RSC-4128 - Adrirobot
RSC-4128
Speech Recognition Processor
Data Sheet
General Description
The RSC-4128 represents Sensory’s next generation
speech and analog I/O mixed signal processor. The
RSC-4128 is designed to bring high performance
speech I/O features to cost sensitive embedded and
consumer
products.
Based
on
an
8-bit
microcontroller, the RSC-4128 integrates speechoptimized digital and analog processing blocks into a
single chip solution capable of accurate speech
recognition; high quality, low data-rate compressed
speech; and advanced music. Products can use one
or all features in a single application.
The RSC-4128 operates in tandem with the radically
new FluentChip™ technology, offering the best
speech recognition technologies in the industry.
FluentChip™ includes Hidden Markov Model-Neural
Net hybrid speech recognition. Accuracy in all kinds
of noise is dramatically improved. New Speaker
Verification technology is perfect for voice password
security applications that must work in noisy
environments. New high quality compressed speech
technology reduces data rates by 5 times. New 8voice MIDI-compatible music includes drum tracks,
effectively increasing instruments beyond 8.
Simultaneous music and speech round out the
FluentChip™ technology.
FluentChip™ technology tools also support the
revolutionary capability of creating speaker
independent recognition sets by simply typing in the
desired recognition vocabulary! A few keystrokes
creates a recognition set in seconds without the wait
or cost of recording sessions to train the recognizer,
speeding time to sales.
A new and unique Audio Wakeup feature listens
while the RSC-4128 is in power down mode. When
an audio event such as a clap or whistle occurs,
Audio Wakeup will wakeup the RSC-4128 for speech
or application tasks. Audio Wakeup is perfect for
battery applications that require continuous listening
and long battery life.
In addition to best-in-class recognition performance,
the RSC-4128 provides further on-chip integration of
features. A complete speech I/O application can be
built with as few additional parts as a clock crystal,
speaker, microphone, and few resistors and
capacitors.
© 2005 Sensory Inc.
Moreover, the RSC-4128 provides an unprecedented
level of cost effective system-on-chip (SOC)
integration, enabling many applications that require
DSP and/or audio processing. The RSC-4128 may
be used as a general-purpose mixed signal
processor
platform
for
custom
algorithms,
technologies and applications.
Features
Full Range of FluentChip™ Capabilities
Noise-robust Speaker Independent and Speaker
Dependent recognition
Many languages now available for international use
Speaker Verification – voice password biometric security
Word Spotting and Continuous Listening recognition
options
High quality, 2.4-7.8 kbps speech synthesis & sound
effects, with Sensory SX™ synthesis technology
8 voice MIDI-compatible music synthesis coincident with
speech; drum track feature enables additional voices
Voice Record & Playback (voice memo)
Audio Wake Up from sleep with whistles or claps
Touch Tone (DTMF) output
Integrated Single-Chip Solution
8-bit microcontroller
128K bytes ROM
16 bit ADC, 10 bit DAC & PWM, and microphone preamplifier
Independent, programmable Digital Filter engine
4.8 KBytes total RAM (262 bytes “user” application RAM)
Five timers (3 GP, 1 Watchdog, 1 Multi Tasking)
Twin-DMA, Vector Math accelerator, and Multiplier
Built-in Analog Comparator Unit (4 inputs)
External memory bus: 20-bit Address(1Mbyte), 8-bit Data
On chip storage for SD, SV, templates (10 templates)
24 configurable I/O lines with 10 mA (typical) outputs
Code security - no ROM dump capability
Uses low cost 3.58MHz crystal (internal PLL)
Low EMI design for FCC and CE requirements
Fully nested interrupt structure with up to 8 sources
Optional Real Time Clock
Long Battery Life
2.4 – 3.6V operation
12mA (typical) operating current at 3V
2 low power modes; 1 µA typical sleep current
Full Suite of Quick & Powerful Tools
Quick Text-to-SI (T2SI) text entry to build noise robust SI
recognition sets – low cost & push-button – no recording!
Quick Synthesis for push-button speech compression
Integrated Development Environment, C Compiler,
Debugger & In Circuit Emulator from Phyton, Inc.
P/N 80-0206-M
1
Data Sheet
RSC-4128
Table of Contents
General Description ........................................................................................................................................................................ 1
RSC-4128 Overview ....................................................................................................................................................................... 3
Speech Technologies ..................................................................................................................................................................... 4
Speech Recognition .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 4
Speech and Music Synthesis ................................................................................................................................................................................ 4
Record and Playback ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 4
RSC-4128 Architecture................................................................................................................................................................... 5
Reference Schematics.................................................................................................................................................................... 7
Using the RSC-4128....................................................................................................................................................................... 9
Instruction Set ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 9
Stack ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 10
Register and User RAM ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 10
L1 Vector Accelerator/Multiplier .......................................................................................................................................................................... 11
Power and Wakeup Control ................................................................................................................................................................................ 11
General Purpose I/O ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 12
Memory Addressing ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 14
Wait States.......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 18
On-Chip ROM ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 19
Oscillators ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 19
Clocks ................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 20
Timers/Counters.................................................................................................................................................................................................. 21
Interrupts ............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 24
Audio Wakeup..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 27
Microphones........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 28
Reset................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 29
Digital-to-Analog-Converter (DAC) Output.......................................................................................................................................................... 29
Pulse Width Modulator (PWM) Analog Output.................................................................................................................................................... 31
Comparator Unit.................................................................................................................................................................................................. 32
Instruction Set Opcodes and Timing Details ................................................................................................................................. 34
MOVE Group Instructions ................................................................................................................................................................................... 34
ROTATE Group Instructions ............................................................................................................................................................................... 35
BRANCH Group Instructions............................................................................................................................................................................... 35
ARITHMETIC/LOGICAL Group Instructions ....................................................................................................................................................... 35
MISCELLANEOUS Group Instructions ............................................................................................................................................................... 36
Special Functions Registers (SFRs) Summary............................................................................................................................. 37
DC Characteristics........................................................................................................................................................................ 39
A.C. Characteristics (External memory accesses)........................................................................................................................ 39
Timing Diagrams........................................................................................................................................................................... 40
Absolute Maximum Ratings .......................................................................................................................................................... 40
Package Options .......................................................................................................................................................................... 41
Die Pad Ring ................................................................................................................................................................................ 44
RSC-4128 Die Bonding Pad Locations......................................................................................................................................... 45
Mechanical Data ........................................................................................................................................................................... 46
Ordering Information..................................................................................................................................................................... 47
2
P/N 80-0206-M
© 2005 Sensory Inc.
Data Sheet
RSC-4128
RSC-4128 Overview
The RSC-4128 is a member of the Interactive Speech™ line of products from Sensory. It features a highperformance 8-bit microcontroller with on-chip ADC, DAC, preamplifier, RAM, ROM, and optimized audio
processing blocks. The RSC-4128 is designed to bring a high degree of integration and versatility into low-cost,
power-sensitive applications. Various functional units have been integrated onto the CPU core in order to reduce
total system cost and increase system reliability.
The RSC-4128 operates in tandem with FluentChip™firmware, an ultra compact suite of recognition and synthesis
technologies. This reduced software footprint enables, for example, products with 3 minutes of compressed
speech, multiple speaker dependent and independent vocabularies, speaker verification, and all application code
built into the RSC-4128 as a single chip solution. Revolutionary Text-to-Speaker-Independent (T2SI) technology
allows the creation of SI recognition sets by simply entering text.
The CPU core embedded in the RSC-4128 is an 8-bit, variable-length-instruction microcontroller. The instruction
set is similar to the 8051 microcontroller, and has a variety of addressing mode, MOV and 16 bit instructions. The
RSC-4128 processor avoids the limitations of dedicated A, B, and DPTR registers by having completely
symmetrical sources and destinations for all instructions.
The RSC-4128 provides a high level of on-chip features and special DSP engines, providing a very cost effective
mixed signal platform for general-purpose applications and development of custom algorithms. The full suite of
industry standard tools for easy product development makes the RSC-4128 an ideal platform for consumer
electronics.
RSC-4128 Block Diagram
Oscillator or Resonator
Multiplexer
Microphone
Pre-Amp
and
Gain
Control
Timers (3)
Watchdog
Timer
ADC
Digital
Filters
DAC Out
PWM
RSC
General Purpose
Microcontroller
AGC
Low Battery
Detection
DAC
Speaker Out
Internal Rom Space
(0K, 128K or 256K)
5K SRAM
Comparators
(2)
Vector Accelerator
with Twin DMA
RSC-4x Series
General Purpose I/O
3 x 8-bit ports (24 I/O)
3
External Memory Interface
8-bit data, 20-bit Address
P/N 80-0206-M
© 2005 Sensory Inc.
Data Sheet
RSC-4128
Speech Technologies
Speech Recognition
The RSC-4128 is designed to operate in tandem with the FluentChip™ technology library, including speaker
independent (SI), speaker dependent (SD), and speaker verification (SV) speech recognition. Combinations of
these technologies may used to create applications that are rich in features. These are described below:
Speaker Independent recognition requires no user training. The RSC-4128 can recognize up to 30 words in an
active set (number of sets is limited only by internal ROM size). Text-to-SI (T2SI), based on a hybrid of Hidden
Markov Modeling and Neural Net technologies, allows creation of accurate SI recognition sets in seconds. SI
requires on-chip ROM or off-chip parallel bus ROM, EPROM, or Flash to store the words to be recognized.
Speaker Dependent recognition allows the user to create names for products or customize recognition sets. SD
is implemented with DTW (dynamic time warping) pattern matching technology. SD requires programmable
memory to store the personalized speech templates(trained patterns) that may be on-chip SRAM, or off-chip
serial or parallel bus EEPROM, Flash Memory, or SRAM. Up to 100 templates can be recognized in an active
set (the number of unique sets is limited only by programmable memory capacity). The RSC-4128 can store up
to 9 SD templates in on-chip SRAM.
Speaker Verification enables the RSC-4128 to authenticate when a previously trained password is spoken by
the target user. SV is also implemented with DTW technology. 5 SV templates can be stored in on-chip SRAM,
or more with external programmable memory such as delineated in SD above.
Word Spotting enables the RSC-4128 to spot a specific word surrounded by other speech within a phrase. This
can be quite effective when the users response may vary (e.g. spotting “telephone” in the phrases “ummm
telephone”, or “telephone call”). This option is available for SI and SD.
Continuous Listening allows the chip to continuously listen for a specific word. This may be used as a trigger
word to request a device to listen for a command. This option is available for SI and SD.
Speech and Music Synthesis
The RSC-4128 provides high-quality speech compression using Sensory SX™ technology. Data rates vary from
2400 – 7800 bits per second. One may select various data rates from approximately 3.7 to 7.8Kbps to manage
speech quality versus allotted memory. Speech and sound effects may also be compressed using 8-bit PCM
(64Kbps) or 4-bit ADPCM (32Kbps) technologies.
The RSC-4128 also provides high-quality, eight-voice, wave table music synthesis which allows multiple,
simultaneous instruments for harmonizing. The RSC-4128 uses a MIDI-like system to generate music. One or
more of the eight voices may be speech playback instead of music. One or more of the eight voices may be a drum
track comprising multiple drums. In effect, drum tracks allow the number of simultaneous instruments to exceed 8.
Speech and Music data may be stored in on-chip ROM or off-chip parallel bus ROM, EPROM or Flash. Speech
data may alternatively be stored in off-chip serial data ROM or serial data Flash for extended durations.
Easy to use tools allow the developer to record and compress their own voice talents and create with the push of a
button, or to create their own MIDI scores and instruments.
Record and Playback
The RSC-4128 can perform speech record and playback (sometimes called “voice memo”) using either 8 bits
(64Kbps) or 4 bits (32Kbps) per sample, depending on the quantity and quality of playback desired. The record and
playback technology also optionally performs silence removal to reduce memory requirements.
External parallel or serial bus Flash or SRAM is required to store the compressed speech.
4
P/N 80-0206-M
© 2005 Sensory Inc.
Data Sheet
RSC-4128
RSC-4128 Architecture
The RSC-4128 is a highly integrated speech and analog I/O mixed signal processor that combines:
8-bit microcontroller with enhanced instructions and interrupt control, superior register architecture, independent
Digital Filter engine and “L1” Vector Math Accelerator
On-chip ROM and RAM (4.8 Kbytes), and the ability to address off-chip RAM, ROM, EPROM or Flash.
Input microphone preamp and 16 bit Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) for speech and audio/analog input
10 bit Digital-to-Analog Converter (DAC), and 10 bit Pulse Width Modulator (PWM) to directly drive a speaker or
other analog device
Low power Audio Wakeup from power down mode, when a selected audio event, such as clap or whistle, occurs
The RSC-4128 has 20-bit address
and 8-bit data buses for interfacing
with external memory. It includes an
-XM input pin capable of enabling or
disabling the internal ROM.
RSC-4128 Internal Block Diagram
NOTE: Neither the -XM input pin nor
the extended memory buses are
available
on
64-lead
LQFP
packaged versions of the RSC-4128
with internal ROM. These are
available on the die and 100 LQFP
versions.
Three bi-directional ports provide 24
configurable, general-purpose I/O
pins to communicate with or control
external devices with a variety of
source and sink currents. Up to 4 of
these I/O may be used as
programmable Analog Comparator
inputs. 16 may be used as I/O
wakeup.
The RSC-4128 has a high
frequency (14.32 MHz) clock as well
as a low frequency (32,768 Hz)
clock. The processor clock can be
selected from either source, with a
selectable divider value. The device
performs speech recognition when
running at 14.32 MHz. The RSC4128 also supports programmable
wait states to allow the use of
slower memory.
OSC1 is a very low-cost 3.58 MHz
crystal oscillator that is used by a
4X PLL to generate the 14.32MHz
clock. The OSC2 oscillator provides the options of using an external crystal or its own internal RC devices (no
external components required for the internal RC mode).
There are three programmable, general-purpose 8-bit counters / timers – Timers 1 and 3 are derived from OSC1,
and Timer2 from OSC2. There is also a Watchdog timer that may be used to exit an undesired condition in
program flow, and Multi-tasking timer to allow chip operations to share resources in parallel.
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P/N 80-0206-M
© 2005 Sensory Inc.
Data Sheet
RSC-4128
A single chip speech I/O solution may be created with the RSC-4128. An external microphone passes an audio
signal to the preamplifier and ADC to convert the incoming speech signal into digital data. Speech features are
extracted using the Digital Filter engine. The microcontroller CPU processes these speech features using speech
recognition algorithms in firmware, with the help of the “L1” Vector Accelerator and enhanced instruction set. The
resulting speech recognition results may be used to control the consumer product application code, or to output
speech or audio in the form of a dialog with the user of the consumer product. If desired, the output speech or
audio signal from the RSC-4128 is generated by a DAC for external amplification into a speaker, or a PWM capable
of directly driving a speaker at typical consumer product volumes. A typical product will require about $0.30 - $1.00
(in high volume) of additional components, in addition to the RSC-4128.
The RSC-4128 also provides a very cost effective mixed signal platform for general-purpose applications and
development of custom algorithms. A typical general-purpose application will require about $0.30 - $0.50 (in high
volume) of additional components, in addition to the RSC-4128.
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P/N 80-0206-M
© 2005 Sensory Inc.
