NAVSUP P486, VOL II, REV 8,

NAVSUP P486, VOL II, REV 8,
FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT
GENERAL MESSES
NAVSUP Publication 486
Volume II, Revision 8, AUG 2016
COG 01 STOCK NO. 0530-LP-011-1940
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
Although the words “he,” “him,” and “his” are used
sparingly in this manual to enhance communication,
they are not intended to be gender driven nor to affront
or discriminate against anyone reading this manual.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
CONTENTS
NAVSUP P486, VOL II
CHAPTER 1
NUTRITITION / MENU PLANNING / SPECIAL MEALS
CHAPTER 2
MESS DECK MASTER at ARMS/FSA OPERATIONS
CHAPTER 3
PRESENTATION SILVER
CHAPTER 4
AFLOAT WARDROOM AND STATEROOM SERVICE
CHAPTER 5
OFFICERS MESSES AFLOAT
CHAPTER 6
CHEMICAL BIOLOGICAL RADIALOGICAL DEFENSE
CHAPTER 7
SAFETY - 3M
CHAPTER 8
FOOD SERVICE EQUIPMENT OPERATING AND CLEANING
PROCEDURES
CHAPTER 9
ASHORE FOOD SERVICE, FACILITY STRUCTURE AND
HOUSEKEEPING
CHAPTER 10
WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONS
CHAPTER 11
HEIMLICH MANEUVER
CHAPTER 12
FOOD MICROBIOLOGY
INDEX
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
CHAPTER 1
NUTRITION AND MENU PLANNING
Part A: NUTRITION STANDARDS
Purpose ....................................................................................................................................... 1000
Weight Control ............................................................................................................................ 1001
Part B: NUTRIENTS AND MICRONUTRIENTS
Nutrients ...................................................................................................................................... 1100
Micronutrients.............................................................................................................................. 1101
Part C: NAVY MENU
Menu Review Process (Ashore/Afloat)....................................................................................... 1200
Cycle Menu ................................................................................................................................. 1201
Menu Planning Procedures ........................................................................................................ 1202
Menu Approval ............................................................................................................................ 1203
Menu Changes ............................................................................................................................ 1204
General Nutrition Guidelines....................................................................................................... 1205
Menu Planning and G4G Nutrition Standards for Entrees ......................................................... 1206
Menu Planning and G4G Nutrition Standards for Starches ....................................................... 1207
Menu Planning and G4G Nutrition Standards for Vegetables ................................................... 1208
Menu Planning and G4G Nutrition Standards for Desserts ....................................................... 1209
Menu Planning and G4G Nutrition Standards for Salad Bars and Fruit Bars............................ 1210
Menu Planning and G4G Nutrition for Beverages ...................................................................... 1211
Healthy Ingredients ..................................................................................................................... 1212
Marketing Menu Items ................................................................................................................ 1213
Food Combinations, Scheduling, Variety and Innovation .......................................................... 1214
Characteristics of an Aesthetically Pleasing Meal...................................................................... 1215
Speed Lines ................................................................................................................................ 1216
Brunch ......................................................................................................................................... 1217
Night Meals ................................................................................................................................. 1218
Special Meals .............................................................................................................................. 1219
Part D: FOOD HANDLING AND NUTRIENT RETENTION
Food Handling ............................................................................................................................. 1300
Food Preparation ........................................................................................................................ 1301
As Purchased (AP) and Edible Portion (EP) .............................................................................. 1302
Temperature Monitoring ............................................................................................................. 1303
Preservation Packaging and Packing for Food Items ................ ................................................1304
Part E: ADVANCED FOOD
Advance Foods ........................................................................................................................... 1400
Advanced Foods Descriptions .................................................................................................... 1401
Part F: TRADITIONAL FOODS
Traditional Foods ........................................................................................................................ 1500
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Part G: SPECIAL MEALS
Special Meals .............................................................................................................................. 1600
Part H: FOOD PRESENTATION
General Food Presentation......................................................................................................... 1700
Self Service Serving Lines .......................................................................................................... 1701
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CHAPTER 1
NUTRITION AND MENU PLANNING
PART A: NUTRITION STANDARDS
1000 PURPOSE
1. GENERAL. Navy nutrition standards are based on federal and military nutrition policy.
These standards include the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, the 2011 MyPlate, the
National Academy of Sciences’ Dietary Reference Standards and the DoD 1338.10 Menu
Standards.
The 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans are developed by the U.S. Departments of
Agriculture (USDA) and Health and Human Services (HHS). They offer the government’s best
advice on healthy eating. These guidelines help shape policies for school lunch and breakfast
programs, Woman, Infants, and Children (WIC), and nourishment programs for the elderly and
military. They are based on evolving nutrition science. They also offer practical guidance on how
to develop a nutrition plan.
Tip #1: Think about your overall way of eating.
You’re eating pattern reflects how you usually eat. Each day doesn’t stand alone—so eating less
whole grains one day balances your diet when you eat more whole grains on a different day. The
U.S.-Style Eating Pattern includes a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables, low-fat dairy, whole
grains, and lean protein (focusing on Omega 3 fish). While similar, the Vegetarian-Style Eating
Pattern consists of plant-based protein, more legumes, nuts, and seeds. Some vegetarians also
eat eggs and fish. The Mediterranean-Style Eating Pattern includes slightly more fruit and
seafood, and slightly less dairy.
Tip #2: Select a variety of vegetables.
Choose vegetables from all 5 groups—dark green, red/orange, dried beans and peas, starchy,
and others (light green, purple, yellow, and tan). To ease shopping and storage, purchase all
forms: fresh, frozen, canned, and dried. Add vegetables in new ways: grilled, roasted, and raw.
Add spinach to a breakfast omelet, or have carrot sticks at lunch, and toss several different
vegetables into your pasta dinner. Be creative, use fragrant spices, and prepare new recipes.
Tip #3: Choose whole grains.
Whole-grain foods include oats, brown rice, popcorn, and quinoa. They are typically higher in
fiber and contain important minerals like iron, Select whole grains for at least half of your grain
choices. Look for “whole-wheat flour” as the first ingredient when buying breads, pasta, or other
grain foods. Replace white flour with winter-white wheat flour; it’s easy and barely noticeable.
Tip #4: Limit the calories consumed from added sugars.
A healthy eating plan is difficult to achieve when you consume too many sugar-sweetened
beverages, snacks, and sweets. This goes for all forms of sugar (honey, molasses, and agave).
The recommendation is to take in less than 10% of total calories from sugar. For a 2,000 calorie
diet, that’s 200 calories. Divide by 4 to get grams (50g) and by 4 again to get teaspoons (12 tsp).
Read food labels to figure out where your sugar is coming from, and then cut back. One can of
soda contains about 40g of sugar.
Tip #5: Lower saturated fat to less than 10% of daily calories.
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What does this mean? A 2,000-calorie daily diet should include less than 20g of saturated fat.
Check the nutrition facts label to see the total saturated fat content in your favorite foods. Most
saturated fat comes from whole milk, cheese, butter, and fatty meats. Choose healthier fats such
as olive, corn, soy, or safflower—these contain poly- and mono-unsaturated fats. Swap whole fat
dairy with 1% fat and reduce saturated fat.
Tip #6: Reduce sodium.
In an average American diet, most sodium comes from processed foods. Common foods include
pizza, canned soups, cured meats, and store-bought breads. Whole grains are encouraged;
however, bread is a source of sodium. Some easy ways to lower sodium is to rinse canned
vegetables before adding them to recipes. Also try new spices (curry powder, garlic, and ginger)
when preparing foods—and always taste before adding salt.
2. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE: MyPlate.
The MyPlate’s sections encourage consumers to fill half of their plate
with fruits and vegetables, one fourth with whole grains and one fourth
with lean protein.
a. MyPlate supports the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans with
easy-to-understand messages. The brightly colored and simply
worded symbol is appealing to consumers of all ages. MyPlate
serves to remind individuals and families to adopt healthier
lifestyles as America continues the fight against the obesity
epidemic. Some of the suggestions include:
1) Balancing calories: enjoy your food, but eat less
2) Foods to increase: make half of your plate fruits and vegetables, make half of your
plate grains emphasizing whole grains, and switch to fat-free or low-fat (1%) milk
3) Foods to reduce: soup, white bread, frozen meals and sugary drinks
3. JOINT SUBSISTENCE POLICY BOARD DoD 1338.10 Menu Standards. The DoD menu
standards are the minimum practical guidelines that military food service programs must use
during menu planning, food procurement, food preparation, and meal service to support the
nutrition standards as shown in Figure 1-1. The DoD Nutrition Committee will monitor, update,
and provide implementation guidance to the JSPB on DoD Menu Standards as additional
scientific information on nutrient needs become available. The DoD Menu Standards will be
reviewed not less than every 3 years and any subsequent updates to the DoD Menu Standards
will be reported in the minutes of the JSPB and further published on the Defense Logistics
Agency (DLA) Troop Support website: http://www.troopsupport.dla.mil/subs/JSPB/.
a. SERVICE IMPLEMENTATION GUIDANCE. The Services will assess “when available”
exceptions to global product availability to ensure that ordering practices comply with
standards. Exceptions for Navy Afloat are indicated by an asterisk*. These exceptions
are only authorized because of limited storage on board ships and resupply of ships at
sea with different ports which may limit access to all items required within the DoD Menu
Standards.
b. DOD MENU STANDARDS. The DoD Menu Standards provide minimum guidelines for
personnel to utilize when menu planning. Below are some key points from these
standards:
• FRUITS AND FRUIT JUICES. Offer two or more fresh fruit choices per meal.
• VEGETABLES. Offer a minimum of two hot vegetables per meal with at least one
non-starchy vegetable.
• SALAD BAR. Must include leafy greens with a minimum of seven multicolored
vegetables and low fat salad dressings.
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
GRAINS AND STARCHES. Offer whole grain and whole wheat varieties of bread
and pasta to include low fat or low calorie alternatives.
MEATS AND ENTREES. Offer a lean cut and serve without added fats.
DAIRY. Ensure all milk products are 1% or skim and fortified with vitamin A & D and
always offer low fat or reduced fat dairy choices.
FATS AND OILS. Use trans-fat free products appropriate to the cooking technique.
SODIUM. Ensure all pre-prepared entrees contain less than 800 milligrams (1/3 tsp
which equals 33% Daily Value) of sodium per serving and always offer lower sodium
alternatives.
BEVERAGES. Offer milk, water and low calorie beverage containing less than 40
calories per serving each meal.
CONDIMENTS. Ensure low sodium, fat and sugar free options are available for each
meal.
SOUPS. Ensure one of your soups for lunch or dinner is a broth or vegetarian soup.
Ensure low or reduced sodium soups are provided containing less than 600
milligrams (1/4 tsp which equals 25% Daily Value) of sodium per 8 oz serving.
DESSERTS. Fresh fruit will always be available on all dessert bars to include a transfat free dessert option.
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Figure 1-1
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4. GO FOR GREEN®. Go For Green is a nutrition awareness program that prominently
displays green coded items first on the serving line, followed by yellow and lastly red. This
concept of choice architecture seeks to influence patron food choice by placing the healthiest
items first. It provides service members with a quick assessment of the nutritional value of
recipes using a color coded label for the Navy Standard Core Menu recipes. The menu
offerings and food items are labeled green (eat often), yellow (eat occasionally), and red (eat
rarely) based on the impact the food can have on a service member's nutritional status.
Classification of foods is based on percentage of calories from total fat, percentage of
calories from saturated fat, type of sugar, amount of fiber and degree of processing. A
sodium code is provided, but independent of the color code. The G4G Program and guides
are shown in Figures 1-2 through 1-7 on the following six pages. The criteria are based on
recommendations of the American Heart Association, National Heart, Lung and Blood
Institute, Department of Health and Human Services, US Department of Agriculture, Food
and Drug Administration and the National Institute of Health.
a. GO FOR GREEN AND DOD 1338.10 JOINT SUBSISTENCE POLICY BOARD MENU
STANDARDS. Menus will offer healthy green coded options to include an entrée, soup,
entrée, vegetable, starch, vegetable, bread, beverage and dessert. Go For Green and
DoD 1338.10 standards are as follows:
• Green coded food categories contain recipes are those less than 30% total fat and
less than 10% saturated fat.
• Yellow coded food categories contain recipes that are 31-49% total fat and 11-15%
saturated fat.
• Red coded food categories contain recipes that are greater than 50% total fat and
greater than or equal to 16% saturated fat.
b. GO FOR GREEN® COMPLIANCY POLICY. Commands are mandated to be compliant
with the Go For Green Program per NAVADMIN 178/15 and ALNAV Message 050/15.
The following six criteria are mandatory for galleys to be considered satisfactorily
compliant:
• The Go For Green menu in FSM shall be utilized by all commands by Apr 2016, and
recipes used must match the G4G color coded menu (NAVSUP Form 1080). All food
items on the main line will have food label cards displayed as referenced on NKO
under Food Service/Go For Green/1999 Natick Nutrient Analysis Spreadsheet.
These will match the color code and sodium code on the menu. Commands must
have their G4G compliant menus available for review when requested. Follow the
NSCM CPI recipe submission Policy to submit new recipes for nutritional review and
use in future NSCM revisions.
• Food label cards must be clean and in serviceable condition.
• The main line must offer a green coded soup, entrée, starch, vegetable, bread,
beverage and dessert option at either lunch or dinner when only one category per
meal is offered.
• The main line must offer a green coded soup, entrée, starch, vegetable, bread,
beverage and dessert option at each meal when two or more are offered.
• Posters and table toppers will be prominently displayed throughout the galley and
dining area.
• All food service personnel must be able to explain the G4G program concept of
choice architecture.
For additional G4G information, marketing material and promotional resources, visit
https://www.nko.navy.mil/ >Quick Links (right)>Links to all Communities on NKO>Food
Services (left)>Go For Green
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Figure 1-2
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Figure 1-3
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Figure 1-4
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Figure 1-5
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Figure 1-6
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Figure 1-7
1001 WEIGHT CONTROL
1. WEIGHT CONTROL INFORMATION. Providing a green coded Navy option for entrées,
starches, vegetables, beverages, bread, soup and desserts appropriate nutrient dense options
are available. To assist patrons in making healthy meal selections advertise the green coded
options on a sample plate at the serving line as well as on the menu, in POD notes and via other
media. Exercise and portion control are necessary for maintaining desirable weight. One pound
of body fat equals 3500 calories. By reducing calorie intake by 500 calories per day and/or
increasing energy expenditure, a weight loss of one pound per week can be achieved. For
example, physical activity that burns 250 calories per day combined with a 250-calorie reduction
equals 500 calories. Over a period of one week, this results in a deficit of 3500 calories. Safe
weight loss is 1-2 pounds per week. The Navy Nutrition Resource Guide 2011 from Navy
Physical Readiness Program Weight Control Guide, NAVPERS 15602, the Navy Operational
Fitness and Fueling Series (NOFFS) and Go For Green program are excellent resources for
weight control information.
a. A standard weight control practice encourages patrons to consume smaller portions within a
well-balanced diet. Fruit, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein, beans/legumes and water
should be promoted. Patrons should choose foods that have a green coded food label card
when eating in the dining facility.
2. NAVY OPERATIONAL FITNESS AND FUELING SERIES. The Navy Operational Fitness
and Fueling System (NOFFS) provides the Navy with "best in class" physical fitness and nutrition
information for Sailors, allowing the Navy to maintain peak physical readiness, which is a top
priority of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative and 2025 Sailor, enriched culture pillar.
This program is designed to promote the culture of fitness and has been available fleet-wide
since June 2010. The fueling series provides sailors practical tools on nutrition fundamentals,
meal planning, portion awareness and energy management. A nutrition blueprint and meal
builder food lists are available with the NOFFS nutrition program in choosing foods for each
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feeding time. There are meal builders for males and females and five zones categorized for
weight loss, maintenance and weight gain. The recommended servings of food per zone are
based on the PRT Instruction of exercising three times per week for 45 minutes each session.
The NOFFS information can be accessed through navyfitness.org/nutrition. Current Fueling
Series charts are displayed in Figures 1-8 through 1-10 below.
Figure 1-8
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Note: Meal plans are available up to 4600 calories. This reference only lists the meal plan up to
3000 calories. Reference navyfitness.org/nutrition to find information for the entire program.
Figure 1-9
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Figure 1-10
3. DIETARY SUPPLEMENT RESOURCE.
a. Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS). This campaign was developed by the DoD joint
service dietitians and accessible on line since 2012. Its purpose is to increase awareness of
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dietary supplements with the DoD community. Many service members utilize supplements
which cost a lot of money, jeopardize their career, and can harm them or do not provide the
intended effect. The OPSS campaign provides credible information from nutrition service
professionals. Educational materials, resources and facts can be obtained from the website
address: http://hprc-online.org/dietary-supplements/OPSS
PART B: NUTRIENTS AND MICRONUTRIENTS
1100 NUTRIENTS
1. Nutrients are required by the body in order to sustain life. During digestion, food is broken
down into nutrients, which are absorbed into the bloodstream and carried to every cell of your
body. Carbohydrates, proteins and fats are macronutrients, needed by the body in large
amounts. Vitamins and minerals are micronutrients.
a. CARBOHYDRATE
1) Function: Carbohydrates are the main source of fuel/energy for the body.
2) Sources: The primary sources of carbohydrates include whole grains, cereals, fruits,
vegetables and simple sugars.
a) Complex Carbohydrates: Complex carbohydrates are composed of chains of
smaller carbohydrate molecules (simple sugars). Complex carbohydrates are
digested more slowly and provide the body with energy for a longer period of time
than simple carbohydrates. They also provide valuable sources of fiber and
nutrients. Sources include grains, legumes, and starchy vegetables.
b) Simple Carbohydrates: Simple carbohydrates are sugars such as glucose,
sucrose (table sugar) and fructose. They are absorbed into the bloodstream very
rapidly and provide a quick source of energy. Simple sugars provide few, if any
nutrients, other than calories. Sources include table sugar, honey, jams/jellies,
candy and skinless fruit.
3) Caloric value: 4 calories per gram.
4) Requirements: Carbohydrates should comprise 55-60% of an individual’s total caloric
intake. The majority of these carbohydrates should be complex carbohydrate.
b. PROTEIN
1) Function: Protein is necessary to build and repair body tissues.
2) Sources: The primary sources of protein include meat, fish, poultry, eggs, dairy
products, nuts and legumes.
3) Caloric value: 4 calories per gram.
4) Requirements: Protein should comprise 15% of an individual’s total caloric intake or
approximately ½ gram protein per pound of body weight.
c. FAT
1) Function: Fat functions as a source of energy and as a vehicle to transport fat-soluble
vitamins.
2) Sources:
a) Saturated Fat. Excess saturated fats in the diet can lead to fatty deposits along
the walls of vital arteries. These deposits can restrict/block the flow of blood
leading to a heart attack or stroke. Saturated fats are generally solid at room
temperature. Sources include foods of animal origin such as meat, cheese, whole
milk, butter, some vegetable oils such as palm oil. Although coconut oil is
saturated, it contains a medium chain fatty acid called lauric acid which does not
raise LDL cholesterol and the body burns quickly for energy.
b) Polyunsaturated/Monounsaturated. Unsaturated fats may help reduce the risk of
heart disease when substituted for saturated fats in the diet. These fats are
generally liquid at room temperature and come from plant sources. Sources of
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polyunsaturated fats include: safflower oil, corn oil, sunflower and soybean oil.
Sources of monounsaturated fats include: peanut oil, canola oil, and olive oil.
c) Cholesterol. Cholesterol is a fat-like substance produced by the body and also
found in foods of animal origin. It does not contain any calories, however, excess
dietary cholesterol may contribute to fatty deposits along the walls of vital arteries.
Sources include: meats, egg yolks, whole milk, whole milk cheeses and butter.
There are 2 types of cholesterol found in the body. They are LDL and HDL. A
total cholesterol less than 200 ml/DL is desirable.
(1) Low-density lipoprotein, or LDL cholesterol. Known as “bad cholesterol.”
Excess LDL builds up in your arteries and may lead to heart disease. The
higher the level of LDL, the higher your risk of heart disease. Lowering
elevated LDL cholesterol can reduce the risk of having a heart attack. A safe
LDL cholesterol level is <100 mg/DL.
(2) High-density lipoprotein, or HDL cholesterol. Earned the nickname “good
cholesterol.” That’s because it is believed to remove cholesterol from the
blood. High levels of HDL in your blood may help to reduce your risk of
coronary heart disease. A low level can increase your risk of heart disease. A
safe level of HDL cholesterol is greater than 40-59 mg/DL.
(3) Triglycerides. Another type of fat used to store excess energy from your diet.
High levels of triglycerides in the blood are associated with atherosclerosis.
Elevated triglycerides can be caused by overweight and obesity, physical
inactivity, cigarette smoking, excess alcohol consumption and a diet very high
in carbohydrates (more than 60 percent of total calories). A triglyceride level
less than 150 ml/DL is desirable.
(4) Trans Fat. Trans fats are fats occur in low levels naturally in meat and dairy
products. Most trans fats in our diet come from processed foods including
cookies, cakes, pastries and pies. They are formed during a process of
hydrogenation which adds hydrogen to a liquid fat making it solid. This
process saturates the fat which increases shelf life, increases the smoke point
and makes it easier to spread. Trans fats raise blood cholesterol and are a
major risk factor for heart disease. Buzz words to look for on nutrition fact
labels for trans fats are partially hydrogenated vegetable oil and palm kernel
oil.
(5) Essential Fatty Acids. There are two types of essential fatty acids and both
are polyunsaturated fatty acids. They are linoleic acid (Omega 6) and alphalinolenic acid (Omega 3). Omega 6 fatty acids are found in vegetable oils
such as corn, safflower, soybean, cottonseed, and sunflower oils,
mayonnaise, salad dressings and margarine. Omega 6 fatty acids tend to
increase blood clotting and blood pressure. Omega 3 fatty acids are found in
canola oil, walnuts, flaxseed, and soybean oil. The body converts Omega 3
fatty acids into two other Omega 3 fatty acids known as DHA and EPA. These
other Omega 3 fatty acids can be found in fatty fish like salmon, mackerel,
albacore tuna, sardines, herring. Omega 3 fatty acids reduce the risk of heart
disease and should be consumed more regularly than Omega 6 fatty acids.
Research shows more Omega 6 fatty acids are consumed in the American
diet.
(6) Caloric value. 9 calories per gram.
(7) Requirements. Fat should comprise no more than 30% of an individual’s total
caloric intake. Only 7-10% of caloric intake should come from saturated fat.
This equates to no more than 30 grams daily for men and no more than 20
grams daily for women.
Table 3.3 provides recommended Protein,
Carbohydrate and Fat intakes for various calorie levels:
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RECOMMENDED PROTEIN, CARBOHYDRATE AND FAT INTAKES FOR VARIOUS
CALORIE LEVELS
CALOR
IES
PER
DAY
GRAMS
PROTEIN
(15% total calories)
GRAMS
CARBOHYDRATE
(55% total calories)
GRAMS
FAT
(30% total calories)
1,200
45
165
40
1,500
56
206
50
1,800
68
248
60
2,000
75
275
67
2,200
83
303
73
2,500
94
344
83
2,800
105
385
93
3,000
113
413
100
3,500
131
481
117
4,000
150
550
133
4,500
169
619
150
TABLE 3.3
Note: The Nutrition Fact Label references 2,000 calories as a standard calorie level for
comparison of food products.
d. FIBER
1) Function. Fiber functions as the body’s broom. Fiber is not an actual nutrient since it
does not supply any vitamins, minerals or calories. It does, however, perform vital
functions.
2) Sources. There are two types of fiber: soluble and insoluble.
a) Soluble fibers are those that dissolve in water and include pectins and gums.
Sources include: apples, bananas, dried beans, peas, and oatmeal. Soluble fiber
may help lower blood cholesterol levels.
b) Insoluble fibers are those that do not dissolve in water and include cellulose and
lignin. Sources include: wheat bran, whole-wheat flour and fibrous material in
fresh fruits and vegetables. Insoluble fiber helps aid in digestion and may prevent
constipation.
e. CALORIC VALUE: Fiber has no caloric value.
f. REQUIREMENTS: 25 grams daily for women and 38 grams daily for men.
1101 MICRONUTRIENTS
1. GENERAL. Vitamins and minerals perform a variety of specialized functions by the body.
Compared with the macronutrients (protein, carbohydrate and fat), your body only requires
vitamins and minerals in small amounts, hence the name micronutrients. Vitamins and minerals
do not contain calories. Each nutrient has a specific and unique function to perform so it is
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important to consume a diet containing a variety of foods to ensure adequate intake of all
nutrients. Vitamins are classified as either water-soluble or fat-soluble. Water soluble vitamins
are Vitamins B and C. Fat soluble vitamins are Vitamins A, D, E and K.
a. Water-soluble vitamins:
1) Dissolve in water and thus cannot be stored by the body
2) Must be replenished on a daily basis
3) Are more fragile and may be washed out or destroyed in food preparation
b. Fat-soluble vitamins:
1) Must be transported throughout the body via fat
2) Can be stored in body fat
3) Excess intake of fat-soluble vitamins can be dangerous because they are
stored in
the body
2. KEY VITAMINS AND MINERALS. Key vitamins and minerals are discussed below:
a. VITAMIN A (Anti-Oxidant)
1) Function: Vitamin A is a fat-soluble vitamin. Vitamin A is involved in the formation
and maintenance of healthy skin, hair, and mucous membranes. Vitamin A helps us
to see in dim light and is necessary for proper bone growth and tooth development.
2) Sources: Yellow, orange, dark green vegetables and fruits (e.g., carrots, broccoli,
greens, and cantaloupe), liver, eggs, cheese, butter, and milk.
b. VITAMIN C (Anti-Oxidant)
1) Function: Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin. Vitamin C is important in forming
collagen (a protein that gives structure to bones, cartilage, muscle, and blood
vessels). It also helps to maintain capillaries, bones, teeth and aids in the absorption
of iron.
2) Sources: Citrus fruits, strawberries, melons, tomatoes, green peppers, dark green
vegetables, and potatoes.
c. FOLATE
1) Function: Folate is a water-soluble vitamin. Folate (Folacin, Folic Acid) helps the
body
form red blood cells and may help prevent the birth defect spina bifida.
Folate is part of the B complex vitamins.
2) Sources: Fruits and vegetables, fortified breads, cereals and grains, and dry beans.
d. B-COMPLEX VITAMINS (Thiamin (B-1), Riboflavin (B-2), Niacin (B-3))
1) Function: The B-complex vitamins are water soluble. They include Thiamin (B-1),
Riboflavin (B-2), Niacin (B-3). The main function of these vitamins is to help the body
produce energy from carbohydrates.
2) Sources:
(a) Thiamin (B-1): Enriched grains, liver
(b) Riboflavin (B-2): Milk products, whole grains
(c) Niacin (B-3): Meat, fish, poultry, peanut butter
e. SODIUM
1) Function: Sodium is a mineral that maintains proper fluid balance in the body and
helps muscles relax/contract properly. Sodium has also been linked to high blood
pressure. People who are “salt-sensitive” may have an increase in blood pressure
when consuming excess sodium. Approximately 30% of America’s population is saltsensitive.
2) Sources: The main sources of sodium in the diet come from processed foods and
table salt. Salt is a mixture of sodium and chloride. People often use the terms salt
and sodium interchangeably. One teaspoon salt = 2400 mg sodium.
f.
CALCIUM
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1) Function: Calcium is a mineral needed to build bones, teeth and maintain bone
strength. 99% of body calcium is found in bones.
2) Sources: Dairy foods such as milk, cheese and yogurt as well as dark green leafy
vegetables.
PART C: NAVY MENU
1200 MENU REVIEW PROCESS (ASHORE/AFLOAT)
1. MENU REVIEW. All galleys are required to have their cycle menu reviewed by the NAVSUP
dietitian annually.
a. Ashore commands must submit menus through the regional directors who will forward to
the NAVSUP Nutrition Manager, listed in the Contact Directory, Page four, NAVSUP P476. Check with your TYCOM for any specific local requirements.
b. Afloat command menus are platform specific and submitted to the NAVSUP functional
mailbox by the TYCOM twice a year.
c. TYCOMS/Commands/Regional Directors can expect a hard copy of their review emailed
to them within 45 days after menu receipt. (NOTE: NAVSUP dietitian will email receipt
acknowledgement of the menu review.) The menu is evaluated in terms of compliance to
the Go For Green Menu Coding Guidelines. Menus are given a numerical score, based
on a 100-point scale. A score of 95 percent or better indicates an acceptable menu.
1201 CYCLE MENU
1. GENERAL. A cycle menu is ideal for general messes. Cycle menus provide more accurate
forecasting for ration costs, requisition requirements, and daily food preparation. Menu cycle
length depends upon the variety and frequency of resupply, storage constraints, and the
number of crew size. Every attempt will be made to offer a selective menu. Selective menus
offer one or more options for each meal category. Ideally, each menu should offer two or
more entrées, side dishes, vegetables and desserts. A variety of beverages and breads will
also be available.
2. MENU PLANNING. Many factors affect the menu planner’s choice of foods selected to be
on a menu:
nutritional requirements, food costs, master load list, availability of
supplies/equipment, skill level of galley personnel and manning levels.
a. Monetary allowances determine the financial resources of the menu planner. A menu
must be written within the Basic Daily Food Allowance.
b. Seasonal availability of foods is important to the menu planner. Menus should be
adjusted to take advantage of seasonal changes in the supply of fresh produce using
Armed Forces Recipes in FSM. Canned in water, or frozen fruits, juices, and vegetables
supplement the fresh menu items and are comparable in nutritive value.
c. Equipment and storage facilities also affect the choice of menu items. Avoid menus that
require too much last minute preparation. Plan a balance between foods that can be
prepared in advance without deteriorating in quality and those that must be prepared just
before serving time. Use progressive cooking practices to ensure foods are properly
cooked and kept hot.
d. The amount of manpower and skill level of galley personnel must be considered when
planning a menu. Balance labor intensive menu items with those that require minimal
preparation.
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1202 MENU PLANNING PROCEDURES
1. MENU 1080. The TYCOM/Regional Director will draft a menu using the following tools:
Cargo (afloat), NAVSUPNOTE 7330, crew preference surveys, AFRS, and regional/NAVSUP
approved recipes within FSM. The menu draft will include the recipe name, recipe number, Go
For Green color code and sodium code. Menus for salad and dessert bars are to be included
and attached to the menu draft and have appropriate codes assigned to the items.
a. Drafting the menu. Most meals are planned around the center of the plate entrée being
meat, fish, or poultry. Other meal items are selected to complement the main dishes.
b. Meat block. A frequency chart for protein is known as a “meat block.” Its purpose is to
optimally distribute beef, veal, pork, lamb, fish, poultry, and other meat substitutes.
Careful attention should be given to balancing the variety of meats and meat substitutes
to prevent the menu from becoming “heavy on beef” or “light on fish.” It is important to
consider items not only because of their popularity but also cost. Meat is the largest
single dollar investment in the menu. A planned pattern of meat and meat substitutes on
the menu will stabilize use of costly and popular meat items and make it easier to
accurately predict menu requirements.
c. The Menu Draft will list each item in a meal with the Armed Forces Recipe Service recipe
numbers as listed in FSM. Indicate a recipe number for all menu items requiring a recipe
for preparation. Referencing the correct Armed Forces Recipe Service recipe number for
each item eliminates guesswork. The following steps illustrate the correct sequence in
drafting the major components of a meal:
Step 1. Entree
Step 2. Starches and vegetables
Step 3. Salads
Step 4. Breakfast fruits and cereals
Step 5. Desserts
Step 6. Breads and breakfast pastries
Step 7. Soups and beverages
d. Foods on the Cycle Menu or the posted menu at the head of the serving line must be
listed in the following order: (Accompaniments to a menu item should be written
alongside or directly underneath it)
Breakfast
Lunch or Dinner
Fruit Juices
Soup-Crackers
Cereals
Main Entree
Main Entree
Gravy or Sauce (if required)
Breakfast Pastry
Starches
Breads-Butter
Vegetables
Jam-Jelly
Salad-Dressings
Beverages
Breads-Butter
Dessert
Beverages
2. ANALYZING THE DRAFT MENU. The Food Service Officer will analyze the NAVSUP
approved navy standard core menu to ensure that food supplies, equipment, and personnel are
optimally utilized. If changes are necessary, the Food Service Officer will review and note
changes on the menu draft and return it to the Leading Culinary Specialist. The menu draft will
be used for preparing the daily Food Preparation Worksheet (NAVSUP Form 1090).
1203 MENU APPROVAL
1. PLATFORM SPECIFIC MENUS.
The platform menus will be submitted to NAVSUP
functional mailbox, [email protected] by TYCOM for dietitian scoring and director of
Navy Food Service signature when a new cycle menu is prepared. Menus will list information
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recipe name, recipe number, G4G code and sodium code. This information will allow the crew to
make more educated food selection choices. Menus posted on menu boards, bulletin boards,
and other designated areas should include accurate wording. Recipe numbers will be omitted
from posted menus.
1204 MENU CHANGES
1. MENU CHANGES. The Commanding Officer or the designated representative may allow the
Food Service Officer to make necessary changes to an approved menu. This authorization
occurs when the Commanding Officer signs the activity’s cycle menu that contain the following
preprinted statement: “The Food Service Officer is authorized to make changes to this menu
when, due to unusual or unforeseen circumstances, it may be necessary to provide substitutions
for food items not in stock or to permit timely use of perishable foods.” Permanent changes to
the approved cycle menu must be resubmitted to NAVSUP for approval and updated in FSM.
1205 GENERAL NUTRITION GUIDELINES
1. GENERAL NUTRITION. Go For Green and DoD 1338.10 Joint Subsistence Policy Board
Menu standards.
a. Menus will offer healthy green coded options to include a soup, entrée, vegetable, starch,
bread, beverage and dessert. Go For Green and DoD 1338.10 standards are as follows:
1) Green coded food categories contain recipes are those less than 30% total fat and
less than 10% saturated fat.
2) Yellow coded food categories contain recipes that are 31-49% total fat and 11-15%
saturated fat
3) Red coded food categories contain recipes that are greater than 50% total fat and
greater than or equal to 16% saturated fat.
b. Vitamins and Minerals. Vitamins and minerals are required for all bodily functions. It is
important to provide a variety of foods on your menu to ensure availability of all key
nutrients. Several key vitamins and minerals are discussed below:
1) Vitamin A: A good source of vitamin A will be on the menu every day. Dark green
and deep yellow fruits and vegetables such as broccoli, sweet potatoes, green
peppers, spinach, carrots, winter squash, tomatoes and cantaloupe are good sources
of vitamin A.
2) Vitamin C: A good source of vitamin C will be served daily. Good sources include
citrus fruit and/or juice, kiwi fruit, cantaloupe, cranberry juice, strawberries, tomato
juice.
3) Folate: Good sources of folate will be offered daily. Sources include oranges/orange
juice, kiwi, bananas, strawberries, spinach, broccoli, peas, green leafy vegetables,
lentils, cereals, breads, rice and pasta.
4) Calcium: In addition to milk at every meal, other good sources of calcium such as
yogurt, cottage cheese and cheese should be offered daily.
5) Sodium: When serving a high sodium entrée such as ham, corned beef, cured meats
or entrées prepared with soy sauce, offer a lower sodium entrée such as fresh meat,
seafood or poultry.
1206 MENU PLANNING AND NUTRITION STANDARDS FOR ENTRÉES
1. GREEN CODED ENTRÉES.
a. When serving two entrées per lunch/dinner meal:
1) If there are two or more entrees, one must be green coded and there may be ONLY
one red coded recipe from each category. The remaining entrée options can be green
or yellow coded.
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b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
2) In addition to red meat (beef, pork, veal, lamb), poultry and fish will be incorporated in
the menu.
3) Lean cuts of beef and pork will be utilized. Refer to the green list on the Go For
Green Foods and Beverages Guide for additional information on lean cuts of meat.
When serving one entrée per lunch/dinner meal:
1) If there is only one entrée one green coded option should be served for either lunch or
dinner. The other meal can offer a yellow or red entrée.
2) In addition to red meat (beef, pork, veal, lamb), poultry and fish will be incorporated in
the menu.
3) Lean cuts of beef and pork will be utilized. Refer to “Go For Green Foods and
Beverages Guide” for additional information on lean cuts of meat.
Only one fried entrée will be offered per day to reduce daily fat intake. It is preferable to
serve entrees that are baked, roasted, broiled, poached, or grilled. If serving a fried
entrée, the alternate entrée will be a green coded option.
When a casserole entrée is served, offer an alternate entrée containing pre-portioned or
sliced meat.
When serving high fat cold cuts such as bologna, offer lean, cold sliced roast meats such
as turkey or lean roast beef to provide a green coded option.
Serve gravy/sauces on the side.
At breakfast, egg white or egg substitute which are cholesterol free will be available.
Oatmeal qualifies as a green coded option for breakfast.
1207 MENU PLANNING AND G4G NUTRITION STANDARDS FOR STARCHES
1. GREEN CODED STARCH.
a. When serving two entrées per lunch/dinner meal:
1) If there are two or more starches, one must be green coded and there may be ONLY
one red coded recipe from each category. The remaining starch options can be green
or yellow coded.
b. When serving one entrée per lunch/dinner meal:
1) When serving one starch per meal, a green coded starch will be provided at either
lunch or dinner. Starch options should include potatoes, rice, or pasta.
2) At breakfast, assorted whole wheat breads, english muffins, bagels and low fat
muffins will be offered as an alternate to high fat breakfast pastries.
3) At least one whole grain breakfast cereal will be offered daily. Prominently display
whole grain RTE cereals on the breakfast serving line.
4) Offer whole grain pastas and whole grain rice when available.
1208 MENU PLANNING AND G4G NUTRITION STANDARDS FOR VEGETABLES
1. GREEN CODED VEGETABLE.
a. When serving two vegetables per lunch/dinner meal:
1) If there are two or more vegetables, one must be green coded and there may be
ONLY one red coded recipe from each category. The remaining vegetable options
can be green or yellow coded. Small amounts of butter/margarine (1 cup per 100
portions) can be added.
2) No more than one starchy vegetable (i.e., corn, peas, baked beans, pinto beans,
black-eyed peas, lima beans) will be offered when serving two vegetables per meal.
3) Ideally, two vegetables will be served at both lunch and dinner.
b. When serving one vegetable per meal/dinner meal:
1) A green coded vegetable will be provided at either lunch or dinner. Small amounts of
butter/margarine (1 cup per 100 portions) can be added.
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c. Relish trays will include a variety of fresh vegetables. If dip is to be served with the relish
tray, offer a low fat/fat free variety.
d. Vegetables should complement the entrée being served. For example, green beans
complement spaghetti but Harvard beets do not.
e. Vegetables will be prepared utilizing batch cooking techniques in order to preserve
nutrients and provide flavorful and appetizing meals.
f. Vegetables served with cheese sauces or cream sauces are generally high in fat.
Recommend serving sauces on the side.
g. Only one fried vegetable will be served per meal when 2 vegetables are provided. Only
one fried vegetable will be served at lunch and dinner if only one vegetable is provided
per meal.
1209 MENU PLANNING AND G4G NUTRITION STANDARDS FOR DESSERTS
1. GREEN CODED DESSERT. Healthy option dessert offered with each meal.
a. A green coded dessert will be served with every lunch and dinner meal. Examples
include fruit, gelatin, angel food cake. Offer fruit selections as a dessert choice for the
lunch and dinner meals.
b. Fresh fruit will be utilized to the greatest extent possible. If canned fruit is utilized, it
should be packed in natural juice vice syrup packed. Seasonal fruits will be incorporated
into the menu as much as possible. A minimum of two fruits will be offered every meal.
c. The dessert menu should take into account personnel resources and skills, preferences,
eye appeal, climate, and cooking facilities. Each week’s menu must be planned to
provide an equitable distribution of favorite cakes, pies, fruit, ice cream, and cookies. The
baker’s schedule should allow adequate time and oven space to make the desserts. If
bread and breakfast pastries are baked in the galley, production schedules will be
coordinated.
1210 MENU PLANNING AND G4G NUTRITION STANDARDS FOR SALAD BARS, FRUIT
BARS AND ALL OTHER BARS
1. SALAD AND FRUIT BAR. Salads and fruits offered with each meal.
a. A salad bar or a pre-made fresh green salad will be served at lunch and dinner pending
availability of ingredients.
b. A minimum of two different fresh fruits will be served at breakfast, lunch and dinner.
c. A salad bar menu will be planned to complement the cycle menu. Avoid duplication of
food flavors between the menus. Several factors to consider:
1) Seasonal availability. Fresh fruits and vegetables in season are a refreshing change
from the processed varieties so often served while the ship is underway. Fresh fruit
and vegetables should be served as often as their availability and the replenishment
schedule allow.
2) Temperature and climate. Cool, colorful salads are most welcome in warm weather.
Lighter meals for hot weather go well with hearty chilled salads, such as potato,
macaroni and tuna salads. Crisp relishes and green leafy salads are an enjoyable
contrast with the hot, heavier dishes of cold weather meals.
d. Salad bar components:
1) Every salad bar will include a raw vegetable salad, such as a tossed green salad.
Take advantage of the wide variety of fresh greens such as romaine, escarole,
endive, Chinese and red cabbage to add variety, color and texture to tossed green
salad.
2) Assorted vegetables such as diced/sliced/shredded celery, radishes, carrots, onions,
tomatoes, cucumbers, cauliflower, broccoli flowerets, baby kale, spinach and green
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3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
pepper rings may be included. Use seasonal fresh vegetables to the maximum extent
possible.
Additional salad bar items may include: pickles, olives, bean sprouts, bacon bits,
croutons, garbanzo beans (chick peas), almonds, sun flower seeds, cashews, red
beets, diced hard boiled eggs, diced/cubed meat or cheese, and cottage cheese.
Specialty salads such as coleslaw, pasta salad, potato/macaroni salad, and
marinated black bean salad should be added to the salad bar as often as possible.
Salad dressings. At least one reduced fat/fat free dressing will be offered at each
meal. Hummus and avocado are spreads that can placed on top of salads in place of
dressing.
Fruit. When possible, fresh fruits should be offered on the salad/fruit bar. If fresh fruit
is not available, canned fruit provides a suitable alternative. A minimum of two types
of fruit will be offered every meal.
Go For Green Salad Bar Set Up
a. Place green coded vegetables and protein (beans) first on the salad bar, followed
by yellow and red coded items. Place smaller amounts of the red coded items on
the salad bar and use smaller serving utensils.
2. OTHER BARS. Other bars such as pasta, potato, taco or chicken bar to name a few may
be offered as an additional feeding option to the main line.
a. These bars must include a green coded option as in accordance with G4G menu
coding guidelines.
b. Use the bar template to code each item on the bar menu.
1211 MENU PLANNING AND G4G NUTRITION STANDARDS FOR BEVERAGES
1. BEVERAGES. Green coded option offered at each meal.
a. One percent low fat and/or skim milk will be offered at each meal. If chocolate milk is
available, offer low fat chocolate milk. Deployed ships and overseas general messes are
encouraged to use 1% low-fat milk when available.
b. Pure 100% fruit juice is coded yellow vice fruit drinks containing large amounts of sugar
which are coded red. Reduced calorie or calorie free beverages sweetened with artificial
sweeteners are coded yellow.
c. Energy drinks should only be considered a part of menu planning for activities feeding
Special Forces or unique war fighter groups that need additional electrolytes in their diet.
Bag-in-a-box (BIB), powdered Gatorade and PowerAde products are available on the
Navy Standard Core Menu (NSCM) Master Load List are the only products approved for
use. The DoD Nutrition Committee evaluates products for inclusion.
1212 HEALTHY INGREDIENTS
1. GREEN CODED INGREDIENTS. Green coded ingredients must be offered with each meal.
a. Substitute whole fat ingredients for low fat/fat free ingredients wherever possible. For
example, mayonnaise, sour cream, yogurt, and cheese products are available in low
fat/reduced fat or fat free versions. Substitute hummus and avocado as flavorful
alternatives.
b. Egg substitute or egg whites which are cholesterol free eggs can be substituted for
regular table eggs.
c. Use 90% lean, ground turkey or ground beef.
NOTE: If mixing ground turkey with beef, the internal cooking temperature must reach 165° F. or
higher for 15 seconds.
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1213 MARKETING MENU ITEMS
1. GENERAL.
a. Menus are posted daily in the general mess to describe and merchandise meals. Recipe
numbers should not be posted on menu boards. Utilize descriptive terms that sound
appetizing (i.e., Seasoned Mixed Vegetables vice Mixed Vegetables or Fluffy White Rice
vice Rice). Menu items will be listed in the following order:
• Appetizer/Soup
• Entrées (gravy, sauce if required)
• Starches
• Cooked vegetables
• Salads
• Breads/spreads
• Desserts
• Beverages
b. Green Coded menu options will be identified. Galleys should utilize the marketing
technique most effective for the individual galley. Posting on cycle menu, menu boards,
beginning of serving lines, or in front of the items on the serving line and specialty bars
(i.e., potato, salad, chili bar, etc.) A food label card must be placed in front of or on top of
the item on the cycle menu/posted menu. Additionally, a sample plate displaying the
green coded options within the portion size as indicated by MyPlate should be placed at
the beginning of the serving line. These techniques provide a quick reference for those
patrons desiring to select the green coded options.
c. Ensure serving line personnel are knowledgeable about the specific ingredients, portion
size and food label card color/sodium code of the foods they are serving.
d. Commands will be required to accurately display food label cards identifying the menu
items served on the serving line.
1214 FOOD COMBINATIONS, SCHEDULING, VARIETY AND INNOVATION
1. GENERAL.
a. Preparation methods will be varied in the same meal, on the same day and throughout
the menu cycle. For example, potatoes can be served mashed, baked, oven-fried or with
a variety of seasonings. Rice can vary from white, brown or wild.
b. The Armed Forces Recipe Service (AFRS) will be the only recipes on menus used to the
greatest extent possible. The menu should incorporate an assortment of different recipes
throughout the cycle and only those recipes within FSM.
c. Variety breads such as cornbread, muffins, garlic bread, biscuits and similar items will be
offered to complement the meal.
d. A choice of two or more spreads will be offered at each meal (i.e., butter, margarine, jam,
jelly, marmalade, honey, or peanut butter).
e. A different type of soup will be served for the second meal when two soups are offered on
the day’s menu. Soup ingredients should differ from other menu selections of the meal.
Example: avoid serving entrées containing tomato sauce with tomato soup, baked beans
with bean soup. The type of soup must be specified on the menu. Terms such as “soup
of the day” will not be used.
f. Meals will offer only one sandwich when two entrees are provided.
Menus that rely
solely on sandwich meals may compromise crew satisfaction and nutrition. Sandwich
preparation can be labor intensive.
g. Avoid reliance on snack foods (i.e., potato chips) as an accompaniment for sandwiches.
h. Theme meals will be included throughout the cycle. Theme/special meals are important
as morale boosters and also allow Culinary Specialists to use their individual talents.
With a few extra touches any meal can become fit for a special occasion. Special meals
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include holiday meals, cookouts, brunches and birthday meals. For example, the menu
for St. Patrick’s Day could read “Irish Stew” rather than “Beef Stew.” Meals on these
days can be highlighted with one or more special dishes to commemorate the occasion
along with printed menus and decorations.
SPECIAL OCCASION MEAL IDEAS
January
New Year’s Day
Martin Luther King, Jr’s Birthday
February
Black History Month
Valentine’s Day
Presidents’ Day
March
St. Patrick’s Day
Easter Sunday (or April)
National Nutrition Month
May
Asian Pacific Heritage Month
Mother’s Day
Armed Forces Day
Memorial Day
June
Father’s Day
Flag Day
July
Independence Day
September
Labor Day
5-a-Day Month
October
Columbus Day
Navy Birthday
Halloween
November
Veteran’s Day
Thanksgiving
Marine Corps Birthday
December
Christmas
1215 CHARACTERISTICS OF AN AESTHETICALLY PLEASING MEAL
1. MEAL CHARACTERISTICS. Making a meal pleasing to the patron.
a. Color - Each meal should be colorful. The colors will complement, not contrast, one
another. It is helpful to visualize the meal on a plate or to look at the meal on the steam
table from the customer’s side of the serving line. A meal of baked fish, steamed rice and
seasoned corn provides no color contrast and is unappealing for the customer.
b. Shape - Each meal will consist of items that vary in shape. The combination of
hamburgers, potato patties, and sliced beets is an example of poor shape variety.
c. Texture - Food items that comprise a meal will vary in texture. A good rule to follow is to
include a crisp, a firm and a soft food at every meal. Avoid a meal containing all saucy
items or all soft items.
d. Flavor - Avoid too many similar flavors in a meal as well as too many different flavors in
one meal. For example, corn should not be scheduled with a meal containing cornbread
or cornbread dressing or sweet potatoes with pumpkin pie. Alternately, a meal consisting
of lasagna, sweet and sour pork, southwestern rice and southern style beans contains
too many different flavors that do not complement one another. Flavors represented
throughout the meal should be complementary.
1216 SPEED LINES
1. GENERAL. Speed lines provide quick “grab and go” items for those patrons not having the
time to proceed through the serving line. Green coded options should be available on the speed
line at each meal. In addition to burgers and fries, healthy sandwiches such as grilled chicken
sandwiches, lean meat sandwiches/wraps and ready-made salads (such as a Chef salad) can be
offered. Seasoned oven fries provide an appetizing, lower fat alternative to french fries. Fresh
fruit is an easy addition to any speed line and provides a green coded dessert for those patrons
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desiring one. Properly managed speed lines can encourage healthful eating and be successful
in any general mess having the space and personnel to run them.
1217 BRUNCH
1. GENERAL. The Brunch meal answers the patron’s desire for a late breakfast and also
provides the option of a more substantial mid-day meal. Generally, all breakfast options are
available as well as a typical lunch entrée item such as a sandwich or casserole. Side dishes
such as a starch and vegetable will accompany the lunch entrée. Green coded healthier options
will also be available for the brunch meal. The green coded option can be one of the breakfast
entrées, however, it is preferable to offer a green coded sandwich or casserole as well.
1218 NIGHT MEALS
1. GENERAL. The night meal is designed as an alternate meal for those who did not receive a
lunch or dinner meal. Green Coded healthier option entrées and side dishes will be scheduled
regularly throughout the night meal cycle.
1219 SPECIAL MEALS
1. HOLIDAY MEALS. Food service facilities will be issued special menus and instructions via
their TYCOMs for the Easter, Thanksgiving, and Christmas meals. These will be made available
by Food Flash, naval message, NKO, and at each TYCOM level. In addition, each galley may
serve its holiday meals on a day which is convenient for shipboard operations; the meal which
was regularly scheduled can be postponed until the next cycle.
2. BIRTHDAY MEALS. Food service facilities are authorized to host monthly birthday meals
utilizing NSCM line items on a day which is convenient for shipboard operations.
3. STEEL BEACH PICNICS. Food service facilities are authorized to host special events such
as steel beach picnics utilizing NSCM line items. The meal which was regularly scheduled can
be postponed until the next cycle.
4. THEME MEALS. Theme meals are incorporated into the NSCM and can be moved to
accommodate shipboard operations.
5. CHANGE OF COMMANDS AND COMMAND SPONSORED RECEPTIONS. Menus can be
created, and should be derived from the NSCM load list. The menu has to be fully funded by
Official Representation Funds, personal funds or other sources. Use of the subsistence
appropriation funds to defray the cost of food items is not authorized.
Part D: FOOD HANDLING AND NUTRIENT RETENTION
1300 FOOD HANDLING
1. GENERAL. The way food is handled greatly effects nutrient retention. Growing conditions
and degree of processing effect nutritional value. Storage conditions are controlled by food
service personnel. These principles apply to minimize nutrient loss during storage:
a. Store at recommended temperatures.
b. Provide ample air circulation to maintain recommended storage temperatures.
c. Provide cool, dry, ventilated conditions.
d. Practice first-in, first-out (FIFO) use of food items.
e. Long storage times result in greater nutrient loss.
f. Variable and excessive temperatures hasten nutrient loss.
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1301 FOOD PREPARATION
1. GENERAL. Preparation methods affect nutrient content of food items. Refer to AFRS
simmering and steaming instructions for vegetables. Avoid early preparation of all cooked foods.
Hot foods continue to cook, losing nutrients, color, flavor and texture. Progressive/batch cooking
techniques will be utilized. Prepare the minimum quantity required to maintain an even flow of
freshly cooked products to serving lines.
1302 "AS PURCHASED" (A.P) AND "EDIBLE PORTION" (E.P.)
1. GENERAL. The Issue column “As Purchased” (A.P.) on the Armed Forces Recipe Cards is
utilized for the correct conversion of actual quantity needed to meet the yield size of 100
portions. The Weight column is equivalent to the “Edible Portion” (E.P.) of the item needed to
yield 100 portions. Example: Carrots, fresh, shredded, Issue column is equivalent to 1-1/8 lb
(A.P.) to yield the Weight column of 1 lb (E.P.) per 100 portions.
1303 TEMPERATURE MONITORING
1. GENERAL. There are many types of thermometers used in food production to monitor
storage temperatures as well as preparation temperatures. The appropriate thermometers for
use in food service areas must be on hand, accurate, and used effectively for food preparation
and storage.
Location
Type of Thermometer
Milk Dispenser
Refrigerator
Freezer
Ovens
Grill
Manual ware washing
Food
air measuring, spirit glass/dial
air measuring, spirit glass/dial
air measuring, spirit glass/dial
air measuring, dial oven
surface measuring, grill
stick type, pocket dial
stick type, pocket dial
1304 PRESERVATION-PACKAGING AND PACKING FOR FOOD ITEMS
1. GENERAL POLICY. All food items will be given the degree of preservation-packaging and
packing required to prevent deterioration and damage to the maximum extent practicable during
shipment, handling, and storage.
2. LEVELS OF PROTECTION. The following levels of protection apply equally to preservationpackaging and packing of food items:
a. Type Pack (TP) 1 - These are shipping cases or bags (balers) which provide limited
protection in handling, warehouse storage and stacking. TP1 does not provide sufficient
protection from inclement weather. Fresh fruits and vegetables are available only in TP1
packing.
b. Type Pack (TP) 2 - These are shipping cases or bags (balers) which can withstand
inclement weather, multiple handling and underway replenishment conditions
experienced by ships. Selected TP2 semi-perishable food items authorized for Navy are
ten pound bags of flour (general purpose and bread), granulated sugar and rice. They
are listed with separate NSNs and are indicated as TP2 items on the quarterly
NAVSUPNOTE 7330. The remaining semi-perishable items are listed under TP1 NSNs.
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3. PLASTIC PACKAGING OF SUBSISTENCE.
The Navy has established the Plastics
Removal in Marine Environment (PRIME) Program to reduce the volume of plastic packaging
materials aboard Navy ships in order to comply with Public Law 100-200, which bans the
discharge of plastic into the oceans. The most preferred product shall be procured based on not
only the cost but the packaging process. The volume of waste generated from packaging
materials must be considered when procuring subsistence items. Approximately 75% of the
shipboard trash is generated in the galley/mess deck areas. Criteria to use when procuring food
is as follows:
a. Purchase bulk size – an item is packaged in a large size compared to other alternative
package options for this type of item.
b. Consider concentrated products – an item is compressed which allows more efficient
storage for shipboard and reduced packaging.
c. Single material packaging – an item consists of a single material that will not require
sorting for shipboard waste processing.
d. Non-plastic packaging – an item does not employ plastic packaging which would increase
demands on plastic waste processor and storing requirements.
e. High density packaging – an item that is packaged in a rigid rectangular package or
flexible container that allows more of the item to be stored in a given volume than
alternative packaging.
f. Refillable container – an item that is packaged in a container that can be refilled with the
same material, i.e., cooking oil.
g. Multiple use container – an item that is packaged in a container that can be used for other
purposes once its initial function is complete.
h. Processed food item – an item where some degree of preparation has already been
performed on the item eliminating the need for separate packaging of ingredients.
i. Low waste item – an item (likely a protein item) which has been trimmed of fat, bone or
other inedible components.
PART E: ADVANCED FOOD
1400 ADVANCED FOODS
1. GENERAL.
Advanced food is considered to be pre-prepared food which eliminates
traditional “cook from scratch” preparation procedures. These foods are pre-cooked/cooked,
prepared/pre-assembled and pre-breaded. Items that are fresh, chilled, seasoned, frozen,
sliced, diced, and shredded are included in this category. Other items are ready-to-serve (RTS)
or ready-to-eat (RTE) items which may require re-heating, cooking or served directly from the
original container.
1401 ADVANCED FOOD DESCRIPTIONS
1. GENERAL. The following products are considered Advanced Food:
a. Pre-Cooked/Cooked. Preparation requires only re-heating vice complete cooking. These
items can be served alone or as a component of another recipe. Examples are precooked bacon, oven roast, chicken and corned beef.
b. Prepared/Pre-Assembled. Items containing two or more ingredients that have been
assembled to create a complete recipe. Preparation requires heat and serve or minimal
preparation. Items may be purchased frozen, chilled, canned or other dry packaging
such as plastic, foil or cardboard, and may include entrées, side dishes or pie fillings and
desserts. Examples: Lasagna, Pizza, Salisbury Steak, Beef Stew, Macaroni and
Cheese, Baked Beans, Refried Beans, Chili, Beef w/BBQ sauce, Ravioli, Lumpia, Egg
Rolls, Assorted Hors d’ouvres, Au gratin Potatoes, frozen or shelf stable dough products,
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cookie dough, frozen whole eggs/egg whites and condensed or frozen soups, stuffing
mixes, rice mixes and flavored potato mixes.
c. Pre-Breaded. Items raw or pre-cooked, which have bread coating applied already.
Preparation requires only heating and serving. These items are typically purchased in
the frozen state.
Examples of breaded products are shrimp, fish portions,
veal/chicken/pork patties, onion rings and vegetables. Most of the breaded items on the
Navy Standard Core Menu (NSCM) require the use of a perforated sheet pan (National
Stock Number 7330-01-588-4313.
d. Pre-Cut/Sliced/Diced/Chopped/Cubed/Shredded/Grated. Items which have been pre-cut,
sliced, diced, chopped, cubed, shredded, or grated, and are purchased fresh, frozen or
chilled. Examples are sliced/diced/chopped cheeses, pre-cut raw vegetables and meats
such as fajita strips and diced meat (chicken, turkey, etc.).
e. Ready-to-Serve (RTS)/Ready-to-Eat (RTE). Items that are fully prepared as purchased.
They can be removed from the package and served as a stand-alone item without any
further preparation other than portioning. Items may be purchased frozen, chilled,
canned or in dry packaging such as plastic, foil or cardboard. Examples: Pre-made shelf
stable or frozen cookies, brownies, cakes, pies, canned/dry puddings, canned meat
spreads, croutons, ready-made pie crusts, ready-made icing, salsa, pizza, cocktail, tartar
and cheese sauces.
PART F: TRADITIONAL FOODS
1500 TRADITIONAL FOODS
1. GENERAL. These foods are NOT Advanced Foods. They are fresh or processed by
canning, dehydration, compression, freezing, or other methods to save labor and to reduce
waste, storage space and refrigeration requirements. Fleet operations and ships’ varying
characteristics have historically dictated a need for foods that save storage space and do not
require refrigeration. These foods can greatly extend the endurance of ships. Some types of
Traditional Foods are as follows:
a. Canned. These foods are practical to use because they can be safely stored in a wide
temperature range, have a longer shelf-life than fresh or frozen foods, and are generally
economical to use. Waste, such as skin, seeds and bones, has been removed. They are
cooked and ready to heat or chill and serve. Canned foods available include fruits,
vegetables, meats, poultry, fish and ice cream toppings, along with many others.
b. Beverages.
Available as Bag-in-a-Box (BIB), canned, concentrated, Ultra High
Temperature (UHT), dehydrated or instant for many beverages (coffee, tea, soda, fruit
juices, milk, flavored beverages).
c. Dehydrated. The advantages of using dehydrated foods are the natural color, flavor, and
texture of the food is preserved, less storage space is required since water is removed,
and the food can be stored without refrigeration. Different methods of dehydration are
used according to the individual characteristics and reactions of the food item. These are
hot air, vacuum, spray, drum, and freeze-drying. Examples are: dehydrated shrimp,
cottage cheese, instant potatoes, garlic and chives, cream substitute, sour cream mix,
green beans, dessert topping, ice milk and milk shake mixes, yogurt mix and American
cheese, among many others.
d. Fresh/Frozen.
Foods commonly stocked are raw, unseasoned, unbreaded ground
meats, fish, poultry, fruits, and vegetables. A variety of fresh items such as breads, rolls
and pastries are available through local bakery contracts.
e. Other. Other kinds of traditional foods are mixes for bakery items and pudding.
Additional items are salad dressings, jams, jellies, gravy, icing mixes, condiments
(including individual portion packets), dry and instant cereals and spices.
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PART G: SPECIAL MEALS
1600 SPECIAL MEALS
1. GENERAL. In-flight and boat meals that are prepared and eaten away from general messes
pose special problems. Facilities for storage, refrigeration, and cooking aboard aircraft and
service craft may be limited or lacking, and thereby limit menu selections. Special meals often
must be held for several hours. Careful consideration must be given to selection food items that
can withstand delays between preparation and serving without risk of food-borne illness or loss
of quality. Factors that may affect the choice of food items:
a. Highly perishable foods:
1) Sandwich fillings made with salad dressing, chopped and ground protein foods, eggs,
fish and shellfish, pastry with custard fillings, creamed soups and sauces, and
leftover, cooked poultry are highly susceptible to bacterial contamination and should
be avoided when making special meals. The Manual of Naval Preventative Medicine,
NAVMED P-5010-1 gives guidelines for safe food handling procedures.
2) Instead of meat spreads for sandwiches use sliced roast turkey, chicken, beef, pork,
cheese, and peanut butter and jelly. If salad dressing is desired, use individual
packages. Other items, such as catsup, mustard, lettuce, and tomato, should be
packed separately so that the sandwiches will not become soggy.
b. Spicy and Fatty Foods:
1) Highly spiced and rich, fatty foods are known to cause discomfort for aircrewsso these
foods should be avoided.
2) Beans, raw onions, cabbage, soy bean products, and carbonated beverages can
cause intestinal gas at high altitudes for some individuals.
3) Liquids and foods containing starch and sugar may help alleviate the effects of motion
sickness, reduced oxygen and fatigue.
c. Water Availability:
1) The amount of water available may be limited and this should be taken into
consideration when planning meals that include dehydrated or concentrated food
items.
d. Refrigeration unavailable for meals:
1) Personnel responsible for meal preparation must strictly follow sanitary precautions.
2) Foods must be held at constant refrigeration while in the galley.
3) Food must be eaten within 4 hours of issue.
4) To ensure that customers are aware of the safe time limit the meals are to be
consumed with, label the food with the following data:
a) Date and time of preparation
b) Prepared by
c) Keep under refrigeration or eat by _____ (within 4 hours of issue).
5) Holding or reusing these meals for later consumption is hazardous and should be
avoided.
6) Menu suggestions for special meals: To increase the variety of food items for special
meals utilize all of your resources (i.e., made from scratch items, pre-prepared items,
individually wrapped items and boxed meals).
a) The following food items are suggested for inclusion in breakfast meals:
• Fruit
• Juice
• Cereal-Ready-To-Eat
• Breads, pastries
• Spreads (peanut butter, jam, margarine, cream cheese)
• Snacks (dried fruit, nuts, granola type bars, cheese and crackers)
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• Beverages (cold or hot as applicable)
b) The following food items are suggested for inclusion in lunch and dinner meals:
• Fruit
• Juice
• Entrée/Sandwich
• Salad or relishes (raw vegetables, pickles)
• Breads or roll
• Accompaniments (cranberry sauce, applesauce)
• Condiment packets (ketchup, mustard, mayonnaise, dressings)
• Desserts (canned fruit or pudding, bakery items)
• Snacks (dried fruit, nuts, granola type bars, chips, pretzels, cheese and
crackers)
• Spreads (peanut butter, jam, margarine, cream cheese)
• Beverages (cold or hot as applicable)
PART H: FOOD PRESENTATION
1700 GENERAL FOOD PRESENTATION
1. GENERAL. Knowledge in menu planning, creative food preparation, plate presentation and
marketing skills are essential for establishing healthy dietary patterns within the Navy. Food
must not only taste good, but it must also look and sound appealing.
2. APPLICABLE EQUIPMENT. Using the correct tools is imperative.
a. Use the right-size steam table pans to ensure an appetizing appearance of food. Use
shallow steam table pans for serving soft vegetables (broccoli, cauliflower) and breaded
or fried foods to prevent a soggy product. Food items should be covered, when
appropriate, to prevent shriveling and drying. The use of clear dome lids allows patrons
to easily view food items on the serving line.
b. The use of proper serving utensils will promote traffic flow, provide good sanitary
practices, and keep neat order of service lines. Portion size appropriate for each food
item is the Culinary Specialists’ responsibility and must be indicated on the Food
Preparation Worksheet. The portion size that is indicated on the Armed Forces Recipe
Service card is a guide, not a rule. Keep in mind that the nutrition information provided
for each recipe is based on the serving size listed on the card. Periodically check excess
tray waste, and if there is food waste, reduce portion sizes. The patron who desires more
may request larger portions. For appropriate use of utensils, see NAVSUP-7, Guideline
Card A-4, Table of Measuring Equivalents.
3. SERVICE AREAS. Managing and controlling your service areas tends to have a positive
impact for each patrons dining experience.
a. General guidelines. The following guidelines may improve a patrons dining experience:
• Coordinate menus based on the serving space available, as overcrowding detracts
from visual appearance and slows service.
• Watch colors closely - tomatoes clash next to red beets.
• Carefully arrange hot and cold foods (extremely important)
• Personnel should be routed to avoid delay and unnecessary congestion in serving
and dining areas.
• Salad bars should be situated to permit the patron to stop there first before
approaching the hot food serving line when possible. Eliminating the stop at the salad
bar enroute to the table will enable the hot food to be eaten while still hot.
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•
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Separate the dessert bar from the serving line and place it in the center of the dining
area when possible. Using this setup, the patrons can pick up desserts after eating
the main course. A reduction in the number of desserts consumed and a decrease in
tray waste will usually be noticed.
Hot Foods. The following guidelines will assist in ensuring hot foods are served hot.
• A steam table should keep food hot without continuing the cooking process.
• All short order type items, such as pancakes, french toast, and eggs should be served
from the grill on a prepared-to-order basis. Timing is important.
• Hot foods should be batch cooked and replenished as required. Do not mix batches.
• Avoid having hot vegetables stand in liquid on the steam table.
Cold Foods. The following guidelines will assist in ensuring cold foods are served cold.
• Ensure items are properly chilled prior to service.
• Cold items should be served in a refrigerated unit or in trays or pans on a bed of ice.
When ice is used proper drainage is required.
• Fresh fruits must be washed prior to serving.
• Highly perishable desserts such as cream puddings and pies, custards, cream puffs
and eclairs must be served chilled.
• Cold drinks and juices should be dispensed by machine.
• Butter patties should be served from a dispenser. If a dispenser is not available, the
ready-to-serve patties may be placed on a tray and set over a container of ice on the
serving line.
Miscellaneous. Use the following guidelines for miscellaneous foods.
• Bread will maintain freshness if served from dispensers, otherwise, bread should be
opened as needed. To give a fresh-baked quality to breakfast pastries such as
coffeecakes and sweet rolls, heat them in an oven (250° F.) for 8 to 10 minutes before
serving.
• Individual boxes of ready-to-eat cold cereal should also be served from dispensers. If
a dispenser is not available, the individual packages should be arranged on a tray on
the serving line.
• To ensure adequate food temperatures are maintained during meal service, serving
areas should be set up in sufficient time for the serving equipment to reach
appropriate temperatures. Foods requiring temperature control will be set on the
serving line as close to meal service as possible. The quality of the food as well as
temperatures are best maintained when the food is held in equipment used for
cooking, a warming box, or appropriate cold storage areas.
Self-Service Items. Use the following guidelines for self-service items.
• Protect food on display with sneeze guards or food shields, in direct line between the
food and the mouth or nose of an average person.
• Use long handled serving utensils to avoid patron contact with food, thus minimizing
cross contamination.
• In self-serving area careful attention should be given to the arrangement of food items
to eliminate reaching over one container of food to get to another.
• Do not let patrons use soiled plates or silverware for refills.
Merchandizing, Plate Presentation and Garnishing. Use the following guidelines for
merchandizing and garnishing.
• Merchandise your food by presenting items on the serving line in an attractive manner
and your patrons will want to eat it. Eye appeal is just as important as taste.
• A well-planned meal should contrast in color, shape, size and texture. Foods within a
meal should have harmonious colors and pleasing color contrasts. A serving line of
all red foods or all bland foods, such as Navy bean soup, roast veal, buttered noodles,
summer squash and rice pudding is not eye appealing.
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•
A garnish is an ornament that is also used for flavor. Some garnishes are used
merely as a decoration; others are planned to complement the flavor and texture of
the dish as well as to add visual appeal. Generally, garnishes should be edible and
should be an integral part of the food so that it will not be left on the plate. Clear
guidelines or instructions for garnishing should be included on the Food Preparation
Worksheet. Rules for garnishing are as follows:
o The entire service setting should be viewed as a whole.
o Plan simple garnishes. Do not sacrifice timely preparation of the meal just for the
sake of garnishing.
o Vary the garnishes such as lemon twists or slices; it should not become
monotonous.
o Overcooked or improperly prepared food will not be helped by an attractive
garnish.
o Use garnishes sparingly. Beware of parsley overkill.
o Ensure the serving line is neat and attractive. Use decoratively folded napkins or
a draped tablecloth, a small centerpiece or garnish to add color and interest to the
serving area.
o Garnishing techniques should support conservation objectives.
1701 SELF-SERVE SERVING LINES
1. GENERAL. The use of self-service feeding style afloat will reduce Food Service workload in
support of serving lines during meal times. Self-service feeding style allows sailors to serve
themselves from the main serving line vice a food service attendant performing that function.
Although sailors serve themselves from the main serving line and the hot/cold serving stations,
food service attendants will restock these serving stations and maintain proper sanitation. These
additional food bars require G4G coded options.
a. This style of feeding is most efficient when additional hot and cold food serving stations
are installed on the mess decks. Studies have demonstrated the advantages of the selfservice feeding style include improved customer satisfaction, labor savings and a
consistently faster throughput of patrons.
b. Challenges associated with self-service feeding include required serving line design
modifications, possible increase in food waste, and potentially degraded sanitation.
2. G4G SERVING LINE CONFIGURATIONS. G4G serving line configuration policy directs that
all green coded food category items be placed first, followed by yellow coded items, and lastly
red (entrée, starch and vegetable). Green coded entrees, starches and vegetables should be
visible first on the serving line in most food service operations (pictured below in Figure 1-11).
Figure 1-11
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
When serving multiple entrées, starches and vegetables use the alternate G4G configuration
serving line set up. This will place all entrees first, followed by all starches and lastly all
vegetables within the serving line. The green coded food category items for the entrees,
starches and vegetables will be placed first, followed by yellow coded items, and lastly red
coded items within the G4G serving line configuration (pictured below in Figure 1-12).
Figure 1-12
The serving line should consist of 6-10 hot food wells designed to minimize the waiting time
in serving lines. The hot food wells will be capable of “buffet style” (self-service) or “cafeteriastyle” service. This may require minor modifications to the serving line such as raising of the
serving line or relocation of current sneeze shield. Proper serving utensils are necessary to
comply with portion control standards. Galley personnel will only need to re-supply food
items, monitor temperatures, and maintain cleanliness of the serving line. An emphasis
should be made on crew awareness and training on proper sanitation and hygiene. Locating
hand sanitizing solution dispenser units at the beginning of each self-service line for crew use
is suggested to improve sanitation.
