Wilson Generalized keyboard U-648 and U-990

Wilson Generalized keyboard U-648 and U-990
Wilson Generalized keyboard
U-648 and U-990
ii
All Rights Reserved
This Manual and all of the products, descriptions, menu-screens, software, hardware,
firmware, algorithms, artwork, and processes discussed are the property of Starr Labs. All
rights are reserved by Starr Labs, Inc and none of the aforementioned may be copied,
photocopied, reproduced, translated, reverse-engineered, or reduced to any electronic
medium or machine-readable form without prior written consent from Starr Labs, Inc.
MicroZone and uZone are trademarks of Starr Labs, Inc. The designs and the
functionality of the MicroZone hardware and software are protected by US patents.
Copying or reproducing the look and behavior of the MicroZone fingerboard, body,
control panel, or performance modes may constitute infringement and will be prosecuted
by law.
Warranty
The MicroZone keyboard is fully warranteed to include repairs or replacement as
deemed necessary to amend defects of workmanship or faulty components for a period of
two years from date of shipment. The customer is responsible for all shipping charges
related to warranty repairs after the first 90 days of ownership.
In order to qualify for warranty coverage, all service and repairs must be made at Starr
Labs factory or an authorized service depot. Any violation of this voids all warranty
coverage. Abuse, mis-handling of the instrument, or connection to an unapproved power
supply will also void the benefits of this warranty.
Starr Labs (c) 1991-2006
Starr Labs, Inc.
7734 Arjons Drive
San Diego, CA 92126
Disclaimer
iii
TABLE of CONTENTS
OVERVIEW .............................................................................
p.2
Function Keys.............................................................................
p.4
Menu System.............................................................................
p.5
Live Mode
p.5
............................................................................
Top Level Edit Menu.....................................................................
p.6
UTILITIES
.......................................................................................
p.7
CURVES
.......................................................................................
p.8
ZONES
...................................................................................
p.11
Keymaps
.......................................................................................
p.13
Keymaps and Zone Processing
.........................................................
p.17
MIDI setups ........................................................................................
p.16
SENSORS
p.20
....................................................................................
BULK-DUMP ..................................................................................
p.24
SYSEX format
p.26
.............................................................................
iv
U-648 Rear Panel
OUT
IN
SUS VOL
FROM COMPUTER
Synth
1/4” stereo
Expression
Pedal
N/O switch-type
pedal
PB-1 Phantom Power Adapter
Controller
PWR
9VDC
TO SYNTH
Power is connected to the U648 via the MIDI OUT Jack.
Connect a 5-wire MIDI cable (important) from the Keyboard’s
MIDI OUT to the PB1’s CONTROLLER input. Connect a second
MIDI cable (3-wire cable is ok) from the Pb1 to the Synth.
1
OVERVIEW
Congratulations on receiving your microZone U648 or U990 Generalized Keyboard
controller. With its combination of hardware and software features it should afford
you a lifetime of creative exploration.
You can skip this section if you want to jump right into programming the instrument.
In general, it’s a good idea to look over this manual, just to see what’s in your new
instrument.
UZone Keyboard layout:
The Black and white color coding shows a 48-key linear keyboard on the bottom
two rows of keys. Vertically you can see 6 ranks of 48-key keyboards (9 ranks of
90 keys for the U990) . Each rank is programmed in its own assigned Zone which
includes settings for MIDI and selection of a keymap. The combination of these
tools allow you to define tunings and fingerings of your own design, without
regard for the default chromatic layout.
User Interface
The UZONE is supported by a Programming/Display system with a 2 line by 40
character backlit LCD and a ’softkey’ based User Interface. What this means is that
the eight keys that surround the display are used in varying ways to select different
items depending on the particular menu screen showing. The menu-system is a
tree-like structure. The UZone has quite a few programmable parameters but every
effort has been made to keep the nesting of menus to a minimum and the
navigation to the system as simple as possible.
The EDIT key is used both to enter an edit-screen in some menus and more often
to exit from a menu-screen when you’re finished programming. In general, pressing
EDIT several times will back you out of a series of menus and bring you back to the
top SONG-MENU, or LIVE-mode
The UZone Operating System has a LIVE mode and an EDIT mode. Pressing the
EDIT key from the SONG-MENU enters the EDIT mode to alter the various setup
parameters of the fingerboard, pads, triggers, joystick and pedals. The UZONE will
continue to play while in the EDIT mode. Make sure to exit back to the LIVE mode
after completing an edit, however, as you may accidentally change one of your
setups by hitting the joystick or another programming key. Also, the instrument will
play a bit faster in the LIVE mode as there it isn’t the necessity to update any Edit
screens.
When selecting Songs (uZone “patches” or “presets”), two Song-names show on
each screen-view. Use the Up/Dn keys to scroll through your Songs.
