Rules - chaos in the old world

Rules - chaos in the old world
Welcome to the
Old World
• Each Ruinous Power also has a unique way to
impose its own Threat on the Old World. Khorne
seeks to kill as many figures as possible to slake his
thirst for blood, for example, while Tzeentch seeks to
infest regions where magic and warpstone are found.
Threat is tracked on four dials affixed to the game
board. Each Power must advance its dial to a certain
point in order to win by this method. One unit of
dial advancement is called a tick.
In Warhammer’s Old World, four Ruinous Powers –
the gods of Chaos – have held sway for uncounted
millennia.
K horne, the Blood God, the Skulltaker, lusts for death
and battle, taking delight in fury and slaughter, rage
and butchery.
If none of the Powers have won by the time the Old
World deck is exhausted, the Old World itself is the
victor, and all four Ruinous Powers lose. See “Check for
Game End” on page 22 for more specific information
about victory conditions and the end of the game.
Nurgle, the Plaguelord, the Father of Corruption, luxuriates in filth and disease, spreading a tide of pus and
pestilence across the land.
Tzeentch, the Changer of Ways, the Great Conspirator, is the architect of the fate of the universe, weaving
strands of confusion and manipulation as slippery as
silk.
Components
Chaos in the Old World includes:
Slaanesh, the Prince of Pleasure and Pain, the Lord
of Temptations, lures even the most steadfast to the
seductions of avidity, gluttony, carnality, paramountcy,
vainglory, and indolency.
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This Rulebook
1 Game Board
4 Threat Dials (one for each Power)
4 Sets of Two-part Plastic Connectors
4 Power Sheets (one for each Power)
196 Cardboard Tokens:
ʺʺ 4 Power Markers (one for each Power)
ʺʺ 4 Victory Point Markers (one for each Power)
ʺʺ 16 Dial Advancement Counters
ʺʺ 116 Corruption Tokens (29 for each Power)
ʺʺ 56 Old World Tokens:
ʴʴ 6 Event Tokens
ʴʴ 4 Hero Tokens
ʴʴ 6 Noble Tokens
ʴʴ 20 Peasant Tokens
ʴʴ 6 Skaven Tokens
ʴʴ 14 Warpstone Tokens
• 149 Cards:
ʺʺ 96 Chaos Cards (24 for each Power)
ʺʺ 20 Upgrade Cards (five for each Power)
ʺʺ 5 Ruination Cards
ʺʺ 28 Old World Cards
• 5 Dice
• 45 Plastic Followers:
ʺʺ 11 Khorne Followers:
ʴʴ 1 Bloodthirster Greater Daemon
ʴʴ 6 Bloodletter Warriors
ʴʴ 4 Bloodsworn Cultists
But even as these four Powers play their Great Game
forever and for all time, the Old World itself resists
their ravages and depredations with staunch resolve and
mighty heroes.
The Object of the Game
In Chaos in the Old World, each player takes the
role of one of the four malignant and horrible Ruinous Powers who are fighting to corrupt, dominate, or
destroy the Old World. The Ruinous Powers are also
sometimes called Chaos Powers, Powers, or gods.
There are two routes each player can take to victory:
• All four Powers are rewarded for corrupting and
dominating the regions of the Old World with their
followers and activities. These rewards are recorded
on the victory point (VP) track. If any Power has
accumulated 50 VP at the end of a game round, the
game ends.
2
ʺʺ 12 Nurgle Followers:
ʴʴ 1 Great Unclean One Greater Daemon
ʴʴ 5 Plaguebearer Warriors
ʴʴ 6 Leper Cultists
ʺʺ 12 Tzeentch Followers:
ʴʴ 1 Lord of Change Greater Daemon
ʴʴ 3 Horror Warriors
ʴʴ 8 Acolyte Cultists
ʺʺ 10 Slaanesh Followers:
ʴʴ 1 Keeper of Secrets Greater Daemon
ʴʴ 3 Daemonette Warriors
ʴʴ 6 Seductress Cultists
P ow e r Sh e e t s
Four Power sheets – one per Chaos Power – present a
variety of information for the player of each Power. Each
sheet also provides a track where the player can use his
power marker to track his power points during each
round’s summoning phase.
Component Overview
The following sections describe the components of
Chaos in the Old World.
Power Sheet Faces
Power Sheet Back
G a m e B oa r d
The main portion of the game board is a map of the Old
World. The game board also features the four Ruinous
Powers’ Threat dials, the victory point track, and spaces
for the Old World cards and ruination cards. For more
information, see “Game Board Breakdown” and “Map
Region Breakdown” on pages 4 and 5.
For more information, see “Power Sheet Breakdown” on
page 5.
P ow e r M a r k e r s
Each Chaos Power’s power marker is moved
along its Power sheet’s power point track to
indicate the power points remaining to that
player at any given time.
T h r e at Di a l s a n d
Pl a s t ic C on n e c tor s
The four Threat dials are attached to the game board
using the plastic connectors.
V ic tory P oi n t M a r k e r s
Each Chaos Power’s victory point marker
is moved along the victory point track on
the game board to indicate the number of
victory points that Power has accumulated
in the course of gameplay.
To attach the dials before playing Chaos in the Old
World for the first time, simply push one half of a plastic connector pair through the board and the other half
through the dial. Then push the halves together until
they fit snugly together. Once attached to the board, the
Threat dials should not be removed.
Di a l Adva nc e m e n t C ou n t e r s
Dial advancement counters are used to
keep track of the number of times, during a given game round, that each Chaos
Power fulfills its Threat dial advancement
condition.
Be sure to affix the dials in the correct locations: Khorne
on top, Nurgle to the right, Tzeentch on the bottom, and
Slaanesh to the left.
If the supply of dial advancement counters is ever
exhausted, any convenient markers, such as coins, can
be substituted. The supply of dial advancement counters
should be considered unlimited.
3
Game Board Breakdown
Threat Dials
2
Old World
Deck
Old World
Track
Ruination
Cards
Old World Map
4
1
5
6
3 Victory Point Track
win the game by dial advancement. (The
black portion of each colored track simply
indicates dead space beneath that portion
of the dial.)
1. Old World Map: The map of the Old
World is divided into nine regions. These
are the areas where follower figures, Chaos
cards, and corruption tokens are placed in
the course of play. Each region is defined
by its name and a number, the latter representing both its Resistance and Conquest
Value. Some regions are considered “Populous” and are so-marked. Arrows indicate
the order in which the regions are resolved
during various game phases.
3. Victory Point Track: Each player moves
his victory point marker along the victory
point track to indicate his current victory
point total. The length of the track is not a
limit on the number of victory points that
can be earned.
4. Old World Deck: A convenient space for
the Old World deck.
2. Threat Dials: These dials track each Power’s progress in afflicting the Old World
with its favored style of depravity. Each
dial has two windows. The main window
reveals the progressive benefits that Power
gains from rotating its dial. The smaller
window reveals the Threat value associated with each given dial position. The
colored tracks around the outside of each
dial indicate how far each Power must
advance the main window of its dial to
5. Old World Track: Old World cards are
played faceup in the spaces of this track
to indicate the order in which they will
expire.
6. Ruination Cards: A convenient space for
the five ruination cards to be kept before
they are used to mark ruined map regions.
4
Map Region
Breakdown
Power Sheet Breakdown
1
2
3
Chaos Card Spaces 4
5
4
1 Name
Populous
Tag 2
6
7
8
Region Area
5
1. Name and Title: The Ruinous Power’s
unholy name and one of the many descriptive epithets by which it is known.
Resistance and
3 Conquest Value
2. Draw Phase Instruction: Describes how
many cards that Power draws during each
round’s draw phase.
1. Name: The name of the region.
3. Threat Dial Advancement Instruction:
Describes the conditions under which that
Power gains a dial advancement counter.
2. Populous Tag: If a region is considered
Populous, that word appears. If it does
not appear, the region is not Populous.
4. Round Sequence Reference: Lists the
phases comprising each game round and
summarizes the activities that take place
in each.
3. Resistance and Conquest Value: A single
number that represents both the region’s
R esistance statistic and its Conquest
Value statistic. Note that although the
same number describes both of these
statistics’ default values, game effects that
modify one – i.e., that increase or decrease
it – do not necessarily apply to the other.
5. Flavor Text: Describes the Chaos Power’s
areas of obsession and influence.
6. Old World Token Reference: A guide to
the names and functions of the six types
of Old World tokens.
7. Power Point Track: Used, in conjunction
with the player’s power marker, to track
that Ruinous Power’s power point total
over the course of each round’s summoning phase. One value on each track is
highlighted.
4. Chaos Card Spaces: Each region has two
areas where Chaos cards can be played.
5. Region Area: All of the area within the
region border is available for players to
place their follower figures, or for the
placement of Old World tokens.
8. Follower Statistics: Three separate areas
provide information about that Power’s
Cultists, Warriors, and Greater Daemon.
Each follower’s summoning cost (within
the circle), attack value (left of the axe),
and defense value (left of the shield) are
listed.
5
The quantities of the various Old World tokens are
purposely fixed. If a given type runs out, no additional
tokens of that type are placed while that stockpile remains depleted.
C or ru p t ion Tok e n s
Corruption tokens are placed on the regions of the game
board map to indicate how much each Ruinous Power
has defiled that area. Each Chaos Power has a unique
stock of corruption tokens.
Khorne
Nurgle
Tzeentch
C h ao s C a r ds
Each Ruinous Power has a unique deck of 24 Chaos
Cards that only that player can use to attempt to dominate the regions of the game board map, and carry out a
variety of special activities during play. There is a breakdown of the different parts of a Chaos card on page 13.
Slaanesh
If any Ruinous Power ever runs out of corruption tokens, then any convenient markers, such as coins, can be
used to represent more; the supply of corruption tokens
should be considered unlimited.
Ol d Wor l d Tok e n s
The six types of Old World tokens represent influences
on the game that originate with the Old World itself,
rather than with the Ruinous Powers. The six types are:
Event Tokens: Event tokens are used to
mark the regions where certain extraordinary occurrences described by certain Old
World cards are occurring.
