15 Dash Board and Windscreen

15 Dash Board and Windscreen
15 Dash Board and Windscreen
15 Dash Board and Windscreen
15.1 Dash Board
a) Re-check the position and symmetry of the cowlings. Use the paper template
supplied with the kit to cut the shape of the two dash board parts out of
cardboard.
Cut the templates oversize, except for the straight rear edges on the
912 templates.
Templates for other engine types may need to be extended at the rear
to accommodate different cowling positions. Cut oversize and trim to fit.
Figure 286; fitting using cardboard templates, and the result, a (well used) dash board.
b) Use them to make adjustments so that they fit nicely in place, Figure.
Use the straight rear edges of the templates as the reference lines. The
rear panel reference line should align with the forward edge of the
instrument panel.
The sides of the dash board towards the rear will have to be left a
slightly loose fit, to allow the windscreen to pass down beneath the
dash board.
Towards the front of the dash board the windscreen will normally be cut
to finish above the level of the dash board. However, if the lip for
riveting the screen to is rather narrow it will be necessary to allow the
windscreen to pass down the sides of the front dashboard piece. This
gives more room for the rivets, but will require more trimming of the
dashboard.
The rear part of the dash board will require slots to be cut to pass the
aileron cables through it, as marked on the template.
On the Jabiru engine the cowling is further forwards, therefore it may be
necessary to use an offcut piece from the sides of the dashboard to
extend the dashboard slightly further forwards in the centre.
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15 Dash Board and Windscreen
c) Use this fitted cardboard template to cut the fibreglass parts, Figure.
The panel without the rounded edge is used to make the front part of
the dash board. Lay the panel upside down, mark the template out, and
cut. A jigsaw works well, cutting on the upstroke to reduce the chance
of damage to the upper surface of the panel. Take care not to damage
the central cut-out, as the removed part will be put back in place to
cover the hole.
d) It may be desirable to thin the forward edge of the panel to fit more easily
between the underside of the cowling and the top of the firewall.
Figure 286; dash board components after cutting.
e) With the main panel upside down, draw a line on the flat part 3mm forward of
the edge of the curved part above it, to mark the forward side of the instrument
panel. Align the template with this line and cut out.
Figure 287; dash board attachment bracket.
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15 Dash Board and Windscreen
f) Fix the dash board to the aluminium angle behind the instrument panel and to
the top of the firewall, Figure,
Use the light gauge aluminium angle in 50mm lengths to form brackets
to fix the dash board to the top of the firewall.
Two bolts at the front and two bolts at the rear should be sufficient,
although more should be used if you wish to mount any instruments,
such as a GPS, on top of the dash board.
To fit the dashboard it may be necessary to temporarily undo the
instrument panel and allow it to lie against the throttle levers.
g) Glue, or secure with bolts, the cut-out parts back into their holes.
Ensure that edges of the glassfibre dashboard and instrument
panel do not rub on any of the tubes, as the glass will abrade the
tubes in the same manner as glasspaper, damaging them
surprisingly quickly!
h) Sand all edges smooth and use a black felt tipped pen, or paint, to colour the
visible edges.
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15 Dash Board and Windscreen
15.2 Windscreen
Do not allow threadlock (Loctite etc.) or other solvents to come in contact with
the Lexan as it will damage it severely.
a) Apply the supplied strips of thin self-adhesive foam strip to the tubes
supporting the top part of the windscreen.
This will reduce noise and vibration.
b) Cut the Lexan sheet to Figure.
For engines other than the Rotax 912 do not cut the forward end of
the windscreen (the 1720 and 1900 measurements) but leave this
full length and cut to fit in situ.
Figure 288; windscreen cutting pattern.
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15 Dash Board and Windscreen
Figure 289; cutting the Lexan.
c) Drill the two rear holes marked on the rear part of the Lexan.
d) Lay the Lexan over the cockpit, locating the holes in the Lexan over the two
bolts sticking up at the rear of the cockpit.
Check that you have not left the leading-edge securing pins in place, as
if you do, and they are incorrectly inserted from the front instead of their
proper insertion from the rear, you will not be able to get them out again
when you have fitted the windscreen!
Figure 290; drilling for the rear mounting bolts.
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15 Dash Board and Windscreen
e) Push the windscreen into position behind the cowling lip.
The windscreen must go inside the lip of the cowling and stop above
the dash board at the front, and pass down the sides of the dash board
towards the rear, Figure.
If there is not enough material along the cowling lip to secure the rivets
then the windscreen may pass down the sides of the dashboard even
at the front, although the dashboard will need further trimming to allow
this.
The windscreen pattern is intended to be oversize at the front: insert
the screen and position carefully, then if it is too long mark along the
inside a short distance above the dash board (hold a pen flat against
the dash board). Remove the screen and trim to this line, and repeat
until the windscreen fits nicely above the dash board at the front and
passes down the side of the dash board towards the rear.
Take care that the tubes tu34 supporting the windscreen do not get
knocked out of position, check them regularly, and check that the shape
of the cowling remains as it should be otherwise you may build a
strange shape into the windscreen and the cowling!
Figure 291; windscreen passing down side of dash board.
f) Rivet the Lexan every 15cm or so to the large curved tubes on the top sides of
the fuselage.
Use the pre-drilled holes, start at the rear and work towards the front of
the Lexan.
g) Get two helpers, one on each side of the fuselage pushing the Lexan tightly
into the inside of the curved part of the cowling.
Make sure there are no gaps, and that the Lexan is evenly positioned
with respect to the cabin upright tubes tu34 on each side, and that
these are in their correct positions too.
