Portable Multi-Gas Monitor GX-6000 Operating Manual

Portable Multi-Gas Monitor GX-6000 Operating Manual
Control Equipment Pty Ltd
A.B.N. 23 009 838 582
Leaders in Gas Detection
Since 1977
Portable Multi-Gas Monitor
GX-6000 Operating Manual
Part Number: 71-0362
Revision: C
Released: 2/7/17
OIL & GAS
CONFINED
SPACE
Head Office:
Unit 1 / 3 Deakin Street
Brendale Qld 4500
Ph: +61 7 3481 9000
HVAC
MINING
LABORATORIES
COUNCILS
Postal Address:
PO Box 5904
Brendale BC Qld 4500
[email protected]
www.controlequipment.com.au
DEFENCE
SHIPPING
FUMIGATION
Representatives/Offices in:
Sydney
Hobart
Melbourne
Auckland
Adelaide
Wellington
Perth
Christchurch
Contents
1 Outline of the Product ...................................................................................................................................... 3
Preface ............................................................................................................................................................ 3
Purpose of use ................................................................................................................................................ 3
Checking gases to be detected ...................................................................................................................... 4
Definition of DANGER, WARNING, CAUTION and NOTE ............................................................................ 5
2 Important Notices on Safety ............................................................................................................................ 6
2-1. Danger cases........................................................................................................................................... 6
2-2. Warning cases ......................................................................................................................................... 7
2-3. Precautions .............................................................................................................................................. 8
2-4. Safety information .................................................................................................................................. 10
3 Product Components ..................................................................................................................................... 11
3-1. Main unit and standard accessories ...................................................................................................... 11
3-2. Names and functions for each part ....................................................................................................... 15
4 Alarm Activation ............................................................................................................................................. 20
4-1. Gas alarm activation .............................................................................................................................. 20
4-2. Fault alarm activation ............................................................................................................................ 22
4-3. Panic alarm ............................................................................................................................................ 23
4-4. Man-down alarm .................................................................................................................................... 24
5 How to Use .................................................................................................................................................... 25
5-1. Before using the gas monitor ................................................................................................................ 25
5-2. Preparation for start-up ......................................................................................................................... 25
5-3. How to start the gas monitor ................................................................................................................. 31
5-4. Air calibration ......................................................................................................................................... 34
5-5. How to detect ......................................................................................................................................... 36
5-6. Power-off ............................................................................................................................................... 41
6 Setting Procedure .......................................................................................................................................... 42
6-1. Display setting (DISP mode) flow .......................................................................................................... 42
6-2. Display setting ....................................................................................................................................... 47
6-3. User mode setting ................................................................................................................................. 61
7 Maintenance .................................................................................................................................................. 68
7-1. Maintenance intervals and items ........................................................................................................... 68
7-2. Calibration (CAL mode) ......................................................................................................................... 70
7-2-1. Preparation for calibration .............................................................................................................. 70
7-2-2. Entering CAL mode ........................................................................................................................ 71
7-2-3. Air calibration (AIR CAL)................................................................................................................. 72
7-2-4. AUTO CAL ...................................................................................................................................... 74
7-2-5. SINGLE CAL ................................................................................................................................... 76
7-2-6. BUMP TEST ................................................................................................................................... 77
7-3. How to clean .......................................................................................................................................... 79
7-4. Parts replacement ................................................................................................................................. 80
7-4-1. Gas inlet filter replacement ............................................................................................................. 80
7-4-2. Sensor filter replacement ................................................................................................................ 81
7-4-3. Sensor replacement ....................................................................................................................... 82
7-4-4. VOC sensor maintenance .............................................................................................................. 84
7-4-5. Regular replacement parts ............................................................................................................. 87
8 Storage and Disposal .................................................................................................................................... 88
8-1. Procedures to store the gas monitor or leave it for a long time ............................................................ 88
8-2. Procedures to use the gas monitor again ............................................................................................. 88
8-3. Disposal of products .............................................................................................................................. 89
9 Troubleshooting ............................................................................................................................................. 90
9-1. Abnormalities on unit ............................................................................................................................. 90
9-2. Abnormalities of readings ...................................................................................................................... 92
10 Product Specifications ................................................................................................................................. 93
10-1. List of specifications ............................................................................................................................ 93
10-2. List of accessories ............................................................................................................................... 95
11 Appendix ...................................................................................................................................................... 96
11-1. Calibration history/various trend/event history functions ..................................................................... 96
11-2. Definition of terms ................................................................................................................................ 98
11-3. List of gases for reading VOC ............................................................................................................. 99
-2-
1 Outline of the Product
Preface
1
1
Outline of the Product
Preface
Thank you for choosing our portable multi-gas monitor GX-6000 (hereinafter referred to as "gas monitor").
First of all, please check that the model number of the product you purchased matches the model number
of the product targeted by this manual.
This manual contains handling methods and specifications for proper use of this product. Not only the
first-time users but also the users who have already used the product must read and understand this
manual before using it.
Note that the contents of this manual are subject to change without notice for product improvement. Also,
any copying or reproduction of this manual, in whole or in part, without permission is prohibited.
Regardless of warranty period, we shall not make any indemnification for accidents and damage caused by
using this gas monitor.
Make sure to read the warranty policy specified on the warranty.
Purpose of use
This product is a pump suction type multi-gas monitor that enables simultaneous monitoring of up to six
different gases: oxygen in the air, combustible gas <%LEL>, toxic gases (carbon monoxide and hydrogen
sulfide) and two of the toxic gases (volatile organic compound, sulfur dioxide, etc.).
The combustible gases detected by this gas monitor are general combustible gases used in ordinary
factories, oil tankers, etc., that is HC (displayed in isobutane conversion) or CH4 (methane).
Note that detection results of the gas monitor are not intended to guarantee life or safety in any way.
A combination of gases to be detected varies by the specification of the gas monitor. Check the gases to be
detected before use and conduct gas detection properly in accordance with purposes.
Check the gases to be detected by your GX-6000 in "Checking gases to be detected" (P. 4).
In addition to this operating manual, an operating manual for the data logger management program Control
Equipment Pty Ltd optional) is available. Contact Control Equipment Pty Ltd if it is needed.
-3-
1 Outline of the Product
Checking gases to be detected
Checking gases to be detected
A combination of gases to be detected varies by the specification of the gas monitor.
Check the gases to be detected by your GX-6000 with the nameplate attached to the side of the product
before use.
Check the gases to be detected with the product code
Position
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5) (6)
(7) (8)
Example)
Symbol
1
0
H
M
0
1
0
1
0
Gas to be detected
Oxygen (O2)
(O2 out of detection targets)
Combustible gas (HC) <%LEL>
Combustible gas (CH4) <%LEL>
(HC/CH4 <%LEL> out of detection targets)
Hydrogen sulfide (H2S)
(H2S out of detection targets)
Carbon monoxide (CO)
(CO out of targets)
P1
Volatile organic compound (VOC) <ppb>
P2
Volatile organic compound (VOC) <ppm>
E1
Sulfur dioxide (SO2)
E2
Nitrogen dioxide (NO2)
E3
00
Hydrogen cyanide (HCN)
(VOC/SO2/NO2/HCN out of detection targets)
When "1M10P1E3" is indicated, the gases to be detected are "O2, CH4 <%LEL>, H2S, VOC
(ppb) and HCN".
-4-
1 Outline of the Product
Definition of DANGER, WARNING, CAUTION and NOTE
Definition of DANGER, WARNING, CAUTION and NOTE
Throughout this manual, the following indications are used to ensure safe and effective work.
DANGER
Indicates that improper handling may cause death or serious damage on
life, health or assets.
WARNING
Indicates that improper handling may cause serious damage on health or
assets.
CAUTION
NOTE
Indicates that improper handling may cause minor damage on health or
assets.
Indicates advice on handling.
-5-
2 Important Notices on Safety
2-1. Danger cases
2
2
Important Notices on
Safety
To maintain the performance and use the gas monitor safely, observe the following instructions of
DANGER, WARNING and CAUTION.
2-1. Danger cases
DANGER
About use

While conducting measurement in a manhole or confined space, do not lean over or look into the
manhole or closed space. It may lead to dangers because oxygen-deficient air or other gases may
blow out.

Oxygen-deficient air or other gases may be discharged from the gas exhausting outlet. Never
inhale the air or gases.

High-concentration (100% LEL or higher) gases may be discharged from the gas exhausting
outlet. Never use fire near it.
WARNING

If any abnormality is found on the gas monitor, promptly contact Control Equipment Pty Ltd . Visit
our Web site to find your nearest Control Equipment Pty Ltd office.
-6-
2 Important Notices on Safety
2-2. Warning cases
2-2. Warning cases
WARNING




Sampling point pressure
The gas monitor is designed to draw gases around it under the atmospheric pressure. If excessive
pressure is applied to the gas inlet and outlet of the gas monitor, detected gases may leak out
from its inside and may cause dangerous conditions. Be sure that excessive pressure is not
applied to them while used.
Handling of sensor
Never disassemble the electrochemical type sensor or galvanic cell type sensor. Inside electrolyte
may cause severe skin burns if it contacts skin. Also, it may cause blindness if it contacts eyes. If
electrolyte is adhered on your clothes, that part on your clothes is discolored or its material is
decomposed. If contact occurs, rinse the area immediately with a large quantity of water.
Fresh air adjustment in the atmosphere
When the fresh air adjustment is performed in the atmosphere, check the atmosphere for
freshness before beginning the adjustment. If interference gases exist, the adjustment cannot be
performed properly, thus causing erroneous detection and leading to dangers when the gas leaks.
WARNING
Response to gas alarm
Issuance of a gas alarm indicates that there are extreme dangers. Take proper actions based on
your judgment.
Panic alarm and man-down alarm

Panic and man-down alarms are intended to assist users and people around in making a decision
and not intended to guarantee life or safety. Do not depend only on this function to use the gas
monitor.
(Normally the man-down alarm is set to OFF and unavailable. To use this function, please contact
Control Equipment Pty Ltd.)

If a panic or man-down alarm is triggered, the people around must take an appropriate action after
confirming the situation.
Battery level check

Before use, check that there remains sufficient battery power. When the gas monitor is used for
the first time or is not used for a long period, the batteries may be exhausted. Replace them with
new ones before use.

If a low battery voltage alarm is triggered, gas detection cannot be conducted. If the alarm is
triggered during use, turn off the power and promptly charge or replace the batteries in a safe
place.
Others

Do not throw the gas monitor into fire.

Do not wash the gas monitor in a washing machine or ultrasonic cleaner.

Do not block the buzzer sound opening. No alarm sound can be heard.

Do not remove batteries while the power is ON.

-7-
2 Important Notices on Safety
2-3. Precautions
2-3. Precautions
CAUTION

•
•
•
•

•


•
•
•
•

Do not use the gas monitor where it is exposed to oil, chemicals, etc. Do not submerge the gas
monitor under water on purpose.
Do not use in a place where the gas monitor is exposed to liquids such as oil and chemicals.
The gas inlet and outlet are not water-proof. Be careful not to let water such as rainwater get into
these parts. Because this may cause trouble and gas cannot be detected.
Do not place the gas monitor where water or dirt gets accumulated. The gas monitor placed at
such a location may malfunction due to water or dirt that gets into the buzzer sound opening, gas
inlet, etc.
Note that drawing in dirty water, dust, metallic powder, etc. will significantly deteriorate the sensor
sensitivities. Be very careful when the gas monitor is used in an environment where these
elements exist.
Do not use the gas monitor in a place where the temperature drops below -20ºC or rises over
50ºC.
The operating temperature of the gas monitor is -20 to +50ºC. Do not use the gas monitor at
higher temperatures, humidities and pressures or at lower temperatures than the operating range.
Avoid long-term use of the gas monitor in a place where it is exposed to direct sunlight.
Do not store the gas monitor in a sun-heated car.
Observe the operating restrictions to prevent condensation inside the gas monitor.
Condensation formed inside the gas monitor causes clogging or gas adsorption, which may
disturb accurate gas detection. Thus, condensation must be avoided. In addition to the installation
environment, carefully monitor the temperature/humidity of the sampling point to prevent
condensation inside the gas monitor. Please observe the operating restrictions.
Do not use a transceiver near the gas monitor.
Radio wave from a transceiver or other radio wave transmitting device near the gas monitor may
disturb readings. If a transceiver or other radio wave transmitting device is used, it must be used
in a place away from the gas monitor where it disturbs nothing.
Do not use the gas monitor near a device that emits strong electromagnetic waves
(high-frequency or high-voltage devices).
Verify that the pump operation status display is rotating before using the gas monitor.
If the pump operation status display is not rotating, gas detection cannot be performed properly.
Check whether the flow rate is lost.
-8-
2 Important Notices on Safety
2-3. Precautions
CAUTION



•
•
•
•





•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Verify that the operation status display is blinking before using the gas monitor.
If the operation status display is not blinking, gas detection cannot be performed properly.
Never fail to perform a regular maintenance.
Never fail to perform a regular maintenance for the gas monitor to ensure safety. Continuing to use
the gas monitor without performing maintenance will compromise the sensitivity of the sensor, thus
resulting in inaccurate gas detection.
Others
Pressing buttons unnecessarily may change the settings, preventing alarms from activating
correctly. Operate the gas monitor using only the procedures described in this operating manual.
Do not drop or give shock to the gas monitor. The accuracy of the gas monitor may be
deteriorated.
Do not use the gas monitor while charging it.
Whereas the gas monitor can detect oxygen, combustible gases, carbon monoxide, hydrogen
sulfide, etc., the measurement environment may include gases that have harmful effects on the
sensors of this unit.
The gas monitor cannot be used in the presence of the following gases:
(1) Sulfides (such as H2S and SO2) continuously existing in high concentrations
(2) Halogen gases (such as chloride compounds and chlorofluorocarbons)
(3) Silicone (Si compounds)
Do not use the gas monitor in the presence of the above gases (such as high-concentration
sulfides, halogen gases and silicone), which may shorten the sensor life significantly or cause
malfunctions such as inaccurate readings.
In case the gas monitor is used for detection in the presence of silicone, etc., be sure to check the
gas sensitivities before using it again.
Do not jab the buzzer sound opening with a sharp-pointed item. The unit may malfunction or get
damaged, allowing foreign matters, etc. to get inside.
Do not remove the panel sheet on the LCD display. The dust-proof performance will be
deteriorated.
Do not affix a label or the like on the infrared port. Infrared communications can no longer be
conducted.
Replacement of batteries
Turn off the power of the gas monitor before replacing batteries of the battery unit.
Replace all of the three batteries with new ones at one time.
Pay attention to the polarities of the batteries.
Usage
In a low-temperature environment, the operating time is shortened due to the battery performance
property.
At low temperatures, the responses of the LCD display may slow down.
Perform air calibration under pressure and temperature/humidity conditions close to those in the
operating environment and in fresh air.
Perform air calibration after the reading is stabilized.
If there is a sudden temperature change of 15ºC or more between the storage and operational
locations turn on the power of the gas monitor, let it stand for about 10 minutes in a similar
environment to the operational location, and perform air calibration in fresh air before using it.
When cleaning the gas monitor, do not splash water over it or use organic solvents such as
alcohol and benzine on it. The surface of the gas monitor may be discolored or damaged.
If the gas monitor is not used for a long time, turn on the power at least once every six months and
check that the pump draws in air (about three minutes). The gas monitor, when not activated for a
long time, may cease to work because of hardening of the grease in the pump motor.
If the gas monitor is not used for a long time, store it after removing the batteries. Battery leaks
may result in fire, injury, etc.
When using the gas monitor after long-term storage, never fail to perform a calibration. For
information on readjustment including calibration, please contact Control Equipment Pty Ltd .
-9-
2 Important Notices on Safety
2-4. Safety information
2-4. Safety information
The GX-6000 can measure maximum six gases with six sensors.
Standard unit measures four gases with four sensors for general combustible gases(LEL), Oxygen(O2),
Hydrogen Sulfide(H2S) and Carbon Monoxide(CO).
For other remaining two slots are for Smart Sensors which consist of sensor part and circuit board and are
connected with apparatus through digital signal output so various sensors. Two different types of detection
principle are applied for Smart Sensors and up to two sensors can be installed into the GX-6000.
Gas is sampled by a built-in micro pump.
Either alkaline battery pack “BUD-6000” or lithium-ion battery pack “BUL-6000” can be installed into
GX-6000.
Structure of battery unit allows end users to replace it by themselves.
It is supposed to replace the battery unit, alkaline battery, and charge the rechargeable battery at
non-hazardous area. Also, Charging BUL-6000 should be done with a specific model, BC-6000 or
SDM-6000.
Specification for safety
•Ex ia IIC T4 Ga
•
II 1 G Ex ia IIC T4 Ga
•Ambient temperature range for use : -20°C to +50°C
•Ambient temperature range during battery charging : 0°C to +40°C
Electrical data
•Power supply of Li-ion battery unit : BUL-6000
Two parallel connected Li-ion cells used in battery pack BUL-6000 are from type Maxell
INR18650PB1 or SDI INR18650-15M or SONY US18650VT3.
Um=250V.
•Power supply of alkaline battery unit : BUD-6000
Powered by three series AA size alkaline batteries, model LR6 by TOSHIBA.
Certificate numbers
•IECEx Certificate number : IECEx *** yy.****
ATEX/IECEx
•ATEX Certificate number : ****yy ATEX****
List of standards
•IEC 60079-0:2011
・EN60079-0:2012
•IEC 60079-11:2011
・EN60079-11:2012
•IEC 60079-26:2006
・EN60079-26:2007
WARNING
•DO NOT CHARGE IN HAZARDOUS LOCATION.
•DO NOT CHARGE IT EXCEPT BY GENUINE CHARGER.
•DO NOT REPLACE BATTERY UNIT IN HAZARDOUS LOCATION.
•DO NOT REPLACE DRY BATTERIES IN HAZARDOUS LOCATION.
•DO NOT ATTEMPT TO DISASSEMBLE OR ALTER THE INSTRUMENT.
•USE ONLY WITH CONNECTED ALKALINE AA BATTERY, TYPE LR6
MANUFACTURED BY TOSHIBA.
INST. No. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
AB C
D
E
A: Manufacturing year (0-9)
B: Manufacturing month (1-9,XYZ for Oct.-Dec.)
C: Manufacturing lot
D: Serial number
E: Code of factory
- 10 -
3 Product Components
3-1. Main unit and standard accessories
3
3
Product Components
3-1. Main unit and standard accessories
Unpack and check the main unit and accessories. If
any part is missing, contact Control Equipment Pty Ltd.
Main unit
See "3-2. Names and functions for each part" (P. 15) for names and functions of each part of the gas
monitor and LCD display.
GX-6000 main unit
- 11 -
3 Product Components
3-1. Main unit and standard accessories
Standard accessories
Lithium ion
battery unit
(BUL-6000)
1 pc
Charger
1 pc
Belt clip
1 pc
(3 screws)
Rubber boot
1 pc
Protect the gas
monitor from
shocks by being
hit, etc.
The gas monitor
can be hung from a
belt.
Taper nozzle
1 pc
Hand strap
1 pc
LCD protection
film
1 pc
Product warranty
Operating manual
Protect the display
from fine
scratches.
- 12 -
3 Product Components
3-1. Main unit and standard accessories
DANGER
About explosion-proof

Do not modify or change the circuit, structure, etc.

When measuring the oxygen concentration, do not measure anything but a mixture of air and
combustible gases or vapors and toxic gases.

When using the gas monitor in a hazardous area, take the following countermeasures for
preventing dangers resulting from electrostatic charges.
(1) Wear anti-static clothes and conductive shoes (anti-static work shoes).
(2) For indoor use, use the gas monitor while standing on a conductive work floor (with a leakage
resistance of 10 MΩ or less).

