Precise Forms Inc., would like to thank you for the privilege of

Precise Forms Inc., would like to thank you for the privilege of
P r e c i s e F o r m s I n c ., would like to thank you for the privilege of assisting you with
the purchase of your “TrimForm” System. The Precise Forms management team has
been designing and manufacturing forms and accessories for concrete construction since
1967. Precise is proud of its products and encourages you to use proper care to ensure
the longevity of your equipment. Following the recommended procedures in this manual
will greatly extend the life of your forms and provide many trouble free pours.
In the following information, we address procedures and problems which may be
encountered on a daily basis. On occasion, your builder or architect will ask for construction designs which require input from a structural engineer with regard to special applications of loads or steel placement. Although we lead the market in form design, we are
not building engineers and will defer those questions to such. If you have any questions
regarding your new forms or their use, please do not hesitate to contact your sales representative or our home office.
Wa l l T i e I n f o r m a t i o n
8 ” Ti e
8 - 1 0 ” Ti e
8 - 1 0 - 1 2 ” Ti e
Precise Forms uses the highest quality carbon 50, pickled steel in the production of wall ties. A high
standard of quality control has been implemented in which ties are inspected to yield a minimum 7,000
lbs. pull strength. Break-off notches allow the wall tie to break off easily with a single hammer blow.
Wall Tie Sizes
Precise Forms can produce wall ties for every wall thickness. When placing an order, you will need
to know which style of tie to order for your job. Wall ties are available in nominal (sometimes referred to
as standard), or full exact sizes. The wall thickness should be determined by the engineer of that project.
Nominal / Standard - The nominal tie is the most common size of wall tie used in the residential industry. It will create a wall that is 3/8” under size to match lumber dimensions.
Full Exact - This tie will pour the wall thickness to the exact dimension desired if your forms have a .125
face sheet.
If you use multiple sizes of ties and find some ties which have been separated from their bundles you
can measure from center of hole to center of hole.
For example:
If the tie measures 13 11/16” it is a standard 12” tie which will pour a 11 5/8” thick wall.
If the tie measures 14 5/32” it is a full exact 12” tie which will pour a 12” thick wall using forms
with a .125 face sheet.
2
A variety of special ties are available for unique projects:
Breakback ties are used when the wall tie must be broken off below the surface of the wall. It allows the
tie to be sealed to prevent rust stains. When breaking off breakback ties, make sure to use a vertical hammer blow, as opposed to a horizontal blow with regular ties, otherwise the concrete may become damaged.
Heavy duty ties are recommended for walls that are to be pumped or that are taller than eight feet. It is
40% thicker and stronger than our regular tie but still breaks off easily.
Pull ties can be removed from the finished wall and reused for many pours. This is helpful in the
international market where a supplier of ties may not be close.
P r e v e n t i n g Wa l l T i e F a i l u r e
Wall ties were created for one purpose, that of holding forms in appropriate widths in order to pour
uniform concrete walls. Our ties are designed and manufactured with critical dimensions and standards.
Do not alter the ties in any manner. The punching or drilling of holes, welding of ties together or to other
items, bending, or reuse of ties not designed for that purpose will alter their strength. Altering of wall ties
will void any warranty or guarantee.
Wall ties are the most critical part of any forming system even though they are usually one of the least
expensive items. It is important to take the proper precautions to prevent wall tie failures. Wall ties can
fail for many reasons. A faulty wall tie is rare to find in the industry due to strict testing procedures. Many
times a wall tie fails due to improper use or treatment of the tie. Here are just a few of the many reasons a wall tie can fail.
Opening Bundles
Proper precautions not to damage the ties must be taken when opening a bundle. The proper way
to open a bundle is to untwist or cut (with wire cutters) the wire that hold the ties together. Many contractors will beat a bundle of ties against the corner of the footing or hit the wire tie with the claw of a
hammer to break the wire. By opening the bundle improperly you risk damaging the ties. A damaged tie
is more likely to fail during the pour.
Re-bar Placement
Sliding re-bar against the tie is another way to easily damage the tie. Precise ties are designed to allow
easy separation at the break-off notch after the wall has been poured. When re-bar is slid into a wall,
instead of being tied into place before setting the forms, the tip of the re-bar can dent or bend the wall
tie causing it to fracture at the break-off notch.
Number of Ties and Tie Placement
Using the proper number and having the proper placement of ties is essential. We have provided recommended tie placement charts at the end of this publication for the most popular hole patterns. These
charts are shorter versions of our standard tie placement charts which have a detailed explanation of the
loads, pressures, and resulting tie placement advised in accordance with the American Concrete
Institute’s recommendations. Failure to place the proper number of ties at the stated locations can cause
fatigue and damage to the forming system. Examples of damage can range from form deflection to tie
failure resulting from inadequate support to the system. The best concept to keep, with regard to the
investment of forms that you have made, is that the proper number of ties and proper tie placement is
inexpensive insurance. Damage occurring due to the improper number of ties or incorrect tie placement
is not covered under the manufacturer’s warranty.
