Power Protection Handbook
Subject
9910
UPS
title
for IBM Power Systems
North America
Power Protection
Handbook
August 2013
Cover headline
Cover subheadline
Table of Contents
9 power problems and their UPS solutions ....................................................................................... 2 UPS topologies: online, line-interactive and standby ........................................................................ 3 The basics of voltage, amperes and frequency ................................................................................. 4 Input plugs and receptacles .............................................................................................................. 5 Frequently asked questions .............................................................................................................. 6 Preventing UPS problems ................................................................................................................. 7 Glossary of power terms ................................................................................................................... 8 Commonly-used acronyms .............................................................................................................. 10 How much battery runtime do you need? ........................................................................................ 11 UPS software overview ................................................................................................................... 12 Attributes at a glance....................................................................................................................... 13 IBM 9910 model P13 ....................................................................................................................... 14 IBM 9910 model E15 ....................................................................................................................... 17 IBM 9910 model E35 ....................................................................................................................... 20 IBM 9910 model E50 ....................................................................................................................... 23 IBM 9910 model E66 ....................................................................................................................... 26 IBM 9910 model E82 ....................................................................................................................... 29 Power Cords ................................................................................................................................... 33 Software and connectivity ............................................................................................................... 34 Service and support ........................................................................................................................ 35 Note: Due to continuing product improvement programs, all specifications are subject to change
without notice. For the latest information, go to www.eaton.com/ibm.
Eaton, Eaton, ABM, Intelligent Power, ConnectUPS, and X-Slot are trade names, trademarks
and/or service marks of Eaton Corporation or its subsidiaries and affiliates. All other trademarks are
property of their respective owners.
www.eaton.com/ibm 1.800.925.4426
1
9 power problems and their UPS solutions
In an ideal world, your wall socket would provide an infinite stream of perfect power, at constant voltage and cycling
exactly the same number of times per second. Don’t count on it.
2
Power Problem
Definition
1
Power Failure
Total loss of utility power.
2
Power Sag
Short-term low voltage.
3
Power Surge
(Spike)
Short-term high voltage more than 110% of normal.
4
Under-voltage
(Brownout)
Reduced line voltage for an extended period of a few
minutes to a few days. Often happens during the summer
months when everyone is cranking up their air conditioners.
5
Over-voltage
Increased line voltage for an extended period of a few
minutes to a few days.
6
Electrical Line
Noise
High power frequency power wave caused by radio
frequency interference (RFI) or electromagnetic interference
(EMI).
7
Frequency Variation
A loss of stability in the power supply’s normal frequency of
50 or 60 Hz.
8
Switching Transient
Instantaneous under-voltage in the range of nanoseconds.
9
Harmonic Distortion
Distortion of the normal power wave, generally transmitted
by unequal loads.
Eaton Power Protection Handbook: 9910 UPS for IBM Power Systems
UPS topologies: online, line-interactive and standby
There are several different UPS topologies that offer varying levels of protection. Selecting the best fit depends on several factors,
including the level of reliability and availability desired, the type of equipment being protected and the application/environment. While all
three of the most common UPS topologies outlined below meet the input voltage requirements for IT equipment, there are key
differences in how the result is achieved, as well as the frequency and duration of demands on the battery.
Standby UPS Technology
Standby UPSs allow equipment to run off utility power until the
UPS detects a problem, at which point the UPS switches to
battery power to protect against sags, surges or outages.
Because the band of normal operation is typically narrow, the
UPS must resort to batteries frequently, which can reduce
battery runtime and service life.
Line-Interactive UPS Technology
Online UPS Technology
Online UPSs provide the highest level of protection by
isolating equipment from raw utility power—converting power
from AC to DC and back to AC. When input voltage is within
preset UPS tolerances, the output is regulated without going to
battery. In this manner, the UPS uses the batteries less often
and for less time than either standby or line-interactive
designs. Many online UPSs allow an even wider input
acceptance window when the UPS is below 100% load.
Line-interactive UPSs regulate voltage either by boosting or
decreasing utility power as necessary before allowing it to pass
to the protected equipment or by resorting to battery power.
Line-interactive models typically switch to battery mode with a
transfer time of 3-8 milliseconds, which is within acceptable
limits for most power supplies. Battery usage is lower than a
standby UPS, but still higher than an online model.
www.eaton.com/ibm 1.800.925.4426
3
The basics of voltage, amperes and frequency
When discussing and dealing with electricity and electrical products, several terms are used to
specify electrical characteristics. Three of the most common are voltage, amperes and frequency.
In layman’s terms, volts (V) is a measure of the “pressure” with which electricity moves through a
wire/circuit, while amperes or amps (A) is a measure of the “volume.” Volts and amps are often compared
to water in a hose, with volts representing the amount of pressure and amps representing the volume.
When you turn on a garden hose without a nozzle, there is a lot of water (amps) but not much pressure
(volts), but by placing your thumb over the end of the hose, you reduce the quantity (amps) and increase
the pressure (volts), so it squirts farther.
Applying this analogy to electricity, the number of amps signifies how many electrons are flowing in the
wire, while the number of volts characterizes how hard those electrons are being pushed. For an
equivalent voltage, a wire carrying more amps needs to be a larger diameter, similar to a fire hose
operating at the same pressure as a garden hose will obviously deliver more water.
Frequency, on the other hand, is the number of times per second (Hz) that the electrical signal oscillates.
Frequency in household voltages may vary based on geographic location, while industrial voltagtes can
often be customized to meet specific site requirements.
Ensuring that the volts, amps and frequency of connected equipment are compatible with the supply of
electricity is much like filling up a car with the appropriate type of fuel. Just as diesel fuel would not power
a gasoline-driven car, a 120V, 15A, 60 Hz device cannot be connected to a 240V, 15A, 50 Hz outlet.
4
Eaton Power Protection Handbook: 9910 UPS for IBM Power Systems
Input plugs and receptacleswww.eaton.com/powerquality
Any UPS with a rating of 1500 VA or below (P13 and E15) can be plugged into a standard household
receptacle/socket. UPS models with ratings higher than 1500 VA use input plugs that cannot be plugged
directly into a standard receptacle. The E66 is hardwired directly into the electrical distribution panel at the
installation location. This procedure should only be done by a license electrician.
Below is a chart to help you visually confirm input and output plug/receptacle options.
9910
UPS
model
P13
NEMA 5-15P
IEC-320-C20
L6-30P


IEC309 2P+G,
60A


E15
E35
E50

E66


E82
Number of output connections by UPS model
9910
UPS
model
P13
E15
E35
NEMA
5-15R
6
NEMA
L6-20R
NEMA
L6-30R
IEC-320-C13
IEC-320-C19
2
2
IEC309
2P+G, 60A
6
2
E50
4
E66
2
E82
4
4
www.eaton.com/ibm 1.800.925.4426
1
5
Frequently asked questions
Knowing the answers to the following questions will prepare you for a number of common scenarios involving
UPSs.
1.
What happens if the UPS is overloaded? For example, if the
protected equipment and/or load draws more current than
the UPS can provide.
The UPS transfers the load to bypass (for a few minutes) until the
overload condition is reversed. If the overload condition
continues, the UPS automatically shuts down.
2.
What causes a UPS to be overloaded?
There are two possible answers: (1) the UPS was undersized
(e.g. the load is rated at 1200 VA but a 1000 VA UPS was
provided), or (2) the customer plugs more equipment into the UPS
than it was designed to handle.
3.
How do you convert watts to VA?
Multiply watts by the power factor 1.3. For example, 1000W x 1.3
= 1300 VA.
4.
How do you convert amps to VA?
Multiply amps by voltage (120 volts in the US). 10A x 120V =
1200 VA
5.
How long does it take for the UPS batteries to recharge?
On average it takes 10 times the discharge time for the UPS
batteries to recover. (A 30-minute battery discharge requires
about 300 minutes to recharge.) After each power outage, the
recharge process begins immediately. It is important to note that
the load is fully protected while the batteries are recharging.
However, if the batteries are needed during the recharge time, the
holdover time available will be less than it would have been if the
batteries were fully charged.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Where can I get technical help?
®
Contact your territory representative, call the IBM UPS Hotline at
1-800-925-4426, or visit eaton.com/ibm.
What is the average lifespan of the batteries used in the
UPS?
®
The typical life of batteries in a Eaton UPS with ABM technology
is 4 to 6 years. Overall service life depends on a number of
factors, including temperature and the number of battery
discharges.
Does the UPS need to have a load on it to charge its
batteries?
The UPS should have a minimum of 10% load for UPS to charge
its batteries. Once connected to a standard supply of electricity
(via input plug or hardwiring), your UPS should charge its
batteries regardless of how much load, if any, is attached to it.
If my UPS is in storage, how often should I charge the
batteries?