The connectable battery unit is BUL-6000 or BUD-6000.
The specifications of the gas monitor are as follows:
Smart sensor 1 circuit: Allowable voltage of 4.95 V, allowable current of 0.770 A and allowable
power of 0.787 W
Smart sensor 2 circuit: Allowable voltage of 4.95 V, allowable current of 0.770 A and allowable
power of 0.787 W
Main circuit: Allowable voltage of 4.95 V, allowable current of 1.112 A and allowable power of
1.137 W
Pump circuit: Allowable voltage of 4.95 V, allowable current of 0.770 A and allowable power of
0.787 W
Motor circuit: Allowable voltage of 4.95 V, allowable current of 0.209 A and allowable power of
0.214 W
Buzzer circuit: Allowable voltage of 4.95 V, allowable current of 0.355 A and allowable power of
0.363 W
NOTE



The charger can be attached to a DIN rail to use.
Use a DIN rail of IEC715 top-hat type TH35.
Hang the tab of the charger unit on the barb part of DIN rail, and then
attach the stopper to the barb part of DIN rail.
To release, push the stopper downward.
Tabs
Stopper
- 13 -
3 Product Components
3-1. Main unit and standard accessories
Optional items (sold separately)
Dry battery unit
(BUD-6000)
1 pc
AA alkaline
battery
3 pcs
Data logger
management
program
Various filters
Various
calibration gases
Gas sampling
bag
- 14 -
3 Product Components
3-2. Names and functions for each part
3-2. Names and functions for each part
This section describes names and functions of main unit and battery unit parts and LCD display.
Main unit
Name
Main function
(1)
LCD display
Displays the gas concentration and so on.
(2)
Buzzer sound opening
Emits operation and judging sounds. (Do not block it.)
(3)
Alarm LED arrays
The red lamp blinks in response to an alarm.
(4)
Illumination lamp
Lights up by holding down the
(5)
Infrared communication
port
Used to carry out data communications with a PC when the data
logger management program is used.
(6)
▲/AIR button
Used to perform air calibration on the detection screen. Or used
to move the cursor (>) up in the DISP and user modes.
(7)
SHIFT/▼
/(PANIC) button
Used to move the cursor (>) down in the DISP and user modes.
In emergency situations, hold down this button to trigger a panic
alarm.
(8)
DISP/LOCK button
Displays the DISP mode and changes the display.
Holding down this button with LCD inversion (P. 56) set locks the
display.
- 15 -
(illumination lamp) button.
3 Product Components
3-2. Names and functions for each part
Name
Main function
(9)
RESET/ (illumination
lamp) button
Used to confirm and reset an alarm. Holding down this button
turns on the upper illumination lamp.
(10)
POWER/ENTER button
Turns on/off the power. Or used to confirm selection in the DISP
and user modes.
(11)
Gas inlet
Draws in a gas. (Do not block it.)
(12)
Gas outlet
Exhausts the gas drawn into the gas monitor. (Do not block it.)
(13)
Holes for hand strap
(2 positions)
Used to attach the provided hand strap.
(14)
Sensor cover
Protects the sensor inside. May be opened only when the sensor
is to be replaced.
(15)
Filter case
Protects the dust filter inside. Do not remove the case except for
maintenance and replacement.
(16)
Battery unit release lever
Push the lever while sliding it to remove the battery unit.
(17)
Battery unit connection
terminal
Used to supply power of the battery unit to the gas monitor.
CAUTION



Do not jab the buzzer sound opening with a sharp-pointed item. Water, foreign matters, etc. may
get inside and cause malfunction or damage.
Do not remove the panel sheet on the surface. The water-proof and dust-proof performances will
be deteriorated.
Do not affix a label or the like on the infrared communication port. Infrared communications can no
longer be conducted.
NOTE

In this operating manual, the buttons equipped with multiple functions are described in operational
procedures in the following manner.
Example) POWER/ENTER button is described as follows:
• POWER button in turning on/off the power
• ENTER button in confirming settings.
- 16 -
3 Product Components
3-2. Names and functions for each part
Battery unit
<Lithium Ion Battery Unit (BUL-6000)>
<Dry Battery Unit (BUD-6000)>
- 17 -
3 Product Components
3-2. Names and functions for each part
LCD display
<Normal Mode>
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
(9)
(10)
Name
Operating state display
Battery level display
Clock display
Pump operation status
display
Combustible gas
concentration
Oxygen concentration
Hydrogen sulfide
concentration
Carbon monoxide
concentration
Arbitrarily selected gas
concentration
Bar display
Main function
Displays the operating status. Blinks at a normal state.
Displays the battery level. See NOTE for a guide for battery level.
Displays the current time.
Displays the drawing status. Rotates at a normal state.
Displays the gas concentration as numeric output.
Displays the gas concentration with bar.
NOTE


The gas concentration display positions can be changed. See "Changing display positions of
measured gases" (P. 64) for how to change the display positions.
The battery level is indicated as follows:
Sufficient
Low
Need charging (replacement of batteries)
If the battery level further drops, the battery icon starts blinking.
- 18 -
3 Product Components
3-2. Names and functions for each part
<Leak Check Mode>



The gas monitor is equipped with leak check mode as well as normal mode. The leak check mode,
however, is set to OFF normally and thus unavailable. To use this function, please contact Control
Equipment Pty Ltd.
Leak check full scale value can be selected from 500, 1000, 2000 and 5000 ppm.
The following figure shows the LCD display in the leak check mode.
(1)
Name
Operating state display
(2)
Battery level display
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
Clock display
Pump operation status display
Gas concentration display
Leak check full scale display
Bar display
Main function
Displays the operating status. Blinks at a normal state.
Displays the battery level. See NOTE (P. 18) for a guide for
battery level.
Displays the current time.
Displays the drawing status. Rotates at a normal state.
Displays the gas concentration as numeric output.
Displays the full scale value to be used in the leak check mode.
Displays the gas concentration with bar.
- 19 -
4 Alarm Activation
4-1. Gas alarm activation
4
4
Alarm Activation
4-1. Gas alarm activation
<Gas Alarm Type>
"Gas alarm" is triggered when the concentration of detected gas reaches or exceeds the alarm setpoint
values shown in the following table. (Self-latching)
Gas alarm types are the first alarm (AL1), second alarm (AL2), TWA alarm, STEL alarm and OVER alarm
(over scale).
Alarm type
First alarm Second alarm TWA alarm STEL alarm
OVER alarm
Oxygen (O2)
19.5 vol%
23.5 vol%
-
-
40.0 vol%
5 %LEL
10 %LEL
-
-
100.0 %LEL
10.00 ppm
30.00 ppm
15.00 ppm
60.00 ppm
10.00 ppm
30.00 ppm
4,300 ppb
6,000 ppb
-
-
50,000 ppb
400.0 ppm
600.0 ppm
42.0 ppm
60.0 ppm
6,000 ppm
2.00 ppm
5.00 ppm
2.00 ppm
5.00 ppm
99.90 ppm
Nitrogen dioxide (NO2)
3.00 ppm
6.00 ppm
3.00 ppm
-
20.00 ppm
Hydrogen cyanide (HCN)
5.0 ppm
10.0 ppm
-
4.7 ppm
20.00 ppm
5,000ppm
10,000 ppm
10.00 vol%
Combustible gas
(HC/CH4)
<%LEL>
Hydrogen sulfide (H2S)
Carbon monoxide (CO)
Volatile organic
compound (VOC)
<ppb>
Volatile organic
compound (VOC)
<ppm>
Sulfur dioxide (SO2)
15.00 pm
200.00 ppm
100.0 ppm
500.0 ppm
Carbon dioxide (CO2)
5,000 ppm
Ammonia (NH3)
25.00 ppm
50.00 ppm
2.00 ppm
5.00 ppm
400.0 ppm
Chlorine (CI2)
3.00 ppm
6.00 ppm
3.00 ppm
-
10.00 ppm
Methane (CH4)
10.0 %LEL
-
-
-
100.0 %LEL
100.0 vol%
-
-
100.0 %LEL
30.0 vol%
Hydrocarbons
-
-
50.0 %LEL
<Sounding Buzzer and Blinking Lamp for Gas Alarm>
In response to a gas alarm, the buzzer sounds, the alarm LED arrays blink and vibration occurs in two
steps.
The following shows the operations of each type.
Alarm type
First alarm
Second alarm
TWA alarm
STEL alarm
OVER alarm
Sounding
Repeatedly
Repeatedly
Repeatedly
Repeatedly
Repeatedly
buzzer
sounds strong
sounds strong
sounds strong
sounds strong
sounds strong
and weak
and weak
and weak
and weak
and weak
beeps at about
beeps at about
beeps at about
beeps at about
beeps at about
1-second
0.5-second
1-second
1-second
0.5-second
intervals.
intervals.
intervals.
intervals.
intervals.
"Beep, beep"
"Beep, beep,
"Beep, beep"
"Beep, beep"
"Beep, beep,
beep, beep"
beep, beep"
Blinking
Repeatedly
Repeatedly
Repeatedly
Repeatedly
Repeatedly
alarm LED
blinks at about
blinks at about
blinks at about
blinks at about
blinks at about
arrays
1-second
0.5-second
1-second
1-second
0.5-second
intervals.
intervals.
intervals.
intervals.
intervals.
Vibration
Vibrate at an alarm state.
- 20 -
4 Alarm Activation
4-1. Gas alarm activation
<Gas Alarm Display>
In case a gas alarm occurs, the gas concentration and alarm detail are displayed alternately.
If the detection range is exceeded (over scale), "OVER" is displayed in the gas concentration display area.
Display example
Methane (CH4) concentration: 10%LEL
First alarm triggered
Alarm type
LCD display
First alarm
Displays the
gas
concentration
and "AL1"
alternately.
Second alarm
Displays the
gas
concentration
and "AL2"
alternately.
TWA alarm
Displays the
gas
concentration
and "TWA"
alternately.
STEL alarm
Displays the
gas
concentration
and "STEL"
alternately.
OVER alarm
Displays the
gas
concentration
and "OVER"
alternately.
WARNING

Issuance of a gas alarm indicates that there are extreme dangers. Take proper actions based on
your judgment.
NOTE

Responses to an alarm can be checked by alarm test in the DISP mode (P. 49). Note that the
display is not changed during alarm test.
- 21 -
4 Alarm Activation
4-2. Fault alarm activation
4-2. Fault alarm activation
"Fault alarm" is triggered when an abnormality is detected in the gas monitor. (Self-latching)
Fault alarm types are system abnormalities, battery voltage abnormalities, clock abnormalities, low flow
rate, sensor abnormalities and calibration failure.
In response to a fault alarm, the buzzer sounds and alarm LED arrays blink.
• Sounding buzzer: Repeatedly sounds intermittent beeps at about one-second intervals. "Beep beep,
beep beep"
• Blinking alarm LED arrays: Repeatedly blinks at about one-second intervals.
The following shows display examples of fault alarms.
System abnormalities
Battery voltage
abnormalities
Low flow rate
Sensor abnormalities/
calibration failure
Clock abnormalities
If a fault alarm is triggered, determine the cause and take appropriate action.
If the gas monitor has problems and is repeatedly malfunctioning, contact Control Equipment Pty Ltd
immediately.
NOTE

For information on malfunctions (error messages), see "Troubleshooting" (P. 90).
- 22 -
4 Alarm Activation
4-3. Panic alarm
4-3. Panic alarm
A panic alarm is a manually triggered alarm to notify the people around of abnormalities.
WARNING


The panic alarm is intended to assist users and people around in making a decision. The detection
results are not intended to guarantee life or safety in any way. Do not depend only on this function to
use the gas monitor.
Use the panic alarm appropriately after confirming the situation.
<Sounding Buzzer and Blinking Lamp for Panic Alarm>
Alarm type
Sounding
buzzer
Blinking
alarm LED
arrays
Preliminary alarm
Main Alarm
Repeatedly sounds intermittent blips at
about 0.5-second intervals.
"Blip, blip, blip, blip"
Repeatedly blinks at about 0.5-second
intervals.
Repeatedly sounds strong and weak beeps
at about 1-second intervals.
"Beep, beep, beep, beep"
Repeatedly blinks at about 1-second
intervals.
Trigger and pattern of panic alarm
Hold down the PANIC button to trigger a panic alarm when sensing an abnormality.
For a panic alarm, a main alarm is triggered after a five-second preliminary alarm.
NOTE
To stop a preliminary or main alarm of panic alarm, press the RESET button.
- 23 -
4 Alarm Activation
4-4. Man-down alarm
4-4. Man-down alarm
A man-down alarm is triggered if the built-in motion sensor, which monitors the motion of the user carrying
the gas monitor, detects no motion of the user for a certain period of time.
Normally the man-down alarm is set to OFF and unavailable. To use this function, please contact Control
Equipment Pty Ltd.
WARNING


The man-down alarm is intended to assist people around the user in making a decision. The
detection results are not intended to guarantee life or safety in any way. Do not depend only on
this function to use the gas monitor.
Use the man-down alarm appropriately after confirming the situation.
<Sounding Buzzer and Blinking Lamp for Man-down Alarm>
Alarm type
Sounding
buzzer
Blinking
alarm LED
arrays
Preliminary alarm 1
Preliminary alarm 2
Main alarm
Repeatedly sounds
intermittent blips at about
1-second intervals.
"Blip, blip"
Repeatedly blinks at about
1-second intervals.
Repeatedly sounds
intermittent blips at about
0.5-second intervals.
"Blip, blip, blip, blip"
Repeatedly blinks at about
0.5-second intervals.
Repeatedly sounds strong
and weak beeps at about
1-second intervals.
"Beep, beep, beep, beep"
Repeatedly blinks at about
1-second intervals.
Display and pattern of man-down alarm
If an abnormality in the motion of the user is detected, the lamp blinks and alarms
are triggered in a step-by-step manner: preliminary alarm 1, preliminary alarm 2
and then main alarm while vibrating.
When a main alarm is triggered, the clock display on the LCD display shows
"MAN DOWN".
The following shows the time to switch from a preliminary alarm to main alarm.
• Preliminary alarm 1: 60 seconds after detection
• Preliminary alarm 2: 75 seconds after detection
• Main alarm: 90 seconds after detection
NOTE


The preliminary alarms of man-down alarm are stopped and measurement state is resumed when
the motion of the user is detected.
To stop the main alarm of man-down alarm, press the RESET button.
- 24 -
5 How to Use
5-1. Before using the gas monitor
5
5
How to Use
5-1. Before using the gas monitor
Not only the first-time users but also the users who have already used the gas monitor must follow the
operating precautions.
Ignoring the precautions may damage the gas monitor, resulting in inaccurate gas detection.
5-2. Preparation for start-up
Before starting gas detection, check the followings.
• Check that the battery level is sufficient
• Check that the taper nozzle is not bent or has no hole
• Check that the filter inside the gas monitor is not contaminated or clogged
• Check that the main unit and taper nozzle are connected properly
Charging and attaching lithium ion battery unit (BUL-6000)
Charge with the provided charger according to the following procedure when the gas monitor is used for
the first time or the battery level of the rechargeable battery in the lithium ion battery unit is low.
DANGER




Replace the lithium ion battery unit in a safe place.
Charge the battery unit using the provided charger in a safe place.
Charge the battery unit at ambient temperatures between 0 to 40ºC.
The specifications of this unit are as follows:
Maximum voltage: 4.2 V, Ambient temperature: -20 - +50ºC
- 25 -
5 How to Use
5-2. Preparation for start-up
CAUTION






Do not use the gas monitor while charging it. Correct measurements cannot be obtained.
Furthermore, the rechargeable batteries get deteriorated more quickly and may have shorter life.
Do not charge the batteries while the gas monitor is wet. The charger is neither water-proof nor
dust-proof.
The charger is not explosion-proof.
After attaching the lithium ion battery unit, lock the battery cover completely. If the battery cover is
not completely locked, the battery unit may drop off or water may get in through the clearance.
Do not damage the rubber seal.
To maintain the water-proof and dust-proof performances, it is recommended to replace the
rubber seal every two years, whether or not it has an abnormality.
<Charging Lithium Ion Battery>
1
Insert the DC plug of the AC
adapter into the DC jack of the
charger.
Lay the DC plug cord along the side
through the notch at the bottom of the
charger.
2
Insert the AC adapter to the
outlet.
3
Insert the main unit to the
charger straight from above.
When the charger is connected, the
charging indicator lamp lights up in
red. (Full charge requires about three
hours at maximum.)
When charging is completed, the
charging indicator lamp goes off.
4
When charging is completed,
disconnect the AC plug from
the outlet.
- 26 -
5 How to Use
5-2. Preparation for start-up
<Removing/Attaching Lithium Ion Battery Unit>
1
Check that the power of the gas
monitor is turned off.
If the power is on, press the
POWER/ENTER button to turn it off.
2
Slide the battery unit release
lever to the right side and push
it.
Slide the battery unit release
lever to the right side.
3
Remove the lithium ion battery
unit from the main unit.
CAUTION

Disconnect the AC plug from the outlet while it is not in use.
NOTE






When attaching the battery unit, be sure that the battery unit release
lever is locked.
If it is not completely locked, the battery unit may drop off or water
may get in through the clearance. Water may also get in if a minute
foreign substance is caught beneath the battery unit.
During charging, the lithium ion battery unit may get hot, but this is
not an abnormality.
Charging causes the main unit temperature to increase. When
charging is completed, leave it for at least ten minutes before use. If
the gas monitor is used while it is still hot, correct measurement may
not be performed.
Fully charged battery cannot be recharged.
It is possible to charge the lithium ion battery unit alone after
removing it from the main unit.
- 27 -
5 How to Use
5-2. Preparation for start-up
Attaching optional dry battery unit (BUD-6000)
When the optional dry battery unit is attached instead of lithium ion battery unit, three AA alkaline batteries
are used to operate the gas monitor.
When the dry battery unit is used for the first time, or when the battery level is low, replace or attach new
AA alkaline batteries according to the following procedure.
DANGER



Replace the dry battery unit in a safe place.
Replace the batteries in a safe place.
The specifications of this unit are as follows:
Maximum voltage: 4.95 V, Power: LR6 (Manufactured by Toshiba Corporation, 1.5 VDC) x 3,
Ambient temperature: -20 - +50ºC
CAUTION





Turn off the power of the gas monitor before replacing the batteries.
Replace the batteries in a safe place where explosive gases are not present.
Replace all of the three batteries with new ones at one time.
Pay attention to the polarities of the batteries when attaching them.
After attaching the batteries, lock the battery cover completely. If the battery cover is not
completely locked, the dry batteries may drop off or water may get in through the clearance. Water
may also get in if a minute foreign substance is caught beneath the battery cover.
<Removing/Attaching Dry Battery Unit>
1
Check that the power of the gas
monitor is turned off.
If the power is on, press the
POWER/ENTER button to turn it off.
2
Slide the battery unit release
lever to the right side and push
it.
Slide the battery unit release
lever to the right side.
3
Remove the dry battery unit
from the main unit.
- 28 -
5 How to Use
5-2. Preparation for start-up
NOTE


When attaching the battery unit, be sure that the battery unit
release lever is locked.
If it is not completely locked, the battery unit may drop off or water
may get in through the clearance. Water may also get in if a
minute foreign substance is caught beneath the battery unit.
<Replacing Dry Batteries>
1
Release the lock plate of the
battery cover.
2
Open the battery cover.
3
Put new batteries paying
attention to the polarities.
Remove old batteries as needed.
4
Close the battery cover and
lock plate.
Close the lock plate securely until it
clicks.
- 29 -
5 How to Use
5-2. Preparation for start-up
Attaching taper nozzle
To perform measurement, attach the taper nozzle to
the gas inlet of the gas monitor.