Data Sheet
RSC-4128
Reference Schematics
Schematic 1-1:
RSC-4128, Utilizing On-chip ROM and Optional External Serial Data Memory
Vdd
Vdd
C2
JP1
1
2
3
4
Recommended Diagnostic Output Port
P0.1
P1.4
C1
2.2uF
LS1
.1
SPEAKER
Optional
2.2uF
C3
Vdd FLASH
AT45DB011B
4
3
2
1
-CS
-RST
SCK
SI
-WP
VCC
GND
SO
5
6
7
8
C4
.1
C9
.1
3.58MHz
Y1
Vdd
C6
12pF
D1
1N4148
100K
P0.7
A7
A8
P1.0
A9
VDD
GND
A10
P1.1
A11
P1.2
A12
P1.3
A13
P1.4
A14
P1.5
A15
Vdd
GND
P1.6
A16
P1.7
A17
PLLEN
RSC-4128
U2
75
74
73
72
71
70
69
68
67
66
65
64
63
62
61
60
59
58
57
56
55
54
53
52
51
Vdd
C5
.1
P1.4
Vdd
C8
.1
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
R1
C11 .1
C7
12pF
P0.0
D7
D6
PDN
D5
D4
GND
X01
XI1
Vdd
-XM
XO2
XI2
D3
D2
P2.7
D1
D0
GND
Vdd
P2.6
M1
P2.5
BRKPT
-RESET
DACOUT
AVss
VCM
MICIN2
MICIN1
AMPCOM
VREF
AVdd
NC
P2.4
P2.3
NC
P2.2
GND
P2.1
P2.0
GND
Vdd
-RDF
-WRD
-RDR
-WRC
A19
A18
TEST
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
Vdd
NC
A0
P0.1
NC
A1
P0.2
A2
NC
P0.3
A3
NC
VDD
PWM1
PWM0
GND
NC
A4
P0.4
NC
A5
P0.5
NC
A6
P0.6
NC
100
99
98
97
96
95
94
93
92
91
90
89
88
87
86
85
84
83
82
81
80
79
78
77
76
P0.1
U1
C10
.1
AVDD
Vdd
2.2uF
C13
.1
C12
Vdd FLASH
AVDD
Vdd
C14
.1
BT1
R2
100
3V
C16
C15
.1
.1
R3
1.2K
NOTE3 C17
X1
C21
MICROPHONE
NOTE1
NOTE2
.1
3300pF
C18
100uF
C19 C20
.1
1uF
NOTES:
1. Optional. This capacitor MAY reduce noise
coupled into the mic input on a noisy PCB.
2. If used, this capacitor MUST be placed
close to the RSC-4128 AGND and MIC1IN pads.
3. Place close to MICIN1.
7
P/N 80-0206-M
© 2005 Sensory Inc.
Data Sheet
RSC-4128
Schematic 1-2:
RSC-4128, Utilizing External Code and Data Memory
8
P/N 80-0206-M
© 2005 Sensory Inc.
Data Sheet
RSC-4128
Using the RSC-4128
Creating applications using the RSC-4128 requires the development of electronic circuitry, software code, and
speech/music data files. Software code for the RSC-4128 can be developed using a complete suite of RSC-4128
development tools including In-Circuit Emulator, C Compiler, and “push button” tools for speech recognition and
synthesis data files. Sensory provides free design reviews of customer applications to assist in the speech dialog
and speech I/O design. Sensory also offers application development services. For more information about
development tools and services, please contact Sensory.
When using the RSC-4128 macro blocks such as the AFE, digital filters, L1, etc, for purposes other than as
intended in the FluentChip™ technology modules, in applications that will also use FluentChip™ technologies, care
must be taken to avoid conflicts that may cause adverse impact on functionality. Contact Sensory Technical
Support for help in avoiding these conflicts.
Instruction Set
The instruction set for the RSC-4128 has 60 instructions comprising 13 move, 7 rotate, 11 branch, 22 arithmetic,
and 7 miscellaneous instructions. All instructions are 3 bytes or fewer and no instruction requires more than 10
clock cycles (plus wait states) to execute. (see “Instruction Set Opcodes and Timing Details” for detailed
descriptions)
Flags
The “flags” register (register FF) has bits that are set/cleared by arithmetic/logical instructions, a trap enable bit set
under program control, a read-only stack overflow bit cleared at power on and set by stack wrap around, and the
Global Interrupt Enable bit:
0FFH
R/W
Bit 7:
Bit 6:
Bit 5:
Bit 4:
Bit 3:
Bit 3:
Bit 1:
Bit 0:
“flags”
carry
zero
sign
trap
stkoflo
stkfull
(unused)
gie
(set = 1 when result of arith/log instruction is 0)
(set = 1 when result of arith/log instruction has msb high)
(read-only, initialized to 0, set to 1 on stack overflow)
(read-only, initialized to 0, set to 1 on stack full)
(Global Interrupt Enable)
NOTE: The “trap” bit must be left written as “0”.
Flags Hold
The “flagsHold” register (register CF) stores the “flags” value when an interrupt occurs. Unlike previous RSC chips,
the RSC-4128 processor has read/write access to “flagsHold” for multi-tasking purposes. Since the “flags” register
is restored from the “flagsHold” register upon return from interrupt, the “stkoflo” and “stkfull” bits are omitted from
the “flagsHold” register to prevent inadvertent clearing of these bits.
0CFH R/W
Bit 7:
Bit 6:
Bit 5:
Bit 4:
Bit 3:
Bit 2:
Bit 1:
Bit 0:
“flagsHold”
carry
zero
sign
trap
(unused – reads 0)
(unused – reads 0)
(unused – reads 0)
gie
NOTE: The “trap” bit must be left written as “0”.
9
P/N 80-0206-M
© 2005 Sensory Inc.
Data Sheet
RSC-4128
See the discussion in “Interrupts” section relating to the value of “gie” stored in the “flagsHold” register when an
interrupt occurs during execution of an instruction that clears the “gie” bit.
Stack
There is a 16-level, 16-bit stack for saving the program counter for subroutine calls and interrupt requests. The
stack pointer wraps around on overflow or underflow. When the stack read and write pointers indicate that stack
overflow has occurred, the “stkoflo” bit in the “flags” register is set. Once set, this bit can only be cleared by a
processor reset. The bit may be tested by software, but it performs no other function. When the stack read and
write pointers indicate that stack is full, the “stkfull” bit in the “flags” register is set. This bit will be reset once the
stack is not full.
Stack Pointers
The 16-level stack has two 4-bit pointers, stack write and stack read. They are normally written by the processor
upon execution of a “CALL” instruction or an interrupt.
The stack also has a 6-bit index register “stkNdx” (register F6) and an 8-bit data port register “stkData” (register F7)
that are used to access the stack contents as bytes in a register file under program control. The contents of the
stack location selected by the “stkNdx” register may be read or written by the processor via MOV instructions at the
“stkData” register. The stack register index must be written first, then the stack data can be read.
The Stack read and write pointers (4 bits each) are also mapped to addresses accessible via the Stack Register
Index.
Stack contents accessed by value in stack register index (“stkNdx”, register F6)
00H Stack0 Lo
08H
Stack4 Lo
10H Stack8 Lo
18H
01H Stack0 Hi
09H
Stack4 Hi
11H Stack8 Hi
19H
02H Stack1 Lo
0AH Stack5 Lo
12H Stack9 Lo
1AH
03H Stack1 Hi
0BH Stack5 Hi
13H Stack9 Hi
1BH
04H Stack2 Lo
0CH Stack6 Lo
14H StackA Lo
1CH
05H Stack2 Hi
0DH Stack6 Hi
15H StackA Hi
1DH
06H Stack3 Lo
0EH Stack7 Lo
16H StackB Lo
1EH
07H Stack3 Hi
0FH
Stack7 Hi
17H StackB Hi
1FH
20(unused)
30(unused)
3EH StackWritePtr
3FH
2FH
3DH
(4bits only)
StackC Lo
StackC Hi
StackD Lo
StackD Hi
StackE Lo
StackE Hi
StackF Lo
StacKF Hi
StackReadPtr
(4bits only)
Register and User RAM
The RSC-4128 has a physical register RAM space of 896 bytes. There is an additional RAM space of 64 bytes
dedicated to Special Function Registers (SFRs), for a total register RAM space of 960 bytes. User RAM is
assigned 262 bytes of this register RAM space, as detailed below.
Logical register space addressing is architecturally limited to 8 bits (256 bytes). Therefore a banking scheme is
used to provide the total of 960 bytes of register RAM space. The lower 128 bytes and the top 64 bytes of
addressing are used to directly address register RAM. The remaining 64 bytes (080H-0BFH) are banked to provide
the remaining 768 bytes of register RAM space. This 768 bytes of register RAM is divided into 12 banks of 64
bytes each. The “bank” register (register FC) is combined with logical addressing to access these 12 banks. Here
is a table illustrating the breakdown of register RAM space:
000H-07FH
080H-0BFH
0C0H-0FFH
unbanked register RAM
banked register RAM
unbanked register RAM (SFRs)
Bits [4:0] of the “bank” register determine which physical bank of 64 bytes is logically mapped to addresses 080H0BFH. When a logical address falls in the range of 080H-0BFH, the lower 6 bits of the logical address (64 byte
address) are combined with the “bank” register bits used as the upper 5 bits of an 11-bit physical address. This
physical address is used to address 768 bytes (12 banks) of physical bank RAM. (Note: 4 bits are required by the
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© 2005 Sensory Inc.
Data Sheet
RSC-4128
“bank” register to address 12 banks, but 5 bits are provided to allow for possible increases in the register RAM for
future RSC family members.) Here is a table that illustrates this banking scheme:
Mapping of logical addresses 080H-0BFH (“bank” register FC is used)
register FC [4:0]
Physical Bank RAM
register FC [4:0]
00H (Bank 0)
00-3FH
08H (Bank 8)
01H (Bank 1)
40-7FH
09H (Bank 9)
02H (Bank 2)
80-BFH
0AH (Bank A)
03H (Bank 3)
C0-FFH
0BH (Bank B)
04H (Bank 4)
100-13FH
0CH
05H (Bank 5)
140-17FH
0DH
06H (Bank 6)
180-1BFH
0EH
07H (Bank 7)
1C0-1FFH
0FH
Physical Bank RAM
200-23FH
240-27FH
280-2BFH
2C0-2FFH
--- (unimplemented)
--- (unimplemented)
--- (unimplemented)
--- (unimplemented)
NOTE: If a value other than those indicated above is used in the “bank” register, an undefined state will result.
User RAM is assigned both in directly addressed register RAM space and in banked register RAM space.
Addresses 03AH-07FH (70 bytes) of directly addressed register RAM and Banks 0, A and B (192 bytes) of banked
register RAM are assigned for a total of 262 bytes of User RAM.
See the “Special Functions Registers Summary” for details on the contents of SFRs.
L1 Vector Accelerator/Multiplier
A variety of macros are provided by Sensory that manipulate the L1 Vector Accelerator to provide signed and
unsigned multiplication functions. See the “FluentChip™ Technology Library Manual” for information on these
macros and their application.
The L1/Multiplier unit may be independently powered down by programming the register D6.Bit 4 to “0” (“clkExt”
register, “L1clk_on” bit).
Digital Filter
The RSC-4128 has a Digital Filter engine capable of dividing up a frequency range into several smaller ranges. It
is also capable of reporting characteristics of each range to the RSC-4128 processor. The configuration of the
Digital Filter engine and access to signal characteristics generated are enabled by technology modules which are
available from Sensory “Technology Support” upon request.
Power and Wakeup Control
The typical Active Supply Current is realized when operating with a main clock rate of 14.32 MHz at 3V and all I/O
configured to the high-Z state. Lowering clock frequency reduces active power consumption, although FluentChip™
technology typically requires a 14.32 MHz clock.
Two supply current power-down modes are available – Sleep and Idle modes. In Sleep mode everything is
stopped, and only an I/O event can initiate a wake-up. In Idle mode OSC2 and Timer2 continue to run, and an
Audio Wakeup, I/O Wakeup or Timer2 interrupt request caused by overflow can generate a wake-up.
Sleep mode is entered by setting register E8.Bit7=1 (“ckCtl” register; “pdn” bit), register E8.Bit0=1 (“osc1_off”) and
register E8.Bit1=0 (OSC2 off). Idle mode is entered by setting register E8.Bit7=1, register E8.Bit1=1 (“osc2_on”)
and register E8.Bit0=1. Setting register E8.Bit7=1 (“pdn”) freezes the processor, but does not insure that the DAC,
Audio Wakeup, and the PWM are placed in the lowest possible current-consumption state. Software control must
power these blocks down prior to setting “pdn” to “1”, according to the procedures indicated in “DAC”, “Audio
Wakeup”, and “Pulse Width Modulator Analog Output” Sections. The “FluentChip™ Technology Library Manual”
provides sample code for achieving the lowest current-consumption state for Sleep and Idle modes. The state of
“pdn” bit may be observed externally on the PDN pin (see pin definitions in “Package Options” section) and used to
control power down of circuitry external to the RSC-4128, if desired.
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Data Sheet
RSC-4128
NOTE: GPIO (Ports 0,1 & 2) should be put in input mode and a known state (e.g. light pull-up) whenever possible
to conserve power, and especially in powerdown mode to achieve the specified minimum supply current
consumption. The external memory interface (A[19:0], D[7:0], -RDR, -WRC, -RDF and –WRD) automatically goes
into a high-Z state and is pulled up by a 100 Kohm internal resistor when the “pdn” bit is set, to conserve current.
Register E8 contains both the “pdn” bit and the processor clock selector (Bit2). The clock selector bit determines
whether the 14.32 clock (“fast clock”) or the 32KHz clock (“slow clock”) will be used at wakeup time, independent of
what clock rate was being used before or during power down mode. This allows the processor clock after wakeup
to be the same or different from the processor clock used when the power-down flag was set. (see “Clock” section
for complete explanation)
To minimize power consumption, most operational blocks on the chip also have individual power controls that may
be selectively enabled or disabled by the programmer.
Wakeup from powerdown
Note that a Wakeup event does not cause a reset. The processor, which was "frozen" when register E8.Bit7 was
set, will be restarted without loss of context. A reset of the chip will also cancel a power down mode, but with a
corresponding loss of processor context.
Wakeup events terminate a power-down state. In Sleep mode, only an I/O Wakeup event can initiate a wake-up. In
Idle mode, an Audio Wakeup, I/O Wakeup or Timer2 interrupt request caused by overflow can generate a wakeup.
An I/O Wakeup is enabled by setting the bit(s) high in registers E9 or EA corresponding to the desired I/O pin(s) to
be used for wakeup. E9 controls P0 wakeup enable and EA controls P1 wakeup enable. The polarity of the
wakeup event is controlled by putting the appropriate port pin in input mode and writing the appropriate bit in the
output register for that pin to the desired polarity. (see “General Purpose I/O” section for complete explanation)
When the value on the wakeup pin equals the value in the output register a wakeup will occur.
A T2 Wakeup is enabled by setting register E8.Bit6 high. Then an overflow of timer T2 will generate an interrupt
request, which in turn will trigger a wakeup event. Note that the Timer2 “irq” bit (register FE.Bit1) must be cleared
prior to powering down to allow the wakeup interrupt request to occur. (the “Timers/Counters” section describes
how timer T2 is configured)
An Audio Wakeup is generated by special circuitry that can detect several classes of sounds, even while in powerdown mode. When the class of sound selected by the programmer is detected by this circuitry a wakeup event will
occur. (see the “Audio Wakeup” section for more information)
General Purpose I/O
The RSC-4128 has 24 general-purpose I/O pins (P0.0-P0.7, P1.0-P1.7, P2.0-P2.7). Each pin can be programmed
as an input with weak pull-up (~200kΩ equivalent device); input with strong pull-up (~10kΩ equivalent device); input
without pull-up, or as an output with sufficient drive to light an LED. (See “DC Characteristics” section for I/O
electrical characteristics.) This is accomplished by programming combinations of 48 bits of configuration registers
assigned to the I/O pins.
Two control registers, A and B, are used to control the nature of inputs and outputs for each port. Registers E6
(“p0CtlA”) and E7 (“p0CtlB”), E2 (“p1CtlA”) and E3 (“p1CtlB”), and DE (“p2CtlA”) and DF (“p2CtlB”), are the control
registers A and B for ports P0, P1 and P2, respectively. Each port pin’s I/O configuration may be controlled
independently by the state of it’s corresponding bits in these registers. Control registers A and B together
determine the function of the port pins as follows:
12
B bit
A bit
Port Pin Function
0
0
1
0
1
0
Input - Weak Pull-up
Input - Strong Pull-up
Input - No pull-up
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Data Sheet
1
RSC-4128
1
Output
(For example, if register E7.Bit 4 is set high, and register E6.Bit 4 is low, then pin P0.4 is an input without a pull-up
device.)
After reset, pins P0.0-P0.7, P1.0-P1.7, and P2.5-P2.7 are set to be digital inputs with weak pull-ups, and pins P2.0P2.4 are configured as analog input pins with no pull-ups. Being reset as an input and lightly pulled to a known
(high) state ensures minimum power consumption as a default beginning. Sixteen of these pins (Ports P0 and P1)
can also be configured as inputs to control IO Wakeup events. (see “Power and Wakeup Control” section).
