Personal protective equipment

Personal protective equipment

Work health and safety procedure

Document number PN066P19

Objective reference A13442339

Version 2.1

25 August 2016

Personal protective equipment (PPE)

Ensuring workers have and use appropriate personal protective equipment for the work they do.

Note: This is a reformatted version of the procedure last published in March 2013 with some minor changes (refer to the change history). The procedure is under review.

Uncontrolled in print

Before using this document always check to ensure you have the most up-to-date version.

See the document source information on the last page.

Work Health & Safety Branch Personal protective equipment (PPE)

While the information provided by Roads and Maritime Services (Roads and Maritime) has been compiled with all due care, Roads and Maritime does not warrant or represent that the information is free from errors or omissions, is up to date or that it is exhaustive. Roads and Maritime does not warrant or accept any liability in relation to the quality, operability or accuracy of the information. Roads and Maritime disclaims, to the extent permitted by law, all warranties, representations or endorsements, express or implied, with regard to the information. Users of the information will be responsible for making their own assessment of the information, and Roads and Maritime accepts no liability for any decisions made or actions taken in reliance upon any of the information. Any such decision or action is made or undertaken at the risk of the user of the information. Users wishing to rely on the information should seek their own expert advice.

PN066P19 ObjID: A13442339 page 2 of 18 Version 2.1 (25 August 2016)

Work Health & Safety Branch Personal protective equipment (PPE)

Contents

Introduction ................................................................................................................. 4

Purpose ................................................................................................................. 4

Scope .................................................................................................................... 4

General requirements ............................................................................................ 4

Personal protective equipment .................................................................................. 5

1

Risk management ........................................................................................... 5

2

Supply of personal protective equipment ......................................................... 5

2.1

Specific circumstances ......................................................................... 5

3

Types of PPE .................................................................................................. 6

3.1

Protective headgear at worksites ......................................................... 7

3.2

Respiratory protection at worksites ...................................................... 8

3.3

Eye, hand and face protection at worksites .......................................... 9

3.4

Skin protection at worksites ................................................................ 10

3.5

Footwear at work ............................................................................... 11

3.6

High-visibility garments ...................................................................... 12

3.7

Noise and vibration protection ............................................................ 13

4

Working on or near water .............................................................................. 14

Roles and responsibilities ....................................................................................... 15

Definitions ................................................................................................................. 16

References ................................................................................................................ 17

Roads and Maritime references ........................................................................... 17

Australian Standards ............................................................................................ 17

Document control ..................................................................................................... 18

Change history ..................................................................................................... 18

Feedback ............................................................................................................. 18

PN066P19 ObjID: A13442339 page 3 of 18 Version 2.1 (25 August 2016)

Work Health & Safety Branch Personal protective equipment (PPE)

Introduction

Purpose

Roads and Maritime Services is committed to the health and wellbeing of all its workers

1

and others. A safe and healthy workplace is the right of every worker.

The purpose of this procedure is to provide a mechanism for identifying and selecting personal protective equipment (PPE). It also gives additional information about PPE, to ensure it is used and maintained correctly.

It is intended that as an outcome of this procedure:

• The risk of injury to workers is prevented

• Workers are consulted in the risk management process

• Roads and Maritime provides appropriate work health and safety training, instruction, information and supervision

• Safe systems of working with PPE are established.

Scope

This procedure covers all workplaces and includes:

• Workers

• Other duty holders who carry out work for Roads and Maritime or those (such as visitors) who are likely to be directly affected by safety issues relating to the use of

PPE.

All workers must comply with this procedure. Industry partners are also required to have in place an equivalent procedure. Roads and Maritime contractors and visitors are required to comply with this procedure when using PPE.

General requirements

Managers must ensure that high-level risk controls are considered before PPE is

selected as the risk control measure. When PPE is selected, it must be appropriate to the work health and safety (WHS) risk and must comply with the relevant Australian

Standards. Managers must ensure that workers are provided with the appropriate training and information necessary for them to use and care for their PPE.