2
Programming, Mode Selection and Data Entry:
Many of the programming features on the UZONE have been implemented in the
screen/menu system and also in shorthand fashion on the front-panel "hot-keys". In
the screen/menu system the eight "soft" keys surrounding the display will be
physically near their selections on the screen. Use of the hot-keys will save a
number of keystrokes. Also, the joystick is used both as a performance tool and a
data entry device in conjunction with the data Up/Down buttons when programming
the system.
“Chase” features:
In several of the menus a String, or a Key, or other Sensor may be selected by
simply touching it, in addition to using the Display keys
Terminology
In an effort to make the UZONE as fully user-programmable as possible some
existing MIDI concepts have been expanded and are slightly re-defined:
Patches for the UZONE are called SONGS. A Song stores the complete
configuration for the instrument. This includes all of the fingerboard splits/zones,
transpositions, patches, tunings,and all of the MIDI control assignments for the
SENSORS, including any recorded Notes, Chords or Drums, Continuous Control
EFX, and a list of other parameters.. SONGS may be thought of as ‘Kits’ in the
sense used in an electronic percussion device, a set of assignments of hardware
Triggers to MIDI output functions and the player’s response setups for all of the
hardware. There is no analogous term in guitar playing so we chose ‘SONGS’ as
you might use a different configuration for each song in a set, different voices, etc.
ZONES in the UZONE environment are arbitrary rectangular areas of the
fingerboard defined by two diagonal corner points like a select-window on a
computer screen. Zones are each assigned a MIDI channel as well as a number of
other values.
Up to 32 zones may be configured at any time. A zone may be as small as one
note or as large as the entire fingerboard. Where Zone boundaries overlap they will
share qualities in those areas. A ‘keyboard-split’ occurs where adjacent zones do
not overlap. Zones may be defined by simply picking a high and a low note from the
fingerboard. When all of the desired parameters influencing a zone have been
punched in the zone may be saved into a Song Memory location. Zones may thus
be set up to perform melody, accompaniment, percussion and effects all from a
single instrument. Library functions are available for copying a previously
configured Song for use as a template in creating a new Song.
3
HOTKEYS/ FUNCTION KEYS
Several function keys have been placed on the surface of the UZone to allow quick
changes to the setup of the instrument:.
OCT Up/Down: These buttons allow you to change the Octave for any Zone on
the fingerboard giving you access to the full MIDI note range.
PAT Up/ Down: These buttons allow you to access up to 128 MIDI patches
within any Zone
PANIC!: Sends a note-off to every note on and resets all controllers for every
channel
Currently we use the brute force approach that takes a little extra time but should
definitely clear any stuck messages for any synth,
The PAT and OCT keys are ‘Zone-based’ controls that allow you to select a zone
by playing and holding a note within it, and then adjust the parameter for just that
Zone. So, if you have, say, two zones on the fingerboard, you can touch a key in
one (or both) and then press the hotkey to change the Patch, etc for that zone. This
shortcut lets you make changes while you're performing rather than having to
wade through menus to re-program the system.
4
MENU SYSTEM – DATA ENTRY
The menu system uses eight “soft” keys around the perimeter of the display to
select various functions as indicated by the messages on the screen. Press the
button nearest to your desired selection in order to activate it. An UP and a Down
key are provided for data entry. The joystick, when installed, may also be used for
data entry. Use the EDIT key to enter and exit the programming menus. The softkeys are numbered here for reference in this manual.
Up
Softkey#1
Softkey#2
Softkey#3
Softkey#4
Softkey#5
Softkey#6
Softkey#7
Softkey#8
Softkey#2
Softkey#3
Softkey#4
Down
EDIT
LIVE-MODE MENU
Up
Down
Softkey#1
UATH
PATCH
EDIT
WITH
Softkey#5
A
VERY
LONG
Softkey#6
LONG
NAME
Softkey#7
Softkey#8
This is the top-level menu, which appears when the uZone is in LIVE-mode. The
uZone is in LIVE-MODE when you first power-up.
It displays the names of the various system configurations that have been saved as
an onboard patch or “Song” in our menu-system. A drummer would refer to these
as “KITS”; A Song is a collection of your programmed options and setups for the
available hardware, including all of the keyboard zones, MIDI assignments,
keymaps, and slider and pedal assignments. The first eight songs are provided
from the factory as templates for your use and are listed two per bank. These are
saved in ROM and may not be overwritten. You can view additional banks by
scrolling with the UP and Down keys on the keypad. The following twenty-four
song locations are provided to store your own setups. These are saved in a batterybacked RAM so that your changes will remain after you remove power from the
UZONE. The Patch banks may also be stored off-line via the MIDI Bulk-Dump
utility.
Use the EDIT key to leave the LIVE mode and enter the EDIT mode. After editing,
use the EDIT key again the return to the LIVE mode.