3. MENU PLANNING. Menu planning and food production is important to the overall success of
the self-serve concept.
Listening to food service personnel feedback and crewmember
comments are essential and could save literally thousands of dollars. Menus should have a wide
variety of items to select from and salad bars should be large enough to offer a large variety of
fresh salads, vegetables, and fruits. Salad bars can be procured that are large enough to have a
separate soup tureen station.
4. ADDITIONAL FOOD BARS. Installation of additional food serving bars on the mess decks
will greatly increase the amount and variety of food offered. These additional food bars require
G4G coded options.
a. Speed line - featuring hamburgers, pizza, chicken wings, hot dogs, etc.
b. Deli line - featuring sandwich making items for patron self-service.
c. Traditional – featuring full meal, two entrée, starch, and vegetable selections.
d. Potato bar - featuring baked potatoes with a variety of toppings.
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e. Suggested food items for an extended mess deck serving line for hot and cold items:
1) Buffalo wings
2) Pasta with sauce (meat or meatless)
3) Tacos (ground beef or turkey)
4) Fajitas (beef/chicken)
5) Burritos
6) Baked fish or chicken
7) Rice
8) Nacho machine with chips
5. FOOD WASTE CONSERVATION. Waste from food comprises roughly 75% of all waste that
is produced on a ship. The self-serve concept could contribute to this waste stream if not
controlled. One way of improving waste control would be monitoring the serving lines and
scullery daily and reminders from the food service personnel to educate the crew. Any food left
over that is taken off the serving line must be discarded at the end of the meal period. An
additional means of controlling portions and waste is the arranging the serving line in the
following order: vegetables, starches, and main entrées.
6. FOOD PRODUCTION.
The galley captain/chief should be willing to give hands-on
instruction and able to communicate exactly the expectations and goals of the Food Service
Officer and Leading Culinary Specialist. They should manage by observing food production and
take corrective actions as necessary. Proper planning, from meal predications to proper menu
acceptability, is essential to a safe, efficient, and financially sound self-serve operation.
Progressive cooking techniques along with utilization of prepared and advanced foods all need to
be properly employed to ensure a successful operation. Low acceptability items should be
deleted from the menu.
7. EXTENDED SERVICE HOURS. Traditionally, serving lines are designed to feed the entire
crew within two hours. Extending the meal periods will decrease customer waiting times. The
Food Service Officer can create an alternating/rotating schedule of galley operations to afford the
crew a nutritious meal anytime and create “off hours” for galley cleaning.
8. SANITATION GUIDELINES
a. Clean plates and bowls will be provided each time the customer returns to the serving
line.
b. Non-commercially prepared salad dressings used in open containers must be discarded
after each meal.
c. Potentially hazardous food must not be held for more than 4 hours between 41° F. -135°
F. Food that has been held between 41° F. -135° F. for more than 4 hours is potentially
hazardous and will be discarded.
d. Serving utensils for self-service must be stored in food with the handles extended above
the rim. Utensils should be cleaned and sanitized every four hours during continued use.
e. Desserts must be in individual dishes.
f. Soft serve ice cream should be dispensed from a dispensing machine. Hard pack ice
cream will be dispensed by a dedicated server only using a proper ice cream scoop and
hot water to assist in dispensing. The hot water used must be changed on a frequent
basis.
g. Do not mix “old” food with “new” food when replenishing items on the serving line. Once
a food item has been depleted, remove the pan, discard the food and
replace with new.
h. Provide a sneeze shield in a position to allow for self-service of food and
prevent contamination from patrons. The sneeze shield must be 18
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i.
inches from the cabinet’s edge of dresser top to the bottom of the sneeze shield. It must
be positioned in a direct line between food and the mouth/nose of the average patron.
Self-Serve Serving Lines will be maintained in accordance with NAVMEDP-5010, Tri
Service Food Code, Chapter 1, Section III, article 3-5.13 under the section titled “Buffets.”
Working closely with the local preventive medicine authority will ensure a safe-food
operation
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CHAPTER 2
MESS DECK MASTER-AT-ARMS
Part A: INTRODUCTION
Introduction Statement ..............................................................................................................2000
Responsibilities..........................................................................................................................2001
Chain of Command ....................................................................................................................2002
Part B: HOW TO BE AN EFFECTIVE MESS DECK MASTER-AT-ARMS
General Guidelines (Afloat) .......................................................................................................2100
General Guidelines (Ashore).....................................................................................................2101
Supervisory and Management Tools........................................................................................2102
Duties of Food Service Attendants............................................................................................2103
Assignments of Food Service Attendants .................................................................................2104
Muster and Inspection ...............................................................................................................2105
Prior to Inspection......................................................................................................................2106
Inspection Procedures ..............................................................................................................2107
Written Instructions ....................................................................................................................2108
Part C: DINING AREA AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT
Safety Precautions ....................................................................................................................2200
Pre-Service Set-Up ...................................................................................................................2201
During the Meal .........................................................................................................................2202
Cleaning Procedures .................................................................................................................2203
Table Condiments .....................................................................................................................2204
Tables, Chairs, and Benches ....................................................................................................2205
Bulkheads ..................................................................................................................................2206
Overheads .................................................................................................................................2207
Decks.........................................................................................................................................2208
Carpeting ...................................................................................................................................2209
Stainless Steel Surfaces ...........................................................................................................2210
Salad Bars .................................................................................................................................2211
Refrigerated Milk Dispensers ....................................................................................................2212
Non-Carbonated Beverage Dispensers ....................................................................................2213
Carbonated Beverage Dispensers ............................................................................................2214
Coffee Urns ...............................................................................................................................2215
Freeze-Dried Coffee Dispensers ..............................................................................................2216
Bulk Ice Making Machine ..........................................................................................................2217
Ice Dispensing Machines ..........................................................................................................2218
Soft-Serve Ice Cream Machine .................................................................................................2219
Butter Dispensers ......................................................................................................................2220
Tray, Bowl, Cup Plate, and Glass Lowerators ..........................................................................2221
Commercial Hot and Cold Beverages…………………………………… ....................................2222
Part D: SERVING LINE AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT
Background ...............................................................................................................................2300
Electric Hot Food Table ............................................................................................................2301
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General Operations ...................................................................................................................2302
Descaling ...................................................................................................................................2303
Sneeze Shield and Tray Slide Rail ...........................................................................................2304
Bread Dispenser........................................................................................................................2305
Rotary Toaster ..........................................................................................................................2306
Cereal Dispenser.......................................................................................................................2307
Part E: SCULLERY OPERATIONS
Background ...............................................................................................................................2400
Safety Precautions for the Dishwashing Machine ....................................................................2401
Preparing Soiled Dinnerware and Silverware for Machine Washing .......................................2402
Operating Instructions for Single-Tank Dishwashing Machines...............................................2403
Operating Instructions for Double-Tank Dishwashing Machines .............................................2404
Cleaning the Dishwashing Machine..........................................................................................2405
Descaling Dishwashing Machines ............................................................................................2406
DE staining Dinnerware and Silverware ...................................................................................2407
Care of Plastic Dinnerware (Non-Disposable) ..........................................................................2408
Inventory of Dinnerware and Silverware ...................................................................................2409
Part F: HAND DISHWASHING OF COOKING UTENSILS
Background ...............................................................................................................................2500
Preparation for Washing ...........................................................................................................2501
Washing and Sanitizing .............................................................................................................2502
Storage of Clean Utensils .........................................................................................................2503
Part G: FOOD WASTE AREAS
Garbage Grinder Safety Precautions and Operating Procedures............................................2600
Cleaning the Garbage Grinder ..................................................................................................2601
Cleaning Garbage/Trash Containers ........................................................................................2602
Part H: CLEANING GEAR/ESTABLISHING AND MAINTAINING
REQUIREMENTS
Cleaning Gear ...........................................................................................................................2700
Proper Usage ............................................................................................................................2701
Cleaning and Sanitizing.............................................................................................................2702
Establishing and Maintaining Requirements .............................................................................2703
Part I: PLANNED MAINTENANCE SUBSYSTEM
Responsibility ............................................................................................................................2800
Trouble Call Log ........................................................................................................................2801
Inoperative Equipment Report ..................................................................................................2802
Part J: TRAINING
Responsibility ............................................................................................................................2900
Secretary of the Navy Requirements ........................................................................................2901
Formal Training .........................................................................................................................2902
Training Records .......................................................................................................................2903
On-the-Job Training ..................................................................................................................2904
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Follow-Up Training ....................................................................................................................2905
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
Table I
Recommended Quantity of Dishwashing Compound for Single-Tank Machines
Table II
Recommended Quantity of Dishwashing Compound for Double-Tank Machines
Table III
Dishwashing Machine Detergent Automatic Dispenser
Table IV
Rinse Additive Automatic Dispensers for the Dishwashing Machines
Table V
Instructions and Questionnaire for Incoming Food Service Attendants
Table VI
Check List for the Mess Deck Master-At-Arms
Summary Review of Responsibilities
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
CHAPTER 2
MESS DECK MASTER-AT-ARMS
_____________________________________________________
PART A: INTRODUCTION
2000 INTRODUCTION STATEMENT
1. GENERAL. Upon being assigned to the food service division, you have assumed an
extremely important and a most demanding leadership responsibility as MDMAA (Mess Deck
Master-at-Arms). One commanding officer recently summed it up this way: “The Mess Deck
Master-at-Arms is the most demanding leadership responsibility a petty officer will ever face due
to the fact that most food service attendants have just begun their enlistment, and are not only
adapting to a new job, but to a new way of life. Many “eyes” will be watching you and, to a large
degree, the health and well-being of the crew members will depend on how efficiently you
perform your job.” Food service is one of the most important morale factors affecting our sailors.
It can either be positive or negative. Regardless of how well the food is prepared, if the dining
patrons are not provided with clean, dry dinnerware, the food is not properly served, the dining
area is not clean and orderly, and good sanitation practices are not enforced, it will have a
negative affect on the crew’s morale. Always strive to provide the excellent services that you
would desire and expect if you were the dining patron. That’s the positive approach.
This handbook is designed to provide you with step-by-step procedures for performing your
duties, and for training and supervising food service attendants. If you are designated as Mess
Deck Master-at-Arms, you will find this handbook a very helpful and easy-to-follow reference.
Think of this handbook as a road map. See Table VI for the Mess Deck Master At Arms
Checklist. By following the plotted charts and directions, you will arrive at your destination on
schedule. There are no known shortcuts; don’t look for any at your activity either.
You will find your assignment offers challenges, rewards, and personal satisfaction for doing your
part to achieve excellence in food service. The reward, though often intangible, is significant the health, well-being and respect of your shipmates.
2001 RESPONSIBILITIES
1. MESS DECK MASTER-AT-ARMS.
The Mess Deck Master-at-Arms serves as the
command’s official host to the patrons of the food service facility. You are directly responsible to
the food service officer or a designated representative who normally is the leading culinary
specialist. Your duties and responsibilities are as follows:
• In charge of all spaces and equipment in the dining area, serving line, scullery and waste
handling areas, except the equipment or areas under the cognizance of the leading
culinary specialist.
• In coordination with the leading culinary specialist, assign food service attendants to the
service of food, maintenance and cleanliness of the dining area and equipment, operation
of the scullery, and handling and disposal of food waste.
• Muster food service attendants daily, and thoroughly inspect for personal neatness and
cleanliness.
• Supervise the cleaning of the dining area, serving line, scullery, dinnerware and
silverware.
• Ensure that all assigned equipment is operated in accordance with current instructions.
• Inventory (conduct bi-monthly mess gear inventory) and maintain adequate dinnerware
and silverware to ensure that sufficient quantities will be available throughout the serving
period.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
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•
In conjunction with the medical department, administer a training program to food service
attendants in sanitation, scullery operation, and food handling.
Maintain order and discipline in assigned areas. Ashore, your duties will be slightly
different, and will be covered more specifically in Section 2.
2002 CHAIN OF COMMAND
1. GENERAL. The Mess Deck Master-at-Arms should ensure that the Leading MS, or a
designated representative, is informed of any problems or changes in procedures.
Communication with superiors promotes good working relationships and eliminates the
possibility of misunderstanding. Remember, over-informing is better than under-informing.
PART B: HOW TO BE AN EFFECTIVE MESS DECK MASTERAT-ARMS
2100 GENERAL GUIDELINES (AFLOAT)
1. GENERAL. As Mess Deck Master-at-Arms, it is necessary that you demonstrate good
leadership and supervisory qualities since many of the food service attendants have just recently
enlisted in the Navy. Demonstrating such qualities will have a lasting effect on their military
enlistment or career. Remember that the young sailors look to their supervisor for guidance and
direction. As Mess Deck Master-at-Arms, you can excel as a supervisor and can earn respect
and cooperation of superiors, peers, and food service attendants by:
a. Knowing your job and performing it effectively.
b. Leading and guiding food service attendants, not driving them.
c. Being a fair, but also firm, leader.
d. Being courteous, cooperative, and helpful to food service attendants and to the patrons of
the food service facility.
e. Setting a good example, e.g. having the right attitude and maintaining an outstanding
military appearance.
f. Listening attentively and sincerely to patrons’ and food service attendants’ complaints
and suggestions.
g. Striving constantly to make food service attendants aware of their responsibilities to the
crew members.
h. Respecting the right of all food service attendants to dignity and self-respect.
Afloat activities are required to take an actual count of personnel who consume a meal
during in port periods. As Mess Deck Master-at-Arms, you are responsible for ensuring
that an accurate count is taken. One acceptable method is using a hand reciprocating
counter (clicker).
Upon securing the serving line, the number of personnel who
consumed the meal should be submitted to the Watch Captain.
2101 GENERAL GUIDELINES (ASHORE)
1. MDMAA DUTIES. As Mess Deck Master-at-Arms at an ashore food service facility, where
civilian contract services are utilized, your responsibilities should be more defined but are just as
important. The following guidelines will assist you in performing your duties:
• CONTRACT SPECIFICATIONS:
o The serving of food and cleaning of food service equipment and dining areas ashore
is normally contracted to civilian companies. A contract is initiated covering the
services to be provided by the contractor.
o The food service officer or a designated representative will be appointed as the
Contracting Officer’s Technical Representative (COTR). The COTR is responsible for
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
•
all matters pertaining to administering the contract. However, you may be delegated
by the Food Service Officer or COTR to conduct sanitation inspections.
o You should become thoroughly familiar with the contract and the services that the
contractor is responsible for providing. Remember that the supervision of the contract
employees is the responsibility of the contractor.
HEAD COUNT PROCEDURES:
o A signature head count procedure is used at most ashore enlisted dining facilities.
Personnel receiving a meal should sign (in ink) a Meal Signature Record, NAVSUP
Form 1291.
o You are responsible for ensuring that only authorized personnel are permitted to eat
in the food service facility. Personnel receiving rations in kind are authorized to eat at
government expense. These personnel should exhibit a valid Meal Pass, NAVSUP
Form 1105, and also their identification card, if in civilian attire. Facilities using
Common Access Cards (CAC) should ensure the patrons’ identity matches the CAC
and the card is properly swiped for ration credit.
o Prior to the meal, you should ensure that the Meal Signature Record, NAVSUP Form
1291, is serialized and the headings filled out to preclude loss or misuse of signature
sheets.
o During the meal, you should direct personnel to the correct signature sheet,
determined by branch of service or cash sales, and ensure that they insert first initial
and surname, and Meal Pass number or command/unit for transient personnel. All
entries should be legible.
o Immediately upon securing the serving line, you should assemble the NAVSUP
Forms 1291 in sequence by category, and draw an ink line horizontally below the last
name on each form. Determine the total number of signatures for each category and
enter the total on the Recapitulation of Meal Record, NAVSUP Form 1292.
• Prepare NAVSUP Form 1292 in duplicate (original and one copy).
• Use one NAVSUP Form 1292 to recap breakfast, lunch and dinner.
• Mess Deck Master-at-Arms signs the first signature line on the NAVSUP Form
1292 and delivers the completed form to the food service office.
2102 SUPERVISORY AND MANAGEMENT TOOLS
1. SUPERVISION OF FOOD SERVICE ATTENDANTS. To clarify the concept of supervisory
responsibilities to food service attendants and host responsibilities to food service facility
patrons, the following guidelines are furnished:
• Work in close coordination with the leading culinary specialist.
• Observe, know and enforce the objectives, policies, standards and procedures of the
command and the food service division (treat “customers” courteously and respectfully).
• Study and analyze the jobs for which you are responsible (learn everything about the job
or equipment and be able to apply your knowledge effectively).
• Use previous food service facility records to determine trends and anticipate workloads
and changes; schedule food service attendants to meet work demands.
• Ensure in advance the availability of needed materials and equipment.
• Balance the workload among food service attendants in their work assignments.
• Give special attention to new food service attendants. Acquaint them with their jobs and
their fellow workers (fully explain the policies, working conditions, and expected
standards).
• Maintain discipline and good conduct, and ensure strict adherence to established
standards.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
•
Keep your supervisor (Leading CS or designated representative) informed as to activities,
progress, problems, etc.
• Keep food service attendants fully informed as to how they are doing, what they do well,
and where improvement is needed.
• Plan and conduct meetings with food service attendants to share information and ideas in
order to promote enthusiasm and teamwork, thus creating a positive atmosphere.
• Encourage good health habits and personal hygiene standards. Ensure proper grooming
and strict conformance with uniform standards at all times.
• Pursue an aggressive training program. Training pays good dividends and will definitely
earn you the respect of the food service attendants.
• Be conscious of wasted time, materials, equipment. Seek solutions to prevent waste.
• Review your area of responsibility periodically and make carefully planned
recommendations for improvement.
• Accompany inspectors on sanitation inspections.
In addition, food service attendants work unusually long hours and perform non-skilled work
which is not a part of a Navy rating. Their performance, however, is critical to the effective
operation of the food service division and an essential factor relating to the health and morale of
the crew. These circumstances, combined with the fact that the food service attendant’s duties
involve continuous cleaning of the same areas and equipment, make your job as a leader and
supervisor unusually demanding. Unlike some assignments, there is never a lull in your duties;
your performance and the performance of those you supervise must be at a peak at all times.
2103 DUTIES OF FOOD SERVICE ATTENDANTS
1. FOOD SERVICE ATTENDANTS. Food service attendants are junior enlisted members
detailed to the food service facility for duty in any of the following capacities:
• Serving of food on the serving line.
• Cleaning and sanitation of food service spaces and equipment not used for food
preparation.
• Operation of the scullery and the handling and disposal of food waste.
• Loading and unloading supplies for the food service facility.
• Night watch standing duties.
• Stateroom/Wardroom duties.
2. DUTIES. Food Service Attendants assigned to the general mess are responsible for
performing the following duties:
• Maintain general cleanliness and sanitation of bulkheads, overheads, decks and
associated equipment in all food service spaces.
• Maintain cleanliness and sanitation of the mess dining area salad bars, beverage bars,
hot bars, condiment tables, self service bars, and galley steam tables.
• Handle and dispose of all trash, food waste, and plastic waste in all food service spaces.
• Maintain the cleanliness, sanitation, and descaling of the scullery, pots and pans machine
and the cleanliness of all deep sink areas in food service spaces.
• Maintain the cleanliness and sanitation of countertops.
• Operate scullery and pots and pans equipment in order to sanitize all pans, dishware,
silverware, and cooking utensils.
• Wash cooking and baking gear in the galley and baking areas.
• Assist in transferring hot and cold foods to all serving line and self service bars/tables.
Assist in setting up the salad bar, hot bars, condiment tables, and galley steam tables.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Refer
Fill and maintain non-carbonated beverage dispensers, milk machines, soda machines,
hot drink dispensing machines, and juice dispensers; including the cutting of dispensing
tubes.
Set tables with napkin dispensers, salt and pepper shakers, sugar dispensers, and all
condiments required for the meal served.
Maintain cleanliness and sanitation of all portable dispensing units. Fill all dispensing
units for the dining tables and beverage bar areas.
Maintain cleanliness and sanitation of all mess gear cleaning equipment; mops, buckets,
brooms.
Place and remove tablecloths and table linens in food service dining areas. Set table
settings in wardroom and CPO dining areas.
Transfer and pick up dining linens from laundry.
Transfer and store messdeck and private mess china, silverware and trays.
Maintain cleanliness and sanitation of carpets and upholstery furniture.
Maintain the cleanliness and sanitation of all dining facility ice dispensing machines.
Prepare non-carbonated beverages and coffee for juice line dispensers.
Assist in setting up individual servings of breads, condiments, desserts, etc.
Assist the Master-at-Arms with the twice monthly inventory of the general mess
dinnerware and silverware.
Operate and maintain the cleanliness of garbage grinders.
Maintain the cleanliness and sanitation of garbage and trash containers.
Load and unload consumable supplies for the food service facility.
Assist the Bulk Storeroom Custodian with stores rotation, store transfers to the galley and
private messes, and general storeroom cleaning.
Serve meals in flag and private messes.
Maintain general stateroom cleaning for the ranks 05 and above Not sure if this is still in
effect?. This may include rack make-up, laundry transfer and pick up, and head facility
cleaning. Additional cleaning requirements may be required for an embarked Flag and
Commanding Officer.
Other duties as assigned by the Leading CS.
to OPNAVINST 3120.32D, chapter 6 for MAA and FSA manning requirements.
2104 ASSIGNMENTS OF FOOD SERVICE ATTENDANTS
1. FOOD SERVICE ATTENDANTS DUTIES.
Up to this point, we have discussed
responsibilities and supervision. Now, let’s start with the first assignment of the food service
attendants and the correct procedures to be followed while assigned to the food service division.
a. INDOCTRINATION. Personnel are detailed by the executive officer to perform food
service duties (usually for a 90-day period). Figure 2-1 is a recommended check-in/out
format. Table V contains proposed instructions and a questionnaire for reporting food
service attendants, to be completed during an indoctrination period. Figure 2-2 is a
proposed format to be used to indicate that indoctrination has been completed. Figures
2-1 and 2-2 should be used to establish minimum requirements. They can be tailored to
the unique needs of your ship/station. Don’t be tempted to skip the indoctrination and
leave the food service attendants to learn for themselves. A good indoctrination program
is an essential management tool to ensure new personnel are properly indoctrinated to
Navy standards.
b. DUTY SECTIONS. Due to the long working hours while assigned to food service duty, it
is recommended that the food service attendants be divided into two sections (port and
starboard) to allow sufficient time off and still ensure full coverage for all meal periods.
Figure 2-3 is a normal in-port routine for food service attendants. For example, the “port
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
section” would report for work at 0530 hours (one hour prior to serving breakfast) and the
“starboard section” would report for work at 0630 hours. At approximately 1400 hours
(after all areas and equipment have been cleaned from the lunch meal) the port section
would commence liberty and the starboard section would remain on duty until secured by
the Mess Deck Master-at-Arms or galley lead cook after the evening meal and all
cleaning has been properly completed. The port and starboard sections’ work schedule
would be reversed each day.
2105 MUSTER AND INSPECTION
1. PERSONAL HYGIENE. The importance of personal hygiene cannot be overemphasized in
food service. Personnel should be physically clean and wear clean clothing. Paper food service
hats or hair nets should be worn to prevent hair from falling on food or falling where food is to be
served or eaten. Ball caps are not authorized for use in food service spaces. Fingernails will be
cleaned and closely trimmed, free of polish or acrylic finishes. Upon completion of food service
duties individuals may comply with grooming standards contained in Chapter 2 of Navy Uniform
Regulations, NAVPERS 156651. Emphasize the need for clean hands and the necessity for
washing hands frequently, especially after visiting the toilet facilities. Use of hand sanitizers are
permitted; although, they should never be used as a substitute for regular hand washing.
2. INSPECTION.
Food service attendants should be mustered and inspected prior to
commencing work. At this time, any noted discrepancies should be corrected prior to handling
food or eating utensils. The food service attendants should always present a neat, “squared
away” appearance to the dining patrons.
2106 PRIOR TO INSPECTION
1. APPEARANCE STANDARDS. You should set the example for good grooming standards.
Your appearance should be interpreted as your standard. Inspect yourself prior to reporting to
work to ensure that you present that “squared away” appearance. Remember that the food
service attendants look to you for guidance and direction; you cannot expect a food service
attendant to conform to Navy grooming standards if you do not adhere to those same standards.
2. UNIFORMS. Ensure that there are sufficient food service uniforms and disposable food
service hats available to permit food service attendants to change daily. A laundry schedule for
food service uniforms should be established by the Food Service Officer. This schedule should
provide for trousers, aprons, etc., to be the first items washed that day. You should ensure that
separate laundry bags are available for trousers and dungarees and food service attendants
utilize them. It is often found that the reason for food service attendants not having clean
uniforms is not the fault of the laundry, but that the food service attendants do not place them in
the correct laundry bag, or they fail to turn in/pickup the laundry on schedule. Lastly, ensure that
rubber aprons, arm length rubber gloves, rubber boots and ear protection (for scullery operation)
are available for the food service attendants assigned to the scullery and the utensil washroom.
3. DAILY CHECKLIST. Figure 2-4 provides a useful daily check sheet to use when mustering
and inspecting food service attendants. Maintain a file, after being initialed by the food service
officer/leading culinary specialist, to provide you with reference on any recurring appearance or
tardiness problems.
2107 INSPECTION PROCEDURES
1. INSPECTION TECHNIQUES. The following are some suggested inspection techniques:
a. Muster food service attendants at the designated time(s).
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
1) Follow military procedures; ensure that food service attendants line up in ranks; do
not hesitate to give them commands, such as: ATTENTION, UNCOVER, PARADE
REST, AT EASE, etc. This will not only make your job easier, but will gain you the
respect of the food service attendants.
b. Inspect each person to ensure that:
1) Clothing is clean and neat.
2) Food service hats are correctly worn to prevent hair from falling on the food. Do not
permit personnel assigned to food service and food preparation areas to wear ball
caps as they are not cleaned daily and are unsanitary.
3) Hair conforms to navy grooming standards.
4) When facial hair is authorized for medical reasons, it is kept clean, trimmed to no
longer than ¾ inch in length and covered with an appropriate mask while performing
food service functions.
5) Shoes are shined.
6) Hands are clean and free of open lesions, cuts, scabs, etc. If any cuts or lesions are
noticed, instruct the person to report to medical.
7) Fingernails are clean and closely trimmed, free of polish or acrylic finishes.
8) Jewelry, as well as watches and bracelets, are prohibited from food service spaces.
This does not apply to a plain ring, such as a wedding band.
2108 WRITTEN INSTRUCTIONS
1. INDOCTRINATION INSTRUCTIONS. The food service attendants have received written
instructions during the indoctrination period in the form of Table V, food service attendants’
reporting instructions. This should be supplemented with frequent oral and written instructions
on personal hygiene and grooming standards. Signs instructing food service personnel to wash
hands prior to returning to work shall be conspicuously posted at all entrances to food service
and toilet areas. See check in/out form for Food Service Attendants on the next page (Figure 21).
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
CHECK IN/OUT FORM FOR FOOD SERVICE ATTENDANTS ______________________
Date
From:
Executive Officer, ________________________________________________________
To:
______________________________________________________________________
Name
Subj:
Division
FOOD SERVICE ATTENDANT DUTIES; ASSIGNMENT TO __________________
Encl: (1)
Food Service Attendant Reporting Instruction (Table V, NAVSUP P-486, Appendix K)
Encl: (2)
Food Service Attendant Questionnaire (Table V, NAVSUP P-486, Appendix K)
1. You are assigned to food service duties for this command to relieve ________________ on
___________________________. Check out and check in with the following personnel:
CHECK OUT
LCPO
Division Officer
Department Head
Postal Clerk
Medical representative (with slip showing that a
medical check has been made)
CHECK IN
Mess Deck Master-at-Arms
_____________________________
Leading CS
Food Service Officer
Personnel Office
_____________________________
_____________________________
_____________________________
_____________________________
_____________________________
_____________________________
_____________________________
_____________________________
2. For planning purposes, you will be relieved on ____________________________________ .
3. Upon completion of the above, return this form to the Food Service Officer. Enclosures (1)
and (2) will be completed during the indoctrination period.
Executive Officer
Figure 2-1
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
FOOD SERVICE ATTENDANT
INDOCTRINATION CERTIFICATION
NAME ____________________________________
RATE _________ DATE____________
Purpose: This sheet is designed to ensure that prior to commencing duty as a food service attendant; an
individual has received proper training in order to perform the duties with the necessary skills. Upon
completion of training, an individual should be able to correctly answer the questions in enclosure (2)
(Table V, NAVSUP P-486, Appendix K).
1. I certify that this individual has passed a medical inspection and has been instructed in the following:
a. The causes and dangers of food poisoning and contamination.
b. Personal hygiene when handling food – both in serving of meals, and in disposal of waste and
scraps, including a review of pertinent sections of General Sanitation Instructions.
c. Oral hygiene.
_____________________________
Senior Medical Representative / (PMT)
2. I certify that this person has been instructed in the following:
a. All pertinent supply instructions covering general Supply Department procedures and duties of
food service attendants.
b. The proper care and cleaning of the dishwashing machine and other food service equipment.
c. Proper serving techniques for all types of food.
d. Proper disposal of waste and scraps.
e. Duties and performance, both professional and military, expected while assigned to the food
service division.
f.
Mustering time and location for quarters, General Quarter’s station, and other watch, quarter and
station bill assignments.
_____________________________
Leading Culinary Specialist
3. I certify that this person has received an assignment of duties, and has had all instructions and safety
precautions explained. Assigned to liberty section ___________________.
________________________________________
Mess Deck Master-at-Arms
4. I have received and understand the above instructions, have read the recommended readings, and
have successfully completed enclosure (2), Appendix K, NAVSUP P-486.
________________________________________
Reporting Food Service Attendant
5. Interview (by division officer). ____________________________________________________________
Food Service Officer
Figure 2-2
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
NORMAL IN-PORT ROUTINE
FOR FOOD SERVICE ATTENDANTS
(All times to be adjusted to ship’s routine/policy)
0500
0530
0600*
0625
0630
0715
0730
1015
1045*
1125
1130
1230
1400**
1530
1600*
1640
1645
1730
1830
Awake oncoming section (port or starboard).
Report to dining area for muster and inspection; commence preparation for
breakfast.
Breakfast for food service attendants. Awaken oncoming section (port or
starboard).
Duty section (port or starboard) at their assigned duty stations.
Breakfast for the crew. Oncoming section (port or starboard) report to dining
area for muster and inspection.
Secure breakfast; commence clean up.
All food service attendants will muster for quarters instruction and inspection.
Commence preparation for the lunch meal.
Lunch for food service attendants.
All food service attendants at their assigned duty stations.
Lunch for the crew.
Secure lunch; commence cleanup.
One section (port or starboard) secured from duty (provided all areas and
equipment are clean).
Commence preparation for the dinner meal.
Dinner for food service attendants.
Duty section (port or starboard) at their assigned duty stations.
Dinner for the crew.
Secure dinner; commence cleanup.
Duty section (port or starboard) secured from duty (provided all areas and
equipment are clean).
NOTE
*
Ensure food service attendants eat at the prescribed times in order to be at their duty
stations during the serving of the meal and to commence cleanup as soon as the meal
secures.
** The Mess Deck Master-at-Arms will decide when to secure the food service attendants
after notifying the Leading MS.
AT-SEA ROUTINE
At-Sea routine will be much the same with the possible exception of weekends.
Figure 2-3
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
DAILY MUSTER AND INSPECTION REPORT
Rate Name
Muster
Trousers
Shirt
Belt
Y
E
S
S
A
T
S
A
T
S
A
T
MDMAA ___________
N
O
U
N
S
A
T
U
N
S
A
T
U
N
S
A
T
Shoes
Haircut
Shave
Hands
S
A
T
S
A
T
S
A
T
S
A
T
U
N
S
A
T
LEADING CS _____________
Figure 2-4
2-15
U
N
S
A
T
U
N
S
A
T
U
N
S
A
T
FOOD SVC OFF
Comments
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
PART C: DINING AREA AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT
2200 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
1. GENERAL. Sections 3 through 7 discuss the food service areas and associated equipment
which usually comes under the cognizance of the Mess Deck Master-at-Arms.
2. EQUIPMENT SAFETY. You should be thoroughly familiar with the operation and safety
precautions pertaining to the equipment in your area. Ensure that the following safety and
operating precautions are observed:
• Operating instructions and safety precautions should be attached to each piece of
equipment or posted adjacent to it. Food service attendants should read, understand and
comply with posted operating instructions and safety precautions.
• Disconnect/secure the electric power prior to cleaning equipment.
• Food or liquid spilled on the deck is cleaned up immediately to prevent falls.
• Exercise caution when handling hot pans, serving line inserts, etc., to prevent burns.
Utilize hot pads or pan holders.
• Personnel should wear full arm length rubber gloves (not electric safety gloves) when
cleaning with hot water or strong detergents.
• Loose fitting clothing will not be worn.
• It is recommended use of hair pieces be avoided to preclude entanglement.
2201 PRE-SERVICE SET-UP
1. PRIOR TO MEAL SET-UP. The following items should be accomplished prior to serving the
meal:
• Clean all areas and equipment.
• Post/update the current menu at the entrance to the serving line.
• If tablecloths are to be used, they should be placed on the tables evenly.
• Set the tables with napkin dispensers, salt and pepper shakers, sugar dispensers, and
other condiments which will be used for the meal.
o
Items should be arranged on the tables in a uniform manner.
o
Ensure all condiments/dispensers are clean and full.
• Place clean, dry dinnerware and silverware in the prospective positions for service.
• Fill the non-carbonated beverage dispenser with pre-chilled beverage or juice.
• Check the refrigerated milk dispensing machine to ensure that:
o Milk containers are filled and dispensing tubes are cut properly.
o Bowls or catch trays are in place to collect spillage.
o A portable thermometer should be kept inside the milk dispenser to register the
internal temperature. Ensure the thermometer is not lost during the changing of milk
containers.
2202 DURING THE MEAL
1. TIME MANAGEMENT. This is the timeframe in which all of your efforts and preparation
should come together. If you have planned properly, and the food service attendants have been
effectively trained, the next hour or so should go smoothly. On the other hand, it could be a time
of complete confusion if you haven’t “gotten organized.” Assignments of food service attendants
should have already been made and each person should know precisely what is to be done.
You might want to review the topics discussed in Sections 1 and 2 which will be very beneficial to
you during this time. During the meal period, both you and the food service attendants will be
extremely busy. Your area of responsibility is indeed large and will require great organizational
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ability. Not only will you be required to maintain good order and discipline and be a good host,
but you, as Mess Deck Master-at-Arms, are responsible for ensuring that:
a. “Customers” are treated courteously at all times. Your function as “host” is extremely
important.
b. Only authorized personnel receive head-of-the-line and early meal privileges.
c. Ensure no food or beverages are removed from the general mess.
d. An accurate head count is taken of all personnel consuming a meal.
e. The flow of personnel through the serving line is regulated to suit the seating capacity of
the dining area.
f. Personnel are wearing the correct uniform or civilian attire and that all articles of clothing
are worn correctly. Greasy, dirty uniforms or coveralls should not be permitted.
1) Personnel should be informed of any uniform/clothing discrepancies and corrective
action should be taken prior to entering the serving line.
2) Any uniform/clothing discrepancy that is discovered after the patron has already been
permitted to enter the serving line should be dealt with individually as the patron is
leaving the dining area, not while the patron is eating.
g. Food service attendants are at their assigned duty stations at least 5 minutes prior to
serving time.
h. Tables, chairs, and benches are cleaned during the meal. This not only ensures the
dining patron a clean area to eat, but aids in cleanup after the meal.
i. Any spillage on the deck or serving lines is cleaned up immediately.
j. Milk and beverage dispensing machines are refilled as needed and any spillage is
cleaned up immediately.
k. The scullery operation is arranged to permit the dining patron to place the soiled
dinnerware (tray) in the appropriate scullery opening to be scraped and sorted by the
food service attendant. Never permit the trash/garbage container to be left outside the
scullery to indicate that the patron should empty their tray.
l. The dining area is secured for cleaning at the conclusion of the meal hour after all
patrons have finished eating.
2203
CLEANING PROCEDURES
1. PROPER CLEANING TECHNIQUES.
Correct cleaning procedures cannot be
overemphasized in food service. The use of strong detergents, salt water, scalding water or
abrasive cleaners may damage or dull the surface of some areas or equipment. Throughout this
handbook, reference will be made to the “two-pan” method for general cleaning of items such as
tables, chairs, bulkheads and most equipment exteriors.
a. The “two-pan” method is described below:
• One pan containing 2 tablespoons of liquid detergent to each gallon of hot water.
• The second pan contains hot, clear water or a sanitizing solution.
Pan One of the “two-pan” method will ensure a thorough cleaning, particularly in
cracks, crevices, and hard-to-get-at areas. Pan Two will ensure that dirt removed by
Pan One and all traces of detergent is removed. You should ensure that the contents
of the “two pans” are changed as the water becomes dirty. A separate clean towel
will be utilized in each pan to prevent the possibility of cross-contamination.
b. For hard-to-remove dirt and baked-on food deposits, the following solution is
recommended:
• Two tablespoons of liquid detergent and four tablespoons of Type I or Type II
dishwashing machine detergent to each gallon of hot water.
• You should read the label carefully on all cleaning products and ensure that they are
not combined with any product containing bleach.
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An example of a “daily and weekly” work schedule for cleaning areas and equipment
in the dining area is illustrated in Figure 2-5. This schedule, combined with the
cleaning instructions in this section, will ensure proper cleaning at the prescribed time
and will assist you in supervising and assigning jobs to food service attendants.
2204 TABLE CONDIMENTS
1. TABLE CONDIMENTS. Napkin dispensers, salt and pepper shakers, and sugar dispensers
should be cleaned and refilled after each meal and during the meals as necessary. Condiment
bottles such as catsup, hot sauce, steak sauce, etc. Should be wiped after the meal and
discarded when empty. The following procedure should be used for cleaning:
• Remove the tops (covers) and place them in a container of hot water. Tops (covers) may
be placed in perforated dish rack and placed in the dishwashing machine.
• Thoroughly clean the exterior of the containers with a mild detergent and water solution
using a clean soft cloth or disposable wiping cloth. Special attention should be given to
the necks of the condiment bottles and the bottom and edges of the napkin dispensers.
• After the tops (covers) have been cleaned and air-dried, or dried with a clean disposable
cloth, replace the tops and store the containers in a clean storage cabinet. Condiments
that require refrigeration must be refrigerated until the next meal to prevent spoilage.
2. The following procedure should be accomplished weekly:
• Empty the salt and pepper shakers and the sugar dispensers into clean containers.
• Remove the napkins and the interior section (spring) from the napkin dispenser.
• Prewash the shakers, dispensers and covers in detergent and water using a nylonbristled brush for hard-to-clean areas such as napkin holder edges and bottoms.
• Place the empty salt and pepper shakers, sugar dispensers, exterior of the napkin
dispensers, and all tops (covers) into the dishwashing machine.
• Allow the shakers, dispensers, and tops to air-dry; refill and store them in a clean storage
cabinet.
2205 DINING TABLES, CHAIRS AND BENCHES
1. CLEANING THE DINING FACILITY.
a. During the meal, tables and seating areas should be cleaned using a mild detergent,
water solution, as soon as each patron has finished eating and left the table.
b. Before breakfast and after each meal:
c. Remove loose dirt, papers, food particles, etc., from table tops, chairs and benches.
d. Using the “two-pan” method, thoroughly clean and rinse all surfaces. Particular emphasis
should be placed on the table edges and around metal rims.
e. Using the “two-pan” method, thoroughly clean and rinse the underside and legs of tables,
chairs and benches. Special attention should be given to the table bottoms, the base of
chair legs, table stanchions, and metal seams.
2206 BULKHEADS
1. BULKHEAD CLEANING
a. Daily, bulkheads adjacent to the serving line should be cleaned and rinsed using the
“two-pan” method.
b. Weekly, painted, Formica, tile and paneled surfaces should be cleaned and rinsed using
the “two-pan” method. Special attention should be placed on seams, cracks, crevices,
and hard-to-get-at areas. Surfaces may be wiped with a clean, dry cloth after rinsing, to
prevent spotting.
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c. As necessary, some areas, such as borders, door openings, around beverage islands,
etc., may require more frequent cleaning.
2207 OVERHEADS
1. WEEKLY CLEANING OVERHEADS. Weekly (for areas without false overheads):
a. Pipes, ventilation ducts, wire ways, etc., should first be cleared of all loose materials and
dust. This may be accomplished by:
1) Vacuuming;
2) Blowing down with low pressure air;
b. Sweeping with a small bristle brush.
c. Overheads should be cleaned first so that dust particles do not fall on previously cleaned
areas.
d. Cover or remove equipment and food, as necessary, to protect from falling dust particles.
e. Clean all areas with a mild detergent and water solution.
f. Clean and change filters in accordance with planned maintenance schedules.
2. WEEKLY CLEANING FALSE OVERHEADS. Weekly (for areas with false overheads):
a. Acoustic tile and other porous surfaces should be vacuumed or brushed to remove loose
dust and dirt.
b. Accumulations of grease or dirt may be removed by careful wiping with a strong
detergent and water solution.
c. Light covers should be removed and cleaned.
d. Ventilation supply/exhaust openings should be cleaned.
2208 DECKS
1. FOOD SERVICE DECKS. Food service decks usually have coverings that will withstand
heavy-duty wear if good maintenance is practiced. Improper cleaning materials and methods
such as strong, caustic base detergents, salt water, rough abrasives or scalding water will dull
colors and cause surfaces to become porous.
a. DECK CLEANING. Decks should not be swept during the serving or preparation of food
as dust particles rise in the air and will fall on food and tables.
1) Afloat activities dining area decks should be swept and cleaned before breakfast in
addition to after each meal. Usually, the ship’s dining area is utilized by crew
members in the evening as a crew’s lounge. Decks in other food service areas
should be cleaned after each meal. Spillage on the decks should be cleaned up
immediately to prevent falls.
b. DECK TYPES. The following deck coverings are normally found in food service areas
throughout the Navy:
• Vinyl floor covering (linoleum)
• Vinyl and vinyl asbestos tile
• Ceramic tile
• Quarry tile (normally found in the galley and scullery)
• Terrazzo
• Rubber terrazzo
• Magnesite
• Perma-deck
• Terra cotta
• Stratica (normally found in dining areas and passageways)
c. DECK CLEANING METHODS. The following method of cleaning is recommended for
the above listed deck coverings:
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•
Prepare the cleaning solution: Two tablespoons of general purpose liquid detergent
to each gallon of warm (not hot) potable fresh (not salt) water.
• Scrub: Use a scrubbing machine with circular brush or stiff bristle brush. Apply
solution and scrub well to loosen dirt. Special attention should be placed on hard-toget-at areas such as under equipment, around deck drains, behind and under piping,
etc.
• Rinse: Use clean, fresh water and a clean mop. Mop up cleaning solution and dirt.
o Change the rinse water frequently as it becomes dirty.
o Areas which have deck drains, such as the scullery, food waste area, utensil
washroom, galley, etc., may be flushed with clean water to rinse. Caution should
be exercised during underway periods not to waste fresh water.
• Dry: Remove remaining water with a squeegee clean mop until surface is barely
damp and allow to air dry.
d. DECK SEALING. Terrazzo, magnesite, and perma-deck surfaces should be resealed
when the surface becomes dull, porous and difficult to clean.
2209 CARPETING
1. GENERAL. Many of our dining facilities ashore have carpeting in the dining area. Some
officer and Chief Petty Officer dining areas afloat also have carpeting. Carpeting requires daily
care which will keep the carpeting looking clean and bright. The following pointers will assist you
in prolonging the life of your expensive carpeting:
• Place a heavy-duty mat at all entrances for personnel to remove rough soil from their
shoes.
• Cover heavily-traveled areas with runners made from the same fabric as the carpet or
from rubber or plastic.
• Vacuum or sweep carpets after each meal. In areas where there is very heavy traffic,
such as doorways, it may be necessary to vacuum several times a day. This will prolong
the life of the carpet as abrasion from embedded sand or grit causes excessive wear.
• Clean up spills promptly. The longer spills remain on the carpet, the more likelihood of
stains, and the spilled material will be tracked to other areas of the carpet.
• When stains do appear, try a dry cleaning solvent. If this doesn’t work, use a detergent
solvent that dries to a powder and can be removed with a vacuum cleaner.
• If wax or chewing gum or similar material is stuck to the carpet, try placing a plastic bag
filled with ice cubes on the material until it is frozen. Scrape it off with a plastic putty knife
instrument not used for food preparation.
When a thorough cleaning is necessary, rotary brush shampoo or dry foam methods should be
satisfactory for normally soiled carpets.
Steam cleaning is the best technique and is
recommended for heavily soiled carpets. Follow the carpet manufacturer’s directions and
recommendations and cleaning equipment operating instructions. In addition, be sure to read
warning labels on cleaning solution containers; some of these can be hazardous.
2210 STAINLESS STEEL SURFACES
1. GENERAL. Stainless steel is being extensively used in food service areas at afloat activities,
not only for equipment, but also for bulkheads and overheads. Stainless steel is easy to
maintain. If properly cared for, it presents a very impressive appearance and will shine like a
mirror. The following cleaning procedures are recommended:
• Stainless steel surfaces should be cleaned daily to prevent the buildup of dirt and grease
deposits which, if permitted to remain for a lengthy period, will harm the finish. Stainless
steel requires exposure to air in order to remain bright and shiny.
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•
•
•
•
Use the “two-pan” method for cleaning and rinsing. Stainless steel has a polishing line or
a “grain” like wood; clean in the direction of this “grain,” not against it. Ensure that strong
cleaning agents or rough abrasives are not used as they will scratch the surface.
Do not permit the cleaning solution or a sanitizing solution to remain on the stainless steel
for long periods as it will cause discoloration.
Stainless steel surfaces should be wiped dry with a soft, dry cloth after cleaning and
rinsing.
A silicone base polish is recommended for polishing stainless steel. Before ordering
stainless steel cleaners, ensure that they meet the shipboard HAZMAT (Hazardous
Material) requirements. Stainless steel polishes will be used in accordance with Material
Safety Data Sheets (MSDS). Stainless steel polishes shall not be utilized on food contact
surfaces.
2211 SALAD BARS
1. NON-REFRIGERATED SALAD BAR AND REFRIGERATED SALAD BARS.
a. Salad bars may be set up on a self-serve basis and must be equipped with a sneeze
shield. To assure all salad bar items remain below 41° F., they must be pre-chilled in a
refrigerator and placed in pans/trays or crocks which are located on a bed of ice or on an
electrically refrigerated salad bar unit. Proper drainage is essential when ice is used.
The top sections of a refrigerated salad bar are normally controlled by a separate valve or
switch. In order to ensure all salad bar items remain below 41° F. these units should be
turned on approximately one hour prior to placing the salads on it.
b. Refrigerated salad bars should be defrosted and thoroughly cleaned after each meal.
Turn off the switch/valve of the top unit and allow it to defrost freely. Do not use any
metal objects to remove the ice as it may puncture the coils and will scratch the surface.
1) Cleaning procedures after each meal:
a) Remove all inserts of salads and dressings and return them to the vegetable
preparation room/galley supervisor.
b) Discard the ice and defrost the salad bar.
c) Using the “two-pan” method, clean and rinse the salad bar and allow it to air dry.
(1) Special attention should be given to the drain to ensure that it is free of food
particles and draining properly.
(2) Clean the sneeze shield, the top and bottom of the refrigerated tier shelves,
and the legs and metal frames.
d) Most refrigerated salad bars have a bottom section for the storage of salads and
dressings. This should also be cleaned after each meal. Ensure that the drain
and the gaskets around the doors are thoroughly cleaned and check for tears in
the gaskets.
e) If the exterior of the salad bar is made of stainless steel, follow the cleaning
procedures for stainless steel surfaces.
2212 REFRIGERATED MILK DISPENSERS
1. PROPER CARE OF MILK DISPENSERS. Take care to ensure milk dispensers are properly
cleaned and sanitized.
a. Before each meal:
1) Check the temperature utilizing the installed external gauge and the internal portable
thermometer. Temperature range should be 32° – 41° F.
2) Fill the milk dispensers. Wipe the bottom of containers or cans before placing them in
the dispenser. Do not reuse disposable cardboard milk containers.
3) Cut milk dispensing tubes with a clean, sanitized instrument at a point ¼ inch below
the dispensing valve opening. Surgical scissors, stainless steel paring knives, or
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disposable plastic knives are recommended. Scissors and paring knives should be
sanitized after each use. Plastic knives should be of the type which are individually
wrapped and should be used only once and discarded.
b. During the meal:
1) Replenish milk containers as necessary.
2) Keep bowls or catch trays clean; empty as necessary.
3) Wipe up spills immediately.
c. After each meal:
1) Clean the exterior; follow the procedure for cleaning stainless steel surfaces. You
should ensure that the base of the machine, around the legs, metal seams, and the
edge under the dispenser opening and door are thoroughly cleaned.
2) Remove and disassemble the metal dispensing valve. Place all stainless steel parts
in the dishwashing machine.
d. Defrosting procedures:
1) Defrost when the ice reaches a thickness of 1/4 inch. Remove milk containers and
place under refrigeration while defrosting. Turn off the electric power supply; open
the door and allow the machine to defrost freely. Do not use metal objects to dislodge
ice.
2) After defrosting, clean the interior of the machine using the “two-pan” method.
Special attention should be given to the door gaskets and check for tears in the
gaskets.
3) After defrosting, cleaning, and wiping dry with a clean cloth, turn on the electric power
supply.
2213 NON-CARBONATED BEVERAGE DISPENSERS
1. GENERAL. Non-carbonated beverage dispensers are usually located in the dining area to
dispense fruit juices, lemonade, iced tea and other popular beverages. These dispensers have a
self-contained refrigeration unit and a recirculating pump to keep the beverages thoroughly
mixed that promotes uniform cooling. The beverages are dispensed from a clear plastic tank.
2. OPERATION. Operation of the equipment is as follows:
• Fill the dispensing tank well in advance of the meal to ensure a properly chilled beverage.
Beverages should be prepared in advance and pre-chilled.
• Empty and clean the drip pans as necessary and wipe up any spillage immediately.
• Turn off the refrigeration unit and recirculating pump when the machine is not in use or
the tank is empty.
3. DISPENSER. The dispenser should be disassembled and thoroughly cleaned after each
meal/use. The following procedure should be followed:
• Turn off/secure the electric power supply to the machine.
• Drain the beverage from the dispenser and check with the galley leading culinary
specialist in regard to future use. Do not discard the beverage unless directed.
• Disassemble the dispenser in the following manner:
o Remove the dispensing valves from the beverage tank.
o Remove the cover, drip pan, re-circulating spray tubes, rubber gasket and
magnetized agitators.
o Remove the beverage tank from the machine.
o Clean the exterior of the exposed dispenser using the “two-pan” method. Areas that
are often overlooked are the base of the dispenser (legs), and the dispensing valve
openings.
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o
o
Wash the removed items in warm detergent and water, rinse with clear water to
remove all traces of detergent, place in a sanitizing solution and allow to air dry. Use
dishwashing compound, hand, for detergent. DO NOT use any abrasive cleaners
and DO NOT place in the dishwashing machine (remember the removable parts are
of plastic material).
Reassemble the dispenser after it has air dried.
4. BASE CLEANING. The base of the dispenser should have an extensive cleaning weekly or
more often if necessary. The following procedure should be followed:
• Disconnect/secure the electric power supply.
• Remove the stainless steel cover from the front of the dispenser.
• Remove the side panels and screens.
• Wash and rinse all removed items (be careful not to lose the metal screws).
• Vacuum the exposed area of the dispenser and wipe with a damp cloth.
• Reassemble the dispenser immediately.
2214 CARBONATED BEVERAGE DISPENSERS
1. GENERAL. Many activities have carbonated beverage dispensers for dispensing soda.
These beverages are highly acceptable to the patrons and are especially good for morale. The
following procedure is recommended for cleaning:
• After each meal:
o Remove the beverage dispensing nozzles, clean in hot water, and replace.
o Remove the front stainless steel cover and clean; clean the exposed interior section
and replace cover.
o Pour hot water into the drain pan to flush all carbonated syrup from the drains.
o Disconnect/secure the electric power and CO² supply when the dispenser is not in
use.
• Syrup containers: Containers should be checked and refilled prior to serving the meal.
Wash, rinse and sanitize containers before refilling. Detachable hoses should be dipped
in hot water prior to replacing to remove beverage syrup and clean O-ring seals.
• Weekly:
o Disconnect/secure the electric power.
o Remove the top cover to the dispenser. Clean the cover with detergent and water,
rinse, and air dry.
o Vacuum or brush the compressor coils and the area around the compressor.
o Reassemble the dispenser.
2215 COFFEE URNS
1. COFFEE PREPARATION. Good coffee is an asset to all food service operations. The
following guidelines will assist you:
o Prepare coffee in small quantities; use the exact amounts of coffee grounds and hot
water prescribed by the leading culinary specialist.
o Coffee should be used within 30 minutes and held no longer than one hour at 185° F.
After 1 hour coffee loses its good aroma and becomes bitter.
o Remove and dispose of used coffee grounds immediately after preparing coffee.
o If a cloth urn bag is used, it should be rinsed in clear hot water and placed in clean, cold
water until the next use.
• This prolongs the life of the urn bag and prevents absorption of foreign odors.
• Disposable paper filters are highly recommended.
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2. CLEANING COFFEE URN. One of the most important factors in preparing good coffee is a
clean coffee urn. The following procedures should be followed:
o Daily
• Clean the urn immediately after the coffee has been used.
• Rinse with enough water to remove sediment and old coffee from the bottom of the
urn liner, drain lines and faucet.
• Add approximately 1 gallon of hot water to the urn liner and brush the sides
carefully with a clean bristle brush. A long-handled bowl brush is recommended.
The brush should be “labeled” and used only for this purpose.
• Drain and flush with hot water until the water runs clear. It is now ready for the next
batch of coffee.
o After the dinner meal (daily): Bev: never heard of this way of cleaning the urn what
happened to the baking soda?
• Follow the above procedure and then proceed with the following cleaning method.
• Add an accurately measured solution of 1 ounce dishwashing machine compound
completely dissolved in 1 gallon of hot water to the urn liner. Use only thoroughly
mixed solution of dishwashing machine compound and hot water. Do not place solid
cleaning agents in the urn liner as they may become entrapped in the drain line or
faucet.
• Thoroughly brush the coffee urn liner and using a small “pipette” brush clean the
gauge glass. Clean the lid (cover) also as it is exposed to coffee vapors.
• Rinse thoroughly to remove all traces of the cleaning solution. Flush the urn liner,
gauge glass, and faucet with hot, clear water (180° F.) to ensure that these items are
sanitized.
• Place approximately 1 gallon of clean water in the urn liner when it is not in use and
leave the lid (cover) ajar. This will prevent the bottom of the urn liner from becoming
burned and will permit the steam to escape.
• Remember to drain the water from the urn liner prior to preparing coffee.
Note: Cleaning and deodorizing the coffee urn can also be accomplished by using ¼
cup to 1 cup of warm water mixed thoroughly then added to the coffee urn for one
cycle. Drain and rinse with hot water before use. Depending upon the coffee urn you
may need to remove the filter before cleaning.
3. DE-STAINING A COFFEE URN. The coffee urn should be de-stained at least weekly, and
more frequently if the urn liner becomes badly stained. The following procedures should be
followed:
o Be sure the urn water jacket is ¾ full and the urn is turned on.
o Fill the urn liner with hot water to the coffee line. Add the de-staining compound in
accordance with the instructions on the container.
o Allow the solution to remain in the urn liner approximately 60 minutes. Drain off some of
the solution through the drain line and faucet and pour back into the urn liner. Place a
warning “DO NOT USE” sign on the coffee during the de-staining process.
o Drain and thoroughly rinse until all traces of the de-staining solution have been removed.
o Place approximately 1 gallon of clean water in the urn liner and leave the lid ajar until the
next use.
2216 FREEZE-DRIED COFFEE DISPENSERS
1. FREEZE-DRIED DISPENSERS. Many activities have freeze-dried coffee dispensers which
provide a fresh cup of coffee each time the dispensing button is pushed. There is also a
dispensing button for hot water which patrons may use to prepare hot tea or cocoa. You should
be familiar with the following:
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•
•
•
The freeze-dried coffee is placed in a container which attaches to the funnel dispensing
assembly. This should be firmly secured to prevent the entrance of moisture which will
prevent the dispenser from operating properly.
The funnel assembly should be cleaned in accordance with the manufacturer’s
instructions, as deemed necessary by the leading culinary specialist, or if moisture enters
the assembly. Empty the freeze-dried coffee, wash and rinse the funnel assembly, and
air dry the assembly parts . DO NOT dry with a cloth.
For instructions on adjusting the amount of freeze-dried coffee dispensed and other
maintenance information, refer to the manufacturer’s operating and maintenance manual.
2. HOT TEA AND HOT CHOCOLATE DISPENSERS. Dispensers for iced tea and hot
chocolate are basically operated in the same manner as the freeze-dried coffee dispenser. See
the manufacturer’s operating and maintenance manual for specific cleaning and operating
instructions.
2217 BULK ICE MAKING MACHINE
1. GENERAL. This machine requires little maintenance by food service personnel, but should
be closely monitored. Ice is easily contaminated; therefore, the following measures should be
taken:
• Only authorized personnel should have access to the machine. From a sanitation viewpoint, the ice bin should be locked.
• The ice scoop should be stored dry outside the ice bin (handle up).
• If the ice is to be served, it should be placed in clean glasses by the food service
attendant.
• Serving tongs should be used for ice cubes and a small spoon for crushed ice. Patrons
should not be permitted to serve themselves.
2. ICE MACHINE CLEANING. The following cleaning procedures should be followed:
• Daily:
o Clean the exterior of the machine using the “two-pan” method.
o Wipe the inside of the ice bin cover.
• Monthly:
o Disconnect/secure the electric power supply and remove the ice from the bin.
o Thoroughly clean the interior of the bin with a mild detergent and water solution using
a nylon bristle brush.
o Flush with clean water until all traces of detergent have been removed.
o Reconnect the electric power supply.
3. ICE MACHINE MAINTENANCE. The machinery and the internal workings of the ice
machine are the responsibility of the engineering/public works department. Any problems
relating to this equipment should be referred to the responsible personnel.
2218 ICE DISPENSING MACHINES
1. GENERAL. These machines are highly appreciated by the dining patrons, particularly during
the hot months of the year. The only cleaning involved by food service attendants is the exterior
of the machine, which should be cleaned daily using the “two-pan” method. Any problems
relating to the machinery and internal workings of the ice dispensing machine should be referred
to the engineering/public works department.
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It is recommended that the machine not be used to furnish ice except during meals. If the
machine becomes empty during service, it should be immediately disconnected to prevent
damage to the dispensing assembly.
2219 SOFT-SERVE ICE CREAM MACHINE
1. ICE CREAM MACHINE CLEANING. This machine is usually located in the dining area and
the patrons serve themselves.
You should be familiar with the cleaning and sanitizing
procedures.
a. Prior to using:
1) Dip each part in sanitizing solution prior to assembly.
2) Reassemble the machine and lubricate parts as per tech manual.
3) Place remainder of sanitizing solution in the hopper, move the switch to the “wash”
position and run for one minute. Drain completely; the soft-serve ice cream machine
is now ready for use.
b. After each use:
1) Remove the hopper cover and mix feed assembly; move the switch to the “wash”
position and draw off all remaining ice cream.
2) Rinse hopper and freezer with cold water, draw off, and move the switch to the “off”
position.
3) Place 1 gallon of detergent and water (140° F.) solution into the hopper. Move the
switch to the “wash” position and operate for 2 minutes. Draw off detergent and water
solution. Use hand dishwashing compound for detergent.
4) Rinse the machine interior with clean water.
5) Remove all detachable parts: freezer door assembly and draw-off plunger, beater,
blades and beater drive shaft, mix feed assembly and hopper cover assembly.
6) Wash all parts in detergent and water, rinse, place in sanitizing solution, remove and
air dry.
(a) Use hand dishwashing compound for detergent.
(b) Store all sanitized parts in a clean area until the next use.
2220
BUTTER DISPENSERS
1. GENERAL. There are two types of butter dispensers. One is electrically refrigerated and the
other is refrigerated by filling the rear compartment with ice or a refrigerant packet which is
stored in the freezer between uses. Both types should maintain the temperature below 41° F.
This temperature will prevent the butter from melting, but will keep it soft enough for easy
spreading.
2. DISPENSER PREPARATION.
a. Prior to the meal:
1) Connect the electric power supply (if electric unit) or fill with ice or place refrigerant
packet in place (if non-electric unit).
2) Fill the dispenser with the tray of butter patties.
b. During each use:
1) Replenish butter patties as needed.
2) Clean up spills immediately.
c. After the meal:
1) Remove butter patties and place under refrigeration.
2) Electric unit: Disconnect power supply; wipe the exterior with a soft, damp cloth. DO
NOT IMMERSE IN WATER.
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3) Non-electric unit: Discard ice or remove refrigerant packet and place in freezer; wash
dispenser in detergent and warm water solution, rinse, sanitize, and wipe exterior with
dry cloth. Use hand dishwashing compound for detergent.
2221 TRAY, BOWL, CUP AND GLASS LOWERATORS
1. GENERAL. These dispensers are self-leveling. The cabinets are made of stainless steel
with a spring platform which pushes the trays and dinnerware to the surface as they are used.
The spring tension may be adjusted according to the weight of the item being dispensed.
2. DAILY CLEANING:
a. The stainless steel should be cleaned, rinsed and dried. Follow the procedures for
cleaning stainless steel surfaces.
b. Some tray and bowl dispensers are combined in one unit.
1) The bowl dispensers should be removed from the unit and the interior vacuumed and
cleaned.
2) Clean the unit exterior following the procedures for cleaning stainless steel surfaces.
1. Table condiments cleaned and refilled.
2. Salt/pepper/sugar/napkin dispensers put through
dishwashing machine.
3. Table tops and chairs cleaned using the two-pan
4. Table bottoms, stanchions and chair bottoms and legs X
cleaned.
5. Decks swept, scrubbed and rinsed.
6. Decks stripped and waxed.
7. Overheads dusted and cleaned.
8. Bulkheads cleaned.
9. Bulkheads adjacent to the serving line cleaned.
10. Ladders leading to the dining area cleaned.
X
11. Doors leading to the dining area cleaned.
X
12. Ventilation supply/exhaust openings cleaned.
X
13. Refrigerated salad bar cleaned and defrosted.
14. Refrigerated milk dispenser cleaned.
2-27
AFTER EACH MEAL
SUNDAY
SATURDAY
FRIDAY
THURSDAY
SPACE: DINING AREA
TUESDAY
MONDAY
WORK SCHEDULE
WEDNESDAY
DAILY AND WEEKLY
BEFORE BREAKFAST
2222 COMMERCIAL HOT AND COLD BEVERAGE DISPENSERS
1. GENERAL. Hot and cold beverage dispensers such as cappuccino dispensers and juice
dispensers require internal and external cleaning on a daily basis.
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
15. Refrigerated milk dispenser defrosted.
16. Non-carbonated beverage dispenser disassembled
and cleaned.
17. Carbonated beverage dispenser cleaned.
18. Soft-serve ice cream machine cleaned and sanitized.
19. Coffee urn cleaned.
20. Coffee urn destained.
21. Butter dispenser cleaned.
22. Bulk ice machine ice removed and bin thoroughly
cleaned and rinsed.
23. All serving table tops, bottoms, and legs cleaned.
24. All stainless steel surfaces cleaned and polished.
25. All cleaning gear thoroughly cleaned and sanitized.
26. Tray/bowl/cup/glass lowerators cleaned.
X
When ice reaches 1/4 inch
thickness
X X X X X X O X
R
X
Before and after each use
X X X X X X X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X Monthl
y
X
X
X
X
TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH CLEANING INSTRUCTIONS
Figure 2-5
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
PART D: SERVING LINE AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT
2300 BACKGROUND
1. SERVING LINE PLANNING. The serving line is one of the keys to good service. Extensive
planning is required to ensure that all food items are properly arranged and easily accessible to
the patrons. Upon securing the serving line, preparation should commence for the serving of the
next meal. The serving line opens and closes at least three times a day, 1,095 times a year.
2. SERVING LINE SETUP. Pre-service setup, supervising the serving line operation and
cleaning the serving line in the galley are normally the responsibility of the culinary specialist;
however, the Mess Deck Master-at-Arms may occasionally assume this responsibility. A sample
daily and weekly work schedule is illustrated in Figure 2-6 to assist in cleaning the serving line
and associated equipment. The following information will provide assistance with serving line
operations.
2301 ELECTRIC HOT FOOD TABLE
1. HOT FOOD TABLE OPERATION.
a. If the food table is designed for “wet operation,” add water to cover the bottom of each
unit. Some units are designed for “dry operation,” without water.
b. Ensure that hot food placed on the electric hot food table is maintained at 140° F. or
above.
2. HOT FOOD TABLE FOOD PLACEMENT. The following procedure should be followed when
placing food items on the hot food table prior to opening the serving line:
• Arrange the food items as determined by the leading culinary specialist to expedite
service.
• Do not overfill food inserts; use hot pads and exercise care when handling hot pans.
• Instruct and demonstrate correct serving techniques and procedures normally
accomplished by the leading culinary specialist.
• Always check with the lead cook to ensure that all food items are in position and properly
arranged; and that personnel are present to serve food items prior to opening the serving
line.
2302 GENERAL OPERATIONS
1. GENERAL. During the period the serving line is open, particular attention should be directed
towards:
a. SERVING LINE CLEANING.
1) Cleaning food spills immediately.
2) Replenishing food items (do not wait until the food insert is empty).
3) Ensuring that personnel assigned to serving food items are courteous and follow
serving instructions.
b. CLOSING THE SERVING LINE. Upon closing of the serving line, the following
procedure should be followed:
1) Check with the leading culinary specialist as to the disposition of food items.
2) Turn off the heat source.
a) Close the steam valve on steam table.
b) Turn the temperature control dials to the “off” position on the electric table.
3) Open the drain valve(s).
c. HOT FOOD TABLE CLEANING. After the hot food table has cooled, the following
procedure should be followed for cleaning:
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
1) Remove all loose food particles. Particular attention should be given to the drains.
2) Using the “two-pan” method, thoroughly clean the interior and exterior of the hot food
table. DO NOT use abrasive materials or cleaners.
2303 DESCALING
1. DESCALING A STEAM TABLE. Strict adherence to safety precautions must be followed
when descaling. Depending on the geographical location and the mineral content of the fresh
water supply, the steam table may require scheduled descaling. This will remove rust, lime, and
scale deposits and allow the unit to operate at maximum efficiency. It is recommended that
descaling be accomplished after the evening meal. The following procedures should be followed
for descaling:
• Fill the steam table with water to cover the coils and mineral deposits.
• Open the steam supply valve and bring the water to a boil.
• Turn off the steam supply valve and add the descaling compound as per the directions on
the container.
• Allow the solution to remain in the steam table overnight.
• Brush the interior of the steam table with a nylon bristle brush.
• Drain and rinse with clear water to remove all loosened particles and descaling solution.
A stronger detergent solution may be required to thoroughly clean the interior of the steam table
on a daily basis. The following cleaning solution is recommended: four tablespoons of
dishwashing machine detergent and two tablespoons of general purpose detergent to each
gallon of hot water.
2. DESCALING ELECTRIC TABLES. If the electric hot food table is designed for “dry”
operation, the bottom of each receptacle may take on a straw-colored appearance. The
discoloration of the stainless steel surface is due to the intense heat from the unit.
If the unit is designed for “wet” operation, descaling may be accomplished by following the basic
procedures for the steam table. Some electric tables designed for “wet” operation have a drain
line installed for each unit making cleaning and descaling procedures easier. Other tables do not
have drains installed and the water/solutions should be removed with a ladle or by wiping dry. If
this is the case, personnel should wear rubber gloves and exercise caution to prevent being
burned or coming into contact with the descaling solution.
The temperature control dials should be cleaned frequently. The following procedures should be
followed:
• Pull outward to remove dial.
• Wash with mild detergent and water solution, rinse, and dry with a soft cloth.
• Replace dials immediately to avoid possible damage or loss.
2304 SNEEZE SHIELD AND TRAY SLIDE RAIL
1. GENERAL. The sneeze shield and tray slide rail are an important part of the serving line and
should be thoroughly cleaned after every meal. Cleaning should be accomplished using the
“two-pan” method giving particular attention to cracks, crevices, and the underside of the tray
slide rail. The following items should be observed during the cleaning procedure:
• Follow the procedure for cleaning stainless steel surfaces for areas adjacent to the
serving line.
• Exercise care not to scratch the glass/plastic glass surfaces of the sneeze shield.
• DO NOT use abrasive materials or cleaners.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
2305 BREAD DISPENSER
1. GENERAL. Bread dispensers are of two types; the self-leveling dispenser, and the countertop dispenser.
a. SELF-LEVELING DISPENSER. The cabinet is made of stainless steel with a coil spring
platform which raises the bread as it is used. The spring tension may be adjusted
according to the weight of the item being dispensed. The self-leveling bread dispenser is
usually recessed in the top of the serving line and should be cleaned after each use in the
following manner:
•
Remove dispenser and disassemble. Remove platform and spring.
•
Wash, rinse, sanitize and reassemble.
b. COUNTER-TOP DISPENSER. Bread is dispensed by lifting a lever which dispenses one
slice at a time onto a tray. The dispenser should be cleaned after each use in the
following manner:
•
Using a clean brush remove all bread crumbs.
•
Wipe the interior and exterior with a clean cloth using a mild detergent and water
solution.
•
Wipe all areas using a clean cloth and clear water.
•
Wipe with a clean, dry soft cloth.
Note: Check with the watch captain for instructions on the disposition of bread prior to
cleaning the dispenser.
2306 ROTARY TOASTER
1. GENERAL.
Rotary toasters are usually located on the serving line. The following
procedures should be followed when the toaster is utilized:
• Turn on electrical power approximately 15 minutes prior to using.
• Prepare toast as needed; ensure that it is hot and fresh for the patrons.
• Keep hands dry when preparing toast to avoid possible electric shock.
• Do not use metal objects to dislodge jammed toast. Turn off the machine and remove
toast by hand.
After each use:
• Disconnect/secure the electric power supply and allow the toaster to cool.
• Remove the catch tray and wash/rinse in the utensil wash sink; catch tray may be placed
in the dishwashing machine.
• Wipe down exposed surfaces with a damp cloth, and brush all crumbs out of the inside of
the toaster and from around the base.
• Do not allow water or cleaning solution to come in contact with the conveyor chains as
they will rust.
• Remove the bread baskets and clean thoroughly. Bread baskets may be placed in the
dishwashing machine. To remove baskets:
o Move each basket in turn to a position midway to the front of the machine.
o Press the left conveyor chain to the left and the pins will slip out of the holes in the
basket.
• When replacing baskets, be sure holes on each side are properly aligned with the
pins on the conveyors so the basket will not be slanted when it goes through the
toaster.
2307 CEREAL DISPENSER
1. GENERAL. The cereal dispenser is usually located at an area adjacent to the serving line.
You should ensure that food service attendants:
a. Fill the cereal dispenser prior to the meal if cereal is to be served.
b. Replenish cereal as required, providing maximum variety.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
c. Check for damaged cereal boxes and deliver these damaged boxes to the leading
culinary specialist for disposition.
d. Rotate stock; oldest date of pack should be used first.