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15 Dash Board and Windscreen
Figure 292; finished windscreen.
h) While the two people hold the cowling in place, drill holes through the cowling
and the Lexan to hold it in place with rivets.
Check that the cowling has not distorted, particularly with reference to
the minimum 10mm clearance from the spinner – the bonnet must be
secured in position before riveting on the lexan, or it may not fit
afterwards!
The curvature of the cowling can be increased slightly by lifting it in the
middle before fixing the windscreen, to increase space for the
carburettors etc. . Don’t over-do this however, as you will distort the rest
of the cowling.
Use washers on the inside to spread the rivet loads against the Lexan.
Space the rivets evenly, every 100mm or so, starting with one rivet in
the exact centre (this will be used later for the screen bracing batten).
i) Drill and rivet the sides of the windscreen to the cabin uprights tu34.
The spacing of the rivets should be around 60mm or so, and for best
effect it should be matched to the doors.
j) Trim the excess Lexan so that it is even with the rear of the tubes.
k) Drill holes in the windscreen centre batten for rivets, matching the spacing on
the adjacent windscreen supports
The batten will need careful bending to precisely match the curve of the
windscreen.
While one person holds the batten against the underside of the top of
the windscreen, another person can drill from the top, through the
Lexan.
l) Rivet it in place with a layer of self-adhesive foam between it and the Lexan.
Note, if the optional Screen centre batten is to be fitted, before riveting in place
follow the instructions in 15.2.1
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15 Dash Board and Windscreen
m) With the left over Lexan, cut a triangular piece to fit in the corners of the
windscreen and tube tu34. Secure in place with rivets through tubes tu34 and
through the cowlings.
The join can be covered with another strip of Lexan riveted in place, if
desired, however it looks best left as is.
A pair of vents such as those available from Light Aero Spares may be
fitted across the joins if desired.
n) The rear of the windscreen should be secured to the upper rear cabin tube
using 3 or more rivets or self-tapping screws and a strip of aluminium between
the bolts holding the rear of the windscreen, Figure. Use self-adhesive foam
strip between the windscreen and the tube to get a good seal otherwise the
rain will blow down your neck!
Figure 293; strip along rear of windscreen.
o) It is important to get a good seal between the lexan roof panel and the upper
surface of the wings. This affects glide performance and stall characteristics.
Where the lexan overlaps the upper surface of the wing the gap should be
sealed using the self adhesive foam strip supplied. This should be fitted with
the self adhesive side against the lexan. It may be necessary to use more than
one thickness to close the gap on the front ¼ of the chord. It will be necessary
to fit the wings to mark the position to attach the foam, and remove them again
to fit it. You can wait for final rigging to do this – but don’t forget!
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15 Dash Board and Windscreen
15.2.1
Screen centre batten
At high cruise speeds the windscreen distorts slightly. This can be prevented with the
installation of the optional Screen centre batten. This is part of the mandatory build
standard for the Swift model, recommended for the standard 912S model, and may
be fitted to all models.
a) Cut the end off the roof centre batten to expose the hollow tube end.
b) Fit the small tube plug inside the end of the tube so that half its length is
exposed. Plug onto this the screen centre batten tube
c) Curve the ensemble to match the curve of the roof and windscreen as
precisely as possible. It may be necessary to trim the length of the screen
centre batten to fit.
d) Apply the thin self adhesive foam strip to the batten ensemble where it will
touch the lexan.
e) Fix into position. Use 4mm aluminium rivets to fix to the roof area as per 15.2
k). Do not use any rivets down the forward windscreen portion – use only one
rivet in the screen centre batten just beyond the join. Secure the bottom end of
the screen centre batten using a 4mm rivet or 4mm bolt to pass through the
glassfibre upper rear cowling piece, the lexan and through the batten.
Screen centre batten
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16 Doors
16 Doors
The doors should be made to fit, with the wings in place for the final trimming. Care
with cutting and positioning the doors will reduce the number of draughts!
Check and double check the fit before cutting the parts, especially the Lexan. The
exact measurements depend upon a number of factors, such as sills, floor etc. . Use
the drawings as a guide only.
16.1 One Piece Door
Figure 294; one piece door.
Figure 295; one piece door frame.
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16 Doors
16.1.1
Door sills
a) Trim the fibreglass door sills to fit around the undercarriage drag link and to fit
inside the cowling at the front.
Figure 296; door sill.
b) Secure them by the bolt at the bottom of the side of the tu34 cabin upright
tubes.
The bolt must pass right through the cowling, the sill and the tube.
c) Use rivets or self-tapping screws to fix the sills to the horizontal tubes tu16 at
the base of the door openings, at a maximum spacing of 150mm.
These can be fitted vertically to the underside of the tubes, to keep
them out of sight, but at least three should be fitted to the sides, with
equal spacing, to help rigidity.
16.1.2
Lexan fixed gussets
a) Cut the two triangular pieces of Lexan required to attach in the area to the
lower rear of the door, between tu144 and tu6,
The rear and lower edges can be cold folded to 45 degrees 10mm from the
edge to form a neat finish. This can be done in a bending brake, or by
clamping between two bits of stout timber.
Figure 297; triangular piece of Lexan..
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Attach them using Rivets. Only rivet along the lower and rear tubes,
don’t rivet to the steel diagonal tube. Use a minimum of three rivets per
edge.
16.1.3
Door frame
a) Drill out the hole at the top of the cabin uprights tu34 to 5mm.
b) Take the door frame and offer it up to the opening.
Aim for a final position with an even 10mm spacing from the cabin
uprights tu34 and the top of the door sill. The rear edge should be
approximately 20mm from the rear cabin uprights tu6 and due to its
shape rather more from the steel diagonal brace tu144.
c) Carefully bend the frame as required to ensure the best fit.
