Teacher`s Manual
Ivy Global
SAT Teacher’s Manual
Edition 2.3
Companion to Ivy Global’s New SAT Guide, Edition 2.0
Additional resources are available at ivyglobal.com/teach.
New SAT Teacher’s Manual, Edition 2.3
This publication was written and edited by the team at Ivy Global.
Head Writer: Zoë Martin
Producers: Lloyd Min and Junho Suh
Editors: Sacha Azor and Ho-Jae Cha
Contributors: Ethan Abramson, Aleah Gornbein, Geoffrey Morrison, and Sarah Pike
This product was developed by Ivy Global, a pioneering education company that delivers a wide range of
educational services.
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.ivyglobal.com
Edition 2.3 – Copyright 2016 by Ivy Global. All rights reserved.
SAT is a registered trademark of the College Board, which is not affiliated with this book.
Contents
Introduction ........................................................................................................................... 1
How to Use this Manual ............................................................................................................................. 3
How to Use the New SAT Guide................................................................................................................ 7
About the SAT ....................................................................................................................... 9
What’s New? ............................................................................................................................................ 11
Structure, Order, & Timing....................................................................................................................... 13
Scoring ...................................................................................................................................................... 15
Test Sections Overview ............................................................................................................................ 19
The Reading Test ................................................................................................................................................ 20
The Writing & Language Test ............................................................................................................................ 22
The Math Test..................................................................................................................................................... 24
The Optional Essay ............................................................................................................................................. 26
Teaching the SAT ............................................................................................................... 27
Instructor Guidelines ................................................................................................................................ 29
SAT-Teaching Strategies .......................................................................................................................... 31
General Test-Taking Strategies .......................................................................................................................... 32
Reading Test Strategies ...................................................................................................................................... 34
Writing Test Strategies ....................................................................................................................................... 36
Math Test Strategies ........................................................................................................................................... 38
Essay Strategies .................................................................................................................................................. 42
Student FAQs ........................................................................................................................................... 45
Classroom Teaching .......................................................................................................... 47
Classroom Advice ..................................................................................................................................... 49
Classroom Checklist ................................................................................................................................. 53
20-Hour Syllabus ...................................................................................................................................... 55
32-Hour Syllabus ...................................................................................................................................... 75
60-Hour Syllabus .................................................................................................................................... 104
Chapter 1
Introduction
Welcome teachers and tutors! This manual is designed to help you prepare students for the recently redesigned
SAT (hereafter referred to as “the SAT”). It serves as a companion to Ivy Global’s New SAT Guide, 2nd Edition.
This section will advise you how to use the Teacher’s Manual and the New SAT Guide together to your
advantage.
Section 1
How to Use this Manual
What Does it Contain?
This manual offers advice, strategies, and detailed plans for teaching group SAT classes and tutoring students
one-on-one (including in-class and homework activities). It contains information and suggestions about
classroom management, what to think about before your first day of teaching, and how to approach each section
of the SAT.
Basically, this manual can help you quickly and thoroughly prepare for teaching or tutoring the SAT, whether
you are preparing for your first class or your twenty-fifth.
How Can I Use it Efficiently?
You might be tempted to skip through all the introductory sections and jump straight to the syllabus or lesson
plan that best suits your upcoming job. Don’t! Take some time to look at the first page of each section, which
contains a brief overview of the following content. If you are already familiar with the structure and scoring of
the SAT, you might be comfortable skipping Section 2, “About the SAT.” But even if you are an experienced
test-prep instructor, you may find some useful tips in Section 3.2 on Teaching Strategies, Section 4.1 on
Classroom Advice, or Section 5.1 on Tutoring Advice.
Syllabi
The teaching and tutoring syllabi found later in this book explain how to use the New SAT Guide to deliver
effective instruction, with page references and detailed steps.
Each syllabus contains:
•
A summary of the topics covered and homework assigned in each 2-hour lesson block
•
Instruction and practice tasks for all 4 sections (Reading, Writing, Math, and the Essay), divided into
2-hour lesson blocks
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Ivy Global How to Use this Manual
3
o
Each lesson block is subdivided into different topics, steps, and activities, with an estimate
for the amount of time each step will take. Each step will also reference relevant pages from
the New SAT Guide.
•
At least 2 full practice tests per course (with more scheduled at regular intervals for longer courses)
•
Suggested homework for each class (usually from the New SAT Guide, but may require other
resources such as downloadable worksheets, or practice tests)
Organization
While the 20-hour class syllabus stands alone, all the other syllabi are organized to build off each other. The
32-hour class syllabus can stand on its own, but it also comprises the first 32 hours of all the longer class syllabi.
For example, if you wish to teach a 60-hour course, you should:
•
Teach the 32-hour syllabus
•
Follow the next 28 hours from the 60-hour syllabus
To lead a 100-hour course, you would do the same thing, expanding from the 60-hour course.
Because each 2-hour lesson block builds off the previous one, it is easy to adapt the syllabi into classes or
sessions of different lengths: to make a 20-hour course of 4-hour-long sessions, simply group the first lesson
block (Hours 1-2) with the second (Hours 3-4), and adjust the breaks and homework assignments accordingly.
Tip: Be Flexible! For every class or tutoring session you teach, you will always need to adapt the syllabus
to fit your and your students’ specific needs.
The tutoring syllabi follow a different structure. When tutoring one-on-one, you have the opportunity to cater
to the individual needs, strengths, and learning styles of your student. Once you have administered a diagnostic
test and gotten through the “First Class” lesson block (as shown in Section 5.3), you can decide how you should
allocate your available time to different sections and aspects of the SAT. To help you make full use of the
flexibility available to you as a tutor, the tutoring lesson blocks are ordered by topic rather than as a
chronological syllabus. For each two-hour tutoring session, you should choose two 35-minute lesson blocks.
For example, for your third session, you might decide that your student should study Reading and Math. Then,
you can follow Lesson 1 from the “Reading Lesson” section, and Lesson 1 from the “Math Lesson” section.
If you do not plan to use one of the provided syllabus outlines, the New SAT Guide can still form the basis of your
own custom-designed class syllabus or tutoring program. See below for advice on creating your own syllabus.
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Introduction Ivy Global
If You Want More:
Be sure to check out our website for even more information. As an owner of this manual you can access
additional resources to support your teaching, such as handouts and quizzes.
Download PDF Handouts at ivyglobal.com/teach.
Have fun helping your students prepare for the SAT and reach their goals!
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Ivy Global How to Use this Manual
5
Section 2
How to Use the New SAT Guide
…To Create Your Own Syllabus
To create your own syllabus using the New SAT Guide as your primary textbook, you should teach material in
the order the Guide presents it, within each chapter or section. Each section of a chapter builds on knowledge
established in the previous section, so teaching out of order can be confusing and counterproductive for students.
Of course, you may feel free to skim or skip over certain sections if your students already have a good
understanding of their contents and are ready to move on to the next part of the New SAT Guide.
Another exception to this rule can be found in the Math Section (p. 283-476). Some students may only struggle
with specific topics or concepts, in which case you may focus on the areas where your student needs to improve
his or her skills.
When creating your own syllabus from our New SAT Guide, we suggest that you:
1.
Start by introducing students to the test, with Chapter 1: The Introduction (p. 3-27). Many students
have had little exposure to the SAT before starting a class. Having a general understanding of the
SAT’s goals & expectations can motivate and reassure students.
2.
Choose one of the test sections (Ch. 2-5), and work through that chapter in order, distributing your
time according to the student’s understanding and ability.
3.
Go through the remaining sections in a similar way, checking for understanding and assigning practice
questions along the way.
For more detailed guidance on creating an appropriate syllabus, be sure to read the advice sections at the
beginning of the “Classroom Teaching” (4.1) and “Private Tutoring” (5.1) sections of this manual.
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Ivy Global How to Use the New SAT Guide
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…To Familiarize Yourself with the Content
As a teacher, it is crucial that you familiarize yourself with the textbook prior to taking on any student. This
inspires confidence and trust in your students, and eases the stress of teaching.
Even if you don’t have the time to work through the entire New SAT Guide before you begin teaching, at the
very least:
•
Read the Table of Contents, and skim through the entire Introduction (p. 3-27). Carefully read any
sections whose subjects you are not familiar with.
•
Make sure you know the structure of each Test Section (Reading, Writing, Math, and the Essay). If
you don’t, read Section 1 of Chapters 2 through 5.
•
Skim through Section 2 of Chapters 2 through 5, for an overview of how to approach each test
section.
•
Do the practice questions! Every question you assign your student(s), whether in class or for
homework, should be something you can not only solve yourself, but also explain in detail. Be sure
to complete all the work that you ask your students to do. It’s easiest to do a large amount of practice
questions and sections before creating a syllabus or assigning homework, so you can be confident in
assigning work that:
o
o
You are able to explain and work through
Is appropriate for the student and the current lesson or topic
…To Administer Practice Tests
Once your students have a grasp of each section and some practice exercises under their belts, you can make
use of the full-length timed practice tests in Chapter 6. Be sure to have your students practice under realistic
SAT conditions (timing, order, etc.) so they are as ready as possible for the day of the test.
Beyond the New SAT Guide, you can also make use of any or all of Ivy Global’s 4 New SAT Practice Tests,
available as separate booklets or compiled into one book (both available at sat.ivyglobal.com/shop). These
practice tests are useful for supplementing any teaching or tutoring program with additional preparation, and
are also included as the practice tests in the longer syllabi in this Teacher’s Manual.
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Introduction Ivy Global
Chapter 2
About the SAT
The following pages provide an overview of the content, structure, and scoring for the SAT.
Section 1
What’s New?
•
Length: 3 hours + 50 minute optional Essay.
•
Sections:
o
Reading
o
No-Calculator
o
Essay
o
Writing and Language
o
Calculator
Sections are always administered in the same order. See the “Structure, Order & Timing” section that
follows for more information.
•
Emphasis: This SAT emphasizes the analysis of evidence, and the application of knowledge to realworld situations. It also more closely reflects the curricula used in American high schools.
•
Optional Essay: Analysis of a well-written argumentative essay
o
o
Required by most top U.S. universities
Graded on comprehension and analysis of source text, and clarity of writing
•
Math: No-calculator section + calculator section. Includes trigonometry & advanced algebra
•
Scoring: 400-1600 scale for overall “composite” scores. See the “scoring” section below for details.
•
Multiple-Choice Questions: 4 answer choices (A-D)
•
Student-Produced Response (SPR) Questions: 13 (in both calculator and no-calculator sections)
•
No Guessing Penalty: no docked points for incorrect answers
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Ivy Global What’s New
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Section 2
Structure, Order, & Timing
The test is always administered in the same order:
•
65 min – Reading Test (5 passages, 52 questions)
•
35 min – Writing and Language Test (4 passages, 44 questions)
o
5-Minute Break
•
25 min – No-Calculator Math Section (20 questions, including 5 SPR)
•
55 min – Calculator Math Section (38 questions, including 8 SPR)
o
•
5-Minute Break
50 min – Optional Essay (1 prompt passage)
Student-Produced Response (SPR) questions are recorded on a bubble-in grid that allows you to fill in a
bubble for each digit of your response. For further information and examples, see p. 292-293 of the New
SAT Guide. Besides SPR questions and the essay, all questions are multiple-choice.
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Ivy Global Structure, Order, & Timing
13
Section 3
Scoring
Elements of SAT Scoring
Score Name
Raw Score
Description
Number of questions answered correctly.
No penalty for incorrect marks.
Scaled Scores
Your raw score for each of the Math, Writing and
Reading sections is converted to another score on a
scale of 10 to 40 using a process called “equating,”
which accounts for the possibility that some versions
of the SAT test might be more or less difficult than
others.
Area Scores
Scaled scores from 200 to 800 for two different areas:
Math and Evidence-Based Reading and Writing.
Composite Score
Your composite score is calculated by simply adding
the two “area scores,” giving a score range of 400-1600.
Two graders will review each essay.
Essay Scores
Each grader gives an essay a score from 1 to 4 on
three different dimensions. The graders’ scores are
then added together on each dimension, so that a
final essay will receive 3 scores ranging from 2 to 8,
which will be added together for an overall score from
6 to 24.
The SAT Scoring diagram and the Essay Scoring Rubric
below provide more information. For more detailed
guidance on scoring students’ essays, refer to the
scoring rubric on p. 262-263 of the New SAT Guide,
read the sample essays with score breakdowns on p.
265-270, and review the checklist on p. 271.
All answers, with the exception of the essay, are “read” by Scantron machines, not by humans. You cannot
write anywhere on your answer sheet except for within the bubbles, in the SPR grids, and on the space provided
for your essay.
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Ivy Global Scoring
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SAT Score Breakdown
Mandatory Sections
Composite
Score
Optional Essay
Essay Score
Composite Score
6 to 24
400 to 1600
200 to 800
Evidence-Based
Reading & Writing
Math
+
Section
Scores
Dimension Scores
2 to 8
Test Scores
10 to 40
Writing &
Language
Reading
•
Math
•
•
1 to 15
Command Relevant Expression Standard
of
Words
of
English
Evidence in Context
Ideas
Conventions
Heart
of
Algebra
ProblemPassport to
Solving &
Advanced
Data
Math
Analysis
+
Subscores
Reading
Analysis
Writing
Reader 1 Reader 2
(1 to 4 on each dimension)
Cross-Test
Scores
•
Analysis in Social Studies
•
Analysis in Science
10 to 40
These scores are calculated using questions from each of the three tests.
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About the SAT Ivy Global
Essay Scoring Rubric
Try using the following rubric to make scoring essays simpler and more systematic. Give your students a score
between 1 (inadequate) and 4 (excellent) for each subcategory. To get a final score of 1 to 4 for each of the
three dimensions, calculate the average of its corresponding subcategories.
Essay Scoring Rubric
Dimension
Subcategory
Comprehension of Source Text
Reference to Text’s Central Ideas
Reading
Accurate Interpretation of Facts
Use of Textual Evidence
Analysis (not summary) of Source Text
Evaluation of Evidence
Evaluation of Reasoning or Logic
Analysis
Evaluation of Rhetoric
Support for Claims Made
Focus on Most Relevant Features
Cohesiveness of Response
Use of a Precise Central Claim
Organization and Progression of Ideas
Writing
Variety of Sentence Structure
Precision of Word Choice
Formal Style and Objective Tone
Grammar and Punctuation
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Ivy Global Scoring
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Section 4
Test Sections Overview
Below is a brief overview of the layout and content of each test section in the SAT. See Section 3.3 for teaching
and learning strategies.
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Ivy Global Test Sections Overview
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The Reading Test
Part 1
•
65 minutes
•
52 questions
•
5 passages
o
o
10 or 11 questions per passage
Approximately 13 minutes per passage (including questions)
Passage Types:
•
1 US/World Literature passage
•
1 Historical/Political passage: “Founding Documents” or “Global Conversation”
•
1 Social Studies passage
•
2 Science passages
1 of the Social Studies or Science passages will be a Paired Passage: two shorter passages with the same
topic, and questions addressing the relationship between the passages.
2 of these passages (one Social Studies and one Science) will include Graphics, with accompanying
questions that assess your ability to interpret the graphic itself or its relation to the text.
Structure:
•
Short blurb includes author’s name and the title of the passage.
•
Long passages with numbered lines
•
After each passage, a series of about 11 multiple-choice (MC) questions pertaining to that passage
Questions:
20
•
All MC
•
Information & Ideas Questions test for understanding of passage content, and involve:
o
Reading closely
o
Determining central ideas and themes
o
Citing textual evidence
o
Summarizing
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About the SAT Ivy Global
o
o
•
•
Understanding relationships
Understanding words and phrases in context
Rhetoric Questions involve analysis questions, usually about the author’s intent. For example:
o
Word choice
o
Point of view
o
Analyzing arguments
o
Text structure
o
Purpose
Synthesis Questions ask you to compare paired passages or passages with graphics. They involve:
o
o
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Analyzing multiple texts
Analyzing quantitative information
Ivy Global Test Sections Overview
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The Writing & Language Test
Part 2
•
35 minutes
•
44 questions
•
4 passages
o
o
Approximately 11 questions per passage
Approximately 8.5 minutes per passage (including questions)
Passage Types:
•
Careers
•
Social Studies or History
•
Humanities
•
Science
-
At least 1 passage will include a graphic (chart, diagram, or table).
Structure:
•
Title for each passage
•
Passages are broken into shorter sections across several pages
•
Questions are presented alongside the passage, and ask you to revise underlined portions of the
passage, or to make changes to entire paragraphs.
•
Some sentences are numbered, indicating that a later question will inquire about their order.
•
See the New SAT Guide p. 163 for an example of what the SAT Writing Test looks like.
Questions:
•
All MC
•
Order is based on passage structure.
•
Expression of Ideas questions (6 per passage): style, tone, evidence, precision, and development of
the passages, as well as the ideas they contain. Concepts tested include:
o
Development: Proposition, Support, Focus, Quantitative Information
o
Effective Language Use: Precision, Concision, Style/Tone, Syntax
o
•
Organization: Logical Sequence, Introductions/Conclusions/Transitions
Standard English Convention questions (5 per passage): grammar, syntax, usage, and punctuation.
There is no explicit question; rather, the implied question is whether and how the underlined portion
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About the SAT Ivy Global
of the passage could be improved. The first answer option (A) is always “NO CHANGE,” indicating
that the underlined portion of the passage cannot be improved. Answer choices B, C, and D provide
different versions of the underlined portion. Concepts tested include:
o
Sentence Structure: sentence formation (sentence boundaries, subordination/coordination,
parallel structure, modifier placement), inappropriate shifts in construction (verb
tense/mood/voice, pronoun person and number)
o
Conventions of Usage: pronouns, possessive determiners, agreement, frequently confused
words, logical comparison, idiomatic expressions
•
Punctuation Questions
•
Vocabulary in Context Questions (2 per passage): These questions ask students whether and how
they would replace a single word in the passage.
•
Command of Evidence Questions (2 per passage): These ask students to improve the development
of ideas and information, by picking out the phrase that, if true, would best fit into the passage.
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Ivy Global Test Sections Overview
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The Math Test
Part 3
No-Calculator Section
•
25 minutes
•
20 questions
o
5 grid-in questions
o
No “Problem Solving and Data Analysis” questions
o
About 1.25 minutes per question
Calculator Section
•
55 minutes long
•
38 questions
o
o
8 grid-in questions
Approximately 1.4 minutes per question
Topics:
•
Heart of Algebra (33%): core concepts in algebra
o
Transforming Algebraic Expressions
o
Inequalities
o
Systems of Equations and Inequalities: substitution method, elimination method,
o
Linear Functions
o
Graphing Equations and Inequalities
o
Manipulating Linear Equations
o
Absolute Value (including absolute value inequalities)
o
•
transforming equations and systems of inequalities
Interpreting Equations: Understanding and working with word problems
Passport to Advanced Math (28%): setting the foundation for students in first-year college-level
math courses.
24
o
Polynomials: polynomial expressions and factoring polynomials
o