The cereal dispenser should be cleaned daily. Remove the cereal boxes and wipe with a
clean cloth using a mild detergent and water solution.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
1. Rotary toaster; cleaned
SUNDAY
SATURDAY
FRIDAY
THURSDAY
WEDNESDAY
SPACE: SERVING LINE
TUESDAY
MONDAY
WORK SCHEDULE
AFTER EACH MEAL
DAILY AND WEEKLY
BEFORE BREAKFAST
EXAMPLE
After each use
2. Serving line; cleaned
X
3. Steam table; descaled
X
Or as necessary
4. Sneeze shield; cleaned
X
5. Bread dispenser; cleaned
X
6. Plastic fruits, vegetables, and greens; cleaned
7. Cleaning gear; cleaned and sanitized
X
Or as necessary
After each use
8. Cereal dispenser; cleaned
X
9. Tray slide rail; cleaned
X
TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH CLEANING INSTRUCTIONS
Figure 2-6
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
PART E: SCULLERY OPERATIONS
2400 BACKGROUND
1. SCULLERY OPERATIONS. The scullery is one of the most important operations in food
service. All dinnerware, silverware, and some food preparation equipment pass through this
area for washing and sanitizing. It is essential that the scullery be scrupulously clean and the
highest sanitation procedures be followed to prevent the growth of harmful bacteria which could
cause serious illness. The sample “Daily/Weekly Work Schedule,” Figures 2-5 and 2-6, will
assist you in ensuring that the scullery and associated spaces and equipment are thoroughly
cleaned. You should be familiar with the operation and maintenance of scullery equipment and
ensure that food service attendants follow the instructions and procedures outlined in this
section.
2. SCULLERY ASSIGNMENTS. Sufficient food service attendants should be assigned to the
scullery to permit dining patrons to place the soiled dinnerware and silverware in the designated
scullery opening. Food service attendants should remove food particles, paper, etc., and sort the
dinnerware and silverware. The garbage/trash container should never be positioned outside the
scullery to indicate that the patrons are required to empty their own tray.
2401 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS FOR THE DISHWASHING MACHINE
1. SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS. All food service attendants assigned to the scullery should be
thoroughly familiar with the safety and operating instructions for the dishwashing machine.
These instructions should be attached to the machine or posted to an area adjacent to it. The
following precautions should be observed during operation of the dishwashing machine:
• Exercise caution. Personnel must keep their mind on the job.
• Ensure that protective covers are in place on all external moving parts of the machine.
• Ensure that the side doors of the machine are closed.
• Do not put hands into the machine while the steam is turned on or the machine is
operating.
• If a dish rack becomes jammed on the conveyor chain, disconnect the electric power and
steam supply prior to removing the rack.
• Personnel should wear arm length rubber gloves (not electrical gloves) and rubber
aprons to prevent burns.
• Any machine malfunctions should be reported per established local procedures. Do not
try to fix the problem yourself.
• Wear hearing protection when the dishwashing machine is operating.
2. DAILY INSPECTION. During your daily inspection of the scullery you should ensure that:
• The ventilation exhaust openings are operating properly.
• All lights are operating.
• The protective rubber covers for electric on/off switches are in place and are not
damaged.
2402 PREPARING SOILED DINNERWARE AND SILVERWARE FOR MACHINE WASHING
1. GENERAL. It is important that all items be prewashed prior to being placed in the
dishwashing machine. This will ensure that all articles are clean and also prevent food
particles/paper from entering the wash section and clogging the spray arms which would reduce
the machine efficiency. The following procedures should be followed:
• Sort soiled dinnerware and silverware by type and size.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
•
•
•
•
•
Scrape off food particles with a plastic nylon bristle brush with handle or a rubber spatula.
DO NOT HIT trays, dinnerware, etc. (especially plastic dinnerware) AGAINST THE SIDE
OF TRASH CANS. This will break or damage the dinnerware. Replacement items are
extremely costly.
Prewash either by using a fine, warm water spray or placing the items in the utensil wash
sink.
o Hand dishwashing detergent should be used in the utensil wash sink.
o The water in the wash sink should be changed as it becomes dirty and more
detergent should be added.
Silverware should be soaked in warm water (120°-125°) containing 3 ounces of hand
dishwashing compound per gallon of water as soon as possible after it is collected.
Scrub each piece with a nylon bristle brush, paying special attention to the spaces
between the tines of the forks.
Dish racks for machine washing should be loaded in the following manner:
o Dishes/plates and trays should be stacked vertically in the openings provided,
ensuring that they do not overlap.
o Cups, glasses, bowls should be placed bottom side up in a single layer.
o Silverware should be placed eating end up in cylinders (a maximum of fifteen pieces
in each cylinder). Use separate cylinders for knives, forks, and spoons.
This will ensure that water reaches all surfaces when the racks are placed in the
dishwashing machine.
If time and space permit, it is recommended that articles be washed in the following
order: Glassware, silverware, dishes, cups, bowls, and trays.
2403 OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS FOR SINGLE-TANK DISHWASHING MACHINES
1. GENERAL. Some enlisted dining facilities, officer dining facilities, and chief petty officer
dining facilities have single-tank dishwashing machines installed. The procedures listed below
should be followed when operating the single-tank dishwashing machine:
• Close the drain valve.
• Open the hot water and steam valves to the rinse mixing valve and adjust the valve
handle to the “hot” position. Some machines have a hot water booster heater installed. If
this is the case, open the hot water and steam valves to the booster heater.
• Fill the tank with hot water to the top of the overflow pipe or the “full” mark on the water
level indicator.
• Check the following:
o Scrap screens are clean and in position.
o Spray arms assembled, capped and properly adjusted so that water spray hits
utensils directly.
o Temperature of wash tank is in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions found on
the data plate affixed to the machine by the manufacturer.
o When the rinse valve is open, the rinse water temperature is in accordance with
manufacturer’s instructions found on the data plate affixed to the machine by the
manufacturer. Some machines will not operate unless the rinse temperature is at a
specified temperature set by the manufacturer. The rinse temperature should not be
less than 165° F.
• If the machine does not have an automatic detergent dispenser installed, add the
prescribed amount of detergent to the wash tank (Table I)
• Push the start button and run the machine for 2 minutes (two cycles) to mix the detergent
and water.
• Open the door and place the dish rack in the machine. Close the door and push the start
button to start the wash cycle.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
If the machine is manually operated, allow for at least 40 seconds wash and then
move the control handle to the rinse position for 10 seconds. Release the handle,
which should return to the closed position.
o Most machines are automatically timed to allow for a 40-second wash, a 10-second
rinse and then shut off.
• Open the door; remove dish rack, shake slightly to remove excess water and allow to air
dry for at least 1 minute.
• Place clean, air dried dinnerware, bottom side up in clean storage cabinet or dispenser.
• Place a sanitized, empty cylinder over clean, air dried silverware, invert, and place in
clean storage cabinet, avoid hand contact with eating surfaces.
Machine temperatures should be checked frequently, using a pocket thermometer (0°-220° F.) to
ensure accuracy of the external temperature gauges. If the machine temperature gauges do not
agree with the thermometer within ±3 degrees, the gauge must be calibrated or replaced.
o
2404 OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS FOR DOUBLE-TANK DISHWASHING MACHINES
1. GENERAL. Most enlisted dining facilities have double-tank dishwashing machines installed.
The procedures listed below should be followed when operating the double-tank dishwashing
machine:
• Close the drain valves to the wash and rinse sections of the machine. Open the hot
water “fill” valves and fill the tanks to the “full” mark on the water level indicator.
• Inspect the inside of the machine to ensure that:
o Scrap screens are in place.
o Spray arms are capped, and adjusted so that the spray hits the utensils directly.
o Splash curtains are in place and not hanging closer than five inches to the conveyor.
• Open the steam valve to the rinse tank until the temperature of the water is in accordance
with manufacturer’s instructions found on the data plate affixed to the machine by the
manufacturer.
• Open the steam and hot water valves to the final rinse mixing valve. Adjust the mixing
valve handle to the “hot” position to maintain a temperature range in accordance with
manufacturer’s instructions found on the data plate affixed to the machine by the
manufacturer. On machines with hot water booster heaters installed, open the hot water
and steam valves to the booster heater.
• On single or double machines without automatic detergent dispensers, add the
prescribed amount of detergent (Table I and II) to the wash tank. See Table III for
automatic detergent dispensers.
• Push the “start” button to start the pumps and conveyor. Run the machine for 2 minutes
to thoroughly mix the detergent and bring the temperature of the wash tank up to a
temperature specified in the manufacturer’s instructions. This can be found on the data
plate affixed to the machine by the manufacturer.
• Inspect the ends of the machine to ensure that the power sprays are operating properly.
• During the operation of the machine, keep a close watch on the temperature gauges and
ensure that they are within temperature ranges specified in the manufacturer’s
instructions found on the data plate affixed to the machine by the manufacturer.
• Place the dish rack on the conveyor carefully and allow the conveyor to push the rack
through the machine. If the conveyor speed is properly set, the utensils will receive a 20second wash and a 20-second rinse.
• As the dish rack approaches the end of the machine, it will pass a lever which will actuate
the final rinse. Observe the final rinse temperature gauge for correct temperature.
• Allow dinnerware and silverware to air dry for at least 1 minute after passing through the
machine.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
•
•
•
Place the clean, air dried dinnerware and trays bottom side up, in a clean storage cabinet
or
dispenser.
Place an empty cylinder over clean and air dried silverware, invert, and place in a clean
storage cabinet.
For every 30 to 45 minutes of continuous machine operation, the wash section should be
drained and the scrap trays cleaned. Machine temperatures should be checked
frequently, using a pocket thermometer (0°-200° F.) to ensure accuracy of the
temperature gauges.
2. TRIPLE TANK DISHWASHERS.
Some shore activities have triple tank dishwashing
machines installed. The procedures are basically the same with the following exceptions:
• The dishwashing machine consists of pre-wash, wash, and rinse sections with a final
rinse.
• Refer to the manufacturer’s operating and instruction manual for the pre-set temperatures
of the pre-wash, wash, and rinse sections.
2405 CLEANING THE DISHWASHING MACHINE
1. DISHWASHER CLEANING. The dishwashing machine should be thoroughly cleaned after
each meal or use. The procedures listed below should be followed:
• Turn the machine off.
• Secure the steam and hot water valves to the final rinse mixing valve, or the steam and
hot water valves to the hot water booster heater.
• Add ¾ to 1½ cups of dishwashing machine detergent to the rinse tank, depending on the
capacity of the rinse tank.
• Turn the machine on and allow it to operate for 5 minutes.
• Turn the machine off and secure the steam valve to the rinse tank.
• Open the drain valves to the wash and rinse tanks; open the doors and allow the machine
to cool.
• Remove the door’s scrap screens, metal frames, wash and rinse spray arms (including
the spray arm caps), pump intake strainer, drain strainer and splash curtains. Wash
thoroughly in the utensil wash sink and rinse.
• Using hand dishwashing detergent and water with a nylon brush, thoroughly clean the
inside and outside of the machine including all removable parts, i.e. splash curtains,
spray arms caps, etc. Rinse with clean water to remove all loosened dirt and detergent.
• Reassemble the machine, close the drain valves to the wash and rinse tanks.
• Fill the tanks ½ full of water, open the steam valve to the rinse tank and allow the
machine to reach normal operating temperatures in accordance with manufacturer’s
instructions.
• Turn the machine on and operate for 5 minutes without detergent.
• Turn the machine off, close the steam valve to the rinse tank, and open the drain valves
to the wash and rinse tanks.
NOTE: Follow the same basic procedures for the single-tank dishwashing machine with the
exception of steps 1 through 4.
2406 DESCALING DISHWASHING MACHINES (NOTE: STRICT SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
MUST BE FOLLOWED.)
1. GENERAL. The interior of the dishwashing machine and the manifold(s) should be inspected
monthly for accumulation of calcium or lime deposits. If deposits are evident, the machine must
be descaled.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
2. DESCALING A DISHWASHER. Descaling the machine should be a part of the Planned
Maintenance System (PMS) and is the responsibility of the food service division. The descaling
operation must be closely supervised from “start to finish,” and personnel must wear face
shields, chemical safety goggles, rubber gloves, and rubber aprons when handling acid. The
following procedures will be followed:
• Drain wash/rinse tank(s), if applicable.
• Install overflow pipe(s), scrap tray(s), screen(s), spray manifold(s) (except final rinse), and
curtains (inlet and discharge ends only). Place final rinse spray manifold on top of scrap
tray in wash tank.
• Shut drain valve(s).
• Commence filling tank(s) to within 2 inches of top of overflow pipe(s) with clean hot water.
• Add 7 fluid ounces of orthophosphoric acid and 1 fluid ounce of rinse additive for each
gallon of water per tank (see Table IV).
• Complete filling tank(s) and close door(s).
• Start the machine and operate for 1 hour maintaining normal operating temperatures.
• Stop machine, open drain valve(s) and completely drain acid solution from machine.
• Inspect interior of machine. Parts should be free of calcium or lime deposits and metal
should be shiny.
• Repeat steps c. through h. if necessary.
• Close drain valve(s) and fill tank(s) with clean hot water. Add two CUPS of dishwashing
machine compound per tank.
• Close door(s), start machine and operate for 5 minutes at operating temperatures.
• Stop machine and completely drain tank(s).
• Refill and flush tank(s) with clear water to remove all traces of acid and detergent.
3. GENERAL NOTES.
a. In the absence of orthophosphoric acid, only USDA approved chemicals for descaling of
dishwashing machine should be used. Follow manufacturer’s instructions.
b. If tank capacity in gallons is unknown, multiply length (inches) x width (inches) x depth to
overflow (inches) and divide product by 231.
c. Shore stations and ships in port shall dispose of acid drains in accordance with local
regulations.
2407 DESTAINING DINNERWARE AND SILVERWARE
1. DESTAINING DISHWARE. Dinnerware and silverware should be destained weekly or as
necessary to remove unsightly stains. The following procedures should be followed:
• Place the prescribed amount of hot water in a large utensil wash sink or steam jacketed
kettle.
• Dissolve destaining compound in hot water as per the instructions on the container.
• Place the dinnerware (glass or plastic) in the destaining solution and allow to remain for
30 minutes. A milder solution should be used for silverware.
• Rinse dinnerware and silverware thoroughly with clear water; place in the dishwashing
machine for washing and sanitizing.
2408 CARE OF PLASTIC DINNERWARE (NON-DISPOSABLE)
1. PLASTIC DINNERWARE. Many afloat and ashore food service activities use plastic
dinnerware: trays, cups, tumblers, and bowls. These items are very durable and will last a long
time if properly cared for. The following precautions will prolong the life of the plastic dinnerware:
• Inspect new items prior to placing them in service for cracks. Those with cracks or
damages should be rejected.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
•
Ensure that food service attendants scrape food particles from dinnerware with a nylon
bristled brush or rubber spatula. DO NOT HIT DINNERWARE ON TRASH CANS (this
cannot be overemphasized).
• Do not use abrasive pads or cleaning compounds to clean dinnerware. These will
scratch the hardened surface and make the dinnerware unsanitary.
• Ensure that the dishwashing machine final rinse temperatures are maintained in
accordance with manufacturer’s instructions. Temperatures in excess of 195° F. will
harm plastic dinnerware.
Plastic dinnerware should be inspected during washing and those with cracks or chips set aside
for disposition. The Mess Deck Master-at-Arms should inspect each piece prior to disposition to
determine cause and course of action to be taken to prevent recurrence.
2409
INVENTORY OF DINNERWARE AND SILVERWARE
1. DINNERWARE INVENTORY. An adequate supply of dinnerware will be maintained so all
personnel will have dinnerware that is air-dried and at room temperature. Three times the
dinnerware/silverware must be on hand based on the seating accommodations available in each
mess.
a. Dinnerware and silverware should be inventoried every two weeks to ensure that a
sufficient supply is available for service.
b. Dinnerware and silverware should be closely inspected during each inventory.
1) Dinnerware with cracks or chips and silverware that is badly bent should be
discarded.
c. A local form or log book may be used to record the inventory. Figure 2-9 illustrates a
proposed inventory record.
ITEM Seats Per Mess
Bowl, soup/salad
Cup, coffee
Tumbler, glass
Silverware
Plate, 9 inch
Plate, 6 3/4 inch
Dish, 5 9/16 inch
Tray, carrying
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
SUNDAY
SATURDAY
FRIDAY
THURSDAY
WEDNESDAY
SPACE: SCULLERY
TUESDAY
MONDAY
WORK SCHEDULE
1. Decks swept, scrubbed and rinsed
AFTER EACH MEAL
DAILY AND WEEKLY
BEFORE BREAKFAST
EXAMPLE
X
2. Overhead cleaned
X
3. Bulkheads cleaned
X
4. Table tops, bottoms and legs cleaned
X
5. Deep sinks thoroughly cleaned
X
6. Silverware metal chute cleaned
X
7. Trash container thoroughly cleaned
X
8. Ventilation supply/exhaust openings cleaned
X
9. Dishwashing machine descaled
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Or as necessary
10. Dishwashing machine disassembled and
thoroughly cleaned
X
11. Dinnerware and silverware inventoried
X
12. Dinnerware and silverware destained
13. Cleaning gear; cleaned and sanitized
X
X
X
X
X
Or as necessary
X
X
X
TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH CLEANING INSTRUCTIONS
Figure 2-7
2-40
1. Overhead cleaned
SUNDAY
SATURDAY
FRIDAY
THURSDAY
WEDNESDAY
SPACE: UTENSIL WASH ROOM
TUESDAY
MONDAY
WORK SCHEDULE
AFTER EACH MEAL
DAILY AND WEEKLY
BEFORE BREAKFAST
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
X
2. Bulkheads cleaned
X
3. Decks swept, scrubbed and rinsed
X
4. Pot and pan storage racks cleaned
X
X
X
X
5. Sanitizing unit drained and flushed with clean
water
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
6. Trash/garbage containers (inside & out) and
lids thoroughly cleaned
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
7. Cleaning gear cleaned and sanitized
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
8. Deep sinks thoroughly cleaned
X
TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH CLEANING INSTRUCTIONS
Figure 2-8
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
INVENTORY RECORD
Date: _______________
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
Item
Tray, plastic
Previous
Inventory
215
Amount
Received
10
On Hand
This Date
223
Loss
2
Gain
Bowl, soup
80
80
0
0
Dish, sauce
125
119
6
Cup, plastic
130
150
4
Tumbler, plastic
205
210
Knife, table
230
227
Fork, table
180
Spoon, dessert
210
203
7
Spoon, tea
120
120
0
0
Dispenser, napkin
30
30
0
0
Dispenser, sugar
30
29
1
Salt shaker
20
37
3
Pepper shaker
33
24
5
3
5
233
48
20
36
3
MDMAA ____________ Leading CS ____________ Food Service Officer ___________
Note:
Column (2) plus column (3) should equal column (4). If (4) exceeds (2) plus (3) there is a gain
(6). If (4) is less than (2) plus (3), there is a loss.
Figure 2-9
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
PART F: HAND DISHWASHING OF COOKING UTENSILS
2500 BACKGROUND
1. GENERAL. As Mess Deck Master-at-Arms, your area of responsibility is extensive, involving
not only the dining area and scullery, but on some occasions, in the galley as well. One of these
instances is the washing of cooking utensils. With the continuous inflationary cost of raw food
products coupled with the Navy’s program to upgrade the quality of food service, it is very
important that the cooking utensils in your food service facility be thoroughly cleaned. Greasy,
improperly cleaned cooking utensils significantly affect an otherwise flavorful food item, not to
mention the added possibility of contamination. By ensuring that food service attendants clean
the cooking utensils properly, you are not only doing your job well but also contributing to the
overall effectiveness of the food service division. Nothing is as irritating as reaching for a pan
when the serving line is “backed up,” and finding a greasy, improperly cleaned/sanitized pan.
Ensure that pans and utensils are cleaned right the first time, every time.
2501 PREPARATION FOR WASHING
1. WASHING PREPARATION. Before washing the cooking utensils, scrape large food particles
off, and sort according to size and type. You should have the necessary hand dishwashing
supplies ready. They are:
a. Dip and drain baskets.
b. Hand dishwashing compound (clear or opaque).
c. Nylon bristle brush.
d. Arm-length rubber gloves.
e. Water thermometer (if a booster heater unit is not available).
f. Scrub pad.
g. Clean storage facilities for cooking utensils.
2502 WASHING, RINSING, AND SANITIZING
1. GENERAL. To determine the proper detergent solution, compute by following the below
procedures:
• Fill the wash sink with water to the bottom of the overflow valve, using a measuring
container to determine how many gallons are in the sink. The water temperature should
be maintained at not less than 110°.
• Mark the water level with a permanent etched mark in the sink for future use.
• Add the proper amount of detergent needed. The amount recommended is usually listed
on the side of the container.
2. WASHING COKING UTENSILS. Below are steps for washing cooking utensils:
• Scrub the surfaces thoroughly utilizing the detergent solution in the wash sink and a nylon
bristle brush. Pay particular attention to the edges and seams.
• Remove stubborn food particles with a scrub pad.
• Transfer each washed utensil to the next sink compartment for rinsing.
Ensure that the wash water’s temperature is continually maintained at not less than 110°.
Replace the water at the first appearance of grease or dinginess.
3. RINSING COOKING UTENSILS. When the cooking utensils are in the second sink
compartment, rinse each utensil thoroughly to remove all traces of detergent. To ensure that this
is done, you should:
• Keep the rinse water clean at all times.
• Replace the rinse water as needed.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
• Transfer each rinsed cooking utensil to the third sink compartment.
4. SANITIZING COOKING UTENSILS. The third sink compartment is designed to sanitize
cooking utensils. Ensure that:
• The water temperature is at least 180° F.
• The utensils are immersed in the water for at least 60 seconds.
5. OTHER SANITIZING METHODS.
Many food service facilities do not have threecompartment deep sinks. To ensure that the cooking utensils are properly sanitized; use one of
the following methods:
• Place them in the dishwashing machine, or
• Use a large pan, in lieu of the second sink compartment to remove all traces of detergent
from each cooking utensil, and utilize the second sink compartment for sanitizing.
The cooking utensils are placed on the clean end-shelf to air dry after sanitizing. DO NOT
dry with a towel or dish cloth. As a safety measure, always ensure that arm-length rubber gloves
are worn during the entire hand dish washing operation.
2503 STORAGE OF CLEAN UTENSILS
1. COOKING UTENSIL STORAGE. Ensure that sanitized cooking utensils are promptly and
properly stored. The storage area should be clean, free of dirt, grease, food particles, personal
clothing, etc., otherwise, they will be contaminated and your time and efforts will be wasted. By
adhering to the following rules, your overall hand dishwashing operation will be a success:
• DO NOT allow the cooking utensils to come in contact with your clothing while
transporting them to the storage area.
• Avoid handling the cooking surfaces.
• Store them face down to prevent dust/dirt from accumulating.
Part G:FOOD WASTE AREAS
2600 FOOD WASTE
1. FOOD WASTE. Garbage collection and disposal methods differ among various types of
ships, but a few sanitary requirements commonly govern these methods. Garbage should be
disposed of promptly to prevent contamination of spaces, preclude buildup of offensive odors
and eliminate a potential fire hazard. Garbage collection areas should be thoroughly cleaned
each day. Trash and garbage should not be left in food service areas overnight as they attract
insects and rodents. The Mess Deck Master-at-Arms should ensure that:
a. Food service attendants are properly trained in the operation and cleaning of equipment
used in collecting and disposing of garbage.
b. All garbage grinders and disposal units are operated in compliance with established
instructions.
c. An adequate supply of garbage/trash containers is available.
d. Garbage/trash containers are kept clean and covered. Recommend use of authorized
trash can liners.
2601 GARBAGE GRINDER SAFETY PRECAUTIONS AND OPERATING PROCEDURES
1. GENERAL. Consult the manufacturer’s operating instructions for the correct procedures to
be followed when operating the garbage grinder.
2. SAFETY PRECAUTIONS. Follow safety procedures prior to operating garbage grinder.
a. Always check to be certain the sealing plate is locked in the open position and the hinged
top of the feed chute hopper is locked shut when the grinder is to be used.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
b. Turn on the flushing water by opening the valve to supply sufficient water to flush the
ground food waste through the grinder. Do not turn on excessive water as the lower half
of the grinder compartment will flood. Increase or decrease the amount of water, as
required, during the grinding operation.
c. The grinder motor must be operating at full speed before feeding food waste into it.
d. Stand in front of the grinder when feeding food waste into the grinder.
e. Pick out and discard all metal tableware, glass, dishes, wood, leather, bones, rice and
cloth from food waste prior to feeding into the garbage grinder.
f. Corn husks and raw meat are not readily shredded and should be fed at a slow rate.
Bones larger than ¼ inch in diameter for 400 pound/hour grinder or 1 inch for the 1600
pound/hour model should not be put into the grinder.
g. Place the food waste into the feed chute at the cut-out end. Rake or push the food waste
through the feed opening provided in front of the hinged safety door of the hopper.
NEVER put your hand inside the hinged feed door while the grinder is operating.
h. The capacity of grinders is either 400 or 1600 pounds per hour. Do not overload it. Feed
food waste at a rate of 7 pounds per minute (about 1 gallon) for the 400 pound per hour
model and 28 pounds per minute (4 gallons) for the 1600 pound per hour grinder.
i. Do not turn off the motor until the grinder is completely clear of food waste.
j. Before turning off the grinder, flush the feed chute with clean water.
k. After turning off the grinder, disconnect/secure the electric power supply, open the hinged
top of the hopper and flush the top, sides, and the interior of the grinder with clean water,
turning the rotor by hand so that the hammer and discs are cleaned.
Due to rigid Navy environmental pollution control standards, always consult with the Food
Service Officer to determine whether discharging garbage overboard is permitted. Never
operate the garbage grinder when the ship is in port, in polluted water, or congested
anchorage.
2602 CLEANING THE GARBAGE GRINDER
1. GENERAL. Cleaning of the garbage grinder after each use:
a. Turn off the machine by pushing the “Stop” button, secure power at the breaker, ensure
the tank is empty. Never stop the grinder with food waste in it.
b. Scrub the interior of the unit, using a nylon bristle brush with detergent and hot water
solution.
c. Flush the machine with hot clean water to remove all traces of detergent.
2603 CLEANING GARBAGE/TRASH CONTAINERS
1. TRASH CONTAINER/LINER USE AND CLEANING. Garbage/trash containers should be
emptied and thoroughly cleaned inside and out after each meal/use. The use of authorized
trash can liners should not preclude the cleaning of garbage/trash containers on the prescribed
frequency.
2. CLEANING TRASH CONTAINERS. To clean the containers, remove large pieces of trash or
food waste, place 1 gallon of hot water and detergent solution in each can. Vigorously scrub the
inside, outside, and the bottom of each container with nylon bristle brush.
a. If a live steam jet is available, invert garbage/trash container over it for 1 minute.
b. Rinse containers with hot, fresh water.
c. Scrub the lids/covers with a hot water and detergent solution and rinse.
d. Invert garbage/trash containers and allow to air dry.
e. Trash cans must stay covered when not in use.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
PART H:
CLEANING GEAR/ESTABLISHING
MAINTAINING REQUIREMENTS
AND
2700 CLEANING GEAR
1. GENERAL. Throughout the preceding sections, emphasis has been placed on when and
how to clean specific areas and equipment. This section discusses the use and care of the tools
used and how to order consumables and maintain adequate supplies on hand.
2701 PROPER USAGE
1. CLEANING TOOL USAGE. There are various kinds of tools used for cleaning, but it is
essential to select the type that eliminates the possibility of damaging the surface to be cleaned.
The following is a list of items and their use:
• A nylon bristle scrub brush can be used for most general cleaning.
• Metal sponges made of corrosion-resistant steel can be useful for hard-to-clean surfaces.
However, this type sponge should never be used on surfaces that can be easily
scratched (stainless steel, formica, plastic, glass, etc.) and should be discarded when
signs of wear are noticed.
• Steel wool is prohibited in all food service spaces.
• Metal polish is prohibited on surfaces that come into contact with food.
• Clean soft wiping cloths which are disposable and lint-free are ideal for wiping surfaces
after they have been thoroughly cleaned.
• Hand dishwashing compound should be used for hand dishwashing of galley utensils and
for cleaning surfaces that come in contact with food (dining tables, food preparation
tables, serving line, beverage dispensing equipment, etc.).
• General purpose detergent should be used for removing dirt from bulkheads, decks, and
over-heads. General purpose detergent should NOT be used for hand dishwashing or on
surfaces which come into contact with food.
• Scouring powder is not recommended for use. The powder contains abrasives which will
scratch most surfaces and leaves a white, powdery film when not thoroughly rinsed.
• Scrubbing deck brushes have bristles made of Palmyra fiber. Use for loosening dirt
deposits from deck surfaces. For sanitation purposes, sponges and scrub brushes used
for cleaning dining tables or surfaces that come in contact with food should be used
solely for that purpose and kept separate from similar cleaning gear. These items should
be marked so as to eliminate their possible use in cleaning garbage/trash containers,
toilet facilities, etc.
2702 CLEANING AND SANITIZING
1. GENERAL CLEANING AND SANITIZING. Effective cleaning and sanitizing procedures
cannot be overemphasized to food service attendants. Food service attendants should be fully
aware of the hazards associated with careless procedures. An example of a careless procedure
would be cleaning a dining table with a nylon scrub brush which had been “washed” (not
sanitized) prior to use. Clean implies that the surface is free from dirt or impurities, while sanitize
means to effectively treat clean surfaces by an approved process that destroys bacteria.
2. APPROVED SANITIZING METHODS. The approved methods of sanitizing are hot water or
chemical sanitizing:
a. Hot water sanitizing - all surfaces are completely immersed in or exposed to hot water of
at least 180° F. for at least 60seconds (this procedure is the preferred method for
sanitizing food service utensils).
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
b. Chemical sanitizing - the use of a chemical sanitizing agent which requires immersion in
or exposure to solutions containing sufficient concentration of the agent to destroy
bacteria. All contact surfaces must be wetted by the sanitizing solution. Immersion
should be for at least one minute.
3. SANITATION OF CLEANING GEAR. Brushes, mops, and sponges should be properly
cleaned and sanitized after each use to preclude transmission of germs. The following methods
of sanitizing different cleaning gear are recommended:
• Scrub brushes - Brushes that are used for scrubbing dining tables or surfaces that come
into contact with food should be cleaned after each use.
o Wash in hot water and detergent solution. Pay particular attention to food particles
between bristles.
o Rinse in hot running water; dip in water to which a sanitizing agent has been added.
o Shake and hang to dry; do not allow brushes to rest on bristles as this will cause the
bristles to bend and mat. Brushes that will not be damaged by hot water may be
placed in the dishwashing machine for sanitizing.
• Scrub brushes (brushes used for general cleaning):
o Hand wash with hot water and detergent solution.
o Rinse.
o Hang to air dry.
• Cellulose sponges - clean at the end of each meal.
o Wash in hot water and detergent solution.
o Rinse in hot clear water.
o Boil for at least 5 minutes (recommended) or chemically sanitize.
o Wring out and air dry. Should be discarded when exceedingly soiled, stained, or
deteriorated.
• Mops - clean after each use:
o Wash in hot water and detergent solution.
o Rinse in clean hot water to which a sanitizing agent has been added.
o Wring out and hang to air dry.
o Mops should be designated for food service use only and stored separately.
• Mop wringer and bucket – clean after each use:
o Wash thoroughly with hot water and detergent solution.
o Rinse and allow too dry.
o Sanitize and store bucket upside down.
4. CLEANING GEAR STORAGE. Cleaning gear (mops, buckets, etc.) and cleaning supplies
(detergents, disinfectants) should be stored in an area specifically designated for that
purpose. These items will not be stored in:
a. Food preparation or serving areas.
b. Food storage cabinets or on food storage shelves.
c. Cabinets or lockers with insecticide.
2703 ESTABLISHING AND MAINTAINING REQUIREMENTS
1. GENERAL. Planning is the basis for supervising an efficient operation. It takes tremendous
planning and forethought to maintain dinnerware and other related supplies in sufficient quantity
to meet the requirements of your area of responsibility. Prior to estimating requirements, the
desired endurance level (weeks or months of supply) should be established. Consult with the
leading Culinary Specialist or Food Service Officer concerning endurance level and ordering
procedures. Past usage data is necessary to establish requirements and endurance levels.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
2. USAGE DATA/ENDURANCE LEVELS. To obtain usage data, a form (such as Figure 2-10)
should be maintained for each individual item. Once reliable data is obtained, multiply the usage
data (weeks or months) by the endurance level (weeks or months) to determine future
requirements. (Usage X endurance level = future requirements). The use of a form (Figure 2-9)
will provide information such as:
a. On hand balance.
b. Excessive usage (losses or breakage).
c. Cost of previous supplies which can be used for supporting future budget information.
3. ORDERING SUPPLIES. Follow local supply procedures for ordering of supplies. Check with
the Leading Culinary Specialist to ascertain the division’s endurance levels prior to
deployment. When ordering be sure to make allowance for:
a. Lead time (in ordering and receiving).
b. Ship’s schedule (duration of cruise, available supply support, etc.).
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
Food Service Supplies Stock Record
Item: Brush, Scrub, Utensil
and Equipment
NSN: 9Q
7920-00-061-0038
High Limit: 10
Low Limit: 5
U/I: EA
Date
Issues
On
Hand
Recpts
Total
Required
Inventory
Level: ____
Stockage
Objective
30 days
Ordering
Date
Quantity
Price
Ordered
6/30/00
INV
10
7/02/00
6
3.55
7/01/00
INV BF
10
7/18/00
3
3.68
7/05/00
6
2
2
14
7/11/00
3
5
11
7/15/00
1
6
10
7/18/00
2
8
8
7/22/00
3
7/27/00
7/31/00
INV
ADJ
8/01/00
INV BF
11
1
9
10
+1
10
9
9
Note: Recommend all items be inventoried monthly.
inventoried weekly.
Figure 2-10
2-49
Fast moving items should be
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
PART I:
PLANNED MAINTENANCE SUBSYSTEM
2800 RESPONSIBILITY
1. GENERAL. “Public Works never fixes anything. The Engineering Department could care
less about our equipment.” How many times have you heard these remarks when equipment
breakdown occurs, but how much did these statements accomplish toward repairing the piece of
equipment? Stop for a minute and think whose job is going to suffer the hardship of poorly
maintained equipment.
2. EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE. Equipment maintenance and upkeep is the responsibility of
the engineering or public works department. They are responsible for assigning qualified
personnel to:
a. Conduct systematic inspections of all food service equipment.
b. Lubricate bearings, shafts, and other moving parts.
c. Make adjustments/repairs before they develop into major defects.
3. MDMAA RESPONSIBILITY. As the Mess Deck Master-at-Arms, you are responsible for the
equipment under your cognizance and should familiarize yourself with the required preventive
maintenance and the frequency in which it should be performed. The procedure for performing
planned maintenance subsystem varies from command to command and ship to shore; however,
the end results should be the same. It is up to you to make sure that the equipment located in
your spaces receives scheduled maintenance.
In conjunction with the preventive maintenance subsystem, you should ensure that:
a. Arrangement for assignment of specific maintenance personnel is made with the
engineering or public works department.
b. Only maintenance personnel are permitted to make repairs.
c. Equipment is not operated in excess of speeds prescribed by the manufacturer.
d. Personnel are thoroughly trained in the operation of assigned equipment.
e. An inspection is conducted each morning of equipment for loose nuts, bolts, parts,
connections, etc., before beginning operation. Culinary Specialists and Food Service
Attendants that find loose nuts, bolts or parts should try to identify their proper location
checking all equipment in the area for missing parts. Finding missing parts may be the
difference between making a piece of equipment operational, operational in a degraded
capacity or inoperative.
f. Proper cleaning is performed on a scheduled basis.
4. NOTIFICATION. The leading culinary specialist/food service officer should be notified of any
problems relating to the performance of preventive maintenance.
2801 TROUBLE CALL LOG
1. TROUBLE CALLS. When equipment malfunction occurs, a trouble call or work request
(OPNAV Form 4790-2K) is normally used for requesting repairs. A log (Figure 2-11) should
be maintained to provide current information of all equipment repairs. This log, if properly
maintained, should provide the following information:
a. Recurring equipment malfunctions/problems.
b. Failure of responsible personnel to expedite repairs.
c. Necessary information for completing the Inoperative Equipment Report.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
2802 INOPERATIVE EQUIPMENT REPORT
1. GENERAL. The Inoperative Equipment Report (Figure 2-12) may be used to provide daily
status of inoperative equipment to the Supply/Food Service Officer. Many afloat activities utilize
the Inoperative Equipment Report for preparation of Supply Department eight o’clock reports.
The procedures listed in this section will initially appear to require additional time and effort,
when time is already in short supply. The alternatives, however, are totally unacceptable.
Preventive maintenance is an effective tool in keeping equipment operational. When properly
performed, equipment “down time,” and cost of maintenance, and man-hours are reduced. After
all, lubrication is cheaper than repair parts.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
TROUBLE CALL/WORK REQUEST LOG
REPORTING
TC/WR
NO.
DATE
TIME
EQUIP
COMPLETED
PROBLEM
TC - TROUBLE CALL
WR - WORK REQUEST
Figure 2-11
2-52
SIGN.
DATE
TIME
SIGN
.
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
INOPERATIVE EQUIPMENT REPORT
DATE
DOWN
DATE
REPORTED
EQUIPMENT
REPAIR STATUS
LEADING CS: ________________________________________________
FOOD SERVICE OFFICER: _____________________________________
MESS DECK MASTER-AT-ARMS: ________________________________
Figure 2-12
2-53
EST’D DATE
OF REPAIR
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
PART J: TRAINING
2900 RESPONSIBILITY
1. GENERAL. The primary objective of the food service attendants’ training program should be
to acquaint food service attendants with sanitation requirements and improve efficiency. Unlike
other divisional training programs designed for advancement qualifications, the food service
attendants’ training should be job-oriented. The need for an effective food service attendants’
training program is essential to the management of the dining area. Needless to say, training is
the most important responsibility of a supervisor. Unfortunately, it is often either omitted or
“gundecked.” Gundecked training does not fool anyone, because training is measured by
effectiveness, not signatures on training attendance sheets.
Food Service Management NAVSUP P-486 states, “The Mess Deck Master-at-Arms will, in
conjunction with the medical department, administer a training program for food service
attendants in sanitation scullery operation and food handling.” Your responsibility has been
assigned; now we begin.
2901 SECRETARY OF THE NAVY REQUIREMENTS
1. GENERAL. In addition to NAVSUP P-486, the Secretary of the Navy issued SECNAVINST
4061.1C which delineates the Navy’s food sanitation program. The instruction states that initial
and subsequent semi-annual refresher training will be given to all food service workers employed
for 30 days or longer. Personnel assigned to food service duties for less than 30 days shall
receive 2 hours initial training and orientation by responsible supervisors.
2. TRAINING AND INSTRUCTORS. A minimum of 4 hours for initial training and 4 hours
annual refresher training is required for all food service personnel. All training programs must be
conducted by qualified food sanitation/safety instructors.
Qualified food sanitation/safety
instructors are:
a. Independent duty Navy hospital corpsman (must re-qualify every three years);
b. Preventive medicine technicians;
c. Environmental health officers;
d. Personnel who supervise or train food service personnel and are successful graduates of
a supervisor/manager food safety training course approved by the Preventive Medicine
Authority (must re-qualify every three years);
e. Navy and Marine Corps food management teams provided the instructors are certified as
required by SECNAVINST 4061.1 Series.
3. INSTRUCTOR TRAINING. Navy and U.S. Environmental and Preventive Medicine Units
should provide instructor training to supervisory personnel to qualify them to carry out local
command food sanitation programs. Food sanitation training shall be an integral part of existing
divisional training programs, both ashore and afloat.
2902
FORMAL TRAINING
1. TRAINING SCHEDULE AND PUBLICATIONS. Now that you are aware of existing training
requirements/directives, you should develop a 3-month training schedule. In 3 months all of your
material will have been covered and the food service attendants should have been rotated. The
following publications will help you greatly in the preparation of a 3-month training cycle and
lesson plan development:
a. Manual of Naval Preventive Medicine, NAVMED P-5010-1 Tri-Service Food Code TB
MED 530.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
b.
c.
d.
e.
Navy Customer Service Manual, NAVEDTRA 12972.
Ship’s 3M Maintenance Material Management Manual, OPNAVINST 4790.4C.
Navy Environmental and Natural Resources Program Manual OPNAVINST 5090.1B.
Hazardous Material and Pollution Control guidance found in OPNAVINST 5100.19E,
Navy Standard Technical Manual (NSTM) 593 and Hazardous Materials User’s Guide
(HMUG, OPNAV P 145-110-03.
f. Culinary Specialist Rate Training Manual.
g. Military Requirements for PO 1 & C (current edition).
h. Military Requirements for PO 3 & 2 (current edition).
i. Navy Food Service, NAVSUP P-476 (published quarterly).
j. NAVSUP published lesson plans are available on the NAVSUP Home Page at
www.navsup.navy.mil.
k. Food Safety Training Program, BUMED INST 4061.2
After each presentation, evaluate the effectiveness and make “pen and ink” changes to your
lesson plan. This will assure you that in 3 months when the topic is presented again it will be
even better. The training program should have a means for measuring effectiveness of the
instructor and trainees. One means is by testing. A written achievement test is the type most
use. A test could be administered monthly or at the end of each phase of instruction.
2. DEVELOPING A FORMAL TRAINING PROGRAM. The procedures for developing a formal
training program for food service attendants are:
a. Know the requirement (SECNAV, NAVSUP, Command Instructions,
NAVMED 5010).
b. Develop the plan. A three-month cycle is recommended.
c. Prepare a lesson plan for each topic. Make pen and ink changes after each presentation.
d. Test for effectiveness. If several trainees miss the same questions, review your method
of presentation.
3. CLASSROOM PRESENTATION.
If you apply the following rules in your classroom
presentation, you will earn the respect of your trainees and you will be more effective:
a. The instructor should provide the motivation essential to learning.
b. Use audio-visual aids and/or OJT improve the learning process. Retention is better when
visual aids or hands-on training are used rather than audio aids.
c. Be sure of facts. It is well-known that to “relearn” is more difficult than to learn correctly in
the beginning.
d. Retention of newly gained knowledge and skills is dependent upon repetitive exercise;
the instructor should provide ample time for trainees to practice newly acquired skills.
e. The relationship that the instructor maintains with the trainee is extremely important.
While giving more guidance and help to the slower learner, the instructor must plan
interesting, session-related activities for fast learners to
perform. Otherwise, the faster
learners will probably become bored and lose interest.
f. Formal presentations should not last over one hour. It is also better to schedule formal
training presentations in the morning when both you and the trainees are most alert.
2903 TRAINING RECORDS
1. RECORDING TRAINING. It is necessary that training be recorded. The procedure for
recording training should be simple but thorough. Individual training folders, although not
required, are recommended. Training documentation should be in accordance with Type
Commander (TYCOM) or command instructions. If utilized, it is recommended that the individual
training folder contain:
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
a. Check In/Out format for Food Service Attendants (Figure 2-1).
b. Food Sanitation Training Certificate, NAVMED 4061/1 (Figure 2-13).
c. Report of Training Attendance (Figure 2-14.
d. Health Card/Health Certification.
These four items are considered sufficient for maintaining efficient training records and also
to provide readily available personnel information concerning Food Service Attendants. All
items can be retained in a binder for organizational purposes.
2904 ON-THE-JOB TRAINING
1. GENERAL. This is an area where a small investment (time) will pay great dividends
(efficiency) com-pounded quarterly (length of food service attendants’ tour of duty). One welltrained person can do the work of two or three poorly trained people. Well-trained personnel
work better, faster, more efficiently, are better motivated and create fewer discipline problems
than poorly trained personnel.
2. ON THE JOB TRAINING. Sections 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 provide excellent information for onthe-job training. On-the-job training is definitely a learning process which is job or work-oriented.
All training, other than formal classroom type, can be defined as on-the-job training. It can either
be group or one-on-one, depending on the job and the number of trainees to be taught; however,
always keep the groups as small as possible.
Never let opportunity for on-the-job training pass by. If you notice a person cleaning the mess
decks table with only one bucket of water, stop them and show them the correct procedure (twopan method). There are two major reasons for this: first, it teaches the person the correct
method, and second, it re-establishes your high standards. If you permit someone to continue
with the wrong method, then both that individual and the other food service attendants will notice
this oversight and interpret it to be either poor leadership or a decline in standards.
3. GOOD TRAINING PRACTICES. Practice the following points:
a. Set realistic goals that the food service attendants can understand.
b. Realize that learning takes time. Learning the daily details which later become routine
requires many hours of hard work.
c. Speed up the learning process by praising where warranted, for encouragement is oil to
the wheels of the mind. Be careful to praise only when justified. This again establishes
your standards.
d. Build good morale. Inform food service attendants that they are a vital part of the food
service organization. Help them realize that their job is important.
e. Recognize different mental and physical capabilities. This information is necessary
to
place the right person in the right job.
f. Finally, adopt the principle that each job is a stage in training for a more responsible
assignment.
4. TRAINING IN SPECIFIC TASKS. In training a newly-assigned food service attendant, tell
the person exactly what is expected and make sure they understand what they are being taught.
If possible, give them a written job description and distribute basic guidelines. Use the following
method in teaching how to do a specific task or to operate or clean a piece of equipment:
a. Prepare the trainee (tell the person how to do the job).
b. Demonstrate the correct technique (show the person how to do the job).
c. Have the person perform under supervision while explaining to you what they are doing.
Make training more realistic by preparing the food service attendants for the unusual or
abnormal situations that may develop on the job. Make sure that they thoroughly
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
understand and can apply what they are being taught. Extra time and effort spent in
explaining and instructing during initial training will prove profitable.
2905 FOLLOW-UP TRAINING
1. GENERAL. Follow-up training is conducted to improve on-the-job performance. It may be
limited to additional instruction or assistance in a specific aspect of the job. Follow-up on daily
performance is the true measure of effective training; closely observe on-the-job performance
and offer constructive criticism when necessary. Repeat training in any specific area of the food
service attendant’s performance that appears weak and continue to encourage and assist until
the individual performs the job efficiently.
...1.1.1..1
...1.1.1..2
...1.1.1..3
...1.1.1..4
...1.1.1..5
Figure 2-13
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
REPORT OF TRAINING ATTENDANCE
Date: __________________
MEMORANDUM
From: Mess Deck Master-at-Arms
To:
Food Service Officer
Subj: Report of Training and Attendance
Encl:
(1) Lesson Plan for Session
1. Lesson:
2. Week of:
3. Date completed:
4. Personnel attending:
__________________________________
__________________________________
__________________________________
__________________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
________________________________
Signature of MDMAA
Figure 2-14
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
RECOMMENDED QUANTITY OF DISHWASHING COMPOUND
FOR SINGLE-TANK MACHINES
1. The quantity of dishwashing compound used is dependent upon:
a. The amount of wash water in the machine’s tank.
b. The hardness of water being used.
2. Water hardness is the critical factor in determining the type and amount of dishwashing
compound to use. Water produced by the ship’s distilling plants is always very soft. Water
furnished from the pier is always harder and will vary greatly depending on location. The
engineering/public works department should assist in determining water hardness.
Water Hardness1
Soft:3
Medium hard:
Hard:
Water in wash
tank (Gal.)
Type of
compound
Amount (Oz.)
Amount2 (Cup)
10
II4
3½
½
15
II
5½
2/3
20
II
7
1
10
I5
5
2/3
15
I
7½
1
20
I
10½
11/3
10
I
7
1
15
I
10
11/3
20
I
14
1¾
1
Shipboard produced water may be considered soft. Ashore dining facilities should adjust
quantities of detergent according to local water conditions.
2
Add ½ the quantity shown after six racks have gone through the machine. The quantities in
the table are initial charges.
3
Engineering/public works department should determine hardness of water.
4
Dishwashing compound, Type II for soft water.
5
Dishwashing compound, Type I for hard water.
Table I
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RECOMMENDED QUANTITY OF DISHWASHING COMPOUND
FOR DOUBLE-TANK MACHINES
1. The quantity of dishwashing compound used is dependent upon:
a. The amount of wash water in the machine’s tank.
b. The hardness of water being used.
2. Water hardness is the critical factor in determining the type and amount of dishwashing
compound to use. Water produced by the ship’s distilling plants is always very soft. Water
furnished from the pier is always harder and will vary greatly depending on location. The
engineering/public works department should assist in determining water hardness.
Water Hardness1
Soft:3
Medium hard:
Hard:
Water in
wash tank (Gal.)
Type of
compound
Amount (Oz.)
Amount2 (Cup)
10
II4
3½
½
15
II
5½
2/3
20
II
7
1
25
II
9
1¼
10
I5
5
2/3
15
I
7½
1
20
I
10½
11/3
25
I
12
1½
10
I
7
1
15
I
10
11/3
20
I
14
1¾
25
I
16½
2¼
1
Shipboard produced water may be considered soft. Ashore dining facilities should adjust
quantities of detergent according to local water conditions.
2
Add ½ the quantity shown after six racks have gone through the machine. The quantities in
the table are initial charges.
3
Engineering/public works department should determine hardness of water.
4
Dishwashing compound, Type II for soft water.
5
Dishwashing compound, Type I for hard water.
Table II
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DISHWASHING MACHINE DETERGENT AUTOMATIC DISPENSER
1. DISHWASHER INSTALLATION. Installation of a dishwashing detergent automatic dispenser
is highly beneficial and strongly recommended. It is designed to automatically feed the
dishwashing machine’s wash section whenever the dishwashing detergent concentration falls
below the proper level. The use of an automatic dispenser significantly reduces the food
service attendant’s work load and minimizes the wasteful use of dishwashing detergent.
2. DISPENSERS.
system.
Dishwashing detergent automatic dispensers are available in the supply
3. DISHWASHER DISPENSER PROCEDURES. Below are procedures to be followed when
using a dishwashing detergent automatic dispenser, regardless of its make or type:
a. Consult the manufacturer’s operating manual for specific instructions.
b. Add dishwashing detergent as necessary. Many dispensers have an alarm feature which
indicates when the detergent is running low.
c. Check the reservoir outlet daily to ensure that it is not clogged. An effective procedure is
to stir the detergent in the reservoir periodically to prevent caking and settling which could
clog the outlet hole.
d. Daily check the sensing electrodes, mounted in the wash tank, to ensure that they are not
coated with mineral scale or other foreign matter. Clean the electrodes as necessary but
at least once a week. A nylon web pad is ideal for this type of cleaning. Sensing
electrodes are susceptible to corrosion from acid and should be protected from contact
with the acid solution when descaling the dishwashing machine.
e. Ensure that periodic maintenance and calibration is performed by trained and authorized
personnel as part of the planned maintenance subsystem.
Table III
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RINSE ADDITIVE AUTOMATIC DISPENSERS
FOR THE DISHWASHING MACHINES
1. GENERAL. Rinse additive automatic dispensers installed on dishwashing machines are
useful attachments designed to produce gleaming and virtually spotless dinnerware and
silverware. Injected in very small amounts into the dishwashing machine’s final rinse section,
the rinse additive reduces the water’s surface tension to allow dinnerware and silverware to
dry more quickly with very little streaking and spotting. However, so called “short cuts” from
the recommended washing procedures such as dinnerware not prewashed, improper amount
of dishwashing machine detergent added, excessively loaded silverware cylinders or tray
racks, will make the rinse additive ineffective.
2. OPERATION. Operation and maintenance of the different types of rinse additive automatic
dispensers varies, depending upon the design and the manufacturer. In any case, consult
the technical manual that accompanies the equipment. Food service attendants assigned to
the scullery should not tamper with this device except to add additive solution, to clean the
exterior, or to adjust the valve regulating the rinse additive’s rate of flow.
Both the rinse additive automatic dispenser and liquid additive are available.
Table IV
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INSTRUCTIONS AND QUESTIONNAIRE FOR INCOMING
FOOD SERVICE ATTENDANTS
1. Food service attendants have been an important part of the Navy from the beginning and will
continue to be so as long as there are ships. Most of the chief petty officers and senior
enlisted personnel on board, as well as numerous captains and admirals in today’s Navy,
served as food service attendants in the early days of their careers. Scuttlebutt has it that
“messcooking (the previous term for food service attendant duty) is a nasty job and that you
will suffer all types of hardship and injustice.” This is not true. There are times when the
work is hard and the hours long, but this is the case in most jobs aboard a Navy ship. While
serving in the food service division, your future leading petty officers will be your “customers.”
There’s a saying that, “If a sailor does a good job as a food service attendant, then that sailor
will perform in a similar manner when rated.” Many senior petty officers use this theory and
closely watch the food service division for future “strikers.”
2. While assigned as a food service attendant, the responsibility for the handling and service of
food, as well as the sanitation of the serving line, dining area and related spaces, will be
delegated to you and your fellow food service attendants. Keep in mind that the health and
well-being of your shipmates depend on how well you do your job. Your attitude, personal
appearance and concern for your customers play an important role in providing excellent
food service for the crew.
3. Rules and regulations are necessary in any organization. In order to make your temporary
assignment more meaningful while assigned to the food service division, familiarize yourself
with the following:
a. Upon reporting to the Mess Deck Master-at-Arms, you will be assigned to the Supply
Department. Work schedules, liberty/leave policy, personnel and similar inspections, and
berthing while assigned as a food service attendant will all be discussed and explained to
you by the Mess Deck Master-at-Arms.
b. Upon completion of your indoctrination period, you will be assigned to a job in the food
service area. Some of the jobs may seem harder than others; nonetheless, they play a
very important role in the overall image of the food service division. Strive to do your best
in whatever job you are assigned. Your supervisors will readily notice your commendable
performance and it will not go unrewarded. Furthermore, your reputation as a high
caliber performer will remain with you beyond your duty as a food service attendant.
c. You will muster for work as instructed by the Mess Deck Master-at-Arms. When reporting
to work, you will be inspected by the Mess Deck Master-at-Arms for cleanliness and
personal hygiene. Always present a smart appearance; your hair must be clean and in
accordance with Navy grooming standards, your fingernails must be clean and trimmed
short, your uniform must be clean and “squared away,” and your shoes must be polished.
Additionally, observe the wearing of hats and “no smoking” regulations at all times.
d. It is expected that you will remain at your assigned station until all work is completed
unless directed otherwise by the Mess Deck Master-at-Arms. Relief of one food service
attendant by, or job-switching with, another food service attendant without authorization
by the Mess Deck Master-at-Arms is not permitted.
e. Whatever your job assignment, you will be expected to perform it as instructed by the
Mess Deck Master-at-Arms. Shortcuts are not allowed; the end product will be less than
acceptable and may possibly contribute to an injury or harm to an individual. Remember
that the supervisors who instruct in these jobs are highly knowledgeable and proficient.
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Nonetheless, should you come up with an idea for improvement, bring it to your
supervisor’s attention.
f.
Disagreements or misunderstandings while assigned to the food service division should
be brought to the Mess Deck Master-at-Arms’ attention. Do not attempt to settle it
yourself. Your supervisor is more experienced in handling such problems.
g. Keeping aware of changes within the Supply Department is of the utmost importance as
food service regulations and procedures are constantly being updated and improved.
The Mess Deck Master-at-Arms will keep you informed of what’s going on concerning
your job as a food service attendant.
h. Your liberty will be regulated by the Mess Deck Master-at-Arms. When on authorized
liberty, ensure that you return to your job on time and in a capable condition. In the event
of a bonafide emergency, immediately notify your supervisor so that necessary
arrangements may be initiated to assist you.
Table V
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INCOMING FOOD SERVICE ATTENDANT’S QUESTIONNAIRE
This questionnaire is to be completed during your indoctrination period.
Return it to the Mess Deck Master-at-Arms upon completion.
1. Who is your division officer while assigned as a food service attendant? _________________
2. Who is your immediate supervisor? ______________________________________________
3. What is the uniform for food service attendants assigned to the dining area? _____________
4. What time do you muster in the morning?
Where? ______________________
5. What time do you start setting up for:
Breakfast? ________
Lunch? ___________
Dinner? ___________
6. What time period is the serving line open for the crew? Breakfast _________
Lunch ____________
Dinner ___________
7. When should the dining tables and chairs be cleaned?_______________________________
8. Why is a clean-as-you-go program necessary? (Example: Wiping tables between sittings)
9. When should the napkin dispensers, salt and pepper shakers, sugar dispensers, and table
condiment containers be cleaned? ______________________________________________
10. How frequently should the napkin dispensers, salt and pepper shakers, and sugar dispensers
be emptied and placed into the dishwashing machine? ______________________________
11. At what temperature ranges should the dishwashing machine be maintained during
operation?
Wash section _____________ Rinse section ___________ Final rinse section ___________
12. How long should dinnerware/silverware be allowed to air dry after being removed from the
dishwashing machine? _______________________________________________________
13. When should the dishwashing machine be disassembled and thoroughly cleaned? _______
14. When should the scullery be thoroughly cleaned? __________________________________
15. When should trash containers and lids be thoroughly cleaned? _______________________
16. The milk tubes should be cut at what length below the metal dispensing mechanism?
__________________________________________________________________________
17. Explain the correct procedure for cleaning dining tables, chairs, and bulkheads.
___________________________________________________________________________
18. Where is the laundry bag for food service attendants’ trousers located? _________________
19. When should the clean trousers be returned from the laundry? ________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
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CHECK LIST FOR MESS DECK MASTER-AT-ARMS
Daily
Weekly
Every Other Week
1. Inventory
dinnerware and
silverware.
Monthly
1. Muster and inspect
food service
attendants.
1. Inventory fast
moving consumable
supplies.
2. Review “daily and
weekly” work schedule.
2. Check with Leading
CS for receipt of
provisions.
2. Review food service
attendants’ job rotation.
3. Check food service
attendants berthing
space (note laundry
bag).
3. Check dishwashing
machine for
scale/mineral deposits.
3. Inventory all
consumable supplies.
4. Check temperatures
of the dishwashing
machine during
operation.
4. Clean ventilation
exhaust filters.
4. Review Planned
Maintenance
Subsystem for
assigned equipment.
5. Review on-the-job
safety.
5. Check trouble call
log/inoperative
equipment report and
make follow-up report.
6. Check equipment
for operating defects
and report to leading
MS/FSO.
Table VI
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1. Ensure safety and
operating instructions
are updated and
posted.
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
SUMMARY
REVIEW OF RESPONSIBILITIES
1. GENERAL. Have you noticed the number of times “effective” has been used throughout this
appendix? According to the dictionary, effective is “producing a decided, decisive, or desired
effect or the decisive accomplishment of a result or fulfillment of an intention.” Regardless of
your intention, in order to be effective, the intention must be fulfilled. Effective is certainly a
very positive word.
All of the many items covered in this appendix are important things to know and follow. Refer
to this appendix often and soon the correct procedures will come automatically.
2. SUPERVISORY TECHNIQUES. By following four very important supervisory techniques,
your effectiveness as well as the effectiveness of the food service attendants will increase
immediately. They are:
a. Muster and inspect food service attendants each morning prior to beginning breakfast
set-up. (Use military procedure and be forceful).
b. Train food service attendants - both formally and on-the-job.
c. Set your standard. Require food service attendants to come up to it. Don’t compromise.
d. Show interest - berthing spaces, laundry, career planning, etc.
In short - be positive and effective and remember that your assignment as Mess Deck
Master-at-Arms is more than a job. It’s a responsibility to your shipmates.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
CHAPTER 3
PRESENTATION SILVER AND OTHER VALUABLE GIFTS
PART A: GENERAL
Introduction ................................................................................................................................3000
Acceptance of Gifts ....................................................................................................................3001
Requests for Presentation Silver ...............................................................................................3002
Classification for Reassignment Purposes ................................................................................3003
PART B: RECEIPT
Appraisal ....................................................................................................................................3100
Report of Receipt .......................................................................................................................3101
Photographs.... ...........................................................................................................................3102
Reassigned Silver ......................................................................................................................3103
PART C: CUSTODY AND STOWAGE
General.......................................................................................................................................3200
Custody ......................................................................................................................................3201
Stowage .....................................................................................................................................3202
PART D: INVENTORY
General.......................................................................................................................................3300
Inventory Reports.......................................................................................................................3301
Care and Maintenance...............................................................................................................3302
Missing, Damaged or Destroyed Items .....................................................................................3303
Recovery of Missing Items.........................................................................................................3304
PART E: TURN-IN
General.......................................................................................................................................3400
Strip Ship ....................................................................................................................................3401
Temporary Vault Storage...........................................................................................................3402
Repair.. .......................................................................................................................................3403
PART F: VALUABLE GIFTS AND HISTORICALLY SIGNIFICANT ARTIFACTS
General.......................................................................................................................................3500
Custody ......................................................................................................................................3501
Damaged, Missing or Destroyed Items and Recovery of Missing Items ..................................3502
Turn-In Procedures...................................................................................................................3503
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
CHAPTER 3
PRESENTATION SILVER AND OTHER VALUABLE GIFTS
__________________________________________________________________
PART A: GENERAL
3000 INTRODUCTION
1. GENERAL. Presentation silver and gold presents us with a vast number of time capsules,
each representing a unique exchange and many with a fascinating tale to tell. The circumstances
surrounding each presentation piece piques our curiosity and raises questions about specific
people, places and events that beg to be answered.
Presentation silver is considered to be “priceless,” and many of the skills used in creating it are a
“lost art,” with irreplaceable artistic expression.
Title 10 U.S. Code, Section 7221 authorizes the Secretary of the Navy to accept and care for gifts
of silver and other valuable articles presented to United States ships by states, municipalities,
organizations, individuals, or other sources, and is the basic authority to expend operational funds
to care for such gifts. Presentation silver may consist of a single item (e.g., a bowl, a tray, a
candelabra) or a group of items (e.g., punch bowl set, tea set, dinner service). Other valuable
articles may consist of paintings, portraits, original historical documents, engraved clocks or
chronometers, and other such items which the Commanding Officer considers to warrant
continuing accountability. The historical value and intrinsic worth of such material, the continuing
high level Navy and public interest it holds, and the numerous inquiries of donors concerning its
status require the maintenance of detailed, current, and accurate records for all items of
presentation silver and other valuable gifts. Presentation silver is the property of the U.S. Navy
and cannot be authorized by assigned ship/activity Commanding Officer to be loaned or returned
to anyone without prior NAVSUP and CNO approval. The Chief of Naval Operations is the
delegated authority to act for the Secretary of the Navy with regard to returns of gifts of
presentation silver services under Title 10 U.S. Code, Section 7545 and 7546.
3001 ACCEPTANCE OF GIFTS
1. APPROVAL AUTHORITY. In accordance with SECNAVINST 4001.2J the following officials
are delegated gift acceptance authority for gifts of silver made to vessels of the Navy under 10
U.S.C. 7221:
a. Only the Secretary of the Navy can accept gifts of a value in excess of $60,000.
b. Gifts of a value of $60,000 or less under Title 10, U.S. Code 7221: the Chief of Naval
Operations, the Vice-Chief of Naval Operations, and the Director of Navy Staff.
c. Gifts of a value at less than $12,000: the Commander, Naval Supply Systems Command
(OPNAVINST 4001.2J).
A letter to the appropriate level of authority must be submitted requesting approval to accept the
gift (see sample on following page). All silver acceptance letters with provided copies of all
related correspondence will be sent to Commander, Naval Supply Systems Command
(COMNAVSUPSYSCOM) (ATTN: SUP N423) via TYCOM/Regional Director. TYCOM/Regional
Director will endorse and then forward to NAVSUP. After approval, these gifts become the
property of the U.S. Navy and must be maintained intact as originally presented and safeguarded
against damage and loss. Commands should start processing paperwork immediately when an
individual or association states their intention to provide a gift of silver to the ship. A signed
approval letter must be completed prior to accepting any donations of silver. Once the silver
donation is accepted the command accepting the silver must ensure they provide the invoice,
manufacturer/warranty information, inventory, appraisal, photos and all historical documents to
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
NAVSUP Code N423 immediately to place in the permanent history file.
presentation silver program are maintained per SECNAV M-5210.1.
All records for the
SAMPLE ACCEPTANCE LETTER
4001
DRAFTER/DOC
DATE
From: Commanding Officer, SHIP (XXX 1000)
To:
APPROPRIATE LEVEL
Via:
Reginal TYCOM/Director
Subj:
GIFTS1 TO (SHIP) FROM (DONOR)
Ref:
(a) NAVSUP P-485, Afloat Supply Procedures
1. To accept a gift in accordance with reference (a), (DONOR) have/has made
unsolicited offers of gifts for (SHIP). The following is a list of presentation silver
items and their appraised value.
Gift
Cost, if Known
Appraised Value2
2.
1. ITEM, DES.
$xxx,xxx.xx
$xxx,xxx.xx
2. ITEM, DES.
$xxx,xxx.xx
$xxx,xxx.xx
3. ITEM, DES.
$xxx,xxx.xx
$xxx,xxx.xx
TOTAL
$xxx,xxx.xx
$xxx,xxx.xx
In the interest of crew morale and development of closer ties between (SHIP) and
(DONOR), recommend approval of acceptance of the gift(s) specified as gift(s) to the
Navy.
(COMMANDING OFFICER)
Copy to:
NAVSUP (IF NOT ADDRESSEE)
____________________
1
Gifts other than presentation silver fall under the cognizance of the Curator of the Navy. The
Curator Branch of the Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) manages heritage assets on
behalf of the Curator of the Navy.
2
Appraised Value (Reproduction Cost) is defined as: “The total cost to reproduce an exact
replica of the property, at current costs, using a similar or the same artist or craftsman, materials
and design as the original property.”
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
3002 REQUESTS FOR PRESENTATION SILVER
1. GENERAL. Previously assigned sets of presentation silver which have been turned-in to
storage may be reassigned by the Naval Supply Systems Command (on a loan basis) to active
Fleet ships that submit justified requests. When a ship has a particular need for a set of such
silver, a request will be submitted in a letter from the Commanding Officer or the prospective
Commanding Officer to the COMNAVSUPSYSCOM (ATTN: SUP N423), Policy Division via their
regional TYCOM. The letter will state the purpose for which the silver is required and will indicate
the size and quantity of the items desired (e.g., one set of silver service consisting of: 1 large tray,
1 large punch bowl, 1 ladle, and 12 punch cups). If the requested silver is unavailable, the
requesting ship will be advised of any available items which most nearly correspond to the
specific items requested or be placed on the waiting list until appropriate items are available. It is
recommended that only 2 or 3 items, or a small coffee and tea service, be assigned to
submarines or ships with limited storage and security. TYCOM will endorse and forward request
package to NAVSUP.
OFFICIAL COMMAND LETTER HEAD
4002
DRAFTER/DOC SER #
DATE
From: Food Service Officer, USS UNDERWAY (CVN 00)
To:
Commander, Naval Supply Systems Command (SUP N423)
Via:
Regional TYCOM/Director
Subj: REQUEST FOR THE USS UNDERWAY PRESENTATION SILVER
Ref:
(a) NAVSUP P486, VOL II
1. Per reference (a), this letter is submitted to request pieces from the USS UNDERWAY
Presentation Silver Service. If approved, the USS UNDERWAY silver will be used as a display
during dignitary visits, Navy events and ceremonies. The USS UNDERWAY silver is currently in
storage at the Fleet Logistics Center Norfolk or San Diego. The ships intent is to have the USS
UNDERWAY silver transferred to the custody of our designated presentation silver custodian,
CS1 ___
in (expected date of transfer). NAVSUP will be provided a copy of the DD 1149 at
the time of transfer.
2. The following is a list of silver pieces desired/requested from the
USS UNDERWAY Silver set:
a.
b.
c.
Punch Bowl
Punch Cups
Punch Bowl Tray
1
12
1
3. The POC is Lieutenant _____; he can be reached at (757) 445 – 0000 or via e-mail at
[email protected]
G. O. NAVY
Copy to:
Fleet Logistics Center, Norfolk
Supply Officer, USS UNDERWAY (CVN 00)
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
2. ASHORE REQUESTS. Per OPNAVINST 4001.3A the use of presentation silver by ashore
activities is discouraged and all requests for its use or display at shore activities must be
specifically approved by the CNO. Requests for presentation silver by shore activities will be
approved only when there are no outstanding requirements for vessels of the active fleet. Shore
commands requesting silver must provide a good explanation for wanting the silver and be
prepared to provide a security plan that will ensure the safeguarding of the silver against damage
and/or loss.
3003 CLASSIFICATION FOR REASSIGNMENT PURPOSES
1. GENERAL. Presentation silver received by a ship as a gift is classified as namesake silver.
Namesake silver is assigned to a ship for as long as that ship remains in commission. Unless
unusual circumstances exist, requests to turn-in namesake silver will not be honored.
Presentation silver obtained from NAVSUP is transferred on a loan basis. Presentation silver on
loan may be turned-in to the supporting NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) at any time
provided prior approval is obtained from NAVSUP N423. On rare occasions, presentation silver
on loan to a Fleet unit may become namesake silver when a new ship by the same name is
commissioned. In such instances, the new ship will have first priority to any or all of such silver
set as determined by NAVSUP.
PART B: RECEIPT
3100 APPRAISAL
1. GENERAL. After receipt of new silver an appraisal must be promptly completed to determine
the value of the silver. Assistance in obtaining the appraisal may be obtained through the
NAVSUP Presentation Silver Manager or NAVSUP FLC Silver Custodians. It is strongly
recommended that silver be reappraised every 5 years. Silver assets with an appraised value
of $500.00 or higher and silver collections having a total value of $5K or higher must be
appraised every 5 years. Appraisal costs are chargeable to the ship’s OPTAR. If appraisal
services are performed aboard ship, the contractor must be accompanied by a crew member
at all times. The contractor must provide an appraisal of the reproduction cost of the silver as
opposed to the fair market value. Reproduction cost is defined as, “The total cost to
reproduce an exact replica of the property, at current costs, using a similar or the same artist
or craftsman, materials and design as the original property.” Silver custodians will need to
provide a copy of their current inventory to ensure the proper silver names, identification
numbers to include Navy ERP asset number, Inventory number and any other information to
assist in making sure that each specific silver piece is documented correctly. Silver
custodians must ensure that all appraisals are completed using the cost of reproducing the
exact replica of each silver piece to include its historical value. In order to achieve a true
silver appraisal value the silver custodian must provide a copy of all the historical information
and certified records/documentation for each piece of silver being appraised. For each
appraisal conducted, the contractor must provide an appraisal for each ship or activity to
include the following mandatory information:
• Quantity of each unique item
• Navy ERP asset and inventory number
• Description, dimensions and markings of each unique item
• Weight of each unique item
• Metallic content
• Manufacturer (if available)
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Name of the namesake ship (include hull #) silver set originally donated to (as determined
by inscription)
Appraised value of each unique item. Note: For new appraisals, Identical assets within a
collection will have the same appraisal value when one silver piece within a set is
appraised (Value for each asset is based on the highest quality piece in the collection that
was appraised regardless of condition of other identical assets within the collection).
Appraised value for the total number of identical items in a collection (e.g., twelve punch
cups, See note above in section 2.1-1g)
Narrative justification of appraised value assigned
Appraised value of each complete silver set with each asset provided with a value.
Date of appraisal
Name of ship or station silver for which appraisal was performed
Ships having sets from more than one namesake ship (original owner of silver) must have
each silver set appraised on a separate appraisal report. Documents sent to NAVSUP via
their TYCOM for each namesake silver collection will be recorded and filed in a folder
under the ship’s original name and hull number in relation to the original donation date.
The original of each completed appraisal and a legible copy of the invoice will be
submitted via the TYCOM within 15 days to:
Naval Supply Systems Command
Presentation Silver Manager
P.O. Box 2050, Code SUP N423
5450 Carlisle Pike
Mechanicsburg, PA 17055-0791
3101 REPORT OF RECEIPT
1. GENERAL. After the approval of a silver request and within 60 days of receipt of donated
presentation silver a complete inventory of all donated items will be sent via the TYCOM to:
Commander, Naval Supply Systems Command, Code SUP N423, P.O. Box 2050, 5450 Carlisle
Pike, Mechanicsburg, PA 17055-0791, or send email to your TYCOM and to the presentation
silver manager listed on page three in the NAVSUP P-476 newsletter.
A cover letter will be submitted with the inventory report giving the date and place of presentation,
the name, address and phone number of the donor, and the name and address of the silversmith,
if known.