P2.0, P2.1, P2.3, and P2.4 can be configured as comparator inputs. P2.2 can be configured as a comparator
reference. Some or all of P2.0-P2.4 can be configured as digital inputs by the use of the “cmpCtl” register (register
D4) Bits[2:0] (see “Comparator Unit” section)
Note: When configuring P2.0-P2.4 as digital inputs the associated weak pull-up should be selected as shown
above.
P0.0 and P0.2 can be configured as External Interrupts (see “Interrupts” section). P0.1 can be configured in input
mode as a gate for an external event counter. (See “Timers/Counters” Section)
Registers E5 (“p0In”) and E4 (“p0Out”), E1(“p1In”) and E0 (“p1Out”), and DD (“p2In”) and DC (“p2Out”), provide
paths for data input and data output on P0, P1 and P2, respectively. The input registers are actually buffers which
record the value at the ports at the time they are read. The output registers latch the data written to them and
express it on the ports when the ports are configured as an output.
Following is a summary of the general purpose I/O control registers:
Register
0DCH Read/Write
0DDH Read
0DEH Read/Write
0DFH Read/Write
0E0H
0E1H
0E2H
0E3H
0E4H
0E5H
0E6H
0E7H
Read/Write
Read
Read/Write
Read/Write
Read/Write
Read
Read/Write
Read/Write
P2[0:7] (port 2) output register. Cleared by reset.
Port 2 input.
Port 2 Control Register A. Cleared by reset.
Port 2 Control Register B. Bits[7:5] cleared by reset.
Bits[4:0] set by reset
P1[0:7] (port 1) output register. Cleared by reset.
Port 1 input.
Port 1 Control Register A. Cleared by reset.
Port 1 Control Register B. Cleared by reset.
P0[0:7] (port 0) output register. Cleared by reset.
Port 0 input.
Port 0 Control Register A. Cleared by reset.
Port 0 Control Register B. Cleared by reset.
GPIO during powerdown
GPIO should be put in input mode and a known state (e.g. light pull-up) whenever possible to conserve power, and
especially in powerdown mode to achieve the specified minimum supply current consumption.
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Data Sheet
RSC-4128
Memory Addressing
The RSC4128 can address up to 2MBytes with a combination of 128Kbytes of default internal ROM and/or optional
external ROM, RAM or flash memories, without additional decoding circuitry. This is accomplished with 16 address
outputs, A[15:0], and up to 4 extended address outputs A[19:16]. There are two different memory spaces of up to
1MBbyte each: Constant/Code Space and Data Space. (“Constant” Space is referred to as “Const” space in
assembly and C-Data space in C) Data Space can be read or written. Constant/Code Space is typically read-only.
The RSC-4128 includes an external memory interface that allows connection with memory devices for storage of
speaker-dependent speech recognition templates, audio record/playback data storage, extended durations of
speech and music synthesis beyond the storage capabilities of on chip ROM, and code storage. Thirty-four (34)
pins are used to provide a parallel bus interface between the processor and external ROM, EPROM, SRAM, or
FLASH, for die and 100LQFP-packaged versions. An example of this parallel bus usage is provided in the
Reference Schematic 1-2. The RSC-4128 external memory interface has been improved for ATD-type memories.
The external address lines remain stable during instruction cycles that access internal RAM or ROM. The –RDR
and –RDF signals go high when not actively reading. The condition of the external data lines is weak pull-up when
not accessing the external bus. (See “DC Characteristics” section for bus electrical characteristics.)
One may also interface to serial memory devices for storage and retrieval of speech data, by using the serial
drivers for ROM, Flash, EEPROM, etc. provided in the FluentChip™ Technology Library. The serial memory option
is useful for applications of the RSC4128 packaged in a 64LQFP (which lacks the external parallel bus) for which
speech or music data exceed the storage capacity of on chip ROM. Using serial ROM, Flash or EEPROM may
result in a simpler, smaller PCB layout and lower overall system cost. The specific I/O used by the serial interface
are configurable. (See the “FluentChip™ Technology Library Manual” for more information). An example of the
optional use of external serial Flash is provided in Reference Schematic 1-1.
Constant/Code Space
When reading, Constant/Code Space can be either internal to the chip or external. Typical uses of this space are
for code storage, and SI recognition set and/or compressed speech constant data storage. When the –XM input
pin is held low, Constant/Code Space is external to the chip when reading and –RDR is the read strobe. When the
–XM pin is high, Constant/Code Space reads are always internal to the chip, and are limited to the physical size of
the internal ROM.
NOTE: Constant Space may be referred to as “Const Space” in assemblers and compilers.
When writing, –WRC is the write strobe regardless of the state of the –XM pin. Writing to Constant/Code Space
requires the MOVC instruction, which is limited to the first 128KBytes of Constant/Code Space.
When reading Constant/Code Space, an application can access up to 1MByte. However, only the first 128KBytes
can be used by the processor for program instructions (Code). The MOVC instruction can only read these first
128KBytes. These first 128KBytes are partitioned into 64Kbyte banks, called Code Bank 0 and Code Bank 1.
(NOTE: Code using both banks up to 128KBytes must provide “mirror” code in both banks for routines such as
Interrupt Service, etc, with protocols to track bank identity.) The MOVX instruction can read the full 1Mbyte.
However, the MOVC is more efficient for reading Constants within the current Code Bank.
The entire 1MByte of Constant/Code Space can be read with the following conditions.
A[19:16] are generated from Bits[3:0] of Extended Addressing Register (register D2):
The upper addresses
1) The MOVX instruction is used to read and Bit 4 (“rw”) of Extended Addressing
Register (register D2) is programmed to “0”.
The first 128KBytes (addresses 00000H-1FFFFH; Code Banks 0 & 1) can be accessed in two additional ways. For
these two cases, addresses A[19:17] are forced to zero by the RSC4x, and A[16] is generated from Bit 5 (“cb1”) of
the Extended Addressing Register. A “0” in “cb1” selects Code Bank 0 and a “1” selects Code Bank 1:
2) The processor fetches instructions from the active Code Bank.
3) The MOVC instruction is used to read from or write to the active Code Bank.
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Data Sheet
RSC-4128
Data Space
Data Space is always external to the chip and can be up to 1MByte. Typical uses of this space are for storage of
SD recognition template data and/or recorded audio data, and frequently the data is volatile. –RDF is the read
strobe and –WRD is the write strobe. A special bit in the Extended Addressing Register must be set high to allow
the processor to read from the data space using the MOVX instruction. When the “rw” bit (Bit 4 of Register D2) is
set, the MOVX instruction reads from the Data Space.
When writing to Data Space, the MOVX instruction generates a –WRD strobe, regardless of the state of the “rw” bit.
Data space can be accessed in two ways. For both cases, upper addresses A[19:16] are generated from bits [3:0]
of Extended Addressing Register:
1) The MOVX instruction is used to read and bit 4 (“RW”) of Extended
Addressing Register (register D2) is programmed to “1”.
2) The MOVX instruction is used to write.
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Data Sheet
RSC-4128
Extended Address Register
0D2H
R/W
ExtAdd
Bit [7:6]
Bit 5
(Unused)
cb1
0:
1:
Bit 4
rw
0:
1:
Bits [3:0]
MOVC reads/writes and processor fetches access addresses
00000H-0FFFFH of Constant/Code Space (Code Bank 0)
MOVC reads/writes and processor fetches access addresses
10000H-1FFFFH of Constant/Code Space (Code Bank 1)
Cleared on reset.
MOVX reads access Constant/Code Space
MOVX reads access Data Space
Cleared on reset.
“eda” bits – extended address bits [19:16]
used by MOVX to generate addresses bits A[19:16] of Data and/or Constant/Code Space.
Cleared on reset.
The programming of the Extended Addressing Register (“extAdd”) is independent of whether the ROM is external
or internal. That is, an external ROM mirrors an internal ROM exactly. This allows products to be developed with
external ROM and masked with the same binary in an internal ROM part.
Note: Unlike the RSC-3x, the last 256 bytes of Data Space are not allocated for internal processor functions. All
internal processor functions are mapped to the SFR area of Register space, leaving all Data space addresses
potentially accessible as external memory.
There are 8 data bus lines. These pins are bi-directional: they are normally inputs except when there is an external
write to Code Space or Data Space. These pins, D[7:0], have weak pull-up devices (~100K ohm) to keep them
from floating when no device is driving the data bus.
External Memory Interface Control Signals
There are 4 active low read/write strobes for reading from and writing to external Constant/Code Space or Data
Space: -RDR, -WRC, -RDF, -WRD. To support cost effective software development for large memory spaces
the external memory strobes are different from earlier RSC chips. The –RDR signal replaces the previous –RDC
signal and the –RDF signal replaces the previous –RDD signal. The –XM pin replaces the previous –XML and
–XMH pins on earlier RSC devices. The –WRC signal and the –WRD signal are the same as in previous RSC
chips. (See “DC Characteristics” section for electrical characteristics.)
The 20-bit extended address for a memory-reference instruction or a code fetch may be directed to the internal
ROM, or it may be directed to an external ROM or flash. The address is always an external address if:
1) the instruction is MOVX read and the “rw” bit is set, or
2) the instruction is MOVX write, or
3) the –XM pin is low, or
4) the instruction is a MOVC write
Otherwise the address is internal.
The –XM pin is an active low input pin that disables internal ROM when pulled low, and forces the use of external
memory for Constant/Code Space. Write accesses to Constant/Code Space (MOVC write; –WRC active) are
always directed off-chip. The -XM pin has a weak pull-up device (~10K ohm) to enable the internal ROM when no
connection is made to this pin. At the end of reset -XM is sampled and, if pulled low externally, the internal 10K
ohm pull-up device is disabled.
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Data Sheet
RSC-4128
The –RDR signal goes low when the –XM pin is held low and either
1) the chip executes an instruction fetch, or
2) the chip executes a MOVC read instruction, or
3) the chip executes a MOVX read instruction and the “rw” bit is zero.
This active low signal is used to enable an external ROM or other external memory containing both executable
code and fixed, read-only data.
The –RDF signal goes low when the chip executes a MOVX read instruction and the “rw” bit is set to 1. This active
low signal is used to read an external flash or other external memory that is used solely for the purpose of Data
Space, either read-only fixed data or read-write dynamic data.
The –WRD signal goes low when the processor executes a MOVX write instruction. The –WRC signal goes low
when the processor executes a MOVC write instruction. These signals do not depend on the contents of the
Extended Address Register or the –XM signal, since a write by definition cannot be done to internal ROM. See the
diagram below for a visual representation of the read and write configurations for internal and external addressing:
Memory Map Diagram
Code/Constant (Const) Space
-XM = 0
000000H
Read: MOVC (-RDR)
Write: MOVC (-WRC)
00FFFFH
010000H
01FFFFH
Codebank 0 and/or
Constants (Const)
Codebank 1 and/or
Constants (Const)
Data Space
000000H
Data
Constants (Const)
Read: MOVX (-RDF),
if D2.4 = 1
Write: MOVX (-WRD),
always
Read: MOVX (-RDR),
if D2.4 = 0
Write: None
0FFFFFH
0FFFFFH
Code/Constant (Const) Space
-XM = 1
000000H
Read: MOVC (-RDR)
Write: MOVC (-WRC)
00FFFFH
010000H
01FFFFH
Codebank 0 and/or
Constants (Const)
Codebank 1 and/or
Constants (Const)
Read: MOVX (-RDR),
if D2.4 = 0
Write: None
N/A
0FFFFFH
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Data Sheet
RSC-4128
External Memory Interface during Reset
While the Reset pin is active A[19:0] are driven low and -RDR, -WRC, -RDF and –WRD are driven high. D[7:0] are
configured as inputs pulled up by 100Kohm internal resistors.
External Memory Interface during Powerdown
The external memory interface (A[19:0], D[7:0], -RDR, -WRC, -RDF and –WRD) automatically goes into a high-Z
state and is pulled up by a 100 Kohm internal resistor when the “pdn” bit is set, to conserve current.
One output, PDN, is active high when RSC-4128 is powered-down. This pin can be connected to the (active low)
chip enable pins of external memory devices to reduce power consumption during RSC-4128 power-down.
Wait States
General control of wait states is managed by register FC.Bits[7:5] (“bank” register). These bits are set to a value of
7 on reset, defaulting to slower memory. An initialization routine may be used to configure for faster memory.
Access of external ROM space is always controlled by these wait state bits. Internal ROM space and all external
R/W space accesses may also controlled by these bits, unless otherwise selected by bits in the clock extension
register (register D6, “clkExt”) The internal RAMs always operate with zero wait states.
Register D6 provides for extended control of some clocks derived from OSC1 for producing additional timer scaling
or specialized wait states. When Bit 5 is set, it overrides the “bank” register control of wait states during MOVX
instructions which access external read/write memory (register D2.Bit4=1), and forces a fixed value of 4 wait states
(nominal 350ns access). When Bit 7 is set, it overrides the “bank” register control of wait states during internal
ROM accesses and forces zero wait states. Using these controls, various memory access speeds may be
accommodated within one application.
Bit 5
0: Certain MOVX* instructions use the Wait State divisor in register FC.Bits[7:5]
1:Certain MOVX* use fixed 4 Wait States (nominal 350nsec access)
Cleared by reset
Bit 6
0: MT timer clock is disabled
1: MT timer clock I s enabled
Cleared by reset
Bit 7
0: Accesses to internal ROM use the Wait State divisor set in register 0FCh[7:5]
1: Accesses to internal ROM use selected CLK (no wait states)
Cleared by reset.
* MOVX accessing external read-write memory (“rw”; register D2.Bit4=1).
Instruction
Opcode Operand 1 Operand 2 Description
Bytes
Cycles
+Cycles/
Waitstate
MOV
10
dest
Source
register to register
3
5
3
MOV
11
@dest
Source
register to register-indirect
3
5
3
MOV
12
dest
@source
register-indirect to register
3
6
3
MOV
13
dest
#immed
immediate data to register
3
4
3
MOVC
14
dest
@source
code space to register
3
7
4
MOVC
15
@dest
Source
register to code space
3
8
4
MOVX
16
dest
@source
data space to register
3
7
4*
MOVX
17
@dest
Source
register to data space
3
8
4*
POP
18
dest
@++source
register to register data
3
10
3
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Data Sheet
RSC-4128
stack pop (source preincremented)
PUSH
19
@dest--
Source
register to register data
stack push (dest postdecremented)
3
9
3
MOVY
1A
dest
@source
RAMY to register, indirect
3
7
3
MOVY
1B
@dest
source
register to RAMY, indirect
3
7
3
MOVD
1C
dest_pair
source_pair
register to register, direct,
16-bit MOV
3
7
3
*MOVX instructions will have the number of wait states selected by register FC.Bits[7:5], unless register D2.Bit4
and register D6.Bit5 are set, in which case the number of wait states is fixed at 4.
On-Chip ROM
The RSC-4128 includes integrated on-chip ROM. This ROM is enabled when the –XM pin is tied , or pulled high by
it’s own internal pullup resistor. This ROM space can combine both Code and Data.
ROM code Security Feature
The RSC-4128 has only one external memory enable pin (-XM), designed to prevent configuring code space for
both internal and external memory. This discourages executing external code that reads internal code via the
MOVC instruction and dumps it externally. In this way, a substantial measure of security is provided for the
developer’s application code.
Oscillators
Two independent oscillators in the RSC-4128 provide a high-frequency oscillator (OSC1), and a 32 KHz timekeeping and power-saving oscillator (OSC2). The oscillator characteristics are:
OSC FREQ PLL PINS
SOURCES
Crystal
1 3.58 MHz 4X XI1
XO1 Ceramic resonator
LC
Crystal
2 32768 Hz N/A XI2
XO2
Internal RC
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Data Sheet
RSC-4128
OSC1
OSC1 is enabled by programming register E8.Bit0 to “0”, which is the reset state for this bit. This bit is also
programmed to “0” during a Wakeup Event, enabling OSC1, if register E8.Bit2 is programmed to “0”. (see “Power
and Wakeup Control” section) In this case, a 10-20 millisecond delay will be forced to allow OSC1 to reach stable
oscillation. OSC1 must run at 3.58 MHz when using the FluentChip™ technologies, but may be slower if the RSC4128 is used as a general purpose platform for other applications. When OSC1 is disabled, the PLL which
generates the 14.32MHz clock (CLK1) is also disabled.