1

See Definitions

PN066P19 ObjID: A13442339 page 4 of 18 Version 2.1 (25 August 2016)

Work Health & Safety Branch Personal protective equipment (PPE)

Personal protective equipment

1 Risk management

Managers, workers and others must identify and assess potential risks that may arise at workplaces or while undertaking work activities. Once WHS risks are identified, then appropriate methods must be taken to eliminate risk exposure or minimise the risks.

The procedure

WHS risk management

is available to assist managers with this process.

Higher level risk controls should be considered before PPE is selected as a control measure. PPE is considered the lowest level of risk control and should be used in conjunction with higher levels of risk controls. Whenever lower level risk controls (such as PPE) are used, review of the effectiveness of controls must be increased.

When PPE is used as a control measure, it must not introduce additional risk. There may be circumstances in which the standard or recommended PPE for the task introduces additional risk to the worker. In these circumstances, a risk assessment should be conducted to determine whether the PPE is an appropriate control, or if more appropriate PPE should be sourced. Examples of this include:

• Wearing hard hats when working under a bridge, and there is no risk from falling objects but hard hats restrict the worker’s ability to look up

• When gloves are required for a task that requires high dexterity but has a low risk of hand injury.

In such circumstances it may be determined that hard hats or gloves are not required, or specialised head or hand protection should be sought prior to work commencing.

2 Supply of personal protective equipment

Roads and Maritime supplies a range of PPE for its workers dependent upon the work activity and risk exposure. PPE is provided through Roads and Maritime stores located at designated work depots. Each store maintains a stock of PPE and workwear obtained from approved suppliers.

Stores supplying protective clothing are to ensure that minimum stock levels of all garments required by the local workforce are maintained at all times and in a full range of sizes to meet local demand. Periods of high demand and usage are to be accounted for, such as when projects like spray sealing operations are to be conducted.

In the event that PPE items are not available and the approved supplier is unable to provide the PPE required, managers may source the required items from an alternative supplier.

2.1 Specific circumstances

Medical conditions

PPE is selected on the basis of risk assessment and exposure to a hazard. On rare occasions, a worker may seek approval to not wear the required PPE. This may be due to a medical condition and must be supported by a medical certificate for approval to

PN066P19 ObjID: A13442339 page 5 of 18 Version 2.1 (25 August 2016)

Work Health & Safety Branch Personal protective equipment (PPE) be provided. Managers must determine whether Roads and Maritime can still ensure the health and safety of the employee when providing approval. Managers must seek advice from Work Health and Safety (WHS) Branch in these rare events (in particular, see Section 3.4 on Skin protection) .

Working near canola fields has the potential risk associated with bees and decreased visibility of the yellow high visibility safety vest. Therefore, a risk assessment must be done to determine appropriate control measures.

Sites controlled by a principal contractor who is not Roads and Maritime

If Roads and Maritime workers work on a site controlled by someone other than Roads and Maritime, the higher PPE standard prevails. That is, if the site controller has higher standards of PPE than Roads and Maritime, Roads and Maritime workers are required to meet those standards when working on that site. Otherwise, Roads and Maritime workers must meet Roads and Maritime’s PPE standards.

Rail corridor

For work in the rail corridor, workers must wear high-visibility garments of the colour

(eg British Rail orange) required by the relevant rail authority.

Traffic controllers

Roads and Maritime traffic controllers (or traffic controllers working for contractors) must wear approved yellow high-visibility safety vests displaying the Roads and

Maritime logo and the words ‘Authorised Traffic Controller’

2

.

Site marshals

When a site marshal is engaged at a worksite, the site marshal may be issued with a high-visibility vest of a different colour to those worn by other workers, provided the vest complies with the requirements of AS 4602.1

.