For valuable gifts other than presentation silver, the report will be sent via the TYCOM to:
Naval History and Heritage Command
Curator Branch
805 Kidder Breese Street SE
Washington Navy Yard, DC 20354-5060
Once received, an accession number will be assigned to each item and placed back on loan with
the ship. The inventory report will include the following:
• Description (including inscriptions and dimensions) and quantity of each item
• Name of the donor
• Identification and explanation of condition
• Copies of all documentation regarding item
• Digital photograph (jpeg format)
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
A retained copy of the initial inventory report will be used to post receipts of new gifts to the
controlled equipage custody records in accordance with par 3-2, 1a. All gifts accepted with
permission from the Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) will be retained onboard
the namesake ship until identified to be decommissioned which at that time arrangements will
be made to transfer the gift to the Naval History and Heritage Command. All valuable gifts
other than presentation silver, and including artifacts on loan to the ship will be inventoried
annually with the signed inventory and current photos provided to the Naval History and
Heritage Command by 1 April of each year.
SAMPLE APPRAISAL FORMAT
USS CARL VINSON (CVN 70)
SANDWICH TRAY
DESCRIPTION:
INVENTORY NO:
NAVY ERP ASSET NO:
INVENTORY TITLE:
QUANTITY:
ORIGINAL OWNER:
DONOR:
METALLIC CONTENT:
MANUFACTURER:
DESIGN NO.:
INSCRIPTION:
DIMENSIONS:
WEIGHT:
CONDITION:
VALUE FOR UNIT:
VALUE FOR SET:
COMMAND:
A sterling silver SANDWICH TRAY of circular outline,
the perfectly plain center engraved with armorials.
1930-10-256-001
204564
SANDWICH TRAY, circular 19” diameter
3 units
USS SAN FRANCISCO (CA 38)
(Protected Cruiser No. 5)
City of San Francisco, CA
Sterling Silver
Wallace International
Not indicated
“SAN FRANCISCO” in Old English letters
Diameter: 19 inches, Height: 1/2 inches
33 troy ounces each
Good
$1,500.00
$4,500.00
USS SAN FRANCISCO (SSN 711)
3102 PHOTOGRAPHS
1. GENERAL. Proper management of Presentation Silver dictates that a system must be in
effect which enables the holder of Presentation Silver to adequately identify to the appropriate
investigative body a complete description of the item(s) should it/they become lost or destroyed.
Accordingly, a photograph of each unique item shall be taken using a ruler in the photograph to
indicate actual size as shown below. For example: for a punch service consisting of a punch
bowl, ladle, a tray and twelve cups, four separate photographs are required, one each of the
punch bowl, the ladle, the tray and one group photograph of the punch cups. The photographs
are to be 8" x 10" black and white (color photographs are unacceptable due to distortion of silver
and tendency to “cover” true condition of silver). When taking the photo of silver assets use a
lighter background behind the silver in order to have a better picture result when scanning the
photo. One copy of the entire set will be forwarded promptly, after receipt of the silver, to
NAVSUP (SUP N423). Two prints of each photograph will be retained by the ship as an
additional means of inventory control. These prints will accompany the gift if and when it is
transferred to another location or placed in permanent storage.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
SAMPLE PHOTOGRAPH OF UNIQUE PIECE OF A SILVER SERVICE SET
3103 REASSIGNED SILVER
1. REPORT OF RECEIPT. Within 30 days of receipt of presentation silver which formerly
belonged to a ship that has been inactivated or otherwise disposed of, the recipient command
will forward a receipted copy of the itemized DD Form 1149 (or DD Form 1348-1-A with an
itemized inventory attached) by letter of transmittal via their TYCOM to Commander, Naval
Supply Systems Command, Code SUP N423, P.O. Box 2050, 5450 Carlisle Pike,
Mechanicsburg, PA 17055-0791. A receipted copy of the DD Form 1149 will be used to post
receipts of reassigned silver to custody records. If reassigned silver is received without
documentation, contact NAVSUP N423 and prepare a dummy receipt invoice (DD Form 1149) as
illustrated below:
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
SAMPLE DD FORM 1149 DUMMY RECEIPT INVOICE
1
SHIPPING CONTAINER TALLY
2
3 4
5
6 7
8
9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
Form Approved
OMB No. 0704-0246
REQUISITION AND INVOICE / SHIPPING DOCUMENT
Public reporting burden for this collection of inf ormation is estimated to average 15 minutes per response, including the t ime for review ing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and
and review
l ti ing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing t his burden, to Washington Headquarters Services, Directo
fInformation Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis Highw ay, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302, and to the Of fice of Management and Budget, Paperw ork Reduction Project (0704-0246), Washington, DC
20503
SHEET
NO. OF
5. REQUISITION DATE6. REQUISITION NUMBER
1. FROM (Include ZIP Code)
NO.
SHEETS
1
(N00189)
FISC Norfolk, VA (Code 301A)
N00189-63300001
8. PRIORITY
9. AUTHORITY OR PURPOSE
2. TO: (Include ZIP Code)
(R52704)
1 26 Nov
95
(YYMMDD)
7. DATE M ATERIAL REQUIRED
COMNAVSUPSYSCOM ltr dtd 10 Nov 95
M. Jones
USS JOUETT (CG-29)
(YYMMDD)
11a.VOUCHER NUMBER & DATE
10. SIGNATURE
LT M. Jones, MSC,
12. DATE SHIPPED(YYMMDD)
USN
3. SHIP TO - M ARK FOR
PRESENTATION SILVER CUSTODIAN
13. MODE OF SHIPMENT
b.
14. BILL OF LADING NUMBER
15. AIR MOVEMENT DESIGNATOR OR PORT REFERENCE NO.
4. APPROPRIATIONS SYMBOL AND SUBHEAD
ITEM
NO.
(a)
OBJ. CL.
BUR. CONT. NO.
SUBALLOT
AUTHORIZATION TRANS.
ACCT' G ACTIVTY TYPE
UNIT
OF
ISSUE
(c)
FEDERAL STOCK NUMBER, DESCRIPTION, AND CODING OF M ATERIEL AND / OR
SERVICES
(b)
1.
Punch Bowl, 15” Diameter
1EA
2.
Serving Tray, 24” Diameter
1EA
Punch Cups
12EA
3.
Date Recv’d: 28 Dec 95
by
AMOUNT
PROPERTY ACCT' G COUN- COST CODE
ACTIVITY
TRY
QUANTITY
REQUESTED
SUPPLY
ACTION
(d)
(e)
TYPE
CONTAINER
(f)
CONTAINER
NOS.
(g)
UNIT PRICE
TOTAL COST
(h)
(i)
N. N. Withrow
LTJG N. N. Withrow, SC,
USS JOUETT (CG-29)
16. TRANSPORTATION VIA MATS OR M STS CHARGEABLE TO
17. SPECIAL HANDLING
18. ISSUED BY
19. CONTAINERS DATE (YYMMDD)
TOTAL
TYPE
TOTAL
TOTAL
DESCRIPTION
CONCONRECEIVED
WEIGHT
CUBE
R
TAINERS
TAINER
EXCEPT AS
E
NOTED
C O
F
R
A
E
P S CHECKED BY
QUANTITIES DATE(YYMMDD)
I H
C
RECEIVED
T I
EXCEPT AS
E
U P
NOTED
I
L
A M
P
PACKED BY
DATE (YYMMDD)
T E
POSTED
T
I N
O T
TOTAL
N
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87
.
Previous editions are obsolete
S/N 0102-LF-017 -7900
306/080
DD Form 1149, DEC 93
BY
SHEET TOTAL
BY
GRAND TOTAL
BY
20. RECEIVER' S
VOUCHER NO.
88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100
(Navy Overprint 1994)
a. If reassigned silver is received without a photograph, contact NAVSUP (SUP N423). An 8
x 10 inch black and white photograph of each unique piece received will be made for use
as an additional means of inventory control. Photographs of reassigned silver are not
normally required by NAVSUP unless there is no photograph on file.
b. If reassigned silver is received without an appraisal, contact NAVSUP (SUP N423) to
check for NAVSUP file copy.
If an appraisal is required, contact the NAVSUP
Presentation Silver Manager or NAVSUP FLC Silver Custodians for assistance. Upon
receipt of appraisal, forward a copy to NAVSUP (SUP N423) via the TYCOM to include in
the silver file for the namesake silver collection.
PART C: CUSTODY AND STOWAGE
3200 ACCOUNTABILITY
1. GENERAL. Adequate protection and strict accountability of presentation silver is required to
guard against damage or loss, which, if occurring, may cause public criticism of the ship's
Commanding Officer and embarrassment to the Secretary of the Navy. The custody of
presentation silver, therefore, will be entrusted to a responsible individual designated in writing by
the Commanding Officer. The designated custodian will be responsible for adequate security,
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
proper display, care, and preservation of all presentation silver items in his custody. When the
Commanding Officer assigns a new presentation silver custodian a proper turnover of all silver
assets must be conducted. During the turnover of the silver custodian position, a full inventory
must be completed documenting all missing or damaged silver. The silver inventory and all
surveys must be signed by both parties conducting the inventory. All inventory discrepancies
must be reported to NAVSUP via your regional TYCOM immediately. After the turnover is
complete the new silver custodian must contact the Presentation Silver Manager by phone or
email to provide point of contact information in order to receive proper support and pass-down
information. The silver custodian is responsible for the care and security of the silver at all times
during use and in storage. The silver custodian must ensure the silver is properly maintained and
must always have security measures in place to protect the silver from loss or damage. When
utilizing presentation silver for command functions where the designated custodian will not have
immediate direct control of the items, sub-custody records will be utilized and alternate custodians
must be assigned to ensure the security of all silver items used or displayed. All silver custodians
will maintain a current working copy record of all presentation silver policies.
3201 CUSTODY
1. RECORDS. The custodian of presentation silver is responsible for maintaining records,
conducting physical inventories, and submitting required reports. Custodian are also responsible
for maintaining on file presentation silver policy documents to include the NAVSUP P486 VOL II,
NAVSUP P-476 Silver Policy Updates, NAVSUP P-485 and OPNAVINST 4001.3A. Records to
be maintained are as follows:
• Controlled Equipage Custody Records, will be maintained for presentation silver or other
valuable gifts (a presentation may consist of one item or a number of items). If all items
included in a presentation cannot be listed and properly identified in a single custody
record, separate custody records will be prepared for individual items or groups of items.
NAVSUP N42 will provide the inventory and asset number for each piece of silver within
the collection. In addition to the requirements, each custody record will include:
o
A card number (to be consecutively assigned if more than one
record is maintained)
o
Complete description, including the engraving and dimensions, of
each item
o
The name, address, and phone number of the donor; if known
o
The name of the ship and hull number to which originally
presented
o
The quantity of each item
o
The condition of each item
o
The date of receipt
o
Place of presentation
o
The receipt document number, for reassigned silver; or the
accession number for gifts other than silver. (The accession
number is the numeric or alphanumeric identification number that is assigned by the
Curator Branch, Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) upon receipt of the
initial inventory report)
o
For presentation silver, photographs of each unique piece
o
Appraised value and date of appraisal
• Copy of inventories submitted to NAVSUP covering the most recent two year
reporting periods
• Copy of Financial Liability Investigation of Property Loss (DD Form 200) if
applicable, submitted/prepared during the most recent two year period
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
•
•
•
Copy of correspondence submitted to or received from NAVSUP for the most
recent two year period
Copy of appraisal report
DD 1149 transfer documents for all transfers to temporary and permanent storage
2. REFERENCE DATA. The designated custodian is provided the following list for use in the
performance of duties:
a. Title 10, U.S. Code, Section 7221 - Acceptance and care of gifts to vessels
b. Title 10, U.S. Code, Section 7546 - Loan or gift of articles to ships' sponsors and donors
c. SECNAVINST 4001.2J Series - Acceptance of Gifts
d. OPNAVINST 4001.3A - Policy and Procedures for the Management of Presentation Silver
e. OPNAVINST 4001.1F – Acceptance of Gifts
f. NAVSUPINST 4441.20 Series - Fitting Out Guide for Prospective Supply Officers
g. JAG Manual, Para. 0217-0220 - Report of Investigation, Distribution
h. OPNAVINST 4440.4 Series - Declassification, Demilitarization and Stripping Procedures
for Ships Programmed for Disposal
i. NAVSUP MANUAL P-485, VOLUME III (Supply Ashore), Para. 23189 - Strip Ship Material
j. NAVSUP P486, VOL II
k. OPNAVINST 5530.14E, Navy Physical Security And Law Enforcement Program
3. SECURITY. In addition to the historical value and intrinsic worth of presentation silver, the
continuing high level Navy and public interest in this material requires that these gifts be
maintained intact as originally presented, and safeguarded against damage or loss. Commands
with a presentation silver inventory valued at $90,000 or more should carefully evaluate their
security procedures and consider integrating presentation silver security procedures into the
ships’ SORM. Consideration should be given to including display on Sounding and Security
Watch/CDO rounds, installation of electronic sensors, and any other security devices deemed
necessary. Security for stored presentation silver at all ashore locations to include NAVSUP FLC
storage, must store presentation silver in a secure location. At a minimum, a General Services
Administration (GSA)/government approved modular vault system or GSA/government approved
armory or security vault door will be used. GSA/government approved high security padlocks
may be used with security doors in place of vault doors only if location is within a secure space. If
the vault is also being used for other valued assets other than presentation silver the silver must
be placed in a separate cage with additional locking devices to limit entry. Clearance should be
limited to the NAVSUP Presentation Silver Manager, NAVSUP FLC Presentation Silver Manager,
Security Manager and the Primary and Alternate Presentation Silver Custodians.
Shore
commands to include NAVSUP FLC storage should consider the installation of electronic security
sensors (IDS, CAC Card entry, or DVR Systems). An access log for vault entrance using the SF702 Security Container Check Sheet shall be used to record all entries in and out of the
vault/secured storage area. NAVSUP FLC Silver custodians must maintain a local vault security
instruction to include a physical security check of the vault per the SF-702 (Security Container
Check List), letter of appointment (kept on file 2 years after relief) and a current SOP for
presentation silver. All changes of vault locations for the movement of silver or changes to the
security posture of silver must first be approved by NAVSUP. Reference OPNAVINST 5530.14E
for additional guidance for the protection of precious metals.
3202 STOWAGE
1. PREPARATIONS FOR SILVER STORAGE. Prior to storing presentation silver for temporary
or permanent storage a joint inventory will be conducted for all items by the ship’s presentation
silver custodian and command appointed representative. The completed inventory must match
the 1149 transfer document created by the current silver custodian; the 1149 must be signed by
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
the ship’s silver custodian and the NAVSUP FLC custodian at the time of transfer. A copy of the
signed ship’s 1149 and a copy of the content inventory must be attached to the silver container
and kept on file at the NAVSUP FLC with a copy forwarded to NAVSUP via the TYCOM at the
time of the transfer. Prior to placing presentation silver in storage, all items will be carefully
cleaned, wrapped in anti-tarnish tissue and silver cloth then protected with an outer layer of
bubble wrap cushioning the material. It is extremely important to wrap silver in anti-tarnish tissue
paper and silver cloth before bubble wrap. The bubble wrap causes the silver to sweat and will
ultimately damage the silver if placed directly against the silver piece. Soft flannel can be used as
a substitute for the anti-tarnish tissue paper. Once the items are carefully wrapped they will be
labeled to identify the item (nomenclature with asset number) and placed in a wood or metal
container.
2.
STOWAGE OF SILVER. All transfers of silver for permanent or temporary storage must
first be approved by NAVSUP. Requests for storage must be submitted to NAVSUP via your
Regional TYCOM at least 60 days in advance of storage. TYCOMS will provide an endorsement
letter for all transfer requests. Request letters must be serialized and placed on command
letterhead with the CO’s signature or at minimum endorsed by the CO. Silver being stowed as
temporary storage must be stored in a wood or metal container having locking devices or secured
with metal bans. All containers must be secured with a car seal at the point of entry. Any time the
security of a container is compromised while in temporary storage, a new inventory must be
conducted by ship’s silver custodian and FLC’s silver managers or documented representatives
immediately with all discrepancies reported to NAVSUP via NAVSUP GLS/TYCOM. All inventory
discrepancies will be properly documented and the appropriate actions taken per NAVSUP Policy.
Silver assets as part of a silver collection must be stored together in approved containers and
located in one location inside the vault. Sufficient packing material will be utilized to prevent
damage of items from the motion of the ship. Anti-tarnish paper, Anti-tarnish silver bags, silver
cloth and silver cleaning kits in preparation for storage are available upon request from NAVSUP
FLC Norfolk and FLC San Diego. All stored silver must be labeled properly in order to identify its
location to include: Original ship name, hull, nomenclature and asset number.
3. SILVER STORAGE MODIFICATIONS/REMOVAL. No changes are authorized to be made to
the original 1149 when any silver pieces are pulled from a collection in temporary storage. When
pieces of a silver collection are needed by the ship/submarine and taken out of temporary
storage, the original 1149 must be closed out with signatures by both parties. A new 1149 is
generated and must be completed for the silver pieces remaining in temporary storage. All silver
assets placed back into temporary storage must be re-inventoried with a new signed inventory
worksheet and a new signed 1149 attached to the silver collection with a copy provided to
TYCOM, NAVSUP FLC and NAVSUP. Silver must then be stored in a wood or metal container
with new car seals added to properly seal the container for storage.
4. STORAGE ENVIRONMENT. Presentation silver must be stored in a clean, dry and low
humidity environment. The silver storage environment must be maintained at 68-72°F and a
recommended humidity rate of 35%. Appropriate equipment must be installed in silver storage
spaces not meeting required environment to regulate temperature and humidity. Silica gels or
dehumidifiers can be used to control humidity. A temperature log will be maintained to monitor
the environment within the storage space. The temperature must be checked and annotated in
the logbook weekly and kept on file one year after completion. A trouble call shall be submitted
when temperatures are not being maintained.
5. STORAGE CONTAINER. Containers used for presentation silver storage or transfers must
be a sturdy container made of wood or metal. The recommended storage container for
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
presentation silver service is manufactured under federal specification: Class 5 Cabinet-AA-F363B (GSA-FSS) and is covered under Federal Supply Schedule 71 III E (FSC Group 71 Part III
Section E Miscellaneous Furniture Insulated and Uninsulated Security Filing Cabinets, Safes,
Vault Doors, and Map and Plan Files) Special Item (S.I.). National Stock Numbers are assigned
to the basic container while special numbers are assigned to associated drawers or shelves. The
dimensions of the safe currently available from Mosler are: Inside - 25 3/4" high, 19 1/4” wide, 19
3/8" deep; outside - 29" high, 22 5/8" wide and 24 1/4" deep. The recommended container, if
possible, will weigh in excess of 500 pounds; therefore, weight and movement compensation will
be required on most combatants as well as other type ships.
Note: For information on proper storage of historical artifacts on loan to the ship, contact the
Curator Branch, NHHC ([email protected] or 202-433-2220). Sometimes when ships
go into a refit period, items have to be removed for work. If artifacts are to be stored for an
extended period of time, the Curator Branch, NHHC must be informed and arrangements made to
return the artifacts to the custody of the Curator.
6. STORAGE LOCKING DEVICES. Locking devices are optional but recommended when
storing silver as temporary storage. All storage containers must have the ability to be locked or
sealed. Once the silver collection is properly placed in secured storage container, a car seal will
be used to secure the opening of each container or locking device that allows entry into the
container. The serial number on each car seal used must be entered on the 1149; this is another
means to identify the container.
PART D: INVENTORY
3300 GENERAL
1. GENERAL. Physical inventories of presentation silver and other valuable gifts are required to
ensure that all items received are actually on hand and in good condition. It is recommended that
at least one person is assigned as a recorder when completing silver inventories having a large
number of assets within the collection. NAVSUP FLCs are required to have a recorder assigned
when conducting annual inventories and both must sign the inventory cover page upon
completion.
All inventories must be provided to NAVSUP via Regional TYCOMs/Directors by 20 March.
Inventory discrepancies must be recorded and forwarded to NAVSUP via Regional
TYCOMs/Directors with the appropriate documentation to include: investigative reports, letter of
explanation and surveys.
3301 INVENTORY REPORTS
1. ANNUAL INVENTORY MESSAGE. NAVSUP sends out an annual inventory message
requesting presentation silver inventories for each command having custody of presentation
silver. An annual report is required for all sets appraised at $90,000 or more; a biennial report, to
be submitted in each odd numbered year, is required for all sets appraised below $90,000. All
ashore locations and Fleet Logistic Centers must provide an inventory annual regardless of value.
2. PRESENTATION SILVER INVENTORIES. Each Command having custody of presentation
silver will submit an itemized inventory report of such material to the Commander, Naval Supply
Systems Command via Regional TYCOMS/Directors. All inventory reports must to be submitted
by mail or email no later than 20 March to their TYCOM. TYCOMS will forward all ship’s silver
inventories to NAVSUP by 01 April. An Excel Worksheet will be the accepted method for a silver
inventory. The NAVSUP FLC Silver Custodians will maintain a current Navy ERP Inventory
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
Worksheet and will adjust at the completion of all silver transfers. All Inventory reports not
provided by NAVSUP must include the following information, in the following order:
• (HEADER) Ship name and hull number, Silver ship name for each silver set (Name and
hull number of original recipients; name of ship originally donated to), inventory date,
signed by (name and title) and silver locations. Note: Ships having more than one silver
set from different hull numbers or ships names should provide to NAVSUP as individual
inventories since all assets must be recorded under their original ships name (name of the
ship and hull during the originally donation of the silver).
• Serial Number and Inventory number (provided by NAVSUP)
• Asset number (ERP, Provided by NAVSUP)
• Command UIC (Used as the silver location in ERP)
• Description of silver
• Quantity of a specific silver piece with identical characteristics (example - 24 punch cups)
• Inscription or placard on the silver describing a donation or specific historical event.
• Condition to be noted as follows:
o
Excellent (like new), listed as OP in ERP
o
Good (almost new), listed as OP in ERP
o
Fair (minor dents and scratches OR items for which an expert
appraiser or silversmith recommends repairs not required in order
to preserve historical value), listed as DM in ERP
o
Poor (broken, missing parts, repairs required), listed as DM in ERP
• Detailed description of the silver when the silver is in fair or poor condition (Identify all
damage). In ERP damaged silver is listed as DM and silver in good condition is listed as
OP (operational)
• Estimated or scheduled date of repair
• Manufacturer, if known
• Date of last appraisal, every five years is recommended
• Appraised value
• Donor and donor date, if known (For first inventory only)
• Item found (Checked/marked with a “Y” to identify that the silver asset has been
inventoried)
• Attach DD Form 200 when applicable
• Title spreadsheet/file as follows: PS-YEAR-INVENTORY-NAMESAKE SILVER NAMEHULL. Example: PS2012INVENTORYUSSNAVYCV00
• A cover page is required for all NAVSUP FLC inventories that will include the responsible
FLC, date of inventory, number of assets inventoried, number of collections inventoried,
inventory discrepancies and signatures of custodian and responsible officer.
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EXAMPLE OF PREFERRED INVENTORY AS AN EXCEL SPREADSHEET
3. OTHER VALUABLE GIFTS. Inventories of gifts other than presentation silver are required to
be taken annually during the first quarter, in addition to relief of the custodian, upon change of
command, and upon inactivation of the ship. Annual inventories, including (a-e below) are to be
sent to Naval History and Heritage Command, Curator Branch, 805 Kidder Breese Street SE,
Washington Navy Yard, DC 20374-5060. The custodian being relieved and the relieving custodian
(if applicable) will report to the Commanding Officer that the inventory has been completed, with
an itemization of any missing or damaged items. For inventories incident to change of command
or inactivation of the ship, an itemized inventory will be submitted to the Naval History and
Heritage Command, Curator Branch, 805 Kidder Breese Street SE, Washington Navy Yard, DC
20374-5060 or by email to [email protected] The inventory will be submitted by letter or
e-mail, identified by NAVHISTCEN report symbol 4001-1, as soon as practicable after completion
of the inventory. A copy of these reports will be provided to the TYCOM/Regional Director. The
report will include the following:
• Description (including inscriptions) and quantity of each item
• Name of the donor
• Accession number assigned by the Curator Branch, NHHC
• Digital photograph of item in jpeg format
• Identification and explanation of any damaged items
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•
Copy of a completed DD Form 200and a Memorandum for the Record for any item which,
incident to inventory, is determined to be missing or destroyed
3302 CARE AND MAINTENANCE
1. GENERAL. Presentation silver is a part of America’s history and Navy tradition and requires
correct handling to prevent damages. White cotton gloves should always be worn. Bare hands
will leave fingerprints or other marks which may be hard to remove. Silver should be handled one
piece at a time using both hands. When setting silver down, place the piece down gently and by
itself. Ask for assistance with bulky or heavy pieces.
2. ROUTINE CARE. Maintenance of presentation silver can be an easy matter if a regular
program is established. It is recommended that presentation silver be cleaned every three
months. All surfaces should be lightly wiped down using a polishing mitt or polish-saturated soft
cloth. A mild dishwashing liquid in hot water may be used to wash pieces by hands. Silver should
be immediately and thoroughly dried with a soft cotton or linen cloth.
3. POLISHING. Polishing requires special care and consideration. Presentation silver may be
cleaned professionally or by using polishing kits available from NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center
(FLC) Norfolk, Code 436, 757-443-1911 (DSN 646-1911) or NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center
(FLC) San Diego, Code 431, 619-556-0419 (DSN 526-0419 ). Instant or dip type commercial
cleaners are not approved for cleaning presentation silver. Pieces with unique engravings or
details require extra time and thought during polishing. Allow enough space to move freely and
cover the workspace with plastic to protect the surface. The following procedures should be used
to clean the silver:
• Using a container with hot water and a mild dishwashing liquid, gently clean all sides with
a thin damp sponge. With the same sponge, rinse the piece with water from another
container.
• Using a small quantity of polish on a clean sponge, put a thin coating of polish all over the
silver and allow to dry briefly and then rinse off.
• With a circular motion, lightly rub a little polish over one area at a time. When one area
has become bright, move to a new area. Never press hard or scrub while polishing.
• Wash off polish with a clean sponge being sure to clean out any carved or engraved
areas. Cotton tipped applicators can help in these areas. These can be hard to polish
and an attempt should not be made to remove all tarnish from these areas, especially in
those places where oxidation is used as accent.
• Use a wet soft toothbrush or a “Tampico” brush to remove old polish that has dried in
engravings and crevices by gently rubbing the surface to lift the polish out.
• When polishing is completed, rinse carefully to remove all traces of polish. Dry thoroughly
before returning to display cabinet or packing for storage.
• Most recommended cleaning method: Calcium Carbonate (Make sure it is precipitated
chalk as there are other grades of Calcium Carbonate), distilled water and denatured
alcohol with a few drops of Orvus soap as the surfactant. The formula to start would be to
mix 1 to teaspoons of precipitated chalk with 1/2 cup of 1:1 mixture of demonized water
and denature alcohol with a few drops of Orvus soap or a soap that is unscented like Ivory
Snow. If the above formula does not remove the tarnish add more precipitated chalk until
you have a paste. Use baby diapers, tarnish cloth or similar cloth as the applicator making
sure that you use a clean area as you polish. Ensure tarnish cloths have washed been
washed thoroughly before each use. After you are satisfied with cleaning, rinse with a
mixture of 1:1 alcohol and distilled water then dry with a lint free cloth (never use wool)
and use a blow dryer to dry out the crevices and grooves.
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•
Avoid harsh polishes and creams. Silver custodians need to limit the use of commercial
made polishes. Hagerty’s polish and creams that have been used extensively to clean
Navy silver is one of the worse. Clay is used as the abrasive and it causes all kinds of
problems. Dipping solutions should NEVER be used as a cleaning method.
4. SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS.
a. Acid Etching. This is a process by which an engraving or detailed design is painted on a
silver item with warm wax. After the wax hardened, the object is placed in acid that eats
away a layer of silver around the wax. Due to the delicate nature of these designs, use a
specially made polishing mitt and be sure keep fingers straight when lightly wiping the
surface. Do not put any pressure on the engraving or design.
b. Engraving/Flat Chasing. Engraving is one of the most common ways to decorate silver
and is performed by using a sharp point to cut lines, detailed patterns and create threedimensional patterns. Flat chasing is made by a tool pressing into the object making a
design that leaves its pattern on the inside surface. Clean these areas by wiping gently,
without pressure, using a specially treated polishing cloth or mitt. Be sure to thoroughly
wash out all traces of polish from the fine lines or it will dry, detracting from the piece’s
appearance.
c. Oxidation. This term is used to describe dark areas which are recessed or sunken in a
decorative pattern. Never try to polish out these places as they have been specially
designed to create shade or accent parts of the design. Oxidation creates contrasts of
color and texture which is important to the appearance. Polish only the upper surface and
lightly wipe the recessed or sunken areas. Wait for the polish to dry before removing
using a soft-bristled toothbrush to gently brush and lift away particles of polish. A cottontipped applicator is also useful.
d. Repousse. This decoration appears to have been carved in the silver or stands away from
the body of the object giving it a three-dimensional look. Clean with a polishing mitt or
treated cloth to keep polish from settling in the details. The appearance and treatment are
similar to those for oxidized silver.
e. Weighted Silver. Lightweight silver objects particularly candlesticks and footed shallow
dishes, often have filled or “weighted” bases. These pieces are filled with plaster, resin or
cement to prevent them from falling over. They are usually marked on the underside of
the base “cement filled,” “weighted,” or “weighted base” to warn the user that they have
been filled and are not solid. These pieces should never be placed directly into water,
which can cause the filling to either melt or shift and the object become unbalanced.
f. Lacquered Surfaces. This is when a thin coating of chemical substance is put on the silver
object to protect from tarnish and chemicals. However, these substances become
yellowed and brittle over time leaving the exposed silver tarnished and hard to polish.
When the lacquer has become chipped exposing the silver, it is best cleaned with a
polishing mitt or treated cloth to prevent unsightly tarnish.
g. Gilt/Gold Wash. Gilding is a coating of gold used to enrich the decoration with its gold
appearance or to protect certain surfaces from acids and chemicals in food. It is easily
recognized by its yellow color. Polish should not be used on these surfaces, as the
coating will easily come off. Instead, use a mild soap and water and wipe gently to dry.
Do not rub these areas.
h. Candle Wax. Whenever candles have been used in table decorating, it is almost certain
that the melted wax will drip where it is not wanted. Allow the wax to become cold and
harden before trying to remove it from any surface. When the wax is hard, many times it
can be gently chipped or picked away from the object. If some of it remains on the silver,
place a cloth soaked in hot water on the area to melt it slightly and carefully rub or ease
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i.
away the wax with a cotton tipped applicator. After the wax has been removed, polish the
area again lightly to protect the surface.
Wood Surfaces. Occasionally silver pieces have handles, carved finials or other parts
made of wood. These should never be placed in water. Keep the wooden parts looking
attractive by rubbing a light coating of an oil-based furniture polish into the wood. Do not
allow silver polish to dry on wooden parts or in areas where they join the body, such as
hinges.
5. SILVER CARE PRODUCTS. Both NAVSUP FLC Norfolk and the NAVSUP FLC San Diego
stock a supply of anti-tarnish tissue paper, flannel cloth storage bags, and silver cleaning kits for
your use. To obtain these products contact NAVSUP FLC NV (757-443-1900 or DSN 646-1900)
or NAVSUP FLC-SD (619-556-0419 or DSN 526-0419) or contact your ship’s LSR.
6. SILVER DISPLAY CONSIDERATIONS. Metal and glass display cases are the best with
special museum cloth sprayed with a tarnish inhibitor. You can purchase the cloth from a
company called Test Fabrics in Pennsylvania, telephone 570-603-0432. You can also place silica
gel in the cases to cut down on the moisture factor. If you are using antique wood cases, they
should be sprayed with polyurethane or an acrylic sprays or paints to keep out the sulfides and
other unwanted gases.
7. OTHER VALUABLE ITEMS – For advice and instructions on how to clean or preserve other
valuable artifacts, please contact the Curator for the Navy Curator Branch, NHHC at
[email protected] or call 202-433-2220.
3303 MISSING, DAMAGED OR DESTROYED ITEMS
1. DAMAGED ITEMS. If a presentation item other valuable gift or artifact is damaged, and repair
is possible, it will be repaired even though the cost to do so may not be considered economical.
The cost of such repairs is the responsibility of the command having custody of the silver assets.
If an item is damaged to such an extent that it cannot possibly be repaired (i.e., destroyed) it will
be surveyed. All presentation silver must always be repaired or replaced when damaged. For
instances where valuable gifts or artifacts are damaged, contact the Curator Branch, NHHC for
the Department of the Navy ([email protected] or call 202-433-2220) for guidance.
2. MISSING OR DESTROYED ITEMS. Presentation silver items and other valuable gifts which
have been lost, stolen or destroyed must be expended by means of survey. The survey action
will be initiated as soon as the loss or irreparable damage is discovered. Regardless of value,
when loss occurs a command investigation must be completed and the investigation report
forwarded with the DD Form 200 survey to NAVSUP via TYCOM/Regional Director immediately.
NAVSUP FLC custodians must ensure their Security Director is notified of all security room
discrepancies or for missing, stolen, lost, and recovered materials within the vault. A detailed
description of the lost silver to include the original ships name and circumstances relative to the
loss or damage will be included in the DD Form 200 or in attachments thereto.
a. All surveys of presentation silver determined to be missing or destroyed must be approved
by NAVSUP, not by the ship’s Commanding Officer. Missing or destroyed silver must be
reported to NAVSUP (SUP N423) via the TYCOM/Regional Director within 48 hours after
discovery via email or naval message. After the initial notification of the missing or
destroyed item(s), a letter report will be promptly submitted to the Naval Supply Systems
Command (ATTN: SUP N423) via the TYCOM/Regional Director briefly outlining the
known facts surrounding the loss or destruction. The letter will include, as a minimum:
1) A brief description to include inventory or asset number and quantity of the item or
items lost or destroyed
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2)
An explanation surrounding the loss of silver to include the approximate time the loss
was discovered
3) The name of the designated custodian
4) A telephone number, if available
5) A statement regarding the feasibility of replacement
After the issuance of the initial reporting message, the submission of a DD Form 200 and
investigation report is required in all cases where loss of presentation silver is involved.
Ensure the current edition of DD 200 is used. When a missing or destroyed item of
presentation silver is surveyed, the original and one copy of the completed DD Form 200
will be forwarded immediately in a letter of transmittal to NAVSUP via the
TYCOM/Regional Director along with a detailed letter of request for the survey approval
signed by the CO on command letterhead. The letter of request will include all the
information regarding the loss of silver along with a copy of the ships investigative report.
The Commanding Officer should always appoint an investigative officer outside the food
service division. Only NAVSUP (SUP N423) is authorized to approve the DD Form 200.
When a missing presentation silver item which has been reported to the NCISH results in
the issuance of a Report of Findings, forward a copy of the report to NAVSUP via
TYCOM/Regional Director to place in the permanent silver file. Since loss of presentation
silver is a potential embarrassment to the Secretary of the Navy, action will be taken to
replace missing items with exact duplicates. If the manufacturer of the missing item
cannot be determined or contacted, NAVSUP N423 may be able to assist in locating silver
replacement sources. A copy of all correspondence concerning replacement of missing
presentation silver will be provided to NAVSUP N423 via Regional TYCOMs/Directors.
TYCOM must provide an endorsement letter for all survey packages submitted to
NAVSUP.
b. When a missing or destroyed item other than presentation silver is surveyed, a copy of the
completed DD Form 200 and investigation report and / or Memorandum for the Record will
be forwarded immediately in a letter of transmittal to the Curator Branch, NHHC.
However, if the loss or damage is discovered during an inventory incident to a change of
command or inactivation of the ship, the copy of the completed DD Form 200 will be
included with the inventory report.
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3304 RECOVERY OF MISSING ITEMS
1. GENERAL. In the event that a presentation silver item or other valuable gift which was
surveyed as missing is subsequently found, written notification of the recovery will be promptly
sent to the Naval Criminal Investigative Service Headquarters (if notified of the loss) and either
Naval Supply Systems Command, if a presentation silver item, or to the Curator for the Navy, if
other than a presentation silver item. The “receipt” of the recovered item will be posted to the
custody record by reversing the previous survey entry.
PART E: TURN-IN
3400 GENERAL
1. GENERAL. Except for the circumstances mentioned in this section, presentation silver will
not be transferred, loaned or removed from the ship without prior approval and disposition
instructions from NAVSUP. Except for the circumstances mentioned in this section, valuable gifts,
other than presentation silver, may not be transferred without prior approval and disposition
instructions from the Curator Branch, NHHC. Presentation silver is the property of the U.S. Navy
and cannot be authorized by the assigned ship or activity Commanding Officer to be loaned or
returned to anyone without requesting in writing via NAVSUP to UNSECNAV for approval. Direct
any loan or return inquiries to COMNAVSUPSYSCOM. Do not include presentation silver at
decommissioning ceremonies unless the loan or return has been approved. Any movement of
silver (transfer, temporary storage, etc.) must be reported and approved by NAVSUP via the
TYCOM/Regional Director.
2. LOANS TO SHIPS FROM STATE ORGANIZATIONS. Loans set up between ships and state
organizations are highly discouraged. NAVSUP N423 must approve this type of loan prior to any
transfer of silver. A letter of request must be sent to NAVSUP N423 for approval. If approved,
ships will be responsible for maintaining the silver in good condition and safeguarding the silver
from theft and damage. Ships are required to submit an annual inventory to the loaner of silver
with a copy of the inventory sent to the NAVSUP N423 Presentation Silver Manager. All
documents associated with the loan agreement must also be forwarded to NAVSUP upon
establishing the loan agreement. All costs associated with the transfer of silver are the
responsibility of the loaner of the silver not the U.S. Navy.
3401 STRIP SHIP AND PERMANENT TRANSFERS
1. GENERAL. When directed by competent authority to remove “strip ship material,” any
presentation silver or other valuable gifts on board will be transferred subject to the restrictions
indicated in the following paragraphs. Ships and submarines that are decommissioning must start
making their arrangements to transfer all their silver to either NAVSUP FLC Norfolk or NAVSUP
FLC San Diego within 60 days of notification. A written request to NAVSUP via TYCOM/Regional
Director is required for all silver transfers. TYCOMS will endorse all silver transfer requests. All
transfers of silver from decommissioning ships/submarines must be completed six months prior to
decommissioning. All decommissioning ships are highly encouraged to transfer their silver 12 to
18 months prior to decommissioning.
2. PREPARATIONS FOR SILVER STORAGE. Prior to the transfers of silver assets for
decommissioning ships/submarines each ship/submarine must ensure that their inventory
matches the master inventory file in Navy ERP. All silver for transfer must be in good condition.
Damaged or lost silver must be repaired or replaced and approved by NAVSUP prior to the turn in
or silver transfer to a NAVSUP FLC. All lost silver must be documented with an approved survey
and replaced with an identical replica prior to transfer. All transfers of silver for permanent
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storage require a joint inventory with the silver custodian or command representative and the
NAVSUP FLC Silver Custodian or appointed NAVSUP FLC representative.
3. PRESENTATION SILVER. Presentation silver, together with 8” x 10” black and white
photographs, appraisals, archive and historical documents and a copy of most recent inventory
report will be turned in when transferring silver to permanent vault storage at the nearest
NAVSUP FLC. During ship availabilities all commands should place their silver in temporary
storage with NAVSUP FLC Norfolk of NAVSUP FLC San Diego for safekeeping. To ensure
proper turn-in procedures are in place, it is recommended that the custodian of the silver contact
the storage point and/or NAVSUP for specific disposition instructions. Broken or visibly damaged
items will not be accepted for turn-in. Holders are expected to repair or survey broken/damaged
items prior to turn-in. All DD Form 200s for presentation silver require NAVSUP approval prior to
turn-in. A legible copy of the transfer document (DD 1149 or DD 1348-1-A) will be provided to
Commander, Naval Supply Systems Command, Code SUP N423, P.O. Box 2050, 5450 Carlisle
Pike, Mechanicsburg, PA 17055-0791 within 30 days of transfer. A legible copy of the receipt
document (DD 1149 or DD 1348-1-A) including the name (printed and signed), command code,
phone number of the new holding custodian, and date received will be forwarded to NAVSUP
(N423). The NAVSUP FLC prior to accepting and storing silver assets for permanent storage
must ensure that all silver is clean with no signs of damage. All silver must be repaired prior to
NAVSUP FLC accepting the silver transfer for permanent storage. NAVSUP FLC will use a
current NAVSUP ERP inventory worksheet provided by NAVSUP to check the accountability of all
silver prior to a transfer approval in order to identify missing silver. All missing silver must be
replaced prior to the completion of the silver transfer. THE NAVSUP FLC will not accept silver
collection having missing pieces or damaged silver until it is either repaired or replaced. A copy of
the NAVSUP approved survey and/or repair statement will be kept on file by NAVSUP and the
NAVSUP FLC involving silver collection within their custody.
4. NAVSUP FLC TRANSFERS (PERMANENT STORAGE). At time of transfer for all silver to
permanent storage, silver must be cleaned, undamaged and properly packaged prior to storage.
NAVSUP FLC silver custodians must not accept damaged silver or partial collections having
missing pieces of silver. At the completion of all transfers-in or transfers-out of silver the NAVSUP
FLC silver custodian will add or delete the collection from inventory and report transfer completion
to NAVSUP within three days of the transfer date. NAVSUP FLC will also provide a copy of the
signed DD 1149 to NAVSUP and retain a copy as part of the ships archive file. NAVSUP FLC
must request a current Navy ERP Presentation Silver ship inventory prior to all silver transfers to
ensure all items for transfer are properly accounted for in ERP.
5. LOSS OF SILVER. Prior to all transfers to permanent storage commands must provide
NAVSUP via their TYCOM a letter of explanation, investigative report and DD200 survey for any
lost silver. At the time of the permanent transfer commands must provide any recent surveys and
replacement silver pieces as part of the inventory to account for any lost silver. In the event that
lost silver cannot be replaced prior to the decommissioning of a ship, proof of replacement,
manufacturers silver replacement contract with funding approval and exception letter submitted to
NAVSUP via the Regional TYCOM prior to the transfer. Funds must be allocated for the silver
replica and for the cost of shipping the replaced silver to the appropriate NAVSUP FLC. These
documents must be sent to NAVSUP via the Regional TYCOM. Commands transferring
presentation silver for permanent storage must provide all documents associated with the silver
collection to include: the 1149 transfer documents, current Navy ERP silver inventory, historical
files, manufacturers invoices/receipts, appraisals, documents for repairs and photos to the
appropriate NAVSUP FLC directed as the site for permanent storage.
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6. OTHER VALUABLE GIFTS. Gifts other than presentation silver will be shipped directly to the
Naval History and Heritage Command, Curator Branch, 805 Kidder Breese Street SE,
Washington Navy Yard, DC 20374-5060.
3402 TEMPORARY VAULT STORAGE
1. GENERAL. When scheduled for a period of extended maintenance such as regular overhaul,
restricted availability, or post shakedown availability, and, in the opinion of the Commanding
Officer, the level of industrial activity will create a significant security risk, presentation silver or
other valuable gifts must be transferred for temporary vault storage to the nearest NAVSUP FLC,
or Naval Shipyard. Currently FLC Norfolk and FLC San Diego are the only two approved
locations for storage of presentation silver. All other FLCs or shipyard locations must be
approved by NAVSUP prior to transferring silver for temporary storage. A written request must be
approved by NAVSUP via the TYCOM/Regional Director prior to the movement of silver for
temporary storage. TYCOMS will endorse all silver transfers. Commands transferring silver for
temporary storage will provide a copy of the signed 1149 transfer document to NAVSUP via the
TYCOM/Regional Director and will advise NAVSUP when the presentation silver transfer is
complete. Transfer information provided will include the date of transfer, transfer document
number, activity to which transferred, and expected date of return. Inventory reports are still
required by 20 March if an annual inventory report is due. Silver must be picked up by the
command within 60 days of the completed maintenance period or sooner if the ship is in
preparations for deployment.
2. PREPARATION FOR STORAGE. Prior to storing presentation silver for temporary storage an
inventory will be conducted for all items by the ship’s presentation silver custodian and command
appointed representative. Once the inventory is completed an 1149 transfer document will be
prepared listing the silver assets to be stored. The completed inventory will accompany the 1149
which must be signed by the ship’s silver custodian and the NAVSUP FLC custodian. A copy of
the ship’s inventory and the signed 1149 must be attached to the silver container and a copy kept
on file at the NAVSUP FLC with a copy forwarded to NAVSUP via the TYCOM at the time of the
transfer. In preparation for transfer all silver will be properly cleaned, wrapped with anti-tarnish
tissue paper and silver cloth or placed in either flannel bags or silver cloth zipper bags then
wrapped with bubble wrap and packaged into a locked or sealable wood or metal container with
car seals prior to delivery to the approved NAVSUP FLC or Naval Shipyard location for shipment
and storage. Car seals will be used in sealing the container to show there has been no attempt
for access while in storage. When car seals are found to be broken while in storage a full
inventory of the container contents must be completed immediately upon discovery. All inventory
discrepancies found must be reported immediately to the command storing the silver and
NAVSUP via TYCOM/Regional Director/NAVSUP GLS.
3. SILVER STORAGE.
Ensure silver is properly prepared for stowage prior to the drop off at
the NAVSUP FLC. The silver remains under the custody of the transferring activity and NAVSUP
FLC signs only for the containers, not its contents as long as the Wood or metal containers can be
secured and are properly sealed to prevent access. Presentation silver in storage containers
without serialized seals (car seals) will not be accepted by the NAVSUP FLC. Additional
NAVSUP FLC activities may be approved for temporary storage of silver as long as all security
requirements are in place. When temporary storage is no longer required and the silver
assets/collections have been properly transferred back to the ship under the commands custody
NAVSUP N423 must be notified and provided a copy of the 1149 transfer document by the
command and NAVSUP FLC via the TYCOM/Regional Director.
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4. SILVER STORAGE MODIFICATIONS/REMOVAL. No changes are authorized to be made to
the original 1149 when any silver pieces are pulled from a collection in temporary storage. When
pieces of a silver collection are needed by the ship/submarine and taken out of temporary
storage, the original 1149 must be closed out with signatures by both parties. A new 1149 is
generated and must be completed for the silver pieces remaining in temporary storage. All silver
assets placed back into temporary storage must be re-inventoried with a new signed inventory
worksheet and a new signed 1149 attached to the silver collection with a copy provided to
TYCOM, NAVSUP FLC and NAVSUP. Silver must then be stored in a wood or metal container
with new car seals added to properly seal the container for storage.
5. TEMPORARY STORAGE INVENTORIES. Commands are still responsible for submitting
their inventory report when storing silver assets at the FLCs. Temporary silver assets that are
properly stored in approved containers with tamper-evident serialized seals and having a current
inventory in place to identify all silver assets can provide NAVSUP with a copy of their last
inventory as long as no changes have been made and the cases are still secure.
Command Letter Head
4002
DRAFTER/DOC SER #
DATE
From: Food Service Officer, USS NAVY (hull #)
To:
Commander, Naval Supply Systems Command (SUP N423)
Subj: TRANSFER OF USS NAVY PRESENTATION SILVER TO PERMANENT/TEMPORARY STORAGE
Ref:
(a) NAVSUP P486 VOL II, Chapter 3.
1. Per reference (a), this letter is submitted in request to transfer (# of assets) pieces of presentation silver
from USS Underway to Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Norfolk or FLC San Diego for temporary/permanent
vault storage due to
List reasons – No available storage, Risks of silver damage (explain), Not namesake silver,
Decommissioning, etc.
2. The following information is provided for your record:
a.
b.
Proposed date of transfer:
Transfer document number:
25 June 2011
UIC date
3. The POC is Lieutenant ; he can be reached at (000) 000-0000 or via e-mail at [email protected]
I. I. Silver
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3403 REPAIR
1. GENERAL. It is the obligation of each ship with presentation silver to provide responsible
care and upkeep of its service. The NAVSUP Silver Manager, NAVSUP FLC Norfolk or NAVSUP
FLC San Diego Silver Custodians should be contacted for assistance in obtaining repairs.
Presentation Silver in need of repair will be released only to a commercial silversmith. The DD
1149 will be annotated with the name, address and phone number of the silversmith. Upon
delivery of the presentation silver to the silversmith, the name of the recipient will be printed below
his or her signature and the date of turnover will be indicated. First line in the description block
will be: “Presentation silver, described as follows:” A copy of the itemized/receipt DD Form 1149
will be provided to the Commander, Naval Supply Systems Command, Code N423, P.O. Box
2050, 5450 Carlisle Pike, Mechanicsburg, PA 17055-0791, via the TYCOM/Regional Director
promptly upon release of the silver to the silversmith. Upon return of the silver, a copy of the
dealer’s invoice will be attached to the DD 1149 and forwarded to NAVSUP (SUP N423) via the
TYCOM/Regional Director. In either the transmittal of the DD 1149 or the DD 1149 with copy of
the dealer’s invoice, a forwarding letter is not required.
3404 TURN-IN PROCEDURES
1. TURN-IN APPROVAL. Presentation Silver on loan to a Fleet unit may be permanently turnedin provided prior written approval has been obtained from NAVSUP via the TYCOM/Regional
Director. The request for turn-in shall include a statement indicating:
a. All silver is in good condition (no damaged items)
b. There is no Financial Liability Investigation of Property Loss (DD Form 200) outstanding
c. Two individual 8” x 10” black and white photographs are on file for each item assigned
d. The silver held has been appraised and a copy of the appraisal report is available
e. Location of supporting NAVSUP FLCs (Norfolk and San Diego)
2. SILVER TURN-IN. Turn-in of presentation silver or other valuable gifts will be accomplished
by an itemized DD Form 1149 with photograph(s) attached and must cite specific NAVSUP
authority. Multiple sets of silver will be packed separately and the outside of the container
appropriately marked with the original collection name. Shipment of presentation silver covered
by this paragraph is not authorized; turn-in shall be made during a routine inport visit. When the
NAVSUP silver transfer approval letter is received, commands will transfer the silver to the
appropriate NAVSUP FLC in the proper storage containers supported by an itemized DD Form
1149 and a copy of the most recent itemized NAVSUP approved inventory report. The silver
assets on the DD Form 1149 and ships inventory must match the NAVSUP Inventory report in
NAVY ERP. NAVSUP will provide a copy of the current ERP silver inventory to the ship and the
appropriate FLC prior to the transfer to ensure all silver assets are turned in and accounted for
with no DD200 surveys pending. A copy of these documents must be submitted to NAVSUP via
the TYCOM/Regional Director at the completion of the transfer. The 1149 and inventory need to
be forwarded to Commander, Naval Supply Systems Command, Code N423, P.O. Box 2050,
5450 Carlisle Pike, Mechanicsburg, PA 17055-0791 via the TYCOM/Regional Director. DO NOT
SEND SILVER TO NAVSUP. The locations for permanent storage turn-in are NAVSUP FLC
Norfolk and NAVSUP FLC San Diego only. After NAVSUP approval, arrangements must be
made in advance with the appropriate FLC prior to the transfer of presentation silver to permanent
storage. Ships that are decommissioning are authorized to transfer their silver up to a year prior
to decommissioning. A letter report will be made to NAVSUP N423 or the Curator Branch, Naval
History and Heritage Command as appropriate. The following must be include with the silver for
transfers to permanent storage: 1149 transfer document, current Navy ERP silver inventory,
historical files, manufacturers invoices/receipts, appraisals, documents for repairs and photos to
the appropriate NAVSUP FLC directed as the site for permanent storage.
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Please contact the FLC prior to transporting silver to the below addresses.
NAVSUP FLC NORFOLK
PRESENTATION SILVER MANAGER
1968 GILBERT ST STE 600
BUILDING W-43 FLOOR 6 CODE 430
NORFOLK VA 23511-3392
NAVSUP FLC SAN DIEGO
PRESENTATION SILVER MANAGER
3985 CUMMINGS RD
BLDG 116-2D FLOOR
SAN DIEGO CA 92136
3. SHIPMENT. When authorized by proper authority, material will be properly cleaned, wrapped
with silver cloth/anti-tarnish tissue paper or placed in flannel bags then wrapped with bubble wrap
and packaged prior to delivery of the material to the supporting NAVSUP FLC or Naval Shipyard
for shipment. An itemized DD 1149 will accompany all shipments of silver. In the absence of a
supporting activity to prepare the material for shipment, every effort must be made to protect the
contents during shipment. The use of cardboard carton(s) as the external shipping container(s) is
prohibited. All silver must be shipped in a protective container or wood crate to prevent damage
during shipping. “Constant Surveillance, Signature Service Required” will be used in the shipment
of presentation silver. Prior to shipping, a declared value equaled to the appraised value, will be
made for insurance purposes. All shipping cost, associated with the transfer out or transfer in of
presentation silver loaned to organizations outside of the Navy, are the responsibility of the
organization accepting the terms of the loan agreement.
PART F: VALUABLE GIFTS AND HISTORICALLY
SIGNIFICANT ARTIFACTS
3500 GENERAL
1. Gifts other than presentation silver fall under the cognizance of the Curator of the Navy. The
Curator Branch of the Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) manages heritage assets on
behalf of the Curator of the Navy. The Curator Branch will make a determination of valuable gifts
other than presentation silver, such as ships’ sponsors’ gifts, and historically significant naval
artifacts for accession into the collections of the NHHC. The responsible individual designated in
writing by the Commanding Officer to be custodian of valuable gifts and historically significant
artifacts will be responsible for reporting these gifts to NHHC, and for adequate security, proper
display, care, and preservation of all valuable gifts and artifacts in his custody. When the
Commanding Officer assigns a new valuable gift/artifact custodian, a proper turnover of all
gift/artifact assets must be conducted. During the turnover of the valuable gift/artifact custodian
position, a full inventory must be completed documenting all missing or damaged items. The
valuable gift/artifact inventory and all surveys must be signed by both parties conducting the
inventory. All inventory discrepancies must be reported to the Curator Branch immediately
([email protected] or (202) 433-2220).
3501 CUSTODY
1. INITIAL INVENTORY REPORTS. The ship’s custodian of valuable gifts/artifacts is
responsible for maintaining records, conducting physical inventories, and submitting required
reports to the Curator Branch NHHC. An initial inventory will be submitted to NHHC for all
valuable gifts, loaned gifts from anyone such as family members (i.e. namesake of ship) or
historically significant artifacts. A presentation of valuable gifts or loaned items may consist of
one item or a number of items. Upon initial report of valuable gifts or historically significant
artifacts, the Curator of the Navy will determine if these items will be accessed into the Navy
Collections to be tracked by NHHC and a determination will be made if the valuable gift(s) or
artifact(s) may be loaned to the ship for display, care, and preservation for the ship’s service life.
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The Curator of the Navy will provide the accession number for each valuable item or items within
the collection. The following information is to be collected for each item:
• Description (including inscriptions and dimensions) and quantity of each item
• Name and address of the donor
• Accession number, a numeric or alphanumeric identification number that is assigned bthe
Curator for the Navy upon receipt of the initial inventory report
• Digital photograph of item in jpeg format
• Identification and explanation of any damaged items
• Initial inventories, annual inventories, and digital photography submissions will be sent to
[email protected]
Sample Initial Inventory Report:
OFFICIAL COMMAND LETTER HEAD
4000
DRAFTER/DOC SER #
DATE
From: Commanding Officer, USS UNDERWAY (CVN 00)
To:
Curator of the Navy, Naval History and Heritage Command, Washington, DC 20374
Subj: VALUBLE GIFTS
Ref:
(a) NAVSUP Pub 486 para. ### <insert correct reference format>
1. On 07 April 2016, the USS UNDERWAY (CVN 00) was commissioned during which the City of
Underway, New York presented the ship with several gifts. The following items are reported in
accordance with reference (a):
a. Bell.
1) “In Memory of Clark Kent”
2) City of Underway
3) USS UNDERWAY CVN 00
4) Condition: Good
5) Unknown
b. Base
1) “Original Bell of the Underway City Carillion Presented by The City of Underway by Mayor
John Smith Commemorating the Commissioning of the USS UNDERWAY CVN 00 April 7,
2016”
2) City of Underway
3) USS UNDERWAY CVN 00
4) Condition: Good
5) Unknown
2. The POC is Lieutenant Josea Williams. He may be reached at (757) 445–0000 or via e-mail at
[email protected]
G. O. NAVY
Copy to:
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2. ANNUAL INVENTORY REPORTS. An annual report of valuable gifts accessioned by the
Curator Branch NSSC and that are on loan to the ship will be made within by April 1 of each year,
however, initial and periodic appraisals are not required. Inventory reports will contain information
as described in 4-2, paragraph 3a-e.
3. LOANS FROM CURATOR OF THE NAVY. The Curator Branch NHHC will, when appropriate
loan material of historic importance to Navy ships. See http://www.history.navy.mil/getinvolved/loan-programs.html for more information.
4. SECURITY. The historical value, intrinsic worth of valuable gifts, and the continuing high level
Navy and public interest in this material requires that these gifts be maintained intact as originally
presented and safeguarded against damage or loss.
5. DISPLAY AND STOWAGE. NHHC discourages the loan of exceptionally fragile and/or
valuable gifts to Navy ships. Such items do not display or store well on board ships due to the
environmental threats such as inconsistent temperature, humidity, risk of fire, and the inherent
movement of ships’ contents.
a. SAFE DISPLAY. Contact the Curator Branch NHHC at ([email protected]) for
the recommended guidance on how to safely display the aforementioned fragile items.
b. STOWAGE. The Curator of the Navy will provide packing instructions for valuable
gifts/artifacts that the ship has on loan from NHHC and would like to return to NHHC.
Additionally, during shipyard periods, NHHC will provide packing instructions and storage
options for valuable gifts/artifacts which should not remain on board the ship during
shipyard periods.
3502 DAMAGED, MISSING OR DESTROYED ITEMS AND RECOVERY OF MISSING ITEMS
1. DAMAGED ITEMS. If a valuable gift or artifact is damaged contact the Curator Branch
immediately for a determination if the item will be returned to NHHC or if the item will be repaired
locally by a conservator identified by the Curator Branch. The item will be repaired even though
the cost to do so may not be considered economical. The cost of such repairs is the responsibility
of the command having custody of the valuable item/artifact. If an item is damaged to such an
extent that it cannot possibly be repaired (i.e., destroyed) it will be surveyed.
2. MISSING OR DESTROYED ITEMS. Other valuable gifts or artifacts which have been lost,
stolen or destroyed must be expended by means of survey in accordance with 4–4, paragraph 2ab.
3. RECOVERY OF MISSING ITEMS. In the event that a valuable gift or artifact which was
surveyed as missing is subsequently found, written notification of the recovery will be promptly
sent to the Naval Criminal Investigative Service Headquarters (if notified of the loss) and the
Curator Branch. The “receipt” of the recovered item will be posted to the custody record by
reversing the previous survey entry.
3503 TURN-IN
1. GENERAL. Except for the circumstances mentioned in this section, valuable gifts or artifacts,
other than presentation silver, may not be transferred without prior approval and disposition
instructions from the Curator for the Navy.
2. LOANS TO SHIPS FROM FAMILY MEMBERS OR ORGANIZATIONS OUTSIDE OF THE
NAVY. Although family members may loan specific items to a namesake ship (e.g. sculpture of
the likeness of the ship’s namesake), loans from family members are highly discouraged due to
continuity and accountability of the loan over the service life of a ship. When the ship is removed
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from service, oftentimes these family loans may be recalled by surviving family members or by
their descendants of deceased donors, if disposition instructions were included in the donor’s will.
3. RETURNING OTHER VALUABLE GIFTS OR ARTIFACTS TO THE CURATOR OF THE
NAVY. Valuable gifts, other than presentation silver, and artifacts will be shipped directly to the
Naval History and Heritage Command, Curator Branch, 805 Kidder Breese Street SE,
Washington Navy Yard, DC 20374-5060.
4. SHIPPING. All shipping costs, associated with the transfer of valuable gifts or artifacts loaned
by family or organizations outside of the Navy, are the responsibility of the family or organization
accepting the terms of the loan agreement. Shipping costs of returning valuable gifts/artifacts on
loan from NHHC are the responsibility of Ship’s force.
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CHAPTER 4
AFLOAT WARDROOM AND STATEROOM SERVICE
PART A: AFLOAT WARDROOM FOOD SERVICE
Introduction .......................................................................................................................4000
Background ......................................................................................................................4001
Responsibilities.................................................................................................................4002
Types of Wardroom Meal Service ...................................................................................4003
Tableware Items ...............................................................................................................4004
Dining Table Center Items................................................................................................4005
Setting the Dining Table ..................................................................................................4006
Setting the Sideboard.......................................................................................................4007
Setting for Buffet Service .................................................................................................4008
Meal Style Procedures .....................................................................................................4009
PART B: AFLOAT STATEROOM SERVICE
Introduction .......................................................................................................................4100
Care of Quarters Afloat ....................................................................................................4101
Using Culinary Specialists and Rotational Pool Personnel .............................................4102
Stateroom Care ................................................................................................................4103
Care of Private Property .................................................................................................4104
Job Scheduling ................................................................................................................4105
Additional Stateroom Cleaning ........................................................................................4106
Care of Deck Coverings ...................................................................................................4107
Carpet Care ......................................................................................................................4108
Control of Linen, Cleaning Equipment, and Supplies ......................................................4109
Personal Laundry .............................................................................................................4110
Access to Staterooms ......................................................................................................4111
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CHAPTER 4
AFLOAT WARDROOM AND STATEROOM SERVICE
PART A: AFLOAT WARDROOM FOOD SERVICE
4000 INTRODUCTION
1. AFLOAT WARDROOMS. This section is designed primarily for use in the operation of afloat
wardrooms. Procedures for performing the basic wardroom food service functions are presented
as guidelines for establishing a uniform training program. The text may also be used for selfstudy, on-the-job training, or a point of reference. However, it should be noted that wardrooms
and groups of officers have different characteristics and habits, and wardroom operations will by
necessity vary with the desires of the command, the extent of the facilities and the number of
personnel assigned. Therefore, questions regarding procedures in certain situations should be
referred to the wardroom supervisor. The information contained in this appendix has been
gathered from various sources within and outside the Navy.
4001 BACKGROUND
1. WARDROOM TYPES. There are different types of wardrooms, many types of Officer/Flag
Officer messes. Large ships may have a flag officer’s mess, a commanding officer’s mess, senior
and junior officer’s messes, and a warrant officer’s mess. Small ships may have only a single
officer’s mess. Although the types of wardroom officer messes may vary, they all have one thing
in common - the wardroom is each officer’s sea-going home; a home in which he/she should be
proud to entertain family and friends. It is their club, reading room, and occasionally conference
room. The attitude and spirit of the wardroom permeates the entire ship. The wardroom must be
an institution in its own right, and one that unites officers and creates among them the desire for
cooperation and growth. Whatever the event, it is a place where members must conduct
themselves within the ordinary rules of propriety, common sense and good manners, and
habitually observe the rules of etiquette and the customs and traditions of the Naval service. The
wardroom should exhibit the maximum in habitability regarding meal preparation and general
messes, berthing arrangements, appearance and decor, and noise level. The quality and variety
of china, silverware, linen, and equipment in the ship’s allowance list are the minimum required
and therefore must be maintained and augmented when necessary. The service of varied, wellprepared and attractively presented meals must likewise be expected and required. The
achievement of high standards of facilities and food service depends upon the cooperation of all
concerned mess members, food service personnel, and commanding officers.
4002 RESPONSIBILITIES
1. GENERAL.
The responsibilities for wardroom mess operations are a combination of
regulation, custom, and tradition. NAVSUP Publication 486, App F, contains the basic regulations
governing wardroom mess operation and procedures, and details of duties and responsibilities
for those involved in the operation of a wardroom.
2. THE COMMAND. The commanding officer is responsible for the proper operation of officer’s
messes. It cannot be expected that Culinary Specialists (CSs), other mess personnel, or young
officers on their initial assignment will assume this responsibility. The commanding officer,
directly, if he/she is president of the mess, or through the president if he/she has his/her own
mess, must not hesitate to exert positive and direct personal control if the operation or condition of
the mess so dictates. Group and division commanders, in the administration of the ships under
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their command, are responsible for ensuring that all of the officer’s messes within their command
meet established standards.
3. PRESIDENT OF THE MESS. The senior line officer in succession to command, who is a
member of the mess, normally is the president of the wardroom mess. In smaller types of ships,
the commanding officer is president; in larger ships, the executive officer is usually president.
Officers of an embarked staff are not eligible for presidency of the ship’s mess. The president
presides over the mess and is responsible for ensuring compliance with mess regulations and
with the customs and traditions of wardroom living. He/she sets the example of conduct and
behavior expected of his/her messmates and looks after the welfare of mess members.
4. WARDROOM OFFICER/TREASURER. The Mess Wardroom Officer/Treasurer is appointed
by the commanding officer for the wardroom mess. He/she may also be assigned the
responsibilities and duties of mess caterer when considered appropriate. The mess treasurer
shall keep accounts of and transact all receipts and expenditures of cash and provisions. Officers
charged with the custody or disbursement of public funds and members of embarked staffs are
not eligible for the office of mess treasurer. The mess treasurer shall render a statement of the
mess account to the members as of the end of each month and be able to produce the books of
the mess whenever called for by the commanding officer or the executive officer.
5. MEMBERS. The members of the wardroom mess are individually and collectively responsible
for adherence to wardroom customs and traditions and their own habits of neatness. All officers
regularly attached to the command normally are members of
the appropriate mess. Officers
attached for temporary duty in excess of 30 days should join the mess. Officers attached for less
than 30 days need not join the mess but shall be accorded the comforts of the mess on a
reimbursement basis. Civilian personnel embarked are not eligible for mess membership.
However, if they are of a status equivalent to naval officers, they shall be accorded the comforts of
the mess on a per diem basis. All wardroom mess members are solely responsible for the care,
maintenance and orderliness of their personal effects. Sorting and storage of personal laundry is
the responsibility of the individual officer.
6. SUPPLY OFFICER. Organizationally, the facilities, equipment, and personnel of officers’
country are under the administration of the supply officer. He/she, therefore, must maintain
particularly close liaison with the officials and members of the mess. The supply officer is
responsible for providing the consumable supplies, soft goods, and laundry and cleaning services
available on the ship for the proper operation of the mess. Because of the supply officer’s
organizational responsibilities in the wardroom, commanding officers may consider the
advantages of assigning the collateral duty of mess caterer the Wardroom Officer to the supply
officer. Appointment of the food service officer is especially advantageous for those ships whose
officers subsist primarily from the general mess. It should be realized, however, that a Supply
Corps Officer reporting for his/her first tour of duty in a ship with only one supply officer will have
all he/she can do to master his/her own department. Therefore, assignment as mess caterer
Wardroom Officer should be deferred for at least a year.
7. CULINARY SPECIALISTS. Wardroom Culinary Specialists are responsible for performing
and supervising functions associated with the management and operation of officers’ messes and
quarters afloat. Food preparation, service and the cleaning and maintenance of these and related
spaces are the responsibility of this rating. Culinary Specialists are also assigned to supervise
the work of rotational pool personnel who work in the food service and quarters areas.
8. ROTATIONAL POOL. Rotational pool personnel are assigned to assist Culinary Specialists in
providing services. All personnel in pay grades E-1 and E-3 will be eligible for assignment to the
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rotational pool. Petty officers shall not be detailed to rotational pools except when personnel E-3
and below are not available. The duties normally assigned to rotational pool personnel include
stateroom housekeeping, maintenance and cleaning of officers’ country, passageways and
heads, food service maintenance, and cleaning and scullery duties. Rotational pool personnel
may also be used to provide support service to include wardroom service and food preparation
efforts when it is impractical to rely solely on CS personnel.
4003 TYPES OF WARDROOM MEAL SERVICE
1. GENERAL. Normally family style is the most popular meal service provided in wardroom
messes afloat. Specific wardroom design, number of food service personnel, and the desires of
the mess president and the commanding officer, in many cases determine the type of service to
be used. However, regardless of which style of service is used, it must be executed properly.
The success of the best written menu and preparation efforts depend on how the food is served.
There is a proper sequence to be observed in good food service. Good food service begins
before the seating of wardroom members. It depends very much on advanced planning and
proper preparation.
2. TWO BASIC MEAL STYLES. The two basic meal styles are “formal” and “informal,” with
variations within each style. Different aspects of these styles will be discussed along with the
peculiarities of each.
a. Formal Service. Formal meal service includes the semi-formal style and the formal style
of “French” service. This type of meal requires more advanced planning, detailed
preparation, and elaborate tableware than any of the other styles. For these reasons, this
style is usually conducted only in commanding and flag officers’ messes and is normally
used for occasions involving the entertainment of special guests. The reference rules for
this meal are covered more completely in the reference book entitled “Service Etiquette.”
Interpretation and application of these rules or guidelines for any officer’s mess afloat will
usually be done by the senior CS in association with the mess president and/or treasurer.
b. Semi-Formal Service. This modification of the formal style service is used much more
often. For example, it may be used daily in commanding and flag officers’ messes if there
are no guests. The preparation and service of this meal are not as elaborate as the
formal style and require less time, facilities and personnel. The individual place settings
are similar to those used for the informal meal styles. Few center items are used other
than salt and pepper shakers, sugar bowls, and creamers.
The method of serving meal items is what distinguishes semi-formal from informal meal
styles. In the semi-formal style, each food item is arranged on a separate serving dish in
the pantry and then offered to each diner. Beginning with the meat or main course, each
course is carried into the wardroom separately. The courses are presented to each diner
in turn, starting with the head of the table, the senior guest, or the individual designated by
a buck. Each diner selects desired items from the serving dishes and places them on
his/her plate while the serving dish is held. Serving dishes are returned to the pantry after
their contents have been offered to all the diners.
3. INFORMAL SERVICE. Several types of informal service are used in the typical wardroom
messes. Each has its own advantages, but all are faster and more convenient to use than the
formal styles. Those currently in use are called family, American, a la carte, cafeteria, and buffet
styles.
a. Family Style. For this style of service, food is arranged in serving dishes, along with the
use of serving utensils. The dishes are then placed on the dining table and diners serve
themselves, and then pass the dishes around the table until all diners have been served.
The CS replenishes serving dishes as necessary and provides beverage service. Dessert
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b.
c.
d.
e.
items may be brought in and placed on the sideboard and served by the CS/rotational pool
personnel when the main course items have been removed from the dining table.
American Style. This type of service is used in most restaurants. The main course plate
is not part of the initial place setting. Instead, individual plates are prepared in the pantry
or galley and placed before the seated diners. This form of meal service is often provided
in officers’ messes in medium-sized ships and is often combined with other, traditional
forms of service. In American service, food is placed on plates in the galley and taken to
the wardroom and served to each diner.
A la Carte (Breakfast) Style. This type of service is usually provided at breakfast. As with
the American style, the main plate is not part of the initial plate setting. Instead, the diner
is given a menu or breakfast order form. After the diner has decided what food he or she
wants and how it is to be prepared, the order is delivered to the pantry or galley and the
food is prepared as requested. It is placed on a plate and served to the diner as the
American style of service.
Cafeteria Style. This is the type of service that is used aboard some larger ships (i.e.,
carriers, tenders, etc.). The diner does not normally serve himself/herself, rather, the diner
selects the desired items and the food service attendant places them on his/her plate. For
example, salads, desserts, and some side dishes may be apportioned in dishes; and the
diner simply takes them from the serving line. The main course, vegetables, starches, and
meat, are portioned onto a plate by the food server as the diner selects them.
Buffet Style (Self-Serve). Although buffet service is listed under informal style service, it
may also be used on formal occasions. The requirements for formal use, as for all formal
service, may be obtained from the references listed under formal meal style. For both
formal and informal use, this type of service can be used when either space or serving
personnel is limited, and this is the preferred method of service to reduce workload. The
food is attractively arranged on a sideboard or serving table and the diners serve
themselves. It is customary to place silverware and other necessary dishes on the dining
table so that the diners do not have to carry them.
4004 TABLEWARE ITEMS
1. TABLEWARE. Tableware items used for arranging individual place settings are listed and
discussed below. See Figures 4-1 through 4-9 for the display of all tableware items. Some ship
wardroom facilities may not have such infrequently used items such as pickle forks or egg cups,
but these items are presented to familiarize food service personnel with them.
a. Main Course Knife. The largest meal knife is always set for lunch and dinner meals.
b. Breakfast Knife. This is always set for breakfast and brunch. It is similar in shape to the
main course knife but is slightly smaller.
c. Bread and Butter Knife. This is used only at lunch and dinner meals when bread is to be
served. It is the same size as the breakfast knife, but has straight edges and a blunt tip.
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Figure 4-1
Figure 4-2
d. Main Course Fork. This is always set for lunch and dinner meals. It is largest of the
eating forks. It is also used for serving meats, starches, and some vegetables.
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e. Dessert/Breakfast Fork. This is always set for breakfast or brunch. It is also set at dinner
or lunch when dry desserts such as cake or pie are to be served. This fork is similar in
shape to the main course fork but is slightly smaller.
f. Salad Fork. This is used only at lunch or dinner when salad is to be served. It has four
short tines, one of which is slightly wider than the other three and has a notch or
indentation at the end.
g. Oyster Fork. This is used only at lunch or dinner when oysters or shrimp cocktails are to
be served. It is slightly smaller than the salad fork and has only three tines. One of the
two outer tines is wider than the other and is notched at the end.
Figure 4-3
h. Teaspoon. The teaspoon is set for every meal. It is similar in size and shape to the
common household teaspoon.
i. Iced Tea Spoon. The iced tea spoon is set at lunch or dinner when iced tea or coffee is to
be served. It has a smaller bowl and a longer handle than the teaspoon.
j. Soup Spoon. The soup spoon is set at lunch and dinner when hearty soups or bouillon is
to be served in the soup plate. It is slightly longer than the teaspoon with an almost round
bowl.
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k. Dessert/Cereal Spoon. The dessert/cereal spoon is set at breakfast or brunch when
cereal is to be served. It is also set at lunch or dinner when frozen, jelled or liquid dessert
is to be served. The spoon is similar in shape to the teaspoon but is somewhat larger.
l. Bouillon Spoon. The bouillon spoon is set for lunch and dinner when the bouillon cup is to
be used. It has a round bowl and is smallest of the eating spoons.
m. Main Course Plate. The main course plate is set when lunch or dinner is to be served in
either semi-formal or family style. It is not set for American, a la carte, cafeteria, or buffet
style meals. The dinner plate is the largest meal plate.
n. Breakfast Plate. The breakfast plate is used for breakfast or brunch. Because these
meals are normally served a la carte or buffet style, the breakfast plate is usually not set
as a part of the cover. It is slightly smaller than the main course plate but is the same
shape. The breakfast plate can be used as an under-liner for soup (if a soup plate is to be
used in serving).
o. Bread and Butter Plate. The bread and butter plate is set when bread, toast, and butter
are to be served at lunch or dinner. It is the smallest flat plate. At breakfast it is used to
deliver individual servings of toast and butter. If rolls or doughnuts are to be served at
breakfast, bread and butter plates are stacked in the center of the table next to the cereal
bowls.
p. Dessert/Salad Plate. The dessert/salad plate is set with individual servings when salad is
to be served at lunch or dinner. It is also used to serve pies, cakes, or other dry desserts
after the main course has been completed. If shrimp cocktail is to be served in a sherbet
cup, the cup is placed on this plate. The dessert/salad plate is smaller than the breakfast
plate.
q. Coffee Cup and Saucer. This coffee cup and saucer are set for every meal. Normally, the
cup is placed upside down on the saucer. The diner turns it over when he/she is ready to
be served.
r. Demitasse Cup and Saucer. This cup and saucer are set when demitasse, a strong, rich
coffee, is to be served at lunch or dinner. These items are shaped similar to the coffee
cup and saucer, but are slightly smaller. The cup is placed upside down until the diner is
ready to be served.
s. Bouillon Cup. The bouillon cup is set at lunch and dinner when bouillon is to be served.
Note, however, that bouillon may also be served in the soup plate at the discretion of the
wardroom supervisor or the mess president. The cup is similar in size and shape to the
coffee cup except that is has two handles. The coffee saucer is used with the bouillon
cup.
t. Sherbet Cup. The sherbet cup is a glass cup used to serve liquid desserts
or
shrimp
cocktail at lunch or dinner. It is always served on a dessert plate.
u. Egg Cup. The egg cup is a small china cup without handles used to serve hard cooked
eggs at breakfast or brunch. It is used with a coffee cup saucer.
v. Dessert/Cereal Bowl. The dessert/cereal bowl is used at lunch or dinner when jellied,
frozen, or liquid desserts are to be served and at breakfast or brunch when cereal is to be
served. At breakfast, when hot or cold cereal is to be served, the dessert/cereal bowl is
placed in stacks of four or five along with the dining table center items. At lunch or dinner,
when jellied, frozen, or liquid desserts are to be served, the dessert/cereal bowl is placed
before the diner after the main course plate has been removed. It may also be used with a
tablespoon as a center item for serving horseradish, sour cream, applesauce, or similar
condiments. It is smaller than the soup bowl.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
w. Soup Plate. The soup plate is used when hearty soup is to be served. It may also be
used for bouillon. It is usually filled and brought from the pantry after the diners are
seated. The soup plate is a shallow plate which is slightly deeper and wider than the
dessert/cereal bowl. It is the larger of the two.
Figure 4-4
x. Beverage Glass. The beverage glass is set for lunch or dinner when milk, iced tea or
coffee, or other chilled beverages are to be served. It is a 10-ounce glass and is taller and
narrower than the water glass.
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y. Water Glass. The water glass is set for lunch or dinner unless another chilled beverage is
to be served. It is a 10-ounce glass and is used only for water. It is wider and shorter than
the beverage glass.
z. Juice Glass. The juice glass is normally used only at breakfast. It is not set but is used to
serve juice when ordered by the diner. It is the smallest glass and contains 6 ounces.
Figure 4-5
4005 DINING TABLE CENTER ITEMS
1. GENERAL. Tableware items commonly placed in the center of the dining table are listed
and discussed below. These items include standard items that are typically used at every meal
and related items which may be included on the basis of menu
requirements.
2. STANDARD CENTER ITEMS. The standard center items listed below are normally set for all
meals.
a. Sugar Bowl. The sugar bowl is a small, silver, oval-shaped container with a short pedestal
stand and lid. It is always set with a sugar spoon.
b. Salt and Pepper Shakers. The salt and pepper shakers may be all silver or they may be
glass with silver tops. The salt should always be kept loose and dry, and both shakers
should always be at least 3/4 full when placed on the dining table.
c. Coffee Cream Pitcher. The coffee cream pitcher is similar in size and shape to the sugar
bowl, but has a spout and no top.
d. Centerpiece. Most ships consider some type of centerpiece as standard. The centerpiece
usually consists of a silver fruit bowl containing either fresh or artificial fruit for breakfast or
fresh or artificial flowers for lunch or dinner.
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e. The Buck. A buck is normally a small object, such as a statue, a model or a dummy
weapon round, which is used aboard some ships to designate which diner, is to be served
first. The buck is not used at breakfast, at brunch, or when guests are to be served.
Figure 4-6
3. MEAL-RELATED CENTER ITEMS. The meal-related center items listed below and shown in
Figure 4-7 are set at the indicated meals if the food items for which they are used are listed in the
menu.
a. Cereal Cream Pitcher. The cereal cream pitcher is shaped like a small beverage pitcher
with a modified hour glass design. It has a handle on one side and a capacity of 16
ounces. It is set only for breakfast or brunch when cereal is to be served.
b. Syrup Pitcher. The syrup pitcher is similar in size and shape to the coffee cream pitcher
except that the pouring spout is partially enclosed by a metal lip. It is set only for breakfast
or brunch when pancakes or waffles are to be served. It is placed on a coffee cup saucer.
c. Silver Fruit Bowl. The silver fruit bowl is a large hollow bowl. It is used for serving fresh
fruit for breakfast or brunch and is also set as a centerpiece containing artificial or real fruit
for breakfast or artificial or real flowers for lunch or dinner.
d. Bread Tray. The bread tray is a rectangular silver dish with rounded ends and perforated
sides. It is used primarily for breads, but it may also be used for relishes such as carrot or
celery sticks. When used for breads, an opened napkin is placed in the tray; the bread is
neatly arranged on the napkin and folded over the bread to retain freshness and warmth.
e. Cruet and Caster. The cruet and caster consists of two stopper glass bottles placed on a
small tray. The bottles hold oil and vinegar salad dressings when salads are served at
lunch or dinner.
f. Butter Dish. The butter dish is a small, rectangular china dish with rounded corners. It
may be used at all meals for serving butter patties. At breakfast or brunch, it may be used
for serving jam or jelly packets.
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g. Pickle Fork. The pickle fork is used only at lunch or dinner when pickles or other relishes
are served. It is placed on the relish (bread) tray.
Figure 4-7
4006 SETTING THE DINING TABLE
1. GENERAL. Setting the dining table involves two basic tasks: setting individual place settings
and setting the dining table center items. Linen placement should be completed before setting the
dining table. This section lists the steps for selecting and placing individual place settings and
dining table center items for specific menus and styles of meal service. Variations in the
procedures may occur, depending on
the way in which a specific general mess is equipped
and on the desires of the mess president and/or the wardroom supervisor. For instance, if there
is a lack of a certain type of needed tableware, the wardroom supervisor should be asked to
decide what items should be used as substitutes.
2. SETTING INDIVIDUAL PLACE SETTINGS. Individual place settings, often called “covers”
are set following the placement of linen. For sanitary reasons, it is important to remember to not
handle tableware on “eating” surfaces. Handle silverware only by the handles, and handle plates,
dishes and serving ware by the edges and/or handles. The sequence of steps involved in setting
individual place settings is outlined below.
a. Determine the Meal Style and Number of Diners. Information concerning the
specific
meal style and the expected number of diners is obtained from the wardroom supervisor.
b. Plan the Place Setting. There are two basic place settings: one for breakfast or brunch
and one for lunch or dinner. The basic breakfast/brunch place setting (Figure 4-8) includes
a breakfast fork, a breakfast knife, a teaspoon, a coffee cup and saucer, and an order
form, if available. The basic dinner setting (Figure 4-9) includes a main course plate, a
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coffee cup and saucer, a main course fork, a main course knife, and a teaspoon.
Modifications to the basic place settings, based on specific meal service and menu
requirements, are discussed below.
c. Breakfast. Breakfast or brunch is normally served a la carte or buffet style. For a la carte
style, each diner’s meal is served with whichever cover items are offered. For buffet style,
the diner obtains his/her own items. If cereal is to be served, the dessert/cereal spoon is
set to the outside of the teaspoon.
d. Lunch/Dinner. The basic lunch/dinner setting applies to informal service. If soup or
shrimp cocktail is being served, the breakfast plate is set as a serving plate. For
cafeteria/buffet, a la carte, and American style meals, the main course plate is not set.
Other changes in the basic settings are based on specific menu requirements. Check
each item on the menu to determine if a specific item of individual tableware is required.
As a general rule, only six pieces of silverware should be set for any one meal, but the
oyster fork may be set as a seventh item. Normally, if more than six items are required,
each additional piece must be set with its related meal item. For example, if six items are
already planned and dessert is to be served, place the dessert fork or spoon in the proper
place on the table when serving the dessert.
e. Obtain Tableware. Based on the plan for each place setting, obtain enough tableware
from the sideboard to arrange a place setting for each diner. If there are not enough seats
for the expected number of diners, arrange extra individual tableware on the sideboard,
unless a buffet is being served. Place the dessert fork or spoon in the proper place on the
table when serving the dessert. For a buffet follow the procedures for placing silverware
on the dining table or serving line as described in that section.
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Figure 4-8
Figure 4-9
4007 SETTING THE SIDEBOARD
1. GENERAL. Most wardrooms are equipped with a waist-high cabinet known as the sideboard.
Its storage spaces are used for storing wardroom linen and tableware, and the top forms a
counter for the placement of beverage services and extra tableware in preparation for a meal.
The sideboard may also be used for a buffet serving line on ships where the use of a separate
buffet table is not practical. This latter use is discussed in “Setting the Buffet Serving Line.” The
steps to be followed in preparing the sideboard for all other meals are outlined below.
2. SETTING UP THE HOT BEVERAGE SERVICE. The principal hot beverage used aboard
ship is coffee. Hot tea or hot chocolate may also be used if desired by wardroom members. The
hot beverage service should be set up following placement of the linen on the sideboard. The
steps outlined below will guide beverage service set-up.
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a. Set Up Coffee. Take coffee pots (one each per 10-12 diners) from the sideboard to the
pantry and obtain enough coffee for the meal. Place the pots on the sideboard coffee
warmers. Select at least one coffee pitcher for each dining table and place on the linen
next to the coffee warmers. Coffee servers should be filled just before serving and should
not be placed on the warmers.
b. Set Up Hot Tea or Chocolate. Place hot water in a coffee pot and set on the coffee
warmer. Arrange tea serving pots next to the warmer. The number of tea pots will be
determined by the wardroom supervisor or through experience. Tea bags and/or hot
chocolate packets should be placed next to the serving pots.
3. SETTING UP EXTRA TABLEWARE
a. Determine Extra Tableware Requirements. The required amount of extra tableware will
normally be determined by the wardroom supervisor. Considerations that may influence
the amount of extra tableware required include occasional breakage of china during meals
and the possibility of unexpected diners. Additionally, if a second seating of diners is
required due to limited wardroom seating capacity, sufficient tableware should be placed
on the sideboard to permit quick resetting of the dining tables after the first seating has
finished.
b. Place the Extra Tableware. Obtain and neatly place all necessary items on the covered
portion of the sideboard. Dishes and bowls may be stacked several high. Cups and
glasses should not be stacked, especially during rough seas. Silverware should be
arranged by type and napkins should be pre-folded and stacked near the silverware.
4. SETTING UP THE COLD BEVERAGE SERVICE
a. Obtain Cold Beverage. Take serving pitchers from the sideboard to the pantry. Water will
be made available even if another beverage is to be served. Water and other cold
beverages are pre-chilled in the pantry and the glasses filled and placed on the table just
before announcing the meal.
b. Prepare Fruit Juices for Breakfast. If fruit juices are called for in the breakfast menu, a
galley serving pan insert should be filled with enough ice to cover half the height of the
glasses and then placed on the sideboard. The juice glasses are then filled to the bulge
with juice and placed in the ice to cool.
4008 SETTING FOR BUFFET SERVICE
1. GENERAL. Buffet service is like cafeteria-style service in that foods are placed in serving
pans on a serving line or table. The main difference between the two styles is that buffet diners
serve themselves, while cafeteria diners are served by food service personnel. In either case, the
food is attractively arranged on a sideboard or on a separate serving table. The area to be
selected for the serving line set-up will depend on the amount of space available in the wardroom.
The wardroom supervisor or the mess caterer should be asked for their buffet-style preference
before setting up the buffet serving line.
Buffet service has the advantage of reducing service personnel with the disadvantage of
possible food waste. Buffets make it possible to display food attractively and are useful in
providing fast service. Buffets are also good for handling large numbers of people who wish to
eat at different times.
Sanitation is an important consideration in preparing and serving all meals. It becomes
especially critical in the set-up and operation of buffet or cafeteria serving lines. Open serving
pans and trays provide ideal sites for the growth and spread of disease-carrying organisms.
Observing a few simple rules can greatly reduce the chance of infection. Hot foods should always
be held for service at temperatures 140° F or higher and cold foods held for service at
temperatures 41° F or lower. If these temperatures cannot be maintained, the food should be
discarded within four hours of the beginning of preparation. Only limited amounts of food should
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be displayed on the serving line at any one time, permitting the balance of the food to be kept in
the pantry for easier temperature control. Serving pans and trays may be refilled as necessary.
Finally, a sneeze shield should be used whenever possible.
The principle tasks involved in setting up the buffet serving line are presented below and the
serving line set-up tasks should be done in the order listed and should be completed five minutes
before serving time.
2. INITIAL PREPARATIONS
a. Obtain Space for the Buffet Serving Line. This is often done by setting up a separate
buffet table. Where space is limited, the counter space on the sideboard is used for the
buffet serving line. If a buffet table is used, it should be located both to allow CSs
convenient access to the pantry for filling the serving pans and to allow diners to easily
use the serving line without being crowded by furniture or other diners. If the sideboard
area is to be used, it should first be cleared of all non-essential items.
b. Placement of Linen. This should be done in accordance with the guidelines in the section
of “Linen.”
c. Set Up the Chafing Dish Stands. The chafing dish stand is composed of a stand or
framework and a pan, which is set on the stand. Enough stands should be set up so that
there is at least one for each food item served. They should be placed in the serving area
so that a diner can have ready access to them without leaning over the table. Sufficient
space should be left at the beginning of the serving line for the placement of plates,
silverware and napkins and at the end of the serving line for dessert items. After the
chafing dish pans have been set in place, one inch of water is put into those pans that will
be used for hot food. Sterno heating units are then placed below the center of the pans
containing water. Ensure that there are no flammable items placed near these units as the
set-up continues. Do not light the heating units at this time.
d. Place the Sneeze Shield. If a sneeze shield is available, put it in place. Ensure that all
food items to be served will be protected by this shield and that diners still have ready
access to the foods.
e. Place Necessary Eating Utensils on the Buffet Table. Determine what plates, bowls and
other eating utensils will be needed to arrange these items neatly at the beginning of the
serving line.
f. Place dinner plates and other china next to the chafing dish stands, but not so close that
diners could burn their hands picking them up. Do not stack china so high that it becomes
unstable and thus presents a danger, especially in rough seas.
g. Napkins and silverware are usually placed on dining tables. However, at times when there
are more diners than seats, additional place settings will be kept on the sideboard and
placed on the dining table as diners finish and depart. If there are not enough CSs to do
the resetting, the napkins and silverware are to be placed on the buffet serving line next to
the china and on the side away from the chafing dish stands.
h. Arrange Decorations on Serving Table. Decorations will be designated by the wardroom
supervisor. Decorations will usually consist of artificial or real flowers placed around the
three sides of the serving area facing the diner. They should not be placed near the
heating units or positioned so that diners could easily knock them off the table. It may be
necessary to pin the decorations to the tablecloth so that they do not become a fire hazard
or interfere with serving during rough sea conditions.
i. Lunch or Dinner with Guests. A buck is not used if guests are present. If there is only one
guest, he or she will be served first; the diner to the right of the guest is served next, and
so on around the dining table. If there are two or more guests, the guest of the senior
officer is served first; the person to the right of the guest is served next, and so on around
the table.
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3. DELIVERY OF FOOD TO THE DINING TABLE
a. Foods are delivered to the dining table in various combinations of three basic methods:
1) Individual service;
2) Table service; and,
3) Self-service.
The various meal styles typically employ combinations of these three methods. The
special characteristics of these methods are discussed below.
b. Individual Service. Individual service involves serving foods directly to each diner, either
by delivering single portions on individual plates or by presenting platters or serving dishes
with utensils to each diner to permit self-service. Individual service is always done from
the diner’s left. Plates are normally placed on the table with your left hand while your right
hand is held behind your back. In rough seas, you may grasp the back of the diner’s chair
for stability. The proper way of offering platters or serving dishes is to stand to the left of
the diner and lower the serving dish with the left hand until the diner can easily serve
himself/herself. The left hand should not rest on the table unless required for stability
during rough seas. The right hand is held behind the back or is used to offer serving
utensils.
c. Table service. Table service involves the careful placement of filled serving utensils
directly on the dining table. Food items are then passed around the table for each diner to
serve themselves.
d. Self-Service. Self-service is normally limited to buffet and cafeteria style meals. Each
diner takes their food from a serving line to the table.
4009
MEAL STYLE PROCEDURES
1. FORMAL STYLE. As mentioned within the section on wardroom meal service, the
requirements for serving this style are quite elaborate and are open to much variation between
general messes. For these reasons, the serving of this style of meal is not described here.
2. SEMI-FORMAL STYLE. In this style of individual service, each item of food is brought to the
dining table and offered to each diner. Serving dishes, other than the main course item, are
placed on serving trays before they are brought into the dining areas. To prevent the serving
dishes from sliding, a clean damp cloth should be placed on the tray.
When all diners are seated, individual servings of the first course, soup and/or salad or shrimp
cocktail are brought to the dining table and placed on the service plate in front of the diner. If both
salad or shrimp cocktail and soup are to be served, the salad or shrimp cocktail is set on the table
before the diners arrive and the soup is served after the diners have been seated. The order of
delivery to the diners will be according to the rules specified previously. When the diners have
finished the first course and the used china (including the service plate and silverware) has been
removed, the main course items are served. Each food item will be in a separate serving dish
and will be served in the following order:
a. The entrée, or meat dish, is arranged on a meat platter and comes first. Serving utensils,
usually a tablespoon and a main course fork are carried in the right hand while the platter
is carried in the left. The platter and serving utensils are offered on the left side of the first
diner to be served. When the first diner has served himself/herself, he/she replaces the
serving utensils on the platter, which is then offered to the next diner. There should be no
need to touch the serving utensils again unless a diner leaves them in an awkward
position for the next diner.
b. The starch food item comes next. It is served in an appropriate serving dish carried on a
serving tray. The tray is carried in the left hand and the serving utensils, a tablespoon and
main course fork, are carried in the right hand. They are offered to the first diner in the
same manner as the entrées.
c. The vegetable comes next and is served in the same manner as the starchy food.
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d. The gravy or sauce is served last unless it is to be used only for the meat. If so, it is
served immediately after the meat. The gravy boat is also placed upon a serving tray.
The tray is carried in the left hand and the ladle in the right. Both are offered to the first
diner to be served. The ladle should then be kept in the gravy boat as it is offered to other
diners.
This type of service is best accomplished when there are four servers at each table, so that
each person can be responsible for serving only one item. Fewer personnel can do this type
of service if there are not many diners to be served.
When two or more persons are serving the food and a serving dish is close to being emptied,
the server should quickly return to the pantry for a refill.
While this is happening, serving should stop until the refilled dish has been presented to the
next diner. To prevent long delays in service, a space of two or three diners should be
maintained between servers.
e. When all diners have been served the main course, bread and/or rolls and butter can be
brought to the dining table and placed in the center. The amount will be determined by the
wardroom supervisor. Refills of food items are seldom available during a semi-formal
meal, but if a diner asks for seconds, the wardroom supervisor will decide if the request
can be granted.
f. If dessert is to be served, it will be served to diners in the same order as the other food
items after all the main course tableware has been removed from the table. Each diner is
offered the dessert and is not served unless he or she replies in the affirmative.
3. INFORMAL MEAL STYLES
a. Family Style. As with the semi-formal style, food items are delivered to the dining table in
appropriate serving dishes after the diners are seated. However, for family style service,
the serving dishes are placed on the dining table and are not delivered or offered to each
diner as is done in semi-formal service. The food items should be delivered to the dining
table in the same order as for semi- formal; that is, the entrée should be placed first,
starchy food second, the vegetable third, and the gravy or sauce last. The number of
serving dishes placed at each table will be determined by the wardroom supervisor.
Once all the serving dishes have been placed, they should be carefully watched so that
they may be refilled when needed. When refills are obtained from the pantry or galley, the
serving dish should be returned to the same place it was picked up. If soups or salads are
to be served at a family style meal, they usually are individually portioned and may be set
in place before the diners arrive. Desserts are served by presenting them to the individual,
as is done for the semi-formal style of meal.
Bread and/or rolls and butter will be placed on the table. The quantity will be determined
by the wardroom supervisor.
b. American Style. For this style of meal, foods are portioned on individual plates in the
pantry or galley and then delivered to the diners. Food is served in the sequence
previously described. Plates should be delivered to the dining table in the order in which
they have been prepared so that the food presented to the diners is as warm as possible.
Salads and/or soups are also served either by presenting them individually or by placing
them on the table before diners arrive. Once the dinner plates have been placed, bread
and rolls and butter will be put on the table in the same manner as for semi-formal style
meals. The dessert service will also be the same as for the semi-formal style in which
each diner is offered a serving.
c. A la Carte (Breakfast) Style. A la carte means “in accordance with the menu.” This style
of service is most often used at breakfast. Since diners enter the general mess at various
times for breakfast, the order of service is simply “first-come, first-served.” As diners seat
themselves, offer them menus and/or breakfast order forms. When it appears that a diner
has made their selection, return and ask if they are ready to order. If so, take the order
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and make sure all ordered items and instructions for their preparation are clearly identified
(e.g., whether or not eggs are to be prepared sunny-side up or easy over). The order form
is coded to identify the diner (i.e. Seat 6 at Table A) and is then delivered to the pantry
where it is placed in sequence on an order board. The wardroom supervisor will describe
how the order forms are to be coded and where they are to be placed. While the main
course is being prepared in the pantry, begin serving the other ordered items. The first
item to be delivered, after coffee has been offered, will be fruit or fruit juice. Next, hot or
cold cereals, if ordered, should be brought to the diner. Quite often, cold cereals are made
available in the center of the dining table along with cereal bowls. In this case, a server
must make sure that a filled cereal cream pitcher and sugar bowl are available. After this
has been done, place butter and syrup next to the diners who have ordered pancakes or
other such items. As the diner completes the cereal, check the pantry for the diner’s next
course. The eggs, pancakes, or other cooked items should not be delivered until the diner
has finished or nearly finished with the previous course of fruit or cereal. Toast, if ordered,
should be taken to the diner immediately after the main hot course has been delivered.
Cereal and fruit dishes should be removed if the diner has finished with them before the
main course is delivered.
d. Cafeteria Style. In this style of meal service, the CS stands behind the serving line and
serves individual portions of each food item at the diner’s request. All food items are
usually available on the serving line or are already in place on the dining table. Thus, this
style of meal is quite efficient, requiring relatively few serving personnel. Once diners
have been served from the serving line, the dining tables must be attended so that
beverages may be served and tableware removed as diners finish.
Place settings should be reset if there are to be more diners than space is available at one
seating. In this case, as a diner finishes the meal, the place at the table should be cleared
quickly and silverware, napkin, beverage glass, and other needed items replaced as
quietly as possible so as not to disturb other diners. However, before removing tableware,
it is best to check with the departing diner to make sure that he is through eating. The
diner may merely be returning to the serving line for more food. If this is the case, remove
only the empty used plates from this place setting and leave everything else as it is.
For cafeteria style service, the serving line is usually kept open throughout the meal
period, unless the wardroom supervisor decides differently. No matter how long the line is
kept open, it is important that sanitary conditions be maintained by keeping foods at proper
temperatures and cleaning up spills as they occur.
e. Buffet Style (Self-Serve). This type of service, as with cafeteria style, requires relatively
few personnel. Food is arranged on the serving line and the diners serve themselves.
The primary tasks are to keep enough food in the serving dishes and to keep the serving
area tidy. As hot food items are nearly depleted on the serving line, go to the pantry or
galley and place more portions of this food on a plate, return to the serving line, and neatly
place the food onto the correct serving pan or dish. Cold food items may be refilled in the
same manner, or the entire serving pan or dish may be replaced by a filled one. Refilling
should be done as smoothly as possible and with minimal disturbances to diners. To
prevent the entire serving line from halting, try not to replace all items at the same time.
In addition to the serving line, the dining tables also must be attended in the fashion
described for cafeteria style meals. Thus, food items such as bread and butter should be
refilled, beverages served, and place settings replaced as needed. Finally, desserts may
be included on the buffet serving line or they may be served individually after diners have
finished the main course. The wardroom supervisor will decide how dessert is to be
served.
4. SERVING BEVERAGES. Presented below are four general guidelines and several specific
procedures for serving beverages.
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a. The first guideline is that beverages are to be served from the diner’s right if at all possible.
Otherwise, check with the wardroom supervisor about how to serve the beverages in a
way which disturbs the least number of diners.
b. The second guideline is that the server should never lift the diner’s glasses or cups from
the dining table to refill them. Rather, the server should pour the beverage into them while
they are on the table. If the cup or glass is not conveniently placed for service, carefully
move it to a better location, or, if it cannot be reached, politely ask the diner to move it.
c. The third guideline is that the order of service for beverages is the same as that for the
serving of foods:
At breakfast, order of service is not a problem, since diners enter at random and are
served on the first-come, first-served basis.
At lunch or dinner when no guests are present, the head of the table or the diner who has
the buck in front of them will be served first. The diner to the right will be served next and
so on around the table.
If one guest is present, this guest will be served first, followed by the diner on the guest’s
right, and so on around the table. If more than one guest is present, the guest of the
senior officer is served first, followed by the diner to the right, and so on around the table.
d. The fourth guideline is to not fill serving pitchers to the tip when they are to be used for
filling glasses or cups at the dining table. A full pitcher is difficult to handle and feels quite
heavy after a while. Therefore, pitchers should be filled to no more than one half to two
thirds full.
e. Finally, it is important to remember that each authorized mess may have certain rules for
serving beverages. The wardroom supervisor should be asked about these rules. Specific
guidelines for the various meal styles are presented below.
5. FORMAL MEAL STYLE
a. Formal Style. This style of meal is quite elaborate and requires considerable guidance to
be done correctly. Guidance should be obtained from the wardroom supervisor and from
other references.
b. Semi-Formal Style:
1) Cold Beverages. Usually, water is the only cold beverage served at semi-formal style
meals. It is poured into the glasses before the diners are seated. Water and another
cold beverage are rarely served together. However, if another cold beverage is
served, water is always made available. If two cold beverages are to be served, both
are usually poured before the diners are seated. Remember, beverages are served
from the right. Glasses should be filled to about one-half inch from the top. Try not to
fill higher than this, as a completely filled glass is difficult for a diner to handle without
spilling.
Refills of cold beverages (except milk) should be offered during the meal to diners
when their glasses become less than one half full. Milk is refilled only upon request.
When refilling a cold beverage, remember not to lift the glass off the table. Always
pour while the glass is on the dining table. If ice cubes are available, they should be
offered first to diners needing refills.
2) Hot Beverages. For semi-formal meals, the hot beverage most often served is
coffee. It normally is not offered to diners until the dessert course has been served.
At that time, coffee should be transferred from the Silex-type pot on the heater to
the serving pots. The coffee should then be politely offered to each diner from
the right in the previously described order. Cups should be refilled to about one-half
inch from the top. If hot tea is requested and is available, hot water and a tea bag
should be put in a tea serving pot and immediately delivered to the diner. Refills of
coffee should be offered to diners when their cups become less than one half full. As
mentioned previously, cups should be left on the table while being filled. Remember
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also that coffee will become cold if left in the serving pitcher too long. If this happens,
empty the cold coffee in the pantry or galley and refill the serving pitcher with fresh
coffee.
c. Informal Meal Service
1) Family Style:
a) Cold Beverages. Use the procedures described under semi-formal style. The
only exception is, if there is enough space, serving pitchers of water or other cold
beverages may be placed on the dining table after the initial service so that diners
can serve themselves. During the meal, the serving pitchers should be checked
and refilled as needed.
b) Hot Beverages. Again, use the procedures listed under semi-formal style with
these variations:
(1) Offer coffee to the diners as soon as they have begun eating the main course;
and,
(2) After the initial serving, filled coffee serving pots may then be left on the dining
table for the diners’ use. Care should be taken so that this coffee does not
become too cold. If it does, the cold coffee should be emptied in the pantry and
fresh coffee obtained.
d. American Style - Use the same procedures given under Family Style meals.
e. A la Carte (Breakfast) Style:
1) Cold Beverages. Water is poured before seating the diners. Upon taking a breakfast
order, juice, if ordered, will be the first item delivered after coffee has been offered.
Obtain juice in glasses from the pan on the sideboard. Wipe ice from the outside of
the glass with a clean cloth and place the glass to the diner’s right, just above the
end of their knife. If milk is ordered by the diner, it is usually obtained from the
pantry. Milk is to be delivered to the diner when it is requested or just after the hot
food item is served. So that there will be no question, it is best to ask the diner when
they would like their milk served. If the diner requests refills of milk or juice, remove
the soiled glass from the dining table and use fresh glasses for the refills. Always
handle both soiled and fresh glasses as close to the bottom as possible.
2) Hot Beverages. If coffee is requested, it should be served immediately while the
diner is deciding what to order. Refills of coffee should be offered when the diner’s
cup becomes less than one half full. If hot tea is requested, the diner should be
asked when they would like to have the tea served. At the requested time, the hot
water and tea bag should be delivered to the diner. Hot chocolate may also be
available at breakfast. If the diner orders this, determine when they would like it
served. At the requested time, either fill the tea pot with hot water and deliver it with
a hot chocolate packet to the diner or prepare the hot chocolate for the diner by
taking the cup and saucer from the dining table to the sideboard, emptying the packet
into the cup, and mixing the correct amount of water with it. Once prepared, the hot
chocolate should be delivered to the diner.
Coffee servers or other beverage pitchers are seldom left on the dining table during
breakfast for service by the diner. Because of few diners likely to be seated at any
one time, the beverage would soon become cold and stale.
f. Cafeteria Style:
1) Cold Beverage. For cafeteria style, cold beverages may be placed on the table prior
to diners entering the general mess. If not, the cold beverages should be offered to
the diner as soon as they have passed through the serving line. Refills should then
be offered when their glasses become less than one half full. Once the dining tables
are full of seated diners, serving pitchers of cold beverages may be left for selfservice. The pitchers should be checked often during the meal and refilled as
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needed. There may be several re-settings of the dining table during this style of
meal so it is important to remain alert for diners who are in need of beverage service.
2) Hot Beverage. Once cold beverages have been offered and served, coffee should
be offered. Refills should then be offered whenever the diner’s cup becomes less
than one half full, or upon the diner’s request for more. Filled serving pitchers may
be left on the dining table once several diners have been initially served coffee.
g. Buffet Style. Use the same procedures given for the cafeteria style meal.
6. REMOVING TABLEWARE. The removal of tableware during a meal is another task which
takes place in the presence of diners. After use, dishes and silverware are often slippery and may
contain food scraps, making them hard to handle. These factors combine to make the removal of
tableware a task which requires care and skill. Special care should be taken until one becomes
more familiar with the tasks. Practice will aid in the development of confidence and of a smooth,
polished performance which can be accomplished without hurrying the diner. A few basic rules
have been developed for the removal of tableware during a meal. The rules are based on
common sense and should be of considerable help in doing all the tasks involved. Remember,
however, that variations may occur in a specific general mess. Thus, if there is any question
about what to do, ask the wardroom supervisor.
a. The first basic rule is to remove soiled tableware from the right side of the diner.
b. The second basic rule applies when more than one item is to be removed from the table.
Pick up the largest item first with your right hand and transfer it to your left hand behind the
diner’s back. Then pick up the next largest item and stack it on top of the first item in your
left hand. Do not stack items in front of the diner before you remove them from the table.
This increases the chance of dropping tableware on the diner, the floor, or yourself.
c. Third, dishes are picked up from the dining table with silverware on them. It is best to first
move the silver to the right side of the dish and hold it with the thumb of the right hand as
the dish is removed. This prevents the silverware from sliding off the dish and gives the
CS better control.
d. Finally, never try to carry more items than can be easily controlled and carried to the
pantry or galley. With experience, one should be able to determine when enough
tableware has been collected from the dining table. Nothing is more disturbing to the diner
and the CS than the crashing sound of tableware hitting the deck.
Further discussion of specific rules is presented under the various meal styles.
7. FORMAL MEAL STYLE
a. Formal Style. As mentioned in other sections, the requirements for the serving of this style
are quite elaborate and are open to much variation among general messes. For these
reasons, nothing on the removal of tableware shall be presented here. Guidance will be
obtained from the wardroom supervisor and from the references, “Service Etiquette” and
the CS Rate Training Manual (NAVEDTRA 10267).
b. Semi-Formal Style. The important factor to keep in mind for the removal of tableware
during a semi-formal style meal is that no items are removed until all diners have
completed a course. The tableware for that course then is removed in the same sequence
that the diners were served. When no guests are present, the head of the table or the
diner with the buck will have their course items removed first, the diner to his/her right
next, and so on around the table. When no more than one guest is present, the guest
should have his/her tableware removed first, followed by the diner to their right, and so on
around the table.
Thus, all tableware for a specific course will be removed before the next course is served.
The specific items to be removed after each course will be determined by what is to be
served next. Be careful not to remove items that are to be used in a later course. If this
should occur, replace these items at the diner’s place setting as soon as possible. After
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the main course is completed all tableware should be removed from the individual place
setting except for coffee cup and saucer, teaspoon, water glass, and any silverware
needed for dessert. All center items should also be removed at this time, with the
exception of the sugar bowl, creamer, and centerpiece. Individual place setting items
should be removed first, followed by the center items. All this should be completed before
serving dessert. Dessert dishes and silverware will then be removed when all diners are
finished. All other items are to be left on the table until the diners leave.
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PART B: AFLOAT STATEROOM SERVICE
4100 INTRODUCTION
1. GENERAL. This section is designed primarily for use in the operation and care of officers’
quarters afloat. Procedures for performing the basic stateroom functions are presented as
guidelines for establishing uniform stateroom maintenance training programs. The text may also
be used for self-study, for on-the-job training, as a point of reference and for developing local
lesson plans.
To effectively use the information contained herein, especially in teaching newly assigned
personnel, it is recommended that the following method be used:
Step 1.
Prepare the trainee (tell how to do the job).
Step 2.
Demonstrate the correct technique (show how to do the job).
Step 3.
Have the trainee perform under supervision while explaining what he/she
is doing.
4101 CARE OF QUARTERS AFLOAT
1. GENERAL. Staterooms are the berthing spaces for officers aboard ship. They are like small
bedrooms ashore. It is here that officers sleep and keep their personal belongings.
Quarters for the commanding officer and for the flag officer (if there is one aboard) include a
stateroom and private head facilities for each of these officers. On some ships, the executive
officer and department heads also have separate quarters and head facilities. Other officers are
usually billeted two to a stateroom. They share head facilities with officers of other staterooms.
Although quarters/stateroom work is not physically hard, it does require a sense of orderliness,
attention to detail and an understanding of the important role played by CS personnel in support
of senior officers. General cleaning for officers also include heads, showers, passageways and
vestibules throughout officer’s quarters.
Personnel assigned to the Admiral's and/or Captain's messes are responsible for cleaning
those quarters while the Culinary Specialists and rotational pool personnel assigned to
wardroom/stateroom areas are responsible for all other officers’ quarters.
NOTE: NAVSUP evaluated the Reduced Stateroom concept of operations onboard the USS
TARAWA (LHA-1) during the period November 99 - May 00. In the concept of operations, Junior
Officers (Lieutenant Commanders and below) performed daily cleaning tasks within their own
staterooms. Commanding Officers receive stateroom cleaning services from the assigned Food
Service Attendants or Culinary Specialists. Results indicated that approximately 7 hours per day
were now available for additional S5 related duties. During the July 2000 Afloat Supply
Department of the Future (ASDOF) conference attended by Supply representatives from the
Fleets and the Type Commanders, the decision was made to allow Fleet-wide implementation of
this concept at the discretion of the Commanding Officer.
4102 USING CULINARY SPECIALISTS AND ROTATIONAL POOL PERSONNEL
1. GENERAL. CS personnel are responsible for performing functions associated with the
management and operation of officers’ messes and quarters afloat. A rotational pool of enlisted
personnel in pay grades E-1 through E-3 will be established to provide basic stateroom and
associated space maintenance services in officers' quarters aboard ship. This is established to
assist the CS’s in providing maintenance, cleaning and other services. These personnel will be
eligible for assignment to the rotational pool without exception, and normally will remain in the
pool for a period not longer than 90 days. Petty officers will not be detailed to rotational pools
except when E-3 and below personnel are not available. Refer to OPNAVINST 3120.32C,
chapter 6 for FSA manning requirements. This pool will be formed of personnel from various
divisions (and squadrons if they are onboard). These personnel are normally assigned to such
duties by the executive officer.
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Under the supervision of the Culinary Specialist, the rotational pool may perform
housekeeping duties and basic maintenance service as required.
4103
ROTATIONAL POOL STATEROOM CLEANING REQUIREMENTS FOR 05 AND
ABOVE
1. BEDMAKING. Bed making service is only provided to the commanding officer.
The characteristics of a properly made-up bunk are as follows:
a. Square corners (all four corners);
b. Bedspread 6-inches from head to mattress;
c. Blanket 6-inches from foot of bed centered from both sides; Pillow centered at the head
ofbed and even with 6-inch folded top sheet; and bed sheet and bedspread tight and free
from wrinkles.
d. The bed mattress should be reversed side to side or from end to end on a monthly basis to
prevent mattress from getting lumps.
2. CLEANING WASHBOWLS AND MIRRORS. When cleaning washbowls and mirrors, apply
cleaning material to a clean, damp cloth, and wipe mirror first, then the light with the cloth. Wash
mirror and light first so that any falling dust and water can be wiped up when cleaning the bowl.
a. Clean all metal, including faucets, valves, stoppers, and chain.
b. Rinse the cloth in running water, add cleaning material, and clean all porcelain surfaces
inside and out. Be sure to clean the underside of the rim above the overflow opening.
Clean the overflow drain opening, using a thick fold of cloth or a wedge covered with the
cloth.
c. Rinse the cloth again and rinse porcelain and metal surfaces with fresh water.
d. Dry and shine all surfaces with a clean dry cloth.
e. Clean all exposed pipes below the basin. If the pipes are nickel, brass or copper,
polish
as scheduled. Also clean the bottoms of washbasins.
3. SWEEPING THE DECK. Decks must be swept carefully every day, which includes all
corners. Place chairs on bunks while sweeping. Dampen the bristles of the broom slightly. This
allows trash to be swept up more easily, and keeps dust from stirring up. Staterooms that are
carpeted should be vacuumed.
4. SWABBING THE DECK. Check the cleaning schedule to see how often decks must be
swabbed. When scheduled, swab them after they have been swept. Use a clean swab and hot
soapy water. For best results, wring out the swab often. Dry the deck immediately with a clean
swab. A wet deck is slippery and can cause accidents.
5. WASHING PAINTWORK.
Weekly, or when scheduled, paintwork must be washed in
staterooms. To do this, use hot soapy water and a clean rag. Use even motions up and down on
the bulkhead. Rinse the suds off with clear water. Wring out the cloth often. Caution: Never use
salt water soap on bulkheads, even for small spots. The soap destroys the paint’s shiny surface
and makes the bulkhead more easily subject to soil.
6. LAUNDRY SERVICE. As a part of the stateroom service, the rotational pool is required to
pick up and deliver officers’ laundry. Sorting, stowage and ticketing of personal laundry is the
responsibility of individual officers.
7. CHANGING TOWELS. Handling personal towels varies on different ships. On some ships, a
supply of towels is issued to the officer when reporting aboard. The officer uses a clean one and
puts the soiled one with clothes that are to go to the laundry. On other ships, the CSs or
rotational pool personnel collect soiled towels, exchange them for clean ones, and put out clean
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ones on the days when towels are scheduled for changing. This may be done twice a week or
more often. Follow the schedule of the ship.
8. CHANGING PILLOWCASES. To change a pillow case, grasp the soiled case by the corners
of the closed end and shake the pillow out. Put the clean case flat on the bunk with its open end
toward you. Place the pillow on the bunk just in front of the clean case. Open the case by
grasping the corners near you and start sliding it onto the pillow. Lift them and shake the pillow
into the case.
9. PRIVATE HEADS AND SHOWERS. Heads must be cleaned thoroughly every day. First
flush the toilet. Next put cleaner or disinfectant into the bowl and let it stand while you clean the
outside, adjoining pipes, seat hinges, and all around the base of the bowl. After cleaning the
outside, use the special brush provided for cleaning the inside of the bowl. Be sure to scrub
under the inside rim to prevent germs and odors from collecting there. The special brush has an
extending tuff of bristles for doing this job quickly. Never use this brush on the outside of the stool
or on the seat. Wipe the seat with disinfectant.
Wash and dry the metal work. Wiping it with an oily cloth as soon as it is dry will prevent a
green tarnish from forming on the metal.
At least once a week, decks in heads and showers must be scrubbed and bulkheads cleaned.
Soap dishes and shower heads must be cleaned, rubber mats scrubbed, shower curtains cleaned
or changed if necessary and all bright work polished in both areas. Figure 4-11 shows an
example of a cleaning bill for stateroom heads and showers.
4104 GENERAL STATEROOM CARE FOR JUNIOR OFFICERS 04 AND BELOW
1. CLEANING. The rotational pool personnel are required to conduct the following stateroom
responsibilities:
a. Trash removal
b. Laundry services (pick up and return only when tickets are properly filled out).
c. Vacuuming staterooms when the floor is clear of gear adrift.
Note: Residence is responsible to maintain their linens and make their own beds.
2. INSPECTIONS. Staterooms should be inspected frequently by the stateroom supervisor to
ensure that these duties are being performed properly, and to request any maintenance or repair
work that must be done by the engineering department.
3. HEADS AND SHOWERS. Heads must be cleaned thoroughly every day. First flush the toilet.
Next put cleaner or disinfectant into the bowl and let it stand while you clean the outside, adjoining
pipes, seat hinges, and all around the base of the bowl. After cleaning the outside, use the
special brush provided for cleaning the inside of the bowl. Be sure to scrub under the inside rim
to prevent germs and odors from collecting there. The special brush has an extending tuff of
bristles for doing this job quickly. Never use this brush on the outside of the stool or on the seat.
Wipe the seat with disinfectant.
Wash and dry the metal work. Wiping it with an oily cloth as soon as it is dry will prevent a green
tarnish from forming on the metal.
At least once a week, decks in heads and showers must be scrubbed and bulkheads cleaned.
Soap dishes and shower heads must be cleaned, rubber mats scrubbed, shower curtains cleaned
or changed if necessary and all bright work polished in both areas. Figure 4-11 shows an
example of a cleaning bill for stateroom heads and showers. Passageways and vestibules must
be incorporated in the daily and weekly schedules. Figure 4-12 is an example of a cleaning bill for
passageways and vestibules.
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4. PASSAGEWAYS AND VESTIBULES. Passageways and vestibules must be incorporated in
the daily and weekly schedules. Figure 4-12 is an example of a cleaning bill for passageways and
vestibules.
4105 CARE OF PRIVATE PROPERTY
1. GENERAL. One important rule to follow in cleaning 05 and above staterooms is to avoid
disturbing anything of a private nature that has been left lying about. From time to time, officers
rush off leaving letters, papers, money, or other valuables in sight. These instances should be
reported at once to the officer or LCPO. Furthermore, papers, books or letters should not be
examined if left lying around. These may concern official Navy matters or the officer’s personal
affairs. In either case, they are to be treated as private property. If valuables or other items of a
private nature must be moved when cleaning, be sure they are put back where they were found.
2. PERSONAL PAPERS AND MONEY. DO NOT TAKE PERSONAL PAPERS unless they are
in the wastebasket. The officer may have official Navy papers or personal letters on his/her desk.
You are trusted not to look at these papers or take them away when cleaning. DO NOT REMOVE
MONEY or valuables which are left unsecured by the officer. They may have been called away in
a hurry and may have forgotten to take their wallet, money, or watch. Notify the officer or the
stateroom supervisor immediately. You are trusted not to take valuables.
4106 JOB SCHEDULING
1. GENERAL. So that all weekly duties can be attended to, jobs can be spread out over the
week, with some weekly jobs scheduled each day. For example, decks may be swabbed on
Mondays, bed linens changed on Tuesdays for 05 and above, extra cleaning of common heads
and showers on Wednesdays, and so on. Major clean-up must also be scheduled regularly.
If all jobs are carefully accomplished when scheduled, getting the spaces ready for field day
(weekly inspection) should be just a matter of taking care of daily duties and touching up any
weekly jobs that need last minute attention. A stateroom cleaning bill must be prepared for trash
removal and vacuuming.
Major stateroom clean-up will be scheduled regularly. Some examples of major stateroom
clean-up are monthly turning over of mattresses and vacuuming underneath beds, quarterly
shampooing of carpets and sending draperies, chair covers and bedspreads for dry cleaning.
Figure 4-10 and 4-11 is an example of a stateroom cleaning bill:
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
Example of an O4 and Below Stateroom Cleaning Bill
DATE:____________
From: Leading CS, Wardroom Mess
To:
All Stateroom Rotational Pool Personnel
Subj:
STATEROOM CLEANING BILL
1. In order to have a more uniform cleaning system, the following cleaning bill will be strictly
adhered to by all personnel concerned. Any deviation of schedule will be referred to the
stateroom supervisor or wardroom mess Leading CS.
DAILY
a. Sweep and mop deck or vacuum carpet.
d. Empty wastebaskets.
WEEKLY
a. Deliver and pick up officers’ laundry as scheduled (all officers).
b. Replace stripped linens with fresh clean ones and leave linens on top of beds as
scheduled.
c. Scrub and wax deck; or spot check carpet and remove stains as scheduled.
CLEAN AS SCHEDULED
a. Monthly rotate/turn mattresses over and vacuum underneath (preferably during linen
change).
b. Quarterly send draperies, curtains, chair covers and bedspreads for dry cleaning.
c. Quarterly shampoo carpets.
b. Clean air conditioning filters and screens as part of PMS as required.
SUBMITTED BY:________________________ APPROVED BY:__________________
Leading CS
Division Officer
Wardroom Mess
Wardroom Mess
Figure 4-10
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
Example of an 05 and Above Cleaning Bill for Stateroom Heads and
Showers
DATE:________
From: Leading CS, Wardroom Mess
To:
All Stateroom CSs and Rotational Pool Personnel
Subj:
CLEANING BILL FOR O-5 AND ABOVE STATEROOM HEADS AND SHOWERS
1. In order to have a more uniform cleaning system, the following cleaning bill will be strictly
adhered to by all personnel concerned. Any deviation of schedule will be referred to the
stateroom supervisor or wardroom mess leading CS.
DAILY
a. Clean wash basins and wipe down mirrors.
b. Refill soap and towel dispensers.
c. Clean utility sink and storage area.
d. Wipe down shower curtains.
e. Scrub down shower stalls.
f. Wipe down glass doors or stainless steel doors.
g. Scrub rubber mats and hang up to air dry.
h. Scrub, clean and disinfect/sanitize urinals and commodes (use rubber gloves).
i. Wipe down partitions or dividers.
j. Sweep and swab deck with hot soapy water and disinfectant.
k. Replenish toilet paper.
l. Empty trash can.
m. Clean and neatly stow all cleaning gear in locker.
WEEKLY
a. Scrub down bulkhead.
b. Clean overhead and light fixtures.
c. Scrub down shower curtains; replace as required.
d. Descale urinals and commodes.
e. Wipe down and polish stainless steel and all other bright work.
f. Sweep, swab and scrub deck with hot soapy water and disinfectant.
AS SCHEDULED
a. Replace burned out bulbs as required.
b. Replace missing curtain hooks/rubber mats.
c. Check for cold and hot water leaks.
SUBMITTED BY:________________________ APPROVED BY:__________________
Leading CS
Division Officer
Wardroom Mess
Wardroom Mess
Figure 4-11
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
Examples of a Passageways and Vestibules Cleaning Bill
DATE:__________
From: Leading CS, Wardroom Mess
To:
All Staterooms Rotational Pool Personnel
Subj:
PASSAGEWAYS AND VESTIBULES CLEANING BILL
1. In order to have a more uniform cleaning system, the following cleaning will be strictly adhered
to by all personnel concerned. Any deviation of schedule will be referred to the stateroom
supervisor or a wardroom mess leading CS.
DAILY
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Sweep down ladders; vacuum if necessary.
Sweep, swab and buff passageways and vestibule decks.
Wipe down ladder handrails with hot soapy water.
Clean around deck coaming or hatch openings.
Check angle iron ledges for gear adrift.
Clean scuttlebutts.
WEEKLY
a. Spotcheck bulkheads and scrub down as required.
b. Sweep, swab, wax and buff decks.
c. Dust overhead, light fixtures and air vents.
d. Clean baseboards and make sure all corners are completely cleaned.
e. Scrub down ladders and dust guards with hot soapy water.
f. Clean knife edges of hatches and ports.
g. Polish brightwork as scheduled.
AS SCHEDULED
a. Strip wax (once every two weeks or as scheduled).
b. Check non-skid deck treads; replace when stripped or as required.
c. Check for burned out bulbs and replace as required.
d. Check for preservation and paint as required (Quarterly).
SUBMITTED BY:________________________ APPROVED BY:__________________
Leading CS
Division Officer
Wardroom Mess
Wardroom Mess
Figure 4-124107
CARE OF DECK COVERINGS
1. GENERAL. Resilient coverings (vinyl, linoleum, etc.) are provided for the interior decks of
many ships today. These coverings require special care. Rough and
improper maintenance
quickly destroys the appearance and durability of these decks.
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When cleaning deck coverings, scrub with a stiff-bristle tampico brush or circular brush,
scrubbing machine, or swab, using a synthetic detergent cleaning solution. Avoid excess water,
and use a limited quantity of detergent solution. To prolong the life of the material and prevent
loss of deck adhesion, strong alkaline soap, abrasive cleaning compounds, or salt water should
never be used. All water, cleaning compounds, and dirt should be removed and the deck rinsed
with clear water, using a clean mop. The trick to efficient mopping is to use a rhythmic side-toside stroke rather than a back-and-forth stroke. Do not try to over-reach. Stand erect and mop
close to your feet, moving slightly backward (toward the buckets) as the mop nears your feet.
Use fine steel wool, or a rag moistened with paint thinner, to remove stubborn grease and dirt.
(See Figures 4-13 and 4-14 for more information on deck caring and cleaning recommendations.)
After washing and drying, the covering may be buffed (without wax) to a velvet sheen with a
buffing machine, or given a coat of wax (except certain linoleum) and allowed to dry without
polishing.
In applying waxes, (see Figure 4-15) the same tools are used for mopping decks but with one
essential condition - the tools must be scrupulously clean. The wringer and the bucket must
contain no traces of cleaning solution, and the mop must be perfectly clean and free of
contaminants. It is desirable to have a separate mop on hand for applying wax only.
It is important to remember that wax should always be applied THINLY AND EVENLY. Care
taken in this respect will not only produce a better job, but will result in a longer lasting finish and
make future deck finishing easier. The deck must be clean and dry and free of all stripping
materials before waxing.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
Deck Care Information
TYPE DECK
COMPOSITION
FEATURE
CERAMIC TILE
CLAY AND WATER
MIXTURE, GLAZED AND
BAKED
CLEANS EASILY BUT
ALKALINE CLEANERS
MAY RUIN GROUT
BETWEEN TILES
LINOLEUM
FORMED OF BURLAP OR
CANVAS, COATED WITH
LINSEED OIL,
POWDERED CORK, AND
ROSIN
EASY TO MAINTAIN BUT
AVOID SOLVENTS AND
EXCESS WATER
RUBBER TILE
RUBBER-NATURAL OR
SYNTHETIC WITH INERT
FILLERS AND COLOR
PIGMENTS
EASY TO MAINTAIN,
OILS, GREASES AND
SOLVENTS MAY CAUSE
HARM
TERRAZZO
MARBLE OR GRANITE
CHIPS MIXED WITH
PORTLAND CEMENT AND
GROUND SMOOTH
VERY DURABLE,
SHOULD BE MAINTAINED
WITH SYNTHETIC
CLEANERS
VINYL TILE
VINYL PLASTICS
VERY EASY TO
MAINTAIN; IMPERVIOUS
TO ALMOST
EVERYTHING
STRATICA DECKING
MINERAL FILLED
ETHYLENE COPOLYMER
WITH A DUPONT SURLYN
SURFACE
LOW MAINTENANCE,
EASY TO CLEAN, NOSTRIPPING, NONWAXING, NON-BUFFING
WITH A SIGNIFICANT
REDUCTION IN
WORKLOAD AFLOAT
Figure 4-13
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
Cleaning Recommendations
TYPE DECK
CLEANING SOLUTION
NOTES
CERAMIC TILE
SYNTHETIC DETERGENT
MILD ABRASIVE
POWDER
WET TILE WITH CLEAR
WATER BEFORE
OCCASIONALLY
APPLYING CLEANER
LINOLEUM
SYNTHETIC DETERGENT
PROMPT RINSING AND
DRYING IMPORTANT
RUBBER TILE
SYNTHETIC DETERGENT
RINSE AND DRY
PROMPTLY
TERRAZZO
NEUTRAL SYNTHETIC
DETERGENT
WET WITH CLEAR
WATER FIRST-RINSE
AND DRY THOROUGHLY
VINYL TILE
SYNTHETIC DETERGENT
WET FLOOR WITH WARM
CLEAR WATER FIRST
STRATICA DECKING
RECOMMEND A
NEUTRAL DETERGENT
SUCH AS JOHNSON
STRIDE 1000, BRITISH
NOVA LIQUID 99, OR
BUTCHERS SUNDANCE
DO NOT USE ANY HARSH
ABRASIVES ON
STRATICA DECKING
Figure 4-14
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
Waxing Recommendations
TYPE DECK
TYPE FINISH
NOTES
CERAMIC TILE
WATER EMULSION
WAXES
FLOOR MUST BE CURED
AND NEUTRALIZED
LINOLEUM
EMULSIFIED RESINS,
WATER EMULSION
WAXES, SOLVENT
LIQUID WAXES
AVOID USE OF VARNISH
OR LACQUER SEALING
COMPOUNDS
RUBBER TILE
WATER EMULSION
WAXES
AVOID OILS AND
SOLVENTS
TERRAZZO
EMULSIFIED RESINS AND
WATER EMULSION
WAXES
SEAL TO PREVENT
DUSTING AND STAINING
VINYL
ALL TYPES
SOME SOLVENTS MAY
ATTACK ADHESIVE
Figure 4-15
2. FLOOR WAXING. It is not always necessary to completely wax a deck when only small areas
are worn. These areas can be cleaned and waxed separately, taking care to avoid waxing over
perfectly good areas. This will prevent excess wax build-up, which will make tedious stripping
projects unnecessary. In rewaxing decks that have not been stripped, on the spot-waxing decks,
care must be taken to avoid mixing types of finishes. If a heavier coating is desired, allow the first
coat to dry thoroughly and then apply a second thin coat. Steps in proper wax application are as
follows:
a. Rinse clean mop in clean water and wring thoroughly.
b. Pour wax in bucket and saturate mop completely.
c. Wring lower half of mop, leaving heel saturated.
d. Swing mop in side-to-side motion, being careful to keep moist heat flat on deck and
allowing fanning out strands to spread wax.
e. If required, apply second coat after at least 1 hour of drying time. Two
thin coats give
higher gloss and last longer than a single, heavy coat.
f. Buff with the buffing machine, if necessary, for appearance.
To conserve wax and reduce maintenance, decks should be rebuffed several times before
rewaxing. Decks may require only rewaxing in the traffic lanes once a week if dirty spots are
promptly wiped up with a damp rag and these areas are immediately redone.
The most painstaking and careful maintenance of deck coverings may be wasted if the
legs of furniture, especially movable pieces, are not properly equipped with rubber tips to prevent
scratching and denting. If such tips are not provided, avoid dragging heavy objects across
resilient deck covering.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
4108
CARPET CARE
1. GENERAL. The ability of carpets to perform the functions of many materials has long been
recognized. Overall safety factors and low maintenance costs make carpeting a far more
desirable and flexible environmental control material than any hard surface material which
performs a single function.
2. PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE. Maintenance time and costs can be greatly reduced and a
good overall appearance of carpets can be maintained by eliminating soil and dirt before they are
tracked into staterooms. Placing mats outside or inside entryways will eliminate most of the soil
from shoes before it can be tracked onto the carpet. Critical high traffic areas, such as hallways
and entrance doors, take the brunt of soiling. Frequent vacuuming and preventive maintenance in
the high traffic areas will reduce the amount of time required to maintain these areas.
3. MAINTENANCE PROGRAM. Carpet maintenance requirements are directly related to the
amount of traffic in the area.
a. Daily. Clean with vacuum cleaner along all traffic patterns. It is extremely important to
keep carpets as free as possible of loose, sandy, gritty soil. Remove spots and stains as
they occur, if possible.
b. Monthly. Shampoo using a good commercial-type steam cleaner, in accordance with
manufacturer’s instructions. Proper shampooing procedures require the use of a neutral,
synthetic detergent which is specially designed for cleaning carpets.
5. SPOTTING PROGRAM. A separate spot-cleaning program should be established, especially
for areas where accidental spillage occurs at a higher rate. There are many excellent commercial
spot-removal kits available for this type of use. Spills should be attended to as soon as possible
and never left for more than a day.
6. DUST AND DIRT. Carpets are cleaned primarily to remove soil, in an effort to restore the
original color, lengthen wear-life by the removal of gritty soil, and discourage mildew and other
unsightly damages. A good carpet-care program will save time and money.
7. LOW MAINTENANCE. Carpeting requires only about half as much time to maintain as hardsurfaced decks. It is recommended that demonstrations be obtained from professional carpet
cleaners before starting your carpet-care program.
4109
CONTROL OF LINEN, CLEANING EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES
1. GENERAL. Aside from being expensive, supplies afloat are limited. A separate record
should be kept for linens, cleaning equipment and consumable supplies. High and low limits for
all items used should be established to assist in determining requirements.
2. CHEMICAL CLEANING PRODUCTS. Most chemicals used for cleaning are considered to be
Hazardous Material based on its quantity, concentration, or physical or chemical characteristics
that pose a present or potential hazard to human health and safety or to the environment.
Approved cleaning products are identified in the NAVSEA Authorized Chemical Cleaning Manual
and
in
the
Ship
Hazardous
Material
List
(SHML)
-0910-LP-103-4836.
http://www.everyspec.com/usn/navsea and GSA Advantage Website:www.gsaadvantage.gov.
4110 PERSONAL LAUNDRY
1. GENERAL. Taking officers’ clothes to the laundry is another duty that varies from ship to
ship. Individual ship schedules should be followed for taking care of personal laundry.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
When clean laundry is returned to the stateroom, the usual practice is to leave it out where the
officer can check it to see that everything has been returned. In the captain’s or Admiral’s mess, it
may be the responsibility of the attendant to check the clean laundry and put it away.
4111 ACCESS TO STATEROOMS
1. GENERAL. Access to staterooms is a necessity in order to accomplish job requirements.
This access should not be abused. To prevent conflict, Culinary Specialists and rotational pool
personnel should be aware of their responsibilities and accountability while in these working
spaces, and a check-in and check-out key control log should be maintained by the stateroom
supervisor or wardroom leading CS.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
CHAPTER 5
OFFICERS' QUARTERS AND MESSES AFLOAT
PART A: AFLOAT MESSES
Purpose and Alignment of Food Service Accounting Operations .............................................5000
Scope .........................................................................................................................................5001
Mission .......................................................................................................................................5002
Officers’ Messes Afloat ..............................................................................................................5003
Operation....................................................................................................................................5004
PART B: ADMINISTRATIVE RESPONSIBILITY
Administration and Technical Direction .....................................................................................5100
PART C: ADMINISTRATION OF OFFICERS’ MESSES AFLOAT
Fleet and Unit Commanders ......................................................................................................5200
Commanding Officers ................................................................................................................5201
Mess President ..........................................................................................................................5202
Mess Treasurer or Wardroom Officer ........................................................................................5203
Duties and Responsibilities of the Mess Treasurer or Wardroom Officer.................................5204
Meal Payment Methods .............................................................................................................5205
Guests ........................................................................................................................................5206
PART D: ASSIGNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION OF ENLISTED PERSONNEL INMESSES
AFLOAT
Culinary Specialist Personnel ....................................................................................................5300
Culinary Specialist Allowance ....................................................................................................5301
Culinary Specialist Assignments and Organization...................................................................5302
Wardroom Culinary Specialist Duties and Responsibilities ......................................................5303
Food Service Attendant Personnel Utilization and Duties Wardroom ......................................5304
CPO Culinary Specialist Duties and Responsibilities ...............................................................5305
Food Service Attendant Personnel Utilization and Duties CPO ...............................................5306
Alcoholic Beverages ..................................................................................................................5307
Name Tags for Enlisted Personnel ............................................................................................5308
Mess Personnel Training Program ............................................................................................5309
Publications ...............................................................................................................................5310
PART E: OFFICER’S QUARTERS AND MESSES AFLOAT
Section 1: INTRODUCTION
Custom, Tradition, and Ceremony.............................................................................................5400
Wardroom Standards .................................................................................................................5401
Habitability ..................................................................................................................................5402
Quality of Facilities, Service, and Meals....................................................................................5403
Use of Wardroom and Staterooms ............................................................................................5404
Association with Mess Personnel ..............................................................................................5405
Section 2: FACILITIES AND SERVICE
Facilities... ..................................................................................................................................5406
Equipment ..................................................................................................................................5407
Service..... ..................................................................................................................................5408
Personal Service ........................................................................................................................5409
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
CHAPTER 5
OFFICERS' QUARTERS AND MESSES AFLOAT
PART A: AFLOAT MESSES
5000 PURPOSE AND ALIGNMENT OF FOOD SERVICE ACCOUNTING OPERATIONS
1. GENERAL. All afloat mess accounting operations, to include Chief Petty Officer, Wardroom,
Commanding Officer and Flag Messes have been aligned within existing general mess
operations.
Discontinuing mess accounting and singling-up food service accounting, for all
messes other than the general mess will enable the supply department to reduce workload afloat
and support the optimal manning initiative for the way ahead to food service distance support.
Commanders and commanding officers in the fleet will ensure that officers' quarters and messes
afloat operate within the principles, concepts and guidelines of this publication. All officer messes
will subsist from the general mess.
All messes will use the standard general mess menu. If deviation from the menu is required, all
additional food items will be purchased separately in the form of bulk sale in accordance with P486, paragraph 6300. The use of subsistence appropriation funds (SIK account) to defray the cost
of these additional food items is strictly prohibited.
a. Officer's mess bills will be collected monthly. Follow procedures for cash and credit sales
of meals from the general mess as stated in paragraph 2201 and 2400.
b. The general mess will claim the chief petty officer rations.
c. The officer's and chief petty officer's mess will remain a separate dining facility and will
continue to promote well being, traditional values and atmosphere. They will not be open
to unauthorized personnel or pay-grades.
d. Officer and chief petty officer messes are authorized to purchase "geedunk" and other
specialty items using their non appropriated association funds. If the officer and chief
petty officer messes wish to serve special meals in lieu of that days Navy Standard Core
Menu as promulgated by their respective TYCOM they may do so pending proper
coordination with the FSO. All items not adhering to those days NSCM must be
purchased from the General Mess as a bulk sale and paid for accordingly. All food items
used for a special meal different from the authorized NSCM must be purchased as a bulk
sale.
5001 SCOPE
1. GENERAL. This publication applies to all officers’ messes afloat. Recommendations for
improvement to, or deviations from the manual may be requested in writing via the chain of
command to the Commander, Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP N42).
5002 MISSION
1. GENERAL. Officers' messes afloat are established for the purpose of promoting and
maintaining the well being, morale, and efficiency of officers by providing dining, lodging, social,
and recreational facilities aboard ship.
5003 OFFICERS' MESSES AFLOAT
1. GENERAL. Officers' messes are generally categorized by their members and are defined as
follows in subparagraphs 2-5.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
2. FLAG MESS. When flag officers are regularly attached to ships they should establish
their
own mess and operate it with personnel assigned to their staff. Normally, the aide and staff
division heads will be invited to be members of the flag mess. However, the admiral may invite
such staff officers as they desire to join the flag mess. Staff officers not invited will become
members of the ship's wardroom mess.
3. UNIT COMMANDER'S MESS. When a unit commander is regularly attached to a ship they
may establish their own mess and operate it with personnel assigned to their staff. Normally, the
commander's staff will be invited to be members of the mess. However the commander may
invite such staff members as they desire. Staff officers not invited will become members of the
ship's wardroom mess. If those ships that do not have separate unit commander and wardroom
mess food preparation and storage facilities, the unit commander should join the wardroom mess
and dine separately, if desired, rather than establishing a separate mess.
4. COMMANDING OFFICER'S MESS. The commanding officer of a ship may form his/her own
mess. As a matter of custom, the commanding officer of a large ship will have his/her own cabin
mess, while on small ships such as destroyers, the commanding officer generally eats in the
wardroom mess. This is necessary, since on small ships the number of personnel assigned is
insufficient to support two officer messes. The ship's manpower authorization and strength will
normally indicate whether or not the commanding officer is expected to have his/her own mess.
5. WARDROOM MESS. Officers aboard a ship other than those subsisting in a flag mess, unit
commander's mess, or commanding officer's mess must join the wardroom mess. This mess is
normally the largest officers' mess on a ship.
5004 OPERATION
1. LOCATION AND DESIGNATION. Officers' messes afloat will be physically located aboard
ships and will be operated as integral parts of the Navy. Messes afloat will be designated as flag
messes, unit commander's messes, commanding officer's messes,
and wardroom messes.
These are established, organized, operated, and controlled by official regulations issued by the
Department of the Navy. Furthermore, they will not be operated for financial profit of any
individual, group, or organization.
PART B: ADMINISTRATIVE RESPONSIBILITY
5100 ADMINISTRATION AND TECHNICAL DIRECTION
1. GENERAL. The Chief of Naval Operations has assigned the responsibility for providing
administrative and technical direction for the operation of authorized messes afloat to the
Commander, Naval Supply Systems Command.
Under the authority delegated by the
Commander, Naval Supply Systems Command, the Deputy Commander for Support Services
(NAVSUP N42 ) is responsible for administering the Navy Food Service Program. Within the
NAVSUP directorate for Support Services responsibility for the food service program is assigned
to the Food Services Division (NAVSUP N42). NAVSUP N42 issues directives and letters of
guidance, requires financial reports, audits and inspections, and provides technical assistance
and training for managers and operating personnel.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
PART C: ADMINISTRATION OF OFFICERS’ MESSES AFLOAT
5200 FLEET AND UNIT COMMANDERS
1. GENERAL. Fleet commanders and unit commanders in the administration of ships under
their command are responsible for ensuring that officers' quarters and messes under their
cognizance are operated and maintained within the standards prescribed in this publication.
5201 COMMANDING OFFICERS
1. GENERAL. Commanding officers are responsible for the proper operation and administration
of the quarters and messes afloat in the command. As such, commanding officers will exert
positive control of the messes through their capacity as mess president, or through the president
of the mess if the commanding officer messes separately.
5202 MESS PRESIDENT
1. GENERAL. In all officers' messes afloat the senior line officer member of the mess, in
command or in succession to command, will be the mess president. This officer will preside over
the mess and ensure the preservation of order. In the absence of the mess president the senior
line officer present in the mess will act as president. The mess president exercises a command
function and is responsible for mess administration. The mess president presides over and
maintains order, ensures compliance with this publication and other mess regulations, and
upholds the customs and traditions of officer messing. The president of the mess will set the
example for conduct and behavior expected of mess members, and will look after the welfare of
mess members. The mess president will no longer approve the menu. Wardroom messes
currently subsist from the General Mess using the authorized Core Menu. All shipboard messes
will serve the authorized Navy Standard Core Menu as promulgated by their respective TYCOM.
5203 MESS TREASURER OR WARDROOM OFFICER
1. GENERAL. A mess treasurer or wardroom officer will be appointed for each officer’s mess
except in those instances when a wardroom mess officer is authorized and assigned for the
wardroom mess per the ships manpower authorization. A mess treasurer or wardroom officer will
be appointed by the commanding officer for the wardroom mess (see Appendix B for template)
and the commanding officer's mess using personnel assigned to the ship. Flag officers and unit
commanders will appoint a mess treasurer or wardroom officer from personnel assigned to their
immediate staffs. Frequent changes in personnel assigned mess treasurer or wardroom officer
duties should be avoided.
2. ELIGIBILITY. Commissioned officers will serve as mess treasurer or wardroom officers for
officers' messes afloat. Individuals charged with the custody and disbursements of public funds
are ineligible for service as mess treasurer or wardroom officer. However, the mess treasurer or
wardroom officer may be assigned the duties and perform the functions of mess wardroom officer
or treasurer, and this practice is encouraged when possible on large ships, i.e., carriers. This
assignment would be a primary duty vice the collateral duty of a mess wardroom officer or
treasurer or a mess treasurer or
wardroom officer.
Members of an embarked staff are
ineligible for duties as treasurer for the wardroom and commanding officer's mess.
3. FLAG, UNIT COMMANDER, AND COMMANDING OFFICER'S MESSES. The assignment of
mess treasurer or wardroom officer duties to enlisted personnel for messes serving one officer,
such as a flag mess, unit commander's mess, or commanding officer's mess is encouraged when
possible.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
5204 DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE MESS TREASURER OR
WARDROOM OFFICER
1. GENERAL. The mess treasurer or wardroom officer is responsible for keeping an account of
meals sold on a credit basis utilizing the NAVSUP FORM 1046. The treasurer will also keep
accounts of and transact all receipts and expenditures of cash and provisions. Officers charged
with the custody or disbursement of public funds and members of embarked staffs are not eligible
for the office of treasurer.
Specifically, the mess treasurer or wardroom officer will:
a. Exercise overall supervision of the operation of the mess, including collection of mess bills,
and comprehensive advance planning.
b. Assume responsibility for the receipt, safekeeping, deposit, disbursement, and
accountability of funds.
c. Ensure that all bills are paid before leaving port. Should circumstances preclude payment,
the mess treasurer or wardroom officer will notify the commanding officer of the number
and amount of unpaid bills on the day the ship leaves port.
d. Compute the monthly mess bills.
e. Collect basic charges and surcharges as applicable for all meals purchased/made
available from the general mess no later than 15 days following the end of the month in
which the meals were purchased.
f. Reimburse the food service officer for officer meals made available/purchased from the
general mess no later than 15 days following the end of the month in which the meals
were sold.
g. Reimburse the food service officer for provisions purchased from the general mess no
later than 15 days following the end of the month in which the provisions were sold.
h. Maintains accounts and transacts all receipts and expenditures of cash and provisions.
Shall render a statement of the mess account to mess members at the completion of each
month and be able to produce the books of the mess when requested by the Commanding
Officer or Executive Officer.
i. Use a “modified” NAVSUP Form 1367 (Monthly Financial Operating Statement for Messes
Afloat) to track all daily transactions in the wardroom.
j. Will maintain the following records as supporting documents to assist in tracking all daily
transactions:
1) Records of Collection
2) Records of Expenditures
3) Records of Receivables (Assets)
4) Records of Liabilities (Payables)
5) NAVSUP FORM 1046 (Sale of Enlisted Dining Facility meals)
5205 MEAL PAYMENT METHODS
1. MESSES SUBSISTING FROM THE GENERAL MESS. Meals will be sold at the rate
prescribed by the Department of Defense and published on the Office of the Under Secretary of
the Navy Homepage, www.dtic.mil/comptroller, Food Service Charges at Appropriated Fund
Dining Facilities, Tab G and in the annual NAVSUP Sale of Meal Rates and Ration Credit
Conversion Factors Naval Message. Mess treasurer or wardroom officers should contact the food
service officer to obtain current prices.
2. PER DIEM. Messes which subsist from the general mess are required to collect a surcharge
for meals from those individuals subsisting from the mess on a temporary basis and who are
drawing per diem. Surcharge rates can be found on the Office of the Under Secretary of the Navy
Homepage, www.dtic.mil/comptroller, Food Service Charges at Appropriated Fund Dining
Facilities, Tab G and also in the annual NAVSUP Sale of Meal Rates and Ration Credit
Conversion Factors Naval Message.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
3. COLLECTION FOR MEALS SOLD ON A CREDIT BASIS. The mess treasurer or wardroom
officer is responsible for maintaining the NAVSUP Form 1046 and collecting money for the credit
sale of meals.
4. PAYMENT METHODS. For those activities on Navy Cash, collections will be made through
the Navy Cash Program. Activities not on Navy Cash will be required to pay his/her mess bill at
the end of each month via check or cash.
5206 GUESTS
1. POLICY. Every officer’s mess must have a policy which distinguishes guests of individual
members from guests of the mess.
2. MEMBER’S GUEST. The cost of a meal for a member’s guest will be billed to the member at
the end of each month. The consumption of a meal of a guest of a member will be recorded on
the NAVSUP Form 1046. Special attention needs to be adhered to in order to ensure that the
applicable meal rates and surcharges are applied to guests IAW the Sale of Meal Rates message
and/or quarterly NAVSUP Notice 7330. Guests are not exempt from paying the applicable
surcharge rates unless the Sale of Meal Rates message indicates otherwise.
PART D: ASSIGNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION OF ENLISTED
PERSONNEL IN MESSES AFLOAT
5300 CULINARY SPECIALIST PERSONNEL
1. GENERAL. Personnel of the Culinary Specialist rating and other enlisted personnel are
assigned to officers' country to provide food service, to care for designated spaces, and to man
assigned battle stations. In providing for the health and well being of the officers attached, and
releasing officers' time for assigned duties, food service personnel are performing a vital service
to the ship and to the Navy. The work of the food service personnel is a key factor in the morale
of any wardroom. For this reason, it is essential that the work assignments be accomplished in an
efficient and timely manner, that service be prompt and cheerful, that the compartments and
rooms be clean at all times, and that training be provided to ensure that custom and etiquette are
observed. It is equally essential that the officers recognize the importance of food service
personnel by complimenting them for work well done. The proper performance of food service
personnel is the collective responsibility of all members of the wardroom.
5301 CULINARY SPECIALIST ALLOWANCE
1. GENERAL. The Culinary Specialist allowance is established by the manpower authorization
for each ship or command. The number of Culinary Specialists assigned to a ship will vary
considerably because of the size and design of the ship, the number of officers assigned, and the
number of messes operated, i.e., commanding officer's mess, wardroom mess, chief petty
officers' mess, etc. The manpower authorizations for ships do not, in every instance, specify the
number of Culinary Specialists allocated to each mess. In those cases, the OPNAVINST
3120.32D, which provides the percentages allowed, should be used in the assignment of Culinary
Specialists to more than one mess based on the size and numbers of members in each mess.
An inequitable distribution to serve the interests of a small mess operation and to the detriment of
a larger mess operation will be prohibited.
2. FLAG OFFICERS' MESSES. Embarked flag officer units are normally manned with Culinary
Specialists but not with food service attendants. Additional augmentations and/or the use of
shipboard Culinary Specialists are not authorized in the flag mess areas. On occasions
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
depending on the circumstances, Food Service Attendants may be provided from the shipboard
rotational pool but is not normally authorized and are highly discouraged. Flag mess staff must
ensure they bring their appropriate manpower support of Culinary Specialists when embarked
aboard naval vessels.
3. COMMANDING OFFICERS' MESSES.
Commanding officers' messes and other small
messes supporting a single officer will not be assigned more than one Culinary Specialists on a
permanent basis.
Commanding officers may temporarily augment the Culinary Specialists
assigned to their mess when entertaining guests to provide adequate service using Culinary
Specialists from other messes on the ship.
5302 CULINARY SPECIALISTS' ASSIGNMENTS AND ORGANIZATION
1. GENERAL. In most ships, personnel allowance do not provide Culinary Specialists to
separately fill all assignments contained in this manual, however, Culinary Specialists along with
food service attendants can be organized to perform all required functions. Individuals of the
Culinary Specialist rating should be assigned to officers' messes and stateroom spaces in
supervisory capacities for sufficient periods of time to provide for continuity in the performance of
assigned duties and teamwork in coordinating total officer support efforts. In this same regard,
those duties which are less desirable and which require only minimum technical and professional
competence should be rotated among assigned Culinary Specialist personnel to the maximum
extent possible. This will ensure that all personnel assigned are provided an equal opportunity for
professional growth and eventual advancement.
2. LEADING MESS PETTY OFFICER. The senior enlisted person assigned is the leading food
service petty officer responsible to the wardroom officer or treasurer for the supervision of food
service personnel and the day-to-day details of mess management. He/she supervises and trains
assigned personnel, directs the procurement, preparation, and service of food, and works out the
details of menus and seating plans for the approval of the mess wardroom officer or treasurer and
the president. During meals he/she stations himself/herself in the wardroom to oversee the
service and ensure that it is properly performed. A good leading food service petty officer will
quickly determine the preferences of the members of the mess and adjusts meal planning
accordingly. He/she will have a thorough knowledge of food and of menu planning, and will
demonstrate great pride in his/her work.
5303 WARDROOM CULINARY SPECIALIST DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
1. GENERAL. Culinary Specialists are responsible for performing the functions associated with
the management and operations of messes and quarters afloat. The functional elements
described below and associated tasks and duties contained within each functional area will
normally be considered the responsibility of the Culinary Specialists. In cases where it is
impractical to rely solely on Culinary Specialists, the rotational pool may be used to assist and
support the Culinary Specialist personnel.
2. WARDROOM. Culinary Specialist personnel are responsible for the following:
a. supervising wardroom mess personnel;
b. determining the number of officers who will be aboard for meals;
c. determining the number of guests expected and being alert for unexpected guests;
d. ensuring that the proper number of tables and covers are provided to serve guests and
officers;
e. supervising the seating arrangement for meals;
f. seeing that the "buck" is in its proper place before each meal (as applicable);
g. supervising the serving of all meals and ensuring that:
h. meals are properly served and on time;
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
i.
wardroom personnel uniforms are clean, unwrinkled, buttoned properly, and that the rules
and requirements of personal hygiene are observed;
j. wardroom personnel are attentive, alert, and do not lean on the sideboard or against the
bulkheads during meal hours;
k. changing soiled linens and napkins;
l. avoiding waste of food and mess supplies of any kind;
m. assuring that the wardroom and equipment are kept clean and neat at all times; and
n. assuring table and chair covers are cleaned quarterly; drapes semiannually or as
prescribed by the mess president or mess wardroom officer or treasurer.
3. GALLEY. Culinary Specialists are responsible for the following:
a. preparing food for the wardroom mess;
b. keeping the galley clean and neat;
c. keeping all cooking utensils, ranges, stowage places, and other equipment clean and free
from grease;
d. disposing of garbage from the galley; and
e. drawing stores for use in preparing food in the galley.
4. PANTRY. Culinary Specialists are responsible for the following:
a. keeping the pantry and equipment clean and neat;
b. ensuring leftover food is stored properly in a sanitary manner;
c. polishing silverware and serving dishes;
d. taking inventory of all silver;
e. drawing and stowing stores;
f. assisting in preparing food for the wardroom mess;
g. keeping the wardroom mess storeroom clean;
h. disposing of all garbage from the pantry; using proper plastic disposal procedures;
i. handling all linens used in the pantry; and
j. ensuring all dishes are washed.
5. STATEROOM AND LIVING SPACES. Culinary Specialists are responsible for the following:
a. supervising personnel assigned to provide basic officer stateroom and living space
maintenance and ensure the availability of cleaning gear. Cleaning gear lockers must be
well equipped with adequate cleaning equipment and supplies in order to allow officers O4 and below to maintain their living quarters
b. ensuring that all tasks and duties are performed in a timely and efficient manner.
6. DUTY WATCH. Culinary Specialists are responsible for the following:
a. keeping the wardroom and associated spaces in good order;
b. setting out food for officers having the late watch;
c. keeping fresh coffee, cream, and sugar available; and
d. keeping the dishes washed and the pantry clean.
5304 FOOD SERVICE ATTENDANT PERSONNEL UTILIZATION AND DUTIES (WR)
1. GENERAL. A rotational pool of enlisted personnel in pay grades E-1 through E-3 will be
established to provide basic stateroom and associated space maintenance services in officers'
quarters aboard ship. All personnel in pay grades E-1 through E-3 will be eligible for assignment
to the rotational pool without exception, and normally will remain in the pool for a period not longer
than 90 days. Petty officers will not be detailed to rotational pools except when E-3 and below
personnel are not available. Refer to OPNAVINST 3120.32D, chapter 6 for FSA manning
requirements.
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2. STATEROOM AND LIVING SPACES. Food service attendant personnel will be responsible
for the following:
a. daily bed making services and weekly bed linen changing for the commanding officer only;
b. keeping all community living areas and heads clean by sweeping and dusting; shining
sinks, mirrors and brightwork; scrubbing urinals, commodes and showers; emptying
wastebaskets daily; vacuuming rugs; and waxing tiles;
c. maintenance and cleaning of passageways; and
d. ensuring that officers' beds have clean linen and that soiled hand and bath towels are
changed twice weekly.
3. FOOD SERVICE RELATED SPACES, FOOD SERVICE AND FOOD PREPARATION. As
delineated in para. 4-4, cleaning and maintenance of food service and related spaces including
food service areas, food preparation areas and sculleries will normally be considered the
responsibility of Culinary Specialist personnel. However, food service attendant personnel may
be used to assist where it is impractical to rely solely on Culinary Specialists. Similarly, while food
service is a Culinary Specialist responsibility, the rotational pool may also be used to support this
function, including wardroom service and food preparation efforts.
5305 CPO CULINARY SPECIALIST DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
1. GENERAL. Culinary Specialists are responsible for performing the functions associated with
the management and operations of messes and quarters afloat. The functional elements
described below and associated tasks/duties contained within each functional area will normally
be considered the responsibility of the Culinary Specialists. In cases where it is impractical to rely
solely on Culinary
Specialists, the rotational pool may be used to assist and support the
Culinary Specialist personnel.
2. CPO MESS. Culinary Specialist personnel are responsible for the following:
a. supervising CPO mess personnel;
b. determining the number of CPO's who will be aboard for meals;
c. determining the number of guests expected and to be alert for unexpected guests while
ensuring that CPO mess guests pay for their meal at the time services are rendered
d. ensuring that the proper number of tables and covers are provided to serve guests and
CPO's;
e. supervising the serving of all meals and ensuring that:;
f. meals are properly served and on time;
g. CPO mess personnel uniforms are clean, unwrinkled, buttoned properly, and that the rules
and requirements of personal hygiene are observed;
h. CPO mess personnel are attentive, alert, and do not lean on the sideboard or against the
bulkheads during meal hours;
i. avoiding waste of food and mess supplies of any kind, and
j. assuring that the CPO mess and equipment are kept clean and neat at all times.
3. GALLEY. Culinary Specialists are responsible for the following:
a. preparing food for the CPO mess;
b. keeping the galley clean and neat;
c. keeping all cooking utensils, ranges, stowage places, and other equipment clean and free
from grease;
d. disposing of garbage from the galley; and
e. drawing stores for use in preparing food in the galley.
4. LIVING SPACES. Culinary Specialists are responsible for the following:
a. supervising personnel assigned to provide basic living space maintenance; and
b. ensuring that all tasks and duties are performed in a timely and efficient manner.
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5. DUTY WATCH. Culinary Specialists are responsible for the following:
a. keeping the CPO mess and associated spaces in good order;
b. setting out food for CPO's having the late watch;
c. keeping fresh coffee, cream, and sugar available; and
d. assisting FSA’s by keeping the dishes washed and the galley clean.
5306 FOOD SERVICE ATTENDANT PERSONNEL UTILIZATION AND DUTIES (CPO)
1. GENERAL. A rotational pool of enlisted personnel in pay grades E-1 through E-3 will be
established to provide basic living space maintenance service in CPO quarters aboard ship. All
personnel in pay grades E-1 through E-3 will be eligible for assignment to the rotational pool
without exception, and normally will remain in the pool for a period not longer than 90 days. Petty
officers will not be detailed to rotational pools.
2. LIVING SPACES. Rotational pool personnel will be responsible for the following:
a. pick up and delivery of bed linen.
b. keeping all living and associated spaces clean by sweeping and dusting; shining sinks,
mirrors and bright work; scrubbing urinals, commodes and showers; emptying
wastebaskets daily; vacuuming rugs; and waxing tiles.
c. maintenance and cleaning of passageways and heads in CPO quarters.
d. operating scullery machine, ware washing, dish washing, washing of pots and pans.
e. assist as servers on serving lines and/or during specific designated meal events as
prescribed by the mess president or mess wardroom officer or treasurer.
5307 ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
1. GENERAL. Sherry, wine, and beer may be served to American or foreign visitors in
wardroom and flag messes on naval vessels in support of diplomatic and community relations
goals. The authority, accountability and control of these alcoholic beverages are prescribed by
the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations and contained in OPNAVINST 1700.16. These
beverages shall be purchased using funds of the hosting mess. Under no circumstances shall
general mess funds be used for the purpose of purchasing alcoholic beverages.
5308 NAME TAGS FOR ENLISTED PERSONNEL
1. GENERAL. The publication, U.S. Navy Uniform Regulations (NAVPERS 15665I) Chapter 6,
section 4, contains general regulations prescribing uniform apparel to be worn by Culinary
Specialists and other food service enlisted personnel, including the wearing of name tags
indicating name, rate, and command to which assigned. The wearing of nametags will assist
officers and guests in correctly addressing the Culinary Specialist and other food service enlisted
personnel during meals and at other times.
5309 MESS PERSONNEL TRAINING PROGRAM
1. GENERAL. An effective training program for mess personnel is vital to establishing and
maintaining proper mess standards. A division officer's notebook, with proper up-to-date records,
written delegation of duties and responsibilities, and outlined training lessons with definite
objectives, is as important for the Culinary Specialist as for any other division in the ship. It is a
training program in which the commanding officer, executive officer, medical officer, supply officer,
chaplain, wardroom officer or treasurer, and other officers, including the junior ensign, have an
intimate and personal interest. All Culinary Specialists must be rotated into the positions of galley
and pantry personnel, under the close supervision of the leading mess petty officer, to ensure
their qualification in cooking. This is necessary both for their own personal growth and to broaden
the base skills upon which to establish duty sections.
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5310 PUBLICATIONS
1. GENERAL. A complete and current file of directives and guides for the use of the mess
wardroom officer or treasurer and assigned personnel is essential to the proper operation of
officers' messes. The presence and use of the necessary publications will assist in ensuring that
the required standards of food preparation, wardroom service, and stateroom service are met.
Further, a complete set of applicable directives must be available for the use of personnel
preparing for advancement in the rate.
PART E: OFFICERS' QUARTERS AND MESSES AFLOAT
SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION
5400 CUSTOM, TRADITION, AND CEREMONY
1. INFLUENCE ON MILITARY SERVICE. Custom, tradition, and ceremony exert a profound
influence on human behavior throughout life. This influence is particularly marked in the military
service with customs, traditions, and ceremonies. Such stimuli, when understood and properly
directed, can be of incalculable value to "esprit de corps". It is on discipline that the strength of
the Naval Service rests, and ceremony to a marked degree enhances discipline. Proper dignified
ceremony is more often in keeping with good custom than the lack of it. Every opportunity
should be used to develop pride and discipline by the example of ceremony.
2. WARDROOM LIVING. The customs and traditions of wardroom living are dictated by
propriety, good manners, and common sense. Since wardroom members are officers and
gentlemen/ladies, the standards of social conduct, deportment, and dress expected of officers and
gentlemen/ladies must be required in the wardrooms of the fleet, and expected of their members
both afloat and ashore.
5401 WARDROOM STANDARDS
1. GENERAL. To instill in their officers a respect for and habitual practice of these naval
customs and traditions, commanding officers must require the highest standards of service,
habitability, and cleanliness in their wardroom, and of neatness, decorum, and orderly manner of
living by the members. While the degree of formality must, as a practical matter, differ between
an aircraft carrier and a destroyer escort because of differences in physical facilities and number
of personnel assigned, no ship in the fleet is so lacking in facilities or personnel that the minimum
standards prescribed herein cannot be met.
5402 HABITABILITY
1. GENERAL. Wardroom country is each officer's seagoing home. It should exhibit the
maximum in habitability regarding meal preparation and dining facilities, berthing arrangements,
appearance and decor, lighting, ventilation, and noise level. The structure and installed
equipment provided in construction is but a base upon which attractive and comfortable facilities
must be built. The guidance of the commanding officer and the interest and efforts of all officers
are required.
5403 QUALITY OF FACILITIES, SERVICE, AND MEALS
1. GENERAL. The quality and variety of china, silverware, linens, and equipment in the ship's
allowance list are the minimum required and therefore must be maintained, augmented as
necessary, and used when appropriate. Alert, attentive, well-trained, and well-groomed food
preparation personnel must be expected and required. The service of varied, well-prepared, and
attractively presented meals must likewise be expected and required. The achievement of high
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standards of facilities and food service depends on the cooperation of all mess members, which in
turn must be elicited by the commanding officer.
5404 USE OF WARDROOM AND STATEROOMS
1. GENERAL. Wardroom and staterooms are officers' country, the seagoing home for officers
aboard ships, and should not be entered by others except when on official business or when
invited. When an officer has anyone in officers' country for business or social purposes, he/she
must keep in mind that he/she is using the home of other officers as well. For these reasons,
official business should be conducted in other parts of the ship to the maximum extent possible.
Wardroom pantries, washrooms, and storerooms are out of bounds to personnel other than mess
members and mess personnel, except for official business related to those spaces.
5405 ASSOCIATION WITH MESS PERSONNEL
1. GENERAL. The mess personnel duties and their continuous presence in officers' country
produce an especially close relationship between the enlisted personnel and mess officers.
Successful wardroom operation depends upon the mutual trust and respect of this relationship
which results from high levels of personal honesty and integrity. Officers who do not display the
qualities necessary for this special group should not be allowed to remain in the mess. Each
officer must, by his/her attitude and comments, show the mess personnel his/her recognition and
appreciation of their importance to the mess, the ship, and the Navy. Mess personnel are to be
addressed courteously by name. Each officer must ensure that others enjoying the privileges of
his/her mess observe these requirements.
SECTION 2: FACILITIES AND SERVICE
5406 FACILITIES
1. GENERAL. The ship structure and installed equipment in officers' country is the basis upon
which a proper facility can be built. Within the limitations of funding, the judicious expenditures of
supplies and equipage and overhaul monies on allowed items must be exercised to obtain
maximum levels of habitability. Improvisations with tender assistance can correct many of the
design deficiencies in our ships. Finally, the members of the mess must not be reluctant to
expend their own efforts in the physical improvement of their wardroom, since it is, after all, their
home.
2. CAMARADERIE AND ESPRIT IN WARDROOMS. To foster camaraderie and esprit in
wardrooms and to improve the opportunity for informal discussion and association between junior
and more senior officers, commanding officers should modify facilities as feasible to provide for
maximum seating at one service.
3. VENTILATION AND SOUND REPRODUCTION.
Efforts should be made to ensure
adequate ventilation and sound reduction is maintained through insulation, paneling, etc.
4. IMPROVEMENTS IN DECOR. Improvements in decor through the use of indirect lighting,
carpeting, draperies, pictures, and furniture coverings should be pursued in a planned manner.
Professional advice in matters of arrangement and decor, usually available without charge from
quality establishments, should be obtained whenever possible.
5. RECREATIONAL ITEMS. Recreational items including radio, stereo, television, and games
should be provided.
6. ADEQUATE AND HABITABLE DINING AREA. An adequate and habitable dining area for
assigned Culinary Specialists and other enlisted mess personnel should be provided when
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practicable, or in its absence mess personnel should be provided the option of dining in the
general mess.
5407 EQUIPMENT
1. GENERAL. An officers' mess afloat cannot operate in keeping with the standards prescribed
herein without adequate types and quantities of equipment and supplies. The allowances of
equipment and furnishings tabulated in the COSAL are minimum required quantities; the
quantities on hand are dictated by the usage necessary to meet the prescribed standards of
service. The full use of allowed equipment and supplies eliminates the need for practices not in
keeping with the standards of
wardroom living such as placing condiment bottles, milk
boxes, and paper on wardroom tables. Basic necessities for wardroom living are available
through the Navy supply system, but wardrooms are encouraged to add additional refinements to
increase habitability. Standard or non-standard allowance items which are not in stock must be
ordered from the supply system. Non-allowance items urgently required may be purchased
commercially.
2. MAINTENANCE OF FOOD SERVICE EQUIPMENT
a. General. Personnel other than maintenance personnel will not be permitted to make
repairs. If it becomes necessary to employ the services of a commercial establishment, the
cost of such services, plus any parts supplies, will be paid by a Voucher for Disbursement
and/or Collection (NAVCOMPT Form 2277) charging the appropriation, Operation and
Maintenance Navy.
b. Inspection. In addition to a thorough inspection for cleanliness, all food service machinery
and equipment will be carefully examined by the personnel who operate the machinery for
loose nuts, bolts, parts, connections, and the like, before beginning operations. This
inspection each morning is especially important afloat where machinery is subject to a
high degree of continuous vibration. Also afloat, a thorough inspection of machinery will
always be made after firing the guns and upon completion of any structural tests to which
the ship may be subjected.
c. Lubrication. Maintenance personnel should assume independent responsibility for proper
lubrication of food service machinery and equipment.
d. Speed of Machinery. Under no circumstances will food service machinery be operated at a
speed in excess of that prescribed by the manufacturer.
5408 SERVICE
1. GENERAL
a. Assigned Personnel. Service is provided by the assigned personnel. Except in the
smallest ships, the number of personnel authorized is designed to supply the full range of
services defined by the skill required of the Culinary Specialist group rating.
b. Shortages of Personnel. Shortages of food service personnel may occur from time to time
to the extent of requiring a reduction in normal services. Commanding officers must
ensure an equitable distribution of services among all officers aboard. Reduced services
must be progressively restored as the number of food service personnel approaches the
allowance level. In a like manner, a shortage of food service personnel will require
streamlining of service. This must be done by simplifying meals, not by neglecting proper
service.
c. Maintenance of Standards for Serving Meals. Heavy demands are placed upon the time
and energy of officers in today's Navy. Shortages of Culinary Specialist personnel must
not be justification for reduction in standards such that properly served meals are not
available in the mess at normal meal hours, regardless of the number of officers aboard.
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2. WARDROOM SERVICE. To maintain proper standards in wardrooms, service must be
organized to:
a. Provide individual table service at the breakfast meal and on those special occasions
deemed appropriate by the president of the mess and the commanding officer. Individual
service may also be necessary because of physical constraints of space or for other
reasons, and in this regard, type commander and fleet commander guidance should be
followed. At all other meals, family or buffet style food service will be used in officers'
messes afloat.
b. Provide duty watch service to tend the wardroom and provide food for the late watch.
c. Keep the wardroom clean and neat at all times.
d. Provide meal service in an efficient, timely, and courteous manner.
3. STATEROOM SERVICE. Minimum standards of stateroom service must be organized to:
a. Deliver and return laundry and dry cleaning from the ship's laundry as scheduled and
requested.
b. Make up beds daily for commanding officers, executive officers, unit commanders, and
officers in paygrades O-5 and above or their equivalents. Change bed linens weekly.
c. Maintain staterooms and associated spaces in a high standard of cleanliness.
4. PANTRY LINEN SERVICE. Linen service will provide:
a. Clean pantry towels daily.
b. Clean mess jackets, in good repair and in proper sizes, as required or prescribed by the
mess president or mess wardroom officer or treasurer.
5409 PERSONAL SERVICE
1. GENERAL. The following services are considered of a personal nature and therefore are the
sole responsibility of individual officers:
a. Bed making and bed linen changing except as noted in para. 5-9, 3b.
b. Care, maintenance and orderliness of personal effects which include military uniforms,
uniform accessories, and shoes.
c. Sorting and stowage of personal laundry.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
CHAPTER 6
CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL DEFENSE
PART A: CBR Defense
General ................................................................................................................................6000
Chemical Defense ...............................................................................................................6001
Biological Defense ..............................................................................................................6002
Decontamination of Equipment and Spaces ......................................................................6003
Prevention of Recontamination ...........................................................................................6004
Decontamination of Food Items ..........................................................................................6005
Radiological Defense ..........................................................................................................6006
Radiological Contamination.................................................................................................6007
Decontamination ..................................................................................................................6008
Food Preservation ...............................................................................................................6009
Additional References .........................................................................................................6010
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CHAPTER 6
CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL DEFENSE
PART A: CBR Defense
6000 GENERAL
1. DIRECTIVE. SECNAVINST 3300.2b titled the DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY (DON)
ANTI-TERRORISM (AT) PROGRAM is the implementation directive for DoD Directive
2000.12 which sets forth the DoD Antiterrorism Program. Food safety and Bio Terrorism is
a major concern today in all areas of food service. Food and water security measures
include those actions taken to detect, prevent, and mitigate the effects from intentional acts
designed to disrupt or contaminate food and water sources. Recent terrorist activities have
made bio-terrorism a real concern in the area of food safety. It is imperative that Culinary
Specialist are made aware of this danger and are prepared to meet this threat, especially
when dealing with overseas vendors and husbanding agents. It is extremely important that
steps are taken to ensure that subsistence is being procured from approved sources and
that a thorough inspection of all food items has been completed prior to stowage onboard.
These steps are necessary in ensuring that the consumption of contaminated food is
avoided at all cost eliminating the chance of illness, injury or death. The nature of the
chemical, biological, and radiological contamination problems, outlining basic defense
measures, and procedures to be followed when decontaminating eating, drinking and galley
utensils, galley equipment, and food preparation spaces are discussed in the following
paragraphs.
6001 CHEMICAL DEFENSE
1. GENERAL. Chemically contaminated food is difficult to decontaminate. Due to limits in
the ability to detect contamination that is bound to other materials, the use of such food will
always pose a major risk. Methods are given for decontaminating eating, drinking, galley
utensils, dinnerware dining spaces, food items, and water.
2. COMBINATION.
Descriptions of chemical agents, methods of detection and
identification of the various agents, material, equipment, and clothing to be used by
decontamination personnel, and methods of decontamination to be employed in the
recovery of various areas, spaces, materials, and objects are published in NAVMED P-5059
“NATO Handbook on the Medical Aspects of NBC Defense Operations,” NSTM Chapter
470, “Shipboard BW/CW Defense and Counter Measures,” and NAVMED P-5041,
“Treatment of Chemical Agents Casualties and Conventional Military Chemical Injuries.”
Descriptions of Biological Warfare Agents are published in NAVMED P-5042 “Treatment of
Biological Warfare Agent Casualties.”
3. DECONTAMINATION OF FOOD SERVICE SPACES AND EQUIPMENT. The degree
of contamination of food, food service spaces and equipment will depend on the chemical
agents used and the factors involved such as the method of delivery, the weather, and
various degrees of contamination (vapor contamination, light liquid contamination and heavy
liquid contamination).
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4. VAPOR CONTAMINATION. After surrounding areas have been decontaminated, the
enlisted messing facility should be aerated thoroughly and the entire food service space
washed down, inside and out, with clean water. All equipment and utensils used in the
preparation and service of food should be washed carefully, using normal procedures.
Spaces, utensils, and equipment then should be tested with the chemical agent detector kit
and, if necessary, any of the prescribed procedures should be repeated.
5. LIGHT LIQUID CONTAMINATION. The food service spaces, inside and out, should be
washed with hot water and an alkaline detergent, such as standard dishwashing compound.
The application of the solution at high pressure will increase effectiveness. During and after
cleaning, the spaces should be aerated. If slight contamination remains, the food service
spaces should be heated to as high a temperature as possible for about 1 to 2 hours. The
spaces then should be opened and ventilated for 15 minutes. This procedure should be
repeated as necessary, testing at intervals with the M8 Chemical Agent Detector Paper, M9
Chemical Agent Detector Paper (tape) or detector kits such as the M256 Chemical Agent
Detector Kit. Porous objects, such as wooden benches, will absorb liquid contamination to
the extent that it probably will be necessary to destroy them. Decontamination of utensils
and equipment is discussed below.
6. HEAVY LIQUID CONTAMINATION. Heavy liquid contamination is unlikely, except from
a direct hit. However, where the necessity of the local situation requires that the food
service officer attempt recovery, the following procedures are recommended:
a. Spaces. As no amount of washing or scrubbing of a porous surface that is heavily
contaminated by a liquid chemical agent, particularly mustard, is likely to do much
good, heavily contaminated areas should be roped off or abandoned as
unsalvageable. Residual contamination on nonporous surfaces or other light
contamination should be removed as described for “light liquid contamination.”
b. Utensils. Metal, glass, or china utensils or any equipment not damaged by water
should be immersed for 30 minutes in actively boiling water. Add 1 cup of alkaline
detergent to each 5 gallons of water. This process should be followed by normal
dishwashing procedures.
c. Large Equipment. Large equipment unsuited for immersion in boiling water should
be scrubbed vigorously with DS2 (general-purpose decontamination that is effective
for all toxic chemical agents) solution of hot water and an alkaline detergent, rinsed,
disassembled, and scrubbed again with particular attention to parts not reached by
the first washing. The equipment should be rinsed, dried, oiled, greased, and
reassembled. Any wooden items should be removed and destroyed.
d. Electrical Equipment. Unless the electrical unit is enclosed in a watertight seal,
water must not be used in the decontamination processes. Electrical equipment
should be decontaminated with DS2 or other solutions and methods as directed by
the damage control assistant or disaster control officer.
e. Decontamination of Water. In war, all water from undetermined sources is
considered contaminated. There are no field methods for individuals or small units to
decontaminate water sources. Disinfection does not remove chemical agents.
Certain types of standard water purification equipment, held by the engineer or
quartermaster units, are capable of removing chemical contaminants from water;
however, some modification of procedures may be required. Water that has been
obtained from approved sources, stored in impermeable containers and has retained
its residual disinfectant can be considered safe for drinking provided that external
decontamination of the container has been performed. Any water source suspected
of contamination should not be used unless the absence of contamination has been
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confirmed using a chemical testing kit. The following table (Table 1) gives some
guidance on the effects of liquid chemical agents on water.
TABLE 1 - Effects of Liquid Chemical Agents on Water
Chemical
Mustard
N-Mustard
Arsenicals
Nerve
Cyanogens
f.
Taste
Acid
Acid
Acid
Acid
Bitter
Effect of Agents on Water
Smell
Color
Bad
Yellow
Bad
Yellow
Bad
Yellow/Turbid
None
None
None
None
Toxicity
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes, but rapidly fades
Decontamination of Food. The effect of chemical agents on food depends on both
the nature of the agent and the nature of the food. These physical and chemical
properties determine the degree of penetration of the food by the agent as well as
whether any chemical reaction will take place. This in turn determines whether
decontamination is possible. There is likely to be a requirement for military units to
go completely over to using prepackaged foods in air tight containers. Physical and
chemical absorption of agents into food can take place. In either event, the taste,
smell, and appearance of the food may be affected. In addition, food may become
highly toxic without any change in outward appearance. Field concentrations of
phosgene and HCN would be unlikely to cause any serious contamination. Unlike
the case with water, both liquids and vapors can cause spoiling of food. The
following table (Table 2) gives some effects of agents on foods.
TABLE 2 - Effects of Chemical Agents on Water
Agents
Liquid Nerve
Vapor Nerve
Food Type
All
Low fat/High/Low
moisture
Vapor Nerve
Low fat/Low moisture
Vapor Nerve
Liquid/Vapor
Blister
Vapor Blister
High fat content
All
Vapor Blister
Low fat/Low moisture
Vapor Blister
Choking
High fat content
All
Cyanogens
All
Low fat/High/Low
moisture
Action
Condemn
Dry food should be exposed to air for 48
hrs., others to be washed with NaHCO3,
peeled if possible, and cooked by boiling.
Dry food should be exposed to air for 48
hrs., others to be washed with NaHCO3,
peeled if possible, and cooked by boiling.
Condemn
Condemn
Dry food should be exposed to air for 48
hrs., others to be washed with NaHCO3,
peeled if possible, and cooked by boiling.
Dry food should be exposed to air for 48
hrs., others to be washed with NaHCO3,
peeled if possible, and cooked by boiling.
Condemn
Agents decompose in water, wash food
and expose to air for 24 hrs. Food may be
unpalatable and require disposal.
Unlikely to have any effect.
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6002 BIOLOGICAL DEFENSE
1. GENERAL. Current and emerging technology indicates that the most effective route for
Biological Warfare Agents to gain entry into the body is the respiratory tract using aerosols
1-5 microns in diameter. Biological warfare employing the oral route of entry through
ingestion of deliberately contaminated food may be limited to small terrorist attack scenarios.
The deliberate use of heat stable toxins, however, such as staphylococcal enterotoxin,
which is frequently the cause of reported peacetime outbreaks of foodborne illness, would
make identification of a biological warfare attack very difficult. Development of detectors,
the use of individual protective equipment and prophylaxis will be the best protection against
biological warfare attack.
The general sanitation procedures discussed in this section are very important from a food
sanitation viewpoint, but will have little impact in reducing the effect of a biological warfare
attack employing aerosols.
The instructions of the military commander should enable the supply officer to operate an
enlisted messing facility under conditions following a biological attack. The following
instructions prescribe the protection that should employed in the decontamination of eating,
drinking, and galley utensils, food preparation equipment, dining spaces, food items and
water in an area contaminated by biological agents. In contrast with nuclear and chemical
contamination, it probably will be impossible to locate or identify in a reasonable time
specific items or areas that are contaminated with biological agents. Similarly, it will not be
possible to measure the completeness or efficiency of the biological decontamination unless
tedious laboratory procedures are used; therefore, all surfaces that would be health hazards
if contaminated will be regarded as contaminated and treated accordingly.
2. PRECAUTIONS IN BIOLOGICAL DEFENSE. Decontamination teams should wear
individual protective equipment including the MCU–2/P protective mask. Precautions should
be taken to prevent any personnel from entering uncontaminated spaces.
3. CONTAMINATION BY BIOLOGICAL AGENTS. When treating the problem of biological
contamination, it is assumed that there could be contamination of personnel, of all exposed
surfaces, and of surrounding air. These instructions are intended for use in the event of
suspected or known contamination.
The task is to decontaminate and prevent
recontamination.
The major risk from transmission of infectious disease is from droplet nuclei, tiny particles
that do not settle readily. Because of their size, they can bypass the barriers in the upper
airway and settle in the alveoli of the lungs. Large particles will settle rapidly; while they are
less likely to be inhaled, they can contaminate surface and foodstuffs. Contamination on
food and surfaces may be ingested with the food or carried from the surfaces to the mouth
by hand-to-mouth contact.
Because of the current difficulty in rapidly detecting biological agents, knowledge of
contamination may (although, not necessarily) be based on the occurrence of widespread or
unusual sickness. This sickness could be caused by contamination that had occurred
several days or weeks before.
6003 DECONTAMINATION OF EQUIPMENT AND SPACES
1. INITIAL PROCEDURES. After contamination has occurred, decontamination measures
should be carried out (as described below) so that recontamination will not occur.
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Decontamination procedures and chemicals are as follows: Steam application to
surfaces, when available, is effective and may be used ashore and afloat. Afloat, Naval
Ships’ Technical Manual (NSTM), Chapter 470, outlines a steaming procedure for
decontaminating spaces. Calcium hypochlorite (65-70%) used as a one percent or 9
percent solutions in water with 0.5 percent detergent (Decontaminating Compound, NSN
9G 6850-00-664-2008) is readily available and is recommended. If the above detergent
is not available, Liquid Detergent #50, NSN 7930-00-282-9699, or equivalent may be
substituted. Disinfectants such as iodophor solutions (germicidal or detergent) or other
disinfectants registered with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) may be used if
chlorine is not available. The medical department should be contacted for advice and
recommendations as necessary when using these solutions. If calcium hypochlorite is
not available, the deposits can be removed (physical decontamination) by the use of
detergent solutions alone. In addition to the CBR decontamination compound a variety
of detergents or cleaning compounds are available including liquid chlorine bleach and
other laundry and dishwashing compounds, solvent-emulsion and water emulsion
cleaners.
2. DECONTAMINATION OF VARIOUS TYPES OF EQUIPMENT
a. Large Equipment. Large equipment (those items too large to be immersed in sinks
or run through dishwashing machines) should be washed, rinsed, and
decontaminated in the same manner as prescribed for interior surfaces of food
service spaces. The methods most suited to decontaminating large equipment are
those involving the use of hypochlorite and detergent solutions. Hypochlorite’s are
corrosive to all metals that will rust and should not be allowed to come into contact
with motors and other electrical equipment from which such hypochlorite’s could not
be thoroughly wiped off. As much equipment as possible should be covered with
clean cloths after decontamination to prevent recontamination.
Hypochlorite’s
identified as calcium hypochlorite (high-test hypochlorite’s), which contain 65-70
percent available chlorine can be used. This is the most concentrated form of
hypochlorite or active chlorine available. Its normal use is for disinfecting potable
water, potable water tanks, potable water hoses, etc. (NAVMED P-5010-6). This
solution can be used, after suitable dilution, for decontamination or the calcium
hypochlorite can be dissolved in 1 gallon of water, which gives a solution of 5,000
ppm (0.5 percent) available chlorine.
b. Small Items of Equipment. Small items of equipment that will not suffer damage by
immersion should be washed, rinsed, and sanitized in the manner described here for
eating and drinking utensils.
c. Dining and Small Galley Utensils and Other Small Items. Dinnerware, small galley
utensils, and all other small items should be decontaminated. Items not absolutely
essential to the operation or the mess can be removed more easily than
decontaminated.
3. ADDITIONAL PROCEDURES. In addition to the initial procedures, decontamination
should continue for as long as it is determined by competent authorities that danger exists.
Interior surfaces, except overhead and bulkhead surfaces out of reach should be
decontaminated daily as long as the danger exists. Also, as long as the danger exists, large
equipment should be decontaminated before and after each meal, and small equipment and
utensils should be decontaminated after each use. After decontamination, the small
equipment and utensils should be covered with a clean cloth.
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Direct exposure to bright sunlight for an hour or more is an effective decontaminant for
smooth, nonabsorbent surfaces. Most exterior surfaces of building and ships where rapid
decontamination is not required will be decontaminated satisfactorily by environmental
conditions, sunlight, and time. Dirty, dusty, or porous surfaces tend to protect biological
organisms from direct rays of the sun.
4. MACHINE WASHING GALLEY UTENSILS. The machine dishwashing instructions
given in this manual shall be scrupulously observed with qualified supervisory personnel
stationed in the scullery.
a. Additional Washing Precautions. The interior walls of the scullery, all working
surfaces (tables, dish carts, and sinks), the interior and exterior of dishwashing
machines, and all other equipment used in the washing and sanitizing of eating and
drinking utensils should be thoroughly washed, rinsed and decontaminated
(sanitized). After all surfaces and equipment have been decontaminated, eating and
drinking utensils should be brought to the scullery for decontamination.
Decontamination of such utensils must be accomplished by following the instructions
for washing and sanitizing eating and drinking utensils contained in this manual and
the “Manual of Naval Preventive Medicine”
b. (NAVMED P-5010-1/TB MED 530 Tri-Service Food Code).
c. Decontaminated eating and drinking utensils should not be handled by any person
who has previously handled contaminated utensils and should not be placed in
contact with any surface that has been exposed to contamination. Baskets or
containers should hold silverware in a vertical position; handle down, during the
washing and sanitizing procedure. Additionally, containers should be available into
which the silverware may be inverted without being handled by workers. If such
containers are not available, silverware should be laid flat in racks not to exceed one
layer of utensils. Particular care should be exercised in removing utensils from racks
after decontamination to prevent recontamination.
d. Sanitizing. If properly operating dishwashing machines, with the wash, rinse and
sanitizing rinse at the recommended temperatures are not available, it will be
necessary to manually wash and/or manually sanitize(171F) the dishware in a deep
sink, steam jacketed kettle or other container. The sanitizing rinse may be hot water
(171° F) or an approved chemical sanitizing agent.
e. After Sanitizing. After sanitizing, cover the wash racks containing utensils with a
cloth that has been sanitized by boiling or soaking in an approved sanitizing solution.
5. HAND WASHING GALLEY UTENSILS. Eating and drinking utensils may be washed
and sanitized to effect decontamination by manual methods as described in “Manual of
Naval Preventive Medicine” (NAVMED P-5010-1/TB MED 530 Tri-Service Food Code). The
washing precautions noted in the instructions in this manual for machine dishwashing are
equally applicable to manual dishwashing.
6004 PREVENTION OF RECONTAMINATION
1. GENERAL. Recontamination may be caused by secondary aerosols or clouds formed
from particles (bacteria or other organisms) which having been deposited on a surface, are
stirred up into the air again by scuffing, shaking, or other mechanical action. Although the
degree of danger that these secondary aerosols represent has not been definitely
established, protective measures to suppress them should be taken. Secondary aerosols
may be suppressed by wetting surfaces with oil or water. If oil is used as a suppressant, it
must not generate harmful vapors (cooking oil is suggested) and it must not be applied to
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walking surfaces, which may create slippery conditions. A suppressant should be used and
traffic should be restricted in food preparation areas.
It is important to ensure that before entering food service spaces, culinary specialists
and all personnel eating in the dining area are as free as possible from contamination. The
medical and public works officers and the damage control assistant may be consulted on the
decontamination of personnel. Personnel should be indoctrinated in at least the objectives
of biological defense. It has been found that removing clothing will shake off organisms
covering on the surfaces, thereby, setting up secondary aerosols. Therefore, in cold
weather, personnel in dining lines should remove outer garments and leave them outside
food service spaces prior to entering. Unauthorized personnel should not be permitted in
the food service spaces.
6005 DECONTAMINATION OF FOOD ITEMS
1. GENERAL. The advice of the medical officer should be sought before any attempt is
made to decontaminate food suspected of biological contamination.
2. DRY ITEMS. Food stored in containers that are resistant to the passage of biological
agents (sealed containers of metal, plastic, glass or porcelain) requires only the proper
exterior decontamination be performed. Paper labels and paper covers should be removed
from the container (identify contents of container using a grease pencil if necessary) and
one of the following methods of decontamination should be used:
a. Immerse the container for one minute in a solution of warm water containing not less
than 200 ppm available chlorine. Check the concentration periodically to ensure the
chlorine residual is maintained above 50 ppm. A potable water rinse is not
necessary. Clean containers may also be immersed in hot water, at least 171° F.
b. If the impermeable containers are soiled and require detergent cleaning, they should
be processed by dishwashing and sanitizing procedures either by machine or
manually.
c. Impermeable containers may be sanitized using any of the standard chemical
methods (such as bleach slurry, sodium carbonate, or DS2) followed by rinsing in
potable water).
d. Food packages that will not stand immersion should be wiped off with a solution of
water containing 200 ppm available chlorine. The food is to be thoroughly cooked
before it is served.
e. Food packed in sacks or other permeable containers, (e.g., fruit vegetables, nuts,
etc.) can be decontaminated by immersion for at least 15 minutes in a 100 ppm free
available chlorine solution or 30 minutes in a 50 ppm free available chlorine solution
and by thoroughly rinsing with potable water before cooking or serving. Head items,
such as lettuce, cabbage, celery, etc., must be broken apart before immersion.
3. FRESH OR CHILL ITEMS
a. Foods That Can Be Peeled or Pared. Foods that can be peeled or pared may be
decontaminated by using the procedure described for food packed in sacks above.
b. All Other Fresh or Chill Items. The use of heat is the most practicable means of
decontaminating contaminated foods. Thorough cooking will reduce contamination to
a safe level so food can be consumed. Specific methods to be followed in this form
of decontamination are outlined under “Additional Precautions” later in this chapter.
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4. FROZEN ITEMS
a. Impermeable Containers. Food items stowed in freezer space in impermeable
containers (canned frozen strawberries, for example) may be decontaminated as
outlined in “Dry Items” in this chapter.
b. Permeable Containers. Food items stowed in freezer space in permeable containers
(frozen fruits or vegetables for example) may be decontaminated by thorough
cooking before use.
c. Not Contained in Outer Packaging. Food items stowed in freezer space but not
contained in outer packaging (meat, for example) should be completely thawed and
thoroughly cooked before eating.
5. ADDITIONAL PRECAUTIONS
a. General. Hands must be free of contamination during the opening operations to
ensure that the contents do not become contaminated.
b. Opened Cans of Food. Opened cans of fruit, jam, jelly, or similar foods will be
destroyed, but opened cans of vegetables may be decontaminated by boiling the
vegetables for a minimum of 15 minutes in a steam-jacketed kettle.
6. DECONTAMINATION BY HEAT
a. Heat is the most practicable method of decontaminating foods. In no case will
decontaminated food be consumed until it is pronounced safe by a designated
medical officer. It is recommended that, insofar as possible, only foods contained in
impermeable packages (cans, bottles, jars) be decontaminated and used for meal
preparation.
b. Cooking. Food items that are not packaged or those, which are packaged in
permeable containers, may be cooked by either of the following methods:
(1) In a pressure-type cooker at 15 pounds pressure at 250° F.
(2) (121° C.) for 15 minutes.
(3) Boiling for a minimum of 15 minutes.
c. Baking. Certain contaminated items may be decontaminated by baking. Only those
items in the Armed Forces Recipe Service that specify an oven temperature of 400°
F. (204° C.) and above for a cooking period of 40 minutes or longer, will be used to
prepare baked items using contaminated ingredients.
d. Meats.
All meats, except those contained in decontaminated impermeable
containers (canned meat items), must be cooked to the well-done stage (at 325° F.)
(167° C.) for about 2 hours. Guidance cards in the Armed Forces Recipe Service
also include information on internal temperature indicating the well-done stage.
7. WATER CONTAMINATION
a. GENERAL. The detection of water contamination and the completion of associated
laboratory analysis are responsibilities of the medical department.
Biological
decontamination of water is not difficult when regular water treatment facilities exist.
However, more chlorine than normal will be needed to process the water. If no
water-treatment facilities are available, water contaminated by bacteria can be
decontaminated by any of the following methods:
1) Boiling for 5 minutes.
2) Distilling, if equipment is available.
3) Using iodine tablets according to the direction found on the label.
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A medical officer will approve the method and the completeness of the
decontamination process before any water is used for drinking purposes. Water that
has been decontaminated must be protected against recontamination.
6006 RADIOLOGICAL DEFENSE
1. GENERAL. Radiological (nuclear) defense includes all measures taken to reduce
personnel injury and material damage from radioactivity. Commanding Officers usually
assign responsibilities for guidance in radiological defense to the. Food service personnel
shall be assigned duties within the overall damage control plan. The specialized nature of
the food service operation will require the following:
a. Preliminary organization, distribution, and training of personnel to deal with blast
damage and subsequent radioactive contamination.
b. Emergency operation, decontamination, and recovery measures to cope with
the
situation. Survival may depend on how all individuals and teams are trained in each
area of responsibility. Advance preparation will contribute to rapid recovery of
functions essential to the mission. All Culinary Specialists will be made thoroughly
familiar with plans and procedures to be followed. Personnel training should be
accomplished with the advice and assistance of disaster control and medical
officers. During an emergency, a realistic evaluation of the disaster situation will be
made and initial steps toward recovery taken. There will be advance planning to
meet this situation. Protective clothing, monitoring equipment, and decontamination
gear will be needed.
6007 RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION
1. GENERAL. Radioactivity may be inducted in exposed materials close to a nuclear burst
or may result from bomb fission residues. Most common will be dust, although such items
as soap, table salt, copper or brass may become radioactive as a result of the action of
neutrons. A person carrying radioactive particles can easily contaminate an otherwise safe
object in an area. If this person handles food, the food likewise can become contaminated.
Radioactivity cannot be destroyed by cooking or sterilization, or neutralized by chemical
treatment. Radioactive materials can only be removed by physical means. It must be
reduced to a limit of radioactivity set by command authority by removing the contamination
physically or allowing it to “decay.” The extent radioactivity is existing in any food space will
be determined by survey with RADIAC (Radiation Detection, Indicator, and Computation)
monitoring equipment. If the survey so indicates, it may be necessary to reestablish the
general mess in an area designated safe by the Commanding Officer.
6008 DECONTAMINATION
1. GENERAL. Natural decay of radioactive substances commences immediately following
the nuclear blast. If the situation permits, hazards to decontamination personnel can be
reduced by delaying decontamination operations until natural decay has reduced
radioactivity to a safer level. The process of decontamination consists mostly of cleaning or
removing the surface to the depth of the contaminated layer. It will often be impossible to
decontaminate meat, fish, etc., due to absorption of radioactive salts found in the fallout.
This process neither neutralizes nor destroys the contamination, but transfers it to another
area where It presents less hazard.
The severity of contamination and its nature should be considered. Because galley and
dining spaces are usually protected, it is likely that contamination will result from the deposit
of finely divided solids or water droplets carried by the blast or otherwise airborne. Some
radioactive particles may lodge in porous surface materials. Distribution and, therefore,
levels of radioactivity will not be uniform.
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There are various methods of removing contamination. They differ in effectiveness in
removing the contaminant, in applicability to various surfaces, and in rate of operation. They
fall into two general classes, gross or rough decontamination and detailed contamination.
Gross decontamination consists of rapid washing down with large quantities of water from a
fire hose or nozzle system. Personnel aboard ship and in the field will be concerned with
gross decontamination. Detailed decontamination procedures are costly in time, manpower,
and material, and would be done only under direction of qualified personnel at shipyards.
2. WATER DECONTAMINATION. Efforts to decontaminate with heavily contaminated
water will obviously be ineffective. Water used for decontamination must be allowed to drain
freely from contaminated areas.
Aboard ship the evaporators are an effective means of obtaining potable water. If a ship is
in port the ship may be required to furnish safe potable water to the station. Seawater in the
neighborhood of an aerial burst to windward will be contaminated at the surface. A
subsurface burst will heavily contaminate seawater in the vicinity. See NSTM, Chapter 070;
Radiological Recovery of ships after Nuclear Weapons Explosions or NAVEDTRA 10670C,
Rate Training Manual for Hospital Corpsman 1 & C, for additional information on
decontamination procedures.
3. DECONTAMINATION BY CLEANING AGENTS. When materials specifically designed
for the removal of radioactive contaminants are available, they will be used as instructed.
When specifically designated materials are not available, the following formulas are
suggested for general cleaning of galley surfaces.
a. Formula 1:
1) Detergent, general purpose, liquid water soluble, type 1, 1/2. Sodium phosphate
tribasic, technical phosphate, type 2, 1/2 pound.
2) Water, hot (12 gallons), 100 pounds.
3) Directions: The sodium phosphate will be completely dissolved by being stirred
into hot water. The syrup liquid detergent will be added and stirred until
thoroughly dispersed.
b. Formula 2:
1) Dishwashing compound, machine granular, free-flowing.
2) Directions: The compound will be dissolved in hot water to make a 0.5 percent
approximate) solution and will be used hot.
c. Formula 3:
1) Citric acid, monohydrate, granular form.
2) Directions: Citric acid will be dissolved by being stirred into hot water to make a
three percent (approximate) solution (3 pounds in 12 gallons of water). In use,
utensils will be immersed and metal surfaces will be sprayed.
3) Except for citric acid, the foregoing materials are commonly used and are readily
available. The suggested formulations are not intended to supplant agents
specified in existing decontamination instructions. They constitute the bare
minimum as substitutes and will serve to meet immediate emergency
requirements. All chemical cleaning agents function most efficiently when hot.
The choice of method and cleaning agent to be used all depend on the nature of
the surface to be decontaminated, kind and degree of contamination, time,
manpower, and materials to do the work.
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4. DECONTAMINATING GALLEY, EQUIPMENT, AND DINING SPACES. Conduct a
radiological assay to determine the presence or absence of contamination with the food
service spaces using radiological detection equipment. Only readily accessible surfaces
(bulkheads and decks), and all food contact surfaces must be decontaminated unless a
significant penetration dose hazard exists in the spaces due to contamination in inaccessible
locations. Use conventional cleaning methods employing two man teams to decontaminate
the majority of interior spaces that have become contaminated. These methods include
scrubbing, wiping and some paint removal, as necessary, working from top to bottom in line
direction of any liquid flow. Care should be taken to avoid electrical equipment, especially
controls that are not water-proofed. Bare metal surfaces should be given an initial scrubbing
with alkaline detergents to remove grease films. Citric acid solution should then be applied
and allowed to remain for a minimum period of 10 minutes. The surfaces should then be
rinsed with clean fresh water, allowed to dry, and then monitored. In the absence of citric
acid, vinegar may be used, but it is less effective.
5. DECONTAMINATING UTENSILS AND DINNERWARE.
The treatment for metal
utensils should be carried out in essentially the same manner as for other metal surfaces,
namely, a detergent wash followed by acid treatment. When feasible, the utensils should be
immersed in the solution. Tray, cutlery, and metal tableware should be given the same
treatment as utensils. Dishes and glass items present no particular cleaning problem if the
glazed surfaces are without scratches and foreign deposits such as stains or hard-water
scale.
Plastic ware may present some difficulty because of the relatively porous character of the
surfaces, scratches, and the presence of foreign deposits. Both glass and plastic ware will
be machine washed, rinsed, dried, and each item monitored. Those that do not pass will be
inspected for cracks and surface defects. Cracked and badly scratched items should be
disposed of immediately. The other items still showing contamination should be given
repeated washings until safe, or should be segregated to await natural decay or disposal.
6. DECONTAMINATING FOOD. All food stuff should be carefully monitored in areas of
low background radiation so that greater accuracy can be achieved. Foods in metal or glass
packages will be safe. Contamination will be on the exterior surfaces and can be removed
by washing. Food items in sealed dust-proof packages will probably be safe if the wrapper
is not broken. Care must be taken with the disposal of the containers and wrappers. Some
vegetables can also be decontaminated if carefully washed, dried, monitored, and peeled.
Nonperishable items that cannot be easily decontaminated, such as flour, sugar, or salt,
should be set aside allowing natural radioactive decay to reduce the radioactivity to less
hazardous levels. Canned food should not be disposed of or segregated on the basis of
high readings obtained from unopened containers. Cans, particularly those enameled, may
incur a high level of induced activity (from zinc in the enamel, and not so much from the iron
in the can). Glass, because of its high salt content, may turn in color. Container
radioactivity is not transferred to the contents and highly radioactive containers can contain
food that is safe to eat. When surface contamination cannot be physically removed, the
food will be condemned. All food will be inspected and approved by the medical officer.
7. PRECAUTIONS IN DECONTAMINATION. Personnel engaged in decontamination must
wear individual protective equipment only if chemical weapons have also been used. In the
absence of chemical weapons, team members should wear water-resistant or waterrepellant clothing and rubber foot wear. In order to prevent heat stress casualties from
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occurring, particularly at high ambient air temperatures and relative humidity, WGBT heat
stress monitors should program work/rest cycles.
Precautions will be taken to prevent any contaminated personnel or material from entering
uncontaminated food storage or food service spaces. All personnel and material must be
monitored and cleared before entering spaces not requiring decontamination. Cleaning
gear, items of protective clothing, etc. used in decontamination procedures should be
segregated and disposed of as contaminated, according to their level of contamination. If
contaminated items are brought accidentally into food spaces, the contaminated items
should be removed and, pending decontamination of the affected areas, these areas should
be isolated. Personnel who may have walked through such areas or who may have
otherwise come in contact with radioactive particles shall be sent to a decontamination
station.
6009 FOOD PRESERVATION
1. GENERAL. Most foods will spoil unless special procedures are used to retard
decomposition. The principle methods used to preserve foods employ high temperatures to
pasteurize the foods, low temperatures to retard growth and enzymatic action, use of
preservative that alters water activity levels or alters pH, and gamma or X-ray radiation that
sterilizes certain foods.
2. PRESERVATIVES. Certain agents are used as preservatives to inhibit microbial growth
in food. They include salt, sugar, and sodium nitrate, and are used for curing and pickling
meat and vegetables. Other agents such as salicylic acid and sodium benzoate are also
used as preservatives. Ordinarily, salting is combined with curing and smoking to preserve
some meats.
Smoking improves flavor and, to a limited extent, helps inhibit
microorganisms.
3. FREEZING. Freezing at 0° F. and below is an effective method of preserving certain
foods. The length of time foods may be stored frozen depends on some extent on the foods
being frozen and on the temperature. Constant and cooler temperature the better for
maintaining foods at -30° F. or below is desirable.
4. CHILLING. Chilling food between 30° F. and 40° F. will prevent most pathogens and
retard many spoilage microbes, but will not prevent spoilage.
5. COOKING. Ordinary cooking may render foods digestible and palatable, but cooking
does not preserve them. In fact, it may expedite spoilage of protein foods (meat, milk and
its products, eggs), permitting active growth of both harmful organisms and those
responsible for spoilage at certain temperatures. Bacteria carry out the protein breakdown
that brings on foul-smelling, rotting processes in these foods.
Temperatures used for boiling (212° F.) (100° C) on top of a range or in a steam-jacketed
kettle are not sufficiently constant to ensure a complete destruction of spoilage organisms in
most foods. A product is safe only if cooked long enough to destroy the spore-forming
microorganisms and many kinds of heat-enduring bacteria.
This destruction is not
accomplished by ordinary baking at the oven temperatures used to bake most products.
During the baking process, heat does not penetrate into the item being cooked. Frying, like
baking, is not effective in destroying heat-resistant microorganisms because heat does not
penetrate the interior of some foods before over browning occurs on the exterior.
6. PASTEURIZATION. Foods can be preserved at least for short periods of time by the
pasteurization process. Pasteurization is a process of heating a substance, usually a liquid,
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to a sufficient temperature to destroy disease producing microorganisms without changing
the composition, flavor, or nutritive value of the liquid. Some spoilage microbes are
destroyed in the process. Milk is a good example of how pasteurization, in combination with
refrigeration or preservatives, can extend the storage times of many foods.
6010 ADDITIONAL REFERENCES
1. GENERAL. Additional information on Food Service Operations in Chemical, Biological
and Radiological Defense can be found in the Army (Field Manual) FM 10-23, Part Five,
Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Operations, Chapter 13, Protection From Contamination
and FM 4-02.7 Health Service Support in A Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Environment,
Chapter 5, Food Protection, and Food Decontamination.
Information on food and water
vulnerability assessments maybe found in US Army CHPPM Technical Guide TG188. A
commander may establish a multi-discipline Food Security Action Team via his AntiTerrorism Officer (ATO) for conducting systematic review and assessment of installation
food systems using principles of Operational Risk Management (ORM).
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CHAPTER 7
SAFETY AND 3M/PMS STANDARDS
PART A: SAFETY AND 3M/PMS STANDARDS
General .............................................................................................................................. 7000
Safe Working Conditions................................................................................................... 7001
Receiving and Stowage Operations ................................................................................. 7002
Safe Food Preparation Operations ................................................................................... 7003
Equipment Used For Food Preparation ............................................................................ 7004
PART B: PLANNED MAINTENANCE SYSTEM (PMS)
General .............................................................................................................................. 7100
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
CHAPTER 7
SAFETY AND 3M/PMS STANDARDS
PART A: SAFETY AND 3M/PMS STANDARDS
7000 GENERAL
1. SAFETY PROGRAM. A well-organized safety program will reduce accidents which result
in time lost from the job, additional administrative burdens and undue hardships on all
concerned. A safety conscious operation with well-trained personnel will result in reduced
dish breakage, a more pleasant atmosphere, more efficient work habits, and better food
service. In the final analysis, safety is good management.
7001 SAFE WORKING CONDITIONS
1. GENERAL. It is necessary to have safe conditions before operations themselves can be
made safe. The following are conditions that should underline safety.
2. AMPLE WORKING SPACE. All working spaces should have adequate clearance
between equipment. Overhead clearance should be adequate enough so as to preclude
injury. All food preparation counters should have adequate width and height so as to make
the preparation area comfortable to work in.
3. SUITABLE STOWAGE FACILITIES.
Food stowage areas should have adequate
stowage facilities for all food items and food preparation equipment, with special emphasis on
stowage of machine attachments and cutting devices.
4. ADEQUATE LIGHTING. All food service spaces should have adequate lighting as well
as proper light intensity for jobs to be performed. For a good working environment it is
necessary to have a well lighted space. Adequate guards on low hanging fixtures are
required so as to avoid personal contact with exposed bulbs. All emergency lighting for exits
are in good operating condition.
5. GOOD INSULATION. Steam and water lines located near food preparation spaces are
required to have adequate insulation on all exposed pipes and valves.
6. GOOD HOUSEKEEPING. A properly cleaned and stowed operation will have a lasting
impression on all parties involved. Safety is a primary concern for all; floor clutter and
improper stowage can and will cause accidents to happen.
7. PROPER ENCLOSURES AND GUARDS FOR MACHINES. Machinery does not cause
physical harm to personnel; people cause physical harm to each other. To avoid personal
injury of personnel, knife guards and safety devices are required to be installed on all
equipment that requires them. You are further required to have all safety and operating
instructions posted adjacent to all equipment and visible to all operators.
8. PROPER CARE OF FLOORS. The floors in all areas require special attention; they must
be kept clean and dry to avoid personal mishaps. Terazzo and tile floors may become
especially slippery when weather is humid, and will require additional attention to maintain a
dry and safe condition.
9. CHAIRS AND TABLES. Chairs and tables can be some of the most abused pieces of
furniture in a food service operation. All chairs and tables requiring repair must be
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
accomplished so as to preclude injury to personnel.
removed until it is repaired.
Any damaged furniture must be
10. FIRE SAFETY. Fire can be the single most damaging casualty afloat as well as ashore.
It is up to you to ensure that your operation is fire safe, and that all personnel follow fire
safety procedures. All fire extinguishers should be checked for leakage as well as charging
on a monthly basis, and personnel must know the location of all equipment as well as who to
notify in case of emergency. All exits must be clearly designated as fire exits, unlocked and
free of debris. The use of supplementary locks or chains on fire exits is prohibited.
11. SAFE CLOTHING. The clothing that you wear during your working hours must be
presentable and well taken care of. Jewelry, watches, and bracelets are prohibited from food
service spaces. This does not apply to a plain ring, such as a wedding band. Safety shoes
are required in all food service spaces and loose sleeved shirts, ties or aprons should not be
worn when using grinders, mixers or saws.
12. COMPLIANCE WITH ORDINANCES, REGULATIONS, AND CODES. All equipment
installed in Navy galleys will be in accordance with National Restaurant Association
guidelines. Electrical equipment must be in accordance with the National Electrical Codes
guidelines. All circuit breakers must be legibly marked as to what that particular circuit
services. Integral electrical wiring on all equipment is mounted and secured properly. There is
no evidence of electrical shock hazards in any food service space.
13. TRASH. All metal trash receptacles within food service spaces are clean and covered
(when not in use) with the proper lid to prevent food contamination and odors. No cleaning gear
is stored in food service spaces. Recycling trash programs are highly encouraged.
7002 RECEIVING AND STOWAGE OPERATIONS
1. STOWAGE. In general, stowage compartments should be located away from sources of
contamination, maintained in good repair and kept clean. When receiving food items the
following procedures apply:
• When opening boxes, cartons, crates etc., remove nails and beware of broken glass.
• Locate the heavier and bulkier materials on the lower shelves. Avoid storage on top
of food lockers or other high storage units.
• Food containers should be covered except when in actual use or service.
• Food containers will become contaminated by wire splinters and dirt if not opened
properly.
• Know where your firefighting equipment is located. Items will not be stored where
they would be in the way when equipment is needed for emergency use. Flammable
cleaning materials or other materials will be placed in specified lockers or in approved
safety cans.
• Maintain good housekeeping so as to reduce the hazards of fire and other accident
hazards. Place stores so that they do not protrude into the aisles from bins or
shelves.
• Be sure that light bulbs are guarded and that materials are stored no closer than 18
inches to any bulb.
• To avoid toppling of cases and injury to personnel; do not stack cases too high.
• Use shelving of sturdy construction. In storerooms afloat, merchandise should be
secured behind battens or lashed down.
• Storerooms will be properly ventilated and smoking prohibited.
• When lifting, keep back straight, bend knees and let leg muscles do the work. If load
is too heavy for one person to manage, ask for assistance.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
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Use adequate and safe ladders; avoid overreaching to get objects.
Store pesticides, cleaning agents and chemicals in original containers away from food
service areas.
Carbon dioxide (CO2) bottles (tanks) should be stored and secured where they
cannot be knocked over. All gauges on tanks should be in good working condition.
7003 SAFE FOOD PREPARATION OPERATIONS
1. GENERAL SAFETY OPERATIONS.
A well-organized and maintained space with
efficient work habits will reduce accidents in creating a safe and pleasant work environment.
a. To avoid burns you must use hot pads properly. Slip hands through the elastic straps
on the back of pads to protect the underside of wrists and enable firm gripping of hot
pans. Launder pads frequently.
b. Cook in minimum amounts of water to avoid boiling over and spilling when pouring off
hot liquids.
c. Remove steam-jacketed kettle covers carefully so that steam may escape without
scalding hands or face.
d. Keep range tops and ventilation hoods free of grease.
e. Handles of cooking utensils should be turned away from the edge of the range to
prevent being pushed off.
f. Ask for help to lift heavy containers; know where to place the container in a clear work
area.
g. To avoid splashing when drawing hot water or coffee from an urn, turn the spigot
slowly and check all valves and spigots for proper closed position before filling urn.
h. Keep oven doors closed when not in use.
i. Do not clean the oven or range until it has cooled.
j. Clean up spills immediately and store all kitchen utensils off the floor and on shelves
or in proper spaces provided.
k. ALL EQUIPMENT MUST BE SECURED WHEN GALLEY WATCH PERSONNEL
ARE NOT IN FOOD SERVICE SPACES.
7004 EQUIPMENT USED FOR FOOD PREPARATION
1. GENERAL. Only trained and qualified personnel are authorized to use food service
equipment. Be sure all safety devices, to include interlock switches, shielded toggle
switches, temperature/pressure gauges, steam relief valves and machinery guards are in
place, are in proper operating condition, and that all parts are installed as directed by the
manufacturer. All electrical equipment must be secured before cleaning or adjusting. The
following guidelines apply for specific types of equipment.
2. CUTTERS AND CHOPPERS. Guards are required for cutters and choppers as specified
by the manufacturer, including blade guard and interlock switches that render the machine
inoperable when the guard is not properly positioned.
3. SLICERS. Slicers are required to be located away from the traffic areas, secured,
mounted, guarded, and grounded electrically.
a. Keep blade guards in place at all times unless the slicer is unplugged and disabled for
cleaning.
b. Use the pusher (not your hand) to guide the product being sliced toward the blade.
c. Always disconnect power cord prior to cleaning and reconnect only when ready
to
use.
d. Never touch the blade with your hands. Clean the blade with a clean, detergent
soaked cloth, wiping from the inside to the outside of the blade.
e. Always secure the slicer machine when not in use.
f. Always replace blade guards after cleaning machine.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
4. GRINDERS. A guard or feeding device must be installed on every grinder and kept in
place while the machine is in use. Do not put fingers or hands against the feed screw or
other grinding mechanisms. On other models a multi-hole plate is secured over the opening.
Plastic or metal stompers especially designated to prevent contact with the feed screw must
be provided. Always feed the grinder with the stomper, not by hand.
5. MIXERS. Food service mixers come in various sizes depending on the specific gallon
capacity that the mixer is capable of holding. You should never fill the mixer more than 2/3
full due to the uneven weight distribution. DO NOT START MACHINE WITH THE CLUTCH
ENGAGED - IT CAN DAMAGE THE MACHINE OR DO PERSONAL HARM TO FOOD
SERVICE PERSONNEL.
6. STEAM-JACKETED KETTLES AND STEAMERS. There are two different types of steam
jacketed kettles in use afloat as well as ashore. It is important to know which type your
command has installed. The following are basic principles to follow for each type kettle:
• Steam-Jacketed Kettle (Steam Supplied). Steam is supplied to food service spaces
for various operations including the use of steam jacketed kettles. The food service
division is required to ensure that the operating procedures are closely monitored, or
the steam kettle can become a potential lethal instrument. To ensure the kettle is
maintained properly follow the required PMS cards and operating instructions 18” pull
chain on relief valve required.
• Steam-Jacketed Kettle (Electric). Steam is internally supplied through a sealed
“vacuum” system. It is the responsibility of the galley watch captain to ensure that the
level of water does not go below the “MIN” level on the sight glass. To recharge the
system with new water it must be distilled. You can obtain this water from either the
ship’s distilling plant or from shore sources of supply. If tap water is used it can cause
buildup of mineral deposits on the heating coils and decrease the effectiveness of the
kettle NO chain required (pull) on relief valve.
• Hydrostatic Testing of Steam-Jacketed Kettles. Hydrostatic testing of steam-jacketed
kettles is required as per OPNAVINST 11000.16A (ASHORE), and NAVSEA Tech
Manual Chapter 651 Commissary Equipment (AFLOAT) is required to be scheduled
on the ship’s preventive maintenance schedules. The testing is required on an
annual basis.
7. CUTLERY. Knives are the most important tool in your food service operation. A dull
knife can cause more harm than a sharp knife, so ensure that your knives are always kept
sharp and clean. Cutting boards made of plastic, polyethylene, or hard maple or equivalent
close-grained wood are required for use (see P5010-1, Section 4 for additional guidance
regarding the use of wood cutting boards and utensils in the general mess). Each CS is
required to clean his/her own knives; do not delegate them to the mess attendant. KNIVES
ARE NOT CAN OPENERS and should not be used as such.
8. DEEP FAT FRYERS. The deep fat fryer has the potential to be an extremely dangerous
piece of equipment. If the deep fat fryer is not maintained properly or safety rules adhered to
the possibility exists that you may be severely burned. The following basic safety rules
should be followed:
• The heating coils must ALWAYS be completely immersed in vegetable oil. If they are
not then the possibility exists that the vegetable oil may ignite.
• The deep fat fryer is required to be manned at all times while the deep fat fryer is in
operation.
• The deep fat fryer will not be operated without deep fat fryer thermometers inserted in
each separate fry kettle or attached to the individual fryer baskets. Use of individual
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
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•
•
thermometers is not only a good safety practice, but allows you to quickly check the
accuracy of the units’ thermostats and make adjustments in your frying temperature
as needed.
When filling the deep fat fryer with new shortening ensure that the coils are packed
with new shortening and that the level is at least 1 inch above the top of the coils.
Vegetable oil ignites at 475° F.
Ensure that the deep fat fryer is calibrated and that all safety devices are in full
operation.
9. CHINA AND GLASSWARE. China and glassware is essential to your food service
operation. To ensure that you get the most out of your eating utensils follow these simple
rules:
• Chipped or cracked dinnerware/glassware is required to be discarded when
discovered.
• Use care when handling glasses and dishes. Do not stack them so that there is
danger of toppling. Whether afloat or ashore, remember, STOW FOR SEA.
• When stowing glasses and cups, place them upside down in the stowage racks.
• If you know of, or suspect that there is broken glass or dishware in soapy water, drain
the tank, remove the broken pieces carefully, and refill with soapy water to resume
the process.
PART B: PLANNED MAINTENANCE SYSTEM (PMS)
7100 GENERAL
1. GENERAL. PMS maintenance actions are the minimum actions required to maintain
machinery and equipment in a fully operable condition, and within specifications. Preventive
maintenance is set up for all equipment that might seriously damage the equipment or affect
the safety of the operator if it should break down. A good maintenance program should have
the list of equipment that requires periodic inspection, adjustment, cleaning, and lubrication.
A well maintained galley plays an important role in having an effective food service operation
that contributes to saving labor and high morale.
2. PLANNED MAINTENANCE SYSTEM (PMS)
a. Ensures that preventive maintenance is completed when required.
b. Provides a simple and standard means for planning, scheduling, controlling and
performing preventive maintenance.
c. Uses schedules and documents, some of which are the following:
• Daily PMS schedule;
• Weekly PMS schedule; and
•
Quarterly PMS schedule.
3. LIST OF EFFECTIVE PAGES (LOEP). The list of effective pages (LOEP) provides a
listing of the maintenance index pages (MIPs) assigned to each department, divided by work
center.
4. MAINTENANCE INDEX PAGE (MIP). The Maintenance Index Page (MIP) lists all
maintenance requirements for each particular piece of equipment (see Fig. P-1).
5. MAINTENANCE REQUIREMENT CARD (MRC). The Maintenance Requirement Card
(MRC) provides detailed procedures for performing maintenance requirements and tell who,
what, when, how, and with what resources a specific requirement is to be accomplished. It
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
also states safety precautions which reduce the chance of costly or dangerous preventive
maintenance errors. The MRC contains the following (see Fig. P-2).
• Ship system, system subsystem, and equipment.
• MRC codes:
• MIP series code
• Periodicity code
• Brief definition of the PMS action to be done.
• Rates. Recommended skill level of the maintenance person identified by rate or
NEC. Qualified maintenance personnel other than specified may be assigned.
• Manhours required to accomplish the maintenance action.
• Safety precautions. Awareness to possible hazards to personnel or equipment while
performing maintenance.
• Tools, parts, materials and test equipment. Note: Necessary to accomplish the
maintenance action.
• Procedure. Sequence of detailed steps to be followed in performing the maintenance
action.
• Location.
• Denotes the physical location of the equipment.
• EGL is placed in lieu of the physical location to alert maintenance personnel
that
more than one piece of equipment exists.
• Date, Month, and year the MRC was prepared.
• SYSCOM MRC control number located vertically along the lower right side of the
MRC.
6. EQUIPMENT GUIDE LIST (EGL). A 5” x 8” card is used when several identical pieces of
equipment are listed under the same MRC card. The EGL contains the following:
• Controlling MRC code.
• Name of equipment and serial number (if applicable).
• Location of each piece of equipment.
7. CYCLE PMS SCHEDULE. The Cycle PMS Schedule displays the planned maintenance
requirements to be performed during the period between major overhauls of the ship. The
Cycle PMS schedule contains the following:
• Ship’s name and hull number.
• Work center.
• Department head signature and date approved.
• MIP/components - listing of the MIP codes and their related system, subsystems, or
equipment for which PMS requirements are to be scheduled in the cycle schedule.
• The annual, semi-annual, multiple-month (18 month and greater) maintenance
requirements, and any related maintenance checks (except daily and weekly) to be
completed during the cycle indicated.
• Every two weeks, monthly, every two months, and quarterly maintenance
requirements, any related maintenance checks and situation requirements to be
completed during each quarter.
8. QUARTERLY PMS SCHEDULE. The Quarterly PMS Schedule displays the work
centers’ PMS requirements to be performed during a specific three-month period. The
quarterly PMS schedule contains the following:
• Work center
• Year
• Quarter after overhaul
• Department head signature
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
•
•
Date prepared
Months covered
9. WEEKLY PMS SCHEDULE.
The Weekly PMS Schedule displays the planned
maintenance schedule for accomplishment in a given work center during a specific
week. The weekly PMS schedule contains the following:
• Work center code
• Date of current week
• Division officer approval signature
• MIP code minus the date code
• List of applicable components
• Maintenance personnel assigned
• Periodicity
• Outstanding major repairs, etc.
10. PERIODICITY CODE. The periodicity code denotes the number of maintenance
requirements needed for a certain piece of equipment. The following are examples of
periodicity codes:
• D - daily
• 2D - every second day
• W - weekly
• 2W - every second week
• M - monthly
• Q - quarterly
• S - semi-annually
• A - annually
• R - situation requirement
• 18M - every 18 months
• 48M - every 48 months, and,
• LU - lay up.
NOTE: The numbers indicate sequence. For example, if a piece of equipment has four
monthly checks, they are identified as M-1, M-2, M-3 and M-4. Periodicity may indicate a
combination of calendar and situation requirements. (For instance, M-1R means that the
check is to be done monthly or when some specified situation occurs).
11. PMS PROCEDURES
a. Daily the designated maintenance person checks the weekly PMS schedule.
b. Maintenance person selects the proper MRC from the holder in his/her work center.
The SYSCOM MIP CONTROL number plus the periodicity code gives the
maintenance person the MRC code, which is found in the upper right hand corner of
the MRC. (The MRC’s are filed in numerical order by MRC code i.e., A-609 M-1,
A609 M-2, 6512 M-1, 6513 W-1, etc.).
c. Verify the correctness of the MRC using the MIP, LOEP, and change page.
d. Perform all maintenance of equipment listed on the EGL (when EGL is attached to the
MRC).
e. Accomplish the job using proper tools, parts, materials, test equipment and
procedures on the MRC.
f. Follow safety precautions.
g. Maintenance person reports to his/her work center supervisor if a problem exists or
when work is complete.
h. Maintenance person returns the MRC to the card holder.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
12. PMS AUDIT/SPOT CHECK.
Individual maintenance requirements will be audited
periodically in order to determine the effectiveness of PMS accomplishment. The food
service division officer, or other designated person, should perform a PMS audit on at least
one maintenance requirement (MR) per week. The following steps should be taken:
• Select at random from the weekly or quarterly schedule a maintenance requirement
that has been crossed off as being completed.
• From the work center supervisor, weekly schedule or accomplishment log, identify the
individual who performed the maintenance requirement.
• Have the maintenance person pull the MRC (auditor should read the MRC and
become familiar with the steps performed). Proceed with the individual to the
equipment selected to be checked.
• Question the maintenance person. The questioning should be of a general nature
and related to the maintenance requirement. Memorizing the card is not required, but
if the maintenance was done, the person should be familiar with the MRC. Inquiries
should be made to determine whether:
o
The person actually did the work. (If not, a scheduling or supervisory problem
exists). If someone else did the work, then the individual who actually did the
maintenance should be questioned.
o
All basic parts of the maintenance requirement were done (i.e., if parts of the
MR required operation of the equipment, is it in fact operable? If there was a
requirement to grease the chain drive, was it greased? If there is a requirement
to calibrate the oven, how was it done, etc.?).
o
Were basic safety precautions observed?
o
The proper tools/materials were used (e.g., where did the maintenance person
obtain the grease or solvent; was test equipment properly calibrated, etc.?).
o
If disassembly is part of the procedure, inspect the equipment for evidence of
disassembly (e.g., access plate, hold down bolts, mechanical guards, etc.).
o
If an equipment guide list (EGL) was used, determine if the maintenance
requirement was performed on all equipment listed.
o
The work center supervisor should question the technical accuracy of the MRC.
(If it is incorrect or not clear in any way, has a technical (category B) feedback
report (FBR) been submitted?).
13. COORDINATING PERSONNEL
a. The work center supervisor initially organizes personnel by filling out the weekly PMS
schedule, based on the cycle and quarterly schedules.
b. Maintenance personnel from other areas such as the Electrical Division, Air
Conditioning and Refrigeration, Steam and Heat, or Damage Control are to perform
the PMS.
1) The senior CS is responsible for communicating with senior personnel from
maintenance divisions to ensure that maintenance has been performed properly
and on schedule.
2) The senior CS reviews the MRC to ensure work was done properly and on
schedule.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
Maintenance Index Page
SHIP SYSTEM, SYSTEM, SUBSYSTEM, OR EQUIPMENT
Dishwashing Machine 6512
T
E
S
T
O
T
H
E
R
SYSCO
MRC
CONTROL NO.
65 Z75J N
58 A7TT N
65 Z75K N
65 Z75L N
MAINTENANCE INDEX
PAGE (MIP)
OPNAV 4790/84
(REV. 2-82)
MAINTENANCE REQUIREMENT
DESCRIPTION
A scheduling aid: “U” MRC
(Unscheduled Maintenance
Requirement) is provided to assist
in restoring system/equipment to an
operational condition. Its use may
be directed by a scheduled MRC,
scheduling air, or
system/equipment failures.
** For scheduling purposes only; no
MRC is provided.
1. Inspect dishwashing machine.
2. Verify accuracy of dishwashing
machine thermometer(s).
NOTE: Accomplish monthly and when
thermometers are suspected of being
out of calibration.
3. Inspect in-line strainer.
4. Descale machine.
INACTIVE EQUIPMENT
MAINTENANCE
The following requirements will be
scheduled when equipment is
inactivated for periods of prolonged
idleness.
Lay-Up Maintenance
1. Inspect dishwashing machine.
NOTE: Use MRC M-1.
1. Install approved fire retardant cover
over dishwashing machine.
NOTE: Accomplished as required to
protect equipment.
Periodic Maintenance
None
Start-Up Maintenance
1. Remove protective cover from
dishwashing machine.
NOTE: Accomplish if required.
Operational Test (None)
...1.1.1
DATE
MAY 2009
REFERENCE PUBLICATIONS
Page 1 OF 1
Figure 1
7-11
PERIODICITY
CODE
RATER
MAN
HOURS
RELATED
MAINTENANCE
M-1
M-9R
EN/MM2
EN/MM2
0.2
2.0
None
None
Q-1
U-1
EN/MM3
1.0
None
None
LU-1 **
SU-1 **
SYSCOM MIP
CONTROL
NUMBER
6512/003-58
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
Maintenance Requirement Card
SHIP SYSTEM
SUBSYSTEM
MRC CODE
6512
SYSTEM
EQUIPMENT
Dishwashing
Machine
6512DV
MAINTENANCE REQUIREMENT DESCRIPTION
1. Verify accuracy of dishwashing machine thermometer(s).
M-9R
RATES
EN/MM2
M/H
2.0
TOTAL M/H
2.0
ELAPSED TIME
2.0
SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
1. Forces afloat comply with Navy Safety Precautions for Forces Afloat, OPNAVINST 5100 series.
2. Ensure all tag-out procedures are in accordance with current shipboard instructions.
58
PROCEDURE
NOTE 1: Accomplish monthly and when thermometers are suspected of being
out of calibration.
NOTE 2: Calibration by an authorized calibration activity shall be accomplished
when Measure Automated System for Uniform Recall and Reporting (MEASURE)
indicates calibration is due.
NOTE 3: Accuracy of installed thermometers should be within ± 3 ° F. of
“standard” used. If thermometer is found to differ by more than ± 3 ° F., have
results verified by authorized calibration activity.
Preliminary
WARNING: Ensure all tag-out procedures are in accordance with current
shipboard instructions.
a. De-energize circuit and tag “Out of Service.”
Page 1 of 2
TOOLS, PARTS, MATERIALS, TEST EQUIPMENT
MATERIALS
MISCELLANEOUS
1. (1144) Tag, safety
1. [1682] Calibrator, temperature
indicator, Model 3604/3605
TOOLS
2. [3631] Calibrator, temperature
1. [1396] Wrench, torque,
indicator, Model 3603-1-1
preset, 2 interchangeable heads, Part No. T8438
2. [1789] Wrench, adjustable,
10” heavy duty, 1.135” jaw open
NOTE: Numbers in brackets can be referenced to Standard PMS Materials
Identification Guide (SPMIG) for stock number identification.
A7T
T
DATE
MAY 2009
MAINTENANCE REQUIREMENT CARD (MRC)
OPNAV 4790/82 (REV. 2-82)
Figure 2
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LOCATION
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
CHAPTER 8
FOOD SERVICE EQUIPMENT OPERATING/SAFETY
PROCEDURES
PART A: NAVAL SHIPBOARD FOOD SERVICE EQUIPMENT CATALOG
General.................................................................................................................................8000
PART B: PREINSTALL DIAGRAM
Equipment Mapping Process ...............................................................................................8100
PART C: EQUIPMENT
Ice Making Machines and Ice Flakers Operating/Safety Precautions ................................8200
Meat Slicer Operating and Safety Precautions ...................................................................8201
Microwave Oven Operating and Safety Precautions ..........................................................8202
Milk Dispensers Operating and Safety Precautions ............................................................8203
Noncarbonated Beverage Dispensers Operating and Safety Precautions.........................8204
Powdered Mix Blender Operating and Safety Precautions .................................................8205
Proof Box Operating and Safety Precautions......................................................................8206
Reach-In Refrigerators Operating and Safety Precautions.................................................8207
Salad Bar Operating and Safety Precautions......................................................................8208
Soft Ice Cream/Milkshake Machine Operating and Safety Precautions .............................8209
Vegetable Cutter Operating and Safety Precautions ..........................................................8210
Vegetable Peeler Operating and Safety Precautions..........................................................8211
Utensil Washing Machines Operating and Safety Precautions...........................................8212
Multiple Blade Bread Slicer Operating and Safety Precautions ..........................................8213
Dishwashing Machine (Conveyor) Operating and Safety Precautions ...............................8214
Dishwashing Machine Operating and Safety Precautions ..................................................8215
Food Mixing Machine, 20 Quart Operating and Safety Precautions...................................8216
Walk In Reefer Operating and Safety Precautions..............................................................8217
Steam Jacketed Kettles Operating and Safety Precautions ...............................................8218
Hot Dog Grill Operating and Safety Precautions .................................................................8219
Deep Fat Fryer (Non-Computer) Operating and Safety Precautions..................................8220
Dough Mixer – Horizontal Operating and Safety Precautions ............................................8221
Rotary Bread Toaster Operating and Safety Precautions ...................................................8222
Food Mixer (140 Quart) Operating and Safety Precautions................................................8223
Bun Slicer (Hotline) Operating and Safety Precautions ......................................................8224
Carbonated Beverage Dispenser Operating and Safety Precautions ................................8225
Coffee Urns Operating and Safety Precautions ..................................................................8226
Convection Oven Operating and Safety Precautions..........................................................8227
Deep Fat Fryer (Computer Type) Operating and Safety Precautions ................................8228
Dough Divider/Rounder Operating and Safety Precautions ...............................................8229
Dough Sheeter/Molder Operating and Safety Precautions .................................................8230
Food Waste Disposal System: Somat Model 3 Operating and Safety Precautions ...........8231
Griddle
Operating and Safety Precautions ....................................................................8232
High Compression Steamer (Market Forge) Operating and Safety Precautions ...............8233
Hot Chocolate Dispenser Operating and Safety Precautions.............................................8234
Ice Tea Dispenser Operating and Safety Precautions........................................................8235
Combi-Oven Operating and Safety Precautions .................................................................8236
Skittle 3-38 Operating and Safety Precautions ...............................................................8237
Accu-Temp Griddle Operating and Safety Precautions ......................................................8238
Electric Steam Table Operating and Safety Precautions ....................................................8239
Regular Steam Table Operating and Safety Precautions ...................................................8240
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
8-2
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
CHAPTER 8
FOOD SERVICE EQUIPMENT OPERATING/SAFETY
PROCEDURES
PART A: NAVAL SHIPBOARD FOOD SERVICE EQUIPMENT
CATALOG
8000 GENERAL
1. The Naval Shipboard Food Service Equipment Catalog is available
on-line on the Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division’s
(NSWC) homepage and is the only catalog that identifies food service
equipment approved for shipboard use. The catalog can be accessed
on-line at:
http://usnhabeqptcatalog.gdit.com/fsc/home.asp
Operating and safety precautions or instructions in this chapter are
general guidelines for food service equipment. General Messes need to
post the current manufacturers safety and operational instructions in the
galley for each piece of equipment. The following information explains
the purpose of the Naval Shipboard Food Service Equipment Catalog
•
•
•
•
The catalog has been prepared to assist planning yards, Naval Shipyards, Supply Officers,
Food Service Officers, Supervisors of Shipbuilding (SUPSHIP), Fleet Industrial Supply
Centers (FISC) and any other personnel who are required to order food service equipment
authorized for Naval ships and to provide information relative to dimensions, weight and
utility requirements. Equipment and their manufacturers have been selected because of
their known conformance to shipboard food service equipment standards.
The catalog identifies Food Service equipment approved for use aboard U.S. Navy ships.
Food service equipment listed in the General Services Administration (GSA) catalog is not
authorized for shipboard use. Some equipment, with the exception of utensils and small
consumable appliances, contained in the Forces Afloat Shopping Guide (FASG) may be
duplicates of those contained in this catalog; however, this catalog shall be the only
authority for all shipboard equipment.
Each page provides information relative to procurement, specific features, sizes, electrical
or steam requirements and any other additional information needed to properly install the
equipment in accordance with all applicable shipboard specifications.
If no entry appears in an equipment field, no information was available and none is
expected to be available. If “Pending” appears, no information was available at the time of
publication, but will be available at a later date. A “Surface Ship Hatchable” entry in the
remarks area means equipment will fit through a 26 inch by 66 inch oval hatch (Gen Spec
624c doors). A “Submarine Hatchable” entry means equipment will fit through a 26 inch
diameter hatch. A “Modular” entry means that the equipment was designed to be
disassembled to allow entry into a submarine and/or surface ship hatch and re-assembled
at place of installation.
Any equipment that is not an exact direct replacement and/or
requires movement to a different physical location could be subject to the "SHIPMAIN"
Ship Change Document (SCD) process. The SHIPMAIN process requirement must be
coordinated with Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division (NSWC-474).
8-3
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
If you wish to procure food service equipment that is not shown in this catalog, a request
must be submitted to NSWC Philadelphia for assessment of shipboard applicability. Letter
or facsimile shall be forwarded containing the following information:
o Requestor’s name, phone number and facsimile (fax) number.
o Requestor’s activity or ship.
o Type of Food Service equipment, manufacturer, model number, and manufacturer’s
point of contact and estimated cost of item.
o Valid technical and configuration justification for procurement. (Note: Please plan
ahead; imminent deployment, circumspect declarations of medical exceptions, end of
fiscal year dollars or other time related reasons are not generally considered valid
reasons for consideration).
o Technical characteristics: dimensions, service or utility requirements, (electrical, water,
steam, air, etc.) materials used in fabrication, hardware integral design and primary
function of equipment.
o Area where equipment is to be used to include compartment name and number.
o Maximum dimensions of location where equipment is to be installed to ensure
adequate fit and accessibility for maintenance/service.
If source of equipment/item is a discount/retail store, recommend soliciting technical
information from this source or obtaining name references of part number used by source.
In addition, the following general notes have been compiled to provide guidance to repair
activities during installation of all food service equipment included in this catalog.
There shall be no crevices or inaccessible voids which might harbor vermin, cooking waste
or other extraneous matter. Access shall be provided to all areas requiring cleaning,
painting or treating with insecticide.
A clearance of 8 inches shall be provided under each piece of deck mounted equipment
except equipment with bedplate bases.
The following deck mounted equipment shall be leg mounted for air circulation and
cleaning access: ovens, deep fat fryers, ranges, under counter and/or upright refrigerators
and freezers, cold food counters, bulk ice machines, and soft serve ice cream makers.
Equipment abutting other pieces of equipment, dressers, or bulkheads shall be installed in
a manner to avoid grease or soil-catching crevices.
Where the back or side of heat producing equipment adjoins a bulkhead, an air space of
not less that five inches shall be provided.
Dresser mounted equipment shall not be welded to the dresser. Equipment shall be
installed on six inch high round stock corrosion resistant (CRES) leg supports of suitable
size in diameter for supporting the specified equipment, and secured by bolting to the
dresser.
Dressers shall be adequately reinforced to support dresser mounted equipment and to
prevent excessive vibration when equipment is operated.
NFPA-96 should be used to reference issues concerning ventilation control and fire
protection for general mess operations.
Thermostats for equipment like fryers, ovens and grills should be calibrated per
OPNAVINST 4790.4c.
Safety
devices
including
interlock
switches,
shielded
toggle
switches,
temperature/pressure gauges, steam relief valves and machinery guards are in place and
in proper operating condition.
All shipboard food service equipment will be COSAL supported.
Equipment not operating properly or out of commission (OOC) must be placed in the
trouble call log and on 8 o’clock reports and CSMP for afloat units.
An equipment Phase replacement is in place to ensure that aged equipment is replaced
prior to its safe use.
8-4
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
•
•
Equipment operation placards need to be posted next to the equipment OPNAVINST
5100.19E.
Questions and comments concerning the catalog may be forwarded to:
COMMANDER, CARDEROCK DIVISION
NAVAL SURFACE WARFARE CENTER
CARDEROCK DIVISION, SHIPS SYSTEMS ENGINEERING STATION
CODE 474, PHILADELPHIA NAVAL BUSINESS CENTER
5001 SOUTH BROAD STREET, PHILADELPHIA PA 19112-1403
FAX: DSN 443-1094, Commercial 215-897-7311/7293
PART B: PREINSTALL DIAGRAM
8100 Equipment Mapping Process
1. Figure 8-1 displays the equipment mapping process.
Figure 8-1
8-5
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
PART C: EQUIPMENT
8200 ICEMAKING MACHINES AND ICE FLAKERS OPERATING/SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
FLAKE ICE MAKER/DISPENSER
1. Check the machine periodically to see that temperatures are being maintained and enough ice
is being produced. The machinery and inner workings of icemakers are the responsibility of
the engineering department. Food service personnel should not enter the equipment, only
engineering and public works personnel. Ensure that planned maintenance on ice making
equipment is carried out in accordance with the established schedules. Weekly disconnect
the electric power and remove ice in the collection bin. Scrub out the bin area with a brush
and mild detergent solution. Flush with clean water until all traces of the detergent are gone.
Reconnect electric power.
2. Make sure all air vents are open and unobstructed at all times.
3. Unless turned off for maintenance or cleaning, leave machine turned on at all times.
4. All housing parts and particularly doors and covers on the ice bin must be securely closed and
attached at all times.
Directions for Cleaning Automatic Ice Flakers Without Disassembly
Step
Procedure
1. Shut off water.
Pour 1 quart cleaning solution slowly into water
reservoir.
2. Place a container below ice chute in Ice will be formed from cleaning solution.
bin and start ice machine.
Discard ice. Shut off machine.
3. Flush ice making system.
Add 1 quart clean water to reservoir. Catch ice
in container. Discard.
4. Wash down storage bin with mild
Inside should be scrubbed with plastic brush.
detergent solution. Rinse.
Areas in and around motor, insulation panels, and condenser coils should be vacuumed or
blown free of lint and dust. Periodic weekly checks for cockroach infestation should be
made.
Directions for Cleaning Water Reservoir
At least once every 30 days, clean out the water reservoir
Step
Procedure
1. Shut off power.
Use manual switch.
2. Turn off water supply.
Shut water inlet valve.
3. Remove entire water reservoir from Take out water inlet. Pull out reservoir from top
fittings of machine.
water inlet.
4. Clean and descale.
Wash out reservoir with warm detergent water.
Rinse.
Use a scale removing solution if
necessary to clean inside of possible sediment.
5. Replace reservoir and reconnect power Refill reservoir and adjust water level in
and water supply.
accordance with manufacturer’s instructions.
8-6
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8201 MEAT SLICER OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
MEAT SLICER
1. Meat slicer should be securely bolted to the dresser top and electrically grounded hard wired.
2. Keep blade guard in place at all times except when slicer is disassembled for cleaning and
only when the power has been secured. All Navy slicers are required to be hardwired with a
bulkhead mounted switch, make sure the switch is off before attempting any cleaning or
adjustment.
3. Use a pusher, not your hand, to guide product being sliced.
4. Never touch the blade with your hands. Clean the blade with a clean cloth soaked in
detergent, and wrapped around a pad or block.
5. Always replace blade guard as quickly as possible after cleaning. Do not leave an unguarded
blade unattended at any time.
6. After each use wash all food contact parts with clean cloth soaked in detergent and warm
water. Rinse thoroughly, air dry, and then reassemble.
8202 MICROWAVE OVEN OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
MICROWAVE OVEN
1. Keep inside of oven door and heating surface on the cabinet scrupulously clean at all
times. Do not use tools or abrasives on door closing surfaces at any time.
2. Do not allow oven door to be closed on any object including rags, towels, etc.
3. Do not attempt to defeat oven door safety interlocks.
4. Do not operate oven with an empty cavity and keep all metal utensils out of the oven cavity at
all times.
5. Do not obstruct cooling vents in the oven housing.
6. Keep the oven door closed when the oven is not in use.
Cleaning:
1. Wipe up spills immediately.
2. Do not allow food particles or grease to collect on plastic stirrer and light cover, inner door and
oven cavity front surface.
3. Do not use scouring pads, abrasive powders or other abrasive materials on any oven
surfaces.
Daily:
1. Turn power to “OFF.”
2. Wipe the plastic stirrer cover with a cloth or sponge dampened in mild detergent solution.
3. Wipe all surfaces in the oven cavity with the dampened cloth or sponge and then dry with a
clean cloth.
4. Wipe the inner door surface and oven cavity front with mild detergent solution and dry.
Weekly:
Remove the air intake filter and wash in hot water to remove grease and dust.
8-7
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8203 MILK DISPENSERS OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
MILK DISPENSERS
1. Check temperature range which should be from 32° to 41° F.
2. Cut milk dispenser tube with a clean sanitized instrument to a point not more than 1/4 inch
below the termination of the dispensing mechanism.
3. Fill milk dispensers and replenish as necessary during the meal.
4. Wipe up spills immediately.
5. Keep catch bowls or trays clean; empty them as necessary.
6. Always wipe off the bottom of the containers or cans before placing them in the dispenser.
7. Do not reuse disposable cardboard milk containers; dispose of them when empty.
Daily:
1. Clean exterior with a mild detergent solution. Rinse well with clear water to remove film. Use
of abrasives is to be avoided.
2. Remove, disassemble, and wash the lift valves after each meal.
Defrosting milk dispensers:
When ice deposits have accumulated to a thickness of about 1/4 of an inch, defrost the dispenser
by securing the electric power and leaving the door wide open. When the ice has melted, wash
the interior with warm solution of water and detergent, rinse, dry, and reconnect the electric
power. DO NOT use metal objects to scrape ice from cabinet walls.
8204 NONCARBONATED
PRECAUTIONS
BEVERAGE
DISPENSERS
OPERATING
AND
SAFETY
NONCARBONATED BEVERAGE DISPENSERS
1. GENERAL. Noncarbonated beverage dispensers are often located on the serving line to
dispense fruit juices, lemonade, and other popular beverages. The majority of these
machines have a self-contained refrigeration unit and a recirculating pump to keep the solids
associated with pulpy juices in suspension and promotes uniform cooling. The beverages are
dispensed from a clear plastic tank.
a. Fill the dispensing tank well in advance of each meal to ensure a properly chilled
beverage. Frequent resupply during the meal will minimize the temperature rise caused
by adding an unchilled beverage to the tank.
b. Turn off refrigeration unit when not in use and as soon as the tank is empty.
c. Empty and clean the drip pans as required.
Daily or after each use:
a. Turn off power to refrigeration unit.
b. Drain, fill with warm detergent water, scrub the tank and flush through the dispensing
valve. Rinse away traces of detergent.
c. Check the impeller assembly for cleanliness and wash away any syrup build-up which
could clog the pumping mechanism.
8-8
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8205 POWDERED MIX BLENDER OPERATING AND SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
POWDERED MIX BLENDER
1. Assemble cleaned and sanitized parts into the machine and lubricate with food grade
lubricant in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions.
2. Assemble powder funnel and “O” ring and install in the funnel opening in the machine top
housing.
3. With both switches in the “OFF” position, position water fill switch for milkshake operation and
water will automatically fill to proper level.
4. Position “AUTO” switch to “AUTO” position which will start blending action and the
refrigeration system.
5. Add milkshake powder through the funnel. Check powder in the funnel periodically and make
sure powder is feeding down the funnel into the mix chamber.
6. The four gallon batch takes about six minutes to blend and chill to 40° F. When batch is done,
turn off both switches and draw off mix and store in refrigerator.
CAUTION: Do not put tools or fingers through funnel opening to the mix chamber.
Cleaning:
1. After each day’s use, disassemble, clean, and sanitize all parts of the machine which
have come into contact with dry powder or powder and water mixture.
a. Dispensing door.
b. Valve core.
c. Beater.
d. Beater drive shaft.
e. Powder funnel.
f. Powder funnel vent tube.
g. All “O” rings.
2. Clean inside of mixing barrel and rear shaft bearing.
3. Before each use, sanitize assembled machine and drain.
8-9
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8206 PROOF BOX OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
PROOF BOX
1. Make sure water is turned on to the proof box automatic feed, or in manual fill machine, and
that the water reservoir is filled.
2. Turn on switches for heat, humidity control and circulating fan.
3. Proper temperature is 95° F. and proper humidity is 95 percent.
4. Allow proof box to reach proper proofing temperature. Normally, 30 to 45 minutes are
required for stable conditions.
5. Proof products in accordance with the appropriate Armed Forces Recipe Service,
NAVSUP P-7.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Directions for Cleaning a Proof Box
Step
Procedure
Clean interior after removing racks.
Clean bottom, walls, top and inside of
door. Scrape sides, corners, and guide
rails with putty knife. Scrub the bottom
with long-handled gong brush and hot
machine detergent solution. Rinse, dry.
Wipe guide rails and ledges thoroughly.
Remove and clean water pan, rinse, wipe
dry.
Scrub exterior.
Scrub top, outside of door, and sides with
hot machine detergent solution; rinse and
dry.
Clean around proof box.
Scrub back of box and wall. Scrub floor
good behind and under machine if space
permits; if not, flush with hot water.
Air dry.
Leave open to air.
8-10
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8207 REACH-IN REFRIGERATORS OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
REACH-IN REFRIGERATORS
1.
2.
3.
4.
Maintain refrigerator temperature at 32° F. - 41° F.
Store only food items in refrigerator.
To avoid taste transfer, do not store eggs and butter with fruits and vegetables.
Frost or glaze should not be allowed to accumulate more than 1/4 inch on surfaces or coils as
compressor overload will result.
Daily:
Clean up spills and exterior surfaces with detergent and warm water. Wipe dry.
Bi-weekly Cleaning:
1. Transfer all stored foods to protected temporary storage.
2. Remove shelving and loose equipment to wash sink filled with detergent solution. Scrub with
plastic bristle brush. Rinse and sanitize with spray. Leave door open to dry.
3. Scrub interior of box with hot detergent solution, using plastic brush. Clean corners, doors,
gaskets, openings, hinges, and latches. Rinse and sanitize.
Periodically:
Clean and vacuum the following: compressor, condenser coils, motor and related areas.
8208 SALAD BAR OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
SALAD BAR
1. Salad bars may be refrigerated or non-refrigerated. Non-refrigerated salad bars will be filled
with enough ice to properly cool the salad pans to ensure all salad bar items remain
below
41° F. Also ensure that the salad dressings are refrigerated. After each meal the ice should
be discarded and the salad bar cleaned.
2. Refrigerated salad bars in use must be maintained at a temperature in order to keep the salad
bar items below 41° F. The electric power should be disconnected prior to cleaning. Clean
and defrost after each use. Particular attention should be paid to the drain when cleaning the
salad bar.
3. Dispose leftover food from the salad bar as directed by the Watch Captain and/or Food
Preparation Worksheet or refer to NAVMED P-5010 3-5.11.
4. Metal objects should not be used to scrape ice from the coils; metal scrapers may damage or
puncture the coils.
After each use:
1. Run insert pans and trays through dishwashing machine.
2. Wash and scrub table surfaces with detergent and plastic brush. Rinse and allow to air dry.
8-11
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8209 SOFT ICE CREAM/MILKSHAKE MACHINE OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
SOFT ICE CREAM/MILKSHAKE MACHINE
1. Assemble the machine in accordance with manufacturer’s detailed instructions. Pay close
attention to lubrication instructions.
2. Sanitize the freezer with approved sanitizing solution. Operate machine in wash cycle for two
minutes, and then drain off all sanitizing solution.
3. Precharge the freezing cylinder with the amount of fresh mix recommended by the
manufacturer. With a container under the draw-off spout, open spout and hold open until
pure mix starts to flow.
4. Set temperature control knob for product to be dispensed. Set machine to automatic and
allow freezer to operate and cycle off.
5. Assemble mix feed and install in machine reservoir. Fill reservoir to fill line with mix.
Directions for Cleaning Soft Ice Cream Machines:
Before use sanitize all utensils that come in contact with mix. Thoroughly clean and sanitize ice
cream freezer and all component parts daily.
To Clean:
1. Empty freezer and flush with cold water until water runs clear.
2. Rinse again with warm water (120° F.).
3. Pour a 140° F. solution of water and detergent into freezer and brush hopper as detergent
runs through freezer.
4. Remove all parts that come in contact with the ice cream mix: lid, hopper valve, dasher,
freezer door, all gaskets, seals, and O-rings. Place all parts in detergent solution and brush
all surfaces. Brush inside of freezing cylinder; pay particular attention to the back wall and
shaft connection. Rinse all parts thoroughly, allow to air-dry, and reassemble.
To Sanitize:
Prepare sanitizing solution (calcium hypochlorite) in accordance with package directions. Wear
disposable gloves when assembling machine. Dip each part in solution as machine is assembled.
Pour remaining solution into hopper and brush solution over entire inside and lid. Rotate dasher
as solution runs through mixer. Drain completely, and the freezer is ready for the next batch of
soft serve ice cream.
8-12
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8210 VEGETABLE CUTTER OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
VEGETABLE CUTTER
1. Never attempt to operate the machine with the blade guard raised.
2. Do not use hands or any other thing to attempt to push vegetable under the blade guard. If
machine becomes clogged, shut off at the circuit breaker box (Required to be hardwired).
3. Observe product in the bowl carefully and unload when chopped satisfactorily.
4. When high speed gear-attachment and slicing-attachments are being used on the power take
off hub, use extreme caution since there are no safety switches on the accessories. Always
shut off the machine when opening or making adjustments.
5. See operator’s manual for complete instructions.
Directions for Cleaning Vegetable Cutter:
Step
Procedure
Daily:
Preflush. Scrub bowl and parts with long handled brush and 125° F. detergent water.
Air-dry. Sanitize. Be sure to reach all food contact surfaces, and reassemble.
Weekly:
1. Shut off motor and disassemble for
Lift out feeder pan. Remove the following:
weekly cleaning.
adjusting ring, perforated chopping plate,
knife, food screw, and chopping cylinder.
2. Clean.
Run parts through dishwasher or wash in
detergent water in pot and pan sink with
brush. Scrub vigorously until food particles
are loosened.
3. Rinse. Sanitize and air-dry.
If not machine cleaned, adequately rinse to
eliminate solution and sanitize in 180° F.
water, air dry, and reassemble.
8-13
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8211 VEGETABLE PEELER OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
VEGETABLE PEELER
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Put in proper load of vegetables in accordance with name plate rating.
Turn on water.
Start machine and run until skin is removed.
Open discharge door and allow load to empty into sink or container of clean water.
Do not over peel or product will be lost.
Keep hands and all other articles out of peeler chamber while machine is running.
Directions for Cleaning Vegetable Peeler:
Step
Procedure
1. Disassemble removable parts.
Remove lid and disk.
2. Wash interior.
Flush with hot water and scrub thoroughly;
walls, shoulders, inside and outside of
door. Leave door open to air dry.
3. Clean peel trap.
Remove (raise) lid, strainer, and stopper.
Flush interior with hot water; scrub with stiff
fiber brush while flushing. Leave open to
air dry.
4. Clean parts.
Under hot running water, scrub lid, disk,
strainer, and stopper. Leave abrasive parts
out to dry.
5. Clean exterior.
Wipe or scrub with brush and hot detergent
solution.
Safety Notes:
1. Do not stop machine while product is being peeled. Allow it to empty before opening.
2. Never operate the peeler unless water has been properly applied.
8-14
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8212 UTENSIL WASHING MACHINES OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
UTENSIL WASHING MACHINES
1.
2.
3.
4.
Properly install all internal removable components.
Clean drain valve, add sudsless detergent as required and lower all doors.
Open all supply valves and turn “heat” switch on.
Turn selector switch to “Manual.” Tanks will be filled to proper level in approximately 2-1/2
minutes. When wash water is heated to desired temperature, machine will be ready for
operation.
5. Open side doors and place rack of utensils in machine. Do not over pack racks.
6. Lower side doors, then turn selector switch to “auto.” The machine will automatically wash,
rinse, and shut off.
7. For continuous operation, repeat steps 5 and 6.
8. If manual operation is desired, turn switch to “manual” and select “wash” or “rinse” as
desired. Machine will perform selected function after doors are lowered.
General Instructions:
1. Remove scraps from all utensils before placing them in racks.
2. Maintain rinse temperature.
3. Drain machine when finished.
4. After use, clean and replace all internal removable components.
5. Pump can be reached for cleaning by removing inspection plate only when necessary.
NOTE: Ware washing machines will be provided with an easily accessible and readable data
plate affixed to the machine by the manufacturer. The plate will indicate the machine’s design
and operating specifications to include required temperatures for washing, rinsing, and sanitizing.
8-15
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8213 MULTIPLE BLADE BREAD SLICER OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
MULTIPLE BLADE BREAD SLICER
1. Carefully remove the slicer from the shipping box. Install machine in accordance with
installation instructions.
2. Ensure machine connection to power source and switch master switch to “ON” position.
3. Use the handle located on the front of the machine to raise the knife frame up until it remains
in fixed position and bread rack pivots forward to open position.
4. Place bread to be sliced in receiving trough and raise operating handle on right side of
machine to automatically operate motor switch and start the knife frame on its downward
slicing motion.
NOTE: Switch will shut off automatically when knife frame reaches its bottom position.
5. To remove sliced bread from machine, place right and left hands against the respective ends
of the sliced loaf and lift loaf out of rack. Place it on bagging attachment for bagging.
6. When cutting rye bread with hard crust, place bottom of loaf against front side of rack.
7. When slicing large round loaves or long loaves lengthwise, use the procedure as follows:
a. Raise the frame.
b. Start the knives by lifting the switch button located on top of the frame at right.
c. Feed bread (lengthwise) upward through knives until uncut portion of bread can rest on
receiving trough.
d. Rest lower end of bread on receiving trough and raise the operating handle to complete
slicing.
CAUTION: Do not allow fingers or hands to come in contact with knives when operating
machine.
8. When slicing very hot bread, or bread of a very sponge-like, soft texture, with a well baked
crust, slightly retard downward motion of knife frame until knives have entered the hard crust.
9. Follow procedures as outlined in operator’s manual for removal and replacement of knife
frames and for removal and replacement of knives in frames.
10. Pay particular attention to manufacturer’s lubrication instructions.
Cleaning:
Daily or after each use:
1. Disconnect machine from power source.
2. Machine parts coming in contact with bread products such as upper and lower knife frame
assemblies, bagging trough, and holding rack should be removed and washed thoroughly in
mild detergent and warm water solution. Rinse and dry. Reassemble parts in accordance
with operator’s manual.
3. Wipe down machine exterior with mild detergent and warm water solution. Rinse.
CAUTION: Do not, at any time, spray or allow water to enter motor housing or crank mechanism.
8-16
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8214 DISHWASHING MACHINE (CONVEYOR) OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
DISHWASHING MACHINE (CONVEYOR)
Take caution not to damage component accessories which usually are appended on the side of
the dishwashing machine. Installation of the machine and component accessories shall be in
accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.
Operating:
1. Close all tank drains.
2. Open water supply service valves, turn main electrical disconnect on.
3. Check to see that conveyor is cleared of objects that may cause “jam-up” in machine.
4. Check to see that all internal removable parts are properly installed.
5. Turn on detergent dispenser.
6. Fill tanks to desired level (either manually by opening fill valves or by turning automatic tank
fill switch to “on” position when machine is so equipped). Tanks will fill in approximately 4-1/2
minutes.
7. Turn heat switch on (or open all steam valves to tanks and booster). Allow time for water in
tanks to reach desired temperatures. Machine is now ready for operation.
8. Start conveyor and pumps by depressing the proper push-buttons, then load dishes in correct
manner for best cleaning.
General:
1. Remove scraps from all dishware and utensils before placing on conveyor.
2. Maintain approximately 110° F. - 120° F. pre-wash, 150° F. - 160° F. wash, 160°F. - 180°F.
rinse, 180° F. - 194° F. final rinse temperatures.
3. Always turn off tank heat before draining tanks.
4. Clean and replace all internal removable parts daily. Make sure spray pipes are free of
foreign matter.
5. Shut off water, electric, steam, and gas supply when machine is not to be used for extended
period.
NOTE: Above listed temperatures are approximate. Ware washing machines will be provided
with an easily accessible and readable data plate affixed to the machine by the manufacturer that
indicates the machine’s design and operating specifications including required temperatures for
washing, rinsing, and sanitizing.
Cleaning:
For best results, the dishwasher should be cleaned after each use. The simple steps outlined
below will ensure clean, sanitized dishware.
1. Before cleaning, shut off the steam, water, and electrical supplies.
2. Open drains and wait until tanks are empty.
3. Remove wash manifolds, rinse manifolds, scrap screens, and suction strainers.
4. Clean dishwasher tank(s) preferably by using a hose. Be careful not to bend or twist any ball
or float arms. Wipe down inside of hood.
5. Clean and replace suction strainers.
6. Clean and replace scrap screens.
7. Clean all spray pipes using the brush provided with the machine. The end caps must first be
removed.
8. Replace caps and install manifolds in their proper positions.
9. Wipe down outside of hood.
10. It is necessary, periodically, to remove lime deposits which may build up on the machine over
a period of time. An approved de-limer should be used for this purpose.
8-17
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8215 DISHWASHING MACHINE OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
DISHWASHING MACHINE
1. Install machine in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions.
2. Filling Tank: Open all water valves and fill tanks to level of overflow with hot water. Turn
main electrical disconnect on.
3. Place an approved detergent in the wash tank.
4. Ensure that conveyor is cleared of objects that may cause “jam-up” in machine.
5. Heat water in rinse tank by opening steam valve. Temperature of water in wash tank will rise
after machine is in operation. The rinse tank-fitted thermostat prevents operation of machine
unless minimum temperature of 180° F. is reached.
NOTE: Do not change this setting if temperature in rinse tank falls below 175° F.; thermostat will
stop motor and pump operation.
6. In event rinse tank thermostat stops motor and pump due to low temperature, add additional
steam to bring temperature of rinse tank up over 180° F. To resume operation, press start
button.
7. Final rinse and sterilization spray: Set lever on steam and water-mixing valve to regulate
mixture of steam and water desired. The final rinse spray should be adjusted to temperature
of about 190° F.
Operating:
1. Press starting button to start pump.
2. Place dishes loosely in baskets. Turn cups upside down, place bowls or deep dishes on end
but tilt enough to allow for drainage of water.
3. Place basket between the conveyor chain lugs.
NOTE: Above listed temperatures are approximate. Ware washing machines will be provided
with an easily accessible and readable data plate affixed to the machine by the manufacturer that
indicates the machine’s design and operating specifications including required temperatures for
washing, rinsing, and sanitizing.
Daily Cleaning:
The scrap trays of the machine are to be cleaned of garbage as follows:
a. Before cleaning, shut off steam, water, and electrical supplies.
b. Remove the lower manifold assembly.
c. Lift out scrap trays, and at the same time, remove pump suction strainer.
d. After cleaning and washing, replace suction strainer and scrap trays in machine.
e. Manifolds may be cleaned by inserting brass cleaning brushes directly into the tube,
pushing ball inwards. When machine starts, the ball will return to end of pipe.
f. Install manifold assembly in proper position.
g. Wipe down outside of hood.
8-18
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8216 FOOD MIXING MACHINE, 20 QUART OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
FOOD MIXING MACHINE, 20 QUART
1. Set the shifter handle at the desired speed and turn on the switch to start the motor.
2. To change speeds, first turn off the motor, then move the shifter handle to the desired speed.
3. Use number 3 speed for fast, light work, such as whipping cream, beating eggs, and mixing
thin batters.
4. Number 1 or slow speed is for heavy mixtures, such as breakfast rolls, etc. Also use this
speed for the food chopper attachment.
5. In many operations, it is desirable to start on number 1 then change to a higher speed as the
work progresses.
6. To lower the bowl, pull the lift handle forward.
NOTE: It is necessary to lower the bowl to change agitators; this position also makes the bowl
more accessible for filling.
7. When raising the bowl, move the lift handle a little beyond the vertical center until it is felt to
touch the stop.
8. To mash potatoes or to cream butter, start with the bowl down and raise it slowly into working
position, while the agitator is rotating.
9. When attaching an agitator (bowl in the “DOWN” position) slip the agitator up on the shaft and
turn it until the driving pin in the shaft reaches the L-shaped slot in the agitator shank.
10. The style “B” beater is commonly used for thin batters, cakes, and mashing potatoes.
11. The style “D” whip is best for whipping cream and beating eggs. The “E” dough arm is for
heavy bread doughs, and the “P” pastry knife for cutting shortening into flour for pastry. The
“S” beater is used for sweet dough and the “C” wing whip for heavy whipping.
12. The attachment socket is for the size 12 attachments. Before putting an attachment into the
socket, stop the motor, then insert with a slight twist toward the left so that the stop stud in the
attachment is tight against the side of the hole that receives it. When in place, tighten the
thumb screw and put a drop of oil in the oiler.
13. The attachment drive has three speeds, governed by the shifter handle of the mixer. For most
attachments, set the handle at number 1. Set the speed at number 3 for the tool grinder.
CAUTION: The chopper attachment must never run faster than speed 1 when cutting meat;
when cutting vegetables it may run at the number 2 speed. Use the motor switch to start and stop
the motor before changing the speed of an attachment.
Cleaning:
Daily or after each use:
1. Disconnect power to machine prior to cleaning.
2. Remove attachment, bowl, or accessory and preflush as required.
3. Scrub bowls, attachments, and accessories with long-handled brush and 125° F. detergent
water solution. Rinse thoroughly. Air dry. Sanitize. Be sure to reach all food-contact
surfaces.
4. Wipe down main body of machine with mild detergent and warm water solution. Rinse.
CAUTION: Do not spray machine.
8-19
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8217 WALK IN REEFER OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
WALK IN REEFER
General:
1. To gain maximum use and performance, this refrigerator must be installed and operated
properly. Assembly/installation must be in strict accordance with manufacturer’s instructions.
2. Operators of the unit must be thoroughly familiar with the various features of the unit.
3. The door latch is equipped with provisions for padlocking and inside door release mechanism
which enables door to be opened from inside even when latch is padlocked.
NOTE: An inside door release instruction label is attached to door interior. DO NOT REMOVE
THIS LABEL FOR ANY REASON.
4. The strike part of the latch is adjustable to compensate for gasket wear. As the need arises,
simply loosen two adjusting screws of the strike and move the sliding tongue forward or
backward as required. Then tighten the screws.
5. The alarm control should be set to operate the warning lamp at 61° F.
6. The hold-back hook holds the door in the open position. To release door, simply press lever
of the hold-back hook.
7. The condensing unit, with compressor and motor, is lubrication-sealed and is equipped with a
relay, overload protector.
8. The evaporator is of the forced circulation type in which the accompanying fan cycles warmer
air over coils of evaporator and re-circulates the air.
CAUTION: Do not load refrigerator too close to the blower coil as this will block the air cycle.
9. The refrigerator cabinet is equipped with an automatic defrosting system, which eliminates the
need for manual defrosting.
Operating:
1. Before starting unit, open liquid valve, suction valve and discharge valve and make connection
to the junction box.
2. The pressure control is factory set to maintain a cabinet temperature of 35° F. If adjustment is
necessary, be sure the temperature does not go below 32° F., as the evaporator coil will be
iced up.
3. If a compressor operates for too long or too often, it is generally due to the refrigerant being
low, even though the temperature is cold enough. In the event either condition is present,
refer to operator’s manual.
Cleaning:
1. To clean the interior of the refrigerator, use a solution of baking soda or borax and hot water.
These compounds act as deodorants and will not scratch or mar the finish.
2. To prepare a soda solution, mix one-half teaspoon of ordinary baking soda to each quart of
water.
3. Clean the exterior of the cabinet with clear water or a weak solution of baking soda and warm
water.
4. Once a week, wash door gasket rubber with mild soap and water followed by a fresh rinse.
NOTE: Grease accumulation on door gaskets will shorten the life of the gaskets.
8-20
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8218 STEAM JACKETED KETTLES OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
STEAM JACKETED KETTLES
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Installation of steam kettle is to be in accordance with installation instructions.
Do not tamper with or obstruct safety valve.
Leave cover and drain open when not in use.
Do not turn on steam unless water or food is in kettle.
Do not put water in hot dry kettle.
When heating a cold kettle, turn the steam on gradually, thus allowing the kettle to become
warm before full pressure is applied. After kettle becomes warm, and before applying full
pressure, open the safety valve momentarily to release any air trapped within the jacket.
Cleaning:
1. Do not use steel wool or any abrasive for cleaning.
2. Wash kettle before and after each use with hot soapy water and rinse thoroughly with clean
water. Dry thoroughly.
3. Clean strainer before and after each use with hot soapy water. Rinse thoroughly.
4. The stainless steel surface of the unit may be polished periodically with an approved stainless
steel cleaner.
5. Clean strainer, draw off valve and draw off tube thoroughly after each use. To clean draw off
valve and tube, remove the front end of the valve and brush. Scrub with hot water.
8-21
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8219 HOT DOG GRILL OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
HOT DOG GRILL
General:
1. Install machine in accordance with installation instructions.
2. The fast heating rollers of the machine are capable of turning a large quantity of franks over at
a slow, even speed which causes the fat to self-baste the franks while sealing in natural juices
and flavors. Cooking the frank is quick, uniform, and requires no constant attention.
3. The machine is equipped with eight rollers with separate heating controls for each set of 4,
which can be lowered or raised, thereby providing flexibility in capacity depending on the
demand.
Operating:
1. Turn on main disconnect switch to machine.
2. Turn both heat controls on high temperature and allow rollers to heat up for 10 minutes before
turning on motor switch.
3. Temperature Controls.
Front Control, left hand side, controls first four rollers nearest operator. Rear Control, right
hand side, controls last four rollers farthest away from the operator. Each control has four
heat settings -- HIGH, MEDIUM, LOW, and OFF -- each independent of the other.
NOTE: On medium heat it is normal for alternate rollers to be cold.
4. Adjust temperature settings in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions.
5. Never change franks that have been on high heat to lower heat as they will shrivel.
6. Franks should always be kept under refrigeration until they are ready to be used. Keep at
about
40° F. but be careful not to store in a freezer as this will cause the franks to dehydrate and
toughen the skin.
7. If drip pan collects an unusual amount of drippings, a large amount of fat in frank is indicated.
This generally means a poor quality frankfurter. If rollers show consistent black deposits, a
high sugar content is indicated and possibly a large cereal content. Both indications reveal a
poor quality frankfurter.
Cleaning:
Daily or after each use:
1. Turn both switches on high heat and allow rollers to get very hot. Turn on motor.
2. Clean rollers with a clean wet cloth. Cold water or plain carbonated water lifts grease.
3. Always start at end of rollers and wipe toward center of rollers. This prevents extra grease
from entering bearings.
8-22
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8220 DEEP FAT FRYER (NON-COMPUTER) OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
DEEP FAT FRYER (NON-COMPUTER)
General:
1. Assembly and installation is to be in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions.
2. Check for accuracy of the thermostat. A reading of more than five degrees difference from the
setting of the thermostat knob requires recalibration of the thermostat.
NOTE: Do not remove manufacturer’s decals from unit.
3. Do not leave fryer unattended while it is in operation.
4. Do not operate deep fat fryer without thermometers inserted into each fry kettle or attached to
individual fryer baskets.
5. Handle food only with the implements provided for the purpose.
6. Foods which have been in water should be well drained before immersion in the shortening.
Keep all other water sources away from the operating fryer.
7. Wipe up fryer spills immediately.
Operating:
CAUTION: DO NOT TURN ON THE POWER TO THE ELEMENTS WITHOUT FIRST FILLING
THE FRY KETTLE.
Filling the Fry Kettle:
1. Check to make sure that the thermostat sensing bulb inside the kettle is firmly held in the
bracket attached to the back of the tank inside. Tighten the screws in clamp holding the bulb
if necessary.
2. Always check to make sure that the drain valve is completely closed before filling the fry
kettle.
3. If the fryer is new, it is advisable to fill the kettle with water and clean thoroughly as explained
in the cleaning instructions in order to remove rust inhibitors and any foreign matter.
4. Using approved liquid shortening (canola vegetable oil); fill the kettle an inch above the top of
the elements
before turning fryer on. If the heating element surfaces are not covered
when the fryer is turned on, the element will become red hot and has the potential to cause
damage to the fryer and personnel.
5. As a further precaution to prevent burning or scorching the shortening, keep the thermostat
knob set at 200° F. until all shortening between and above the element has melted. Additional
shortening can then be added until the desired frying depth has been reached.
6. After filling fry kettle, always check thermostat calibration. See “Thermostat Calibration and
Recalibration Instructions” in the operator’s manual.
Frying:
1. After filling the fry kettle, select the proper temperature for the product to be fried. Set the
thermostat to this temperature.
NOTE: DO NOT ATTEMPT TO FRY ANYTHING UNTIL THE PROPER TEMPERATURE HAS
BEEN REACHED.
The indicator light will shut off when the set temperature is obtained.
2. Fill each basket with food, and lower them into the fry pot. Sample frying times are given in
the operator’s manual. These are average times and, with a little practice, proper load and
time will be established.
Cleaning the Fry Kettle:
Do the following DAILY:
1. Turn off electrical power.
2. Screw drain nipple into drain valve. Place a suitable container under the drain nipple
and drain the fry kettle completely.
3. Flush out any sediment remaining in the kettle with a little hot shortening.
4. Wipe off the elements and the inside of the fry kettle with a clean cloth.
8-23
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
5. Close drain valve and strain the shortening back into the fry kettle through several
thicknesses of cheesecloth or filter it back using a filter machine.
NOTE: Add at least 7-1/2 pounds of new shortening to kettle daily. If equivalent weight has not
been absorbed by fried foods, remove sufficient amount of old shortening to allow addition of new
shortening.
6. Unscrew the drain nipple and the fryer is ready to operate when needed.
Do the following WEEKLY:
1. Follow steps 1, 2, and 3 above.
2. Close drain valve and fill kettle with a solution of warm water and an approved strong
detergent.
3. Turn on electric supply to the fryer and bring the water to a gentle boil.
4. Turn off electrical power.
5. Let the solution stand until the gum deposits are softened and the carbon spots and burned
grease spots can be rubbed off.
6. Scrub the kettle walls, then drain out the kettle and rinse it with clean water.
7. Turn on electrical power.
8. Refill the kettle with clean water and boil again.
9. Turn off electrical power.
10. Drain and rinse well.
11. Wipe dry with a clean cloth.
12. Close drain valve and strain the shortening back into the fry kettle through several thicknesses
of cheesecloth or filter it back using a filter machine.
NOTE: Add at least 7-1/2 pounds of new shortening to kettle daily. If equivalent weight has not
been absorbed by fried foods, remove sufficient amount of old shortening to allow addition of new
shortening.
13. Unscrew the drain nipple and the fryer is ready to operate when needed.
Cleaning the Exterior Surfaces:
14. Wipe off spilled or splashed shortening while still warm with a soft clean cloth.
8-24
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8221 DOUGH MIXER – HORIZONTAL OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
DOUGH MIXER
1. INSTALLATION. Uncrate mixer machine carefully to prevent damage. Install in accordance
with manufacturer’s instructions.
Operating:
1. FUNCTION OF POWER DUMP: The function of the power dump is to place the bowl in the
three working positions: loading position for flour and other ingredients; mixing position, where
bowl is up to stop point and closed by the canopy; and dumping position, for removal of
dough. Press the “DOWN” button until bowl is open far enough for loading and press “STOP”
button. Press “UP” button until bowl stops (partially open), then hold in “UP” button to
complete closing.
2. LOADING: To load flour and other ingredients, open the hinged part of the canopy and run
the bowl toward the dump position far enough to allow the flour and ingredients to be put into
the bowl. Run the bowl up to stop point (mixing position), close the hinged part of the canopy
and start the mixer.
3. STARTING: The agitator is driven by a two-speed motor through a starter that has over-load
and low-voltage protection. Starter is set into front of frame. Push button control for agitator
motor consists of “BLOW,” “FAST,” and “STOP” when bowl is tilted, safety switch cuts off
current. With bowl anywhere from slightly open to dump position, agitator will run only as long
as “SLOW” button is held in.
NOTE: If machine is equipped with “JOG” button, hold both “SLOW” and “JOG” buttons in to run
agitator with bowl open.
4. RESTARTING: Relay in starter box will cut off when the current in the event line voltage
drops below safe limit, or if motor over-load occurs. To restart motor, wait approximately two
minutes and press “SLOW” button.
5. TIMERS: If mixer is equipped with one or two timers, set low speed timer for desired low
speed mixing, set high speed timer for total mixing time and press “SLOW” button.
6. Lubrication of mixer is to be in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions.
Cleaning:
1. After finishing the last mix, the bowl, agitator, dough seals and canopy must be cleaned.
Residue will harden if allowed to stand over a half-hour period.
2. To clean bowl, use the following procedure:
a. Run bowl to loading position, put approximately 10 gallons of hot water into bowl, run bowl
up to mix position and start mixer.
b. Allow mixer to run for several minutes and push “STOP” button.
c. Run bowl half way down to dump position and clean surfaces with hot water and a stiff
brush then empty water and residue.
3. Clean dough seals in the following manner:
a. Remove the two wing nuts and slide the pressure ring off at the studs.
b. Grasp lugs of seal ring and pull ring out of bowl head.
c. Flip seal garter out of seal groove by placing the index finger under garter at notch in
bowl seal. CAUTION: Use finger to remove garter; do not use tools to remove garter.
d. After disassembling the seal, wash all parts and allow them to dry.
e. To replace bowl seals, place garter around seal ring and push ring into bowl. Place
pressure ring over studs and finger tighten wing nuts.
8-25
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8222 ROTARY BREAD TOASTER OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
ROTARY BREAD TOASTER
Operating:
1. Turn on the electrical power approximately fifteen minutes prior to use.
2. After warm-up, set the conveyor speed to produce desired browness of toast.
3. Turn knob on right side of the toaster only if jamming occurs in the unit.
4. Place slices of bread on each conveyor rack as the conveyor turns.
5. Remove finished toast from the drop tray.
Safety Precautions:
1. Secure the electrical power when the toaster is not in use.
2. Do not introduce any foreign objects into, or allow parts of the body to come into contact with,
the toaster when in operation.
Cleaning:
Daily or After Each Use:
1. Secure the power to the unit.
2. Turn the knob on the right side of the toaster to ensure all the toast is out of the unit.
3. Remove the catch tray and chute, wash in a solution of hot water and an approved mild
detergent, sanitize in 180° F. minimum water. Allow all removable parts to air dry.
4. Brush all crumbs out of the toaster and from around the base.
5. Clean the exterior of the toaster with a clean wet cloth and wipe dry.
8-26
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8223 FOOD MIXER (140 QUART) OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
FOOD MIXER (140 QUART)
Operating:
1. Properly attach the mixing bowl prior to starting the machine.
2. When shifting gears, always disengage the clutch lever and move the shift lever to the desired
position. Re-engage the clutch to activate the spindle.
3. The bowl is raised and lowered by a power lift controlled by a lever on the control panel.
Place the whip or beater in the bowl before raising the bowl. With the power off, attach the
beater to the spindle. Always use the recommended beater for the product to be mixed.
a. Batter beater for mixing cake batter, etc.
b. Wing whip for icings, mayonnaise, etc.
c. Balloon whip for thin mixtures.
d. Dough hooks for bread and roll dough.
e. Sweet dough beater for sweet yeast dough’s.
f. Pastry knife for cutting shortening into flour.
Safety Precautions:
1. Keep hands and utensils out of the mixing bowl when the beater is running.
2. Never attempt to attach or detach beaters when the spindle shaft is turning.
3. Do not wear loose clothing or jewelry when working with rotating parts.
4. Determine that bowl lugs are firmly seated on the pins before raising or lowering the bowl.
5. Do not allow anything to be placed under the bowl when it is in the raised position.
6. At any sign of unusual noise or operating condition, secure the power immediately.
Cleaning:
1. Secure the electrical power.
2. Detachable parts such as beaters should be thoroughly washed in a solution of hot water
and approved mild detergent. Sanitize in the sanitizing sink and air dry. Bowls should also be
thoroughly washed in a solution of hot water and approved mild detergent. If the sanitizing
sink is large enough, sanitize the bowls and air dry.
Chemical sanitizing may also be used.
3. Wipe down exterior parts of the mixer with a solution of hot water and approved mild
detergent, rinse and wipe dry.
CAUTION: DO NOT ALLOW WATER TO ENTER MACHINE ELECTRICAL COMPARTMENTS
OR GEAR CASE.
8-27
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8224 BUN SLICER (HOTLINE) OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
BUN SLICER (HOTLINE)
WARNING: Do not operate this machine without guards. Operators should be thoroughly
familiar with the safety guards and safety features of the machine.
1. The machine is adjustable for width and height and can be adjusted to cut all the way
through the bun, or part way. Maximum product size is 4-1/2” wide x 2-3/4” thick.
CAUTION: Adjustments should be made with switch in the “OFF” position (switch is located on
the base of the machine).
2. To adjust for thickness of bun, turn knob located on top of guard. This will increase or
decrease the height of the chute.
3. To adjust for the thickness of cut, first loosen knob located on machine base under chute, then
turn the thumb screw (which penetrates flange of base and underside of chute) to obtain
desired thickness, and reset knob.
4. To adjust for depth of the cut and the width of the bun, loosen the two thumb screws located
on the underside of the chute and slide the right guide assembly to the desired width. Tighten
right guide thumb screws. Depth of cut has now been set.
Left guide adjustment also aids
in adjusting chute for width of bun after depth of cut has been determined. To make this
adjustment, loosen the two left guide thumb screws and slide left guide toward the right guide,
(to narrow chute) or away from the right guide (to widen chute), tighten left guide thumb
screw.
NOTE: Operator will note that chute-width and depth-of-cut adjustments are interrelated.
5. Adjustments should be made liberally to allow for size irregularities of buns.
6. The motor is equipped with manual reset thermal overload protection. In the event that the
motor becomes overheated and stops, proceed as follows:
a. Turn switch to “OFF” position.
b. Allow motor to cool for approximately five (5) minutes.
c. Reset by pressing red button on bottom side of motor.
Cleaning:
Daily or as required.
1. Machine may be disassembled as required for cleaning.
CAUTION: DISCONNECT MACHINE PRIOR TO CLEANING.
2. Dip-wash disassembled machine parts in warm water and a mild detergent solution. Do not
use abrasive cleaners. Rinse and dry thoroughly with soft cloth.
NOTE: Do not submerse base (motor housing) in water.
3. Wash outside surfaces of base (motor housing) with mild detergent - warm water solution.
Rinse with clean water and dry.
CAUTION: DO NOT ALLOW WATER TO ENTER BASE.
4. Reassemble machine.
5. Before each day’s use, wash with warm water and mild detergent solution, rinse thoroughly,
and dry all machine parts coming into contact with bread product.
8-28
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8225 CARBONATED BEVERAGE DISPENSER OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
CARBONATED BEVERAGE DISPENSER
1. The refrigeration system cools the dispensed drinks by means of an ice bank or block which is
built up over an initial period of 5 to 7 hours after connection to electrical outlet. Periods of
inactivity for the dispenser are needed to replenish the ice banks. Therefore, except as
required for repairs, do not turn dispensers off between uses.
2. On dispensers serving one non-carbonated drink, the extreme left hand valve is for noncarbonated. The small lever on the side of the valve is for plain cold water.
3. Due to evaporation of water in the water bath inside the dispenser, it will be necessary to
periodically add water. Low water level results in noisy operation and reduced cooling
capacity. Refer to operating manual.
4. Make sure water lines to dispenser and carbonator are open at all times. Refer to operating
manual for restarting procedure after extended shut down.
CAUTION: DO NOT REMOVE EXTERIOR HOUSING OR PUT HANDS INTO OPERATING
COMPARTMENT WITH ELECTRICAL POWER CONNECTED.
Cleaning:
1. To remove dispensing valves for cleaning or repair, remove plastic cover from valve, remove
vertical latch pin from top center of valve body, and pull valve body away from the valve plate.
Quick disconnect fittings automatically close and prevent liquid discharge. All other valves will
remain operational.
2. When replacing valves, moisten the “O” ring on the inlet fittings with water.
3. Lines leading from the syrup tanks to dispenser can be cleaned in place by putting a little
water in each tank.
CAUTION: Before opening syrup tanks, disconnect all lines and bleed pressure off slowly.
8-29
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8226 COFFEE URNS OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
COFFEE URNS
1. Make coffee as needed according to the Armed Forces Recipe Service P-7.
2. Hold coffee at 185° F. for no longer than one hour. Coffee held longer than one hour
loses its good aroma and becomes bitter.
3. Remove coffee grounds immediately after water passes through coffee grounds.
4. Discard filter and coffee grounds after use.
Daily - Between brews:
Clean coffee making equipment is required before your patrons can enjoy a good brew. Deposits
will form on all surfaces of the equipment and will contaminate successive brews unless the urn is
cleaned frequently.
1. Clean the urn immediately after a batch of coffee has been used up or disposed of.
2. Rinse with enough water to remove the sediment and old coffee from bottom of urn, drain
lines and faucet.
3. With a gallon or more of hot water in the urn, brush the sides carefully with a bristle brush.
Drain and flush out with some more hot water until the water runs clean. It is now ready for
the next pot of coffee.
Daily - At the end of the day or when securing the urn:
1. Carry out the procedure above except it must be brushed and cleaned more thoroughly. Use
an accurately measured solution of 1 ounce of dishwashing compound, Type 1 completely
dissolved in 1 gallon of hot water. Detergents are also good for cleaning but require a more
extensive rinse to remove all traces of the detergent. Baking soda is good for “sweetening”
the urn but it is a relatively poor cleaning agent.
2. Clean the gauge glass with a narrow brush. Check to see that the vents at the top of the
gauge glasses are not fouled. A clogged vent will cause inaccurate readings of the coffee
level.
3. Rinse thoroughly to remove all traces of the cleaning agent. Flush out the entire urn, including
the faucet, with 180° F. water for sterilization. Leave about 1 gallon of water in the urn when
it’s secured.
4. The lid of the urn must be cleaned also since it is exposed to the coffee vapors which will
eventually cause a buildup on the lid. Leave the lid ajar when the urn is secured.
5. Remember to drain the old water out of the urn prior to making up a new batch of coffee.
SAFETY NOTE: Never place any solid cleaning compounds directly into a coffee urn. Some of
the solid material may become entrapped in the drain lines or faucet. This material would cause
serious illness.
Destaining Procedures:
1. Persistent stains may be removed by the periodic use of a destaining compound.
2. Be sure the jacket is at least 3/4 full of water, then turn on the heat.
3. Fill the liner with hot water to the coffee line. Add the destaining compound in accordance
with the instructions which come on the package.
4. Allow the solution to remain in the liner approximately 60 minutes at about 180° F. Pass some
of the solution down into the drain line and faucet.
5. Drain and thoroughly rinse until all traces of the compound have been removed.
6. Leave about a gallon of water in the urn.
SAFETY NOTE: Hang a warning tag on the faucet while the urn is soaking with cleaning
solutions.
NOTE: To destain vacuum-type coffee makers, use a solution of one teaspoon of destaining
compound per quart of warm water. Fill lower bowl to within two inches from top. Assemble unit,
apply heat, and allow it to go through a regular cycle. Let stand five minutes (longer if badly
stained), drain, and dry.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8227 CONVECTION OVEN OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
CONVECTION OVEN
1. Put in proper number of shelves to give shelf spacing for the product to be cooked.
2. Set speed switch; high for solid products like meats, low for cakes and other fragile items.
3. Close doors, turn on main power switch and set thermostat for proper cooking temperature.
NOTE: Fan and heating elements will not operate unless doors are closed. Oven takes
approximately ten minutes to preheat.
4. When the doors are open, ovens lose temperature very rapidly. Load and unload as quickly
as possible. Use interior lights and glass doors to observe cooking progress.
5. Use damper control wisely. Wide open dampers waste heat, cause heating elements to run
continuously and produce lower cooked yields for meat products. For cakes, open damper
enough to exhaust moisture so that cakes will rise properly.
Convection Ovens With Stainless Steel Liners
Step
Procedure
1. Clean oven liners, shelves and shelf
Clean daily when oven is cold with mild
supports.
detergent or soap and water. For burnt on
foods and grease which resist simple soap
and water cleaning, an abrasive cleaner,
sized into a paste, may be employed.
Apply with stainless steel wool, always
rubbing with the “grain.” Rinse with clear
water and dry.
2. Remove shelves and shelf supports.
Remove all shelves by pulling forward,
To clean liners and to occasionally clean
lifting up and out. Remove both right and
left shelf supports by lifting out. When
blower wheel.
cleaning blower, remove blower baffle by
lifting up and pulling out. Wire brush the
wheel and wipe it up with a moist cloth.
Remove all loose particles.
3. Replace the hardware.
Reverse the disassembly procedure.
4. Clean oven exterior.
Wash all exterior surfaces daily with warm
water and mild soap or detergent.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8228 DEEP FAT FRYER (COMPUTER TYPE) OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
DEEP FAT FRYER (COMPUTER TYPE)
1. Follow operating instructions on the decal on the front of the fryer and in the manual
furnished by the manufacturer.
2. Set the thermostat knob on the left hand front panel to the required temperature.
3. Set the doneness control on the right hand front panel to get the proper coils for the food
being fried. This knob controls the computer.
4. Filter shortening daily after using the fryer. Add at least 7-1/2 pounds of new shortening
to
the kettle daily. If equivalent weight has not been absorbed by fried foods, remove a sufficient
amount of old shortening to assure new shortening has raised the shortening level up to the
normal operating level.
5. If the fryer is not used for 30 minutes, it will shut off automatically and must be restarted. The
time to heat the shortening to operating temperature at start-up is approximately 6 minutes.
6. When the fryer is not in use, power should be shut off and the cover should be placed on the
fryer.
Safety Precautions:
1. Fryer shuts off automatically if vegetable oil temperature reaches 430° F. - 460° F. for any
reason. However, periodically check the temperature while the fryer is in operation. Never
leave a fryer unattended while it is turned on.
2. Handle food only with the implements provided for that purpose.
3. Avoid spattering hot vegetable oil. Foods which have been in water should be well drained
before immersion in the vegetable oil. Keep all other water sources away from the operating
fryer.
4. Wipe up spilled vegetable oil immediately. At all times keep the vegetable oil level above the
top of the heating coils, and thermostat bulb.
Directions for Cleaning Deep Fat Fryers:
Step
Procedure
1. Turn off heating element.
Allow vegetable oil to cool to 150° F.
2. Drain and filter vegetable oil (after each Open the drain valve and catch the drained
use).
shortening in container. Drain entire kettle
contents and filter into a container. Place
a clean shortening container into well or
wash and replace original one.
3. Remove baskets.
Scrape off oxidized shortening with a knife.
Remove all loose food particles from the
heating units with a spatula or with a wire
brush. Flush down sides of kettle with a
scoop of the hot vegetable oil. Soak
basket and cover in deep sink in hot
detergent water.
4. Remove strained sediment container
Clean off the sediment and place back in
cup as often as necessary for cleaning.
the kettle. Stir hot vegetable oil and whirl
cleaning sediment to center to permit
settling in the sediment container. Drain
shortening and wipe off excess.
5. Close drain.
Fill the tank with water and add water up to
full level. Add 2 ounces of dish compound.
6. Turn on heating element.
Set heat control at 250° F. and boil 10-20
minutes, depending on need.
7. Turn off heat.
Open drain. Draw off cleaning solution.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8. Scrub interior.
9. Rinse and sanitize.
10. Air dry parts.
11. Clean exterior.
Using long-handled brush, scrub interior.
Flush out with water. Clean basket with
nylon brush and place back in kettle.
Fill kettle with water. Add 1/2 cup vinegar
to neutralize remaining detergent. Turn on
power and boil for 5 minutes. TURN OFF
HEAT. Drain. Rinse with clear water.
Expose baskets and strainer to air and dry.
While kettle is cool, wipe off exterior with a
grease solvent, or a detergent solution.
Then rinse.
Weekly Cleaning:
Destain Deep-Fat Fryer:
1. Fill the kettle to full level with water. Heat to at least 175° F., or allow it to boil for 5 to 10
minutes. Turn off heat.
2. Add 2 tablespoons of destaining compound per gallon of water. Let stand up to 1 hour.
Agitate solution and loosen particles remaining on the sides of kettle.
3. Place screens and strainers in 175° F. water containing 2 tablespoons of destaining
compound per gallon. Make sure water covers. Allow to stand overnight. Rinse thoroughly
and air dry.
4. Drain kettle and rinse thoroughly before replacing cleaned screen and strainer.
Self-Cleaning Units:
1. Lift calrod heating units and drain thoroughly.
2. Turn on fryer; set thermostat at 400° F. for 2 minutes to allow heating units to burn clean.
3. Turn off fryer and brush carbon from heating units with a soft wire brush.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8229 DOUGH DIVIDER/ROUNDER OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
DOUGH DIVIDER/ROUNDER
1. Do not allow any part of the body to come in contact with working parts when the machine is
in operation. Keep hands free from under the divider heads.
2. Scale dough to proper weight, place in dough pan and pull down handle to divide and round.
3. Weight of the finished dough pieces is controlled by the scaled weight of the bulk dough.
4. Shut machine off while removing dough pieces.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Directions for Cleaning Dough Divider:
Step
Procedure
Shut off power.
Disconnect switch when knife and ram are
in the extreme backward position, or turn
divider by hand or move knives to the rear.
Prepare divider for cleaning.
DAILY
Thoroughly clean these parts:
Sifter
Scaling plunger
Measuring chamber
Ram
Knife
Hopper
Conveyor belt
Remove parts in this order:
Remove pan.
Remove pins and pull lever forward.
Depress trip to release knives.
Remove dropped knives with care.
Release ram with care.
Remove all plungers.
WEEKLY
Remove frame, trip, bed plate, knife frame
and clean thoroughly.
Clean parts.
DAILY
Base and frame: Clean with hot machine
dishwashing detergent solution; rinse and
dry. Pistons: Soak in bucket containing a
solution of soda and water. When dough
has loosened, remove and rinse under hot
running water then dry. Dip each piston in
divider oil and wipe off excess before
replacing cylinders that have been wiped
or scraped free of all dough.
WEEKLY
Soak pressure stems, all screws and all
removable parts in a solution of hot
machine dishwashing detergent. Scrub,
Rinse and air-dry.
Brush and clean frame.
DAILY
Vacuum or blow out all flour from divider,
conveyor belts, drives, and switchboxes.
Clean the face of yoke and floor dividers,
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
scraping if necessary. Clean frame with
mild detergent solution. Rinse, dry.
WEEKLY
Clean flour sifter hoppers. Wipe off all the
exposed parts of divider and oil unpainted
surfaces with divider oil.
Reposition all parts and return pressure
stems and screws. Replace washed pan
under divider head to protect the conveyor
belt.
5. Replace parts.
6. Test for operation.
8230 DOUGH SHEETER/MOLDER OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
DOUGH SHEETER/MOLDER
1. Refer to manufacturer’s manual for adjustments and special instructions.
2. Adjust drag boards for size of piece to be molded.
3. Scale pieces to use correct weight from Duchess Divider.
NOTE: It may be necessary to use more than divided piece from the duchess machine to round
to desired finished weight.
4. Turn machine on and place dough pieces on the belt between the drag boards.
5. For sheeting only, use roller part of the machine.
Directions for Cleaning Molder:
Step
1. Shut off power.
2. Blow out dough particles and flour.
3. Clean.
4. Check conveyor belts.
5. Paint rollers with divider oil.
Procedure
Clean once daily; cleaning should proceed
only when the machine is turned off for
maximum safety.
Use air hose to clean hard to reach areas.
Use wet cloth to soften hardened dough on
rollers, scrapers, deflectors. DO NOT USE
TOOLS OR COARSE ABRASIVES.
Clean daily after each shutdown, and
during operation if dough particles stick.
Apply oil to soften any remaining dough
after shutdown. DO NOT USE RAGS to
wipe up oil during operation. Use a brush
to apply oil every hour during run.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8231 FOOD WASTE DISPOSAL SYSTEM: SOMAT MODEL 3 OPERATING AND SAFETY
PRECAUTIONS
FOOD WASTE DISPOSAL SYSTEM: SOMAT MODEL 3
General:
The operator should become thoroughly familiar with the equipment and the operating instructions
prior to starting the machine since visual observation of abnormal operation and rapid reaction to
shut the machine down when conditions require it is essential to safe and sanitary operation.
Start-Up Procedure:
1. Serious damage to the cutting mechanism or the drive system can result from attempts to pulp
metals or other non-pulpable objects. Before starting the system, remove the feed chute and
inspect inside of pulper tank for non-pulpable items.
NOTE: Non-pulpable items must be removed prior to start-up of the system.
2. The feed chute contacts an electrical interlock switch; therefore the chute must be correctly
positioned before the system can be started.
3. When the unit is started, the water level in the pulper should stabilize approximately twothirds of the way up the inside of the pulper tank with a large vortex in the center of the pulper.
Water level may be observed by momentarily depressing the feed chute flexible curtain. Do
not attempt to feed food waste into the machine until normal water level is established.
Start-Up Procedure
Operation
1. Remove feed chute.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Result
Inspect interior of pulper for non-pulpable
items.
Fully close drain valve by turning Closes bypass port to ship’s drain system.
handle 90° from open position.
Fully open water shut–off valve (gate) Water admitted to inlet side of electrically
by turning hand wheel fully counter- operated water inlet valve.
clockwise.
Turn system disconnect handle on Power available to pulper motor starter and
electrical control panel to “ON” position. water inlet valve (red light on).
Move drain switch control arm to Equalize use of all cutting edges.
opposite rotation position from last
previous run.
Replace feed chute.
Green indicator “Run” light comes on.
Move detent over “STOP” button to “START” button in ready position.
out-of-way position.
8. Depress “START” button.
9. Wait one minute.
Water inlet valve opens. Pulper motor
starts.
Water level stabilize in pulper tank and
water dam.
Indicates proper water level.
Food waste ground and discharged.
10. Check water level.
11. Begin feeding food waste into the feed
chute.
Shut-Down Procedures:
1. The shut-down procedures described herein assume that the Food Waste Disposal System
is used continuously in a single run daily for disposal of all accumulated food waste.
However, shipboard conditions may make it desirable to operate for more than one period
during a day. In such cases, it is recommended that the interrupted runs in a single day be
considered as temporary shut-down in which case it is necessary to accomplish the following:
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
Temporary Shut-Down Procedure:
1. This procedure should be used if the equipment will be operated for particular time periods.
For instance, a breakfast period, a lunch period, and a dinner period. In between each period
the following shut-down procedure should be used.
Temporary Shut-Down Procedure
Operation
Result
1. Allow the pulper to run for 5 minutes Clears the machine, dam and associated
after last pieces of waste are fed to the piping of any accumulations of waste.
machine.
2. Depress “STOP” button and move Closes the water inlet valve and stops the
detent over “STOP” button
pulper motor.
WARNING:
DO NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES ATTEMPT TO CLEAN THE MACHINE OR PLACE
YOUR HANDS INSIDE THE PULPER TANK DURING THIS TEMPORARY SHUT-DOWN
CYCLE.
1. Use an approved, clear liquid detergent to wash the interior/exterior surfaces of the machine.
Detergent should be mixed with hot fresh water in accordance with instructions for its use.
Shut-Down Procedure (End-of-Day)
Operation
Result
1. Allow the Pulper to run for 5 minutes Clears the machine, dam and associated
after last pieces of waste are fed into piping of any accumulations of water.
the machine.
2. Fully open drain valve by turning Opens bypass port to ship’s drain system,
handle 90° from the closed position.
drain pulper.
3. Depress “STOP” button and move Closes the water inlet valve and stops the
detent over “STOP” button.
pulper motor.
4. Fully close water supply shut-off valve. None.
5. Turn system disconnect switch to Green indicator “Run” light goes off and all
“OFF” position.
power is removed from system.
6. Remove feed chute.
Exposes interior of pulper for inspection
and cleanout.
WARNING:
FOOD WASTES HAVE A HIGH BACTERIA CONTENT. BROKEN GLASS OR
OTHER SHARP REFUSE MAY BE PRESENT INSIDE THE PULPER TANK AND
EXERCISE
JUNK BOX AND CUTTING MEMBERS HAVE SHARP EDGES.
EXTREME CAUTION WHEN REACHING INTO THESE AREAS. WEAR RUBBER
GLOVES WHILE PERFORMING THE FOLLOWING STEPS. DO NOT DRINK, EAT
OR SMOKE.
Operation
7. Remove accumulated debris from the
pulper tank.
8. Fully close drain valve by turning
handle 90° from open position.
9. Dump bucket full (2 gal) of hot fresh
water/detergent solution into pulper
tank.
Result
Clear interior of extraneous material.
Closes bypass port to ship’s drain system.
Washes lower part
tank/impeller assembly.
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of
the
pulper
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
Operation
Result
10. Wash down the feed chute, the interior Ensures that all interior faces are cleaned.
of the pulper tank, the gasket area with
a bristle brush and hot detergent
solution.
11. Turn system disconnect handle on Red indicator “Power On” light comes on.
electrical control panel to “ON” position.
12. Replace feed chute.
Red indicator “Power On” light goes out
and green indicator “Run” light comes on.
13. Move detent over “STOP” button to “START” button in ready position, will
out-of-way position.
permit system’s operation without water
input.
14. Depress “START” button and run Pulper drive motor starts. Water inlet valve
pulper for 2 minutes.
opens but no water enters. Part of wash
water is “pumped” out through dam
assembly.
15. Depress “STOP” button move detent Pulper drive motor stops; water inlet valve
over “STOP” button.
closes.
16. Fully open drain valve by turning Open bypass port to ship’s drain system,
handle 90° from closed position.
drains pulper.
17. Fully close drain valve by turning Closes bypass port to ship’s drain system.
handle 90° from open position.
18. Remove feed chute.
Provides access to pulper interior. Red
light comes on.
19. Fill pulper tank with approximately 5 Rinses feed chute, pulper tank and dam
gallons of hot fresh water, rinse assembly.
feedchute and allow to set for 2
minutes.
20. Replace feed chute.
Red indicator “Power On” light goes out
and green indicator “Run” light comes on.
21. Move detent over “STOP” button to Will permit system’s operation without
out-of-way position.
water input.
22. Depress “START” button and run Pulper drive motor starts. Water inlet valve
pulper for 2 minutes.
opens but no water enters. Part of rinse
water is “pumped” out through dam
assembly.
23. Depress “STOP” button; move detent Closes the water inlet valve and stops the
over “STOP” button.
pulper motor.
24. Fully open drain valve by turning Opens bypass port to ship’s drain systems,
handle 90° from closed position.
drains pulper.
25. Scrub all exterior surfaces faces with Ensures that all exterior surfaces are
bristle brush and hot detergent cleaned.
solution.
26. Rinse all exterior surfaces faces with Remove wash water and water. Dislodge
hot fresh water.
waste particles.
27. Turn system disconnect switch to Shut-down completed.
“OFF” position.
Preparation for an Extended Period of Inactivity:
1. The Navy Model 3 Pulper assembly disposes of food waste which contain solids or semisolids which may dry into rigid solids. The procedure described in the shut-down procedure
(end-of-day) must be extended to include a more thorough cleansing of the internal passages
if the unit is to remain idle for periods beyond 7 days.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
2. Either of the chemical disinfecting agents listed herein are recommended for use in sanitizing
the Food Waste Disposal System:
a. Disinfectant, Food Service, (Chlorine-Iodine type), NSN 6840-00-810-6396. Complete
directions for use are given on the package.
WARNING: HAZARDOUS REACTIONS TO THE CHEMICAL OCCUR UPON EXPOSURE TO
ACETONE, M-E-KETONE, AMMONIA, ANILINE (ALKALINE), PYRIDINE AND FLAME OR
SPARK.
b. Sodium Hypochlorite Solution, NSN 6810-598-7316 (one gallon bottle)
dosage levels are.
GALLONS OF WATER
AMOUNT TO ADD
25
7 OZ
10
3 OZ
5
2 OZ
recommended
NOTE: Rinsing is not required after completing the following steps.
SHUT-DOWN PROCEDURE FOR EXTENDED PERIOD
Operation
Result
1. Fully close drain valve by turning Close bypass port to ship’s drain system.
handle 90° from open position.
2. Remove feed chute.
Provides access to pulper for scrubbing.
3. Dump 5 gallons of hot fresh Washes lower part of the pulper
water/sanitizing solution into pulper shell/impeller assembly.
tank.
WARNING: FOOD WASTES HAVE A HIGH BACTERIA CONTENT. WEAR RUBBER
GLOVES WHILE PERFORMING THE FOLLOWING STEPS. DO NOT DRINK, EAT
OR SMOKE.
Operation
4. Scrub feed chute and exposed posed
gasket area with a bristle brush and hot
sanitizing solution.
5. Leave sanitizing solution in pulper tank
for 10 minutes.
6. Turn system disconnect handle on
electrical control.
7. Replace feed chute.
Ensures that
cleaned.
Result
all interior surfaces are
Ensures that all crevices are soaked to
sanitize interior.
Red indicator “Power On” light comes on.
Red indicator “Power On” light goes out
and green indicator “Run” light comes on.
8. Remove detent over “STOP.”
“START” button in ready position, will
permit systems operation without water
input
9. Depress “START” button and run Pulper drive motor starts. Water inlet valve
pulper for 2 minutes.
opens but no water enters.
Part of
sanitizing water is “pumped” out through
dam assembly.
10. Depress “STOP” button move detent Pulper drive motor stops, water inlet valve
over “STOP” button.
closes.
11. Fully open drain valve by turning Opens bypass port to ship’s drain system,
handle 90° from closed position.
drains pulper.
12. Turn system disconnect switch to Shut-down completed.
“OFF” position.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8232 GRIDDLE OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
GRIDDLE
1. The griddle has separate thermostatic controls for each 9 to 12 inches of width. Turn on only
the amount of griddle surface required for the operation. Set thermostats to required
temperature and allow to preheat approximately twenty minutes.
2. Turn all thermostats to “OFF” when not in use. Allowing a griddle to heat unused for long
period of time wastes energy and results in premature burn-out of heating elements.
3. Periodically check the calibration of the thermostats by using an accurate surface
thermometer or pyrometer. Have thermostats calibrated as necessary.
Directions for Cleaning Griddles:
Step
1. Shut off power.
2. Turn off heat.
Remove carbonized
grease (after each use).
3. Clean grease and/or drain troughs.
4. Empty grease receptacles.
5. Scrub guards, front, and sides of
griddle.
Procedure
Use manual switch.
NEVER clean surface plate while hot.
Allow plate to cool.
NEVER POUR
WATER ON HOT PLATE. Scrape surface
with spatula or pancake turner.
Wipe
clean with dry paper towels. Use pumice
stone block to clean hard to remove
burned areas on plate after each use.
Pour hot detergent solution into small drain
and brush. Rinse with hot water.
Remove grease from scrapings and
supporting name with hot detergent
solution; rinse and dry.
Using hot detergent solution, wash off
grease, splatter, and film. Rinse and dry.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8233
HIGH COMPRESSION STEAMER (MARKET FORGE) OPERATING AND SAFETY
PRECAUTIONS
HIGH COMPRESSION STEAMER (MARKET FORGE)
1. Make sure drain plug is in place. Pour 6 quarts of water into cooking chamber. Note
water level and keep replenished during operation.
2. Turn main power switch on, turn timer to maximum setting and let cooker preheat
approximately twenty minutes. When water starts to boil, cooker is ready for operation. Turn
timer “OFF.”
3. Put in pans of food, close and latch door and set timer at cooking time. Cooking pressure is 9
to 10 pounds.
4. When cooking cycle is complete, steam will be automatically exhausted and buzzer will
sound. Turn timer to “OFF” to silence buzzer.
5. Unlatch door and wait a few seconds for vapor to clear, then open door and remove food.
CAUTION: NEVER attempt to open door when cooker is pressurized.
6. With cooker pressurized and before starting to cook, manually operate pressure relief valve
briefly.
Directions for Cleaning High-Speed Steam Cookers (Routine Daily Cleaning):
Step
Procedure
1. Turn off main power switch.
Let Remove anti-spill pan. Drain chamber and
chamber cool. Disassemble.
replace drain plug.
2. Wash interior chamber walls, door, Use a mild detergent solution.
Scrub
spray nozzle.
interior with plastic brush to remove
stubborn food particles.
3. Soak cooking chamber, shelves, and Add about 2 quarts of detergent solution
anti-spill pan. Rinse.
and let remain for short time. Drain. Rinse
with clean hot water.
4. Clean exterior.
Scrub with brush and hot detergent
solution, legs, side, top, back, outside and
inside of doors, space between door and
handle, and gasket. Rinse with hot water;
dry.
Polish stainless-steel exterior with
non-abrasive cleaner.
DO NOT USE
STEEL WOOL.
5. Replace parts.
Fill chamber with 6 quarts of water; close
chamber door. Operate for a 5-minute
cooking cycle.
Cleaning After Use (or as needed):
Thoroughly clean cookers in which meat and starchy foods are cooked frequently. Remove pan
racks, door, and anti-spill pan. Wash with a solution of hot detergent water. Rinse with clean hot
water. Replace parts.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8234 HOT CHOCOLATE DISPENSER OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
HOT CHOCOLATE DISPENSER
CAUTION: For initial operation and whenever dispenser experiences loss of water supply, press
and hold “HOT WATER” button until water flows from the dispensing spout before turning on the
power switch. This will fill the water tank and prevent premature heater burnout.
1. Turn power switch on. Red light will glow. Tank should preheat in 15 minutes.
2. Set beverage quantity selector switch: small is for 6 oz. cup, large for 8 oz. cup.
3. Lift off cabinet hood, remove hopper cover and loosely fill hopper with chocolate mix.
Replace cover and housing hood.
4. Press and release “CUP” button. Dispenser fills and shuts off automatically. For hot water
only, press and hold hot water button until cup is almost full.
5. For drink strength and quantity adjustments, refer to the service manual.
Cleaning:
1. The product handling system is basically self-cleaning, since each time the product is
dispensed, hot water flushes the water system.
2. Weekly, a complete cleaning should be accomplished. Since a number of interrelated parts
must be removed before cleaning and replaced properly after cleaning, refer to the operating
manual for complete instructions.
WARNING: Do not use hot water for cleaning plastic parts; use warm soapy water. Rinse all
parts thoroughly and dry. Do not use abrasives and do not run through dishwashing machine.
8235 ICE TEA DISPENSER OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
ICE TEA DISPENSER
CAUTION: If dispenser will be without power supply for more than 45 minutes, remove the tea jar
to avoid clogging. Duct heater must be operative to keep tea powder dry and free flowing.
1. Lift off machine front cover, lift jar and dispensing head out of the unit. Unscrew jar and fill
with powdered iced tea.
NOTE: Jar must be clear and completely dry for proper dispensing. Reinstall jar and
dispensing head assembly and replace front cover.
2. To adjust drink strength, remove jar and dispensing head as above, tap lightly on dispensing
head with hand to remove tea from dispensing wheel, invert the jar and turn strength adjuster
on the dispensing head toward higher number to increase strength or to lower number to
decrease strength of drinks. Turn the adjustor until it snaps into the next notch. Refer to
manual for exploded view of parts of dispensing head. Reinstall dispensing assembly and
cabinet front before operation.
3. If dispenser malfunctions, refer to troubleshooting chart in the operating manual.
Cleaning:
Remove cup rest and drip tray and empty drip tray. Remove front panel from unit. Lift jar and
dispensing head up and out of unit. Remove mixing bowl by lifting front edge up and out. Wash
cup rest, drip tray, mixing bowl, and all outside surfaces of unit with mild detergent/warm water
solution. Rinse with clean water and dry with soft lint-free cloth. Do not use abrasive cleaners.
To clean dispensing head, remove jar ring and disassemble dispensing head as shown in
operator’s manual. Wash disassembled parts in water, and then dry thoroughly with clean lintfree cloths. Reassemble dispensing head and attach to jar with jar ring. MAKE SURE PRODUCT
TUBE SEALS OFF DISPENSING HEAD PRODUCT CHUTE. Position mixing bowl within unit.
Invert and position jar on jar support so rotor shaft of dispensing head seats on motor drive.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8236 COMBI-OVEN OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
COMBI-OVEN
The Combi-Oven/Steamer can cook using (1) Steam, (2) Hot Air, or (3) Steam and Hot Air
Combined. These modes of operation can be used separately, combined, or in sequence. Check
manual for detailed instructions. The current combi-ovens approved for Navy use are the AltoShaam 7-14 ESI/DLX MAR, Blodgett Hydrovection HV-100 EM and the Rational SCC62/SCC102.
Four Function Selector Switch:
Steam Mode: Steam, Stew, Blanch, Poach, Reheat, and Thaw.
Hot Air Mode: Roast, Broil, or Bake.
Combi Mode: Defrost, Roast, Bake, Rethermalize, or Reheat.
Cool Down Mode: Allows unit to cool down rapidly with door open or shut.
OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
1. Turn power on, indicator light will come on.
2. Set mode: Steam, Hot Air, or Combi (Steam & Hot Air).
3. Set time for desired cooking time. When timer time expires, the unit shuts off and the buzzer
rings. Move the selector to Stay On to stop the buzzer ringing.
4. For Hot Air and Combi modes, set the temperature. The heat indicator light illuminates and
stays lit until temperature is reached.
5. For the Steam mode the adjustment knob controls the rate of steam production. Turn
clockwise to increase the steam.
6. Use the Cool Down mode in preparation for cleaning. In the Cool Down mode, neither the
temperature dial nor the timer will be operational. The blower will function with the door open
or closed.
Cleaning the Exterior:
1. When the unit has cooled down, wipe the exterior with a soft cloth saturated with light oil.
2. Wipe dry with a clean soft cloth.
NOTE: Do not spray exterior with water.
Cleaning the Interior (daily when used):
1. Cool oven to 140 degrees Fahrenheit. If oven is cold, turn on Steam mode for 3 to 4 minutes
to warm the oven interior surfaces.
2. Spray the interior of the oven with recommended cleaning detergent.
NOTE: Never spray water into the unit when the temperature is above 212 degrees Fahrenheit.
3. Let cleaner work for 15 to 20 minutes.
4. Set oven on Steam mode and adjust timer for 20 minutes.
5. Use the exterior hose to rinse the oven interior with water.
6. Set oven on Steam mode and set timer for 5 minutes to remove all detergent residues.
NOTE: Never scrape or scour the oven interior.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8237 SKITTLE OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
SKITTLE
Operating:
1. Press rocker switch to the ON position.
2. Set thermostat to the desired temperature.
3. Close lid until HEATER POWER ON light goes out.
4. Start cooking.
5. To shut down the unit, turn thermostat and rocker switch to OFF position.
Cleaning (Disconnect Power before Cleaning):
Exterior:
After each use, clean the stainless steel with a good commercial stainless steel cleaner or polish.
Interior:
1. Use mild detergent, plastic scouring pads, and soft cloths.
2. Rinse off cleaning agent with water; wipe dry with soft cloth.
NOTE: Never use cleaners containing chlorides or abrasive compounds.
Draw-Off Valve:
1. Make sure stem is in the open position.
2. Unscrew the hex bonnet nut.
3. Carefully remove the nut and stem assembly.
4. Clean valve body and tube using draw-off brush provided with Legion Care Kit.
5. Re-assemble; tighten bonnet nut by hand only.
Maintenance:
See manual for specific maintenance of unit, such as actuator tension adjustment and re-packing
actuator with grease.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
8238 ACCU-TEMP GRIDDLE OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
ACCU-TEMP GRIDDLE
SEASONING
It is recommended that you clean your ACCU-STEAM™ griddle thoroughly before turning your
unit on. To clean the griddle surface, just simply wash the cooking surface down with a solution of
mild soap and water, and then rinse thoroughly with clean water. Once the cooking surface has
been cleaned, set the thermostat to 200°F (93°C), turn the griddle power switch to the “On”
position and allow the griddle cooking surface to heat for 10 minutes.
Using high temperature oil, such as Pan and Grill Shortening™, Whirl™ or equivalent, pour
enough to cover the entire griddle surface. Do not use standard vegetable oil to season the
griddle cooking surface. It may cause food to stick and result in improperly cooked food. Work this
seasoning oil into the griddle surface with a regular heavy-duty scrub pad for about 5 minutes,
making sure that you scrub the seasoning oil over the entire griddle-cooking surface. After the
entire griddle surface has been scrubbed with seasoning oil for 5 minutes, simply wipe or
squeegee off excess oil from griddle surface. Your griddle is now ready to use! If you use
chemicals to clean your griddle periodically or on a schedule, you may need to repeat this process
after the use of chemicals.
PREHEATING
Turn On switch to the “On” position and set the thermostat to the desired temperature. The griddle
will increase its surface temperature at an average rate of 15° F (8°C) per minute. It takes
approximately 22 minutes to raise the griddle from room temperature to its maximum temperature
of 400° F (204°C). The griddle will be preheated when the “Heat” light starts to cycle on and off.
Please use caution as temperatures on and around the griddle cooking surface could cause
severe burns.
COOKING
Begin cooking only after the griddle has been preheated to the desired temperature.
Please note these facts:
• You can cook all the way to the edges of the griddle surface because the
temperature does not very across the entire cooking surface.
• You can turn the product to the same spot because the griddle has near
instant heat recovery.
•
It will always cook the same, regardless of product load or surface coverage.
Accurate Cooking Temperatures
Because of the inaccurate surface temperatures and long recovery times common with other
griddles, it is doubtful you were cooking at the set temperature or the temperature you wanted.
Adjust the temperature on your ACCU-STEAM™ griddle and it AT2T-2742-1 Rev. E ACCUSTEAM ELECTRIC GRIDDLE OWNERS MANUAL Page 13 / 41 OPERATION (cont.) won’t
change or vary by the location on the griddle surface. There are no hot or cold zones.
Heat Lamp
It is normal for the heat light to cycle on and off. This light indicates when the heaters are
energized. You will soon notice how little they are energized to maintain perfect surface
temperatures on your griddle.
Grease Pan
Use caution when emptying the grease pan. The contents in this pan could cause severe burns.
The pan should be checked periodically and emptied as necessary to prevent an overflow or
dangerous condition. The grease can contents could cause severe burns. Slowly remove the
grease can from the griddle to avoid spilling the contents.
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
CAUTION
DAILY CLEANING
Cleaning during the work shift can be performed with a sharp scraper. When heavy cleaning at
the end of a shift or periodically as needed, the following is recommended:
•
•
•
•
Turn the griddle off and allow it to cool to between 220°F and 240°F
(104°F and 116°C). Use water, ice and/or griddle cleaner as needed. For
example, the 3M Scotch-Brite™ Quick Clean Griddle System provides the
Scotch-Brite™ polishing pads, quick clean liquid, pad holder and squeegee.
Clean-up is very easy using these tools with the quick clean liquid, water, ice
or combinations of these liquids.
If a griddle with grease on the cooking surface is cleaned at a high
temperature using water or ice, the grease may splatter and cause
skin burns. Be very cautious!
Do not use a griddle stone or brick to clean the griddle.
Do not use a water-jet to clean the griddle.
Never leave a chlorine sanitizer in contact with the stainless steel longer than 10 minutes. Longer
contact can cause corrosion.
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8239 ELECTRIC STEAM TABLE OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
ELECTRIC STEAM TABLE
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8240 REGULAR STEAM TABLE OPERATING AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
REGULAR STEAM TABLE
Thermostatic Controls
The temperature of the Cospolich Hot Well is controlled using a thermostat. The heating element
will cycle on and off periodically based on the users desired temperature setting.
The temperature is set by turning the black temperature control knob. From the off position,
turning the knob clockwise will switch the unit “on”. The knob contains graduated numbers. The
operating temperature increases as the numbers on the dial increase. When not in use, the knob
should be turned to the “off” position. This position has a detent to ensure that the switch is indeed
off. You should be able to both hear and feel a “click” when the unit is turned off.
The controls contain a red indicator light to visually notify you when the unit is on.
Operating Instructions
A. Adding Water
The Hot Well units are designed to operate with water in the well. The unit will run without water,
or “dry”. However, the heating is much more even and effective and the unit is more efficient with
water placed in the well. The water level should be no less than 1” deep and no higher than the
bottom of the food pan.
The water level evaporates at a rapid pace – especially at higher temperatures. The water level
should be checked periodically to ensure optimum performance.
B. Pre-Heating
Using the well with water requires more time from ambient temperature until the food pan begins
to get warming effects. The heater must warm the volume of water which should take no more
than 20 minutes. Once the water is heated, the thermostatic controls will allow the unit to run less
due to the heat held by the water.
*Note: The water warms faster if covered. A food pan makes a great cover.
C. Operation
Operating the Hot Well is as simple as turning a knob. Below is a list of steps, from start to finish,
in operating the Cospolich Hot Well:
1. Check drain valve(s). It should be closed if using one (1) well and open if using more than one
well.
2. Add water to the dry well.
3. Close valve(s).
4. Drop in food pan with or without (if pre-heating) food.
5. Turn knob “on”. A higher number indicates a higher temperature. The indicator light should
glow red to indicate that the unit is on. Unit will cycle on and off periodically prior to reaching
maximum temperature. When cycled off, the light will be off.
6. If pre-heating, upon reaching adequate well temperature, add pan with food.
7. Adjust thermostat setting to achieve desired food temperature.
8 Stir food products periodically to prevent sticking.
9 Periodically check water level in well.
*Note: When changing food pans or adding water, use extreme caution. The surrounding
metal surfaces are hot.
10. When finished, turn control knob to “off” position.
11. To drain water from well, open valve(s).
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Maintenance & Cleaning
The Cospolich Hot Well unit is nearly maintenance free. There are, however, a couple of things
that, if done routinely, can extend the life and performance of the unit.
Cleaning is by far the most important thing that you can do to ensure reliable service from the Hot
Well. The stainless steel surfaces should be cleaned after every use. The controls should be free
of moisture, dust, and debris. A warm solution of soapy water should be a sufficient cleaning
solution for routine spills. However, a mixture of warm water and bleach can both clean and
disinfect stubborn or heavy spills or stains.
The drain should be checked before or after every use to ensure that there are no obstructions
preventing the flow of water.
In addition, the seal of the Hot Well to the mounting surface should be checked monthly. A faulty
seal could result in liquid infiltration under the well and below the well mounting surface.
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CHAPTER 9
ASHORE FOOD SERVICE, FACILITY STRUCTURE &
HOUSEKEEPING
PART A: ASHORE FOOD SERVICE, FACILITY STRUCTURE & HOUSEKEEPING
General Facility Structure and Housekeeping.....................................................................9000
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CHAPTER 9
ASHORE FOOD SERVICE, FACILITY STRUCTURE &
HOUSEKEEPING
PART A: ASHORE FOOD SERVICE, FACILITY STRUCTURE &
HOUSEKEEPING
9000 GENERAL FACILITY STRUCTURE AND HOUSEKEEPING
The following information may be used as a guide for all ashore food service activities, including
MWR facilities, serving Rations-In-Kind patrons.
1. Eating involves all the senses: taste, touch, smell, sight and hearing. Proper food
preparation and plate presentation is essential for a pleasurable dining experience. It is
equally important to serve food in an attractive environment that is conducive to dining.
2. Serving areas should be well-lighted, well-maintained and free from dirt, dust and food
residue. The area should be organized and adequately stocked with food and supplies. A
menu will be posted daily, include all food items offered for the meals served that day, and
will be displayed at the front of the serving line. The use of plastic, paper or styrofoam
tableware should be limited to take-out orders only.
3. The dining area will be kept neat, clean and free from litter. Flooring, ceilings and walls will
be kept in good repair (no marks, chips or discoloration), and free from dirt, dust and food
residues. Table top and chair coverings will be well maintained and clean. The color
scheme in the dining area should contain subtle complementing colors. The quality, intensity
and distribution of lighting have an effect on the appearance of food and the overall comfort
of the customers. Warm lighting provides the best atmosphere in a dining area. To enhance
the dining atmosphere, reduce the noise from the kitchen and dish washing areas. Navy
Food Service sanitation standards are established by BUMED and are published in the
manual of Naval Preventive Medicine (NAVMED P-5010, Tri Service Food Code). Ashore
general messes refer to Unified Facilities Criteria (UFC) 4-722-01, 27 JAN 03, Dining
Facilities. This publication can be downloaded from the following website:
http://65.204.17.188//report/doc_ufc.htmland http:/criteria.navfac.navy.mil.
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CHAPTER 10
WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONS
PART A: WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONS
Regulations ...........................................................................................................................10000
Policy .....................................................................................................................................10001
Solid Waste Processing Equipment .....................................................................................10002
Handling and Storage Guidance ..........................................................................................10003
Training .................................................................................................................................10004
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CHAPTER 10
WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONS
PART A: WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONS
10000 REGULATIONS
1. PLASTICS. Surface ships equipped with Plastic Waste Processors (PWP) are prohibited from
discharging plastics into the sea. Currently, those ships without plastic processing capability or
have non-operating Plastic Waste Processors must retain all plastic waste onboard or
retrograde/transfer it to other ships. Discharge of plastics is prohibited for all ships. Exceptions to
these retention requirements are allowed only when necessary for the purpose of securing the
safety of the ship or the health of ship’s force.
2. BIODEGRADABLE TRASH AND FOOD WASTE. Biodegradable trash (paper and cardboard)
and food waste may be discharged beyond three nautical miles from any shoreline as long as it is
pulped using the approved Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) developed pulpers.
3. METAL AND GLASS. Metal and glass that has been shredded and bagged so as to ensure
negative buoyancy may be discharged once the ship is beyond 12 nautical miles from any
shoreline.
4. DEFINITIONS.
Food Waste:
Spoiled or unspoiled food substances, such as fruits,
vegetables, dairy products, meat products, food scraps, and food particles.
a. Pulped Waste: Pulped or ground waste capable of passing through a screen with
openings no greater than 12 millimeters (0.47 inch).
b. Plastic Waste: Styrofoam, nylon, vinyl, polypropylene and similar synthetic materials
produced by polymerization and any material that contains plastic (e.g., punctured spray
cans which contain plastic tubes).
10001 POLICY
1. GENERAL.
An internal instruction is required that outlines policy, procedures and
responsibilities for plastic waste storage and disposal.
A sample shipboard solid waste
management instruction may be acquired via NSWCCD-TR-63-97/25. All waste management
policy information can be found at http:navyseic.dt.navy.mil/solid/solid.htm.
2. PLASTICS
a. All waste plastic shall be separated from other types of waste and placed into “plastic
waste only” receptacles for the collection and processing in the Plastic Waste Processor.
Plastic waste, whether processed or unprocessed, shall be held onboard for disposal
ashore.
b. In the event that the Plastic Waste Processors are inoperative, the ship shall retain
plastic waste onboard by utilizing odor barrier bags for storage of waste in accordance
with the instructions provided in NAVSUP/NAVSEA PUB 726, Afloat Solid Waste
Management Guide and OPNAVINST 5090.1B Change 2, Guide to Environmental
Compliance Afloat.
c. If retention of plastic waste endangers the health or safety of crew members, creates
unacceptable nuisance conditions or compromises combat readiness, overboard
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discharge is authorized, provided it is properly packaged (in a manner that will not
separate in the ocean) and weighted for negative buoyancy and dumped beyond 50 miles
from any shoreline. Discharges shall be recorded in the ship’s deck log. Log entry shall
include:
1) Date, time and location of discharge;
2) Approximate weight and cubic volume of the discharge; and,
3) Nature of the material discharged.
3. TRASH DISCHARGE AT SEA. Upon completion of deployment, Navy ships shall report by
routine message to OPNAV (N45) and the chain of command regarding discharges other than
food waste into the in-effect special area. Special areas now in-effect are the Baltic Sea, the
North Sea and the Antarctic Area. Other special areas that have been designated but are not yet
in-effect are: the Persian Gulf, Red Sea, Black Sea, Mediterranean Sea, Caribbean Sea and the
Gulf of Mexico.
4. NON-PLASTIC
a. Non-plastic solid waste shall be discharged at sea only where permitted by law as defined
above.
b. Recyclable materials will be collected and recycled when practical without negatively
impacting shipboard habitability and readiness. No materials containing food residues will
be retained onboard longer than necessary to process or properly dispose.
10002 SOLID WASTE PROCESSING EQUIPMENT
1. GENERAL. In most cases, the Auxiliary Engineering Department maintains the solid waste
processing equipment. Guidelines on equipment operation may be obtained by contacting the
Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) 03L.
2. PROCESSORS. Plastic Waste Processors (PWP) will melt and compress plastic into a disc
at a 30 to 1 ratio. The PWP includes a shredder, melt unit, and cooling unit. The output discs,
weighing approximately 10 pounds, are stored onboard until they can be off-loaded onto a
Combat Logistics Force (CLF) ship during an underway replenishment or return to shore.
3. PULPERS. Pulpers will process paper, food waste, and cardboard into a non-floating slurry
that is authorized for overboard discharge. Pulped materials will allow waste to be discharged
near land (greater than 3 nautical miles) and during flight operations. Available are a large pulper
capable of pulping 500 pounds per hour and a small pulper capable of processing 100 pounds per
hour. Small pulpers will be installed on ships with a minimal waste stream and ships where a
large pulper is not easily accommodated.
4. SHREDDERS. The glass and metal shredder will compact at a three-to-one ratio. The
shredder is identical to the plastics shredder, except it has combs in the shredding chamber. All
shredded waste will be placed in a burlap bag for authorized discharge. Bags must be weighted
for negative buoyancy.
10003 HANDLING AND STORAGE GUIDANCE
1. GENERAL.
Procedures shall be developed for collecting and separating the waste. Waste
receptacles shall be placed at designated locations and labeled “Plastics Only,” “Biodegradable or
Pulpables,” and “Metal and Glass.”
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All food-contaminated plastic, glass, and metal cans should be washed prior to processing to
avoid possible safety and health problems during storage. Clean plastic discs will enhance
recycling.
10004 TRAINING
1. GENERAL. Food service personnel will be provided training on operation, source separation,
waste disposal and waste discharge restrictions. Regular meetings should be held to ensure
ship’s policies are effective and comply with the law. Training aids are available by contacting
your local Food Service Management Team.
Additional guidance and samples of shipboard waste management plans may be acquired by
contacting NAVSUP at (717) 605-5623 (DSN 430-5623) or NAVSEA at (703) 602-0351.
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CHAPTER 11
HEIMLICH MANEUVER
PART A: HEIMLICH MANEUVER
Heimlich Maneuver Chart.........................................................................................11000
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CHAPTER 11
HEIMLICH MANEUVER
PART A: HEIMLICH MANEUVER
11000 HEIMLICH MANEUVER CHART
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NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
CHAPTER 12
FOOD MICROBIOLOGY
PART A: FOOD MICROBIOLOGY
Microbiology ..........................................................................................................................12000
Controlling Microorganisms ..................................................................................................12001
Investigating and Reporting Food Borne Disease Outbreaks..............................................12002
TABLE I – Food Borne Intoxication
TABLE II – Food Borne Parasitic Infections
TABLE III – Chemicals
TABLE IV – Natural Poisons
TABLE V – Food Borne Infections
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12000 FOOD MICROBIOLOGY
1. GENERAL. The term microbiology or microbe refers to organisms too small to see without a
microscope. They include bacteria, viruses, protozoa, and fungi, and are found wherever life can
exist. The vast majority of these microbes are either beneficial or do not affect humans directly.
Microbes that will cause disease in humans are referred to as pathogens. Knowing some basic
facts about microorganisms will help us take advantage of their beneficial characteristics and
avoid the undesirable ones. The FDA "BAD BUG" document also known as the Foodborne
Pathogenic Microorganism & Natural Toxins Handbook provides information on agents
responsible for foodborne disease outbreaks. This document may be found at the FDA webpage.
http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Food/FoodborneIllnessContaminants/UCM297627.pdf
2. BACTERIA. Bacteria, like most other living organisms must have basic requirements to
survive and grow. These include nutrients, moisture, temperature, pH (degrees of acidity and
alkalinity), presence or absence of oxygen, and time to grow. Most foods provide the necessary
nutrients, moisture and pH. With the addition of proper temperatures and oxygen levels, bacteria
can multiply in large numbers within a short period of time. Under ideal conditions, many bacteria
can triple their number every hour.
3. VIRUSES. Viruses are microbes that must be inside animal or plant cells to survive and
multiply. The most important thing to know about viruses is that they are passed in human waste
and unlike bacteria do not multiply in food or cause disease.
4. PROTOZOA. Protozoa are single celled animals which are normally not found in food. They
are abundant in natural waters and most are not harmful to humans, but some kinds can cause
diarrheal diseases.
5. FUNGI. Fungi include a large variety of microscopic plants lacking chlorophyll. Yeast, mold,
and mushrooms are all forms of fungi. Like bacteria, most fungi are beneficial and do not affect
humans directly. Fungi decompose matter similar to bacteria which results in destruction of food.
Beneficial forms of fungi are used to ferment beer, raise bread and sharpen several kinds of
cheeses. A number of fungi produce toxins which are harmful to humans.
12001 CONTROLLING MICROORGANISMS
1. GENERAL. Microorganisms may be controlled by manipulating the temperature, moisture,
pH, presence or absence of oxygen, and time. These are described below:
a. Temperature. Microorganisms may be controlled by altering the temperature. Below 32°
F., most organisms stop growing, although freezing won't kill them. As the temperature
rises most pathogenic bacteria will multiply. The optimum temperature for pathogens is
normal body temperature (98.6° F.). Above 135° F. most bacteria will die, however, heat
resistant bacteria or spores may continue to survive above 170° F. Most microorganisms
are killed at 212° F.
b. Moisture. Moisture is controlled by dehydration or altering the activity level. With the
addition of sugar, salt, or certain other ingredients, water becomes unavailable to bacteria
and growth is retarded.
c. PH. Most microorganisms, particularly pathogens, do not tolerate acidic conditions.
Foods with a pH of 4.5 or below will not support the growth of bacteria. Preserving food in
vinegar is an example of controlling bacteria by lowering the pH.
d. Oxygen. Bacteria may be classified into two groups with respect to oxygen needs.
Anaerobic bacteria thrive in the absence of oxygen and facultative bacteria can exist either
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with or without oxygen. Vacuum packing for example is a way to alter the availability of
oxygen.
e. Time.
Microorganisms require time to grow.
The population of microorganisms,
particularly bacteria, may be controlled by limiting the time food is allowed to stand at their
optimum temperature ranges. This is the basis of the 4 hour rule in food service which
states that the maximum amount of time potentially hazardous food may be held between
41° F. and 135° F. is 4 hours. Beyond the 4 hour time limit, pathogenic bacteria are
capable of producing sufficient number of microorganisms to cause illness. Table N-1
shows incubation times of certain agents.
f. Frequent and thorough hand washing by food service personnel is a critical control
measure for the prevention of food borne illness outbreaks. Chemical sanitizers may
supplement but do not replace the use of proper designed and readily accessible hand
washing facilities to include hot and cold water, disposable paper towels and soap.
12002 INVESTIGATING AND REPORTING FOOD BORNE DISEASE OUTBREAKS
1. General. All suspected occurrences of food borne outbreaks (epidemics) must be
investigated and reported by Medical Event Reports by the Medical Department Representative.
Information about this report is addressed in BUMEDINST 6220 series. Report all cases of
suspected food borne disease to the medical department immediately. Exclusion of sick
personnel from food preparation is critical. Timely and adequate response by Culinary
Specialists/Food Service Officer and the Medical Department Representative is essential for
Force Protection.
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FOOD BORNE INTOXICATION
Table of Incubation Times
Name
Etiologic Agent
Staphylococcus Food
Poisoning
Several Enterotoxins
of Staphylococcus
aureus
Botulism
Toxins produced by
Clostridium botulinum
types A, B and E;
rarely F and G
Clostridium
perfringens Food
Poisoning
Toxins elaborated by
Type A and C strains
of Clostridium
perfringens
Enterotoxins and
hemolylsis
(responsible for a
hemolytic reaction,
the "kenagawa
phenomenon" of
Vibrio
parahaemolyticus)
Two enterotoxins of
Bacillus cereus, one
heat stable causing
vomiting and one heat
labile causing
diarrhea.
Vibrio
parahaemolyticus
Food Poisoning
Bacillus cereus Food
Poisoning
Foods usually
involved
Cream filled Pastries,
custards, salad
dressings, meat, meat
products
Home canned
vegetables, fruits,
meats, baked
potatoes, pot pies,
usually low acid or
alkaline
Meats, stews, meat
pies, gravies made of
beef, turkey or
chicken and beans
Seafood, any food
cross-contaminated
with raw seafood,
food rinsed with
contaminated sea
water
Incubation Time
(Onset of Symptoms)
1 to 7 hours, usually 2
to 4 hours
Rice (such as fried
rice), vegetables and
meat dishes
30 minutes to 6 hours,
where vomiting is the
symptom, 6 to 16
hours where diarrhea
is the symptom.
TABLE I
12-5
12 to 36 hours,
usually 18 to 36 hours
8 to 22 hours, usually
10 to 12 hours
4 to 96 hours, usually
12 to 24 hours
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
FOOD BORNE PARASITIC INFECTIONS
Name
Amebiasis
Table of Incubation Times
Etiologic Agent
Foods usually
involved
Entamoeba histolytica Contaminated raw
vegetables;
contaminated water
Trichinosis
(Trichiniasis,
Trichinellosis)
Trichinella spiralis
Taeniasis due to
Taenia Solium
Intestinal Form (Pork
Tapeworm)
Cysticerosis (Infection
by Taenia solium
cystericercus)
Taenia saginata
Infection (Beef
Tapeworm)
Diphyllocothriasis
(Broad or Fish
Tapeworm infection)
Anisakiasis
Taenia solium
Raw or insufficiently
cooked flesh of
animals; animals
containing viable
encysted larvae,
chiefly pork and pork
products, and beef
products adulterated
with raw pork
Raw or uncooked
infected pork
Taenia solium
Taenia saginata
Diphyllobothrium
latum
Larval nematodes of
the family Anisakidae,
along with
Pseudoterranova
species and ,
Contracaecum
species
8 to 12 weeks
Food or water
contaminated with the
eggs of Taenia solium
Raw or uncooked
beef
A few months to 30
years
Raw or inadequately
cooked fresh water
fish
Raw, undercooked, or
improperly frozen
seafood, especially
cod, haddock, fluke,
Pacific salmon,
herring, flounder,
monkfish, and fish
used for sashimi
3 to 6 weeks
TABLE II
12-6
Incubation Time
(Onset of Symptoms)
A few days to several
months or years.
Commonly 2 to 4
weeks
2 to 28 days;
depending on number
of larvae ingested
10 to 14 weeks
A few hours to 1 week
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
CHEMICALS
Table of Incubation Times
Name
Etiologic Agent
Chinese Restaurant
Syndrome
Monosodium
glutamate
Arsenic Poisoning
Insecticides and
rodenticides
Insecticides and
rodenticides
Fluoride Poisoning
Antimony Poisoning
Lead Poisoning
Copper Poisoning
Cyanide Poisoning
Zinc Poisoning
Organophosphorous
Poisoning
Antimony in gray
enamelware
Lead in earthenware
vessels, pesticides,
paint, plaster, putty,
soldered joints
Copper in pipes and
utensils
Metal polishes (Silver
polishes) containing
cyanide
Zinc in galvanized
containers
Organic phosphorous
insecticides, e.g.,
parathion, TEPP,
diazinon malathion
Foods usually
involved
Food containing large
quantities (5 gms) of
MSG
Unwashed fruits and
vegetables
Accidentally
contaminated foods
such as dry milk,
flour, baking powder,
cake mixes
High-acid foods and
beverages
High-acid foods and
beverages stored in
lead-containing
vessels, any
accidentally
contaminated food
High-acid foods and
beverages
Food accidentally
contaminated with
detarnishers
High-acid foods and
beverages stored in
galvanized containers
Any accidentally
contaminated food
TABLE III
12-7
Incubation Time
(Onset of Symptoms)
Few minutes to 1 hour
1 hour or less
Few minutes to 2
hours
Few minutes to 1 hour
30 minutes or longer
Few minutes to a few
hours
2 hours or less
Few minutes to a few
hours
Few minutes to a few
hours
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
NATURAL POISONS
Table of Incubation Times
Name
Etiologic Agent
Mushroom Poisoning
Muscarine group of
mushrooms
Mushroom Poisoning
Gastrointestina
irritating group of
mushrooms
Cyclopeptides and
gyromitrin in some
mushrooms
Mushroom Poisoning
Paralytic/Neurologic
Shellfish Poisoning
Saxitoxin and similar
toxins from
dinoflagellates
Protoogonaulas and
Gymnodinium species
Diarrhetic Shellfish
Poisoning
Okadaic acid and
others produced by
dinoflagellates
Dinophyses
acuminata and D. forti
Ciguatoxin in
intestines, roe,
gonads, and flesh of
tropical marine fish
Ciguatera Poisoning
Water Hemlock
Poisoning
Resin and cicutoxin in
hemlock root
Jimsonweed
Poisoning
Tropane alkaloids
Solanine Poisoning
Solanine
Foods usually
involved
Eating Muscarine
group of mushrooms,
eating unknown
varieties, mistaking
toxic mushrooms for
edible types
Many varieties of wild
mushrooms
Incubation Time
(Onset of Symptoms)
15 minutes to 2 hours
Certain species of
Amanita, Galerina,
and Gyromitra
mushrooms
Shellfish from waters
with high
concentration of
Protogonalulax or
Gymnodinium species
(Red Tide)
Shellfish from waters
with high
concentration of
Dinophyses
6 to 24 minutes
Liver, intestines, roe,
gonads, or flesh of
tropical reef fish;
usually large reef fish
are more commonly
toxic
Root of water
hemlock Citcuta
virosa, C. maculata,
and C. douglarii. May
be mistaken for wild
parsnip, sweet potato,
or carrot.
Any part of plant,
tomatoes grafted to
Jimsonweed root
stock
Potato sprouts
3 to 5 hours
TABLE IV
12-8
30 minutes to 2 hours
Few minutes to 30
minutes
1/2 hour to 12 hours,
usually 4 hours
15 to 60 minutes
Less than 1 hour
1 hour or less
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
FOOD BORNE INFECTIONS
Table of Incubation Times
Name
Etiologic Agent
Foods usually
involved
Contaminated water
and food, including
milk, sliced meats,
salads, and raw or
undercooked
mollusks
Clams, oysters,
cockles, green salads,
pastry, and frostings
Incubation Time
(Onset of Symptoms)
10 to 50 days,
average 30 days
Viral Hepatitis A
(Infectious Hepatitis)
Hepatitis A virus
Epidemic Viral
Gastroenteropathy
(Norovirus type
disease)
Norovirus,
adenoviruses,
astroviruses,
caliciviruses,
coronavirus, and
others
Escherichia coli
(E.coli 0157:h7)
Escherichia coli
Undercooked ground
beef, unpasteurized
milk
1 to 10 days
Salmonellosis
Numerous serotypes
of Salmonella, e.g.,
S enteritidis, S.
typhimurium
6 to 48 hours, range
12 to 36 hours
Typhoid Fever
Salmonella typhi
Yersiniosis
Yersinia
enterocolitica, Y.
pseudotuberculosis
Raw (especially
cracked) eggs, egg
products, raw milk
and products, poultry,
pet turtles and chicks.
Food or water
contaminated by
feces or urine of a
patient or carrier.
Shellfish from sewage
contaminated water.
Flies can infect foods.
Meat (pork, beef and
lamb), oysters, fish,
raw milk,
contaminated
pasteurized milk and
raw unpasteurized
milk and tofu
TABLE V
12-9
24 to 48 hours,
usually 12 to 36 hours
Usually 1 to 3 weeks
1 to 7 days, usually 1
to 3 days
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
FOOD BORNE INFECTIONS (continued)
Table of Incubation Times
Name
Etiologic Agent
Shigellosis (Bacillary
dysentery)
Four species or
subgenera of
Shigella, e.g.,
S. dysenteriae, S.
flexneri, S. boydii, and
S. sonnei. They are
divided into groups A,
B, C, and D and some
40 serotypes
identified by arabic
numbers
Diarrhea caused by
campylobacteria
(Campylobacter
enteritis, Vibrionic
enteritis)
Campylobacter jejuni
(C. fetus subsp.
jujuni) and C. coli. A
diversity of biotypes
and serotypes occur
Brucellosis (Undulant
fever, Malta fever)
Brucella abortus,
biotypes 1 to 7 and 9;
B. melitensis,
biotypes 1 to 3; B
suis, biotypes 1 to 4;
and B. canis
Leptospirosis (Weil's
disease, Hemorrhagic
jaundice)
Leptospira
interrogans species
which is subdivided
into more than 170
serovars in the U.S.
are
icterohaemorrhagiae,
canicola, autumnalis,
and hebdomidis.
Foods usually
involved
Food or water
contaminated by
feces from a patient
or carrier. Any direct
or indirect fecal-oral
transmission from a
patient or carrier.
Water, milk,
cockroach and flyborne transmission
may occur from direct
fecal contamination.
Food or
unpasteurized milk or
water. Contact with
infected pets
(especially puppies
and kittens), wild
animals, or infected
infants; and possibly
food crosscontaminated with
these sources.
Raw milk, daily
products (cheese)
from infected animals.
Contact with infected
animals or their
tissues, blood, urine,
vaginal discharges,
aborted fetuses, and
placentas.
Food contaminated
with urine of infected
rats. Abraded skin or
mucous membrane
contact with water
moist soil or
vegetation
contaminated with
urine of infected
animals.
TABLE V
12-10
Incubation Time
(Onset of Symptoms)
1 to 7 days, usually 1
to 3 days
1 to 10 days, usually
3 to 5 days
1 to 10 days, usually
3 to 5 days
4 to 19 days, usually
10 days
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
FOOD BORNE INFECTIONS (continued)
Table of Incubation Times
Name
Etiologic Agent
Streptococcal
Diseases caused by
Group A (Beta
Hemolytic)
Streptococci
(Streptococcal sore
throat)
Tuberculosis (TB),
Bovine
Stretococcus
pyogenes, Group A
has about 75
serologically distinct
types. Occasionally
groups B, C, and G
can produce disease.
Mycobacterium bovis
Tularemia (Rabbit
Fever)
Francisella tularensis
Q Fever (Query
Fever)
Listerosis
Coxiella burnetii
Listeria
monocytogenes from
soil, manure and
silage
Foods usually
involved
Milk, milk products,
egg salad, deviled
hard boiled eggs.
Incubation Time
(Onset of Symptoms)
1 to 3 days, rarely
longer
Raw unpasteurized
milk or dairy products.
About 4 to 12 weeks,
the risk of infection
remains greatest for 1
to 2 years after
infection. Risk may
persist for lifetime as
a latent infection.
2 to 10 days, usually
3 days
Insufficiently cooked
rabbit or hare meat;
contaminated water.
Raw milk from
infected cows
Inadequate cooking,
failure to properly
pasteurize milk,
prolonged
refrigeration.
TABLE V
12-11
Usually 2 to 3 weeks
3 to 21 days, maybe
longer
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
12-12
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
Index
to
P486 Volume II
A
Afloat Wardroom And Stateroom Service
Acceptance of Gifts
Accu - Temp Griddle
Advanced Foods
Afloat Wardroom and Stateroom Service
Alcoholic Beverages Wardroom
Appraisal
Ashore Food Service, Facility Structure And Housekeeping
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
4
3
8
1
4
5
3
9
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
6
2
2
2
8
2
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
8
4
2
4
4
2
2
6
6
5
8
2
2
2
2
8
B
Biological Defense
Bread Dispenser
Bulk Ice Making Machine
Bulkheads
Bun Slicer (Hotline) Operating And Safety Precautions
Butter Dispensers
C
Carbonated Beverage Dispensers
Care of Deck Coverings
Care Of Plastic Dinnerware (Non-Disposable)
Care of Private Property
Care of Quarters Afloat
Carpeting
Cereal Dispenser
Chemical Defense
Chemical, Biological, And Radiological Defense
Chief Petty Officer Messing On Ships
Clam Shell Griddle
Cleaning And Sanitizing Cleaning Gear
Cleaning Garbage/Trash Containers
Cleaning Gear - Establishing And Maintaining Requirements
Cleaning Gear - Proper Usage
Coffee Urns
1
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
Combi Oven
Commanding Officer Administrative Responsibility
Commanding Officers’ Mess
Controlling Microorganisms
Convection Oven
Conveyor Broiler
Cookie Cutter/Dropper
Culinary Specialist Personnel
Culinary Specialist Personnel Utilization
Culinary Specialist Responsibilities And Duties
Custody and Stowage
Custom And Tradition Of Officers’ Messes
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
8
5
5
6
8
8
8
5
5
5
3
5
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
3
2
6
6
8
8
2
2
2
2
2
4
2
8
2
8
2
8
8
8
8
8
5
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
2
8
5
8
D
Damaged Silver
Decks
Decontamination of Equipment and Spaces
Decontamination of Food Items
Deep Fat Fryer (Computer Type)
Deep Fat Fryer (Non-Computer)
Descaling
De-staining Dinnerware And Silverware
Dining Area And Associated Equipment Cleaning Procedures
Dining Area And Associated Equipment During The Meal
Dining Area And Associated Equipment Safety Precautions
Dining Table Center Items
Dining Tables, Chairs, And Benches
Dishwashing Machine
Dishwashing Machine Cleaning
Dishwashing Machine Conveyor
Dishwashing Machine Descaling
Dough Divider/Rounder
Dough Mixer – Horizontal
Dough Sheeter/Molder
Doughnut Accumulating Conveyor
Doughnut Glazer
Duties Of A Wardroom Officer
E
Electric Hot Food Table
Electric Steam Table
Enlisted Personnel Assignment And Utilization
Equipment
2
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
F
Facilities
Facilities And Service
Flag Mess
Food Handling and Nutrient Retention
Food Management Teams And Detachments
Food Microbiology
TABLE I – Food Borne Intoxication
TABLE II – Food Borne Parasitic Infections
TABLE III – Chemicals
TABLE IV – Natural Poisons
TABLE V – Food Borne Infections
Food Mixer (140 Quart)
Food Mixing Machine, 20 Quart
Food Presentation
Food Preservation
Food Service In Chemical, Biological, And Radiological Defense
Food Waste Disposal System: SOMAT Navy Model 3
Freeze-Dried Coffee Dispensers
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
5
5
5
1
5
12
12
12
12
12
12
8
8
1
6
6
8
2
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
2
2
9
8
5
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
5
5
2
2
2
11
8
8
8
G
Garbage Grinder Cleaning
Garbage Grinder Safety Precautions And Operating Procedures
General Facility Structure and Housekeeping
Griddle
Guests
H
Habitability
Habitability Items
Hand Dishwashing Of Cooking Utensils, Preparation For Washing
Hand Dishwashing Of Cooking Utensils, Storage Of Clean Utensils
Hand Dishwashing Of Cooking Utensils, Washing And Sanitizing
Heimlich Maneuver
High Compression Steam Cooker (Market Forge)
Hot Chocolate Dispenser
Hot Dog Grill
3
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
I
Ice Dispensing Machines
Ice Tea Dispenser
Ice making Machines And Ice Flakers
Inoperative Equipment Report
Inventory Dinnerware And Silverware
Inventory of Silver
Investigating and Reporting Food Borne Disease Outbreaks
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
2
8
8
2
2
3
6
J
Job Scheduling
Chapter 4
L
Location And Designation Of Messes
Chapter 5
M
Micronutrients
Meal Style Procedures
Meals Sold For Cash
Meat Slicer
Menu Planning and Food Preparation
Mess Deck Master-At-Arms Assignments Of Food Service Attendants
Mess Deck Master-At-Arms Chain Of Command
Mess Deck Master-At-Arms Duties Afloat
Mess Deck Master-At-Arms Duties Ashore
Mess Deck Master-At-Arms Duties Of Food Service Attendants
Mess Deck Master-At-Arms General Guidelines (Afloat)
Mess Deck Master-At-Arms General Guidelines (Ashore)
Mess Deck Master-At-Arms Inspection Procedures
Mess Deck Master-At-Arms Muster And Inspection
Mess Deck Master-At-Arms Prior To Inspection
Mess Deck Master-At-Arms Responsibilities
Mess Deck Master-At-Arms Supervisory and Management Tools
Mess Deck Master-At-Arms Written Instructions
Mess Operation
Mess Publications
Mess Service
Mess Treasurer For Officers’ Messes
Microwave Oven
Milk Dispensers
Mission Of Messes Afloat
4
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
1
4
5
8
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
5
5
5
5
8
8
5
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
Model 550 Frispo-Matic
Multiple Blade Bread Slicer
Chapter 8
Chapter 8
N
Naval Shipboard Food Service Equipment Catalog
Non-Carbonated Beverage Dispensers
Nutrients
Nutrients – Macronutrients
Nutrients – Micronutrients
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
8
8
1
1
1
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
5
5
5
2
2
2
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
5
4
8
2
7
8
2
3
2
6
8
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
6
6
8
3
2
8
5
5
8
5
O
Officer Mess Bills
Officers Association With Enlisted Personnel
Officers’ Mess Treasurer Duties
Operating Instructions For Double-Tank Dishwashing Machines
Operating Instructions For Single-Tank Dishwashing Machines
Overheads
P
Pantry Linen Service
Personal Laundry
Pie Rimmer/Crimper
Planned Maintenance Subsystem, Responsibility
PMS Standards
Powdered Mix Blender
Preparing Soiled Dinnerware And Silverware For Machine Washing
Presentation Silver
Pre-Service Set-Up
Prevention of Recontamination
Proof Box
R
Radiological Contamination
Radiological Defense
Reach-In Refrigerators
Receipt of Presentation Silver
Refrigerated Milk Dispensers
Regular Steam Table
Responsibilities Of Mess Caterer
Responsibilities Of Officers’ Mess Treasurer
Rotary Bread Toaster
Rotational Pool Personnel Utilization
5
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
S
Safe Food Preparation Operations
Safe Work Conditions
Safety And 3M/PMS Standards
Safety Precautions For The Dishwashing Machine
Salad Bar
Scullery Operations Background
Self Serving Lines
Service
Serving Line And Associated Equipment - General Operations
Setting the Buffet Service
Setting the Dining Table
Setting the Sideboard
Skittle
Sneeze Shield And Tray Slide Rail
Soft Ice Cream/Milkshake Machine
Soft-Serve Ice Cream Machine
Solid Waste Processing Equipment
Special Meals
Stainless Steel Surfaces
Stateroom Care
Stateroom Service
Status As Government Instrumentalities
Steam Jacketed Kettles
Subsisting From General Mess
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
7
7
7
2
8
2
1
5
2
4
4
4
8
2
8
2
10
1
2
4
5
5
8
5
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
2
4
3
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
4
T
Table Condiments
Tableware Items
Temporary Vault Storage
Traditional Foods
Traditional Foods
Training Follow-Up
Training Formal
Training Records
Training Responsibility
Training Secretary of The Navy Requirements
Training, On-The-Job
Tray, Bowl, Cup and Glass Lowerators
Trouble Call Log
Turn In of Presentation Silver
Types of Wardroom Meal Service
6
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
U
Unit Commanders’ Mess
Using Culinary Specialist and Rotational Pool Personnel
Utensil Washing Machines
Utilization Of Enlisted Personnel
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
5
4
8
5
V
Vegetable Cutter
Vegetable Peeler
Chapter 8
Chapter 8
W
Walk In Reefer
Wardroom and Stateroom Food Service
Wardroom Mess
Wardroom Service
Wardroom Standards
Waste Management
Waste Management Operations Handling And Storage Guidance
Waste Management Operations Training
7
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
8
4
5
5
5
10
10
10
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
8
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT GENERAL MESSES
NAVSUP P- 486 VOL II SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Publication Changes
Changed NAVSUP 51 to NAVSUP N423.
Changed Defense Supply Center Philadelphia (DSCP) to Defense Logistics Agency (DLA).
Changed OPNAVINST 3120.32C to OPNAVINST 3120.32D.
Changed all DOS FSM Charts, Figures, Displays, Examples to new Charts, Figures, displays and examples
from FSM3.
Changed Fleet Industrial Supply Center (FISC) to Fleet Logistics Center (FLC).
Chapter 1
PART A: 1000 – 1001
1000-1001
Updated nutritional program information to include: 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans,
2011 My Plate, National Academy of Sciences Dietary Reference Standards, DoD Nutritional
Standards, Go For Green Program and USDA Age Serving Size Standards. Added Navy
Operational Fitness and Fueling Series Standards and Operation Supplement Safety
information. Inserted Operational Fitness and Fueling posters.
Added Joint Subsistence Policy Board DoD Menu Standards. Also inserted DoD Menu
Standard Guideline Posters, Go For Green Posters and Criteria References.
PART C: 1200 – 1219
1200-1219
Updated Operation Supplement Safety information and provided new menu guidance to include
the Go For Green program information.
PART H: 1200 – 1219
1701
Inserted G4G serving line configurations to self-serve serving lines.
Chapter 2
PART A: 2000 – 2001
2001
Changed mess gear inventory from weekly to bi monthly.
Chapter 3
PART A: 3000 – 3003
3000-3003
Changed the process for submitting silver requests for surveys, transfers and gifts. All requests
submitted to NAVSUP through the TYCOM.
Modified the silver policy for requesting presentation silver assets ashore.
PART B: 3100 – 3103
3100
Updated appraisal guidance and set a dollar value for the completion of appraisals.
PART C: 3200 – 3202
3200
Modified silver accountability and security measure requirements.
1
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
3202
Stowage requirements modified for both temporary and permanent storage.
Joint inventory requirement at NAVSUP FLCs for all permanent transfers of silver.
Modified storage container requirements.
Updated process for submitting transfer documents.
PART D: 3300 – 3304
3301
Inventory policy change for the submission of inventory reports.
Modified the information for submitting gifts other than silver to the Naval History and Heritage
Command.
3302
Updated silver cleaning methods and instructions.
3303
Updated the silver survey process and included the requirement for a command investigation for
all missing silver.
Removed requirement for requesting a Naval Criminal Investigation for lost silver. Note:
SECNAVINST 5500.4 series was cancelled and the investigation requirement moved to another
instruction pertaining to nuclear and ammo only.
PART E: 3400 – 3404
3401
Modified the presentation silver turn-in process for permanent transfers.
Added information for the turn-in process of silver for decommissioning ships “strip ship
material” to include: turn-in date requirement, silver inventory matching with the master
inventory in Navy ERP and the requirement for the replacement of lost silver.
3402
Modified the process for the turn-in of silver for temporary vault storage.
3403
Updated the process to initiate a transfer and approval for silver repairs.
3404
Modified all silver turn-in and transfer procedures.
PART F: 3500 – 3503
3500 – 3503 Procedure for all valuable gifts and historically significant artifacts through the Naval Heritage
and History Command. Procedures on the custody, transfer, inventory, surveys and care of
valuable gifts other than silver.
Chapter 4
PART A: 4000 – 4111
4002, 4102
Modified the using of CS and rotational pool personnel.
4103
Added information for 05 and above cleaning requirements.
4100 - 4105 Modified general stateroom care.
4106
Modified stateroom cleaning bill.
Chapter 5
PART A: 5000 – 5409
5000
Removed Messes Ashore.
Moved NFMT information to VOL I.
5203 - 5204 Modified wardroom treasurer eligibility
Chapter 7
PART A: 7000 – 7100
2
NAVSUP P-486, Rev 8 – Food Service Management, Volume Two
7001
Updated recycling trash program information.
Chapter 8
PART A: 8000 – 8240
8000 – 8240 Modified safety device information.
8000
Added information for OCC equipment.
8201
Modified meat slicer cleaning information.
8236
Added information for the combi-ovens
Chapter 12
PART A: 12000 – 12002
12000
FDA website change
12002
Modified Food Borne Tables
3
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