3
Using Multiple Wall Tie Suppliers
Wall tie lengths may vary from one supplier to another. If wall ties from different suppliers are used
in the same form joint this could cause the shorter tie to become overloaded and cause a tie failure. It is
imperative when setting a wall not to mix ties from different manufacturers.
Moving the Wall Improperly / Misaligned Forms
The safest method of squaring a foundation is to do so prior to setting the forms. Place corner points
in the footing and use snapped chalk lines for the wall lines. This is not always the way it is done. Some
contractors will set the corners and the wall, squaring afterwards. This method will cause the contractor
to slide the wall in different directions in order to accomplish a square foundation. When the wall forms
are slid it is very easy to move one side of the wall further or maybe not as far as the other side. If one
side of the wall travels a different distance than the other side, the form joints will be misaligned and the
wall tie will be at an angle thereby increasing the potential for wall tie failure. It is imperative that you
check to make certain that you do not have any bent wall ties in the wall prior to pouring. Make certain
that when moving a wall both sides of the wall travel at the same time and the same distance.
Inspection
After the forms have been set and before the wall is poured, it is highly recommended that a visual
inspection of the forms be made. You should be looking for damaged wall ties, wall ties that have been
left out, and ties that are not pinned on both sides of the wall. If a wall tie is not pinned on both sides of
the wall it is the same as not having a wall tie there at all and a failure will surely occur. This inspection
may take 10-15 minutes but is the best insurance you can invest in as a wall failure can cost thousands
of dollars. Take time to do this thoroughly!! Look at every pin, wedge, wall tie and other vital components to ensure their proper positioning as well as any steps in the footing you may have.
Vibration
A vibrator, when used properly, can be used with the Precise Forms aluminum forming system.
Internal vibration is possible as long as the vibration is completed with its intended purpose of consolidating the concrete and not as a vehicle to move the concrete. Consolidation can be accomplished with
minimal vibration. Improper consolidation techniques can overload the wall ties by tighter compaction,
therefore resulting in increased loads. Special precautions must be taken not to hit the face sheet of the
form or wall ties with the vibrator head. Never use external vibration as the hardware may work loose.
W h a t To D o I n Ca s e O f A Wa l l T i e F a i l u r e
In case of a wall tie failure, gather as much of the broken tie as possible and send it to Precise Forms.
Precise has a testing facility that can determine the strength of the tie and whether or not the material
was faulty. Please make a note of how many ties were used in the wall and their location. If possible,
note the pour rate and the weather conditions. The ambient temperature can have a great deal to do
with the maximum rate of pour. A chart is located in this publication concerning the effects of the ambient temperature.
4
For m I nfor m a t ion
Precise manufactures its forms with the accepted industry standard of +/- 1/32” tolerance. The
width of our 3 foot form is 35 15/16”. This is done to compensate for minimal buildup of concrete that
can occur on the side rail. Forms “grow” because of this casual buildup of concrete. By under-sizing our
forms, we believe we have found an acceptable solution to this problem.
D e t e r m i n i n g T h e Ho l e P a t t e r n
The proper way to measure the hole pattern is from the end of the side rail to the center of the first
pin hole. The remaining holes can be determined by measuring from the right side of one pin hole to
the right side of the next. When ordering additional forms to match an existing set it is extremely important to note the correct hole pattern. It is standard policy for Precise to ask the customer to sign a shop
drawing on all non-standard items or hole patterns. This ensures that the product is made to the customers specifications.
C o m m o n Ho l e P a t t e r n s
8”
8”
6”
8”
16”
8”
6”
8”
12”
16”
18”
8”
24”
24”
12”
8”
8”
30”
24”
32”
32”
40”
12”
40”
42”
8”
24”
48”
12”
8”
8”
8”
54”
24”
56”
56”
64”
12”
64”
66”
24”
72”
12”
8”
8”
8”
78”
24”
80”
80”
12”
88”
96”
8” OC
88”
90”
6”
8”
96”
6-12
96”
8-24
5
F u l l V S . S t a n d a r d C o r n e r s , Ac c e s s o r i e s , A n d T i e s
The option is available to pour either a nominal (standard) wall thickness or a full dimension wall thickness. Each of these wall sizes demand a particular inside and outside corner, as well as wall ties. If you
attempt to use a standard corner with a full tie or vise-versa, the corner you set will kink and be difficult
to straighten. In measuring your inside corner, place the end of a tape measure on the outside face sheet
and measure in to the 90 degree turn of the face sheet. The dimension will be either a 4 3/16” for a
standard corner or 4” for a full inside corner. This same application will hold true for other forms and
accessories which are affected by wall thickness such as outside corners, attachments, blockbacks, bulkheads, window bucks, and blockdowns.