OSC2
OSC2 is enabled by programming register E8.Bit1 to “1”. The reset state for this bit is “0”, so this oscillator is
disabled by reset. OSC2 will be enabled during a Wakeup Event if register E8.Bit2 is programmed to “1”. (see
“Power and Wakeup Control” section) No delay will be forced, as OSC2 is assumed to be running during Idle
mode. The OSC2 source may be set to an external 32 KHz crystal by programming register EF.Bit2 to “0” (Note:
register EF.Bit7 must be “0” to enable writing EF.Bit2) The external 32KHz crystal should be used when accurate
timing and/or time-keeping is essential. In this mode, OSC2 is capable of achieving errors as low as 20ppm,
depending on the quality of the crystal and crystal circuit design. A typical value for the crystal bias capacitors is
27pF, but this will vary depending on the crystal quality and stray capacitance inherent in the application board
layout.
The OSC2 source may be set to an on-chip RC by programming register EF.Bit2 to “1” (Note: register EF.Bit7 must
be “0” to enable writing EF.Bit2). When using the on-chip RC, no external components are required for OSC1. The
on-chip RC value will vary due to process, temperature and supply voltage variations, so this oscillator frequency
will vary by +/- 30%. The on-chip RC mode should be used for low power modes where timing is not critical and
minimum system cost is important.
Oscillator Stabilization
When exiting Sleep mode (see “Power and Wakeup Control” section) OSC1 will have a forced 10-20millisecond
delay for stabilization if it is enabled. If OSC2 is enabled, it may require several seconds to stabilize, after which
the RSC4128 will begin running. Therefore, for fast response out of Sleep mode OSC1 should be enabled.
Clocks
The RSC-4128 uses a fully static core – the processor can be stopped (by removing the clock source) and
restarted without causing a reset or losing contents of internal registers. Dynamic operation is guaranteed from
~1KHz to 14.32 MHz.
Fast Clock
The 3.58 MHz OSC1 frequency is quadrupled by an on-chip PLL to produce a 14.32 MHz internal clock (CLK1).
Creating the internal clock in this way avoids an expensive high frequency crystal, substantially reducing overall
system cost. When used as the processor clock (see below), the 14.32 MHz internal clock creates internal RAM
cycles of 70 nsec duration, and internal or external Code/Data memory cycles of 140 nsec duration. Careful design
may allow operation with memories having access times as slow as 140 nsec.
Slow Clock
OSC2 generates an internal clock (CLK2) with an equivalent frequency to OSC2. When used as the processor
clock (see below), the RAM access cycles are one CLK2 cycle and Code/Data access cycles are two CLK2 cycles.
Processor Clock
Either CLK1 or CLK2 can be selected as the processor clock (PCLK) on the fly by changing the value of register
E8.Bit2. The reset state defaults to CLK1. (NOTE: it is possible to select a disabled clock as the processor clock. It
is the responsibility of the programmer not to select a clock until the corresponding oscillator has been enabled and
allowed to stabilize.) Power savings may result by using CLK2 when the processor is a lower activity mode and
using CLK1 when in a higher activity mode. If the use of an external clock driver is desired, the output of that driver
should be connected to the XI1 pin.
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Data Sheet
RSC-4128
After source selection, the processor clock can be divided-down in order to limit power consumption.
E8.Bits 4 and 3 determine the divisor:
E8.Bit4
0
0
1
1
E8.Bit3
0
1
0
1
Register
Processor Clock Divisor
1/2
1/1 (reset default)
1/8
1/256
A Processor Clock divisor of 1/1 is typically required for FluentChip™ technology.
The processor clock is gated by the Wake-up delay and also gated by “pdn”=0 (register E8.Bit7), in such a way that
the processor is stopped in a zero-power state with no loss of context.
Other System Clocks
The following functional clocks are generated from OSC1: CLK1, the digital filter clock, the analog front end (AFE)
master clock, the L1 clock, Timer1 clock, Timer3 clock, and the Multi-Task timer clock. The Timer2 clock and the
Watchdog timer clock are generated from OSC2. (see each block’s section for clocking details) All clocks except
the Timer2 and Audio Wakeup clocks are gated with the pdn = 0, to assure they are disabled during IDLE and
SLEEP modes. Timer2 and Audio Wakeup can run during Idle mode to produce a T2 Wakeup or Audio Wakeup.
(see “Power and Wakeup Control” section)
Timers/Counters
Four programmable timers and one fixed timer in the RSC-4128 provide a variety of timing/counting options. Timers
1, 2, 3 and the Multi-Tasking timer can all generate interrupts upon overflow. (See “Interrupts” section)
Timers 1 and 3
Each of Timer1 (T1) and Timer3 (T3) consists of an 8-bit reload value register, an 8-bit up-counter, and a 4-bit
decoded prescaler register. Each is clocked by CLK1 divided by 16. The reload register is readable and writeable
by the processor. The counter is readable with precaution taken against a counter change in the middle of a read.
NOTE: If the processor writes to the counter, the data is ignored. Instead, the act of writing to the counter causes
the counter to preset to the reload register value.
When the timer overflows from FFH, a pulse is generated that sets register FE.Bit 0 (“irq” register; T1 bit) or register
FE. Bit 4(T3 bit). The width of the pulse is the pre-scaled counter clock period. Instead of overflowing to 00, the
counter is automatically reloaded on each overflow.
For example, if the reload value is 0FAH, the counter will count as follows:
0FAH, 0FBH, 0FCH, 0FDH, 0FEH, 0FFH, 0FAH, 0FBH etc.
The overflow pulse is generated during the period after the counter value reaches 0FFH.
A separate 4-bit decoded prescaler register is between the clock source and the up-counter for each of T1 and T3.
The 4bits represent the power of 2 used to divide the timer clock before applying it to the up-counter. For example,
a prescaler value of 0 passes the timer clock directly through (divides by 2^0 = 1). A prescaler value of 5 divides the
timer clock by 2^5 = 32.
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Data Sheet
RSC-4128
Prescaler value
0000
0001
0010
0011
0100
0101
0110
0111
Divisor
1
2
4
8
16
32
64
128
Prescaler value
1000
1001
1010
1011
1100
1101
1110
1111
Divisor
256
512
1024
2048
4096
8192
16384
32768
The resolution of T1 and T3 is 8 bits, but the range is 23 bits. The longest interval that can be timed by T1 or T3 is
2^15*256 clocks = 9.3 seconds.
The 4-bit prescaler for T1 is in the Clock Extensions Register, (register D6.Bits[3:0]). The 4-bit prescaler for T3 is in
the Timer3 Control Register (register D9.Bits[3:0]).
In addition to its timing capability, T3 can also be configured as a counter of external events. In this configuration it
uses either the rising or falling edge of a signal applied to I/O pin P0.1. The selected transition is internally
synchronized to CLK1. The maximum external count rate for T3 is 447KHz.
The Timer3 Control Register contains the counting/timing options for T3. The register is write-only. Bits[6:4] provide
configuration control.
22
Bit6
Bit5
Bit4
x
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
x
timer
source
T3CLK
T3CLK
T3CLK
P0.1
1
1
x
P0.1
Configuration
timer
timer gated by P0.1 LOW
timer gated by P0.1 HIGH
count P0.1 events, rising
edge
count P0.1 events, falling
edge
Bit 7
0: disable T3 and prescaler from counting/timing
1: enable T3
cleared by reset.
Bit 6
0: use rising edge for external event counting
use LOW state on pin P0.1 for timer gating
1: use falling edge for external event counting
use HIGH state on pin P0.1 for timer gating
cleared by reset
Bit 5
0: use internal T3CLK for source (timing)
1: use external events on pin P0.1 for source (counting)
cleared by reset
Bit 4
0: normal operation
1: T3 is gated by pin P0.1 according to Bit6
cleared by reset.
Bit 3:0
Encoded prescaler for T3. (See prescaler table above).
cleared by reset.
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Data Sheet
RSC-4128
T1 and T3 can generate interrupts upon overflow by setting register FD.Bit0=1 and Bit4=1, respectively. (see
“Interrupts” section)
Timer2
Timer2 (T2) is clocked by CLK2 divided by 128. The overflow pulse from T2 can cause an interrupt request which in
turn will cause a T2 Wake-up from power-down, if register E8.Bit6=1. (see “Power and Wakeup Control” section).
Note that the Timer2 “irq” bit (register FE.Bit1) must be cleared prior to powering down to allow the wakeup
interrupt request to occur. T2 can also generate a standard interrupt request by setting register FD.Bit1=1. (see
“Interrupts” section)
Timers 1, 2 and 3 Timer Reload and Counter Registers
All are cleared to zero on reset.
Register
t1r
t1v
addr
EBH
ECH
t2r
t2v
EDH
EEH
t3r
t3v
DAH
DBH
Read/Write
Read
Write
Read/Write
Read
Write
Read/Write
Read
Write
Timer1 Counter Reload (2's complement of period)
Timer1 current counter value
Force load of Timer1 counter from reload register
Timer2 Counter Reload (2's complement of period)
Timer2 current counter value
Force load of Timer2 counter from reload register
Timer3 Counter Reload (2's complement of period)
Timer3 current counter value
Force load of Timer3 counter from reload register
Multi-Task Timer
The multi-tasking (MT) timer is intended to count a fixed interval of 858.1 microseconds. This provides a
“heartbeat” for multi-tasking in the FluentChip™ technology library. Other applications may find this useful for
similar purposes. This interval is obtained by dividing the CLK1 rate, when running at 14.32 MHz, by a fixed factor
of 12288. There is no configurability to the MT timer. One bit in the Clock Extension Register (D6.Bit6) enable this
timer’s clock. The MT timer overflow can generate an interrupt by setting register FD.Bit7=1. (see “Interrupts”
section)
Watchdog Timer
Due to static electricity, voltage glitches, or other environmental conditions (or program bugs!), a software program
can begin to operate incorrectly. The watchdog timer provides protection from such errant operation.
The Watchdog Timer (WDT) unit comprises two control bits in the System Control Register (D5), a special
instruction, two status bits, and a 17-bit counter. The counter, driven by OSC2, produces a toggle rate of
approximately 4 seconds at the 17th bit. A 2-bit decoded mux in the “sysCtl” register (register D5) allows selecting
the WDT timeout pulse from bit 9, 13, 15, or 17 of the counter. This selection sets the timeout in the range of
approximately 15.6 msec to 4 seconds. The accuracy of these times will depend on whether the OSC2 source is a
32 KHz crystal or the on-chip RC.
The WDT is enabled by register FB.Bit4=1. This bit can only be set by execution of the “WDC” instruction. This bit
is cleared by reset, so the WDT is disabled by reset. The bit is also cleared when E8.Bit7=1 (pdn), so the WDT is
disabled in either SLEEP or IDLE mode. It is not automatically re-enabled on Wakeup. Program control cannot
write to register FB.Bit4 to enable or disable the WDT. That is, FB.Bit4 is a read-only bit for normal register access
instructions. Since the WDT needs OSC2 for its operation, once the WDC instruction has been executed and
register FB.Bit4=1 to enable the WDT, OSC2 cannot be disabled by programming register E8.Bit1 =0 unless the
“pdn” bit (register E8.Bit7) is also set simultaneously. This allows disabling the WDT only when entering a power
down mode and is intended to reduce the probability of accidental software disabling of the WDT in active mode.
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Data Sheet
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Executing the WDC instruction clears the WDT counter, sets register FB.Bit4=1, clears register FB.Bit5=0
(wd_timed-out), and starts a new timeout period. The OSC2 oscillator may also be enabled by executing the WDC
instruction. If the oscillator is stopped, executing this instruction also sets register E8.Bit1=1 to enable OSC2. In this
case, timing will not begin until the oscillator is active.
Once the WDT is started, software must execute the WDC instruction at a rate faster than the timeout period.
Otherwise the watchdog circuit sets the “watch dog timed out” bit (register FB.Bit5) and generates a Timed Out
Reset, which resets the RSC-4128. A Timed Out Reset disables the WDT. (See “Reset” section) Software in the
reset routine can detect that the WDT timed out (FB.Bit5=1), since that is preserved during the Timed Out Reset.
Placing the chip in Sleep or Idle mode disables the WDT operation.
Timer Powerdown
Some timers have independent power down control, while others may only be powered down by turning off their
clock source, setting the “pdn” bit, or resetting. It is not required for the application to do this for full chip power
down, as long as it complies with directions in the “Power and Wakeup Control” section. However, one may
choose to reduce power consumption in active mode by turning off individual timers.
Timer 3 and MT Timer may be independently powered down by setting the register D9.Bit 7 to “0” (“t3Ctl” register,
“t3_on” bit) and register D6.Bit 6 to “0” (“clkExt” register, “MTclk_on” bit), respectively.
Timer 1, Timer 2 and the WDT require special circumstances to powerdown, which are appropriate for their
application. See their respective descriptions for more detail.
Interrupts
The RSC-4128 allows for 8 interrupt request sources, as selected by software. All are asynchronous positive edge
activated except the two external requests, which have programmable edges. Each has its own mask bit and
request bit in the “imr” and “irq” registers respectively. There is a Global Interrupt Enable flag in the “flags”
registers. The “imr” and “irq” bits are listed below with the RSC-4128 interrupt source shown in parenthesis:
0FDH “imr”
0FEH
24
Bit 7:
Bit 6:
Bit 5:
Bit 4:
Bit 3:
Bit 2:
Bit 1:
Bit 0:
1= enable interrupt request #7 (Overflow of MT timer)
1= enable interrupt request #6 (Edge of P0.2)
1= enable interrupt request #5 (Block End)(Reserved for Technology code)
1= enable interrupt request #4 (Overflow of Timer3)
1= enable interrupt request #3 (Edge of P0.0)
1= enable interrupt request #2 (Filter End Marker)(Reserved for Technology code)
1= enable interrupt request #1 (Overflow of Timer2)
1= enable interrupt request #0 (Overflow of Timer1)
Bit 7:
Bit 6:
Bit 5:
Bit 4:
Bit 3:
Bit 2:
Bit 1:
Bit 0:
1=interrupt request #7 (Overflow of MT Timer)
1= interrupt request #6 (Edge of P0.2)
1=interrupt request #5 (Block End)(Reserved for Technology code)
1= interrupt request #4 (Overflow of Timer3)
1= interrupt request #3 (Edge of P0.0)
1= interrupt request #2 (Filter End Marker)(Reserved for Technology code)
1= interrupt request #1 (Overflow of Timer2)
1= interrupt request #0 (Overflow of Timer1)
“irq”
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Data Sheet
RSC-4128
If an “irq” bit is set high and the corresponding “imr” bit is set high and the Global Interrupt Enable (“gie”; register
FF.bit0) bit is set high, an interrupt will occur. Interrupts may be nested if software handles saving and restoring the
“flagsHold” register (register CF). The “flags” register is copied to the “flagsHold” register and then the Global
Interrupt Enable is cleared, preventing subsequent interrupts until the IRET instruction is executed. The IRET
instruction will restore the “flags” register from the “flagsHold” register. The Global Interrupt Enable bit in the “flags”
register must not be re-enabled during the period after an interrupt has been acknowledged and before an IRET
instruction has been executed unless interrupt nesting is desired.
If an interrupt occurs during an instruction that clears the Global Interrupt Enable bit (typically the CLI instruction)
the value of the “gie” bit will be 0 upon completion of the Interrupt Service Routine and Return From Interrupt to the
instruction following the one that cleared the “gie” bit. (NOTE: This is a change from the operation of the RSC-364.)
The “flagsHold” register is accessible under program control at address CF in order to improve multi-tasking
operation.
External interrupts may be enabled on pins P0.0 (1st external interrupt request) and P0.2 (2nd external interrupt
request), by setting register FD.Bit3=1 and register FD.Bit6=1, respectively. The polarity of the edges to trigger an
external interrupt request for P0.0 and are controlled by register D5.Bits[1:0]. Setting D5.Bit0=0 will cause a
positive going edge on P0.0 to generate and interrupt and D5.Bit0=1 will cause a negative going edge to generate
an interrupt. The same controls for P0.2 are possible with D5.Bit1. The corresponding external “irq” flag will be set
if the transition matches the interrupt edge control bit.
NOTE: If P0.0 or P0.2 are configured as outputs, writing to those outputs can trigger external interrupt requests if
the proper edge polarities occur. The user must be careful to avoid this, unless it is intended to use this as a way of
generating interrupt requests under internal software control.