3 Types of PPE

Roads and Maritime provides its workers with a wide range of PPE. Note that work clothing provided to workers as part of their award or required uniform is not necessarily PPE. High-visibility garments are those that have specific luminance and fluorescence. The standard colour for high-visibility garments for Roads and Maritime workers is yellow-lime. For night work, high visibility depends on the retro-reflective tape applied to PPE clothing (see AS 1906 ) rather than colour.

2

Traffic Control at Worksites Manual, version 4.0. issue 2, July 2010; section 8.1.1

PN066P19 ObjID: A13442339 page 6 of 18 Version 2.1 (25 August 2016)

Work Health & Safety Branch Personal protective equipment (PPE)

3.1 Protective headgear at worksites

When should safety helmets and broadbrimmed hats be used?

Safety helmets:

Are required when there are potential risks of head injury, including but not limited to: falling or flying objects, striking overhead structures or energy sources and in an elevated work platform (EWP).Specialist safety helmets are required for high temperature environments.

Broad-brimmed hats

Should be used when there is a risk of prolonged exposure to solar

(ultraviolet) radiation.

Who needs to use these?

Safety helmets:

All workers, contractors and visitors must wear a relevant safety helmet, as determined above.

Broad-brimmed hats:

All workers are required to wear broad-brimmed hats at worksites where there is a heightened risk of exposure to solar radiation.

What types of safety helmets are there?

Care and maintenance of safety helmets

Supply and replacement of safety helmets

Helmet accessories

Type 1 Industrial Helmet (refer AS 1800 )

Suitable for use in construction, industry and quarry work.

Type 2 Helmets

Must be worn in high temperature workplaces.

 Safety helmets should be cleaned regularly

 All components of the safety helmets must be checked weekly for dents, cracks, penetrations and other damage

 Helmets showing any damage to the shell must be withdrawn from use and destroyed

 Helmets with sound shells but damaged harness components are to have the complete harnesses and cradles replaced

 Sweatbands replaced as required.

The following components have a limited lifespan from the date of issue to workers:

 Helmet harnesses must be replaced two years after being issued

 Safety helmets must be replaced three years after being issued.

Reissue of safety helmets

Safety helmets should not be reissued unless they have been thoroughly cleaned and inspected. If being reissued to other workers, new harnesses, cradle fittings and sweatbands should be installed.

Accessories may be fitted to safety helmets – such as sun-protection brims or earmuffs. No unauthorised alterations may be made to the helmets, such as drilling holes to fit an accessory.

PN066P19 ObjID: A13442339 page 7 of 18 Version 2.1 (25 August 2016)

Work Health & Safety Branch Personal protective equipment (PPE)

3.2 Respiratory protection at worksites

When should respiratory protection be used?

Respiratory protection should be used for work in atmospheres where there is a risk of oxygen deficiency or exposure to a contaminant above pre-set limits. A documented risk assessment is mandatory before any respiratory PPE is used.

Workers exposed to a risk of oxygen deficiency or contaminants. Who needs to use these?

Types of respiratory protection

Respirator care and maintenance

Selection of the correct respiratory protection must be appropriate to the work undertaken

Supply and replacement of respirators

Purifying air: Inhaled air is drawn through a filter that removes the harmful substances.

Particulate respirators filter out thermally and mechanically generated particulates.

Gas respirators filter out gases and vapors.

Supplied air: An air source independent of the working environment is provided.

There are three major categories of supplied air respirators:

 Air-hose respirators: the air supplied is not pressurised

 Air-line respirators: the air supplied is pressurised

 Self-contained breathing apparatus.

All respiratory equipment must be maintained and serviced in accordance with directions provided by the manufacturer.

When selecting respiratory protection, ensure:

 Consultation with the supplier occurs, so as to make sure the respirator is suitable for the work activity and workplace conditions

 Preference is for respirators that comply with the relevant

Australian Standard or equivalent standard

Specialist advice is available (and is recommended) in assisting with selection of the most appropriate respirator.

