Level 1 VRQ`s in Sound and Music Technology

Level 1 VRQ`s in Sound and Music Technology
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and
Music Technology (7603)
Qualification handbook
7603-11 - Awards
7603-12 - Certificates
7603-13 - Diplomas
www.cityandguilds.com
September 2012
Version 1.2
About City & Guilds
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across a wide range of industries, and progressing from entry level to the highest levels of
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Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
www.cityandguilds.com
[email protected]
2
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and
Music Technology (7603)
www.cityandguilds.com
September 2012
Version 1.2
Qualification handbook
7603-11 - Awards
7603-12 - Certificates
7603-13 - Diplomas
Qualification title
Qual
Number
Accreditatio
n number
Level 1 Award in Sound Engineering and Music Technology ( Introduction to
the Music Industry)
7603-11
501/0237/0
Level 1 Award in Sound Engineering and Music Technology (Introduction to
Midi techniques)
7603-11
501/0237/0
Level 1 Award in Sound Engineering and Music Technology (Introduction to
Sound recording and editing)
7603-11
501/0237/0
Level 1 Certificate in Sound Engineering and Music Technology
7603-12
501/0492/5
Level 1 Diploma in Sound and Music Technology
7603-13
500/8805/1
Version and date
1.2 Sep 2012
Change detail
NOS references added to units and
appendix
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
Sections
7 Units
8 Appendix
3
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Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
4
Contents
1
Introduction to the qualification
7
2
About the qualifications
8
2.3
The structure of the qualifications
11
3
Leaner entry and progression
13
4
Centre requirements
15
5
Course design and delivery
20
6
Assessment
22
7
Units
23
Unit 101
Follow safe working practices in music and sound industries
24
Unit 102
Occupational roles and employment in music and sound industries
30
Unit 103
Basic equipment connections for music and sound industries
35
Unit 104
MIDI sequencing and software
41
Unit 105
Sound recording skills
48
Unit 106
Digital sound editing
55
Unit 107
MIDI and audio techniques
62
Unit 207
Music instrument digital interface (MIDI)
67
Unit 215
MIDI operations
73
8
Appendix 1 NOS Mapping
78
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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1
Introduction to the qualification
This document contains the information that centres need to offer the following qualifications:
Last
Last
City & Guilds Ofqual
Qualification titles
certification
qualification
accreditation registration
date
date
numbers
numbers
AWARDS
Level 1 Award in Sound Engineering
and Music Technology ( Introduction
to the Music Industry)
7603-11
501/0237/0
31/12/2012
31/12/2013
Level 1 Award in Sound Engineering
and Music Technology (Introduction
to Midi techniques)
7603-11
501/0237/0
31/12/2012
31/12/2013
Level 1 Award in Sound Engineering
and Music Technology (Introduction
to Sound recording and editing)
7603-11
501/0237/0
31/12/2012
31/12/2013
7603-12
501/0492/5
31/12/2012
31/12/2013
7603-13
500/8805/1
31/12/2012
31/12/2013
CERTIFICATE
Level 1 Certificate in Sound
Engineering and Music Technology
DIPLOMA
Level 1 Diploma in Sound and Music
Technology
This document includes details and guidance on:
• centre resource requirements
• leaner entry requirements
• information about links with, and progression to, other qualifications
• qualification standards and specifications
• assessment requirements.
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
7
2
About the qualifications
2.1 Aim of the qualifications
These qualifications are for learners who wish to learn the basic skills and knowledge of sound and
music technology at level 1, they support progression on to further study or training in the subject,
and on to potential future employment in the sector. As a vocational award, the Level 1
qualifications provide the opportunity for learners not yet meeting the requirements of occupational
competence, to begin developing the relevant skills and knowledge as a platform for further
development. These qualifications are also suitable for those who want to develop a personal
interest or hobby.
This suite of Level 1 qualifications will replace the existing ones.
Accreditation details
These qualifications are accredited by the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority at Level 1 of the
QCF.
The aims of these qualifications are to:
• meet the needs of learners who wish to develop their sound and music skills and techniques
• meet the needs of learners who work or want to work in the sound and music industry
• allow learners to learn, develop and practise the skills required for employment and/or career
progression in the sound and music industry
• to provide bite size chunks of learning, allowing learners to progress at their own pace
• be flexible in terms of delivery as they can be delivered either part-time or full-time
• to encourage progression by providing a framework for learners
• to meet the needs and objectives of those employed in the industry wishing to broaden their
knowledge and skills
• to support the skills required within the sound and music industry
• contribute to the knowledge and understanding towards the related Level 2 VRQ in sound and
music
• to increase participation and retention in education and training and to help overcome social
exclusion
• to widen and increase participation in lifelong learning
• to combat fears of failure by ensuring that all achievement is recognised.
Specialist Learning (SL) offers young people the opportunity to study a particular topic in more
depth or broaden their studies through complementary learning. This qualification has been
approved as SL by the SSC/DDP and OfQual for the Certificate/Diploma in Creative and Media. It has
been designed to:
•
complement principal learning within the Certificate/ Diploma in Creative and Media.
•
provide a broad background understanding of the Creative and Media sector and an
introduction to the practical skills and knowledge required
•
provide an awareness of the range of jobs and work settings in the Creative and Media
sector
•
enable learners to make an informed assessment of their own aptitude for work in this
sector and to make informed decisions about careers
•
encourage learners to reach a level of knowledge and skills that will facilitate progress into
further vocational learning or to potential employment in the sector
•
introduce learners to the discipline of the working environment and to encourage mature
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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•
•
•
attitudes to the community in general
encourage learners to value continued learning and remain in the learning process
allow learners to learn, develop and practise selected skills required for progression in the
sector
provide opportunities for progression to the Certificate/Diploma in Creative and Media and
other related qualifications in the sector.
Further information
These qualifications
• form part of Foundation Learning
• allow learners to develop knowledge and skills towards independent living and learning
• encourage learners to learn, develop and practise basic sound engineering and music
technology skills required for employment and/or career progression in this sector
• provide valuable accreditation of skills and knowledge for learners, without requiring or
proving occupational competence
For more information on Foundation Learning please go to www.cityandguilds.com/flt
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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2
About the qualifications
2.2 Units
City &
Guilds
unit
number
Unit title
Credit
GLH
WBA no
Unit 101
Follow safe working practices in music and sound
industries
4
40
L6012584
Unit 102
Occupational roles and employment in music and
sound industries
5
40
J6012597
Unit 103
Basic equipment connections for music and sound
industries
4
40
A6012600
Unit 104
MIDI sequencing and software
4
40
L6012603
Unit 105
Sound recording skills
6
40
Y6012605
Unit 106
Digital sound editing
6
40
K6012608
Unit 107
MIDI and audio techniques
6
40
K6012611
Unit 207
Music instrument digital interface (MIDI)
4
40
Y6013043
Unit 215
MIDI operations
4
40
D6013075
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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2
About the qualifications
2.3 The structure of the qualifications
To achieve full certification for the Level 1 VRQ’s in Sound Engineering and Music Technology,
learners must achieve one of the combinations below:
Ofqual No:
Qualification title
AWARDS
Pathways and
Structure
Credit
GLH
Qual
number
Cert
Claim
Unit
501/0237/0
Level 1 Award in Sound
Engineering and Music
Technology ( Introduction to
the Music Industry)
2x Mandatory units
101 and 102 (9 credits)
9
80
7603-11
901
501/0237/0
Level 1 Award in Sound
Engineering and Music
Technology (Introduction to
Midi techniques)
2x Mandatory units
104 and 107 (10
credits)
10
80
7603-11
902
501/0237/0
Level 1 Award in Sound
Engineering and Music
Technology (Introduction to
Sound recording and editing)
2x Mandatory units
105 and 106 (12
credits)
12
80
7603-11
903
Ofqual No:
Qualification title
CERTIFICATE
Structure
Credit
GLH
Qual
number
Cert
Claim
Unit
501/0492/5
Level 1 Certificate in Sound
Engineering and Music
Technology
6x Optional units from
101-107, 207 and 215
25-31
240
7603-12
N/A
Ofqual No:
Qualification title
DIPLOMA
Structure
Credit
GLH
Qual
number
Cert
Claim
Unit
500/8805/1
Level 1 Diploma in Sound and
Music Technology
9x Mandatory units
from 101-107 plus 207
and 215
43
360
7603-13
N/A
Certificate Claim Unit Numbers
The pathways for the certificates have the same qualification number therefore to ensure you
receive the right certificate when you register your learners please use the certificate claim
numbers listed in the tables’ far right hand column.
You must enter the relevant Certificate Claim Number as a P or X in Walled Garden in order to claim
the correct Certificate. For example, enter Cert Claim Unit 901 if you are entering your learners for the Level
1 Award in Sound Engineering and Music Technology (Introduction to the Music Industry).
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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2
About the qualifications
2.4 Relevant sources of information
Support Materials
City & Guilds also provides the following publications and resources specifically for these
qualifications:
Description
How to access
Qualification Handbook
www.cityandguilds.com
Assessment pack for centres
www.cityandguilds.com
Sample work
www.cityandguilds.com
Learner Guides
www.cityandguilds.com
Contacting City & Guilds by e-mail
The following e-mail addresses give direct access to our Customer Relations team.
e-mail
Query types
[email protected]
All queries related to this suite of qualificaitons
[email protected]
all learner enquiries, including
• requesting a replacement certificate
• information about our qualification
• finding a centre.
[email protected]
all centre enquiries
[email protected]
all enquiries relating to the Walled Garden,
including
• setting up an account
• resetting passwords.
City & Guilds websites
Website
Address
Purpose and content
City & Guilds
main website
www.cityandguilds.com
This is the main website for finding out about the
City & Guilds group, accessing qualification
information and publications.
Walled Garden
www.walled-garden.com
The Walled Garden is a qualification
administration portal for approved centres,
enabling them to register learners and claim
certification online.
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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3
Leaner entry and progression
Leaner entry requirements
Learners should not be entered for a qualification of the same type, content and level as that of a
qualification they already hold.
There are no formal entry requirements for learners undertaking these qualifications. However,
centres must ensure that learners have the potential and opportunity to successfully gain the
qualifications.
Age restrictions
There are no age limits attached to learners undertaking the qualifications unless this is a legal
requirement of the process or the environment.
Other legal considerations
Data protection and confidentiality
Data protection and confidentiality must not be overlooked when planning the delivery of this
qualification.
Centres offering these qualifications may need to provide City & Guilds with personal data for staff
and learners. Guidance on data protection and the obligations of City & Guilds and centres are
explained in Providing City & Guilds qualifications.
Protecting identity
It is extremely important to protect the identity of the service users encountered by learners in the
work setting, eg customers and clients.
Confidential information must not be included in leaner portfolios or assessment records.
Confidential information should remain in its usual location, and a reference should be made to it in
the portfolio or assessment records.
Images of minors being used as evidence
If videos or photographs of minors (those under 18) are used as the medium to present evidence as
part of the qualifications, both centre and leaner have responsibilities for meeting child
protection legislation.
It is the responsibility of the centre to inform the leaner of the
• need to obtain permission from the minor’s parent/guardian prior to collecting the evidence
• reasons and restrictions for using photographs or video recordings as evidence
• period of time for which the photographs or video recordings may be kept
• obligation to keep photographs or video recordings secure from unauthorised access
• secure electronic storage requirements of photographs or video recordings
• associated child protection legislation.
