null  User manual
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blind folio i
Third Edition
Frank McPherson
McGraw-Hill/Osborne
New York Chicago San Francisco Lisbon
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McGraw-Hill/Osborne
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contact McGraw-Hill/Osborne at the above address. For information on translations or book
distributors outside the U.S.A., please see the International Contact Information page
immediately following the index of this book.
How to Do Everything with Your Pocket PC, Third Edition
Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Printed in the United
States of America. Except as permitted under the Copyright Act of 1976, no part of this publication
may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval
system, without the prior written permission of publisher, with the exception that the program
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for publication.
1234567890 CUS CUS 019876543
ISBN 0-07-222979-9
Publisher
Vice President &
Associate Publisher
Acquisitions Editor
Project Editor
Acquisitions Coordinator
Technical Editor
Copy Editor
Proofreader
Indexer
Composition
Illustrators
Series Design
Cover Series Design:
Brandon A. Nordin
Scott Rogers
Tim Green
Julie M. Smith
Tana Allen
Todd Ogasawara
Lisa Theobald
Stefany Otis
Valerie Perry
Carie Abrew
Melinda Moore Lytle, Kathleen Fay Edwards, Dick Schwartz
Mickey Galicia
Dodie Shoemaker
This book was composed with Corel VENTURA™ Publisher.
Information has been obtained by McGraw-Hill/Osborne from sources believed to be reliable. However, because of the possibility of
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HP iPAQ 1940 image used by permission from Hewlett-Packard Company
Dell Axim X5 image used by permission from Dell™ Incorporated
ViewSonic Pocket PC V37 image courtesy of ViewSonic Corporation
Screen shot(s) reprinted by permission from Microsoft Corporation
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Dedication
Little did we know on a cold, clear, January night in 1990, just how much
our life would change. It was a group of people meeting after work for
food, drinks and fun. It was also a chance meeting between a man
and woman that became friendship,
love, and then marriage.
Some may call it luck, others destiny, I say it was the best day of my life.
Ever since that day my life has been blessed, and I live happy and loved.
This book is dedicated to my wife Ruth, who is one of the warmest,
most loving, and most caring persons I know.
I love you Ruth!
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About the Author
Frank McPherson is an avid user of handheld computers, starting with the Newton MessagePad
in 1993 and all versions of Microsoft Handheld, Palm-sized, and Pocket PCs. Since 1993 he has
been helping Newton, Handheld, and Pocket PC users online on Compuserve, the Microsoft
Network, and in Internet newsgroups. He developed and maintains the PocketPCHow2 Web site
(http://www.pocketpchow2.com), which is visited by Pocket PC users around the world seeking
help using their Pocket PCs.
Frank has been a sports columnist and reporter for the Norway Current, a weekly newspaper
in Norway, Michigan, and has also covered high school sports for the Iron Mountain Daily News
in Iron Mountain, Michigan. Articles written by Frank about Pocket PCs have appeared in Pocket
PC Magazine, Brighthand.com, and PocketPC.com.
He is a 1989 graduate of Michigan Technological University with a BS degree in Computer
Science. Frank is a Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer and Senior Information Specialist
at EDS, where he has been employed for over ten years. Originally from Norway, Michigan,
located in Michigan’s beautiful Upper Peninsula, this Yooper now lives in West Bloomfield,
Michigan with his wife, Ruth.
About the Technical Editor
Todd Ogasawara is currently the eGovernment Team Leader for the State of Hawaii Information
& Communications Services Division. He spent most of the past decade at GTE/Verizon as an
Advanced Technology Engineer. During that same period, he simultaneously worked as a contractor
for the Microsoft Network (MSN) and later ZDNet (when MSN migrated their Online Forums
to ZDNet) as the Online Forum Manager for both the Telephony and the Windows CE Forums. At
ZDNet, these Forums were renamed the Communications & Messaging Forum and the Handhelds
Forum.
Todd was privileged to have been the co-manager of the Communications & Messaging
Forum with the legendary Don Watkins (awarded the 1994 Dvorak PC Telecommunications
Lifetime Achievement Award) while at ZDNet. He served as an editor for the Microsoft Uplink
web site that focused on the Palm-size PC and authored dozens of articles for the Microsoft
PocketPC.com web site. He has been awarded the Microsoft Most Valuable Professional in the
Mobile Devices category for the past several years.
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Contents
Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
xv
xvii
PART I
Get Started with Your Pocket PC
CHAPTER 1
Welcome to Windows Mobile Software for Pocket PCs . . . . . . . . . .
3
Information Appliances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Microsoft PC Companions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows Mobile Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Handheld PCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Palm-Size PCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Auto PCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Handheld PC 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pocket PCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pocket PC Phone Edition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Looking to the Future . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows Mobile Software for Pocket PCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows CE .NET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ActiveSync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pocket Outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pocket Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Microsoft Money . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Play Music and Games . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Read Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connect to the Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wrapping Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4
6
7
8
8
10
10
11
12
12
13
13
14
15
15
15
15
16
16
16
Get Acquainted with Your Pocket PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17
Meet Your Pocket PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Review the Pocket PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set Up Your Pocket PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Meet the Today Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use the Pocket PC Start Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Work with Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18
18
22
24
25
28
CHAPTER 2
v
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How to Do Everything with Your Pocket PC
CHAPTER 3
CHAPTER 4
CHAPTER 5
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Get Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Print Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
File Storage and Program Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manage Files with File Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wrapping Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
30
32
32
33
34
38
Personalize Your Pocket PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
39
Change the Personal Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program Hardware Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure the Input Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change the Start Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edit Owner Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Turn on Password Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change Sounds & Notifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change the Today Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enter Information on Pocket PCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use the Software Input Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Try Alternative Recognizers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use External Keyboards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manage Running Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enhance the Today Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wrapping Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
40
41
42
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45
46
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49
51
51
58
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59
60
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Change Your Pocket PC System Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
63
Change the System Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change the Device Name Using About . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Align the Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjust the Backlight or Brightness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set the Clock and Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjust Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manage Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change the Regional Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remove Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manage Certificates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wrapping Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
64
64
66
66
67
69
71
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Connect Your Pocket PC with Desktop Computers . . . . . . . . . . . . .
75
Introducing ActiveSync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ActiveSync Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Install ActiveSync on Desktop PCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Start ActiveSync on Desktop PCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change Desktop ActiveSync Connection Settings . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connect with Desktop PCs by Using a Serial Connection . . . . . .
Connect with Desktop PCs by Using Infrared . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connect with Desktop PCs by Using Bluetooth . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
76
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Contents
Connect with Desktop PCs by Using Ethernet Networking . . . . .
Connect with Desktop PCs Using a Modem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wrapping Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 7
89
94
98
Synchronize Data with Desktop Computers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
99
Create a Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create Two Partnerships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Delete Partnerships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure Outlook Synchronization Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change Outlook Calendar Synchronization Settings . . . . . . . . . .
Change Outlook Contact Synchronization Settings . . . . . . . . . . .
Change Outlook Inbox Synchronization Settings . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change Task Synchronization Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change File Synchronization Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change Notes Synchronization Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change Favorites Synchronization Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change AvantGo Synchronization Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure Exchange Synchronization Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change Calendar Synchronization Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change Inbox Synchronization Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change Exchange Server Connection Information . . . . . . . . . . .
Change the Synchronization Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resolve Synchronization Conflicts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure File Conversion Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wrapping Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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103
107
108
109
110
110
112
112
113
113
115
116
117
117
118
120
121
122
123
Manage Your Pocket PC from Your Desktop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
125
Explore Files and Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Browse Files and Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Copy, Delete, and Rename Files and Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Back Up and Restore Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Define the Backup Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Define Where to Store the Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Restore from a Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Install and Remove Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use ActiveSync to Install Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use ActiveSync to Remove Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use Desktop Pass Through . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wrapping Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
126
127
128
129
130
131
131
132
132
135
135
136
PART II
Make the Most Out of Your Pocket PC
CHAPTER 8
Manage Appointments, Tasks, and Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
139
Use Pocket Outlook on Your Pocket PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Schedule Appointments Using Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create an Appointment in Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
140
142
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How to Do Everything with Your Pocket PC
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Enter Notes for Appointments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Schedule a Meeting Using Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edit the Appointment Category List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Filter Appointments by Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edit and Delete Appointments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Find Appointments in Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Send and Receive Appointments via Infrared . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure Calendar Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Store and Retrieve Addresses Using Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
View Addresses in Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change the Contact List View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create New Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edit and Delete Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edit the Contact Category List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Filter Contacts by Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Find Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Send E-Mail to a Contact . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Send and Receive Contacts via Infrared . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure Contact Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manage Your Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
View Your Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create New Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enter Notes for Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use the Task Entry Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edit and Delete Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edit the Task Category List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Filter Tasks by Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Find Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Send and Receive Tasks via Infrared . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure Task Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wrapping Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Call a Friend from Your Pocket PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
175
Buy a Pocket PC Phone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Make and Receive Phone Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Make Phone Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Receive Phone Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manage Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program Speed Dial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Send and Receive Text Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connect to the Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manage Your Mobile Data Bill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure the Pocket PC Phone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change the Phone Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change the Services Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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HowTo-Tght (8) / How to Do Everything with Your Pocket PC / McPherson / 222979-9 / Front Matter
Color profile: Generic CMYK printer profile
Composite Default screen
Contents
CHAPTER 10
CHAPTER 11
CHAPTER 12
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Change the Network Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change Device-Specific Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Consider Smartphone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wrapping Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
187
187
188
188
Create Documents with Pocket Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
189
Use Pocket Word on Your Pocket PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create, Open, and Save Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edit Your Pocket Word Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Copy Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Delete Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Search for a Text String . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Check the Spelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Format Your Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use the Four Pocket Word Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Express Yourself with Writing Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Get Artistic with Drawing Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Be Heard with Recording Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use the View Menu to Change the Screen Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Share Documents Easily with Other Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Copy and Delete Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wrapping Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
190
191
194
194
194
195
195
196
197
197
199
200
202
202
203
204
Crunch Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
205
Pocket Excel on the Pocket PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Start Pocket Excel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create a New Workbook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Save Workbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Move Around in Workbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Add Data and Formulas to Workbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change the View in Workbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edit Data in Workbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Format Data in Workbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Work with Data in Workbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Password-Protect Workbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Share Workbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Pocket PC Calculator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use Calculator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wrapping Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
206
208
209
210
210
211
214
217
220
222
225
225
226
226
227
Manage Your Money . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
229
Install Microsoft Money . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronize with Microsoft Money . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure Synchronization Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use Pocket Money . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create, Edit, and Delete Accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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HowTo-Tght (8) / How to Do Everything with Your Pocket PC / McPherson / 222979-9 / Front Matter
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How to Do Everything with Your Pocket PC
CHAPTER 13
CHAPTER 14
CHAPTER 15
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Use Accounts and the Account Register . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edit and Delete Transactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create, Edit, and Delete Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create, Edit, and Delete Payees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create, Edit, and Update Investments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wrapping Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
237
241
241
243
244
245
247
247
Take Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
249
Create, Open, and Save Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Write Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edit Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Zoom Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Make Voice Recordings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create Recordings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Send Notes and Recordings via E-Mail or Infrared . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronize Notes and Recordings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manage Your Notes and Recordings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Search for Notes and Recordings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronize the Outlook Journal Using CLC Journal . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create a Journal Entry Using CLC Journal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wrapping Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
250
250
252
252
252
253
255
256
257
258
259
260
261
262
View Pictures and Presentations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
263
View Pictures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
View Pictures Using Microsoft Pictures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
View Pictures Using IA Album . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edit Pictures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edit Pictures with Pocket Artist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edit Pictures with Photogenics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Show PowerPoint Presentations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Show Presentations Using Pocket SlideShow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create Presentations Using Pocket Slides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wrapping Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
264
266
268
272
272
273
274
276
278
280
Store and Query Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
281
Select a Pocket PC Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create Databases with HanDBase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Install HanDBase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create a Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enter and Edit Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronize Data with Your Desktop PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronize Microsoft Access Databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronize PC Databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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284
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HowTo-Tght (8) / How to Do Everything with Your Pocket PC / McPherson / 222979-9 / Front Matter
Color profile: Generic CMYK printer profile
Composite Default screen
Contents
CHAPTER 16
CHAPTER 17
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Monday, August 25, 2003 2:39:39 PM
Configure Database Synchronization Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronize Mobile Device Databases to the Desktop . . . . . . . .
Stop Database Synchronization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Work with Pocket Access Databases Using Data On The Run . . . . . . . .
Install Data On The Run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Open a Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
View Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Search for Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edit Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wrapping Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
291
291
292
292
292
292
293
293
294
294
294
Be Productive at Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
295
Bring Your Pocket PC to Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connect to Your PC at Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Work with Non-Microsoft Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Access the Corporate Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Secure Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use the Power-On Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use Anti-Virus Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Store Sensitive Information in Secure Databases . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assign Passwords to Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Encrypt Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connect to Corporate E-Mail Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Send and Receive E-Mail from Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Send and Receive E-Mail from Lotus Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Run Windows Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use Microsoft Mobile Terminal Server Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use Citrix Winframe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use Other Remote-Control Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wrapping Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
296
297
298
301
307
307
308
308
309
309
309
310
310
311
312
313
314
314
Travel with Your Pocket PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
315
Prepare to Travel with Your Pocket PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keep Your Pocket PC Running . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Plan How to Connect Your Pocket PC to the Internet . . . . . . . . .
Print on the Road . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Back Up Your Pocket PC on the Road . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Secure Your Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Turn Your Pocket PC into a Traveling Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Know Where to Go and How to Get There . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Language Translation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hit the Road . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Make Final Preparations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Complete a Travel Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wrapping Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
316
316
318
319
320
321
321
322
326
327
327
327
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HowTo-Tght (8) / How to Do Everything with Your Pocket PC / McPherson / 222979-9 / Front Matter
Color profile: Generic CMYK printer profile
Composite Default screen
xii
How to Do Everything with Your Pocket PC
CHAPTER 18
Relax with Games, Music, Books, and Movies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
329
Play Games on Your Pocket PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Download Games to Play . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use Emulators to Play Games . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Play Solitaire on Your Pocket PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure Solitaire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Play Jawbreaker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Play Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Play Music Using Windows Media Player . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Personalize Windows Media Player . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Copy Music to Your Pocket PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Where to Find Music on the Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Listen to Books Using Audible Player . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Read eBooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Read eBooks Using Microsoft Reader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Download Microsoft Reader eBooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Read eBooks Using Other Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Play Movies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Play Movies Using Windows Media Player . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Play Movies Using PocketTV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Watch TV Shows Using a Personal Video Station . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wrapping Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
330
331
332
333
335
336
337
338
340
341
341
342
343
343
346
347
348
348
348
349
349
PART III
Go Online with Your Pocket PC
CHAPTER 19
Connect to Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
353
Connection Improvements in Windows Mobile 2003 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connect to Networks Using Modems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create Modem Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manage Modem Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connect to Networks Using Virtual Private Networking . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure Proxy Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connect Using Wireless Modems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connect to Networks with Mobile Phones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connect to the Internet with Wireless Card Modems . . . . . . . . . .
Connect Using ActiveSync Desktop Pass Through . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connect to Local Area Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Select a Network Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure Network Interface Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use Network Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wrapping Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
354
356
358
360
363
365
366
368
368
372
372
373
374
376
381
383
Send and Receive E-Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
385
Use Inbox to Work with E-Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Start Inbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
386
388
CHAPTER 20
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Monday, August 25, 2003 2:39:39 PM
HowTo-Tght (8) / How to Do Everything with Your Pocket PC / McPherson / 222979-9 / Front Matter
Color profile: Generic CMYK printer profile
Composite Default screen
Contents
CHAPTER 21
CHAPTER 22
P:\010Comp\HowTo8\979-9\FM.vp
Monday, August 25, 2003 2:39:40 PM
Add Internet E-Mail Accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edit and Remove Accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronize E-Mail with Outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Send and Receive E-Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Compose a New E-Mail Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Read and Respond to E-Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manage Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manage Attachments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Receive Meeting Requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Find Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wrapping Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
389
392
392
394
396
399
400
402
403
403
403
Send and Receive Instant Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
405
Send and Receive Instant Messages Using MSN Messenger . . . . . . . . .
Send and Receive Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manage Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change MSN Messenger Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Send and Receive Instant Messages Using Other Services . . . . . . . . . . .
Send and Receive Instant Messages Using AIM . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Send and Receive Instant Messages Using ICQ . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Consolidate Instant Messaging to One Program . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Send and Receive Instant Messages Using iMov Messenger . . . .
Wrapping Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
406
407
410
410
411
411
413
414
415
416
Browse the Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
417
Start Pocket Internet Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Browse Websites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use the Address Bar and History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use Favorites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keep Track of Your Favorite Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Add to Favorites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronize Favorites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure Security Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Control Cookies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change the Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Control How Pages Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change the Home Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Store Web Pages on Your Pocket PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronize Mobile Favorites Content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
View Mobile Favorites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronize AvantGo Content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set Up with AvantGo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure AvantGo Connect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
View AvantGo Channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronize Content Using Mazingo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wrapping Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
419
420
421
421
421
422
422
423
423
423
424
424
424
425
426
427
427
428
430
431
432
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How to Do Everything with Your Pocket PC
PART IV
Customize Your Pocket PC
CHAPTER 23
Expand Your Pocket PC with Software and Hardware . . . . . . . . . . .
435
Find Pocket PC Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Download Free Software from Microsoft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Download Software from CNET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Download Software from HPC.net . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Download Games from PocketGamer.org . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Download Skins and Themes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Buy Pocket PC Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Top Ten Pocket PC Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PowerToys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create Lists with ListPro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Read the Bible with PocketBible . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Test Network Connections with vxUtil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create Outlines with Streamliner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Secure Information in eWallet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Explore the Pocket PC Registry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Capture Screenshots with Pocket ScreenSnap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Print Pocket Word Documents and E-Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
View Flash Content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Add Storage Space with Peripheral Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Expand with PC Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Expand with CompactFlash Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Expand with Secure Digital Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Increase Storage Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wrapping Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
436
436
437
437
437
437
438
438
438
440
440
441
441
441
442
442
442
443
443
443
445
445
446
447
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
449
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Acknowledgments
Over the years since the first edition of this book became available I have received many kind
e-mails from readers complimenting my work. This third edition would not exist if not for those
who bought the first two editions. So first, and foremost, I want to thank all of you for buying
this book.
It has been a pleasure to work again with the entire crew at Osborne/McGraw-Hill. While my
name is on the cover, many more have worked behind the scenes to produce this book. Thanks to
Tim Green, Julie Smith, and Tana Allen. Special thanks to Megg Morin for taking a chance on
me in the beginning and giving me a chance to fulfill a dream.
Writing this book was a collaborative effort between my technical editor, Todd Ogasawara
and myself. Todd’s many suggestions in each chapter have made this book better, and you and
I have benefited from his work. Thank you Todd.
Special thanks goes to Derek Brown at Microsoft and Brandi Cook at Waggener Edstrom for
providing information and answering questions about the Windows Mobile Software for Pocket PCs.
For securing the images seen on this book’s cover, thanks go out to Sheila Watson at
Hewlett-Packard, to Ann Camden at Dell, to Diana Sagey at ViewSonic, and to Danielle Carter
and Brandi Cook at Waggener Edstrom. Thanks to Crown Logic Corporation, CNetX, Biohazard
Software, DDH Software, IA Style, Inc., Idruna Software, Applian Technologies Inc., Spb Software
House, and Conduit Technologies Inc. for providing permission to include screen shots of their
products in this book. Their quick turnaround and efforts are much appreciated.
Thanks to my friends, mentors, and co-workers including: Ray Anderson, Scott Van Wolvelaere,
Amy Dulan, Bob Naglich, Brad Gee, Bill Weber, Marshall Haney, Mark North, Matt Anderson,
Kevin Klott, Saverio Rinaldi, Keith Muir, Dawn Pfaff, and Rhonda Belinc. Thank you for your
friendship and support.
Thanks to my niece, Carley Vander Vliet, for instant messages that provided diversion,
encouragement, and support while I wrote. Thanks to my grandmother, Dorothy McPherson,
and my mother, Sharon McPherson for their love and support. And last but not least, thanks to
my wife Ruth. Your love, patience, understanding, and support are what made this book happen.
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Introduction
What’s in a name? Over the years since Microsoft first released software for handheld devices,
Microsoft has changed the name three times. First it was Windows CE, then Windows Powered,
and now Windows Mobile Software.
Regardless of the names, the software remains true to its Windows heritage, enabling us to
use handheld computers in the much the same way as we use desktop computers. Critics claim
that the Windows user interface was never designed for, and therefore not appropriate for, handheld
computers. What the critics overlook is the power of familiarity that enables one to pick up a
Pocket PC and use it right away.
Pocket PCs help you interact in different ways with a variety of information. Think about all
of the information that is important to you. It might be appointments, addresses, bank account
balances, or documents. It might even be voice recordings, web pages, video clips, or music.
Many people have turned to personal computers to help them keep track of all this different
information. But, there is a problem with personal computers. Most sit on tables and desks at
home, while we need the information they contain when we are sitting in meetings or out shopping.
With a Pocket PC that information can be taken out of the computer so that it is with you at any
time, and anywhere. And when you return home that information can be easily updated to your
personal computer.
The Pocket PC is part of a series of hardware devices that run the Microsoft Windows CE .NET
operating system and application software. Also in the series are the Smartphone, Handheld PC,
Auto PC, and embedded devices. Microsoft calls the series Windows Mobile devices. The
combination of Windows CE .NET and application software is known as Windows Mobile Software
for Pocket PCs, Handheld PCs, and Smartphones.
These are incredibly powerful little devices that you can use for work and play. In How To
Do Everything With Your Pocket PC I show you how to use the latest Windows Mobile Software
for Pocket PCs to create documents and spreadsheets, check off those items on your task list, and
then relax to the sounds of your favorite musician. If there is something that you want to do with
a Pocket PC, this book will show you how to do it.
Part I of this book provides the information that you need to get started with your Pocket PC.
Chapter 1 provides an overview of the devices that make up the Windows Mobile platform to help
you decide which is right for you. Then starting in Chapter 2, I walk you through the experience of
setting up your Pocket PC, and in Chapter 3 you learn how to personalize your Pocket PC.
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One of the first things you will want to do is move information from your personal computer
into the device. Chapter 5 shows you how to connect Pocket PCs with personal computers, and
in Chapter 6 you learn how to use the ActiveSync software to synchronize data so that what is
stored in Microsoft Outlook on your PC, also appears in Pocket Outlook on your device. As that
information changes synchronization ensures that it is the same on both the PC and Pocket PC.
Part II, called “Make The Most of Your Pocket PC” focuses on how you will use your Pocket
or PC every day. You will use Pocket Outlook to manage your appointments, addresses, and tasks,
and Pocket Office to create documents and spreadsheets. I also provide tips for using your Pocket
PC at the office, and when you are traveling. And when you are ready for a break you can install
and play one of the many games available for Pocket PCs.
The Internet has become a very important tool for retrieving and exchanging information, and
Part III, “Go Online with Your Pocket PC” provides all the instructions you need to connect to
and use the Internet. Pocket PCs can connect to the Internet using landline and wireless modems,
mobile phones, and wired or wireless local area networks. Once the connection is made you can
send and receive e-mail, chat with friends using instant messaging, and browse any web site. You
can download Web pages to your device so that they can be read any time, even when you are not
connected to the Internet.
Part IV, “Customize Your Pocket PC” shows you how to tailor your device to suit your tastes.
You can expand the storage space on Pocket PC to install software from a library of thousands of
programs available on the Internet. In Chapter 23 you will learn about some of my favorite programs
that you can use to expand the functionality of your Pocket PC.
A number of special elements have been added to help you get the most out of this book:
■ How to… These special boxes explain, in a nutshell, how to accomplish certain tasks
that use the skills that you learn in this book.
■ Did You Know… These special boxes provide additional information about topics
relating to Pocket PCs.
■ Notes These provide extra information or important things that you need to watch out
for in certain situations.
■ Tips These tell you how to do something better, faster, or in a smarter way.
Within the text you will find words in special formatting. New or defined terms are in italic.
If there is a hyphen between two different keys, such as CTRL-B, that’s a keyboard combination,
and you should press each key while holding down the others, then release them simultaneously.
Some instructions involve tapping on different buttons or menu items in sequence. Each step in
the sequence is separated by an I-beam, for example File | Open means tap the File and then Open
menu options.
Technology changes at a break-neck pace, and undoubtedly you will have a question, or
encounter a problem not covered in this book. One good source for information is the microsoft
.public.pocketpc Internet newsgroup, which is monitored by Microsoft Mobile Device MVPs.
You can also reach me through my web site, PocketPCHow2.com, at http://www.pocketpchow2
.com, or via the e-mail address, [email protected]
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Get Started
with Your
Pocket PC
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Welcome to
Windows Mobile
Software for
Pocket PCs
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How to Do Everything with Your Pocket PC
How to…
■ Recognize the different Windows Mobile Software platforms
■ Know what Windows Mobile devices include
■ Know the different parts of Windows Mobile Software for Pocket PCs
I
n 1996, several companies including Hewlett-Packard, Casio, Sharp, and Compaq began selling
a brand-new device called a Handheld PC. Handheld PCs run Microsoft software, including the
Windows CE operating system and other programs for managing personal information and creating
documents and spreadsheets.
The Handheld PC was only the first of a variety of types of what Microsoft now calls Windows
Mobile devices. The devices continue to evolve and include the Pocket PC, which is the subject
of this book. Each device is designed so that you can work with the information important to you,
wherever it is needed and in the manner you find most comfortable.
Windows Mobile devices do more than just manage appointments, addresses, and task lists,
although they do those tasks very well. With a Windows Mobile device, you can read your e-mail
and surf the web. You can write a letter, balance your checkbook, make voice recordings, read
books, and listen to music. In the case of the Pocket PC, all these things are possible in a device
that can rest in your hand and fit in your pocket.
Everyone’s information needs are different, and the Windows Mobile Software for Pocket PCs
provides you with all the tools to meet your needs. This book is about how to use this software to
make your Pocket PC your own personal information appliance.
Each component of Windows Mobile Software for Pocket PCs is covered in depth in the
chapters of this book, which focuses on the current versions of the software that run on Pocket PCs.
While older versions continue to exist, and much of what is contained in this book applies to those
versions, the focus is on the newest software for this platform.
We begin by laying the foundation, learning about all the hardware platforms that, when
combined, are the Windows Mobile devices. This chapter also includes an introduction to
Windows Mobile Software for Pocket PCs, all of which is explained in more detail in the
remaining chapters of this book.
Information Appliances
In the 70 years since it was introduced, the television set has undergone a number of changes. From
black-and-white to color images, and from simple 19-inch round displays to 35-inch flat panels,
the television set has been improved and re-invented. Through it all, one thing has remained
constant: Each television set has a power button, and when you press that button the screen
springs to life to display what we commonly call TV.
It is true of all consumer electronic devices that we expect them to work the instant we turn
them on. Radios and CD/DVD players immediately start playing music, and Game Boys start
games. What about your personal computer? What happened the last time you turned it on? Did
it spring to life and start computing?
In offices all around the world, the following ritual is played out every morning (you might
even find yourself doing it). After fighting through traffic and dragging yourself and the work
you brought home into your cube or office, you hang up your coat, turn on your computer, grab
your coffee mug, and head for the coffee machine. Sound familiar? This ritual has come about
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CHAPTER 1: Welcome to Windows Mobile Software for Pocket PCs
because of what is known as the booting process of personal computers. The booting process
includes all steps that a computer takes from when it is first turned on until it is ready for you
to use, and this typically takes more time than turning on consumer electronic devices.
You might stumble across the Outlook icon on your computer’s desktop and discover that
it can store appointments, contacts, and tasks. In fact, you learn that it can be used for all of the
same functions as the planner you carry constantly. You realize that if you use Outlook to manage
your time, rather than your planner, you would have one less item to carry home every night.
You begin the task of entering all of the appointments, tasks, and contacts from your planner
into Outlook. This works splendidly during the day, as everything is right there at your fingertips
as you work on your computer. Then comes your business trip. As you enter the airport, your cell
phone rings. The call is from your boss, who wants to know whether you are available the day
you get back to attend an important meeting with a potential client. With one hand on the phone, you
unzip the bag that contains your notebook computer, fumble around to turn it on, and then wait
for what seems an eternity while your boss grows impatient and you watch your PC boot up. You
wish you had the planner that you left on your dresser at home.
Wouldn’t it be great if your computer were as easy to use as a television set and functioned
from the moment you turned it on? That is the promise of information appliances. In his book
The Invisible Computer (MIT Press, 1998), author Donald A. Norman defines the information
appliance as “an appliance specializing in information: knowledge, facts, graphics, images, video,
or sound. An information appliance is designed to perform a specific activity, such as music,
photography, or writing. A distinguishing feature of information appliances is the ability to share
information among themselves.”
Information appliances have recently begun to receive a lot of attention, mostly from computer
magazines writing about low-cost devices that connect to the Internet and replace personal computers.
Most of these articles would have you believe that information appliances are new, but in reality
only the attention is new. The term was created in 1978 and trademarked by Jef Raskin, who was
the creator of the Macintosh computer project at Apple Computer.
A newer form of an information appliance is the personal digital assistant (PDA). During a
speech at the 1992 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, former Apple Computer CEO John
Sculley defined the PDA and announced Apple’s intention to develop such a device. PDAs are
information appliances that use computer technology to help manage personal information and
assist with mundane tasks. Later that same year, Sculley introduced Apple’s PDA, the Newton
MessagePad, at the Spring Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Chicago.
The Newton MessagePad may not have been the first information appliance, but it can be
credited for being the first to draw attention to the concept. Its introduction at the CES captured
the imagination of the press, who saw a demonstration of the device that performed handwriting
recognition. From that point on, much was expected from this new device that was going to
re-establish Apple as a technology leader.
From the time of its introduction in 1992 to its launch at the 1993 MacWorld Expo in Boston, a
tremendous amount of hype was generated about the Newton MessagePad. Competitors also weighed
in with their devices. Tandy and Casio jointly created their PDA, called Zoomer; General Magic
created MagicCap; and Microsoft was rumored to be developing a Newton-killer called WinPad.
Unfortunately, the hype was short-lived; and during the life span of the Newton MessagePad
from 1993 to 1998, sales never reached Apple’s projected levels. Sadly, despite the technology of
the Newton MessagePad, it may be best known in computing history for a series of Doonesbury
comic strips that made fun of the results of Newton’s handwriting recognition.
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With the benefit of hindsight, one can look back at the Newton MessagePad and see its
shortcomings. The handwriting recognition was not complete when it was first released, which
resulted in the PDA being branded a failure. Even during the existence of the Newton MessagePad,
Apple started referring to the device as a Personal Communications Assistant; and even today,
Palm Computing and Microsoft do not refer to their devices as PDAs. During its five years,
Newton MessagePads grew larger in size and increased in price, conflicting with a market that
wanted smaller devices at a lower cost. Finally, exchanging information between a MessagePad
and a desktop computer was too difficult.
Despite these shortcomings, the Newton MessagePad leaves a legacy of creating the PDA
market and furthering the cause of information appliances. Lessons learned from the Newton
MessagePad were applied to both Palm Computing devices and Microsoft PC Companions.
Microsoft PC Companions
During the summer of 1992, Microsoft began its version of the Newton MessagePad, which it
called WinPad. At the same time another project, Pulsar, was underway to develop a pager-like
device. In 1994, senior management at Microsoft reviewed both projects and decided to combine
the two into a new project that was given the code name Pegasus, which became Windows CE.
WinPad was designed to be a companion for business users and was based on Windows 3.1.
Pulsar was to include an entirely new object-oriented operating system, completely unlike any
other Microsoft product. In the end, Pegasus did not include the technology from either of these
projects, but it did inherit the WinPad vision of being a companion for Windows desktop computers.
That vision became known as the PC Companion.
A PC Companion is a small device that fits in the palm of your hand and is designed to exchange
information with programs running on personal computers. A PC Companion enables you to
carry all of the information you create on a personal computer, wherever it may be needed. And,
equally important as its size and ability to communicate with personal computers, PC Companions
use an operating system stored on a computer chip that runs continuously, eliminating the booting
process. A PC Companion functions immediately when it is turned on, just like a television set.
PC Companion is the old terminology for what Microsoft now calls Windows Mobile
devices.
The PC Companion changes the scenario described at the beginning of this chapter. All of
the information is still entered into Outlook from a planner, but instead of carrying the notebook
computer everywhere, you download the information to a PC Companion. If all you need is the
information contained in Outlook, you can leave the notebook computer behind and pack only
the PC Companion when you’re traveling.
Now, when your boss calls you to ask if you can attend a meeting, all you need to do is take
out your PC Companion, turn it on, and look up the information—in no more time than it takes
to retrieve and look up the same information in a planner. After you determine that you are
available on the date and time of the meeting, you create the appointment on the PC Companion.
When you return to the office, you connect the PC Companion to the notebook computer; the
new appointment uploads to Outlook, eliminating the need to re-enter information, as might be
the case if you were using a planner and Outlook together.
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The process of exchanging information between a PC Companion and a desktop computer is
called synchronization. Synchronization is actually a bit more sophisticated than simply uploading
and downloading information, because it has the ability to determine what has been added to both
devices and to ensure that the information is the same on both, all in one step.
One can debate whether or not the Microsoft PC Companion is an information appliance.
It specializes in information, yet it can perform multiple activities, rather than just one. Because
information can be expressed and used in many different ways, a PC Companion not only manages
personal information such as your appointments and addresses, but it also manages documents,
spreadsheets, web pages, voice recordings, and music.
Nor is information the only variable; how each person wishes to interact with that information
is also variable. Some people prefer using small devices with small keyboards, while others are
comfortable with a stylus and handwriting recognition. Others prefer a larger device, closer in
size to a notebook computer, and some prefer to have that information available in their cars,
which they can retrieve by using voice commands.
Over the years since 1996, when the first PC Companion was introduced, Microsoft has
continually made changes to the Windows CE operating system and the software that it includes
to support a wide range of information types. At the same time, new hardware has been introduced,
targeted at the variety of different ways users want to interact with the device.
The results are subtle differences between operating system versions and application software,
five different hardware platforms, and a confused market. Microsoft discovered that part of the
confusion is created by the plethora of hardware and software names. Therefore, in the fall of 1999,
Microsoft introduced the terms Windows Powered Devices, and Windows for Pocket and Handheld
PCs, which in 2003 became Windows Mobile Devices and Windows Mobile Software for Pocket
and Handheld PCs. These two terms are defined in the remainder of this chapter.
Windows Mobile Devices
Since Microsoft launched the first Handheld PC, several original equipment manufacturers
(OEMs) such as Philips, Casio, Hewlett-Packard, and Compaq have made the hardware while
Microsoft creates the software. Included in the software is a new operating system and pocket
versions of some Microsoft desktop software, such as Pocket Outlook (Calendar, Contacts, and
Tasks) and Pocket Office (Pocket Word and Excel).
Unlike a personal computer, the software of the Handheld PC is stored on computer chips.
Windows Mobile Software for Handheld and Pocket PCs is available only on Read-Only Memory
(ROM) chips. A ROM chip was necessary to store all of the software in a very small amount of
space and to eliminate the booting process. The combination of the operating system, Pocket
Outlook, and Pocket Office became known as Windows CE, even though Windows CE is really
just the operating system. Today, Microsoft calls this combination of software on a ROM chip
Windows Mobile Software for Handheld PCs or Pocket PCs.
Microsoft has released three versions of Windows for Pocket PCs using Windows CE.
To distinguish between them, we refer to the first release as Pocket PC 2000, the second
release as Pocket PC 2002, and the current release as Windows Mobile 2003.
The Handheld PC was the first Windows Powered hardware platform, and since 1996
Microsoft introduced four additional platforms: Palm-size PCs, Auto PCs, Handheld PC 2000,
and Pocket PCs.
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Handheld PCs
Handheld PCs are the result of the Pegasus project, which began in 1994. The device included
the first versions of the Windows CE operating system, Pocket Outlook, and Pocket Office. The
first version of Pocket Office included only Word and Excel. Microsoft also included a copy of
its first Personal Information Manager (PIM), Schedule +, and Handheld PC Explorer, which
provided synchronization between Schedule + and the Handheld PC.
A few months later, Microsoft released an upgraded version of the Handheld PC Explorer,
which provided synchronization between Handheld PCs and Outlook. Even now, if you have a
Handheld PC using Windows CE Version 1, you must use Handheld PC Explorer because the
latest version of the software, called ActiveSync, does not work with your device.
You can find Handheld PC Explorer Version 1.0 at http://www.microsoft.com/mobile/
handheldpc/downloads/hpcexplorer/hpcexp.asp.
Along with the software, the following hardware specifications were typical for Handheld PCs:
■
■
■
■
■
■
Clamshell design, approximately 3.5×7 inches and weighing 13 ounces
Powered by alkaline batteries
480×240 resolution monochrome display
Keyboard for data input and a stylus instead of a mouse
One serial port and cable to connect the Handheld PC to desktop computers
An IrDA (Infrared Data Association)-compliant infrared port to exchange information
with other Handheld PCs
Nearly one year after the first Handheld PCs began selling, Microsoft upgraded Windows CE
and the application software. Windows CE Version 2 added support for color displays, direct
printing, Ethernet networking, an improved web browser, and video output to external monitors.
Pocket PowerPoint was added to the suite of application software.
Palm-Size PCs
In 1998, Microsoft introduced two more Windows Powered platforms: Palm-size PCs and Auto PCs.
Palm-size PCs are approximately 3×5 inches and weigh around 6 ounces. The Palm-size PC screen
uses a portrait layout, and the device does not include a keyboard. Instead, to input data you use
a stylus either to write on the screen using a character recognizer or tap on an onscreen keyboard.
Originally Microsoft wanted to call these devices Palm PCs, but Palm Computing filed
a lawsuit against Microsoft. In an agreement with Palm Computing, Microsoft changed
the name to Palm-size PC, which is a mouthful and is often abbreviated as P/PC.
Windows CE remained at Version 2, but the user interface was slightly altered to support the
different screen layout and size. Significant changes were made to the software that Microsoft
included with the P/PC. Pocket Outlook remained, as did Inbox and Solitaire, but Pocket Office,
Windows Explorer, and Pocket Internet Explorer were not included. These applications cannot be
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installed separately; fortunately, several third-party developers have written programs to provide
the functionality that was lost.
Microsoft added software to P/PCs that was not available for Handheld PCs. Included was
the Mobile Channel Viewer, which replaced Pocket Internet Explorer. Mobile Channel Viewer
is designed for viewing content that you download to your PC using Internet Explorer and then
download to the device. Note Taker provides the ability to create files that can contain text, writing
in digital ink, or drawings. The files can be synchronized to a PC and opened with Microsoft
Word. Voice Recorder enables you to create, play back, and organize recordings made using the
microphone of the P/PC.
Windows CE Services replaced Handheld PC Explorer and added support for mobile channels,
Note Taker files, and synchronization across an Ethernet network. The hardware specifications
for a typical P/PC include the following:
■ A monochrome screen with a 320×240 resolution and diagonal size of about 4 inches
■ An LED that flashes to notify you of an alarm
■ Microphones to make voice recordings, and headphone jacks to listen to the recording
play back
■ IrDA-compliant infrared ports for exchanging information with Handheld and P/PCs
■ A CompactFlash slot for storage cards and peripherals such as modems and Ethernet cards
Examples of the first P/PCs include the Casio E-11, the Philips Nino 320, and the
Everex Freestyle Associate.
In February 1999, Microsoft announced a color version of the P/PC. Other than support for
color screens, little was changed to Windows CE, except a version number change to 2.11. The
hardware for these devices retained basically the same physical size, but some included faster
processors and more RAM.
The most distinguishing feature between the different brands of color P/PCs is the technology
used in the display. Two types of color LCD (liquid crystal display) screens are used: active and
passive. Active displays, such as thin film transistor (TFT), provide a sharper, clearer image by
refreshing the screen more frequently than passive displays.
Today’s Pocket PC is really the current version of P/PC. The display technologies
discussed here apply to Pocket PCs as well.
An individual transistor controls each pixel of an active display, making it more expensive
to make than passive displays that use a grid of horizontal and vertical wires. Because passive
displays are cheaper, companies continue to research ways to make them better. Double-layer
super-twisted nematic (DSTN) is a passive display that uses two display layers. Color supertwisted nematic (CSTN) is another passive display developed by Sharp that rivals TFT displays
at about half the cost.
Another display issue is lighting, and again two types exist: transmissive and reflective.
Transmissive lighting provides lighting from a source behind the screen. This type of lighting
makes the screens readable indoors but virtually unusable outdoors. Reflective screens use
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external light, such as ambient light around the device or a front-lighting system. Reflective
screens are easier to read outdoors, but they are not as bright indoors or under poor lighting
conditions. The major benefit of reflective screens, however, is that they use much less power
than transmissive screens.
The Casio E-100 was the most stunning of the P/PCs, with its TFT screen supporting
65,536 colors and stereo sound. Casio sold the E-100 and later the E-105, which has
32MB of RAM, as multimedia P/PCs.
While the TFT screens are beautiful indoors, they are practically unusable outdoors. Hybrid
transflective TFT screens reflect ambient light but also use a backlight. This makes the screen
easier to read outdoors but tends to make the screen darker indoors. Older Hewlett-Packard
devices used a transmissive CSTN color screen, and Philips used a transmissive DSTN screen.
Auto PCs
At the same time that Microsoft announced the P/PC, it also announced the Auto PC. An Auto
PC replaces your car radio with a Windows Mobile information appliance. The device is voiceactivated, enabling you to retrieve information, such as driving directions, using spoken commands.
Addresses that you have in the Contacts program on other Windows Mobile devices can be
transferred to the Auto PC by using infrared.
An optional component of the Auto PC is a wireless receiver with which you can receive
traffic conditions, weather, news, stock quotes, and e-mail. The Auto PC voice synthesizer reads
all of that information to you.
At the heart of the Auto PC is the Windows CE operating system—the same operating
system that runs all other Windows Powered devices. The Auto PC demonstrates the modular
design of Windows CE, which allows Microsoft to remove components, such as the Pocket PC
user interface, and replace it with other interfaces, such as the Auto PC voice recognizer.
Not many people bought Auto PCs, and today this platform is no longer supported by Microsoft.
However, all the major automobile manufacturers are developing products similar to the Auto PC,
and today these types of products are called telematics. For more information about telematics, read
the Motorola FAQ at http://www.motorola.com/ies/telematics/htmls/faq.html.
Handheld PC 2000
In the fall of 1998, Microsoft announced the Handheld PC Professional. This platform retains the
screen and keyboard combination introduced with the Handheld PC but in a larger size. In the fall
of 2000, Microsoft released the current version of this platform, called Handheld PC 2000. The
largest Handheld PC 2000 device is 10×8 inches, and the smallest is about 4×7.
Handheld PC 2000 is the current release of Windows for Handheld PCs, and we will
refer to the devices that run this software as Handheld PCs.
Handheld PCs were first sold to consumers, but they never sold as successfully as originally
anticipated. Today Microsoft and the manufacturers of Handheld PCs target the devices at the
corporate market, where they have had great success. Companies use Handheld PCs for specific
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functions, such as inventory control or for customer relationship management. Such functions
require the larger screens and keyboards that are part of Handheld PCs. Consumers can still
buy Handheld PCs from online sources such as MobilePlanet at http://www.mobileplanet.com.
Pocket PCs
The newest addition to the stable of Windows Mobile devices is the Pocket PC. In April 2000,
Microsoft released the first version of Pocket PCs, which is now called Pocket PC 2000. Since
then, Microsoft has released two additional versions: Pocket PC 2002, and the current version
Windows Mobile 2003. Windows Mobile 2003 refers to Windows Mobile devices running
Windows CE .NET Version 4.2, Pocket Outlook, and Pocket Office.
Pocket PCs have the same physical specifications as P/PCs, but they include faster processors,
more memory, and better battery life. Hewlett-Packard, Dell, Toshiba, Audiovox, Zayo, ViewSonic,
and NEC manufacture Pocket PCs.
Several hardware features are common to all Windows Mobile 2003 devices:
■
■
■
■
■
Intel StrongARM or X-Scale processors
A FlashROM chip for storing the Windows Mobile 2003 software
A minimum of 32MB of RAM
A color transflective TFT display
At least one, and in many cases multiple, storage card slots
What’s New in Windows Mobile 2003
All the improvements available in the Windows Mobile 2003 software are covered in detail
throughout this book. Here is a summary of the major enhancements:
■ A new connection manager
■ Wireless Local Area Network (LAN) profiles that automatically configure the Pocket
PC with the correct network settings
■
■
■
■
■
Enhanced keyboard navigation
Performance improvements for Internet Explorer
Built-in Bluetooth support
Pictures, a new picture viewer program
Jawbreaker, a new game
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FlashROM Enables Devices Upgrades
Like ROM chips, software written on FlashROM chips is not erased even when the batteries
in the device are completely drained. However, while software can be written only once on
ROM chips, software can be erased and rewritten on FlashROM chips. FlashROM chips are
also more expensive, but they enable the hardware manufacturers to upgrade the Pocket PC
software without having to replace the chip.
Some programs, such as Microsoft Reader and Windows Media Player, might be
installed only in RAM on Pocket PCs with smaller amounts of FlashROM. The upgrade
CD-ROM will include these programs, or it will include instructions for downloading the
programs, which you can install separately. The spell checker included in Pocket Word and
Inbox with Pocket PC 2002 cannot be installed on upgraded Pocket PCs.
Pocket PC 2002 uses only 24MB and in some cases devices have larger FlashROM
chips. Some of the device manufacturers provide a utility that allows the extra space on
the FlashROM chip to be used as a storage card.
Pocket PC Phone Edition
During the summer of 2002, Microsoft released Pocket PC Phone Edition, which is Windows
Mobile Software for Pocket PCs plus additional software to support wireless voice and data
communications. The first release of Pocket PC Phone Edition supports only the Global System
for Mobile (GSM) telecommunications standard for voice communication and the General Packet
Radio Service (GPRS) for data communication used by T-Mobile and AT&T Wireless in the
United States.
The Phone Edition version of Windows Mobile 2003 adds support for Code Division Multiple
Access (CDMA) and its data counterpart CDMA2000 or 1XRTT used by Verizon Wireless and
Sprint PCS in the United States. In addition to these two widely used U.S. standards, the 2003
version of the Phone Edition software includes several enhancements, such as the ability to mute
and unmute a call, a new speakerphone menu, and a separate volume control for the ringer.
Looking to the Future
The Microsoft vision for mobile computing is that no one device will be the best fit for every
person. As you have seen in this chapter, Handheld PCs meet the needs for vertical applications
requiring larger screens and keyboards, while Pocket PCs meet the needs for people who want a
portable information appliance. Smartphones and Tablet PCs are two additional mobile computing
platforms that Microsoft brought to market in 2002.
The goals of Smartphones are to combine Pocket PCs with mobile phones and to create a
device that appeals to people who prefer to use a small device in the form of a mobile phone.
Smartphones have some of the functionality of Pocket PCs. For example, they have an Inbox and
a version of Internet Explorer, along with Pocket Outlook, but they will not support stylus input
as do Pocket PCs.
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Windows CE Stands for Nothing
Since Windows CE’s introduction, debate has ensued about what CE stands for. Two of the
most popular theories are that it stands for Compact Edition or Consumer Edition. However,
Microsoft says that CE stands for neither of these, nor anything else.
Tablet PCs appear to be a big brother to Handheld and Pocket PCs, but they are in fact totally
different devices. A Tablet PC is a fully functional personal computer that runs Windows XP
Professional Tablet PC Edition and full Windows applications. The key features provided by the
Tablet PC are handwriting recognition, long battery life, high-resolution displays, and wireless
connectivity. The Microsoft vision for Tablet PCs is that they will be used to take notes instead
of pen and paper and to annotate and read digital documents.
Windows Mobile Software for Pocket PCs
Windows Mobile Software for Pocket PCs includes the Windows CE .NET operating system and
application software (such as Pocket Outlook and Pocket Office) that run on Pocket PCs. All
Windows Mobile 2003 devices include the Windows CE .NET operating system, but some may
have different combinations of the application software. For example, some devices may include
all the software, while others may include only Pocket Outlook.
This section provides an introduction to the components that make up Windows Mobile Software
for Pocket PCs.
Pocket PC 2002 runs on the Windows CE 3.0 operating system.
Windows CE .NET
In the simplest of terms, an operating system manages the interaction between application software
and the hardware on which it runs. As a user, you should not be concerned with how the operating
system works, only that it can run software at acceptable performance levels and remain stable.
One may be tempted to look at Windows CE .NET and decide that Microsoft simply transferred
Windows 95 to handheld devices. The truth is that Windows CE .NET is a completely new 32-bit
operating system, built from the ground up to run on embedded devices.
The following aspects of Windows CE .NET can affect you as a user:
■ It implements a subset of the Win32 API, which was completely rewritten for embedded
devices. This makes it easier for software developers to write programs using familiar
tools, which speeds up the software development process.
■ It is portable and can run on a variety of different processor types. That means that
OEMs can choose from among a variety of processor manufacturers, enabling them
to implement the latest processor technology at a lower price.
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■ It is a real-time operating system, which means that certain actions performed by the
operating system occur within bounded times. To you, this means that the operating
system should run faster.
■ It is modular, so a system can be built using only the components needed for a particular
platform. This means that a variety of different devices, such as the Pocket PC and the
Auto PC, can be built from the same core operating system, decreasing product
development life cycles.
The Windows CE .NET user interface, called the shell, is also a separate component. As
such, Microsoft can create a separate shell for each hardware platform that runs the operating
system. Separate shells have been created for the Handheld and Pocket PC platforms, resulting
in a different look between the two devices. The Auto PC shell is not graphic-based, but instead
uses a voice command system.
The Windows CE .NET modular design means that it can be used in a wide range of devices.
In fact, you might be surprised to know that Windows CE .NET is also used in devices such as
gas pumps and point-of-sale terminals.
ActiveSync
It is important that information appliances easily exchange information with other devices;
otherwise, the information is on a virtual island and not accessible everywhere it is needed. All
Windows Mobile devices come with infrared ports that can be used to exchange information with
other devices, but they also communicate with PCs running ActiveSync.
ActiveSync runs on PCs that use the Windows 98, Windows NT, Windows 2000, or
Windows XP operating systems. It synchronizes information between Windows Mobile devices
and Outlook 2000 or newer. During synchronization, the software compares information between
the device and the PC, determining what has been added to both. Then the two are updated so
that the information is consistent on both devices.
The primary purpose for ActiveSync is to synchronize appointments, contacts, and tasks,
but it also synchronizes Outlook Notes, Mobile Favorites, and AvantGo content. Synchronization
NET Compact Framework
Included in ROM on all Windows Mobile 2003 devices is the .NET Compact Framework.
Programmers can leverage their existing skills in C# to create applications for Windows
Mobile 2003. Programs can be quickly developed by providing native web services support
and by allowing developers to focus on application development rather than on low-level
infrastructure items such as memory management.
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can be done using infrared, serial, USB, Bluetooth, and wired or wireless Ethernet networks for
communication. You also use ActiveSync to install programs on the device and to back up and
restore the device. Chapters 5, 6, and 7 provide all the details for using this important program.
Pocket Outlook
You can make a Windows Mobile device your personal information appliance in many ways,
but chances are you will start by using the Pocket Outlook programs to manage your personal
information. You’ll use the Calendar program to schedule appointments and all-day events;
you’ll use Contacts to store addresses; you’ll use Tasks to manage your projects; and you’ll
use Inbox to send and receive e-mail.
ActiveSync synchronizes the information in each of these programs with their counterpart
folders in Outlook. When you read Chapter 8, you will learn how to use Calendar, Contacts, and
Tasks on Pocket PCs. Chapter 20 shows you how to use Inbox.
Pocket Office
When you are traveling about with your Pocket PC, you may need to write a letter, read a report,
or determine how much it will cost to remodel your kitchen. Chapter 10 shows you how to create
documents using Pocket Word. Included in Chapter 13 are instructions for creating written and
verbal notes using the Pocket PC Notes program. In Chapter 11, you’ll learn how to use Pocket
Excel to crunch numbers and how to use the Calculator program to make quick calculations.
Pocket Office does not include versions of Microsoft Access or PowerPoint. Several
software developers have written database programs for Pocket PCs, which you will
learn about in Chapter 15. Likewise, several programs are also available for viewing
and presenting PowerPoint presentations, which are discussed in Chapter 14.
Microsoft Money
Quicken and Microsoft Money are two popular financial programs that run on desktop computers.
In Chapter 12, you’ll learn how to synchronize financial information in Money 2003 on a PC and
with Microsoft Money on Pocket PCs. Microsoft Money also provides you with the ability to
download stock quotes to your Pocket PC by using an Internet connection.
Play Music and Games
The Internet is becoming a popular way for distributing music in the MP3 (MPEG Audio Layer 3)
or WMA (Windows Media Audio) file format. You can download these files to a Pocket PC and
play them using the Windows Media Player introduced in Chapter 18.
A beautiful color display and stereo sound make Pocket PCs great for playing games. Included
with all Windows Mobile devices is that hallmark of Microsoft game software, Solitaire. Other
game software is available, including the Microsoft Entertainment Pack and several games that
you can download from the Internet. Information about games for Windows Powered devices is
provided in Chapter 18.
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Read Books
Windows Mobile Software for Pocket PCs is the first Microsoft product to include Microsoft
Reader, which uses the company’s ClearType display technology. This technology significantly
improves font resolution on LCD screens, making it easier to read text on the device. Microsoft
Reader provides tools for bookmarking, highlighting, and annotating books that you purchase and
download from the Internet. Chapter 18 provides the instructions for using this program.
Connect to the Internet
The English poet John Donne wrote in Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions (Meditation XVII),
“No man is an Island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the Continent, a part of the main.”
Today the Internet connects people from all walks of life around the world, reinforcing the idea
that no man, or woman, is an island.
Connecting to the Internet is no longer optional for computers because people expect computers
to be connectable. And for many, the Internet has become a personal medium; with it they grow,
develop relationships, share a few laughs, and buy their favorite author’s book. The Internet has
become the location for much personal information, to which a personal information appliance
must provide access.
Microsoft Mobile Windows Software for Pocket PCs includes the software needed to connect
to the Internet, and Chapter 19 provides instructions to help you get connected. Once online, you
can use Pocket Internet Explorer to view your favorite website, use Inbox to send and receive
e-mail, and use MSN Messenger to send and receive instant messages. You learn how to use Pocket
Internet Explorer in Chapter 22, Inbox in Chapter 20, and MSN Messenger in Chapter 21.
Wrapping Up
Windows Mobile devices provide a fast and simple way to manage all types of information.
Over the course of seven years, Microsoft has improved its software for Windows Powered
devices, resulting in products with many features and integration with Windows desktop software.
Today the Microsoft mobile device strategy recognizes that no one device will meet all the needs
for handheld computing: Companies need devices with larger screens and keyboards, which
Handheld PCs provide. Consumers want devices for storing personal information, for entertainment,
and for connecting to the Internet, which Pocket PCs provide. The remaining chapters of this
book provide all that you need to make the most of your Pocket PC. In the next chapter, you’ll
get acquainted with all of the Pocket PC hardware and software features.
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How to…
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Identify hardware components
Set up your Pocket PC
Find information
Use the Start menu
Use common program elements
Use Online Help
Configure storage and program memory
Organize files and folders
A
ll great athletes master the fundamentals of their sport. Their tremendous physical and
mental gifts set them apart, but if you analyze their performances, you often find that the
fundamentals are performed flawlessly. This mastery does not come by chance; it is the result
of years of practice and coaching. By the time an athlete becomes a professional, the fundamentals
have become habit.
To master your Pocket PC, you need to learn the fundamentals of how it works. This chapter
provides coaching that can help you understand these fundamentals and polish your skills to
become a master.
Following a review of the hardware components that come with the Pocket PC, we review
the setup procedure. After you set up the device, you’ll see the Today screen, which we cover
before moving on to the Start menu, common application components, organization of files, and
Online Help. This chapter finishes with an overview of an important part of your device—the
memory used for storing files and running programs.
Meet Your Pocket PC
Your Pocket PC is a powerful little device that is capable of meeting your needs for an information
appliance in a number of different ways. Throughout this book, you’ll learn how to make a
Pocket PC your own appointment book or checkbook, but to use the device in the best way
possible, you need first to understand its fundamental parts.
Each Pocket PC looks slightly different, but several options are found on every device. The
Today screen is the closest thing to a PC desktop on the Pocket PC; it provides a summary for
appointments, e-mail, and tasks. You enter information using either the onscreen keyboard,
character recognizer, or handwriting recognition, which lets you write anywhere on the screen.
Like your desktop computer, information is stored in files, which you manage using File Explorer.
If you have difficulty using any of these items, Online Help is available by tapping
Start | Help.
Review the Pocket PC
Let’s take a tour of a typical Pocket PC, starting with the front of the device. You’ll learn the
function of parts commonly found on the Pocket PC, but keep in mind that slight variations may
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19
exist among various Pocket PC brands. You’ll use some parts more often than others, but all are
important to know how to use.
Review the Front
2
The largest part of the Pocket PC is its screen. The 4-inch diagonal LCD (liquid crystal display)
touch screen has a portrait layout and is used for viewing and entering information.
To help you understand the difference between portrait and landscape layouts, think
of a standard 8.5 11-inch sheet of paper. The portrait layout of that sheet is oriented
vertically, with the 8.5-inch sides at the top and bottom, and a landscape layout is
oriented horizontally, with the 11-inch sides at the top and bottom.
As you can see in Figure 2-1, the buttons below the screen are assigned to various programs.
If the Pocket PC is turned off, you can press one of these buttons to turn it on and start the assigned
program in one step, unless this feature is disabled..
Usually, two of the buttons are assigned to Calendar and Contacts, with third and fourth buttons
assigned to Tasks, Inbox, or other programs provided by the hardware manufacturer. The button
assignments of each of these programs can be changed using the Buttons icon in the Pocket PC
settings; Chapter 4 provides instructions.
Casio was the first company to place a Navigation button on the front of its Pocket PC, and
since then, all Pocket PC brands include this feature. The Navigation button provides a way for
you to scroll through screens and menu options without using a stylus.
Notification LEDs
Action button
Record button
Cursor button
Headphone jack
Program buttons
FIGURE 2-1
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Clean Your Pocket PC Screen
The Pocket PC LCD screen can get dirty quickly through daily use, and some dirt particles
can even scratch the screen when they come in contact with the stylus. In my experience,
products designed to clean the lenses of glasses work well.
Fellowes sells a PDA Screen Clean kit that includes a soft leather cloth for cleaning the
screen throughout the day and packets of wet-dry cleaning cloths for more intensive cleaning.
It also sells the WriteRight screen protector, which is a clear plastic overlay that covers the
Pocket PC screen. You can find more information about both products at http://www.fellowes.com.
Many Pocket PC games use the Program and Navigation buttons for controlling game
play. Older iPAQ Pocket PCs have problems recognizing two button presses at the same
time, which can cause problems when you’re playing some games.
Some Pocket PCs have the Power button and microphone on the front. It is important that
you know the location of the microphone on your Pocket PC to make the best voice recordings.
When you make a recording, the microphone should be placed as close to the source as possible.
Review the Bottom
At the bottom of the Pocket PC is the accessory port. This port does not look like the ports that
you find on desktop computers, and, unfortunately, each Pocket PC brand uses a different port
style. Because the ports are variable, you cannot share peripherals, such as cradles and
keyboards, among Pocket PC brands.
The accessory port is designed to plug the Pocket PC into a cradle, which uses a cable to
connect to the serial or Universal Serial Bus (USB) port of a desktop computer. The port may
also be used to provide power to the Pocket PC and recharge the battery. Some Pocket PCs also
Connect Your Pocket PC to Devices
Using a Serial Cable
The serial cable that comes with your Pocket PC is a special version of what’s sometimes called
a null modem cable. These cables are designed to communicate with other personal computers
rather than peripherals, such as modems. To use the serial cable to connect to a serial peripheral
device such as a modem, you need a null modem adapter. The adapter converts the cable into a
standard RS-232 cable that provides communication with serial devices.
You can find null modem adapters at your local RadioShack (you will need a female-to-male
DB9 adapter, part number 26-264). Most peripherals have female ports, so if the peripheral
to which you are connecting has a 9-pin female port, you will also need a male-to-male DB9
serial gender changer (RadioShack part number 26-231).
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include a port for plugging in an AC power adapter, which can allow you to recharge the device
without having to carry the Pocket PC cradle.
Review the Left Side
Next to the front, the left side of the Pocket PC is the most important location on your device. Here,
Action Control and Voice Recorder buttons are designed for using the Pocket PC with one hand.
Action Control is used in two ways: Rotating the wheel up or down performs operations
similar to pressing the up and down arrows on a computer keyboard. Pressing the button performs
an operation similar to pressing ENTER on a computer keyboard. You can use Action Control to
scroll through the Start menu items by rotating the wheel up or down, and then pressing the wheel
to start the program that you select.
Some Pocket PCs have Action Control on the left side and a Navigation button on the
front. You can use both to scroll up and down on these devices.
To make voice recordings on your Pocket PC, press-and-hold Voice Recorder and begin
speaking after the device beeps. Use the Notes program, explained in Chapter 13, to play back
and manage voice recordings. You can configure Voice Recorder in Notes to switch to the Notes
program and start recording or to stay in the current program and start recording.
Review the Top
Here you will find the alarm notification LED, headphone jack, and either a CompactFlash or
Secure Digital card slot. If you have a Pocket PC Phone Edition or a Pocket PC with built-in
wireless, your device may have an antenna. The LED will flash whenever an alarm occurs,
unless you turn off the LED notification in the Pocket PC settings. This same LED may be used
to indicate that the device is charging. (The user manual includes more information about how
the LED is used.)
All Pocket PCs have a headphone jack, though the jack be located somewhere other than at the
top. You can plug in a 3.5 millimeter headphone into the jack for listening to voice recordings, music,
or videos. Most Pocket PC Phone Editions have a 2.5 millimeter jack, which is the common size
found on mobile phones.
Some Pocket PCs have slots that support Type II CompactFlash cards. Type II cards are
made a little thicker than a Type I card so that they can support additional functions. In Chapter
23, you’ll find information about a number of cards that work in these slots. The newest Pocket
PCs have Secure Digital card slots. Secure Digital cards are significantly smaller and thinner
than CompactFlash cards and have built-in support for encryption.
The final item that you will find at the top of some Pocket PCs is an infrared port compliant
with the Infrared Data Association (IrDA) standard. Infrared is a form of light, or radiation, beyond
red light that cannot be seen by human eyes. An infrared transmitter sends data to a receiver using
pulses of infrared light. Every Pocket PC has software that is capable of using the infrared port as
either a transmitter or a receiver; and for communication to work, the sending and receiving ports
must be lined up with each other. As Chapter 5 shows, the infrared port can also be used with a
desktop computer for synchronization.
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Review the Right Side
On the right side of a Pocket PC is the stylus, which you use to interact with the Pocket PC.
Some Pocket PCs also place a speaker along this side of the device.
Review the Back
The most important item on the back of the device is the Soft Reset button, which is recessed so
that it is not accidentally pressed. A soft reset is similar to rebooting a desktop computer, because
it restarts the Windows CE operating system, and data in the program memory is lost. However,
any data in storage memory and all settings are retained. An explanation of program and storage
memory is provided in the “File Storage and Program Memory” section later in this chapter.
Be sure to check the user manual for your Pocket PC to verify the location of the Soft
Reset button. The location on your Pocket PC may be somewhere other than the back
of the device.
The back of some Pocket PCs may include covers for the main and backup batteries and
possibly a cover for a memory expansion slot. Because the options on the back of each device
varies according to manufacturer, consult your user manual for details about your Pocket PC.
Set Up Your Pocket PC
When you turn on your Pocket PC for the first time, a series of steps are initiated to set up your
device, which Microsoft calls the Welcome wizard.
Resetting Pocket PCs
You can reset a Pocket PC two different ways. A soft reset shuts down running programs,
clears data from program memory, and restarts the Pocket PC. A hard reset disconnects
power from the Pocket PC, which deletes all programs and data that you add to the Pocket
PC. The soft and hard reset processes are different for each device and are provided in the
Pocket PC users manual.
After a hard reset a Pocket PC works as it does when take it out of the box and turn it
on for the first time. The software that came pre-loaded remains, but any software that you
installed is removed. You will either need to re-install software, or restore a backup that you
create using ActiveSync or a backup program on the device. Chapter 7 provides instructions
for backing up and restoring Pocket PCs.
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Before turning on your Pocket PC, it is important that
you charge its main battery so that settings and data
are not lost. When you charge the batteries on most
Pocket PCs, an LED either blinks or illuminates a
certain color. The Pocket PC is fully charged when
the light stops blinking or stops changing colors.
The first charge of the Pocket PC battery may take
several hours. Consult the user manual for specific
instructions on charging the battery.
The first screen that you see is the Welcome screen.
Tap anywhere on the screen to continue.
Next, you align the Touch screen so that it properly recognizes
any text or taps that you enter. Use the stylus to tap the center of
the cross as it moves around the screen.
You can align the screen at any time by tapping Start |
Settings. Tap the System tab and then tap the Screen
icon. Some Pocket PCs also provide a series of hardware
buttons that you can press to start the Align Screen
program; consult the user manual for instructions.
The next two screens introduce you to the tap-and-hold process.
Tap-and-hold is used throughout the Pocket PC user interface and
is similar to right-clicking a Windows desktop, in that it causes a
pop-up list of commands to open, which can be executed on the
object you select with tap-and-hold.
On the first screen, you are instructed on how to use tap-and-hold.
Tap Next to move on.
The second screen, shown in the following image, provides an
opportunity for you to try out the tap-and-hold procedure.
After you tap Cut, the next screen
shown to the left automatically
appears. Tap-and-hold the 11 A.M.
time slot and then tap Paste on the
pop-up list.
After you’ve successfully
completed the tap-and-hold
procedure, a Congratulations
screen appears. Tap Next to move
on to the Location screen shown
in the image to the right.
On this screen, specify your
local time zone by selecting a time
zone or location in the drop-down
lists. If you are in the United States, select a time zone; otherwise,
select a city. If the city that you live in is not in the list, select the name of a city in the same time zone.
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After you specify a time zone and tap Next, the Complete
screen displays. Tap anywhere on the screen to end the Welcome
wizard and display the Today screen.
More Settings
The Welcome wizard sets the basic information for your Pocket
PC, but you should perform some additional steps to complete
the setup of your device. To set the date and time, tap Start |
Settings, tap the System tab, and then tap the Clock icon. Follow
the instructions provided in Chapter 3 for changing the date and
time using the Clock settings.
If you synchronize multiple Windows Powered devices with
the same desktop computer, each device must have a unique
name. To change the name of your Pocket PC, tap Start |
Settings, tap the System tab, and then tap the About icon to display the Settings dialog box, as
shown in the image below:
Tap the Device ID tab, enter a name and description for the
device, and tap OK.
Each Pocket PC can store information about you, such
as your name and address, which you enter on the Owner
Information screen, as shown in the image to the right.
To open the Owner Information
screen, tap Start | Settings |
Owner Information. If you want
the information to be displayed
every time the Pocket PC turns
on, tap Show Information When
Device Is Turned On. Additional
information can be stored on the
Notes tab.
One of the first things you’ll
Tap here to configure network
connections.
Tap here want to do after becoming
to mute
familiar with your Pocket PC
the sound.
is synchronize it with your
desktop computer. During the
first synchronization, you
establish a partnership between the device and the desktop
computer and you download data in Outlook to the Pocket
PC. The entire synchronization process is explained
in Chapter 6.
Meet the Today Screen
When the Welcome wizard completes, you end up at the
Today screen shown in the image to the left.
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The Today screen serves a purpose similar to the Outlook Today page on the PC. It provides
the date, a summary overview of personal information, including the owner’s name and telephone
number, upcoming appointments, the number of unread and unsent e-mail messages, and the
number of active tasks.
When you tap a section of the Today screen, the associated program starts. For example, tap
the appointments section to start the Calendar program. The Owner Information settings display
when you tap the owner name. You can also start Inbox and Tasks from the Today screen by
tapping the appropriates spots.
To change the date and time from the Today screen, tap the date to open the Clock
Settings dialog box.
The bottom of the Today screen may display program icons; the Today screen is the only part
of the Pocket PC that displays these icons. Tap an icon to execute a particular function or start a
program.
You can select themes that change the appearance of the Today screen, as well as select
which items should display on the screen by changing the Today screen settings. Chapter 4
provides the instructions for changing these settings.
Use the Pocket PC Start Menu
One change that has been made to the Pocket PC user interface is the location of the Start button.
All prior versions of the user interface followed the approach defined by Windows 95, which
placed the Start button on the lower-left corner of the screen. That same interface is still used on
Handheld PCs, where tapping the button expands the Start menu from the bottom up. However,
the Start button is now located on the upper-left corner of the screen, and a few other changes
have been made.
The title changes on the Navigation bar to display the name of the current program visible on
the screen.
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The Second change is that when you tap the Start button, the menu expands from the top
down, as shown in the following image:
The Shortcut bar
When this menu is expanded, the title on the Navigation bar also changes to Start.
The third new item on the Pocket PC Start menu is the Shortcut bar across the top of the
menu. The Shortcut bar provides an easy way for you to switch among frequently used programs.
Each time you run a program on the Pocket PC, its icon is added to the Shortcut bar, which displays
icons for the last six programs you started. After six icons are added to the bar, the next time you
run a program that is not on the bar, the least recently used icon is removed.
Pocket PC 2000 allows you to add every program to the Start menu. When more than 11
applications are added to the Start menu, the menu moves to the middle of the screen and arrows
appear at the top and bottom of the menu. Pocket PC 2002 and 2003 limit the number of programs
that can appear on the Start menu to nine.
While it is nice that Pocket PC 2000 does not have a menu listing limitation, adding too
many programs to the Start menu can slow you down. I recommend placing no more
than eight programs on the Start menu and not putting any programs assigned to
hardware buttons on the Start menu.
Another change made to the Start menu is that the Programs
and Settings menus do not cascade as they do in Windows.
Instead, when you tap either item, a separate program window
displays—such as the Programs window shown in the image to
the right.
If a program shortcut does not appear on the Start menu,
it will be found in the Programs window. Start a program by
tapping its icon.
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To indicate whether a shortcut will appear on the Start menu
or in the Programs window, tap Start | Settings | Menus to display
the dialog box shown in the following image:
Tap the check box next to the items that you want to appear
on the Start menu. The items not selected will appear in the
Programs window.
2
To add a program shortcut to the Start menu or
Programs window, tap-and-hold a file name in File
Explorer and tap Copy. Next, open the Start menu
or the Programs sub-folder in File Explorer and tap
Edit | Paste Shortcut.
Launching a program from the Start menu on a Pocket PC
involves the same process as all other versions of Windows. Tap
Start and then tap the shortcut of the program that you want to run.
Search for Information Using Find
On a Pocket PC, you can perform a search
on a word or phrase that is stored in any of
the Pocket Outlook and Pocket Office data
files, as well as in Notes. To search for
information, tap Start | Find to open the
Find dialog box (as shown to the right).
Enter the word or phrase in the Find
field, and select the type of search from the
Type drop-down list. Previous search words
or phrases are saved and available in the
Find drop-down list.
Tap here to select
from a list of
previous search
words.
You can narrow the search to a specific program by selecting
the program name from the Type drop-down list. The default is
All Data, which will search through all Pocket Outlook, Pocket
Office, and Notes files on the device.
After you enter the search item and select the Type, tap Go
to begin the search. The search results display on the middle of
the screen. You can tap any entry in the Results list to open it.
When you tap OK to close the item, you return to the results
listed in Find.
The search was on the word Doe, which returned a John
Doe contact and an e-mail message.
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Search for Files
The Pocket PC search functionality is designed to search for information stored in Pocket
Outlook, Online Help, Notes, Pocket Word, and Pocket Excel. It does not search for other file
types or for files on storage cards. If you want to expand searches to include files on storage
cards, you will need to download and install a third-party program. Two programs that provide
this functionality are Pocket File Finder, at http://www.portable-software.com/, and Kilmist
File Quest, at http://www.kilmist.com.
Work with Applications
The Pocket PC user interface has a flat design that is simple and easy to navigate. At the top of
the screen is the Navigation bar, which displays the title of the active program and the current
time. Tap the Start icon, which is immediately to the left of the program title on the bar to expand
the Start menu.
Pocket PC programs display on the entire screen, and they do not appear in separate windows
as on desktop computers. At the top-right corner, you’ll see a round button labeled with OK or
an X. OK appears within dialog boxes or screens of a program. For example, when you start
Contacts and display a contact, you will see an OK button, as shown in the following image:
The Navigation bar
Tap here to close
the dialog box.
When you tap OK, the Contact screen closes, but you remain within the Contacts program at the
Contacts list view.
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From the Contacts list view, you see an X, such as shown in
the image to the right.
When you tap X, the Contacts program disappears, and you
see the program started prior to running Contacts. Tapping the
X button allows you to close the current program screen, but
the program is still running in memory, which makes it faster
to switch among programs as you work.
Windows CE manages the memory on Pocket PCs
and automatically shuts down programs if it starts
to run out of program memory. You may prefer to
shut down programs manually as you do on a
personal computer. To do this, you use the Memory
setting on your Pocket PC or use a program task
manager. Chapter 3 has instructions for using
program task managers to shut down programs.
At the bottom of the screen is the Command bar, which has menus and buttons that provide
commands for programs. The Command bar in the following illustration shows menu items that
you commonly find with Pocket PC programs:
Every program that creates something, such as a document of an appointment, displays a New
button on the left side of the Command bar. To create a new item, tap New.
The Edit menu provides commands used to edit data that you enter on the Pocket PC. It usually
includes commands such as Undo, Redo, Cut, Copy, Paste, Clear, and Select All. Certain programs
provide additional commands, such as Format in Pocket Word.
The View menu provides commands that change the appearance of the screen. This may
include different input modes, such as the Writing and Drawing modes found in Pocket Word,
as well as Zoom, found in many programs and used for magnifying the display.
The Tools menu provides additional commands available in the program, such as Insert Date
and Beam Document, which you find in Pocket Word. If a program includes an Options dialog
box, which is used to configure the program settings, open it by tapping Tools | Options.
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View List Views
Programs that create files, such as Notes and Pocket Word, use a List view to display all the files
you created using the program. When you start the program, the first screen displayed is the List
view, such as that shown in the following image for Notes:
Tap here to
open folders.
Tap here to sort items
in the List view.
From the List view, you can navigate through various folders and sort the items in the list. Tap an
item name in the list to open that item in the program, or tap New to create a new file.
The List view will display only when a file associated with the starting program is found
on the device. If no file is found, the Program window opens, rather than the List view.
View Pop-Up Menus
The Pocket PC has a feature that provides the same function as right-clicking an object in Windows
on desktop computers. When you tap-and-hold the stylus on an
item on the screen, a pop-up menu appears with commands
appropriate to the active program.
After the menu appears on the screen, lift the stylus and
tap the command that you want to perform. For example, to
create a copy of a note, tap-and-hold the stylus on the item
to be copied in the Notes List view to open the pop-up list,
as shown in the image to the right.
Then tap Create Copy to create a new copy of the note
you selected.
Get Help
Online Help is available directly on your Pocket PC; to open
Online Help, tap Start | Help. The information that appears on
the screen, as shown in the following image, will relate to the
program window currently open.
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Tap here to close
Online Help.
2
Tap here to open the
Online Help contents.
Tap here to move backward or forward one page.
Use Online Help
The Online Help Command bar has a View menu item and buttons for navigating through the
help pages. View has two options: Contents and All Installed Help. Tap Contents to display a
Table of Contents of Online Help for the current program, or tap All Installed Help to display all
Online Help for the device.
Some help pages include hyperlinks that you can tap to open another page of information. To
return to the previous page, tap the Back arrow on the Command bar. Tap OK to close the Online
Help window.
Receive Help on the Internet
Online Help is a great source of information on your device, but it may not provide an answer to
your particular question. While this book provides enough information to answer most questions,
technology changes at a blinding rate and only the Internet seems able to keep up.
On the Internet you can find pages of frequently asked questions (FAQs) that provide
answers for a variety of topics. During the last four years, I have created and maintained the
PocketPCHow2 website at http://www.pocketpchow2.com, which provides hundreds of links to
information that answer many questions about Windows CE and Pocket PCs.
The website is organized into three areas: How, What, and Where:
■ How Provides links to information about how to do things with Pocket PCs, such as
How do I display Adobe PDF files on my Pocket PC?
■ What Provides definitions, such as What is Windows CE?
■ Where Provides links to locations for more information or files, such as Where can I
find the Mobile Channel wizard?
My website is only one of several websites on the Internet that are dedicated to Pocket PCs.
Included on my website are several pages of links to other websites that provide FAQs, News,
Forums, Reviews, and Software.
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Print Documents
Windows for Pocket PCs does not let you print documents. HP Mobile Printing for Pocket PC is
a free utility that works with all Pocket PC 2002 and 2003 devices. It prints Pocket Word, Notes,
Calendar, Contact, and Task items, and it supports direct, infrared, Bluetooth, and network printer
connections. You can download this utility from http://www.hp.com/pond/mep/download/
ppcdownload.html.
If you need to print Pocket Excel spreadsheets, try Field Software Products’ PrintPocketCE,
which you can install to print on Hewlett-Packard, Canon, Epson, Pentax, Brother, and several
other printers. You will find this program at http://www.fieldsoftware.com.
File Storage and Program Memory
Unlike desktop computers, Pocket PCs do not have built-in hard drives. Instead, Random Access
Memory (RAM) is used for built-in file storage. However, like desktop computers, your Pocket
PC uses RAM to run programs. Every Pocket PC comes with a certain amount of RAM that is
used for file storage and program memory, and it includes a setting for configuring the amount
of memory allocated to each.
Some Pocket PCs provide a way to store files in space available on the Flash ROM chips
used to store the Pocket PC software. Newer devices may even include chips using NAND Flash
memory, which is a cheaper version of Flash ROM, just for providing built-in storage. Files
written to this built-in store will not be erased even during a hard reset, which makes it a perfect
location for storing backups of your Pocket PC.
Different Types of Flash ROM
Pocket PC manufacturers use two different types of Flash ROM: NAND and NOR. NAND
and NOR are engineering terms that describe the design of the memory chips. NOR memory
chips are more expensive and capable of storing and running applications. The majority of
Pocket PCs use NOR Flash ROM chips, which enable the device to provide all available
RAM to users.
NAND Flash ROM can only store programs. Two low-cost Pocket PCs, the HP iPAQ
1910 and the Viewsonic V35, use NAND Flash ROM. While this decreases the cost of the
devices, it also means that some RAM is used by the Pocket PC software and not available
to users. The labeling on the Pocket PC does not indicate what type of Flash ROM is used,
so the best way to determine this is to check to see how much RAM is available to users.
Toshiba’s E750 Pocket PC includes both types of Flash ROM chips. NOR chips store the
Pocket PC software, making all 64MB of RAM available to users, and NAND chips are used
to provide an internal storage card. The affect of this design is more total built-in storage
space for users.
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Unfortunately, Pocket PC manufacturers do not agree on what to call special storage.
For example, HP refers to it as a File Store, while Dell refers to it as Built-in Storage.
Using storage cards can increase the total storage space of a device. Storage cards are
available in the CompactFlash, Multimedia Card, Secure Digital, and PC Card formats, and they
come in a variety of sizes. IBM even sells a microdrive that uses the same type of technology as
your PC hard drive, but it is in the CompactFlash size and holds up to 1GB of files.
See Chapter 23 for an explanation of how CompactFlash, Multimedia, Secure Digital,
and PC cards differ.
Storage memory is differentiated between internal storage memory and storage cards.
Internal storage uses the RAM installed inside your device. You insert storage cards into the
Secure Digital card or CompactFlash slots.
Configure Memory
To configure memory, tap Start | Settings, the System tab,
and the Memory icon to open the dialog box to the right.
The left side of the slider represents internal storage
memory, and the right side represents program memory.
To adjust the amount of memory allocated to either, move
the slider left or right.
At the middle of the screen you can see the amount of
memory Allocated, In Use, and Free for storage and
program memory. Tap the Storage Card tab of the Memory
Settings dialog box to see the size of the storage card and
the amount of space in use and free.
Add More Program Memory
Storage cards cannot increase program memory; until recently, program memory could not
be increased at all. However, Pocket PC Techs at http://www.pocketpctechs.com now sells
internal memory upgrades for several brands of Pocket PCs. Pocket PC Techs can install
64MB and 128MB upgrades. Be aware that this upgrade voids your Pocket PC’s warranty,
however.
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Conserve Storage Space
Internal storage in Pocket PCs is finite, and therefore it can be important to use a strategy that
conserves internal storage space while installing programs. It helps, therefore, to know what
must be stored internally and what can be placed on storage cards.
All data in Calendar, Contacts, Tasks, and Inbox is in databases in internal storage. These
databases are part of what is called the object store, which is limited to 16MB. Over time,
you’ll want to remove items in these programs, and the best way is to configure Outlook on
your PC to archive data automatically. The auto-archive process removes items from the main
Outlook folders, and during the next synchronization those items will be removed from the
Pocket PC.
Data files, such as Pocket Word documents and Pocket Excel spreadsheets, can be easily
stored on storage cards or internally. Both programs automatically check the storage cards
for files to display in the File list view. However, files on storage cards are not backed up by
ActiveSync or by any of the backup programs provided with Pocket PCs. You may want to
store only noncritical files on storage cards, or use Windows Explorer to copy files manually
from storage cards to the hard drive .
You can install most Pocket PC programs on storage cards. The instructions for installing
software to storage cards are discussed in Chapter 7. Some programs execute immediately
when the Pocket PC turns on, and you may have problems running those programs from
storage cards. This is because cards are not available during a slight period of time when the
Pocket PC first turns on. Most programs include README files that specify whether the
program must be installed to internal storage.
I recommend installing system files to internal storage. If your Pocket PC has only one
slot, you will need to install programs internally that you would use while peripherals, such
as modems, are in the slot.
Manage Files with File Explorer
With File Explorer, you can browse the contents of folders on the Pocket PC to locate, open,
copy, move, and delete files. You also use this program to create new folders and to transfer files
to other devices using infrared.
The My Documents folder is particularly important on Pocket PCs because it is the storage
location for data files. If you synchronize files between a Pocket PC and a desktop computer, the
entire contents of the My Documents folder will appear on the desktop computer. Most Pocket
PC programs, such as Pocket Word and Pocket Excel, work only with the My Documents folder
or its subfolders, while files stored in any other folder on the device will not appear in the
program List view.
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If you create a My Documents folder on a storage card, the contents of that folder are
combined with the contents of the My Documents folder on the device by programs that have a
List view. This feature is particularly important for Windows Media Player, which plays music
stored in large files that you will want to keep on storage cards. Chapter 18 provides instructions
for playing music using Windows Media Player.
Locate Files
To start File Explorer, tap Start | Programs | File Explorer,
and the program will open. When File Explorer starts, it opens
the My Documents folder and lists the files and subfolders
stored therein. The contents of a Folder view can be sorted by
Name, Date, Size, or Type by tapping an option in the
drop-down list located at the upper-right of the Folder view.
Expand the drop-down list at the upper-left of the Folder view
to open a parent folder. The Pocket PC root folder is called My
Device and contains the My Documents, Program Files, Temp,
Storage Card, and Windows folders, among others. If a storage
card is in the device, it appears in the My Device Folder view,
as shown in the image below.
On the Command bar at the bottom of the screen are three
buttons you can use to switch among internal storage, storage
cards, and network shares.
This folder contains
everything on the
storage card.
Network shares
Storage cards
Internal storage
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Network shares are storage locations on file servers or workstations that share files among
users on a network. When you tap the network shares icon or the Open command from the
Command bar, the following Open dialog box appears:
Enter the full path to the network share using the Universal Naming Convention (UNC),
which has the form \\[server name]\[share name]. For example, to open a share with the name
Music on a computer named Fred, enter \\Fred\Music.
You cannot directly open a file on a network share. Instead, you must first copy the file to the
Pocket PC and then open it. However, you can create a shortcut to a file on a network share and
paste it on a Pocket PC. This does not actually copy the entire file to the Pocket PC. Because
shortcuts only point to files, when you open the shortcut you actually open the file across the
network. To create a shortcut, tap-and-hold on a file name and then tap Copy. Switch to the
destination location on the Pocket PC and tap Edit | Paste Shortcut. The only way to open a
shortcut is by using File Explorer. You will not see shortcuts in the various program List views.
The process is the same for opening a file or folder in the Folder view; you tap the item, and
it will open in its associated program on the Pocket PC. File Explorer does not display file
extensions, but an icon appears with each file name to indicate the file type.
Organize Files with Folders
Typically, you will not use File Explorer to open a file; instead, you will start a program, such
as Pocket Word, and then open a file from its List view. You will, however, use File Explorer to
move files among folders and to create new folders.
A folder can be created in two ways: you can tap-and-hold the stylus on an open space in
the Folder view and tap New Folder on the pop-up list, or you can tap Edit | New Folder. A new
folder appears with its name selected so that you can enter a new name, as shown in the
following image:
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2
To move or copy a file into a folder, you use tap-and-hold to choose Cut, Copy, and Paste.
File Explorer does not support drag-and-drop, but tap-and-hold makes the process easy. To move
a file to another folder, tap-and-hold the stylus on the file name, tap Cut on the pop-up list, open
the destination folder, tap-and-hold the stylus on the folder, and then tap Paste on the pop-up list.
To paste a file into a folder, tap Edit | Paste.
Copy a file by using the same process, except tap Copy on the pop-up list instead of Cut. If
you paste a copy of a file into the same folder, File Explorer will automatically change the file
name by adding Copy of to the beginning of the name.
To delete a file, tap-and-hold the file name and then tap Delete on the pop-up list. To change
the name of a file, tap Rename on the pop-up list, and then enter the new file name.
Send Files with E-mail
You can send any file as an e-mail attachment
from File Explorer. Tap-and-hold a file name and
then tap Send Via E-mail on the pop-up list. Inbox
starts and creates a new e-mail message with the
file attached, as shown in the image to the right.
Complete and send the e-mail message as
instructed in Chapter 20.
This is the file attachment
sent from File Explorer.
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Beam Files with Infrared
Files can be transferred to another Pocket PC from File Explorer by using infrared. Line up
the infrared ports of the two devices and set up the receiving device. To send a file from File
Explorer on a Pocket PC, tap-and-hold on a file name and then tap Beam File on the pop-up list.
A message box appears on the screen of both devices to indicate that the file was transmitted.
Wrapping Up
Pocket PCs have features that are similar to Windows running on desktop computers. You use the
Start menu to start programs and to switch between running programs. Files are stored in folders
in a hierarchical manner, and you use File Explorer to browse and manage files and folders. The
Today screen on Pocket PCs is the closest thing to the Windows desktop, but the purpose of the
Today screen is to provide an overview for your information rather than display program
shortcuts. The Today screen also provides a way for you to personalize your Pocket PC by
selecting different themes, which display pictures on the screen and change the colors of the
Navigation and Command bars. In the next chapter, you’ll learn how to personalize your Pocket
PC for your preferences and tastes.
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How to…
■
■
■
■
Change the Pocket PC personal settings
Use the Pocket PC input methods to enter information
Manage running programs using a program task manager
Change the Pocket PC appearance
I
t is easy to overlook the second P in Pocket PC, which stands for personal. Yet of all the
computers made, Pocket PCs may be the most personal of all. The information they store—
appointments, addresses, and tasks—is personal for most people, as rarely will more than one
person share a Pocket PC. So it makes sense for you to want to configure your Pocket PC to
conform to your personal needs and tastes.
The Pocket PC software provides several ways to personalize your device, including settings
for entering owner information, setting passwords, programming hardware buttons, and configuring
input methods. In fact, you can choose among four input methods to use the one that works best
for you. If the input methods included with your Pocket PC do not work well for you, others are
provided by third-party companies.
Many people find it cumbersome to use the Start menu and the methods for starting and
closing programs. Several programs are available to help you manage the programs running on
your Pocket PC. If you prefer to use a simple menu of icons to launch programs, you can use one
of the many Today screen plug-ins that provide such a menu. In fact, the Today screen is one of
the most customizable parts of the Pocket PC, and a variety of plug-ins exists that change the
appearance of the screen as well as add functionality.
You can personalize your Pocket PC to make it reflect you, its owner. In this chapter we go
over the personal settings in detail and show you how to enter data into your Pocket PC. We also
take a look at the program task managers and Today screen plug-ins available for the Pocket PC.
Change the Personal Settings
The Personal tab is where you personalize the Pocket PC by changing settings to accommodate
the way you work. To access the Personal tab, tap Start | Settings. Table 3-1 contains a summary
of what you can do with each icon.
Icon
TABLE 3-1
Name
Description
Buttons
Specifies which application a button will start.
Input
Configures options for character recognition and the onscreen keyboard.
Also configures word completion and voice record formats.
Icons of the Personal Tab in Pocket PC Settings
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Icon
TABLE 3-1
Name
Description
Menus
Specifies the program shortcuts that appear in the Start menu. Also turns on
the New button, and specifies the items that appear in the New Button menu.
Owner
Information
Enter personal information, such as address and phone number, here.
Includes a Notes field that can be used to enter additional information
not included with the owner information. Both sets of information can
be configured to display when you turn on your device.
Password
Creates or changes the password on your device and specifies whether
you want to enable password protection for the device.
Sounds &
Notifications
Changes the volume of your device as well as the type of sound that is
made for particular events.
Today
Changes the appearance of the Today screen with themes and plug-ins.
Icons of the Personal Tab in Pocket PC Settings (continued)
Program Hardware Buttons
In Chapter 2 you learned that hardware buttons may be located in different areas on the Pocket PC.
These buttons make it easier for you to navigate within the device and start applications; you can
program most buttons to start any application. Following are some of the specifics of hardware
buttons.
■ To open the Buttons properties dialog box shown in the following image, tap the Buttons
icon on the Personal tab.
Select the button
to program here.
Select the program
that a button will start.
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■ To change the program associated with a button, first select a button in the list. Then tap
the triangle to the right of the Button Assignment field and select the program you want
from the drop-down menu. You will see the assigned program change in the Button list.
When you’re finished, tap OK. If at any time you want to restore the default settings for
your device, tap the Restore Defaults button.
■ The Up/Down Control tab is used for configuring the Action button. The Action button
is either a wheel, a rocker, or a navigation pad (a flat button on the front of the device)
that is used to move the cursor up or down. This button is particularly useful to use when
you’re reading documents, because you can scroll through a document while holding the
device in one hand.
■ Within the Up/Down Control tab shown in the following image, you change how quickly
the cursor starts scrolling and how fast is scrolls.
■ In the Delay Before First Repeat section, move the slider left or right to control how
soon scrolling starts. To control the scrolling speed, move the slider left or right within
the Repeat Rate section.
Windows Mobile 2003 adds three button assignments that are designed to make it easier
to operate a Pocket PC with one hand. You can program hardware buttons to open and
close the Start menu and the pop-up menu, which normally appears when you tap-and-hold.
You can also program a button that you can push rather than having to tap OK or Close.
Configure the Input Methods
Windows Mobile 2003 has four methods of input. The Block and Letter Recognizers recognize
characters that you write with the stylus in the Input Panel on the screen. (The Input Panel
is discussed in the section “Use the Software Input Panel” later in this chapter.) Microsoft
Transcriber is a natural handwriting recognizer that translates to text what you write with the
stylus on the Pocket PC screen. Finally, you can use the onscreen keyboard to tap characters.
Settings for each method are configured in the Input Settings dialog box, which you open by
tapping Start | Settings | Input.
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The Input Settings dialog box has three tabs: Input Method, Word Completion, and Options.
Use the Input Method tab to configure settings for each method. To make a change to an input
method, select it from the drop-down list and then tap Options. (Note that there are no Block
Recognizer options.) When you select the Keyboard input method, the Input Settings dialog
box looks like the following:
3
Change the size of the keys on the keyboard by selecting either the Large Keys or Small
Keys radio button. When you select Large Keys, you then have the option to use gestures for
SPACE, Backspace, SHIFT+key, and ENTER, which are made on the keyboard.
You will notice that at the bottom of the Input Settings dialog box is a sentence that
contains an underlined link, similar to the hyperlinks found on web pages. The Pocket
PC settings include links to related settings; in this case, if you tap the Align link in this
dialog box, the Align Screen Settings dialog box displays.
When you select the Letter Recognizer input method and tap Options, the following screen
displays:
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When you select the Quick Stroke option, you must write all letters in one stroke for the
Pocket PC to translate. A single stroke enables you to write faster, but it requires that you first
learn new ways to write certain letters. The Right To Left Crossbar option specifies whether you
write crossbars for t, f, and the plus symbol (+) from right to left. If you need to write accented
characters, be sure to check the Allow Accented Characters option.
Pocket PC Online Help contains demonstrations of how to write characters. To see the
demonstration while the Letter Recognizer Options dialog box is displayed, tap Start |
Help, and then tap Demo. You can also display help by tapping the Information button
on the Input Panel any time that the panel is open.
As you enter characters in the Input Panel, the Pocket PC
will suggest words that you may be writing. If you tap the word
that is displayed, that word will be placed wherever the cursor
is located. By using this word completion feature, you can speed
up data entry on your device. Use the Word Completion tab, as
shown in the image to the left, to turn on or off word completion
and to specify how many words to display. This feature can
display one to four words at a time.
You can specify how many
characters you must enter before
a word is suggested in this tab,
as well as specify whether you
want a space automatically
inserted after the word.
Use the Options tab, shown
in the following image, to configure options wherever writing or
recording is supported.
Specify the default Voice Recording Format by selecting
an option from the drop-down list. Selecting percentages from
the Default Zoom drop-down lists specifies the default zoom
levels for writing and typing. The Pocket PC automatically
capitalizes the first letter of sentences if you select that option
in this dialog box. Choose Scroll Upon Reaching The Last Line
and the Pocket PC will automatically scroll the window when
you reach the last line.
Each of the voice recording options affects the quality and the size of the audio file.
Mobile Voice (GSM) is the recommended format because it provides good recording
quality and takes far less storage than Pulse Code Modulation (PCM). PCM provides
slightly better sound quality, but it can take up to 50 times more storage.
Change the Start Menu
One of the first things you need to do with a new Pocket PC is edit the Start menu so that
shortcuts to the programs you use most frequently are listed there. By placing application
shortcuts in the Start menu, you decrease the number of taps necessary to start these programs.
Change the contents of the Start menu by tapping the Menus icon in the Personal tab of the
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Settings screen. (To access the Settings screen, tap Start | Settings.)
When you tap the Menus icon, the Menus Settings dialog box
displays, as shown in the image to the right.
This box lists all the programs installed on your Pocket
PC. Items that are checked appear in the Start menu, while the
remaining items are available by selecting Start | Programs. To
add an item to the Start menu, simply check the box next to its
name; to remove an item from the Start menu, deselect the check
box next to the name of the program.
A feature unique to the Pocket PC is the New button. This
feature adds a pop-up menu to the New menu option on the
Command bar. Enable this feature and a small triangle appears
next to the New menu option.
Tapping the triangle enables you to create a new item, such
as an appointment, wherever you may be currently working on your Pocket PC. For example,
suppose you are working in Pocket Word editing a document, when you are asked to attend a
meeting. If the New button is enabled, all you need to do is tap the triangle and select Appointment.
An appointment entry sheet appears for you to enter the appointment, which saves you the extra
step of having to first switch to Calendar and then create the appointment.
To turn on or off the New button, tap the New Menu tab in the Menus Settings dialog box to
display the following dialog box:
Check the Turn On New Button Menu box to turn on the menu, and clear the check box to turn it
off. The list box in the middle of the dialog box displays the items that will appear in the list. By
default, everything is checked. Remove items from the list by clearing their check boxes.
Edit Owner Information
With the Owner Information icon, you can enter your name and address and have this information
display whenever you turn on your Pocket PC. Enter this information by following these steps.
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1. Tap the Owner Information icon in the Personal tab of the Settings dialog box. The
resulting dialog box, shown in the following image, has two tabs: Identification and Notes.
2. Enter your Name, Company, Address, Telephone number, and E-mail address in the
Identification tab. To have this information display every time you turn on your Pocket
PC, check the Show Information When Device Is Turned On box. With this option
checked, the information will display every time the device is turned on, and it continues
to display until you tap the screen.
3. Use the Notes tab to add information that is not on the Identification tab. One way to use
this tab is to provide a message in case your device is lost. When the device is turned on,
you can have the message display along with the owner information by checking the box
next to Show Information When Device Is Turned On.
Turn on Password Protection
You can protect the data in your device by requiring a password
every time the device turns on. Tap the Password icon on the
Personal tab to open the dialog box shown here.
Windows Mobile 2003 supports a four-digit password or a
strong alphanumeric password. Strong alphanumeric passwords
combine letters, numbers, and mixed case characters and are
considered to be more secure because they make it more difficult
to someone to guess your password.
Sign-On, from Communication Intelligence Corporation,
is a password security utility that uses your signature
for authentication. Find more information about this
program at http://www.cic.com.
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Tap the Prompt If Device Unused For check box to turn on password protection, and configure
how often you enter the device password by selecting a time from the drop-down list. Selecting
0 Minutes forces you to enter the password every time you turn on your Pocket PC. Selecting 30
Minutes forces you to enter the password only after the device has not been used for 30 minutes.
Thus, if the device is turned off and turned right back on again, you won’t have to enter the
password.
When you tap the Simple 4 Digit Password radio button, a numeric keypad appears where
you can tap in the password. A similar keypad displays for you to enter the password when you
turn on the Pocket PC. Enter the password by tapping the buttons on the screen using either the
stylus or your finger.
Use the onscreen keyboard for entering passwords to ensure that no translation
errors occur.
Strong alphanumeric passwords provide greater security. When you tap the Strong Alphanumeric
Password radio button, two fields display for you to enter a password. The password must be at
least seven characters long, and it must contain a combination of uppercase and lowercase letters,
numbers, or punctuation.
Strong alphanumeric passwords are case sensitive.
It is crucial that you remember your password, because without it you will not be able to
retrieve your data. If you forget your password, the only way to access your device is to perform
a full reset, which deletes all data. (The process varies for a full reset with each manufacturer’s
device; consult your owner’s manual for details. The process usually involves removing your
backup and main batteries so that your device has no power; when you do this, all of your data
will be lost.)
To help remember your password, tap the Hint tab and enter a word or phrase that will
remind you of the password. The Pocket PC will display the hint after the wrong password is
entered four times. Remember that the hint may be visible to others, so make it something that
reminds you, yet remains difficult for others to guess.
Change Sounds & Notifications
Using a Pocket PC is both a visual and audible
experience. Sound plays an important role in providing
feedback. For example, when you tap a button using a
stylus, you not only see the button being tapped, but
you also hear a sound. In most cases, this sound lets
you know that the Pocket PC has recognized your
request.
Sounds and their volumes are controlled using the
Sounds & Notifications Settings dialog box. To open
this dialog box, shown in the following image, tap the
Sounds & Notifications icon on the Personal tab.
Adjust
volume
by moving
this slider.
Turn sounds on or off by checking these boxes.
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You will notice two tabs in the Sounds & Notifications Settings dialog box. The Volume tab
allows you to enable sounds for events or applications. (An event is something generated by the
operating system, such as opening or closing a program or emptying the recycle bin.) The
Notifications tab allows you to specify what you hear when you want to be reminded of
appointments and tasks.
The following sounds can be enabled by checking their boxes on the Volume tab:
■ Events Such as warnings and system events.
■ Programs and notifications Such as alarms and
reminders.
■ Screen taps Specify Soft or Loud by selecting
the appropriate radio button.
■ Hardware buttons Specify Soft or Loud by
selecting the appropriate radio button.
Tap here to
preview the
sound.
You can move the slider on the Volume tab to adjust the
sound volume. Tap and hold the slider while dragging it to
adjust the volume.
On the Notifications tab, shown in the following image,
you specify what sound plays when an event occurs.
Tap here to
stop the sound
preview.
Select an event from this drop-down list.
Settings for Sounds & Reminders
Pocket PC 2000 devices have a Sounds & Reminders dialog box with three tabs: Volume,
Sounds, and Reminders. The Notifications tab on Pocket PC 2002 and 2003 combines
the Sounds & Reminders settings. To change Sounds on Pocket PC 2000 devices, follow
these steps:
1. Tap a name in the Event Name list in the Sounds tab.
2. Tap the Sound drop-down list at the bottom of the dialog box. Select the sound that
you want from the list. If you do not want a sound associated with the event, select
None from the list.
3. Once you have selected the sound that you want, preview it by tapping the Play
button to the right.
4. Tap OK to save the changes.
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First, select an event from the drop-down list, and then tap the Play Sound check box and
select a sound. To preview the sound, tap the Play button.
Certain events have additional options that appear on the Notifications tab. For example,
when you select Beam: Autoreceive from the drop-down list, Display Message On Screen and
Flash Light For options appear. When you select the Flash Light For option, you can specify
how long the light flashes by selecting a number of minutes from the drop-down list.
Change the Today Screen
The Pocket PC Today screen is similar to the Windows desktop. The Today screen can contain
owner information, appointments, e-mail messages, and tasks. Tap the Today icon on the
Personal tab to open the Today Settings dialog box and configure the appearance of this screen.
You can tap each item of the Today screen to start the associated application. Tap the
Date icon to open the Pocket PC clock settings; tap the Owner icon to open the Owner
Information settings; tap the Appointments, Unread Messages, or Tasks icon to open
the Calendar, Inbox, or Tasks.
Themes change the look of the Today screen, Start menu, and Navigation bar, and are new
with Pocket PC 2002. Select which theme to use on the Appearance tab of the Today Settings
dialog box, as shown in the following image:
To change the current theme, tap the new theme you want to use from the list box and then
tap OK.
Several programs have been developed for Pocket PCs that change the appearance of
the Today screen. An overview of several of these programs is provided later in this
chapter in the section “Enhance the Today Screen.”
To add a theme to your Pocket PC, copy the theme file, which has a .tsk extension, to either
the Windows or My Documents folder on the Pocket PC. Themes can also be stored in a My
Documents folder on storage cards, but they should not be in subfolders of My Documents.
Chapter 7 shows you how to use ActiveSync to copy files to the Pocket PC, or you can use File
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Explorer to copy themes from a network share. If you want to share a theme with another Pocket
PC, tap the theme, tap Beam, and align the infrared ports. To delete a theme, first tap the theme
name, and then tap Delete.
If you don’t want to change the appearance of the Start menu or Navigation bar, but you want
to change the Today screen background image, tap the Use This Picture As The Background
check box, and then tap Browse to select an image. Background images can be either JPEG or
GIF files and must be stored in the My Documents folder or a subfolder of My Documents.
You can combine themes and background images to further customize the Today screen
appearance to your personal preferences.
The items that can appear on the Today screen are listed on the Items tab of the Today
Settings dialog box, as shown in the following image:
To add or remove items from the screen, tap the check box next to the item name. Owner
Info, Calendar, Inbox, and Tasks can be moved up or down in the list by selecting the item and
then tapping the Move Up or Move Down button.
Options that control what displays on the Today screen can be set for the Calendar and
Tasks items. Select either and then tap the Options button. The Today screen can display the
next appointment, upcoming appointments, as well as all-day events. Task options include the
number of high-priority tasks, the number of tasks due today, and the number of overdue tasks.
You can also restrict the task information to a specific category.
After the last appointment time for the current day, Windows Mobile 2003 will display
the first appointment of the next day. Pocket PC 2002 shows that no upcoming
appointments are scheduled for the current day.
The best time for the Today screen to be displayed is when you turn on the device for the
first time each day. You might also want to have the screen display after a specified period of
time has elapsed, which will happen if you tap the Display Today Screen If Device Is Not Used
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For [ ] Hours check box on the Today Settings dialog box. Specify the number of hours that
must elapse before the screen displays from the drop-down list on the dialog box.
Enter Information on Pocket PCs
Handwriting recognition is one of the most intimate ways you can interact with computers. Writing
on a computer screen with your own hand, and seeing the writing translated to text, makes the
computer more personal than just a machine. It is no wonder that handwriting recognition has
captured the imagination of computer users.
Your Pocket PC provides several ways of translating what you write to text. The Block and
Letter recognizers instantly translate a letter that you write on the Pocket PC Software Input Panel
to a character inserted at the cursor location. You can also write on the screen as you write on
paper and see the results displayed on the screen in digital ink. After you finish writing, either
store what was written in the digital ink form or have the Pocket PC translate the digital ink into
a text font. Finally, you can write anywhere on the Pocket PC screen in your own handwriting,
and after you finish writing, the Pocket PC translates each written word and inserts it at the cursor
location.
If you prefer not to use any of the handwriting recognition methods, you can use the stylus
to tap letters from an onscreen keyboard. Each letter that you tap will appear on the screen at the
cursor location. In this section, you’ll find instructions for using the onscreen keyboard, the Pocket
PC Block and Letter recognizers, and Transcriber handwriting recognition. The process of
translating digital ink is called deferred recognition, and because it works in many of the Pocket
PC programs, instructions for using it are in the chapters covering those programs.
The fastest way to enter information into your Pocket PC is by using ActiveSync to
synchronize data between the device and Microsoft Outlook. Chapter 6 provides
instructions for using ActiveSync.
Use the Software Input Panel
The Software Input Panel is a window on the Pocket PC screen that provides a location for
writing characters or displays the onscreen keyboard. To open the window, tap the Software
Input Panel button located at the bottom-right corner of the application screen, as shown in the
following image:
Tap here to select the onscreen
keyboard, the recognizers, or
the Transcriber.
Tap here to open the Input Panel.
The button image changes to indicate which of the three modes are in use. A keyboard
indicates the onscreen keyboard, a blue pencil indicates the Block or Letter recognizers, and
a hand and pencil indicates the Transcriber.
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To change the input method, tap the arrow next to the Input Panel icon to open the following
pop-up menu:
Tap the name of the input method that you want to use; if you select Keyboard, Block
Recognizer, or Letter Recognizer, the menu closes and the panel switches to the mode that you
select. If you select Transcriber, the panel closes and the icon switches to the hand and pencil.
Included at the top of the pop-up menu is Options, which you can tap to open the Input
Settings dialog box, as shown in the following image:
You can also open the Input Settings dialog box by tapping Start | Settings | Input.
Enter Information Using the Onscreen Keyboard
The standard onscreen keyboard displays in the Software Input Panel, as shown in the following
image:
Tap here to switch to
the numeric keypad.
Tap here to switch to the special character keyboard.
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To use the onscreen keyboard to enter information, do the following:
1. To enter text, tap the letters on the keyboard using the stylus. The keyboard has three
different modes: standard, numeric, and special character.
2. To switch to the numeric or special character keyboard, both shown in Figure 3-1, tap the
123 and ÁÜ button, respectively, on the standard keyboard.
3. Tap SHIFT to switch the keyboard buttons to their uppercase equivalents, and the number
row displays the symbols that normally display above the number row on a standard
keyboard. After you enter an uppercase letter by tapping SHIFT and then tapping a
letter, the keyboard switches back to lowercase, but tapping CAP locks the keyboard
in CAPS LOCK.
4. The standard onscreen keyboard displays small keys, but that can be switched to large
keys by opening the Input Settings dialog box and selecting the Keyboard Input Method
option, as shown earlier in the chapter.
5. Tap the Large Keys or the Small Keys radio button to switch between the two keyboard
types. The Large Keys keyboard supports gestures that you can write across the keyboard
for the SPACE, BACKSPACE, ENTER, and SHIFT keys. To use the gestures shown on the
Input Settings dialog box, tap the check box in the dialog box.
FIGURE 3-1
On the left is the numeric keyboard; on the right is the special character
keyboard.
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Enter Information Using the Letter Recognizer
To use the letter recognizer to enter text, tap Letter Recognizer on the Software Input Panel
pop-up menu, which changes the panel, as shown in the following image:
Enter uppercase
letters here.
Enter lowercase
letters here.
Enter numbers here.
BACKSPACE
Move the cursor forward and back.
Enter
Online Help
SPACE
Symbol keyboard
The letter recognizer has four areas for entering uppercase letters, lowercase letters, numbers,
and keyboard commands, such as BACKSPACE and ENTER.
Drag the stylus across the panel horizontally from left to right to insert a space,
and drag from right to left to delete a character or space.
The letter recognizer translates letters written in lowercase, but you have the option of using
a single stroke to enter certain letters of the alphabet. To enter characters in a single stroke, select
the Quick Stroke option on the Letter Recognizer Options screen, which you open by tapping the
Options button in the Input Settings dialog box. To see demos for writing all characters, open
the Letter Recognizer Online Help, and tap Demo.
The dotted middle line and the solid bottom line on the panel help the letter recognizer
translate shorter letters and letters with descenders or ascenders. Write letters such as o and c
between the midline (dotted) and baseline (solid). Write letters with descenders, such as p, with
the top of the letter between the midline and baseline and the descender below the baseline.
Letters with ascenders, such as b, should be written with the ascender above the midline and
the bottom portion between the midline and baseline.
The letter recognizer also translates accented and special characters. Open Online Help
to see demonstrations of how to enter these characters on the Input Panel.
Enter Information Using the Block Recognizer
If you switch to a Pocket PC from a Palm OS Version 4 or older device, you may prefer using
the block recognizer because it translates the Palm Graffiti-like character strokes to text. To
use the block recognizer to enter text, tap Block Recognizer on the Software Input Panel pop-up
menu, which changes the panel, as shown in the following image:
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Enter letters here.
55
Enter numbers here.
BACKSPACE
Move the cursor forward and back.
ENTER
Online Help
SPACE
Symbol Keyboard
The block recognizer has three areas for entering letters, numbers, and keyboard commands
such as BACKSPACE and ENTER.
The first word of each sentence is automatically capitalized; otherwise, all other letters
translate in lowercase. To capitalize other words, switch to Shift mode by drawing a straight line
from the bottom up for at least half the length of the Input Panel. The abc label at the upper-left
corner of the Input Panel changes to Abc, indicating Shift mode. To activate Caps Lock, draw
two lines from the bottom up. You will know that Caps Lock is active by the ABC label on the
Input Panel.
To see a demonstration of how to enter characters using Graffiti, tap Online Help on the
Input Panel, and then tap Demo.
You enter punctuation and symbols anywhere on the Input Panel. To enter punctuation, tap
once on the panel, and then write the punctuation mark. A circle appears in the upper-left corner
of the Input Panel, indicating punctuation mode. Enter extended characters by first drawing a
slash in the Input Panel and then writing the character. A slash appears in the upper-left corner
of the Input Panel, indicating Extended Character mode.
Punctuation and symbols can also be entered by tapping the
Symbol Keyboard button on the Input Panel, and then by tapping
an item on the keyboard, as shown in the image to the right.
The Block Recognizer also translates accented
characters, special characters, and mathematical
symbols. See Online Help for demonstrations on
how to enter these characters on the Input Panel.
Word Completion
As you enter letters using the onscreen keyboard or recognizers,
the Pocket PC suggests words in a pop-up window that appears
above the Input Panel. Tap the word to enter it at the insertion point.
On the Input Settings dialog box, tap the Word Completion
tab to configure options for word completion.
When the Pocket PC suggests more words, a greater amount of space is taken up above the
Input Panel, which covers up other information in the dialog box where you enter text.
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Enter Information Using Transcriber
Transcriber is a natural-handwriting recognition translator for the
Pocket PC. It recognizes words written in cursive, print, or mixed
handwriting by using an integrated dictionary. When you select
Transcriber from the Software Input Panel pop-up menu, the
panel closes and you enter text by writing directly on the screen.
The Input Panel button changes to the Hand and Pencil icon.
An introductory screen and icon bar will display if these
items are selected in the Transcriber Options dialog box shown
in the image to the right.
To open this dialog box, tap the Options button under the
Transcriber input method on the Input Settings dialog box.
The icon bar, shown in the image below, appears at the
bottom of the screen when Transcriber is active.
Open the Letter Shapes selector.
Open the Transcriber keyboard.
Switch recognition modes.
Open the Correction window.
Undo
Control Writing
Orientation.
Open the Options dialog box.
Open Transcriber Help.
The Control Writing Orientation arrow on the icon bar points upward relative to the selected
direction of the writing. For example, if the arrow points northwest, then you should write
characters with an inclination of 45 degrees from bottom left up to top right. If your writing slants
letters slightly to the left, tap the arrow until it points northeast.
Transcriber has three recognition modes: Unrestricted,
Uppercase, and Numeric. The Unrestricted mode allows all
symbols and words and is indicated by an a on the icon bar.
The Uppercase mode converts everything to uppercase and
is indicated by an A on the icon bar. The Numeric mode
converts numbers and some letters and is indicated by a 12
on the icon bar.
The Transcriber keyboard provides an easy way to enter
punctuation or symbols. It will remain visible until you tap
OK, but if you tap the Push-pin button, the keyboard will
close after you tap a key.
Use the Letter Shapes selector shown in the image to the
right to configure Transcriber for your handwriting.
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Tap each shape shown on the screen and then tap the Often, Rarely, or Never radio button to
specify whether you write the letter in that shape. It’s worth taking some time to go through each
letter and symbol to increase translation accuracy.
The Transcriber Correction Window simplifies the process of correcting translation mistakes.
To open the window, highlight a mistake, whether it’s a letter, word, or phrase; then tap the
Correction icon on the toolbar. You can also use the quick-correct gesture, which is an up/down
motion, over the highlight, and then tap Go To Corrector on the pop-up menu; or, you can use
the correction gesture—a check mark—to open the window, which looks like the following:
Full screen
Delete
Undo
Text/Draw
You can use several gestures to direct Transcriber to perform certain actions, such as
enter a Return or Backspace character. You will find these gestures in Online Help,
which you can open by tapping Help (the question mark) on the toolbar or by tapping
Start | Help.
You can make a correction in many ways: You can write directly over a letter or word to change
it, or you can double-tap the letter or word to open the Alternates menu. From the Alternates
menu, you can select an alternative letter or word from those provided, add the selection to the
Transcriber dictionary, change the case of the selection, or cancel corrections.
Another method is to select the letter or word and then tap the
caret (^) under the text to open a menu, where you can delete the
selection, replace the selection with a space, change the case of
the selection, copy the selection, or replace the selection with text
from the clipboard. If you double-tap the correction window in
any area not over a word or the caret, a menu opens where you
can erase everything in the window, cancel the previous action,
copy everything in the window to the clipboard, or paste text
from the clipboard into the window.
The General tab of the Transcriber Options dialog box can
also be used to configure the color and the width of the ink that
displays when you write onscreen. The Recognizer tab of the
Transcriber Options dialog box, as shown in the image to the
right, provides settings for controlling handwriting recognition.
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Use the Transcriber Calculator
Transcriber has a built-in calculator that can complete simple mathematical equations. Write
the equation as you would text, such as 2+2=. Transcriber recognizes this equation, performs
the calculation, and translates what you wrote to 2+2=4.
If you select the Add Space After check box, a space is added after each translated word. If
you do not connect letters when you write, select the Separate Letters Mode check box to speed
up recognition. The Speed of Recognition Vs. Quality slider controls the trade-off between
recognition speed and quality, with faster speed resulting in decreased quality. The Recognition
Start Time slider controls the length of time after a word is written before Transcriber translates
the word to text. When the slider is in the center, Transcriber will wait about a second.
Try Alternative Recognizers
Each recognizer that comes with the Pocket PC might require that you make slight changes to
how you write. If the recognizers have difficulty translating your handwriting, you may want
to try one of several alternative recognizers available for the Pocket PC, such as PenReader or
Calligrapher. Many of these recognizers come in trial versions so that you can try the software
before purchasing it.
Transcriber supports only the English, French, and German languages. If you write in a
language other than these, you may want to consider PenReader from Paragon Software, because
it supports 28 languages. It recognizes all national alphabets based on the standard Latin ABC,
and additional recognition engines are adjusted for Cyrillic and Greek alphabets. You will find
more information about PenReader at http://www.penreader.com.
Calligrapher is the big brother of Transcriber. It was developed by ParaGraph, from whom
Microsoft licenses code used in Transcriber. ParaGraph is also the company that developed
the handwriting recognition software used by the Apple Newton operating system. PhatWare
Corporation distribures and supports Calligrapher. One of the features that sets Calligrapher
apart is PenCommander, which launches user-defined commands that you create using a scripting
language. It also includes an integrated spell checker. English and International versions of this
program are available, and you will find more information about it at http://www.phatware.com.
Following are other applications that perform similar functions:
■ MyScript from Vision Objects Adds a new Software Input Panel to Pocket PCs that
enables you to write across the entire width of the panel. English and French versions
are available. Find more information about MyScript at http://www.visionobjects.com.
■ Fitaly from Textware Solution An alternative to the onscreen keyboard. The keys are
arranged for optimal input using a stylus, with 84 percent of the keystrokes clustered in
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a central area. People who are proficient with Fitaly have been able to enter text as fast
as 50 words per minute. You will find this program at http://www.fitaly.com.
■ Resco Keyboard Pro Enhances the onscreen keyboard by adding three numeric
layouts, including a calculator for typing numbers or numerical expressions. Another
keyboard from Resco stores phrases, which you can insert by simply tapping a button.
This program can be found at http://www.resco-net.com/resco/en/default.asp.
■ AccessPanel from DeveloperOne An additional Software Input Panel that speeds
data entry by storing phrases that you can insert into documents or e-mail. It also
automatically inserts information from the Pocket PC Contacts program into documents.
More information about this program can be found at http://www.developerone.com.
Use External Keyboards
Even though the Pocket PC’s handwriting recognizers do a good job, typing remains the fastest
way to enter information. Most Pocket PC manufacturers sell external keyboards that attach to
the accessory port at the bottom of the device.
One of the popular third-party keyboards is the Stowaway from Think Outside.
(http://www.thinkoutside.com/). When open, the Stowaway keyboard is nearly as large
as a full-size keyboard, but it folds up to about the same size as a Pocket PC. The keyboards
sold by Pocket PC manufacturers also fold up, making them easy to carry.
If you find the folding external keyboards too large, consider a thumb keyboard. These
keyboards attach to the bottom of the Pocket PC and add about two inches to the length of
the Pocket PC. Some Pocket PC manufacturers also sell thumb keyboards. Belkin (http://
www.belkin.com) sells the SnapNType keyboard for the HP iPAQ 3100, 3600, 3700, and 3800
series Pocket PCs. The Hitachi Multimedia Pocket PC Communicator is a Pocket PC Phone
Edition device that has a built-in thumb keyboard.
Enhancements in Windows Mobile 2003 make it easier to navigate in programs using
keyboards. These enhancements include four new navigation and application keys, menu
keyboard accelerators, auto-correct, and auto-suggest.
Manage Running Programs
One of the most hotly debated topics between Microsoft and Pocket PC users is about exiting
programs. Microsoft believes it is better to have all programs open and to jump between them,
because it is much faster to switch between running programs than it is to start a program. Because
of this, Microsoft does not provide a way to exit programs. Pocket PC users prefer to start, exit,
and switch between programs on their devices just as they do on their personal computers.
Most Pocket PC users prefer to have more control over what programs run on their Pocket
PC. Furthermore, Windows CE does not do a good enough job of managing memory, so when
too many programs are running, the Pocket PC slows down. Consequently, software developers
have written programs that provide users with the ability to shut down running programs.
While several program task managers exist for Pocket PCs, they all work in a similar way.
Additional buttons are added to the Pocket PC Navigation bar at the top of the screen, and the
default OK button is replaced with a button that automatically switches between Exit and OK.
Tapping Exit shuts down the program.
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X Marks the Spot
Windows Mobile 2003 has an X button that appears to exit programs but does not. When
you tap the X, the window closes and the previously opened program appears on the screen.
However, tapping the X really just closes the window and does not exit the program. If you
tap Start | Settings | System | Memory, and then tap the Running Programs tab, you will see
the program still listed as running. Consequently, it is best to think of the X as a minimize
button, and use a program task manager to shut down programs.
The choice of which program task manager to install is based on whether you want a number
of features available from the Navigation bar or a simple button that just shuts down programs.
For example, GigaBar from ThumbsUpSoftware (http://www.gigabar.com) switches tasks,
supports gestures for starting programs, browses files, shows memory and battery status,
displays background images, and captures screen shots. In contrast, Go from Stellarmetrics
(http://stellarm.hostme.com/Software/go.htm) adds one button to the Navigation bar for switching
and exiting programs.
The support of background images, or skins, with GigaBar is popular with its users because
it allows them to change the Pocket PC appearance to something they find more appealing. There
are links to GigaBar skins at http://www.gigabar.com/htm/skins.html. Another program task
manager that supports skins is WIS Bar, which is made by the Japanese firm Walkers Internet
Service. WIS Bar displays running programs as icons on the Navigation bar and adds icons for
the Today screen, Battery, and Memory meters to the Navigation bar. You can download WIS Bar
from http://www.walkers.ne.jp.
TaskPro Navigator from DeveloperOne does not support skins, but you can customize its
colors. TaskPro Navigator adds Navigation buttons to the top of the screen and includes memory
and battery meters. You will find this program at http://www.developerone.com/pocketpc/
taskpronavigator.
Scott Seligman’s PocketNav is a program task manager favored by Pocket PC users who
simply want to switch among programs and shut down programs. It adds two buttons to the
Navigation bar: one loads the Today screen and the other loads the task switcher. You’ll find
more information about this program at http://www.scottandmichelle.net/scott/cestuff.html.
Enhance the Today Screen
The Pocket PC Today screen supports plug-ins, which provide software developers the ability to
enhance the Today screen by adding more functions or changing its appearance. You can select
from several programs to tailor the Today screen to your personal needs.
Perhaps the most widely used Today screen enhancement is Dashboard from SnoopSoft.
Dashboard replaces all the default parts of the Today screen with its own agenda, mail, and task
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viewers, and it adds a program launcher. You can combine Dashboard skins with WIS Bar and
GigaBar skins to change nearly the entire appearance of the Pocket PC. You will find more
information about this program at http://www.snoopsoft.com/.
DeveloperOne provides several Today screen plug-ins. Normally the Today screen displays
only the number of tasks that you have, but TaskView Today lists the actual tasks on the Today
screen. Agenda Today replaces the Calendar portion of the Today screen with all of the day’s
activities, including tasks. PointStart adds a list of icons that you can tap to run programs, and
Phrase Today adds inspirational thoughts, quotes, and trivia to the Today screen. You will find
all of these plug-ins at http://www.developerone.com.
Scary Bear Software provides a number of Today screen plug-ins. QuickCalendar displays
the current week, and if you tap the QuickCalendar window, it expands to display two months.
QuickAgenda provides an overview for several days of appointments. QuickQuotes displays
quotes on the Today screen, and PowerLevel displays meters for power level and memory. You
will find these plug-ins at http://www.scarybearsoftware.com/.
BirthdayBoy plug-in from Gigabyte Solutions Ltd. displays birthdays and anniversaries up to
31 days in advance. One version of the plug-in works with the Today screen, and another version
is available for Dashboard. You can download this plug-in from http://www.gigabytesol.com.
If you would like the appearance of the Today screen to change a little bit each day, check
out the Today’s The Day plug-in from Stellarmetrics. It displays a different image on the Today
screen for each day of the week. Stellarmetrics provides instructions for how to create your own
images for the plug-in, along with links to other sites that have images, at http://stellarm.hostme
.com/Software/ttd.htm.
Microsoft provides a free Today screen image tool that you can download from http://www
.pocketpc.com. The tool is a Today screen plug-in that displays any JPEG, GIF, or BMP image
that you select. When you install the tool on your Pocket PC, an Image Entry is added to the
Today screen items list.
Change the Overall Appearance
of the Pocket PC
The skinning capabilities of Dashboard, WIS Bar, and GigaBar significantly change the
appearance of a Pocket PC. However, parts of the Pocket PC software cannot be changed
by these programs, but you can use other software to make these changes.
Stardock has brought the features of its popular WindowBlinds program to the Pocket PC.
It changes the appearance of the Navigation bar and allows you to add and place as many
buttons on the Navigation bar as you want. You will find this program at http://www
.stardock.com/products/pocketblinds/.
You can use CETuner from Paragon Software to change the color schemes and system
fonts on your Pocket PC. By decreasing the font size, more information will display on the
screen, or you can make the fonts bolder so they are easier to see. This program is available
from http://www.penreader.com/PocketPC/CETuner.html.
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It’s best to use images that are 240-pixels wide, but the plug-in will fit the image to the width
of the screen when you tap the Fit Image To Window Width check box. You can also configure
the plug-in to start programs that you enter in the Run This When Tapped field.
The Today Screen Image tool provides an easy way to add corporate logos to the Today
Screen.
Wrapping Up
As you have seen, you can emphasize the personal part of the Pocket PC in several ways. Each
setting and program discussed in this chapter has the purpose of tailoring the Pocket PC to your
tastes and preferences. You now know well that the second P stands for personal; in the next
chapter you’ll understand the importance of the second C in Pocket PC, which stands for
computer. A number of system settings control how the Pocket PC operates, and we’ll take
a closer look at these settings next.
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How to…
■
■
■
■
■
Conserve battery power by adjusting the screen brightness
Change the date and time on your Pocket PC
Configure the amount of RAM used to run programs and store files
Monitor and manage the amount of storage space available in Pocket PCs and storage cards
Change regional settings
I
t may not look it, but your Pocket PC is a powerful computer. The Electronic Numerical
Integrator And Computer (ENIAC) was the world’s first electronic computer, built by the
Army during World War II to compute ballistic firing tables. ENIAC weighed more than 30 tons,
calculated 5000 additions per second, and stored 200 digits. A Pocket PC weighing 6.1 ounces
calculates more than 300 million additions per second and can store more than 16 million digits.
One of the most powerful features of Pocket PCs is that they are designed so that you
shouldn’t have to change how they operate. Nowhere is this more evident than in the Pocket PC
memory management features, which automatically allocates memory in the Pocket PC between
storage space and program memory. However, on occasion you will need to make changes, and
for that you use the System tab of the Settings screen.
Some examples of the type of system changes you may need to make include changing the
Pocket PC device name if you synchronize more than one Pocket PC with a desktop computer.
If taps on the screen do not properly register, fix the problem by using the Screen setting. You
manage battery power by adjusting the Backlight and Power settings. In this chapter, you’ll learn
how to change these and other system settings on your Pocket PC.
Change the System Settings
You use the System tab to change hardware settings. To access the System tab, tap Start | Settings,
and then tap the System tab to open it.
Table 4-1 contains a summary of the icons in the System
tab. In this chapter, you’ll learn how to use each of these.
Change the Device Name Using About
The Windows CE operating system runs on several
different types of processors, though Pocket PC 2002 and
Windows Mobile 2003 run only on Intel StrongARM and
X-Scale processors. Pocket PC 2000 runs on SH3, MIPS, and
StrongARM processors, which means that you may need to
determine what processor is in these Pocket PCs to install the
correct version of a program. The About icon in the System tab
displays this information and more. When you tap the About
icon, the following About Settings dialog box displays:
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As you can see, the dialog box has three tabs: Version, Device ID, and Copyrights. The
Version tab displays the current version of the Pocket PC, the processor type, the amount of
internal memory, whether the expansion slot is in use, and the owner’s name and company.
The Copyrights tab displays all the copyright information for the software that is installed
on the Pocket PC.
Icon
TABLE 4-1
Name
Description
About
Provides information about the Pocket PC version, the
processor, and the amount of memory. Specifies the name
of the device that is used with ActiveSync.
Screen
Changes the way the stylus works with the touch screen.
Use this icon if you have problems getting the touch screen
to recognize the exact location of the stylus.
Backlight
Configures the screen backlighting to conserve
battery power.
Clock
Sets the current date and time on the Pocket PC. Enables
the Pocket PC to act like an alarm clock.
Memory
Configures the amount of internal memory allocated for
storage and program memory. Displays the amount of
space available on storage cards. Shows the programs
that are running and enables you to stop them.
Power
Shows the amount of main and backup battery power
available and configures power saving features.
Regional Settings
Enables your Pocket PC to support international settings
that can be used by some programs. Also changes the way
numbers, currency, time, and dates display.
Remove Programs
Uninstalls any applications that you have installed on
your device.
Certificates
Manages personal and root certificates.
The Pocket PC System Settings
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Use the Device ID tab, as shown in the imageto the right, to
specify a name for the Pocket PC. This name is used to identify
the device to other computers on a network. It is also used by
ActiveSync to store partnership information. (See Chapter 5
for information about ActiveSync and partnerships.)
Enter a name in the Device Name field. If you wish, enter
information in the Description field. The Description field can
contain up to 50 characters and can be used to display any
information.
Align the Screen
When you turned on your Pocket PC for the first time, you
aligned the Touch screen. The process involves tapping the
center of a target as it moves across the screen. You will
need to realign the screen if you start to have difficulty
getting the Pocket PC to respond exactly as you expect
when you tap the screen.
To realign the Touch screen, tap the Screen icon on the
System tab to open the Screen Settings dialog box as shown
to right.
Begin the process by tapping Align Screen. Tap the target as it
moves around the screen, and the Pocket PC stores the information
and returns to this dialog box. Close the dialog box by tapping OK.
Most Pocket PCs have button sequences you can use
to align the screen. For example, on a HP iPAQ,
pressing the Navigation and Calendar buttons at the
same time opens the Align Screen dialog box. Check
the owner’s manual of your Pocket PC to determine
whether it has a similar button sequence.
ClearType is a font smoothing technology available only
with Microsoft Reader on Pocket PC 2000. With Pocket PC
2002 and Windows Mobile 2003, ClearType is available for all
programs when you select the Enable ClearType check box on
the Screen Settings dialog box. After you tap the check box, soft
reset your device for changes to take effect.
Adjust the Backlight or Brightness
With this setting, you specify that backlighting be turned off when
the device is on battery power and idle for a specified period of
time, or when it’s on external power and idle for a specified period
of time. To configure these settings, tap the Backlight icon in the
System tab to open the following Backlight Settings dialog box as
shown to left.
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Normally, this dialog box has tabs only for Battery Power and External Power, although some
Pocket PCs include an additional tab (as shown here for Brightness). Both Power tabs have the
same two check boxes—one to turn off the backlight if the device is not used for a specified amount
of time and another to turn on the backlight when a button is pressed or the screen is tapped.
Some Pocket PCs have a Frontlight or Brightness icon in the System tab rather than a
Backlight icon.
Check the appropriate boxes to configure the backlight settings. If you select Turn Off
Backlight, you can then select the amount of time to wait from the drop-down list. Use the
Brightness tab on iPAQs to configure how bright the backlight displays. A brighter display
will drain the batteries faster than a dimmer display.
Tap the Adjust Power Settings link at the bottom of the dialog box to go to the Power
Settings dialog box.
Set the Clock and Alarms
When you tap the Clock icon in the System tab, the Clock
Settings dialog box opens, as shown in the following image:
The Time tab is used to set the date and time of the Pocket
PC, and the Alarms tab is used to create alarms.
The top half of the dialog box contains the settings for the
Home location, and the bottom half contains the settings for a
Visiting location. Use either the Home or Visiting settings to
change the date and time. Tapping the radio button next to
Home or Visiting makes it available for changes.
The Home and Visiting settings are handy for travelers,
allowing you to change the date and time between two
locations. However, be aware that when you switch
between the two, appointment times in Calendar will
change to correspond with the new time zone.
To change the date, tap the down arrow to the right of the date to open the date picker, and
then follow these steps:
1. To change the month, tap the month that is currently displayed, and then select the
desired month from the list. Or, tap the left or right arrows to move forward or back
one month at a time.
2. To change the year, tap the year that is currently displayed. Use the spinner buttons to
increase or decrease the year setting.
3. To change the date, tap the date on the calendar.
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You can change the time in two ways:
■ Tap any part of the digital clock to select it, and then tap the up or down arrow to the
right of the clock to change the value.
■ Move the arms in the analog portion of the clock by tapping-and-holding an arm on the
screen. Drag the arm in the direction you want. As you move the arm, the display in the
digital portion of the clock changes.
When you tap OK after making any change to the clock settings, a dialog box will display
asking if you want to save the changes. Tap Yes, and the dialog box will close with the changes
in effect. Tap No, and the dialog box will close without saving the changes. Tap Cancel, and you
return to the Clock dialog box without saving any changes.
Set Alarms
You can also use the clock to set alarms. Four alarms are available to go off at specified times
throughout the day. To set an alarm, tap the Alarms tab to open the dialog box shown in the
following image:
Check this box to turn
the alarm on or off.
Tap here to set the
time of the alarm.
To set alarms, follow these steps:
1. Tap the field that contains <Description> and enter a description of the alarm.
2. Select the day of the week for the alarm from the date abbreviations located below the
description. More than one day can be selected by tapping each day of the week.
3. Tap the time to open a window that displays an analog and digital clock. Use either clock
to set the alarm time and then tap OK.
Once you have set the alarms, activate them by selecting the check boxes to the left of the
alarm descriptions. The alarms you create stay in the Alarms tab, and they stay active even after
they go off for the first time. Unless you clear the check boxes, the alarms that you create will go
off when the designated times occur every day you selected.
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This dialog box (shown here) appears when you tap the
Bell icon (located above the time setting) and controls what
happens when an alarm goes off:
In this dialog box, you specify whether a sound should be
made, whether that sound will repeat, whether a message will be
displayed on the screen, and whether the alarm light should flash
when the alarm goes off.
While Pocket PC 2000 provides repeating alarms,
Pocket PC 2002 and Windows Mobile 2003 do not.
Spb Software House’s Pocket Plus provides repeating
alarms for 2002 and 2003 devices. You can download
it from http://www.softspb.com/index.html.
You can change the sound that the alarm plays by using the
drop-down list next to the Play Sound option. Tap the down arrow button to expand the list
and select the sound that you want. The sound plays after it is selected.
An alarm can be any WAV file stored in the Windows folder. You can also make your
own alarms using the Notes voice recording function, as described in Chapter 13.
Adjust Memory
In Chapter 2, you learned how Windows CE uses RAM for
both file storage and program execution. The total amount
of memory in your device is divided between storage space
and program execution. Use the Memory Settings dialog
box shown in this image to change how much memory is
allocated for each:
To open the Memory Settings dialog box, tap the Memory
icon in the System tab. To adjust the allocation of internal
memory between Storage and Program memory, tap-and-hold
the stylus on the slider, and then drag it left or right. After the
slider moves, the numbers next to Allocated, In Use, and Free
change to reflect the new settings.
Pocket PCs automatically adjust between storage and
program memory as more programs run. In most cases,
you will not need to change this setting manually.
The Storage Card tab tells you the total amount of storage card memory, how much is in use,
and how much is free.
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The Running Programs tab shown in the following image
displays the programs that are currently running. You can switch
from one program to another, stop a particular program, or stop
all the programs from this tab.
To switch to a program, select it from the Running Program
List and then tap Activate. To stop a program, select it from
the Running Program List and then tap Stop. To stop all the
programs that are running tap Stop All.
In Chapter 3, you find information about third-party
programs that help you manage running programs.
Manage Storage Space
Several programs and Today screen plug-ins are available that show you how much storage
space is available without having to use Pocket PC memory settings. Other programs are
available for compressing files and searching for large files so that you can free-up storage
space. You might consider installing one of the following programs to monitor and manage
the amount of space available in your Pocket PC and on your storage cards.
■ Disk’n Power Suite from Carry-on Crew adds storage space, program memory,
■
■
■
■
■
and battery indicators to the Today screen. You will find this program at
http://www.pocketgear.com.
PowerLevel from ScaryBear Software is a Today screen plug-in that displays
battery power and memory information. You will find this program at
http://www.scarybearsoftware.com.
SpaceLeft, free from Tillanosoft, shows you the amount of storage space remaining
in the Pocket PC and on storage cards. You can download this program from
http://www.tillanosoft.com/ce/sleft.html.
Compress files using the PC-compatible ZIP/UNZIP functionality in Resco Explorer,
available at http://www.resco-net.com. Another compression program is HandyZip
from CNetX. You will find this program at http://www.cnetx.com/HandyZIP.
Repair and format storage cards using Flash Format from CNetX, which is available
at http://www.cnetx.com/format.
Find out which files take up the most storage space by using Where Is
My RAM? (WIMR?) from Rolf Olsen. You will find this free program
at http://www.mypaq.net/mysoftware.
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Manage Power
Most of the time, your Pocket PC will run on battery power.
Managing that power so that it lasts as long as possible is
important. Tap the Power icon in the System tab to open the
Power Settings dialog box shown in the image here. This dialog
box provides information about the status of your main and
backup batteries.
The Power setting screen is often unique among Pocket
PC brands. Your screens may look different from those
shown here.
Tap the Wireless tab to conserve battery power by turning
off wireless signals. Tap the Advanced tab to configure the
amount of time your Pocket PC is inactive before being turned
off. Tap the check boxes to have the Pocket PC turn off after a specified amount of time lapses,
and select the amount of time from the drop-down lists.
The Pocket PC 2002 Power Settings dialog box combines the settings on the Battery and
Advanced tabs onto one screen.
Change the Regional Settings
Although English may be spoken around the world, how it is
spoken differs, and writing numbers, currency, time, and dates
can vary from country to country. You can customize your
Pocket PC so that these items display in a manner consistent
with various locations. The Regional Settings dialog box shown
in the this image is used to make these changes. To open the
Regional Settings dialog box, tap the Regional Settings icon
in the System tab.
As you can see, five tabs are available in this dialog box:
Region, Number, Currency, Time, and Date. The Region tab
displays a drop-down list that contains preconfigured settings for
different parts of the world. Selecting one of these configurations
will automatically configure the appropriate settings in the other
four tabs. If you wish to further customize any of these settings,
tap a tab and select an item from any of the drop-down lists.
Remove Programs
Chapter 7 shows you how to manage programs using ActiveSync, which is used to install and
remove programs on your device. However, you might need to remove a program while you are
away from your desktop. Tap the Remove Programs icon in the System tab to open the Remove
Programs dialog box.
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Manage Battery Life
All Pocket PCs use batteries for power. After a period of time, the batteries need to be replaced or
recharged. The trick is to extend the life of the batteries, because Murphy’s Law dictates that the
time to change the batteries is when you need your device the most. Following is some advice to
help prolong battery life:
■ Use the Backlight settings to adjust the brightness of the display on your device. The
brighter the display, the more power is consumed.
■ Configure the battery power portion of the Backlight settings so that the backlight
automatically turns off after a short period of time.
■ Configure the Power settings so that the Pocket PC automatically turns off if it is not
in use after a short period of time.
■ Turn off sounds.
■ Use peripherals that have low power ratings. Most cards that have the Made for
Windows CE logo are designed for low power consumption.
■ Remove storage cards and microdrives that are not being used. If a card is inserted
in your device, it may draw power.
■ Program a button in Windows Media Player to toggle the screen on and off, and
program other buttons to control playback. Turn the screen off when playing music.
■ Play music from CompactFlash cards rather than from microdrives. Microdrives
have moving parts; thus they consume more power than CompactFlash storage cards.
■ Keep your Pocket PC in its cradle and charging whenever possible. The lithium ion
battery technology used in Pocket PCs does not have the same memory problems
that exist with other battery technologies.
■ Use a power level monitor plug-in for the Today screen that easily shows you how
much battery power is left. (An example is PowerLevel from ScaryBear Sofware at
http://www.scarybearsoftware.com.) If you use a program task manager such as WIS
Bar or GigaBar, you can configure it to display the power level at the top of the screen.
■ If you have a Pocket PC that uses an X-Scale processor and includes software to
adjust the processor speed, switch the processor to the PowerSave setting.
Some Pocket PC brands drain batteries faster than others. If battery life is a concern, you
may want to check message boards or newsgroups on the Internet to find out which device
has the longest battery life. Some Pocket PC devices have removable batteries, which you
can replace with a spare battery when necessary.
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This dialog box displays all the programs that have been installed. To remove a program,
simply tap it and then tap the Remove button. A warning message dialog box will display asking
if you are sure that you want to remove the program. If you tap Yes, the program is deleted and
irretrievable, so be judicious in your use of this feature!
Sometimes, when uninstalling an application, you will see a message saying that a file
is in use and the application cannot be uninstalled. If that happens, soft reset the Pocket
PC and then uninstall the application.
Manage Certificates
Security certificates are files that help identify computers or users and allow computers to send
and receive encrypted data. To use some secure websites, a computer’s browser must be able
to accept certificates. Windows Mobile 2003 adds support for security certificates, which you
manage by tapping the Certificates icon on the System tab.
You can store two types of certificates on your Pocket PC: Personal certificates, which you
manage on the Personal tab, establish your identity. Root certificates, which you manage on the
Root tab, establish the identity of the servers with which you connect. To view more information
about a certificate, type its name in the Root tab. To delete a certificate, tap-and-hold the
certificate name and then tap Delete.
Wrapping Up
The system settings shown in this chapter are available on all Pocket PCs, but each brand of
Pocket PC may include additional settings that are unique to that device. You will find more
information about these settings in the owner’s manual that comes with your Pocket PC.
The Pocket PC has the same computing power as any other standalone computer, but it is
not designed to work alone. Instead, Pocket PCs form partnerships with desktop computers to
exchange data, install software, and back up everything. In the next chapter, you will learn the
many ways in which you can connect Pocket PCs with desktop computers.
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How to…
■
■
■
■
■
■
Prepare to install Microsoft ActiveSync on a PC
Install Microsoft ActiveSync
Change ActiveSync connection settings
Connect Pocket PCs to desktop computers by using infrared
Connect Pocket PCs to desktop computers by using Ethernet networking
Connect Pocket PCs to desktop computers by using modems
W
hy did you buy your Pocket PC? One reason may be to carry information normally stored
on desktop computers wherever you may go. You probably want to use your Pocket PC
to update and add information, and then automatically copy those changes to your desktop
computer at the next opportunity. Similarly, while you are away, changes may be made to the
information on the desktop that you will want to copy to the Pocket PC automatically. This
synchronization ensures that information is current on both your Pocket PC and desktop
computer.
Your Pocket PC is designed to be a companion to your desktop computer—your PC away
from your PC. Vital to this design is the desktop software called ActiveSync, which enables the
communication between the Pocket PC and personal computer. In this chapter, you’ll learn how
to install ActiveSync and how to connect your Pocket PC with desktop computers. Chapter 6
shows you how to configure ActiveSync to synchronize information between Microsoft Outlook
and Pocket Outlook. In Chapter 7 you learn how to use ActiveSync to manage files and folders
on your Pocket PC, back up or restore data, and install or remove programs.
Introducing ActiveSync
ActiveSync has undergone several significant upgrades over the years. When Windows CE was
first sold, the software was called H/PC Explorer (Handheld PC Explorer), then Windows CE
Services, and finally ActiveSync.
The changes between the versions have been significant. At first, H/PC Explorer synchronized
only with Microsoft Schedule+ and did not run on Windows NT. These issues were quickly
resolved with Version 1.1 of the program, which supported Microsoft Outlook and Windows NT
Version 4.0.
The next major release of the program came with the introduction of the Palm-size PC (P/PC).
Obviously, H/PC Explorer did not appropriately identify the software that now also worked with
P/PCs; therefore, the name changed to Windows CE Services. This version of the program included
many significant features, such as the ability to synchronize with more than one desktop computer,
continuous synchronization, file synchronization, e-mail synchronization, and an application
manager. A later release, timed with the release of the H/PC Professional, added support for
synchronization of Pocket Access databases and made installation and performance improvements.
ActiveSync Version 3.7 is the most recent release of the desktop software, and along with the
name change is a dramatic difference in how Windows CE devices communicate with desktop
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computers. Prior versions communicated via the dial-up networking software built into Windows
9x and NT, but ActiveSync Version 3.7 uses its own network communications.
ActiveSync works only with devices that run Windows CE Version 2.0 or newer. If your
device runs Version 1.0, you must use H/PC Explorer to connect it to your desktop
computer. You will find H/PC Explorer at http://www.microsoft.com/mobile/handheldpc/
downloads/hpcexplorer/hpcexp.asp.
Because Windows CE Services uses built-in dial-up networking, it has several problems. A
PC cannot connect to a Windows CE device and the Internet at the same time unless the PC has
the latest version of the dial-up networking software. Another problem is that if Internet Explorer
is configured to make a call to an ISP automatically, it will start dialing the telephone number
whenever the device connects. The only way to get around this problem is to configure Internet
Explorer not to call the ISP automatically, or upgrade to Internet Explorer Version 5.
ActiveSync solves these problems by not using the built-in networking software on the desktop
computer. With ActiveSync, your desktop computer can connect to the Internet and a Pocket PC
at the same time. It will not cause Internet Explorer to dial the Internet whenever your device
connects.
Another problem with prior versions of the software is the complexity of changing the
connection speed. Prior versions require changes to be made on both the desktop computer and
the device. ActiveSync automatically detects the connection speed of the device so that all you
need to do is change the speed at one location.
ActiveSync can use the serial port of desktop computers for communication, but with prior
versions you had to disable serial communication manually if you wanted to connect another
device to the same port. For example, you may want to connect a digital camera to the same
serial port. ActiveSync now automatically detects when another program tries to use the port and
offers to disable serial communications automatically. Unfortunately, you still have to re-establish
serial communications in ActiveSync once you are done using the serial port with the other software.
The first steps to use ActiveSync is to install the software on a desktop computer and establish
a connection between the Pocket PC and the desktop. These two steps are the focus for this chapter.
ActiveSync Installation
Included with your Pocket PC is a copy of the ActiveSync software on a companion CD-ROM.
Normally, you will use that disc to install the software on your PC. However, before you install
the software, check the Microsoft website at http://www.pocketpc.com to verify that it is the
current version. Your Pocket PC may not have the current version of ActiveSync because a newer
version was released after your version shipped from the factory.
Even if the version of ActiveSync on the CD-ROM is the same, you may still want to download
the version from the Microsoft website, because it may be a newer build of the same version.
Microsoft often releases newer copies of ActiveSync as different builds that have the same version
number. Save the program that you download to a directory on your personal computer, and
remember its location because you will run that program to install ActiveSync.
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Before you begin installing ActiveSync on your personal computer, verify that it meets the
following minimum requirements:
■ Microsoft Windows NT Workstation Version 4 with Service Pack 6, Windows 2000 with
at least Service Pack 1, or Windows 98/Me/XP
■ Microsoft Outlook 98 or later
■ Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.01 SP1 or later
■ 16MB of RAM for Windows 95/98, 32MB of RAM for Windows NT Workstation 4, and
64MB of RAM for Windows 2000 or Windows XP
■ Hard disk with 12 to 65MB of available space, depending on the features that you select
during installation
■ Available 9-pin or 25-pin serial port, infrared port, or USB port
■ One CD-ROM drive, if installing from CD-ROM
■ VGA graphics card or a compatible graphics adapter at 256 colors or higher
USB support works only with Windows 98, Windows Me, Windows 2000, or Windows XP.
Microsoft Outlook must be installed on the PC before installing ActiveSync. You will find a
copy of Outlook 2000 or 2002 on the companion CD-ROM that is packaged with Pocket PC devices.
If you install ActiveSync before installing Outlook, you must reinstall ActiveSync after installing
Outlook. Follow the instructions that come with Outlook to install it on your personal computer.
Initially, Outlook 2002 was included with Pocket PC 2002, but later this changed to
Outlook 2000. Regardless of which version you have, Outlook should be installed prior
to installing ActiveSync.
Pocket PCs connect to personal computers by using a cable bundled with the device. Some
manufacturers include a cradle in which you place the Pocket PC to establish communication.
Plug one end of the cable into the cradle and the other into a Universal Serial Bus (USB) or serial
port on the personal computer, as described in the user manual that came with the device. If the
device does not have a cradle, plug one end of the cable into the device.
If you connect a Pocket PC to a desktop computer with a USB, do not connect the
Pocket PC with the desktop until instructed to do so by the ActiveSync installation
program.
Install ActiveSync on Desktop PCs
Even though you may download a newer version of ActiveSync from the Internet, you should
first install the version on the CD that came with your device so that the drivers for the device
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install on your PC. After you install the CD version, you can install the new version that you
downloaded.
Insert the CD into the CD-ROM drive of your personal computer, and an opening screen
loads with a picture of a Pocket PC and four buttons on the right. Click Start Here to open the
next screen, which provides the three first steps for setting up your Pocket PC.
As mentioned previously, before you install ActiveSync you must first install Outlook;
if Outlook is not on your PC, click Install Outlook.
Click Install ActiveSync 3.7, and then click Install on the next screen to start the ActiveSync
setup program. If Autorun is disabled on your PC, you can start the setup program by using
Windows Explorer to open \MS\ACTSYNC\Main on the CD-ROM and run setup.exe. The setup
program starts by opening the ActiveSync Program Window dialog box, as shown in the
following image:
During setup, the ActiveSync program files copy to the personal computer and the software
configures to connect with your device. At each step of the process, click Next to continue to the
next step of the installation, click Back to go back one screen, or click Cancel to stop installation.
To display Online Help, click Help.
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To begin the software installation, click Next in the Program Window. In the next program
window, shown in the following image, select the location where you want ActiveSync to be
installed:
Click Change to open a window in which you browse the folders on the PC hard drive to select
the installation location. Once you select the location, click Next to begin installation.
After the program files copy to your PC, the Get Connected wizard will start. Make sure that
your device is connected to the USB or serial port of the PC so that the wizard will find it.
When you click Next, the wizard begins checking each serial and USB port on the PC to find
the Pocket PC. If the PC has an infrared port, it will be included among the ports the wizard checks.
If you currently use the infrared port, you must start ActiveSync on the device before the Get
Connected wizard starts searching ports. The process for using ActiveSync via the infrared port
is described in more detail later in this chapter in the section “Connect with Desktop PCs by Using
Infrared.” When the device is found on a port, ActiveSync is configured to use that port for future
communications.
The next step is to create a partnership between the PC and the device. A partnership defines
how information synchronizes. Every Pocket PC can have partnerships with only two different
PCs, but a PC can have partnerships with more than two devices.
Sync Manager from Kelbran Software enables you to create more than two partnerships
on a Pocket PC. You can find Sync Manager at http://www.kelbran.com.
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Troubleshoot ActiveSync Connections
ActiveSync Online Help has a troubleshooting wizard that helps fix communication problems.
You will also find an online ActiveSync troubleshooter at http://www.microsoft.com/
mobile/pocketpc/support/help/activesync.asp, and Chris De Herrera has a great ActiveSync
Troubleshooting Guide at http://www.cewindows.net/faqs/t-shootactivesync.htm. The
following are some troubleshooting tips:
■ You may have problems connecting your Pocket PC with your desktop computer
using a USB cable or cradle. This problem can be avoided by installing the latest
version of ActiveSync, because it fixes bugs that existed in prior versions. Some
USB hubs cause problems for ActiveSync, so it is best to plug the Pocket PC USB
cable directly into the desktop computer.
■ If the desktop computer does not detect that the Pocket PC is connected, click File |
Connection Settings on the desktop and verify that the USB or Serial connection
options are selected.
■ If you connect a Pocket PC with a desktop computer before installing ActiveSync,
the PC may end up using the wrong USB drivers and ActiveSync will not be able to
detect the Pocket PC. Start Device Manager on the desktop computer and remove the
Windows CE USB devices. Then reinstall ActiveSync and connect the Pocket PC
when instructed by the installation program.
■ In some instances, the Get Connected wizard may not find a device that is attached to
a COM port. Typically, this happens because another program, such as a digital camera
communications program, has the port locked for its use. Check to make sure that
none of these programs are running.
■ Another potential cause of the preceding problem is an interrupt conflict, which can
happen if you are connecting the device to COM3 or COM4, and COM1 or COM2
are in use. COM1 shares an interrupt with COM3, while COM2 shares an interrupt
with COM4. If this is a problem, try changing the interrupt of the port you are trying
to use.
For example, a partnership can be created between your Pocket PC and a PC at home and
another at the office. Once the two partnerships exist, the device cannot create a partnership with
a third computer unless one of the previously created partnerships is deleted. However, if everyone
in a family of four has a Pocket PC, each one can create a partnership with the same PC at home.
You can synchronize all information types with two partner PCs except Inbox. Inbox will
synchronize with only one partner PC.
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Once ActiveSync configures the port, it will start the New Partnership wizard, which has options
for creating a standard or guest partnership. Standard partnerships provide synchronization of
data, while guest partnerships allow you only to move or copy information. If you select Standard
Partnership, the wizard continues; if you select Guest Partnership, the wizard will stop and your
device will connect to the PC as a guest.
A Pocket PC can connect to any PC as a guest, regardless of how many partnerships
the device has.
When you connect a Pocket PC to a personal computer as a guest, you cannot synchronize
information between the two, but you can browse files and folders, back up and restore the
device, and install programs to the device. You can also use Desktop Pass Through to access
the Internet or LAN (Local Area Network).
Desktop Pass Through is a new feature that works only with Pocket PC 2002, Windows
Mobile 2003 and newer, and ActiveSync 3.5 and newer. Pocket PC 2000 does not
support Desktop Pass Through. Instructions for using Desktop Pass Through are
provided in Chapter 19.
If you decide to create a partnership (by clicking Yes and then Next), the next step is to specify
whether you are synchronizing with a desktop computer or a Microsoft Exchange server:
If you select synchronization with Microsoft Exchange server, you must have a user ID on
an Exchange 2003 server or Microsoft Mobile Information Server. You can synchronize with
desktop computers and Exchange.
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The next step is to specify whether you want to synchronize one or two desktop computers. If you
have already synchronized your Pocket PC with another desktop computer and you want to retain that
partnership, select the No radio button; otherwise select the Yes radio button to synchronize.
The final step, shown next, in setting up a partnership is to configure all of the possible
synchronization settings between the device and the PC. These settings are described in more
detail in Chapter 6.
5
When you click Next, you see the Setup Complete program window. When you click Finish,
ActiveSync will begin synchronization, as shown next:
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Here, the horizontal bar indicates the synchronization progress; the window also displays how
many items will synchronize and estimates the amount of time synchronization will take. When
synchronization is complete, the bar will disappear and be replaced with the word Connected.
The ActiveSync installation program places a desktop shortcut icon on the desktop of your
computer.
ActiveSync
icon
The ActiveSync installation program also adds an icon to the System Tray. When a device
connects, the System Tray icon turns green; otherwise, it is grayed out. Double-click either icon
to start ActiveSync manually.
By default, ActiveSync is configured to start automatically whenever a device connects.
To stop ActiveSync from starting automatically, you need to change the synchronization
mode, which is described in Chapter 6.
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Start ActiveSync on Desktop PCs
Unless you have configured ActiveSync for manual
synchronization, synchronization starts when you place
the Pocket PC in its cradle. If you configure ActiveSync
for manual synchronization, you will need to click the Sync
toolbar button to start it.
To start ActiveSync without
a connection, double-click the
System Tray icon or the desktop
shortcut icon. The setup program
also places a shortcut in the Start
menu, as shown in the image to
the left.
When you start ActiveSync
while no device is connected, the
program window looks like the
image below.
The name of the last device
that synchronized with the PC is
Select this icon to
shown in the program window,
start ActiveSync.
along with the date and time
of the synchronization. You also
see details of the partnership between the device and the PC, which include all the synchronized
information types. To turn the Detail Display on or off, click Details.
The partnership information is
stored on the PC by the name of
the device. If you synchronize more
than one device with the PC, be
sure to give each device a unique
name. Chapter 4 provides
instructions for changing the
name of Pocket PCs.
Most of what you do with ActiveSync is
not available unless a device is connected, but
you can configure the synchronization
options by clicking the Options toolbar
button. Instructions for configuring the
synchronization options are provided later in
this chapter. You can also delete partnerships
and configure the connection settings.
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Change Desktop ActiveSync Connection Settings
ActiveSync automatically loads when you connect a device to the PC. It first determines whether
a partnership exists; if it does, synchronization begins. If no partnership is found, ActiveSync
starts the Partnership wizard, which is described in Chapter 6.
Normally, the connection settings configure when you connect your device to the PC for the
first time, and they don’t need to be changed after that. However, on some occasions the connection
settings may need to be changed or reset.
One such occasion is when you use the PC Serial Communications port to communicate with
another device, such as a digital camera. If you connect a digital camera to the port, ActiveSync
starts, determines that the connected device is not a Pocket PC, and then displays the Device Not
recognized dialog box. If you click Disconnect COM Port, ActiveSync disables communication
to the port, and the next time you attempt to connect a Pocket PC, ActiveSync will not start.
To restart communication via the COM port, first connect the Pocket PC, start ActiveSync,
and choose File | Get Connected. The Get Connected wizard starts, just as it did during installation,
and searches all ports for a Pocket PC. When the Pocket PC is found, the connection settings
configure and synchronization begins.
If you want to use a different serial port for ActiveSync, connect the cable to the new port,
start ActiveSync, and then start the Get Connected wizard. The wizard will find the Pocket PC,
change the connection settings, and start synchronization.
If you have problems establishing communication between the device and the PC, see
the How To sidebar earlier in this chapter for troubleshooting tips.
The Serial
Communications
option has been
disabled on this PC.
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To change the connection
settings manually, choose
File | Connection Settings
to display the Connection
Settings dialog box shown
in the following image:
Serial Communications
is turned on or off by clicking
the Allow Serial Cable Or
Infrared Connection To This
COM Port check box. Specify
which port to use by selecting
one from the drop-down list.
The dialog box displays the
current status of the COM
port. ActiveSync will also
communicate via a network
or Remote Access Service
(RAS) connection if the box
for network connections is
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checked. If you do not want the ActiveSync icon to display in the System Tray, clear the Show
Status Icon In Taskbar check box.
Connect with Desktop PCs by Using a Serial Connection
By default, Pocket PCs are set up to use USB cables or cradles for synchronization. If you need
to use a serial cable or cradle to synchronize with a PC, you will have to make a change on your
Pocket PC.
To switch to a serial connection on a Pocket PC 2002 device, start ActiveSync on the Pocket
PC and tap Tools | Options. Select the serial port speed from the Enable Synchronization When
Cradled Using drop-down list. The options are 115200 Default, 19200 Default, 38400 Default,
and 57600 Default.
The fastest setting is Serial Port @ 115K, with other settings in between. If you have
difficulty establishing a connection using the 115K setting, try the Serial Port @ 57600
setting. Pocket PC 2002 defaults to USB connections.
To change the speed on Windows Mobile 2003, start ActiveSync and tap Tools | Options, and
then tap the Options button on the PC tab. Select the serial port speed from the Enable PC Sync
Using This Connection drop-down list.
Finally, make sure that ActiveSync 3.7 is set up for a serial connection on the correct COM
port. The easiest way is to connect the serial cable to the desktop computer, then connect the
Pocket PC, and choose File | Get Connected to run the Get Connected wizard. You can manually
configure the serial connection by choosing File | Connection Settings, and then selecting a COM
port from the Allow Serial Cable Or Infrared Connection To This COM Port drop-down list.
Connect with Desktop PCs by Using Infrared
Infrared is light beyond the color red in the spectrum that is not visible to the human eye. Data is
sent between transmitters and receivers that are within a line of site, such as with television and
stereo remote controls. Every Pocket PC includes an infrared port that can be used for wireless
synchronization with desktop computers.
If you synchronize different brands of Pocket PCs with a PC, you will find yourself
constantly unplugging and switching cables because each device manufacturer uses
a different cable. Infrared is wireless, making it easier to synchronize multiple devices
with a PC by eliminating the need to switch cables.
To synchronize using infrared, you need software and an infrared port for your PC, but you
do not need to install software on your device because each is already configured for infrared
communication. For PCs running Windows 95, you need to install the Windows 95 Infrared
Support Software, which you can find on the Microsoft website at http://www.microsoft.com/
windows95/downloads/. Windows 98, Windows 2000, and Windows XP have built-in infrared
support, but Windows NT Version 4 requires third-party software, such as QuickBeam from
Extended Systems.
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Many notebook computers have built-in infrared ports, but most desktop computers do not.
To add an infrared port to desktop computers, you must install an infrared serial or USB adapter,
such as the XTND Access IrDA PC Adapter from Extended Systems.
After you install an adapter on a PC, the next step is to configure ActiveSync to use the
infrared port. Start ActiveSync and choose File | Connection Settings. Make sure the Allow
Serial Cable Or Infrared Connection To This COM Port is checked, select Infrared Port from
the drop-down list, and then click OK.
If Infrared Port is not listed in the drop-down list, run the Get Connected wizard so that
ActiveSync recognizes it as an available port.
To start synchronization, first line up the infrared port
of the Pocket PC with the PC adapter, and then start
ActiveSync on the Pocket PC. Tap Tools | Connect Via IR,
as shown in the following image:
Line up the infrared port of the Pocket PC with the PC
port and the ActiveSync icon in the System Tray will turn
green, indicating that the connection is established. To
close the connection, tap Stop on the Pocket PC.
Connect with Desktop PCs by
Using Bluetooth
Bluetooth is a short-range, low-power wireless
communications technology that replaces cables that
connects mobile devices. There has been a significant
amount of hype about Bluetooth for many years, but it’s
only recently that Bluetooth-capable devices have become
major players.
Pocket PCs are among the list of devices that now support Bluetooth, as several brands now
come with built-in Bluetooth radios. You can add Bluetooth to other Pocket PCs by using a
Bluetooth Compact Flash or Secure Digital card.
Windows Mobile 2003 has built-in Bluetooth software that supports many profiles. Bluetooth
profiles define the functions that utilize the wireless connection. For example, one of the profiles
that Windows Mobile 2003 supports is dial-up networking, so you can wirelessly connect a
Pocket PC with a mobile phone and use the phone as a modem to connect to the Internet.
You will find more information about using Bluetooth to connect to the Internet in
Chapter 19.
Unfortunately, one of the profiles not built-in to Windows Mobile 2003 is data synchronization.
However, this functionality is available using third-party software for Pocket PC 2002 and Windows
Mobile 2003. If you buy Socket Communication’s Bluetooth Compact Flash card or a Pocket PC
with a built-in Bluetooth radio, you will get the software you need for synchronization.
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To use Bluetooth for synchronizing with a desktop computer, you will need to add a Bluetooth
radio to the PC. Several Bluetooth USB and PC Card adapters are available, such as 3Com’s
Bluetooth USB adapter.
The key to making Bluetooth work with ActiveSync is that the Bluetooth software on the PC
provides virtual serial ports, which ActiveSync can use for synchronization. You need to determine
the Bluetooth Serial Host port, which will be something like COM4 or COM5, and configure
ActiveSync to use that port. To configure ActiveSync, choose File | Connection Settings, and
then select the Serial Host port from the Allow Serial Cable COM Port drop-down list.
You will want to establish a Bluetooth binding, or pairing, between the Pocket PC and desktop
computer so that you don’t have to enter security information on every connection. To bind Windows
Mobile 2003 to another PC with Bluetooth, tap Start | Settings | Connections | Bluetooth |
Bonded Devices, and then tap New. The Pocket PC will search for Bluetooth devices and list
them. Select a device and tap Next and then enter a PIN. The same PIN must be entered on the
Pocket PC and desktop computer. Tap Next, enter the same PIN on the PC, and then tap Finish.
You must start synchronization on the Pocket PC. Most third-party Pocket PC Bluetooth
software places an icon at the bottom of the Today screen. Tap the serial connect icon and select
the synchronization option from the pop-up menu. If everything is configured correctly, a connection
will be established and the Pocket PC and PC will start synchronization. To end the connection,
tap the serial connect icon at the bottom of the Today screen on the Pocket PC and then tap
Disconnect.
Bluetooth provides wireless synchronization within 30 feet of your desktop PC, and it doesn’t
require line of sight like infrared. In the future, Bluetooth synchronization will be automatic, but
for now you can enjoy the convenience Bluetooth provides even if it requires you to start the
process manually.
Connect with Desktop PCs by Using Ethernet Networking
While infrared and Bluetooth provide convenient wireless connections, much faster connections
are possible with an Ethernet network. Of course, you can also connect to Ethernet networks by
using a wireless Ethernet card. Pocket PCs are capable of synchronizing with a PC using a network
as well as connecting to mail servers and the Internet. This section focuses on using a network
connection to synchronize with a PC, and Chapter 19 covers how to connect to the Internet.
You may want to connect your Pocket PC to a network at work. The instructions in this
section will work in your office, but you will need to get some information about your
network at work, which a LAN Administrator can provide. For this section, assume that
you will create the network connection at home. Chapter 16 addresses issues specific to
using Pocket PCs at the office.
Ethernet synchronization can happen only between a Pocket PC and a PC that are already in
a partnership. Therefore, the first step is to create the partnership using either a serial, USB, or
infrared port. Next, you must set up both the PC and Pocket PC for network communication.
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Many good books have been written about building an Ethernet network, details of
which are beyond the scope of this book. Included here are the instructions for setting
up network connections to work with Pocket PCs. If you do not know how to configure
networking on your PC, a good place to start is at http://www.wown.info/j_helmig/
basics.htm.
Configure a PC for Network Synchronization
The following must be set up on the PC to configure it for network synchronization:
■ An Ethernet network interface card must be installed. You can find these cards at computer
stores, and they usually come with the instructions and drivers that you need to install
the card. Most cards are designed for unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) cable. UTP cables
have RJ-45 jacks that look like phone jacks but are wider. You may also find cards that
support coaxial cable, but UTP is more popular and easier to work with, so for the rest
of these instructions I assume that is what you are using.
UTP cables are sometimes referred to as 10BaseT, though 10BaseT is really a
specification for an Ethernet standard. You will also see the term Category 5, which
refers to the EIA/TIA 568 Commercial Building Wiring Standard. Category 5 UTP cable
is certified for transmission speeds up to 100Mbps, and I recommend that you use only
Category 5 UTP cable.
■ You will need a UTP cable to connect the PC to a hub. A hub is required for networking
more than two computers with UTP cable, but a connection can be made directly
between the PC and the Pocket PC with a crossover cable. I recommend that you use a
hub, and you can find inexpensive ones at any computer store. Plug one end of the cable
into the hub and the other into the card in your PC. Most hubs and cards have lights that
indicate when a connection is established.
■ Install the Client for Microsoft Networks and the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet
Protocol (TCP/IP) protocol. If you do not use Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
(DHCP), you must assign a TCP/IP address and subnet mask to your PC. Network
devices use DHCP to obtain TCP/IP addresses automatically from a server on a network.
Many home broadband gateways and routers, such as the Linksys Etherfast router, act as
a DHCP server. Pocket PCs and Windows computers use DHCP by default so that all
you need to do to connect to the network is plug the network cable into the network card.
In a private network at your home, you may use TCP/IP addresses that are part of
a group of addresses set aside for private networks, defined in RFC 1918. These
addresses cannot be used on the Internet. The available private address space
blocks (Class A, B, and C blocks) defined by RFC 1918 are listed here:
10.0.0.0 …………10.255.255.255
172.16.0.0………172.31.255.255
192.168.0.0…….192.168.255.255
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Finally, configure ActiveSync on the PC for network connections. Choose File | Connection
Settings and make sure Allow Network (Ethernet) And Remote Access Service (RAS) Server
Connections With This Desktop Computer is checked.
Configure a Pocket PC for Network Synchronization
For your Pocket PC to connect to an Ethernet network, it needs three things: a network interface
card, a cable, and Ethernet drivers. The network interface cards (NICs) for Pocket PCs are
available as either PC cards or CompactFlash cards. If you have an NE2000-compatible card,
it may work with your Pocket PC. Check Chris De Herrera’s Ethernet Connectivity FAQ at
http://www.cewindows.net/wce/20/ethernet.htm to find a complete list of the cards that work
with Pocket PCs.
Many of the Ethernet cards include a cable, but if yours does not, you will need a cable to
connect the card to the hub. If you choose to use a crossover cable, you will plug one end into
the Ethernet card on the PC and the other end into the adapter connected to the device.
Pocket PCs include some Ethernet drivers in Read-Only Memory (ROM), which you can
verify by tapping Start | Settings | Connections | Network Adapters in Pocket PC 2002. On a
Windows Mobile 2003 device, tap Start | Settings | Connections | Connections, and then tap the
Advanced tab and the Network Card button. Found on all Pocket PCs is the NE2000-compatible
Ethernet driver, which is a generic driver that works with many Ethernet cards. Other Ethernet
cards designed to work for Pocket PCs will include drivers that you will need to install on your
Pocket PC.
If you use the generic NE2000 driver with an Ethernet card, the Pocket PC may display a
message box asking which driver to use when you insert the card. Enter ne2000 in the message
box and tap OK. Some cards will require that you enter the driver name every time it is inserted
into the Pocket PC. To prevent from having to enter the driver repeatedly, download and install a
shareware NE2000 driver from http://www.sbm.nu/englisch/windowsce/sbm-ne2000/index.htm.
After the Ethernet and network
adapter drivers are installed, you
must configure the adapter for your
network. Open the list of network
adapters and tap the name of the
Specify TCP/IP address
adapter. If you are using Pocket PC
Enter TCP/IP address
2002 you will need to tap the
Properties button. The Driver
Enter subnet mask
Settings dialog box, as shown in
the following image, will display:
The Driver Settings dialog box
looks the same for every Ethernet
driver listed in the Network
Adapters dialog box, but the
window title displays the
respective driver name.
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The Driver Settings dialog box is used to configure the TCP/IP information. To configure
these settings for your Pocket PC, follow these steps:
1. If you use a DHCP server, verify that the Use Server-Assigned IP Address radio button is
selected and skip to step 5.
2. If you do not use a DHCP server, tap the Use Specific IP Address radio button and enter
an address in the IP Address field.
3. Enter an address in the Subnet Mask field.
4. Enter an address in the Default Gateway field.
5. Tap the Name Servers tab.
6. In the Primary WINS field, enter the TCP/IP address of the PC with which the device is
synchronizing. This will be the same address that you entered in the “Configure a PC for
Network Synchronization” section of this chapter.
7. Tap OK to save the changes, and a dialog box tells you that the settings will take effect
the next time the adapter is inserted in the device.
Step 5 is critical for using a network connection for synchronization with Pocket PC
2000. The Connection Manager of the Pocket PC 2002 and Windows Mobile 2003
automatically handles the WINS (Windows Internet Name Service) configuration so
that you don’t need to configure this setting. Before using a network connection, you
must establish a partnership between the device and the PC.
In large networks, WINS normally runs on a dedicated server. The instructions here are
for home networks, but if you connect a device to a network that has a WINS server, its
address can be put in the Primary WINS field. The partner PC must be registered with
the WINS server so that it can provide its TCP/IP address to the device.
The final step in configuring Pocket PCs for network
synchronization is to tell Connection Manager which
settings to use with the network card. Connection
Manager centralizes all connection settings in one place.
Use it to configure dial-up connections to the Internet or
a LAN. Instructions for using Connection Manager are
provided in Chapters 16 and 19.
Connection Manager is not available with
Pocket PC 2000.
To synchronize a Pocket PC 2002 with a desktop
computer over a network, start Connection Manager
by tapping Start | Settings | Connections | Connections,
to open the Connections Settings dialog box shown in
this image:
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From the My Network Card Connects To drop-down
list, select Work and tap OK.
The process for Windows Mobile 2003 is different.
Tap Start | Settings | Connections | Connections, and then
tap the Advanced tab and the Network Card button to
open this dialog box shown on the upper right.
From the My Network Card Connects To drop-down
list, select Work and tap OK.
Synchronize with a PC Using
an Ethernet Network
Now that everything is configured, you are ready to
synchronize across the network. Insert the Ethernet card
into the PC card or CompactFlash slot of the device, and
plug the UTP cable into the card and the hub. Start
ActiveSync on the Pocket PC by tapping Start | ActiveSync
or Start | Programs | ActiveSync to open the following
dialog box shown on the lower right.
Tap Sync to start synchronization, and tap Stop to
close the connection.
To start ActiveSync on Pocket PC 2000 devices,
tap Start | Programs | Connections | ActiveSync.
If you have a Socket Communications Ethernet
card, you can configure its driver to start
ActiveSync automatically whenever the card is
inserted. See the documentation that came with
the card to use this setting.
By default, the Pocket PC automatically disconnects
once synchronization is complete. If you want to maintain
the connection with Pocket PC 2002, tap Tools | Options
In ActiveSync, and then tap the Schedule tab and clear the
When Synchronizing Remotely With My PC, Disconnect When Complete check box. With
Windows Mobile 2003, tap Tools | Options, tap Options, and select the Maintain Connection
radio button.
Access Shared Folders
One of the primary reasons why LANs are built is to allow network users to share files with each
other. Windows 95/98/2000 and Windows XP all have the ability to share folders for access by other
computers on a network. Pocket PC 2002 and Windows Mobile 2003 devices can access these
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shared folders by using File Explorer. To access a shared
folder, connect the device to the network, start File
Explorer, and tap Open or the Network Share icon,
as shown in the following image:
Enter the UNC path for the share in the Open Path
field, and tap OK. The UNC path is the combination of
the PC name and the share name in the format \\[PC
Name]\[Share Name]. For example, to access the
Documents share on a computer named Fred, you
would enter \\Fred\Documents.
If a network share is already open on the Pocket
PC, tapping the device and Network Share
buttons on the Command bar switches between
folders opened at either location.
While you can open network shares using File
Explorer, there are limitations on what can be done.
Tap here to switch back
Tap here to
For example, you cannot directly open a Word or
to the device.
open a network
Excel document from a share; instead, you must copy
the documents to the Pocket PC and then open them. You can copy Pocket Word and Excel
documents to a network share, but the files are not converted as they are when copying files
using ActiveSync.
When you install ActiveSync on a desktop computer, the installation program looks for
Microsoft Word, and if it is found, the installation program adds a file type so that it can open
Pocket Word documents. Unfortunately, a similar file type is not added for Excel. If you need
to copy a Pocket Excel document directly to a network share, you can save the workbook in
the Excel 97/2000 format and then copy the file to the network. Chapter 11 provides the
instructions for saving files in the Excel 97/2000 format from Pocket PC. Chapter 10 has
similar instructions for saving Pocket Word documents in the Word 97/2000 format.
Connect with Desktop PCs Using a Modem
With remote networking, Pocket PCs can synchronize data using a modem, allowing you to
synchronize wherever a telephone line is available. Once the connection is established, it is
used to synchronize data between a PC and the device.
Plan to synchronize data only when using a modem. You cannot manually start a
backup or install software by using ActiveSync on a Pocket PC. ActiveSync can be
configured to back up a Pocket PC automatically whenever a connection is made,
but backups over a dial-up connection are slow. Software can be installed from the
PC once a connection is made, but it requires assistance from someone at the computer.
See Chapter 17 for tips on backing up data while working away from your PC.
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To synchronize using a modem, the Pocket PC and desktop computer must already be in a
partnership. You must also configure ActiveSync on the desktop for dial-up connections. Choose
File | Connection Settings and make sure Allow Network (Ethernet) And Remote Access Service
(RAS) Server Connections With This Desktop Computer is checked.
To use a modem to synchronize data, you will need a dial-up server to receive the call and
Connection Manager configured to dial that server. The connection may be with a RAS account
that provides access to an entire network, or with a PC that provides only local access. If the
connection is with a RAS, the PC in the partnership must be on and logged into the network.
Install Dial-Up Server on Windows 98/Me
To establish a dial-up connection between a Pocket PC and a PC running Windows 98/Me, you
will need to install the Windows Dial-Up
Server. The Dial-Up Server is not automatically
installed with Windows 98/Me. To install it,
follow these steps:
1. Open the Windows 98/Me Control
Panel and double-click Add/Remove
Programs.
2. Click the Windows Setup tab.
3. In Add/Remove Programs Properties
window, double-click
Communications.
4. Select the Dial-Up Server check box,
as shown in the image to the upper
right, and then click OK.
5. Click OK again.
The Dial-Up Server software adds a menu
option to Dial-Up Networking. To find it,
select Start | Programs | Accessories |
Communications | Dial-Up Networking,
and then select the Connections menu.
Then choose Dial-Up Server, and the
Dial-Up Server dialog box displays,
as shown in the image to the lower right.
Turn on the Dial-Up Server by selecting
the Allow Caller Access radio button. Click
Change Password to assign a password that
must be entered when a modem connects.
Clicking Server Type enables you to select
either a Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) server
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or a Windows for Workgroups server. You can leave this setting at the default, which is PPP,
because that is the type of client connection used by Pocket PCs.
When you click OK, the Dial-Up Server software starts and adds an icon to the System Tray,
as shown in the following image, indicating that
it is ready to receive a call:
To turn off the Dial-Up Server, double-click
the icon, select No Caller Access, and click OK.
Dial-Up Server icon
Configure Connection
Manager
The Pocket PC ActiveSync program
automatically uses the Connection
Manager Work Settings if it detects
a modem. To configure Connection
Manager, tap Start | Settings, tap
the Connections tab, and then
tap Connections. The Pocket PC 2002
Connection Settings dialog box opens,
as shown in the following images.
Tap Modify for the Work Settings,
and then tap New on the Modem tab of
the Work Settings screen.
The Windows Mobile 2003
Connection Settings dialog box
looks like the image below.
Under My Work Network, tap
Add A New Modem Connection.
Tap here to set up a
connection to your
desktop computer.
Three screens are used for entering information about
the connection. On the first screen, enter a name for the
connection, select the modem, and on Pocket PC 2002
select the baud rate, and then tap Next. On the next screen,
enter the connection phone number and then tap Next.
Leave the default settings as they are on the third screen
and tap Finish, which returns you to the Work Settings
screen on Pocket PC 2002 or the Connection Settings
screen on Windows Mobile 2003.
You do not need to configure the VPN (virtual private
network) and Proxy Settings tabs of the Work Settings
screen if the Pocket PC dials a desktop computer. If the
modem connection is for a corporate network, you may
need to configure these two tabs. See Chapter 16 for
instructions.
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Synchronize with a Desktop PC Using a Modem
Now that you have a dial-up server set up and running
and Connection Manager configured on your Pocket PC,
you are ready to connect to the server and synchronize
information. Connect a telephone line to the modem in
your device and then start ActiveSync by tapping Start |
ActiveSync or tapping Start | Programs | ActiveSync if
the ActiveSync icon is not in the Start menu. Tap Sync to
start synchronization, and the following Network Log On
screen displays (as shown to right).
If the connection is for a Windows 98/Me Dial-Up
Server, and you assigned a password, you must enter it in
the Password field. Connections for remote access servers
require a username, password, and possibly a domain
name if you are connecting to a Windows NT network.
Once the connection is made, ActiveSync will
determine whether a partnership exists with the
computer and will then begin synchronization. During
synchronization, the green icon on the ActiveSync screen
spins and the progress displays at the bottom. When synchronization is complete, the icon stops
spinning and the status changes from Synchronizing to Connected. To end the session and
disconnect the call, tap Stop.
If you want Pocket PC 2002 ActiveSync to disconnect the call automatically once
synchronization is complete, tap Tools | Options, and then tap the Schedule tab:
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Tap the When Manually Synchronizing, Disconnect When Complete check box. You can also
schedule your Pocket PC to synchronize automatically at scheduled intervals by tapping the
Automatically After check box and selecting a time from the drop-down list.
To configure Windows Mobile 2003 ActiveSync to disconnect the call automatically once
synchronization is complete, tap Tools | Options, and then tap the Options button to open this
screen:
Tap Disconnect When Done, and then tap OK.
Wrapping Up
Microsoft ActiveSync supports four ways to connect Pocket PCs to desktop computers: serial/
USB cable or cradle, infrared, wired or wireless Ethernet network, and modem. With third-party
software you can connect using Bluetooth. The majority of the time, you will use a serial or USB
connection, because the hardware needed for that connection is provided with the Pocket PC.
Infrared, Bluetooth, Ethernet, and modem connections provide flexibility either by supporting
multiple brands of Pocket PCs or by enabling you to synchronize while not being physically near
the desktop computer.
The purpose for all of these connection types is to synchronize data between Pocket PCs and
desktop computers. As you might guess, a variety of different settings in ActiveSync control what
information is synchronized. In the next chapter, you’ll learn how to change these synchronization
settings.
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How to…
■ Use the Partnership wizard to create partnerships between Pocket PCs
and desktop computers
■ Configure synchronization settings
■ Resolve synchronization conflicts
S
ynchronization is the process of keeping information consistent on a Pocket PC and a desktop
computer. What and how information is synchronized is stored in a partnership that is created
between Pocket PCs and desktop computers by using the ActiveSync Partnership wizard.
Whenever information changes on one side of the partnership, synchronization changes the
information on the other side, too, so that it matches. For example, if you create a new task on
your PC, that task is copied to your Pocket PC at the next synchronization. If you then mark the
task complete on the Pocket PC, it will be marked complete on the PC after another synchronization.
If the same piece of information is changed on both the PC and the device, ActiveSync will
identify the conflict and provide you with the opportunity to designate which change you want
to keep. How ActiveSync resolves conflicts depends on how you configure conflict resolution.
ActiveSync matches each of the main sections in Outlook with corresponding programs on
the Pocket PC using the same names: Calendar, Contacts, Inbox, Notes, and Tasks. Favorites and
AvantGo correspond with parts of Internet Explorer.
ActiveSync does not synchronize with Outlook Journal or Microsoft OneNote. Chapter 13
provides instructions for using Crown Logic Corporation’s CLC Journal to synchronize
with Outlook Journal. You will find CLC Journal at http://www.crownlogic.com/.
In this chapter you’ll learn how to use the Partnership wizard to create and delete partnerships
between Pocket PCs and desktop computers. You’ll also learn how to configure synchronization
settings for all the information types that ActiveSync supports, change how synchronization starts,
resolve synchronization conflicts, and change file conversion settings.
ActiveSync supports the synchronization of the Outlook primary Calendar, Contacts,
and Tasks folders only. You cannot synchronize with any Calendar, Contacts, or Tasks
subfolders unless you use a third-party synchronization program, such as Intellisync
from Puma Technology. However, ActiveSync 3.7 does support synchronization of Inbox
subfolders with Pocket PC 2002 and Windows Mobile 2003 devices.
Create a Partnership
Partnerships exist between Pocket PCs and desktop computers and contain all of the information
that ActiveSync uses to synchronize data between the two. Normally, you create a partnership by
using the Partnership wizard the first time you connect the device to the PC.
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Synchronize with Programs Other
than Microsoft Outlook
ActiveSync synchronizes only with Outlook and Microsoft Exchange. If you want to
synchronize your device with other desktop Personal Information Manager programs, you
must use a third-party synchronization program. Third-party synchronization programs
include the following:
■
■
■
■
■
Intellisync from Puma Tecnology, http://www.pumatech.com
XTNDConnect PC from Extended Systems, http://www.extendedsystems.com
TrueSync from Laplink, http://www.laplink.com
CompanionLink, http://www.companionlink.com
Cadenza from CommonTime, http://www.commontime.com
Partnerships can be created only by using either a serial, USB, or infrared connection
between the device and PC. Partnerships cannot be created with a network connection.
When you connect a Pocket PC to a desktop computer for the first time, ActiveSync determines
whether a partnership exists. If the partnership does not exist, the Partnership wizard starts, as
shown in the following illustration:
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To create a partnership with your desktop computer, select Standard Partnership, or select Guest
Partnership to connect the device to the PC as a guest. Guest connections cannot synchronize
data but can perform all the other functions provided by ActiveSync.
The only way to start the Partnership wizard is to connect a device that does not have
an existing partnership to a PC running ActiveSync. You cannot manually start the
Partnership wizard.
Your Pocket PC can synchronize with Outlook, or with Outlook and a Microsoft Exchange
Server. The next wizard screen, shown here, asks which of these programs you want to use for
synchronization.
Exchange is Microsoft’s e-mail server software that provides e-mail and personal information
services for a large number of users. If you are setting up your Pocket PC at home, select the
Synchronize With This Desktop Computer radio button. If you are at work and your company
is running Exchange 2003 or Microsoft Mobile Information Server and you want to synchronize
with Exchange, select the Synchronize With Microsoft Exchange Server radio button.
Microsoft Mobile Information Server (MIS) enables you to synchronize Pocket PCs
with Microsoft Exchange 2002. The synchronization functionality provided by MIS
is included in Exchange 2003.
Click Next to select the synchronization settings shown in the following screen:
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6
Select which information you want to synchronize between the Pocket PC and desktop computer
by checking the boxes next to each information type. Select a type and click Settings to configure
synchronization of each information type (listed in the Mobile Device column in this dialog box).
The details for changing synchronization settings are provided later in this chapter in the section
“Configure Synchronization Settings.” For now, select the information types and then click Next.
If a partnership already exists between the Pocket PC and a desktop computer, the
Partnership wizard will ask you to select the number of partnerships prior to the
synchronization settings. The next part of this section explains how to create two
partnerships.
The final dialog box of the Partnership wizard tells you that it has all the information it needs
to create the partnership. Click Back to return to the previous screens and make changes. Click
Cancel to stop and not synchronize. Or click Finish to close the Partnership wizard and start
synchronization.
Create Two Partnerships
A Pocket PC can be in a partnership with two PCs that have different names. This kind of partnership
is commonly done to synchronize a Pocket PC with a PC at home and another at work.
Before you decide to create a second partnership, you need to consider a number of issues:
■ You will not be able to synchronize Inbox information with two desktop computers.
Inbox synchronization works only for the first partnership created between a Pocket PC
and a desktop computer.
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Synchronize with Macintoshes
Microsoft ActiveSync runs only on Windows desktop computers; there is no version for
Macintoshes. You can synchronize a Pocket PC with a Macintosh running Virtual PC, but
that does not provide synchronization with native Macintosh applications. Information
Appliance Associates sells a native Macintosh synchronization program called PocketMac.
PocketMac comes in two versions: PocketMac Regular Edition synchronizes files with
Macintoshes running only OS 9 or OS X. PocketMac Professional Edition synchronizes files
and Calendar, Contacts, and Tasks, with Microsoft Entourage, iCal, or Address Book on OS X.
You can find more information about this program at http://www.pocketmac.net.
■ If possible, both computers should use the same version of Microsoft Outlook. You can
synchronize a Pocket PC between two different versions of Outlook, but doing so may
introduce synchronization problems.
■ Both computers should synchronize the same information and have the same
synchronization settings.
■ All of the information in the Pocket PC will synchronize to both PCs.
■ Synchronizing a Pocket PC with two PCs can be complicated because it adds another
place where information can change. Keep in mind that changes that you make at work
and then synchronize to your Pocket PC will then appear on your home PC when you
synchronize the device with it.
Synchronize and Keep Data Separate
on Two Pocket PCs
Several Pocket PCs can synchronize with the same desktop computer. For example, I can
synchronize my wife’s Pocket PC and my Pocket PC with our one desktop computer. However,
unless we take steps to prevent it, our data will be combined in Outlook and end up on both
our Pocket PCs. My wife’s tasks will get mixed with my tasks on my Pocket PC.
You can synchronize two Pocket PCs with one desktop computer and still keep the data
separate for both devices. To do so, you will need to create separate Outlook profiles for each
person or Pocket PC.
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The simplest way to create separate profiles is to use different Windows logon IDs for each
person. Windows and Outlook automatically create separate profiles for each user. Each person
will then need to log into Windows with his or her user ID prior to synchronizing the device.
Another way to create separate profiles in Outlook 2000 is to configure it for Corporate or
Workgroup support. In Outlook 2000, choose Tools | Options, and then open the Mail Delivery
tab and Reconfigure Mail Support. With Outlook 2000 configured for Corporate or Workgroup
support, you can create separate profiles for each person by opening the Mail applet in Control
Panel. When you start Outlook 2000, you will be prompted to enter a profile.
To create separate profiles for Outlook 2002, simply open the Mail applet in Control
Panel. Outlook 2002 does not have separate Internet and Corporate or Workgroup support.
6
The process of creating a second partnership is much the same as creating the first partnership.
You will need a copy of ActiveSync installed on the second PC, along with Microsoft Outlook.
Follow the steps for installing ActiveSync and using the Get Connected wizard described in
Chapter 5.
When you connect the device to the second PC for the first time, the Partnership wizard
will start. After you click Next in the second screen of the partnership wizard, the following
screen is displayed:
This screen displays only if the device is already part of another partnership. If you select Yes,
the wizard will delete the previous partnership information on the device so that a partnership
is created only with the second computer. Select No to create a second partnership with the
computer without deleting any existing partnerships.
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If you select Yes in this screen, the previous partnership will be deleted from the Pocket
PC. The next time you connect the device with the previous PC, the Partnership wizard
will start.
If your device is already in two partnerships and you attempt to create another partnership,
the Partnership wizard will display the following screen:
To create the new partnership, you must delete one of the two existing partnerships listed here, or
click Cancel to stop the Partnership wizard.
Sync Manager from Kelbran provides a way to create partnerships with more than two
desktop computers. You will find Sync Manager at http://kelbran.com.
After you select the number
of partnerships, the wizard will
continue through the same steps
used when the first partnership
was created and then start
synchronization. If ActiveSync
finds information on both the
PC and the Pocket PC during
synchronization, the Combine
or Replace dialog box displays
as shown to right.
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Within this dialog box, indicate whether you want to combine the information found on both
the PC and Pocket PC, replace the information on the Pocket PC with what is on the PC, or not
synchronize any of the information. Select the option that you want and then click OK.
When information is combined from the PC and Pocket PC, it is possible for ActiveSync
to find duplicate information. If this happens, the Remove Duplicate Items dialog box displays.
Select the duplicate items that you want to delete and click Remove Selected, or click Remove
All to delete all of the items. If you want to keep the duplicates, click Keep All.
ActiveSync does not do a good job of detecting all duplicate entries. In just about every
instance, combining information leads to duplicate entries that then have to be manually
deleted. Because of this, it is a good idea to make a backup copy of the Outlook data file
prior to creating a second partnership.
Delete Partnerships
You can delete partnerships using the Partnership wizard or manually within ActiveSync. The
Partnership wizard will delete existing partnerships when you select Yes, I Want To Synchronize
With Only This Computer in the Select Number of Partnerships screen of the wizard.
To delete a partnership manually, first start ActiveSync on the PC. Only the open partnership
in ActiveSync, indicated by the name of the device in the program window, can be deleted. If the
PC has partnerships with more than one device and the one you want to delete is not displayed,
open the partnership to be deleted by choosing File | Mobile Device and then choose the name
of the device. To delete the partnership, choose File | Delete Partnership, and click Yes on the
Confirm Partnership Deletion dialog box.
When you delete a partnership, all of the synchronization information is removed from the
PC, but any backup files for the device will not be deleted.
Prevent Accidental Deletion
of All Information
Once a partnership is created between a Pocket PC and a desktop computer, all changes,
including deletions, will be synchronized. For example, if you delete a contact on the Pocket
PC, it will be deleted from the PC during the next synchronization. If all of the information
is deleted from the PC, during the next synchronization all of the information will be deleted
from the Pocket PC.
It is always a good idea, despite the fact that a copy of the data exists on both the device
and desktop, to back up your device. You can prevent ActiveSync from deleting all information
by manually deleting the partnership. The PC will restore the information when you re-create
the partnership and synchronize the device.
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If file synchronization is included in the partnership, you will be asked whether you want
to delete the Synchronized Files folder. Check the contents of the folder on the PC to determine
whether the files should be deleted. Click Yes to delete the files from the PC, or click No if you
do not want to delete the files.
Configure Outlook Synchronization Settings
Not only can you specify which information
types to synchronize, but you can also control
how much of the information to synchronize
by changing the settings for each information
type. To conserve storage space, some of the
default settings limit the amount of information
that synchronizes. To change these settings,
you can either click the Options button on the
ActiveSync toolbar or choose Tools | Options
to open the Options dialog box shown in the
following image.
The top part of the dialog box lists
the information types on the Pocket PC (listed
in the Mobile Device column) that synchronize
with Outlook running on a desktop computer.
The bottom part features a check box for
enabling synchronization with an Exchange
server. In the section “Configure Exchange
Synchronization
Settings,” later in this chapter, you’ll find
information about configuring the Exchange
server synchronization settings.
You cannot synchronize an information type with both a desktop computer and an
Exchange server.
Each checked information type synchronizes with the Pocket PC currently displayed in the
program window. For example, the following dialog box shows the ActiveSync program window
with PocketPC as the current Mobile Device:
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Open the Options
dialog box.
The Pocket PC
device name
Toggle the information
type display on or off.
6
This is synchronizing with a server.
The name of the device displayed is the last one to synchronize with the PC. Information
types that show the sync status on the device are synchronizing with a server.
Use the Options dialog box to configure the synchronization settings for the Pocket PC
named in the ActiveSync program window. To select a different device, choose File | Mobile
Device, and then choose the device name. The name of the device, along with the date and time
of its last synchronization, will appear in the program window. When you open the Options
dialog box, it will show the information types that synchronize with that device.
A quick way to change synchronization settings is to double-click the information type
in the ActiveSync details, or click Details to display the ActiveSync details.
To change the synchronization settings for an information type (listed in the Mobile Device
column), first select it in the Sync Options list and then click Settings. The following sections
describe settings for the basic information types.
The ActiveSync synchronization settings control only the information on desktop computers
that is being sent to Pocket PCs. Once data is on a Pocket PC, it will appear on all
partner desktop computers.
Change Outlook Calendar Synchronization Settings
From the Calendar Synchronization Settings dialog box, you can synchronize all appointments
by selecting the Synchronize All Appointments radio button. If you want to synchronize only a
select number of past and future appointments, select Synchronize Only The and then choose the
number of past and future appointments from the drop-down lists. To synchronize appointments
in specific categories, select Synchronize Only Those Appointments In The Following Selected
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Categories and then select the categories from
the list. Then click OK to save the changes
and close the dialog box 9shown in image
to the right).
Categories will not be listed unless
the device is connected with the PC.
Change Outlook Contact
Synchronization Settings
You can synchronize contacts in the Contact
Synchronization Settings dialog box. As
shown in the image to the lower right, you
can synchronize all contacts by selecting the
top radio button. To synchronize only specific
contacts, choose the Synchronize Only The
Following contacts radio button and then
select the appropriate contacts from the list.
If you want to synchronize contacts in specific
categories, select the last radio button and then
choose the categories from the list. Click OK
to save the changes and close the dialog box.
Change Outlook Inbox
Synchronization Settings
Inbox synchronization occurs between the
Pocket PC Inbox application and the Outlook
Inbox. With these synchronization settings, you
control the size and number of messages that
synchronize and you select the Outlook Inbox
subfolders that you want to synchronize with
your Pocket PC 2002 or Windows Mobile
2003 device.
Pocket PC 2000 does not support the
synchronization of Outlook Inbox
subfolders.
ActiveSync does not synchronize the
contents of Inbox subfolders, Deleted Items,
Drafts, Outbox, or Sent Items folders. When
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you delete an e-mail, it is moved to Deleted
Items, but ActiveSync removes that e-mail
from the Deleted Items folder and deletes
the e-mail from the Outlook Inbox.
ActiveSync moves new e-mail from the
Outbox folder on the Pocket PC to the
Outlook Outbox folder. New e-mail
messages that are written on your Pocket
PC and synchronized to Outlook are sent
using default e-mail service in Outlook.
The inbox synchronization settings
differ between Pocket PC 2000 and
Windows Mobile 2003. When you open
the ActiveSync Inbox information type
for Pocket PC 2000 devices, the Inbox
Synchronization Settings dialog box
displays, as shown in the image to the right.
To specify the maximum size of inbox
messages, check To Save Space Copy At
Most and enter a number in the Lines field,
or clear the check box to synchronize entire
messages. Check Copy Messages From The
Last box and enter a number in the Days
field to specify how many days’ worth
of messages to synchronize. To include
attachments, check the Include File
Attachments box, and if you want to
limit the attachment file size, check
Limit Attachment Size To and then enter
a number in the KB field. These settings
work the same for Pocket PC 2000, 2002,
and Windows Mobile 2003 devices.
To turn on outbound mail
synchronization, check Automatically Send
All Messages In The Outbox Folders Of
These Selected Services, and then check
the services. This setting tells ActiveSync
which Windows CE Inbox e-mail services
to use for retrieving outbox items.
When you open the ActiveSync Inbox
information type for Pocket PC 2002 and
Windows Mobile 2003 devices, the Mail
Synchronization Settings dialog box
displays, as shown to the right.
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The Outlook Inbox mail folders display in the middle of the window, with subfolders indented
beneath Inbox. Select the check box next to the subfolders that you want to synchronize with the
Pocket PC.
The Mail Synchronization Settings dialog box for Pocket PC 2002 and Windows Mobile
2003 devices does not have an option for selecting Inbox e-mail services for sending mail. Only
those items in the Outbox folder of the Inbox ActiveSync service will be transferred to the desktop
computer. Click OK to save the changes and close the dialog box.
Change Task Synchronization Settings
The Task Synchronization Settings dialog box,
as shown in the following image, controls how
tasks are synchronized between Outlook and
Pocket Outlook.
To synchronize complete and incomplete
tasks, select Synchronize All Tasks. If you
want to synchronize only incomplete tasks,
select Synchronize Only Incomplete Tasks.
You can control how active tasks synchronize
by selecting the Synchronize Only The [ ]
Past Weeks Of Active Tasks and [ ] Future
Weeks Of Active Tasks radio button. Select the
number of past and future weeks from the
drop-down lists. To synchronize tasks in
specific categories, select Synchronize Only
Those Tasks In The Following Selected
Catagories radio button and then select the
categories in the list. Click OK to save the
changes and close the dialog box.
Change File
Synchronization Settings
Pocket PCs synchronize files between specific folders on the PC and the device. The PC files that
synchronize with the device are stored in subfolders of My Documents. For example, a Pocket PC
named Sammy synchronizes files stored in the \My Documents\Sammy My Documents folder.
To synchronize files to a Pocket PC, simply copy the file to the synchronized files folder
on the PC. Using the preceding example, that folder is \My Documents\Sammy My Documents.
Everything stored in the Pocket PC \My Documents folder synchronizes with desktop computers.
Only files located in internal storage on Pocket PCs synchronize with a PC.
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The File Synchronization Settings dialog box,
as shown in the image to the right, displays the PC
location of synchronized files for the Pocket PC.
You cannot chbange this location from this
dialog box, but you can add or remove files that
are in the list of synchronized files.
Click Add to browse a file and copy it to the
synchronized files folder, or select a file in the list
and then click Remove to delete the file from the
synchronized files folder. If the device is connected,
and continuous ActiveSync is enabled, the changes
that you make will update immediately on the device.
Otherwise, the changes will occur at the next
synchronization.
Change Notes
Synchronization Settings
Although no setting changes can be made for Notes
synchronization, Notes can be synchronized with
desktop computers in two ways. If you select the
Notes information type in ActiveSync, the notes on your Pocket PC will synchronize with
the main Notes folder in Outlook. If you do not select the Notes information type but File
Synchronization is selected, notes on your Pocket
PC will synchronize with the synchronized files
folder on the PC.
Notes synchronization does not support
Outlook Notes subfolders or categories.
Change Favorites
Synchronization Settings
The Favorites information type synchronizes your
favorite website addresses and pages to your Pocket
PC. (Chapter 23 provides instructions for selecting
website addresses and pages for synchronization.)
Synchronizing a large number of web pages may
be slow, and it can use up a lot of storage space.
To save space, you can configure the ActiveSync
Favorite Synchronization Settings so that images
or sounds do not synchronize to your Pocket PC,
or so that it synchronizes certain web pages only.
To stop a page synchronization, clear the
check box next to the corresponding page listed on
the General tab of the Favorite Synchronization Options dialog box shown above.
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Change the Synchronized Files
Folder on the PC
When file synchronization is enabled, ActiveSync creates a folder for the synchronized files
in the My Documents folder on the PC. The folder name is the combination of the Pocket PC
name and My Documents (like this: \PCName My Documents).
Editing the registry on the PC can change the location of the synchronized files on the
PC. However, do not make any changes to the registry unless you are familiar with editing
the registry. Any error in the registry can have disastrous effects, so it is wise to back up the
PC before you make any changes. It’s also a good idea to back up the device before you
make this change in case the contents of the synchronized files folder is deleted.
Change the location for synchronized files by performing the following steps:
1. Run regedit on Windows 95/98/Me; run regedt32 on Windows NT/XP/2000.
2. Click HKEY_CURRENT_USER | Software | Microsoft | Windows CE Services |
Partners | [Partner ID] | Services | Synchronization. The name of the [Partner ID]
key is different for each device in a partnership with the PC. You’ll find the device
name in the DisplayName value of this key.
3. Double-click the Briefcase Path value of the Synchronization key and enter the drive
letter and full directory path for the new location. It is a good idea to write down the
contents of this value before you change it.
4. Close the registry editor.
During the next synchronization, the files will be written to the new location on the PC.
To stop synchronizing all pages, click Clear All.
To stop images or sounds from synchronizing to your Pocket PC, open the Customize tab
and clear the Synchronize Images or Synchronize Sound check boxes.
To limit the number of linked web pages that synchronizes to your Pocket PC, right-click the
Favorites link in the Mobile Favorites folder on the desktop computer, and then choose Properties.
Select the number of linked pages to download on the Download tab. For example, if you set the
number of linked pages to 0 (zero), only the page that you select will download to the computer.
If you set the linked pages to 1, the current page and every linked page will download.
Web pages first synchronize from the Internet to your desktop computer, and then they
synchronize to your Pocket PC. If the web page doesn’t appear on your Pocket PC, choose
Tools | Synchronize in Internet Explorer on the PC, and synchronize the web page.
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Change AvantGo Synchronization Settings
AvantGo provides a way to synchronize web
content to a Pocket PC. To use AvantGo, you
must first create an account at http://www
.avantgo.com. Chapter 23 provides additional
instructions for using AvantGo.
When you select the AvantGo information
type and then connect your Pocket PC, the
Internet settings, such as port and proxy settings,
are automatically configured. If you need to
change the AvantGo synchronization settings,
double-click the AvantGo information type to
open the AvantGo Connect dialog box shown
in the image to the right.
Use the Servers tab to configure the AvantGo
server. If you need to change your AvantGo
password, select My AvantGo and click
Properties to open the Edit Server Profile
dialog box shown below.
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If a problem occurs during synchronization and no AvantGo content is on your Pocket
PC, select the Refresh All Content At Next Sync check box on the Edit Server Profile
dialog box.
The Connection tab of the AvantGo Connect dialog box displays information about the proxy
servers used by AvantGo. If you need to change these settings, you can do so from this dialog
box. Either click Autodetect Now and AvantGo will check the settings on your PC and make any
necessary changes, or click Change and manually enter the settings.
Configure Exchange Synchronization Settings
You can synchronize Calendar, Contacts, and Inbox information between your Pocket PC and
an Exchange server running Exchange Server ActiveSync. Exchange 2003 includes Exchange
Server ActiveSync, while you will need Microsoft Mobile Information Server to synchronize
a Pocket PC with Exchange 2002.
Exchange server synchronization is supported only on Pocket PC 2002, Windows
Mobile 2003, or later.
ActiveSync 3.7 provides Exchange Synchronization settings so that when you connect a
Pocket PC to the desktop it will synchronize with Exchange. You can configure a Pocket PC
synchronize with Outlook and Exchange, but an information type can synchronize with only
one location. For example, if you synchronize the
Calendar with Outlook, you cannot then
synchronize it with Exchange.
You must first connect your Pocket PC with
the desktop computer before you can make changes
to the server synchronization settings. To enable
server synchronization, either click the Options
button on the ActiveSync toolbar or choose
Tools | Options to open the Options dialog box.
Then, in the Sync Options tab, select the Enable
Synchronization With A Server check box. This
check box may already be selected if at the time
you created the partnership you specified to
synchronize with the desktop and Exchange.
To change the synchronization settings
between the Pocket PC and the server, click
Configure, and the Server Options dialog box
appears (shown right).
Select the check boxes next to the information
types (listed under Mobile Device) that you want to
synchronize. To configure how the information synchronizes,
click Settings. You cannot change the settings for Contacts.
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The server synchronization settings are written to the Pocket PC—which is why it must be
connected before you can make changes. To see the settings in ActiveSync on the Pocket PC, tap
Tools | Options and then tap the Server tab. Figure 6-1 shows how the Server Synchronization
setting screen looks on Pocket PC 2002 and Windows Mobile 2003.
To change the synchronization settings for an information type, tap the information type
name and then tap Settings. The options that you can change appear the same on both the Pocket
PC and in ActiveSync 3.7, and they are explained in more detail in the following sections.
Change Calendar
Synchronization Settings
The Calendar Synchronization Settings
dialog box, shown next, provides a
drop-down list you can use to specify the
duration of appointments to synchronize.
Regardless of what duration you select, all
future appointments will synchronize.
Change Inbox
Synchronization Settings
The Inbox Synchronization Settings dialog
box, shown next, provides settings to
control the number and size of the e-mail
that synchronizes between the Pocket PC
and Exchange.
Select a duration from the Amount
Of Messages To Copy drop-down list,
and select the size of each message from
the To Save Space, Copy At Most
drop-down list.
Messages larger than the size
you specify will be truncated.
When you read the message in
Inbox, you can specify to
download the entire message
during the next synchronization.
You can synchronize file attachments
by selecting the Include File Attachments check box. Specify the maximum size file attachment
for synchronization by selecting the Only If Smaller Than check box and entering the file size in
kilobytes. Larger files will not automatically synchronize, though you can request that they be
retrieved when you open the message in Inbox.
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Chapter 20 provides instructions for using Inbox for synchronizing entire messages and
downloading file attachments.
Exchange server Inbox subfolders will synchronize with Pocket PC 2002 and Windows
Mobile 2003. Click Select Folders to specify which subfolders you want to synchronize.
Change Exchange Server Connection Information
To synchronize a Pocket PC with an Exchange Server, you must enter the following information
about the server in the Server Options dialog box:
■
■
■
■
Server name
Username
Password
Domain name
You will also need to know whether the server uses a Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) connection.
To enter the server information in ActiveSync 3.7, click Connection in the Server Connection
section of the Server Options dialog box. The Connection Information dialog box opens:
Enter information in the fields. If the server uses an SSL connection, select the This Server
Uses An SSL Connection check box. Click Save Password to store the password; otherwise, you
will need to enter the password during each synchronization.
The server information is written to the Pocket PCs, where you can view it from the Server
tab in the ActiveSync program window, as shown in Figure 6-1. To change the server logon
information in Pocket PC 2002, tap Advanced; in Windows Mobile 2003, tap Options.
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6
FIGURE 6-1
The server synchronization settings for Pocket PC 2002 (left), and on the screen
for Windows Mobile 2003 (right)
Synchronize a Pocket PC Directly
with Exchange
In this How To, we show you how to configure settings so that you can synchronize a Pocket
PC with an Exchange server when the device connects to a desktop computer. Pocket PC
2002 and Windows Mobile 2003 devices are capable of synchronizing directly with an
Exchange server, so you do not need a desktop connection.
Direct synchronization works with any network connection that provides access to the
Exchange server. You can use dial-up modems, Ethernet network connections, wireless
Ethernet network connections, or wireless Internet connections. You may need to use virtual
private networking (VPN) software to synchronize by using an Internet connection. (Chapter
16 provides more information about VPN software, and Chapter 19 provides information
about connecting to networks.)
To synchronize a Pocket PC directly with Exchange, start the ActiveSync program on the
Pocket PC and tap Sync. You can configure the Pocket PC to synchronize automatically at
specified time intervals, and Exchange can even automatically synchronize (or push) new
information with Windows Mobile 2003 Phone Edition.
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The synchronization settings for direct synchronization are the same as synchronization
via a desktop computer. To change the settings, tap Tools | Options, and then tap the Server
tab, where you can enable and configure synchronization for Calendar, Contacts, and Inbox
and enter server information.
Change the Synchronization Schedule
To change the synchronization schedule,
either click Options from the ActiveSync
program window, or choose Tools | Options
in ActiveSync on the desktop and then click
the Schedule tab, which is shown in the
image to the right.
The Schedule tab has three sections for
specifying the synchronization schedule
for desktop, server, and wireless
synchronization.
The Wireless Schedule portion of
the tab does not appear for Pocket
PC 2002 and older devices.
By default, desktop synchronization
runs continuously while the Pocket PC
is connected to the PC. If you select
continuous synchronization, ActiveSync
monitors Outlook and the Pocket PC, and
changes synchronize immediately. The
desktop synchronization schedule can be
changed to synchronize only when the
Pocket PC is first connected or only when you initiate synchronization.
The Server Schedule section of the dialog box is for setting how often the Pocket PC will
synchronize with an Exchange server while connected to the desktop computer. If you turn on
server synchronization, this setting is ignored.
The changes you make to the Wireless Schedule section define how often the Pocket PC
directly synchronizes with an Exchange server over a network connection. If you use a wireless
connection with different rates for peak and off-peak usage you may want to control how often
synchronization occurs to save money.
You can change the Server and Wireless schedules only while the Pocket PC is connected
to the desktop computer, because they change settings on the Pocket PC. To see the Wireless
synchronization schedule in ActiveSync on the Pocket PC, tap Tools | Options and then tap the
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Mobile Schedule tab. To see the Server synchronization schedule in Pocket PC 2002, tap Tools |
Options | Schedule; in Windows Mobile 2003, tap Tools | Options | Server | Options | Rules.
Resolve Synchronization
Conflicts
When a conflict occurs during desktop
synchronization, the affected item is
marked as unresolved in ActiveSync
and on the Pocket PC, unless you tell
ActiveSync how to handle conflicts.
To change the conflict resolution
settings, open the Options dialog box
and select the Rules tab, shown in the
imageto the right.
The Conflict Resolution section
provides drop-down lists for specifying
how to resolve conflicts during desktop
and server synchronization.
The three settings for Desktop
synchronization are Leave The Item
Unresolved, Always Replace The Item
On My Device, or Always Replace The
Item On The Computer. The settings for
Server synchronization are Always
Replace The Item On My Device or Always Replace The Item On The Server. Select the setting
you want and click OK.
Conflicts usually occur when
an item is changed on the Pocket
PC and PC before synchronization.
As you can see in the following
image, if ActiveSync is configured
to leave items unresolved, the
number of unresolved items for
Click here
each information type displays
to resolve
and a Resolve Items link appears,
items.
as shown to the left.
When you click Resolve
Items, a Resolve Conflict dialog
box displays. Here, you tell
ActiveSync how to resolve each
conflict by clicking the Action
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Fix Persistent Conflicts
Sometimes, one or more ActiveSync information types report conflicts that are not resolved,
regardless of how conflict resolution is configured. This problem, along with other
synchronization problems, is often caused by problems with the Outlook data file on the
desktop computer.
The Inbox Repair Tool, of file name scanpst.exe, is installed on all PCs running Microsoft
Outlook. If you have problems synchronizing data, you should use this tool to scan the Outlook
data file, called outlook.pst. To use the repair tool, follow these steps:
1. Disconnect the Pocket PC from the desktop computer and exit Outlook.
2. Search your desktop computer for the file name outlook.pst, and make note
of the file location.
3. Search your desktop computer for the file name scanpst.exe.
4. Start the repair tool by double-clicking scanpst.exe in the Search Results window.
5. Click Browse and select outlook.pst using the information provided in step 1.
6. Click Start.
The Inbox Repair Tool will scan through the outlook.pst file and fix any problems that it
finds. You may want to run the repair a second time if the first scan identified several problems.
drop-down list and selecting an item. The
options include replacing the desktop item
with the mobile device item, replacing the
mobile device item with the desktop item,
or skipping the item. If you skip the item,
ActiveSync will continue to indicate that
at least one unresolved item exists.
Configure File Conversion
Settings
ActiveSync converts files when they are
copied, moved, or synchronized between
the Pocket PC and desktop computer. To
specify whether or not conversion is to
take place and how files are converted,
click Conversion Settings in the Rules
tab of the Options dialog box. The File
Conversion Properties dialog box opens,
as shown in the following image:
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Turn file conversion on by selecting the check box on the General tab. When the box is
unchecked, file conversion is turned off.
Select the Device To Desktop tab of the File Conversion Properties dialog box to change
conversion settings for files moved from the device to the PC. To make a change, select a file
type from the list and then click Edit.
Select the desktop file type from the Type drop-down list in the Edit Conversion Settings dialog
box, as shown in the following image, and click OK. Then click OK on the File Conversion Properties
dialog box to save the change.
6
The process for changing the file conversion settings of files moved from the desktop to the
device is the same. First, select the Desktop to Device tab, select a file type, click Edit, select a
new file type, and then click OK.
Wrapping Up
The primary reason for connecting Pocket PCs to desktop computers is to synchronize data with
Microsoft Outlook or Microsoft Exchange. ActiveSync synchronizes data between the Pocket PC
Calendar, Contacts, Tasks, Notes, and Inbox programs with their counterparts in Microsoft Outlook.
You can synchronize Calendar, Contacts, and Inbox with Microsoft Exchange. ActiveSync also
provides synchronization for Internet Explorer Favorites and web pages, as well as AvantGo.
Software developers may also use ActiveSync to synchronize data between other Pocket PC
applications and desktop counterparts.
Synchronization is not the only reason for connecting a Pocket PC to a desktop computer,
however. As you will see in the next chapter, you can also use ActiveSync to manage files on
folders on the Pocket PC, to back up and restore data, and to install programs.
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How to…
■
■
■
■
■
Explore files and folders
Copy, delete, and rename files and folders
Back up and restore a Pocket PC
Install and remove programs on a Pocket PC
Use Desktop Pass Through
A
s you have seen in the previous two chapters, you can connect Pocket PCs with desktop
computers and synchronize data in a variety of ways. Synchronization is not the only reason
for connecting Pocket PCs with desktop computers, however. ActiveSync also provides help in
managing Pocket PCs, such as in exploring files and folders, copying, deleting and renaming
files and folders, backing up and restoring Pocket PCs, installing and removing programs, and
connecting to networks. In this chapter, you will learn how to use ActiveSync to perform all of
these functions.
Explore Files and Folders
All versions of ActiveSync enable the user to browse files and folders from a PC on a connected
Pocket PC. In fact, ActiveSync is the only way to browse older Palm-size PCs unless third-party
Protect Your Pocket PC
Against Viruses
No known viruses currently affect Pocket PCs, and so far there has been greater concern
about Pocket PCs spreading viruses to desktop computers than virus attacks on Pocket PCs.
The purpose of VirusScan for Pocket PCs from McAfee is to scan files on Pocket PCs from
desktop computers to prevent the desktop from infection.
After you install the McAfee software, Pocket PCs are scanned for viruses every time
they connect to the desktop computer. You will find more information about VirusScan for
Pocket PCs at http://www.mcafee.com/myapps/vsw/handscan/ov_pocketpc.asp.
Virus scan programs that run on Pocket PCs include PC-cillin for Wireless from Trend
Micro (http://www.trendmicro.com/en/products/desktop/pcc-wireless/evaluate/overview.htm)
and F-Secure Anti-Virus for Pocket PC (http://www.f-secure.com/wireless/pocketpc/
pocketpc-av.shtml).
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software is installed on the device. Browsing with Handheld PC (H/PC) Explorer was done in
a separate program window, but since the inclusion of Windows CE Services, device files and
folders can be browsed from within Windows Explorer.
Browse Files and Folders
You can browse files and folders on a connected Pocket PC either within Windows Explorer
or by using ActiveSync. As you can see in Figure 7-1, when ActiveSync is installed on the PC,
a Mobile Device item is added to Windows Explorer.
If a Pocket PC is connected, double-clicking the Mobile Device icon in Windows Explorer
will display the files and folders of the device. The process of browsing files and folders on a
Pocket PC is similar to browsing the hard drive of a PC. You open a folder by double-clicking
7
Double-click these
to browse files
and folders on
the device.
FIGURE 7-1
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With ActiveSync installed, a Mobile Device item is added to My Computer,
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its icon. But it differs from PCs in that double-clicking a file name opens a Properties dialog box
rather than opening the file.
To use ActiveSync to browse a connected Pocket PC, click the Explorer icon on the ActiveSync
toolbar or choose File | Explore. An Explorer window will open:
To open a folder, double-click its icon. Double-click a file name to open a Properties
dialog box.
Copy, Delete, and Rename Files and Folders
The processes for copying, deleting, and renaming files and folders on a Pocket PC using ActiveSync
are the same as those on a PC. You can copy files and folders within locations on a Pocket PC,
such as between the My Documents folder and the Storage Card folder, and between the Pocket
PC and desktop computer.
To copy files or folders, use either the drag-and-drop method or copy and paste. ActiveSync
will automatically convert files if file conversion is enabled. (See Chapter 6 for instructions on
configuring file conversion.)
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Use File Synchronization to copy a file to a Pocket PC or desktop PC while the two are
not connected. Move or copy the file to the Synchronized Files folder of either, and the
file will be copied at the next synchronization.
Delete a selected file or folder by simply pressing DELETE or by choosing File | Delete. Items
deleted using ActiveSync are not backed up to a recycle bin prior to deletion. Rename a selected
file or folder by choosing File | Rename or by right-clicking the item and then choosing Rename.
Back Up and Restore Files
While synchronization keeps copies of your personal information on both the Pocket PC and
desktop computer, it does not back up program settings or files not stored in the Synchronized
Files folder. The best way to ensure that you can restore a Pocket PC to its current state is by
running regular backups, which you can do with ActiveSync.
ActiveSync does not back up files or folders that are on storage cards. If you want to
back up data on storage cards, you need to use a third-party program, such as CF2Desktop
from Information Appliance Associates at http://www.doctorce.com/cf2desktop.htm.
If you want to synchronize files on a storage card, you can use MightySync found at
http://www.mydocsunlimited.com/html/mightysync.html.
Automatic backups execute if you configure ActiveSync to back up whenever the device
connects. To configure this option, connect the Pocket PC to the desktop computer and then
choose Tools | Backup/Restore to open the following dialog box:
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Check the Automatically Back Up Each Time The Device Connects check box and then click
OK. The next time the device connects, a backup will run immediately after synchronization.
The only way to use ActiveSync to back up a device with a modem connection is by
configuring ActiveSync to perform backups automatically. Keep in mind, however,
that a backup with a modem connection may take a long time.
Automatic backups occur every time you connect a Pocket PC, extending the time of
synchronization. If you do not want backups to occur automatically, you can manually back up
a Pocket PC by connecting the device to the desktop PC and then choosing Tools | Backup/Restore.
Click Back Up Now on the Backup tab, and the backup will start showing its progress as it works.
Do not use the device until the backup is finished.
Define the Backup Type
ActiveSync will run either a full or an incremental backup. An incremental backup backs up only
those changes that have occurred since the last backup, while a full backup backs up all information
every time. Incremental backups are quicker than full backups and therefore work well with
modem connections.
Run a Local Backup
of Your Pocket PC
Most Pocket PCs include a backup program that will back up the program files and data on
the device to a storage card. You should find the backup program in the Program Files folder.
These programs run faster backups than ActiveSync and are convenient to use while you’re
traveling away from desktop computers.
If your Pocket PC provides an internal storage card in FlashROM, consider storing
backups to this area. Files written to FlashROM will not be deleted even if the Pocket PC
loses power, so it is a safe location for backup files.
If your Pocket PC does not have a backup program, or if you prefer a more robust program,
try Sprite Software’s Pocket Backup, which enables you to select specific files and folders to
back up and restore. The Plus version of the program enables you to back up files to a desktop
computer or network file share in addition to storage cards. You can schedule backups to run
automatically at a specific time each day or once a week, and a battery-monitoring feature
automatically backs up a Pocket PC when the battery reaches a defined threshold.
You can buy a copy of Pocket Backup or download a trial version of the program from
http://www.spritesoftware.com.
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To define the backup type, choose Tools | Backup/Restore, select either the Full Backup or
Incremental Backup radio button, and then click OK.
Define Where to Store the Backup
ActiveSync backups are written to the PC hard drive. By default, the backup file name is Backup.stg
and is stored in a folder with the name of the device in the \Program Files\Microsoft ActiveSync\
Profiles folder. For example, if the device has the name Pocket_PC, the Backup.stg file is stored
in \Program Files\Microsoft ActiveSync\Profiles\Pocket_PC. On Windows 2000 and Windows XP
desktops, the files may be stored in a subfolder of Documents and Settings. For example, for a
user named Frank, the backup files may be in \Documents and Settings\Frank\Application Data\
Microsoft\ActiveSync\Profiles\Pocket_PC.
Two files that contain partnership information are also stored in the backup folder.
These files have the names outstore.dat and repl.dat. If you want to back up the
partnership information stored on the PC, back up these two files.
You may want to change the location of the backup file to a hard drive that has more storage
space or to make it easier to back up on the PC. To change the location where the backup file is
written, do the following:
1. Choose Tools | Backup/Restore.
2. Click Change.
3. Select a new location in the Select Backup Set dialog box.
4. Click Save to close the Select Backup Set dialog box.
5. Click OK to close the Backup/Restore dialog box.
You can also use this procedure for renaming backup files to something with the current
date so that you can easily see when you ran the backup.
Restore from a Backup
ActiveSync restores data from the backup file on the PC to the Pocket PC. During the process,
all of the contents in the Pocket PC are replaced by the items in the backup, and the recycle bin
is emptied. Restore does not overwrite a Pocket PC password.
Before you perform a restore, you need to be aware of a few things:
■ If you change the country settings on the Pocket PC prior to the backup, you must make
sure the Pocket PC is set to the same country settings before the restore; otherwise, the
restore will not work.
■ The restore will replace everything within internal storage on the Pocket PC. If files have
been written on the Pocket PC since the backup, you should copy them to a storage card
or a PC before running Restore; otherwise, the files will be lost.
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Control Pocket PCs
from Desktop Computers
Some people find it awkward to work with Pocket PCs while they are docked in cradles and
connected to PCs. Virtual CE from BitBank Software fixes this problem by enabling you to
manipulate Pocket PCs from desktop computers while they are attached by cradles or over
Ethernet networks. In addition to controlling Pocket PCs remotely, Virtual CE enables you
to display Pocket PC screens on projectors and to capture various screen shots. You can
download Virtual CE from http://www.bitbanksoftware.com/VirtualCE.html.
■ While you can back up a Pocket PC using a network connection, you must restore
a Pocket PC using either a serial, USB, or infrared connection.
To restore from a backup file, follow these steps:
1. Connect the Pocket PC to the desktop computer. If the Partnership wizard starts, follow
the instructions to create the partnership.
2. Close any programs that may be running on the Pocket PC.
3. Choose Tools | Backup/Restore and then choose the Restore tab.
4. Click Restore Now. Do not use the Pocket PC while the restore runs.
5. After the restore completes, soft-reset the Pocket PC.
Install and Remove Programs
Most Pocket PC software includes a setup program that you run on a PC to install software to the
device. Setup programs usually store copies of the Pocket PC installation files on the PC and then
run ActiveSync Add/Remove Programs to install the program on the device. With this process,
ActiveSync tracks the Pocket PC software that has been installed, and it can be used to reinstall
software without having to rerun the installation program.
To remove a program from a device, use either the Remove Programs setting on the Pocket
PC or the ActiveSync Add/Remove Programs. Chapter 4 provides the instructions for using the
Control Panel setting.
Use ActiveSync to Install Programs
To use ActiveSync to install software, you must first connect the Pocket PC to the desktop
computer. The connection can either be as a partner or as a guest. After the connection is made,
choose Tools | Add/Remove Programs. ActiveSync determines what programs are installed on
the device and then displays the Add/Remove Programs dialog box, as shown next:
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7
If the check box next to a program is grayed out, it means the program was installed on
the Pocket PC using a desktop computer other than the PC you are currently using.
The checked programs listed in the dialog box are installed on the Pocket PC, and those not
checked are available for installation. To install one of these programs, select its check box and
then click OK. If the Install Program Into The Default Installation Folder check box is checked,
installation starts immediately; otherwise, the following dialog box will display, asking whether
to install the program in main memory or on the storage card:
Select the location from the Save In drop-down list and then click OK.
As the software is installed, a dialog box indicates its progress, where you can click Cancel if
you want to stop the installation.
Once installation is complete, another dialog box displays, asking you to check your device
to see if other steps are necessary to complete the installation. Click OK to close the dialog box,
and then check the device to see if instructions are displayed on the screen.
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Install Programs
Without Using ActiveSync
ActiveSync provides the easiest, but not the only, way to install programs on a Pocket PC.
You can install programs onto Pocket PCs without using ActiveSync by manually copying a
cabinet file to the Pocket PC and then running it. Pocket PC Cabinet files contain compressed
copies of program files and execute directly on Pocket PCs.
The challenges with installing programs in this way are finding the cabinet file to copy
to the Pocket PC and insuring that you copy the correct version of the cabinet file. The
second challenge is an issue only for Pocket PC 2000 devices, because their processors
require different versions of program files. All Pocket PC 2002 and 2003 devices can run
the same program files, so this it not an issue for these devices.
If a Pocket PC program has already been installed from a desktop computer, you will
probably find the cabinet files for that program in the \Program Files\Microsoft ActiveSync
folder on the desktop computer. Cabinet file names use the extension .cab. The standard
Pocket PC software installation process that most programs follow creates a subfolder in
the Microsoft ActiveSync folder on the PC and copies the Pocket PC installation files to
that folder. ActiveSync then copies those files to the Pocket PC and installs the program.
If the installation files are not found in such a subfolder, you may find them elsewhere
on the PC’s hard drive, or they may be stored in a compressed file that you downloaded
from the Internet.
Unfortunately, no naming standards exist for cabinet files. Most software developers
include the processor type in the cabinet file name to help determine which file goes with
each processor. If you have a Compaq iPAQ or UR There @migo Pocket PC 2000 device,
or any Pocket PC 2002 or 2003 device, look for files that indicate ARM (Advanced RISC
Machine) processors. Hewlett-Packard 520 and 540 series Jornadas have SH3 processors;
and Casio E-115, E-125, EM-500 and EG-800 Pocket PCs have MIPS processors.
Use Windows Explorer or ActiveSync Explorer to copy the cabinet file to the Pocket PC.
Then use File Explorer on the Pocket PC to browse to the file location, and tap the cabinet
file name to install the program. Usually, after installation is complete, the cabinet file is
deleted. If you don’t want the cabinet file deleted, use Windows or ActiveSync Explorer to
make the file read-only.
When you install a program by running a cabinet file you cannot specify where it will
install on the Pocket PC. The freeware program CabInstl, available at http://www.geocities
.com/s_k_s_k_s_kru/, enables you to specify the installation directory for programs in
cabinet files.
Information Appliance Associates has developed a Windows ActiveX control called
CEWebInstallX that installs programs to Pocket PCs directly from web pages. You will
find more information about this control at http://www.doctorce.com.
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Use ActiveSync to Remove Programs
To use ActiveSync to remove a program from a Pocket PC, connect it to the PC and then choose
Tools | Add/Remove Programs. The Add/Remove Programs dialog box will open, with the
programs installed on the Pocket PC checked, as shown in the following image:
This program is installed
on the Pocket PC.
7
To remove a program from the Pocket PC, clear the program’s check box and then click OK.
A message box will display, indicating that the program is being removed. When finished, the
Add/Remove Programs dialog box closes.
If ActiveSync cannot uninstall an application because files are open, soft reset the
Pocket PC and then reconnect it to the desktop.
If you re-open the Add/Remove Programs dialog box, you will see that the removed program
is still listed. It remains in the list because the installation files are still on the PC. If you want to
remove the program from both the Pocket PC and the desktop PC, clear the program check box
and then click Remove.
Use Desktop Pass Through
Desktop Pass Through is a feature that enables the Pocket PC to access the Internet while it is
connected with desktop computers. The feature works only with ActiveSync 3.5 and newer versions,
and it is not available for Pocket PC 2000.
Any Pocket PC application that works with the Internet will work using Desktop
Pass Through.
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Pass Through uses the same Internet connection used by the desktop computer. If you access
the Internet on the desktop using a modem, you will need to establish a connection to the Internet
before using Pass Through.
Desktop Pass Through works with ActiveSync Guest connections, so you can access the
Internet via Pass Through from any desktop computer with ActiveSync installed on it.
Desktop Pass Through is always available, although you can change the configuration to
specify whether to connect to the Internet or a LAN (Local Area Network). To make this change,
choose Tools | Options | Rules in ActiveSync on the desktop computer to open the following
dialog box:
These drop-down list selections
should be the same.
The selection in the drop-down list of the connection field (left image) should be the same as the
selection in the drop-down list of the My Network Card Connects To field (right image) in the
Connection Manager on the Pocket PC. If a proxy server is in use on the network for accessing
the Internet, you will need to set the drop-down lists to Work.
Wrapping Up
The Pocket PC is designed to work as an extension of your desktop computer. ActiveSync
enables the partnership between Pocket PCs and desktop computers by providing for data
synchronization and device management. Now that you know the basic functions of your
Pocket PC and how to connect it with a desktop computer, it is time to learn how to use software
to make the most of your Pocket PC. Perhaps the most important of these programs is Pocket
Outlook, with its Calendar, Contacts, and Tasks components, which you will learn how to use in
the next chapter.
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Out of Your
Pocket PC
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Appointments,
Tasks, and
Contacts
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How to…
■
■
■
■
■
Schedule appointments
Store addresses
Track tasks
Search for appointments, addresses, and tasks
Use the New button menu on the Pocket PC to create appointments, contacts, and tasks
T
oday’s fast pace and hectic schedules have made time management an important skill. The
fundamental tools of managing time include a calendar for appointments, an address book
for contact information, and a task list to keep track of what needs to be done. Despite all of the
capabilities that Pocket PCs provide, you probably bought your device to help manage these
three things.
In this chapter, you learn how to use the programs included in Pocket Outlook: Calendar,
Contacts, and Task programs on the Pocket PC. You will probably use each of these programs
frequently throughout the day to enter and look up information. The programs provide a search
capability that helps you quickly find information based on a word or phrase. With Calendar’s
recurrence scheduling capability, creating an appointment that occurs on the same day and time
every month is as easy as completing one screen, eliminating the need to write the appointment
on multiple entries in a day planner.
Calendar and Contacts are integrated with Inbox, the e-mail program on your device that is
covered in Chapter 21. From Calendar, you can schedule a meeting with people by retrieving
their e-mail addresses from Contacts and e-mailing a meeting request. From Contacts, you can
send an e-mail simply by selecting an entry in the contacts list and tapping a button.
Appointments, addresses, and tasks can be sent to other Pocket PCs by using the infrared port,
making it easy to share information with other people. Perhaps even more important, as you read
in Chapter 6, the information in these three programs can be synchronized with your desktop
computer, enabling you to work with the same information whether you are sitting at your desk
or in a taxi cab.
Use Pocket Outlook on Your Pocket PC
Calendar, Contacts, and Tasks may be the most frequently used programs on your Pocket PC.
Each program contains information that you use constantly throughout the day. Need to schedule
an appointment? Start Calendar. Need to look up an address? Start Contacts. Been given another
assignment? Start Tasks.
You will want to retrieve the information stored in these three programs quickly, and the Pocket
PC is designed to help you achieve that goal. By default, shortcuts for Calendar, Contacts, and
Tasks are placed in the Start menu. If the shortcuts are not in the Start menu, you will find them
in Programs, which you open by tapping Start | Programs.
Each program may also be assigned to a hardware button. An exception are Pocket PC Phone
Editions, which typically assigns just Calendar and Contacts to hardware buttons; with two other
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buttons assigned to operate the phone. You can use the button settings program on the Pocket PC
to change the assignment of all the hardware buttons.
If you assign Calendar, Contacts, and Tasks to hardware buttons, consider removing
these programs’ shortcuts from the Start menu. By doing so, you will make space for
other programs that you can place in the Start menu for quicker access.
The instructions for starting Calendar, Contacts, and Tasks in this section use the Start menu.
Quickly Create Appointments,
Contacts, or Tasks Using the
New Button Menu
The Today screen includes a New button that you can tap to open a pop-up menu with
options for creating appointments, contacts, tasks, e-mail messages, and more. Using this
menu from the Today screen saves you the step of first opening the program and then tapping
New, but Calendar, Contacts, and Tasks does not have this New button feature.
The New button menu fixes this problem by adding a pop-up menu everywhere that the
New button appears, but it is not turned on by default. To enable this feature, tap Start |
Settings | Menus, and then tap the New Menu tab to open the dialog box shown here:
Tap the check box to turn on the New button menu, select the items that you want to
appear on the menu, and then tap OK. When you access the menu you will see a triangle to
the right of the New button. When you tap the triangle, the New button menu pops up with
Appointment, Contact, and Task options, which you can tap to create the desired items.
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Schedule Appointments Using Calendar
The Calendar program in Pocket Outlook is the Pocket PC companion to the Calendar folder in
Microsoft Outlook. ActiveSync synchronizes appointments that you enter in Calendar on the
Pocket PC with the Calendar folder in Outlook or Exchange, as explained in Chapter 6. To enter
an appointment, first start Calendar by tapping Start | Calendar, which opens the program window
shown in Figure 8-1.
View Your Schedule in Calendar
You can view your schedule by day, week, month, and year. Calendar also provides an Agenda
view that summarizes your appointments for each day.
Each view has buttons, as shown here, used for moving forward and back and for returning to
the current date:
Tap here to move forward
Tap here to return to the current date
Tap here to move back
You can use the Action button (or Jog wheel) to move forward and backward through the
calendar in the Week view. In the Month and Year views, the Action button scrolls the screen up
and down one line at a time; in the Agenda and Day views, the Action button moves the scroll
bar up and down.
FIGURE 8-1
The Calendar menu and toolbars are at the bottom of the screen.
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Switching Views
The method for switching among Calendar views is different for Pocket PC 2000, 2002,
and 2003. In each release, pressing the Calendar hardware button cycles through views,
but Pocket PC 2002 and 2003 replaces the View menu with the following five buttons on
the command bar:
8
Tap here to display
the Week view
Tap here to display the Day view
Tap here to display
theAgenda view
Tap here to display
the Month view
Tap here to display
the Year view
Pocket PC 2000 devices have this View menu:
To switch between views on these Pocket PCs, tap View and then the view name— for
example, tap View | Week to see the view for the week.
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View One Day of Appointments
To display your schedule in the Day view, tap the Day view button and the program will be
displayed as shown here:
All-day events are
displayed here
All-day events, which are items that you associate with a day but are not scheduled for a
time, appear at the top of the screen. An example of an all-day event is an anniversary or holiday.
Appointments are displayed in the middle of the screen, and by default they are listed in
one-hour slots. The slot sizes can be changed to 30-minute increments by tapping Tools | Options
and then tapping the Show Half Hour Slots check box. More space is taken up on the screen
when you use half-hour slots.
The left edge of the appointment shows a bar indicating its status. An appointment shown
as free time by a white bar means that another appointment could be scheduled in that time slot.
Appointments can be free, tentative, busy, or out-of-office, and each is shown with a different
color bar.
Icons are used to provide information about an appointment, such as whether a reminder is
set or the whether the appointment recurs. By default, the icons are turned off, and they can be
turned on by tapping Tools | Options to display the Options dialog box shown here:
These icons will be
displayed on appointments.
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These icons will not be
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New Calendar Features in Windows
Mobile 2003
The day view in Calendar highlights two new features available with Windows Mobile 2003.
Locations for all-day events now display along with the event title, and yearly repeating
events show a count next to them in the title. Weekends are highlighted with colors—red for
Saturday and blue for Sunday. Holidays also appear in blue.
You can now accept vCalendar (vCal) attachments in Inbox that will add information
to Calendar. vCalendar is a file format that enables sharing of calendar information between
different programs. Appointments with a free status can no longer conflict with any other
appointments. Finally, you can edit a recurring appointment while the Pocket PC is in another
time zone without seeing warning messages or the appointment disappearing.
Tap each of the icons that you want to be displayed so that the icon turns dark, as shown in
the illustration, and then tap OK. The icons then appear with the appointment in the Day view,
as shown here:
A recurring appointment
The appointment has a note.
Each appointment can include more information than is displayed in the Day view. To see
more details, tap the appointment to open it in Summary view, as shown here:
Tap OK to close
Summary view.
Summary view provides all of the information about the appointment on one easy-to-read screen.
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Tap the date at the top of the screen to display a date picker, which you can use to select a
different date to be displayed.
Remember that you can use the buttons on the screen for returning to the current date
or moving backward and forward through the dates.
View a Week of Appointments
The Week view displays appointments for the workweek, with each day displayed as a column,
as shown here:
To switch to this view, tap the Week view button. Appointments appear as blocks in different
colors, indicating statuses of free, busy, tentative, and out-of-office. All-day events are indicated
by a bar running down the column. To display the appointment information, tap a block to show
the information at the top of the screen, as shown in the preceding illustration.
You can change the number of days displayed in the Week view by tapping Tools | Options
and then selecting either 5-day week, 6-day week, or 7-day week in the Week View drop-down
list. Tap OK to save the changes and close the Options dialog box.
To move to a different week in the year, tap the month at the top of the screen to display a
date picker, which you use to select a different date to be displayed. Switch years by tapping the
year at the top of the screen, and select a year from the drop-down list that is displayed. Tap the
column head of a day in the Week view to switch to the Day view for that day.
View a Month of Appointments
To display the calendar one month at a time, tap the Month view button to switch to the Month
view shown here:
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Morning and afternoon
appointments
Morning and afternoon
appointments and an
all-day event
Current date
Morning appointment
All-day event
Afternoon appointment
8
Appointments are displayed as filled blocks, with a solid block indicating morning and
afternoon appointments. If a day has only a morning appointment, the upper-left corner of the
filled block is displayed. A filled-in lower-right corner of a block indicates afternoon appointments.
All-day events are indicated by an empty block with a blue border.
A black box on a date indicates the current date. Tap the month at the top of the screen to
display a drop-down list that you can use to select a different month to be displayed. Change the
year by tapping the year at the top of the screen and selecting a different year from the drop-down
list. To switch the display to the Day view for a specific date in a month, tap the date on the calendar.
Display Week Numbers
in Month View
Pocket PC 2002 and 2003 has the ability to display week numbers in the Month view. To turn
on week numbers, tap Tools | Options, tap the Show Week Numbers check box, and tap OK.
In Week view, the number displays at the top right of the screen and in Month view the week
numbers are displayed along the left edge of the screen.
European users who use a Julian type week number scheme will notice a bug in the week
numbers that causes the last week of the year to use the wrong numbers. For example, the
last week of 2003 shows as week 1, while the last week of 2004 shows as week 53.
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View a Year of Appointments
The Year view displays every month of a year. To switch to the Year view, tap the Year view
button, which changes the display to look like the following:
Indicates multiple dates
The current day is indicated by a black square. Each month in the Year view is limited to five
lines, so a sixth line of dates is indicated by a slash (/).
To display a different year, tap the year at the top of the screen and select another year in the
drop-down list. To switch the display to the Month view for a specific month in the calendar, tap
the name of the month. You can switch to the Day view for a specific date by tapping a date in the
Year view.
View a Daily Agenda
The Agenda view, shown to the right, summarizes
appointments and all-day events on one screen.
All-day events are displayed at the top of the screen,
and appointments are listed in rows by time. Current
appointments are displayed in a darker font on the screen,
and past appointments are grayed out.
Tap the date at the top of the agenda to display the
date picker, which you use to jump to a specific date. Tap
the date on the calendar to jump to that date in the Agenda
view. You can also use the buttons along the top of the screen
to move through the days of the week or to return to the
current date.
Tap an event or appointment in the Agenda view to
open the appointment in Summary view.
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Create an Appointment in Calendar
To create an appointment in Calendar, tap New to open the Appointment dialog box shown here:
8
When the dialog box opens, the Subject field is selected, and the Software Input Panel is open
and ready for you to enter a description for the appointment. Tap each field on the dialog box that
you want to complete, and enter information where appropriate.
Enter a description of the appointment in the Subject field, and enter a location for the
appointment in the Location field. The Location drop-down list contains locations that were
previously entered. If the new appointment is at a location that you already entered, you can
select it from this list.
The Subject field is also a drop-down list that contains words commonly used in
appointments. Unfortunately, the list doesn’t change, and there is no way to add words
to the drop-down list.
Dates are entered in the Starts and Ends fields by tapping the date that is displayed to open
the date picker shown here:
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Tap a date on the calendar to select it for either field. You can use the arrows at the top of the
calendar to move backward and forward a month at a time, or tap the month to jump to another
month that appears in a pop-up menu. The starting date that you select will automatically appear
in the Ends field, though you can change the date by tapping the field.
Starting and ending times are displayed in drop-down lists, which contain times in half-hour
increments. Tap the values in the drop-down lists to set the starting and ending times for the
appointment. If you opened the dialog box from within the Day view, the Starts and Ends fields
will contain the date and time selected in the Day view.
A quick way to enter the starting and ending times from the Day view is to select a
group of time slots and then tap New. The dialog box opens with the Starts and Ends
fields populated with the starting and ending time that you selected in the Day view.
By default, Calendar creates appointments that have starting and ending times, but all-day
events do not have these times. To create an all-day event, tap the All Day field and select Yes
from the drop-down list that appears. The times in the Starts and Ends fields will be removed.
The appointment screen for Pocket PC 2002 and older versions is different from 2003.
To create an all-day event in Pocket PC 2002, tap Type and select All Day from the
drop-down list that appears.
Appointments can be scheduled multiple times by selecting a recurrence pattern. The default
setting for each appointment is to occur once, as indicated by the value in the Occurs field. To
schedule the appointment for multiple dates, tap the Occurs field to display items shown here:
The items that appear in this menu vary according to the day of the week, day of the month, and
date that you select.
The appointment shown in the preceding illustration is being scheduled for Monday, April
21, 2003. Select Every Monday to schedule the appointment at the same time on every Monday.
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Select Day 21 Of Every Month to schedule the
appointment for the twenty-first of each month. If
you want to schedule the appointment for that specific
date—in this case, April 21—every year, select Every
April 21.
If none of the items in the drop-down list meet your
requirements, tap <Edit pattern…> to start the Recurrence
wizard. The Recurrence wizard has three dialog boxes,
the first of which is shown to the right.
In the first dialog box, you set the starting and ending
times for the appointment. Typically, the times that you
originally set appear here, and they are the times you want
to use. If the starting time is correct, you can change the
ending time by expanding the Duration drop-down list and
tapping a value in the list. Tap Remove Recurrence to close
the dialog box and delete the recurrence.
You can change the times in the dialog box by tapping
them to open another dialog box; clocks and times on the left side show the starting time, and the
clock and time on the right is the ending time. You can change the times by tapping the clock
faces to move the hands or tapping the up and down arrows on the digital display. Tap OK to save
the times that you select.
Tap Next to open the second dialog box of the Recurrence wizard, and tap the buttons along
the top of the dialog box to define a recurrence time. When you tap Daily, two radio buttons
appear, as shown here:
Tap the Every Weekday radio button to schedule the appointment on every weekday. To schedule
the appointment for multiple days, tap Every and then select a number from the Day(s)
drop-down list.
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Tapping Weekly changes the dialog box, as shown here:
Tap the days in the week that you want to schedule the appointment; you can select more than
one day. Choose a value from the Week(s) drop-down list to schedule the appointment for several
weeks on the days that you select.
Tap Monthly to define a monthly recurrence pattern, as shown here:
The pattern can be defined for a specific date in a month (such as the twenty-first), for a select number
of months, or for a day in a week (such as the third Monday) for a select number of months. Tap the
radio button of the option you want, and select the values from the drop-down lists.
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Tap Yearly to define a yearly recurrence pattern, as shown here:
8
The yearly pattern is similar to the monthly pattern. Your options are to schedule the appointment
for the same date each year, or for the day in a week of the month that you select. Tap the radio
button of the option that you want, and select the values from the drop-down lists.
Tap Next to define the starting and ending dates of the recurrence pattern, as shown here:
Select the starting date by using The Pattern Starts drop-down list. Three options are available
for defining the end date: the recurrence pattern does not end, it ends on a date that you select, or
it ends after a select number of occurrences. Tap the radio button of the option that you want and
select the appropriate values from the drop-down lists.
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After you select the starting and ending dates of the recurring appointment, tap Finish to
return to the Appointment dialog box. The Occurs field will contain <Edit pattern…> to indicate
that a customized recurrence pattern has been created for the appointment.
The Reminder field on the dialog box sets the time when you will be notified about the upcoming
appointment. Turn the reminder notification on or off by tapping the field and selecting either
None or Remind Me from the drop-down list. The second line of the Reminder field defines the
amount of time prior to the appointment that notification occurs. For example, a reminder can be
set for one day or 15 minutes before the appointment. Tap the number in the field to set the amount
of time, and tap the minutes portion to select either minutes, hours, days, or weeks.
Appointments assigned to categories can be filtered in any of Calendar’s views by tapping
View | Categories. To filter appointments, you must first assign them to a category, which you do
by setting a value for the Categories field in the Appointment dialog box. Tap the field to display
a list of categories, and then tap the check box next to the categories listed to assign them to the
appointment.
The Attendees field is used to create a meeting and is explained in the next section. The
Status field is a drop-down list containing Free, Tentative, Busy, or Out Of Office. The item that
you select from the list changes the color of the bar on the left side of the appointment in the Day
view, and it is used to indicate how the time should be treated when scheduling other appointments.
Tapping the Sensitivity field displays a drop-down list containing Normal and Private. If you
select Private, the appointment will be private in Outlook and Exchange after it is synchronized
with a desktop computer. Other Outlook and Exchange users may view normal appointments.
Time Zones Affect Appointments
If you change the time zone on your Pocket PC by tapping Start | Settings | System | Clock,
you will also change the times for appointments. That is because every appointment time
considers the current time zone setting. For example, if you are creating an appointment in
the Eastern time zone for 10 A.M., changing the Clock to the Central time zone will cause the
appointment time to change to 9 A.M.
Unfortunately, the way your Pocket PC treats time zones means that you have to keep in
mind where you will be on the day of your appointment. If, for example, you are in New York
today, and you are going to be in Chicago tomorrow for a 10 A.M. appointment, you can
choose to not change the Pocket PC clock when you are in Chicago or you can create the
appointment for 11 A.M. Eastern Time.
As you can tell, appointment times can become difficult to manage for those who travel.
Information Appliance Associates provides CorrectTime, which will reset appointments to
their original times after you change the Pocket PC Clock. CorrectTime can be downloaded
from http://www.doctorce.com/correcttime.htm.
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Enter Notes for Appointments
Appointment notes can contain text, drawings, recordings, or writing in digital ink. To enter a
note, tap the Notes tab to display the portion of the Appointment dialog box that functions in a
manner similar to the Notes program explained in Chapter 13.
To make a recording, press and hold the Hardware Record button. Your device will beep and
begin recording. Stop the recording by releasing the button. Once the recording is finished, an
icon is inserted into the note, which you tap to play back the recording.
Schedule a Meeting Using Calendar
In Calendar, meetings are appointments that include
people. When you create a meeting in Calendar, an e-mail
containing the meeting request is sent to the people that
you select in the Appointment dialog box. To send the
e-mail, Inbox must be configured with an e-mail account,
as outlined in Chapter 20.
The process of creating a meeting is the same as
creating an appointment, but with one additional step:
you select participants in the Attendees field. Create a
new appointment and complete the fields in the dialog
box as needed. Tap the Attendees field to display the
following dialog box, which lists names and e-mail
addresses and is shown to the right.
The names listed in the dialog box are entries in
Contacts that contain an e-mail address. A name may
appear in the list more than once if it has more than one e-mail address.
Tap the check box next to a person’s name to select him or her as a meeting participant.
Complete the fields on the Appointment dialog box and tap OK to create the meeting.
The meeting will be displayed in the Calendar Day view just like an appointment, but it
contains a graphic to indicate that it is a meeting, as shown here:
This icon indicates a meeting.
If you do not see the icon, tap Tools | Options and check to see that the meeting icon
is selected.
An e-mail message of the meeting request is placed in the Outbox of the e-mail service that
you select in Calendar. To select the e-mail service in Calendar, tap Tools | Options and select the
service in the Send Meeting Requests Via field. The e-mail message will be sent the next time
you use Inbox to send and receive e-mail, unless you select ActiveSync for the e-mail service.
If ActiveSync is selected, the request will move to Outlook during the next synchronization.
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Edit the Appointment Category List
Appointments can be filtered on categories so that only appointments belonging to a category are
displayed. You assign categories in the Appointment dialog box while creating the appointment.
The category list contains several default items and is shared by Calendar, Contacts, and Tasks.
You add items to the category list when you are creating an appointment or editing an
existing appointment. Tap the Categories field on the Appointment dialog box to open the
Categories dialog box:
Tap the Add/Delete tab, enter the new category item in the box, and tap Add. You can also use this
dialog box to delete items in the category list. To delete an item, select it in the list and then tap Delete.
Filter Appointments by Categories
Filters help you focus on specific groups of appointments by displaying only those entries that
belong to a particular category that you select. To use filters, you must have assigned appointments
to categories.
To filter appointments on a category, tap Tools | Categories, tap the check box next to the
categories that you want to display, and then tap OK.
Categories does not appear in the Tools menu if no appointments are assigned to a
category.
Clear the filter and display all appointments by tapping Tools | Categories, tapping the check
boxes of the categories selected, and then tapping OK.
To filter appointments on Pocket PC 2000 devices, tap View | Categories.
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Edit and Delete Appointments
Tap appointments listed in the Day and Agenda views to display the appointment in Summary view.
You can also open the Summary view from the Week view by tapping the appointment block and
then tapping the summary that appears at the top of the screen.
To edit the appointment, tap the Edit command at the bottom of the screen. The Appointment
dialog box opens for you to make any changes by either tapping the fields or tapping the Notes
tab. Tap OK to save the changes.
Appointments listed in Day, Week, or Agenda view can be copied, moved, or deleted by
tapping and holding. Tap-and-hold the stylus on the appointment that you want to edit, and then tap
Cut, Copy, or Delete from the pop-up menu. When you tap Delete, a confirmation dialog box asks
whether you want to delete the appointment.
To paste an appointment that you cut or copied, tap-and-hold the stylus on an open time slot
in either Day, Week, or Agenda view, and then tap Paste in the pop-up menu that appears.
Find Appointments in Calendar
To search for appointments in Calendar, tap Start | Find to open the following dialog box:
Enter the word or phrase that you are searching for in the Find field, expand the Type field drop-down
list, tap Calendar, and then tap Go.
Find will search through all appointments and list the entries containing the word or phrase
in the Results portion of the dialog box. Tap an entry in the list to open the Summary view of the
appointment; when you tap OK on the Summary View dialog box, you return to the Find dialog box.
You can search for entries in other Pocket Outlook programs by tapping their entry in the
Type drop-down list or by tapping the Pocket Outlook entry to search across all the programs.
The procedure for searching and viewing each type is the same.
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Send and Receive Appointments via Infrared
Any appointment in Calendar can be sent to another Pocket PC using the infrared port on the
device. To send and receive appointments with infrared, follow these steps:
1. Start Calendar on the Pocket PC, tap-and-hold on the appointment that you want to send,
and then tap Beam Appointment.
2. Line up the infrared ports of the two devices.
If for some reason the receiving device is not receiving the appointment, tap Start |
Settings | Connections | Beam and make sure the Pocket PC is set to receive incoming
beams. If you use an external keyboard, it may also interfere with receiving infrared
beams, so check the keyboard software.
Once the connection is established, the appointment
will be transferred and the sending Pocket PC will display
the following dialog box shown to the right.
The receiving Pocket PC will display a similar dialog
box indicating that the appointment was received.
Configure Calendar Options
Several Calendar options can be set by tapping Tools |
Options to open the Options dialog box shown below:
By default, the first day of the week is Sunday, but
you can change it by selecting a day from the 1st Day Of
Week drop-down list. To set the default number of weeks
in the Week view, expand the drop-down list and tap
5-day week, 6-day week, or 7-day week.
To have Calendar show half-hour slots, week numbers,
or use large fonts, tap the check boxes for each in the
dialog box. To have Calendar automatically set reminders
for new appointments, tap the Set Reminders For New
Items check box. Select the default time for the reminder
notification by tapping the appropriate drop-down lists.
Tap the information icons that you want to be displayed on appointments in the Day view.
The dark icons will be displayed on the appointment. Meeting announcements are sent using
the Inbox e-mail service that you select in the Send Meeting Requests Via drop-down list.
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Send and Receive via Infrared
with Pocket PC 2000
The process for sending and receiving appointments via infrared is unique for the Pocket PC
2000 software. To receive appointments on Pocket PCs running this software, start Calendar
and tap Tools | Receive Via Infrared. To send appointments, tap-and-hold on the appointment
that you want to send, and then tap Send Via Infrared.
Store and Retrieve Addresses Using Contacts
The Contacts program is the Pocket PC companion to the Contacts folder in Microsoft Outlook.
ActiveSync synchronizes addresses that you enter in Contacts on the Pocket PC with the Contacts
folder in Outlook or Exchange, as explained in Chapter 3. To enter an address, first start Contacts
by tapping Start | Contacts, which opens the program window shown in Figure 8-2.
As you can see in Figure 8-2, the Contacts program on the Pocket PC does not have a toolbar
along the top of the screen. The Command bar at the bottom of the screen replaces the menu bar
and toolbar.
View Addresses in Contacts
Your contacts are listed in alphabetical order by last name in the program window. At the top
of the program window shown in Figure 8-2 are the alphabetical tabs, which you tap to move
through the list. Tapping a tab multiple times moves through contacts by jumping to entries that
start with each letter on a tab.
Categories drop-down list
Alphabetical index tabs
FIGURE 8-2
The Contacts List view on a Pocket PC
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Press-and-hold the Action button or Jog wheel, and after a brief pause the alphabet will
scroll in large letters. Release the button to scroll to the first contact matching the letter
displayed on the screen.
The Quick Find box above the alphabetical tabs is used to find names in the list. Tap the box
and start entering a name. As the letters are entered, the display will scroll and eventually show
the name that is being entered.
Each contact in the list is displayed with the last name and first name, unless it is a business,
in which case the business name is displayed. Also included with each contact is a phone number
or e-mail address, indicated by a blue letter to the right of the contact information.
If a contact has multiple telephone numbers and e-mail addresses, the work telephone number
will be displayed by default. To change what is included with the contact in the list, tap the blue
letter and select the desired item from the pop-up menu that is displayed.
To view the address information for a contact, tap its entry in the Contacts list to display the
Contact Summary view shown here:
Tap OK to close the Summary view and return to the Contacts list. The Summary displays only
information that has been entered for a contact.
Change the Contact List View
To view your contacts by company, tap View | By Company
to change the List view, as shown to the right.
Each company name is listed alphabetically with a
number to the right indicating the number of contacts you
have included for that company. Tap the company name to
display the contacts. Tap the company name a second time
to collapse the Contacts List view.
View By Company is not available with Pocket
PC 2000.
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New Features in Contacts for
Windows Mobile 2003
One of the first new features that you see in Contacts for Windows Mobile 2003 are gradients,
which are little design lines in the background of the application that make the text stand out.
You see these gradients in Contacts, Calendar, Tasks, and Inbox. The gradients also provide
a quick way for you to tell whether a device is running Windows Mobile 2003 or Pocket PC 2002.
Contacts now has better keyboard navigation so that you can quickly find information
using hardware keyboards. You can search through contacts by typing letters on the keyboard
to spell either the first or last name, and you can use the navigation button to move through
fields in the contact summary view. If you receive a vCard e-mail attachment, you can save it
directly to Contacts. vCard is a file format that enables address information to be exchanged
between different programs.
Department names in Windows Mobile 2003 display in the List view when it is set to
view by company and the File As field is equal to the company name.
Tapping View | By Name switches the List view back to the default listing. Outlook’s File As
setting defines the default listing. Unfortunately, to change the default view, you have to edit each
of your contacts in Outlook. If you wish to make this change in Outlook do the following:
1. Start Outlook.
2. Open the contact that you want to change.
3. Click the File As drop-down field as shown here:
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4. Select the option that you want, and click the Save And Close button. The next time you
synchronize your Pocket PC, the contact will be listed using the option you selected.
Create New Contacts
To create a new contact, tap New to open the Contacts dialog box shown here:
Tap here to see each part
of the name.
Tap here to see each part
of the address.
As you can see, the dialog box has two tabs: Details and Notes. The Details tab contains all
of the fields available for a contact. Tap each field that you want to complete and then enter the
information. The Notes field can contain text, drawings, recordings, or writing in digital ink.
The Name and Address fields in the Details tab include detail indicators that you can tap
to display the different parts of the field. You can enter
the information directly in the field, or tap the details
indicator and enter the various parts of the field
separately, as shown to the right.
Telephone numbers on the dialog box automatically
include the area code that you define in the Contacts
Options dialog box. To change the area code, tap Tools |
Options, enter the number in the Area Code field, and
tap OK.
Tap the Categories field to display the Category list.
Assign the contact to one or more categories by tapping
the check box next to the items in the list. If the category
that you want to use is not available in the list, tap the
Add/Delete tab, enter a category in the empty box, and
tap Add. When you tap the Select tab, you will notice
that the check box next to the category you entered is
automatically assigned to the contact.
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Have More Power over Contacts
One of the most frustrating aspects of the Pocket PC 2000 software is that the Contacts program
does not allow you to change how contacts display in the List view. Microsoft partially addresses
this issue with Pocket PC 2002 and 2003 by adding the View By Company command.
While some will find this addition to Contacts useful, others will find that it still does not
provide the power they want over how contacts are listed. Fortunately, third-party programs
address this shortcoming.
Pocket Informant by Web Information Solutions is a popular alternative to all the Pocket
Outlook programs. It can display contacts by first name, last name, and company name. This
program also provides an Agenda view that lists appointments and tasks for each day, and
more informative week and month views. You can also link appointments, contacts, and tasks
to each other and to files on your Pocket PC. More information and a trial version of the
program is available at http://www.pocketinformant.com.
Another popular program is Agenda Fusion from Developer One. It also can display
contacts by first name, last name, or company name. You can find out more about Agenda
Fusion at http://www.developerone.com.
To enter a contact note, tap the Notes tab to display the portion of the Contacts dialog box
that functions in a manner similar to the Notes program explained in Chapter 13.
To make a recording, press and hold the Hardware Record button. Your device will beep and
begin recording. Stop the recording by releasing the button. Once the recording is finished, an
icon is inserted into the note, as shown next. You can tap the speaker icon to play the recording.
When you have finished entering all the information for the contact, tap OK and the contact
will be added to the Contacts list.
Edit and Delete Contacts
To edit a contact, first tap its entry in the Contacts list to open the Summary view. Then tap Edit.
Tap the Notes tab to edit the contact’s notes.
On Pocket PC 2000 devices, tap any item displayed in the Summary view to open the
contact’s Detail view, where you can edit any of the fields for the contact.
Entries in the Contacts list can be copied or deleted by tapping-and-holding. Tap-and-hold
the stylus on the contact that you want to edit, and then tap Delete Contact from the pop-up menu.
When you tap Delete Contact, a confirmation dialog box asks whether you want to delete the contact.
To copy a selected contact, tap Tools | Copy Contacts. When you create a copy of a contact
that you selected, it is inserted into the Contacts list. You can then edit the entry that was added
to the Contacts list.
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Create a Contact Template
You might find yourself creating many contacts with the same information, such as contacts
for people who work for the same company. One trick you can use to help speed up entering
these types of contacts is to create a template that contains all of the duplicate information.
By using the template, you save yourself the time spent entering the same information
repeatedly. Here is what you do:
1. Tap New to create a new contact.
2. Enter the company name as the first name of the contact, and enter _Template for
the last name. By using an underscore for the first character of the last name, you
ensure that the template appears at the top of the Contacts list.
3. Complete the remaining details, such as the work address and category that are
shared by all the contacts.
4. Tap OK to add the template to the Contacts list.
The template contact will appear at the top of the list. To create a new contact using the
template, tap-and-hold on the template and then tap Create Copy. Tap the copy of the template
that was added to the list, and edit the fields as needed for the new contact you are creating.
Edit the Contact Category List
Contacts can be filtered on categories so that only contacts
belonging to a category are displayed. You assign categories
in the Contacts dialog box while creating the contact. The
Category list contains several default items and is shared
with Calendar and Tasks.
To add an item to the Category list, expand the
Categories drop-down list, shown next, and tap More.
The title of the drop-down list changes to Show when
the list is expanded.
Tap the Add/Delete tab, enter the new item in the box,
and tap Add. You also use this dialog box to delete items in
the Category list. To delete an item, select it in the list and
then tap Delete.
The Category list can also be edited from the Contacts
dialog box. Tap the Categories field to open the Categories
dialog box and then tap the Add/Delete tab.
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Filter Contacts by Categories
Filters help you focus on specific groups of contacts by displaying only entries belonging to a
category that you select. For filters to be useful, you must assign contacts to categories. You use
the Categories drop-down list to filter items quickly by the category that you select.
The title of the Categories drop-down list changes to display the category currently being
displayed. To filter tasks on a category, tap the Categories drop-down list and tap the category
that you want to display. If the category is not in the drop-down list, tap More, tap the check box
next to the categories that you want to display, and then tap OK.
Clear the filter and display all contacts by expanding the Categories drop-down list and
tapping All Categories.
Tap the Recent entry in the Categories drop-down list to display the contacts you have
recently added, edited, or viewed.
Find Contacts
To search for entries in Contacts, tap Start | Find to open the Find dialog box. Enter the word
or phrase that you are searching for in the Find field, expand the Type field drop-down list, tap
Contacts, and then tap Go.
Find will search through all contacts and list the entries containing the word or phrase in the
Results portion of the dialog box. Tap an entry in the list to open the contact, and tap OK in the
Contacts dialog box to return to the Find dialog box.
You can search for an entry in other Pocket Outlook programs by tapping it in the Type dropdown list, and the procedure for searching and viewing each type is the same.
Send E-Mail to a Contact
To send e-mail to a person from Contacts, tap-and-hold on the person’s entry in the Contacts list,
and then tap Send E-mail on the pop-up menu. Inbox will start and create a new e-mail message
using the contact’s e-mail address. If the contact does not have an e-mail address, Inbox will still
create a new message, but the e-mail Address field will be blank.
Display Contacts Not Assigned
to a Category
A problem on Pocket PC 2000 devices is that you cannot display contacts not assigned to
a category, which means if you use categories, you might not find a contact since it won’t
display. A No Categories option is available in the Categories drop-down list for Pocket PC
2002 and 2003. When you select this option, only the contacts that have not been assigned
to a category will display.
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Complete the message, tap Send, and you will return to Inbox. Return to Contacts by
pressing the hardware button or tapping Start | Contacts.
On Pocket PC 2002 and 2003 devices you can also send e-mail from a contact’s
Summary view by tapping the contact’s e-mail address. You can also open the contact’s
web page by tapping the URL entered in the Web Page field on the Summary view.
Send and Receive Contacts via Infrared
Any entry in Contacts can be sent to another Pocket PC using the infrared port on the device.
To send and receive contacts with infrared, follow these steps:
1. Start Contacts on the Pocket PC sending the contact, tap-and-hold on the contact that
you want to send, and then tap Beam Contact.
2. Line up the infrared ports of the two devices.
Once the connection is established, the contact will transfer and the sending Pocket PC will
indicate that the contact has been received.
Configure Contact Options
Several options can be set in Contacts by tapping Tools | Options to open the dialog box shown here:
Tap the check boxes next to Show ABC Tabs, Show Contact Names Only, or Use Large Font
to change how the contact list is displayed. Enter the area code and select a country or region to
be used for new contacts. Tap OK to save the changes that you make and close the dialog box.
Manage Your Tasks
The Tasks program is the Pocket PC companion to the Tasks folder in Microsoft Outlook.
ActiveSync synchronizes tasks that you enter in Tasks on the Pocket PC with the Tasks folder
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in Outlook, as explained in Chapter 3. To enter a task, tap Start | Tasks, which opens the program
window shown in Figure 8-3.
As you can see in the figure, the Tasks program on the Pocket PC does not have a toolbar
along the top of the screen. The Command bar at the bottom of the screen replaces the menu bar
and toolbar, and overall the screen looks less busy.
View Your Tasks
Tasks are displayed in the main program window in one complete list. To the left of each task is a
check box that you tap to mark a task complete. Immediately to the right of the check box is the
Priority column that displays exclamation marks for high-priority tasks, an arrow pointing down
for low-priority tasks, and nothing for normal tasks. The description of the task takes up the
remaining space for each item.
Above the Tasks list and to the left is the Categories drop-down list. The “Filter Tasks by
Categories” section, a little later in the chapter, explains how to use the Categories drop-down list
to change what is displayed in the Tasks list.
To the right of the Categories drop-down list and above the Tasks list is the Sort drop-down
list. The title of the drop-down list displays the name of the item used to sort the list. In Figure 8-3
the Tasks list is sorted by Priority. Tap the title to expand the drop-down list.
You can sort the Tasks list by Status, Priority, Subject, Start Date, and Due Date. A task has
either an active or a complete status, and when the list is sorted by Status, active tasks appear
before complete tasks. To change the sort order of the Tasks list, expand the Sort drop-down list
and then tap an item in the list.
Task start and due dates do not appear in the Tasks list unless you enable them. To display
start and due dates, tap Tools | Options and then tap the Show Start And Due Date check box.
When the dates are enabled, each task will occupy two lines in the Tasks list, as shown here:
Past due tasks are displayed in red in the Tasks list. The font size can be increased by tapping
Tools | Options and then tapping the Use Large Font check box.
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FIGURE 8-3
Tasks on a Pocket PC
Each task can include more information than is displayed in the Tasks list. To see the details,
tap the task to open it in Summary view, as shown here:
Tap here to close
Summary view.
Tap here to expand
the details of Summary.
Summary view provides all the information about the task on one easy-to-read screen. The top
part of the screen displays the task details and can be expanded by tapping the down arrows to the
task’s start and due dates and category assignments. The bottom part of the screen displays notes.
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Create New Tasks
Tap New to open the Tasks dialog box and create a new
task. As you can see in the illustration to the right, the
dialog box has two tabs: Task and Notes. On the Task
tab, you enter all of the details about the task. The Subject
field is a drop-down list that you can use to select words
commonly used in task subjects. By using the drop-down
list, you can speed up data entry, but unfortunately the list
does not change and you cannot add words.
Dates are entered in the Starts and Due fields by
tapping the field to open the date picker shown here:
Tap a date on the calendar to select it for either field.
You can use the arrows at the top of the calendar to move
backward and forward one month at a time, or tap the month
to jump to another month that appears in a pop-up menu.
The start date that you select will automatically appear in
the Due field.
A task cannot be assigned a start date and not a due date, but a due date can be
assigned without a start date.
Tasks can be created multiple times by selecting a recurrence pattern. The default setting for
each task is to occur once, as indicated by the value of the Occurs field. To make the task appear
multiple times, tap the Occurs field to display the items shown here:
The items will vary depending on the day of the week, day of the month, and date on which the
task is to be created.
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The task shown in the illustration is being created on Saturday, April 19, 2003. Select Every
Saturday to add the Tasks to the task list on every Saturday. Select Day 19 Of Every Month to add
the task on the nineteenth of each month. If you want to add the task on the specific date—in this
case, April 19—every year, select Every April 19.
If none of the items in the drop-down list meet your requirements, tap <Edit pattern…> to
start the Recurrence wizard. The Recurrence wizard has three dialog boxes. In first dialog box,
you set the start and due dates for the task. Typically, these will have been already entered prior
to creating the recurrence pattern. If the start date is correct, you can change the due date by
expanding the Duration drop-down list and tapping a value in the list. Tapping Remove
Recurrence closes the dialog box and deletes the recurrence.
Tap Next to open the second dialog box of the Recurrence wizard. Tap the buttons along the
top of the dialog box to define a recurrence time. When you tap Daily, two radio buttons appear.
Tap the Every Weekday radio button to create the task on every weekday. To create the task on
multiple days, tap the Every radio button and select a number from the Day(s) drop-down list.
Tap Weekly to change the dialog box. Tap the days in the week for which you want to create
the task; you can select more than one day. Select a value from the Week(s) drop-down list to
create the task for several weeks on the days that you select.
Tap Monthly to define a monthly recurrence pattern. The pattern can be defined for a specific
date in a month (such as the nineteenth), for a select number of months, or for a day in a week
(such as the third Saturday) for a select number of months. Tap the radio button of the option you
want, and select the values from the drop-down lists.
Tap Yearly to define a yearly recurrence pattern. The yearly pattern is similar to the monthly
pattern. Your options are to create the task on the same date and month each year or for the day
in a week of the month that you select. Tap the radio button of the option that you want, and select
the values from the drop-down lists. Tap Next to define the starting and ending dates of the recurrence
pattern. Select the starting date by using The Pattern Starts drop-down list. Three options are
available for defining the end date: the recurrence pattern does not end, it ends on a date that you
select, or it ends after a select number of occurrences. Tap the radio button of the option that you
want and select the appropriate values from the drop-down lists. After you select the start and end
dates of the recurring task, tap Finish to return to the Tasks dialog box. The Occurs field will contain
<Edit pattern…> to indicate that a customized recurrence pattern has been created for the task.
You may have problems synchronizing recurring tasks between your Pocket PC and
Outlook. If you create a recurring task, edit it only on the Pocket PC; otherwise, the
task may not be re-created for each occurrence.
The Reminder field on the Tasks dialog box sets the date when you will be notified about the
upcoming task. Turn the reminder notification on or off by tapping the field and selecting either
None or Remind Me from the drop-down list. The second line of the Reminder field defines the
date for the notification. Tap the date on the second line to display the date picker, and tap a date
on the calendar that you want the reminder notification to occur.
Tasks assigned to categories can be filtered in the Tasks list by using the Categories drop-down
list. To filter tasks, you must first assign them to a category, which you do by setting a value for
the Categories field. Tap the field to display a list of categories, and then tap the check box next
to the categories listed to assign them to the task.
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Enter Notes for Tasks
Task notes can contain text, drawings, recordings, or writing in digital ink. To enter a note, tap
the Notes tab to display the portion of the Tasks dialog box that functions in a manner similar
to the Notes program explained in Chapter 13.
To make a recording, press and hold the Hardware Record button. Your device will beep and
begin recording. Stop the recording by releasing the button. Once the recording is finished, an
icon is inserted into the note, which you tap to play back the record.
Use the Task Entry Bar
The Entry Bar provides a quick way to enter
tasks, but it is disabled by default. To display
the Entry Bar, tap Tools | Entry Bar. When the
Entry Bar is enabled, an extra line is added
beneath the Categories and Sort drop-down
lists, as shown here:
The Entry Bar includes two priority buttons
and the task subject. Set the task priority to
either high or low by tapping the exclamation
mark or arrow. Create the subject by tapping
Tap Here To Add A New Task on the bar and
entering the task subject.
When you have finished entering values on
the Entry Bar, tap ENTER on the Software Input
Panel to add the new task to the Tasks list.
The Entry Bar
Edit and Delete Tasks
Tap an item in the Tasks list to display the task Summary screen, and then tap Edit to open the
task information. Edit the task notes by tapping the Notes tab. Make any necessary changes to
the fields in the dialog box, and then tap OK to save the changes.
On Pocket PC 2000 devices, tap the top part of the Summary screen to edit the task
information, and tap the bottom part of the screen to edit notes.
Tasks can be copied or deleted by tapping-and-holding. Tap-and-hold the stylus on the task
that you want to edit, and then tap either Create Copy or Delete Task on the pop-up menu that
appears. When you tap Delete, a confirmation dialog box asks whether you want to delete the
appointment.
Edit the Task Category List
Tasks can be filtered on categories so that only tasks belonging to a given category are displayed.
You assign categories in the Tasks dialog box while creating the task. The Category list contains
several default items and is shared with Calendar and Contacts.
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Display Tasks Not Assigned
to a Category
On Pocket PC 2000 devices, you cannot display tasks not assigned to a category, which
means if you use categories you might miss a task since it won’t display. A No Categories
option has been added to the Categories drop-down list in Pocket PC 2002 and 2003. When
you select this option, only the tasks that have not been assigned to a category will display.
To add an item to the Category list, expand the Categories drop-down list box and tap More.
Tap the Add/Delete tab, enter the new item in the box, and tap Add. You also use this dialog box
to delete items in the Category list. To delete an item, select it in the list and then tap Delete.
The Category list can also be edited from the Contacts dialog box. Tap the Categories field
to open the dialog box and then tap the Add/Delete tab.
Filter Tasks by Categories
Filters help you focus on specific groups of tasks by displaying only entries belonging to a category
that you select. As usual, for filters to be useful, you must assign tasks to categories. You use the
Categories drop-down list to filter items quickly by the category that you select.
The title of the Categories drop-down list changes to indicate the category currently being
displayed. To filter tasks on a category, tap the Categories drop-down list and tap the category
that you want to display. If the category is not in the drop-down list, tap More, tap the check box
next to the categories that you want to display, and then tap OK.
Clear the filter and display all contacts by expanding the Categories drop-down list and
tapping All Categories.
Tap the Recent entry in the Categories drop-down list to display the tasks that you have
recently added, edited, or viewed.
The Categories drop-down list has two items useful for looking at tasks. Select Active Tasks
to list all tasks with a start date before and on the current date. Tasks not assigned a start date are
always active. Select Completed Tasks to list all tasks marked complete.
You can select a category and Active Tasks or Completed Tasks to display the active or
completed tasks for a category.
Find Tasks
To search for entries in Tasks, tap Start | Find to open the Find dialog box. Enter the word or
phrase that you are searching for in the Find field, expand the Type field drop-down list, tap
Tasks, and then tap Go.
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Find will search through all tasks and list the entries containing the word or phrase in the
Results portion of the dialog box. Tap an entry in the list to open the task, and tap OK in the
Tasks dialog box to return to the Find dialog box.
You can search for entries in other Pocket Outlook programs by tapping their entry in the
Type drop-down list, and the procedure for searching and viewing each type is the same.
Send and Receive Tasks via Infrared
Any entry in Tasks can be sent to another Pocket PC using the infrared port on the device. To
send and receive tasks with infrared, follow these steps:
1. Start Tasks on the Pocket PC sending the task, tap-and-hold on the task that you want to
send, and then tap Beam Task.
2. Line up the infrared ports of the two devices.
Once the connection is established, the task will transfer and the sending Pocket PC will
indicate that the task has been received.
Configure Task Options
Three options can be set by tapping Tools | Options to open the dialog box shown here:
Tap the Set Reminders For New Items check box to have reminders automatically created for new
tasks. Add the start and due dates to the Tasks list by tapping the Show Start And Due Dates check
box. Tap the Use Large Font check box to increase the size of the font used for the Tasks list.
Tap OK to save the changes that you make and close the Options dialog box.
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Wrapping Up
Pocket Outlook provides the tools that help you manage your time. Recurring appointments are
easy to schedule in Calendar because you have to enter the appointment information only once,
and your Pocket PC automatically enters that appointment on all the other days.
The Tasks program provides the same functionality, reminding you of tasks that you must
complete at regular intervals. All of your addresses are stored in Contacts, which make it easy
to retrieve a phone number or e-mail address.
In Chapter 9, you will see how Pocket PC 2002 and Windows Mobile 2003 provide more
power to Contacts by integrating all of the phone numbers with a dialer program. The combination
of Contacts, the dialer program, and integrated mobile phone hardware enables you to make
phone calls using your Pocket PC.
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How to…
■
■
■
■
Purchase a Pocket PC with mobile phone capabilities
Make and receive phone calls using a Pocket PC
Manage phone call information
Change phone, service, and network settings
C
hances are, you own a mobile phone and have had one long before you even considered
buying a Pocket PC. Today, mobile phones are one of a growing number of gadgets that we
consider essential and that must be carried with us at all times. Pocket PCs are also in that list
of essential gadgets, but for many, lugging around a phone and a Pocket PC all day is one gadget
too many. The answer, according to analysts and hardware manufacturers, are devices that integrate
mobile phone and personal digital assistant (PDA) features.
Over the last several years there has been considerable talk about integrated devices, which
are often called smart phones. In fact, Microsoft competitors have taken a lead in developing
such devices. Palm Computing works with several mobile-phone manufacturers, such as Kyocera
and Samsung, in developing integrated devices. Handspring’s Treos runs the Palm operating system
and works with the mobile services provided by Sprint, Cingular, and T-Mobile.
During the summer of 2002, Microsoft released Pocket PC Phone Edition, which is an extension
to the Pocket PC software that supports mobile-phone hardware to provide a standard user interface
for phone functions across all devices.
In this chapter, the phone features for standard Pocket PCs are not discussed.
Buy a Pocket PC Phone
Several companies sell integrated devices, but the total numbers sold have not been nearly as
high as the number of mobile phones or even handheld computers sold. The challenge is designing
a device that is large enough to be useful as a handheld computer, while being small enough to be
carried around and used as a phone. With the trend of mobile phones becoming smaller, integrated
devices feel and look like bricks in comparison.
The Microsoft solution to this dilemma recognizes that no one hardware design will be best
for everyone. One part of the Microsoft solution is Windows Mobile Software for Pocket PC Phone
Edition and its mobile-phone capabilities, which is designed to be the best handheld computer
capable of making phone calls. The second part of the Microsoft solution is the Windows Mobile
Software for Smartphone, which was developed under the code name “Stinger.” Smartphone is
designed to be the best mobile phone that also has some handheld computing capabilities.
The two Microsoft solutions are targeted at two different types of users. People who frequently
use cell phones, or want to carry one small device, will prefer Smartphones because they are
small and optimized for use in one hand. Those who do not frequently use cell phones, yet use
handheld computers, will prefer Pocket PC Phone Edition so that they don’t have to carry
multiple devices.
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Trying to decide which Microsoft solution is right for you? First determine how frequently
you make phone calls, and then determine whether you can live with the trade-offs of one
solution over another. A Smartphone will be smaller than a Pocket PC, but it will not have all
of the features available on handheld computers. Pocket PC Phone Edition is larger than most
mobile phones and can be awkward to hold up to your ear. You will most likely want to use a
hands-free microphone with any Pocket PC Phone Edition device.
Pocket PC Phone Edition is not sold in the same way as Pocket PCs. Rather than being sold
directly by the device manufacturer, mobile service providers sell them. Instead of finding them
at computer stores, you will find Pocket PC Phone Edition at mobile phone stores, unless the
computer store has a relationship with a mobile provider.
At the time that this book is being written, all of the major mobile providers in the United
States either sell a Pocket PC Phone Edition or have plans to sell one by the end of
2003. If you want to buy a Phone Edition device, first determine what provider provides
the best service in your area, and then call them to find out what devices they sell.
When you buy a Pocket PC Phone Edition from a mobile provider, it will be configured to
work with that provider’s service. In most cases, all you will need to do is dial a phone number
to make a call or open a website to connect to the Internet. If you have a problem using your Pocket
PC Phone Edition, you’ll need to call the mobile provider’s support line.
In this chapter, the focus is on Pocket PC Phone Edition, and we will show you how these
integrated devices work. At the end of the chapter is a brief overview of the Microsoft Smartphone.
New Phone Features
in Windows Mobile 2003
Microsoft has made several improvements to the Windows Mobile Software for Phone
Edition 2003 software at the recommendation of the hardware manufacturers, mobile service
providers, and users. The key changes include the following:
■ Support for Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) so that Phone Edition devices
can work with Sprint PCS and Verizon Wireless.
■ Greater extensibility for mobile providers so that Phone Edition devices can support
features unique to their networks.
■ A Speakerphone menu item in the phone call progress view if the device supports a
speakerphone.
■ Separate volume control for the ringer and the handset, and the call volume can be
adjusted while the phone is dialing.
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■ Users can now immediately silence ringing with one touch of the hardware
volume button.
■ Users can mute and unmute a call.
■ Windows Media and MIDI audio files can be used for ring tones.
Network connectivity status is indicated by a Navigation bar icon, and notification bubbles
no longer appear during network registration.
Make and Receive Phone Calls
The mobile-phone features in Pocket PC are available only with integrated devices known as
Pocket PC Phone Edition. You will not be able to obtain the Microsoft phone application unless
you buy one of these products. When you turn on Pocket PC Phone Edition, you will see a
Phone Notifications icon like the one shown at left. The phone searches for a connection, and
when one is found it shows signal strength in the form of bars to the right of the icon.
Turn the phone on or off by tapping the Phone Notifications icon. By default, the phone
is always on, even when you have the Pocket PC turned off.
Turn Your Pocket PC into a Phone
If you are happy with your Pocket PC and don’t want to buy Pocket PC Phone Edition,
you can turn your Pocket PC into a phone by using an expansion card. The cards come
with software that adds phone functionality to your Pocket PC.
Convergent Technologies sells a CompactFlash Global System for Mobile (GSM) and
General Packet Radio Service (GPRS) radio. It has a tri-band radio so that the phone will work
in most parts of the world, and the card will work in Pocket PCs that have a Type II CompactFlash
slot. More information about this card is available at http://www.convergentech.com/cfgsmgprs.htm.
Sprint PCS CF2031 is a Type II CompactFlash card that turns a Pocket PC into a
Sprint PCS phone that also works with the Sprint Vision data network. Look for this card
at http://www.sprintpcs.com.
Sierra Wireless sells a number of PC Cards that add voice and data communication capability
to notebook PCs and Pocket PCs that have a PC Card expansion pack. The AirCard 550 works
with Sprint PCS; the AirCard 555 works with Verizon, Cellular One, Bell Mobility and Telus;
and the AirCard 750 works with T-Mobile, AT&T Wireless, and Rogers. You will find more
information about all these cards at http://www.sierrawireless.com.
Novatel Wireless sells PC Cards that work with GSM and GPRS networks. The Merlin
G201 works in Europe and the G100 works in North America. Several mobile providers
resell these cards under their own brand names. Information about these products can be
found at http://www.novatelwireless.com/pcproducts/index.html.
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Make Phone Calls
You can make a phone call in one of several ways, depending
on the number that you want to dial. One way to make a
call is simply to dial a number using the Phone application,
which you start by tapping Start | Programs | Phone. Tap the
numbers on the keypad and then tap Talk. The image to the
right shows a call in progress. Tap End to complete the call
and hang up.
Pocket PC Phone Edition also has dedicated
hardware buttons for Talk and End, which are similar
to the buttons on mobile phones. Press Talk to open
the Phone application.
The Phone application supports speed dialing, which
uses phone numbers that you program into storage locations
associated with numbers on the keypad. To speed dial a
number, tap-and-hold a number on the keypad and the Phone
application will dial the associated number. If the speed dial
location is a two-digit number, tap the first digit and then
tap-and-hold the second digit. You can also tap Speed Dial on the keypad and then tap a number
from the list that appears, as shown in the illustration to the left.
While speed dialing can be handy when making calls from the Phone application, you will
most likely store all phone numbers in Contacts. The Contacts program on integrated Pocket
PCs is enhanced to support dialing phone numbers. To dial a number from the Contacts List
view, tap-and-hold on the contact. On the pop-up menu, tap
Call and the type of phone number displayed. For example, if
the contact’s work number is displayed in the list view, the item
Call Work Tel will display in the pop-up menu.
To change the number for a contact that displays in
the list view, tap the letter to the right of the number
in the Contacts list view and then select a number
from the pop-up menu.
Another enhancement to Contacts is that phone numbers
display as hyperlinks in the Contacts Summary view, as shown
in the image to the right.
To make a call, simply tap any one of the phone numbers
in the Summary view.
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Mobile Phone Technology
Several mobile-phone technologies are available, but Global System for Mobile (GSM)
communications was the first technology for Pocket PC Phone Edition because it is available
around the world. GSM is widely used throughout Europe but is used much less in the United
States. T-Mobile provides the majority of GSM service in the United States, but AT&T Wireless
and Cingular Wireless also provide GSM service.
Verizon Wireless and Sprint PCS use Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA), and these two
companies provide the greatest mobile phone coverage in the United States. By the end of 2003,
you should be able to buy Pocket PC Phone Edition devices from both of these companies.
GSM and CDMA are voice communications technologies and both have data communication
counterparts. General Packet Radio Service (GPRS) is the data counterpart to GSM, and
Single Carrier Radio Transmission Technology (1XRTT) is the data counterpart for CDMA.
(1XRTT is also referred to as CDMA2000.)
GPRS and 1XRTT provide data connectivity that is similar to local area networks (LANs).
Rather than dialing a phone number like a modem, GPRS and CDMA2000/1XRTT connect
through access points that provide the device with an Internet protocol (IP) address. Consequently,
applications designed to work on IP-based networks will work on GPRS and 1XRTT networks.
Usually you will be charged for the amount of data that is sent and received from the device.
While GSM is used throughout the world, it operates on different frequencies, so a device
that you buy in the United States may not work in Europe, and vice versa. GSM devices operate
on the 1900 band in North America and the 900 or 1800 band in Europe. Some Pocket PC
Phone Editions will work on multiple bands.
An advantage for using GSM phones is Subscriber Identification Module (SIM) cards,
which are smart cards that store mobile-phone service settings and user preferences. In some
cases, SIM cards contain contact information that you can access as speed-dial numbers on
Pocket PC phones. You can also import contacts from SIM cards to the Pocket PC.
If you already subscribe to a GSM service, you should be able to use a Pocket PC phone
with that service by simply transferring the SIM card from your phone to your Pocket PC.
When you make a call from Contacts, the Phone application does not display. Instead,
a notification displays showing that a call is connected. Tap the Phone Notification icon
at the top of the screen to end the call.
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Take Notes During Calls
If you want to take notes during a call, tap the icon shown in the following image.
The Pocket PC Notes application starts for you to write notes. Notes taken
during a call are associated with the phone number, and you can open the note from within
the Call Log. To take notes during a call, you will need to use a hands-free microphone or
the speakerphone functionality that may be available with integrated Pocket PCs.
All the calls that you make
or receive are tracked in the Call
Log. You can review and make
calls from the Call Log by
tapping Call Log on the keypad
and then tapping a number on
the list, as shown in the image
to the left.
You can filter the Call Log
to show missed calls, outgoing
calls, incoming calls, or calls
sorted by caller name. In the
image to the right, the Show
drop-down list at the top left of
the Call Log shows call options.
Receive Phone Calls
When the Pocket PC receives a call, a notification bubble appears on the screen with options for
Answer and Ignore. Tap Ignore to silence the phone and transfer the call to voice mail if it is
included by the mobile-phone service, or tap Answer to receive the call. If the Phone application is
running, you can also tap Talk to answer a call. Finally, if you use an integrated device that includes
a Talk hardware button, press the button to receive the call just as you do with mobile phones.
Manage Calls
Every call that is made, received, or missed is entered in the Call Log. To view the contents of
the log, tap Call Log on the keypad.
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You can filter the items in the Call Log by selecting one of the following items from the
Show drop-down list.
■
■
■
■
■
All Calls
Missed
Shows all the calls made, received, or missed in chronological order.
Shows only those calls that were not answered.
Outgoing Shows only those calls made from the phone.
Incoming Shows only those calls made to the phone.
By Caller Shows only those calls associated with a single caller.
If a note was created for a call, an icon will appear next to
the call entry in the log; tap the icon to open the note. Tapping
within the white space of an entry in the log displays a tooltip
showing the date, time, and duration of the call.
To delete all the items in the Call Log, tap Tools | Delete
All Calls. You can also delete a select number of entries from
the log by tapping Tools | Options to display the Call Log
Options screen, as shown in the image to the left. Select an
item from the Delete Call Log Items Older Than drop-down
list and tap OK.
The Call Log Options screen displays call statistics. You
can view the total time spent on all calls, the total number of
calls, and the total time since the last time the Call Log was
reset. Tap Reset to reset the call statistics to zero.
Program Speed Dial
You can add a speed-dial number in two ways. To create a speed dial from
a contact, tap-and-hold on the item in the Contacts list view, and then tap
Add Speed Dial and the type of phone number displayed. For example, if
the work phone number is displayed,
tap Add Speed Dial Work Tel, as shown
in the image to the right.
You can also create a speed-dial
number by tapping Speed Dial on the
keypad of the Phone application and
then tapping New, which opens the
Speed Dial Contact screen, as shown in the image to the left.
Select the name of the contact for the speed dial, the phone
number for the speed dial, and the speed-dial location. You
can use up to 99 speed-dial locations. Tap OK to save the
speed dial.
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Send and Receive Text Messages
Text messaging provides a simple way to send and receive
messages on mobile phones. It works like e-mail but does not
require an Internet connection. Pocket PC Phone Edition can
send and receive text messages at any time while it is connected
to the mobile network. When you receive a text message, a
notification bubble displays, as shown in the image to the right.
Tap View to open the message in Inbox, or tap Close to
close the notification bubble.
Text messaging on GSM networks is called Short Message Service (SMS). The maximum
size of a SMS message is 160 characters. On CDMA networks, this feature is called text
messaging.
SMS Enhancements in Windows
Mobile 2003
Microsoft has made several enhancements to Inbox on Windows Mobile 2003 specifically
for SMS. These changes include the following:
■ SMS caller-ID matching Inbox attempts to match the sender’s phone number to
Contacts, and if a match is found it populates the From field with the contact name
and phone number.
■ SMS callback You can return a call to the SMS sender directly from the message
in Inbox. When you view the message in Inbox, a menu item is available to call the
sender. This option is not available on CDMA Pocket PC Phone Edition.
■ SMS character count SMS messages are limited to 160 characters, and Inbox now
displays the number of characters you have written while you’re composing a message.
■ SMS available offline Pocket PC Phone Edition 2002 does not allow access to SMS
messages while the phone is not connected to the mobile network. With Windows
Mobile Phone Edition 2003, you can access all your SMS messages even while the
phone is offline. You can also compose messages offline, save them in the Drafts
folder, and then send them once you are online.
■ Inbox Today Screen plug-in for Phone Edition 2003 This feature displays the
unread message count for all Inbox accounts including SMS messages.
■ Inbox plug-ins that provides Enhanced Message Service (EMS) or Multimedia
Messaging Service (MMS) Both of these services extend the capabilities of SMS
beyond text messaging to support photos and sound.
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You use Inbox to read and reply to, or write and send text messages. Phone PC Phone Edition
has an additional service (or account) called SMS or text messaging, depending on the type of
network. To read and write text messages when you start Inbox, select the SMS or Text Message
service from the Services menu in Inbox on Pocket PC 2002 or from the Accounts menu on
Windows Mobile 2003. See Chapter 20 for instructions for using Inbox.
Some mobile service providers include customized applications for working with SMS.
Check the user manual of your device for instructions on how to use this application.
Normally, all you need to send a text message is a person’s mobile phone number. Simply
enter the phone number in the To field of the message. You can also send a message from
Contacts. Tap-and-hold on a contact name in the Contacts List view and then tap Send SMS or
Send Text Message. If the contact has a mobile phone number, a new Inbox message is created
with that number in the To field. If the contact does not have a mobile phone number, Inbox
does not start.
SMS was originally designed for sending messages between phones. However, many
wireless services provide SMS-to-e-mail gateways so that you can send messages to
e-mail addresses. Usually, you can also receive e-mail messages. Check with your
service provider to find out whether it provides an e-mail gateway and instructions
for how to use it.
Connect to the Internet
While Pocket PC Phone Edition provides voice communications, it is particularly suited for
providing wireless connections to the Internet. Part III of this book provides instructions for
connecting Pocket PCs to networks, sending and receiving e-mail, sending instant messages,
and browsing the web. Everything in that section applies to Pocket PC Phone Edition; however,
in this section we’ll cover Internet connectivity issues unique to Pocket PC Phone Edition.
If you buy your Pocket PC Phone Edition from a mobile provider, it will already be configured
for wireless access to the Internet. Internet connections are configured using Connection Manager,
which is covered in Chapter 19. If you are having problems connecting to the Internet, you should
call your mobile service provider for help.
The simplest way to connect to the Internet is to start
Internet Explorer and open a web page. When the Pocket PC
connects you will see a notification bubble that looks like the
image to the right.
Tap Hide to close the bubble, and tap End to disconnect
from the Internet.
When a connection is made, the network icon at the top
of the screen changes to the icon to the left in Pocket PC
Phone Edition. Tap this icon to display connection
information.
When you want to disconnect, tap the network icon, which opens the notification bubble, and
then tap End.
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When you turn off Pocket PC Phone Edition 2002, the device will disconnect from
the Internet.
Manage Your Mobile Data Bill
Most mobile service providers have separate rate plans for data communications that are based
on the amount of data transmitted. Typically, these plans provide a set amount of data that you
can transmit per month, and you are charged
This icon is for
an additional amount per megabyte over
GPRS Monitor.
your limit.
Unless you have a plan that allows
you to transmit an unlimited amount of
data for a set fee per month, you will want
to monitor your data traffic each month.
An application that monitors your data use
is Spb Software House’s GPRS Monitor,
which adds its icon to the top of the screen,
as shown in the image to the right.
Disconnect from
The GPRS icon provides a graphical
the Internet.
indication of the data transmission speed,
the amount of data transmitted per session,
and battery strength. When you tap the
icon, a notification bubble displays showing
the amount of data transmitted that day and how much data is left in your plan.
You can download GPRS Monitor from http://www.softspb.com/index.html. Another program
that provides the same functionality as GPRS Monitor is All-Locations’ GPRS Traffic Counter,
which you will find at http://www.all-locations.com.
Configure the Pocket PC Phone
To change the phone settings, tap Tools | Options
in the Phone application. Alternatively, you can
choose Start | Settings | Phone on your PC. The
settings screen has at least three tabs: Phone,
Services, and Network. Your Pocket PC Phone
Edition may have more tabs depending on its
features.
Change the Phone Settings
The Phone tab displays the phone number, which
is read from the SIM card, as shown in the image
to the right.
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Sample a
Ring Tone.
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The Ring Type and Ring Tone settings configure how the Pocket PC reacts to an incoming
call. Ring Type specifies the type of notification you receive for an incoming call. If you select a
Ring Type option, you can sample and select a Ring Tone. You cannot select a Ring Tone if you
select the Vibrate Only ring type.
Pocket PC 2002 ring tones are WAV files, and Windows Mobile 2003 ring tones are
WAV, Windows Media, or MIDI files. Ring tones are stored in the \Windows\Rings
folder.
The Keypad field specifies what you hear when using the dialer. You can set the keypad to
Beep or to Off so beeps don’t sound in public places. Tapping Other Settings opens the Pocket
PC Sounds and Notifications settings, where you can set phone, volume, and system sounds.
Select the Require PIN When Phone Is Used check box to prevent unauthorized use of the Pocket
PC phone by requiring that a PIN be entered to use the phone. Tap Change PIN to change the
PIN. Emergency 911 calls can be made at any time without first entering a PIN.
Change the Services Settings
You use the Services tab to access and configure services
provided by your mobile-phone service provider, as shown
in the image to the right. To configure a setting, select the
service and then tap Get Settings.
The Caller ID setting controls whether or not your phone
number displays to the person you call. You can prevent your
number from being displayed by configuring this setting.
Tapping Call Forwarding configures the service to forward
calls made to the phone depending on the status of the phone.
You can configure the following forwarding options:
■ Unavailable Forwards calls if the phone is turned
off or unreachable.
■ Busy Forwards calls when the line is busy.
■ No answer Forwards calls if you do not answer the phone.
Tapping Call Waiting allows you to receive a second call during a call. To turn call waiting
off, tap Do Not Notify Me.
Tapping Voice Mail And SMS configures the voice mail and Short Message Service (SMS)
access numbers.
Speed dial location 1 is automatically configured for accessing voice mail.
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Change the Network Settings
The network settings allow you to select which mobile-phone
network the Pocket PC phone will use. The selection remains
active until you change it, lose the network signal, or change
the SIM card. The currently registered network displays on the
Network tab, as shown in the image to the right. If your phone
is not able to find a network, tap Find Network to start the
network selection process.
The phone will search for a network using the criteria
specified in the Network Selection portion of the screen. If you
select Automatic, the phone will select a network from those
you specify as preferred networks. If you select Manual, the
phone will search for all available networks and list them. You
can then select the network that you want to use from the list.
Tap Set Preferred Networks to specify the networks the phone
should use and the order in which they should be accessed.
Change Device-Specific Settings
Your Pocket PC Phone Edition may have additional settings
depending on the features provided by your mobile service
provider. For example, GSM phones may have a Band tab,
as shown in the image to the left, that enables you to select
wireless frequencies.
If you travel from North America to Europe, you
will need to change bands because the European GSM
network does not work on the 1900 band. Europe has
two GSM bands, 900 and 1800, and therefore the phone
may still not work if service is not available for the band
you select.
Before you use a North American–based phone in
Europe, check with your mobile service provider to
determine whether roaming agreements are available
at the locations you will visit and how much the
service will cost.
Some additional settings that you may be able to change
on your Pocket PC Phone Edition are shown in the image to
the right.
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Automatic pickup makes it easier to answer the phone by automatically answering an incoming
call after a set number of rings. If you plan to ignore calls, you will want to turn off this feature.
Normally Pocket PCs will turn on when you press any hardware button, however, so if you carry
your Pocket PC in a pocket or bag it may get bumped, turn on, and drain the battery. Using the
settings on this tab, you can lock all the buttons except the Power button.
Consider Smartphone
Integrated devices tend to have some deficiencies as a result of compromises that have to be
made in their design. For example, while Pocket PC Phone Edition is a great handheld, it needs
to have a large screen, so it can be difficult to operate with one hand as you can do with a mobile
phone. If you think Pocket PC Phone Edition is too large, you might consider using a Smartphone.
Windows Mobile Software for Smartphones is like Windows Mobile Software for Pocket
PCs because it bundles the Windows CE operating system with applications. Smartphone
includes Calendar, Contacts, Tasks, Inbox, Internet Explorer, MSN Messenger, Voice Notes,
Windows Media Player, Calculator, Solitaire, and ActiveSync. Calendar, Contacts, Tasks, and
Inbox synchronizes with Microsoft Outlook or Exchange Server, but you cannot synchronize
files or Internet Explorer favorites.
Smartphone is designed to be a great mobile phone, so you can easily operate it with one
hand. However, the Smartphone’s screen is much smaller than a Pocket PC’s, and it does not
have a touch screen so all input is done using the keypad. Since it is difficult to enter large
amounts of text using the keypad, Smartphone does not include a text editor.
The Orange SPV, which is the first Windows Mobile Smartphone on the market, has been
available outside of the United States since the fall of 2002. A Windows Mobile Smartphone
should be available in the United States by the end of 2003, though at the time this book is
being written we do not know which mobile providers will sell these devices. To keep up to date
on the latest Smartphone developments, check http://www.microsoft.com/mobile/smartphone/.
Wrapping Up
Pocket PC Phone Edition is designed to be a great handheld computer that is also capable of
making phone calls. Whether or not you want to use your Pocket PC as a phone will depend
on your mobile phone needs. If you simply want a mobile phone capable of some personal
information management, consider a Microsoft Smartphone.
In this chapter, you have seen how to use Pocket PC Phone Edition to place a call. Long
before phones were invented, people communicated by writing letters, and you can use your
Pocket PC to write a letter as well. In the next chapter, you’ll learn how to use Pocket Word
to create and edit documents.
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How to…
■
■
■
■
■
Create and save documents
Edit and format documents
Add handwriting, drawings, and recordings to documents
Send documents via e-mail
Beam documents using infrared
P
ocket Word enables you to use your device for more than just storing personal information
and retrieving e-mail. With Pocket Word, you can create letters, memos, or notes wherever
the need arises. Pocket Word is similar to Microsoft Word, but its purpose is to complement the
desktop software rather than replace it. Because of this, Pocket Word does not have many of the
formatting features—such as tables and footnotes—that you find in Microsoft Word. With Pocket
Word, though, you can instantly write documents wherever you are, and then transfer the document
to a desktop computer for further editing and final formatting.
When a Word document that contains a significant amount of formatting is transferred to
a Pocket PC, most of the formatting will be lost when you edit the document on a Pocket
PC. This also applies to e-mail attachments that you receive and return to the sender.
Use Pocket Word on Your Pocket PC
Unlike the desktop version, Pocket Word cannot do any of the following:
■
■
■
■
■
Create outlines
Password-protect documents
Print documents
Create tables
Create numbered lists
HP provides a free mobile printing utility that prints to a wide array of Bluetooth,
infrared, and network printers, and it works with most Pocket PC 2002 and Windows
Mobile 2003 devices. You can download the utility that prints Pocket Word documents
from http://www.hp.com/go/pocketprint.
Figure 10-1 shows the differences between the Pocket Word program window on the Pocket
PC and Word on a desktop computer. At the bottom of the Pocket Word screen is the Command
bar, which contains menu items similar to the menu bar on the desktop version of Word. Each
item of the Command bar is summarized in Table 10-1. By default, the toolbar is not displayed,
but you can tap the blue arrow button to the right of Tools and the toolbar will show or hide.
Command bar is a new term created by Microsoft to refer to the bar at the bottom of the
screen on the Pocket PC.
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Tap here to open the toolbar.
The Command bar
The Pocket Word program window with Windows Mobile for Pocket PCs (left)
and the Microsoft Word program window (right)
FIGURE 10-1
Create, Open, and Save Documents
To start Pocket Word, tap Start | Pocket Word, and the File List View window shown in Figure 10-2
displays. Tap New to create a blank document in the program window.
To create documents using a template, the New button menu must be enabled on your Pocket
PC. To enable the New button, follow these steps:
1. Tap Start | Settings.
2. In the Personal tab, tap Menus.
3. Tap the New Menu tab.
Function
Edit
Copy, move, or delete text in documents using cut, copy, and paste. Search for and replace
words in documents. Change how text in the document looks by selecting fonts and
changing paragraph alignment.
View
Control how the document displays by wrapping text and enlarging text using Zoom.
Change between Writing, Drawing, Typing, and Recording modes.
Tools
Check spelling, count words, and convert digital ink to text. Send the document via
infrared or e-mail. Delete the document, and save it using a different file name.
TABLE 10-1
Pocket Word Command Bar Items on a Pocket PC
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Change folders
Change how file
names are sorted
Create a new document
FIGURE 10-2
The Pocket Word File List View window on the Pocket PC
4. Check the box next to Turn On New Button Menu.
5. Tap OK.
When you start Pocket Word, you will notice that to the right of New is a vertical line and an
up arrow. Tap the up arrow to open a pop-up menu and select a template listed at the top. Four
templates come preinstalled: Meeting Notes, Memo, Phone Memo, and To Do.
The New pop-up menu also contains options for creating the following: Appointment,
Contact, E-mail, Excel Workbook, Note, Task, and Word Document. These options are
available wherever you see New, enabling you to create these items quickly regardless
of what application is currently running.
Use the File List View window shown in Figure 10-2
to create new documents or to open, copy, delete, or move
existing documents. By default, all documents in the My
Documents folder, and any subfolders, will display. If a My
Documents folder exists on a storage card inserted in the
device, its contents, along with the contents of its subfolders,
will be merged into the list. Tap the down arrow next to All
Folders to display the Folders drop-down list, as shown in the
following image:
Select a folder name from this list to display its contents.
If you tap the Add/Delete item of the drop-down list, you can
create, rename, and delete subfolders.
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Create Document Templates
Document templates save time by creating documents that already contain text. Your Pocket
PC comes with four templates that are listed in the New pop-up menu. To create your own
template and add it to the menu, follow these steps:
1. Start Pocket Word, create a new document, and enter the text that you want to appear
in the document every time you use the template.
2. Tap Tools | Save Document As.
3. Enter a name for the template.
4. Tap the Folder drop-down list, select Templates, and then tap OK. Keep the Type
as Pocket Word Document and the Location at Main memory. The template can be
placed on a storage card, but it will not be available if the card is not inserted in the
Pocket PC.
5. Tap OK to close the document.
To use your template, tap the up arrow next to New and then tap the name of your
template in the pop-up menu.
You can also create document templates using Microsoft Word on your desktop computer.
Just create a document in Word and save it in the Templates folder, which is in the Pocket PC
My Documents folder on the desktop. During the next synchronization, the template will be
copied to your Pocket PC. See Chapter 6 for instructions on setting up file synchronization
between your Pocket PC and desktop computer.
Pocket PCs will look for only those documents stored in the My Documents folder. That’s
why, if you want to store your documents on a storage card, it is best to create a My
Documents folder on the card and then store the documents in it.
In the File List View window, the files are sorted alphabetically
by name. To sort them by Date, Size, or Type, tap the arrow to the
right of Name. Notice that the type of sort that you select displays
on the top line.
To open a document, tap its file name. Tap-and-hold on a file
name to display the pop-up menu shown to the right.
Tap Create Copy, and another copy of the file using the same
file name appears with a copy number added to the file name.
For example, if you select Create Copy for the file named Foo,
the file name Foo(1) will be added to the list. Tap Delete to
delete the file that you selected, and tap Rename/Move to open
a dialog box in which you can specify a new file name, folder,
and storage location.
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Edit Your Pocket Word Documents
The Pocket Word Edit menu provides the tools you need for editing text in a document. With the
commands in the Edit menu, you can copy, delete, search for, and replace text.
To count the number of words in a document, tap Tools | Word Count.
Copy Text
To copy or move text within a document, follow these steps:
1. Select the text by tapping-and-holding at the beginning of the text to be selected,
drag to the end, and release.
2. Tap Edit | Copy to copy text, or Edit | Cut to move text.
3. Tap at the location where you want the text to be inserted.
4. Tap Edit | Paste.
A shortcut on the Pocket PC is to tap-and-hold on the selected text, and then choosing
Copy, Cut, or Paste from the pop-up menu.
Delete Text
To delete text from a document, select the text and then tap Edit | Clear. To select all of the text in
a document, tap Edit | Select All.
If you make an edit that you do not like, you can undo it by selecting Edit | Undo. If you
performed multiple edits, continue to select Edit | Undo to remove each edit that was performed.
The opposite is Edit | Redo, which restores each edit that was removed using Edit | Undo.
Revert to the Previously
Saved Document
The Undo command recovers mistakes that you make, one at a time. For example, if you
enter a line of text in a document, and then decide to remove it, tapping Edit | Undo Typing
removes the text one character at a time. If you made a number of edits to a document, you
might want to cancel them all, but unlike Word 2000, there is no Close menu command or
button to close the file without saving. To cancel all the changes you made since you opened
the document, tap Tools | Revert to Saved, and then tap Yes when Pocket Word asks whether
you want to undo all document changes.
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Search for a Text String
To search for a word or phrase in a document, tap Edit |
Find/Replace to open the Find dialog box, as shown in the
image to the right.
Enter the search text in the Find What field. If you want to
search only for a whole word that you enter, and not search for
words containing the letters you type, select Match Whole
Words Only. If you want to search only for words using a
specific case, select Match Case. After you have entered the
text, tap Find. The first instance of the text in the document
will be highlighted and a bar will appear above the Command
bar that contains four buttons, as shown below.
Tap Next to move to the next occurrence of the text in
the document. Tap the Close button, which looks like an X,
to stop searching for text.
Replacing text is a similar process. Tap Edit |
Find/Replace, and then tap the Replace button. Enter the text
to be replaced in the Find What field, and enter the new text
in the Replace With field. If you want to match whole words,
or case, be sure to select the appropriate check boxes and
then tap Find. A bar appears with buttons for Next, Replace,
Replace All, and Close; the first instance of the text to be
replaced is highlighted. To skip the instance and move to the
next, tap Next; to replace the text, tap Replace. The text is
replaced and the search continues to the next occurrence of
the text. If there are no more occurrences, a dialog box displays saying that Pocket Word has
finished searching the document. Tap Replace All to replace all occurrences of the text being
replaced without a prompt for direction from you.
Check the Spelling
To check the spelling in a document, tap Tools | Spell Check.
Questionable words highlight and a pop-up menu appears
near the word, as shown in the image to the right.
Tap one of the recommended words at the top of
the pop-up menu to replace the highlighted word. If the
highlighted word is correct as is, tap Ignore, and the next
questionable word will be highlighted. Tap Ignore All to
skip the remaining instances of that word in the document.
When you tap Add, the highlighted word is added to the Spell
Check Dictionary so that the word will not be highlighted as
questionable in the future.
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Edit the Spell Check Dictionary
Words that you add to the Spell Check Dictionary are stored in a file named custom.dic. You
will find this text file in the Windows folder on your Pocket PC. To edit the file, copy it to
your desktop using ActiveSync Explorer, open the file, and add or remove words. Save the
file and then copy it back to the Windows folder on your Pocket PC with ActiveSync
Explorer. Chapter 7 provides instructions for using ActiveSync Explorer to copy files
between a Pocket PC and desktop computer.
Format Your Documents
Text displayed in a document can use different fonts and be aligned left, center, or right. Paragraphs
can also be indented in a couple of different ways. To make these changes, use the Format and
Paragraph options from the Edit menu.
Apply formatting to existing text by selecting the text, and then choosing the desired option.
If you specify the formatting that you want before typing text, anything that you entered will
display as specified. Most formats can be specified using the toolbar buttons as well as through
menu selections. The Pocket PC pop-up menu that appears when you tap-and-hold on selected
text includes the same Format and Paragraph menu options that are in the Edit menu.
In the Format dialog box on the Pocket PC, shown next, you can select fonts and font sizes
from the appropriate drop-down lists. Select font color from the Line/Font drop-down list. In
addition to the standard font styles, you can also select Highlight, which adds yellow highlighting
over the text, and Strikethrough, which displays a line through selected text.
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To specify paragraph formatting, select Edit | Paragraph and the following Paragraph dialog
box appears:
Align text Left, Center, or Right by selecting from the Alignment drop-down list. To indent
the margins, use the arrows in the Left and Right fields to select the indent value. If you want the
first line of the paragraph to be indented, or you want a hanging indent, select it from the Special
field; the size of the indent is specified in the field directly beneath the Special field.
Select the Bulleted check box to create a bulleted list. Numbered lists cannot be created on
the Pocket PC.
You can work around the lack of support for numbered lists in Pocket Word by creating
a document template that contains the numbers 1 through 10 down the left side. Save it
with the file name Numbered List and store it in the Templates folder. Then, to create a
new document with numbered lists, start Pocket Word and select the Numbered List
template in the New pop-up menu.
Use the Four Pocket Word Modes
The View menu is used primarily for switching among the four modes of Pocket Word: Writing,
Drawing, Typing, and Recording. Each of the modes can be used separately or combined to
create documents that contain handwriting, drawings, text, and recordings. By default, Pocket
Word starts in Typing mode. In Typing mode, you enter text into the document using the soft
input panel, and text appears in the body of the document above the panel.
Express Yourself with Writing Mode
Switching to Writing mode enables you to write directly on the screen with the writing displayed
in digital ink, as shown in Figure 10-3. The screen background changes from blank to ruled, and
the toolbar changes to include additional buttons. As your writing extends toward the bottom of
the screen, Pocket Word automatically scrolls to the next page so that you can continue writing.
Most of the Edit menu functions work in Writing mode, and the toolbar provides shortcuts to the
formatting options.
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Type Documents In Pocket Word
The easiest way to write large documents on a Pocket PC is to use a keyboard. A variety
of keyboards are available for most Pocket PCs. One popular keyboard is Think Outside’s
Stowaway, a full-sized keyboard that folds up to about the same size as a Pocket PC.
Information about the Stowaway keyboard is available at http://www.thinkoutside.com.
The Stowaway keyboard connects to the Pocket PC accessory port, which varies according
to Pocket PC brands. Consequently, the Stowaway is available only for certain brands of Pocket
PCs. Thumb keyboards, which are tiny keyboards that you type on using your thumbs, also
attach to the accessory port. The Pocketop keyboard (http://www.pocketop.net) avoids
compatibility problems by using the infrared port to connect to Pocket PCs.
If you use one of these keyboards, you will be glad to know that Windows Mobile 2003
includes some basic support for keyboard shortcuts in Pocket Word. For example, you can
use CTRL-B for bold, CTRL-I for italics, and CTRL-U for underlined text.
Pocket PC 2002 doesn’t support even these three basic shortcuts. To add more support
for keyboard shortcuts on your Pocket PC, download and install WordCommands from
http://www.lagorio.net/pocketpc/wordcommands/. WordCommands provides 26 different
shortcuts that significantly speed up text entry by keyboard in Pocket Word.
Change igital ink thickness
FIGURE 10-3
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Writing Mode in Pocket Word
Add space
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To select onscreen handwriting, tap-and-hold the stylus on the screen, wait until the cursor
appears, and then drag the stylus across the writing that you want to select. Once the text is
selected, you can edit it, use cutting and pasting, or apply formatting. For example, if you want
to change the ink color, select Edit | Format, tap the Line/Font drop-down list, and select a color.
The Pocket Word Tools | Recognize command converts handwriting to text. Use the
command to convert the entire document to a text font, or select a portion of the document
and then use the command.
To correct words not properly recognized, tap-and-hold on the word and select Alternates;
a list of possible words will display. Tap the correct word in the list to replace the incorrect word.
Get Artistic with Drawing Mode
In Drawing mode, you use the stylus to draw on the screen. Gridlines appear to help you draw.
Once you lift the stylus off the screen, a drawing box appears, indicating the boundaries of the
drawing. Additional lines that touch the drawing box become part of the drawing. The Drawing
mode toolbar, shown in Figure 10-4, provides shortcuts to formatting options. Tap the Ink Color
button to change the color of what is drawn on the screen. To select an object, tap-and-hold on it
until the cross appears, and then lift the stylus; or follow these steps:
1. Tap-and-hold the stylus on the screen.
2. Drag the stylus across the object that you want to select.
10
3. Lift the stylus.
Change ink color
FIGURE 10-4
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Drawing Mode in Pocket Word
Change fill color
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Little squares and circles, called selection handles,
surround a selected object, as shown in the following image:
After an object is selected, a variety of changes can be
made to it, as described in Table 10-2.
The options in Table 10-2 are also possible to apply to
multiple objects. To select multiple objects, hold down the
Action button (or Jog Wheel) while tapping each object.
Three additional changes are available for multiple objects,
as described in Table 10-3.
Be Heard with Recording Mode
Use the Pocket Word Recording mode to embed voice
recordings into a document. Recordings are made by using
the Recording Mode toolbar or with the Record Hardware
button of the Pocket PC.
Do This
Switch from Drawing to Edit mode
Tap the Pen button on the toolbar.
Resize the object
Tap-and-hold one of the square boxes around the object
and then drag the stylus to change the size.
Rotate the object
Tap-and-hold one of the circles around the object and
then drag the stylus in the direction to rotate.
Change the line color
Tap Edit | Format, and select the color from the
Line/Font drop-down list; or tap the up arrow next to the
Line button on the toolbar and select a color.
Change the fill color
Tap Edit | Format, and select the color from the Fill color
drop-down list; or tap the up arrow next to the Fill button
on the toolbar and select a color.
Change the line thickness
Tap Edit | Format, and select an option from the Pen
Weight drop-down list; or tap the up arrow next to the
Line button on the toolbar and select an option.
Undo an edit
Tap Edit | Undo Style, or tap the Undo button on the
toolbar.
Create a copy of the object
Tap-and-hold on the object and select Create Copy from
the pop-up menu.
Make the shape a perfect rectangle,
circle, triangle, or line
Tap-and-hold on the object, select Shape, and then select
the desired shape.
TABLE 10-2
Pocket Word Drawing Mode Formats
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Do This
Align objects left, right, top or bottom, and center
vertically or horizontally
Tap the Alignment button on the toolbar and select
the option.
Group objects
Tap the Group Objects button on the toolbar.
Ungroup objects
Tap the Ungroup Objects button on the toolbar.
TABLE 10-3
Drawing Mode Formats for Multiple Objects
To use the Recording mode, follow these steps:
1. Tap View | Recording.
2. Tap Record on the toolbar.
3. Begin speaking into the microphone after the beep.
4. Stop recording by tapping Stop.
Using the Record Hardware button is easier; just follow these steps:
1. Press-and-hold the Record Hardware button until you hear a beep.
2. Continue to hold the button and speak into the Pocket PC microphone.
3. Release the button to stop recording.
Two beeps will sound and the new recording appears in the document as an Embedded icon,
as shown in the following image:
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Full-Featured Word Processing
on Your Pocket PC
As you can tell by this chapter, Pocket Word does not provide many of the features available
in desktop word processors. For example, you cannot create tables or footnotes, nor can you
make changes to the layout of a document. If you need more word processing features, your
only option is SoftMaker’s TextMaker word processor.
TextMaker has just about every feature available on desktop word processors. Not only
can you create tables, add footnotes, and change the document layout, but you can also work
with embedded graphics and create borders and shades. TextMaker works directly with
Microsoft Word files, which allows you to synchronize and edit Word files on your Pocket
PC without worrying about losing formatting. SoftMaker also sells a desktop version of
TextMaker that runs on Windows and Linux.
While TextMaker provides a ton of features, they come at a price. The program costs $49
and requires a little over 6MB of storage space and 3 MB of program memory. You will find
more information about this program at http://www.softmaker.de/.
Tap the Embedded icon to play the recording, and use the toolbar buttons to control the
playback.
Text can be added to the document while in Recording mode, enabling you to annotate
the recordings. Recordings may be played in either the Typing or Writing mode, but not in the
Drawing mode. If the document is uploaded to a desktop computer, the recordings can be played
in Microsoft Word by double-clicking the Embedded icon.
Use the View Menu to Change the Screen Display
The View menu is also used to control the screen display. To hide or show the toolbar, tap View |
Toolbar. Turn Wrap To Window on or off by tapping View | Wrap To Window. Use View | Zoom
to change the display size by selecting from one of the five settings in the menu.
Share Documents Easily with Other Users
Pocket Word makes it easy to share documents with other people by including the ability to send
documents via infrared or e-mail. Use infrared to send a document to another Windows Powered
device by following these steps:
1. If the receiving device is running Pocket PC 2000, tap Start | Programs | Infrared
Receive; otherwise, simply align the two devices’ infrared ports.
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Add Fonts to Your Pocket PC
Like Windows 2000, Windows CE uses TrueType fonts, and each Windows CE device comes
with six different fonts. You can add fonts to your Pocket PC by copying the font file from
your desktop computer to the device. On your desktop computer, the default location for your
computer fonts is the \Windows\Fonts folder.
If you want to transfer a font from your desktop computer to your Pocket PC, use
Windows Explorer and ActiveSync to copy a font file to the \Windows\Fonts folder on your
Pocket PC. Once the font is copied, do a soft reset and then start Pocket Word. Check the
Fonts drop-down list to verify that the font is now available.
See Chapter 7 for directions on how to copy files from your desktop computer to the
Pocket PC using ActiveSync.
2. On the sending device that has a document open in Pocket Word, tap Tools | Beam
Document, and line up the device infrared ports.
If the sending device is running Pocket PC 2000, tap Tools | Send Via Infrared.
3. After the two devices recognize each other, the file will transfer to the receiving device.
When the transfer is complete, the sending device will indicate that one file has been
sent, and a Close button will appear, which you tap to return to Pocket Word.
To send a document via e-mail, tap Tools | Send Via E-mail, and a new e-mail message will
open with the document as an attachment. Enter an e-mail address, subject, and message, and then
tap Send. Inbox will send the message the next time you connect to the Internet and retrieve e-mail.
Copy and Delete Documents
To create another copy of the document currently open in Pocket Word, tap Tools | Save Document
As, and the Save As dialog box will display. Enter a new file name, select the location where you
want the file to be stored, and tap OK. Tap Cancel to close the dialog box and not save the document.
Tap Tools | Delete Document and then tap Yes on the Confirmation dialog box to delete the
currently open document. The document is deleted, and you are returned to the Pocket Word List
View window.
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Wrapping Up
Because Pocket Word does not have all the features of Microsoft Word, I use it primarily for
creating text, and then I transfer documents to a PC for formatting. As you have seen in this
chapter, Pocket Word has all the features you need for creating new documents, including spell
check and word count.
Spreadsheets are important documents for people who analyze financial data. In the next chapter,
you will learn how to use Pocket Excel to create and edit spreadsheets on your Pocket PC.
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How to…
■
■
■
■
■
Create Pocket Excel workbooks
Add data and formulas to workbooks
Edit and format workbooks
Password-protect workbooks
Make calculations using the Pocket PC calculator
O
f all the types of software that have been written for personal computers, spreadsheets may
have had the most impact. Indeed, it wasn’t until VisiCalc and Lotus 1-2-3 were released
that businesses began to use personal computers in earnest, perhaps launching the entire personal
computer industry. The appeal of the spreadsheet is its tremendous versatility: it can be used for
tracking hours, managing budgets, or creating what if scenarios.
Pocket Excel provides similar versatility for your Pocket PC. In this chapter, you’ll learn how
to use Pocket Excel to create workbooks that crunch numbers. You’ll learn how these workbooks
can be transferred to a desktop computer, beamed via infrared to other Windows-powered devices,
or e-mailed to your friends and coworkers via the Internet. Because workbooks may contain
sensitive information, you’ll also learn how to protect your data by assigning a password to
workbooks. Finally, for those times when all you need to do is add some numbers, you’ll learn
how to use the Pocket PC Calculator application.
Pocket Excel on the Pocket PC
Pocket Excel is similar to the version of Excel that you run on your desktop computer, except that you
cannot create graphs and charts and you cannot print spreadsheets. Nor does it support macros or the
Visual Basic for Applications programming language. Like Excel, Pocket Excel spreadsheets can
have 256 columns, but only 16,384 rows—versus the 65,536 in PC Excel—can be used. Nonetheless,
Pocket Excel features do allow you to create spreadsheets that will meet the majority of your needs.
In this section, you’ll learn about Pocket Excel for the Pocket PC and how to use it to create
and save workbooks, work with data, password-protect workbooks, and send workbooks via
e-mail or infrared.
Figure 11-1 shows the differences between the Pocket Excel program window on the Pocket
PC (left) and Excel on a desktop computer (right). At the bottom of the screen on the left is the
Command bar, which contains menu items similar to the menu bar on the desktop version of
Excel. Each item of the Command bar is summarized in Table 11-1. By default, the toolbar is not
displayed, but tapping the blue arrow button to the right of Tools will display or hide the toolbar.
The Command bar is a new term created by Microsoft to refer to the bar at the bottom
of the screen on the Pocket PC.
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Menu bar
Toolbar
Tap here to open
the toolbar.
Command bar
FIGURE 11-1
The Pocket Excel program window on a Pocket PC and the Excel program
window on a desktop computer
11
Menu Item
Function
Edit
Copies, moves, or deletes data in spreadsheets using Cut, Copy, and Paste.
Searches for and replaces data in spreadsheets. Assigns passwords to workbooks.
View
Controls how the spreadsheet displays by turning on or off scrollbars, the Status bar,
and row and column headings. Also includes the commands to split spreadsheets,
freeze panes, display the spreadsheet as a full screen, and zoom the display.
Format
Changes the appearance of data in cells, along with the appearance of rows and
columns. Also includes commands for adding, renaming, and modifying sheets,
as well as inserting and deleting cells.
Tools
Sorts and filters data. Inserts functions and symbols, and defines cell names. Sends
workbooks via infrared and e-mail, and names and deletes workbooks.
TABLE 11-1
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Graph Your Pocket Excel Data
While Pocket Excel does not create graphs, you can generate graphs on your Pocket PC from
Pocket Excel data by using Pocket AutoGraph from DeveloperOne.
To create a graph with Pocket AutoGraph, first select and copy data in Pocket Excel and
then paste it into Pocket AutoGraph. You can then create bar, column, descriptive bar, pie, XY
scatter/line, line, and stock trend graphs. After you crate a graph, it can be saved to a bitmap
file or copied to the clipboard and pasted in Pocket Word or a graphics editor. More information
and a trial version of Pocket AutoGraph are available at http://www.developerone.com.
SpreadCE from Bye Design Ltd. is a spreadsheet program that you can use instead of
Pocket Excel. It provides the same functionality described in this chapter, plus it adds macros
and graphs. Unlike Pocket AutoGraph, the charts you create in SpreadCE stay within the
spreadsheet, and they change as you update the data for the chart. You can open and save
Pocket Excel files in SpreadCE, but charts will be saved only in Excel 97 format, which is
the default file format for the program. More information and a trial version of this program
are available at http://www.byedesign.freeserve.co.uk.
Start Pocket Excel
To start Pocket Excel, tap Start | Programs | Pocket Excel, and the List View window shown in
the following image displays:
Change
folders.
Create a new workbook.
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Change how
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are sorted.
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If you start Pocket Excel with no workbooks stored in the My Documents folder, the
program automatically creates a blank workbook and skips the List view.
Use the List View window to create new workbooks or to open, copy, delete, or move
existing workbooks. By default, all workbooks in the My Documents folder, and any subfolders,
will display. If a My Documents folder exists on a storage card inserted in the device, its contents,
and the contents of its subfolders, will be merged into the list. Tap the down
arrow next to All Folders to display the folders drop-down list, as shown in
the image to the right.
Select a folder name from this list to display its contents. If you tap the
Add/Delete option from the drop-down list, you can create, rename, and
delete subfolders.
Pocket PCs will look only for documents stored in the
My Documents folder. Therefore, if you want to store
your documents on a storage card, it is best to create
a My Documents folder on the card and store the
documents in it.
To open a workbook, tap the file name in the list. Tap-and-hold on a file name to display the
pop-up menu.
Tap Create Copy to copy the file using the same file name with a
number appended. For example, if you select Create Copy for a file
named Foo, the file name Foo(1) will be added to the list. Tap Delete
to delete a selected file, and tap Rename/Move to open a dialog box in
which you can specify a new file name, folder, and storage location.
Create a New Workbook
Tap New on the Command bar in Pocket Excel to create a blank workbook, as shown in the
following image:
Cell reference
display
Data entry area
AutoCalculate area
Select a sheet.
Tap here to open or
close the toolbar.
Status bar
Toolbar
Command bar
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Tap here to
save the
workbook.
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To create workbooks using a template, the New Button menu must be enabled on your
Pocket PC. To enable the New Button menu, follow these steps:
1. Tap Start | Settings.
2. In the Personal tab, tap Menus.
3. Tap the New Menu tab.
4. Check the box next to Turn On New Button Menu.
5. Tap OK.
When you start Pocket Excel, you will notice a vertical line and an up arrow to the right of
the New button. Tap the up arrow to open a pop-up menu and select a template listed at the top.
One template, Vehicle Mileage Log, comes preinstalled on your Pocket PC.
Save Workbooks
When you tap OK in Pocket Excel, the current workbook writes to the My Documents folder and
is given a default file name, unless you are editing a previously saved workbook. To assign a file name
to a workbook, tap Tools | Save Workbook As to open the Save As dialog box. Enter a file name,
select a file type and storage location, and then tap OK.
To add your own templates to the New Button menu, create a workbook, tap Tools | Save
Workbook As, select the Templates folder, select the Pocket Excel Template type, and
then tap OK.
Normally, you should leave the file type as Pocket Excel Workbook. If the file is synchronized
with a desktop computer, it will be converted to the Excel file format. However, if you write the
file to a storage card that will be read on a PC that does not have a copy of ActiveSync installed,
you will need to specify an Excel file type corresponding to the version of Excel on that PC.
When you tap OK in Pocket Excel, the List view will replace the application program
window. To rename a workbook in the List view, tap-and-hold on a workbook name,
select Rename/Move from the pop-up menu, and then enter a file name.
Move Around in Workbooks
Spreadsheets tend to grow in size as you add information,
which can make it difficult to move through cells quickly.
The Define Name command and the Go To command can
help with this problem. By using the Define Name
command, you can name a cell, and then use the Go To
command to move the cursor to that cell.
To assign a name to a cell, follow these steps:
1. Tap a cell to select it.
2. Tap Tools | Define Name to open the Define Name
dialog box, as shown in the image to the right.
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3. Enter a name in the Names In Workbook field.
4. Tap Add.
5. Tap OK to close the dialog box.
After the name is assigned, it will appear in the cell name display area. If you want to
assign a name to a range of cells, select the range in step 1, and then enter the name in the
Names In Workbook field.
To use the name with the Go To command, first tap Tools | Go
To to open the Go To dialog box, as shown to the right.
Select the Cell Reference Or Name radio button, enter the
name in the field, and then tap OK. The cursor will move to the
cell, or range of cells, assigned to that name. The Current Region
radio button selects the region of cells around the current cell.
Cell references also work with the Go To command. For example,
entering F18 in the dialog box moves the cursor to cell F18 in the
spreadsheet.
The cell reference display area can also be used to move to cells within a sheet. Tap
the display, enter the name or reference, and then tap ENTER on the soft input panel.
The Go To command works across all spreadsheets in a workbook. To use the Go To command
to move to a cell reference in another sheet, enter the sheet name, an exclamation mark, and the cell
reference in the Go To dialog box. For example, to move to cell A1 in Sheet1, enter Sheet1!A1.
The Go To dialog box retains the last entered cell reference or name, and it can be
used to switch between cells quickly. For example, if the cursor is currently in cell F18,
and you enter A1 to move to that cell, the next time the Go To dialog box opens it will
contain F18. To switch quickly back to that cell, just tap OK.
A workbook may contain more than one sheet, and the sheet selector in the Status bar is
available to move between them. Tap the down arrow in the sheet selector to display a pop-up
list of the sheet names, and then tap the name of the destination sheet.
Add Data and Formulas to Workbooks
Entering data into Pocket Excel is a simple process. First, select the cell in which you want to
enter data, open the soft input panel, write the data, and then tap ENTER or move to another cell.
If the cell is not visible on the screen, use the Go To command by selecting Tools | Go To, as
described in the preceding section.
Entering data on a Pocket PC is easier when using the keyboard buttons on the soft
input panel. Chapter 3 contains information on how to use these buttons.
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What is written appears in the data entry area, and as the following image shows, three
buttons appear to the left of that area for canceling the entry, entering the value in the cell,
and opening the Insert Function dialog box:
Cancel data entry.
Insert a function.
Enter the value.
Use Fill to Enter Data Quickly
To enter a series of data quickly in a range of cells, enter the
first value in a cell, select the range, and then tap Edit | Fill
to open the Fill dialog box, as shown in the image to the right.
To copy the value entered in all cells in the range, tap
the Copy radio button, select the fill direction from the Fill
drop-down list, and then tap OK. The value will be copied
into all the cells in the range.
The fill direction is based on the range. If a column of
cells is selected, the direction is up or down; but if a
row of cells is selected, the direction is left or right.
If you want the range to contain a series of data, such as
the numbers one through ten, follow these steps:
1. Select a cell and enter the starting value.
2. Select the range of cells starting with the cell selected in step 1.
3. Tap Edit | Fill.
4. Tap the Series radio button.
5. Select the direction from the Fill drop-down list.
6. Select the series type:
■ AutoFill Creates a series based on the contents of the first cell. The first value
must be a day of the week or month, or text followed by a number. For example,
a range starting with Value1 will be filled with Value1, Value2, Value3, and so on.
■ Date Creates a series of dates. Specify which part of the date to increment by
selecting Day, Month, or Year from the drop-down list. The series will increment
by the amount entered in the Step Value field.
■ Number Creates a series of numbers that is incremented by the value entered in
the Step Value field. For example, to create a series of even numbers, the first value
must be even, with a step value of two.
7. Tap OK to create the series.
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The starting value of a date series must contain at least a month and a date. Other
values will generate unexpected results.
Enter Formulas
Every formula begins with the equal sign (=) plus one or more of the following: values, cell
references, name references, operators, and functions. The result of the formula displays in the
cell in which it was entered. For example, if cell A1 contains the value 10, cell B1 the value 5,
and C1 the formula =A1 B1, then the number 5 will display in cell C1.
To enter a formula, select the cell that you want to contain the result, enter the equal sign,
enter a combination of one of the following, and then tap ENTER:
■ Values Otherwise known as constants, they can be numbers, characters, text, or dates.
■ Cell references The two-character identifier made by the intersection of the column
and row headers. For example, G6 is the cell at the intersection of column G and row 6.
An example of cell references in a formula is =A1 B1. To use cell references of multiple
sheets in a formula, add the sheet name and an exclamation mark before the reference.
For example, the formula =Sheet1!A1+Sheet2!A1 adds the values in the A1 cell of both
sheets and places the result in the selected cell.
■ Name references Names that you assign to a cell using Tools | Define, as
described earlier in this chapter. An example of a name reference in a formula is
=Assets Liability. Name references of multiple sheets can also be used in formulas,
such as =Sheet1!Total Sheet2!Total.
■ Operators Operators are arithmetic, comparison, or reference. Arithmetic operators
perform basic mathematical operations such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, and
division. Comparison operators compare two values, and the result is either true or false.
Reference operators combine a range of cells for calculations.
■ Functions Functions are predefined formulas that return a result, based on constants or
references passed to it as arguments. For example, the formula =POWER(2,3) displays
the value 8. If 2 were entered in cell A1, and 3 in cell B1, the formula =POWER(A1,B1)
would also display the value 8.
Pocket Excel supports many functions, and you can find a list of the functions in Online
Help. If you have Excel on your desktop computer, you can find out more information about the
functions in its Online Help.
Pocket Excel does not support all of the functions
available in the desktop version of Excel.
Fortunately, the Insert Function dialog box is available
to assist in adding functions to formulas. Tap Tools | Insert
Function to open the Insert Function dialog box, as shown
in the following image:
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Another way to open the Insert Function dialog box is to tap Function in the data
entry area.
The functions are listed in the middle of the dialog box; to narrow the list of options, select
an item from the Category drop-down list. Tap a function to add it to the formula in the data entry
area. When you add a function to a formula, it will include a template between the parentheses
for its arguments—for example, POWER(number,power). The template items must be replaced
with either a value or a reference—POWER(2,3).
A description of each function displays in the Insert Function dialog box when you tap a
function name in the list.
Some functions return a result based on a range of values. Use the reference operators, such
as A1:A10 and A1, B1, C1, to identify a range. You could type all the references, but it is quicker
to select the range using the pointing device, as described in the following steps:
1. Begin entering the formula.
2. Select a function that takes a range of numbers as an argument. The template of these
functions contains three periods, such as COUNT(value1,value2,…).
3. Delete the template items of the function in the data entry area.
4. Select the range of values in the spreadsheet. As you do, the cell references will appear
in the data entry area.
5. Tap ENTER.
If a name is assigned to a range of cells using the Tools | Define Name command, that
name can be used with functions that require a range of values.
The most common function that you will use is Sum, and the AutoSum (Sigma) button on
the toolbar provides a quick way to insert the sum of a range of cells into a spreadsheet. To use
AutoSum, follow these steps:
1. Select the cell in which you want to insert the sum.
2. Tap AutoSum. AutoSum automatically selects a range of cells adjacent to the selected
cell. The selection starts with the first cell above the selected cell, and it continues until
finding a blank cell. If the cell immediately above is blank, a range of adjacent cells to
the right will be selected. However, if you wish, you can select a range and override what
Pocket Excel automatically selects.
3. Press ENTER.
Change the View in Workbooks
Pocket Excel provides multiple ways to change the view of a workbook. These commands are
particularly useful with the small displays of the Pocket PC. The horizontal scrollbar, the vertical
scrollbar, the Status bar, and row and column heads are turned on and off by selecting the appropriate
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command from the View menu. Turning off these elements allows more of the spreadsheet to
display in the program window.
You may find it easier to use the side scroll button or the Navigation button, if they are
available on your Pocket PC, to navigate within Pocket Excel.
Split the Screen
By splitting the screen display horizontally or vertically, you can see different parts of the
spreadsheet at the same time. To split the screen, tap View | Split, and the screen will split
above and to the left of the selected cell, as shown in the following image:
11
If you want to split the screen horizontally, select a cell in column A, and then tap View | Split.
To split the screen vertically, select a cell in row 1, and then tap View | Split. To remove the split,
tap View | Remove Split.
Adjust the screen split by moving the horizontal and vertical bars. To make the adjustment,
tap-and-hold the stylus on the bar, and then drag it in the direction you want it to move.
Freeze Panes
Freezing panes locks a column or row in place while you scroll through the rest of the spreadsheet.
This is typically done to display column and row heads of data beyond the screen. To freeze
panes on a spreadsheet, first select the cell where you want to freeze panes, and then tap View |
Freeze Panes. All rows above the current cell, and all columns to the left of the current cell, are
frozen. Lines will appear above and to the left of the cell, indicating the location of the panes.
To unfreeze panes, tap View | Unfreeze Panes.
Change the Screen Display
The Zoom command changes the display size of items in the spreadsheet, allowing
more rows and columns to display. To zoom the display, tap
View | Zoom, and then select the magnification. Create a
custom zoom setting by tapping View | Zoom | Custom, and
then enter a value in the Custom dialog box, as shown in the
image to the right,
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Zoom settings apply to the entire workbook, and they are saved when you save the workbook.
To display even more columns and rows, tap View | Full Screen. All that appears are the cell
reference and data entry areas, along with the spreadsheet rows and columns. To exit the Full
Screen view, tap Restore.
Adjust Column Width and Row Height
Changing the size of columns and rows will display more or less of the data that they contain.
To change the size of a column, tap-and-hold the stylus on the right edge of the column head,
and then drag the stylus left or right. To adjust the row height, with a stylus, tap-and-hold on the
bottom edge of the row head, and then drag the stylus up or down. Another way to change row
height and column width is to tap Format | Cells, enter values in the Row Height and Column
Width fields, and then tap OK.
Automatically adjust the size of a column to the width of its longest value by double-tapping
the right edge of the column head, or tap Format | Column | AutoFit. To size a row automatically,
double-tap the bottom edge of the row head, or tap Format | Row | AutoFit.
Hide Rows or Columns
Hiding a row or column removes it from the display but does not delete the contents from the
workbook. To hide a row or column, follow these steps:
1. Select a cell in the row or column to be hidden.
2. To hide a row, tap Format | Row | Hide.
3. To hide a column, tap Format | Column | Hide.
To display a hidden row or column, follow these steps:
1. Tap Tools | Go To.
2. Type a reference for a cell, such as E4, in the hidden row or column.
3. Tap OK.
4. To display the hidden row, tap Format | Row | Unhide.
5. To display the hidden column, tap Format | Column | Unhide.
Insert, Rename, Move, and Delete Sheets
By default, each new workbook contains three sheets. To insert another sheet into a workbook,
tap Format | Modify Sheets. Tap Insert, enter a name for the sheet, and then tap OK. The Modify
Sheets dialog box is also used to rename, delete, and move sheets.
To rename a sheet, select it in the sheets list, tap Rename, enter a new name, and then tap
OK. To delete a sheet, select it in the sheets list and then tap Delete. To move a sheet, select it
in the sheets list and then tap Move Up or Move Down to move the sheet in the list.
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View Your Spreadsheet
in Landscape
By now you have probably thought to yourself, “Wouldn’t it be great to view a spreadsheet
in landscape?” Indeed, by default, the Pocket PC portrait display shows only three columns
in Pocket Excel, although spreadsheets tend to have many more columns.
Two software developers have created programs that enable you to switch the display
to landscape on other Pocket PCs. Both programs also increase the screen resolution by
changing the way pixels display on the screen. Higher resolutions display text smaller and
therefore show more information, but you might find text harder to read, so the programs
provide Zoom and Pan functions. One of these programs is JS Landscape X from Jimmy
Software, which you will find at http://www.jimmysoftware.com. The other program is
Nyditot Virtual Display, which you will find at http://www.nyditot.com.
Edit Data in Workbooks
As each cell is selected, its contents display in the data entry area. To edit the contents, place
the cursor in the area by tapping the area, and then use the soft input panel to edit the data. If
you intend to replace the contents of a cell, just select it and begin writing and the contents are
replaced.
If you decide that you do not want the edit after it is made, you can restore the
previous contents by using the Edit | Undo command.
Move Cell Contents
Use the following steps to move the contents of a cell or range:
1.
Select the cell or range.
2.
Tap Edit | Cut.
3.
Select the cell in which you want to paste the data.
4.
Tap Edit | Paste.
When you tap-and-hold anywhere in a spreadsheet, a pop-up menu appears with Cut,
Copy, Paste, Insert, Delete, Clear, and Format Cells commands.
Copy Cell Contents
The processes for copying the contents of a cell or range are similar; just follow these steps:
1.
Select the cell or range.
2.
Tap Edit | Copy.
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3. Select the cell in which you want to paste the data. For a range, select the upper-left cell.
4. Tap Edit | Paste.
If you want only to paste formulas, values, formats, or everything except borders, select Edit
| Paste Special in step 4 to display the Paste Special dialog box, as shown below.
Tap the radio button of an option and then tap OK.
The cell or range selected during a copy operation
remains selected until you perform another copy. With
this feature, you can paste multiple copies of a selection
in the workbook.
If you want to copy the contents of a cell or range to
adjacent cells, use the Edit | Fill command by carrying out
the following steps:
1. Select the cell or range containing the data and the adjacent destination cells.
2. Tap Edit | Fill.
3. Tap the Copy radio button to select the fill type.
4. Select the direction of the destination cells from the Fill Direction drop-down list.
5. Tap OK.
Find or Replace Cell Contents
To find a number or text in a cell value or formula, tap Edit |
Find/Replace to open the Find dialog box, as shown to the right,
and then follow these steps:
1. Enter a value in the Find What field.
2. Check the Match Case or Match Entire Cells boxes as
needed.
3. Specify whether to look in the cell values or formulas
from the Look In drop-down list.
4. Tap OK.
To replace a number or text in a cell value or formula, tap
Edit | Find/Replace to open the Find dialog box, and then tap
Replace to open the Replace dialog box, as shown in the image
to the right.
Enter values in the Find What and Replace With fields,
check the Match Case or Match Entire Cells boxes as needed,
and then tap Find. The first instance of the value being searched
for is highlighted, and a toolbar appears with buttons for Next,
Replace, Replace All, and Close. Tap the appropriate button on
the toolbar, or tap Close to stop the search.
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Clear Cell Contents
To clear the contents of a selected cell or range, tap Edit | Clear and select one of the
following options:
■ Contents Removes the data in the cell but not the format of the cell.
■ Formats Removes the format of the cell but not the data.
■ All Removes the data in the cell and the format of the cell.
If you want to clear the entire contents of a column or row, first select a cell in the row
or column and then tap Format | Delete Cells to open the following Delete Cells dialog box:
Tap either Entire Row or Entire Column, and then tap OK. When a column is deleted, its
contents are replaced with the contents of the column to the right. The contents of a deleted row
are replaced with the contents of the row immediately below.
The Shift Cells Left and Shift Cells Up options specify how the contents of a selected cell
or range are replaced. For example, if you select cells G3, H3, and I3, and then select Shift Cells
Up, the contents in cells G4, H4, and I4 will replace the contents of the selected cells.
Insert Cells
The Format | Insert Cells command inserts a row or column in the location of the current cell. When
you select the command, the Insert Cells dialog box displays, as shown in the following image:
When you insert a column, the contents of the column shift to the right, and rows shift down.
Selecting Shift Cells Right or Shift Cells Down specifies the direction that the selected cell or
range will move when the cells are inserted.
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Format Data in Workbooks
Pocket Excel provides a variety of ways to format the display of
data in a workbook. Select a cell, or a range of cells, and then tap
Format | Cells to open the following Format Cells dialog box:
With this dialog box, you can change the cell size, and
format the display of numbers, alignment, font, and borders
(and fills) by making changes in the tabs and then tapping OK.
Tap a row or column head to select the entire row or
column and then change the formatting for the entire
selection.
Change the Cell Size
The Size tab has fields for the row height and column width in
pixels. Changing the values of these fields changes the entire row or column of the current
cell. The default row height is 12.75 pixels, and the default column width is 9.00 pixels.
You can also change the row height or column width from the spreadsheet. To change
the row height, tap-and-hold on the line underneath the row number and drag up or
down. To change the column width, tap-and-hold on the line to the right of the column
letter and drag left or right.
Format Numbers
Ten predefined formats exist for numbers: Number, Currency, Accounting, Date, Time, Percentage,
Fraction, Scientific, Text, and General. You can also customize the format of numbers. By default,
every number in a spreadsheet has a general format.
To apply a format, first select a cell or range, select a format from the Category list, configure
the format, and then tap OK. As you change the settings, a sample of the format will display in
the dialog box. The following list summarizes each number format:
■ Number Changes the display to show the number of decimal places specified. Negative
numbers display based on the format selected from the Negative Numbers drop-down
list. To include a 1,000 separator (a comma), check the Use 1000 Separator box.
■ Currency Adds the currency symbol to the display when Use Currency Symbol is
checked. The symbol is based on the settings that you define using the Regional Settings
icon in Pocket PC Settings. This format also defines the number of decimal places and
negative numbers.
■ Accounting Adds the currency symbol and decimal places to the display. Negative
numbers are formatted using parentheses and cannot be changed.
■ Date Enables you to change the date in 11 different ways by selecting the format from
the list. When you enter a value into a cell that contains a number followed by a forward
slash and then another number (4/5, for example), Pocket Excel will automatically
assume you are entering a date. By default, the date will appear as specified in the
Pocket PC Regional settings.
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■ Time Has six different formats that you select from the list. When you enter a value
into a cell that contains a number followed by a colon and then another number (such
as 12:05), Pocket Excel will automatically assume you are entering a time. The default
format is specified in the Pocket PC Regional settings.
■ Percentage Adds the percent symbol (%) at the end of a number, and you select the
number of decimal places in the Decimal Places field.
■ Fraction Changes the display of a calculated value, such as =1/4 from a decimal of
0.25 to a fraction. To specify the number of digits in the fraction, select it from the Type
field. To enter a fraction in a cell, the fraction must be preceded by an equal sign;
otherwise, the value will be treated as a date.
■ Scientific Displays the value in scientific notation, using the number of decimal places
that you specify.
■ Text Forces the contents of a cell to be formatted as text, even when a number is in
the cell.
Create a Custom Format If none of the pre-existing formats meet your needs, you can create a
custom format by creating a template using format codes. Pocket Excel includes several predefined
templates that you can select and customize. The templates contain four sections of format codes,
which are separated by semicolons. The sections define positive numbers, negative numbers,
zero values, and text, in that order. If only two sections are specified, the first is used for positive
numbers and zeros and the second for negative numbers and text. When only one section is
specified, it is applied to all numbers. To skip a section, include the ending semicolon for that
section. Pocket Excel uses the same format codes as Excel, and you can find the codes in the
Excel Online Help.
Change Alignment
To align cell contents, first select the cells to be changed, open
the Format Cells dialog box, and tap the Align tab, as shown in
the following image:
Options in the Horizontal group change the position of
values left-to-right within the cell, and options in the Vertical
group change the position of values top-to-bottom within the
cell. You can also align cell contents by tapping the left,
right, or center align buttons on the toolbar.
Unless you change the row height, you will not notice
much change on the device screen after selecting
vertical alignment options.
If you enter text that is longer than the cell width, it will not
display completely within the cell. To see the complete text in
the cell, check Wrap Text in the Align tab.
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Change Font Settings
The Font tab of the Format Cells dialog box, as shown in the
following image, provides settings to change the display of
text or numbers:
To change the font, first select the cells, tap Format | Cells,
tap the Font tab, select the changes, and then tap OK.
Change the font by selecting a font from the Font
drop-down list. Selecting a value from the Size drop-down
list changes the font size, and checking the appropriate
boxes sets the font styles to Bold, Italic, and Underline.
To change font colors, select a color from the Color
drop-down list.
Change Borders and Fills
To change the cell border or fill color, use the Borders tab of the Format Cells dialog box, as
shown in the following image:
Select the border color from the Borders drop-down list, and check the options in the Border
group to select which sides of the border to change. To change cell fill colors, select a color from
the Fills drop-down list.
Work with Data in Workbooks
As your spreadsheets grow with data, you may want to hide some data so that you see only a
subset, or you may want to change the order in which the data is entered so that similar values
are grouped together. The Pocket Excel Sort and AutoFilter tools enable you to change the order
of data and decrease the amount of data in the display.
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Filter Data
A filter uses values in columns to decrease the number of rows that display below the point
where the filter is created. Where the filter starts depends on how it is created. If only one cell
is selected, the filter will begin in row 1, but if a range of cells is selected, the filter will begin
in the row that contains the range. Figure 11-2 shows a filter that starts in row 5.
This filter will not change rows above row 5, but the rows below will change.
To filter data, follow these steps:
1. Select a cell, or a range of cells, in a row.
2. Tap Tools | AutoFilter.
3. Tap the arrow in one of the columns to open a drop-down list.
4. Select a value from the drop-down list.
Only the rows containing the value that you selected will display below the location of the
filter. For example, if the number 5 is selected in the filter drop-down list in step 3, only the rows
below the filter that contain the number 5 will continue to display. To remove the filter, tap Tools |
AutoFilter.
11
Selecting a range of cells in
this row created this filter.
FIGURE 11-2
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This filter affects rows below row 5.
Tap these arrows to select
the column values to filter
out rows.
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Custom filters give you more control over what rows are displayed. To create a custom filter,
select Custom from the Filter drop-down list, and the Custom AutoFilter dialog box, as shown in
the following image, displays:
Select the filter criteria from
these drop-down lists.
Select the filter value from
these drop-down lists.
The two drop-down lists at the top of the Custom AutoFilter dialog box contain the filter
criteria, such as Is Greater Than and Is Not Equal To. The two drop-down lists at the bottom of
the dialog box contain the filter values that are in the column below the filter.
You can have your filters define two sets of criteria by selecting values in the second drop-down
lists and selecting one of the middle radio buttons (And or Or). For example, you could create a
filter that showed rows in which the column value is greater than 3 and less than 9.
In addition to the column values and the custom filter selection, you will also see All and Top
10 in the Filter drop-down list. Selecting All clears the filter and displays all of the rows; selecting
Top 10 displays rows that contain the top ten values in the column.
Sort Data
The Pocket Excel Sort command enables you to change the order of rows in a selected range of
cells based on values in columns. To sort data, first select a range of cells, and then tap Tools |
Sort to open the following Sort dialog box:
Select the first column or
header row title to sort
from this drop-down list.
If the selected range
includes a header row,
check this box to exclude
it from the sort.
Up to three columns can be included in a sort, which you select from the drop-down lists;
these columns are sorted in order from top to bottom. By default, the sort is in ascending order
unless the Ascending check box for the column is cleared, in which case the sort is in descending
order. If the range of cells includes a header row, and the Exclude Header Row From Sort box is
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checked, then the header titles appear in the drop-down lists rather than the column references,
and the row is not included in the sort.
If a range of cells is not selected, the Sort command will automatically select all
adjacent rows and columns of the selected cell for the sort.
Password-Protect Workbooks
A password can be assigned to workbooks so they will be secure. Without entering the password,
the workbook cannot be opened. To create passwords, follow these steps:
1. Tap Edit | Password.
2. Enter the password in the Password field.
3. Enter the same password in the Verify Password field.
4. Tap OK.
5. Save the workbook.
When you open the workbook, the Password prompt will display and the password will have
to be entered.
Don’t forget the password; without it, you will not be able to open the workbook, nor
will you be able to synchronize the workbook with your desktop computer!
To remove passwords, select Edit | Password, delete the contents of the Password field,
tap OK, and then save the workbook.
If you synchronize a Pocket Excel workbook that has a password, ActiveSync will prompt
you for the password during synchronization. After you enter the correct password, a copy of the
file will be written to the synchronized files folder of your desktop computer, but the password
will no longer be assigned to the workbook. Excel workbooks that contain passwords will not
synchronize with your Pocket PC, and during synchronization a message box will display telling
you that the file cannot be converted.
Share Workbooks
Pocket Excel makes it easy to share workbooks with other people by including the ability to send
workbooks via infrared or e-mail. To use infrared to send a workbook to another Windows-powered
device, follow these steps:
1. If the receiving device is a Handheld PC, open Windows Explorer and tap File | Receive.
2. If the receiving device is another Pocket PC, tap Start | Programs | Infrared Receive.
3. On the sending Pocket PC, which has a workbook open in Pocket Excel, tap Tools |
Beam Workbook, and line up the infrared ports of the two devices.
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If your device is running Pocket PC 2000, tap Tools | Send Via Infrared.
After the two devices recognize each other, the file will transfer to the receiving device.
When the transfer is complete, the sending device will indicate that one file has been sent and
a Close button will appear, which you tap to return to Pocket Excel.
To send a workbook via e-mail, tap Tools | Send Via E-mail and a new e-mail message will
open with the workbook as an attachment. Enter an e-mail address, subject, and message, and
then tap Send. Inbox will send the message the next time you connect to the Internet and retrieve
e-mail.
The Pocket PC Calculator
Pocket Excel is useful for what if scenarios, but it can be overkill if all you want to do is add
a bunch of numbers. For such simple mathematical tasks, your Pocket PC includes a standard
calculator application.
Some Pocket PCs include alternative calculators stored in ROM. For example, HP
Jornadas include OmniSolve. Several alternative calculators are also available for
download from the Internet, such as the MRI-Graphing Calculator from MathResources
Inc. at http://www.mathresources.com/.
Use Calculator
To start Calculator, tap Start | Programs | Calculator, and the following program window
will display:
Memory Recall
Backspace
Memory Clear
Add to Memory
Clear Entry
Clear
Your Pocket PC 2002 device may have a calculator that looks different than the one
shown here. Microsoft included a blue version of the calculator in the second End User
Update (EUU) of Pocket PC 2002. The blue version of the calculator has a bug in the
currency calculator that forgets the conversion factor after a soft reset.
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Tap the buttons on the screen to use the calculator. If you want to copy a value in the display
into a document, tap Edit | Copy and then paste it into the document.
Wrapping Up
Pocket Excel enables you to analyze numbers and track information, and the Calculator is ideal
for quick arithmetic. You can also use Pocket Excel to manage money, but you may prefer to use
Pocket Money, because it synchronizes with the desktop version of Microsoft Money. In the next
chapter you learn how to keep track of your finances using Pocket Money.
11
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Manage Your
Money
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How to . . .
■
■
■
■
■
Install Microsoft Money
Synchronize Microsoft Money
Set up accounts in Microsoft Money
Use Microsoft Money to track how you spend and save money
Use Microsoft Money to track your investments
A
s you have seen, Pocket PCs can be used to manage most of your personal information,
from contacts, appointments, and tasks to Pocket Word documents and Pocket Excel
spreadsheets. You may also want to manage your money on your Pocket PC, which you can
do in Pocket Excel, but an even better solution may be Microsoft Money.
Microsoft Money is a financial information management program that runs on Pocket PCs.
With this program, you can track financial information such as checking accounts, savings accounts,
credit card accounts, and investment accounts. If you run Microsoft Money on a desktop computer,
all of your data can be synchronized between it and your device. Transactions that you enter on
your Pocket PC will automatically synchronize to your desktop and update account balances.
Pocket PC 2000 originally shipped with the first version of Microsoft Money that
synchronizes with Money 2000 and 2001. If you have a Pocket PC 2002 or Windows
Mobile 2003 device, you will need Money 2002 or 2003 to synchronize data.
In this chapter, you learn how to install Microsoft Money on your device and how to configure
ActiveSync to synchronize data between a Pocket PC and desktop computer. You also learn how
to work with transactions, categories, and payees. Finally, you learn how to track your investments
by downloading stock quotes from the Internet.
Microsoft Money came preinstalled with Pocket PC 2000 devices, but Money is a separate
program that you must install on Pocket PC 2002 and Windows Mobile 2003 devices.
Install Microsoft Money
If you plan to synchronize with Money on a PC and it is not already installed, you need to install
it first. The Pocket PC version of Microsoft Money is included on the CD for the desktop software,
or you can download a copy from http://www.microsoft.com/mobile/pocketpc/downloads/
money.asp.
Microsoft provides several versions of Microsoft Money for Pocket PC at the download
website. Use Table 12-1 to determine which version you should download for your Pocket PC.
To install Microsoft Money on your Pocket PC, your desktop PC must be running Windows
98, Me, Windows 2000, or Windows XP. The PC must have 70MB of available hard disk space,
16MB of RAM, and at least a 90MHz Pentium processor. Microsoft Money requires 500K of
storage space available on the Pocket PC for installation.
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CHAPTER 12: Manage Your Money
Desktop Version of
Microsoft Money
Pocket PC
Download
Money 2003
Pocket PC 2002 or
Windows Mobile 2003
Money 2003 for Pocket PC
Money 2002
Pocket PC 2002
Money 2002 for Pocket PC
Money 2002
Pocket PC 2000
Update Money for Pocket PC 2000
to Money 2002
Money 2001
Pocket PC 2000
Sync Update for Money 2001
TABLE 12-1
231
Match Versions for Microsoft Money for Pocket PC with Microsoft Money
for PCs
To install Microsoft Money on a Pocket PC, first connect the device with a desktop computer.
Use Windows Explorer to browse to the location where you downloaded Microsoft Money,
and then run the setup program. The software installs like any other Pocket PC program, using
ActiveSync’s Add/Remove Programs function. The installation program may ask to replace files
on your device, which you should do by tapping Yes on the dialog box that appears.
Synchronize with Microsoft Money
Microsoft Money 2003 for Pocket PC will synchronize only with Microsoft Money 2003 on a
desktop PC. If you have other versions of the Pocket PC or Microsoft Money software, you may
need to upgrade one or the other, as shown in Table 12-1.
Synchronization of Microsoft Money data can occur only between one Pocket PC and one
desktop computer. This rule applies for multiple Pocket PCs synchronizing with the same PC,
as well as for synchronizing a Pocket PC with multiple PCs.
If you intend to synchronize your Microsoft Money data with a Pocket PC, you should not
enter information on the Pocket PC before synchronizing. During the first synchronization,
ActiveSync will detect any data on the Pocket PC and give you the chance to combine it with the
data on your desktop computer. However, there is always a chance that a problem can occur and
data will be lost. To prevent that from happening, it is best not to enter any data on the Pocket PC
before synchronizing.
Do not disconnect or turn off your Pocket PC while synchronizing with Microsoft Money
or you may experience problems with the program. If this occurs, start ActiveSync on
your desktop computer, double-click the Microsoft Money information type, click the
Tools tab, and then click Sync All to force a full resynchronization of your Money data.
Configure Synchronization Settings
ActiveSync can be configured to limit the amount of data that synchronizes to a Pocket PC, which
can speed up synchronization. To configure synchronization, connect your Pocket PC to your
desktop PC and then perform the following steps on the PC.
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Synchronize Money Data After
Installing Microsoft Money on a PC
We recommend that you do not add data to Microsoft Money on your Pocket PC until you
install Microsoft Money on your desktop computer. However, if you do input Money data
on your Pocket PC, here is how you can safely synchronize that data to a new Money file on
a PC. Before you follow these steps, you should back up your Pocket PC following the
instructions in Chapter 7.
1. Install Microsoft Money on your desktop computer.
2. Run Microsoft Money on your desktop. On the initial Money Setup
Assistant screen, click Start Here. This will create a blank Money file.
3. Exit Microsoft Money on your desktop.
4. Connect your Pocket PC with the desktop and reinstall Microsoft Money
for the Pocket PC.
5. When prompted on the Pocket PC, tap OK to reinstall.
6. This step is very important—otherwise you will lose the Microsoft Money
data on your Pocket PC. When prompted on the Pocket PC, tap No when
you’re asked whether you want to delete any existing Money databases on
your Pocket PC.
7. When prompted on the Pocket PC, tap Yes To All when you’re asked whether
you want to replace existing files.
8. The install will end on the Pocket PC at the Items tab for the Today
Screen settings. Leave this screen open and connect your Pocket PC
to the desktop computer.
9. Check ActiveSync to verify that the Money data synchronizes.
10. Once synchronization completes, you can close the Today Screen settings
on the Pocket PC.
By default, Microsoft Money synchronizes the last four weeks of data. Data
older than four weeks is removed from the Pocket PC as it ages, but it will
remain on the PC. You can choose to synchronize all data, but this will
require more storage space if you have a lot of transactions.
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1. Double-click the Microsoft Money
entry in the Details section to open
the Microsoft Money Synchronization
Settings dialog box shown at top right.
By default, ActiveSync selects
the current Money 2003 file for
synchronization. You can change the
file by clicking on the Browse button.
2. ActiveSync can be configured to
synchronize all transactions for
selected accounts, or to synchronize
only a defined amount of transactions.
Select the radio button for the setting
that you desire; to limit the transactions
to a defined period of time, select a
value from the drop-down list.
3. All of the accounts in the Money 2003
file are listed on the dialog box, which
you can select for synchronization by
clicking the check box next to each
entry. If you clear the check box, the
account will not synchronize to the
Pocket PC—however, if the account
was previously synchronized, it will
not be deleted from the Pocket PC.
4. The Investments tab is used to select
the investments to synchronize
between the Pocket PC and desktop
PC. Select the Synchronize All
Investment Names radio button to
synchronize all investments, or add
a check mark next to the investments
that you want to synchronize, as
shown to the bottom right.
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5. The Tools tab, shown next, provides options for fixing problems that may occur during
synchronization.
6. Click Sync All to initiate a full resynchronization of your Money data. The Sync All
button is grayed out if the Pocket PC is not connected to the desktop computer.
7. Click Delete All to delete all of the Money Data on your Pocket PC. If you protect your
desktop Money data with a password, you will be prompted to enter that password each
time Money synchronizes. You can select the Remember Password And Use It Next
Time You Sync check box if you prefer not to enter the desktop password during
synchronization.
If the Microsoft Money data on your Pocket PC becomes out of sync with your desktop
computer, click Delete All to remove the data from your Pocket PC, and then click Sync
All to restore the data on the desktop to the Pocket PC.
8. Click OK to save the Microsoft Money synchronization settings and close the dialog box.
You can assign a password to the Microsoft Money data file on your Pocket PC by
tapping Tools | Password. This password is different from the password that you assign
to Money on your PC.
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Use Pocket Money
Microsoft Money has five views: Account Manager, Account Register, Categories, Investments,
and Payees. The current view is always displayed at the top of the screen, as shown here for
Account Manager view:
Open the drop-down
list view.
To switch between views, select a view from the View drop-down list, or tap a command bar
button, as shown here:
Categories
New transaction
Investments
Payees
Account Manager
Create, Edit, and Delete Accounts
Microsoft Money can store as many accounts as you want, depending on the amount of storage
memory available. All of the data is written to the Pocket PC data store, which is the same place
where the Pocket Outlook data is written. This data cannot be written to a storage card, and the
Pocket PC data store is limited to 16MB.
In addition to affecting how much Pocket Outlook data your device can hold, the speed
of Microsoft Money will be impacted if you choose to store a great deal of data on your
device.
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To create a new account in Microsoft Money, you will need to provide a name for the
account and select an account type. Microsoft Money on Pocket PCs does not support all Money
2003 account types, but the account types it does support are Cash, Checking, Credit Card, Line
of Credit, and Savings. Any new account that you create on your device will be added to Money
2003 during the next synchronization.
To create a new account, tap New on a Pocket PC, and the following dialog box displays:
Enter a name in the Account Name field, and select
the type of account that you want to create in the Account
Type drop-down list. All the other fields on the dialog box
are optional, although you will probably enter an amount
in the Opening Balance field. Tap the Display Account
On Today Screen check box if you want to see the account
balance displayed on the Today screen. The Optional tab
provides fields for storing an Account Number, Institution
Name, Contact Name, and Phone Number.
After an account exists, you can edit its details at any
time. You can also edit some of the details for accounts
that have been created in Money 2003. When you make
changes, they will be uploaded to Money 2003 during the
next synchronization.
Information for accounts enabled for online
banking cannot be edited on Pocket PCs.
To edit an account, tap-and-hold on the account name in the Account Manager view and
select Edit Details from the pop-up menu. You can edit most of the details for an account except
the account type. If you want to change the account type, you must delete the account and create
a new account of another type.
When you delete an account, you also delete all the transactions it contains. You cannot,
however, delete an account that has been synchronized with Money 2003 from a Pocket PC. You
must use Money 2003 to delete synchronized accounts. To delete an account, tap-and-hold on the
account name in the Account Manager view and select Delete Account from the pop-up menu.
Display Money Information
on the Today Screen
Microsoft Money account balances and investment information can be displayed on the
Pocket PC’s Today screen. During installation, a Money entry is added to the Today screen
items, which you view by tapping Start | Settings | Today, and then tapping the Items tab.
Clear the Money check box to remove the Money information from the Today screen. Select
the Money item, and then tap Options to select the accounts and investments you want to see
on the Today screen.
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Use Accounts and the Account Register
When you start Microsoft Money, the Account Manager view displays, which is the main view of
the program. This view displays the name and balance for each account, as well as the total balance
for all accounts. To see the transactions for an account, tap the account name in the Account
Manager view. You can also switch to the Account Register by expanding the View drop-down list
and tapping Account Register, which opens the program window on a Pocket PC, as shown here:
Select different
accounts.
You will notice that the current account displays in the upper right-hand corner. If you want
to switch to another account, tap the drop-down list triangle next to the account name and tap an
account name in the list, as shown here:
Select an account
from this list.
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Enter Transactions
Microsoft Money for the Pocket PC is designed so that entering transactions is fast and easy. Many
of the fields that you complete while entering a transaction contain default values; for instance
the default type for all new transactions is Withdrawal. AutoFill automatically enters the most
recently used amount, category, and subcategory for the last transaction for a payee.
AutoComplete+ is an option that must be turned on. The process for setting options in
Microsoft Money is explained later in this chapter in the section “Change Settings.”
Microsoft Money supports three transaction types: withdrawal, deposit, and transfer. A
withdrawal is a transaction that removes money from an account; deposits add money to accounts.
A transfer moves money from one account to another. You can enter new transactions from any
view by tapping the New Transaction button on the Command bar; or if you are in the Account
Register view, tap New. When you create a new transaction, the following screen displays:
To enter a new transaction, do the following:
1. Select Withdrawal, Deposit, or Transfer from the Type drop-down list.
2. Select an account from the Account drop-down list.
3. Enter a payee in the Payee field, or select an entry from the drop-down list. AutoFill will
attempt to determine which payee you are entering and will automatically display one
previously entered into the field based on the letters you enter.
4. Select a date from the Date pop-up menu.
5. Enter a value in the Amount field.
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At this point, you have completed all of the fields
required for the transaction, and if you tap OK, the
transaction will appear in the Account Register. However,
you can complete optional fields by tapping the Optional
tab, as shown here.
The most frequently used field on the Optional tab may
be Check Num, in which you enter a check number for
withdrawal transactions. If AutoFill is enabled, and the last
transaction for the payee was a check, the next available
check number for the account will be automatically entered
in this field.
Deposits and transfers do not include the Check
Num field on the Optional tab.
Categories and subcategories are downloaded from
Money 2003 during synchronization. Select values from
each drop-down list to complete these two fields. You can also enter a new item in either field,
which is automatically entered in the category list and uploaded to Money 2003 during the next
synchronization.
The Status field is used to set the transaction status to either C for cleared, R for reconciled,
or V for void; and you can use the Memo field to enter a short note for the transaction. When you
are done entering all of the information for the transaction, tap OK.
Transfer Money Between Accounts Transfers move money
from one account to another; to accommodate this, the New
Transaction dialog box changes when you select the transfer
transaction type. As you can see here, two fields appear on
the dialog box: From and To.
To transfer money from one account to another, select the
source account in the From drop-down list, and select the
destination account in the To drop-down list. Complete the
rest of the fields on the dialog box as you would for any
other transaction. Figure 12-1 shows the Account Register
for the source and destination accounts after a transfer is
complete.
Split Transactions Categories and subcategories are used
to track how money is spent. It is often the case that
financial transactions should be split into multiple
categories. For example, one purchase at a computer store
may include hardware and software, and you might want to track the amount of money that you
spend on each category. Microsoft Money’s split transaction functionality enables you to track
your finances at this level of detail.
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Transfer out
Transfer in
FIGURE 12-1
On the left is the Account Register view for a source account after a transfer;
on the right is the Account Register view for the destination account.
While you can split any withdrawal or deposit, you cannot split a transfer. To enter split
transactions, do the following:
1. Create a new transaction.
2. Complete the Payee and Amount fields.
3. Tap Split to open the Split Transaction dialog box shown here:
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4. Tap New to open the next dialog box. Enter the Amount, Category, Subcategory, and
Description for a part of the transaction and tap OK. As each part of the transaction is
entered, the Unassigned amount will change, as shown here:
5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 for each part of the transaction.
6. Tap OK when you’re done.
Another way to enter a split transaction is to skip entering the amount in step 2. Enter each
part of the transaction, and when you are done tap Adjust Total, which displays a dialog box
asking whether you want the total transaction to equal the sum of the split items. Tap Yes, and
the total for the transaction will equal the sum of the split items. Tap OK to return to the Split
Transaction dialog box.
If you tap the Optional tab in the New Transaction dialog box, you will see that the Category
field contains the word Split and the Subcategory field is grayed-out.
Edit and Delete Transactions
Editing a transaction in an Account Register is simple. Tap the transaction that you want to edit,
make the changes, and tap OK. To delete a transaction on a Pocket PC, tap-and-hold on the
transaction, and on the pop-up menu, tap Delete Transaction. You will be asked to confirm that
you want to delete the transaction permanently. Tap Yes to delete the transaction. During the next
synchronization, the transaction will also be deleted from Money 2003.
Create, Edit, and Delete Categories
One reason why you might want to use Microsoft Money is to see where you are spending your
money. Using that information, you can create a budget that reflects your spending habits.
Microsoft Money’s method for tracking cash flow is to assign transactions to categories and
subcategories.
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Categories stored in Microsoft Money are listed in
the Categories view. To open the view, shown next, tap
Categories in the View drop-down list or tap the Categories
command bar button.
Expense categories are listed first and are in alphabetical
order. Subcategories are indented underneath categories
and provide more specific details about the transactions.
For example, a Computers category may have hardware
and software subcategories to identify how money is spent
on computers.
Prior to synchronization, the Category view is empty.
The first time you synchronize Microsoft Money on a Pocket
PC with Money 2003, the Category view is populated with
the Money 2003 categories. When you create a new category
on your Pocket PC, it will be added to Money 2003’s
categories during the next synchronization.
You can create as many categories and subcategories as
you want, but keep in mind that this information, along with everything else in Microsoft Money,
is kept in internal storage. The more information you store, the slower Microsoft Money will run.
To create a new category from within the Category view, tap New to open the New Category/
Subcategory dialog box shown here:
Categories and subcategories can also be created while you are entering a new
transaction, as described in the previous section of this chapter.
Enter the category name in the Name field, and tap the appropriate radio button to specify
whether it is an income or expense category. If you are creating a subcategory, tap the Subcategory
Of radio button and select a subcategory name from the drop-down list. You can also enter a
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short description for the category or subcategory in the Memo field. Tap OK to add the item to
the Category view.
Because subcategories belong to categories, you can create a subcategory only for a
category that already exists.
The only parts of a category that can change after it is created are the Name and Memo fields.
If you want to change the category type, you must delete the category and create a new one. To
change these items for a category, tap the category name in the Category view, change the entries
in the Name field, and tap OK.
Any category or subcategory can be deleted, and when you delete a category all subcategories
that it contains are also deleted. Transactions in Microsoft Money that are in a deleted category
or subcategory remain, but they are no longer part of the category. However, the same transactions
in Money 2003 are not changed, and, therefore, the category may not be deleted in Money 2003.
If that is the case, the category will reappear in Microsoft Money after the next synchronization.
Categories and subcategories that you delete in Microsoft Money will be removed from
Money 2003 only if they are not used in any transactions.
To delete a category or subcategory, tap-and-hold on the item and tap Delete Category from
the pop-up menu.
Create, Edit, and Delete Payees
Payees are people or organizations to whom you pay money or from whom you receive money.
Typically, payees are created when you enter a transaction in Microsoft Money, but they may also
be created in the Payee view. To see a listing of the payees entered in Microsoft Money, tap Payees
in the View drop-down list, or tap the Payee Command bar button, to open this dialog box:
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To create a new item in the Payee view, tap New and complete the fields on the dialog box.
Only the Name field is required. When you are done, tap OK to add the item to the list of payees.
During the next synchronization, the item will be added to the list of payees in Money 2003.
Any payee that you enter in Microsoft Money or Money 2003 can be edited. To edit an item
in the Payee view, tap the item, make the changes to the fields, and then tap OK.
Every transaction in Microsoft Money requires a payee; therefore, you can delete only payees
that are not used in any transactions currently on your Pocket PC. Microsoft Money will prevent
you from deleting a payee included in transactions and will display a warning box. When you
delete a payee from Microsoft Money, it will also be permanently deleted from Money 2003
during the next synchronization.
To delete an item in the Payee view on a Pocket PC, tap-and-hold on the item and tap Delete
Payee on the pop-up menu.
Create, Edit, and Update Investments
Of course, checking and savings accounts are not the only places in which we put our money.
Investments in stocks and mutual funds can be an important way for us to save and make money.
People who make investments like to keep current on the performance of their holdings, and
today a number of ways exist for you to obtain stock quotes. One of those ways is with software
like Microsoft Money and Money 2003.
With Microsoft Money, you can keep track of the value of your investment portfolio either
directly online or by synchronizing with Money 2003. The first step to tracking this information
is to enter the market symbols and the amount of shares that you hold by using the Investment
view, which you open by selecting Investments in the View drop-down list or by tapping the
Investments Command bar button.
To enter an investment, tap New to open the New Investment dialog box, shown here:
Enter the name of the investment, its symbol, and the number of shares you hold. If you want the
investment to display on the Today screen, tap the Display Investment On Today Screen check
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box. If you know the investment’s last price, you can enter
it, but this is not required. Tap OK to save the investment
information and close the dialog box.
After the investment is entered, it appears in the
Investments view, as shown to the right.
You do not need to enter the number of shares that you
hold, and you can simply provide a name and symbol to
obtain a stock quote. Entries in the Investment view cannot
be edited. To delete an entry, tap-and-hold on it, and then
tap Delete Investment on the pop-up menu.
Perhaps the most important part of the Investment view
is its ability to download stock quotes from the Internet.
Microsoft Money retrieves quotes from the MSN
MoneyCentral website. The quotes are provided by
Standard & Poor’s Comstock and are delayed at least
20 minutes.
To download stock quotes to your Pocket PC, you
must create and use an Internet connection (described in Chapter 19). Connect the Pocket PC to
the Internet and then tap Tools | Update Investments, or tap the Update toolbar button. Microsoft
Money will download the latest market prices for your investments and display them in the
Investment view. If you enter an invalid symbol for an investment, the market value will display
“Invalid Symbol.”
Stock quote prices may be updated by using a direct Internet connection. If you connect
to the Internet using a proxy server, you must provide the address and port number in
Microsoft Money’s options, as described in the next section.
Change Settings
At first, you may not even notice some of the most useful
options available in Microsoft Money. These include using
AutoComplete+, assigning Money to a hardware button,
and downloading stock quotes from the Internet. To change
these options, tap Tools | Options to open the Options
dialog box shown at right.
The Editing tab is used to turn AutoComplete+ on or
off, to turn AutoFill on or off, and to turn large fonts on
or off. AutoComplete+ fills in words you have used before
as soon as you enter the first few letters. AutoFill remembers
payees and automatically fills in the most recently used
amount, category, and subcategory for the payee. It also
automatically fills in the next check number if you are
entering a check. When checked, the Use Large Font
setting switches the font display in Microsoft Money
to boldface.
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Microsoft Money can be assigned to a hardware button
on your device. The Options dialog box on the Pocket PC
includes a Program Button link that you can
tap to open the Button Settings dialog box. Follow the
instructions provided in Chapter 3 for assigning programs
to hardware keys, and tap OK to return to the Microsoft
Money Options dialog box.
Stock quotes can be downloaded from the Internet
using a direct network connection. Many local area
networks provide connection to the Internet through a
proxy server. If that is the case in your situation and you
want to download stock quotes, you must configure the
Proxy Server tab on the Options dialog box. When you
tap the Proxy Server tab, the following dialog box will
display:
Tap the check box so that Microsoft Money uses the
proxy server. Enter a URL or TCP/IP address in the
HTTP:// field, and enter a number in the Port field. Typically, the port number will be 80, but
consult your network administrator to confirm this value. Tap OK when you’re done.
Synchronize with Quicken
LandWare is licensed by Intuit to develop and sell handheld versions of Quicken, which are
called Pocket Quicken. The Pocket PC version of Pocket Quicken runs on Pocket PC 2000,
2002, or Windows Mobile 2003 and Quicken Basic, Deluxe, Home & Business, and Premier
versions 99 through 2003. Pocket Quicken also synchronizes with Quicken UK 2002 or later,
while Microsoft Money synchronizes only with U.S. versions of Money. You will find more
information about Pocket Quicken at http://www.landware.com/pocketquicken/ ppc/index.html.
A few alternatives to Microsoft Money and Pocket Quicken include the following:
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Mastersoft Money http://www.mastersoftmobilesolutions.com/
Cash Organizer http://www.inesoft.com
PocketMoney http://www.catamount.com/PocketMoney.html
Money etc http://www.pylin.com/
DMX Checkbook
http://www.dmxcoding.com/
Money Manager http://www.owlseeker.co.uk/
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Set Passwords
You can assign a password to Microsoft Money, which must be entered each time you start the
program. To assign a password, tap Tools | Password. Enter a password in the New Password
field, enter it a second time in the Confirm Password field, and then tap OK.
Wrapping Up
Because a Pocket PC is portable, you’ll find it easy to record financial transactions as you shop.
Then when you return home, all you need to do is synchronize your Pocket PC to update the
financial information on your desktop computer. The combination of Microsoft Money, a Pocket
PC, and synchronization with your desktop PC provide an example how you can use a Pocket PC
as part of your normal routine.
Pocket PCs are also great note-taking tools—in the next chapter, you will learn how you can
take both handwritten notes and voice recordings on your Pocket PC and then later synchronize
them to your desktop computer.
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How to…
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Create notes in digital ink or text
Make voice recordings
Change the voice recording format
Send notes and voice recordings via e-mail
Beam notes and voice recordings to other devices
Synchronize notes with Outlook
Manage and search for notes on your Pocket PC
Synchronize Outlook Journal entries using CLC Journal
I
f you need to write a quick note, what do you use? Before I started using my Pocket PC, I
would write notes on pieces of paper and stick them somewhere easy to find. On my desk
at work, notes were scattered everywhere, and over time my workspace would look cluttered.
Inevitably, a note that had an important phone number or appointment would be lost, causing
me either to lose time hunting for the phone number or miss a meeting.
Now that I have my Pocket PC, I store phone numbers in Contacts and enter appointments in
Calendar, and when I need to jot a quick note, I turn to the Notes application. Of course, I could
use Pocket Word, but I have found Notes to be better suited for this task.
As you will learn in this chapter, Notes can be configured to store what you write in digital
ink or translated to text. Since I usually tend to write these notes quickly, I use digital ink, and I
use Pocket Word for creating documents in text.
For those times when writing is not convenient, you can use your Pocket PC to make voice notes,
which are stored and retrieved along with all your handwritten information. Finally, Notes on your
Pocket PC can be synchronized with the Notes folder in Outlook or synchronized as individual files
in the My Documents folder. Think of Notes, configured for digital ink, as your electronic notepad,
which neatly stores all your information in one place and never runs out of paper.
Create, Open, and Save Notes
Tap Start | Notes to start the Notes application. If Notes is not listed in the Start menu, tap Start |
Programs | Notes. The application will open in List view, as shown in Figure 13-1. Simply tap a
file name in the List view to open the note. Tap New to create a blank note page that is ready for
handwriting, text, or recordings. Tap OK to save the note and return to the List view.
Write Notes
Writing notes is as simple as using a paper notepad. When you create a note by tapping New,
the screen displays a ruled page that looks similar to a paper page. If you write directly on the
screen, your handwriting will appear as digital ink, as shown in Figure 13-2. Notice the Pencil
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Open a note
Record
Create a new note
FIGURE 13-1
The Notes application in List view
13
Switch between Writing
and Typing mode
FIGURE 13-2
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button on the Command bar; the square around the Pencil button indicates that Notes is in
Writing mode. Tap the Pencil button to switch to Typing mode, where you can put text into
the note using the soft input panel.
By default, Notes is configured for Writing mode, which displays all of your handwriting
in digital ink. If you always want your handwriting to be translated to text, tap Tools |
Options from the List view, and then select Typing from the Default Mode drop-down list.
If you tap Tools | Recognize, all handwriting in the note converts to text. You may also narrow
the conversion down to a portion of the handwriting by first selecting it, and then tapping Tools |
Recognize. To make corrections to the conversion, tap-and-hold the stylus on the incorrect word
and tap Alternates. Tap the correct word from the list that appears. Undo the conversion by
tapping Edit | Undo Recognize.
Even though Notes does not have a Drawing mode, drawings can be made in Writing
mode. However, you may have problems viewing the drawings after you synchronize the
file to a desktop PC. If you tap Tools | Recognize to convert an entire document to text,
Notes will convert the drawing to text as well, generating some strange results.
Edit Notes
The standard edit functions (Cut, Copy, and Paste) can be used to edit Notes. Select these functions
from either the Edit or pop-up menu. To select writing, tap the stylus on the screen until the cursor
appears, drag the stylus across the writing, and then lift the stylus. When selecting text, just drag
the stylus across the words that you want to select and lift the stylus. Embedded recordings are
also selected in this manner. Tap-and-hold the stylus on the selection to open the pop-up menu
and tap Cut, Copy, Paste, or Clear. These same functions are also available in the Edit menu.
To select the entire note, tap Edit | Select All. Any edit function can be undone by using the
Edit menu. The Undo options in the Edit menu change according to the last edit performed. For
example, if you just cut an item from the document, the Edit menu contains Undo Delete, which
will replace the item cut (deleted) from the document.
To insert the current date and time into a note, tap-and-hold the stylus on the screen
until the pop-up menu appears, and then select Insert Date.
Zoom Notes
Change the display size by selecting a zoom percentage from the Tools menu; for example,
to increase the display size 200%, tap Tools | 200%. You cannot customize the zoom settings.
Make Voice Recordings
How often do you drive and use your computer at the same time? (Not often, I hope, or I would
like to know what roads you travel on so that I can avoid them.) Yet, while you shouldn’t be
using your computer while driving, there probably have been times when you’ve had a thought
that you would like to make sure you remember. For that, you could use a cassette recorder or
your Pocket PC.
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Recording memos to yourself is little reason to buy a Pocket PC, but once a recording is
completed, the Pocket PC capabilities shine. You can label the recordings, giving them a name
that you can easily identify for later retrieval, as well as date and time stamp each recording.
Recordings can be grouped in folders and synchronized to a desktop computer. They can also be
attached to e-mail and sent to anyone with an Internet e-mail address, and they can be beamed
via infrared to any other Pocket PC.
The number of recordings you may store on your device is limited by the amount of storage
space available. Recordings can be stored either in internal storage memory or on a storage card.
Your Pocket PC creates files in the Waveform (WAV) audio format, and there are different types
of WAV files. Depending on which format you select and its recording quality, a three-second
recording can require 1KB to 28KB of storage. Approximately one hour of recordings can take
up to 1MB of space.
Storage space is not your only consideration; using the microphone and other peripherals
drains batteries fast, decreasing the amount of recording time. If you plan to make long
recordings, make sure the battery is fully charged and remove any unnecessary peripherals.
If you want to record audio to the MP3 format on a Pocket PC, or you want a voice
recording program that provides more functions than Notes, check out VITO Technology’s
SoundExplorer at http://www.vito-tech.com.
Create Recordings
Your Pocket PC is designed to work like a tape recorder. To make a recording, press-and-hold
the Record hardware button. The device will beep and begin recording. Stop the recording by
releasing the button. The recording is stored on your device and is included in the Notes List
view with a default file name. To play a recording, tap its file name, and use the buttons on the
recording toolbar to control the playback.
13
Create a Customized Alarm
Your Pocket PC comes with several different sounds that are used for reminders in Calendar
and Tasks and as general alarms. You can record your own customized alarm using Notes.
First, create the recording that you want to use, and then tap-and-hold on the file and rename
the file to something easy to remember. Then start File Explorer and copy the file from the
My Documents folder to the Windows folder. To use the recording for reminders, tap Start |
Settings | Sounds & Reminders, and then tap the Reminder tab and select your recording
from the Sound drop-down list. To create an alarm, tap Start | Settings | System | Clock, and
then tap the Alarms tab. Tap the Alarm button and select your recording from the Play Sound
drop-down list.
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Recordings can also be created in Notes by tapping Record on the Command bar to open the
Recording toolbar, as shown in the following image:
Stop Play
Start recording
Record
Volume
Tap the Record button on the toolbar to begin recording, and tap the Stop button to end
recording.
The default file name for text notes and recordings is based on the folder name in which
the item is stored. For example, if you select a folder named Projects in the Notes List
view, notes and recordings will have the default file name of Projects and a number,
such as Projects1.
If you make a recording while a note is open, it will be embedded in the note. Once the
recording is finished, an icon is inserted into the note, as shown in the following image. Play
the recording by tapping the icon.
Speak directly into the microphone to create good recordings. Check the user manual of
your Pocket PC to locate the microphone.
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Change the Format
of Voice Recordings
Recordings are created using one of several formats available on your Pocket PC. Which
format you use depends on your personal preferences for sound quality, and how much you
want to record. Higher quality recordings require more storage space.
To change the recording format, tap Start | Settings | Input, and then tap the Options tab
on the Input screen. Tap the Voice Recording Format drop-down list to expand the list of
available formats, and then select the format you want to use. The Pulse Code Modulation
(PCM) and Global System for Mobile (GSM) telecommunications 6.10 formats come
standard with Pocket PC 2002 and Windows Mobile 2003. Pocket PC hardware
manufacturers may add formats that are unique to their devices.
Of the standard formats, PCM provides the highest quality, and the drop-down list provides
several different bit rates of this format in either mono or stereo, which you can select to
balance between quality and storage space. GSM 6.10 provides medium quality recordings, and
both formats can be played on Windows desktop computers. If your Pocket PC has additional
formats, make sure you select either PCM or GSM 6.10 as the format to use if you plan to
e-mail recordings to people who can receive them only on Windows desktops.
Send Notes and Recordings via E-Mail or Infrared
Notes and recordings may be sent to someone via e-mail, which the receiver opens using
Microsoft Word or the default WAV file player. To e-mail a note, follow these steps:
1. If the note is already open, tap Tools | Send Via E-mail.
2. If the note or recording is displayed in the Notes List view, tap-and-hold on the
file name and select Send Via E-mail from the pop-up menu.
3. Inbox starts with a new message and the note attached. Enter an e-mail address.
(See Chapter 21 for instructions on how to use Inbox.)
4. Enter a subject.
5. Tap Send.
Depending on how you use Inbox, the e-mail will be sent the next time you connect with your
Internet Service Provider (ISP) or the next time you synchronize with your desktop computer.
If you e-mail a voice recording and the person who receives the recording cannot play
it, check to make sure the recording is in either the PCM or GSM 6.10 format.
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Distribute Meeting Minutes Quickly
With a large enough storage card, entire meetings can be recorded using a Pocket PC. To
do this, start Notes, create a new note, start the recording, and then place the device in the
middle of the meeting table. Make sure that everyone speaks loud enough to be recorded.
Once the meeting is over, send the recording as an e-mail attachment to all of the participants.
If the meeting is long, you can create multiple recordings of different meeting topics.
Notes and recordings can be transferred between devices using the infrared port. To perform
infrared transfers, follow these steps:
1. If the note is already open, tap Tools | Beam Note.
2. If the note or recording is displayed in the Notes List view, tap-and-hold on the file name
and select Beam File from the pop-up menu.
3. Make sure the device receiving the transfer is set to Receive.
4. Line up the infrared ports of both devices. A sound will indicate that a connection is
made, and the note will transfer.
5. The receiving device will indicate that one file was received and the sending device will
indicate that one file was sent.
Synchronize Notes and Recordings
You can synchronize notes with a desktop computer in two ways: If you prefer to store notes in
Outlook, you can configure ActiveSync to synchronize them with the Notes folder in Outlook.
When Notes synchronization is disabled and File synchronization is enabled, notes are
synchronized along with other files in the Pocket PC My Documents folder.
To enable the Notes ActiveSync information type on your PC, choose Tools | Options, and
then select the Notes check box. When you synchronize the device with your desktop computer,
any note on the device will appear in Outlook Notes, and notes already in Outlook will appear
on the device. All note types are synchronized, including those containing digital ink and voice
recordings.
Notes located on storage cards will not synchronize with Outlook.
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Manage Your Notes and Recordings
The best way to manage notes is by using the Notes List view. Notes are sorted by Name, Date,
Size, or Type. Select one of the four sort options, as shown in the following image:
Select one of these
options to change
the sorting order.
Assign an Alarm to a Note
13
There are many good reasons for taking notes; one of them is to remind yourself to do
something in a couple of hours. You could create an appointment or task and set a reminder,
but sometimes that is overkill when you just want to jot a quick note to yourself. Fortunately,
three software developers have created solutions that sound an alarm and display a written
note at a set time, or that automatically play a voice recording at a set time.
RemindMe from Applian is available in English, German, French, and Spanish. RemindMe
can display notes or play voice recordings either within a certain amount of time, say 15
minutes from now, or at a set time. You can find a trial version of this program along with
more information at http://www.applian.com/pocketpc/remindme/index.htm.
BugMe from Electric Pocket is an award-winning Palm OS application that has also been
written for the Pocket PC. It provides the same functions as RemindMe, plus it adds the ability
to change note and ink colors as well as lock notes so they can’t be accidentally deleted. A
trial version of BugMe is available at http://www.bugme.net/bugme-pocketpc/index.html.
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If you already use Pocket Informant as an alternative to Pocket Outlook, you don’t need
to install RemindMe or BugMe, because their features are available as a Pocket Informant
Alarm Note. By default, Pocket Informant assigns the Alarm Note feature to the Voice
Record button on your Pocket PC, but if that is not the case on your Pocket PC, you can
create an Alarm Note by selecting PI Alarm Note in the New button menu. Pocket Informant
provides many more features than described here, and more information and a trial version of
the program is available at http://www.pocketinformant.com.
Notes are copied, deleted, renamed, or moved by using the pop-up menu that appears when
you tap-and-hold the stylus on a note. Table 13-1 summarizes the pop-up menu options.
An open note can be renamed or moved by tapping Tools | Rename/Move. To delete a note
while it is open, tap Tools | Delete Note.
Search for Notes and Recordings
Pocket PCs allow you to search through all data stored on the device. You can search for file
names or words within documents. To search for a note, follow these steps:
1. Tap Start | Find.
2. Enter a word in the Find field.
3. Select Notes from the Type drop-down list.
4. Tap Go.
5. Search results display in the bottom half of the screen. Open a listed note
by tapping its name.
Action
Create Copy
Places a copy of the selected note in the List view. The note will have the same
name with the addition of a number in parentheses—Note(1).
Delete
Opens a warning dialog box telling you that the selected item(s) will be
permanently deleted. Tap Yes to delete or No to cancel.
Send Via E-Mail
Starts Inbox and creates a new e-mail message with the note you select as an
attachment.
Beam File
Initiates an infrared beam of the note that you select. After you tap Beam File, align
the infrared ports of the sending and receiving Pocket PCs.
Rename/Move
Opens the Rename/Move dialog box. Enter a name in the Name field to rename the
note. Move the note to a different folder by selecting it from the Folder drop-down
list, or to a different storage location by selecting it from the Location drop-down list.
TABLE 13-1
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Store Notes in Multiple
Outlook Folders
The Notes application has a couple of limitations that affect how you can manage your notes
in Outlook. For one, Notes does not support categories. You can store notes in various folders
on your Pocket PC, but those folders correspond with the subfolders in My Documents, not
folders in Outlook. However, the folder names are inserted at the beginning of a note’s
subject, so if you sort the notes by subject in Outlook, those stored in the same folder will
be grouped together. Another limitation is that Notes, like Calendar, Contacts, and Tasks,
does not synchronize with Outlook subfolders or public folders.
To date, no third-party developer provides an alternative to Notes that supports Outlook
categories. However, HPC Notes from the Phatware Corporation does support synchronization
of notes with multiple Outlook folders. For example, you can create one HPC Notes database
on your Pocket PC that synchronizes with a Work folder in Outlook and another database
that synchronizes with a Home folder, therefore separating notes you take at work and at home.
More information and trial versions of HPC Notes is available at http://www.phatware.com.
Configure Notes
Unlike all other Pocket PC applications, you can configure Notes only from List view. You can set
several options in the Options dialog box, which you open by tapping Tools | Options. Table 13-2
lists these options, what they do, and their possible values.
What It Does
Possible Values
Default Mode
Specifies which mode Notes will be
in when the application starts.
Writing
Typing
Default Template
Specifies the template used to create
new notes.
Blank Note
Meeting Notes
Memo
Phone Memo
To Do
Save To
Specifies the default storage location
for new notes.
Main memory
Storage card 1 (if available)
Record Button Action
Specifies what happens when you
press the Hardware Record button.
Switch to Notes
Stay in current program
TABLE 13-2
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Notes Configuration Settings
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Note Taking Alternatives
If Notes does not provide enough functionality for you, several alternative note taking
applications are available for the Pocket PC. Here is a list of some of these programs:
■
■
■
■
HPC Notes http://www.phatware.com
Forget Me Not and Journal Pro http://www.dsrtech.net
dNote http://www.derago.com/english.htm
Meeting Minutes Manager http://www.speakandbyte.com.au
If you prefer to take notes in an outline format, you may prefer to use one of these
outlining programs available for the Pocket PC:
■
■
■
■
TreNotes http://www.fannsoftware.com
Pocket MindMap
http://www.pocketmindmap.com
Streamliner http://www.kopsisengineering.com/streamliner
Pocket Outliner http://www.dsrtech.net
Notes written to a storage card will not synchronize with your desktop computer.
Synchronize the Outlook Journal Using CLC Journal
If you are proficient with Outlook, you may have noticed that ActiveSync does not support
synchronization with the Outlook Journal. Apparently, Microsoft felt that Journal created too
much data to be synchronized with a Pocket PC, since it can be configured to track every
document that you open on your desktop automatically. However, many people turn off the
Journal tracking feature and manually enter information, because it automatically assigns a
date and time stamp to all entries.
Fortunately, Crown Logic has created Crown Logic (CLC) Journal, which synchronizes with
the Outlook Journal. Using this program, you can create all of the different types of Outlook Journal
entries on your Pocket PC, such as notes or phone calls, and then synchronize them to a desktop.
The program can be downloaded from http://www.crownlogic.com.
You can now synchronize Pocket Informant’s Journal with Outlook’s Journal by
installing the Pocket Informant Journal ActiveSync Plug-in. If you already use this
alternative to Calendar, Contacts, and Tasks, you can purchase this plug-in at
http://www.pocketinformant.com/JournalSync.php.
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The CLC Journal installation program
adds a Journal information type to ActiveSync.
With the information type enabled and CLC
Journal installed on a Pocket PC, journal
entries will synchronize between the desktop
and Pocket PC along with all other information
during synchronization. As you can see in the
following image, Journal synchronization can
be configured for a period of time, for
selected contacts, or for selected categories:
The installation program adds the
Journal shortcut to the Pocket PC Start
menu. When the program starts, it first
displays all the journal entries in a List
view, as shown in the following image:
Create a Filter
You can filter the List view display by selecting an item
from the All drop-down list at the top-left of the screen or
by tapping the Filter button. Like Notes, you can filter journal
entries by category, but if you tap More in the drop-down
list, you can also define filters for date ranges and months.
Tap the Subject drop-down list at the top-right of the screen
to sort the entries in the list.
Create a Journal Entry Using CLC Journal
To create a journal entry, tap New to open the following
entry screen:
The screen has two tabs, with the Entry tab containing
the Journal fields and the Note tab containing the text of the
journal entry. The Subject field in the Entry tab includes a
drop-down list of commonly used subjects, which you can
edit by selecting the <Edit Quick Subjects> entry from the
drop-down list.
Tap here to turn
the timer on or off
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Tap the Categories field to assign the journal entry to a category, which may be one of the
categories you already created in other Pocket Outlook applications. You can also create categories
in CLC Journal, which will be available in all other Pocket Outlook applications. Tap the Contacts
field to link one or more contacts with the journal entry. You will not be able to open the contact
from within CLC Journal, but you can click the contact in Outlook to open it and see its information.
Notice the clock on the Command bar? When you tap the clock, CLC Journal will keep track
of the amount of time that elapses and update the Duration field on the Entry tab. Time is rounded
to the nearest minute. Tap the clock a second time to turn off the timer.
Tap the Note tab to enter the text of the journal entry. The Edit menu provides the standard
edit functions Cut, Copy, and Paste, along with Undo and Redo; the View menu provides options
for zooming the display. Tap the two Command bar buttons, as shown in the following image, to
insert the current date and time into the text:
Tap here to insert the current time
Tap here to insert
the current date
Wrapping Up
Now, whenever you need to write a quick note, reach for your Pocket PC rather than a scrap piece
of paper. Anything that you need to write and throw away quickly is written with digital ink in
Notes, and a backup copy of your notes is stored in Outlook by ActiveSync. Use CLC Journal to
take notes during phone calls and meetings, and use the time-tracking option to know just how
much time you spent.
Up to this point, all the information that we have worked with has been words and numbers,
but at times we all need to work with graphics. In the next chapter, you’ll learn how to create
colorful drawings on your Pocket PC as well as view pictures and Microsoft PowerPoint
presentations.
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and Presentations
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How to…
■
■
■
■
■
View digital pictures
Edit digital pictures
Create drawings
View PowerPoint presentations
Create presentations
A
feature that sets Pocket PCs apart from other handheld computers is their beautiful color
displays. Most of the new Pocket PCs can display 64,000 colors on 3.5-inch or 3.8-inch
screens. Surprisingly, Microsoft did not exploit these beautiful displays by providing graphics
programs like Microsoft Paint or Pocket PowerPoint prior to Windows Mobile 2003. However,
Microsoft Pictures is now included with all Windows Mobile 2003 devices.
Microsoft Pictures enables you to view and make minor edits to digital pictures. However,
you cannot use Pictures to make your own drawings or presentations. This omission provides an
opportunity for other people to write programs to fill the void. The picture drawing and presentation
programs that we present in this chapter will not disappoint Pocket PC owners. If you enjoy drawing
or taking digital pictures, or you need to give presentations, you will find the Pocket PC capable
at performing these tasks.
View Pictures
Twenty years ago, the only way you could see a photo right after it was taken was by using a Polaroid
instant camera. After you shot the picture, the photo would pop out of the camera and the image
would slowly appear on the paper after a couple of minutes. By today’s standards, the old Polaroid is
quaint compared to digital cameras, which enable you to see pictures at nearly the instant they are shot.
Digital photography not only enables us to see pictures instantly, but it has also changed the way
we store and transport pictures. While our parents and grandparents stored photos in albums, which
lost color over time, you and I and our children are more likely to store our pictures on CD-ROMs,
and the pictures will be as vibrant in the future as they were on the day they were taken.
While you might still carry pictures of loved ones in a wallet or purse, it is also likely that
you will simply carry them on CD-ROM to display on a personal computer. You can even buy
devices that are designed to display photos from CDs on TV screens. If you carry a Pocket PC,
you can also view pictures anywhere by using one of the many picture-viewing programs.
To view pictures on a Pocket PC, you will need to load them on the device, normally using a
storage card. If you use a camera that stores pictures on CompactFlash or Secure Digital cards, you
can simply remove the card from the camera and insert it into the Pocket PC to view the pictures.
All the picture-viewing programs display pictures from a folder as thumbnails, and you can select
individual pictures to display or sort the pictures to display in a slide show.
SmartMedia is another popular storage format used by digital cameras. You can
view pictures with SmartMedia cards by using Pretec’s CompactSSFDC SmartMedia
to CompactFlash adapter. More information about this adapter is available at
http://www.pretec.com.
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Turn a Pocket PC
into a Digital Camera
Several Pocket PC manufacturers sell digital cameras for their Pocket PCs. The cameras use
the CompactFlash slot to attach to Pocket PCs, and they include software for taking pictures
and managing photos. Most of these cameras can use the Pocket PC’s screen as a viewfinder.
These cameras do not take high-quality pictures, but they are small and do a fine job when all
you want is a snapshot.
The following is a list of some of the cameras that work with Pocket PCs:
■ Pretec’s CompactCamera (http://www.pretec.com) is a CompactFlash camera that
takes photos at 640×480 resolution and has a 2X digital zoom.
■ IA Style’s CF Digital Camera (http://www.iastyle.com) is a CompactFlash camera
that is bundled with several programs. You can use it to capture video and still pictures.
■ LifeView’s FlyCAM-CF (http://www.lifeview.com.tw) is a Type I CompactFlash
camera that has a self-timer and is capable of taking photos at 640×480 resolution.
■ LifeView’s FlyJacket iCam (http://www.lifeview.com.tw) is an add-on camera for
the FlyJacket i3800, which is an expansion sleeve that adds video input and output
capability to 3600, 3700, 3800, and 3900 series HP iPAQs.
■ Nexian’s NexiCam (http://www.nexian.com) is a digital camera sleeve that works
only with the 3600, 3700, 3800, 3900, and 5400 series HP iPAQs. It can take photos
at resolutions up to 800×600 and has a 2X digital zoom.
All the picture-viewing programs provide a way to rotate and zoom pictures. Most provide
ways to annotate pictures with text and attach voice recordings to pictures. These extra features
can be useful for recording information about the pictures when they are taken.
As stated, Microsoft did not include a picture-viewing program prior to Windows Mobile
2003. However, several manufacturers bundle these programs with Pocket PC 2002 and earlier
devices. In some cases, they simply include third-party programs, but others provide their own
picture-viewing programs. Table 14-1 provides an overview of the picture-viewing programs
URL
Applian PicturePerfect
http://www.applian.com
IA Style IA Album
http://www.iastyle.com
Aidem System PhotoExplorer
http://www.aidem.com.tw
Resco Picture Viewer
http://www.resco-net.com/resco/en/default.asp
ScaryBear Software PocketPics
http://www.scarybearsoftware.com
Spb Palbum Picture Viewer
http://www.softspb.com
TABLE 14-1
Picture-Viewing Programs for the Pocket PC
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URL
TangCode Image Explorer
http://www.tang.btinternet.co.uk/tangcode/imgexp.html
CD Software Solutions Pocket Image
http://www.members.aol.com/doanc/products.html
PQView
http://www.bitbanksoftware.com
ACDSee Mobile
http://www.acdsystems.com/English/index.htm
Conduits Pocket Album
TABLE 14-1
http://www.conduits.com
Picture-Viewing Programs for the Pocket PC (continued)
available for the Pocket PC. In this chapter we will show you Microsoft Pictures, which is
included with Windows Mobile 2003, and IA Style’s IA Album.
View Pictures Using Microsoft Pictures
Microsoft Pictures provides Windows Mobile 2003 users the ability to view and share digital
pictures. You can also crop and rotate pictures along with changing their brightness and contrast.
To start Pictures, tap Start | Programs | Pictures, which displays the program window shown here
to the left.
When Pictures starts, it scans the My Documents
folder for JPEG image files and displays them as a
thumbnail along with the file name. You can also
configure Pictures
to scan a Digital
Camera Image
(DCIM) folder that
some digital cameras
create on storage
cards. Tap the
Device or Storage
card Command bar
buttons, shown to
the right, to switch
between file
locations.
Windows Mobile 2003 has a My Pictures
folder inside My Documents. If you enable
file synchronization, the pictures in this folder
will synchronize between the Pocket PC and a
desktop computer.
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Start a
slide show.
List pictures on
a storage card.
List pictures stored
on the device.
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By default, the thumbnail pictures are sorted by date, but you can change the sort order by
selecting either Name, Date, Size, or Type from the Sort drop-down list on the upper-right of the
screen. Tap a thumbnail to display a larger version of the picture on the screen. Tap-and-hold on
a thumbnail to open a pop-up menu where you can choose to copy, delete, or rename the picture;
send the picture as an e-mail attachment; or beam the picture to another Pocket PC.
When you display a picture, the Command
bar changes to show the picture editing options
shown at right.
Tap the Rotate button to rotate the picture
90 degrees to the left. To crop a picture, do
the following:
1. Tap the Crop button.
2. Use the stylus to draw a box around
the section of the picture that you
want to keep.
3. Tap inside the box to remove
everything in the picture except
what is inside the box you drew.
Display the
full picture.
Zoom In.
Zoom Out.
If you decide after you crop the picture
that you want to undo the change, tap Edit |
Undo, and the picture will be restored to its
Zoom the
Rotate the
previous form.
picture.
picture.
When you tap the Zoom button, a small
zoom window appears. Tap the Zoom In and
Crop the picture.
Zoom Out buttons to change the magnification,
and tap-and-hold the stylus on the picture to
drag it around the screen. Tap the Zoom button to close the zoom window, and tap the Full
Picture button to display the entire picture on the screen.
To change the picture’s brightness or contrast,
Increase
Decrease the contrast.
tap Edit | Brightness And Contrast. The toolbar
the contrast.
Increase the brightness.
shown at right appears with buttons for increasing
and decreasing the picture’s contrast and brightness.
Tap Done to save the changes, or tap Cancel
to restore the picture to the prior state and close
the toolbar. If you tap Done and then decide you
do not like the change that you made, tap Edit |
Decrease the
brightness.
Undo to restore the picture.
The Tools menu provides options for
transferring the picture to other Pocket PCs, saving the picture, or using the picture as wallpaper.
To transfer the picture to another Pocket PC, tap Tools | Beam Picture, and then align the Pocket
PC’s infrared ports. You can also send the picture as an e-mail attachment by tapping Tools |
Send Via E-mail.
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If you wish to display the picture on the Today screen, tap
Tools | Set As Today Wallpaper to open this screen to the right.
Choosing the Crop To Fit radio button automatically selects
a portion of the picture for display, while choosing Fit To Screen
adjusts the size of the picture so that it fits on the Today screen.
Change the transparency level to a percentage that allows the
picture to be seen while not being too dark to read any words
that are displayed on top of the picture. Tap Done when you
are finished with this screen, or tap Cancel to cancel the changes.
Back in the Tools menu, tapping Tools | Revert To Saved
restores the picture to the way it was before you made any
changes. You can save the picture using a new file name by
selecting Save Picture As. To close the picture and return to
the list of thumbnail pictures, tap OK.
Tap Tools | Options to change the way Pictures display
photos. If your Pocket PC’s screen does not display images in
16-bit color or greater, tap the Enable Dithering check box to improve how the pictures look.
If you use a digital camera that writes pictures to a DCIM directory on a storage card, you can
configure Pictures to start automatically when you insert the storage card in the Pocket PC.
Tap the Detect Digital Camera Storage Cards check box to enable this option.
The Slide Show tab of the Options screen provides options for how slide shows display. You
can control how long pictures display by entering the number of seconds in the Display Between
Slides field. Pictures will automatically display as a screen saver on your Pocket PC if you select
the Play A Screensaver When Docked check box.
Ilium Software’s DockWare will display pictures as a screen saver when docked
on Pocket PC 2002, Windows Mobile 2003, and older devices. You can download
DockWare from http://www.iliumsoft.com.
Tap the Slide Show button on the Command
bar to start displaying pictures as a slide show on
your Pocket PC. To control the slide show, tap
your stylus on the screen to display the slide show
toolbar shown to the right.
Pause Previous
Play
Next
End
View Pictures Using IA Album
If you have a Pocket PC 2000 or 2002 device, the
Switch the display between
manufacturer may have included a picture
portrait and landscape.
viewing program, or you can use one or more of
the programs listed in Table 14-1. One of these programs is IA Style’s IA Album, which is
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available at http://www.iastyle.com/iaalbum/index.asp.
When you start IA Album, you see the program window
to the right.
The main program window is divided in two: the
top half displays the Pocket PC folder structure, and
the bottom half displays the folder contents.
Tap the Mode menu Command bar button to switch
the viewing mode between Full Screen, Filmstrip,
Filename, List, or Thumbnail, as shown below left.
To display
one picture,
double-tap either
a file name or
thumbnail, or
tap Full Screen
or Filmstrip in
the Mode menu.
When you tap
Display the toolbar.
Full Screen,
Display the
Mode menu.
the picture is
displayed across
the entire Pocket PC screen, while tapping Filmstrip
displays the command and toolbars along with the picture.
IA Album’s toolbar provides quick access to many of
the program’s functions. The toolbar changes depending
on the viewing tools that you select, as shown below.
Three sets of viewing tools are available: Pan
Tools, Zoom Tools, and Annotation Tools. The
Pan tool mode is the default mode, and it provides
buttons for moving through pictures and rotating
pictures left and right.
14
All the toolbar functions are
also available in the View and
Annotate menus.
Zoom
control
Next
Select a
Previous
viewing tool.
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Information
Rotate Right
Rotate Left
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The Zoom toolbar, shown to the right,
offers buttons for zooming in and out of
pictures, displaying a picture in its actual
size, zoom select, quick view, and zoom
control.
To zoom in on a specific section of a
picture, tap Zoom Select and then draw a
box around the section you want to zoom.
Quick view displays a thumbnail of the
picture and provides a way for you to
select a specific portion of the picture to
display. The Zoom control is a slider that
you use to zoom the display in or out.
Zoom in
Zoom out
Actual size
Zoom select
Quick view
Zoom
control
Tap-and-hold the stylus on the picture to pan while in Zoom mode.
The Annotation Mode toolbar, shown below right, has buttons for adding voice recordings, inserting
text, selecting digital ink color, and selecting
digital ink width.
Create a voice recording.
When you tap the Voice Recording
Add text.
button, a toolbar appears with buttons for
Pick digital ink color.
Record, Play, Stop, and Close. Text
Select digital ink width.
annotations appear in a separate window
that includes a thumbnail view
Zoom
of the picture along with a text field.
control
You can also associate recordings
that have already been made by
tapping Annotate | Select Audio.
You can annotate a picture using
digital ink when it displays full screen or
when it is displayed in Filmstrip mode. If you draw something and want to erase it, tap Annotate
| Undo Last Stroke. You can continually tap Annotate | Undo Last Stroke to erase all digital ink
from a picture. A faster way to remove all annotations is to tap Annotate | Remove | All.
By default, digital ink annotations are stored in a separate file, but you can also merge digital
ink with a picture, which creates a new picture file. To merge digital ink and create a new picture,
tap Annotate | Merge Ink.
Be careful with merging digital ink. The original picture will be altered, and there is no way
to return to the original picture without overwriting the file.
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The toolbars are the same for the Filename,
List, and Thumbnail modes; it looks like this
(shown right):
To select multiple pictures, tap the Select
Multiple toolbar button and then tap the pictures
you want to view.
IA Album provides tap-and-hold menus
throughout the program. To perform operations
on a picture file, such as Cut, Copy, or Paste,
tap-and-hold on the picture in the Filename,
List, or Thumbnail mode. You can tap-and-hold
on a picture while it displays full screen to
rotate or flip the picture, and to exit the Full
Screen mode.
To display pictures in a slide show, tap the
Slide Show button on the toolbar, or tap View |
Mode | Slide Show. The slide show toolbar
appears on the screen, as shown below.
Change IA
Album
settings.
Select multiple
pictures.
View picture full screen.
Collapse Previous
Next
toolbar.
Select
picture.
Play slide
show.
View slideshow.
Slide show
options
Tap the Options button on the toolbar to change
one of the many slide show options, as shown to
the right.
You can select slide show transitions on
this screen. The VGA tab includes settings for
displaying slide shows and filmstrips on VGA
monitors or projectors using a VGA output card.
(See the Project Presentations How To later in this
chapter for instructions on how to connect Pocket
PCs to VGA output devices.)
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Display picture
information.
Select the home folder.
To start a slide show, tap the Play
button on the toolbar. The toolbar
disappears when the slide show starts
playing. Tap the screen to stop a
slide show.
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Edit Pictures
Microsoft Pictures and IA Album provide easy ways to view and perform simple editing of
digital pictures on a Pocket PC. For example, while IA Album has the ability to crop and resize
pictures, it doesn’t have a way to adjust the brightness of a picture. To make significant changes
to a picture on a Pocket PC, you need a graphics editor such as Conduit’s Pocket Artist or Idruna
Software’s Photogenics.
Edit Pictures with Pocket Artist
Pocket Artist is a 24-bit graphics editor for Pocket PCs. You edit pictures and create drawings at
the pixel level. Pocket Artist has many of the features available with desktop graphics programs,
but it works within the constraints of the Pocket PC’s screen size. An evaluation version of
Pocket Artist can be downloaded from http://www.conduits.com/products/artist/index.htm.
When you start Pocket Artist, you see the program window with the following tools shown
directly below.
Selection
The white space on the
Edit tools
Drawing
tools
tools
main part of the screen is
the main image area. You
can think of this as your
Document
canvas for drawing or
tools
where pictures display.
Text/shape tools
Drawing colors
Brush size
The Command bar
provides the program
menus, and the toolbar provides fast access to most of the program functions.
Pocket Artist can edit BMP, GIF, JPG, and 2BP image files.
To open a picture, tap Menu | File | Open, which opens dialog
box to the right.
At the top of the screen, select the folder that contains the
picture file you want to see. When you select a folder, any
pictures that it contains are displayed as thumbnails at the
bottom half of the screen. Tap the picture that you want to edit.
To zoom a picture, tap Menu | View, and then tap Zoom In,
Zoom Out, Zoom 100%, or Zoom To Fit. To crop a picture,
first tap the Selection tool on the Command bar, and then use
the stylus to draw a box around the portion of the picture you
want to keep. After you make the selection, tap Menu | Image |
Crop Image.
To adjust a picture’s brightness or contrast, tap Menu |
Image | Bright/Contrast, which opens a dialog box. Move the
sliders left or right to adjust the brightness or contrast. As you move the sliders, you will see the
changes made to a thumbnail of the picture. You can change the size of the thumbnail by tapping
plus or minus buttons under the image. Tap OK to save the changes you made or tap Cancel to
undo the changes and close the dialog box.
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Pocket Artist provides many of the drawing features that are available in a
desktop graphics program. To select different drawing tools, tap-and-hold on the
toolbar buttons to display a pop-up menu. For example, tap-and-hold the Paint
Brush button to display the pop-up menu to the right.
To save pictures, tap Menu | File | Save, or if you want to save the picture
using a new file name, tap Menu | File | Save As. Pocket Artist can save files
only in the BMP or JPG formats.
Edit Pictures with Photogenics
Photogenics from Idruna Software is an advanced paint and
photo-editing program, and versions of the program are
available for Pocket PCs as well as Windows, Linux, and
Amiga desktop computers. Two Pocket PC versions of the
program are available. The personal version provides the basic
features for editing pictures and creating original artwork. The
standard version includes all of the advanced features that you
expect of graphics software. Both programs are available at
http://www.idruna.com/.
When you first start Photogenics on a Pocket PC, you see
screen to the right.
If you are editing a picture and know its specific location,
tap Open An Existing Image. To browse through the Pocket PC
folders to find an image file, tap Browse For Images. Like other
Pocket PC graphics programs, Photogenics displays pictures in
a folder as thumbnails.
To create a new image, tap Create A New Image. You first see this dialog box (shown
below), on which you specify the image’s size and resolution.
The Presets drop-down list provides a number
of predefined image sizes; to create an image that
fits on the Pocket PC’s screen, select a Width of
320 pixels and a Height of 240 pixels. Select the
background color by tapping a Colour radio button.
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After you tap OK to create
the new image file using the
Media tab
settings on the screen, the main
Tools tab
program window appears, as
Color tab
shown here.
Paint Mode Options tab
Photogenics provides a
Transparency tab
toolbar along the top right
Image Control tab
of the screen in addition to
the Command bar buttons and
commands at the bottom of
the screen.
One of the important
Experiment mode
concepts of Photogenics is the
Erase
paint layer. Imagine painting on
a glass sheet over an existing
image. You could paint on the
glass without changing the
Fill Layer Fix
image underneath. You could
Clear Layer
also wipe the paint off the glass
if you make a mistake, or
remove the glass and get rid of your painting—all leaving the original image untouched.
Photogenic’s paint layers act like that glass sheet; the drawings do not become part of an image
until you decide to make the change.
The Fill Layer button causes the paint layer to be filled with a selected color or effect. You
can tap the Clear Layer button to clear the paint layer and undo changes that you are not happy
with, or tap the Erase button and use the stylus to “rub out” parts of the paint layer you want
removed. Tap the Fix button to combine the paint layer to an image. After you tap Fix, you can
no longer erase changes.
The Experiment mode provides a way for you to see how a picture will look if you decide
to change paint colors. For example, if you draw a red circle while Experiment mode is enabled,
you can then select blue on the Color tab and the circle will instantly change to blue.
Idruna has video tutorials for Photogenics that you can download from
http://www.idruna.com/resources.html.
Show PowerPoint Presentations
Many business people rely on Microsoft PowerPoint every day as part of their job. For those people,
if a Pocket PC is to replace notebook computers, they must include software that can view and display
PowerPoint presentations. While Microsoft does not offer a Pocket PC version of PowerPoint, several
companies provide programs that can display PowerPoint presentations on a Pocket PC.
Table 14-2 lists the programs that are available, and in this section we will present two of the
of the most popular: CNetX’s Pocket SlideShow and Conduit’s Pocket Slides.
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URL
CNetX Pocket SlideShow
http://www.cnetx.com
Conduit’s Pocket Slides
http://www.conduits.com
IA Style IA Presenter
http://www.iastyle.com
Presenter Inc. iPresentation Mobile Client
http://www.presenter.com
Albatros Slides
http://www.albatros-development.com
Westtek ClearVue Presentation
http://www.westtek.com
Repligo
http://www.cerience.com
TABLE 14-2
PowerPoint File-Viewing Programs for the Pocket PC
Many of the image-viewing programs presented earlier in this chapter can be used to
view PowerPoint presentations as well, if you export the presentation to JPEG formatted
files. However, be aware that you will lose any animation effects.
Project Presentations
Colorgraphic sells a Type I CompactFlash VGA card that works with all Pocket PCs.
With this card, you can project anything on the Pocket PC’s screen to a computer monitor or
television set. The card is capable of displaying VGA, SVGA, Wide VGA, and XGA output,
as well as NTSC/Pal TV output. The card includes a standard VGA adapter for making
connections to projectors and RCA adapter and S-Video adapters to connect to televisions.
The software driver enables the display to appear in portrait or landscape orientation, and it lets
you center and enlarge the display. The card can be ordered from http://www.colorgraphic.net.
Margi Systems Inc.’s Presenter-to-Go is a Type II CompactFlash card that comes with an
infrared remote control, which works with the Pocket PC’s infrared port. You can order this
card from http://www.margi.com.
IA Style’s Presenter CF VGA Card is a Type I CompactFlash VGA card capable of
resolutions up to 1024×768. It supports a variety of video outputs and includes a 14-key
infrared remote control; it’s bundled with full versions of IA Presenter, IA Presenter
Converter, IA Album, and IA Screen Mirror. You can find out more information about
this card at http://www.iastyle.com.
If you own a Compaq iPAQ Pocket PC, you can use the LifeView FlyJacket i3800, which is
an expansion pack that includes a CompactFlash slot. The FlyJacket accepts video input from
VCRs and DVD players, and it supports standard VGA output as well as Composite and
S-Video. You will find more information about the FlyJacket at http://www.lifeview.com.tw/
eng/home.html.
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Show Presentations Using Pocket SlideShow
CNetX’s Pocket SlideShow is one of many PowerPoint viewing programs for the Pocket PC. It
has received Pocket PC magazine’s Best Pocket PC Software and People’s Choice Awards, and
you can download a trial version at http://www.cnetx.com/slideshow/.
When you install Pocket SlideShow, a PowerPoint file converter is added to ActiveSync on
the desktop computer. For file conversion to work, Microsoft PowerPoint 97 or later must be
installed on the PC. To view a PowerPoint file, use ActiveSync Explorer to copy the file to a
folder on the Pocket PC.
ActiveSync will detect that
you are copying a PowerPoint
file, and the following dialog
box will appear to the right.
Select the screen format
for the presentation on the
Pocket PC. If you don’t plan
on projecting the presentation,
you should select the 320×240
Pocket PC display, which is
the default setting. Click
Finish and the file will be
converted to the Pocket
SlideShow format and then
copied to the Pocket PC.
After the file is copied to
the Pocket PC, you can open
it with Pocket SlideShow.
When you first start Pocket SlideShow, you see a list of the presentations on the Pocket PC,
which you can tap to open. An open presentation looks like the image below.
All the slides appear as thumbnails along the bottom of the
screen, with the current slide shown at the top. If you prefer to
see the slide at the bottom of the screen, tap View | Swap Panes
and the thumbnails will move to the top of the screen.
You can change the size of the slide on the screen and
make more thumbnails visible by dragging the
separator bar up or down.
To view the presentation as a slide show, tap the Slide Show
Command bar button, or tap View | Slide Show. The slides will
display on the Pocket PC’s screen in landscape orientation. You
can manually move through the slide show by tapping the screen
or by using the Pocket PC’s Navigation button. To stop a slide
show, press the Action or Navigation button or tap-and-hold on
the screen.
View slide show
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If you prefer to have the slide show automatically advance,
tap Tools | Options and then tap the Show tab to display this
screen.
You can manually advance slides, use the presentation
times as entered in the original PowerPoint file, or specify a
number of seconds between slides. If the slides automatically
advance, you can specify whether the presentation should
loop continuously by tapping the appropriate check box on
the screen.
To view slide notes, tap View | Notes. You cannot enter notes
for slides in Pocket SlideShow, so the notes you see here must be
entered using PowerPoint on the desktop. Transitions that you set
up in PowerPoint will appear in Pocket SlideShow, or you can
set up transitions on the Pocket PC.
To specify a transition for a slide, select the slide and then
tap Edit | Transition, which displays a screen where you can select the transition effect from a
drop-down list on the middle of the screen. A demonstration of the effect is shown using the
graphic on the screen. You can specify the speed of the transition by tapping an appropriate
radio button.
You can hide slides by tapping Edit | Hide Slide. When a slide is hidden, a check mark
appears next to the Hide Slide option in the Edit menu, and the slide number is crossed out in
the thumbnail view.
Pocket SlideShow has direct support for external VGA output, such as that provided by the
Colorgraphic Voyager VGA CompactFlash card. To configure settings for using the card, tap
Tools | Options and then tap the Output tab.
Control PowerPoint Presentations
Using a Pocket PC
The programs mentioned in this chapter are used to view PowerPoint presentations on a Pocket
PC. SlideShow Commander enables you to view and control a PowerPoint presentation that is
running on a desktop computer. When combined with wireless networking, you can use
SlideShow Commander to control a presentation remotely from anywhere in a room.
To use the program, you must be able to establish a network connection between the Pocket
PC and the desktop computer. You will be able to view the PowerPoint presentation on the
Pocket PC’s screen, and you can tap the screen or use hardware buttons to advance slides
in the presentation.
To obtain more information about SlideShow Commander and buy a copy of the program,
go to http://www.synsolutions.com/software/slideshowcommander/.
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Create Presentations Using Pocket Slides
Pocket SlideShow does not provide a way to create new slides or edit existing slides. If you need
more editing capabilities to create presentations, Conduit’s Pocket Slides may be the program
for you. It has all the same features as Pocket SlideShow, plus it can create and edit slides and
presentation notes. An evaluation copy of Pocket Slides can be downloaded from http://www
.conduits.com/products/slides/default.asp.
When you start Pocket Slides, you’ll see a List view that shows the presentations that
are on the Pocket PC. Tap the presentation that you want to open, or tap New to create a new
presentation.
If the New button menu is enabled on the screen, you can create a new presentation
based on one of several Pocket Slides templates.
A new presentation file is created with one slide,
as shown to the right.
Tap-and-hold on the slide title or subtitle and
then tap Edit Text on the pop-up menu to enter
text on the slide. As you can see, several options
are available for entering text, as shown below.
Tap here to
expand the
slide notes.
To add a new slide to the presentation, tap Edit | New
Slide. The toolbar provides many of the functions that you
need for adding items to a blank slide as shown bottom right.
You use the slide sorter to move slides within
a presentation. To switch to the slide sorter view,
tap View | Slide Sorter. The slide sorter, shown
here, has command buttons you can use to change
the slide sorter view, hide slides, preview
animations, set up animations, and select
transitions.
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Add text.
Add rectangles.
Add circles.
Add lines.
Insert a picture.
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The toolbar contains drop-down lists
for selecting transitions between slides. To
specify a transition to a slide, first select the
slide and then select a transition from the
drop-down list.
To view a slide show, tap View | Slide
Hide slide.
Show. Use the Navigation button to move
between slides or tap the screen to advance.
You can also use the stylus to draw on the
Set up animation.
screen during the slide show. To draw,
tap-and-hold on the screen, and then tap Stylus
Select transitions.
Mode | Pen. Clear the drawings by tapping
Presentation | Erase Pen on the tap-and-hold
menu. Tap Speaker Notes on the tap-and-hold
menu to view speaker notes. Exit the slide
show by tapping End Show on the
Change view.
Preview animation.
tap-and-hold menu.
When you install Pocket Slides, a PowerPoint file converter is added to ActiveSync
on the desktop computer. Microsoft PowerPoint 97 or later must be installed on the PC.
To view a PowerPoint file, use ActiveSync Explorer to copy the file to a folder on the
Pocket PC.
Display the Pocket PC Screen During
a Presentation
When I give presentations about Pocket PCs, I usually like to display the Pocket PC screen
to demonstrate how various aspects of the device work. I could use one of the VGA output
cards described earlier in this chapter, but it is easier for me to use the free Remote Display
Control that Microsoft provides as a Pocket PC Power Toy. You can download this program
from the Downloads section of http://www.pocketpc.com.
The Remote Display Control has two parts—one that runs on a desktop PC and another
that runs on a Pocket PC. First, you start the desktop part, and then you establish an ActiveSync
connection between the desktop and Pocket PC. You can use any type of connection including
Ethernet, Bluetooth, infrared, or the synchronization cable. After you establish the connection,
start the Pocket PC part, and the Pocket PC screen will display in a window on the desktop
computer.
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View PowerPoint Attachments
Both Pocket SlideShow and Pocket Slides require ActiveSync to convert Microsoft
PowerPoint presentations for viewing on Pocket PCs. If you receive a PowerPoint file as an
e-mail attachment, you will not be able to view the presentation on your Pocket PC using
either of these programs. To view a PowerPoint file directly on your Pocket PC, you can use
Westtek’s ClearVue Viewers, which are available at http://www.westtek.com/clearvue.htm.
ClearVue Viewers are available for Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint files.
Wrapping Up
Pocket PCs have beautiful color screens that can display pictures and presentations, and they can be
much easier to carry than notebook computers when you’re traveling. For many business people, the
programs presented in this chapter make it possible for Pocket PCs to replace notebook computers.
Pocket PCs do not come with a database program, but as you will see in the next chapter, several
database programs are available from third-party developers to meet any database requirements.
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Data
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How to…
■
■
■
■
Create databases using HanDBase
Synchronize HanDBase data with a desktop computer
Synchronize Microsoft Access databases with a Pocket PC
View and Edit Pocket Access databases using Data On The Run
S
o far, you have learned how Pocket Outlook, Pocket Word, and Pocket Excel can be used
to manage time, write documents, and work with numbers. But sometimes the information
you have just doesn’t fit into any of these applications. If that is the case, a database may be just
the program you need.
The Access database application is not available for Pocket PC, and Microsoft does not
provide a Pocket PC version of Access for you to install. Fortunately, several software developers
have written Pocket PC database programs that you can download from the Internet. In this
chapter, you’ll learn how to use some of these programs to create databases to store and query
information.
Even though Pocket Access is not on your Pocket PC, you can still synchronize Access
databases using ActiveSync, creating a Pocket Access version of the database on your Pocket
PC. You can then use some of the programs covered in this chapter to view, query, and update
that data on the Pocket PC. During the next synchronization, any changes will be made to the
desktop database.
Select a Pocket PC Database
Pocket PC database software ranges from simple programs designed for creating databases on
your Pocket PC to more complex programs designed to synchronize data with enterprise databases
from Oracle and Sybase. Many of the programs work with Access databases and take advantage
of the synchronization abilities that ActiveSync provides. Some of these Pocket PC programs are
clients for databases stored on a desktop computer, which they access across a network.
Software vendors continually create new Pocket PC database programs that you can download
from the Internet. Table 15-1 provides a list of the programs available as of this writing.
Product
Web Site
HanDBase
http://www.ddhsoftware.com
Pocket Database
http://www.pocket-innovations.com
Data On The Run
http://www.biohazardsoftware.com/dataon.htm
Wireless Database
http://www.kelbran.com/
HandyDB
http://www.soft4ce.com/
DBF View
http://www.soft-expert.ro/dbfview.htm
abcDB
http://www.pocketsoft.ca/Features.asp
TABLE 15-1
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Product
Web Site
Data Anywhere
http://www.smartidz.com/DataAnywhere.htm
SprintDB
http://www.kaione.com/
Visual CE
http://www.syware.com
Microsoft SQL Server CE
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/ce/default.asp
Oracle 9i Lite
http://www.oracle.com/ip/deploy/database/oracle9i/9ilite/index.html
Sybase SQL Anywhere Studio
http://www.sybase.com/products/databaseservers/sqlanywhere
TABLE 15-1
283
Pocket PC Database Software (continued)
Usually, you want to create a simple database on your Pocket PC or synchronize an existing
Microsoft Access database so that you can carry that data with you. In this chapter, you’ll receive
instructions for completing these two tasks using two of the programs in Table 15-1—HanDBase
and Data On The Run.
Create Databases with HanDBase
HanDBase, from DDH Software, is one of the most downloaded programs for Palm OS devices
on the Internet. DDH Software has a version of this popular program for the Pocket PC with the
following features:
■ Create databases on your Pocket PC.
■ Use a wide variety of field types, such as text, integer, float, check box, image, date,
note, and more.
■ Multiple security settings allow you to require passwords to open databases, add records,
edit records, delete records, and more.
■
■
■
■
Move or copy records between databases.
Export records to a text file.
Print records using PrintPocketCE (if installed).
Use infrared beams to send individual records and full databases between Pocket PCs
and Palm OS devices.
■ Find, sort, and filter records.
■ Use a Windows desktop companion program to create and edit databases for your Pocket PC.
■ Use hundreds of databases that have already been created and are available for free from
the DDH Software website.
A 30-day evaluation version of HanDBase is available at the DDH website, and the registration
fee for this shareware is $29.99. Included in that fee is Pocket PC and desktop software.
In this section, you’ll create a database on your Pocket PC, enter data, and synchronize the
data with your desktop computer.
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Install HanDBase
You install HanDBase the same way you install other Pocket PC applications. First the setup
program copies files to your desktop computer; then ActiveSync is initiated to complete the
installation to your Pocket PC. During the process, you can install the software to the default
location, which is internal on your Pocket PC, or to a storage card. The installation process also
adds a HanDBase 3.0 folder to the Start menu on your desktop computer. Included in that folder
is the icon for the HanDBase desktop application.
The HanDBase program takes as much as 253K of storage space on your Pocket PC and
adds the icon to the left to the Programs window.
Create a Database
To start HanDBase, tap Start | Programs | HanDBase. When you
start the program for the first time, the screen to the right displays.
From here, you could either open an existing database file
from those listed on the screen or create a new database by
tapping Create A New Database. To be listed on this screen and
opened from within the program, a database must be stored in
the My Documents folder or in a subfolder of My Documents.
You can open databases stored in other locations by using File
Explorer.
Let’s create a new database. For this example, we’ll create
a simple database to keep track of a CD collection. The database
will contain simple information such as the title of the CD, the
artist, how much the CD cost, when it was bought, the type of
music it contains, and some comments.
1. Tap Create A New Database.
2. On the next screen, enter a name for the database and then tap OK. The resulting
Edit Database screen
displays, as shown in
the image to the right.
Here you define the
database fields and
their order.
3. To create fields, tap one
of the fields listed in the
scroll box on the Edit
Database screen. For
example, tap Field 1 to
open the field definition
screen, as shown in the
image to the far right.
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4. Change the name of the field by selecting the contents of the Field 1 Name text box and
typing in the new name.
5. To change the type of field, tap the Field Type drop-down list and select a data type.
After you’re finished, tap OK.
You can select from among the following field data types:
■ Not-Used Select this data type to designate that the field is not to be used for storing
data. The field will not be visible in either the List View or Edit Record screens.
■ Text Select this data type for fields that contain text. Text fields can contain a
maximum of 254 characters.
■ Integer Select this data type for fields that will contain whole numerical values.
The possible values range from –2147483647 to +2147483647.
■ Float Select this data type for fields that will contain numbers with decimals. You can
indicate up to four digits to follow the decimal in Float fields.
■ Date Select this data type for fields that will contain dates. Date fields can be configured
with default behaviors, such as automatically populating the field with the date that a
record is added, the date that a record is modified, or the current date. The default is Date
Record Added.
■ Pop-up Select this data type to provide a pop-up list of items that can be selected.
A default value can be assigned for this field as well.
■ Note Select this data type to create a field for entering memopad-type notes.
If you select the Text data type, a number of additional properties display, which you can
use to configure how the field displays. One of the settings unique to HanDBase is Pixels Shown.
This setting lets you accurately control the amount of space the field occupies on the small
Pocket PC screen. As a gauge, keep in mind that a typical
character is approximately 6 pixels wide—so, for example,
you would enter 12 pixels to display up to a two-digit number.
For the screens that you see in this chapter, the number of
pixels is set at the default setting, which is 87 pixels.
Each of the fields in HanDBase can have an associated
pop-up menu, which is useful for data entry. New items are
automatically added to the pop-up menu when you enter them
in the field, so that the item is available for data entry in other
records. To stop items from being automatically added to
the pop-up menus, clear the Popups check box on the Field
Properties screen.
The Edit Database screen to the right shows the types of
data we’ll be storing in our CD database.
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When you’re finished defining fields, you’ll notice that
several fields listed in the Edit Database screen have
not been defined. These fields are not included in the
database because their field type has been set to
Not-Used.
Tap OK to close the Edit Database screen, and the Database
Properties screen will display. Tap OK to close the Database
Properties screen. To re-open the Database Properties screen,
tap File | DB Properties.
The Database Properties screen, shown to the right, provides
the following options for editing databases:
■ General Change the database name.
■ Fields Open the Edit Database screen to make changes to the database fields.
■ Forms Starts the HanDBase forms designer program, which is not available at the time
we are writing this book.
■ Views Opens the Database Views screen, where you create and edit different views of
the database. Each database view can define a different way for displaying data, allowing
you to show or hide certain fields from the List view or Edit Record screens.
■ Alarms Provides a way for you to set alarms for a database. There are two types of
alarms: automatic and manual. Automatic alarms are automatically set to the values
of the date and time fields in records that you enter into the database. If you specify
manual alarms you can then set an alarm from the Record Details screen.
■ Author Enter an author name and comments for the database.
■ Extras This option is not available
at the time this book is written.
Select a database
view here.
■ Security Opens the Security
Settings screen where you can
create a password for the database,
set access permissions, and enable
encryption.
Enter and Edit Data
Database data displays in a tabular view,
as shown in the image to the right.
Slide the scroll bar to
view more columns.
Create a new record.
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To resize a column in a database, tap the stylus on the
right edge of the column head and drag either left or right.
You can select views of a database from the Views drop-down
list at the upper-right corner of the database window. Select Edit
Views from the list to open the Views screen and create a new
database view, as shown to the right.
Tap New to create a view, and enter a name for the view
in the New View screen. A Database view controls what fields
display, what records are filtered, or the sort order for records.
Enter a name for the view, tap Fields to select what fields to
display in the view, tap Filters to define a record filter, and tap
Sorting to define a sort order, then tap OK to save the view.
To see more database columns on your Pocket PC, use
either JS Landscape or Nyditot Virtual Display, as
described in Chapter 11, to change the display to landscape.
To create a record, in the Database window, tap the New Record icon on the Command bar
to display the following Edit Record window.
All of the fields in the Edit Record window are ordered from top to bottom based on the criteria
you defined in the Edit Database screen. To the left of each field
name is a small triangle, indicating that a pop-up menu exists
for that field. Tap the name of the field to display the pop-up
menu, and then tap the item you want to appear in the field.
To add an entry to the pop-up menu, tap Edit Pop-up List
from the menu.
Date fields include a check box you can tap to enter the
current date. You can select different dates using the calendar
picker, which displays when you tap the triangle to the right of
the current date field. If you tap the field name of a date field
in the Edit Record window, you’ll see a pop-up menu with
options including Today, Tomorrow, One Week, or No Date.
After you’ve finished adding information for the new record,
tap OK to save your changes. The new record will appear in
the list of database views.
Synchronize Data with Your Desktop PC
The HanDBase installation program automatically installs the HanDBase ActiveSync Conduit
on your desktop PC. While the HandDBase conduit synchronizes data at the same time you
synchronize other Pocket PC data, the conduit is not part of ActiveSync. To change the
HandDBase synchronization options, click Start | Programs | HandDBase 3.0 | ActiveSync
Conduit Options on the desktop PC.
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HanDBase synchronization
automatically occurs whenever you connect
the Pocket PC to the desktop computer.
The dialog box to the right will appear on
the PC during and after synchronization.
If you do not want the dialog box to
display after synchronization completes,
click the Always Close Dialog When
Sync Done check box.
Close out of HanDBase databases prior to synchronizing, because data in open
databases does not synchronize.
HanDBase’s ActiveSync Conduit provides record-level synchronization with desktop
versions of HanDBase databases. Record-level synchronization enables you to add and edit
records on a Pocket PC and desktop computer, and the changes merge into one database file.
This is the same way Pocket Outlook data synchronizes with Outlook.
HanDBase files are stored in a HanDBase3 folder in the My Documents folder on
a Pocket PC.
After the database is synchronized with your desktop, it can be opened using the HanDBase
Desktop program. You can then add or edit records. The next time you synchronize, the updated
records synchronize to your Pocket PC, just like Calendar, Contacts, and Tasks.
DDH Software sells Sync Exchange Conduits that enable you to synchronize HanDBase
databases with Microsoft Access, FileMaker Pro, or any Open Database Connectivity
(ODBC) database. You can buy these conduits at http://www.ddhsoftware.com.
Save Time by Using
the HanDBase Gallery
Because HanDBase has been available for Palm OS devices for several years, thousands of
people have been using the program to create databases.
In addition to providing a great program, DDH Software also provides a free service of
storing and cataloging databases so they can be easily found and downloaded. If you need
a database, first check the HanDBase Gallery at http://www.ddhsoftware.com/gallery.html,
because chances are it has already been created. At the least, you’ll find a database that is
close to meeting your needs, which you can then modify. If you find something useful in the
gallery, the best way to pay the developer back is by contributing databases that you create
to the gallery.
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Synchronize Microsoft Access Databases
Even though Pocket Access is not available on the Pocket PC, you can still synchronize Pocket
Access data with Microsoft Access on a desktop by using ActiveSync. Synchronization between
Pocket Access and Microsoft Access is not enabled by default. It has to be turned on by selecting
the Pocket Access information type in ActiveSync. As you will learn later in this chapter, the
process for setting up synchronization varies depending on where synchronization is initiated.
Pocket Access database files on your Pocket PC use a .cdb file name extension, and
Microsoft Access database file names on your desktop use extension.mdb.
While you can synchronize Microsoft Access data to a Pocket PC, you are limited in how
much information you can synchronize. Only tables, fields, and indexes are synchronized
between your device and PC. You can choose to synchronize only certain fields within a table
or mark information as read-only on your device. Unfortunately, you cannot synchronize forms,
queries, or reports. The Pocket PC database programs that work with Access data work with only
one table of a database, and they don’t provide the full functionality of a relational database.
Only 65,536 records can be synchronized from a host database to a Pocket PC database.
Synchronize PC Databases
ActiveSync converts Microsoft Access files and other ODBC databases to Pocket Access, but
Pocket Access files will convert only to Microsoft Access.
If the Pocket PC device is not
connected to the PC, make sure
the correct device name displays
in ActiveSync. If not, switch
to the appropriate device by
choosing File | Mobile Device,
and select the name of the device.
The first step for enabling database
synchronization is to enable the Pocket
Access information type in ActiveSync.
To do that, start ActiveSync on your PC,
and follow these steps:
1. Click Options, or choose Tools |
Options to open the Options
dialog box shown in the image
to the right.
2. Select the check box next to
Pocket Access.
3. Click OK.
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After the Pocket Access information type
is enabled for the device, you need to set up
database synchronization. To do this, connect
the device to the PC and then follow these steps:
1. If the information type details do not
display, click Details on the toolbar.
2. Double-click the Pocket Access
information type to open the Database
Synchronization Settings dialog box
shown in the image to the right.
3. Click Add, select a database in the Open
dialog box, and then click OK. By default,
Microsoft Access databases are listed, but
ODBC databases can be selected from the
Files Of Type drop-down list. When you
select a database, the Import From Database
To Mobile Device dialog box displays.
4. Enter a location and file name for the
Pocket Access database, and select the
tables and fields to include in the database
using the Import From Database To Mobile
Device dialog box, as shown in the image
to the right.
Another way to synchronize a database is to
drag-and-drop a database file from the PC
to the device. The Import From Database
To Mobile Device dialog box will then open.
By default, the database will be stored in
the My Documents folder on the device.
5. Click OK. ActiveSync will copy the
database file to the device. When that
is done, the Database Synchronization
Settings dialog box will display with an
entry for the database currently being
synchronized.
Pocket Access is one of the few ActiveSync information types that will synchronize data
not stored in the internal My Documents folder. This enables you to synchronize large
databases to storage cards—though if you do, it is recommended that you store the
database in a My Documents folder on the storage card. Doing so insures that database
programs will be able to find and open the database.
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Table synchronization is now established between the Pocket Access database on the device
and the database on the PC. You can then open the database on the device and add or edit information;
at the next synchronization, those changes will be copied to the PC.
Synchronization Conflicts
A synchronization conflict occurs when ActiveSync determines that a record has changed on
both the device and PC. ActiveSync automatically resolves conflicts by giving the PC priority.
The record from the device is written to the MSysCECXxx table in the PC Database, where Xxx
is the original name of the table. You can check the MsysCEConflicts table to determine whether
a conflict occurred, and then go to the MSysCECXxx table to look at the data.
Configure Database Synchronization Options
You can open the database Properties dialog box to change the host and device file locations.
To make these changes, follow these steps in ActiveSync on the PC:
1. Click Details to display the Information Types.
2. Double-click Pocket Access.
3. Select the database you want to change, and then click Properties.
4. In the Properties window, change the contents of the Host Location or Device Location
fields as desired.
5. Click OK to save the changes.
Synchronize Mobile Device
Databases to the Desktop
The programs Pocket Database, HandyDB, abcDB,
DBAnywhere, and Visual CE listed in Table 15-1
will create Pocket Access databases on a Pocket
PC, which can be synchronized with a PC running
Microsoft Access. ActiveSync will not automatically
synchronize a database file that is placed in the My
Documents folder on the device. To synchronize a
Pocket Access database to a PC, you must use the
ActiveSync Explorer to copy the file.
When you drag-and-drop a Pocket Access
database file to a folder on the PC, the Export
From Mobile Device To Database dialog box
displays, as shown in the image to the right.
Within this dialog box, you specify the location
on the PC where the file will be written, and you select the tables in the database to copy to the PC.
By default, ActiveSync will write the database to the \Program Files\ActiveSync\Profiles\
device name folder on the PC.
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If you clear the Keep Tables Synchronized check box, ActiveSync will make a copy of the
database to the PC and not set up synchronization. When the Overwrite Existing Tables And/Or
Data check box is selected, ActiveSync will overwrite any database files or tables that have the
same file name on the PC.
After synchronization is established, you can disconnect and add data to the database on the
device and the PC. At the next synchronization, ActiveSync will compare the tables in the two
databases, identify the records that have been added or changed, and then synchronize them so
that both databases are current.
Stop Database Synchronization
You can stop synchronizing a database in two ways, and both involve opening the Database
Synchronization Settings dialog box by double-clicking the Pocket Access information type on
the ActiveSync Options screen. If you want to stop synchronization temporarily, select the check
box next to the database name. To remove a database permanently, select it in the dialog box and
then click Remove.
Work with Pocket Access Databases
Using Data On The Run
ActiveSync provides the ability to synchronize data only with Microsoft Access. To view or edit the
data once it is on your Pocket PC, you’ll need to download and install one of the programs listed in
Table 15-1. Perhaps the easiest and least expensive of those programs is Data On The Run from
Biohazard Software. A trial version of this program is available at http://www.biohazardsoftware.com.
Install Data On The Run
The process of installing Data On The Run is the same as that for all other Pocket PC applications.
First, the setup program copies files to your desktop computer, and then ActiveSync is initiated to
complete the installation to your Pocket PC. During the process, you have the option of installing
the software to the default location that is internal on your Pocket PC or on a storage card.
Data On The Run requires a hefty 3213K of storage space,
with many of those programs being system files that are written
to the \Windows folder on the Pocket PC. While you can install
the program to a storage card, only 450K of files are written
to the card, with the rest being stored internally. ActiveSync
will determine whether enough storage space is available on
your Pocket PC before installing the program.
After the installation completes, the icon to the left is added
to the Programs menu. Tap this icon to start Data On The Run.
Open a Database
When Data On The Run first loads, you’ll see the program
window to the right.
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To open a Pocket Access database that is stored in the My Documents folder, either internally
or on a storage card, tap File | Open, and then tap the name of the database that you want to open.
Access databases can contain several tables of records that store information. Only one table
opens at a time in Data On The Run, so immediately after selecting a database you are prompted
to select the table to open from a drop-down list of tables in the database. To open another table
in the database, tap the Tables tab, select a table, and then tap Open Selected Table.
View Data
The table that you select displays in the Form view to the right.
This Form view is automatically created by the program,
and unlike other database software available for Pocket PCs,
Data On The Run does not allow you to create your own
forms. However, you can change the font size, the font style,
and background color of the form labels by tapping File |
Options.
The Command bar has
buttons for moving through
the records in the table. Above
the Command bar are tabs
for different parts of the
database. Tap List to
Delete a record.
display all of the records Tap these buttons to
in the table in a tabular
move through records.
Switch to List view.
view, as shown to the left.
Create a new record.
To resize a column, tap
the stylus on the right edge of the column head and drag either
left or right. Slide the scroll bar left or right to view more columns
in the table.
At the top of the screen. you see the name of the table and the
number of records in the table. Tap File | Options to configure the
Tap here to move
number of records that display in the List view. Tap the Form tab
through records.
to switch the display back to the default Form view.
Switch to Form view.
Create Tables
To create a new table in the database, tap the Tables tab and then
tap Create New Table to open the Table Creator screen shown to
the right.
Enter field names on the left side of the screen and select
a data type from the drop-down lists on the right side of the
screen. Tap Done when you have finished creating and adding
all the fields for the table, and you are then prompted to enter a
name for the table. Finally, you are asked whether you want to
add the table to database that is currently open, or if you want
to create a new database.
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Search for Data
While in the Form view or the tabular Form view, tap the
Magnifying Glass to open a dialog box where you enter search
criteria, an example of which is shown to the right. Select the
field to search from the Search Field drop-down list, select
an operator from the Operator drop-down list, and enter the
information that you want to search for in the Criteria field.
To add a second field to the search, tap the Second Criteria
check box, select And or Or, and then provide the search
information. Tap Apply Query Only to run the search and
display the records that meet the specified search criteria in
the table. Tap Save And Apply to save and then run the query.
After you run a query, only the records that meet the query
display. At the top of the screen, you will see a bar indicating
the number of records that meet the query. To remove the query
results filter and display all the records in the table, tap the bar at the top of the screen.
In Form view, you can tap the Query tab to see a list of the queries that you have created.
Edit Data
You might choose to synchronize a Microsoft Access database so that you can edit the data when
you are away from your desktop computer. Editing data using Data On The Run is easy, but you
can edit only existing data in the Form view. Simply tap the field that you want to change, make
the changes, and then move to the next record to save the changes.
To add or delete data from either the Form or List view, tap either the Add Record or Delete
Record button on the Command bar. When you tap the Add Record button while in List view, a
new record is added, but you cannot enter data in the record unless you switch to the Form view.
Keep in mind that if you change a record on a Pocket PC and the desktop computer before
synchronizing, a synchronization conflict will occur. ActiveSync will automatically apply
the change on the desktop and ignore the change on the Pocket PC.
One of the neat features that Data On The Run provides is the ability to define a drop-down
list of data that is frequently entered into a database. First, you need to select a field; then enter the
items for the drop-down list by tapping Edit | Setup Drop-Down Choices. Enter an item for the
drop-down list and tap Add. Tap Done when you’re finished.
A triangle to the right of a field indicates that a drop-down list contains information. When you
add a record, tap the triangle to display the list, tap an item, and it will be inserted into the field.
Wrapping Up
Many programs written for Pocket PCs are really just databases. The programs described in this
chapter provide you with the ability to create similar programs for yourself, either by creating
databases on a Pocket PC using HanDBase or synchronizing Access databases and viewing them
with Data On The Run.
We have now completed our overview of the productivity applications available for the Pocket
PC. In the next chapter, you’ll learn how to best use these programs on your Pocket PC at the office.
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How to…
■
■
■
■
■
■
Secure information
Send and receive e-mail from Exchange
Send and receive e-mail from Lotus Notes
Access mainframe applications
Access corporate databases
Run Windows programs
Y
our Pocket PC is designed to help you organize your life and to have fun along the way. While
at home, you may enjoy listening to music using the Windows Media Player or reading a book
using Microsoft Reader. But many of you will most often use your Pocket PC at work.
One of the reasons why you might have bought a Pocket PC is because a coworker has one.
Personal digital assistants (PDAs), whether they are Pocket PCs, Palms, or Cliés, are increasing
in numbers at corporations. These devices are usually brought to work by employees who bought
them with their own money, or who received one as a gift.
The extent to which you use your device at work will depend significantly on how the
computers at work are used and supported. Before you connect your Pocket PC to your desktop
PC at work, you should find out whether your company has a policy for using PDAs. Some
people will have no problem connecting their device to their desktop PC at work, while others
may be restricted because of corporate policy. Unfortunately, in many cases, policies are defined
out of ignorance about how Pocket PCs work.
This chapter provides information for using your Pocket PC at the office. You will find tips
for connecting your Pocket PC to your desktop at work and with the corporate network. You will
also learn ways to secure information, access your company’s e-mail, and you even learn how to
run Windows programs.
Bring Your Pocket PC to Work
Many great features are built into your Pocket PC to help you be more productive at work and,
it is hoped, to gain more free time to enjoy life. Obviously, you can use your device to schedule
appointments, track tasks, and store contact information, yet the Pocket Office applications
enable you to create documents and spreadsheets as well.
You probably already knew about all these features before you bought your device, and you’ve
probably tried each soon after you took the device out of its box. Inevitably, the time will come
when you pack your Pocket PC in your briefcase and head off to work, but once you are there,
how will you use your device?
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Connect to Your PC at Work
You will encounter few problems using your Pocket PC at work, but you may face some hurdles
connecting the device to your work computer. You will need to resolve two issues:
■ The physical connection between the device and computer
■ Installing and running ActiveSync
Make the Connection
Every Pocket PC is capable of partnering with two PCs, but most Pocket PCs include only
one cable or cradle. Chances are good that you already use the cable or cradle with your home
computer, so you might be faced with the prospect of carrying the cable back and forth between
work and home. There are a few solutions to this problem.
First, check to see whether your work computer has an infrared port—some notebook
computers have built-in infrared ports. If the port is available, it can be used to communicate
with your device. Chapter 5 provides the instructions for using infrared ports with ActiveSync.
Even if your computer does not have a built-in infrared port, you might want to add one. It
can be useful for connecting with multiple devices or connecting notebook computers to desktop
computers. Attached to my home computer is a XTNDAccess IrDA Adapter from Extended
Systems, which I find useful for connecting multiple devices. Extended Systems sells serial
and USB versions of this adapter, which you can find at http://www.extendedsystems.com.
The second solution is to buy a second cable to use at work. All hardware manufacturers
sell cables as accessories. Most of the cables sell for less than $25 and are available from the
manufacturers or from any online store that sells Pocket PCs. If you upgrade within a brand,
you might already have two cables, so be sure to check the manufacturer’s website.
Finally, you can use an Ethernet card to make the connection between your device and the
desktop PC. However, before an Ethernet card can be used, you must create a partnership using
a cable or an infrared port. Chapter 6 provides the instructions for synchronizing with a network
connection, and later in this chapter you will learn about additional aspects of connecting your
device to a corporate network.
Install ActiveSync
After you determine how you will connect the device to your computer at work, the next step
is to install ActiveSync. Other than corporate policies prohibiting the installation of software
on company PCs, ActiveSync is easy to install on PCs running Windows 98 or Me. Detailed
instructions for installing ActiveSync are provided in Chapter 5.
Installing ActiveSync on PCs running Windows NT 4, Windows 2000, or Windows XP is
more difficult. The user ID that you use to install ActiveSync must be a local administrator on
the PC. Once installed under Windows NT 4, ActiveSync will run even if the ID is only in the
local users group.
The same is not true for Windows 2000 or XP, however. By default, to run ActiveSync, the
ID must at least be for a user in the power users local group if ActiveSync is installed on a drive
formatted with NTFS (NT File System). The reason is because the Windows 2000/XP default
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security on the Program Files folder and subfolders does not provide users with write access, and
ActiveSync must be able to write files in the \Program Files\Microsoft ActiveSync folder. An
alternative is to modify the NTFS permissions of the ActiveSync folder so that the users group
has full control over the folder.
This problem does not occur if the Program Files folder is on a FAT (file allocation
table) partition.
Work with Non-Microsoft Applications
Personal Information Managers (PIMs) have been available for many years, but they have never
caught on in a major way, probably because the data stored by PIMs is not as useful when anchored
to a desk. Sure, when you sit at your desk, you could quickly search for a telephone number or an
appointment, but what happens when you are in a meeting? The best solution is probably to print
the information on paper and take it with you, but adding appointments and tasks is tedious because
the device requires that you enter that information when you return to your desk.
The synchronization capabilities of personal digital assistants (PDAs) make PIMs more
useful because it is easier to carry and update data. Furthermore, now that the data is in electronic
form, it is much easier to share with others, and that has led to the group scheduling capabilities
that make PIMs corporate tools.
Microsoft Outlook is a popular PIM, but it is certainly not the first, or only, one used by
companies. Lotus Organizer has been available for much longer, and its user interface, which
looks like a paper planner, is popular. Other programs store PIM data but specialize in contact
management, such as Act!, Goldmine, and Maximizer. Collaborative software such as Microsoft
Exchange Server and Lotus Notes also store PIM data.
With all of these options, there is a chance that your company uses a program other than
Microsoft Outlook. If that is the case, for your Pocket PC to be useful at work, you will need to
come up with a way to synchronize data with that program. The good news is that Pocket PCs
can synchronize with programs other than Outlook. The bad news is that you may need to buy
additional software, because ActiveSync communicates only with Outlook.
Synchronize Data with Non-Microsoft Applications
Four programs expand the Pocket PC synchronization capabilities beyond Outlook to several
different PIMs: Intellisync from Puma Technology, XTNDConnect PC from Extended Systems,
CompanionLink Express or Professional from CompanionLink Software, and TrueSync from
LapLink. These programs include features not found with ActiveSync that provide more control
over synchronization and address shortcomings. For example, Intellisync and XTNDConnect PC
support synchronization of Outlook subfolders, which is not possible with ActiveSync.
Each of these programs synchronizes calendar, e-mail, contacts, and tasks. Both Intellisync
and XTNDConnect PC give you the ability to match fields of data, providing flexibility not available
with ActiveSync, which is optimized for Outlook. What may be appealing to companies is that
both synchronize with Pocket PCs and Palm Computing devices, enabling them to provide a
standard method of synchronization with a standard PIM.
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Intellisync provides synchronization with 15 programs, including Microsoft Exchange, Lotus
Notes, and Novell GroupWise. For a current list of the programs that Intellisync supports, check
the Puma Technology website at http://www.pumatech.com/is_desktop_main.html.
In addition to synchronizing with Pocket PC and Palm Computing, XTNDConnect PC also
synchronizes with Pocket Viewer from Casio. Pocket Viewer is a low-cost organizer that does not
support all of the features found with the Pocket PC or Palm. XTNDConnect PC synchronizes with
fewer programs than Intellisync, but it does support NetManage Ecco Pro 4, unlike Intellisync.
For more information about XTNDConnect PC, go to the Extended Systems website at http://
www.extendedsystems.com.
CompanionLink also synchronizes with fewer programs than Intellisync, supporting versions
of GoldMine, Lotus Organizer, Outlook, ACT!, and Telemagic. More information and a trial
version of CompanionLink can be found at http://www.companionlink.com.
ACT! version 6 includes ACT! Link for Pocket PC, which is written by CompanionLink
Software. You can also buy ACT! Link for Pocket PC separately, and you will find more
information at http://www.act.com.
TrueSync is the newest of these products and supports synchronization among a variety of
Pocket PCs, Palm Computing devices, and mobile phones, with seven different desktop applications.
The desktop applications it supports are Outlook, Lotus Notes, and Palm Desktop. You will find
more information about TrueSync at http://www.laplink.com/products/truesync/overview.asp.
Manage Contacts
Contact managers are programs that store data in a manner similar to PIMs, but they are designed
for the purpose of managing relationships with people. Usually, all of the data in a contact manager
relates back to a person. For example, using a contact manager, you can quickly see all the
appointments that you have scheduled with a particular person. Sales departments of companies
commonly use these programs to help build relationships with people.
The four third-party synchronization programs described in the previous section support the
synchronization of Pocket Outlook with popular desktop contact managers like ACT! and GoldMine.
However, Pocket Outlook does not provide many of the features, such as linking contacts with
appointments or tasks that one expects of a contact manager. If you want these features on your
Pocket PC, you will have to obtain a third-party application.
One of the most popular of these applications is PocketInformant, available for download from
http://www.pocketinformant.com. PocketInformant enables you to link contacts with appointments,
tasks, other contacts, or files. It also provides the ability to create appointments or tasks using the
contact information, which is automatically linked to the contact.
PocketInformant works with your Pocket Outlook data, so everything synchronizes with Outlook.
Pocket On-Schedule version 5 for Pocket PC from Odyssey synchronizes with On-Schedule
version 5 or Microsoft Outlook. Because of this, it is a good alternative to Pocket Outlook if you
don’t like Outlook.
Unlike Pocket Outlook, Pocket On-Schedule provides journaling capabilities to track contact
information, and it supports multiple address books, calendars, and to-do lists. For people who
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Boost Contacts
The Power Contacts power toy from Microsoft adds three options to the Contacts pop-up
menu: Create Appointment, Create Task, and Open Web Page. Create Appointment creates
an appointment with the contact as the subject and attendee, Create Task creates a task with
the contact as the subject, and Open Web Page starts Internet Explorer and loads the web
page associated with the contact. This program is free and can be downloaded from
http://www.microsoft.com/mobile/pocketpc/downloads/powertoys.asp.
find Pocket Outlook categories insufficient for separating data, Pocket On-Schedule may be a
good alternative. You will find more information, and a trial version of the software, at http://
www.odysseyinc.com.
Convert Files
Even though Microsoft Word and Excel are the most popular word processor and spreadsheet
programs, they are not the only programs used by companies. At one time, WordPerfect and
Lotus 1-2-3 were more popular, and they are still in use.
Unfortunately, no widely available file conversion tools for the Pocket PC enable you to open
WordPerfect or Lotus 1-2-3 files in Pocket Word or Excel. In both cases, the best way to work
with these files is to save them in Microsoft formats before downloading to your device. This
also means that if someone wants to e-mail a WordPerfect document as an attachment, the file
must first be converted to a Microsoft format.
Chapter 6 explains how ActiveSync converts files as they move between a device and a desktop
computer. Inbox also converts files so that you can easily send and receive Word and Pocket Word
file attachments. But if you use any other method of transferring files, such as an FTP client or a
network connection, you will have to convert the file manually to a supported format.
You can use WESTTEK’s ClearVue Suite to view native Microsoft Office 97, 2000, and
XP PowerPoint, Excel, and Word files. More information about this software is
available at http://www.westtek.com.
Pocket Word can save files in Rich Text format (RTF), plaintext, Word 97, and Word 6.0/95
formats. To save a document in these formats, tap Tools | Save Document As, expand the Type
drop-down list, and select a format. Pocket Excel can save files in Excel 97, 5.0, and 95 workbook
formats. To save a Pocket Excel workbook in one of these formats, tap Tools | Save Workbook
As, expand the Type drop-down list, and select a format.
Open Adobe Acrobat Files
The Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF) has become the de facto standard for distributing
documents on the Internet. This is because Adobe distributes Acrobat Reader, which is required
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to view PDF files, for free on the Internet. PDF files look exactly the same as printed documents
and are easy to create. For these reasons, many companies create documentation in PDF format
and make it available from their websites.
You can view PDF files with the Acrobat Reader for Pocket PCs. The Pocket PC version of
Acrobat Reader is capable of viewing tagged and untagged Acrobat files. Tagged files are preferable
for viewing on Pocket PCs because the Pocket PC allows the Reader to format the text for the
size of the Pocket PC screen. When you install Acrobat Reader on your Pocket PC, it adds an
Acrobat file converter to ActiveSync, which attempts to convert Acrobat files to the tagged
format. If the PDF file cannot be converted to the tagged format, it is copied to the Pocket PC in
the untagged format. You will find more information about Acrobat Reader at http://www.adobe.com/
products/acrobat/readerforppc.html.
Before Adobe Acrobat Reader, Primer PDF Viewer from Ansyr was the only Acrobat Reader
for Pocket PCs. Primer supports most PDF image formats, including bookmarks, hyperlinks, and
Table of Contents. It provides magnification capabilities that are important for viewing documents
designed for larger PC screens. More information and a 30-day trial version of this program is
available at http://www.ansyr.com/.
Access the Corporate Network
Chances are good that your computer at work is connected to a Local Area Network (LAN) so
that it can access shared resources such as printers and e-mail servers. The Pocket PC includes
the software to enable it to connect to these networks, either by using a modem and dial-up
connection or directly with an Ethernet card. You can use this connectivity to send and receive
e-mail from your company mail server or to access web pages on your corporate intranet.
Gather Dial-Up Information
Today, many companies provide dial-up access to their networks to enable employees to access
resources from home or on the road. The dial-up access is probably expected to work with desktop
computers, while few companies provide support for Pocket PCs. This does not mean that your
Pocket PC will not work with a company dial-up access, but it does mean that you may have to
gather more information and probably configure the device yourself.
If you can access a corporate network using standard Windows Dial-Up Networking, you
should be able to connect using a Pocket PC. You will need to gather some information before
you can create a dial-up connection. If your company provides instructions for connecting using
Windows, what you need will be provided in those instructions. If the dial-up connection has
already been created, you can find the information by opening the connection Properties window.
The following is the information that you will need to create the dial-up connection on your
Pocket PC:
■ Find out whether you provide a username and password in the Dial-Up Connection
dialog box, or whether a terminal window opens after the number has been dialed (in
which you enter a username and password).
■ Obtain the maximum baud rate for the connection as well as the settings for data bits,
parity, stop bits, and flow control.
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■ Find out whether the connection uses Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) or Serial Line
Interface Protocol (SLIP). The most common in use is PPP.
■ Determine whether the network access server, or Windows NT Remote Access Server,
provides an IP address, or whether one is manually assigned. The most common
configuration is server-assigned, but if it is manually assigned you will need the address.
■ Find out whether the connection uses software compression or IP header compression.
The most common configuration is to use both.
■ Learn whether the server assigns addresses for name servers, or are they manually
assigned? If they are manually assigned, you will need the addresses for the Primary
Domain Name Server (DNS), Secondary DNS, Primary Windows Internet Name Server
(WINS), and Secondary WINS.
■ If a proxy server is used to access the Internet, you will need the proxy server name, if
one is used, and you plan on accessing the Internet from the corporate network. To find
the proxy server name found in Internet Explorer on desktop computers, click Tools |
Internet Options, and then click the Connections tab and the LAN Settings button.
■ Determine whether you need to use virtual private networking (VPN) to connect to the
corporate network. If you do, obtain the host name or IP address of the VPN server.
■ Obtain the phone number for accessing the corporate network, or if you use VPN, obtain
the phone number for an Internet Service Provider (ISP).
Configure Connection Manager Work Settings
After you gather this information, you are ready to create the dial-up connection. To create
a dial-up connection with Pocket PC 2002 and Windows Mobile 2003, you use Connection
Manager, which simplifies the process.
The Windows Mobile 2003
Connection Manager, shown in the
image to the left, has two sections:
one for Internet Service Provider
(ISP) connection settings and another
for Work Network settings.
Configure Internet
connection settings.
To open Connection Manager on
your
Pocket PC, tap Start | Settings |
Configure Work
Connections | Connections. The
connection settings.
Pocket PC 2002 Connection
Manager has three sections—one
for Internet connections, another for
Work connections, and the final
section configures network cards.
To create a dial-up connection to
a work network on Windows Mobile
2003, tap Add A New Modem
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Connection under My Work Network on the main Connection Manager screen. You then enter
information on three screens to create a modem connection. On the first screen, enter a name for
the connection, select the modem that you will use, and tap Next.
On the second screen, enter the phone number exactly as it should be dialed, including extra
numbers such as an outside line or credit card, and then tap Next. If you travel or frequently
change location (and thus area codes), configure the Pocket PC to use dialing rules by tapping
Use Dialing Rules.
Finally, on the third screen, enter the username and password you use to log on to your work
network. If you are connecting to a Microsoft Windows NT or 2000 network, you may need to
enter a domain name, which your network administrator can provide. Tap Advanced to change
the modem baud rate or enter network addresses for the Pocket PC, domain name servers (DNS),
or Windows Internet Name (WINS) servers. Tap OK to exit the Advanced Settings screen, and
then tap Finish to exit from the third and final modem connection screen.
After you create a modem connection for a Work Network, a new option called Manage
Existing Connections appears on the Connection Manager screen. Tap this option to
change the modem connection settings.
Most work networks use Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) to configure network
addresses automatically, and Pocket PCs use DHCP by default, so you should not need to enter
network addresses. If you need to enter TCP/IP or name server information, or if you need to
have a terminal window open after the modem connects so that you can log on to the network,
tap Advanced on the third modem connection screen.
The Advanced Settings screen has four tabs, as
shown in the image to the right.
Change the modem baud rate on the General tab.
The Port Settings tab has check boxes to specify whether
a terminal window displays. Tap the Use Terminal After
Connecting check box if you need a terminal window
for logging on to the network. Tap the Use Terminal
Before Connecting or Enter Dialing Commands
Manually check boxes if you need to enter modem
commands prior to the call being made.
Tap the TCP/IP tab to enter the IP address that the
Pocket PC should use when connecting to the network,
and tap the Servers tab to enter IP addresses for DNS
and WINS. Tap OK to close the Advanced Settings
screen.
Pocket PC 2002 and Windows Mobile 2003 support
VPN solutions that use the Point-to-Point Tunneling
Protocol (PPTP), which is provided by Windows servers.
To configure your Pocket PC to use VPN, you will need the host name or IP address of the VPN
connection. To configure Windows Mobile 2003 to use VPN, tap Add A New VPN Server
Connection on the Tasks tab of Connection Manager.
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Virtual Private Networking Provides
Access to Corporate Networks
Virtual private networking (VPN) uses encryption to secure communication between a client
and a server, and it is commonly used to enable one to use the public Internet to access
servers on a private network. Typically, you first dial an ISP using dial-up networking. Then
you run a VPN client, which establishes a connection with the VPN server. After a VPN
connection is made, you can then run any application that requires a network connection.
Enter the host name or IP address for the VPN server, which your network administrator
can provide, and tap Next. Enter your VPN server username and password on the second VPN
settings screen, and tap Finish. You will then see the main Connection Manager screen, where
you will now see an Edit My VPN Servers link under My Work Network; tap this link to edit the
VPN server settings.
To delete a VPN server, tap-and-hold on the server name and then tap Delete on the
pop-up menu.
The final work setting to configure is the Proxy
Servers. Proxy servers are typically used by web
browsers to access pages on the Internet on computers
connected to a corporate network. If you need to use
a proxy server, tap Set Up My Proxy Server on the
Windows Mobile 2003 Connection Manager screen,
which opens the image to the right.
Tap the two check boxes on the screen to select
them and enter the host name or IP address of the proxy
server in the Proxy Server field. Tap Advanced if you
need to change the ports for the proxy server, enter a
WAP (Wireless Application Protocol) proxy server, or
configure the Socks proxy server.
WAP proxy servers provide access to web
pages that are designed for display on mobile
phones. Socks proxy servers enable clients
and servers of client/server applications to
communicate with each other by using the Internet.
Tap OK to return to the main Connection Manager screen. You will now see an Edit My
Proxy Server link under My Work Network, which you can tap if you need to make any changes
to the proxy server settings.
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Make VPN Connections Using
the IP Security Protocol
Pocket PC 2002 and Windows Mobile 2003 do not support the IP Security Protocol (IPSec),
and Pocket PC 2000 does not include PPTP. If your company requires IPSec, movianVPN
from Certicom may be your best solution. The client software runs on Pocket PC and Palm
Computing devices and is optimized for wireless communication. You will find more
information about this product at http://www.moviansecurity.com.
V-ONE provides another VPN solution for Pocket PCs called SmartPass Pocket PC.
SmartPass Pocket PC works only with the V-ONE SmartGate Server, and you will find more
information about both of these products at http://www.v-one.com.
Connect to the Corporate Network
The easiest way to make a dial-up connection to a work network is directly from Inbox or
Internet Explorer. Chapter 20 shows you how to configure an e-mail service in Inbox so that
it uses the work settings.
Internet Explorer does not have an option for you to specify whether to use an Internet or
Work connection. Instead, the Connection Manager determines which type of connection to use
based on the URL you enter in the address bar or the URL you select in Favorites. If the address
is a fully qualified domain name, such as www.pocketpchow2.com, Connection Manager
connects to the Internet. If the address is one word, such as pocketpchow2, Connection Manager
will connect to Work.
If you access a corporate intranet that uses fully
qualified domain names, and you have a Pocket PC 2002
device, you will have to either manually initiate the call
using Connection Manager or configure the Internet
connection to access the corporate network. Windows
Mobile 2003 fixes this by providing a way for you to
enter intranet web addresses as exceptions, so that when
you try to open them in Internet Explorer, Connection
Manager will establish a connection to a work network.
To add a URL to the Exceptions list on Windows
Mobile 2003, tap the Advanced tab on Connection
Manager, and then tap Select Networks. On the Network
Management screen, tap Exceptions, which opens the
Work URL Exceptions screen shown to the right.
Tap Add New URL and then enter the URL of the
websites on your intranet. You can use wildcards—for
example, entering *.companyname.com will match any
URL ending with companyname.com.
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If your corporate network uses a proxy server to connect to the Internet, Internet Explorer
on Windows Mobile 2003 will not use the proxy server to access websites in the Exceptions list.
With Pocket PC 2002, you cannot configure Pocket PCs so that they don’t use a proxy server to
access intranet websites. If the proxy server on your corporate network does not support intranet
websites, you may need to create two work settings in Connection Manager—one that uses a
proxy server and another that does not use a proxy server.
Use Ethernet Networking
Most Pocket PCs are capable of connecting to an Ethernet network, which is used by most
companies that have LANs. You might want to connect your device to an Ethernet network for
several reasons. For one, network synchronization is much faster than using serial or infrared
ports. You can also use Pocket Internet Explorer to access intranet websites, and you can even
use a proxy server to access the public Internet. Furthermore, Inbox can also access e-mail
servers that use standard Internet e-mail protocols. Before you connect your device to the
network in your office, review the information in this section with your network administrator.
To connect your Pocket PC to an Ethernet network, you will need an Ethernet network card.
Several companies sell CompactFlash Ethernet cards that work on Pocket PCs with Type I or
Type II slots. Type II cards are larger than Type I cards and will not fit in slots designed only for
Type I cards, so you need to know which type of CompactFlash slot is in your Pocket PC. The
Pocket PC’s user manual should tell you what type of CompactFlash slot is in your Pocket PC.
Chris De Herrera maintains a list of cards that work at http://www.cewindows.net/peripherals/
cfethernet.htm.
Before you can connect the Pocket PC to an Ethernet network, you must gather the following
information so that you can configure the Ethernet card driver. Your network administrator can
provide this information. Chapter 5 provides the instructions for using this information to
configure the Ethernet card driver.
■ Does the network provide IP addresses using DHCP, or are they manually assigned (static)?
■ If the addresses are static, what is the address, the subnet mask, and the default gateway?
■ If the network provides the addresses, are the DNS and WINS addresses also provided?
If not, obtain the IP addresses for the Primary and Secondary DNS, and the Primary and
Secondary WINS.
■ Some networks do not use WINS, so if you plan to synchronize using the network
connection, you will need the IP address assigned to your desktop computer. You can
determine that address by running winipcfg.exe with Windows 95/98, or running
ipconfig.exe from a Windows NT command prompt. Use the IP address of the desktop
computer for the Primary WINS address.
Connection Manager also has a role in how a Pocket PC uses network cards, because it
specifies whether network cards connect to the Internet or Work networks. The third section of the
Pocket PC 2002 Connection Manager is a drop-down list that specifies whether you are using
the card to connect to the Internet or Work. If you use a network card to connect to a LAN to
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synchronize with a desktop computer on that network,
you must specify that the network card connects to Work.
To specify how Windows Mobile 2003 uses network
cards, tap the Advanced tab and then tap Network Card
on the Connections screen shown here:
Select either The Internet or Work from the My
Network Card Connects To drop-down list on the
Configure Network Adapters screen.
If you specify that a network card connects to
Work, and the work settings are configured for
a proxy server, you will not be able to access
websites on the Internet unless the proxy server
is available. This means that if you connect to
a home network that does not have a proxy
server, you will need to set the network card
to the Internet to access websites.
Use ActiveSync Desktop Pass Through
With Pocket PC 2002, Windows Mobile 2003, and ActiveSync version 3.7 or greater, you can
access the corporate network from a Pocket PC while the device is connected to a desktop
computer. The feature is enabled by default in ActiveSync, but if it is not working, choose Tools |
Options on the desktop computer, and then click the Rules tab. If you need to use a proxy server
to access an Internet site, be sure to select Work from the drop-down list on the Pass Through
section of the Rules tab.
Secure Information
Because Pocket PCs are small, they are handy to carry around. Unfortunately, their size also
makes it easy for the devices to be stolen. It is bad enough that your appointments, addresses,
and tasks are at risk, but it is another thing entirely to expose confidential documents to outsiders.
Fortunately, you can secure the information and data in a Windows Pocket PC in several ways.
This section reviews some of these methods to help you determine which way is the best for you.
Use the Power-On Password
Every Pocket PC can be assigned a password that you must enter whenever you turn on the
device. The only way to access the device without the password is by performing a hard reset,
which removes all information stored on the device. To assign a password to your device, follow
the instructions provided in Chapter 3.
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Pocket PC 2002 and Windows Mobile 2003 support strong passwords, which consist
of alphabetic and numeric characters. Because strong passwords are more secure than
the simple four-digit numeric PINs used with Pocket PC 2000, they are preferred by
corporations.
Use Anti-Virus Software
To date, no instances of viruses have been reported on Pocket PCs. Virus scan software vendors
have focused on preventing infection of desktop PCs from viruses transported on Pocket PCs.
McAfee’s Virus Scan version 7 runs on desktop computers and scans files on the Pocket PC during
synchronization. You will find more information about this product at http://www.mcafee.com.
Solutions that scan files from a desktop computer do not protect the Pocket PC from viruses
that may be sent via e-mail or downloaded from the Internet. However, few on-device virus scan
programs exists for Pocket PCs. One such program is F-Secure Anti-Virus for Pocket PC, which
works on HP, Toshiba, and Symbol Pocket PC 2002 devices; we assume it will be upgraded to
support Windows Mobile 2003. For information about F-Secure Anti-Virus, see http://www
.f-secure.com/wireless/pocketpc/pocketpc-av.shtml.
Store Sensitive Information in Secure Databases
It seems as though the Internet has dramatically increased the number of user IDs and passwords in
our lives. Combined with account numbers and PINs, it can be too much information to keep track
of. A Pocket PC is perfect for storing and retrieving this information, but how do you protect it?
Fortunately, several programs have been written to store and protect this type of information.
One of these programs is PassKey from AppStudio, which is an information manager that lets
you store password and registration information in one encrypted database. You can use PassKey
to store passwords, CD-ROM keys, and website registration information. For information and an
evaluation copy, go to http://www.appstudio.com.
With The Safe from the German company Softwarebürro Müller, you can also store encrypted
information. Unlike PassKey, this program allows you to define three fields, which can contain
any string, for each record. You can then determine whether or not you want to encrypt a particular
record. To view encrypted data, you must enter a password when the program starts. For more
information and an evaluation copy, go to http://www.sbm.nu/englisch/windowsce/thesafe/
index.htm.
eWallet from Ilium Software has a graphical user interface (GUI) that takes the form of a
wallet. In this wallet, you can store cards that resemble credit cards, calling cards, and cards that
include PINs and registration numbers. Each card can be protected with a password and encryption.
Ilium Software sells versions of eWallet for all Windows CE platforms, and a version is also
available for desktop computers. For more information and an evaluation copy, go to http://
www.iliumsoft.com/wallet.htm.
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Assign Passwords to Documents
The Pocket Word and Excel documents that you store on your device might also contain confidential
information. Unfortunately, you cannot password-protect Pocket Word documents on a Pocket PC.
You can, however, password-protect an Excel spreadsheet on a Pocket PC; tap Edit | Password.
Note that one problem with password-protecting documents exists: when you synchronize a
document, the password-protection can be removed. At first, ActiveSync will not synchronize the
protected file, and instead it creates a synchronization conflict. If you resolve the conflict, you will
be prompted for the password, and after you enter it, the password is removed from the document.
Documents that are password-protected on the desktop PC cannot be synchronized to a Pocket PC.
Encrypt Files
Encryption is the process of converting messages and data into a form unreadable by anyone except
the intended recipient. People commonly use this method to secure data transferred across the
Internet. For example, the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocol developed by Netscape encrypts
the contents of web pages before they are transmitted between the web server and the web browser.
Encryption can also be used to secure files, which cannot be opened unless a password is
provided. While encryption is effective for securing documents, there is a risk that if the password
is lost or forgotten, the document cannot be opened. One way to protect against this risk is to
store unencrypted copies of the files in a secure location. Two products, Sentry CE and
PocketLock, provide encryption for Pocket PCs.
SoftWinter, Inc., sells Sentry 2020 Pocket PC, which is also available for Windows XP.
Sentry 2020 creates an encrypted virtual volume on a Pocket PC that is compatible with its
Windows XP product, which means that if the volume is on a storage card and your device fails,
you still can gain access to the data. Encrypting a file is a simple matter of copying the file to the
virtual volume and providing a password. The virtual volume can be created on a storage card,
which you can then remove from the device and store for even more security. The virtual volume
looks like a large file when viewed with File Explorer. You will find more information about
Sentry 2020 at http://www.softwinter.com.
PocketLock from Applian provides simple encryption and decryption of files or folders
located internally or on a storage card. It uses the Microsoft High Encryption Pack to provide
eight encryption methods. To encrypt a file or folder, you simply select either using PocketLock
and provide a numeric PIN. Encrypted files can be automatically decrypted from File Explorer,
but they are not visible to Pocket Word or Excel. You will find more information about
PocketLock at http://www.applian.com.
Connect to Corporate E-Mail Systems
You might expect Inbox to work with the Microsoft Exchange server. After all, they’re both
Microsoft products, so why wouldn’t they work together? However, prior to Microsoft releasing
Exchange 2003, you needed an intermediary program to synchronize e-mail with Exchange unless
it was configured to support Internet protocols. Exchange 2003 includes server ActiveSync, which
supports synchronization with Pocket PCs.
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Lotus Notes and Novell GroupWise are two other popular e-mail servers used by corporations,
but both primarily support their own clients, which do not use the Internet e-mail protocols. Unless
Internet protocol support is added to these servers, the only way to use Inbox with them is through
an intermediary program. Inbox communicates with the intermediary program using the Internet
protocols, and the intermediary program communicates with the e-mail server using the appropriate
non-Internet protocols.
Inbox on Windows Mobile 2003 supports SSL encryption for communicating with
e-mail servers using Internet protocols. See Chapter 20 for instructions on how to
use SSL with Inbox.
The good news is that the intermediary program can run on a server and provide access to
the corporate e-mail server for several clients. The bad news is that you must add a server to the
corporate network, which may be beyond your capability.
You do have a couple of alternatives, however. One is to synchronize messages between
Inbox and an e-mail client running on your PC. The process for synchronization between Inbox
and Outlook, explained in Chapter 20, will enable you to send and receive messages from Exchange
when Outlook is used as an Exchange client. Intellisync and XTNDConnect PC, described
earlier in this chapter, are both capable of synchronizing Inbox messages with Lotus Notes
clients, and Intellisync can also sync with Novell GroupWise.
Send and Receive E-Mail from Exchange
As explained in Chapter 20, Inbox is primarily an Internet e-mail client. While Exchange includes
support for Internet protocols, many implementations have this feature disabled. If the Exchange
server that you use does support either the POP3 or IMAP4 protocol, Inbox can be configured to
work with the server. Follow the instructions provided in Chapter 20 for setting up an Internet service.
Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 includes server ActiveSync (previously called Mobile
Information Server), which supports direct synchronizing of Pocket PCs with Exchange. Chapter 6
provides instructions for configuring your Pocket PC for server synchronization. You can configure
Exchange 2003 to initiate synchronization when new mail arrives.
If your company does not run Exchange Server 2003, it can provide Pocket PC access to
Exchange by installing an intermediary server on their network. One product in this category
is XTNDConnect Server from Extended Systems, which was formerly known as ASL-Connect.
This product synchronizes Pocket PC and Palm Computing devices with Microsoft Exchange
and Lotus Notes. It runs on a server on the network and can provide e-mail access to several
devices at the same time. Microsoft has partnered with Extended Systems to provide a concurrent
five-user, 30-day trial copy of the program. You will find more information about XTNDConnect
Server at http://www.extendedsystems.com/go/mstrial/.
Send and Receive E-Mail from Lotus Notes
To say that Lotus Notes is commonly found among corporations around the world is an
understatement. Recently, Lotus announced that it had reached 50 million users. The popularity
of this program has created a whole new category of software, called groupware.
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Companies use groupware to provide access to free-form information stored in databases.
Several copies of the same database may be kept consistent throughout a company through a
process called replication. Replication is similar to the synchronization process that you use
to keep your Pocket PC and Outlook consistent. The difference is that the databases may be
countries apart, and they use networks and messaging to pass information back and forth.
At first, Lotus Notes consisted of e-mail messages and databases. Later, PIM features and
group scheduling were added to the product. The product has also been divided in two, with
Notes being the client and Domino being the server, but people often refer to the two as one
and call it Lotus Notes.
As you can tell, Lotus Notes has many features and can be complicated. For a person trying
to determine how to get a Pocket PC to work with Lotus Notes, things can get confusing. First,
you need to ask yourself a few questions: Do you want to communicate with the Notes client or
the Domino Server? Do you want to synchronize e-mail, calendar, contacts, and tasks, or do you
want access to databases? Let’s see if we can sort this out.
A number of the products already described enable synchronization of e-mail, calendar,
contacts, and tasks with the Lotus Notes client. Intellisync and XTNDConnect PC support Lotus
Notes versions 4.5, 4.6, 5.0, and 6.0. Intermediary programs provide synchronization of PIM
data between Pocket PCs and Domino servers. One of these programs is XTNDConnect Server,
described earlier in the “Send and Receive E-Mail from Exchange” section of this chapter.
Finally, if you need access to Lotus Notes databases, you will want to look at Cadenza mNotes
from CommonTime Ltd. This product is the only one designed specifically for working with Lotus
Notes databases, which CommonTime specializes in developing. If you are familiar with Lotus Notes,
you will find that CommonTime products provide the most support for all of its features. More
information is available at http://www.commontime.com/.
Run Windows Programs
You may be painfully aware by now that the Pocket Office applications included with Pocket
PCs are not the same as those provided in Microsoft Office. If you travel frequently, you may
have hoped that your device could replace that notebook computer you lug around, only to have
those hopes dashed when you found out that you couldn’t create tables in Pocket Word. Wouldn’t
it be great if you could run the full copy of Microsoft Word on your Pocket PC?
Well, you can, kind of. Actually, you can work with a display of Word on your Pocket PC while
the program actually runs on another computer. The process for doing this is called network
computing, and it is similar to the mainframe programs you access with a terminal emulator.
A terminal server client runs on your Pocket PC that accesses programs running on the
server. The display of those programs appears on your Pocket PC, and it seems as if you are
sitting at a regular desktop computer, but all of the processing happens back at the server. This
software is becoming a popular way for companies to provide remote access to its systems,
because it centralizes support. Programs are installed on one computer and made available to all
who access it, rather than having to install programs on hundreds of notebook computers spread
throughout the country.
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While they work incredibly well, terminal server clients have one significant limitation: the
client must be able to connect to the server to run applications. People who travel frequently on
airplanes may find this limitation to be a problem when they want to run Microsoft Word or Excel.
However, for users of Pocket PCs, these clients are the only way to run Windows programs.
Use Microsoft Mobile Terminal Server Client
The first step in using the Microsoft Mobile Terminal Server client is to obtain access to the
server. Your network administrator will create a username and password that you will use to log
on to the server. The administrator will also set you up
with the programs that you will need to run. You will
also need to connect your Pocket PC to the corporate
network, as described in the “Access the Corporate
Network” section earlier in this chapter.
The Mobile Terminal Service client may already be
installed on your Pocket PC; if not, you can download
it from http://www.pocketpc.com. Install the program
using the process described in Chapter 7. To start the
program, tap Start | Programs | Terminal Services
Client. Enter a host name or an IP address of the
terminal server and tap Connect.
After a connection is established, you will see the
standard Windows NT/2000/2003 logon screen, as
shown in the image to the left.
Along the bottom of the screen are five buttons that
quickly move the display around the screen. If you limit
the size of the server desktop to fit the Pocket PC
screen, the buttons do not display.
Tap these buttons to move
around on the screen.
The Pocket PC portrait orientation limits what you can see on the Windows desktop.
Use Nyditot Virtual Display or JS Landscape, as described in Chapter 11, to change
the screen to landscape orientation and see more of the desktop.
Use the stylus for mouse operations when running Windows programs, and tap-and-hold to
open a drop-down menu (like the one that appears when you right-click with your PC mouse).
You cannot use Transcriber with terminal services, so you will need to use the keyboard, letter
recognizer, or block recognizer to enter information. To end the terminal session, tap Start | Shut
Down, then select Logoff, and then tap OK.
The Pocket PC Close button does not shut down the Terminal Services client. If you tap
Close and then switch back to Terminal Services, you will find that your Pocket PC is
still connected to the server.
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Use Terminal Services with
Pocket PC 2000
Microsoft has not provided a Terminal Services client for Pocket PC 2000 devices. However,
a version of the client for handheld PCs works on the Compaq iPAQ Pocket PC. Because the
program is designed for handheld PCs, it does not have the features found in the Terminal
Services client for Pocket PC 2002. The Pocket PC Start button will move to the bottom of
the screen, the server display is limited to 256 colors and to the size of the Pocket PC screen,
and there is no support for a right-click.
If you run Navigation bar replacement programs, such as WIS Bar or
Gigabar, you should exit out of them before running the Terminal Server
client; otherwise you will have problems accessing the soft-input panel.
To install the client on an iPAQ, download the program from http://www.microsoft.com/
mobile/downloads/ts-final.asp and follow these steps:
1. Connect your iPAQ to your desktop computer.
2. Run the program that you downloaded. The installation program will say that you do
not have a compatible device and will leave you at the Add/Remove Programs screen.
Click Cancel to close Add/Remove Programs and click Finish on the Setup screen.
3. Start Windows Explorer on your desktop computer and open C:\Program Files\
Microsoft ActiveSync\Terminal Server Client for Windows CE, Handheld PC
Edition. This directory path is for a standard installation of ActiveSync and may
be different if you installed to a different drive or directory.
4. Copy the file rdp.hpc_sa1100.CAB to a folder on your Pocket PC.
5. Start File Explorer on the iPAQ, open the folder in which you stored the file in step
4, and then tap the file name. You’ll see a warning that the program is designed for
the H/PC; tap Yes to continue the installation.
The Terminal Server Client is installed into the \My Device\Program Files\Terminal
Server Client folder, and the program name is mstsc40. You can use File Explorer to run
the program, or use ActiveSync to create a shortcut as described in Chapter 7.
Use Citrix Winframe
Citrix pioneered the development of server-based computing when it created and sold Winframe.
The Independent Computing Architecture (ICA), also developed by Citrix, enables client devices
running a variety of operating systems to access their terminal server. Included among those
devices are Pocket PCs.
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Because Citrix has been selling Winframe for a number of years, a large number of corporations
have it installed. If your company uses Citrix, you will be able to download and use the ICA
client, which you can find at http://www.download.citrix.com/.
Use Other Remote-Control Applications
Remote-control software works like terminal servers because you run programs running on other
computers. The difference is that the host program can support only one client session at a time.
Perhaps the most popular use of these programs is to provide remote troubleshooting and help
desk support for remote and mobile workers.
Virtual Network Computing (VNC) is a remote display system that allows you to view a
desktop environment running on a machine from anywhere on the Internet. It is usually used to
display an X Windows environment that runs on UNIX, but it will also run on Macintoshes and
Windows. With a VNC Viewer running on a Pocket PC, you can access desktops running on
UNIX, Macintosh, and Windows computers running the VNC server. Best of all, the software is
free and available for download from the Internet. To download any one of the server programs,
go to http://www.realvnc.com/. You will find a Pocket PC version of the VNC Viewer at
http://www.cs.utah.edu/~midgley/wince/vnc.html.
Wrapping Up
Pocket PCs are powerful productivity tools at the office. They connect to corporate networks and
synchronize with desktop computers, open Internet and intranet websites, retrieve e-mail from
corporate mail servers, and run Windows programs using the Terminal Services client. A number
of third-party applications are available to synchronize data with PIMs, such as ACT! and Lotus
Organizer, as well as view PDF files.
In Chapter 14 you learned how to use third-party programs to create and give PowerPoint
presentations. You can secure the information on your Pocket PC using strong passwords and
encryption software. Just as Pocket PCs are useful at the office, they are even more useful when
traveling. In the next chapter you will learn how to take full advantage of your Pocket PC while
you are away from your home or office.
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How to…
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Prepare to travel with your Pocket PC
Extend battery life
Get connected to the Internet while traveling
Print to different types of printers
Back up your device while traveling
Connect a GPS receiver to your device
Find maps to install on your device
Find language translators for your device
W
hether you choose to replace your notebook computer with a Pocket PC on your next
business trip will depend on the amount of functionality that you need from software
applications versus the convenience of less weight, longer battery life, and the “instant on”
startup time provided by a Pocket PC. If you need to retrieve your e-mail, give a presentation,
write documents, and create spreadsheets, a Pocket PC will meet your needs, with much less
weight and longer battery life than most notebook computers. In this chapter, you’ll find many
tips on traveling with a Pocket PC, along with a handy checklist that you can use while packing
for your trip.
Prepare to Travel with Your Pocket PC
Murphy’s Law seems to apply most often when you are on the road and away from any help.
Preparation will either prevent problems or help you deal with them when they happen. Planning
how you’ll use your Pocket PC on your trip will reduce stress and increase productivity. Four items
that you should plan ahead for before embarking on your trip are power, connectivity, printing, and
backup.
Keep Your Pocket PC Running
Every computer ever made has at least one thing in common: it needs a power source to work.
Batteries enable computers to be used in places where using a power cord is not possible. The
longer the battery lasts, the more productivity you gain using the computer. A Pocket PC
maximizes your productivity with its long battery life.
Unfortunately, no matter how long a battery can last, it will eventually need to be replaced or
recharged. Because power is so important, you should take the time to plan how you will power
your device and recharge its batteries while traveling. Here are some tips for planning for your
power needs:
■ Charge the batteries before you leave. Batteries tend to run out at the worst possible
time, like halfway through a flight while you’re writing a report that is due the next day.
That would not be a good time to recall that the last time you charged the batteries was
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last week. Don’t let batteries be the cause of not finishing that report; charge them the
night before you leave.
■ Pack an extra battery. If your device uses a removable battery, consider buying a
spare battery that you can bring on long trips. Of course, make sure you charge up that
extra battery before you leave on the trip.
■ Buy an external battery pack. Some Pocket PCs do not have replaceable batteries but
do have external battery packs that connect to the power adapter port and recharge the
internal battery.
■ Buy an extra power adapter. If you frequently travel to the same location, buy an
■
■
■
■
■
■
extra power adapter and leave it at that location. It is also a good idea to keep adapters at
your office and home. By doing this, you will lighten your luggage and avoid forgetting
to pack the adapter.
Buy a USB Sync-and-Charge cable. These cables draw power from the USB ports on
personal computers and also support synchronization. By using these cables, you do not
have to carry separate power adapters and synchronization cables or cradles. You will
find Sync-and-Charge cables at retail and online computer stores that sell Pocket PC
accessories.
Pack an extension cord. Older hotel rooms tend to have too few power outlets, which
may be covered by beds and dressers and always seem to be placed as far from the desk
or table as possible. An extension cord will allow you to use your device wherever it is
convenient.
Pack a portable surge suppressor. Power surges can occur anywhere, creating the
possibility of destroying your device. Most computer stores carry portable surge
suppressors that have two outlets and possibly two or three phone jacks, all of which
protect your device from power surges.
Get a power adapter for your car. If you travel a great distance by car, consider
getting an adapter that converts the car cigarette lighter into an outlet for the AC adapter
of the device. Using this adapter, you can charge up your device while driving your car.
Remove cards. Modem and network cards draw extra power from the device, even
if they are not being used. Plug the cards in your device only when they are being used.
As an extra precaution, use the card in your device only while it is using the AC adapter.
Buy a case to house extra storage cards so they don’t get lost.
Be aware of international power differences. Many countries have different power
standards than those of the United States. AC adapters designed for the United States
will not work in those countries, and vice versa. Check with the manufacturer of your
device to find out whether its power adapter can work in the country to which you plan
to travel. You many need to purchase an international power adapter for your device, or
you may find it easier to buy a power conversion kit.
■ Know the power-saving features of your device. Most devices include features
designed for extending battery life. An example of this is settings that control the
backlighting of the display. Learn how to use these features, and use them while
you travel.
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Plan How to Connect Your Pocket PC to the Internet
Next to battery life, the biggest challenge of using a Pocket PC on the road is connectivity. Most
of us have become dependent on our Internet access to communicate via e-mail and to keep
abreast of news on the web. Determining how you will access the Internet, or your office
network, before you leave on a trip will help tremendously when you finally make it to your
hotel room.
Even though these tips are for access to the Internet, they also apply to accessing
corporate networks. Chapter 16 has additional information on accessing corporate
networks via the Internet using virtual private networking (VPN) software.
Here are some tips to help you get connected on the road:
■ Get the local ISP phone numbers before you leave. Most ISPs have pages on their
websites that list all their phone numbers, or they will provide the numbers based on an
area code and phone number that you enter. They may also have a toll-free number that
you can call to obtain these numbers. Use the hotel phone number to determine what will
be a local phone call. If your ISP provides a toll-free access number, find out what it is;
while you may be charged more for using the number, it might be the only way to
connect with the ISP at the destination.
■ Test access numbers before you leave. If connection to the Internet is important, it
may be worth the long-distance call to test the connection before you leave. Use remote
networking to create a new dial-up connection using the access number. You will find it
easier to get help while you are at home, and you can travel with the confidence that you
will connect to the Internet when you reach your destination.
■ Check wireless coverage. If you have a Pocket PC Phone Edition, check the service
provider’s website to verify that it provides coverage for your destination. Most providers
do not charge for roaming, but coverage can be limited to metropolitan areas. If your
Pocket PC supports wireless Ethernet, check to see whether Wi-Fi Hotspots are available
where you are traveling.
■ Know how to create and use dialing locations. Most hotel and office phones require
the entry of a number to access an outside line. The dialing locations of a Pocket PC
make it easy to configure your modem to dial that number before making any call.
Chapter 19 provides instructions for creating dialing locations on a Pocket PC.
■ Use a calling card. Your ISP may not have a local-access number or toll-free number
that you can use at your destination. In these cases, you may want to use a phone company
calling card. Unlike Windows 98, no special support is offered for calling cards on
Pocket PCs. But you can create dial-up connections that use calling cards by putting the
appropriate codes in the telephone number field of the Dial-Up Connection dialog box.
Chapter 19 provides instructions for creating dial-up connections.
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■ Research international requirements. If you travel to another country and want to
use your device to connect to the Internet, you will need to do some additional research.
First, find out whether your ISP has access numbers outside the United States; many of
them do not. Next, be aware that international numbers do not include a one (1) before
the area code, but they may require country and city codes. This is best handled by using
Dialing Locations and Dialing Patterns, as described in Chapter 19. The international
dialing pattern is used when a dial-up connection of a country code is blank.
■ Pack a phone line tester. A few hotels and businesses use digital phone lines that
can damage the modem. The tester has an indicator light that shows whether the line
is digital, which should not be used, or analog, which is safe.
■ Pack a long phone cord. Phone jacks can be hidden behind beds and dressers, making
them difficult to reach. A long phone cord can be useful for connecting your device to
those phone jacks. Computer and electronics stores carry retractable phone lines that are
easy to carry.
■ Pack a one-to-two phone jack adapter. Some hotel rooms have only one phone jack
and a phone without a data port. In this case, the adapter will enable you to connect your
modem and the phone to the jack.
■ Pack a phone line adapter for international travel. The phone jacks in some
countries may not match the jacks you use at home. Call ahead and find out whether you
will need a special adapter, or ask your travel agent. If you travel abroad, you may want
to buy a travel kit available at most computer stores. These kits contain many adapters
and tools that you may need to connect to phone systems in other countries.
■ Pack a line noise filter. Some hotels have phone systems that are not modem-friendly,
and some European countries add a tax tone to monitor usage. The result is a reduction
of signal clarity, making it difficult for modems to communicate with each other. A noise
filter can reduce this problem.
■ Know how to synchronize using a modem. If it is important for you to synchronize
Pocket Outlook data while traveling, you can use ActiveSync with remote networking to
access your home computer. Chapter 5 provides instructions for synchronizing using a
modem.
Print on the Road
The Pocket PC does not have built-in support for printing, but you can add the ability to print
Pocket Word documents, plain text, or e-mail using PrintPocketCE from FieldSoftware. The
program will print to HP PCL3-compatible printers as well as a variety of printers that have
built-in infrared ports. A list of supported printers is available at http://www.fieldsoftware.com/
PrintersSupported.htm, and you can find more information and a 30-day trial copy of PrintPocketCE
at http://www.fieldsoftware.com.
Infrared provides the simplest way to connect a Pocket PC to a printer. When using
PrintPocketCE, all you need to do is align the infrared ports and tap Start Printing. The
FieldSoftware website lists a number of printers that have infrared ports, or you can connect
an infrared printer adapter to a printer parallel port. Such adapters are available from ACTiSYS
Corporation, at http://www.actisys.com/actir100.html.
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Serial printers are harder to find, but still available. You can use a serial sync cable for
your Pocket PC and a null modem adapter to connect with a printer serial cable. You
cannot connect a Pocket PC to a printer using a USB cable.
If you don’t plan to do a lot of printing, you might not want to purchase extra software or
cables. Yet you may find that, on occasion, you need to print a page or two. In these instances,
a road warrior trick comes in handy: fax the document from your device to a fax machine.
To send faxes from your Pocket PC, you need fax software. The following two fax programs
are available: WinPhone Pocket (http://www.bvrp.com) from BVRP Software and Truefax
(http://www.ksesoftware.com) from KSE Software. Most hotels provide fax services for their
customers, so call the front desk and get the fax number. Then start up either WinPhone Pocket
or Truefax and send the document to that fax machine.
PrinterOn Wireless (http://www.printeron.net) provides printing and faxing for Pocket PCs via
the Internet. After you subscribe to its service and install an application on your Pocket PC, you
print documents by connecting to the Internet and then running the application. The document
prints on any printer in the PrinterOn directory, and many of the printers are located in hotels and
other business locations around the world. Atsonic’s SweetPrint is a similar service and is available
at http://www.atsonic.com/sweetprint.asp.
If you decide that you need a printer, Pentax, Hewlett-Packard, Citizen, Canon, and Seiko
Instruments all make portable printers. Be aware that these printers may require special paper,
and they are not designed for high-volume printing. Some of these printers have built-in infrared
ports, which eliminate the need for carrying and connecting extra cables.
Back Up Your Pocket PC on the Road
If you consider the information in your Pocket PC to be critical, you ought to live by the motto
“Back up early and often.” The most common way to back up your device is by using ActiveSync,
as described in Chapter 7. Chances are good that when traveling, you will not have access to a
desktop computer, yet the risk of losing data while traveling is great. Therefore, you need a way
to back up your device without using a PC.
The best tool for backing up your device on the road is a storage card. If you already use a
storage card, consider buying an extra card that you use only for backups. The extra card should
be at least 32MB so it can hold all of the files in internal storage memory.
You could copy files to the storage card, but many devices have a better method of backup.
Included is software designed to back up the entire contents of internal storage to a storage card.
Backing up this way is faster than using a serial cable, so you might want to use this as your
main backup method. Consult the user manual of your device for instructions on using its backup
software.
Be aware that the backup file is written in a proprietary format. If the device is lost or
stolen, you will need to obtain an identical device to restore the files.
For an additional level of security, use a PC storage card reader to copy the backup file from
the card to a computer hard drive. You will find this a better method for backing up your device
to a desktop computer, but it has the additional cost of the card reader. Chapter 23 has more
information about card readers.
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The backup software on most Pocket PCs is pretty basic in its functioning. Sprite
Software’s Pocket Backup has features such as automatic backup when the battery is
low and scheduled backups. It also provides a way to select specific files and folders
to back up and restore. You will find Pocket Backup at http://www.spritesoftware.com.
The Internet is also a useful tool for backing up files on your device. If you don’t have a
storage card and you want to back up a file, attach the file to an e-mail message and mail it to
yourself. The e-mail and the file will stay on the mail server until it is deleted. This has the added
benefit of giving you access to the file from any computer that can read e-mail from the server.
Secure Your Data
While traveling, your Pocket PC and the data it contains are at risk of being lost or stolen.
Backing up your data to a storage card and then carrying that card separately from the device
will ensure that you have a secure copy of your data at all times. Other methods exist for
securing the data even further, but they come with the cost of some inconvenience and the
risk of rendering data inaccessible due to lost passwords.
Here are some tips for securing your data:
■ Use password protection by using the Password icon in Settings on a Pocket
PC. With power-on protection enabled, a password must be entered every time the
device is turned on. If you forget the password, the device will be inaccessible unless
you perform a hard reset, which will remove all installed applications and data from
the device.
■ Use password protection with Pocket Excel.
■ Use software that securely stores personal information such as bank account
numbers and user IDs. Programs that provide this function include CodeWallet at
http://www.developerone.com; eWallet at http://www.iliumsoft.com; and Virtual Wallet
at http://www.applian.com.
■ Encrypt data stored either internally or on a storage card.
Chapter 16 provides more information about securing your Pocket PC.
Turn Your Pocket PC into a Traveling Tool
Now that all of the preparations are out of the way, let’s look at some additional hardware and
software that turn your Pocket PC into a valuable travel tool. From time to time we all get lost
while traveling, and we may end up looking to the skies for direction. With a global positioning
system (GPS) receiver, a Pocket PC can show your exact location on a map. Even if you don’t
have a GPS, several different mapping programs run on the Pocket PC, and with the software
you won’t have to figure out how to refold the map.
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These GPS systems may not include maps for use outside the contiguous United States.
You may want to check which systems provide maps for Alaska, Hawaii, or other
countries.
International travel presents additional challenges of overcoming language barriers. Several
language translators exist that run on the Pocket PC, and using one can help you order a grilled
cheese sandwich in France or Spain.
Know Where to Go and How to Get There
GPS has existed since 1973 and is operated by the United States Department of Defense. It
determines a location by computing the difference between the time a signal is sent and the
time it is received. The signals come from three different satellites floating over the Earth.
A GPS receiver uses the data to triangulate a location in latitude and longitude, which is then
used to identify a spot on a map.
GPS hardware and software are popular Pocket PC accessories. While you can buy standalone
GPS receivers, there are several advantages to using a receiver with a Pocket PC. For example,
in a car, you can place the receiver wherever the signal strength is the greatest and hold the
device in your hand. In addition, Pocket PC displays are in color and have higher resolutions
than standalone GPS receivers, making it easier for you to read the maps. Finally, Pocket PC GPS
software is designed to work with storage cards, providing a significantly greater amount of
space to store maps over standalone GPS receivers.
Several companies sell GPS receivers and software that work with Pocket PCs. Each product
provides driving directions, voice prompts, route computation, and off-route warning. Maps are
provided on CD-ROM and are downloaded either to internal storage on a Pocket PC or onto a
storage card. Here is a summary of the GPS solutions available for the Pocket PC:
■ Pharos bundles its GPS and software in a product called Pocket Navigator, and versions
are available for most Pocket PC brands. If your Pocket PC supports Bluetooth, you can
use the wireless version of the GPS, which allows you to place the receiver anywhere in
your car. You can find more information about this product at http://www.pharosgps.com.
■ CoPilot Live | Pocket PC 4 from ALK Technologies, Inc., is the Pocket PC version of its
popular CoPilot software for PCs. CoPilot Live | Pocket PC 4 is available only in bundles
that include a GPS receiver and software, and it includes cables that connect directly to
Pocket PC brands. If you use this product with a Pocket PC that has a wireless Internet
connection, you can receive live updates on road conditions and accidents. The software
will work only with the ALK Technologies’ GPS receiver. Map data is downloaded to a
Pocket PC or storage card using desktop software. This product and can be found at
http://www.alk.com.
■ The Destinator Personal Navigation System is a GPS receiver and software bundle that
works only with the HP iPAQ. It includes the same street-level NAVTECH maps used
by FedEx, OnStar, Mercedes-Benz, and Lexus. Voice prompts speak English, French, or
Spanish, and detailed maps are available for the United States, Canada, and Europe. This
product can be found at http://www.trackmyvehicle.com/destinator.htm.
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■ TeleType GPS sells several receivers that work with Pocket PCs, including CompactFlash
and PC Card versions that turn your Pocket PC into a portable GPS. The CompactFlash
GPS works with most Pocket PCs, and the PC Card GPS works only with the Compaq
iPAQ. The TeleType GPS software can be purchased separately and will work with other
GPS receivers compliant with the standards of the National Marine Electronics Association
(NMEA). You will find these products at http://www.teletype.com.
■ HandMap from Evolutionary Systems is a vector-based map viewer. The professional
version of the software includes plug-ins that work with GPS receivers. A standard
version is available as a free download from the company’s website, but it works only
with maps provided by Evolutionary Systems. More information can be found at
http://www.handmap.net.
■ TomTom Navigator is a bundle that includes TomTom’s popular Route Planner mapping
software and a GPS receiver. You can buy a version of the bundle that uses either
Bluetooth or a serial cable. You will find this product at http://www.tomtom.com.
Connect a GPS Receiver
to a Pocket PC
Most handheld GPS receivers include a serial cable designed to work with computers so that
you can download maps to the GPS. If the receiver can send NMEA standard information out
that serial port, you can use it with a Pocket PC. To use the receiver with a Pocket PC, the
GPS serial cable has to be connected to a serial ActiveSync cable. Each Pocket PC hardware
manufacturer sells serial ActiveSync cables for its device, which you can purchase from its
website, or you can purchase them from the TeleType website at http://www.teletype.com. To
complete the connection, you will need two adapters that you can purchase at RadioShack: a
null modem adapter (part number 26-264B) and a male DB9 to male DB9 gender adapter
(part number 26-231).
Plug the ActiveSync cable into your Pocket PC. Connect the null modem adapter to the
serial ActiveSync cable, and then connect the gender adapter to the null modem adapter.
Next, connect the GPS serial cable to the gender adapter, and then plug the GPS serial cable
into the GPS receiver. This configuration will work for handheld GPS receivers or receivers
designed to work with PCs, such as the DeLorme Earthmate.
If you use a handheld GPS receiver, you might need to configure the interface for NMEA.
For example, to make this change on a Garmin eMap, press Menu twice, select Setup, select the
Interface tab, and then move the cursor to the Serial Data Format field. Press ENTER and then
select NMEA Out. Press ESC twice to close out of the setup screen.
To use the receiver, you will need the Pharos, TeleType, or HandMap GPS programs on
the Pocket PC.
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View a Customized Map with Pocket Streets
Pocket Streets is a map-viewing program that displays maps created with Microsoft Streets &
Trips 2003, AutoRoute 2003, or MapPoint 2002. It is included with these programs only and is
not on the ActiveSync CD-ROM that ships with Pocket PCs. You can also buy Pocket Streets
directly at http://www.microsoft.com/pocketstreets.
Microsoft has released an update to Pocket Streets that provides support for GPS
receivers and integration with Pocket Outlook. You can download the update from
http://www.microsoft.com/pocketstreets/using/download.htm.
The setup files for Pocket Streets is on the setup CD-ROM of Streets & Trips, AutoRoute, and
MapPoint. To install the program, connect your Pocket PC with a desktop running ActiveSync, and
then use Windows Explorer on the desktop to open the PStreets folder on the CD-ROM and run the
setup program. You can install Pocket Streets to either internal storage or a storage card following
the standard software installation procedure described in Chapter 7.
Pocket Streets will run a little slower if it loads maps from a storage card.
Microsoft provides 318 U.S. and Canadian city maps and 277 European city maps on the setup
CD-ROM, and you can also download these maps from http://www.microsoft.com/pocketstreets.
To use these maps, copy the file to the My Documents folder on your Pocket PC or a My
Documents folder on a storage card.
To create your own maps using Streets & Trips, select a portion of the map on your desktop
using the mouse, right-click within the selected area, and then click Export Map for Pocket
Streets. Streets & Trips calculates the approximate amount of storage space the map will need
on the Pocket PC and then prompts you for a location on your desktop to store the files.
Pocket Streets Is Bundled
with Streets & Trips
A free version of Pocket Streets is available on the ActiveSync 3.1 CD-ROM, along with
several free maps. It was also available as a free download from the Microsoft website until
Streets & Trips 2002 was released. You could also find a copy of this version of Pocket
Streets with Streets & Trips 2001, AutoRoute 2001, and MapPoint 2001. Now Microsoft
provides Pocket Streets only with the full retail versions of the desktop software or as a
separate purchase to prevent people from distributing illegal copies of maps. The free version
of Pocket Streets cannot open maps made using the 2002 or newer versions of the desktop
software, and the current version of Pocket Streets cannot open the free version maps.
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Two files are created: a map file that has a .mps extension and a pushpin file that has a .psp
extension. Copy these two files to the My Documents folder on your Pocket PC or on a Storage
Card using ActiveSync Explorer, as described in Chapter 7.
If you have a CompactFlash reader connected to your desktop, you can export the map
file directly to a CompactFlash storage card.
When Pocket Streets starts, you first see the standard Pocket PC List view showing all the
map files stored in the My Documents folder on your Pocket PC. Maps that you put in the My
Documents folder on storage cards are also listed.
If you do not see a map, make sure it is in the My
Documents folder. Tap a map name to open the
map, as shown in the image here.
Tap the buttons on the Command bar to zoom
the map and tap the buttons in the Navigation box
to move the map.
Another way to zoom in on a map is to
select an area of the map using the stylus.
Tap the Pushpin button on the Command
bar and then tap a location on the map to
create a pushpin location on the map. The
Pushpin Properties dialog box displays for
you to enter the name of the pushpin and a
note. Tap Change Symbol to change the
pushpin shape on the map.
Tap here
to move
the map.
Tap here to
zoom in.
Tap here to place a pushpin.
Tap here to zoom out.
Pushpin Bug Fixed
in Pocket Streets 2002
Pushpins that you create using the desktop software are exported along with maps so that
you can view them in Pocket Streets. However, you cannot open pushpins that you create in
Pocket Streets with the desktop software. The free version of Pocket Streets has a bug that
causes pushpins created on the desktop to appear at the wrong locations. Fortunately, this bug
has been fixed in the newest version of Pocket Streets.
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Several other mapping programs and websites exist for Pocket PCs; some are free, while
others are sold as commercial software. Here is a summary of what is available and where you
can get more information:
■ Street Wizard from Adept Computer Solutions runs on Windows 98 and NT desktop
computers and includes Pocket PC software so you can download maps to a device.
The professional version integrates with popular contact managers. You can find more
information at http://www.streetwizard.com.
■ TomTom Route Planner is a sophisticated road map and route planning application that
includes countries other than the United States. It runs on all Pocket PCs, and it comes in
English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, and Dutch versions. The software will work
with GPS receivers. A complete listing of the country maps that are included is available
at http://www.tomtom.com.
■ The Portable Internet provides maps of 135 metropolitan areas in the United States and
Canada. It also provides reviews from Frommer’s Travel Guides for 29 metro areas,
highlighting places to stay, dine, and things to see and do. More information about this
program can be found at http://www.portableinternet.com.
■ MSN Mobile at http://www.mobile.msn.com/pocketpc provides a link to Expedia.com
Travel, which provides access to travel itineraries, flight information, and driving directions.
You must first create the travel itinerary using a desktop web browser and accessing
http://www.expedia.com. Expedia.com Travel also provides an AvantGo channel so that
you can download information and maps to your Pocket PC.
■ AvantGo has 78 travel channels that provide information you can download to your
Pocket PC and view using Internet Explorer. Among those channels are MapBlast! and
MapQuest, which provide driving directions and maps. To obtain driving directions and
maps, you enter the origin and destination addresses and then synchronize your Pocket
PC. The information is then downloaded to your Pocket PC so that you have it while you
travel. Instructions for using AvantGo with Internet Explorer are provided in Chapter 23.
You can also access AvantGo at http://www.avantgo.com.
Language Translation
English is a widely used language inside and outside of the United States. Americans who do not
speak foreign languages, or those who are learning them, rely on either interpreters or language
translators. Typically, these translators will list English words and their foreign-language equivalents.
Language translators are available for Pocket PCs and provide searching capabilities that make it
easier to find the correct words to say. Here is an overview of some language translator software
available for your Pocket PC:
■ TomTom sells Pocket PC versions of HarperCollins’ English-French, English-German,
English-Italian, and English-Spanish translators. More information is available at
http://www.tomtom.com.
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■ Ectaco’s Talking Partner dictionaries provide word translation both in text and audio
for English and Russian, Spanish, simplified Chinese, traditional Chinese, French, and
German. Ectaco also sells text-only translation dictionaries for many more languages,
as well as learning language software. You will find all of Ectaco’s products at
http://www.ectaco.com.
Hit the Road
Having read this far, you know how to plan ahead for your trip and how your Pocket PC can help
you get to your destination. Now it is time to put everything together, pack it up, and head off on
your trip. Before you go, here are a few final preparations.
Make Final Preparations
If you plan to work in your hotel room, ask about accommodations for business travelers when
you make the reservation. Ask whether computer modems can be used in the rooms. If not, and
connecting to the Internet is important for you, you might want to stay at another hotel.
Some hotels have business centers that have personal computers and printers available for
their patrons. Find out the manufacturers of their equipment and ask whether you can use their
printers with your notebook computer. (Don’t bother asking about Pocket PCs; chances are good
the person you talk to will know nothing about them.) This information will help you decide
what printer software should be installed on your device.
Make sure you download all of the data files that you will need to your device or storage
card. The wrong time to find out that you are missing a file is when you try to open it hundreds,
or thousands, of miles away. The ActiveSync file synchronization capability helps with this,
because as long as the file stays in the synchronized files folders, you know a copy is stored
on the device. Chapter 6 has all the information you need on using file synchronization.
Don’t put your Pocket PC, or important components, in checked luggage. Not only do you
run the risk of the luggage, and your equipment, not showing up at your destination, but it can
be stolen as well. Keep briefcases and computer bags with you at all times. Airports are popular
locations for thieves.
What type of case do you use to carry your Pocket PC? If you use the case that it came with,
it is probably too small to carry accessories, and it may not provide enough protection. Targus
(http://www.targus.com) offers some nice cases, as does E&B Company (http://www.ebcases.com).
Try to find a case that has enough padding to withstand normal travel abuses.
Todd Ogasawara keeps an extensive list of carrying-case vendors at
http://www.to-tech.com/windowsce/faqs/cases.htm.
Complete a Travel Checklist
Checklists are handy tools to help you remember what to pack and what to do as you prepare
for a trip. Chapter 24 has information about ListPro, a handy program designed for making and
reusing lists. Unfortunately, a ListPro file cannot be attached to this book, so the next best thing
is the following travel checklist, as shown in Figure 17-1.
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FIGURE 17-1
Pocket PC travel checklist
Wrapping Up
Pocket PCs are made for traveling. With a little planning, you will have a happy and safe journey.
When I travel, I enjoy taking along my Pocket PC and GPS so that I know where I am and how
much longer I have to travel. For anyone like me who gets anxious when they are lost, a GPS can
be a godsend. But traveling can also be boring, particularly if you fly or ride a train. Fortunately,
a variety of entertainment software—games, music players, and eBook readers—is available for
the Pocket PC to help you pass the time. Chapter 18 shows you how your Pocket PC can help
you unwind and relax after a long day of traveling.
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How to…
■
■
■
■
■
■
Pick the best Pocket PC for playing games
Find games to play on your Pocket PC
Read eBooks
Play audio books
Play music
Play movies and watch television shows
H
aving read this far, you may think that a Pocket PC is for nothing more than managing time
and creating documents. Nothing could be further from the truth. When it’s time to kick
back and relax, a Pocket PC can be a perfect companion. With your Pocket PC you can play
games, listen to music or audio books, read a novel, or even watch a movie.
If you enjoy playing computer games, you’ll be happy to find Pocket PC programs for every
game category. The speed, color screens, and sound capabilities of the latest Pocket PCs make
them great portable game machines. Fortunately, many talented programmers have been hard at
work writing games that exploit the capabilities of your Pocket PC.
If you don’t find playing games to be relaxing, perhaps lounging on a couch listening to your
favorite music is more to your liking. Here, too, your Pocket PC is up to the task, thanks to the
Windows Media Player, which is capable of playing music stored in digital files that you can
download to your Pocket PC or put on storage cards. You can also play audio books using the
Windows Media Player or the AudiblePlayer.
Perhaps your favorite way to relax is to curl up in front of a warm fire and read a novel. You
can purchase and download electronic books, or eBooks, from the Internet, and read them on
your Pocket PC using software such as Microsoft Reader.
Perhaps you prefer the complete audio and visual experience of a movie a great form of
relaxation. No, you won’t be able to play the latest box office hit, but several independent artists
make their work available on the Internet that you can download and play on your Pocket PC.
As you can see, your Pocket PC provides many tools to help you relax during a trip. It also
lightens your load because you don’t have to pack a half dozen CDs or a couple of books. Of
course, you don’t need to travel to enjoy all these features of your Pocket PC. Anywhere your
Pocket PC goes, so goes your favorite music or books. Ready? Let’s have some fun!
Play Games on Your Pocket PC
If any one software category represents how well the Pocket PC has sold, it is games. When we
wrote the first edition of this book in early 2000, few games were available, but today this is not
the case. Right now, http://www.pocketgamer.org has 16 different categories of games listed,
including action and arcade, board, role-playing, simulation, and strategy games.
Game software evokes a tremendous amount of passion from Pocket PC owners. Go to any
online forum and ask which Pocket PC is the best for games, and you are certain to receive many
replies promoting one brand over another. The debate over which brand of Pocket PC is best for
games centers around three items: processors, screens, and buttons.
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Of all the software available for Pocket PCs, games may be the most processor intensive,
particularly action and arcade games and simulations. Simply stated, many games run better on
faster processors. Of the Pocket PC 2002 devices, processor speeds range from 206 Mhz with
some of the iPAQs to 400 MHz on the Toshiba E750. Most likely, Windows Mobile 2003 devices
will also have different processor speeds, with 300 MHz at the low end. If action and arcade
games or simulations are what you like, you should consider buying the Pocket PC with the
fastest processor; however, even slower processors are capable of playing card and board games.
One exception to this recommendation are Pocket PC 2002 devices with X-Scale
processors that may have faster processor speeds but slower overall performance due
to the way the processor is designed. Devices running Windows Mobile 2003 software
have newer chips for which faster processor speeds also provide faster overall
performance.
Good computer games have great graphics, and the Pocket PC color screens set it above
other handhelds for great looking games. Graphics quality doesn’t necessarily affect game play,
so the differences have more to do with personal preference. If you want to see the best graphics
in the games you play, pick a Pocket PC that has a transreflective display with the most colors.
Most current Pocket PC brands now use transreflective liquid crystal displays (LCDs). These
screens reflect ambient light but also have a backlight to brighten the display in dark conditions.
The combination provides a good display in a variety of lighting conditions. Older Pocket PCs
had either transmissive screens, which had backlighting that worked better indoors than
outdoors, or reflective screens, which had combined front-lighting and ambient light for good
viewing outdoors but tended to look dark indoors. Just as most current Pocket PCs display
65,536 colors, older Pocket PCs were limited to 4096 or 256 colors.
Action games not only demand a lot from a processor, but they can demand a lot from a
player in the form of input. While desktop computers can support a wide array of joysticks and
game pads, the Pocket PC is limited to a few buttons. Casio pioneered the navigation button on
their E-100 Palm-size PCs, and it has become the benchmark for game control on Pocket PCs
because it provides complete cursor control.
Today most Pocket PCs have a navigation button, but some, like the iPAQ 3600, suffer from
what many consider a flaw in not being able to process simultaneous button presses. If you press
two buttons at once, one will be ignored; this is unlike other Pocket PCs, which recognize both
button presses. Consequently, you may find it difficult to play action games on these devices. If
action games are important to you, we recommend that you ask the device manufacturer whether
its device can process simultaneous button presses.
Another source of information about the best Pocket PCs for playing games is
PocketGamer’s forums at http://www.pocketgamer.org.
Download Games to Play
The best source of Pocket PC games is the Internet, and Table 18-1 lists some of the websites
that provide games. Most of the download websites described in Chapter 23 also have categories
for games, where you can find many links for games that you can download and install on your
device.
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The process for downloading and installing these games is usually similar. First, download
the software to your desktop computer. If the software has been compressed, decompress it using
one of the many desktop programs, such as WinZip, available for this task. Next, connect your
device and run the setup program on the desktop computer.
Use Emulators to Play Games
A game emulator is a program designed to run games originally written for other hardware
platforms. By using an emulator, you can play games not written specifically for the Pocket PC;
however, in many cases the games will not perform as well with an emulator because they were
optimized for other hardware. Emulators are available for games that run on Nintendo GameBoy,
Nintendo Entertainment System, Super Nintendo Entertainment System, Sega Master System,
Sega GameGear, Sega Genesis, and Atari 2600 VCS. Pocket PC programs that emulate personal
computer operating systems, such as the Apple II+, Commodore 64, Atari 800, and MS-DOS,
are also available.
Most game programs are written to read-only chips packaged inside cartridges. To legally play
most of these games on your Pocket PC, you must own the cartridge and the program must not be
encrypted. A special device is used to download the game off the cartridge, or you can download
the ROM images from many international websites on the Internet. Two websites provide
copyright-free GameBoy images. One is the Bung Enterprises GameBoy competition page at
http://www.bunghk.com, which lists games written by amateurs for a programming competition.
The other is the Gambit Studio website at http://www.gambitstudios.com/FreeSoftware.asp. Be
sure to check the copyright information at other websites, keeping in mind that if you don’t own
the game cartridges, that is software piracy.
PocketGamer.org has a complete list of the emulation programs for the Pocket PC at http://www
.pocketgamer.org/games/emulators. If you want to try one of these programs, keep in mind that some
of them are in various stages of development and could cause problems with your Pocket PC. Before
you install any game emulator, you should run a complete backup of your Pocket PC. You will find
instructions for performing a backup in Chapter 7.
Website
URL
PocketGamer.org
http://www.pocketgamer.org
Jimmy Software
http://www.jimmysoftware.com
Rapture Technologies
http://www.rapturetech.com
Ppcgaming.com
http://www.ppcgaming.com
ZioSoft
http://www.ziosoft.com
TABLE 18-1
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Track Your Golf Game
with Your Pocket PC
This chapter is about playing games on Pocket PCs, but your Pocket PC can also be used
while you are playing games. By using a Pocket PC, for example, you could take a couple of
strokes off your golf game!
IntelliGolf Par Edition runs on Pocket PCs and enables up to four players to score,
analyze, and review statistics of their golf game. The software also enables players to place
on course wagers. With this software, golfers can do the following:
■
■
■
■
Automate golf scoring
Calculate an approximate handicap
Download courses from the Internet
Capture round statistics to help improve their game
The Birdie Edition of IntelliGolf includes desktop software that will synchronize with the
software on the Pocket PC. By using the PC, golfers can review historical trends and evaluate
their strengths using more than 60 categories of performance statistics. You will find more
information about IntelliGolf at http://www.intelligolf.com.
Play Solitaire on Your Pocket PC
It began as a way to learn a new way of interacting with a computer and quickly became a
phenomenon. We all have probably seen people obsessed with clicking-and-dragging until they
see cards drop all across their computer screen. Of course, I am talking about the great computer
pastime—Solitaire.
Solitaire became part of the computer operating system
when it was included with Windows Version 3.1. Since then,
every Microsoft operating system, including Windows CE
.NET, which is the Pocket PC operating system, has included
a version to help teach users how to click-and-drag.
Pocket PC users may not need to learn how to click-anddrag, but some people use Solitaire as a way to compare the
speed and feel of different devices. It can also be a great way
to kill a little free time.
To start Solitaire, tap Start | Programs | Games | Solitaire,
and the game will load as shown in the image to the right
When you start Solitaire, the cards are dealt and displayed
on the computer screen. Four spaces are marked at the top of the
screen for building the foundation piles, and the hand is placed
face down in the upper-left corner. Tap the top of the hand to turn
over a packet of three cards into the stock. To turn over cards in the tableau piles, tap on them.
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To move a card, tap-and-hold the stylus on the card, drag
the card to a location on the screen, and then lift up the stylus.
If the play is legal, the card will stay on the pile; otherwise,
the card returns to its original location. Double-tap a card to
move it to a foundation pile, and the card will be placed in
the correct pile.
Play continues until you win, exit the game, or deal a
new set of cards. When you win, the cards cascade around
the screen, as shown to the right.
To deal cards, tap New
Rules for Playing Solitaire
Solitaire is a term applied to a variety of card games that can be played by one person.
Among the most popular of these is Canfield, considered the most challenging game of
Solitaire, and Klondike, which is the easiest of the Solitaire games to learn.
Klondike is the Solitaire game included with your Pocket PC. Twenty-eight cards are
dealt in seven piles known as a tableau. The cards are dealt in rows, starting with one card
turned up, followed by six cards dealt face down to the right. The seventh card is turned up
and placed on top of the first turned down card in the first row, starting the second pile. Next,
five cards are dealt face down to the right, fanned down from the previous row, and the sixth
card is turned up and placed on top of the third pile. The remaining cards are dealt in this
manner until seven piles have been formed, each with one less card and topped by a card
turned up. The remainder of the deck is the hand. As they become available, aces form four
foundation piles, built up by suit. The objective is to get all 52 cards, or as many possible,
into the foundation piles.
The game is played by continuously turning over packets of three cards from the hand,
forming the stock. In each turn, the top card is available for play on any one of the seven tableau
piles, in descending order and alternating color, or on a foundation pile, in ascending order and
only in the same suit. If the top card is moved to a pile, the next card of the stock is available for
play. The top card of each tableau pile is always available for play and can be moved between
piles or moved to a foundation pile. Once moved to a foundation pile, a card can no longer be
played. When all of the turned-up cards of a tableau pile are removed, the next face-down card
is turned over. If all cards are removed from a tableau pile, a new pile can be started with a king.
Play stops when cards can no longer be played into the foundation piles.
Pocket PCs break one rule of Klondike by allowing cards from foundation piles to be
played into tableau piles. However, when such a play is made, 15 points are deducted from
the score.
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Deal a Perfect Hand
You might think I spent all night playing Solitaire to capture the screenshot of cascading
cards. Actually, I didn’t have to, because you can make Solitaire deal a winning hand every
time. (You might want to stop reading the rest of this box if you don’t want to know how to
cheat at Solitaire.)
Here is what you need to do:
1. Start Solitaire.
2. Open the keyboard version of the software input panel.
3. Tap CTL-SHIFT.
4. Tap New.
Configure Solitaire
While the Pocket PC follows the Klondike rules, it does allow for some minor variations. For
example, the number of cards played from the hand, which is normally three, can be changed
to one. Two levels of scoring are possible, Standard and Vegas; or scoring can be turned off.
With Standard scoring, points are earned based on time and moves:
■
■
■
■
■
10 points for each card moved to a foundation pile
5 points for each card moved from the hand to a tableau pile
–15 points for each card moved from a foundation pile to a tableau pile
–20 points for each pass through the hand after four passes in the Draw Three option
–100 points for each pass through the hand after one pass in the Draw One option
A bonus is given when you complete a timed game, with larger bonuses given for shorter
games. With Vegas scoring, the ante is $52.00 to begin playing a game:
■ The object is to earn more than you wagered.
■ No time penalty or bonus is given.
■ If you select the Keep Cumulative Score option, you’ll see a running total of the score
from game to game.
■ You win $5 for each card moved to a foundation pile.
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Set Solitaire Options
To open the Options dialog box, tap Tools | Options. The dialog
box shown to the left will display:
To change the draw, select an option from the Draw dropdown list. Change the scoring by selecting an option from the
Scoring drop-down list. Turn Game Timing off by clearing the
Time Game check box. Turn Game Status on or off by checking
Display Status. Cumulate Vegas scores by checking Keep
Cumulative Score.
The Card Back design can be changed to one of six
graphics. Tap a graphic in the Options dialog box to change the
card design. Once you finish changing options, tap OK to close
the dialog box.
Play Jawbreaker
Jawbreaker is a new game included with Windows Mobile 2003.
This game has been available for previous versions of Pocket PCs
and is also called Bubblets. Microsoft made arrangements with
the original software developer, Oopdreams Software, Inc., to
include it with Windows Mobile 2003.
To start the game, tap Start | Programs | Games | Jawbreaker,
which opens the program window to the right.
To start playing a new game, tap Game | New Game. The
objective is to align the same colored circles, or jawbreakers, to
form large blocks before bursting them. The more jawbreakers in
a block, the higher the number of points you earn when you burst
the block.
To burst a jawbreaker, tap one that is connected to the same
color jawbreaker. All of the connected jawbreakers will be
highlighted, and you will see the number of points you earn if
you burst them. To burst a block, tap a highlighted jawbreaker. If you decide that you don’t want
to burst a highlighted block, simply select a different block of jawbreakers.
After you burst a block of jawbreakers, surrounding jawbreakers fill in the open space. The
game continues until you have burst all the possible blocks of jawbreakers, and if less than 5
jawbreakers remain you will earn bonus points. The game ends if no more possible blocks exist
for you to burst.
To set game play options, tap Game | Options. Jawbreaker will track game-play statistics,
which you display by tapping Info | Statistics. If you want to let someone else play the game
without affecting the statistics, tap the Guest Mode check box on the Options screen.
Four different game styles are available, which you can select from the Game Style drop-down
list on the Options screen. Standard is the default mode, with a set number of jawbreakers ar used
and none are added during the game. If you select Continuous mode, an additional column of
jawbreakers appear on the left as you burst a vertical block, and the remaining jawbreakers shift
to the right. In Shifter mode, when you burst a block, the remaining jawbreakers to the top and left
shift down and to the right. The MegaShift mode combines the Continuous and Shifter modes.
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Play Music
Recently, the Internet has become popular for distributing music, thanks to MPEG (Moving
Picture Experts Group). MPEG is a family of standards for encoding audio-visual information
in a compressed digital format. Part of the standard is the audio-coding format known as MP3,
or MPEG Audio Layer 3.
Without compression technology, three minutes of CD-quality sound requires approximately
32MB of storage space, which is too large for distribution over the Internet. MP3 compresses this
storage space to 3MB, making it possible to download sound files from the Internet.
Audio compression enables CD-quality music to be played on personal computers, portable
music players such as the Apple iPod, and Pocket PCs. The Windows Media Player on your
Pocket PC plays music that you can download from thousands of websites on the Internet. With
your Pocket PC and a storage card, you can listen to hours of music and not have to carry an
extra CD player.
Audio File Formats
MP3 is one of several sound file types. Another type is the WAV (Waveform), which doesn’t
compress the size of the file and therefore requires a lot of storage space. It is, however, the
simplest sound format and is typically used to create small files, such as the sounds available
in Microsoft Themes. As explained in Chapter 13, Voice Recorder creates WAV files that
vary in size based on the quality of the sound. Lower quality sound, captured in kilobits per
second (Kbps), creates smaller files than higher quality sound. Windows CE, like all versions
of Windows, has built-in support for playing WAV files.
Microsoft created the WMA (Windows Media Audio) format. It also compresses audio
files but with half the size of MP3 and with better quality. The file format can be secured to
protect sound files from being illegally distributed.
The file formats listed so far—MP3, WAV, and WMA—are called samples because they
contain the actual recording of the sound. Two other file formats create sound—one is MIDI
(Musical Instrument Digital Interface) and the other is MOD (Module). MIDI contains
commands that tell the computer how to reproduce sound. Usually, keyboard synthesizers
or music generators are used to create these files.
MODs are hybrids of samples and instructions. An explanation of modules is found at
http://www.castlex.com/modfaq/index.html and reproduced here:
Modules are digital music files, made up of a set of samples (the instruments) and
sequencing information, telling a mod player when to play which sample on which
track at what pitch, optionally performing an effect like vibrato, for example. Thus
mods are different from pure sample files such as WAV or AU, which contain no
sequencing information, and MIDI files, which do not include any custom samples/
instruments.
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Play Music Using Windows Media Player
Windows Media Player Version 9 from Microsoft plays MP3
and WMA music files and Windows Media Video stored
internally on a Pocket PC or on a storage card. It can also play
streaming media stored on a network. The player is included
in ROM of some Pocket PCs, or it can be installed on to the
Pocket PC and stored in RAM. To start the player, tap Start |
Windows Media. The image to the right shows how the program
looks when it starts.
When Media Player starts, it searches internal
storage and storage cards for audio and video
Play/Pause
content. To see a list of the available content,
tap Playlist on the Command bar, and make sure
Local Content is selected from the drop-down list.
You cannot edit the Local Content list, but you can
Stop
Skip to next track
create a new playlist based on it. To create a
Adjust volume
Skip to previous track
playlist, follow these steps:
1. Tap Playlist on the Command bar to open the Content Selection window, as shown in the
image to the right.
2. Tap Organize Playlists from the Local Content
drop-down list.
Tap here to select and create playlists.
3. Tap New and give the playlist a name.
4. Tap the box next to each track you want to include in
the playlist.
5. Tap OK.
After a playlist is created, it can be edited so that tracks move
up and down in the list or are removed. To edit a playlist, follow
these steps:
1. Tap Playlist on the Command bar.
2. Select the playlist you want to edit from the Select
Playlist drop-down list.
3. Tap the track to edit in the list and perform one of
the following edits:
■ Tap the up or down arrow on the Command bar to move the track in the list.
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■ Tap the plus sign (+) on the Command bar to add a track to the list.
■ Tap the red X on the Command bar to remove a track from the list.
4. Tap OK to close the playlist, or tap the Play button (the triangle) on the Command bar to
start playing the track.
To play music in a playlist, tap Select Playlist on the Command bar, select the playlist from
the Select Playlist drop-down list, tap the track you want to start playing in the list, and then tap
the Play button on the Command bar.
Windows Media Player’s playlist editor is pretty simple. For example, it doesn’t
automatically group songs by album or artist. CEPlaylist adds more playlist editing
features to Media Player, and you can download it from http://pdacentral.clix.pt/
pocket/preview/264278.html.
To play music or videos stored on a network, tap Tools | Open URL and enter the URL.
You can also play music or videos from Internet Explorer. When you tap a link to the content on
a web page, Windows Media Player automatically loads and starts playing the content. To add
that content to Web Favorites, tap Tools | Add Web Favorite and enter a name in the Favorite
Name field. To access Web Favorites, tap Playlist and then select Web Favorites from the Select
Playlist drop-down list. You can edit the Web Favorites list in the same way you edit playlists.
The playback quality of music and videos stored on a network depends on the network
connection. To specify whether or not an HTTP Proxy server is used, the Internet connection
speed, and which protocols to use, tap Tools | Settings | Network.
Control Winamp from a Pocket PC
Nullsoft’s Winamp is a popular desktop media player. With RemoteAmp, you can remotely
control Winamp from your Pocket PC using any network connection, even while the Pocket
PC is in its cradle. With RemoteAmp you can control playback, edit and build playlists, and
adjust volume, and it supports Winamp versions 3 and 2.x. For more information and to
download a copy go to http://www.smashcasi.com/remoteamp.
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Personalize Windows Media Player
Tape and CD players have buttons that control music playback. This functionality is provided
by onscreen buttons in Windows Media Player. You can program the hardware buttons on your
Pocket PC to provide the same playback control. Tap Tools |
Settings | Buttons to open the screen shown at right.
To map a button, first select a function from the drop-down
list and then press the Hardware Button that you want to use to
perform that function. To remove a button mapping, tap-andhold on the item listed in the Button Mapping area, and tap
Unmap This Button on the pop-up menu.
The Screen Toggle function is unique to Pocket PCs; it
turns the screen display on or off. Turning the display off saves
battery life, which allows you to play more music. All of the
button mappings that you program remain in effect while the
screen is off so that you can easily adjust music playback.
You should also notice the Un-map Buttons During
Background Play check box on the button-mapping screen. If
you do not tap this check box, the button mappings will remain
in effect when you switch to another program on your Pocket PC. If you are listening to music
on your Pocket PC, open Internet Explorer, and find that the navigation hardware button does
not move the web page up or down, it’s probably because the navigation button has been mapped
to something in Windows Media Player.
The Media Player supports skins, which you can change to tailor the user interface to your
tastes. A Media Player skin consists of a number of bitmap image files and a text file. Files of
each skin should be stored in a separate directory on the Pocket PC. The skin directories can be
stored anywhere on the Pocket PC, but keep in mind that if a skin is on a storage card, the card
will need to be in the Pocket PC every time you run Media Player so that it can load the skin.
If Windows Media Player cannot find the skin it is configured to use, it will
automatically load the Skin Chooser so that you can select another skin.
To change skins in Windows Media Player, tap Tools | Settings | Skin Chooser. The Skin
Chooser dialog box displays with left and right arrows at the bottom of the box. Tap the arrows
to scroll through the skins that are available, and then highlight and tap OK to select the skin.
Table 18-2 lists websites where you can find Windows Media Player skins to download.
Website
URL
PDAGold
http://www.pdagold.com
Pocket PC Freeware and Software by Paul
http://www.bypaul.com/PPCFS/Free-Skins.htm
SnoopSoft, Inc.
http://www.snoopsoft.com/skins/other.html
Microsoft Windows Media
http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windowsmedia/
software/pocket/custome.apx
TABLE 18-2
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Copy Music to Your Pocket PC
The fastest way to add music to your Pocket PC is to copy the music files from a desktop
computer to a storage card using a storage card reader. Chapter 23 provides more information
about storage card readers that work with desktop computers. You can also use Windows
Explorer, as described in Chapter 7, to copy music files to the Pocket PC.
If you use Windows Media Player on your PC, you can use its Copy To CD Or Device
feature to copy music files to a Pocket PC connected to the desktop with a serial or USB cable.
You can also use the feature to copy files to a storage card that is in a reader attached to the PC,
and Media Player will keep track of the amount of space available on the card.
Another feature available if you run Windows XP is Microsoft Plus! Digital Media Edition. This
software package, which you can buy at computer stores, provides a number of add-ons to Windows
Media Player, including Plus! Sync & Go for Pocket PC. Plus! Sync & Go automatically transfers
audio and video content from the Internet or the Windows Media Player library to Pocket PCs.
Plus! Sync & Go will synchronize only Windows Media Audio (WMA) audio files that
are in the media library. It will not synchronize MP3 audio files.
Plus! Sync & Go has desktop and Pocket PC components. You use the desktop component to
specify what video and audio you want to synchronize, and you use the Pocket PC component
to play the content. Every time the Pocket PC synchronizes, Plus! Sync & Go copies any
updated video and audio files to the storage card in the Pocket PC.
Windows Media Player has special playlists that monitor the songs you play most often
or the songs you rank the highest. You can configure Plus! Sync & Go to automatically
synchronize those playlists and the music to your Pocket PC. When a change occurs to
the playlists, the files automatically update during the next synchronization.
Where to Find Music on the Internet
Of course, the Windows Media Player is useless unless you have files to play. Fortunately, plenty
of websites on the Internet contain free copies of music files for you to download. In fact, so
many MP3 websites are available that I can’t begin to describe them all. The simplest way to find
them is to go to a large index website, like Yahoo! or Excite, and perform a search for MP3. I
assure you, you will find plenty of sites.
Be aware that you probably won’t find legal copies of songs by popular artists in MP3 format
because the format does not have provisions to protect against piracy. Most of the music that
you’ll find at websites like http://www.mp3.com is written and performed by relatively unknown
bands and musicians from around the world. This, in itself, makes finding MP3s fun because it
gives you a chance to discover music that you have never heard before.
Finding WMA files is a little more challenging, because they are not as popular as MP3 files. The
best site for WMA files is Microsoft’s Windows Media.com at http://www.windowsmedia.com. At
this website, you’ll find tracks from popular artists such as 10,000 Maniacs, Berlin, and Indigo Girls.
The WMA format supports encryption to prevent music from being played unless it is purchased.
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Alternative Music Players
The Windows Media Player does not have an equalizer or other settings common to many
music players. If you prefer to use a different music player, check out the players listed here.
Player
URL
Pocket Player
http://www.conduits.com
PocketMusic
http://www.pocketmind.com
withMP3
http://www.citsoft.net
Pocket Divx
http://www.projectmayo.com/projects/index.php
Listen to Books Using Audible Player
Audible, Inc., is a leading provider of Internet-delivered spoken content for playback on personal
computers and Pocket PCs. The sound files can be purchased from the Audible website at
http://www.audible.com.
Much of the content you buy is recordings of books, but you’ll also find special broadcasts,
such as The Wall Street Journal Final & Analysis. The process of downloading Audible files to
a Pocket PC takes two steps. First, the Audible Manager, which is a program that runs on your
desktop computer, logs on to the Audible website and downloads the sound file to the PC.
Second, you connect the Pocket PC to the desktop using its serial cable, and then you transfer
the sound file to the Audible player.
Play Audible Content with
Microsoft Reader
When you install the Audible Manager, the installation program will configure your Pocket
PC, so it must be connected to the desktop. It will install the Audible Player to your Pocket
PC, but you can also choose not to download the Player and instead listen to books using
Microsoft Reader, which is described in the next section of this chapter. Microsoft Reader
lists Audible content along with all other eBooks on the Library page. To play an Audible
book, just tap its entry on the Library page. The Reader playback features are not as robust
as the Audible Player, but since Reader is already installed on your Pocket PC, you can save
storage space by not installing another program that provides the same functionality.
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For every hour of audio programming, you will need 2MB of storage space. The recordings
will vary in length; for example, The Wall Street Journal Final & Analysis broadcast lasts 20
minutes, but you can also buy actor Gregory Peck’s narration of the Bible that runs 19 hours
and 45 minutes. Fortunately, you can specify where Audible will write the sound files when
you download them to the Pocket PC.
The player software contains features optimized for playback of spoken content. You can
skip back and forth to sections, which usually are chapters in books. If, during playback, you
hear a particular segment to which you want to return, you can create a bookmark that the player
is able to skip to during playback.
Read eBooks
For many people, reading a book is the ultimate escape from computers and the Internet. Most
people still read books printed on paper, but an increasing number prefer to have their favorite
books available on their personal computer or personal digital assistant, which is the idea behind
electronic books, or eBooks.
Read eBooks Using Microsoft Reader
Microsoft Reader is an eBook-viewing program for the Pocket PC. It uses a font rendering
technology called ClearType that is designed to make text easier to read on color LCD screens.
With Microsoft Reader, you can read eBooks on your Pocket PC that you may have purchased
and downloaded off the Internet.
Microsoft Reader Digital Rights
Management
Digital Rights Management (DRM) is technology that ensures that content, such as music
and eBooks, are not pirated on the Internet. While the technology is implemented in a variety
of ways, it typically involves encrypting the content to prevent it from being copied to
multiple computers.
The Microsoft version of DRM has three levels: sealed, inscribed, and owner exclusive.
Sealed eBooks are simply encrypted to ensure the authenticity of the content and can be
distributed among multiple computers. Inscribed eBooks are sealed and further encrypted
to include the purchaser’s name on the cover page. They can be distributed among multiple
computers but will always display the purchaser’s information to reinforce honest usage.
Owner exclusive eBooks include additional encryption that require them to be read only on
activated Reader clients. Activation uses the Microsoft Passport authentication, and you can
activate only two computers using a Passport ID.
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The Reader program that runs on Pocket PC 2000 devices does not support owner
exclusive eBooks, or what has also been referred to as DRM Level 5. Microsoft does not
intend to provide an upgrade for Pocket PC 2000 devices that will support owner exclusive
eBooks. You can read sealed (DRM Level 0) and inscribed (DRM Level 3) eBooks on Pocket
PC 2000 devices.
The Reader program that runs on Pocket PC 2002 and Windows Mobile 2003 devices
does support owner exclusive eBooks as well as sealed and inscribed eBooks. To read an
owner exclusive eBook, you must activate the Reader client. The activation process is
explained in a How To section later in this chapter.
To start Microsoft Reader on a Pocket PC, tap Start |
Programs | Microsoft Reader, which opens the Microsoft
Reader Library page, as shown in the image to the right.
The Library lists all of the eBooks that are stored in the
My Documents folder on the Pocket PC. Any eBooks stored
in subfolders, or in a My Documents folder on a storage card,
are also listed.
To open a book, tap its name on the Library page, and
the cover page of the eBook will open, as shown in the
image below.
Along the left side of
the cover page are buttons
you can tap to move to
various parts of the eBook
or the Reader program. Tap
Go To to open a menu with options for moving to
the Table of Contents, Most Recent Page, Begin Reading,
Furthest Read, Annotations, About This Title, and Cover
Image.
When you tap the Most Recent Page link, you return
to the last page that was open in the eBook; when you tap
Furthest Read, you return to the furthest page opened in the
eBook. Tap Annotations to open a list of all the annotations
added to the eBook. To move to an annotation quickly, tap
its entry in the list.
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Activate Microsoft Reader on a
Pocket PC
Premium eBooks are owner exclusive and can be read only using an activated Reader client.
To activate Reader, you’ll need a Passport ID, which you can get at http://www.passport.net.
You’ll also need at least ActiveSync Version 3.1 and Internet Explorer Version 4. (Reader
cannot be activated on Pocket PC 2000 devices.) Your Pocket PC must be connected with a
desktop running ActiveSync during activation and shouldn’t have Reader running. You might
have activated Reader the first time you synchronized; if not, follow these steps:
1. Connect your Pocket PC with the desktop.
2. Start Internet Explorer and open das.microsoft.com/activate.
3. Log in to the website using your Passport ID.
4. Click Activate Your Pocket PC.
The activation process associates your Passport ID with your Pocket PC. It also
downloads files to your Pocket PC that are unique to you, along with an Activation
Certificate, which is the key piece of information that enables you to read premium eBooks
on your Pocket PC.
The Microsoft Reader Help provides additional information about activation, and you
will find a FAQ at the activation website.
The easiest way to read an eBook is to tap the First Page
link on the cover page and begin reading. Use the Action
button on the Pocket PC to move back and forth between
pages, or tap the arrows at the upper-right corner of the page.
When you tap the title of the eBook at the top of the page, a
pop-up list appears, as shown in the image to the right.
Tap Settings on the pop-up list to change how Reader
displays an eBook. Three pages of settings are available:
the first page is for turning the visual guides on or off, the
second page controls annotations, and the third page controls
the font size. To select a page, tap Go To, and then tap the
items on the page to turn them on or off. When you are done
making setting changes, tap Return at the bottom of the
screen.
18
Tap here to return to the
previous location.
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Text on a page in an eBook can be annotated by selecting
the text using the stylus, which causes a pop-up list to appear,
as shown in the following image.
Tap an entry in the menu to carry out its action. For
example, to highlight the text that you selected, tap Add
Highlight. When you tap Copy Text, the text is placed on the
Pocket PC Clipboard and can be pasted into a Note or Pocket
Word document. If you select a word and tap Find, Reader will
search through the book for the next occurrence of that word.
Electronic sticky notes can be attached to specific passages
of text. To add notes, use the stylus to select text on a page and
tap Add Text Note on the pop-up menu. A Note icon appears on
the left margin and a notepad displays on the screen. When you
are finished writing, tap outside the note to close it. To view
notes, tap Note in the left margin; to delete a note, tap-and-hold
on the Note icon and tap Delete from the pop-up menu. To display a list of notes for an eBook
from the cover page, tap Go To | Annotations.
For more information about how to use Microsoft Reader, open the Microsoft Reader
Help eBook on your Pocket PC.
Download Microsoft Reader eBooks
Many Internet websites provide eBooks that you can download and read on your Pocket PC, some
of which are listed in Table 18-3. To read these eBooks on your Pocket PC, copy them to the My
Documents folder on your device, or copy them into a My Documents folder on a storage card. Tap
Shop from the Reader Library, or tap the cover page of any eBook, to open Internet Explorer on
your Pocket PC and a web page with a link to http://www.microsoft.com/reader/shop.asp.
Create Your Own Reader eBook
Microsoft provides a free add-in for Word 2000 and Word XP that converts a document to the
.lit format used by Reader. You will find the Add-In at http://www.microsoft.com/ebooks/
tools/default.asp. OverDrive ReaderWorks is another eBook creation tool that converts
HTML, text, and image files to the .lit format. ReaderWorks Standard is free; ReaderWorks
Publisher costs $69 and enables you to add cover art and marketing data. You can download
ReaderWorks from http://www.overdrive.com/readerworks.
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Website
URL
CEWindows.net
http://www.cewindows.net
Elegant Solutions Software
and Publishing Company
http://www.esspc-ebooks.com/default.htm
Pocket PC eBooks Watch
http://www.cebooks.blogspot.com
Baen
http://www.baen.com
University of Virginia
http://www.etext.virginia.edu/ebooks
Pocket PC Press
http://www.pocketpcpress.com
Black Mask Online
http://www.blackmask.com
Fictionwise
http://www.fictionwise.com
Memoware
http://www.memoware.com
Barnes and Noble
http://www.ebooks.barnesandnoble.com/pocketpc/index.asp
TABLE 18-3
347
Websites Offering Microsoft Reader eBooks for Download
Read eBooks Using Other Programs
Microsoft Reader isn’t the only eBook program available for Pocket PCs. Most of the other
eBook programs are available for Palm OS devices as well as Pocket PCs, and because of this
fact, more eBooks are available.
Ironically, one of the top eBook alternatives for the Pocket PC is the Palm Reader, owned
by Palm Digital Media. Originally, the program was the PeanutPress Reader, but it became
part of Palm Digital Media when Palm Computing purchased PeanutPress during the summer
of 2001. Table 18-4 lists the alternative eBook readers for the Pocket PC.
Reader
URL
Palm Reader
http://www.palmdigitalmedia.com
Mobipocket Reader
http://www.mobipocket.com/en/HomePage/default.asp
TomeRaider
http://www.tomeraider.com
TABLE 18-4
eBook Reader Programs for Pocket PCs
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Play Movies
While other handheld computers have games, eBooks, and music software, none are capable of
playing video like the Pocket PC. Several video players exist that take advantage of the processing
power and colorful screens of Pocket PCs and the large storage capacity of CompactFlash cards.
Play Movies Using Windows Media Player
The Windows Media Player plays files in the Windows Media Video format and streaming
Windows Media on the Internet. Clicking a link to streaming video in Internet Explorer launches
the Media Player, which automatically starts to play the video. You can also load a streaming
video directly from the Media Player by tapping Tools | Open URL, and entering the URL of
the video. You select and play video files on storage cards the same way that you play music.
Included in the Internet Explorer favorites is a link to the mobile version of WindowsMedia.com,
which is located at http://www.windowsmedia.com/mobile. This website offers links to
streaming video and audio that play on the Pocket PC using the Windows Media Player.
By default, videos display in the small Media Player window, but you can change that so that
videos display using the entire Pocket PC screen. To display videos at full screen, tap Tools |
Settings | Audio & Video, and select Always from the Full Screen drop-down list. Full Screen
videos display in landscape on the Pocket PC screen, and you can flip the display by tapping the
Rotate 180º check box on the Audio & Video Settings screen.
Some videos that you play may be designed for a screen larger than the Pocket PC screen.
By default, Windows Media Player crops the video to fit the screen. You can change this action
so the display fits the screen by tapping the Shrink To Fit In Window check box on the Audio &
Video Settings screen.
Play Movies Using PocketTV
MPEG is a more popular video file format than Windows Media Video, and you can play MPEG
video files on a Pocket PC using PocketTV. PocketTV is free for personal use and can be
downloaded from http://www.pockettv.com.
PocketTV is capable of playing streaming video files, and it can play video in both portrait
and landscape view. It has a Dither option that uses a special algorithm to improve video playback
on devices, such as the Compaq iPAQ 3600 and HP Jornada 540 that have only 4096 colors.
PocketTV also has a Microdrive option that reduces the power used when playing videos from
the IBM Microdrive.
Encoders are programs that convert audio and video files from one format to another. Several
encoders are available for making MPEG video files, which you can use to create your own MPEG
files from home videos. You will find several links to encoders at http://www.mpegtv.com/
wince/pockettv/encoding.html.
If you don’t have the time to make your own MPEG videos, you will find several websites
that provide files for you to download. Table 18-5 lists websites that have MPEG files optimized
for playback on Pocket PCs.
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Websites
URL
PocketMovies.net
http://www.pocketmovies.net
PocketRocketFX.com
http://www.pocketrocketfx.com
TABLE 18-5
349
Websites with MPEG Video Files Optimized for Pocket PCs
Watch TV Shows Using a Personal Video Station
SnapStream Media’s Personal Video Station is the computer equivalent to a VCR. First, install a
TV Tuner card into a desktop computer and connect the card to a TV. Next, run the SnapStream
software to record television shows, which are stored as files on the computer. With the Pocket
PC module, you can have Personal Video Station synchronize the shows to your Pocket PC,
which you can watch at any time.
The Windows Media Player provides the actual video playback on the Pocket PC, and
the Personal Video Station Pocket PC module manages the file synchronization. A 30-minute
show recorded in standard quality for Pocket PCs requires 29MB of storage space, while a high
quality recording requires 43MB. The file sizes will vary a little between Pocket PC brands
due to optimizations for their screens. To find more information about this product go to
http://www.snapstream.com.
Wrapping Up
The Pocket PC is a great entertainer. It lets you play games, store a library of eBooks, play music,
and thrills you with movies. All of these tasks take advantage of the Pocket PC multimedia features,
which set it apart from the competition. These features require the additional storage space that
storage cards provide to Pocket PCs. The games, eBooks, music, and movies available on the
Pocket PC are available for download from the Internet, which can be entertaining on its own. In
the next chapter, you’ll learn how to connect your Pocket PC to the Internet.
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Go Online
with Your
Pocket PC
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Connect
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How to…
■
■
■
■
Use the Connection Manager to configure network connections
Select a wireless modem
Use ActiveSync Desktop Pass Through to connect to networks using serial cables
Connect to local area networks
B
y all accounts, the number of people who use the Internet has grown at a phenomenal rate.
The majority of Internet connections are made using personal computers, but a variety of
other devices, such as smart phones, TV/set-top boxes, and handheld computers, are starting to
be used to connect to the Internet.
When Microsoft originally designed Pocket PCs, the company recognized the importance of
connecting to the Internet; as a result, every Pocket PC has the ability to connect in a variety of
different ways. One way is the traditional dial-up method using a modem and telephone line,
which is normally called remote networking or dial-up networking. All Pocket PCs come with
the software needed to make this connection, and a number of companies make CompactFlash
modems that work with Pocket PCs.
The modem and telephone line combination is the most widely used means of connecting to
the Internet, but two alternative methods are emerging. One is wireless networking, which provides
a connection to the Internet using analog or digital cellular phones, special wireless modems, or
wireless Ethernet cards. The second emerging method for Internet access is broadband. In the
simplest terms, broadband is fast Internet access for consumers. Two implementations of
broadband are popular: cable-modem service, using the same cable wire connected to your
television set, and Digital Subscriber Line (DSL), which provides high-speed access using
regular telephone lines.
For the majority of Pocket PC users, remote networking will be the method used to connect
to the Internet, and this chapter provides instructions for making the connection. Wireless networking
with cellular phones and wireless modems is configured the same way as remote networking on
Pocket PCs.
You’ll find instructions for connecting to the Internet using the device’s USB cable and
ActiveSync Desktop Pass Through. Finally, instructions are also provided for connecting to
Local Area Networks (LANs) using wired and wireless Ethernet cards.
Connection Improvements in Windows Mobile 2003
Of all the changes that have been made to Windows Mobile 2003, the most significant are the
improvements in how you connect Pocket PCs to networks. The changes make Pocket PCs easier
to connect to networks. Whether you are a network administrator for a large company or a home
user who just connects to the Internet, you will be pleased with the new networking capabilities.
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Tap here to open the
The most obvious change is this network status icon on the navigation
notification bubble.
bar at the top of the screen shown at right.
Table 19-1 shows how the network status icon
indicates the network connection status. When you
tap the icon, a notification bubble displays, providing
information about the connection and a link to open
Connection Manager, which you use to change
connection settings.
Normally, Pocket PCs automatically connect to the Internet based on the program you are
using and the information you retrieve. (Table 19-2, later in this chapter, provides a summary
of the programs and information.) However, when you tap the connection status icon while the
Pocket PC is not connected, the notification bubble displays links that you can tap to connect to
a network manually.
The bubble will display only the connections that
you can make based on what hardware is available with
the Pocket PC. For example, suppose you have a Pocket
PC that has a Bluetooth radio and a connection configured
to use a Bluetooth Dialup Modem and another connection
configured to use a Pretec CompactFlash modem. When
you tap the connection status icon while the Pretec
modem is not in the Pocket PC, you see the image shown here.
The GPRS connection displays since the Bluetooth modem is available, but the CompactFlash
modem connection does not display. If you insert the CompactFlash modem into the Pocket PC
and tap the connection status icon, the connection that is configured to use the CompactFlash
modem displays in the notification bubble.
The notification bubble displays the default Internet or Work connections, or the
connections that you specify the Pocket PC to use. If you configure a VPN connection,
it will also display in the notification bubble along with the default Internet connection,
because VPN connections use Internet connections.
Connection
Icon
Explanation
The Pocket PC is not connected to the network. What appears in the notification bubble
depends on what connections are configured. You will always see a Settings link that
opens Connection Manager.
The Pocket PC is connected to a network. The notification bubble shows whether you are
connected to the Internet or a Work network. If a VPN connection is configured you will
see a link for establishing a VPN connection. You also see the Settings link to open
Connection Manager.
The arrows are moving in a circle, indicating that the Pocket PC is synchronizing with
a desktop computer or server.
TABLE 19-1
Windows Mobile 2003 Connection Status Icons
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Windows Mobile 2003 adds zero configuration support for Wireless Fidelity (Wi-Fi) connections.
If you have a wireless network card in your Pocket PC and its driver supports zero configuration,
when the Pocket PC gets into the coverage area of a Wi-Fi network for the first time a notification
bubble appears asking if this network connects to the Internet or a Private/Corporate network.
The selection that you make is stored in Connection Manager so that the next time the Pocket PC
detects the same network, it is automatically configured to what you set it to earlier and you are
not asked again.
Bluetooth provides wireless connections between devices. For example, instead of using a
cable to connect a Pocket PC to a mobile phone, you can connect the two using a wireless Bluetooth
connection. Windows Mobile 2003 has built-in support for Bluetooth and supports most Bluetooth
capabilities, or what are called profiles. One of these profiles is dial-up networking, which enables
you to use mobile phones with Bluetooth as wireless modems.
Managing Connections
Connection Manager controls all network connections for a Pocket PC. One of the most significant
differences between Pocket PC 2002 and Windows Mobile 2003 are improvements in Connection
Manager. As you can see in Figure 19-1, the user interface has changed, as has the underlying
code to make it easier for you to make connections.
The Windows Mobile 2003 Connection Manager has two tabs: Tasks and Advanced. On the
Tasks tab you create and manage network connections. On the Advanced tab you configure how
Configure Internet
connections here.
Configure Work
connections here.
FIGURE 19-1
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On the left is the Pocket PC 2002 Connection Manager; on the right Windows
Mobile 2003.
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Connection Manager connects to networks, manages dialing rules, and configures network cards.
The Pocket PC 2002 Connection Manager also has two tabs: Connections and Dialing Locations.
You create and manage network connections on the Connections tab and manage dialing rules on
the Dialing Locations tab.
Connection Manager has two categories for network connections: Internet and Work. Internet
connections connect a Pocket PC to the Internet, and normally that is done by using a modem
to connect to an Internet Service Provider (ISP), which is why the Windows Mobile 2003 Connection
Manager lists these types of connections under My ISP.
Work connections define how a Pocket PC connects to LANs. Most corporations use LANS,
which is why Connection Manager labels these as Work connections. The same connection options
available for Internet connections are also available for Work connections; however two additional
options are included for Work connections.
As you can see in Figure 19-1, one option is for virtual private network (VPN) server
connections. VPNs provide a secure connection to corporate networks by using encryption and
public Internet connections. To use a VPN server connection, you first connect to the Internet,
and then tap the connection status icon to open the notification bubble that provides a link to
connect to the VPN server.
Another option for work connections in Figure 19-1 is a proxy server. Proxy servers provide
a way to share an Internet connection with multiple PCs on a LAN. If your work network has a
proxy server, you must enter the information for the proxy server in Connection Manager or you
will not be able to connect to the Internet while connected to the Work network.
Once you configure Connection Manager, it makes connections based on the type of information
that you attempt to retrieve and the peripheral attached to the Pocket PC. Table 19-2 lists the
applications that use network connections, along with the connection scenarios when using a
modem. If a network card is available instead of a modem, the applications will make a connection
based on the network card setting in Connection Manager.
Application
Internet
Work
Internet Explorer
Enter a URL in a fully qualified
domain name form, such as
http://www.pocketpchow2.com.
Enter a one word URL, such as fmcpherson.
Inbox
All Inbox services connect to the
Internet by default.
Configure Inbox services to connect to Work.
MSN Messenger
MSN Messenger is only configured
to use a Passport account.
MSN Messenger is configured to use an
Exchange account.
ActiveSync
Never connects to the Internet.
Always connects to Work.
Terminal Server
Client
Does not directly make a network
connection.
Does not directly make a network
connection. If you use a modem you must
use Connection Manager.
TABLE 19-2
Scenarios for Which the Pocket PC Will Connect to the Internet or Work Using
a Modem
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Use the Pocket PC 2002 Desktop
Connection Wizard
The Pocket PC 2002 Connection Manager is difficult to use, so Microsoft created the
Connection Wizard to make it easier to configure connections. The Wizard runs on desktop
computers running Windows, and it guides you through the process of creating connections.
You will find it in the downloads section at http://www.pocketpc.com.
Before you can begin using the Connection Wizard, you must connect your Pocket PC
with a desktop computer. It reads the connections settings on your Pocket PC and then guides
you through the process of editing existing connections or creating new ones.
If you want to synchronize using a network card, you must configure the card to connect
to Work.
Your Pocket PC can be connected to networks in a number of ways. It can use modems to
connect with ISPs or with corporate remote access servers. The USB cable, infrared port, or
Bluetooth radio that you use to connect a Pocket PC with a PC creates a small network between
the two and can also be used by the Pocket PC to connect with the Internet.
LANs are common in offices today and are also sometimes installed in homes to enable two
or more home computers to share resources and Internet connections. All Pocket PCs include
the software necessary to connect to LANs by using either PC Card or CompactFlash Ethernet
network interface cards (NICs). In the remaining sections of this chapter, you will see how you
can use all of these connection types to connect either to the Internet or to Work networks.
Connect to Networks Using Modems
Most people still connect to the Internet by using a modem to dial-in to an Internet Service Provider
(ISP)—the company that provides connections to the Internet. Thousands of ISPs provide telephone
numbers that you use either to connect directly to the Internet or, as is the case with America
Online (AOL), connect to a private network and then connect to the Internet. Pocket PCs work
with the majority of ISPs that connect directly to the Internet, but you cannot use Pocket PC
2002’s or Windows Mobile 2003’s modem connections to connect to AOL.
If you want to connect to AOL, you can use the AOL for Pocket PC software, which you
can buy at http://www.handango.com.
You can also use modems to connect to Work networks, usually by dialing in to a Remote
Access Service (RAS). RAS provides secure access to LANs via modems. You will need the
same information to create a modem connection to Work networks that you need for Internet
connections.
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Before you connect to the Internet or a Work network, you need to gather some information
to configure the connections. If your ISP provides instructions for connecting to the Internet,
what you need will be provided in those instructions. If your ISP does not provide instructions,
you can find the information by opening the Properties of the connection in Windows. The
system administrator of your Work network should be able to provide the information that you
need to create the work modem connection.
You will need the following information to create Internet or Work modem connections on
your Pocket PC:
■ Do you provide a username and password in the Dial-Up Connection dialog box, or does a
terminal window open after the number has been dialed (in which case you enter a username
and password)? If a terminal window is used, you must configure the Pocket PC connection
to open one, as explained in the “Create Modem Connections” section of this chapter.
■ Obtain the maximum baud rate for the connection and the settings for data bits, parity,
stop bits, and flow control.
■ Find out whether the connection uses Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) or Serial Line
Interface Protocol (SLIP). The most common in use is PPP.
■ Does the network access server, or Windows NT remote access server, provide an IP
address, or is one manually assigned? The most common configuration is server-assigned,
but if it is manually assigned you will need the address provided by the ISP or the Work
network.
■ Does the connection use software compression and IP header compression? The most
common configuration is to use both.
■ Does the server assign addresses for name servers, or are they manually assigned? If they
are manually assigned, you will need the address for Primary DNS, Secondary DNS,
Primary WINS, and Secondary WINS.
■ Obtain the phone number to access the connecting server.
Buy a Modem for Your Pocket PC
CompactFlash modems are the most common modems for Pocket PCs. All brands of
CompactFlash modems work with Pocket PCs, but you do want to make sure that if your
Pocket PC has only a Type I CompactFlash slot, that you buy a Type I CompactFlash
modem. (Most Pocket PCs that have CompactFlash slots now have Type II slots. However,
if you have an older HP Jornada Pocket PC, be aware that it has only a Type I slot.) Examples
of Type I modems are CompactModem from Pretec; 56K Modem CF Card from Socket
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Communications, Inc.; and Pocket Modem from Targus. The CompactCard Modem 56
Global Access card from Xircom is a Type II CompactFlash modem.
To connect modems such as the 56K Travel Modem from Psion with the Pocket PC
infrared port, select the Generic IrDA modem from the Select A Modem drop-down list when
you’re creating modem connections. You can also connect Pocket PCs to standard external
PC modems by using a serial ActiveSync cable, a null modem adapter, and an RS-232 cable.
When using an external PC modem, select the Hayes Compatible On COM1: modem when
creating a modem connection.
If you have a Pocket PC that has only a Secure Digital card slot, you may have difficulty
finding a modem that works with your Pocket PC. If your Pocket PC supports Secure Digital
Input & Output (SDIO), theoretically you can use a modem; however, to date, no one sells
a Secure Digital modem card. Your options in this case are to use an infrared modem, an
external modem using the ActiveSync cable, or a Bluetooth SD card and a modem or mobile
phone with a Bluetooth radio.
Create Modem Connections
Before creating a new modem connection that uses a CompactFlash modem, insert the modem
into the Pocket PC. If the modem works in Pocket PCs, the drivers will be read from the card and
loaded on the Pocket PC; otherwise a message box displays saying that the card is not recognized.
You will see the CompactFlash modem listed when you create the modem connection.
To create modem connections for either Internet or Work networks with Windows Mobile
2003, tap Add A New Modem Connection under either the My ISP or My Work Network section
on the Tasks tab in Connection Manager, as shown in Figure 19-1. (On Pocket PC 2002, tap Modify
in either the Internet or Work section.)
You enter the connection information on three screens.
On the first screen, shown here, you enter a name for the
connection and select the modem.
The Select A Modem drop-down list contains
CompactFlash modems that have been connected to
the Pocket PC, along with Bluetooth, Generic IrDA,
and Hayes Compatible On COM1: options.
The Bluetooth and Generic IrDA (infrared) options
provide wireless connections to mobile phones, which
you can use as modems. See the “Connect to Networks
with Mobile Phones” section later in this chapter for
instructions on using the Bluetooth and Generic IrDA
options. You can also connect external modems using a
serial ActiveSync cable, in which case you should select
the Hayes Compatible On COM1: option.
On the second screen, you enter the phone number
for the connection. You can enter the area code or extra
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numbers for outside lines or credit cards directly in the field on this screen. If you frequently
change area codes because you’re dialing in from various locations, use Dialing Rules. Dialing
Rules store area codes, extra numbers, and instructions for when they should be dialed. Once you
create the rules, you don’t have to enter extra numbers for every connection. The “Create Dialing
Rules” section later in this chapter provides instructions for creating dialing rules.
After you turn on Dialing Rules, the second modem connections screen changes to
display separate fields for the Country/Region Code, Area Code, and Phone number.
The third screen has fields for entering the User Name, Password, and Domain that you
provide to connect to the network. If the modem connection is to an ISP you will probably
leave the Domain field blank. If the modem connection is for a Work network, your system
administrator can tell you what to enter in this field, or it can be left blank.
Normally, after you enter the information on the third
screen, you tap Finish to complete the creation of the
modem connection. However, if you need to change the
modem baud rate, have a terminal window display, or
change network addresses, tap Advanced. As you can
see here, the Advanced modem connection settings
screen has four tabs.
On the General tab, you can specify maximum speed,
or baud rate, for the modem connection. If you connect to
a mobile phone or a digital phone adapter that does not
provide a dial tone, clear the Wait For Dial Tone Before
Dialing check box. In the Extra Dial-String Modem
Commands field, enter any modem commands, such as
commands to adjust volume, that should be entered every
time a call is made.
The Port Settings tab has fields to change the Data
Bits, Parity, Stop Bits, and Flow Control of the modem
connection. All of these settings control how modems
communicate, and you usually do not need to make changes to these fields. On this tab are also
three check boxes for displaying a terminal window. The terminal window is a blank window in
which you can enter modem commands. If you want to control the modem connection manually,
you can select one of these check boxes.
Tap the Use Terminal Before Connecting check box to display the terminal window before
the modem dials the phone number. Tap the Use Terminal Window After Connecting check
box to display the terminal window after the modem dials the phone number and establishes
a connection. You will need to use this option if the ISP or Work network requires you to enter
your username and password in a terminal window rather than from the information you enter
on the third modem connection setup screen. To enter the commands to the modem to dial the
phone number manually, tap the Enter Dialing Commands Manually check box.
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On the TCP/IP tab, shown here, you can specify how
the Pocket PC obtains an Internet Protocol (IP) address
and specify how network communication works.
Most ISPs and Work networks provide server-assigned
IP addresses, in which case you leave the Use ServerAssigned IP Address radio button selected. If you must
use a specific IP address, which your ISP or Work network
administrator provides, tap the Use Specific IP Address
radio button and enter the address in the field.
Serial Line Internet Protocol (SLIP) is an old method
of connecting to networks using modems, and if your ISP
or Work network requires this method, tap the Use Slip
check box. If your ISP or Work network doesn’t specify
otherwise, leave the Use Software Compression and Use
IP Header Compression check boxes selected. Most
networks use these compression methods to speed up
network communication.
On the Servers tab, you enter IP addresses for Domain Name Servers (DNS) and Windows
Internet Name Service (WINS). Normally the ISP or Work network provides the addresses for
these servers automatically, but if you need to specify them, tap the Use Specific Server Address
radio button and enter the IP addresses in the fields on the screen. Fields are also provided for
primary and alternative DNS and WINS servers.
After you finish entering changes to the Advanced modem settings, tap OK, and then tap Finish
on the third modem setup screen. You will then return to the Connection Manager Tasks tab.
You can enter more than one modem connection for ISP and Work network connections.
When multiple modem connections are available, Connection Manager will dial the number
that has an area code matching the dialing location area
code, if Dialing Rules exist. The one exception is 800
numbers, which will always be used even if local phone
numbers are available.
Create Dialing Rules
Dialing Rules store area codes, extra numbers, and
instructions for when they should be dialed. Once you
create the rules, you don’t have to enter extra numbers for
every connection. To create new Dialing Rules, tap the
Use Dialing Rules link on the second modem connection
screen, which opens this screen shown at right.
You can also open this screen by tapping Select
Location on the Connection Manager Advanced tab. Tap
the Use Dialing Rules check box, then tap the radio button
for either Home or Work to specify the location, and then
tap Edit. Tap New to create a new dialing location.
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Each specific dialing location screen looks similar to
the image shown to the right.
In this screen, you configure information about the
location from which you’re dialing, including the local
area code, the local country code, whether you use tone
or pulse dialing, and whether or not you need to disable
call waiting. You can also control dialing patterns, such
as whether a 9 must be dialed to reach an outside line.
Dialing patterns are used to control how the modem
will dial a phone number from the location you have
selected. When you tap Dialing Patterns, you’ll see the
screen below.
From this screen, you control how local, long-distance,
and international calls are dialed. Placeholders—letters
and punctuation marks—are used as a type of shorthand
so that parts of the
phone number that
must be dialed
each time can be merged into the dialing pattern. For
example, suppose that the location you are dialing from
requires that you dial a 9 to place a long-distance phone
call. In the field For Long Distance Calls, Dial, you
should enter 9,1FG. If the number you are dialing is
248-555-1212, the modem will dial 9,12485551212
because your device will interpret the 9,1FG as dial 9,
wait two seconds, and then dial 1, the area code (F),
and the number (G). The characters you can use and
their corollary interpretations are shown in Table 19-3.
Manage Modem Connections
After you create a modem connection for ISP and Work
networks, a Manage Existing Connections link appears on
To
Enter
Dial country code
E or e
Dial area code
F or f
Dial local number
G or g
Insert a pause (typically 2 seconds)
, (comma)
Wait for credit card tone
$ (dollar sign)
TABLE 19-3
Phone Call Dialing Characters Used by the Pocket PC
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To
Enter
Wait for a second tone
W or w
Tone-dial the following numbers
T or t
Pulse-dial the following numbers
P or p
Transfer to another extension (0.5 seconds on hook, 0.5
seconds off hook, sometimes called hook flash)
!
Wait for quiet answer (typically indicated by 6.5 seconds
of silence, followed by a ringing tone)
@
Use special controls on some systems (tone only)
ABCD or * or #
TABLE 19-3
Phone Call Dialing Characters Used by the Pocket PC (continued)
the Connection Manager Tasks tab. Tap the link to make
changes to modem connections that you create. The
following screen appears, listing all of the modem
connects that exist.
The radio buttons specify which modem connection
Connection Manager will use to connect to a network.
The Auto Pick option appears only when two or more
modem connections are available, and it specifies that
Connection Manager is to select automatically which
connection to use based on the dialing location or device.
You can force Connection Manager to use one of the
other connections by tapping the radio button of the one
you want to use.
To edit a connection, tap its radio button and then
tap Edit. You can then go through each of the modem
connection setup screens and make changes. To delete a
connection tap-and-hold on the connection and tap Delete
on the pop-up menu. The pop-up menu also has a Connect
option, which you can tap to initiate a call to the network manually. Tap New to create a new
modem connection.
The screen that appears when you tap the Manage Existing Connections link has two
tabs—General and Modem; the Modem tab opens by default. The General tab provides a field
for you to change the name of the connection settings. For example, you can change the name
from My ISP to Frank’s Internet Connections. You may not have a need to change the name, but
companies that provide Pocket PCs to their workers might want to change My Work Network to
their company name.
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Connect to Networks Using Virtual Private Networking
Virtual Private Networking (VPN) is a method for providing a secure connection to Work
networks using the public Internet. All information is encrypted and sent to the VPN server,
which then decrypts the information and passes it along to the corporate network.
Various methods can be used for implementing VPN, and Windows Mobile 2003 supports
Microsoft’s Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) and IP Security Layer 2 Tunneling
Protocol (IPSec/L2TP). Pocket PC 2002 supports only PPTP, though you can add support for
IPSec/L2TP by purchasing third-party software. You will need to verify that the VPN server to
which you need to connect uses these protocols, or you will need a third-party VPN client for
your Pocket PC.
To configure Windows Mobile 2003 to use VPN, tap
Add A New VPN Server Connection under My Work
Network. You need to complete two or three screens’
worth of information, depending on which VPN type
you use. On the first screen, you enter a name for VPN
connection and the Host Name or IP Address of the VPN
server, and then select the VPN Type: IPSec/L2TP or
PPTP. The Host Name (server name) or IP address field
must be completed.
If you select the IPSec/L2TP VPN type, you will see
this screen to the right.
On this screen, you specify how to authenticate the
IPSec/L2TP connection. If an IPSec/L2TP digital certificate
has been installed on your device, usually by your company,
select the first option. In most cases, you will select the
second option, A
Pre-Shared Key.
You will need to
enter the shared key, usually a passphrase and not your
VPN server username or password, into the field.
The third screen for the IPSec/L2TP VPN type is the
same as the second (and final) screen for the PPTP VPN
type. On this screen, you enter a username, password, and
domain name for the VPN server in the fields provided. In
most cases, after you enter this information you can tap
Finish; however, if you need to specify IP addresses for
the VPN connection, DNS, or WINS, tap Advanced.
After you finish entering the VPN server information,
the link under My Work Network changes to Edit My
VPN Server. When you tap this link, the screen appears
to the left.
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To edit a connection, tap the connection’s radio
button and then tap Edit. Tap-and-hold on a connection
to delete it.
VPN server connections do not work on their own;
you first have to connect to the Internet and then
connect to the VPN servers. Windows Mobile 2003
simplifies the process by automatically connecting to
the Internet when you select a VPN connection. For
example, when I tap Connect VPN on this notification
bubble (shown at top), Windows Mobile 2003 first
connects to the Internet using My Connection and then
connects to the VPN server.
Tap the connection status icon to disconnect from the
VPN server and the Internet.
You can also use VPN with network cards, which
allows you to access private networks using
broadband connections.
Configure Proxy Servers
Proxy servers provide access to the Internet from Work
networks. To configure Windows Mobile 2003 to use a
proxy server, tap Set Up My Proxy Server under My Work
Network, which opens the screen shown in the center.
Tap the two check boxes on the screen and enter the
host name or IP address of the proxy server in the Proxy
Server field.
If you create a partnership between the Pocket
PC and a desktop computer configured to use a
proxy server, ActiveSync will use the information
from the desktop to set up a proxy server
automatically on your Pocket PC.
If you need to configure port or Socks settings for the
proxy server, tap Advanced on the Proxy Settings tab to
open the screen shown at the bottom.
The HTTP field and Port setting specify the proxy
server and port to be used by Internet Explorer when
browsing the web. The default port for HTTP is 80, and
this usually shouldn’t be changed unless specified by a
network administrator.
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Wireless Access Protocol (WAP) settings are used to specify a proxy or gateway server and
port that enable browsers using WAP to browse the web. These settings are not commonly used
and will be blank in most cases.
A Socks proxy server is used by applications that need to access application servers using
TCP/IP. If you need to use Socks, enter the proxy server and port number. The default port
number for Socks is 1080, and this usually shouldn’t be changed unless you’re instructed to do
so by a network administrator. Two versions of the Socks proxy server protocol exist: Socks 4
and Socks 5. Socks 5 supports authentication, so if you tap the Socks 5 radio button, you must
enter a user ID and password.
After you set up the proxy server, the link under My Work Network changes to Edit My
Proxy Server, which you can tap to make changes to the proxy server settings. The proxy server
is automatically used whenever you retrieve information using HTTP, WAP, or Socks protocols
on a Work network. For example, if your Pocket PC is connected to a Work Network and you
open a page on the public Internet, such as http://www.pocketpchow2.com, the Pocket PC first
connects to the proxy server and you may be prompted for a username and password unless you
already saved that information.
Exclude Sites from Using
a Proxy Server
Table 19-2 shows the various ways in which Windows Mobile 2003 determines how to
connect to the Internet. One way is the format of the URL you open with Internet Explorer.
If you enter a fully qualified domain name, for example http://www.pocketpchow2.com,
Connection Manager determines that you need to connect to the Internet. If you enter a short
name, for example pocketpchow2, Connection Manager determines you need to connect to a
Work network.
This creates a problem for accessing web sites on a Work network that uses fully
qualified domain names. Connection Manager connects to the Internet when you want it
to connect to a Work network. Windows Mobile 2003 has a simple fix to this problem by
providing a way for you to specify URLs that are associated with Work networks.
Unfortunately, this feature is not available on Pocket PC 2002.
To enter URLs into the exception list, open the Advanced tab in Connection Manager, tap
Select Networks, and then tap Exceptions. Tap Add New URL in the URL Exceptions list
and enter the URL. You can use wildcards in the URL to cover entire domains, for example
enter *.companyname.com to add all pages with companyname.com in its URL to the
exception list.
When you enter a URL in Internet Explorer that is in the exception list, Connection
Manager connects to a Work network rather than the Internet. The URLs you enter in the
exception list are also not sent to proxy servers.
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Connect Using Wireless Modems
Using a wireless modem, you can connect a Pocket PC to the Internet anywhere that the radio
of the wireless modem can receive a signal. Wireless modems provide the convenience of not
having to locate phone jacks and string phone cable to connect to the Internet.
Two types of wireless modems work with Pocket PCs. Some mobile phones have built-in
modems, and these phones are usually classified as data-capable. To use the modems in these
mobile phones with a Pocket PC, you connect the Pocket PC to the phone by using the infrared
port, a serial cable, a CompactFlash card, or Bluetooth. You’ll find a list of mobile phones that
work with Pocket PCs at http://www.cewindows.net/peripherals/cellular.htm.
Some Pocket PCs have an integrated wireless modem that you can use for voice and
data communications. To connect these types of Pocket PCs to the Internet, create
modem connections, as described in the section “Create Modem Connections,” and
select the built-in modem.
The second type of wireless modem are PC Cards or CompactFlash cards that connect to
Pocket PCs that have PC Card expansion sleeves (such as the Compaq PC Card Expansion Pack)
or a CompactFlash slot.
Connect to Networks with Mobile Phones
Before you can use a mobile phone to connect to the Internet, you need to find out whether or not
your mobile phone service provider supports data communications. Normally, you’ll need to sign
up for an additional service for data communications that may or may not use the minutes that
are part of your regular plan. Contact your mobile phone service provider and ask whether you
can connect to the Internet using their service.
Mobile phone networks in the United States use a variety of technologies. The maximum
data rate for services that use the Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM), such as
T-Mobile, is 9600 bits per second (bps). Services, such as Verizon Wireless and Sprint PCS, that
use Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) have a maximum data rate of 14,400 bps. CDMA
is the most common technology in the United States, and GSM is the standard for mobile
communication in Europe.
The data speeds of GSM and CDMA are not optimal for browsing the web. Fortunately, mobilephone service providers have upgraded their networks to provide faster data communication.
These upgrades are frequently referred to as second generation (2.5G) and third generation (3G)
upgrades. The current GSM and CDMA technologies are referred to as 2G because they are
upgrades of the original analog cellular technology.
One 2.5G implementation in the United States is General Packet Radio Service (GPRS),
which is being used by T-Mobile, AT&T Wireless, and Cingular Wireless. These companies offer
GPRS service in most major cities in the United States. In Europe, there are implementations of
GPRS and High-Speed Circuit Switched Data (HSCSD). GPRS and HSCSD will provide data
speeds of 19.2 Kbps to 115 Kbps, though realistic speeds are around 30 Kbps.
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Connecting Pocket PC Phone Edition
to Networks
Pocket PC Phone Edition, which is explained in Chapter 9, provides wireless voice and data
communications. The wireless data communication capabilities for Pocket PC Phone Edition
are the same as mobile phones. T-Mobile sells Pocket PC Phone Edition devices that use
GPRS for data communications; Verizon and Sprint PCS sell devices that use 1XRTT. The
Pocket PC Phone Edition devices are sold only by service providers and are preconfigured to
connect to the Internet. To connect these devices to the Internet, use a program as described
in Table 19-2, or tap the connection status icon.
Another implementation is Single Carrier Radio Transmission Technology (1XRTT), which
is provided by Verizon Wireless and Sprint PCS. As is the case with GPRS, 1XRTT is now
available in most major U.S. cities, but it is not commonly available outside the United States.
Service providers often refer to 1XRTT as a 3G implementation because it supports data speeds
up to 144 Kbps, but more realistic speeds are between 40 to 50 Kbps.
To date, third-generation upgrades are not planned until some time after 2003. Currently, 3G
upgrades are expected to provide data speeds of 38.4 Kbps to 2 Megabits per second (Mbps). The
higher speeds promised by 3G are needed to support video transmission.
The method that you use to connect your phone to a Pocket PC will depend on the capabilities
of the phone. If the phone has an infrared port, you can create a modem connection that uses the
Generic IrDA modem and align the infrared ports. Infrared is nice because it is available with all
Pocket PCs, but because infrared ports must be lined up, it can be difficult to use.
Alternatives to infrared connections are serial cables; the Digital Phone card from Socket
Communications, Inc.; and Bluetooth. Most mobile phones have unique ports that require special
serial cables, which you can usually purchase from the phone manufacturer. To connect the cable
to a Pocket PC, you’ll need a null modem adapter and a serial ActiveSync cable for the Pocket
PC. Supplynet (http://www.thesupplynet.com) sells cables that connect some mobile phones
directly with the HP iPAQ Pocket PC, eliminating the need for a null modem adapter or a serial
ActiveSync cable.
Digital Phone card is a Type I CompactFlash card with a cable that connects directly to many
popular mobile phones. The card includes a driver that you install on the Pocket PC, which you
select when creating a modem connection. You’ll find more information about these cards at
http://www.digitalphonecard.com.
Bluetooth is a specification for short-range radio links between PCs, mobile telephones, and
other portable devices. Its purpose is to eliminate the need to carry and use cables to connect
devices, which can multiply like rabbits when you use a lot of different peripherals. Bluetooth
provides a function similar to the infrared ports on Pocket PCs, but it is better because it does not
require a line of sight between devices and it promises to be supported by a wider range of devices.
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To use Bluetooth to connect to the Internet, you need a mobile phone that has a Bluetooth
radio, and the phone must be able to make connections to the Internet. Examples of phones that
support Bluetooth are the Sony-Ericsson T68, T39, and R520 phones. You will also need a
Bluetooth radio for the Pocket PC. Some Pocket PCs have built-in Bluetooth radios, or you can
add one using the CompactFlash or Secure Digital card slot. Socket Communications, Inc., and
Anycom sell Type I CompactFlash Bluetooth cards, and Toshiba and Socket Communications
sell Secure Digital Bluetooth cards. The cards come with drivers that provide a Bluetooth modem
option when creating modem connections.
You can also use Bluetooth to connect Pocket PCs to printers and personal computers.
Use Bluetooth to Connect to the Internet
Windows Mobile 2003 has built-in support for Bluetooth,
so you may not need to install additional software to
create a wireless connection with mobile phones. The
first step to using Bluetooth is to create a modem
connection (as described in the “Create Modem
Connections” section earlier in this chapter) and select
Bluetooth as the modem. You will then see the screen
(shown here) for selecting bonded Bluetooth phones.
Bonding is a security method for Bluetooth that
establishes a relationship between two devices. Bonded
devices are given permission to communicate with each
other, and this prevents any random device from being
given access to a mobile phone to establish data
connections.
Tap the name of your mobile phone and then tap
Next. If your mobile phone is not listed, follow the
instructions in the “Create Bluetooth Bonds” section later
in this chapter. The remaining screens are the same as
described in the “Create Modem Connections” section of this chapter, but the information on
these screens will be different than what you normally enter for modem connections.
You enter a special connection string on the phone number screen that tells the mobile phone
to use GPRS or 1XRTT to connect to the Internet. The connection string is different for each
service provider. An example string for connecting to T-Mobile’s GPRS network is *99***1#.
Your service provider should be able to provide this connection string.
GPRS and 1XRTT networks either don’t require a username or password, or they use the
username and password that you enter on the mobile phone. Therefore, you can leave the username
and password fields blank on the third modem connection setup screen. If you do enter something
in a field, it will usually be ignored.
After you create the modem connection specifying Bluetooth as the modem, you can then
use that connection to connect to the Internet just as you would any other modem connection.
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When the Pocket PC connects to the Internet, it establishes a wireless connection with the mobile
phone, which it uses as a modem to connect to the Internet. To use Bluetooth, the mobile phone
must be on and within 10 meters of your Pocket PC.
If you tap the connection status icon, you will notice that the notification bubble has an
additional entry for turning off Bluetooth. Turning off Bluetooth saves battery life. Tap the Turn
Bluetooth Off link to turn the radio off, and tap the Turn Bluetooth On link on the notification
bubble to turn Bluetooth back on.
Create Bluetooth Bonds
If the Pocket PC has not already bonded with a mobile
phone, tap New in the Bonded Devices list and the Pocket
PC will search for devices with Bluetooth radios. This list
will appear after you select Bluetooth as the modem
while creating modem connections, or you can open it by
tapping Start | Settings | Connections | Bluetooth and then
tap the Bonded Devices tab.
When you tap New, the Pocket PC searches for other
Bluetooth devices for 10 seconds. If the name of your
mobile phone does not appear, you may need to enable it
to be discoverable, which means that other Bluetooth
devices can obtain the name of the mobile phone.
Tap the name of your mobile phone and tap Next,
which opens the next screen, shown right, where you
enter a PIN.
The PIN is 1 to 16 characters long, and the same PIN
must be entered on the mobile phone and Pocket PC.
You first enter the PIN on the Pocket PC, and then you
are prompted to enter the PIN on the mobile phone. If both PINs are entered correctly,
the bonding completes and the name of the mobile phone is added to the list.
While this section describes bonding with mobile phones, you follow this same process
for bonding Pocket PCs with printers or computers that have Bluetooth radios.
If you have a problem creating the bond from the
Pocket PC, try creating the bond from the mobile phone.
First, you need to set up the Pocket PC so that it is
discoverable. Tap Start | Settings | Connections | Bluetooth,
and then tap the Discoverable radio button. When the
mobile phone discovers the Pocket PC, you will see
notification bubble at right:
Tap OK to continue and add the mobile phone, in this
case T39m, to the Bonded Devices list. You will then enter a PIN on both the mobile phone and
the Pocket PC, and if the bonding succeeds the mobile phone is added to the Bonded Devices
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list. To see the devices that are bonded with your Pocket PC, tap Start | Settings | Connections |
Bluetooth and then tap the Bonded Devices tab.
You might find the Bluetooth icon in the System tab (tap Start | Settings | Connections |
System) instead of the Connections tab. A Bluetooth icon in the System tab is associated
with different Bluetooth software than the software Microsoft includes with Windows
Mobile 2003. An example of this is the HP iPAQ 2215, which uses software provided by
Widcomm, Inc., rather than from Microsoft.
To rename or delete a device from the bonded devices list, tap-and-hold on the device name
and then tap Rename or Delete on the pop-up menu. If you delete a device from the list, you will
have to go through the entire bonding process to add it back to the list.
Connect to the Internet with Wireless Card Modems
GPRS and 1XRTT data connections became available in late 2002, and while they are available
in many major U.S. cities, they cover only a small percentage of the United States. Cellular Digital
Packet Data (CDPD) is an older technology with a maximum speed of 19.2 Kbps, but it is
available in more places than either GPRS or 1XRTT.
Unfortunately, since CDPD service is older, the number of companies providing the service
is decreasing, as are the card manufacturers. Verizon Wireless and Earthlink provide wireless
data service using CDPD. Sierra Wireless and Novatel Wireless sell PC Card CDPD modems
that work with these services. The cards come with drivers that make them work like ordinary
modems on Pocket PCs.
Sierra Wireless (http://www.sierrawireless.com) sells a number of PC Cards that add voice
and data communication capability using either GSM/GPRS or CDMA/1XRTT to notebook PCs and
Pocket PCs that have a PC Card expansion pack. Novatel Wireless (http://www.novatelwireless.com/
pcproducts/index.html) sells PC Cards that work with GSM and GPRS networks. The Novatel
Merlin G201 works in Europe and the G100 works in North America.
If your Pocket PC has only a CompactFlash slot, your options are more limited. Convergent
Technologies (http://www.convergentech.com/cfgsmgprs.htm) sells a Type II CompactFlash
GSM and GPRS card. Sprint PCS’s CF2031 is a Type II CompactFlash card that turns a Pocket
PC into a Sprint PCS phone that also works with the Sprint Vision data network. Look for this
card at http://www.sprintpcs.com.
Connect Using ActiveSync Desktop Pass Through
Desktop Pass Through, which is available in ActiveSync 3.7, provides network connection
sharing between desktop computers, Pocket PC 2002, and Windows Mobile 2003 devices. By
using Desktop Pass Through, you can access the Internet or LANs from Pocket PCs while they
are connected to desktops using serial, infrared, or USB connections.
Desktop Pass Through is not available for Pocket PC 2000.
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Desktop Pass Through is available
by default for all Pocket PC 2002 and
Windows Mobile 2003 devices. Once
you connect the Pocket PC to the
desktop, you can simply use Internet
Explorer or Inbox to browse websites
or retrieve e-mail. Desktop Pass
Through is always available, but
you can control to what network
the Pocket PC connects from within
ActiveSync. Tap Tools | Options, and
then tap the Rules tab to display the
screen to the right.
Internet connectivity is provided
when the Pass Through Connection
field (at the bottom of the screen)
shows The Internet. Change the field
to Work to enable the Pocket PC to
use Pass Through to connect to LANs.
Terminal Server Client, File
Explorer network access,
and VPN do not work with
ActiveSync Desktop Pass Through.
Connect to Local Area Networks
Once used only by corporations, LANs are being installed in homes, mainly to share a single
high-speed Internet connection among two or more computers. The setup works something like
this: You subscribe to a broadband service provider, which installs the cable or DSL data service
in the home. To use the service with one PC, you install an Ethernet NIC in the PC and plug a
cable into the card and either a cable or DSL modem.
You can also purchase DSL cards for PCs that eliminate the need for installing an
Ethernet NIC.
Sharing a high-speed connection with other PCs on a LAN requires a cable modem or DSL
router, which is sometimes called a residential gateway. Several manufacturers sell these devices;
I use the Linksys EtherFast Cable/DSL router. You’ll find information about the Linksys router at
http://www.linksys.com. Practically Networked provides a complete guide to many of the routers
that are available at http://www.practicallynetworked.com/pg/router_guide_index.asp.
Any device that connects to a LAN either at work or home can access the Internet using the
shared high-speed connection. The following section explains how to use network adapters with
your Pocket PC to connect to LANs and to the Internet.
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Select a Network Adapter
Several vendors manufacture Ethernet network interface adapters. You can buy wired Ethernet
adapters, which usually come in speeds of 10 Mbps or 100 Mbps, or wireless Ethernet adapters.
Wireless Ethernet adapters support one of several wireless communication standards: 802.11b,
802.11g, 802.11a, or HomeRF. You need to take several factors into consideration when deciding
which type of card to buy.
An older ROM version on the HP iPAQ 5450 and 5455 had problems communicating
with 802.11g access points. HP has released a ROM update that fixes this problem.
The first decision that you need to make is whether or not you want to buy a wired or
wireless Ethernet adapter. To buy a wired Ethernet adapter, you’ll need to know the network
speed and the type of network cabling that is being used. You can buy adapters that support
only 10 Mbps or 100 Mbps, and you can buy adapters that support both speeds. However, if
the network speed is only 10 Mbps, you may want to buy a 10 Mbps adapter because they are
Wireless Ethernet Standards
Several wireless Ethernet standards can seem a bit like alphabet soup. The two key
characteristics of the standards are the frequency and their maximum speeds. HomeRF, one
of the oldest standards, uses the 2.4GHz frequency and has a maximum speed of 2 Mbps. It
also uses a unique method of transmitting data, so it does not work with any of the other
wireless Ethernet standards.
Cordless phones and microwave ovens also use the 2.4GHz frequency,
and they may interfere with wireless LANs using the same frequency.
If you experience intermittent communication problems on a wireless LAN, check to see
whether these devices are in use near the LAN.
802.11b is currently the most popular standard, and it uses the 2.4GHz frequency and has
a maximum speed of 11 Mbps. The 802.11g standard also uses the 2.4GHz frequency and has a
maximum speed of 54 Mbps. Since 801.11b and 802.11g use the same frequency and method
of transmitting data, devices using the two standards can communicate with each other.
802.11a is a newer standard that uses the 5GHz frequency and has a maximum speed of
54 Mbps. Since it uses a different frequency, it does not work with the other wireless Ethernet
standards. Some manufacturers that make 802.11a access points add a 802.11b or 802.11g
radio so that they work with both types of wireless networks.
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cheaper. The most common network cable is Category 5 (CAT5) Unshielded Twisted-Pair (UTP),
which has a RJ-45 connector. Most Ethernet adapters work with CAT5 UTP.
Wireless Ethernet adapters have radios that communicate with access points or other wireless
adapters. The type of adapter that you need to buy is dictated by the standard used by the access
point or wireless adapter that you want to communicate with. If the access point or adapter uses
802.11b, you must buy an 802.11b card; likewise for 802.11a or HomeRF.
The 802.11g standard is backward compatible with 802.11b, so you can use 802.11g cards
with 802.11b access points. 802.11g access points work with 802.11b and 802.11g cards. Some
manufacturers are selling cards that have multiple radios to work with various access points.
802.11b is currently the most popular wireless Ethernet standard, but the new 802.11g standard
will probably become more popular within a few years because it is faster and backward
compatible with 802.11b.
Most 802.11g access points can be configured to support both 802.11b and 802.11g,
just 802.11g, or just 802.11b. If you have an 802.11b card that cannot connect to an
802.11g access point, make sure the access point is configured to support 802.11b.
After you determine whether you need a wired or wireless Ethernet adapter, the next decision
is which type of card. You can buy both types of adapters as PC Cards, CompactFlash cards, or
Use Wireless Ethernet to Connect
to Home Networks
Wireless networking is becoming a popular way to connect computers to home networks
where it is difficult to install network cable. You can use wireless Ethernet adapters to connect
a Pocket PC to a home network in two ways. One way is to use access points in what is
usually referred to as infrastructure mode. The second way is to create a point-to-point
connection between two wireless Ethernet adapters in what is called ad hoc mode.
Access points support multiple wireless Ethernet adapters and can be easier to set up
than point-to-point connections. You connect an access point to an existing LAN by running
a network cable from the access point to an Ethernet hub. This connection allows computers
connected to the network with cables to communicate with computers connected to the
network with wireless Ethernet adapters. If a cable or DSL modem is connected to the hub,
you can access the Internet using the wireless Ethernet adapter.
Wireless Ethernet adapters cost less than access points, so if you want to connect a Pocket
PC only to one computer, a point-to-point connection may be desirable. If the computer is
connected to a wired network and supports network connection sharing, the Pocket PC can
access the wired network. The downside of point-to-point connections is that when a wireless
Ethernet adapter is configured for ad hoc mode, it cannot communicate with access points or
other adapters.
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Secure Digital cards, so you can choose a card based on the type of slot in your Pocket PC. Few
companies currently sell Secure Digital adapters, but they should become more popular in the
coming years. Because CompactFlash cards are smaller and use less battery power, they tend to
be the most popular adapters for Pocket PCs.
You can also use CompactFlash Ethernet adapters in laptop computers that have only
PC Card slots by inserting the CompactFlash card into a PC Card adapter.
Finally, when buying an Ethernet adapter to use in a Pocket PC, you need to consider
whether or not a Pocket PC driver that works with the adapter is available. The card will not
work without a driver. Wireless Ethernet adapters require specific Pocket PC drivers, but some
wired Ethernet adapters will work with the built-in NE2000 Compatible Ethernet driver that is
available on all Pocket PCs. Table 19-4 provides addresses to websites that list Pocket PC
compatible Ethernet adapters.
Configure Network Interface Adapters
If you purchase a network adapter that has a Pocket PC
driver, you must install the driver onto your device by
following the manufacturer instructions. To see the
network drivers installed on Windows Mobile 2003, tap
Start | Settings | Connections, tap the Advanced tab, and
then tap Network Card. The installed network adapter
drivers are listed on the screen shown here.
Any number of adapter drivers may be installed on a
Pocket PC. Most Pocket PCs include at least the NE2000
Compatible Ethernet Driver, which is a generic driver that
can work with any NE2000 compatible card. Beyond that,
each Pocket PC vendor may include additional drivers on
its device to support a variety of types of network cards.
With Windows Mobile 2003, it is easy to set up and
use network adapters. After you install the driver for the
adapter, connect the adapter to your network, and then
Type of Ethernet Adapter
Website
Wired PC Card
http://www.cewindows.net/peripherals/pccardethernet.htm
Wired CompactFlash Card
http://www.cewindows.net/peripherals/cfethernet.htm
Wireless PC Card
http://www.cewindows.net/peripherals/pccardwirelesslan.htm
Wireless CompactFlash Card
http://www.cewindows.net/peripherals/cfwirelesslan.htm
Wireless Secure Digital Card
http://www.cewindows.net/peripherals/sdiowirelesslan.htm
TABLE 19-4
Websites That List Pocket PC Ethernet Adapters
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plug it into the Pocket PC. Windows Mobile 2003
automatically detects and configures the card and
displays the notification bubble shown at right.
If you plan to access only the Internet, select The
Internet and tap OK. If you plan to access files or folders
on the LAN or synchronize the Pocket PC with a desktop
computer using the network, tap the Work radio button
and then tap OK.
If no server on the network provides network
addresses, or the network adapter’s driver is not
designed for Windows Mobile 2003, you will need to configure the properties of the driver so
that they work in your network environment. The configuration screens and process are the
same for every driver type, so the following instructions are the same for every brand of network
adapter.
To configure wired network adapters manually in
Windows Mobile 2003, do the following:
1. Tap Start | Settings | Connections | Connections.
2. Tap the Advanced tab, and then tap Network Card
to open the Configure Network Adapters screen.
3. Tap the adapter that you want to configure, which
opens this screen at right.
The settings that you configure in the IP Address
and Name Servers tabs are specific to your
network. Many residential gateways and cable or
DSL routers automatically assign IP addresses; if
that is the case for your network, you can select
Use Server-Assigned IP Address and tap OK.
4. If you need to use a specific IP address with the
adapter, select Use Specific IP Address, and complete the IP Address, Subnet Mask, and
Default Gateway fields, which appear when you select Use Specific IP Address.
5. If you need to enter addresses for Domain Name Servers (DNS) or Windows Internet
Name Service (WINS) servers, tap the Name Servers tab and enter the addresses.
6. Tap OK.
You can see the current IP address that is assigned by a server to your Pocket PC by
opening the Configure Network Adapters screen for the adapter while it is connected
to the network.
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Configure Wireless Ethernet Adapters
Network adapter settings are the same for wired and wireless Ethernet adapters, but wireless
adapters have additional settings for the wireless portion of the network. The items that you must
configure for all wireless Ethernet adapters are described in Table 19-5.
Some brands of wireless Ethernet adapters will have additional settings found only on that
adapter. An example of such a setting is a power-saving mode, which specifies how power is
supplied to the adapter to save battery strength. Read the user manual of your adapter to
determine how to change any settings that are unique
to the adapter.
Like wired adapters, Windows Mobile 2003
automatically configures wireless Ethernet adapters if
you are within range of an access point. First, install
the drivers for the card and then soft reset the Pocket
PC. Insert the adapter into the Pocket PC, and the
following notification bubble displays (shown here).
All of the available networks are listed, shown by
SSID. Tap the radio button of the network to which
you want to connect, specify whether you are
connecting to the Internet or a Work network, and
then tap Connect. If you tap Hide, you can tap the
radio tower icon at the top of the screen to open
the notification bubble.
Item
Description
Extended Service Set Identifier
(ESSID) or Service Set
Identifier (SSID)
The ESSID has up to 32 characters and provides a unique identifier
for the wireless network. The ESSID assigned to the adapter must be
the same as assigned to all access points or other wireless adapters on
the network. Some adapters display this setting as SSID.
Operating Mode
If the wireless adapter communicates with an access point, it must
be set to an infrastructure operating mode. If the wireless adapter
communicates with another wireless adapter, the operating mode
must be set to ad hoc. If you use an ad hoc operating mode, you’ll
need to specify a channel number, which must be the same for both
wireless adapters.
Wireless Equivalency Privacy
(WEP) or Encryption
WEP is a special form of encryption designed for wireless Ethernet
adapters. The appropriate version of WEP depends on the size of the
key that the encryption uses. Most adapters support 40-bit and 128-bit
encryption. Some adapter drivers use ASCII characters for keys, while
others use hex characters. The WEP key that you enter for the adapter
must match the key used by the access point or wireless adapter that
the card communicates with.
TABLE 19-5
Common Wireless Ethernet Adapter Settings
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Wi-Fi Protected Access
WEP’s small encryption key and method for sharing keys enable people to break into
wireless networks that implement only WEP for security. While corporations have turned
to stronger security methods such as VPN, these methods are not practical for home users.
Fortunately, a better version of WEP, called Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) has been
developed, and should be available for all Wi-Fi products by the end of 2003. The initial
release of Windows Mobile 2003 does not include WPA, but it may be added later by an
End User Update (EUU).
If no server on the network provides network
addresses, or the adapter’s driver is not designed for
Windows Mobile 2003, you will need to configure the
properties of the driver so that they work in your network
environment. Use the steps provided in the “Configure
Network Interface Adapters” section of this chapter, but
include one additional step, because additional properties
are required for the wireless network. When you tap
the Network Card button on Connection Manager’s
Advanced tab with a wireless adapter in the Pocket PC,
you’ll see the screen shown here.
The Wireless tab displays the settings for the wireless
network, and the Network Adapters tab, which is the
same as described in the “Configure Network Interface
Adapters” section, has settings for the Ethernet network.
You will not see the Wireless tab if a wireless
adapter is not in the Pocket PC or if the
adapter’s driver is not designed for Windows Mobile 2003.
On the screen, you see a list of wireless networks, and a status indicator. You can connect
a Pocket PC only to one wireless network at a time, and other networks in range are listed as
Available. Unavailable networks are those networks that the Pocket PC previously connected to,
but are not within range. Wireless adapters can communicate only with networks that are within
100 meters.
To connect manually to an available wireless network, tap-and-hold on the network and
tap Connect on the pop-up menu. To remove a network, tap Remove Settings.
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For Connection Manager to configure the adapter for
wireless networks automatically, the access points on the
network must broadcast its SSID. For security reasons,
some networks may be configured not to broadcast the
SSID, in which case you must manually enter the
information to connect to the wireless network.
To add settings manually for a wireless network,
tap Add New Settings to open the screen at the right.
Enter the SSID or ESSID in the Network Name field.
Select which type of network, The Internet or Work, the
network connects to, and then tap the check box if you are
connecting directly to a PC instead of to an access point.
(See Table 19-5 for an explanation of these settings.)
Tap the Authentication tab to open this screen, where
you configure the adapter for the network’s security
settings (shown at bottom right).
If the network uses WEP, tap the Data Encryption
check box. If shared key authentication is being used,
tap Network Authentication (shared mode), and to use a
network key automatically, tap The Key Is Provided For
Me Automatically, or enter the network key.
Some wireless networks use an enhanced mode of
security called IEEE 802.1X, which uses the Extensible
Authentication Protocol (EAP). Windows Mobile 2003
supports two types of EAP: Transport Layer Security
(TLS) and Protected Extensible Authentication Protocol.
(PEAP). The 802.1X security uses a server to authenticate
users on a wireless network, and this is the method used
by some companies to secure their network.
If you are accessing a wireless network that uses
802.1X security, you will need to obtain a personal
certificate, which is used to identify who you are and
enable the security on your Pocket PC. Personal
certificates are encrypted files that contain information
about you and are stored in the Windows folder on your
Pocket PC. You can see what certificates are on a Pocket PC by tapping Start | Settings | System |
Certificates.
To enable 802.1X security, tap the Enable Network Access Using IEEE 802.1X check box
on the Authentication tab, and then select the EAP type in use on the network. Tap Properties
to see the information associated with your personal certificate.
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Use Network Adapters
After you configure the adapter driver for your network settings, you can insert the adapter into
the Pocket PC’s CompactFlash or Secure Digital slot. For wired Ethernet adapters, you’ll need
to connect an Ethernet cable to the card and the high-speed router or an Ethernet hub. Many
adapters have indicator lights that show whether a connection is available, and most routers and
hubs have similar indicators to show connections.
Windows Mobile 2003’s connection status icon
changes, as shown in Table 19-1, when you insert a
network adapter into the Pocket PC and it connects to
the network. To see information about the network
connection, tap the icon to open a notification bubble.
The notification bubble tells you what type of network
connection (Internet or Work) you have, and for wireless
networks it shows a graphical indication of the wireless
signal strength.
If the network adapter driver is configured correctly
for the network, you’ll be able to use Internet Explorer,
Inbox, MSN Messenger, Terminal Server Client, and File
Explorer to access resources on the Internet or the LAN.
You can also use ActiveSync to synchronize with desktop
computers. You may try to use ActiveSync and see the
following notification bubble (shown at top right).
If you never connect to a Work network using VPN,
you may wonder how you can synchronize with a PC on your home network. The message that
you see is confusing, because the problem is really that Connection Manager is not configured to
use the network card in the manner in which you are
trying to use it.
Table 19-2 shows that ActiveSync can use only a
Work network, so if you configure the network adapter to
connect to a Work network, ActiveSync will then be able
to synchronize with a PC. However, when you connect to
a Work network you cannot access the Internet unless
there is a proxy server on the network, and most home users
do not have a proxy server on their network. You can end
up constantly switching the network adapter between the
Internet and Work network settings.
Fortunately, there is a work around to this problem
in Windows Mobile 2003 that involves changing what
network’s Connection Manager uses for applications.
Tap Start | Settings | Connections | Connections, tap the
Advanced tab, and then tap Select Networks, which
opens the screen at bottom right.
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The first drop-down list on the screen specifies how applications automatically connect to
the Internet, and the second drop-down list specifies how applications connect to private (Work)
networks.
If you are connecting only to a home network, and you do not need to connect to a company
network by either dial-up or VPN, change the second drop-down field to My ISP, and then tap
OK. After you do this, the Tasks tab in Connection Manager displays only the My ISP settings,
and you can synchronize with PCs and connect to the Internet.
Because My Work Network is removed from Connection Manager, you do not have access to
the VPN or proxy server settings. If you need access to these, you can change both of the drop-down
lists on the Select Networks screen to My Work Network, with a few caveats.
First, when you tap the connection status icon, the notification bubble shows that you are
connected to the Internet even though you are really connected to a Work network. The notification
bubble also does not display a link for establishing a VPN connection, so you will need to go into
Connection Manager, tap Edit My VPN Servers, and then tap-and-hold on the VPN connection
and tap Connect on the pop-up menu. You must create all modem connections under My Work
Network, and if you have separate connections for an ISP and a Work network, you will have to
switch manually between the two by tapping-and-holding on the connection name.
Use Zero Configuration Wi-Fi
If you use a wireless Ethernet adapter and connect to many different networks, such as at home,
work, and a Wi-Fi hotspot, you will appreciate the new Wi-Fi zero configuration feature. Windows
Mobile 2003 automatically changes the wireless card settings when you move between networks.
Wi-Fi hotspots are public locations that provide wireless access to the Internet using
Wi-Fi. Some hotspots provide free access, while others charge a fee. To find a hotspot
see http://www.hotspotlist.com.
Because each network may have different SSID settings, you have to specify which settings
the adapter should use. In some cases, you have to change the information in several fields each
Troubleshoot Network Connections
One of the most important network troubleshooting tools for your Pocket PC is a free
program called vxUtil from Cambridge Computer Corporation. You can download this
program from http://www.cam.com/vxutil.html. If you have problems connecting to a
network, use the Info utility in vxUtil to review the IP address settings of the Pocket PC and
make sure they are correct. Use the Ping utility to test network communication between the
Pocket PC and a destination computer.
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time you want to connect to a different network. The software for some Wi-Fi cards simplifies
this by storing all the settings in a profile; you select which profile to use, and all the fields
change automatically.
Windows Mobile 2003 takes this one step further by automatically switching profiles. All you
do is plug the card into the Pocket PC, and if you previously connected to the network, Connection
Manager automatically selects the network settings. If Connection Manager does not find the
network information, it displays a notification bubble for you to provide the settings. After you
configure the wireless network settings for Windows Mobile 2003, you may never need to change
the wireless settings again.
Wrapping Up
Pocket PCs are capable of connecting to the Internet and LANs in a variety of ways. You use
Connection Manager to configure all modem connections, and it will automatically connect to
the appropriate network based on the type of information you enter. Connection Manager also
specifies whether network cards connect to the Internet or Work networks.
Wireless modems and network adapters are becoming the hottest accessories for Pocket PCs.
With these accessories, you can use your Pocket PC to connect to the Internet from any location
at any time.
Once you get connected to the Internet, you can send and receive e-mail using Inbox on the
Pocket PC. In the next chapter, you will learn how to use Inbox to send and receive e-mail using
Internet e-mail servers.
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E-Mail
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How to…
■
■
■
■
■
Create e-mail accounts that work with POP3 and IMAP4 servers
Synchronize e-mail messages with Microsoft Outlook
Compose, edit, and send new e-mail messages
Receive e-mail messages and reply to or forward messages
Manage file attachments
B
ack in 1992, people did not know much about the Internet unless they were in college, in
the military, or computer geeks. My, how things have changed! Today many people, even
people who don’t consider themselves “into computers,” not only know what the Internet is but
use it on a regular basis.
How do you use the Internet? Chances are good that you use e-mail to send messages to
friends and loved ones around the world. You probably surf the web to listen to music, check
stock prices or sports scores, buy CDs or books, and follow the news. Perhaps you make friends
by interacting with them in an online forum, or you keep in touch with other friends by using
instant messaging.
Regardless of how you use it, chances are also good that the Internet is becoming increasingly
important to you. E-mail might be the only way you communicate with coworkers, or perhaps you
make a living building websites for companies. As access to the Internet becomes more important,
many people are seeking ways to stay connected, wherever they may be.
For that task, Pocket PCs are well suited. The combination of their small size, software, and
their communications hardware makes it easy to get connected. Included with every device are
Inbox, a program that works with Internet e-mail servers, and Microsoft Outlook. In this chapter,
you learn how to use Inbox to send and receive e-mail. In Chapter 21 you learn how to send and
receive instant messages, and in Chapter 22 you learn how to browse websites.
Use Inbox to Work with E-Mail
One of the first acts of the new United States Congress in 1789 was to authorize a postal service,
creating 75 local post offices covering 1875 miles. The fact that one of the first acts of a new nation
was the establishment of a postal service highlights the importance of mail delivery at that time. As
the nation grew, mail became more important for communication. For example, the Pony Express is
credited with keeping California in the Union by providing rapid communication between the two
coasts.
In 1861, the Pony Express gave way to the telegraph, introducing technology as a means of
speeding communication. Ever since then, technology—from telephones to satellites—has been
used to speed communication around the world. In the 1990s, e-mail came into widespread use,
reducing the time it took to deliver messages around the world from days to seconds. Today we
are accustomed to writing a message, clicking a button, and expecting it to end up around the
world as soon as the button is released.
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As e-mail becomes more important, methods for sending and receiving e-mail, no matter where
we may be, also become important. Combined with the right communications equipment, small
Pocket PCs can be used to send and receive e-mail from your living room or the back seat of a taxi.
One of the reasons why you bought your Pocket PC might have been to send and receive
e-mail. In this chapter, I show you how to use Inbox to work with your e-mail. You will learn
how to set up Inbox to access Internet mail servers and then retrieve e-mail from those servers.
You’ll also learn how to compose and send a message and how to handle file attachments.
Inbox has dual roles: one is as a client to Microsoft Outlook, and the other is as an Internet
e-mail client. Unfortunately, while these dual roles provide flexibility, they also add complexity.
I will clarify these roles so that you can choose the best method for working with your e-mail.
E-mail and traditional mail share a few common aspects. To receive mail, the post office
needs to know your address. When someone sends you a card, he or she writes your address,
which includes a postal code, on the envelope. In the United States, the postal, or ZIP, code on
the card is used to route it to your state, city, and, finally, post office. Once at the post office, a
person determines its final location by using the street address of the post office box number.
The equivalent of a post office for e-mail is a mail server, which has a name that looks
something like this: mail.acme.com. Just as you must register your address with the post office to
receive mail, you need a mailbox registered at a mail server to receive e-mail. Usually, a mailbox
is associated with a user ID, such as frank.
Internet e-mail addresses have a defined format, interpreted the same way by all mail servers.
The address starts with the user ID, followed by the at (@) sign, and then followed by a domain
name—for example, [email protected] Each of these parts is used by mail servers to send and
receive e-mail.
Conceptually, corporate e-mail addresses are similar to Internet e-mail addresses, but
they may use a different format.
Most post offices have a front and back entrance, with the front being where mail enters the
office and the back being where mail leaves the office. E-mail is similar because two servers are
involved in the process: one receives e-mail and the other sends e-mail.
The servers that receive e-mail are called POP3 (Post Office Protocol) or IMAP4 (Internet
Mail Access Protocol) hosts because of the protocols that they use. Because mailboxes reside on
these servers, they are often simply referred to as mail servers. Servers that send e-mail are called
SMTP (Simple Mail Transport Protocol) hosts—because they use the SMTP protocol.
E-mail clients, such as Windows Mobile 2003’s Inbox, are designed to work with both servers.
When you send an e-mail message using Inbox, it transfers the message to an SMTP host. The SMTP
host first uses the domain name portion of the e-mail address to contact a Domain Name Server
(DNS) and obtain the TCP/IP address of the mail server. Once the SMTP host has the TCP/IP address,
it contacts the mail server and tells it that it has a message for the user ID. The mail server determines
whether a mailbox exists for the user ID, and if it does, it then accepts the message. If a mailbox does
not exist, the SMTP server will return the message to the sender’s mail server.
Inbox receives e-mail by logging in to the mail server and downloading the messages to the
device. As you will see later in this section, Inbox can be configured to download only message
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headers or entire messages. Downloading message headers provides you with enough information
to determine whether you want to download the entire message to your device. With that information,
you can decide to skip certain messages that you don’t want to read, saving the time it would
otherwise take to download the entire contents of that message.
Start Inbox
The process for starting Inbox on a Pocket PC depends
on how the Start menu is configured. By default, you start
Inbox by tapping Start | Inbox. However, if the menu has
been changed, Inbox may be under Programs, in which
case you tap Start | Programs | Inbox.
When Inbox starts, the program window shown to the
right will display.
At the bottom of the window is the command bar, with
two menu options and two buttons. Above the command bar
is a status bar that displays the name of the account, the total
number of items in the folder, and the number of unread
items in the folder.
On Pocket PC 2002 you see a Services menu
instead of an Accounts menu. Windows Mobile
2003 changes the name of Services to Accounts.
This shows the name
of the current account.
In the middle of the screen is the list of messages stored
in a folder. Use the Show Accounts drop-down list in the
upper-left corner, shown here, to select the account and folder that you want to display.
The name of the open folder displays at the top.
To change the order of the message list,
expand the Sort drop-down list in the upper-right
corner. The items can be sorted on From, Received
Date, or Subject, and the field currently used for
Select an
the sort is displayed at the top. To switch between
account
ascending and descending order, repeat the
and folder
selection of the sort field.
from here.
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For example, the message list shown here is sorted by
From in descending order.
To sort the message list in ascending order, select From
in the Sort drop-down list a second time.
Add Internet E-Mail Accounts
To send and receive e-mail, Inbox must communicate with
POP3 or IMAP4 servers and SMTP servers, and to do that
you must provide Inbox with information about those servers.
That information is stored in an account.
One of the first things that you need to do to use Inbox
is add an account. To do that, you will need the following
information about your mail servers, which your Internet
Service Provider (ISP) can provide:
■ The account type, which is the type of mail server that you use to receive e-mail.
This will be either IMAP4 or POP3.
■ A connection, which is used to connect to your ISP. The process for creating a connection
on Pocket PCs is explained in Chapter 19.
■ The host or server name, which is the name of the server from which you receive e-mail.
■ A user ID, which is used to log in to the mail server. Typically, this is the same user ID
that you use to connect to your ISP.
■ A password is also used to log in to the mail server. This may also be the same password
that you use to connect to your ISP.
■ If you are connecting to a network that uses Windows NT domain security, you will need
the name of the domain. You will not need this for most Internet accounts.
■ The SMTP host or server name, which is the name of the server used to send e-mail.
■ Your e-mail address, which will look similar to this: [email protected]
Another source for information about mail servers is Chris De Herrera’s ISP FAQ at
http://www.cewindows.net/wce/isp.htm.
After you gather this information, you are ready to start Inbox, create an account, and start
sending and receiving e-mail.
To add an account on a Pocket PC, tap Accounts | New Accounts. The first E-mail Setup
screen displays. You use five screens for setting up an e-mail account. On the first screen, enter
your e-mail address and tap Next.
On the next screen you see a feature of Inbox introduced in Pocket PC 2002, called Auto
configuration. Auto configuration connects to the Internet and then uses the e-mail address you
enter to try and retrieve mail server names. The Pocket PC first checks a database on Microsoft’s
servers for the information, and if there is no match it attempts to retrieve the information from
the e-mail service provider.
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Connect to Multiple E-Mail Services
with One Call
When you connect to an ISP from within Inbox, you can connect with only one mail server
at a time. If you have multiple e-mail accounts and want to check e-mail on all of them using
Inbox, you must disconnect and end the call before connecting to another account, even if the
second account is configured to use the same dial-up connection.
This can be expensive when you are charged for each call that you make. Fortunately,
there is a workaround for this problem. The trick is not to use Inbox to connect with the ISP,
and instead connect using Connection Manager. Chapter 19 has instructions for creating
modem connections in Connection Manager. Tap the Windows Mobile 2003 connection
status icon and then tap the name of the network connection you want to use.
After the connection is established, switch to Inbox and tap Send And Receive to connect
to the mail server and retrieve e-mail. To check other e-mail accounts, first disconnect by
tapping the Connect toolbar button, and this time Inbox will not disconnect the call. Select
the second e-mail service and then tap the Send And Receive toolbar button. If you see a
dialog box asking if you can access the mail server using the current connection, tap Yes, and
Inbox will then connect to the account and retrieve the e-mail. To disconnect the call, tap the
Connect icon on the command bar and then tap Disconnect.
While this process works for receiving e-mail, you may experience problems sending
e-mail. Some ISPs do not allow you to use their SMTP servers unless you connect to their
service. If that is the case, you will need to connect to the ISP to send e-mail, or find an
SMTP server that can be accessed from any ISP.
Your Pocket PC will need to connect to the Internet for
Auto configuration to work. Therefore, if you connect
by modem you will want to plug in the modem before
executing this step. If you forget to attach the modem
before accessing this screen, you can tap Back to
return to the previous screen, attach the modem, and
then tap Next.
When Auto configuration completes, the status changes to
Completed, and you can tap Next to go to the next step. On the
third e-mail setup screen, shown here, enter the name you want
displayed on the messages you send, along with your mail
server user ID and password.
Tap the Save Password check box if you want Inbox not
to prompt you to enter your password each time you retrieve
e-mail. Be careful with this feature; if you save the password,
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anyone who has access to your Pocket PC may be able to
send and receive your e-mail. If you choose to save the
password, you might consider password protecting the
password by using the Password setting, as described in
Chapter 3.
On the fourth e-mail setup screen, select the type of mail
server that you will use to receive e-mail in the Account Type
drop-down list. The options are POP3 or IMAP4. Enter a name
in the Name field and tap Next.
The fifth and final e-mail setup screen, shown to the right,
provides fields for entering the names of the incoming (POP3
or IMAP4) mail server and outgoing (SMTP) mail server.
These fields may already be populated if Auto configuration
found a match when it connected to the Internet. Otherwise,
enter the names for the mail servers in the fields on the
screen. If you are connecting to a network that uses Windows NT domain security, enter the
domain name in the Domain field. Normally you will leave this field blank.
If you are using MSN’s e-mail servers, you must enter MSN in the Domain field.
Tap the Options button to configure additional settings that
control how the e-mail service communicates with the mail
server. Three option screens appear. On the first option screen,
shown to the right, you can specify how often Inbox will check
for new mail and how the account connects to the Internet.
You should leave the Connection field set to The Internet,
unless the e-mail account is for a corporate e-mail server,
in which case you want to change the field to Work.
If you are using MSN’s e-mail servers, you must check
the Outgoing E-mail Server Requires Authentication
check box in the second options screen.
On the second options screen, you can specify whether
the outgoing (SMTP) e-mail server requires authentication,
whether a Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) connection is required,
and how many days of messages Inbox should display. While several different methods of SMTP
authentication are available, Inbox uses only the POP server username and password. If your
SMTP server requires a different username and password, you will need to use a third-party
e-mail program.
On the third and final options screen, you specify whether Inbox retrieves only message
headers or entire messages. If you select message headers, you can specify how much of the
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message the service will retrieve along with the headers. If you are creating an IMAP4 e-mail
account, you’ll see an additional setting on this screen to specify whether the service downloads
attachments when getting full copies of messages. You can specify the maximum-size attachment
the service will download. Tap Finish to save the e-mail service.
Edit and Remove Accounts
To change an account that has already been created, tap Accounts |
Accounts to display the Options dialog box shown here.
Tap a name in the Accounts list to open the E-mail Setup
screen. To delete an account, tap-and-hold a name in the
Accounts list and select Delete from the pop-up menu.
Synchronize E-Mail with Outlook
You may have noticed that one of the Inbox accounts is
ActiveSync. It is not listed as an account when you tap Accounts |
Accounts, but it is visible in the Accounts drop-down list of the
Inbox list view. This account is built in to Inbox and cannot be
removed, but you can control whether it is used.
The purpose of the ActiveSync account is to synchronize
e-mail messages between the Inbox folder in Outlook and the
Pocket PC’s Inbox. With this feature, you can download e-mail to
your device and then take it with you to read. You can reply to messages offline or create new
messages, which will then synchronize to Outlook during the next ActiveSync session. Once in
Outlook, the messages are sent using Outlook’s e-mail connectivity.
E-mail synchronization has one significant limitation: you can synchronize e-mail only with
the first partnership you create with the Pocket PC. If you have already created a partnership
between the Pocket PC and a desktop computer, and you want to synchronize e-mail with a
different desktop, you will have to delete the first partnership.
Inbox synchronization works with serial, infrared, Bluetooth, network, and modem
connections. It can also be the only way to send e-mail using Microsoft Exchange server,
unless you use Exchange’s server ActiveSync or Internet support or an intermediary server
such as XTNDConnect Server from Extended Systems. If the Exchange server is configured
to support the Internet mail protocols, you can use an Internet e-mail account with Exchange,
which you create as described earlier in this chapter. Chapter 16 has more information about
using Pocket PCs with Exchange.
Set Up Inbox Synchronization
To use e-mail synchronization, you must enable the Inbox synchronization option in ActiveSync.
Start ActiveSync and then tap the Options toolbar button, or select Tools | Options. The Options
dialog box shown next will display.
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Turn on synchronization by checking
the box next to Inbox, as shown in the
illustration. Chapter 6 provides instructions
for configuring the Inbox synchronization
settings.
Use Inbox
Synchronization
This box must
be checked to
enable Inbox
synchronization.
Inbox synchronization
works the same way it
does for calendar,
contacts, and tasks. When you connect a
Pocket PC to the desktop computer, as
described in Chapter 5, ActiveSync
compares the contents of the device and
PC and synchronizes the changes. In the
end, both will have the same items. Of
course, if you configure ActiveSync to
synchronize only a limited number of
messages, Inbox will not contain
everything in Outlook.
Only Outlook’s Inbox root folder and subfolders synchronize. Messages that you write and
send before synchronizing appear in the Outbox but are moved to Outlook during synchronization
and then removed from the Outbox. Deleted items work in the same way. During synchronization,
messages are removed from the Deleted Items folder on the Pocket PC and the message is deleted
from Outlook. The contents of the Drafts and Sent Items folders on the Pocket PC do not
synchronize with Outlook.
Inbox synchronization does not control the number of messages that appear in
subfolders. All messages in Outlook Inbox subfolders will synchronize with the Pocket
PC, regardless of the setting for the root Inbox folder.
All Outlook Inbox subfolders appear on the Pocket PC, but you must specify which of those
folders synchronize by configuring the ActiveSync options on the desktop computer. Messages
that you move to synchronizing subfolders will appear on both the Pocket PC and the desktop
computer. However, if you move a message on the Pocket PC to a subfolder that is not synchronizing,
the message will be moved to the subfolder on the desktop computer but will not appear in that
subfolder on the Pocket PC.
The process of composing, reading, and responding to e-mail is the same for the ActiveSync
service as it is for Internet mail services, which is described in the rest of this section.
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Manage Synchronized E-Mail
If you use Pocket PC 2002, you may notice that e-mail that you delete from Outlook is not
removed from your Pocket PC during synchronization. When you move an e-mail to a folder
in Outlook that you do not synchronize with your Pocket PC and that e-mail has already been
synchronized with Inbox on Pocket PC 2002, the e-mail remains on the Pocket PC.
When you delete an e-mail in Outlook, it is moved to the Deleted Items subfolder until
you manually clear the Deleted Items folder or unless you’ve configured Outlook to empty
Deleted Items when you shut down. After you empty the Deleted Items folder, any
synchronized e-mail will then be deleted.
There is a bug with Pocket PC 2002’s e-mail synchronization, where synchronized items kept
in the same Outlook data file, regardless of what folder they are in, are not removed from the
Pocket PC. This is why synchronized items that you move to Outlook Inbox subfolders are not
provided from Pocket PC 2002’s Inbox. To keep e-mail in Outlook and remove it from Pocket PC
2002, create a second Personal Folders File (tap File | New | Personal Folders), create a folder in
the second Personal Folders File, and then move the synchronized item to that folder.
The good news is that this bug is fixed with Windows Mobile 2003. Synchronized e-mail
in Windows Mobile 2003 is removed from the Pocket PC as soon as you delete or move the
e-mail to a subfolder.
Send and Receive E-Mail
While you can send and receive e-mail using Inbox synchronization, the only way to update your
e-mail is to connect the device with a desktop computer, unless you use remote synchronization.
While synchronization works, it may not be very functional. On the other hand, you can use an
Internet e-mail service anywhere by using a modem or wireless connection.
Synchronize with Outlook Express
Many people have asked me how to synchronize their Pocket PC with Microsoft Outlook
Express. Most are amazed to learn that ActiveSync does not support this Microsoft product.
If you want to synchronize Inbox with Outlook Express, you need SyncExpress, which you
will find at http://www.syncdata.it. SyncExpress adds an Outlook Express information type
to ActiveSync and synchronizes e-mail and addresses. Outlook Express’s Address Book
synchronizes with Contacts on the Pocket PC.
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If you use server ActiveSync and have access to that server from the Internet, you can
synchronize e-mail with an Exchange server using any Internet connection. Chapter 6
provides more information about server ActiveSync.
Before you send and receive e-mail, you must create an Internet e-mail account, as described
earlier in this chapter. If you have more than one Internet e-mail account, select the one you want
to use from the Accounts drop-down list.
You can send and receive e-mail by using either a modem or a network connection. If you
are using a modem connection, connect the device to the modem and plug in a phone line. For a
network connection, insert a wired or wireless Ethernet
adapter. Next, start Inbox and tap the Send And Receive
button on the toolbar. The following illustration shows
Send And Receive button
the Send And Receive button on a Pocket PC.
If you are using a modem connection, Inbox will display the Network Logon dialog box for
the connection that you assigned to the service. Enter a username and password if they are not
already provided, and tap OK. The modem will then dial the number of the connection and log
on to the network. The Network Logon dialog box will close and you will start to see messages
displayed on the status bar.
If a network card is plugged in to the device, Inbox will use it to communicate with the
mail servers and will not open the Network Logon dialog box.
First, Inbox will open a transmit port with the SMTP host to send e-mail, and then it will open
a receive port with the POP3 or IMAP4 host to receive e-mail. Once these ports are established,
Inbox will first send any e-mail waiting to be sent, and it will then start downloading messages.
While the messages download, the status bar shows how many messages are on the server and
how many have download to the Pocket PC. In a process similar to ActiveSync, Inbox synchronizes
messages with the mail server so that they both contain the same items. If a message has already
been downloaded, it will not be downloaded again; if a message on the device is no longer on the
server, it will be removed on the Pocket PC.
By default, Inbox does not automatically delete e-mail
from the server. When you delete a message in Inbox, the
message moves to the Deleted Items folder. You can open the
Deleted Items folder, select the messages, and delete them
again, and the messages will then be deleted from the server.
You can simplify this manual deletion process by configuring
Inbox to delete messages automatically. Tap Tools | Options and
then tap the Message tab, as shown right.
Change the selection of the Empty Deleted Items field to
On Connect/Disconnect or Immediately.
You can download a fresh copy of all messages from a server
by clearing them from the Pocket PC, by tapping Accounts | Clear
[account name] (where [account name] is the account name on
the status bar) and then tapping the Send And Receive button.
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Send and Receive E-Mail Using
Other Programs
Inbox is a functional e-mail program, but you may find that it does not meet your needs—or
maybe you would prefer to use a different program. Two other e-mail programs work with
POP mail servers and run on Pocket PCs. One is nPOP by Tomoaki Nakashima and the other
is @Mail from Web Information Solutions, Inc.
Unlike Inbox, nPOP supports multiple e-mail accounts on a single Internet connection,
and it supports signatures. Inbox on Pocket PC 2002 and Windows Mobile 2003 do not support
SMTP authentication, so nPOP is a workaround because it supports SMTP authentication
and POP after SMTP. Unfortunately, nPOP does not work with Contacts, so you have to enter
e-mail addresses in a separate address book. You can download English and Japanese versions
of this program at http://www.nakka.com/soft/npop/index_eng.html.
Web Information Solutions’ @Mail uses the same software as Pocket PC 2002 and
Windows Mobile 2003’s Inbox, so it has the same limitations for SMTP authentication.
However, it can display HTML e-mail and also provides e-mail signatures for Pocket PC
2002. You can download @Mail from http://www.pocketinformant.com.
After all of the messages download, the status bar will display the folder name (Inbox) and
the total number of items and unread items. Inbox will disconnect the call if you configured the
service to do so; otherwise, it will remain connected. If a new message arrives while the device
is connected, Inbox will notify you. You will see a notification bubble or hear a sound, unless
notification sounds are turned off. If while connected you want to force Inbox to check for
messages, tap the Send And Receive button.
Compose a New E-Mail
Message
An e-mail message can be written at
any time, even if the device is not connected
to the Internet. When the device is not
online, the message is stored in the Outbox
folder—where it will stay until the next time
you connect with a mail server. Inbox
retrieves the e-mail addresses that are stored
in Contacts and makes them available for
use when creating a message.
To create a new message on a
Pocket PC, tap New to open the dialog
box shown here.
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Tap here to expand
the message header.
Tap here to open
the address book.
Tap here to make
a voice recording.
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The To field is highlighted, ready for you to enter the e-mail address of the person receiving
the message. E-mail addresses stored in Contacts can be retrieved for use in this field either by
selecting the address or searching for the address.
You can also create new e-mail messages directly from Contacts. Tap-and-hold an item
in the Contacts List view and then tap Send E-mail on the pop-up menu. You can also
tap a contact’s e-mail address on the Contact Summary tab.
Tap the Address Book button on the command bar to display a list of all contacts with e-mail
addresses. To search for an address, enter the first few letters of the person’s name in the search
box. As you enter letters, the list is filtered to display only the contacts containing the letters you
type. Tap the addresses you want, and they will be entered in the To field. If you select multiple
addresses, each will be entered in the field, separated by a semicolon. Tap the Address Book
button to close the address list.
Windows Mobile 2003 allows only semicolons as separators in e-mail addresses. Pocket
PC 2002 allows both semicolons and commas.
Enter a subject for the message in the Subj field. To send a carbon copy or a blind carbon
copy to another person, expand the message header by tapping the down arrow to the right of the
subject line. The message header expands to display the CC, BCC, and Account fields. Enter an
e-mail address in either the CC or BCC fields by using one of the methods described earlier.
The last line of the message header shows the e-mail account that will be used to send the
message. If you want to select a different account, tap the account name and select one from the
drop-down list. When you send the message, it will be stored in the Outbox folder of the service
that you select. To collapse the message header, tap the up arrow to the right of the Account field.
To send a reply to a synchronized e-mail message by using a modem instead of
synchronization, change the service for the message from ActiveSync either to a POP3
or an IMAP4 account.
The body of the message is immediately below the subject
line. To compose the message, tap the empty middle pane of the
window and begin entering text using the soft input panel or
onscreen keyboard. The My Text menu provides a way to insert
text quickly into a message. When you tap My Text, a menu
expands with nine messages, as shown here.
The My Text menu contains the same entries for Inbox
and MSN Messenger. If you change a My Text menu item
in Inbox, that change is available in MSN Messenger.
Tap a message to insert
the text into the e-mail.
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You can change the phrases that are in the My Text menu
by tapping Edit | Edit My Text Messages, to open the screen
shown here.
Tap a message in the list and edit it in the field at the
bottom of the screen.
The Edit menu contains commands—such as Copy, Cut,
Paste, Clear, and Select All—that you can use to edit the
message. These same options become available when you
tap-and-hold on selected text.
To check the spelling of an e-mail message, tap Edit | Spell
Check. To confirm e-mail addresses, tap Edit | Check Names.
Check Names will verify e-mail addresses using Contacts and
the mail servers that you specify by tapping Tools | Options |
Address. You can also address a message by simply entering
part of a contact’s name in the To, CC, or BCC field and then
tapping Edit | Check Names. You can then select addresses from a list that displays.
To change the character set for a message, tap Edit | Language and then select the
character set.
If you want to add an attachment to the message, tap Edit | Add Attachment to open the Open
dialog box. Listed in the dialog box are all the files stored in the My Documents folder. Use the
Folder drop-down list to switch to a different folder. While the Type drop-down list is shown in
Use E-Mail Signatures with Windows
Mobile 2003
Windows Mobile 2003’s Inbox supports e-mail signatures,
which are predefined lines of text, such as your name, that
is automatically inserted at the end of each e-mail that you
write. To create a signature, tap Tools | Options | Signatures.
You can create different signatures for each account. First,
select the account from the drop-down list, tap the Use
Signature With This Account check box, and then enter
the signature text as shown here:
Signatures will be inserted only in new e-mail messages
unless you select the Use When Replying And Forwarding
check box.
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the dialog box, you cannot select anything but All Files.
Tap the name of the file to attach and it will be added to
the message, as shown here.
The Record command button enables you to create
voice recordings and automatically attach them to
e-mail messages.
If you want to save the message that you are creating without
sending it, tap OK and the message will be placed in the Drafts
folder. If you want to cancel and delete the message, tap Edit |
Cancel Message. When you are ready to send the message, tap
Send and the message will be placed in the Outbox folder.
The message will be sent and removed from the Outbox
folder the next time you use the account to send and receive
e-mail. If the message is composed for the ActiveSync service,
during the next synchronization it will be moved from the Outbox folder on the device to the Outbox
folder in Outlook. From there, how the message will be sent depends on how Outlook is configured.
Pocket PC 2000 stores draft messages in the Inbox folder.
Read and Respond to E-Mail
New mail is written to the service’s Inbox folder and appears
in the message list. Messages that have not been read are in
boldface, and messages that have been read are in a normal
typeface. To open a message, tap its entry in the message list
and the message will open, as shown here.
Inbox opens most HTML e-mail messages as
plain-text. However, some HTML messages may be
too complicated and won’t appear as designed on
the Pocket PC.
To move to the preceding message in the list, tap the up
arrow on the toolbar; tap the down arrow to move to the next
message. If the current message is at the top or bottom of the
list, you will return to the message list. Tap the Delete button
to delete the message that is currently open, and the next
message will display. Tap the Action button to Forward,
Forward, Reply All, or Reply
Reply All, or Reply to the message.
Delete the message
When you tap Reply, a new message is created with the
To field already filled with the e-mail address of the person who sent you the original message.
The contents of the original message are inserted into the new message and the cursor is placed
at the top. Enter the text of the reply and tap the Send button.
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Reply All also creates a new message and fills the To field
with the e-mail address of the person who sent the original
message. However, if the original message contained any carbon
copies or other recipients, the additional addresses are added to
the carbon copy line of the reply.
You can configure Inbox so that it does not insert the
original message in replies. On a Pocket PC, tap Tools |
Options, and then open the Message tab, as shown here.
To stop inserting the text, clear the When Replying,
Include Body check box. When the text is inserted, it will be
indented unless you clear the Indent check box. Each line of
the inserted text will contain a leading character that you specify
unless you clear the Add Leading Character check box. These
options do not affect message forwarding, which will always
include the contents of the original message.
Manage Messages
Folders are valuable for organizing and storing many messages, and you can create folders for all
e-mail accounts except ActiveSync. Unfortunately, Inbox does not have the message filter capabilities
that you find in Outlook, but you can create folders and manually store messages in them.
While Pocket PC 2002 and Windows Mobile 2003 support subfolder synchronization, they do not
allow you to create subfolders for ActiveSync on the device. Instead, you have to create subfolders on
a desktop computer and then set up that folder for synchronization. Pocket PC 2000 does not support
subfolder synchronization, but it does allow you to create subfolders for the ActiveSync service.
Use Web-Based E-Mail Services
Another alternative to Inbox is a web-based e-mail service. The challenge in using such
services with Pocket PCs is finding one that formats e-mail for the Pocket PC’s screen. I
have found three services that work well with Pocket PCs. One is Yahoo! Mobile, which
requires a Yahoo! ID. You can access Yahoo! Mobile from your desktop computer at
http://mobile.yahoo.com or from your Pocket PC at http://www.wap.oa.yahoo.com. MSN
Mobile is available at http://www.mobile.msn.com/pocketpc and provides online access to
Hotmail.
The services provided by Yahoo! and MSN provide their own e-mail addresses. Gopher
King, at http://www.gopherking.com, is different because it provides access only to existing
e-mail accounts. It uses SSL to secure communications and assists in setting up e-mail access
to many popular ISPs, including AOL. Gopher King supports POP3 and IMAP4 servers, and
it also provides many other services such as newsgroups and instant messaging.
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Create, Rename, and Delete Folders
Folder management is simplified to one screen with Pocket PC
2002 and Windows Mobile 2003. To create, rename, or delete
folders, tap Tools | Manage Folders to open this screen.
To create a folder, first select a location within the folder
hierarchy on the screen and then tap New. Enter a name for the
new folder and tap OK.
The folders that you see on the Manage Folders
screen are for the active e-mail account.
To rename a folder, select it in the folder hierarchy, tap
Rename, and then enter a new name in the Rename Folder dialog
box. Delete a selected folder by tapping the Delete button on the
command bar. The folder and its contents will be deleted.
Tap here to delete a folder.
If you create a folder within Deleted Items and then
delete that folder, it will not be removed from the Manage Folders screen immediately.
However, if you close Manage Folders and open it again, you will find that the folder
is no longer available.
Move and Copy Messages
Because Inbox does not provide filtering capabilities, you must manually move or copy messages
from the main message list to a folder. When you move a message to a subfolder in the ActiveSync
service, the message will appear in the destination folder in Outlook. If the destination subfolder is set
up for synchronization, you will see the message at both locations. However, if the subfolder does not
synchronize, it appears only on the desktop computer. When you move messages associated with
Internet services, they are not deleted from mail servers.
To move a message, tap-and-hold on the message and tap Move in the pop-up menu. Select
the destination folder and tap OK. To move an open message, tap Edit | Move To, select the
destination folder, and tap OK.
Download a Full Copy of a Message
One of the Inbox preferences allows the Pocket PC to download only message headers and a
specified number of lines. You may decide while reading a truncated message that you want to
retrieve a full copy. You can tell Inbox to download a full copy of the message during the next
connection with the mail server.
To download a full copy of an open message, tap Edit | Mark For Download. You can also
tap-and-hold on a message header, and then tap Mark For Download on the pop-up menu.
If you later decide not to download the entire message, tap-and-hold on the message
header, and then tap Do Not Download.
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Check Inbox Status
Most of the time, you will use Inbox while it is not connected. During that time, you will compose
new messages or delete messages. You may also request that Inbox get a full copy of a message.
The Status dialog box shows you the actions that are queued up for the next connection.
The status information is for the current service. To see the status of another service,
select it and open the Status dialog box.
To open the Status dialog box, tap Tools | Status, and this
screen displays.
Manage Attachments
Attachments are handled differently by POP3 and IMAP4
services. If a POP3 service is configured to get only message
headers, it will insert “[Message truncated. Tap Edit->Mark for
Download to get remaining portion.]” at the bottom of messages
that contain an attachment. To download the attachment to
your Pocket PC, you will need to mark the message for
download and then reconnect to the mail server. If the
POP3 service is configured to get full copies of messages,
attachments automatically download to the Pocket PC.
Embedded images and OLE objects cannot be
received as attachments.
IMAP4 services always indicate an attachment with an icon at the bottom of the message,
in its own window pane, even if the attachment has not been downloaded. This icon indicates
that the attachment still needs to be downloaded.
This icon indicates that the attachment is on the Pocket PC.
Both POP3 and IMAP4 e-mail services indicate that a message contains an attachment
in the Inbox List view with an icon of an envelope with a paperclip.
IMAP4 services provide two ways to download attachments. One is to configure the service
to download attachments when retrieving full copies, and the second is to request a specific
attachment by tapping its icon.
Inbox automatically converts Word and Excel documents to the Pocket formats. You can
purchase Westtek’s ClearVue, which is available from http://www.westtek.com/clearvue.htm,
to open Word, Excel, and PowerPoint attachments in their native formats.
One of the problems with file attachments is their size, and if you download many messages
with attachments, the internal storage space on your Pocket PC can be quickly used up. Fortunately,
you can configure Inbox to put attachments on a storage card. To configure a Pocket PC to write
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attachments to a storage card, tap Tools | Options, and then tap the Storage tab, and select the Store
Attachments On Storage Card check box.
Receive Meeting Requests
Pocket Outlook treats appointments, meetings, and events differently. Appointments are activities
that you schedule in Calendar that don’t involve inviting people. A meeting is an appointment to
which you invite someone, and an event is an activity that lasts 24 hours or longer. Sending and
receiving meeting requests involves integration between the Calendar and Inbox programs. The
process for sending a meeting request is covered in “Schedule Appointments Using Calendar”
in Chapter 8.
If you synchronize Inbox messages with Outlook, you will automatically receive meeting
requests. To receive meeting requests using an Internet service, the mail server must be running
Microsoft Exchange server. The Exchange server must use Rich Text Format and Transport
Neutral Encapsulation Format (TNEF).
TNEF is a Microsoft proprietary method for packaging information to send across the
Internet. If it is enabled, you will not receive messages that are included in other messages as
attachments, and you will not be able to tell whether a message has an attachment until you get
the full copy.
Meeting requests appear on Pocket PCs as attachments, and therefore you must either
manually or automatically download full copies of the e-mail to open them. When you receive
a meeting request, tap Appointment and then select Accept, Tentative, or Decline. The response
will be sent during the next synchronization, or connection with mail servers, and the appointment
is added to the Calendar.
Find Messages
As described earlier, Inbox folders are useful for separating and storing e-mail messages.
Unfortunately, Inbox does not provide a way to move messages to folders automatically, which
would make the process for finding messages easier. However, you can search for messages, and
if you search on the same sending address, they will all appear in one list.
To search for a message on a Pocket PC, use the Find utility, which is used to search for any
information on the device. Tap Start | Find; enter a name, e-mail address, or phrase in the Find
field; select Inbox from the Type drop-down list; and then tap Go. The results are displayed in
the dialog box. To open a message, tap it in the list.
Wrapping Up
Your Pocket PC has all the tools you need for sending and receiving e-mail to family, friends,
and coworkers. Inbox works with standard POP3 and IMAP4 e-mail servers and synchronizes
with Microsoft Outlook. Instant Messaging is another popular form of communicating over the
Internet, and in the next chapter you will learn how to use Pocket PC programs to chat via MSN,
Yahoo!, and AOL.
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How to…
■
■
■
■
Send and receive instant messages using MSN Messenger
Send and receive instant messages using AOL Instant Messenger
Send and receive instant messages using ICQ
Use imov Messenger with all instant messaging services
I
nstant messaging is the CB radio of the Internet. If you are too young to remember, CB
(citizens band) radios provide two-way voice communication, and they were popular in the
mid ’70s. The pop song “Convoy” by C.W. McCall shows how CB radios were popular among
truck drivers at the time.
CB radios can be used to communicate with other people who have the same radios, whether
you are at home, in a vehicle, or walking around. The radios use airwave frequencies that are
unlicensed, so unlike phone calls, you don’t have to pay for the conversations. Today, most CB
radios have been replaced by mobile phones; however, the spirit of free, two-way conversation
lives on in the form of instant messaging on the Internet.
In 1996, a small Israeli company called Mirabilis Ltd. created ICQ, which stands for I Seek
You. It was the first of what is now called instant messaging software. Using an instant messaging
program, you can see whether your friends are connected to the Internet, and if so, send them
text messages. Instant messaging is faster than e-mail, because you know the recipient is online
to receive your message.
All of the popular instant messaging programs are available for free, so, like CB radios, you
can use them to communicate with people across great distances for free. As CB radios provide
mobile communication, so do Pocket PCs, which run all the popular instant messaging programs,
and they can connect to the Internet from nearly anywhere. In this chapter, you’ll learn how to
use instant messaging programs on Pocket PCs.
Send and Receive Instant Messages
Using MSN Messenger
The Microsoft Network (MSN) Instant Messenger is installed
in ROM on most Pocket PC 2002 and Windows Mobile 2003
devices, or it can be installed in RAM on Pocket PCs with
Pocket PC 2002 after it’s downloaded from http://www
.pocketpc.com.
Before you can use MSN Messenger, you’ll need to create a
Hotmail or Passport account. Hotmail is a free web-based e-mail
system; you can create a new account at http://www.hotmail
.com. If you don’t want to use the Hotmail e-mail service,
you can create a Passport account at http://www.passport.com.
After you create either a Hotmail or Passport account,
configure MSN Messenger to use the account by tapping
Tools | Options, and then tap the Accounts tab, as shown
in the image.
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Select the MSN Messenger Service check box, even if you are using a Hotmail account. In the
Sign In Name field, enter the full e-mail address, such as [email protected], and enter the
password in the Password field. Tap OK to close the dialog box and save the account information.
Microsoft Exchange Server provides an Exchange Instant Messaging service that supports
instant messages using the MSN Messenger client. Some corporations use this service to
provide instant messaging within their private network. Pocket PCs can also work with
Exchange Instant Messaging if you select the Enable Exchange Account check box and
provide the required login information.
Send and Receive Messages
To use MSN Messenger, you must connect your Pocket PC to the Internet. MSN Messenger
automatically uses the default Internet modem connection that you set up in Connection Manager,
or it uses a network card if one is available. Chapter 19 provides the instructions for creating
modem connections in Connection Manager.
MSN Messenger also works with ActiveSync Desktop Pass Through, which is described
in Chapter 19.
When you start MSN Messenger, you’ll see the opening screen. Tap the middle of the screen
to sign in to the MSN Messenger server. You can also sign in by tapping Tools | Sign In. When
you do, you’ll see this sign-in screen:
If you configured MSN Messenger with a Hotmail or Passport account, that information will
already appear on the screen, or you can enter it on the screen and tap Save Password to save the
account and password. Tap Sign In to connect to the server.
To sign out from MSN Messenger, tap Tools | Sign Out.
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All your MSN Messenger contacts are stored on the Messenger server, and you will see all of
your contacts that are online or not online in the main program window, as shown in the following
image:
This contact is away
from his desk
These contacts are online.
These contacts
are not online.
To send a message to a contact that is online, tap the contact name to open the following
screen:
Enter messages here.
Enter a message and tap Send. The message that you enter moves to the top of the screen, which
is where you will also see any replies from the person you are chatting with.
You can also tap-and-hold on the contact name and then tap Send An Instant Message
on the pop-up list. To send an e-mail message, tap-and-hold on the contact name and
tap Send Mail on the pop-up list. You can send e-mail to online and offline contacts.
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You can chat with more than one person by using the Chat
menu to switch among people. However, each chat is in a
separate window, and you cannot participate in conference
chats. If you receive a message from a person with whom
you are not chatting, or for which you don’t have the chat
window open, the message will appear in a Notification
bubble, as shown in the image to the right.
The Notification bubble displays for about 30 seconds, and
if it closes before being acknowledged, the following indicator appears at the top
of the Pocket PC screen to the left.
The Notification bubble and indicator will also appear if you have another program open on
your Pocket PC while MSN Messenger is running. When you tap Chat on the Notification bubble
while another program is running, the Pocket PC switches programs so that you can enter a response.
If you do not want to chat, tap Ignore on the Notification bubble.
To change your status to indicate that you do not want to chat, tap
Tools | My Status.
Writing long messages with the stylus can be tedious, so MSN
Messenger provides a way to send predefined messages, which are
listed in the My Text menu shown in the image to the right.
Tap the text that you want inserted in the message, and then either
add more text or tap Send.
Up to ten entries can appear in the My Text menu, and you can change
what appears in the menu by tapping Tools | Edit My Text Messages, to open
the screen below.
Change the text here.
To change text, first tap the item you want to change in the scroll list at the top of the screen,
and then highlight the text in the field under the scroll list and enter the new text. When you tap
a different text item or tap OK, the text you enter is saved.
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MSN Messenger and Inbox both have My Text menus that contain the same items. When
you change an item in one program, it also changes for the other program.
Manage Contacts
MSN Messenger Contacts are not the same as Pocket Outlook Contacts; MSN Messenger Contacts
are stored on the MSN Messenger server. Because the contacts are on the server, the same contacts
appear in versions of MSN Messenger running on desktop PCs or Pocket PCs. Before you can
add a contact, you must be online with the MSN Messenger server.
To add a contact using a Pocket PC, tap Tools | Add A Contact, and enter the contact’s MSN
Messenger sign-in name in the Sign-in Name field. Tap Next, and if the sign-in name is found
on the server, you’ll see a message indicating that the contact has been added to your list. If the
sign-in name is not found, you’ll see a message saying that the operation has failed, and you’ll
return to the Add A Contact screen.
To delete a contact, tap-and-hold on its entry on the MSN Messenger screen and tap Delete
Contact on the pop-up list. A message box appears where you confirm whether or not you want
to delete the contact. Tap Yes to delete or No to cancel.
If you want to prevent a contact from ever sending a message to you, tap-and-hold on its entry
on the MSN Messenger screen and tap Block on the pop-up menu. When you block a contact,
you’ll always appear offline to that person. Blocked contacts show a cross-out indicator on the
MSN Messenger screen, as shown in the following image:
To unblock a contact, tap-and-hold on its entry and tap Unblock on the pop-up menu.
Change MSN Messenger Options
If you want to block multiple contacts, the simplest way is to tap Tools | Options, and then tap
the Privacy tab, which displays the following screen:
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Tap the contact that you want to block from the My Allow List, and then tap the arrow in the
middle of the screen pointing toward the My Block List. The contact will then appear in the My
Block List and will be removed from the My Allow List. To unblock contacts, tap entries in the
My Block List and tap the arrow pointing toward the My Allow List. The contact will again be
moved.
At the bottom of the Privacy tab is a check box to alert you when another MSN Messenger
user ads you to his or her Passport Contact list. If you want to receive these notifications, make
sure you select the check box. To see who has you in his or her Contact list, tap View.
To change your name as it appears to other MSN Messenger users, tap Tools | Options and
enter the new name in the Name field of the General tab. To change the MSN Messenger sign-in
name and password, or to configure MSN Messenger to work with the Exchange Instant Messaging
service, tap Tools | Options, and then tap the Accounts tab.
Send and Receive Instant Messages
Using Other Services
Unlike other services on the Internet, instant messaging is not open. To communicate with a
service, you must use the software designed for the service. For example, you cannot send instant
messages to AOL Instant Messenger (AIM) users using the MSN Messenger software on your
Pocket PC.
While MSN is already on your Pocket PC, you may have friends who use other services,
such as AIM or Yahoo! Messenger. In this section you will learn how you can use your Pocket
PC to send and receive instant messages using these services.
Yahoo! no longer provides a Yahoo! Messenger client for Pocket PCs. If you want to
send instant messages using Yahoo! Messenger from a Pocket PC, you can use the imov
Jabber client, available for download from http://www.movsoftware.com/products/
imov/imov.htm.
Send and Receive Instant Messages Using AIM
AIM is one of the most popular messaging services on the Internet. Fortunately, a version of this
program runs on Pocket PC 2002 and Windows Mobile 2003 devices. Before you can use AIM,
you need to create a free screen name. Go to http://www.aim.com on a PC and complete the forms.
Remember your screen name and password, because you will need to enter that information on
your Pocket PC.
Download and Install AIM
While AOL provides free copies of AIM for desktop PCs, it charges for the Pocket PC version,
which you can buy from Handango at http://www.handango.com. After you purchase and
download the software to a PC, connect your Pocket PC and run the setup program.
The installation program adds a shortcut to the Pocket PC Start menu. To start the program,
tap Start | AIM. To sign on to AIM, tap Sign On on the Command bar, and then enter your screen
name and password on the Sign On screen. To exit from AIM and disconnect from the server, tap
File | Exit.
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If you want AIM to log in automatically when you start the program, tap the Auto-Login
check box on the sign on window.
Send and Receive Messages
When you start AIM, you’ll see a program window with two tabs: one for showing buddies who
are online and another for managing your buddy list. AIM provides four default categories for
grouping buddies, and you can create additional categories as well.
To send a message to a buddy, either double-tap the buddy’s name on the screen or single-tap
the buddy and then tap Send Message at the bottom of the screen. You’ll see the Instant Message
screen where you enter messages and receive replies.
AIM does not provide a shortcut for entering text, but it does provide a window for selecting
emoticons. Emoticons are a clever way of using standard punctuation to express emotion. For
example, a smiley face is made with a colon and right parenthesis, like :). On desktop computers,
AIM displays emoticons as graphics, but while you can select a graphic on a Pocket PC, you will
see the punctuation marks in the message area.
When you receive a message from someone you are not chatting with, AIM flashes a
Notification icon at the bottom right of the screen. Tap the icon to open the message window
and send a reply.
To start a new message session with another buddy from the message window, tap Start
A Session. End a message session by tapping End Session. You can be chatting with more than
one buddy at a time, but the Pocket PC version of AIM does not support conferences. To switch
between conversations, expand the drop-down list at the top-right of the screen, and then tap the
buddy’s name.
Manage Buddies
To add and delete buddies, create buddy groups, and rename buddies, tap the List Setup tab of
the Buddy List screen. To add a buddy or group, tap the appropriate buttons and enter the buddy’s
screen name or a group name.
AIM provides a way for you to rename a buddy in your buddy list, but you need to be careful
with this feature. If your buddy does not change his or her name, you will not be able to send
messages to that buddy, nor will you be able to see whether the buddy is online. To rename a
buddy, tap Rename Buddy and then enter a new name.
To delete a buddy or a group, first tap the buddy or group name and then tap Delete.
Change Preferences
AIM provides preference settings for privacy, instant messaging, news headlines, stock quotes,
and general settings. To change the preferences, tap Edit | Preferences. The privacy settings
enable you to control who can send you a message. The options include Allow All Users, Allow
Only Users On Your Buddy List, Block All Users, Allow Only The Users You List, and Block
The Users That You List.
On the instant messaging, or IM tab, you specify whether AIM plays a sound when you
receive a message and whether AIM shows an Accept Message dialog box when you receive
messages from people not on your buddy list. You can also create a customized message that
is automatically sent when you receive a message while you are away from your Pocket PC.
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The General tab provides a way to remove all the screen names on your buddy list and to
reset all the preferences. Be careful using this feature because the process cannot be reversed; AIM
will display two confirmation messages to make sure you really want to delete screen names.
Send and Receive Instant Messages Using ICQ
ICQ was released in November 1996 by the Israeli company Mirabilis Ltd. and later sold to AOL
in 1998. Despite little advertising or marketing, more than 100 million people now use ICQ to
send instant messages across the Internet.
With the success of ICQ, it is not surprising that Pocket PC users have long sought a version
of the program for Pocket PCs. If you use ICQ on your desktop computer, you’ll be happy to
know that a beta version of the Pocket PC program is now available.
If you already use ICQ on your desktop PC, you’ll want to upgrade the program to version
2001b or later because it uploads all your ICQ contacts to a server. Putting your contacts on a
server makes it easier to use those same contacts on Pocket PCs or other desktop computers.
If you have never used ICQ, you’ll need to first download and install the software for your
desktop PC to create an ICQ ID, otherwise known as a Universal Internet Number. The Pocket
PC version of ICQ does not provide a way to create an ID, and no web-based method exists for
registration. To download the PC version of the software, go to http://www.icq.com and click
the Download ICQ link. During the installation process, you’ll register yourself with ICQ and
receive your ID, which you’ll need to use ICQ on your Pocket PC.
Download and Install ICQ
To download ICQ for the Pocket PC, go to http://www.icq.com and click the ICQ For Handhelds
link, which you’ll find on the left side of the page under the heading “ICQ Anywhere.” Download
the setup program to the hard disk in your PC, connect your Pocket PC with the desktop, and
then run the setup program.
The installation program automatically adds an ICQ link to the Pocket PC Start menu, and
you start the program by tapping Start | ICQ. When you first start ICQ, you’ll see the Sign On
screen, where you enter your ICQ ID number and password. Check boxes are available to save
the password and to auto-login, which bypasses the Sign On screen and connects directly to the
ICQ server. To exit ICQ and disconnect from the server, tap File | Exit.
Send and Receive Messages
After ICQ connects to the server, you’ll see the main program window. In the middle of the window
are all of your ICQ contacts, categorized into different groups. You can double-tap the categories
to contract or expand the listing of contact names.
Along the right side of the screen are buttons for performing all of the program functions: send
an instant message, send a Short Message Service (SMS) message, display information about a
contact, delete a contact, display your information, change preferences, and display stock quotes.
SMS is a text messaging service that works with mobile phones, so you can send a text message
from your Pocket PC using ICQ to a mobile phone.
To send a message to a contact, either double-tap the contact name on the screen or tap a
contact once and then tap Instant Message. Enter your message and then tap Message. After
a message is sent, you’ll see it at the top of the screen, which is where you also see messages
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that the contact sends to you. ICQ also provides an emoticon menu that lets you easily select
and send various emoticons in your messages.
When you receive a message from someone that you are not chatting with, ICQ flashes a
Notification icon at the bottom right of the screen. Tap the icon to open the message window
and send a reply.
To close the messaging window and return to your Contact list, either tap Back at the bottom
of the screen or tap the drop-down list at the top left of the screen, and then tap Contact List.
Manage Contacts
To add a contact to your Contact list, tap Add/Invite Users at the bottom of the screen. ICQ will
search for a contact by first and last name, e-mail address, or ICQ ID. To delete a contact from
your Contact list, tap the contact name and then tap Delete.
Change Preferences
ICQ has general preference settings, along with settings for stock quotes and privacy. To change
the preferences, tap Edit | Preferences. On the General tab, you specify whether or not you want
ICQ to play sounds when receiving messages, whether or not you want to receive messages only
from people on your Contact list, and whether or not you want to see a confirmation message
when you sign off.
The Stocks tab provides check boxes for selecting stock market indices to display when ICQ
retrieves stock information. You can also add and remove the display of a company’s stock market
ticker in ICQ. You change your ICQ password on the Privacy tab. It may be a good idea to change
your password occasionally to insure that nobody else can send messages from your device.
Consolidate Instant Messaging to One Program
By now, you probably have the impression that to send and receive instant messages from multiple
services, you need to install multiple programs on your Pocket PC. Because Pocket PCs have
limited storage space, it seems to be a waste to use multiple programs that perform the same
basic function. This same problem exists on desktop computers, which is why Jabber exists.
Jabber is an open protocol for exchanging instant messages on the Internet. Servers that use
Jabber are also capable of sending instant messages to all of the main instant messaging services
such as MSN, AIM, ICQ, and Yahoo!. Several public servers on the Internet provide free access,
so you can run one program on your Pocket PC that uses Jabber to send and receive messages
from all services. A list of public servers is available at http://www.jabber.org/user/
publicservers.php.
Before you can set up a Jabber client to communicate with instant messaging services
like AIM, you will need to set up an account for the particular service using their
software.
Two programs that use Jabber are available for Pocket PCs: Antepo’s ACCEPT
Messaging Client at http://www.antepo.com and mov Software’s iMov Messenger Client
at http://www.movsoftware.com.
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Send and Receive Instant Messages Using iMov Messenger
Two versions of iMov Messenger are available: a free version called iMov Messenger Basic
and a commercial version called iMov Messenger Enterprise. The Enterprise version includes
technical support via e-mail and doesn’t show advertisements. Both versions are available for
download through http://www.movsoftware.com or http://www.handango.com. Versions of iMov
Messenger are also available for Smartphones and Handheld PCs.
Set Up iMov Messenger
To use iMov Messenger, you will need an account on a public Jabber server and accounts for all
of the instant messaging services that you want to use. You can use iMov to create an account on
Jabber servers, but you will need to create the other IM service accounts beforehand.
The first time you run iMov Messenger, you see a setup wizard that guides you through the
process of setting up the accounts. A default Jabber service is provided (at jabber.org), but it does
not provide communication with the other IM services. I use myjabber.net, or you can select
another server listed at http://www.jabber.org/user/publicservers.php.
To add or make changes to the IM services in Jabber, tap Menu | Setup, and select a service
from the Service Setup drop-down list. You can rerun the setup wizard by tapping Menu | Run
Setup Wizard.
After you set up up the services, log in to the Jabber server, and connect to the IM services,
iMov obtains a list of all your IM contacts from the services and displays them on screen (except,
however, your AIM buddies will have to be entered manually into iMov). To add an AIM buddy,
tap Add, select the AIM Transport, enter a nickname, and enter their AIM screen name.
The main screen in iMov is separated into three areas: Active Chats, Contacts, and Services.
Active Chats lists all of the instant messaging sessions you currently have open. Contacts lists
all of your IM contacts from services. To just display contacts currently online, tap View | Only
Online Contacts. Services lists all of the instant messaging services, called transports, that you
are set up to use. You are logged in to the services with yellow icons; services that are not logged
in have gray icons.
Send and Receive Messages
To send a message, double-tap a contact name, or tap a contact name and then tap Chat. Enter
your message at the bottom of the screen, and then tap Send. What you enter, and replies that you
receive, appear at the top of the screen. To switch between instant messaging sessions, tap View |
Contacts, and tap a contact name under Active Chats. Tap Close to end the instant messaging
session.
Manage Contacts
By default, all of your IM contacts display in one group called Contacts. You can put contacts
into groups, but you must enter the group name at the time that you add the contact in Jabber.
To add a group, tap Add, select the IM Service from the What Service Is This Person Using
drop-down list, and enter the new group name in the Add User To Group field. The field includes
a drop-down list, and after you enter a group name you can select it from the drop-down list when
you add contacts.
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Change Preferences
As contacts sign on, you will hear a sound and see a notification bubble. To turn the sounds off,
and to change other settings, tap Menu | Setup. To have iMov Messenger automatically log in on
startup, or to encrypt sessions, tap the Advanced button on the Setup screen.
Wrapping Up
You can use your Pocket PC to chat with friends, family, and coworkers using the MSN, Yahoo!,
AOL, and ICQ instant messaging services. All you need is the software provided by these
companies and a connection to the Internet, and you can chat whenever and wherever there is
a need. E-mail and instant messaging are two of the popular ways people use the Internet, while
everyone browses the web for information. In the next chapter, you’ll learn how you can use
Internet Explorer on the Pocket PC to open websites and download content to read when you are
not connected to the Internet.
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How to…
■
■
■
■
Browse websites using Pocket Internet Explorer
Save shortcuts to your favorite websites
Synchronize web pages to your Pocket PC
Subscribe to and view AvantGo channels
I
n 1989, the World Wide Web was nothing more than a project for British physicist and
computer scientist Timothy Berners-Lee. In 1993, when the first major browser, Mosaic,
was developed, the Web was still not used for much more than research. All of that has changed
dramatically to the point where today some companies exist with nothing more than a web page
as their storefront.
The Web has become the graphical user interface for the Internet—the method by which the
majority of people use it. When you access the Internet to check stock quotes, buy a book, find
a phone number, or read a magazine, you probably do so on the Web with a web browser.
Because of the importance of the Web, a web browser is now perhaps the most important
program on your computer. Go to any computer store, look at any computer, and you’ll find a
web browser installed. Pocket PCs are no different; they, too, have a web browser installed,
called Pocket Internet Explorer.
Like all the Pocket PC applications, Pocket Internet Explorer is not designed to be your
full-time browser. However, it provides enough functionality to perform the majority of tasks
necessary when you don’t have access to a browser on a desktop computer. In fact, the combination
of a Pocket PC, Pocket Internet Explorer, and wireless networking may represent the future of
the Internet, a future in which the Internet is used for communication wherever one may be—at
home, at the grocery store, or while traveling.
The web browser software on Pocket PCs is named Internet Explorer, but because it
is different from web browsers for desktop computers, I prefer to call it by its original
name, Pocket Internet Explorer. The smaller screen on Pocket PCs means that most
pages will not look the same as they do on a PC, and Pocket PCs cannot display
graphics at the same resolution and color density as a PC.
The version of Pocket Internet Explorer with Windows Mobile 2003 is based on Internet
Explorer Version 4.01 but does not support all of its features. The following is a summary of
the features that are not supported:
■
■
■
■
Java applets designed to run within a web browser
Microsoft Visual Basic Script
Several multimedia file formats, such as AVI and MPEG
The HTML tags APPLET, BLINK, ISINDEX, LINK, MARQUEE, and OBJECT.
Pocket Internet Explorer supports all the basic security types, including the 128-bit
encryption used by some websites. Pocket PC 2000 does not have built-in support for 128-bit
encryption, but you can add it by downloading and installing the Microsoft High Encryption
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Pocket Internet Explorer Updates
with Windows Mobile 2003
The version of Pocket Internet Explorer that comes with Windows Mobile 2003 has been
significantly updated from the version on Pocket PC 2002. Since it is now based on Internet
Explorer Version 4.01, you will be able to access more websites because some sites blocked
browsers based on Internet Explorer 3, such as the one that is on Pocket PC 2002. The new
Pocket Internet Explorer now supports the following standards:
■ XHTML, which provides Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) content in standard
Extensible Markup Language (XML) format.
■ Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), which makes it easier for web developers to create
pages with a consistent appearance.
■ Wireless Markup Language (WML) Version 2, which is used to create content
transmitted using the Wireless Application Protocol (WAP).
■ JScript 5.5, which is a scripting language that Microsoft provides with its web
browsers.
■ Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6), which is the next version of the current Internet
communications protocol (IPv4) used by applications to communicate on the
Internet.
Pack for Pocket PCs from http://www.microsoft.com/windowsmobile/resources/downloads/
pocketpc/default.mspx.
Start Pocket Internet Explorer
To start Pocket Internet Explorer on a Pocket PC, tap Start |
Internet Explorer or tap Start | Programs | Internet Explorer,
depending on how the Start menu is configured. The program
window looks like the image to the right.
The Address bar is at the top of the program window, and
the Command bar menu options and buttons are at the bottom.
To turn on or off the Address bar, tap View | Address Bar. You
cannot move the Address bar to another location on the screen.
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Browse Websites
The process for browsing websites in Pocket Internet Explorer is the same as with Internet
Explorer. First, you must connect to the Internet, which requires a dial-up or LAN (Local Area
Network) connection. Chapter 19 provides the instructions for using Connection Manager to
configure Internet connections. Connection Manager automatically connects to the Internet
based on how it is configured and the URL (Uniform Resource Locator—the website address)
you request in Internet Explorer.
You can also browse websites while your Pocket PC is in its cradle by using the
ActiveSync Desktop Pass Through. You will find more information about Desktop
Pass Through in Chapter 19.
Use a Proxy Server
Proxy servers are often used when connecting to the Internet through a LAN, such as that
used by a corporate network. They allow multiple users to share the same connection to the
Internet and provide added security by masking the TCP/IP address of the client PC.
On Pocket PC 2000 devices, Pocket Internet Explorer must be configured to access the
Internet via a proxy server. Tap Tools | Options and then open the Connections tab. Select
Use Proxy Server, and enter an address in the Proxy Server HTTP field (the Address field on
a Pocket PC) and a number in the Port field. Ask your network administrator for the address
and port number of the proxy server if you do not know them. If you also access an intranet
website, you must select Bypass Proxy For Local Addresses so that the browser does not try
to use the proxy server to access intranet sites.
Pocket PC 2002 moves the proxy server settings from Pocket Internet Explorer to the
Work Settings portion of Connection Manager. To configure the proxy server, start Connection
Manager by tapping Start | Settings | Connections | Connections. Tap Modify in the Work
Settings portion of the screen, and then tap the Proxy Settings tab. Tap the two check boxes
on the screen and enter the host name or IP address of the proxy server on the screen. You
will find more instructions for using Connection Manager in Chapter 19.
Windows Mobile 2003 changes the proxy server settings slightly and adds an exceptions
list. To configure proxy server settings, tap Start | Settings | Connections | Connections, and
then tap Set Up My Proxy Server under My Work Network. To add items to the exception
lists, which are website addresses that are not to be retrieved by a proxy server, open the
Advanced tab in Connection Manager and tap Select Networks.
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Use the Address Bar and History
Access a website by using the Address bar or Favorites. To use the Address bar, enter an address
in the bar, and then tap the button to the right of the Address bar, as shown in the following image:
Tap here to retrieve web pages.
The Address bar keeps a history of the websites that you visit. The most recent sites are
available from the drop-down list, as shown in the following image:
To open one of these websites, select the address and Pocket Internet Explorer will load the page.
Pocket Internet Explorer also keeps a history of each web page that you visit, which you can
use later to return to a page. To view the web page history, tap View | History to open the
following screen:
Tap here to display page
titles or addresses.
Open a page by tapping
an entry in the list.
Use Favorites
The second way to access a web page is by selecting a shortcut in Favorites. To access a web
page by using its Favorites shortcut, tap the Favorites Command bar button, shown in the image
to the left, and then tap a shortcut listed in the Favorites dialog box.
Keep Track of Your Favorite Pages
Web addresses can be difficult to remember and tedious to enter, particularly on a Pocket PC.
Pocket Internet Explorer solves these problems by providing a place to store the address of your
favorite websites. Whenever you want to return to a site, all you need to do is select the site name
from the Favorites menu, as described in the preceding section.
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Add to Favorites
The first step to store a favorite site on either device is to open
the website in Pocket Internet Explorer. To store a favorite
website, tap the Favorites button and then tap the Add/Delete
tab to open the Favorites screen (shown to right).
Tap Add to open the Add Favorite dialog box, and tap OK
to store the site in the Mobile Favorites folder. If you want to
change the name of the website, delete the contents of the Name
field and enter the new name before tapping OK.
A quick way to add the current page to Favorites is
to tap-and-hold on the page and then tap the Add To
Favorites option in the pop-up list.
You can group your favorite shortcuts into folders, but you must create the folders first. To
create a folder, tap New Folder, enter a name for the folder, and then tap Add. Shortcuts cannot
be moved to folders.
Synchronize Favorites
If Microsoft Internet Explorer 4 or later is installed on your desktop computer, you can synchronize
favorite links. If Internet Explorer 5 or later is installed, you can also download offline favorites,
which is described in the “Store Web Pages on Your Pocket PC” section later in this chapter.
When you install ActiveSync on your PC, it will add a Mobile Favorites folder to Favorites in
Internet Explorer.
To synchronize the links, you must enable the Favorites information type in ActiveSync.
Start ActiveSync and choose Tools | Options, and then select the box next to Favorites in the
Mobile Device list, as shown in the following image:
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During the next synchronization, the contents of the Mobile Favorites folder in Internet
Explorer will synchronize with Favorites on the Pocket PC. You can then add a link to either
the desktop computer or the Pocket PC; when you synchronize, the link will appear on both.
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Configure Security Options
Pocket Internet Explorer supports the security protocols used by secure sites. To determine whether
a web page is secure, tap View | Properties.
The security settings on a Pocket PC are not sophisticated. The Pocket PC supports all of the
standard security protocols, but it does not provide you with the option for turning them on or off.
A warning message will display when Pocket Internet Explorer moves from a secure page to an
insecure page. To turn on or off that message, tap Tools | Options, and then select the Advanced
tab to display the following screen:
Tap here to turn the
security warning
message on or off.
Control Cookies
Cookies are files stored on the device that contain information about your identity and preferences.
They are written by a web page and retrieved the next time you open the web page so that
information can be tailored to your needs.
To prevent Pocket Internet Explorer from accepting cookies, tap Tools | Options, and then
select the Advanced tab; clear the Allow Cookies check box and tap OK. To clear the cookies
already on a Pocket PC, tap Clear Cookies.
Change the Display
Unfortunately, the small screen size of Pocket PCs affects the way Pocket Internet Explorer
displays a web page. Another problem is that the browser does not support as many colors
as desktop computers; therefore, graphics may not look the same. Fortunately, you can make
changes to help compensate for these problems.
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Control How Pages Display
Changing the font size of text on a web page enables more text to appear in the program window.
To change the font size, tap View | Text Size and select a size.
Text size changes that you make on Windows Mobile 2003 remain until you change
them. Text size changes in Pocket PC 2002 change back to the default setting after
you reset the Pocket PC.
Web pages designed for higher resolution screens may require scrolling unless Pocket Internet
Explorer changes the display so that it fits completely in the program window. Pages will display
within the program window when you tap View | Fit To Screen.
While graphics make web pages visually appealing, they can take a long time to download
to your device. Often, the words on the web page are all you need. To prevent Pocket Internet
Explorer from downloading graphics, tap View | Show Images. Pocket PC 2002 has a Command
bar button that you can tap to turn images on and off.
When graphics are turned off, you’ll see the locations on the page where they would
appear. To select individual images for display, tap-and-hold on the location and tap
Show Picture in the pop-up menu.
People all around the world create web pages, and some use alphabets other than the Roman
alphabet (which Pocket Internet Explorer calls the Western Alphabet) used in many countries
around the world. To display characters of other alphabets, tap Tools | Options | Advanced and
select an alphabet from the Default Character Set drop-down list.
Change the Home Page
The home page is the web page that opens whenever you start Pocket Internet Explorer. At first,
this will be set to the default page, which is stored on the device. You may prefer a different home
page to open whenever you start the browser.
To change the home page, first open the new page in Pocket Internet Explorer, then tap Tools
| Options, and then tap Use Current to set the new home page. If you later decide to reset the home
page to the default, open the Options screen and tap Use Default.
As you open web pages on your Pocket PC, they are written to internal storage, and
over time they can take up a significant amount of storage space. You can free-up
space by tapping Delete Files on the General tab of Internet Explorer options.
Store Web Pages on Your Pocket PC
With Mobile Favorites, you can synchronize Internet Explorer favorite
links to your Pocket PC. If you use Internet Explorer Version 5, you can
also download web pages to your Pocket PC by synchronizing offline
favorites.
When you install ActiveSync, the installation program adds a Mobile
Favorites button to the Internet Explorer toolbar. A Mobile Favorites
folder is also added to Internet Explorer Favorites, as shown here.
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If Favorites is not listed as an information type for your Pocket PC in ActiveSync, open
the Options dialog box, click the check box next to Favorites, and then click OK.
Synchronize Mobile Favorites Content
The process of adding a Mobile Favorite is the same as adding Internet Explorer Favorites. When
you have a page open that you want to add to Mobile Favorites, click the Mobile Favorites toolbar
button, or click Tools | Create Mobile Favorite. The Create Mobile Favorite dialog box will display,
as shown in the following image:
If you are running Internet Explorer Version 5, the website content will download to your
PC and the page will be added to the ActiveSync list of pages to synchronize to your Pocket PC.
The next time you connect the Pocket PC to the desktop computer, the content will download.
To see the list of pages that will synchronize, double-click the Favorites information type in
ActiveSync on your PC. The Favorite Synchronization Options dialog box will display, as
shown in the following image:
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Fix Mobile Favorites
Synchronization Problems
One of the problems Pocket PC users frequently experience is that they try to set up a web
page to synchronize and find that it never appears on their Pocket PC. This problem is
typically caused by the fact that the web page has not been downloaded to their desktop
computer. Offline Mobile Favorites takes advantage of the synchronization features available
with Internet Explorer 5 and later, which downloads web pages to desktop computers. When
ActiveSync synchronizes favorites, it simply copies the pages from the desktop to the Pocket
PC. So the pages must already be on the PC or they will not be available for ActiveSync.
The most common reason why the web page is not on the PC is that Internet Explorer is
not set up to download the page automatically. When you create a Mobile Favorite, the default
setting is not set to schedule updates. This means that until you either schedule an update or
manually force Internet Explorer to synchronize pages, nothing will be available to download
to your Pocket PC.
To synchronize pages manually in Internet Explorer on your desktop computer, choose
Tools | Synchronize, and then choose Synchronize on the Items To Synchronize dialog box.
To fix a page so that it automatically downloads on your desktop computer at a specified
time, choose Tools | Synchronize, select the page, and then choose Properties. Click the
Schedule tab, and make sure that a date and time is selected for synchronization.
To stop synchronizing a page, clear the check box next to its name in the Favorite
Synchronization Options dialog box. If you want to stop synchronizing all of the pages, click
Clear All. Any content on the Pocket PC associated with the page that you stop synchronizing
will be removed during the next synchronization. The link, however, will remain in Mobile
Favorites.
To remove a Mobile Favorite from Pocket Internet Explorer, tap Favorites to open the Favorites
dialog box, and then tap the Add/Delete tab. Select an item, tap
Delete, and then tap OK to close the dialog box. The link
and any offline content will be deleted. During the next
synchronization, the item will be removed from the Favorite
Synchronization Options dialog box in ActiveSync, and the
link will also be removed from the Mobile Favorites folder
in Internet Explorer.
View Mobile Favorites
This page has been
synchronized to the Pocket PC.
The process for viewing Mobile Favorites that have been
downloaded to a Pocket PC is the same as browsing web
pages online. Start Pocket Internet Explorer and tap
Favorites. The items not available for offline viewing
are grayed out, as shown in the dialog box.
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Use Alternative Web Browsers
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Pocket Internet Explorer is not the only web browser you can use on your Pocket PC. Several
third-party developers have written browsers to provide better performance or more features
than Internet Explorer. One of these browsers is Netfront from ACCESS Systems America,
available at http://www.access-us-inc.com. Netfront has built in multi-window browsing and
zoom. Bitstream’s Thunderhawk browser (http://www.bitstream.com) displays web pages in
landscape, so pages appear as originally designed. Finally, ftxPBrowser also provides multiwindow browsing and is free to download from http://www.af.wakwak.com/~ftoshi/pocket/
index_e.html.
To view an offline page, tap an item that is not grayed out in the Favorites list.
Some pages are not grayed out, yet they do not synchronize to your Pocket PC. Those
pages were previously viewed on the Pocket PC and the pages are still stored on the
Pocket PC and can be opened. You can clear those pages by deleting temporary Internet
files from the Pocket Internet Explorer Options screen.
Synchronize AvantGo Content
AvantGo.com is a web-based information service for handheld devices. Hundreds of channels
designed specifically for the devices are available from name-brand content providers such as
USA Today, the Wall Street Journal, the Weather Channel, and MapQuest. Some channels are
interactive; for example, you can submit a FedEx tracking number and have information about
the package sent back to you during synchronization.
The most common way to use AvantGo.com is to synchronize content to your device using
ActiveSync. Your PC must be connected to the Internet during synchronization to download
content. Synchronization can also be achieved by using a modem or LAN connection to the
Internet, and AvantGo.com even provides content specifically designed for wireless connections.
AvantGo.com is integrated into Pocket Internet Explorer on Pocket PCs, which includes
the software needed to communicate with the AvantGo.com servers. The AvantGo information
type is also part of ActiveSync, so every Pocket PC includes all that is needed to download
AvantGo.com content right out of the box. All you need to do is browse to the AvantGo.com
website and sign up for the service.
Set Up with AvantGo
The first step to using AvantGo is to enable AvantGo synchronization in ActiveSync. Choose
Tools | Options, choose the AvantGo check box, and then click OK. Connect your Pocket PC
to the desktop to synchronize it, and three default channels of information will download to
your Pocket PC.
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During the first synchronization, the latest AvantGo software downloads to your Pocket
PC and an AvantGo Connect icon is added to the Connections tab of your Pocket PC’s
Settings.
To view the information, start Pocket Internet Explorer
on your Pocket PC, open Favorites, and tap AvantGo
Channels. The page shown at right displays in Pocket
Internet Explorer.
To add more channels, you must personalize AvantGo
by creating your own user ID. Tap the Get More Channels
link, enter your e-mail address on the form, and tap Submit.
Synchronize your Pocket PC to send your e-mail address
to AvantGo.
The AvantGo server e-mails a message back to you
containing a link to a web page for setting up your account.
The process for setting up an account involves completing
several pages using a web browser on a desktop computer.
You create a username and password and provide some
information about your location, such as zip code and time
zone. You are also asked about your interests so that
AvantGo can recommend channels.
You are told to connect your Pocket PC to the desktop so that it can configure the Pocket PC.
In one step in this process, you will be asked whether you want to replace the existing server
profile, which you do want to do. The current profile on your Pocket PC uses a default username
that does not have access to your information, so you want to replace that profile with one that
contains your username.
The last step in the setup process tests the communications between your PC and AvantGo’s
servers. After the test completes, you will see a web page where you can select additional channels
to download to your Pocket PC. Select the channels that you want, and then synchronize your
Pocket PC. When you open the AvantGo Channels in Pocket Internet Explorer, you will see
the screen shown below right.
You can tap the Add link to add channels from your
Pocket PC, or you can open my.avantgo.com using a browser
on a desktop computer.
Configure AvantGo Connect
The Pocket PC and ActiveSync include all of the software
that you need to connect with the AvantGo.com server.
Most of the time, you’ll configure AvantGo from your
desktop computer using their web-based configuration
tools. However, you can also configure AvantGo
synchronization from your Pocket PC. The process involves
configuring AvantGo Connect on your Pocket PC and then
synchronizing the device with the desktop computer.
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To configure AvantGo Connect on a Pocket PC, tap Start | Settings | Connections, and then
tap the AvantGo Connect icon to open the following Connect screen:
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The screen should include a server setting for the AvantGo.com server, as shown in the
image. If the server is not listed, tap Add and complete the fields in the dialog box as described
in Table 22-1.
If the AvantGo.com server is listed in the dialog box, select it and tap Properties to open the
Server Settings dialog box. Complete the Username and Password fields as described in Table
22-1, and then tap OK.
After you configure AvantGo Connect on the Pocket PC, the next step is to synchronize the
device and desktop computer. Before synchronizing the two, connect the PC to the Internet so
that communication with the AvantGo.com server can be established. During synchronization,
the settings that you enter on the Pocket PC will be copied to the desktop.
During synchronization, the AvantGo Connect software on the PC will contact the
AvantGo.com server and transfer information to your device. You will see the status line change
to show the synchronization progress. When synchronization is complete, the status will change
to Synchronized. From this point, every time you synchronize the device and PC, the AvantGo
Connect software will update the content on your device.
Field
Value
Hostname
Enter sync.avantgo.com
Port
Enter 80
Username
Enter the username you created on AvantGo.com
Set Password
Tap Set Password and enter the password you created
on AvantGo.com
Connect To This Server
Leave checked
Refresh All Content On Next Sync
Leave checked
TABLE 22-1
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Retrieve AvantGo Content Using
Network Connections
AvantGo content can be downloaded from the Internet using a modem or LAN connection,
which is valuable for retrieving information when you are away from a desktop PC. To
retrieve content using a modem, you must create a modem connection to the Internet, as
described in Chapter 19.
Connect your Pocket PC to the Internet using the modem connection, and then open the
AvantGo channels page in Internet Explorer. Tap the Tools link at the bottom of the page,
and then tap Modem Sync. While the page suggests that you are performing modem
synchronization, the process also works for LAN connections and ActiveSync Desktop
Pass Through.
On occasion, a problem may occur during synchronization, which causes the AvantGo
channels page to disappear on the Pocket PC. You can recover this page by either synchronizing
the Pocket PC with a partner desktop computer or starting synchronization from the AvantGo
Connect settings on the Pocket PC. To start synchronization, follow these steps:
1. Tap Start | Settings.
2. Tap the Connections tab.
3. Tap AvantGo Connect.
4. Tap Sync All.
The AvantGo Connect program will connect with the AvantGo.com server and update the
content on your Pocket PC. After the update is complete, tap OK to close the AvantGo Connect
program window, and then open Pocket Internet Explorer to view the AvantGo content.
View AvantGo Channels
To view the AvantGo channels on your Pocket PC,
Tap here
start Pocket Internet Explorer and tap Favorites.
to open the
As you can see in the dialog box, AvantGo
AvantGo
Channels are listed in Mobile Favorites.
Channels
When you tap AvantGo Channels, the AvantGo
home page.
home page will display a listing of your channels.
AvantGo Channels contain links just like ordinary web
pages. To open a channel listed on the home page, tap its link;
continue tapping links to open the pages that belong to the
channel. You can also tap the Pocket Internet Explorer Back
button to move backward through the pages.
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Move AvantGo Channels to Storage
Cards on Pocket PC 2002
By default, AvantGo channels are stored in internal storage, which can be used up if you have
too many subscriptions. You can move channels to a storage card, but it requires making a
change to the Pocket PC registry. Keep in mind that if you make this change, the storage card
must be in the Pocket PC during synchronization, and you may not be able to synchronize
using modem connections with CompactFlash modems.
This change has been tested only with Pocket PC 2002, and the Pocket
PC 2002 version of RegKing does not work with Windows Mobile 2003.
Information Appliance Associates provides a free tool called RegKing that makes
the registry changes needed to synchronize AvantGo channels to storage cards. Go to
http://www.doctorce.com/regking.htm and download RegKing to your Pocket PC. Run
RegKing and apply the Store AvantGo Channels on Flash Cards registry hack. If you
determine that you want to move the channels back from the storage card to internal
storage, you can use RegKing to undo this registry change.
Next, you need to move the AvantGo channels to the storage card. First, close Pocket
Internet Explorer by using either a program task manager or the Running Programs tab
of the Memory settings (Start | Settings | System | Memory). Second, use File Explorer to
move the contents of the \Windows\AvantGo folder and subfolders to the \Storage card folder.
Finally, you need to refresh the AvantGo channels on your Pocket PC. You can force a
refresh either from a partner desktop computer or directly from the Pocket PC. From a desktop
computer, double-click the AvantGo information type in the ActiveSync details section, and
then click Properties and select Refresh All Content At Next Sync. Synchronize the Pocket
PC to refresh the content.
To refresh AvantGo content from a Pocket PC, tap Start | Settings | Connections |
AvantGo Connect, and then tap Properties. Select Refresh All Content At Next Sync and
tap OK. Finally, tap Sync All on the AvantGo Connect screen.
To make the AvantGo home page the default home page for Pocket Internet Explorer,
open the page, tap Tools | Options, tap Use Current, and then tap OK. After you make
this change, tapping the Pocket Internet Explorer Home button displays the AvantGo
home page.
Synchronize Content Using Mazingo
Mazingo is similar to AvantGo in that it provides offline viewing of web content on your Pocket
PC. However, it also provides the distribution of audio and video content to Pocket PCs. Like
AvantGo, you need to register with the Mazingo service before you can select channels. To
register and download the Mazingo software, go to http://www.mazingo.net.
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Unlike AvantGo, Mazingo is not integrated with ActiveSync or Pocket Internet Explorer. The
software has two parts: one that runs on desktop computers and the other that runs on Pocket PCs.
You can configure the Mazingo desktop software to synchronize automatically whenever a
Pocket PC connects, so you don’t have to do any extra work to synchronize Mazingo content.
Another feature that sets Mazingo apart from AvantGo is its built-in support for storage cards.
When you set up a Mazingo account, you can specify whether content should be written to
internal storage or a storage card. You can also configure the desktop software to download
content directly to a storage card if you have a storage card reader attached to the computer.
Wrapping Up
Pocket Internet Explorer enables you to access websites when you are away from a desktop
computer. It has most of the features that you use to view web pages while connected to the
Internet, and with Offline Mobile Favorites and AvantGo, you can also view pages even while
not connected to the Internet. One of the top reasons that people access the Internet is to
download software; the next chapter provides information about the top Pocket PC software
download sites and the programs they make available.
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Part IV
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Customize
Your Pocket PC
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Expand Your
Pocket PC
with Software
and Hardware
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How to…
■ Find Pocket PC software on the Internet
■ Try some of the best software for Pocket PCs
■ Add storage space to your Pocket PC
R
ight out of the box, a Pocket PC is useful. However, you might want to explore beyond
what is built-in and use your Pocket PC for tasks other than word processing or managing
appointments. One way to increase the functionality of your Pocket PC is to install software.
This chapter describes some of the greatest Pocket PC programs that are available for download,
where to find them, and how to get them.
The number of programs you can install on your Pocket PC is limited by the amount of
available storage space. Even though your device has limited built-in storage memory, you can
increase the total storage available by adding storage cards. In this chapter, you’ll find information
about the storage card options available for Pocket PCs.
Find Pocket PC Software
Software is distributed in two major ways: commercially through stores, or as a downloadable
shareware or freeware product. Shareware is software that you download and install, and if you
find that you like it, you pay the author of the program. After a trial period, you are expected to
purchase the software or remove it from your computer. Freeware is software that is free.
The majority of Pocket PC software is available only via the Internet, whether it’s shareware,
freeware, or the more traditional retail shrink-wrapped products. In many cases, you’ll find
demonstration copies of commercial software online so that you can download and try it before
buying it. Usually, the demonstration software will lack some of its full functionality or will quit
working after a period of time. Shareware is unique because it includes all functionality and will
probably work even after the trial period ends. We all benefit from this method of distribution because
we can try software before spending our money on something we find does not meet our needs.
Download Free Software from Microsoft
Microsoft provides support for Pocket PCs through its website at http://www.pocketpc.com. At this
site, you’ll find tips and news about Pocket PCs, support, and software downloads. The Downloads
page at http://www.microsoft.com/mobile/pocketpc/downloads/default.asp contains links to all of
the Pocket PC software updates and applications that you can download from the site.
Microsoft sells three Pocket PC software titles: the Pocket PC Entertainment PocketPak, the
Arcade PocketPak, and the Games PocketPak. The Arcade PocketPak includes three popular arcade
games: Pac-Man, Ms. Pac-Man, and Dig Dug. The Games PocketPak includes five games made only
for the P