If a UPS is in storage, we recommend that you plug it in every 6
months to prevent the batteries from becoming fully discharged
and significantly shortening their service life. We recommend that
you follow the same guidelines for charging external batteries.
10. I came across a spare, unused Eaton UPS that we had in
storage. Is it still operable?
If the UPS has been in storage for more than 6 months, the
6
batteries inside your UPS may be bad. If your UPS has been in
storage without any charge for longer than a year, it’s likely that
the batteries need to be replaced.
11. How can you be sure UPS batteries are in good condition in
order to insure they have maximum holdover in the event of
a power failure? What preventive maintenance procedures
should be done and how often should they be done?
The batteries used in the UPS and associated battery modules
and cabinets are sealed, lead-acid batteries often referred to as
maintenance-free batteries. While this type of is sealed and you
do not need to check the fluid level in the battery, they do require
some attention to assure proper operation. You should inspect the
UPS a minimum of once per year by initiating a self-test of the
UPS.
12. I already have surge protection. Why do I need a UPS?
Surge protection will not keep your business, network or phones
operational during a blackout. In addition, surge protectors do
nothing to improve the quality of power feeding your sensitive and
expensive telecom equipment. The Eaton UPS provides perfect,
clean power to your equipment at all times. Over time, poor
quality power will degrade your equipment.
13. What’s the difference between a surge protector and a UPS?
While surge protection is important, power surge is one of many
power anomalies that occur in business every day. In addition to
surge protection, a UPS continually regulates incoming voltage
and provides battery backup in the event of a power failure. You’ll
often see surge protectors plugged into a UPS for added surge
protection and additional output receptacles.
14. How much capacity of a UPS should I use?
To allow for future expansion, we recommend that you install a
UPS at approximately 75% capacity. In addition, the batteries
degrade overtime so by over sizing you provide room for error. In
the Eaton.com/ibm sizing tool we have included a “capacity used”
column.
15. How is battery runtime impacted if I reduce the load on the
UPS?
There can be a significant increase in runtime. Generally
speaking, a UPS that provides 5 minutes at full load will provide
15 minutes at half load.
16. Why is power quality such a problem today?
Today’s high-tech IT equipment and control units are much more
sensitive to electrical disturbances and are more important to the
critical functions of many businesses than in the past. As a result,
power quality problems today are more frequent and more costly
than ever.
17. Are power quality problems always noticeable?
No. In many cases, disturbances can cause imperceptible
damage to circuits and other components, a major cause of
premature equipment failure and problems like computer lockups.
Many power quality problems go unresolved resulting in lost
revenue and data.
Eaton Power Protection Handbook: 9910 UPS for IBM Power Systems
Preventing UPS problems
The following observations can help you avoid potential problems
with the sale and installation of a UPS. Observation #1 alone will
protect you from a large percentage of problems. If you have any
questions about this information, please contact your IBM
consultant for IBM UPS sales.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Always be sure to advise the customer which wall receptacle
is required to plug in the UPS.
Only UPSs with power ratings up to 1500 VA plug into a standard
15-amp wall outlet. All others require a larger receptacle, which
must be installed by an electrician. Things will go more much
more smoothly if your customers are not waiting for this to be
done after all of their equipment has arrived.
Does your customer have the correct set of interconnecting
cords?
For some applications, it’s as simple as plugging the UPS into the
wall socket and plugging the loads into the UPS. However, IBM
9910 applications often require specific interconnecting cords in
order to complete installation. We recommend that you make that
determination before installation to avoid delays.
Be sure that the UPS has enough output receptacles.
If the UPS is not equipped with enough output receptacles, you
may need to add a PowerPass Distribution Module or choose
another UPS.
Adding batteries to the UPS provides additional battery
runtime only, not added capacity.
If a customer adds equipment to the configuration, a higher rated
UPS may be needed.
With larger UPS models particularly above 3 kVA and for 3-phase
UPS solutions, it is extremely important to make sure that you
review that site at which the UPS will be located. Here are a few
general guidelines:
5.
Make sure the UPS, batteries, and options will fit in the
allocated space.
Is there enough room for a technician to service the UPS? Some
customers have limited space.
6.
Does the UPS have adequate ventilation?
Most UPS models incorporate internal fans to cool the UPS but
they need to pull cooler air through the UPS to work effectively.
You should not install the UPS in a sealed container or small,
sealed room.
7.
Ensure that the UPS can be placed in its final position.
Will the UPS components fit through any doors? Are there any
stairs?
8.
Is the floor strong enough?
The UPS and its battery cabinets can be heavy so make sure that
the site has the proper floor loading capacity.
9.
Check to see if there is an adequate electrical supply near
the UPS.
Compare UPS fuse ratings (amps) and breaker types and
whether any electrical work may be needed (i.e. cabling to the
UPS terminal block input). The site may have its own electrical
contractors.
www.eaton.com/ibm 1.800.925.4426
7
Glossary of power terms
The following terms are common when discussing power and UPSs. Familiarizing yourself with these terms will enhance your
overall understanding of power protection.
Ampere (A or Amp) – The unit of measure for the “rate of
flow” of electricity, analogous to “gallons per minute.”
VA x 0.7 (power factor) = Watts
Alternating Current (AC) – An electric current that reverses
its direction at regularly recurring intervals.
Arc – Sparking that results when undesirable current flows
between two points of differing potential. This may be due to
leakage through the intermediate insulation or a leakage path
due to contamination.
Audible Noise – A measure of the noise emanating from a
device at audible frequencies.
Backup Time – The amount of time the battery in a UPS is
designed to support the load.
Blackout – A zero-voltage condition lasting for more than two
cycles.
Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) – Electrical interference
that can cause equipment to work improperly. EMI can be
separated into conducted EMI (interference conducted through
cables out of the UPS) and radiated EMI (interference
conducted through the air).
Ground – A conducting connection, whether intentional or
accidental, by which an electric circuit or equipment is
connected to the earth, or to some conducting body of
relatively large extent that serves in place of the earth.
Harmonic – A sinusoidal component of an AC voltage that is
multiple of the fundamental waveform frequency. Certain
harmonic patterns may cause equipment problems.
Harmonic Distortion – Regularly appearing distortion of the
sine wave whose frequency is a multiple of the fundamental
frequency. Converts the normal sine wave into a complex
waveform.
Hertz (Hz) – A unit of frequency equal to one cycle per second.
BTU – British Thermal Unit. Used to measure heat dissipation.
Energy required to raise one pound of water one degree
Fahrenheit. One pound of water at 32 degrees F requires the
transfer of 144 BTUs to freeze into solid ice.
Brownout – A steady state of low voltage, but not zero
voltage.
Common Mode Noise – An undesirable voltage that appears
between the power conductors and ground.
Crest Factor – Usually refers to current. It is the mathematical
relationship between RMS current and peak current. A normal
resistive load will have a crest factor of 1.4142, which is the
normal relationship between peak and RMS current. A typical
PC will have a crest factor of 3.
Critical Equipment – Equipment such as computers,
communications systems or electronic process controls, whose
continuous availability is imperative.
Direct Current (DC) – An electric current in which the flow of
electrons is in one direction, such as supplied by a battery.
Double-Conversion – A UPS design in which the primary
power path consists of a rectifier and inverter. Double conversion isolates the output power from all input anomalies such
as low voltage surges and frequency variations.
Downtime – The time during which a functional unit cannot be
used because of a fault within the functional unit or within the
environment.
Electrical Line Noise – Radio frequency interference (RFI),
electromagnetic interference (EMI) and other voltage or
frequency disturbances.
8
High Voltage Spike – Rapid voltage peak up to 6,000 volts.
Hot-Swappable – The ability to change a module without
taking the critical load off the UPS.
Input Voltage Range – The voltage range within which a UPS
operates in “normal” mode and does not require battery power.
Inverter – UPS assembly that converts internal DC power to
output AC power to run user’s equipment. When the inverter is
supporting 100% of the load at all times, as with an online
UPS, there is no break from utility power to battery power.
System i Server – One of a family of general-purpose systems
that supports IBM i5/OS and Operating System 400 and that
provides application portability across all models.
Kilovolt Ampere (kVA) – An approximation of available power
in an AC system that does not take the power factor into
account.
Line-Interactive – An offline UPS topology in which the
system interacts with the utility line in order to regulate the
power to the load.
Load – The equipment connected to and protected by a UPS.
Logical Partition (LPAR) – (1) A set of key or RID pairs in a
non-partitioning index that are associated with a particular
partition. (2) A subset of a single system that contain resources
(processors, memory, and input/output devices). A logical
partition operates as an independent system. If hardware
requirements are met, multiple logical partitions can exist
within a system.
Eaton Power Protection Handbook: 9910 UPS for IBM Power Systems
Glossary of power terms (continued)
Maintenance bypass – An external wiring path to which the
load can be transferred in order to upgrade or perform service
on the UPS without powering down the load.
