JavaFX - Oracle Help Center

JavaFX - Oracle Help Center

JavaFX

Handling Events

Release 8

E50628-01

March 2014

This document describes how event handlers and event filters can be used to handle events such as mouse events, keyboard events, drag-and-drop events, window events, action events, touch events and others that are generated by your JavaFX application.

You learn how to implement a drag-and-drop feature in

JavaFX applications, which objects participate in a drag-and-drop gesture, what types of data can be transferred, and which events occur during a drag-and-drop gesture.

JavaFX Handling Events, Release 8

E50628-01

Copyright © 2011, 2014, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

Primary Author: Joni Gordon, Irina Fedortsova

Contributor: Lubomír Nerád, Pavel Safrata, Irina Grineva

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Contents

Preface

................................................................................................................................................................ vii

Audience...................................................................................................................................................... vii

Documentation Accessibility .................................................................................................................... vii

Related Documents .................................................................................................................................... vii

Conventions ................................................................................................................................................ vii

Part I Handling Events

1 Processing Events

Events

............................................................................................................................................................ 1-1

Event Types ...........................................................................................................................................1-1

Event Targets ........................................................................................................................................1-2

Event Delivery Process

.............................................................................................................................. 1-2

Target Selection ....................................................................................................................................1-3

Route Construction ..............................................................................................................................1-3

Event Capturing Phase ........................................................................................................................1-4

Event Bubbling Phase ..........................................................................................................................1-4

Event Handling

........................................................................................................................................... 1-4

Event Filters ..........................................................................................................................................1-5

Event Handlers .....................................................................................................................................1-5

Consuming of an Event .......................................................................................................................1-5

Additional Resources

................................................................................................................................ 1-6

2 Working with Convenience Methods

Using Convenience Methods

................................................................................................................... 2-1

Examples for Mouse Events ...............................................................................................................2-3

Examples for Keyboard Events ..........................................................................................................2-4

Additional Resources

................................................................................................................................ 2-4

3 Working with Event Filters

Registering and Removing an Event Filter

........................................................................................... 3-1

Using Event Filters

..................................................................................................................................... 3-2

Draggable Panels Example .................................................................................................................3-2

Filters for the Draggable Panels Example .........................................................................................3-4

iii

Additional Resources

................................................................................................................................ 3-5

Application Files

........................................................................................................................................ 3-5

4 Working with Event Handlers

Registering and Removing an Event Handler

...................................................................................... 4-1

Using Event Handlers

................................................................................................................................ 4-2

Keyboard Example ...............................................................................................................................4-2

Handlers for the Keyboard Example .................................................................................................4-3

Additional Resources

................................................................................................................................ 4-4

Application Files

........................................................................................................................................ 4-4

5 Working with Events from Touch-Enabled Devices

Gesture and Touch Events

........................................................................................................................ 5-1

Targets of Gestures ..............................................................................................................................5-2

Other Events Generated ......................................................................................................................5-2

Gesture Events Example

........................................................................................................................... 5-3

Creating the Shapes .............................................................................................................................5-4

Handling the Events ............................................................................................................................5-4

Handling Scroll Events .................................................................................................................5-5

Handling Zoom Events ................................................................................................................5-6

Handling Rotate Events ...............................................................................................................5-6

Handling Swipe Events ................................................................................................................5-7

Handling Touch Events ...............................................................................................................5-7

Handling Mouse Events ...............................................................................................................5-8

Managing the Log ................................................................................................................................5-8

Additional Resources

................................................................................................................................ 5-9

Application Files

........................................................................................................................................ 5-9

6 Working with Touch Events

Overview of Touch Actions

...................................................................................................................... 6-1

Touch Points .........................................................................................................................................6-1

Touch Events .........................................................................................................................................6-2

Event Sets ..............................................................................................................................................6-2

Touch Point Targets and Touch Event Targets ................................................................................6-3

Additional Events Generated from Touches ....................................................................................6-3

Touch Events Example

............................................................................................................................... 6-4

Handling Concurrent Touch Points Independently .......................................................................6-5

Changing the Target of a Touch Point ..............................................................................................6-6

Additional Resources

................................................................................................................................ 6-8

Application Files

........................................................................................................................................ 6-8

Part II Drag-and-Drop Feature in JavaFX Applications

7 Drag-and-Drop Operation

Objects and Data Types for Drag-and-Drop Operation

..................................................................... 7-1

Transfer Modes .....................................................................................................................................7-1

iv

Implementing a Basic Drag-and-Drop Gesture

................................................................................... 7-2

Starting the Drag-and-Drop Gesture on a Source ...........................................................................7-2

Handling a DRAG_OVER Event on a Target ..................................................................................7-2

Providing Visual Feedback by a Gesture Target .............................................................................7-3

Handling a DRAG_DROPPED Event on a Target ..........................................................................7-4

Handling a DRAG_DONE Event on a Source .................................................................................7-4

Dragging Custom Data .......................................................................................................................7-5

Application Files

........................................................................................................................................ 7-5

8 PaperDoll Drag-and-Drop Application

Layout of the PaperDoll Application

..................................................................................................... 8-1

Organization of the PaperDoll Application

.......................................................................................... 8-2

Starting the Drag-And-Drop Operation

................................................................................................ 8-4

Handling the Drop of the Data

................................................................................................................ 8-5

Application Files

........................................................................................................................................ 8-9

Part III Source Code for the Handling Events Tutorial

A DraggablePanelsExample.java

B KeyboardExample.java

C GestureEvents.java

D TouchEvents.java

E HelloDragAndDrop.java

F Paper Doll Drag-and-Drop Sample

PaperDoll.java

............................................................................................................................................ F-1

Cloth.java

.................................................................................................................................................... F-4

ClothListBuilder.java

................................................................................................................................ F-6

Body.java

..................................................................................................................................................... F-7

BodyElement.java

...................................................................................................................................... F-8 v

vi

Preface

This preface describes the document accessibility features and conventions used in this tutorial - Handling Events.

Audience

This document is intended for JavaFX developers.

Documentation Accessibility

For information about Oracle's commitment to accessibility, visit the Oracle

Accessibility Program website at http://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?ctx=acc&id=docacc

.

Access to Oracle Support

Oracle customers have access to electronic support through My Oracle Support. For information, visit http://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?ctx=acc&id=info

or visit http://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?ctx=acc&id=trs

if you are hearing impaired.

Related Documents

For more information, see the following documents in the JavaFX documentation set:

Getting Started with JavaFX

Conventions

The following text conventions are used in this document:

Convention boldface

italic

monospace

Meaning

Boldface type indicates graphical user interface elements associated with an action, or terms defined in text or the glossary.

Italic type indicates book titles, emphasis, or placeholder variables for which you supply particular values.

Monospace type indicates commands within a paragraph, URLs, code in examples, text that appears on the screen, or text that you enter.

vii

viii

Part I

Part I

Handling Events

In JavaFX applications, events are notifications that something has happened. As a user clicks a button, presses a key, moves a mouse, or performs other actions, events are dispatched. Registered event filters and event handlers within the application receive the event and provide a response. This tutorial describes how events are processed and provides examples of handling events.

This tutorial contains the following topics:

Processing Events

Describes the underlying architecture of how events are processed within JavaFX applications.

Working with Convenience Methods

Explains the simplest way to provide event handlers to handle the events generated as users interact with your application.

Working with Event Filters

Provides a sample of how event filters can be used to handle events.

Working with Event Handlers

Provides a sample of how event handlers can be used to handle events.

Working with Events from Touch-Enabled Devices

Describes the events generated for user gestures on touch-enabled devices and provides a sample that logs the events from gestures.

Working with Touch Events

Describes the events and touch points that are generated when a user touches a touch screen and provides a sample that shows how touch events can be used in a

JavaFX application.

1

1

Processing Events

This topic describes events and the handling of events in JavaFX applications. Learn about event types, event targets, event capturing, event bubbling, and the underlying architecture of the event processing system.

Events are used to notify your application of actions taken by the user and enable the application to respond to the event. The JavaFX platform provides the structure for capturing an event, routing the event to its target, and enabling the application to handle the event as needed.

Events

An event represents an occurrence of something of interest to the application, such as a mouse being moved or a key being pressed. In JavaFX, an event is an instance of the javafx.event.Event

class or any subclass of Event. JavaFX provides several events, including DragEvent, KeyEvent, MouseEvent, ScrollEvent, and others. You can define your own event by extending the Event class.

Every event includes the information described in

Table 1–1

.

Table 1–1 Event Properties

Property Description

Event type

Source

Target

Type of event that occurred.

Origin of the event, with respect to the location of the event in the event dispatch chain. The source changes as the event is passed along the chain.

Node on which the action occurred and the end node in the event dispatch chain. The target does not change, however if an event filter consumes the event during the event capturing phase, the target will not receive the event.

Event subclasses provide additional information that is specific to the type of event.

For example, the MouseEvent class includes information such as which button was pushed, the number of times the button was pushed, and the position of the mouse.

Event Types

An event type is an instance of the EventType class. Event types further classify the events of a single event class. For example, the KeyEvent class contains the following event types:

KEY_PRESSED

Processing Events 1-1

Event Delivery Process

KEY_RELEASED

KEY_TYPED

Event types are hierarchical. Every event type has a name and a super type. For example, the name of the event for a key being pressed is KEY_PRESSED, and the super type is KeyEvent.ANY. The super type of the top-level event type is null.

Figure 1–1

shows a subset of the hierarchy.

Figure 1–1 Event Type Hierarchy

The top-level event type in the hierarchy is Event.ROOT, which is equivalent to

Event.ANY

. In the subtypes, the event type ANY is used to mean any event type in the event class. For example, to provide the same response to any type of key event, use

KeyEvent.ANY

as the event type for the event filter or event handler. To respond only when a key is released, use the KeyEvent.KEY_RELEASED event type for the filter or handler.

Event Targets

The target of an event can be an instance of any class that implements the EventTarget interface. The implementation of the buildEventDispatchChain creates the event dispatch chain that the event must travel to reach the target.

The Window, Scene, and Node classes implement the EventTarget interface and subclasses of those classes inherit the implementation. Therefore, most of the elements in your user interface have their dispatch chain defined, enabling you to focus on responding to the events and not be concerned with creating the event dispatch chain.

If you create a custom UI control that responds to user actions and that control is a subclass of Window, Scene, or Node, your control is an event target through inheritance.

If your control or an element of your control is not a subclass of Window, Scene, or Node, you must implement the EventTarget interface for that control or element. For example, the MenuBar control is a target through inheritance, but the MenuItem element of a menu bar must implement the EventTarget interface so that it can receive events.

Event Delivery Process

The event delivery process contains the following steps:

1-2 JavaFX Handling Events

Event Delivery Process

3.

4.

1.

2.

Target selection

Route construction

Event capturing

Event bubbling

Target Selection

When an action occurs, the system determines which node is the target based on internal rules:

For key events, the target is the node that has focus.

For mouse events, the target is the node at the location of the cursor. For synthesized mouse events, the touch point is considered the location of the cursor.

For continuous gesture events that are generated by a gesture on a touch screen, the target is the node at the center point of all touches at the beginning of the gesture. For indirect gesture events that are generated by a gesture on something other than a touch screen, such as a trackpad, the target is the node at the location of the cursor.

For swipe events that are generated by a swipe on a touch screen, the target is the node at the center of the entire path of all of the fingers. For indirect swipe events, the target is the node at the location of the cursor.

For touch events, the default target for each touch point is the node at the location first pressed. A different target can be specified using the ungrab(), grab(), or grab(

node) methods for a touch point in an event filter or event handler.

If more than one node is located at the cursor or touch, the topmost node is considered

the target. For example, if a user clicks or touches the triangle shown in Figure 1–2 , the

triangle is the target, not the rectangle that contains the circle and the triangle.

Figure 1–2 Sample User Interface Event Targets

When a mouse button is pressed and the target is selected, all subsequent mouse events are delivered to the same target until the button is released. Similarly for gesture events, from the start of the gesture to the completion of the gesture, gesture events are delivered to the target identified at the beginning of the gesture. The default for touch events is to deliver the events to the initial target node that was identified for each touch point, unless the target is modified using the ungrab(), grab(), or grab(

node) methods.

Route Construction

The initial event route is determined by the event dispatch chain that was created in the implementation of the buildEventDispatchChain() method of the selected event target. For example, if a user clicks the triangle shown in

Figure 1–2 , the initial route is

shown by the gray nodes in Figure 1–3

. When a scene graph node is selected as an

Processing Events 1-3

Event Handling event target, the initial event route set in the default implementation of the buildEventDispatchChain()

method in the Node class is a path from the stage to itself.

Figure 1–3 Event Dispatch Chain

The route can be modified as event filters and event handlers along the route process the event. Also, if an event filter or event handler consumes the event at any point, some nodes on the initial route might not receive the event.

Event Capturing Phase

In the event capturing phase, the event is dispatched by the root node of your application and passed down the event dispatch chain to the target node. Using the

event dispatch chain shown in Figure 1–3 , the event travels from the Stage node to the

Triangle node during the event capturing phase.

If any node in the chain has an event filter registered for the type of event that occurred, that filter is called. When the filter completes, the event is passed to the next node down the chain. If a filter is not registered for a node, the event is passed to the next node down the chain. If no filter consumes the event, the event target eventually receives and processes the event.

Event Bubbling Phase

After the event target is reached and all registered filters have processed the event, the event returns along the dispatch chain from the target to the root node. Using the

event dispatch chain shown in Figure 1–3 , the event travels from the Triangle node to

the Stage node during the event bubbling phase.

If any node in the chain has a handler registered for the type of event encountered, that handler is called. When the handler completes, the event is returned to the next node up the chain. If a handler is not registered for a node, the event is returned to the next node up the chain. If no handler consumes the event, the root node eventually receives the event and processing is completed.

Event Handling

Event handling is provided by event filters and event handlers, which are implementations of the EventHandler interface. If you want an application to be

1-4 JavaFX Handling Events

Event Handling notified when an event occurs, register a filter or a handler for the event. The primary difference between a filter and a handler is when each one is executed.

Event Filters

An event filter is executed during the event capturing phase. An event filter for a parent node can provide common event processing for multiple child nodes and if desired, consume the event to prevent the child node from receiving the event. Filters that are registered for the type of event that occurred are executed as the event passes through the node that registered the filter.

A node can register more than one filter. The order in which each filter is called is based on the hierarchy of event types. Filters for a specific event type are executed before filters for generic event types. For example, a filter for the MouseEvent.MOUSE_

PRESSED

event is called before the filter for the InputEvent.ANY event. The order in which two filters at the same level are executed is not specified.