Respirators are to be supplied strictly on a personal basis to workers and other individuals at worksites. They are not to be shared or reused without being inspected, cleaned and serviced. Respirators are only to be issued to workers who have been trained and instructed in their use for the particular risk agent and the application they are to be used for.

Further details on the classes and types of air-purifying and supplied air respirators are available in AS 1715 – Selection, use and

maintenance of respiratory protective devices .

PN066P19 ObjID: A13442339 page 8 of 18 Version 2.1 (25 August 2016)

Work Health & Safety Branch Personal protective equipment (PPE)

3.3 Eye, hand and face protection at worksites

When should eye, hand and face PPE be used?

These should be used when workers are exposed to the potential risk of eye, hand or facial injuries.

Workplace situations where this could happen include (but not limited to): airborne particles or debris, radiation and hazardous substances etc (as a minimum, medium impact resistance protective eyewear must be worn) or when workers’ hands are exposed to potential risk from plant, equipment or hazardous work activities.

All workers and visitors who are exposed to the risk of eye, hand or facial injuries.

Who needs to use eye, hand and face protection?

What type of eye, hand and face protection PPE are there?

Care and maintenance

Prescription safety glasses

Contact lenses

Eye, hand and face protection types may include:

 Glasses or spectacles

 Goggles

 Shields, hoods or helmets

 Work or protective gloves.

These must comply with AS 1337. Selection of appropriate eye and face protection must be made following a risk assessment.

When face shields are used, safety spectacles are also required.

Some machines, such as grinders, are fitted with movable eye shields.

These systems do not provide sufficient eye and face protection so face and eye protection must be worn while using them .

All eye, hand and face protection equipment must be maintained and serviced in accordance with directions provided by the manufacturer.

Damaged or deteriorated eye/face PPE must be withdrawn from service immediately.

Conditions of approval:

Approval for the purchase of prescription safety glasses is granted by the relevant operational manager following provision of:

 A prescription from a suitably qualified optical dispenser

 Two quotes for supply of the glasses.

Prescription safety glasses must be on a standard frame, fitted with side shields, have clear lenses and be used for work only.

The wearing of contact lenses must never be considered as an alternative to eye safety protection requirements.

In some industrial situations where there is inadequate protection for eyes from hazardous substances, the consequences from risk exposure could be higher for contact lens wearers. Eye protection should always be worn in conjunction with contact lenses, wherever a risk assessment indicates it is required.

Note however, there is no additional risk to wearers of contact lenses from any welding process or operation, including from arc flash.

PN066P19 ObjID: A13442339 page 9 of 18 Version 2.1 (25 August 2016)

Work Health & Safety Branch Personal protective equipment (PPE)

3.4 Skin protection at worksites

Workers must be protected from the effects of solar radiation and insect bites at workplaces. This must be done by using risk management-based controls to prevent exposure or by providing barrier protection through the use of PPE, including clothing and screening products.

When should skin protection be used?

Who needs protection?

As determined by a risk assessment, skin protection should be used

(but not limited to) when there is a risk of exposure to solar radiation or in the presence of harmful insects.

All workers are to be protected from the effects of solar radiation, insect bites and any potential skin irritants at workplaces.

Types of PPE for skin protection

Special consideration

Following are some of the PPE for skin protection:

 Headwear –broad-brimmed hats and broad-brimmed safety helmet attachments.

 Suitable clothing, including Roads and Maritime uniforms (when required by the business unit), or outer garments that include, as a minimum, long-sleeved shirts fitted with collars and long trousers

 Broad-spectrum UVA/UVB sun-screen applied topically to exposed skin at the rate and frequency recommended by the supplier and which meet the standard AS 2604 Sunscreen products – evaluation

and classification

 Insect repellents

 Enclosed footwear that protects ankles and feet from solar radiation exposure

 When local conditions or procedures require it, gaiters or ‘snake chaps’ to protect against biting or stinging animals or stinging plants.