Hero Tokens: Hero tokens represent the
mightiest individual denizens of the Old
World, who lead its fight against the Ruinous Powers.
Khorne Chaos Card
Face and Back
Nurgle Chaos Card
Face and Back
Slaanesh Chaos Card
Face and Back
Tzeentch Chaos Card
Face and Back
Upg r a de C a r ds
Each Chaos Power has a unique set of five upgrade cards
comprising two Chaos Power upgrades and three follower upgrades. These cards are used to record increases
in the inherent capabilities and follower statistics, respectively, of each Ruinous Power. Each upgrade card’s
face and back have the same appearance.
Noble Tokens: Noble tokens represent the
notable rulers of the various nations of the
Old World.
Peasant Tokens: Peasant tokens represent
the common denizens of the Old World.
Skaven Tokens: Skaven tokens represent the
presence and activities of the secretive and
subversive rat-men of the Old World.
Warpstone Tokens: Warpstone tokens represent areas where the strange and Chaosaligned substance known as warpstone has
manifested in the Old World.
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Ru i n at ion C a r ds
Ruination cards are used to mark regions of the game
board that the Chaos Powers have collectively ruined by
their pervasive infestation. In addition to marking such
regions, each ruination card serves as a reference of the
victory points scored at the time of ruination.
Ol d Wor l d C a r ds
Old World cards describe things that happen in the Old
World in the course of the game. Most of their effects
manipulate and spawn Old World tokens on the game
board. Only a subset of all Old World cards, based on
the number of players participating, is used in any given
game of Chaos in the Old World.
Ruination Cards Faces
and Common Back
Old World Cards Faces
and Common Back
Dic e
Standard six-sided dice are used to resolve battles in
Chaos in the Old World. They are sometimes called
“battle dice.” The quantity of dice included in the game
is not a limit on the number that can be rolled at once
during play. If additional dice are needed, they can be
scavenged from other games, or the initial results recorded or remembered and the same dice rolled again.
Ruination Card
Breakdown
1. Order Number: 1
A number that
indicates the order in which ruination cards are
used as regions
are ruined over
the course of
the game. (“1”
is used first, “2”
is used second,
and so on.)
2
3
Pl a s t ic Fol l ow e r s
These plastic figures – known interchangeably as “followers” and “figures” – represent the worshippers and
champions of the Ruinous Powers. They are summoned
onto the game board to engender corruption, destroy
enemies, and establish dominance.
2. “Ruiners Score…” Text: A description of
how many victory points each Power that
is party to the ruination of a region scores
during that corruption phase (see “Placing
Corruption Tokens” on page 19).
Each Ruinous Power controls all of the figures of a
given color: red for Khorne, green for Nurgle, blue for
Tzeentch, and purple for Slaanesh.
3. Ruination Victory Point Table: A table
listing the number of victory points scored
by the first- and second-place corruptors in
the end phase, based on the region ruined
(see “Score Ruined Regions” on page 20).
There are three different classes of followers – Cultists, Warriors, and Greater Daemons – that are common to all of the gods of chaos. However, each Ruinous
Power also has a unique, descriptive name for its followers of each class. The following table summarizes these.
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Power
Class
Name
Khorne
Cultists
Bloodsworn
Warriors
Bloodletters
Greater Daemon
Bloodthirster
Cultists
Lepers
Warriors
Plaguebearers
Greater Daemon
Great Unclean One
Cultists
Acolytes
Warriors
Horrors
Greater Daemon
Lord of Change
Cultists
Seductresses
Warriors
Daemonettes
Greater Daemon
Keeper of Secrets
Nurgle
Tzeentch
Slaanesh
Setup
To prepare a game of Chaos in the Old World, players carry out the following steps.
1. Place Game Board: Place the game board in the
center of the play area. Assemble the Threat dials (see
page 3) if this game set has never been used before.
Set each Ruinous Power’s Threat dial so its “start”
text is visible in its main window (just above the
three o’clock position).
2. Distribute Sheets and Arrange Seating: Distribute one Power sheet to each player, either by consensus among the players, or, if no consensus can
be reached, randomly. If there are fewer than four
players, return any unused sheets to the box. Then,
arrange the seating order around the table so players
will take their turns in clockwise order: Khorne sits
first, with Nurgle to his left, Tzeentch to Nurgle’s
left, and Slaanesh to Tzeentch’s left. (Skip over any
Chaos Powers not being played.)
Note that the Cultist figures of the four Powers share
the same sculpted shape, while each Power’s Warriors
and Greater Daemon take forms particularly pleasing to
the Chaos god in question.
Bloodsworn
Lepers
Bloodletters
Plaguebearers
3. Distribute Powers’ Cards, Tokens, and Figures:
Distribute the power markers, victory point markers, corruption tokens, Chaos cards, upgrade cards,
and plastic followers to the appropriate players. If
there are fewer than four players, return any unused
components to the box. It is wise for each player to
tuck his as-yet-unused upgrade cards partway under
the left or right edge of his Power sheet in a stack,
so none of the other players will be confused about
which upgrade cards are in play and which are not.
Bloodthirster
4. Place Power Markers and Victory Point Markers:
Each player places his power marker on the highlighted starting space of the power point track on his
Power sheet, and places his victory point marker on
the “0” space of the game board’s victory point track.
Great
Unclean One
Acolytes
Horrors
Lord of Change
Seductresses
Daemonettes
Keeper of
Secrets
5. Prepare Common Tokens, Ready Dice, and Place
Ruination Cards: Separate the dial advancement
counters and Old World tokens into piles by type,
placing each pile near the board so it can be easily
reached by all players. Also place the dice near the
game board, in easy reach of all players. Finally, sort
the ruination cards into an ordered stack with the
“1” card on top and the “5” card on the bottom, and
place this stack on the game board where indicated.
8
6. Create Old World Deck: Shuffle all of the Old
World cards together. Then deal cards facedown
from the top of this stack to form the Old World
deck. Deal seven cards for a four-player game, or
eight cards for a three-player game. Place this deck
facedown on the game board where indicated. Return the remaining Old World cards to the box; they
will not be used this game.
In many phases, all four Chaos Powers carry out actions that are interdependent (i.e., where the actions
of one Power may depend on the actions of another).
When this is the case, the players always act in Power
order: Khorne first, Nurgle second, Tzeentch third,
and Slaanesh fourth. For convenience, this is the order
(clockwise from the top) in which the four dials are arranged on the game board.
7. Place Starting Old World Tokens: Separate two
Noble tokens, three Warpstone tokens, and four
Peasant tokens from the main stockpiles and mix
these nine tokens together. Then randomly choose
tokens from this pool (such as from one player’s
cupped hands, or from the box top held above eye
level) one at a time, placing each on the board as it is
selected, one per map region, in the standard region
order (see “Region Order” on page 25). When this is
done, there should be one token in each region.
The Old World Phase
In the Old World phase, a single card is drawn from
the top of the Old World deck and its italicized instructions carried out immediately. These actions should be
carried out by the player with the lowest Threat (see
“Threat” on page 22). If the card requires any decisions
to be made, such as in which region(s) new Old World
tokens should be placed, the player with the lowest
Threat makes these decisions.
8. Shuffle and Draw Chaos Cards: Each player
shuffles his Chaos cards to form a Chaos deck, draws
a hand of three cards from the top of his deck, and
places the remainder of the deck near his Power sheet
and as-yet-unused upgrade cards.
Unless a given Old World card instructs otherwise, once
the italicized instructions have been followed, the Old
World card is placed faceup in the left-hand (“1”) space
of the Old World card track. Any card previously in the
“1” space is moved to the “2” space. If a card is moved
from the “1” space to the “2” space, any card previously
in the “2” space is removed from play, has no further
effect, and can be returned to the box.
Once these steps have been carried out, gameplay begins
with the first game round’s Old World phase.
The Game Round
Certain Old World cards bear the text “Discard this
card instead of adding it to the Old World track.”
Such cards can be returned to the game box after their
instructions have been carried out. The cards on the Old
World track are not affected and remain in place.
Chaos in the Old World is played in a series of game
rounds, or rounds. Each game round is made up of
six phases that always occur in the following order each
round:
For more information on the effects of Old World cards,
and the effects of the Old World tokens that most Old
World cards manipulate, see “Old World Cards” and
“Old World Tokens,” both on page 24.
1. Old World Phase
2. Draw Phase
3. Summoning Phase
4. Battle Phase
5. Corruption Phase
6. End Phase
The corruption phase and end phase each have several
steps, which are always carried out in order. The steps of
each of these phases are enumerated in “The Corruption
Phase” and “The End Phase” sections (pages 19 and 20,
respectively).
9
The Twin-tailed Comet Icon
the Old World track.” Because “Greenskins
Invade” bears the Twin-tailed Comet icon, it is
immediately removed from play and returned
to the box. This leaves the “1” space on the Old
World track empty.
Cards with Twin-tailed
Comet icons bear the image
shown here near their titles.
Twin-tailed
Some Old World cards include Comet Icon
text that reads “[R]emove any
Old World cards bearing the Twin-tailed
Comet icon from the Old World track.”
“Norse Reavers”
Drawn
When a card that gives the above instruction
is placed into play, all Old World cards on
the Old World card track bearing the Twintailed Comet icon are removed from from
play before the new event card is added to
the Old World track. They can be returned
to the box. Such cards cease to affect the
game, regardless of whether and how many
Event tokens remain on the game board.
“Greenskins Invade”
Removed
Next, the rest of the immediate instructions
(see page 24) on the “Norse Reavers” card are
carried out, with various Old World tokens
being removed from and placed on the map.
Once its immediate instructions have been
carried out, “Norse Reavers” is added to the
Old World track. Because there is no card in
the “1” space at the time it is added, no card is
displaced to the “2” space, and so the existing
“Warpstone Discovery” card simply remains
there. At the end of the Old World phase, the
Old World track is arranged in this way:
Example: When the Old World phase
begins, “Greenskins Invade” and “Warpstone
Discovery” are present on the Old World track
in the “1” and “2” spaces, respectively.