DANGER
Do not use the taper nozzles not specified by Control Equipment Pty Ltd or other parts for the gas
monitor.
- 30 -
5 How to Use
5-3. How to start the gas monitor
5-3. How to start the gas monitor
When the power is turned on, various settings including date and alarm setpoint are displayed and then the
measurement screen is displayed in the normal mode.
Power-on
Hold down the POWER/ENTER button (over
five seconds) until the buzzer blips.
Power is turned on.
The entire LCD display lights up.
NOTE


The gas monitor is equipped with leak check mode as well as normal mode. The leak check mode,
however, is set to OFF normally and thus unavailable. To use this function, please contact Control
Equipment Pty Ltd.
When the power is turned on with the leak
check mode set to ON, the screen for selecting
the normal mode or leak check mode is
displayed after the entire LCD display lights up.
Select the mode with the ▲/▼ button and
press the ENTER button to confirm it.
- 31 -
5 How to Use
5-3. How to start the gas monitor
Screen transition from selecting normal mode to displaying
measurement screen
When the power is turned on, the LCD display changes automatically as shown below before the
measurement screen is displayed.
The buzzer blips twice and
then the measurement
screen is displayed.
- 32 -
5 How to Use
5-3. How to start the gas monitor
CAUTION

After start-up, perform air calibration (P. 33) before performing gas detection.
NOTE
If any abnormality is detected in the sensor, "FAIL" is displayed in place of measured value just
before entering the measurement screen and a sensor abnormality alarm is triggered. In this case,
press the RESET button to temporarily reset the sensor abnormality alarm. However, the alarm
cannot be reset if there is an abnormality in all the sensors. After the alarm is reset, "- - - -" appears
in the concentration display area of the gas with sensor abnormality. Detection of the gas having
sensor abnormality will become unavailable. Promptly contact Control Equipment Pty Ltd.

If there is an abnormality in the built-in clock, a fault alarm FAIL CLOCK may be triggered. Press the
RESET button in this case. The fault alarm is temporarily reset, and measurement is started with
incorrect clock time.
WARM-UP

Displays the WARM-UP screen.
DATE

Displays a year/month/day and time. The date/time and display type can be set in the user mode (P.
61).
BATTERY

Displays the battery level (voltage) in the upper section of the screen.

Displays the used battery (lithium ion or dry battery) in the center of the screen.

Displays the gas alarm pattern setting (LATCHING <self-latching>) in the lower section of the
screen.
GAS

Displays the gas name of detection target. Detection principles are indicated by the following
symbols for some gases.

Symbol
Gas to be detected
Detection principle
P
○
Volatile organic compound (VOC)
Photoionization type
E
○
Sulfur dioxide (SO2)
Nitrogen dioxide (NO2)
Hydrogen cyanide (HCN)
Electrochemical type
GAS SMART 1/GAS SMART 2

For the specification targeting volatile organic compound (VOC) for detection, isobutylene or a gas
name set for reading is displayed. See "VOC reading setting" (P. 57) for the reading setting.
F.S.

Displays the full scale value of the gas to be detected.
AL1

Displays the first alarm setpoint of the gas to be detected.
AL2

Displays the second alarm setpoint of the gas to be detected.
STEL

Displays the STEL alarm setpoint of the gas to be detected. A STEL value refers to a concentration
of toxic substances which does not have harmful effects on the users' health by 15-minute
continuous exposure provided that everyday exposure does not exceed TWA value.
TWA

Displays the TWA alarm setpoint of the gas to be detected. A TWA value refers to a time weighted
average concentration of toxic substances which is considered no harm on almost all the users'
health by repeated exposure at regular work of eight hours a day or 40 hours a week.
- 33 -
5 How to Use
5-4. Air calibration
5-4. Air calibration
Air calibration is zero adjustment to correctly measure the current gas concentration.
1
Hold down the AIR button on the
measurement screen.
The air calibration screen is displayed.
Keep the AIR button pressed while the screen shown
in the right figure is displayed.
Zero adjustment is not performed when the button is
released before the screen is displayed.
2
Release the AIR button when the screen
shown in the right figure is displayed.
When zero adjustment is completed, the screen
shown in the right figure is displayed.
- 34 -
5 How to Use
5-4. Air calibration
When zero adjustment is successfully completed, the
measurement screen returns automatically.
WARNING

When air calibration is performed in the atmosphere, check the atmosphere for freshness before
beginning it. If interference gases exist, zero adjustment cannot be performed properly, thus
leading to dangers when the gas leaks.
CAUTION



Perform air calibration under pressure and temperature/humidity conditions close to those in the
operating environment and in fresh air.
Perform air calibration after the reading is stabilized.
If there is a sudden temperature change of 15ºC or more between the storage and operational
locations turn on the power of the gas monitor, let it stand for about 10 minutes in a similar
environment to the operational location, and perform air calibration in fresh air before using it.
NOTE

When air calibration fails, "FAIL" appears in the concentration display area of the faulty sensor as
well as "SENSOR". Press the RESET button to reset the fault alarm (calibration failure). When the
alarm is reset, the value before calibration is displayed.
- 35 -
5 How to Use
5-5. How to detect
5-5. How to detect
With the measurement screen displayed, put the taper nozzle close to the detection area and read the
value on the LCD display.
<Normal Mode>
Display example
<Leak Check Mode>
The gas monitor is equipped with leak check mode as well as normal mode. The leak check mode,
however, is set to OFF normally and thus unavailable. To use this function, please contact Control
Equipment Pty Ltd.
Gas concentration
Indicate gas
concentration
with bar
DANGER



While conducting measurement in a manhole or confined space, do not lean over or look into the
manhole or closed space. It may lead to dangers because oxygen-deficient air or other gases may
blow out.
Oxygen-deficient air or other gases may be discharged from the gas exhausting outlet of the gas
monitor. Never inhale the air or gases.
High-concentration (100% LEL or higher) gases may be discharged from the gas exhausting
outlet of the gas monitor. Never use fire near it.
- 36 -
5 How to Use
5-5. How to detect
WARNING






The gas monitor is designed to draw gases around it under the atmospheric pressure. If excessive
pressure is applied to the gas inlet and outlet of the gas monitor, detected gases may leak out
from its inside and may cause dangerous conditions. Be sure that excessive pressure is not
applied to them while used.
Do not connect the taper nozzle directly to a detection area with a pressure higher than the
atmospheric pressure. The internal piping system may be damaged.
When air calibration is performed in the atmosphere, check the atmosphere for freshness before
beginning it. If interference gases exist, the calibration cannot be performed properly, thus leading
to dangers when the gas leaks.
Issuance of a gas alarm indicates that there are extreme dangers. Take proper actions based on
your judgment.
Gas detection cannot be performed with a low battery voltage. If the low battery voltage alarm is
triggered during use, turn off the power and promptly charge or replace the batteries in a safe
place.
Do not block the buzzer sound opening. No alarm sound can be heard.
CAUTION



An oxygen concentration higher than a certain level is required for the combustible gas sensor
<%LEL> of the gas monitor to correctly detect gases and display concentrations.
When measuring concentrations of oxygen in inert gases for a long time, the carbon dioxide
concentration in the air must be 15% or less. When the gas monitor is used in the inert gas with a
carbon dioxide concentration higher than 15%, perform measurement in as short time as possible.
Using the gas monitor under high concentrations for a long time may shorten the life of the oxygen
sensor.
Long-time detection of a high-concentration combustible gas may adversely influence the
combustible gas sensor <%LEL>. If presence of high-concentration combustible gas in a
measurement location is known in advance, set the combustible gas sensor <%LEL> protection
setting (P. 44) to ON before use.
NOTE



In a low-temperature environment, the operating time is shortened due to the battery performance
property.
At low temperatures, the responses of the LCD display may slow down.
If a combustible gas with 100%LEL or higher concentration is drawn, some adsorbed gas may
remain in the taper nozzle or filter. After drawing a high-concentration combustible gas, be sure to
draw in fresh air and perform the air clening until the reading indicates zero to remove adsorbed
gases. Performing fresh air calibration before cleaning completely may result in inaccurate
adjustment, giving adverse influence on measurement.
- 37 -
5 How to Use
5-5. How to detect
Basic operating procedures
<Normal Mode>
This mode is used on the measurement screen after power-on.
<Fault Alarm State>
(Self-latching <Reset after recovery to normal state>)
- 38 -
5 How to Use
5-5. How to detect
<Leak Check Mode>
The gas monitor is equipped with leak check mode as well as normal mode. The leak check mode,
however, is set to OFF normally and thus unavailable. To use this function, please contact Control
Equipment Pty Ltd.
With the leak check mode set to ON, the mode selection screen is displayed after power-on. When
the leak check mode is selected, the following screen transition is made.
NOTE
 In the leak check mode, a full scale value can be selected from four levels: 500 ppm, 1000 ppm, 2000
ppm and 5000 ppm. The value switches to another every time the DISP button is pressed.
 The buzzer sounds intermittently according to the gas concentration. As the concentration becomes
higher, the interval of beeps of the buzzer becomes shorter.
 For the specification targeting carbon monoxide (CO) for detection, the PEAK value and carbon
monoxide (CO) concentration can be set so that they are displayed alternately every time the
RESET button is pressed. Contact Control Equipment Pty Ltd for the setting.
- 39 -
5 How to Use
5-5. How to detect
Manual memory
Up to 256 arbitrary instantaneous values during measurement can be recorded.
When the number of recorded data points reaches the maximum, recorded data will be overwritten, starting
from the oldest data.
1
Hold down the ▲ and ▼ buttons at the same
time on the measurement screen.
The memory number, station ID, recorded date and
recorded concentration are displayed in turn as
shown below.
2
Press the ENTER button.
"SAVED" is displayed on the screen, and the memory
number, station ID, date and gas concentration at the
time the ENTER button is pressed are recorded.
After recording, the data from memory number to
recorded concentration are displayed again in turn. To
continue recording the data, press the ENTER button.
3
Press the DISP button to end.
The measurement screen returns.
NOTE

The gas concentration data recorded by manual memory can be viewed according to "Log data
display" (P. 53).
- 40 -
5 How to Use
5-6. Power-off
5-6. Power-off
CAUTION

If the concentration display is not reset to zero (or 20.9% for the oxygen concentration display)
after measurement is completed, leave the gas monitor in fresh air until the display returns to zero
and then turn off the power.
Keep the POWER/ENTER button pressed.
To turn off the power, hold down the POWER/ENTER button
after the display returns to zero (0, or 20.9% for oxygen) in a
safe place.
The buzzer blips three times and "TURN OFF" appears on
the display before the power is turned off.
Power-off
NOTE
To turn off the power, keep the button pressed until the display disappears.

CAUTION


When the gas monitor is contaminated, clean it with a waste cloth, etc.
When cleaning the gas monitor, do not use organic solvents such as alcohol and benzine on it.
- 41 -
6 Setting Procedure
6-1. Display setting (DISP mode) flow
6
6
Setting Procedure
6-1. Display setting (DISP mode) flow
The DISP mode allows users to view and change various display settings.
Press the DISP button on the measurement screen.
Various screens are displayed in turn by pressing the DISP
button.
Press the DISP button when settings are
completed.
The previous screen returns. Press the button several times
more to call the measurement screen.
Item
Combustible gas
sensor <%LEL>
protection setting
(Displayed only for the
specification targeting
combustible gas
<%LEL> for detection)
PEAK display/clear
LCD display
Details
Remarks
Protects the combustible gas
sensor <%LEL> from
high-concentration
combustible gases.
Press the ENTER
button to go to the
setting screen
(P. 47)
Displays the maximum
concentration of gas (or
minimum concentration for
oxygen) detected from
power-on to the present.
Go to the
display/clear screen
(P. 48)
- 42 -
6 Setting Procedure
6-1. Display setting (DISP mode) flow
STEL value display
Displays the STEL value after
power-on.
TWA value display
Displays the TWA value after
power-on.
Full scale/
alarm setpoint
display/
alarm test
Displays the full scale and
alarm setpoint values and
allows users to check the
alarm activation of the setting
displayed.
Measurement time
display
Displays the measurement
time from power-on.
Date/voltage display
Displays a date and time,
battery level and battery type.
- 43 -
Press the ENTER
button to go to the
confirmation screen
(P. 49)
6 Setting Procedure
6-1. Display setting (DISP mode) flow
Data logger remaining
time display
Displays the remaining time
which data logger can record.
Clear log data
Clears the data recorded in
the manual memory.
Press the ENTER
button to go to the
clear screen
(P. 50)
User ID
display/selection
Displays user ID and allows
users to select it.
Press the ENTER
button to go to the
display/selection
screen
(P. 51)
Station ID
display/selection
Displays station ID and allows
users to select it.
Press the ENTER
button to go to the
display/selection
screen
(P. 52)
Log data display
Displays data recorded in the
manual memory.
Press the ENTER
button to go to the
display screen
(P. 53)
- 44 -
6 Setting Procedure
6-1. Display setting (DISP mode) flow
Peak display setting
Used to set peak display so
that a peak value blinks on
the bar displayed on the right
side of gas concentration on
the measurement screen.
Press the ENTER
button to go to the
setting screen
(P. 54)
Gas concentration
display setting
Used to set the measurement
screen to split display to six
divisions or single display.
When the single display is
selected, automatic or manual
switching of display can be
set.
Press the ENTER
button to go to the
setting screen
(P. 55)
LCD inversion setting
Used to invert the LCD
display by 180 degrees
according to the direction of
the gas monitor.
Press the ENTER
button to go to the
setting screen
(P. 56)
VOC reading setting
(Displayed only for the
specification targeting
VOC for detection)
By changing the setting to the
pre-registered gas in the gas
monitor, the converted
concentration from the
detection target gas
(isobutylene) will be
displayed.
Press the ENTER
button to go to the
setting screen
(P. 57)
LCD black and white
inversion setting
Used to invert the black and
white display of LCD.
Press the ENTER
button to go to the
setting screen
(P. 59)
- 45 -
6 Setting Procedure
English display
setting
(Displayed only when
selecting languages
other than English)
6-1. Display setting (DISP mode) flow
Used to resume English
display when another
language is set.
NOTE


Press the ENTER
button to go to the
setting screen
(P. 60)
If the screen is left unoperated for 20 seconds, the measurement screen returns.
Pressing the DISP button on the English display setting screen returns to the measurement screen.
- 46 -
6 Setting Procedure
6-2. Display setting
6-2. Display setting
Combustible gas sensor <%LEL> protection setting
(only for the specification targeting combustible gas <%LEL> for detection)
The combustible gas sensor <%LEL> is turned off to protect it from contact with high-concentration
combustible gases.
1
Press the DISP button to display
the screen shown in the right
figure, and then press the ENTER
button.
2
Select with the ▲/▼ button.
Select the combustible gas sensor
<%LEL> protection setting.
3
Press the ENTER button.
When the setting is completed, the screen
shown in the step 1 returns automatically.
NOTE

With ON selected, "- - - -" is displayed in the combustible gas <%LEL> concentration display area.
Also, "NO ALARM" is displayed in the clock display area and the gas alarm function is disabled for
all gases.
- 47 -
6 Setting Procedure
6-2. Display setting
PEAK display/clear
This item is used to display or clear the maximum concentration (or minimum concentration for oxygen)
detected during measurement from power-on to the present.
1
Press the DISP button to display
the screen shown in the right
figure.
2
Hold down the RESET button to
clear PEAK value.
3
When "RELEASE" is displayed,
release the RESET button.
PEAK value has been cleared.
After PEAK value is cleared, the screen
shown in the step 1 returns automatically.
- 48 -
6 Setting Procedure
6-2. Display setting
Full scale/alarm setpoint display/alarm test
This item is used to display the full scale and alarm setpoint values and check the alarm activation of the
setting displayed.
Note that the LCD display is not changed during alarm test.
1
Press the DISP button to display the
screen shown in the right figure, and
then press the ENTER button.
2
Press the ▲/▼ button to display the
full scale or alarm setpoint values.
Full scale display
Alarm 1 display
Alarm 2 display
TWA Value Display
3
Display a desired screen and press
the ENTER button.
The alarm LED arrays blink in red,
allowing the user to check the alarm
activation of the screen displayed.
4
Press the ENTER button to stop the
alarm activation.
To exit from the display and alarm test,
press the DISP button to return to the
screen shown in the step 1.
- 49 -
STEL Value Display
6 Setting Procedure
6-2. Display setting
Clear log data
This item is used to clear the log data recorded in the manual memory.
1
Press the DISP button to display
the screen shown in the right
figure, and then press the ENTER
button.
2
Press the ENTER button to clear
the log data.
Press the DISP button to return to the
screen shown in the step 1 without
clearing the log data.
3
Press the ENTER button.
The log data has been cleared.
After the log data is cleared, the screen
shown in the step 1 returns automatically.
- 50 -
6 Setting Procedure
6-2. Display setting
User ID display/selection
This item is used to display or select user ID.
1
Press the DISP button to display
the screen shown in the right
figure, and then press the ENTER
button.
2
Select user ID with the ▲/▼ button.
3
Press the ENTER button.
Press the DISP button to return to the
screen shown in the step 1 without
displaying or selecting user ID.
When the selection is completed, the
screen shown in the step 1 returns
automatically.
NOTE



When the unit is used for the first time, user ID is displayed as shown
in the right figure.
If not specified, user ID numbers are registered as 001 to 128.
The data logger management program (optional) is required to
register or change an ID. Contact Control Equipment Pty Ltd to
purchase it.
- 51 -
6 Setting Procedure
6-2. Display setting
Station ID display/selection
This item is used to display or select station ID.
1
Press the DISP button to display the
screen shown in the right figure,
and then press the ENTER button.
2
Select station ID with the ▲/▼
button.
Press the DISP button to return to the
screen shown in the step 1 without
displaying or selecting station ID.
3
Press the ENTER button.
When the selection is completed, the
screen shown in the step 1 returns
automatically.
NOTE



When the unit is used for the first time, station ID is displayed as
shown in the right figure.
If not specified, station ID numbers are registered as 001 to 128.
The data logger management program (optional) is required to
register or change an ID. Contact Control Equipment Pty Ltd to
purchase it.
- 52 -
6 Setting Procedure
6-2. Display setting
Log data display
This item is used to display log data recorded in the manual memory.
1
Press the DISP button to display
the screen shown in the right
figure, and then press the ENTER
button.
2
Select recorded data with the ▲/▼
button.
Recorded data is indicated by
year/month/day, time and memory
number. When a station ID has been set,
it is displayed under a memory number.
Press the DISP button to return to the
screen shown in the step 1 without
displaying the log data.
3
Press the ENTER button.
The selected recorded data is displayed.
Press the ENTER button again to return
to the screen shown in the step 2.
To exit from the log data display, press the
DISP button to return to the screen shown
in the step 1.
NOTE


See "Manual memory" (P.40) for recording gas concentrations.
When no gas concentration is recorded, the screen shown in the
right figure appears.
- 53 -
6 Setting Procedure
6-2. Display setting
Peak display setting
This item is used to set peak display so that a peak value blinks on the bar displayed on the right side of
gas concentration on the measurement screen.
1
Press the DISP button to display
the screen shown in the right
figure, and then press the ENTER
button.
2
Select with the ▲/▼ button.
3
Press the ENTER button.
Select whether or not to blink peak value
on the bar.
Press the DISP button to return to the
screen shown in the step 1 without
changing the setting.
When the setting is completed, the screen
shown in the step 1 returns automatically.
NOTE