When working outdoors, special consideration needs to be given to situations and conditions associated with higher rates of UV radiation injuries among workers. They are:

 Susceptibility of a person to sunburn

 Certain medical conditions (eg albinism, xeroderma pigmentosum)

 The use of photo-sensitising medications by the person

 Previous exposure, if any, to photo-sensitising chemicals, such as creosote

 Use of photo-sensitising chemicals during work.

Workers must inform their supervisor if they have a condition that:

 Prevents the use of sunscreens or insect repellents

 Might increase the risk of photo-sensitivity

 Means avoiding exposure to solar radiation is recommended by their doctor.

The worker must obtain a medical certificate from their treating doctor to support such restrictions.

PN066P19 ObjID: A13442339 page 10 of 18 Version 2.1 (25 August 2016)

Work Health & Safety Branch Personal protective equipment (PPE)

3.5 Footwear at work

When should protective footwear be worn?

At all times on construction, traffic, vessels and fleet operations workplaces and other places, as determined through risk assessments.

Hazards to consider include: slipping, falling, rolling, cutting, crushing, penetration of the shoes, electrical hazards (including static discharge), chemicals, heat and molten metal.

Who needs to use

PPE footwear at work

Types of protective footwear

All workers must wear footwear that is suitable for their duties, while at work. Workers exposed to particular workplace injury risks are to be issued with safety footwear to protect them from foot injuries and/or to isolate them from energy sources within the workplace.

Protective footwear is classified as either Type 1 (heavy duty) or Type

4 (waterproof duty) and in accordance with AS 2210 . Safety footwear must be Australian Standards compliant.

Care and maintenance of protective footwear

Scale of issue

Workers must maintain and care for safety footwear provided to them for their personal protection. Where the work performed results in faster deterioration of the safety footwear, which lessens its effectiveness or creates risks such as conduction pathways from exposed metal toe-caps etc, workers notify their supervisor who will approve replacement.

Managers and supervisors are required to approve the issue of suitable safety footwear. Following the initial issue, two pairs of safety footwear for each worker are provided annually on an exchange basis.

PN066P19 ObjID: A13442339 page 11 of 18 Version 2.1 (25 August 2016)

Work Health & Safety Branch Personal protective equipment (PPE)

3.6 High-visibility garments

When should high visibility garments be worn?

Workers on foot and visitors at workplaces should be protected from traffic and plant operations by the provision of safe, clearly delineated pedestrian access ways. In addition high visibility garments must be worn by workers:

 When exposed to traffic and plant movements at worksites

(including haul roads and quarries) and while operating vehicles and plant within such workplaces

 When working in or near water

 Whenever they are outside a vehicle within the bounds of a road reserve

 Whenever they are engaged in vehicle inspection operations

 When so instructed by their supervisor, consistent with a recommendation from risk assessment.

All workers and authorised visitors must wear high visibility garments. Who should wear these?

What types of high visibility garments are there?

Care and maintenance

Only high visibility garments meeting the requirements of AS 4602.1

are approved. The approved standard colour for high visibility garments for Roads and Maritime workers is fluorescent lime-yellow.

See the table High-visibility garment options below.

Workers must keep their high-visibility garments clean and serviceable. High visibility garments must be replaced if they are found to be defective or become stained or faded such that their highvisibility is reduced.

High-visibility garments for workers must be suitable to the prevailing work conditions and the worksite location.

High-visibility garment options

Work conditions

Day time work

Class D garment required – high visibility fluorescent lime-yellow garment without retro-reflective tape

Work at dawn, dusk or in poor visibility

Class D/N garments required – high visibility fluorescent limeyellow garment with retroreflective tape

Night work

Class N garments required – garments with retro-reflective tape specifically designed for night use, such as headlight, floodlit or street light illumination

      

  

  

PN066P19 ObjID: A13442339 page 12 of 18 Version 2.1 (25 August 2016)

Work Health & Safety Branch Personal protective equipment (PPE)

3.7 Noise and vibration protection

All workers and visitors to worksites are to be protected from hazardous noise and vibration energy, including those generated by vehicles, plant and equipment.