The relative positions of the rear cabin uprights tu6 and the cabin
uprights tu34 requires that the rear edge is also bent outwards slightly
relative to the front.
d) With the frame supported in position mark the front edge of the door frame
10mm lower than the pivot bolt centre in the cabin upright tu34.
The pivot bolt will pass through the hole at the top of tu34.
Figure 298; forward and rear pivots.
e) Mark the rear edge 15mm up from the lower edge of the rear spar attachment
bracket.
f) Remove the door frame and carefully hacksaw to these marks and dress with
a file.
g) Fix in place the upper rear hinge piece to the rear cabin upright tu6.
This attaches at its top with a 5mm bolt through the hole already in tu6.
Secure the lower fixing with a 4mm rivet. Slide the L-shaped part of the
hinge assembly onto the spigot.
h) Temporarily fit the front hinge plate onto the hinge bolt though tu34.
i) Offer up the door frame to the correct position. Mark the forwards edge with
the correct position for the hinge plate drillings.
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16 Doors
j) Remove, drill and rivet in place the hinge plate.
Use 4mm steel rivets.
k) Refit the door frame. Offer up the top cross-piece of the doorframe and mark
to attach it to the doorframe.
Its forward edge should be positioned so the upper edge is flush with
the top of the doorframe tube. The rear should be positioned so the that
the top of the tube is level with the top of the rear hinge plate (5mm
above fixing bolt centre).
l) Offer up the rear gusset plate (found in the bag of door fittings) to the Lshaped part of the hinge assembly. Mark their positions.
m) Drill and rivet the top cross-piece, gussets and hinge piece.
Use 4mm steel rivets.
n) Fit the door frame and check satisfactory fit and opening.
o) Offer up the centre cross-piece tube and mark the length to trim.
This piece has a slight curve, trim from the straight end. It should fit to
align with the top of the cowling at the front and sit just above the bend
in the frame at the rear.
p) Drill and rivet the centre cross-piece and gussets, Figure and Figure.
Use 4mm steel rivets.
Figure 299; rear of centre cross-piece.
q) Do a final check of fit and operation of the doorframe.
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16.1.4
Fitting the Lexan
a) Cut out the Lexan sheet from the patterns.
Use a large pair of tin snips. The patterns are supplied as a guide, and
your individually constructed doors may vary slightly, so cut oversize
initially to be safe.
b) With the door in position offer up the Lexan and mark some reference points
to align with the door frame.
The Lexan can be fitted flush or overlapped with the windscreen and
cowling at the front edge and overlap at the lower edges by
approximately 25mm. The rear edge should be overlapped to at least
the centre of the rear cabin upright tu6. The upper edge should sit
inside the wing root and should be 50mm or so above the wing
undersurface. It may have to be trimmed slightly lower than this at the
rear to avoid fouling the structure during opening.
c) Before riveting mark the holes on the doorframe.
Use a nominal rivet spacing of 60mm. Remove the protective coating
from the inside face of the Lexan, leave it in place on the outside but
remove it using your fingernail around each point to clear the rivet
heads.
d) Drill and rivet in place using 4mm aluminium rivets.
Work from the upper front corner, and rivet the front edge first. Follow
this by riveting the lower edge. Due to the curve in the central crosspiece the rear edge will have to be worked around the curve, to avoid a
wavy edge.
It may be necessary to drill out some rivets and reposition the tension in
the Lexan slightly to get the best fit. Do not be tempted to put more
curve in the central cross piece to give greater shoulder room or you
will turn this into an impossible task! Finish by riveting the upper cross
piece and then the central cross piece.
When drilling angle the drill slightly away from the last rivet. When
squeezing the rivets bring the rivet upright. This then applies some light
tension to the Lexan and prevents the Lexan bulging between rivets.
Take care when drilling to ensure the tube is drilled centrally.
e) Fit the door and check its fit and operation.
f) Trim the rear edge of the Lexan to match the line of the triangular pieces
behind the lower doors.
g) Trim the Lexan to accurately fit around the forward wing spar and the aileron
cables, and trim the top edge to miss the wing tension bolts.
h) Fit the thin self-adhesive foam strip around the lower and rear edges.
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16.1.5
Fittings
a) Fit the lower catch assemblies as per Figure and Figure.
It should be positioned so that the 6mm hole is drilled 300mm
rearwards from the rear edge of the cabin uprights tu34 and the
cowlings.
Use two 4mm steel rivets to attach the aluminium plate to the
doorframe.
Figure 300; lower catch.
b) The inner edge of the sill should be positioned so the latch it a tight fit to lock
into place.
The fibreglass can be filed a little to achieve a slight indent to prevent
the lever from inadvertently rotating to the open position, or an
aluminium piece can be riveted on to protect the fibreglass from wear.
c) Position the front catch just above the gusset plate for the forwards edge of
the centre cross piece.
UKMOD: this is an additional catch for UK aircraft to secure the front of
the doorframe to the cabin uprights tu34.
It should be fitted with the bolt tightened to ensure enough friction to
prevent inadvertent rotation. A convenient hole in tu34 can be used as
a detent, or one drilled for the purpose.
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Figure 301; front catch.
d) With the wings fitted and in place fit the open door keeper, Figure.
This should be positioned so that the door handle can be rotated into it.
It is fitted to the wing surface with two screws (cut these to length) with
spreader plates made from two rectangles of scrap Lexan 30mm X 150
(15mm radius at each end) either side of the wing fabric. This job will
require two people or very long bendy arms!
Figure 302; open door keeper.
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16.2 Two Piece Door
16.2.1
Lower door frames
Figure 303; two-piece door.
a) Fit the fibreglass door sills if desired.