An interrupt is disabled by writing a zero to the corresponding bit in the imr register (register 0FDH). However, an
active interrupt request can still be pending. To be certain that an interrupt does not happen, you should clear the
interrupt request flag in the irq register (register 0FEH) as well. For example:
; Disable timer 1 interrupt
cli
and
mov
sti
imr,#0FEH
irq,#0FEH
; mask new interrupt requests
; clear any pending interrupt request
For each interrupt, execution begins at a different address:
Interrupt #0
Interrupt #1
Interrupt #2
Interrupt #3
Interrupt #4
Interrupt #5
Interrupt#6
Interrupt#7
Address 04H
Address 08H
Address 0CH
Address 10H
Address 14H
Address 18H
Address 1CH
Address 20H
(Overflow of Timer 1)
(Overflow of Timer 2)
(Filter End Marker)(Reserved for Technology code)
(Edge of P00)
(Overflow of Timer 3)
(Block End)(Reserved for Technology code)
(Edge of P02)
(Overflow of MT timer)
The interrupt vector is generated as a 20-bit address. The low 16 bits are derived from the execution table above,
and the high 4 bits are selected as a normal code fetch as described in the “Memory Addressing” section.
Specifically, the “cb1” bit is not touched by the interrupt.
If the corresponding mask register bit is clear, the “irq” bit will not cause an interrupt. However, it can be polled by
reading the “irq” register.
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Data Sheet
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“irq” bits can be cleared by writing a “0” to the corresponding bit at register FE (the “irq” register). “irq” bits cannot
be set by writing to register FE. Writing a “1” to that register is a NO-OP.
The “irq” bits must be cleared within the interrupt handler by an explicit write to the “irq” register rather than by an
implicit interrupt acknowledge.
PLEASE NOTE:
Clear interrupts this way –
mov irq, #bitmask
; CORRECT
Not this way –
And irq, #bitmask
; INCORRECT
The “and” instruction is not atomic. The “and” instruction is a read-modify-write action. If an interrupt occurs during
an “and irq” operation the interrupt will be cleared before it is seen, possibly disabling the interrupt until the system
is reset. Because one cannot directly set or clear bits in the “irq” register, use “mov irq” as a safe, effective and
atomic way to clear bits in the “irq” register. Use it the way you would use an “and” instruction to operate on other
registers.
NOTE: Bit2 and Bit5 of the “irq” register should always be written as “1” when clearing other “irq” bits, to avoid
conflicts with the Technology code use of these bits.
In Idle mode, Timer2 continues to operate even when the rest of the RSC-4128 is powered-down. An overflow
from Timer2 will set the corresponding “irq” flag even when there is no clock input to the processor. Note that the
Timer2 “irq” bit (register FE.Bit1) must be cleared prior to powering down to allow the wakeup interrupt request to
occur. This may also lead to normal interrupt processing once the processor is active, if the Timer 2 “imr” bit is set
(register FD.Bit1). This interrupt response is unique from, and may be in addition to, the T2 Wakeup.
Analog input
The analog front end (AFE) for the RSC-4128 consists of a preamplifier with gain control, a 16-bit analog-to-digital
converter, digital decimator and channel filters, and associated references. A single analog input can be processed
through the AFE. All of this circuitry can be powered down to conserve battery life by programming register EF.Bit0
to “0”. Setting this bit to “1” powers up the circuitry, requiring a settling time of approximately 10milliseconds.
The analog front end (AFE) performs analog to digital conversions on a low-level signals, which may be derived
from an electret microphone. The microphone signal is amplified by a preamp that provides four levels of gain,
which are selected by programming register D5.Bits[4:3]. Full-scale output for the four settings corresponds to
input signals of 100, 50, 25, and 12.5 millivolts Vpeak-peak, as shown in the table below.
Gain
“sysCtl”
Bits[4:3]
00
01
10
11
Input Referred
Noise
µVrms
Max Input Signal
mVp-p
mVrms
5.2*
4.9*
4.6*
4.4
100
50
25
12.5
35.4
17.7
8.8
4.4
Input signals higher than specified will produce a saturated full scale output with no wrap around. A line level audio
input must be attenuated to the range shown above for use with the AFE.
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Data Sheet
RSC-4128
Digital Transfer Functions
Lowpass response
Frequency
Below 8 kHz
9.395 kHz
20 kHz
Above 20 kHz
Detail of passband
Attenuation
Min
Max
0
1.18
3 dB
87.82
53
NOTE: A 1uF capacitor should be connected to AMPCOM and tied to GND, a 2.2uF should be connected to VCM
and tied to GND, and a 0.1uF capacitor should be connected to VREF and tied to GND. Failure to connect this
capacitors will substantially degrade ADC performance, and FluentChip™ technology.
A/D Conversion
The amplified signal is processed by a delta-sigma A/D converter that provides a 1-bit over-sampled digital signal.
This digital stream is filtered and decimated to produce 16-bit samples at the fixed rate of 18,636 samples per
second. The 16 bit signal will have about 12.5 bits of dynamic range, with about 10 bits above the noise level.
These samples are then provided to the RSC-4128 digital filter unit formatted as signed two’s-complement 16-bit
values. The samples are stored in the digital filter input registers “adcSampleHi” (register F5) and “adcSampleLo”
(register F4).
Note: Using the AFE for general purposes other than as intended in FluentChip™ technology modules may conflict
with FluentChip™. Such conflicts may adversely impact FluentChip™ functionality and/or the functionality of the
general purpose application. Care should be taken to avoid such conflicts. Contact Sensory Technical Support for
help in this area.
Audio Wakeup
The Audio Wakeup unit is an analog/digital circuit that can be configured to wakeup from one of four specific audio
events:
1) Two handclaps, or any two sharp, closely spaced sounds
2) Three handclaps, or any three sharp, closely spaced sounds
3) A whistle
4) Any “loud” sound above a specified amplitude, with duration options of 1 or 2 seconds
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Data Sheet
RSC-4128
Because it is intended to “listen” continuously at very low power levels, the Audio Wakeup unit must detect each of
these events without any processor interaction. The processor configures and enables the unit under program
control before going into Idle mode. Audio Wakeup is not available in Sleep mode because the unit requires the
CLK2 signal. The detection signal from the Audio Wakeup unit can trigger a wakeup event, which starts the
processor and allows further audio processing. The processor inputs to the Audio Wakeup are an enable signal and
control signals to select for which sound to listen. See schematic 1-3 for details on this implementation.
Schematic 1-3
NOTES:
1. Optional. This capacitor MAY reduce noise
coupled into the mic input on a noisy PCB.
2. If used, this capacitor MUST be placed
close to the RSC-4128 AGND and MIC1IN pads.
3. Place close to MICIN1.
4. Place close to MICIN2.
RSC-4x
Example using one microphone for
both Audio Wakeup and normal
operation
R1
Vdd
GND
AVdd
AVss
.1
100 -> 220uF
VREF
C5
AVdd
C8
MICROPHONE
MICIN2
100
AMPCOM
(Px.n is any available port
I/O pin)
Px.n
1.2K
VCM
1
2
MICIN1
R2
MK1
Vdd
C7
NOTE 4
C6
.047
.1
NOTE 1
NOTE 2
C4
C1
.1
NOTE 3
C2
C9
3300pF
.1
C3
1uF
2.2uF
example 1
RSC-4x
Example using one microphone for normal
operation only
AVdd
Vdd
R1
1
GND
C4
AVss
NOTE 3
C1
3V
2
Vdd
Vdd
C6
BT1
GND
AVss
AVdd
VREF
.1
100 -> 220uF
VCM
100
C7
C5
AVdd
1.2K
MICROPHONE
AMPCOM
(Px.n is any available port
I/O pin)
Px.n
MICIN2
1
2
MICIN1
R2
MK1
.1
.1
.1
NOTE 1
C8
3300pF
NOTE 2
C2
2.2uF
C3
1uF
The RSC-4128 FluentChip™ library contains routines for detecting each of the four audio events listed above.
These routines also manage powerdown appropriately. See the “FluentChip™ Technology Library Manual” for
reference code to invoke these routines.
Microphones
A single electret microphone may be used both for the analog front-end input (for recognition purposes) and as the
sound source for the Audio Wakeup unit. The current consumption and frequency response requirements are
different for the two uses, so two microphone input pads are provided: MICIN1 for the normal recognition input to
the analog front-end, and MICIN2 for the Audio Wakeup analog front end. A common microphone ground is used
for both the normal recognition analog front-end and the Audio Wakeup analog front end.
During normal recognition and Audio Wakeup operation, the microphone would typically be powered from a source
with an impedance in the range of 1-3 Kohms. If both the normal recognition and Audio Wakeup front ends are
used, they must be isolated from each other by capacitors and may share one microphone and microphone bias
circuit. The switching of the microphone input source is under program control. See schematic 1-3 for details on
this implementation.
The recommended value for the microphone filter capacitor (labeled “C5” in Schematic 1-3) is in the range of
100uF-220uF. Using a capacitor at the upper end of this range will reduce low frequency noise. Low frequency
noise on the microphone input typically won’t affect recognition, but could affect the quality of speech playback
when using Record and Playback technology in an application. (see the “FluentChip™ Technology Library Manual”
for more information on Record and Playback) Typical low frequency noise sources include 60 Hz hum, “motor
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Data Sheet
RSC-4128
boating” or cyclical fluctuations in the system power supply from “sagging” due to flash writes during speech
recording, and LED blinking during recording of speech. All of these effects are reduced in speech playback by
using a capacitor closer to 220uF.
NOTE: See Design Notes - “Microphone Housing” and “Selecting Microphone” on the RSC-4x Demo/Evaluation
CD. Improper microphone circuit and/or enclosure design will result in poor recognition performance.
Reset
An external reset is generated by applying a low condition for at least two clock cycles on -RESET, an active low
Schmitt trigger input. The output of the Schmitt trigger passes through a 10 nsec glitch blocking circuit, followed by
an asynchronous flip-flop. The output of the flip-flop generates active high reset throughout RSC-4128. The
internal reset state is held for 20 msec (when clocked by a 14.32 MHz PCLK). The purpose is to allow the
oscillator to stabilize and the PLL to lock before enabling the processor and the other RSC-4128 circuits.
External reset clears the Global Interrupt Enable flag and begins execution at address 0h. The special function
registers will be cleared, set, or left as-is, as detailed in the “Special Function Registers Summary” section.
Watchdog Timeout Reset
A special Watchdog Timeout Reset is produced if the Watchdog Timer is enabled and the Watchdog counter times
out. The only difference between the Watchdog Timeout Reset and an ordinary reset is that the “wd_timed” bit in
the “sysStat” register (register FB.Bit5) is preserved as “1” for a Watchdog Timeout Reset
Digital-to-Analog-Converter (DAC) Output
The DAC consists of an R-2R network with 10 bits of resolution and an output impedance of approximately 11
Kohms. An external amplifier is required to drive a speaker when using the DAC. The specifications of that
amplifier will determine the best choice of speaker impedance and the resulting volume.
The 10-bit resolution corresponds to an analog voltage range between 0V and Vdd minus 1 LSB (represented as
“Vdd-“). At Vdd=3V, one LSB of the R-2R network corresponds to about 3 mV. For example:
R2R Value
000H = 0v
001H = 0v+
200H = Vdd/2
3FFH = Vdd-
DAC output; Vdd=3V
0.000V
0.003V
1.500V
2.997V
There are two DAC output modes, full-scale and half-scale. In full-scale mode the output voltage swings between
0v and Vdd-; in half-scale mode the output swings between Vdd/4 and 3Vdd/4 minus 1 LSB (roughly Vdd/2 +/Vdd/4). Values written into the DAC hold register and certain Analog Control register bits are converted into analog
voltages.
The DAC hold register (“dac”; register FA) presents an 8-bit signed value to the DAC unit. In full-scale mode, the 8
most significant bits are driven by the DAC hold register and the 2 least significant bits are driven by the LSB1 and
LSB0 bits in the Analog Control register (“anCtl”; register EF.Bits[5:4]). This results in a total output range of –512
to +511. In half-scale mode the 8 middle bits of are driven by the DAC hold register, the most significant bit is
generated automatically by sign extension, and the least significant bit is driven by bit LSB1 in the Analog Control
register. This gives a total output range of –256 to +255. The half-scale mode is enabled by setting the mode bit
(d2a_half) equal to “1” in register EF.Bit3. The tables below show a selection of values and the resulting output
voltage.
Note: Register EF.Bit7 (“-anctlen”) must be “0” in the value being written to register EF, when writing
EF.Bit2.
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Data Sheet
RSC-4128
Full-Scale Mode (Output range 0v to Vdd- 1 LSB)
Decimal
DAC hold
Analog Cntrl
Digital input
Equivalent
reg[7:0] (hex) [5:4] (binary)
-512
80H
00
000H
-511
80H
01
001H
-510
80H
10
002H
-509
80H
11
003H
-508
81H
00
004H
-2
-1
0
+1
+2
+3
+4
FFH
FFH
00H
00H
00H
00H
01H
10
11
00
01
10
11
00
1FEH
1FFH
200H
201H
202H
203H
204H
+510
+511
7FH
7FH
10
11
3FEH
3FFH
Analog Voltage output
General
0-3V (approx)
0V
0.000V
0V+ 1 LSB
0.003V
0.006V
0.009V
0.012V
Vdd/2- 1 LSB
Vdd/2
Vdd/2+ 1LSB
1.497V
1.500V
1.503V
Vdd- 1LSB
2.994V
2.997V
The translation in Full-Scale mode is:
R2R[9] = dac[7] inverted
R2R[8:2] = dac[6:0]
R2R[1:0] = anCtl[5:4]
Half-Scale Mode (Output range Vdd/4 to 3Vdd/4- 1 LSB)
Decimal
DAC hold
Analog Cntrl
Digital Input
Equivalent
reg[7:0] (hex) [5:4] (binary)
-256
80H
0x
100H
-255
80H
1x
101H
-254
81H
0x
102H
-253
81H
1x
103H
-252
82H
0x
104H
-2
-1
0
+1
+2
+3
+4
FFH
FFH
00H
00H
01H
01H
02H
0x
1x
0x
1x
0x
1x
0x
1FEH
1FFH
200H
201H
202H
203H
204H
+254
+255
7FH
7FH
0x
1x
2FEH
2FFH
Analog Voltage output
General
0-3V (approx)
Vdd/4
0.750V
Vdd/4+ 1 LSB 0.753V
0.756V
0.759V
0.762V
Vdd/2- 1LSB
Vdd/2
Vdd/2+ 1LSB
1.497V
1.500V
1.503V
3Vdd/4-1 LSB
2.244V
2.247V
The translation in Half-Scale mode is:
R2R[9] = dac[7] inverted
R2R[8:1] = dac[7:0]
R2R[0] = anCtl[5]
DAC Power Control
The DAC has no explicit power control. It is turned off (placed into lowest current mode) by loading the value 80H
into the DAC hold register, and 0 into the LSB1 and LSB0 bits of the Analog Control Register (register EF.Bits[5:4]).
Note: register EF.Bit7 (“-anCtl” must be “0” in the value being written to register EF, when writing
EF.Bits[5:0].
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Data Sheet
RSC-4128
Pulse Width Modulator (PWM) Analog Output
The PWM consists of circuitry to regulate the width of a pulse supplied to one of two outputs, PWM0 and PWM1,
over a period of programmable duration. One or the other of the two outputs is held at ground and the other is
driven with a pulse of programmable duration, giving “push-pull” drive. Both outputs have “low shoot-thru”
transistors to reduce radiated EMI. Once programmed, the PWM produces outputs continuously until register
values are changed. The PWM has both 8 and 10 bit modes. The PWM Control Register (‘pwmCtl”; register D7)
contains the PWM on/off control (Bit0), the sample period (Bits[3:2]), sample size selection controls (Bit5), and the
two least-significant bits of the 10-bit output value (Bits[7:6]). The sample size defaults to 8 bits, with register
D7.Bit5=0 (“tenBits”). A sample size of 10 bits is selected by setting “tenBits” =1. The PWM output impedance is
approximately 11 Ohms. Of the standard speaker impedances available, an 8 ohm speaker will provide optimal
volume when driven by the PWM.