The Old World card “Norse Reavers” is
drawn from the Old World deck. It bears
the text “[R]emove any Old World cards
bearing the Twin-tailed Comet icon from
10
ing Follower Figures” on this page and “Playing Chaos
Cards” on page 12. When a figure or card with a power
cost of zero is summoned or played, the power marker is
not adjusted.
The Draw Phase
During the draw phase, each player draws cards from
his own Chaos card deck according to the draw phase
instructions on his Power sheet. If a player’s deck is ever
exhausted, he shuffles his discards to create a fresh deck.
If a player’s turn comes and that player does not wish to
summon a figure or play a card, he must move his power
marker to the “0” space of his power point track, and his
turn ends.
Note that each player only ever draws cards from his
own Chaos deck, and never from the decks of the other
Chaos Powers.
So long as a player has power points remaining, he may
continue to summon a follower or play a card each time
his turn comes. However, when a player’s turn comes
and that player’s power marker is on the “0” space of his
power point track, that player’s turn is skipped.
There is no Chaos card hand size limit.
During the draw phase, each player also moves his
power marker to the highlighted space on his Power
sheet’s power point track. Alternately, if a player has
purchased one or more upgrade cards that give him
extra power points, he moves his marker further than
the highlighted value, depending on the specifics of the
upgrade(s) he has purchased.
The summoning phase ends when all players’ power
markers are on the “0” spaces of their respective power
point tracks.
Su mmon i ng Fol l ow e r F igu r e s
To place one of his followers on the board during the
summoning phase (i.e., to summon a figure), a player
simply does the following:
Note that players never carry over unused power points
from previous rounds.
Because their activities are not interdependent, all players may act simultaneously during the draw phase.
1. Chooses one of his available figures.
2. Pays the selected figure’s cost.
3. Places the figure on a legal board region.
Summoning Phase
When choosing a figure, the player may either select one
of his figures that is not currently on the board, or may alternately select a figure that is already on the board (in the
latter case, presumably to move it to a different region).
No matter the source of the figure, it is still considered to
be “summoned.” To “summon” a figure, “place” a figure,
and even “move” a figure are all equivalent terms.
During the summoning phase, the players summon followers and play Chaos cards to the board’s nine regions.
In each summoning phase, most players will summon a
number of figures and play several cards.
To pay the figure’s cost, the player simply adjusts his
power point track by an amount equal to the figure’s
cost. If the player does not have enough power remaining, he may not choose that figure.
In the summoning phase, the players take turns acting, following the standard order (Khorne, Nurgle,
Tzeentch, Slaanesh). After the Slaanesh player acts, the
Khorne player is next, with this circular order continuing until the summoning phase ends.
To place the figure on the board, the player places the
figure in one of the nine map regions. The only restriction on figure placement is that the figure must be
placed in a region where that Chaos Power already has
a figure, or in a region adjacent to such a region. (A djacent regions are those that share a border.) The only
exception is that when a given player has no figures on
the board, he may place his first figure in any region,
without restriction.
Each time a player’s turn to act comes, he may either
summon (i.e., place) one follower figure on the board, or
play one Chaos card.
Most follower placement and card play requires the
player to spend power points. A player spends power
points by simply moving his power marker leftward to
reflect his reduced power point total. See “Summon-
11
Note that the placing player may count a given region
as occupied by his own figure if he chose the last figure
in that region to summon. For example, a player who
picks up his last figure in Norsca in order to summon it
to a different location may summon that figure to Troll
Country (which is adjacent to Norsca) even if he has no
other figures in Troll Country or in any regions adjacent
to Troll Country.
Pl ay i ng C h ao s C a r ds
To play a Chaos card, a player simply does the
following:
Example: Brian is playing Khorne. When his turn of the
summoning phase comes, he plays one of his Bloodsworn
followers in Troll Country and moves his power marker one
space down his power track (because his Bloodsworn have a
cost of one). This is legal because he already has at least one
figure in the adjacent region of Kislev, and because he has
enough power left to pay the cost of the Cultist.
To pay a card’s cost, the player simply adjusts his power
point track by an amount equal to the card’s cost. If the
player does not have enough power remaining, he may
not choose that card.
1. Chooses a card from his hand of Chaos cards.
2. Pays the selected card’s cost.
3. Places the card on an empty card space on any of the
board’s nine regions and carries out its effects.
When placing a card on the board, the player must
place it in an empty card space. There are two such card
spaces corresponding to each region, one on each side
of its name-label. If a given region’s spaces are already
full, the card may not be played to that region. If all 18
spaces on the board are full, the player may not play a
Chaos card.
Brian places a new
Bloodsworn figure in
Troll Country…
…and moves his power
marker one space to
the left to pay its cost.
The board’s 18
Chaos card spaces
When a Chaos card is played on the board, its effects
are carried out. Some make an immediate change to the
state of the game, some have effects that are persistent
while the card remains in play, and others take effect at
some specified later time.
Brian would not have been able to play any figure to
Norsca (because he has no followers in Norsca or in any
region adjacent to Norsca) and would not have been able to
summon his Bloodthirster follower to any region (because it
costs more power points than he has remaining).
If two Chaos cards played to the same region would
otherwise happen simultaneously, the left-hand (i.e.,
eastern) card is resolved first, and the right-hand card
resolved second.
Once Brian’s placement has been carried out, the Nurgle
player’s turn begins.
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Chaos Card Breakdown
Magic Symbol: When
this icon is present, the
card contributes one magic
symbol to the region in
question while the card is
present there. See “Magic
Symbols” on page 26.
Title: The name of the card.
Cost: A Chaos card’s cost
is the number of power
points that must be spent
to play this card, which
is sometimes modified
by other cards or effects.
Also, it is the amount this
card contributes toward its
player’s domination value in
the region where it is played
(see “Calculating Domination” on page 19), which
is never modified by other
cards or effects.
Victory Point Track
The effects of Chaos cards are mandatory, assuming
that they are possible, unless their text notes otherwise.
For example, the Tzeentch card “Teleport” says, “Move
any Cultist or Warrior in this region to any other region
when you play this card.” The Tzeentch player may not
play this card to a region containing a figure and then
not move that figure to another region, even if such
movement would be disadvantageous to Tzeentch. If the
Tzeentch player played the card to a region containing
no figures – which is legal – then obviously no figure
would be moved.
Effect: The special game
effect this card has, sometimes called the “text effect” of the card. The word
“you” in this section always
refers to the player who
played the card.
resulting hits before regular battle dice are rolled.” If
Khorne played two copies of “Blood Frenzy” in a given
region, that player would roll four dice.
Note, however, that some Chaos cards’ effects are obviously non-cumulative by their nature. For example,
“Field of Carnage” reads, “No figures other than yours
may be summoned from this region.” Applying such
an effect twice clearly yields no additional effect. The
card “The Skull Throne” is another example. It reads,
“When adding up your domination value in this region,
count the sum of your figures’ attack values rather than
your quantity of figures.” Two copies played in the same
region would each cause the Khorne player to use his
sum of attack values rather than his quantity of figures,
so the effect is non-cumulative.
The effects of two Chaos cards with the same name in
the same region are generally cumulative. For example,
“Blood Frenzy” reads, “At the beginning of battle in
this region, you roll two battle dice here and apply any
13
Example: Brian is playing Khorne. When his turn in the
summoning phase comes, he spends one power point to play
“The Skull Throne,” a Chaos card, from his hand. He pays
its cost and then places the card in an empty card space in
Kislev.
Cards With Reminders
Some Chaos cards give instructions intended
to help players remember their effects, such
as which particular follower figure is affected
by a given Chaos card. For example, the
Tzeentch Chaos card “Warp Shield” says,
“When you play this card, choose one of
your figures in this region. That figure cannot be killed in battle this round. Place it on
this card to help you remember the chosen
figure.”
He could not have played his “Reborn in Blood” card,
because it costs more power points than he has left. He
could not have played any Chaos card to Troll Country,
because both card spaces there are already full.
The Nurgle player’s turn begins. The next time Brian’s turn
comes, it will be skipped, because his power marker is now
on the “0” space of its track.
Memory aids of this type never have the force
of a game rule; when necessary, they should
be set aside. If the players wish, some alternate memory aid may be introduced.
Example: The Tzeentch player plays “Warp
Shield” in the Empire, identifies one of his
Cultists already present there as the target, and
places that Cultist figure on the “Warp Shield”
card. Later in the turn, the Tzeentch player
plays a “Teleport” card in the second Empire
card space. (Teleport reads,“Move any Cultist
or Warrior in this region to any other region
when you play this card.”) The Tzeentch player
chooses the Cultist protected by “Warp Shield”
and moves it to Estalia. Nothing about the
“Warp Shield” card prevents him from choosing
that Cultist, and the “Warp Shield” card’s
location is not affected by the play of “Teleport.”
The “Warp Shield” remains in its Empire card
space. Critically, the effects of “Warp Shield” –
that the Cultist in question cannot be killed in
battle this round – do remain in effect for that
particular Cultist figure even though it has been
moved to Estalia. If the players wish, they could
place the Cultist in Estalia on top of a coin or
some other marker to help them remember it
is protected by the effects of the “Warp Shield”
card even though it is no longer in the Empire.
Brian places his
“The Skull Throne”
card in Kislev…
…and moves his
power marker one
space to the left.
14
The Battle Phase
Six-only Hits
In the battle phase, the Chaos Powers’ followers in
each region fight against one another, as well as against
Peasant tokens.
The upgrade card for Slaanesh’s Daemonettes
gives them the special ability that they can
only be damaged by battle die results of 6.
This is as simple as it seems: battle dice showing results of 4 and 5, which would normally
cause hits, cannot be assigned to cause hits
against upgraded Daemonettes.
Battle is carried out region by region in the standard
region order (see “Region Order” on page 25). It occurs
in every region where one player is entitled to roll battle
dice and has at least one legal target for his hits.
To resolve battle in a given region, each player, in the
normal player order (i.e., Khorne, Nurgle, Tzeentch,
Slaanesh), does the following:
1. Calculates the number of battle dice available to him
and rolls them. Observing their results, he rolls any
additional dice gained from explosions.
