800-952-5302
Spira Manufacturing Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-98-SPIRA
Tri-Mag, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 559-651-2222
WEMS Electronics . . . . . . . . . 310-962-4410
Filters, RF and Microwave
API Technologies Corp . . . . . 855-294-3800
ESDEMC Technology LLC . . . 877-864-8479
Filconn Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 480 222 3565
Lionheart Northwest . . . . . . . 425-882-2587
Oak-Mitsui Technologies . 518-686-4961
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 215
Product/Service Directory
Alco Technologies, Inc . . . . . . 310-328-4770
East Coast Shielding . . . . . . . 908-852-9160
Fotofab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 773-463-6211
Ja-Bar Silicone Corp . . . . . . . 973-786-5000
Leader Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-TECH EMI
Orbel Corporation . . . . . . . . . 610-829-5000
Tech-Etch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-747-0300
Wurth Electronics Midcom . . 800-643 2661
3Gmetalworx Inc . . . . . . . . . . .
Americor Electronics Ltd . . . .
Captor Corporation . . . . . . . .
EMC Technologists . . . . . . . .
LCR Electronics, Inc. . . . . . .
Power Dynamics, Inc . . . . . . .
Schurter Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FerriShield . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .866-TECH-EMI
Intermark USA, Inc. . . . . . . . 408-971-2055
Laird Technologies . . . . . . . . 636-898-6215
Leader Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-TECH EMI
MAJR Products, Inc . . . . . . . . . 877-625-7776
Murata Electronics . . . . . . . . . 800-554-4070
TechDream, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-800-7362
Wurth Electronics Midcom . . 800-643 2661
P ro d u ct / S e r v ic e Direc tor y
Filters, Shielded Air
Alco Technologies, Inc. . . . . . 310-328-4770
Parker Hannifin, Chomerics Div
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-935-4850
Spira Manufacturing Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-98-SPIRA
Tech-Etch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-747-0300
Filters, Shielded Room
Product/Service Directory
Alco Technologies, Inc. . . . . . 310-328-4770
Captor Corporation . . . . . . . . 937-667-8484
DJM Electronics . . . . . . . . . . .866-DJM-ELEC
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
Genisco Filter Corp . . . . . . . . 858-565-7405
NexTek, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-486-0582
WEMS Electronics . . . . . . . . . 310-962-4410
Filters, Signal Line
Amphenol Canada Corp. . . . 416-754-5688
Captor Corporation . . . . . . . . 937-667-8484
Corcom/Tyco Electronics . . . 847-573-6504
DJM Electronics . . . . . . . . . . .866-DJM-ELEC
DNB Engineering, Inc. . . . . . . 714-870-7781
EMI Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-206-9960
Genisco Filter Corp . . . . . . . . 858-565-7405
LCR Electronics, Inc. . . . . . . 800-527-4362
Oak-Mitsui Technologies . 518-686-4961
Quell Corporation . . . . . . . . 505-243-1423
Reliant EMC LLC . . . . . . . . . . . 408-600-1472
Solar Electronics Company . 800-952-5302
TDK Corporation . . . . . . . . . . 512-258-9478
Texas Spectrum Electronics . 972-296-3699
WEMS Electronics . . . . . . . . . 310-962-4410
Filters, Third-Party Approved, EU
LCR Electronics, Inc. . . . . . . 800-527-4362
Filters, Third-Party Approved,
US/Canada
LCR Electronics, Inc. . . . . . . 800-527-4362
Finger Stock
Laird Technologies . . . . . . . . 636-898-6215
Leader Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-TECH EMI
Orbel Corporation . . . . . . . . . 610-829-5000
P & P Technology Ltd . . 44 (0)1376 550525
Foils, Shield Tape
Ad-Vance Magnetics . . . . . . . 574-223-3158
André Consulting, Inc. . . . . 206-406-8371
East Coast Shielding . . . . . . . 908-852-9160
JEMIC Shielding Technology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 717-232-1030
The MuShield Company Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-669-3539
Orbel Corporation . . . . . . . . . 610-829-5000
P & P Technology Ltd . . 44 (0)1376 550525
216 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Electrical & Electronic Components
Parker Hannifin, Chomerics Div
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-935-4850
PRISMIER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630-592-4515
TechDream, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . 408-800-7362
Gaskets
3Gmetalworx Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 888-965-3634
Alco Technologies, Inc. . . . . . 310-328-4770
East Coast Shielding . . . . . . . 908-852-9160
Fotofab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 773-463-6211
Intermark USA, Inc. . . . . . . . 408-971-2055
Ja-Bar Silicone Corp . . . . . . . 973-786-5000
JEMIC Shielding Technology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 717-232-1030
Laird Technologies . . . . . . . . 636-898-6215
Leader Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-TECH EMI
MAJR Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . 877-625-7776
Metal Textiles Corporation . 732-287-0800
Omega Shielding Products, Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-828-5784
Orbel Corporation . . . . . . . . . 610-829-5000
P & P Technology Ltd . . 44 (0)1376 550525
Parker Hannifin, Chomerics Div
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-935-4850
PRISMIER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630-592-4515
SAS Industries, Inc. . . . 631-727-1441 x302
Schlegel Electronic Materials, Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-204-0863
Spira Manufacturing Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-98-SPIRA
Tech-Etch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-747-0300
TechDream, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . 408-800-7362
Vanguard Products Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203-744-7265
VTI Vacuum Technologies, Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-482-1941
W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc.
Wurth Electronics Midcom. . 800-643 2661
3Gmetalworx Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 888-965-3634
Ad-Vance Magnetics . . . . . . . 574-223-3158
Alco Technologies, Inc. . . . . . 310-328-4770
API Technologies Corp. . . . . 855-294-3800
East Coast Shielding . . . . . . . 908-852-9160
Ja-Bar Silicone Corp . . . . . . . 973-786-5000
PRISMIER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630-592-4515
Schurter Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-848-2600
Spira Manufacturing Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-98-SPIRA
Wurth Electronics Midcom. . 800-643 2661
Zero Ground LLC . . . . . . . . . . 866-937-6463
Shielded Enclosures
3Gmetalworx Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 888-965-3634
Ad-Vance Magnetics . . . . . . . 574-223-3158
André Consulting, Inc. . . . . 206-406-8371
API Technologies Corp. . . . . 855-294-3800
Cuming-Lehman Chambers, Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 717-263-4101
DDB Unlimited, Inc . . . . . . . . 800-753-8459
Fil-Coil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-467-5328
Fotofab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 773-463-6211
K-Form, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-450-4401
Magnetic Shield Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-766-7800
The MuShield Company Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-669-3539
Panashield, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 203-866-5888
Parker Hannifin, Chomerics Div
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-935-4850
Raymond EMC Enclosures Ltd.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-362-1495
Select Fabricators, Inc. . . . . . 888-599-6113
VTI Vacuum Technologies, Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-482-1941
Shielded Modules
Resistors
Americor Electronics Ltd. . . . 800-830-5337
Shielded Cable Assemblies and
Harnesses
Alco Technologies, Inc. . . . . .
Bittele Electronics . . . . . . . . .
Electri-Flex Company . . . . . .
Vermillion, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shielded Connectors
310-328-4770
416-800-7540
800-323-6174
305-968-5981
Ad-Vance Magnetics . . . . . . . 574-223-3158
The MuShield Company Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-669-3539
Shielded Tubing
Ad-Vance Magnetics . . . . . . . 574-223-3158
Electri-Flex Company . . . . . . 800-323-6174
The MuShield Company Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-669-3539
Shielded Conduit
Americor Electronics Ltd. . . . 800-830-5337
Electri-Flex Company . . . . . . 800-323-6174
Magnetic Shield Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-766-7800
The MuShield Company Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-669-3539
Zero Ground LLC . . . . . . . . . . 866-937-6463
www.incompliancemag.com
Electrical & Electronic Components – ESD Equipment & Products
Shielded Wire and Cable
Alco Technologies, Inc . . . . . . 310-328-4770
Electri-Flex Company . . . . . . 800-323-6174
EMC Technologists . . . . . . . . 732-919-1100
Magnetic Shield Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-766-7800
Shielding Coatings
Magnetic Shield Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-766-7800
Parker Hannifin, Chomerics Div
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-935-4850
VTI Vacuum Technologies, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-482-1941
Shielding Compounds
3Gmetalworx Inc . . . . . . . . . . . 888-965-3634
Parker Hannifin, Chomerics Div
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-935-4850
Shielding Material
Shielding Material, EMI/RFI
3Gmetalworx Inc . . . . . . . . . . . 888-965-3634
Ad-Vance Magnetics . . . . . . . 574-223-3158
Alco Technologies, Inc . . . . . . 310-328-4770
André Consulting, Inc. . . . . 206-406-8371
DDB Unlimited, Inc . . . . . . . . 800-753-8459
Dexmet Corporation . . . . . . . 203-294-7867
East Coast Shielding . . . . . . . 908-852-9160
Electri-Flex Company . . . . . . 800-323-6174
FerriShield . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .866-TECH-EMI
Fotofab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 773-463-6211
Intermark USA, Inc. . . . . . . . 408-971-2055
Shielding Material, Magnetic Field
3Gmetalworx Inc . . . . . . . . . . . 888-965-3634
Ad-Vance Magnetics . . . . . . . 574-223-3158
André Consulting, Inc. . . . . 206-406-8371
Dexmet Corporation . . . . . . . 203-294-7867
FerriShield . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .866-TECH-EMI
Fotofab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 773-463-6211
Magnetic Shield Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-766-7800
MAJR Products, Inc . . . . . . . . . 877-625-7776
Microwave Vision Group . . . 678-797-9172
The MuShield Company Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-669-3539
Orbel Corporation . . . . . . . . . 610-829-5000
Panashield, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 203-866-5888
Vermillion, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305-968-5981
VTI Vacuum Technologies, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-482-1941
Shielding, Board-Level
3Gmetalworx Inc . . . . . . . . . . . 888-965-3634
Leader Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-TECH EMI
Orbel Corporation . . . . . . . . . 610-829-5000
PRISMIER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630-592-4515
Suppressors
Suppressors, Transient
Captor Corporation . . . . . . . .
NexTek, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Okaya Electric America, Inc . .
Texas Spectrum Electronics .
WEMS Electronics . . . . . . . . .
937-667-8484
978-486-0582
800-852-0122
972-296-3699
310-962-4410
ESD Equipment & Products
Air Ionizers
3M Electronic Solutions . . . . 512-984-6747
MKS ION Systems . . . . . . . . . 800-367-2452
TREK, INC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-FOR-TREK
ESD Tape
Mag Daddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-719-5600
Polyonics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603-352-1415
Meters
Meters, Static Charge
ESDEMC Technology LLC . . . 877-864-8479
Megalin Source International
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 886-2-8698-4181
MKS ION Systems . . . . . . . . . 800-367-2452
Monroe Electronics, Inc. . . 585-765-2254
Prostat Corporation . . . . . . . . 630-238-8883
Staticworx Flooring . . . . .888-STATICWORX
TREK, INC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-FOR-TREK
Simulators
Simulators, EMP
EM TEST USA . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-450-0085
Teseq Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732-417-0501
Simulators, ESD
Advanced Test Equipment Rentals
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-558-6500
ARC Technical Resources, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-263-6486
Barth Electronics, Inc . . . . . . . 702-293-1576
EM TEST USA . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-450-0085
ESDEMC Technology LLC . . . 877-864-8479
Grund Technical Solutions, LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 510-453-2617
Haefely EMC Technology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 845-279-3644 x240
HV TECHNOLOGIES, Inc. . . 703-365-2330
Noise Laboratory Co (NoiseKen)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 (0) 42 712 2051
Teseq Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732-417-0501
Thermo Fisher Scientific
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-275-0800 x2302
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 217
Product/Service Directory
The MuShield Company Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-669-3539
Vermillion, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305-968-5981
W . L . Gore & Associates, Inc .
Zero Ground LLC . . . . . . . . . . 866-937-6463
Ja-Bar Silicone Corp . . . . . . . 973-786-5000
JEMIC Shielding Technology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 717-232-1030
Leader Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-TECH EMI
Magnetic Shield Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-766-7800
MAJR Products, Inc . . . . . . . . . 877-625-7776
Microwave Vision Group . . . 678-797-9172
The MuShield Company Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-669-3539
Omega Shielding Products, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-828-5784
Orbel Corporation . . . . . . . . . 610-829-5000
P & P Technology Ltd . . 44 (0)1376 550525
Panashield, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 203-866-5888
PRISMIER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630-592-4515
Pulver Laboratories Inc . . . . . 800-635-3050
Raymond EMC Enclosures Ltd .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-362-1495
SAS Industries, Inc . . . . 631-727-1441 x302
Schlegel Electronic Materials, Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-204-0863
Spira Manufacturing Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-98-SPIRA
Tech-Etch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-747-0300
TechDream, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-800-7362
Vermillion, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305-968-5981
VTI Vacuum Technologies, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-482-1941
W . L . Gore & Associates, Inc .
Wurth Electronics Midcom . . 800-643 2661
Zero Ground LLC . . . . . . . . . . 866-937-6463
Product/Ser vice Director y
P ro d u ct / S e r v ic e Direc tor y
Simulators, Lightning
Advanced Test Equipment Rentals
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-558-6500
EM TEST USA . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-450-0085
Haefely EMC Technology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 845-279-3644 x240
HV TECHNOLOGIES, Inc. . . 703-365-2330
Mag Daddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-719-5600
Noise Laboratory Co (NoiseKen)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 (0) 42 712 2051
NTS Pittsfield . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-270-2516
Teseq Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732-417-0501
Thermo Fisher Scientific
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-275-0800 x2302
Static Control
Product/Service Directory
Static Control Containers
3M Electronic Solutions . . . . 512-984-6747
Static Control Flooring
3M Electronic Solutions . . . . 512-984-6747
Protective Industrial Polymers
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-361-3331
ESD Equipment & Products – Materials, Adhesives & Coatings
Static Control Monitoring Equipment
3M Electronic Solutions . . . . 512-984-6747
MKS ION Systems . . . . . . . . . 800-367-2452
TREK, INC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-FOR-TREK
Static Control Packaging
3M Electronic Solutions . . . . 512-984-6747
Static Control Workstations
3M Electronic Solutions . . . . 512-984-6747
Static Control Wrist Straps
3M Electronic Solutions . . . . 512-984-6747
ESDEMC Technology LLC . . . 877-864-8479
Prostat Corporation . . . . . . . . 630-238-8883
Transient Detectors and
Suppressors
D . C . Smith Consultants . . . .
EMI Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ESDEMC Technology LLC . . .
MKS ION Systems . . . . . . . . .
Quell Corporation . . . . . . . .
Texas Spectrum Electronics .
WEMS Electronics . . . . . . . . .
800-323-3956
949-206-9960
877-864-8479
800-367-2452
505-243-1423
972-296-3699
310-962-4410
Materials, Adhesives &
Coatings
Absorbing Materials
Dexmet Corporation . . . . . . . 203-294-7867
DMAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0031-(0)715012526
Intermark USA, Inc. . . . . . . . 408-971-2055
Laird Technologies . . . . . . . . 636-898-6215
Leader Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-TECH EMI
NTS Albuquerque . . . . . . . . . 505-821-4740
Oak-Mitsui Technologies . 518-686-4961
Orbel Corporation . . . . . . . . . 610-829-5000
Panashield, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 203-866-5888
Adhesives
Staticworx Flooring . . . . .888-STATICWORX
Static Control Footwear
Staticworx Flooring . . . . .888-STATICWORX
Static Control Garments
3M Electronic Solutions . . . . 512-984-6747
Static Control Mats
3M Electronic Solutions . . . . 512-984-6747
ESDEMC Technology LLC . . . 877-864-8479
Prostat Corporation . . . . . . . . 630-238-8883
218 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Ja-Bar Silicone Corp . . . . . . . 973-786-5000
Master Bond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201-343-8983
Polyonics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603-352-1415
Staticworx Flooring . . . . .888-STATICWORX
Alloys
Ad-Vance Magnetics . . . . . . . 574-223-3158
Dexmet Corporation . . . . . . . 203-294-7867
Lubrizol Conductive Polymers
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-680-1555
Magnetic Shield Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-766-7800
The MuShield Company Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-669-3539
NTS Albuquerque . . . . . . . . . 505-821-4740
Coatings
Master Bond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201-343-8983
Krefine Co .Ltd . . . . . . . . . . . . . 520-838-0548
Polyonics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603-352-1415
Protective Industrial Polymers
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-361-3331
Staticworx Flooring . . . . .888-STATICWORX
TestingPartners .com . . . . . . . 862-243-2329
VTI Vacuum Technologies, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-482-1941
Foams and Foam Materials
Krefine Co .Ltd . . . . . . . . . . . . . 520-838-0548
Laird Technologies . . . . . . . . 636-898-6215
TechDream, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-800-7362
W . L . Gore & Associates, Inc .
Insulation
Polyonics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603-352-1415
Powders
Lubrizol Conductive Polymers
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-680-1555
Resins and Compounds
Krefine Co .Ltd . . . . . . . . . . . . . 520-838-0548
Lubrizol Conductive Polymers
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-680-1555
RTP Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-433-4787
Sealants
Master Bond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201-343-8983
W . L . Gore & Associates, Inc .
Silicone Conductive Sponge
Ja-Bar Silicone Corp . . . . . . . 973-786-5000
JEMIC Shielding Technology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 717-232-1030
P & P Technology Ltd . . 44 (0)1376 550525
Thermally Conductive Silicone
Materials
Ja-Bar Silicone Corp . . . . . . . 973-786-5000
Laird Technologies . . . . . . . . 636-898-6215
TechDream, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-800-7362
Thermoplastic Components
Lubrizol Conductive Polymers
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-680-1555
Thermoplastics and
Thermoplastic Materials
Dexmet Corporation . . . . . . . 203-294-7867
Krefine Co .Ltd . . . . . . . . . . . . . 520-838-0548
www.incompliancemag.com
Product/Ser vice Director y
Materials, Adhesives & Coatings – Power & Power Management
Lubrizol Conductive Polymers
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-680-1555
Oak-Mitsui Technologies . 518-686-4961
RTP Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-433-4787
Power & Power Management
Constant Voltage Regulators
Power Entry Modules
Overvoltage Protection
CITEL, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-248-3548
NexTek, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-486-0582
Okaya Electric America, Inc . . 800-852-0122
Power Amplifier
AE Techron, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 574-295-9495
800-830-5337
847-573-6504
800-662-2290
518-686-4961
310-306-5556
973-560-0019
800-848-2600
Power Generators
OPHIR RF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310-306-5556
Clarion Safety Systems . . . . . 800-748-0241
Laird Technologies . . . . . . . . 636-898-6215
Converters
Murata Electronics . . . . . . . . . 800-554-4070
OPHIR RF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310-306-5556
Power Line Conditioning
Equipment
Cord Sets
Mag Daddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-719-5600
NexTek, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-486-0582
Okaya Electric America, Inc . . 800-852-0122
866-463-1785
800-672-7244
847-719-5600
973-560-0019
800-848-2600
Electronic Loads
Chroma Systems Solutions, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-600-6400
Interrupters, AC Power
OPHIR RF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310-306-5556
Isolators, Power/Signal Line
OPHIR RF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310-306-5556
Line Cords
Americor Electronics Ltd . . . .
Mag Daddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
OPHIR RF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Dynamics, Inc . . . . . . .
Power Converters
800-830-5337
847-719-5600
310-306-5556
973-560-0019
Motors
Associated Power Technologies
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-322-7693
Chroma Systems Solutions, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-600-6400
WEMS Electronics . . . . . . . . . 310-962-4410
Power Cords
BMI Surplus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-871-8868
CSA Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-463-1785
The MuShield Company Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-669-3539
Multiple Outlet Strips
DDB Unlimited, Inc . . . . . . . .
HM Cragg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interpower Corporation . .
Mag Daddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Com-Power Corporation . . . 714-528-8800
Mag Daddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-719-5600
OPHIR RF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310-306-5556
TechDream, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-800-7362
TREK, INC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-FOR-TREK
800-753-8459
800-672-7244
800-662-2290
847-719-5600
Overcurrent Protection
CITEL, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-248-3548
Okaya Electric America, Inc . . 800-852-0122
Schurter Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-848-2600
Americor Electronics Ltd . . . .
CSA Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HM Cragg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interpower Corporation . .
Schurter Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
800-830-5337
866-463-1785
800-672-7244
800-662-2290
800-848-2600
Power Distribution Systems
API Technologies Corp . . . . . 855-294-3800
Captor Corporation . . . . . . . . 937-667-8484
CMD Ltd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .441709829511
HM Cragg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-672-7244
IQS, a Division of CMG . . . . . 508-460-1400
Oak-Mitsui Technologies . 518-686-4961
Schurter Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-848-2600
Power Rectifier
DDB Unlimited, Inc . . . . . . . . 800-753-8459
HM Cragg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-672-7244
Power Supplies
AE Techron, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 574-295-9495
Americor Electronics Ltd . . . . 800-830-5337
API Technologies Corp . . . . . 855-294-3800
Associated Power Technologies
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-322-7693
Chroma Systems Solutions, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-600-6400
CSA Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-463-1785
HM Cragg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-672-7244
Murata Electronics . . . . . . . . . 800-554-4070
Test Equipment Connection . 800-615-8378
TREK, INC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-FOR-TREK
Tri-Mag, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 559-651-2222
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 219
Product/Service Directory
CSA Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HM Cragg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mag Daddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Dynamics, Inc . . . . . . .
Schurter Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Americor Electronics Ltd . . . .
Corcom/Tyco Electronics . . .
Interpower Corporation . .
Oak-Mitsui Technologies .
OPHIR RF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Dynamics, Inc . . . . . . .
Schurter Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
P ro d u ct / S e r v ic e Direc tor y
Switch Mode Power Supply
AE Techron, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 574-295-9495
Associated Power Technologies
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-322-7693
Chroma Systems Solutions, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-600-6400
Tri-Mag, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 559-651-2222
Power & Power Management – Test & Measurement Equipment
EM Software & Systems (USA) Inc
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-419-5566 (FEKO)
Aum Electro Technology Pvt Ltd
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 00912512871365
CST of America . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-665-4400
MossBay EDA . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206-779-5345
TechDream, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-800-7362
Product/Service Directory
Americor Electronics Ltd . . . . 800-830-5337
Associated Power Technologies
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-322-7693
Chroma Systems Solutions, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-600-6400
Interpower Corporation . . 800-662-2290
Tri-Mag, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 559-651-2222
Wireless Propagation Software
Safety and
Protective Equipment
Clarion Safety Systems . . . . . 800-748-0241
Lewis Bass International . . . . 408-942-8000
NTS Newark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
EM Software & Systems-S .A .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 21 831 1500
EMSS Consulting . . . . . . . . . .27 2188 01880
Anechoic Chamber Software
Software Suppliers
3D Simulation Software
CST of America . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-665-4400
EM Software & Systems (USA) Inc
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-419-5566 (FEKO)
EMC Simulation Software
ANDRO Computational Solutions
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315-334-1163
CST of America . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-665-4400
Delcross Technologies, LLC . 217-363-3396
EM Software & Systems (USA) Inc
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-419-5566 (FEKO)
EM Software & Systems-S .A .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 21 831 1500
EMC/EMI Software
Delcross Technologies, LLC . 217-363-3396
AR RF/Microwave Instrumentation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-933-8181
ARC Technical Resources, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-263-6486
CST of America . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-665-4400
Delcross Technologies, LLC . 217-363-3396
EM Software & Systems (USA) Inc
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-419-5566 (FEKO)
MossBay EDA . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206-779-5345
NEC Corporation
Reliant EMC LLC . . . . . . . . . . . 408-600-1472
TechDream, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-800-7362
ESD, Static Control Software
CST of America . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-665-4400
MKS ION Systems . . . . . . . . . 800-367-2452
220 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Aum Electro Technology Pvt Ltd
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 00912512871365
EMSS Consulting . . . . . . . . . .27 2188 01880
Finero USA L .L .C . . . . . . . . . . . 239-898-8487
Signal Integrity and
EMC Analysis Software
Switching Power Supplies
Safety and Warning Labels
Product Safety Software
Aum Electro Technology Pvt Ltd
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 00912512871365
Delcross Technologies, LLC . 217-363-3396
EM Software & Systems (USA) Inc
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-419-5566 (FEKO)
EMSS Consulting . . . . . . . . . .27 2188 01880
MetaGeek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208-639-3140
Standards Suppliers
Clarion Safety Systems . . . . .