Other advanced equations: exponential equations, radical equations, etc.
o
Quadratics: equations, functions, and graphs
o
Applications of functions: graphs and science studies
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About the SAT Ivy Global
•
Problem Solving and Data Analysis (29%): multi-step problems, analyzing relationships,
interpreting qualitative and quantitative data. This question type only occurs in the Calculator section
of the Math Test.
•
o
Measures of Central Tendency: range, mean, median, mode
o
Ratios and Rates
o
Probability
o
Analysis of Graphics: all types of charts and graphs
o
Percentages and Proportions
o
Using Data as Evidence
Additional Topics (10%):
o
o
Plane and Solid Geometry: right triangles, angles and volumes, radians and degrees, circles
Complex Numbers
Questions:
•
MC questions and SPR questions get progressively more complex within each section, but are all
weighted the same.
•
SPR questions are always at the end of the section.
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Ivy Global Test Sections Overview
25
The Optional Essay
Part 4
•
50 minutes
•
1 assignment
•
1 long prompt passage (650-750 words; high school reading level)
•
Required for most top universities in the U.S.
Assignment:
•
Each prompt passage will be preceded by the same instructions, which will always tell you to consider
how the author uses:
o
Evidence to support claims
o
Stylistic or persuasive elements to add power to his or her ideas
o
•
Reasoning to develop ideas and connect claims to evidence
The instructions for the specific essay assignment will appear after the passage; these will be different
for each prompt passage; however, each will include the following instructions:
o
“Write an essay in which you explain how [the author] builds an argument to persuade
o
Analyze how the author uses one or more of the features listed above (evidence, reasoning,
o
Focus on the most relevant features of the passage.
o
26
[his/her] audience that [author’s claim].”
and rhetoric).
“Your essay should not explain whether you agree with [the author’s] claims, but rather
explain how [the author] builds an argument to persuade [his or her] audience.”
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About the SAT Ivy Global
Chapter 3
Teaching the SAT
If you are completely new to teaching the SAT, we suggest you take time to familiarize yourself with the test
first. Read through the Introduction to the SAT in this book in order to understand the test’s composition and
what topics are covered. You may also want to practice with some test questions from the New SAT Guide.
If you have experience with teaching the older version of the SAT, the points below offer further guidance on
key changes to the test, and how to adjust teaching accordingly.
Section 1
Instructor Guidelines
Below are some general guidelines for proper conduct in an instructional setting. These guidelines are not
exhaustive; please also refer to Ivy Global’s Instructor Policy Manual, available at teach.ivyglobal.ca. If
you are not an employee at Ivy Global, always refer to any policies, rules, and guidelines provided by your
school or company. Use common sense and good judgment, and if unsure of how to handle a situation always
speak with someone at your company or school.
Arrive Early
Always allow yourself at least 10 minutes before each class or session to set up materials, refresh your memory
on the lesson plan, and address any unforeseen problems. Factor in potential delays when travelling to work,
and do not use transit delays as an excuse for arriving late. Arrive 30 minutes to an hour early for your first
day of class.
Keep Your Commitments
Once you have agreed to teach a class or tutor a student, do not cancel or reschedule except in serious
emergencies.
Be Professional
Act as you would if parents were watching. Respect your student by adhering to the following rules during a
scheduled session:
•
Wear appropriate attire (as defined by your employer, if applicable).
•
Do not use a personal computer or phone during sessions or breaks.
•
Do not eat during your sessions.
•
Do not use profane language around students, parents, or coworkers.
•
Do not leave students unsupervised.
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Ivy Global Instructor Guidelines
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Clean Up After Each Session
Leave your classroom as clean as, or cleaner than, it was before you entered.
Be Prepared
Students should feel that you are prepared for the session and have a general structure for what will be covered.
Have a lesson plan ready for each session. Keep important information close at hand—if you need to, have the
student’s name, test date, and other relevant personal information on a sheet of paper or your laptop.
Provide Frequent Feedback
Tutoring: You should follow up each tutoring session with a brief session report via email. This can be drafted
while your student is working on problem sets, but you are also permitted to end the session 5 minutes before
the scheduled end-time to allow yourself time to finish and send the session report. In it, you can briefly explain
what you covered, homework, plans for future lessons, and any important progress or concerns. You can send
these reports to the front office to forward to parents, or you may talk to parents in the last 5 minutes of your
session. Parents like to be kept in the loop about their child’s progress.
Classroom: Make sure to grade and comment on students’ essays, and return them in a timely manner. At the
end of the course, send individual progress reports to each student, detailing their practice test scores and
specific tips for their future study. Send these final reports no later than one week after the last day of class.
Know Your Limitations
Understand that there are some forms of assistance you are not qualified to provide. You should never give
specific admissions advice—don’t advise students on their specific school choices, try to dissuade a student
from taking the SAT, or make any other suggestions that fall outside the realm of studying and preparing for
the SAT. If you have concerns about a student’s admissions goals, speak with Junho, Jay, or your supervisor
to determine the appropriate course of action.
You should also be aware of the age, attention limits and comprehension limits of your students.
If you feel that a student is not progressing or improving as expected, let your supervisor or administrator know
as soon as possible so they can work with you and the parents in addressing any issues. If you believe that you
are personally unable to help a student to progress, it is in both of your best interests to be honest. If you suspect
that a student may have learning disabilities, you should speak with your supervisor or boss. Never attempt
to diagnose a learning disability for a student—only licensed professionals should do this.
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Teaching the SAT Ivy Global
Section 2
SAT-Teaching Strategies
The following section offers targeted advice on the best methods for teaching the redesigned SAT. Combined
with your knowledge of the test and the curricula provided in this Teacher’s Manual, these strategies will help
you empower your students to reach their potential. You can find more specific teaching techniques in the
Classroom Advice and Tutoring Advice sections of this manual.
General Teaching Strategies
•
•
Follow this process for teaching each concept:
o
Teach students tips and tricks
o
Have them practice with their notes slowly
o
Get them to first work with you slowly
o
Have them practice on their own slowly, and then gradually speed up.
Help students build the habit of answering questions efficiently: using appropriate strategies and
pacing, and moving forward without dwelling for too long on any one question.
•
Provide concrete examples of everything you teach—it is easier to learn complex concepts this way.
•
Humor can make lessons more memorable and less boring. Use it whenever you can.
•
Encourage participation and engagement as much as possible. Have your student(s) develop
examples for what you are teaching them, or explain concepts back to you. Have them invent practice
questions for themselves or each other. Invent games that test their knowledge of a concept, and allow
them to be creative and competitive. Ask frequent questions to check for understanding.
•
Help them create realistic and specific goals about the improvements they would like to make. Ask
students to explain why these goals are important to them.
•
Help students track their progress. This can involve looking at their improving scores over time,
reminding them of the new concepts they have learned, or congratulating them on writing more in their
50-minute essay. Students should also be recognized for becoming more comfortable with the test over
time, and developing a plan of action and positive attitude to tackle the SAT.
•
Be Positive: Help your students see the SAT as a chance to demonstrate how much they have learned,
and how hard they can work when committed to a task.
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Ivy Global SAT-Teaching Strategies
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General Test-Taking Strategies
Part 1
Read pages 9-27 of the New SAT Guide for some good test-taking advice.
Teaching exam format and strategies help students to apply the skills and knowledge they already possess to
the best of their abilities on exam day. Students at nearly any level can benefit from learning the basic format
of the SAT and a few essential strategies. You can use your judgment to gauge what will benefit your students
the most, given both their current achievement levels and how much time you will have to work with them
before the exam.
Focusing on providing a student with test-taking strategies rather than reviewing content is generally the best
use of limited time. Reinforcing strategy tips is helpful when a student has achieved adequate mastery of a
concept, but still struggles under the timed conditions of the exam. It can also be a sound choice when a student
has not mastered a concept, but may not have enough time to do so before the exam.
Below is an introduction to some of the most important and generally applicable SAT strategies.
Remember The 5 P’s*
1.
Plug in: Also called back-solving, plugging in involves choosing one of the 4 answer choices, and
testing whether it works with the question. This is most obviously helpful in the Math Test, where
plugging in answer options to an equation can help you avoid long calculations. But you can also plug
alternative phrasings into sentences in the Writing and Language Test, or word definitions into
sentences in the Reading Test.
2.
Pencil to Paper: Students should use their pencil as an extension of their brain; marking up passages
as they go, summarizing complex questions, and showing their work. This will help them engage with
the test, increasing their retention and decreasing the likelihood of their attention drifting, or their
misunderstanding a question.
3.
Process of Elimination: Students should get into the habit of physically crossing out answers that
they are sure are wrong. Since all but one question must be wrong, sometimes it is easiest to find the
correct answer by eliminating incorrect answer options. When eliminating answer options, remember
that when one element of an answer option is wrong, that entire option is wrong. Sometimes, it can
be more useful to compare syntactically parallel elements of answer options than reading and
comparing each in its entirety.
4.
Pick & Skip: Because every question in a section is weighted the same, students should not waste
time struggling with a question they find particularly difficult unless they have answered all the
questions they find easy. Instead, students should circle and skip questions that confuse or worry them,
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and first pick the questions they are most comfortable with. They should remember to bubble in a
placeholder in case they don’t have time to get back to the skipped question.
5.
Predict: In the English sections, students should always try to come up with a guess before looking
at the answer options. In the Math sections, one should actually look at the answers before performing
any calculations, to figure out the format one’s answer should be in, but one should still make some
broad predictions first (for example, will the answer be a positive or negative number?)
* The New SAT Guide only contains 4 P’s. Enjoy your bonus P.
Guess Strategically
Because there is no penalty for incorrect answers in the new SAT, students should never leave a question blank
if they can help it. With proper preparation, students should always be able to eliminate 1 or 2 answer choices,
allowing them to make an educated guess about the remaining 2 or 3 options. However, even in the (hopefully
rare) case that a student doesn’t have the time or knowledge to eliminate any answer after carefully considering
the question, we encourage guessing. A blank question has 0% possibility of improving a student’s mark, while
a completely random guess (for a multiple choice question) has a 25% chance of being correct. Students may
want to choose a personal “Guess Letter” that they will always select if they:
•
Have no idea how to answer a question, and cannot eliminate any incorrect answer options.
•
Have decided to skip a question for now, with the intention of coming back to it later in the test.
Pace Yourself
You should train students to keep track of how much time they have left in a section. They should know how
much time and how many questions are in each section, and they should practice checking the time remaining
at regular intervals. It’s nice for you to call out 10-minute warnings during practice tests, but students shouldn’t
rely on having such a conscientious proctor on their actual exam. One strategy for students who tend to lose
track of time is to have them write a small symbol at the bottom of each page of their question sheet (the letter
T or a simple drawing of a clock face, for example) before approaching the questions. This way, whenever
they see the symbol, they will be reminded to check their watch or the clock.
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Reading Test Strategies
Part 2
Learning:
•
Don’t use common sense. Answers that “could be right”, and information that “would make sense if
it were true” are almost always wrong. The correct answer is one that has direct evidence in the text.
•
Use key words. If you are deciding between two similar answers, pick out the key words from each
answer choice, and try to find them or their synonyms in the passage (making sure to read around for
context).
•
Keep moving. If you notice yourself re-reading a sentence without understanding it, move to the next
sentence, perhaps marking that area with a “?” to remind yourself where you had trouble.
•
Locating > understanding. Students shouldn’t worry as much about grasping the deep nuances of a
paragraph as they should about locating information when a question asks them to.
•
Mark up the passage. Actively and physically engaging with the passage will help you understand
and remember it more thoroughly. Using strategic and meaningful marking techniques will give you
a sort of map of the passage, making it easier for you to locate various bits of information you might
need to answer questions. When you encounter a difficult sentence or concept, and are able to figure
it out, writing a quick note in shorthand will allow you to review the concept without having to work
through the actual sentence(s) again.
•
Things to note:
o
Main idea(s): one for the entire passage, and one per paragraph
o
Names or characters
o
Evidence for an argument
o
Author’s opinion(s)
o
Changes in topic, argument/opinion, or tone
o
Notable or interesting stylistic devices
Repetition Steps:
1.
Read the Blurb. Find the topic of the passage. Notice names in case they’re brought up later. If you
have a very strong preference for (or aversion to) a certain type of passage, you may skip or find that
passage type accordingly. Otherwise, read the passages in the order they are presented, to avoid time
wasted flipping between passages and deciding on a passage order.
2.
Read the Passage. Give the passage a diligent skim, writing as you go. Pause after each paragraph,
and check that you understood the gist of it.
o
34
Try making very brief summaries (a symbol or a word) for each paragraph.
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Teaching the SAT Ivy Global
3.
Read a question. Simplify it, finding key words.
4.
Predict an answer before looking at answer choices. Your prediction should be based on specific
lines and the text as a whole (and notes you’ve written!)
5.
Eliminate answer choices that are at odds with your prediction.
6.
Choose an answer that matches your prediction, or one that remains.
o
Check that your chosen answer fits the question.
Teaching:
Since there’s less focus on obscure or rarely used vocabulary on the current SAT than the previous version,
focus less on vocabulary memorization than you would have previously. It is more helpful for students to learn
words with multiple meanings, as well as word parts to help them identify any unfamiliar words. It is also
important for students to learn to analyze the impact of an author’s choice of words. This is covered on pages
108-110 of the Reading chapter in the New SAT Guide.
If you are leading a class, call on various students to share what they underlined in the passage, and what
summaries they made. This will help students to learn from one another by seeing how their peers approach
the same passage.
Once your students understand how to approach the passages, take time to familiarize them with the various
question types they will encounter on test day. All of the question types are explained in detail in the New SAT
Guide, beginning on page 77.
If your students struggle with a particular question type, take the time to review it thoroughly, and encourage
them to attempt similar questions for practice. Most of the question types will be repeated frequently, and some
will appear with every passage. Thus, understanding them will give students a significant advantage.
Make sure your students understand that they are not meant to provide their opinion or personal interpretation
of a passage, as they may sometimes do in English class. Because the Reading Test is multiple choice, there is
only one correct answer and it must be supported by evidence in the text.
A good way to encourage students to find support for their answers in the passage is to ask them what words,
lines, or sentences led them to their answer choice for each question. This reinforcement will help students
adopt the habit of finding evidence in the passage. Discussing what led students to their answers can also help
you understand where they have gone wrong when they answer incorrectly.
This technique is also good practice for Evidence questions, which ask students to decide which line from the
text best supports the answer to the previous question. You can read more about Evidence questions on pages
93-96 in the New SAT Guide.
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35
Writing Test Strategies
Part 3
Learning:
•
Learn Common Grammar Errors and Harder Grammar Errors (p. 182-197).
•
Develop a habit of searching for these errors in order of how easy it is to identify them (the order will
depend on the student).
Steps:
1.
Read the first passage: Don’t use outside knowledge; simply read enough to understand the author’s
intended meaning, and assess for clarity and correctness. Read a page or paragraph at a time before
looking to the questions for that section. Use your pencil to mark up the passage, anticipating future
questions without reading them. Using your pencil, you should correct underlined sections as you
go. By each underlined portion, you should mark:
2.
o
“” if you believe there is no grammatical error
o
“X” if the sentence contains an error
o
“?” if you are uncertain
o
If you can identify why the sentence is wrong, you should also try to quickly edit it.
Read a question: You may skip tough questions, but never move on from a passage without having
answered all its questions. Find key words in the question, and rephrase or simplify the question if it
is long or difficult to understand.
3.
Answer that question: Predict what the correct answer should contain before looking at answer
choices. Then, look at the answer choices and
o
Eliminate answer choices that do not fit with your prediction
o
Choose an answer choice that fits with your prediction
o
Eliminate answer choices that contain common errors
4.
Check: Substitute your answer choice into the passage.
5.
Repeat for all questions in a passage, and then all passages in the section.
Teaching:
All the questions on the Writing section of the new SAT are embedded in full passages. To help your students
do their best on the Writing Test, you need to ensure they have a good command of key grammar concepts,
help expand their vocabulary, and help build their skill in recognizing contextually appropriate word choices.
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It is also important to give students practice reading passages with the goal of finding grammar and stylistic
errors, rather than simply understanding the passage.
Use Examples. When you’re explaining concepts in grammar and expression, it’s important to provide a clear
explanation of a rule or concept itself. However, it’s also essential to provide examples. Many examples are
provided through the grammar sections in the New SAT Guide on pages 181-196, but you may find that you
need to come up with more as you instruct the class. Use examples that focus on specific errors; examples with
multiple errors might muddle things too much to be useful. Contrast correct examples with incorrect ones, and
use them to illustrate key grammar concepts both when you are introducing and returning to key concepts.
Make it Interesting. Remember that while grammar review may be dry, language is a very rich medium.
When you’re coming up with example sentences to help explain a concept, you can make them more engaging
by making them humorous, telling a story, or writing about topics that are of interest to your students. You can
also ask students to participate, either by offering their own sentences or providing settings, topics, or names
for yours.
Try creating a negative association with grammar errors. This might include reading awkward or erroneous
sentences in a silly voice, or making jokes about what a sentence means when it’s written incorrectly. This
should only be done for errors or sentences that you or the book has created. Make sure you never make jokes
at a student’s expense! You can review grammar errors on pages 181-197 of the Reading chapter in the New
SAT Guide.
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Ivy Global SAT-Teaching Strategies
37
Math Test Strategies
Part 4
Learning:
•
Focus on what you know: Don’t worry about unfamiliar terms or symbols. Take stock of what you
do know, and see what you can do from there.
•
Show your work: Don’t put pressure on your short-term memory to keep track of where you are in a
problem, the ultimate goal, your particular calculation, or anything else involved in solving a math
problem. Use your pencil.
•
Plug-in: This includes back-solving, or plugging an answer option into your equation to test whether
it works, as well as choosing values to plug into an equation in place of variables. Choose values that
are as easy to work with as possible.
•
Choose appropriate variable names: If you have “Nathan’s age” as a variable, you should either
label that variable n (for Nathan, if the other variables are also names of people) or a (for age, if the
other variables also pertain to Nathan). Choosing meaningful variable names helps you keep track of
them.
•
Eyeball: Often, your gut instinct is correct. If you can make a quick prediction that aligns with one
of the answer choices, pick it and move on.
•
Eliminate: Eliminate answers that are obviously wrong before considering which one might be
correct.
•
Use the Math Dictionary to translate words into corresponding math symbols (see table below).
•
Memorize Facts: The new SAT draws on a large body of Math knowledge that students should
recognize from high school. Here are some facts that students should be familiar with:
38
o
Exponents: Squares 12-162, Cubes 13-63, 20- 210, and Exponent laws
o
Linear equations: Be able to identify and label y = mx + b.
o
Quadratic equations: standard form & vertex form (h, k) h =
o
Trigonometry: SohCahToa (and how to use it)
–b
2a
o
Measures of Central Tendency: Definition of mean, median, & mode, and the formula for
o
Geometry: Formulae for area, perimeter, congruence, diagonals, tangents, chords, and arcs.
finding a mean.