2. Assigns hits to legal targets.
figures (unless they are controlled by another player –
see “Control of Enemy Figures” on page 25).
If enough hits are assigned to a figure that they equal
or exceed its defense value, that figure is tipped onto its
side to indicate that it has been killed. (However, it will
not be removed from the board until all players have
rolled their battle dice for the region; see the next page.)
C a l c u l at i ng B at t l e Dic e
To calculate the number of battle dice available to a
player, he totals the attack values of all of his figures in
that region. Previously tipped figures that remain on the
board (see below) contribute their attack values normally. Note that many figures – especially Cultists – have
an attack value of “0,” and so contribute no dice. Additional battle dice may arise from the effects of Chaos
cards, or other special circumstances. These are simply
added to the player’s total.
A Peasant token can only sustain one hit. Immediately
upon sustaining a hit, a Peasant token is removed from
the board and placed on the Power sheet belonging
to the player who
killed it. (That is,
Peasant tokens are
not “tipped” like
figures are.)
A player must always roll all of the battle dice he is
entitled to roll.
Once a player’s battle dice are rolled, for each die whose
result is 4, 5, or 6 the rolling player scores one hit. In
addition, every result of 6 explodes, which means that
the attacker rolls one additional battle die immediately
(which causes an additional hit on a 4, 5, or 6, and
which explodes again on a 6). There is no limit to the
number of times a player’s battle dice can explode if he
continues to roll results of 6.
Assig n i ng H i t s
To assign hits, once all battle dice have been rolled
(including additional dice from any die explosions), the
player simply announces, for each hit, which enemy figure, or Peasant token, he is targeting. Each hit must be
assigned to a target in the region whose battle is being
resolved. A player may not allocate hits against his own
15
Early Hits
Combat Example:
A Three-way Battle
Some Chaos cards and upgrade powers give
players battle dice to roll at the beginning of
the battle phase or – in the case of upgraded
Bloodletter figures – “before other figures roll
their dice.”
Brian’s forces of Khorne in Kislev consist of
two Bloodletters. Maria, playing Nurgle, has
a Great Unclean One present. Finally, Alan,
playing Tzeentch, has two Acolytes in that
region.
Such battle dice can kill adversary figures
before those figures roll their own battle dice.
Such casualties should therefore be removed
from the board immediately when they are
killed (instead of simply being tipped). However, early hits are also cumulative with hits
rolled by the same player’s figures when regular
battle dice are rolled. This is an exception to
the normal rule that hits may not be “stored
up” (see page 17).
The battle phase begins. Players act in Power
order, so Brian is first. Brian is entitled to roll
four battle dice, because each of his Bloodletters has an attack value of 2. He rolls 1,
3, 4, and 6. He counts two hits (from the 4
and 6). The 6 also explodes, so he rolls one
additional die, which results in a 5 – another
hit – for a total of three hits. He applies them
all to the Great Unclean One, which has a
defense value of 3. He tips the Great Unclean
One figure on its side to indicate that it will
be eliminated.
Example: A Khorne player uses a “Blood
Frenzy” Chaos card (which allows him to roll
two additional battle dice at the beginning
of the battle phase) in a region where his
Bloodthirster is attacking Nurgle’s Great
Unclean One. His “Blood Frenzy” dice results
are 4 and 5, which both score hits. However,
these two hits are not enough to kill the Great
Unclean One, which can sustain three hits.
In the main part of the battle phase, Khorne’s
Bloodthirster rolls four additional dice, with
results of 2, 3, 4, and 5. Two additional hits
are scored, which, added to the two hits from
earlier in the phase, is one more than necessary
to kill the Great Unclean One. The Nurgle
player also has the opportunity to roll his own
three battle dice, with results of 1, 3, and 5.
His single hit is not enough to take out the
Bloodthirster.
Maria acts next in the Power order. Her
Great Unclean One’s attack value is 3, so she
throws three battle dice and rolls 2, 4, and 5.
Two hits, no explosions. She applies one hit
to one of Brian’s Bloodletters and the other
to one of Alan’s Acolytes, tipping each.
Alan is the last one to act, but his remaining
Acolyte figure has an attack value of 0, so
he rolls no battle dice and can’t generate any
hits.
With all of the dice rolled, the tipped Great
Unclean One, Bloodletter, and Acolyte are
removed from the board, leaving one Bloodletter and one Acolyte remaining in Kislev.
Battle resolution moves to the next region –
in this case, the Empire.
Note that if the “Blood Frenzy” dice had
exploded, and enough hits generated to kill the
Great Unclean One outright before the main
part of the battle phase, then the Great Unclean
One would have been eliminated from the
board immediately at that time, and the Nurgle
player would not have been able to roll the
Great Unclean One’s battle dice at all.
16
A player may not assign fewer hits to a figure than are
necessary to kill it and thereby “store them up” in order
to combine hits with other players. That is, different
players may not “gang up” on the same powerful figure
within a region.
Combat Example:
Fighting Peasants
Excess rolled hits – i.e., those without a legal target –
are lost.
In the Border Princes, Khorne is the only
Chaos Power with any figures present: he has
a single Bloodletter there. There are also two
Peasant tokens present.
A player who has legal targets for rolled hits must assign
them. A player might not wish to assign hits to his own
figures that are under the temporary control of another
player, for example, but nevertheless, must do so if no
other targets exist.
When the times come to resolve battle in the
Border Princes, Brian – the Khorne player –
throws two battle dice, rolling 3 and 4. He
scores one hit, and uses it to kill one Peasant
token, which he places on his Power sheet,
leaving the other one behind, unharmed.
Once all players have rolled dice and assigned hits, tipped
units are removed from the board and the next region is
addressed, until all battle is done for all regions.
Battle resolution proceeds to the next region.
Be g i n n i ng of B at t l e a n d
E n d of B at t l e Eff e c t s
Note that certain effects – such as from Chaos cards –
instruct players to carry out certain actions at the beginning or end of the battle phase. Such actions are
carried out before any player rolls his normal
battle dice in any region, or after all players
roll all battle dice in all regions, respectively.
17
Combat Example: A Complicated Fight
Plaguebearer would remove one Nurgle battle die from the equation before it could be
rolled, and was therefore the better choice.)
In Estalia, Brian (Khorne) has one Bloodletter and one Bloodsworn. Maria (Nurgle) has
one Great Unclean One, two Plaguebearers,
and one Leper. Neither of the other Powers
have any figures present in Estalia. However,
to complicate matters, Brian played a “Blood
Frenzy” card in Estalia during the summoning phase, while Maria played a “Rain of
Pus” card there.
With no more “beginning of battle” effects to
resolve, regular battle dice are rolled beginning
with Khorne. Brian counts two dice for his
Bloodletter and no dice from his Bloodsworn.
He rolls two 4s for two hits. Applying them to
Maria’s Great Unclean One is illegal because
they would not be sufficient to kill it, so he
applies them both to the Leper (whose defense
value is currently 2 due to “Rain of Pus”) and
tips it over.
Maria is next. Maria counts three battle dice
from her Great Unclean One, one from her
remaining Plaguebearer, and none from her
Leper. (She receives no battle dice from her
dead Plaguebearer because “Blood Frenzy” is a
“beginning of battle” effect and its targets – if
killed – are removed from play before they can
roll their regular dice. She receives none from
her Leper not because it is tipped, but because
its attack value is 0.) Rolling 1, 2, 3, and 6,
Maria counts one hit and one explosion. Her
explosion also results in a 6, for a second hit
and a second explosion. The second explosion
results in a 4, for a third hit. She applies one hit
to Brian’s Bloodletter (tipping it) and one hit to
Brian’s Bloodsworn (tipping it). Her third hit
goes to waste for want of any more targets.
First, “beginning of battle” effects are
resolved. Brian throws the two battle dice
specified by his “Blood Frenzy” card, which
result in rolls of 1 and 6 (one hit and one
explosion). The additional die from the explosion results in a 4. Brian has generated two
hits. Normally, it would only take one hit to
kill a Plaguebearer, but the effects of “Rain of
Pus” increase each Nurgle figure’s defense by
one. He uses both hits to kill one of Maria’s
Plaguebearers. However, it is removed immediately rather than tipped for later removal,
per the effects of “Blood Frenzy.”
Finally, the tipped figures – the Bloodletter,
Bloodsworn, and Leper – are removed. Battle
resolution proceeds to the next region with
only the Great Unclean One remaining alive in
Estalia. The Chaos cards in Estalia also remain
in place, for the time being; they will not be
cleared from the board until the end phase.
(Brian could have elected, as an alternate
strategy, to apply his two hits to Maria’s
Great Unclean One, in hopes of rolling
at least two more hits to eliminate that
figure in the main part of the battle phase.
However, he reasoned that eliminating the
18
represented by precisely the same numeral on the game
board), they are modified by various effects independently. For example, a Skaven Old World token reduces
a region’s Resistance by one, but does not affect its
Conquest Value. A Noble Old World token increases a
region’s Conquest Value by one, but does not affect its
Resistance.
The Corruption Phase
The corruption phase has two steps. In the domination step, which takes place first, players score conquest
points for dominating the board regions. In the corruption step, which is second, players place corruption
tokens in the regions where they have one or more Cultist followers.
Example: In the domination step of the corruption phase,
Khorne has two Bloodsworn followers in Kislev and has
played the card “The Blood God’s Call” there. Nurgle,
meanwhile, has a Great Unclean One figure and a “Plague
Touch” card in Kislev. Khorne’s domination value in
Kislev is 4 (two figures present, and one card with a cost of
2), while Nurgle’s domination value is only 1 (one figure
present, and one card with a cost of 0). Because Khorne has
the highest domination value, that value is compared to
the region’s Resistance of 3. Because Khorne’s domination
value exceeds Kislev’s Resistance, the Khorne player scores 3
victory points, as Kislev’s Conquest Value is also 3.
C a l c u l at i ng D om i n at ion
To resolve the domination step of the corruption phase,
each region is considered in turn, in standard region
order (see “Region Order” on page 25).
For each region, calculate each player’s domination
value there by adding the summoning costs on any
Chaos cards that player played in that region to the raw
quantity of figures that player controls in that region.
