South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016

South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
1
South African Intruder Detection
Services Association
INFORMATION GUIDE AND MEMBER LISTING
66.....
CONTENTS
2.......
Who is SAIDSA?
2.......Membership
3.......
Code of Conduct.
4.......
What you can expect from your Intruder Alarm system.
6.......
The Importance of training.
7.......
SAIDSA Technical Training.
8.......
Lifetime of a security system.
10...... Pet Immunity in Intruder Alarm Systems.
10...... Compromising Security for Price.
11...... Managing your Intruder Alarm System.
13...... False Alarms and Non-Activations.
15...... Radio Jamming in Security Systems.
17...... Frequently Asked Questions.
18...... The operation of a central station.
20...... Bylaw 1.....Requirements for a SAIDSA Approved Alarm Control Room.
25.....
Bylaw 2.....Requirements for a SAIDSA Approved un-manned Control Room.
28..... Selecting an Armed Reaction service.
29..... Bylaw 3.....Requirements for an Armed Reaction service.
33..... Bylaw 4.....Register of Approved Installers.
35.....
Bylaw 5.....Requirement for installation of an Intruder Alarm.
42.....
Annexures (Installation Categories) for Bylaw 5
49.....
Bylaw 6.....Requirements for a CCTV Off-site monitoring Control Room.
54.....
Bylaw 7.....Requirements for a Specialised Security Service
57.....
Bylaw 8.....Requirements for an approved electric fence installer & installations
58.....
Bylaw 9.....Requirements for installation of a CCTV System.
MEMBER LISTING
Published by The South African Intruder Detection Services Association (SAIDSA):
146 Newlands Avenue, Western Extension, Benoni, 1501.
P O Box 17103, Benoni West, 1503
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.saidsa.co.za
Tel: (011) 845-4870 Fax: (011) 845-4850
Editor: Bryan Rudolph DTP Layout: Bryan Rudolph
Printers: Print Junction
No part(s) or section(s) of this publication, in its current form or in any other form including previous
issues by the same author / publishers, may be reproduced, copied, translated, transmitted, stored or
retrieved, sold, altered in any way, used by any other third party directly or indirectly or recorded in
any form, whether electronically, mechanical or by any other means, irrelevant if such is subject to or
without remuneration or any other royalty that may be applicable, unless prior written permission to
do so has been obtained from the author / publishers hereof. All rights of the author / publishers are
reserved, and any indulgence made by the author / publishers must not be construed as whole or part
abandonment of the authors’ / publishers copyright herein. Every effort has been made to ensure
accuracy of information at the time of going to print. However, the author and publishers cannot be
held responsible for errors or omissions for any reason whatsoever.
Copyrights © 1994 - 2016 - SAIDSA - All rights reserved
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
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South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
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Who is SAIDSA?
The South African Intruder Detection Services Association (SAIDSA) is an association of
service providers of security systems, ranging from basic alarms to sophisticated electronic CCTV
and intruder detection systems, incorporating signal monitoring as well as the provision of armed
reaction services. SAIDSA is regarded as the “Watchdog” of this segment of the industry and has
the interests of both its members and the public at heart.
It is the representative employer body for the industry in South Africa. The objectives of the
Association include a continuous evaluation of the development and the adequacy of skills in the
industry. The objective of SAIDSA is to upgrade the quality and standards of electronic security in
South Africa and to protect the public from unscrupulous, “fly-by-night” operators.
Why you should use the services of a SAIDSA member
It is important to realise that when a security system is purchased, an ongoing relationship is
entered into between the purchaser and the security company concerned. The security company
must have an infrastructure and the required expertise to support the relationship continuously.
All companies listed on SAIDSA’s Approved Register have complied in every way with very
stringent standards that have been laid down by SAIDSA in regard to control rooms, installations
and reaction services and are continuously inspected to ensure continued compliance.
A complaint against an approved service provider will be investigated by the Executive
Committee of SAIDSA and, if not satisfactorily resolved, the member may be removed from the
Register.
SAIDSA appeals to all members of the public, commerce and industry to consider the
importance of selecting a reputable company. This Register of Service Providers has been
compiled to assist in making the right choice and is available to all interested parties.
The benefits to the public of the Register are that the companies:
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Have been vetted, are experienced and conform to acceptable standards.
Have a minimum number of employees and the infrastructure to support their operation.
Offer a 24-hour contact and repair service throughout the year.
Use a Control Room that is properly constructed and supported as described in SAIDSA’s
By-law 1 or 6.
Are capable and willing to install to the recommended standards laid down in SAIDSA’s
By-law 5.
Are capable and willing to use or provide Reaction Services as prescribed in SAIDSA’s
By-law 3.
The official register is continually updated at the SAIDSA Head Office. Should you wish to confirm
that a company is approved, contact SAIDSA on (011) 845-4870 or Fax (011) 845-4850 or write to
P O Box 17103, Benoni West, 1503.
Member listings are also updated on our website: www.saidsa.co.za
Membership
SAIDSA
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attempts to meet its commitments to the public interest by:
Establishing a minimum eligibility standard for membership.
Inspecting the adequacy of the facilities available to provide service.
Examining the extent of financial risk to contain insolvency, i.e. credit rating.
Explanatory notes on membership
It should be appreciated that within the field of electronic security there are several disciplines viz.
installing, repair and maintenance, monitoring and armed reaction. While some companies are
engaged in all the disciplines, some may specialise in only one or two of these disciplines and it is
therefore necessary to clearly define, for users of this booklet, a guideline.
To this end, a short explanation of each category of membership, defining the business in which the
member company would be engaged in, is given below.
Corporate Members
alarm systems and, in addition, operate an in-house monitoring service. Such a company is required to have, in its own employ, a specific number of technical staff, in order to facilitate a
24-hour repair service.
Its Central Station, which carries out the monitoring function, must comply with SAIDSA’s
By-Law 1 (Alarm monitoring) and/or By-Law 6 (CCTV off-site monitoring) which prescribes the
standard of construction, equipment and operation for Central Stations.
In addition, a Corporate Member may also operate its own in-house armed reaction service and in
such an instance this must comply with SAIDSA’s By-Law 3.
Associate Members
This category of membership refers to those member companies which install, repair and maintain
security systems, but who may not operate an in-house monitoring or reaction service. Such a
company will facilitate a monitoring or reaction service for its clients through an Approved Central
Station service provider and/or armed reaction service provider.
Central Station Providers
This category of membership refers to a company which provides a monitoring service, largely
to those companies which do not operate an in-house monitoring facility.
Reaction Service Members
The Reaction Service Member provides armed reaction. Due to the fact that a company operating
an armed reaction service is restricted to specific geographic areas of operation, such members
tend to be localised and will offer their services to other member companies and members of the
public.
Affiliate Members
This membership category caters for those companies engaged in the supply of electronic
equipment to the industry. Such members do not install, monitor or engage in armed reaction.
Special Services Members
This membership category caters for members who operate a specialised security service and who
are offering, to members of the public, a valuable and important service of an extremely dangerous
nature. Specialised Services for the purpose of this by-law will include all armed reaction services
not covered by Bylaw 3, and shall include the following services: Asset in Transit Services, Bank
Security, Close Protection Services (where vehicles are used), Surveillance Services (where vehicles
are used), or any other security service involving the use of vehicles and such service does not fall
within the ambit of By-law 3.
Asset Tracking and Recovery Members
and/or Asset Recovery Members
The tracking and/or recovery of assets not stationary/positioned at a fixed address.
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 Code of Conduct
As a member of SAIDSA I undertake to:
Conform and abide by the Constitution and By-Laws of the Association and fulfil the requirements as laid down by the Security Officers’ Act.
Act with integrity, dedication and responsibility at all times, uphold
standards and avoid any action contrary to the public interest that would bring the Association or the Industry into disrepute.
Decline to act in a professional capacity unless capable, qualified and
competent to do so.
To support improvements to the law and administration, and to promote beneficial legislation or other measures affecting the Association and the security industry.
This category of membership is reserved for those companies that install, repair and maintain
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What you can expect from your
intruder alarm
system
A question regularly asked of the
security industry is: “What can I expect
from a security system?”
Fortunately the answer is not complicated
and, once answered, a prospective buyer
should be able to choose and appraise a
system with confidence. The system not
only refers to the physical system but also
to the monitoring of the system.
Most individuals, companies or organisations that have goods, personnel or offer
a service need alarm protection. This will
include private users, commercial, retail, financial
establishments, manufacturers and state departments. Insurance companies indirectly need
security systems to minimise their risk. Direct and indirect users of security systems should expect
the system to satisfy a number of requirements.
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A security system is expected to minimise the risk of loss and damage to property
and in the event of personal attack be able to alert a third party so that the person under attack can be assisted. The system is designed to detect and deter, but can never
guarantee against intrusion.
The system must be designed, in conjunction with the client, by a consultant who is well trained in risk assessment. He must be able to advise and design a suitable system by taking cognisance of the risk, the environment and the capability of the user.
The equipment and the installation must be of a very high standard as shoddy
equipment and installation can result in malfunctions and false alarms.
Security systems may have to operate under extreme temperature changes, dusty
environments and in very hostile conditions. The system is often subjected to
considerable wear and tear. In many instances door contacts are operated frequently during the day.
The system is also in many instances, certainly in the commercial sector, required to
operate 24 hours a day. A high standard of maintenance must therefore be expected by the user. If there is any malfunction that is not rectified quickly and efficiently the protection will be jeopardised.
The security system is only as good as the response that it will generate. The user
must therefore expect, if the system is monitored by a control room, to have information and instructions passed on with a minimum delay to responsible parties.
It is very important to note, however, that a security system forms part of the total protection
and must not be seen to be a replacement for personnel and physical protection. The system, in
conjunction with the other security measures, must improve the total security. Do not expect the
responsibility of good security management to be replaced by a security system. It is the user’s
responsibility to check the system and ensure that it is operated correctly.
Security systems have previously been considered by many to be an unnecessary expense,
perhaps a “grudge buy”. Fortunately, this attitude has changed and security systems are accepted
as being a fundamental requirement for the protection of businesses, possessions and personnel.
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The Importance of Training
The importance of training can never be over-emphasised in an industry
where there is a constant shortage of skilled technical staff.
Whether starting a new career or keeping abreast of the latest technology,
ongoing training and skills development should form part of our everyday lives.
Unfortunately, training is often seen in our industry as an expense rather than an investment and
usually placed at the bottom of the list. Technicians tend to move from company to company,
bringing with them a load of experience, but often a lack of solid skills.
Whether you are a company investing in your staff or an individual investing in your career,
training will bring with it a host of advantages that will give you or your company a competitive
edge.
The saying, “With knowledge comes responsibility” is very true. By empowering technicians with
knowledge, their mindsets change and they develop a sense of responsibility, accountability, loyalty
and pride in their work. When we equate this into monetary terms and bottom line profits, it is
priceless.
In any country, the success of its people and economy is directly proportional to its skills and it is
our social responsibility to ensure that skills development is available to everyone. The security
industry is by far the most serious industry in the world as clients as well as government look to us
as the “professionals” responsible for protecting their lives and assets.
Most reasons for failing to implement a training programme within a company are usually attributed to time constraints or lack of finances. If correctly budgeted, both of these excuses can be
overcome, with training. Productivity will rise, false alarms will be reduced and profits will increase.
This is a guarantee !
So, by investing in your future or the future of your employees, you will have placed yourself or
your company firmly on the road to success.
At SAIDSA, we place training at the top
of the list, ensuring that the industry has
a constant supply of expert technical
staff going into the future. SAIDSA has a
SASSETA acredited training centre.
The Intruder Alarm industry in South Africa is continuously in need of well
trained technical staff. SAIDSA has introduced a series of comprehensive
training courses for new and current technicians aimed at skills development
and upliftment.
SAIDSA Technical Courses
This 5 day course offers new and current technicians the opportunity to learn, update or improve
their skills. These short courses carry a SAIDSA recognised certificate and consist of theory and
practical training as well as the writing of exams for each course.
The courses include the following subjects:
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Detector Theory
False Alarm management
Worksite Safety
Wiring Techniques
Radio and Antenna Installations
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Installation Techniques
Programming principles
Basic Security Electronics
Faultfinding Principles
SAIDSA Certified Technicians
A current technician may qualify as a SAIDSA “Certified” Technician by completing all 9 of the
courses and being found competent in all of them as well as a final certified exam. These courses
will require the passing of exams in theory and practical. Technicians applying for “certified” status
are required to have practised as an Intruder Alarm technician for a minimum period as specified
by SAIDSA.
Insurance Assessor Training
This 1 day certificate course allows
Insurance Brokers and Assessors to
become familiar with the identification
and workings of the modern Intruder
Alarm system, learn how to inspect
and recognise problems and assess
the risk in an installation.
Sales Training
This 1 day certificate course will
teach a salesperson how to identify
and select the correct products for
an application, correctly assess a
risk and place detectors according to
the theory of detection and SAIDSA
standards. A powerful and dynamic
learning experience which places the
sales person on the right path to
successful sales in intruder alarms.
Whether a new technician to the industry, a current technician, a salesperson
or a school-leaver looking to start a
career in this dynamic and ever-changing
industry, SAIDSA has a training course
tailor-made for you.
“Training is an Investment,
not an Expense”
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SAIDSA Technical Training
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
For more details on costs and course dates, please visit our website www.saidsa.co.za or contact SAIDSA on (011) 845-4870 or email: [email protected]
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Lifetime of a Security System
It would be naive to believe that a security system can last for ever. Although
the lifetime of a system may vary among products, a general industry
accepted lifespan is between five and seven years.
This however, should never be taken as a strict rule.
A battery performing under heavy loads or subjected to
continuous power cuts may only have a short lifespan. Batteries or control panels installed in extreme heat or extreme
cold areas may also have a reduced lifespan.
Detectors and control panels that do not have their cable
entry points sealed may allow insects to enter the device.
Insect excretion corrodes and damages printed circuit
boards and components.
Did you know that a pyroelectric sensor within a Passive
infrared detector starts degrading after about two years?
This does not mean that the detector stops working, but the
detector may slowly become either more sensitive as it gets
older, or less sensitive, and may be prone to false alarms,
intermittent activations or non-activations.
Another example of a reduced lifetime is a system that
is installed in an area that is prone to frequent lightning
strikes in summer months. Constant exposure to static
electricity caused by lightning can weaken the electronic
components in a device, eventually leading to component
failure. Ask your installation company to do regular checks on your system and advise you when
components start to show signs of ageing. Better still, consider taking out a maintenance
agreement with your installation company.
By having your system checked and maintained on a regular
basis you can avoid the effects of sudden device failure.
Useful Information
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Batteries, transformers, control panels, Radio transmitters and Antennas should never be placed in ceiling voids or any other areas where extreme heat or cold is present. SAIDSA Bylaws prohibit this practice.
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Always have your system checked regularly to avoid battery
failure.
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Ensure that your transformer is plugged in and switched on at all times.
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Pet ‘Immunity’ in Intruder
Alarm Systems
Pets have always been a major cause
of false alarms in domestic intruder alarm
systems. Although great strides have been
made in detector technology, we have yet
to see a totally foolproof pet “immune”
detector that does not compromise the
catch performance of the detector.
However, there are many very good pet
“friendly” detectors on the market that are
reasonably secure providing that they are
correctly installed.
What we need to ask ourselves is “How
big is a pet?”
In industry terms, we consider a pet as
being around the size of a Jack Russel,
maltese poodle, spaniel, cat, etc. for indoor
use.
Most detectors will see a larger animal as
the size of a human if it gets close enough
to the detector. In fact, at close range, a cat
may be seen as the size of a tiger.
Most pet “friendly” detectors will not
detect pets, provided the pet stays on the
floor. But what about a cat climbing up
the curtains or jumping on furniture? This
becomes a real problem if the cat gets too
close to the detector and will most likely
cause false alarms.
While a cat on its own may not produce
much infrared, a number of cats or dogs
moving together in a bunch will also
increase the total amount of infrared seen
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Spend a few Rand more for good security.
Do not leave yourself vulnerable by underprotecting your property to save money.
Always use a SAIDSA member to install your security system.
Upgrade your system when your risk or assets increase, or when alterations or additions are carried out.
 Consider entering into a maintenance agreement with your installation company.
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Managing your Intruder Alarm System
In order to ensure years of trouble-free operation of your intruder alarm
system, it is important to follow a few basic rules regarding the management,
operation and maintenance of your system.
by the detector.
When designing a detector, the first priority is to
detect a human target of a specified temperature,
within a specified distance, at a specific speed with
reference to the background temperature of the
area. The closer a human target is to the detector
the easier it is to detect it as the infrared emitted by
the target gets stronger.
Although a pet may not emit sufficient infrared
while on the floor, the closer it gets to the
detector, the easier a detector will detect it and may
then see it as a larger target or a human.
The trick is to ensure that the detector is installed
so that it is neither near the curtains or looking
directly onto furniture or cupboards that may be
accessible to your pets. It is preferable to face the
detector onto an area free of obstructions.
Compromising Security for Price
We all agree that a security system is a
grudge buy at the best of times and
therefore we tend to opt for the lowest
quote we can find.
An intruder alarm system can only
perform to the highest level and offer true
security if quality components are used.
Would you buy the cheapest pacemaker
you could find to keep you alive? Well,
security systems can be similar - we use
them firstly to protect the lives of our
Never expect a low quality detector to provide stable, reliable and false-alarm-free protection when
you need it most. Never compromise security for price.
families and secondly to protect our assets.
The lower you go in price, the less likely your
installer will use top of the range equipment in
your installation and the less likely your system
will work when required to do so.
The next time you get your usual three
quotes, do not ask your salesperson why his
quote is so high, but rather ask yourself why
the other two are so low.
The chances are, they are using low quality
devices to protect your life.
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
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2.
3.
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5.
6.
It is essential that all the users of the system are properly instructed in the use of
the system and the procedures relating to the Central Station and the armed reaction. The system must be tested at least every two weeks. This includes ALL of the devices in the system to ensure that they are fully operational.
Have the system checked at least twice a year. These checks should preferably be
carried out by a technician from the company which installed the system.
It is essential that the power supply to the system is not interrupted. Make all members of family and staff aware of this.
Rodents can damage cabling, so ensure the property (ceiling voids in particular) is
rodent free.
Keep the control panel and the radio antenna free of obstructions to ensure
ventilation and efficient operation.
Responsibilities of the User
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Ensure that instruction manuals are kept in a safe place.
Ensure that the Central Station has up-to-date information concerning the owner, keyholders and telephone numbers.
Arming codes should be changed should a staff member leave under unusual
circumstances.
Test the system thoroughly after repairs are carried out to equipment. This advice is also important after renovations, alterations, etc.
If using your alarm communicator on a pre-paid telephone service, ensure that it is
fully paid at all times.
When making alterations or additions, always call your service provider to test,
re-assess and extend the system, if necessary.
Keep the distribution of arming codes among staff to the absolute minimum.
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False Alarms and Non-Activations
False alarms or nuisance alarms are alarm activations that occur when there
is no danger to life or property and can create major problems for businesses,
private individuals and security companies. Non-activations on the other
hand can occur when a system is not correctly installed or incorrect
operation prevents the system from activating.
False alarms are not just a constant annoyance but are a real threat
to the security of homes and businesses – not to mention the threat
they pose to the alarm industry. Customers are needlessly woken up
in the early hours – which doesn’t endear them to their neighbours,
who are also disturbed.
Finally, the alarm response provider could suffer from the misconception that the alarm is a waste of time, lulling the responding security
officers into a false sense of security.
Fewer false alarms mean faster response times. False alarms can also
strain relations between customers and service providers. This costs
time and money in repeated call-outs and wastes response officers’
time which could be better spent responding to genuine alarms. Steps
should be taken to identify the causes of false alarms.
POSSIBLE CAUSES OF FALSE ALARMS
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Draughts caused by air-conditioners, fans, heaters, open or broken windows.
Birds, insects, rodents or pets in close proximity to detector.
Vibrations caused by heavy machinery.
Reflections from windows, mirrors, swimming pools, ponds or water features.
Doors that don’t close securely.
Detectors not mounted securely with screws.
Direct sunlight on detectors
Damaged or old sensors.
Constant AC power failure.
Incorrect voltage to detectors due to damaged batteries.
Insects inside PIRs due to cable entry points not being sealed.
Poor quality or poorly installed detectors.
Wiring joints not soldered and insulated.
Dirty or cracked lenses in detectors.
POSSIBLE CAUSES OF NON-ACTIVATIONS
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Incorrect detector used for the application.
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Insufficient coverage of the area.
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Incorrect placement of the detector.
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Radio antennas incorrectly mounted, touching or too close to metal objects in
cupboards e.g golfclubs, coat hangers, safes etc.
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Placement of boxes or stock in front of detectors in warehouses, storerooms or
supermarkets
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Adding or moving of partitions, furniture or plants in front of detectors.
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Hanging signage being placed in front of a detector in a shop.
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Incorrect mounting height of detector.
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Background temperature of area higher than human body temperature.
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Dirty or cracked lenses in detectors.
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Radio Jamming in Security Systems
Radio jamming has become a real threat to the security industry worldwide and
is becoming a common crime trend. End-users and technicians need to be aware
of the telltale signs of jamming and counteract them accordingly.
Once detected, it is relatively simple to reduce the threat or remove it altogether.
What is jamming?
Radio jamming is the transmission of radio signals
that disrupt communications by decreasing the
signal-to-noise ratio. A transmitter, tuned to the
same frequency as the opponents’ receiving
equipment and with the same type of modulation,
can, with enough power, override any signal at the
receiver. Jamming is a common occurrence
world-wide and not something new.
How the Security Industry is affected by the use of jammers:
Jamming can interfere with various types of
wireless equipment including the alarm panel, detectors and the radio or GSM equipment
reporting to the control room. It can prevent a wireless detector from transmitting a signal to the
control panel or prevent an alarm panel from transmitting a detected signal to the control room. It
is used increasingly during hi-jackings to block the GPS positioning signals and GSM tracking, and is
commmonly used by criminals to prevent vehicle remote locking systems from activating, allowing
undetected and unforced entry into a vehicle.
Wireless video systems can also be at risk due to Wi-fi links being blocked during criminal activity.
Which frequencies are mostly at risk?
When jamming occurs in wireless alarm systems, it mostly effects systems using the 433MHz
“open” band equipment. These frequencies are legal unlicenced short range open frequencies and
may be used by anyone. This is the most populated and overcrowded frequency worldwide and is
commonly used in gate and garage door automation, panic transmitters, geyser limiting, baby
monitors, remote controlled toys and many wireless alarm systems.
Due to the 100% duty cycle allowed and no limits on channel spacing, it will allow jamming without
interruption of the signal.
Jamming of GSM transmitters are more complex and there are many custom built jammers available
that will jam multiple cellular frequencies.
It should be noted that no equipment is totally immune from jamming. With the right equipment
and power levels, any radio-based system can be jammed. The question is, what type of equipment
is generally available (although illegal) to the general public or criminals to carry out such an act.
Industry Solutions and SAIDSA recommendations
1. The most effective solution to jamming in GSM equipment is the use of Dual Monotoring. This
has been part of SAIDSA’s installation bylaws for many years. Dual monitoring employs the use of
two different transmission technologies in two separate units.
2. Where wireless alarm systems are installed, always use a combination of hard-wired and wireless
devices. Jammers cannot affect the hard-wired part of the system. All control devices and repeaters
should always be protected by hard-wired devices.
3. The preferred frequency for wireless alarm systems is the 868MHz band. It is a much cleaner
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band and to date no incidences of jamming on this frequency have been detected.
It is the CE standard also used in SA and specifically allocated to “Alarms in general”.
It is recommended by the CE standard for exclusive use by alarms and not shared by other services
and devices. Alarm equipment in this sub-band may use a maximum of 10mW power with <1%
duty cycle and must follow a 25kHz channel spacing. The use of anti-jamming techniques are not
available in the 433MHz band, but in the 868MHz band manufacturers have access to two versions
of improving data transfer, frequency-hopping spread-spectrum (FHSS) and direct-sequence
spread-spectrum (DSSS). Some alarm equipment manufacturers already make use of these
technologies for wireless equipment in their range of products. FHHS and DSSS have been proven
to be highly immune to jamming.
4. The use of unique licenced frequencies are also less susceptable to jamming.
5. The use of 2-way communications between the control panel and peripherals will allow a
successful transmission to be acknowledged.
6. Device networking forming mini repeaters such as mesh technology in industrial systems may
also ensure more successful signal transmission.
7. Where the control panel allows, jamming detection should always be switched on.
1.
How safe is remote arming?
2.
Is GSM/GPRS technology a reliable communication medium?
3.
Why can’t my control panel be installed in the ceiling?
Remote arming is only secure while the remote arming device is in your possession. Should the device be lost, misplaced or stolen, your security system is no longer secure. Although this may be a convenient method of arming, you need to consider the risks involved.
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5.
6.
The technology itself is extremely reliable. However, the technology is dependent on the reliability of the Cellular Service Provider Network. If the network is down, your signal is not likely to get to the control room. SAIDSA bylaws therefore require dual monitoring in the case of Retail, Commercial, Industrial and high risk domestic installations.
Control panels, Radios, Antennas and Power supplies must be installed within a
protected area. High South African temperatures can adversely affect all electronics as well as batteries.
Do PIR detectors work in ceilings?
In the average South African home, PIR detectors are seldom reliable in ceiling voids due to extremely high summer temperatures, dusty conditions, obstructions, insects and
the mounting heights required by detectors. Commercial buildings or shops having high ceiling voids may be more suitable.
Should my alarm or panic buttons be silent?
This is the subject of an age old argument. SAIDSA believes that audible alarms are more likely to scare off the average intruder. Due to the fact that a panic has to be held in for approxiametly 2 seconds, there is no way of knowing whether the panic has activated when silent.
Can my PIR detectors be defeated by criminals?
Yes, it is possible using clever cloaking methods, but usually only where low end
detectors are used. It is more difficult to defeat a good quality detector that has been “correctly installed”. Always ensure that you use the correct detector for the application.
7.
Can I see the infrared beams from a PIR detector if I wear special glasses?
No. That only happens in the movies. PIRs are detectors of infrared, not emitters of infrared. They detect body heat. There are no “beams”.
SAIDSA bylaws stipulate that the client must test the system at least every 2 weeks.
8.
9.
10.
How often should I test my alarm system?
Should my monitoring company phone me when they receive a panic signal?
No. All life threatening signals such as panic or duress must be responded to by the Armed Reaction unit without a phone call.
Where do I get a certificate of compliance?
Certificates can be purchased from SAIDSA Offices. However only a SAIDSA Approved installer may issue a Certificate of Compliance. They must be issued with every
installation.
11.
18
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
If I have infrared beams around my property, do I still need an alarm system in my house?
Yes, you do. Standard Dual Active infrared Beams should ideally be used as an early warning system or security layer and not as primary protection. Once the intruder South African
knows
where
they Services
are, they
can easily
be defeated.
Intruder
Detection
Association
- 2016
19
The Operation of a Central Station
The Central Station is recognised as the nerve-centre of the entire electronic
security network. A SAIDSA “approved” Central Station is required to comply
with stringent standards which have been set by the South African Intruder
Detection Services Association.
The purpose of setting high standards is to:

Force the serious security companies to upgrade and maintain the physical structure, equipment and operational methods of their Central Station.

Offer clients peace of mind that their intruder alarm systems are professionally
monitored and their system information is well protected 24 hours a day. 
Limit the proliferation of the unprofessional “fly-by-night” operators by setting them apart from professional security companies.

The ultimate goal is to improve and maintain a consistent standard of electronic security throughout the industry.
In order for a Central Station to become
“approved” in terms of the SAIDSA specifications, certain criteria must be met.
Protection of a Central Station from any
form of physical attack, is of utmost
importance.
Floors, walls and roof are required to be
of a substantial specified fabric and structure. The windows are
to be protected by
bullet-resistant glass.
The entrance to a
Central Station has two
electronically interlocked
doors separated by a
lobby, with closed-circuit
television monitoring
the approaches, thus
protecting the Central
Station from unauthorised or forced entry.
All the equipment
pertaining to the receipt
and processing of alarm signals is
duplicated, allowing for a swift and simple
switch-over should any device become
faulty. A continuous standby power supply
to all essential equipment is mandatory. It
is therefore possible to operate a Central
Station continuously without loss of
security or degradation of performance.
The receiving antenna together with the
various relay sites and repeater stations are
well protected against tampering.
2020
The Central Station operator requires
intelligence and initiative and is trained to
understand the significance of their actions
and the vital role they play in the
operational functions within the security
network.
Communication devices enable the
monitoring process to be further improved
by signal differentiation
which means that the
computer tells the operator
what type of signal has
been generated e.g. “burglary”; “fire”; “hold-up”;
etc.
It is therefore possible to
prioritise the order in which
these signals should be
attended to and to ensure
the correct type of action.
The Central Station
can monitor and identify
signals such as low battery,
power failure, tampering and locking up
of business premises and can identify who
has armed or disarmed the system. This
has proved to be a significant management
tool to many commercial, industrial and
financial institutions.
Communications to and from an alarm
system can be performed remotely from
the Central Station via a modem, enabling
information to be downloaded or uploaded
as required.
African
Intruder
Detection
Services
Association
SouthSouth
African
Intruder
Detection
Services
Association
- 2016- 2016
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
21
BY-LAW NO. 1
SOUTH AFRICAN INTRUDER DETECTION SERVICES ASSOCIATION
Requirements for a SAIDSA Approved Central Station
Amended October 2015
PREAMBLE
The construction of the Central station is intended to prevent or delay unauthorised entry and to
enable the occupants to raise an alarm in the event of an attack. These are categorised as follows, the
requirements of each being dealt with under separate headings:1.Construction
2.
Permitted Openings
3.
Normal Entrance
4.Doors
5.
Emergency Exits
6.
Glazed Areas
7.
Ablution Facilities
8.
Ventilation Inlets and Outlets
9.
Alarm Protection to the Central Station
10.
Closed Circuit Television
11.
Personnel Entry to Central Station
12.
Telephone Lines
13.
Power Supply
14.
Central Station Antenna
15.
Relay Sites and Repeater Stations
16.
Signals Received from Alarms Protected Premises
17.Records
18.
Action Required
19.
Supervisory Checks
20.
Procedure Manual
21.Maintenance
22.
Central Station Equipment
23.
Digital Telephone Monitoring Receiver
1.
CONSTRUCTION
All parts of the fabric of the Central Station shall be of substantial construction.
Substantial construction is taken to mean:
1.
CONSTRUCTION
1.1
Walls: At least 230mm of cement mortar brick work or 150mm reinforce concrete.
1.2Roof/Ceiling:
Suitably reinforced concrete at least 120mm thick, or steel to the
equivalent strength.
1.3
Where metal ceilings are installed, the thickness of the sheet must be a minimum of 3mm. Sheets must be bolted or welded together. A Structural and Safety report must be provided
to SAIDSA.
2.
PERMITTED OPENINGS
2.1
Permitted openings only are allowed as specified herein.
3.
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
NORMAL ENTRANCE
A normal entrance shall comprise at least two interlocked doors separated by a lobby.
Both doors cannot be opened simultaneously.
The area between interlocked doors may not have other openings unless into another
control room of the same construction. (3-way interlock)
The lobby shall be of the same construction as the central station.
4.
DOORS
4.1
The doors together with their hinges, frames and locking devices shall be of substantial
construction.
4.2
Where timber doors are used, both doors shall be at least 44mm thick, and of solid-core
22
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
construction faced with a minimum 1,5mm mild steel metal sheet on both sides.
On an outward opening door, Bullet hinges must be used. All other hinges shall be internal.
The locks securing the doors shall be of a high security type. All locks must be installed to
manufacturer’s specifications and must resist a sudden impact.
5.
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
EMERGENCY EXITS
Emergency Exits shall comply with the requirements above, however, a single door is
acceptable and no lobby is required.
The Emergency Exit door shall be easily opened from the inside. This shall comply with
local fire regulations.
The Door must be alarmed on a 24 hour non-shuntable zone and must be monitored by a SAIDSA approved Central Station.
Where timber doors are used, both doors shall be at least 44mm thick, and of solid-core
construction faced with a mild steel sheet of a minimum thickness of 1,5mm on both sides.
The doors must be tamper proof from the outside.
6.
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
GLAZED AREAS
Any glazed areas shall offer resistance to forced entry at least equivalent to that of three-ply laminated glass of 15mm thick, in sheets not larger in area than 1,5 square metres. Where glazed areas are larger than 1.5 square metres, they shall offer
resistance to forced entry at least equivalent to that of European Standard EN1063
BR3-S for internal glazed areas, and BR4-S for external glazed areas. The member must be able to provide a certificate from a supplier confirming the standard of the glazed area installed.
Frames and fixings must be of substantial construction.
No opening sections are permitted in the glazed areas.
Where windows are line-of-sight, suitable Flatex or a minimum of 20mm diamond mesh of metal construction must be fitted.
7.
7.1
ABLUTION FACILITIES
Where only one control room operator is present, toilets and wash basins must be situated
inside the control room. Where more than one operator is present, toilets and wash basins may be situated outside the control room but in close proximity. Exit may only be through the lobby doors.
8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5
8.6
VENTILATION AND INLETS/OUTLETS
The cross sectional area of the inlets and outlets shall not exceed 0,02 square metres.
It shall be ensured that the interior/staff of the Central Station are not within direct line of
sight from the outside. Ventilation piping/ducting must be protected by means of suitably constructed right angle elbows/bends.
Ventilation inlets and outlets shall be suitably protected against physical attack.
The inlets must be situated within a protected area or alternatively, be inaccessible.
Adequate ventilation to be supplied to cycle and replace the air within the Central Station every 30 minutes.
Suitable air-conditioning is to be provided in the Central Station.
9.
ALARM PROTECTION TO THE CENTRAL STATION
9.1
Deliberately activated devices (emergency switches) shall be strategically sited within the
Central Station.
9.2
Signalling from the above deliberately activated devices will be directly to the Central
Station of another SAIDSA approved Central Station. Such signalling must be tested weekly.
10.
10.1
10.2
CLOSED CIRCUIT TELEVISION
All permitted openings to the Central Station shall be suitably monitored by vandal resistant
closed circuit television cameras.
Recording of the cameras as per 9.1 above shall be provided at a minimum of 6 frames per second per camera with a history of at least 24 hours with time/date stamp.
11.
11.1
11.2
ENTRY TO CENTRAL STATION
Where 4 or more operators are utilised in the Central Station, access control should be
provided which includes a time event log.
Entry to the Central Station other than by authorised personnel shall require positive
identification by the Central Station operators.
12.
TELEPHONE LINES
12.1
Where Telkom or other service provider regulations and techniques permit there should
be a minimum of two exchange telephone lines for voice communication.
12.2
These telephone lines shall be routed separately from the building, underground or
concealed.
12.3
One telephone line shall be barred from incoming calls.
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
23
BY-LAW NO. 1
Normal entrance
Emergency exits
Glazed areas
Ventilation inlets and outlets
Service inlets and outlets
BY-LAW NO. 1
2.1.1
2.1.2
2.1.3
2.1.4
2.1.5
4.3
4.4
12.4
12.5
12.6
Cellular communications are acceptable, but must be a fixture.
In all communications with the police and response companies, a reference number shall be obtained and recorded.
All records to be kept for a minimum of twelve (12) months.
19.
19.1
19.2
SUPERVISORY CHECKS
When the Central Station is manned by one operator, provision shall be made for physical or electronic supervisory checks on the operator at intervals not exceeding 30 minutes.
Failure of the operator to respond to the checks shall result in an alarm being transmitted.
13.
13.1
13.2
13.3
13.4
13.5
13.6
13.7
POWER SUPPLY
The electricity supply may be either from external mains or from a battery standby.
In the event of a disruption of the external electricity supply, the stand-by power supply
shall automatically be brought into use without interruption.
The stand-by supply shall include batteries located within the Central Station, capable of sustaining the monitoring equipment for a period of not less that 24 hours or not less than 50 minutes if a standby generator is installed.
The standby generator shall have an independent means of starting without leaving the control room vulnerable.
The amp hour capacity of the standby power supply shall be calculated on the basis of the average hourly current drain multiplied by the factor 1.5.
Any recharging facility of the standby power supply shall be sufficient to provide the
maximum load requirements and to simultaneously recharge the battery from that
discharged state to the required capacity within 24 hours.
In the event of an interruption in the mains power supply, all equipment essential to the operation of the Central Station shall continue to operate without loss of security or
degradation of performance.
20.
PROCEDURE MANUAL
There shall be a Central Station procedure manual. Compliance with this manual should be checked at regular intervals.
21.
MAINTENANCE
An effective preventative maintenance programme shall be instituted covering the Central Station receivers, power supplies, stand-by equipment, relay sites and repeater stations. Tests must be carried out once a week and documented.
14.
CENTRAL STATION ANTENNA
(including any antenna receiving/transmitting RF signals)
14.1
The antenna must be sited within close proximity to the Central Station. Where this is impracticable, then the aerial and any connecting cables should be suitably protected against any mechanical damage or unauthorised interference.
14.2
The antenna shall be protected by suitable electronic intruder detection devices to detect tampering.
15.
15.1
RELAY SITES AND REPEATER STATIONS
Where the service provider permits, a comprehensive signal test shall be carried out every hour to ensure the efficient working order of all relay sites, repeater stations and receivers and all records of such tests shall be maintained.
16.
16.1
16.2
SIGNALS RECEIVED FROM ALARM PROTECTED PREMISES
Receipt of an alarm signal from an alarm installation shall give a visible and audible warning with a hard copy printout available.
Where GSM or IP protocols are utilised, a backup receiver/decoder must be used. It is recommended that a second form of signal routing into the central station is used.
17.
RECORDS
The following records should be kept in the Central Station
23.
23.1
23.2
23.3
DIGITAL TELEPHONE MONITORING RECEIVER
The receiver shall include a 256-event buffer on the control module.
The receiver shall include a line fault monitor for each line.
Surge suppressers and filters will be provided for the AC mains and the telephone lines.
BY-LAW NO. 1
22.
CENTRAL STATION EQUIPMENT
22.1
All primary communication equipment must be situated within the Central Station.
22.2
Stand-by equipment is to be readily accessible in the company’s premises.
22.3
The Stand-by equipment must be alarmed and protected if situated outside the Central
Station.
22.4
Stand-by equipment shall be directly interchangeable and all reasonable precautions shall be taken to ensure that normal uninterrupted Central Station service is provided in the event of essential equipment being faulty or damaged.
22.5
Stand-by equipment shall be dedicated to the Alarm Central Station and shall remain un-
plugged until required.
17.1
Hard copy printout, electronic or disc storage of alarm signals received.
17.2
Record of alarm calls received giving details of action taken and response.
17.3
Primary monitoring system must be computer based.
17.4
Back-up system may be PC based or manual card system.
17.5
Back-up records may not be older than 24 hours.
17.6
Electronic on-line back up equipment must be optically and electronically isolated.
It can however remain unplugged and remain this way unless a back-up is being
performed.
17.7
All reported incidents shall be available for a period of 36 months.
ACTION REQUIRED
The following action shall be taken by the central station on receipt of a valid signal from an alarm system.
Signals received are grouped into three main categories.
Namely; Life Threatening, Intruder Signals and Status/Maintenance signals. Each category should receive the minimum action as per the table below but not limited thereto.
Life Threatening
No Yes Dispatch Police and/or Armed Reaction
Yes
Record
Phone and Verify
24
Intruder
Yes
Yes Yes
Status
No
No
Yes
BY-LAW NO. 1
18.
18.1
18.2
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
25
BY-LAW NO. 2
SOUTH AFRICAN INTRUDER DETECTION SERVICES ASSOCIATION
PREAMBLE
Requirements for a SAIDSA Approved
Un-manned Central Station
Amended October 2015
An un-manned Central Station is defined as a secure area used for the automatic receiving and
relaying of alarm signals to a manned Central Station in a different location. The construction of an
un-manned Central station is intended to prevent or delay unauthorised entry and to protect the
receiving equipment and antennas from physical attack. The un-manned Central Station is NOT
used for the despatch of an Armed Reaction Service.
The categories are as follows, the requirements of each being dealt with under
separate headings:1.Construction
2.Doors
3.
Entry to the Central Station
4.
Glazed Areas
5.
Closed Circuit Television
6.
Power Supply
7.
Central Station Antenna
8.
Central Station Equipment
1.
CONSTRUCTION
All parts of the fabric of the Central Station shall be of substantial
construction. Substantial construction is taken to mean:
1.1
1.2
1.3
Walls: At least 230mm of cement mortar brick work or 150mm reinforce concrete.
Roof/Ceiling: Suitably reinforced concrete at least 120mm thick, or steel to the
equivalent strength.
Where metal ceilings are installed, the thickness of the sheet must be a minimum of 3mm. Sheets must be bolted or welded together. A Structural and Safety report must be provided to SAIDSA.
2.
DOORS
2.1
The door together with hinges, frame and locking device shall be of substantial
construction.
2.2
The door shall comply with the requirements above, however, a single door is
acceptable and no lobby is required.
2.3
Where a timber door is used, it shall be at least 44mm thick, and of solid-core
construction faced with a minimum 1,5mm mild steel metal sheet on both sides.
2.4
On an outward opening door, Bullet hinges must be used.
2.5
The lock securing the door shall be of a high security type. All locks must be installed to manufacturers specifications and must resist a sudden impact.
3.
ENTRY TO CENTRAL STATION
3.1
Suitable access control is required and a log kept of all persons entering the Central
Station.
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
26
GLAZED AREAS
Any glazed areas shall offer resistance to forced entry at least equivalent to that of three-ply laminated glass of 15mm thick, in sheets not larger in area than 1,5 square metres. Where glazed areas are larger than 1.5 square metres, they shall offer
resistance to forced entry at least equivalent to that of European Standard EN1063
BR3-S for internal glazed areas, and BR4-S for external glazed areas. The member must be able to provide a certificate from a supplier confirming the standard of the glazed area installed.
Frames and fixings must be of substantial construction.
No opening sections are permitted in the glazed areas.
Where windows are line-of-sight, suitable Flatex or a minimum of 20mm diamond mesh of metal construction must be fitted.
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
27
BY-LAW NO. 2
4.
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
5.
5.1
CLOSED CIRCUIT TELEVISION
CCTV is required on all approaches, recorded for a minimum period of 24 hours with time and date stamp.
6.
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
POWER SUPPLY
The electricity supply may be either from external mains or from a battery standby.
In the event of a disruption of the external electricity supply, the stand-by power supply shall automatically be brought into use without interruption.
The stand-by supply shall include batteries located within the Central Station, capable of sustaining the monitoring equipment for a period of not less that 24 hours or not less than 50 minutes if a standby generator is installed.
The standby generator shall have an independent means of starting.
The amp hour capacity of the standby power supply shall be calculated on the basis of the average hourly current drain multiplied by the factor 1.5.
Any recharging facility of the standby power supply shall be sufficient to provide the
maximum load requirements and to simultaneously recharge the battery from that
discharged state to the required capacity within 24 hours.
In the event of an interruption in the mains power supply, all equipment essential to the operation of the Central Station shall continue to operate without
loss of security or degradation of performance.
28
BY-LAW NO. 2
7.
CENTRAL STATION ANTENNA
(including any antenna receiving/transmitting RF signals)
7.1
The antenna must be sited within close proximity to the Central Station. Where this is impracticable, then the aerial and any connecting cables should be suitably protected against any mechanical damage or unauthorised interference.
7.2
The antenna shall be protected by suitable electronic intruder detection devices to detect
tampering.
8.
CENTRAL STATION EQUIPMENT
8.1
All primary communication equipment must be situated within the Central Station.
8.2
Stand-by equipment is to be readily accessible in the company’s premises.
8.3
The Stand-by equipment must be alarmed and protected if situated outside the Central Station.
8.4
Stand-by equipment shall be directly interchangeable and all reasonable precautions
shall be taken to ensure that normal uninterrupted Central Station service is provided in the event of essential equipment being faulty or damaged.
8.5
Stand-by equipment shall be dedicated to the Alarm Central Station and shall remain unplugged until required.
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
29
BY-LAW NO. 3
Selecting an Armed Reaction Service
During the past decade, there has been a steady increase in companies
providing an armed reaction service to alarm and panic alarm calls. The
insurance industry often specify the necessity of having a reaction service and
in most urban areas have become a recognised part of the security scene.
essential to have accepted minimum standards
for the protection of staff and clients. Also,
there can be no guarantee that a reaction
service will arrive at a site within a specific
time period. Training of a reaction officer is to
be to standards laid down by the Private Security Industry Regulatory Authority (PSIRA) and,
in particular, he must be competent in the use
of the weapon he carries.
Geographic areas of operation for a reaction service
will vary in size due to
many factors such as traffic
density, road conditions and
urban versus rural territory. As a general rule and
under normal circumstances,
the company providing a
reaction service must have
a minimum of two vehicles
available for duty 24 hours
a day.
Equipment to be carried by the reaction vehicle is listed and there are rules on the issue
and control of firearms.
Control centres used by reaction services
must be constructed and operated in accordance with SAIDSA standards.
SAIDSA also recommends that a legal
written contract is
entered into between
a reaction service
company and the
client and there are
also recommendations for insurance of reaction officers against
death and injury.
It is sufficient to say that members of
the public who are contemplating hiring the
services of a reaction company, should always
ensure that the company they are considering
is a member of SAIDSA.
Always notify your
Central Station before
testing your
Intruder Alarm System’
3030
South
African
Intruder
Detection
Services
Association
- 2016
South
African
Intruder
Detection
Services
Association
- 2016
REQUIREMENTS FOR AN ARMED REACTION SERVICE
Amended September 2011
FOREWORD
The purpose of By-Law 3 is to determine a set of minimum standards and requirements
pertaining to those members who operate a Reaction Service and who are offering, to members
of the public, a valuable and important service of an extremely dangerous nature. In providing
such a service the Reaction Service companies are putting themselves and their staff at great risk
and it is therefore essential that certain minimum standards are achieved for the protection of
both the member company, its Reaction Officers, its clients and members of the public.
With due regard being given to the exigencies of its business and to circumstances beyond its
control, the duty requirement of the Reaction Service company is to provide a 24-hour direct
armed tactical approach in its mission to minimise the risk of loss, injury or damage caused by
burglary or attack, with no warranty or guarantee whatsoever that the said Reaction Service
company will succeed in its mission.
It should also be clearly stated and understood by all parties concerned that there can be no
guarantee that the said Reaction Service will arrive at the scene within a specific time period.
These are categorised as follows, the requirements of each being dealt with under separate
headings:
1.Premises
2.
Response Member
3.Personnel
4.
Reaction Officers Equipment
5.
Geographical Areas
6.
Reaction Vehicles
7.Firearms
8.
Response Slips
9.Training
10.
Dispatch Base
11.Administration
12.Communications
13.Contracts
14.Operations
Abbreviations:
RSC
RO
Act
ID
RV
RSO
RS
PSIRA
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
Reaction Service Member
Reaction Officer
The Private Security Industry Regulatory Act 56 of 2001
Identity Document
Reaction Vehicle
Reaction Service Operation
Reaction Service
Private Security Industry Regulatory Authority
1.
PREMISES
1.1
The premises from which the RSC operates must comply with local municipal
regulations regarding the operation of such a business and proof of this must be made available.
1.2
Where domestic premises are used for satellite bases these must provide a dedicated sector for business and operational purpose and must comply with local municipal and health regulations.
1.3
A satellite base is a premise where Reaction Vehicles (RV) park when out of service, or changeovers take place. Changeovers must be in accordance with the Firearms Control Act.
1.4
A supervisor must be present at each shift changeover.
1.5
Dispatching of reaction vehicles may not take place from satellite bases.
1.6
Caravans may not be used as a despatch base of any sort.
BY-LAW NO. 3
SAIDSA believes that there is a necessity for
this service, particularly in view of its nature,
to be carefully controlled and that guidelines
should be given for the benefit of the
client who is going to use an Armed Reaction
Service.
By-Law No 3 “Requirements for an Armed
Reaction Service” governs the control and
operation of reaction
services. It is important to remember that
reaction officers have no
more powers, right or
privileges than any other
private citizen.
It has become an
accepted fact that in all
major centres throughout
South Africa there has
been a large increase in
crime, burglaries and
attacks on peoples’
homes are daily occurrences.
The South African
Police Service with their lack of manpower
have great difficulty in coping with the
dramatic increase on their workload and
therefore cannot guarantee a response to
alarm call-outs.
Armed Reac‘
tion services are
therefore offered by
private companies
to attend to an
incident. A house
or business fitted
with a security system signals for help if there
is a break-in or if any emergency switch is
activated. The signal is received at a monitoring control centre who then dispatch a mobile
reaction unit to investigate.
It is emphasised in the by-law that a
reaction supplier is providing a service of an
extremely high risk nature and it is therefore
SOUTH AFRICAN INTRUDER DETECTION SERVICES ASSOCIATION
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
31
1.7
Where domestic premises are used as a dispatch base. (See section 1.3 and 1.4)
2.
RESPONSE MEMBER
2.1
The RSC must be registered, or be a division of a business, registered with the relevant authorities.
3.
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
PERSONNEL
All partners, directors and employees must be registered individually with the PSIRA as specified by the Act.
Reaction Officers (RO)
The RO must provide proof that he is authorised to practice as an RO when prescribed by statute.
The RO must display proof of identity on his person while on duty or while in uniform.
The ID should be in the form of a tag or laminated plastic card and should display the following:Name
Photograph
Company name and telephone number
PSIRA registration number (personal)
Cards Expiry date
I.D. Number
Blood Group
Allergies
3.5
The RO must comply with the Arms and Ammunition Act 60 of 2001 Section 8 or as amended.
3.6
The RO must wear a company uniform while on duty together with clear indication by means of a badge or suitable insignia.
3.7
The RO must be issued with a suitable bullet-resistant vest (minimum of handgun
calibre) of approved design to be worn by him at all times while on duty.
4
4.1
REACTION OFFICERS EQUIPMENT
While on duty a reaction officer must all times have the following equipment with him:-
6.3
The RV will be clearly marked with:-
6.3.1
The Members’ name
6.3.2
Members’ Logo
6.3.3
Telephone number
6.3.4
That it is a 24 hour service and be marked as a response vehicle
6.4
Where a vehicle roof light is used, this must comply with the Road Traffic Ordinance Act.
6.5
RV’s shall be equipped with a suitable communications device.
6.6
It is recommended that every RV be fitted with a GPS tracking device.
6.7
RV’s must at all times have sufficient fuel to complete their duties.
6.8
It is the company’s responsibility to discipline staff members as far as obeying road
traffic rules.
6.9
RV’s must at all times be in good mechanical condition.
6.10
Code 3 vehicles are not permitted as RV’s.
6.11
It is recommended that RV’s not be older than three years or exceed 250 000km.
6.12
An additional dedicated and fully equipped back up RV must be available at all times should this become necessary.
6.13
Stand-by RV’s must not be less than one per ten (10) RV’s.
6.14
Stand-by RV’s must be parked at a satellite or dispatch base.
6.15
It is recommended that RV’s be equipped with an all-purpose SABS approved fire extinguisher. 6.16
Spare wheel, jacks and wheel spanners must be available at all times.
6.17
RV’s must be refuelled within its patrol area. Should this not be possible a second
vehicle should be sent into the area before the vehicle leaves to refuel.
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
8
RESPONSE NOTIFICATION
8.1
A response slip will be left at a premise every time a RV visits a premise on activation of an alarm signal or emergency call.
8.2
Response notification must contain the following information:8.2.1
Date of visit
8.2.2
RSC details
8.2.3
Address of premises visited
8.2.4Remarks
8.2.5
Reason for visit
8.2.6
Reference number
8.2.7
Notification of visit must be available on request
9
9.1
9.2
TRAINING
Initial training shall be carried out in terms of the legislation as determined by the
controlling body.
Regular firearms training shall be carried out in accordance with Firearms control Act.
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
BY-LAW NO. 3
32
BY-LAW NO. 3
5
GEOGRAPHICAL AREAS
5.1
The geographic areas of operation will vary in size due to various factors such as traffic density, road conditions and urban versus rural territory.
5.2
All areas must be predetermined and marked on a map, which should be maintained for inspection.
5.3
Where reaction times exceed 15 minutes in any area, a log is to be kept of this for not less than 90 days.
5.4
Should the reaction times per area for more than 10% of the occurrences per month, be in excess of 15 minutes, the situation should be reviewed and steps taken to over
come the problem.
5.5
Accurate records of all occurrences are to be kept for a minimum of ninety (90) days and should be made readily available for inspection at any time by an appointed
inspectorate of SAIDSA.
REACTION VEHICLES (RV)
A RV is a vehicle that is solely dedicated to the purpose of responding in a
predetermined area to clients.
A minimum of two (2) RV’s must be fully equipped, manned and available for 24-hours a day with a minimum of one (1) fully equipped back up.
7
FIREARMS
7.1
The firearm calibre issued to an RO shall not be less than 9mm Parabellum (9x19) or 38 Special (.38) calibre.
7.2
All requirements regarding member’s firearms must be read in conjunction with the Firearms Control Act 60 of 2001 and does not supersede any part thereof.
7.3
RO’s may be issued non-lethal firearms in conjunction with lethal firearms, but never be issued with non-lethal firearms only.
7.4
If and when a new or current member applies for armed reaction service approval, and such member is not in possession of licensed firearms, the member may be approved for this service subject to the following conditions:
7.4.1
Proof of purchase of firearms must be submitted to SAIDSA;
7.4.2
Proof of licence application for purchased firearms must be submitted to SAIDSA;
7.4.3
Monthly status reports obtained from the central firearm registrar must be submitted to SAIDSA;
7.4.4
The words “armed” may not appear on any response vehicle or literature of the
member;
7.4.5
The member may not advertise an “armed reaction or response” service.
7.4.6
It is the member’s duty to inform the client of the fact that non-lethal response services are delivered until the approval of firearm licences.
7.4.7
The member must make use of non-lethal firearms during this period.
7.4.8
Should for whatever reason the application for licences not be granted, the member will immediately inform SAIDSA, and approval for this service will automatically be
withdrawn.
4.1.1Firearm
4.1.2Torch
4.1.3
Black pen
4.1.4Watch
4.1.5
Pocket Book
4.1.6
Handcuffs and key / suitable cable ties
4.1.7
Bullet Resistant Vest
4.1.8
Response Slips or suitable notification of visit
4.1.9
I.D. Card
4.1.10 Suitable means of navigation
4.1.11 Rain Coat
4.1.12 Drivers Licence
4.1.13 Firearm permit. Duration to be in accordance with the firearms control act.
4.1.14 Firearm competency card.
6
6.1
6.2
33
9.3
9.4
9.5
SAIDSA BY-LAW 4
The firearm qualifications of the RO’s and that of the instructor shall be kept on record and made available for inspection by SAIDSA.
Every RO must qualify with the Member’s firearm as per the Firearms control Act.
It is recommended that RO’s do first aid and defensive driving courses.
SOUTH AFRICAN INTRUDER DETECTION SERVICES ASSOCIATION
REGISTER OF APPROVED INSTALLERS
10
DISPATCH BASE
10.1
Construction
The requirements must meet with those of SAIDSA By-Law 1 for approved Central
Stations.
10.2
Equipment
All equipment pertaining to rendering of an effective reaction service must meet with the same requirements as those of SAIDSA By-Law 1 for approved Central Stations.
Amended September 2011
APPROVED INSTALLERS
In addition to the general criteria specified under the Membership Section the
following additional requirements will apply:
11
ADMINISTRATION
11.1
A register must be maintained and kept up-to-date in the dispatch base containing information on each RO, which may be required in the event of the death or injury of
an RO.
11.1.1Name
11.1.2 I.D. No
11.1.3 Next-of-kin and telephone number
1. 12
COMMUNICATIONS
12.1
Communication with the RV must be via a suitable means of communication.
12.2
It is recommended that a second means of communication should be used as a back-up for when the RO is away from the RV or if the communication device malfunctions or is occupied.
13
13.1
13.2
13.3
13.4
13.5
13.6
CONTRACTS
A legal contract shall be entered into with the client.
The contract shall not guarantee a specific reaction time.
The contact shall state that the objective of the reaction service (RS) is to minimise the risk of loss, injury or damage by theft, burglary or attack and not to guarantee exclusion of any of the aforementioned.
The contract shall state that testing of response times are strictly prohibited and have an appropriate penalty clause.
Every RSC must have adequate public liability insurance.
The Reaction Service Company must comply with the Sectoral Determination in relation to Provident Fund Benefits.
14
14.1
14.2
OPERATIONS
On dispatching a RV to a premises or to a client, as much information as possible must be relayed to the RO as to exactly where the activation has arisen from, and what type of activation was received.
After investigation of activation or emergency call, a report back must be received from the RO stating where the premises were checked and what was noted on the premises.
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
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South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
BY-LAW NO. 4
BY-LAW NO. 3
34
The member must:
1.1
At all times, employ directly a minimum of three (3) persons, of which at least one (1) for every 10 technicians employed, shall be SAIDSA Certified technicians and will be engaged in operations as follows:
Working full time in the intruder detection industry, installing and servicing intruder detection systems for a minimum period of two (2) years, subject to the provision that the Executive Committee may waive or allow any leniency, if good cause is shown to the satisfaction of the Executive Committee.
2. Provides a 24-hour repair service throughout the year.
3. Can be contacted 24 hours a day telephonically. The SAIDSA approved control room must have direct contact with the installing company and/or its representatives,
telephonically, in the instance where there is an agreement or relationship between the installing company and the control room.
4. Shall have installed not less that fifty (50) intruder detection systems.
5. The technical staff must be competent to install all equipment specified within the
By-Laws of SAIDSA.
6. A full range of replacement equipment required for installations as defined in the
By-Laws of SAIDSA, applicable to the category of membership for which the member has been approved, must be available at all times including weekends and public
holidays.
7.
Installers must be prepared for spot checks at any time by members of the
Executive Committee or an inspector appointed by the Executive Committee for that purpose.
8
The premises, from which the approved installer operates, must comply with local
municipal regulations regarding the operation of a business from such premises and proof of this must be submitted.
9. All installers applying to be entered on the Register of Approved Installers must sign an affidavit confirming that they are capable of installing a system complying to the By-laws of SAIDSA applicable to the category of membership for which the member has been approved.
10.
The Installer must at all times issue a SAIDSA Certificate of Compliance on completion of the installation.
11. The Register of Approved Installers will be updated and issued annually.
12. An approved Installers Certificate will be issued on payment of the appropriate
subscription fee and will be reviewed annually.
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BY-LAW NO. 5
SOUTH AFRICAN INTRUDER DETECTION SERVICES ASSOCIATION
STANDARD INSTALLATION SPECIFICATION FOR INTRUDER
ALARM SYSTEMS FOR DOMESTIC, COMMERCIAL, RETAIL
AND INDUSTRIAL INSTALLATIONS
Amended October 2015
1.
GENERAL
1.1
This specification lays down the minimum requirements for the construction, installation, operation and maintenance of intruder alarm systems in buildings. Specifications herein contain requirements to be applied in the aforesaid. Any deviation is to be indicated on the installation certificate and such deviation should not be seen as an acceptance of compliance.
1.2
SAIDSA does not accept any liability and/or responsibility for any defect there may be now or hereafter in the installation or any loss suffered by any party, due to its failure
to operate at any time and no warranty or condition expressed or implied whether
statutory or otherwise is given by SAIDSA in regard to the above installation either to the approved installer or to the customer.
1.3
This specification does not purport to cover all the necessary requirements for a particular installation and all efforts should be made to ensure correct risk assessment.
1.4
The client must be clearly informed that the installed equipment does not prevent
intrusion but is intended to detect or deter intrusion.
1.5
This entire By-law must be read in conjunction with the appropriate annexures.
1.6
All equipment must be installed to manufacturer’s specifications.
36
DEFINITIONS
2.1
For the purposes of this specification the following definitions apply:
2.1.1
24-Hour Zone: A zone that is permanently armed (Panic button, tamper switch).
2.1.2
Alarm condition: A condition whereby the alarm system, when armed, activates
indicating a violation of any detection device.
2.1.3
Alarm company: A SAIDSA-approved installation organisation prepared to enter into a contract for the provision of the installation and/or monitoring, reaction and maintenance of an intruder alarm system.
2.1.4
APP (smartphone application): A mobile app (application software) is a computer program designed to run on smartphones, tablet computers and other mobile devices. Apps can be used for the view or control of remote systems, including alarm or video security equipment. The APP should be sufficiently secure to prevent its misuse by third party. It is recommended that upon arming/disarming and bypass, the user ID is recorded in the control panel event log or server.
2.1.5
Arming: Putting an intruder alarm system or part of it (switching on of the alarm) into such a condition that an alarm condition created by any of the associated detection
devices in the alarmed area is signalled.
2.1.6
Back up battery: Device responsible for ensuring a constant supply of backup power to the intruder alarm system in the event of a power failure.
2.1.7
Balanced circuit: A closed circuit so arranged that severance or shorting-out of any protective switch, detection device or wiring of the intruder alarm system will cause a detectable change in the resistance of the circuit.
2.1.8
Central station/control room: Continually manned premises, equipped to receive and display signals from intruder alarm systems which complies with the requirements of
By-Law 1 of SAIDSA and is prepared to enter into a contract for the provision of alarm monitoring.
2.1.9
Cloaking: The deliberate covering of an intruder using infrared blocking materials with the intent of hiding the infrared emission of the human body.
2.1.10 Anti-cloaking: A specific detector used to detect the deliberate covering of an intruder with infrared blocking materials.
2.1.11 Closed circuit: A circuit within an intruder alarm system which when opened creates an alarm condition.
2.1.12 Closed circuit device: A device arranged to create an alarm condition by opening a closed circuit.
2.1.13 Code hopping: A rolling code (Also called a hopping code) used in keyless entry
systems to prevent the capture and recording of the code for duplication purposes. South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
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BY-LAW NO. 5
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
2.
BY-LAW NO. 5
Such systems are typical in alarms, garage door openers and keyless car entry systems.
2.1.14 Control equipment: Equipment including switches, relays, indicators and other
apparatus necessary for arming, disarming and/or programming intruder alarm system for activating signalling equipment and for indication of faults.
2.1.15 Delay Zone: A Detection Circuit which when the control equipment is armed will
provide a time delay for the purposes of entry and exit arming or disarming.
2.1.16 Deliberately operated device (e.g. (panic button, glass break call point): A device permitting the subscriber or his staff to deliberately create an alarm condition.
2.1.17 Detection circuit: Circuit by means of which one or more detection devices or
deliberately operated devices are connected to the control or signalling equipment of an intruder alarm system.
2.1.18 Detection device – electronic (e.g. passive infrared, microwave, glass break
detector) : Apparatus or section of wiring intended to detect the entry or attempted entry of an intruder.
2.1.19 Digital communicator: Equipment for the transmission of electronic signals through the telephone system to the central station/control room to a receiving device, which acknowledges receipt of the signal.
2.1.20 Disarming: Putting an intruder alarm system or part of it into such a condition that an alarm condition created by any of the alarm conditions in the disarmed area, will not be registered in the central station (switching off of alarm).
2.1.21 Double pole circuit: A closed circuit so arranged that throughout its length there are two or more adjacent conductors in different electrical states and such that an alarm and/or fault condition is generated if the two conductors are connected together or if either closed circuit is opened.
2.1.22 End of line resistance: A closed circuit so arranged that at severance or shorting-out of any part of the wiring will cause a detectable change in the resistance of the circuit.
2.1.23 External sounder: Signalling equipment consisting of a sound-producing device.
2.1.24 Follower zone: A Detection Circuit which when the control equipment is armed and subsequently violated, prior to a Delay Zone being violated, results in an instant alarm. Should a delay zone be triggered first, this zone will be treated as a delay zone.
2.1.25 Instant Zone: A Detection Circuit which when the control equipment is armed and subsequently violated, results in an instant alarm.
2.1.26 Internal sounder: Signalling equipment consisting of a sound-producing device so situated within the protected premises.
2.1.27 Intruder alarm system: A means of detecting and signalling the presence, entry or attempted entry of an intruder into a protected premises. For the purposes of this
By-law, it is specifically noted that the use of wireless/wirefree systems is permitted.
2.1.28 Isolate (bypass): A deliberate action whereby part (circuit) of the alarm system is disabled during a single alarm state and does not have the ability to signal an alarm condition.
2.1.29 Jamming: The transmission of radio signals with the purpose of interfering with the correct operation of wireless networks to disrupt information flow, including alarm, GSM, Radio and CCTV equipment in a security installation.
2.1.30 Masking: The deliberate or accidental covering or blocking of a detector where the detector is unable to detect infrared.
2.1.31 Anti-masking: A detector specifically designed to detect the covering or blocking of a detector.
2.1.32 Multiplex circuit: A multiple detection device circuit arranged in such a way that operation of a single detection device will signal the identity of that device to the control equipment. The multiplex cabling must be tamper protected.
2.1.33 Multi-Shot: A circuit capable of multiple Alarm Conditions during a single arming period.
2.1.34 Open circuit: A circuit within an intruder alarm system which when closed creates an alarm condition. 2.1.35 Open Circuit device: A device arranged to create an alarm condition by closing an open circuit.
2.1.36 Power supply equipment: Equipment providing power for the retaining of the
battery in a good state of charge and for the operation of any component part of an intruder detection system, either independently or through the control equipment.
2.1.37 Protected premises: That part of the premises under the control of one or more subscriber, to which protection is afforded by an intruder alarm system.
2.1.38 Protective switch - mechanical (e.g. magnetic switches, pressure mats)
: Apparatus or section of wiring intended to detect the entry or attempted entry of an intruder.
2.1.39 Radio transceiver: Bi-directional radio with acknowledgement capabilities.
2.1.40 Radio transmitter: Equipment for the transmission of signals from the protected premises to a central station/control room by radio waves.
2.1.41 Remote: (also known as a keyfob). A wireless handheld transmitting device used for the purpose of remotely arming and disarming a control panel and other auxiliary
functions.
2.1.42 Risk area: (Protected area) Offices, rooms and other areas within the Protected
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South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
39
Premises, which either contain or give, access to disposable movable property.
2.1.43 Signalling circuit: Circuit within an intruder alarm system operated by the control equipment, which communicates a signal from the control equipment to the signalling equipment.
2.1.44 Signalling equipment: Equipment used to communication information to a Central Station e.g. communicator, radio, etc.
2.1.45 Single pole circuit: A circuit consisting of a conductor in the form of an electrical loop.
2.1.46 Spread Spectrum: In radio communication, spread-spectrum techniques are methods by which a signal generated is deliberately spread over a number of frequencies, resulting in a signal that provides more secure communications including increasing resistance to natural interference, noise and jamming.
2.1.47 Subscriber: A person or organisation utilising the services of a SAIDSA-approved alarm company for the installation and maintenance of an intruder alarm system.
2.1.48 Swinger shutdown: whereby a zone or zones are automatically bypassed/shutdown by the system after a pre-programmed number of alarm conditions. (see Multi-Shot)
2.1.49 Tamper: Any unauthorised entry into component parts of the alarm system and
detection devices.
2.1.50 Trouble condition: An abnormal condition in any part of an intruder alarm system, which must be eliminated to restore correct operation.
2.1.51 Verification Remote: A remote transmitting device using two-way communication to the alarm panel which can indicate successful transmission of a command to the panel and give such successful or failure feedback to the user.
2.1.52 Visual Verification: Visual Verification is the management by exception of an Intruder Alarm Activation at any site being monitored, providing a means of visually verifying the intruder alarm activation. The purpose of Visual Verification is to quickly discriminate a positive alarm that requires urgent attention from any other event that should not be
considered as a positive alarm, as well as to provide a minimum level of visual
information to verify an Intruder Alarm Activation and respond to it accordingly.
2.1.53 Volumetric Detector: A detector capable of sensing human movement in a volume of space such as a room.
2.1.54 Web Interface: A user interface which allows users to control and interact with their security installation through a web browser. This can be used for a remote control, system management, visual feedback, and many other functions.
3.
CONSTRUCTION
3.2
3.2.1
3.2.2
3.2.3
3.2.4
Precautions against tampering
The control panel housing cover and electronic detection devices e.g. PIR, glassbreak, etc, must be tamper protected on a 24 hour zone in retail, commercial, industrial and high risk domestic installations.
The communication devices, antenna, control panel and power supply must be in a
protected area.
Wiring of electronic detectors may not use a common negative.
The detection devices and other parts of the alarm system shall be so mounted and
located that the possibility of interference by mechanical or magnetic means is reduced to a minimum. Where the frame of a protected door, window or other entry exit point can be readily displaced, this displacement must create an alarm condition.
3.3
3.3.1
Detection circuits
Every detection circuit forming part of the intruder alarm system shall be so arranged that failure of the power supply to the circuit displays a fault condition during arming.
3.4
3.4.1.
Control equipment
Location and Enclosure
Where ceiling access is possible, the control panel, radio and antenna shall be installed a minimum of 1,5m below the ceiling, or in an area that is not vulnerable to tampering from within the ceiling void. These devices must be protected by a volumetric detector on an instant zone and must not visible from the outside of the premises. This will not apply in the stay mode.
3.4.2
3.4.2.1
3.4.2.2
3.4.2.3
System Control Facilities
Digital keypads are to be of the data transfer technology type.
The use of a mechanical keyswitch alone, is prohibited.
In the case of an intruder alarm system having a keypad as an integral part of the
40
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
enclosure, it may not be part of the entry/exit area. In the armed state, a person must not be able to gain access to the control panel within the entry delay period. The control panel and battery must not be in an entry/exit delay zone. It is recommended that
remote arming or a second keypad be used.
3.4.2.4
3.4.2.5
Remote Arming (Also called keyfob arming)
All remote arming transmitters must be of the Encrypted Rolling code type.
In commercial installations, remote arming is only permissible if the code verification
takes place within the control panel using a unique user/engineer identification.
The client must be clearly informed of any possible risks associated with the use of
remote arming. 3.4.3
Disarming
When using a time delay on a zone protecting the keypad, such entry delay shall not exceed 30 seconds.
3.4.4
Arming
During the arming period procedure the status of all isolated circuits or faulted circuits shall be easily accessible.
3.4.4.1 Circuit Identification
Where more than one detection circuit is used, the control equipment shall be capable of indicating immediately the individual circuit in which the alarm condition occurred, on disarming the control panel.
3.4.4.2 Bypass/Isolation
Once armed, no bypassed zones shall be indicated on the keypad.
3.5
Power Supply Equipment
3.5.1
The mains transformer must be a minimum of 40VA, fused, surge protected and should not be less than the control panel manufacturer’s specification. Due consideration must be given to the current draw of all devices connected to the control panel.
All transformers shall have internal PTC’s and/or thermal fuses for protection against short circuits.
3.5.2
The control panel back-up battery must have a minimum capacity of 7.0aH and be of the sealed type or have a minimum standby time of six hours for any part of the system. The control panel must provide a low battery cut-off of a minimum of 10.2v. (Exclusive of wireless systems)
3.5.3
The battery charger shall be sufficient to recharge the battery to the required capacity within 24 hours.
3.5.4
The use of liquid electrolyte lead acid type or car batteries is not permitted.
3.5.5
A mains failure or low battery signal shall be transmitted to the central station.
3.5.6
The cable from the transformer to the control panel must have a minimum core diameter of 0.5mm (Cabtyre)
3.5.7
All power supply equipment shall be correctly earthed according to manufacturers
instructions using an electrical earth.
3.6
3.6.1
3.6.2
3.6.3
Audible sounders
The audible sounders shall be capable of sounding for a minimum period of three (3) minutes and must comply with the relevant Municipal Regulation.
All sounders must be audible unless agreed to in writing between the client and the installation company.
External sounders shall have their cables monitored for tamper by the control panel.
3.7
Signalling Equipment Systems
3.7.1
To Central Stations/Control rooms.
The following methods are considered acceptable. Use can be made of one or more of the following. Dual monitoring using different technologies or carrier mediums is
recommended.
•
•
•
•
•
•
PSTN
Radio
GSM Communication
SWIFTNET
TCP/IP
Spread Spectrum
3.7.2
Minimum signals i.e. burglary and panic must be monitored separately.
The radio transmitter and antenna must be correctly installed to manufacturers
specifications.
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
BY-LAW NO. 5
Intruder alarm system
The intruder alarm system shall consist of detection circuits, various detection devices, control equipment, one or more signalling circuits, signalling equipment and the
necessary power supply equipment.
BY-LAW NO. 5
3.1
41
3.7.3
3.7.4
3.7.5
The DC power cable from the Radio transmitter to the control panel must have a
minimum core diameter of 0.5mm (Cabtyre or Ripcord).
Where required, all communication equipment shall be ICASA approved.
Where any communication mediums are vulnerable or unreliable, a second or alternate method of signalling must be used.
3.8
3.8.1
3.8.2
3.8.3
3.8.4
3.8.5
GSM Requirements
Where GSM transmitters are used, the GPRS should revert to another network or to SMS signals where signals are weak or high volumes of traffic exist on the network.
No pre-paid SIM cards will be permitted.
Only Private Networks (APNs) may be used.
GSM Clients should be clearly informed that they are being monitored by GSM
technology as well as any risks associated with the connection of this equipment to the cellular network.
Commercial, Retail, Industrial and high risk domestic installations must have Dual
monitoring, using different carrier mediums.
3.9
General Requirement
Communication cable shall not form part of main wiring harness and shall be run in such a manner as to protect them from tampering or physical damage. Cables to the
communications devices must be wired below the ceiling.
4.
INSTALLATION AND DETECTION DEVICES
4.1
Detection circuit restriction
A detection circuit/zone must consist of only one of the following combination:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Five (5) Magnetic contacts (Except in Zone doubling, then 1 magnetic contact only on each zone.)
One (1) infrared beam or one pair of beams in parallel (dual beam units).
Two (2) electronic detection devices. (Except in Zone doubling, then 1 electronic detector only on each zone.)
Two (2) audio detection devices.
Five (5) electronic shock sensors.
Ten (10) anti-tamper detection devices.
Five (5) sealed magnetic pull switches with an end-of-line resistor
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South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
6.
OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES
When the system is installed, the subscriber shall receive a practical demonstration of the systems full functionality and shall be required to enter alarm user code. An operating instruction manual for the control panel must be available on request.
7.
RECORDS
The Alarm Company shall maintain accurate records relating to each intruder alarm
system installed.
8.
ALARM COMPANY REPRESENTATIVE IDENTIFICATION
All representatives of the alarm company shall carry an identification card bearing the company name, PSIRA number, photograph and identity number.
9.
9.1
9.2
9.3
CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE
A SAIDSA certificate of compliance must be issued to the client when the intruder alarm system has been installed. The Installation Company must keep duplicate certificates for the duration of the contract.
All certificates and/or guarantees provided by the installer will be null and void if any third party, including the user, tampers, adds, removes or replaces any equipment in the
installation. SAIDSA must be informed by the installer of any such occurrence.
Any non-compliance exceptions are to be clearly noted on the certificate.
10.
EQUIPMENT SPECIFICATIONS
10.1
10.1.1
10.1.2
10.1.3
10.1.4
Control Panels
The control panel shall be microprocessor controlled, keypad operated.
Where permissible the system may be controlled via remote control as defined in 3.4.2.4
The control panel must have a minimum 128 event log.
The event log must not be erasable via downloading.
10.2
10.2.1
10.2.2
Keypad
The keypad shall have an internal sounder.
Keypads shall be of the data transfer type only.
11.
11.1
11.2
11.3
11.4
11.5
WIRELESS SYSTEMS.
The wireless system shall operate on a South African ICASA approved frequency.
The wireless system shall include 24 hour monitoring of zone supervision, low battery and tamper from each detector.
Wireless detectors must include a battery saving feature.
The control panel must be in a protected area which is protected by a hard-wired PIR.
All wireless receivers/repeaters shall be installed within a protected area.
12.
INSTALLATION SPECIFICATION SCHEDULES
This entire By-law must be read in conjunction with the following Annexures.
i.
Annexure A
-
Domestic Wireless Systems
ii.
Annexure B
-
Domestic Wired Systems
BY-LAW NO. 5
BY-LAW NO. 5
5.
INSTALLATION AND EQUIPMENT
5.1
All LED’s within detectors are to be disabled after installation set-up. (Voluntary for
domestic, compulsory for Commercial installations.)
5.2
Magnetic contacts may be installed at the hinge side of a window to permit partial
opening when the alarm is armed in domestic applications.
5.3
Two stage magnetic contacts can be fitted to windows to allow for partial opening of the window when the alarm is armed, providing the gap does not exceed 75mm.
Unless recessed reed switches are used, these contacts must be installed at the top of the window. These contacts are not to be placed on an entry/exit zone.
5.4
The use of car batteries, mechanical keyswitches, mechanical vibration switches and shuntlocks (cut out switches) is not permitted.
5.5
All detectors must be fixed using wall plugs and screws in mortar bricks, concrete, wood or dry walling. In the case of glass, aluminium, or treated surfaces, a secure attachment method must be used. The use of double sided tape, cable glue or glue guns are not permitted. Cables must run neatly in such a manner so as to avoid physical damage. All cables that are vulnerable to corrosion and damage as well as external wiring must be suitably protected or placed in conduit.
5.6
Cables must run neatly in such a manner so as to avoid physical damage. All cables that are vulnerable to corrosion and damage as well as external wiring must be suitably
protected or placed in conduit.
5.7
All joints must be soldered and insulated or in a junction box containing screw terminal blocks.
5.8
The use of a cigarette lighter or any other flame-producing device for the purpose of soldering, is not permitted.
5.9
Where Radio or GSM units are used, the power cables must be terminated at the battery via a radio battery connection pc board.
5.10
Detector lenses must be suitably fixed in such a way as to prohibit their easy removal from the outside of the housing.
5.11
Cables within the control panel must be marked and terminated in an enclosure, using solder, crimping ferrules or strip connectors (chocolate blocks). Cables must be
identified either by marking, labelling or colour coding.
5.12
All detection zones are to use single end-of-line or double end-of-line monitoring.
End-of-line resistors are to be installed at the detector end of the line, i.e. within the detector.
5.13
Each zone shall be 24-hour tamper protected with the ability to report a tamper to the
central station. (Commercial only)
5.14
All user codes must be programmable by the user including the master code and must be EPROM and not PROM based.
5.15
The event log must be an integral part of the control panel and must not be physically removable.
5.16
All equipment must be installed to manufacturers specifications.
iii.
Annexure C
-
Commercial, Retail, Industrial and High Risk domestic Systems
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form
or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any
information storage or retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publishers.
Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of information at the time of going to print.
However, the authors and publishers cannot be held responsible for errors or
omissions for any reason whatsoever.
Copyright - South African Intruder Detection Services Association (SAIDSA) –
All rights reserved 1994-2015
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
43
44
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
Not permitted
ALARM SIGNAL
TRANSMISSION
DELAY
All perimeter
doors to be
protected
PERIMETER
PROTECTION
REQUIRED
30 seconds
MAXIMUM
PERMISSIBLE
ENTRY DELAY
Within the vicinity
of the entry/exit
door
Main bedroom,
passage.
FIXED PANIC
BUTTONS
REQUIRED
6 Hours
MIN BATTERY
BACKUP
REQUIRED
UNDER
NORMAL
CONDITIONS
(As per applicable
specification)
Remote arming
and disarming
or wired and/or
Remote keypad
SYSTEM
OPERATION
VIA
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
Not permitted
ALARM SIGNAL
TRANSMISSION
DELAY
All perimeter
doors to be
protected
PERIMETER
PROTECTION
REQUIRED
30 seconds
MAXIMUM
PERMISSIBLE
ENTRY DELAY
Within the vicinity
of the entry/exit
door
Main bedroom,
passage.
FIXED PANIC
BUTTONS
REQUIRED
6 Hours
MIN BATTERY
BACKUP
REQUIRED
UNDER
NORMAL
CONDITIONS
(As per applicable
specification)
Remote arming
and disarming
or wired and/or
Remote keypad
SYSTEM
OPERATION
VIA
* To be read in conjunction with Bylaw 5
Reaction where
available
DUAL
MONITORING
MONITORING
AND
REACTION
All defined risk
areas.
All other rooms
containing
valuable property.
Main Bedroom,
Passage,
TV Room,
Lounge.
AREAS
REQUIRING
VOLUMETRIC
DETECTION
PROTECTION
Detector Presence
to be determined
at least every 60
minutes. Detector
low battery to be
reported locally
and to central
station.
DETECTOR
BATTERY AND
SYSTEM
SUPERVISION
REQUIREMENTS
Arm,
Disarm,
Panic
KEYPAD
FUNCTIONS
REQUIRED
30 seconds
Internal or
external sounder
for a
duration of not
less than 3
minutes audible
throughout the
protected area,
which must be
tamper-proofed
if not in a
protected area
Panic and/or Duress.
Alarm.
Mains failure or Control panel
low battery.
Detector low battery.
GROUP 1 SIGNALS
REQUIRED TO BE REPORTED TO
THE CENTRAL STATION
MAXIMUM
PERMISSIBLE
SIREN DELAY
REQUIRED
AUDIBLE
WARNING
Detector Presence
to be determined
at least every 60
minutes. Detector
low battery to be
reported locally
and to central
station.
DETECTOR
BATTERY AND
SYSTEM
SUPERVISION
REQUIREMENTS
Arm,
Disarm,
Panic
KEYPAD
FUNCTIONS
REQUIRED
30 seconds
Internal or
external sounder
for a
duration of not
less than 3
minutes audible
throughout the
protected area,
which must be
tamper-proofed
if not in a
protected area
Panic and/or Duress.
Alarm.
Mains failure or Control panel
low battery.
Detector low battery.
GROUP 1 SIGNALS
REQUIRED TO BE REPORTED TO
THE CENTRAL STATION
MAXIMUM
PERMISSIBLE
SIREN DELAY
REQUIRED
AUDIBLE
WARNING
CATEGORY 2
* To be read in conjunction with Bylaw 5
Reaction where
available
Monitoring.
(Dual monitoring
Optional)
MONITORING
AND
REACTION
Main Bedroom,
Passage
Room containing
Hi-Fi, VCR, DVD
and TV.
Subject to residence design.
All other rooms
containing
valuable property
AREAS
REQUIRING
VOLUMETRIC
DETECTION
PROTECTION
CATEGORY 1
Arm, disarm by
user.
Bypass by zone.
System error.
Troubled zones.
Supervision.
Alarm by Zone.
RF Jamming.
GROUP 2 SIGNALS.
24 Hour tamper.
Temperature
compensated.
Sealed optics.
DETECTOR
SPECIFICATION
PERMISSIBLE
Arm, disarm by
user.
Bypass by zone.
System error.
Troubled zones,
Alarm by Zone.
LOG ONLY OF
OPTIONAL SIGNALS
REQUIRED
24 Hour tamper.
Temperature
compensated.
Sealed optics.
DETECTOR
SPECIFICATION
PERMISSIBLE
Annexure A - Installation Specification Schedule DOMESTIC WIRELESS SYSTEMS
~ Version 1.3 July 2010* ~
Annexure A - Installation Specification Schedule DOMESTIC WIRELESS SYSTEMS
~ Version 1.3 July 2010* ~
45
BY-LAW NO. 5
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
46
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
47
48
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
Not permitted
ALARM SIGNAL
TRANSMISSION
DELAY
All perimeter
doors to be
protected
PERIMETER
PROTECTION
REQUIRED
30 seconds
6 Hours
MIN BATTERY
BACKUP
REQUIRED
UNDER
NORMAL
CONDITIONS
or Remote
(As per applicable
specification)
Within the vicinity
of the entry/exit
door
MAXIMUM
PERMISSIBLE
ENTRY DELAY
Data Transfer
keypad
SYSTEM
OPERATION
VIA
Main bedroom,
passage.
FIXED PANIC
BUTTONS
REQUIRED
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
Not permitted
ALARM SIGNAL
TRANSMISSION
DELAY
All perimeter
doors to be
protected
PERIMETER
PROTECTION
REQUIRED
30 seconds
6 Hours
MIN BATTERY
BACKUP
REQUIRED
UNDER
NORMAL
CONDITIONS
(As per applicable
specification)
Within the vicinity
of the entry/exit
door
MAXIMUM
PERMISSIBLE
ENTRY DELAY
Data Transfer
keypad
SYSTEM
OPERATION
VIA
Main bedroom,
passage.
FIXED PANIC
BUTTONS
REQUIRED
* To be read in conjunction with Bylaw 5
Reaction where
available
DUAL
MONITORING
MONITORING
AND
REACTION
All defined risk
areas
Main Bedroom,
Passage,
TV Room,
Lounge.
AREAS
REQUIRING
VOLUMETRIC
DETECTION
PROTECTION
30 Seconds
MAXIMUM
PERMISSIBLE
SIREN DELAY
Arm,
Disarm,
Duress/Panic
KEYPAD
FUNCTIONS
REQUIRED
128 Event Log
SYSTEM
REQUIREMENTS
Panic and/or Duress.
Alarm.
Mains failure or low battery
GROUP 1 SIGNALS
REQUIRED TO BE REPORTED TO
THE CENTRAL STATION
Internal or
external sounder
for a
duration of not
less than 3
minutes audible
throughout the
protected area,
which must be
tamper-proofed
if not in a
protected area
REQUIRED
AUDIBLE
WARNING
30 Seconds
MAXIMUM
PERMISSIBLE
SIREN DELAY
Arm,
Disarm,
Duress/Panic
KEYPAD
FUNCTIONS
REQUIRED
Panic and/or duress.
Arm, disarm by user.
Bypass by zone.
System error by type.
Alarm by zone.
Tamper by zone.
Mains failure with restore.
Battery low with restore.
Alarm.
Panic and/or Duress.
Arm, disarm.
System error.
Mains failure with restore.
Battery low with restore.
Radio Power-up
(if applicable)
24Hour tamper.
EOL Resistor.
Temperature
compensated.
Sealed optics.
DETECTOR
SPECIFICATION
PERMISSIBLE
GROUP 2 SIGNALS
128 Event Log
SYSTEM
REQUIREMENTS
System error.
Troubled zones,
Alarm by Zone.
Arm, disarm by
user.
Bypass by zone.
LOG ONLY OF
OPTIONAL SIGNALS
REQUIRED
24Hour tamper.
EOL Resistor.
Temperature
compensated.
Sealed optics.
DETECTOR
SPECIFICATION
PERMISSIBLE
GROUP 1 SIGNALS
Internal or
external sounder
for a
duration of not
less than 3
minutes audible
throughout the
protected area,
which must be
tamper-proofed
if not in a
protected area
REQUIRED
AUDIBLE
WARNING
CATEGORY 2
* To be read in conjunction with Bylaw 5
Reaction where
available
Monitoring.
MONITORING
AND
REACTION
Main Bedroom,
Passage.
Room containing
Hi-Fi, VCR, DVD
and TV.
Subject to residence design.
e.g. open plan
AREAS
REQUIRING
VOLUMETRIC
DETECTION
PROTECTION
CATEGORY 1
Annexure B - Installation Specification Schedule DOMESTIC WIRED SYSTEMS ~ Version 1.3 July 2010* ~
Annexure B - Installation Specification Schedule DOMESTIC WIRED SYSTEMS ~ Version 1.3 July 2010* ~
49
Panic and/or
duress.
Arm, disarm
by user.
Bypass by
zone.
System error
by type.
Alarm by zone.
Tamper by
zone.
Mains failure
with restore.
Battery low
with restore.
GROUP 2
SIGNALS
Requirements for a SAIDSA Approved Central Station
for CCTV off-site Monitoring which includes 24 Hour Active
Monitoring and/or Alarm Verification Monitoring
6 Hours
MIN BATTERY
BACKUP
REQUIRED
UNDER
NORMAL
CONDITIONS
Amended October 2015
PREAMBLE
The construction of the Central station is intended to prevent or delay unauthorised entry and to enable
the occupants to raise an alarm in the event of an attack. These are categorised as follows, the requirements of each being dealt with under separate headings:-
24Hour tamper.
Alarm.
High RF immunity. Panic and/or
Sealed optics.
Duress.
EOL resistor.
Arm, disarm.
Temperature
System error.
compensated.
Mains failure
Anti masking on
with restore.
PIRS where
Battery low with
required.
restore.
Range only 75%
of manufacturers
Radio
specification.
Power-up
Same for glass (if applicable)
break detectors.
1.Construction
2.
Permitted Openings
3.
Normal Entrance
4.Doors
5.
Emergency Exits
6.
Glazed Areas
7.
Ventilation Inlets and Outlets
8.
Alarm Protection to the Central Station
9.
Closed Circuit Television
10.
Personnel Entry to Central Station
11.
Telephone Lines
12.
Power Supply
13.
Central Station Antenna
14.
Relay Sites and Repeater Stations
15.
Signals received from a CCTV installation
16.Records
17.
Supervisory Checks
18.
Procedure Manual
19.Maintenance
20.
Stand-by Equipment
21.
Data Protection and Storage
* To be read in conjunction with Bylaw 5
All defined risk 128 Event log.
areas must be Each user shall
protected.
be allocated a
All perimeter separate user
doors to be
code
protected.
Any display
window must
be protected
with either
glass break
detectors or
curtain passive
detectors.
Reaction
where
available
Keypad,
Reception
areas,
Pay points.
Dual
monitoring
Data
Arm/Disarm
Internal or
external
Transfer Duress/Panic
sounder
Keypad
for a
or remote
duration of not
(As per
less than 3
Encrypted
applicable
minutes audible
Code Hopping
throughout the
on remotes
protected area,
which must be
tamper-proofed
if not in a
protected area
GROUP 1
SIGNALS
DETECTOR
SPECIFICATIONS
REQUIRED
AUDIBLE
WARNING
KEYPAD
FUNCTIONS
REQUIRED
SYSTEM
OPERATION
VIA
PANIC
BUTTONS
REQUIRED
SYSTEM
MONITORING
REQUIREMENTS
AND
REACTION
PROTECTION
REQUIRED
Annexure C - Installation Specification for Commercial, Retail
and Industrial Security ~ Version 1.3 July 2010* ~
SOUTH AFRICAN INTRUDER DETECTION SERVICES ASSOCIATION
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
1.
1.1
1.2
CONSTRUCTION
All parts of the fabric of the Central Station shall be of substantial construction.
Substantial construction is taken to mean:
Walls: At least 230mm of cement mortar brick work or 150mm reinforce concrete.
Roof/Ceiling: Suitably reinforced concrete at least 120mm thick, or steel to the
equivalent strength.
2.
2.1
2.1.1
2.1.2
2.1.3
2.1.4
2.1.5
PERMITTED OPENINGS
Permitted openings only are allowed as specified herein.
Normal entrance
Emergency exits
Glazed areas
Ventilation inlets and outlets
Service inlets and outlets
3.
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
NORMAL ENTRANCE
A normal entrance shall comprise at least two interlocked doors separated by a lobby.
Both doors cannot be opened simultaneously.
The area between interlocked doors may not have other permitted openings.
The lobby shall be of the same construction as the central station.
4.
DOORS
4.1
The doors together with their hinges, frames and locking devices shall be of substantial construction.
4.2
Where timber doors are used, both doors shall be at least 44mm thick, and of solid-core construction faced with a mild steel sheet of a minimum thickness of 1,5mm on both sides.
4.3
On an outward opening door, hinge bolts must be used. All other hinges shall be internal.
4.4
The locks securing the doors shall be of a high security type. All locks must be installed
to manufacturers specifications and must resist a sudden impact.
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
BY-LAW NO. 6
50
BY-LAW NO. 6
51
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
52
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
53
5.
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
EMERGENCY EXITS
Emergency Exits shall comply with the requirements above, however, a single door is acceptable and no lobby is required.
The Emergency Exit door shall be easily opened from the inside. This shall comply with
local fire regulations.
The Door must be alarmed on a 24 hour non-shuntable zone and must be monitored
by a SAIDSA approved Central Station.
Where timber doors are used, both doors shall be at least 44mm thick, and of solid-core construction faced with a mild steel sheet of a minimum thickness of 1,5mm on both sides.
The doors must be tamper proof from the outside.
6.
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
GLAZED AREAS
Any glazed areas shall offer resistance to forced entry at least equivalent to that of three-ply laminated glass of 15mm thick, in sheets not larger in area than 1,5 square metres. Where glazed areas are larger than 1.5 square metres, they shall offer
resistance to forced entry at least equivalent to that of European Standard EN1063
BR3-S for internal glazed areas, and BR4-S for external glazed areas. The member must be able to provide a certificate from a supplier confirming the standard of the glazed area installed.
Frames and fixings must be of substantial construction.
No opening sections are permitted in the glazed areas.
Where windows are line-of-sight, suitable Flatex or a minimum of 20mm diamond mesh of metal construction must be fitted.
7.
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
VENTILATION INLETS AND OUTLETS
The cross sectional area of the inlets and outlets shall not exceed 0,02 square metres.
It shall be ensured that the interior/staff of the Central Station are not within direct line
of sight from the outside. Ventilation piping/ducting must be protected by means of
suitably constructed right angle elbows/bends.
Ventilation inlets and outlets shall be suitably protected against physical attack.
The inlets must be situated within a protected area or alternatively, be inaccessible.
Suitable air-conditioning is to be provided in the Central Station.
Adequate ventilation to be supplied to cycle and replace the air within the Central
Station every 30 minutes.
8.
ALARM PROTECTION TO THE CENTRAL STATION
8.1
Deliberately activated devices (emergency switches) shall be strategically sited within
the Central Station.
8.2
Signalling from the above deliberately activated devices will be directly to the Central
Station of another SAIDSA approved Central Station. Such signalling must be tested weekly.
9.
CLOSED CIRCUIT TELEVISION
9.1
All permitted openings to the Central Station shall be suitably monitored by vandal resistant closed circuit television cameras.
9.2
Recording of the cameras as per 9.1 above shall be provided at at a minimum of 6
frames per second per camera with a history of at least 24 hours with time/date stamp.
10.
10.1
10.2
ENTRY TO CENTRAL STATION
Where 4 or more operators are utilised in the Central Station, access control should be provided which includes a time event log.
Entry to the Central Station other than by authorised personnel shall require positive identification by the Central Station operators.
54
POWER SUPPLY
The electricity supply may be either from external mains or from a battery standby.
In the event of a disruption of the external electricity supply, the stand-by power supply shall automatically be brought into use without interruption.
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
The stand-by supply shall include batteries located within the Central Station, capable of sustaining the monitoring equipment for a period of not less that 24 hours or not less than 50 minutes if a standby generator is installed.
The standby generator shall have an independent means of starting without leaving the control room vulnerable.
The amp hour capacity of the standby power supply shall be calculated on the basis of the average hourly current drain multiplied by the factor 1.5.
Any recharging facility of the standby power supply shall be sufficient to provide the
maximum load requirements and to simultaneously recharge the battery from that
discharged state to the required capacity within 24 hours.
In the event of an interruption in the mains power supply, all equipment essential to the operation of the Central Station shall continue to operate without loss of security or degradation of performance.
13.
CENTRAL STATION ANTENNA
(including any antenna receiving/transmitting RF signals)
13.1
The antenna must be sited within close proximity to the Central Station. Where this is impracticable, then the aerial and any connecting cables should be suitably protected against any mechanical damage or unauthorised interference.
13.2
The antenna shall be protected by suitable electronic intruder detection devices to detect
tampering.
14.
14.1
RELAY SITES AND REPEATER STATIONS
Where the service provider permits, a comprehensive signal test shall be carried out every hour to ensure the efficient working order of all relay sites, repeater stations and receivers and all records of such tests shall be maintained.
15.
15.1
SIGNALS RECEIVED FROM A CCTV INSTALLATION
Receipt of a signal from a CCTV installation shall give a visible and/or audible warning.
16.
16.1
16.2
16.3
16.4
RECORDS
The following records should be kept in the Central Station.
Record of visual events received giving details of action taken and response.
Customer database backups may not be older than 24 hours.
Electronic on-line back up equipment must be optically and electronically isolated. It can however remain unplugged and remain this way unless a back-up is being performed.
All reported incidents shall be available for a period of 36 months.
17.
17.1
17.2
SUPERVISORY CHECKS
When the Central Station is manned by one operator, provision shall be made for physical or electronic supervisory checks on the operator at intervals not exceeding 30 minutes.
Failure of the operator to respond to the checks shall result in an alarm being transmitted.
18.
PROCEDURE MANUAL
There shall be a Central Station procedure manual. Compliance with this manual should be checked at regular intervals.
19.
MAINTENANCE
An effective preventative maintenance programme shall be instituted covering the visual receiving equipment, power supplies, stand-by equipment, relay sites and repeater stations.
Tests must be carried out once a week and documented.
20.
STAND-BY EQUIPMENT
20.1
Stand-by equipment is to be readily accessible in the company’s premises.
20.2
Stand-by equipment shall be directly interchangeable and all reasonable precautions shall be taken to ensure that normal uninterrupted Central Station service is provided in the event of essential equipment being faulty or damaged.
20.3
The Stand-by equipment must be alarmed and protected if situated outside the Central
Station.
20.4
Stand-by equipment shall be dedicated to the CCTV Central Station and shall remain unplugged until required.
21.
DATA PROTECTION AND STORAGE
21.1
All recorded visuals shall be kept in safekeeping for a minimum of 30 days.
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
BY-LAW NO. 6
12.
12.1
12.2
BY-LAW NO. 6
11.
TELEPHONE LINES
11.1
Where Telkom or other service provider regulations and techniques permit there should be a minimum of two exchange telephone lines for voice communication.
11.2
These telephone lines shall be routed separately from the building, underground or
concealed.
11.3
One telephone line shall be barred from incoming calls.
11.4
Cellular communications are acceptable, but must be a fixture.
11.5
In all communications with the police and response companies, a reference number shall be obtained and recorded.
11.6
All records to be kept for a minimum of twelve (12) months.
12.3
12.4
12.5
12.6
12.7
55
BY-LAW NO. 7
statute.
3.1.1.2 Where required the SSO must display proof of identity on his person while on duty or while in uniform. The ID should be in the form of a tag or laminated plastic card and should display the following:-
SOUTH AFRICAN INTRUDER DETECTION SERVICES ASSOCIATION
REQUIREMENTS FOR A SPECIALISED SECURITY SERVICE
March 2012
FOREWORD
The purpose of By-Law 7 is to determine a set of minimum standards and requirements pertaining to
those members who operate a specialised security service and who are offering, to members of the
public, a valuable and important service of an extremely dangerous nature. In providing such a service
the Specialised Service companies are putting themselves and their staff at great risk and it is therefore
essential that certain minimum standards are achieved for the protection of both the member company,
its Officers, its clients and members of the public.
With due regard being given to the exigencies of its business and to circumstances beyond its control,
the duty requirement of the Specialised Service company is to provide a tactical approach in its
mission to minimise the risk of loss, injury or damage caused by transporting, surveillance, protection,
burglary or attack, with no warranty or guarantee whatsoever that the said Service company will succeed in its mission.
Specialised Services for the purpose of this by-law will include all armed reaction services not covered
by Bylaw 3, and shall include the following services: Asset in Transit Services, Bank Security, Close
Protection Services (where vehicles are used), Surveillance Services (where vehicles are used), or any
other security service involving the use of vehicles and such service does not fall within the ambit of
By-law 3.
The requirements of this category of membership are dealt with under separate
headings:
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. Premises
Specialised Security Member
Personnel
Specialised Equipment
Vehicles
Firearms
Training
Dispatch Base
Administration
Communications
Contracts
SPECIALISED SECURITY OFFICERS EQUIPMENT
While on duty an officer must all times have at least the following equipment with him:Firearm
Black pen
Watch
Pocket Book
Bullet Resistant Vest
I.D. Card
Drivers Licence
5
5.1 5.2 SPECIALISED VEHICLES (SV)
A SV is a vehicle that is solely dedicated to the purpose of providing the specialised security
service and specifically excludes the use of that SV for the purpose as set out in By-law 3.
Subject to the operational area of the SSM, the SSM must have a minimum of two (2) SV’s,
fully equipped, with a minimum of one (1) fully equipped stand-by SV.
The SV may be clearly marked with:-
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
The Members’ name
Members’ Logo
Telephone number
Specialised security service type
5.4 Where a vehicle roof light is used, this must comply with the Road Traffic Ordinance Act.
5.5 SV’s used for asset transit, bank security or any other service where constant
communication with a central station is required, shall be permanently fitted with a two-
way radio.
5.6 It is recommended that every SV be fitted with a GPS tracking device.
5.7 SV’s must at all times have sufficient fuel to complete their duties.
5.8 It is the company’s responsibility to discipline staff members as far as obeying road traffic
rules.
5.9 SV’s must at all times be in good mechanical condition, and be of the correct type for the
specialised service being offered.
5.10 Code 3 vehicles are not permitted as SV’s.
5.11 It is recommended that SV’s not be older than three years or exceed 250 000km.
5.12 Stand-by SV’s must not be less than one per ten (10) SV’s operating at any one given
moment.
5.13 Stand-by SV’s must be parked at a satellite or dispatch base, and may not be used for any
other purpose.
5.14 Stand-by SV’s must be parked at such a satellite or dispatch base, that if needed, to reach the area to be deployed in within 60 minutes.
5.15 It is recommended that the SV’s be equipped with an all-purpose SABS approved fire
extinguisher.
5.16 Spare wheel, jacks and wheel spanners must be available at all times.
5.17 SV’s must be refuelled within its service area.
6
6.1 6.2 6.3 FIREARMS
The firearm calibre issued to an SSO shall not be less than 9mm Parabellum (9x19) or 38
Special (.38) calibre.
All requirements regarding member’s firearms must be read in conjunction with the Fire
Arms Control Act 60 of 2001 and does not supersede any part thereof.
SSO’s may be issued non-lethal firearms in conjunction with lethal firearms, but never be
issued with non-lethal firearms only.
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
BY-LAW NO. 7
PERSONNEL
All partners, directors and employees must be registered individually with the PSIRA as
specified by the Act.
BY-LAW NO. 7
PREMISES
The premises from which the SSM operates must comply with local municipal regulations
regarding the operation of such a business and proof of this must be made available.
Where domestic premises are used for satellite bases these must provide a dedicated
sector for business and operational purpose and must comply with local municipal and health regulations.
A satellite base is a premise where Specialised Vehicles (SV) park when out of service, or
changeovers take place.
Caravans may not be used as a base of any sort.
3.1.1 Specialised Security Officers (SSO)
3.1.1.1 The SSO must provide proof that he is authorised to practice as an SSO when prescribed by 56
4
4.1 4.1.1 4.1.2 4.1.3 4.1.4 4.1.5 4.1.6 4.1.7 5.3.1
5.3.2
5.3.3
5.3.4
2. SPECIALISED SECURITY MEMBER
2.1 The SSM must be registered, or be a division of a business, registered with the relevant
authorities.
3. 3.1 3.1.2 The SSO must comply with the Firearms Control Act 60 of 2000, Section 9 or as
amended.
3.1.3 The SSO must be issued with a suitable bullet-resistant vest of approved design to be
either worn by him or available to him while on duty.
5.3 Abbreviations:
SSM : Specialised Security Member
SSO : Specialised Security Officer
Act : The Private Security Industry Regulatory Act 56 of 2001
ID : Identity Document
SV : Specialised Vehicle
SS : Specialised Service
PSIRA : Private Security Industry Regulatory Authority
1. 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Name
Photograph
Company name and telephone number
PSIRA registration number (personal)
Cards Expiry date
I.D. Number
57
BY-LAW 8
6.4 If and when a new or current member applies for special security service approval, and such member is not in possession of licensed firearms, the member may be approved for this service subject to the following conditions:
6.4.1 Proof of purchase of firearms must be submitted to SAIDSA;
6.4.2 Proof of licence application for purchased firearms must be submitted to SAIDSA;
6.4.3 Monthly status reports obtained from the central firearm registrar must be submitted
to SAIDSA;
6.4.4 The words “armed” may not appear on any vehicle or literature of the member;
6.4.5 The member may not advertise an “armed” service.
6.4.6 It is the member’s duty to inform the client of the fact that non-lethal services are
delivered until the approval of firearm licences.
6.4.7 The member must make use of non-lethal firearms during this period.
6.4.8 Should for whatever reason the application for licences not be granted, the member
will immediately inform SAIDSA, and approval for this service will automatically be
withdrawn.
7
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
SOUTH AFRICAN INTRUDER DETECTION SERVICES ASSOCIATION
REQUIREMENTS FOR AN APPROVED ELECTRIC FENCE
INSTALLER & INSTALLATIONS
4 June 2014
TRAINING
Initial training shall be carried out in terms of the legislation as determined by the
controlling body.
Regular firearms training shall be carried out in accordance with PSIRA requirements.
The firearm qualifications of the SSO’s and that of the instructor shall be kept on record and
made available for inspection by SAIDSA.
Every SSO must qualify with the Member’s firearm as per PSIRA requirements.
It is recommended that SSO’s do first aid and defensive driving courses.
8
DISPATCH BASE
This requirement is only applicable to the member where constant communication between the SSO and a central station is required.
8.1 Construction
The requirements must meet with those of SAIDSA By-Law 1 for approved Central Stations.
8.2 Equipment
All equipment pertaining to rendering of an effective service must meet with the same
requirements as those of SAIDSA By-Law 1 for approved Central Stations.
9
ADMINISTRATION
9.1 A register must be maintained and kept up-to-date in the dispatch base containing
information on each SSO, which may be required in the event of the death or injury of an SSO.
9.1.1 Name
9.1.2 I.D. No
9.1.3 Next-of-kin and telephone number
11 11.1
11.2
11.3
11.4
11.5
CONTRACTS
A legal contract shall be entered into with the client.
The contract shall not guarantee a specific reaction time.
The contact shall state that the objective of the specialised service (SS) is to minimise the risk of loss, injury or damage by theft, burglary or attack and not to guarantee exclusion of any of the aforementioned.
Every SSM must have adequate public liability insurance.
The SSM Company must comply with the Sectoral Determination in relation to Provident Fund Benefits.
58
1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 A
1.9 1.10 1.11 At all times, employ directly a minimum of three (3) persons, of which at least one (1) shall be duly registered in terms of the regulations applicable to electric fence installations as set out in the OHS Act, working full time in the electric fence installation and repair industry for a minimum of 2 (two) years, and have installed not less than 50 (fifty) electric fences, subject to the provision that the Executive committee may waive or allow leniency, if good cause is shown.
Provide a 24-hour repair service throughout the year;
Be able to be contacted 24 hours a day telephonically;
The technical staff must be competent to install all electric fence equipment in accordance with SANS specifications;
Suitable replacement equipment required for repairs must be available over weekends and public holidays;
Installers must be prepared for spot checks at any time by members of the Executive
committee or an inspector appointed by SAIDSA for that purpose;
The premises, from which the approved installer operates, must comply with local
municipal regulations regarding the operation of a business from such premises and proof thereof must be submitted;
Installers applying to be entered on the Register of Approved Electric Fence Installers must sign an affidavit confirming that they are capable of installing and repairing an
electric fence to SANS standards, and in addition provide proof of the registered installer in its employ.
Provide a cancelled example of the certificate of compliance issued by the installer;
The Register of Approved Electric Fence Installers will be updated and issued annually on receipt of the applicable annual subscription fee.
The use of the approved and registered SAIDSA logo will be subject to the inclusion of the words “Electric Fence Installer” at the botton of the logo wherever it is used, equal in size to words “SAIDSA” inside the logo.
INSTALLATIONS
2.1 2.2 2.3 All installations and repairs must be done and carried out in accordance with applicable SANS standards as published from time to time;
Certificates of compliance must be issued and copies kept on file by the approved installer;
The installer will provide SAIDSA with a copy of such certificate if called upon.
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
BY-LAW NO. 8
COMMUNICATIONS
Communication with the SV must be via two-way radio.
It is recommended that a second means of communication should be used as a back-up for
when the SSO is away from the SV or if the two-way radio malfunctions or is occupied.
1. The member must:
BY-LAW NO. 7
10 10.1 10.2 APROVED INSTALLER
In addition to the general criteria specified under the Membership Section, and in terms of the
Occupational Health and Safety Act, as amended from time to time, the following additional
requirements will apply:
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
59
BY-LAW NO. 9
1.3.2
1.3.3
1.3.4
SOUTH AFRICAN INTRUDER DETECTION SERVICES ASSOCIATION
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INSTALLATION OF A CCTV SYSTEM
1.4
Management issues.
1.4.1
Constraints, i.e. licensing, regulations, public consultations, etc;
1.4.2
Legal issues, i.e. laws pertaining to Data Protection, Privacy, handling of data for
evidentiary proceedings, etc;
1.4.3
Maintenance, i.e. of system equipment, warranties, upgrades, etc;
1.4.4
Resources, i.e. personnel to run system, service contracts, consumables, training costs, etc.
Amended October 2015
PREAMBLE
The purpose of this By-Law is to determine a minimum technical requirement for CCTV surveillance
systems that will ensure the appropriate/sufficient quality images under different physical and environmental circumstances around residential and commercial sites for monitoring, detection, recognition and identification with the purpose of deterrence of potential perpetrators and the generation
of video footage that will support investigations and successful prosecutions.
The compilation of this By-Law involved consultation between members of SAIDSA; experts in the
field of CCTV, including amongst other accredited installers, retailers and manufacturers of CCTV
equipment and other relevant sectors where required. Many local and world standards were referenced and included to assist in the compilation and application of this By-Law.
These minimum requirements for CCTV surveillance can be categorised as follows, and are dealt
with separately under each heading:
1.
Operational Requirement Analysis (OR)
2.
Functional requirements
3.
System management
4.
Installation guidelines
DEFINITIONS
For the purpose of this By-Law, the following definitions apply:
OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS (OR)
The Operational Requirement analysis is a critical requirement when designing, testing and the operational effectiveness of the CCTV system.
The OR document clearly states:
1.1.
What problems need to be solved – the user needs to assist in selection of
observation purposes for each camera. These categories are to suggest appropriate
image size to aim towards, so as to fulfill the specific observation requirement. The speed of target movement in the observation frame must be considered, as this affects frame rate of the events being observed. If the imagery is to be recorded, playback observation may be affected by compression technologies.
Image Capture
All images that are captured shall have sufficient detail and accuracy to enable the user to extract sufficient information as defined in the operational requirement. This may include but is not limited to resolution, colour, size of displayed image and frame rate.
2.2
2.2.1
Image Handling
Presentation
The displayed image shall be the same as in the original image source. Any object masks, timestamps, camera names or camera numbers produced by the system shall not obscure the required image. This does not include privacy masks.
2.2.1.1 Monitoring device (e.g. Monitors, TV monitor, mobile devices, projector)
2.2.1.2 Maximum number of images displayed
2.2.1.3Resolution
2.2.1.4 Frame rate
2.2.1.5 Response time
2.2.2Storage
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
2.2.2.1
2.2.2.2
2.2.2.3
2.2.3
Any live display shall not influence the storing of video images
The system shall be able to be configured in such a way that the maximum
storage time can be set.
The CCTV system shall be capable of automatically deleting images once they have been stored for the set period of time.
Image data backup / archiving
If storage or recording functions are available in the CCTV system, the following requirements
apply:
2.2.3.1 It shall be possible to extract and preserve the image data for evidential or other purpose. A means of playing back the extracted image data shall be
available without compromising the ability of the system to continue to function as designed.
2.2.3.2 If digital data is transferred to a secondary storage medium, then it shall be an identical copy of the original data and shall be called ‘exact copy´.
2.2.3.3 A documented procedure should be written and followed, specific to each operational need requirement.
3.
SYSTEM MANAGEMENT
3.1
Operation
User instructions shall be self-explanatory. Alarm situations shall be identifiable and accessible immediately with consistent documentation of the event.
3.2
Activity and information management
3.2.1.1 The system must be capable of distinguishing between user requested and event-driven data. Alarm data shall always be given priority over events.
3.2.1.2 The CCTV system shall be capable of indicating an alarm visually and audibly.
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BY-LAW NO. 9
60
System requirements
What alert function must the system produce on event detected/triggered, i.e. audible, BY-LAW NO. 9
1.3
1.3.1
2.1
Where recording functions or storage are available in the system the following shall apply and must
be stated in the manufacturer’s documentation:
1.1.1
These observation categories are defined as follows:
1.1.1.1
Monitoring and Control – to oversee a large area or wide field of view;
1.1.1.2
Detection – to be alerted to the presence of activity in the field of view;
1.1.1.3
Observation – to be able to observe characteristics within a moderately sized field of view;
1.1.1.4
Recognition – to be able to identify a known person or object within the field of view;
1.1.1.5
Identification – to be able to clearly identify an unfamiliar individual or object within the field of view.
The selections taken here will impact heavily on many of the system and management
requirements of the CCTV system. A robust operating procedure is imperative for establishing
integrity of evidence and dealing with legal challenges in court.
FUNCTIONAL REQUIREMENTS
1.
Operational issues – will suggest:
who will monitor the CCTV system;
when and where the CCTV system shall be monitored from;
how the events observed or generated will be handled.
2
The following information shall be stated in the manufacturer’s documentation with regard to
presentation of images:
CCTV System: System consisting of camera equipment, storage, monitoring and associated
equipment for transmission and controlling purposes.
Surveillance: Observation or inspection of persons or premises for security purposes.
Operation Requirement (OR): A statement of needs based on a thorough and systematic
assessment of the problems to be solved and the hoped for solutions.
1.2
1.2.1
1.2.2
1.2.3
display, record, log, etc
Display of images, i.e. screen sizes, number of images per display, remote viewing, etc
Recording, i.e. storage media, retention periods, image quality, frame rates, compression technologies, metadata embedded into image, etc
Archiving & Exporting of data for permanent record, i.e. export/archive procedure, media & software needed to view images.
3.2.1.3 The CCTV system shall offer a means of alarm acknowledgement.
3.2.2
For systems of security grades 3 and 4, on an alarm the CCTV system shall be able to display alarm information which should include:
3.2.2.1
alarm origin;
3.2.2.2
alarm type;
3.2.2.3 alarm time and date.
3.3
3.3.1
3.3.2
3.3.3
3.3.4
System Logs
The system must be capable of,
Maintaining accurate and complete system logs for a period of time defined in the
Operational Requirement;
Presenting log data in a chronological order;
Preventing unauthorized editing or deletion of system logs;
Maintaining a log, that should contain each individual operator’s activity.
3.4
System Security
CCTV system security consists of system integrity and data integrity.
3.4.1
System integrity includes physical security of all system components and control of
unauthorised access to the CCTV system. CCTV systems of security grades 2, 3 and 4 shall be capable of backup and restoral of all system data.
3.4.2
Data integrity refers to the prevention of unintentional changes to the CCTV system data.
3.5
System Integrity
3.5.1
Detection of failures
CCTV systems with a user interface, which is normally manned by an operator (either remote or local), alarm conditions from the specified components shall cause an alert. The failure shall be notified at any time that a new user logs in or the system restarts.
The information to be presented shall include:
3.5.1.1
3.5.1.2
Time and date;
Origin and type of failure.
Where the system provides for the facility to prioritize messages, then the priority level shall also be indicated.
3.5.2
Monitoring of Power Supply
The CCTV system shall be capable of,
3.5.2.1
3.5.2.2
3.5.3
Monitoring of system functions and components
For security grades 3 and 4, the CCTV system shall manage device failure by indicating any failure of the essential functions.
3.5.4
Tamper
3.5.4.1
3.5.4.2
3.5.5
Shutdown without loss of stored data;
Resuming normal operation after a power loss.
protection and detection
The CCTV system shall be protected against tampering.
Where a tamper condition is detected, a tamper alarm must be generated and logged separately to an alarm condition or failure.
Protection against unauthorized access
3.5.5.1.1
Level 1 - Any person - This level has no restriction on access.
3.5.5.1.2
Level 2 - Any user - This level affects system operation, without configuration changes. Access may include password, key or code.
3.5.5.1.3
Level 3 - System administrators -This level affects system configuration. Access may include password, key or code.
3.5.5.1.4
Level 4 - Service personnel or manufacturer - Access to system design changes and maintenance. Access may include password, key or code
3.5.6
62
Authorisation
A CCTV system that implements user level authorisation shall be capable of,
BY-LAW NO. 9
3.5.5.1
Access levels
For each security grade of a CCTV system, there shall be several user
authority access levels. These access levels govern privileges to the functions of the CCTV system.
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63
3.5.6.1 Passwords of users shall be hidden, never be stored or displayed in an alpha or numerical format.
3.5.6.2 A password change by the user shall always require a valid user login.
3.5.6.3 Providing a method for data access to system logs and system setup according to the valid authorisation level granted to the user.
3.6
Image and data integrity
3.6.1
Data identification
3.6.1.1 The CCTV system shall provide methods to identify data in accordance with the applicable security grades.
3.6.1.2 The CCTV system shall always maintain the original data labels when data is exported.
3.6.2
Data authentication
In order to verify the integrity of images and data, grades 3 and 4 systems shall provide a method (e.g. watermarking, checksums, fingerprinting) to validate image and Metadata.
The validation method shall be applied to the recording and shall advise the user of the following:
3.6.2.1
3.6.2.2
3.6.2.3
3.6.2.4
3.6.3
Data protection
CCTV systems of security grade 4, shall provide a method to,
3.6.3.1
3.6.3.2
3.7
Documentation
Documentation relating to a CCTV system shall be sufficient to,
Changes or alterations to images.
Images removed from a sequence;
Images added to a sequence;
Changes or alterations to data labels.
prevent unauthorized viewing of the images and data;
Protect the confidentiality of copied and exported data.
3.7.1Install;
3.7.2
Commission into operation;
3.7.3
Operate and maintain;
3.7.4
Procedures that need to be followed.
3.7.5
System specifications and block diagrams, including specification of
configuration, shall be documented.
INSTALLATION GUIDELINES
4.1
4.1.1
4.1.2
4.1.3
4.1.4
4.1.5
4.1.6
4.1.7
Scene and illumination
The existing lighting should be evaluated for the level, direction and spectral content. Optimal light sources are those which have a spectrum that best matches the camera imaging device response. If additional lighting is required, the number, type, siting and power of the light sources should be determined taking the following parameters into consideration:
The new or additional light source selected should give acceptable pictures under all likely working conditions.
Illumination over the scene being surveyed should be as even as possible avoiding any area of very low light illumination. The ratio of maximum to minimum illumination within the covered area of any scene should ideally be 4: 1 or better.
Where possible lights should be mounted so that they do not impair the camera picture quality. The preferred position for the light is above the camera. The camera should not view the scene through intense beams of light.
Particular attention should be paid to the direction of illumination. The aim is to produce a maximum of contrast for intruder detection. An object can only be detected it its brightness is different to that of its background.
Prior to commencing work all relevant Safety Requirements should be considered. These will vary with the nature of the premises and may involve special installation equipment when working in hazardous areas.
Electric installation methods should comply with current national and site regulations and the installation should be carried out by technicians who are qualified to the appropriate level.
64
BY-LAW NO. 9
4.
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
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65
4.2
4.2.1
4.2.2
4.2.3
4.2.4
4.2.5
4.2.6
4.2.7
4.2.8
4.2.9
Cable installation
All cables to be of a type and size appropriate to the application and should take account of transmission rate, electrical interference and voltage drop.
Cable routes should be planned to provide the shortest practical distance between the equipment locations. Consideration should be given to the possibilities of future expansion of the system and any likely changes to the site.
When selecting cables consideration should be given to possible voltage drop and signal loss. Environmental, safety and security aspects should be taken into consideration and cables should be marked with the appropriate ratings.
When fiber optic cables are used, loss figures should allow for a minimum of three cable repairs during the life of the system. Bending radius should be within the manufacturer’s specification.
Overhead cable runs should be avoided wherever possible. If this is not possible, the clearance height should allow for stretching of the support wire and fixings should comply to the current standard.
Where cables are installed in underground ducts, a draw wire should be left in the duct for maintenance purposes.
Protection should be provided for cables which are subject to mechanical damage or deliberate interference.
Cable wiring to camera equipment with pan and tilt units should remain sufficiently flexible over the full environmental temperature range.
Precautions should be taken during cable installation to ensure that moisture cannot penetrate; this is especially important, when using air spaced coax cables.
4.3
Hardware mounting
4.3.1
Fixings should be in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Environmental conditions may influence the choice of fixings.
4.3.2
Earthing should take into consideration the possibility of lightning strikes and electrical interference. On winch down and pivot types of masts, earth continuity must allow for the mechanical joints.
4.3.3
Camera and lens mounting arrangement should allow for the separation of video signal earth and housing and local safety earth.
4.3.4
All fixing positions should allow for mechanical stability, future access and safe working.
4.3.5
Planning considerations and architectural requirements should be taken into account.
4.3.6
Brackets and towers should be selected to support the maximum weight of the equipment and to provide sufficient rigidity for the camera equipment and other devices. As a general rule, the narrower the angle of view, the more rigid are the mounting requirements.
4.3.7
The rigidity of camera equipment fixings and the possibility of shock and vibration should also be taken into account.
4.3.8
Camera towers should preferably be of the winch down or pivot type and be positioned to provide safe access for service.
4.3.9
No equipment should be mounted near overhead high voltage cables.
4.3.10 All anti tamper devices should be employed where it is required.
4.3.11 Mounting equipment sighting should not compromise the overall security of the site.
4.3.12 Moving cameras should have sufficient clearance from adjacent objects.
The Following referenced standards and documents on the next page will assist in the application of
this Bylaw:
66
BY-LAW NO. 9
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by
any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage or
retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publishers.
Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of information at the time of going to print. However, the authors and publishers cannot be held responsible for errors or omissions for any reason
whatsoever.
Copyright - South African Intruder Detection Services Association (SAIDSA) – All rights reserved
1994-2016
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
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67
MEMBER DIRECTORY
EASTERN CAPE
ADT Security (PTY) LTD Group
(port elizabeth)
ADT House, Ring Road, Greenacres, Port Elizabeth
P O Box 12480, Centrahil, 6006
Tel: 086 12 12 200 Fax: 086 680 0634
Contact: Mr Ryan Britz
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
ATLAS SECURITY
3 Packer Road, Sydenham, Port Elizabeth
P O Box 2544, North End, Port Elizabeth, 6056
Tel: (041) 401-2222 Fax: (041) 401-2233
Contact: Mr Mike Burmeister
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.atlas24.co.za
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
CHUBB ELECTRONIC SECURITY
(ARMED RESPONSE) – GEORGE
19 Courtenay Street, George
P O Box 1165, George, 6530
Tel: (044) 801-7200 Fax: (044) 801-7201
Contact: Mr Jacques Cilliers
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installations, Armed Reaction
Chubb Electronic Security
(Armed Response) –
Port Elizabeth
Incorporating Port Alfred
84 Pickering Street, Newton Park, Port Elizabeth
P O Box 2172, North End, 6056
Tel: (041) 966-7900 Fax: (041) 365-3328
Contact: Mr Jacques Cilliers
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Armed Reaction, CCTV Installations
DELYN SECURITY SERVICES
T/A WATCHDOG SECURITY
90B Campbell Street, Fort Beaufort
P O Box 161, Fort Beaufort, 5720
Tel: (046) 645-2441 Fax: (046) 645-2441
Contact: Deon Ferreira
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
CCTV Monitoring, CCTV Installations.
G4S security services (Pty) LTD
Unit 12, Neptune Terrace, Da Gama Rd, Jeffreys Bay
P O Box 1218, Jeffreys Bay, 6330
Tel: (042) 293-3028 Fax: (042) 293-2480
Contact: Mr Ramesh Maharaj
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
CCTV Monitoring, CCTV Installations.
68
HARTWIG & HENDERSON
13 Scherwitz Road, Berea, East London
P O Box 19338, Tecoma, 5214
Tel: (043) 726-8742 Fax: (043) 726-6751 Contact: Mr D Hartwig
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations
M SEC SECURITY (MOSSEL BAY)
4 Bolton Street, Voorbaai, Mosselbay
P O Box 433, Hartenbos, 6520
Tel: (044) 695-0888 Fax: (044) 695-1416 Contact: Mr H R Burger
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
EASTERN CAPE (Cont’d)
RED GUARD SECURITY
33-35 Ebden Street, Queenstown
P O Box 1364, Queenstown, 5320
Tel: (045) 839-7228 Fax: (045) 838-2430
Contact: Mr A van Schoor
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
SMADA SECURITY SERVICES (PTY) LTD
43 Shirley Street, Newton Park, Port Elizabeth
P O Box 452, Port Elizabeth, 6000
Tel: (041) 365-0863 Fax: (041) 365-0864 Contact: Brian Callanan
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
SKY ALARMS
26 Biscay Avenue, Port Alfred
P O Box 2614, Port Alfred, 6170
Tel: (046) 624-3142 Fax: (046) 624-2806
Contact: Mr Louis Oosthuizen
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
TOPFLIGHT SECURITY SERVICES TRUST
20 Union Ave, Riebeeck Heights, Uitenhage P O Box 3016, Riebeeck Heights, Uitenhage, 6231
Tel: (041) 992-5778 Fax: (041) 992-5776
Contact: Mr S Baumeister
Email: [email protected] Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
CCTV Installations
FREE STATE
M SEC SECURITY (GEORGE)
92 Meade Street, George
P O Box 433, Hartenbos, 6520
Tel: (044) 873-0977 Fax: (044) 873 5761 Contact: Mr H Burger
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Armed Reaction
M SEC SECURITY (OUDTSHOORN)
Langenhoven Street, Oudtshoorn
P O Box 433, Hartenbos, 6520
Tel: (044) 873-0977 Fax: (044) 873 5761 Contact: Mr H Burger
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Armed Reaction.
multi security services
41 van der Riet Street, Port Alfred
P O Box 424, Port Alfred, 6170
Tel: (046) 624-3708 Fax: (046) 624-1538 Contact: Mr. C. Millard
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring.
nsa burglar alarms
Unit 8, Sherwood Centre, Kei Street, Sherwood,
Port Elizabeth
P O Box 24007, Sherwood, 6034
Tel: (041) 371-5095 Fax: (041) 371-5097 Contact: Mr Anton Swanepoel
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
RED ALERT ALARMS
Chester Road, Sunnyridge, East London
P O Box 1711, East London, 5200
Tel: (043) 703-4700 Fax: 086 681 7897
Contact: Mr M Harvey
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
Electric Fence Installations
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
ADT SECURITY (PTY) LTD GROUP (BLOEMFONTEIN)
16 Barnes Street, cnr. Collins Road, Arboretum,
Bloemfontein.
P O Box 28436, Danhof, 9310
Tel: 086 12 12 600 Fax: (086) 685-9243 Contact: Andre de Wet
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
CHUBB ELECTRONIC SECURITY
(ARMED RESPONSE) – FREE STATE
INCORP. BLOEMFONTEIN AND WELKOM
155 Zastron Street, Westdene, Bloemfontein
P O Box 28361, Danhof, 9310
Tel: (051) 430-0911 Fax: (051) 430-8058
Contact: Mr Jan Louw
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installations, Armed Reaction,
BLOEMSEC
28 Kellner Street, Westdene, Bloemfontein
P O Box 12114, Brandhof, 9324
Tel: (051) 430-2010 Fax: (051) 448-6997
Contact: Stefan Meyer
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Monitoring, CCTV Installations
(See our display advert)
Corcomm SECURITY
36 Reitz Street, Kroonstad
P O Box 2260, Kroonstad, 9500
Tel: (056) 215-2231 Fax: (056) 213-4886
Contact: Piet Cordier
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Monitoring, CCTV Installations, Electric Fencing
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
69
GAUTENG (cont’d)
FREE STATE (Cont’d)
Defensor Security (PTY) Ltd
Cnr. Alpha & Kraal Streets, East-End, Bloemfontein
P O Box 183, Bloemfontein, 9300
Tel: (051) 430-5797/96 Fax: 086 641 7898
Contact: Claudias. Peterson
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
MAYDAY ALARMS
14 Warden Street, Harrismith
P O Box 452, Harrismith, 9880
Tel: (058) 622-1568 Fax: (058) 622-1568
Contact: J H van der Merwe
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring
SENFORCE SECURITY
53 Barnes Street, Bloemfontein
P O Box 35188, Faunasig, Bloemfontein, 9325
Tel: (051) 430-0040 Fax: (051) 430-0042
Contact: Willie Hoffman
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Nonitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations
ALPHA SECURITY INSTALLATIONS
Cnr. Albatross & Cypress Streets, Kempton Park
P O Box 3904, Kempton Park, 1620
Tel: (011) 394-1880 Fax: (011) 975-0770
Contact: Mr. Martin Herbst
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installations, Electric Fence
Installations
Top Security Systems (Pty) Ltd
37 Angel Street, Kimberley
P O Box 1373, Kimberley, 8300
Tel: (053) 831-1958/9 Fax: (053) 831-1958
Contact: Mr P Hindley
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
ALPHA SECURITY & ALARMS
Cnr. Albatross & Cypress Streets, Kempton Park
P O Box 3904, Kempton Park, 1620
Tel: (011) 394-1880 Fax: (011) 975-0770
Contact: Mr. M Herbst
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
GAUTENG
24-7 SECURITY
8 Philo Road, Wynberg
P O Box 1229, Highlands North, 2037
Tel: (011) 444-2237 Fax: (011) 444-2238
Contact: Mr D de Lima
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
(See our display advert)
ANCHOR SECURITY GAUTENG (PTY) LTD
716 Fourth Street, Wynburg
P O Box 576, Pinegowrie, 2123
Tel: (011) 887-4030 Fax: (011) 887-4039
Contact: Mr. Zack Nurick
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installer, CCTV Monitoring, Electric Fence
Installer
ANTI INTRUSION MANAGEMENT SA
36 Diagonal Street, La Rochelle, Johannesburg
P O Box 1230, Southdale, 2130
Tel: (011) 681-9700 Fax: (011) 436-2793
Contact: Mr R S Twilley
Email: [email protected] Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring
APCAN RISK MANAGEMENT (PTY) LTD
19 Madeline Street, Florida
P O Box 13, Florida Hills, 1716
Tel: (011) 472-0770 Fax: 086 645 8900
Contact: Mr. Leon Mans
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
Axon Security
219 Trichardt Crescent, President Park, Midrand
P O Box 7262, Halfway House, 1685
Tel: (011) 315-2870 Fax: (011) 315-0319
Contact: Mr I Pistorius
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
Aaa alarms
61a Paul Smit Street, Boksburg North
P O Box 6214, Dunswart, 1508
Tel: (011) 892-0772 Fax: (011) 892-5752
Contact: Mr. Cobus Venter
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Armed Reaction
ACCESS SECURITY SYSTEMS
12 George Avenue, Sandringham
P O Box 381, Highlands North, 2037
Tel: (011) 485-1355 Fax: (011) 485-1434
Contact: Mr. Robert Salkow
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installer
ADT SECURITY (PTY) LTD GROUP - (jhb)
1 Charles Crescent, Eastgate Ext 4, Sandton
P O Box 785396, Sandton, 2146
Tel: (011) 259-3500 Fax: (011) 259-3510
Contact: Mr Theunis Kotze
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
ADT SECURITY (PTY) LTD GROUP (Pretoria)
4th Floor, Brooklyn Mall, Cnr. Fehrsen & Middle Streets,
Brooklyn, Pretoria
P O Box 95870, Waterkloof, 0145
Tel: 086 12 12 500 Fax: 086 12 12 505
Contact: Mr Terry van Zyl
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
70
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
71
GAUTENG (cont’d)
GAUTENG (cont’d)
Chandel Security SERVICES
454 Mooi Street, Hermanstad, Pretoria
P O Box 30269, Wonderboompoort, 0033
Tel: 086 122 6335 Fax: 086 614 0333
Contact: Ms. A Raftopoulos
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Monitoring
CHUBB ELECTRONIC SECURITY
(ARMED RESPONSE) – INCORPORATING
NORTH, WEST, EAST
Gateview House A3, Cnr. 14th Ave & Hentrik Potgieter
Road, Weltevreden Park.
P O Box 6776, Westgate, 1734
Tel: (011) 763-9600 Fax: (011) 763-9680
Contact: Mr A. Worthington
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Armed Reaction, CCTV Installations
BHEKANI ABANTU SECURITY SERVICES
21 Mouton Avenue, Horison Ext. 1, Roodepoort
P O Box 1094, Roodepoort, 1724
Tel: (011) 760 6669 Fax: (011) 760 2528
Contact: Piet Wessels
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV installer, Alarm Monitoring,
CCTV monitoring, Armed Reaction
BIDVEST PROTEA COIN
6 Eddington Crescent, Highveld Technopark,
Centurion
P O Box 68276, Highveld, 0169
Tel: (012) 665-8000 Fax: (012) 665-0042
Contact: Mr. N. Moodley
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
BLUE LABEL ALARMS (PTY) LTD
128 River Road, Lyttelton Manor, Centurion
P O Box 14672, Lyttelton, 0140
Tel: (012) 940-0095 Fax: (086) 605-7272
Contact: Theuns Minnaar
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer
BONA ELECTRONIC SOLUTIONS
21 Mandy Road, Reuven, Johannesburg
P O Box 38221, Booysens, 2016
Tel: (011) 210-3500 Fax: (011) 210-3506
Contact: Mr Shaun Thome
Email: [email protected]
Alarm & CCTV Installations
B-Safe systems
78 Fourth Street, Northmead, Benoni
P O Box 12181, Benoryn, 1504
Tel: (0861) 99 11 11 Fax: (011) 425-4407
Contact: Mr. Johann Yssel
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, CCTV Installations,
CCTV Monitoring
72
CHUBB MONITORING BUSINESS (CMB)
Cnr Pheasant & Pigeon Streets, Horizon Park,
Roodepoort
P/Bag X47, Wilro Park, 1731
Tel: (011) 761-7000 Fax: (011) 761-7335
Contact: Mr Neville Rothfusz
Email: neville.[email protected]
Alarm Monitoring
CORPORATE INVESTIGATING AND
VERACITY ASSESSMENTS (CIVA)
57 Migmatite Drive, Zwartkop, Centurion,
P O Box 55502, Wierda Park, Centurion, 0157
Tel: (012) 643-1924 Fax: (012) 663-4320
Contact: Mr Stefan Hansen
Email: [email protected]
CCTV Installer
DATAVISION (Addx trading 2013 t/a)
3-5 Dalcrest Centre, cnr. Roux and Tiller Streets,
Dalpark Ext. 1, Brakpan.
P O Box 1815, Brakpan, 1540
Tel: (011) 915-6350 Fax: (011) 915-6381
Contact: Sharon Newton
Email: [email protected]
CCTV Installer
Crime Stop
Plot 24, Boschfontein, Vereeniging Rd, Heidelburg
P O Box 1135, Heidelburg, 1438
Tel: (016) 341-9004/7/8 Fax: (086) 689-3968
Contact: Mrs Suzan Basson
Email: [email protected] Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitorin
D & D Tactical
66 Bellairs Drive, Glenvista.
P O Box 480, Glenvista, 2058
Tel: (011) 432-6050 Fax: (086) 610 3830
Contact: Mr Andrew Ledwick
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, CCTV Installer,
CCTV Monitoring, Armed Reaction
DAILTRON SECURITY SYSTEMS
29 Wicklow Avenue, Parkview.
P O Box 98374, Sloane Park, 2182
Tel: (011) 486-4342 Fax: (011) 486-0993
Contact: Mr S Goff
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer
Diamond Security SYSTEMS
129 Pembroke Street, Sydenham
P O Box 29649, Sandringham, 2131
Tel: (011) 485-1923 Fax: (011) 485-1958
Contact: Mr M Diamond
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer
Chubb fire and security –
Pretoria (Incorporating Brits) 1st Floor Sanlam Building,
Cnr. Festival & Arcadia Streets, Hatfield
P O Box 11662, Hatfield, Pretoria, 0028
Tel: (012) 428-4900 Fax: (012) 440-4491
Contact: Mr Andre Becker
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Armed Reaction, CCTV Installer
COLT SECURITY SYSTEMS
119 8th Avenue, Fairland, Johannesburg.
P O Box 731436, Fairland, 2030
Tel: (011) 476-1252 Fax: (011) 476-9122
Contact: Mr Glenn Cartwright
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installer, Electric Fence Installer
COMMUNITY MONITORING SERVICES
Cnr. Louisa & Great North Roads, Benoni
P O Box 15531, Farrarmere, 1518
Tel: (011) 578-8700 Fax: (086) 679 5530
Contact: Gerrit
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
COPWATCH
220 Ruimte Street, Wierda Park, Centurion
P O Box 3152, Lyttelton South, 0176
Tel: (012) 653-6417 Fax: (012) 653-6706
Contact: Mr AC Myburgh Email: [email protected]
Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
73
GAUTENG (cont’d)
EA24
27 van der Walt Street, Dalview
P O Box 3161, Dalview, 1544
Tel: (011) 744-1181 Fax: (011) 740-6872
Contact: Mr H Niemand
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring
emis security
7 Apsey Street, Heidelberg
Postnet Suite #116, P/Bag H607, Heidelberg, 1438
Tel: (016) 341-3131 Fax: (016) 341-6218
Contact: Mr Deon Ardendorff
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations
ENGINEERED SYSTEMS SOLUTIONS
21 George Storrar Drive, Groenkloof, Pretoria.
P O Box 1699, Groenkloof, Pretoria, 0027
Tel: (012) 460-8240 Fax: (012) 346-5529
Contact: Jorge Morais
E-Mail: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installer
epr (PTY) LTD
38 Fiat Street, Aureus, Randfontein
P O Box 2214, Randfontein, 1760
Tel: 0861 692 1956 Fax: (011) 693-6245
Contact: Johan Booysen
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
(See our display advert)
EPR West cc
38 Fiat Street, Aureus, Randfontein
P O Box 2214, Randfontein, 1760
Tel: (011) 753-2580 Fax: (011) 693-6245
Contact: Johan Krogh
Email: [email protected]
Armed Reaction
(See our display advert)
Fidelity security services (RO)
1170 Domkrag Street, Robertville.
P O Box 58564, Newville, 1664
Tel: (011) 763-9000 Fax: (011) 672-1965
Contact: Mr K Whateley
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, CCTV Installations,
CCTV Monitoring, Armed Reaction
(See our display advert)
FUTURIS monitoring SYSTEMS
2 van Boeschoten Street, Meyerton
Postnet Suite 7, Private Bag X1003, Meyerton, 1960
Tel: (016) 362-3960 Fax: (086) 631-0304
Contact: Mr Nico le Roux
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
74
Genesis Security
68 Oxford Street, Ferndale, Randburg
P O Box 2171, Randburg, 2125
Tel: (011) 326-0886 Fax: 086 503 7113
Contact: Mr Collin Ton
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installations
(See our display advert)
GROUP technical security
management
1 Cedar Avenue, Westonaria
P O Box 533, Westonaria, 1780
Tel: (011) 757-0055 Fax: 086 673 6722
Contact: Mr Shane Ulgheri
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installations
Guardarm Security
19 Molyneux Ave, Selcourt, Springs
P O Box 1759, Springs, 1560
Tel: 0861 111 012 Fax: 086 519 1396
Contact: Mr Klaus Friebe
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installer
HANDZ-ON SECURITY
1067 Gewelhuis Avenue, Allens Nek
P O Box 81, Mondeor, 2110
Tel: (011) 675-0007 Fax: (086) 293-6138
Contact: Mr B Adamstein
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installer, Electric Fence Installer
Hercules Alarms (PTY) Ltd
1 Sedar Street, Winchester Hills
P O Box 1018, Mondeor, 2110
Tel: (011) 433-2128 Fax: (011) 680-2146
Contact: Mr. H. du Booij
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
75
GAUTENG (cont’d)
GAUTENG (cont’d)
imc reaction
1303 Hartebeestspruit Street, Hatfield
P O Box 11853, Hatfield, 0028
Tel: (012) 362-5425 Fax: (086) 672-0692
Contact: Barend Buys
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
imVULA QUALITY PROTECTION
(AFRICA) (PTY) LTD
5 Wolseley Road, Woodmead East
Postnet Suite #358, Private Bag X29, Gallo Manor, 2052
Tel: (011) 202-7700 Fax: (086) 630-1820
Contact: Mr. Neville Maharaj
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, CCTV Installations,
CCTV Monitoring, Armed Reaction
Incity alarms & security
SYSTEMS (PTY) LTD
9 Power Street, Germiston South
P O Box 701, Germiston, 1400
Tel: (011) 872-1974 Fax: (011) 873-9254 Contact: Mr John Sizer
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
(See our display advert)
IPROTECT
(Sharp Sharp Security Services t/a)
Cnr. Mego and Chein Streets, Lewisham, Krugersdorp
P O Box 2183, Ruimsig, 1732
Tel: (011) 955-5248 Fax: 086 602 6629
Contact: Andrew Barnard
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installer,
Alarm Monitoring, CCTV Monitoring,
Asset Recovery
Joshua Morris protection
services
68 Bram Fisher Road, Blairgowrie, Randburg
P O Box 35544, Northcliff, 2115
Tel: 086 111 4089 Fax: 086 500 3753
Contact: Mr C. van der Berg Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installer
Lectronic Security Systems
& SERVICES
2 Kamferhout Street, East Village, Sunward Park
P O Box 19935, Sunward Park
Tel: (011) 913-2104 Fax: (011) 913-2155
Contact: Mr S O’Connor
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
(See our display advert)
LOCKSECURE (PTY) LTD
7 Victoria Link, Rout 21 Office Park, Irene
P O Box 90579, Garsfontein, 0042
Tel: (086) 111-2816 Fax: (086) 234-7886
Contact: Johan Visagie
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer
76
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
LONDOLOZA PROTECTION GROUP
Office 1H, Honeydew Shopping Centre,
Cnr. Beyers Naude Drive and Blueberry St, Honeydew
Postnet Suite 41, Private Bag X4006, Ferndale, 2160
Tel: 086 156 6365 Fax: (086) 554-2387
Contact: Mr R. le Roux
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, CCTV Monitoring,
CCTV Installer
Maximum Security
206 Koos de la Rey Street, Pretoria North
P O Box 52636, Fouriesrus, 0024
Tel: (012) 546-0427 Fax: (012) 546-0427
Contact: Mr G Delport
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
maxi phumelela security
t/a maxi security
243 Louis Botha Avenue, Orchards
P O Box 1503 Houghton, 2041
Tel: (011) 551-1600 Fax: (011) 485-2802
Contact: Michelle de Villiers
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
MML ELECTRONIC SECURITY
19 Dick Muller Drive, Norkem Park.
P O Box 13155, Norkem Park, 1631
Tel: (011) 972-9115 Fax: (011) 972-5451
Contact: Mr Mike de Lange
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
MJAYELI SECURITY SERVICES
82 6th Avenue, Cnr. Rabie St, Fonteinbleau, Randburg.
P O Box 2463, Randburg, 2194
Tel: (011) 793-4866 Fax: (011) 793-3916
Contact: Mr Kalani Ndlovu
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring.
Monitor Net
690 Tobie Street, Henopspark Ext.27, Centurion
P O Box 16257, Lyttleton, 0140
Tel: 086 111 7117 Fax: 086 680 8536
Contact: Mr Wynand Grove
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
MR. B Security systems
8 14th Street, Orange Grove
P O Box 46401, Orange Grove, 2192
Tel: (011) 640-3122 Fax: (086) 603-3523
Contact: Better Sibanda
Email: sales @mrbsecuitysystems.co.za
Alarm Installer, Electric Fence Installer
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
77
GAUTENG (cont’d)
NTAMO TECHNOLOGIES (PTY) LTD
23 Chasewater Street, New Redruth, Alberton
P O Box 9369, Verwoerdpark, 1453
Tel: 086 126 8266 Fax: (011) 869-1714
Contact: Mr. Quentin Louw
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, CCTV Installer,
CCTV Monitoring
Scantronic Security systems &
equipment
202 Rose Ave, Extension 5, Lenasia
P O Box 1048, Lenasia, 1820
Tel: (011) 854-4416 Fax: (011) 852-5334
Contact: Mr. Ismail Kholvadia
Email: [email protected] Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, CCTV Installations
Prosafe Security
2 South Main Reef Road, New Era, Springs
P O Box 1703, Springs, 1560
Tel: (011) 362-5590 Fax: (011) 362-5281
Contact: Mr. A. de Cruz
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
SECURITAS SPECIALISED SERVICES
15a - 4th Street, Wynberg
Postnet Suite 529, Private Bag X1, Melrose Arch, 2076
Tel: 0861 100 900 Fax: 086 550 3193
Contact: Reshina Sewpersa
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations
PROTECTIVE FORCE SECURITY
34 Hennie Alberts Street, Brackenhurst
P O Box 124178, Alrode, 1451
Tel: (011) 867 1234
Contact: Mr. E. Jacobs
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring,
Armed Reaction, CCTV Installations,
CCTV Monitoring
SECURITAS TECHNOLOGY
14 Humber Street, Woodmead.
P O Box 691, Strathavon, 2031
Tel: 086 110 0900 Fax: (011) 234-3228
Contact: Darren Nathan
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, CCTV Installations,
CCTV Monitoring
RIDGEWAY ENTERPRISES T/A
REMEZ SECURITY
59 Western Service Road, Wendywood
P O Box 76171, Wendywood, 2144
Tel: (011) 802-7002 Fax: (011) 802-7006
Contact: Mr Sam Goldstein
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installer
S A Security Alarms and CCTV
(PTY) LTD
1 Cornish Road, New Township, Springs
P O Box 1349, Springs, 1560
Tel: Tel: (011) 365-7800/1 Fax: (011) 362-2091
Contact: Mrs. C. Borrett
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
SAVIKA ARMED RESPONSE
50 Tesla Crescent, Sunninghill Estate
P O Box 16233, Dowerglen, 1612
Tel: (011) 234-7424 Fax: (011) 440-3962
Contact: Emy
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
Electric Fence Installer
SBV SERVICES (PTY) LTD
T/A SBV SERVICES
34-36 Laub Street, Selby
Postnet Suite 48, Private Bag X1,
Melrose Arch, 2076
Tel: (011) 283-2000 Fax: (011) 283-2201
Contact: Chris Coetzee
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Monitoring, CCTV Monitoring
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
78
SMADA SECURITY HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD
21 Impala Road, Doringkloof, Centurion
Postnet Suite #179, P/Bag 1028, Lyttelton, 0140
Tel: (012) 667-1567 Fax: 086 571 9381
Contact: Mr Brian Callanan
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
sOS protecsure national division
22 Gill Street, Gillview
P O Box 259, Mulbarton, 2059
Tel: (011) 680-0021 Fax: (011) 680-0261
Contact: Mr. F. Hoosen
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
Southwest systems
36 St. James Street, Ferndale
P O Box 1123, Ferndale, 2160
Tel: (011) 792-2649 Fax: (011) 791-2384
Contact: Mr David Maboi
Email: [email protected]
CCTV Installations
(See our display advert)
ssg security (pty) ltd
128 Oak Avenue, Highveld Technopark, Centurion
P O Box 1059, Bramley, 2018
Tel: (011) 518-3700 Fax: 086 650 4531
Contact: Mr. Gert Olivier
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, CCTV Installations
CCTV Monitoring, Armed Reaction, Special Services
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
79
GAUTENG (cont’d)
Stallion REACTION
35 Siemert Road, Doornfontein
P O Box 16638, Doornfontein, 2028
Tel: (011) 533-8888 Fax: (087) 807-3662
Contact: Mr Steve Steyn
Email: [email protected] Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
SYSTEMS CONTROL INTEGRATION SA
t/a SYSCONTROL SECURE
Section 6, Stand 189, Northlands Business Park,
New Market Avenue, Northriding
P O Box 1316, Northriding, 2162
Tel: (086) 111-4453 Fax: 086 687 2511
Contact: Mr. Rudolph Nothling
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring,
Electric Fence Installer.
(See our display advert)
tactical reaction services
414 Bernie Street, Kya Sands
P O Box 68124, Bryanston, 2021
Tel: (011) 708-1895 Fax: (011) 708-2787
Contact: Mr Renato Ramos
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
Telltale Security
P O Box 1841, Halfway House, 1685
Tel: (011) 805-2444 Fax: 086 606 9729
Contact: Mr. M Glaeser
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installations
Thompsons Khusela
271 Voortrekker Road, Monument, Krugersdorp
P O Box 4175, Luipaardsvlei, 1743
Tel: (011) 954-0605 Fax: (011) 954-0649
Contact: Mr. Cliff Thompson
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Monitoring, Alarm Installer, Armed Reaction
KWAZULU-NATAL
KWAZULU-NATAL
GAUTENG
(cont’d)
Triotic protection services
155 Dumbarton Street, Arcadia, Pretoria, 0083
P O Box 13335, The Tramshed, 0126
Tel: (012) 430-3234 Fax: (012) 430-3238
Contact: Francois Mostert
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
Trojan Security
Boskruin Village Shopping Centre Cnr. Hawken & President Streets, Boskruin
P O Box 44558, Linden, 2104
Tel: (011) 792-0738 Fax: (011) 792-9148
Contact: Mr. Izak van Zyl Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
U&S radio alarms
36 Talford Street, Duncanville, Vereeniging
P O Box 517, Vereeniging, 1930
Tel: (016) 422-0760 Fax: (016) 422-0791
Contact: Mr. J. Steenkamp
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
venus security solutions (pty) ltd
Building 5, Esdoring Street, Central Park,
Highveld Technopark, Centurion
P O Box 732, Irene, 0062
Tel: (012) 665-3719 Fax: (012) 665-0486
Contact: Mr. H. Kekanah
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction, CCTV Monitoring
ADT SECURITY (PTY) LTD GROUP
(KwaZulu Natal)
2 Hallifax Road, Pinetown
P O Box 242, New Germany, 3620
Tel: (031) 716-5540 Fax: (031) 701-4641
Contact: Mr K Whitehead
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
Blue security 48 Kings Road, Pinetown
P O Box 2007, Pinetown, 3600
Tel: (031) 717-5000 Fax: (031) 717-5014
Contact: Mr Henk van Bemmelen
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
(See our display advert)
Alpha Alarms and Monitoring
Centre
17 Thie Road, Isipingo Rail
P O Box 31009, Merebank, 4059
Tel: (031) 902-4133 Fax: (031) 902-5114
Contact: Mrs S Govender
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
Chubb Electronic Security
(Armed Response) – Durban
200 Burman Drive, Morningside
P O Box 47795, Greyville, 4023
Tel: (031) 362-3500 Fax: (031) 362-3666 Contact: Barrie Northam
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Armed Reaction, CCTV Installations
Blue INTERNATIONAL 37-39 Island Circle, Block S, Island Office Park
Briardene Industrial Park, Durban.
P O Box 201948, Durban North, 4016
Tel: (031) 569-5656 Fax: (031) 569-1629
Contact: Mr Henk van Bemmelen
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring
Chubb Electronic Security
(Armed Response) – LADYSMITH
26 Egerton Road, Ladysmith
P O Box 284, Ladysmith, 3370
Tel: (036) 631-0144 Fax: (036) 631-0144
Contact: Corne Momberg
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Armed Reaction, CCTV Installations
VUSELA RISK SERVICES (PTY) LTD
9 Victoria Link, Route 21 Business Park, Irene
P O Box 68790, Highveld, 0169
Tel: (012) 345-1447 Fax: (012) 345-1174
Contact: Mr Dirk Pretorius
Email: [email protected]
Alarm & CCTV Installations, Alarm and CCTV monitoring
Top Security - EAST region
33 van Buuren Road, Bedfordview
P O Box 751860, Gardenview, 2047
Tel: 0861 10 11 12 Fax: (011) 450-2540
Contact: Mr Charles Zeelie
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
80
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
81
KWAZULU-NATAL
(Cont’d)
GAUTENG (cont’d)
KWAZULU-NATAL (Cont’d)
Chubb Electronic Security
(Armed Response) – PMB 342b Boom Street, Pietermaritzburg
P O Box 2171, Pietermaritzburg, 3200
Tel: (033) 392-4000 Fax: (033) 394-5336
Contact: Corne Momberg
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Armed Reaction, CCTV Installations
LINK UP SECURITY
220 Market Street, Vryheid
P O Box 673, Vryheid, 3100
Tel: (034) 980-8872 Fax: (034) 989-8402
Contact: Mr Simon Taylor
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, CCTV Installations,
CCTV Monitoring, Armed Reaction
Chubb Electronic Security
(Armed Response) – Richards Bay
2 Dollar Drive, Richards Bay
P O Box 1595, Richards Bay, 3900
Tel: (035) 789-8859 Fax: (035) 789-1105
Contact: Corne Momberg
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Armed Reaction, CCTV Installations
MARSHALL SECURITY
262 Blackburn Road, Durban North, 4051
Tel: 086 162 7732 Fax: 086 511 6711
Contact: Mr Tyron Powell
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
ENFORCE ELECTRONICS (PTY) LTD
43 Sea Cow Lake Road, Springfield Park, Durban
P O Box 937, Durban, 4000
Tel: (031) 573-7600 Fax: 086 600 0603
Contact: Shane Thompson
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
G and P Security
971 Owen Ellis Drive, Port Edward
P O Box 42, Port Edward, 4295
Tel: (039) 311-1117 Fax: (039) 311-1478
Contact: Mr G Bircher
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
G4S SecurE SOLUTIONS (sa) (PTY) LTD
17 White House Centre, 13 Chief Albert Luthuli Street,
Kwa Dukuza
P O Box 121, Kwa Dukuza, 4450
Tel: 0861 911 032 Fax: (032) 437-3710
Contact: Mr. Reaaz Munga
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
IMVULA QUALITY PROTECTION (AFRICA) (KZN) (PTY) LTD
21 Circuit Road, Westmead, Pinetown
P O Box 15657, Ashwood, 3605
Tel: (031) 700-9190 Fax: (031) 700-3690
Contact: Mr. A. van Rooyen
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installer, Alarm Monitoring,
Armed Reaction
IPSS Security
The Circle, Lower Level, Shop 14a, Ballito
Suite 23, Private Bag X0001, Ballito, 4420
Tel: 0861 32 4777 Fax: (032) 946-2348
Contact: Mr F. Labidi
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring, Electric Fence
Installer
82
Smart solutions
401 Queen Elizabeth Avenue, Glenwood, Westridge
P O Box 21517, Bluff, 4036
Tel: (031) 564-1972 Fax: (086) 648-0457
Contact: Mr Neran Bhagwandin
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installer
TACTICAL SECURITY SERVICES
590 Lighthouse Road, Bluff
P O Box 16052, Bluff, 4036
Tel: 0861 911 877 Fax: 086 606 3798
Contact: Mr Martin Botes
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
MASER FORCE
Section 9, 90 Marine Drive, Uvongo
P O Box 603, Uvongo, 4270
Tel: (039) 315-7799 Fax: (039) 315-7799
Contact: Mrs T. Maser
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
MZansi FIRE & SECURITY (PTY)LTD
348/350 Umbilo Road, Umbilo, Durban
P O Box 18084 Dalbridge, 4014
Tel: (031) 203-5200 Fax: (031) 203-5225
Contact: Nishaal Rawasunker
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installer, Alarm Monitoring,
Armed Reaction, Electric Fence Installer
PARK PATROL SECURITY
141 Montclair Road, Montclair
P O Box 53356, Yellowwood Park, 4011
Tel: (031) 469-4406 Fax: (031) 462-6276
Contact: Mr Clint Rusk
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Monitoring
PMB SECURITY
129 Longmarket Street, Pietermaritzburg
Tel: (033) 345-0459 Fax: (033) 342-2709
Contact: Mrs M A Jeffery
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
(See our display advert)
PRO5 SECURITY
147 Deputation Street, Vryheid
P O Box 1785, Vryheid, 3100
Tel: (034) 980-1000
Contact: Mr JJ Jooste
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
CCTV Monitoring, CCTV Installations.
RED ALERT (PTY) LTD (PMB)
280 Burger Street, Pietermaritzburg CBD
P O Box 11840, Dorpspruit, 3206
Tel: (033) 345-5860 Fax: (033) 345-5868
Contact: Rob Anderson
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
REMEZ SECURITY
Unit 1, 6 Devon Road, Pinetown.
P O Box 851, Westville, 3630
Tel: (031) 702-9292 Fax: (031) 701-2622
Contact: Mr Juan Chanu
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installer
R K SYSTEMS securivision
Unit 11, Shalee Park, 53 Ebonyfield Avenue,
Springfield Park, Durban
P O Box 52531, Moore Road, 4083
Tel: (031) 579-7850 Fax: (031) 579-1899
Contact: Mr Ivor Rixon
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, CCTV Installations
TRAP ALARMS
73 Stamfordhill Road, Greyville.
P O Box 47734, Greyville, 4023
Tel: (031) 309-7090 Fax: 031) 309-2137
Contact: Mr A Pillai
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring
VERULAM SECURITY SERVICES
Shop 2, John Hall Centre, 61 Wick St, Verulum
P O Box 539, Verulam, 4339
Tel: (032) 533-5713 Fax: (032) 533-3393
Contact: Ronny Chetty
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
SECURELINK (PTY) LTD
68 Old Main Road, Botha’s Hill
P O Box 1100, Linkhills, 3652
Tel: (031) 765-3333 Fax: (031) 765-5575
Contact: Mr Karl Michel
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring,
Electric Fence Installer
SAIDSA MEMBERS ARE REQUIRED TO ISSUE A
SAIDSA CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE
FOR ALL INSTALLATIONS
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
83
MPUMALANGA
ACS SECURITY
8 Bester Street, Nelspruit
P O Box 10424, Nelspruit, 1200
Tel: (013) 752-4792 Fax: 086 601 7637
Contact: Mr Johan Kriel
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
ADT SECURITY (PTY) LTD GROUP –
(nelspruit)
32 Marloff Street, Nelspruit
P O Box 95870, Waterkloof, 0145
Tel: (013) 755-4600 Fax: 086 12 12 565
Contact: Mr Marius Boshoff
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Armed Reaction
ADT SECURITY (PTY) LTD GROUP –
(Witbank)
Cnr Watermeyer & Longfellow Streets, Witbank.
P O Box 95870, Waterkloof, 0145
Tel: (013) 697-2285 Fax: (013) 697-2292
Contact: Mr Rassie Erasmus
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Armed Reaction
NORTHERN PROVINCE
Hi-Tech Security Nelspruit
17 Hendrik Potgieter Street, Nelspruit
P O Box 1422, Nelspruit, 1200
Tel: (013) 752-5358 Fax: (013) 752-5358
Contact: Mr J Kerswill Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
CCTV Monitoring, CCTV Installer
ADT SECURITY (PTY) LTD GROUP
(polokwane)
129 Marshall Avenue, Polokwane
P O Box 95870, Waterkloof, 0145
Tel: 086 12 12 570 Fax: (012) 252-1206
Contact: Mr H Oosthuizen
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Armed Reaction
J&M Business security
Riverside Industrial Park, Waterfall Avenue, Nelspruit
P O Box 608, White River, 1240
Tel: (013) 750-6630 Fax: 086 502 6645
Contact: Shaun Terblanche
Email: [email protected]
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring, Alarm Monitoring,
Armed Reaction
Chubb Electronic Security (Armed Response) – Polokwane
84 Schoeman St cnr. Devenish St, Polokwane
P O Box 5362, Pietersburg North, 0750
Tel: (015) 294-6300 Fax: (015) 297-2520
Contact: Gert Pretorius
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Armed Reaction, CCTV Installations
Loskop Alarms
26 Kruger Street, Groblersdal.
P O Box 429, Groblersdal, 0470
Tel: (013) 262-2171 Fax: (013) 262-5823
Contact: Mr Jaco Nel
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
Chubb Electronic Security
(Armed Response) – Witbank
Cnr Rhodes & Haig Streets, Witbank
P O Box 2251, Witbank, 1035
Tel: (013) 690-3380 Fax: (013) 690-2718
Contact: Vernon Strydom
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Armed Reaction, CCTV Installations
Maksimum Securiteit
23/24 Sarel Cilliers Street, Delmas
P O Box 766, Delmas, 2210
Tel: (013) 665-3113 Fax: (013) 665-2115
Contact: Mrs H Coombe
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Monitoring, CCTV Installer
CRIME COMBAT SOLUTIONS
89 Viljoen Street, Lydenberg
Postnet Suite #99, Private bag X20097, Lydenburg, 1120
Tel: (013) 235-1822 Fax: (013) 235-1583
Contact: Mr Elmar Freeman
E-mail: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installer, Alarm Monitoring,
CCTV Monitoring, Armed Reaction
Mid alarms cc
171 Cowen Ntuli Street, Middelburg.
P O Box 4746, Middelburg, 1050
Tel: (013) 243-5004 Fax: (013) 243-1333
Contact: Erika du Preez
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installer, Alarm Monitoring,
Armed Reaction
GLADIATOR SECURITY SERVICES
35 Ada Street, Carletonville
P O Box 6022, Oberholzer,
Tel: (018) 786-1330 Fax: (086) 618-9338
Contact: Mr E Potgieter
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installer, Alarm Monitoring,
CCTV Monitoring, Armed Reaction
ROMAN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
28 Paul Kruger Street, Trichardt
P O Box 384, Trichardt, 2300
Tel: (017) 638-0523 Fax: (017) 638-1119
Contact: Zelda Swarts
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
GNT SECURITY
31 van der Merwe Street, Nelspruit.
P O Box 1279, Nelspruit, 1200
Tel: (013) 755-2596 Fax: (013) 755-2625
Contact: Amanda Vorster
E-mail: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
Electric Fence Installer
SECURE ACCESS
32 Lukin Street, Witbank.
Postnet Suite 68, Private Bag X7260, Witbank, 1035
Tel: (013) 656-4478 Fax: (013) 656-4487
Contact: Mr A Fleming
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
84
VITAL SECURITY
4 Nicol Street, Witbank
P O Box 14331, Leraatsfontein, Witbank, 1038
Tel: (013) 656-6209/6 Fax: (013) 656-6803
Contact: Mr C Pretorius
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
Secure Crime Prevention
18 Hans van Rensburg Street, Polokwane
P O Box 73 , Cycad Centre, Bendor, 0713
Tel: (015) 291-3278 Fax: (015) 291-3944
Contact: Mr J A Odendaal
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
URBAN AFRICA PROTECTION SERVICES
14 Yster Street, Ladanna, Polokwane
P O Box 123, Ladanna, Polokwane, 0704
Tel: (015) 293-0800 Fax: (086) 640-9479
Contact: Mr Jaco Benadie
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
NORTHWEST PROVINCE
Action Force t/a Watchguard
1 Roderick Campbell Road, Klerksdorp
P O Box 3113, Freemanville, Klerksdorp, 2573
Tel: (018) 462-5689 Fax: (018) 464-3445
Contact: Mr D Fensham
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
ADT SECURITY (PTY) LTD GROUP (brits)
Morgantrust Building, 6 Court Street, Brits
P O Box 95870, Waterkloof, 0145
Tel: 086 12 12 507 Fax: (012) 252-1206
Contact: Mr Marius Boshoff
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Armed Reaction, CCTV Installations
CHUBB ELECTRONIC SECURITY
(Armed Response) – mahikeng
19 Hatchard Street, Mahikeng
P O Box 2004, Mahikeng, 2745
Tel: (018) 381-2226 Fax: (018) 381-3837
Contact: Mr Joseph Ngwenya
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Armed Reaction, CCTV Installations
Cpi Security (hekstraat)
43 Ruby Street, Carltonville
P O Box 65, Welverdiend, 2495
Tel: (018) 787-5096 Fax: (018) 787-5096
Contact: Mr T van Zyl
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
ADT SECURITY (PTY) LTD GROUP (RUSTENBURG)
146 Kerk Street, Rustenburg
P O Box 95870, Waterkloof, 0145
Tel: 086 12 12 520 Fax: (012) 252-1206
Contact: Mr Marius Boshoff
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Armed Reaction, CCTV Installations
CSS SECURITY
41 Connie Avenue Adamayview, Klerksdorp
P O Box 270, Stilfontein, North West, 2550
Tel: (018) 468-8506 Fax: (018) 468-3488
Contact: Mr G Chatwind
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installer, Alarm Monitoring,
CCTV Monitoring, Armed Reaction
ARS Security
128 Kock Street, Rustenburg
P O Box 3003, Rustenburg, 0300
Tel: (014) 592-2277 Fax: (014) 592-2304
Contact: Mr W Nienaber
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
extrasec SECURITY (PTY) LTD
28 Berg Street, Rustenburg
P O Box 7823, Rustenburg, 0300
Tel: (014) 594-1257 Fax: (014) 592-0377
Contact: Mr W Thwaits
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installer, Alarm Monitoring,
Armed Reaction
CB SECURITY SOLUTIONS (PTY) LTD
2 Turfvlei Agricultutal Holdings, Potchefstroom
P O Box 1077, Potchefstroom, 2520
Tel: (018) 293-3947 Fax: (086) 809-6117
Contact: Mr Coert Erasmus
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
GOLDEN EYE SECURITY
38 Bantjes Street, Lichtenburg.
P O Box 199, Lichtenburg, 2740
Tel: (018) 632-4637 Fax: (018) 632-4637
Contact: Mr F Hammann
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction, CCTV
Installations
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
85
NORTHWEST PROVINCE (Cont’d)
PPS MONITORING AND REACTION
74 Harrington Avenue, Brits
Postnet Suite #549, Private Bag X5091, Brits, 0250
Tel: (012) 252-1191 Fax: 086 620 0666
Contact: Mr Q. Dunn
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
WESALARMS
32 Von Wielligh Street, Rustenburg, 0299
P O Box 1590, Rustenburg, 0300
Tel: (014) 592-8364 Fax: (014) 592-2585
Contact: Anton Vermeulen
E-Mail: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installer, Alarm Monitoring,
CCTV Monitoring, Armed Reaction
WESTERN CAPE
Western Tvl Security Services
113 Church Street, Lichtenburg
P O Box 2120, Lichtenburg, 2740 Tel: (018) 632-4592 Fax: (018) 632-4548
Contact: Mr CD Breedt
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installer, CCTV Monitoring
A C Security
Security House, 21 Riebeeck Street, Worcester
P O Box 667, Worcester, 6849
Tel: (023) 342-7050 Fax: (023) 342-7040
Contact: Mr A C Kilian
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
Western Tvl Security Services
822 Unit 3, Mmbatho
P O Box 2120, Lichtenburg, 2740 Tel: (018) 452-4286 Fax: (018) 632-4548
Contact: Mr W Koen
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Armed Reaction
ADT SECURITY (PTY) LTD GROUP
(Cape Town)
5 Louwtjie Rothman Ave, N1 City, 7405
Private Bag X104, N1 City, 7463
Tel: (021) 512-2126 Fax: (021) 508-8648
Contact: Mr. Anthony Saddington
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
ADT SECURITY (PTY) LTD GROUP
(Hermanus)
Cnr. Arum & Mimosa Streets, Hermanus Industrial
P O Box 582, Hermanus, 7200
Tel: 086 12 12 306 Fax: 086 12 12 308
Contact: Mr Hein Muller
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations
ADT SECURITY (PTY) LTD GROUP
(Paarl)
JFC Building, 367 Main Road, Paarl
P O Box 2724, Paarl, 7620
Tel: (086) 12 12 307 Fax: (086) 12 12 309
Contact: Mr. A Moorad
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations
astrosec ASSET PROTECTION
(pty) ltd
3 Warrior Crescant, Blackheath
P O Box 31 Blackheath, 7581
Tel: (021) 007-1034 Fax: (021) 007-1035
Contact: Mr. Adriaan Bosch
Email: [email protected]
CCTV Monitoring
BLUE LABEL ALARMS (PTY) LTD
11 Tradelink Park, Potgieter Street, Strand
P O Box 14672, Lyttelton, 0140
Tel: (021) 854-5288 Fax: (021) 531-7114
Contact: Mr Theuns Minnaar
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer
BUZZARD SECURITY
49 Links Drive, Pinelands, 7405
Tel: (021) 531-9729 Fax: (021) 531-7114
Contact: Mr Andrew Bowes
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installer
CAPITAL SECURITY SERVICES
49 High Street, Worcester
P O Box 1089, Worcester, 6849
Tel: (023) 347-3827 Fax: (023) 342-8180
Contact: Mrs J Saayman
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installer
Chubb Electronic Security
(Armed Response) – Cape Town
98 Marine Drive, Paarden Eiland
P O Box 112, Paarden Eiland, 7420
Tel: (021) 508-1300 Fax: (021) 511-9693
Contact: Mr Pieter du Bois
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Armed Reaction, CCTV Installations
CHUBB MONITORING BUSINESS - CMB
CAPE TOWN
98 Marine Drive, Paarden Eiland
P/Bag X47, Wilro Park, 1731
Tel: (011) 761-7000 Fax: (011) 761-7335
Contact: Neville Rothfusz
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Monitoring
AVENUE RESPONSE
22 Kloof Road, Seapoint, Cape Town
Tel: (021) 434-6400 Fax: (021) 434-1370
Contact: Allan Strates
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
Bassett Burglar Alarms
36 Bloemhof Street, Oakdale, Bellville
P O Box 2914, Durbanville, 7551
Tel: 0861 227 388 Fax: 0861 329 227
Contact: Mr. Johan Hulme
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations
(See our display advert)
86
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
87
WESTERN
CAPE
(Cont’d)
NORTHERN
CAPE
District Watch
9 Monte Vista Boulevard, Monte Vista
P O Box 265, Edgemead, 7407
Tel: (021) 559-3024 Fax: (021) 559-3020
Contact: Pierre Gouws
Email [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Monitoring, CCTV Installations
(See our display advert)
ELECTROLARM monitor
7 Tallent Park, Tallent Street, Parow
P O Box 21128, Parow, 7499
Tel: (021) 939-7212 Fax: (021) 939-2512
Contact: Mr Andre Smit
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring
City Bowl Armed Response 162 Upper Buitenkant Street, Gardens
P O Box 12288, Mill Street, 8010
Tel: (0860) 151515 Fax: (0860) 151516
Contact: Alan Kuseuitsky
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
CRIME WATCH
Unit 6b, Point Business Park, cnr. Koeberg and Marinus
Roads, Milnerton, 7441
Tel: 086 0500 005 Fax: 086 590 4788
Contact: Craig Ginsberg
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installer, CCTV Monitoring
DISTRICT Bassett
36 Bloemhof Street, Oakdale, Bellville
P O Box 2914, Durbanville, 7551
Tel: 0861 227 388 Fax: 0861 329 227
Contact: Mr. Pierre Gouws
Email: [email protected]
Armed Reaction
(See our display advert)
FANG FENCES & GUARDS
4 Heath Circle, Blackheath
P O Box 141, Blackheath, 7581
Tel: (021) 905-1204 Fax: (021) 905-1919
Contact: Mr John Swart
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installer, Electric Fence Installer
gordons bay security TRUST
2 Link Road, Mansfield Industrial, Gordons Bay
P O Box 1264, Gordons Bay, 7150
Tel: (021) 856-0214 Fax: (021) 856-0213
Contact: Matthew Williams
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
HALT SECURITY (Pty) ltd
27 Main Road, Durbanville.
P O Box 2031, Durbanville, 7551
Tel: (021) 975-1503 Fax: (021) 975-6343
Contact: Lesley Kotze
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
KEEP ELECTRONICS (PTY) ltd
23 Stibitz Street, Westlake Business Park, Westlake,
Constantia, 7945
P O Box 31567, Tokai, 7966
Tel: (021) 702-1102 Fax: (021) 701-2877
Contact: Susan Fitchat
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installations
VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR UPDATED LISTINGS
WWW.SAIDSA.CO.ZA
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South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
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South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
WESTERN CAPE (Cont’d)
secure rite security boland
34b Victoria Street, Somerset West
P O Box 2666, Somerset West, 7129
Tel: 086 010 3099 Fax: (021) 852-3852
Contact: Mr Craig Austen
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations & Monitoring
(See our display advert)
SECURITY & investigation services
42 Milpark Centre, Ixia Road, Milnerton, 7441
Tel: (021) 555-1703 Fax: (021) 555-1709
Contact: Mr Raymond Collop
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction
ONLINE SECURITY SYSTEMS
t/a premier armed response
395 Main Road, Kirstenhof.
P O Box 30586, Tokai, 7966
Tel: (021) 701-7777 Fax: (021) 701 7778
Contact: Mr Richard Frost
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
PINEWATCH-ZONEWATCH
(T. BlatheRwick t/a)
Pinewatch Place, 4 Camp Road, Maitland
P O Box 272, Maitland, 7404
Tel: 086 15 15 800 Fax: 086 15 15 810
Contact: Mr. Thomas Blatherwick
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monotoring
(See our display advert)
Rhode Security & fire cc
t/a Rhotech
6 Kahler Street, Idas Valley, Stellenbosch
P O Box 3296, Matieland, University of Stellenbosch, 7602
Tel: (021) 886-5844 Fax: (021) 886-5844
Contact: Mr William Rhode
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installations
Safe ‘n Secure
153 Lower Main Road, Observatory
P O Box 1357, Seapoint, 8060
Tel: (021) 486-1820 Fax: (021) 448-1774
Contact: Mr Mark Finch
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, CCTV Installations
ssc Infrasek
9 Petrusa Park, Cnr. Bill Bezuidenhout &
Petrusa Streets, Bellville
P O Box 1132, Sanlamhof, 7532
Tel: (021) 948-6299 Fax: (021) 948-3574
Contact: Mr I. Venter
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer
star RAPID RESPONSE
62 Blouberg Road, Table View.
P O Box 22, Table View, 7441
Tel: (021) 557-1455 Fax: (021) 557-1539
Contact: Mr. C van Rensburg
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
THE ALARM GUY
12 Dunkeld Road, Camps Bay
Tel: (086) 100-0772 Fax: (086) 563-3587
Contact: Mr. Ross Goodall
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer
Vetus schola boland (PTY) LTD
12 Meltz Centre, Somerset West.
Tel: (021) 852-5425 Fax: (021) 914-5803
Contact: Geraldine Saulse
Email: [email protected]
Alarm Installer, Alarm Monitoring, Armed Reaction,
CCTV Installations, CCTV Monitoring
YZERFONTEIN ARMED RESPONSE
63F Duckitt Street, Yzerfontein, Cape Town
P O Box 142, Yzerfontein, 7351
Tel: (022) 451 2747 Fax: 088 022 451 2747
Contact: Alfie Van Litsenborgh
Email: [email protected]
Armed Reaction
South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
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South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
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South African Intruder Detection Services Association - 2016
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