5
SONG MENU, the Top-Level SONG-EDIT screen
Up
Softkey#1
Softkey#2
Down SONG: #01 UATH
ZONES
SENSORS
EDIT
Softkey#5
Softkey#6
Softkey#3
UTILITIES
Softkey#7
Softkey#4
WRITE
Softkey#8
This is the top-level edit screen, which displays sub-menus for the various
programmable features for each Song.
A Song consists of:
1) One or more Zones with all of their programmed settings.
2) Assignments for the Sensors.
2) Physical response settings for the Sensors.
3) A Tuning for the fingerboard keys and Open-Strings, and settings for Triggering
modes.
4) A setup for the metronome.
SONG-MENU sub-menus:
Name-Edit: Press the name of the SONG to enter the Name-Edit screen.
Zone: enters the Zone menu to set up the fingerboard. All of your settings can be
made into 32 independent fingerboard Zones.
Sensor: enters the Sensor menu to set up the Pads/Triggers/Joystick
configuration.
Utility: enters the Utility menu to edit a variety of objects.
Write: Takes you to the Write screen so that you may save your current setup
The top-left of the screen shows the Song number followed by its name. By placing
the cursor over the song number and using the joystick or Up/Down buttons you
may scroll through the Song Banks without going back to the LIVE menu to make
your selection.
6
SONG-MENU\ NAME-EDIT screen
To enter a new Song name: Place the cursor over the name field using the
softkey#2 button above the name. Use the Joystick or Up/Down buttons to enter a
character, then use the soft keys to the left and right of the “CURSOR” message to
move the cursor over to the next character position.
Up
Down
Softkey#1
SONG:#01
Softkey#2
Softkey#3
Softkey#4
Softkey#6
Softkey#7
Softkey#8
Softkey#2
Softkey#3
UZONE
CURSOR
EDIT
Softkey#5
UTILITIES MENU
Up
Softkey#1
Down <UTILITY>
CURVES
BULK-DUMP
Velocity
EDIT
Softkey#5
Softkey#4
PAD:1
Softkey#6
Softkey#7
Softkey#8
The UTILITIES menu consists of the CURVES and BULK-DUMP Sub-menus and the
Velocity curve settings for you Sensors
7
CURVES Edit screen
Up
Down
EDIT
Softkey#1
# 1-4:
1 5-8:
3- 4
84- 40
Softkey#5
Softkey#2
Softkey#3
Softkey#4
30- 15
90- 60
50- 20
95- 95
76- 30
100-127
Softkey#6
Softkey#7
Softkey#8
There are 16 programmable curves stored globally in the UZone that may be
applied to the keyboard. Use these curves to adapt your touch to the UZone and
the synth and patch you’re using. Each curve is drafted using eight
programmable points and may be thought of as a graph relating physical force on
the X-Axis to MIDI velocity on the Y-Axis.
Each Zone assigned on the keyboard may have a different velocity-response
curve.
The left-hand side of the menu-screen shows the Curve-number. When you first
enter the menu, use the Up/Dn keys to select a new Curve-number for editing. If
you press any other key first, you’ll have to exit the menu and re-enter it to select a
different curve. When you make your edits to a curve you’re changing the MIDI
Velocity output to match the Force of your touch or the travel of a pedal-type
sensor.
Each of eight points on a curve is described by a pair of numbers. Each pair has
the Force-value on the left and the Velocity-value on the right. The UZone’s
computer draws a smooth curve between these eight points to create the
velocity-response for the selected curve-number. For the curve shown here, you
might read Point#3 as “having a Force of 50% and a MIDI Velocity 20”. This
particular curve is skewed to give more response in the lower force-range with
full volume only coming with maximum force.
Use the softkeys to select a point and toggle between the Force-field and the
Velocity-field. Use the Up/Dn keys and the Joystick to set the values.
8
127
(1 0 0 ,1 2 7 )
(9 5 ,9 5 )
V e lo c ity
(9 0 ,6 0 )
(8 4 ,4 0 )
(7 6 ,3 0 )
(5 0 ,2 0 )
(3 0 ,1 5 )
(3 ,4 )
0
F o rc e
100
Troubleshooting response problems:
If you notice that the keys responds late, then come on too strong when they do
fire, probably the threshold, the lowest point of the curve is set too high.
If a sensor seems too “Hot” you may notice that it’s showing a MIDI 127 at a
force level much lower than you’d like, say 50%. Try to match the MIDI velocity to
the relative force you feel when you play.
9
UZone ZPC Curves Tutorial
Describing how to set the response curve for a Sensor using the Curve-edit
menu.
We’re going to draw a response curve that gives a Sensor a smooth response to
your touch using 8 programmable points, in the way you might enter them on a
piece of graph paper.
Set the response endpoints:
Go to the UTILITIES/ CURVES edit screen for the CURVE number that’s
assigned to the Zone. Or go to an un-used curve-number and edit a new one.