S t a c k i n g O r La y i n g D o w n O f F o r m s A n d S p e c i a l A p p l i c a t i o n s
Aluminum forms were created for pouring concrete walls. Misuse of
aluminum forms such as using them for walking planks, ladders, prying
bars, etc., will be detrimental and shorten the life of your forms. Precise
aluminum forms were designed for use in a specific manner. There are
certain ways in which forms should not be set when pouring walls.
Because of the bracing design, 36”x96” forms cannot be doublestacked horizontally in order to create a 6 foot high wall (Note illustration). This action could result in weld failure or structural deformation.
A Le v e l F o u n d a t i o n D e p e n d s O n A Le v e l F o o t i n g
A level footing is the key to a level foundation. If you begin your job with a level footing there is a
very good chance that the entire building will be level. Those who have worked with wood forms and
have had the problem of leveling off the top of their forms are in for an easier time. Now, instead of
working up on their forms they can come down and work at ground level. There are several ways of
putting in a good footing and the techniques to follow largely depend on your area and its unique soil
conditions. Your Precise sales representative will be happy to discuss with you the recommended methods for your area.
P l a c e m e n t A n d Ha n d l i n g O f F o r m s
Precise aluminum forms are lightweight and easy to transport. Our standard residential smooth aluminum 36”x96” form weighs approximately 83 pounds. Buildup of concrete will quickly add to the
weight of any form. For this reason, we recommend a premium form release agent and cleaning of the
forms after each use. It is always easier to regularly maintain a panel than it is to clean the concrete buildup off later. An additional factor which may affect weight is the addition of the Captive Pin and Set &
Lok System. Even with this consideration a standard 36”x96” aluminum form is comparable in weight
to a two foot wide wood form of the same height.
The design of the Precise TrimForm allows several ways of manual transporting. The more common
ways are on your shoulder or on your back. There is no absolute perfect method. In most cases it is what
works the best for you and your crew. Your Precise salesperson would be happy to demonstrate or discuss the available options. The most current way of placing forms is with a crane and form baskets. The
crane allows easy placement and removal of forms with minimum manpower.
Ap p l i c a t i o n O f O i l
When forms are unloaded it is best to lay them around the job site where they need to be set. While
placing the forms, one individual should be responsible for oiling all of the forms before they are set. The
6
oil creates a positive barrier between the panel and the concrete which promotes a controlled reaction
with the free lime in the concrete. This action provides a quick and clean release preventing concrete
buildup. It is a good idea to oil the back of the form every 3-4 pours. This will prevent concrete buildup
on the braces. Your crew will be able to work faster saving labor, time, and money by keeping the forms
consistently clean.
R a t e O f P o u r An d Am b i e n t Te m p e r a t u r e
A wall tie failure can occur when the rate of fill exceeds the ability of the wall tie to withstand the
loads subjected to it. The pour rate of 8’ per hour or less should be followed as closely as possible. There
are several factors that need to be addressed when deciding on your rate of pour. The trapping of concrete in corners near doors or windows will increase the rate of fill and there by increase the liquid head
pressure. Special measures, such as slowing the rate of fill, must be taken in these areas. An improper
rate of pour can cause damage to the forms or wall tie failure. It is best to address these issues before
they happen.
Most wall tie failures occur in the spring and fall. This is the time of the year when the outside air
temperature can drop quickly and unexpectedly. The concrete company may not have adjusted for the
temperature swings with the addition or deletion of hot water and other stimulants that enhance early
setting of the concrete, therefore providing early support and lessening the liquid head pressure. The following information has been extracted from the text; FORMWORK FOR CONCRETE, fourth edition
published by the ACI:
Temperature of the concrete at the time of placing has an important influence on pressures
because it affects the setting time of concrete. At low temperatures the concrete takes longer to
stiffen and therefore a greater depth can be placed before the lower portion becomes firm enough
to be self supporting. The greater liquid head thus developed results in higher lateral pressures. It
is particularly important to keep this in mind when designing forms for concrete to be placed in
cold weather or with fly ash replacement or retarding admixtures used in any weather.
Maximum Lateral Pressure For Design Of Wall Forms
Please find following pressure formulas for placement at 10 feet per hour or less based on ACI Committee 347.
NOTE: Do not design pressures in excess of 150 x height of fresh concrete in forms.