Make-Before-Break – Operational sequence of a switch or
relay where the new connection is made prior to disconnecting
the existing connection, also soft-load-transfer switching
Noise – (1) A disturbance that affects a signal; it can distort the
information carried by the signal. (2) Random variations of one
or more
characteristics of any entity such as voltage, current or data.
(3) Loosely, any disturbance tending to interfere with normal
operation of a device.
Offline – Any UPS that does not fit the definition of online.
Line-interactive and standby topologies are offline.
Ohm – The unit of measurement for electrical resistance or
opposition to current flow.
Online – (1) A UPS that provides power to the load from its
inverter 100% of the time, regulating BOTH voltage and
frequency, usually double conversion topology.
Orderly Shutdown – The sequenced shutdown of units
comprising a computer system to prevent damage to the
system and subsequent corruption or loss of data.
Plug-and-Play – An electrical device that does not require
extensive setup to operate.
Power Factor (PF) – The ratio of real power to apparent
power. Watts divided by VA. Most power supplies used in
communication and computer equipment have a power factor
of 0.7.
(PF = 0.7)
VA x PF = W
W/PF = VA
Redundancy – Duplication or repetition of elements in
electronic equipment to provide alternative functional channels
in case of failure. Relay Communication – Communication
between a UPS and a computer through the opening and
closing of solid-state relays which are pre-defined to indicate
UPS status.
RS-232 – The standard for serial interfaces (serial refers to the
eight bits of each character successively sent down one wire)
used by most computers, modems and printers; a 25-pin
physical interface.
Sine Wave – A waveform that represents periodic oscillations
of a pure frequency.
Single-Phase – Power system with one primary waveform.
Standby – UPS technology where power is applied to the load
directly from the utility under normal operation, but switched to
the inverter and battery for emergency support (offline
topology).
System p Servers – The IBM server family that uses IBM’s
POWER architecture designed for AIX and Linux operating
systems.
Three-Phase – A power system with three primary voltage
waveforms spaced equally (in time) out of phase with each
other.
Total Harmonic Distortion (THD) – Describes how much the
circuit voltage deviates from a perfect sine wave. A poor
voltage THD is most often manifested in a “flat topped”
waveform that comes from the inability of a power source to
respond to the demands of highly non-linear loads.
Uninterruptible Power System (UPS) – An electrical system
designed to provide instant, transient-free back up power
during power failure or fault. Some UPSs also filter and/or
regulate utility power (line conditioning).
Power Sag – Low voltage (below nominal 120 volts).
Power Server – The most current generation of the IBM
System family. Built as an open platform for choice with IBM i,
IBM AIX and Linux, Power servers provide solutions for
organizations of all sizes that help turn massive volumes of raw
data into actionable business insights on a scalable, secure,
and resilient system.
Volt/voltage (V) – Electrical pressure that pushes current
through a circuit. High voltage in a computer circuit is
represented by 1; low (or zero) voltage is represented by 0.
Volt Amps (VA) – Voltage x amps.
Volts Direct Current (Vdc)
Power Surge – High voltage (above nominal 120 volts).
Volts Alternating Current (Vac)
Rectifier – UPS component that converts incoming AC power
to DC power for feeding the inverter and for charging the
battery.
Watts (W) – The rate of doing electrical work.
W x 1.3 = VA.
Rackmount – Ability to mount an electrical assembly into a
standardized rack.
xSeries® Servers – The product name of an IBM eServer
product that emphasizes industry-standard server scalability
and self-managing server technologies. It is the successor to
the Netfinity® family of servers.
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9
Commonly-used acronyms
When selling power protection solutions, you will likely encounter the following acronyms:
ABM
Advanced Battery Management
SAN
Storage Area Network
AC
Alternating Current
THD
Total Harmonic Distortion
BBM
Break-Before-Make (Bypass Switch)
UL
Underwriter’s Laboratory
BDM
Bypass Distribution Module
UPS
Uninterruptible Power System
BTU
British Thermal Unit
USB
Universal Serial Bus
CSA
Canadian Standards Association
VA
Volt Amps
DC
Direct Current
VoIP
Voice Over IP
EBC
Extended Battery Cabinet
WAN
Wide Area Network
EBM
Extended Battery Module
EMEA
Europe, Middle East, Africa
HW
Hardwired
IEEE
Institute of Electrical And Electronics Engineers
IP
Internet Protocol
kVA
Kilovolt ampere
LAN
Local Area Network
MBB
Make-Before-Break (bypass switch)
MTBF
Mean Time Before Failure
MTTR
Mean Time To Repair
NEMA
National Electrical Manufacturers Association
NEC
National Electrical Code
PBX
Private Branch Exchange
PDM
Power Distribution Module
PPDM
PowerPass Distribution Module
PoE
Power Over Ethernet
PUE
Power Usage Efficiency
REPO
Remote Emergency Power-off
RFI
Radio Frequency Interference
RM
Rackmount
RoHS
Restriction of Hazardous Substances
SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol
10
Eaton Power Protection Handbook: 9910 UPS for IBM Power Systems
How much battery runtime do you need?
To meet customer needs of continued operation during power outages, IBM 9910 UPS solutions offer
options that can extend battery runtimes beyond 60 minutes. In today's 24x7 business environment,
continued availability along with application and safety considerations must be taken into account and
estimated when calculating UPS battery runtimes.
For example, a typical battery runtime is 15 minutes. The recommended formula used to calculate runtime
is: Runtime (calculated in minutes) = business + system application shutdown + safety
Example
Business needs
System (application) shutdown
Safety margin
Total battery runtime required
=
=
=
=
5
6
4
15
Business needs: Approximately 80% of power outages are less than 5 minutes in duration. Using 5
minutes will ensure that if the typical power outage is less than 5 minutes, the application will not start a
premature or unrecoverable shutdown. In the example, 5 minutes is used.
System shutdown: The National Power Laboratory Power Quality Report indicates there may be
consecutive power outages before power continuity is fully restored. By doubling the system/application
time, you allow for two consecutive power outages to occur while providing an adequate reserve of battery
runtime to initiate a safe system shutdown during the second power outage. In the example, it takes the
application 3 minutes to shut down. Doubling the shutdown time results in 6 minutes.
Safety margin: Allows for natural battery charge cycles, temperature variations and aging. Also take into
account variations in business needs. In the example, 4 minutes is used.
Find the correct UPS model then select the runtime required. If the power consumption of the equipment
to be protected is unknown, use the maximum load (Watts) number given for the UPS.
For example, if the load requires less than 3,500 Watts and the runtime is 15 minutes, a valid UPS will be
the E50 with one Extended Battery Module providing 25 minutes of battery backup (autonomy) runtime at
the E50 maximum capacity of 3,500 watts.
Note: The runtime is total (standard internal batteries and optional EBMs), not additive.
Battery Runtime in Minutes at Maximum Watts Supported
UPS
Model
P13
E15
E35
E50
E66
E82
Maximum
Watts
Supported
950
1050
2700
3500
4500
8000
Standard
(Internal)
Battery
5
7
5
5
8
5
+1 EBM
34
29
22
19
12
+2 EBMs
63
n/a
41
n/a
27
+3 EBMs
88
n/s
62
n/s
35
www.eaton.com/ibm 1.800.925.4426
+4 EBMs
135
n/a
83
n/a
45
EBM
Feature
Code
None
6647
6651
6648
6652
6646
11
UPS software overview
Figure 1. Intelligent Power Manager facilitates easy and versatile monitoring and
management of multiple devices, keeping you apprised of power and environmental
conditions.
Operating a UPS without power management software is kind of like driving in the rain without windshield
wipers—you may be protected from the downpour, but your visibility only lasts for so long.
While a UPS protects the attached load during a power outage, power management software is required
to ensure that all work-in-progress is saved and sensitive electronic equipment is gracefully shut down if
the power outage exceeds battery runtime. Without software, the UPS simply runs until its batteries are
depleted and then drops the load.
In addition to facilitating automatic, orderly shutdown of all connected devices during an extended outage,
power management software delivers a broad spectrum of other advantages. The perfect complement to
any UPS solution, management software keeps a constant pulse on network health through its monitoring
and management capabilities.
Most power management software is shipped with the UPS and is usually available as a free download
online as well. Power event notifications are available as audible alarms, pop-up alerts on a monitor, emails to pre-designated recipients based on the condition, text messages, phone calls from our remote
monitoring center, and triggers for a multitude of network and building management systems to initiate the
orderly shutdown of equipment.
Some software offerings are capable of delivering a global view across the network —often from any PC
with an Internet browser. Software can also provide a complete log of events and UPS utility data, which
is invaluable when debugging a power anomaly. Many power management products have the ability to
centralize alarms, organize data by customized views and maintain event logs for preventive maintenance
of the entire installed equipment base.