Set the FORCE value, the left-hand number, for Pont#1 to the LOWEST force
you expect, say 0-10. Now set the FORCE value for Point#8 to the highest force
value you expect, say 90-100 These are your physical performance limits. Lower
this number if you don’t reach MIDI 127.
Go to the MIDI value, the right-hand number, for Point#1 and set it to a low MIDI
velocity like 10. Now go to the MIDI value for Point #8 and enter a 127, the
highest MIDI velocity value.
Go to Points#2-7 and enter values that ascend evenly from point #1 to Point#8
for both the FORCE and MIDI-output values. If the actual response of the entire
curve is uniformly too high or low, leave the MIDI values constant and adjust the
force values to change the response. To make the curve hotter, or more
sensitive, lower the Force values.
The easiest way to create new curves is to set all of the right-hand numbers in
equal increments from Point#1=0 to Point#8=127. A linear curve using these
endpoints will have difference of FORCE=14 and MIDI=18 between adjacent
points.
10
ZONES
A Zone is a group of keys that share a common set of parameters: Keymap, MIDI
channel, MIDI patch number, transposition, volume level, and offset into the
keyboard’s larger virtual keymap.
<ZONE 1
MISC
Notes:ON
Keymap # 1
EFX
X: 0
KEYMAP-EDIT
Y: 0
MIDI
<ZONE ‘n’: Prompt that shows the currently selected Zone. Press the softkey
near the word “ZONE” and use the Up/Dn keys or the joystick to change the
Zone number.
NOTES:
A zone may be instructed to play notes or not play notes. This is useful for test
and for creating ‘dummy’ zones that can be used to set up patch changes to
external equipment such as EFX processors, etc.
KEYMAP:
One of 32 global keymaps may be selected and assigned to a Zone. A Keymap
is a list of all of the keys on the keyboard by row and column. Each key may be
assigned a MIDI note number and channel within the Keymap editor.
X: # ; Y: # :
This specifies the offset of the physical keyboard within the larger virtual
keyboard of 10 rows and 108 columns. “X” refers to the column offset and “Y” is
the row offset.
MISC:
Jumps the the “MISC” menu.
EFX:
Jumps to the EFX menu.
KEYMAP-EDIT:
Jumps to the Keymap-Edit menu.
11
MIDI:
Jumps the the MIDI menu.
ZONE/MISC Menu:
ZONE# 1 /MISC>
Solo: Off
Vel:Touch Sensitive
Unison: Off
Transpose: 0
Invert: Off
ZONE#:
Shows and selects a Zone for editing.
UNISON:
A zone may be instructed to have all of its keys play the same note number for
certain percussive effects. Otherwise the zone will play normally according to its
keymap assignments.
TRASNPOSE:
A zone may be transposed up or down by 24 half-steps. Place the cursor over
the transpose field with the softkey and use the joystick or Up/Dn Keys to adjust
the value.
SOLO:
When Zones overlap they create a layered effect with multiple sounds coming
from each key. Press the SOLO softkey to isolate the current zone from the stack
so that it may be edited and auditioned.
VEL:
A zone may play with a touch-sensing response or a fixed velocity which is
specified. Place the cursor over the field and adjust with the UP/Dn keys or
joystick.
INVERT:
When this field is turned “ON” the velocity response for this zone is inverted. That
is, when played softly the velocity is high and when played hard the velocity is
soft. When an ‘Inverted’ zone is layered over a ‘Normal’ zone a velocitycrossfade effect is created between those two voices.
12
EFX Menu:
ZONE#: 1
FretBoard PolyKeyPressure: On/Off
P-K Threshold: 16
P-K Sens: 4
ZONE#:Zone prompt
FretBoard PolyKeyPressure: On/Off
PolyKey Afterpressure may be turned on for the selected zone
P-K THRESHOLD:
Set the lower pressure threshold value that will activate a PolyKey Afterpressure
message from the keys;
P-K SENS:
Set the minimum value of pressure change that will initiate a Pressure message.
<ZONES>KEYMAP-EDIT Menu:
<MAP# 1
EDIT
MASK
RESET
MAP#:
Shows the currently selected keymap for this Zone. Select the field with the
softkey and use the Up/Dn keys and the joystick to select other keymaps.
EDIT:
Jumps to the Keymap-Edit screen for this keymap
MASK:
Jumps to the Mask screen for this keymap
RESET:
13
Resets the keymap to the basic ROM default map.
<ZONES>KEYMAP-EDIT\ EDIT Menu:
Row
1, 1:
1-- 11
1-- 12
1-- 13
4:
1-- 14
1-- 15
1—16
Col
This screen is a little tricky to read due to the small size of the display and the
large amount of information to be shown.
Referencing the selected Keymap (from the prior screen):
Each screen shows six keys and their note.channel assignments.