Event Handlers

An event handler is executed during the event bubbling phase. If an event handler for a child node does not consume the event, an event handler for a parent node can act on the event after a child node processes it and can provide common event processing for multiple child nodes. Handlers that are registered for the type of event that occurred are executed as the event returns through the node that registered the handler.

A node can register more than one handler. The order in which each handler is called is based on the hierarchy of event types. Handlers for a specific event type are executed before handlers for generic event types. For example, a handler for the

KeyEvent.KEY_TYPED

event is called before the handler for the InputEvent.ANY event.

The order in which two handlers at the same level are executed is not specified, with the exception that handlers that are registered by the convenience methods described in

Working with Convenience Methods are executed last.

Consuming of an Event

An event can be consumed by an event filter or an event handler at any point in the event dispatch chain by calling the consume() method. This method signals that processing of the event is complete and traversal of the event dispatch chain ends.

Consuming the event in an event filter prevents any child node on the event dispatch chain from acting on the event. Consuming the event in an event handler stops any further processing of the event by parent handlers on the event dispatch chain.

However, if the node that consumes the event has more than one filter or handler registered for the event, the peer filters or handlers are still executed.

For example, using the event dispatch chain shown in Figure 1–3 , assume that the

Pane node has an event filter registered for the KeyEvent.KEY_PRESSED event and an event filter registered for the InputEvent.ANY event. If the filter for the key pressed event consumes the event, the filter for the input event is executed and the Triangle node does not receive the event.

Note that the default handlers for the JavaFX UI controls typically consume most of the input events.

Processing Events 1-5

Additional Resources

Additional Resources

For more information on how events are processed, see the JavaFX API documentation for the javafx.event package.

1-6 JavaFX Handling Events

2

2

Working with Convenience Methods

This topic describes convenience methods that you can use to register event handlers within your JavaFX application. Learn an easy way to create and register event handlers to respond to mouse events, keyboard events, action events, drag-and-drop events, window events, and others.

Some JavaFX classes define event handler properties, which provide a way to register event handlers. Setting an event handler property to a user-defined event handler automatically registers the handler to receive the corresponding event type. The setter methods for the event handler properties are convenience methods for registering event handlers.

Using Convenience Methods

Many of the convenience methods are defined in the Node class and are available to all of its subclasses. Other classes also contain convenience methods.

Table 2–1

describes the events that convenience methods can be used to handle and identifies the classes in which the convenience methods are defined.

Table 2–1 Classes with Convenience Methods for Event Handling

User Action Event Type

Key on the keyboard is pressed.

Mouse is moved or a button on the mouse is pressed.

KeyEvent

MouseEvent

Full mouse press-drag-release action is performed.

MouseDragEvent

Input from an alternate method for entering characters (typically for a foreign language) is generated, changed, removed, or committed.

InputMethodEvent

Platform-supported drag and drop action is performed.

Object is scrolled.

Rotation gesture is performed on an object

Swipe gesture is performed on an object

An object is touched

Zoom gesture is performed on an object

DragEvent

ScrollEvent

RotateEvent

SwipeEvent

TouchEvent

ZoomEvent

Class

Node

, Scene

Node

, Scene

Node

, Scene

Node

, Scene

Node

, Scene

Node

, Scene

Node

, Scene

Node

, Scene

Node

, Scene

Node

, Scene

Working with Convenience Methods 2-1

Using Convenience Methods

Table 2–1 (Cont.) Classes with Convenience Methods for Event Handling

User Action Event Type Class

Context menu is requested

Button is pressed, combo box is shown or hidden, or a menu item is selected.

ContextMenuEvent

ActionEvent

Node

Item in a list, table, or tree is edited.

ListView.EditEvent

TableColumn.CellEditEvent

TreeView.EditEvent

, Scene

ButtonBase

,

ComboBoxBase

,

ContextMenu

,

MenuItem

, TextField

ListView

TableColumn

TreeView

Media player encounters an error.

Menu is either shown or hidden.

Popup window is hidden.

MediaErrorEvent

Event

Event

Tab is selected or closed.

Event

Window is closed, shown, or hidden. WindowEvent

MediaView

Menu

PopupWindow

Tab

Window

Convenience methods for registering event handlers have the following format: setOnEvent-type(EventHandler<? super event-class> value)

Event-type

is the type of event that the handler processes, for example, setOnKeyTyped

for KEY_TYPED events or setOnMouseClicked for MOUSE_CLICKED events.

event-class

is the class that defines the event type, for example, KeyEvent for events related to keyboard input or MouseEvent for events related to mouse input. The string

<? super

event-class> indicates that the method accepts an event handler for

event-class

or an event handler for one of its super classes as the argument. For example, an event handler for InputEvent could be used when the event is either a keyboard event or a mouse event.

The following statement shows the definition for the method that registers an event handler to handle the events that are generated when a key is typed, that is, when a key is pressed and released: setOnKeyTyped(EventHandler<? super KeyEvent> value)

You can create and register your event handler in a single step by defining the handler as an anonymous class in the call to the convenience method. The event handler must implement the handle() method to provide the code needed to process the event.

A example of the use of a convenience method is shown in the code that is generated when you use the NetBeans IDE to create a JavaFX application. If you select the Create

Application Class option when you create your JavaFX application, the main class that is created contains a "Hello World" application. The generated code is shown in

Example 2–1

.

Example 2–1 Hello World Example

package yourapplication; import javafx.application.Application; import javafx.event.ActionEvent; import javafx.event.EventHandler; import javafx.scene.Group; import javafx.scene.Scene;

2-2 JavaFX Handling Events

Using Convenience Methods import javafx.scene.control.Button; import javafx.stage.Stage; public class YourApplication extends Application {

/**

* @param args the command line arguments

*/

public static void main(String[] args) {

Application.launch(args);

}

@Override

public void start(Stage primaryStage) {

primaryStage.setTitle("Hello World");

Group root = new Group();

Scene scene = new Scene(root, 300, 250);

Button btn = new Button();

btn.setLayoutX(100);

btn.setLayoutY(80);

btn.setText("Hello World");

btn.setOnAction(new EventHandler<ActionEvent>() {

public void handle(ActionEvent event) {

System.out.println("Hello World");

}

});

root.getChildren().add(btn);

primaryStage.setScene(scene);

primaryStage.show();

}

}

The "Hello World" code creates a window with a single button. The setOnAction() method is used to register an event handler that handles the action events that are dispatched when the button is clicked. The handle() method in the event handler handles the event by printing the string "Hello World" to the console.

Examples for Mouse Events

Convenience methods for registering event handlers for mouse events include setOnMouseEntered

, setOnMouseExited, and setOnMousePressed. Example 2–2 shows

samples of these event handlers.

Example 2–2 Sample Event Handlers for Mouse Events

final Circle circle = new Circle(radius, Color.RED); circle.setOnMouseEntered(new EventHandler<MouseEvent>() {

public void handle(MouseEvent me) {

System.out.println("Mouse entered");

}

}); circle.setOnMouseExited(new EventHandler<MouseEvent>() {

public void handle(MouseEvent me) {

System.out.println("Mouse exited");

}

});

Working with Convenience Methods 2-3

Additional Resources circle.setOnMousePressed(new EventHandler<MouseEvent>() {

public void handle(MouseEvent me) {

System.out.println("Mouse pressed");

}

});

To see how similar event handlers are used, run the Ensemble sample, which is available in the JavaFX samples that can be downloaded from the JDK Demos and

Samples section of the Java SE Downloads page. The Ensemble sample also provides the source code for the event handlers.

Examples for Keyboard Events

Convenience methods for registering event handlers for keyboard events include setOnKeyPressed

and setOnKeyReleased. Example 2–3 shows samples of these event

handlers.

Example 2–3 Sample Event Handlers for Keyboard Events

final TextField textBox = new TextField(); textBox.setPromptText("Write here"); textBox.setOnKeyPressed(new EventHandler<KeyEvent>() {

public void handle(KeyEvent ke) {

System.out.println("Key Pressed: " + ke.getText());

}

}); textBox.setOnKeyReleased(new EventHandler<KeyEvent>() {

public void handle(KeyEvent ke) {

System.out.println("Key Released: " + ke.getText());

}

});

To see how similar event handlers are used, run the Ensemble sample, which is available in the JavaFX samples that can be downloaded from the JDK Demos and

Samples section of the Java SE Downloads page. The Ensemble sample also provides the source code for the event handlers.

Additional Resources

For information on the available convenience methods, see the JavaFX API documentation.

2-4 JavaFX Handling Events

3

3

Working with Event Filters

This topic describes event filters in JavaFX applications. Learn how event filters can be used to process the events generated by keyboard actions, mouse actions, scroll actions, and other user interactions with your application.

Event filters enable you to handle an event during the event capturing phase of event processing. A node can have one or more filters for handling an event. A single filter can be used for more than one node and more than one event type. Event filters enable the parent node to provide common processing for its child nodes or to intercept an event and prevent child nodes from acting on the event.

Registering and Removing an Event Filter

To process an event during the event capturing phase, a node must register an event filter. An event filter is an implementation of the EventHandler interface. The handle() method of this interface provides the code that is executed when the event that is associated with the filter is received by the node that registered the filter.

To register a filter, use the addEventFilter() method. This method takes the event type and the filter as arguments. In

Example 3–1

, the first filter is added to a single node and processes a specific event type. A second filter for handling input events is defined and registered by two different nodes. The same filter is also registered for two different types of events.

Example 3–1 Register a Filter

// Register an event filter for a single node and a specific event type node.addEventFilter(MouseEvent.MOUSE_CLICKED,

new EventHandler<MouseEvent>() {

public void handle(MouseEvent) { ... };

});

// Define an event filter

EventHandler filter = new EventHandler(<InputEvent>() {

public void handle(InputEvent event) {

System.out.println("Filtering out event " + event.getEventType());

event.consume();

}

// Register the same filter for two different nodes myNode1.addEventFilter(MouseEvent.MOUSE_PRESSED, filter); myNode2.addEventFilter(MouseEvent.MOUSE_PRESSED, filter);

// Register the filter for another event type myNode1.addEventFilter(KeyEvent.KEY_PRESSED, filter);

Working with Event Filters 3-1

Using Event Filters

Note that an event filter that is defined for one type of event can also be used for any subtypes of that event. See

Event Types for information on the hierarchy of event

types.

When you no longer want an event filter to process events for a node or for an event type, remove the filter using the removeEventFilter() method. This method takes the

event type and the filter as arguments. In Example 3–2

, the filter defined in

Example 3–1

is removed from the MouseEvent.MOUSE_PRESSED event for myNode1. The filter is still executed by myNode2 and by myNode1 for the KeyEvent.KEY_PRESSED event.

Example 3–2 Remove a Filter

// Remove an event filter myNode1.removeEventFilter(MouseEvent.MOUSE_PRESSED, filter);

Using Event Filters

Event filters are typically used on a branch node of the event dispatch chain and are called during the event capturing phase of event handling. Use a filter to perform actions such as overriding an event response or blocking an event from reaching its destination.

To see an example of how filters can be used, download the

DraggablePanelsExample.zip

file. Extract the NetBeans project and open it in the

NetBeans IDE. The following sections describe the filters that are used by this example.

Draggable Panels Example

The Draggable Panels example demonstrates the following uses of filters:

Registering a filter for a super-type event to provide common handling for subtype events

Consuming an event to prevent a child node from acting on it

Figure 3–1

is the screen that is shown when the Draggable Panels example is started.

The user interface consists of three panels. Each panel contains different UI controls.

At the bottom of the screen is a check box that controls whether the panels can be dragged.

3-2 JavaFX Handling Events

Figure 3–1 Initial Screen for the Draggable Panels Example

Using Event Filters

If the check box is not selected, clicking any of the controls in the panels generates a response from the control. If the check box is selected, the individual controls do not respond to mouse clicks. Instead, clicking anywhere within a panel and dragging the mouse moves the entire panel, enabling you to change the position of the panels as

shown in Figure 3–2

.

Figure 3–2 Screen with Repositioned Panels

Working with Event Filters 3-3

Using Event Filters

Filters for the Draggable Panels Example

In the Draggable Panels example, the makeDraggable() method is used in the creation of the three panels to make each panel movable. This method and the filter definitions

are shown in Example 3–3 .

Example 3–3 Filter Definitions in makeDraggable()

private Node makeDraggable(final Node node) {

final DragContext dragContext = new DragContext();

final Group wrapGroup = new Group(node);

wrapGroup.addEventFilter(

MouseEvent.ANY,

new EventHandler<MouseEvent>() {

public void handle(final MouseEvent mouseEvent) {

if (dragModeActiveProperty.get()) {

// disable mouse events for all children

mouseEvent.consume();

}

}

});

wrapGroup.addEventFilter(

MouseEvent.MOUSE_PRESSED,

new EventHandler<MouseEvent>() {

public void handle(final MouseEvent mouseEvent) {

if (dragModeActiveProperty.get()) {

// remember initial mouse cursor coordinates

// and node position

dragContext.mouseAnchorX = mouseEvent.getX();

dragContext.mouseAnchorY = mouseEvent.getY();

dragContext.initialTranslateX =

node.getTranslateX();

dragContext.initialTranslateY =

node.getTranslateY();

}

}

});

wrapGroup.addEventFilter(

MouseEvent.MOUSE_DRAGGED,

new EventHandler<MouseEvent>() {

public void handle(final MouseEvent mouseEvent) {

if (dragModeActiveProperty.get()) {

// shift node from its initial position by delta

// calculated from mouse cursor movement

node.setTranslateX(

dragContext.initialTranslateX

+ mouseEvent.getX()

- dragContext.mouseAnchorX);

node.setTranslateY(

dragContext.initialTranslateY

+ mouseEvent.getY()

- dragContext.mouseAnchorY);

}

}

});

return wrapGroup;

3-4 JavaFX Handling Events

Application Files

}

Filters for the following events are defined and registered for each panel:

MouseEvent.ANY

. This filter processes all mouse events for the panel. If the Drag

Mode check box is selected, the filter consumes the event, and the child nodes, which are the UI controls within the panel, do not receive the event. If the check box is not selected, the control at the location of the mouse cursor processes the event.

MouseEvent.MOUSE_PRESSED

. This filter processes only mouse-pressed events for the panel. If the Drag Mode check box is selected, the current location of the mouse is stored.

MouseEvent.MOUSE_DRAGGED

. This filter processes only mouse-dragged events for the panel. If the Drag Mode check box is selected, the panel is moved.