EMC Compliance . . . . . . . . . .
ESD Association . . . . . . . . . . .
Hoolihan EMC Consulting .
Trace Laboratories, Inc . . . . . .
800-748-0241
256-650-5261
315-339-6937
651-213-0966
410-584-9099
Test & Measurement
Equipment
Amplifiers
Amplifiers, Low Noise
A.H. Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . 818-998-0223
Advanced Test Equipment Rentals
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-558-6500
AE Techron, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 574-295-9495
Agilent Technologies . . . . . 800-829-4444
API Technologies Corp . . . . . 855-294-3800
AR RF/Microwave Instrumentation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-933-8181
Avalon Equipment Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-542-8256
Com-Power Corporation . . . 714-528-8800
Dynamic Sciences International
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-966-3713
Electro Rent Corporation . . . 800-688-1111
Giga-tronics Incorporated . . 800-277-9764
Instruments For Industry, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-467-8400
OPHIR RF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310-306-5556
Teseq Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732-417-0501
www.incompliancemag.com
Product/Ser vice Director y
Test & Measurement Equipment
Amplifiers, Power
Amplifiers, RF
Advanced Test Equipment Rentals
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-558-6500
Agilent Technologies . . . . . 800-829-4444
API Technologies Corp . . . . . 855-294-3800
AR RF/Microwave Instrumentation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-933-8181
ARC Technical Resources, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-263-6486
Avalon Equipment Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-542-8256
BMI Surplus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-871-8868
Com-Power Corporation . . . 714-528-8800
CPI, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 905-877-0161
Dynamic Sciences International
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-966-3713
Electro Rent Corporation . . . 800-688-1111
HV TECHNOLOGIES, Inc. . . 703-365-2330
Instruments For Industry, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-467-8400
Lionheart Northwest . . . . . . . 425-882-2587
MetaGeek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208-639-3140
MILMEGA Ltd . . . . . . . . 44 (0) 1983-618004
OPHIR RF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310-306-5556
Reliant EMC LLC . . . . . . . . . . . 408-600-1472
Rohde & Schwarz, Inc. . . . . 888-TEST-RSA
Test Equipment Connection . 800-615-8378
Vectawave Technology, Ltd .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 1983 821818
Analyzers
Analyzers, EMI/EMC Spectrum
Advanced Test Equipment Rentals
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-558-6500
Aeroflex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-835-2352
Agilent Technologies . . . . . 800-829-4444
ARC Technical Resources, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-263-6486
Avalon Equipment Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-542-8256
Com-Power Corporation . . . 714-528-8800
Dynamic Sciences International
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-966-3713
Electro Rent Corporation . . . 800-688-1111
Electronic Instrument Associates
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630-924-1600
GAUSS INSTRUMENTS . . 49-89-5404699-0
MetaGeek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208-639-3140
Reliant EMC LLC . . . . . . . . . . . 408-600-1472
Rigol Technologies . . . . . . . . 877-474-4651
Rohde & Schwarz, Inc. . . . . 888-TEST-RSA
Tektronix, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-833-9200
Teseq Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732-417-0501
Test Equipment Connection . 407-804-1299
Analyzers, Flicker
Advanced Test Equipment Rentals
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-558-6500
ARC Technical Resources, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-263-6486
Avalon Equipment Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-542-8256
EM TEST USA . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-450-0085
Lionheart Northwest . . . . . . . 425-882-2587
Reliant EMC LLC . . . . . . . . . . . 408-600-1472
Analyzers, Power Quality
Advanced Test Equipment Rentals
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-558-6500
Avalon Equipment Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-542-8256
Electro Rent Corporation . . . 800-688-1111
Lionheart Northwest . . . . . . . 425-882-2587
Test Equipment Connection . 800-615-8378
Analyzers, Telecom
Advanced Test Equipment Rentals
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-558-6500
Aeroflex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-835-2352
Avalon Equipment Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-542-8256
Hermon Laboratories TI . . . 972-4-6268401
MetaGeek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208-639-3140
Automatic Test Sets
Aeroflex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-835-2352
Amber Precision Instruments, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-752-0199 x102
ARC Technical Resources, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-263-6486
Aum Electro Technology Pvt Ltd
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 00912512871365
Chroma Systems Solutions, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-600-6400
Hermon Laboratories TI . . . 972-4-6268401
Innco Systems GmbH .0049 9435 301659 0
Reliant EMC LLC . . . . . . . . . . . 408-600-1472
Analyzers, Harmonics
ARC Technical Resources, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-263-6486
Avalon Equipment Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-542-8256
Electro Rent Corporation . . . 800-688-1111
EM TEST USA . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-450-0085
Lionheart Northwest . . . . . . . 425-882-2587
Reliant EMC LLC . . . . . . . . . . . 408-600-1472
Analyzers, Network
Advanced Test Equipment Rentals
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-558-6500
Aeroflex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-835-2352
Agilent Technologies . . . . . 800-829-4444
Avalon Equipment Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-542-8256
BMI Surplus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-871-8868
Electro Rent Corporation . . . 800-688-1111
Giga-tronics Incorporated . . 800-277-9764
Global Test Equipment . . . . . 866-409-0400
Rohde & Schwarz, Inc. . . . . 888-TEST-RSA
Test Equipment Connection . 800-615-8378
Teseq Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732-417-0501
Thermo Fisher Scientific
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-275-0800 x2302
VEROCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 954-990-7544
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 221
Product/Service Directory
Advanced Test Equipment Rentals
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-558-6500
AE Techron, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 574-295-9495
Agilent Technologies . . . . . 800-829-4444
AR RF/Microwave Instrumentation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-933-8181
Avalon Equipment Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-542-8256
Com-Power Corporation . . . 714-528-8800
CPI, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 905-877-0161
Electro Rent Corporation . . . 800-688-1111
Electronic Instrument Associates
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630-924-1600
Giga-tronics Incorporated . . 800-277-9764
HV TECHNOLOGIES, Inc. . . 703-365-2330
Instruments For Industry, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-467-8400
Lionheart Northwest . . . . . . . 425-882-2587
MILMEGA Ltd . . . . . . . . 44 (0) 1983-618004
OPHIR RF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310-306-5556
Rohde & Schwarz, Inc. . . . . 888-TEST-RSA
Solar Electronics Company . 800-952-5302
Vectawave Technology, Ltd .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 1983 821818
P ro d u ct / S e r v ic e Direc tor y
Avionics Test Equipment
AE Techron, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 574-295-9495
Aeroflex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-835-2352
Avalon Equipment Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-542-8256
Dayton T . Brown, Inc . . . . . . . 800-TEST-456
EM TEST USA . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-450-0085
HV TECHNOLOGIES, Inc. . . 703-365-2330
MI Technologies . . . . . . . . . 678-475-8345
Narda Safety Test Solutions . 631-231-1700
Thermo Fisher Scientific
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-275-0800 x2302
Product/Service Directory
Buildings, EMC Testing
Audivo GmbH . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 9435 5419 0
Cuming-Lehman Chambers, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 717-263-4101
Narda Safety Test Solutions . 631-231-1700
Burn-in Test Equipment
VEROCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 954-990-7544
Calibration & Repair Services
Aeroflex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-835-2352
Agilent Technologies . . . . . 800-829-4444
Avalon Equipment Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-542-8256
EM TEST USA . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-450-0085
ESDEMC Technology LLC . . . 877-864-8479
eti Conformity Services . . . . . 877-468-6384
Fischer Custom Communications
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310-303-3300
GAUSS INSTRUMENTS . . 49-89-5404699-0
Global Test Equipment . . . . . 866-409-0400
Liberty Labs, Inc. . . . . . . . . . 712-773-2199
MI Technologies . . . . . . . . . 678-475-8345
Prostat Corporation . . . . . . . . 630-238-8883
Restor Metrology . . . . . . . . . . 877-220-5554
VEROCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 954-990-7544
World Cal, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . 712-764-2197
Current Leakage Testers
Advanced Test Equipment Rentals
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-558-6500
Associated Research, Inc . . . 800-858-8378
Chroma Systems Solutions, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-600-6400
ED&D Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-806-6236
Ergonomics, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-862-0102
ESDEMC Technology LLC . . . 877-864-8479
Finero USA L .L .C . . . . . . . . . . . 239-898-8487
NTS Santa Clarita . . . . . . . . . . 800-270-2516
Slaughter Company, Inc . . . . 800-504-0055
VEROCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 954-990-7544
Vitrek Corporation . . . . . . . . . 858-689-2755
222 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Test & Measurement Equipment
Data Acquisition Monitoring
Systems
EM TEST USA . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-450-0085
3M Electronic Solutions . . . . 512-984-6747
Advanced Test Equipment Rentals
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-558-6500
Avalon Equipment Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-542-8256
Global Test Equipment . . . . . 866-409-0400
MKS ION Systems . . . . . . . . . 800-367-2452
NTS Albuquerque . . . . . . . . . 505-821-4740
Dielectric Strength Testers
Advanced Test Equipment Rentals
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-558-6500
Associated Research, Inc . . . 800-858-8378
Chroma Systems Solutions, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-600-6400
ED&D Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-806-6236
Ergonomics, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-862-0102
Slaughter Company, Inc . . . . 800-504-0055
Vitrek Corporation . . . . . . . . . 858-689-2755
Electrical Safety Testers
Advanced Test Equipment Rentals
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-558-6500
AE Techron, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 574-295-9495
Associated Research, Inc . . . 800-858-8378
Avalon Equipment Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-542-8256
Chroma Systems Solutions, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-600-6400
ED&D Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-806-6236
Ergonomics, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-862-0102
Finero USA L .L .C . . . . . . . . . . . 239-898-8487
Prostat Corporation . . . . . . . . 630-238-8883
Slaughter Company, Inc . . . . 800-504-0055
VEROCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 954-990-7544
Vitrek Corporation . . . . . . . . . 858-689-2755
EMC Testers
Advanced Test Equipment Rentals
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-558-6500
AE Techron, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 574-295-9495
Aeroflex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-835-2352
Amber Precision Instruments, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-752-0199 x102
Avalon Equipment Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-542-8256
D . C . Smith Consultants . . . . 800-323-3956
Electronic Instrument Associates
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630-924-1600
EMC Test Design, LLC . . . . . . 508-292-1833
EMSCAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-367-2261
GAUSS INSTRUMENTS . . 49-89-5404699-0
Haefely EMC Technology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 845-279-3644 x240
HV TECHNOLOGIES, Inc. . . 703-365-2330
Noise Laboratory Co (NoiseKen)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 (0) 42 712 2051
Reliant EMC LLC . . . . . . . . . . . 408-600-1472
Rohde & Schwarz, Inc. . . . . 888-TEST-RSA
TechDream, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-800-7362
Teseq Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732-417-0501
Test Equipment Connection . 800-615-8378
Thermo Fisher Scientific
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-275-0800 x2302
TÜV SÜD America Inc. . . . . 800-888-0123
EMP Simulators
Dayton T . Brown, Inc . . . . . . . 800-TEST-456
EM TEST USA . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-450-0085
Fischer Custom Communications
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310-303-3300
HV TECHNOLOGIES, Inc. . . 703-365-2330
Teseq Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732-417-0501
Environmental Chambers
Advanced Test Equipment Rentals
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-558-6500
ED&D Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-806-6236
NTS Newark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
NTS Rockford . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-270-2516
Thermotron Industries . . . . . 616-393-4580
TÜV SÜD America Inc. . . . . 800-888-0123
VEROCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 954-990-7544
www.incompliancemag.com
Product/Ser vice Director y
Test & Measurement Equipment
ESD Test Equipment
Fiber-Optic Systems
Audivo GmbH . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 9435 5419 0
Global Test Equipment . . . . . 866-409-0400
HV TECHNOLOGIES, Inc. . . 703-365-2330
Michigan Scientific Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-685-3939 x111
Flow Meters
VEROCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 954-990-7544
Gaussmeters
BMI Surplus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-871-8868
Ergonomics, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-862-0102
Magnetic Shield Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-766-7800
Narda Safety Test Solutions . 631-231-1700
Generators
Generators, Arbitrary Wave Form
Aeroflex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-835-2352
Electro Rent Corporation . . . 800-688-1111
Rigol Technologies . . . . . . . . 877-474-4651
Tektronix, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-833-9200
Test Equipment Connection . 800-615-8378
Generators, ESD
EM TEST USA . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-450-0085
Haefely EMC Technology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 845-279-3644 x240
HV TECHNOLOGIES, Inc. . . 703-365-2330
Teseq Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732-417-0501
Thermo Fisher Scientific
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-275-0800 x2302
Advanced Test Equipment Rentals
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-558-6500
Electro Rent Corporation . . . 800-688-1111
EM TEST USA . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-450-0085
Fischer Custom Communications
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310-303-3300
Haefely EMC Technology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 845-279-3644 x240
HV TECHNOLOGIES, Inc. . . 703-365-2330
Noise Laboratory Co (NoiseKen)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 (0) 42 712 2051
Thermo Fisher Scientific
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-275-0800 x2302
Generators, Impulse
Applied EM Technology . . . . 410-326-6728
Electro Rent Corporation . . . 800-688-1111
EM TEST USA . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-450-0085
Haefely EMC Technology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 845-279-3644 x240
Noise Laboratory Co (NoiseKen)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 (0) 42 712 2051
Thermo Fisher Scientific
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-275-0800 x2302
Generators, Interference
Electro Rent Corporation . . . 800-688-1111
Noise Laboratory Co (NoiseKen)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 (0) 42 712 2051
Generators, Lightning
EM TEST USA . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-450-0085
Haefely EMC Technology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 845-279-3644 x240
HV TECHNOLOGIES, Inc. . . 703-365-2330
Solar Electronics Company . 800-952-5302
Thermo Fisher Scientific
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-275-0800 x2302
Generators, Signal
Aeroflex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-835-2352
Agilent Technologies . . . . . 800-829-4444
AR RF/Microwave Instrumentation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-933-8181
Electro Rent Corporation . . . 800-688-1111
Giga-tronics Incorporated . . 800-277-9764
Global Test Equipment . . . . . 866-409-0400
Reliant EMC LLC . . . . . . . . . . . 408-600-1472
Rigol Technologies . . . . . . . . 877-474-4651
Rohde & Schwarz, Inc. . . . . 888-TEST-RSA
Tektronix, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-833-9200
Test Equipment Connection . 800-615-8378
Generators, Surge Transient
Advanced Test Equipment Rentals
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-558-6500
Electro Rent Corporation . . . 800-688-1111
EM TEST USA . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-450-0085
Haefely EMC Technology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 845-279-3644 x240
HV TECHNOLOGIES, Inc. . . 703-365-2330
Lionheart Northwest . . . . . . . 425-882-2587
Noise Laboratory Co (NoiseKen)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 (0) 42 712 2051
Solar Electronics Company . 800-952-5302
Thermo Fisher Scientific
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-275-0800 x2302
Ground Bond Testers
Associated Research, Inc . . . 800-858-8378
Chroma Systems Solutions, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-600-6400
ED&D Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-806-6236
Finero USA L .L .C . . . . . . . . . . . 239-898-8487
Slaughter Company, Inc . . . . 800-504-0055
Staticworx Flooring . . . . .888-STATICWORX
Vitrek Corporation . . . . . . . . . 858-689-2755
Ground Resistance Testers
Associated Research, Inc . . . 800-858-8378
Chroma Systems Solutions, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-600-6400
Ergonomics, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-862-0102
Finero USA L .L .C . . . . . . . . . . . 239-898-8487
Prostat Corporation . . . . . . . . 630-238-8883
Slaughter Company, Inc . . . . 800-504-0055
Staticworx Flooring . . . . .888-STATICWORX
Hipot Testers
Associated Research, Inc . . . 800-858-8378
Avalon Equipment Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-542-8256
Chroma Systems Solutions, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-600-6400
ED&D Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-806-6236
Electro Rent Corporation . . . 800-688-1111
Ergonomics, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-862-0102
Finero USA L .L .C . . . . . . . . . . . 239-898-8487
Slaughter Company, Inc . . . . 800-504-0055
Test Equipment Connection . 800-615-8378
VEROCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 954-990-7544
Vitrek Corporation . . . . . . . . . 858-689-2755
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 223
Product/Service Directory
3M Electronic Solutions . . . . 512-984-6747
Amber Precision Instruments, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-752-0199 x102
Avalon Equipment Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-542-8256
Barth Electronics, Inc . . . . . . . 702-293-1576
Electro Rent Corporation . . . 800-688-1111
Electronic Instrument Associates
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630-924-1600
ESDEMC Technology LLC . . . 877-864-8479
Grund Technical Solutions, LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 510-453-2617
HV TECHNOLOGIES, Inc. . . 703-365-2330
Monroe Electronics, Inc. . . 585-765-2254
Noise Laboratory Co (NoiseKen)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 (0) 42 712 2051
NTS Newark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
TechDream, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-800-7362
Thermo Fisher Scientific
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-275-0800 x2302
TREK, INC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-FOR-TREK
Generators, Fast/Transient Burst
P ro d u ct / S e r v ic e Direc tor y
Meters
Monitors
Megohmmeters
Monitors, Current
Chroma Systems Solutions, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-600-6400
Finero USA L .L .C . . . . . . . . . . . 239-898-8487
Monroe Electronics, Inc. . . 585-765-2254
Staticworx Flooring . . . . .888-STATICWORX
Vitrek Corporation . . . . . . . . . 858-689-2755
Meters, Field Strength
Product/Service Directory
Test & Measurement Equipment
AR RF/Microwave Instrumentation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-933-8181
EMC Test Design, LLC . . . . . . 508-292-1833
Ergonomics, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-862-0102
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
Magnetic Shield Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-766-7800
Narda Safety Test Solutions . 631-231-1700
TREK, INC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-FOR-TREK
Meters, Magnetic Field
EMC Test Design, LLC . . . . . . 508-292-1833
Ergonomics, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-862-0102
Magnetic Shield Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-766-7800
Narda Safety Test Solutions . 631-231-1700
Meters, Radiation Hazard
EMC Test Design, LLC . . . . . . 508-292-1833
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
Narda Safety Test Solutions . 631-231-1700
Meters, RF Power
Aeroflex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-835-2352
Agilent Technologies . . . . . 800-829-4444
AR RF/Microwave Instrumentation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-933-8181
BMI Surplus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-871-8868
Electro Rent Corporation . . . 800-688-1111
EMC Test Design, LLC . . . . . . 508-292-1833
Giga-tronics Incorporated . . 800-277-9764
Global Test Equipment . . . . . 866-409-0400
MetaGeek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208-639-3140
Meters, Static Charge
Monroe Electronics, Inc. . . 585-765-2254
Prostat Corporation . . . . . . . . 630-238-8883
Staticworx Flooring . . . . .888-STATICWORX
TREK, INC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-FOR-TREK
Meters, Static Decay
Monroe Electronics, Inc. . . 585-765-2254
Prostat Corporation . . . . . . . . 630-238-8883
Staticworx Flooring . . . . .888-STATICWORX
224 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
3M Electronic Solutions . . . . 512-984-6747
Pearson Electronics, Inc . . . 650-494-6444
Monitors, EMI Test
3M Electronic Solutions . . . . 512-984-6747
EMC Test Design, LLC . . . . . . 508-292-1833
MKS ION Systems . . . . . . . . . 800-367-2452
Test Equipment Connection . 800-615-8378
Monitors, ESD
3M Electronic Solutions . . . . 512-984-6747
MKS ION Systems . . . . . . . . . 800-367-2452
Noise Laboratory Co (NoiseKen)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 (0) 42 712 2051
TREK, INC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-FOR-TREK
Monitors, Ionizer Balance
MKS ION Systems . . . . . . . . . 800-367-2452
Monitors, Static Voltage
MKS ION Systems . . . . . . . . . 800-367-2452
TREK, INC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-FOR-TREK
Oscilloscopes and Transient
Recorders
Aeroflex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-835-2352
Agilent Technologies . . . . . 800-829-4444
Aum Electro Technology Pvt Ltd
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 00912512871365
Avalon Equipment Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-542-8256
BMI Surplus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-871-8868
D . C . Smith Consultants . . . . 800-323-3956
Electro Rent Corporation . . . 800-688-1111
GAUSS INSTRUMENTS . . 49-89-5404699-0
Global Test Equipment . . . . . 866-409-0400
Lionheart Northwest . . . . . . . 425-882-2587
MetaGeek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208-639-3140
Rigol Technologies . . . . . . . . 877-474-4651
Tektronix, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-833-9200
Test Equipment Connection . 800-615-8378
Probes
Probes, Current/Magnetic Field
A.H. Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . 818-998-0223
Agilent Technologies . . . . . 800-829-4444
Amber Precision Instruments, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-752-0199 x102
AR RF/Microwave Instrumentation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-933-8181
Com-Power Corporation . . . 714-528-8800
D . C . Smith Consultants . . . . 800-323-3956
EM TEST USA . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-450-0085
EMC Test Design, LLC . . . . . . 508-292-1833
Ergonomics, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-862-0102
ESDEMC Technology LLC . . . 877-864-8479
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
Fischer Custom Communications
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310-303-3300
MI Technologies . . . . . . . . . 678-475-8345
Solar Electronics Company . 800-952-5302
Tektronix, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-833-9200
Teseq Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732-417-0501
Test Equipment Connection . 800-615-8378
Van Doren Company . . . . . . . 573-341-4097
Probes, Electric Field
Agilent Technologies . . . . . 800-829-4444
Amber Precision Instruments, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-752-0199 x102
AR RF/Microwave Instrumentation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-933-8181
Com-Power Corporation . . . 714-528-8800
D . C . Smith Consultants . . . . 800-323-3956
Electronic Instrument Associates
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630-924-1600
EMC Technologists . . . . . . . . 732-919-1100
EMC Test Design, LLC . . . . . . 508-292-1833
ESDEMC Technology LLC . . . 877-864-8479
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
Test Equipment Connection . 800-615-8378
Van Doren Company . . . . . . . 573-341-4097
Probes, Voltage
Agilent Technologies . . . . . 800-829-4444
ARC Technical Resources, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-263-6486
Barth Electronics, Inc . . . . . . . 702-293-1576
BMI Surplus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-871-8868
D . C . Smith Consultants . . . . 800-323-3956
Fischer Custom Communications
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310-303-3300
Global Test Equipment . . . . . 866-409-0400
Reliant EMC LLC . . . . . . . . . . . 408-600-1472
Tektronix, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-833-9200
Test Equipment Connection . 800-615-8378
VEROCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 954-990-7544
Receivers
Receivers, EMI/EMC
Advanced Test Equipment Rentals
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-558-6500
Agilent Technologies . . . . . 800-829-4444
API Technologies Corp . . . . . 855-294-3800
AR RF/Microwave Instrumentation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-933-8181
Com-Power Corporation . . . 714-528-8800
Dynamic Sciences International
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-966-3713
Electro Rent Corporation . . . 800-688-1111
EMI Instrumentation . . . . . . . 805-835-8547
GAUSS INSTRUMENTS . . 49-89-5404699-0
Reliant EMC LLC . . . . . . . . . . . 408-600-1472
Rohde & Schwarz, Inc. . . . . 888-TEST-RSA
TechDream, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-800-7362
www.incompliancemag.com
Test & Measurement Equipment – Testing Services
Receivers, RF
Agilent Technologies . . . . . 800-829-4444
API Technologies Corp . . . . . 855-294-3800
Dynamic Sciences International
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-966-3713
Electro Rent Corporation . . . 800-688-1111
GAUSS INSTRUMENTS . . 49-89-5404699-0
Global Test Equipment . . . . . 866-409-0400
MI Technologies . . . . . . . . . 678-475-8345
Receivers, Tempest
API Technologies Corp . . . . . 855-294-3800
Dynamic Sciences International
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-966-3713
GAUSS INSTRUMENTS . . 49-89-5404699-0
RF Leak Detectors
Safety Test Equipment
Associated Research, Inc . . . 800-858-8378
Avalon Equipment Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-542-8256
Chroma Systems Solutions, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-600-6400
Com-Power Corporation . . . 714-528-8800
ED&D Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-806-6236
EMC Technologists . . . . . . . . 732-919-1100
Ergonomics, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-862-0102
Finero USA L .L .C . . . . . . . . . . . 239-898-8487
Narda Safety Test Solutions . 631-231-1700
Slaughter Company, Inc . . . . 800-504-0055
VEROCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 954-990-7544
Shock & Vibration Testing
Shakers
Aum Electro Technology Pvt Ltd