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Progression
On completion of this qualification learners may progress into employment or to the following City &
Guilds qualifications:
• Level 2 VRQ Qualifications in Sound and Music Technology (7603-02)
• Level 3 VRQ Qualifications in Music Technology and Sound Engineering (7603-03)
• Level 3 VRQ Qualifications in Media Techniques (7601).
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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4
Centre requirements
4.1 Obtaining centre and qualification approval
This section outlines the approval processes for Centres to offer these qualifications and any
resources that Centres will need in place to offer the qualifications including qualification-specific
requirements for Centre staff.
Centres not yet approved by City & Guilds
To offer these qualifications, centres will need to gain both centre and qualification approval.
Please refer to our website for further information.
Existing City & Guilds centres
To offer these qualifications, centres already approved to deliver City & Guilds qualifications will
need to gain qualification approval. Please refer to our website for further information.
Centres already offering City & Guilds qualifications in this subject area
Centres approved to offer Level 1 7503 qualifications may apply for approval for the equivalent
qualifications in Sound Engineering and Music Technology (7603) using the fast track approval
form, available from the City & Guilds website:
The 7603 Sound Engineering and Music Technology qualifications are the 7503 Sound Engineering
and Music Technology migrated onto the QCF (Qualifications and Credit Framework). If you
currently offer a L1 7503 Sound Engineering and Music Technology qualifications you can apply for
free fast-track approval for the equivalent in 7603 Level 1 Sound Engineering and Music
Technology.
Centres may apply to offer the new qualifications using the fast track form
• providing there have been no changes to the way the qualifications are delivered, and
• if they meet all of the approval criteria specified in the fast track form guidance notes.
Fast track approval is available for 12 months from the launch of the qualification. After this time,
the qualification is subject to the standard Qualification Approval Process. It is the centre’s
responsibility to check that fast track approval is still current at the time of application.
The standard form is called Form FTAP, and is available from the City & Guilds website:
www.cityandguilds.com or email [email protected]
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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4
Centre requirements
4.2 Resource requirements
Physical resources
Centres must have access to sufficient equipment in the centre or workplace to ensure learners
have the opportunity to cover all of the practical activities. It is acceptable for centres to use
specially designated areas within a centre for some of the units. Centres must have a
software/hardware facility to be able to convert .wav audio files supplied by City & Guilds for
assignments 106, 209 and 211 and create playback audio CDs for learners use.
Unit 101
Legislation, legal documentation, updated act amendments, industry links.
Unit 102
Handouts, industry maps, sector charts, media, employment contracts, freelance
info, industry links.
Unit 103
Series of professional analogue and digital leads and connectors included in unit
103 range specification ability to connect equipment and match signals with
recording chain signal path, monitoring and meterage in place. Would also suit
recommended installed kit list 1, 2 and 3, however the minimum requirement for this
unit is Kit list 1.
Unit 104
Access to Midi equipment hardware and professional DAW software. Would also
suit recommended installed kit list 1, 2 and 3, however the minimum requirement for
this unit is Kit list 1.
Unit 105
Access to Instruments and a series of professional analogue and digital leads and
connectors included in unit 103 range specification, ability to connect equipment
and record analogue source signals with recording chain signal path, monitoring and
meterage in place. 8-24 track recording device. Would also suit recommended
installed kit list 1, 2 and 3, however the minimum requirement for this unit is Kit list 1.
Unit 106
Access to digital or analogue stereo recording/editing environment, professional
DAW software. Would also suit recommended installed kit list 1, 2 and3, however
the minimum requirement for this unit is Kit list 1.
Unit 107
Access to instruments and a series of professional analogue and digital leads and
connectors included in unit 103 range specification, ability to connect equipment
and record analogue source signals with recording chain signal path, monitoring and
meterage in place. 8-24 track recording device, MIDI equipment hardware and
professional DAW software. Would also suit recommended installed kit list 1, 2 and
3, however the minimum requirement for this unit is Kit list 1.
Unit 207
Access to GM, XG and GS MIDI equipment hardware and software, professional
DAW/MIDI software. Would also suit recommended installed kit list 1, 2 and 3 (see
below), however the minimum requirement for this unit is Kit list 1.
Unit 215
Access to variety of MIDI sound modules, synthesis equipment and sampling
hardware and software, professional DAW/MIDI software, IT resources including
office software. Would also suit recommended installed kit list 1, 2 and 3 (see
below), however the minimum requirement for this unit is Kit list 1.
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Kit List Level 1
IT basic editing and recording workstations
Per student per class to include: PC/MAC keyboard/mouse, 17”+ screens, 350mb-1Gb of RAM, proaudio software licences for: Logic, Pro-tools and Cu-Base (loop based software is not approved for
linear based audio editing), speakers, amplification, 8 channel mixing console, 8 track recording
device, headphones, dynamic microphones, AD-DA breakout box, MIDI sound modules/software,
synthesis, samplers, instruments, cables, amplification and the means to record single pass or solo
parts, DI boxes mastering and archiving (safety copy back-up equipment), APRS/SPARS tape label
system in place. DJ equipment, full peripheral cleaning and maintenance kit, maintenance
electrical/audio toolkit including test equipment, soldering tools and equipment, oscilloscope, test
tones. I.T online access with basic office software for learners.
Kit List Level 2
Per student per class to include: K1 list plus addition of studio recording area including minimum 24
channel recording and mixing console, 24 track hardware recording machine with remote, selection
of transformer balanced, electronic, active, passive DI boxes, SMPTE/MIDI synchronisation
equipment, 6 –10 MIDI sound modules/units, several virtual software plug-in, synthesis, samplers,
un-normalled, semi-normalled, normalled patch-bay system, processing equipment, effects/FX
units, good selection of professional dynamic, condenser and ribbon microphone types,
oscilloscope, professional monitoring speaker and amplification equipment, professional mastering
equipment, APRS/SPARS tape label system in place. Ownership or access to a public address (PA)
sound/DJ system, full peripheral cleaning and maintenance kit, maintenance electrical/audio toolkit
including test equipment, soldering tools and equipment, oscilloscope, test tones.
Kit List Level 3
Per student per class to include: K1 & K2 list plus addition of centre area/equipment ideally to be
incorporated into fully floated and AC fitted recording environment to include acoustically designed
live performance area, vocal booth, additional live area/separation booths, isolated from control
room, 24-96 channel pro recording/mixing console (see unit range lists), 24-48 track software and
hardware recording machines plus remotes and full break-out AD-DA hardware, full range of
professional monitoring speaker and amplification system, equipment broad selection of
professional transformer balanced, electronic, active, passive DI boxes/racks, fold-back systems,
professional processing equipment (see unit range lists), broad range of industry virtual software
plug-ins, synthesisers and good range of synthesis types, samplers, professional effects/FX units
(see unit range lists),broad selection of professional dynamic, condenser and ribbon microphones
(see unit range lists), 6-10 professional studio headphones, AV software and synchronisation
equipment to AV edit within logic pro, pro-tools and Cu-Base, DVI screen, AV EDL off-line pre & post
editing. Ownership or access to a public address (PA) sound system and DJ system, professional
range of digital and analogue mastering stereo equipment, APRS/SPARS tape label system in place.
Full peripheral cleaning and maintenance kit, full maintenance electrical/audio toolkit including test
equipment, soldering tools and equipment, oscilloscope, test tones. Ability for learners to control,
record, mix and master solo artist, band or orchestral and ensemble pieces professionally within
recording environment is an ideal equipped facility standard.
Human resources
Staff delivering these qualifications must be able to demonstrate that they meet the following
occupational expertise requirements. They should:
•
be technically competent in the areas for which they are delivering training and/or have
experience of providing training. This knowledge must be at least to the same level as the
training being delivered
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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•
•
•
have verifiable and relevant current industry experience and competence of their occupational
working area at or above the level being assessed.
have recent relevant experience in the specific area they will be assessing
have credible experience of providing training.
Centre staff may undertake more than one role, eg tutor and assessor or internal verifier, but must
never internally verify their own assessments.
Assessors and internal verifiers
Assessors’ and Quality Assurance Co-ordinators’ experience and competence could be evidenced
by:
• curriculum vitae and references
• possession of a relevant NVQ/SVQ
• corporate membership of a relevant professional institution
• continuing professional development (CPD).
While the Assessor/Verifier (A/V) units are valued as qualifications for centre staff, they are not
currently a requirement for the qualifications.
Continuing professional development (CPD)
Centres are expected to support their staff in ensuring that their knowledge remains current of the
occupational area and of best practice in delivery, mentoring, training, assessment and verification,
and that it takes account of any national or legislative developments.
External quality assurance
External quality assurance for the qualifications will be provided by City & Guilds external
verification process.
External Verifiers are appointed by City & Guilds to approve centres, and to monitor the assessment
and internal quality assurance carried out by centres. External verification is carried out to ensure
that assessment is valid and reliable, and that there is good assessment practice in centres.
To carry out their quality assurance role, External Verifiers must have appropriate occupational and
verifying knowledge and expertise. City & Guilds External Verifiers attend training and development
designed to keep them up-to-date, facilitate standardisation between verifiers and share good
practice.
External Verifiers:
The role of the External Verifier is to:
• provide advice and support to centre staff
• ensure the quality and consistency of assessments within and between centres by the use of
systematic sampling
• regularly visit centres to ensure they continue to meet the centre and qualification approval
criteria
• provide feedback to centres and to City & Guilds.
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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4
Centre requirements
4.3 Quality assurance
Internal quality assurance
Approved centres must have effective quality assurance systems to ensure optimum delivery and
assessment of qualifications.
Quality assurance includes initial centre approval, qualification approval and the centre’s own
internal procedures for monitoring quality. Centres are responsible for internal quality assurance,
and City & Guilds is responsible for external quality assurance.
National standards and rigorous quality assurance are maintained by the use of:
• City & Guilds online examinations
• City & Guilds assignments, marked by the centre according to externally set marking criteria
• internal (centre) quality assurance
• City & Guilds external verification.
Full details and guidance on the internal and external quality assurance requirements and
procedures, are provided on the website.
In order to fully support learners, centres are required to retain copies of learners’ assessment
records for three years after certification.
External quality assurance
External verifiers are appointed by City & Guilds to approve centres, and to monitor the assessment
and internal quality assurance carried out by centres. External verification is carried out to ensure
that assessment is valid and reliable, and that there is good assessment practice in centres.
To carry out their quality assurance role, external verifiers/moderators must have appropriate
occupational and verifying knowledge and expertise. City & Guilds external verifiers attend training
and development designed to keep them up-to-date, to facilitate standardisation between verifiers
and to share good practice.
External verifiers:
The role of the external verifier is to:
• provide advice and support to centre staff
• ensure the quality and consistency of assessments within and between centres by the use of
systematic sampling
• regularly visit centres to ensure they continue to meet the centre and qualification approval
criteria
• provide feedback to centres and to City & Guilds.
External quality assurance for the qualification will be provided by the usual City & Guilds external
verification process. This includes the use of an electronically scannable report form which is
designed to provide an objective risk analysis of individual centre assessment and verification
practice.
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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5
Course design and delivery
Recommended delivery strategies
Centre staff should familiarise themselves with the structure, content and assessment requirements
of the qualification before designing a course programme.
In particular, staff should consider the skills and knowledge related to the national occupational
standards.
Provided that the requirements for the qualification are met, centres may design course
programmes of study in any way that they feel best meets the needs and capabilities of their
learners. Centres may wish to include topics as part of the course programme, which will not be
assessed through the qualification.
Relationship to other qualifications and the wider curriculum
City & Guilds recommends centres address the wider curriculum, where appropriate, when
designing and delivering the course. Centres should also consider links to the National Occupational
Standards, Key/Functional Skills and other related qualifications.
Health and safety
The requirement to follow safe working practices is an integral part of all City & Guilds qualifications
and assessments, and it is the responsibility of centres to ensure that all relevant health and safety
requirements are in place before learners start practical assessments.
Should a leaner fail to follow health and safety practices and procedures during an assessment, the
assessment must be stopped. The leaner should be informed that they have not reached the
standard required to successfully pass the assessment and told the reason why. Learners may
retake the assessment at a later date, at the discretion of the centre. In case of any doubt, guidance
should be sought from the external verifier.
Data protection and confidentiality
Centres offering this qualification may need to provide City & Guilds with personal data for staff and
learners. Guidance on data protection and the obligations of City & Guilds and centres are
explained in Providing City & Guilds qualifications – a guide to centre and qualification (scheme)
approval.
Images of minors being used as evidence
It is the responsibility of the approved centre to inform the leaner of the:
• need for the leaner to obtain permission from the minor’s parent/guardian prior to collecting the
evidence
• purpose of the use of photographs or video recordings
• period of time for which the photographs or video recordings are to be kept
• obligation to keep photographs or video recordings secure from unauthorised access
• storage of the photographs or video recordings which are kept electronically, and the
associated security of using electronic systems
• associated child protection legislation.
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Initial assessment and induction
Centres will need to make an initial assessment of each leaner prior to the start of their programme
to ensure they are entered for an appropriate type and level of qualification.
The initial assessment should identify any specific training needs the leaner has, and the support
and guidance they may require when working towards their qualification.
City & Guilds recommends that centres provide an induction programme to ensure the leaner fully
understands the requirements of the qualification they will work towards, their responsibilities as a
leaner, and the responsibilities of the centre. It may be helpful to record the information on a
learning contract.
Equal opportunities
It is a requirement of centre approval that centres have an equal opportunities policy (see Providing
City & Guilds qualifications – a guide to centre and qualification (scheme) approval ).
The regulatory authorities require City & Guilds to monitor centres to ensure that equal opportunity
policies are being followed.
The City & Guilds equal opportunities policy is set out on the City & Guilds website, in Providing City
& Guilds qualifications – a guide to centre and qualification (scheme) approval, in the Directory of
qualifications, and is also available from the City & Guilds Customer Relations department.
Access to assessment
City & Guilds’ guidance and regulations on access to assessment are designed to facilitate access
for assessments and qualifications for learners who are eligible for adjustments to assessment
arrangements. Access arrangements are designed to allow attainment to be demonstrated. For
further information, please see Access to assessment and qualifications, available on the City &
Guilds website.
Appeals
Centres must have their own, auditable, appeals procedure that must be explained to learners
during their induction. Appeals must be fully documented by the quality assurance co-ordinator and
made available to the external verifier or City & Guilds.
Further information on appeals is given in Providing City & Guilds qualifications – a guide to centre
and qualification (scheme) approval. There is also information on appeals for centres and learners
on the City & Guilds website or available from the Customer Relations department.
JAMES Industry Accreditation
The industry organisation JAMES represents education matters for the Association of Professional
Recording Services (APRS), the Music Producer’s Guild and the UKScreen Association. These are the
recognised industry organisations representing the recording, music production, music technology
and audio post-production for film industries.
At JAMES we have been extremely pleased to work with City & Guilds on the development and
update of these new qualifications and will continue to be involved with their effective evolution.
Our professional contributions have helped to ensure that the qualifications will be relevant to our
industry for years to come.
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6
Assessment
For these qualifications, learners will be required to complete the following assessments:
• one assignment for each unit
Time constraints
The following time constraint must be applied to the assessment of this qualification:
• It is anticipated that an assignment should take no longer than fifteen hours, in total, to
complete. Centre staff should guide learners to ensure excessive evidence gathering is avoided.
Centres finding that assignments are taking longer, should contact the external verifier for
guidance.
Grading and marking
Assessments will be graded pass, credit or distinction. Detailed marking and grading criteria are
provided in the Marking Criteria section of each assignment in the assessment pack.
Accreditation of prior learning and experience (APEL)
Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL) and Accreditation of Prior Experience and Learning (APEL) are
approaches used to recognise the contribution a person’s previous experience might contribute to
a qualification.
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7
Units
Availability of units
The units for this qualification follow.
They may also be obtained from the centre resources section of the City & Guilds website.
Structure of units
The units in this qualification are written in a standard format and comprise the following:
• level
• credit
• title
• unit reference number
• rationale
• statement of guided learning hours
• connections with other qualifications, eg NVQs
• assessment details
• learning outcomes in detail expressed as practical skills and/ or underpinning knowledge
• range
• notes for guidance.
The units in this qualification are:
City & Guilds unit
numbers
Unit title
101
Follow safe working practices in music and sound industries
102
Occupational roles and employment in music and sound industries
103
Basic equipment connections for music and sound industries
104
MIDI sequencing and software
105
Sound recording skills
106
Digital sound editing
107
MIDI and audio techniques
207
Music instrument digital interface (MIDI)
215
MIDI operations
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Unit 101
Level:
Follow safe working practices in music and
sound industries
1
Credit value: 4
Rationale
This unit introduces learners to essential safety awareness regulations when working in the Music
and Sound Industries. Learners should be encouraged to appreciate why companies or businesses
cannot work with or represent artists/bands/groups, or even operate legally, without these
measures and regulations being in place for all staff and resources.
This unit instructs the leaner in the observation of safe working practices as described in:
• the law in regard to health and safety at work
• legal regulations applicable to work situations
• the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974
• Regulations governing the control of safety at work (eg Safety Representatives and Safety
Committees 1977, Notification of Accidents and General Occurrences Regulations 1980
Learning outcomes
There are three outcomes to this unit. The leaner will be able to:
• Follow basic health and safety guidelines
• Maintain facilities and equipment
• Follow accident and emergency procedures
Guided learning hours
It is recommended that 40 hours should be allocated for this unit. This may be on a full time or part
time basis.
Assessment and grading
This unit will be assessed by:
An assignment covering practical skills and underpinning knowledge
Relationship to NOS
This unit has links to the following Music NOS;
• CCSMT1 Follow Health and Safety practices in music and sound industries
• CCSMT2 Follow Health and Safety practices for basic maintenance of equipment and facilities
• CCSCCS8 Assist with emergency procedures
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Unit 101
Outcome 1
Follow safe working practices in music and
sound industries
Follow basic health and safety guidelines
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
locate safety signs and information
2
locate first aid equipment
3
locate fire fighting equipment
4
report fire and evacuation procedures
5
report potential hazards
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
list the main health and safety legislation relating to the music and sound industry
2
state the main employer and employee responsibilities as stated in the Health and
Safety at Work Act
3
state the main requirements of RIDDOR (Reporting of Injuries Diseases and Dangerous
Occurrences Regulations)
4
state the main requirements of COSHH (Control of Substances Hazardous to Health
Regulations)
5
list substances covered by COSHH that are commonly used in music and sound industry
environments
6
state the importance of fire regulations
7
state the importance of evacuation procedures
8
explain the difference between hazards and risks
9
list actions that would reduce risk
10
state when to summon assistance to reduce risk
Range
Health and safety legislation: to protect people at work, Control of Noise at Work Regulations,
hearing, effects, dangers
Employer and employee responsibilities
Employer: written Health and Safety policy, to provide and maintain a safe and healthy working
environment
Employee: to act in a way that does not put themselves or others at risk
Requirements of RIDDOR: to report injuries, diseases, dangerous occurrences
Requirements of COSHH: to control substances hazardous to health
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Substances covered by COSHH: cleaning chemicals
Importance of fire regulations: to prevent and control the spread of fire
Importance of evacuation procedures: to evacuate staff and customers
Difference between hazards and risks
Hazard: something with the potential to cause harm
Risk: the likelihood that it will cause harm
Actions that would reduce risk: placing wet floor signage, regular checking of equipment,
wearing protective clothing, removing obstacles, safely storing of media, chemicals and cleaning
substances
When to summon assistance: when something is outside of own responsibility
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Unit 101
Outcome 2
Follow safe working practices in music and
sound industries
Maintain facilities and equipment
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
check facilities and equipment
2
clean and tidy facilities and equipment
3
use equipment and materials safely
4
dispose of waste safely and hygienically
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
outline hazards involved in cleaning and tidying
2
list the cleaning equipment/machinery commonly used in music and sound industry
3
state the main reasons for storing cleaning materials and equipment safely
4
list protective clothing that should be worn when cleaning and tidying
5
state the importance of leaving areas clean, tidy and safe
6
list types of waste and rubbish
7
outline methods of dealing with waste and rubbish
Range
Hazards involved in cleaning and tidying: wet floors, untidy store rooms, blocked exits,
obstacle and trip hazards, ventilation
Cleaning equipment/machinery: caution signage, brushes, mops, buckets, electric floor
clearners
Reasons for storing cleaning materials and equipment safely: away from the public, fire risk,
ready for future use
Protective clothing: overalls, gloves, goggles, masks, boots
Importance of leaving areas clean, tidy and safe: health and safety requirement, public image
Types of waste and rubbish: hazardous, domestic (sharps, toxic)
Methods of dealing with waste and rubbish: following organisation and manufacturers
guidelines
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Unit 101
Outcome 3
Follow safe working practices in music and
sound industries
Follow accident and emergency procedures
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
report accident situations
2
report emergency situations
3
follow accident and emergency procedures
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
describe emergencies that can occur in the music and sound industry
2
list common causes of accidents associated with music and sound industry activities
3
state ways of raising the alarm in an emergency
4
list recognised sources of qualified assistance
5
explain the importance of following accident and near miss reporting procedures
6
outline the procedure for reporting accidents and near misses
Range
Emergencies: fire, gas leak, electrical, chemical, medical emergencies
Causes of accidents: spillage, chemical, electrical shock, obstacles, hazards, medical, lifting
equipment, fire
Ways of raising the alarm: fire alarm, alarms in studio facilities, strobe alarms, mobile phone
Sources of qualified assistance: on site first aider, doctor, emergency service
Importance of following accident and near miss reporting procedures: legal requirement,
insurance claims, prevent other accidents
Procedure for reporting accidents and near misses: organisational, appropriate forms, date
and time of incident
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 101
Follow safe working practices in music and
sound industries
Notes for guidance
Suggested good practice
This unit will inform the leaner of the following issues relating to employers’ responsibilities towards
the maintenance of safety:
• the importance of a safe environment in which to work and the need for safe internal access
entrances and exits in buildings and venues
• a safe system of work and safe working methods, and how they lead to a secure working
environment
• the importance of employers providing adequate sanitation and first aid facilities
• the requirement for an employer to provide the means to report all accidents and maintain an
accident register
• the importance of employers providing safety information, instruction, training and supervision
to all employees
• provision of a basic safety policy which is subject to regular review jointly by employer and
employees’ representatives
• provision of safety education and public display of such information.
Learners will be made aware that developing positive personal attitudes to safety at work is
important for the smooth running of any working environment. They will also be made aware of the
employer’s duty to ensure that they and their staff make daily positive decisions to act and work
responsibly and safely in order to protect themselves and other people in their work environment.
Portable appliance testing (PAT) reports are available from the following website:
http://www.londonelectricalinspectiontesting.co.uk/pat-testing-sample-form.htm
Suggested resources
There are a range of resources available to support the delivery of this unit and it would be
impossible to create a definitive list. Teachers should use those they feel most comfortable with.
However, in the fast moving music and sound industry it is imperative to ensure that the latest
edition of any resource is utilised.
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 102
Level:
Occupational roles and employment in music
and sound industries
1
Credit value: 5
Rationale
This unit offers an overview of the music, sound and recording industries. The unit will help learners
become aware of the roles of different parts of the industry. This includes record labels, publishing
companies, management companies, agencies, recording studios, equipment hire companies,
sound equipment manufacturing companies, public relations companies and venues.
Learning outcomes
There are two outcomes to this unit. The leaner will be able to:
• Describe the main organisations and sectors of the music and sound industry
• Outline employment opportunities in the different music and sound sectors
Guided learning hours
It is recommended that 40 hours should be allocated for this unit. This may be on a full time or part
time basis.
Assessment and grading
This unit will be assessed by:
An assignment covering practical skills and underpinning knowledge
Relationship to NOS
This unit has links to the following Music NOS;
• CCSMT4 Research relevant occupational roles and employment in music and sound recording
sectors
• CCSMT5 Evaluate personal skills to work with others in the music and sound industries
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Unit 102
Outcome 1
Occupational roles and employment in music
and sound industries
Describe the main organisations and sectors of the
music and sound industry
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
research sources of information on the music and sound industry
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
list the company types within the music and sound industries
2
list the main organisations within the music and sound industries
3
state the key functions of main organisations within the music and sound industries
4
list common roles within sectors of the music and sound industries
Range
Sources of information: I.T. office software access, localised web sites relevant to territory (not
overseas), music industry directories (also, please see suggested good practice)
Company types
Main: record labels, publishing companies, management companies, production companies,
recording studios
Others: equipment hire companies, sound equipment manufacturing companies, public relations
companies, agencies and venues, radio and TV stations
Main organisations: IFPI, BPI, MPA, PRS for Music, MCPS, PAMRA, PPL, AIM, IMRO, SMC, BMR,
MMF, MPG, AURA, APRS, Musicians Union, BASCA, FAC ( Featured Artists Coalition), UK Music, PMG
(Producers Managers Group)
Common roles: artist managers, A&R managers, studio managers, producers, engineers, artists,
re-mixers, royalty managers, research and development managers, PR personnel, booking agents,
entertainment/venue managers
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Unit 102
Outcome 2
Occupational roles and employment in music
and sound industries
Outline employment opportunities in the different
music and sound sectors
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
access sources of information on employment opportunities
2
review and select information relevant to personal career options
3
research a chosen full-time post and what its duties may involve
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
state possible routes into employment for career options
Range
Sources of information: music, sound and media press publications, Musicweek, Broadcast,
Campaign, Guardian Media, Audio Media, Resolution, Tape Op, Future Music, Sound On Sound
Industry Directories, Showcase, Musicians Bible, Music Industry Manual (MIM) websites, industry HR
employment agencies
Personal career options: assistant /runner posts, assistant team member recording/media
engineer, engineer, programmer, musician, session musician, assistant live recording and sound
crew, in house assistant or live engineer to music venues/bars/theatres, resident DJ, assistant
radio/media posts, reception and administration work, junior A&R posts, press assistant posts,
personal day to day PA to range of posts, artists management post room work, research assistant,
marketing and advertising, work experience/research within industry HR departments
Routes into employment
Main: record labels, publishing companies, management companies, production companies,
recording studios
Others: equipment hire companies, sound equipment manufacturing companies, public relations
companies, agencies and venues
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 102
Occupational roles and employment in music
and sound industries
Notes for guidance
Suggested good practice
The unit will deal with common misconceptions and clarify the different business and creative tasks
undertaken by personnel in the music industry sectors. This unit will assist learners in
understanding the landscape of employment in the music industry. Learners will need to research a
particular sector and provide evidence of such research. They will be encouraged to understand
where a selection of common posts might be found in relation to this sector.
Learners will describe and research a chosen full-time post and what its duties may involve by
creating a virtual timetable operating on a weekly basis over a specified period. They will be asked
to examine their own interests and analyse their current skills in order to find a job that may suit
their current abilities. They will be given resources which will help them to gain part time or full time
employment by applying for specific posts inside the industry sectors from an informed
perspective.
With this knowledge the leaner will be able understand where specific employment can be found
and will be encouraged to make decisions based on knowledge about positions generally available
in each sector. It is also important for the leaner to know which type and size of company would
employ applicants in specific types of roles. In this unit an overview of the many types of vacancy
will be given, for example; A&R junior posts; management; royalty administration; sound editors;
assistant engineer; maintenance posts etc.
Sources of information
www.uk.music-jobs.com
www.aes.org
www.recordproduction.com
www.bbc.co.uk/radio1/onemusic/industry
www.trugroovez.com/music-industry-jobs.htm
www.scenta.co.uk/music/jobs_&_careers.cfm?cit_id=963881&FAArea1=widgets.content_view_1
www.ccskills.org.uk
Industry directories
Musicweek
Showcase
Music Industry Manual (MIM)
Please note it is not advised that learners research overseas territories for this unit. Many overseas
industries are often not relevant to the localised industry. Learners should show evidence of
localised music and sound industries.
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Suggested resources
There are a range of resources available to support the delivery of this unit and it would be
impossible to create a definitive list. Teachers should use those they feel most comfortable with.
However, in the fast moving music and sound industry it is imperative to ensure that the latest
edition of any resource is utilised.
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 103
Level:
Basic equipment connections for music and
sound industries
1
Credit value: 4
Rationale
This introduces learners to different types of leads and connectors. They will need a basic
appreciation of the differences between digital communication protocols (such as MIDI and S/PDIF)
and analogue methods of connection between devices. They will also need a basic understanding
of the different types of signal to be connected such as MIDI vs. audio, mono vs. stereo. Learners
will be encouraged to gain knowledge about the common types of connector and will become
aware of the reasons for different uses of particular types of connection in the audio chain.
Learning outcomes
There are four outcomes to this unit. The leaner will be able to:
• Identify the basic types of common leads and connectors
• Distinguish between digital and analogue connectors and types of signals
• Describe the difference in level between mic, line, headphone and speaker signals
• Test that leads are working and signals are routed correctly
Guided learning hours
It is recommended that 40 hours should be allocated for this unit. This may be on a full time or part
time basis.
Assessment and grading
This unit will be assessed by:
An assignment covering practical skills and underpinning knowledge
Relationship to NOS
This unit has links to the following Music NOS;
• CCSMT6 Identify, test and use basic professional audio equipment connections and interfaces
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 103
Outcome 1
Basic equipment connections for music and
sound industries
Identify the basic types of common leads and
connectors
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
connect together pieces of equipment using common leads and connectors
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
identify types of common leads and connectors
Range
Leads: mono (¼” jack to jack), balanced or stereo (¼”jack to jack), stereo (3.5mm mini-jack to
3.5mm mini-jack), balanced or unbalanced (XLR to ¼” jack), XLR to XLR (In-line socket to in-line plug),
stereo (RCA phono to RCA phono), stereo (3.5mm mini-jack to left and right channel RCA phono), 5
pin DIN to 5 pin DIN (MIDI), mains 2 pin fig-8, IEC socket
Connectors: XLR in line socket, XLR in line plug, ¼” mono jack plug, ¼” stereo jack, ¼” in line stereo
jack socket, RCA/phono plug, 5 pin DIN plug, BNC word clock
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 103
Outcome 2
Basic equipment connections for music and
sound industries
Distinguish between digital and analogue
connectors and types of signals
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
choose correct leads for use in analogue and/or digital connections
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
identify types of common connectors
2
identify cables used for digital connections
3
identify the properties of analogue and digital electrical signals
Range
Types of common connectors
Analogue: XLR, ¼” mono jack plug, ¼” stereo jack, RCA/phono plug, 5 pin DIN plug
Digital: RCA, XLR, Toslink, TDIF (DSUB 25pin), 5 pin DIN, BNC
Both: XLR, RCA phono, 5 pin DIN (MIDI or domestic Hi-Fi stereo interconnection)
Cables: RCA phono to RCA phono S/PDIF 75 Ohm coaxial, AES/EBU - XLR to XLR lead 110 Ohm
balanced, Toslink lightpipe cable for S/PDIF, Toslink lightpipe cable for ADAT, mini 3.5mm Toslink for
portable CD/minidisk, BNC 75 Ohm word clock, DSUB 25 pin TDIF cable
Electrical signals
Analogue: AC signals/audio signals, voltage/amplitude, distortion and signal degradation due to
poor cables
Digital: digital signals and voltage, data considerations (degradation and loss/retrieval, storage vs.
bit rate and sample resolution)
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 103
Outcome 3
Basic equipment connections for music and
sound industries
Describe the difference in level between mic, line,
headphone and speaker signals
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
connect together signals at different levels
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
state the main categories of signal level
2
outline the importance of matching signals when connecting equipment
Range
Main categories of signal level: microphone, line level -10dB consumer, line Level +4dB pro,
headphone, speaker signal
Matching signals
Desirability of matching signals between pieces of equipment: under powering between
equipment (raising of noise floor, inability to reach required volume levels), over powering between
equipment (audio distortion caused, mechanical or thermal damage caused
Gain stages required: mic to line level – pre-amplification stage, line to headphone output –
headphone amp stage (built in or discrete), line to speaker level - power amp stage
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 103
Outcome 4
Basic equipment connections for music and
sound industries
Test that leads are working and signals are routed
correctly
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
2
Test that leads are working by:
a
listening
b
visual metering
c
continuity tests using multimeter
Test routing by:
a
listening
b
metering
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
outline ways of checking that the routing of signals is correct
2
describe signal path/signal flow between points
3
describe how to use a multimeter to show continuity between points
Range
Leads are working: listen for a good quality signal at the receiving end, watch for a good level of
signal on meters at the receiving end, use a multi meter to carry out a continuity test
Routing: starting at the point that the signal originates from, use logical steps to check a signal is
correctly routed between pieces of equipment, use listening and metering tests at various stages
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 103
Basic equipment connections for music and
sound industries
Notes for guidance
Suggested good practice
In this unit learners will develop an awareness of the terminology used to describe different types of
leads and connectors. They will then apply this knowledge to the setting up and basic testing of
audio and MIDI based equipment. Learners should develop the ability to become independent in
requesting leads and setting up equipment so that they can work unaided when starting a specified
project.
At this level of study the main emphasis of teaching should be to enable the learners to anticipate
the requirements of a particular system and to be able to find leads and connect pieces of
equipment together. Systems should be adopted within the learning environment whereby leads
are stored in a central location and labelled using correct terminology so that learners become
familiar with asking for connecting leads by their proper names. Every opportunity should be given
to the student to set up a selection of pieces of equipment on a regular basis so that they are
confident in configuring basic equipment. They should also be encouraged to adopt a logical
approach to connecting recording equipment together. The outcomes for this unit directly inform
the use of skills required for Unit 105, Sound Recording Skills.
Suggested resources
There are a range of resources available to support the delivery of this unit and it would be
impossible to create a definitive list. Teachers should use those they feel most comfortable with.
However, in the fast moving music and sound industry it is imperative to ensure that the latest
edition of any resource is utilised.
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 104
Level:
MIDI sequencing and software
1
Credit value: 4
Rationale
MIDI sequencing is used widely in the sound and media related industries to coordinate and layerup multiple different sound sources under tight control.
This unit introduces learners to the basic functions of software-based MIDI sequencing packages.
Learners will be shown how to connect together and use MIDI sequencing packages and will
explore the basic parameters of the software. They should be encouraged to develop an intuitive
awareness of the place of MIDI sequencing in the creative process with special regard to flexibility
of operation due to the nature of MIDI as an easily-editable form of control data.
Learning outcomes
There are four outcomes to this unit. The leaner will be able to:
• Set up a software MIDI sequencer and headphone/monitor system
• Explain the basic functions of a software-based MIDI sequencing package
• Create MIDI files to a given brief
• Explain computerised file location, file saving and backup procedures
Guided learning hours
It is recommended that 40 hours should be allocated for this unit. This may be on a full time or part
time basis.
Assessment and grading
This unit will be assessed by:
An assignment covering practical skills and underpinning knowledge
Relationship to NOS
This unit has links to the following Music NOS;
• CCSMT7 Use basic functions of MIDI sequencing on professional DAWs
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 104
Outcome 1
MIDI sequencing and software
Set up a software MIDI sequencer and
headphone/monitor system
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
make connections between pieces of MIDI equipment
2
configure a MIDI sequencer to accept and transmit MIDI instructions
3
configure audio connections between MIDI sound sources and audio monitoring facilities
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
list the steps required to make MIDI connections
2
outline the procedures required to set up a software MIDI sequencer to receive and
transmit MIDI data
3
state ways in which audio connectors are used in order to monitor MIDI sound sources
4
define terminology relating to MIDI connections
Range
Make MIDI connections
Connect wiring between different MIDI devices: MIDI in, MIDI out, MIDI thru
Connecting multiple MIDI devices: socket and cable type – 5 pin DIN, configuration of multiple
devices (Star (Thru Box), Daisy chain (MIDI IN to MIDI THRU), separate independently addressable
MIDI OUT sockets), using controller keyboards
Using a synthesiser to input MIDI data and as a multi-timbral sound source at the same
time: requirement to implement LOCAL OFF, where LOCAL OFF is found in synth menu
Computer MIDI interfaces: soundcard/joystick-multimedia port, soundcard/ 5-pin DIN socket or
flying breakout lead, breakout front panel, USB external interface, serial port external interface,
other MIDI connection protocols
Set up a software MIDI sequencer: accessing software’s options-page to check MIDI drivers are
configured (MIDI hardware interface drivers, internal software MIDI synth drivers), configuring MIDI
click by assigning to correct drivers, verification of MIDI incoming signal by visual or other means,
routing of MIDI signal THRU to sound source (software THRU enabled globally, MIDI track recordenabled to allow signal to pass THRU, verification of MIDI IN signal reaching sound source,
verification of MIDI IN signal at visual interface of internal soft synth
Audio connectors
Midi sound sources as external devices driven by MIDI cable, USB cable or other systems:
verification that MIDI is causing triggered sound, identification of audio line out points on external
MIDI sound sources, setting master audio output levels on external MIDI sound sources, connecting
audio outputs to mixing desk or straight to monitor amp, location of headphone output on external
MIDI sound sources for monitoring or signal verification
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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MIDI sound sources as internal software virtual instruments: verification that MIDI is causing
triggered sound, routing of audio outputs of internal synth back through audio system on the
computer, verifying computer soundcard output is working generally, verifying that software synth
sound is reaching computer soundcard drivers
Terminology: MIDI, local on/off, driver software, soundcard, 5 pin DIN, MIDI interface, MIDI
IN/OUT/THRU
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 104
Outcome 2
MIDI sequencing and software
Explain the basic functions of a software-based
MIDI sequencing package
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
implement MIDI functions within a software sequencer package
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
explain different MIDI functions within a software MIDI sequencer
2
describe how a MIDI sequencer allows multiple channels of data to be controlled
simultaneously
3
define terminology associated with functions of MIDI sequencing package
Range
MIDI functions: recording MIDI data onto tracks from a live performance, entering MIDI data into
edit pages (pianoroll/keyedit, score), transforming MIDI input in real time or after entry (pitch
transposition, velocity range – compression, quantising), assigning voices (entry by program and
bank number, entry by menu of patch names), adjusting volume and panning (from main front
(project) window, from dedicated MIDI Mixer or combined audio/MIDI mixer window
Multiple channels: 16 Channels per MIDI interface, expansion of the number of MIDI channels
available (multiple MIDI INs on single MIDI sound source, a number of different MIDI sound sources,
software synths, other protocols), assigning tracks to external device MIDI channels, assigning
tracks to soft synth MIDI channels, available number of simultaneous notes across channels (per
external device per software synth device
Terminology: quantisation, multi-timbral, polyphony, monophonic, dynamic note, allocation,
velocity, transposition
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 104
Outcome 3
MIDI sequencing and software
Create MIDI files to a given brief
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
create MIDI files
2
balance and edit MIDI processes
3
save MIDI files to specified locations
4
backup MIDI files
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
outline the skills required for following project briefs
2
describe MIDI processes required for particular creative outputs
Range
Skills required for following project briefs: ability to comprehend scope and requirements set
out in a project brief, ability to follow through a reasonable progression of actions to achieve a
desired result, ability to manage own time in order to achieve the required results within a
prescribed deadline
MIDI processes: ability to differentiate between different MIDI processes and their affect on the
end result/creative outcome
THIS IS NOT A PROCESS
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 104
Outcome 4
MIDI sequencing and software
Explain computerised file location, file saving and
backup procedures
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
use computerised file structure to store files
2
use different types of storage media to backup and transport files
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
describe computerised file structures and computer network storage systems
2
outline reasons for data backup policies
3
describe ways of using storage media to secure data
Range
File structure: files and folders (nesting of files and folders within other folders, naming files,
naming folders, sharing locations with other users, security from external deletion/tampering), file
extensions and their meanings (eg .mid or .txt), location of internal hard drive icons on computer
interface, different partitions/hard drives located on same machine, hard drives/partitions
accessible over networks
Reasons for data backup policies: organisational policy for data storage/backup and retrieval,
passwords and security, backup as a way of stepping back to earlier versions, backing up to
different physical locations/media in case of virus/fire or malfunction, importance of using of virus
checking software
Storage media: location of data (hard drives, floppy disk, CD-R/DVD-R or CDRW/DVD-RW, USB
storage device, removable drives)
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 104
MIDI sequencing and software
Notes for guidance
Suggested good practice
In this unit learners will be given the opportunity to connect together and use a MIDI sequencing
software package. They will learn how to keep track of files and backup their work as well as how to
use basic MIDI entry, save and editing procedures. This will be achieved through a series of short
projects taking them through basic areas of the sequencing environment.
They will use knowledge gained in Unit 103 – Basic Equipment Connections in order to set up and
test hardware and software comprising the MIDI sequencing package. This unit will start learners on
a pathway which could they could develop further by taking higher level units of study in MIDI
sequencing at Levels 2 and 3.
Suggested resources
There are a range of resources available to support the delivery of this unit and it would be
impossible to create a definitive list. Teachers should use those they feel most comfortable with.
However, in the fast moving music and sound industry it is imperative to ensure that the latest
edition of any resource is utilised.
Technical papers/media assets from the Producers & Engineers wing
Pro Tools:
http://charlesdye.com/ptguidelines2.0.pdf
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 105
Level:
Sound recording skills
1
Credit value: 6
Rationale
This unit introduces learners to the basic recording chain and its significance in completing simple
recording tasks to a high quality.
There are many ways of originating analogue & digital recordings on a wide variety of hardware
and/or software devices. In all of these systems it is most important to learn the simple foundations
of the recording chain. This unit introduces learners to the procedures involved for contemporary
good recording practice. It is also important to screen for prior bad habits with respect to the
recording chain and to encourage best-practice in its place.
This unit will introduce learners to the basics of working with analogue connectivity and a recording
source such as a microphone, piano/keyboard or guitar on either a PC/Mac based computer system
or a discrete basic multi-track hardware device with a minimum of eight tracks. With this knowledge
learners will be encouraged to develop the independent skills necessary to record and monitor back
the signal derived from an external source. They will also be required to make a basic volume
balance of a multi-track recording and then archive or digitally save the recorded work.
Learning outcomes
There are four outcomes to this unit. The leaner will be able to:
• Implement audio connections within different recording scenarios
• Connect analogue sources to digital or analogue recording systems
• Record and monitor signal sources and make a basic volume balance
• Save and archive recordings
Guided learning hours
It is recommended that 40 hours should be allocated for this unit. This may be on a full time or part
time basis.
Assessment and grading
This unit will be assessed by:
An assignment covering practical skills and underpinning knowledge
Relationship to NOS
This unit has links to the following Music NOS;
• CCSMT8 Use essential analogue and digital sound recording skills
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 105
Outcome 1
Sound recording skills
Implement audio connections within different
recording scenarios
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
access sources of information on basic analogue connectivity
2
set up different recording scenarios
3
connect a variety of recording equipment
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
describe different recording scenarios and approaches
2
identify basic connections for a recording scenario
Range
Analogue connectivity: ¼’’Jacks, DI boxes, XLR, microphones, amplifiers, signal routing (working
connectivity for basic recording scenarios)
Recording scenarios: vocal performance, musical instruments, spoken word, sound effects,
drum/percussion
Basic connections: microphones, cabling, multi-track looms, auxiliaries, desks, amplifiers,
foldback, monitoring
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 105
Outcome 2
Sound recording skills
Connect analogue sources to digital or analogue
recording systems
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
prepare connection of instruments
2
connect and route instruments to digital or analogue recording systems
3
Set up either a:
a. computer-based audio system
b. digital multi-track device
c. analogue multi-track device
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
describe how to prepare a variety of external analogue connections for instruments
2
describe how to route a variety of connections to digital or analogue recording
3
describe how to prepare and use a digital or analogue recording devices
Range
External analogue connections: prepare and select wiring and connectivity for each instrument
or source being used - microphone and piano/keyboard or guitar
Route a variety of connections: assemble a variety of equipment to prepare recordings with a
digital or analogue recording device, cables and wiring looms
Prepare and use: operate and set up an 8 track session on a digital or analogue recording device
(PC/MAC based or hardware 8-24 track machine) to facilitate the recording of instruments on
discrete tracks
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 105
Outcome 3
Sound recording skills
Record and monitor signal sources and make a
basic volume balance
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
make an original recording of external analogue sources
2
operate and monitor a digital or analogue recording device during recording
3
adjust the balance of levels of recorded work
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
outline good practice in the operation of the recording process on digital or analogue
recording devices
2
describe how to make observed adjustments on recorded material
3
describe the use of balancing of levels on recorded material
Range
Good practice and operation: controlling and monitoring of a recording on a digital or analogue
8-24track recording device, using track sheet, list of recorded content for project
Observed adjustments: adjustments necessary during the recording whilst monitoring the
material under observation, constantly check levels being recorded
Balancing of levels: review the recorded signal levels of material, balance the discrete recorded
tracks to improve the clarity of all playback levels
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 105
Outcome 4
Sound recording skills
Save and archive recordings
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
operate machinery, menus and parameters to store recordings
2
make safe and secure archives of recordings
3
restore saved recordings on a digital or analogue 8-24 track recording device
4
reset and tidy equipment
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
describe how to prepare and manage machinery, menus and parameters
2
describe how to restore and verify recorded material
Range
Menus and parameters: operate and control digital or analogue recording devices in ways that
prepare all recorded material for archiving, list discrete track titles and content, title and version of
recording, dates and times, source of recording
Safe and secure archives: WAV, AIFF, DVD, DVD RAM, Digital removable HD CADDY,TAPE, DAT,
CD, External HD.
General Deliverables/media sheets/archiving assets:
http://www2.grammy.com/Recording_Academy/Producers_And_Engineers/Guidelines/
Reset and tidy: health and safety good practice, reset environment and recording equipment,
remove and store all cables, wiring looms, instruments, stands, microphones
Restore and verify: good practice PC/MAC based or hardware 8-24track device, caution, verify
and recall saved media will fully restore and playback prior to cleaning out machinery or resetting
any parameters
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 105
Sound recording skills
Notes for guidance
Suggested good practice
This unit will look at common misconceptions involved in recording practice as well as the problemsolving issues that can occur on a daily basis when working with the basic analogue recording chain.
It will help to promote skills required for team work and communication between the sound
engineer and the client.
The client could be an artist or writer requesting that a vocal or instrumental source of some kind is
recorded and a basic volume balance provided for a demo CD/MD. The client/artist will concentrate
on his/her performance whilst the leaner must concentrate on the capture and subsequent basic
volume balancing of the recording of the client/artist. Learners can also record their own
performance. Software synthesiser performances do not fulfil the learning requirements for this unit
as no experience is gained relating to acquiring a signal from an analogue signal chain source.
The learners recording can be either digital or analogue but the original recorded source must have
been analogue (ie from an external piece of equipment). Learners will need to record a variety of
requested sources, as they would be required to do with a client. It is also important that learners
understand that the material which they are recording today may not be used by them tomorrow
but may be passed on to another engineer. The recording needs to be representative of the original
source and useable by others. In these ways this unit is intended to provide evidence that the leaner
has a basic working knowledge of the recording chain, signal levels and archiving. This unit will start
learners on a pathway which could they could develop further by taking higher level units of study in
MIDI sequencing in Levels 2 and 3.
For the original recording, learners should show evidence of external sources being recorded on
digital, implement actions to safely secure and save entire recorded content via l or analogue 824track recording device and label and title all archived content.
Websites (sources of information)
Technical papers/media assets from the Producers & Engineers wing
Pro Tools:
http://charlesdye.com/ptguidelines2.0.pdf
General Deliverables/media sheets/archiving assets:
http://www2.grammy.com/Recording_Academy/Producers_And_Engineers/Guidelines/
www.bossus.com/Manuals/BasicsofMRec.pdf
www.blind-summit.co.uk/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=70
www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~bunce/mix1.htm
www.canford.co.uk/blueprintonline/blueprintaug2003/techsupport.aspx
www.tweakheadz.com/signal_flow_1.htm
www.tweakheadz.com/setting_up_your_audio_card.htm
www.soundrecordingadvice.com/studio.html
www.soundrecordingadvice.com/audio.html
http://88.208.201.17/answerbase/article.php?id=064
www.performermag.com/CablesandCords.php
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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www.jeepjazz.com/JeepJazzMusic/handbk.html
www.tweakheadz.com/all_about_cables.htm
http://latetrain.derekchung.org/music/rvrguid3.html
http://latetrain.derekchung.org/music/rvrguid3b.html
http://emusician.com/mag/emusic_good_connections/index.html
www.sweetwater.com/shop/cables/cables_buying-guide.php
www.homerecordingconnection.com/studio_equipment.php?cat=Live+Audio+Snakes&list=pop
www.canford.co.uk/commerce/category_2000003_2000000.aspx
www.homerecordingconnection.com/studio_equipment.php?cat_type=Adapters
www.homerecordingconnection.com/studio_equipment.php?cat=Instrument+Cables&list=pop
www.homerecordingconnection.com/studio_equipment.php?cat=Live+Audio+Snakes&list=pop
Suggested resources
There are a range of resources available to support the delivery of this unit and it would be
impossible to create a definitive list. Teachers should use those they feel most comfortable with.
However in the fast moving music and sound industry it is imperative to ensure that the latest
edition of any resource is utilised.
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 106
Level:
Digital sound editing
1
Credit value: 6
Rationale
There are many ways of originating analogue and digital recordings on a wide variety of hardware
and/or software devices. Common to understanding all of these systems is the basic practices of the
editing process. It is important to highlight any bad habits with respect to these editing procedures
and to encourage best practice in their place.
This unit introduces learners to basic knowledge relating editing recorded source material. It will
help them become aware of how this underpinning knowledge is significant in completing basic
editing tasks to a high standard.
This unit is designed to allow learners to show evidence of a good basic working knowledge of
editing methods including the ability to carry out accurate editing of audio material. It is important
that learners understand that what they are editing today may not be used by them tomorrow but
may be passed on to another engineer. The final edited work needs to be useable by others without
requiring further work or preparation. In these ways this unit is intended to show that learners have
good basic editing theory and practice with an acceptable quality output and a secure method of
archiving.
Learning outcomes
There are five outcomes to this unit. The leaner will be able to:
• Transfer or import basic audio material without any deterioration in the quality
• Make basic editing decisions
• Make improvements to selected audio files without any obvious deterioration of the material
• Make tempo and timing editing decisions
• Save and archive edits as new audio files
Guided learning hours
It is recommended that 40 hours should be allocated for this unit. This may be on a full time or part
time basis.
Assessment and grading
This unit will be assessed by:
An assignment covering practical skills and underpinning knowledge
Relationship to NOS
This unit has links to the following Music NOS;
• CCSMT9 Use essential analogue and digital sound editing techniques
• CCSMT21 Edit sound and spoken word using both analogue and digital systems
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 106
Outcome 1
Digital sound editing
Transfer or import basic audio material without any
deterioration in the quality
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
make basic audio connections to digital editing and recording equipment
2
operate a computer-based (DAW) digital editing system and parameters
3
configure equipment to safely transfer audio materials
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
outline procedures for connecting digital editing and recording equipment
2
describe how to use menus and parameters to transfer and import audio
3
state the importance of preserving original audio content
4
describe how to save and manage audio materials
Range
Connecting digital editing and recording equipment: power up equipment, connect sources of
equipment, operate software, monitor digital equipment on headphones
Transfer and import audio: operate computer based digital editing software, set up both import
and recording parameters, ensure correct sampling/recording sample rates are in place,
understand location of files and record audio paths, monitor stereo signals being received, import
audio, record audio
Preserving original audio content: observe the importance of 100% replication of original
sources for editing, make A/B comparisons to audio source and audio copy, ensure no external
interference or influence has changed the original audio, good practice, the importance of well
maintained cables and wiring at all times, good sources of power, editing audio material does not
require the user to alter the sound of the edited material, cloning of files, destructive or nondestructive audio editing
Save and manage: transfer audio location, import audio location, save audio, file
name/management, title working tracks to be edited, be aware of location of audio files and
recordings saved, folders/path/chain of archived events, save audio
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 106
Outcome 2
Digital sound editing
Make basic editing decisions
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
carry out editing decisions effectively
2
identify areas of audio requiring editing or cleaning
3
provide editing solutions to resolve problems and improve audio
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
describe common editing problems associated with many editing scenarios
2
outline basic editing solutions to improve audio and remove problems
Range
Common editing problems: background interference, general ambience, wind, external
interruptions, phasing, coughing, sneezing, noise, bad recordings, pops, clicks, repetition, false
starts, bad fades, furniture, jewellery
Solutions to improve audio: cut, copy, paste, insert, transfer, delete, use of EQ, rearrangement,
top and tail
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 106
Outcome 3
Digital sound editing
Make improvements to selected audio files without
any obvious deterioration of the material
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
use editing functions on a computer based digital editing program
2
make corrections and improvements to audio materials
3
maintain procedures to ensure audio does not deteriorate or degrade
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
describe ways in which digital editing parameters are used
2
state ways to edit and repair audio material
3
outline procedures for ensuring audio materials does not deteriorate or degrade
Range
Procedures: analyse, review, observe, make comparisons
Edit and repair: plug-ins, processing software, cut, copy, paste, delete, insert, transfer, delete,
filter, noise reduction, spatial improvement, use of EQ, rearrangement, top and tail, fades, save
Digital editing parameters: keyboard, mouse, short cuts, menus, plug-ins, processing software
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 106
Outcome 4
Digital sound editing
Make tempo and timing editing decisions
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
assemble small drum and percussion edits to present perfect timekeeping of original
2
assemble vocal/music edits that reflect good timing, pace and tempo awareness
3
measure the overall timing and feel of audio to be edited
4
adjust bad timing and tempo errors with accurate editing decisions
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
outline the process of timekeeping and tempo relationships with all editing decisions
2
outline reasons for editing audio with timing and tempo
Range
Timekeeping and tempo relationships: interviews, tempo and pace, length of audio, extend or
shorten audio without any detriment or distraction to the overall piece, editing sentences of
speech, editing musical pieces, deletion of audio, general observation and awareness
Reasons for editing audio: good timekeeping and presentation, work not obviously edited to
listening audience, background interference, general ambience, wind, external interruptions,
phasing, coughing, sneezing, noise, bad recordings, pops, clicks, repetition, false starts, bad fades,
furniture, jewellery
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 106
Outcome 5
Digital sound editing
Save and archive edits as new audio files
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
operate computer based menus and parameters to save audio files
2
make safe and secure archive of edits
3
restore saved edits on another digital workstation
4
reset and tidy equipment
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
describe how to prepare and manage digital editing menus and parameters
2
describe how to restore and verify edited material
Range
Menus and parameters: operate and control (DAW) digital editing device in ways that prepare all
recorded material for archiving, list stereo track titles and content title and version of edits, dates
and times, source of recording, version of edit
Safe and secure archive: WAV, AIFF, (file formats) DVD, DVD RAM, digital removable HD CADDY,
TAPE, DAT, CDR, external HD storage device
Reset and tidy: health and safety good practice, reset digital environment and equipment, remove
and store all cables, wiring looms
Restore and verify: good practice, caution, verify and recall saved media files will fully restore and
playback prior to cleaning out machinery or resetting of any parameters, shutdown and restart
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 106
Digital sound editing
Notes for guidance
Suggested good practice
The unit will look at dealing with common problem-solving and other issues that can occur on a
regular basis in the editing process. This unit will further support the team work and communication
skills of user and client, as covered in Unit 105. In addition to this, it will also build upon skills learned
in Unit 104 and inform learners about best practice regarding contemporary editing procedures.
Learners will be required to import/transfer an audio file for editing and then save and archive the
new and renamed audio file prior to any editing. They will also be required to remove unwanted
noise from a recorded source, and then save and archive this new edited/cleaned audio file.
Learners will be required to implement actions to safely secure and save entire recorded content
via WAV, AIFF, (file formats) DVD, DVD RAM, Digital removable HD CADDY,TAPE, DAT, CD, External
HD. Label and title all archived content.
General Deliverables/media sheets/archiving assets:
http://www2.grammy.com/Recording_Academy/Producers_And_Engineers/Guidelines/
Learners will also edit out unwanted audio problems such as coughs or sneezes from a live
interview section, and then save and archive the file.
Learners will also be required to edit a drum and percussion recording showing good understanding
of tempo and timing knowledge. The audio source can be either digital or analogue but must be
saved as digitally captured material and edited and stored in the form of a computer based audio
file (.wav or .aiff).
Learners will independently edit recorded material to the required specification and save the newly
edited work. Backups should be made by learners of all original and edited materials. They will need
to edit a variety of requested sources, as they would be required to do for a commercial client.
Suggested resources
There are a range of resources available to support the delivery of this unit and it would be
impossible to create a definitive list. Teachers should use those they feel most comfortable with.
However, in the fast moving music and sound industry it is imperative to ensure that the latest
edition of any resource is utilised.
Technical papers/media assets from the Producers & Engineers wing
Pro Tools:
http://charlesdye.com/ptguidelines2.0.pdf
General Deliverables/media sheets/archiving assets:
http://www2.grammy.com/Recording_Academy/Producers_And_Engineers/Guidelines/
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 107
Level:
MIDI and audio techniques
1
Credit value: 6
Rationale
One of the techniques available to MIDI programmers is to include live recorded parts alongside
their sequenced materials. This has the advantage that the precision of MIDI sequenced work can
be enhanced by the more ‘real’ nature of live recorded sounds. Another advantage of combining
audio and MIDI parts is the stability that MIDI can provide to musicians playing-in live parts. This
could involve the creation of a MIDI drum track in order that a set of live musicians could overdub
materials whilst maintaining stable timing.
Learners will gain a basic awareness of the differences in the overall feel and quality of live audio
and MIDI-sequenced parts. At this level learners are expected to take part in a series of projects
combining both audio and MIDI material. The emphasis in the learning process should be on an
exploration of features of the software in relation to the way in which audio and MIDI parts behave
and work alongside each other.
Learning outcomes
There are three outcomes to this unit. The leaner will be able to:
• Set up software audio/MIDI sequencing packages to record and play back audio/MIDI tracks in
sync
• Explain the difference between the features available to audio and MIDI tracks
• Record and mix down a combination of MIDI and audio materials
Guided learning hours
It is recommended that 40 hours should be allocated for this unit. This may be on a full time or part
time basis.
Assessment and grading
This unit will be assessed by:
An assignment covering practical skills and underpinning knowledge
Relationship to NOS
This unit has links to the following Music NOS;
• CCSMT10 Develop key MIDI and DAW audio techniques
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 107
Outcome 1
MIDI and audio techniques
Set up software audio/MIDI sequencing packages to
record and play back audio/MIDI tracks in sync
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
set up audio tracks in an audio/MIDI sequencer
2
set up MIDI tracks in an audio/MIDI sequencer
3
synchronise audio and MIDI with each other within the same piece of sound or music
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
list the requirements for setting up audio within an audio/MIDI sequencer
2
list the requirements for setting up MIDI within an audio/MIDI sequencer
3
outline procedures for synchronising MIDI and audio materials within the same project
Range
Requirements for setting up audio: create audio tracks within the software environment (mono,
stereo), routing inputs from sources through to monitoring environment within the sequencer,
routing input busses to required audio tracks, optimising levels within the hardware and software
environment, record-enabling tracks when appropriate, setting up audio monitoring systems to
monitor the recording while in progress, implementing correct monitoring status for audio tracks
within the sequencing software
Requirements for setting up MIDI: create MIDI tracks within the software environment, route
tracks to an appropriate MIDI sound source, route sound sources from MIDI software synths or
external devices to appropriate monitoring facilities, adjust levels to appropriate levels, route click
tracks MIDI data to appropriate MIDI sound source where applicable
Procedures for synchronising
Audio to MIDI: set up a backing click-track and route to headphone monitor mix, ascertain an
appropriate fixed tempo at which to record the final piece, set the MIDI sequencer to the desired
tempo, synchronise other aspects of the mix to the MIDI tempo (ie delay settings)
MIDI to audio: balance elements of the audio mix and rehearse MIDI based overdub parts
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 107
Outcome 2
MIDI and audio techniques
Explain the difference between the features
available to audio and MIDI tracks
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
list the main differences in features available to audio and MIDI tracks
2
state the implications of using either MIDI or audio to record a particular required
instrumental part.
Range
Features
MIDI: tracks allow the examination of pitch, velocity (i.e. volume/timbre characteristics) adjustment
of note lengths globally, note duration, global compression and expansion of velocity range, ability
to increase or decrease the level of individual note velocities after recorded performance, to correct
timing and pitch attributes on a global or individual note basis, global tempo of MIDI tracks can be
altered after recording with little or no implications for audio quality
Audio: tracks allow the examination of waveform information after recording, implementation of
open-ended protocols on audio materials via plug-in audio effects such as reverb, delay, distortion,
adjustment of the qualities of the timbre of audio via equalisation, audio parts can be sped up or
slowed down but synchronisation is generally compromised and audio quality is also affected
outside of a very narrow range.
Both: audio and MIDI tracks allow easy cutting and pasting of sections of tracks, automation of
volume and panning settings on a track by track basis
Implications
MIDI: easier to record and edit materials, wide sound palette is available, dedicated MIDI
controllers, editing and arrangement of individual notes and chords, potential lifeless or un-realistic
performance, quality of playback sound sources, accuracy and definition of MIDI data
Audio: linear editing techniques, the benefit of ‘feeling’ live, continuous variations of timbre and
acoustic characteristics of instrument and playing style, benefits of real’ sound of live played
microphone parts, data storage space, implications for project storage and transportation
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
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Unit 107
Outcome 3
MIDI and audio techniques
Record and mix down a combination of MIDI and
audio materials
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
make recordings of audio materials
2
make live MIDI recordings or enter MIDI materials via editing screen
3
render down MIDI tracks to audio files for mixdown purposes
4
create a balanced mix of audio and MIDI materials
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
state reasons for choosing to record various instruments as MIDI or audio materials within a
multitrack recording to create a balanced mix
2
state reasons to render down MIDI tracks to audio tracks for the purposes of mastering
within the audio/MIDI sequencer environment
Range
MIDI materials: MIDI materials which compliment the more ‘human’ aspects of live recorded audio
parts
Balanced Mix: creating a balanced and complimentary mix of MIDI and Audio materials
Render down MIDI tracks: requirement to render MIDI tracks from external sources back into
audio files within the audio/MIDI sequencer in order to mix down and export as single stereo file,
feature of rewired or built in virtual synth instruments to be combined within the audio mixdown
upon stereo file export
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
65
Unit 107
MIDI and audio techniques
Notes for guidance
Suggested good practice
In this unit learners will be given a basic understanding of the nature of combining original audio and
MIDI parts within an audio/MIDI software sequencing package. Learners will be given the
opportunity to record audio and MIDI material within the same project and to gain experience in the
advantages and limitations of combining the two different elements. The unit will require learners to
complete a series of short projects.
This unit builds on previous work in units covering Recording Skills and MIDI Sequencing & Software
by allowing learners to develop pieces of sound/music which combine both MIDI and Audio
materials.
Suggested resources
There are a range of resources available to support the delivery of this unit and it would be
impossible to create a definitive list. Teachers should use those they feel most comfortable with.
However, in the fast moving music and sound industry it is imperative to ensure that the latest
edition of any resource is utilised.
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
66
Unit 207
Level:
Music instrument digital interface (MIDI)
2
Credit value: 4
Rationale
MIDI is used extensively for the creation of musical performances and the control of complex
processes in the sound and media related industries. It is an established format which can
communicate between a wide range of different types of equipment.
This unit develops learners’ understanding of MIDI language, protocols and applications. They will
gain an understanding of MIDI connections and configurations, and create MIDI sequences.
Learning outcomes
There are four outcomes to this unit. The leaner will be able to:
• Describe MIDI features
• Save and archive MIDI files
• Connect and configure MIDI equipment
• Create short MIDI sequences
Guided learning hours
It is recommended that 40 hours should be allocated for this unit. This may be on a full time or part
time basis.
Assessment and grading
This unit will be assessed by:
An assignment covering practical skills and underpinning knowledge
Relationship to NOS
This unit has links to the following Music NOS;
• CCSMT7 Use basic functions of MIDI sequencing on professional DAWs
• CCSMT10 Develop key MIDI and DAW audio techniques
• CCSMT15 Set up and dismantle professional MIDI equipment and audio equipment
(hardware/software devices)
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
67
Unit 207
Outcome 1
Music instrument digital interface (MIDI)
Describe MIDI features
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
Use MIDI control devices
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
Describe the basic features of control voltage systems
2
Describe the basic features of MIDI control systems
3
Explain the differences between control voltage and MIDI control
4
Explain the differences between types of MIDI messages
5
Identify common extensions to the MIDI language
Range
MIDI control systems
Uses digital binary system, serial language, similarity to piano-roll on player piano, language of
control rather than direct (analogue) control, use of conventions to build a language of
instructions
Control voltage
Analogue control voltage principals, CV keyboard, VCO, LFO
MIDI messages
Channel messages (eg voice, mode), system messages, common, Real-Time, Exclusive, the MIDI
Detailed Specification 1.0
Extensions
General MIDI (GM) instrument list, GM drum mapping, general MIDI files, other general MIDI
specifications, extensions to general MIDI, reasons for extensions, Yamaha XG implementation,
Roland GS implementation
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
68
Unit 207
Outcome 2
Music instrument digital interface (MIDI)
Save and archive MIDI files
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
Save and archive MIDI files in different formats
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
Describe formats of MIDI files
2
Describe save and archive procedures
Range
Save and Archive
Saving from sequencer as general MIDI file type 0 and/or type 1, saving and archiving to a secure
location
Formats
MIDI files saved as specific sequencer type (eg MIDIfile.cpr), general MIDI file type 0 and type 1, XG
file, GS file
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
69
Unit 207
Outcome 3
Music instrument digital interface (MIDI)
Connect and configure MIDI equipment
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
Independently connect and configure MIDI equipment
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
Explain how to configure MIDI equipment for use in MIDI sequencing
Range
Configure MIDI equipment
MIDI in/out connections thru, local on/off switch, master keyboard (mother board) MIDI OUT,
sequencer MIDI IN, sequencer MIDI OUT, to either independent MIDI sound module/device/drum
machine/plug in or master keyboard (mother board) MIDI IN
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
70
Unit 207
Outcome 4
Music instrument digital interface (MIDI)
Create short MIDI sequences
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
Create original MIDI sequences using MIDI processing parameters
2
Operate MIDI controller and editing parameters
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
Describe MIDI controller parameters
2
Describe MIDI musical parameters
3
Describe editing parameters
Range
Controller parameters
Entering MIDI data into edit pages (eg pianoroll/keyedit/score), adjusting volume and panning (eg
from main front (project) window), from dedicated MIDI mixer or combined audio/MIDI mixer
window
Musical parameters
Transforming MIDI input in real time or after entry, pitch transposition, velocity range
(compression), quantising, assigning voices (eg entry by program and bank number, entry by menu
of patch names)
Editing parameters
Adjusting note pitches, adjusting note lengths, adjusting velocity values, adjusting note timings
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
71
Unit 207
Music instrument digital interface (MIDI)
Notes for guidance
Suggested good practice
MIDI is used extensively for creation of musical performances and the control of complex processes
in the sound and media related industries. It is an established format which can communicate
between a wide range of different types of equipment. This unit establishes a solid grounding of
MIDI theory and practice to understand the opportunities and limitations of the MIDI protocol.
Learners will become familiar with the connections of MIDI equipment and will use this information
to facilitate the creation of MIDI based compositions or short pieces to further illustrate the nature
of the creative use of the MIDI language.
Learners will be shown various features of the MIDI language which relate to contemporary creative
practice. Issues relating to file types, storage and archiving will be addressed, as well as matters of
compatibility between computer type and different MIDI sequencer applications.
Learners will be encouraged to appreciate the language of MIDI to the point where there is a
fundamental understanding of the difference between analogue or digital audio signals and the
function of the MIDI control data stream.
Issues relating to file types, storage and archiving will be addressed as well as matters of
compatibility between computer type and between different MIDI sequencer applications.
Suggested resources
There are a range of resources available to support the delivery of this unit and it would be
impossible to create a definitive list. Teachers should use those they feel most comfortable with.
However, in the fast moving music and sound industry it is imperative to ensure that the latest
edition of any resource is utilised.
Technical papers/media assets from the Producers & Engineers wing
Pro Tools:
http://charlesdye.com/ptguidelines2.0.pdf
General Deliverables/media sheets/archiving assets:
http://www2.grammy.com/Recording_Academy/Producers_And_Engineers/Guidelines/
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
72
Unit 215
Level:
MIDI operations
2
Credit value: 4
Rationale
MIDI sequencing has an important role in the composition of soundscapes and pieces of music. The
ability to play or enter MIDI data into sequencing packages and to edit the parameters of
performances of pieces of music are very useful skills for learners to develop.
This unit will enable learners to examine the procedures available within a MIDI sequencing
package.
Learning outcomes
There are three outcomes to this unit. The leaner will be able to:
• Explain MIDI routing and implementation requirements
• Analyse the suitability of MIDI sound sources for different sound or music applications
• Edit MIDI data
Guided learning hours
It is recommended that 40 hours should be allocated for this unit. This may be on a full time or part
time basis.
Assessment and grading
This unit will be assessed by:
An assignment covering practical skills and underpinning knowledge
Relationship to NOS
This unit has links to the following Music NOS;
• CCSMT15 Set up and dismantle professional MIDI equipment and audio equipment
(hardware/software devices)
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
73
Unit 215
Outcome 1
MIDI operations
Explain MIDI routing and implementation
requirements
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
Route MIDI tracks to different sound sources
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
Describe the requirements for routing MIDI data between sequencers and sound
sources
Range
Requirements for routing MIDI data
Setting track outputs in sequencer to correct hardware MIDI output, routing from hardware MIDI
output to MIDI IN socket on MIDI sound source, setting MIDI track outputs to address virtual MIDI
input drivers running on same computer (ie synth running on sound card or drivers addressing
separate software running on the same computer), setting MIDI track outputs to VST Instrument
inputs, setting MIDI track outputs to address other formats of software device inputs
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
74
Unit 215
Outcome 2
MIDI operations
Analyse the suitability of MIDI sound sources for
different sound or music applications
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
Route and play back different MIDI sound sources
2
Aurally evaluate different MIDI sound sources
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
Describe the characteristics of different MIDI sound sources and their potential
applications
Range
Characteristics
Realistic imitation of acoustic instrument, artificial sounds, characteristic sounds of different eras,
grainy, hi-fi, lo-fi, punchy, atmospheric, sound effects
Applications
Radio jingle, advertisement, film/TV, promotion, installation, theatre/sound design, dance, ambient
music (eg musak in shops/lifts/hotels), general release (eg CD)
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
75
Unit 215
Outcome 3
MIDI operations
Edit MIDI data
Practical skills
The leaner will be able to:
1
Analyse MIDI sequencers to identify editing processes
2
Use editing processes within a MIDI sequencer
Underpinning knowledge
The leaner will be able to:
1
Describe the editing processes within a MIDI sequencer
2
Explain the importance of following a design brief
Range
Editing processes
Pianoroll editor, list editor, logical editor, score editor, note addition/deletion, note reposition in
pitch and time, note length alteration, quantising (over quantise, analytical quantise and iterative
quantise) dynamics alteration and compression, MIDI note-ON velocity alteration, volume alteration
per channel, transposition per track, time delay per track, instrument voice allocation per channel,
cutting and pasting notes by dragging and by use of positioning the song position pointer, cutting
and pasting parts within the main project window, splitting and deleting MIDI parts
Design brief
Project timescale, instrumental, stroke style, arrangement, theme/purpose, length of piece,
resources
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
76
Unit 215
MIDI operations
Notes for guidance
Suggested good practice
Learners will be shown the various different editing operations available within a MIDI sequencing
package. They will be presented with a range of processes through a series of short tasks which will
allow them to evaluate the creative potential of MIDI editing tools. Learners will also be encouraged
to adopt a critical attitude towards the suitability of different sound sources triggered by the MIDI
sequencer.
Some background to basic elements of music theory will be covered in order to allow learners to
appreciate the breadth of use of tools available to them in the sequencing package. Practices of
manipulating MIDI data will be taught in order to facilitate production of sound and music relatively
quickly with accurate results. The flexible nature of MIDI and associated editing techniques will be
explored and learners should be taken through a programme of short studies illustrating the
different editing procedures available to them.
An important part of the unit will be the study by learners of the quality of sound sources available
to them in the learning environment. They will make an evaluation of the different sound sources
and their potential creative uses and will create MIDI pieces which are richly and sensibly voiced to
suit their intended purpose. The nature and requirements of MIDI in combination with audio will
also be examined in this context. It is envisaged that this unit will take place on a software MIDI
sequencing package.
Sound characteristics
Definitions are obviously going to range from those that are quantifiable (ie sounds which
predominantly occupy a high frequency bandwidth) and those that are more subjective (sounds
which work well for pieces of music about water). Learners should attempt to define the
characteristics which they believe make a sound or set of sounds useful for a potential creative
application.
Suggested resources
There are a range of resources available to support the delivery of this unit and it would be
impossible to create a definitive list. Teachers should use those they feel most comfortable with.
However, in the fast moving music and sound industry it is imperative to ensure that the latest
edition of any resource is utilised.
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
77
8
Appendix 1 NOS Mapping
The table below shows the mapping of each 7603 unit against the Music NOS;
NOS Reference
NOS Title
CCSMT1
Follow Health and Safety
practices in music and sound
industries
Follow Health and Safety
practices for basic maintenance
of equipment and facilities
Assist with emergency
procedures
Research relevant occupational
roles and employment in music
and sound recording sectors
Evaluate personal skills to work
with others in the music and
sound industries
Identify, test and use basic
professional audio equipment
connections and interfaces
Use basic functions of MIDI
sequencing on professional
DAWs
Use essential analogue and digital
sound recording skills
Use essential analogue and digital
sound editing techniques
CCSMT2
CCSMT3
CCSMT4
CCSMT5
CCSMT6
CCSMT7
CCSMT8
CCSMT9
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
7603-01
Level
101
2
Mandatory (M) / Optional (O)
L2
L3
L4
O
O
O
101
2
O
O
O
101
2
O
O
O
102
2
201/301
3
M
O
O
102
2
201/301
3
M
O
O
103
2
202/303
3
M
O
O
104
2
207
3
M
O
O
105
2
M
O
O
106
2
M
O
O
7603-02/03
78
Level
NOS Reference
NOS Title
CCSMT10
Develop key MIDI and DAW audio
techniques
CCSMT11
Produce audio materials using
sampling and synthesis
technology for music and sound
industries
Create a sample and audio file
library - archive digital content
CCSMT12
CCSMT13
CCSMT14
CCSMT15
CCSMT16
CCSMT17
CCSMT18
CCSMT19
Assist with recording of live
sound location sources
Operate professional audio
equipment, OB, ambience sound
recording and studio sound
recording
Set up and dismantle professional
MIDI equipment and audio
equipment (hardware/software
devices)
Operate analogue and digital
equalisation for music and audio
industries
Carry out advanced analogue and
digital equalisation for music and
audio industries
Operate analogue and digital
Dynamics and effects equipment
for music and audio industries
Operate analogue and digital
mixing and recording consoles
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
7603-01
Level
7603-02/03
Level
107
2
207
3
Mandatory (M) / Optional (O)
L2
L3
L4
M
O
O
2
208
3
M
O
O
2
208
3
M
O
O
306/309/310
3
O
O
O
306/309/310
3
O
O
O
2
202/207/212/
213/214/215
3
M
O
O
2
203/205/
O
M
M
302/304/312
3
O
M
M
2
206/302
3
O
M
M
2
203/302/304
3
O
M
M
79
NOS Reference
NOS Title
CCSMT20
Carry out advanced studio
routing and wiring for music and
audio industries – patchbays & tie
lines
Edit sound and spoken word
using both analogue and digital
systems
Carry out tape and tape-less
digital editing
CCSMT21
CCSMT22
CCSMT23
CCSMT24
CCSMT25
CCSMT26
CCSMT27
CCSMT28
CCSMT29
Carry out multi track and stereo
tape machine alignment and
maintenance
Synchronise audio to visuals and
gaming materials
Develop techniques for
mastering and restoring audio
using critical listening skills
Apply techniques for archiving
and recalling audio materials –
session management
Develop your professional
knowledge of intellectual
property (IP), copyright, revenue
streams, contracts and royalties
Carry out soldering and wiring
basic repairs and maintenance for
sound and audio industries
Evaluate acoustics and sound
reinforcement systems (PAs)
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
7603-01
106
Level
7603-02/03
Level
2
202/203/303
3
Mandatory (M) / Optional (O)
L2
L3
L4
O
M
M
2
211/216/305
3
O
M
M
305
3
O
M
M
2
213/302/312
3
O
O
M
2
217
O
O
O
2
209/211/312
3
O
O
O
2
212/302
3
O
M
O
301
3
O
O
O
O
0
O
O
O
M
2
221
2
219/310
80
3
NOS Reference
NOS Title
CCSMT30
Carry out basic repairs and
maintenance of sound equipment
CCSMT31
Carry out advanced audio
electronics repairs and
maintenance of sound equipment
Produce surround sound for film
and audio
Carry out studio sound
synchronisation for computer
games and multi-media
Prepare and operate live sound
and performance technology
CCSMT32
CCSMT33
CCSMT34
CCSMT35
CCSMT36
CCSMT37
CCSMT38
CCSMT39
CCSMT40
CCSMT41
CCSMT42
Operate DJ and sound PA
equipment
Cost and design the layout of a
recording studio
Set up and use microphones and
direct inject (DI) boxes
Use advanced stereo microphone
techniques
Carry out software sound and
audio manipulation
Manage digital broadcast and
network online media
Demonstrate a knowledge of the
history and development of
studio recording equipment
Use audio mix automation and
control surfaces
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
7603-01
Level
7603-02/03
2
202/221/222/
2
2
2
Level
Mandatory (M) / Optional (O)
L2
L3
L4
O
M
O
314
3
O
O
M
214/216/307/
309
217
3
O
O
O
O
O
O
310
3
O
O
O
O
O
O
220
313
3
O
O
O
2
204/306
3
M
M
M
2
204/306
3
O
O
O
2
211/308
3
O
O
O
2
218/311
3
O
O
O
2
210
O
O
O
2
203/304
O
O
O
81
3
Published by City & Guilds
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T +44 (0)844 543 0033
F +44 (0)20 7294 2413
www.cityandguilds.com
City & Guilds is a registered charity
established to promote education
and training
Stock Code: EN017603
Level 1 VRQ's in Sound and Music Technology (7603)
82
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