The Skyranger UK two-piece doors can be fitted with or without the
fibreglass doorsills supplied in the main kit. The standard patterns and
some of the hardware assume that the doorsills are not fitted (the
recommended option for weight reasons, they weigh 1kg). If you
choose to fit the sills then some adjustment will have to be made to the
vertical position of the lower tube piece on the bottom door, plus some
trimming of the gusset plates and the Lexan pattern for the lower doors.
The sills require trimming to fit around the undercarriage drag link and
to fit inside the cowling at the front. They should be secured by the bolt
at the bottom of the side of the tu34 cabin upright tubes, passing
through the cowling, the sill and the tube. Rivets or self-tapping screws
should be used to fix the sills to the horizontal tubes tu16 at the base of
the door openings, at a maximum spacing of 150mm. These can be
fitted vertically to the underside of the tubes, to keep them out of sight,
but at least three should be fitted to the sides, with equal spacing, to
help rigidity.
b) Ensure that the aluminium door hinges have been fitted to the cabin uprights
tu34.
Typically these should be fitted so that the bottom edge is above the
lowest bolt on the cabin uprights, with the top edge approximately level
with the bottom of the dash board lip. However this will vary depending
on the positioning of the dashboard.
Remember that the doors open outwards and forwards, so the hinge
“bulge” needs to be on the outside.
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c) Position the lower door frame tubes so that the lower tube clears the ends of
the cabin cross member tu15 by at least 5mm, with the forward end of the
upper door frame tube sitting snugly just under the dash board lip, and at its
rear end the upper edge of the tube should align with the colour change in the
rear fuselage fabric.
If your instrument panel is non-standard use the Lexan pattern to guide
you for vertical position at this point.
Make sure that the rear part of the door frame is close enough to the
rear cabin upright to allow the door catch to reach without requiring the
rivets to be positioned too close to the door tubes.
d) When happy with the positioning tape the doorframe tubes to the structure in
the closed position.
Take care that the upper tube is the correct way around (bend
rearmost) and not sagging due to rotation.
e) After verifying the correct positioning drill through the tubes and hinge and
either attach with Cleco’s (temporary rivets) or aluminium rivets (which will be
removed later when fitting the Lexan).
f) Drill and rivet the gusset plates into position – six of the 4mm aluminium rivets
should be sufficient.
Make sure that the doorframes are not allowed to twist during this
process.
g) Un-tape and check correct fit and opening and closing.
Some adjustment by carefully bending the tubes may be required.
h) Fit the small fixed part of the slide bolt to the aluminium angle piece.
Drill and countersink the rivet holes so that the rivets do not protrude
noticeably from the surface of the bracket and cause misalignment with
the slide bolt.
Do not fix it to the door pillar at this stage.
i) Use the fixed part as a guide to determine the correct positioning of the main
part of the slide bolt on the gusset plate.
Use the aluminium rectangles under the slide bolt to lift it and ensure
correct alignment with the fixed catch.
j) When satisfied with the positioning fix the main part of the slide bolt into place.
The fixed catch part should be fitted to the door pillar later, after the
Lexan has been fitted, as fitment of the Lexan can cause changes in
the exact alignment.
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Figure 304; lower door and catch.
16.2.2
Upper door frames
d) Fit the upper rear hinge piece to the door pillar tu6, Figure.
This attaches at its top with a 5mm bolt through the hole already in tu6.
Secure the lower fixing with a 4mm rivet.
e) Slide the L-shaped part of the hinge assembly onto the spigot.
f) Offer up the upper doorframe into position.
Space it evenly 20mm above the lower doorframe.
g) The rear upright part of the doorframe must be bent outwards to match the
different angles of the cabin uprights and the door pillar tu6.
Figure 305; upper door rear and front pivots.
h) Drill out the hole at the top of the cabin uprights tu34 to 5mm, Figure.
The doorframe will pivot on a bolt through this hole.
i) When happy with the fit of the upper doorframe, mark the position of the hole
to be drilled in the doorframe for the pivot bolt.
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j) Offer up the top crosspiece of the doorframe and mark the position to attach it
to the doorframe.
Its forward edge should be positioned so the upper edge of the tube is
10mm lower than the forward pivot bolt hole centre. The rear should be
positioned so that the top of the tube is level with the top of the rear
pivot plate (5mm above the fixing bolt centre).
k) Offer up the rear gusset plate (found in the bag of door fittings included in the
main kit) and the L-shaped part of the hinge assembly. Mark their positions.
l) Remove the door pieces.
m) Drill the hole for the forward hinge bolt.
n) Drill and rivet the top cross piece, gussets and hinge piece all together.
o) Refit the door by sliding it onto the rear hinge spigot before inserting the
forwards hinge bolt, with a small piece of plastic tube used as a spacer on the
bolt between door frame and cabin uprights.
p) Check satisfactory fit and opening of the door.
16.2.3
Fitting the Lexan
a) Mark out the Lexan sheets using the patterns supplied.
The Lexan is big enough but there is not much spare space. Lay out
the patterns and find the best arrangement to ensure they can all be cut
from the sheet. Remember to allow for enough spare to make the two
triangular pieces required to attach in the area behind the lower door,
between tu144 and tu6.
b) Cut out the Lexan using a pair of large tin snips.
The patterns are supplied as a guide and your individually constructed
doors will vary slightly, so cut out oversize to be safe.
c) Fit the Lexan to the lower doors first.
Use the forward and upper edges as your accurate edges and trim so
that these fit nicely. Allow a generous overlap on the lower and rear
edges, which can be trimmed later.
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Figure 306; upper door.
d) Before riveting mark the position of the holes to be drilled on the doorframe.
Use a nominal rivet spacing of 60mm adjusted where required to
provide an even spacing on each side. Remove the protective covering
from the inside face of the Lexan, leave it in place on the outside, but
remove it using your fingernail around each point to clear the rivet
heads.
e) Drill and rivet the Lexan into place.
Work from the upper front corner, outwards and downwards together.
When drilling angle the drill slightly away from the last rivet. When
squeezing the rivets bring the rivet upright. This then applies some light
tension to the Lexan and prevents the Lexan bulging between rivets.
Take care when drilling to ensure the tube is drilled centrally.
f) Repeat this process for the upper doors.
The Lexan should overlap the lower doors by 20mm or so. The upper
edge of the Lexan will tuck inside the wing root and can be trimmed for
neatness later to be 50mm or so above the wing undersurface. The
forward edge can either be fitted flush or overlapped up to the
windscreen. Allow an overlap at this stage anyway and trim back as
desired later.
g) Repeat this process for the two triangular pieces required to attach in the area
behind the lower door, between tu144 and tu6,.
Only rivet along the lower and rear tubes, don’t rivet to the steel
diagonal tube. Use a minimum of three rivets per edge.
h) When the doors have been fitted trim the rear edge of the upper door Lexan to
match the line of the triangular pieces behind the lower doors. The lower edge
may be cold folded if desired to form a neat return.
16.2.4
Fittings
e) Drill through the centre of the upper door frame lower tube 400mm from the
forward edge of the door using a 6mm drill bit to accept the door handle.
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f) Use the handle / catch parts from the main kit, inserting the handle through the
hole in the doorframe.
g) On the inside fit a thin plastic washer followed by the plain nut, hooped shape
handle and Nyloc nut.
h) Tighten the nuts against one another to lock the parts into position.
Adjust the position of the nuts so that some friction is felt when rotating
the handle. The hooped handle can be left as is or the hooped part cut
off to leave a flat lever as desired.
Figure 307; upper door catch.
i) Fit the forward catch by drilling a 5mm hole in the forward vertical of the upper
door frame 340mm down from the hinge bolt centre.
If a hole is present on the inside of the cabin upright tu34 close to this
position then adjust the position slightly to use the hole as a detent.
Alternatively an extra hole can be drilled.
Assemble the parts with two 2mm plastic washers between catch and
doorframe.
j) Adjust the tension to achieve some friction.
Figure 308; upper door forward catch.
k) The lower door should have the self-adhesive foam strip applied to its upper
outer edge, and its inner side and lower edges to suit.
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l) The upper door should have the foam tape applied to its rear edge only.
m) Fix the lower door catch fixed part to the door pillar tu6 in position to suit,
using two 4mm rivets.
n) Fit the wings.
o) Trim the upper door Lexan to accurately fit around the forward wing spar and
aileron cables, and trim the top edge to miss the wing tension bolts.
p) Fit the open door keeper, Figure.
This should be positioned so that the door handle can be rotated into it.
It is fitted to the wing surface with two screws (cut these to length) with
spreader plates made from two rectangles of scrap Lexan 30mm X 150
(15mm radius at each end) either side of the wing fabric. This job will
require two people or very long bendy arms!
16.2.5
Type two door catches
These are optional sprung ‘slam shut’ door latches with remote opening levers.
Fig 309 and 310 type two dooor catch assembly and catch detail
a) Offer up the catch and aluminium angle. Determine the best position to fix the
angle to the door pillar, so it lies flat against the gusset plate on the door, and
doesn’t cross any rivet heads. Drill and rivet it in position. Use two 4mm steel
rivets and snug down firmly, so that it fits tightly with no movement.
b) Determine the best position for the latch, ensuring maximum engagement
when closed. Mark the position and drill and rivet in position. Note there is a
standoff plate that must go between the latch and gusset plate.
c) Determine the best position for the opening lever so that at rest it is vertical.
Mark and drill a 4mm hole in the door frame. Fit the lever to the door frame
with its 4mm panhead securing bolt, head to the outside. A small washer
should be fitted either side of the lever The lever must have a little play to
avoid friction, so don’t do up the nut too tight.
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17 Seats and Seatbelts
17 Seats and Seatbelts
17.1 Seats
a) Assemble the frame as per the drawing, noting that the seat back piece is not
fitted quite yet.
Note the choice of holes in the front of the side tubes, to set the seat
position. If the seat is positioned forwards, a wooden spacer or similar
should be made and secured with cable ties to support the seat back.
Insert the front three tubes into the front of the seat, then lever apart the
rear ends of the side tubes and secure to the rear tube.
b) It is worth cutting the threaded ends of the eyebolts to the minimum 1.5
threads showing above the Nyloc, in order to make the seats more
comfortable when getting in and out of the aircraft.
c) Fit the seat frames to the aircraft.
Figure 311; seat frames.
258
17 Seats and Seatbelts
Figure 312; seat base.
d) The seats themselves have a frame inserted into the back. This should be
bolted to the rear of the seat base frame with the seats in position.
Note that the seat frame threads in to holes in the seat back fabric that
run most of the length of the seat. It is a common mistake only to pass
the frame through the short webbing reinforcement strips..
Ensure that the securing bolts have the threads pointing forwards. It is
acceptable to drill out the holes in the seat base to 5mm, which allows
some movement of the bolts without straining them.
A wooden seat base is included which may be useful for shorter pilots.
Taller pilots should omit this to give increased head-room.
e) Install the seats into the aircraft using clevis pins and split pins.
f) A small diagonal bracing piece should be fitted to each seat base ,Fig 313.
This is a mandatory requirement specified in Service Bulletin SKR-SB-001.
The brace should be at approximately 45° to the two tubes to which it
attaches. Mark the position of the brace on the seat base rear tube, and
drill and rivet in place with a 4mm steel rivet. Then, with the seat in
position on its supports, mark and drill the other hole to accurately hold
the correct position, and secure with another 4mm steel rivet.
Figure 313; diagonal brace
259
17 Seats and Seatbelts
17.2 Seatbelts
a) The seatbelts should already have their shoulder straps looped over the upper
rear cabin cross-piece, Fig 314.
This was done before the covering was riveted along the front of the
cross-piece – take care not to drill and rivet through the belt!.
Figure 314; shoulder strap looped over frame.
b) The lap strap part of the seatbelts should be looped around the main
undercarriage cross-beam.
Take a double wrap around the beam to prevent the strap slipping
under side-loads.
Figure 315; lap strap looped around undercarriage beam.
260
17 Seats and Seatbelts
c) The seatbelt should be brought around the front of the seat, without passing
around the drag link upper brace (the diagonal steel tube with the cover) Fig
316.
Figure 316; position of seatbelts.
261
18 Spats
18 Spats
Figure 317; spats.
18.1 Nose Wheel
a) Check that the axle is correctly positioned behind the forks.
b) The spat should be offered up to the nose-wheel, to mark the position of the
hole for the nose-leg, if not already marked and/or cut-out.
Cut the hole using the same technique as those cut in the instrument
panel, link-drilling and finishing with a flap-wheel. Cutting a little
oversize and finishing the hole with rubber edging super-glued into
place gives a good effect.
The spat may be positioned as per Figure317. Raising the rear of the
spats a little further can give a more racy look if desired, figure 318.
Figure 318; nose wheel spat.
262
18 Spats
c) The spat should be slipped over the nose-leg, and positioned as required.
Mark a point on the spat corresponding to the fork of the nose-leg, close to the
bottom of the spat.
The nose-leg will have to be dropped out of the aircraft to fit the nosewheel spat. Undo the bolt securing the nose-leg at the top of the leg,
and the bolt securing the steering bar to the nose-leg. Have someone
hold the tail of the aircraft down whilst you slide the nose-leg out.
The spat was not fitted earlier to protect it from all the parts which you
dropped whilst fitting the engine!
d) Drill the spat and the nose-leg for a 4mm diameter steel rivet or self-tapping
screw on each side, and rivet the spat in place.
A washer may be required on each side between the fork and the spat
to achieve the correct spacing without distorting the spat. A washer on
the outside helps spread the load.
18.2 Main Wheels
a) The spats may be positioned as per Fig 319.
Note the bulge goes to the inside to encompass the brakes, with the flat
spat side outwards.
Figure 319; main wheel spat.
b) The spats will have to be cut away to clear the undercarriage leg, Fig 320.
Again note that the spats fit over the brake callipers.
c) Remove the wheel retaining tubes and attach the aluminium angle pieces to
the ends.
Position them to be flush with the end of the tube. Drill through the
lower surface of the tube only, and attach with the M5x20 bolt supplied.
d) Refit the retaining tubes.
263
18 Spats
Figure 320; spat cut out for undercarriage leg.
Figure 321; spat brackets.
e) Fit the spats and secure them with M5 bolts with Nylon washers under the
heads to protect the fibreglass.
Three bolts secure each spat, two on the inside and one on the outside.
Figure 322; spat, showing outer mount bolt.
264
19 Curved top Instrument Panel Option
19. Fitting the mark II Curved top Instrument Panel Option
19.1 Fitting the instrument panel
a) Working with the panel material.
The material is polyester glassfibre. This can be cut either with a hacksaw
blade
or a ‘Dremel’ type tool. Edges can be dressed and finished using
sandpaper and a
sanding block. Take care when sanding and cutting not to
put too much pressure on an upward stroke or the gelcoat surface finish may be
chipped. Sanding along
the edge of the material is recommended rather
than across it for this reason.
b) Cut and fit the panel in position
Trim the top and bottom flanges on the
instrument panel to allow it to sit flat against the
cabin uprights.
Fig 323 instrument panel edges
355mm
The panel should fit approximately 355mm
measured from the cockpit floor to the lower edge
of the panel. If the panel is too low the throttle
level will foul the lower edge of the panel before
reaching the full throttle stop. You can check this
by measuring from the top of the instrument
panel to the inside face of the throttle lever
without the end knob. The maximum distance is
40mm.
Fig 324 Vertical dimension
Carefully trim the lower centre portion of the panel to allow it to fit in the correct
position according to the measurements and checks above. Allow at least 3mm
clearance when trimming around the control stick torque tube.
The outer edges of the panel should be trimmed to fit just inside the door hinges,
overlapping the cabin upright.
When trimmed, clamp the panel in position and verify that all fits and is square.
Mark the position of the lower edge of the panel on the cabin uprights. And then
remove the panel.
265
19 Curved top Instrument Panel Option
c) Fix in place the mountings and secure the panel
The panel secures to the cabin uprights each side via a pair of mounting angles.
These should be positioned as shown 20mm and 140mm respectively from the
lower edge of the panel. Drill the uprights with a 4mm drill and secure the angels
in place with 4mm steel rivets. Refit the panel, mark the panel through the angles,
remove and drill the panel using a 5mm drill bit. Refit the panel bolting it in place
to the angles with the 5mm pan head bolts.
140mm
20mm
Fig 324 securing angles and dimensions
The lower centre portion of the panel secures to the central TU19 tubes using two
L brackets and hose clamps as shown. Temporarily secure the L brackets in
position with the clamps and slide them up to position flat against the back edge
of the panel. Check the panel is in the correct position and the lower centre
portion is not flexed forwards or backwards relative to the rest of the panel.