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 00912512871365
Dayton T . Brown, Inc . . . . . . . 800-TEST-456
NTS Newark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
NTS Santa Clarita . . . . . . . . . . 800-270-2516
Thermotron Industries . . . . . 616-393-4580
TÜV SÜD America Inc. . . . . 800-888-0123
Susceptiblity Test Instruments
AE Techron, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 574-295-9495
Amber Precision Instruments, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-752-0199 x102
AR RF/Microwave Instrumentation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-933-8181
ARC Technical Resources, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-263-6486
Com-Power Corporation . . . 714-528-8800
Telecom Test Equipment
AE Techron, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 574-295-9495
Aeroflex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-835-2352
ED&D Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-806-6236
Electro Rent Corporation . . . 800-688-1111
Electronic Instrument Associates
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630-924-1600
EM TEST USA . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-450-0085
Global Test Equipment . . . . . 866-409-0400
Haefely EMC Technology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 845-279-3644 x240
Hermon Laboratories TI . . . 972-4-6268401
HV TECHNOLOGIES, Inc. . . 703-365-2330
MetaGeek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208-639-3140
NTS Newark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
NTS Tinton Falls . . . . . . . . . . . 732-936-0800
Test Equipment Connection . 800-615-8378
Thermo Fisher Scientific
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-275-0800 x2302
Temperature Cycling Systems
ED&D Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-806-6236
Used & Refurbished Test
Equipment
A.H. Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . 818-998-0223
AR RF/Microwave Instrumentation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-933-8181
Avalon Equipment Corporation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-542-8256
BMI Surplus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-871-8868
Giga-tronics Incorporated . . 800-277-9764
Global Test Equipment . . . . . 866-409-0400
Test Equipment Connection . 800-615-8378
TÜV SÜD America Inc. . . . . 800-888-0123
VEROCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 954-990-7544
Testing Services
Accredited Registrar
CKC Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . . 800-500-4362
CSA Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-463-1785
Curtis-Straus (Bureau Veritas)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-277-8880
Electro Magnetic Test, Inc . . . 650-965-4000
Nemko Canada . . . . . . . . . . . 613-737-9680
Nemko USA - SouthEast . . . 813-662-4606
NQA Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 514-242-2655
NQA Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-398-8282
NQA West Coast . . . . . . . . . . 888-734-4476
NQA, USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-649-5289
Parker Hannifin, Chomerics Div
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-935-4850
TÜV Rheinland of North America
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-TUV-RHEINLAND
TÜV SÜD America Inc. . . . . 800-888-0123
CE Competent Body
Abstraction Engineering Inc . 408-258-3282
American Certification Body, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-847-4700
CKC Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . . 800-500-4362
Compatible Electronics, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 650-417-EMC1 (3621)
Compliance Management Group
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-281-5985
CSA Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-463-1785
Curtis-Straus (Bureau Veritas)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-277-8880
D .L .S . Electronic Systems, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-537-6400
Electro Magnetic Test, Inc . . . 650-965-4000
Elite Electronic Engineering . . 800-ELITE-11
EMCC DR . RASEK . . . . . . . . . . 49-9194-9016
G&M Compliance, Inc . . . . . . 714-628-1020
LS Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262-375-4400
Nemko Canada . . . . . . . . . . . 613-737-9680
Nemko USA - SouthEast . . . 813-662-4606
Parker Hannifin, Chomerics Div
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-935-4850
SIEMIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-526-1188
Test Site Services Inc . . . . . . . 508-962-1662
TÜV Rheinland of North America
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-TUV-RHEINLAND
TÜV SÜD America Inc. . . . . 800-888-0123
UL LLC
CE Notified Body
American Certification Body, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-847-4700
CKC Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . . 800-500-4362
Compatible Electronics, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 650-417-EMC1 (3621)
CSA Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-463-1785
Curtis-Straus (Bureau Veritas)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-277-8880
D .L .S . Electronic Systems, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-537-6400
Electro Magnetic Test, Inc . . . 650-965-4000
EMCC DR . RASEK . . . . . . . . . . 49-9194-9016
G&M Compliance, Inc . . . . . . 714-628-1020
Intertek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-WORLDLAB
LS Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262-375-4400
Nemko Canada . . . . . . . . . . . 613-737-9680
Northwest EMC Inc . - Washington
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
Northwest EMC, Inc . - Oregon
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 225
Product/Service Directory
AR RF/Microwave Instrumentation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-933-8181
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
MetaGeek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208-639-3140
Narda Safety Test Solutions . 631-231-1700
Test Equipment Connection . 800-615-8378
Electronic Instrument Associates
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630-924-1600
EM TEST USA . . . . . . . . . . . . 858-450-0085
EMC Test Design, LLC . . . . . . 508-292-1833
Narda Safety Test Solutions . 631-231-1700
NexTek, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-486-0582
Solar Electronics Company . 800-952-5302
Thermo Fisher Scientific
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-275-0800 x2302
Product/Ser vice Director y
P ro d u ct / S e r v ic e Direc tor y
CE Notified Body continued
NTS Newark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
SGS Consumer Testing Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-777-TEST (8378)
SIEMIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-526-1188
Test Site Services Inc . . . . . . . 508-962-1662
TÜV Rheinland of North America
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-TUV-RHEINLAND
TÜV SÜD America Inc. . . . . 800-888-0123
UL LLC
Product/Service Directory
Environmental Testing and
Analysis Services
ACS - Boca Raton, FL . . . . . . 561-961-5585
Alberi EcoTech . . . . . . . . . . . . 702-677-6923
Cascade TEK - Oregon . . . . . 888-835-9250
Cascade TEK - Colorado . . . . 888-835-9250
CertifiGroup Inc . . . . . . . . . . . 800-422-1651
Core Compliance Testing . . . 603 889-5545
CSA Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-463-1785
CSZ Testing Services . . . . . . . 513-793-7774
D .L .S . Electronic Systems, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-537-6400
EMC Testing Laboratories, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770-475-8819
G&M Compliance, Inc . . . . . . 714-628-1020
Garwood Laboratories . . . . . 888-427-4111
Garwood Laboratories Inc . SC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-427-4111
Green Mtn . Electromagnetics
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 802-388-3390
Keystone Compliance . . . . . . 724-657-9940
LabTest Certification Inc . . . . 604-247-0444
NTS Santa Clarita . . . . . . . . . . 800-270-2516
Staticworx Flooring . . . . .888-STATICWORX
Test Site Services Inc . . . . . . . 508-962-1662
TestingPartners .com . . . . . . . 862-243-2329
Thermotron Industries . . . . . 616-393-4580
VEROCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 954-990-7544
Homologation Services
ACS - Atlanta, GA . . . . . . . . . . 770-831-8048
ACS - Boca Raton, FL . . . . . . 561-961-5585
ACS - Melbourne, FL . . . . . . . 321-951-1710
American Certification Body, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-847-4700
CertifiGroup Inc . . . . . . . . . . . 800-422-1651
CSIA, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503-489-8006
Curtis-Straus (Bureau Veritas)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-277-8880
Dayton T . Brown, Inc . . . . . . . 800-TEST-456
Electro Magnetic Test, Inc . . . 650-965-4000
H .B . Compliance Solutions . . 480-684-2969
IQS, a Division of CMG . . . . . 508-460-1400
Jacobs Technology . . . . . . . . 248-676-1101
Lewis Bass International . . . . 408-942-8000
Nemko Canada . . . . . . . . . . . 613-737-9680
Nemko USA - SouthEast . . . 813-662-4606
226 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Testing Services
O'Brien Compliance Management
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-970-0525
SGS Consumer Testing Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-777-TEST (8378)
SIEMIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-526-1188
Telcron LLC
Test Site Services Inc . . . . . . . 508-962-1662
TestingPartners .com . . . . . . . 862-243-2329
Versus Global Certifications Pty Ltd .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 83 5140709
Pre-Assessments
Abstraction Engineering Inc . 408-258-3282
ACS - Atlanta, GA . . . . . . . . . . 770-831-8048
ACS - Boca Raton, FL . . . . . . 561-961-5585
ACS - Melbourne, FL . . . . . . . 321-951-1710
Advanced ESD Services + . . . 607-759-8133
Alberi EcoTech . . . . . . . . . . . . 702-677-6923
American Certification Body, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-847-4700
CASE Forensics . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-736-1106
CertifiGroup Inc . . . . . . . . . . . 800-422-1651
Compatible Electronics, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 650-417-EMC1 (3621)
Corcom/Tyco Electronics . . . 847-573-6504
CSA Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-463-1785
Curtis-Straus (Bureau Veritas)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-277-8880
Electro Magnetic Test, Inc . . . 650-965-4000
EMI Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-206-9960
G&M Compliance, Inc . . . . . . 714-628-1020
Garwood Laboratories Inc . SC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-427-4111
H .B . Compliance Solutions . . 480-684-2969
IQS, a Division of CMG . . . . . 508-460-1400
Jastech EMC Consulting LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-876-4810
Lewis Bass International . . . . 408-942-8000
MI Technologies . . . . . . . . . 678-475-8345
Montrose Compliance Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-247-5715
NCEE Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-567-6860
O'Brien Compliance Management
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-970-0525
Product Safety Consulting . . 877-804-3066
Pulver Laboratories Inc . . . . . 800-635-3050
RF Exposure Lab . . . . . . . . . . . 760-471-2100
RMV Technology Group, LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 650-964-4792
SIEMIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-526-1188
SILENT Solutions LLC . . 603-578-1842 x203
Spectrum EMC Consulting, LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 651-688-0634
Stephen Halperin & Associates
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630-238-8883
Telcron LLC
Test Site Services Inc . . . . . . . 508-962-1662
TestingPartners .com . . . . . . . 862-243-2329
TÜV Rheinland of North America
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-TUV-RHEINLAND
Product and Component
Testing Services
Abstraction Engineering Inc . 408-258-3282
ACS - Atlanta, GA . . . . . . . . . . 770-831-8048
ACS - Boca Raton, FL . . . . . . 561-961-5585
ACS - Melbourne, FL . . . . . . . 321-951-1710
Cascade TEK - Oregon . . . . . 888-835-9250
Cascade TEK - Colorado . . . . 888-835-9250
CertifiGroup Inc . . . . . . . . . . . 800-422-1651
Compatible Electronics, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 650-417-EMC1 (3621)
CSA Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-463-1785
CSIA, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503-489-8006
Electronics Test Centre - Airdrie
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403-912-0037
EMC Testing Laboratories, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770-475-8819
EMI Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-206-9960
Ergonomics, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-862-0102
Garwood Laboratories . . . . . 888-427-4111
Garwood Laboratories Inc . SC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-427-4111
Jastech EMC Consulting LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-876-4810
Keystone Compliance . . . . . . 724-657-9940
L-3 Communications Cincinnati
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-543-8220
LabTest Certification Inc . . . . 604-247-0444
Lambda Calibration Ltd
LCR Electronics, Inc. . . . . . . 800-527-4362
MI Technologies . . . . . . . . . 678-475-8345
Nexlogic Technologies, Inc . . 866-845-1197
Product Safety Consulting . . 877-804-3066
Raymond EMC Enclosures Ltd .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-362-1495
RF Exposure Lab . . . . . . . . . . . 760-471-2100
SGS Consumer Testing Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-777-TEST (8378)
SIEMIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-526-1188
www.incompliancemag.com
Product/Ser vice Director y
Testing Services
Telcron LLC
Test Site Services Inc . . . . . . . 508-962-1662
TestingPartners .com . . . . . . . 862-243-2329
TÜV Rheinland of North America
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-TUV-RHEINLAND
UL LLC
Testing Laboratories
Accelerated Stress Testing
Cascade TEK - Oregon . . . . . 888-835-9250
Cascade TEK - Colorado . . . . 888-835-9250
Compliance Management Group
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-281-5985
Core Compliance Testing . . . 603 889-5545
CSZ Testing Services . . . . . . . 513-793-7774
Dayton T . Brown, Inc . . . . . . . 800-TEST-456
DNB Engineering, Inc . . . . . . . 714-870-7781
Elite Electronic Engineering . . 800-ELITE-11
EMC Testing Laboratories, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770-475-8819
Flextronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 613-895-2053
Garwood Laboratories Inc . SC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-427-4111
Global EMC Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-441-7337
IQS, a Division of CMG . . . . . 508-460-1400
Keystone Compliance . . . . . . 724-657-9940
MET Laboratories . . . . . . . . . . 410-354-3300
NTS - Corporate HQ . . . . . . 800-270-2516
NTS Fullerton . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-677-2687
NTS LAX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-559-3202
NTS Northeast . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-723-2687
NTS Plano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-717-2687
NTS Santa Clarita . . . . . . . . . . 800-270-2516
NTS Tempe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 480-966-5517
NTS Tinton Falls . . . . . . . . . . . 732-936-0800
Professional Testing . . . . . . 800-695-1077
Retlif Testing Laboratories
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-737-1500 x111
Acoustical Testing
Compliance Worldwide, Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603-887-3903
Core Compliance Testing . . . 603 889-5545
Dayton T . Brown, Inc . . . . . . . 800-TEST-456
DNB Engineering, Inc . . . . . . . 714-870-7781
Ergonomics, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-862-0102
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . 512-531-6400
Flextronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 613-895-2053
Garwood Laboratories Inc . SC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-427-4111
IQS, a Division of CMG . . . . . 508-460-1400
MET Laboratories . . . . . . . . . . 410-354-3300
NCEE Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-567-6860
NTS Fullerton . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-677-2687
NTS LAX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-559-3202
NTS Northeast . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-723-2687
NTS Plano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-717-2687
NTS Santa Clarita . . . . . . . . . . 800-270-2516
NTS Tempe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 480-966-5517
NTS Tinton Falls . . . . . . . . . . . 732-936-0800
Professional Testing . . . . . . 800-695-1077
Pulver Laboratories Inc . . . . . 800-635-3050
Retlif Testing Laboratories
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-737-1500 x111
BSMI Compliant Certification Testing
ACS - Atlanta, GA . . . . . . . . . . 770-831-8048
ACS - Boca Raton, FL . . . . . . 561-961-5585
ACS - Melbourne, FL . . . . . . . 321-951-1710
Atlas Compliance & Engineering
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-573-9742
Compliance & More, Inc . . . 303-663-3396
Compliance Management Group
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-281-5985
Compliance Worldwide, Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603-887-3903
Core Compliance Testing . . . 603 889-5545
D .L .S . Electronic Systems, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-537-6400
DNB Engineering, Inc . . . . . . . 714-870-7781
Electro Magnetic Test, Inc . . . 650-965-4000
EMC Integrity Inc . . . . . . . . . . 888-423-6275
EMCplus LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303-663-3396
G&M Compliance, Inc . . . . . . 714-628-1020
Nemko USA - SouthEast . . . 813-662-4606
Northwest EMC Inc . - Minnesota
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
Northwest EMC Inc .- California
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
Northwest EMC Inc . - Washington
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
Northwest EMC, Inc . - Oregon
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
NTS Fremont . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
SGS Consumer Testing Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-777-TEST (8378)
SIEMIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-526-1188
Test Site Services Inc . . . . . . . 508-962-1662
TÜV Rheinland of North America
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-TUV-RHEINLAND
CB Test Report
ACS - Atlanta, GA . . . . . . . . . . 770-831-8048
ACS - Boca Raton, FL . . . . . . 561-961-5585
ACS - Melbourne, FL . . . . . . . 321-951-1710
Compliance & More, Inc . . . 303-663-3396
CSA Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-463-1785
CSIA, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503-489-8006
Curtis-Straus (Bureau Veritas)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-277-8880
DNB Engineering, Inc . . . . . . . 714-870-7781
Electro Magnetic Test, Inc . . . 650-965-4000
EMCplus LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303-663-3396
G&M Compliance, Inc . . . . . . 714-628-1020
MET Laboratories . . . . . . . . . . 410-354-3300
Nemko USA - SouthEast . . . 813-662-4606
NTS Fremont . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
NTS Newark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
O'Brien Compliance Management
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-970-0525
Professional Testing . . . . . . 800-695-1077
SGS Consumer Testing Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-777-TEST (8378)
SIEMIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-526-1188
Test Site Services Inc . . . . . . . 508-962-1662
TÜV Rheinland of North America
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-TUV-RHEINLAND
UL LLC
CE Marking
ACS - Atlanta, GA . . . . . . . . . . 770-831-8048
ACS - Boca Raton, FL . . . . . . 561-961-5585
ACS - Melbourne, FL . . . . . . . 321-951-1710
American Certification Body, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-847-4700
Atlas Compliance & Engineering
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-573-9742
CertifiGroup Inc . . . . . . . . . . . 800-422-1651
CKC Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . . 800-500-4362
Compatible Electronics, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 650-417-EMC1 (3621)
Compliance & More, Inc . . . 303-663-3396
Compliance Management Group
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-281-5985
Compliance Worldwide, Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603-887-3903
Core Compliance Testing . . . 603 889-5545
CSA Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-463-1785
CSIA, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503-489-8006
Curtis-Straus (Bureau Veritas)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-277-8880
D .L .S . Electronic Systems, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-537-6400
DNB Engineering, Inc . . . . . . . 714-870-7781
Electro Magnetic Test, Inc . . . 650-965-4000
Electronics Test Centre . . . . 613-599-6800
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 227
Product/Service Directory
UL Verification Services . . .86 20 28667188
Test Site Services Inc . . . . . . . 508-962-1662
Trace Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . 410-584-9099
TÜV SÜD America Inc. . . . . 800-888-0123
P ro d u ct / S e r v ic e Direc tor y
Product/Service Directory
CE Marking continued
Electronics Test Centre - Airdrie
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403-912-0037
Elite Electronic Engineering . . 800-ELITE-11
EMC Integrity Inc . . . . . . . . . . 888-423-6275
EMC Testing Laboratories, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770-475-8819
EMCC DR . RASEK . . . . . . . . . . 49-9194-9016
EMCplus LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303-663-3396
Ergonomics, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-862-0102
F2 Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-405-1580
G&M Compliance, Inc . . . . . . 714-628-1020
Garwood Laboratories . . . . . 888-427-4111
Garwood Laboratories Inc . SC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-427-4111
Global EMC Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-441-7337
Green Mtn . Electromagnetics
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 802-388-3390
H .B . Compliance Solutions . . 480-684-2969
HCT Co ., Ltd . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82-31-645-6454
International Certification Services, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-286-6888
Intertek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-WORLDLAB
Keystone Compliance . . . . . . 724-657-9940
LabTest Certification Inc . . . . 604-247-0444
Lewis Bass International . . . . 408-942-8000
LS Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262-375-4400
MET Laboratories . . . . . . . . . . 410-354-3300
Montrose Compliance Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-247-5715
NCEE Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-567-6860
Nemko Canada . . . . . . . . . . . 613-737-9680
Nemko USA - SouthEast . . . 813-662-4606
Northwest EMC Inc . - Minnesota
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
Northwest EMC Inc .- California
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
Northwest EMC Inc . - Washington
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
Northwest EMC, Inc . - Oregon
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
NTS Fremont . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
NTS Fullerton . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-677-2687
NTS Newark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
NTS Northeast . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-723-2687
NTS Rockford . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-270-2516
O'Brien Compliance Management
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-970-0525
Product Safety Consulting . . 877-804-3066
Professional Testing . . . . . . 800-695-1077
Pulver Laboratories Inc . . . . . 800-635-3050
Radiometrics Midwest Corp.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 815-293-0772
Retlif Testing Laboratories
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-737-1500 x111
SGS Consumer Testing Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-777-TEST (8378)
SIEMIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-526-1188
Test Site Services Inc . . . . . . . 508-962-1662
Thermo Fisher Scientific
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-275-0800 x2302
228 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Testing Services
TÜV Rheinland of North America
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-TUV-RHEINLAND
TÜV SÜD America Inc. . . . . 800-888-0123
UL LLC
China Compulsory Certification
(CCC)
American Certification Body, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-847-4700
Compliance & More, Inc . . . 303-663-3396
CSA Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-463-1785
CSIA, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503-489-8006
D .L .S . Electronic Systems, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-537-6400
Electro Magnetic Test, Inc . . . 650-965-4000
EMC Integrity Inc . . . . . . . . . . 888-423-6275
EMCplus LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303-663-3396
G&M Compliance, Inc . . . . . . 714-628-1020
Garwood Laboratories . . . . . 888-427-4111
Garwood Laboratories Inc . SC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-427-4111
Go Global Compliance Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-416-3772
HCT Co ., Ltd . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82-31-645-6454
Nemko Canada . . . . . . . . . . . 613-737-9680
Nemko USA - SouthEast . . . 813-662-4606
RTF Compliance . . . . . . . . . . 949-813-6095
SGS Consumer Testing Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-777-TEST (8378)
SIEMIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-526-1188
TÜV Rheinland of North America
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-TUV-RHEINLAND
TÜV SÜD America Inc. . . . . 800-888-0123
UL LLC
Electrical Safety Testing
ACS - Atlanta, GA . . . . . . . . . . 770-831-8048
ACS - Boca Raton, FL . . . . . . 561-961-5585
ACS - Melbourne, FL . . . . . . . 321-951-1710
American Certification Body, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-847-4700
CASE Forensics . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-736-1106
CertifiGroup Inc . . . . . . . . . . . 800-422-1651
Compliance Management Group
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-281-5985
Core Compliance Testing . . . 603 889-5545
CSA Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-463-1785
Curtis-Straus (Bureau Veritas)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-277-8880
D .L .S . Electronic Systems, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-537-6400
DNB Engineering, Inc . . . . . . . 714-870-7781
Electro Magnetic Test, Inc . . . 650-965-4000
Elite Electronic Engineering . . 800-ELITE-11
EMCC DR . RASEK . . . . . . . . . . 49-9194-9016
eti Conformity Services . . . . . 877-468-6384
F2 Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-405-1580
G&M Compliance, Inc . . . . . . 714-628-1020
Global EMC Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-441-7337
Green Mtn . Electromagnetics
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 802-388-3390
HCT Co ., Ltd . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82-31-645-6454
High Voltage Maintenance . 866-486-8326
Intertek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-WORLDLAB
LabTest Certification Inc . . . . 604-247-0444
Lewis Bass International . . . . 408-942-8000
MET Laboratories . . . . . . . . . . 410-354-3300
NCEE Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-567-6860
Nemko Canada . . . . . . . . . . . 613-737-9680
Nemko USA - SouthEast . . . 813-662-4606
NTS Fremont . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
NTS Fullerton . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-677-2687
NTS Tinton Falls . . . . . . . . . . . 732-936-0800
Product Safety Consulting . . 877-804-3066
Professional Testing . . . . . . 800-695-1077
Pulver Laboratories Inc . . . . . 800-635-3050
Retlif Testing Laboratories
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-737-1500 x111
SGS Consumer Testing Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-777-TEST (8378)
Test Site Services Inc . . . . . . . 508-962-1662
TestingPartners .com . . . . . . . 862-243-2329
Trace Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . 410-584-9099
TÜV Rheinland of North America
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-TUV-RHEINLAND
TÜV SÜD America Inc. . . . . 800-888-0123
UL LLC
Ultratech EMC Lab . . . . . . . . . 905-829-1570
EMC Testing
ACS - Atlanta, GA . . . . . . . . . . 770-831-8048
ACS - Boca Raton, FL . . . . . . 561-961-5585
ACS - Melbourne, FL . . . . . . . 321-951-1710
Alion Science and Technology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 610-825-1960
Amber Precision Instruments, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-752-0199 x102
American Certification Body, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-847-4700
Americor Electronics Ltd . . . . 800-830-5337
www.incompliancemag.com
Product/Ser vice Director y
Testing Services
Atlas Compliance & Engineering
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-573-9742
CKC Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . . 800-500-4362
Compatible Electronics, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 650-417-EMC1 (3621)
Compliance & More, Inc . . . 303-663-3396
Compliance Management Group
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-281-5985
Compliance Worldwide, Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603-887-3903
Core Compliance Testing . . . 603 889-5545
CSIA, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503-489-8006
Curtis-Straus (Bureau Veritas)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-277-8880
D .L .S . Electronic Systems, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-537-6400
Pulver Laboratories Inc . . . . . 800-635-3050
Qualtest Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407-313-4230
Radiometrics Midwest Corp.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 815-293-0772
Retlif Testing Laboratories
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-737-1500 x111
RF Exposure Lab . . . . . . . . . . . 760-471-2100
SGS Consumer Testing Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-777-TEST (8378)
SIEMIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-526-1188
Southwest Research Institute
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210-522-2122
Test Site Services Inc . . . . . . . 508-962-1662
TestingPartners .com . . . . . . . 862-243-2329
Thermo Fisher Scientific
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-275-0800 x2302
Trace Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . 410-584-9099
TÜV Rheinland of North America
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-TUV-RHEINLAND
TÜV SÜD America Inc. . . . . 800-888-0123
UL LLC
Ultratech EMC Lab . . . . . . . . . 905-829-1570
Yazaki Testing Center . . . . . . 734-983-6012
Energy Efficiency Testing
ACS - Atlanta, GA . . . . . . . . . . 770-831-8048
ACS - Boca Raton, FL . . . . . . 561-961-5585
ACS - Melbourne, FL . . . . . . . 321-951-1710
CSA Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-463-1785
CSIA, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503-489-8006
G&M Compliance, Inc . . . . . . 714-628-1020
Intertek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-WORLDLAB
MET Laboratories . . . . . . . . . . 410-354-3300
Nemko USA - SouthEast . . . 813-662-4606
Pulver Laboratories Inc . . . . . 800-635-3050
SGS Consumer Testing Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-777-TEST (8378)
SIEMIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-526-1188
TÜV Rheinland of North America
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-TUV-RHEINLAND
TÜV SÜD America Inc. . . . . 800-888-0123
UL LLC
UL Verification Services . . .86 20 28667188
Environmental Simulation Testing
NTS - Corporate HQ . . . . . . 800-270-2516
NTS Europe GmbH . . . . . 49 89 787475 160
NTS Fremont . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
NTS Fullerton . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-677-2687
NTS Newark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
NTS Northeast . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-723-2687
NTS Plano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-717-2687
NTS Rockford . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-270-2516
NTS Tempe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 480-966-5517
NTS Tinton Falls . . . . . . . . . . . 732-936-0800
Professional Testing . . . . . . 800-695-1077
ACS - Atlanta, GA . . . . . . . . . . 770-831-8048
ACS - Boca Raton, FL . . . . . . 561-961-5585
ACS - Melbourne, FL . . . . . . . 321-951-1710
Cascade TEK - Oregon . . . . . 888-835-9250
Cascade TEK - Colorado . . . . 888-835-9250
Compliance Management Group
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-281-5985
Core Compliance Testing . . . 603 889-5545
CSZ Testing Services . . . . . . . 513-793-7774
Curtis-Straus (Bureau Veritas)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-277-8880
Dayton T . Brown, Inc . . . . . . . 800-TEST-456
DNB Engineering, Inc . . . . . . . 714-870-7781
Electronics Test Centre - Airdrie
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403-912-0037
Elite Electronic Engineering . . 800-ELITE-11
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 229
Product/Service Directory
Dayton T . Brown, Inc . . . . . . . 800-TEST-456
Electro Magnetic Test, Inc . . . 650-965-4000
Electronics Test Centre . . . . 613-599-6800
Electronics Test Centre - Airdrie
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403-912-0037
Elite Electronic Engineering . . 800-ELITE-11
EMC Compliance . . . . . . . . . . 256-650-5261
EMC Integrity Inc . . . . . . . . . . 888-423-6275
EMC Testing Laboratories, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770-475-8819
EMCC DR . RASEK . . . . . . . . . . 49-9194-9016
EMCplus LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303-663-3396
eti Conformity Services . . . . . 877-468-6384
F2 Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-405-1580
Flextronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 613-895-2053
G&M Compliance, Inc . . . . . . 714-628-1020
Garwood Laboratories . . . . . 888-427-4111
Garwood Laboratories Inc . SC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-427-4111
General Dynamics C4 Systems
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 480-441-5321
Global EMC Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-441-7337
Green Mtn . Electromagnetics
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 802-388-3390
H .B . Compliance Solutions . . 480-684-2969
HCT Co ., Ltd . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82-31-645-6454
International Certification Services, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-286-6888
Intertek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-WORLDLAB
Jacobs Technology . . . . . . . . 248-676-1101
Keystone Compliance . . . . . . 724-657-9940
L-3 Communications Cincinnati
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-543-8220
LabTest Certification Inc . . . . 604-247-0444
LCR Electronics, Inc. . . . . . . 800-527-4362
Lewis Bass International . . . . 408-942-8000
LS Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262-375-4400
MET Laboratories . . . . . . . . . . 410-354-3300
Microwave Vision Group . . . 678-797-9172
Montrose Compliance Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-247-5715
NCEE Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-567-6860
Nemko Canada . . . . . . . . . . . 613-737-9680
Nemko USA - SouthEast . . . 813-662-4606
NexTek, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-486-0582
Northwest EMC Inc . - Minnesota
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
Northwest EMC Inc .- California
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
Northwest EMC Inc . - Washington
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
Northwest EMC, Inc . - Oregon
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
P ro d u ct / S e r v ic e Direc tor y
Product/Service Directory
Environmental Simulation Testing
continued
EMCC DR . RASEK . . . . . . . . . . 49-9194-9016
Flextronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 613-895-2053
Garwood Laboratories . . . . . 888-427-4111
Garwood Laboratories Inc . SC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-427-4111
Global EMC Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-441-7337
Intertek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-WORLDLAB
Keystone Compliance . . . . . . 724-657-9940
L-3 Communications Cincinnati
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-543-8220
MET Laboratories . . . . . . . . . . 410-354-3300
NCEE Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-567-6860
Nemko USA - SouthEast . . . 813-662-4606
NTS Europe GmbH . . . . . 49 89 787475 160
NTS Fullerton . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-677-2687
NTS LAX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-559-3202
NTS Northeast . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-723-2687
NTS Plano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-717-2687
NTS Santa Clarita . . . . . . . . . . 800-270-2516
NTS Tempe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 480-966-5517
NTS Tinton Falls . . . . . . . . . . . 732-936-0800
Professional Testing . . . . . . 800-695-1077
Qualtest Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407-313-4230
Retlif Testing Laboratories
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-737-1500 x111
Trace Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . 410-584-9099
TÜV SÜD America Inc. . . . . 800-888-0123
Yazaki Testing Center . . . . . . 734-983-6012
EuP Directive Compliance
ACS - Atlanta, GA . . . . . . . . . . 770-831-8048
ACS - Boca Raton, FL . . . . . . 561-961-5585
ACS - Melbourne, FL . . . . . . . 321-951-1710
Curtis-Straus (Bureau Veritas)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-277-8880
Intertek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-WORLDLAB
Nemko USA - SouthEast . . . 813-662-4606
TÜV Rheinland of North America
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-TUV-RHEINLAND
UL Verification Services . . .86 20 28667188
GOST R certification
CSIA, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503-489-8006
DNB Engineering, Inc . . . . . . . 714-870-7781
Electro Magnetic Test, Inc . . . 650-965-4000
EMC Integrity Inc . . . . . . . . . . 888-423-6275
G&M Compliance, Inc . . . . . . 714-628-1020
Global EMC Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-441-7337
Go Global Compliance Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-416-3772
Keystone Compliance . . . . . . 724-657-9940
Nemko Canada . . . . . . . . . . . 613-737-9680
Nemko USA - SouthEast . . . 813-662-4606
Northwest EMC Inc . - Minnesota
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
Northwest EMC Inc .- California
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
230 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Testing Services
Northwest EMC Inc . - Washington
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
Northwest EMC, Inc . - Oregon
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
Professional Testing . . . . . . 800-695-1077
TestingPartners .com . . . . . . . 862-243-2329
Green Energy Compliance
CertifiGroup Inc . . . . . . . . . . . 800-422-1651
CSA Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-463-1785
Intertek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-WORLDLAB
TÜV Rheinland of North America
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-TUV-RHEINLAND
UL LLC
GS Mark Certification
Compliance & More, Inc . . . 303-663-3396
Curtis-Straus (Bureau Veritas)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-277-8880
Electro Magnetic Test, Inc . . . 650-965-4000
EMCplus LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303-663-3396
Global EMC Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-441-7337
Intertek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-WORLDLAB
Nemko Canada . . . . . . . . . . . 613-737-9680
Nemko USA - SouthEast . . . 813-662-4606
TÜV Rheinland of North America
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-TUV-RHEINLAND
UL LLC
Halogen Testing
Product Safety Consulting . . 877-804-3066
RTF Compliance . . . . . . . . . . 949-813-6095
SGS Consumer Testing Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-777-TEST (8378)
Lithium-Ion Battery Testing
Cascade TEK - Oregon . . . . . 888-835-9250
Cascade TEK - Colorado . . . . 888-835-9250
CASE Forensics . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-736-1106
Dayton T . Brown, Inc . . . . . . . 800-TEST-456
DNB Engineering, Inc . . . . . . . 714-870-7781
Elite Electronic Engineering . . 800-ELITE-11
Garwood Laboratories . . . . . 888-427-4111
Garwood Laboratories Inc . SC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-427-4111
Intertek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-WORLDLAB
Nemko USA - SouthEast . . . 813-662-4606
Product Safety Consulting . . 877-804-3066
SGS Consumer Testing Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-777-TEST (8378)
TÜV Rheinland of North America
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-TUV-RHEINLAND
TÜV SÜD America Inc. . . . . 800-888-0123
Marine Electronics Testing
Cascade TEK - Oregon . . . . . 888-835-9250
Cascade TEK - Colorado . . . . 888-835-9250
Compliance Management Group
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-281-5985
Compliance Worldwide, Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603-887-3903
Core Compliance Testing . . . 603 889-5545
Curtis-Straus (Bureau Veritas)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-277-8880
Dayton T . Brown, Inc . . . . . . . 800-TEST-456
Electro Magnetic Test, Inc . . . 650-965-4000
EMC Testing Laboratories, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770-475-8819
Garwood Laboratories . . . . . 888-427-4111
Garwood Laboratories Inc . SC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-427-4111
Green Mtn . Electromagnetics
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 802-388-3390
Nemko USA - SouthEast . . . 813-662-4606
NTS Northeast . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-723-2687
Professional Testing . . . . . . 800-695-1077
Qualtest Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407-313-4230
Retlif Testing Laboratories
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-737-1500 x111
Test Site Services Inc . . . . . . . 508-962-1662
Trace Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . 410-584-9099
Nationally Recognized Testing
Laboratory (NRTL)
CSA Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-463-1785
Curtis-Straus (Bureau Veritas)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-277-8880
Go Global Compliance Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-416-3772
Intertek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-WORLDLAB
MET Laboratories . . . . . . . . . . 410-354-3300
NTS - Corporate HQ . . . . . . 800-270-2516
NTS Europe GmbH . . . . . 49 89 787475 160
NTS Fullerton . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-677-2687
NTS Northeast . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-723-2687
NTS Tempe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 480-966-5517
NTS Tinton Falls . . . . . . . . . . . 732-936-0800
Product Safety Consulting . . 877-804-3066
Qualtest Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407-313-4230
SGS Consumer Testing Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-777-TEST (8378)
TÜV Rheinland of North America
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-TUV-RHEINLAND
TÜV SÜD America Inc. . . . . 800-888-0123
Network Equipment Building System
(NEBS) Testing
Cascade TEK - Oregon . . . . . 888-835-9250
Cascade TEK - Colorado . . . . 888-835-9250
Compliance Management Group
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-281-5985
Curtis-Straus (Bureau Veritas)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-277-8880
Dayton T . Brown, Inc . . . . . . . 800-TEST-456
Electro Magnetic Test, Inc . . . 650-965-4000
Flextronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 613-895-2053
Garwood Laboratories . . . . . 888-427-4111
Garwood Laboratories Inc . SC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-427-4111
www.incompliancemag.com
Product/Ser vice Director y
Testing Services
MET Laboratories . . . . . . . . . . 410-354-3300
NTS - Corporate HQ . . . . . . 800-270-2516
NTS Europe GmbH . . . . . 49 89 787475 160
NTS Fremont . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
NTS Fullerton . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-677-2687
NTS Newark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
NTS Northeast . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-723-2687
NTS Plano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-717-2687
NTS Tempe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 480-966-5517
NTS Tinton Falls . . . . . . . . . . . 732-936-0800
Southwest Research Institute
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210-522-2122
Thermo Fisher Scientific
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-275-0800 x2302
UL LLC
Product Pre-Compliance Testing
Curtis-Straus (Bureau Veritas)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-277-8880
D .L .S . Electronic Systems, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-537-6400
Dayton T . Brown, Inc . . . . . . . 800-TEST-456
DNB Engineering, Inc . . . . . . . 714-870-7781
ED&D Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-806-6236
Electro Magnetic Test, Inc . . . 650-965-4000
Electronics Test Centre . . . . 613-599-6800
Elite Electronic Engineering . . 800-ELITE-11
EMC Testing Laboratories, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770-475-8819
EMCC DR . RASEK . . . . . . . . . . 49-9194-9016
EMCplus LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303-663-3396
Ergonomics, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-862-0102
eti Conformity Services . . . . . 877-468-6384
F2 Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-405-1580
Flextronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 613-895-2053
G&M Compliance, Inc . . . . . . 714-628-1020
Garwood Laboratories . . . . . 888-427-4111
Garwood Laboratories Inc . SC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-427-4111
Global EMC Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-441-7337
Green Mtn . Electromagnetics
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 802-388-3390
H .B . Compliance Solutions . . 480-684-2969
HCT Co ., Ltd . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82-31-645-6454
High Voltage Maintenance . 866-486-8326
Intertek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-WORLDLAB
Product Safety Testing
ACS - Atlanta, GA . . . . . . . . . . 770-831-8048
ACS - Boca Raton, FL . . . . . . 561-961-5585
ACS - Melbourne, FL . . . . . . . 321-951-1710
Cascade TEK - Colorado . . . . 888-835-9250
CASE Forensics . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-736-1106
CertifiGroup Inc . . . . . . . . . . . 800-422-1651
CKC Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . . 800-500-4362
Compatible Electronics, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 650-417-EMC1 (3621)
Compliance & More, Inc . . . 303-663-3396
Core Compliance Testing . . . 603 889-5545
CSA Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-463-1785
Keystone Compliance . . . . . . 724-657-9940
LabTest Certification Inc . . . . 604-247-0444
Lewis Bass International . . . . 408-942-8000
MET Laboratories . . . . . . . . . . 410-354-3300
Montrose Compliance Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-247-5715
NCEE Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-567-6860
Nemko USA - SouthEast . . . 813-662-4606
NTS - Corporate HQ . . . . . . 800-270-2516
NTS Fremont . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
NTS Fullerton . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-677-2687
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 231
Product/Service Directory
ACS - Atlanta, GA . . . . . . . . . . 770-831-8048
ACS - Boca Raton, FL . . . . . . 561-961-5585
ACS - Melbourne, FL . . . . . . . 321-951-1710
Atlas Compliance & Engineering
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-573-9742
Cascade TEK - Colorado . . . . 888-835-9250
CASE Forensics . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-736-1106
CertifiGroup Inc . . . . . . . . . . . 800-422-1651
CKC Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . . 800-500-4362
Compatible Electronics, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 650-417-EMC1 (3621)
Compliance & More, Inc . . . 303-663-3396
Compliance Management Group
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-281-5985
Compliance Worldwide, Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603-887-3903
Core Compliance Testing . . . 603 889-5545
CSA Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-463-1785
CSIA, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503-489-8006
Curtis-Straus (Bureau Veritas)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-277-8880
D .L .S . Electronic Systems, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-537-6400
Dayton T . Brown, Inc . . . . . . . 800-TEST-456
Electro Magnetic Test, Inc . . . 650-965-4000
Electronics Test Centre - Airdrie
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403-912-0037
Elite Electronic Engineering . . 800-ELITE-11
EMC Integrity Inc . . . . . . . . . . 888-423-6275
EMCC DR . RASEK . . . . . . . . . . 49-9194-9016
EMCplus LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303-663-3396
Ergonomics, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-862-0102
eti Conformity Services . . . . . 877-468-6384
F2 Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-405-1580
Flextronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 613-895-2053
Garwood Laboratories . . . . . 888-427-4111
Garwood Laboratories Inc . SC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-427-4111
Global EMC Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-441-7337
H .B . Compliance Solutions . . 480-684-2969
International Certification Services, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-286-6888
Keystone Compliance . . . . . . 724-657-9940
L-3 Communications Cincinnati
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-543-8220
LCR Electronics, Inc. . . . . . . 800-527-4362
Lewis Bass International . . . . 408-942-8000
LS Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262-375-4400
Montrose Compliance Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-247-5715
NCEE Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-567-6860
Nemko Canada . . . . . . . . . . . 613-737-9680
Northwest EMC Inc . - Minnesota
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
Northwest EMC Inc .- California
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
Northwest EMC Inc . - Washington
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
Northwest EMC, Inc . - Oregon
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
NTS Fremont . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
NTS Plano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-717-2687
NTS Rockford . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-270-2516
O'Brien Compliance Management
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-970-0525
Parker Hannifin, Chomerics Div
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-935-4850
Product Safety Consulting . . 877-804-3066
Professional Testing . . . . . . 800-695-1077
Pulver Laboratories Inc . . . . . 800-635-3050
Qualtest Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407-313-4230
Radiometrics Midwest Corp.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 815-293-0772
Retlif Testing Laboratories
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-737-1500 x111
RF Exposure Lab . . . . . . . . . . . 760-471-2100
SGS Consumer Testing Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-777-TEST (8378)
Stephen Halperin & Associates
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630-238-8883
Test Site Services Inc . . . . . . . 508-962-1662
TestingPartners .com . . . . . . . 862-243-2329
Trace Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . 410-584-9099
TÜV Rheinland of North America
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-TUV-RHEINLAND
UL Verification Services . . .86 20 28667188
Ultratech EMC Lab . . . . . . . . . 905-829-1570
Wyatt Technical Services LLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-443-9275
P ro d u ct / S e r v ic e Direc tor y
Product/Service Directory
Product Safety Testing continued
NTS Newark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
NTS Northeast . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-723-2687
NTS Pittsfield . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-270-2516
NTS Plano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-717-2687
NTS Tempe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 480-966-5517
NTS Tinton Falls . . . . . . . . . . . 732-936-0800
O'Brien Compliance Management
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-970-0525
Product Safety Consulting . . 877-804-3066
Professional Testing . . . . . . 800-695-1077
Pulver Laboratories Inc . . . . . 800-635-3050
SGS Consumer Testing Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-777-TEST (8378)
SIEMIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-526-1188
Test Site Services Inc . . . . . . . 508-962-1662
TestingPartners .com . . . . . . . 862-243-2329
Trace Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . 410-584-9099
TÜV Rheinland of North America
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-TUV-RHEINLAND
TÜV SÜD America Inc. . . . . 800-888-0123
UL LLC
Radio Performance &
Functionality Testing
ACS - Atlanta, GA . . . . . . . . . . 770-831-8048
ACS - Boca Raton, FL . . . . . . 561-961-5585
ACS - Melbourne, FL . . . . . . . 321-951-1710
Compliance Worldwide, Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603-887-3903
Curtis-Straus (Bureau Veritas)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-277-8880
D .L .S . Electronic Systems, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-537-6400
Dayton T . Brown, Inc . . . . . . . 800-TEST-456
Electro Magnetic Test, Inc . . . 650-965-4000
Elite Electronic Engineering . . 800-ELITE-11
Flextronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 613-895-2053
Garwood Laboratories . . . . . 888-427-4111
Garwood Laboratories Inc . SC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-427-4111
Green Mtn . Electromagnetics
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 802-388-3390
H .B . Compliance Solutions . . 480-684-2969
Intertek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-WORLDLAB
Keystone Compliance . . . . . . 724-657-9940
LS Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262-375-4400
Microwave Vision Group . . . 678-797-9172
Nemko USA - SouthEast . . . 813-662-4606
NTS Fremont . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
Professional Testing . . . . . . 800-695-1077
RF Exposure Lab . . . . . . . . . . . 760-471-2100
SGS Consumer Testing Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-777-TEST (8378)
SIEMIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-526-1188
Ultratech EMC Lab . . . . . . . . . 905-829-1570
232 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Testing Services
RoHS Directive Compliance
Alberi EcoTech . . . . . . . . . . . . 702-677-6923
G&M Compliance, Inc . . . . . . 714-628-1020
Garwood Laboratories . . . . . 888-427-4111
Intertek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-WORLDLAB
Nemko Canada . . . . . . . . . . . 613-737-9680
Product Safety Consulting . . 877-804-3066
Professional Testing . . . . . . 800-695-1077
Pulver Laboratories Inc . . . . . 800-635-3050
RTF Compliance . . . . . . . . . . 949-813-6095
SGS Consumer Testing Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-777-TEST (8378)
TestingPartners .com . . . . . . . 862-243-2329
Trace Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . 410-584-9099
TÜV Rheinland of North America
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-TUV-RHEINLAND
UL LLC
Standards Council of Canada
Certification Body
ACS - Atlanta, GA . . . . . . . . . . 770-831-8048
ACS - Boca Raton, FL . . . . . . 561-961-5585
ACS - Melbourne, FL . . . . . . . 321-951-1710
Compliance Management Group
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508-281-5985
CSA Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-463-1785
Curtis-Straus (Bureau Veritas)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-277-8880
Electronics Test Centre . . . . 613-599-6800
Intertek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-WORLDLAB
LabTest Certification Inc . . . . 604-247-0444
MET Laboratories . . . . . . . . . . 410-354-3300
Nemko USA - SouthEast . . . 813-662-4606
Northwest EMC Inc . - Minnesota
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
Northwest EMC, Inc . - Oregon
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
NTS Fremont . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
Retlif Testing Laboratories
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-737-1500 x111
SGS Consumer Testing Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-777-TEST (8378)
SIEMIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-526-1188
TÜV Rheinland of North America
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-TUV-RHEINLAND
TÜV SÜD America Inc. . . . . 800-888-0123
UL LLC
CSIA, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503-489-8006
Curtis-Straus (Bureau Veritas)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-277-8880
D .L .S . Electronic Systems, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847-537-6400
DNB Engineering, Inc . . . . . . . 714-870-7781
Electro Magnetic Test, Inc . . . 650-965-4000
Elite Electronic Engineering . . 800-ELITE-11
G&M Compliance, Inc . . . . . . 714-628-1020
Garwood Laboratories . . . . . 888-427-4111
Garwood Laboratories Inc . SC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-427-4111
Go Global Compliance Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-416-3772
H .B . Compliance Solutions . . 480-684-2969
Intertek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-WORLDLAB
MET Laboratories . . . . . . . . . . 410-354-3300
Microwave Vision Group . . . 678-797-9172
Nemko Canada . . . . . . . . . . . 613-737-9680
Nemko USA - SouthEast . . . 813-662-4606
Northwest EMC Inc . - Minnesota
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
Northwest EMC Inc .- California
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
Northwest EMC, Inc . - Oregon
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-364-2378
NTS - Corporate HQ . . . . . . 800-270-2516
NTS Fremont . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-245-7800
NTS Northeast . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-723-2687
Professional Testing . . . . . . 800-695-1077
Retlif Testing Laboratories
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-737-1500 x111
SGS Consumer Testing Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-777-TEST (8378)
SIEMIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408-526-1188
Test Site Services Inc . . . . . . . 508-962-1662
TestingPartners .com . . . . . . . 862-243-2329
Thermo Fisher Scientific
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-275-0800 x2302
TÜV Rheinland of North America
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-TUV-RHEINLAND
UL LLC
Ultratech EMC Lab . . . . . . . . . 905-829-1570
Telecommunication Certification
Approval
ACS - Atlanta, GA . . . . . . . . . . 770-831-8048
ACS - Boca Raton, FL . . . . . . 561-961-5585
ACS - Melbourne, FL . . . . . . . 321-951-1710
Compatible Electronics, Inc .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 650-417-EMC1 (3621)
www.incompliancemag.com
Vendor Director y
ACS - Melbourne, FL
Abstraction Engineering Inc
A.H. Systems, Inc.