When the peak bar display setting is selected, peak value
blinks on the bar as shown in the right figure.
- 54 -
6 Setting Procedure
6-2. Display setting
Gas concentration display setting
This item is used to select the measurement screen display type from split display to six divisions and
single display. For the single display, automatic or manual switching of display can be selected.
1
Press the DISP button to display
the screen shown in the right
figure, and then press the ENTER
button.
2
Select display type with the ▲/▼
button.
DISPLAY ALL indicates a split display to
six divisions.
SCROLL AUTO indicates a single display
which displays multiple channels in turn
automatically.
SCROLL MANUAL indicates a single
display which switches a gas
concentration display to another manually
by pressing the ENTER button.
Press the DISP button to return to the
screen shown in the step 1 without
changing the setting.
3
Press the ENTER button.
When the setting is completed, the screen
shown in the step 1 returns automatically.
NOTE


The figures on the right show examples
of split display to six divisions and single
display.
The gas concentration display setting is
reset by turning on/off the power.
- 55 -
6 Setting Procedure
6-2. Display setting
LCD inversion setting
This item is used to invert the LCD display by 180 degrees according to the direction of the gas monitor.
1
Press the DISP button to display
the screen shown in the right
figure, and then press the ENTER
button.
2
Select with the ▲/▼ button.
Select the LCD inversion setting.
Press the DISP button to return to the
screen shown in the step 1 without
changing the setting.
3
Press the ENTER button.
When the setting is completed, the screen
shown in the step 1 returns automatically.
NOTE



When the LCD inversion setting is set to OFF (display
direction fixed), "LOCK" is displayed (lights up steadily) in the
upper right section of the screen as shown in the right figure.
Even when the LCD inversion setting is set to ON (display
direction inverted), the display direction can be fixed by
holding down the DISP button during use. While the display
direction is fixed, "LOCK" is displayed (blinks) in the upper
right section of the screen as shown in the right figure.
For the case the display direction is fixed by holding down
the DISP button, the setting is reset by turning on/off the
power.
- 56 -
6 Setting Procedure
VOC reading setting
6-2. Display setting
(only for the specification targeting VOC for detection)
Normally, a volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration is displayed after isobutylene conversion;
however, the reading can be converted to a pre-registered gas concentration.
1
Press the
DISP button
to display the
screen shown
in the right
figure, and
then press
the ENTER
button.
2
Select with
the ▲/▼
button.
USER LIST
indicates a set
gas list, and
RECENT
indicates a
recently
selected gas list.
All gases are
displayed from A
to X.
3
Press the
ENTER
button.
Gas types are
displayed.
Press the DISP
button to return
to the step 2.
4
Press the
ENTER
button.
The name,
chemical
formula,
conversion
factor, etc. of
each gas are
displayed.
Press the DISP
button to return
to the step 3.
- 57 -
6 Setting Procedure
5
6-2. Display setting
Press the
ENTER
button.
When the
setting is
completed, the
screen shown in
the step 1
returns
automatically.
NOTE





The setting is retained after power-off.
Up to 30 frequently selected gas types can be registered in USER LIST.
The data logger management program (optional) is required to use USER LIST.
The history of selecting gas type from the list of all gases can be kept in RECENT (up to eight types).
See the appendix "List of gases for reading VOC" (P. 99) for the gas types available for reading.
- 58 -
6 Setting Procedure
6-2. Display setting
LCD black and white inversion setting
This item is used to invert the black and white display of LCD.
1
Press the DISP button to display
the screen shown in the right
figure, and then press the ENTER
button.
2
Select with the ▲/▼ button.
Select the LCD black and white inversion
setting.
Press the DISP button to return to the
screen shown in the step 1 without
changing the setting.
3
Press the ENTER button.
When the setting is completed, the
screen shown in the step 1 returns
automatically.
NOTE

The figure on the right shows an example of black and white
inversion.
- 59 -
6 Setting Procedure
6-2. Display setting
English display setting
This item is used to resume English display when another language is used.
To correct erroneous language setting, resume English display once using this function and set again.
1
(Example: Resuming English display from Japanese display)
Press the DISP button to display
the screen shown in the right
figure, and then press the ENTER
button.
<Display
Contents>
LANGUAGE
CHANGE
TO ENGLISH
YES/ENTER
NO/DISP
2
Press the ENTER button.
Press the DISP button to return to the
screen shown in the step 1 without
changing to English display.
LANGUAGE
CHANGE
TO ENGLISH
CONFIRM?
The displayed language is changed to
English.
When the setting is completed, the screen
shown in the step 1 (displayed in English)
is displayed automatically.
NOTE

The language setting can be changed in the user mode (P. 61) as well.
- 60 -
6 Setting Procedure
6-3. User mode setting
6-3. User mode setting
The display positions of date/time, gas concentration, etc. can be changed in the user mode to make
them easier to use.
Displaying user mode
1
When the power is off, press the POWER
button while pressing the ▲ or ▼ button.
The screen to select user or maintenance mode is
displayed.
2
Select USER MODE and press the ENTER
button.
The user mode menu is displayed.
3
When the setting is completed, select START
MEASURE in the user mode menu and then
press the ENTER button.
The unit operates just like after turning on the power
and goes on to the measurement screen.
NOTE


The user mode menu returns after setting various items. Press the DISP button to return in the
process of setting.
The maintenance mode is intended for important settings to perform normal measurement. This is
unavailable for users to prevent an accidental change of settings. If the maintenance mode is
selected accidentally, turn off the power once and then turn it on again.
- 61 -
6 Setting Procedure
6-3. User mode setting
Setting date/time
This item is used to set date/time.
1
Select DATE with the ▲/▼ button.
2
Press the ENTER button.
3
When year is set, press the ENTER
button.
The year portion (YYYY) blinks.
Change numbers with the ▲/▼ button.
The month portion (MM) blinks.
Change numbers with the ▲/▼ button.
Similarly, set day, hour and minute.
Press the DISP button to go back to the
previous portion like month to year.
4
When minute is set, press the
ENTER button.
When the setting is completed, the user
mode menu returns automatically.
- 62 -
6 Setting Procedure
6-3. User mode setting
Selecting date display format
A desired format can be selected from three options for date display.
1
Select DATE FORMAT with the
▲/▼ button and then press the
ENTER button.
2
Select display with the ▲/▼
button.
DD/MM/YYYY indicates day/month/year.
MM/DD/YYYY indicates month/day/year.
YYYY/MM/DD indicates year/month/day.
Press the DISP button to return to the
screen shown in the step 1 without
changing the display format.
3
Press the ENTER button.
When the setting is completed, the user
mode menu returns automatically.
- 63 -
6 Setting Procedure
6-3. User mode setting
Changing display positions of measured gases
The measured gas concentration display positions can be changed.
1
Select CONFIGURE CH with the
▲/▼ button and then press the
ENTER button.
2
Select the display position to
change with the ▲/▼ button and
then press the ENTER button.
Display positions of CH1 to CH6 are as
follows.
Use ESCAPE to return to the user mode
menu.
3
Select the display to exchange with
the ▲/▼ button.
The display positions of the selected
channel and the selected channel in the
step 2 (blinking) are exchanged.
4
Press the ENTER button.
When the setting is completed, the screen
shown in the step 2 returns automatically.
To return to the user mode menu, press
the DISP button, or select ESCAPE and
press the ENTER button.
NOTE

The display of the same measured gas cannot be allocated to multiple CH positions.
- 64 -
6 Setting Procedure
6-3. User mode setting
Changing display language
This item is used to change the language used on the LCD display.
1
Select LANGUAGE with the ▲/▼
button and then press the ENTER
button.
2
Select language with the ▲/▼
button.
3
Press the ENTER button.
When the setting is completed, the display
changes to the selected language and the
user mode menu returns automatically.
- 65 -
6 Setting Procedure
6-3. User mode setting
Displaying ROM/SUM
This item is used to check ROM number and the version of error detection data (checksum) sent with data.
1
Select ROM/SUM with the ▲/▼
button and then press the ENTER
button.
ROM number is displayed.
After calculation, SUM is displayed.
2
Press the ENTER button.
The display ends and then the user mode
menu returns automatically.
- 66 -
6 Setting Procedure
6-3. User mode setting
Setting password
This item is used to set password to enter the user mode.
1
Select PASSWORD with the ▲/▼
button and then press the ENTER
button.
2
Select ON with the ▲/▼ button and
then press the ENTER button.
3
Set a four-digit password.
4
Press the ENTER button.
The leftmost "0" blinks.
Select a number from 0 to 9 with the
▲/▼ button and then press the ENTER
button. The next digit will blink.
When the setting is completed, the user
mode menu returns automatically.
NOTE

With a password set, the password entry screen shown in the
right figure appears before entering the user mode or CAL mode.
Enter a password with the ▲/▼ button and then press the
ENTER button.
- 67 -
7 Maintenance
7-1. Maintenance intervals and items
7
7
Maintenance
The gas monitor is an important instrument for the purpose of safety.
To maintain the performance of the gas monitor and improve the reliability of safety, perform a regular
maintenance.
7-1. Maintenance intervals and items
Perform the following maintenance regularly before use.
• Daily maintenance: Perform maintenance before beginning to work.
• Monthly maintenance: Perform alarm test once a month.
• Regular maintenance: Perform maintenance once or more for every six months to maintain the
performance as a safety unit.
Maintenance
item
Battery level
Concentration
display
Operation of
main unit
Pump
operation
Filter
Alarm test
Span
adjustment
Gas alarm
check
Maintenance content
Check that the battery level is
sufficient.
Make the gas monitor draw in fresh
air. Check that the concentration
display value is zero (or 20.9% on
the oxygen meter). When the value
is other than zero, perform zero
adjustment by air calibration after
ensuring that no interference gases
exist around.
Check the LCD display for a fault
indication.
Check the pump operation status
display for a fault indication.
Check that the filter is not
contaminated.
Perform alarm test and check that
the alarm LED arrays, buzzer and
vibrator function normally.
Perform span adjustment using a
calibration gas.
Check the gas alarm using a
calibration gas.
Daily
maintenance
Monthly
maintenance
Regular
maintenance
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
-
○
○
-
-
○
-
-
○
WARNING

If any abnormality is found on the gas monitor, promptly contact RIKEN KEIKI.
- 68 -
7 Maintenance
7-1. Maintenance intervals and items
NOTE




Perform span adjustment using a calibration gas at least once every six months.
The span adjustment requires dedicated equipment and creation of calibration gas. Therefore,
contact Control Equipment Pty Ltd for span adjustment.
The built-in sensors of the gas monitor have a validity period and must be replaced regularly.
The sensor life has expired if, for example, the sensors cannot be calibrated in span adjustment, the
readings do not come back after air calibration, or the readings fluctuate. In this case, contact Control
Equipment Pty Ltd. Note that the warranty period is one year.
About maintenance services
We provide services on regular maintenance including span adjustment, other
adjustments and maintenance.
To make the calibration gas, dedicated tools, such as a gas cylinder of the specified concentration and gas
sampling bag must be used.
Our qualified service engineers have expertise and knowledge on the dedicated tools used for services,
along with other products. To maintain the safety operation of the gas monitor, please use our maintenance
service.
The followings are typical maintenance services. Please contact Control Equipment Pty Ltd for more
information.
<Typical Maintenance Services>
Battery level
check
Concentration
display check
Flow rate check
Filter check
Alarm test
Checks the battery level.
Verifies that the concentration display value is zero (or 20.9% on the oxygen meter)
using a zero gas.
Performs air calibration (zero adjustment) if the reading is incorrect.
Checks the flow rate indicator for a fault indication.
Checks the flow rate by using an external flow meter to verify the correctness of the
flow rate indicator on the gas monitor. If the flow rate is incorrect, performs the flow
rate adjustment.
Checks the dust filter for dust or clogging.
Replaces a dirty or clogged dust filter.
Performs alarm test to check that the alarm lamp, buzzer and vibrator function
normally.
Span
adjustment
Performs span adjustment using a calibration gas.
Gas alarm check
Checks the gas alarm using a calibration gas.

Checks the alarm. (Checks triggering of alarm when the alarm setpoint is
reached.)

Checks the delay time. (Checks time to delay until the alarm is triggered.)

Checks the buzzer, lamp, vibrator and concentration display. (Checks each
activation of two-step alarm.)
Cleaning and
repair of the unit
(visual
diagnosis)
Unit operation
check
Replacement of
consumable
parts
Checks dust or damage on the surface of the unit, cleans and repairs such parts.
Replaces parts which are cracked or damaged.
Operates the buttons to check the operation of functions and parameters.
Replaces consumable parts, such as a sensor, filter and pump.
- 69 -
7 Maintenance
7-2. Calibration (CAL mode)
7-2. Calibration (CAL mode)
The CAL mode of the gas monitor provides AUTO CAL and SINGLE CAL in addition to AIR calibration.
AUTO CAL performs calibration with the predetermined gas concentration, while SINGLE CAL performs
calibration by setting gas concentration each time for a single channel.
The gas monitor is equipped with a bump test (function check) function; however, it is set to OFF normally
and thus unavailable. To use this function, please contact Control Equipment Pty Ltd.
Perform span adjustment of sensors using a calibration gas at least once every six months
(recommendation).
The span adjustment requires dedicated equipment and a calibration gas. Contact Control Equipment Pty
Ltd for it.
CAUTION

Do not use a lighter gas to check the sensitivity of the gas monitor. A constituent of the lighter gas
may deteriorate the sensor performances.
7-2-1. Preparation for calibration
<Required Equipment/Material>
 Calibration gas (optional)
 Gas sampling bag (optional)
<Recommended Calibration Gas Concentration>
Gas to be detected
Oxygen (O2)
Carbon monoxide (CO)
Combustible gas (HC) <%LEL>
Combustible gas (CH4) <%LEL>
Hydrogen sulfide (H2S)
Volatile organic compound (VOC)
<ppb>
Volatile organic compound (VOC)
<ppm>
Sulfur dioxide (SO2)
Nitrogen dioxide (NO2)
Hydrogen cyanide (HCN)
Calibration gas
Oxygen (O2)
Carbon monoxide (CO)
Isobutane (i-C4H10)
Methane (CH4)
Hydrogen sulfide (H2S)
Isobutylene (i-C4H8)
Calibration gas concentration
12.5 vol%
50 ppm
50%LEL
50%LEL
25.0 ppm
20000 ppb
Isobutylene (i-C4H8)
100 ppm
Sulfur dioxide (SO2)
Nitrogen dioxide (NO2)
Hydrogen cyanide (HCN)
3.20 ppm
4.80 ppm
5.0 ppm
<Connection>
To perform calibration, connect a gas sampling bag to the unit as shown below.
Exhaust
- 70 -
7 Maintenance
7-2. Calibration (CAL mode)
WARNING
Calibration gas
A calibration gas uses a hazardous gas (combustible gas, toxic gas, oxygen deficiency, etc.).
Handle the gas and related jigs and tools with due care.
Gas sampling bag
Use different gas sampling bags for each gas type and concentration to perform accurate
calibration.
Place for calibration
 Do not perform calibration in a confined space.
 Perform calibration in a place where no silicone, spray can gases, etc. is used.
 Perform calibration indoors at normal temperatures without remarkable fluctuation (within ±5ºC).
Calibration gas discharge
 The gas outlet of the gas monitor must be left open without any pipe connected for release.
Discharge the gas to a safe place.
 A calibration gas uses a hazardous gas (combustible gas, toxic gas, oxygen deficiency, etc.).
Discharge the gas with due care.
7-2-2. Entering CAL mode
1
With the measurement screen displayed in
the normal mode, press the DISP and SHIFT
buttons at the same time.
The CAL mode screen is displayed.
NOTE


Selecting NORMAL MODE returns to the measurement screen.
Press the DISP button to return to the previous screen.
- 71 -
7 Maintenance
7-2. Calibration (CAL mode)
7-2-3. Air calibration (AIR CAL)
1
In the CAL mode, select AIR CAL with the
▲/▼ button and then press the ENTER
button.
2
Hold down the AIR button.
The air calibration screen is displayed.
Keep the AIR button pressed while the screen shown
in the right figure is displayed.
- 72 -
7 Maintenance
3
7-2. Calibration (CAL mode)
Release the AIR button when the screen
shown in the right figure is displayed.
When zero adjustment is successfully completed, the
screen shown in the step 2 returns. Press the DISP
button to return to the CAL mode menu.
WARNING

When air calibration is performed in the atmosphere, check the atmosphere for freshness before
beginning it. If interference gases exist, zero adjustment cannot be performed properly, thus
leading to dangers when the gas leaks.
CAUTION


Perform air calibration under pressure and temperature/humidity conditions close to those in the
operating environment and in fresh air.
Perform air calibration after the reading is stabilized.
NOTE
When air calibration fails, "FAIL" appears in the measured value display area of the faulty sensor as
well as "SENSOR". Press the RESET button to reset the fault alarm (calibration failure). When the
alarm is reset, the value before calibration is displayed.
- 73 -
7 Maintenance
7-2. Calibration (CAL mode)
7-2-4. AUTO CAL
Calibration is performed using the predetermined gas concentration. Simultaneous calibration is available
for the four channels: oxygen, combustible gas <%LEL> and toxic gases (carbon monoxide and hydrogen
sulfide).
Prepare a calibration gas (P. 70).
1
In the CAL mode, select AUTO CAL with the
▲/▼ button and then press the ENTER
button.
2
Select COCENTRATION or GAS SELECT with
the ▲/▼ button and then press the ENTER
button.



3
Setting gas concentration
Select "CONCENTRATION" -> Go to step 3
Selecting gas type
Select "GAS SELECT" -> Go to step 4
Canceling calibration
Select "ESCAPE" -> Go to CAL mode menu
Select gas with the ▲/▼ button and then
press the ENTER button.
The concentration value of the selected gas blinks.
Select calibration gas concentration with the ▲/▼
button and then press the ENTER button to confirm it.
Select ESCAPE to return to the screen shown in the
step 2.
4
Select calibration target gas with the ▲/▼
button and then press the ENTER button.
Simultaneous calibration is available for the four
channels: oxygen, combustible gas <%LEL> and
toxic gases (carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide).
- 74 -
7 Maintenance
7-2. Calibration (CAL mode)
Select ESCAPE to return to the screen shown in the
step 2.
5
Make the gas monitor draw in the calibration
gas from the gas inlet and press the ENTER
button after 60 seconds.
Calibration is executed.
To stop the calibration process, press the DISP
button to return to the screen shown in the step 4.
6
Press the DISP button.
The CAL mode menu returns after finishing AUTO
CAL.
- 75 -
7 Maintenance
7-2. Calibration (CAL mode)
7-2-5. SINGLE CAL
Calibration is performed by setting gas concentration each time for a single channel. Prepare a calibration
gas (P. 70).
1
In the CAL mode, select SINGLE CAL with the
▲/▼ button and then press the ENTER
button.
2
Select a sensor with the ▲/▼ button and
then press the ENTER button.
Select ESCAPE to return to the screen shown in the
step 2.
3
Make the gas monitor draw in the calibration
gas from the gas inlet, and adjust the
displayed gas concentration to the
concentration of the calibration gas used
with the ▲/▼ button.
Press the ENTER button 60 seconds after starting
drawing in the gas to execute calibration.
To stop the calibration process, press the DISP
button to return to the screen shown in the step 4.
4
Press the DISP button.
The CAL mode menu returns after finishing SINGLE
CAL.
- 76 -
7 Maintenance
7-2. Calibration (CAL mode)
7-2-6. BUMP TEST
The gas monitor is equipped with a bump test (function check) function; however, it is set to OFF normally
and thus unavailable.
To use this function, please contact Control Equipment Pty Ltd.
Simultaneous execution of bump test is available for the four channels: oxygen, combustible gas
<%LEL> and toxic gases (carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide). Prepare a bump test gas as in the
case of calibration gas (P. 70).
1
Select BUMP TEST with the ▲/▼ button and
then press the ENTER button.
2
Select the gas to be tested with the ▲/▼
button.
Simultaneous testing is available for the four
channels: oxygen, combustible gas <%LEL> and
toxic gases (carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide).
- 77 -
7 Maintenance
7-2. Calibration (CAL mode)
Select ESCAPE to return to the CAL mode menu.
3
Make the gas monitor draw in the test gas
from the inlet and press the ENTER button.
BUMP TEST starts and a 30-second countdown
starts.
To stop the process, press the DISP button to return
to the screen shown in the step 4.
After 30 seconds, the result of BUMP TEST is
displayed.
If the result of BUMP TEST is NG, calibration is
started automatically. Check that calibration has been
performed accurately for all gases and OK has been
displayed before use.
If NG is displayed as a result of calibration, replace
the sensor (P. 82).
4
Press the DISP button.
The CAL mode menu returns after finishing SINGLE
CAL.
- 78 -
7 Maintenance
7-3. How to clean
7-3. How to clean
Clean the gas monitor if it becomes extremely dirty. The gas monitor must be turned off while cleaning it.
Use a waste cloth or the like to remove dust. Do not use water or organic solvent for cleaning because they
may cause malfunctions.
Because an extremely contaminated taper nozzle may disturb the gas detection, it must be cleaned with
dry air, etc.
CAUTION

When cleaning the gas monitor, do not splash water over it or use organic solvents such as
alcohol and benzine on it. It may cause discoloration or damage to the surface or sensor failure.
NOTE

When the gas monitor gets wet, water may remain in the buzzer sound opening or grooves. Drain
water as follows:
(1) Wipe away moisture on the gas monitor thoroughly using a dry towel, cloth, etc.
(2) While holding the gas monitor firmly, shake it about ten times with the buzzer sound opening facing
downward.
(3) Wipe away moisture coming out from the inside thoroughly using a towel, cloth, etc.
(4) Place the gas monitor on a dry towel, cloth, etc. and let it stand at normal temperatures.
- 79 -
7 Maintenance
7-4. Parts replacement
7-4. Parts replacement
7-4-1. Gas inlet filter replacement
The gas inlet part contains a dust filter and wire mesh filter. Because the filters may gradually get dirty or
clogged over time, they must be replaced according to the operating conditions. Especially the dust filter
must be replaced when it shows a sign of water absorption, low flow rate or contamination. See the regular
replacement parts (P. 87) for a replacement filter.
1 Turn the filter case counterclockwise and remove it.
2 Take out the filter and replace with a new filter.
3 Attach the filter case that has been removed.
NOTE


The dust filter and wire mesh filter are attached to the main unit side.
Use only the filters specified by Control Equipment Pty Ltd.
- 80 -
7 Maintenance
7-4. Parts replacement
7-4-2. Sensor filter replacement
The sensor part contains various filters. Replace them regularly. See the regular replacement parts (P. 87)
for a replacement filter.
1
Remove the battery unit, loosen the four
screws of the sensor cover and remove
the sensor cover.
2
Take out filters and replace them with
new ones.
3
Attach the sensor cover to the main unit
and tighten the four screws.
CAUTION




Turn off the power of the gas monitor before replacing the filter.
Do not remove the sensor cover except for filter replacement. When the sensor cover is not
attached properly, accurate measurement may not be possible due to leaks, or water may get
inside.
Use the dedicated filters for this gas monitor only. Using a similar product may have harmful
effects on the gas detection performance.
If the screws are not tightened completely, accurate gas measurement may not be possible due to
leaks, or water may get inside. The same thing may occur if a minute foreign substance gets
stuck.
- 81 -
7 Maintenance
7-4. Parts replacement
7-4-3. Sensor replacement
The built-in sensors of the gas monitor have a validity period and must be replaced regularly.
The sensor life has expired if, for example, the sensors cannot be calibrated in span adjustment, the
readings do not come back after air calibration, or the readings fluctuate. Replace them as necessary. See
"Regular replacement parts" (P. 85) for recommended replacement intervals of sensors.
1
Remove the four screws at the
back of the main unit and remove
the sensor cover.
2
Remove the hydrogen sulfide
scrubber filter and activated
carbon filter from the rubber seal.
3
Remove the rubber seal.
Hydrogen sulfide
scrubber
Filter
- 82 -
Activated carbon filter
7 Maintenance
4
Replace the sensor.
Attach a new sensor to the position
where the old sensor was mounted.
Attach the sensor according to the
following instructions.
 Combustible gas sensor <%LEL>
The contact piece on the side of the
sensor comes in contact with the
contact piece of the main unit.
 CO and H2S sensors
The triangle marks (▲) on the sensor
and main unit are facing each other.
 Arbitrarily selected sensor (1) and (2)
The connector at the back of the
sensor is inserted to the connector of
the main unit.
5
7-4. Parts replacement
<%LEL>
Arbitrarily
selected
sensor (1)
Attach the rubber seal, new
hydrogen sulfide scrubber
filter and activated carbon
filter, and then fix the sensor
cover by tightening the four
screws.
Arbitrarily
selected
sensor (2)
Tabs
To attach the rubber seal, hang it on the
tabs (two locations) of the case to fix.
NOTE
 The mounted sensors vary by the specification.
 To replace a sensor, be sure to attach a new sensor to the position where the old sensor was
attached. If a sensor is attached to a wrong position, "SENSOR FAIL" is displayed or correct
measurement cannot be performed.
 If the mounting position of the arbitrarily selected sensor is lost, attach the VOC sensor <ppb>, VOC
sensor <ppm> and other sensor in this order to the arbitrarily selected sensor (1) mounting position
and arbitrarily selected sensor (2) mounting position. If the sensor is attached in the wrong order,
"SENSOR FAIL" is displayed and measurement becomes unavailable.
 When replacing a sensor, replace the sensor filter as well.
 Use only the filters specified by Control Equipment Pty Ltd.
 Never fail to perform calibration (P. 70) after sensor replacement.
- 83 -
7 Maintenance
7-4. Parts replacement
7-4-4. VOC sensor maintenance
The electronics in the MiniPID sensor are designed to be maintenance-free and not accessible. Periodic
sensor maintenance is required for the Mini Pellet and the lamp.
When does my MiniPID require maintenance?
Your MiniPID lamp will need cleaning from time to time. How often depends on the
environment you are measuring. If you are measuring indoor air quality where the
VOC concentrations are low and there are few particulates, then a monthly or even
less frequent calibration may be adequate. However, if you are measuring high VOC
concentrations and particulates are present in high concentration then check
calibration frequently and when the PID has lost sensitivity or error state shows,
change the pellet as explained below.
Signs when the PID needs attention:
 If the baseline climbs after you zero the PID, then the pellet needs replacing.
 If the PID becomes sensitive to humidity, then the pellet needs replacing.
 If the baseline shifts/unstable when PID moves, then pellet needs replacing.
 If sensitivity has dropped too much (note the change required when checking calibration), then the lamp
needs cleaning.
When do I clean the MiniPID lamp?
Cleaning of the MiniPID lamp is recommended as a first action when presented with an MiniPID that needs
cleaning. Use the procedure described below. It is recommended that a cell is recalibrated after cleaning a
lamp, especially if the cell has been used for a few months since the sensor was last used.
When do I replace the MiniPID electrode pellet?
The MiniPID pellet can last the lifetime of the MiniPID if used in clean environments, or may only last a month
if used in heavily contaminated sites. The pellet is a disposable item, so always hold a spare pellet if you are
working in a dirty environment. If the cell shows signs of contamination after the lamp window has been
cleaned, or is known to have been subjected to severe contamination, then it should be replaced. Instructions
for replacing the pellet are below. It is recommended that the MiniPID is recalibrated after replacing the pellet.
When do I replace the MiniPID lamp?
An MiniPID will last a long time, typically a few thousand hours. Lamps are warranted for 12 months;
replacement bulbs are available and are not expensive to replace. The sensitivity of the MiniPID is
approximately in direct proportion to the lamp light intensity, so as a bulb fails, the response to a particular,
low gas concentration becomes more noisy.
Validity of lamp warranty is compromised if lamp cleaning maintenance is not followed and lamp has obvious
fouling/contamination.
Removing Mini Pellet and Lamp
Caution: Always use the Pellet removal tool. Any other tools (for example screwdrivers) may damage your
MiniPID body and will invalidate your warranty.
1. Gently remove the sensor from equipment.
2. Place the MiniPID, pellet side down, onto a clean surface.
3. Locate pellet removal tool into the side slots of the MiniPID and squeeze together until pellet and lamp are
released.
4. Lift carefully the MiniPID body away from the pellet and lamp.
5. Occasionally the lamp may be temporarily lodged in the cell and will need to be freed carefully with
tweezers.
6. Occasionally the small spring behind the lamp will come out when the lamp is removed from the sensor.
Simply replace it in to the sensor house.
- 84 -
7 Maintenance
7-4. Parts replacement
Cleaning the MiniPID Lamp
Inspection of the lamp may reveal a layer of contamination on the detection window that presents itself as a
'blue hue.' To check for contamination, hold the lamp in front of a light source and look across the window
surface
Only clean the lamp using our recommended lamp cleaning kit and detailed instructions. To avoid
contaminating the sensor and affecting accuracy, do not touch the lamp window with bare fingers. You may
touch the lamp body with clean fingers.
MiniPID lamp cleaning kit A-31063
The vial of cleaning compound contains alumina (CAS Number 1344-28-1) as a very fine powder. Cleaning
should be undertaken in a well-ventilated area. A full material safety data sheet MSDS is available on request
from Ion Science Ltd. Key safety issues are identified below:
Hazard identification:

May cause irritation of
respiratory tract and eyes
Storage:

Keep container closed to
prevent water adsorption and
contamination.
Handling:




Do not breathe in the powder. Avoid contact with skin, eyes and clothing
Wear suitable protective clothing
Follow industrial hygiene practices: Wash face and hands thoroughly
with soap and water after use and before eating, drinking, smoking or
applying cosmetics.
3
The powder carries a TVL(TWA) limit of 10 mg/m
Cleaning the Lamp
Use of MiniPID lamp cleaning kit A-31063
1. Open the container of alumina polishing compound.
2. With a clean cotton bud, collect a small amount of the powder.
3. Use this cotton bud to polish the PID lamp window. Use a circular
action, applying light pressure to clean the lamp window. Do not
touch the lamp window with fingers.
4. Continue polishing until an audible “squeaking” is made by the cotton
bud moving over the window surface. (usually within 15 seconds)
5. Remove the residual powder from the lamp window with a clean
cotton bud. Care must be taken not to touch the tips of cotton buds
that are to be used to clean the lamps as this may contaminate them with finger print oil.
6. Ensure the lamp is completely dry and any visible signs of contamination are removed before refitting.
Discarding the MiniPID pellet
Discard the contaminated pellet. The pellet does not have any toxic components, but if it has been
contaminated by toxic materials, then show due care when disposing.
- 85 -
7 Maintenance
7-4. Parts replacement
Re-fitting MiniPID pellet and lamp
Caution! Never refit a damaged lamp
1. Place the lamp inside the O-ring seal in the pellet as illustrated. Twisting the lamp slightly during insertion
will help to ensure the lamp window is snug against the pellet’s front electrode. The lamp should be freely
supported by the O-ring.
2. Lay the pellet front face down on a clean, flat surface and then screw the lamp down into the O-ring until it
firmly abuts against the front electrode face – this is most important. Then bring the MiniPID body carefully
down over the lamp so as not to disturb its positioning within the pellet and then push the body firmly onto
the face down pellet so that it clicks into place.
3. Refit the sensor into the sensing equipment.
4. Re-calibrate the equipment in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions.
- 86 -
7 Maintenance
7-4. Parts replacement
7-4-5. Regular replacement parts
Consumable parts of the gas monitor are listed below. Replace the consumable parts according to the
recommended intervals.
<List of Recommended Replacement Parts>
Recommended
check intervals
Recommended
replacement
intervals
Quantity
Activated carbon filter
3 months
6 months
1
Hydrogen sulfide scrubber
filter
3 months
6 months
1
Dust filter
3 months
6 months
1
Combustible gas sensor
<%LEL>
(NC-6264AZP)
6 months
3 years
1
O2 sensor (OS-BM2C)
6 months
1 year
1
H2S sensor (ES-1827i)
6 months
1 year
1
CO sensor (ES-1821)
6 months
1 year
1
SO2 sensor (ESS-03DH)
6 months
1 year
1
NO2 sensor (ESS-03DH)
6 months
1 year
1
HCN sensor (ESS-03DH)
6 months
1 year
1
VOC sensor <ppb> (PIS-001)
6 months
4 years
1
VOC sensor <ppm>
(PIS-002)
6 months
4 years
1
PID lamp (10.6 eV)
6 months
1 year
1
Electrode pellet <ppb>
6 months
1 year
1
Electrode pellet <ppm>
6 months
1 year
1
Pump unit (RP-12)
6 months
1 - 2 years
1
Rubber seals
-
2 years
1 set
Lithium ion battery unit
(BUL-6000)
-
About 500 cycles
of charging and
discharging
1
Alkaline dry battery
-
-
3
Name
*
Remarks
Used for CO sensor.
Sold as a set
containing five filters.
Used for combustible
gas sensor (%LEL).
Sold as a set
containing five filters.
Sold as a set
containing ten filters.
Used for VOC sensor.
Used for VOC sensor
<ppb>.
Used for VOC sensor
<ppm>.
*
For customers who
use the lithium ion
battery unit.
For customers who
use the alkaline
battery unit (optional
accessory). AA type.
The operation must be checked after replacement by a qualified service engineer. For the stable
operation of the unit and safety, ask a qualified service engineer to take care of replacement of the part.
Request it from Control Equipment Pty Ltd.
NOTE

The above replacement intervals are recommendation only. The intervals may change depending on
the operating conditions. These intervals do not mean the warranty periods either. The result of the
regular maintenance may determine when to replace the parts.
- 87 -
8 Storage and Disposal
8-1. Procedures to store the gas monitor or leave it for a long time
8
8
Storage and Disposal
8-1. Procedures to store the gas monitor or leave it for a
long time
The gas monitor must be stored under the following environmental conditions.
• In a dark place under the normal temperature and humidity away from direct sunlight
• In a place where gases, solvents or vapors, etc. are not present
Store the gas monitor in a shipping carton, if any, in which the product was delivered.
Store the gas monitor away from dust, etc. if the shipping carton is not available.
CAUTION


If the gas monitor is not used for a long time, store it after removing the lithium ion battery unit. Or
remove dry batteries when the dry battery unit is used. Leaks from dry batteries may result in fire
or injury.
If the gas monitor is not used for a long time, turn on the power at least once every six months and
check that the pump draws in air (about three minutes). The gas monitor, when not activated for a
long time, may cease to work because of hardening of the grease in the pump motor.
NOTE
If the gas monitor with the lithium ion battery unit attached is not used for a long time, it is
recommended to store it after discharging the batteries until the battery level icon shows one battery
mark or so. If the gas monitor is stored with the batteries fully charged, the batteries get deteriorated
more quickly and may have shorter life.
If the gas monitor with the dry battery unit attached is not used for a short time, store it with dry
batteries attached. Since the sensor of the gas monitor is energized at all times including power-off
time, it is required to keep dry batteries attached for storage.


8-2. Procedures to use the gas monitor again
When using the gas monitor after storage, perform calibration.
CAUTION


Contact Control Equipment Pty Ltd for readjustment including calibration.
If there is a sudden temperature change of 15ºC or more between the storage and operational
locations, turn on the power of the gas monitor, let it stand for about 10 minutes in a similar
environment to the operational location, and perform air calibration in fresh air before using it.
- 88 -
8 Storage and Disposal
8-3. Disposal of products
8-3. Disposal of products
When the gas monitor is disposed of, it must be treated properly as an industrial waste in accordance with
the local regulations.
WARNING

Do not disassemble the electrochemical type sensor or galvanic cell type sensor because they
contain electrolyte. Electrolyte may cause severe skin burns if it contacts skin, while it may cause
blindness if it contacts eyes. If electrolyte is adhered on your clothes, that part on your clothes is
discolored or its material is decomposed.
If contact occurs, rinse the area immediately with a large quantity of water. Dispose of dry
batteries in accordance with procedure specified by the local authority.
<Disposal in EU Member States>
When disposing of the gas monitor in EU member states, sort the batteries as specified.
Handle the batteries removed from the lithium ion battery unit (BUL-6000) or dry batteries used for the dry
battery unit (BUD-6000) according to the classified refuse collection system and recycling system based on
the regulations of EU member states.
NOTE
Crossed-out recycle dustbin mark

This symbol mark is indicated on the products which contain the batteries
which fall under EU Battery Directive 2006/66/EC. Such batteries need to be
disposed of as specified by the latest Directive. This symbol mark indicates
that the batteries need to be separated from the ordinary waste and disposed
of appropriately.
- 89 -
9 Troubleshooting
9-1. Abnormalities on unit
9
9
Troubleshooting
The troubleshooting does not explain the causes of all the malfunctions which may occur on the gas
monitor. This simply helps to find the causes of malfunctions which may frequently occur.
If the gas monitor shows a symptom which is not explained in this manual, or still has malfunctions even
though remedial actions are taken, please contact Control Equipment Pty Ltd.
9-1. Abnormalities on unit
Symptoms
<Screen display>
Causes
Actions
Lithium ion battery unit: Charge in a safe place.
The battery level is too low.
Dry battery unit: Replace all the three dry
batteries with new ones in a safe place.
The POWER button was
not pressed enough.
For power-on, press the POWER button and
release it when the buzzer blips.
Improper installation of the
battery unit
Check whether the battery unit is properly
attached to the main unit.
Abnormal
operations
Disturbances by sudden
static electricity noise, etc.
Turn off the power once and then turn it on again
(restart).
Cannot operate the
gas monitor.
Disturbances by sudden
static electricity noise, etc.
Remove the battery unit in a safe place. Then
reinstall it and turn on the power to perform
operations.
The power cannot
be turned on.
A low battery
voltage alarm is
displayed.
<FAIL BATTERY>
The batteries
cannot be charged.
(Lithium ion battery
unit only)
A low flow rate
alarm is displayed.
<FAIL LOW FLOW>
The battery level is low.
Lithium ion battery unit: Turn off the power and
charge it in a safe place.
Dry battery unit: Turn off the power and replace
the dry batteries with new ones in a safe place.
The charger is not
connected properly.
Connect the AC plug and DC plug of the AC
adapter properly.
A charging circuit
abnormality occurred.
Request the dealer or Riken Keiki local
representative for repair.
The batteries have been
fully charged.
When fully charged batteries are charged again,
the charging indicator lamp does not go on.
Water, oil or the like is
drawn.
Check the taper nozzle for any damage or mark
of drawn water, oil, etc.
The filter is clogged.
Check the filter for attachment condition,
clogging, torsion, etc.
- 90 -
9 Troubleshooting
Symptoms
<Screen display>
A low flow rate
alarm is displayed.
<FAIL LOW FLOW>
Air calibration
impossible
<SENSOR FAIL>
Sensor
abnormalities
<SENSOR FAIL>
System
abnormalities
<FAIL SYSTEM>
9-1. Abnormalities on unit
Causes
Actions
The pump has deteriorated.
Request the dealer or Riken Keiki local
representative to replace the pump.
The unit was stored for a
long time without being
used (six months or longer).
When the low flow rate alarm is displayed, turn
off the unit once and then turn it on again
(restart). Repeat this procedure several times. If
the problem still persists, request RIKEN KEIKI
to replace the pump.
Fresh air is not supplied
around the gas monitor.
Supply fresh air.
Deteriorated sensor
sensitivity
Replace the sensor with new one. (P. 82)
Deteriorated sensor
sensitivity
Replace the sensor with new one. (P. 82)
(If "FAIL" is displayed in place of measured
value at power-on, the alarm can be reset by
pressing the RESET button. The operation can
be continued using only the normal sensors to
detect other gases.)
The sensor mounting
position is incorrect.
Mount the sensor properly. (P. 82)
(VOC sensor)
The PID lamp is
contaminated.
Clean the PID lamp. (P. 83)
(VOC sensor)
Deteriorated electrode
pellet
Replace the electrode pellet with new one. (P.
83)
(VOC sensor)
Deteriorated PID lamp
Replace the PID lamp with new one. (P. 83)
A circuit abnormality
occurred.
Error No. 000
Abnormalities of internal
ROM
Error No. 010
Abnormalities of internal
RAM
Error No. 021
Abnormalities of internal
FRAM
Error No. 022
Abnormalities of internal
FLASH memory
Request Riken Keiki for repair.
Clock abnormalities
<FAIL CLOCK>
Abnormalities of the
internal clock
Make a setting of date/time. (P. 62)
If a symptom like this is observed repeatedly, the
built-in clock is seemingly malfunctioning. Thus,
it must be replaced. Please contact RIKEN
KEIKI.
Cannot enter the
user mode.
A password to enter the
user mode has been
forgotten.
Please contact RIKEN KEIKI.
- 91 -
9 Troubleshooting
9-2. Abnormalities of readings
9-2. Abnormalities of readings
Symptoms
The reading rises
(drops) and it
remains so.
A gas alarm is
triggered despite
of no gas leak and
no other
abnormalities at
the detection
point.
Slow response
Calibration
impossible
VOC
concentration
rises despite of no
abnormalities like
gas leak at the
detection point
after zero
calibration.
VOC sensor
sensitivity has
been deteriorated
significantly.
Causes
Actions
Drifting of sensor output
Perform zero adjustment (air calibration). (P. 34)
Presence of interference gas
Disturbances by interference gases, such as
solvents, cannot be eliminated completely.
A very small amount of the gas to be detected
may be leaking (slow leak). Because ignoring it
may cause dangers, take actions and measures
which are taken at an occurrence of gas alarm.
Slow leak
Environmental changes
Perform zero adjustment (air calibration). (P. 34)
In particular, the galvanic cell type is affected by
the air pressure.
Presence of interference gas
Disturbances by interference gases, such as
solvents, cannot be eliminated completely.
Disturbance by noise
Turn off the power once and then turn it on again
(restart).
If a symptom like this is observed frequently,
take appropriate measures to eliminate the
noise.
Clogged dust filter
Replace the dust filter. (P. 80)
Bended or clogged taper
nozzle
Fix the defective parts.
Condensation is formed
inside the gas monitor.
Fix the defective parts by providing dry air, etc.
Deteriorated sensor
sensitivity
Replace the sensor with new one. (P. 82)
Improper calibration gas
concentration
Use the proper calibration gas.
Deteriorated sensor
sensitivity
Replace the sensor with new one. (P. 82)
Deteriorated electrode pellet
Replace the electrode pellet with new one. (P.
83)
The PID lamp is
contaminated.
Clean the PID lamp. (P. 83)
Deteriorated PID lamp
Replace the PID lamp with new one. (P. 83)
- 92 -
10 Product Specifications
10-1. List of specifications
10
10
Product Specifications
10-1. List of specifications
<Common Specifications>
Concentration display
Digital LCD (full-dot display, 160 x 128 dots)
Detection method
Pump suction type
Flow rate
0.45 L/min or more (Open flow rate)
Displays
Clock display, battery level display, operating state display and flow check display
Display language
English, Japanese, German, Russian, Korean
Buzzer sound volume
95 dB (A) or higher (30 cm)
Gas alarm display
Lamp blinking, continuous modulating buzzer sounding, gas concentration and alarm
detail display blinking and vibration
Gas alarm pattern
Self-latching
Fault alarm/self diagnosis
System abnormalities, sensor abnormalities, battery voltage drop, calibration failure, and
low flow rate
Fault alarm display
Lamp blinking, intermittent buzzer sounding, and detail display
Fault alarm pattern
Self-latching
Panic alarm display
Preliminary alarm: Lamp blinking, intermittent buzzer sounding
Main alarm: Lamp blinking, continuous modulating buzzer sounding
Panic alarm pattern
Self-latching
Man-down alarm display
(*)
Man-down alarm pattern
(*)
Transmission
specification
Preliminary alarm: Lamp blinking, intermittent buzzer sounding
Main alarm: Lamp blinking, continuous modulating buzzer sounding
Non latching (auto-reset)
IrDA (for data logger)
Power supply
Standard: Dedicated lithium ion battery unit [BUL-6000]
Option: Dedicated dry battery unit <AA alkaline dry battery x 3> [BUD-6000]
Continuous operating
time
BUL-6000: About 14 hours (25ºC, no alarm and no lighting)
BUD-6000: About 8 hours (25ºC, no alarm and no lighting)
Operating temperatures
-20 - +50ºC
Operating humidities
Below 95% RH (Non-condensing)
Structure
Drip-proof and dust-proof performances (compliant to IP67 level) (tubes excluded)
Explosion-proof structure Intrinsically safe explosion-proof structure
Explosion-proof class
Ex ia IIC T4 Ga (ATEX/IECEx)
Operating environment
Operating temperature range: -20 - +50ºC, operating humidity range: Below 95%RH
(non-condensing)
External dimensions
Approx. 70 (W) x 201 (H) x 54 (D) mm (projection portions excluded)
Weight
Approx. 500 g (When BUL-6000 is used)/Approx. 450 g (When BUD-6000 is used)
* Normally the man-down alarm function is set to OFF and unavailable. To use this function, please contact Control
Equipment Pty Ltd
- 93 -
10 Product Specifications
10-1. List of specifications
<Specifications of Each Sensor>
Gas to be
detected
Detection
principle
Detection range
<Service range>
Minimum
resolution
Alarm setpoint
Gas to be
detected
Detection
principle
Detection range
Minimum
resolution
Alarm setpoint
Gas to be
detected
Detection
principle
Detection range
Minimum
resolution
Alarm setpoint
Combustible gas
(HC/CH4)
<%LEL>
Oxygen
(O2)
Hydrogen sulfide
(H2S)
Carbon monoxide
(CO)
New ceramic
Galvanic cell type
Electrochemical type
Electrochemical type
0 - 100%LEL
0 - 25.0%
<to 40.0 vol%>
0 - 30.0 ppm
<to 100.0 ppm>
0 – 150 ppm
<to 500 ppm>
1%LEL
0.1 vol%
0.5 ppm
1 ppm
10.0 ppm (AL1)
15.0 ppm (AL2)
10.0 ppm (TWA)
15.0 ppm (STEL)
100.0 ppm (OVER)
30 ppm (AL1)
60 ppm (AL2)
30 ppm (TWA)
60 ppm (STEL)
500.0 ppm (OVER )
5%LEL
(AL1)
10%LEL
(AL2)
100%LEL (OVER)
19.5 vol% (AL1)
23.5 vol% (AL2)
40.0 vol% (OVER)
Volatile organic
compound
(VOC)
<ppb>
Volatile organic
compound
(VOC)
<ppm>
Sulfur dioxide
(SO2)
Nitrogen dioxide
(NO2)
Photoionization type
Photoionization type
Electrochemical type
Electrochemical type
50,000 ppb
6,000 ppm
0 - 99.90 ppm
0 - 20.00 ppm
1 ppb
(0 - 5,000 ppb)
10 ppb
(5,000 – 50,000 ppb)
0.1 ppm
(0 - 600.0 ppm)
1 ppm
(600 – 6,000 ppm)
400.0 ppm (AL1)
600.0 ppm (AL2)
42.0 ppm (TWA)
60.0 ppm (STEL)
6,000 ppm (OVER)
0.05 ppm
0.05 ppm
2.00 ppm (AL1)
5.00 ppm (AL2)
2.00 ppm (TWA)
5.00 ppm (STEL)
99.90 ppm (OVER)
3.00 ppm (AL1)
5.00 ppm (AL2)
3.00 ppm (TWA)
5.00 ppm (STEL)
20.00 ppm (OVER)
4,300 ppb (AL1)
6,000 ppb (AL2)
50,000 ppb (OVER)
Hydrogen cyanide
(HCN)
Carbon Dioxide
(CO2)
Electrochemical type
IR Sensors
0 - 15.0 ppm
0 - 10,000 ppm
0.1 ppm
0 - 5% Vol.
5.0 ppm (AL1)
10.0 ppm (AL2)
5.0 ppm (STEL)
10.0 ppm (TWA)
15.0 ppm (OVER)
5,000 ppm (AL1)
5,000 ppm (TWA)
10,000 ppm (STEL)
10.00 vol% (OVER)
- 94 -
10 Product Specifications
10-2. List of accessories
10-2. List of accessories
Standard accessories
• Lithium ion battery unit (BUL-6000)
• Charger (1 pc)
• Rubber boot (1 pc)
• Belt clip (1 pc)
• Taper nozzle (1 pc)
• Hand strap (1 pc)
• LCD protection film (1 pc)
• Operating manual
• Product warranty
Optional items (sold
separately)
• Dry battery unit (BUD-6000)
• AA alkaline battery (3 pcs)
• Various filters
• Data logger management program
• Various calibration gases
• Gas sampling bag
- 95 -
11 Appendix
11-1. Calibration history/various trend/event history functions
11
11
Appendix
11-1. Calibration history/various trend/event history
functions
The gas monitor has history and trend functions. To use these functions, please contact Control
Equipment Pty Ltd.
NOTE

The data logger management program (optional) is required to use the history and trend functions.
Please contact Control Equipment Pty Ltd for more information.
Data logger provides five functions.
(1) Interval trend
Records the change of measured concentration from power-on to power-off.
Up to 100 latest data are recorded.
After the number of recorded data reaches 100, the oldest data will be overwritten by the latest data.
* However, when the maximum recording time is exceeded, the oldest data will be deleted before reaching
100.
The maximum recording time is specified as follows for each interval time.
Interval time
10-second 20-second 30-second 1-minute 3-minute
Maximum
10 hours
20 hours
30 hours
60 hours
180
recording time
hours
*The standard interval time is "5 minutes."
5-minute
300
hours
10-minute
600 hours
Interval time can be set by "Data Logger Management Program" (optional).
(2) Alarm trend
Starting immediately after the alarm is triggered, this function records the change of measured
concentration for one hour, which is from 30 minutes before the alarm was triggered until 30 minutes after
the alarm was triggered.
Alarm trend records the peak value of five-second time at a 5-second interval.
Last eight measurement data shall be recorded.
When the number of data exceeds eight, the oldest data will be overwritten by the latest data.
(3) Alarm event
Records the trigger of alarm as an event.
The event records the time of alarm trigger, target measurement gas and type of alarm event (AL1, AL2,
OVER).
Up to 100 latest events are recorded.
After the number of recorded events reaches 100, the oldest data will be overwritten by the latest data.
- 96 -
11 Appendix
11-1. Calibration history/various trend/event history functions
(4) Trouble event
Records the trigger of fault alarm as an event.
The event records the time when the trouble was triggered, the target gas of measurement, and the type of
fault event.
Up to 100 latest events are recorded.
After the number of recorded events reaches 100, the oldest data will be overwritten by the latest data.
(5) Calibration history
Records data when the calibration is performed.
The history records the calibration time, concentration values before and after the calibration, as well as the
calibration error.
Up to 100 latest calibration data are recorded.
After the number of recorded data reaches 100, the oldest data will be overwritten by the latest data.
NOTE