Measure upwards 30mm from the top of the tube TU19’s and drill a 4mm hole
each side. Mark through to the L brackets. Remove them and drill through on the
marks with the 4mm drill bit. Refit and bolt in position with 4mm screws.
30mm
Fig 325 Securing the lower edge
d) Fit the instruments in the panel
266
19 Curved top Instrument Panel Option
You should now have a blank panel secured in the right position. Now is the time
to plan the instrument layout, being mindful of the position of the throttle levers
and their torque tube. A good tip is to cover the face of the panel with masking
tape, which then can be drawn on to mark the intended position of the
instruments. Once the rough layout has been decided on the panel can be
removed and the exact positions and dimensions marked on ready for cutting out.
Cutting out the holes for the instruments can be done in a variety of ways. Rough
cutting can be done by Dremel tool, or by link drilling (drilling a series of holes
next to each other and finally breaking / cutting the centre out). Fine sanding
should be used to finally open up accurately to the marking out. This can be with
a Dremel sanding attachment, or an abrasive flapwheel used in a normal drill, or
with sandpaper wrapped around a tube. The main thing is to take your time, be
careful not to chip gelcoat, and use the actual instrument to check fit as you
approach the final stage. Simple and cheap drilling templates for the mounting
screw positions can be bought that are sized for the two standard instrument
sizes (Light Aero Spares stock them), or you can carefully mark out and drill
them. Be aware that Glassfibre dust can cause skin and respiratory irritation.
Wearing overalls with sleeves taped, and a particle mask are recommended (also
avoid doing this in the Kitchen!)
e) When the instruments are fitted in the panel the panel can be refitted.
The top is braced with two aluminium angles as shown. These can be cut from
the aluminium angles supplied in the main kit that are used to brace across the
standard instrument panel. Cut them so the rebated end will fit under the panel lip
bent down to match the angle of the lip. Size them to fit as shown running from
under the top lip of the instrument panel to just behind the windscreen where it
joins the glassfibre scuttle piece, approximately 10mm below the windscreen
edge. They should be fixed under the instrument panel lip 170mm apart
measured from the inside faces of the angles. Use the two 4mm countersunk
bolts, countersinking the holes in the glassfibre after drilling using a large drill bit
turned slowly by hand. Secure the angles to the engine brace tubes with the P
clips supplied as shown.
170mm
Fig 326 Upper bracing angles
267
19 Curved top Instrument Panel Option
19.2 Fitting the dash top
The dash top is supplied in two halves. Due to the individual nature of each
homebuild aircraft these are supplied oversize, and must be trimmed to fit, prior to
covering with the finishing material.
a) Trim the dash halves to fit.
Offer them in place and mark where trimming is necessary. Large areas of excess
may be removed with a rough cut using a hacksaw blade or sharp ‘Stanley Knife’.
80 grit sanding paper used on a sanding block can be used for precise final
shaping.
When trimming do a little at a time and keep checking the fit. It is useful to mark
the centre of the panel, which can be used as a reference to ensure you are not
trimming too much away at the sides!
The lip protruding over the instrument panel should be around 30mm. Don’t sand
away too much material at the front and reduce this overhang, or the reinforced
areas for the fixing screws wont be in the right place!
During the trimming process it is easy to scratch the windscreen as the dash tops
are repeatedly fitted and removed. It is a good idea to protect the vulnerable
areas with masking tape.
Fig 327 Trimming the dash halves to fit
b) The parts can now be covered.
When happy with the fit, the halves are ready for covering. Lay on the material
and cut out allowing for a 50mm overlap around the front and sides and 70 mm
on the rear edge (the edge that protrudes over the instrument panel).
268
19 Curved top Instrument Panel Option
Lightly sand the top of the dash halves to remove any bumps or spikes that may
be present in the glassfibre – but don’t sand much – it is only glass tissue and
very thin.
Apply vinyl spray adhesive, or similar impact adhesive to stick the fabric in place.
Try to work in a little tension to get the fabric to lay nice and flat with no wrinkles.
Wrap it around the edges, cutting darts where necessary to allow the fabric to
contour around inside curves, and neatly fold edges. The same adhesive as
above can be used, but something with a little better ‘grab’ is easier – a hot glue
gun works well for this. The fabric should be anchored in place on the underside
using a domestic stapler. Take care not to staple too close to the edge on the
area that will overhang the instrument panel, or they will show when fitted.
Fig 328 Covering
Fit the dash halves in place. Shape the insert pieces to
fit. Cover them in fabric using the same techniques as
above.
Fig 329 insert pieces
c) Fitting the dash parts in place.
Fit a strip of self adhesive Velcro to the underside of the insert pieces. The inserts
are held in place using the aluminium strips which span the angle braces. These
should have strips of Velcro applied so they can attach to the inserts and the
angles.
Fig 330 Insert pieces fixing method
269
19 Curved top Instrument Panel Option
With everything in place and positioned for best fit, drill for the fixing bolts. The
holes should be positioned 35mm and 360mm from the panel centerline
respectively, to pass through the panel upper lip 15mm behind the face, drilled
through 5mm. Slide the captive nut clips in place on the dash lip, and then use the
5mm bolts to secure. Finish with the ‘skiffy cap’ covers
Fig 330 fixings for Dash halves
d) Fit the throttle stops.
Size the throttle levers as required trimming so that the end knobs are just below
the dash lip. Position the throttle stops so that the end knobs contact them in the
centre of their radius. Mark the position, drill and fix them in place using 4mm
screws.
e) For those retrofitting this option, check that full throttle can still be achieved at
the carburettors.
