Study Guide for How to Inspect the Attic, Insulation, Ventilation and

Study Guide for How to Inspect the Attic, Insulation, Ventilation and

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Study  Guide  for  How  to  Inspect  the  

Attic,  Insulation,  Ventilation  and  

 

Interior  Course  

 

 

This  study  guide  can  help  you:  

• take  notes;  

• read  and  study  offline;    

• organize  information;  and    

• prepare  for  assignments  and  assessments.  

 

As  a  member  of  InterNACHI,  you  may  check  your  education  folder,  transcript,  and  

  course  completions  by  logging  into  your  Members-­‐Only  Account  at   www.nachi.org/account .  

To  purchase  textbooks  (printed  and  electronic),  visit  InterNACHI’s  ecommerce   partner  Inspector  Outlet  at   www.inspectoroutlet.com

.    

 

Copyright  ©  2007-­‐2015  International  Association  of  Certified  Home  Inspectors,  Inc.  

 

 

 

 

Page 1 of 170

   

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 2 of 170

   

 

Student  Verification  &  Interactivity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Student  Verification  

 

By  enrolling  in  this  course,  the  student  hereby  attests  that  s/he  is  the  person   completing  all  coursework.  S/he  understands  that  having  another  person  complete   the  coursework  for  him  or  her  is  fraudulent  and  will  result  in  being  denied  course   completion  and  corresponding  credit  hours.  

The  course  provider  reserves  the  right  to  make  contact   as  necessary  to  verify  the  integrity  of  any  information   submitted  or  communicated  by  the  student.  The  student   agrees  not  to  duplicate  or  distribute  any  part  of  this   copyrighted  work  or  provide  other  parties  with  the   answers  or  copies  of  the  assessments  that  are  part  of  this   course.  If  plagiarism  or  copyright  infringement  is  proven,   the  student  will  be  notified  of  such  and  barred  from  the   course  and/or  have  his/her  credit  hours  and/or   certification  revoked.  

 

Communication  on  the  message  board  or  forum  shall  be  of  the  person  completing  all   coursework.  

Page 3 of 170

   

Introduction  

 

Welcome  to  InterNACHI's  free,  online  How  to  Inspect  the  Attic,  Insulation,  Ventilation  

and  Interior  course.    The  purpose  of  this  course  is  to  provide  accurate  and  useful   information  for  performing  an  inspection  of  the  attic,  insulation,  and  interior  of  a   residential  property.  This  course  is  free  to  all  InterNACHI  members  and  can  be   taken  again  and  again,  without  limit.  

   

Page 4 of 170

   

Upon  completion  of  this  course  and  passing  of  the  60-­‐question  final  exam,  the   student  can  download  and  print  their  own  Certificate  of  Completion  which  is  auto-­‐ generated  in  their  own  name.  

   

The  student's  (InterNACHI  member's)  information  is  recorded  on  InterNACHI's   servers  for  membership  compliance  verification,  and  automatically  logs  completion   into  InterNACHI's  online  Continuing  Education  log.    

 

Members  will  need  their  username  and  password.    If  you  have  forgotten  your   password,  CLICK  HERE  (instant  response)  or  email  [email protected]  and  request   it  (don't  forget  your  name).    

Objectives  

 

Overall  Objectives  

The  purpose  of  this  course  is  to  provide  accurate  and  useful  information  for   performing  an  inspection  of  the  attic,  insulation,  ventilation  and  interior  at  a   residential  property.    

This  course  covers  many  topics,  including:  

• the  different  types  of  insulation;  

Page 5 of 170

   

 

• insulation  thickness  and  R-­‐values;   the  movement  of  air,  water  and  heat;   moisture  control;   roof,  attic  and  crawlspace  ventilation;   vapor  diffusion  retarders;   natural,  whole-­‐house  and  spot  ventilation;   air  sealing  and  air  barriers;   vapor  barriers  and  vapor  retarders;   windows,  doors,  floors,  walls  and  ceilings;   bathroom  ventilation;   safety  glass  windows;   garage  door  inspection;   egress,  steps,  handrails  and  illumination;   emergency  escape  and  rescue  openings;  and   much  more.  

The  focus  throughout  this  course  is  on  the  three  major  factors  of  a  healthy  home:  

• insulation;   ventilation;  and   moisture  control.  

 

The  course  refers  to  the  general  inspection  process  and  the  InterNACHI  Residential  

Standards  of  Practice.    

Learning  Objectives  

 

The  student  should  demonstrate  an  understanding  and  comprehension  of  this   course  by  reading  and  studying  the  material,  taking  the  practice  quizzes  at  the  end   of  selected  sections,  and  by  taking  the  online  course  in  its  entirety  and  successfully   passing  a  timed,  online  exam.    

After  successful  completion  of  this  course,  the  student  should  be  able  to  perform  an   inspection  of  the  attic,    insulation,  ventilation  and  interior  of  a  residential  home   according  to  the  InterNACHI  Residential  Standards  of  Practice.  A  section  of  this   course  lists  the  particular  part  of  the  InterNACHI  Residential  Standards  of  Practice   related  to  the  inspection  of  the  attic,  ventilation,  insulation,  windows,  doors  and   interior  of  a  residential  property.    The  full  text  of  the  Standards  can  be  found  at   http://www.nachi.org/sop.htm.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 6 of 170

   

 

Inspector  Safety  

Personal  Protective  

Equipment  

Ironically,  the  process  of  inspecting   for  safety  defects  can  itself   compromise  the  safety  of  inspectors   and  their  clients.    Inspectors  should   always  bring  personal  protective   equipment  (PPE)  that  can  protect   them  against  the  hazardous  conditions  inherent  in  performing  property  inspections.  

Let’s  review  some  PPE  that  inspectors  should  always  have  on  hand  to  help  ensure   that  inspections  proceed  safely  and  problem-­‐free.    

Overalls  and  Coveralls  

Overalls  and  coveralls  protect  your  clothes.    They're  handy  when  moving  through  a   crawlspace  and  getting  under  a  low  deck  or  porch.    Coveralls  are  typically  made  of   denim,  canvas  or  Tyvek®,  a  tear-­‐resistant,  flexible  plastic  widely  used  to  make  items   such  as  postal  mailers,  banknotes  and  even  DVDs.  While  canvas  is  puncture-­‐ resistant,  Tyvek®  is  also  disposable  and  lightweight,  as  well  as  anti-­‐static,   breathable  and  chemical-­‐resistant.    However,  it  should  not  be  worn  near  heat  or   open  flame.  Both  canvas  and  Tyvek®  provide  effective  barriers  against  splashes,   asbestos,  chemicals,  lead  dust,  and  other  harmful  substances.  

Shoe  Covers  or  Booties  

Put  on  some  shoe  booties  prior  to  entering  the  house  that  you  are   inspecting.    Booties  protect  the  floors  and  demonstrate  care  and  consideration  for  

  your  client's  property.  

Gloves

 

Your  PPE  should  include  a  simple  pair  of  gloves.    Gloves  will  protect  your  hands   from  insect  bites,  scratches  from  vegetation  and  soil,  dirt  and  debris,  splinters,  and   sharp  edges  of  building  components.    Rubber  or  leather  gloves  are  important  for   inspecting  electrical  panels  to  reduce  the  chance  of  accidental  shock.  Also,  they   should  be  worn  in  crawlspaces  and  basements.  A  certain  amount  of  crawling  on  all   fours  through  these  areas  will  be  necessary  during  inspections,  and  gloves  will   certainly  make  this  activity  safer.    Gloves  should  not  be  loose.  

Page 7 of 170

   

 

Knee  Pads  

It  is  important  to  protect  your  knees  while  crawling  around,  particularly  when  the   ground  surface  is  rough  and  covered  with  rocks  and  stones.  

Goggles  

Goggles  can  protect  against  many  types  of  harmful  airborne  substances,  such  as   mold  spores  and  sawdust.  Inspectors  should  be  sure  to  wear  goggles  or  some  other   type  of  eye  protection  while  inspecting  electrical  panels,  which  can  emit  dangerous   sparks  and  arcs.    

Respirators  

Respirators  are  necessary  safety  equipment  for  inspectors.  Choices  include  a  full-­‐ face  respirator,  which  covers  the  eyes,  nose  and  mouth,  and  a  half-­‐face  respirator.  

Full-­‐face  respirators  may  provide  greater  protection  against  certain  toxins  because   they  protect  the  mucous  membranes  around  the  eyes,  but  they  are  generally  less   comfortable.  Wearers  may  find  that  the  mask’s  air  filtration  makes  it  hard  to   breathe,  especially  when  the  inspector  must  crawl  and  bend  using   physical  movements  that  may  restrict  breathing.  Respirators  that  have  high-­‐ efficiency  particulate  air  or  HEPA  filters  are  excellent  personal  protective  equipment   because,  by  definition,  they  trap  at  least  99.97%  of  small  particles.  

Inspection  Tools  and  Safety  Equipment  

 

Flashlights  

A  flashlight  is  handy  for  inspecting  under  the  deck  or  porch,  behind  dense   vegetation,  and  in  shaded  areas  of  the  property.    Inspectors  should  bring  at  least  two   flashlights  with  them  before  entering  dimly  lit  attics  and  crawlspaces.  This   precaution  will  eliminate  the  possibility  that  one  flashlight  will  lose  power,   forcing  the  inspector  to  feel  his  way  back  out.  The  multitude  of  dangerous  elements   that  potentially  lie  in  attics  and  crawlspaces  is  startling  -­‐-­‐  from  exposed  nails  and    

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

Page 8 of 170

   

  broken  glass,  to  dangerous  reptiles,  insects  and  mammals.  No  one  should  ever  enter   these  areas  without  a  flashlight.  

Tape  Measure  

A  tape  measure  can  be  used  to  measure  the  infill  spacing  of  railing  spindles  and   balusters,  the  rise  and  run  of  stairs,  the  height  of  a  railing,  the  width  of  an  egress   door,  the  amount  of  damage  visible,  the  dimensions  of  a  joist,  and  much  more.  

Level  or  Plumb  Bob  

A  level  or  plumb  bob  can  be  used  to  check  walls,  posts  and  columns  for  plumb  and   level.    A  level  can  be  used  to  check  the  slope  of  a  walk,  a  driveway,  garage  floor  or  

  hard  surface  at  the  house's  perimeter.  

Screwdriver,  Awl  or  Probe

 

These  can  be  used  to  check  for  wood  rot  or  damage.    A  screwdriver  may  be  needed   to  remove  an  access  panel  or  some  type  of  cover.  

 

 

Magnet    

A  magnet  can  be  used  to  tell  the  difference  between  aluminum  siding  and  steel   siding,  or  galvanized  steel  flashing  from  copper  flashing.  

Moisture  Meter  

 

A  moisture  meter  is  used  to  detect  or  confirm  moisture.    It  could  be  used  to  confirm   water  intrusion  problems  or  confirm  that  wood  is  saturated  with  water.    There  are   meters  that  are  non-­‐invasive  and  meters  that  have  invasive  probes.    Check  out  

InterNACHI's  free,  online  Moisture  Intrusion  Inspection  course.  

Infrared  Camera

 

You  should  be  professionally  trained  and  certified  to  use  an  infrared   camera.    Thermography  is  an  effective  tool  to  use  when  inspecting  for  moisture   intrusion  and  areas  of  energy  loss.    Check  out  NACHI.TV's    Introduction  to  Infrared  

Thermography.    

Page 9 of 170

   

 

Roof  Inspection  Equipment  

Inspectors  who  must  walk  on  rooftops  (especially  those  who  perform  roof  and  wind   and  hail  inspections)  regularly  risk  fall-­‐related  injuries.  Some  equipment  that  can   keep  you  from  stumbling  off  a  roof  are:  

binoculars:  In  addition  to  other  uses,  binoculars  can  be  used  to  look  where   physical,  up-­‐close  access  is  restricted.    The  soffit  and  fascia  components   cannot  be  inspected  closely  without  the  use  of  a  ladder  or  binoculars;  

ladder:    A  ladder  can  be  used  to  gain  access  to  those  higher-­‐up  areas  that  are   not  readily  accessible  or  visible  from  the  ground.    Many  inspectors  attempt  to   reach  the  gutter  or  eaves  of  a  roof  with  a  ladder.  

roof  shoes:    Shoes  form  the  only  constant  point  of  contact  between  the   inspector  and  the  roof,  and  the  bond  between  them  needs  to  be  firm.  Some   companies  make  shoes  that  are  specially  designed  for  roof  work,  but  these   are  not  always  necessary.  Whatever  type  of  shoes  inspectors  decide  to  wear,   they  should  be  flat  and  have  high-­‐traction  rubber  soles.  Footwear  with  heels   can  become  caught  on  roof  surfaces,  potentially  causing  the  inspector  to  trip   and  fall;  

ladder  tie-­‐offs:    Inspectors  should  bring  with  them  straps  to  use  to  attach   their  ladders  to  the  roof  or  structure.  This  attachment  will  help  prevent  the   ladder  from  being  blown  away  by  a  strong  wind,  embarrassing  the  marooned   inspector.  Also,  a  ladder  tie-­‐off  can  potentially  prevent  the  ladder  from   slipping  away  from  the  building  beneath  the  weight  of  the  climber.    

personal  tie-­‐off:    Inspectors  may  want  to  attach  themselves  to  the  roof  as  an   added  security  measure.  A  few  notes  about  this  procedure:    

Some  roofs  do  not  allow  for  the  implementation  of  this  safety  measure.  Roofs  must   have  a  protruding,  sturdy,  accessible  place  as  a  connection  point,  such  as  a  chimney.  

The  strap  must  have  as  little  slack  as  possible.  Rolling  down  15  feet  of  steep  roof  and   then  plunging  another  10  feet  before  being  halted  in  mid-­‐air  is  still  going  to  hurt.  

Plus,  the  dangling  inspector  will  need  to  somehow  climb  back  up.    It  is  best  to  attach   the  strap  to  a  harness  designed  for  that  purpose,  rather  than  a  tool  belt  or  limb.    It  is   dangerous  to  tie  the  strap  to  a  car  on  the  other  side  of  the  house.  While  the  car  might   hold  the  inspector  in  place  during  a  fall,  it  would  not  hold  the  inspector  in  place  if    

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

Page 10 of 170

   

 

 

someone  were  to  drive  the  car  away.  A  riding  lawnmower  is  also  a  poor  choice  for   an  anchor.  

Road  Cones    

Inspectors  may  want  to  consider  placing  road  cones  some  distance  behind  their   vehicles  to  prevent  others  from  parking  too  close  behind.  Large,  unwieldy  items   such  as  ladders  are  more  safely  removed  when  there  is  ample  room  in  which  to   maneuver.  Nothing  causes  tension  like  a  Realtor  who  gets  knocked  in  the  head  after   parking  snugly  behind  the  inspector’s  truck.  Also,  as  universal  symbols  of  caution,   road  cones  will  alert  passing  motorists  and  pedestrians  of  the  need  to  maintain  a   safe  distance.  

"Danger"  Signs  

A  sign  can  be  placed  near  dangerous  areas  where  the  inspector  is  working  to  warn   clients  and  others  of  potential  hazards.  In  2008,  an  inspector  in  Seattle  was  sued   because  his  client  fell  through  an  opening  in  the  floor  leading  to  a  crawlspace  that  he   was  inspecting,  and  the  client  broke  his  arm  in  three  places.  The  lawsuit  alleges  that   the  inspector  was  guilty  of  “negligence  and  misconduct”  because  he  failed  to  notify   the  client  of  the  potential  hazard.        

To  avoid  such  liability  and  to  ensure  the  safety  of  all  persons  present  at  an   inspection,  InterNACHI  has  created  compact,  lightweight  "STOP  -­‐-­‐  Inspector  at  

Work"  signs  for  inspectors  to  use  at  job   sites.    These  signs  are  specifically  designed  to   be  placed  on  ladders  and  near  crawlspace   entrances  that  are  being  inspected.    Made  of   strong,  durable  plastic,  they  fold  up  flat  and  fit   securely  over  a  rung  of  the  inspector's  ladder.  

Using  them  may  also  provide  legal  leverage  for   inspectors  who  are  held  responsible  for  harm   inflicted  to  their  clients  during  an  inspection.  

In  summary,  inspections  can  be  dangerous  for   inspectors,  as  well  as  their  clients.    Safety   equipment  should  be  brought  to   all  inspections  to  help  avoid  injury  and  liability   issues.  

Page 11 of 170

   

 

InterNACHI  Residential  

Standards  of  Practice  

InterNACHI's  Residential  SOP  

Review  the  section  of  the  InterNACHI's  Standards  of  Practice  for  Performing  a  

General  Home  Inspection  that  are  particularly  relevant  to  the  inspection  of  the   components  of  the  attic,  insulation,  ventilation  and  interior.    

Visit  http://www.nachi.org/sop.htm#attic  

General  Inspection  Requirements  

Comments  

If  your  client  is  buying  a  house  or  building  a  new  one,  they  might  ask  you  to  check   that  the  insulation  is  properly  installed  and  meets  current  requirements  or   recommendations.    You  might  be  asked  to  provide  information  on  the  type,   thickness  and  R-­‐value  of  the  insulation  that  is  installed  in  the  readily  accessible   parts  of  the  house.    You  may  check  to  see  if  the  proper  amount  of  insulation  has   been  used  and  also  whether  it  has  been  installed  properly.  Many  state  and  local   building  codes  include  minimum  requirements  for  home  insulation.  You  may  check   to  see  if  the  insulation  meets  those  codes.  Your  client’s  energy  costs  (as  the  new   homeowner)  will  be  lower  if  the  home  is  energy-­‐efficient.    

It  is  a  good  idea  to  get  the  home  airtight.    There  are  special  products  and  techniques   available  to  eliminate  the  big  air  leaks  between  the  walls  and  floor  and  between  the   walls  and  ceiling.  Encourage  your  client  to  make  areas  around  the  windows  and   doors  as  tight  as  possible  and  to  properly  caulk  or  seal  joints.  

You  are  required  to  inspect  the  insulation  in  unfinished  spaces,  including  the   attic.    You  are  not  required  to  enter  the  attic  or  any  unfinished  spaces  that  are  not   readily  accessible  or  where  entry  could  cause  damage  or  pose  a  safety  hazard.  You    

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

Page 12 of 170

   

  should  try  to  enter  the  crawlspace  and  check  the  ground  covering,  insulation  and   ventilation.  Check  for  structural  problems  that  might  be  caused  by  ventilation  and   insulation  defects.  

Tell  your  client  about  the  absence  or  lack  of  insulation  in  areas  of  the  house.    You  are   not  required  to  identify  the  exact  composition  or  the  exact  R-­‐value  of  the  insulation.  

You  do  not  have  to  move  insulation  or  vapor  diffusion  retarders  during  your   inspection.  

You  are  required  to  inspect  the  ventilation  of  attic  spaces  and  to  check  the   mechanical  ventilation  systems.  You’re  not  required  to  determine  the  adequacy  of   the  ventilation.  

You  are  required  to  open  and  close  a  representative  number  of  doors  and   windows.    Many  inspectors  find  it  easy  to  operate  every  interior  door  but  too  time-­‐ consuming  to  operate  all  of  the  windows.  Report  to  your  client  any  windows  that   are  fogged  or  display  evidence  of  a  broken  seal.  

While  performing  the  inspection  inside  the  house,  check  the  walls,  ceilings,  steps,   stairs  and  railings.  You  are  not  required  to  discover  firewall  compromises.  

If  there  is  a  garage,  inspect  the  garage  door  and  opener,  if  installed.    

You  are  not  required  to  check  the  wallpaper,  paint,  window  treatments  or  finish   treatments.  Cosmetic  items  are  not  part  of  a  typical  home  inspection.  You  need  not   check  the  fastening  of  countertops,  cabinets,  sink  tops  or  fixtures.  

You  do  not  have  to  move  furniture,  personal  stored  items,  or  any  carpeting  in  order   to  inspect  the  floor  structure.  You  do  not  have  to  move  any  drop-­‐ceiling  tiles.  

In  the  kitchen,  you  have  to  check  the  fixtures,  water  supply  and   drainpipes.    However,  you  are  not  required  to  inspect  any  household  appliances,   including  operating  oven  cycles  or  microwave  ovens.  

Quiz  1  

T/F:  You  are  required  to  inspect  the  insulation  in  unfinished  spaces,  including  the   attic.  

True  

False  

T/F:  You're  required  to  inform  your  client  about  the  absence  or  lack  of  adequate   insulation  in  areas  of  the  house.  

Page 13 of 170

   

True  

False  

T/F:  You  are  required  to  check  the  mechanical  ventilation  systems  by  activating   thermostatically  operated  fans.  

False  

True  

T/F:  You  are  required  to  move  a  representative  number  of  drop-­‐ceiling  tiles.  

False  

True  

Heat  Movement  

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 14 of 170

   

 

Heat,  energy  and  insulation  are  all  related  to  each  other.  As  inspectors,  we  should   understand  how  heat  moves  around  the  inside  of  a  home,  and  how  insulation  can   control  that  movement.  One  important  reason  we  need  to  understand  how  heat   moves  is  because  warm  air  can  carry  moisture,  and  warm,  moist  air  needs  to  be   controlled  in  relation  to  a  building  envelope.  Uncontrolled,  moving  warm  air  and   moisture  can  cause  a  lot  of  problems.  Another  reason  to  learn  about  heat  is  that   insulation  provides  resistance  to  the  flow  of  heat,  and  the  more  insulation  there  is,   the  less  energy  is  needed  to  heat  and  cool  the  house.  

Heat  needs  to  be  controlled  to  keep  the  occupants  of  the  home  comfortable.  When  a   home  is  well-­‐insulated,  your  client  will  save  on  energy  costs.  After  learning  the   information  provided  in  the  next  few  sections  about  heat,  moisture,  air  and   insulation,  you’ll  be  able  to  perform  an  inspection  armed  with  the  knowledge  of   what's  needed  to  gain  greater  energy  efficiency  and  speak  authoritatively  to  your   client  about  how  well  the  building  envelope  is  functioning  toward  that  goal.    

Now,  let’s  talk  heat.  There  are  essentially  three  ways  that  heat  moves  from  one  area   to  another.    When  bodies  of  unequal  temperatures  are  near  each  other,  heat  leaves   one  body  and  goes  to  the  other.    Heat  moves  from  the  hotter  body,  and  the  colder   body  absorbs  it.  The  greater  the  difference  in  temperature,  the  greater  the  rate  of   flow  of  the  heat.    

Heat  moves  from  one  body  to  another  by  the  following  ways:  

• radiation;   conduction;  and   convection.  

Radiation  

Radiation  is  the  transfer  of  heat  energy  by  electromagnetic  wave  motion.    Heat  is   transferred  in  direct  rays.    It  travels  in  a  straight  line  from  the  source  of  heat  to  a   body.    The  closer  you  are  to  a  hot  object,  the  warmer  you'll  feel.    The  intensity  of  the   heat  radiated  from  the  hot  object  decreases  as  your  distance  from  the  object   increases.  

You'll  feel  cool  in  a  room  that  has  a  cold  floor,  walls  and  ceiling.    The  amount  of  heat   loss  from  your  body  in  that  room  depends  on  the  relative  temperature  of  the  objects   in  that  room.    The  colder  the  floor  is  (relative  to  the  temperature  of  your  feet),  the   greater  the  heat  loss  from  your  body  will  be  as  you  continue  to  stand  there.    If  the   floor,  walls  and  ceiling  of  that  room  are  relatively  warmer  than  your  body,  then  heat   will  be  radiated  to  your  body  from  those  objects  or  surfaces.  

When  you  step  into  a  cold  room,  you  can  immediately  feel  the  heat  energy  leaving   your  body.  Use  all  of  your  senses  as  an  inspector  when  moving  about  the  house.  Just  

Page 15 of 170

   

  entering  a  space  with  your  body  can  give  you  some  clues  about  the  insulation,  the   heat,  air  movement,  and  even  moisture  and  humidity  levels.  Some  inspectors  can   provide  a  good  estimate  of  the  temperature  in  an  attic  space  simply  by  entering  it.  

Keep  aware  of  your  surroundings  while  moving  about  the  interior  of  the  house.  

Radiant  heat  emits  in  all  directions.    Radiant  heating  in  residential  buildings   includes  the  piping  and  electrical  wiring  in  the  floors,  walls  and  ceilings.  Reflective   materials  are  commonly  used  in  a  radiant  heat-­‐emitting  system  in  order  to  direct  or   control  where  the  heat  is  emitted.  

Radiation  happens  when  heat  moves  as  energy  waves,  called  infrared  waves,   directly  from  its  source  to  something  else.  This  is  how  the  heat  from  the  Sun  gets  to  

Earth.    In  fact,  all  hot  things  radiate  heat  to  cooler  things.  When  the  heat  waves  hit   the  cooler  thing,  they  make  the  molecules  of  the  cooler  object  speed  up.    When  the   molecules  of  that  object  speed  up,  the  object  becomes  hotter.  

Conduction  

Conduction  is  the  transfer  of  heat  from  one  molecule  to  another,  or  through  one   substance  to  another.    It  is  heat  that  moves  from  one  body  to  another  by  direct   contact.    For  example,  heat  is  transferred  by  conduction  from  a  boiler  heat   exchanger  to  the  water  passing  through  it.    When  an  air  conditioner  is  operating   properly,  the  liquid  line  should  feel  warm  to  the  touch  and  the  suction  line  should   feel  cool.  

Heat  is  a  form  of  energy,  and  when  that  heat  comes  into  contact  with  matter,  it   makes  the  atoms  and  molecules  move.  When  atoms  and  molecules  move,  they   collide  with  other  atoms  and  molecules  and  make  them  move,  too.    This  movement   transfers  heat  through  matter.  

This  is  demonstrated  when  touching  a  ceramic  coffee  cup.    The  exterior  surface  of   the  cup  is  warm  to  the  touch  because  the  heat  of  the  hot  coffee  was  transferred   through  the  cup's  material.  

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 16 of 170

   

 

Convection  

Convection  is  understood  by  most  people  by  the  phrase,  “Heat  rises.”    Convection  is   the  transfer  of  heat  by  warming  the  air  next  to  a  hot  surface  and  then  moving  that   warm  air.    It’s  the  transfer  of  heat  by  the  motion  of  the  heated  matter  itself.    The  air   moves  from  one  place  to  another,  carrying  heat  along  with  it.    Since  warm  air  is   lighter  than  the  cool  air  around  it,  the  warm  air  (or  heat)  rises.  

Warm  fluids  tend  to  rise  while  the  surrounding  cool  fluids  fall.    This  rising-­‐and-­‐ falling  motion  tends  to  form  loops,  or  convective  loops,  where  warm  air  rises  and   the  cool  air  falls.    Early  warm-­‐air  furnaces,  called  gravity  furnaces,  operate  by  the   principles  of  convective  loops.    In  a  gravity  system,  the  warm  air  rises  and  cool  air   falls,  and  this  is  how  the  gravity  warm-­‐air  heating  system  circulates  air.  

When  a  certain  amount  of  air  is  heated  up,  it  expands  and  takes  up  more  space.    In   other  words,  hot  air  is  less  dense  than  cold  air.    Any  substance  that  is  less  dense  than   the  fluid  (gas  or  liquid)  of  its  surroundings  will  float.    Hot  air  floats  on  cold  air   because  it  is  less  dense,  just  as  a  piece  of  wood  floats  because  it  is  less  dense  than   water.    Warm  air  is  often  described  as  weighing  less  than  cool  air.  

Warm  air  rises,  and  cool  air  falls.    The  weight  per  unit-­‐volume  of  air  decreases  as  its   temperature  increases.    And,  conversely,  the  weight  per  unit-­‐volume  of  air  increases   as  its  temperature  decreases.    

Inside  a  wall  cavity,  there  can  be  convective  loops  where  cool  and  warm  air  are   moving  around  inside  the  wall  cavity.  If  warm,  moist  air  comes  into  contact  with  a   cold  surface  of  that  wall  assembly,  then  condensation  may  form  inside  the  wall.  And   that’s  not  good.  

As  another  example,  an  old  gravity  furnace  heats  the  air;  the  air  gets  lighter  and   rises  out  of  the  heating  system.    Cool  air  enters  the  heating  system  and  pushes  or   displaces  the  warm,  rising  air.    The  warm  air  rises  up  through  warm-­‐air  ducts  or   pipes  (often  called  stacks)  that  are  inside  the  walls.    The  warm  air  rises  up  through   the  building.    The  warm  air  enters  a  room  through  the  supply  registers  on  the  wall   or  floor.    The  cool  air  falls  out  of  the  room  and  may  return  through  a  return  grille   and  travel  back  through  return  ducts  to  the  heating  system.    

Some  houses  with  old  gravity  heating  systems  may  not  have  a  lot  of  ducts  and  pipes   but  may  rely  on  large  openings  in  the  floors  covered  with  iron  grates  or  grilles  that   allow  the  cool  air  to  fall  down  through  the  building.    The  cool  air  is  allowed  to  simply   fall  back  to  the  furnace  -­‐-­‐  hence,  the  name  gravity  warm-­‐air  heating  system.    

The  air  circulation  in  a  house  with  a  gravity  warm-­‐air  heating  system  depends  on   the  temperature  difference  between  the  warm  air  rising  and  the  cool  air  falling.    The   greater  the  temperature  difference,  the  greater  the  speed  of  the  air  circulating.  

Page 17 of 170

   

 

So,  heat  moves  from  one  body  to  another  by  the  following  three  ways:  

• radiation;   conduction;  and   convection.  

Understanding  how  heat  moves  will  help  you  understand  how  moisture  moves,  too.  

Quiz  2  

T/F:  Heat  can  move  from  one  body  to  another  by  radiation.  

True  

False  

_______  is  the  transfer  of  heat  energy  by  electromagnetic  wave  motion.  

Radiation  

Conduction  

Convection  

Electrocution  

________  is  the  transfer  of  heat  from  one  molecule  to  another,  or  through  one   substance  to  another.  

Conduction  

Convection  

Electrical  

Radiation  

________  is  the  transfer  of  heat  by  warming  the  air  next  to  a  hot  surface  and  then   moving  that  warm  air.  

 

Convection  

Conduction  

Evaporation  

Radiation  

_____  air  is  less  dense  than  _____  air.  

Hot.....  cold  

Cold.....  hot  

Flowing.....  moist  

Page 18 of 170

   

Moisture  Movement  

 

It  is  important  to  study  moisture  in  a  course  that  is  about  inspecting  insulation   because  wet  insulation  does  not  work  well.  Also,  insulation  is  an  important  part  of   the  building  envelope  system,  and  all  parts  of  that  system  must  work  together  to   keep  moisture  from  causing  damage  to  the  structure  or  creating  a  health  hazard  for   the  occupants.  For  example,  mold  can  grow  in  moist  areas  and  cause  allergic   reactions  in  sensitive  people,  as  well  as  structurally  and  cosmetically  damage  the   components  of  a  house.  

To  be  able  to  inspect  for  moisture  intrusion  and  related  problems,  an  inspector   should  understand  the  basics  of  how  moisture  can  move  through  a  house.  

Water  vapor  moves  in  only  three  ways:  

• air  transportation;   diffusion  through  materials;  and   thermal  diffusion.  

If  a  builder  understands  the  different  ways  that  water  vapor  moves  and  also  knows   in  what  type  of  climate  the  house  is  located,  then  there  shouldn’t  be  any  major   problems  with  the  vapor  diffusion  retarder  that  is  installed.  

Page 19 of 170

   

The  problem  is  that  there  are  ways  to  control  vapor  diffusion  that  are  ineffective  at   controlling  air-­‐transported  moisture,  and  vice  versa.  An  effectively  built  wall  is   designed  to  control  both  vapor  diffusion  and  air  transportation  at  the  same  time  in   relation  to  the  climate  of  the  house's  location.  

Vapor  Diffusion  

Vapor  diffusion  is  how  moisture  in  a  vapor  state  moves  through  a  material  because   of  a  difference  in  pressure  (known  as  the  pressure  gradient)  or  a  difference  in   temperature  (known  as  the  thermal  gradient).  Vapor  diffusion  is  not  air  movement.  

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 20 of 170

   

Vapor  diffusion  is  water  vapor  moving  through  a  material  from  a  high  pressure  to  a   low  pressure,  or  from  the  warm  side  of  a  wall  to  the  cool  side  of  the  wall.  Moisture  in   air  will  move  from  high  pressure  to  low  pressure  or  from  high  temperature  to  low   temperature  only  if  the  air  that  is  moving  actually  contains  the  water  vapor.  

Take  a  look  at  the  illustration  below.  Assuming  the  outside  temperature  is  cold,   interior  moisture  in  air  will  move  through  the  wall  material.  

 

Thermal  or  heat  diffusion  happens  when  moisture  in  a  vapor  state  moves  from  a   warm  part  of  an  assembly  to  the  cold  part.  The  second  law  of  thermodynamics  can   explain  how  water  vapor  or  moisture  can  be  pressure-­‐  and  thermally  driven  from   high  (or  hot)  to  low  (or  cold).  

Air  Transportation  

Diffusion  is  an  important  factor  to  understand,  but  diffusion  is  a  slow  process.  Air,   however,  can  move  and  flow  quickly  and  in  large  volumes.  

Air  transportation  accounts  for  more  than  98%  of  all  water-­‐vapor  movement  in   building  cavities.  Air  naturally  moves  from  a  high-­‐pressure  area  to  a  lower  one  by   the  easiest  path  possible  —  generally,  through  any  available  hole  or  crack  in  the  

Page 21 of 170

   

building  envelope.  Moisture  transfer  by  air  currents  is  very  fast  -­‐-­‐  in  the  range  of   several  hundred  cubic  feet  of  air  per  minute.  Thus,  to  control  air  movement,  a  house   should  have  any  unintended  air  pathways  (holes,  gaps,  cracks,  separations,  etc.)   carefully  and  permanently  sealed  by  a  practice  referred  to  in  this  course  as  air   sealing.  

Diffusion  through  materials  is  a  much  slower  process.  Most  common  building   materials  slow  moisture  diffusion  to  a  large  degree,  although  they  can  never  stop  it   completely.  

       

 

Look  at  the  illustration  above  of  wall  material  with  a  hole  in  it.    Significantly  more   water  vapor  travels  through  a  wall  by  air  leakage  than  by  diffusion.    The  arrow   represents  air  leakage  through  a  1-­‐inch  hole:    about  30  quarts  of  of  water  can  travel   through  a  wall  during  a  heating  season.    As  inspectors,  we  need  to  look  for  air   leakage  through  holes.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

Page 22 of 170

   

 

The  laws  of  physics  govern  how  moist  air  reacts  within  various  temperature   conditions.  The  study  of  moist  air  properties  is  technically  referred  to  as   psychrometrics.  A  psychrometric  chart  is  used  by  professionals  to  determine  at   what  temperature  and  moisture  concentration  water  vapor  begins  to  condense.  This   is  called  the  dew  point.  By  understanding  how  to  find  the  dew  point,  you  will  better   understand  how  to  inspect  for  and  diagnose  moisture  problems  in  a  house.  

Relative  humidity  (RH)  refers  to  the  amount  of  moisture  contained  in  a  quantity  of   air  compared  to  the  maximum  amount  of  moisture  the  air  could  hold  at  the  same   temperature.  As  air  warms,  its  ability  to  hold  water  vapor  increases;  this  capacity   decreases  as  air  cools.  For  example,  according  to  the  psychrometric  chart,  air  at  68º  

F  (20º  C)  with  0.216  ounces  of  water  (H

2

O)  per  pound  of  air  (14.8g  H

2

O/kg  air)  has   a  100%  RH.  The  same  air  at  59º  F  (15º  C)  reaches  100%  RH  with  only  0.156  ounces   of  water  per  pound  of  air  (10.7g  H

2

O/kg  air).  The  colder  air  holds  about  28%  of  the   moisture  than  the  warmer  air  does.  The  moisture  that  the  air  can  no  longer  hold   condenses  on  the  first  cold  surface  it  encounters  (the  dew  point).  If  this  surface  is   within  an  exterior  wall  cavity,  wet  insulation  and  framing  will  be  the  result.  And   that’s  bad.  

In  addition  to  air  movement,  temperature  and  moisture  content  can  also  be   controlled.  Since  insulation  reduces  heat  transfer  or  flow,  it  also  moderates  the   effect  of  temperature  across  the  building  envelope's  cavity.  In  most  U.S.  climates,   properly  installed  vapor  diffusion  retarders  can  be  used  to  reduce  the  amount  of   moisture  transfer.  Except  in  deliberately  ventilated  spaces,  such  as  attics,  properly   installed  insulation  and  vapor  diffusion  retarders  work  together  to  reduce  the   opportunity  for  condensation  to  form  in  a  house's  ceilings,  walls  and  floors.  

Moisture  Can  Be  a  Problem  

When  moist  air  touches  a  cold  surface,  some  of  the  moisture  may  leave  the  air  and   condense  or  become  a  liquid.  If  the  moisture  condenses  inside  a  wall  or  in  an   inaccessible  attic,  you  may  not  be  able  to  see  the  water  but  it  will  be  causing   numerous  problems.  

Don’t  recommend  that  your  client  add  insulation  as  a  quick  fix.  Adding  insulation   can  cure  a  problem,  or  it  may  actually  cause  one.  When  a  wall  is  insulated,  the   temperature  of  the  space  inside  that  wall  is  changed.  A  surface  inside  that  wall,  such   as  the  plywood  sheathing  behind  the  siding,  can  become  much  colder  in  the   wintertime  than  it  was  before  the  wall  was  insulated.  This  cold  surface  could  be  the   place  where  moisture  traveling  through  the  wall  could  condense  and  cause  trouble.  

The  same  situation  could  happen  in  the  attic.  

Four  Things  Your  Client  Can  Do  

There  are  four  general  things  that  your  client  can  do  to  avoid  moisture  problems.  

Page 23 of 170

   

 

1.      Prevent  water  intrusion.  

Water  coming  into  the  house,  even  in  the  form  of  a  small  leak,  must  be  stopped.    

Furthermore:  

• the  roof  should  be  in  good  shape;   the  exterior  windows  and  doors  should  be  watertight;   the  gutters  should  be  kept  clear;   downspouts  should  divert  water  far  enough  away  from  the  house;   condensate  from  the  air  conditioner  should  properly  drain  away;   lawn  sprinklers  should  be  adjusted  to  spray  efficiently;   caulking  around  the  tub  and  shower  should  be  checked;   exposed  dirt  in  the  crawlspace  should  be  covered  with  a  vapor   diffusion  retarder;   all  bathroom  and  kitchen  ventilation  fans  must  exhaust  outside;  and   the  clothes  dryer  must  exhaust  outside  and  not  into  the  attic.  

2.  Ventilate.  

The  home  needs  to  be  ventilated.  Your  clients  will  generate  moisture  when  they   cook,  shower,  do  laundry,  and  even  breathe.  More  than  99%  of  the  water  used  to   water  plants  eventually  enters  the  air.  Unvented  natural  gas,  propane,  or  kerosene   space  heaters  exhaust  all  the  byproducts  of  combustion,  including  water  vapor,   directly  into  the  house's  interior.  This  water  vapor  can  add  5  to  15  gallons  of  water   per  day  to  the  air  inside  your  client’s  home.  Just  the  act  of  breathing  by  a  typical   family  can  add  about  3  gallons  of  water  per  day  into  the  home.  Baffles  or  rafter  vents   can  be  used  to  prevent  loose-­‐fill  insulation  from  blocking  the  attic  vents.  

3.  Stop  air  leaks.  

It  is  important  that  the  air  leakage  pathways  between  the  living  spaces  of  the  house   and  other  parts  of  the  building  are  stopped  or  sealed  closed.  Air  leakage  into  a  wall   or  the  attic  can  carry  a  significant  amount  of  moisture.  If  there  is  air  leaking  around   electrical  outlets  or  around  plumbing  lines  in  the  wall,  moisture  can  be  carried  along   those  same  pathways.  Ductwork  needs  to  be  sealed  and  insulated,  especially  if  the   ducts  pass  through  an  unconditioned,  unheated  space,  such  as  an  attic.  Returns    

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 24 of 170

   

  ducts  should  be  sealed,  too.  Air  sealing  is  important.  

4.  Provide  a  path  of  escape  for  moisture.  

An  example  of  this  can  be  found  in  a  typical  attic  that  has  vents  to  provide  a  path  for   moisture  to  escape.  Cold  air  usually  contains  less  water  than  hot  air,  so  diffusion   usually  carries  moisture  from  a  warm  place  to  a  cool  place.  A  wall  can  be  designed  to   allow  moisture  to  escape  from  a  wall  cavity  to  the  exterior  during  the  winter.  Or,  a   wall  can  dry  to  the  indoors  during  summer  by  avoiding  the  use  of  vinyl  wall   coverings  or  low-­‐perm  paint.  

   

Protection  from  Water  Damage  

 

Water  may  be  essential  to  life,  but,  as  a  destructive  force,  water  can  diminish  the   value  of  your  client’s  home  or  building.  An  inspector  is  required  to  report  any   present  conditions  or  clear  indications  of  active  water  penetration  that  s/he   observes.    

Homes  as  well  as  commercial  buildings  can  suffer  water  damage  that  results  in   increased  maintenance  costs,  a  decrease  in  the  value  of  the  property,  lowered   productivity,  and  potential  liability  associated  with  a  decline  in  indoor  air  quality.  

The  best  way  to  protect  against  this  potential  loss  is  to  ensure  that  the  building   components  that  enclose  the  structure,  known  as  the  building  envelope,  are  water-­‐

Page 25 of 170

   

  resistant.  Make  sure  that  the  plumbing   and  ventilation  systems,  which  can  be   quite  complicated  in  some  buildings,   operate  efficiently  and  are  well-­‐ maintained.  

This  and  the  following  sections   provide  some  basic  steps  for   identifying  and  eliminating  potentially   damaging  excess  moisture.  

Check  for  Water  Intrusion  

The  following  are  common  building-­‐related  sources  of  water  intrusion:  

windows  and  doors.    Check  for  leaks  around  windows,  doors,  and   storefront  systems  in  commercial  buildings.  

the  roof.    Improper  drainage  systems  and  roof  sloping  reduce  the  roof's  life   and  become  a  primary  source  of  moisture  intrusion.  Leaks  are  also  common   around  vents  for  exhaust  and  plumbing,  and  rooftop  air-­‐conditioning  units   and  other  specialized  equipment  in  commercial  buildings.  

the  foundation  and  exterior  walls.    Seal  any  cracks  and  holes  in  exterior   walls,  joints  and  foundations.  Such  cracks  and  holes  often  develop  as  a   naturally  occurring  byproduct  of  differential  soil  settlement.  

the  plumbing.    Check  for  leaking  plumbing  fixtures,  dripping  pipes  

(including  fire  sprinkler  systems  in  commercial  buildings),  clogged  drains  

(both  interior  and  exterior),  defective  water  drainage  systems,  and  damaged   manufacturing  equipment,  if  applicable  in  commercial  buildings.  

the  heating,  ventilation  and  air-­‐conditioning  (HVAC)  system.    Numerous  

HVAC  system  types  -­‐-­‐  some  of  them  very  sophisticated  -­‐-­‐  are  a  crucial   component  to  maintaining  a  healthy,  comfortable  work  environment  in   commercial  structures.  They  are  comprised  of  a  number  of  components  

(including  chilled  water  piping  and  condensation  drains)  that  can  directly   contribute  to  excessive  moisture  in  the  work  environment.  In  addition,  in   humid  climates,  one  of  the  functions  of  the  system  is  to  reduce  the  ambient   air-­‐moisture  level  (or  relative  humidity)  throughout  the  building.  An   improperly  operating  HVAC  system  will  not  perform  this  function.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 26 of 170

   

 

Inspections  as  Part  of  a  Regular  Home  Maintenance  

Plan  

Advise  your  clients  to  have  annual  inspections  of  the  following  elements  of  their   homes  (and  commercial  buildings)  to  ensure  that  they  remain  in  good  condition:  

flashings  and  sealants.    Flashing,  which  is  typically  a  thin  metal  strip  found   around  doors,  windows  and  roofs,  is  designed  to  prevent  water  intrusion  in   spaces  where  two  building  materials  come  together.  Sealants  and  caulking   are  specifically  applied  to  prevent  moisture  intrusion  at  building  joints.  Both   must  be  maintained  in  good  condition.  

vents.      All  vents  should  have  appropriate  hoods,  should  exhaust  to  the   exterior,  and  should  be  in  good  working  order,  without  any  blockage  or   restriction.  

HVAC  systems  are  more  complicated  in  commercial  buildings  compared  to   residential  homes,  but  the  inspection  processes  are  similar.  Check  for  leakage   in  supply  and  return  water  lines,  pumps,  air  handlers  and  other  components.  

Drain  lines  should  be  clean  and  clear  of  obstructions.  Ductwork  should  be   insulated  to  prevent  condensation  on  exterior  surfaces.  Air-­‐filtering  systems   should  be  checked  regularly  and  maintained  properly.  

humidity.      Except  in  specialized  commercial  facilities,  the  relative  humidity   in  your  building  should  be  between  30%  and  50%.  Condensation  on   windows,  wet  stains  on  walls  and  ceilings,  and  musty  smells  are  signs   that  relative  humidity  may  be  too  high.  If  you  are  concerned  about  the   humidity  level  in  your  building,  consult  with  a  mechanical  engineer,   contractor  or  air-­‐conditioning  repair  company  to  determine  whether  your  

HVAC  system  is  properly  sized  and  in  good  working  order.  A  mechanical   engineer  should  be  consulted  when  renovations  to  interior  commercial   spaces  are  planned.  

moist  areas.    Moist  or  wet  areas  should  be  regularly  cleaned  and  thoroughly   dried.  

expansion  joints.    Expansion  joints  are  materials  between  bricks,  pipes  and   other  building  materials  that  absorb  movement.  If  expansion  joints  are  not  in   good  condition,  water  intrusion  can  occur.  

interior  finish  materials.    Water-­‐damaged  drywall,  plaster  and  carpet   should  be  replaced.    Water-­‐damaged  ceiling  tiles  should  also  be  removed  and   replaced.  

exterior  walls.    Exterior  walls  are  generally  comprised  of  a  number  of   materials  combined  into  a  wall  assembly.  When  properly  designed  and   constructed,  the  assembly  is  the  first  line  of  defense  between  water  and  the   interior  of  your  building.  It  is  essential  that  they  be  maintained  properly,   including  regular  refinishing  and/or  resealing  with  the  appropriate   materials.  

storage  areas.    Storage  areas  should  be  kept  clean.    Allow  air  to  circulate  to   prevent  potential  moisture  accumulation.  

Page 27 of 170

   

 

Quick  Action  If  Water  Intrusion  Occurs  

Water  shut-­‐off  valves  should  be  readily  accessible  and  identified  so  that  the  water   supply  can  be  easily  turned  off  in  the  event  of  a  plumbing  leak.  If  water  intrusion   does  occur,  damage  can  be  minimized  by  addressing  the  problem  quickly  and   thoroughly.  Inspectors  should  help  their  clients  identify  all  main  water  and  fuel   shut-­‐off  valves.    

Immediately  following  a  leak,  the  standing  water  and  all  damp  materials  should  be   removed,  cleaned  up  and  dried  out.  Should  the  building  become  damaged  by  a   catastrophic  event,  such  as  a  fire,  flood  or  storm,  appropriate  action  should  be  taken   to  prevent  further  water  damage,  once  it  is  safe  to  do  so.  This  may  include  boarding   up  damaged  windows,  covering  a  damaged  roof  with  plastic  sheeting,  and/or   removing  wet  materials  and  supplies.  Fast  action  will  help  minimize  the  time  and   expense  for  repairs,  resulting  in  faster  recovery.  

Water  Intrusion  That’s  Not  So  Obvious  

In  this  course,  we  present  a  lot  of  information  about  water,  air  and  insulation.    These   three  things  can  cause  problems  for  your  client's  property    -­‐-­‐  including  water   damage  -­‐-­‐  if  the  house  is  not  built  correctly  or  maintained  properly.    

Water  damage  that  is  visible  during  an  inspection  should  be  reported  to  your   client.    That’s  obvious.    What’s  not  so  obvious  is  determining  what’s  going  on  (if   anything)  inside  the  building  assemblies,  including  the  walls,  floors  and   ceilings.    Access  is  not  typically  available  in  order  to  see  within  a  finished  wall  cavity   to  check  the  insulation  and  vapor  barrier,  and  to  take  moisture  and  temperature   measurements.    It  is  not  possible  to  see  what  happens  to  the  attic  space  during  the   winter  if  you  are  inspecting  the  property  during  the  summer.    There  are  a  lot  of   things  that  are  beyond  the  scope  of  a  typical  home  inspection,  including  determining   how  moisture  is  controlled  in  the  house,  especially  at  the  wall  assemblies.  

Be  sure  to  communicate  to  your  clients  that  your  inspection  is  a  visual-­‐only,  non-­‐ invasive  inspection  of  the  readily  accessible  components  of  the  house.  

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 28 of 170

   

 

Quiz  3  

T/F:  Water  damage  that  is  visible  during  an  inspection  should  be  reported  to  your   client.  

True  

False  

T/F:  Water  shut-­‐off  valves  should  be  readily  accessible  and  identified  so  that  the   water  supply  can  be  easily  turned  off  in  the  event  of  a  plumbing  leak.  

True  

False  

T/F:  An  inspector  is  required  to  report  any  present  conditions  or  clear  indications  of   active  water  penetration  observed  at  the  time  of  the  inspection.  

True  

False  

Insulation  

Introduction  to  Insulation  

As  a  property  inspector,  you  are  required  to  inspect  and  report  on  the  insulation.  

Refer  to  the  Standards  of  Practice  at  http://www.nachi.org/sop.htm  

In  this  section,  you'll  learn  about  insulation  and  how  it  functions  to  keep  the   building  durable  and  the  occupants  comfortable.    

Heating  and  cooling  account  for  50%  to  70%  of  the  energy  used  in  the  average  home   in  the  United  States.    Inadequate  insulation  and  air  leakage  cause  a  lot  of  wasted   energy  in  most  homes.    

Insulation:  

• helps  us  save  money;   helps  to  conserve  our  limited  energy  resources;   makes  a  house  comfortable;   maintains  uniform  temperatures  throughout  a  house;   makes  a  house  warm  in  the  winter;  and   makes  a  house  cool  in  the  summer.  

Page 29 of 170

   

 

How  Insulation  Works  

Insulation  provides  resistance  to  heat  flow.  The  more  heat-­‐flow  resistance  the   insulation  provides,  the  lower  the  heating  and  cooling  costs.    Heat  flows  naturally   from  a  warmer  space  to  a  cooler  space.  In  the  cold  winter,  this  heat  flow  moves   directly  from  all  heated  living  spaces  to  adjacent  unheated  spaces,  such  as  attics,   garages,  basements,  under-­‐floor  crawlspaces,  and  even  to  the  outdoors.  Heat  flow   can  also  move  indirectly  through  interior  ceilings,  walls  and  floors  —  wherever   there  is  a  difference  in  temperature.  During  the  cooling  season,  heat  flows  from  the   exterior  to  the  interior  of  a  building.  

To  keep  the  occupants  of  the  building  comfortable,  the  heat  lost  in  the  winter  must   be  replaced  by  the  heating  system,  and  the  heat  gained  in  the  summer  must  be   removed  by  the  cooling  system.  A  properly  insulated  home  will  decrease  this  heat   flow  by  providing  an  effective  resistance  to  the  flow  of  heat.  

Insulation  in  the  form  of  batts,  blankets,  loose  fill,  and  low-­‐density  foams  all  work  by   limiting  air  movement.  The  still  air  inside  the  insulation  is  an  effective  insulator   because  it  eliminates  convection.  Still  air  also  has  low  conduction,  so  heat  doesn’t   flow  very  well  via  conduction  through  insulation.  Some  foams  are  filled  with  special   gases  that  provide  additional  resistance  to  heat  flow.  

Reflective  insulation  limits  heat  that  travels  in  the  form  of  radiation.    Some  reflective   insulation  also  reduces  air  movement,  but  not  as  much  as  other  types  of  insulation.  

Don’t  confuse  insulation’s  ability  to  limit  air  movement  with  air  sealing.    Insulation   reduces  air  movement  only  within  the  space  it  occupies.    It  cannot  limit  air   movement  through  other  pathways  nearby.    For  example,  the  insulation  in  the  wall   cavity  does  not  affect  the  air  leakage  that  may  take  place  around  a  window  frame.  

Adding  insulation  will  likely  not  have  the  same  effect  as  air  sealing.  

Insulation's  resistance  to  heat  flow  is  measured  or  rated  in  terms  of  its  thermal   resistance,  better  known  as  its  R-­‐value.  

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 30 of 170

   

R-­‐Value  of  Insulation  

Insulation  is  rated  in  terms  of  thermal  resistance,  called  the  R-­‐value.  The  R-­‐value  is   an  indicator  of  insulation's  resistance  to  heat  flow.  The  higher  the  R-­‐value,  the   greater  the  insulating  effectiveness.  

The  R-­‐value  depends  on  the  type  of  insulation,  which  includes  its  material,  thickness   and  density.  The  effectiveness  of  an  insulation  material’s  resistance  to  heat  flow  also   depends  on  how  and  where  the  insulation  is  installed.  For  example,  insulation  that   is  compressed  will  not  provide  its  full  rated  R-­‐value.  The  overall  R-­‐value  of  a  wall  or   ceiling  will  be  somewhat  different  from  the  R-­‐value  of  the  insulation  itself  because   heat  flows  more  readily  through  studs,  joists,  and  other  building  materials,  in  a   phenomenon  known  as  thermal  bridging.  In  addition,  insulation  that  fills  building   cavities  densely  enough  to  reduce  airflow  can  also  reduce  convective  heat  loss.  

The  amount  of  insulation  or  R-­‐value  needed  in  the  home  will  depend  on  its  climate,   type  of  heating  and  cooling  system,  and  the  particular  part  of  the  house  where  the   insulation  is  installed.  

 

 

The  U.S.  Department  of  Energy  (DOE)  has  recommendations  for  new  and  existing   homes  in  relation  to  R-­‐value.  The  insulation  recommendations  for  ceilings,  wood-­‐ frame  walls,  floors,  foundation  walls,  crawlspace  walls,  and  slabs  have  been   increased  overall  and  generally  exceed  those  required  by  most  building  codes.    

The  DOE’s  range  of  recommendations  is  based  on  comparing  future  energy  savings   to  the  current  cost  of  installing  insulation.  You  can  use  the  map  and  tables  in  this   section  for  new  and  existing  homes  as  a  reference  guide  for  your  inspection  and  

Page 31 of 170

   

  evaluation  of  their  insulation.    If  you  observe  insulation  material  used  in  layers,  such   as  framing  cavity  insulation  and  insulating  sheathing,  the  material  can  be  summed   to  compute  the  component  R-­‐value.  

Climate  zones  (see  map  above)  are  used  to  determine  applicable  requirements  in   home  energy  efficiency  design  and  construction.  The  basement  walls,  exterior  walls,   floor,  roof,  and  any  other  building  elements  that  enclose  conditioned  space  or   provides  a  boundary  between  conditioned  space  and  unconditioned  space  is  called   the  building  thermal  envelope.  

Insulation  requirements  by  component  

CLIMAT

E  ZONE  

CEILIN

G  

R-­‐

VALUE  

WOOD  

FRAM

E  

WALL  

R-­‐

VALUE  

MASS  

WALL  

R-­‐

VALUE i

 

FLOO

R  

R-­‐

VALU

E  

BASEMENT

L   c

 WAL

R-­‐VALUE  

SLAB d

 

R-­‐

VALUE  

&  

DEPT

H  

CRAWL  

SPACE c

 WAL

L  

R-­‐VALUE  

1  

2  

3  

30  

38  

38  

13   3/4   13  

13   4/6   13  

20  or  

13  +  5 h

  8/13  

20  or  

13  +  5 h

 

8/13  

19  

19  

0  

0  

5/13 f

 

0  

0  

0  

0  

0  

5/13  

4  except  

Marine  

5  and  

Marine  4  

6  

49  

49  

49  

20  or  

13  +  5 h

 

20  +  5   or  13  +  

10 h

 

13/17   30

15/20   30 g g

 

 

10/13  

15/19  

15/19  

10,  2  ft  

10,  2  ft  

10,  4  ft  

10/13  

15/19  

15/19  

7  and  8   49  

20  +  5   or  13  +  

10 h

 

19/21   38 g

  15/19   10,  4  ft   15/19  

  a.  R-­‐values  are  minimums.  When  insulation  is  installed  in  a  cavity  which  is  less  than   the  label  or  design  thickness  of  the  insulation,  the  installed  R-­‐value  of  the  insulation   shall  not  be  less  than  the  R-­‐value  specified  in  the  table.   c.  "15/19”  means  R-­‐15  continuous  insulation  on  the  interior  or  exterior  of  the  home   or  R-­‐19  cavity  insulation  at  the  interior  of  the  basement  wall.  "15/19”  shall  be   permitted  to  be  met  with  R-­‐13  cavity  insulation  on  the  interior  of  the  basement  wall   plus  R-­‐5  continuous  insulation  on  the  interior  or  exterior  of  the  home.  "10/13”   means  R-­‐10  continuous  insulation  on  the  interior  or  exterior  of  the  home  or  R-­‐13   cavity  insulation  at  the  interior  of  the  basement  wall.  

Page 32 of 170

   

  d.  R-­‐5  shall  be  added  to  the  required  slab  edge  R-­‐values  for  heated  slabs.  Insulation   depth  shall  be  the  depth  of  the  footing  or  2  feet,  whichever  is  less  in  Zones  1  through  

3  for  heated  slabs.   f.  Basement  wall  insulation  is  not  required  in  warm-­‐humid  locations  as  defined  by  

Figure  N1101.10  and  Table  N1101.10.   g.  Or  insulation  sufficient  to  fill  the  framing  cavity,  R-­‐19  minimum.   h.  First  value  is  cavity  insulation,  second  is  continuous  insulation  or  insulated  siding,   so  "13  +  5”  means  R-­‐13  cavity  insulation  plus  R-­‐5  continuous  insulation  or  insulated   siding.  If  structural  sheathing  covers  40  percent  or  less  of  the  exterior,  continuous   insulation  R-­‐value  shall  be  permitted  to  be  reduced  by  no  more  than  R-­‐3  in  the   locations  where  structural  sheathing  is  used  –  to  maintain  a  consistent  total   sheathing  thickness.   i.  The  second  R-­‐value  applies  when  more  than  half  the  insulation  is  on  the  interior  of   the  mass  wall.  

Compressed  Insulation  

Insulation  that  is  compressed  will  not  provide  its  full  rated  R-­‐value.  The  overall  R-­‐ value  of  a  wall  or  ceiling  will  be  somewhat  different  from  the  R-­‐value  of  the   insulation  itself  because  some  heat  flows  around  the  insulation  through  the  studs   and  joists.  If  denser,  heavier  insulation  is  installed  on  top  of  lighter  insulation  in  an   attic  floor  area,  the  overall  value  may  be  different.    If  R-­‐19  batt  insulation  that  is   sized  for  6¼  inches  is  stuffed  inside  a  5½-­‐inch  wall  cavity,  the  effectiveness  is   decreased.  

If  the  insulation  is  installed  in  a  wall  with  electrical  wires  or  plumbing  pipes,  the   fiberglass  batt  insulation  may  be  compressed.    

It’s  important  that  the  insulation  is  properly  installed  to  achieve  its  maximum  R-­‐ value.  

The  amount  of  insulation  or  R-­‐value  that  is  recommended  by  building  standards  will   depend  on  the  local  climate  and  the  particular  location  of  the  insulation  in  the  

  house.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 33 of 170

   

 

Thermal  Bridging  

Insulation  in  between  studs  in  a  wall  does  not  restrict  the  heat  flow  through  those   studs.  This  heat  flow  is  called  thermal  bridging.    The  overall  R-­‐value  of  that  wall  may   be  different  from  the  R-­‐value  of  the  insulation  itself.  

It  is  recommended  that  the  insulation  installed  in  an  attic  covers  the  tops  of  the  attic   floor  joists.    It  is  also  recommended  that  insulation  sheathing  be  installed  on  stud   walls.  Wood  studs  can  transfer  energy  through  the  wall  assembly.    Metal  studs  can   transfer  energy  much  better  than  wood  studs  can.  As  a  result,  the  metal  wall’s   overall  R-­‐value  can  be  as  low  as  half  of  the  insulation’s  R-­‐value.  

Inspecting  the  Insulation  

You  may  be  asked  by  your  client,  “Does  the  home  I’m  about  to  buy  need  more   insulation?”    Unless  the  home  was  specially  constructed  for  energy  efficiency,  the   homeowner  can  probably  reduce  the  home's  energy  bills  by  adding  more  insulation.  

Many  older  homes  have  less  insulation  than  homes  built  today,  but  even  adding   insulation  to  a  newer  home  can  pay  for  itself  within  a  few  years.  

Adding  more  insulation  where  you  already  see  insulation,  such  as  in  the  attic,  will   likely  reduce  energy  bills  of  the  home.  

To  determine  whether  insulation  should  be  added,  the  homeowner  first  needs  to   find  out  how  much  insulation  they  already  have  in  their  home  and  where  it  is.  Your   inspection  includes  observing  the  insulation,  and  it  also  may  identify  areas  of  the   home  that  are  in  need  of  air  sealing.  (Before  a  homeowner  insulates,  they  should   make  sure  that  their  home  is  properly  air  sealed.)  

You  should  find  out  the  following  for  the  homeowner:  

Where  the  home  is,  isn't,  and/or  should  be  insulated;  

What  type  of  insulation  does  the  home  have;  and  

The  R-­‐value  and  the  thickness  or  depth  (inches)  of  the  insulation  that  is   observed.  

 

Check  the  attic,  walls,  and  floors  adjacent  to  an  unheated  space,  like  a  garage  or   basement.  The  structural  elements  are  usually  exposed  in  these  areas,  which  makes   it  easy  to  see  what  type  of  insulation  is  installed  and  to  measure  its  depth  or   thickness  (inches).  

 

To  inspect  the  exterior  walls  by  using  an  electrical  outlet  (this  far  exceeds  the  

Standards  of  Practice):  

1. Turn  off  the  power  to  the  outlet.  

Page 34 of 170

   

 

2. Remove  the  outlet  cover  and  shine  a  flashlight  into  the  crack  around  the   outlet  box.  You  should  be  able  to  see  if  there  is  insulation  in  the  wall  and   possibly  how  thick  it  is.  

3. Pull  out  a  small  amount  of  insulation  if  needed  to  help  determine  the  type  of   insulation.  

4. Check  outlets  on  all  floors  as  well  as  old  and  new  parts  of  your  house.  Just   because  you  find  insulation  in  one  wall  doesn't  mean  that  it's  everywhere  in   the  house.  

Inspect  and  measure  the  thickness  (inches)  of  any  insulation  in  unfinished  basement   ceilings  and  walls,  or  above  crawlspaces.  If  the  crawlspace  isn't  ventilated,  it  may   have  insulation  in  the  perimeter  wall.  If  the  house  is  relatively  new,  it  may  have   insulation  outside  the  basement  or  foundation  walls.  If  so,  the  insulation  in  these   spaces  won't  be  visible.  The  builder  or  the  original  homeowner  might  be  able  to  tell   you  if  exterior  insulation  was  used.  

Once  you've  determined  the  type  of  insulation  the  home  has  in  these  areas  and  its   thickness  (inches),  refer  to  the  following  table  to  determine  the  R-­‐values  of   insulation  previously  installed  in  the  home.  

What  you  see:    

    loose   fibers   light-­‐weight   yellow,  pink  or   white   dense  gray  or   near-­‐white,  may   have  black   specks   small  gray  flat   pieces  or  fibers  

(from  news   print)   granules   light-­‐weight  

What  it  

probably  is:    

Total  R-­‐

value:     fiberglass   2.5  x  depth   rock  wool   2.8  x  depth   cellulose   3.7  x  depth   vermiculite   or  perlite  

2.7  x  depth   fiberglass   3.2  x  depth  

    batts     light-­‐weight   yellow,  pink,  or   white  

Once  you  find  out  the  R-­‐values  of  the  insulation,  you  can  then  use  the  Insulation  

Requirements  by  Component  table  in  the  previous  section  to  determine  determine  

Page 35 of 170

   

  how  much  insulation  should  be  added  and  where  it  should  be  added  for  maximum   energy  efficiency.  

Precautions  About  Adding  Insulation  

Adding  insulation  may  require  hiring  a  professional  contractor.  If  the  house  is  old,   the  electrical  system  should  be  checked  by  an  electrician  if  the  wiring  is  degraded,   overloaded,  or  uses  knob-­‐and-­‐tube  wiring.  It  is  hazardous  to  add  insulation  when   conditions  such  as  these  exist.  Adding  thermal  insulation  within  a  closed  cavity   around  wires  could  cause  the  wires  to  overheat.  Code  does  not  allow  the  installation   of  loose-­‐fill,  rolled  or  foam-­‐in-­‐place  insulation  around  knob-­‐and-­‐tube  wiring.  Adding   insulation  in  a  mobile  home  is  complex  and  usually  requires  special  expertise.  

Adding  insulation  over  existing  insulation  should  not  include  a  vapor  diffusion   retarder  between  the  two  layers.      

Quiz  4  

The  total  R-­‐value  for  loose  fiberglass  when  you  see  about  6  inches  thick  of  insulation   at  the  floor  of  the  unfinished  attic  is  approximately  _____.  

(6  inches  x  2.5)  =  15  R-­‐value  

(6  inches  x  3.2)  =  19  R-­‐value  

(6  inches  x  2.8)  =  17  R-­‐value  

(6  inches  x  3.7)  =  22  R-­‐value  

The  R-­‐value  per  inch  of  material  for  fiberglass  batt  insulation  is  ______.  

3.2  

2.5  

2.8  

3.7  

According  to  the  DOE,  the  minimum  R-­‐value  for  a  ceiling  in  a  home  located  in  Zone  5   is  _____.  

49  

30  

38  

3.7  

According  to  the  DOE,  the  minimum  R-­‐value  for  a  ceiling  in  a  home  located  in  Zone  2   is  _____.  

38  

Page 36 of 170

   

 

 

30  

49  

5  

T/F:  The  insulation  recommendations  made  by  the  U.S.  DOE  for  attics,  ceilings,  walls   and  floors  have  been  increased  overall  and  generally  exceed  those  required  by  most   building  codes.  

True  

False  

T/F:  Insulation  that  is  compressed  will  not  provide  its  full  rated  R-­‐value.  

True  

False  

It  is  recommended  that  the  insulation  installed  in  an  attic  covers  the  tops  of  the  attic   floor  joists  to  stop  _________.  

 

• thermal  bridging   air  exfiltration   wood  condensation   thermal  movement  

Adding  more  ______  where  you  already  see  insulation,  such  as  in  the  unfinished  attic   floor  area,  will  likely  reduce  energy  bills.  

• insulation   flooring   retarding  materials   ventilation   bridging  

It  is  _____  to  install  loose-­‐fill,  rolled  or  foam-­‐in-­‐place  insulation  around  knob-­‐and-­‐ tube  wiring.  

• hazardous   preferred   required  by  most  standards   permitted  

Page 37 of 170

   

 

Attic  

Check  the  Attic  

At  unfinished  attic  floors,  be  careful  where  you   step.  Walk  only  on  the  joists  so  that  you  do  not   fall  through  the  ceiling  below.  

The  following  table  can  help  you  determine   what  type  of  insulation  you  will  typically  find   in  attics,  based  on  its  appearance,  and  the   related  R-­‐value  of  the  insulation.  

What  you  see:    

What  it  

probably  is:    

Total  R-­‐

value:    

    loose   fibers   light-­‐weight   yellow,  pink  or   white   dense  gray  or   near-­‐white,  may   have  black   specks   fiberglass   rock  wool  

2.5  x  depth  

2.8  x  depth   small  gray  flat   pieces  or  fibers  

(from  news   print)   granules   light-­‐weight   cellulose   3.7  x  depth   vermiculite   or  perlite  

2.7  x  depth   batts     light-­‐weight   yellow,  pink,  or   white   fiberglass   3.2  x  depth  

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 38 of 170

   

If  there  isn’t  any  insulation  in  the  attic  space,  then  insulation  should  be  installed   between  the  joists.  If  there  is  insulation  installed  and  it's  near  the  top  of  the  joists,   then  a  good  practice  is  to  install  new  batts  perpendicular  to  the  existing  ones.    That   will  help  to  cover  the  tops  of  the  joists  and  reduce  thermal  bridging  through  the   framing  members.      

The  Attic  Access  

The  attic  access  hatch  or  door  should  be  insulated.  A  non-­‐insulated  attic  door  will   reduce  energy  savings  substantially.  Ideally,  the  attic  access  will  be  located  in  an   unconditioned  part  of  the  house,  if  possible.  Otherwise,  the  attic  access  should  have   weatherstripping  and  insulation.  The  access  opening  could  be  covered  by  an   insulated  cover  box.      

There  should  be  an  access  opening  to  all  attic  spaces  that  exceed  30  square  feet  and   have  a  vertical  height  of  30  inches  or  more.  The  rough-­‐framed  opening  should  be  at   least  22  inches  by  30  inches.  It  should  be  located  in  a  hallway  or  other  readily   accessible  location.  An  attic  access  that  is  located  in  a  clothes  closet  is  often   inaccessible  due  to  permanent  shelving  installed.  There  should  be  headroom  that  is   a  minimum  of  30  inches  above  the  attic  access.  

If  there  is  a  plumbing  or  electrical  system  or  mechanical  equipment  in  the  attic   space  (or  in  the  under-­‐floor  crawlspace),  then  the  space  should  be  accessible  for   inspection,  service  and  removal.  

 

Page 39 of 170

   

 

Based  on  the  diagram  below,  the  following  guidelines  apply:  

1. In  addition  to  an  adequately  sized  access  opening,  a  passageway  should  be   provided.    In  an  attic,  the  passageway  should  be  made  of  solid  flooring.  

2. There  should  be  an  opening  to  the  space,  and  a  clear,  unobstructed   passageway  large  enough  to  allow  removal  of  the  mechanical  appliance.    The   opening  should  be  at  least  22  inches  by  30  inches.    The  opening  should  be   large  enough  for  a  person  to  get  through  it  and  for  equipment  to  be  removed.  

3. The  passageway  beyond  the  opening  should  be  at  least  30  inches  high,  at   least  24  inches  wide,  and  not  more  than  20  feet  in  length  when  measured   along  the  centerline  of  the  passageway  from  the  opening  to  the   appliance.    There  are  some  exceptions.  

4. A  service  area  is  required  in  front  of  the  mechanical  equipment.    The   dimensions  should  be  at  least  30  inches  by  30  inches.  

5. A  light  fixture  should  be  installed  to  illuminate  the  passageway  and  the   mechanical  appliance.    

6. A  control  switch  should  be  installed  near  the  entry   to  the  passageway.    

7. An  electrical  receptacle  should  be  installed  at  or   near  the  mechanical  appliance  to  allow  for  safe  and   convenient  maintenance  and  servicing  of  the   appliance.      

Attic  Pull-­‐Down  Stairs  

Attic  pull-­‐down  ladders,  also  called  attic  pull-­‐down  stairs,   are  collapsible  ladders  that  are  permanently  attached  to  the   attic  floor.  Occupants  can  use  these  ladders  to  access  their   attics  without  being  required  to  carry  a  portable  ladder.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 40 of 170

   

 

Common  Defects  for  Attic  Pull-­‐Down  Stairs  

Homeowners  -­‐-­‐  not  professional  carpenters  -­‐-­‐  usually  install  attic  pull-­‐down  ladders.  

Evidence  of  this  distinction  can  be  observed  in  consistently  shoddy  work  that  rarely   meets  safety  standards.  Some  of  the  more  common  defective  conditions  observed  by   inspectors  include:  

• cut  bottom  cord  of  the  structural  truss.  Often,  homeowners  will  cut  through  a   structural  member  in  the  field  while  installing  a  pull-­‐down  ladder,   unknowingly  weakening  the  structure.  Structural  members  should  not  be   modified  in  the  field  without  an  engineer’s  approval;   fastened  with  improper  nails  or  screws.  Homeowners  often  use  drywall  or   deck  screws  rather  than  the  standard  16d  penny  nails  or  ¼-­‐inch  by  3-­‐inch   lag  screws.  Nails  and  screws  that  are  intended  for  other  purposes  may  have   reduced  shear  strength  and  they  may  not  support  pull-­‐down  ladders;   fastened  with  an  insufficient  number  of  nails  or  screws.  Manufacturers   provide  a  certain  number  of  nails  with  instructions  that  they  all  be  used,  and   they  probably  do  this  for  a  good  reason.  Inspectors  should  be  wary  of  “place   nail  here”  notices  that  are  nowhere  near  any  nails;   lack  of  insulation.  Hatches  in  many  houses  (especially  older  ones)  are  not   likely  to  be  weatherstripped  and/or  insulated.  An  uninsulated  attic  hatch   allows  air  from  the  attic  to  flow  freely  into  the  home,  which  may  cause  the   heating  or  cooling  system  to  run  overtime.  An  attic  hatch  cover  box  can  be   installed  to  increase  energy  savings;   loose  mounting  bolts.  This  condition  is  more  often  caused  by  age  rather  than   a  defective  installation,  although  improper  installation  will  hasten  the   loosening  process;   attic  pull-­‐down  ladders  are  cut  too  short.  Stairs  should  reach  the  floor;     attic  pull-­‐down  ladders  are  cut  too  long.  This  causes  pressure  at  the  folding   hinge,  which  can  cause  breakage;   missing  fasteners;   compromised  fire  barrier,  when  the  attic  access  is  installed  in  the  garage;   the  attic  ladder  frame  is  not  properly  secured  to  the  ceiling  opening;   the  closed  ladder  is  covered  with  debris,  such  as  blown  insulation  or  roofing   material  that's  shed  during  roof  work.  Inspectors  can  place  a  sheet  on  the   floor  beneath  the  ladder  to  catch  whatever  debris  may  fall  onto  the  floor;  and   cracked  steps.  This  defect  is  a  problem  with  wooden  ladders.  

In  sliding  pull-­‐down  ladders,  there  is  a  potential  for  the  ladder  to  slide  down  too   quickly.  Always  pull  the  ladder  down  slowly  and  cautiously.    

An  important  safety  tip  for  inspectors  is  to  place  an  "InterNACHI  Inspector  at  

Work!"  stop  sign  nearby  while  mounting  the  ladder.  These  are  available   atInspectorOutlet.com.  

Page 41 of 170

   

 

Relevant  Codes  

The  2009  edition  of  the  International  Building  Code  (IBC)  and  the  2006  edition  of   the  International  Residential  Code  (IRC)  offer  guidelines  regarding  attic  access,   although  not  specifically  pull-­‐down  ladders.  Still,  the  information  may  be  of  some   interest  to  inspectors.  

2009  IBC  (Commercial  Construction):  

1209.2  Attic  Spaces.  An  opening  not  less  than  20  inches  by  30  inches  (559  mm  by  762   mm)  shall  be  provided  to  any  attic  area  having  a  clear  height  of  over  30  inches  (762   mm).  A  30-­‐inch  (762-­‐mm)  minimum  clear  headroom  in  the  attic  space  shall  be  

provided  at  or  above  the  access  opening.  

2006  IRC  (Residential  Construction):  

R807.1  Attic  Access.  Buildings  with  combustible  ceiling  or  roof  construction  shall  have   an  attic  access  opening  to  attic  areas  that  exceed  30  square  feet  (2.8m

2

)  and  have  a   vertical  height  of  30  inches  (762  mm)  or  more.  The  rough-­‐framed  opening  shall  not  be   less  than  22  inches  by  30  inches,  and  shall  be  located  in  a  hallway  or  readily  accessible   location.  A  30-­‐inch  (762-­‐mm)  minimum  unobstructed  headroom  in  the  attic  space  

shall  be  provided  at  some  point  above  the  access  opening.  

Tips  That  Inspectors  Can  Pass  on  to  Their  Clients  

Do  not  allow  children  to  enter  the  attic  through  an  attic  access.  The  lanyard   attached  to  the  attic  stairs  should  be  short  enough  that  children  cannot  reach   it.  Parents  can  also  lock  the  attic  ladder  so  that  a  key  or  combination  is   required  to  access  it.  

If  possible,  avoid  carrying  large  loads  into  the  attic.  While  properly  installed   stairways  may  safely  support  an  adult,  they  might  fail  if  the  person  is   carrying  a  heavy  load.  Such  trips  can  be  split  up  to  reduce  the  load's  weight   and  the  stress  on  the  stairs.  

Replace  an  old,  rickety  wooden  ladder  with  a  new  one.  Newer  aluminum   models  are  often  lightweight,  sturdy  and  easy  to  install.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 42 of 170

   

In  summary,  attic  pull-­‐down  ladders  are  prone  to  a  number  of  defects,  most  of   which  are  due  to  improper  installation.  

Attic  Insulation  Rulers  and  

Thicknesses  

A  professional  installer  will  attach  vertical  rulers  (or  attic  rulers)  to  the  joists  of  the   attic  prior  to  installing  blown-­‐in  insulation.  The  installer  should  provide  a  signed   and  dated  statement  describing  the  insulation  installed,  its  thickness,  the  coverage   area,  its  R-­‐value,  and  the  number  of  bags  installed.  This  informational  notice,  located   in  the  attic,  is  referred  to  as  the  attic  card.  

The  following  is  a  sample  chart  that  might  be  used  by  a  professional  installer  of   blown-­‐in  fiberglass  insulation.  

 

Insulation  manufacturers  provide  similar  charts  on  their  product  bags.  The  chart   states  the  minimum  number  of  bags  that  need  to  be  installed  per  1,000  square  feet   of  area  in  order  to  obtain  a  specific  R-­‐value.  For  example,  to  achieve  R-­‐38  for   insulation  installed  in  a  3,200-­‐square-­‐foot  attic,  the  following  formula  applies:  

3,200  ft

2

 ÷  1,000  =  3.2,  and  19.2  (bags  per  1,000  ft

2

 for  R-­‐38)  x  3.2  =  61.4  bags.  

Building  inspectors  typically  check  the  insulation's  depth  to  verify  compliance  with   local  codes.  Making  sure  the  appropriate  amount  of  insulation  is  installed  requires  a   bag  count  or  a  comparison  with  the  recommendations  on  the  attic  card.  

Difficult-­‐to-­‐Inspect  Attic  Areas  

 

If  the  attic  has  blown-­‐in  insulation,  check  the  back  corners,  and  the  hard-­‐to-­‐see  and   hard-­‐to-­‐access  areas.  It  is  common  for  these  areas  to  have  insulation  installed  that  is   too  thin.  Insulation  should  be  evenly  distributed  throughout  the  attic,  with  the   correct  density  and  depth.  

Page 43 of 170

   

 

Additionally:  

Baffles  should  be  installed  to  prevent  blocking  the  air  flow  through  the  attic   vents,  particularly  at  the  eaves.    

The  insulation  should  be  blown  all  the  way  to  the  top  plate  of  the  exterior   wall.    

The  recessed  lights  should  be  properly  filled  in  and  covered  (insulated   contact-­‐rated  fixtures).  Only  IC-­‐rated  recessed  lights  should  be  installed   because  they  are  airtight  and  can  be  covered  with  insulation.  

Check  underneath  any  pieces  of  plywood  or  platforms  in  the  attic.  Those   areas  need  to  be  insulated.  

If  mechanical  equipment  or  storage  areas  are  located  in  the  attic,  the  flooring   or  platform  decking  should  be  elevated  to  allow  the  full  height  or  thickness  of   the  insulation  to  be  installed.      

Check  around  ductwork,  wires  and  plumbing.      

Attic  Knee  Walls  

Knee  walls  are  vertical  walls  with  an  attic  space  directly  behind  them.  You’ll   typically  find  them  in  houses  with  finished  attic  spaces  and  dormer  windows,  as   with  1½-­‐story  houses.  

There  are  a  couple  of  ways  that  you  may  see  a  knee  wall  insulated.  The  most   important  areas  and  most  overlooked  areas  to  insulate  are  the  open  joist  ends   below  the  knee  wall.  The  open  joist  ends  below  a  knee  wall  should  be  plugged  or   stuffed  with:  

• squares  of  cardboard,  metal  flashing  or  rigid  insulation;   cellulose  insulation  blown  at  high  density;  or   batt  insulation  stuffed  into  plastic  bags.  

The  plugs  should  be  sealed  to  the  joists  using  caulk,  sealant  or  spray  foam.  

The  knee  wall  and  attic  floor  in  the  attic  space  behind  the  knee  wall  should  be   insulated.  Sometimes,  string,  wire  or  cardboard  is  used  to  hold  the  insulation  in   place  at  the  backside  of  the  knee  wall.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 44 of 170

   

 

Another  way  to  insulate  this  area  is  to  seal  and  insulate  the  rafter  spaces  along  the   sloping  ceiling  of  the  knee  wall  attic  space.  The  rafters  should  have  proper   insulation  and  ventilation,  as  required.  One  advantage  of  this  approach  is  that,  after   properly  insulating,  any  ductwork  that  was  in  that  small  space  is  now  inside  a   conditioned  space.  

Exterior  

Check  the  Exterior  

An  exterior  wall  of  a  building  should  be  properly  sealed,  protected  from  moisture,   and  insulated  adequately  to  increase  comfort,  reduce  noise,  and  save  on  energy   costs.  Exterior  walls  are  one  of  the  most  complex  systems  in  a  building.  

An  effective  wall  has  all  of  the  following  characteristics:  

It  is  airtight.    All  air  leaks  should  be  sealed  in  the  wall  during  construction   and  before  the  insulation  is  installed  in  it.  

It  controls  moisture.    An  exterior  rain-­‐drainage  system,  an  air  barrier,  and  a   vapor  diffusion  retarder  should  be  installed  on  the  wall  on  the  correct  side  of   the  wall.  

It  has  complete  insulation  coverage.    The  wall  framing  should  provide   enough  room  for  complete,  maximum  insulation  coverage  and  reduce   thermal  bridging,  with  no  open  gaps  or  compressed  insulation,  and   continuous  insulated   sheathing.  

Airtightness  

Air  sealing  reduces  heat  flow   from  air  movement,  or   convection.  Air  sealing   prevents  water  vapor  in  the  air   from  entering  the  wall   assembly.  In  a  100-­‐square-­‐foot   wall,  1  cup  of  water  can  diffuse   through  drywall  without  a   vapor  diffusion  retarder  in  a   single  year.  Fifty  cups  can  enter   through  a  ½-­‐inch  round  hole.  

Air  sealing  is  10  to  100  times  as   important  as  installing  a  vapor   diffusion  retarder.      

Page 45 of 170

   

 

Controlling  Moisture  

It  is  incorrect  to  think  that  installing   a  vapor  diffusion  retarder  is  the  most   important  step  for  controlling   moisture  in  a  wall.  Vapor  diffusion   retarders  only  retard  moisture  via   diffusion,  while  most  moisture  enters   a  wall  either  through  fluid  capillary   action  or  in  the  form  of  water  vapor   through  air  leaks.  

A  drainage  plane  in  a  wall  system   makes  an  easy  pathway  for  water  to   drain  away  from  the  house.  Rain   leaks  cause  a  lot  of  problems  for   walls.  Water  penetration  into  a  wall   can  be  the  result  of  improper   installation  of  the  siding,  poor   flashing  installation,  bad   weatherstripping,  poor  caulking   around  joints  at  the  building  exterior,   and  wind-­‐driven  rain  into  and   through  the  exterior  siding  material.  

A  drainage  plane  in  the  wall  assembly   protects  against  water  intrusion.  

Houses  in  all  climates  require  the  following  to  control  moisture:  

• a  polyethylene  sheet  should  cover  the  exposed  dirt  in  houses  with   crawlspaces;   the  grading  around  the  house  should  slope  away  from  the  foundation;   a  continuous  vapor  diffusion  retarder  with  a  perm  rating  of  less  than  1   should  be  installed;  and  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

 

Page 46 of 170

   

 

• a  termite  shield,  sill  gasket,  or  other  vapor-­‐impermeable  membrane  on  the   top  of  the  foundation  wall  should  be  installed  to  prevent  moisture  from   wicking  into  the  wood  framing  components  via  capillary  action.  

OVE  Techniques  

The  U.S.  Forestry  Products  Association  has  come  up  with  optimum  value   engineering  (OVE)  framing  techniques  that  reduce  unnecessary  lumber  use  and   improve  the  R-­‐value  of  the  wall  by  reducing  thermal  bridging  and  maximizing  the   wall  area  that  is  insulated.  

The  OVE  techniques  include:  

• eliminating  unnecessary  framing  at  intersections  using  2-­‐stud  rather  than  3-­‐ stud  corners;   interior  bracing  (or  let-­‐in  bracing)  to  allow  the  use  of  insulated  sheathing  in   corners;   framing  based  on  a  24-­‐inch  instead  of  a  16-­‐inch  on-­‐center  measurement;   building  a  house  using  compact  designs,  and  simpler  shapes  and  volumes;   aligning  windows  and  doors  with  existing  stud  spacing;  and   using  insulated  headers.  

2x6  Wall  Construction  

You  may  see  the  house  walls  built  with  2x6  studs  instead  of  2x4s.  In  most   jurisdictions,  2x6  studs  can  be  spaced  on  24-­‐inch  centers,  instead  of  the  standard  

16-­‐inch  on-­‐center  measurement  for  2x4  studs.  

The  advantages  of  using  2x6s  are:  

• the  thicker  wall  provides  more  room  for  thicker  insulation,  such  as  R-­‐19  or  

R-­‐22;   thermal  bridging  is  reduced  because  fewer  studs  are  used;  and   there  is  more  space  for  insulating  around  piping,  wiring  and  ductwork.  

Wall  Sheathing  

Many  builders  use  common  ½-­‐inch  wood  sheathing,  which  has  an  R-­‐value  of  0.6.  

They  may  use  an  asphalt-­‐impregnated  sheathing  called  blackboard  that  has  an  R-­‐ value  of  1.3.  These  two  sheathings  are  installed  on  the  exterior  framing  before  the   siding  system  is  installed.  Many  builders  use  ½-­‐inch  foam-­‐insulated  sheathing  that   has  an  R-­‐value  of  2  to  3.5.  Foam  sheathing  provides  a  continuous  layer  of  insulation   that  reduces  thermal  bridging  through  the  wood  studs.  Foam  sheathing  also  

Page 47 of 170

   

  protects  against  condensation  on  the  inside  wall  by  keeping  the  interior  of  the  wall   warmer.  

If  you  are  inspecting  this  type  of  insulated  wall  sheathing  during  construction,  the   sheathing  should  completely  cover  the  wall  and  should  be  sealed  to  the  top  plate   and  band  joist  at  the  floor.  Once  installed,  the  sheathing  should  be  sealed  around  all   holes  and  penetrations.  The  seams  should  be  sealed  with  caulk  or  housewrap  tape,   according  to  the  manufacturer’s  recommendations.  

It  is  difficult  to  check  the  insulation  in  a  wall  of  a  home  whose  construction  is   completed.    It’s  also  difficult  to  add  insulation  to  an  existing  wall.  

There  is  a  way  to  inspect  the  insulation  inside  a  wall  cavity,  but  this  goes  far  beyond   the  scope  of  a  typical  home  inspection.    

To  inspect  the  insulation  inside  an  exterior  wall,  utilize  an  electrical  outlet  located  at   that  wall  and:  

• turn  off  the  power  to  the  electrical  receptacle  (outlet);   remove  the  receptacle  cover  and  shine  a  flashlight  into  the  crack  around  the   outlet  box.  You  should  be  able  to  see  if  there  is  insulation  in  the  wall  and,   possibly,  how  thick  it  is;   pull  out  a  small  amount  of  insulation,  if  needed,  to  help  determine  its  type;   and   check  the  receptacles  on  the  first  and  upper  floors,  if  any,  and  in  old  and  new   parts  of  a  house.  Just  because  you  find  insulation  in  one  wall  doesn't  mean   that  it's  installed  everywhere  in  the  house.  

Inspect  and  measure  the  thickness  (in  inches)  of  any  insulation  in  unfinished   basement  ceilings  and  walls,  or  above  crawlspaces.  If  the  crawlspace  isn't  ventilated,   it  may  have  insulation  installed  at  the  perimeter  walls.  If  the  house  is  relatively  new,   it  may  have  been  built  with  insulation  outside  the  basement  or  foundation  walls.  If   so,  the  insulation  in  these  spaces  won't  be  visible.  The  homeowner  might  be  able  to   tell  you  about  the  insulation.  

If  the  house  has  newer  siding,  there  may  have  been  some  new  thermal  insulation   installed  prior  to  the  siding's  installation.  Sometimes,  insulation  is  blown  into  a  wall    

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 48 of 170

   

  cavity,  and  you’ll  see  drilled  circular  holes  1½  to  2½  inches  in  diameter  in  the  siding   outside.  The  holes  are  the  places  through  which  the  new  insulation  was  blown  into   the  wall.  

The  first-­‐floor  band  joist  may  be  readily  accessible  from  the  basement  or   crawlspace.  It  should  be  properly  insulated.  

If  batt  or  rigid  insulation  is  installed  to  insulate  the  inside  of  concrete  basement   foundation  walls,  it  may  be  necessary  to  have  furring  strips  installed  at  the  walls  by   nailing  or  bonding.  Or,  you  may  find  that  an  interior  stud  wall  on  which  the   insulation  and  interior  wall  finish  are  attached  was  installed  around  the  basement   perimeter.  

The  kraft  paper  or  standard  foil  vapor  diffusion-­‐retarder  facings  on  the  blanket   insulation  should  be  covered  with  gypsum  or  interior  paneling  because  of  the  fire   hazard.  Some  types  of  blanket  insulation  have  a  special  flame-­‐resistant  facing  

(labeled  FS25  =  flame  spread  index  25).  There  are  some  blanket  insulation  products   for  basement  wall  installations  that  can  be  left  exposed,  and  they  have  a  flame-­‐ resistant  facing  and  are  labeled    ASTM  C  665,  Type  II,  Class  A.  

Quiz  5  

T/F:  Air  sealing  is  10  to  100  times  as  effective  as  installing  a  vapor  diffusion   retarder.  

True  

False  

____  cups  of  water  can  enter  through  a  ½-­‐inch  round  hole  via  air  transportation  in  a   year.  

Fifty  

Ten  

Thirty  

Five  

In  a  100-­‐square-­‐foot  wall,  ____  of  water  can  diffuse  through  drywall  without  a  vapor   diffusion  retarder  in  a  single  year.  

1  cup  

30  quarts  

60  gallons  

12  pints  

T/F:  Air  sealing  reduces  heat  flow  from  air  movement,  known  as  convection.  

Page 49 of 170

   

 

True  

False  

T/F:  The  exterior  wall  is  one  of  the  most  complex  systems  in  a  building.  

True  

False  

T/F:  Installing  a  vapor  diffusion  retarder  is  the  most  important  step  for  controlling   moisture  in  a  wall.  

False  

True  

OVE  stands  for  ______________.  

• optimum  value  engineering   opus  volute  entra   other  volume  engineering   outside  velocity  entrance  

In  most  jurisdictions,  ______  studs  can  be  spaced  on  24-­‐inch  centers,  instead  of  the   standard  16-­‐inch  on-­‐center  measurement  for  2x4  studs.  

2x6  

1x2  

2x2  

2x11  

Many  builders  use  common  ½-­‐inch  wood  sheathing,  which  has  an  R-­‐value  of  ______.  

0.6  

1.6  

2.6  

4.2  

T/F:  If  the  house  has  newer  siding,  there  may  have  been  some  new  thermal   insulation  installed  prior  to  the  siding's  installation.  

True  

False  

The  kraft  paper  or  standard  foil  vapor  diffusion-­‐retarder  facings  on  the  blanket   insulation  should  be  covered  with  gypsum  or  interior  paneling  because  of  the  _____   hazard.  

Page 50 of 170

   

 

• fire   water   health   mold  

Floors  

Check  the  Floors  

Look  at  the  underside  of  any  floor  that  is  located  over  an  unheated  space,  such  as  a   crawlspace,  basement  or  garage.    Check  and  measure  the  insulation  that  is  installed   there.  It  will  likely  be  fiberglass  batt  insulation.    The  insulation  may  be  identified   with  its  R-­‐value  printed  on  it.    If  it's  not,  multiply  the  thickness  of  the  insulation  by  

3.2  to  figure  out  its  R-­‐value.  

If  the  insulation  is  foamboard  or  a  sprayed-­‐foam  application  and  you  can’t  find  any   labeling,  multiply  its  thickness  in  inches  by  5  to  get  a  good  estimate  of  its  R-­‐value.      

Floors  and  Crawlspaces  

If  there  is  a  floor  over  a  crawlspace,  check  for  the  presence  of  insulation  installed   underneath  the  floor.    Also,  check  to  see  whether  the  crawlspace  is  ventilated.    You   may  discover  that  the  floor  is  not  insulated  and  the  crawlspace  is  not  ventilated,  but   the  perimeter  walls  are  insulated.  

There  should  be  an  access  hole  through  the  perimeter  wall  of  the  crawlspace.    It   should  be  at  least  16x24  inches.  If  the  access  is  through  the  floor,  then  the  minimum   dimension  should  be  18x24  inches.  

When  batts  or  rolls  of  insulation  are  installed  on  the  underside  of  a  floor  above  an   unheated  crawlspace  or  basement,  insulation  should  be:  

• fitted  between  the  beams  or  joists;   pushed  up  against  the  floor  overhead  as  securely  and  snugly  as  possible;   installed  without  compressing  it;   held  in  place  with  netting  or  snap-­‐in  wire  holders;   cut  off  and  stuffed  into  tight  spaces  by  hand;   cut  and  fitted  around  cross-­‐bracing  between  floor  joists  and  any   obstructions;   installed  against  the  perimeter  band/rim  joist  that  rests  upon  the  sill  plate;   and     installed  on  all  ducts  and  pipes  passing  through  the  unheated  space.  

Page 51 of 170

   

 

Reflective  systems  are  installed  in  a  way  similar  to  batt  insulation.  It  is  important  to   install  reflective  insulation  properly  for  it  to  be  effective.  Sometimes,  reflective   insulation  will  have  flanges  stapled  to  the  framing  members.  This  conductive   material  must  not  come  in  contact  with  any  electrical  current!  

You  may  find  spray-­‐foam  insulation  at  a  floor  system.  The  spray  can  do  an  excellent   job  of  insulating  and  filling  the  spaces  around  the  electrical  wires,  pipes,  and  other   obstructions.    

In  a  non-­‐ventilated  crawlspace,  you  may  see  fiberglass  blanket  insulation  installed   on  the  perimeter  walls  attached  to  furring  strips.  You  may  also  see  insulation   fastened  to  the  sill  plate  and  draped  down  the  perimeter  wall  of  the  crawlspace.  The   insulation  may  continue  over  the  crawlspace  floor  for  a  couple  of  feet  on  top  of  the   required  ground  vapor  diffusion  retarder.  Foam  insulation  installed  on  the  walls  of  a   non-­‐ventilated  crawlspace  may  be  bonded  to  the  wall  using  adhesive.  If  any   insulation  is  exposed,  consider  checking  the  local  fire  codes  and  the  flame-­‐spreading   ratings  of  the  insulation.  If  your  client’s  home  is  in  an  area  prone  to  termite   infestation,  be  sure  you  communicate  to  your  client  about  the  inspection  restrictions   caused  by  the  insulation.  

Ductwork  

Check  the  Ductwork

 

 

The  ductwork  of  the  HVAC   system  in  a  house  may  be   checked  by  the  inspector.  If  the   ducts  run  through  unconditioned   spaces  in  the  house,  such  as  a   crawlspace  or  an  attic,  then  the  ductwork  should  be  insulated.    

The  ductwork  should  not  leak  air.  Leaking  joints  should  be  repaired  with   mechanical  fasteners  and  then  sealed  with  water-­‐soluble  mastic  and  embedded   fiber  mesh.    Gray-­‐cloth  duct  tape  should  never  be  used  for  this  purpose.    It  degrades,   cracks  and  loses  its  integrity  and  bond  with  age.    If  the  joint  is  going  to  be  opened  up  

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 52 of 170

   

  in  the  future  for  maintenance  or  other  reasons,  then  aluminum  foil  tape  may  be   used.  

The  ductwork  should  be  wrapped  with  insulation  that  has  a  minimum  R-­‐value  of  6,   with  a  vapor  diffusion  retarder  facing  on  the  outer  (exterior)  side.  The  insulation   should  not  be  compressed.    It  should  be  overlapped  and  sealed  with  fiberglass  tape   where  sections  of  the  insulation  meet.  The  insulation  should  not  be  torn  or   damaged.    The  vapor  diffusion  retarder  should  not  be  cut,  torn  or  damaged.    The   ductwork  should  not  be  compressed  or  damaged.    

If  you  are  going  to  enter  the  attic  space,  be  careful  not  to  step  on  and  compress   ductwork  that  may  be  hidden  under  your  feet  by  blown-­‐in  insulation.    Sometimes,   blown-­‐in  insulation  will  be  layered  over  ductwork  in  the  attic  space,  and  it  will  be   hard  to  see  the  ductwork.  

Types  of  Insulation  

Introduction  

The  type  of  insulation  used,  its  R-­‐value,  and  the  thickness  needed  are  all  directly   related  to  the  nature  and  location  of  the  spaces  in  the  house  that  are  insulated.  

Different  forms  of  insulation  can  be  used  together.    For  example,  you  may  find  batt   or  roll  insulation  over  loose-­‐fill  insulation.      

Blankets  

Blankets  come  in  the  form  of  batts  and  rolls.  They  are  flexible.  They  are  made  from   mineral  fibers,  including  fiberglass  and  rock  wool.  They  are  available  in  different   widths  and  lengths.  They  are  made  in  standard  sizes  (widths)  for  inserting  in   between  studs  and  floor  joists.    They  are  available  with  or  without  vapor-­‐retarder   faces  (paper  face).  A  batt  insulation,  when  installed  in  the  ceiling  of  a   basement  with  the  insulation  exposed,  may  have  a  flame-­‐resistant  face.      

Blown-­‐In,  Loose-­‐Fill  

Blown-­‐in,  loose-­‐fill  insulation  may  be  made  of  cellulose,  fiberglass,  rock  wool  or   fiber  pellets.    The  insulation  can  be  blown  in  using  a  pump  and  hose  system.    This   type  of  insulation  can  be  blown  into  wall  cavities.  You  may  often  see  it  blown  onto   the  attic  floor.  

When  the  wall  is  being  insulated,  cellulose  and  fiberglass  can  be  blown  onto  the   wall.  The  insulation  material  is  mixed  with  an  adhesive  or  foam  to  make  the   insulation  resistant  to  settling.    

Page 53 of 170

   

 

Foam  Insulation  

Foam  insulation  can  be  installed  by  a  professional  using  special  equipment  that   meters,  mixes  and  sprays  the  foam  insulation.    Polyicynene  is  an  open-­‐cell   foam.    Polyisocyanurate  and  polyurethane  are  closed-­‐cell  foams.  In  general,  open-­‐ cell  foams  allow  water  to  move  through  the  wall  more  easily  than  closed-­‐cell  foams.  

Some  of  the  closed-­‐cell  foams  are,  therefore,  able  to  provide  a  better  R-­‐value  where   the  space  is  limited.      

Rigid  Insulation  

Rigid  insulation  is  made  from  fibrous  materials  and  plastic  foams.    They  are  made   into  boards  and  molded-­‐pipe  coverings.  Rigid  insulation  boards  may  be  faced  with   reflective  foil  that  reduces  heat  flow  when  installed  next  to  an  air  space.  You’ll  often   find  rigid  insulation  installed  up  against  foundation  walls  and  used  as  an  insulated   wall  sheathing.        

Reflective  Insulation  

Reflective  insulation  is  made  up  of  aluminum  foil  with  a  variety  of  different   backings,  including  kraft  paper,  plastic  film,  polyethylene  bubbles,  and  cardboard.  

Reflective  insulation  is  most  effective  in  reducing  downward  heat  flow.  You  often   find  them  located  between  roof  rafter  boards,  floor  joists  and  wall  studs.  If  a  single   reflective  surface  is  installed  and  it  faces  an  open  air  space,  then  it  is  called  a  radiant   barrier.  

Radiant  Barriers  

Radiant  barriers  are  intended  to  reduce  the  summer  heat  gain  and  the  winter  heat   loss.  In  new  homes,  you  may  see  foil-­‐faced  wood  components  at  the  roof  sheathing   system  installed  with  the  foil  facing  down  into  the  attic.  There  may  be  other  areas   where  the  radiant  barrier  is  integrated  into  the  building  components  and  structure   of  the  home.  For  older  homes,  a  radiant  barrier  will  typically  be  found  stapled  across   the  bottom  of  some  joists.    All  proper  radiant  barriers  should  have  a  low  emittance   of  0.1  or  less,  and  a  high  reflectance  of  0.9  or  more.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 54 of 170

   

 

The  radiant  barrier  should  not  be  laid  on  top  of  the  attic  floor  insulation,  or  on  the   attic  floor  anywhere,  because  it  will  soon  be  covered  with  dust  and  will  not  work.  

Table  of  Insulation  Types  

   

Form  

Blanket:   batts  and  

rolls  

Concrete   block  

insulation  

Foamboard or rigid

 

foam

 

Insulation  Materials  

Natural  fibers  

Fiberglass  

Mineral  (rock  or  slag)   wool  

Plastic  fibers  

Polystyrene

Polyisocyanurate

Polyurethane

 

Where  

Applicable  

Unfinished   walls,   including   foundation   walls,  and   floors  and   ceilings  

Unfinished walls, including foundation walls, floors and ceilings, non-vented low-slope roofs

Installation  

Methods  

Fitted   between   studs,  joists   and  beams  

Foam beads or liquid foam:

Polystyrene  

Polyisocyanurate  

Polyurethane  

Vermiculite  or  perlite  pellets    

Unfinished   walls,   including   foundation   walls,  for  new   construction   or  major   renovations  

Involves   masonry   skills  

Interior application must be covered with

1/2-inch gypsum or other building code- approved material for fire safety.

Advantages  

Do  it  yourself.  

Suited  for   standard  stud   and  joist   spacing,   which  is   relatively  free   from   obstructions  

Autoclaved   aerated   concrete  and   autoclaved   cellular   concrete   masonry   units  have  10   times  the   insulation   value  of   conventional   concrete.  

High insulating value for relatively little thickness

Can block thermal short circuits when installed continuously over frames

Page 55 of 170

   

 

Exterior applications must be covered with weatherproof facing.

 

or joists

Insulating   concrete  

forms  (ICFs)  

Loose-­‐fill  

Reflective  

system  

Foamboards  or  foam  block  

Cellulose  

Fiberglass  

Mineral  (rock  or  slag)  wool  

Unfinished   walls,   including   foundation   walls,  for  new   construction  

Enclosed   existing  wall   or  open  new   wall  cavities;   unfinished   attic  floors;   hard-­‐to-­‐reach   places      

 

Installed  as   part  of  the   building   structure    

   

Blown  into   place  using   special   equipment;   sometimes   poured  in  

Foil-­‐faced  kraft  paper,  plastic   film,  polyethylene  bubbles  or   cardboard  

Unfinished   walls,  ceilings   and  floors  

 

 

Foils,  film  or   papers    fitted   between   wood-­‐frame   studs,  joists   and  beams  

Insulation  is   literally  built   into  the   home's  walls,   creating  a   high  thermal   resistance.  

Good  for   adding   insulation  to   existing   finished   areas,   irregularly   shaped  areas,   and  around  

  obstructions  

Do-­‐it-­‐yourself  

All  suitable   for  framing  at   standard   spacing.  

Bubble-­‐form   suitable  if   framing  is   irregular  or  if   obstructions   are  present.  

Most  effective   at  preventing   downward   heat  flow;   however,   effectiveness   depends  on   spacing  

Page 56 of 170

   

 

Rigid   fibrous  or   fiber  

insulation  

Spray  foam   and  foamed-­‐

in-­‐place  

Structural   insulated   panels  

(SIPs)  

Mineral  (rock  or  slag)  wool  

Fiberglass  

Cementitious  

Phenolic  

Polyisocyanurate  

Polyurethane  

Foamboard  or  liquid   foam-­‐insulation  core  

Straw-­‐core  insulation  

Ducts  in   unconditioned   spaces  and   other  places   requiring   insulation  that   can  withstand   high   temperatures  

Enclosed   older  wall  or   open  new  wall   cavities,  

  unfinished   attic  floor  

HVAC   contractors   fabricate  the   insulation   into  ducts   either  at  their   shops  or  at   the  job  sites.  

Applied  using   small  spray   containers,  or   in  larger   quantities  as  a   pressure-­‐ sprayed  

(foamed-­‐in-­‐ place)   product.  

 

 

Can   withstand   high   temperatures  

Good  for   adding   insulation  to   existing   finished   areas,   irregularly   shaped  areas,   and  around   obstructions  

Unfinished   walls,  ceilings,   floors  and   roofs  for  new   construction  

Builders   connect  them   together  to   construct  a   house.  

SIP-­‐built   houses   provide   superior  and   uniform   insulation   compared  to   more   traditional   construction   methods;  they   also  take  less   time  to  build.  

 

Insulation  Labels  

The  U.S.  Federal  Trade  Commission  has  clear  rules  about  the  R-­‐value  label  that  must   be  placed  on  all  residential  insulation  products.  The  label  should  have  a  clearly   stated  R-­‐value  and  information  about  health,  safety  and  fire-­‐hazard  issues.  If  you  are   inspecting  a  house  during  construction,  you  may  request  that  the  contractor  provide   the  product  label  from  each  package.  This  can  also  tell  you  how  many  packages  were   used.  

   

Page 57 of 170

   

Where  to  Look  for  Insulation  

Areas  in  the  House  

   

This  illustration  shows  the  spaces  inside  a  home  that  should  be  insulated.    The   spaces  should  be  properly  insulated  to  the  R-­‐values  recommended.  

1.  In  unfinished  attic  spaces,  the  insulation  should  be  installed  between  and  over  the   floor  joists  to  seal  off  the  living    

       spaces  below.  

 

Page 58 of 170

   

 

1A:    attic  access  door  

2.  In  finished  attic  rooms  with  or  without  a  dormer,  the  insulation  should  be   installed:  

2A:    between  the  studs  of  knee  walls;  

2B:    between  the  studs  and  rafters  of  the  exterior  walls  and  roof;  

2C:    at  ceilings  with  cold  spaces  above;  and  

2D:    extended  into  the  joist  space  to  reduce  air  flow.  

3.  All  exterior  walls  should  have  insulation,  including:  

3A:    the  walls  between  living  spaces  and  an  unheated  garage,  shed  roofs,  and/or   storage  areas;  

3B:    the  foundation  walls  above  ground  level;  and  

3C:    the  foundation  walls  in  heated  basements,  full  wall  (either  interior  or  exterior).  

4.  Floors  above  cold  spaces,  such  as  vented  crawlspaces  and  unheated  garages,   should  have  insulation  installed,  including:  

4A:    any  portion  of  the  floor  in  a  room  that  is  cantilevered  beyond  the  exterior  wall   below;  

4B:    slab  floors  built  directly  on  the  ground;  

4C:    as  an  alternative  to  floor  insulation,  and  foundation  walls  of  non-­‐vented   crawlspaces;  and  

4D:    extended  into  the  joist  space  to  reduce  air  flow.  

5.  Insulation  should  be  installed  between  band  joists.  

6.  Additionally,  check  the  condition  of  the  storm  windows.  Caulking  and  sealing  may   be  needed  around  all  windows  and  doors.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 59 of 170

   

 

Quiz  6  

T/F:  Insulation  should  be  installed  without  compressing  it.  

True  

False  

If  the  ducts  of  the  HVAC  system  run  through  unconditioned  spaces  in  the  house,   such  as  a  crawlspace  or  an  attic,  then  the  ductwork  should  be  _______.  

• insulated   metal   shortened   dampered  

In  general,  ______-­‐cell  foams  allow  water  to  move  through  the  wall  more  easily  than  

_____-­‐cell  foams.  

• open.....  closed   closed.....  open   single.....  multi  

T/F:  Radiant  barriers  are  intended  to  reduce  the  summer  heat  gain  and  the  winter   heat  loss.  

True  

False  

Roof  Insulation  and  Ventilation  

Introduction  

Roof  system  ventilation  and  insulation  are  important  for  a  number  of  reasons,   including:  

• condensation  control;   temperature  (or  heat)  control;       energy  efficiency;  and   the  prevention  of  chronic  ice  dam  formation.  

Ventilation  of  attic  areas  is  intended  to  prevent  the  accumulation  of  moisture  vapor   in  the  attic-­‐roof  space  and  to  dry  low  levels  of  condensation  that  may  form  on  the   underside  of  a  roof  deck.  Ventilation  is  also  intended  to  reduce  the  temperature  of  

Page 60 of 170

   

  the  roof  deck  during  hot  periods  to  improve  shingle  durability.    Reducing  attic   temperature  through  ventilation  and  insulation  also  improves  energy  efficiency   during  hot  periods.  And  in  the  case  of  ice  dams,  elevated  attic  and  roof  temperatures   during  the  winter  can  cause  snow  on  the  roof  to  melt.  Insulation  and  roof  ventilation   help  to  keep  the  roof’s  exterior  surface  cold  and  minimizes  the  development  of   melted  water  and,  consequently,  ice  dams.  

Ventilating  roofs  in  hot  and  humid  conditions  may  add  -­‐-­‐  rather  than  remove  -­‐-­‐   moisture  from  attics  and  enclosed  roof  spaces.  However,  not  ventilating  a  roof  may   void  the  manufacturer’s  warranty  and  slightly  decrease  the  life  expectancy  of  the   asphalt  shingles  due  to  the  increased  temperature  of  the  roof  surface.  

In  colder  climates,  roof  ventilation  serves  to  remove  humidity  and  condensation   from  the  roof-­‐attic  space  and  helps  to  prevent  the  chronic  formation  of  ice  dams  at   eaves.  

Tile,  concrete  and  metal  roofing  materials  are  not  similarly  affected.    It  is  possible  to   have  an  unvented  attic  space,  but  such  a  choice  may  require  designing  the  attic-­‐roof   space  as  a  conditioned  space,  similar  to  that  required  when  creating  a  habitable   space  in  the  attic.  There  are  several  sources  that  provide  detailed  information  for   designing  an  unvented  attic.  Traditional  attic  ventilation  remains  a  cost-­‐effective   though  imperfect  solution  for  moisture  control.  

Unvented  Roof  Systems/Attic  Assemblies  

Spray  foam  (open-­‐  and  closed-­‐cell)  and  fiberglass  insulation  can  perform   successfully  at  unvented  roof  systems  (or  unvented  attic  assemblies)  when   airtightness  is  provided  and  humidity  is  controlled.    

There  are  many  other  important  factors  involved  when  inspecting  unvented  roof   systems,  including:  the  climate  zone;  roofing  solar  and  exposure  properties;  air   vapor  barriers;  and  interior  humidity  levels.  

Wood-­‐framed  pitched-­‐roof  systems  are  traditionally  constructed  with  fibrous   insulation  materials  installed  on  the  ceiling  plane  (attic  floor)  or  along  the  sloped   underside  of  the  roof  deck.    Proper  ventilation  is  critical  for  these  types  of  systems.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 61 of 170

   

 

For  vented  wood-­‐framed  pitched-­‐roof  systems,  the  primary  concern  is  the  potential   for  moisture  to  build  up  at  the  sloped  underside  of  the  roof  deck  during  cold   weather.    The  underside  of  the  roof  deck  is  the  condensing  plane.  

For  unvented  roof  systems,  the  condensing  plane  is  the  underside  of  the  air-­‐ impermeable  foam.  When  they’re  properly  installed,  condensation  should  not  exist   because  the  temperature  of  the  interior  face  of  the  foam  should  be  about  the  same   as  the  interior  air  temperature.  

To  control  airtightness,  an  air-­‐barrier  system  must  be  installed  in  the  roof  insulation   assembly.    An  air-­‐impermeable  layer  may  be  installed  on  the  inside  of  air-­‐permeable   insulation  (such  as  fiberglass  or  cellulose)  to  control  both  air  and  moisture   movement.  For  roofs  sealed  with  spray-­‐foam  insulation,  air  leakage  is  effectively   stopped.  Failure  will  be  likely  via  accidental  or  unintended  air  flows  at  unvented   wood-­‐framed  pitched-­‐roof  systems,  such  as  around  roof  penetrations,  including   plumbing  vents.  

Unvented  attic  assemblies  should  meet  the  following  conditions:  

The  unvented  attic  space  must  be  completely  contained  within  the  building’s   thermal  envelope.  

Interior  vapor  retarders  must  not  be  installed  on  the  ceiling  (attic  floor)  of   the  unvented  attic  assembly.  

At  wood  shingle/shake  roofs,  a  vented  air  space  of  ¼-­‐inch  should  separate   the  shingles/shakes  from  the  roofing  underlayment  above  the  roof  deck.  

Air-­‐impermeable  insulation  can  be  applied  in  direct  contact  with  the   underside  of  the  roof  deck.  For  Climate  Zones  5,  6,  7  and  8,  air-­‐impermeable   insulation  must  have  a  vapor  retarder  in  direct  contact  with  the  underside  of   the  insulation.  

As  long  as  airtightness  is  provided  and  humidity  during  the  winter  is  controlled,   unvented  roof  systems  can  perform  successfully.    

Roof  Vents,  Baffles  &  Insulation  Clearance  

Where  vents  are  installed  at  the  eaves,  the  insulation  should  not  block  the  vents  or   the  free  flow  of  air.  Where  eave  or  cornice  vents  are  installed,  insulation  must  not   block  the  free  flow  of  air.  There  should  be  a  minimum  1-­‐inch  space  provided   between  the  insulation  and  the  roof  deck  sheathing  and  at  the  location  of  the  vent.    

This  clearance  can  be  provided  by  a  rafter  vent  component,  often  referred  to  as  a   baffle.  The  ridge  vent  itself  may  have  external  baffles  and  a  weather  filter  (a  mesh   material)  integrated  into  the  vent's  design  to  help  prevent  the  entrance  of  rain  or   snow  through  the  openings  of  the  ridge  vent  component.    

Page 62 of 170

   

 

To  completely  cover  an  attic  floor  with  insulation  out  to  the  eaves,  the  installation  of   rafter  vents,  also  called  insulation  baffles,  is  needed.  Complete  coverage  of  the  attic   floor,  along  with  sealing  any  air  leaks,  will  ensure  that  the  homeowner  gets  the  best   performance  from  the  insulation.  Rafter  vents  ensure  that  the  soffit  vents  are  clear   and  there  is  a  channel  for  outside  air  to  move  into  the  attic  at  the  soffits  and  out   through  the  gable  or  ridge  vent  (see  illustration  above).  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 63 of 170

   

To  install  the  rafter  vents,  a  contractor  can  staple  them  directly  to  the  roof  decking.  

Rafter  vents  come  in  4-­‐foot  lengths  and  14-­‐1/2-­‐inch  and  22-­‐1/2-­‐inch  widths  for   different  rafter  spacings.  

When  the  rafter  vents  (or  baffles)  are  in  place  properly,  the  batts  or  blankets,  or   blown  insulation,  can  be  installed  right  out  to  the  very  edge  of  the  attic  floor.  Note:  

Blown  insulation  may  require  an  additional  set  of  rafter  vents  (or  blocking  material)   to  prevent  the  insulation  from  being  blown  into  the  soffit.  A  piece  of  rigid  foamboard   placed  on  the  outer  edge  of  the  top  plate  works  very  well  for  this  purpose.    

Ventilation  Required  

Code  requires  ventilation  to  be   provided  for  each  enclosed  attic   space  and  enclosed  rafter  space   that's  formed  where  ceilings  are   installed  at  the  bottom  of  the  roof   rafter  boards.  Each  separate  rafter   space  must  be  ventilated.    The   ventilation  openings  should  be  a   minimum  of  1/8-­‐inch  and  a   maximum  of  1/4-­‐inch  and  protected   with  corrosion-­‐resistant  wire  mesh.      

   

Roof  Ventilation  

Definitions  

 

Page 64 of 170

   

 

1:150  is  the  traditional,  standard  minimum  for  attic  ventilation.  To   determine  the  minimum  square  footage  of  vent  required,  take  the  horizontal   floor  area  of  the  attic  space  under  the  roof  and  divide  it  by  150.  

1:300:    To  determine  the  minimum  square  footage  of  ventilation  required   when  an  approved  vapor  barrier  is  installed  on  the  warm-­‐in-­‐winter  side  of   the  ceiling,  take  the  horizontal  floor  area  of  the  attic  space  under  the  roof  and   divide  it  by  300.  

The  enclosed  rafter  space  is  the  space  formed  between  the  roof-­‐deck   sheathing  (on  top  of  the  rafter  boards),  the  sides  of  the  roof-­‐framing  rafter   boards,  and  the  wallboard  or  ceiling  finish  on  the  bottom  of  the  rafter  boards.  

The  net-­‐free  ventilation  area  is  the  actual  unobstructed,  open  area  of  a  vent   with  the  louvers,  grates  or  screens  deducted  from  the  overall  ventilation   area.  

A  vapor  barrier  is  a  material  that  impedes  the  flow  of  moisture  vapor   through  the  material.  The  vapor  barrier  has  a  perm  of  1  or  less.  

Inspecting  Roof  Ventilation  in  10  Steps  

Step  1:  Measure  the  area  to  be  ventilated  in  square  feet.  

Step  2:  Determine  if  there  is  a  vapor  barrier  installed  on  the  warm-­‐in-­‐winter  side  of   the  ceiling.  

Step  3:  Check  the  location  of  the  vents.  

Step  4:  Check  the  type  of  vents.  Remember  to  inform  your  client  that  turbine  vents   and  electrically  powered  fan-­‐vents  need  to  be  inspected,  tested  and  maintained   annually.    

Step  5:  Determine  if  the  enclosed  attic  spaces  and  the  enclosed  rafter  spaces  

(formed  by  the  ceiling  finish  applied  directly  to  the  bottom  of  the  rafter  boards)   have  cross-­‐ventilation  for  each  separate  space.  Attics  and  enclosed  rafter  spaces   must  have  cross-­‐ventilation.    

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 65 of 170

   

 

Step  6:  Measure  the  net-­‐free  area  of  the  vents.  

Step  7:  Determine  whether  the  ventilation  openings  are  protected  against  rain  and   snow.  They  should  measure  a  minimum  of  1/8-­‐inch  and  a  maximum  of  1/4-­‐inch  and   be  protected  with  corrosion-­‐resistant  wire  mesh.  

Step  8:  Calculate  the  required  roof  ventilation.  If  a  vapor  barrier  is  installed,   multiply  the  area  by  1:300.  

If  no  vapor  barrier  is  installed  and  the  vents  are  installed  only  in  the  lower  portion   of  the  space  to  be  ventilated  (below  3  feet  of  the  vertical  height  of  the  space),  then   multiply  the  area  by  1:150;  OR  if  50%  to  80%  of  the  vents  are  in  the  upper  portion   of  the  space  to  be  ventilated  and  the  balance  of  the  ventilation  is  provided  by  the   eave  vents,  multiply  the  area  by  1:300.      

Step  9:  Compare  the  calculations  of  the  observed  ventilation  with  the  requirements   for  ventilation.  

Step  10:  Where  eave  or  soffit  vents  are  installed,  the  insulation  should  not  block  the   free  flow  of  air.    A  minimum  space  of  1  inch  should  be  provided  between  the   insulation  and  the  roof-­‐deck  sheathing.  Baffles  are  commonly  used  to  provide  that  

1-­‐inch  space.  

Ice  Dams  

An  ice  dam  is  caused  by  the  warming  of  an  attic  space.  And  while  attic  ventilation   and  insulation  contribute  to  the  prevention  of  ice  dams  by  keeping  attics  cold,  they   can  be  overpowered  by  other  attic-­‐warming  effects,  such  as  air  leakage  from  the   house  into  the  attic  through   ceiling  bypasses,  chases,  open   gaps  and  uninsulated  ducts   installed  in  the  attic.  

If  significant  conditioned  air   escapes  into  the  attic,  the  attic   ventilation  may  not  be   capable  of  preventing  the   warming  of  the  roof  decking   and  the  subsequent  formation   of  ice  dams.  Therefore,  sealing   air  leaks  between  the  house   and  the  vented  attic  is   essential  for  making  attic   ventilation  work.  Air  leakage   from  the  interior  into  the  attic  

Page 66 of 170

   

  also  introduces  moisture.  If  a  significant  amount  of  interior  air  leaks  into  an  attic,   the  ventilation  in  the  attic  may  not  be  sufficient  to  prevent  moisture  and   condensation  problems  there.  

Roof  Ventilation  Based  on  Climate  

Most  building  codes  require  roof  vents  to  expel  moisture  that  could  cause  insulation   or  other  building  materials  to  deteriorate  during  winter.  In  summer,  ventilation  may   reduce  the  roof  temperature  and  lengthen  its  service  life.  

Researchers  are  still  investigating  whether  attic  ventilation  is  good  for  all  climates.  

Until  the  research  results  are  available  and  accepted,  installation  practices  for  attic   ventilation  should  follow  local  code  requirements.  

A  combination  of  continuous  ridge  vents  along  the  peak  of  the  roof  and  continuous   soffit  vents  at  the  eaves  provides  the  most  effective  ventilation.  

Rule  of  Thumb  

The  rule  of  thumb  is  to  use  1  square  foot  of  net-­‐vent  opening  for  every  150  square   feet  of  insulated  ceiling,  or  1:300  if  the  insulation  has  a  vapor  diffusion  retarder.  The   vent  area  should  be  divided  equally  between  the  ridge  and  the  soffits.  

Attic  spaces  and  roof  cavities  should  be  ventilated  in  accordance  with  minimum   local  building  code  requirements,  as  represented  in  the  following  table.  

Minimum  Roof  Ventilation  Requirements    

Applicability  Requirements  

Vertical  separation  of  inlet  and  outlet  vents  is  less  than  3  feet  

Ventilation  

Amount a

 

1:150  

Vertical  separation  of  inlet  and  outlet  vents  is  at  least  3  feet  with   balanced  inlet  and  outlet  vent  areas b

 or  a  vapor  diffusion  retarder  is   installed  on  the  warm-­‐in-­‐winter  side  of  the  ceiling  

1:300   a.  Values  are  given  as  a  ratio  of  total  net  (unobstructed)  open  area  of  inlet  plus  outlet   vents  to  total  horizontal  projected  area  of  the  ventilated  space.  Therefore,  vent  size   must  be  increased  in  to  account  for  the  obstructed  vent  area  due  to  louvers  and   screens.   b.  Inlet  and  outlet  vent  areas  shall  be  considered  balanced  provided  that  at  least  50%   and  not  more  than  80%  of  the  required  ventilating  area  is  provided  by  ventilators   located  in  the  upper  portion  of  the  space  to  be  ventilated.  

     

Page 67 of 170

   

For  enhanced  protection  against  the  formation  of  ice  dams,  the  table  provides   recommended  insulation  levels  and  vent-­‐area  ratios  as  a  function  of  the  venting   layout.  These  recommendations  should  be  found  in  areas  with  a  ground  snow  load   greater  than  30  pounds  per  square  foot  (psf),  and  in  other  areas  where  ice  dams  are   a  concern.  The  ventilation  recommendations  in  the  table  can  be  used  in  addition  to   eave  ice-­‐dam  flashing  to  create  multiple  lines  of  defense.  Also,  the  arrangement  of   vent  areas  must  balance  the  high  (outlet)  with  the  low  (inlet)  vent  openings.  

Cap  vents  and  gable  vents  can  supplement  a  roof  design  that  has  an  insufficient   ridge-­‐vent  area.  Turbine  vents  can  also  be  used,  but  they  need  annual  inspection  and   maintenance.  Electrically  powered  roof  fans  are  not  ideal  because  they  typically  use   more  energy  than  they  save.  

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 68 of 170

   

 

Powered  roof  fans  can  also  cause  other  problems,  such  as:  

• sucking  conditioned  air  from  the  house's  interior  through  leakage  pathways   in  the  ceiling;   pulling  airborne  pollutants  from  the  crawlspace  into  the  house's  interior;  and   causing  exhaust  gases  from  fireplaces  and  combustion  appliances  to  enter   the  home.  

Roof  Height  at  the  Eaves  

A  common  problem  with  many  roof  designs  can  be  found  at  the  eaves.    There  is   often  very  little  space  for  insulation  of  the  required  thickness  to  be  installed  at  the   eaves  without  blocking  the  soffit  vents.  Often,  the  insulation  is  compressed  in  that   area  in  order  to  fit  into  the  tight  space,  which  diminishes  its  R-­‐value.  

To  correct  that  situation,  some  builders  install  a  truss  roof  with  a  raised  heel  or   oversized  cantilever.  This  type  of  truss  has  an  elevated  overhang  that  uses  a   combination  of  soffit  and  eave  vents,  with  baffles  and  soffit  dams  installed  at  the   eaves.  This  type  of  truss  provides  plenty  of  room  for  insulation  at  the  wall-­‐to-­‐roof   intersection,  as  well  as  additional  window  shading.    

In  stick-­‐built  roofs,  some  builders  install  an  additional  top  plate  across  the  top  of  the   ceiling  joists  at  the  eave  to  raise  the  roof  height.  This  additional  top  plate  raises  the   roof  height,  prevents  compression  of  the  insulation,  and  allows  room  for   ventilation.      

Quiz  7  

T/F:  Ventilation  of  attic  areas  is  intended  to  prevent  the  accumulation  of  moisture   vapor  in  the  attic-­‐roof  space  and  to  dry  low  levels  of  condensation  that  may  form  on   the  underside  of  a  roof  deck.  

True  

False  

There  should  be  a  minimum  space  of  ____  provided  between  the  insulation  and  the   roof  deck  sheathing  and  at  the  location  of  the  vent.  

1  inch  

1-­‐1/2  inches  

2  inches  

1/2-­‐inch  

Page 69 of 170

   

 

T/F:  A  combination  of  continuous  ridge  vents  along  the  peak  of  the  roof  and   continuous  soffit  vents  at  the  eaves  provides  the  most  effective  ventilation.  

True  

False  

The  rule  of  thumb  to  remember  is  to  use  1  square  foot  of  net-­‐vent  opening  for  every  

_____  square  feet  of  insulated  ceiling,  or  1:____  if  the  insulation  has  a  vapor  diffusion   retarder.  

150.....  300  

300.....  150  

150.....  250  

350.....  100  

T/F:  Electrically  powered  roof  fans  are  not  ideal  because  they  typically  use  more   energy  than  they  save.  

True  

False  

T/F:  Powered  roof  fans  can  cause  problems,  such  as  sucking  conditioned  air  from   the  house's  interior  through  leakage  pathways  in  the  ceiling.  

True  

False  

A  common  problem  inspectors  will  see  is  insulation  compressed  into  the  eaves  area   that  was  done  in  order  to  fit  it  into  the  tight  space,  which  ______  its  R-­‐value.  

• diminishes   increases   has  little  to  do  with   doubles  

Basement  Wall  Insulating  and  

Finishing  

Finished  Basement  Walls  

Finished  basement  walls  are  exposed  to  many  different  things  that  come  from  all   directions.  The  finished  basement  wall  is  exposed  to  different  temperatures,   moisture  levels,  water  vapor  movement,  heat,  cold,  cool  concrete,  warm  interior  air,  

Page 70 of 170

   

  etc.    And  they  all  relate  to  the  biggest  concern  with  basement  finished   walls:    moisture  -­‐-­‐  specifically,  exterior  moisture.  

This  section  focuses  on  the  use  of  insulation,  vapor  diffusion  retarders,  and  air   leakage-­‐sealing  practices  that  are  used  to  construct  finished  basement  areas.  

Understanding  these  building  practices  will  improve  your  inspection  skills.  

The  approaches  for  insulating  and  finishing  basement  spaces  vary,  depending  on   whether  you’re  dealing  with  new  or  existing  construction,  and  whether  a  basement   is  being  only  insulated  but  not  finished.  

You  may  find  foam  insulation  installed  as  the  interior  basement  insulation.    It  offers   good  moisture  performance,  but  it  also  requires  being  covered  with  a  fire-­‐resistant   material,  such  as  drywall  gypsum.    Foam  is  good  for  insulating  a  finished  basement.  

A  finished  basement  that  is  high-­‐quality  usually  has  some  type  of  exterior   waterproofing,  relative-­‐humidity  control  in  the  basement,  and  air  sealing.  A  dry   basement  is  less  likely  to  have  problems  with  wood-­‐destroying  organisms.    Once  the   exterior  grading  and  groundwater  factors  have  been  addressed,  the  basement   should  remain  dry  and  protected  by  properly  installed  wall  assemblies.  

The  basement's  finished  walls  need  to  be  insulated  to  minimize  cold  surfaces.  Cold   surfaces,  such  as  on  the  foundation  wall,  can  create  water  condensation  and  raise   the  humidity  level  in  the  basement.  The  concrete  foundation  walls  are  below  grade   and  are,  therefore,  relatively  cool  to  the  touch,  especially  if  the  finished  walls  are   insulated.  If  the  basement  air,  which  tends  to  be  warm  and  humid  (particularly  in   the  summertime),  passes  through  the  finished  walls  and  comes  in  contact  with  the   cool  foundation  walls,  condensation  may  form  and  cause  moisture  problems,   including  damage  and  mold  growth.  The  rim/band  joist  area,  which  is  the  area   directly  above  the  foundation  walls,  is  of  particular  concern  because  that  area  tends   to  stay  relatively  cool  all  the  time.  

A  finished  basement  should  be  insulated  around  the  perimeter  of  the  basement's   exterior  walls.    And  the  basement  ceiling  should  not  be  insulated.    There  should  not   be  any  insulation  in  between  the  finished  basement  space  (the  conditioned  space)   and  the  floor  above.  The  finished  basement  walls  should  not  be  insulated  with  a  type   of  insulation  that  is  sensitive  to  water.  It  should  be  an  insulation  that  is  relatively   water-­‐resistant.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 71 of 170

   

 

This  technique,  as  well  as  traditional  basement  finish  practices,  is  not  intended  to   compensate  for  inadequate  waterproofing,  foundation  drainage,  indoor  relative-­‐ humidity  control,  or  air-­‐leakage  control.  If  there  are  problems  with  water  intrusion,   drainage,  humidity  or  air  leakage,  then  the  method  of  insulating  the  basement   foundation  wall  will  not  matter.  

Exterior  Foundation  Insulation  

Home  inspectors  work  in  both  new   and  existing  construction,  but  this   section  primarily  addresses   interior  insulation  systems  in   basements  in  existing  homes.  

Exterior  insulation  that  uses  foam   insulation  panels  on  the  outside  of   the  foundation  wall  is  commonly   installed  for  new  construction  and   is  difficult  to  evaluate  on  existing   homes.    This  exterior  insulation  

(foam  panels  on  the  outside  of  the   foundation)  provides  a  moisture-­‐ tolerant  insulation  layer  on  the   outside  of  the  foundation  wall.  

This  insulation  layer  moderates   the  temperature  of  the  inside  wall   surface,  and  can  also  be  integrated   with  exterior  water-­‐  or  damp-­‐ proofing.    If  this  type  of  insulation   is  installed,  it  requires  shifting  the   house  structure  outward  such  that   the  sill  plate  overlaps  the  upper   edge  of  the  foundation  insulation,   protecting  exterior  insulation   during  construction,  and  providing   long-­‐term  protection  for  the   exposed  insulation.  If  there  is  foam   insulation  installed  on  the  outside   of  the  exterior  foundation,  look  for   building  practices  that  overlap  and   protect  the  insulation.  

This  illustration  shows  a  concrete   foundation  wall  with  exterior  

insulation.  Enlarge  this  illustration.    

Page 72 of 170

   

 

The  above-­‐grade  wood  frame  wall  is  constructed  of  2x6s  that  overhang  the   foundation  wall.  The  overhang  can  be  up  to  2  inches.  Additional  rigid  insulation  can   be  added  that  extends  over  the  entire  wall  assembly.      

Basement  Walls  Dry  to  the  Interior  

Some  common  practices  for  insulating  a  basement  on  the  interior-­‐side  of  the   foundation  wall  are  illustrated.  The  concept  is  relatively  new  to  residential   construction  as  a  best  practice.  Therefore,  this  strategy  is  included  here  primarily   for  your  consideration.  

Traditional  practices,  such  as  the  use  of  a  warm-­‐in-­‐winter  vapor  diffusion  retarder   on  the  inside  of  the  finish  wall  system,  have  resulted  in  moisture  problems.    A   basement  foundation  wall  assembly  that  dries  toward  the  interior  is  the  best  and   most  desirable.    

The  insulation  to  use  when  finishing  a  basement  is  a  rigid  foam  insulation  board.  

That  type  of  insulation  will  allow  the  foundation  wall  assembly  to  dry  inward,  away   from  the  foundation  wall  and  toward  the  interior  of  the  finished  basement   space.    The  foam  insulation  should  be  vapor-­‐permeable  (greater  than  1  perm).  The   greater  the  perm,  the  easier  for  the  wall  to  dry  inward.  

Because  the  foam  insulation  needs  to  be  continuous  and  sealed  at  the  seams,  the   insulation  should  be  installed  behind  the  wood-­‐framed  wall.    Additional  insulation   can  be  installed  in  the  spaces  between  the  studs.  

No  Interior  Vapor  Barrier  

Low  permeability  and  continuous  vapor  diffusion  retarders  (such  as  polyethylene   sheeting  and  vinyl  wallpaper)  on  the  interior  side  of  basement  finishes  should  be   avoided  because  they  will  trap  moisture  vapor  moving  through  the  foundation   wall.    They  also  slow  the  drying  process  for  newly  formed  foundations.  

The  most  important  point  to  remember  is  that  there  should  not  be  an  interior  vapor   barrier  installed.  This  would  not  permit  inward  drying.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 73 of 170

   

Unfaced  fiberglass  batt  insulation  and  permeable  paint  finishes  on  gypsum   wallboard  can  be  installed  on  basement  finished  wall  assemblies.  

There  are  proprietary  basement  finish  systems  that  use  products  such  as  rigid   fiberglass  insulating  boards  that  have  performed  well  in  testing  and  use.  

Finding  Foam  Insulation  

Finding  Semi-­‐Permeable  Rigid  Foam  

Insulation  Between  the  Foundation  Wall  and  Finish  

Wall  Assembly  

The  use  of  rigid  foam  creates  a  buffer  of  moisture-­‐resistant  material  between  the   finish  wall  materials  and  the  basement  foundation  wall.  Because  below-­‐grade   portions  of  the  foundation  wall  must  be  able  to  dry  to  the  interior,  semi-­‐permeable,   rigid  foam-­‐insulating  sheathing  products  (such  as  EPS  or  XPS)  should  be  used.  Since  

 

Page 74 of 170

   

  their  permeability  levels  vary  by  manufacturer,  the  product  specifications  of  the   perm  rating  for  the  required  thickness  should  be  greater  than  1  perm.  Joints  in  the   foam  sheathings  should  be  taped  and  sealed.  If  additional  insulation  is  required  or   desired,  a  frame  wall  may  be  built  and  cavity  insulation  installed,  as  shown  in  the   illustration  below.    

Foam  is  a  Fire  Hazard  

Semi-­‐permeable  rigid  foam  insulation  on  the  inside  of  basement  foundation  walls  is   often  found  during  an  inspection  of  the  foundation  of  a  house.    Its  use  is  a  good   strategy  for  a  moisture-­‐resistant  finished  basement.  However,  fire  and  smoke   characteristics  of  this  type  of  insulation  require  that  it  be  covered  with  a  fire-­‐ resistant  layer,  such  as  gypsum  wallboard  (drywall).    This  works  fine  when  the   basement  is  being  finished.  

If  a  basement  will  only  be  insulated  and  not  finished,  a  fire-­‐rated  foam  panel  or   similar  fire-­‐rated  covering  needs  to  be  used.  Because  the  above-­‐grade  portions  of   the  basement  wall  can  dry  to  the  outside,  fire-­‐rated  insulation  on  these  surfaces  may   be  of  an  impermeable  type.    For  example,  it  can  have  a  foil  facing.    But  insulating   approaches  that  restrict  the  drying  potential  of  below-­‐grade  portions  of  the   foundation  wall  toward  the  inside  should  be  avoided.      

Look  for  Holes  

Humid  air  at  the  basement's  interior  should  be  prevented  from  leaking  into  the   finished  basement  wall  assembly  and,  subsequently,  condensing.  The  interior  side  of   the  wall  assembly  should  not  have  large  holes  in  it.    The  wall  should  be  sealed  to   prevent  air  leakage.  The  ideal  approach  uses  the  gypsum  wallboard  as  an  air  barrier   and  requires  sealing  any  penetrations  through  and  leaks  around  the  panels.  Air   sealing  of  ceiling  penetrations  in  the  basement  should  also  be  addressed.  Also,  joints   in  the  foam  insulation  should  be  taped  and  sealed.  Look  for  holes  that  allow  air   leakage  into  the  wall.      

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 75 of 170

   

 

Moisture  at  the  Bottom  

Gypsum  wallboard,  wood  trim  and  wood  framing  will  wick  moisture  from  the   basement  concrete  slab.  The  concrete  slab  will  tend  to  cool  materials  that  are  in   contact  with  it,  creating  higher  surface-­‐humidity  levels  that  may  support  mold   growth.  Therefore,  finishes  and  baseboard  trim  should  be  held  up  about  1/2-­‐inch   from  the  slab  surface.  This  gap  could  be  sealed  with  caulk  or  sealant  to  prevent  air   leakage  from  indoors  into  the  wall  assembly.  In  addition,  a  thin  foam  plastic  sill   sealer  may  be  used  underneath  the  finished  wall's  bottom  plate  for  added  moisture   protection.    During  an  inspection  of  a  basement,  check  the  bottom  of  the  finished   wall  for  moisture.      

Quiz  8  

The  basement  concrete  slab  will  tend  to  _____  materials  that  are  in  contact  with  it,   creating  higher  surface-­‐humidity  levels  that  may  support  mold  growth  

• cool   dry  out   burn   warm  

T/F:  Humid  air  in  the  basement's  interior  should  be  prevented  from  leaking  into  the   finished  basement  wall  assembly  and,  subsequently,  condensing.  

 

True  

False  

T/F:  Fire  and  smoke  characteristics  of  rigid-­‐foam  insulation  board  require  that  it  be   covered  with  a  fire-­‐resistant  layer,  such  as  gypsum  wallboard.  

True  

False  

T/F:  Low  permeability  and  continuous  vapor  diffusion  retarders  (such  as   polyethylene  sheeting  and  vinyl  wallpaper)  on  the  interior  side  of  basement  finishes   should  be  avoided  because  they  tend  to  trap  moisture  vapor  moving  through  the   foundation  wall.  

True  

False  

Page 76 of 170

   

 

Slab-­‐on-­‐Grade  Foundation  &  Insulation  

Insulation,  Moisture  and  Slab  on  Grade  

It's  important  to  know  something  about  insulation,  moisture  and  slab-­‐on-­‐grade  

(thickened  edge  and  monolithic  slab)  foundation  construction.  Given  their   similarity,  concrete  and  masonry  stem-­‐wall  foundations  with  an  independent  above-­‐ grade  slab  floor  are  covered  in  this  section.  

Moisture-­‐resistant  installations  are  illustrated.  They  are  relatively  simple  in   comparison  to  the  requirements  for  basement  construction;  however,  many  of  the   same  principles  apply.  

Appropriate  moisture-­‐resistant  site  design  and  foundation  installation  should  be   checked  during  an  inspection.    In  mixed  and  cold  climates,  careful  attention  should   be  given  to  the  slab  edge  and  foundation's  perimeter  insulation  to  avoid  thermal   bridges,  which  can  cause  cold  slab  surfaces  and  condensation.  

A  typical  home  inspection  will  not  necessarily  go  into  great  detail  about  site  design   and  the  builder’s  methods  and  practices  in  relation  to  moisture-­‐resistant   foundations.    However,  a  good  understanding  of  the  best  practices  for  moisture-­‐ resistant  construction  will  greatly  improve  the  inspector’s  ability  to  discover  and   evaluate  moisture  problems.  

Slab  on  Mound  

The  elevation  of  a  slab-­‐on-­‐grade  foundation  (thickened-­‐edge  slab,  and  independent   slab  and  stem-­‐wall  foundation)  should  be  a  minimum  of  8  inches  above  the  exterior   finish  grade.  In  areas  with  heavy  rainfall,  a  clearance  of  greater  than  8  inches  or   some  other  rain-­‐control  measures  may  be  installed,  such  as  back-­‐vented  cladding,   and  an  ice  and  water  shield  18  inches  up  the  wall.  

During  new  construction,  the  foundation  elevation  needed  to  achieve  this  8-­‐inch   clearance  must  be  coordinated  with  site  plans  and  the  exterior  grading  around  the    

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 77 of 170

   

house  perimeter.  In  particular,  the  topsoil  must  be  removed  and  the  foundation  pad   must  be  built  up  with  suitable  (compactible)  structural  fill  material  as  needed  to   achieve  that  8-­‐inch  clearance.  Fills  of  more  than  12  inches  thick  are  generally   required  to  be  engineered.  As  a  simple  test,  the  slab-­‐foundation  pad  should  be  able   to  support  a  loaded  dump  truck  with  minimal  depression  from  the  wheel  load  of  

1/2-­‐inch  or  less.  

With  a  properly  mounded  slab  and  functional  site  grading,  surface  water  should   drain  away  and  minimize  the  moisture  load  around  and  beneath  the  slab.  

Vapor  Retarder  and  Capillary  Break  

A  vapor  diffusion  retarder  of  6-­‐mil  poly  or  other  approved  vapor  diffusion  retarder   is  generally  required  by  standards  below  any  slab  intended  as  a  floor  for  habitable   space.    The  joints  should  be  lapped  not  less  than  6  inches.    It  should  be  placed  in   direct  contact  with  the  underside  of  the  concrete  slab.  The  vapor  diffusion  retarder   will  prevent  moisture  vapor  from  adding  to  the  building's  interior  moisture  load,   and  also  serve  as  a  break  to  the  capillary  movement  of  moisture.  

A  capillary  break  layer  -­‐-­‐  generally,  4  inches  of  clean,  graded  sand,  gravel,  crushed   stone  or  crushed  blast-­‐furnace  slag  -­‐-­‐  further  prevents  bulk-­‐soil  moisture  from  

 

Page 78 of 170

   

  wicking  up  to  the  bottom  of  the  slab.  

Sometimes,  a  sand  layer  is  installed  on  top  of  the  vapor  diffusion  retarder,  which  is   an  incorrect  installation  and  will  create  problems.  

Building  codes  typically  require  a  capillary  layer  directly  below  the  slab,  and  this   should  be  provided  under  the  vapor  diffusion  retarder  so  that  water  cannot  be   trapped  in  a  gravel  layer  between  the  vapor  diffusion  retarder  and  the  slab.  The   vapor  diffusion  retarder  will  help  to  cure  the  concrete  properly  by  preventing   exposure  to  excessive  drying  conditions  if  it  is  properly  damp-­‐cured  on  the  top   surface,  and  if  excessive  water  is  not  added  in  the  concrete  mix  to  begin  with.  

Cracks  in  the  Concrete  Floor  

Concrete  will  crack  as  a  normal  outcome  of  the  curing  process.  Cracking  can  be   worsened  if  uneven  bearing  conditions  exist  under  the  slab,  such  as  un-­‐compacted   fill  areas.  

Excessive  water  used  for  the  workability  of  cement  tends  to  produce  excessive   cracking,  which  can  allow  moisture  to  more  readily  penetrate  the  concrete  slab,   weakening  the  concrete,  and  leading  to  differential  drying  issues  and  cracking.  

Excessive  cracking  can  allow  additional  moisture,  as  well  as  radon  gas,  to  penetrate   more  easily  through  the  slab.  

The  use  of  welded  wire-­‐fabric  reinforcement  provides  a  means  of  controlling  the   severity  of  cracking.  The  use  of  fiber-­‐reinforced  concrete  may  also  provide  adequate   crack  control.    

Concrete  control  joints  may  also  be  used  to  control  random  cracking  by  creating   planned  lines  of  weakness  in  the  slab.  Shrinkage  or  curing  cracks  generally  occur  in   any  continuous  length  of  concrete  longer  than  about  12  feet.  

Rebar  Reduces  Cracking  

As  with  basement  foundations  and  footings,  the  local  building  code  does  not  always   require  horizontal  reinforcement  of  the  thickened-­‐edge  footing  of  a  monolithic  slab    

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 79 of 170

   

on  grade.  The  same  applies  to  stem-­‐wall  and  independent-­‐slab  construction.  

Some  building  practices  may  incorporate  a  minimum  of  a  continuous  #5  rebar   located  horizontally  at  the  top  and  bottom  of  the  thickened  edge  of  a  monolithic  slab   or  stem  wall.  This  allows  the  thickened  slab  edge  (footing)  to  act  as  a  moderately   reinforced  grade  beam  to  reduce  cracking  from  differential  settlement.  Concrete  and   masonry  stem  walls  may  be  reinforced  with  horizontal  reinforcement  bars  in  a   manner  similar  to  that  recommended  for  basement  walls.  For  difficult  site  soil   conditions  (e.g.,  expansive  or  weak  soils),  other  types  of  concrete-­‐slab  foundations   may  be  more  appropriate,  such  as  mat  foundations  and  post-­‐tensioned  slabs.      

   

Insulation  at  the  Slab  

 

Building  codes  allow  foundation  insulation  to  be  placed  in  various  locations  at  the   perimeter  of  a  slab-­‐on-­‐grade  foundation.    

The  best  location  for  insulation  in  slab-­‐on-­‐grade  foundations  is  on  the  vertical   outside  face  of  the  foundation.  

In  this  location,  thermal  bridges  are  minimized,  energy  efficiency  is  maximized,  and   slab  surface  temperatures  are  moderated  to  prevent  the  risk  of  condensation  during   cold  weather.  If  slab-­‐on-­‐grade  insulation  is  placed  in  a  different  location  (e.g.,  on  the   inside  face  of  the  perimeter  foundation  wall),  then  there  should  be  a  continuous   thermal  break  between  the  indoor  portions  of  the  slab  and  the  exterior.  

Page 80 of 170

   

 

When  used,  exterior  foundation  insulation  must  be  protected  from  the  elements  at   additional  expense.  One  way  a  builder  could  reduce  costs  while  installing  exterior-­‐ slab  perimeter  insulation  is  to  use  a  frost-­‐protected  shallow  foundation  (FPSF).  

These  foundations  are  found  in  northern  regions.    They  are  most  cost-­‐effective  in   climates  where  required  frost  depths  are  substantially  greater  than  12  inches  and   foundation  insulation  requirements  are  more  stringent.  

FPSF  and  Insulation  

Frost-­‐protected  shallow  foundation  (FPSF)  systems  offer  a  design  option  that  allows   for  shallower  footing  depths  by  raising  the  frost  depth  around  the  building  through   the  use  of  insulation.  

FPSF  systems  offer  many  advantages  for   slab-­‐on-­‐grade  construction  in  cold   climates,  including:  

• reduced  construction  costs;   increased  energy  efficiency;   improved  slab  comfort;  and     increased  slab  temperatures  to   prevent  condensation.  

Ideally,  heated  slab  systems  may  be   used  with  insulation  amounts  increased   above  that  minimally  required  for  

FPSFs.    

 

Slab  Finishes  and  Insulation  

Like  basement  wall  finishes,  finishes  on   concrete  floors  of  slabs  on  grade  are  exposed   to  a  unique  environment  due  to  direct  ground   contact.  This  section  of  the  course  teaches  the   inspector  what  to  look  for  when  inspecting  a   moisture-­‐resistant  floor  finish  on  a  concrete   slab  on  grade.  

Slab  with  Moisture-­‐

Resistant  Finishes  

From  a  moisture  perspective,  tile,  terrazzo,  stained  decorative  concrete,  and  other   moisture-­‐resistant  finishes  are  ideal  for  slab-­‐on-­‐grade  construction.  These  materials   are  resistant  to  flooding  and  other  sources  of  moisture  damage,  and  are  typical  in  

Page 81 of 170

   

southern  (hot-­‐humid)  climates.  In  such  cases,  the  primary  concerns  are  limiting   indoor  humidity,  providing  a  sub-­‐slab  vapor  diffusion  retarder  directly  below  the   concrete  slab  (such  as  6-­‐mil  polyethylene),  and  providing  a  capillary  break  (such  as   a  3-­‐  to  4-­‐inch-­‐thick  clean  gravel  layer).  

   

 

 

Slab  with  Moisture-­‐Sensitive  Finishes  

Carpet  and  wood-­‐based  floor  finishes  should  not  be  applied  directly  to  slabs  on   grade  unless  the  slab  or  finish  surface  temperature  is  raised  near  room   temperature.    Moderated  floor  temperatures  that  can  accommodate  moisture-­‐ sensitive  finishes  can  be  achieved  with  sub-­‐slab  or  slab-­‐surface  insulation,  as  well  as   perimeter  insulation,  to  prevent  thermal  short  circuits  in  the  slab.  Where  slab   temperatures  are  chilled  by  cold  exterior  winter  conditions,  or  cooled  by  ground   temperatures  during  the  spring  and  summer,  surface  condensation  or  high  humidity   may  result  in  mold  growth  or  condensation  damage.  

Missing  Slab  Insulation  

Slabs  that  do  not  have  a  moisture  vapor  diffusion  retarder  underneath  are  often  not   suitable  for  finished  flooring  in  living  spaces.  This  can  be  the  case  in  both  slab-­‐on-­‐

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 82 of 170

   

grade  foundations  and  for  basement  slabs.  Newer-­‐model  building  codes  require  a   moisture  vapor  diffusion  retarder  (such  as  6-­‐mil  poly)  underneath  slab-­‐on-­‐grade   floors  serving  living  spaces.  Very  old  (80+  years)  and  historic  homes  typically  have   basement  concrete  floors  with  no  moisture  vapor  diffusion  retarder  installed.    In  the   event  that  this  requirement  is  not  met  in  an  existing  slab  on  grade  or  basement  slab,   water  vapor  may  be  controlled  from  the  top  of  the  slab  surface.  

Signs  of  Moisture  Problems  

If  a  slab  shows  signs  of  a  pre-­‐existing  moisture  problem,  such  as  dampness  or   condensation,  salt  deposition,  or  standing  water,  that  issue  should  be  addressed   before  moving  ahead  with  finish  flooring.  Once  any  pre-­‐existing  moisture  issues  

  with  the  slab  are  addressed,  a  floor  finish  assembly  that  can  accommodate  a  small   amount  of  upward  moisture  flow  can  be  installed.  One  viable  approach  involves  the   use  of  a  rigid,  semi-­‐permeable  (>1  perm)  insulating  sheathing,  such  as  extruded   polystyrene,  on  top  of  the  slab,  with  12-­‐  to  16-­‐inch  on-­‐center  furring  above  the   foam,  followed  by  a  layer  of  T&G  plywood  for  the  subfloor.    

The  finish  flooring  above  the  plywood  should  be  of  a  breathable  finish,  and   impermeable  materials,  such  as  vinyl  flooring,  should  be  avoided.  With  this  type  of   assembly  installed,  a  relatively  dry  slab  without  a  sub-­‐slab  layer  of  poly  can  be   finished  and  designed  to  accommodate  a  limited  amount  of  moisture,  which  dries   upward.  

Page 83 of 170

   

 

Crawlspaces,  Insulation  and  Moisture  

Inspection  Tips  

The  primary  causes  of   moisture  problems  in   crawlspaces  include  poor  site   drainage,  lack  of  a  ground   vapor  diffusion  retarder,   improperly  installed   insulation,  and  crawlspace   ventilation  during  humid   summer  conditions.  

Crawlspace  moisture  damage   and  mold  formation  can  be  caused  by  any  one  of  these  issues.  Therefore,  these   issues  should  be  checked  during  an  inspection.  

Crawlspace  construction  should  ideally  result  in  an  interior  crawlspace  floor-­‐ ground  surface  that  is  at  or  above  the  exterior  finish  grade.  This  is  not  often  the  case.  

Extra  attention  should  be  paid  to  foundation  drainage  for  crawlspaces  below  the   exterior  finish  grade.  Also,  venting  crawlspaces  in  humid  conditions  can  result  in   condensation  of  warm,  moist  air  on  cool  surfaces  in  the  crawlspace,  including   ductwork,  and  the  underside  of  floor  framing.  In  very  humid  conditions,  this  can   lead  to  water  accumulation,  wet  insulation,  material  degradation,  and  mold.      

Floor  and  Walls  

Crawlspace  Floor  May  Be  a  Mud  Slab  

Groundcover  material,  such  as  a  thick  layer  of  plastic,  laid  on  a  crawlspace  floor  can   become  damaged  or  disturbed  over  time,  resulting  in  loss  of  effectiveness.    In   addition,  it's  difficult  to  drain  a  crawlspace's  groundcover  that  may  become   occasionally  wet  on  top,  such  as  from  a  plumbing  leak.  To  correct  that  condition,  a   mud  slab  (such  as  a  2-­‐inch-­‐thick  concrete  slab)  may  be  placed  on  top  of  the    

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 84 of 170

   

groundcover  and  slightly  sloped  to  drain  to  a  sump  pit.  The  concrete  floor  that  you   see  inside  a  crawlspace  may  be  a  mud  slab.  

Crawlspace  Floor  Covered  with  Plastic  

All  exposed  ground  areas  in  crawlspaces  should  be  covered  with  a  minimum  6-­‐mil   layer  of  polyethylene  sheeting.  The  edges  of  this  sheeting  should  be  overlapped  at   least  6  inches.  The  polyethylene  should  then  be  sealed  with  tape  or  adhesive  at  all   overlaps,  and  to  walls  and  to  all  penetrations  in  the  sheeting.  This  is  a  simple   measure  that  helps  control  ground  moisture  effectively.    If  the  groundcover  initially   installed  is  damaged  during  the  construction  process,  an  additional  layer  should  be   added,  or  damaged  sections  should  be  patched  and  sealed.  

Crawlspace  Wall  Is  Damp-­‐Proofed  

If  the  crawlspace's  elevation  is  below  the  exterior  finish  grade,  foundation  drainage   and  foundation  wall  damp-­‐proofing  using  a  bituminous  coating  on  the  below-­‐grade   exterior  face  of  the  crawlspace  foundation  wall  should  be  installed  in  a  fashion   similar  to  that  required  for  basements.  

Vented  and  Non-­‐Vented  

 

Page 85 of 170

   

 

There  are  essentially  two  choices  for  ventilation  of  crawlspaces.  The  first  follows   conventional  ventilation  practices,  and  the  second  follows  a  non-­‐vented  crawlspace   design  strategy.  

Vented  

The  under-­‐floor  space  between  the  bottom  of  the  floor  joists  and  the  earth  under   any  building,  except  for  a  basement,  should  have  ventilation  openings  that  allow  air   to  pass  through  the  exterior  foundation  walls.    The  ventilation  openings  should  be  at   least  1  square  foot  for  each  150  square  feet  of  under-­‐floor  space  area,  unless  the   earth/ground  surface  is  covered  by  a  vapor  retarder.  One  such  ventilation  opening   must  be  installed  in  each  corner  of  the  space.  

Class  I  Vapor  Retarder  

When  a  vapor  retarder  is  installed  and  covers  the  earth/ground  surface  of  the   crawlspace,  the  minimum  net  area  of  the  openings  should  be  at  least  1  square  foot   for  each  1,500  square  feet  of  under-­‐floor  space  area.    The  ventilation  openings  

(previously  mentioned)  can  be  reduced  from  1:150  to  1:1,500  where  the   earth/ground  surface  is  covered  by  a  Class  I  vapor  retarder  and  the  ventilation   openings  are  installed.  

As  a  best  practice,  exposed  earth  (dirt)  on  the  crawlspace  floor  should  always  be   covered  by  a  vapor  retarder.  Joints  of  the  vapor  retarder  should  overlap  6  inches   and  should  be  sealed  or  taped.    The  edges  should  extend  at  least  6  inches  up  the  wall   and  should  be  secured  and  sealed  to  the  wall.  

Vapor  Retarder  Class  

 

A  vapor  retarder  class  is  a  measure  of  a  material's  ability  to  limit  the  amount  of   moisture  that  passes  through  it.    It  is  established  by  the  manufacturer's  testing  of   the  material.    The  vapor  retarder  in  the  crawlspace  should  be  a  Class  I  material  with   a  permeance  rating  of  0.1  perm  or  less.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 86 of 170

   

 

Class  I:  0.1  perm  or  less  (sheet  polyethylene,  non-­‐perforated  aluminum  foil)  

Class  II:  0.1  <  perm  ≤  1.0  perm  (kraft-­‐faced  fiberglass  batts)  

Class  III:  1.0  <  perm  ≤  10.0  perm  (latex  or  enamel  paint)  

Under-­‐Floor  Ventilation  Openings  

For  under-­‐floor  spaces,  one  ventilation  opening  must  be  installed  within  3  feet  of   each  corner  of  the  building.  The  installation  of  a  covering  material  over  the  open   vents  keeps  rodents  and  other  intruders  from  entering  the  crawlspace.  A  variety  of   materials  can  be  installed.  Openings  can  be  covered  with  the  following  materials,   provided  that  the  smallest  dimension  is  not  greater  than  1/4-­‐inch  (6.4  mm):  

• perforated  sheet  metal  plates;   expanded  sheet  metal  plates;   cast-­‐iron  grates;   load-­‐bearing  brick  vents;   hardware  wire  cloth;  or   corrosion-­‐resistant  wire  mesh.  

Check  Local  Standards  

The  inspector  should  refer  to  the  locally  applicable  building  code  or  standard  before   making  evaluations  regarding  defective  installations.  

Non-­‐Vented  (Unvented)  Crawlspace  

As  a  second  option,  there  is  mounting  evidence,  as  well  as  recent  recognition  of   model  building  codes,  that  non-­‐vented  crawlspaces  are  an  acceptable  method  of   crawlspace  foundation  construction.  The  method  is  particularly  suitable  for  hot-­‐ humid  climates  where  ventilating  with  outdoor  air  actually  adds  moisture  to  the   crawlspace  during  much  of  the  year,  so  this  method  should  be  considered  an  option   in  other  climates.  However,  there’s  more  to  it  than  simply  taking  out  the  vents.  

When  inspecting  an  unvented  crawlspace,  the  inspector  should  check  the  following   factors:  

• functional  exterior  grading  and  site  drainage;   air  leakage  between  the  exterior  and  the  crawlspace  area,  mainly  at  the  top   of  the  foundation  wall  and  the  floor's  perimeter;   insulation  on  the  crawlspace's  perimeter  walls,  and  not  the  floor  above,  such   as  the  use  of  2-­‐inch  rigid-­‐foam  insulation  on  the  interior  side  of  the   crawlspace's  perimeter  wall;   the  use  of  6-­‐mil  polyethylene  groundcover  in  the  crawlspace,  with  joints   lapped  6  inches  and  sealed  or  taped  (this  is  the  standard  recommendation);  

Page 87 of 170

   

 

• damp-­‐proofing  of  the  foundation  walls  and  the  installation  of  an  exterior   drainage  system  if  the  crawlspace's  ground  elevation  is  lower  than  the   exterior  finish  grade;  and   some  ventilation  of  the  crawlspace  with  conditioned  air.  

Recent  model  building  codes  also  recommend  that  the  non-­‐vented  crawlspace  be   treated  as  a  conditioned  basement  space  -­‐-­‐  that  is,  it's  supplied  with  conditioned  air,   along  with  a  return-­‐air  transfer  grille  placed  in  the  floor  above  the   crawlspace.    Alternatively,  the  crawlspace  could  be  mechanically  ventilated  or   designed  as  an  under-­‐floor  space  plenum  for  the  distribution  of  conditioned   air.    While  non-­‐vented  crawlspace  designs  without  these  features  have  performed   well,  inspectors  should  check  with  local  code  requirements  when  inspecting  a  non-­‐ vented  crawlspace.  

One  of  the  following  should  be  provided  for  an  non-­‐vented  (unvented)  crawlspace:    

• mechanical  exhaust  ventilation  operating  continuously  at  a  rate  of  1  cubic   foot  per  minute  or  each  50  square  feet  of  crawlspace  floor  area;  or   conditioned  air  supply  duct  sized  at  a  rate  equal  to  1  cubic  foot  per  minute   for  each  50  square  feet  of  crawlspace  floor  area,  including  a  duct  or  grille   providing  a  return  pathway  to  the  common  area,  and  insulation  installed  at   the  perimeter  walls.  

Understanding  Vented  and  Non-­‐Vented  Crawlspaces  

The  principal  perceived  advantage  of  a  vented  crawlspace  over  a  non-­‐vented  one  is   that  venting  can  minimize  radon  and  moisture-­‐related  decay  hazards  by  diluting  the   crawlspace  air.  

Venting  can  complement  other  moisture-­‐  and  radon-­‐control  measures,  such  as   groundcover  and  proper  drainage.  However,  although  increased  air  flow  in  the   crawlspace  may  offer  some  dilution  potential  for  ground-­‐source  moisture  and   radon,  it  will  not  necessarily  solve  an  established  problem.  

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 88 of 170

   

 

The  principal  disadvantages  of  a  vented  crawlspace  over  a  non-­‐vented  one  are:    

• pipes  and  ducts  must  be  insulated  against  heat  loss  and  freezing;   a  larger  area  usually  must  be  insulated,  which  may  increase  the  cost;  and   in  some  climates,  warm,  humid  air  circulated  into  the  cool  crawlspace  can   actually  cause  excessive  moisture  levels  in  wood.  

Vented  crawlspaces  are  often  provided  with  operable  vents  that  can  be  closed  to   reduce  winter  heat  loss  but  may  potentially  increase  radon  infiltration.  Although  not   their  original  purpose,  the  vents  can  also  be  closed  in  summer  to  keep  out  moist   exterior  air  having  a  dew  point  above  the  crawlspace's  temperature.  

It  is  not  necessary  to  vent  a  crawlspace  for  moisture  control  if  it  is  open  to  an   adjacent  basement,  and  venting  is  clearly  incompatible  with  crawlspaces  used  as   heat-­‐distribution  plenums.  

In  fact,  there  are  several  advantages  to  designing  crawlspaces  as  semi-­‐heated  zones.  

Duct  and  pipe  insulation  can  be  reduced,  and  the  foundation  is  insulated  at  the   crawlspace's  perimeter  instead  of  at  its  ceiling.  This  usually  requires  less  insulation,   simplifies  installation  difficulties  (in  some  cases),  and  can  be  detailed  to  minimize   condensation  hazards.  

Although  unvented  crawlspaces  have  been  recommended  "except  under  severe   moisture  conditions"  by  the  University  of  Illinois  Small  Homes  Council,  moisture   problems  in  crawlspaces  are  common  enough  that  many  agencies  are  unwilling  to   endorse  closing  the  vents  year-­‐round.  

Soil  type  and  the  groundwater  level  are  key  factors  influencing  moisture  conditions.  

It  should  be  recognized  that  a  crawlspace  can  be  designed  as  a  short  basement  with   a  slurry-­‐slab  floor,  and  having  a  higher  floor  level  is  subject  to  less  moisture  hazard,   in  most  cases.  Viewed  in  this  way,  the  main  distinction  between  unvented   crawlspaces  and  basements  is  in  the  owner’s  accessibility  and  likelihood  of  noticing   moisture  problems.  

Quiz  9  

T/F:  Carpet  and  wood-­‐based  floor  finishes  should  not  be  applied  directly  to  slabs  on   grade  unless  the  slab  or  finish  surface  temperature  is  raised  near  room  temperature.  

True  

False  

T/F:  Slabs  that  do  not  have  a  moisture  vapor  diffusion  retarder  underneath  are   often  suitable  for  finished  flooring  in  living  spaces.  

Page 89 of 170

   

 

False  

True  

All  exposed  _____  areas  in  crawlspaces  should  be  covered  with  a  minimum  6-­‐mil   layer  of  polyethylene  sheeting.  

• ground   pipe   water  intrusion   venting  

T/F:  When  a  vapor  retarder  is  installed  and  covers  the  earth/ground  surface  of  the   crawlspace,  the  minimum  net  area  of  the  openings  should  be  at  least  1  square  foot   for  each  1,500  square  feet  of  under-­‐floor  space  area.  

True  

False  

T/F:  There  is  mounting  evidence,  as  well  as  recent  model  building-­‐code  recognition,   that  non-­‐vented  crawlspaces  are  an  acceptable  method  of  crawlspace  foundation   construction.  

True  

False  

As  a  best  practice,  exposed  earth  (dirt)  on  the  crawlspace  floor  should  _____  be   covered  by  a  vapor  retarder.  

• always   never   sometimes  

Air  Leakage  and  Major  Moisture  

Problems  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 90 of 170

   

What  to  Look  For  and  How  to  Address  Problems  

 

Air  leakage  through  building  assemblies  can  move  large  quantities  of  water  vapor   and  is  a  major  factor  in  many  vapor-­‐related  moisture  problems.  Building  envelopes   should  be  designed  and  constructed  to  reduce  air  leakage  from  inside  to  outside  in   cold  climates,  and  from  outside  to  inside  in  hot-­‐humid  climates.  To  achieve  this   objective,  the  big  air  leaks  in  the  building’s  envelope  must  be  sealed.  Most  insulation   will  not  stop  air  leaks.  In  addition,  a  suitable  air-­‐barrier  system  should  be  carefully   considered  and  installed  during  the  construction  of  the  home.  

Any  one  or  a  combination  of  the  following  drives  air  leakage:  

• wind;   stack  effect;  and   forced-­‐air  HVAC  equipment,  such  as  the  central  air  handler.    

Wind  and  stack  effect-­‐driven  air  leakage  is  best  handled  by  the  use  of  air  barriers.  

HVAC  equipment  should  be  properly  installed,  and  seams  and  connections  in  the   distribution  piping  should  be  sealed  airtight.  

There  are  a  few  precautions  worth  mentioning  when  the  building  envelope  is  

“tightened.”  

Page 91 of 170

   

 

First,  the  use  of  air  barriers  and  air-­‐leakage  sealing  practices  can  reduce  the  supply   of  combustion  air  for  fuel-­‐fired  equipment  (oil  or  gas  furnaces,  gas  water  heaters,   gas  dryers,  etc.)  located  within  the  conditioned  space.  This  can  result  in  negative   pressure  and  back-­‐drafting  of  combustion  products.  The  operation  of  spot  exhaust   fans  (kitchen  or  bath),  whole-­‐house  exhaust  ventilation,  and  even  the  stack  effect   can  also  cause  depressurization  of  the  indoor  space  near  combustion  equipment  and   lead  to  back-­‐drafting  and  the  introduction  of  combustion  products  into  the  home,   such  as  carbon  monoxide.  Because  of  these  health  and  safety  concerns,  sealed   combustion  equipment  is  often  installed  when  the  house  is  “tight.”  

Second,  mechanical  ventilation  may  be  required  or  recommended  to  address  other   consequences  of  tightening  the  building  envelope,  such  as  IAQ  (indoor  air  quality)   and  humidity  control.  For  example,  modern  residential  building  codes  still  permit   the  use  of  operable  windows  as  a  means  of  providing  fresh-­‐air  ventilation,  though   this  has  been  contested  in  recent  years.    It  may  be  risky  to  rely  solely  on  the   behavior  of  the  occupant  to  provide  adequate  ventilation  in  this  manner  in  the   absence  of  higher  levels  of  natural  ventilation.  

As  a  final  precaution,  air-­‐barrier  materials  must  also  be  considered  in  terms  of  their   impact  on  vapor  movement  and  water  shedding.  For  instance,  if  an  air  barrier  is   used  on  the  exterior  of  the  wall  as  a  weather  barrier  underneath  cladding  or   housewrap,  it  must  have  adequate  water-­‐resistant  qualities.  And  if  an  air  barrier  is   used  on  the  inside  of  a  wall  in  a  hot-­‐humid  climate,  it  needs  to  be  a  permeable   material  and  not  one  that  will  prevent  vapor  from  drying  to  the  inside.    

Air  Sealing  

Air  sealing  is  important  because  air  carries  both  moisture  and  energy,  usually  in  the   direction  that  the  homeowner  does  not  want.  Air  leaks  can  carry  hot,  humid  outdoor   air  into  the  house  in  the  summertime.  Air  leaks  can  carry  warm,  moist  air  from  a   bathroom  into  the  cool  attic  in  the  winter.  

Your  client  will  probably  already  know  that  air  can  leak  in  and  out  of  their  house   through  small  openings  around  doors  and  windows,  and  through  a  fireplace    

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 92 of 170

   

  chimney.  Air  can  leak  into  the  house  from  unconditioned  spaces,  such  as  the  attic,   basement  and  crawlspace.    What  your  client  might  not  be  fully  aware  of  are  the   other  pathways  for  air  leakage,  including:  

• any  openings  and  cracks  where  two  walls  meet;   any  openings  and  cracks  where  the  wall  meets  the  ceiling;   any  openings  and  cracks  near  interior  door  frames;   gaps  around  electrical  receptacle  outlets,  switches,  and  recessed  light   fixtures;   gaps  behind  recessed  cabinets;   false  ceilings  and  soffits  in  the  kitchen;   behind  bathtubs  and  shower  stall  units;   through  floor  cavities  of  finished  attics  adjacent  to  unconditioned  attic   spaces;   utility  chaseways  for  ducts,  pipes  and  wires;  and   plumbing  and  electrical  wire  penetrations.  

Air  sealing  is  an  essential  first  step.    It  is  important  to  stop  the  air  leakage  prior  to   adding  insulation  in  these  particular  areas  because  the  insulation  might  make  the   pathways  hidden  and  difficult  to  access.    

Because  these  leakage  pathways  exist  due  to  the  tendency  of  warm  air  to  rise  and   cool  air  to  fall,  the  attic  is  often  the  best  place  to  find  air  leaks  and  seal  them   up.    Usually,  adding  more  insulation  at  the  attic  floor  area  will  not  stop  leaks  because   the  air  will  flow  through  and  around  the  insulation.  Most  insulation  will  not  stop  air   leaks.  

Look  for  Big  Air  Leaks  

To  ensure  that  an  air  barrier  functions  as  intended,  leaks  in  the  building  envelope   and  air  barrier  system  must  be  reasonably  controlled.  The  methods  are  generally   low-­‐tech  and  common-­‐sense  oriented.  

Current  building  codes  (such  as  the  IRC  2006)  require  air  sealing  around  the   following  areas:  

• all  joints,  seams  and  penetrations,  including  utility  penetrations;   site-­‐built  windows,  doors  and  skylights;   openings  between  window  and  door  assemblies,  and  their  respective  jambs   and  framing;   knee  walls;   drop  ceilings  and  chases  adjacent  to  the  thermal  envelope;   wall  cavities  and  chases  that  extend  into  unconditioned  space;   walls  and  the  ceiling  separating  an  attached  garage  from  conditioned  space;   openings  behind  tub  and  shower  enclosures  on  exterior  walls;  

Page 93 of 170

   

 

• common  walls  between  dwelling  units;  and   other  sources  of  air  leakage.  

Sealing  materials  include  acceptable  air-­‐barrier  materials  and  durable  caulks,   weatherstripping,  sealants,  tapes  and  gaskets,  as  appropriate.  The  material  could  be   a  suitable  film  or  solid  material.  

The  above  list  is  exhaustive.    All  obvious  air-­‐leakage  pathways  should  be  sealed.  Yet,   practicality  suggests  that  the  major  focus  should  be  on  the  big  leaks  and  big  holes.  

Big  leakage  points  that  should  be  air-­‐sealed  include:  

• vertical  mechanical  chases;   attic  access  hatches  and  pull-­‐down  ladders;   floor  overhangs;   openings  behind  tub  and  shower  enclosures;   plumbing  stack  penetrations;   utility  penetrations  in  walls;  and   any  exposed  wall  cavities  that  open  into  an  adjacent  attic  space.  

Major  leakage  points  in  a  house  are  illustrated.    Property  inspectors  should  look   here.  

Air  Sealing  from  the  Attic  

It  is  important  to  seal  up  the  air  leakage  pathways  between  the  living  space  and  the   attic  space,  especially  before  your  client  adds  any  insulation  in  the  attic.  

The  materials  for  sealing  air-­‐leakage  pathways  should  be  products  that  are  durable   and  compatible  with  the  joined  materials,  especially  around  hot  surfaces.  Examples   include:  

• high-­‐quality  caulks;   construction  adhesives;  

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 94 of 170

   

• spray  polyurethane  foam;   gaskets;   sill  sealers;   tapes;  and   a  number  of  specialty  products,  such  as  gasketed  electrical  receptacles,   switch  boxes,  and  ceiling  light-­‐fixture  boxes.  

Cathedral  Ceilings  and  Air  Leaks  

   

 

Cathedral  roofs  can  hide  leaks  and  condensation,  particularly  if  a  vapor  diffusion   retarder,  such  as  polyethylene  sheeting,  is  used  on  the  ceiling  side  -­‐-­‐  something  that   should  be  considered  only  for  very  cold  climates.  If  there  are  cathedral  ceilings  in   the  house,  the  ceiling  and  any  penetrations  through  it  should  be  carefully  sealed  to   prevent  air  leakage.  This  may  involve  special  air-­‐sealed  light  fixtures,  the  use  of   caulks  and  sealants  at  all  penetrations  and  joints,  and  avoiding  leaky  ceiling  systems,   such  as  exposed  tongue-­‐and-­‐groove  boards.  Leakage  of  humid  indoor  air  into  cold   cathedral  roof  cavities  is  a  major  cause  of  condensation  and  moisture  problems  in   this  type  of  roof.  

Cathedral  Ceilings  and  Insulation  

For  cathedral  ceilings,  there  needs  to  be  enough  space  between  the  roof  deck  and   the  ceiling  for  adequate  insulation  and  ventilation.  Adequate  insulation  thickness   can  be  achieved  when  the  builder  uses  raised  trusses,  truss  joists,  scissor-­‐truss   framing,  and/or  sufficiently  large  rafters.  Remember  that  cathedral  ceilings  with  

Page 95 of 170

   

 

2x12  rafter  boards  have  a  maximum  amount  of  space  for  standard  10-­‐inch-­‐thick,  R-­‐

30  batt  insulation.  

You  may  see  foil-­‐faced  batt  insulation  used  in  a  cathedral  ceiling  because  it  has  a  0.5   perm  rating  and  provides  the  permeability  often  required  for  use  in  ceilings  without   attic  spaces.  You  should  see  a  vent  baffle  installed  between  the  insulation  and  the   roof  decking  to  ensure  proper  ventilation.    

If  the  roof  framing  at  the  cathedral  ceiling  cannot  provide  enough  room  for  proper   insulation  and  ventilation,  then  you  may  see  furring  strips  attached  to  the  underside   of  the  rafter  boards.  The  furring  will  provide  enough  room  for  thicker  insulation  to   be  installed.  Some  builders  will  install  high-­‐density  batts  in  tight  areas  or  add  rigid   foam  insulation  under  the  rafters.  Rigid  foam  insulation  is  a  good  choice  because  of   its  ability  to  resist  thermal  bridging  through  the  rafters.  

Why  Recommend  Air  Sealing?  

Finding  the  Right  Balance  

Air  flow  can  transfer  moisture  vapor  through  and  into  building  assemblies  in   amounts  10  to  100  times  more  than  what  would  typically  occur  by  vapor   diffusion.    Significant  air  leaks  -­‐-­‐  from  a  bathroom  into  a  cold  attic,  for  example  -­‐-­‐  can   deposit  a  large  amount  of  moisture  vapor  on  cool  surfaces  and  create  condensation   and  water  accumulation  that  can  damage  building  materials  and  make  some   insulation  materials  ineffective.    Without  reasonable  air-­‐leakage  control,  the  use  of   vapor  diffusion  retarders  is  of  limited  benefit.    Similarly,  attempts  to  pressurize  a   building  in  a  hot-­‐humid  climate  to  control  against  the  intrusion  of  outdoor  humidity   and  to  depressurize  a  building  in  a  cold  climate  are  far  more  effective  with  a  tighter   building  shell.  

Some  amount  of  natural  air  leakage  under  the  right  climate  conditions  can  be  a  good   thing.  Old  houses  naturally  breathe,  and  that  can  be  beneficial.  Under  ideal   conditions  that  may  occur  during  some  periods  of  the  year,  it  can  help  to  dry  the   house.  Air  leakage  in  the  form  of  intended  ventilation  in  attics  and  crawlspaces  -­‐-­‐   outside  of  the  building’s  thermal  envelope  -­‐-­‐  is  a  good  way  to  reduce  moisture  and  is    

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 96 of 170

   

  very  effective  in  many  climates.  Air  leakage  through  the  thermal  envelope  can  also   allow  for  uncontrolled  natural  ventilation  of  the  building  for  indoor  air  quality.    

However,  the  benefits  of  air  infiltration  through  a  building’s  thermal  envelope  are   either  unreliable  or  risky  in  many  climates.  Therefore,  dependence  on  excessive  or   uncontrolled  air  leakage  through  thermal-­‐envelope  systems  in  modern  buildings   and  new  construction  is  generally  discouraged.  And,  in  fact,  modern  building   standards  and  energy  codes  usually  require  fairly  extensive  practices  to  prevent  the   uncontrolled  leakage  of  air  through  a  building’s  thermal  envelope.  

Blower  Doors  

A  blower  door  test  to  evaluate  the  effectiveness  of  air-­‐leakage  sealing  is  highly   effective.  Blower  door  testing  can  be  conducted  on  a  finished  house,  or,   alternatively,  on  a  house  that  is  insulated  and  sealed  but  with  walls  not  yet  closed  in.  

Such  testing  at  a  pre-­‐completion  stage  of  construction  will  not  provide  a  useful   numerical  result,  but  the  use  of  a  smoke-­‐pencil  device  that  indicates  drafts  can  be   very  helpful  for  clearly  observing  where  leakage  in  the  envelope  is  occurring.  

Blower  door  tests  on  a  finished  house  may  also  be  used  to  determine  whether   supplemental  ventilation  may  be  necessary  for  improving  indoor  air  quality.  

Blower  door  testing  goes  beyond  the  scope  of  a  typical  home  inspection.    However,  

InterNACHI  inspectors  who  are  trained  and  have  the  proper  equipment  can  perform   this  testing  as  part  of  a  home  energy  audit,  which  they  can  offer  as  an  ancillary   service.    Read  more  about  blower  door  testing  and  take  InterNACHI's  free,   online  How  to  Perform  Energy  Audits  course.  

Air  Barriers  Defined  

This  section  of  the  course  explains  basic  air  barrier  strategies  and  where  to  look  for   air  barriers.  

Reducing  air  leakage  through  the  building  envelope  is  a  good  practice  regardless  of   where  in  the  envelope  it  takes  place.  Air  barrier  systems  are  strategies  to  block  air   leaks  at  a  certain  point  in  the  building  assembly  while  also  addressing  other   envelope  concerns,  such  as  rainwater  protection  and  vapor  diffusion  retarders.  

Examples  of  Air  Barriers  

Appropriate  air  barrier  materials  include  some  panel  products,  membranes,  and   other  coatings  that  have  low  air-­‐permeability.    

Examples  of  air  barriers  include:  

Page 97 of 170

   

 

• gypsum  wallboard;   spray  polyurethane  foams;   exterior  wood  structural  panels  (sheathing);   extruded  polystyrene  foamboard;   polyisocyanurate  foamboard;   building  wraps;  and   other  building  products.  

Seams  and  laps  in  these  products  must  be  sealed.  

Examples  of  products  that  may  be  considered  too  air-­‐permeable  to  serve  as  an  air   barrier  include  fiberboard,  expanded  polystyrene  insulation  (Type  I),  fiberglass   insulation  board,  and  tarred  felt  paper.    

Rigid  materials,  such  as  drywall  (gypsum  wallboard),  exterior  wood  sheathing,  and   rigid  foamboards,  are  effective  air  barriers  because  they  have  the  ability  to  resist   air-­‐pressure  differences.        

Four  Types  

There  are  basically  four  methods  of  providing  an  air  barrier  system.  Two  of  these   approaches  involve  installing  the  air  barrier  on  the  inside  of  the  thermal  envelope,   and  the  other  two  involve  installing  the  barrier  on  the  exterior,  as  shown  below.  

Here  are  the  four  types:  

Interior  Air  Barrier  Methods   o o

Airtight  Drywall  Approach  (ADA)  

Airtight  Polyethylene  Approach  (APA)  

Exterior  Air  Barrier  Methods   o o

Airtight  Sheathing  Approach  (ASA)  

Airtight  Wrap  Approach  (AWA)  

In  cold  and  very  cold  climates,  moisture  primarily  tends  to  travel  from  the  interior    

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 98 of 170

   

conditioned  spaces  to  the  exterior  through  the  wall  and  ceiling  assemblies.    The   primary  concern  is  to  prevent  interior  warm  and  humid  air  from  flowing  outward   into  the  building's  exterior  envelope  assemblies  during  winter  months.  This  air  flow   can  carry  a  large  amount  of  moisture  and  cause  condensation  in  the  wall.  Therefore,   the  use  of  an  interior  air  barrier  system  in  cold  and  very  cold  climates  is  preferred   and  may  be  combined  with  a  warm-­‐in-­‐winter  vapor  diffusion  retarder.  A  viable   approach  in  these  climates  is  the  ADA  method  used  in  conjunction  with  an  interior   vapor  diffusion-­‐retarder  layer,  such  as  kraft-­‐faced  batts  or  vapor  diffusion-­‐retarder   paint  on  drywall.  The  APA  method  should  be  applied  more  cautiously,  as  some   localities  and  building  scientists  are  concerned  that  the  poly  layer  is  almost  too   airtight  and  vapor-­‐impermeable  and  will  not  allow  drying  to  the  interior  of  the  

 

Page 99 of 170

   

building  at  any  time  of  the  year.  Conditioned  interior  spaces  should  be  maintained  at   a  low  moisture  level.

   

In  hot-­‐humid  climates,  moisture  tends  to  go  from  the  exterior  to  the  cooled  interior   by  passing  through  the  walls  and  ceiling.  The  primary  concern  is  preventing  exterior   warm-­‐humid  air  from  leaking  inward  through  exterior  surfaces  into  building   envelope  assemblies  that  will  be  cool  from  air  conditioning.  In  humid  climates,  an   air  barrier  system  is  preferred  for  the  outside  of  the  wall.  Many  exterior  sheathing   products  and  wraps  can  provide  this  function  and  also  serve  the  water  barrier   function  underneath  siding  materials  -­‐-­‐  particularly,  the  ASA  and  AWA  methods.  

 

Page 100 of 170

   

 

In  climates  of  mixed  conditions,  the  most  suitable  air  barrier  system  can  be  selected   based  on  other  construction  characteristics  and  then  combined  with  these  systems.  

For  example,  if  building  wrap  is  used  as  part  of  a  drained-­‐cavity,  weather-­‐resistant   envelope,  then  the  Airtight  Wrap  Approach  (AWA)  can  be  used  with  a  little  extra   detailing  of  the  building  wrap,  such  as  taping  the  overlapped  seams.  Similarly,   sealing  interior  drywall  joints  and  penetrations  can  make  the  Airtight  Drywall  

Approach  a  reasonable  strategy.  

Quiz  10  

T/F:  Most  types  of  insulation  will  not  stop  air  leaks.  

True  

False  

Because  air  leakage  pathways  exist  due  to  the  tendency  for  warm  air  to  rise  and  cool   air  to  fall,  the  ____  is  often  the  best  place  to  find  air  leaks  and  seal  them  up.  

• attic   basement   utility  room   chimney  

T/F:  Leakage  of  humid  indoor  air  into  cold  cathedral  roof  cavities  is  a  major  cause  of   condensation  and  moisture  problems  in  this  type  of  roof.  

True  

False  

T/F:  A  good  example  of  an  air  barrier  is  gypsum  wallboard.  

True  

False  

T/F:  Without  reasonable  air-­‐leakage  control,  the  use  of  vapor  diffusion  retarders  is   of  limited  benefit.  

True  

False  

T/F:  Reducing  air  leakage  through  the  building  envelope  is  a  good  practice   regardless  of  where  in  the  envelope  it  takes  place.  

True  

False  

Page 101 of 170

   

 

The  primary  concern  in  _____  climates  is  preventing  interior  warm  and  humid  air   from  flowing  outward  into  the  building's  exterior  envelope  assemblies  in  winter   months.  

• cold   warm   hot   humid  

In  hot-­‐humid  climates,  moisture  tends  to  go  from  the  _____  to  the  cooled  _____  by   passing  through  the  walls  and  ceiling.  

• exterior.....  interior   insulation.....  exterior   interior.....  exterior   walls.....  ceiling  

Vapor  Diffusion  Retarders  

Vapor  Diffusion  Retarders  Defined  

The  movement  of  water  vapor  via  vapor  diffusion  is  a  major  factor  of  water  vapor   problems  in  houses,  along  with  high  indoor  relative  humidity  (RH)  and  air  leakage.  

A  vapor  diffusion  retarder  is  intended  to  control  the  entry  of  water  vapor  into  a   building  assembly  by  vapor  diffusion.  The  vapor  diffusion  retarder  may  be  needed   to  control  the  diffusion  entry  of  water  into  a  wall  from  the  interior,  or  from  the   exterior,  or  both.  

Vapor  diffusion  retarders  should  not  be  confused  with  air  barriers.  Air  barriers   control  the  movement  of  air  through  a  building  assembly,  such  as  a  wall.  

Some  Effective  Air  and  Vapor  Diffusion  Retarders  

A  continuous  rubber  membrane  applied  to  the  exterior-­‐side  of  a  foundation   wall  is  both  an  air  barrier  and  vapor  diffusion  retarder.  

A  plastic  sheet  covering  an  exposed  dirt  floor  in  a  crawlspace  is  an  air  barrier   and  vapor  diffusion  retarder.  

Building  paper  and  housewrap  are  effective  air  barriers.  

Most  building  papers  and  housewraps  are  vapor-­‐permeable  because  they   breathe.  

Vapor  diffusion  retarders  are  used  to  control  and  slow  the  diffusion  of  moisture   vapor  through  building  envelope  materials.  Vapor  diffusion  retarders,  when  used  

Page 102 of 170

   

correctly,  prevent  high  levels  of  humidity  inside  building  envelope  assemblies  that   can  result  in  condensation.  When  used  incorrectly,  vapor  diffusion  retarders  can   trap  moisture,  slow  the  normal  drying  process,  and  contribute  to  moisture  damage.  

Air  leakage  is  a  primary  type  of  water  vapor  movement,  but  vapor  diffusion   retarders  also  play  an  important  role  in  a  strategy  to  control  moisture.    All  materials   exhibit  some  amount  of  vapor  retardance  -­‐-­‐  that  is,  they  have  some  impact  on   allowing  moisture  vapor  to  pass  through  them.    Inspectors  should  understand  that   all  materials  play  some  role  in  the  migration  of  water  vapor.  Any  material  is  either   impermeable  or  permeable.  

Materials  that  retard  the  flow  of  water  vapor  are  impermeable.  Materials  that  allow   water  vapor  to  pass  through  them  are  considered  permeable.  But  there  are  degrees   of  permeability,  and  materials  can  change  from  impermeable  to  permeable  if  their   condition  changes.  For  example,  dry  plywood  is  relatively  impermeable  until  it  gets   wet.  Plastic  vapor  diffusion  retarders  on  crawlspace  floors  do  not  change  their   permeability.  The  unit  of  measurement  of  permeability  is  called  a  perm.  

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 103 of 170

   

 

Some  building  materials  that  are  considered  impermeable  to  water  vapor  include:  

• polyethylene  plastic  sheets;   sheathing  with  foil  facing;   rubber  membranes;   aluminum  foil;   sheet  metal;  and   glass.  

Building  materials  considered  semi-­‐permeable  to  water  vapor  include:  

• plywood;   oriented  strand  board  (OSB);   heavy-­‐weight  (#30)  building  tar  and  felt  paper;  and   bitumen-­‐impregnated  kraft  paper  (the  facing  on  fiberglass  batt  insulation).  

Housewraps,  unpainted  gypsum  wallboard  (or  drywall),  unfaced  fiberglass   insulation,  and  cellulose  insulation  are  considered  permeable  to  water  vapor.  

Vapor  Diffusion  Retarder  vs.  Vapor  Barrier  

Using  the  correct  terms  is  important  and  can  be  difficult.  "Vapor  diffusion  retarder"   and  "vapor  barrier"  are  often  used  interchangeably,  and  that  might  cause  some   confusion  because  they  are  not  exactly  the  same  thing.  

A  vapor  barrier,  as  defined  by  the  International  Building  Code  (IBC),  is  classified  as  1   perm  or  less.  Vapor  barrier  is  an  old  term  that  refers  to  controlling  moisture.  Don't   get  this  confused  with  the  term  "air  barrier,"  which  is  a  material  used  to  provide  a   barrier  to  air  leakage  through  the  building  envelope.    

A  vapor  diffusion  retarder  is  the  better  term  to  use  instead  of  air  barrier.  A  vapor   diffusion  retarder  is  installed  in  a  building  assembly,  such  as  an  exterior  wall  of  a   house,  and  retards  the  movement  of  water  by  vapor  diffusion  through  a  material  or   wall  assembly.  A  vapor  diffusion  retarder  is  a  material,  membrane,  or  coating  that   limits  the  amount  of  moisture  vapor  that  passes  through  a  material.  And  there  are  a   few  classes  or  categories  of  vapor  diffusion  retarders.  These  classes  are  defined  in   the  2012  International  Residential  Code.    A  vapor  retarder  class  is  a  measure  of  the   ability  of  a  material  or  assembly  to  limit  the  amount  of  moisture  that  passes  through   that  material  or  assembly.  

 

   

Vapor  diffusion  retarder  helps  reduce  the  rate  of  water  vapor  movement  through   material.  

Page 104 of 170

   

 

Four  General  Categories  of  Perm  Ratings  

Class  I  vapor  diffusion  retarder    vapor-­‐impermeable        ≤  0.1  perm  

Class  II  vapor  diffusion  retarder    semi-­‐impermeable    >  0.1  perm  and  ≤  1  perm  

Class  III  vapor  diffusion  retarder    semi-­‐permeable    >  1  perm  and  ≤  10  perms  

Class  IV  vapor  diffusion  retarder    vapor-­‐permeable    >  10  perms  

Class  I  is  often  referred  to  as  a  vapor  barrier  and  is  considered  impermeable.  An   example  would  be  a  sheet  of  polyethylene  or  non-­‐perforated  aluminum  foil.  

Class  II  vapor  retarder  is  considered  semi-­‐impermeable.  And  example  would  be  

Kraft  facing  on  fiberglass  batt  insulation  or  extruded  polystyrene  greater  than  1  inch   thick.  

Class  III  examples  would  include  most  latex  paints,  #30  building  paper,  and   plywood.  

Walls  in  Hot-­‐Humid  Climates  

Inward  Drying  

In  hot-­‐humid  climates,  exterior  wall  systems  should  dry  toward  the  interior  by   installing  vapor  retarding  materials  on  the  outside  of  the  wall  assembly  and  using   vapor-­‐permeable  interior  materials.  

Providing  some  resistance  to  outdoor  moisture  vapor  from  diffusing  into  the  wall   assembly  limits  moisture  problems  during  hot  and  humid  periods  of  the  year.  And   by  keeping  the  interior-­‐side  of  the  wall  assembly  vapor-­‐permeable,  any  moisture   within  the  wall  system  can  migrate  to  the  cool  and  dry  interior  of  the  building.  

If  a  vapor-­‐retarding  material,  such  as  polyethylene  or  even  vinyl  wallpaper,  is  used   toward  the  inside  of  the  wall  assembly,  it  could  block  vapor  migration  on  its  cool   surface  and  cause  condensation  problems.  Instead,  materials  toward  the  interior  of   the  wall  assembly  should  be  semi-­‐permeable  or  permeable,  such  as  unfaced    

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 105 of 170

   

  fiberglass  batts  with  permeable  interior  paint  on  the  gypsum  board.  Installation   choices  and  practices  related  to  vapor  diffusion  retarders  and  other  wall-­‐assembly   materials  are  subject  to  local  code  requirements.  

Warm  Walls  in  Cold  Climates  

Inspecting  

Some  current  research  in  building  science  recommends  avoiding  the  use  of   sheathing  materials  that  are  low-­‐perm  and  also  of  little  insulating  value  in  cold   climates,  such  as  wood  structural  panels  and  similar  sheathings.  The  concern  is  that   the  inside  face  of  these  materials  will  create  a  cold  surface  during  cold  weather,  and   if  humid  indoor  air  enters  the  wall  from  air  leakage  or  vapor  diffusion,  it  will   condense  on  this  surface.  Condensation  that  does  form  in  this  manner  would  be   unable  to  dry  outward  through  the  sheathing,  since  the  sheathing  is  low-­‐perm.    

 

Furthermore,  when  an  exterior  insulating  sheathing  is  used  that  also  happens  to  be   a  low-­‐perm  material,  the  available  research  and  experience  on  such  wall  systems   suggest  that  it  should  have  an  R-­‐value  high  enough  to  keep  its  inside  face  from   reaching  a  temperature  low  enough  to  cause  condensation  for  any  significant  period   of  time.  This  type  of  design  may  be  called  a  warm-­‐wall  approach.  For  this  concept  to   work  without  creating  condensation  on  a  cold  surface  internal  to  the  wall,  the   exterior  insulating  sheathing  must  be  thick  enough  to  minimize  the  potential  for  its   inside  face  to  reach  dew-­‐point  temperature,  given  a  reasonable  winter-­‐design   condition  (e.g.,  indoor  and  outdoor  temperature  and  humidity).  

Current  building  codes  do  not  explicitly  address  this  design  approach  for  moisture-­‐ vapor  control  in  walls.  Building  energy  codes  generally  recommend  an  R-­‐value  for   insulating  sheathing  of  approximately  one-­‐third  of  the  required  overall  wall   insulation's  R-­‐value,  including  the  cavity  insulation.  

While  this  course  acknowledges  current  research  in  these  areas,  documentation  of   these  issues  and  well-­‐established  best  practices  are  lacking  standardized  rules  for   design  and  construction.  Regardless,  a  properly  executed  warm-­‐wall  design  is   frequently  used  with  success  in  colder  climates  because  of  the  condensation  control   it  provides.  

In  hot-­‐humid  regions,  walls  must  be  able  to  dry  to  the  inside.  Homeowners  in  such   regions  must  be  educated  not  to  limit  the  ability  of  walls  to  dry  toward  the  interior   by  adding  non-­‐breathable  interior  finishes  on  exterior  walls.  Finishes  that  could   compromise  the  wall’s  ability  to  dry  inward  include  vinyl  wallpaper  finishes  and   vapor  diffusion-­‐retarder  paints.  

Page 106 of 170

   

Proper  Wall  Assemblies  

Outwardly  Dry  

In  cold  climates,  exterior  wall  systems  should  dry  toward  the  outside  by  installing  

  vapor-­‐retarding  materials  on  the  inside  of  the  wall  assembly  and  keeping  exterior   materials  vapor-­‐permeable.  Along  with  that,  controlling  the  indoor  humidity  level   and  addressing  air  leakages  are  also  very  important  issues.  

To  prevent  moisture  vapor  from  diffusing  into  the  wall  assembly  from  inside  the   house,  common  materials  used  for  this  purpose  include  kraft-­‐faced  or  paper-­‐faced   insulation  batts  and  semi-­‐permeable  interior  paints.  And  while  practices  related  to   vapor  diffusion  retarders  and  other  wall-­‐assembly  materials  are  subject  to  local   code  requirements,  regions  in  northern  climates  have  homes  built  with  the  wall   assemblies  designed  to  dry  toward  the  exterior.  As  the  climate  becomes  colder,  this    

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 107 of 170

   

  issue  becomes  even  more  important  because  longer  and  colder  winter  conditions   require  walls  that  can  dry  outward  and  assemblies  that  limit  indoor  moisture  from   entering  the  wall.  

Along  with  vapor  diffusion-­‐retarder  materials  such  as  kraft-­‐faced  batts   installed  toward  the  inside  of  wall  assemblies  in  cold  regions,  vapor-­‐permeable   materials  installed  toward  the  outside  of  the  assembly  will  facilitate  outward  drying.  

This  allows  any  moisture  in  the  wall  to  dry  outward  toward  the  colder  and  drier   outdoor  environment.  However,  several  common  sheathing  materials,  such  as  wood   structural  panels  and  foam  insulating  panels,  have  fairly  low-­‐perm  ratings  which,  in   theory,  could  impede  drying  and  possibly  even  create  a  cold  surface  for   condensation.  The  building  science  community  is  still  researching  these  issues.  

Vapor  Diffusion  Retarder  Location  by  

Geographical  Location  

In  most  cold  climates,  the  vapor  diffusion  retarder  should  be  placed  on  the  interior  

(warm-­‐in-­‐winter)  side  of  walls.  

In  some  southern  climates,  the  vapor  diffusion  retarder  should  be   omitted.    However,    in  hot-­‐humid  climates,  such  as  along  the  Gulf  Coast  and  in  

Florida,  the  vapor  diffusion  retarder  should  be  placed  on  the  exterior  of  the  wall.  

Ventilation  of  Interior  House  Air  

Ventilation  of  the  House  Air  

Unless  properly  ventilated,  an  airtight  home  can  seal  in  indoor  air  pollutants.  

Ventilation  also  helps  control  moisture  -­‐-­‐  another  important  consideration  for  a   healthy,  energy-­‐efficient  home.  Historically,  homes  did  not  have  requirements  for   ventilation  because  air  leaks  through  the  building  envelope  and  natural  ventilation   were  considered  adequate.  As  envelope  construction  techniques  and  materials  have   improved,  the  need  to  control  indoor  air  quality  in  the  home  has  increased.  

 

Today,  many  residential  building  codes  require  a  home  to  have  adequate  mechanical   ventilation  systems  installed  with  controls  for  the  occupants  to  use.  Each   mechanical  ventilation  system  (supply,  exhaust  or  both)  should  have  a  readily   accessible  switch  or  other  means  for  shutoff  (or  volume  reduction  and  shutoff).  

Automatic  or  gravity  dampers  that  close  when  the  system  is  not  operating  should  be   installed  at  the  exterior  air  hoods  (intake  and  exhaust).    

Page 108 of 170

   

 

Some  terms  to  know:  

• mechanical  ventilation:    the  process  of  supplying  or  removing  air  by   mechanical  means  to  or  from  any  space.  Such  air  may  or  may  not  be   conditioned.  

• natural  ventilation:    the  process  of  supplying  or  removing  air  by  natural   means  to  or  from  any  space.  

CFM:    stands  for  cubic  feet  per  minute,  which  is  a  standard  measurement  of   air  flow.  

The  Purpose  of  Ventilation  

All  homes  need  ventilation  —  the  exchange  of  indoor  air  with  outdoor  air  —  to   reduce  moisture,  indoor  pollutants  and  odors.  Contaminants,  such  as  formaldehyde,   volatile  organic  compounds  (VOCs)  and  radon,  can  accumulate  in  poorly  ventilated   homes  and  cause  health  problems.  

Excess  moisture  in  a  home  can  generate  high  humidity.  High  humidity  can  lead  to   mold  growth  and  structural  damage  to  the  home.  

To  ensure  adequate  ventilation,  the  American  Society  of  Heating,  Refrigerating  and  

Air-­‐Conditioning  Engineers  (ASHRAE)  says  that  a  home's  living  area  should  be   ventilated  at  a  rate  of  0.35  air  changes  per  hour,  or  15  cubic  feet  per  person  per   minute  -­‐-­‐  whichever  is  greater.  

Three  Ways  to  Ventilate  

A  home  can  be  ventilated  in  the  following  three  ways:  

Natural  ventilation  is  uncontrolled  air  movement  into  a  home  through   cracks,  small  holes  and  vents,  such  as  through  windows  and  doors.    This   method  cannot  be  relied  upon  for  tightly  sealed  and  many  new-­‐construction   homes.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 109 of 170

   

 

 

Whole-­‐house  ventilation  is  controlled  air  movement  using  one  or  more  fans   and  duct  systems.    

Spot  ventilation  is  controlled  air  movement  using  localized  exhaust  fans  to   quickly  remove  pollutants  and  moisture  at  their  source.    It  is  typically  used  in   conjunction  with  one  of  the  other  strategies.  

Natural  Ventilation  

Natural  ventilation  used  to  be  the  most  common  ventilation  method  for  allowing   fresh  outdoor  air  to  replace  indoor  air  in  a  home.  Today,  it's  usually  not  the  best   ventilation  strategy,  especially  for  homes  that  are  properly  air-­‐sealed  for  energy   efficiency.  Natural  ventilation  also  usually  doesn't  provide  adequate  moisture   control.  

Natural  ventilation  occurs  when  there  is  uncontrolled  air  movement  or  infiltration   through  cracks  and  small  holes  in  a  home  —  the  same  ones  homeowners  want  to   seal  to  make  their  homes  more  energy-­‐efficient.  Opening  windows  and  doors  also   provides  natural  ventilation.  Because  of  central  heating  and  cooling  systems,   however,  most  people  don't  open  windows  and  doors  as  often  for  natural   ventilation.  Therefore,  air  infiltration  has  become  the  principal  mode  of  natural   ventilation  in  homes.  

A  home's  natural  ventilation  rate  is  unpredictable  and  uncontrollable  —  it  can't  be   relied  upon  to  ventilate  a  house's  interior  uniformly.  Natural  ventilation  depends  on   a  home's  air-­‐tightness,  outdoor  temperature,  wind,  and  other  factors.  Therefore,   during  mild  weather,  some  homes  may  lack  sufficient  natural  ventilation  for  the   removal  of  indoor  air  pollutants.  Tightly  sealed  and/or  tightly  built  homes  may  have   insufficient  natural  ventilation  most  of  the  time,  while  homes  with  high  air-­‐ infiltration  rates  may  experience  high  energy  costs.  

Spot  ventilation  can  be  used  to  improve  the  effectiveness  of  natural  ventilation.  

However,  if  both  spot  and  natural  ventilation  together  don't  meet  the  home's   ventilation  needs,  then  the  homeowner  should  consider  a  whole-­‐house  ventilation   strategy.  

Whole-­‐House  Ventilation  

The  decision  to  use  whole-­‐house  ventilation  is  typically  motivated  by  concerns  that   natural  ventilation  won't  provide  adequate  air  quality,  even  with  source  control  by   spot  ventilation.  

Page 110 of 170

   

 

Whole-­‐house  ventilation  systems  provide  controlled,  uniform  ventilation   throughout  a  house.  These  systems  use  one  or  more  fans  and  duct  systems  to   exhaust  stale  air  and/or  supply  fresh  air  into  the  house.  

There  are  four  types  of  whole-­‐house  ventilation  systems:  

1. Exhaust  ventilation  systems  force  inside  air  out  of  a  home.    Spot  ventilation  is   a  form  of  exhaust  ventilation.  

2. Supply  ventilation  systems  force  outside  air  into  the  home.  

3. Balanced  ventilation  systems  force  equal  quantities  of  air  into  and  out  of  the   home.    

4. Energy-­‐recovery  ventilation  systems  transfer  heat  from  incoming  or   outgoing  air  to  minimize  energy  loss.    (This  type  of  ventilation  system  is   covered  in  the  next  slide.)  

Exhaust  Ventilation  Systems  

Exhaust  ventilation  systems  work  by  depressurizing  the  building.  By  reducing  the   air  pressure  indoors  to  a  level  below  the  air  pressure  outdoors,  this  type  of  system   extracts  indoor  air  from  a  house  while  make-­‐up  air  infiltrates  through  leaks  in  the   building's  shell  and  through  intentional,  passive  vents.  

Exhaust  ventilation  systems  are  most  effective  in  cold  climates.  In  climates  with   warm,  humid  summers,  depressurization  can  draw  moist  air  into  building  wall   cavities,  where  it  may  condense  and  cause  moisture  damage.  

An  exhaust  ventilation  system  is  relatively  simple  and  inexpensive  to  install.  

Typically,  it's  composed  of  a  single  fan  connected  to  a  centrally  located,  single   exhaust  point  in  the  house.  An  ideal  design  option  is  to  connect  the  fan  to  ducts  from   several  rooms  -­‐-­‐  preferably,  rooms  where  pollutants  tend  to  be  generated,  such  as   bathrooms.  Adjustable,  passive  vents  through  windows  and/or  walls  can  be   installed  in  other  rooms  to  introduce  fresh  air,  rather  than  relying  on  leaks  in  the   building  envelope.  However,  passive  vents  may  be  ineffective  because  pressure   differences  larger  than  those  induced  by  the  ventilation  fan  may  be  needed  for  them   to  work  properly.  

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

Page 111 of 170

   

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above:    diagram  of  an  exhaust  ventilation  system  showing  a  side  view  of  a  simple  

house  with  an  attic,  living  space  and  basement  

In  the  attic  is  horizontal  ductwork  leading  into  a  box  labeled  as  the  central  exhaust   fan.  A  duct  extending  vertically  from  the  central  exhaust  fan  and  through  the  roof  is   labeled  as  the  exhaust  air  outlet.  Arrows  show  air  flow  going  into  the  house  through   vents  in  the  walls,  moving  through  the  living  space,  and  moving  into  the  central   exhaust  fan  and  out  of  the  house  through  the  exhaust  air  outlet.  Minus  symbols  on  the   label  show  that  the  living  space  has  negative  air  pressure.  Air  infiltration  into  the  

living  space  through  the  attic,  basement,  and  the  exterior  walls  is  indicated  by  arrows.  

Page 112 of 170

   

 

 

Spot  Ventilation    

Spot  ventilation  exhaust  fans  installed  in  the  bathroom  and  operated  continuously   represent  an  exhaust  ventilation  system  in  its  simplest  form.  

One  concern  with  exhaust  ventilation  systems  is  that  they  may  draw  pollutants,   along  with  fresh  air,  into  the  house.  For  example,  in  addition  to  drawing  in  fresh   outdoor  air,  they  may  draw  in  the  following:  

• radon  and  mold  spores  from  a  crawlspace;   dust  from  an  attic;   vapors  from  an  attached  garage;  and     flue  gases  from  a  fireplace  or  fossil-­‐fuel-­‐fired  water  heater  and  furnace.  

This  can  be  of  special  concern  when  bathroom  fans,  range  fans,  and  clothes  dryers  -­‐-­‐   which  also  depressurize  the  home  while  they  operate  -­‐-­‐  are  run  while  an  exhaust   ventilation  system  is  also  operating.  

Exhaust  ventilation  systems  can  also  contribute  to  higher  heating  and  cooling  costs   compared  with  energy-­‐recovery  ventilation  systems  because  exhaust  systems  do   not  temper  or  remove  moisture  from  the  make-­‐up  air  before  it  enters  the  house.  

Supply  Ventilation  Systems  

Supply  ventilation  systems  work  by  pressurizing  the  building.  They  use  a  fan  to   force  outside  air  into  the  building  while  air  leaks  out  of  the  building  through  holes  in   the  shell,  bathroom  and  range  fan  ducts,  and  intentional  vents  (if  any  exist).  

As  with  exhaust  ventilation  systems,  supply  ventilation  systems  are  relatively   simple  and  inexpensive  to  install.  A  typical  supply  ventilation  system  has  a  fan  and   duct  system  that  introduces  fresh  air  into  usually  one  (but  preferably  several)   rooms  of  the  home  that  residents  occupy  most  often,  such  as  the  bedrooms  and   living  room.  This  system  may  include  an  adjustable  window  and/or  wall  vents  in   other  rooms.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

Page 113 of 170

   

 

   

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

 

Above:    diagram  of  a  supply  ventilation  system  showing  a  side  view  of  a  simple  house  

with  an  attic,  living  space  and  basement  

In  the  attic  is  horizontal  ductwork  labeled  as  the  central  supply  fan.  A  duct  extending   vertically  from  the  central  supply  fan  and  through  the  roof  is  labeled  as  the  fresh-­‐air   inlet.  Arrows  show  air  flow  going  into  the  house  through  the  fresh-­‐air  inlet,  moving   through  the  central  supply  fan  into  the  living  space  and  out  of  the  house  through  vents   in  the  walls.  Plus  symbols  on  the  label  show  that  the  living  space  has  positive  air   pressure.  Arrows  on  the  label  indicate  air  infiltration  out  of  the  living  space  through  

the  ceiling,  floor  and  exterior  walls.  

Page 114 of 170

   

 

Supply  ventilation  systems  allow  better  control  of  the  air  that  enters  the  house  than   do  exhaust  ventilation  systems.  By  pressurizing  the  house,  supply  ventilation   systems  discourage  the  entry  of  pollutants  from  outside  the  living  space  and  prevent   back-­‐drafting  of  combustion  gases  from  fireplaces  and  appliances.  Supply   ventilation  also  allows  outdoor  air  that's  introduced  into  the  house  to  be  filtered  to   remove  pollen  and  dust,  or  it  may  be  dehumidified  to  provide  humidity  control.  

Supply  ventilation  systems  work  best  in  hot  and  mixed  climates.  Because  they   pressurize  the  house,  supply  ventilation  systems  have  the  potential  to  cause   moisture  problems  in  cold  climates.  In  winter,  the  supply  ventilation  system  causes   warm  interior  air  to  leak  through  random  openings  in  the  exterior  wall  and  ceiling.  

If  the  interior  air  is  humid  enough,  some  moisture  may  condense  in  the  attic  or  the   cold,  outer  parts  of  the  exterior  wall  where  it  can  promote  mold,  mildew  and  decay.  

Like  exhaust  ventilation  systems,  supply  ventilation  systems  do  not  temper  or   remove  moisture  from  the  make-­‐up  air  before  it  enters  the  house.  Thus,  they  may   contribute  to  higher  heating  and  cooling  costs  compared  with  energy-­‐recovery   ventilation  systems.  Because  air  is  introduced  into  the  house  at  discrete  locations,   outdoor  air  may  need  to  be  mixed  with  indoor  air  before  delivery  in  order  to  avoid   cold  air  drafts  in  the  winter.  An  in-­‐line  duct  heater  is  another  option,  but  it  will   increase  operating  costs.  

Balanced  Ventilation  Systems  

Balanced  ventilation  systems,  if  properly  designed  and  installed,  neither  pressurize   nor  depressurize  a  house.  Rather,  they  introduce  fresh  outside  air  and  exhaust   polluted  inside  air  in  roughly  equal  quantities.  

A  balanced  ventilation  system  usually  has  two  fans  and  two  duct  systems.  It   facilitates  effective  distribution  of  fresh  air  by  placing  supply  and  exhaust  vents  in   appropriate  places.  Fresh-­‐air  supply  and  exhaust  vents  can  be  installed  in  every   room.  But  a  typical  balanced  ventilation  system  is  designed  to  supply  fresh  air  to   bedrooms  and  living  rooms,  where  people  spend  the  most  time.  It  also  exhausts  air   from  rooms  where  moisture  and  pollutants  are  most  often  generated,  such  as  the   kitchen,  bathrooms,  and  perhaps  the  laundry  room.  Some  designs  may  use  a  single-­‐ point  exhaust.  Because  they  directly  supply  outside  air,  balanced  systems  allow  the   use  of  filters  to  remove  dust  and  pollen  from  outside  air  before  introducing  it  into   the  house.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

Page 115 of 170

   

 

   

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

 

Above:    diagram  of  a  balanced  ventilation  system  showing  a  side  view  of  a  simple  

house  with  an  attic,  living  space  and  basement  

In  the  attic  is  horizontal  ductwork  that  is  labeled  for  the  room  air  exhaust  ducts   leading  from  an  exhaust  fan  into  the  living-­‐space  rooms.  A  pipe  extending  vertically   from  the  exhaust  fan  and  through  the  roof  is  labeled  as  the  exhaust  air  outlet.  A  box  in   the  basement  labeled  as  the  supply  fan  has  two  ducts  leading  into  the  living  space  and   one  duct  leading  to  the  outside,  labeled  as  the  fresh-­‐air  inlet.  Arrows  on  the  label  show   air  flow  into  the  house  through  the  fresh-­‐air  inlet  in  the  basement,  moving  through  the  

Page 116 of 170

   

 

supply  fan  and  into  the  living  space,  through  the  room  air  exhaust  ducts,  into  the  

exhaust  fan  in  the  attic,  and  out  of  the  house  through  the  exhaust-­‐air  outlet  in  the  roof.  

Balanced  ventilation  systems  are  appropriate  for  all  climates.  However,  because   they  require  two  duct-­‐and-­‐fan  systems,  balanced  ventilation  systems  are  usually   more  expensive  to  install  and  operate  than  supply  or  exhaust  systems.  

Like  both  supply  and  exhaust  systems,  balanced  ventilation  systems  do  not  temper   or  remove  moisture  from  the  make-­‐up  air  before  it  enters  the  house.  Therefore,  they   may  contribute  to  higher  heating  and  cooling  costs,  unlike  energy-­‐recovery   ventilation  systems.  Also,  like  supply  ventilation  systems,  outdoor  air  may  need  to   be  mixed  with  indoor  air  before  delivery  to  avoid  cold  air  drafts  in  the  winter.  

Energy-­‐Recovery  Ventilation  System  

Energy-­‐recovery  ventilation  systems  provide  a  controlled  way  of  ventilating  a  home   while  minimizing  energy  loss.  They  reduce  the  costs  of  heating  ventilated  air  in  the   winter  by  transferring  heat  from  the  warm  inside  air  being  exhausted  to  the  fresh  

(but  cold)  supply  air.  In  the  summer,  the  inside  air  cools  the  warmer  supply  air  to   reduce  ventilation  cooling  costs.  

Types  of  Systems  

There  are  two  types  of  energy-­‐recovery  systems:  heat-­‐recovery  ventilators  (HRVs)   and  energy-­‐recovery  (or  enthalpy-­‐recovery)  ventilators  (ERVs).  Both  types  include   a  heat  exchanger,  one  or  more  fans  to  push  air  through  the  machine,  and  some   controls.  There  are  some  small  wall-­‐  and  window-­‐mounted  models,  but  most  are   central,  whole-­‐house  ventilation  systems  with  their  own  duct  systems  or  shared   ductwork.  

The  main  difference  between  a  heat-­‐recovery  and  an  energy-­‐recovery  ventilator  is   the  way  the  heat  exchanger  works.  With  an  energy-­‐recovery  ventilator,  the  heat   exchanger  transfers  a  certain  amount  of  water  vapor  along  with  heat  energy,  while  a   heat-­‐recovery  ventilator  transfers  only  heat.  

Because  an  energy-­‐recovery  ventilator  transfers  some  of  the  moisture  from  the   exhaust  air  to  the  usually  less  humid  incoming  winter  air,  the  humidity  of  the   house's  interior  air  stays  more  constant.  This  also  keeps  the  heat  exchanger  core   warmer,  which  minimizes  problems  with  freezing.  

In  the  summer,  an  energy-­‐recovery  ventilator  may  help  to  control  humidity  in  the   house  by  transferring  some  of  the  water  vapor  in  the  incoming  air  to  the  

(theoretically)  drier  air  that's  leaving  the  house.  In  homes  with  an  air  conditioner,    

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

Page 117 of 170

   

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        an  energy-­‐recovery  ventilator  generally  offers  better  humidity  control  than  a  heat-­‐ recovery  system.  However,  there's  some  controversy  about  using  ventilation   systems  at  all  during  humid  (but  not  excessively  hot)  summer  weather.  Some   experts  suggest  that  it  is  better  to  turn  the  system  off  in  very  humid  weather  to  keep   indoor  humidity  low.  A  system  can  also  be  set  up  that  runs  only  when  the  air-­‐ conditioning  system  is  running,  or  by  using  pre-­‐cooling  coils.  

Most  energy-­‐recovery  ventilation  systems  can  recover  about  70%  to  80%  of  the   energy  in  the  exiting  air  and  deliver  that  energy  to  the  incoming  air.  However,  they   are  most  cost-­‐effective  in  climates  with  extreme  winters  and/or  summers,  and   where  fuel  costs  are  high.  In  mild  climates,  the  cost  of  the  additional  electricity   consumed  by  the  system's  fans  may  exceed  the  energy  savings  from  not  having  to   condition  the  supply  air.  

Installation  and  Maintenance  

Energy-­‐recovery  ventilation  systems  usually  cost  more  to  install  than  other   ventilation  systems.  In  general,  simplicity  is  key  to  a  cost-­‐effective  installation.  To   save  on  installation  costs,  many  systems  share  existing  ductwork.  Complex  systems   are  not  only  more  expensive  to  install,  but  they  are  generally  more  maintenance-­‐ intensive  and  often  consume  more  electrical  power.  For  most  houses,  attempting  to   recover  all  of  the  energy  in  the  exhaust  air  will  probably  not  be  worth  the  additional   cost.  Also,  these  types  of  ventilation  systems  are  still  not  very  common.  Only  a   minority  of  HVAC  contractors  have  enough  technical  expertise  and  experience  to   install  them.  

In  general,  there  should  be  a  supply  and  return  duct  for  each  bedroom  and  each   common  living  area.  Duct  runs  should  be  as  short  and  straight  as  possible.  The   correct-­‐size  duct  is  necessary  to  minimize  pressure  drops  in  the  system  and  thus   improve  performance.  Insulate  ducts  located  in  unheated  spaces,  and  seal  all  joints   with  duct  mastic.    Despite  its  name,  never  use  ordinary  duct  tape  on  ducts.  

Also,  energy-­‐recovery  ventilation  systems  operating  in  cold  climates  must  have   devices  to  help  prevent  freezing  and  frost  formation.  Very  cold  supply  air  can  cause   frost  formation  in  the  heat  exchanger,  which  can  damage  it.  Frost  buildup  also   reduces  ventilation  effectiveness.  

Page 118 of 170

   

 

Energy-­‐recovery  ventilation  systems  require  more  maintenance  than  other   ventilation  systems.  They  need  to  be  cleaned  regularly  to  prevent  deterioration  of   ventilation  rates  and  heat  recovery,  and  to  prevent  mold  and  bacteria  from  growing   on  the  heat  exchanger's  surfaces.      

 

Spot  Ventilation  

Spot  ventilation  improves  the  effectiveness  of  natural  and  whole-­‐house  ventilation   strategies  by  removing  indoor  air  pollutants  and/or  moisture  at  their  source.  

Kitchens,  bathrooms,  lavatories,  laundry  rooms,  utility  rooms  and  toilet  rooms  all   have  specific  functions  in  the  home.  These  functions  produce  pollutants,  such  as   moisture,  odors,  volatile  organic  compounds  (VOCs),  particles  and  combustion   byproducts.  The  purpose  of  spot  ventilation  is  to  control  the  concentration  of  these   pollutants  in  the  room  they  were  emitted  into,  and  to  minimize  the  spread  of  the   pollutants  into  other  parts  of  the  house.  

Spot  ventilation  includes  the  use  of  localized  exhaust  fans,  such  as  those  used  above   kitchen  ranges  and  in  bathrooms.  The  American  Society  of  Heating,  Refrigerating   and  Air-­‐Conditioning  Engineers  (ASHRAE)  recommends  intermittent  or  continuous   ventilation  rates  for  bathrooms  and  kitchens  instead  of  using  windows  (natural   ventilation):  50  or  20  cubic  feet  per  minute  for  bathrooms,  and  100  or  25  cubic  feet   per  minute  for  kitchens,  respectively.        

Bathroom  Ventilation  

Bathroom  ventilation  systems  are  designed  to  exhaust  odors  and  moist  air  to  the   home's  exterior.  Typical  systems  consist  of  a  ceiling-­‐fan  unit  connected  to  a  duct   that  terminates  at  the  roof.    

Fan  Function      

 The  fan  may  be  controlled  in  one  of  several  ways:  

Most  are  controlled  by  a  conventional  wall  switch.  

A  timer  switch  may  be  mounted  on  the  wall,  which  is  recommended  to   prevent  an  accidental  fire  caused  by  a  unit  left  running  that  may  potentially   overheat.  

A  wall-­‐mounted  humidistat  can  be  pre-­‐set  to  turn  the  fan  on  and  off  based  on   different  levels  of  relative  humidity.  

Page 119 of 170

   

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Newer  fans  may  be  very  quiet  but  work  just  fine.  

Older  fans  may  be  very  noisy  or  very  quiet.  If  an   older  fan  is  quiet,  it  may  not  be  working  well.  

Inspectors  can  test  for  adequate  air  flow  with  a   chemical  smoke  pencil  or  a  powder  puff  bottle,   but  such  tests  exceed  InterNACHI's  Standards  of  

 

Practice.  

Bathroom  ventilation  fans  should  be  inspected   for  dust  buildup  that  can  impede  air  flow.  

Particles  of  moisture-­‐laden  animal  dander  and   lint  are  attracted  to  the  fan  because  of  its  static   charge.  Inspectors  should  comment  on  dirty  fan  covers.  

Ventilation  systems  should  be  installed  in  all  bathrooms.  This  includes  bathrooms   with  windows,  since  windows  will  not  be  opened  during  the  winter  in  cold  climates.  

Defects  

The  following  conditions  indicate  insufficient  bathroom  ventilation:  

• moisture  stains  on  walls  and/or  ceilings;   corrosion  of  metal;   visible  mold  on  walls  and/or  ceilings;   peeling  paint  or  wallpaper;   frost  on  windows;  and     high  humidity.  

The  most  common  defect  related  to  bathroom  ventilation  systems  is  improper   termination  of  the  duct.  Vents  must  terminate  at  the  home's  exterior.  The  most   common  improper  locations  for  terminations  are:  

• mid-­‐level  in  the  attic,  which  are  easy  to  spot;   beneath  the  insulation.  You  need  to  remember  to  look.  The  duct  may   terminate  beneath  the  insulation,  or  there  may  be  no  duct  installed;  and   beneath  attic  vents.  The  duct  must  terminate  at  the  home's  exterior  -­‐-­‐  not   just  above  the  ceiling  or  beneath  the  roof.  

Page 120 of 170

   

 

Improperly  terminated  ventilation  systems  may  appear  to  work  fine  from  inside  the   bathroom;  you  have  to  look  in  the  attic  or  on  the  roof.  Sometimes,  poorly  installed   ducts  will  loosen  or  become  disconnected  at  joints  and  connections.  

Ducts  that  leak  or  terminate  in  attics  can  cause  problems  from  condensation.  Warm,   moist  air  will  condense  on  cold  attic  framing,  insulation  and  other  materials.  This   condition  has  the  potential  to  cause  health  problems  and  structural  decay  issues   from  mold  growth,  as  well  as  damage  to  building  materials,  such  as  drywall.  

Moisture  also  reduces  the  effectiveness  of  thermal  insulation.  

Mold  

Perhaps  the  most  serious  consequence  of  an  improper  ventilation  setup  is  the   potential  accumulation  of  mold  in  attics  and  crawlspaces.  Mold  may  appear  as  a   fuzzy,  thread-­‐like,  cob-­‐webby  fungus,  although  it  cannot  be  identified  with  certainty   without  being  lab-­‐tested.  Health  problems  caused  by  mold  are  related  to  high   concentrations  of  spores  in  indoor  air.  

Mold  spores  resemble  microscopic  seeds  that  are  released  by  mold  fungi  when  they   reproduce.  Every  home  has  mold.  Moisture  levels  of  about  20%  in  building   materials  will  cause  mold  colonies  to  grow.  Inhaling  mold  spores  can  cause  health   problems  in  those  with  asthma  or  allergies,  as  well  as  serious  and  even  fatal  fungal   infections  in  those  with  lung  disease  and  compromised  immune  systems.  

Mold  is  sometimes  difficult  to  recognize  visually  and  must  be  tested  by  a  lab  in  order   to  be  accurately  identified.  Inspectors  should  refrain  from  calling  anything  mold  per  

se,  but  should  refer  to  anything  that  appears  to  be  mold  as  "a  material  that  appears   to  be  microbial  growth."  Inspectors  should  include  in  their  report,  as  well  as  in  the   inspection  agreement  signed  by  the  client,  a  disclaimer  that  explicitly  states  that  the  

General  Home  Inspection  is  an  inspection  for  safety  and  system  defects,  and  not  a   mold  inspection.    Trained  inspectors  may  wish  to  offer  mold  inspections  as  an   ancillary  service.    Training  is  available  through  InterNACHI's  How  to  Perform  Mold  

Inspections  course.  

Decay,  which  is  rot,  is  also  caused  by  fungi.  Incipient  or  early  decay  cannot  be  seen.  

By  the  time  decay  becomes  visible,  wood  may  have  lost  up  to  50%  of  its  strength.  

In  order  to  grow,  mold  fungi  require  that  the  following  conditions  are  present:  

• oxygen;   a  temperature  between  approximately  45°  F  and  85°  F;   food.  This  includes  a  wide  variety  of  materials  generally  found  in  homes;  and   moisture.  

Page 121 of 170

   

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

If  any  of  these  requirements  are  of  insufficient   levels,  all  mold  growth  will  stop  and  the  fungi   will  go  dormant.  But  most  molds  are  difficult  to   actually  kill.  

Improper  Ventilation  

Even  though  mold  growth  may  take  place  in  the   attic,  mold  spores  can  be  sucked  into  the  living   areas  of  a  residence  by  low  air  pressure.  Low  

 

air  pressure  is  usually  created  by  the  expulsion   of  household  air  from  exhaust  fans  in   bathrooms  and  the  kitchen,  and  from  the   clothes  dryer  and  heating  equipment.  

Ventilation  ducts  must  be  made  of  appropriate  materials  and  oriented  effectively  in   order  to  ensure  that  stale  air  is  properly  exhausted.  

Ventilation  ducts  must:  

• terminate  outdoors.  Ducts  should  never  terminate  within  the  building   envelope;   contain  a  screen  or  louvered  (angled)  slats  at  their  termination  to  prevent   bird,  rodent  and  insect  entry;   be  as  short  and  straight  as  possible,  and  avoid  turns.  Longer  ducts  allow   more  time  for  vapor  to  condense  and  also  force  the  exhaust  fan  to  work   harder;   be  insulated,  especially  in  colder  climates.  Cold  ducts  encourage  the   formation  of  condensation;   protrude  at  least  several  inches  from  the  roof;   be  equipped  with  a  roof  termination  cap  that  protects  the  duct  from  the   elements;  and     be  installed  to  manufacturer's  recommendations.  

The  following  tips  are  helpful,  although  not  required.  Ventilation  ducts  should:  

Page 122 of 170

   

 

• be  made  from  inflexible  metal,  PVC,  or  other  rigid  material.  Unlike  dryer   exhaust  vents,  they  should  not  droop;  and     have  a  smooth  interior.  Ridges  encourage  vapor  to  condense,  allowing  water   to  back-­‐flow  into  the  exhaust  fan  or  leak  through  joints  onto  vulnerable   surfaces.  

Above  all  else,  a  bathroom  ventilation  fan  should  be  connected  to  a  duct  capable  of   venting  water  vapor  and  odors  out  to  the  exterior.  Mold  growth  within  the   bathroom  or  attic  is  a  clear  indication  of  improper  ventilation  that  must  be   corrected  in  order  to  avoid  structural  decay  and  respiratory  health  issues.  

Quiz  11  

T/F:  A  balanced,  whole-­‐house  ventilation  system,  if  properly  designed  and  installed,   will  neither  pressurize  nor  depressurize  a  house.  

True  

False  

Energy-­‐recovery  ventilation  systems  provide  a  controlled  way  of  ventilating  a  home   while  minimizing  ______  loss.  

• energy   water   air   humidity  

The  purpose  of  ______  ventilation  is  to  control  the  concentration  of  pollutants  in  the   room  they  were  emitted  into,  and  to  minimize  the  spread  of  pollutants  into  other   parts  of  the  house.  

• spot   heat-­‐recovery   natural   whole-­‐house  

T/F:  Bathroom  vents  must  terminate  at  the  home's  exterior.  

True  

False  

Windows  

Page 123 of 170

   

 

Types  and  Characteristics  

This  section  deals  with  the  common  details  and  styles  of  windows  that  may  be   observed  during  an  inspection  of  the  interior.    At  the  end  of  this  section,  you  should   be  able  to:  

• list  the  different  types  of  the  most  common  windows;   describe  how  each  type  of  window  operates;  and   list  the  components  of  a  typical  double-­‐hung  window.  

 

Fixed  

Fixed  windows  are  sometimes  referred  to  as  picture  windows.    A  fixed  window  does   not  open.    

Picture  Window  

A  picture  window  is  a  very  large  fixed  window  in  a  wall.    Picture  windows  are   intended  to  provide  an  unimpeded  view.  

Double-­‐Hung  

A  double-­‐hung  window  has  two   operable  sashes  that  move.    Many   older  and  historic  homes  have  double-­‐ hung  windows.    This  window  is  a   traditional  style  of  window  in  the  

U.S.    The  window  has  two  parts  or   sashes  that  overlap  slightly  and  slide   up  and  down  inside  the  frame.      Most   new  double-­‐hung  sash  windows  use   spring  balances  to  support  the   sashes.    Traditionally,  counterweights   were  used.  The  weights  are  attached   to  the  sashes  using  pulleys  of  either  a   cord  or  chain.  

Horizontal  Sliding  

A  horizontal  sliding-­‐sash  window  has  two  or  more  sashes  that  overlap  slightly  but   slide  horizontally  within  the  frame.    In  the  U.K.,  these  are  sometimes  called  

Yorkshire  sash  windows.    The  entire  window  may  have  sliders,  or,  more  typically,    

Page 124 of 170

   

 

 

 

 

   

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        only  one  sash  slides.    These  sliders  are  similar  to  patio  door  sliders,  where  one  slider   door  is  fixed  and  the  other  slides  open  and  closed.    

Single-­‐Hung  

Single-­‐hung  windows  have  a  fixed  and  an  operable  sash.    The  operable  sash  is   usually  located  on  the  bottom,  and  the  fixed  is  located  at  the  top  of  the  window.  

Casement  

A  casement  window  is  one  that  is  hinged,  usually  at  the  side,  and  sometimes  at  the   top  or  bottom.    The  sash  swings  in  or  out,  much  like  a  door,  comprising  either  a  side-­‐ hung,  top-­‐hung,  or,  occasionally,  a  bottom-­‐hung  sash,  or  a  combination  of  these   types.    In  the  U.S.,  these  windows  are  usually  opened  using  a  crank.    In  Europe,  they   tend  to  use  friction  mechanisms  and  espagnolette  locking.    If  the  window  opens   outward,  a  crank,  stay  or  friction  hinge  is  necessary  in  order  to  hold  the  window  in   position.  

Page 125 of 170

   

 

Awning  (Casement)  Window  

 

An  awning  window  is  a  casement  window  that  is  hinged  at  the  top.    The  window   hangs  horizontally  by  the  hinges.    It  swings  outward  like  an  awning.    It  usually  opens   outward  and  operates  with  a  crank.  

Hopper  (Casement)  Window  

A  hopper  window  is  a  casement  window  that  has  hinges  on  the  bottom.    Usually,  the   window  opens  inward  toward  the  living  space,  rather  than  outward.  

Jalousie  or  Louver  

A  jalousie  window  consists  of  parallel  glass,  acrylic  or  wooden  louvers  set  in  a   frame.  The  louvers  are  locked  together  onto  a  track  so  that  they  may  be  tilted  open   and  shut  in  unison  to  control  air  flow  through  the  window.    When  the  window  is   closed,  the  louvers  overlap   each  other  in  a  shingle   pattern.  

Jalousie  windows  are  best-­‐ suited  for  porches  that  are   not  climate-­‐controlled  and   are  in  mild-­‐winter   climates.    They  are  common   on  mid-­‐20th-­‐century  homes   in  Florida  and  other  southern   states  of  the  U.S.    They  are   also  common  in  Hawaii.  

They  are  good  for  providing   ventilation.    They  are  not   weathertight.    They  are  not   good  insulators  in  northern   climates  if  energy  efficiency  is   a  concern.    They  can  remain   open  during  rain  and  yet  keep   most  of  the  rain  from  entering   because  of  the  shingle   orientation.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

Page 126 of 170

   

   

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Transom  

A  transom  window  is  located  above  a  door.    In  an  exterior  door,  the  transom   window  is  typically  fixed.    In  an  interior  door,  it  may  open.    In  an  older  house,  the   function  of  an  interior  transom  window  that  opens  was  to  provide  ventilation   before  the  forced-­‐air  HVAC  system  was  introduced.  

Bay  Window  

A  bay  window  is  a  multi-­‐panel  window  with  at  least  two  panels  set  at  different   angles  to  create  a  projection  from  the  wall.  

Emergency  Escape  and  Egress  

This  is  a  window  designed  to  allow  occupants  to  escape  through  the  opening  in  an   emergency,  such  as  a  fire.    In  the  United  States,  specifications  for  emergency   windows  in  bedrooms  are  provided  in  many  building  codes.  

The  term  

“light”   glass  

Lite/Light  

"lite"  or   refers  to  a  

 

Page 127 of 170

   

  pane.    Several  lites  may   be  installed  in  a   window.    For  example,  a   fixed  window  has  one   lite.    A  single-­‐light  can   refer  to  one  piece  of  glass   in  a  sash.    A  horizontal   slider  has  two  lites,  with   one  sash  fixed  and  the   other  a  slider.    A  double-­‐ light  refers  to  two  lites  of   a  window.    

Muntins  

The  lites  in  a  window   sash  are  divided   horizontally  and   vertically  by  narrow   strips  of  wood  or  metal   called  muntins.    Muntins   divide  a  sash  into  smaller   lites  or  panes.    

In  many  modern  windows,  the  muntins  are  not  true  muntins  but  are  decorative   only.    Fake  muntins  are  mounted  either  on  the  interior-­‐side  of  the  glass,  or  they  are   installed  between  two  panes  of  a  double-­‐glazed  window.    They  may  be  made  of   wood,  metal  or  plastic.  

Mullion  

A  mullion  is  a  structural  element  that  divides  adjacent  window  units.    “Mullion”  is   often  confused  with  "muntin"  (or  "glazing  bar"  in  the  U.K.),  which  is  the  term  for  the   small  strips  of  wood  or  metal  that  divide  a  sash  into  smaller  glass  panes  or  lites.  

A  mullion  acts  as  a  structural  member,  and  it  may  also  carry  the  dead  load  of  the   weight  above  the  opening.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 128 of 170

   

 

In  Florida  and  other  states,  mullions  are  required  to  be  engineered  to  resist  wind-­‐ load  forces.    Often,  the  structural  opening  is  designed  with  a  header  to  support  the   loads  across  the  entire  span  of  the  multiple  window  units  that  are  “mulled”  together,   and  the  mullion  carries  no  dead  load.    Typically,  a  “mull  bar”  includes  special   brackets  and  fasteners  to  attach  it  to  the  rough  header  and  sill  designed  and  tested   to  resist  the  horizontal  forces  of  high  wind  loads.    The  whole  process  is  called  

“mulling”  windows  together.    Window  units  can  be  factory-­‐mulled  or  field-­‐mulled.  

Special  thanks  to  member  David  W.  Martin  for  his  contribution.  

Condensation  in  Double-­‐Paned  Windows  

Condensation  is  the  accumulation  of  liquid  water  on  relatively  cold  surfaces.  

Almost  all  air  contains  water  vapor,  which  is  the  gas  phase  of  water  and  is  composed   of  tiny  water  droplets.  The  molecules  in  warm  air  are  far  apart  from  one  another   and  allow  the  containment  of  a  relatively  large  quantity  of  water  vapor.  As  air  cools,   its  molecules  get  closer  together  and  squeeze  the  tiny  vapor  droplets  closer   together,  as  well.  A  critical  temperature,  known  as  the  dew  point,  exists  where  these   water  droplets  will  be  forced  so  close  together  that  they  merge  into  visible  liquid   in  the  process  called  condensation.  

Household  air  is  humidified  from  high  levels  of  water  vapor  in  human  and  animal   exhalation,  plant  transpiration,  and  household  appliances  and  fixtures,  such  as   showers  and  dryers.  This  humidity  can  rise  significantly  higher  than  exterior  air   because  of  the  insulation  design  of  the  house.  Cold  indoor  surfaces  can  cool  the   surrounding  air  enough  to  force  vapor  to  condense.  This  often  happens  on  single-­‐ paned  windows  because  they  lack  the  necessary  thermal  insulation   available  in  higher-­‐quality  windows.  Double-­‐pane  windows  have  a  layer  of  gas  -­‐-­‐   usually,  argon  or  air  -­‐-­‐  trapped  between  the  two  panes  of  glass  and  should  be   insulated  enough  to  prevent  the  accumulation  of  condensation.  If  this  type  of   window  appears  misty  or  foggy,  it  means  that  its  seal  has  failed  and  the  window   needs  to  be  replaced.  

Silica  Desiccant  

A  desiccant  is  an  absorptive  material  designed  to   maintain  dryness  within  its  vicinity.  A  common  type   of  desiccant  is  silica  gel,  a  porous  plastic  used  to   prevent  spoilage  in  various  food  products,  as  well  as   supplied  in  the  pockets  of  new  clothing  and  within   new  shoes  and  leather  goods  to  prevent  the   accumulation  of  moisture  during  temperature   extremes  that  are  typical  when  such  goods  are   shipped  from  their  manufacturers  to  their  

Page 129 of 170

   

  distributors  in  distant  locations.    In  a  window,  a  tightly  packed  assortment  of  silica   pellets  is  contained  inside  the  aluminum  perimeter  strip  to  dehumidify  incoming   household  air  that  is  not  stopped  by  the  window’s  seal.  If  not  for  this  substance,   incoming  air  could  condense  on  the  glass.  

Silica  gel  has  an  immense  surface  area  -­‐-­‐  approximately  800  m²/g  -­‐-­‐  which  allows  it   to  absorb  water  vapor  for  years.  Eventually,  the  silica  pellets  will  become  saturated   and  will  no  longer  be  able  to  prevent  condensation  from  forming.  A  double-­‐paned   window  that  appears  foggy  has  failed  and  needs  to  be  repaired  or  replaced.  

Why  Double-­‐Paned  Windows  Fail:    Solar  (Thermal)  

Pumping  

Although  double-­‐paned  windows  appear  to  be  stable,  they  actually  experience  a   daily  cycle  of  expansion  and  contraction  caused  by  thermal  pumping.    This  process   occurs  when  sunlight  heats  the  air  space  between  the  panes  and  causes  the  gas   there  to  heat  up  and  pressurize.  Expanding  gas   cannot  leave  the  chamber  between  the  panes,   and  causes  the  glass  to  bulge  outward  during  the   day  and  contract  at  night  to  accommodate  the   changing  pressures.  This  motion  acts  like  the   bellows  of  a  forge,  pumping  minute  amounts  of   air  in  and  out  of  the  air  space  between  the  panes.  

Over  time,  the  constant  pressure  fluctuations   caused  by  thermal  pumping  will  stress  the  seal   and  challenge  its  ability  to  prevent  the  flow  of   gas  in  and  out  of  the  window  chamber.  If  it  is   cold  enough,  incoming  humid  air  has  the   potential  to  condense  on  the  window's  surface.  

Can  failed  windows  be  repaired?  

Inspectors  should  be  aware  that  there  are  companies  that  claim  to  be  able  to  repair   misty  windows  through  a  process  known  as  de-­‐fogging.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 130 of 170

   

 

This  repair  method  proceeds  in  the  following  order:  

1. A  hole  is  drilled  into  the  window,  usually  from  the  outside,  and  a  cleaning   solution  is  sprayed  into  the  air  chamber.  

2. The  solution  and  any  other  moisture  are  sucked  out  through  a  vacuum.  

3. A  de-­‐fogger  device  is  permanently  inserted  into  the  hole  that  will  allow  the   release  of  moisture  during  thermal  pumping.  

Inspectors  should  know  that  there  is  currently  a  debate  as  to  whether  this  process  is   a  suitable  repair  for  windows  that  have  failed,  or  if  it  merely  removes  the  symptom   of  this  failure.  Condensation  appears  between  double-­‐paned  windows  when  the  seal   is  compromised,  and  removal  of  this  water  will  not  fix  the  seal  itself.  A  window  

“repaired”  in  this  manner,  although  absent  of  condensation,  might  not  provide  any   additional  insulation.  This  method  is  still  fairly  new  and  opinions  about  its   effectiveness  range  widely.  Regardless,  de-­‐fogging  certainly  allows  for  cosmetic   improvement,  which  is  of  some  value  to  homeowners.  It  also  removes  any  potential   damage  caused  by  condensation  in  the  form  of  mold  or  rot.  

Window  condensation  will  inevitably  lead  to  irreversible  physical  damage  to  the   window.  This  damage  can  appear  in  the  following  two  ways:  

• riverbedding:    Condensed  vapor  between  the  glass  panes  will  form  droplets   that  run  down  the  length  of  the  window.  Water  that  descends  in  this  fashion   has  the  tendency  to  follow  narrow  paths  and  carve  grooves  into  the  glass   surface.  These  grooves  are  formed  in  a  process  similar  to  canyon  formation.   silica  haze:    Once  the  silica  gel  has  been  saturated,  it  will  be  eroded  by   passing  air  currents  and  accumulate  as  white  “snowflakes”  on  the  window's   surface.  It  is  believed  that  if  this  damage  is  present,  the  window  must  be   replaced.  

Thermal  Imaging  as  a  Detection  Tool  

The  presence  of  condensation  in  double-­‐paned  windows  means  that  they  have   failed,  but  the  absence  of  condensation  does  not  mean  that  the  window  is  fully   functional.  This  latter  fact  is  especially  true  in  hot,   dry  environments,  and  when  the  temperature   inside  a  house  is  the  same  as  the  temperature   outside.  A  method  has  recently  developed  that  uses   infrared  (IR  or  thermal)  imaging  to  provide  a   better  determinant  of  faulty  windows.  

Home  inspectors  can  become  trained  to  use   thermal  imaging  cameras  to  test  for  heat  transfer   through  windowpanes  (and  other  interior   locations).  In  NACHI.TV's  Introduction  to  Infrared  

Page 131 of 170

   

 

Thermography  course,  John  McKenna  explains  how  an  IR  camera  can  be  used  to   identify  failed  windows  by  imaging  any  unusual  temperature  gradients.  Even  the   slightest  entry  of  cold  exterior  air  into  the  home  that  would  ordinarily  go  unnoticed   will  stand  out  as  a  dark  blue  haze  in  an  IR  image.  A  trained  inspector  can  stand   outside  or  inside  the  house  and  watch  for  the  escape  of  warm  air  or  the  entrance  of   cool  air,  respectively.  A  trained  inspector  will  compare  images  of  individual   windows  in  a  residence  and  look  for  anomalies.  

In  summary,  condensation  in  double-­‐paned  windows  indicates  that  the  window  has   failed  and  needs  to  be  replaced.  Condensation,  while  it  can  damage  windows,  is  itself   a  symptom  of  a  lack  of  integrity  of  the  window’s  seal.  A  failing  seal  will  allow  air  to   transfer  in  and  out  of  the  window  even  if  it  is  firmly  closed.  Inspectors  should  be   aware  of  this  process  and  know  when  to  recommend  that  clients’  windows  be   replaced.  

Safety  Glass  

Safety  glass  is  a  stronger,  safer  version  of  ordinary  glass.  It  is  often  used  in  locations   where  human  harm  due  to  breakage  is  likely,  such  as  in  vehicles  and  low  windows.  

It  is  manufactured  in  the  following  two  forms:  

Laminated  safety  glass  is  typically  found  in  car  windshields.  It  is  produced  by   bonding  a  resin  or  a  thin,  transparent  plastic  film,  known  as  PVB,  between   multiple  sheets  of  ordinary  glass.  The  effect  of  this  process  is  that,  when   shattered,  the  glass  will  adhere  to  the  plastic  sheet  and  be  held  in  place.  

Laminated  safety  glass  blocks  most  ultraviolet  radiation,  as  well  as  sound,   and  is  used  in  cutting  boards,  thermometers,  and  bullet-­‐resistant  windows  in   banks.  

Tempered  safety  glass  fractures  parallel  to  its  edge,  rather  than   perpendicular,  and  when  it  shatters,  it  breaks  into  small,  rounded,  generally   safe  pieces.  It  is  created  by  heating  glass  to  a  high  temperature  and  then   rapidly  cooling  it  to  produce  compression  stress  fractures  on  the  surface,   while  retaining  tension  in  the  center.  The  glass  is  several  times  stronger  as  a   result  of  this  process,  and  it  can  withstand  significantly  higher  temperatures.  

Tempered  safety  glass  is  commonly  found  in  rear  and  side  windows  of    

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 132 of 170

   

  vehicles,  computer  monitors  and  storm  doors.  Unlike  laminated  safety  glass,  it   cannot  be  custom-­‐cut  once  it  is  formed.  

Where  in  a  home  might  you  find  it?

 

Laminated  glass  may  sometimes  be  found  in  shower  enclosures,  but  it  is  generally   uncommon  in  homes.  Tempered  glass  appears  more  often  and  can  be  found  in   storm  doors,  skylights,  sliding  glass  doors,  and  unsafe  locations.  Safety  glass  should   be  found  in  locations  considered  to  be,  according  to  the  2006  International  

Residential  Code  (IRC),  “subject  to  human  impact.”  It  describes  these  locations,  as   well  as  their  exceptions,  in  R308.4:    Hazardous  Locations,  under  Section  R308,  

Glazing,  as  the  following:  

R308.4:  The  following  shall  be  considered  specifically  hazardous:  

Locations  for  the  Purposes  of  Glazing:  

glazing  in  swinging  doors  except  jalousies;  

glazing  in  fixed  and  sliding  panels  of  sliding  door  assemblies,  and  panels  in  

sliding  and  bifold  closet  door  assemblies;  

glazing  in  storm  doors;  

glazing  in  all  unframed  swinging  doors;  

glazing  in  doors  and  enclosures  for  hot  tubs,  whirlpools,  saunas,  steam  rooms,  

bathtubs  and  showers;  

glazing  in  any  part  of  a  building  wall  enclosing  these  compartments  where  the   bottom  exposed  edge  of  the  glazing  is  less  than  60  inches  (1,524  mm)  measured  

vertically  above  any  standing  or  walking  surface;  

glazing  in  an  individual  fixed  or  operable  panel  adjacent  to  a  door  where  the   nearest  vertical  edge  is  within  a  24-­‐inch  (610  mm)  arc  of  the  door  in  a  closed   position,  and  whose  bottom  edge  is  less  than  60  inches  (1,524  mm)  above  the  

floor  or  walking  surface;  

glazing  in  an  individual  fixed  or  operable  panel,  other  than  those  locations  

described  in  Items  5  and  6  above,  that  meets  all  of  the  following  conditions:   o o o o

exposed  area  of  an  individual  pane  larger  than  9  square  feet  (0.836  

mm);  

bottom  edge  less  than  18  inches  (457  mm)  above  the  floor;  

top  edge  more  than  36  inches  (914  mm)  above  the  floor;  

one  or  more  walking  surfaces  within  36  inches  (914  mm)  horizontally  of  

the  glazing.  

all  glazing  in  railings,  regardless  of  an  area  or  height  above  a  walking  surface;  

included  are  structural  baluster  panels  and  non-­‐structural  infill  panels;  

glazing  in  walls  and  fences  enclosing  indoor  and  outdoor  swimming  pools,  hot   tubs  and  spas  where  the  bottom  edge  of  the  glazing  is  less  than  60  

Page 133 of 170

   

 

inches  (1,524  mm)  above  a  walking  surface  and  within  60  inches  (1,524   mm)  horizontally  of  the  water’s  edge.  This  shall  apply  to  single  glazing  and  

all  panes  in  multiple  glazing;  

glazing  adjacent  to  stairways,  landings  and  ramps  within  36  inches  (914   mm)  horizontally  of  a  walking  surface  when  the  exposed  surface  of  the  glass  is   less  than  60  inches  (1,524  mm)  above  the  plane  of  the  adjacent  walking  

surface;  

glazing  adjacent  to  stairways  within  60  inches  (1,524  mm)  horizontally  of   the  bottom  tread  of  a  stairway  in  any  direction  when  the  exposed  surface  of  

the  glass  is  less  than  60  inches  (1,524  mm)  above  the  nose  of  the  tread.  

Exception:  The  following  products,  materials  and  uses  are  exempt  from  the  above  

hazardous  locations:  

openings  in  doors  through  which  a  3-­‐inch  (76-­‐mm)  sphere  is  unable  to  pass;  

glazing  in  Section  R308.4,  Items  1,  6  or  7,  in  decorative  glass;  

glazing  in  Section  R308.4,  Item  6,  when  there  is  an  intervening  wall  or  other  

permanent  barrier  between  the  door  and  the  glazing;  

glazing  in  Section  R308.4,  Item  6,  in  walls  perpendicular  to  the  plane  of  the   door  in  a  closed  position,  other  than  the  wall  toward  which  the  door  swings   when  opened,  or  where  access  through  the  door  is  to  a  closet  or  storage  area  3   feet  (914  mm)  or  less  in  depth.  Glazing  in  these  applications  shall  comply  

with  Section  R308.4,  Item  7;  

glazing  in  Section  R308.4,  Items  7  and  10,  when  a  protective  bar  is  installed  on   the  accessible  side(s)  of  the  glazing  36  inches  ±  2  inches  (914  mm  ±  51   mm)  above  the  floor.  The  bar  shall  be  capable  of  withstanding  a  horizontal   load  of  50  pounds  per  linear  foot  (730  N/m)  without  contacting  the  glass,  and  

be  a  minimum  of  1-­‐1/2  inches  (38  mm)  in  height;  

outboard  panes  in  insulating  glass  units  and  other  multiple  glazed  panels  in  

Section  R308.4,  Item  7,  when  the  bottom  edge  of  the  glass  is  25  feet  (7,620   mm)  or  more  above  grade,  a  roof,  walking  surfaces,  or  other  horizontal  [within  

45  degrees  (0.79  rad)  of  horizontal]  surface  adjacent  to  the  glass  exterior;  

louvered  windows  and  jalousies  complying  with  the  requirements  of  Section  

R308.2;  

mirrors  and  other  glass  panels  mounted  or  hung  on  a  surface  that  provides  a  

continuous  backing  support;  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 134 of 170

   

 

safety  glazing  in  Section  R308.4,  Items  10  and  11,  is  not  required  where:   o o o

the  side  of  a  stairway,  landing  or  ramp  has  a  guardrail  or  handrail,   including  balusters  or  infill  panels,  complying  with  the  provisions  of  the  

handrail  and  guardrail  requirements;  and  

the  plane  of  the  glass  is  more  than  18  inches  (457  mm)  from  the  railing;  

or  

when  a  solid  wall  or  panel  extends  from  the  plane  of  the  adjacent   walking  surface  to  34  inches  (863  mm)  to  36  inches  (914  mm)  above  the   floor,  and  the  construction  at  the  top  of  that  wall  or  panel  is  capable  of  

withstanding  the  same  horizontal  load  as  the  protective  bar.  

glass  block  panels  complying  with  Section  R610.  

How  do  you  identify  safety  glass?  

If  safety  glass  is  not  specifically  labeled  as  such,  there  are  often  signs  that  aid  in  its   identification.  Unfortunately,  it  may  be  impossible  to  identify  ordinary  glass  with   certainty  without  breaking  it.  

According  to  the  IRC,  tempered  glass  must  contain  an  identifying  label.  It  states  that   a  label  must  be  “acid-­‐etched,  sand-­‐blasted,  ceramic-­‐fired,  laser-­‐etched,  embossed,  or   be  of  a  type  which,  once  applied,  cannot  be  removed  without  being  destroyed.”  

Tempered  spandrel  glass,  an  opaque  glass  found  in  commercial  curtain  walls,  is   exempt  from  this  rule  because  an  etched  label  can  cause  the  entire  panel  to  fracture.  

Of  multi-­‐pane  assemblies  containing  safety  glass,  the  IRC  states  the  following:  

R308.1.1  Identification  of  multi-­‐pane  assemblies:    Multi-­‐pane  assemblies  having   individual  panes  not  exceeding  1  square  foot  (0.09  m

2

)  in  exposed  area  shall  have  at   least  one  pane  in  the  assembly  identified  in  accordance  with  Section  R308.1.  All  other  

panes  in  the  assembly  shall  be  labeled  "16CFR1201."  

 

Section  R308.1  details  identification  as  follows:  

R308.1  Identification:  Except  as  indicated  in  Section  R308.1.1,  each  pane  of  glazing   installed  in  hazardous  locations  as  defined  in  Section  R308.4  shall  be  provided  with  a   manufacturer's  or  installer’s  label,  designating  the  type  and  thickness  of  glass  and  the   safety  glazing  standard  with  which  it  complies,  which  is  visible  in  the  final  installation.  

The  label  shall  be  acid-­‐etched,  sand-­‐blasted,  ceramic-­‐fired,  embossed-­‐mark,  or  shall  

be  of  a  type  which,  once  applied,  cannot  be  removed  without  being  destroyed.  

Country-­‐specific  laws  similarly  require  a  permanent  label  on  most  or  all  safety  glass.  

In  the  U.K.,  for  instance,  tempered  glass  must  include  a  “T,”  and  laminated  glass   must  include  an  “L.”  New  Zealand  requires,  according  to  Clause  303.7  of  NZS  4223:  

Page 135 of 170

   

 

Part  3:  1999,  that  all  safety  glass  include  a  label  at  the  bottom  that  includes  the   following  information:  

• the  name,  registered  trademark  or  code  of  the  manufacturer  or  supplier;   the  type  of  safety  glazing  material.  This  may  be  in  the  form  of  a  code,  such  as  

"T"  for  toughened  glass,  or  "L"  for  laminated  glass,  as  indicated  by  the   relevant  test  Standard  (refer  to  AS/NZS  2208);   the  Standard  to  which  the  safety  glazing  material  has  been  tested,  e.g.  

AS/NZS  2208;   if  applicable,  the  classification  relating  to  impact-­‐test  behaviour,  i.e.,  A  for  

Grade  A,  B  for  Grade  B,  C  for  Grade  C.  

Laminated  safety  glass  is  often  labeled,  although  codes  do  not  always  require  it  to   be.  An  easy  way  to  tell  if  unlabeled  glass  is  laminated  is  by  examining  the  reflection   of  your  hand  or  some  other  object.  As  there  are  two  pieces  of  glass,  you  should  see   two  different  images,  but  you  must  be  careful  not  to  confuse  them  with  the  inner   and  outer  surfaces  of  a  single  sheet  of  ordinary  glass.  Laminated  glass  is  also  slightly   thicker  than  ordinary  glass,  although  this  difference  is  difficult  to  discern  without   the  aid  of  very  precise  measuring  instruments.  

Tempered  glass  can  also  be  identified  through  polarized  glasses  when  viewed  from   an  angle.  Black  lines,  a  result  of  the  heating  and  cooling  process,  should  appear  as   you  approach  the  glass’s  side  and  your  angle  from  the  glass  surface  increases.  

When  uncertain,  property  inspectors  should  always  assume  that  glass  is  not  safety   glass.  

Doors  

Details  and  Styles  

This  section  deals  with  the  common  details  and  styles  of  doors  that  may  be   observed  during  an  inspection  of  the  interior.    At  the  end  of  this  section,  the   inspector  should  be  able  to:  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Page 136 of 170

   

 

 

• list  the  different  types  of  the  most  common  doors;   describe  how  each  type  of  door  operates;  and   list  the  components  of  a  typical  panel  door.  

 

A  door  is  a  movable  barrier  used  to  cover  an  opening.    A  door  can  be  opened  to   provide  egress.    It  can  be  closed  and  secured  using  a  lock.    When  a  door  is  open,  it   brings  in  light  and  ventilation.  Doors  assist  in  preventing  the  spread  of  fire.    Doors   can  reduce  noise.  

There  are  all  kinds  of  doors.    There  are  many  names  for  different  doors,  depending   upon  their  purpose.  

The  most  common  type  of  door  consists  of  a  single  rigid  panel  that  fills  the   doorway.      

Types    

A  Dutch  door  is  divided  in  half  horizontally. &