When should noise and vibration PPE be used?

As determined by risk assessment, noise and vibration PPE must be used when workers are exposed to hazardous noise and vibration, eg from plant, machinery or other sources:

 Continuous noise levels exceeding 85dBA

 Impact noise levels approaching or exceeding 140dBA

 Vibration forces for which PPE has been specified as a control

 As an outcome of risk assessment of that hazard.

See the procedure

Noise

for methods of determining and measuring levels of noise.

All workers and visitors at worksites must be protected from hazardous noise and vibration energy, including those generated by vehicles, plant and equipment.

Who needs to use noise and vibration protection equipment?

Types of PPE for noise control Examples include but are not limited to.

 Ear plugs – disposable, reusable and custom-made models. Also headband mounted and cord-attached versions are available.

 Ear muffs – effectiveness varies, depending on materials, construction, clamping force and other factors, including fit.

 Communication headsets for confined space work and similar applications

 Noise-occluding helmets

PPE issued for protection from noise may be used with the above to increase effectiveness when exposed to extreme noise sources (eg wearing earmuffs over ear plugs).

Types of vibration protection

 Energy absorbing gloves and liners

 Energy absorbing footwear and inserts

 Energy absorbing matting

 Energy absorbing suspension units, such as airbag or gas-filled seating systems or vehicle suspension systems.

Care and maintenance of noise and vibration PPE

All noise and vibration PPE should be maintained and serviced in accordance with directions from the PPE manufacturer or Australian Standards.

For example, cushion replacement should be considered every three to six months. Earmuffs with any damage to the cups or headband are to be withdrawn from use and destroyed.

If any doubt exists about the quality or integrity of the items, they should be disposed of and new items used. In hot conditions, disposable covers that are commercially available may be fitted to the seals of hearing protectors to absorb perspiration.

PN066P19 ObjID: A13442339 page 13 of 18 Version 2.1 (25 August 2016)

Work Health & Safety Branch Personal protective equipment (PPE)

Workplace control measures Prevention of injury related to noise and/or vibration exposure requires effective supervision. This is in addition to instructing workers to use protective equipment against workplace noise and vibration. These measures reinforce higher level controls that might be used, including:

 Purchasing vehicles, plant and equipment where noise and vibration is controlled by the standards of design and manufacture

 Maintaining vehicles, plant and equipment to a high standard with routine scheduled replacement or servicing of components impacting on noise and vibration generation

 Enclosing, isolating and attenuating sources of noise and vibration energy at source

 Properly sign-posting or otherwise highlighting hazard areas or plant where risks to hearing injuries exist

 Limiting the duration of personal exposure to damaging noise and vibration by effective worker time management at workplaces.

Guidance on the selection, use, and maintenance of hearing protectors is detailed in AS/NZS-1269.3

.

4 Working on or near water

Workers on board waterborne vessels need to wear a range of PPE, according to the relevant conditions. For example, vessels surveyors, boating safety officers (BSOs) and wharf inspectors should wear overalls, disposable gloves, hardhats, and eye and ear protection where necessary. This requirement is for larger vessel inspections that may require workers to enter engine rooms and other machinery spaces, while machinery is operating.

Personal floatation devices

Workers engaged in activities on waterborne vessels or near water need to wear appropriate personal floatation devices to protect them from potential hazards they may encounter while in or near water.

There are three primary types of personal floatation devices:

Level 100+ (Type 1) lifejackets

Designed for the highest level of safety and for use on open waters, Level 100+ lifejackets provide extra buoyancy, keeping the wearer’s head above the water, even if unconscious. Wet weather jackets and windproof vests that incorporate inflatable lifejackets are also available in the range.

Level 50 (Type 2) lifejackets

A Level 50 lifejacket is designed to keep a conscious person afloat. It is suitable for boating on sheltered waters, where help is generally close at hand. These lifejackets are considered to be more comfortable than a foam Level 100+ lifejacket and its bright colours make search and rescue easier.

Level 50

S

(Type 3) lifejackets

The Level 50

S

range has the same buoyancy characteristics of Level 50 lifejackets, but without the highly visible colours. These lifejackets provide great comfort and style. Best used where help or the shoreline is nearby.

PN066P19 ObjID: A13442339 page 14 of 18 Version 2.1 (25 August 2016)

Work Health & Safety Branch Personal protective equipment (PPE)

Roles and responsibilities

Role Responsibilities

Roads and

Maritime

(through its managers from the executive to the front line) must:

Managers must:

 Comply with the legislation and ensure that systems are in place to manage potential WHS risks in relation to PPE

 Ensure that WHS responsibilities are appropriately defined and that appropriate resources (including financial and time) are provided to ensure effective hazard and risk management for workers

 Monitor and inspect PPE used at workplaces to determine the safe and competent use of the equipment and its suitability for purpose.

 Ensure this procedure is fully implemented

 Ensure that signs are posted in conspicuous locations at the workplace, including on plant and equipment, wherever it is necessary to use PPE

 Ensure workers are trained in the use of the PPE

 Select and procure PPE that meets the Australian Standard, where one is available for that item

 Maintain stocks of PPE onsite for use by visitors

 Ensure contractors and subcontractors supply appropriate and fit-forservice PPE for their own workers.

Workers must:

 Comply with WHS legislation and the requirements of this procedure

 Undertake training and familiarisation as required to competently select, maintain, use or operate the prescribed PPE

 Use the appropriate PPE at locations where signage requires its use

 When provided with PPE, care for and maintain it in a serviceable state.

Stores and administration

personnel must:

 Maintain stocks of PPE, including components and spare parts to ensure availability

 Assist in systematically replacing PPE consistent with timeframes and life cycles as advised by managers and WHS branch, including colour coding replacement stock and disposal of replaced items

 Assist workers in the selection of PPE in terms of fit and comfort

 Arrange collection and disposal of superseded and out-of-date PPE.

PN066P19 ObjID: A13442339 page 15 of 18 Version 2.1 (25 August 2016)

Work Health & Safety Branch Personal protective equipment (PPE)

Definitions

Term Definition

High visibility Refers to the luminance and fluorescence of safety clothing as tested against the Australian Standard AS 1906 .

High visibility

(Day)

Class D (day) garment required – high visibility fluorescent lime-yellow garment without retro-reflective tape.

These must be worn during daylight hours only.

High visibility

(Night)

High visibility

(Day/Night)

Manager

Class N (night) garments – garments with retro-reflective tape specifically designed for night use, such as headlight, floodlit or street light illumination.

Class D/N (day/night) garments required – high visibility fluorescent limeyellow garment with retro-reflective tape.

These can be worn at dusk or dawn and provide high visibility at times when sunlight is fading or not at its brightest.

A person responsible for planning and directing the work of a worker or group of workers, monitoring their work, and taking corrective action.

Personal protective equipment

(PPE)

WHS reporting line

Worker

PPE may be clothing or devices that are used to protect workers from exposure to a wide variety of workplace hazards.

Types of PPE may include: clothing, high visibility garments, footwear, gloves, goggles, face shields, safety glasses, hard hats, earplugs and earmuffs.

The 24-hour telephone service for reporting hazards and occurrences at

Roads and Maritime. The number is 1300 131 469.

Workplace

Any person who carries out work in any capacity at a Roads and Maritime workplace – Roads and Maritime employees (including labour hire, apprentices and trainees); professional services contractors and consultants; contractors, subcontractors and their employees; outworkers; students gaining work experience and volunteers.

A place where work is carried out for Roads and Maritime’s business or undertaking and includes any place where a worker goes or is likely to be, while at work.

PN066P19 ObjID: A13442339 page 16 of 18 Version 2.1 (25 August 2016)

Work Health & Safety Branch Personal protective equipment (PPE)

References

Roads and Maritime references

Doc no Title

PN066P02

PN066P08

Procedure:

WHS risk management

Form: WHS risk assessment

Procedure:

Noise

Australian Standards

Available from SAI Global – www.saiglobal.com

Head protection

 AS/NZS 1800:1998: Occupational protective helmets – Selection, care and use

 AS/NZS 1801:1997/Amdt 1:1999 – Occupational protective helmets

Hearing protection

 AS/NZS 1269 Set:2005: Occupational noise management set

Eye protection

 AS/NZS 1336:2014: Eye and face protection – Guidelines

 AS/NZS 1337.0:2014: Personal eye protection – Eye and face protection – Vocabulary

 AS/NZS 1337.1:2010: Personal eye protection – Eye and face protectors for occupational applications

 AS/NZS 1337.6:2012: Personal eye protection – Prescription eye protectors against low & med. impact

 AS/NZS 1338.1:2012: Filters for eye protectors – Filters for protection against radiation generated in welding and allied operations

 AS/NZS 1338.2:2012: Filters for eye protectors – Filters for protection against ultraviolet radiation

Respiratory protection

 AS/NZS 1715:2009: Selection, use and maintenance of respiratory protective equipment

 AS/NZS 1716:2012: Respiratory protective devices

Hand protection

 AS/NZS 2161.1:2016: Occupational protective gloves – Selection, use and maintenance

 AS/NZS 2161.2:2005: Occupational protective gloves – General requirements

 AS/NZS 2161.3:2005: Occupational protective gloves – Protection against mechanical risks

 AS/NZS 2161.4:1999: Occupational protective gloves – Protection against thermal risks (heat and fire)

 AS/NZS 2161.5:1998: Occupational protective gloves – Protection against cold

 AS 2225-1994: Insulating gloves for electrical purposes

 AS 2225-1994/Amdt 1-1996: Insulating gloves for electrical purposes

Leg and foot protection

 AS/NZS 2210.1:2010: Safety, protective and occupational footwear – Guide to selection, care and use

Whole of body protection

 AS/NZS 1906.4:2010: Retroreflective materials and devices for road traffic control purposes – High visibility materials for safety garments

 AS/NZS 4501.1:2008: Occupational protective clothing – Guidelines on the selection, use, care and maintenance of protective clothing

 AS/NZS 4501.2:2006: Occupational protective clothing – General requirements

 AS/NZS 4399:1996: Sun protective clothing – Evaluation and classification

 AS/NZS 4399:1996/Amdt 1:1998: Sun protective clothing – Evaluation and classification

 AS/NZS 4602.1:2011: High visibility safety garments – Garments for high risk applications

PN066P19 ObjID: A13442339 page 17 of 18 Version 2.1 (25 August 2016)

Work Health & Safety Branch Personal protective equipment (PPE)

Document control

Owner

WHS Risk Manager

Approval

General Manager Work Health and Safety

File name

procedure-pn066p19.pdf

Online location

Home (www.rms.nsw.gov.au)

 Safety  Work Health & Safety 

OneRMS safety management system

 Procedures, forms and guidance

Objective ID

A13442339

Publlication no.

RMS 16.415

Template

Objective ID: A10508605

Objective label: WHS procedure template

Change history

Issue Date Description of change

2.1

2.0

25/08/16 Reformatted to current WHS procedure template

Minor wording changes

Updated definitions table

18/03/13 No change history information available

Feedback

Contact WHS Branch with feedback on this document at: [email protected]

PN066P19 ObjID: A13442339 page 18 of 18 Version 2.1 (25 August 2016)

Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project