Fig 331 Throttle stops
270
20 Centre Console Option
20. Fitting the Centre console option.
Fig 332 Centre console overview
a) First remove the seats to gain free access, if already fitted.
b) Offer up the side panels.
It may be necessary to trim the edges so that they sit flat against the TU19 tubes.
The rear edges should butt up snug against the TU15 tube. With the panels resting in
place mark the forward edge position with a piece of tape.The forward mounting
bracket should be fitted to align with this mark. Use the two self tapping screws to
secure it in the floor positioned as shown.
Self tapping
screws
Fig 334 forward fixings
271
20 Centre Console Option
c) Fit the rear mounting bracket. It secures on the mounting bolts for the floor rear
support bracket.
Fig 335 rear fixings
d) Put a strip of self adhesive hook Velcro on the sides of the TU19 tubes. Put a strip
of the opposite loop Velcro on the inside face of the top of the side panels.
e) Fit the side panels in position. Mark the positions to drill the securing bolt holes.
Remove and drill 5mm. refit and bolt in place using the 5mm pan head screws.
f) Offer up the top panel in position.
Sand the forward face as required to butt up at the right angle neatly against the
instrument panel. It may be necessary to file a small angle on the forward face of the
control stick torque tube support bracket to allow the top panel to sit down in position.
Do not file more than 10mm off the corner.
Fig 336 angle
272
20 Centre Console Option
g) When happy with the fit of the top panel, and after ensuring the stick has full and
free movement without fouling anything, fit the two small securing brackets at the
rear.
To do this first replace the bolts that secure the central brace angles with the slightly
longer ones supplied. Then with the top panel in place offer up the brackets and mark
the position for the securing rivets. Remove the top panel and drill and rivet the
brackets in place using the 4mm aluminium rivets supplied.
Fit longer bolts
here. Do up the
nuts. The brackets
fit on the extended
threaded portion.
Fig 337 Bolt swap
Fixing bracket rivets
into the glassfibre
panel. Fit a washer
and nut to finally hold
in place
Fig 338 Console top rear fitting
h) Apply Hook Velcro to the inside edges of the top panel sides. And loop Velcro to
the rebated edge of the side panels.
i) Fit the top panel in place. The rear brackets attach to the excess threaded portion
of the bolts. Fit a 6mm nut and washer on each.
273
20 Centre Console Option
j) Check the clearance to be able to operate the flaps.
If necessary remove the detent lever, clamp the riveted end in a vice and using a
short length of tube slipped over the detent lever arm bend it upwards approximately
15 degrees. Inspect for a smooth fracture free bend and refit.
Check suitable
clearance here
Fig 339 Detent lever clearance
Finally check everything is secure and the stick has full and free movement, and
there are no cables rubbing on the glassfibre parts. Refit the seats.
274
21 Adjustable Seat Option
21. Fitting the Adjustable Seat Option
21.1 Description
The adjustable seat option allows rapid seat repositioning between two settings. The
seat back is attached to the seat base on a pair of rotating arms. The seat is held in
the forward position by a pair of webbing straps, and in the aft position by Velcro ties.
In the forwards position the seat back sits forwards of the main fuselage structure
supported by a bracket pivoted off the seat back and clipping to the fuselage cross
member TU40.
Fig 339 Seat positions overview
21.2 Modifying the seat base
50m
Drill 4mm
dia hole
360mm
Existing
forward
hole
Drill 6mm
dia hole
425mm
a) Move the front cross member to the second hole – 50mm behind the first
b) Drill a 6mm diameter hole in the vertical plane 425mm behind the forward hole
centre. Re site the rear cross member in this position.
c) Drill a 4mm diameter hole in the horizontal plane 360mm behind the forward
hole centre. This will be used as the pivot hole for the swing arms.
275
21 Adjustable Seat Option
21.3 Modifying the seat back
a) The seat back support hoop slides into pockets that run vertically down the
seat cushion. In order to fix the pivoted extension hoop, it must be modified to
allow the frame to come out of the pocket at the pivot point.
Use a sharp blade and carefully cut horizontal slots in the pockets at the positions
shown. If possible heat the blade so that the cut edges are not left ragged.
Use factory cut
hole
as
measuring
datum
90mm
300 mm
Fig 340 Seat cushion pocket modification
b) Drill the pivot holes in the seat back hoop.
Drill these 4mm diameter in a transverse orientation 310mm above the lower fixing
holes
310mm
Fig 341 Drilling the hoop pivot holes
276
21 Adjustable Seat Option
21.4 Assembly
a) Assemble the seat frame, with the fabric base in position.
b) Fix the rotating arms assembly to the base using 4mm bolts. Place washers
either side of the rotating arms, and tighten only enough to take out any slack,
but still permit easy rotation.
c) Assemble the seat back components, sliding the seat back support in the
pockets in the seat cushion as shown in the photos. Fix in place the extension
hoop, using 4mm bolts, heads to the insides.
Fig 342 Attaching the hoop
d) Attach the seat back assembly to the rotating arm assembly using 4mm bolts
heads rearwards.
e) Drill the rear cross member with two 4mm holes and secure the Velcro ties in
position with a 4mm steel rivet each. Holes should be positioned 40mm
outside the existing holes
40mm
apart
Fig 343 Securing the Velcro ties
277
21 Adjustable Seat Option
f) Make sure the seat base is square and then fit the bracing strap in the rear
corner nearest the outside of the aircraft, drilling and securing with 4mm rivets.
Fig 344 Bracing angle
g) Fit the webbing straps, running them under the seat, around the forwards
cross member and the pivoting arm assembly cross member
Fig 345 Webbing straps
h) Finally refit the seat in the aircraft
278
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