So, to summarize:
Domination Value =
Sum of Chaos Card Costs + Quantity of Figures
Pl ac i ng C or ru p t ion Tok e n s
To resolve the corruption step, each region is considered
in turn, in standard region order (see “Region Order” on
page 25).
Note that the summoning costs of the figures in question
are not relevant to the domination value calculation;
only the actual quantity of figures counts. Thus, one
Greater Daemon is the equivalent of one Cultist for this
purpose.
For each region, each player first places one corruption
token in that region for each of his Cultists there. Then,
before moving on to the next region, the players count
the total number of corruption tokens in the region
(among all players). If this total is 12 or more, that region is ruined. Warpstone tokens also count as corruption tokens when calculating this sum (see “Old World
Tokens” on page 24).
Note also that the printed summoning cost of each Chaos
card is the factor that is considered when calculating a
player’s domination value, rather than the number of
power points actually paid to play the card (in case these
are different values).
Once domination values have been calculated, the
player whose domination value is highest compares his
domination value to the Resistance of the region. If the
player’s domination value exceeds the region’s Resistance
(equalling it is not sufficient), that player immediately
scores victory points equal to that region’s Conquest
Value.
Corruption Tokens
If two or more players tie for the highest domination
value in a region, none of them dominate it, and none
score victory points, even if all tied players exceeded the
region’s Resistance.
If a region is ruined, the top ruination card from the ruination card stack is placed on that region. (This should
be the next sequential ruination card that’s available, as
indicated by order number. For example, if two regions
have already been ruined in a given game, a newly ruined region would receive the ruination card bearing the
order number “3.”)
Important Note: Although each region’s initial Resistance and Conquest Value are the same (and are
Then, each player who placed at least one corruption
token in that region during this corruption step imme-
19
The End Phase
diately scores the number of victory points indicated for
ruiners on that ruination card. Once the ruiners’ points
have been scored, the players move on to the next region
to place corruption tokens. (More points will be scored
from that ruination card in the end phase.)
The end phase has several steps that occur in order.
They are:
If a region would be ruined according to the count of
corruption tokens there, but no ruination cards remain
in the stack (because five regions have already been
ruined), then the region is not ruined, and no points are
scored for its ruination, either by ruiners (as described
above) or by the players with the most and second-most
corruption tokens there (see “Score Ruined Regions”
later on this page).
1. Remove Chaos Cards from the Board
2. Resolve Hero Tokens
3. Resolve Old World Cards
4. Score Ruined Regions
5. Advance Threat Dials
6. Check for Game End
Example: In the corruption step of the corruption phase,
Estalia is already near ruination: four Khorne corruption
tokens, five Nurgle corruption tokens, and one Slaanesh
corruption token are already present from previous turns.
This turn, Khorne and Tzeentch each have one Cultist
figure present, while Nurgle has three Cultists. Thus, the
Khorne player places one new Khorne corruption token, the
Tzeentch player places one new corruption token, and the
Nurgle player places three new corruption tokens. Then,
the total number of corruption tokens among all players
is counted, providing a total of 15 (5 Khorne tokens + 8
Nurgle tokens + 1 Tzeentch token + 1 Slaanesh token). The
region is ruined because the total is 12 or more.
R e mov e C h ao s C a r ds
f rom t h e B oa r d
Each player removes his played Chaos cards from the
board and places them in his deck’s discard pile.
Each step is described below.
R e s olv e H e ro Tok e n s
In each region with a Hero token, the
player with the greatest Threat who also
has at least one figure in that region
must choose one of his figures in that
region, and remove it from the board.
Hero Token
This process is carried out once for each Hero token
present, one at a time. If, for example, one player’s last
figure is eliminated from a region and other players still
have followers there, subsequent Hero tokens in that
same region will affect a different player or players.
This is the first ruination in
this game, so the ruination
card with the order number
“1” is placed in Estalia.
That card reads, “Ruiners
Score 3 Points Each,” so
the Khorne, Tzeentch, and
Nurgle players each score 3
victory points immediately,
because they all placed
corruption tokens in the
region during this step.
Slaanesh does not score
any victory points, because
although there is one
The First Ruination Card
Slaanesh corruption token
present in the region, it was not placed during this step.
R e s olv e Ol d Wor l d C a r ds
Players examine the Old World card track and resolve
any effects that begin with the phrase, “When Old
World cards are resolved…” Multiple cards with such
effects are resolved in the order of their position on the
track. That is, the card in the “1” space of the track is
resolved before the card in the “2” space.
S c or e Ru i n e d R e g ion s
For each ruination card placed this round (i.e., for each
such card still faceup on the board), players score points
based on the number of their corruption tokens found
in the ruined region. Ruined regions are scored in standard region order (see “Region Order” on page 25).
Khorne and Nurgle will also score additional points for
their part in Estalia’s ruination in the end phase, but those
points are not recorded yet.
For each ruined region to be scored, the player with the
most corruption tokens in that region scores the “first”
value for the region in question (as recorded in the table
20
on the ruination card). Then, the player with the secondmost corruption tokens in that region scores the “second” value for the region in question.
Adva nc e T h r e at Di a l s
Throughout the game round, the Powers collect dial
advancement counters on their Threat dials (see “Dial
Advancement Conditions and Counters” on page 22).
If only one player has corruption tokens in the region
in question, only the “first” value is scored for that
ruination.
In this step, every player who has one or
more advancement counters on his dial
advances his dial by one clockwise tick
and carries out the instruction revealed.
If two or more players tie for the most corruption
tokens in the region, the “first” and “second” values are
summed and divided by the number of tied players to
determine how many victory points each of those players scores. Fractional victory points are not scored (i.e.,
round down). In such cases, no other (i.e., no non-tied)
players score points.
Dial
Advancement
Additionally, the player with the most
Counter
counters on his dial advances his dial
by one additional tick, carrying out the instruction
revealed. If two or more players are tied for the most
counters, no player scores an additional tick.
If there is no tie for the most corruption tokens in the
region, and if two or more players tie for the secondmost tokens, the “second” value is divided by the number of tied players to determine how many victory points
each of those players scores. Once again, fractional
victory points are not scored.
For a full description of the effects of each dial instruction, see “Dial Instructions” on page 23.
Once all players have advanced their dials, all dial advancement counters are returned to the stockpile.
Example: At the end of the first game round, there are two
dial advancement counters on Khorne’s Threat dial, one
counter on Nurgle’s dial, one counter on Tzeentch’s dial,
and no counters on Slaanesh’s dial. Khorne, Nurgle, and
Tzeentch each advance their dials by one tick and carry
out the newly revealed instructions. Specifically, Khorne
scores 4 victory points, Nurgle scores 3 victory points, and
Tzeentch places one Warpstone token on the board. Then,
because Khorne has the most advancement counters (and is
not tied with any other player for this honor), Khorne’s dial
is advanced a second tick. Khorne selects and puts into play
an upgrade card, per the newly revealed instruction.
Once these points are awarded, the ruination card is
turned facedown in that region, marking it as permanently ruined (see “Ruined Regions” on page 25), and
all corruption tokens are cleared from the region.
Example: In continuation of the example on the previous
page, a ruination card is faceup in Estalia during the end
phase, where Nurgle has eight corruption tokens, Khorne
has five corruption tokens, Tzeentch has one corruption
token, and Slaanesh has one corruption token.
The players refer to the ruination card and see that the
Estalia values for “first” and “second” on this ruination
card are 9 and 4, respectively. Nurgle has the most
corruption tokens of any Power, so Nurgle scores 9 victory
points. Khorne has the second-most, so Khorne scores 4
victory points. Neither Tzeentch nor Slaanesh score any
victory points.
Then, all advancement counters are cleared from all Threat
dials, and are returned to the stockpile.
The ruination card is turned facedown, and Estalia is
considered ruined. All corruption tokens in Estalia are
returned to their players’ stockpiles.
Each player with at least one advancement counter on his dial
advances his dial one tick. The player with the most counters – in
this case, the Khorne player – advances his dial a second tick.
21
Other Rules
C h e c k for G a m e E n d
If any of the following four conditions are true, the
game ends:
The following sections contain additional rules for playing Chaos in the Old World.
1. The game ends if one or more players’ Threat dials
have reached their “Victory” dial instruction.
2. The game ends if one or more players have scored 50
or more victory points.
3. The game ends if five regions have been ruined.
4. The game ends if the Old World card deck is empty.
The Threat Dials
The Threat dials found on the game board are an
important part of Chaos in the Old World. The sections that follow give more information about how they
function.
Each condition, and how the winner is determined for
each, is described below.
Note that the four conditions are checked in order, and
the game ends immediately when one of them is true.
Further game-ending conditions are not checked once
the game has ended, and players may not win by fulfilling them. For example, if one player wins by Threat
dial advancement, it is not relevant that another player
has more than 50 victory points; the first player wins as
described under “Maximum Threat,” below.
T h r e at
For each text instruction that appears in the main window of a given Threat dial, a smaller window also reveals
a corresponding number. This number is that Chaos
Power’s Threat value, or Threat. Certain rules and
cards often call for the player with the highest or lowest
Threat to do something or to be affected by some effect.
Ma x im u m T h r e a t
If one player has turned his Threat dial to the maximum
level of Threat (i.e., the word “Victory” appears in his
dial’s main window), that player wins. If more than one
player reaches this level, the tied player with more victory points wins. If some players remain tied, the victory
is shared among them.
Khorne’s Threat dial.
Khorne’s current Threat
value – also simply called
Khorne’s “Threat” – is 3.
Fif t y Vi c t o r y Poin t s
If one player has earned 50 or more victory points, that
player wins. If more than one player has earned 50 or
more victory points, the player with the most victory
points wins. If some players are tied, the tied player with
the highest Threat wins.
Di a l Adva nc e m e n t
C on di t ion s a n d C ou n t e r s
Each Chaos Power has a unique dial advancement
condition, which is found on its Power sheet. Each time
that Power fulfills that condition, that player immediately places one dial advancement counter on his Threat
dial. (The counter can be placed anywhere on the dial
that does not obscure either its main window or its
Threat window.) Multiple advancement counters can –
and frequently will – be placed on each Power’s dial over
the course of a given game round.
Fiv e R e g i on s R u in e d
If five regions have been ruined, the player with the
most victory points wins. If some players are tied, the
tied player with the highest Threat wins.
E x ha u st e d O l d Wo r l d D e ck
If no cards remain in the Old World deck, the denizens
of the Old World have weathered the war between the
Chaos Powers, and all players lose.
In the end phase, each Power who has placed dial advancement counters this round cashes them in for dial
advancements (see “Advance Threat Dials” on page 21).
Example: It is the corruption step of the corruption phase,
and Slaanesh has one Acolyte in the Empire, two Acolytes
in Bretonnia, and three Acolytes in Estalia. Slaanesh’s dial
advancement condition is “Place 2+ corruption tokens in
22
the same region.” So, each time the Slaanesh player places
two or more corruption tokens in the same region, that
player places one dial advancement counter on the Slaanesh
Threat dial.
Di a l I n s t ruc t ion s
Each of the instructions that can be revealed on the four
Ruinous Powers’ Threat dials is explained below.
Carrying out an instruction when it is revealed is not
optional, unless conditions are insufficient to allow
it. For example, the only way a player who reveals a
“Remove 2 Old World Tokens” instruction can avoid
doing so is if there are not enough Old World tokens
in play to remove. In such a case, the player would
remove as many as possible and disregard the rest of the
instruction.
When the Empire is addressed in the corruption step, the
Slaanesh player places one corruption token there. This does
not call for the placement of a dial advancement counter,
because two or more corruption tokens must be placed for
that. When Bretonnia is addressed, the Slaanesh player
places two corruption tokens there, which triggers the dial
advancement condition, and so a dial advancement token
is placed on the Slaanesh dial. When Estalia is addressed,
three Slaanesh corruption tokens are placed there, and a
single dial advancement token is placed on the Slaanesh
dial.
Draw X Chaos Cards: That player draws the listed
number of Chaos cards from his deck and adds them to
his hand.
At the end of the corruption step, there are two dial
advancement tokens on the Slaanesh advancement dial.
Place X Nobles: That player takes the listed number of
Noble tokens from the stockpile and places them in any
region or regions of the game board.
Note that a single event cannot trigger the placement
of multiple dial advancement tokens due to an excess
of some quantity related to the Ruinous Power’s dial
advancement condition.
Place X Warpstone: That player takes the listed number
of Warpstone tokens from the stockpile and places them
in any region or regions of the game board.
Example: Khorne’s dial advancement condition is “Kill
2+ enemy creatures in the same region.” If Khorne were to
kill four (or more) enemy creatures in some region during a
particularly bloody combat phase, the Khorne player would
still only place a single dial advancement counter on the
Khorne Threat dial.
[Power] Start (e.g., “Khorne Start”): Marks the place
where that Power’s main window begins the game. This
instruction has no other effect.
[Power] Victory! (e.g., “Khorne Victory!”): The Ruinous Power named in the instruction wins the game, subject to ties and other end phase instructions (see “Check
for Game End” on page 22).
Remove X Corruption: That player removes the listed
number of corruption tokens, belonging to any Chaos
Power or combination of Chaos Powers, from the board.
Remove X Old World Tokens: That player removes
the listed number of Old World tokens, of any type
or types, from the game board, returning them to the
stockpile.
Score X VP: That player scores the listed number of
victory points.
Upgrade Card: That player chooses one of his upgrade
cards that he has not yet placed into play and places it
into play. See “Playing Upgrade Cards” on page 26.
23
Old World Cards
Old World Tokens
There are two different kinds of instructions presented
on Old World cards: immediate instructions and persistent effects. Immediate instructions are presented
in italics, while persistent effects are recorded in nonitalicized text. All cards have immediate instructions,
but only some cards have persistent effects.
Six different types of Old World tokens affect gameplay.
Each is described below.
Most Old World tokens are introduced to the board via
Old World cards, but other effects (such as dial advancement instructions and Chaos cards) can also place Old
World tokens in play, remove them from the board, and
move them from region to region.
Immediate
Instructions
Event Tokens: Event tokens have no
effects of their own. Instead, they mark
the regions affected by the persistent effects of certain Old World cards. If Event
tokens remain in play after all cards that
define their Event token effects have been
removed from the Old World card track,
those Event tokens remain, but have no
effect on play until such time as a new Old
World card redefines them.
Persistent
Effects
Hero Tokens: Hero tokens in a region
eliminate figures from play in that region.
See “Resolve Hero Tokens” on page 20.
The immediate instructions on an Old World card are
carried out right away when that card is drawn.
Noble Tokens: Each Noble token in a
region increases that region’s Conquest
Value by one. (This does not affect that
region’s Resistance.)
The persistent effects on an Old World card are only carried out when that card is on the Old World track, and
even then only at certain points in each game round.
The persistent effects of most cards are carried out in the
Old World cards step of the end phase (see “The End
Phase” on page 20). Some Old World cards, however,
specify that their effect is constant (with text such as
“While this card remains in play…”) or is carried out
at some other time (with text such as “At the beginning
of the battle phase…”). If a particular Old World card
does not specify when its
persistent effect is carried
out, the effect is carried
out in the Old World cards
step of the end phase.
Peasant Tokens: Peasant tokens have
no effects of their own. Instead, they are
available targets for battle in the regions
they occupy (see “The Battle Phase” on
page 15). Certain Old World cards, when
drawn, award victory points to players who
have claimed Peasant tokens in battle.
Skaven Tokens: Each Skaven token in a
region decreases that region’s Resistance
by one. (This does not affect that region’s
Conquest Value.)
Some Old World
cards, like this one,
have only immediate
instructions, and no
persistent effects.
Warpstone Tokens: Each Warpstone
token in a region counts as the equivalent
of one corruption token when determining whether that region is ruined in the
corruption phase (see “Placing Corruption
Tokens” on page 19).
24
Region Order
Ruined Regions
When some activity – such as battle – must be carried
out in multiple regions at the same time, these activities
are always carried out region by region, in the following
order:
When a region is ruined (i.e., when a ruined region card
is found there, either faceup or facedown), the following
rules affect that region:
• New Chaos cards cannot be played to that region.
1. Norsca
2. Troll Country
3. Kislev
4. The Empire
5. Bretonnia
6. Estalia
7. Tilea
8. The Border Princes
9. The Badlands
• New Old World tokens cannot be placed in that
region (although existing Old World tokens are not
necessarily removed at the time of ruination).
• During the corruption phase, no victory points are
scored for dominating that region (i.e., domination is
not checked for that region).
• During the corruption phase, no corruption tokens
are placed in that region.
When the activity being carried out is not relevant to a
particular region – if, for example, there are no combatants in some region during the battle phase – that region
is simply skipped.
All other normal rules for regions remain in effect for
ruined regions. Battle still occurs in a ruined region
each round, such a region is still adjacenct to other
regions, it still occupies the same slot in the standard
region order, and so on.
When an activity is carried out in region order, earlier
resolutions can affect later resolutions. That is, activities carried out in region order are not considered to be
simultaneous. For example, if several regions are ruined
in a given end phase, earlier ruination cards are placed
in the regions that come earlier in the region order. If
the ruination cards run out – recall that there are only
five – then it’s possible that regions later in the region
order will not be ruined at all, and players who might
otherwise be due to score victory points will not score
them.
Control of Enemy Figures
When one player uses an effect that gives him “control” of an enemy figure, then for the duration of the
effect, it is as if the figure was of the controlling player’s
color. The controlling player thus rolls battle dice for
that figure, places a corruption token of his own color
during the corruption phase, and so forth.
The region order arrows on the game board provide a
convenient reminder of the standard region order. Players can simply begin resolution at the top of the board
with Norsca and follow the arrows between adjacent
regions until they finish with the Badlands in the south.
Note, however, that during the duration of the control
effect, the figure retains its normal statistics (so, for
example, if the original owner had upgraded his figures
of that type, the upgrade remains in effect).
25
Playing Upgrade Cards
Magic Symbols
Each Chaos Power has a deck of five upgrade cards.
There are two types of upgrade cards: follower upgrades and Chaos Power upgrades.
Magic symbols appear most frequently on
Chaos cards. Magic symbols have no game
effect of their own, but their presence in a
region is used to resolve other effects, such
as Tzeentch’s dial advancement condition. Magic Symbol
Upgrade cards enter play when a player reveals the “Upgrade Card” instruction when advancing his Threat dial.
Each time that instruction is revealed, that player may
choose one available upgrade card and place it into play.
“Available,” in this case, simply means a card belonging
to that player that has not yet been placed into play.
Note that certain effects can impart magic symbols to
figures. Obviously, the icon above does not appear in
those cases, but the figure in question is still said to
“have” those magic symbols, and they can still be used
to trigger effects that require their presence, wherever
that figure is located.
When a follower upgrade card is placed into play, that
player announces which upgrade he has chosen and
places the card over the corresponding pre-printed
follower statistics on his Power sheet (allowing it to protrude below the Power sheet). The upgrade card statistics
and abilities replace those that the card covers up.
Contradictory Effects
From time to time, different Chaos card effects, follower
abilities, Old World card effects, and the like may come
into apparent conflict, with one effect enabling some action while another disables the very same thing. In such
instances, the disabling effect trumps the enabling effect.
For example, the Khorne Chaos card “Battle Cry” reads,
“No corruption tokens may be placed in this region
during this round,” while the Nurgle Chaos card “The
Stench of Death” reads, “If you dominate this region,
place two corruption tokens here.” If both cards were
found in the same region at the same time, the Nurgle
player would not place corruption tokens when dominating the region, because the disabling effect takes
precedence.
A follower upgrade card – Khorne’s
Bloodsworn upgrade, in this case – is
placed over the pre-printed Bloodsworn
statistics on the Khorne power sheet.
The upgrade card’s statistics and
abilities replace those that it covers.
When a player places a Chaos Power upgrade card
into play, that player announces which upgrade he has
chosen and places the card faceup in any convenient
area adjacent to his Power sheet that makes it clear to all
players that the card is in play.
26
Designer’s Notes
“Players take on the roles of the four Ruinous Powers
of Chaos and attempt to corrupt the world.”
victory conditions dovetailed throughout the
course of play. In this way, players would each
have a unique, intersecting approach to ruining the world rather than playing four games of
solitaire.
When Christian Petersen pitched me that
concept for a board game, my first thought was
that they wanted me to redevelop an old Games
Workshop classic.
In addition, I wanted the game to feel slightly
different if any of the Ruinous Powers were
absent from play. For example, in a three-player
game without a Khorne player, there would be
less combat overall, resulting in an increased focus on ruination. Conversely, without Tzeentch,
there would be less dynamic movement around
the board and tactics would be more predictable.
“No, Eric. We want you to design this game.”
My world was officially rocked. A brand new
Warhammer fantasy board game, and based on
what is possibly the coolest aspect of the mythology to boot! The initial meeting continued, but
I was already in another world, stunned by the
possibilities before me.
One issue I wrestled with was the opposing
relationships between Khorne and Slaanesh
on one hand, and Nurgle and Tzeentch on the
other. Each of those pairs harbors a loathing for
the other that needed some representation in the
game. However, I was wary of overdoing this
and creating bad three-player game experiences
where one player would win by sheer virtue of
having no specific foil. Instead, I tried to implement this more subtly in card interactions. For
example, the way some of Khorne’s Chaos cards
encourage more battles and Slaanesh’s tactically
avoid battles altogether provide an interesting
dynamic that also interacts with other players in
the process.
I spent the following weekend in a fevered state
of inspired excitement. I read more Warhammer
in two days than in previous years. There were
hourly stretches where I became lost in the richness and complexity of the backstory. While I
was never a heavy miniatures gamer, the mythology has always interested me.
My design goals were simple: To create a simple
but rich territory control game in which players felt a strong connection to their “characters,”
and in which the world itself felt more alive and
dynamic than in most games of this category. For
Warhammer fans, I wanted to do justice to the
uniqueness of each of Chaos’s four aspects. For
those new to the world, I wanted the gameplay
experience to give players some insight into the
Ruinous Powers’ personalities.
This is one of the most exciting game design projects I have ever worked on, and I am extremely
happy with the results. I’d like to thank Jeff Tidball and Tim Uren for their superb development
work, and Kevin Childress, Andrew Navaro,
Brian Schomburg, and WiL Springer for the eyepopping graphic design.
It was important that each of the four play quite
differently. From the beginning I knew that
each would have a unique alternate path to
victory that reflected the nature of its power.
The challenge was in making sure that both
I hope you enjoy playing the game as much as I
did designing it. Skulls for the Skull Throne!
27
Playing Khorne
Playing Nurgle
No subtlety has Khorne. He has no yearning for beauty of
form in his black heart, for he is the Blood God, the Skulltaker. Within his immortal frame there is room for rage
alone, and slaughter is his only desire.
Nurgle is the Great Lord of Decay, who presides over physical corruption and morbidity. Nurgle can truly be called
the father of all pestilence, for his immense frame is home to
every disease known to mortals.
K hor n e S t r at e g y
• Your key strength is battle. Your Warriors roll two
dice in battle, which is unique among the other
Chaos Powers.
n u rg l e S t r at e g y
• Your key strength is that your figures are cheap and
plentiful. Also, your Chaos cards and dial advancements help you dominate the best regions turn after
turn, and prevent them from being ruined too early.
• It is easier for you to win by advancing your Threat
dial than by accumulating victory points. Try to get
two dial ticks every round, if you can.
• It is easier for you to win by scoring victory points
than advancing your Threat dial. Even so, try to
score at least one dial advancement each round, for
the benefit it gives.
• Spread your forces out to kill your enemies in as
many regions as possible each round.
• When placing your figures, concentrate on the Populous regions. But beware of placing too many corruption tokens in regions you can’t also dominate.
• Nurgle is usually the most ripe target for attack, followed by Slaanesh, and then Tzeentch.
• Avoid competing with other players in highly
contested regions. Try to score in regions the other
players ignore.
Opp o si ng N u rg l e
Nurgle’s Cultists are easy targets often found in the
Populous regions. Prevent him from gaining a strong
foothold in those areas, or he has the potential for massive point-scoring once regions begin falling to ruin.
Opp o si ng K hor n e
Your low-defense figures are attractive targets for
Khorne. Avoid spreading them too widely, since Khorne
advances his dial by killing figures in many different
regions.
Opp o si ng T z e e n tc h
Tzeentch gains dial advancements from corrupting
areas containing at least two Warpstone tokens and/
or magic symbols. Because he must place two corruption tokens to place dial advancement tokens, killing a
single Tzeentch Cultist in such a region can often foil
his plans.
Opp o si ng T z e e n tc h
Tzeentch gains dial advancements from corrupting areas
containing at least two Warpstone tokens and/or magic
symbols. Competing for domination of such areas is
rarely worthwhile, unless they are high-value Populous
regions.
Opp o si ng Sl a a n e sh
Slaanesh gains dial advancements from corrupting areas
containing Noble and Hero tokens. Those are good
places to battle against him.
Opp o si ng Sl a a n e sh
Slaanesh gains dial advancements from corrupting areas
containing Noble and Hero tokens. Competing for
domination of such areas is rarely worthwhile, unless
they are high-value Populous regions.
28
Playing Tzeentch
Playing Slaanesh
Tzeentch is the Changer of Ways, the Weaver of All Fates,
the Great Conspirator, and the architect of the fate of the
universe. He takes great delight in the plotting and politicking of others, and favors the cunning over the strong, the
manipulative over the violent.
Slaanesh is master of cruel passions and hidden vices, and
of terrible temptations. It is impossible for a mortal to
look upon Slaanesh without losing his soul, for all who see
Slaanesh become slaves to his slightest whim.
Sl a a n e sh S t r at e g y
• Your key strength is flexibility. You have useful
Chaos cards, a simple dial advancement condition,
and the capability to use your opponents’ resources
against them.
T z e e n tc h S t r at e g y
• Your key strength is your Chaos deck. It has many
useful free and low-cost cards, and your draw ability
lets you replace all of the cards you play every round
(so play as many as you can, every round!).
• Concentrate on the Noble tokens early in the game.
Either enter those regions in force, or use your “Dark
Influence” cards to bring those tokens to regions
where you are already strong.
• Pay attention to the regions that begin with Warpstone tokens. They are key to your dial advancements
early in the game.
• Conserve your power points early in each round’s
summoning phase by playing free or low-cost cards.
Make the other players commit their resources first.
• Adjust your strategy as the game unfolds. Play for a
dial advancement win if more Noble and Hero tokens appear early in the game, or a victory point win
if Khorne is strong or your opponents leave valuable
regions uncontested.
• You can realistically win by either advancing your
dial or scoring victory points. Keep your options
open for as long as you can.
• Act opportunistically: use “Perverse Infiltration”
cards for easy points just as regions are ruined, and
control key Cultists belonging to your opponents for
additional corruption tokens and to swing closely
contested regions to you.
Opp o si ng K hor n e
Khorne is more effective at dial advancement than scoring victory points. He scores dial advancement counters
by killing enemies in many different regions. Avoid giving him easy targets.
Opp o si ng K hor n e
Khorne is more effective at dial advancement than scoring victory points. He scores dial advancement counters
by killing enemies in many different regions. Avoid giving him easy targets.
Opp o si ng N u rg l e
Nurgle is more effective at scoring victory points than
dial advancements. He can come on very strong near the
end of the game when regions start falling to ruination.
Opp o si ng N u rg l e
Nurgle is more effective at scoring victory points than
dial advancements. He can come on very strong near the
end of the game when regions start falling to ruination.
Look for opportunities to hurt Nurgle and help yourself
at this stage.
Opp o si ng Sl a a n e sh
Slaanesh can realistically win by either dial advancement or victory points. Figure out his victory strategy as
soon as you can, and act accordingly. Slaanesh advances
his dial by corrupting regions containing Hero or Noble
tokens.
Opp o si ng T z e e n tc h
Tzeentch can realistically win by either dial advancement or victory points. Tzeentch gains dial advancements from corrupting areas containing at least two
Warpstone tokens and/or magic symbols.
29
Index
Credits
Game Design: Eric M. Lang
Game Development: Jeff Tidball with Tim Uren
Creative Consultants: JR Godwin and Jay Little
Editing: Mark O’Connor
Graphic Design: Kevin Childress, Andrew Navaro, Brian
Schomburg, and WiL Springer
Cover and Logo Design: Kevin Childress
Board Design: Andrew Navaro
Figure Design: Michael Jaecks
Playtest Coordinator: Robert A. Kouba
Playtesters: Bryan Bornmueller, Bill Cauble, Kevin
Childress, Cody Cosgrove, Luke Cosgrove, Galen Farah,
Robert Flick, Nate French, JR Godwin, Christina Gyimesi,
James Hata, Terri Hoff, Steve Horvath, Evan Kinne,
Andrew Konen, Corey Konieczka, Rob Kouba, Gavin
Larson, Jay Little, Paul Lertola, Jonathan Moriarity, Randy
Munce, Andrew Navaro, Paul Neumann, Scott Page,
Casey Ryan, Mark Schell, Shaun Schreiner, WiL Springer,
Jason Steinhurst, Matthew Tee, Jason Walden, Mike
Westerbur, Dylan Westerbur, John Wibben, Kevin Wilson,
and Ansley Zampino
Production Manager: Gabe Laulunen
Producer: Jeff Tidball
Executive Developer: Christian T. Petersen
Publisher: Christian T. Petersen
adjacent (regions), 11–12
battle, 15–18
battle dice. See dice
battle phase, 9, 15
Chaos cards, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11,
12–13, 14, 16, 19, 20, 23,
25, 26
control (of followers), 25
combat. See battle
Conquest Value, 4, 5, 19
corruption phase, 9, 19–20
corruption step, 19–20
corruption token, 6, 8, 19,
20–21, 23, 25
Cultist, 5, 6–7
dial advancement counter, 3,
21, 22–23
dial instructions, 23
dice, 7, 15, 16
domination, domination
step, domination value, 19
draw phase, 5, 9, 11
end phase, 9, 20–22, 24
explode, 15
Event token, 6, 24
figure. See follower
follower, 5, 7–8, 11, 26
game board, 3, 4, 8
game round, 9
Greater Daemon, 5, 6–7
Hero token, 6, 20, 24
hit, 15, 16, 17
immediate instructions (on
Old World cards), 24
Khorne, 2, 8, 28
magic symbol, 13, 26
“move” (a follower). See
summon
Noble token, 6, 19, 23, 24
Nurgle, 2, 8, 28
object of the game, 2
Old World cards and deck,
4, 7, 9, 10, 20, 22, 24, 26
Old World phase, 9
Old World tokens, 6, 9, 23,
24, 25
Old World track, 4, 9, 10
Peasant token, 6, 15, 17, 24
persistent effects (of Old
World cards), 24
phase, 9
place (a follower). See
summon
Populous (regions), 4, 5
Power order, 9
power points, power marker,
power track, 3, 5, 11, 12,
13
Power sheets, 3, 5, 8, 26
Games Workshop
Licensing Manager: Owen Rees
Licensing & Acquired Rights Manager: Erik Mogensen
Head of Legal & Licensing: Andy Jones
Intellectual Property Manager: Alan Merrett
Special thanks to the Games Workshop Design
Studio for their amazing and creative work.
www.Fa nta sy F light G a mes . com
1975 County Road B2, Suite 1
Roseville, MN 55113
United States of America
651-639-1905
30
region, 4, 5, 11–12, 19–20,
20–21, 25
region order, 4, 25
“reminder”, 14
Resistance, 4, 5, 19
round. See game round
ruination, ruined regions,
ruiner, 19–20, 20–21, 22,
25
ruination card, 4, 7, 8,
19–20, 20–21
setup, 8–9
Skaven token, 6, 19, 24
Slaanesh, 2, 8, 29
summon, 11–12
summoning phase, 9, 11–12
target (in battle), 15, 17
text effect (of a Chaos card),
13, 14
Threat, Threat dial, 2, 3, 4,
5, 21, 22, 22–23
tick, 2, 21
tipped followers, 15, 17
Twin-tailed Comet icon, 10
Tzeentch, 2, 8, 29
upgrade cards, 6, 8, 16, 23,
26
victory conditions, 2, 22, 23
victory points, victory point
marker, victory point
track, 3, 4, 8, 20, 20–21,
22, 23
Warpstone token, 6, 19, 23,
24
Warrior, 5, 6–7
Glossary
Nurgle: One of the four Ruinous Powers of Chaos, with
dominion over filth, disease, and corruption.
Old World phase: The first phase of the game round, in
which a card is drawn from the Old World deck and its
effects carried out.
persistent effects: The non-italicized text found on some Old
World cards, carried out either at a time specified by the
text itself, or in the end phase.
phase: One of the six activity-specific divisions of the game
round, which are the Old World phase, draw phase, summoning phase, battle phase, corruption phase, and end
phase. The six phases are always carried out in order.
Populous: A type of region, denoted with the word “Populous” in its title bar. A given region can be either Populous
or not Populous. Populousness has no effect of its own, but
Populous regions are referred to by other game effects.
Power order: The order in which the Ruinous Powers most
frequently act. The standard Power order is Khorne first,
Nurgle second, Tzeentch third, and Slaanesh fourth.
power point: The currency with which the players play
Chaos cards, summon figures, and carry out certain other
actions.
Powers: See “Ruinous Powers.”
region: One of the nine geographical divisions of the map
portion of the game board.
Resistance: The characteristic that represents how difficult it
is to dominate a particular region.
round: See “game round.”
Ruinous Powers: The four gods of Chaos collectively:
Khorne, Nurgle, Tzeentch, and Slaanesh.
Slaanesh: One of the four Ruinous Powers of Chaos, the
prince of pleasure and pain.
step: Some phases are subdivided; these subdivisions are
called steps.
summon: To place a follower on a new region. A figure can
be summoned from either a player’s stockpile or a different
region.
summoning phase: The third phase of the game round, in
which the players take turns playing Chaos cards and summoning figures.
text effect: The portion of a Chaos card that describes, in
plain English, what it does.
Threat: A characteristic represented by a number. Each Power’s current Threat value is always shown by the position of
its Threat dial, in the smaller of the two cut-out regions.
tick: A single-unit advancement of a Threat dial.
Twin-tailed Comet icon: An icon appearing on certain
Old World cards. This icon has no effect of its own, but is
referred to by other Old World cards.
Tzeentch: One of the four Ruinous Powers of Chaos, the
architect of fate and font of magical power.
victory point track: The series of sequential, numbered
circles on the board. Each player places his victory point
marker on the victory point track to denote his current victory point total.
victory point: A type of reward for certain activities in the
game. Victory points are most often earned, and earned in
the greatest quantities, by dominating regions. Accumulating victory points is one route to winning the game.
VP: Abbreviation for “victory point.”
Warrior: A category of follower that offers relatively high
combat-worthiness for relatively low cost.
adjacent: The relationship between two different regions
where they share a border.
battle phase: The fourth phase of the game round, in which
the Powers’ followers fight each other in each region.
Chaos Power upgrade: A class of upgrade cards that increase
a Chaos Power’s abilities directly.
Chaos Powers: See “Ruinous Powers.”
class: The category – Cultist, Warrior, or Greater Daemon –
that a given follower belongs to.
Conquest Value: The characteristic that represents how
rewarding it is to dominate a particular region.
corruption phase: The fifth phase of the game round, in
which the players calculate domination and score victory
points for each region in turn, and place corruption tokens
in the various regions.
corruption step: The second step of the corruption phase,
in which the players place corruption tokens in the regions
where they have Cultists. Each region is also checked for
ruination at this time.
cost: The characteristic of a figure or Chaos card describing
how many power points must be spent to put it into play.
Cultist: A category of follower, the least combat-worthy in
the game, but capable of corrupting regions.
domination step: The first step of the corruption phase, in
which the players determine which Power – if any – scores
each region’s Conquest Value as victory points.
domination value: The sum calculated by each player in
each region during the domination step of the corruption
phase to determine if he dominates that region.
draw phase: The second phase of the game round, in which
each player draws Chaos cards and recovers power points.
end phase: The sixth and final phase of the game round, in
which the players remove Chaos cards from the board,
resolve the effects of Hero tokens, resolve the effects of
certain Old World cards, score victory points for regions
ruined earlier in the round, advance their Threat dials, and
check to see whether the game ends.
explosion: When a battle die roll results in a 6 and gives the
player who rolled it an additional battle die to roll.
figure: See “follower.”
follower upgrades: A class of upgrade cards that increase the
capabilities of a Power’s followers.
follower: A sculpted plastic playing piece of any of the three
types.
game round: One iteration of the game’s six phases.
gods: See “Ruinous Powers.”
Greater Daemon: A category of follower, the most powerful
in the game.
hit: A battle die result – typically a 4, 5, or 6 – with the
potential to eliminate, on its own or in multiples, an opponent’s figure(s).
immediate instructions: The italicized text found on every
Old World card, carried out when that card is drawn.
Khorne: One of the four Ruinous Powers of Chaos, the lord
of death and battle.
magic symbol: An icon appearing in the upper right hand
corner of certain Chaos cards, and also an effect created
by certain other events and powers. Magic symbols have
no game effects of their own, but are referred to by other
cards, powers, and abilities.
31
S e t u p S t e ps
1. Place Game Board.
2. Distribute Sheets and Arrange Seating. Assign Power
sheets randomly, or by concensus. Sit in Power order.
3. Distribute Powers’ Cards, Tokens, and Figures.
4. Place Power Markers and Victory Point Markers.
5. Prepare Common Tokens, Ready Dice, and Place
Ruination Cards. Sort the ruination cards in order,
with “1” on top and “5” on the bottom.
6. Create Old World Deck. Shuffle all Old World cards
together, then deal out a facedown Old World deck of
seven cards (four-player game) or eight cards (threeplayer game). Return the unused cards to the box.
7. Place Starting Old World Tokens. Separate out two
Noble tokens, three Warpstone tokens, and four Peasant tokens. Randomly place these tokens on the board,
one in each of the nine regions.
8. Shuffle and Draw Chaos Cards: Each player starts
with a hand of three Chaos cards.
W h e n a r e g i o n i s R u i n e d…
• New Chaos cards cannot be played to that region.
• New Old World tokens cannot be placed in that region.
• No victory points are scored for dominating that
region.
• No corruption tokens are placed in that region.
Chaos in the Old World © Games Workshop Limited 2009. Games Workshop, Warhammer, Chaos
in the Old World and all associated marks, logos, places, names, creatures, races and race insignia/
devices/logos/symbols, vehicles, locations, weapons, units and unit insignia, characters and
illustrations from the Warhammer world and Chaos in the Old World game setting are either ®, tm
and/or © Games Workshop Ltd 2000–2009, variably registered in the UK and other countries
around the world. This edition published under license to Fantasy Flight Publishing, Inc. Fantasy
Flight Games and the FFG logo are trademarks of Fantasy Flight Publishing, Inc. All Rights
Reserved to their respective owners.
G a m e en d con dit ions
First, check the Threat dials. If any player’s dial shows
“Victory!,” that player wins. (Ties broken by victory
points.)
Second, check for 50 victory points. If any player has
50+ victory points, that player wins. (Ties broken by
Threat.)
Third, check whether five regions are ruined. If this is
true, the player with the most victory points wins.
Finally, check whether any cards remain facedown in
the Old World deck. If not, all players lose.
s ta n da r d r e g ion or de r
1. Norsca
2. Troll Country
3. Kislev
4. The Empire
5. Bretonnia
6. Estalia
7. Tilea
8. The Border Princes
9. The Badlands
s ta n da r d c h ao s p ow e r or de r
1. Khorne
2. Nurgle
3. Tzeentch
4. Slaanesh
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