Special triangles: 3-4-5, 30-60-90, 45-45-90

Circle equation: (x – h)2 + (y – k) 2 = r2; (h, k) = center point coordinates
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Teaching the SAT Ivy Global
Try translating the following words into their corresponding mathematical symbol whenever you see them in
an SAT Math question. This strategy can make it easier to find a concrete equation or calculation in a more
abstract question. The Math Dictionary can especially help students who struggle with interpreting word
problems, and those who struggle with English and Math in general.
Math Dictionary
English Word
Math Meaning
Symbol
equals
=
of / product / each
multiplication
×
double / twice
multiply by 2
× 2 or 2 ×
division
÷
is / was / has / will be
Per / out of / quotient /
every
Example
“x is half of eight” 
x=8÷2
“a fifth of 28”  ⅕ × 28
“Tal’s age doubled” 
t×2
“Her speed is two miles
per hour“
 2(miles) ÷1(hour)
divided by 100
÷100
“5 percent”  5 ÷ 100
more than /exceeds /
gained / older / farther /
greater / total / sum
addition
+
“Jae has 5 more than Zoe
does”
less than / decreased /
lost / younger / fewer /
difference
subtraction
−
“Mia is 2 years younger
than Bob”  m = b − 2
at least / meet or exceed
greater than or equal to
≥
“His hair is at least one
inch long”  h ≥ 1
at most / not more than
less than or equal to
percent
x is between a and b
j=5+z
≤
x is greater than a and less
than b
a<x<b
a variable, your goal
x
“He weighs eight pounds,
at most”
a≤8
“Kai is between two & six
feet tall”
 2<k<6
“What percent of 50 is 5?”
what / what number
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Ivy Global SAT-Teaching Strategies
 x ÷ 100 × 50 = 5 (solve
for x)
39
Steps:
1.
Read the question.
o
Find the question’s Goal (what you are trying to solve for) and Givens (the information they
o
Simplify & Assess: Rephrase the question into simpler words, draw a diagram using the
are handing you to help you solve the problem).
given information, or use the Math Dictionary to translate the question into an equation.
2.
Glance at the answer options: How far do you need to go in your calculations?
3.
Plan a path between goal and givens.
o
4.
5.
Choose appropriate/easy variables.
o
Look for shortcuts and tricks.
o
Don’t do more calculations than you have to reach your goal.
o
Check to ensure that your final answer fits with your goal.
Do the math (calculate).
Circle the answer choice that matches your calculations.
Teaching:
For the no-calculator section especially, students need to become comfortable solving problems and making
simple calculations themselves. Students can practice and improve their mental math at ivy.gl/mentalmath.
When teaching, it is essential to first assess the fundamental mathematical ability of your student or class. You
need to make sure that your students have the necessary skills to solve SAT questions.
If you are teaching a class, it is inevitable that some students will catch on more quickly than others. Try to
move at a pace that is best for the majority of the class. If there is a student or two who is frustrated with how
slow things are going, ask them to help explain topics or provide examples. If there is a student or two who
can’t keep up, try to find time to speak with them after class.
When introducing a topic, make sure to give a concrete example for each concept you present.
Work through problems slowly (at least at first), breaking them down into separate steps. Make sure that the
purpose and method of each step is clear.
Some students get stuck on the idea that there is always one “proper way” of solving any math problem, and
that using shortcuts is somewhat frowned upon. Point out that getting the correct answer on the SAT does not
always mean solving the question in a traditional, methodical manner. There are usually many ways to solve
any given SAT Math question, and which way is most efficient might depend on the student.
Leave lots of room for questions and encourage students to explore different methods for finding a solution.
Serve as a guide rather than a lecturer when working through the questions together. Ask your students to
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determine the next step in the question, so they will formulate their own strategies. Afterward, you can talk
about what was most effective.
To reinforce learning, you should summarize at the end of each section what strategy or method your class or
student found most useful for tackling the material.
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Ivy Global SAT-Teaching Strategies
41
Essay Strategies
Part 5
Learning:
•
Ask how, not what: Remember that the focus of your essay should be about the way the author of the
prompt essay is arguing his or her point, not the content of the argument itself.
•
Avoid using subjective words like “good,” “well,” “nicely,” “bad,” “poorly,” etc.
•
Be specific in your examples and your claims. Whether you are paraphrasing the author, or directly
quoting him or her, it must be clear from reading your words exactly what you are talking about.
•
Be direct and simple. Make your essay clear, concise, and easy to read.
•
Keep Writing. The essay should be about 3 full pages long.
•
What to look for in the passage:
o
o
Evidence: What evidence is the author using? How does the evidence support her claims?
Reasoning: connects the claim to the evidence. Does the author expect you to make the
connection between his or her claim and example/evidence? Is the author’s reasoning clear
and explicit? Can you identify any unstated assumptions one must make to get from the
author’s evidence to his or her claim?
o
o
o
Stylistic/Persuasive Elements: what word choice/style/examples does the author use to
enhance the argument/its reception?
Most Persuasive Part: what is the biggest thing the author does that makes his or her
argument persuasive?
Goals: What is the author trying to do, specifically?
Steps:
•
Read the whole passage, marking it up. 5 minutes
o
•
Use the “what to look for” section above as a guide for what to mark.
Plan your Essay. Take 5-10 minutes to make a clear, brief outline to avoid repeating yourself, wasting
time, and hitting walls.
o
o
•
Find your thesis statement. This should tie together your body paragraphs, and answer the
question: “How is the author creating and supporting his or her argument?”
Write your essay. 30 minutes
o
42
2-3 Body paragraphs including transitions
Be concise, clear, and explicit.
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Teaching the SAT Ivy Global
o
o
o
•
Introduction: Include the author’s name, the main technique the author used, and the main
effect(s) of this technique (your thesis).
Body Paragraphs: Point, Example, Explain (PEE) structure
Conclusions: If your introduction is like a movie trailer, your conclusion is more of a movie
review.
Edit Lightly (if you have time)
o
o
Look for common errors.
Don’t move around paragraphs or sentences, or insert large chunks of information (this
becomes messy and confusing for the reader).
Teaching:
Although the Essay is technically optional, unless students have finalized their list of schools, they should take
the Essay to be safe. It cannot be completed at a separate time.
Because students will need to respond to a highly specific writing prompt, they cannot prepare any examples
or arguments beforehand. Instead, students will need to become comfortable with analyzing a written text and
responding to it. There are multiple practice essay prompts and examples of how to analyze persuasive writing
in the Essay chapter of the New SAT Guide, which begins on page 227.
Read prompt passages together. In class or during tutoring, you can have students read texts and share
elements they think are noteworthy in particular passages. Then you should ask them how the author uses those
elements to construct his or her argument. Remind them that it’s not enough just to identify these elements;
students have to explain their importance to the argument overall.
Encourage strong writing. The SAT Essay is a time to opt for clear, explicit, straight-to-the-point writing.
Students should ensure they summarize their thesis statement at the end of their introduction, and use topic
sentences at the start of each body paragraph. Remind your students to make claims about how the author
constructs his or her argument, not to state whether they agree or disagree with the argument.
You can encourage strong writing by referring to the skills you’ve been teaching for the Writing Test. In
particular, students should aim for cohesive paragraphs that develop a central point, so they can apply methods
for thinking about paragraph cohesion and excluding extraneous sentences. Have students go over their own
practice essays with the same critical eye they would apply to passages on the Writing Test to practice this
skill.
Grade students’ essays. Having students write essays for homework and in class is important not just for
practice, but so they can receive personalized feedback. Make sure you assign an appropriate amount of essays,
and that you mark them conscientiously and in a timely manner. For advice and instructions on grading your
students’ essays, see the Essay Scoring Rubric and accompanying explanation under “Essay” in section 2.4.
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Ivy Global SAT-Teaching Strategies
43
In addition to assigning numerical scores, you should also mark grammatical errors, employing the same
terms used during grammar practice to reinforce learning. You should also give students comments that will
help them become better writers. However, too many corrections can be demoralizing and overwhelming, so
pick just a few areas of improvement to highlight. Keep it positive by framing your comments as advice rather
than admonishment; for example, you could say, “Next time, work on having clear topic sentences.” Make
sure to identify at least two things the student did well.
It is often helpful to phrase your comments as questions—this can prompt students to start reaching for
solutions. For example, if a student is not justifying his or her assertions either with logical development or
with evidence from the text, instead of writing, “You need to justify this assertion,” you can simply write,
“Why?” This also gives students a quick script they can use in their own heads as they write. Just be sure to
clarify what all those “why’s” mean in your final comments at the end of the essay, so students have a clear
plan for future improvement.
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Teaching the SAT Ivy Global
Section 3
Student FAQs
Here are some questions that students often ask which you may not have intended or expected to have to answer.
Some of these questions have simple, relevant, concrete answers, which are provided below. Some of these
questions may seem tough, irrelevant, or confusing. We have included these below as well, with the hope that
you’ll feel better prepared by at least having thought about them before a student confronts you with one.
•
Scaled Scoring: What is a scaled score? How do you scale a score? Is it like a bell-curve? Why can’t
you get 0 as your scaled score? You may use the brief explanation of equating provided to you in
chapter 2, section 1 of this manual to answer this question.
•
Sending Scores: Can I choose which scores I send to my prospective Universities? If you have taken
the SAT test more than once, you can choose which test score to send, based on date. You may not
select different area scores, test scores, or sub-scores from various tests into a Frankenstein’s monster
composite score.
•
Taking the SAT More Than Once: How many times can I take the SAT? As many times as you
like—but we recommend that you take it a maximum of 2 or 3 times. If I took the old SAT, can I still
take the new one? Yes, if you were not satisfied with your score. Colleges will accept either or both
scores.
•
My Score: What score is good enough for my school? What score do I need to get? Should I take the
SAT again based on my score? Each school weights the SAT score differently, and each school has
different requirements or minimums. Many schools post information about their students’ average
SAT scores on the College Board website. Schools also generally post that information on their own
websites, along with the minimum SAT scores they accept in order to review an application.
•
Optional Essay: Can I take the essay, and then opt out if I feel like I’ve done badly? Can I take the
essay, and then choose which universities I send it to? No to both. Should I take the essay? Probably.
Check the requirements of your prospective schools.
•
Calculators: What kind of calculator can I use? The College Board website has a Calculator Policy
section (https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sat/taking-the-test/calculator-policy). Generally,
all scientific calculators are permitted outside of those with Internet, Bluetooth, or cellular access,
those with a QWERTY keypad, or pen/ stylus input. Calculators that make noise, use electrical outlets,
or have a paper tape are not permitted.
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Ivy Global Student FAQs
45
•
Test Dates: What’s the best date to take the test? There is no reliable way to choose the date of your
SAT to optimize your percentile ranking. You should decide your test date based on your personal
schedule, and the application deadlines of your prospective universities.
•
Old SAT vs. New SAT: Which is easier? What’s the difference? See p. 4 of the New SAT Guide for
a table comparing the two. Also, be aware that taking the old test is no longer an option.
•
Answer Patterns: What if my answers follow a strange pattern, or are a long string of A’s? The
correct answers in the SAT are random, so if they cluster into a surprising pattern, this is entirely
accidental. Analyzing bubble patterns will distract students from the actual content of the test, and
will not provide any useful information.
•
During the Test: Can I bring food? Food and drinks are not allowed in the testing room, but you will
receive several breaks during which you can eat whatever snacks and beverages you brought ahead
of time. Can my dad/mom/friend bring me a snack during the break? No. You will not be able to meet
with non-test-takers during the breaks.
•
46
What score did you get? You may choose to answer this at your own discretion.
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Teaching the SAT Ivy Global
Chapter 4
Classroom Teaching
The following sections contain advice specific to classroom teaching, a checklist of items to bring to each class,
and detailed syllabi for four courses of different lengths, which you can adapt as necessary to suit the needs of
your class. Each syllabus is divided into two-hour lesson blocks, which are most easily taught as two or fourhour classes.
Section 1
Classroom Advice
Quality content is a great start to leading a successful SAT class, but you’ll need more than that—without a
confident, engaging, and organized teacher, the best syllabus can fall flat.
Whether you are a veteran instructor or gearing up to lead an SAT class for the first time, the tips below will
offer strategies and ideas for effectively and entertainingly teaching the SAT syllabus.
Be Prepared
•
Review your class list before students arrive to the first class, so you know whom to expect.
•
Know your classroom and amenities before you start. Allow about half an hour or more on the
first day to resolve potential unforeseen problems (i.e., locked doors, lack of whiteboard markers, and
confusing audio-visual equipment).
•
Have all materials for yourself and your students. Set them out beforehand (you might get help with
this from your organization).
•
o
See the Classroom Checklist in section 5.2 for examples of materials you will need.
Keep in contact with your administrators. Make sure you know what is expected of you, and what
you will be helped with. You should also keep them informed about the class: make sure you let them
know when you have arrived at the teaching venue, whether you have all the necessary materials, etc.
•
Make sure you have a copy of your syllabus in front of you in class each day. You will probably want
to make adjustments to the provided syllabus based on your students’ particular needs and the
restraints of your particular class. Make sure you make these updates before class begins.
•
Do the Homework. Make sure you can confidently work through and explain all the material you
assign to students. This means actually doing the homework you assign to your students.
•
Practice. You may want to practice presenting material before you teach it for the first time.
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49
Create Rapport
Create a classroom environment where students are expected to work hard, but also feel supported, respected,
and comfortable.
•
Student-Led Introduction: Ask students to introduce themselves to avoid mispronouncing their
names and to encourage class participation. Repeat each name aloud to ensure that you’ve got the
correct pronunciation, and to help learn your students’ names quickly.
•
Get to Know Your Students: Make the effort to learn about your students: their personalities,
learning styles, and goals.
o
In the first class, you may introduce fun icebreaker questions to break the initial tension.

To make the icebreaker both fun and informative, you might ask each student to
describe the best or worst teacher they’ve ever had. Take notes!
o
You could also have your students quickly fill out a questionnaire to help you figure out
how to tailor your future sessions to their needs. These questions might include:

Have you taken the SAT before? What was your score? Which section did you
find most difficult?

What grade are you in?

What is your favorite subject?

What is one of your hobbies?

Do you have a “dream school?”

How much time each evening can you devote to studying for the SAT?

Where did you learn about the SAT? What do you know about it so far?
Encourage Mistakes
Let students know that mistakes are an essential part of learning and improving as they present opportunities
to address and resolve problems before the test.
•
Respond to mistakes without judgment or exasperation.
•
Remember: teachers make mistakes too! Let students know that your policy of welcoming mistakes
applies to you as well. If you are unsure how to answer a question a student asks, tell your student
you’ll get back to her/him with the answer at the beginning of next session, rather than dwelling or
struggling to figure it out in class.
Encourage Participation
Give students the opportunity to participate as much as possible—people learn better by engaging with material
than by passively receiving it. Frequent feedback from your students will also help keep you on track, ensuring
that you’re actually teaching rather than simply lecturing. Check for understanding at frequent intervals and
when you are presenting particularly difficult concepts. Try to include interactive activities in each class.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
•
Encourage Questions: Remember, our ultimate goal is to help the students become independent
learners. Let students know that the purpose of the class is for them to learn, understand, and improve,
not simply for you to get through a lesson. When one student has a question, it usually means several
students are struggling with the same concept.
•
o
Frequently ask students if they have any questions, or if there are any ideas or concepts
o
Even if the students do not ask questions, you should still anticipate what questions they
o
If students seem too shy to ask questions, but you are uncertain of their level of
they’d like you to explain more clearly.
might have and address those.
understanding, you can ask them probing questions to test their understanding.
Call on Students: Make sure that you are asking as many students as possible to “help you out” with
the lesson. It’s hard to figure out how much a student understands (even for the student him/herself!)
without seeing how she is able to implement what she’s learned.
o
When students can’t answer your question, you can nudge students toward the answer or ask
if they’d like to ask another student for help. If your students still cannot solve the problem,
this may be an indication that you need to review or clarify the concept or strategy.
Address Any Disruption Immediately:
•
A student should never disrupt the flow of the class, whether through inappropriate or distracting
behavior or foul language. It is best to anticipate and prevent disruptions rather than deal with them
once they occur, so try to make your class rules clear from the beginning. If such situations arise,
however, you need to address the issue immediately to minimize interruption. Later, you should speak
with the student one-on-one, either after class or during a break. If the student continues to disrupt the
class, contact your supervisor or administrator as soon as possible.
Take Breaks
Frequent breaks will help students (and you!) stay fresh and focused. It would be great if everyone could be in
peak learning condition for an entire two or four-hour class, but this simply doesn’t happen. Taking a tenminute break can make the following fifty minutes far more productive than the entire hour would be without
a break.
Breaks also allow students to use the restroom, stretch their legs, or have a snack, making it less likely for
students to leave or lose focus in the middle of a lesson.
•
A good rule of thumb is to provide students with a five-minute break every hour, or whenever you
sense your students are getting tired and losing focus. This may depend on the age of the students,
how many there are, how warm the room is, etc.
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Ivy Global Classroom Advice
51
•
The frequency of breaks may also depend on the length of your class sessions (more hours = more
breaks). There are ten minutes allocated for break time in every two-hour lesson block, which you
should use flexibly to provide breaks that best fulfill the needs of your class.
Homework
Assigning homework is important to help students practice skills they learned in class and to help solidify their
memory of concepts learned in class. However, too much homework and too little homework can be equally
detrimental to a student’s learning. Assign too much and risk overwhelming and disheartening the student,
possibly to the point that they don’t even start the assignment. Assign too little, and students may not
consolidate or learn how to implement the information they were taught in class. How much homework you
assign depends on when the class is (weekend, summer break, during school, etc.), and therefore how much
students can reasonably accomplish. If teaching a course in the summer that meets once a week, students should
generally be able to complete 4-6 hours of homework per class, but students who meet on schooldays have
little free time to devote to the homework you assign.
The suggested homework in the syllabi below is intended to take one and a half to three hours long per twohour lesson block, or three to six hours per four-hour class. Please take the time to adjust the amount of
homework you assign based on the particular context of your class.
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Section 2
Classroom Checklist

Class list – Leave some space to take notes, to remind yourself of how to pronounce a name, of a
preferred nickname, or which student is which. You can also take notes about particular students’
progress or learning styles to help yourself write final reports.

Your syllabus (from this Teacher’s Manual)

Teacher’s Manual Sections – You might want to print out other sections of the manual to remind
yourself of the tips you find most helpful.

Writing Utensils – Pens, pencils, and erasers (you may include extras for students). Chalk for a
chalkboard or marker for a whiteboard.

Calculator

Scrap paper – For writing notes, sharing with students, etc.

Your own New SAT Guide

Presentation Material – This may include whiteboard markers, chalk, a USB key with a
PowerPoint presentation on it, or any audio-visual equipment and instructions for working it.

Student Materials – This will depend on the day (see First Day section), but may include handouts,
worksheets, graded essays, or score reports. Have extra copies of worksheets, etc.

Water (to combat a scratchy voice)
Additional Items for Your First Day
On your first day, you will need to bring some extra materials for your students. These will include:

Copies of the New SAT Guide (have a couple more than you think you’ll need)

Diagnostic tests (with extra copies)

Spare pencils

Spare calculators

A questionnaire (if you so choose—as described in Section 4.1 under “Create Rapport”).
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Ivy Global Classroom Checklist
53
Section 3
20-Hour Syllabus
See Section 1.1 for an overview of the contents and structure of the syllabi. See Chapter 3 and Section 4.1 for
help with teaching techniques and strategies.
The following pages provide a 20-hour course syllabus, which you can adapt as necessary to suit the
needs of your class.
Unless otherwise stated, all page numbers refer to the New SAT Guide, 2nd Edition.
Materials
•
Ivy Global’s New SAT Guide, 2nd Edition
•
New SAT 2-hour Diagnostic Test (available at sat.ivyglobal.com)
•
Ivy Global’s New SAT 4 Practice Tests book, or New SAT Practice Test 1 booklet
o
•
Alternatively, you may use a test from the College Board’s The Official SAT Study Guide,
also available online.
New SAT Bubble Sheets (for students to record their answers—available at sat.ivyglobal.com)
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Ivy Global 20-Hour Syllabus
55
Course Summary
In the table below, each test section is abbreviated to one letter (e.g., “M” means “Math Test”). Other
abbreviations include: “V” (vocabulary), “PT” (practice test), “HW” (homework), “wksht” (worksheet), and
“WP” (word parts from p. 154-157).
20-Hour Syllabus Summary
Hours 1-2
Hours 3-4
General Introduction | R: Intro
2-Hour Mini-Diagnostic
HW: Key Strategies p. 14-27, p. 25 | WP p. 154 | R p. 35-43
Hours 5-6
Hours 7-8
R: Answering Questions | W: Intro
W: Grammar | M: Intro
HW: W p. 177-179; p. 181 | review R&W from PT | M p. 301305, wksht.
HW: M p. 306-321, review PT | WP p. 155 | W confused words
& idioms p. 196-297 + example sentences, p. 190-191, 198199
Hours 9-10
Hours 11-12
R: Passage Types | M: Passport to Advanced Math
E: Intro, Practice Set, Analysis
HW: M p. 394-395, 350-356 (p. 697-706) | WP: all roots
HW: E compare sample essays, p. 271, write an essay p. 272273 | M p. 357-362 | WP up to intra
Hours 13-14
Hours 15-16
R: Passage Types | M: Passport to Advanced Math
W: Grammar Review | M: Problem Solving & Data
Analysis | Test Prep
HW: WP all prefixes | M p. 369-375, 386-388, 440-463 | R p.
653-668
HW: p. 26-27 | WP all | full PT p. 481-557 |
Hours 17-18
Hours 19-20
Practice Test #1
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 1-2
Introduction
1. Take Attendance and Get to Know Each Other (15 minutes)
•
Briefly introduce yourself and ask students to introduce themselves (with attendance sheet in hand,
noting any absences). Your goal is to help your students feel comfortable and for you to get to know
them. Find more advice on creating rapport in class introductions in Section 5.1 on Classroom Advice.
2. Introduce the Course (5 minutes)
•
Explain any class policies such as expectations for homework, when there will be breaks, what
students will need to bring to class, and what students cannot bring out during class time (e.g., cell
phones). At a minimum, students should bring the following to every class:
•
o
Ivy Global’s New SAT Guide, 2nd Edition
o
A notebook or notepaper
o
Pens, pencils, & erasers
o
A calculator
Review the general schedule of the class, including the dates of practice tests.
3. Introduce the SAT (40 minutes)
•
SAT Format, Content, and Purpose (see p. 4-7 of the New SAT Guide or Chapter 2 of this manual).
•
Signing Up for The SAT (see p. 8-9)
•
General Test-Taking Tips (see p. 12-14)
o
Learn the test (format, instructions, timing)
o
Guess strategically
o
o
Manage your time (bring your own watch!)
Entering answers: Use the Mini-Diagnostic Test answer sheets (Scantron / bubble-in sheet)
as a reference, and ensure that the students understand how to fill in each type of answer
(essay, multiple choice, and grid-in).
•
Key SAT Strategies (see teaching strategies in section 3.2 of this manual, and p. 15-23 of the Guide).
The 5 P’s: Plug in. Use your Pencil. Process of Elimination. Pick & Skip (pick easy questions and
skip time-eaters). Predict answers before looking at answer options.
•
Managing Stress and Distraction (see p. 26-27, “During the Test”). When students are anxious,
bored, tired, or otherwise distracted, this can greatly affect their test performance. However, if they
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Ivy Global 20-Hour Syllabus
57
are self-aware and have strategies for responding to these difficulties, they can still excel. Add any
tips you may have for combating distraction during a test.
Suggested 10-Minute Break
4. Introduce the Mini-Diagnostic Test (10 minutes)
•
Announce that you will administer the test in the next 2-hour lesson block. If you are teaching a
4-hour class, this will happen in the next hour. Otherwise, they will take the test in the next class.
•
Purpose, difference from full test
o
Helps establish a baseline score, so students can track their improvement
o
2 hours long (vs. 4) – same number and order of sections, but each is shorter
o
Helps familiarize students with the test
o
Students will receive a graded Score Report, but this score will not be predictive of their
performance on the actual test—it’s just a general indication of their current strengths and
weaknesses at the very beginning of their studies.
•
Explain Rules (see test instruction sheet and bubble sheet for reference, or p. 481 of the New SAT
Guide)
o
Make sure students understand that they must complete sections in the order they are given,
and can only work on one section at a time (they can’t work ahead or go back to work on
previous sections, even if they have extra time).
•
Time Management: Remind students not to get stuck on difficult questions, and to be as aware as
possible of how much time they have left in each section.
If you are teaching a 4-hour class, you may want to administer the diagnostic test before these next two steps
(5 and 6). This is so that your students’ initial scores are more likely to be actual “baseline scores,” reflecting
their strengths and weaknesses independent of what they learn in your class.
5. Introduce Vocabulary Building (15 minutes)
•
Discuss the importance of vocabulary to the Reading and Writing Tests (see p. 153-154).
•
Introduce the concepts of word roots, prefixes, and suffixes (see p. 154-157). Explain why it is helpful
to learn word parts. Depending on the edition of your textbook, the first column of “Common Prefixes”
and “Common Suffixes” might erroneously read “Root” rather than “Prefix” or “Suffix,” respectively.
•
Suggest memorization strategies. Students should create their own flash cards. They can also invent
mnemonic devices, and practice using word parts in context. Give an example or two, if you can.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
6. Introduce the Reading Test (10 minutes)
•
Outline the structure and content of the reading test, and the general format of the questions (see p.
31-33, and/or the Reading Test overview in Section 2.4 of this manual).
•
You may show students a practice passage (e.g. p. 54-56) so they can get a better sense of what to
expect.
7. Outline Approach to Reading Test (10 minutes)
•
Briefly introduce the content on p. 36-37.
•
Explain that in future classes there will be time to discuss how to approach the passages in more depth.
8. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 1-2)
•
Read p. 3 and p. 14-27, taking notes on Key Strategies and recording any questions you have.
•
Complete a personalized study plan, as suggested on p. 25.
•
Memorize the first page of word roots (ag, act to cid, cis) – p. 154.
•
Read and complete the exercises on “Marking Up a Passage” and “Summarizing” – p. 35-43.
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Ivy Global 20-Hour Syllabus
59
Hours 3-4
Mini-Diagnostic Test
1. Proctor Mini-Diagnostic Test (2 hours)
•
•
Maintain realistic test conditions: enforce SAT rules and conventions
Give students a way to track the time—if there is no easily visible clock in your classroom, you can
run a countdown timer through a projection screen or mark the time remaining on a board if you have
one. Give students a 5 or 10 minute warning for each section.
2. Assign Homework (2 minutes)
Homework (Hours 3-4)
•
Take home your Mini-Diagnostic Test question sheets and bring them to next class.
•
Continue last lesson’s homework, to be handed in next class.
3. [AFTER CLASS]
•
Prepare a score report for each student. Follow the instructions on the New SAT Mini-Diagnostic 2.0
Scoring Sheet (available to Ivy Global employees at teach.ivyglobal.ca)
•
Have Score Reports ready to return by the next class session if possible. It is a good idea to return
Score Reports at the end of class, rather than the beginning. This way students will stay focused on
the new lesson rather than reviewing or comparing their scores.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 5-6
Reading Test, Continued | Introduction to the Writing Test
1. [BEFORE CLASS]
•
Print out Fundamental Math Review practice questions
•
Fundamental Math Review packet is available to teachers and students at ivyglobal.com/study, as an
additional resource accompanying the New SAT Guide, 2nd edition.
•
Print enough copies of the Fundamental Math Online Drills worksheet for all of your students, with
an extra copy or two (p. 25-27).
2. Review & Take in Homework for Past Two Classes (20 minutes)
•
Take in students’ personalized study plans (unless they were emailed to you).
•
Allow time for students to ask questions.
•
Ask students to remind you what they learned about the Reading Test so far.
•
Go over Passage Reading exercises (see Answer Key: p. 719-720).
•
Review Passage Reading strategies, and present any that weren’t present or obvious in the assigned
reading.
3. Reading Test Questions (30 minutes)
•
Explain how to approach questions in this section (see p. 44-47).
•
Give students around 8-10 minutes to complete the practice questions on p. 46-47, and review them
together (using the Answer Key on p. 721, if you like).
•
Explain how to choose answers in this section (see p. 48-53).
•
Give students around 5-6 minutes to complete the practice questions on p. 52-53, and review them together.
•
Briefly introduce Vocabulary in Context Questions (see p. 78-81).
Suggested 10-Minute Break
4. Introduce the Writing Test (10 minutes)
•
See p. 161-164 for guidance, or refer to the Writing Test Overview in Section 2.4 of this manual).
•
If you wish, you may briefly flip to p. 204 to introduce the three different passage styles (informative,
argumentative, and nonfiction narrative) and their goals.
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Ivy Global 20-Hour Syllabus
61
5. Writing: Reading the Passages (10 minutes)
•
See p. 166.
•
You may wish to use the Writing Test Strategies outlined in Section 3.2 of this manual. Namely:
o
•
By each underlined portion, you should mark:

“” if you believe there is no grammatical error

“?” if you are uncertain

“X” if the sentence contains an error

You should also try to quickly edit it if you can identify an error
Have students practice marking up a Writing Test passage. You may ask students to use a passage
from their Mini-Diagnostic Test.
6. Approaching the Questions (35 minutes)
•
Reading Questions (p. 167-173): Work through examples together, and give students time to
complete the practice questions from p. 171-173 before going over them together.
•
Choosing Answers (p. 174-177): Work through examples, but only have students go through practice
questions 1 and 1a. Leave the rest for homework.
7. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
•
Hand out Fundamental Math Review worksheets.
Homework (Hours 5-6)
•
Complete Writing Test Practice: Answering the Questions – p. 177-179.
•
Review the Reading and Writing sections of your diagnostic test, and try to re-answer questions using
the strategies you learned today. Circle any questions you still cannot answer, and try to find a common
theme.
•
Read p. 181, and check that you can identify the word parts in the Example sentences on the following
page.
•
Read Fundamental Math Review PDF: http://ivyglobal.com/study/ (see “Additional Resources” under
New SAT Guide, 2nd Edition)., and complete Fundamental Math Online Drills worksheet, showing your
work.
•
Read and complete practice questions on Algebraic Expressions – p. 301-305.
8. Return Mini-Diagnostic Score Reports (1 minute)
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 7-8
Grammar | Introduction to the Math Test
1. [BEFORE CLASS]
•
Make sure you have the Fundamental Math Review PDF with you in some form.
•
Optional: create a few new, memorable (strange or funny) sentences to illustrate common grammar errors.
•
Optional: Pick questions in the Math Test of the Mini-Diagnostic that apply to the strategies you will
teach in Step 4 of this lesson block.
2. Review Homework (20 minutes)
•
Quickly go over the Fundamental Math Review questions, making sure that most of the students feel
comfortable with these concepts.
•
Go over Algebraic Expressions questions from p. 304-305. Ask students about key (bolded)
vocabulary on p. 302-303, and go over concepts as necessary.
•
Go over Writing Test practice questions, demonstrating strategies taught in the previous lesson block
to show how to efficiently get the correct answer.
3. SAT Grammar (40 minutes)
•
Warm up by writing a sentence or two on the board, and asking students to identify various parts of
speech, as listed on p. 181.
•
Common Grammar Errors (p. 182-189): Go through a few errors and examples, checking for
understanding, and creating new examples as needed for clarification. Make sure students can identify
the following errors:
o
Comma Splice (p. 183)
o
Pronoun agreement (especially “one” vs. “you”; p. 185-187)
o
•
Either/or and Neither/nor errors (p. 185)
Advise on strategies for recognizing these errors. To test for agreement, for example, you might suggest
that students always draw a line from the verb to the noun it refers to. You might also suggest that students
cross out extraneous words (such as parenthetical information) to shorten and simplify a sentence.
•
Introduce Harder Grammar Errors (p. 192-199).
o
o
Parallel Structure – p. 192-194
Misplaced Modifiers – p. 194-195. For a fun exercise, select or invent a sentence with a badly
misplaced modifier, and ask students to demonstrate / act out what the erroneous phrasing
implies—or do so yourself.
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Ivy Global 20-Hour Syllabus
63
o
o
Comparison Errors – p. 195-196.
If there is time: Confused Words and Idioms – p. 196-197. You may invent sentences with
funny idiomatic / incorrect homonym mistakes in them, and discuss what they imply and
what they should imply. Encourage participation and humor—if students can laugh about a
rule, they are more likely to remember it.
•
Give students a few minutes to answer some questions from the Harder Grammar Errors practice
set on p. 200-201, reminding them to use all strategies they’ve learned so far. Then discuss the answers
as a class (using the answer key on p. 723, if necessary).
Suggested 10-Minute Break
4. Introduce the Math Test (10 minutes)
•
Explain general structure and content – p. 283-285.
5. Approaching the Math Test (35 minutes)
•
Non-mathematical Strategies (p. 288-294): These strategies can improve students’ Math Test
scores, but require little mathematical knowledge.
•
Math Strategies (p. 295-299): These strategies will help students answer questions more efficiently
– maximum points with minimum calculation.
•
Be sure to give students the opportunity to try out these strategies, whether by working through the
examples in the text, or applying them to questions in their mini-diagnostic test.
6. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 7-8)
•
Read, take notes on, and complete the practice questions for the following sections, remembering to use
the Math Test strategies you learned in class:
o
o
o
64
Linear Equations – p. 306-310
Inequalities – p. 311-316
Absolute Value – p. 317-321
•
Optional: Review the Math sections of your diagnostic test, and try to re-answer questions using the
strategies you learned today. Circle any questions you still cannot answer, and see if they have a common
theme.
•
Memorize the left column of word roots on p. 155, and review those you already learned (all up to nov) – p.
154.
•
Read “Confused Words and Idioms,” highlighting any words that you get mixed up – p. 196-197.
•
Write your own example sentences for each word on p. 197.
•
Complete the Common & Harder Grammar Errors practice questions, naming each grammar error you find
– p. 190-191, p.198-199.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 9-10
Heart of Algebra
1. Review Homework (25 minutes)
•
Ensure that students know the rules for inequalities (p. 312), how to interpret inequalities on a number
line (p. 313-314), and absolute value inequalities (p. 318-319).
•
Take inventory of the questions students still had trouble with, and ask how they applied their
strategies.
•
Go over Writing Test questions, ensuring that students understand the common grammar errors.
2. Vocabulary Quiz or Game (10 minutes)
•
On word roots up to nov (p. 154-155).
•
You may test students by calling/writing out words that contain the word parts studied, or the word
parts themselves, and asking for definitions. You may ask them to use words in a sentence to ensure
understanding.
•
You may also give students a written quiz to complete. You may download the “Roots Quiz” handout
from ivyglobal.com/teach.
Suggested 10-Minute Break
3. Math (1 hour, 10 minutes)
For each topic in a math lesson (e.g., for steps A. through D., below), you should:
•
Introduce and explain the topic
•
List items that students should memorize
•
Discuss common questions or question types
•
Work through a few questions with the class
•
Assign some practice questions for individual or small-group work (but leave some for homework).
•
Ask questions frequently: “Is this familiar?”, “Why did I do that?”, “Am I moving too quickly/slowly?”
•
You may also ask students to invent their own questions based on what you have taught them. They
may then assign their own questions to other classmates. If you do this, be sure to check that the
student who wrote the question is able to solve it correctly before asking another student to solve it.
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Ivy Global 20-Hour Syllabus
65
A. Systems of Equations and Inequalities (20 minutes)
o
B.
Linear Functions (20 minutes)
o
C.
See p. 322-326.
See p. 327-330.
Interpreting Equations (20 minutes)
o
See p. 331-335.
D. Overview of Measurement & Units (10 minutes)
o
o
Briefly teach unit conversions – p. 390-395. Leave most (if not all) practice questions for
homework.
Imperial System: See table 1 on p. 390. Students should be familiar with converting inches,
feet, and yards, as well as minutes, seconds, and hours. Other measurements and conversions
aren’t necessary to memorize.
o
Metric system: students must memorize kilo-, centi-, and milli- units and conversions – table
2 on p. 390.
4. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 9-10)
66
•
Finish reading about Measurement and Units, and complete the practice set – p. 394-395.
•
Complete all other Heart of Algebra practice questions not done in class – p. 304-347.
•
Read sections on Polynomial Expressions, and complete the practice questions, noting down any
questions you may have – p. 350-356.
•
Memorize all word roots (ag, act to viv, vit) – p. 154-155.
•
Optional: (only if teaching a 32-hour course) Complete the Math Test (With Calculator) from Practice Test 3,
using the strategies you learned in class. You may use your notes. Time yourself to see how long it takes you – p.
697-706.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 11-12
The Essay
1. Review Homework (20 minutes)
•
Pay special attention to Polynomial Expressions.
•
Forget about dividing polynomials (p. 353-354): Students are most likely to have trouble with this
topic. It is unlikely that you will have time to fully teach it in a 20-hour crash course, and there will
only be one of these questions per test, so it is probably best to ignore it if students do not already
understand it.
2. Introduce the Essay (10 minutes)
•
See p. 227-230
•
Make sure you cover the prompt format, the instructions, and the scoring.
•
Analyze Form, not Content: The concept of writing an analysis of an essay’s argumentative structure
can be foreign and confusing to many high school students. It is easy for students to lose sight of the
assignment, and formulate an argumentative essay that either supports or rebuts the prompt essay’s
thesis. Take the time to ensure that students understand what they are being asked to do: to discuss
how the author is arguing, rather than what the author is arguing.
3. How to Write the Essay (10 minutes)
•
See p. 231-236. Emphasize concision, concreteness, clarity, and specificity.
•
You should give a minute-by-minute and/or paragraph-by-paragraph breakdown of how students
should write their essay. In addition to the pages listed above, you may want to refer to the Essay
Section Strategies in Section 3.2 of your Manual.
Suggested 10-Minute Break
4. Essay Practice Set (20 minutes)
•
Give students approximately 6-10 minutes to read and complete the practice set on p. 237-238, leaving
time to discuss the answers as a class.
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Ivy Global 20-Hour Syllabus
67
5. Analyzing an Argument (30 minutes)
•
Language – p. 240-242. Go over word choice, paying special attention to the paragraphs after each
example.
o
Give students 3 minutes to answer one question from the practice set on p. 242-243. As a
class, discuss and analyze four words or phrases out of those that the students chose.
•
Evidence – p. 244-247.
•
Organization and Reasoning – p. 248-252.
•
Go over the sample passage analysis on p. 253-255, so students can see what to look for in a prompt
passage.
•
Discuss the identified themes from the passage on p. 256-257, so that students can see how to organize
the observations they make while reading a prompt passage.
•
Allow 10 minutes for students to do Part 4 Practice – p. 257-259.
6. Understanding the Rubric (15 minutes)
•
Go over the College Board’s rubric on p. 262-264, making sure students understand why each example
provided is “good” or “bad.”
•
If you have extra time, you may ask students to come up with their own good and bad examples of
certain points on the rubric.
7. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 11-12)
68
•
Read Sample Essays, and write down detailed notes on what makes Essay #2 (p. 268-269) better than Essay
#1 (p. 267), using the rubric on p. 262-264, and the things you learned in today’s class.
•
Read and bookmark the Essay Checklist on p. 271.
Write an essay based on Essay Prompt #1, following your notes and the Checklist. Time yourself to see how
long it takes you – p. 272-273.
•
Read sections on Factoring Polynomials, and complete the practice questions, noting down any questions
you may have – p. 357-362.
•
Review all word roots (ag, act to viv, vit), and learn the first column of prefixes (up to intra) – p. 154-156.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 13-14
Reading Passage Types | Passport to Advanced Math
1. [BEFORE CLASS]
•
Optional: think up words that include some of the prefixes and word roots learned for homework, to
use for the Vocabulary Quiz. You may also include suffixes, which were not studied (many students
implicitly understand the meaning of common suffixes without realizing it).
2. Review Homework (10 minutes)
•
Have students take a separate sheet of paper and, looking at the Essay Rubric on p. 262-264, estimate
the mark they will receive on this essay. Have the students keep this sheet for themselves.
•
Collect the students’ essays.
•
Leave Factoring Polynomials homework until later in the class (see step 5).
3. Vocabulary Quiz or Game (15 minutes)
•
On all word roots, and the first column of prefixes (all word parts up to intra, p. 154-156).
•
Whatever the format of your game or quiz, try to include full words that include the word parts studied.
You may ask students to guess at the definition of the word, as well as defining the word parts it
contains.
4. Reading: Passage Types (20 minutes)
•
Provide an overview, strategies, and practice for each of the following:
•
Literature Passages – p. 60-65
•
Science Passages – p. 66-71
•
History/Social Studies Passages – p. 72-75
Suggested 10-Minute Break
5. Reading: Atypical Passage Formats (15 minutes)
•
See p. 133-146: while the majority of passages will look the same, three of them will be presented
somewhat differently, including slightly different question types and requiring a slightly different
approach. These passages include synthesis questions.
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Ivy Global 20-Hour Syllabus
69
•
Paired Passages (p. 134-139): 1 of the 5 passages will actually be two shorter passages on a similar
topic, with questions relating the two.
•
Passages with Graphics (p. 140-146): 2 passages (1 Science passage and 1 Social Studies passage)
will include graphs and/or tables.
6. Math: Factoring Polynomials (15 minutes)
•
See p. 357-362.
•
Review FOIL, Difference of Squares, and Sum or Difference of Cubes.
•
Review homework, p. 361-362.
7. Math: Quadratic Equations (15 minutes)
•
See p. 363-366.
•
Work through some problems together from p. 367-368.
•
Note that the SAT will never ask a question that is only solvable using the quadratic formula—more
often than not, the alternative is quicker than using the quadratic formula. If students choose to use
the quadratic formula to solve a question, they should always start by simplifying the equation
provided in the question as much as possible.
8. Applications of Functions (15 minutes)
•
See p. 383-385 (leave some questions for homework if time is tight).
•
Introduce Example questions, and then explain how functions are used to solve each one.
9. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 13-14)
•
Learn all word roots and prefixes – p. 154-156.
•
Read the section on Quadratic Functions and Graphs, and complete the practice questions – p. 369-375.
•
Complete any remaining practice questions on Applications of Functions – p. 386-388.
•
Geometry: Read sections and answer questions on Angles and Volumes of Shapes, Right Triangles, and
Radians & the Unit Circle – p. 440-463.
•
In Practice Test 3’s Reading Test, complete the questions for two passages of your choosing, identifying
passage type and applying the strategies learned in class – p. 653-668.
10. [AFTER CLASS] Mark Students’ Essays
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 15-16
Grammar Review | Problem Solving & Data Analysis | General Test
Prep
1. Review Homework (25 minutes)
•
Go over geometry homework, briefly add anything you want students to know or memorize.
o
o
o
•
Angles & Volumes: Ensure understanding of basic terms. Demonstrate how to find the
volume and surface area of a cylinder.
Special Right Triangles: recognize 3-4-5, 5-12-13, 8-15-17, 30-60-90, 45-45-90. Understand
SOHCAHTOA. Know what similar triangles are.
Radians & Degrees: conversion equation & common angles (p. 456).
Go over quadratic functions homework.
2. Vocabulary Quiz (10 minutes)
•
On all word roots and suffixes.
3. Grammar Review (10 minutes)
•
Have students complete the Grammar Practice Set on p. 200-201, and discuss the answers as a class.
4. Math: Data Analysis – Rates, Ratios & Proportions (15 minutes)
•
See p. 407-411.
•
Ensure that students understand the difference between fractions and ratios.
•
Work through some practice questions – p. 411-413.
5. Return Graded Essays (as students leave for break)
Suggested 10-Minute Break
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71
6. Math: Statistics & Probability (30 minutes)
•
See p. 414-422.
•
Work through some of the practice questions with your students (perhaps only the odd numbers), and
have them do the rest individually, to be taken up when they’re finished – p. 422-424.
7. Test Reminder (5 minutes)
•
Remind students that the final practice test is coming up.
•
Briefly outline how they should prepare. Feel free to share any personal tips for preparation or stressreduction that you might have.
8. Creating a Study Schedule (10 minutes)
•
See p. 24-25.
•
Encourage students to identify their own strengths and weaknesses based on their diagnostic test and
their homework during the course. They should aim to spend the most time improving their weakest
areas and perfecting their best areas.
•
Remind students to use the full-length practice tests at the end of their book. Encourage them to set
realistic testing conditions for themselves.
•
You may also present students with specific study suggestions, based on your experience with the
SAT or your students’ learning styles.
9. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 15-16)
72
•
Read “Approaching the SAT: Test Day” – p. 26-27
•
Review strategies for all sections, and all word parts, in anticipation of the practice test.
•
Complete all of Practice Test 1, tearing out the bubble sheet on p. 483 to mimic test conditions – p. 481557.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 17-20
Final Practice Test
1. [BEFORE CLASS]
•
Write down the order and timing of the test (including break times) on the board (See Section 2.2 of
this Teacher’s Manual).
•
If you have space, you may also write down some test rules
•
Be sure to leave space for writing down time left per section, if needed.
2. Briefly remind students of rules and timing (5 minutes)
•
Remind them that question / test sheets will not be taken in for marking; all marking is done from the
bubble sheets, which must be filled out with HB or #2 pencils.
3. Proctor the Practice Test & Begin Final Reports (3 hours, 50 minutes)
•
Ensure that students are able to keep track of time.
•
You may write final reports for your students while they take the test. These should include:
o
Information and study advice that applies to your class as a whole.
o
Strengths and areas of improvement for each student (phrased in a positive light).
o
Particular study advice for each particular student.
o
A table comparing the student’s scores for each practice test (you can fill out the second half
once you have scored all the tests).
4. Score Reports
•
Inform students when and how their scores will be sent to them (within a few days is preferable).
5. [AFTER CLASS] Prepare Score Reports
•
Score students’ tests using the online scoring tool for New SAT Practice Test 1 (cloud.ivyglobal.com).
•
Write a final progress report for each student as explained in section 3.1 of this guide.
•
You can email scores and reports or make them available for pick-up by students and parents. See
Classroom Advice for more information on practice tests.
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Ivy Global 20-Hour Syllabus
73
Section 4
32-Hour Syllabus
See Section 1.1 for an overview of the contents and structure of the syllabi. See Chapter 3 and Section 4.1 for
help with teaching techniques and strategies.
The following pages provide a 32-hour course syllabus, which you can adapt as necessary to suit the
needs of your class. Each syllabus is divided into two-hour lesson blocks, which are most easily taught as 2hour or 4-hour classes.
Unless otherwise stated, all page numbers refer to the New SAT Guide, 2nd Edition.
Materials
•
Ivy Global’s New SAT Guide, 2nd Edition
•
New SAT 2-hour Mini-Diagnostic Test (available at sat.ivyglobal.com)
•
Ivy Global’s New SAT 4 Practice Tests book
o
If you do not wish to use this practice book, you may buy the New SAT Practice Test 2
and/or 3 booklet, or use Practice Test 2 and 3 from The College Board’s The Official SAT
Study Guide, also available online on The College Board website. If you are teaching a 100hour course, however, you will need to use tests from both books unless you have an external
source.
•
New SAT Bubble Sheets (for students to record their answers—available at sat.ivyglobal.com).
•
Math Fundamental Review Sheet (available at ivyglobal.com/study, as an additional resource
accompanying the New SAT Guide, 2nd edition).
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Ivy Global 32-Hour Syllabus
75
Course Summary
In the table below, each test section is abbreviated to one letter (e.g., “M” means “Math Test”). Other
abbreviations include: “V” (vocabulary), “PT” (practice test), “HW” (homework), “wksht” (worksheet), and
“WP” (word parts from p. 154-157).
32-Hour Syllabus Summary
Hours 1-2
Hours 3-4
General Introduction | R: Intro
2-Hour Mini-Diagnostic PT
HW: key strategies, study plan | R p. 35-43
HW: WP p. 154 | full E p. 272
Hours 5-6
Hours 7-8
R: Answering Questions | W: Intro
W: Grammar | M: Intro
HW: M fundamental wksht, p. 301-305 | W p. 177-179, 181
HW: W PT review | WP p. 155 | M p. 306-321
Hours 9-10
Hours 11-12
M: Heart of Algebra
E: Intro, Practice, Analysis
HW: WP all roots | M p. 304-347, 394-395
HW: WP – intra | E - compare sample essays, full E p. 274 | M p.
350-356
Hours 13-14
Hours 15-16
R: Passage Types | M: Passport to Advanced Math
M: Passport to Advanced Math, cont’d
HW: WP all suffixes | M p. 362, 367-375 | R full p. 653-668
HW: M p. 380-388 | W grammar wksht
Hours 17-18
Hours 19-20
W: Grammar 2 | Distraction & Stress | R: Question Types
M: Problem Solving & Data Analysis
HW: full PT2
HW: M prob & stats p. 414-424.
Hours 21-22
Hours 23-24
M: Problem Solving & Data Analysis, cont’d | PT2
Review
E: Review & Practice | W: Question Types | PT2 Review
HW: W p. 211-224 | M geometry p. 440-463, note toughest
topic
HW: M data p. 425-429.
Hours 25-26
Hours 27-28
PT2 Review | M: Additional Topics + Strategy Review
M: Review + Game | Study Plan | Class Discussion
HW: WP all | M circles p. 470-471, full PT3 no-calc
HW: teacher’s choice
Hours 29-30
Hours 31-32
Practice Test #3
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 1-2
Introduction
1. Take Attendance and Get to Know Each Other (15 minutes)
•
Briefly introduce yourself, and ask students to introduce themselves (with attendance sheet in hand,
noting any absences). Your goal is to help your students feel comfortable and for you to get to know
them. Find more advice on creating rapport during class introductions in Section 5.1 on Classroom
Advice.
2. Introduce the Course (5 minutes)
•
Explain any class policies such as expectations for homework, when there will be breaks, what
students will need to bring to class, and what students cannot have out during class time (e.g., cell
phones, headphones, etc.). At a minimum, students should bring the following to every class:
•
o
The Ivy Global New SAT Guide
o
A notebook or notepaper
o
Pens, pencils & erasers
o
A calculator
Review the general schedule of the class, including the dates of practice tests.
3. Introduce the SAT (40 minutes)
•
SAT Format, Content, and Purpose (see p. 4-7 of the New SAT Guide. You may also use Chapter
2 of this manual for reference).
•
Signing Up for The SAT (see p. 8-9)
•
General Test-Taking Tips (see p. 12-14)
o
Learn the test (format, instructions, timing)
o
Guess strategically
o
Manage your time (bring your own watch!)
o
Entering answers: Use the Diagnostic Test answer sheets (Scantron / bubble-in sheet) as
reference, and ensure that they understand how to fill in each type of answer (essay,
multiple choice, and grid-in).
•
Key SAT Strategies (see the “Teaching Strategies” section of this manual, and p. 15-23 of the Guide).
The 5 P’s: Plug in. Use your Pencil. Process of Elimination. Pick & Skip (pick easy questions and
skip time-eaters). Predict answers before looking at answer options.
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Ivy Global 32-Hour Syllabus
77
•
Managing Stress and Distraction (see p. 26-27, “During the Test”). When students are anxious,
bored, tired, or otherwise distracted, this can greatly affect their test performance. However, if they
are self-aware and have strategies for responding to these difficulties, they can still excel. Add any
tips you may have for combating distraction during a test.
•
Give students around 5-6 minutes to complete the practice questions on p. 52-53, and review them
together.
Suggested 10-Minute Break
4. Introduce the Mini-Diagnostic Test (10 minutes)
•
Announce that you will administer the test in the next 2-hour lesson block. If you are teaching a
4-hour class, this will happen in the next hour. Otherwise, they will take the test next class.
•
Purpose, difference from full test
o
Helps establish your baseline score, so students can track their improvement
o
2 hours long (vs. 4) – same number and order of sections, but each is shorter
o
Helps familiarize students with the test
o
Students will receive a graded Score Report, but this score will not be predictive of their
performance on the actual test—it’s just a general indication of their current strengths and
weaknesses at the very beginning of their studies.
•
Explain Rules (see test instruction sheet and bubble sheet for reference, or p. 481 of the New SAT
Guide)
o
Make sure students understand that they must complete sections in the order they are given,
and can only work on one section at a time (they can’t work ahead or go back to work on
previous sections, even if they have extra time).
•
Time Management: Remind students not to get stuck on difficult questions, and to be as aware as
possible of how much time they have left in each section.
5. Introduce Vocabulary Building (15 minutes)
If you are teaching a 4-hour class, you may want to administer the diagnostic test before these next two steps
(5 and 6).
•
Discuss the importance of vocabulary building in the Reading and Writing Tests (see p. 153-154).
•
Introduce the concepts of word roots, prefixes, and suffixes (see p. 154-157). Explain why it is helpful
to learn word parts.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Depending on the edition of your textbook, the first column of “Common Prefixes” and “Common Suffixes”
might erroneously read “Root” rather than “Prefix” or “Suffix,” respectively.
•
Suggest memorization strategies. Students should create their own flash cards. They can also invent
mnemonic devices, and practice using word parts in context. Give an example or two, if you can.
6. Introduce the Reading Test (10 minutes)
•
Outline the structure and content of the reading test, and the general format of the questions (see p.
31-33, and/or the Reading Test overview in Section 2.4 of this manual).
•
You may show students a practice passage (e.g. p. 54-56) so they can get a better sense of what to
expect.
7. Outline Approach (10 minutes)
•
Briefly introduce general strategies for approaching the content of a Reading Test, as on p. 36-37.
•
Explain that in future classes there will be time to discuss and practice how to approach passages in
more depth.
8. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 1-2)
•
Read p. 3 and p. 14-27, taking notes on Key Strategies, and any questions you have.
•
Complete a personalized study plan, as suggested on p. 25, to be handed in (or emailed to you) for next
class.
•
Read and complete the exercises on “Marking Up a Passage” and “Summarizing” – p. 35-43.
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Ivy Global 32-Hour Syllabus
79
Hours 3-4
Mini-Diagnostic Test
1. [BEFORE CLASS]
•
Have tests for your students (Answer sheets and question sheets) + extra
•
Have separate Essay answer sheets to assign for homework + extra
2. Proctor Mini-Diagnostic Test (2 hours)
•
Administer under SAT-taking conditions: enforce the College Board’s guidelines for taking the
SAT.
•
Give students a way to track the time—if there is no easily visible clock in your classroom, you can
run a countdown timer through a projection screen or mark the time remaining on a board. Give
students a 5- or 10-minute warning for each section.
3. Assign Homework (2 minutes)
Homework (Hours 3-4)
•
Memorize the first page of word roots (ag, act to cid, cis), p. 154.
•
Complete a 50-minute Essay, using Essay Prompt #1 on p. 272.
4. [AFTER CLASS]
•
Prepare a score report for each student. Follow the instructions on the Scoring Sheet for the “New
SAT Mini-Diagnostic 2.0” (available for Ivy Global employees at https://sites.google.com/site/
ivyglobalresources/new-sat-teacher-resources).
•
Email the resulting score reports to the students and/or their parents.
•
Print (or have your office print) a short form of the score reports.
o
•
These should include a list of the correct and student-chosen answers for each question, the
cumulative score, and perhaps area and/or test scores.
Have Score Reports ready to return by the next class session if possible. If you do return a hard copy,
it is a good idea to do so at the end of class, rather than the beginning. This way students will stay
focused on the new lesson rather than reviewing or comparing their scores.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 5-6
Reading, Continued | Introduction to the Writing Test
1. [BEFORE CLASS]
•
Print out Fundamental Math Review, available to teachers and students at ivyglobal.com/study, as an
additional resource accompanying the New SAT Guide, 2nd Edition.
•
Print enough copies of the Fundamental Math Online Drills worksheet for all your students, with an
extra copy or two (p. 25-27 of the Fundamental Math Review PDF).
2. Review & Take in Homework (25 minutes)
•
Take in students’ essays, and personalized study plans (unless they were emailed to you)
•
Reading homework review:
o
o
Ask students to remind you what they learned about the Reading Test so far. See p. 31-33
for reference.
Review Passage Reading strategies, and present any that weren’t present or obvious in the
assigned reading (or any that you may not have had the time to cover in the introductory
class).
o
•
Go over Passage Reading exercises (see Answer Key: p. 719-720).
Allow time for students to ask questions.
3. Reading Test Questions (30 minutes)
•
Explain how to approach questions in this section (see p. 44-47).
•
Give students around 8-10 minutes to complete the practice questions on p. 46-47, and review them
together (using the Answer Key on p. 721, if you like).
•
Explain how to choose answers in this section (see p. 48-53).
•
Give students around 5-6 minutes to complete the practice questions on p. 52-53, and review them
together.
•
Briefly introduce Vocabulary in Context Questions—p. 78-81.
Suggested 10-Minute Break
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Ivy Global 32-Hour Syllabus
81
4. Introduce the Writing Test (10 minutes)
•
See p. 161-164 for guidance, or refer to the Writing Test Overview in Section 2.4 of this manual.
•
If you wish, you may briefly flip to p. 204 to introduce the 3 different passage styles (informative,
argumentative, and nonfiction narrative) and their goals.
5. Reading the Passages (10 minutes)
•
See p. 166.
•
You may wish to use the Writing Test Strategies outlined in Section 3.2 of this manual. Namely:
o
•
Near each underlined portion, students should mark one of the following:

“” if you believe there is no grammatical error

“?” if you are uncertain

“X ” if the sentence contains an error

You should also try to quickly edit it if you can identify an error
Have students practice marking up a Writing Test passage, without looking at the questions. You may
ask students to use a passage from their Diagnostic Test, or choose a passage from the New SAT
Guide (e.g., p. 177-179).
6. Approaching the Questions (30 minutes)
•
Reading Questions (p. 167-173): Work through examples together, and give students time to
complete the practice questions from p. 171-173 before going over them together.
•
Choosing Answers (p. 174-177): Work through examples, but only have students go through practice
questions 1 and 1a. Leave the rest for homework.
7. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 5-6)
•
Read Fundamental Math Review PDF (available at http://ivyglobal.com/study/—see “Additional
Resources” under New SAT Guide 2nd Edition).
•
Complete Fundamental Math Online Drills worksheet and show your work.
•
Read and complete practice questions on Algebraic Expressions– p. 301-305.
•
Complete Writing Test Practice: Answering the Questions – p. 177-179.
•
Read p. 181, and identify the parts of speech in the Example sentences on the following page.
8. Return Diagnostic Test Score Reports (1 minute)
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 7-8
Writing: Grammar | Introduction to the Math Test
1. [BEFORE CLASS]
•
Make sure you have the Fundamental Math Review PDF with you.
•
Optional: create a few memorable (strange or funny) sentences to illustrate common grammar errors.
•
Optional: Pick questions in the Math sections of the Diagnostic Test that apply to the strategies you
will teach in Step 4 of this lesson block.
2. Review Homework (20 minutes)
•
Quickly go over the Fundamental Math Review questions, making sure that most of the students feel
comfortable with them.
•
Go over Algebraic Expressions questions from p. 304-305. Ask students about key (bolded)
vocabulary on p.302-303, and go over concepts as necessary.
•
Go over Writing Test practice questions, demonstrating strategies taught in the previous lesson block
to show how to efficiently get to the correct answer.
3. SAT Grammar (40 minutes)
•
Warm up by writing a sentence or two on the board, and asking students to identify various parts of
speech, as listed on p. 181.
•
Introduce Common Grammar Errors (p. 182-189). Go through each error and example, checking
for understanding, and creating new examples as needed for clarification. Make sure students can
identify the following errors:
•
o
Comma Splice (p. 183)
o
Pronoun agreement errors (especially “one” vs. “you” – p. 186)
o
Either/or and Neither/nor errors (p. 185)
o
Tense shift errors (p. 188)
Provide strategies for recognizing these errors in the Writing Test. To test for agreement, for example,
you might suggest that students always draw a line from the verb to the noun it refers to. You might
also suggest that students cross out extraneous words (such as non-underlined parenthetical
information) to shorten and simplify a sentence, thereby making it easier to spot errors.
•
Practice: Go through 1 or 2 questions from the Common Grammar Errors practice set together (p.
190-191), asking students to identify the errors (including, if you have time, any errors present in the
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Ivy Global 32-Hour Syllabus
83
answer options). Then, have students complete the rest of the practice set individually. Leave time to
discuss the answers afterwards.
Suggested 10-Minute Break
4. Introduce the Math Test (10 minutes)
•
Explain general structure and content – p. 283-285.
5. Approaching the Math Test (35 minutes)
•
Non-mathematical Strategies (p. 288-294): These strategies can improve students’ Math Test
scores, but require little mathematical knowledge.
•
Math Strategies (p. 295-299): These strategies will help students answer questions more
efficiently—maximum points with minimum calculation.
•
Be sure to give students the opportunity to try out these strategies, whether by working through the
examples in the text, or applying them to questions in their Diagnostic Test.
6. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 7-8)
•
Go through the Writing section of your Diagnostic Test, and identify every instance of a common grammar
error you can find, correcting each one as you go. Bring it to next class.
•
Memorize the left column of word roots on p. 155, and review those you already learned (all up to nov)—p.
154.
•
Read, take notes on, and complete the practice questions for the following Math topics, remembering to
use the Math Test strategies you learned in class:
o
o
o
84
Linear Equations – p. 306-310.
Inequalities – p. 311-316.
Absolute Value – p. 317-321.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 9-10
Heart of Algebra
1. Review Homework (25 minutes)
•
Ensure that students know the rules for inequalities (p. 312), understand how to interpret inequalities
on a number line (p. 313-314), and manipulate absolute value inequalities (p. 318-319).
•
Take inventory of the questions students still had trouble with, and ask how they applied their
strategies.
•
Go over Writing Test questions from the Diagnostic Test, ensuring that students understand the
common grammar errors.
2. Vocabulary Quiz or Game (10 minutes)
•
On word roots up to nov (p. 154-155).
•
Test students by either:
o
Calling/writing out words that contain the word parts studied (e.g. “regicide” for the roots
“reg” and “cid”), and ask students to define the word and identify its roots.
o
Presenting the word roots alone, and asking for definitions.
o
Giving students a written quiz to complete. You may download the “Roots Quiz” handout
o
Asking them to use the words or roots in context, to ensure understanding.
from ivyglobal.com/teach.
Suggested 10-Minute Break
3. Math (1 hour, 10 minutes)
•
For each topic in an ordinary math lesson (e.g. for steps A. through D., below), you should:
|
o
Introduce and explain the topic
o
Tell common questions or question types
o
Assign some practice questions for individual or small-group work (but leave some for
o
Ask questions frequently: “Is this familiar?” “Why did I do that?” “Am I moving too
o
List items that students should memorize
o
Work through a few questions with the class
homework).
quickly/slowly?”
Ivy Global 32-Hour Syllabus
85
•
You may also ask students to invent their own questions based on what you have taught them. They
may then assign their own questions to other classmates. If you do this, be sure to check that the
student who wrote the question is able to solve it correctly before asking another student to solve it.
A. Systems of Equations and Inequalities (20 minutes)
o
B.
Linear Functions (20 minutes)
o
C.
See p. 322-326.
See p. 327-330.
Interpreting Equations (20 minutes)
o
See p. 331-335.
D. Overview of Measurement & Units (10 minutes)
o
Briefly teach unit conversions – p. 390-395. Leave most (if not all) practice questions for
o
Imperial System: Students should be familiar with converting inches, feet, and yards, as
homework.
well as minutes, seconds, and hours. Other measurements and conversions aren’t necessary
to memorize – table 1 on p. 390.
o
Metric system: students must memorize kilo-, centi-, and milli- units and conversions – table
2 on p. 390.
4. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 9-10)
86
•
Complete the Measurement and Units practice set – p. 394-395.
•
Read the Graphing Equations section, and complete the associated practice questions – p. 336-347.
•
Complete all other Heart of Algebra practice questions not done in class – p. 304-347.
•
Memorize all word roots. (ag, act to viv, vit)– p. 154-155.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 11-12
The Essay
1. Review Homework (20 minutes)
•
Go over Heart of Algebra practice sets.
•
Pay special attention to the Graphing Equations section, making sure to teach any unfamiliar or
confusing concepts.
2. Introduce the Essay (10 minutes)
•
See p. p. 227-230
•
Make sure you cover the prompt format, the instructions, and the scoring.
•
Analyze Form, not Content: The concept of writing an analytical essay can be foreign and confusing
to many high-school students. It is easy for students to lose sight of the assignment, and formulate an
essay that either supports or rebuts the prompt passage’s thesis. Take the time to ensure that students
understand what they are being asked to do: to discuss how the author is arguing, rather than what the
author is arguing.
3. How to Write the Essay (10 minutes)
•
See p. 231-236. Emphasize concision, concreteness, clarity, and specificity.
•
You should give a minute-by-minute and/or paragraph-by-paragraph breakdown of how students
should write their essay. In addition to the pages listed above, you may want to refer to the Essay
Section Strategies in Section 3.2 of your Manual.
Suggested 10-Minute Break
4. Essay Practice Set (20 minutes)
•
Put students in pairs or small groups, and give them approximately 6-10 minutes to read and complete
the practice set on p. 237-238, leaving time to discuss the answers as a class.
5. Analyzing an Argument (30 minutes)
•
Language – p. 240-242. Go over word choice, paying special attention to the paragraphs after each
example.
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Ivy Global 32-Hour Syllabus
87
o
Give students three minutes to each answer one question from the practice set on p. 242-243.
As a class, discuss and analyze 4 words or phrases out of those that the students chose.
•
Evidence – p. 244-247. Focus more on the practice set than the earlier pages.
•
Organization and Reasoning – p. 248-252. Emphasize that students should never write in full
sentences when marking up a passage, as shown on p. 249.
•
Go over the sample passage analysis on p. 253-255, so students can see what to look for in a prompt
passage.
•
Discuss the themes identified in the passage on p. 256-257, so that students can see how to organize
the observations they make while reading a prompt passage.
6. Understanding the Rubric (15 minutes)
•
Go over the College Board’s rubric on p. 262-264, making sure students understand why each example
provided is “Good” or “Bad.”
•
If you have extra time, you may ask students to come up with their own good and bad examples of
certain points on the rubric.
7. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 11-12)
88
•
Read Sample Essays, and write detailed notes on what makes Essay #2 (p. 268-269) better than Essay #1 (p.
267); use the rubric on p. 262-264, and your notes from class that day.
•
Read and bookmark the Essay Checklist on p. 271.
•
Write an essay based on Essay Prompt #2, following your notes and the Checklist. Time yourself to see how
long it takes you – p. 274-275.
•
Review all word roots (ag, act to viv, vit), and learn the first column of prefixes (up to intra) – p. 154-156.
•
Read sections on Polynomial Expressions, and complete the practice questions, noting down any
questions you may have – p. 350-356.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 13-14
Reading Passage Types | Passport to Advanced Math
1. [BEFORE CLASS]
•
Optional: for the Vocabulary Quiz, think up words that include some of the prefixes and roots learned
for homework. You may also include suffixes, which were not studied (students often understand the
meaning of common suffixes implicitly, without realizing it).
2. Review Homework (10 minutes)
•
Have students take a separate sheet of paper and, looking at the Essay Rubric on p. 262-264, estimate
the mark they will receive on this essay. Have the students keep this sheet for themselves.
•
Collect students’ essays.
•
Leave Polynomials homework to take up later in the class (step 5).
3. Vocabulary Quiz or Game (15 minutes)
•
On all word roots, and the first column of prefixes (all word parts up to intra, p. 154-156).
•
Whatever the format of the game or quiz, try to include full words that contain the word parts studied.
You may ask students to guess at the definition of the word, as well as defining its parts.
4. Reading: Passage Types (15 minutes)
•
Include an overview, strategies and practice for each of the following:
o
Literature Passages – p. 60-65
o
History/Social Studies Passages – p. 72-75
o
Science Passages – p. 66-71
5. Reading: Atypical Passage Formats (15 minutes)
•
See p. 133-146: while the majority of passages will look the same, 3 of them will be presented
somewhat differently. They will include slightly different question types and require a slightly
different approach. These passages include synthesis questions.
•
Paired Passages (p. 134-139): 1 of the 5 passages will be a passage pair on a similar topic, with
questions relating the two.
•
Passages with Graphics (p. 140-146): 2 passages (1 Science passage and 1 Social Studies passage)
will include graphs and/or tables.
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Ivy Global 32-Hour Syllabus
89
Suggested 10-Minute Break
6. Math: Polynomials (30 minutes)
•
Go over Polynomial Expressions practice questions – p. 355-356. Review FOIL
•
Teach Factoring Polynomials – p. 357-362.
•
Make sure to cover Difference of Squares, and Sum/Difference of Cubes (p. 359-360).
•
Go through at least half of the Factoring Polynomials practice questions (p. 361-362)
7. Math: Quadratic Equations (20 minutes)
•
See p. 363-366. Make sure students can identify quadratic equations
•
Teach students the steps for finding the roots of a quadratic equation (p. 363-364):
•
o
Rearrange the equation so that there is a quadratic on the left, and 0 on the right
o
Set each factor to 0, and solve x for each.
o
Factor the left side
o
Make sure you have 2 separate roots.
To help students understand word problems with quadratic equations, follow the example equation
and make sure the following is clear:
o
h = 0 when the object in question is on the ground
o
Extraneous solutions: only one solution will make logical sense.
o
t = 0 when the action in question has not yet occurred
•
Quadratic Formula: make sure the “±”sign is understood.
•
Note that the SAT will never ask a question that is only solvable using the quadratic formula. If
students already know the formula by heart, they should continue using it whenever they see fit. In
this case, they should always start by simplifying the equation in question as much as possible.
•
Work through several problems together from p. 367-368.
8. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 13-14)
90
•
Learn all word roots and prefixes – p. 154-156.
•
Complete any Factoring Polynomials not done in class – p. 362.
•
Complete any Quadratic Equations questions not done in class – p. 367-368.
•
Read the section on Quadratic Functions and Graphs, and complete the practice questions – p. 369-375.
•
Complete the Reading Test of Practice Test 3, paying attention to passage type and applying strategies
learned in class – p. 653-668.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 15-16
Passport to Advanced Math, Continued
1. [BEFORE CLASS]
•
Print out copies of the “Confused Words & Idioms Quiz,” available at ivyglobal.com/teach.
2. Review Homework (20 minutes)
3. Quadratic Functions & Graphs (20 minutes)
•
See p. 369-376. Explain that one can apply the generic function notation equation [ f (x) = ax2 + bx + c]
to any quadratic function.
•
Explain how each feature of a quadratic function can alter the features of a parabola. Make sure
students understand the difference between adding a constant (which can be described as altering c)
and “taking the function of x plus a constant”.
•
You shouldn’t need to spend too much time on systems of equations – if you don’t have time to teach
this section, you may assign it for homework.
•
Work through a few practice questions (p. 374-375).
4. Advanced Equations (25 minutes)
•
Exponential Equations – p. 377.
•
Rational Equations – p. 378. You can essentially skip this section as long as you make sure that
students are comfortable with cross-multiplying fractions.
•
Radical Equations – p. 379. You will likely need to cover this part more thoroughly than the previous
two.
•
Practice Questions – p. 380-382. Cover a few in class, and leave the rest (at least #6-10) for homework.
Suggested 10-Minute Break
5. Vocabulary Quiz/Game (20 minutes)
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Ivy Global 32-Hour Syllabus
91
6. Application of Functions (20 minutes)
•
See p. 383-388 (leave some questions for homework if time is tight).
•
Introduce Example questions, and then explain how functions can be used to solve each one.
7. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 15-16)
92
•
Complete the Advanced Equations practice questions – p. 380-382.
•
Complete any other Passport to Advanced Math questions not completed in class – p. 355-388.
•
Read “Applications of Functions” and complete the associated practice questions – p. 383-388.
•
Complete the Confused Words & Idioms Quiz or worksheet.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 17-18
Harder Grammar | Managing Stress & Distraction | Reading Test
Question Types
1. [BEFORE CLASS]
•
Print copies of Ivy Global’s Practice Test #2. Be sure to have extra copies.
2. Review Homework (20 minutes)
3. Writing: Grammar Lesson 2 (40 minutes)
•
Review Common Grammar Errors – a good way to do so might be to write a few sentences that,
together, contain all of the common grammar errors, and ask students to call out where and how an
error has been made.
•
Introduce Harder Grammar Errors (p. 192-199).
o
o
Parallel Structure – p. 192-194
Misplaced Modifiers – p. 194-195. For a fun exercise, select or invent a sentence with a
misplaced modifier and ask students to demonstrate/act out what the erroneous phrasing
implies.
o
o
Comparison Errors – p. 195-196
Confused Words and Idioms – p. 196-197. You may invent sentences with funny idiomatic
/ incorrect homonym mistakes in them, and discuss what they imply versus what they should
imply. Encourage participation and humor—if students can laugh about a rule, they are more
likely to remember it.

•
Ask students to circle the ones that they are less comfortable with.
Work together as a class to complete the Harder Grammar Errors practice questions, naming each
grammar error that shows up – p.198-199.
•
Give students ten minutes to complete the grammar practice set on p. 200-201, reminding them to
apply the strategies they’ve learned, and to search for both common & harder grammar errors. Discuss
the answers as a class (using the answer key on p. 723, if necessary).
Suggested 10-Minute Break
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Ivy Global 32-Hour Syllabus
93
4. Stress Management (20 minutes)
•
Let your students know that there are some elements of their test-taking experience that will be out of
their control. The key is to respond to them as gracefully as possible.
•
Feel free to include any strategies you have picked up that have helped you or past students respond
productively to anxiety or distraction. Here are some ideas:
o
Guess & Keep Moving: If you’re spending more time than you should on a question, you’ll
probably do better to move onto the next question. Make an educated guess using process of
elimination if you can; a totally random guess if you can’t; circle the question and move on
to the next one otherwise.
o
Don’t Dwell: Once you finish an entire test section, try to forget about it entirely. If you
need something to replace those thoughts, try looking forward to the next section: think about
what you have to watch out for and what strategies you will use.
o
Take A Mini-Break: Try to notice when you are feeling distracted, frustrated, or bored. Try
closing your eyes, adjusting your posture, and taking a few slow, deep breaths. Changing
your setting even slightly can help you feel ready for the next task.
o
Think Positive: When you’re feeling overwhelmed or anxious, focus instead on what you
can do or have achieved.

Remind yourself of your strengths.

Remind yourself how hard you have worked to prepare for the SAT, and how
prepared you are compared to people who haven’t had the time or money to prepare
like you have.
o
Visualize Success: Picture getting into a state of supreme focus. Whenever you get
distracted, you are incredibly adept at noticing it without getting upset or stuck. Instead, you
return to the test and work on what’s in front of you.
o
Mark Your Progress: You may find yourself lost in a long passage or overwhelmed by a
complicated word problem. Try to chop up these painfully long tasks into little feasible
chunks. One way to do this is by engaging more closely with the question/passage you’re
working on, recording your progress by marking up the passage as you go.
o
Dismiss External Distractions: If there is an annoying sound in the testing room, the key is
to view it as something entirely outside of your control. You may bring earplugs to the test,
but this may not be enough. You can also use your imagination: perhaps the chronic cougher
in the testing room is in fact a robot designed to test your concentration. See how well you
can rise to the challenge.
5. Reading: Question Types (25 minutes)
•
See p. 77-102.
•
Review vocabulary in context questions. You may ask your students to actually write down a guessword instead of just thinking of one.
•
94
Work through the practice set on p. 85-86.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
•
Emphasize the importance of identifying main ideas as you read the passage.
•
Work through each example and type of “Central Ideas and Relationships” question, but try not to
overstate the difference between Summarizing and Central Ideas questions. Students shouldn’t be
worrying about whether they can memorize the question types; they should just be aware of the
different ways of approaching different questions, and practice implementing those methods.
•
Emphasize how you can use Command of Evidence questions to correct previous questions, and vice
versa.
•
Be sure to work through the Analogical Reasoning questions on p. 100-101.
6. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 17-18)
•
Complete the entire Practice Test #2 (from the 4-test book, or handed out by your teacher). Use the bubble
sheet and paper provided to enter your answers, and make sure to keep within the allotted time.
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Ivy Global 32-Hour Syllabus
95
Hours 19-20
Problem-Solving & Data Analysis
1. Vocabulary Quiz/ Game (15 minutes)
2. Review Homework (25 minutes)
•
Collect the bubble sheet from students’ practice tests (if this is a 4-hour class, collect them during
hours 21-22).
3. Math: Applications of Functions (15 minutes)
•
If you have not yet had time to do so, go over the Applications of Functions homework (p. 383-388),
and make sure students understand exponential growth. If your students feel comfortable with this
topic and/or you have gone over the homework already, take 15 more minutes to work on Statistics
& Probability (Step 6).
Suggested 10-Minute Break
4. Properties of Data (10 minutes)
•
P. 396-399 should all be review to most students – go over these measures of tendency quickly, by
having students define each key term.
•
Explain how students should generally approach graphs and charts, but do not spend too much time
on each type if students are familiar with graphical data representation (p. 400-403).
5. Ratios, Percentages, Rates & Proportions (25 minutes)
•
See p. 407-411.
•
Ensure that students understand the difference between fractions and ratios (some ratios can be
represented in fraction form – this can be confusing).
•
Help students get comfortable with percentages word problems – you may want to use the Math
Dictionary in Section 3.2 on SAT-Teaching Strategies.
96
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
6. Probability & Statistics (15 minutes)
•
Give a brief introduction to or overview of this section, referring to p. 414-418.
•
Go into more depth if you have the time, covering as much as you can from p. 414-421.
7. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 19-20)
•
Read and take notes on Probability & Statistics, and complete the even-numbered practice questions – p.
414-424.
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Ivy Global 32-Hour Syllabus
97
Hours 21-22
Problem-Solving & Data Analysis, Continued | Practice Test
Review
1. Review Homework (20 minutes)
•
Take in students’ bubble-in sheets for their at-home practice test (Practice Test #2) if you are teaching
a 4-hour class.
•
Leave the Statistics & Probability homework until step 3.
2. Vocabulary Quiz / Game (15 minutes)
3. Math: Statistics & Probability (25 minutes)
•
Go over the homework, introducing any new concepts and resolving any misunderstandings as you
go – p. 414-424.
Suggested 10-Minute Break
4. Using Data as Evidence (15 minutes)
•
See p. 430-437. Explain how to efficiently approach charts, graphs, and tables, using the examples
provided.
5. Start Reviewing Practice Test (30 minutes)
•
Go over the most difficult questions from the at-home practice test – this should include questions
that students couldn’t answer, as well as questions that students should be able to answer more
efficiently, by using shortcuts and strategies, or by becoming more familiar with the material.
6. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 21-22)
98
•
Read about “Modeling Data,” and complete the associated practice questions – p. 425-429.
•
Complete any questions from the “Problem Solving and Data Analysis” section that you haven’t yet
finished – p. 394-429.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 23-24
Writing Question Types | Essay Review | Practice Test Review
1. Review Homework (20 minutes)
2. Essay Review & Practice (40 minutes)
•
Have students read a Sample Essay Prompt of your choosing (from p. 272-279).
•
Work together on developing a good essay outline.
Suggested 10-Minute Break
3. Writing Question Types: Expression of Ideas (15 minutes)
•
Cover Development of Ideas questions – p. 204-212.
•
Cover Organization of Ideas questions – p. 213-218.
•
Optional: Introduce Effective Language Use questions – p. 219-224.
4. Review Practice Test (30 minutes)
5. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 23-24)
•
Read about “Effective Language Use” questions – p. 219-224.
•
Complete all the practice questions found in the Expression of Ideas section – p. 211-212, 217-218.
•
Read sections and answer questions on Angles and Volumes of Shapes, Right Triangles, and Radians & the
Unit Circle – p. 440-463.
•
Send an email listing 1-3 Math topics you are least comfortable with, and would like to go over in coming
classes.
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Ivy Global 32-Hour Syllabus
99
Hours 25-26
Math: Additional Topics & Strategy Review | Practice Test Review
1. [BEFORE CLASS]
•
Send out score reports for students’ at-home practice tests (Practice Test #2).
2. Review Homework (20 minutes)
•
Leave Geometry homework review for after the break.
3. Review Practice Test (35 minutes)
•
Go over the questions students had most difficulty with.
•
Note any topics that the class as a whole particularly struggles with.
Suggested 10-Minute Break
4. Math: Geometry (30 minutes)
•
Angles & Volumes of Shapes – p. 440-447. Review homework and clarify.
•
Right Triangles – p. 448-455.
•
Circles – p. 465-471.
5. Radians and The Unit Circle (15 minutes)
•
See p. 456-464.
•
Make sure students can convert between radians and degrees.
•
Cover the Unit Circle.
6. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 25-26)
100
•
Complete any practice questions on circles that you didn’t get to in class– p. 470-471
•
Complete a full 25-minute No-Calculator Math Section from Practice Test 3 in your New SAT Guide – p. 687694.
•
Review and/or memorize all Word Parts – p. 154-157.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 27-28
Final Test Prep | Last Class Reminders | Math Review
1. [BEFORE CLASS]
•
Read all your students’ emails, and decide which Math topic(s) students generally need most help
with (to be taught in hours 27-28).
2. Math Game (30 minutes)
•
In this game, your students will alternate playing the roles of SAT question-writer and test-taker.
Divide your class into 2 teams. Each team member on each team has to create 1 SAT Math question.
•
Each question needs to be written on paper and solved by the creating team before it is submitted to
the teacher for review.
•
One of the questions is written on the board, and the students on the other team have to answer it
within the allotted time.
•
1 point is awarded for answering the opposition’s question correctly, and 1 point for creating a good
question (i.e., one that adheres to SAT’s style). A point is taken away if the creating team can’t answer
its own question correctly.
•
You may decide to bring a small prize for the winning team.
2. Review Homework (20 minutes)
Suggested 10-Minute Break
3a. IF LAST CLASS (20 minutes)
•
Address any final questions.
•
Provide timeframe for returning students’ final score reports.
•
Advise students on short and long term study plan. For example:
o
“Try to set up a regular sleep routine for at least the week before the test – 8 hours is ideal,
and your bedtime and wake-up time should be organized based on when you have to wake
up to get to the actual test.”
o
|
Check the test location and plan to arrive early.
Ivy Global 32-Hour Syllabus
101
o
Do not study the night before or the morning of the exam. The night before should be a time
to rest. Sleep early and allow your brain to work on consolidating all the knowledge you have
been accruing in past weeks.
o
o
Wear multiple layers (so you are prepared whatever the temperature).
Plan your meals and clothes at least the night before.
•
You may want to give students a checklist, or have them make their own.
•
Answer any final questions students have about the test day.
3b. If NOT Last Class: Vocabulary Game
4. Math Review (30 minutes)
•
Go over whatever topic the students find most difficult. This will probably include a general review
of the topic(s), close analysis of some already-done practice questions, and both group and individual
work on more practice questions
5. Open Discussion (15 minutes)
•
Organize a discussion/debate among your students about what they are most worried about, how/how
much/when they plan to study for the SAT, etc. Try to encourage student participation as much as
possible, and only speak to answer questions directed at you.
6. Assign Homework (Optional)
If the practice test is more than a couple days away, you may choose to assign some actual homework. Choose a
topic that your students have been struggling most with, and assign practice questions.
102
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 29-32
Practice Test #3
1. [BEFORE CLASS]
•
Have copies of a full practice test (Recommended: Practice Test 3 from Ivy Global’s New SAT 4
Practice Tests book), including bubble sheets.
•
Write down the order and timing of the test (including break times) on the board.
•
If you have space, you may also write down some test rules.
•
Be sure to leave space for writing down time left per section, if needed.
2. Briefly remind students of rules and timing (5 minutes)
3. Proctor the Test (3 hours, 50 minutes)
•
See Section 2.2 of this Teacher’s Manual for the order and timing of the test.
•
Remember to provide students with 2 breaks (for a total of 10 minutes).
4. [AFTER CLASS] Prepare Score Report
•
Follow the instructions on the Online Scoring Sheet (cloud.ivyglobal.com) to prepare a Score Report
for each student.
•
If this is your last class,, you should also send each student (or parent) a personalized Final Report.
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Ivy Global 32-Hour Syllabus
103
Section 4.5
60-Hour Syllabus
See Section 1.1 for an overview of the contents and structure of the syllabi. See Chapter 3 and Section 4.1 for
teaching techniques and strategies.
Together with the 32-hour syllabus, the following pages provide a 60-hour course syllabus. Each syllabus
is divided into two-hour lesson blocks, which are most easily taught as 2-hour or 4-hour classes.
Unless otherwise stated, all page numbers refer to the New SAT Guide, 2nd Edition.
Materials
•
Ivy Global’s New SAT Guide, 2nd Edition (hereafter “New SAT Guide”)
•
The College Board’s The Official SAT Study Guide (hereafter “CB”)
•
Ivy Global’s New SAT 4 Practice Tests book
•
The College Board’s Practice Test 1 (available at sat.ivyglobal.com, as well as in CB with answer
explanations)
•
New SAT Bubble Sheets (for students to record their answers – available at sat.ivyglobal.com)
•
Math Fundamental Review (available at ivyglobal.com/study as an additional resource accompanying
the New SAT Guide, 2nd Edition)
•
Vocabulary List (available at ivyglobal.com/study as an additional resource accompanying the New
SAT Guide, 2nd Edition)
•
104
Common Grammar Errors worksheet (available at ivyglobal.com/teach)
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Course Summary
In the table below, each test section is abbreviated to one letter (e.g., “M” means “Math Test”). Other
abbreviations include: “V” (vocabulary), “PT” (practice test), “HW” (homework), “wksht” (worksheet), and
“OV” (words from the online Vocabulary List).
60-Hour Syllabus Summary
Hours 1-32
Adapt hours 1-32, using Practice Test #1
Hours 33-34
Hours 35-36
E: Group Practice | R: Methods Review
W: Question Types | Test-Taking Difficulties
Homework: E grading, R practice set, W test review
Homework: full W test section, classmate test-taking
strategies
Hours 37-38
Hours 39-40
W: PT3 Review | V: Vocab List Intro | R: Passage Types
M: Data, Radians & Unit circle | R: PT3 Review
HW: OV 1-23; R p. 64-75, 121-126.
HW: OV 1-35; Math Calc Test– p. 539-551.
Hours 41-42
Hours 43-44
M: review (general & PT3) | E: Self-Grading
W: Grammar | E: Approach & Timing
HW: full M p. 697-709.
HW: OV 1-65; W: full test, read p. 108-111; E: article HW
Hours 45-46
Hours 47-48
R: Persuasive Language | E: Debate | M: Complex #s
V | W: Paired Competition
HW: OV 1-90 + flash cards; R: p. 127-132; M: p. 475-476.
HW: 2-hour mini-diagnostic
Hours 49-50
Hours 51-52
R: Word Search | V: Charades | M: Polynomials Review
M: Geometry | E: Discussion / Debate
HW: OV 1-112 + sentences; M: p. 619-632; R: p. 147-152.
HW: OV 1-125; cylinder msmt; create 2 geometry questions
Hours 53-54
Hours 55-56
M: Game + Triangles | mini-PT Review | W: Review
SAT Jeopardy | Test-Taking Advice | V: Charades
HW: Optional. OV 1-140; study plan; M: circles wksht
HW: None
Hours 57-58
Hours 59-60
Practice Test #4
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Ivy Global 60-Hour Syllabus
105
Hours 1-4
Introduction | Practice Test 1 (Adapted from the 32-Hour Syllabus)
The 60- and 100-hour courses should begin with a full diagnostic practice test, as their lengths permit time for
a more thorough and accurate assessment of students’ initial skill level. In order to provide enough time for
introduction before students begin the test, assign the 50-minute optional essay as homework. This will leave
you with a 3-hour practice test, plus 10 minutes for break, allowing for 50 minutes of introduction. Use this
time to teach a condensed version of Hours 1-2 in the 32-hour syllabus. You may alter the lesson plan for
Hours 1-2 as follows:
1. [BEFORE CLASS]
•
Have printed copies of Ivy Global’s Practice Test 1, from the 4 Practice Tests book.
2. Take Attendance and Get to Know Each Other (15 minutes)
•
Briefly introduce yourself, and ask students to introduce themselves (with attendance sheet in hand,
noting any absences). Your goal is to help your students feel comfortable and for you to get to know
them. Find more advice on creating rapport during class introductions in Section 5.1 on Classroom
Advice.
3. Introduce the Course (5 minutes)
•
Explain any class policies such as expectations for homework, when there will be breaks, what
students will need to bring to class, and what students cannot have out during class time (e.g., cell
phones, headphones, etc.). At a minimum, students should bring the following to every class:
•
o
The Ivy Global New SAT Guide
o
A notebook or notepaper
o
Pens, pencils, & erasers
o
A calculator
Review the general schedule of the class, including the dates of practice tests.
4. Introduce the SAT (20 minutes)
•
SAT Format, Content, and Purpose (See p. 4-7 of the New SAT Guide. You may also use Chapter
2 of this manual for reference).
•
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Signing Up for The SAT (See p. 8 – 9)
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
•
General Test-Taking Tips (see p. 12-14)
o
Learn the test (format, instructions, timing)
o
Guess strategically
o
Manage your time (bring your own watch!)
o
Entering answers: Use the Diagnostic Test answer sheets (Scantron / bubble-in sheet) as
reference, and ensure that they understand how to fill in each type of answer (essay, multiple
choice, and grid-in).
•
Key SAT Strategies (see the “Teaching Strategies” section of this manual, and p. 15-23 of the Guide).
The 5 P’s: Plug in. Use your Pencil. Process of Elimination. Pick & Skip (pick easy questions and
skip time-eaters). Predict answers before looking at answer options.
•
Managing Stress and Distraction (see p. 26-27, “During the Test”). When students are anxious,
bored, tired, or otherwise distracted, this can greatly affect their test performance. However, if they
are self-aware and have strategies for responding to these difficulties, they can still excel. Add any
tips you may have for combating distraction during a test.
•
Give students around 5-6 minutes to complete the practice questions on p. 52-53, and review them
together.
5. Proctor Practice Test #1 (3 hours)
•
Administer under SAT-taking conditions: enforce the College Board’s guidelines for taking the SAT.
•
Give students a way to track the time – if there is no easily visible clock in your classroom, you can
run a countdown timer through a projection screen or mark the time remaining on a board. Give
students a 5- or 10-minute warning for each section.
Suggested 10-Minute Break
6. [Optional] Introduce Vocabulary Building (1-2 minutes)
•
See p. 153-157.
7. Introduce the Reading Test (8-10 minutes)
•
Outline the structure and content of the reading test, and the general format of the questions (see p.
31-33, and/or the Reading Test overview in Section 2.4 of this manual).
•
You may show students a practice passage (e.g. p. 54-56) so they can get a better sense of what to
expect.
•
Briefly introduce general strategies for approaching the content of a Reading Test, as on p. 36-37.
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Ivy Global 60-Hour Syllabus
107
•
Explain that in future classes there will be time to discuss and practice how to approach passages in
more depth.
8. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 1-4)
108
•
Read p. 3 and p. 14-27, taking notes on Key Strategies, and any questions you have.
•
Complete a personalized study plan, as suggested on p. 25, to be handed in (or emailed to you) for
next class.
•
Read and complete the exercises on “Marking Up a Passage” and “Summarizing” – p. 35-43.
•
Memorize the first page of word roots (ag, act to cid, cis), p. 154.
•
Complete the 50-minute essay that accompanies the SAT Practice Test #1.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 5-32
Follow the rest of the 32-Hour Syllabus
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Ivy Global 60-Hour Syllabus
109
Hours 33-34
Essay Correction | Reading Review
1. [BEFORE CLASS]
•
Make sure you send out students’ score reports for Practice Test #3.
•
Print simplified versions of the score reports (include list of correct answers vs. student’s answers).
•
Bring students’ marked essays to return to them.
•
Review essays; note any common mistakes or weaknesses to teach in class.
•
Bring a copy of Practice Test #3 to class, including the essay prompt.
o
Print out extra copies of the essay prompt.
2. Review Homework (15 minutes)
•
If you didn’t assign homework last class, discuss Practice Test #3, taking up questions that most
students had trouble with.
3. Reading Test Review (15 minutes)
•
Ask students to help you come up with a step-by-step breakdown of how to approach passages in the
Reading Test. Refer to p. 36-38 if needed.
•
Do the same task (or extend it) for approaching Reading Test questions.
4. Practice Marking Up a Passage (25 minutes)
•
Discuss how to mark up a passage efficiently – ask students what symbols, abbreviations, and
notations they use when marking up a passage (e.g. double-underlining, circling key words, using
smiley faces, or creating acronyms). Emphasize the importance of making notes brief, and never using
full words or sentences.
•
Have students read and mark up the passage on p. 54, practicing using new notation. Take up the
passage by asking each student to share at least one note or mark they made on the passage.
•
Go through a few questions on p. 55 slowly, asking students to share whether and how their notes
guide them.
Suggested 10-Minute Break
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
5. Essay Review (50 minutes)
•
Return essays from Practice Test #3. Allow five minutes or so for students to look them over.
•
Discuss what the class did well, and what the class could generally improve upon.
•
Review the prompt passage and ask students to help you summarize it.
•
Work together to make a detailed essay outline.
•
Have students write a full essay based on that outline (or as much of a full essay as they can). The rest
will be assigned for homework. Students may “self-plagiarize” – using effective sentences and ideas
from their or their classmates’ original essays.
6. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 33-34)
•
Complete the essay you began in class.
•
Grade your completed essay on a separate sheet of paper, using the rubric on p. 262-264 and/or p. 271.
•
Complete the Reading Practice Set, with a focus on marking up the passages – p. 54-58.
•
Review all Word Roots, Prefixes, and Suffixes – p. 153-157.
•
Review the Writing Test from your most recent practice test, correcting any mistakes you can find and
circling any questions you need help with.
7. Return Score Reports (as students leave)
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111
Hours 35-36
Writing: Question Types | Test-Taking Difficulties
1. Vocabulary Game (15 minutes)
2. Review Homework (20 minutes)
3. Writing: Development of Ideas Questions (20 minutes)
•
Explain “Expression of Ideas” questions (p. 203). Expression of Ideas questions can be identified by
the inclusion of actual questions or sentences above the multiple-choice options, whereas Conventions
questions simply include answer options.
•
Review how to identify and respond to questions about propositions (main idea questions – p. 204205), support (evidence questions – p. 205-206), focus (or questions of relevance – p. 206-207), and
graphics (p. 208-209). Teach students how to approach “yes, yes, no, no” questions (as in p. 207 #3)
– first predict an answer (yes or no), and then eliminate the two answer choices that don’t fit, finally
evaluating the two that remain.
•
Allow students to read the passage on p. 211 and have them identify the type of each question.
•
Complete the practice set on p. 211-212. Discuss how understanding question types helped.
Suggested 10-Minute Break
4. Writing: Organizing Ideas Questions (15 minutes)
•
Review p. 213-217.
•
For “Common Signal Words,” you might add that conclusion words are used to indicate the result of
something. You may also introduce the opposite: “reason” words such as “because,” “reason,”
“cause,” and “factor.”
•
Discuss the clues mentioned on p. 216.
•
Work through the first question on p. 217 together, and have students complete the practice questions
(p. 218) individually or in pairs.
5. Writing: Effective Language Use (25 minutes)
112
•
Work through p. 219-224.
•
The last sentence on p. 222 concisely summarizes ideal SAT syntax.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
6. Identify Recurrent Test-Taking Issues (10 minutes)
•
Ask students to (anonymously) write down one or two difficulties they encounter when taking the
test. These should be issues with the process of test taking rather than with the content (i.e., problems
that can’t easily be solved by simply studying).
o
Examples may include forgetting to check the time, spending too long on difficult questions
or reading passages, or tending to guess the wrong answer when choosing between two
remaining options.
•
Have students copy this information so they have one copy to keep for themselves, and one copy to
share anonymously with another student. Then, give each student someone else’s sheet of paper.
•
For homework, students will suggest strategies to help improve their own and each other’s test-taking
skills.
•
Provide an example of a creative way to improve test-taking skills (see the General Test-Taking
Strategies in Section 3.2 of this manual for some suggestions).
7. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 35-36)
•
Complete a full, timed Writing Test – p. 671-684. Record answers in the Section 2 bubble sheet – p. 643.
•
Correct yourself using the answer key on p. 729.
•
Revisit the questions you circled on the Writing Test for your last in-class practice test.
•
Come up with at least one strategy that directly addresses the test-taking difficulty written on the sheet of
paper you received in class, and one that addresses your own issue with test-taking. Email these strategies
to your teacher.
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Ivy Global 60-Hour Syllabus
113
Hours 37-38
Practice Test Review | Reading: Passage Types | Vocabulary List
1. [BEFORE CLASS]
•
Compile an anonymous list of all the test-taking improvement strategies that your students emailed
you for homework. Email this list to your students, or print out copies to hand out in class. If you
disagree with any of the strategies, try to add your own alternatives below rather than omitting the
student’s suggestion.
•
Have a copy of the New SAT Vocabulary List (available at ivyglobal.com/study as an additional
resource accompanying the New SAT Guide, 2nd Edition).
2. Review Homework (20 minutes)
•
Take in students’ essays.
•
Review all other homework.
3. Review Practice Test #3: Writing Test (40 minutes)
•
Review the Writing Test. Be sure to cover the questions students circled for homework.
•
If time allows, review the Reading Test as well.
Suggested 10-Minute Break
4. Introduce Vocabulary List (15 minutes)
•
Introduce the online Vocabulary List as the next step in SAT vocabulary building (available under
“Additional Resources” at ivyglobal.com/study).
•
Explain the importance of vocabulary building for the Reading and Writing tests – see p. 153-154.
•
Introduce strategies for vocabulary memorization, such as creating flash cards and mnemonic
devices like rhyming, alliteration and imaginary scenarios. You may also recommend the online
flashcard tool quizlet.com.
•
Have students invent a few mnemonic devices, and suggest a few of your own.
o
114
Examples: for the word anomalous or anomaly, imagine somebody pronouncing the word
“abnormal” in a strange accent. Write the word florid in an ornate font with a red pen. For
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
the verb flagging, create a sentence that also includes “sagging.” Pronounce the word gravity
as “grave-ity” to remember its secondary meaning.
5. Reading: Passage Types (30 minutes)
•
Review each passage type, discussing what specific things to look for in each. You may use the
Reading section of Practice Test #3 to practice searching for passage-type-specific content. Leave the
practice questions for homework.
o
Literature – p. 60-64. While examining characterization techniques (p. 62), ask students
what they think each example reveals about the protagonist and/or other characters.
o
Science – p. 66-69. When looking over the example passage (p. 67), ask students to identify
o
Social Sciences & History – p. 72-73. While examining common rhetorical techniques (p.
the thesis, supporting evidence, a counterclaim, the refutation, and a conclusion.
73), ask students to discuss the effect of each example of a rhetorical technique.
6. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 37-38)
•
Bring in your essay grading sheets next class, to be compared with the teacher’s grading.
•
Read through the Vocabulary List, and circle all of the words you definitely know (reading the definitions
to make sure).
•
Create flash cards for the first 23 words (accede to auspicious) with definitions in your own words (making
sure you understand definitions by looking them up elsewhere) and memorize them.
•
Complete practice questions for each Reading Test passage type – p. 64-65; p. 70-71; p. 74-75.
•
Read about Analyzing Arguments, and complete practice questions – p. 121-126.
7. [AFTER CLASS]
•
Grade students’ essays. Remember that the essay started in class, so the first part of each should be
identical.
•
Optional: Have prizes ready for the student(s) who accurately guessed the grade their essay would
receive. For example:
o
Small office supplies or novelty items from a dollar store; food or candy; bonus points for
the next vocabulary test / game (if that this is something your students would value); a pass
on the next homework assignment, etc.
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Ivy Global 60-Hour Syllabus
115
Hours 39-40
Review Practice Test | Math: Data, Radians & The Unit Circle
1. Review Homework (20 minutes)
2. Review Properties of Data (10 minutes)
•
Ask students to define measures of central tendency, range, and standard deviation – p. 396-399.
3. Review Modeling Data (10 minutes)
•
Ask students to explain scatter plots and lines of best fit – p. 425-426.
•
Make sure students know how to estimate equations for data using a line of best fit.
4. Review Using Data as Evidence (10 minutes)
•
Look at each example (in the grey boxes) and ask students to help you answer the question efficiently
– p. 430-432.
•
Discuss error measurements – p. 434-435.
Suggested 10-Minute Break
5. Review Practice Test #3: Reading (35 minutes)
•
Take up difficult questions from the Reading section of Practice Test 3 in detail. If you have time left
over, begin reviewing the Math section.
6. Review Radians & The Unit Circle (20 minutes)
•
Fill in anything that you haven’t had the chance to teach, or that students aren’t comfortable with.
•
Students should memorize conversions of common angles (as seen in the table at the bottom of p.
456). Emphasize that 180° = π.
•
Ask students to draw the unit circle. They should label coordinates, angles, and the four quadrants.
•
See p. 460. Explain the rules at the top of the page: “The sine of the angle…” and “The cosine of the
angle…”
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
7. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 39-40)
•
Memorize words 1-35 (accede to caustic) from the online Vocabulary List (available at ivyglobal.com/study
as an additional resource accompanying the New SAT Guide, 2nd Edition).
•
Complete a full Math Test – Calculator section – p. 539-551.
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117
Hours 41-42
Math Review | Essay Grading
1. [BEFORE CLASS]
•
Bring in graded essays to return to students.
•
Optional: Bring in prizes for students who graded their own essays most accurately.
2. Review Homework (20 minutes)
3. Review Algebraic Expressions (15 minutes)
•
Define algebraic expressions – p. 302.
•
Ask students to define and give examples for the following terms: variable, constant, coefficient, term,
polynomial, binomial, like terms, greatest common factor (GCF).
•
Go over the distributive property and factoring, and explain their relationship.
4. Review Measurement and Units (15 minutes)
•
Rather than covering the pages in the SAT Guide, copy down each of the example questions (p. 391393 – or invent some of your own) and ask the students to solve them.
•
If they have difficulty remembering units, teach them the mnemonic device on p. 391, or use your
own.
o
For example: “King Hector Disqualified [one] Dressy Centipede Milker.” Each word sounds
somewhat like the unit it denotes, and the ones unit is represented by “one.”
5. Assess Students’ Essay Grading (during the break)
•
Take in students’ essay grading sheets, and compare each to your own. Decide the winners.
Suggested 10-Minute Break
6. Review Absolute Value (15 minutes)
118
•
See p. 317. Have students help you define “absolute value” and provide examples.
•
Explain the two rules for solving absolute value inequalities.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
o
o
•
You may want to share the mnemonic device “Less Thand” (e.g., x is greater than – a and
less than a) and “Greater” (e.g. x is either less than – a or greater than a – it cannot be both).
Show how these two rules are represented on a number line.
Teach “Interpreting Absolute Value” – p. 333.
7. Review Practice Test #3: Math (35 minutes)
•
Take up difficult questions from the Math section of Practice Test 3 in detail. If you have time left
over, begin reviewing another section students had trouble with.
8. Return Graded Essays & Present Prize(s) (5 minutes)
•
Leave time to answer general questions.
9. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 41-42)
•
Complete a full Math Test: Calculator Section – p. 697-709.
•
Memorize words 1-56 (up to cursory) from the online Vocabulary List. Create flash cards and mnemonic
devices.
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Ivy Global 60-Hour Syllabus
119
Hours 43-44
Grammar Review | Essay Review | Vocab Quiz
1. [BEFORE CLASS]
•
Print out copies of the Common Grammar Errors worksheet (available at ivyglobal.com/teach).
•
Choose an article or persuasive essay for students to read for homework—either print it out or make
sure it is otherwise easily accessible to your students.
2. Vocabulary Game (20 minutes)
•
Test students on words from the online Vocabulary List.
•
Give students extra points for identifying a helpful mnemonic device or including a word in a
memorable sentence. Make sure that students understand the meaning of the word rather than simply
being able to recite the definition from the list.
3. Review Homework (20 minutes)
4. Writing: Grammar Review (10 minutes)
•
Have students complete the Common Grammar Errors worksheet.
•
Identify the grammar errors that appeared in the Writing Test of Practice Test #3 or another Writing
Test that they have already completed.
Suggested 10-Minute Break
5. Writing: Grammar Questions Competition (30 minutes)
•
Have students divide into teams, and each write one sentence with an accompanying SAT-style
multiple-choice grammar question. Each question should test one or more grammar concept from p.
181-189 or p. 192-197. Each team then has to solve each other’s Grammar Test at the same time,
competing for speed and accuracy.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
6. Essay Writing Breakdown (25 minutes)
•
Discuss or review how to approach an essay.
•
Go over the timing of the Essay, making sure to emphasize the importance of a clear and compendious
outline – see p. 234-236.
•
Ask students to discuss things to avoid when writing the SAT essay, and/or the difference between
the SAT essay and essays written for school.
7. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 43-44)
•
Memorize words 1-65 (up to destitute) in the online Vocabulary List, using mnemonic devices.
•
Complete a full Writing and Language Test – from Practice Test 2, p. 593-605.
•
Read and annotate “Analyzing Word Choice,” and complete the associated practice questions – p. 108111.
•
Read the assigned article, and focus on one strategy the author uses to successfully builds his or her
argument. Explain the effect(s) and/or purpose(s) of this strategy.
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Ivy Global 60-Hour Syllabus
121
Hours 45-46
Reading: Persuasive Language | Essay Debate |Complex Numbers
1. [BEFORE CLASS]
•
Make sure you have a copy of the article assigned for homework.
2. Review Homework (20 minutes)
3. Essay: Debate (40 minutes)
•
Organize a discussion about the article read for homework.
•
First, students should come to a consensus about which aspect of the article to focus on (for example,
an extended analogy or the repetition of a particular word).
•
Second, students should discuss the effect that this element has on the reader, and/or the author’s goal
in employing this element.
•
You may divide students into teams in order to encourage the development of opposing viewpoints,
give students points to encourage participation, allow students to discuss freely.
Suggested 10-Minute Break
4. Reading: Persuasive Language (20 minutes)
•
See p. 107-126. Work through examples and practice questions where possible, but leave the Practice
Set for homework.
5. Math: Complex Numbers (25 minutes)
•
•
See p. 472-476. Note that a square root of a negative number (e.g. √-x) or a negative square (e.g.
x2 = −y, is a cue to use the imaginary number, i = √-1.
Work through the example questions with the class. Have students solve the first two practice
questions individually – p. 475.
•
122
Leave some practice questions for homework.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
6. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 45-46)
•
Memorize words 1 – 90 (up to enigma) from the Vocabulary List. Create flash cards for new words, and
identify word parts.
•
Complete the Persuasive Language Practice Set – p. 127-132.
•
Complete the Complex Numbers practice set – p. 475-476.
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Ivy Global 60-Hour Syllabus
123
Hours 47-48
Vocabulary Quiz | Writing Test Competition
1. [BEFORE CLASS]
•
Print out copies of Ivy Global’s 2-hour diagnostic Practice Test (available at sat.ivyglobal.com) to be
assigned as homework.
•
Optional: bring prizes for the writing test competition.
2. Vocabulary Quiz / Game (25 minutes)
3. Review Homework (20 minutes)
Suggested 10-Minute Break
4. Paired Writing Test Competition (1 hour)
•
Divide students into pairs, and give them 30 minutes to do as much as they can of the Writing and
Language Test from the New SAT Guide’s Practice Test 1 (p. 511-526). Students must agree with
their partners on the answer for each question, and must come up with a justification for each answer.
•
Leave 30 minutes to go over the questions as a group. To ensure that each student has participated,
go around the room, calling on each student in turn to identify and justify the answer for one question.
•
Students will be judged on accuracy and justification: you may assign a pair 2 points for a correct
answer, for example, and 1 point for a clear justification.
5. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 47-48)
•
124
Complete the 2-hour Mini-Diagnostic practice test.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 49-50
Word Search Race | Vocabulary Charades | Polynomials
1. [BEFORE CLASS]
•
Print out the Reading – Word Search question & answer sheet (available online at
ivyglobal.com/teach) – to be used with the Global Conversations passage in the 2-hour minidiagnostic test (p. 15-16).
2. Review Homework (20 minutes)
•
Take in students’ bubble sheets for the 2-hour Mini-Diagnostic practice test.
•
Go through the 2-hour Mini-Diagnostic practice test.
3. Reading: “Word Search” (20 minutes)
•
Have students take out the Global Conversations passage from their 2-hour Mini-Diagnostic Test.
•
Explain the rules of the word search: You will ask students to locate a word or phrase in the passage,
and students will have to locate it and identify the line number where it appears. The first student to
answer a question gets a point. (You may choose to divide the class into pairs or teams if you wish).
•
You may include a “bonus round” where students can earn extra points by identifying an interesting
or important element of the passage that was not mentioned.
Suggested 10-Minute Break
4. Vocabulary Charades (40 minutes)
•
Explain the rules of charades, if necessary.
•
Divide students into two teams and choose words that they’ve memorized from the Vocabulary List
for their opponents to act out silently to one another. For each turn, one student must blindly pick a
word chosen by the opposing team, and must act it out silently for his or her own team. The team is
given a limited amount of time to guess the word.
5. Math: Polynomials Review (25 minutes)
•
See what students remember by asking them to help you work through example problems and define
terms that are bolded in the New SAT Guide.
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125
o
o
Polynomial Expressions: See p. 350-355.
Factoring Polynomials: See p. 357-361.
6. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 49-50)
•
Memorize words 1-112 (up to glacial) from the online Vocabulary List.
•
Create sentences that illustrate the meaning of 10 or more of the new words you have memorized.
•
Complete a full Calculator Math Test – Practice Test 2, p. 619-632.
•
Complete the Reading Practice Set – p. 147-152.
7. [AFTER CLASS]
•
Mark students’ 2-hour take-home practice tests, using the New SAT Mini-Diagnostic 2.0 Scoring
Sheet (available to Ivy Global employees at teach.ivyglobal.ca).
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 51-52
Geometry 1 | Essay Discussion
1. [BEFORE CLASS]
•
Prepare a sheet of 8.5 x 11 paper that you can roll into a cylinder with no bases (you may label one
side “height” and one side “circumference”).
2. Review Homework (20 minutes)
3. Geometry Review (30-40 minutes)
You should spend a total of about one hour on Geometry Review, but the time needed to cover each topic
will vary depending on the class.
As always, feel free to adjust time spent on each topic to optimize student learning and engagement to the
best of your ability.
•
Draw large, clear diagrams whenever possible.
•
Lines & Angles: see p. 441-442. Students should be able to define the following terms:
o
•
exterior angles
Prisms: see p. 442-443. Students should be able to define the following terms:
o
•
Congruent, complementary and supplementary angles, transversal, bisect, interior and
Base, face, edge, and vertex
Circles: See p. 465-470.
Suggested 10-Minute Break
4. Geometry Review: Cylinders & Spheres (20-30 minutes)
•
Cylinders: See p. 444-445.
o
Roll a sheet of 8.5 x 11 paper into a cylinder, so that the circumference is 11 inches (or 10
inches if you overlap the two edges by an inch, in order to tape the cylinder together).

|
Ask students to find the radius of this cylinder’s base (~1.75 in2).
Ivy Global 60-Hour Syllabus
127

Ask students to find the cylinder’s volume (81.78 in3), and then its surface area
(6π + 93.5 = 112.35 in2).
o
When going over surface area, use the 8.5 x 11 cylinder and include 2 circles with a
circumference of 11. Seeing flattened or unfolded solids is often helpful for learning about
surface areas.
•
Spheres: See p. 445.
5. Essay Discussion (25 minutes)
•
•
Give students 5-10 minutes to read (and annotate) Essay Prompt #4 – p. 278-279.
Give students 15-20 minutes to discuss how the author built his argument. If the students need help
focusing, you may ask them guiding questions, or divide them into debate teams.
o
(Optional) Debate Exercise: Team “Yes” has to defend the author’s argument. Team “No”
has to refute the author’s argument.
6. Assign Homework (5 minutes)
Homework (Hours 51-52)
128
•
Memorize words 1-125 (up to impetuous) from the online Vocabulary List.
•
Find a cylindrical object in your house, and measure its diameter and height using a ruler. Draw a
diagram of it, and find its radius, circumference, volume, and surface area.
•
Write 2 math questions related to Geometry (you may use p. 440-455 as reference). Your classmates
will have to answer these questions next class. Answer your own questions on a separate sheet of
paper, showing your work.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 53-54
Writing Review | Math: Geometry 2 | Mini-Diagnostic Review
1. Review Homework & Practice Test (30 minutes)
2. Writing: Review Toughest Concepts (20 minutes)
•
Go over whatever aspect of the Writing Test students have most difficulty with. For example:
o
Review “Approaching the Writing Test” by asking students to tell you what to do, step by
o
Review “Organizing Ideas” and “Effective Language Use” questions, p. 213-223.
step, and what to watch out for (see p. 166-177).

Go over “common signal words,” p. 213.

Discuss “precision” and “concision,” p. 219-221.
Suggested 10-Minute Break
3. Geometry Review Game (40 minutes)
•
Divide students into teams, and have them take turns answering the Geometry questions their
opponents wrote for homework.
•
Students should get a point off for answering their own questions incorrectly, for making mistakes in
their questions, and for not writing a question at all.
4. Geometry Review: Triangles (20 minutes)
•
Focus on Special Triangles (p. 449-450), and Trigonometry (p. 451-453).
5. Assign Homework - Optional
•
If you are teaching a 4-hour class in a 60-hour course, then this will be your last class, and you should
not assign homework. If this is not your last class, you may assign the homework below – if possible,
print out copies of the Circles Worksheet for your students – available at ivyglobal.com/teach.
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Ivy Global 60-Hour Syllabus
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Homework (Hours 53-54)
130
•
Memorize words 1 – 140 (up to insular) from the Online Vocabulary List, creating mnemonic devices,
sentences, and/or flash cards for each new word.
•
Write a study plan outlining your goals and plans for each week leading up to the SAT, and each day in
the week leading up to the SAT.
•
Complete the Circles Worksheet – available online at ivyglobal.com/teach.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 55-56
Grammar Jeopardy | Vocabulary Charades | Test-Taking Advice
1. [BEFORE CLASS]
•
Prepare SAT Jeopardy game: Ivy Global employees have access to a pre-made SAT Jeopardy game
at teach.ivyglobal.ca. Alternatively, you may build your own jeopardy game at jeopardy.rocks.
o
•
Questions should include important strategies and facts you taught throughout the course.
o
Prepare a separate Answer Sheet for yourself (note that you will have to mark a team as
o
Organize questions by category (e.g., Math, Writing, Essay, Reading, and Other) and by
o
Make sure you have appropriate, working audio-visual equipment to play the game in your
“correct” or “incorrect” before the answer is shown on the screen).
difficulty (e.g., the most difficult Math questions should be worth $500).
classroom.
If you do not have the time or resources for SAT Jeopardy, print out copies of Reading – Extra Passage
Practice from ivyglobal.com/study.
2. Review Homework (20 minutes)
3. SAT Jeopardy (40 minutes)
•
Explain the rules of the game.
•
Divide students into teams (each team chooses a vegetable), and choose a third vegetable who will
take any points that neither team can answer.
•
If you cannot do SAT Jeopardy: Review Reading Test strategies. Then, have students complete the
passages & questions from the “Reading - Extra Passage Practice” worksheet, and go over each
question together.
Suggested 10-Minute Break
4. Vocabulary Charades (40 minutes)
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5. Test-Taking Advice (20 minutes)
•
Discuss how students will prepare in the days and weeks leading up to the test.
•
Remind students of how to sign up for the SAT if they haven’t.
•
Give students advice about how to prepare the night before and morning of – review the strategies
you discussed regarding stress-relief and working despite distractions.
6. Assign Homework - Optional
•
132
If this is your last class, do not assign homework. If this is not your last class, you may if you wish.
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Classroom Teaching Ivy Global
Hours 57-60
Practice Test #4
1. [BEFORE CLASS]
•
Have copies of a full practice test (Recommended: Practice Test 4 from Ivy Global’s New SAT 4
Practice Tests book), including bubble sheets.
•
Write down the order and timing of the test (including break times) on the board.
•
If you have space, you may also write down some test rules.
•
Be sure to leave space for writing down time left per section, if needed.
2. Briefly remind students of rules and timing (5 minutes)
3. Proctor Practice Test (3 hours, 50 minutes)
•
See Section 2.2 of this Teacher’s Manual for the order and timing of the test.
•
Remember to provide students with 2 breaks (for a total of 10 minutes).
4. [AFTER CLASS] Prepare Score Report
•
Follow the instructions on the Online Scoring Sheet (cloud.ivyglobal.com) to prepare a score report
for each student.
•
If this is your final class, you should also send each student (or parent) a personalized final report.
See “Provide Frequent Feedback” under section 3.1 of this manual for more information.
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