The more robust and versatile software offerings are compatible with devices that support a network
interface, including all manufacturers’ UPSs, environmental sensors, ePDUs and other devices.
Furthermore, power management software enables load segment control for UPS models supporting that
feature.
Because power protection and management are just as vital for virtual machines as they are for physical
servers, new software technologies have been specifically designed to provide monitoring and
management capabilities in virtualized environments. Shutdown software is now compatible with
VMware’s ESXi and vSphere and Microsoft’s Hyper-V, enabling graceful shutdown of multiple virtual
machines.
To view an online demonstration of power management software capabilities, please visit
www.eaton.com/ibm.
12
Eaton Power Protection Handbook: 9910 UPS for IBM Power Systems
Attributes at a glance
Understanding the features of specific IBM UPS models will help you to determine the best device to meet your customers’ needs. For
example, some customers will want the option of extending battery runtime, so it is important o be able to identify a UPS offering this
attribute.. The following chart summarizes the key information and features of each IBM UPS model.
Attribute
P13
E15
E35
E50
E66
E82
IBM Part Number
39J4809
44V6738
74Y8478
44V7912
74Y8483
44V3918
Vac Input/Output
120
120
208
208
208
220-240
Maximum Output (Watts)
950
1350
2700
3500
4500
8000
Maximum Output (VA)
1400
1500
3000
5000
5000
10000
Level of Protection (Series)
5
9
5
9
5
9
Tower Form Factor



Rackmount Form Factor




Rack Height (U)
3
3
4
6
ABM Technology






Hot-Swappable Batteries









Hot-Swappable Electronics
Module
Maintenance (Service)
Bypass


Load Segments





Extended Battery Module





6647
6651
6648
6652
6646
44V6740
74Y8481
44V7915
74Y8486
44V3921
Communication Card Option
Relay
Interface Card
Network
Management
Card or Relay
Serial Card
ConnectUPSMS
Web/SNMP
Network
Management
Card or Relay
Serial Card
ConnectUPS
Web/SNMP
Communication Card Feature
Code
2941
2945 or
2944
2941
2945 or
2944
2934
EBM Feature Code
EBM IBM part number
www.eaton.com/ibm 1.800.925.4426
13
IBM 9910 model P13
950 Watt/1400 VA, 120 Vac UPS
The IBM 9910 Model P13 offers an ideal, low-cost tower solution to safeguard entry- to mid-level servers.
Features and Benefits
 Low cost power protection for entry- to mid-level desk side servers
 Extends battery service life and provides advanced warning of the end of
useful battery life with ABM technology
 Regulates power fluctuations with Buck and Boost voltage regulation
 Protects equipment connected by network or phone wiring from ”back door”
power surges with a network transient protector
 Minimizes downtime with hot-swappable batteries
 Serial connectivity enhances communication capability
 Tested and approved by IBM to assure out-of-box usability
 Backed by a five-year Advanced Element Exchange Warranty (including battery) with IBM as point
of contact
P13 Model Guide
Model
Number
IBM Number
Power Out
(Watts/VA)
Input
Connection
Output
Connections
Dimensions
(HxWxD, in/mm)
Unit
Weight
(lb/kg)
950/1400
NEMA 5-15P
(6) NEMA 5-15R
7.6 x 5.9 x 15.4/
193 x 150 x 390
37/16.8
120 Vac1; 50/60 Hz auto-sensing
9910-P13
39J4809
1
120V default, also user-selectable for 110V with rear panel DIP switches.
P13 Battery Runtimes Chart (in Minutes)
Load
UPS Internal Batteries
128W/200 VA
58
192W/300 VA
41
320W/500 VA
28
402W/600 VA
19
500W/750 VA
14
603W/900 VA
10
670W/1000 VA
8
804W/1200 VA
6
938W/1400 VA
5
Note: This guide provides typical application information. Battery times are approximate
and may vary with equipment, configuration, disk access, battery age, temperature, etc.
14
Eaton Power Protection Handbook: 9910 UPS for IBM Power Systems
P13 Technical Specifications*
General
Topology
Line-interactive
Power Factor
0.68
Dimensions and Weight
See Model Guide
Network Transient Protector
In and out RJ-11 jack for telephone/modem protection or RJ-45 for 10BaseT network
cable; UL497A tested
Electrical Input
Nominal Voltage
120 Vac (user selectable to 110 Vac)
Online Voltage Range
±20% for nominal voltage at full load
Nominal Input Frequency
45–65 Hz, 50/60 Hz; auto-sensing
Input Protection
Reset-able circuit breaker
Connection
6-ft cord with NEMA 5-15P
Electrical Output
Power Levels
950W/1400 VA
Online Regulation
-10%, +6% of nominal voltage
On Battery Voltage Regulation
±5% of nominal voltage; -10% after low battery warning
On Battery Frequency Regulation
±0.1 Hz of nominal frequency
Voltage Wave Shape
Sine wave (during normal and battery operation)
Connections
(6) NEMA 5-15R
Indicators and Controls
Front Panel LEDs
Power on, on battery, overload, and battery fault
Front Panel Buttons
On/off and alarm silence/self-test
Communication Port
DB-9 female (UPS ships with communication cable); USB Interface Adapter is
optional
Battery
Battery Type
Sealed, maintenance-free lead-acid; starved electrolyte
Battery Description
(3) 12V, 9 Ah
Battery Recharge
<3 hours to 90% capacity
Battery Runtime
See Battery Runtimes table
Start-On-Battery
Startup with UPS batteries in absence of utility power
Environmental and Safety
Operating Temperature
0°C to 40°C (32°F to 104°F) UL tested at 25°C (77°F)
Transit/Storage Temp.
-15°C to 55°C (5°F to 131°F)
Relative Humidity
05% to 95% noncondensing
Heat Dissipation
189 BTU/hr, maximum
Audible Noise
<45 dBA typical
Safety Markings
UL, cUL, and CSA
Safety Conformance
UL 1778, CAN/CSA C22.2, No. 107.1
EMC Markings
FCC Class B; 230V models also CE (EN50091-2) and C-Tick
Surge Suppression
ANSI C62.41 Category A (formerly IEEE 587)
Immunity
IEC 801-2, -3, -4
*Due to continuing product improvement programs, specifications subject to change without notice.
www.eaton.com/ibm 1.800.925.4426
15
P13 UPS Rear Panel
What’s included with the P13 UPS
 950W /1400 VA, 120V UPS
 Serial Cable, DB-9 to DB-9 (6 ft/1.8m)
 AS/400 Interface Cable (6 ft/1.8m)
 USB Cable, DB-9 to USB (6 ft/1.8m)
 Eaton 5115 UPS User’s Guide
 Eaton (9910-P13 and P14) Communication Options for IBM Applications Manual
 Eaton Software Suite CD
 Service and Support Manual for IBM Applications
16
Eaton Power Protection Handbook: 9910 UPS for IBM Power Systems
IBM 9910 model E15
1350 Watt/1500 VA, 120 Vac UPS
Offering premium performance and a high power factor design, the IBM 9910 Model E15 delivers
continuous clean power for high availability and uptime.
Features and Benefits
 Protects against downtime, data loss and process interruption by
providing continuous, clean power
 Offers premium performance with a 0.9 power factor and >95 percent efficiency in high efficiency
mode
 Increases battery service life and system uptime with ABM battery charging technology
 Enables prolonged runtime of essential equipment during power outages by allowing for orderly,
remote shutdown of non-critical systems or processes
 Conserves valuable space with a slim tower design
 Ensures data and system integrity with LanSafe power management software
 Backed by a five-year Advanced Element Exchange Warranty (including battery) with IBM as point
of contact
E15 Model Guide
Model
Number
IBM
Number
Power Out
(Watts/VA)
Input
Connection
Output
Connections
NEMA 5-15P
(6) NEMA 5-15R
—
—
Dimensions
(HxWxD, in/mm)
Unit
Weight
(lb/kg)
9.1 x 6.3 x 16.9
(230 x 160 x 430)
42/19
9.1 x 6.3 x 16.9
(230 x 160 x 430)
54/24
120 Vac; 50/60 Hz auto-sensing
9910-E15
44V6738
1350/1500
1
Extended Battery Module (EBM)
9910-6647
44V6740
—
1. E15 includes (3) IEC-320-C13 to NEMA 5-15P interconnecting cords.
E15 Battery Runtimes Chart (in Minutes)
UPS Internal
+1 EBM
+2 EBMs
+3 EBMs
+4 EBMs
Batteries
34
63
1050/1500
7
88
135
44
84
788/1125
11
129
210
79
148
525/750
18
207
267
167
278
263/375
38
475
540
Note: This guide provides typical application information. Battery times are approximate and may vary with equipment,
configuration, disk access, battery age, temperature, etc. Runtimes are shown at a 0.7 power factor.
Load (Watts/VA)
www.eaton.com/ibm 1.800.925.4426
17
E15 Technical Specifications*
General
User interface
Graphical LCD with blue backlight and text in English, French, German, Russian and
LEDs
Four status-indicating LEDs
Topology
True online, double-conversion
UPS bypass
Automatic bypass
Remote Emergency Power Off
(REPO)
Emergency shutdown control through the REPO port
Electrical Input
Nominal voltage
120V
Voltage range
60-138 Vac (voltage low level vary according to output load level)
Power draw of UPS
12.5A
Frequency
50/60 Hz
Frequency range
40-70 Hz
Electrical Output
Power factor
0.9
On utility voltage regulation
±2% of nominal
On battery voltage regulation
±3% of nominal
Efficiency
>94% in high-efficiency mode; >86% in online mode
Frequency regulation
±2% Hz online, user-configurable
Voltage waveform
Sine wave
Load segments
Two configurable, individually controlled receptacles
Battery
Battery type
VRLA 12V/9 Ah (both internal and external)
Battery replacement
Hot-swappable internal and external batteries
Start-on-battery
Allows start of UPS without utility input
Communications
Serial port
RS-232 standard, for interface to power management software
USB port
USB HID port/serial/optional LAN Card
Relay output
Common alarm standard
Communication slot
Optional communication slots (BD Slot)
Optional communication cards
SNMP/Web card for direct control and monitoring in SNMP-based networks,
monitoring of UPS status and meters through Web browser interface. Relay card for
integration to industrial environment and building management systems, remote
shutdown for IBM AS/400 systems
Environmental and Safety
Safety markings
UL, cUL, VCCI
EMC markings
FCC Class B, EN55022 Class B
Audible noise
<50 dB
Ambient operating temperature
0°C (32°F) to 40°C (104°F)
Storage temperature
-20°C (-4°F) to +40°C (104°F) with batteries and -25°C (-13°F) to +55°C (131°F)
without batteries
Relative humidity
5-90% non-condensing
Normal mode: 670 BTU/hr
On battery: 1011 BTU/hr
*Due to continuing product improvement programs, specifications subject to change without notice.
Heat dissipation
18
Eaton Power Protection Handbook: 9910 UPS for IBM Power Systems
E15 UPS Rear Panel
What’s included with the E15 UPS
 1350W /1500 VA, 120V UPS
 Relay Interface Card (1014018)
 9406 UPS to AS/400 Communication cable (7.6m/25 ft) (103004349-5501)
 Relay Interface Card Instructions (1018946)
 Eaton 9130 (9910-E15/E16) Installation Guide for IBM Applications (164201783)
 (1) Eaton 9130 UPS (1500 VA) User’s Guide (164201718)
 (1) Software Suite CD (619-00205-15)
 (1) USB Cable (1.8m/6 ft) (720-65037-01)
 (1) RS-232 Cable (1.8m/6 ft) (720-60258-00)
 (3) C13 to 5-15P Equipment Power Cords, UL and cUL rated, (1.8m/6 ft) (108-00101-01A)
E15 Options
Various options are available depending on application.
Description
IBM Feature Code
IBM Part Number
Extended Battery Module (EBM) (up to 4 EBMs)
6647
44V6740
www.eaton.com/ibm 1.800.925.4426
19
IBM 9910 model E35
2700 Watt/3000 VA, 208 Vac UPS
Cost-effective UPS lowers the price per watt protected and delivers a robust
2700 watts of power in a space efficient 3U form factor.
Features and Benefits
 Provides up to 3000 VA/2700 W in only 3U of rack space
 A 95 percent or greater efficiency rating helps reduce energy usage and costs
 Intuitive, customizable LCD display in nine languages and bundled intelligent IBM UPS Manager
software enhance control and manageability
 Hot-swappable batteries for maximum uptime, availability and ease of maintenance
 Load segments allow for individual control of receptacle groups
 Integrates with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager™
E35 Model Guide
Model
Number
IBM Number
Power Out
(Watts/VA)
Input
Connection
Output
Connections
Dimensions
(HxWxD, in/mm)
Unit
Weight
(lb/kg) 3
2700/3000
L6-30P2
(2) L6-20R,
(2) IEC-320-C19
(2) IEC-320-C13
5 x 17.25 x 20.8/
127 x 438 x 527
88/40
208 Vac; 50/60 Hz auto-sensing
9910-E351
74Y8478
Extended Battery Module (EBM)
5 x 17.25 x 20.8/
119/59
127 x 438 x 527
1. Base configuration for the E35 consists of the E35 Accessory Kit (IBM part number 74Y8480) and internal batteries. 2. Input
mains connection is an IEC-320-C19 to NEMA L6-30P (Type 11) power cord.
9910-6651
74Y8481
—
—
—
E35 Battery Runtimes Chart (in Minutes)
Load in Watts
UPS Internal Batteries
+1 EBM
660
41
153
1403
14
68
2040
10
43
2660
5
29
Note: This guide provides typical application information. Battery times are approximate and may vary with equipment,
configuration, disk access, battery age, temperature, etc.
20
Eaton Power Protection Handbook: 9910 UPS for IBM Power Systems
E35 Technical Specifications*
General
VA/Watts rating
3000 VA/2700 W
Nominal output voltage (Vac)
(autosensing at first power-up)
208V
Waveform type
Sine wave
Output connections (All output
receptacles are controllable via TwoLoad Groups (segments))
(2) NEMA L6-20R,
(2) IEC 320 C19,
(2) IEC 320 C19
Nominal output voltage (Vac)
184 - 228V (208V)
Input
Nominal input voltage
208V
Input frequency (autosensing)
50/60 Hz +/- 3 Hz
Input connection type
IEC-320-C20 with IEC-320-C19 to NEMA L6-30P (Type 11) power cord
Batteries
Typical backup times
14 minutes (at 50% rated W),
5 minutes (at rated W)
Battery type
Valve Regulated Lead Acid (VRLA)—maintenance free, sealed, leak proof
Optional external battery pack
Yes
Typical recharge time
4 hours to 90% charge from a UPS/battery discharge of 50% rated load.
Communications and Management
Interface port
USB HID port/serial/optional LAN Card
Management software included
IBM UPS Manager software
Control panel
Intelligent three-button, dual-color, backlit graphical LCD displays vital UPS status in
nine languages
Audible alarm
Alarm when on battery: Distinctive low-battery alarm
Remote Power Off (REPO)
REPO port
Surge Protection and Filtering
Surge energy rating
2400J
Filtering
ANSI/IEEE C62.41; 1991 CATEGORYB3 (SURGE)
Physical
Rack height
3U
Dimensions (HxWxD)
5 x 17.25 x 20.8 in./127 x 438 x 527 mm
Product weight
88 lb/40 kg
Packaging weight
110 lb/ 50 kg
Color
IBM black bezel
Environmental and Safety
Audible noise, 1 meter from
unit surface
Normal operation at rated load and Battery Discharge Mode <55 dbA For load <70%
<50 dbA
Efficiency
95% minimum at full-rated load—normal usage, not during battery recharge
Operating temperature
0°C (32°F) to +40°C (104°F)
Maximum operating altitude
10,000 ft/3048 m
Relative humidity
0-95% noncondensing
Safety markings
UL, cUL; IEC/EN 62040-1-1, IEC/EN 60950-1, TUV CB Report ; CE Mark, TUV CB
Report transfer global
EMC markings
208 V FCC Class A, EN55022 Class A; BSMI, CNS14757-2, Class A 230 V: CE (per
IEC/EN62040-2:Emissions, Category C2; Immunity, Category C2); VCCI, Class A;
C-Tick, AS/NZS 3548, Class A; IEC61000-3-2:2000; IEC61000-3-3: 2004; ICES
Canada
* Due to continuing product improvement programs, specifications subject to change without notice.
www.eaton.com/ibm 1.800.925.4426
21
E35 UPS Rear Panel
What’s included with the E35 UPS
 2700W/3000 VA, 208V UPS
- 3U cabinet, 298V
- Battery
- Rail Kit
- Shipping bracket
 Accessory kit (IBM Part Number 74Y8480) consisting of
- Documentation CD-ROM
- UPS Management Software CD-ROM
- 3000 VA UPS and EBM Installation Guide
- REACH document
- UPS front cover
- RS-232 cable
- (16) Screws, M5x16 round slotted for rack installation
- (2) IEC 320 C13 to C14 jumper cords
E35 Options
Various options are available depending on application.
Description
22
IBM Feature Code
IBM Part Number
Extended Battery Module (EBM)
6651
74Y8481
EBM Accessory Kit (1 per FC 6652)
-
74Y8487
Network Management Card (NMC)
2945
74Y8489
Relay Serial card
2944
74Y8488
PDU to UPS Power Cord, UTG/ Burndy to IEC-320-C20, 6 ft.
2974
42R4333
IEC-320-C19 to NEMA L6-30P Power Cord
2975
C19 to L6-20P (Type 11) input power cord, 14 ft.
9860
Eaton Power Protection Handbook: 9910 UPS for IBM Power Systems
IBM 9910 model E50
3500 Watt/5000 VA, 208 Vac UPS
The IBM 9910 Model E50 not only delivers continuous clean power to protect critical
equipment, it does so in a space-saving 3U design.
Features and Benefits
 Provides clean continuous power to protect critical equipment and applications from power-related




downtime, data loss and corruption, and process interruption
Saves valuable rack space by delivering 5000 VA/3500W in only 3U. Rail kits and pedestal
included.
Offers extended battery runtime options to power essential systems for more than an hour during
outage
Simplifies UPS monitoring and management with a bright LCD user interface, intuitive LanSafe
software
Backed by a five-year Advanced Element Exchange Warranty (including battery) with IBM as point
of contact
E50 Model Guide
Model
Number
IBM
Number
Power Out
(Watts/VA)
Input
Connection
Output
Connections
Dimensions
(HxWxD, in/mm)
Unit
Weight
(lb/kg)
44V7912
3500/5000
L6-30P
(4) L6-30R
5.14 x 17.5 x 29.2
(130 x 444 x 741)
125.7
(57.0)
5.25 x 17.5 x 29.2
(133 x 444 x 741)
155.4
(77.5)
UPS
E50
Extended Battery Module
6648
44V7915
E50 Battery Runtimes Chart (in Minutes)
Load
UPS Internal
+1 EBM
+2 EBMs
+3 EBMs
+4 EBMs
(Watts/Load)
Batteries
132
232
700/1000
36
332
433
52
95
1400/2000
13
140
184
40
74
2100/3000
10
110
146
29
53
2800/4000
7
80
107
22
41
3500/5000
5
62
83
Note: This guide provides typical application information. Battery times are approximate and may vary with equipment,
configuration, disk access, battery age, temperature, etc. Runtimes are shown at a 0.7 power factor.
What’s included with the E50 UPS
 3500W /5000 VA, 208V UPS
 Rail Kit (IBM9136RCKIT)
 Battery Tray (IBM PN 44V7914)
 E50 Accessory Kit which includes the following:
-
Software Suite CD (619-00205-151)
Eaton 9135 (5000 VA) UPS User’s Guide (164201726)
Eaton 9135 (9910-E50) Installation Guide for IBM Applications (164201784)
(4) Pedestals (3312123900)
RS-232 Cable (6 ft/1.8m) (3080432001)
ConnectUPS-MS Web/SNMP Card Communication Cable 673807 AS/400 (8 ft/2.4m) (3081324500)
www.eaton.com/ibm 1.800.925.4426
23
E50 UPS Rear Panel
E50 Options
Various options are available depending on application.
IBM Feature
Code
2941
2972
2973
6648
1420
1421
24
IBM Part
Number
44V7917
25R2555
42R4331
44V7915
Description
ConnectUPS-MS Web/SNMP Card
PDU to UPS Power Cord (14 ft/4.3m)
PDU to UPS Power (4 ft/1.2m)
Extended Battery Module (EBM)
L6-30R to L6-30P (Type 12) input power cord, 14 ft.
L6-30R to L6-30P (Type 12) input power cord, 6 ft.
1422
L6-30R to Russell Stoll RS3750 (Type 40) input
power cord, 6 ft.
1423
L6-30R to Russell Stoll RS3750 (Type 40) input
power cord, 14 ft. For Europe and Latin America.
Eaton Power Protection Handbook: 9910 UPS for IBM Power Systems
Quantity
Min: 0, Max: 1
Min: 0, Max: 4
Min: 0, Max: 4
Min: 0, Max: 4
E50 Technical Specifications*
General
User interface
Graphical LCD with blue backlight and text in English, French, German, Portuguese,
Italian and Spanish
LEDs
Four status-indicating LEDs
Topology
True online, double-conversion
Diagnostics
Full system self-test
UPS bypass
Automatic bypass
Electrical Input
Nominal voltage
208V; 200V, 208V, 220V, 230V, 240V and 250V user-selectable
Voltage range
156-280 Vac (output PF 0.7)
Power draw of UPS
24.0A
Recommended input breaker rating
NA: 30A ; EMEA: 32A
Frequency
50/60 Hz
Frequency range
40-70 Hz
Electrical Output
Power factor
0.7
On utility voltage regulation
±2% of nominal
On battery voltage regulation
±2% of nominal
Efficiency
>97% in high-efficiency mode; 91% in online mode
Frequency regulation
±3% Hz online
Load crest factor
3 to 1
Voltage waveform
Sine wave
Battery
Internal Battery Type
5.5 Ah, sealed, lead-acid; maintenance free
External Battery Modules
Up to four per E50, rail kits included for rackmounting
EBM battery type
5.5 Ah, sealed, lead-acid; maintenance free
Battery runtime
Four minutes with internal batteries @ 100% load (0.7 PF)
Battery recharge time
Six hours to recover 90% of nominal backup time after 100% RCD load discharge
Battery replacement
Hot-swappable internal and external batteries
Start-on-battery
Allows start of UPS without utility input
Communications
Serial port
RS-232 standard, RS-232 cable provided
USB port
HID standard
Relay output
DB-9 dry contact – common alarm standard
Communications slot
Optional communication slots (Mini X- Slot)
Software
LanSafe UPS monitoring and management software
Environmental
Safety markings
CE, C-Tick, UL, GS
EMC markings
FCC-A, VCCI-A, BSMI-A, C-Tick, CE Compliance
Audible noise
Max 46 dB
Ambient operating temperature
0°C (32°F) to 40°C (104°F)
Storage temperature
-20°C (-4°F) to +40°C (104°F) with batteries and -25°C (-13°F) to +55°C (131°F)
without batteries
Relative humidity
5-90% non-condensing
Heat dissipation
Normal mode: 1150 BTU/hr at 91% efficiency; Battery: 1650 BTU/hr at 86%
efficiency; High efficiency: 370 BTU/hr at 97% efficiency
*Due to continuing program improvements, specifications are subject to change without notice.
www.eaton.com/ibm 1.800.925.4426
25
IBM 9910 model E66
4500 Watt/5000 VA, 208 Vac UPS
High-efficiency protection delivers more real power in space-saving design.
Features and Benefits
 Provides up to 5000 VA/4500 W in only 4U of rack space
 A 95 percent or greater efficiency rating helps reduce energy usage and costs
 Intuitive, customizable LCD display in nine languages and bundled intelligent IBM UPS Manager
software enhance control and manageability
 Hot-swappable batteries for maximum uptime, availability and ease of maintenance
 Load segments allow for individual control of receptacle groups
 Integrates with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager™
E66 Model Guide
Model
Number
IBM Number
Power Out
(Watts/VA)
Input
Connection
Output
Connections
Dimensions
(HxWxD, in/mm)
Unit
Weight
(lb/kg) 3
4500/5000
L6-30P
(2) L6-30R,
(4) IEC-320-C19
7 x 17.25 x 31/
178.5 x 438 x 790
159/72
208 Vac; 50/60 Hz auto-sensing
9910-E661
74Y8483
Extended Battery Module (EBM)
5.25 x 17.25 x 28/
127 x 438 x 706
1. Base configuration for the E66 consists of the E66 Accessory Kit (IBM p/n 74Y8485) and internal batteries.
9910-6652
74Y8486
—
—
—
119/59
E66 Battery Runtimes Chart (in Minutes)
Load in Watts
UPS Internal Batteries
+1 EBM
1125
51
112
2250
21
51
3375
12
31
4500
8
19
Note: This guide provides typical application information. Battery times are approximate and may vary with equipment,
configuration, disk access, battery age, temperature, etc.
26
Eaton Power Protection Handbook: 9910 UPS for IBM Power Systems
E66 Technical Specifications*
General
VA/Watts rating
5000 VA/4500 W
Nominal output voltage (Vac)
(autosensing at first power-up)
208V
Waveform type
Sine wave
Output connections (All output
receptacles are controllable via TwoLoad Groups (segments))
(2) NEMA L6-30R
(4) IEC 320 C19
Nominal output voltage (Vac)
184 - 228V (208V)
Input
Nominal input voltage
208V
Input frequency (autosensing)
50/60 Hz +/- 3 Hz
Input connection type
L6-30P power cord
Batteries
Typical backup times
21 minutes (at 50% rated W),
8 minutes (at rated W)
Battery type
Valve Regulated Lead Acid (VRLA)—maintenance free, sealed, leak proof
Optional external battery pack
Yes
Typical recharge time
4 hours to 90% charge from a UPS/battery discharge of 50% rated load.
Communications and Management
Interface port
USB HID port/serial/optional LAN Card
Management software included
IBM UPS Manager software
Control panel
Intelligent three-button, dual-color, backlit graphical LCD displays vital UPS status in
nine languages
Audible alarm
Alarm when on battery: Distinctive low-battery alarm
Remote Power Off (REPO)
REPO port
Surge Protection and Filtering
Surge energy rating
1300J
Filtering
ANSI/IEEE C62.41; 1991 CATEGORYB3 (SURGE)
Physical
Rack height
4U
Dimensions (HxWxD)
7 x 17.25 x 31 in./178.5 x 438 x 790 mm
Product weight
159 lb/72 kg
Packaging weight
183 lb/ 83 kg
Color
IBM black bezel
Environmental and Safety
Audible noise, 1 meter from
unit surface
Normal operation at rated load and Battery Discharge Mode <55 dbA For load <70%
<50 dbA
Efficiency
95% minimum at full-rated load—normal usage, not during battery recharge
Operating temperature
0°C (32°F) to +40°C (104°F)
Maximum operating altitude
10,000 ft/3048 m
Relative humidity
0-95% noncondensing
Safety markings
UL, cUL; IEC/EN 62040-1-1, IEC/EN 60950-1, TUV CB Report ; CE Mark, TUV CB
Report transfer global
EMC markings
208 V FCC Class A, EN55022 Class A; BSMI, CNS14757-2, Class A 230 V: CE (per
IEC/EN62040-2:Emissions, Category C2; Immunity, Category C2); VCCI, Class A;
C-Tick, AS/NZS 3548, Class A; IEC61000-3-2:2000; IEC61000-3-3: 2004; ICES
Canada
* Due to continuing product improvement programs, specifications subject to change without notice.
www.eaton.com/ibm 1.800.925.4426
27
E66 UPS Rear Panel
What’s included with the E66 UPS
 4500W/5000 VA, 208V UPS
- 4U cabinet, 298V
- Battery
- Rail Kit
- Shipping bracket
 Accessory kit (IBM Part Number 74Y8485) consisting of
- Documentation CD0-ROM
- UPS Management Software CD-ROM
- 6000 VA UPS and EBM Installation Guide
- REACH document
- UPS upper front cover (with LCD opening)
- UPS lower front cover
- RS-232 cable
- (16) Screws, M5x16 round slotted for rack installation
- (2) IEC 320 C13 to C14 jumper cords
E66 Options
Various options are available depending on application.
Description
28
IBM Feature Code
IBM Part Number
Extended Battery Module (EBM)
6652
74Y8486
EBM Accessory Kit (1 per FC 6652)
-
74Y8487
Network Management Card (NMC)
2945
74Y8489
Relay Serial card
2944
74Y8488
PDU to UPS Power Cord, UTG/ Burndy to IEC-320-C20, 6 ft.
2974
42R4333
Eaton Power Protection Handbook: 9910 UPS for IBM Power Systems
IBM 9910 model E82
8000 Watt/10000 VA, 208-240 Vac UPS
The IBM 9910 Model E82 provides ideal protection for dense and blade environments, offering a
high-power, low-profile design.
Features and Benefits
 High power, low profile design ideal for dense Power Servers or Blades
 Supports multiple PDUs (1–5 PDUs in a non-redundant power configuration and 2-10 PDUs in a
dual-redundant power configuration)
 Maximizes 60A input (mains) power connection capacity by providing 8000
watts of output power
 Optional interface/communication cards expand control of application
 Tested and approved by IBM to assure out-of-box usability
 Backed by a five-year Advanced Element Exchange Warranty (including battery) with IBM as point
of contact
E82 Model Guide
Model
Number
IBM
Number
Power Out
(Watts/VA)
Input
Connec-tion2
Output
Connections
Dimensions
(HxWxD, in/mm)
Unit
Weight
(lb/kg) 3
IEC309 2P+G
60A
(1) IEC309 2P+G
60A,
(4) IEC-320-C19
10.5 x 17.2 x 30/
266 x 437 x 762
254/115
200-240 Vac; 50/60 Hz auto-sensing
9910-E821
44V3918
8000/10000
Extended Battery Module (EBM)
5.25 x 17.2 x 23.9/
179/81
133.5 x 437 x 607
1. Base configuration for the E82 consists of the E82/E83 Accessory Kit (IBM p/n 44V3919) and four UPS Internal Battery
Trays (IBM p/n 44V3920). 2. Input power cord is 9.9ft/3m. 3. Weight includes batteries.
9910-6646
44V3921
—
—
—
E82 Battery Runtimes Chart (in Minutes)
UPS Internal
+1 EBM
+2 EBMs
+3 EBMs
+4 EBMs
Batteries
1000
80
137
189
275
365
2000
31
61
99
138
181
3000
18
38
68
92
121
4000
12
27
52
69
90
5000
9
21
42
55
72
6000
7
17
35
46
60
7000
6
14
31
40
51
8000
5
12
27
35
45
Note: This guide provides typical application information. Battery times are approximate and may vary with equipment,
configuration, disk access, battery age, temperature, etc.
Load in Watts
www.eaton.com/ibm 1.800.925.4426
29
E82 Rear Panel
What’s included with the E82 UPS
 8000W/10000 VA, 208V nominal, optional 200–240V UPS
 (4) Battery Trays (IBM Part Number 44V3920)
 (Internal) Accessory Kit (no IBM PN)
- Mounting Brackets front and rear
- Rails (left, right) and hardware
 (External) Accessory kit (IBM Part Number 44V3919) consisting of:
- Eaton 9140 (9910 E82 & E83) Installation Guide for IBM Applications
- User’s Guide CD (in Nine languages)
- Eaton Software Suite CD
- Serial Cable, RJ-45 to DB-9 (6 ft/1.8m)
- Serial Cable, DB-9 to DB-9 (12 ft/3.6m)
- REPO Connector Plug 10A, 2-pin
E82 Options
Various options are available depending on application.
IBM Part
Number
POWER
(AIX, Linux),
System p
Rack
Worldwide
POWER
(IBM i),
System i
Rack
Worldwide
Description
IBM Feature
Code
ConnectUPS-X Web/SNMP Card
2934
1
39J4824
Yes
No
X-Slot Relay/Serial Card Kit
2939
1
42R4332
No
Yes
Extended Battery Module (EBM)
(up to 4 EBMs)
6646
44V3921
Yes
Yes
EBM Accessory Kit (1 per FC 6646)
-
44V3922
Yes
Yes
PDU to UPS Power Cord, UTG/ Burndy to
IEC-320-C20, 6 ft.
2974
42R4333
Yes
Yes
RS/6000 Rack
7015
Yes
No
AS/400 iSeries Expansion Unit
7117
No
Yes
2
1. Maximum one FC 2934 or 2939 per E82 UPS. ConnectUPS-X Web/SNMP Card required if implementing Logical Partitions (LPARs)
on POWER Systems (AIX or Linux), p5 or System p. 2. Used to connect a 7188/9188/5889/7109 PDU to the C19 outlet.
30
Eaton Power Protection Handbook: 9910 UPS for IBM Power Systems
E82 Technical Specifications*
General
Battery Module Replacement
Yes, hot-swap
Diagnostics
Full system self-test on power up
UPS Bypass
Internal bypass
Dimensions and Weight
See Model Guide
Electrical Input
Nominal Voltage
208 default, optional; 200, 220, 230, and 240 Vac
Input Voltage Ranges
200/208; 160–253V, 220/230/240; 174-288V
Frequency
50/60 Hz, auto-sensing
Frequency Range
45-65Hz
Default Frequency
60Hz
Maximum Input Current at Nominal
Utility Voltage
48A
Noise Filtering
MOVs and line filter for normal and common mode noise
Connections
9.9ft/3-meter IEC309 2P+G 60A (360P6W) power cord
Input Power Factor
>0.99
Input Mode
Single-phase with input power cord. Three-phase input available when input power
cord removed.
Electrical Output
Regulation
Nominal Outputs
Output Overload
Voltage Waveform
Output Receptacles
Nominal output voltage +/- 2% Static, +/- 10% Dynamic
200/208/220/230/240
(voltage configurable or auto-sensing)
45/48/45/43/41A
9/10/10/10/10 kVA
7.2/8/8/8/8 kW
100-110%: Activates Overload alarm
110-130%: load transfers to Bypass mode after 1 minute
130-150%: load transfers to Bypass mode after 1 second
>150%: load transfers to Bypass mode after 100 ms
Normal mode: Sine wave; <3% THD with linear load;
<5% with nonlinear load
(4) IEC-320-C19, 16A
(1) IEC309 2P+G 60A (360C6W)
Battery
Battery Type
Sealed, maintenance-free, valve-regulated, lead-acid
Monitoring
Advanced monitoring for earlier failure detection and warning
Configuration
(32) 12V, 5 Ah
Battery Runtime
See Battery Runtime Chart
Battery Replacement
Hot-swappable UPS internal batteries and external batteries modules
Charging (in minutes) to 80% usable
capacity at nominal line voltage after
full load discharge
UPS Internal Batts
266
Start-On-Battery
Allows start of UPS without utility input
+1 EBM
336
+2 EBMs
368
+3 EBMs
398
+4 EBM
419
Communications
User Interface
Front control panel, with two-line graphical LCD with backlight
Languages
User selectable
Audible Alarms
For various UPS alarm conditions, including: On Battery, Low Battery, Overload, and
UPS Fault
REPO Port
Meets NEC code 645-11 intent and UL requirements
Communication Ports
Native USB and serial port (DB-9)
X-Slot Interface
Empty; other X-Slot options available
Cable
Two (2) 6-ft communication cables (DB-9 to DB-9 and RJ-45 to DB-9) included
Power Management Software
Eaton Software Suite CD-ROM (bundled with UPS)
www.eaton.com/ibm 1.800.925.4426
31
Environmental and Safety
Operating Temperature
0 to 40°C (32 to 104°F)
Storage Temperature
-20 to 50°C (-4 to 122°F)
Relative Humidity
0% to 95% noncondensing
Heat Dissipation
2066 BTU/hr (605.5W) maximum
Lightning & Surge Protection
ANSI/IEEE C62.41 (IEEE 587), IEC61000-4-5
Surge Energy Rating
High-energy 6500A peak
Audible Noise
<55 dBA at 5 feet with battery fully charged, without horn
Altitude
3000m (10,000 ft) without derating
Leakage Current
<3.5 mA
Surge Suppression
ANSI C62.41 Category B3
Safety Certifications
UL 1778; CSA C22.2, No. 107.3; EN and IEC 62040-2; NOM-019-SCFI-1993;
Agency Markings
cULus, cUL, NOM, CE
EMC Compliance
FCC Part 15, EN 50091-2, ICES-003
Seismic
Uniform Building Code (UBC) and Bellcore for Zone 4 Earthquake
*Due to continuing product improvement programs, specifications subject to change without notice.
32
Eaton Power Protection Handbook: 9910 UPS for IBM Power Systems
Power Cords
Consult the table below for country-specific and region-specific input power cords.
Power Cord Feature
Code
Description
For use with UPS Model
Order Through
9910-2975
C19 to L6-30P (Type 12) input power
cord, 6 ft.
E35 with Power Server
Factory or MES
9910-2976
C19 to IEC 309 (P+N+G) 32A (Type
46) input power cord, 4.3m.
E35 with Power Server
Factory or MES
9910-9860
C19 to L6-20P (Type 11) input power
cord, 14 ft.
E35 with Power Server
Factory or MES
9910-9866
C19 to CEE 7 VII 16A (Type 18) input
power cord, 4.3 m.
E35 with Power Server
Factory or MES
9910-9867
C19 to SABS 16416A (Type 22) input
power cord, 4.3 m.
E35 with Power Server
Factory or MES
9910-9868
C19 to CEI 23-16 16A (Type 25) input
power cord, 4.3 m.
E35 with Power Server
Factory or MES
9910-9871
C19 to IEC 309 (P+N+G) 16A (Type
46) input power cord, 4.3m.
E35 with Power Server
Factory or MES
9910-9872
C19 to SII 32-1971 16A (Type 32)
input power cord, 4.3m.
E35 with Power Server
Factory or MES
9910-9874
C19 to SAA-AS 3112 16A (Type 54)
input power cord, 4.3m.
E35 with Power Server
Factory or MES
9910-9875
C19 to IEC 60083-A5 16A (Type 64)
input power cord, 4.3m.
E35 with Power Server
Factory or MES
9910-1420
L6-30R to L6-30P (Type 12) input
power cord, 14 ft.
E50 with Power Server
Factory or MES
9910-1421
L6-30R to L6-30P (Type 12) input
power cord, 6 ft.
E50 with Power Server
Factory or MES
E50 with Power Server
Factory or MES
E50 with Power Server
Factory or MES
E50 with Power Server
Factory or MES
9910-1422
9910-1423
9910-1424
L6-30R to Russell Stoll RS3750 (Type
40) input power cord, 6 ft.
L6-30R to Russell Stoll RS3750 (Type
40) input power cord, 14 ft. For Europe
and Latin America.
L6-30R to IEC 309 (P+N+G) 32A
(Type 46) input power cord, 4.3m.
9910-1426
L6-30R to PDL Australia 30A (Type
PDL) input power cord, 4.3m.
E50 with Power Server
Factory or MES
9910-1427
L6-30R to PDL New Zealand 30A
(Type PDL) input power cord, 4.3m.
E50 with Power Server
Factory or MES
www.eaton.com/ibm 1.800.925.4426
33
Software and connectivity
Power management software unifies and centralizes UPS management
Bundled with every IBM 9910 UPS, UPS power management software gives you all the tools you need to
manage power devices in your physical or virtual environment. This innovative software solutions ensures
system uptime and data integrity by allowing you to monitor, manage and control the devices on your
network remotely. IBM offers two levels of software. Use each software independently or as a powerful
combination. Together with your IBM UPS, they provide end-to-end power management for maximum
uptime and data integrity:
Intelligent Power Manager: software for extensive monitoring and management
Supervisory software lets you monitor and manage multiple power and environmental devices
across the network from a single interface, giving you up-to-the-minute information on the status of
power in your network. It also works seamlessly with VMware’s vCenter Server™ and vMotion™ as
well as other platforms and migration applications.
Intelligent Power Protector: shutdown software for extended power outages
Protection software provides graceful, automatic shutdown of network devices during a prolonged
power disruption, preventing data loss and saving work-in-progress. As part of Eaton’s power
network management system, these two applications work together to deliver comprehensive
power management and protection.
Seamlessly integrate UPSs into the IBM Management Console with Eaton Extensions for IBM
Active Energy Manager
Eaton Extensions allow administrators to monitor UPSs in the network, in real-time and obtain advance
notice on critical elements of server power management, such as UPS battery status, load level,
temperature and alarms for battery replacement. Monitor, diagnose, configure, set alarms, schedule selftests, check battery, gather inventory information, and control Eaton UPSs network wide from a single
console within IBM AEM.
Connectivity options offer maximum flexibility
Connectivity options are available to suit nearly any communication requirement. Eaton UPSs are
equipped with an RS-232 serial communication port, some with built-in USB port to interface with power
management software. You can customize your UPS by adding any of the following X-Slot interface
options for other types of communication:
Network Management Card (FC2945) allows the E35 or E66 UPS to directly
connect to the Ethernet network and the Internet, supporting real-time monitoring
and control of UPSs across the network via a standard Web browser, SNMPcompliant network management system or power management software.
Relay Serial Card (FC2944) for use with E35 or E66 UPS, provides a simple way
to remotely deliver UPS information to an alarm system, PLC or computer system
via dry contacts, or it can be an RS-232 interface for connection to a PC or a UPS
control display unit.
ConnectUPS Web/SNMP Interface Card (FC 2934) enables direct control and
monitoring in SNMP-based networks, plus the ability to monitor UPS status and
meters through a Web browser (includes built-in switch hub). Use with IBM
POWER Systems (AIX, Linux), p5/System p server, OpenPower, or xSeries server
with virtualization LPARs and/or Network (Web server) connection (UPS as a
node).
Relay-Serial Card and Cable Kit (FC 2939) provides DB-9 and DB-25 serial
interface between the UPS and IBM POWER Systems (IBM i (i5/OS)), System i
(AS/400) server and Serial Server (Microsoft Windows, Linux, AIX, or other
operating systems).
ConnectUPS-MS Web/SNMP Card (2941) is designed for the rigorous task of
managing the 9910-E50 UPS that protects equipment and the critical data residing
throughout the network
34
Eaton Power Protection Handbook: 9910 UPS for IBM Power Systems
Service and support
In the United States and Canada, call 1-800-IBMSERV (1-800-426-7378). In Europe, the Middle East, and
Africa (EMEA); Latin America; or Asia-Pacific, call the IBM office that services your account. Please have
your serial, model, and part number ready when you call (see Figure 1).
Figure 1. Example of IBM front and rear panel labels
www.eaton.com/ibm 1.800.925.4426
35
For more information, please visit
www.eaton.com/IBM
Eaton
Electrical Sector
1000 Eaton Boulevard
Cleveland, OH 44122 USA
Eaton.com
©2013 Eaton Corporation
All RightsReserved
9910HBNA / TN
August 2013
Eaton, Intelligent Power, Powerware, ABM,
LanSafe, ConnectUPS, and X-Slot are trade
names, trademarks and/or service marks of
Eaton Corporation or its subsidiaries and
affiliates. All other trademarks are property of
their respective owners.
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