The PWM contains two counters. The data value counter is programmed with the value programmed in the
“pwmData” register (register D8) in 8-bit mode. In 10-bit mode the data value counter uses “pwmData” and
appends Bits[7:6] of “pwmCtl” as the least significant two bits to create a 10 bit value. Output data always lags input
by one PWM sample period. The sample period counter is fixed and counts to 128. The prescaler in the PWM
control register (register D7.Bits[3:2]) determines the clock for both the data value counter and the sample period
counter. The prescaler divides the 14.3 MHz clock by 4,6, or 7, resulting in a PWM frequency of 27.9 KHz, 18.6Khz
and 15.97 KHz, respectively. The PWM restarts every sample period, at which time either PWM0 or PWM1 pulses
high. The selected signal pulses high for a duration determined by the data value and then returns low. The nonselected signal remains low. The pulsed output selection is controlled by the sign of the data. When Bit 7 of the
“pwmData” register is 0, PWM0 pulses high while PWM1 remains 0. When Bit 7 of the “pwmData” register is 1,
PWM1 pulses high while PWM0 remains low. When the data value in “pwmData” is 0, both signals remain low.
When the sample period count selected by programming Bits[3:2] of the “pwmCtl” register D7.Bit has been
reached, the PWM restarts. The PWM hardware sample period and the software data value updating must be
synchronized to avoid aliasing.
The following table shows the rates and pulse durations obtained for 8-bit mode (“tenBits” programmed to “0”)
SOFTWARE NOTE: “Full scale” output for all prescaler values is obtained by setting the data value to 7FH, so 8-bit
signed data can be output at any of the three rates without amplitude adjustment.
PWM timing for “tenBits”=0
Item
prescaler=4
prescaler=6
nsec/clock (period clock) 280
420
CLK1 clocks per period
512
768
nsec/clock
(sample 280
420
clock)
PWM frequency
27.9 kHz
18.6 kHz
pulse for data=01
4 H / 508 L
6 H / 762 L
pulse for data=7F
508 H / 4L
762 H / 6 L
prescaler=7
490
896
490
15.97 kHz
7 H / 889 L
889 H / 7 L
For 10-bit mode (“tenBits” programmed to “1”), the sample period counter counts a full 7-bits (128 counts), exactly
as when TenBits is 0. The 14.3 MHz clock is divided by the prescaler value and supplied to the sample period
counter. The data value counter is clocked by the 14.3 clock divided by 2 for prescaler values 6 or 7, and is clocked
directly by the 14.3 MHz clock when the prescaler value is 4. Table YY shows the rates and pulse durations
obtained with TenBits set to 1. SOFTWARE NOTE: “Full scale” output is obtained with a different data value for
each prescaler value. Only prescaler=4 supports a full 9-bit count (512), so true 10-bit signed data can be output
only with prescaler=4. Otherwise the amplitudes must be adjusted to have maximum amplitude of 447
(prescaler=7) or 383 (prescaler=6). See “Additional considerations using the PWM for 10-bit Data” below.
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Data Sheet
RSC-4128
PWM timing for TenBits=1
Item
prescaler=4
prescaler=6
nsec/clock (period ctr)
280
420
CLK1 clocks per period 512
768
nsec/clock (data ctr)
70
140
PWM frequency
27.9 kHz
18.6 kHz
pulse for data=001
1 H / 511 L
2 H / 766 L
pulse for data=17F
383 H / 129 L
766 H / 2 L
pulse for data=1BF
447 H / 65 L
-- n/a -pulse for data=1FF
511 H / 1 L
-- n/a --
prescaler=7
490
896
140
15.97 kHz
2 H / 894 L
766 H / 130 L
894 H / 2 L
-- n/a --
Additional considerations using the PWM for 10-bit Data
The 14.3 MHz CLK1 clock rate of the RSC-4128 is not fast enough to provide PWM synchronization with 10-bit
8kHz or 9.3 kHz data. To understand this, consider a PWM rate of 8 kHZ (125 microsec). To output 10 bits (9 bits
plus sign) during this interval, a source must provide 512 clocks, giving a source rate of 125000/512 = 244 nsec.
The CLK1 period is 70 nsec, so the relationship between the source clock and CLK1 is 244/70 = 3.5, which is not
an integer. So the source clock cannot be derived simply from CLK1.
The RSC-4128 application developer should address this issue by using a “near-10-bit” resolution, as follows. The
TenBits bit is set in the “pwmCtl” register, and the prescaler is programmed to 7 to produce a PWM frequency of
15.98 kHz (62.57 microseconds). During this interval there will be 62570/70 = 894 CLK1 clocks, or 894/2 (=447)
data counter clocks. The number 447 thus represents the largest possible count that can be loaded into the data
value counter. The range of allowable values is from –447 to +447. Any larger value would produce the same
output of the PWM pulse “on” for the entire duration of the PWM period. Thus 447 represents “full scale” of the
PWM. If all 10-bit data values are then scaled to a maximum of +/-447, the PWM will provide full-scale swing and
(close-enough) synchronization at 8 kHz. The actual number of bits in the data is log2(447 – (-447)) = 9.8 bits. The
developer must ensure that the value programmed in the data value counter must not exceed the range of –447 to
+447. FluentChip™ provides PWM output utilities for speech and music that manage the PWM for the developer, if
so desired. (See “FluentChip™ Technology Library Manual”)
PWM powerdown
The PWM may be independently powered down by programming the register D7.Bit 0 to “0” (“pwmCtl” register,
“pwm_on” bit). When the PWM is off, the PWM outputs PWM0 and PWM1 are in a high-Z state and pulled up by
internal 10K resistors. The PWM must be explicitly turned off before setting “pdn” equal to 1 to achieve the lowest
powerdown current.
Comparator Unit
The Comparator Unit consists of 2 analog comparators designated “A” and “B”, a programmable voltage reference,
selection circuitry, and two registers – the Comparator Control register (“cmpCtl”) and the Comparator Reference
(“cmpRef”). Register “cmpCtl” configures the comparator unit and provides the digital comparator outputs. Bits [2:0]
are used to select from one of eight comparator configurations, in which some or all of P2.0-P2.4 may be analog or
digital inputs. (See “RSC-4128 Comparator Unit” figure; “A” denotes analog input and “D” denotes digital input) Bits
[3:0] are read-write.
Register “cmpRef” controls the Comparator Reference Voltage. The unit can provide level information under
software control about 4 external analog signals. All external signals connected to the comparator inputs must be
between Vss and Vdd.
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Data Sheet
RSC-4128
Each comparator has two analog inputs, designated “+” and
“-“, and one digital output. When the analog voltage on the
“+” input is greater than the analog voltage on the “-“ input,
the digital output is a high level. This is indicated by a “1” in
the “cmpCtl” register (register D4) Bits 7 & 6 for Comparators
A and B, respectively. When the analog voltage on the “+”
input is less than the analog voltage on the “-“ input, the
digital output is a low level. This is indicated by a “0” in the
“cmpCtl” register (register D4) Bits 7 & 6 for Comparators A
and B, respectively. Bits 7 and 6 are the comparator outputs
and are “Read-Only” by the processor.
A
D P2.0
A P2.3
A P2.1
B
A P2.4
B
D P2.4
OFF
A P2.2
OFF
D P2.2
CmpCtl=001
A P2.0
CmpCtl=010
A
A P2.0
A P2.3
A
A P2.3
B
A P2.1
A P2.4
B
A P2.4
iVREF
D P2.2
A P2.2
CmpCtl=011
A P2.0
CmpCtl=100
A
A P2.0
A
A P2.3
D P2.1
B
D P2.1
D P2.4
Each comparator “+” input has an analog multiplexer that
selects between one of two external signals. When Bit3 of
“cmpCtl” is programmed to “0”, comparator input A+ is
multiplexed to P2.0 and input B+ is multiplexed to P2.1.
When Bit3 of “cmpCtl” is programmed to “1”, comparator
input A+ is multiplexed to P2.3 and input B+ is multiplexed to
P2.4. The “-“ inputs of both comparators are connected
together. This common “-“ input can be multiplexed to either
an external comparator reference signal input through P2.2,
or the Comparator Reference Voltage (CRV).
OFF
D P2.1
A P2.3
Comparator Multiplexing
A
D P2.3
OFF
A P2.1
Each comparator can be separately enabled or disabled.
When a comparator is disabled, both inputs are isolated from
any circuitry common to both comparators, the inputs are
grounded, and the comparator power is turned off.
CmpCtl=111
CmpCtl=000
A P2.0
B
D P2.4
OFF
OFF
iVREF
D P2.2
A P2.2
CmpCtl=101
D P2.0
CmpCtl=110
A
D P2.0
D P2.3
A
D P2.3
OFF
A P2.1
B
A P2.4
OFF
A P2.1
B
A P2.4
iVREF
D P2.2
A P2.2
RSC-4128 Comparator Unit
Comparator Reference Voltage
The internal Comparator Reference Voltage (CRV) is derived from a multi-tap resistive divider and a 4-bit analog
multiplexer. Register “cmpRef” controls the Comparator Reference Voltage. The power for the Comparator
Reference Voltage is provided by unregulated Vdd. This means that the CRV will track external voltages referenced
from the system supply, giving consistent comparisons as the system supply drops. Power to the CRV is gated by
decoding the comparator configuration. The voltage select value in “cmpRef” Bits[3:0] selects one of 16 outputs of
an analog multiplexer connected to 16 equally spaced taps. The Comparator Reference Voltage covers the range
from 0.15*Vdd to 0.90*Vdd in steps of 0.05*Vdd and is given by 0.15*Vdd + (D3[3:0]/20)*Vdd.
In some configurations the Comparator Control register can be set up once and simply read thereafter. In many
configurations it will be necessary to switch the input multiplexers and/or re-program the reference voltage
repeatedly. These multiplexing and selection operations will have settling times of approximately 10 microseconds.
When the “pdn” bit is set for Idle or Sleep mode the entire comparator unit is powered down, but the contents of the
“cmpCtl” and “cmpRef” registers are preserved. When the RSC-4128 wakes up the comparators resume normal
operation.
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Data Sheet
RSC-4128
Instruction Set Opcodes and Timing Details
The RSC-4128 instruction set has 60 instructions comprising 13 move, 7 rotate/shift, 11 jump/branch, 13 register
arithmetic, 9 immediate arithmetic, and 7 miscellaneous instructions. All instructions are 3 bytes or fewer, and no
instruction requires more than 10 clock cycles (plus wait states) to execute. The column “Cycles” indicates the
number of clock cycles required for each instruction when operating with zero wait states. Wait states may be
added to lengthen all accesses to external addresses or to the internal ROM (but not internal SRAM). The column
“+Cycles/Waitstate” shows the number of additional cycles added for each additional wait state. Opcodes are in
HEX.
MOVE Group Instructions
Register-indirect instructions accessing code (MOVC), data (MOVX), technology (MOVY) or register (MOV) space
locations use an 8-bit operand (“@source” or “@dest”) to designate an SRAM register pointer to the 16-bit target
address. The “source” or “dest” indirect pointer register must be at an even address unless it is a 8-bit pointer
(indirect MOV). The LOW byte of the target address is contained at the pointer address, and the HIGH byte of the
target address is contained at the pointer address+1. Unless the flags register is the destination, the carry, sign,
and zero flags are not affected by MOV instructions.
Instruction
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOVC
MOVC
MOVX
MOVX
POP
Opcode
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
Operand 1
dest
@dest
dest
dest
dest
@dest
dest
@dest
dest
Operand 2
Source
Source
@source
#immed
@source
Source
@source
Source
@++source
PUSH
19
@dest--
Source
MOVY
MOVY
MOVD
1A
1B
1C
dest
@dest
dest_pair
@source
source
source_pair
Description
register to register
register to register-indirect
register-indirect to register
immediate data to register
code space to register
register to code space
data space to register
register to data space
register to register data
stack pop (source preincremented)
register to register data
stack push (dest postdecremented)
RAMY to register, indirect
Register to RAMY, indirect
register to register, direct,
16-bit MOV
Bytes
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Cycles
5
5
6
4
7
8
7
8
10
+Cycles/Waitstate
3
3
3
3
4
4
4*
4*
3
3
9
3
3
3
3
7
7
7
3
3
3
* If register D6.Bit 5=1 (movX_4ws) and external read/write memory is selected by setting the “rw” bit (register D2.Bit4), MOVX
instructions have four additional wait states.
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Data Sheet
RSC-4128
ROTATE Group Instructions
Rotate group instructions apply only directly to register space SRAM locations. The carry flag is affected by these
instructions, but the sign and zero flags are unaffected.
Instruction
RL
RR
RLC
RRC
SHL
Opcode
30
31
32
33
34
Operand 1
dest
dest
dest
dest
dest
Operand 2
-
SHR
35
dest
-
SAR
36
dest
-
Description
rotate left, c set from b7
rotate right, c set from b0
rotate left through carry
rotate right through carry
shift left, c set from b7,
b0=0
shift right, c set from b0,
b7=0
shift right arithmetic, c
set from b0, b7
duplicated
Bytes
2
2
2
2
2
Cycles
5
5
5
5
5
+Cycles/Waitstate
2
2
2
2
2
2
5
2
2
5
2
BRANCH Group Instructions
The branch instructions use direct address values rather than offsets to define the target address of the branch.
This implies that binary code containing branches is not relocatable. However, object code produced by the RSC4128 assembler contains address references that are resolved at link time, so .OBJ modules are relocatable. The
indirect jump instruction uses an 8-bit operand (“@dest”) to designate an SRAM register pointer to the 16-bit target
address. The “dest” pointer register must be at an even address. The LOW byte of the target address is contained
at the pointer address, and the HIGH byte of the target address is contained at the pointer address+1.
Instruction
JC
JNC
JZ
JNZ
JS
JNS
JMP
CALL
RET
IRET
JMPR
Opcode
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
2A
Operand 1
dest low
dest low
dest low
dest low
dest low
dest low
dest low
dest low
@dest
Operand 2
dest high
dest high
dest high
dest high
dest high
dest high
dest high
dest high
-
Description
jump on carry = 1
jump on carry = 0
jump on zflag = 1
jump on zflag = 0
jump on sflag = 1
jump on sflag = 0
jump unconditional
direct subroutine call
return from call
return from interrupt
jump indirect
Bytes
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
2
Cycles
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
4
+Cycles/Waitstate
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
2
ARITHMETIC/LOGICAL Group Instructions
Arithmetic and logical group instructions apply only to Register Space SRAM locations. The results of the
instruction are always written directly to the SRAM “dest” register. The exceptions are TM and CP instructions,
which do not write the result to the “dest” register and only update the flags register based on the operation’s
outcome. All but the INCrement and DECrement instructions have both register source and immediate source
forms.
In each of the following instructions the sign and zero flags are updated based on the result of the operation. The
carry flag is updated by the arithmetic operations (ADD, ADC, SUB, SUBC, CP, INC, DEC) but it is not affected by
the logical operations (AND, TM, OR, XOR). Note: the carry is set high by SUB, CP, SUBC and DEC when a
borrow is generated.
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Data Sheet
RSC-4128
Instruction Opcode Operand 1 Operand 2 Description
AND
40
dest
source
logical and
TM
41
dest
source
like AND, destination
register unchanged
OR
42
dest
source
logical or
XOR
43
dest
source
exclusive or
SUB
44
dest
source
subtract
CP
45
dest
source
like SUB, destination
register unchanged
SUBC
46
dest
source
subtract w/carry
ADD
47
dest
source
add
ADC
48
dest
source
add w/carry
INC
49
dest
increment
DEC
4A
dest
decrement
AND
50
dest
#immed
logical and
TM
51
dest
#immed
like AND, destination
register unchanged
OR
52
dest
#immed
logical or
XOR
53
dest
#immed
exclusive or
SUB
54
dest
#immed
subtract
CP
55
dest
#immed
like SUB, destination
register unchanged
SUBC
56
dest
#immed
subtract w/carry
ADD
57
dest
#immed
add
ADC
58
dest
#immed
add w/carry
INCD
69
dest_pair & register pair 16-bit
source_pair
increment
CPD
66
dest_pair
source_pair 16-bit compare
Bytes
3
3
Cycles +Cycles/Waitstate
6
3
6
3
3
3
3
3
6
6
6
6
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
3
3
6
6
6
5
5
5
5
3
3
3
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
5
5
5
5
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
5
5
5
8
3
3
3
2
3
10
3
Bytes
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Cycles
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
+Cycles/Waitstate
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
MISCELLANEOUS Group Instructions
Instruction
NOP
CLC
STC
CMC
CLI
STI
WDC
36
Opcode
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
Operand 1
-
Operand 2
-
Description
no operation
clear carry
set carry
complement carry
disable interrupts
enable interrupts
enable/restart Watchdog
timer
P/N 80-0206-M
© 2005 Sensory Inc.
Data Sheet
RSC-4128
Special Functions Registers (SFRs) Summary
Address
FF
FE
FD
FC
FB
D3
D2
D1
D0
CF
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
W
R
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
W
R
W
R
R/W
R/W
W
R
R/W
W
R
W
R
R/W
W
R
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R
R/W
R/W
R/W
R
R/W
R/W
R/W
R
R/W
W
R
R/W
W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
W
R
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
CE
W
FA
F9
F8
F7
F6
F5
F4
F3
F2
F1
F0
EF
EE
ED
EC
EB
EA
E9
E8
E7
E6
E5
E4
E3
E2
E1
E0
DF
DE
DD
DC
DB
DA
D9
D8
D7
D6
D5
D4
37
Name
flags *****
irq *
imr ****
bank
RESERVED
sysStat
dac
RESERVED
RESERVED
stkData
stkNdx
RESERVED
adcSampleHi
RESERVED
adcSampleLo
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
anCtl ***
Reset
Bit 7
0000 0000
carry
0000 0000 MTtimer
0000 0000 MTtimer
1110 0000
ws2
Bit 6
zero
p0.2
p0.2
ws1
Bit 5
sign
block
block
ws0
0000 0000
0000 0000
0
dh7
brownout wd_timed
dh6
dh5
0000 0000
0000 0000
stdk7
0
stkd6
0
0000 0000
adc15
0000 0000
adc07
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
trap
stkoflo stkfull
timer3
p0.0
endmark
timer3
p0.0
endmark
(bank4)
bank3
bank2
Bit 1
--timer2
timer2
bank1
Bit 0
gie
timer1
timer1
bank0
wd_on
dh4
0
dh3
0
dh2
fastClk
dh1
0
dh0
stkd5
stkind5
stkd4
stkind4
stkd3
stkind3
stkd2
stkind2
stkd1
stkind1
stkd0
stkind0
adc14
adc13
adc12
adc11
adc10
adc09
adc08
adc06
adc05
adc04
adc03
adc02
adc01
adc00
0000 0000 -anctlen
0
lsb1
0000 0000 -anctlen
0
lsb1
t2v **
0000 0000
x
x
x
0000 0000
t2v7
t2v6
t2v5
t2r
0000 0000
t2r7
t2r6
t2r5
t1v **
0000 0000
x
x
x
0000 0000
t1v7
t1v6
t1v5
t1r
0000 0000
t1r7
t1r6
t1r5
wake1
0000 0000
w1.7
w1.6
w1.5
wake0
0000 0000
w0.7
w0.6
w0.5
ckCtl **** 0000 1000
pdn
t2wake
fclk_on
p0CtlB
0000 0000 ctlb0.7 ctlb0.6 ctlb0.5
p0CtlA
0000 0000 ctla0.7 ctla0.6 ctla0.5
p0In
xxxx xxxx
pin0.7
pin0.6
pin0.5
p0Out
0000 0000 pout0.7 pout0.6 pout0.5
p1CtlB
0000 0000 ctlb1.7 ctlb1.6 ctlb1.5
p1CtlA
0000 0000 ctla1.7 ctla1.6 ctla1.5
p1In
xxxx xxxx
pin1.7
pin1.6
pin1.5
p1Out
0000 0000 pout1.7 pout1.6 pout1.5
p2CtlB
0000 0000 ctlb2.7 ctlb2.6 ctlb2.5
p2CtlA
0000 0000 ctla2.7 ctla2.6 ctla2.5
p2In
xxxx xxxx
pin2.7
pin2.6
pin2.5
p2Out
0000 0000 pout2.7 pout2.6 pout2.5
t3v **
0000 0000
x
x
x
0000 0000
t3v7
t3v6
t3v5
t3r
0000 0000
t3r7
t3r6
t3r5
t3Ctl
0000 0000
t3_on
polarity p0.1_src
pwmData
0000 0000
pwmd09
pwmd08
pwmd07
pwmCtl
0000 0000
pwmd01
pwmd00
tenBits
clkExt **** 0000 0000 rom_0Ws MTclk_on movx_4ws
sysCtl
0000 0000
wd_ps1
wd_ps0 brnout_on
cmpCtl
1100 0000
1
1
0
1100 0000
compA+
compB+
0
cmpRef
0000 0000
0
0
0
extAdd
0000 0000
0
0
cb1
RESERVED
RESERVED
flagsHold
0000 0000
carry
zero
sign
*****
awcCtl
0000 0000
pwrl
0
thrh2
P/N 80-0206-M
lsb0
lsb0
x
t2v4
t2r4
x
t1v4
t1r4
w1.4
w0.4
clk_div1
ctlb0.4
ctla0.4
pin0.4
pout0.4
ctlb1.4
ctla1.4
pin1.4
pout1.4
ctlb2.4
ctla2.4
pin2.4
pout2.4
x
t3v4
t3r4
t3_gated
pwmd06
0
L1clk_on
afe_g1
0
0
0
rw
d2a_half rc_osc2
0
afe_on
d2a_half rc_osc2
0
afe_on
x
x
x
x
t2v3
t2v2
t2v1
t2v0
t2r3
y2r2
t2r1
t2r0
x
x
x
x
t1v3
t1v2
t1v1
t1v0
t1r3
t1r2
t1r1
t1r0
w1.3
w1.2
w1.1
w1.0
w0.3
w0.2
w0.1
w0.0
clk_div0 slow_pclk osc2_on osc1_off
ctlb0.3 ctlb0.2 ctlb0.1 ctlb0.0
ctla0.3 ctla0.2 ctla0.1 ctla0.0
pin0.3
pin0.2
pin0.1
pin0.0
pout0.3 pout0.2 pout0.1 pout0.0
ctlb1.3 ctlb1.2 ctlb1.1 ctlb1.0
ctla1.3 ctla1.2 ctla1.1 ctla1.0
pin1.3
pin1.2
pin1.1
pin1.0
pout1.3 pout1.2 pout1.1 pout1.0
ctlb2.3 ctlb2.2 ctlb2.1 ctlb2.0
ctla2.3 ctla2.2 ctla2.1 ctla2.0
pin2.3
pin2.2
pin2.1
pin2.0
pout2.3 pout2.2 pout2.1 pout2.0
x
x
x
x
t3v3
t3v2
t3v1
t3v0
t3r3
t3r2
t3r1
t3r0
t3_ps3
t3_ps2
t3_ps1
t3_ps0
pwmd05
pwmd04
pwmd03
pwmd02
period1 period0
0
pwm_on
t1_ps3
t1_ps2
t1_ps1
t1_ps0
afe_g0
0
p02Edge p00Edge
mux_sel
ccs2
ccs1
ccs0
mux_sel
ccs2
ccs1
ccs0
crv03
crv02
crv01
crv00
eda19
eda18
eda17
eda16
trap
0
0
0
gie
thrh1
thrh0
thrl2
thrl1
thrl0
© 2005 Sensory Inc.
Data Sheet
RSC-4128
Address R/W
R
Name
CD
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
CC
CB
CA
C9
C8
C7
C6
C5
C4
C3
C2
C1
C0
W
R
Reset
0000 0000
Bit 7
pwrl
Bit 6
detect
Bit 5
thrh2
Bit 4
thrh1
Bit 3
thrh0
Bit 2
thrl2
Bit 1
thrl1
Bit 0
thrl0
Reset: “x” = unknown/don’t care, ‘-‘ = not implemented
* Only “0” can be written to “irq” bits. “1” is a “nop” for the bit to which it is written. When using FluentChip™ technology, always write “1” to
“block” and “endmark” in the “irq” register to avoid conflicting with technology code control of these bits.
** Write value is ignored and reload register value is written instead.
*** -anctlen (Bit7) of values written to the “anCtl” register must be “0” to enable writing the other bits in the value to “anCtl”.
**** When using FluentChip™ technology, “fclk_on”, “L1clk_on”, and “block” and “endmark” in the “imr” register should be left at the values
programmed by the technology code. A read-modify-write action should be used to modify the registers to avoid changing these bits.
***** “trap” must always be written as “0” in the “flags” and “flagsHold” registers
38
P/N 80-0206-M
© 2005 Sensory Inc.
Data Sheet
RSC-4128
DC Characteristics
Operating Conditions (TO = 0°C to +70°C, VDD = 2.4V – 3.6V)
SYMBOL
VIL
VIH
IIL
IACT
IACT
IIDLE
ISLEEP
RPU
RPO
IOL
IOH
PARAMETER
Input Low Voltage
Input High Voltage
Input Leakage Current
Supply Current, Active
Supply Current, Active
Supply Current, Idle
Supply Current, Sleep
Pull-up resistance
P0.0-P0.7, P1.0-P1.7, P2.0- P2.7
A0-A19, D0-D7, PLLEN, -RESET,
-RDR, -RDF, -WRC, -WRD
-XM, PWM0, PWM1
Pull-down resistance
TEST
Output Low Current
A0-A19, D0-D7, -RDR, -RDF,
-WRC, -WRD, PDN
P0.0-P0.7, P1.0-P1.7, P2.0-P2.7
PWM0, PWM1
Output High Current
A0-A19, D0-D7, -RDR, -RDF,
-WRC, -WRD, PDN
P0.0-P0.7, P1.0-P1.7, P2.0-P2.7
PWM0, PWM1
MIN
TYP
MAX
UNITS
TEST CONDITIONS
0.75
Vdd+0.3
10
V
V
µA
mA
mA
µA
µA
Vss<Vpin<Vdd
Hi-Z Outputs, Vdd=3V
Hi-Z Outputs, Vdd=3.6V
Hi-Z Outputs
Hi-Z Outputs
10, 200, Hi-Z
100
kΩ
kΩ
Software selectable
Fixed
10
10
kΩ
kΩ
Fixed
Fixed
mA
VOL = 0.5V, VDD = 2.4V
mA
mA
VOL = 0.5V, VDD = 2.4V
VOL = 0.8V, VDD = 3.3V
mA
VOH = 1.8V, VDD = 2.4V
mA
mA
VOH = 1.8V, VDD = 2.4V
VOH = 2.5V, VDD = 3.3V
-0.1
0.8*Vdd
<1
10
20
7
4
4
1
4
8
180
-2.5
-5
-80
A.C. Characteristics (External memory accesses)
Operating Conditions (TO = 0°C to +70°C, VDD = 3.3V; load capacitance for outputs = 30pF)
SYMBOL
PARAMETER
PCLK=CLK1/1, 1WS
MIN
1/TCL1
TRLRH
TRLAV
TALRAX
TRAVDV
TRHDX
TWLWH
TAVWL
TALWAX
TWDVAV
TWHQX
39
Processor Clock frequency
-RDR (-RDF) Pulse Width
-RDR (-RDF) Low to Address valid
Address hold after -RDR (-RDF)
Address valid to Valid Data In
Data Hold after -RDR (-RDF)
-WRC (-WRD) Pulse Width
Address Valid to -WRC (-WRD)
Address Hold after -WRC (-WRD)
Write Data Valid to Address Valid
Data Hold after -WRC (-WRD)
0
MAX
14.32
140
5
0
115
0
PCLK=CLK1/1, 0WS
MIN
0
35
35
70
35
35
5
35
P/N 80-0206-M
14.32
70
5
0
47
0
140
5
35
UNITS
MAX
MHz
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
© 2005 Sensory Inc.
Data Sheet
RSC-4128
Timing Diagrams
Note that the -RDR signal does not necessarily pulse for every read from code space, but may stay low for multiple
cycles.
-RDF (-RDR)
TRLRH
-WRC (-WRD)
TWLWH
ADDRESS
ADDRESS
TRLAV
TALRAX
TAVWL
TALWAX
DATA
DATA
TRAVDV
TWDVAV
TWHQX
TRHDX
External Read Timing
External Write Timing
Absolute Maximum Ratings
Any pin to GND:
-0.1V to +4.0V
WARNING:
Storage temperature:
-65°C to +150°C
Operating temperature:
-40°C to +85°C
Soldering temperature:
260°C for 10 sec
Power dissipation:
1W
Stressing the RSC-4128 beyond the “Absolute
Maximum Ratings” may cause permanent damage.
These are stress ratings only.
Operation beyond the “Operating Conditions” is not
recommended and extended exposure beyond the
“Operating Conditions” may affect device reliability.
40
P/N 80-0206-M
© 2005 Sensory Inc.
Data Sheet
RSC-4128
Package Options
The RSC-4128 can be purchased in 100-lead LQFP or in unpackaged die. When using an in circuit emulator (ICE)
on dice applications, a COB bonding pad ring equivalent to a 100-lead LQFP footprint is advised for easy ICE
adapter attachment.
DIE
GND
NC
A4
86
85
84
NC
PWM1
PWM0
88
87
A6
P0.6
NC
VDD
90
89
76
NC
P0.3
A3
93
92
91
P0.5
NC
P0.2
A2
95
94
78
77
A1
96
80
79
NC
97
P0.4
A0
P0.1
99
98
NC
A5
NC
100
82
81
100-lead LQFP
82
83
100
1
4
5
72
71
P1.0
A9
D4
GND
6
7
70
69
VDD
GND
XO1
XI1
8
9
68
67
A10
P1.1
VDD
-XM
XO2
XI2
10
11
12
13
66
65
64
63
A11
P1.2
A12
P1.3
D3
D2
14
15
62
61
A13
P1.4
P2.7
D1
D0
GND
16
17
18
19
60
59
58
57
A14
P1.5
A15
VDD
VDD
P2.6
20
21
56
55
GND
P1.6
RESERVED
22
23
24
25
54
53
52
51
A16
P1.7
A17
PLLEN
DIE
Pad #
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
41
----------- 100 LQFP
Pin #
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
7
8
9
10
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
19
20
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
50
A18
TEST
48
49
46
47
-WRC
A19
-WRD
-RDR
42
GND
VDD
-RDF
44
45
40
41
P2.1
P2.0
43
38
39
36
37
NC
33
34
35
AVDD
NC
P2.2
GND
31
32
P2.4
P2.3
30
MICIN1
-RESET
AMPCOM
VREF
P2.5
RESERVED
RSC-4128
(100-lead LQFP)
29
52
A7
A8
PDN
D5
MICIN2
30
P0.7
74
73
27
28
53
75
2
3
26
Logo
29
1
D7
D6
AVSS
VCM
(100 pad DIE)
P0.0
DACOUT
RSC-4128
Pin Name Description
Signal Type
P0.0
D7
D6
PDN
D5
D4
GND
GND
XO1
XI1
VDD
VDD
-XM
XO2
XI2
D3
D2
P2.7
D1
D0
GND
GND
VDD
VDD
P2.6
reserved
P2.5
reserved
-RESET
DACOUT
AVSS
VCM
MICIN2
MICIN1
I/O, 10k or 200k pull-up resistor; high-Z
I/O, 100k pull-up; high-Z
I/O, 100k pull-up; high-Z
Output
I/O, 100k pull-up; high-Z
I/O, 100k pull-up; high-Z
GND
GND
Output
Input
PWR
PWR
Input, 10k pull-up resistor
Output
Input
I/O, 100k pull-up; high-Z
I/O, 100k pull-up; high-Z
I/O, 10k or 200k pull-up resistor; high-Z
I/O, 100k pull-up; high-Z
I/O, 100k pull-up; high-Z
GND
GND
PWR
PWR
I/O, 10k or 200k pull-up resistor; high-Z
DO NOT USE
I/O, 10k or 200k pull-up resistor; high-Z
DO NOT USE
Input, 100k pull-up resistor
Analog out
(A) GND
Analog
Analog IN
Analog IN
General Purpose I/O that can act as a “wake-up” input
External Data Bus (no connect for 64-lead LQFP)
External Data Bus
Power Down (active high when powered down)
External Data Bus
External Data Bus
Ground
Ground
Oscillator 1 output
Oscillator 1 input
Supply Voltage
Supply Voltage
External Memory Enable (active low)
Oscillator 2 output
Oscillator 2 input
External Data Bus
External Data Bus
General Purpose I/O that can act as a “wake-up” input
External Data Bus (no connect for 64-lead LQFP)
External Data Bus
Ground
Ground
Supply Voltage
Supply Voltage
General Purpose I/O that can act as a “wake-up” input
DO NOT USE
General Purpose I/O that can act as a “wake-up” input
DO NOT USE
Reset (active low)
DAC output
Analog ground
Common mode reference
Microphone input for audio wakeup
Microphone input
P/N 80-0206-M
© 2005 Sensory Inc.