9710 Cozycroft Avenue
Chatsworth, CA 91311 USA
tel: 818-998-0223
fax: 818-998-6892
[email protected] .com
http://www .ahsystems .com
3Gmetalworx Inc.
http://www .abstractionengineering .com
Abstraction Engineering is
professional engineering for safe
machinery . We provide CE Mark
(LVD-MD-EMC), SEMI S2 and tracer
gas, RIA R15 .06 robot, hazard labels
and manuals, field labels (Silicon
Valley, Oregon, Minnesota, and
other locations), and factory safety
including arc flash, LOTO, and QEW
training . Give us a call today .
Abstraction Engineering has a
reputation for competent fast
service without the hassle . Checklists
and reports are easy to read . Our
certifications are accredited by many
top tier companies in your industry .
We have well known affiliations
including Montrose Compliance
(EMC), LaCroix-Davis (tracer gas),
PSL (power testing), and others .
A2LA
5301 Buckeystown Pike, Suite 350
Fredrick, MD 21704 USA
tel: 301-644-3204
fax: 301-662-2974
[email protected] .org
http://www .A2LA .org
ACS - Atlanta, GA
90 Snow Boulevard
Concord, ON L4K 2C6 Canada
tel: 905-738-7973 x 229
toll free: 888-965-3634
[email protected] .com
http://www .3gmetalworx
5015 B .U . Bowman Drive
Buford, GA 30518 USA
tel: 770-831-8048
fax: 770-831-8598
[email protected] .com
http://www .acstestlab .com
3M Electronic Solutions
ACS - Boca Raton, FL
926 JR Industrial Drive
Sanford, NC 27332 USA
tel: 512-984-6747
[email protected] .com
http://www .3MStatic .com
Ad-Vance Magnetics
625 Monroe Street
Rochester, IN 46975 USA
tel: 574-223-3158
fax: 574-223-2524
[email protected] .com
http://www .advancemag .com
Adams Magnetic Products
807 Mantoloking Road
Brick, NJ 08723 USA
tel: 732-451-0123
toll free: 800-275-6312
fax: 732-451-0339
[email protected] .com
http://www .adamsmagnetic .com/
soft-magnetic-cores/soft_ferrite_cores .php
Admired Services
Components
695 Central Avenue
Saint Petersburg, FL 33701 USA
tel: 727-346-5157
[email protected] .com
http://www .admiredelectroniccomponents .com
Advanced ESD Services +
818 E . Windsor Road
Windsor, NY 13865 USA
tel: 607-759-8133
[email protected] .net
http://advancedesdservices .com
Advanced Test
Equipment Rentals
10401 Roselle Street
San Diego, CA 92121 USA
tel: 858-558-6500
fax: 858-558-6570
[email protected] .com
http://www .atecorp .com
3998 FAU Boulevard, Suite 310
Boca Raton, FL 33431 USA
tel: 561-961-5585
fax: 561-961-5587
[email protected] .com
http://www .acstestlab .com
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 233
Vendor Directory
A .H . Systems manufactures a
complete line of affordable, reliable,
individually calibrated EMC Test
Antennas, Preamplifiers, Current
Probes and Low-Loss, HighFrequency Cables that satisfy FCC,
MIL-STD, VDE, IEC and SAE testing
standards . We also provide tripods
and accessories that compliment
other EMC testing equipment used to
complete your testing requirements .
We provide rental programs for our
equipment and offer recalibration
services for Antennas, Preamplifiers,
Current Probes and Cables, including
other manufacturers worldwide .
A .H . Systems provides next-day,
on-time delivery for a fast turn
around schedule to help minimize
any down time the customer may
be experiencing during testing .
Manufacturing high quality products
at competitive prices with immediate
shipment plus prompt technical
support are goals we strive to achieve
at A .H . Systems .
6590 Felter Road
San Jose, CA 95132-3410 USA
tel: 408-258-3282
[email protected]
abstractionengineering .com
284 West Drive, Suite B
Melbourne, FL 32904 USA
tel: 321-951-1710
fax: 321-951-2362
[email protected] .com
http://www .acstestlab .com
Ven d o r D i re cto r y
American Certification
Body, Inc.
Agilent Technologies
5301 Stevens Creek Boulevard
Santa Clara, CA 95051 USA
tel: 800-829-4444
toll free: 800-829-4444
fax: 800-829-4433
[email protected] .com
http://www .agilent .com/find/emc
Vendor Directory
Agilent Technologies Inc . (NYSE: A)
is the world's premier measurement
company and a technology leader
in chemical analysis, life sciences,
diagnostics, and electronic
measurement .
Agilent offers EMI measurement
solutions for compliance and
precompliance testing . The CISPRcompliant MXE EMI receiver delivers
outstanding measurement accuracy
and sensitivity as well as extensive
diagnostic tools . To ensure successful
compliance testing, Agilent's
EMC measurement application
can perform precompliance
measurements with any X-Series
signal analyzer . Through Agilent
Solutions Partners, combine
Agilent products with value-added
integration, software, probes,
antennas, chambers, and more for a
complete solution that meets MILSTD and commercial specifications .
AE Techron, Inc.
2507 Warren Street
Elkhart, IN 46516 USA
tel: 574-295-9495
fax: 574-295-9496
[email protected] .com
http://www .aetechron .com
Aeroflex
10200 W York Street
Wichita, KS 67215 USA
tel: 316-522-4981
toll free: 800-835-2352
fax: 316-524-2623
[email protected] .com
http://www .aeroflex .com
234 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Americor Electronics Ltd.
675 S Lively Boulevard
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007 USA
tel: 847-956-6200
toll free: 800-830-5337
fax: 847-956-0300
[email protected] .com
http://www .americor-usa .com
Americor's product line includes
power cords, IEC 320 power inlets,
cable assemblies, power supplies,
relays, solenoids, fans, terminal blocks
and strips, Piezo electric, EMI/RFI
filters, transformers domesticinternational, adapters, and shielded
flexible conduits . ISO9001:2008 &
RoHS . The new catalog is free,
easy to use, and available online at
www .americor-usa .com .
6731 Whittier Avenue, Suite C110
McLean, VA 22101 USA
tel: 703-847-4700
fax: 703-847-6888
[email protected] .com
http://www .acbcert .com
Amphenol Canada Corp.
605 Milner Avenue
Toronto, ON M1B 5X6 Canada
tel: 416-754-5688
fax: 416-292-0647
[email protected] .com
http://www .amphenolcanada .com
André Consulting, Inc.
12812 NE 185th Court
Bothell, WA 98011-3121 USA
tel: 206-406-8371
fax: 425-485-8153
[email protected] .com
http://www .andreconsulting .com
Alberi EcoTech
6130 Elton Avenue #370
Las Vegas, NV 89107 USA
tel: 702-677-6923
[email protected] .com
http://www .AlberiEcoTech .com
Alco Technologies, Inc.
1815 W . 213th Street #175
Torrance, CA 90501 USA
tel: 310-328-4770
fax: 310-328-1262
[email protected] .com
http://www .alcotech .com
Alion Science and Technology
20 Clipper Road
West Conshohocken, PA 19428 USA
tel: 610-825-1960
fax: 610-825-1684
[email protected] .com
http://rb .alionscience .com
Amber Precision
Instruments, Inc.
746 San Aleso Avenue
Sunnyvale, CA 94085 USA
tel: 408-752-0199 x102
fax: 408-752-0355
[email protected] .com
http://www .amberpi .com
ANDRO Computational
Solutions
7902 Turin Road, Suite 2-1
Rome, NY 13440 USA
tel: 315-334-1163
fax: 315-334-1397
[email protected] .com
http://www .androcs .com
API Technologies Corp.
4705 S . Apopka Vineland Road, Suite 210
Orlando, FL 32819 USA
tel: 855-294-3800
[email protected] .com
http://www .apitech .com
Applied EM Technology
Post Office Box 1437
Solomons, MD 20688-1437 USA
tel: 410-326-6728
[email protected] .com
http://www .AppliedEMtech .com
ARC Technical Resources, Inc.
2006 Lockwood Drive
San Jose, CA 95132 USA
tel: 408-263-6486
[email protected] .com
http://www .arctechnical .com
www.incompliancemag.com
Vendor Director y
Aum Electro Technology Pvt Ltd
AR RF/Microwave
Instrumentation
160 School House Road
Souderton, PA 18964 USA
tel: 215-723-8181
toll free: 888-933-8181
[email protected] .us
http://www .arworld .us
AR is your once source for
RF/Microwave amplifiers, amplifier
modules, complete EMC test systems,
EMI receivers and more .
The parent company consists of
AR RF/Microwave Instrumentation,
AR Modular RF, AR Receiver Systems
and AR Europe .
AR RF/Microwave Instrumentation –
Souderton, PA
• RF Power Amplifiers, 1 – 50,000
watts, dc – 1 GHz
• Microwave Amplifiers, 1 – 10,000
watts, 0 .8 – 45 GHz
• RF Conducted Immunity Generators
• Radiated Immunity Test Systems
• EMC Test Software
• EMC and RF Test Accessories
Atlas Compliance &
Engineering
1792 Little Orchard Street
San Jose, CA 95125 USA
tel: 408-971-9743
toll free: 866-573-9742
fax: 408-971-9783
[email protected] .com
http://www .atlasce .com
Atlas Compliance & Engineering,
located in San Jose, California, is an
accredited test lab which has been
in business since 1997 . We specialize
in EMC testing for North America,
Europe, Japan, Korea and many other
markets . We also provide In Situ and
Product Safety testing . Our solutions
support your business during the
complete product development cycle,
from design to production, ensuring
consistent compliance, accelerating
market access . We are very
reasonable in our prices and we offer
many benefits as an engineering
focused laboratory . Scheduling
is quick and we work with you to
accommodate your needs . We are a
service organization and as such we
understand your need to have the
process of regulatory compliance to
be as smooth and quick as possible .
ARC Technologies, Inc.
11 Chestnut Street
Amesbury, MA 01913 USA
tel: 978-388-2993
fax: 978-388-6866
[email protected] .com
http://www .arc-tech .com
Associated Power
Technologies
1142 S . Diamond Bar Boulevard #106
Diamond Bar, CA 91765 USA
tel: 909-860-1646
toll free: 877-322-7693
[email protected] .com
http://www .aspowertechnologies .com
Associated Research, Inc
13860 W . Laurel Drive
Lake Forest, IL 60045 USA
tel: 847-367-4077
toll free: 800-858-8378
[email protected] .com
http://www .asresearch .com
Audivo GmbH
Irrenloher Damm 17
Schwarzenfeld, D 92521 Germany
tel: 49-9435-5419-0
fax: 49-9435-5419-19
[email protected] .com
http://www .audivo .com
Avalon Equipment Corporation
2453 Cades Way, Building B
Vista, CA 92081 USA
tel: 760-536-0191
toll free: 888-542-8256
fax: 760-536-0184
[email protected] .com
http://www .avalontestequipment .com
Barth Electronics, Inc.
1589 Foothill Drive
Boulder City, NV 89005 USA
tel: 702-293-1576
fax: 702-293-7024
[email protected] .com
http://www .BarthElectronics .com
BestESD Technical Services
P .O . Box 5146
Santa Cruz, CA 95063 USA
tel: 831-824-4052
fax: 206-350-7458
[email protected] .com
http://www .bestesd .com
Bittele Electronics
250 Consumers Road, Suite 202
North York, Ontario M2J 4V6 Canada
tel: 416-800-7540
[email protected] .com
http://www .bittele .com
BMI Surplus
149 King Street
Hanover, MA 02339 USA
tel: 781-871-8868
fax: 781-871-7412
[email protected] .com
http://www .bmius .com
Braden Shielding Systems
9260 Broken Arrow Expressway
Tulsa, OK 74145 USA
tel: 918-624-2888
fax: 918-624-2886
[email protected] .com
http://www .bradenshielding .com
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 235
Vendor Directory
• Hybrid Power Modules, , 1-6 & 4 – 18
GHz and custom design
D-22 Phase 2, MIDC Dombivli East
Thane, Maharashtra 421203 India
tel: 91 2512871365
[email protected] .in
http://www .aumtech .in
Ven d o r D i re cto r y
Captor Corporation
5040 S . County Road
Tipp City, OH 45371 USA
tel: 937-667-8484
fax: 937-667-5133
[email protected] .com
http://www .captorcorp .com
Cascade TEK - Oregon
5245 NE Elam Young Parkway
Hillsboro, OR 97124 USA
tel: 503-648-1818
toll free: 888-835-9250
fax: 503-648-1798
[email protected] .com
http://www .cascadetek .com/
product-testing-services
Cascade TEK - Colorado
Vendor Directory
1530 Vista View Drive
Longmont, CO 80504 USA
tel: 720-340-7810
toll free: 888-835-9250
fax: 720-684-6919
[email protected] .com
http://www .cascadetek .com/
product-testing-services
CASE Forensics
4636 N Williams Avenue
Portland, OR 97217 USA
tel: 503-736-1106
toll free: 877-736-1106
fax: 503-736-1051
[email protected] .com
http://www .case4n6 .com
CertifiGroup Inc
901 Sheldon Drive
Cary, NC 27513 USA
tel: 800-422-1651
toll free: 800-422-1651
fax: 919-481-6716
[email protected] .com
http://www .CertifiGroup .com
Chroma Systems
Solutions, Inc.
19772 Pauling
Foothill Ranch, CA 92610 USA
tel: 949-600-6400
fax: 949-600-6401
[email protected] .com
http://www .chromausa .com
236 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
CITEL, Inc.
11381 Interchange Circle South
Miramar, FL 33025 USA
tel: 954-430-6310
toll free: 800-248-3548
fax: 954-430-7785
[email protected] .us
http://www .citel .us
CKC Laboratories, Inc.
5046 Sierra Pines Drive
Mariposa, CA 95338 USA
tel: 209-966-5240
toll free: 800-500-4362
fax: 866-779-9776
gina [email protected] .com
http://www .ckc .com
Clarion Safety Systems
190 Old Milford Road
Milford, PA 18337 USA
tel: 570-296-5686
toll free: 800-748-0241
fax: 570-296-5656
[email protected] .com
http://www .clarionsafety .com
CMD Ltd
Eastwood Trading Estate
Rotherham, South Yorkshire S65 1EN
United Kingdom
tel: 44 1709 829511
[email protected] .co .uk
http://www .cmd-ltd .com
Com-Power Corporation
114 Olinda Drive
Brea, CA 92823 USA
tel: 714-528-8800
fax: 714-528-1992
[email protected] .com
http://www .com-power .com
Compatible Electronics, Inc.
114 Olinda Drive
Brea, CA 92823 USA
tel: 650-417-EMC1 (3621)
fax: 714-528-1992
[email protected] .com
http://www .celectronics .com
Compliance & More, Inc
1076 Deer Clover Way
Castle Rock, CO 80108 USA
tel: 303-663-3396
fax: 303-663-5545
[email protected] .com
http://compliance-more .com
Compliance Management
Group
202 Forest Street
Marlborough, MA 01752 USA
tel: 508-281-5985
fax: 508-281-5972
[email protected] .NET
http://www .cmgcorp .net
Compliance Worldwide, Inc.
357 Main Street
Sandown, NH 03873 USA
tel: 603-887-3903
fax: 603-887-6445
[email protected] .com
http://www .cw-inc .com
Comply Tek, Inc.
13114 Lomas Verdes Drive
Poway, CA 92064 USA
tel: 858-674-6155
[email protected] .com
http://www .ComplyTek .com
Conec Corporation
343 Technology Drive
Garner, NC 27529 USA
tel: 919-460-8800
fax: 919-460-0141
[email protected] .com
http://www .conec .com
Corcom/Tyco Electronics
620 S . Butterfield Road
Mundelein, IL 60060 USA
tel: 847-573-6504
[email protected] .com
http://www .corcom .com
Core Compliance Testing
79 River Road
Hudson, NH 03051 USA
tel: 603-889-5545
[email protected] .com
http://www .corecompliancetesting .com
www.incompliancemag.com
Vendor Director y
CSIA, LLC
CST of America
492 Old Connecticut Path, Suite 500
Framingham, MA 1701 USA
tel: 508-665 4400
fax: 508-665 4401
[email protected] .com
http://www .cst .com
CPI, Inc.
45 River Drive
Georgetown, ON L7G 2J4 Canada
tel: 905-877-0161
fax: 905-877-5327
tom [email protected] .com
http://www .cpii .com/emc
CSZ Testing Services
11901 Mosteller Road
Cincinnati, OH 45241 USA
tel: 513-793-7774
fax: 513-793-7277
[email protected] .com
http://www .csztesting .com
Cuming-Lehman
Chambers, Inc.
5800 Cumberland Highway
Chambersburg, PA 17202 USA
tel: 717-263-4101
fax: 717-263-4102
[email protected] .com
http://www .cuminglehman .com
Curtis Industries
2400 S . 43rd Street
Milwaukee, WI 53219 USA
tel: 414-649-4200
toll free: 800-657-0853
fax: 414-649-4279
[email protected] .com
http://www .curtisind .com
CSA Group
8501 E Pleasant Valley Road
Cleveland, OH 44131-5516 USA
tel: 216-524-4990
toll free: 866-463-1785
cert [email protected] .org
http://csagroup .org
1250 Peterson Drive
Wheeling, IL 60090 USA
tel: 847-537-6400
fax: 847-537-6488
[email protected] .com
http://www .dlsemc .com
D .L .S . Electronic Systems, Inc . offers
EMC, Product Safety, Wireless, and
Environmental compliance testing
and consulting services for electric
and electronic equipment and
devices for the Military, Avionics,
Commercial, Medical, and Industrial
marketplace, including MIL STD,
RTCA, FCC, IC, CE, IEC, ETSI,EN, UL-c,
UL and other global standards . D .L .S .
is a NVLAP Accredited and iNARTE
certified organization, is accredited
to the UL third party testing program,
and is a Notified Body for EMC and
RTTE Directives . D .L .S . offers design
seminars on a regular basis, including
proprietary design software and a
hands-on workshop .
Curtis-Straus (Bureau Veritas)
One Distribution Center Circle, Suite 1
Littleton, MA 01460 USA
tel: 978-486-8880
toll free: 877-277-8880
fax: 978-486-8828
[email protected] .com
http://www .bureauveritas .com/ee
CQC Co LTD
Subislawa 23m/13
Gdansk, Pomorskie 80-180 Poland
tel: 48 509959591
[email protected] .eu
http://www .certificator .eu
D.L.S. Electronic
Systems, Inc.
CV DIMULTI
JL Swatantra V, Villa Andalusia No .9
Jatirasa, Jatiasih
Bekasi, Jawa Barat 17424 Indonesia
tel: 62 12132608337
fax: 62 2182415949
[email protected] .com
http://www .dimulti .co .id
D. C. Smith Consultants
1305 Arizona Street
Boulder Dam Hotel, Suite 101
Boulder City, NV 89005 USA
tel: 702-570-6108
toll free: 800-323-3956
[email protected] .org
http://emcesd .com
dB Instruments Co.
22 Berwick Road
Easton, MA 02375 USA
tel: 508-238-1303
fax: 508-238-6098
[email protected] .com
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 237
Vendor Directory
CST develops and markets high
performance EM field simulation
software . Its products allow you to
characterize, design and optimize
electromagnetic devices before
going into the lab or measurement
chamber . This can help save
substantial costs especially for new
or cutting edge products, reduce
design risk, and improve overall
performance and profitability . CST
STUDIO SUITE® enables the fast and
accurate electromagnetic simulation
of high frequency devices and the
analysis of emissions or susceptibility
of electromagnetic systems
(including cables) in the time and
frequency domain . CST's customers
operate in industries as diverse
as Telecommunications, Defense,
Automotive, Electronics, and
Medical Equipment .
61535 SW Highway 97, Suite 9635
Bend, OR 97702 USA
tel: 503-489-8006
[email protected] .com
http://www .csiassoc .com
Ven d o r D i re cto r y
Dexmet Corporation
Dayton T. Brown, Inc.
Vendor Directory
1195 Church Street
Bohemia, NY 11716 USA
tel: 631-589-6300
toll free: 800-TEST-456
fax: 631-589-3648
[email protected] .com
http://www .dtbtest .com
Dayton T . Brown, Inc . is an A2LA/
NVLAP accredited independent engineering and testing lab . Please see our
website for our scopes of accreditation . DTB offers environmental, vibration, EMI/EMC and structural testing
to a host of international standards,
including commercial and military
requirements . We also provide engineering analysis to our customers for
both physical and electrical characteristics, as well as, for dimensional and
material inspection, failure analysis
and reverse engineering . Tap into our
experience, flexibility, reduced timeto-test and low set up costs, to satisfy
your most demanding test objective .
Ask about our new T5500, 3 inch
displacement, vibration facility or our
new 100 meter indoor ballistics range .
DDB Unlimited, Inc
8445 Highway 77N
Wynnewood, OK 73098 USA
tel: 800-753-8459 ext 2828
toll free: 800-753-8459
fax: 405-665-9995
[email protected] .com
http://www .ddbunlimited .com
Delcross Technologies, LLC
3015 Village Office Place
Champaign, IL 61822 USA
tel: 217-363-3396
[email protected] .com
http://www .delcross .com
Design Chain Associates, LLC
5 3rd Street, Suite 732
San Francisco, CA 94103 USA
tel: 415-904-8330
toll free: 866-322-7676 x2
[email protected] .com
http://www .DesignChainAssociates .com
238 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
22 Barnes Industrial Road South
Wallingford, CT 06492 USA
tel: 203-294-7867
fax: 203-294-7898
k [email protected] .com
http://www .dexmet .com
Dexter Magnetic Technologies
1050 Morse Avenue
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007 USA
tel: 847-956-1140
toll free: 800-317-2537
fax: 847 956 8205
[email protected] .com
http://www .dextermag .com
DJM Electronics
2907 Shelter Island Drive #105-138
San Diego, CA 92106 USA
tel: 619-299-6090
toll free: 866-DJM-ELEC
fax: 619-299-6090
[email protected] .com
http://www .djmelectronics .com
DMAS
Industrieweg 12
Zoeterwoude 2382NV The Netherlands
tel: 31 715012526
[email protected] .eu
http://www .dmas .eu
DNB Engineering, Inc.
3535 W . Commonwealth Avenue
Fullerton, CA 92835 USA
tel: 714-870-7781
fax: 714-870-5081
[email protected] .com
http://www .dnbenginc .com
Don HEIRMAN Consultants
143 Jumping Brook Road
Lincroft, NJ 07738-1442 USA
tel: 732-741-7723
fax: 732-530-5695
d [email protected] .org
http://www .donheirman .com
Dynamic Sciences International
6130 Variel Avenue
Woodland Hills, CA 91604 USA
tel: 818-226-6262
toll free: 800-966-3713
fax: 818-226-6247
[email protected] .com
http://www .dynamicsciences .com
ED&D Inc.
901 Sheldon Drive
Cary, NC 27513 USA
tel: 919-469-9434
toll free: 800-806-6236
fax: 919-469-5743
[email protected] .com
http://www .ProductSafeT .com
World leading manufacturer of
Product Safety test equipment,
including Hipot, ground continuity,
leakage current, access probes,
impact testers, burn test equipment,
ingress protection equipment, cable
and cord testers, and everything else .
ISO 17025 accredited .
East Coast Shielding
37 Route 46
Hackettstown, NJ 07840 USA
tel: 908-852-9160
fax: 908-852-9163
[email protected] .com
http://www .eastcoastshielding .com
Eisner Safety Consultants
3331 SW Seymour Street
Portland, OR 97239 USA
tel: 503-244-6151
fax: 503-244-6152
[email protected] .com
http://www .EisnerSafety .com
Electri-Flex Company
222 W . Central Avenue
Roselle, IL 60172 USA
tel: 630-529-2920
toll free: 800-323-6174
fax: 630-529-0482
[email protected] .com
http://www .electriflex .com
Electro Magnetic Test, Inc.
1547 Plymouth Street
Mountain View, CA 94043 USA
tel: 650-965-4000
fax: 650-965-3000
[email protected] .com
http://www .emtlabs .com
www.incompliancemag.com
Vendor Director y
Electronics Test Centre
302 Legget Drive
Kanata, ON K2K 1Y5 Canada
tel: 613-599-6800
fax: 613-599-7614
lynn [email protected] .com
http://www .etc-mpb .com
The Electronics Test Centre brings
compliance and certification services,
as well as, customized test and
engineering to the Aeronautical,
Automotive, Medical, Military and
Telecommunications industries .
We are NVLAP accredited and
experienced in a bRd spectrum of
standards, including Commercial,
Military, and Aerospace . Additional
services offered include mechanical
engineering, consultation and custom
fabrication .
Electro Rent Corporation
Electronic Instrument
Associates
PO Box 6487
Bloomingdale, IL 60108 USA
tel: 630-924-1600
fax: 630-477-0321
[email protected] .com
http://www .electronicinstrument .com
Electronics Test Centre Airdrie
27 East Lake Hill
Airdrie, AB T4A 2K3 Canada
tel: 403-912-0037
fax: 403-912-0083
[email protected] .com
http://www .etc-mpb .com
1516 Centre Circle
Downers Grove, IL 60515 USA
tel: 630-495-9770
toll free: 800-ELITE-11
[email protected] .com
http://www .elitetest .com
Elite Electronic Engineering is the
premiere accredited independent test
laboratory in North America . Experts
in the fields of EMC, Environmental
stress testing and electrical products
and components testing and
certification since 1954 . Elite caters
to the automotive, aerospace,
military, medical, and commercial
electrical products industries . With an
extensive 45,000 square foot facility
conveniently located in Chicago,
Elite offers efficient, effective and
inexpensive testing and consulting to
suit the gamut of testing needs .
Elna Magnetics
203 Malden Turnpike
Saugerties, NY 12477 USA
tel: 845-247-2000
toll free: 800-553-2870
fax: 845-247-0196
[email protected] .com
http://www .elnamagnetics .com
EM Software & Systems-S.A.
32 Techno Avenue
Stellenbosch, 7600 South Africa
tel: 27 21 831 1500
fax: 27 21 880 1936
[email protected] .co .za
http://www .feko .info
100 Exploration Way, Suite 310-B
Hampton, VA 23666 USA
tel: 757-224 0548
toll free: 800-419-5566 (FEKO)
fax: 757-282 5897
[email protected] .com
http://www .feko .info
FEKO: Comprehensive
Electromagnetic Simulation Tool
EM Software & Systems (USA) Inc is
established to distribute and support
FEKO in the United States, Canada,
Mexico and Central America . FEKO is
a leading CEM code for the analysis
of: antennas (wire antennas, patch
antennas, horn antennas, integrated
antenna systems, etc .), antenna
placement on electrically small and
large structures, electromagnetic
compatibility, microstrip circuits and
antennas in stratified media and
dielectric bodies .
EMC Integrity Inc.
1736 Vista View Drive
Longmont, CO 80504 USA
tel: 303-776-7249
toll free: 888-423-6275
fax: 303-776-7314
[email protected] .com
http://www .emcintegrity .com
EMC Technologists
5033 Industrial Road, Building . 6
Farmingdale, NJ 07727 USA
tel: 732-919-1100
fax: 732-919-7196
[email protected] .com
http://www .emctech .com
EMC Compliance
P .O . Box 14161
Huntsville, AL 35815-0161 USA
tel: 256-650-5261
ken [email protected] .com
http://www .emccompliance .com
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 239
Vendor Directory
6060 Sepulveda Boulevard
Van Nuys, CA 91411 USA
tel: 800-688-1111
toll free: 800-688-1111
fax: 818-374-7399
[email protected] .com
http://www .ElectroRent .com
Elite Electronic Engineering
EM Software & Systems
(USA) Inc
Ven d o r D i re cto r y
EM TEST USA
9250 Brown Deer Road
San Diego, CA 92121 USA
tel: 858-450-0085
fax: 858-458-0267
tom [email protected] .com
http://www .emtest .com
Vendor Directory
EM Test manufactures simulators
and generators to meet international,
national and corporate EMC
requirements for virtually all
industries including Automotive,
Avionics, Consumer Electronics,
Industrial Controls, Medical, Military,
Telecom, and others . We provide
test solutions for ESD, Surge, Fast
Transients, Conducted RF, and a wide
variety of AC and DC power mains
tests, including many specialized
requirements in the automotive and
avionics fields .
EMC Test Design, LLC
P .O . 600532
Newton, MA 02460 USA
tel: 508-292-1833
[email protected] .com
http://www .emctd .com
EMC Testing Laboratories, Inc.
2100 Brandon Trail
Alpharetta, GA 30004 USA
tel: 770-475-8819
fax: 770-475-2011
[email protected] .com
http://emctesting .com
EMCC DR. RASEK
Moggast, Boelwiese 4 - 8
Ebermannstadt, 91320 Germany
tel: 49-9194-9016
fax: 49-9194-8125
i [email protected] .de
http://www .emcc .de
EMCplus LLC
1076 Deer Clover Way
Castle Rock, CO 80108 USA
tel: 303-663-3396
fax: 303-663-5545
[email protected] .com
http://emcplus .com
240 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
ESDEMC Technology LLC
EMSCAN
#1, 1715-27 Avenue N .E .
Calgary, AB T2E 7E1 Canada
tel: 403-291-0313
fax: 403-250-8786
[email protected] .com
http://www .emscan .com
EMSCAN is a world-leading
developer of real-time magnetic verynear-field measurement solutions . We
provide real-time visual test Solutions
for antenna and PCB designers and
verification engineers . We have two
product portfolios:
RFxpert is the only real-time,
compact, bench-top antenna
measurement equipment that
calculates accurate far-field patterns
and radiated power levels based on
near-field measurements . Immediate
access to FF data saves time and
cost by reducing reliance upon time
consuming and costly anechoic
chambers . Unique NF data provides
insight into root cause of problems .
EMxpert is a real-time, compact,
bench-top EMC/EMI diagnostic
tool enabling designers to rapidly
diagnose and solve EMC/EMI
problems in a single design cycle .
EMI Instrumentation
650 Rogers Circle
Folsom, CA 95630 USA
tel: 805-835-8547
steven [email protected] .com
http://emi-i .com
EMI Solutions
13805 Alton Parkway #B
Irvine, CA 92618 USA
tel: 949-206-9960
fax: 949-206-9983
[email protected] .com
http://www .4EMI .com
4000 Enterprise Drive, Suite 103
Rolla, MO 65401 USA
toll free: 877-864-8479
[email protected] .com
http://www .esdemc .com
• IV-Curve TLP Systems up to
30A (TLP/VFTLP), customize up
to 10kV/200A for bench top or
60kV/1200A for rack mount
• HV RF Pulse Attenuators up to
5kV/4GHz
• ESD Simulators up to 30kV (300kV
for military use)
• ESD Calibration Kits up to 4GHz
• Cable Discharge Event Testers
• HV DC Supply Modules
• HV Measurements up to 120kV
• IC Stripline TEM Cells up to 5 .5GHz
• Customized RF System Design up to
30GHz
ESDEMC Technology designs,
manufactures and markets ESD
and EMC related products . We
are devoted to delivering creative,
flexible and cost effective ESD
and EMC solutions and top-level
consulting services . We offer
customized design services to
satisfy all of our customers .
EMSS Consulting
3 Meson Avenue
Stellenbosch, 7600 South Africa
tel: 27 21 880 1880
[email protected] .co .za
http://www .emssixus .com
Ergonomics, Inc.
324 Second Street Pike Unit 3
Southampton, PA 18966 USA
tel: 215-357-5124
toll free: 800-862-0102
fax: 215-364-7582
[email protected] .com
http://www .ergonomicsusa .com
www.incompliancemag.com
Vendor Director y
Fil-Coil
ETS-Lindgren
1301 Arrow Point Drive
Cedar Park, TX 78613 USA
tel: 512-531-6400
[email protected] .com
http://www .ets-lindgren .com
ESD Association
7900 Turin Road, Building 3
Rome, NY 13440-2069 USA
tel: 315-339-6937
fax: 315-339-6793
[email protected] .org
http://www .esda .org
Espresso Engineering
6731 Whittier Avenue, Suite C110
McLean, VA 22101 USA
tel: 703-847-4700
fax: 703-847-6888
[email protected] .tv
http://espressoengineering .tv
eti Conformity Services
8760 Orion Place, Suite 110
Columbus, OH 43240 USA
tel: 877-468-6384
fax: 614-410-8500
[email protected] .com
http://www .eticonformity .com
1 Commercial Row
Wallkill, NY 12589 USA
tel: 845-895-2055
toll free: 888-324-7748
fax: 845-895-2629
[email protected] .com
http://www .fair-rite .com
For over fifty years Fair-Rite Products
Corp . has been the first choice in
cost effective ferrite components .
We offer a comprehensive product
line that includes a wide range of
materials and geometries for EMI
Suppression, Power Applications, and
RFID Antennas . We place the highest
value on quality, engineering, service,
and continual improvement . FairRite Products Corp . supplies a wide
variety of standard catalog ferrite
parts to thousands of customers
worldwide . Many commonly used
ferrite parts are stocked by our
distributors, who offer prompt
deliveries . In addition to our standard
product offering, Fair-Rite can provide
custom designs and shapes to meet
your specific requirements . We have
an experienced team of engineers
to assist you with new design and
technical support .
F2 Labs
26501 Ridge Road
Damascus, MD 20872 USA
tel: 440-632-5541 x208
toll free: 877-405-1580
fax: 440-632-5542
[email protected] .com
http://www .f2labs .com
FerriShield
12420 Race Track Road
Tampa, FL 33626 USA
tel: 813-855-6921
toll free: 866-TECH-EMI
fax: 813-855-3291
[email protected] .com
http://www .ferrishield .com
Filconn Inc.
3324 N . San Marcos Place
Chandler, AZ 85225 USA
tel: 480-222-3565
fax: 480-222-3567
[email protected] .com
http://www .filconn .com
Finero USA L.L.C.
3009 Lake Manatee Court
Cape Coral, FL 33909 USA
tel: 239-898-8487
[email protected] .com
http://www .qacontrol .com
Fischer Custom
Communications
20603 Earl Street
Torrance, CA 90503 USA
tel: 310-303-3300
fax: 310-371-6268
[email protected] .com
http://www .fischercc .com
Flextronics
21 Richardson Side Road
Ottawa, ON K4A 3H6 Canada
tel: 613-895-2053
fax: 613-271-2581
philippe [email protected] .flextronics .com
http://www .flexdvc .com
Fotofab
3758 W . Belmont Avenue
Chicago, IL 60618 USA
tel: 773-463-6211
fax: 773-463-3387
[email protected] .com
http://www .fotofab .com
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 241
Vendor Directory
ETS-Lindgren is a leading
manufacturer of turn-key systems
and components for EMC, Wireless,
Acoustic, and RF testing . We
adapt new technologies and apply
proven engineering principles to
create value-added solutions for
our customers . Our well known
products include antennas, field
probes and monitors, positioners, RF
and microwave absorbers, shielded
enclosures, and anechoic chambers,
to name a few . Innovative software
offered includes TILE!™ for EMC test
lab management and EMQuest™ for
antenna pattern measurement .
ETS-Lindgren provides expert calibration services at our A2LA accredited
calibration lab . Based in Cedar Park,
Texas, ETS-Lindgren has facilities in
North America, South America,
Europe and Asia . For more information visit www .ets-lindgren .com
Fair-Rite Products Corp.
77-18 Windsor Place
Centeral Islip, NY 11722 USA
tel: 631-467-5328
fax: 631-467-5066
[email protected] .com
http://custompowersystem .com
Ven d o r D i re cto r y
G&M Compliance, Inc.
Go Global Compliance Inc.
154 South Cypress Street
Orange, CA 92866 USA
tel: 714-628-1020
fax: 714-628-1021
[email protected] .com
http://www .gmcompliance .com
Garwood Laboratories
7829 Industry Avenue
Pico Rivera, CA 90660 USA
tel: 562-949-2727
toll free: 888-427-4111
fax: 562-949-8757
[email protected] .com
http://www .garwoodlabs .com
Garwood Laboratories Inc. SC
143 Calle Iglesia
San Clemente, CA 92672 USA
tel: 949-361-9189
toll free: 888-427-4111
fax: 949-361-9597
[email protected] .com
http://www .garwoodlabs .com/gsc
Vendor Directory
GAUSS INSTRUMENTS
Agnes-Pockels-Bogen 1
Muenchen, 80992 Germany
tel: 49-89-54-04-699-0
[email protected] .com
http://www .tdemi .com
General Dynamics C4 Systems
8201 E McDowell Road
Scottsdale, AZ 85257 USA
tel: 480-441-5321
harry [email protected] .com
http://www .gdc4s .com
Genisco Filter Corp
5466 Complex Street, Suite 207
San Diego, CA 92123 USA
tel: 858-565-7405
fax: 858-565-7415
[email protected] .com
http://www .genisco .com
Giga-tronics Incorporated
4650 Norris Canyon Road
San Ramon, CA 94583 USA
tel: 925-328-4650
toll free: 800-277-9764
fax: 925-328-4700
[email protected] .com
http://www .gigatronics .com
242 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
4454 Crabapple Court
Tracy, CA 95377 USA
tel: 408-416-3772
[email protected] .com
http://www .goglobalcompliance .com
Grund Technical
Solutions, LLC
5932 Amapola Drive
San Jose, CA 95129 USA
tel: 510-453-2617
fax: 408-446-4061
[email protected] .com
http://www .grundtech .com
At GTS our constant commitment
is to provide for all your ESD device
characterization needs . We do this by
developing cutting edge equipment
with features you wont find anywhere
else . Whether you’re a designer,
technician, or program manager we
have the products and expertise to
solve the problems you face .
Our products fall into three main
categories, stress generation, stress
delivery, and stress measurement .
This means we can offer you a fully
integrated solution that can not only
generate the standards compliant
waveforms to qualify your devices,
but deliver them to your part without
distortions, while showing you what
stress was provided to your part
measured at your part .
Global EMC Inc.
11 Gordon Collins Drive, PO Box 581
Gormley, ON L0H 1G0 Canada
tel: 905-883-8189
toll free: 888-441-7337
fax: 905-883-7995
[email protected] .com
http://www .globalemclabs .com
Global Test Equipment
1424 Centre Circle
Downers Grove, IL 60515 USA
tel: 630-678-0400
toll free: 866-409-0400
fax: 630-678-0404
[email protected] .com
http://www .4gte .com
Green Mtn. Electromagnetics
219 Blake Roy Road
Middlebury, VT 05753 USA
tel: 802-388-3390
fax: 802-388-6279
[email protected] .com
http://www .gmelectro .com
H.B. Compliance Solutions
5005 S . Ash Avenue, Suite #A-10
Tempe, AZ 85282 USA
tel: 480-684-2969
[email protected] .com
http://www .hbcompliance .com
Haefely EMC Technology
1650 Route 22 N .
Brewster, NY 10509 USA
tel: 845-279-3644 x240
fax: 845-279-2467
[email protected] .com
http://www .haefelyemc .com
HCT Co., Ltd.
105-1 Jangam-ri, Majang-myeon
Icheon, Gyeonggi 467-811 South Korea
tel: 82-31-645-6454
fax: 82-31-645-6401
[email protected] .co .kr
http://www .hct .co .kr
Henry Ott Consultants
48 Baker Road
Livingston, NJ 07039-2502 USA
tel: 973-992-1793
fax: 973-533-1442
h [email protected] .net
http://www .hottconsultants .com
Hermon Laboratories TI
Hatachana Street
Binyamina, 30500 Israel
tel: 972-4-6268401
fax: 972-4-6288277
[email protected] .com
http://www .hermonlabs .com
www.incompliancemag.com
Vendor Director y
High Voltage Maintenance
5100 Energy Drive
Dayton, OH 45414 USA
tel: 937-278-0811
toll free: 866-486-8326
fax: 937-278-7791
[email protected] .com
http://www .hvmcorp .com
HM Cragg
7674 Washington Avenue South
Eden Prairie, MN 55344 USA
tel: 952-884-7775
toll free: 800-672-7244
fax: 952-884-7739
[email protected] .com
http://www .hmcragg .com
Hoolihan EMC Consulting
32515 Nottingham Court - Box 367
Lindstrom, MN 55045 USA
tel: 651-213-0966
fax: 651-213-0977
[email protected] .com
http://www .emcxpert .com
HV TECHNOLOGIES, Inc.
In Compliance Magazine
531 King Street, Suite 5
Littleton, MA 01460 USA
tel: 978-486-4684
fax: 978-486-4691
[email protected] .com
http://www .incompliancemag .com
iNARTE at RABQSA
International
600 N . Plankinton Avenue, Suite 301
Milwaukee, WI 53201 USA
tel: 414-272-3937
toll free: 800-89-NARTE
[email protected] .com
http://www .narte .org
1310 Tully Road, Suite 117
San Jose, CA 95122 USA
tel: 408-971-2055
fax: 408-971-6033
[email protected] .com
http://www .intermark-usa .com
iNARTE at
RABQSA International
International Certification
Services, Inc.
600 N . Plankinton Ave ., Suite 301
Milwaukee, WI 53201 USA
tel: 414-272-3937
toll free: 800-89-NARTE
[email protected] .com
http://www .narte .org
1100 Falcon Avenue
Glencoe, MN 55336 USA
tel: 320-864-4444
toll free: 888-286-6888
fax: 320-864-6611
[email protected] .com
http://www .icsi-us .com
WE GET YOU RECOGNIZED
iNARTE is credentialing brand offered
by RABQSA International, a nonprofit, credentialing body . We offer
validation of professional credentials
for Engineers and Technicians
through a number of certification
programs in Telecommunications,
Electromagnetic Compatibility,
Electrostatic Discharge Control
and Product Safety Engineering .
Whether just starting out, or widely
experienced, iNARTE Certification can
get your career on the Fast Track .
Interpower Corporation
PO Box 115
Oskaloosa, IA 52577 USA
tel: 800-662-2290
[email protected]ower .com
http://www .interpower .com
Intertek
70 Codman Hill Road
Boxborough, MA 01719 USA
tel: 800-WORLDLAB
[email protected] .com
http://intertek .com
Innco Systems GmbH
Erlenweg 12
Schwarzenfeld, D-92521 Germany
tel: 49-9435-301659-0
fax: 49-9435-301659-99
[email protected] .com
http://www .inncosystems .com
IQS, a Division of CMG
257 Simarano Drive
Marlborough, MA 01752 USA
tel: 508-460-1400
fax: 508-460-7979
[email protected] .com
http://www .iqscorp .com
Instruments For Industry, Inc.
903 South Second Street
Ronkonkoma, NY 11779 USA
tel: 631-467-8400
fax: 631-467-8558
[email protected] .com
http://www .ifi .com
Get Social with Us.
facebook.com/incompliancemag
@InComplianceMag
linkedin.com/company/in-compliance-magazine
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 243
Vendor Directory
8526 Virginia Meadows Drive
Manassas, VA 20109 USA
tel: 703-365-2330
fax: 703-365-2331
[email protected] .com
http://www .hvtechnologies .com/
EMCSolutions/tabid/56/Default .aspx
Intermark USA, Inc.
Ven d o r D i re cto r y
JDM LABS LLC
Ja-Bar Silicone Corp
252 Brighton Road
Andover, NJ 07821 USA
tel: 973-786-5000
fax: 973-786-5546
[email protected] .com
http://jabar .com
Vendor Directory
Ja-Bar specializes in silicone and
elastomeric materials for electromagnetic shielding . Products include
Electrically Conductive particle filled
elastomers, Wire oriented in silicone,
Elastomer filled metallic sheeting,
BeCu fingers, Shielding Vents and
Windows, manufactured to Military,
Federal, AMS, SAE and customer
specifications .
AZ . . .Steven Bess . . . . . . . . . . 480-967-5332
CA . . .GL Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . 714-701-1800
CT . . .Tuna Associates . . . . . . 617-548-0741
IA . . . .Harris Hanson . . . . . . . . 636-519-7776
KS . . .Harris Hanson . . . . . . . . 636-519-7776
MA . .Tuna Associates . . . . . . 617-548-0741
ME . . .Tuna Associates . . . . . . 617-548-0741
MO . .Harris Hanson . . . . . . . . 636-519-7776
NE . . .Harris Hanson . . . . . . . . 636-519-7776
NH . .Tuna Associates . . . . . . 617-548-0741
OR . . .GL Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . 714-701-1800
RI . . . .Tuna Associates . . . . . . 617-548-0741
VT . . .Tuna Associates . . . . . . 617-548-0741
WA . .GL Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . 714-701-1800
GBR . .Ja-Bar Europe . . . . . .44-1543-254410
ISR . . Phoenix International . .972-9-7644800
Jacobs Technology
3300 General Motors Road
MC-483-340-145
Milford, MI 48380 USA
tel: 248-676-1101
fax: 248-676-1135
debra [email protected] .com
Jastech EMC Consulting LLC
47523 Clipper Street
Plymouth, MI 48170 USA
tel: 248-876-4810
fax: 866-790-9081
[email protected] .com
http://www .Jastech-EMC .com
244 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
430 Weidner Road
Buffalo Grove, IL 60089 USA
tel: 847-630-2769
[email protected] .org
JEMIC Shielding Technology
1160 South Cameron Street
Harrisburg, PA 17104 USA
tel: 717-232-1030
[email protected] .com
http://jemic .com
K-Form, Inc.
9A Acacia Lane
Sterling, VA 20166 USA
tel: 703-450-4401
fax: 703-894-4914
[email protected] .com
http://www .kform .com
Keystone Compliance
131 Columbus Inner Belt
New Castle, PA 16101 USA
tel: 724-657-9940
fax: 724-657-9920
[email protected] .com
http://www .keystonecompliance .com
Kimmel Gerke Associates, Ltd.
628 LeVander Way
South Street . Paul, MN 55075 USA
tel: 651-457-3715
toll free: 888-EMI-GURU
fax: 651-457-4139
[email protected] .com
http://www .emiguru .com
Krefine Co.Ltd.
420 Lexington Avenue, Suite 2525
New York, NY 10170 USA
tel: 520-838-0548
fax: 520-838-0548
[email protected] .com
http://www .Krefine .com
L-3 Communications Cincinnati
7500 Innovation Way
Mason, OH 45040 USA
tel: 513-573-6809
toll free: 800-543-8220
fax: 513-573-6499
[email protected] .com
http://www .cinele .com/
environmental .html
LabTest Certification Inc.
3133 - 20800 Westminster Highway
Richmond, BC V6V2W3 Canada
tel: 604-247-0444
fax: 604-247-0442
colin [email protected] .com
http://www .labtestcert .com
Laird Technologies
3481 Rider Trail South
Earth City, MO 63045 USA
tel: 636-898-6215
fax: 636-898-6100
[email protected] .com
http://www .lairdtech .com
Lambda Calibration Ltd
Stump Lane
Chorley, Lancs PR6 0BL
United Kingdom
[email protected] .com
http://www .lambda-cal .co .uk
LCR Electronics, Inc.
9 South Forest Avenue
Norristown, PA 19401 USA
tel: 610-278-0840
toll free: 800-527-4362
fax: 610-278-0935
[email protected] .com
http://www .lcr-inc .com
Leader Tech
12420 Race Track Road
Tampa, FL 33626 USA
tel: 813-855-6921
toll free: 866-TECH-EMI
fax: 813-855-3291
[email protected] .com
http://www .leadertechinc .com
Lewis Bass International
1250 Ames Avenue
Milpitas, CA 95035 USA
tel: 408-942-8000
fax: 408-957-9621
sandeep [email protected] .com
http://www .lewisbass .com
Liberty Labs, Inc.
1346 Yellowwood Road
Kimballton, IA 51543 USA
tel: 712-773-2199
fax: 712-773-2299
[email protected] .com
http://www .liberty-labs .com
www.incompliancemag.com
Vendor Director y
Lionheart Northwest
15874 NE 93rd Way
Redmond, WA 98052 USA
tel: 425-882-2587
fax: 425-952-8739
[email protected] .com
http://www .lionheartnw .com
LS Research
W66 N220 Commerce Court
Cedarburg, WI 53012 USA
tel: 262-375-4400
fax: 262-375-4248
[email protected] .com
http://www .lsr .com
Lubrizol Conductive Polymers
9911 Brecksville Road
Cleveland, OH 44141 USA
tel: 866-680-1555
toll free: 866-680-1555
fax: 216-447-5750
[email protected] .com
http://www .stat-rite .com
Mag Daddy
MAJR Products, Inc.
17540 State Highway 198
Saegertown, PA 16433 USA
tel: 814-763-3211
toll free: 877-625-7776
fax: 814-763-2952
[email protected] .com
http://www .majr .com
Master Bond
154 Hobart Street
Hackensack, NJ 07601 USA
tel: 201-343-8983
fax: 201-343-2132
[email protected] .com
http://www .masterbond .com
MC Global Access
Carlsbad Boulevard
Carlsbad, CA 92008 USA
tel: 760-696-3700
[email protected] .com
http://www .mcglobalaccess .com
740 N . Thomas Drive
Bensenville, IL 60106 USA
tel: 630-766-7800
toll free: 888-766-7800
fax: 630-766-2813
[email protected] .com
http://www .magnetic-shield .com
Since 1941, Magnetic Shield
Corporation has provided magnetic
shielding materials and custom
fabrications for OEM customers,
worldwide . Today, we offer our
proprietary brands of high permeability
alloys as magnetic shields, for EMI
shielding of sensitive electrical &
electronic components and equipment .
Our brands of MuMETAL®, CO-NETIC®,
and NETIC® alloys are used Worldwide .
Our other popular, specialty electrical/
electronics shielding for wiring
applications include INTER-8® Weave
Cable, Spira-Shield flexible conduit, and
CO-NETIC® Braided Sleeving, and are
used to shield sensitive circuits in many
industries and market segments . Our
engineering staff will work closely with
you to design custom solutions, and
address to your specific interference
problem . We will then execute your
design to fabricate your shields in a
timely fashion with superior quality our hallmark for over 70 years .
Megalin Source International
3F-6 Sec .1 Xin-Tai-Wu Road
Si-Chi District, New Taipei City, 221
Taiwan
tel: 886-2-8698-4181
fax: 886-2-8698-4197
[email protected] .com
http://www .megalinsource .com
MET Laboratories
914 W . Patapsco
Baltimore, MD 21230 USA
tel: 410-354-3300
fax: 410-354-3313
[email protected] .com
http://www .metlabs .com
Metal Textiles Corporation
970 New Durham Road
Edison, NJ 08818 USA
tel: 732-287-0800 x150
fax: 732-287-8546
[email protected] .com
http://www .metexcorp .com
Metal Textiles has been a manufacturer
of standard & custom EMI/RFI
Shielding products for over 50
years, serving Military, government,
automotive, manufacturing, and
commercial electronic industries .
Our line of products include Wire mesh
tape, wire mesh gasketing, combine
strips, metalized fabric over foam,
conductive elastomers, vent panels,
conductive gaskets, fingerstock, & EMI
windows .
As an ISO/TS 16949 Registered & ISO
3001 Registered company, we offer
solid technical and customer support
while also giving competitive pricing
and outstanding delivery .
MetaGeek
10147 Emerald Street, Suite 150
Boise, ID 83704 USA
tel: 208-639-3140
[email protected] .net
http://www .metageek .net
MI Technologies
1125 Satellite Boulevard, Suite 100
Suwanee, GA 30024-4629 USA
tel: 678-475-8345
fax: 678-542-2601
[email protected] .com
http://www .mi-technologies .com
Microwave Vision Group
2105 Barrett Park Drive, Suite 104
Kennesaw, GA 19044 USA
tel: 678-797-9172
[email protected] .com
http://www .microwavevision .com
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 245
Vendor Directory
1155 Rose Road
Lake Zurich, IL 60047 USA
tel: 847-719-5600
[email protected] .com
http://www .magdaddyusa .com
Magnetic Shield Corporation
Ven d o r D i re cto r y
Monroe Electronics, Inc.
100 Housel Avenue
Lyndonville, NY 14098 USA
tel: 585-765-2254
[email protected] .com
http://www .monroe-electronics .com
Michigan Scientific
Corporation
321 East Huron Street
Milford, MI 48381 USA
tel: 248-685-3939
fax: 248-684-5406
http://www .michsci .com
Vendor Directory
Michigan Scientific Corporation
(MSC) is the leading manufacturer of
Fiber-Optic Systems that provide RF
immunity for signals that are linked
to/from equipment under test during
automotive component and full-scale
vehicle electromagnetic compatibility
(EMC) engineering and testing .
MSC Fiber-Optic Systems have earned
a reputation for superior stability
and immunity that is necessary for
Monitoring/Sourcing signals To/From
any DUT/EUT located in high-field
areas such as anechoic chambers .
This is especially true when seeking
certification with the Automotive
Electromagnetic Compatibility
Laboratory Recognition Program
(AEMCLRP) . MSC F-O Links are also
compatible with BCI testing when used
as recommended .
MILMEGA Ltd
Park Road
Ryde, Isle of Wight PO33 2BE
United Kingdom
tel: 44 1983 618004
fax: 44 1983 811521
[email protected] .co .uk
http://www .milmega .com
MKS ION Systems
1750 North Loop Road
Alameda, CA 94502 USA
tel: 510-217-0600
toll free: 800-367-2452
fax: 510-217-0484
[email protected] .com
http://www .mksinst .com
246 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Montrose Compliance
Services
2353 Mission Glen Drive
Santa Clara, CA 95051-1214 USA
tel: 408-247-5715
fax: 408-247-5715
[email protected] .com
http://www .montrosecompliance .com
MossBay EDA
23889 NE 112th Circle #2
Redmond, WA 98053 USA
tel: 206-779-5345
[email protected] .com
http://www .mossbayeda .com
Murata Electronics
2200 Lake Park Drive
Smyrna, GA 30080 USA
tel: 770-433-5782
toll free: 800-554-4070
fax: 770-436-3030
[email protected] .com
http://www .murata .com
The MuShield Company Inc.
9 Ricker Avenue
Londonderry, NH 03053 USA
tel: 603-666-4433 x21
toll free: 888-669-3539
fax: 603-666-4013
[email protected] .com
http://www .mushield .com
Narda Safety Test Solutions
435 Moreland Road
Hauppauge, NY 11788 USA
tel: 631-231-1700
fax: 631-231-1711
[email protected] .com
http://www .narda-sts .us
NEC Corporation
7-1, Shiba 5-chome, Minato-ku
Tokyo, 108-8001 Japan
[email protected] .jp .nec .com
http://www .nec .com
NCEE Labs
4740 Discovery Drive
Lincoln, NE 68521 USA
tel: 402-323-6233
toll free: 888-567-6860
fax: 402-323-6238
[email protected] .com
http://www .nceelabs .com
NCEE Labs is an A2LA accredited
testing facility offering EMC,
Environmental, Safety testing and
consulting which gives us the flexibility
to develop the testing program that's
right for you .
Our 15,700 square foot state-of-the-art
facility houses one of the nation's few
public 10-m semi-anechoic chambers
as well as a 3-m chamber, so we can
handle products of a variety of shapes
and sizes .
Nemko Canada
303 River Road
Ottawa, ON K1V 1H2 Canada
tel: 613-737-9680
fax: 613-737-9691
sim [email protected] .com
http://www .nemko .com
Nemko USA - SouthEast
Tampa Sales Office
Tampa, FL 33511 USA
tel: 813-662-4606
andrew [email protected] .com
http://www .nemko .com
Nexlogic Technologies, Inc.
2085 Zanker Road
San Jose, CA 95131 USA
tel: 408-436-8150
toll free: 866-845-1197
fax: 408-436-8156
[email protected] .com
http://www .nexlogic .com
www.incompliancemag.com
Vendor Director y
NexTek, Inc.
2 Park Drive, Building #1
Westford, MA 01886 USA
tel: 978-486-0582
fax: 978-486-0583
[email protected] .com
http://www .nexteklightning .com
Noise Laboratory Co
(NoiseKen)
1-4-4, Chiyoda, Chuo-ku
Sagamihara City, Kanagawa Pref
252-0237 Japan
tel: 81 (0) 42 712 2051
fax: 81 (0) 42 712 2051
[email protected] .com
http://www .noiseken .com
NQA Canada
7 Donat
Valleyfield, QC J6S 6C9 Canada
tel: 514-242-2655
fax: 450-373-1835
[email protected] .com
http://www .nqacanada .ca
NQA Indiana
700 E . Beardsley Avenue
Elkhart, IN 46514 USA
tel: 574-264-0745
toll free: 800-398-8282
fax: 574-264-0740
[email protected] .com
http://www .nqa-usa .com
NQA West Coast
Northwest EMC Inc. Minnesota
9349 W Broadway Avenue
Brooklyn Park, MN 55445 USA
toll free: 888-364-2378
[email protected] .com
http://www .nwemc .com
41 Tesla Avenue
Irvine, CA 92618 USA
toll free: 888-364-2378
[email protected] .com
http://www .nwemc .com
Northwest EMC Inc. Washington
19201 120th Avenue NE Suite 104
Bothell, WA 98011 USA
tel: 888-364-2378
toll free: 888-364-2378
[email protected] .com
http://www .nwemc .com
Northwest EMC, Inc. - Oregon
22975 NW Evergreen Parkway, Suite
400
Hillsboro, OR 97124 USA
tel: 503-943-3122
toll free: 888-364-2378
fax: 503-844-3826
[email protected] .com
http://www .nwemc .com
NQA, USA
4 Post Office Square
Acton, MA 01720 USA
tel: 978-635-9256
toll free: 800-649-5289
fax: 978-263-0785
[email protected] .com
http://www .nqa-usa .com
NTS - Corporate HQ
24007 Ventura Boulevard
Calabasas, CA 91302 USA
tel: 800-270-2516
toll free: 800-270-2516
[email protected] .com
http://www .nts .com
NTS Albuquerque
3801 Academy Parkway, North, NE
Albuquerque, NM 87109 USA
tel: 505-821-4740
fax: 505-821-5210
[email protected] .com
http://www .nts .com
Hofmannstr . 50
Munich, D-81379 Germany
tel: 4-89-787475-160
[email protected] .com
http://www .nts .com/locations/europe
NTS Fremont
41039 Boyce Road
Fremont, CA 94538 USA
tel: 510-578-3500
toll free: 877-245-7800
fax: 510-440-9525
[email protected] .com
http://www .nts .com
NTS Fullerton
1536 East Valencia Drive
Fullerton, CA 92831 USA
tel: 714-879-6110
toll free: 800-677-2687
fax: 714-879-6117
[email protected] .com
http://www .nts .com
NTS LAX
5320 West 104th Street
Los Angeles, CA 90045 USA
tel: 310-348-0900
toll free: 800-559-3202
fax: 310-670-7556
[email protected] .com
http://www .nts .com/locations/los_
angeles
NTS Newark
38995 Cherry Street
Newark, CA 94560 USA
tel: 510-578-3500
toll free: 877-245-7800
fax: 510-440-9525
[email protected] .com
http://www .nts .com
NTS Northeast
1146 Massachusetts Avenue
Boxborough, MA 02109 USA
tel: 978-266-1001
toll free: 800-723-2687
fax: 978-266-1073
[email protected] .com
http://www .nts .com
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 247
Vendor Directory
Northwest EMC Inc. California
3639 Harbor Boulevard, Suite 202
Ventura, CA 93001 USA
tel: 805-644-8476
toll free: 888-734-4476
fax: 805-644-8451
[email protected] .com
http://www .nqa-usa .com
NTS Europe GmbH
Ven d o r D i re cto r y
NTS Pittsfield
10 Downing Industrial Parkway
Pittsfield, MA 01201-3890 USA
tel: 413-499-2135
toll free: 800-270-2516
fax: 413-499-2503
[email protected] .com
http://www .nts .com
NTS Plano
1701 East Plano Parkway, Suite 150
Plano, TX 75074 USA
tel: 972-509-2566
toll free: 877-717-2687
fax: 972-509-0073
[email protected] .com
http://www .nts .com
NTS Rockford
Vendor Directory
3761 South Central Avenue
Rockford, IL 61102 USA
tel: 815-315-9250
toll free: 800-270-2516
fax: 815-489-9561
[email protected] .com
http://www .nts .com
OnFILTER, Inc.
Okaya Electric America, Inc.
52 Marks Road, Suite 1
Valparaiso, IN 46383 USA
tel: 219-477-4488
toll free: 800-852-0122
fax: 219-477-4856
[email protected] .com
http://www .okaya .com
Okaya Electric is a manufacturer
of Noise and Surge Suppression
devices . Okaya is the world's leading
manufacturer of X-capacitors and
a leading manufactuer of Surge
suppressors including AC and DC
Power line, Electrostatic and Network
line and SMD TVSS gas tubes . Other
products include EMI-RFI Filters,
Single Phase, Three Phase, IEC Inlet
and PCB Style, Lightning arrestors, Gas
Discharge Tubes, Spark Quenchers
and High Pulse and Snubber Caps .
Okaya also offers a complete line of
LCD, TFT and OLED displays .
NTS Santa Clarita
20970 Centre Pointe Parkway
Santa Clarita, CA 91350 USA
tel: 661-259-8184
toll free: 800-270-2516
fax: 661-254-4814
[email protected] .com
http://www .nts .com
NTS Tempe
1155 West 23rd Street, Suite 11A
Tempe, AZ 85282 USA
tel: 480-966-5517
fax: 480-966-5525
[email protected] .com
http://www .nts .com
NTS Tinton Falls
36 Gilbert Street South
Tinton Falls, NJ 07724 USA
tel: 732-936-0800
fax: 732-936-0700
[email protected] .com
http://www .nts .com
248 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
O’Brien Compliance
Management
12 Stedman Street
Chelmsford, MA 01824 USA
tel: 978-970-0525
fax: 978-970-0526
[email protected] .com
http://www .obcompman .com
Oak-Mitsui Technologies
80 First Street
Hoosick Falls, NY 12090 USA
tel: 518-686-4961
fax: 518-686-8080
[email protected] .com
http://www .faradflex .com
Omega Shielding Products, Inc.
9 Emery Avenue
Randolph, NJ 07869 USA
tel: 973-366-0080 x21
toll free: 800-828-5784
fax: 973-366-8232
[email protected] .com
http://www .omegashielding .com
3601-B Caldwell Drive
Soquel, CA 95073 USA
tel: 831-824-4052
fax: 206-350-7458
[email protected] .com
http://www .onfilter .com
OPHIR RF
5300 Beethoven Street
Los Angeles, CA 90066 USA
tel: 310-306-5556
fax: 310-821-7413
[email protected] .com
http://www .ophirrf .com
Orbel Corporation
2 Danforth Drive
Easton, PA 18045 USA
tel: 610-829-5000
fax: 610-829-5050
[email protected] .com
http://www .orbel .com
Oxford University Technology
CPD Centre, 1 Wellington Square
Oxford, Oxfordshire OX1 2JA United
Kingdom
tel: 44 1865 286958
[email protected] .ox .ac .uk
http://www .conted .ox .ac .uk/
courses/professional/staticdetails .
php?course=202
P & P Technology Ltd
1-3 Finch Drive
Springwood Industrial Estate
Braintree, Essex CM7 2SF
United Kingdom
tel: 44 1376 550525
fax: 44 1376 552389
[email protected] .co .uk
http://www .p-p-t .co .uk
Parker Hannifin,
Chomerics Div
77 Dragon Court
Woburn, MA 01801 USA
tel: 781-935-4850
fax: 781-933-4318
[email protected] .com
http://www .chomerics .com
www.incompliancemag.com
Vendor Director y
Protective Industrial
Polymers
Panashield, Inc.
185R West Norwalk Road
Norwalk, CT 06850-4312 USA
tel: 203-866-5888
fax: 203-866-6162
[email protected] .com
http://www .panashield .com
Panashield provides facility
solutions for global electromagnetic
compatibility (EMC), by creating
controlled electromagnetic
environments necessary for testing
electronic devices in today's world .
Panashield Inc . was founded by a
team of knowledgeable personnel
in the RF and RF/Anechoic industry
in 1989,and is located in Norwalk,
Connecticut . Panashield, Inc . is a Small
Business Concern and a WomanOwned business . Panashield (UK) Ltd .
was established in Surrey, England in
1996 to provide direct service to the
European market .
605 Country Club Drive
Bensenville, IL 60106 USA
tel: 630-238-0188
toll free: 877-804-3066
fax: 630-238-0269
[email protected] .com
http://www .productsafetyinc .com
Product Safety Consulting,
now in its 25th year, has been
providing product developers and
manufacturers with expert advice and
testing services, so they confidently
secure product safety and regulatory
compliance in the least time, and
for the least expense (UL, ETL, CSA,
CE, etc .) . From consumer products
to lighting fixtures, to motor
controllers and medical devices,
they have helped more than 3,000
customers in over 35 countries . No
other consultancy can this breath of
experience . They’ve trademarked
Design for Safety Approvals –
DFSAtm . Get them involved early in
your process and you’ll benefit with
smoother, faster and less expensive
Certification projects . Some of their
clients include Colgate Palmolive,
Hewlett-Packard, Johnson Controls,
Acuity Lighting, EcoLab, Hamilton
Sundstrand, Bissel, SC Johnson &
Son, Dell, and many more .
7875 Bliss Parkway
North Ridgeville, OH 44039 USA
tel: 440-327-0015
toll free: 866-361-3331
fax: 440-353-0549
[email protected] .com
http://www .protectpoly .com
http://www .inhibistat .com
A facility's flooring plays a vital
role in the success of any robust
ESD-Control program . Protective
Industrial Polymers is dedicated to
providing fully compliant, turn-key
ESD flooring solutions that provide
peace of mind both today and in the
future . PIP's InhibiStat line of polymer
ESD-Control Flooring Systems are
designed to meet and exceed current
performance standards, assuring the
end-user the most comprehensive
ESD flooring product range,
combined with expert consultation,
superior installation, certification and
ongoing compliance support .
PRISMIER
10216 Werch Drive, Suite 118
Woodridge, IL 60517 USA
tel: 630 .592 .4515
fax: 630-214-4099
[email protected] .com
http://prismier .com
Professional Testing
Pearson Electronics, Inc
4009 Transport Street
Palo Alto, CA 94303 USA
tel: 650-494-6444
fax: 650-494-6716
[email protected] .com
http://www .pearsonelectronics .com
Phoenix Technical Group
PO Box 522
Cary, NC 27512 USA
tel: 919-535-3662
[email protected] .com
http://www .phoenixtechnicalgroup .com
Polyonics
28 Industrial Park Drive
Westmoreland, NH 03467 USA
tel: 603-352-1415
fax: 603-352-1936
[email protected] .com
http://www .polyonics .com
Power Dynamics, Inc
145 Algonquin Parkway
Whippany, NJ 07981 USA
tel: 973-560-0019
fax: 973-560-0076
[email protected] .com
http://www .powerdynamics .com
1601 North A .W . Grimes Boulevard,
Suite B
Round Rock, TX 78665 USA
tel: 512-244-3371
toll free: 800-695-1077
fax: 512-244-1846
[email protected] .com
http://www .ptitest .com
Prostat Corporation
1072 Tower Lane
Bensenville, IL 60106 USA
tel: 630-238-8883
fax: 630-238-9717
[email protected] .com
http://www .prostatcorp .com
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 249
Vendor Directory
These controlled environments
include radio-frequency (RF) shielded
enclosures and RF/Anechoic test
chambers, to meet global RF/EMC
standards for Immunity and Emissions
testing of electronic products; Free
Space Simulation for Antenna and
RCS measurements; Industrial and
Medical RFI protection; TEMPEST
Security; and HEMP protection .
Product Safety Consulting
Ven d o r D i re cto r y
Pulver Laboratories Inc.
320 North Santa Cruz Avenue
Los Gatos, CA 95030-7243 USA
tel: 408-399-7000
toll free: 800-635-3050
fax: 408-399-7001
Los [email protected] .com
http://www .PulverLabs .com
Qualtest Inc.
5325 Old Winter Garden Road
Orlando, FL 32811 USA
tel: 407-313-4230
fax: 407-313-4234
[email protected] .com
http://www .qualtest .com
Quell Corporation
5639 Jefferson NE
Albuquerque, NM 87109 USA
tel: 505-243-1423
fax: 505-243-9772
[email protected] .US
http://www .eeseal .com
Vendor Directory
RABQSA International
600 N Plankinton Avenue
Milwaukee, WI 53201 USA
tel: 414-272-3937
toll free: 888-722-2440
fax: 414-765-8661
[email protected] .com
http://www .rabqsa .com
Radiometrics Midwest Corp.
12 East Devonwood
Romeoville, IL 60446 USA
tel: 815-293-0772
fax: 815-293-0820
[email protected] .com
http://www .radiomet .com
Raymond EMC
Enclosures Ltd.
5185 Dolman Ridge Road
Ottawa, ON K1C 7G4 Canada
tel: 613-841-1663
toll free: 800-362-1495
fax: 613-841-0456
[email protected] .ca
http://www .raymondemc .ca
250 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
RF Exposure Lab
Reliant EMC LLC
6501 Crown Boulevard, Suite 106A9
San Jose, CA 95120 USA
tel: 408-600-1472
[email protected] .com
http://www .reliantemc .com
Reliant EMC offers World Class
turn-key systems for EMC and RF
Emissions and Immunity testing .
By applying proven engineering
principles to create value-added EMC
solutions for our customers; Reliant
EMC becomes your top source for
CE and FCC, Automotive, Solar MIL
and Aerospace Electromagnetic
Compliance (EMC), . Our product
line includes Test Cells, Antennas,
Filters, LISNs, Analyzers, Synthesizers,
RF-Amplifiers, Calibrators and
Comb/Noise Generators . Based in
San Jose, California, Reliant EMC
provides expert advice on test
requirements and products . Reliant
EMC exclusively distributes products
from York EMC, Laplace Instruments,
Spitzenberger & Spies and OnFILTER .
For additional information, visit our
website at www .ReliantEMC .com .
Restor Metrology
921 Venture Avenue
Leesburg, FL 34748 USA
tel: 877-220-5554
eric [email protected] .com
http://www .restormetrology .com
Retlif Testing Laboratories
795 Marconi Avenue
Ronkonkoma, NY 11779 USA
tel: 631-737-1500 x111
fax: 631-737-1497
[email protected] .com
http://www .retlif .com
802 N . Twin Oaks Valley Road,
Suite 105
San Marcos, CA 92069 USA
tel: 760-471-2100
fax: 760-471-2121
[email protected] .com
http://www .rfexposurelab .com
Rigol Technologies
7401 First Place, Suite N
Oakwood Village, OH 44146 USA
tel: 877-474-4651
fax: 440-232-4488
[email protected] .com
http://www .rigolna .com
RMV Technology Group, LLC
NASA Ames Research Park
Moffett Field, CA 94035 USA
tel: 650-964-4792
fax: 650-964-1268
[email protected] .com
http://www .esdrmv .com
Rohde & Schwarz, Inc.
8661 A Robert Fulton Drive
Columbia, MD 21046 USA
tel: 410-910-7800
toll free: 888-TEST-RSA
fax: 410-910-7801
[email protected] .rohde-schwarz .com
http://www .rohde-schwarz .com
RTF Compliance
22431 Antonio Parkway #B160-698
Rancho Santa Margarita, CA 92688 USA
tel: 949-813-6095
fax: 949-271-4016
randy [email protected] .com
http://www .rtfcomp .com
RTP Company
580 East Front Street
Winona, MN 55987 USA
tel: 507-474-5472
toll free: 800-433-4787
fax: 507-454-2041
[email protected] .com
http://www .rtpcompany .com
www.incompliancemag.com
Vendor Director y
Schlegel Electronic
Materials, Inc.
SE Laboratories
1065 Comstock Street
Santa Clara, CA 95954 USA
tel: 408-727-3286
toll free: 800-939-CALS
fax: 408-988-6186
[email protected] .com
http://www .selabs .com
Founded in 1978, SE Laboratories is
the leading independent metrology
lab in the Western US, committed to
providing the industry with quality
test equipment calibration, repair,
and preventative maintenance .
Since its founding, SE Laboratories
has grown with the demands of
the market . Today we offer services
across a wide range of equipment
types in the compliance market .
Sabritec
Same Page Publishing, LLC
531 King Street, Suite 5
Littleton, MA 01460 USA
tel: 978-486-4684
fax: 978-486-4691
[email protected] .com
SAS Industries, Inc.
939 Wading River Manor Road
Manorville, NY 11949 USA
tel: 631-727-1441 x302
fax: 631-727-1387
[email protected] .com
http://www .sasindustries .com
Schaffner EMC Inc.
52 Mayfield Avenue
Edison, NJ 08837 USA
[email protected] .com
http://www .schaffnerusa .com
Schurter Inc.
447 Aviation Boulevard
Santa Rosa, CA 95403 USA
tel: 707-636-3000
toll free: 800-848-2600
fax: 707-636-3033
[email protected] .com
http://www .schurterinc .com
Select Fabricators, Inc.
5310 North Street, Building 5
Canandaigua, NY 14424-0119 USA
tel: 585-393-0650
toll free: 888-599-6113
fax: 585-393-1378
[email protected] .com
http://www .select-fabricators .com
SGS Consumer
Testing Services
620 Old Peachtree Road, Suite 100
Suwanee, GA 30024 USA
tel: 770-570-1800
toll free: 800-777-TEST (8378)
fax: 770-277-1240
uscts [email protected] .com
http://www .us .sgs .com/cts
SIEMIC
775 Montague Expressway
Milpitas, CA 95035 USA
tel: 408-526-1188
fax: 408-526-1088
mark [email protected] .com
http://www .siemic .com
SILENT Solutions LLC
10 Northern Boulevard, Suite 1
Amherst, NH 03031 USA
tel: 603-578-1842 x203
fax: 603-578-1843
[email protected] .com
http://www .silent-solutions .com
28105 N . Keith Drive
Lake Forest, IL 60045 USA
tel: 847-932-3662
toll free: 800-504-0055
[email protected] .com
http://www .hipot .com
Solar Electronics Company
10866 Chandler Boulevard
North Hollywood, CA 91601 USA
tel: 818-755-1700
toll free: 800-952-5302
fax: 818-755-0078
[email protected] .com
http://www .solar-emc .com
Southwest Research Institute
6220 Culebra Road, P .O . Drawer 28510
San Antonio, TX 78228-0510 USA
tel: 210-522-2122
fax: 210-522-3496
[email protected] .org
http://www .swri .org
Spectrum EMC
Consulting, LLC
3238 Black Oak Drive
Eagan, MN 55121 USA
tel: 651-688-0634
[email protected] .com
http://www .spectrumemc .com
Spira Manufacturing
Corporation
12721 Saticoy Street South
North Hollywood, CA 91605 USA
tel: 818-764-8222
toll free: 888-98-SPIRA
fax: 818-764-9880
[email protected] .com
http://www .spira-emi .com
Sprinkler Innovations
95 Ledge Road, Suite 4
Seabrook, NH 03874 USA
tel: 978-375-2302
toll free: 800-850-6692
fax: 603-468-1031
[email protected] .com
http://www .sprinklerinnovations .com
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 251
Vendor Directory
17550 Gillette Avenue
Irvine, CA 92614 USA
tel: 949-250-1244
fax: 949-250-1009
[email protected] .com
http://www .sabritec .com
1600 Lexington Avenue, Suite 236A
Rochester, NY 14606 USA
tel: 585-643-2010
toll free: 800-204-0863
fax: 585-427-7216
haydee [email protected] .com
http://www .schlegelemi .com
Slaughter Company, Inc.
Ven d o r D i re cto r y
Staticworx Flooring
124 Watertown Street
Watertown, MA 02472 USA
tel: 617-923-2000
toll free: 888-STATICWORX
fax: 617-923-2009
[email protected] .com
http://www .staticworx .com
Stephen Halperin & Associates
1072 Tower Lane
Bensenville, IL 60106 USA
tel: 630-238-8883
fax: 630-238-9717
[email protected] .com
http://www .halperinassoc .com
Sunol Sciences Corporation
6780 Sierra Court, Suite R
Dublin, CA 94568 USA
tel: 925-833-9936
fax: 925-833-9059
[email protected] .com
http://www .sunolsciences .com
Vendor Directory
TDK-EPC Corporation
485B Route 1 South, Suite 200
Iselin, NJ 08830 USA
tel: 732-906-4327
toll free: 800-888-7728
joseph [email protected] .com
http://www .epcos .com
Tech-Etch
45 Aldrin Road
Plymouth, MA 02360 USA
tel: 508-747-0300
fax: 508-746-9639
[email protected] .com
http://www .tech-etch .com
TechDream, Inc.
19925 Stevens Creek Boulevard
Cupertino, CA 95014 USA
tel: 408-800-7362
[email protected] .com
http://www .tech-dream .com
Technology Forecasters Inc.
2000 Santa Clara Avenue
Alameda, CA 94105 USA
[email protected] .com
http://www .techforecasters .com
252 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
TDK Corporation
1101 Cypress Creek Road
Cedar Park, TX 78613 USA
tel: 512-258-9478
fax: 512-258-0740
[email protected] .com
http://tdkrfsolutions .com
TDK RF Solutions is a world leader
in the design, development, and
manufacture of technical solutions
for the electromagnetic compatibility
testing industry .
We offer a complete range of
solutions, including automated test
systems, TDK anechoic chambers,
software antennas and a wide range
of test products . We call it
Total System Technology .
Tektronix, Inc.
14150 SW Karl Braun Drive
Beaverton, OR 97077 USA
toll free: 800-833-9200
[email protected] .com
http://www .tek .com
Telcron LLC
Bloomfield, NJ 07003 USA
[email protected] .net
http://www .telcron .net
Test Equipment Connection
30 Skyline Drive
Lake Mary, FL 32746 USA
tel: 407-804-1299
toll free: 800-615-8378
fax: 407-804-1277
[email protected] .com
http://www .TestEquipmentConnection .com
Test Site Services Inc
30 Birch Street
Milford, MA 01757 USA
tel: 508-962-1662
fax: 508-634-0388
[email protected] .net
http://www .testsiteservices .com
Teseq Inc.
52 Mayfield Avenue
Edison, NJ 08837 USA
tel: 732-417-0501
fax: 732-417-0511
[email protected] .com
http://www .teseq .com
Teseq, provider of EMC
instrumentation and systems for
radiated and conducted interference
in the automotive, consumer
electronics, telecommunications,
medical, aerospace and defense
industries, acquired MILMEGA, Ltd
in January 2012 and Instruments
for Industry (IFI) in October 2012 .
The acquisitions extend Teseq's
product ranges and expertise, further
positioning them as a global leader
in EMC testing . Teseq has been
accredited to perform calibration
services according to ISO 17025 at its
Edison, N .J . laboratory . Teseq is the
only pulsed immunity manufacturer
in North America with an accredited
calibration lab .
TestingPartners.com
8440 East Washington Street #207
Chagrin Falls, OH 44023 USA
tel: 862-243-2329
[email protected] .com
http://www .testingpartners .com
Texas Spectrum Electronics
120 Regency Drive
Wylie, TX 75098 USA
tel: 972-296-3699
fax: 972-296-7881
[email protected] .com
http://www .texasspectrum .com
Thermo Fisher Scientific
200 Research Drive
Wilmington, MA 01887 USA
tel: 978-275-0800 x2302
fax: 978-275-0850
william [email protected] .com
http://www .thermo .com/esd
www.incompliancemag.com
Vendor Director y
Thermotron Industries
291 Kollen Park Drive
Holland, MI 49418 USA
tel: 616-393-4580
[email protected] .com
http://www .thermotron .com
Trace Laboratories, Inc.
5 North Park Drive
Hunt Valley, MD 21030 USA
tel: 410-584-9099
fax: 410-584-9117
[email protected] .com
http://www .tracelabs .com
TREK, INC.
11601 Maple Ridge Road
Medina, NY 14103 USA
tel: 585-798-3140
toll free: 800-FOR-TREK
fax: 585-798-3106
[email protected] .com
http://www .trekinc .com
Tri-Mag, Inc.
TÜV Rheinland of
North America
1300 Massachusetts Avenue
Boxborough, MA 01719 USA
tel: 1-TUV-RHEINLAND
fax: 203-426-3293
[email protected] .tuv .com
http://www .us .tuv .com
TÜV SÜD America Inc.
10 Centennial Drive
Peabody, MA 01960 USA
tel: 978-573-2500
toll free: 800-888-0123
fax: 978-977-0159
[email protected] .com
http://www .TUVamerica .com
UL Verification Services
25, South HuanShi Avenue
Nansha District
Guangzhou, 511453 China
tel: 86-20-28667188
jerry [email protected] .com
http://www .ul .com/verification
333 Pfingsten Road
Northbrook, IL 60062 USA
tel: 888-503-5536
[email protected] .com
http://www .ulknowledgeservices .com
UL Knowledge Services is one of UL's
five strategic business units, providing training and advisory services
designed to help make people and
the companies they work for smarter,
safer, more efficient and more effective . We recognize that knowledge
creates new opportunities, better
business results, a stronger workforce
and a true sense of accomplishment .
Through our services your organization can access first-hand, real-time,
industry-critical information that not
only covers UL Standards, but also
addresses specific topics intended
to help you create and/or install safe
products, increase efficiency and
realize improved speed to market .
COMMITMENT. COMMUNITY. COMPLIANCE.
EMC / EMI • PRODUCT SAFETY • ESD • ENVIRONMENTAL
In Compliance is committed to the community of
compliance engineering professionals who make up
our readership.
You can turn to us as your #1 source for all your
compliance news - in our magazine, at events and
online.
Monthly Print & Digital Editions
incompliancemag.com
Online Product & Vendor Directory
Annual Reference Guide
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Sign up for FREE subscriptions at www.incompliancemag.com/subscribe
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 253
Vendor Directory
1601 North Clancy Court
Visalia, CA 93291 USA
tel: 559-651-2222
fax: 559-651-0188
[email protected] .com
http://www .tri-mag .com
UL Knowledge Services
Ven d o r D i re cto r y
VTI Vacuum
Technologies, Inc.
UL
Vendor Directory
333 Pfingsten Road
Northbrook, IL 60062 USA
tel: 877-UL-HELPS (877-854-3577)
fax: 360-817-6278
cec [email protected] .ul .com
www .ul .com/appliances
UL is a premier global independent
safety science company with more
than 118 years of history . Employing
more than 10,000 professionals with
customers in over 100 countries,
UL has five distinct business units –
Product Safety, Environment, Life
& Health, Knowledge Services, to
meet the expanding needs of our
customers and to deliver on our
public safety mission . For more
information on UL’s family of
companies and network of 95
laboratory, testing, and certification
facilities, go to UL .com .
Ultratech EMC Lab
3000 Bristol Circle
Oakville, ON L6H 6G4 Canada
tel: 905-829-1570
fax: 905-829-8050
[email protected] .com
http://www .ultratech-labs .com
Unitek, A Division of NQA
5900 Fort Drive, Suite 100
Centreville, VA 20121 USA
tel: 703-961-9901
toll free: 800-998-9395
fax: 703-961-9936
[email protected] .com
http://www .nqa-uts .com
Van Doren Company
11600 County Road 5180
Rolla, MO 65401 USA
tel: 573-341-4097
[email protected] .edu
http://emc-education .com
254 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
Universal Shielding
20 West Jefryn Boulevard
Deer Park, NY 11729 USA
tel: 631-667-7900
toll free: 800-645-5578
fax: 631-667-7912
[email protected] .com
http://www .universalshielding .com
Universal Shielding Corp. was established in 1972 and is a pioneer
in providing pre-fabricated shielded
enclosures for the military, commercial, and medical industries. USC has
the capabilities to provide a shielded
enclosure of any size; from the smallest prefabricated unit for an R & D lab
to the largest and most complex installations for a computer or communications center. USC offers a full range of
RF Shielded Enclosures, RF Shielded
Doors, RF Shielded Cabinets, Exterior
Doors and RF Shielding Accessories.
Vanguard Products Corporation
87 Newtown Road
Danbury, CT 06810 USA
tel: 203-744-7265
fax: 203-798-2351
sal[email protected] .com
http://www .vanguardproducts .com
Vectawave Technology, Ltd.
Street . Cross Business Park
Newport, Isle of Wight PO30 5XW
United Kingdom
tel: 44 1983 821818
fax: 44 1983 532737
[email protected] .uk
http://www .vectawAvenuecom
Vermillion, Inc.
4754 S . Palisade
Wichita, KS 67217 USA
tel: 305-968-5981
fax: 316-524-2011
[email protected] .com
http://www .vermillioninc .com
1215 Industrial Avenue
Reedsburg, WI 53959 USA
tel: 608-524-9822
toll free: 800-482-1941
fax: 608-524-9722
[email protected] .com
http://www .vactecinc .com
VTI Vacuum Technologies Inc .
supplies EMI/RFI/ESD Shielding
and Form-In-Place Gasketing
solutions for medical, defense,
aerospace and industrial devices .
VTI utilizes a vacuum deposition
process for selectively shielding
plastic electronic enclosures against
electromagnetic interference,
radio frequency interference and
electrostatic discharge . The company
robotically dispenses conductive
and environmental Form-In-Place
(FIP) Gaskets for sealing on plastic
or metal components . VTI is an ISO
9001:2008 certified, ITAR compliant
and veteran owned small business
established in 1993 .
VEROCH
10036 NW 53rd Street
Sunrise, FL 33351 USA
tel: 954-990-7544
fax: 954-440-8040
[email protected] .com
http://www .veroch .com
Versus Global Certifications
Pty Ltd.
658 Reier Road
Johannesburg, Gauteng 159
South Africa
tel: 27 83 5140709
fax: 27 86 565 2895
[email protected] .com
http://www .versusglobal .com
Vitrek Corporation
9880A Via Pasar
San Diego, CA 92126 USA
tel: 858-689-2755
[email protected] .com
http://vitrek .com
www.incompliancemag.com
Vendor Director y
W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc.
380 Starr Road
Landenberg, PA 19350 USA
electronics [email protected] .com
http://gore .com
Washington Laboratories
7560 Lindbergh Drive
Gaithersburg, MD 20879 USA
tel: 301-216-1500
fax: 301-417-9069
[email protected] .com
http://www .wll .com
WEMS Electronics
4650 West Rosecrans Avenue
Hawthorne, CA 90250-6898 USA
tel: 310-962-4410
fax: 310-644-5334
[email protected] .com
http://www .wems .com
World Cal, Inc.
Yazaki Testing Center
2012 High Street
Elk Horn, IA 51531 USA
tel: 712-764-2197
fax: 712-764-2195
[email protected] .com
http://www .world-cal .com
Wurth Electronics Midcom
121 Airport Drive
Watertown, SD 57201 USA
tel: 605-886-4385
toll free: 800-643 2661
[email protected] .com
http://www .we-online .com
Wyatt Technical Services LLC
56 Aspen Drive
Woodland Park, CO 80863 USA
tel: 719-310-5418
toll free: 877-443-9275
fax: 719-687-1428
[email protected] .com
http://www .emc-seminars .com
6800 N . Haggerty Road
Canton, MI 48187 USA
tel: 734-983-6012
fax: 734-983-6013
[email protected] .com
http://www .yazakiemc .com
Zero Ground LLC
3392 Hillside Court
Woodridge, IL 60517 USA
tel: 401-377-8389
toll free: 866-937-6463
fax: 401-519-6696
[email protected] .com
http://www .dbzshield .com
Zone Safe Solutions
1601 North A .W . Grimes Boulevard,
Suite B
Round Rock, TX 78665 USA
tel: 775-622-0400
[email protected] .com
http://www .zonesafesolutions .com
Online Directory
www.incompliancemag.com/directory
Magazine’s
2013 Annual Guide In Compliance 255
Vendor Directory
Visit
Advertiser Index
Advertiser
Page
Web Address
2013 Minnesota EMC Event. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.mnemcevent.com
35th Annual EOS/ESD Symposium & Exhibits. . . . . . . . . 257 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.esda.org
A.H. Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C2, 12/13, 198 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.ahsystems.com
A2LA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.A2LA.org
Abstraction Engineering Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.abstractionengineering.com
Advanced Test Equipment Rentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35, 199 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.atecorp.com
Agilent Technologies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.agilent.com/find/emc
AMTA 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.amta2013.org
André Consulting, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.andreconsulting.com
AR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gate Fold, 199 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.arworld.us
ARC Technologies, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.arc-tech.com
Captor Corporation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.captorcorp.com
Chomerics, a division of Parker Hannifin . . . . . . . . . . . . 79, 199 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.chomerics.com
Compliance Worldwide, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14/15, 189, 199 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.cw-inc.com
CST of America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.cst.com
Don Heirman Consultants, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.donheirman.com
Dutch Microwave Absorber Solutions (DMAS). . . . . . . . 77 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.dmas.eu
E. D. & D. , Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129, 200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.ProductSafeT.com
Electronics Test Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47, 200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.etc-mpb.com
EM Test USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83, 200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.emtest.com
ETS-Lindgren . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16/17, C3, 200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.ets-lindgren.com
Fair-Rite Products Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.fair-rite.com
Go Global Compliance, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.goglobalcompliance.com
Haefely EMC Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37, 200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.haefelyemc.com
Henry Ott Consultants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9, 195, 196 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.hottconsultants.com
Hoolihan EMC Consulting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.emcxpert.com
HV TECHNOLOGIES, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3, 18/19, 200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.hvtechnologies.com
IEEE EMC 2013 Symposium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.emc2013.org
IEEE Symposium on Product Compliance Engineering . . 131 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.psessymposium.org
Intermark USA, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.intermark-usa.com
Interpower Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.interpower.com
Kimmel Gerke Associates, Ltd.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.emiguru.com
256 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
www.incompliancemag.com
35TH ANNUAL EOS/ESD
SYMPOSIUM & EXHIBITS
September 8-13, 2013
Rio All Suites,
Las Vegas, NV
Benchmark your companies operation
against the practices of other
companies. Solve business challenges
inControllingESDbyNetworkingwith
other ESD professionals and industry
experts to learn best practices and
technologyadvancesforESDControl
SD from
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ss the orma
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pro ound st inf ling ge!
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o tat
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• Over 37 Tutorials
with New or Revised classes!
• Technical Sessions
Over 50 Exciting ESD Presentations.
Workshops and Exhibits
• For stimulating your ESD programs.
• Exhibitors “Showcase” ESD technologies with 8
minute presentations during technical sessions.
• Two “Year in Review” sessions of factory
standards and device standards.
For more information please visit www.esda.org
SettingtheGlobalStandardsforStaticControl!
EOS/ESDAssociationInc.7900TurinRdBld3•RomeNY13440
Phone315-339-6937•Fax315-339-6793
[email protected]•www.esda.org•JoinourEOS/ESDSymposiumGrouponLinkedIn
1
Advertiser Index
Advertiser
Page
Web Address
LCR Electronics, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57, 201 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.lcr-inc.com
Liberty Labs/World Cal Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.liberty-labs.com
Magnetic Shield Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.magnetic-shield.com
MI Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.mi-technologies.com
Monroe Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.monroe-electronics.com
Montrose Compliance Services, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.montrosecompliance.com
The MuShield Company, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49, 201 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.mushield.com
Northeast Product Safety Society Vendors’ Night . . . . . 195 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.nepss.net/
NTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20/21, 73 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.nts.com
Oak-Mitsui Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.faradflex.com
Okaya Electric America, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.okaya.com
Panashield, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22/23, 65, 201 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.panashield.com
Pearson Electronics, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.pearsonelectronics.com
Professional Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24/25, 59, 202 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.ptitest.com
Quell Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 202 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.eeseal.com
Radiometrics Midwest Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.radiomet.com
Reliant EMC LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.reliantemc.com
Rohde & Schwarz GmbH & Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.rohde-schwarz.com
RTF Compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.rtfcomp.com
Schlegel Electronic Materials Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.schlegelemi.com
Schurter Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.schurterinc.com
Spira Manufacturing Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28/29, 45, 202 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.spira-emi.com
Sprinkler Innovations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39, 202 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.sprinklerinnovations.com
TDK RF Solutions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . tdkrfsolutions.com
Teseq . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203, C4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.teseq.com
Tri-Mag, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.tri-mag.com
TÜV Rheinland of North America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26/27, 33, 203 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.us.tuv.com
TÜV SÜD America Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30/31, 41, 203 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.TUVamerica.com
UL LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.ul.com/appliances
Universal Shielding Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.universalshielding.com
Washington Laboratories Ltd. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.wll.com
Wyatt Technical Services LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.emc-seminars.com
258 In Compliance 2013 Annual Guide
www.incompliancemag.com
Experience Hands-On
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NSG 3040 MULTIFUNCTION GENERATOR –
GOOd THINGS COME IN SMALL pACkAGES
Small and smart, the NSG 3040 features a high-contrast 7” touchscreen color display and rotary wheel for quick input with appealing
ease of operation. With its open modular architecture, the NSG 3040
NSG 3040 at a glance:
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amazing capacities for demanding EMC testing companies and for
EFT/Burst to 4.8 kV/1 MHz
easy integration into the production process. The electromagnetic
pulses generated from this multipurpose unit are especially tailored
for CE marking requirements and other national and international
standards. Like its big brother, NSG 3060 (6.6 kV), the NSG 3040 also
has a SD memory card where test files can be saved easily and
expanded at any time.
Dip/Interrupt to 16 A/260 VAC & DC
Easy-to-operate 7“ touchscreen color display
Quickly launch tests from extensive Standards Library
or User Test folders
Parameters can be changed during test
Teseq Inc. Edison, NJ USA
T + 1 732 417 0501 F + 1 732 417 0511
[email protected] www.tesequsa.com
a TESEQ Company
a TESEQ Company
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