Rate of Placement
1 foot per hour
2 feet per hour
3 feet per hour
4 feet per hour
5 feet per hour
6 feet per hour
7 feet per hour
8 feet per hour
9 feet per hour
10 feet per hour
90 f
250
350
450
550
650
750
850
881
912
943
80 f
262
375
488
660
712
825
938
973
1,008
1,043
70 f
278
407
536
664
793
921
1,050
1,090
1,130
1,170
60 f
300
450
600
750
900
1,050
1,200
1,246
1,293
1,340
50 f
330
510
690
870
1,050
1,230
1,410
1,466
1,522
1,578
40 f
375
600
825
1,050
1,275
1,500
1,725
1,795
1,865
1,935
Maximum lateral pressure, pounds per square foot for temperature indicated
7
S t r i p p i n g a n d M a i n t a i n i n g Yo u r F o r m s
It is best to establish a routine of cleaning your forms as they are stripped. It is generally faster to
clean off the small amounts of concrete that may exist while the concrete is still green and the oil is still
present. A form scraper may be used to clean excess concrete off the face sheet without causing damage to the face sheet. Failure to keep the side rails clean will contribute to lateral form growth and a more
difficult time setting the panels on future pours. By keeping your forms in top condition, their life will be
extended and they will have a greater re-sale value.
Textured brick forms require the use of form pullers to remove the initial form when stripping. This
tool will allow you to safely remove the first panel without damage to the form or wall. After the first
form is removed, use one form puller to help remove the remaining forms. Place the puller on the
panel’s side where it can be used in conjunction with the panel beside it. On the open side to the panel,
remove as usual being careful not to scar the freshly poured wall. Precise Stoop Forms have been
designed for both strength and ease of stripping. Because of the designed roll on the corners, the brackets will tend to drop off on some occasions so take special precautions when stripping the stoop forms.
Un e x p e c t e d R e s u l t s F r o m Yo u r F i r s t F e w P o u r s
Aluminum forms, as with any aluminum component, will undergo a chemical reaction with wet concrete. As explained by the American Concrete Institute: An aluminum form will experience a mild
etching on the form surface. When this occurs a tough film of corrosion develops on the face sheet
of the form restricting contact with the aluminum and further concrete reactions. This process will
occur during the first several pours. The appearance of both the form and the wall may look unique during this time period. The wall will show streaks or lines where gasses have escaped the face sheet. The
condition is purely cosmetic. There is no structural damage to the concrete wall or the aluminum form.
There are procedures that limit the chemical reaction described above. The most common procedure
is using a dehydrated lime mixture. Prepare a solution by mixing dehydrated lime and water to the consistency of latex paint. With the panels laying out flat (preferably in the sun) with the face sheet up, mop
or brush the mixture over the complete surface of the panel’s face sheet. A bubbling action will occur
releasing hydrogen gas inherent within the aluminum. When the bubbling action begins to decrease
sprinkle the panels with water until this action increases. Never let the mixture completely dry on the
face sheet. Repeat this process as often as necessary until the reaction completely stops. Finally, completely rinse the lime off the face sheet of the panels. By using this method you will lessen the chemical
reaction that will occur during your initial pours. This method is time consuming and as any method, may
have varied results.
P r e v e nt in g The f t
It is strongly recommended that you identify your forms in some way that will allow you to unmistakably identify them if they were stolen. Some ways this is done is to paint, stamp, or weld the last four
digits of your social security number or special number on the back side of the form. Another technique
is to punch or drill a special hole in a particular spot on all of your forms. Some contractors have marked
their panels by painting the entire backs or edges a special color. Precise would also like to remind you
that, like any investment, aluminum forms should be insured against loss. Your local agent can help you
or you can contact a local or national poured wall contractors association for advice on this matter.
M on o l i t hi c Po u r s
Precise Forms has been recognized around the world as an innovative leader in monolithically poured
structures. The Precise Ledger System enables the contractor to form and pour the walls, beams,
columns, and deck in one continuous pour. The window and door openings are cast in place simultane8
OUTSIDE
LEDGER
OVERHANG
ADJUSTABLE
TURNBUCKLE
DECK
TELESCOPING BEAM
INSIDE
LEDGER
SHUT OFF
PLATES
ADJUSTABLE
SHORE POST
ously with the walls and ceilings. With the rising cost of lumber, all concrete structures are a definite alternative. The modular design of the Precise Ledger System permits unlimited configurations and architectural designs. The Precise Ledger System has been utilized very effectively internationally as well as in
the earth sheltered and underground home industry. The Precise Ledger System is simple to operate.
Few tools are required, unskilled laborers are easily trained, and developers are setting and pouring a unit
a day.
Pr ecis e Wind ow S ys t em
The Precise Window Series offers the easiest after-pour installation on the
market. The extruded buck is provided to the customer at no cost to help
lower startup expenses. Please note that the buck remains the property of
Precise Forms. Precise reserves the right to retrieve the buck at its discretion
due to non activity or using windows that were not purchased from Precise
or one of its representatives in the opening poured by the buck.
Plastic Plugs are available for installation of the window without drilling
the concrete. Place the plugs into the holes on the side of the buck
(Illustration 1). Set the buck into the wall and carefully pour the concrete
around the buck so as not to prematurely break off the plugs. When you are
ready to remove the buck, break off the interior of the plugs (Illustration 2)
and tap each of the four corners of the buck. The buck should easily slip out
of the opening.
Illustration 1
Illustration 2
The builder has the option of using either the Precise Vinyl
or Aluminum Window since the opening poured by the buck will
support both styles. To install the window simply place a line of
caulk around the opening in the wall (Illustration 3). Push the
window into place and drive the screws into the plastic plugs. If
Plastic Plugs were not poured into the wall, tapcons can be used
to hold the window into place.
Illustration 3
9
F r e q u e n t l y As k e d Q u e s t i o n s
Q
A
What pressures can your form withstand?
Precise Forms are rated at 1200 P.S.F. The standard ties are rated at 7000 Lbs.
Q What is the cost per square foot of your forms?
A Although some wood systems are priced per square foot, aluminum forms are priced per item due to
differing manufacturing costs.
Q Can you pour walls over 8 foot high?
A Precise Forms are stackable allowing commercial or residential "tall" walls to be poured. Our home
office is happy to assist with recommended tie placements for your specific jobs.
Q How thick of walls can you pour?
A Precise makes ties for any size wall. Very little lateral pressure is created by a thick wall. Vertical
pressure becomes the concern on thick walls and the footing must be reflective of that.
Q Why can't I weld two ties together to make a longer tie?
A This changes the strength of the tie and puts it into a high risk of a blowout. Never apply heat to a tie.
Precise can service your needs very quickly and supply you with the proper accessories.
Q How do I attach blockouts to your forms?
A Aluminum forms, like wood, can be nailed. Using a portable drill, holes can be made for attaching wood
blockouts with duplex nails. If you prefer not to put holes in your forms fillers can be used to position ties in
Special 4x2x4 Corner
proper blockout widths. The ties can then be used to attach the blockouts with wire.
Q
A
How do I make 2" and 4" offsets?
See drawings.
Q How do I run pipes through your system?
A In the same way as above. Position ties into the proper
position and slip an oversized pipe over the tie.
Q What do I do for a radius wall?
A Our staff in Kansas City will help you lay out your difficult
projects. Radius walls are no problem and have been done many
times in the past.
Q
A
How do I make a one sided wall?
Our staff in Kansas City can address that question best.
8"
Special 4x2x4 Corner
8"
4" ISC
8"
8"
10"
8"
8"
4" ISC
10"
4"
4"
12"
4" 4"
2” and 4” Offsets.
12"
4" 4"
Q I can't afford to buy your forms over wood. They are too expensive.
A You can't afford to buy wood forms. The number of wood form sets you have to buy in proportion to one
Angle forms
8" is 4"
set of Precise aluminum can be as many as 15 sets. Even if the cost of one90
setDeg
of wood
only a third of
4" ISC
Precise's cost, you could end up paying almost 5 times as much. An added benefit, aluminum forms retain
8"
90 Deg
8"
4"
their basic aluminum value. Lease/Purchase financing is also available from
our Angle
associates.
4" ISC
Q What is the best way to insulate a wall?
8"
4" ISC
A If the builder does not want the insulation on the outside of the wall but rather in
the
center
of
the
wall,
4"
8"
90 Deg Angle
8"
use a combination tie such as a 6-10" tie. Pour half of the wall with the insulation in place. Then strip half of
4" ISC
the wall in order to reset and pour the other half of the wall.
4"
8"
90 Deg Angle
8"
10
8"
Q My wood forms are fast.
A Aluminum forms are just as fast. There is 50% more square footage of form carried each time and the 3
foot aluminum weighs in most cases the same as a 2 foot wood form.
Q When I need a special filler I just cut it.
A In most cases this is not necessary, but we do offer special custom forms. Our staff would be glad to
show you why you wouldn't need a special in most situations.
Q How do I pour against an existing
wall?
A Use base tie pins against the existing
wall, put your ties in place and set as
normal. Beside each panel nail 2 x 4's
against the existing wall. Secure the end of
the wall with braces so it can not push
away from the existing wall.
Existing Wall
2x4
First Form
is a 4" Filler
Base Tie Pins
Wall Tie
Footing Brace is nailed to
footing with concrete nails
8"
Use 2 x 12 to prevent
bracing from embeding
itself into the soil
Braces
Dirt Bank
8"
Q I can buy accessories almost anywhere
for my wood forms.
Special
Corner has many distributors around
A 4x2x4
Precise
the country and can react as fast as needed
10"
on most items.
Q Is the channel brace as strong as the
competition's hat section?
A 4"Independent test results support the
4" ISC
fact that the Trimform is stronger in most
12"
every way. The results are available upon
request.
4" 4"
8"
Q Why doesn't Precise have three grades of forms like other companies?
A It doesn't make sense to build more than one form when the form you manufacture is the strongest in the
90 Deg Angle
8"
4"
industry (see independent test results).
4" ISC
Q
A
How do I make an offset T-Wall?
See Drawings.
8"
8"
4"
8"
8"
4" ISC
8"
8"
4" ISC
4"
4" ISC
90 Deg Angle
4" ISC
12"
8"
16"
4" ISC
2"
10"
16"
Q Why doesn't Precise forms have a striker plate at every hole in the side rail?
A With the .125 thick face sheet there is no need for the striker plate. By welding the striker plate you are
heating the face sheet and therefore allowing it to deflect. Other manufactures do not put the plates on some of
their .125 face sheet forms.
11
Q
A
Can I pour full walls with nominal corners?
This can be achieved by putting a spacer on the outside corner so the wall ties remain straight.
Q
A
Can a 6-12 hole pattern hook up with an 8" on center hole pattern?
Not unless you punch a filler with a 2" on center hole pattern.
Q
A
Q
A
What hole pattern do you recommend?
Either the 6-12 or the 8" on center.
Why does the aluminum forming system have fewer accessories than plywood?
The aluminum system is a 36" modulation vs. 24". Therefore, 33% fewer accessories.
12
6975 lb
2 Ties
16’ Height
8’ + 8’
6525 lb
2 Ties
186”
174”
6075 lb
2 Ties
5625 lb
2 Ties
162”
150”
138”
5175 lb
2 Ties
6919 lb
2 Ties
126”
114”
5906 lb
2 Ties
3375 lb
1 Tie
4219 lb
2 Ties
4050 lb
2 Ties
2250 lb
1 Tie
506 lb
1 Tie
102”
90”
78”
66”
54”
42”
30”
18”
6”
6075 lb
2 Ties
5625 lb
2 Ties
5175 lb
2 Ties
4725 lb
2 Ties
6244 lb
2 Ties
5231 lb
2 Ties
2925 lb
1 Tie
2475 lb
1 Tie
2869 lb
1 Tie
2250 lb
1 Tie
506 lb
1 Tie
14’ Height
8’ + 6’
162”
150”
138”
126”
114”
102”
90”
78”
66”
54”
42”
30”
18”
6”
5175 lb
2 Ties
4725 lb
2 Ties
4275 lb
2 Ties
3825 lb
2 Ties
4894 lb
2 Ties
3881 lb
2 Ties
2025 lb
1 Tie
2700 lb
1 Tie
900 lb
1 Tie
12’ Height
8’ + 4’
138”
126”
114”
102”
90”
78”
66”
54”
42”
30”
18”
6”
4275 lb
2 Ties
3825 lb
2 Ties
3375 lb
1 Tie
2925 lb
1 Tie
2475 lb
1 Tie
2869 lb
1 Tie
1856 lb
1 Tie
675 lb
1 Tie
225 lb
1 Tie
10’ Height
8’ + 2’
114”
102”
90”
78”
66”
54”
42”
30”
18”
6”
3825 lb
2 Ties
3375 lb
1 Tie
2925 lb
1 Tie
2475 lb
1 Tie
2869 lb
1 Tie
2250 lb
1 Tie
506 lb
1 Tie
9’ Height
8’ + 1’
102”
90”
78”
66”
54”
42”
30”
18”
6”
6”
900 lb
1 Tie
Load per tie in pounds
Number of ties required at this location
3825 lb
2 Ties
3375 lb
1 Tie
2925 lb
1 Tie
2475 lb
1 Tie
2869 lb
1 Tie
2250 lb
1 Tie
506 lb
1 Tie
9’ Height
102”
90”
78”
66”
54”
42”
30”
18”
6”
3375 lb
1 Tie
4219 lb
1 Tie
4050 lb
1 Tie
2250 lb
1 Tie
506 lb
1 Tie
8’ Height
90”
78”
66”
54”
42”
30”
18”
6”
3544 lb
1 Tie
3656 lb
1 Tie
900 lb
1 Tie
6’ Height
66”
54”
42”
30”
18”
6”
2700 lb
1 Tie
900 lb
1 Tie
4’ Height
42”
30”
18”
6”
M a x i m u m Lo a d s
If the load is higher than the maximum you must use two ties.
8’ and under wall: Maximum load per tie is 4667 lbs. (Safety factor 1.5:1)
Over 8’ high wall: Maximum load per tie is 3500 lbs. (Safety factor 2.0:1)
Hole location
Example
3 F e e t W i d e F o r m s W i t h 6 - 1 2 Ho l e P a t t e r n
R e c o m m e n d e d S t a n d a r d D u t y T i e Lo c a t i o n
4725 lb
1 Tie
6975 lb
2 Ties
16’ Height
8’ + 8’
6525 lb
2 Ties
186”
174”
6075 lb
2 Ties
5625 lb
2 Ties
5175 lb
2 Ties
162”
150”
138”
4275 lb
1 Tie
126”
114”
3825 lb
1 Tie
3375 lb
1 Tie
4219 lb
1 Tie
4050 lb
675 lb
2250 lb
1 Tie
506 lb
1 Tie
102”
90”
78”
66”
54”
42”
30”
18”
6”
6075 lb
2 Ties
5625 lb
2 Ties
5175 lb
2 Ties
4725 lb
1 Tie
4275 lb
1 Tie
3825 lb
1 Tie
3375 lb
1 Tie
4219 lb
1 Tie
4050 lb
1 Tie
2250 lb
1 Tie
506 lb
1 Tie
14’ Height
8’ + 6’
162”
150”
138”
126”
114”
102”
90”
78”
66”
54”
42”
30”
18”
6”
5175 lb
2 Ties
4725 lb
1 Tie
4275 lb
1 Tie
3825 lb
1 Tie
3375 lb
1 Tie
4219 lb
1 Tie
4050 lb
1 Tie
2250 lb
1 Tie
506 lb
1 Tie
12’ Height
8’ + 4’
138”
126”
114”
102”
90”
78”
66”
54”
42”
30”
18”
6”
4275 lb
1 Tie
3825 lb
1 Tie
3375 lb
1 Tie
4219 lb
1 Tie
4050 lb
1 Tie
2250 lb
1 Tie
506 lb
1 Tie
10’ Height
8’ + 2’
114”
102”
90”
78”
66”
54”
42”
30”
18”
6”
3825 lb
1 Tie
3375 lb
1 Tie
4219 lb
1 Tie
4050 lb
1 Tie
2250 lb
1 Tie
506 lb
1 Tie
9’ Height
8’ + 1’
102”
90”
78”
66”
54”
42”
30”
18”
6”
6”
900 lb
1 Tie
Load per tie in pounds
Number of ties required at this location
3825 lb
1 Tie
3375 lb
1 Tie
4219 lb
1 Tie
4050 lb
1 Tie
2250 lb
1 Tie
506 lb
1 Tie
9’ Height
102”
90”
78”
66”
54”
42”
30”
18”
6”
4894 lb
1 Tie
4950 lb
1 Tie
3656 lb
1 Tie
900 lb
1 Tie
8’ Height
90”
78”
66”
54”
42”
30”
18”
6”
3544 lb
1 Tie
3656 lb
1 Tie
900 lb
1 Tie
6’ Height
66”
54”
42”
30”
18”
6”
2700 lb
1 Tie
900 lb
1 Tie
4’ Height
42”
30”
18”
6”
M a x i m u m Lo a d s
If the load is higher than the maximum you must use two ties.
8’ and under wall: Maximum load per tie is 6533 lbs. (Safety factor 1.5:1)
Over 8’ high wall: Maximum load per tie is 4900 lbs. (Safety factor 2.0:1)
Hole location
Example
3 F e e t W i d e F o r m s W i t h 6 - 1 2 Ho l e P a t t e r n
R e c o m m e n d e d H e a v y D u t y T i e Lo c a t i o n
56
80
2925 lb
1 Tie
6625 lb
2 Ties
80
104
5625 lb
2 Ties
6075 lb
2 Ties
5175 lb
2 Ties
4725 lb
2 Ties
6875 lb
2 Ties
6600 lb
2 Ties
4800 lb
2 Ties
3325 lb
1 Tie
900 lb
1 Tie
14’ Height
8’ + 6’
160
152
6525 lb
2 Ties
6975 lb
2 Ties
136
128
112
104
88
6075 lb
2 Ties
5625 lb
2 Ties
6200 lb
2 Ties
5175 lb
2 Ties
16’ Height
8’ + 8’
184
176
160
152
136
128
112
88
64
64
40
2475 lb
1 Tie
3375 lb
1 Tie
32
2600 lb
1 Tie
16
56
40
8
2400 lb
1 Tie
4725 lb
2 Ties
5175 lb
2 Ties
3825 lb
2 Ties
4275 lb
2 Ties
5375 lb
2 Ties
4800 lb
2 Ties
3325 lb
1 Tie
900 lb
1 Tie
12’ Height
8’ + 4’
136
128
112
104
88
80
64
56
40
32
16
8
3825 lb
2 Ties
4275 lb
2 Ties
3375 lb
1 Tie
3825 lb
2 Ties
2925 lb
1 Tie
2475 lb
1 Tie
3125 lb
1 Tie
1997 lb
1 Tie
509 lb
1 Tie
9’ Height
8’ + 1’
100
92
76
68
2925 lb
1 Tie
3375 lb
1 Tie
52
44
28
20
4
8
3875 lb
2 Ties
3000 lb
1 Tie
1225 lb
1 Tie
10’ Height
8’ + 2’
112
104
88
80
64
56
40
32
16
8
6”
900 lb
1 Tie
Load per tie in pounds
Number of ties required at this location
5569 lb
2 Ties
2700 lb
1 Tie
3150 lb
1 Tie
3781 lb
2 Ties
2400 lb
1 Tie
625 lb
1 Tie
9’ Height
100
104
76
80
52
56
28
32
4
8
3375 lb
1 Tie
3800 lb
1 Tie
4200 lb
1 Tie
2400 lb
1 Tie
625 lb
1 Tie
8’ Height
88
80
64
56
40
32
16
8
2600 lb
1 Tie
2475 lb
1 Tie
2400 lb
1 Tie
625 lb
1 Tie
6’ Height
64
56
40
32
16
8
2700 lb
1 Tie
900 lb
1 Tie
4’ Height
40
32
24
16
8
M a x i m u m Lo a d s
If the load is higher than the maximum you must use two ties.
8’ and under wall: Maximum load per tie is 4667 lbs. (Safety factor 1.5:1)
Over 8’ high wall: Maximum load per tie is 3500 lbs. (Safety factor 2.0:1)
Hole location
Example
3 F e e t W i d e F o r m s W i t h 8 - 2 4 Ho l e P a t t e r n
R e c o m m e n d e d S t a n d a r d D u t y T i e Lo c a t i o n
32
16
8
625 lb
1 Tie
80
3825 lb
1 Tie
104
5625 lb
2 Ties
6075 lb
2 Ties
5175 lb
2 Ties
4725 lb
1 Tie
4275 lb
1 Tie
3825 lb
1 Tie
3375 lb
1 Tie
3800 lb
1 Tie
4200 lb
1 Tie
2400 lb
1 Tie
900 lb
1 Tie
4725 lb
1 Tie
5175 lb
2 Ties
3825 lb
1 Tie
4275 lb
1 Tie
3800 lb
1 Tie
3375 lb
1 Tie
4200 lb
1 Tie
2400 lb
1 Tie
625 lb
1 Tie
12’ Height
8’ + 4’
136
128
112
104
88
80
64
56
40
32
16
8
3825 lb
1 Tie
4275 lb
1 Tie
4400 lb
1 Tie
3825 lb
1 Tie
4375 lb
1 Tie
3125 lb
1 Tie
1997 lb
1 Tie
509 lb
1 Tie
9’ Height
8’ + 1’
100
92
76
68
3800 lb
1 Tie
3375 lb
1 Tie
44
52
28
20
4
8
4200 lb
1 Tie
2400 lb
1 Tie
625 lb
1 Tie
10’ Height
8’ + 2’
112
104
88
80
64
56
40
32
16
8
6”
900 lb
1 Tie
Load per tie in pounds
Number of ties required at this location
5569 lb
2 Ties
3150 lb
1 Tie
2700 lb
1 Tie
3781 lb
1 Tie
2400 lb
1 Tie
625 lb
1 Tie
9’ Height
100
104
76
80
52
56
28
32
4
8
5375 lb
1 Tie
4800 lb
1 Tie
3325 lb
1 Tie
900 lb
1 Tie
8’ Height
88
80
64
56
40
32
16
8
3875 lb
1 Tie
3325 lb
1 Tie
900 lb
1 Tie
6’ Height
64
56
40
32
16
8
2700 lb
1 Tie
900 lb
1 Tie
4’ Height
40
32
24
16
8
M a x i m u m Lo a d s
If the load is higher than the maximum you must use two ties.
8’ and under wall: Maximum load per tie is 6533 lbs. (Safety factor 1.5:1)
Over 8’ high wall: Maximum load per tie is 4900 lbs. (Safety factor 2.0:1)
Hole location
Example
3 F e e t W i d e F o r m s W i t h 8 - 2 4 Ho l e P a t t e r n
R e c o m m e n d e d He a v y D u t y T i e Lo c a t i o n
14’ Height
8’ + 6’
160
152
6525 lb
2 Ties
6975 lb
2 Ties
136
128
112
104
88
64
6075 lb
2 Ties
5625 lb
2 Ties
4275 lb
1 Tie
5175 lb
2 Ties
4275 lb
1 Tie
16’ Height
8’ + 8’
184
176
160
152
136
128
112
88
3375 lb
1 Tie
56
3800 lb
1 Tie
80
64
40
32
4200 lb
1 Tie
16
56
40
8
2400 lb
1 Tie
625 lb
1 Tie
32
16
8
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