Data Sheet
RSC-4128
DIE
Pad #
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
42
----------- 100 LQFP
Pin #
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
56
57
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
69
70
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
86
87
88
89
89
90
91
Pin Name Description
Signal Type
AMPCOM
VREF
AVDD
NC
P2.4
P2.3
NC
P2.2
GND
P2.1
P2.0
GND
VDD
-RDF
-WRD
-RDR
-WRC
A19
A18
TEST
PLLEN
A17
P1.7
A16
P1.6
GND
GND
VDD
VDD
A15
P1.5
A14
P1.4
A13
P1.3
A12
P1.2
A11
P1.1
A10
GND
GND
VDD
VDD
A9
P1.0
A8
A7
P0.7
NC
P0.6
A6
NC
P0.5
A5
NC
P0.4
A4
NC
GND
GND
PWM0
PWM1
VDD
VDD
NC
A3
Analog IN
Analog OUT
(A) PWR
Amplifier input common
Voltage reference
Analog Supply Voltage
Not connected
General Purpose I/O or comparator input
General Purpose I/O or comparator input
Not connected
General Purpose I/O or comparator reference
Ground
General Purpose I/O or comparator input
General Purpose I/O or comparator input
Ground
Supply Voltage
External Data Read Strobe (active low)
External Data Write Strobe (active low)
External Code Read Strobe (active low)
External Code Write Strobe (active low)
External Memory Address Bus
External Memory Address Bus
Test Mode
PLL Enable
External Memory Address Bus
General Purpose I/O that can act as a “wake-up” input
External Memory Address Bus
General Purpose I/O that can act as a “wake-up” input
Ground
Ground
Supply Voltage
Supply Voltage
External Memory Address Bus
General Purpose I/O that can act as a “wake-up” input
External Memory Address Bus
General Purpose I/O that can act as a “wake-up” input
External Memory Address Bus
General Purpose I/O that can act as a “wake-up” input
External Memory Address Bus
General Purpose I/O that can act as a “wake-up” input
External Memory Address Bus (NC for 64-lead LQFP)
General Purpose I/O that can act as a “wake-up” input
External Memory Address Bus
Ground
Ground
Supply Voltage
Supply Voltage
External Memory Address Bus
General Purpose I/O that can act as a “wake-up” input
External Memory Address Bus
External Memory Address Bus (NC for 64-lead LQFP)
General Purpose I/O that can act as a “wake-up” input
Not connected
General Purpose I/O that can act as a “wake-up” input
External Memory Address Bus (NC for 64-lead LQFP)
Not connected
General Purpose I/O that can act as a “wake-up” input
External Memory Address Bus
Not connected
General Purpose I/O that can act as a “wake-up” input
External Memory Address Bus (NC for 64-lead LQFP)
Not connected
Ground
Ground
Pulse Width Modulator Output 0
Pulse Width Modulator Output 1
Supply Voltage
Supply Voltage
Not connected
External Memory Address Bus (NC for 64-lead LQFP)
P/N 80-0206-M
I/O, 10k or 200k pull-up resistor; high-Z
I/O, 10k or 200k pull-up resistor; high-Z
I/O, 10k or 200k pull-up resistor; high-Z
GND
I/O, 10k or 200k pull-up resistor; high-Z
I/O, 10k or 200k pull-up resistor; high-Z
GND
PWR
Output, 100k pull-up resistor; high-Z
Output, 100k pull-up resistor; high-Z
Output, 100k pull-up resistor; high-Z
Output, 100k pull-up resistor; high-Z
Output, 100k pull-up resistor; high-Z
Output, 100k pull-up resistor; high-Z
Input, 10k pull-down resistor
Input, 100k pull-up resistor
Output, 100k pull-up resistor; high-Z
I/O, 10k or 200k pull-up resistor; high-Z
Output, 100k pull-up resistor; high-Z
I/O, 10k or 200k pull-up resistor; high-Z
GND
GND
PWR
PWR
Output, 100k pull-up resistor; high-Z
I/O, 10k or 200k pull-up resistor; high-Z
Output, 100k pull-up resistor; high-Z
I/O, 10k or 200k pull-up resistor; high-Z
Output, 100k pull-up resistor; high-Z
I/O, 10k or 200k pull-up resistor; high-Z
Output, 100k pull-up resistor; high-Z
I/O, 10k or 200k pull-up resistor; high-Z
Output, 100k pull-up resistor; high-Z
I/O, 10k or 200k pull-up resistor; high-Z
Output, 100k pull-up resistor; high-Z
GND
GND
PWR
PWR
Output, 100k pull-up resistor; high-Z
I/O, 10k or 200k pull-up resistor; high-Z
Output, 100k pull-up resistor; high-Z
Output, 100k pull-up resistor; high-Z
I/O, 10k or 200k pull-up resistor; high-Z
I/O, 10k or 200k pull-up resistor; high-Z
Output, 100k pull-up resistor; high-Z
I/O, 10k or 200k pull-up resistor; high-Z
Output, 100k pull-up resistor; high-Z
I/O, 10k or 200k pull-up resistor; high-Z
Output, 100k pull-up resistor; high-Z
GND
GND
Output; 10k pull-up resistor; high-Z
Output; 10k pull-up resistor; high-Z
PWR
PWR
Output, 100k pull-up resistor; high-Z
© 2005 Sensory Inc.
Data Sheet
DIE
Pad #
95
96
97
98
99
100
-
43
----------- 100 LQFP
Pin #
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
RSC-4128
Pin Name Description
Signal Type
P0.3
NC
A2
P0.2
A1
NC
P0.1
A0
NC
I/O, 10k or 200k pull-up resistor; high-Z
General Purpose I/O that can act as a “wake-up” input
Not connected
External Memory Address Bus
General Purpose I/O that can act as a “wake-up” input
External Memory Address Bus (NC for 64-lead LQFP)
Not connected
General Purpose I/O that can act as a “wake-up” input
External Memory Address Bus (NC for 64-lead LQFP)
Not connected
P/N 80-0206-M
Output, 100k pull-up resistor; high-Z
I/O, 10k or 200k pull-up resistor; high-Z
Output, 100k pull-up resistor; high-Z
I/O, 10k or 200k pull-up resistor; high-Z
Output, 100k pull-up resistor; high-Z
© 2005 Sensory Inc.
Data Sheet
RSC-4128
Die Pad Ring
VDD
VDD
A3
P0.3
A2
P0.2
A1
P0.1
PWM1
PWM0
P0.6
A6
P0.5
A5
P0.4
A4
GND
GND
91
90
89 88 87 86 85 84 83 82
A0
100 99 98 97 96 95 94 93 92
P0.0 1
D7 2
D6 3
PDN 4
D5 5
D4 6
GND 7
GND 8
XO1 9
XI1 10
VDD 11
VDD 12
-XM 13
XO2 14
XI2 15
D3 16
D2 17
P2.7 18
D1 19
D0 20
GND 21
GND 22
VDD 23
VDD 24
P2.6 25
reserved 26
P2.5 27
reserved 28
-reset 29
81 P0.7
80 A7
79 A8
78 P1.0
77 A9
76 VDD
75 VDD
74 GND
73 GND
72 A10
71 P1.1
70 A11
69 P1.2
68 A12
67 P1.3
66 A13
65 P1.4
64 A14
63 P1.5
62 A15
61 VDD
60 VDD
59 GND
58 GND
57 P1.6
56 A16
55 P1.7
54 A17
53 PLLEN
30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52
TEST
A18
A19
-WRC
-RDR
-WRD
-RDF
VDD
GND
P2.0
P2.1
GND
P2.2
P2.3
P2.4
AVDD
VREF
AMPCOM
MICIN1
MICIN2
VCM
AVSS
DACOUT
44
P/N 80-0206-M
© 2005 Sensory Inc.
Data Sheet
RSC-4128
RSC-4128 Die Bonding Pad Locations
PAD #
PADNAME X (um) Y (um)
PAD #
PADNAME X (um) Y (um)
PAD #
PADNAME X (um) Y (um)
PAD #
PADNAME X (um) Y (um)
1
P0.0
95
4564
30
DACOUT
447
95
53
PLLEN
2965
368
82
P0.6
2694
2
D7
95
4412
31
AVSS
542
95
54
A17
2965
516
83
A6
2599
4880
4880
3
D6
95
4260
32
VCM
637
95
55
P1.7
2965
665
84
P0.5
2504
4880
4
PDN
95
4107
33
MICIN2
732
95
56
A16
2965
813
85
A5
2409
4880
5
D5
95
3955
34
MICIN1
827
95
57
P1.6
2965
961
86
P0.4
2314
4880
6
D4
95
3803
35
AMPCOM
922
95
58
GND
2965
1110
87
A4
2219
4880
7
GND
95
3651
36
VREF
1017
95
59
GND
2965
1291
88
GND
2124
4880
8
GND
95
3498
37
AVDD
1112
95
60
VDD
2965
1446
89
GND
2029
4880
9
XO1
95
3346
38
P2.4
1364
95
61
VDD
2965
1681
90
PWM0
1792
4880
10
XI1
95
3251
39
P2.3
1459
95
62
A15
2965
1831
91
PWM1
1366
4880
11
VDD
95
3063
40
P2.2
1554
95
63
P1.5
2965
1972
92
VDD
1128
4880
12
VDD
95
2858
41
GND
1649
95
64
A14
2965
2104
93
VDD
1033
4880
13
-XM
95
2729
42
P2.1
1744
95
65
P1.4
2965
2237
94
A3
938
4880
14
XO2
95
2605
43
P2.0
1839
95
66
A13
2965
2366
95
P0.3
843
4880
15
XI2
95
2510
44
GND
1934
95
67
P1.3
2965
2481
96
A2
748
4880
16
D3
95
2376
45
VDD
2029
95
68
A12
2965
2596
97
P0.2
653
4880
17
D2
95
2238
46
-RDF
2124
95
69
P1.2
2965
2708
98
A1
558
4880
18
P2.7
95
2095
47
-WRD
2219
95
70
A11
2965
2817
99
P0.1
463
4880
19
D1
95
1943
48
-RDR
2314
95
71
P1.1
2965
3061
100
A0
368
4880
20
D0
95
1790
49
-WRC
2409
95
72
A10
2965
3194
21
GND
95
1667
50
A19
2504
95
73
GND
2965
3358
22
GND
95
1434
51
A18
2599
95
74
GND
2965
3513
23
VDD
95
1282
52
TEST
2694
95
75
VDD
2965
3678
24
VDD
95
1129
76
VDD
2965
3827
25
P2.6
95
964
77
A9
2965
3975
26
reserved
95
825
78
P1.0
2965
4123
27
P2.5
95
672
79
A8
2965
4272
28
reserved
95
520
80
A7
2965
4420
29
-RESET
95
368
81
P0.7
2965
4568
Notes:
1. Coordinates are in microns (um), rounded to nearest um.
2. Coordinates are of the center of the bonding pad opening (70um).
3. Coordinate (0,0) is the lower left corner of the die.
4. Die size with scribe and seal ring is 3060 um x 4975 um.
5. No external die substrate tie is required. However, a substrate tie to ground is preferred.
45
P/N 80-0206-M
© 2005 Sensory Inc.
Data Sheet
RSC-4128
Mechanical Data
LQFP 100 PLASTICQUAD FLATPACK (14x14x1.4 mm)
46
P/N 80-0206-M
© 2005 Sensory Inc.
Data Sheet
Symbol
A
A1
A2
b
b1
c
c1
D
D1
E
E1
L
L1
R1
R2
S
RSC-4128
Dimension in mm
Min
Nom
Max
1.60
0.05
0.15
1.35
1.40
1.45
0.17
0.22
0.27
0.17
0.20
0.23
0.09
0.20
0.09
0.16
15.85 16.00 16.15
13.90 14.00 14.10
15.85 16.00 16.15
13.90 14.00 14.10
0.50 BSC
0.45
0.60
0.75
1.00 REF
0.08
0.08
0.20
0.20
-
1
Dimension in inch
Min
Nom
Max
0.063
0.002
0.006
0.053 0.055 0.057
0.007 0.009 0.011
0.007 0.008 0.009
0.004
0.008
0.004
0.006
0.624 0.630 0.636
0.547 0.551 0.555
0.624 0.630 0.636
0.547 0.551 0.555
0.20 BSC
0.018 0.024 0.030
0.039 BSC
0.003
0.003
0.008
0.008
-
0º
3.5º
7º
0º
3.5º
7º
0º
-
-
0º
-
-
2
12º TYP
12º TYP
3
12º TYP
12º TYP
Notes:
A.
B.
C.
All linear dimensions are in millimeters.
This drawing is subject to change without notice.
Falls within JEDEC MS-026 BBC
Ordering Information
Part
RSC-4128 Die
Shipping P/N
(ROM specific)
Description
Tested, Singulated RSC-4128 die in waffle pack
RSC-4128 100LQFP
(ROM specific)
RSC-4128 100 pin 14 x 14 x 1.4 mm LQFP
47
P/N 80-0206-M
© 2005 Sensory Inc.
The Interactive Speech™ Product Line
The Interactive Speech line of ICs and software was developed to “bring life to products” through advanced
speech recognition and audio technologies. The Interactive Speech Product Line is designed for consumer
telephony products and cost-sensitive consumer electronic applications such as home electronics, personal
security, and personal communication. The product line includes the award-winning RSC-4x general-purpose
microcontrollers and tools, the SVC line of speaker verification chips, the SC series of speech and music
synthesis microcontrollers, and our suite of software development kits designed to run on non-Sensory
processors and DSP’s supporting most popular operating systems.
RSC Microcontrollers and Tools
The RSC product line contains low-cost 8-bit speech-optimized microcontrollers designed for use in
consumer electronics. All members of the RSC family are fully integrated and include A/D, preamplifier, D/A, ROM, and RAM circuitry. The RSC family can perform a full range of speech/audio
functions including speech recognition, speaker verification, speech and music synthesis, and voice
record/playback. The family is supported by a complete suite of evaluation tools and development kits.
SVC Microcontrollers and Tools
The SVC product line combines text-dependent speaker verification password biometrics with low-cost 8-bit
microcontrollers designed for use in consumer electronics. All members of the SVC family are fully integrated
for speech applications and include A/D, pre-amplifier, D/A, ROM, and RAM circuitry. The SVC family performs
noise robust speaker verification password security functions and speech synthesis. The family is supported by
a complete suite of evaluation tools and development kits.
SC Microcontrollers and Tools
The SC-6x product line features the highest quality speech synthesis ICs at the lowest data rate in the industry.
The line includes a 12.32 MIPS processor for high-quality low data-rate speech compression and MIDI music
synthesis, with plenty of power left over for other processor and control functions. Members of the SC-6x line
can store as much as 37 minutes of speech on chip and include as much as 64 I/O pins for external interfacing.
Integrating this broad range of features onto a single chip enables developers to create products with high
quality, long duration speech at very competitive price points.
FluentSoft™ Technology
FluentSoft™ Recognizer is the engine powering the FluentSoft™ SDK. It provides noise and echo cancellation,
performs word spotting for natural language usage; offers telephone barge-in; and provides continuous digit
recognition. This small footprint software recognizes up to 50,000 words, runs on non-Sensory processors
including Intel XScale and ARM9 platforms, and supports operating systems such as Windows and Linux.
FluentSoft™ Animation Toolbox offers animated avatars with advanced speech recognition and synthesis
capabilities for use in Smart Phones and Kiosk applications. Facial expressions can be configured for
different emotions, and the technology offers text-to-speech synthesis in either male or female voices.
Important notices
Reasonable efforts have been made to verify the accuracy of information contained herein, however no
guarantee can be made of accuracy or applicability. Sensory reserves the right to change any specification or
description contained herein.
1991 Russell Ave., Santa Clara, CA 95054
Tel: (408) 327-9000 Fax: (408) 727-4748
© 2005 SENSORY, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
Sensory is registered by the U.S. Patent and
Trademark Office.
All other trademarks or registered trademarks are the
property of their respective owners.
www.sensoryinc.com
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