The top line of the sample screen reads “Row #1, Column #1”, then the
assignments for columns 1,2, and 3 are shown.
The bottom line shows the “Column select” prompt and the assignments for
columns 4,5, and 6.
Press the softkey at the word “Row” and use the Up/Dn keys or joystick to select
a row. Each set of “black-and-white” piano keys corresponds to a row and will
power-up default to a single MIDI channel.
Press the softkey and the word “Col” to allow the selection of other columns and
column screens. Use the Up/Dn keys and joystick to move around.
To change a note/channel combination for a key, press the softkey once to select
the channel number. Press it again to select the note-number.
Notes may be turned ‘OFF’ by selecting the Channel field and decrementing
past “0”. You can do this block out single notes from a zone.
The power-up default keymap arrangement for the Wilson keyboard has a
separate zone and a separate keymap for each of the ranks, or ‘pianos’ on the
keyboard. When you investigate the keymap for each zone you’ll see that the
notes are turned ‘OFF’ in all rows other than the current rank.
<ZONES>KEYMAP-EDIT\ MASK Menu
<MAP# 1 /MASK
Low X: 1
Y: 1
ON
OFF
High X: 40
Y:20
14
This menu allows you to select a ‘rectangular’ group of keys as defined by
diagonal points similar to the corners of a select-window on a computer screen.
The selected block of keys may then be turned on or off within the keymap for
the selected Zone#. This way isolated islands of keys or irregularly shaped zones
may be created.
MAP#:
Shows and selects the Map#.
ON: Turn on keys outlined by the boundaries shown in the bottom row of this
screen.
OFF: Turn off the keys outlined by the boundaries shown in the bottom row of
this screen.
LOW X:
Enter the lowest Row number for MASK select-block. The Low X and Y define
the low corner of the mask block.
LOW Y:
Enter the lowest Column number for the selected blovk of keys.
HIGH X:
Enter the highest Row number for the Mask block.
HIGH Y:
Enter thte highest Column number for the Mask Block.
Press either the “ON” or the “OFF” keys to add or delete keys from the keymap in
this zone.
15
<ZONE>MIDI Menu
ZONE# 1
P&Vsend: N
Patch: 1
Channel: 1
CC#0: 0
CC#32: 0
Volume: 127
SEND
ZONE#:
Press the softkey here to select and change the ZONE number
P&V Send:
Turn this on (yes) to enable patch and volume changes to be sent from this zone.
You sometimes may wish to turn this “off” if all of your patch and volume changes
are sent from another master sequencer or controller.
PATCH:
Set the Program default hange number for this Zone.
CHANNEL:
Set the default Channel number for this Zone.
CC#0:
This is the MSB of the two-byte Bank select command that allows accessing
external patches above MIDI 127.
CC#32:
This is the LSB of the two-byte Bank select command that allows accessing
external pacthes above MIDI 127.
Different synth manufacturers specify various values for CC0 and CC32 in order
to access their patch banks. Please refer to the manufacturer literature for these
values.
VOLUME:
Set the base default volume level for this channel/zone.
SEND:
Press this to immediately send any patch, channel, or volume updates from this
screen.
16
Key and Zone Processing in the Microzone
"Internal" hardware mapping
Although the Microzone keyboard is physically 9 rows of 90 keys each, it is wired
electrically in a 27x32 matrix. The keyboard scanning software produces this 27x32
"scan position." A ROM lookup table converts this to a 9x90 physical key position. This
is strictly an internal operation, which is done to allow flexibility in the printed-circuitboard layout. There is never any reason for the user to know the scan position of any
key. The ROM table is uniquely determined by the printed-circuit-board layout of each
keyboard.
27 x 32 scan
position
ROM lookup
table
9 x 90 physical key
position
Zone
1
Zone
2
Zone
32
Add x,y offset
Zone
disabled
Keymap
1
Keymap
2
11x96 virtual key
position
Selected RAM
keymap
Keymap
M
MIDI channel and
note
Key
disabled
Add transposition to
note, or change to
unison note
Keymap
29
Keymap
30
Output to MIDI
17
Mapping of keys to notes (Zone processing)
A given key may be active in any combination of 32 independent "zones." That is, a key
may be active in no zones, a single zone, several zones, or all zones.
The zones are not defined by rectangles. They may have any shape, which is defined by
a RAM keymap. Each zone independently decides whether a given key is active, as
follows:
First, an X and Y offset
are added to the
column and row
number of the key,
producing a "virtual"
key position. This
allows the physical
keyboard to be shifted
up and/or to the right
before being applied to
the RAM keymap.
11 x 96 "virtual keyboard"
9 x 90 physical keyboard
The RAM keymap is
an 11x96 lookup table
X
that corresponds to the
virtual keyboard. This
offset
table contains an
Y
"active" flag for each
key on the keyboard.
offset
So, after the X and Y
offsets are applied, the selected keymap indicates whether that key is active.
If the X or Y offset pushes the key "off the edge" of the virtual keyboard, that key will be
inactive in that zone.
If the key is active, the keymap gives the MIDI channel number and note to be output for
that virtual key. If the key is not active in the keymap, it is deemed to be inactive in this
zone, and no further processing takes place in this zone. (The key may be active in other
zones.)
There are 30 RAM keymaps. Each zone must specify which keymap it is using. So, one
keymap may be used by several zones, possibly with different X and Y offsets for each
zone. Or, each zone may use a different keymap (subject to the limitation that there are
32 zones, and only 30 available keymaps).
When the MIDI channel and note are obtained from the keymap, the zone may further
modify the note number. If unison tuning is enabled, a fixed note number will be used
instead of the number obtained from the keymap. If unison is disabled, a transposition
value is added to the note number obtained from the keymap. In either case, the channel
number is unchanged (the channel number output is the number obtained from the
keymap).
To recap: X and Y offset, unison, and transposition are defined per-zone. MIDI channel
and note are defined per-keymap. Any zone can use any keymap.
18
(The default settings are: zones 1-30 use keymaps 1-30. All X and Y offsets are zero.
Unison is disabled, and transposition is zero.)
19
SENSORS MENU
The word PAD is often used interchangeably with the word SENSOR. The word
Note is often used interchangeably with the word EVENT.
Sensors screen #1
Up
Down
Softkey#1
Softkey#2
<SENSOR> SLIDER 1
Softkey#3
Softkey#4
MIDI CHANNELS
Effect #1: VOLUME UP
EDIT
Softkey#5
Softkey#6
Softkey#7
Softkey#8
Sensor: displays the list of available on-board sensors. Use the Up/Down arrowbuttons or joystick to see the entire list and make your selection.
Effect: displays the list of available effects which can be assigned to the on-board
sensors. Use the data buttons or joystick to see the entire list and make your
selection. Two effects may be assigned to each sensor.
MIDI-Channels: Selects the Sensor/MIDI menu for Continuous Control EFX. Any
sensor may send its output to up to four channels simultaneously.
To set up an on-board sensor:
1)Select the SENSOR menu.
2) Move the cursor to the top-left screen position with the soft-key. The first
example shows the "Joystick Down" direction as the selected sensor. Use the
joystick or data buttons to scroll through the list of on-board controllers.
Each sensor may send two separate effects to four channels each. For instance,
one channel may receive a "pitchbend-up" while another channel receives a
"pitchbend-down" message.
4) Soft-key #5 toggles the MIDI effect number 1 or 2 you wish to program. Softkey
#6 selects the effect-type. Use the joystick or data buttons to select a MIDI effect or
Controller number.
20
5) Select the MIDI CHANNELS menu. Effect #1 and Effect #2 may each transmit to
four channels. Use the soft keys to pick any of the four channels per effect and use
the joystick or data buttons to enter a channel number at that location.
This completes the Sensor assignment for effects. Repeat the process for each onboard sensor on the UZONE and don't forget to save your changes.
SENSORS\ MIDI CHANNELS MENU
Up
Softkey#1
Softkey#2
Down <SENSOR/MIDI OUTPUT CHANNELS>
Ch.A: 1
EDIT
Softkey#5
Ch.B: OFF
Softkey#6
Softkey#3
Ch.C: OFF
Softkey#7
Softkey#4
Ch.D: OFF
Softkey#8
Select an output and adjust the value to the proper channel.
21
Sensor Functions:
No assign: No output function.
Pitchbend Up: Sends Pitchbend 64-127
Pitchbend Down: Sends Pitchbend 64-0
Volume Up: Sends Master Volume 0-127
Volume Down: Sends Master Volume 127-0
Velocity Up: Sensor actuation adds to Fingerboard/Trigger note-velocity.
Velocity Down: Sensor actuation subtracts from Fingerboard/Trigger note-velocity.
Modulation: Continuous Controller #1, Mod Wheel
Sustain: Continuous Controller #64.
Expression: Continuous Controller #11.
Channel Pressure: Sensor actuation applies an effect to the selected channel.
Poly Key Pressure: Sensor actuation applies an effect to the active notes on the
fingerboard.
User Control # (for single byte parameters):A Continuous Control message may be
assigned to an arbitrary controller number. Many synths accept control data on Controllernumbers that are specific to that piece of equipment. Also, there are a number of MIDI
controller EFX that have not been listed by name in the assignment-list, such as Breathcontrol on CC#2.
User Upper Control #: Used for center-detented effects similar to Pitchbend. Control
MIDI 64-127.
User Lower Control #: Used for center-detented effects similar to Pitchbend. Control
MIDI 64-0.
Program Change: Send up to (8) Program Changes whe the Sensor is actuated.
Single-Key Re-Trigger: Re-trigger active fingerboard notes for a selected channel.
Sequence Stop/Continue: External Sequencer control for a selected sequence number.
Sequence Restart: External Sequencer control for a selected sequence number.
Sequence Stop: External Sequencer control for a selected sequence number.
Chord Hold #1 Release: All active notes in a Chord-hold group will turn Off. Use this if
you’re not sure which Sensor’s notes are currently playing.
Chord Hold #2 Release:
Chord Hold #1 Re-Trigger: The notes assigned to this Sensor will re-trigger on
actuation rather than toggling On/Off.
Chord Hold #2 Re-Trigger
Chord Hold #1: Up to (8) programmed note/channel pairs are latched on when the
Sensor is struck. The next strike toggles the notes off. When several sensors are
programmed to this function, the actuation of one sensor will cancel the note(s) of
another sensor that is currently playing, and then it will issue its own notes. You can use
this to create chordal accompaniment or trigger looped drum samples. Two groups of
sensors may be operated in this way independently and simultaneuosly, #1 and #2. You
can use two “chains” of note-messages to orchestrate a performance or to create
polyrhythmic compositions.
Chord Hold #2
Chord Trigge:r Up to (8) Note/Channel pairs may be played from the Sensor. When the
sensor (Pad) is released the notes will release, similar to the action of a keyboard key.
22
When an effect is assigned to "CHORD TRIGGER", "CHORD NOTES" appears at
the upper-right of the SENSOR menu. Use the soft-key to select the menu for
making note assignments to the sensors.
<UTILITY/BULK-DUMP> MENU
Send: Dumps the entire Song Memory from the UZONE to a receiving device.
Receive: Prepares the UZONE to receive a Bulk-dump to its Song-Memory.
Pedals:
Volume/Expression Pedal:
We're looking for a 50 KOhm 3-terminal pot wired to a 1/4" stereo phono plug
with the center tap being the ring terminal. 25 KOhm pots don't quite swing all the
way. 100 KOhm pots are fine but no one seems to use them. The Yamaha FC-7
is ideal. Music Industries I think has a not-so-rugged pedal which is electrically
about right. Kurzweil re-sells these. Also, I've seen them in Guitar Center at
various times. The Roland EV5 has a different pot with different wiring but still
works a little. I'd assume the Boss pedal is about the same but I haven't tested it.
Also, I think a Korg expression pedal works.
Sustain Pedal: Normally Open momentary footswitch wired to a 1/4" mono plug.
23
BULK-DUMP menu
Up
Softkey#1
Softkey#2
Softkey#3
Down
<BULK-DUMP>
KEYMAPS
SEND
Softkey#4
RECEIVE
KEYMAP# ALL
EDIT
Softkey#5
Softkey#6
Softkey#7
Softkey#8
To save the song banks to an external MIDI system:
1) Connect the MIDI In port on the UZONE to MIDI Out on your computer or other
device.
2)
3) Set up your computer to receive a Sysex data dump. You can use most MIDI
sequencer programs or MIDI monitor programs to do this.
4) When the computer is ready and waiting for data press the SEND soft-key on the
UZone keypad. The UZone display will indicate when the operation is finished
saying, “Function Complete”.
5) Your computer should indicate the receipt of about 15k-18kbytes depending on
the UZone model-type.
KEYMAPS: Press softkey#2 to toggle bulk dumps for Keymaps or Songs
SEND: Send data from the uZone.
RECEIVE: Receive data from the computer.
The bottom line will show whether Keymaps or Songs are selected.
Press Softkey#5 and use the Up/ Dn keys to select which Song or Keymap, or All.
Sending All Songs will also send all Keymaps.
To restore the UZONE song banks from an external MIDI system:
1) Make the same cable connections as for the MIDI "send" procedure.
2) Press the RECEIVE soft-key on the UZone first, then start the transmission from
your computer. The UZONE gives you about 20 seconds to start the transmission
before it flags an error.
24
ERROR MESSAGES
Bulk receive prints the following error messages:
--- CONDITION ---
--- MESSAGE ---
20 seconds elapse before any data received
MIDI cable unplugged / too few data bytes
•
•
“timeout”
“timeout”
Check your cables and connections
Make sure the MIDI device in your computer is set up correctly and the sending
program is configured to use it.
Wrong SysEx dump / Bad MIDI data
•
•
“Data corrupt”
Possible faulty cable or loose connection
Corrupted file stored in computer
Wrong checksum / no EOX (End of Transmission)
•
Corrupted transmission. Retry the procedure.
CRC/Framing or Receive buffer overrun
•
•
“Bad Checksum”
“MIDI off line”
Corrupted transmission. Retry the procedure.
Possible faulty cable
25
UZONE INDIVIDUAL SONG SPECIFICATION
Mar 2002
[678 total bytes per song. 24 user-songs available.]
The format of this specification shows the number of 8-bit bytes allotted to each
parameter. Where a given byte is packed with single-bit parameters, the packing scheme
is detailed.
GLOBAL [18 bytes]
9 Ascii name.
1 Scan-mode: 0abcdefg
a Sustain Mode... 1= Enable
b Dual Mode... 1= Enable
c TriggerCapture Mode... 1= Enable.
d Guitar / Polyphonic... 1 = Poly.
e Triggers On/Off... 1 = Triggers Off.
f Hammeron/ Pulloff enable... 1 = On
g OpenPullOff... 1 = Enable
6 Tuning -- one MIDI note number for base tuning of each string,
starting with the lowest string for a right handed player.
1.Fingerboard PolyKey Aftertouch Threshold
2 Fingerboard PolyKeyAftertouch Sensitivity
ZONE [12 bytes per zone x 16 zones = 192 bytes]
2 Fret boundaries:
0n0fffff = n is zone disable if set, fffff is low fret boundary.
000fffff = fffff is high fret boundary, inclusive.
2 String boundaries:
00000sss = sss is low string boundary.
00000sss = sss is high string boundary.
1 Bit-packed parameters:
0pvtmmmm
p = Patch change and velocity send: 1 = enable, 0 = disable.
v = Velocity on or off:
1 = use pressure of keys/triggers for note velocity
0 = use default velocity for channel.
t = Unison or default tuning:
1 = unison, 0 = default tuning.
unison => transposition is pitch
default => tuning(string) + fret# + transposition.
mmmm = Midi channel for note output and patch/vol change.
1 0ttttttt = Transposition / note number (hex)00, 0C, 18, 24, 30 are octaves.
1 0nnnnnnn = Fixed note velocity level for channel (if v=0)
0000000i = Velocity inversion on or off (if v=1).
1 0ppppppp = Patch change number, sent only if enabled.
1 0vvvvvvv = Master volume change number, sent only if enabled.
1 0bbbbbbb = Bank Select value sent out on Continuous Controller #0
1 0bbbbbbb = Bank Select value sent out on Continuous Controller #32
26
1 0axxxxxxx = Zone Flags: a;Poly Aftertouch Enable. x; reserved for future use.
SENSOR x 18 (6 triggers, 6 pads, 4 joystick poles, 2 pedals.)
[18 bytes per Sensor x 26 sensors = 468 bytes]
The Output channels are used in the case of an effect selection.
If Chord Trigger is selected (only possible as Effect #1) then the following 16
bytes after
the two Effect Select bytes are all used for eight notes of chord data, in the
format:
0000mmmm
MIDI channel 1-16
0nnnnnnn
MIDI note 0-127
[the 18th Sensor byte is not used when the chord memory is enabled]
1 0000xxxx = xxxx is Effect #1 selected from the SENSOR FUNCTION LIST.
1 000ammmm = a is disable flag for Output A on MIDI channel mmmm.
1 000bmmmm = b is disable flag for Output B on MIDI channel mmmm.
1 000cmmmm = c is disable flag for Output C on MIDI channel mmmm.
1 000dmmmm = d is disable flag for Output D on MIDI channel mmmm.
4 storage for chord data, or user control number in first byte.
<continue next page>
1
1
1
1
1
4
0000xxxx = xxxx is Effect #2 selected from the SENSOR FUNCTION LIST.
000ammmm = a is disable flag for output A on MIDI channel mmmm.
000bmmmm = b is disable flag for output B on MIDI channel mmmm.
000cmmmm = c is disable flag for output C on MIDI channel mmmm.
000dmmmm = d is disable flag for output D on MIDI channel mmmm.
storage for chord data, or user control number in first byte.
SENSOR ASSIGNMENT LIST
The listed hexadecimal value for each message output type is loaded into the "xxxx"
Effects Select byte for each hardware sensor in the "Sensor" byte-block within each
Song preset.
0 = no assign
1 = Pitchbend Up
2 = Pitchbend Down
3 = Volume Up
4 = Volume Down
5 = Velocity Up
6 = Velocity Down
7 = Modulation
8 = Sustain
9 = Expression
A = Channel Pressure
B = Poly Key Pressure
C = User Control # (for single byte parameters)
D = User Upper Control #
27
E = User Lower Control #
(D and E are for center-detented effects which swing both sides of zero,
and require two bytes for full-scale.)
0F = Program Change
10 =Single-Key Re-Trigger
11 = Sequence Stop/Continue
12 = Sequence Restart
13 = Sequence Restart
14 = Sequence Stop
15 = Chord Hold #1 Release
16 = Chord Hold #2 Release
17 = Chord Hold #1 Re-Trigger
18 = Chord Hold #2 Re-Trigger
19 = Chord Hold #1
1A = Chord Hold #2
1F = Chord Trigger
28
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement