1 g 85 “L59
USOO7742609B2
(12) United States Patent
(10) Patent N0.2
Yeakel et a1.
(54)
(75)
(45) Date of Patent:
LIVE PERFORMANCE AUDIO MIXING
5,027,689 A *
SYSTEM WITH SIMPLIFIED USER
INTERFACE
5,153,829 A
5,212,733 A
Inventors; Nathan YeakeL Sunnyvale, CA (Us);
Jeffrey Vallier, Sunnyvale, CA (US)
(73) Assignee: Gibson Guitar Corp., Nashville, TN
(US)
(*)
Notice:
Jun. 22, 2010
7/1991 Fujimori .................... .. 84/622
10/1992 Furuya et al.
5/1993 DeVitt et al.
5,390,295 A *
2/1995
5,524,060 A *
6/1996 Silfvast et al. ............ .. 381/104
Bates et al. ............... .. 715/789
5,526,456 A
6/ 1996 HeiIIZ
5,559,301 A *
9/1996
5,608,807 A
3/1997 Brunelle
5,739,454 A *
4/1998
5,740,436 A
4/1998 Davis et a1.
7/ 1998 Kentish et al.
Bryan, Jr. et al. ........... .. 84/653
Kunimoto .................. .. 84/615
Subject to any disclaimer, the term of this
5,778,417 A
patent is extended or adjusted under 35
5,812,688 A *
9/1998 Gibson ..................... .. 381/119
U.S.C. 154(b) by Odays.
6,031,529 A *
2/2000 Migosetal. .............. .. 715/783
(21) Appl- NO-I 10/406,620
(22) Filed:
US 7,742,609 B2
6,067,072 A
5/2000 Fujishita et al.
6,118,883 A
9/2000 Rocha
Apr. 3, 2003
(Continued)
(65)
Prior Publication Data
US 2004/0030425 A1
Feb. 12, 2004
OTHER PUBLICATIONS
Website Publication 0finn0vas0n.com dated Jan. 30, 2003.
R1 th.S.A
e a 6
1'
t'
PP lea Ion
D t
a a
Primary ExamineriVivian Chin
(60) Provisional application No. 60/370,872, ?led on Apr.
Assiszanz ExamineriDouglas Suthers
8, 2002-
74 Allorney, A [email protected], 0r FirmiBates & Bates, LLC
(51) Int. Cl.
H04B 1/00
(57)
H04B 1/20
(52)
58
ABSTRACT
(2006.01)
(
2006.01
G10H 1/00
(2006.01)
)
A
digital audio mixing system
for live performance venues
.
.
.
G06F 17/00
(2006.01)
G06F 3/16
(2006.01)
1nternal d1g1tal s1gnal processor to perform d1g1tal m1x1ng
1ncludes a software user 1nterface and system host PC W1th an
.
fu
US. Cl. ....................... .. 381/119; 381/118; 700/94;
F M f Cl
( )
_?
S
369/3; 369/4; 715/727; 715/728
.
t
.
1 d
1 h
.
.
.
.
f
m?ftilolgs(oufhs?rilgnmgi:1:15:ail?ocinizlnfngnmgdzr
P
.
P y
.
P
g
le 0381/3581 gitlggo/gzra?m 728’
host PC, and an audio patch bay unit. One or more stage boxes
_
’
’ 715/71’6_’ 8 4/ 6 47 4T77 R’
?l f
ee app Icanon
(56)
h
.
board (tact1le) control surfaces operat1vely connected to the
1,
s
.
Th
381/1 19
’
_
.
t.
1
’ h h,
e or comp ete seam
’
are linked to each other and to the system host PC by wired or
wireless connections. The user interface includes multiple
lstory'
functional views and con?gurationpresets, displayed in setup
References Cited
and real time modes, to allow the user to operate the system in
a user friendly and simpli?ed environment.
US. PATENT DOCUMENTS
4,792,974 A
12/1988 Chace
16 Claims, 5 Drawing Sheets
1(8):
1(8):
-®-
I
015) [email protected]
1
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.
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g 85 “L59
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US 7,742,609 B2
Page 2
US. PATENT DOCUMENTS
_
6,140,565 A
6,169,540 B1
6,281,420 B1
10/2000 Yamauchl et a1.
1/2001 Rosenberg et a1.
8/2001 Suzuki et a1.
6,353,169 B1
3/2002 Juszkiewicz et a1.
6,359,632 B1
3/2002 Eastty et :11.
6,490,359 B1
* cited by examiner
12/2002 Gibson
US. Patent
Jun. 22, 2010
Sheet 1 0f5
US 7,742,609 B2
UMX CONFIGURATION
22
22
T
_
I10
12
HOST PC
M
@QQQ
18
FIG. I
FIG. 2
‘6
US. Patent
Jun. 22, 2010
Sheet 2 0f5
US 7,742,609 B2
22
2A
DRUM
|N
CYM
@@
/ “é
1A
KICK
OH VOX
MON
OTHER
US. Patent
®
Jun. 22, 2010
(X)
Sheet 3 0f5
US 7,742,609 B2
:(E):
(E)
m
.J%g%
1
@@
XE):
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1(3):
LSTART I lines]! Aux
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FIG. 5
US. Patent
Jun. 22, 2010
Sheet 4 0f5
US 7,742,609 B2
FIG.6
US. Patent
Jun. 22, 2010
Sheet 5 0f5
US 7,742,609 B2
US 7,742,609 B2
1
2
LIVE PERFORMANCE AUDIO MIXING
SYSTEM WITH SIMPLIFIED USER
INTERFACE
powerful interface providing the mo st powerful digital mixer
This application claims bene?t of co-pending US. Patent
Provisional Patent Application Serial No. 60/370,872, ?led
ware user interface, system host PC running on a WIN
features controlled by a simple to use software front end.
In accordance with one embodiment of the invention, a
system in accordance with the invention will include a soft
DOWS-based operating system and with an internal digital
Apr. 8, 2002, entitled “Live Performance Audio Mixing Sys
signal processor (DSP) card to perform digital mixing func
tem with Simpli?ed User Interface”, the disclosure of which
tions. In accordance with another aspect of the invention, the
system includes a system console having an array of multiple
LCD touch screen displays and a fader board (tactile) control
surface operatively connected to the host PC, and an audio
is hereby incorporated by reference.
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
patch bay unit. In a further embodiment of the system, one or
more stage boxes are linked to each other and to the system
host PC by wired or wireless connections. Each stage box and
The present invention relates to audio mixing systems.
More particularly, the present invention pertains to audio
mixing consoles and mixing systems for use in live perfor
mance applications.
Audio mixing consoles are used to control and adjust the
studio box contains a multi-channel analog audio interface,
analog-to-digital converters, and a wired or wireless digital
links to each other and to the system host PC. The stage boxes
audio characteristics and sound mix of audio signals gener
ated by musical instruments, microphones, and like, as per
and studio boxes are functionally the same as the system fader
board control surface and are used as interfaces to stage
ceived by listeners at live audio performances. In recent years,
20
analog mixing consoles (sometimes referred to simply as
“mixers”) used in live performance applications have been
supplanted by digital mixers. However, one of the single
biggest ?aws with conventional digital mixers is that their
user interfaces resemble their older analog predecessors. For
example, analog mixers use large arrays of mechanical and
electromechanical knobs and faders to allow the console
operators to individually adjust the audio characteristics asso
ciated with multiple audio sources and channels. Such arrays
are simply not necessary for a digital mixing product but their
use has not been entirely abandoned. With conventional digi
tal mixer user interfaces, an experienced audio profes sional is
required to page through multiple layers of on-screen menus
to locate the desired feature on the mixer. This experience can
create even more frustration than operating a product contain
instruments, speakers, microphones, and the like (sometimes
collectively referred to as stage elements).
The system provides an improved control interface by
visually and functionally (in multiple functional views)
abstracting the channel strips found in prior art mixing con
25
30
soles. Accordingly, changing a variable in a mix is as simple
as selecting the stage element audio source (instrument,
microphone, or speaker) that the sound engineer wants to
change, and then selecting the audio parameter associated
with that stage element that needs adjustment. For example,
using the example summarized above for conventional sys
tems, the same problem can be handled by a sound engineer
at a system console as follows: The engineer taps the icon of
the guitar player’s monitor speakers on the touch screen. He
then selects “Select Bass Drum Mix List” and taps “Too
35
Boomy”. Finally, the engineer selects “Vocall” from the Mix
ing dedicated adjustment hardware. In addition, conventional
List and taps “Buried”. This causes the software in the mixing
digital mixer interfaces are confusing and not intuitive such
that to operate them e?iciently one must have extensive train
system to implement the adjustments electronically, without
the engineer having to scroll or page through layers of cryptic
ing in interpreting the displayed menus.
As an example of the ine?iciencies caused by extensive
menu layering and confusing digital mixer nomenclature, a
menus.
40
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
sound engineer at a live performance venue may notice that an
on stage guitar monitor has excessive audible “boom” on the
FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a typical arrangement of
system components in accordance with the system of the
invention.
bass drum and that the vocal is buried in the audio mix. Using
a conventional mixing system and user interface, the sound
engineer has to understand and recall which sub-mix the
FIG. 2 is front view of the touch screen array and fader
board control surface portions of the system of FIG. 1.
FIG. 3 is a block diagram showing a typical arrangement of
system stage boxes connected to the system host PC.
guitar player is on (assuming the guitar player has the luxury
of his own sub-mix). Further, the engineer has to recall from
memory which mixer input is associated the bass drum. The
engineer then has to ?nd the low frequency EQ knob and turn
50
system user interface.
FIG. 5 is a front view of a system touch screen display
showing the stage view portion of the user interface as seen
where the vocals come in, how they are mixed into the sub
mix, and then turn them up but not so much as to cause
feedback.
55
What is needed, then, is a digital audio mixing system for
use in live performance applications that provides a more
ef?cient and understandable user interface.
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
60
The audio mixing system of the present invention provides
during system setup and/or after appropriate stage elements
have been selected and arranged during system setup.
FIG. 6 is a front view of the touch screen display showing
the virtual console view portion of the system user interface.
FIG. 7 is a view of the touch screen display showing the
mixer functions view portion of the user interface.
DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED
EMBODIMENTS
an elegant answer to the need for an ef?cient and u ser-friendly
digital mixer and user interface for controlling audio associ
ated with a live ampli?ed performance. It provides a cost
effective solution to a problem mixing console designers have
attempted to solve for years. The heart of the system is a
FIG. 4 is a view of a portion of the system touch screen
display when using the “drum editor view” portion of the
it down, assuming this is possible without affecting the over
all house mix. Also, the sound engineer has to remember
65
FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a typical arrangement of
components in the audio mixing system of the invention. The
system 10 is controlled by a host PC (personal computer) 12.
US 7,742,609 B2
3
4
The host PC 12 is equipped with an internal PCI-based DSP
elements, i.e., the audio source and destination components,
(digital signal processor) card (not shown) where the actual
thereby affecting the “mix” or perceived sound coming from
the audio components on stage (stage elements). The stage
mixing functions are performed. The system 10 further
includes a system console 14 comprising a horizontal array of
multiple LCD touch screen displays 16 combined with cor
responding fader board tactile control surfaces 18. The com
ponents of console 14 are electronically coupled to the host
PC 12 so as to send mixing control signals to the host PC 12.
The mixing control signals are used by the DSP to vary audio
boxes 22 can provide operational connections to the stage
parameters associated with the various stage elements (audio
return or track from the hard drive on host PC 12.
elements as needed.
The system 10 of the invention can support 64 simulta
neous inputs and 32 simultaneous outputs. Each output can
have a custom mix of any or all of the inputs. Additionally,
there may be “soft” inputs. A soft input can be an auxiliary
source components and audio destination components) con
The host PC 12 and internal DSP are provided with soft
nected to the system 10. The host PC 12 is also operatively
connected to a console patch bay unit 20. The patch bay unit
20 has multiple inputs to receive audio signals from a plural
ity of different source audio components and multiple outputs
ware, including device drivers and Application Program
Interface (API) modules to seamlessly integrate all needed
mixing, recording, and DSP functions into the system 10. The
actual writing of the software to implement these functions is
conventional, as is the programming necessary to implement
to transmit audio signals to different audio destination com
ponents. Preferably, the host PC uses a WINDOWS-based
the novel user interface described herein.
operating system and includes software functional to imple
ment the novel user interface described below.
The stage portion of the system 10 will include one or more
The stage boxes 22 (and patch bay unit 20) are each a
l6-channel in, l6-channel out, professional quality analog
20
stage boxes 22 which are functionally equivalent to the con
interface for the system 10. In addition to being able to func
sole patch bay unit 20. In a preferred embodiment of the
system 10, the system components are interconnected using a
tion in a stand-alone mode, the stage box 22 uses a universal
digital audio link to send audio up to 100 meters between
universal digital media communications link (hereinafter
referred to as a “universal digital audio link”) such as that
25
de?ned in the system and protocol introduced by Gibson
Guitar Corporation and disclosed in US. Pat. No. 6,353,169
via a universal digital audio link control link.
for a “Universal Audio Communications and Control System
and Method”, the disclosure of which is fully incorporated
herein by reference. Accordingly, the system 10 will include:
30
a 64x32 channel mixer with full metering on all inputs and
outputs; 64 compressors; 64 parametric equalizer (“EQ’s”);
plug-in insert effects; real-time total live-in to live-out latency
of <3 ms with a single board con?guration; and streaming
audio to/from a hard disk on host PC 12.
35
As shown in more detail in FIG. 2, the system console 14
has up to six touch-sensitive LCD screen displays 16 posi
tioned for easy viewing in a horizontal array and a combina
tion of multiple fader board tactile control surfaces 18. The
graphical user interface of the invention spans across all
screens on displays 16. Depending on the function being
units without signal loss. The stage box 22 includes advanced
preampli?ers (not shown) that operate over a gain range of
—60 dB to +15 dB. The analog trim canbe remotely controlled
In addition to analog performance, the stage boxes 22
include analog-to-digital (A/D) converters that are capable of
up to 24 bit, 96 kHz samples. Phantom power and hard pad
can also be controlled remotely using a universal digital audio
link. The system 10 can also be adapted for use with SPDIF
and AES/EBU, and MIDI protocols and interfaces.
The system user interface is presented to a system user
primarily as a series or combination of graphical interfaces
presented on one or more touch screen displays 16. The user
interface includes multiple functional “views” presented to
the user in two modesisetup and real-timeiincluding ini
tial setup windows and dialogs, and real time operational
40
performed by the system, not all displays may be used at the
interfaces, referred to herein as “stage view”, “virtual console
view”, “mixer view”, and “cute view”. In addition, the user
interface can optionally include a “drum editor view” for
con?guring an on-stage drum set.
same time or different displays 1 6 may be presenting different
functional parts or “views” of the user interface.
Positioned below, or otherwise visually and operatively
45
faders electromechanically “snap to” the current settings
re?ected on the corresponding display 16. Manipulating the
First-time Setup
The setup mode of system 10 includes a setup process in
which system input and output connections are made in the
DSP architecture. This greatly simpli?es the process of mak
associated with, each display 16 is a fader board tactile con
trol surface 18 containing an array of motorized faders that
re?ect information shown on the displays 16. The individual
ing connections and con?guring the system DSP mixer. The
“real” faders on control surfaces 18 and touching the virtual
result of this setup process will be a table of inputs and outputs
with speci?c properties. User “friendly” names are assigned
controls on touch screen displays 16 causes console 14 to
by the system user to each input, representing different stage
send mixing control signals to the host PC 12. The host PC
and internal DSP use these mixing control signals to elec
50
elements. The table below re?ects one example of a “virtual
tronically interact, through patch bay unit 20, with the stage
patch bay” table of inputs, friendly names, and input proper
ties that is developed during system setup.
PREAMP
INPUTS
TYPE
(Db)
INPUT
PHANTOM
PORT
OTHER
COMP
EQ PRESET PLUGIN
LEAD VOX
XLR
4
lAOl
FOLLOWING
LDVOX
VOX2
XLR
2
lAO3
FOLLOWING
BKVOX
VOX3
XLR
2
IAUZ
SIMPLE
BKVOX
GUITAR 1 CAB
GUITAR 2 CAB
GUITAR 2 DI
XLR
XLR
1/4"
—12
—22
—6
lAO6
lAO7
lAOS
LIMITER
LIMITER
LIMITER
COMBO
CAB
NONE
AT, NT, SS
CRP
US 7,742,609 B2
5
6
-continued
PREAMP
INPUTS
TYPE
(Db)
BASS DI
DRUM INPUTS
XLR
-4
HATS
SNARE
KICK
TOMI
TOM2
TOM3
OHI
OH2
DRUMMER VOX
XLR
XLR
XLR
XLR
XLR
XLR
XLR
XLR
XLR
—18
—28
-30
II
-I4
-15
—6
—6
I
INPUT
PHANTOM
YES
YES
YES
PORT
IB03
IBI3
1B04
1B05
1B06
1B09
1B01
1B02
1B12
OTHER
COMP
EQ PRESET PLUGIN
NONE
NONE
BS
NONE
LIMITER
LIMITER
LIMITER
LIMITER
LIMITER
CYM
CYM
SIMPLE
HP
HP
LP-KICK
NONE
LP
LP
HP
HP
BKVOX
EXP
The user interface presented during system setup is similar
but not identical to a conventional “wizard” type setup win
dow so as to provide a familiar visual environment to the 20
system user. A series of pop-up menus allows the user to
con?gure connections in the patch bay unit 20.
FIG. 5 shows one example of a “stage view” portion of the
user interface generated by the system 10 on a touch screen
display 16. The icons on the stage view, as shown in FIG. 5,
25
visually correspond to different musical instruments and
other stage components used on stage, such as guitars, drums,
microphones, and speakers. In a preferred embodiment of the
system 10 will generate a custom setup menu on a display 16.
22 (labeled 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B) connected to the system host
30
should re?ect the changes made in the system setup window.
Adjusting the shape and appearance of the stage in the touch
screen display 16 will help add to the user experience.
The ?rst set of system setup presets will toggle through
basic stage setups. The system software is con?gured to gen
erate and store input and output assignments as part of stan
35
dard system stage con?guration “presets.” Sample system
setups and presets include “club”, “amphitheatre”, “church”,
“lecture hall”, “multi-room” and “custom” as follows:
40
ClubiThis preset is de?ned by the basic con?guration
with the default setup being:
45
3 vocal microphones
2 instrument microphones
3 monitor speakers
1 D.l.
50
AmphitheatreiThis preset is the same as Club, but with
one additional musician, microphone, and monitor and with a
55
4 piece band
5 piece band
and should include wireless microphone rigs, PZM micro
phones, and optional Pit Orchestra as stage elements.
3 monitor speakers
60
reverb
Lecture Hall
Service
A church venue can be de?ned as a preset without having
to be overly speci?c. Stage element inputs can include a
wireless microphone, speakers 1 and 2, chorus and a several
2 vocal microphones
1 monitor speaker
Multi-Room:iThe multi-room stage view interface
includes multiple visual boxes representing different rooms.
During system setup, the default settings are modi?ed and
initial input labels are assigned and placed. The user interface
includes two types of “show” setups: Venue and Performance.
The difference between Venue type and Performance type is
that Venue type is designed to be setup once while a Perfor
mance setup is changed before each show. Also, custom con
?gurations can be stored in this environment.
The following Venue and Performance types can be setup:
TheateriThis is a setup for a play or similar presentation,
3 D.l.
2-channel public address ampli?er
If there are two stage boxes 22 on a port, the stage box 22
that is farthest from the host PC 12 is called unit 1, and the one
located between the host PC 12 and stage box unit 1 is
example:
Church
2-channel public address ampli?er
stage box (1A)
stage boxes (1A, 2A)
stage boxes (1A, 1B)
stage boxes (1B, 2B)
stage boxes (1A, 2A, 1B)
stage boxes (1A, 1B, 2B)
stage boxes (1A, 2A, 1B, 2B)
BandiThis can be broken down to a group of presets, for
larger stage.
5 vocal microphones
l instrument microphone
1
2
2
2
3
3
4
Show Setup
speaker
2-channel public address ampli?er
PC12. Accordingly, the setup menu can include the following
options for selection by the user:
referred as unit 2.
5 piece drum set with 2 overhead speakers and 1 monitor
3 other musicians
The system 10 can also be used to de?ne custom stage setups
without a default con?guration. If the DSP card selected for
use with host PC 12 includes software that will automatically
query the mixer inputs and outputs, then the system can be
programmed to con?gure itself. Otherwise, or in addition the
FIG. 3 illustrates a typical arrangement of system stage boxes
user interface of the system 10, a number of different pre
de?ned stage element icons are stored in the system software,
along with user de?nable and selectable icons. The stage view
1 stage box in each room
3 vocal microphones per room
2 monitor speaker per room
keyboard inputs.
65
Drums
Another novel feature of the system user interface and
software is the drum editor. The drum editor is a hierarchical
US 7,742,609 B2
8
7
part of the information displayed on touch screen display 16.
Add Dest. This option allows a new destination to be
Because drums require many different con?gurations and
added to the current con?guration. Parameters for the
inputs, the drum editor is loaded as a simple alternative to
new destination are obtained using the “Destination
labeling generic inputs on individual drums. The default drum
Dialog” which is documented in the section “Desti
con?guration is a 5 piece drum set. An example of a drum
editor user interface display is shown in FIG. 4. Note that the
interface includes overhead visual representations of each
drum set piece or component with an array of separate labeled
nation Dialog”.
Add Aux Bus. This option allows a new aux bus to be
added to the current con?guration. The system only
supports three aux buses. This option is disabled if all
three buses have already been added. Parameters for
icons corresponding to each component.
The overhead drum set can be arranged to suit the type of
set that is being used. Often a microphone is used to amplify
several cymbals or drums. In the drum editor, only drums and
cymbals with their own microphone are provided with a spe
ci?c icon. Microphones used for multiple inputs use the Over
the new aux bus are obtained using the “Aux bus
Dialog” which is documented in the section “Aux Bus
Dialog”.
Delete Object. This option deletes the currently selected
object. See the topic “Cute View” for a de?nition of
head (OH) icon.
the currently selected Object.
Display
Bass drum, tom-tom drum, snare drum, hats and OH each
have different audio gains and equalization settings. Each
icon should have displayed the gain and EQ associated with it.
Once the basic con?guration of the stage is established, the
Calibrate Display #1. This option invokes the calibration
routine for display #1. The calibration routine pre
user can see the selections made re?ected on the stage view
in the top left corner. The user is prompted to touch the
portion of the user interface, as shown in FIG. 5. At this point,
circle exactly. After touching and releasing the circle,
the user can use can manipulate the mouse and cursor to drag
it reappears in the top right comer with the same
prompt. This is repeated for all four corners. The
and drop the drums, monitors and inputs to positions that
visually re?ect the layout of the actual stage.
sents a white window with a black circle and crosshair
routine enters a mode where the user can draw on the
25
System Software and User Interface De?nition
As indicated above, the system 10 supports two modes:
setup and real time. The setup mode requires use of only one
of the touch screen displays 16 and a conventional mouse.
The setup screen occupies all of one screen in a display 16. A
standard menu bar is displayed at the top of the screen. The
the user has the option to recalibrate or set the cali
bration.
Calibrate Display #2. This option works the same as
30
Calibrate Display #4. This option works the same as
following selections in the menu bar:
File
Calibrate Display #1, except for Display #4.
35
con?guration. The conventional view is implemented via
includes many elements.
Load. The Load option allows a user to select a saved
con?guration, using the common WINDOWS ?le
load dialog. If the user does not cancel the operation,
the current con?guration is reset, and the selected
con?guration is loaded from the ?le.
Save. The Save option saves the current con?guration
40
using the current ?le name. A current ?le name is set
using “Load”, or “Save as”. If there is not a current ?le
45
FIGS. 6 and 7 show the “virtual console” and “mixer func
tions” views respectively of the user interface as seen on
50
up the source edit dialog (if the icon represents an audio
55
machine on non-test systems.
60
If it is not pressed againbefore it stops blinking, then real
time mode is not entered.
Lines. This tool toggles on or off the lines that graphically
illustrate connections in the Cute View.
Options. This option allows global con?guration options
to be edited using the “Con?guration Dialog” which
is documented in the section “Con?guration Dialog”.
is documented in the section “Source Dialog”.
source, such as a keyboard), or the destination edit dialog if
the icon represents a destination, such as a monitor speaker.
As seen on FIGS. 5, 6, and 7, beneath the Cute View is a
tool bar 32. The tool bar 32 contains the following tools:
Start. In setup mode the ?rst tool enters real time mode.
Clicking this tool causes it to blink for about 4 seconds.
tem mode from Setup to Real time.
Exit. This exits the system user interface and reboots the
source are obtained using the “Source Dialog” which
Icons in the Cute View can be dragged to any location with
persistence. Double-clicking an icon in the Cute View brings
Start Con?g. The Start Con?g option switches the sys
Add Source. This option allows a new source to be added
to the current con?guration. Parameters for the new
console 14. The Cute View is presented as a rectangle 30.
There are icons inside the rectangle that represent the audio
sources and destinations in the stage con?guration. There are
optional lines that graphically illustrate the connections
between the currently selected object and the objects to which
it is connected. The currently selected object is highlighted.
port, source name, or destination name. The listing
can be saved to a text ?le, or sent to a printer, if one is
Edit
“channel strips” as described under the real time section. The
CuteView is always visible on one of the displays 16 (display/
monitor #1) both in setup mode and in real time mode. (See
FIGS. 5, 6 and 7)
Port Listing. The Port Listing option lists the system
con?guration. The format is a list optionally sorted by
attached to the system.
Cute View
“Cute View” refers to a non-conventional view of a system
?ed using the Setup Wizard. The Setup Wizard
name then this option is disabled.
Save As. The Save option prompts the user for a ?lename
(using the common WINDOWS ?le save dialog), and
saves the current con?guration.
Calibrate Display #1, except for Display #2.
Calibrate Display #3. This option works the same as
Calibrate Display #1, except for Display #3.
setup mode user interface is functionality organized by the
Newi(Setup Wizard). The New option resets the con
?guration and allows a new con?guration to be speci
monitor in order to test the calibration. After testing,
Aux A. This option brings up the Aux Edit Dialog for aux
65
A.
Aux B. This option brings up the Aux Edit Dialog for aux
B.
US 7,742,609 B2
9
10
Aux C. This option brings up the Aux Edit Dialog for aux
Effects selected from a list box that contains all supported
effects except EQ. (EQ is automatically available for all
C.
aux buses).
The CuteView can include text or graphic icons on the display
Real time mode uses from one to four touch-screens 16.All
screens can be operated by touch or mouse. Monitor #1 con
that are programmed to automatically implement certain
audio parameter adjustments associated with certain stage
elements. For example, if the low frequency response of the
lead singer’s microphone is an ongoing concern in a particu
lar live performance venue, a particular “adjustment” icon
tains the Cute View, the Master Fader, and the Info Bar. All
other displays/monitors contain conventional channel strips.
Cute View
In real time mode, the Cute View is available on display 16
can be pre-con?gured on the display 16 in the real time mode.
Touching an adjustment icon on the screen will immediately
cause the console 14 to send mixing control signals to the
DSP that will decrease the low frequency response of the
#1. Referring to the setup mode de?nition, the following
differences are noted:
The icons ?ash red to indicate clipping.
designated microphone, without the user having to separately
The ?rst tool in the toolbar causes the system to switch
from real time mode to setup mode.
Double-touching an icon causes a different system behav
ior. Double touching an icon brings up the source real
time window for a source, and the destination real time
operate an EQ fader. One or more adjustment icons can be
pre-con?gured such that when the adjustment icon is touched,
it will cause the system to implement a pre-de?ned adjust
ment to a pre-de?ned audio parameter associated with a pre
de?ned stage element.
Con?guration Dialog
window for a destination. Touching an aux tool on the
20
The con?guration dialog allows editing of the following
parameters:
Text description of the con?guration
Master Fader
The master fader 34 is a high-resolution fader that controls
Notes about the con?guration
File name speci?cation for stream-to-disk function
25
Speci?cation of number of stage boxes attached to system
(if this information can not be automatically detected)
Source Edit Dialog
The source edit dialog allows editing of the following
Info Bar
30
Instance name and icon
Current level
35
Port selected from a list box that contains only unused
VU and margin (animated)
Flag to indicate clips detected since change to level
Other misc. information such as connections in order to
ports.
make the readout appear robust
Outputs selected from a list box that contains all destina
tions and aux buses.
effects except EQ.
(EQ is automatically available for all sources).
Destination Edit Dialog
The destination edit dialog allows editing of the following
The info bar 36 displays information about the currently
selected object. If no object is selected, all of the objects are
paged. The following information is shown:
Instance name speci?ed as text.
Initial trim level set using a fader control. This controls the
analog level on the stage box.
Effects selected from a list box that contains all supported
scaling of all output levels for all destinations. Beneath the
fader is a toggle. Switching the toggle “on” enables stream to
disk for all destination objects in which the stream to disk
option is enabled.
parameters pertaining to audio source components as stage
elements:
Type speci?ed as text.
Icon selected from a list box.
toolbar brings up the source real time window (wherein
the aux bus is treated exactly like a source).
40
45
All Real Time Windows
Windows that open in real time are non-modal, though
normally restricted to only one window that is associated with
a particular object. Real-time windows have a toolbar in the
top left corner. Some real-time windows have custom tools in
the toolbar, but all of them share the following tools:
A close tool that is used for closing the window
Four tools numbered 1-4 which move the window to the
same position in the corresponding window
parameters pertaining to destination audio components as
Source Real Time Windows
stage elements:
Type speci?ed as text.
50
Icon selected from a list box.
Port selected from a list box that contains only unused
ports.
Inputs selected from a list box that contains all sources and
55
aux buses.
VU and margin animated
Pan control icon that brings up the pan control window
described below. The icon displays the word “discrete”
if the levels have been set discretely using individual
faders. If the levels have been set using the pan control
Initial level set using a fader control.
House option selected as a toggle.
Stream to disk option selected as a toggle.
window, the positions of all destinations of type house
are illustrated as well as the virtual position of the
60
Aux Edit Dialog
The aux edit dialog allows editing of the following param
source.
EQ control icon that brings up the EQ control window
described below. The EQ icon displays the calculated
response of the current settings.
eters:
Inputs selected from a list box that contains all sources.
Outputs selected from a list box that contains all destina
tions.
Initial trim level set using a fader control.
Source real time windows have the following components:
Instance name as a text display
Trim level as a fader
Instance name speci?ed as text.
An attached folding window that allows discrete access to
65
output levels.
A tool in the toolbar that opens the discrete level window
automatically.
US 7,742,609 B2
11
12
Threshold
Ratio
Final Gain
Look ahead
A button associated with all insert effects chained to the
associated audio source. Pressing these buttons brings
up the edit windows for the effect. In addition to EQ, two
effects are “hard coded” into the system, meaning they
are supported with custom edit windows. These are the
01
compressor effect which is edited using the compressor
control window, and the reverb effect which is edited
using the reverb control window. Other DSP effects that
may be selected from setup mode are not supported by
the user interface. Those effects are edited using any
DSP surfaces that they support.
the dynamic response. The line is animated with the VU for
the input of the associated source.
The discrete level window has a fader that controls the mix
level for each output to which this source is connected. Each
fader is labeled with the instance name of the output, (or aux
Channel Strips
A, B, or C). Above each fader is an animatedVU and margin
for the connection. If the output mix levels for the associated
source were determined using the Pan Control Window, and
any of the faders are moved, the pan control icon reverts to
displaying the word “Discrete”.
Pan Control Windows
The pan control window 38 contains a grid with meaning
less tick spacing. lt graphically illustrates the location of all
destinations of type “house”, as represented in the Cute View.
The grid also illustrates a virtual location for the associated
audio source that can be dragged to any position by the user.
The mix level for the source to any house destination is
determined by the distance from the virtual source icon to the
associated house destination icon.
Levels that are changed using the pan control window 38
cause the fader controls in the discrete level window to be
updated. Moving one of those faders to adjust a level dis
20
touching it brings up the source control window rather
30
causes all other sources to be muted when in the on state.
A toggle labeled “Mut”, for “mute”, which causes the
associated source to be muted when in the on state.
associated parametric EQ band. Two bands are band ?lters.
One of the other bands is low shelf and the ?nal is high shelf.
40
Trim fader.
Text display of the name of the corresponding audio source
component.
When a point is touched on the grid, a level fader is enabled
45
made with it. When a point is touched on the grid, if it is a band
?lter, a Q fader is also enabled and associated with that point.
Adjustments to the width of the band ?lter, expressed in
relative Q, can be made with that fader. When a point is
system any time a software fader is moved (unless that fader
is a trim that is already assigned to a hardware fader). Any
fader being controlled by the assignable fader is highlighted.
Simpli?ed User Interface
The following changes can be made to the system user
interface in order to simplify it:
50
EQ: Can be replaced with simple bass, mid, and treble
sliders. The advanced user interface option can be
selected for full parametric control.
Compression: Controls can be replaced with a type selec
55
following components:
An animated level display showing in, out, and compres
60
A grid, (described below), which can be used to set the
threshold and ratio
A folding window containing faders that control the fol
Attack rate
Release rate
Faders
External faders control the trim levels corresponding to the
channel strips, except the ?rst fader. It is reassigned by the
of high shelf.
lowing parameters:
A text display of all insert effects for the source.
Animated VU and margin display.
No bands can be moved to the left of low shelf, or to the right
bypassed
than the pan control window for the associated source.
A toggle labeled “Aud” (or “Solo”) for “audition”, which
35
sion
A bypass button which causes the compressor to be
An EQ control icon that functions as exactly as the EQ
control icons documented in the source control window.
A pan control icon that functions as the pan control icons
documented in the source control window, except that
EQ Control Window
The EQ control window 40 (FIG. 7) contains a grid with
vertical ticks indicating gain centered at 0 dB, and horizontal
ticks indicating frequency in linear octaves. Points on the grid
can be dragged to coarsely set the frequency and gain of the
Compressor Control Window
The compressor control window 42 (FIG. 7) contains the
for all sources (house). If a destination that is not of type
“house” is selected in the Cute View, then only sources that
A channel strip 44 has the following components:
25
closes it.
touched on the grid, a horizontal fader is enabled and associ
ated with that point. Fine adjustments in a two-octave range
can be made with that fader. The grid also displays a calcu
lated response curve for the EQ effect.
Channel strips 44 (FIGS. 6 and 7) are associated with each
input source, including aux buses. A channel strip 44 occupies
the full height of the display. The position of the channel strips
44 begins at the left display (16) #2, and occupies up to three
of the displays 16. If a house destination (or no destination) is
selected in the Cute View, the system activates a channel strip
have output to that destination are active.
cretely invalidates the settings of the pan control window and
and associated with that point. Finer gain adjustments can be
The grid has ticks indicating dB levels for input level
(horizontal), and output level (vertical). Two points can be
dragged inside the grid. One point controls the threshold and
can only be dragged vertically. The other point controls the
compression ratio. It can only be dragged vertically, and not
below the threshold point. A line is plotted which represents
tion, and a single fader labeled “amount”. The exact
function and range of “amount” may vary depending on
the type. Advanced option can be selected for full com
pressor control.
Browser: can be modi?ed to present simplistic data in a
way which is useful to unsophisticated users.
The following additions can be made to the system user
interface in order to simplify it:
Input Type Functionality
During setup, the user can select an input type. For
65
example, a microphone could be not only of type “vocal”, but
even more speci?c subcategories such as “announcer”, “lec
turer”, or “singer”. The types would control some effects. For
US 7,742,609 B2
14
13
example, “vocal” type applies a band pass between 80 Hz and
POSITION: This locates the component or element on the
14000 Hz in order to ?lter 60 Hz hum and hiss.
stage in x, y coordinates. The stage corresponds to coor
The “Announcer” type will automatically have an (op
dinate range —l,—l to +l,+l (?oating).
ROTATION: The system supports rotation in radians inter
tional) control that works like a chain compressor. When the
microphone input is active, all other levels are brought down.
m
“Lecturer” type is a solo speaker giving a speech or lecture,
and could have some compression useful for making the
nally.
If the port is for a source, the following de?nitional infor
mation is needed:
OUTPUTS: A list of all I/ O destinations or auxiliary buses
that this source ultimately goes to (ignoring inserts).
This is not a port number. Rather, it is a reference to the
speci?c item through whatever means the wizard iden
ti?es them.
EFFECTS: Up to three insert effects are selected. The hard
coded effects are indicated by number, e. g., l:compres
speech clear.
“Singer” type would apply a tighter band pass, and some
default compression useful for vocals.
If all simpli?cation options are implemented, along with
aesthetic and labeling changes, the system user interface
would then be very simple. Unsophisticated users can rely on
the “stage” view. The user would then touch the icon corre
sponding to the input they want to adjust, and then be pre
sented with a simple panel with labels like “volume”, “bass”,
“mid”, “treble”, etc.
EFFECT PARAMS: Defaults can be set for the effect
Enhanced Setup:
The setup mode already has the potential to be very simple
can be input using a prede?ned format.
If the port is for a destination, the following de?nitional
information is needed:
sor, 2:reverb, and 3IEQ.
parameters. Otherwise, the various effects parameters
if a large database of prede?ned objects is created. Users can
simply pick objects from a tree of categories. They are added
to the stage, and can be dragged to a virtual position.
Optionally, the system 10 can support using a microphone
with a known frequency response for calibration. This micro
phone must be able to send input to the system 10 which is
analyzed with a Fast Fourier Transform, using the host PC 12
processor. A sound “sweet spot” is chosen in the venue, and
INPUTS: A list of all I/O sources or auxiliary buses that
this source ultimately goes to (ignoring inserts). This is
not the port number. Rather, it is a reference to the
speci?c item through whatever means the wizard iden
ti?es them.
HOUSE FLAG: If the ?ag is set to l?his is house. This
could mean that it is a speaker but not a monitor. If the
?ag is set to O?his is some other kind of output. If this
?ag is set to indicate house, the output appears in the
two-dimensional panning screen.
the microphone is placed in that position. Through an inter
active process of playing noise through the speakers, analyz
ing the sampled input (with the microphone’s known
response subtracted), the speaker levels can be automatically
calibrated, and ?nal EQ could be determined in order to
Auxiliary Bus De?nitions
NUMBER: 1, 2, or 3.
OUTPUTS: A list of all I/O destination objects that the bus
ultimately goes to (ignoring the effects). This is the same
remove resonant frequencies, and ?atten the character of the
speakers. Other calibrations could be done using this calibra
tion technique, such as virtual positioning of speakers and
as for a source I/O port.
instruments.
EFFECTS: Up to three insert effects can be de?ned, just
I/O Port De?nitions
like with sources.
For all I/O Ports (source or destination), the following
parameters can be selected to create the port de?nition:
40
I/O TYPE: source or destination
PORT NUMBER: This is virtualized, meaning that it is just
a number and it doesn’t matter which DSP module. For
example, if there are 32 inputs from 4 DSP DATS, each
having 8 inputs, select a port number between 1 and 32.
NAME: A short name is assigned to describe what this port
45
Thus, using the system 10 of this invention, the sound mix
at a live performance venue can be setup and then controlled
is used for, e.g., a class name like “Mic”.
INSTANCE NAME: This represents the name of this par
ticular port in this setup, such as “Lead Singer”.
ICON: An icon is assigned from the following list:
undefsource,
undefdest,
microphone,
speaker,
monitor,
keybd,
effect,
patchbox,
drumset,
inport,
outport,
kick,
Custom Parameter De?nitions
Custom audio parameters can be de?ned in a variety of
ways. For example, a custom parameter may be de?ned that
tightens the EQ and raises volume at the same time. A custom
parameter is described as a list of things a parameter changes,
with an offset and multiplier for each.
in real time using a digital mixing console with a highly
e?icient and easy to comprehend and operate user interface.
50
The user is provided with one or more preset stage and venue
con?gurations, with de?ned audio sources and destinations.
The sources and destinations (stage elements) are visually
displayed as graphical icons with “friendly” names and icons
and are assigned to various mixer inputs and outputs. The
icons are moved to different positions on the display to re?ect
the physical arrangement on the stage. Audio characteristic
associated with each stage element (e.g., gain and EQ) are
displayed in connection with each icon. To adjust an audio
parameter, the icon is touched on the display and then appro
priate adjustments are made using virtual console and mixer
function views on the system display. Standard adjustments
can be selected by simply touching “friendly” names on the
snare,
display.
?oortom,
racktom,
embodiments of the present invention of a new and useful
cymbal,
guitar
Thus, although there have been described particular
Live Performance Audio Mixing System with Simpli?ed
User Interface, it is not intended that such references be
US 7,742,609 B2
15
16
4. The system of claim 3 wherein the touch screen faders
construed as limitations upon the scope of this invention
except as set forth in the following claims.
What is claimed is:
are arranged in channel strips having multiple audio channels
to visually simulate a non-virtual mixing console.
5. The system of claim 4 wherein the each of the channels
in the channel strips includes an EQ control icon, a pan
control icon for bringing up a pan control window, a sole
mode toggle con?gured to mute all other system audio
1. A digital audio mixing system for real time mixing and
adjustment of audio signals during a live performance on a
live performance stage, the system comprising:
a. a host computer having a processor con?gured to per
form digital audio mixing functions which controls
selected audio parameters including the relative volume
sources, a mute toggle con?gured to mute the audio source
corresponding to that channel, a text display of all insert
effects for the corresponding audio source, a VU and margin
display, a trim fader, and a text display of the name of the
corresponding audio source component.
levels of audio signals for a plurality of inputs and a
plurality of outputs in response to mixing control signals
for controlling the selected audio parameters;
b. an audio patch bay unit coupled to the processor, the
6. The system of claim 4, the user interface further com
patch bay unit having a plurality of inputs, the inputs
prising a mixer functions view, the mixer functions view
comprising a pan control window and an EQ control window.
7. The system of claim 6 wherein the virtual console view
and mixer function view each include a cute view window, the
cute view window displaying the icons selected and arranged
by the user to represent the types and locations of the audio
adapted to receive audio signals from a plurality of dif
ferent live audio source components and a plurality of
outputs adapted to transmit audio signals to a plurality of
audio destination components wherein the patch bay
unit con?gures the connections between the inputs and
the outputs;
c. a system console con?gured to generate and transmit the
mixing control signals to the processor, the system con
sole comprising at least one touch sensitive display and
at least one tactile control surface having audio faders;
d. a system user interface, the user interface comprising
software which directs the host computer to generate
20
8. The system of claim 7, the cute view window further
comprising a visual display of audio parameters associated
25
with an audio source represented on the display.
9. The system of claim 3, the user interface further com
prising a drum editor view.
10. The system of claim 3, the setup view further compris
ing user selectable, pre-de?ned show setup con?gurations.
11. The system of claim 10, the setup con?gurations
multiple functional views on the display; the multiple
functional views including a stage view; and
e. the stage view comprising a plurality of different pre
de?ned and user selectable icons on the display, each of
source and destination components on stage.
including venue-type con?gurations and performance-type
30
con?gurations.
the icons visually representing different types of the
12. The system of claim 1, the user interface comprising
audio source and destination components connected to
the system, the icons movable by the user on the display
to positions representing actual stage locations on the
live performance stage of the stage elements corre
sponding to the icons, and a plurality of user selectable
selectable between an advanced user interface mode and a
simpli?ed user interface mode which reduces the complexity
of the advanced user interface mode for an unsophisticated
35 user.
stage element con?guration presets, the presets includ
13. The system of claim 1, the stage view further compris
ing at least one user de?nable adjustment icon, the adjustment
ing a prede?ned selection and arrangement of audio
icon programmed to automatically implement pre-de?ned
source and destination components,
f. wherein the software con?gures the system user interface
40
to control the audio patch bay unit so that the user can
audio parameter adjustments associated with a pre-de?ned
stage element.
14. The system of claim 1, further comprising at least one
select multiple ones of the inputs and recon?gure the
stage box linked to the host PC wherein the stage box can
connections between the selected inputs and one or more
of the outputs to de?ne one or more user selected mixes
con?gure the connections between a plurality of stage box
inputs and a plurality of stage box outputs.
15. The system of claim 14 wherein the host PC, stage box,
and stage elements are linked by a universal digital audio link
wherein the universal digital audio link interconnects the host
PC, the stage box, and the stage elements, on a universal
network.
of audio signals from said live audio source components;
and
g. wherein the software con?gures the system user inter
face to receive user input commands in real time during
a the live performance to select an audio signal from one
or more of said live audio source components by touch
ing or pointing to one or more icons on the stage view
45
50
representing said one or more live audio source compo
nents, and to receive user input commands real time
during the live performance to adjust multiple audio
parameters, including the relative volume levels, related
55
to the one or more live audio source components by
selecting multiple audio parameters of the selected sig
nal and then adjusting the multiple selected parameters.
2. The system of claim 1, the user interface further com
prising a setup view, the setup view comprising a virtual patch
60
by table of system inputs and input audio properties associ
ated with each input, each of the inputs having user-assign
able user-friendly names, the user-friendly names represent
ing different stage elements assignable by the user to the
input.
3. The system of claim 2 wherein the virtual console view
includes an array of touch screen faders.
16. A method of digital audio mixing comprising:
a. providing a host computer having a processor that per
65
forms digital audio mixing functions which controls
selected audio parameters, including the relative volume
levels, of audio signals for a plurality of inputs and a
plurality of outputs in response to mixing control signals
for controlling the selected audio parameters;
b. providing an audio patch bay unit coupled to the proces
sor, the patch bay unit having the plurality of inputs, the
inputs adapted to receive audio signals from a plurality
of different live audio source components and the plu
rality of outputs adapted to transmit audio signals to a
plurality of audio destination components wherein the
patch bay unit con?gures the connections between the
inputs and the outputs in response to mixing control
signals for controlling the connections;
c. providing a system console that enerates and transmits
the mixing control signals to the processor, the system
US 7,742,609 B2
17
18
including a prede?ned selection and arrangement of
console, comprising at least one touch sensitive display
and at least one tactile control surface having audio
audio source and destination components;
f. controlling the audio patch bay unit and selecting mul
faders;
. providing a system user interface, the user interface
tiple ones of the inputs and recon?guring the connection
comprising software that directs the host computer to
generate multiple functional views on the display; the
multiple functional views including a stage view and a
virtual console view;
e. wherein the stage view comprises a plurality of different
pre-de?ned and user selectable icons on the display,
each of the icons visually representing different types of
between the selected inputs and one or more of the
the audio source and destination components connected
to the system, the icons movable by the user on the
display to positions representing actual stage locations
on the live performance stage of the stage elements
corresponding to the icons, and a plurality of user select
able stage element con?guration presets, the presets
output to de?ne one or more user selected mixes of audio
signals from said live audio source components; and
. selecting in real time during the live performance an
audio signal from one of said live audio source compo
10
nents by touching or pointing to one or more icons on the
stage view representing said one or more live audio
source components, and selecting multiple audio param
eters, including the relative volume levels, of the
selected signal and then adjusting the multiple selected
parameters.
US007742609C1
(12) EX PARTE REEXAMINATION CERTIFICATE (97 61st)
United States Patent
(10) Number:
US 7,742,609 C1
Yeakel et al.
(54)
(45) Certi?cate Issued:
LIVE PERFORMANCE AUDIO MIXING
(52)
SYSTEM WITH SIMPLIFIED USER
INTERFACE
700/94; 715/727; 715/728
(75) Inventors: Nathan Yeakel, Sunnyvale, CA (US);
Reexamination Request:
No. 90/012,408, Jul. 27, 2012
Reexamination Certi?cate for:
Field of Classi?cation Search
None
See application ?le for complete search history.
Jeffrey Vallier, Sunnyvale, CA (U S)
(Us)
US. Cl.
USPC ................. .. 381/119; 369/3; 369/4; 381/118;
(58)
(73) Assignee: Bank of America, N.A., Chicago, IL
Jul. 19, 2013
(56)
References Cited
To vieW the complete listing of prior art documents cited
during the proceeding for Reexamination Control Number
90/012,408, please refer to the USPTO’s public Patent
Application Information Retrieval (PAIR) system under the
Display References tab.
Patent No.:
Issued:
7,742,609
Jun. 22, 2010
Primary Examiner * Jason Proctor
Appl. No.:
Filed:
10/406,620
Apr. 3, 2003
(57)
ABSTRACT
A digital audio mixing system for live performance venues
Related US. Application Data
includes a software user interface and system host PC With an
(60) Provisional application No. 60/370,872, ?led on Apr.
8, 2002.
functions. The system includes a console having an array of
(51)
Int. Cl.
H04B 1/00
H04B 1/20
G10H 1/00
G06F 17/00
G06F 3/16
(2006.01)
(2006.01)
(2006.01)
(2006.01)
(2006.01)
1011211; @1111 i! 111-1 111111111110 5
k
I
32
internal digital signal processor to perform digital mixing
multiple touch screen displays With corresponding fader
board (tactile) control surfaces operatively connected to the
host PC, and an audio parch hay unit. One or more stage boxes
are linked to each other and to the system host PC by Wired or
Wireless connections. The user interface includes multiple
functional views and con?guration presets, displayed in setup
and real time modes, to alloW the user to operate the system in
a user friendly and simpli?ed environment.
US 7,742,609 C1
1
EX PARTE
REEXAMINATION CERTIFICATE
ISSUED UNDER 35 U.S.C. 307
2
[a] the live performance [to select] by supporting selec
tion of an audio signal from one or more of said live
audio source components [by touching or pointing]
when a user touches or points to [one or more] an icon of
the icons on the stage view representing said one or more
THE PATENT IS HEREBY AMENDED AS
INDICATED BELOW.
live audio source components, and [to receive user input
commands real time during the live performance to
adjust], in response to the selection, by presenting a
Matter enclosed in heavy brackets [ ] appeared in the
source real time window that includes components asso
patent, but has been deleted and is no longer a part of the
patent; matter printed in italics indicates additions made
to the patent.
ciated with multiple audio parameters, including the
relative volume levels, related to the [one or more] live
audio source [components by selecting] component
AS A RESULT OF REEXAMINATION, IT HAS BEEN
DETERMINED THAT:
associated with the selected icon, and selecting and
adjusting the multiple audio parameters of the selected
signal [and then adjusting] when an associated compo
Claims 1 -3, 9-1 1, 13 and 1 6 are determined to be patentable
nent ofthe [multiple selected parameters] components is
selected and adjusted.
as amended.
2. The system of claim 1, the user interface further com
Claims 4 and 6, dependent on an amended claim, are
determined to be patentable.
Claims 5, 7, 8, 12, 14 and 15 were not reexamined.
20
[by] bay table of system inputs and input audio properties
associated with each input, each of the inputs having user
assignable user-friendly names, the user-friendly names rep
resenting different stage elements assignable by the user to
1. A digital audio mixing system for real time mixing and
adjustment of audio signals during a live performance on a
live performance stage, the system comprising:
25
a. a host computer having a processor con?gured to per
form digital audio mixing functions which controls
selected audio parameters including the relative volume
30
faders.
9. The system of claim [3] l, the user interface further
comprising a drum editor view, wherein the drum editor view
includes a visual representation of an arrangement of drum
set components.
10. The system of claim [3] 2, the setup view further
comprising user selectable, pre-de?ned show setup con?gu
adapted to receive audio signals from a plurality of dif
ferent live audio source components and a plurality of
the input.
3. The system of claim [2 wherein the] 1 further comprising
a virtual console view that includes an array of touch screen
levels of audio signals for a plurality of inputs and a
plurality of outputs in response to mixing control signals
for controlling the selected audio parameters;
b. an audio patch bay unit coupled to the processor, the
patch bay unit having a plurality of inputs, the inputs
prising a setup view, the setup view comprising a virtual patch
35
rations.
outputs adapted to transmit audio signals to a plurality of
11. The system of claim 10, the setup con?gurations
audio destination components wherein the patch bay
unit con?gures the connections between the inputs and
the outputs;
including venuitype con?gurations designed to be setup
c. a system console con?gured to generate and transmit the
mixing control signals to the processor, the system con
sole comprising at least one touch sensitive display and
at least one tactile control surface having audio faders;
d. a system user interface, the user interface comprising
software which directs the host computer to generate
once and performance-type con?gurations designed to be
setup before each live performance.
40
icon programmed to automatically implement pre-de?ned
45
multiple functional views on the display[;], the multiple
functional views including a stage view; and
50
audio source and destination components connected to
the system, the icons movable by the user on the display
to positions representing actual stage locations on the
live performance stage of the stage elements corre
sponding to the icons, and a plurality of user selectable
55
stage element con?guration presets, the presets includ
ing a prede?ned selection and arrangement of audio
source and destination components,
f. wherein the software con?gures the system user interface
to control the audio patch bay unit so that the user can
audio parameter adjustments associated with a pre-de?ned
stage element when the adjustment icon is touched.
16. A method of digital audio mixing comprising:
a. providing a host computer having a processor that per
e. the stage view comprising a plurality of different pre
de?ned and user selectable icons on the display, each of
the icons visually representing different types of the
13. The system of claim 1, the stage view further compris
ing at least one user de?nable adjustment icon, the adjustment
60
forms digital audio mixing functions which controls
selected audio parameters, including the relative volume
levels, of audio signals for a plurality of inputs and a
plurality of outputs in response to mixing control signals
for controlling the selected audio parameters;
b. providing an audio patch bay unit coupled to the proces
sor, the patch bay unit having the plurality of inputs, the
inputs adapted to receive audio signals from a plurality
of different live audio source components and the plu
rality of outputs adapted to transmit audio signals to a
plurality of audio destination components wherein the
patch bay unit con?gures the connections between the
inputs and the outputs in response to mixing control
signals for controlling the connections;
select multiple ones of the inputs and recon?gure the
0. providing a system console that generates and transmits
connections between the selected inputs and one or more
of the outputs to de?ne one or more user selected mixes
the mixing control signals to the processor, the system
console, comprising at least one touch sensitive display
of audio signals from said live audio source components;
and
g. wherein the software con?gures the system user inter
face to receive user input commands in real time during
and at least one tactile control surface having audio
65
faders;
d. providing a system user interface, the user interface
comprising software that directs the host computer to
US 7,742,609 Cl
3
generate multiple functional views on the display[;], the
multiple functional views including a stage vieW and a
virtual console vieW;
e. Wherein the stage vieW comprises a plurality of different
pre-de?ned and user selectable icons on the display, 5
each of the icons visually representing different types of
the audio source and destination components connected
to the system, the icons movable by the user on the
display to positions representing actual stage locations
on the live performance stage of the stage elements 10
corresponding to the icons, and a plurality of user select
able stage element con?guration presets, the presets
including a prede?ned selection and arrangement of
audio source and destination components;
f. controlling the audio patch bay unit and selecting mul- 15
tiple ones of the inputs and recon?guring the connection
between the selected inputs and one or more of the
[output] outputs to de?ne one or more user selected
mixes of audio signals from said live audio source com
ponents; and
20
g. selecting in real time during the live performance an
audio signal from one of said live audio source compo
nents by touching or pointing to one or more icons on the
stage vieW representing said one or more e live audio
source components, and, [selecting] in response to the 25
icon selection, presenting a source real time window that
includes components associated with multiple audio
parameters, including the relative volume levels, of the
selected signal and then selecting and adjusting [the
multiple selected parameters] the multiple audio param- 30
eters of the selected signal using the components.
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