The data logger function of this gas monitor is entirely based on the overwriting system (the oldest
data is deleted and the latest data is recorded).
The recorded data can be read out by the "Data Logger Management Program" (optional). See the
operating manual of "Data Logger Management Program" for more information.
- 97 -
11 Appendix
11-2. Definition of terms
11-2. Definition of terms
ppb
ppm
vol%
LEL
TWA
(Time weighted
average exposure
limit)
STEL
(Short term
exposure limit)
Self-latching
Non latching
(auto-reset)
Gas concentration indicated in the unit of one-billionth of the volume
Gas concentration indicated in the unit of one-millionth of the volume
Gas concentration indicated in the unit of one-hundredth of the volume
The acronym of Lower Explosion Limit.
LEL refers to the lowest concentration of a combustible gas in air capable of causing
explosion when ignited.
An abbreviation for "Threshold Limit Value Time Weighted Average." A time
weighted average concentration of toxic substances which is considered no harm
on almost all the workers' health by repeated exposure at regular work of eight
hours a day or 40 hours a week.
An abbreviation for "Threshold Limit Value Short Term Exposure Limit." A
concentration of toxic substances which does not have harmful effects on the
workers' health by 15-minute continuous exposure provided that everyday exposure
does not exceed TWA value.
One of alarm patterns. Once an alarm is triggered, this keeps the alarm activated
until it is reset even when the alarm conditions are not met.
One of alarm patterns. When an alarm is triggered, this stops the alarm
automatically when the alarm conditions are not met.
- 98 -
11 Appendix
11-3. List of gases for reading VOC
11-3. List of gases for reading VOC
Normally, a volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration is displayed as isobutylene; however, the
reading can be converted to a pre-registered gas concentration. See "VOC reading setting" (P. 57) for the
setting.
Gas name
Formula
CAS No.
Response factor
Acetaldehyde
C2H4O
75-07-0
3.4
Acetamide
C2H5NO
60-35-5
2
Acetic acid
C2H4O2
64-17-7
36.2
Acetic anhydride
C4H6O3
108-24-7
4
Acetoin
C4H8O2
513-86-0
1
Acetone
C3H6O
67-64-1
0.7
Acetophenone
C8H8O
98-86-2
0.6
Acetyl bromide
C2H3BrO
506-96-7
3
Acetylglycine, N-
C4H76NO3
543-24-8
2
Acrolein
C3H4O
107-02-8
3.2
Acrylic Acid
C3H4O2
79-10-7
2.7
A
Alkanes, n-, C6+
1
Allyl alcohol
C3H6O
107-18-6
2.1
Allyl bromide
C3H5Br
106-95-6
3
Allyl chloride
C3H5Cl
107-05-1
4.5
Allyl glycidyl ether
C6H10O2
106-92-3
0.8
Allyl propyl disulfide
C6H12S2
2179-59-1
0.4
Ammonia
NH3
7664-41-7
8.5
Amyl acetate
C7H14O2
628-63-7
1.8
Amyl acetate, sec-
C9H14O2
626-38-0
2
Amyl alcohol
C5H12O
71-41-0
3.5
Amyl alcohol, tert-
C5H12O
75-85-4
1.5
Amyl methyl ether, tert-
C6H14O
994-05-8
0.8
Anethole
C10H12O
104-46-1
0.4
Aniline
C6H7N
62-53-3
0.48
Anisole
C7H8O
100-66-3
0.5
Anisyl aldehyde
C8H8O2
123-11-5
0.4
Arsine
AsH3
7784-42-1
2.5
8052-42-4
1
Asphalt, petroleum fumes
B
Benzaldehyde
C7H6O
100-52-7
0.9
Benzene
C6H6
71-43-2
0.46
- 99 -
11 Appendix
11-3. List of gases for reading VOC
Gas name
Formula
CAS No.
Response factor
Benzene thiol
C6H5SH
108-98-5
0.7
Benzoic acid
C7H6O2
65-85-0
0.7
Benzonitrile
C7H5N
100-47-0
0.7
Benzoquinone, o-
C6H4O2
583-63-1
1
Benzoquinone, p-
C6H4O2
106-51-4
1
Benzoyl bromide
C7H6BrO
618-32-6
2
Benzyl 2-phenylacetate
C15H14O2
102-16-9
0.5
Benzyl acetate
C9H10O2
140-11-4
0.6
Benzyl alcohol
C7H8O
100-51-6
1.3
Benzyl chloride
C7H7Cl
100-44-7
0.48
Benzyl formate
C8H8O2
104-57-4
0.8
Benzyl isobutyrate
C11H14O2
103-28-6
0.5
Benzyl nitrile
C8H7N
140-29-4
1
Benzyl propionate
C10H12O2
122-63-4
0.5
Benzylamine
C9H8N
100-46-9
0.6
Biphenyl
C12H10
92-52-4
0.4
Borneol
C10H18O
507-70-0
0.8
Bromine
Br2
7726-95-6
15
Bromo-2,2-dimethylpropane, 1-
C5H11Br
630-17-1
2
Bromo-2-chloroethane, 1-
C2H4Cl
107-04-0
8
Bromo-2-methylpentane, 1-
C6H13Br
25346-33-2
2
Bromoacetone
C3H5BrO
598-31-2
1
Bromoacetylene
C2HBr
593-61-3
4
Bromobenzene
C6H5Br
108-86-1
0.3
Bromobutane, 1-
C4H9Br
105-65-9
1
Bromobutane, 2-
C4H9Br
78-76-2
1.5
Bromocyclohexane
C6H11Br
108-85-0
3
Bromoethane
C2H5Br
74-96-4
5
Bromoethanol, 2-
C2H4BrO
540-51-2
2
Bromoethyl methyl ether, 2-
C3H7OBr
6482-24-2
2.5
Bromoform
CHBr3
75-25-2
2.8
Bromopentane, 1-
C5H11Br
203-776-0
2
Bromopropane, 1-
C3H7Br
106-94-5
1.3
Bromopyridine, 3-
C5H4BrN
636-55-1
2
Bromopyridine, 4-
C5H4BrN
1120-87-2
2
Bromotrimethylsilane
C3H9BrSi
2857-97-8
2
But-2-ynal
C4H4O
1119-19-3
3
- 100 -
11 Appendix
11-3. List of gases for reading VOC
Gas name
Formula
CAS No.
Response factor
But-3-ynal
C4H4O
52844-23-2
1.5
Butadiene diepoxide, 1,3-
C4H6O2
1464-53-5
4
Butadiene, 1,3-
C4H6
106-99-0
0.8
Butane, n-
C4H10
106-97-8
44
Butanedione, 2,3-
C4H6O2
431-03-8
0.4
Butanoic acid
C4H8O2
107-92-6
5
Butanol, 1-
C4H10O
71-36-3
4
Buten-3-ol, 1-
C4H8O
598-32-3
1.2
Butene, 1-
C4H8
106-98-9
1.5
Butene, 2-
C4H8
107-07-7
1.3
Butene, cis-2-
C4H8
590-18-1
1.3
Butene, trans-2-
C4H8
624-64-6
1.3
Butenoic acid, 3-
C4H6O2
107-93-7
2
Butoxyethanol, 2-
C6H14O2
111-76-2
1.1
Butoxyethyl acetate, 2-
C8H16O3
76-22-2
1
Butoxyethylacetate, 2-
C8H16O3
112-07-2
3
Butyl acetate
C6H12O2
123-86-4
2.4
Butyl acetate, sec-
C6H12O2
105-46-4
2.4
Butyl acetate, tert-
C6H12O2
540-88-5
2
Butyl acrylate
C7H12O2
141-32-2
1.5
Butyl alcohol, sec-
C4H10O
78-92-2
3
Butyl benzene, tert-
C10H16
35952
0.4
Butyl butyrate
C8H16O2
109-21-7
1.8
Butyl chloroformate
C5H9O2Cl
592-34-7
3.2
Butyl cyclohexan-1-ol, 4- tert-
C10H20O
98-52-2
1.4
Butyl cyclohexyl acetate, 2- tert-
C12H22O2
88-41-5
0.8
Butyl ether, n-
C8H18O
142-96-1
0.7
Butyl glycidyl ether
C7H14O2
192337
2
Butyl iodide
C4H9I
542-69-8
1
Butyl isocyanate
C5H9NO
111-36-4
2.5
Butyl lactate
C7H14O3
138-22-7
2.5
Butyl mercaptan
C4H10S
109-79-5
0.5
Butyl mercaptan, tert-
C4H9S
75-66-1
0.4
Butyl methacrylate
C8H14O2
97-88-1
1
Butyl propionate, n-
C7H14O2
590-02-1
1.8
Butylamine, n-
C4H11N
109-73-9
1
Butylamine, sec-
C4H11N
513-49-5
0.9
- 101 -
11 Appendix
11-3. List of gases for reading VOC
Gas name
Formula
CAS No.
Response factor
Butylamine, tert-
C4H11N
75-64-9
0.9
Butylene carbonate, 1,2-
C5H8O3
224-651-7
2
Butylphenol, o-sec-
C10H14O
89-72-5
0.9
Butyn-1-ol, 2-
C4H6O
764-01-2
1.5
Butyn-2-one
C4H4O
1423-60-5
3
Butyraldehyde
C4H8O
123-72-8
1.6
Butyrolactone, gamma-
C4H6O2
96-48-0
15
Butyryl chloride
C4H9OCl
141-75-3
3
Camphene
C10H16
565-00-4
0.5
Camphor
C10H16O
76-22-2
0.4
Carbon disulfide
CS2
75-15-0
1.4
Carbon suboxide
C3O2
504-64-3
10
Carbon tetrabromide
CBr4
558-13-4
3
Carene
C10H16
13466-78-9
0.5
Carvone, R-
C10H14O
6485-40-1
1
Caryophyllene
C15H24
13877-93-5
0.4
Chlorine dioxide
ClO2
10049-04-4
1
Chloro-1,1-difluoroethene, 2-
C2H3ClF2
359-10-4
1.5
Chloro-2-propanone, 1-
C3H5ClO
28615
1
Chloroacetaldehyde
C2H3OCl
107-20-0
3
Chlorobenzene
C6H5Cl
108-90-7
0.36
Chlorobutane, 1-
C4H9Cl
109-69-6
10
Chlorobutane, 2-
C4H9Cl
78-86-4
8
Chlorocyclohexane
C6H111Cl
542-18-7
4
Chloroethanol, 2-
C2H5ClO
107-07-3
10
Chloroethyl methyl ether, 2-
C3H7ClO
627-42-9
2.6
Chloromethoxyethane
C3H7ClO
3188-13-4
4
Chloromide
NH2Cl
10599-90-3
2
Chloroprene
C4H5Cl
126-99-8
1.3
Chloropyridine, 2-
C5H4ClN
109-09-1
1
Chlorostyrene, o-
C8H7Cl
2039-87-4
0.4
Chlorotoluene, m-
C7H7Cl
108-41-8
0.5
Chlorotoluene, o-
C7H7Cl
95-49-8
0.5
Chlorotoluene, p-
C7H7Cl
108-41-8
0.39
Chlorotrifluoroethylene
C2ClF3
79-38-9
1
Cinnamic acetate
C11H12O2
21040-45-9
0.4
C
- 102 -
11 Appendix
11-3. List of gases for reading VOC
Gas name
Formula
CAS No.
Response factor
Cinnamic alcohol
C9H10O
203-212-3
0.4
Cinnamic aldehyde
C8H8O
104-55-2
0.4
Citral
C10H16O
5392-40-5
1
Citronellal
C10H18O
106-23-0
0.9
Citronellol
C10H20O
26489-01-0
1
Citronellol acetate
C12H22O2
150-84-5
1.5
Citronellol formate
C11H20O2
105-85-1
1.5
Citronellyl isobutyrate
C14H26O2
97-89-2
0.9
Coumarin
C9H6O2
91-64-5
0.4
Cresol, m-
C7H8O
108-39-4
2.2
Cresol, o-
C7H8O
95-48-7
1.1
Cresol, p-
C7H8O
106-44-5
1.1
Cresyl acetate, p-
C9H10O
140-39-6
1
Cresyl ethyl ether, p-
C9H12O
622-60-6
0.8
Cresyl methyl ether
C8H10O
104-93-8
0.8
Crotonaldehyde
C4H6O
4170-30-3
1
Cumene
C9H12
98-82-8
0.32
Cycloalkanes
1.5
Cyclobutanone
C6H6O
214-745-6
1.2
Cyclobutene
C4H6
833-35-5
3
Cycloheptane
C7H14
291-64-5
1.1
Cyclohex-2-enedione, 1,4-
C6H6O2
4505-38-8
1
Cyclohexane
C6H12
110-82-7
1.2
Cyclohexanol
C6H12O
108-93-0
2.9
Cyclohexanone
C6H10O
108-94-1
1.1
Cyclohexanthiol
C6H14S
1569-69-3
0.5
Cyclohexene
C6H10
110-83-8
0.8
Cyclohexyl acetate
C8H14O2
622-45-7
1.2
Cyclohexylamine
C6H13N
108-91-8
1
Cyclooctadiene
C8H12
29965-97-7
1
Cyclopentadiene
C5H6
542-92-7
0.8
Cyclopentane
C5H10
287-92-3
4
Cyclopentanone
C5H8O
120-92-3
0.7
Cyclopentene
C5H8
142-29-0
1.5
Cyclopentene-1,3-dione, 4-
C5H4O2
930-60-9
1
Cymene, p-
C10H14
99-87-6
0.35
- 103 -
11 Appendix
Gas name
11-3. List of gases for reading VOC
Formula
CAS No.
Response factor
Decahydronaphthalene
C10H18
91-17-8
0.9
Decanal
C10H20O
112-31-2
0.9
Decane
C10H24
124-18-5
0.9
Decyne, 1-
C10H18
764-93-2
1.3
Diacetone alcohol
C6H12O2
123-42-2
0.8
Diazine, 1,2-
C4H4N2
289-80-5
3
Diazine, 1,3-
C4H4N2
289-95-2
3
Dibromoacetylene
C2Br2
623-61-3
1.5
Dibromochloromethane
CHBr2Cl
124-48-1
10
Dibromocyclohexane, 1,2-
C6H10Br2
5401-62-7
3
Dibromocyclopentane
C5H8Br2
33547-17-0
3
Dibromodichloromethane
CBr2Cl2
594-18-3
4
Dibromoethane, 1,2-
C2H4Br2
106-93-4
2
Dibromoethene, 1,1-
C2H2Br2
593-92-0
1.5
Dibromoethene, 1,2-
C2H2Br2
540-49-8
1.5
Dibromomethane
CH2Br2
74-95-3
1.2
Dichloro-1,2-difluoroethene, 1,2-
C2Cl2F2
598-88-9
2
Dichloro-1-propene, 2,3-
C3H4Cl2
78-88-6
1.4
Dichloro-2,2,-difluoroethene, 1,1-
C2H2Cl2F2
79-35-6
1
Dichloroacetylene
C2Cl2
7572-29-4
5
Dichlorobenzene, o-
C6H4Cl2
95-50-1
0.5
Dichlorobenzene, p-
C6H4Cl2
106-46-7
0.5
Dichloroethene, 1,1-
C2H2Cl2
75-35-4
1
Dichloroethene, cis-1,2-
C2H2Cl2
156-59-2
0.8
Dichloroethene, trans-1,2-
C2H2Cl2
156-60-5
0.36
Dichloroethylene 1,2-
C2H2Cl2
540-59-0
0.36
Dichloroethyne
C2Cl2
7572-29-4
2
Dichloromethane
CH2Cl2
27639
39
Dichloromethylamine
CH3Cl2N
7651-91-4
2
Dicyclohexylamine
C12H22N
101-83-7
0.8
Dicyclopentadiene
C10H12
77-73-6
0.9
68334-30-5
0.8
D
Diesel fuel
Diethoxymethane
C4H10O2
110-71-4
1.3
Diethyl carbonate
C5H10O3
105-58-8
2
Diethyl ether
C4H10O
60-29-7
0.9
Diethyl maleate
C8H12O4
141-05-9
2
- 104 -
11 Appendix
11-3. List of gases for reading VOC
Gas name
Formula
CAS No.
Response factor
Diethyl phosphite
C4H11O3P
762-04-9
2
Diethyl phthalate
C12H14O4
84-66-2
1
Diethyl sulfate
C4H10SO4
64-67-5
3
Diethyl sulfide
C4H10S
352-93-2
0.6
Diethyl sulfone
C4H10O2S
597-35-3
2
Diethylacetylene
C6H10
928-49-4
2
Diethylamine
C4H11N
109-89-7
1.3
Diethylaminoethanol, 2-
C6H15ON
100-37-8
2.7
Diethylaminopropylamine, 3-
C7H18N2
104-78-9
1.2
Diethylenetriamine
C4H13N3
111-40-0
0.9
Diethylhydroxylamine
C4H12NO
3710-84-7
2
Diethylsilane
C4H12Si
542-91-6
2
Diglycidyl ether
C6H10O3
123639
3
Dihydroeugenol
C10H14O2
2785-87-7
0.4
Dihydrojasmone
C11H18O
1128-08-1
0.6
Dihydromercenol
C10H20O
18479-58-8
0.8
Dihydroxybenzene, 1,2-
C6H6O2
120-80-9
1
Dihydroxybenzene, 1,3-
C6H6O2
108-46-3
1
Diiodomethane
CH2I2
27704
1.2
Diisobutyl ketone
C9H18O
108-83-8
0.8
Diisobutylene
C8H16
107-39-1
0.6
Diisopropyl benzene
C12H18
25321-09-9
0.4
Diisopropyl ether
C6H14O
108-20-3
0.7
Diisopropylamine
C6H15N
108-18-9
0.7
Diketene
C4H4O2
674-82-8
2.2
Dimethoxybenzene, 1,4-
C8H10O2
150-78-7
1.3
Dimethoxyethane, 1,2-
C3H8O
109-87-5
1.2
Dimethoxymethane
C3H8O2
109-87-5
1.4
Dimethyl cyclohexane, 1,2-
C8H16
583-57-3
0.8
Dimethyl disulfide
C2H6S2
624-92-0
0.2
Dimethyl ether
C2H6O
115-10-6
1.3
Dimethyl octan-1-ol, 3,7-
C10H22O
106-21-8
1.2
Dimethyl octan-3-ol, 3,7-
C10H22O
78-69-3
1.2
Dimethyl pentane, 2,4-
C7H16
108-08-7
1
Dimethyl phosphite
C2H7O3P
868-85-9
8
Dimethyl phthalate
C10H10O4
131-11-3
1
Dimethyl sulfoxide
C2H6OS
67-68-5
1
- 105 -
11 Appendix
11-3. List of gases for reading VOC
Gas name
Formula
CAS No.
Response factor
Dimethylacetamide N,N-
C4H9NO
127-19-5
1.3
Dimethylacetylene
C4H6
503-17-3
1
Dimethylamine
C2H7N
124-40-3
1.4
Dimethylaminoethanol, 2-
C4H11NO
108-01-0
1.5
Dimethylaniline, NN-
C8H11N
121-69-7
0.6
Dimethylboron bromide
C2H6BBr
5158-50-9
4
Dimethylbutyl acetate
C8H16O2
108-84-9
1.6
Dimethylcycloheptane, 1,2-
C9H18
13151-50-3
1.3
Dimethylethylamine, NN-
C4H11N
598-56-1
3
Dimethylformamide
C3H7NO
25174
0.8
Dimethylhydrazine, 1,1-
C2H8N2
57-14-7
1
Dimethylmethylphosphonate
C3H9P03
756-79-6
5
Dimethylsilane
C2H8Si
1111-74-6
2
Dimethylthiophosphoryl chloride
C2H6ClO2PS
2524-03-0
1
Di-n-butylamine
C8H19N
111-92-2
0.9
Di-n-propylamine
C6H15N
142-84-7
1
Dioxane, 1,4-
C4H8O2
123-91-1
1.5
Dioxolane
C3H6O2
646-06-0
1.8
Dipentene
C10H16
138-86-3
0.9
Diphenyl ether
C12H10O
101-84-8
0.8
Dipropyl ether
C6H14O
111-43-3
0.8
Dipropylene glycol
C6H14O3
110-98-5
4
Disilane
Si2H6
1590-87-0
2
Disulfur dibromide
S2Br2
13172-31-1
1.5
Disulfur dichloride
S2Cl2
10025-67-9
3
Di-tert-butyl-p-cresol
C15H24O
128-37-0
0.3
Divinylbenzene
C10H10
1321-74-0
0.4
Dodecene
C12H36
112-40-3
0.8
Epichlorohydrin
C3H5ClO
106-89-8
3.4
Epoxypropyl isopropyl ether, 2,3-
C6H12O2
4016-14-2
1.1
Estargol
C10H12O
140-67-0
0.7
Ethanol
C2H6O
64-17-5
8.7
Ethanolamine
C2H7NO
141-43-5
3
Ethoxy-2-methylpropane, 1-
C6H14O
627-02-1
0.8
Ethoxy-2-propanol, 1-
C5H10O2
1569-02-4
2
Ethoxy-butane, 2-
C6H14O
19316-73-5
0.8
E
- 106 -
11 Appendix
11-3. List of gases for reading VOC
Gas name
Formula
CAS No.
Response factor
Ethoxyethanol, 2-
C4H10O2
110-80-5
2
Ethoxyethyl acetate, 2-
C6H12O3
111-15-9
3
Ethyl 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl ether
C4H7F3O
461-24-5
5
Ethyl 2-methylbutyrate
C7H14O2
7452-79-1
2
Ethyl acetate
C4H8O2
141-78-6
3.6
Ethyl acetoacetate
C6H10O3
141-97-9
3
Ethyl acrylate
C5H8O2
140-88-5
2
Ethyl benzene
C8H10
100-41-4
0.5
Ethyl benzoate
C9H10O2
93-89-0
0.9
Ethyl butyrate
C6H12O2
105-54-4
1
Ethyl chloroformate
C3H5O2Cl
541-41-3
83
Ethyl cyanoacrylate
C6H7O2N
7085-85-0
1.5
Ethyl cyclohexane
C8H16
1678-91-7
1
Ethyl decanoate
C12H24O2
110-38-3
1.8
Ethyl formate
C3H6O2
109-94-4
29.8
Ethyl hexanoate
C8H16O2
123-66-0
2.6
Ethyl hexanol, 2-
C8H18O
104-76-7
1.5
Ethyl hexyl acrylate, 2-
C11H20O2
103-11-7
1
Ethyl iodide
C2H5I
27459
1.2
Ethyl isopropyl ketone
C6H12O
565-69-5
0.8
Ethyl lactate
C5H10O3
97-64-3
3
Ethyl mercaptan
C2H6S
27607
0.56
Ethyl methacrylate
C6H10O2
97-63-2
1.5
Ethyl morpholine, 4-
C6H13NO
100-74-3
0.6
Ethyl octanoate
C10H20O2
106-32-1
2.3
Ethyl phenyl acetate
C10H12O2
101-97-3
1.2
Ethyl propanoate
C4H10O2
105-37-3
2
Ethyl tert-butyl ether
C6H14O2
637-92-3
0.6
Ethyl toluene
C9H12
611-14-3
0.4
Ethyl-3-ethoxypropionate
C7H14O3
763-69-9
3
Ethyl-3-propylacrolein, 2-
C8H14O2
645-62-5
1
Ethylacetylene
C4H6
107-00-6
3
Ethylamine
C2H7N
27491
1
Ethylene
C2H4
74-85-1
8
Ethylene carbonate
C3H4O3
96-49-1
3
Ethylene glycol
C2H6O2
107-21-1
20
Ethylene glycol diacetate
C6H10O4
111-55-7
4
- 107 -
11 Appendix
11-3. List of gases for reading VOC
Gas name
Formula
CAS No.
Response factor
Ethylene glycol monopropyl ether
C5H12O2
2807-30-9
3
Ethylene oxide
C2H4O
75-21-8
15
Ethylenediamine
C2H8N2
107-15-3
0.8
Ethyleneimine
C2H5N
2179-59-1
2
Ethylhexanal, 2-
C8H16O
123-05-7
1.5
Ethylhexenal, 2-
C8H14O
645-62-5
1.3
Ethylvanillin
C9H10O3
121-32-4
1
Eucalyptol
C10H18O
470-82-6
0.6
Eugenol
C10H12O2
97-53-0
0.4
Eugenol methyl ether
C11H14O2
93-15-2
0.4
Fenchol
C10H18O
1632-73-1
0.4
Ferrocene
C10H10Fe
102-54-5
0.8
Fluorobenzene
C6H5F
462-06-6
0.8
Fluorobenzoic acid, 4-
C7H5FO2
456-22-4
2
Formamide
CH3ON
27735
2
Furfural
C5H4O2
35796
0.82
Furfuryl alcohol
C5H6O2
98-00-0
2
Furfuryl mercaptan
C5H6OS
35828
0.5
8006-61-9
0.8
F
G
Gasoline
Geraniol
C10H18O
106-24-1
0.7
Geranyl acetate
C12H20O2
105-87-3
1.2
Gerenial
C10H16O
141-27-5
0.6
Germane
GeH4
7782-65-2
10
Glutaraldehyde
C5H8O2
111-30-8
0.9
Glycidyl methacrylate
C7H10O3
106-91-2
1.2
Glyoxal
C2H2O2
107-22-2
1
Heptan-2-one
C7H14O
110-43-0
0.7
Heptan-3-one
C7H14O
106-35-4
0.8
Heptane
C7H16
142-82-5
1.6
Heptanol
C7H16O
53535-33-4
1.7
Heptene, 1-
C7H14
592-76-7
0.9
Heptylcyclopentan-1-one, 2-
C12H22O
137-03-1
0.8
Heptyne, 1-
C7H12
628-71-7
2
Hex-1-en-3-ol
C6H12O
4798-44-1
0.9
Hexachlorodisilane
Cl6Si
13465-77-5
8
H
- 108 -
11 Appendix
11-3. List of gases for reading VOC
Gas name
Formula
CAS No.
Response factor
Hexafluorobutadiene
C4F6
685-63-2
3
Hexamethyldisilazane, 1,1,1,3,3,3-.
C6H19NSi2
999-97-3
1
Hexamethyldisiloxane
C6H18OSi2
107-46-0
0.3
Hexamethylene diisocyanate
C8H12N2O2
822-06-0
1.5
Hexan-2-one
C6H12O
591-78-6
0.8
Hexane
C6H14
110-54-3
2.6
Hexanoic acid
C6H12O2
142-62-1
3
Hexanol
C6H14O
111-27-3
2
Hexene, 1-
C6H12
592-41-6
0.9
Hexenyl acetate, cis-3-
C8H14O2
3681-71-8
1.5
Hexenyl butyrate, cis-3-
C10H18O2
16491-36-4
1.5
Hexylaldehyde
C6H12O
66-25-1
0.6
Hydrazine
H4N2
302-01-2
3
Hydrogen iodide
HI
10034-85-2
5
Hydrogen selenide
H2Se
2148909
2
Hydrogen sulfide
H2S
2148878
4
Hydrogen telluride
H2Te
2148973
1.5
Hydroxycitronellal
C10H20O2
107-75-5
1
Hydroxyethyl acrylate
C5H8O3
818-61-1
1.2
Hydroxylamine
H3NO
7803-49-8
2
Hydroxypropyl acrylate, 2-
C6H10O3
999-61-1
1.5
Indene
C9H8
95-13-6
0.5
Indole
C8H7N
120-72-9
0.4
Iodine
I2
7553-56-2
0.2
Iodobenzene
C5H5I
591-50-4
0.2
Iodoethene
C2H3I
593-66-8
1.2
Iodoform
CHI3
75-47-8
1.5
Iodomethane
CH3I
74-88-4
0.4
Isoalkanes, C10-C13
C8H18O
68551-17-7
1
Isoamyl acetate
C7H14O2
123-92-2
1.6
Isoamyl salicilate
C12H16O3
87-20-7
1
Isoamylene
C5H10
513-35-9
1
Isopentene
C5H10
563-46-2
0.8
Isobornyl acetate
C12H20O2
125-12-2
0.4
Isobutane
C4H10
75-28-5
8
Isobutanol
C4H10O
78-83-1
3.5
I
- 109 -
11 Appendix
11-3. List of gases for reading VOC
Gas name
Formula
CAS No.
Response factor
Isobutyl acetate
C6H12O2
110-19-0
2.3
Isobutyl acrylate
C7H12O2
106-63-8
1.3
Isobutylene
C4H8
115-11-7
1
Isobutylene epoxide
C4H8O
558-30-5
3
Isobutyraldehyde
C4H8O
78-84-2
1.2
Isobutyric acid
C4H8O2
79-31-2
4
Isodecanol
C10H22O
25339-17-7
0.9
Isoeugenol
C10H12O2
97-54-1
0.4
Isoheptane
C7H16
591-76-4
1.2
Isojasmone
C11H18O
95-41-0
0.7
Isomenthone
C10H18O
1196-31-2
0.6
Isononanol
C9H20O
3452-97-9
1.5
Isooctane
C8H18
565-75-3
0.74
Isooctanol
C8H18O
26952-21-6
1.7
Isopentane
C5H12
78-78-4
6
Isophorone
C9H14O
78-59-1
0.8
Isophorone diisocyanate
C12H18N2O2
4098-71-9
0.6
Isoprene
C5H8
78-79-5
0.8
Isopropanol
C3H8O
67-63-0
4.4
Isopropanolamine
C3H9NO
78-96-6
1.5
Isopropoxyethanol, 2-
C5H12O2
109-59-1
1.5
Isopropyl acetate
C5H10O2
108-21-4
2.2
Isopropyl chloroformate
C4H7O2Cl
108-23-6
1.6
Isopropyl mercaptan
C3H8S
75-33-2
0.56
Isopropyl nitrite
C3H7NO2
541-42-4
4
Isopropylamine
C3H9N
75-31-0
1.2
Isopropylaminoethanol, 2-
C5H13NO
109-56-8
2
Isopropylcyclohexane
C9H18
696-29-7
0.9
Isothiazole
C3H3NS
288-16-4
3
Isothiocyanatomethane
C2H3NS
556-61-6
1.5
Isoxazole
C3H3NO
288-14-2
6
Jasmal
C11H22O3
1322-17-4
1.4
Jasmone, cis-
C11H16O
488-10-8
0.5
J
Jet Fuel JP-4
0.8
Jet Fuel JP-5
0.7
Jet Fuel JP-8
0.7
- 110 -
11 Appendix
Gas name
11-3. List of gases for reading VOC
Formula
CAS No.
Response factor
8008-20-6
0.8
463-51-4
3
K
Kerosene
Ketene
C2H2O
L
Linalool oxide
C10H18O2
14049-11-7
0.6
Linalyl acetate
C12H20O2
115-95-7
0.9
Maleic anhydride
C4H2O3
108-31-6
2
Menthol
C10H20O
1490-04-6
0.5
Menthone
C10H18O
89-80-5
0.4
Mercaptoacetic acid
C2H4O2S
25143
1
Mesitylene
C9H12
108-67-8
0.3
Methacrylic acid
C4H6O2
79-41-4
2.3
Methacrylonitrile
C4H5N
126-98-7
5
Methanol
CH4O
67-56-1
200
Methoxy-1-butanol, 3-
C5H12O2
2517-43-3
3
Methoxy-1-propanol, 2-
C4H10O2
1589-47-5
2
Methoxy-2,2-dimethylpropane
C6H14O
1118-00-9
0.7
Methoxybutyl acetate, 3-
C7H14O3
4435-53-4
2
Methoxyethanol, 2-
C3H8O2
109-86-4
2.7
Methoxyethene
C3H6O
107-25-5
1
Methoxyethoxyethanol, 2-
C5H12O3
111-77-3
1.4
Methoxyethyl acetate
C5H10O3
110-49-6
2.7
Methoxyethyl ether, 2-
C6H14O3
111-96-6
0.8
Methoxymethylethoxy-2-propanol
C7H16O3
34590-94-8
1.3
Methoxypropan-2-ol, 1-
C4H10O2
107-98-2
2
Methoxypropane, 2-
C4H10O
555-17-5
0.9
Methoxypropyl acetate
C6H12O3
108-65-6
1.2
Methyl 2-methylpropanoate
C5H10O2
547-63-7
2
Methyl acetate
C3H6O2
79-20-9
5.2
Methyl acetoacetate
C5H8O3
105-45-3
3
Methyl acrylate
C4H6O2
96-33-3
3.4
Methyl anthranilate
C8H9NO2
134-20-3
0.4
Methyl benzoate
C8H8O2
93-58-3
0.7
Methyl benzoate
C8H8O2
93-58-3
1.2
Methyl bromide
CH3Br
74-83-9
1.9
Methyl dimethylacrylate
C6H10O2
924-50-5
2.5
Methyl ethyl ketone
C4H8O
78-93-3
0.8
M
- 111 -
11 Appendix
11-3. List of gases for reading VOC
Gas name
Formula
CAS No.
Response factor
Methyl ethyl ketone peroxides
C8H18O2
1338-23-4
0.8
Methyl heptyne carbonate
C9H14O2
111-12-6
1.3
Methyl ionone
C14H22O
1335-46-2
0.4
Methyl isobutyl ketone
C6H12O
108-10-1
0.8
Methyl isobutyl ketone
C5H10O
563-80-4
0.8
Methyl isocyanate
C2H3NO
624-83-9
5
Methyl isothiocyanate
C2H3NS
556-61-6
0.6
Methyl mercaptan
CH4S
74-93-1
0.7
Methyl methacrylate
C5H8O2
80-62-6
1.6
Methyl phenyl acetate
C9H10O2
101-41-7
0.4
Methyl propargyl ether
C4H6O
627-41-8
2
Methyl propionate
C4H8O2
554-12-1
1.5
Methyl propynoate
C4H4O2
922-67-8
10
Methyl salicylate
C8H8O3
119-36-8
0.8
Methyl sulfide
C2H6S
75-18-3
0.5
Methyl tert-butyl ether
C5H12O
1634-04-4
0.8
Methyl thiocyanate
C2H3NS
556-64-9
2
Methyl thioglyconate
C3H6O2S
2365-48-2
1
Methyl undecanal, 2-
C12H24O
110-41-8
1.1
Methyl vinyl ketone
C4H6O
78-94-4
0.6
Methyl-1-butene, 3-
C5H10
563-45-1
0.8
Methyl-2-butanol, 3-
C5H12O
6032-29-7
3.3
Methyl-2-propen-1-ol, 2-
C4H8O
513-42-8
1.1
Methyl-2-pyrrolidinone, N-
C5H9NO
872-50-4
0.9
Methyl-5-hepten-2-one, 6-
C8H14O
110-93-0
0.8
Methylamine
CH5N
74-89-5
1.4
Methylamyl acetate
C8H16O2
108-84-9
1.2
Methylbutan-1-ol, 3-
C5H12O
123-51-3
3
Methylbutanol
C5H12O
137-32-6
1.5
Methylcyclohexane
C7H14
108-87-2
1.1
Methylcyclohexanol
C7H14O
25639-42-3
2.4
Methylcyclohexanol, 4-
C7H14O
589-91-3
2.4
Methylcyclohexanone, 2-
C7H12O
583-60-8
1
Methylcyclopentane
C6H14
96-37-7
1.5
Methylenepentane, 3-
C6H12
760-21-4
0.8
Methylheptan-3-one, 5-
C8H16O
541-85-5
0.8
Methylhexan-2-one, 5-
C7H14O
110-12-3
0.8
- 112 -
11 Appendix
11-3. List of gases for reading VOC
Gas name
Formula
CAS No.
Response factor
Methylhydrazine
CH6N2
60-34-4
1.3
Methylpent-3-en-2-one, 4-
C6H10O
141-79-7
0.7
Methylpentan-2-ol, 4-
C6H14O
108-11-2
2.8
Methylpentane, 2-
C6H14
107-83-5
1.5
Methylpentane, 3-
C6H14
96-14-0
1.5
Methylpentane-2,4-diol, 2-
C6H14O2
107-41-5
4
Methylpropanoyl chloride, 2-
C4H7ClO
79-30-1
6
Methylstyrene
C9H10
25013-15-4
0.5
Methylthiopropional, 3-
C4H8OS
3268-49-3
2
Mineral oil
8042-47-5
0.8
Mineral spirits
64475-85-0
0.8
Monoisobutanolamine
C4H11NO
124-68-5
1.6
Morpholine
C4H9NO
110-91-8
2
Myrcene
C10H16
123-35-3
0.5
Naphthalene
C10H8
91-20-3
0.4
Naphthol methyl ether, 2-
C11H10O
34068
0.5
Nitric oxide
NO
10102-43-9
8
Nitrobenzene
C6H5NO2
98-95-3
1.7
Nitrogen dioxide
NO2
10102-44-0
10
Nonane
C9H20
111-84-2
1.3
Nonanol (all isomers)
C9H20O
143-08-8
1.2
Nonene (all isomers)
C9H18
27215-95-8
0.8
Nonene, 1-
C9H18
124-11-8
0.55
Norbornadiene, 2,5-
C7H8
121-46-0
0.6
Propylamine, n-
C3H9N
107-10-8
1
Ocatanol (all isomers)
C8H18O
111-87-5
1.5
Octamethyltrisiloxane
C8H24O2Si3
107-51-7
0.3
Octane
C8H18
111-65-9
1.3
Octene (all isomers)
C8H16
25377-83-7
0.9
Octene, 1-
C8H16
111-66-0
0.58
Oxalyl bromide
C2Br2O2
15219-34-8
5
Oxydiethanol 2,2-
C4H10O3
111-46-6
2
Paraffin wax, fume
8002-74-2
1
Paraffins, normal
64771-72-8
1
13463-40-6
1
N
O
P
Pentacarbonyl iron
FeC5O5
- 113 -
11 Appendix
11-3. List of gases for reading VOC
Gas name
Formula
CAS No.
Response factor
Pentan-2-one
C5H10O
107-87-9
0.8
Pentan-3-one
C5H10O
96-22-0
0.8
Pentanal
C5H10O
110-62-3
1.2
Pentandione, 2,4-
C5H8O2
123-54-6
0.8
Pentane
C5H12
109-66-0
5
Pentanoic acid
C5H10O2
109-52-4
4
Pentanol, 2-
C5H12O
6032-29-7
1.5
Pentanol, 3-
C5H12O
584-02-1
1.5
Pentene, 1-
C6H12
109-67-1
1.3
Pentylcyclopentan-1-one, 2-
C10H18O
4819-67-4
1
Pentylcyclopentane
C10H20
3741-00-2
1.1
Pentyne, 1-
C5H8
627-19-0
3
Peracetic acid
C2H4O3
79-21-0
2
Perfluorobutadiene
C4H6
682-63-5
10
Perfluoro-tert-butylamine
C4H2F9N
2809-92-9
5
8032-32-4
0.9
Petroleum ether
Phellandrene
C10H16
99-83-2
0.8
Phenethyl methyl ether, 2-
C9H12O
3558-60-9
0.6
Phenol
C6H6O
108-95-2
1.2
Phenyl ethyl isobutyrate, 2-
C12H16O2
103-48-0
1.5
Phenyl propene, 2-
C9H10
98-83-9
0.4
Phenyl-2,3-epoxypropyl ether
C9H10O2
122-60-1
0.8
Phenylacetaldehyde
C8H8O
122-78-1
0.7
Phenylacetic acid
C8H8O2
103-82-2
1
Phenylethyl acetate, 1-
C10H12O2
93-92-5
0.7
Phenylethyl alcohol, 2-
C8H10O
60-12-8
1.2
Phosphine
PH3
7803-51-2
2
Picoline, 3-
C6H7N
108-99-6
0.9
8002-09-3
1
Pine oil
Pinene, α-
C10H16
80-56-8
0.27
Pinene, β-
C10H16
127-91-3
0.27
Piperazine
C4H10N2
110-85-0
0.8
Piperidine
C5H11N
110-89-4
0.9
Piperylene
C5H8
504-60-9
0.7
Prop-2-yn-1-ol
C3H4O
107-19-7
2.9
Propadiene
C3H4
463-49-0
1
Propan-1-ol
C3H8O
71-23-8
4.8
- 114 -
11 Appendix
11-3. List of gases for reading VOC
Gas name
Formula
CAS No.
Response factor
Propanamide
C3H7NO2
79-05-0
2
Propane-1,2-diol
C3H8O2
57-55-6
3
Propanolamine
C3H9NO
156-87-6
1.5
Propargyl chloride
C3H3Cl
624-65-7
2
Propen-1-imine, 2-
C3H5N
73311-40-7
2
Propene
C3H6
115-07-1
1.4
Propiolic acid
C3H2O3
471-25-0
8
Propionaldehyde
C3H6O
123-38-6
1.7
Propionic acid
C3H6O2
79-09-4
8
Propoxy-2-propanol, 1-
C6H14O2
1569-01-3
1.1
Propyl acetate, n-
C5H10O2
109-60-4
2.5
Propyl butanoate
C7H14O2
105-66-8
2.3
Propyl formate
C4H8O2
110-74-7
10
Propyl iodide
C3H7I
107-08-4
1
Propylbenzene (all isomers)
C9H12
74296-31-4
0.45
Propylene carbonate
C4H6O3
108-32-7
2
Propylene glycol ethyl ether acetate
C7H14O3
98516-30-4
1.2
Propylene oxide
C3H6O
75-56-9
2.7
Propyleneimine
C3H7N
75-55-8
1.3
Propyne
C5H4
74-99-7
4
Pyrazine
C4H4N2
290-37-3
3
Pyrdinol, 4-
C5H5NO
626-64-2
3
Pyridine
C5H5N
110-86-1
0.8
Pyridylamine 2-
C5H6N2
504-29-0
0.8
C10H18O
16409-43-1
0.8
Stibine
SbH3
7803-52-3
1.5
Styrene
C8H8
100-42-5
0.35
Sulfur dichloride
SCl2
234-129-0
2
R
Rose oxide, cis-
S
T
Terpineol, α-
C10H18O
98-55-5
0.8
Terpinolene
C10H16
586-62-9
0.59
Terpinyl acetate, α-
C12H20O2
80-26-2
1.2
Tert-butanol
C4H10O
75-65-0
2.6
Tert-butyl bromide
C4H9Br
507-10-7
1.5
Tert-butyl formate
C5H10O2
762-75-4
8
Tetrabromoethane, 1,1,2,2-
C2H2Br4
79-27-6
2
- 115 -
11 Appendix
11-3. List of gases for reading VOC
Gas name
Formula
CAS No.
Response factor
Tetracarbonylnickel
NiC4O4
13463-39-3
1
Tetrachloroethylene
C2Cl4
127-18-4
0.44
Tetrachloropyridine, 2,3,5,6-
C5HNCl4
2402-79-1
1
Tetraethyl orthosilicate
C8H20O4Si
78-10-4
2
Tetrafluoroethylene
C2F4
116-14-3
15
Tetrahydrofuran
C4H8O
109-99-9
1.6
Tetrahydronaphthalene
C10H12
119-64-2
0.4
Tetrahydrothiophene
C4H8S
110-01-0
0.6
Tetramethyl succinonitrile
C8H12N2
3333-52-6
1
Tetramethylbenzene (all isomers)
C10H14
95-93-2
0.3
Tetramethylbutane, 2,2,3,3-
C8H18
594-82-1
1
Tetramethylgermane
C4H12Ge
865-52-1
2
Tetramethylsilane
C3H10Si
993-07-0
2
Tetrathydropyran
C5H10O
142-68-7
3
Thioacetic acid
C2H4OS
507-09-5
2
Thiocarbonyl fluoride
CSF2
420-32-6
6
Thiocyanogen
C2S2N2
505-14-6
8
Thioformaldehyde trimer
C3H6S3
291-21-4
1.5
Thiophene
C4H4S
110-02-1
0.4
Thiophosgene
CS2Cl
463-71-8
1
Titanium-n-propoxide
C12H28O4Ti
3087-37-4
3
Toluene
C7H8
108-88-3
0.5
Toluene-2,4-diisocyanate
C9H6N2O2
584-84-9
1.6
Toluenesulfonyl chloride, p-
C7H7SO2Cl
98-59-9
3
Toluidine, o-
C7H9N
95-53-4
0.5
Tolylaldehyde, p-
C8H8O
104-87-0
0.8
Triazine, 1,3,5-
C3H3N3
290-87-9
6
Tributyl phosphate
C12H27O4P
126-73-8
5
Tributylamine
C12H27N
102-82-9
1.2
Trichlorobenzene 1,2,4-
C6H3Cl3
120-82-1
0.6
Trichloroethylene
C2HCl3
79-01-6
0.7
Triethyl phosphate
C6H15P04
78-40-0
3.5
Triethyl phosphate
C6H15O4P
78-40-0
3
Triethyl phosphite
C6H15O3
122-52-1
1.5
Triethyl silane
C2H6Si
617-86-7
2
Triethylamine
C6H15N
121-44-8
0.9
Triethylbenzene
C12H18
25340-18-5
0.35
- 116 -
11 Appendix
11-3. List of gases for reading VOC
Gas name
Formula
CAS No.
Response factor
Triethylene aluminum
C6H15Al
97-93-8
1
Trifluoroethene
C2HF2
359-11-5
5
Trifluoroethyl methyl ether, 2,2,2-
C3H5F3O
460-43-5
10
Trifluoroiodomethane
CF3I
2314-97-8
2
Trimethoxymethane
C4H10O3
149-73-5
1
Trimethylamine
C3H9N
53-50-3
0.5
Trimethylbenzene mixtures
C9H12
25551-13-7
0.3
Trimethylbenzene, 1,3,5-
C9H12
108-67-8
0.4
Trimethylborate
C3H9FBO3
121-43-7
1
Trimethylcyclohexane, 1,2,4-
C9H18
2234-75-5
1
Trimethylene oxide
C3H6O
503-30-0
1.5
Trimethylsilane
C3H10Si
993-07-7
1
Trioxane
C3H4O3
110-88-3
2
Turpentine
C10H16
9005-90-7
0.6
TVOC
1
U
Undecane
C11H24
1120-21-4
0.9
Vanillin
C8H8O3
121-33-5
1
Vinyl acetate
C4H6O2
108-05-2
1.1
Vinyl bromide
C2H3Br
593-60-2
1.5
Vinyl chloride
C2H3Cl
75-01-4
2.1
Vinyl ethyl ether
C4H8O
109-92-2
0.6
Vinyl fluoride
C2H3F
75-02-5
2
Vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone, 1-
C6H9NO
88-12-0
0.9
Vinylcyclohexene, n-
C8H12
100-40-3
0.7
Vinylene carbonate
C3H2O3
872-36-6
1
Vinylidine difluoride
C2H2F2
75-38-7
5
Vinylsilane
C2H6Si
7291-09-0
1.5
Xylene mixed isomers
C8H10
1330-20-7
0.33
Xylene, m-
C8H10
108-38-3
0.4
Xylene, o-
C8H10
95-47-6
0.6
Xylene, p-
C8H10
106-42-3
0.6
Xylidine, all
C8H11N
1300-73-8
0.7
V
X
- 117 -
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement