S022 Personal protective equipment and clothing

S022 Personal protective equipment and clothing

Doc ID

939409

Version Date

13 June 2017

Next Review Date

13 May 2020

S022 Personal Protective Equipment and Clothing

Custodian

Manager Field Support

Accountabilities Framework

Level 1: Manage Occupational Safety and

Health

Level 2: Manage Hazards and OSH Incidents

Approved

Manager SEAA Branch

Stakeholders

Principal Engineer Electrical, MESB

Principal Engineer, Desal & Process Technology

Standards

1 Purpose

This standard provides information required for the correct selection and application of Personal Protective

Equipment (PPE), clothing and work wear. PPE comprises of a range of clothing and equipment that is worn to protect the body from various workplace hazards, where the risks from those hazards cannot be satisfactorily controlled through other means.

2 Scope

This standard applies to Water Corporation employees at Water Corporation workplaces or other premises, and in public areas where PPE and work clothing may be necessary in the course of work.

This standard also applies to the Water Corporation’s contractors and subcontractors.

Note: For the purpose of this document, employees shall be defined as all employees including Contract of Service empl oyees, Contract of Service personnel, and the personnel of the Corporation’s Alliance Contractors in performing the services required under their respective alliance contracts.

Content

1 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Roles and Responsibilities ...................................................................................................................... 3

4 Standard

– Personal Protective Equipment and Clothing ....................................................................... 4

4.1

Hierarchy of Controls .................................................................................................................... 4

4.2

Guideline for Enforcement ............................................................................................................ 4

4.2.1

Intentional Breaches ........................................................................................................... 4

4.2.2

Unintentional Breaches ....................................................................................................... 4

4.3

Selection of PPE ........................................................................................................................... 4

4.4

Training in the Use of PPE ............................................................................................................ 4

4.5

Minimum PPE Requirements for Operational Sites ...................................................................... 5

4.5.1

Safety Eyewear ................................................................................................................... 6

4.5.2

Safety Footwear .................................................................................................................. 6

4.5.3

High Visibility Clothing ........................................................................................................ 6

4.5.4

Safety Helmet ..................................................................................................................... 6

4.5.5

Long sleeved shirt and long pants ...................................................................................... 7

4.5.6

Hat or Helmet Brim ............................................................................................................. 7

4.5.7

Gloves ................................................................................................................................. 8

4.6

Hearing Protection Devices ........................................................................................................... 8

4.7

Respiratory Protection ................................................................................................................... 8

4.8

Personal Flotation Devices ........................................................................................................... 8

4.9

Inspection, Maintenance and Replacement of PPE...................................................................... 9

4.10

PPE Concession ........................................................................................................................... 9

S022 Personal Protective Equipment and Clothing

4.10.1

PPE Conflicts and Limitations ............................................................................................. 9

4.10.2

Site-Specific PPE Requirements ........................................................................................ 9

4.10.3

Outdoors Events Organised or Sponsored by the Water Corporation ............................... 9

5 Records ................................................................................................................................................. 10

6 Definitions .............................................................................................................................................. 10

7 Compliance Mapping ............................................................................................................................. 11

8 References ............................................................................................................................................ 12

9 Document Revision History ................................................................................................................... 12

Appendix A

Appendix B

Notes for Table 1 .............................................................................................................. 13

Respiratory Protection Types ........................................................................................... 14

Appendix C

Appendix D

Request for HSEAA Concession Form ............................................................................. 15

Personal Protective Equipment for Electrical Workers ..................................................... 18

1 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 18

2 Scope .................................................................................................................................................... 18

3 Standard

– PPE for Electrical Workers ................................................................................................. 18

3.1

General ........................................................................................................................................ 18

3.2

Protective Clothing ...................................................................................................................... 18

3.2.1

Methodology for Determination of Minimum Requirements ............................................. 18

3.2.2

Minimum Protective Clothing Requirements..................................................................... 19

4 Inspection and Testing of PPE .............................................................................................................. 20

5 PPE Usage Guide ................................................................................................................................. 20

6 PPE Category Descriptions ................................................................................................................... 20

7 Preselected Electrical PPE .................................................................................................................... 22

8 Definitions .............................................................................................................................................. 23

9 Compliance Mapping ............................................................................................................................. 24

10 References ............................................................................................................................................ 24

Appendix E Personal Protective Equipment for Chemical Dosing Facilities ................................................... 25

1 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 25

2 Scope .................................................................................................................................................... 25

3 Standard - PPE for Chemical Dosing Facilities ..................................................................................... 25

3.1

Entry to Chemical Dosing Facilities with Non-Hazardous Substances ....................................... 26

3.2

Entry to Chemical Dosing Facilities with Hazardous Substances that are not Corrosives ......... 26

3.3

Entry to Chemical Dosing Facilities with Chlorine or Ammonia Gas .......................................... 26

3.4

Entry to Chemical Dosing Facilities with Liquid Corrosives ........................................................ 27

4 Determining PPE requirements for overhead pipes .............................................................................. 27

5 PPE Concession for Chemical Dosing Facilities ................................................................................... 28

6 Definitions .............................................................................................................................................. 30

7 References ............................................................................................................................................ 30

Appendix F SCBA and Canister Respirator Use ............................................................................................. 31

1 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 31

2 Scope .................................................................................................................................................... 31

3 Roles and Responsibilities .................................................................................................................... 31

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4 Training .................................................................................................................................................. 31

5 Standard

– SCBA and Canister Respirator Use ................................................................................... 31

5.1

Facial Hair ................................................................................................................................... 31

5.2

Medical Assessment ................................................................................................................... 32

5.3

Replacement and Disposal of Canisters ..................................................................................... 32

5.4

SCBA Cylinder Refill ................................................................................................................... 32

5.5

SCBA Low Pressure Test (audible alarm) .................................................................................. 32

5.6

SCBA Maintenance and Inspection ............................................................................................ 32

5.7

Fit Checking / Testing of Facemasks .......................................................................................... 33

5.8

Storage of SCBA and Canister Respirators ................................................................................ 33

5.9

Speech Diaphragms .................................................................................................................... 33

6 Records ................................................................................................................................................. 33

7 Definitions .............................................................................................................................................. 33

8 References ............................................................................................................................................ 33

9 Compliance Mapping ............................................................................................................................. 34

3 Roles and Responsibilities

Position Title

Managers

Supervisors

Employees

Responsibilities

Provide adequate resources for the purchase, maintenance and replacement of

PPE and work clothing in accordance with this standard.

Ensure PPE inspections are occurring.

Ensure non-compliance with PPE requirements is acted upon (advice regarding action should be obtained from the HR Consultant).

Provide required PPE at no cost to employees.

Ensure adequate PPE and work clothing is provided for employees.

Inspect the use of PPE during workplace inspections to ensure PPE and work clothing is worn in compliance with this standard.

Report non-compliance with PPE requirements to Managers.

Ensure employees and contractors dress in accordance with site requirements.

Ensure employees are trained in the use and maintenance of PPE items that require training (i.e. respirators, hearing protection).

Wear PPE and work clothing as required by this Standard.

Comply with site-specific PPE requirements of their work area.

Comply with PPE in relevant work instructions, Safe Job Planning documentation,

Material Safety Data Sheets or other documentation.

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4 Standard

– Personal Protective Equipment and Clothing

4.1 Hierarchy of Controls

The hierarchy of controls shall be considered when determining appropriate means of reducing risks to safety and health. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is recognised as a lower order control measure.

Where practicable, other (higher order) means of reducing risk shall be utilised, alone or in conjunction with

PPE.

1.

Elimination

2.

Substitution

The complete elimination of the hazard

Replacing the material or process with a less hazardous one

3.

Isolation

Isolating the hazard by guarding or enclosing it

4.

Engineering

Redesign the equipment or work process

5.

Administration

6.

PPE

Providing controls such as training and procedures

Use appropriate and properly fitted PPE where other controls are not practical

4.2 Guideline for Enforcement

Water Corporation has zero tolerance for breaches of OSH requirements.

4.2.1 Intentional Breaches

Intentional breaches of this Standard shall be followed up by the relevant manager and disciplinary action may be taken which can include termination of employment.

Where a breach has been identified, the relevant manager should contact the HR Consultant to discuss the appropriate follow up steps and consequence actions.

4.2.2 Unintentional Breaches

Where a breach is determined to have been unintentional the employee/contractor involved shall be informed as to the requirements of this standard and the correct use and wearing of PPE.

4.3 Selection of PPE

PPE is intended to protect the user from certain aspects of harm when working with hazards. PPE shall comply with the relevant Australian Standard or, where there is no relevant Australian Standard, other international standards relevant to that type of PPE.

4.4 Training in the Use of PPE

Employees shall be provided with information on the correct storage, use, inspection, maintenance and operational limitations of PPE. For some types of specialised PPE (such as SCBA) competency-based training and assessment is also required. It is the responsibility of the Supervisor to ensure this training occurs and is recorded.

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4.5 Minimum PPE Requirements for Operational Sites

Table 1 outlines the mandatory minimum workplace PPE requirements for Water Corporation operational

sites and indicates where additional PPE items apply based on a risk assessment. A risk-based, common sense decision approach should be applied when determining the duration of requirements aimed at protection from sun exposure i.e. the risk may be determined as negligible very early in the morning and in the early evening.

Where additional items of PPE are required by Safety Data Sheets, Safe Job Planning (e.g. Job Safety

Environment Analysis), procedures / work instructions or regulatory requirements for specific tasks, these items shall be indicated by appropriate PPE signage and communicated to workers, contractors and visitors during the induction process.

Table 1

– Minimum workplace PPE Requirements for Operational Sites *

Place of Work

(Refer Appendix A for notes 1

– 9)

Safety

Eyewear

(Refer 0)

Safety

Footwear

(Refer 4.5.2)

High

Visibility

Vest/Shirt/

Jacket

(Refer 4.5.3)

Safety

Helmet

(Refer 4.5.4)

Long

Sleeved

Shirt, Long

Pants

(Refer 4.5.5)

Hat or helmet brim/ flap

(Refer 4.5.6)

Gloves

(Refer 4.5.7)

Construction sites

(Note 1)

     

Carried on person

Worn where required by R/A

Construction/ refurbishment work within a structure, not associated with a construction site

(Note 2)

Public roadways and verges (e.g. asset inspection, surveying, meter replacement)

(Note 3)

Overhead work or fall hazards

Worn where required by R/A

Carried on person

Worn where required by R/A

Carried on person

Worn where required by R/A

Work below ground, or where others may be overhead (e.g. dry wells, valve pits, water tank sites) (Note 4)

Workshop interiors (e.g. mechanical or electrical, excluding desk based work) (Note 5)

Workshop interiors

(desk based work)

(Note 6)

Treatment plants, dams and similar operational sites (Note 7)

Worn where required by R/A

 

For direct sunlight only

Worn where required by R/A

Worn where required by R/A

Worn where required by R/A

   

For outdoors work

Carried on person

Worn where required by R/A

Worn where required by R/A

Worn where required by R/A

Worn where required by R/A

Worn where required by R/A

Worn where required by R/A

Worn where required by R/A

Worn where required by R/A

Social functions and events (Note 8)

Incidental short term exposure to the sun (e.g. short walk between buildings) (Note 9)

Sunglasses recommended

Recommended but not required

KEY: ‘’ indicates ‘is required’.

‘R/A’ indicates a risk assessment should be used to determine requirement based on activities and tasks to be undertaken.

Refer Appendix A for Notes to Table 1.

Note: Specific PPE requirements for electrical work are detailed in Appendix D.

Specific PPE requirements for personnel entering or approaching chemical dosing facilities are outlined in 0.

Where non-electrical staff are required to operate switchgear as part of an isolation process, they shall undertake a task risk assessment and seek technical guidance from electrical staff to identify higher risk sites where flame retardant PPE should be used during the switching activity.

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4.5.1 Safety Eyewear

Eye protection shall be worn according to the minimum standards specified in Table 1 for work on

operational and construction sites and in workshops, unless an exemption applies.

Typical hazards may include flying particles, dust, splashing substances and welding flashes. Consideration shall be given to the need for protecting persons who are working nearby or that pass close to the hazardous areas. Guidance for the selection of eye protection is provided in AS/NZS 1337. Safety eyewear is designed to meet required characteristics to protect the wearer, and shall not be tampered with (i.e. by removal of side shields from safety glasses).

Eye protection is required at all sites without exception under the following conditions:

Grinding are required.

– full medium impact face shield and if vision permits, safety glasses or mono goggles

Welding

– clear safety glasses and medium impact welding helmet are required.

Use of powered tools

– safety glasses and /or medium impact face shield shall be used in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.

Using chemicals

Data Sheets.

– safety glasses, goggles or full face shield, as documented on Material Safety

Employees working in conditions where they are exposed to airborne particles or eye hazards

(i.e. bushes and trees)

– as a minimum, employees shall wear low impact safety glasses (with

Australian Standard compliant frames and lenses) to protect eyes from contact. Mono goggles should be worn in high dust areas where injury is more likely

Exposure to the sun

– tinted safety glasses shall be worn as a minimum.

Guidelines for the provision or subsidy of prescription Safety Glasses for Water Corporation employees are covered in Prescription Safety Glasses

. Photochromic safety glasses, commonly known as ‘transitions’ lenses, are not suitable for all conditions as the lens transition from dark to lighter is not instantaneous. They should not be used when operating mobile plant between different light conditions (e.g. operating a forklift between indoor and outdoor areas) and may not be suitable for use at night / twilight.

4.5.2 Safety Footwear

Safety footwear (safety boots with a steel or composite toecap) shall be worn on all operational sites, as per

(Table 1). Visitors to operational sites may be exempt from these requirements when a risk assessment has

proved it unnecessary in specific areas (i.e. exclusion zones) and when accompanied throughout their visit.

Where safety footwear exemptions exist, visitors shall wear enclosed, flat soled footwear as a minimum.

Meter Readers who only perform meter reading tasks are exempt from the requirement for wearing Safety boots with a steel or composite toecap, but their footwear must be rated as Occupational footwear Class O1 or O2 as per AS 2210 Occupational Protective Footwear.

Note: Refer to the factsheet Ergonomics guidance for Meter Readers for more guidance on footwear selection for Meter Readers.

4.5.3 High Visibility Clothing

A high visibility garment shall be worn on all operational sites, including depots, as per Table 1. A high

visibility shirt or jacket may be worn as an alternative to a high visibility vest. Visitors to operational sites may be exempt from these requirements when a risk assessment has proved it unnecessary in specific areas (i.e. exclusion zones), and when accompanied throughout their visit. High visibility garments shall be orange or yellow, and shall have reflective tape when worn at night or in low light conditions.

When undertaking activities close to ignition sources (i.e. welding), flame resistant high visibility clothing shall be used.

4.5.4 Safety Helmet

A safety helmet (hard hat) shall be worn on all construction sites as per Table 1 and at all times where there

is a risk of being struck by a falling object or other credible risk of head injury.

No other headwear, such as caps, bandanas or beanies shall be worn under the safety helmet.

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Where the safety helmet is worn outdoors in daylight conditions, a legionnaire’s flap or wide brim shall be worn to provide sun protection for the ears and neck.

At the time of issue to the wearer, the helmet shall be marked with an issue date on the sticker provided by the manufacturer for this purpose.

All safety helmet components and accessories should be visually inspected prior to use by the wearer, for signs of dents, cracks, penetration, excessive discolouration of the shell colour, weathering of the surface or other damage which may indicate a loss of strength.

Helmets showing damage or deterioration to the shell shall be immediately withdrawn from service and discarded (completely destroyed). Helmets with intact shell but with damaged or defective harness components should be withdrawn from service and the harness and cradle shall be replaced.

Under no circumstances are helmets to be subjected to paint or solubles, as these can have a detrimental effect on the material from which the helmets are made and render them less effective.

Helmets which have been in regular use for three (3) years from the date of issue should be regularly inspected and replaced as necessary. Helmets that are stored out of the sun and not used often (such as building or fire warden helmets, site visitors helmets or helmets stored in PPE bags) generally last longer and should be inspected as part of workplace inspections . Helmets that are in good condition can be used for up to a maximum of 10 years from date of issue (or date of manufacture, if no date of issue has been noted).

Plastic components of harnesses may deteriorate more rapidly when in continual use and in these cases harnesses should be replaced at intervals not longer than two (2) years from the date of issue.

4.5.5 Long sleeved shirt and long pants

Long sleeved shirts and long pants shall be worn when working on all operational sites.

Long sleeved shirts shall have a collar, and sleeves shall remain fully extended to wrist level. Long pants shall be fully extended to ankle level.

Where Water Corporation employees are required to wear a uniform in accordance with PCY008 Uniform

Policy - Field and Office , long sleeved shirts and long pants should be sourced from the

Water Corporation’s

Corporate Workwear Catalogue, as appropriate fabric and Ultra Violet Factored (UPF) garments have been selected to offer the best protection. As a guide, fabric for long sleeved shirts should have a UPF rating of

40-50+ and fabric for long pants should have a UPF rating of 30+.

Where Water Corporation employees are not required to wear a uniform under PCY008 Uniform Policy -

Field and Office , it is recommended that long sleeved shirts and long pants are sourced from the Water

Corporation’s Corporate Work wear Catalogue.

When sourced outside the Water Corporation’s approved range of corporate work wear clothing, long sleeved shirts and long pants should offer the same level of protection offered by the garments within the approved range.

Note:

Appendix D

specifies the minimum standard requirements of protective clothing for electrical work

where an electrical hazard exists.

4.5.6 Hat or Helmet Brim

Water Corporation guidelines for work in the heat or sun exposure are contained in the Heat and Sun

Exposure guideline. Where practicable, higher order controls should be considered to reduce exposure to the sun (i.e. providing shade or scheduling outdoor work to hours other than the middle of the day).

When an individual is working outdoors, personal protection shall be worn in the form of protective clothing

(i.e. hat, long sleeved shirt and long pants) in accordance with Table 1 of this standard. A sun-protective hat

does not need to be worn when it is raining, nor when working in a pit where there is no direct exposure to the sun.

It is recommended that hats, for prolonged outdoor exposure, are sourced from the Water Corporation’s corporate work wear catalogue. In instances where hats are sourced outside of this range, they shall provide the minimum level of protection offered by the hats in the Water Corporation approved range. As a guide, wide brimmed hats should have a brim of at least 70 mm and bucket hats should have a brim of at least 60 mm (casting a shadow equivalent to the 70 mm wide-brimmed hat).

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Sunscreen should also be worn to provide protection from reflected sunlight to any exposed skin areas.

Sunscreen shall be SPF 30+ in accordance with AS/NZS 2604 Sunscreen Products

– Evaluation and

Classification.

Safety sunglasses conforming to AS/NZS 1337, with lenses complying with AS 1067 Sunglasses and

Fashion Spectacles

– Safety Requirements, are required for work outdoors during daylight hours.

4.5.7 Gloves

Gloves should be worn for activities where there is a risk of injury to the hand and where the wearing of gloves does not increase the risk of a more severe injury occurring than would occur without gloves. Site managers should conduct a risk assessment to determine the tasks and activities that require gloves and ensure that glove requirements are notified to all employees and contractors working in the area.

4.6 Hearing Protection Devices

Water Corporation standards for managing risks of noise are contained in S147 Noise and Vibration . Where other means of reducing noise exposure are not practicable or satisfactorily reliable, hearing protection shall be provided and used where noise levels are likely to exceed an 8hr Time Weighted Average (TWA) of

85dB(A) or over peak levels of 140dB(C).

Guidance on managing noise and relevant PPE is provided in AS/NZS 1269 Occupational Noise

Management, and in AS/NZS 1270 Acoustics

– Hearing Protectors.

Note: Refer to the Hearing Protection Selection Chart for specific guidance for the selection and use of hearing protection devices.

4.7 Respiratory Protection

Respiratory protective equipment shall be worn where there is exposure to airborne contaminants or a deficiency in oxygen, and shall be selected and worn in accordance with AS/NZS 1716 Respiratory

Protective Devices. Where an adequate facial fit cannot be achieved with a disposable or reusable respirator, a powered air purifying respirator (PAPR) shall be used.

Only respiratory protection of the supplied air type (such as Self Contained Breathing Apparatus) provides protection against oxygen deficiency.

Respiratory protection devices shall be selected with regard to the potential airborne contaminants in the work area. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) may provide information about the types of potential airborne contaminants and the types of personal protective equipment to be worn. A flowchart outlining the

types of respiratory protective equipment is provided in Appendix B. Guidance on the selection and usage of

respiratory protection is provided in AS/NZS 1716 and AS/NZS 1715. If in doubt, advice should be sought from the suppliers of the relevant respiratory device.

Refer to 0 for requirements for Appendix F SCBA and Canister Respirator Use.

4.8 Personal Flotation Devices

Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs) shall be provided to employees and worn where:

 a person works over or within two (2) metres of water or other liquid and they are working alone, and

 there is a credible risk of falling into the water or other liquid and drowning.

The requirement to wear PFDs may also be specified by Rescue Plans associated with tasks in accordance with S467 Rescue Planning

PFDs shall comply with AS 4758 Personal Flotation Devices and provide ‘Level 150’ buoyancy. The PFDs shall automatically inflate upon contact with water. PFDs shall be purchased from an authorised sales agent.

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PFDs must display a service date and shall be serviced by the manufacturer or an authorised servicing agent:

Following each activation of the automatic-inflation mechanism.

Periodically, in accordance with manufacturers

’ specifications. Where no servicing interval is specified by the manufacturer, a service shall be performed annually.

Branch / Regional Managers / Contractors shall ensure that routine servicing of PFDs are scheduled

(e.g. using SAP PM04 work orders) and that inspection records are maintained in accordance with

Section 5.

PFDs shall be visually inspected before each use for signs of wear and tear and to verify that the PFD displays an up-to-date service date.

4.9 Inspection, Maintenance and Replacement of PPE

PPE shall be properly maintained and regularly inspected by the user before each use. This shall include provision for the appropriate storage, cleaning and servicing of PPE. PPE should be serviced and/or replaced in line with manufacturer’s guidelines or when there is obvious sign of wear and tear. Replacement

PPE shall be issued at no cost to the employee. PPE should be replaced when:

 the safe working life has expired (as specified by the manufacturer if the equipment); it is worn to a point that its function is impaired; or

 it is damaged or defective in a way that its function is impaired.

4.10 PPE Concession

If a deviation from the minimum requirements set out in this Procedure is required a HSEAA concession must be obtained by following the Management of Concessions from HSEAA Requirements Procedure .

The endorsed PPE requirements must be indicated by appropriate PPE signage and communicated to workers, contractors and visitors during the induction process.

Note: Alternative PPE that better control operational risks can contribute towards continuous improvement of standard PPE requirements and should be shared with the custodian of this standard for further consideration.

4.10.1 PPE Conflicts and Limitations

Where the risk to the individual is likely to be increased through the use of a component of PPE, or where the requirement to wear one item of PPE may impede the wearing of another item of PPE a HSEAA concession must be obtained by following the Management of Concessions from HSEAA Requirements Procedure .

4.10.2 Site-Specific PPE Requirements

Site-specific PPE requirements (where there is an approved HSEAA concession in place) must be communicated to personnel visiting from another business area through the site visit notification and site induction processes (refer to WC-OSH 033 Site Entry ) if required for the purposes of their visit.

4.10.3 Outdoors Events Organised or Sponsored by the Water Corporation

It is likely that the PPE specified for outdoor recreational events will vary from the minimum PPE

requirements for normal operational activities (Table 1). For events organised by the Water Corporation, the

Event Organiser must document and risk assess this concession by using the HSEAA Concession Form.

Requirements for sun and other hazard protection should be determined by the event organiser and consideration should be given to:

 the level of cardiovascular activity involved the degree and duration of exposure to the sun the functional requirements of the event the frequency and duration of the event(s)

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 what measures should be implemented for protection from these hazards what measures will be taken to provide protection from hazards such as sun exposure.

If Water Corporation employees participating in an externally organised event are uncertain of the PPE requirements, the event organiser should be contacted and official guidance requested.

5 Records

Records associated with the personal protective equipment and clothing must be filed in accordance with the

Water Corporation Records Retention and Disposal Schedule , with the filing convention, retention period and disposition type outlined below:

Record To be retained by

Filing convention Retained for

(time period)

Disposition

Type

HSEAA

Concession

Request Form

Safety

Equipment

Registers

Applicant Party

MS Team

Branch

Manager of the relevant work area

OSH-Compliance

Information Management

Control - Registers and

Registration

– [Name of Register]

– [Location or Business Unit Name]

Retain 2 years active storage

Retain 2 years active storage

Destroy after

10 years

Destroy after

7 years

PPE

Maintenance

Records

Branch

Manager of the relevant work area

Supply and Suppliers -

Maintenance - Personal Protective

Equipment PPE

[Location or

Business Unit Name]

Retain 2 years active storage

Destroy after

7 years

6 Definitions

Term

Construction Site

JSEA

Long Pants

Description

A workplace at which construction work is done and includes any adjoining area where plant or other materials used, or to be used in connection with that work are located or kept, and over which the main contractor has control for the purpose of doing the construction work.

Construction/Refurbishment work within a building not associated with a construction site

All internal construction, restoration and refurbishment work (i.e. office refurbishment).

Event Organiser

Hat

The individual who is responsible for organising an event or liaising with external contacts to organise corporate participation in an event.

Wide brimmed hat, bucket hat, legionnaire’s hat, safety helmet hat brim or safety helmet with legionnaire’s flap; must be capable of casting a face shadow equal to that of a hat with a forward projection from the forehead of

70mm.

Incidental Exposure Short duration exposure to the sun during work hours, in which no direct or short term harm results from the exposure (i.e. short walk between buildings,

‘walking meetings’ outdoors, walking from the car park to the nearest building).

A documented risk assessment which breaks down the job into work steps with the identified hazards and required control measures formally recorded for each step.

Pants that remain fully extended to ankle level.

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Term

Long Sleeved Shirt

Non-operational Site

Operational Site

PAPR

Personal Flotation Device

(PFD)

Personal Protective

Equipment (PPE)

Public Roadways and

Verges

Respirator

Responsible Person

Shall

Should

Treatment plants, dams and similar operational sites

Work wear

Description

A collared shirt with long sleeves that remain fully extended to wrist level.

Sites where no operational work is undertaken including, but not limited to office buildings, office areas of depots.

Any site where operational work is undertaken including, but not limited to, depots, workshops, treatment plants, dams, construction sites and excavation sites.

Powered air purifying respirator

A garment or device which, when correctly worn and used in water, will provide the user with a specific amount of buoyancy which will increase the likelihood of survival.

Personal protective equipment (PPE) is any clothing, equipment or substance designed to protect a person from risks of injury or illness.

Operational work conducted on roadways or verges, not the momentary presence in these areas, such as alighting from a vehicle and walking into a building (e.g. asset inspection, surveying, meter replacement).

A personal respiratory protective device that is designed to prevent the inhalation of contaminated air.

Supervisor of workers undertaking the work. It is the responsibility of the

Responsible Person to identify and control hazards/risks arising from the work itself.

A mandatory requirement.

Recommended, but non mandatory.

Work/Treatment/Process areas such as groundwater or wastewater treatment plants, pump stations, bore fields, pits and at treatment areas of dam sites.

Clothing required to aid personal safety in the workplace (i.e. closed in, nonslip shoes).

7 Compliance Mapping

Task

Personal Protective

Equipment and Clothing

Compliance

Occupational Safety and Health Act 1984

Occupational Safety and Health Regulations 1996

Code of Practice: First Aid Facilities and Services, Workplace Amenities and

Facilities, Personal Protective Clothing and Equipment

AS 1067 Sunglasses and Fashion Spectacles

AS/NZS 1269 Occupational Noise Management

AS/NZS 1270 Hearing Protectors

AS/NZS 1319 Signs for the Occupational Environment

AS/NZS 1336 Eye and Face Protection - Guidelines

AS/NZS 1337 Eye Protectors for Industrial Applications

AS/NZS 1715 Selection, Use and Maintenance of Respiratory Protective

Devices

AS/NZS 1716 Respiratory Protective Devices

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Task Compliance

AS/NZS 1715 Selection, use and maintenance of respiratory protective equipment.

AS/NZS 1801 Occupational Protective Helmets

AS/NZS 1906 Retroreflective Materials

AS/NZS 2161 Occupational Protective Gloves

AS/NZS 2210 Occupational Protective Footwear

AS 4758 Personal Flotation Devices

AS/NZS 2225 Insulating Gloves for Electrical Purposes

AS/NZS 2604 Sunscreen Products

– Evaluation and Classification

AS/NZS 2919 Industrial Clothing

AS/NZS 4836 Safe Working on Low Voltage Electrical Installations

ENA NENS 09-2006 National Guidelines for the Selection, Use and

Maintenance of Personal Protective Equipment for Electrical Hazards

IEC 61482-1-1Ed. 1.0 2009 Live Working

– Protective Clothing Against the

Thermal Hazards of an Electric Arc - Part 1-1: Test Methods

American Standard NFPA 70E 2009

– Standard for Electrical Safety in the

Workplace

National Standards for Commercial Vessels

8 References

Document Number

WC-OSH 118

S147

S467

S389

WC-OSH 007

WC-OSH 033

PCY008

Title

Ergonomics guidance for Meter Readers

Hearing Protection Selection Chart

Heat and Sun Exposure Guideline

High Voltage Switching Practice (ME-2)

Noise and Vibration

Prescription Safety Glasses

Rescue Planning

Risk Assessment Criteria

Safe Job Planning

Sites Entry

Uniform Policy

– Field and Office

9 Document Revision History

Document Revision History

20 Feb 2015 Name change WC-OSH 033 Site Visits to WC-OSH 033 Site Entry - References in this document have been updated. Refer to MOC# 10613042

13 June

2017

Include clarification around PPE requirements in Chemical Dosing Facilities (Appendix E) and update posters.

Remove PPE risk assessment variance and align with Management of HSEAA concessions Procedure.

MOC#16652202

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Appendix A Notes for Table 1

1.

Construction Sites. Safety eyewear, safety footwear, high visibility clothing, safety helmet (with brim or flap attached for outdoors work) and long sleeved shirt and pants are required for work on all construction sites. Gloves required to be carried upon the person at all times and worn where required by a risk assessment.

2.

Construction/refurbishment work within a building not associated with a construction site.

Safety eyewear is required unless a outlines specific areas or tasks where they are proved unnecessary. Safety helmets are required for all overhead work or where fall hazards exist.

3. Public roadways and verges (e.g. asset inspection, surveying, meter replacement).

Requirements in Table 1 are not intended to apply for momentary presence in these areas, such as

alighting from a vehicle and walking to a building. Safety eyewear should be worn when working around bushes.

4. Work below ground, or where others may be overhead (e.g. dry wells, valve pits, water tank

sites). Hats are not required when it is raining, when working below ground or when partially shaded

(e.g. in a shaded pit).

5.

Workshop interiors (e.g. mechanical or electrical, excluding desk based work). Safety eyewear is required.

6.

Workshop interiors (desk based work). Requirements in Table 1 are intended to apply to a

designated work desk in a workshop or depot, removed from eye hazards associated with work undertaken in the workshop or depot.

7.

Treatment plants, dams and similar operational sites. Other than long sleeves, pants and sun hat,

the requirements in (Table 1) are not intended to apply to areas on sites such as offices and amenities

areas, or public areas of dam sites.

8.

Social functions and events. The event organiser should use their discretion when completing a risk assessment and putting risk mitigation strategies in place to determine safety requirements (including

PPE) for social functions and events. The Risk Assessment ( HSEAA Concession Form ) must focus on protection from sun exposure, but equally protection from any other hazards caused by the nature of the activity and surroundings.

9.

Incidental short term exposure to the sun. PPE should be worn where incidental short term sun exposure could result in immediate harm (i.e. exposure to the sun for the specified duration will result in sunburn). A walk from the car park to the nearest building would be classified as incidental exposure. Where the walk from the car park to the building occurs on an operational site, it is important to give adequate consideration to other PPE hazards (e.g. the need for high visibility clothing). A Risk Assessment shall be used to assess other PPE hazards.

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Appendix B Respiratory Protection Types

Major Types of Respirators

Air Purifying Supplied Air

Non-powered Powered

Filer Selfrescue

Gas Filter

Particulate

Filter

Combination

Filter

Respirators supplied by a remote source of air

Respirators supplied by a source of oxygen or air carried by the wearer

Respirators supplied by air at or near atmospheric pressure

Respirators supplied by compressed air

Air Hose

Natural

Breathing

Manually

Operated

Blower

Electronically

Operated

Blower

SCBA

Compressed

Air

Compressed

Oxygen

Liquid

Oxygen

Mode of Air Delivery

Chemical

Oxygen

Natural

Breathing

Continuous

Flow

Negative

Pressure

Positive

Pressure

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Appendix C

Request for HSEAA Concession Form

Complete this form to request a concession from existing HSEAA Process requirements. Please complete Section 1 to 4, and then send to the SEAA Branch

Management Systems Team on [email protected]

Section 1. Request

to be completed by the Contractor, Region and/or Alliance requesting the concession

Name:

Name of the document from which concession is sought:

Role:

Define specific section or clause, including headings.

Transcribe the wording from the document to which the requested concession relates to.

Reason for the request :

Explain why the HSEAA requirement cannot be met

Provide background information in support of the requested concession

Propose alternative to meet the criteria:

Describe advantages or disadvantages of the proposed alternative.

Detail the duration and location of

the concession.

Permanent ☐

Temporary ☐

Start date: Completion date: Comments:

Section 2. Alternatives considered - Detail the alternatives considered and exhausted before requesting the concession

Outline alternatives considered:

Include details of impact of

HSEAA risk/alternatives considered

Proposed approach if concession is granted

What is different? Have additional risks been introduced? How are they being controlled?

Site:

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Section 3. Risk Assessment- Refer to S389 Risk Assessment Criteria

Include details of the HSEAA impacts and risks for the proposed alternatives and controls allocated to reduce the risk to ALARP

Activity Hazard

What could harm workers?

Initial Risk

Rating

Controls

What can be done to reduce the risk?

Residual

Risk Rating

Further mitigation/actions

Required to reduce risk to ALARP

List of documents that support the concession or that are affected by this concession: (attach documents)

Document title:

Document title:

Document title:

Section 4. Review and Submission

Local review of the request before submitting it to the SEAA Branch

☐ Accepted

☐ Accepted with comments

☐ Rejected

Reviewer No.1

– SME/OSH Coordinator/

Environmental Coordinator’s signature:

Insert Aqua link to email

Reviewer No.2

– Region Manager/ Site

Manager/ Project Manager / Contract

Manager’s signature:

Insert Aqua link to email

Date:

Date:

Section 5. Impact Assessment

to be completed by the SEAA Branch Section Manager

☐ Safety

☐ Financial

☐ People

Comments

☐ Health

☐ Quality

☐Equipment

☐ Environment

☐ Time

☐Material

Comments or reason for rejection :

☐ Aboriginal Affairs

☐Training

☐ Other

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Section 6. Approval and Endorsement- Select type of concession to be considered Minor or Major, refer to

Management of concessions from HSEAA requirements

Procedure

for further explanation.

Minor Concession

(Approval No. 1 and 2 signatures

Must not : required)

☐ Accepted

☐ Accepted with comments

☐ Rejected

Approval No.1 - SEAA Section Manager

’s signature:

Insert Aqua link to email

Approval No. 2 - Contract Manager/Project

Manager/Regional Manager’s signature:

Insert Aqua link to email

Result in an increase in the risk of injury/illness or environmental impact

Date:

Plus three of the following must apply:

☐Industry accepted approach

☐Intent of the requirement is being met

☐No additional controls are required

☐High level controls in place

☐Not known incidents

Date:

☐Administrative or support process

Major Concession

(All four approval signatures required)

☐ Accepted

☐ Accepted with comments

☐ Rejected

Approval No. 3 - SEAA Branch Manager

’s signature:

Insert Aqua link to email

Date:

Approval No. 4

– General Group Manager’s

Signature:

Insert Aqua link to email

Date:

Additional instructions

Comments or reason for rejection

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S022 Appendix D

– Personal Protective

Equipment for Electrical Workers

Appendix D Personal Protective Equipment for Electrical Workers

1 Purpose

The purpose of this standard is to provide the Water Corporation requirements for personal protective equipment (PPE) for electrical workers.

2 Scope

This standard applies to Water Corporation electrical workers including Operations and Maintenance Alliance electrical personnel at Water Corporation workplaces or other premises, and in public areas where PPE may be necessary in the course of work.

This standard also applies to the Corporation’s Electrical Contractors and sub-contractors. PPE used by contractors and subcontractors for the activities described in this document shall have flame retardant properties equal to or higher than the Water Corporation’s selected PPE.

3 Standard

– PPE for Electrical Workers

3.1 General

A risk assessment shall be undertaken prior to commencing work to identify electrical hazards. Where electrical hazards are identified, the use of PPE shall be considered as the final control measure in the application of the hierarchy of controls.

PPE shall be used in conjunction with other control measures, or when other control measures are not possible or practicable. Should it be deemed that the use of PPE in conjunction with other control measures cannot adequately protect the individual, the work method should be re-examined for an alternative approach.

PPE shall be selected, used and maintained in a manner so as to avoid or minimise unacceptable risks by ensuring:

 suitability for the purpose correct fit

 appropriate maintenance and inspection procedures.

All PPE shall be visibly inspected immediately prior to use for signs of damage, deterioration and legibility of markings. All PPE should be cared for in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendation. PPE identified as having any defect or being out of date shall be replaced or withdrawn from service.

Persons required to use PPE shall be competent to select, use and maintain any such PPE.

When retro reflective material is required, it shall be in accordance with AS/NZS 1906.4 and be nonconductive. Only retro reflective PPE made from materials with flame retardant properties shall be used.

3.2 Protective Clothing

3.2.1 Methodology for Determination of Minimum Requirements

When determining the minimum standard requirements of protective clothing for electrical work, where electrical hazards exist, it is necessary to consider a range of factors including, but not limited to:

 prospective fault current fault duration distance from the arc

 conducting materials properties of the clothing fabrics wearer comfort climatic conditions.

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– Personal Protective

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3.2.2 Minimum Protective Clothing Requirements

The minimum protective clothing for electrical work where electrical hazards exist shall:

have properties not inferior to clothing referred to in Section 7.

 be worn so that the body is covered from neck to wrist to ankle; shirt, coat or jacket, and/or overalls shall be fastened at both the wrist and neck area

 have non-metallic fasteners or have fasteners protected by a layer of the same material as that of the garment on both the top and undersides be maintained in accordance with manufacturers’ instructions.

Note: Both the baseball cap style hood and switching hood (see Section 7) meet all the criteria for eye and

arc flash head protection.

Gloves

Safety Footwear

Eye Protection

Arc Flash Head

Protection

Hearing Protection

Insulating

Insulating gloves shall be selected, used and maintained in accordance with

AS 2225. They shall:

be worn at all times when there is a risk of accidental contact with live electrical equipment (unless other measures are applied that control the risk)

have a voltage rating appropriate for the work being undertaken

be worn on each hand

be free from harmful physical irregularities on both the inner and outer surfaces which may degrade the quality of the glove and/or the insulating properties of the glove (i.e. where moisture or contaminants may collect)

 be worn under arc protective gloves when both types of glove are required (refer Note 6).

Arc Protective

Arc Protective Gloves shall be selected to comply with IEC 61482-1-1 Ed. 1.0

2009. They shall:

be worn at all times when there is an increased likelihood of an arc fault occurring due to the electrical work being undertaken

be worn on each hand.

be worn over insulating gloves when both types of glove are required

(refer Note 6).

Appropriate footwear shall be selected, used and maintained in accordance with AS/NZS 2210.1 for all work where there is a potential for exposure to electrical hazards.

Eye protection and/or face protection in accordance with AS/NZS 1336 and

AS/NZS 1337 shall be worn at all times.

In determining appropriate eye protection, consideration shall be given to:

lenses that could minimise the effects of arc and flash

non-conductive frames

 side shields or ‘wrap around’ designs.

Arc flash rated head protection shall be worn at all times when:

there is a potential for exposure to electrical arc hazards (unless other measures are applied that control the risk)

risk assessment identifies the need.

Hearing protection in accordance with AS/NZS 1270 shall be worn at all times when:

there is an increased likelihood of explosion occurring due to the electrical work being undertaken

as a minimum, hearing protection shall be an ear plug type.

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– Personal Protective

Equipment for Electrical Workers

Underclothes

Additional

Requirements

It is recommended that underclothes made of natural fibres (i.e. cotton) should be worn underneath arc flash rated clothing as high temperatures of arc flash will melt some fibres.

Whilst performing electrical work in the vicinity of live electrical equipment, metallic bracelets, rings, neck chains, metal zips, or watches, shall not be worn.

Before performing electrical work requiring PPE described as Cat 1, 2 or 3 in

Table 2, all other items of outer clothing not made of natural fibres shall be removed for the duration of the task.

4 Inspection and Testing of PPE

All PPE shall be visibly inspected immediately prior to use for signs of damage, deterioration and legibility of markings. Where applicable, the due date for tests shall be checked to ensure currency.

5 PPE Usage Guide

The degree of risk associated with electrical work depends on the likelihood of an arc flash, potential arc flash energy and separation from the conductor. The selection of PPE is therefore based on risk.

The guide below represents the basic PPE requirements. Every situation shall be assessed individually, and the potential for harm assessed. To simplify the considerations, the PPE selection has been grouped according to the likely available arc fault energy based on the transformer size supplying the switchboard(s) in an area. When considering risk, the user should take into account the size of the supply transformer, the protective devices, their rating, the type of work to be undertaken, the age of the installation and the components history in making a choice. Every installation has the potential to be a threat to the safe execution of work, so as the threat increases, so should the level of PPE selected.

The recommendations in Table 2 represent the minimum level PPE requirement for that category of activity.

The level of PPE may be increased if special conditions or circumstances require it. Each individual taking part in electrical work shall be aware of these requirements and consult the table to select an appropriate mitigation level, ensuring they are adequately protected for the period of the activity.

PPE shall be selected to provide a level of protection where no harm will be sustained should an unplanned event take place.

Encumbering PPE may be removed only if a full isolation of the equipment has been completed, and it has been locked, tagged, and proven with tests, to be de-energised.

6 PPE Category Descriptions

Cat 0:

Heavy cotton or flame retardant clothing, safety shoes, safety glasses.

Cat 1:

Flame retardant clothing, flame retardant gloves, safety shoes, safety glasses.

Cat 2:

Flame retardant clothing, flame retardant gloves, safety shoes, flame retardant hood (cap type).

Cat 3:

Flame retardant clothing, flame retardant gloves, safety shoes, switching jacket (20 cal), switching hood (helmet type), ear protection (plugs).

or

Heavy cotton clothing, flame retardant gloves, safety shoes, switching jacket (40 cal), switching hood (helmet type), ear protection (plugs).

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S022 Appendix D

– Personal Protective

Equipment for Electrical Workers

The following table refers to minimum PPE required for specific electrical activities.

Table 2 - Minimum PPE for Specific Electrical Activities

Activity

(Notes 1 and 5)

LV < 300 kVA

(Note 4)

External inspection Cat 0

LV ≥ 300 kVA

(Note 4)

Cat 1

HV (> 1 kV)

(Note 2)

Cat 1 (note 3)

Testing ancillaries (note 6)

Inspecting - Internal

Switching (note 2)

Testing low energy power circuits (note 6)

Testing main power circuits (note 6)

Earthing

Cat 1

Cat 1

Cat 1

Cat 1

Cat 2

Cat 2

Cat 1

Cat 2

Cat 2

Cat 1

Cat 3

Cat 3

Cat 1 (note 3)

Cat 2 (note 3)

Cat 3

N/A

N/A

Cat 3

Activity Definitions

The following definitions of activities all relate to when a worker is potentially exposed to live conductors:

External Inspection: Visual inspection of operational equipment with doors or panels open. No part of the body enters the confines of the switchboard.

Internal Inspection:

Any part of the worker’s body entering the switchboard space to observe functional operation of electrical components.

Switching: Changing the operational state of a functional unit i.e. isolator, fuse switch, disconnector, circuit breaker, manual spring charger, integral earth mechanisms, fuse insertion/removal.

Testing ancillaries: Com missioning or maintenance live testing and fault finding of control circuits ≤240 V ac or ≤110 V dc.

Testing low energy power circuits:

On low energy circuits ≤ 15 kW (30 amps) – commissioning or maintenance testing of live circuits, live fault finding, removing fuses or links, phasing out, testing for dead.

Testing main power circuits: On high energy circuits > 15 kW (30 amps) - commissioning or maintenance testing of live circuits live fault finding, removing fuses or links, phasing out, testing for dead.

Earthing: Application of portable earths after isolation.

Note: Whenever covers are removed from switchboards, thereby significantly increasing the risk of exposure to arc flash, site access shall be controlled to prevent unauthorised entry.

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S022 Appendix D

– Personal Protective

Equipment for Electrical Workers

Subject to undertaking a Safe Job Planning Assessment, a minimum of Cat 0 PPE may be considered sufficient protection when working within dedicated Control Panels (i.e. SCADA, Fire Monitoring panel,

Instrumentation panel, Security panels) and similar situations where the power supply is less than 250 V single phase and protected by a fuse or circuit breaker rated not greater than 20 Amps.

Explanatory Notes:

Note 1 Activities that inherently contain additional risk are to be controlled. In such cases, required outcomes shall be planned to ensure all steps are only undertaken with the switchboard, conductors or associated panels isolated. Examples are removal of covers from compartments containing live conductors, direct connection of test equipment to high energy conductors (without suitable arc fault limiting devices), operating energised devices while doors are open, demounting

MCC compartments, insertion or removal (racking) of CBs or devices while doors are open.

Note 2 All HV activities and testing must be undertaken as per the requirements of WC-OSH 118 High

Voltage Switching Practice (ME-2) . Also note that some switching activities require the use of HV rated insulating gloves. Refer to ME-2 for details.

Note 3 Activities associated with HV switchboards assumes that there are no live HV conductors within the space to be inspected. However, conductors in adjacent compartments may potentially be live.

Note 4 The transformer size selected is indicative of a nominal fault current of 10kA

Note 5

Cat 2 (or Cat 3 PPE for ≥ 300 kVA) shall be adopted for any work inside walk-in switchboards. All work in this circumstance is considered a higher risk due to the lack of protection from exposed conductors.

Note 6 Insulating gloves are also required due to the risk of unintended contact with live electrical equipment.

7 Preselected Electrical PPE

Below is the general description for Flame Retardant clothing and other PPE required to be used in

combinations to meet the Categories described in Section 6. The range of PPE has been chosen to exceed

the minimum requirements of Australian Standards and to also comply with the Flame Retardant properties defined in American Standard NFPA 70E 2009.

The clothing shall be selected from the Water Corporation Corporate Clothing, Electrical Workwear

Catalogue as published by Procurement Branch. Abbreviated descriptions are as follows:

Flame Retardant Shirt

Flame Retardant Shirt

– plain - 6.4 cal/cm²

– with silver reflective tape - 6.4 cal/cm²

Flame Retardant Trousers

Flame Retardant Trousers

– plain – 12.7 cal/cm²

– with silver reflective tape – 12.7 cal/cm²

Flame Retardant Safety Vest - with silver reflective tape

Hood and Visor - Baseball Cap style, flame retardant with visor - 10 cal/cm²

Flame Retardant Switching Coat Banwear/UltraSoft Single Layer

Leggings Double Layer - 45 cal/cm²

– 20 cal/cm² with Switching

Flame Retardant Switching Coat Banwear/UltraSoft Double Layer

Leggings Double Layer - 45 cal/cm²

– 40 cal/cm² with Switching

Arc Protective Gloves 32.8 cal/cm2 (leather) - 45 cal/cm²

Switching Hood Double Layer

– 40 cal/cm²

Insulating Gloves rated for 1000 V

– (Water Corporation Procurement MMR 19898)

Notes:

1. The design of the PPE selection is for electrical workers who are frequently working in a situation that requires Category 1 PPE to be issued flame retardant PPE instead of cotton drill as their daily work wear.

2. Staff wearing flame retardant PPE may use the 20 cal/cm² switching jacket combination where Cat 3

PPE is required.

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3. Staff wearing cotton drill work wear will need to use the 40 cal/cm²switching jacket combination where

Cat 3 PPE is required.

4.

It has been noted that the day/night reflective tape decreases the comfort level of the clothing.

Depending on their individual circumstances, staff may choose to select the plain shirt and use a flame retardant reflective safety vest when required.

Note: Some mine sites are known to mandate that all clothing must include non-removable reflective tape in the clothing. This may affect some employees’ choice.

8 Definitions

Term

Approved

Competent Person

Conductor

De-energised

Electrical Apparatus

Electrical Work

Earthed

Energised

Exposed Conductor

Flame Retardant

Hierarchy of Controls

High Voltage (HV)

Isolated (electrical)

Live

Low Voltage (LV)

Near

Overhead Line

Safe Approach Distance

Shall

Should

Description

Having appropriate organisation endorsement in writing for a specific function.

A person who has acquired through training, qualification or experience, or a combination of those things, the knowledge and skills required to do that thing competently.

Any conductor forming part of an electrical apparatus, which under normal operating conditions is live (the neutral connections of the electrical apparatus shall also be included).

Separated from all sources of supply but not necessarily isolated, earthed, discharged or out of commission.

Any electrical equipment, including overhead conductors, cables, transformers, switchgear and electric motors, the conductors of which can be made, or are, live.

Work involving the operation of switching devices, links, fuses or other connections intended for ready removal or replacement, proving electrical conductors are de-energised, earthing and/or short-circuiting, testing and inspecting live electrical apparatus, locking and/or tagging of electrical apparatus and erection of barriers and/or signs.

Where any electrical apparatus has been electrically connected to the earth mass effectively, ensuring a low impedance, immediate, and continuous discharge path for electrical energy.

Connected to a source of electrical supply or subject to hazardous induced or capacitive voltages.

An electrical conductor, the approach to which is not prevented by a barrier of rigid material or by insulation that is adequate under a relevant Australian Standard specification for the voltage concerned.

Having properties that suppress or delay the combustion or propagation of flame.

The preferred order of control measures for OHS risks:

Elimination: e.g. controlling the hazard at source.

Substitution: e.g. replacing one substance or activity with a less hazardous one.

Engineering: e.g. installing guards on machinery.

Administration: e.g. policies and procedures for safe work practices.

Personal Protective Equipment: e.g. respirators, ear plugs.

A nominal voltage exceeding 1,000 volts (V) alternating current (A.C.) or exceeding 1,500 V direct current (D.C.).

Disconnected from all possible sources of electricity supply and rendered incapable of being made energised without premeditated and deliberate action.

Energised or subject to hazardous induced or capacitive voltages.

Nominal voltage exceeding 50 V A.C. or 120 V ripple free D.C. but not exceeding 1,000 V A.C. OR

1,500 V D.C.

A situation where there is a reasonable possibility of a person either directly or through a conducting medium, coming within the relevant safe approach distances.

Means any aerial conductor or conductors with associated supports, insulators and other apparatus erected, or in the course of erection, for the purpose of conveyance of electrical energy.

Means the minimum separation in air from an exposed conductor that shall be maintained by a person, or any object (other than insulated objects designed for contact with live conductors) held by or in contact with that person. These are detailed in ENA NENS 04 - 2006 National Guidelines for Safe Approach Distances to Electrical Apparatus.

A mandatory requirement.

Recommended, but not mandatory.

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S022 Appendix D

– Personal Protective

Equipment for Electrical Workers

9 Compliance Mapping

Task

Personal Protective

Equipment for Electrical

Workers

Legislation

Electricity Act 1945

Electricity Regulations 1947

Code of Practice: Managing Electrical Risks in the Workplace

AS/NZS 1270 Acoustics

– Hearing Protectors

AS/NZS 1336 Eye and Face Protection - Guidelines

AS/NZS 1337 Eye Protectors for Industrial Applications

AS 2210.1: Safety, Protective and Occupational Footwear

– Guide to Selection

AS 2225 Insulating Gloves for Electrical Purposes

AS/NZS 4863 Safe working on or near low-voltage electrical installations and equipment

IEC 61482-1-1 Ed. 1.0 2009 Live Working

– Protective Clothing against the Thermal Hazards of an

Electric Arc

10 References

Document Number

WC-OSH 118

S022

Title

High Voltage Switching Practice ME-2

Personal Protective Equipment and Clothing

Electrical Workwear Catalogue

Document Revision History

9 Jan 2013 New document.

13 Jan 2014

28 Nov 2014

Removed clause relating to introduction of electrical PPE requirements. Transition period has ended.

Appendix E PPE for electrical workers has been updated to make it clearer which specific electrical activities require Insulating Gloves to be worn under Arc Protective Gloves.

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S022 Appendix E

– Personal Protective

Equipment for Chemical Dosing Facilities

Appendix E Personal Protective Equipment for Chemical Dosing

Facilities

1 Purpose

This appendix defines the minimum Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) requirements for personnel entering or approaching chemical dosing facilities. The use of PPE in such an environment is a low level control used to manage the risks associated with unplanned exposure to chemicals.

2 Scope

The requirements of this appendix apply to Water Corporation employees and contractors who are required to enter and or approach a Water Corporation chemical dosing facility.

A chemical dosing facility is an operational asset where process chemical dosing takes place, including the associated storage areas.

The requirements of this appendix apply when conducting activities at chemical dosing facilities that require:

Entering a chemical dosing room

Coming within 5 metres of: o Pressurised pipework that contains a chemical at a hazardous concentration (identified by labelling or colour coding) o Mixing or pouring of chemicals from an open container with a volume of 3L or greater o A chemical delivery that involves making or breaking connections, such as tanker deliveries

Being beneath overhead pipework that contains a chemical at a hazardous concentration (refer to Section 14 Figure 1)

Note: Pressurised pipework does not include ground based storage tanks or pipework subject to only

tank head pressure (i.e. pipework on the suction side of pumps).

Note: The required level of PPE for mixing or pouring from an open container with volume less than 3L

must be determined and documented as part of the risk assessment by referencing the PPE controls for

the chemical noted in the SDS.

3 Standard - PPE for Chemical Dosing Facilities

The required level of PPE for entering a chemical dosing facility shall be determined by reviewing the requirements set out in this appendix and the Liquid Corrosive Chemical PPE Selection chart . These PPE requirements shall be included in the site induction.

If there is a conflict between the guidance in this appendix and the SDS for the relevant substance, operators shall seek guidance from a Dangerous Goods Coordinator or OSH Coordinator/Advisor.

The PPE requirements for chemical dosing facilities depend on the substances that are used within that facility and the task to be performed. There are four categories of chemical dosing facilities:

Chemical Dosing Facilities with Non-Hazardous Substances.

Chemical Dosing Facilities with Hazardous Substances that are not Liquid Corrosives.

Chemical Dosing Facilities with Chlorine or Ammonia Gas.

Chemical Dosing Facilities with Liquid Corrosives.

Where a chemical dosing facility has a mixture of substances, the higher PPE requirements shall apply.

Prior to conducting work at a chemical dosing facility the Responsible Person must determine the PPE requirements applicable to the scope of work. The required PPE is to be identified and documented when conducting a risk assessment of the work:

Water Corporation Employees must complete a JSEA or Step back form in accordance with

WC-OSH 007 Safe Job Planning

Contractors must follow their Risk Assessment process (eg: JSEA) as detailed within their approved Project HSE Management Plan.

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Equipment for Chemical Dosing Facilities

Note: The use of PPE is only one of several controls that should be used to protect workers from chemicals.

3.1 Entry to Chemical Dosing Facilities with Non-Hazardous Substances

Non-hazardous substances can cause harm under certain conditions. Examples of commonly used chemicals that are classified as non-hazardous substances used at Water Corporation include:

Polyelectrolyte

Sodium Hexametaphosphate (Calgon)

Sodium Bicarbonate

The required level of PPE for working in a chemical dosing facility that contains non-hazardous substances must be determined and documented during the risk assessment by referencing the PPE controls for the chemical noted in the SDS.

3.2 Entry to Chemical Dosing Facilities with Hazardous Substances that are not

Corrosives

Examples of hazardous substances that are not classified as “liquid corrosives’ and are used at Water

Corporation include:

Potassium Permanganate Powder

Sodium Nitrate Powder

Sodium Carbonate Powder

Sodium fluoride Powder

Sodium Fluorosilicate Powder

The required level of PPE for working in a chemical dosing facility that contains hazardous substances that are not classified as ‘corrosives’ must be determined and documented as part of the risk assessment by referencing the PPE controls for the chemical noted in the SDS.

Note:

some hazardous substances (including the powders aforementioned) can become a liquid corrosive once in solution form, and therefore the PPE requirements for liquid corrosives apply.

For example: Potassium Permanganate is only a hazardous substance in powder form, however, once a solution strength of ~3% (or more) is made its classification then changes to a corrosive liquid.”

3.3 Entry to Chemical Dosing Facilities with Chlorine or Ammonia Gas

The minimum PPE requirements for chemical dosing facilities containing chlorine or ammonia are to be identified and documented during the risk assessment and meet the following requirements:

Operating valves, moving containers

– minimum operational site PPE (Refer to Table 1) plus

mechanical rated gloves (EN 388 rated).

Making/breaking connections

– minimum operational site PPE (Refer to Table 1) plus respiratory

protection (as specified by Chlorine procedures and work instructions) and nitrile gloves.

Entering chlorine module dosing room (wet room)

– minimum operational site PPE (Refer to Table

1) plus face shield.

Other Activities

– minimum operational site PPE (Refer to Table 1) plus additional PPE determined

and documented during the risk assessment process (JSEA or Step back).

Chlorine 1ppm and 5ppm Alarm investigation

– As specified by the Chlorine Alarm Investigation

Procedure, Self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA), Coveralls, PVC Boots, Chemical rated gloves

(EN 374 rated with letter rating K and L)

Note: PPE requirements associated with Ammonia gas cylinders are similar to those for chlorine, although a

different respirator canister type shall be used. Refer to the Liquid Corrosive Chemical PPE Selection chart

for more information on canister selection

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S022 Appendix E

– Personal Protective

Equipment for Chemical Dosing Facilities

3.4 Entry to Chemical Dosing Facilities with Liquid Corrosives

Examples of liquid corrosives that are used at the Water Corporation include:

Aluminium Sulphate (Alum)

Sodium Hydroxide (Caustic)

Fluorosilicic Acid (FSA)

Sodium Hypochlorite (Hypo)

Sulphuric Acid

Citric Acid

For chemical facilities that contain liquid corrosives (other than chlorine or ammonia gas), the minimum level

of PPE to be worn is to be identified during the risk assessment by referencing Table 3. This table

categorises PPE requirements into category A, B, C or D for the facility based on a combination of the:

Current operational status of the facility and

Activities to be undertaken by personnel.

Where a chemical dosing facility has a mixture of contained (e.g. wrapped) and uncontained pipework or

pressurised and non-pressurised pipework the higher PPE requirement as per Table 3 shall apply.

Chemical resistant gloves for liquid corrosives must meet EN 374 (European standard for protective gloves against chemical and micro-organism hazards) indicated by the symbol below with the letter rating K and L:

Note: Refer Liquid Corrosive Chemical PPE Poster for more information

4 Determining PPE requirements for overhead pipes

Within this appendix the term ‘overhead’ pipes refers to pipes that are above head height and within a certain proximity to the person. A pipe is only categorised as being overhead if it:

Is any height above the head of the person AND

Within 5 metres either side of the person

Figure 1: Visual representation of overhead pipes

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S022 Appendix E

– Personal Protective

Equipment for Chemical Dosing Facilities

5 PPE Concession for Chemical Dosing Facilities

If a deviation from the minimum requirement set out in this Appendix is required, refer to Management of

Concessions from HSEAA Requirements Procedure .

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S022 Appendix E

– Personal Protective Equipment for Chemical Dosing

Facilities

Table 3 Chemical Dosing Facilities with liquid Corrosives-Additional PPE Requirements

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Required

Current Operational State

Operational Activities examples

Chemical

Face Shield

PLUS Safety

Glasses or

Goggles

Chemical resistant

Gloves

Impervious

Coveralls

KL rating

Apron

PVC

Boots

Respiratory Protection

1

A

B

C

There are no corrosive chemicals present within piping or associated infrastructure.

OR

Corrosive chemicals are present within piping or associated infrastructure, but operator entry is to viewing room only or more than 5 metres from pressurised chemical pipework.

The facility is in operational or shut-down state.

Corrosive chemicals are present.

AND

There is no suspected or confirmed leak.

AND

Operator protected by barrier protection / wrapping.

The facility is in operational or shut-down state.

Corrosive chemicals are present.

AND

There is no suspected or confirmed leak.

AND

Operator is not protected by barrier protection or wrapping.

 Entry to viewing room only

Being more than 5 metres from pressurised pipework

New plant that has not had any chemical delivered.

Delivery and handling of sealed containers of chemical

Being within 5 metres of pressurised pipework, where barrier protection and or wrapping are installed

Being underneath overhead chemical pipework where barrier protection and or wrapping are installed

Operator activity does not involve making/breaking connections.

Operator activity can be completed while protected by a barrier protection

Being within 5m of pressurised pipework , where barrier protection and or wrapping are not installed or have been temporarily removed

Being underneath overhead pipework where barrier protection and or wrapping are not installed or have been temporarily removed

Operator activity does not involve making/breaking connections.

Operator activity cannot be completed while protected by a barrier protection. (e.g. Adjust pump, Manual valve operation, Calibration tube dosing check )

 Mechanical pumping of chemicals from open containers (excludes tanker deliveries) or decanting with the use of a mechanical aid

Normal operational site PPE requirements apply.

Or

Coveralls

For Mechanical pumping check SDS

D

The facility is in operational or shut-down state.

Corrosive chemicals are present.

OR

The reason for entering the facility could expose the entrant(s) to chemicals, chemical containers or process infrastructure that is pressurised.

OR

Accidental loss of containment or spill would expose the entrant(s) to the chemical or hazardous fumes.

Chemical deliveries involving making or breaking connections (like tanker deliveries)

Manual decanting (Pouring) of chemicals from open containers having a volume of 3L or greater

Any activity that involves making/breaking connections

Leak identification, spill neutralization & disposal, major spill recovery.

Or Respiratory

Protection

 

Note: (1) Refer to Appendix G for specific requirements related to the use, maintenance and wearing of SCBA and full face canisters

Manual Decanting (Pouring) – Check SDS

Either SCBA

1

or a full-face canister respirator

(Inorganic & acid cartridge) for:

Leak identification

Minor leak neutralization and disposal

ONLY SCBA

1

for:

Significant leak neutralization and disposal

Recovering the chemical from a major leak.

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S022 Appendix E

– Personal Protective

Equipment for Chemical Dosing Facilities

6 Definitions

Term

Chemical Dosing Facilities

Corrosive Liquid

Hazardous Substance

Overhead pipe

Self-Contained Breathing

Apparatus (SCBA)

Description

Operational assets where process chemical dosing takes place, and includes the associated storage areas.

A liquid defined by an SDS as having at least one of the following health statements: H314

(Causes severe skin burns and eye damage), H315 (Causes skin irritation), H318 (Causes serious eye damage), H319 (Causes serious eye irritation)

A substance that has the potential, through being used at work, to harm the health or safety of persons in the workplace. A SDS will state whether a substance is classified as hazardous or nonhazardous.

A pipe that is any height above the head of the person AND within 5 metres either side of the

person. Refer to Figure 1.

A safety data sheet (SDS), previously called a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS), is a document that provides information on the properties of hazardous chemicals, how they affect health and safety in the workplace and on how to manage the hazardous chemicals in the workplace

A self-contained system, not dependent on a remote supply of air. Includes closed circuit

‘rebreathers’ and open circuit systems, consisting of a high-pressure tank (e.g. 2,216 to 4,500 psi

(15,280 to 31,000 kPa)), a pressure regulator, and an inhalation connection (mouthpiece, mouth mask or face mask), connected together and carried/worn by the operator.

7 References

Document Number

WC-OSH 007

Title

Corrosive Chemical PPE Selection chart

Dangerous Goods Management System

Liquid Corrosive Chemical PPE Poster

Safe Job Planning

Document Revision History

21 May 2014

17 Jun 2014

Original version. Refer to MOC #9269724.

Amendment to Table 3. Clarified the difference between Category B and C.

19 May 2015 Amended to include the provision of Chemical resistant coveralls and the introduction of double eye protection for liquid corrosive sites where pipes and other infrastructure is not covered by reliable screens or barriers

(compliant with DS 79.3) Refer to MOC# 12038879.

13 June 2017 Include clarification around PPE requirements in Chemical Dosing Facilities (Appendix E) and update posters.

Remove PPE risk assessment variance and align with Management of HSEAA concessions Procedure.

MOC#16652202

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S022 Appendix F

– SCBA and Canister

Respirator Use

Appendix F SCBA and Canister Respirator Use

1 Purpose

This standard defines requirements for personnel using self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or canister respirators.

2 Scope

This standard applies to Water Corporation personnel and contractors who are required to store and/or use self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or full face canister respirators.

3 Roles and Responsibilities

Role

Supervisor / Line Manager

Employees

Responsibility

Shall ensure that personnel who are required to use SCBA in the course of their work are trained and competent. Shall instruct personnel as to the proper use, cleaning, maintenance, storage and limitations of SCBA.

Shall ensure that there is a process in place for a SCBA-trained person to conduct a monthly

‘low-pressure test’ on each SCBA set within their area of responsibility.

Where required to be competent in SCBA and canister respirator use as part of their position, shall be clean-shaven.

4 Training

Supervisors shall ensure that personnel who are required to use SCBA in the course of their work (e.g. for the operation or maintenance of chlorine systems, or don SCBA associated with emergency response actions) hold the following qualification (or equivalent to meet the national unit of competency

MSAPMOHS216A - Operate Breathing Apparatus).

Water Corporation training records shall be maintained in accordance with Section 6. Contractors shall be

responsible for maintaining employee training records.

Course Name Mandatory for Roles Description Period of Validity

SCBA

– Operate

Breathing Apparatus

SAP #Q10010450

Persons required to use SCBA in connection with chlorine or other purposes.

Demonstrate an ability to operate, use and maintain a Self-Contained

Breathing Apparatus (SCBA).

This course is associated with a national unit of competency:

MSAPMOHS216A- Operate

Breathing Apparatus

2 years

Supervisors shall instruct personnel who use canister respirators in the course of their work in its proper use, cleaning, maintenance, storage and limitations.

5 Standard

– SCBA and Canister Respirator Use

SCBA and Canister Respirator use for chlorine or other chemical installations shall comply with the requirements of relevant work instructions from the

Dangerous Goods Management System

.

5.1 Facial Hair

Personnel who are required to be competent in SCBA and canister respirator use as part of their position, shall be clean-shaven, such that a proper seal can be obtained between the face and face-mask - i.e. beards, large side burns, large moustaches etc. shall not be permitted. Refer to AS1715 Selection, Use and

Maintenance of Respiratory Protective Devices for further detail.

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S022 Appendix F

– SCBA and Canister

Respirator Use

5.2 Medical Assessment

Water Corporation personnel who are required to use SCBA to enter and work within confined spaces and/or potentially hazardous atmospheres shall undergo an initial medical assessment. Confined Spaces may include sewers, wet wells, tanks, pits, pipes and water mains. Hazardous atmospheres may include chlorine, toxic gases and/or insufficient levels of oxygen.

For new job applicants or current employees transferring to a dissimilar job role within the Water Corporation, the initial medical assessment will be in the form of the Pre-Placement Health Assessment (PPHA) administered by the Human Resources Branch. The PPHA is a comprehensive assessment of fitness for task and includes a medical review and functional capacity assessment aligned with the requirements of the

Job Task Profile for the role.

Following this initial medical certification of fitness, ongoing medical certification of fitness is undertaken (as required) when employees complete the SCBA

– Operate Breathing Apparatus training course. The

Trainer Provider coordinates the completion of the following forms:

Employee Self-Assessment - completed by the employee at the start of the training course.

Trainer’s observations

- completed by the trainer after practical demonstration.

Completed forms are retained by the Training Provider. If either form indicates a requirement for further medical certification of fitness, the trainer conveys this information to the relevant Water Corporation Line

Manager who will then arrange for the employee to be reviewed by their treating GP using the Medical

Certification of Fitness - SCBA

form. The completed form shall be retained in accordance with Section 6.

Contractors shall have a process in place to ensure that personnel are fit to undertake work using SCBA.

5.3 Replacement and Disposal of Canisters

Personnel shall use a permanent marker to date and initial new canisters upon fitting. Canisters which have been subjected to notable chemical exposure, or which have been in use for three (3) months, shall be replaced (canister filters discarded).

5.4 SCBA Cylinder Refill

Following use, any SCBA compressed air cylinder with less than nominally 25 minutes supply of breathing air shall be re-filled.

Note: AS1715 Selection, Use and Maintenance of Respiratory Protective Devices requires bottles to be recharged before their contents have dropped below 80% of full working pressure. As bottles larger than 30 minutes are now in use (e.g. 45 minute sets) the Department of Mines and Petroleum have agreed that air supply time is the critical issue rather than the percentage filled.

5.5 SCBA Low Pressure Test (audible alarm)

Line Managers of personnel who use SCBA sets shall ensure that there is a process in place for a SCBAtrained person to conduct a monthly ‘low-pressure test’ on each SCBA set. Additionally, prior to each use, personnel issued with an SCBA set shall conduct their own

‘low pressure test’ having assembled the set and prior to donning.

5.6 SCBA Maintenance and Inspection

SCBA sets shall be inspected and serviced annually in accordance with manufacturers

’ recommendations and a record kept by the service provider. Water Corporation maintenance records shall be kept in

accordance with Section 6.

Face masks shall be cleaned prior to and after each use by use of sanitising wipes or cleansing solution.

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S022 Appendix F

– SCBA and Canister

Respirator Use

5.7 Fit Checking / Testing of Facemasks

As part of SCBA training, the appropriate size and fit of the SCBA for the employee is determined (fit check).

Line Managers shall ensure that personnel are provided with appropriately sized facemasks.

All negative pressure respirators (including disposable masks, half-face mask and full face masks) shall be fit tested in accordance with WC-OSH 212 Occupational Hygiene .

Contractors shall have a process to ‘fit check’ or ‘fit test’ facemasks (as appropriate) in accordance with

AS/NZS 1715.

5.8 Storage of SCBA and Canister Respirators

SCBA and canister respirators shall be stored in accordance with the manufactures

’ recommendations so as to avoid unnecessary degradation.

5.9 Speech Diaphragms

All SCBAs and canister respirators shall be equipped with speech diaphragms, in order to allow communication between personnel whilst respiratory protection is being worn.

6 Records

Records shall be filed in accordance with the Water Corporation Records Retention and Disposal Schedule , with the filing convention, retention period and disposition type outlined below:

Record To be retained by Filing convention

Medical Certification of

Fitness

– SCBA form

SCBA service records

Training and

Competency records

Human Resources

Section manager of the work area

SAP

HUMAN

RESOURCES -

Personal

SUPPLY AND

SUPPLIERS -

Maintenance n/a

Retained for (time period)

Interim 3 years after last action

2 years after last action n/a

Disposition

Type

Destroy File after 56 years

Destroy 7 years after last action n/a

Branch Manager STAFF

DEVELOPMENT -

Training

2 years after last action

Destroy 7 years after last action

7 Definitions

Term

Canister respirator

Facial Fit Check

Facial Fit Test

Self-Contained

Breathing Apparatus

(SCBA)

Description

Consists of a replaceable filter canister which screws into a full-face or half- face mask.

A simple check to ensure the respirator fits each time it is worn.

A validated method of matching a respirator to an individual.

A self-contained system, not dependent on a remote supply of air. Includes closed circuit ‘rebreathers’ and open circuit systems, consisting of a highpressure tank (e.g. 2,216 to 4,500 psi (15,280 to 31,000 kPa)), a pressure regulator, and an inhalation connection (mouthpiece, mouth mask or face mask), connected together and carried/worn by the operator..

8 References

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S022 Appendix F

– SCBA and Canister

Respirator Use

Document Number

WC-OSH 212

Title

Dangerous Goods Management System .

Employee Self-Assessment

Medical Certification of Fitness - SCBA Form

Occupational Hygiene

Trainer’s observations

9 Compliance Mapping

Task Compliance

Personal Protective

Equipment and Clothing

AS/NZS 1715 Selection, Use and Maintenance of Respiratory Protective

Devices

AS/NZS 1716 Respiratory Protective Devices

Document Revision History

9 May 2014 Original version. Refer to MOC #9269724.

21 May 2014

Correction to ‘Medical Assessment’ requirements. Refer to MOC #10861517.

11 Feb 2015 Clarification on SCBA medical assessment requirements and fit test/ fit check processes.

Refer to MOC 10858000

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