Note that a panel has three registered filters. Filters for specific event types are invoked before super-type events, so the filters for MouseEvent.MOUSE_PRESSED and

MouseEvent.MOUSE_DRAGGED

are invoked before the filter for MouseEvent.ANY.

Additional Resources

For information on event filters, see the JavaFX API documentation.

Application Files

Source Code

DraggablePanelsExample.java

NetBeans Projects

DraggablePanelsExample.zip

Working with Event Filters 3-5

Application Files

3-6 JavaFX Handling Events

4

4

Working with Event Handlers

This topic describes event handlers in JavaFX applications. Learn how event handlers can be used to process the events generated by keyboard actions, mouse actions, scroll actions, and other user interactions with your application.

Event handlers enable you to handle events during the event bubbling phase. A node can have one or more handlers for handling an event. A single handler can be used for more than one node and more than one event type. If an event handler for a child node does not consume the event, an event handler for a parent node enables the parent node to act on the event after a child node processes it and to provide common event processing for multiple child nodes.

Registering and Removing an Event Handler

To process an event during the event bubbling phase, a node must register an event handler. An event handler is an implementation of the EventHandler interface. The handle()

method of this interface provides the code that is executed when the event that is associated with the handler is received by the node that registered the handler.

To register a handler, use the addEventHandler() method. This method takes the event type and the handler as arguments. In

Example 4–1

, the first handler is added to a single node and processes a specific event type. A second handler for handling input events is defined and registered by two different nodes. The same handler is also registered for two different types of events.

Example 4–1 Register a Handler

// Register an event handler for a single node and a specific event type node.addEventHandler(DragEvent.DRAG_ENTERED,

new EventHandler<DragEvent>() {

public void handle(DragEvent) { ... };

});

// Define an event handler

EventHandler handler = new EventHandler(<InputEvent>() {

public void handle(InputEvent event) {

System.out.println("Handling event " + event.getEventType());

event.consume();

}

// Register the same handler for two different nodes myNode1.addEventHandler(DragEvent.DRAG_EXITED, handler); myNode2.addEventHandler(DragEvent.DRAG_EXITED, handler);

// Register the handler for another event type

Working with Event Handlers 4-1

Using Event Handlers myNode1.addEventHandler(MouseEvent.MOUSE_DRAGGED, handler);

Note that an event handler that is defined for one type of event can also be used for

any subtypes of that event. See Event Types for information on the hierarchy of event

types.

When you no longer want an event handler to process events for a node or for an event type, remove the handler using the removeEventHandler() method. This method takes the event type and the handler as arguments. In

Example 4–2 , the

handler defined in

Example 4–1

is removed from the DragEvent.DRAG_EXITED event for myNode1. The handler is still executed by myNode2 and by myNode1 for the

MouseEvent.MOUSE_DRAGGED

event.

Example 4–2 Remove a Handler

// Remove an event handler myNode1.removeEventHandler(DragEvent.DRAG_EXITED, handler);

Tip:

To remove an event handler that was registered by a convenience method, pass null to the convenience method, for example, node1.setOnMouseDragged(null).

Using Event Handlers

Event handlers are typically used on a the leaf nodes or on a branch node of the event dispatch chain and are called during the event bubbling phase of event handling. Use a handler on a branch node to perform actions such as defining a default response for all child nodes.

To see an example of how handlers can be used, download the KeyboardExample.zip file. Extract the NetBeans project and open it in the NetBeans IDE. The following sections describe the handlers that are used by this example.

Keyboard Example

The Keyboard example demonstrates the following uses of handlers:

Registering a single handler for two different event types

Providing common event processing for child nodes in a parent node

Figure 4–1

is the screen that is shown when the Keyboard Example is started. The user interface consists of four letters, each in its own square, which represent the corresponding keyboard key. The first key on the screen is highlighted, which indicates that it has the focus. Use the left and right arrow keys on the keyboard to move the focus to a different key on the screen.

Figure 4–1 Initial Screen for Keyboard Example

4-2 JavaFX Handling Events

Using Event Handlers

When the Enter key is pressed, the key on the screen with the focus changes to red.

When the Enter key is released, the key on the screen returns to its previous color.

When the key for a letter that matches one of the keys on the screen is pressed, the matching key on the screen changes to red, and returns to its previous color when the key is released. When a key that does not match any key on the screen is pressed,

nothing happens. Figure 4–2

shows the screen when the A key has focus and the D key on the keyboard is pressed.

Figure 4–2 Key Pressed Screen

Handlers for the Keyboard Example

In the Keyboard example, internally each key shown on the screen is represented by a key node. All key nodes are contained in a single keyboard node. Each key node has a handler that receives key events when the key has focus. The handler responds to the key-pressed and key-released events for the Enter key by changing the color of the key on the screen. The event is then consumed so that the keyboard node, which is the parent node, does not receive the event.

Example 4–3

shows the installEventHandler() method that defines the handler for the key nodes.

Example 4–3 Handler for the Key Nodes

private void installEventHandler(final Node keyNode) {

// handler for enter key press / release events, other keys are

// handled by the parent (keyboard) node handler

final EventHandler<KeyEvent> keyEventHandler =

new EventHandler<KeyEvent>() {

public void handle(final KeyEvent keyEvent) {

if (keyEvent.getCode() == KeyCode.ENTER) {

setPressed(keyEvent.getEventType()

== KeyEvent.KEY_PRESSED);

keyEvent.consume();

}

}

};

keyNode.setOnKeyPressed(keyEventHandler);

keyNode.setOnKeyReleased(keyEventHandler);

}

The keyboard node has two handlers that handle key events that are not consumed by a key node handler. The first handler changes the color of the key node that matches the key pressed. The second handler responds to the left and right arrow keys and moves the focus.

Example 4–4

shows the installEventHandler() method that defines the handlers for the keyboard node.

Working with Event Handlers 4-3

Additional Resources

Example 4–4 Handlers for the Keyboard Node

private void installEventHandler(final Parent keyboardNode) {

// handler for key pressed / released events not handled by

// key nodes

final EventHandler<KeyEvent> keyEventHandler =

new EventHandler<KeyEvent>() {

public void handle(final KeyEvent keyEvent) {

final Key key = lookupKey(keyEvent.getCode());

if (key != null) {

key.setPressed(keyEvent.getEventType()

== KeyEvent.KEY_PRESSED);

keyEvent.consume();

}

}

};

keyboardNode.setOnKeyPressed(keyEventHandler);

keyboardNode.setOnKeyReleased(keyEventHandler);

keyboardNode.addEventHandler(KeyEvent.KEY_PRESSED,

new EventHandler<KeyEvent>() {

public void handle(

final KeyEvent keyEvent) {

handleFocusTraversal(

keyboardNode,

keyEvent);

}

});

}

The two handlers for the key-pressed event are considered peer handlers. Therefore, even though each handler consumes the event, the other handler is still invoked.

Additional Resources

For information on event handlers, see the JavaFX API documentation.

Application Files

Source Code

KeyboardExample.java

NetBeans Projects

KeyboardExample.zip

4-4 JavaFX Handling Events

5

5

Working with Events from Touch-Enabled

Devices

This topic describes the events that are generated by the different types of gestures that are recognized by touch-enabled devices, such as touch events, zoom events, rotate events, and swipe events. This topic shows you how to work with these types of events in your JavaFX application.

Starting with JavaFX 2.2, users can interact with your JavaFX applications using touches and gestures on touch-enabled devices. Touches and gestures can involve a single point or multiple points of contact. The type of event that is generated is determined by the touch or type of gesture that the user makes.

Touch and gesture events are processed the same way that other events are processed.

See

Processing Events

for a description of this process. Convenience methods for

registering event handlers for touch and gesture events are available. See Working with Convenience Methods for more information.

Gesture and Touch Events

JavaFX applications generate gesture events when an application is running on a device with a touch screen or a trackpad that recognizes gestures. For platforms that recognize gestures, the native recognition is used to identify the gesture performed.

Table 5–1

describes the gestures that are supported and the corresponding event types that are generated.

Working with Events from Touch-Enabled Devices 5-1

Gesture and Touch Events

Table 5–1 Supported Gestures and Generated Event Types

Gesture

Rotate

Scroll

Swipe

Zoom

Description Events Generated

Two-finger turning movement where one finger moves clockwise around the other finger to rotate an object clockwise and one finger moves counterclockwise around the other finger to rotate an object counterclockwise.

Sliding movement, up or down for vertical scrolling, left or right for horizontal scrolling.

ROTATION_STARTED

ROTATE

ROTATION_FINISHED

SCROLL_STARTED

SCROLL

SCROLL_FINISHED

If a mouse wheel is used for scrolling, only the events of type SCROLL are generated.

Sweeping movement across the screen or trackpad to the right, left, up, or down. Diagonal movement is not recognized as a swipe.

SWIPE_LEFT

SWIPE_RIGHT

SWIPE_UP

SWIPE_DOWN

A single swipe event is generated for each swiping gesture. SCROLL_STARTED, SCROLL, and

SCROLL_FINISHED

events are also generated.

Two-finger pinching motion where fingers are brought together to zoom out and fingers are moved apart to zoom in.

ZOOM_STARTED

ZOOM

ZOOM_FINISHED

Touch events are generated when the application is running on a device with a touch screen and the user touches one or more fingers to the screen. These events can be used to provide lower level tracking for the individual touch points that are part of a touch or gesture. For more information on touch events, see

Working with Touch

Events .

Targets of Gestures

The target of most gestures is the node at the center point of all touches at the beginning of the gesture. The target of a swipe gesture is the node at the center of the entire path of all of the fingers.

If more than one node is located at the target point, the topmost node is considered the target. All of the events generated from a single, continuous gesture, including inertia from the gesture, are delivered to the node that was selected when the gesture started.

For more information on targets of events, see Target Selection

.

Other Events Generated

Gestures and touches can generate other types of events in addition to the events for the gesture or touch performed. A swipe gesture generates scroll events in addition to the swipe event. Depending on the length of the swipe, it is possible that the swipe and scroll events have different targets. The target of a scroll event is the node at the point where the gesture started. The target of a swipe event is the node at the center of the entire path of the gesture.

Touches on a touch screen also generate corresponding mouse events. For example, touching a point on the screen generates TOUCH_PRESSED and MOUSE_PRESSED events.

Moving a single point on the screen generates scroll events and drag events. Even if

5-2 JavaFX Handling Events

Gesture Events Example your application does not handle touch or gesture events directly, it can run on a touch-enabled device with minimal changes by responding to the mouse events that are generated in response to touches.

If your application handles touches, gestures, and mouse events, make sure that you do not handle a single action multiple times. For example, if a gesture generates scroll events and drag events and you provide the same processing for handlers of both types of events, the movement on the screen could be twice the amount expected. You can use the isSynthesized() method for mouse events to determine if the event was generated by mouse movement or movement on a touch screen and only handle the event once.

Gesture Events Example

The Gesture Events example shows a rectangle, an ellipse, and an event log. Figure 5–1

shows the example.

Figure 5–1 Gesture Events Example

The log contains a record of the events that were handled. This example enables you to try different gestures and see what events are generated for each.

The Gesture Events example is available in the GestureEventsExample.zip file.

Extract the NetBeans project and open it in the NetBeans IDE.

Working with Events from Touch-Enabled Devices 5-3

Gesture Events Example

To generate gesture events, you must run the example on a device with a touch screen or a trackpad that supports gestures. To generate touch events, you must run the example on a device with a touch screen.

Creating the Shapes

The Gesture Events example shows a rectangle and an ellipse.

Example 5–1 shows the

code used to create each shape and the layout pane that contains the shapes.

Example 5–1 Set Up the Shapes

// Create the shapes that respond to gestures and use a VBox to

// organize them

VBox shapes = new VBox(); shapes.setAlignment(Pos.CENTER); shapes.setPadding(new Insets(15.0)); shapes.setSpacing(30.0); shapes.setPrefWidth(500); shapes.getChildren().addAll(createRectangle(), createEllipse());

...

private Rectangle createRectangle() {

final Rectangle rect = new Rectangle(100, 100, 100, 100);

rect.setFill(Color.DARKMAGENTA);

...

return rect;

} private Ellipse createEllipse() {

final Ellipse oval = new Ellipse(100, 50);

oval.setFill(Color.STEELBLUE);

...

return oval;

}

You can use gestures to move, rotate, and zoom in and out of these objects.

Handling the Events

In general, event handlers for the shape objects in the Gesture Events example perform similar operations for each type of event that is handled. For all types of events, an entry is posted to the log of events.

On platforms that support inertia for gestures, additional events might be generated after the event-type_FINISHED event. For example, SCROLL events might be generated after the SCROLL_FINISHED event if there is any inertia associated with the scroll gesture. Use the isInertia() method to identify the events that are generated based on the inertia of the gesture. If the method returns true, the event was generated after the gesture was completed.

Events are generated by gestures on a touch screen or on a trackpad. SCROLL events are also generated by the mouse wheel. Use the isDirect() method to identify the source of the event. If the method returns true, the event was generated by a gesture on a touch screen. Otherwise, the method returns false. You can use this information to provide different behavior based on the source of the event.

Touches on a touch screen also generate corresponding mouse events. For example, touching an object generates both TOUCH_PRESSED and MOUSE_PRESSED events. Use the

5-4 JavaFX Handling Events

Gesture Events Example isSynthesized()

method to determine the source of the mouse event. If the method returns true, the event was generated by a touch instead of by a mouse.

The inc() and dec() methods in the Gesture Events example are used to provide a visual cue that an object is the target of a gesture. The number of gestures in progress is tracked, and the appearance of the target object is changed when the number of active gestures changes from 0 to 1 or drops to 0.

In the Gesture Events example, the handlers for the rectangle and ellipse are similar.

Therefore, the code examples in the following sections show the handlers for the rectangle. See

GestureEvents.java

for the handlers for the ellipse.

Handling Scroll Events

When a scroll gesture is performed, SCROLL_STARTED, SCROLL, and SCROLL_FINISHED events are generated. When a mouse wheel is moved, only a SCROLL event is generated.

Example 5–2 shows the rectangle’s handlers for scroll events in the Gesture

Events example. Handlers for the ellipse are similar.

Example 5–2 Define the Handlers for Scroll Events

rect.setOnScroll(new EventHandler<ScrollEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(ScrollEvent event) {

if (!event.isInertia()) {

rect.setTranslateX(rect.getTranslateX() + event.getDeltaX());

rect.setTranslateY(rect.getTranslateY() + event.getDeltaY());

}

log("Rectangle: Scroll event" +

", inertia: " + event.isInertia() +

", direct: " + event.isDirect());

event.consume();

}

}); rect.setOnScrollStarted(new EventHandler<ScrollEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(ScrollEvent event) {

inc(rect);

log("Rectangle: Scroll started event");

event.consume();

}

}); rect.setOnScrollFinished(new EventHandler<ScrollEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(ScrollEvent event) {

dec(rect);

log("Rectangle: Scroll finished event");

event.consume();

}

});

In addition to the common handling described in Handling the Events

, SCROLL events are handled by moving the object in the direction of the scroll gesture. If the scroll gesture ends outside of the window, the shape is moved out of the window. SCROLL events that are generated based on inertia are ignored by the handler for the rectangle.

The handler for the ellipse continues to move the ellipse in response to SCROLL events that are generated from inertia and could result in the ellipse moving out of the window even if the gesture ends within the window.

Working with Events from Touch-Enabled Devices 5-5

Gesture Events Example

Handling Zoom Events

When a zoom gesture is performed, ZOOM_STARTED, ZOOM, and ZOOM_FINISHED events are generated.

Example 5–3

shows the rectangle’s handlers for zoom events in the

Gesture Events example. Handlers for the ellipse are similar.

Example 5–3 Define the Handlers for Zoom Events

rect.setOnZoom(new EventHandler<ZoomEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(ZoomEvent event) {

rect.setScaleX(rect.getScaleX() * event.getZoomFactor());

rect.setScaleY(rect.getScaleY() * event.getZoomFactor());

log("Rectangle: Zoom event" +

", inertia: " + event.isInertia() +

", direct: " + event.isDirect());

event.consume();

}

}); rect.setOnZoomStarted(new EventHandler<ZoomEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(ZoomEvent event) {

inc(rect);

log("Rectangle: Zoom event started");

event.consume();

}

}); rect.setOnZoomFinished(new EventHandler<ZoomEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(ZoomEvent event) {

dec(rect);

log("Rectangle: Zoom event finished");

event.consume();

}

});

In addition to the common handling described in

Handling the Events

, ZOOM events are handled by scaling the object according to the movement of the gesture. The handlers for the rectangle and ellipse handle all ZOOM events the same, regardless of inertia or the source of the event.

Handling Rotate Events

When a rotate gesture is performed, ROTATE_STARTED, ROTATE, and ROTATE_FINISHED

events are generated. Example 5–4 shows the rectangle’s handlers for rotate events in

the Gesture Events example. Handlers for the ellipse are similar.

Example 5–4 Define the Handlers for Rotate Events

rect.setOnRotate(new EventHandler<RotateEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(RotateEvent event) {

rect.setRotate(rect.getRotate() + event.getAngle());

log("Rectangle: Rotate event" +

", inertia: " + event.isInertia() +

", direct: " + event.isDirect());

event.consume();

}

}); rect.setOnRotationStarted(new EventHandler<RotateEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(RotateEvent event) {

5-6 JavaFX Handling Events

Gesture Events Example

inc(rect);

log("Rectangle: Rotate event started");

event.consume();

}

}); rect.setOnRotationFinished(new EventHandler<RotateEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(RotateEvent event) {

dec(rect);

log("Rectangle: Rotate event finished");

event.consume();

}

});

In addition to the common handling described in Handling the Events

, ROTATE events are handled by rotating the object according to the movement of the gesture. The handlers for the rectangle and ellipse handle all ROTATE events the same, regardless of inertia or the source of the event.

Handling Swipe Events

When a swipe gesture is performed, either a SWIPE_DOWN, SWIPE_LEFT, SWIPE_RIGHT, or

SWIPE_UP

event is generated, depending on the direction of the swipe. Example 5–5

shows the rectangle’s handlers for SWIPE_RIGHT and SWIPE_LEFT events in the Gesture

Events example. The ellipse does not handle swipe events.

Example 5–5 Define the Handlers for Swipe Events

rect.setOnSwipeRight(new EventHandler<SwipeEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(SwipeEvent event) {

log("Rectangle: Swipe right event");

event.consume();

}

}); rect.setOnSwipeLeft(new EventHandler<SwipeEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(SwipeEvent event) {

log("Rectangle: Swipe left event");

event.consume();

}

});

The only action performed for swipe events is to record the event in the log. However, swipe gestures also generate scroll events. The target of the swipe event is the topmost node at the center of the path of the gesture. This target could be different than the target of the scroll events, which is the topmost node at the point where the gesture started. The rectangle and ellipse respond to scroll events that are generated by a swipe gesture when they are the target of the scroll events.

Handling Touch Events

When a touch screen is touched, a TOUCH_MOVED, TOUCH_PRESSED, TOUCH_RELEASED, or

TOUCH_STATIONARY

event is generated for each touch point. The touch event contains

information for every touch point that is part of the touch action. Example 5–6 shows

the rectangle’s handlers for touch pressed and touch released events in the Gesture

Events example. The ellipse does not handle touch events.

Working with Events from Touch-Enabled Devices 5-7

Gesture Events Example

Example 5–6 Define the Handlers for Touch Events

rect.setOnTouchPressed(new EventHandler<TouchEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(TouchEvent event) {

log("Rectangle: Touch pressed event");

event.consume();

}

}); rect.setOnTouchReleased(new EventHandler<TouchEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(TouchEvent event) {

log("Rectangle: Touch released event");

event.consume();

}

});

The only action performed for touch events is to record the event in the log. Touch events can be used to provide lower level tracking for the individual touch points that are part of a touch or gesture. See

Working with Touch Events for more information

and an example.

Handling Mouse Events

Mouse events are generated by actions with the mouse and by touches on a touch

screen. Example 5–7 shows the ellipse’s handlers for MOUSE_PRESSED and MOUSE_

RELEASED

events in the Gesture Events example.

Example 5–7 Define Handlers for Mouse Events

oval.setOnMousePressed(new EventHandler<MouseEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(MouseEvent event) {

if (event.isSynthesized()) {

log("Ellipse: Mouse pressed event from touch" +

", synthesized: " + event.isSynthesized());

}

event.consume();

}

}); oval.setOnMouseReleased(new EventHandler<MouseEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(MouseEvent event) {

if (event.isSynthesized()) {

log("Ellipse: Mouse released event from touch" +

", synthesized: " + event.isSynthesized());

}

event.consume();

}

});

Mouse pressed and mouse released events are handled by the ellipse only when the events are generated by touches on a touch screen. Handlers for the rectangle record all mouse pressed and mouse released events in the log.

Managing the Log

The Gesture Events example shows a log of the events that were handled by the shapes on the screen. An ObservableList object is used to record the events for each shape, and a ListView object is used to display the list of events. The log is limited to

50 entries. The newest entry is added to the top of the list and the oldest entry is

removed from the bottom. See

GestureEvents.java

for the code that manages the log.

5-8 JavaFX Handling Events

Application Files

Work with the shapes in the application and notice what events are generated for each gesture that you perform.

Additional Resources

See the JavaFX API documentation for more information on gesture events, touch events, and touch points.

Application Files

Source Code

GestureEvents.java

NetBeans Projects

GestureEventsExample.zip

Working with Events from Touch-Enabled Devices 5-9

Application Files

5-10 JavaFX Handling Events

6

6

Working with Touch Events

This topic describes the touch events that enable users to interact with your JavaFX application using a touch screen. Touch points identify each point of contact for a touch. This topic shows you how to identify the touch points and handle touch events to provide sophisticated responses to touch actions.

A touch action consists of one or more points of contact on a touch screen. The action can be a simple press and release, or a more complicated series of holds and moves between the press and release. A series of events is generated for each point of contact for the duration of the action. In addition to the touch events, mouse events and gesture events are generated. If your JavaFX application does not require a complex response to a touch action, you might prefer to handle the mouse or gesture event instead of the touch event. For more information about handling gesture events, see

Working with Events from Touch-Enabled Devices

.

Touch events require a touch screen and the Windows 7 operating system.

Overview of Touch Actions

The term touch action refers to the entire scope of a user’s touch from the time that contact is made with the touch screen to the time that the touch screen is released by all points of contact. The types of touch events that are generated during a touch action are TOUCH_PRESSED, TOUCH_MOVED, TOUCH_STATIONARY, and TOUCH_RELEASED.

Each point of contact with the screen is considered a touch point. For each touch point, a touch event is generated. When a touch action contains multiple points of contact, a set of events, which is one event for each touch point, is generated for each state in the touch action.

See the sections Touch Points ,

Touch Events

, and

Event Sets

for more information

about these elements. See Touch Events Example

for an example of how touch events can be used in a JavaFX application.

Touch Points

When a user touches a touch screen, a touch point is created for each individual point of contact. A touch point is represented by an instance of the TouchPoint class, and contains information about the location, the state, and the target of the point of contact.

The states of a touch point are pressed, moved, stationary, and released.

Working with Touch Events 6-1

Overview of Touch Actions

Tip:

The number of touch points that are generated might be limited by the touch screen. For example, if the touch screen supports only two points of contact and the user touches the screen with three fingers, only two touch points are generated. For the purposes of this article, it is assumed that the touch screen recognizes all points of contact.

Each touch point has an ID, which is assigned sequentially as touch points are added to the touch action. The ID of a touch point remains the same from the time that contact is made with the touch screen to the time that contact is released. When a point of contact is released, the associated touch point is no longer part of the touch action.

For example, if the touch screen is touched with two fingers, the ID assigned to the first touch point is 1 and the ID assigned to the second touch point is 2. If the second finger is removed from the touch screen, only touch point 1 remains as part of the touch action. If another finger is then added to the touch action, the ID assigned to the new touch point is 3, and the touch action has touch points 1 and 3.

Touch Events

Touch events are generated to track the actions of touch points. A touch event is represented by an instance of the TouchEvent class. Touch events are generated only from touches on a touch screen. Touch events are not generated from a trackpad.

Touch events are similar to other events, which have a source, target, and event types that further define the action that occurs. The types of touch events are TOUCH_PRESSED,

TOUCH_MOVED

, TOUCH_STATIONARY, and TOUCH_RELEASED. Multiple TOUCH_MOVED and

TOUCH_STATIONARY

events can be generated for a touch point, depending on the

distance moved and the time that a touch point is held in place. See Processing Events

for basic information about events and how events are processed.

Touch events also have the following items:

Touch point

Main touch point that is associated with this event

Touch count

The number of touch points currently associated with the touch action

List of touch points

The set of the touch points currently associated with the touch action

Event set ID

ID of the event set that contains this event

Event Sets

When a touch action has a single point of contact, a single touch event is generated for each state of the action. When a touch action has multiple points of contact, a set of touch events is generated for each state of the action. Each touch event in the set is associated with a different one of the touch points.

Each set of events has an event set ID. The event set ID increments by one for each set that is generated in response to the touch action. The events in the set can have different event types, depending on the state of the touch point with which it is associated. As points of contact are added or removed during the touch action, the

number of events in the event set changes. For example, Table 6–1 describes the event

6-2 JavaFX Handling Events

Overview of Touch Actions sets that are generated when a user touches the touch screen with two fingers, moves both fingers, touches the touch screen with a third finger, moves all fingers, and then removes all fingers from the screen.

Table 6–1 Event Sets for a Single Touch Action

Event Set ID

6

7

4

5

1

2

3

8

9

10

3

3

3

3

1

2

2

3

2

1

Number of

Touch Events Event Type for Each Event

TOUCH_PRESSED

TOUCH_STATIONARY

, TOUCH_PRESSED

TOUCH_MOVED

, TOUCH_MOVED

TOUCH_STATIONARY

, TOUCH_STATIONARY, TOUCH_PRESSED

TOUCH_MOVED

, TOUCH_MOVED, TOUCH_MOVED

TOUCH_MOVED

, TOUCH_MOVED, TOUCH_MOVED

TOUCH_MOVED

, TOUCH_MOVED, TOUCH_MOVED

TOUCH_RELEASED

, TOUCH_STATIONARY, TOUCH_STATIONARY

TOUCH_RELEASED

, TOUCH_STATIONARY

TOUCH_RELEASED

Touch Point Targets and Touch Event Targets

The target of a touch event is the target of the touch point that is associated with the event. The initial target of the touch point is the topmost node at the initial point of contact with the touch screen. If a touch action has multiple points of contact, it is possible for each touch point, and therefore each touch event, to have a different target. This feature enables you to handle each touch point independently of the other

touch points. See Handling Concurrent Touch Points Independently

for an example.

Typically, all of the events for one touch point are delivered to the same target.

However, you can alter the target of subsequent events using the grab() and ungrab() methods for the touch point.

The grab() method enables the node that is currently processing the event to make itself the target of the touch point. The grab(target) method enables another node to be made the target of the touch point. Because events in the event set have access to all of the touch points for the set, it is possible to use the grab() method to direct all subsequent events for the touch action to the same node. The grab() method can also be used to reset the target of a touch point, as shown in

Changing the Target of a Touch

Point

.

The ungrab() method is used to release the touch point from the current target.

Subsequent events for the touch action are then sent to the topmost node at the current location of the touch point.

Additional Events Generated from Touches

When a user touches a touch screen, other types of events are generated in addition to touch events:

Mouse events

Simulated mouse events enable an application to run on a device with a touch screen even if touch events are not handled by the application. Use the

Working with Touch Events 6-3

Touch Events Example

■ isSynthesized()

method to determine if the mouse event is from a touch action.

See

Handling Mouse Events for an example.

Gesture events

Gesture events are generated for the commonly recognized touch actions of scrolling, swiping, rotating, and zooming. If these are the only types of touch actions that your application must handle, you can handle these gesture events instead of the touch events. See

Working with Events from Touch-Enabled Devices

for information on gesture events.

Touch Events Example

The Touch Events example uses four folders to demonstrate the ability to independently handle each touch point in a set. The example also shows how the grab()

method can be used to repeatedly jump the circle from one rectangle to another.

Figure 6–1 shows the user interface for the example.

Figure 6–1 Touch Events Example

The Touch Events example is available in the TouchEventsExample.zip file. Extract the

NetBeans project and open it in the NetBeans IDE. To generate touch events, you must run the example on a device with a touch screen.

6-4 JavaFX Handling Events

Touch Events Example

Handling Concurrent Touch Points Independently

In a typical gesture, the target is the node at the center of all of the points of contact, and only one node is affected by the response to the gesture. By handling each touch point separately, you can affect all of the nodes that are touched.

In the Touch Events example, you can move each folder by touching the folder and moving your finger. You can move multiple folders at once by touching each folder with a separate finger and moving all fingers.

Each folder is an instance of the TouchImage class. The TouchImage class creates an image view and adds event handlers for TOUCH_PRESSED, TOUCH_RELEASED, and TOUCH_

MOVED

events.

Example 6–1

shows the definition of this class.

Example 6–1 TouchImage Class Definition

public static class TouchImage extends ImageView {

private long touchId = -1;

double touchx, touchy;

public TouchImage(int x, int y, Image img) {

super(img);

setTranslateX(x);

setTranslateY(y);

setEffect(new DropShadow(8.0, 4.5, 6.5, Color.DARKSLATEGRAY));

setOnTouchPressed(new EventHandler<TouchEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(TouchEvent event) {

if (touchId == -1) {

touchId = event.getTouchPoint().getId();

touchx = event.getTouchPoint().getSceneX() - getTranslateX();

touchy = event.getTouchPoint().getSceneY() - getTranslateY();

}

event.consume();

}

});

setOnTouchReleased(new EventHandler<TouchEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(TouchEvent event) {

if (event.getTouchPoint().getId() == touchId) {

touchId = -1;

}

event.consume();

}

});

setOnTouchMoved(new EventHandler<TouchEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(TouchEvent event) {

if (event.getTouchPoint().getId() == touchId) {

setTranslateX(event.getTouchPoint().getSceneX() - touchx);

setTranslateY(event.getTouchPoint().getSceneY() - touchy);

}

event.consume();

}

});

}

}

When a folder is touched, a touch point is created for each point of contact and touch events are sent to the folder. The touch ID is used to ensure that a folder responds only once when multiple points of contact are on the folder.

Working with Touch Events 6-5

Touch Events Example

When a TOUCH_PRESSED event is received, the touch ID is checked to determine if it is a new touch for this folder. If so, the touch ID is set to the ID of the touch point and the location of the touch point is saved.

When a TOUCH_RELEASED event is received, the touch ID is checked to ensure that it matches the touch point that is being processed. If so, the touch ID is reset to indicate that processing is complete.

When a TOUCH_MOVED event is received, the touch ID is checked to ensure that it matches the touch point that is being processed. If so, the folder is moved to the new location for the touch point. If the touch ID does not match the touch point, then more than one point of contact is likely on the folder. To avoid responding to multiple movements of the same folder, the event is ignored.

Changing the Target of a Touch Point

The target of a touch point is typically the same node for the duration of the touch action. However, in some situations, you might want to change the target of a touch point during the touch action.

In the Touch Events example, the circle moves from one rectangle to another by touching the circle with one finger and a rectangle with a second finger. While the second finger remains on the circle after the jump, lift the first finger and touch a different rectangle to cause the circle to jump again. This action is possible only if you change the target of the second touch point.

The circle is an instance of the Ball class. The Ball class creates a circle and adds event handlers for the TOUCH_PRESSED, TOUCH_RELEASED, TOUCH_MOVED, and TOUCH_

STATIONARY

events. The same handler is used for the TOUCH_MOVED and TOUCH_

STATIONARY

events. Example 6–2 shows the definition of this class.

Example 6–2 Ball Class Definition

private static class Ball extends Circle {

double touchx, touchy;

public Ball(int x, int y) {

super(35);

RadialGradient gradient = new RadialGradient(0.8, -0.5, 0.5, 0.5, 1,

true, CycleMethod.NO_CYCLE, new Stop [] {

new Stop(0, Color.FIREBRICK),

new Stop(1, Color.BLACK)

});

setFill(gradient);

setTranslateX(x);

setTranslateY(y);

setOnTouchPressed(new EventHandler<TouchEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(TouchEvent event) {

if (event.getTouchCount() == 1) {

touchx = event.getTouchPoint().getSceneX() - getTranslateX();

touchy = event.getTouchPoint().getSceneY() - getTranslateY();

setEffect(new Lighting());

}

event.consume();

}

});

6-6 JavaFX Handling Events

Touch Events Example

setOnTouchReleased(new EventHandler<TouchEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(TouchEvent event) {

setEffect(null);

event.consume();

}

});

// Jump if the first finger touched the ball and is either

// moving or still, and the second finger touches a rectangle

EventHandler<TouchEvent> jumpHandler = new EventHandler<TouchEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(TouchEvent event) {

if (event.getTouchCount() != 2) {

// Ignore if this is not a two-finger touch

return;

}

TouchPoint main = event.getTouchPoint();

TouchPoint other = event.getTouchPoints().get(1);

if (other.getId() == main.getId()) {

// Ignore if the second finger is in the ball and

// the first finger is anywhere else

return;

}

if (other.getState() != TouchPoint.State.PRESSED ||

other.belongsTo(Ball.this) ||

!(other.getTarget() instanceof Rectangle) ){

// Jump only if the second finger was just

// pressed in a rectangle

return;

}

// Jump now

setTranslateX(other.getSceneX() - touchx);

setTranslateY(other.getSceneY() - touchy);

// Grab the destination touch point, which is now inside

// the ball, so that jumping can continue without

// releasing the finger

other.grab();

// The original touch point is no longer of interest so

// call ungrab() to release the target

main.ungrab();

event.consume();

}

};

setOnTouchStationary(jumpHandler);

setOnTouchMoved(jumpHandler);

}

}

When a TOUCH_PRESSED event is received, the number of touch points is checked to ensure that only the instance of the Ball class is being touched. If so, the location of the touch point is saved, and a lighting effect is added to show that the circle is selected.

Working with Touch Events 6-7

Additional Resources

When a TOUCH_RELEASED event is received, the lighting effect is removed to show that the circle is no longer selected.

When a TOUCH_MOVED or TOUCH_STATIONARY event is received, the following conditions that are required for a jump are checked:

The touch count must be two.

The touch point that is associated with this event is considered the start point of the jump. The event has access to all of the touch points for the touch action. The second touch point in the set of touch points is considered the end point of the jump.

The state of the second touch point is PRESSED.

The circle is moved only when the second point of contact is made. Any other state for the second touch point is ignored.

The target of the second touch point is a rectangle.

The circle can jump only from rectangle to rectangle, or within a rectangle. If the target of the second touch point is anything else, the circle is not moved.

If the conditions for a jump are met, the circle is jumped to the location of the second touch point. To jump again, the first point of contact is released and a third location is touched, with the expectation that the circle will jump to the third location. However, when the first point of contact is released, the touch point whose target was the circle goes away and now the circle no longer gets touch events. A second jump is not possible without lifting both fingers and starting a new jump.

To make a second jump possible while keeping the second finger on the circle and touching a new location, the grab() method is used to make the circle the target of the second touch point. After the grab, events for the second touch point are sent to the circle instead of the rectangle that was the original target. The circle can then watch for a new touch point and jump again.

Additional Resources

See the JavaFX API documentation for more information on touch events and touch points.

Application Files

Source Code

TouchEvents.java

NetBeans Projects

TouchEventsExample.zip

6-8 JavaFX Handling Events

Part II

Part II

Drag-and-Drop Feature in JavaFX

Applications

This tutorial contains the following chapters:

Drag-and-Drop Operation

PaperDoll Drag-and-Drop Application

7

7

Drag-and-Drop Operation

In this document, you learn how to implement a drag-and-drop feature in JavaFX applications, which objects participate in a drag-and-drop gesture, what types of data can be transferred, and which events occur during a drag-and-drop gesture.

This document also includes code samples to illustrate the APIs being used and the explained material.

Objects and Data Types for Drag-and-Drop Operation

A drag-and-drop operation is a data transfer between two objects: a gesture source and a gesture target. The gesture source and gesture target can be the following objects:

Nodes

Scenes

The gesture source and gesture target can belong to a single JavaFX application or to two different JavaFX or Java Client applications. Moreover, drag-and-drop can be implemented between a JavaFX application and a third-party (native) application such as Windows Explorer or a desktop.

A drag-and-drop gesture happens as follows: The user clicks a mouse button on a gesture source, drags the mouse, and releases the mouse button on a gesture target.

While dragging the data, the user gets visual feedback, which denotes locations that do not accept the data and, when over a target that accepts the data, gives a hint where to drop the data.

The data is transferred using a dragboard, which has the same interface as a system clipboard but is only used for the drag-and-drop data transfer.

During the drag-and-drop gesture, various types of data can be transferred such as text, images, URLs, files, bytes, and strings.

The javafx.scene.input.DragEvent class is the basic class used to implement the drag-and-drop gesture. For more information on particular methods and other classes in the javafx.scene.input package, see the API documentation.

Transfer Modes

Transfer modes define the type of transfer that happens between the gesture source and gesture target. Available transfer modes include COPY, MOVE, and LINK.

A gesture source reports supported transfer modes. A gesture target accepts one or more transfer modes. The transfer mode in a given drag-and-drop gesture is chosen by

Drag-and-Drop Operation 7-1

Implementing a Basic Drag-and-Drop Gesture the system from the modes supported by the source and accepted by the target according to the keyboard modifiers pressed by the user.

Implementing a Basic Drag-and-Drop Gesture

You can learn how to implement basic drag-and-drop functionality by using the

HelloDragAndDrop

sample application. The gesture source and gesture target are two

text nodes defined as shown in Example 7–1

.

Example 7–1

final Text source = new Text(50, 100, "DRAG ME"); final Text target = new Text(300, 100, "DROP HERE");

Starting the Drag-and-Drop Gesture on a Source

The drag-and-drop gesture can only be started by calling the startDragAndDrop method inside the handler of the DRAG_DETECTED event on a gesture source. It is here that transfer modes supported by the gesture source are defined, and the data to be transferred is placed onto the dragboard.

See the implementation of the onDragDetected handler in

Example 7–2

.

Example 7–2

source.setOnDragDetected(new EventHandler<MouseEvent>() {

public void handle(MouseEvent event) {

/* drag was detected, start a drag-and-drop gesture*/

/* allow any transfer mode */

Dragboard db = source.startDragAndDrop(TransferMode.ANY);

/* Put a string on a dragboard */

ClipboardContent content = new ClipboardContent();

content.putString(source.getText());

db.setContent(content);

event.consume();

}

});

The startDragAndDrop method takes a set of transfer modes supported by the gesture source. You can pass any combination of available transfer modes. By passing

TransferMode.COPY

, you can indicate that the gesture source only supports copying, but not moving or referencing.

Handling a DRAG_OVER Event on a Target

After the drag-and-drop gesture is started, any node or scene that the mouse is dragged over is a potential target to drop the data. You specify which object accepts the data by implementing the DRAG_OVER event handler.

Note the importance of the DRAG_OVER event handler. For a successful drag-and-drop operation, you must implement the DRAG_OVER event handler, which calls the acceptTransferModes(TransferMode...) method on the event, passing the transfer modes that the target intends to accept. If none of the passed transfer modes are supported by the gesture source, the potential target does not fit the given drag-and-drop gesture.

7-2 JavaFX Handling Events

Implementing a Basic Drag-and-Drop Gesture

Note that the type of data available on the dragboard must be taken into account when deciding whether to accept the event. To access the data stored on the dragboard, use the event.getDragboard() method.

Example 7–3

shows the implementation of the DRAG_OVER event handler.

Example 7–3

target.setOnDragOver(new EventHandler<DragEvent>() {

public void handle(DragEvent event) {

/* data is dragged over the target */

/* accept it only if it is not dragged from the same node

* and if it has a string data */

if (event.getGestureSource() != target &&

event.getDragboard().hasString()) {

/* allow for moving */

event.acceptTransferModes(TransferMode.MOVE);

}

event.consume();

}

});

Providing Visual Feedback by a Gesture Target

During a drag-and-drop gesture, when the mouse pointer hovers over a target that fits the given drag-and-drop gesture, the target typically changes its appearance to provide a hint to the user where the data can be dropped.

When the drag gesture enters the boundaries of a potential gesture target, the target receives a DRAG_ENTERED event. When the drag gesture leaves the potential target’s boundaries, the target receives a DRAG_EXITED event. You can use the DRAG_ENTERED and DRAG_EXITED event handlers to change the target’s appearance in order to provide the visual feedback to the user.

Example 7–4

shows how the visual feedback is implemented by changing the color of the text.

Example 7–4

target.setOnDragEntered(new EventHandler<DragEvent>() {

public void handle(DragEvent event) {

/* the drag-and-drop gesture entered the target */

/* show to the user that it is an actual gesture target */

if (event.getGestureSource() != target &&

event.getDragboard().hasString()) {

target.setFill(Color.GREEN);

}

event.consume();

}

});

Note the importance of verifying the contents of the dragboard. The target only changes its appearance if the dragboard contains data in the proper format, which is a string in this case.

Example 7–5

shows the implementation of the DRAG_EXITED event handler, which restores the original appearance of the text.

Drag-and-Drop Operation 7-3

Implementing a Basic Drag-and-Drop Gesture

Example 7–5

target.setOnDragExited(new EventHandler<DragEvent>() {

public void handle(DragEvent event) {

/* mouse moved away, remove the graphical cues */

target.setFill(Color.BLACK);

event.consume();

}

});

Handling a DRAG_DROPPED Event on a Target

When the mouse button is released on the gesture target, which accepted previous

DRAG_OVER

events with a transfer mode supported by the gesture source, then the

DRAG_DROPPED

event is sent to the gesture target. In the DRAG_DROPPED event handler, you must complete the drag-and-drop gesture by calling the setDropCompleted(Boolean)

method on the event. Otherwise, the gesture is considered unsuccessful.

See the implementation of the DRAG_DROPPED event handler in Example 7–6 .

Example 7–6

target.setOnDragDropped(new EventHandler<DragEvent>() {

public void handle(DragEvent event) {

/* data dropped */

/* if there is a string data on dragboard, read it and use it */

Dragboard db = event.getDragboard();

boolean success = false;

if (db.hasString()) {

target.setText(db.getString());

success = true;

}

/* let the source know whether the string was successfully

* transferred and used */

event.setDropCompleted(success);

event.consume();

}

});

Handling a DRAG_DONE Event on a Source

After the drag-and-drop gesture is finished, the DRAG_DONE event is sent to the gesture source to inform the source about how the gesture finished. In the DRAG_DONE event handler, get the transfer mode by calling the getTransferMode method on the event. If the transfer mode is NULL then that means the data transfer did not happen. If the

mode is MOVE, then clear the data on the gesture source as shown in Example 7–7 .

Example 7–7

source.setOnDragDone(new EventHandler<DragEvent>() {

public void handle(DragEvent event) {

/* the drag and drop gesture ended */

/* if the data was successfully moved, clear it */

if (event.getTransferMode() == TransferMode.MOVE) {

source.setText("");

7-4 JavaFX Handling Events

Application Files

}

event.consume();

}

});

Dragging Custom Data

Similarly, you can implement the drag-and-drop gesture on custom data. Define the custom data type as shown in

Example 7–8

:

Example 7–8

/** The custom format */ private static final DataFormat customFormat =

new DataFormat("helloworld.custom");

When putting a custom data onto a dragboard, specify the data type. Note that the data must be serializable.

When reading the data from the dragboard, a proper casting is needed.

Application Files

Source Code

HelloDragAndDrop.java

NetBeans Projects

HelloDragAndDrop.zip

Drag-and-Drop Operation 7-5

Application Files

7-6 JavaFX Handling Events

8

PaperDoll Drag-and-Drop Application

This chapter further illustrates the drag-and-drop feature using the PaperDoll application.

The basic principles explained in the

Drag-and-Drop Operation

are used here in a more advanced application that enables the user to drag the images of dresses and drop them on the image of a paper doll, and drag the images of dresses from the image of a paper doll.

Layout of the PaperDoll Application

The PaperDoll application displays four images that represent dresses (pieces of clothing) and a paper doll that participate in a drag-and-drop operation. The

application window is shown in Figure 8–1

.

PaperDoll Drag-and-Drop Application 8-1

Organization of the PaperDoll Application

Figure 8–1 Paper Doll Application

The graphical scene of the application consists of two parts:

A VBox object is displayed in the upper part of the window. It contains an image and the Paper Doll text, and is used for decoration only.

A GridPane object is displayed in the bottom part of the window.

The first column contains a FlowPane object with the images of clothing.

The second column contains a Pane object with an image of a paper doll.

The images of the clothing can be dragged and dropped on an image of a paper doll and back to their original locations. The PaperDoll application provides an example of a drag-and-drop operation in which the same object can be both the source and the target of the operation.

Organization of the PaperDoll Application

The PaperDoll application contains the following packages and classes:

PaperDoll.java

is the main application class, which lays out the user interface

(UI) elements and implements the application logic. paperdoll.body

contains classes that define a container for the body that accepts drops of the data.

Body.java

BodyElement.java

paperdoll.clothes

contains classes that define a draggable piece of clothing.

8-2 JavaFX Handling Events

Organization of the PaperDoll Application

Cloth.java

ClothListBuilder.java

paperdoll.images

contains the graphical resources for the application.

Note:

This chapter does not provide a step-by-step procedure to build the PaperDoll application.

You can download the PaperDoll.zip to see the completed NetBeans project.

The UI of the PaperDoll application is created as shown in

Example 8–1 .

Example 8–1

package paperdoll; import paperdoll.clothes.Cloth; import paperdoll.clothes.ClothListBuilder; import paperdoll.body.Body; import paperdoll.images.ImageManager; import java.util.HashMap; import java.util.List; import javafx.application.Application; import javafx.geometry.Insets; import javafx.scene.Scene; import javafx.scene.image.ImageView; import javafx.scene.input.DragEvent; import javafx.scene.input.Dragboard; import javafx.scene.input.TransferMode; import javafx.scene.layout.ColumnConstraints; import javafx.scene.layout.FlowPane; import javafx.scene.layout.GridPane; import javafx.scene.layout.Pane; import javafx.scene.layout.Priority; import javafx.scene.layout.VBox; import javafx.stage.Stage; public class PaperDoll extends Application {

public static void main(String[] args) {

launch(args);

}

/**

* All laying out goes here.

* @param primaryStage

*/

@Override

public void start(Stage primaryStage) {

primaryStage.setTitle("Paper Doll");

ImageView header = new ImageView(ImageManager.getImage("ui/flowers.jpg"));

VBox title = new VBox();

title.getChildren().addAll(header);

title.setPadding(new Insets(10.0));

PaperDoll Drag-and-Drop Application 8-3

Starting the Drag-And-Drop Operation

GridPane content = new GridPane();

content.add(Body.getBody().getNode(), 1, 1);

content.add(createItemPane(Body.getBody().getBodyPane()), 0, 1);

ColumnConstraints c1 = new ColumnConstraints();

c1.setHgrow(Priority.ALWAYS);

ColumnConstraints c2 = new ColumnConstraints();

c2.setHgrow(Priority.NEVER);

c2.setPrefWidth(Body.getBody().getBodyPane().getMinWidth() + 20);

content.getColumnConstraints().addAll(c1, c2);

items = new HashMap<>();

Body.getBody().setItemsInfo(itemPane, items);

populateClothes();

VBox root = new VBox();

root.getChildren().addAll(title, content);

primaryStage.setScene(new Scene(root, 800, 900));

primaryStage.setMinWidth(800);

primaryStage.setMinHeight(900);

primaryStage.show();

}

private FlowPane itemPane = null;

private HashMap<String, Cloth> items;

/**

* A container for unequipped items is created here.

* @param bodyPane body container is needed so that the item is removed from

* it when dropped here.

* @return

*/

private FlowPane createItemPane(final Pane bodyPane) {

// code for creating the itemPane container

}

private void populateClothes() {

//code for adding items to the itemPane container

}

}

The itemPane object represents separate pieces of clothing and the bodyPane object represents the body of the doll with pieces of clothing that can be put on.

Starting the Drag-And-Drop Operation

The source for the drag-and-drop operation is one of the ImageView objects that represent a Cloth item. At any moment, each currentImage is either a node in the itemPane

or in the bodyPane. The setOnDragDetected method is implemented as shown in bold in

Example 8–2

.

Example 8–2

public class Cloth {

private final Image previewImage;

private final Image activeImage;

private final Image equippedImage;

8-4 JavaFX Handling Events

Handling the Drop of the Data

private final ImageView currentImage;

public void putOn() {

currentImage.setImage(equippedImage);

}

public void takeOff() {

currentImage.setImage(previewImage);

}

private void activate() {

currentImage.setImage(activeImage);

}

public String getImageViewId() {

return currentImage.getId();

}

public Node getNode() {

return currentImage;

}

public Cloth(Image[] images) {

this.previewImage = images[0];

this.activeImage = images[1];

this.equippedImage = images[2];

currentImage = new ImageView();

currentImage.setImage(previewImage);

currentImage.setId(this.getClass().getSimpleName() +

System.currentTimeMillis());

currentImage.setOnDragDetected((MouseEvent event) -> {

activate();

Dragboard db = currentImage.startDragAndDrop(TransferMode.MOVE);

ClipboardContent content = new ClipboardContent();

// Store node ID in order to know what is dragged.

content.putString(currentImage.getId());

db.setContent(content);

event.consume();

});

}

}

Note the usage of a lambda expression in this example. The setOnDragDetected method starts the drag-and-drop gesture that supports only the MOVE transfer mode by calling the startDragAndDrop(TransferMode.MOVE) method.

Handling the Drop of the Data

The target of the drag-and-drop gesture can be either the itemPane or the bodyPane object depending on where the drag-and-drop gesture was started, which means that the setOnDragOver and setOnDragDropped methods must be implemented for the both objects, itemPane and bodyPane.

As described earlier, the itemPane object is created in the PaperDoll.java class.

Example 8–3

complements the code in Example 8–1 , and provides the complete code

to create the itemPane container.

PaperDoll Drag-and-Drop Application 8-5

Handling the Drop of the Data

Example 8–3

/**

* A container for unequipped items is created here.

* @param bodyPane body container is needed so that an item is removed from

* the bodyPane when dropped on the itemPane.

* @return

*/

private FlowPane createItemPane(final Pane bodyPane) {

if (!(itemPane == null))

return itemPane;

itemPane = new FlowPane();

itemPane.setPadding(new Insets(10.0));

itemPane.setOnDragDropped((DragEvent event) -> {

Dragboard db = event.getDragboard();

// Get item id here, which was stored when the drag started.

boolean success = false;

// If this is a meaningful drop...

if (db.hasString()) {

String nodeId = db.getString();

// ...search for the item on body. If it is there...

ImageView cloth = (ImageView) bodyPane.lookup("#" + nodeId);

if (cloth != null) {

// ... the item is removed from body

// and added to an unequipped container.

bodyPane.getChildren().remove(cloth);

itemPane.getChildren().add(cloth);

success = true;

}

// ...anyway, the item is not active or equipped anymore.

items.get(nodeId).takeOff();

}

event.setDropCompleted(success);

event.consume();

});

itemPane.setOnDragOver((DragEvent event) -> {

if (event.getGestureSource() != itemPane &&

event.getDragboard().hasString()) {

event.acceptTransferModes(TransferMode.MOVE);

}

event.consume();

});

return itemPane;

}

/**

* Here items are added to an unequipped items container.

*/

private void populateClothes() {

ClothListBuilder clothBuilder = new ClothListBuilder();

if (itemPane == null)

throw new IllegalStateException("Should call getItems() before populating!");

List<Cloth> clothes = clothBuilder.getClothList();

clothes.stream().map((c) -> {

itemPane.getChildren().add(c.getNode());

return c;

8-6 JavaFX Handling Events

Handling the Drop of the Data

}).forEach((c) -> {

items.put(c.getImageViewId(), c);

});

}

Note that the itemPane.setOnDrageOver method must accept the transfer mode only if the source of the drag-and-drop gesture was not the itemPane object itself and the dragboard contains a string.

The itemPane.setOnDragDropped method is called when the mouse button is released over the itemPane object, which accepted the previous DRAG_OVER event. It is here that the draggable piece of clothing is added to the itemPane container and removed from the bodyPane object, and the drag-and-drop gesture is completed by calling the setDropCompleted (Boolean)

method on the event.

Similarly, the setOnDragOver and setOnDragDropped methods for the bodyPane container are implemented as shown in

Example 8–4

.

Example 8–4

bodyPane.setOnDragDropped((DragEvent event) -> {

Dragboard db = event.getDragboard();

boolean success = false;

// If this is a meaningful drop...

if (db.hasString()) {

// Get an item ID here, which was stored when the drag started.

String nodeId = db.getString();

// ...search for the item in unequipped items. If it is there...

ImageView cloth = (ImageView) itemPane.lookup("#" + nodeId);

if (cloth != null) {

// ... the item is removed from the unequipped list

// and attached to body.

itemPane.getChildren().remove(cloth);

bodyPane.getChildren().add(cloth);

cloth.relocate(0, 0);

success = true;

}

// ...anyway, the item is now equipped.

items.get(nodeId).putOn();

}

event.setDropCompleted(success);

event.consume();

}); bodyPane.setOnDragOver((DragEvent event) -> {

if (event.getGestureSource() != bodyImage &&

event.getDragboard().hasString()) {

event.acceptTransferModes(TransferMode.MOVE);

}

event.consume();

});

Example 8–5

shows the complete code for the BodyElement class.

Example 8–5

package paperdoll.body; import paperdoll.clothes.Cloth; import paperdoll.images.ImageManager; import java.util.Map; import javafx.geometry.Insets;

PaperDoll Drag-and-Drop Application 8-7

Handling the Drop of the Data import javafx.scene.Node; import javafx.scene.image.ImageView; import javafx.scene.input.DragEvent; import javafx.scene.input.Dragboard; import javafx.scene.input.TransferMode; import javafx.scene.layout.Pane;

/**

* Container for body that accepts drops. Draggable details dropped here

* are equipped.

*

*/ public class BodyElement {

private final Pane bodyPane;

private final ImageView bodyImage;

private Pane itemPane;

private Map<String, Cloth> items;

public void setItemsInfo(Pane p, Map<String, Cloth> m) {

itemPane = p;

items = m;

}

public Pane getBodyPane() {

return bodyPane;

}

public BodyElement() {

bodyPane = new Pane();

bodyImage = new ImageView(ImageManager.getResource("body.png"));

bodyPane.setOnDragDropped((DragEvent event) -> {

Dragboard db = event.getDragboard();

boolean success = false;

// If this is a meaningful drop...

if (db.hasString()) {

// Get an item ID here, which was stored when the drag started.

String nodeId = db.getString();

// ... search for the item in unequipped items. If it is there...

ImageView cloth = (ImageView) itemPane.lookup("#" + nodeId);

if (cloth != null) {

// ... the item is removed from the unequipped list

// and attached to body.

itemPane.getChildren().remove(cloth);

bodyPane.getChildren().add(cloth);

cloth.relocate(0, 0);

success = true;

}

// ...anyway, the item is now equipped.

items.get(nodeId).putOn();

}

event.setDropCompleted(success);

event.consume();

});

bodyPane.setOnDragOver((DragEvent event) -> {

if (event.getGestureSource() != bodyImage &&

event.getDragboard().hasString()) {

event.acceptTransferModes(TransferMode.MOVE);

8-8 JavaFX Handling Events

}

event.consume();

});

bodyPane.getChildren().add(bodyImage);

bodyPane.setMinWidth(bodyImage.getImage().getWidth());

bodyPane.setPadding(new Insets(10.0));

}

public Node getNode() {

return bodyPane;

}

}

Application Files

Source Code

PaperDoll.java

Cloth.java

ClothListBuilder.java

Body.java

BodyElement.java

Netbeans Projects

PaperDoll.zip

Application Files

PaperDoll Drag-and-Drop Application 8-9

Application Files

8-10 JavaFX Handling Events

Part III

Part III

Source Code for the Handling Events

Tutorial

The following table lists the demo applications in this document with their associated source code files.

Tutorial

Event Filters

Event Handlers

Events from

Touch-Enabled

Devices

Touch Events

Drag-and-Drop

Feature

PaperDoll

Drag-And-Drop

Application

Source Code

NetBeans Project

File

DraggablePanelsExa mple.java

DraggablePanelsExa mple.zip

KeyboardExample.ja

va

KeyboardExample.zi

p

GestureEvents.java

GestureEventsExamp le.zip

TouchEvents.java

TouchEventsExample

.zip

HelloDragAndDrop.j

ava

HelloDragAndDrop.z

ip

PaperDoll.zip

PaperDoll.java

Cloth.java

ClothListBuilder.j

ava

Body.java

BodyElement.java

A

A

DraggablePanelsExample.java

For a description, see Working with Event Filters

.

Legal Terms and Copyright Notice

/*

* Copyright (c) 2012, 2014, Oracle and/or its affiliates.

* All rights reserved. Use is subject to license terms.

*

* This file is available and licensed under the following license:

*

* Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without

* modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions

* are met:

*

* - Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright

* notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.

* - Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright

* notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in

* the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.

* - Neither the name of Oracle nor the names of its

* contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived

* from this software without specific prior written permission.

*

* THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS

* "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT

* LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR

* A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT

* OWNER OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL,

* SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT

* LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE,

* DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY

* THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT

* (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE

* OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

*/

Code

package draggablepanelsexample; import javafx.application.Application; import javafx.beans.binding.Bindings; import javafx.beans.property.BooleanProperty; import javafx.beans.property.SimpleBooleanProperty; import javafx.collections.FXCollections; import javafx.event.ActionEvent;

DraggablePanelsExample.java A-1

import javafx.event.EventHandler; import javafx.geometry.Insets; import javafx.geometry.Pos; import javafx.scene.Group; import javafx.scene.Node; import javafx.scene.Scene; import javafx.scene.control.Button; import javafx.scene.control.CheckBox; import javafx.scene.control.ChoiceBox; import javafx.scene.control.Label; import javafx.scene.control.PasswordField; import javafx.scene.control.ProgressIndicator; import javafx.scene.control.RadioButton; import javafx.scene.control.Slider; import javafx.scene.control.TextField; import javafx.scene.control.ToggleGroup; import javafx.scene.control.Tooltip; import javafx.scene.input.MouseEvent; import javafx.scene.layout.BorderPane; import javafx.scene.layout.HBox; import javafx.scene.layout.Pane; import javafx.scene.layout.Region; import javafx.scene.layout.VBox; import javafx.stage.Stage; public final class DraggablePanelsExample extends Application {

private final BooleanProperty dragModeActiveProperty =

new SimpleBooleanProperty(this, "dragModeActive", true);

@Override

public void start(final Stage stage) {

final Node loginPanel =

makeDraggable(createLoginPanel());

final Node confirmationPanel =

makeDraggable(createConfirmationPanel());

final Node progressPanel =

makeDraggable(createProgressPanel());

loginPanel.relocate(0, 0);

confirmationPanel.relocate(0, 67);

progressPanel.relocate(0, 106);

final Pane panelsPane = new Pane();

panelsPane.getChildren().addAll(loginPanel,

confirmationPanel,

progressPanel);

final BorderPane sceneRoot = new BorderPane();

BorderPane.setAlignment(panelsPane, Pos.TOP_LEFT);

sceneRoot.setCenter(panelsPane);

final CheckBox dragModeCheckbox = new CheckBox("Drag mode");

BorderPane.setMargin(dragModeCheckbox, new Insets(6));

sceneRoot.setBottom(dragModeCheckbox);

dragModeActiveProperty.bind(dragModeCheckbox.selectedProperty());

final Scene scene = new Scene(sceneRoot, 400, 300);

stage.setScene(scene);

stage.setTitle("Draggable Panels Example");

stage.show();

}

public static void main(final String[] args) {

launch(args);

}

private Node makeDraggable(final Node node) {

final DragContext dragContext = new DragContext();

final Group wrapGroup = new Group(node);

wrapGroup.addEventFilter(

MouseEvent.ANY,

new EventHandler<MouseEvent>() {

@Override

public void handle(final MouseEvent mouseEvent) {

if (dragModeActiveProperty.get()) {

// disable mouse events for all children

mouseEvent.consume();

}

}

});

wrapGroup.addEventFilter(

MouseEvent.MOUSE_PRESSED,

new EventHandler<MouseEvent>() {

@Override

public void handle(final MouseEvent mouseEvent) {

if (dragModeActiveProperty.get()) {

// remember initial mouse cursor coordinates

// and node position

dragContext.mouseAnchorX = mouseEvent.getX();

dragContext.mouseAnchorY = mouseEvent.getY();

dragContext.initialTranslateX =

node.getTranslateX();

dragContext.initialTranslateY =

node.getTranslateY();

}

}

});

wrapGroup.addEventFilter(

MouseEvent.MOUSE_DRAGGED,

new EventHandler<MouseEvent>() {

@Override

public void handle(final MouseEvent mouseEvent) {

if (dragModeActiveProperty.get()) {

// shift node from its initial position by delta

// calculated from mouse cursor movement

node.setTranslateX(

dragContext.initialTranslateX

+ mouseEvent.getX()

- dragContext.mouseAnchorX);

node.setTranslateY(

dragContext.initialTranslateY

+ mouseEvent.getY()

- dragContext.mouseAnchorY);

}

}

DraggablePanelsExample.java A-3

});

return wrapGroup;

}

private static Node createLoginPanel() {

final ToggleGroup toggleGroup = new ToggleGroup();

final TextField textField = new TextField();

textField.setPrefColumnCount(10);

textField.setPromptText("Your name");

final PasswordField passwordField = new PasswordField();

passwordField.setPrefColumnCount(10);

passwordField.setPromptText("Your password");

final ChoiceBox<String> choiceBox = new ChoiceBox<>(

FXCollections.observableArrayList(

"English", "\u0420\u0443\u0441\u0441\u043a\u0438\u0439",

"Fran\u00E7ais"));

choiceBox.setTooltip(new Tooltip("Your language"));

choiceBox.getSelectionModel().select(0);

final HBox panel =

createHBox(6,

createVBox(2, createRadioButton("High", toggleGroup, true),

createRadioButton("Medium", toggleGroup,

false),

createRadioButton("Low", toggleGroup, false)),

createVBox(2, textField, passwordField),

choiceBox);

panel.setAlignment(Pos.BOTTOM_LEFT);

configureBorder(panel);

return panel;

}

private static Node createConfirmationPanel() {

final Label acceptanceLabel = new Label("Not Available");

final Button acceptButton = new Button("Accept");

acceptButton.setOnAction(

new EventHandler<ActionEvent>() {

@Override

public void handle(final ActionEvent event) {

acceptanceLabel.setText("Accepted");

}

});

final Button declineButton = new Button("Decline");

declineButton.setOnAction(

new EventHandler<ActionEvent>() {

@Override

public void handle(final ActionEvent event) {

acceptanceLabel.setText("Declined");

}

});

final HBox panel = createHBox(6, acceptButton,

declineButton,

acceptanceLabel);

panel.setAlignment(Pos.CENTER_LEFT);

configureBorder(panel);

return panel;

}

private static Node createProgressPanel() {

final Slider slider = new Slider();

final ProgressIndicator progressIndicator = new ProgressIndicator(0);

progressIndicator.progressProperty().bind(

Bindings.divide(slider.valueProperty(),

slider.maxProperty()));

final HBox panel = createHBox(6, new Label("Progress:"),

slider,

progressIndicator);

configureBorder(panel);

return panel;

}

private static void configureBorder(final Region region) {

region.setStyle("-fx-background-color: white;"

+ "-fx-border-color: black;"

+ "-fx-border-width: 1;"

+ "-fx-border-radius: 6;"

+ "-fx-padding: 6;");

}

private static RadioButton createRadioButton(final String text,

final ToggleGroup toggleGroup,

final boolean selected) {

final RadioButton radioButton = new RadioButton(text);

radioButton.setToggleGroup(toggleGroup);

radioButton.setSelected(selected);

return radioButton;

}

private static HBox createHBox(final double spacing,

final Node... children) {

final HBox hbox = new HBox(spacing);

hbox.getChildren().addAll(children);

return hbox;

}

private static VBox createVBox(final double spacing,

final Node... children) {

final VBox vbox = new VBox(spacing);

vbox.getChildren().addAll(children);

return vbox;

}

private static final class DragContext {

public double mouseAnchorX;

public double mouseAnchorY;

public double initialTranslateX;

public double initialTranslateY;

DraggablePanelsExample.java A-5

}

}

B

B

KeyboardExample.java

For a description, see Working with Event Handlers .

Legal Terms and Copyright Notice

/*

* Copyright (c) 2012, 2014, Oracle and/or its affiliates.

* All rights reserved. Use is subject to license terms.

*

* This file is available and licensed under the following license:

*

* Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without

* modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions

* are met:

*

* - Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright

* notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.

* - Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright

* notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in

* the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.

* - Neither the name of Oracle nor the names of its

* contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived

* from this software without specific prior written permission.

*

* THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS

* "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT

* LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR

* A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT

* OWNER OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL,

* SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT

* LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE,

* DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY

* THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT

* (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE

* OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

*/

Code

package draggablepanelsexample; import javafx.application.Application; import javafx.beans.binding.Bindings; import javafx.beans.property.BooleanProperty; import javafx.beans.property.SimpleBooleanProperty; import javafx.collections.FXCollections; import javafx.event.ActionEvent;

KeyboardExample.java B-1

import javafx.event.EventHandler; import javafx.geometry.Insets; import javafx.geometry.Pos; import javafx.scene.Group; import javafx.scene.Node; import javafx.scene.Scene; import javafx.scene.control.Button; import javafx.scene.control.CheckBox; import javafx.scene.control.ChoiceBox; import javafx.scene.control.Label; import javafx.scene.control.PasswordField; import javafx.scene.control.ProgressIndicator; import javafx.scene.control.RadioButton; import javafx.scene.control.Slider; import javafx.scene.control.TextField; import javafx.scene.control.ToggleGroup; import javafx.scene.control.Tooltip; import javafx.scene.input.MouseEvent; import javafx.scene.layout.BorderPane; import javafx.scene.layout.HBox; import javafx.scene.layout.Pane; import javafx.scene.layout.Region; import javafx.scene.layout.VBox; import javafx.stage.Stage; public final class DraggablePanelsExample extends Application {

private final BooleanProperty dragModeActiveProperty =

new SimpleBooleanProperty(this, "dragModeActive", true);

@Override

public void start(final Stage stage) {

final Node loginPanel =

makeDraggable(createLoginPanel());

final Node confirmationPanel =

makeDraggable(createConfirmationPanel());

final Node progressPanel =

makeDraggable(createProgressPanel());

loginPanel.relocate(0, 0);

confirmationPanel.relocate(0, 67);

progressPanel.relocate(0, 106);

final Pane panelsPane = new Pane();

panelsPane.getChildren().addAll(loginPanel,

confirmationPanel,

progressPanel);

final BorderPane sceneRoot = new BorderPane();

BorderPane.setAlignment(panelsPane, Pos.TOP_LEFT);

sceneRoot.setCenter(panelsPane);

final CheckBox dragModeCheckbox = new CheckBox("Drag mode");

BorderPane.setMargin(dragModeCheckbox, new Insets(6));

sceneRoot.setBottom(dragModeCheckbox);

dragModeActiveProperty.bind(dragModeCheckbox.selectedProperty());

final Scene scene = new Scene(sceneRoot, 400, 300);

stage.setScene(scene);

stage.setTitle("Draggable Panels Example");

stage.show();

}

public static void main(final String[] args) {

launch(args);

}

private Node makeDraggable(final Node node) {

final DragContext dragContext = new DragContext();

final Group wrapGroup = new Group(node);

wrapGroup.addEventFilter(

MouseEvent.ANY,

new EventHandler<MouseEvent>() {

@Override

public void handle(final MouseEvent mouseEvent) {

if (dragModeActiveProperty.get()) {

// disable mouse events for all children

mouseEvent.consume();

}

}

});

wrapGroup.addEventFilter(

MouseEvent.MOUSE_PRESSED,

new EventHandler<MouseEvent>() {

@Override

public void handle(final MouseEvent mouseEvent) {

if (dragModeActiveProperty.get()) {

// remember initial mouse cursor coordinates

// and node position

dragContext.mouseAnchorX = mouseEvent.getX();

dragContext.mouseAnchorY = mouseEvent.getY();

dragContext.initialTranslateX =

node.getTranslateX();

dragContext.initialTranslateY =

node.getTranslateY();

}

}

});

wrapGroup.addEventFilter(

MouseEvent.MOUSE_DRAGGED,

new EventHandler<MouseEvent>() {

@Override

public void handle(final MouseEvent mouseEvent) {

if (dragModeActiveProperty.get()) {

// shift node from its initial position by delta

// calculated from mouse cursor movement

node.setTranslateX(

dragContext.initialTranslateX

+ mouseEvent.getX()

- dragContext.mouseAnchorX);

node.setTranslateY(

dragContext.initialTranslateY

+ mouseEvent.getY()

- dragContext.mouseAnchorY);

}

}

KeyboardExample.java B-3

});

return wrapGroup;

}

private static Node createLoginPanel() {

final ToggleGroup toggleGroup = new ToggleGroup();

final TextField textField = new TextField();

textField.setPrefColumnCount(10);

textField.setPromptText("Your name");

final PasswordField passwordField = new PasswordField();

passwordField.setPrefColumnCount(10);

passwordField.setPromptText("Your password");

final ChoiceBox<String> choiceBox = new ChoiceBox<>(

FXCollections.observableArrayList(

"English", "\u0420\u0443\u0441\u0441\u043a\u0438\u0439",

"Fran\u00E7ais"));

choiceBox.setTooltip(new Tooltip("Your language"));

choiceBox.getSelectionModel().select(0);

final HBox panel =

createHBox(6,

createVBox(2, createRadioButton("High", toggleGroup, true),

createRadioButton("Medium", toggleGroup,

false),

createRadioButton("Low", toggleGroup, false)),

createVBox(2, textField, passwordField),

choiceBox);

panel.setAlignment(Pos.BOTTOM_LEFT);

configureBorder(panel);

return panel;

}

private static Node createConfirmationPanel() {

final Label acceptanceLabel = new Label("Not Available");

final Button acceptButton = new Button("Accept");

acceptButton.setOnAction(

new EventHandler<ActionEvent>() {

@Override

public void handle(final ActionEvent event) {

acceptanceLabel.setText("Accepted");

}

});

final Button declineButton = new Button("Decline");

declineButton.setOnAction(

new EventHandler<ActionEvent>() {

@Override

public void handle(final ActionEvent event) {

acceptanceLabel.setText("Declined");

}

});

final HBox panel = createHBox(6, acceptButton,

declineButton,

acceptanceLabel);

panel.setAlignment(Pos.CENTER_LEFT);

configureBorder(panel);

return panel;

}

private static Node createProgressPanel() {

final Slider slider = new Slider();

final ProgressIndicator progressIndicator = new ProgressIndicator(0);

progressIndicator.progressProperty().bind(

Bindings.divide(slider.valueProperty(),

slider.maxProperty()));

final HBox panel = createHBox(6, new Label("Progress:"),

slider,

progressIndicator);

configureBorder(panel);

return panel;

}

private static void configureBorder(final Region region) {

region.setStyle("-fx-background-color: white;"

+ "-fx-border-color: black;"

+ "-fx-border-width: 1;"

+ "-fx-border-radius: 6;"

+ "-fx-padding: 6;");

}

private static RadioButton createRadioButton(final String text,

final ToggleGroup toggleGroup,

final boolean selected) {

final RadioButton radioButton = new RadioButton(text);

radioButton.setToggleGroup(toggleGroup);

radioButton.setSelected(selected);

return radioButton;

}

private static HBox createHBox(final double spacing,

final Node... children) {

final HBox hbox = new HBox(spacing);

hbox.getChildren().addAll(children);

return hbox;

}

private static VBox createVBox(final double spacing,

final Node... children) {

final VBox vbox = new VBox(spacing);

vbox.getChildren().addAll(children);

return vbox;

}

private static final class DragContext {

public double mouseAnchorX;

public double mouseAnchorY;

public double initialTranslateX;

public double initialTranslateY;

KeyboardExample.java B-5

}

}

C

C

GestureEvents.java

For a description, see Working with Events from Touch-Enabled Devices

.

Legal Terms and Copyright Notice

/*

* Copyright (c) 2012, 2014, Oracle and/or its affiliates.

* All rights reserved. Use is subject to license terms.

*

* This file is available and licensed under the following license:

*

* Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without

* modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions

* are met:

*

* - Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright

* notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.

* - Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright

* notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in

* the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.

* - Neither the name of Oracle nor the names of its

* contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived

* from this software without specific prior written permission.

*

* THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS

* "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT

* LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR

* A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT

* OWNER OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL,

* SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT

* LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE,

* DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY

* THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT

* (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE

* OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

*/

Code

package gestureevents; import javafx.application.Application; import javafx.collections.FXCollections; import javafx.collections.ObservableList; import javafx.event.EventHandler; import javafx.geometry.Insets; import javafx.geometry.Pos;

GestureEvents.java C-1

import javafx.scene.Scene; import javafx.scene.control.ListView; import javafx.scene.effect.Lighting; import javafx.scene.input.MouseEvent; import javafx.scene.input.RotateEvent; import javafx.scene.input.ScrollEvent; import javafx.scene.input.SwipeEvent; import javafx.scene.input.TouchEvent; import javafx.scene.input.ZoomEvent; import javafx.scene.layout.AnchorPane; import javafx.scene.layout.VBox; import javafx.scene.paint.Color; import javafx.scene.shape.Ellipse; import javafx.scene.shape.Rectangle; import javafx.scene.shape.Shape; import javafx.stage.Stage;

/**

*

* Sample that shows how gesture events are generated. The UI consists of

* two shapes and a log. The shapes respond to scroll, zoom, rotate and

* swipe events. The log contains information for the last 50 events that

* were generated and captured for the rectangle and ellipse object.

*/ public class GestureEvents extends Application {

private int gestureCount;

private ObservableList<String> events = FXCollections.observableArrayList();

/**

* @param args the command line arguments

*/

public static void main(String[] args) {

launch(args);

}

@Override

public void start(Stage primaryStage) {

AnchorPane root = new AnchorPane();

// Create the shapes that respond to gestures and use a VBox to

// organize them

VBox shapes = new VBox();

shapes.setAlignment(Pos.CENTER);

shapes.setPadding(new Insets(15.0));

shapes.setSpacing(30.0);

shapes.setPrefWidth(500);

shapes.getChildren().addAll(createRectangle(), createEllipse());

AnchorPane.setTopAnchor(shapes, 15.0);

// Create the log that shows events

ListView<String> log = createLog(events);

AnchorPane.setBottomAnchor(log, 5.0);

AnchorPane.setLeftAnchor(log, 5.0);

AnchorPane.setRightAnchor(log, 5.0);

root.getChildren().addAll(shapes, log);

Scene scene = new Scene(root, 500, 500);

primaryStage.setTitle("Gesture Events Example");

primaryStage.setScene(scene);

primaryStage.show();

}

/**

* Creates a rectangle that responds to gestures on a touch screen or

* trackpad and logs the events that are handled.

*

* @return Rectangle to show

*

*/

private Rectangle createRectangle() {

final Rectangle rect = new Rectangle(100, 100, 100, 100);

rect.setFill(Color.DARKMAGENTA);

rect.setOnScroll(new EventHandler<ScrollEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(ScrollEvent event) {

if (!event.isInertia()) {

rect.setTranslateX(rect.getTranslateX() + event.getDeltaX());

rect.setTranslateY(rect.getTranslateY() + event.getDeltaY());

}

log("Rectangle: Scroll event" +

", inertia: " + event.isInertia() +

", direct: " + event.isDirect());

event.consume();

}

});

rect.setOnZoom(new EventHandler<ZoomEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(ZoomEvent event) {

rect.setScaleX(rect.getScaleX() * event.getZoomFactor());

rect.setScaleY(rect.getScaleY() * event.getZoomFactor());

log("Rectangle: Zoom event" +

", inertia: " + event.isInertia() +

", direct: " + event.isDirect());

event.consume();

}

});

rect.setOnRotate(new EventHandler<RotateEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(RotateEvent event) {

rect.setRotate(rect.getRotate() + event.getAngle());

log("Rectangle: Rotate event" +

", inertia: " + event.isInertia() +

", direct: " + event.isDirect());

event.consume();

}

});

rect.setOnScrollStarted(new EventHandler<ScrollEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(ScrollEvent event) {

inc(rect);

log("Rectangle: Scroll started event");

event.consume();

}

GestureEvents.java C-3

});

rect.setOnScrollFinished(new EventHandler<ScrollEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(ScrollEvent event) {

dec(rect);

log("Rectangle: Scroll finished event");

event.consume();

}

});

rect.setOnZoomStarted(new EventHandler<ZoomEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(ZoomEvent event) {

inc(rect);

log("Rectangle: Zoom event started");

event.consume();

}

});

rect.setOnZoomFinished(new EventHandler<ZoomEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(ZoomEvent event) {

dec(rect);

log("Rectangle: Zoom event finished");

event.consume();

}

});

rect.setOnRotationStarted(new EventHandler<RotateEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(RotateEvent event) {

inc(rect);

log("Rectangle: Rotate event started");

event.consume();

}

});

rect.setOnRotationFinished(new EventHandler<RotateEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(RotateEvent event) {

dec(rect);

log("Rectangle: Rotate event finished");

event.consume();

}

});

rect.setOnMousePressed(new EventHandler<MouseEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(MouseEvent event) {

log("Rectangle: Mouse pressed event" +

", synthesized: " + event.isSynthesized());

event.consume();

}

});

rect.setOnMouseReleased(new EventHandler<MouseEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(MouseEvent event) {

log("Rectangle: Mouse released event" +

", synthesized: " + event.isSynthesized());

event.consume();

}

});

rect.setOnTouchPressed(new EventHandler<TouchEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(TouchEvent event) {

log("Rectangle: Touch pressed event");

event.consume();

}

});

rect.setOnTouchReleased(new EventHandler<TouchEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(TouchEvent event) {

log("Rectangle: Touch released event");

event.consume();

}

});

rect.setOnSwipeRight(new EventHandler<SwipeEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(SwipeEvent event) {

log("Rectangle: Swipe right event");

event.consume();

}

});

rect.setOnSwipeLeft(new EventHandler<SwipeEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(SwipeEvent event) {

log("Rectangle: Swipe left event");

event.consume();

}

});

return rect;

}

/**

* Creates an ellipse that responds to gestures on a touch screen or

* trackpad and logs the events that are handled.

*

* @return Ellipse to show

*

*/

private Ellipse createEllipse() {

final Ellipse oval = new Ellipse(100, 50);

oval.setFill(Color.STEELBLUE);

oval.setOnScroll(new EventHandler<ScrollEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(ScrollEvent event) {

oval.setTranslateX(oval.getTranslateX() + event.getDeltaX());

oval.setTranslateY(oval.getTranslateY() + event.getDeltaY());

log("Ellipse: Scroll event" +

", inertia: " + event.isInertia() +

", direct: " + event.isDirect());

event.consume();

}

});

oval.setOnZoom(new EventHandler<ZoomEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(ZoomEvent event) {

oval.setScaleX(oval.getScaleX() * event.getZoomFactor());

oval.setScaleY(oval.getScaleY() * event.getZoomFactor());

log("Ellipse: Zoom event" +

", inertia: " + event.isInertia() +

", direct: " + event.isDirect());

event.consume();

GestureEvents.java C-5

}

});

oval.setOnRotate(new EventHandler<RotateEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(RotateEvent event) {

oval.setRotate(oval.getRotate() + event.getAngle());

log("Ellipse: Rotate event" +

", inertia: " + event.isInertia() +

", direct: " + event.isDirect());

event.consume();

}

});

oval.setOnScrollStarted(new EventHandler<ScrollEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(ScrollEvent event) {

inc(oval);

log("Ellipse: Scroll started event");

event.consume();

}

});

oval.setOnScrollFinished(new EventHandler<ScrollEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(ScrollEvent event) {

dec(oval);

log("Ellipse: Scroll finished event");

event.consume();

}

});

oval.setOnZoomStarted(new EventHandler<ZoomEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(ZoomEvent event) {

inc(oval);

log("Ellipse: Zoom event started");

event.consume();

}

});

oval.setOnZoomFinished(new EventHandler<ZoomEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(ZoomEvent event) {

dec(oval);

log("Ellipse: Zoom event finished");

event.consume();

}

});

oval.setOnRotationStarted(new EventHandler<RotateEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(RotateEvent event) {

inc(oval);

log("Ellipse: Rotate event started");

event.consume();

}

});

oval.setOnRotationFinished(new EventHandler<RotateEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(RotateEvent event) {

dec(oval);

log("Ellipse: Rotate event finished");

event.consume();

}

});

// Respond to mouse pressed only if it is in response to a screen touch

oval.setOnMousePressed(new EventHandler<MouseEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(MouseEvent event) {

if (event.isSynthesized()) {

log("Ellipse: Mouse pressed event from touch" +

", synthesized: " + event.isSynthesized());

}

event.consume();

}

});

// Respond to mouse released only if it is in response to a screen touch

oval.setOnMouseReleased(new EventHandler<MouseEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(MouseEvent event) {

if (event.isSynthesized()) {

log("Ellipse: Mouse released event from touch" +

", synthesized: " + event.isSynthesized());

}

event.consume();

}

});

return oval;

}

/**

* Creates a log that shows the events.

*/

private ListView<String> createLog(ObservableList<String> messages){

final ListView<String> log = new ListView<String>();

log.setPrefSize(500, 200);

log.setItems(messages);

return log;

}

/**

* Uses lighting to visually change the object for the duration of

* the gesture.

*

* @param shape Target of the gesture

*/

private void inc(Shape shape) {

if (gestureCount == 0) {

shape.setEffect(new Lighting());

}

gestureCount++;

}

/**

* Restores the object to its original state when the gesture completes.

*

* @param shape Target of the gesture

*/

private void dec(Shape shape) {

gestureCount--;

if (gestureCount == 0) {

shape.setEffect(null);

}

GestureEvents.java C-7

}

/**

* Adds a message to the log.

*

* @param message Message to be logged

*/

private void log(String message) {

// Limit log to 50 entries, delete from bottom and add to top

if (events.size() == 50) {

events.remove(49);

}

events.add(0, message);

}

}

D

D

TouchEvents.java

For a description, see Working with Touch Events .

Legal Terms and Copyright Notice

/*

* Copyright (c) 2012, 2014, Oracle and/or its affiliates.

* All rights reserved. Use is subject to license terms.

*

* This file is available and licensed under the following license:

*

* Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without

* modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions

* are met:

*

* - Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright

* notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.

* - Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright

* notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in

* the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.

* - Neither the name of Oracle nor the names of its

* contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived

* from this software without specific prior written permission.

*

* THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS

* "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT

* LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR

* A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT

* OWNER OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL,

* SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT

* LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE,

* DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY

* THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT

* (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE

* OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

*/

Code

package touchevents; import javafx.application.Application; import javafx.event.EventHandler; import javafx.scene.Group; import javafx.scene.Scene; import javafx.scene.effect.DropShadow; import javafx.scene.effect.Lighting;

TouchEvents.java D-1

import javafx.scene.image.Image; import javafx.scene.image.ImageView; import javafx.scene.input.TouchEvent; import javafx.scene.input.TouchPoint; import javafx.scene.paint.Color; import javafx.scene.paint.CycleMethod; import javafx.scene.paint.RadialGradient; import javafx.scene.paint.Stop; import javafx.scene.shape.Circle; import javafx.scene.shape.Rectangle; import javafx.stage.Stage;

/**

*

* Sample that shows how touch events can be used. UI contains four folders

* and a row of blocks with a circle on one of the blocks. The folders

* can be moved independently by touching one or more simultaneously

* (number of folders that can be moved at one time can be limited by the

* number of touch points the screen supports).

* The circle can be moved from block to block by first touching the circle

* and then touching an empty block. Jumping can continue until the finger

* over the circle is removed.

*

*/ public class TouchEvents extends Application {

@Override

public void start(Stage primaryStage) {

Group root = new Group();

final TouchImage img1 = new TouchImage(50, 20,

new Image(TouchEvents.class.getResource(

"images/folder002.png").toExternalForm(), false));

final TouchImage img2 = new TouchImage(350, 20,

new Image(TouchEvents.class.getResource(

"images/folder004.png").toExternalForm(), false));

final TouchImage img3 = new TouchImage(150, 200,

new Image(TouchEvents.class.getResource(

"images/folder006.png").toExternalForm(), false));

final TouchImage img4 = new TouchImage(450, 200,

new Image(TouchEvents.class.getResource(

"images/folder007.png").toExternalForm(), false));

root.getChildren().addAll(img1, img2, img3, img4);

for (int i = 1; i <= 5; i++) {

Rectangle pad = new Rectangle(100, 85, Color.BLANCHEDALMOND);

pad.setTranslateX((i*125-100));

pad.setTranslateY(470);

pad.setStroke(Color.GRAY);

root.getChildren().add(pad);

}

root.getChildren().add(new Ball(75, 512));

Scene scene = new Scene(root, 650, 600);

scene.setFill(Color.GAINSBORO);

primaryStage.setTitle("Touch Events Example");

primaryStage.setScene(scene);

primaryStage.show();

}

/**

* Image that can be dragged by a finger on a touch screen

*/

public static class TouchImage extends ImageView {

private long touchId = -1;

double touchx, touchy;

public TouchImage(int x, int y, Image img) {

super(img);

setTranslateX(x);

setTranslateY(y);

setEffect(new DropShadow(8.0, 4.5, 6.5, Color.DARKSLATEGRAY));

setOnTouchPressed(new EventHandler<TouchEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(TouchEvent event) {

if (touchId == -1) {

touchId = event.getTouchPoint().getId();

touchx = event.getTouchPoint().getSceneX() - getTranslateX();

touchy = event.getTouchPoint().getSceneY() - getTranslateY();

}

event.consume();

}

});

setOnTouchReleased(new EventHandler<TouchEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(TouchEvent event) {

if (event.getTouchPoint().getId() == touchId) {

touchId = -1;

}

event.consume();

}

});

setOnTouchMoved(new EventHandler<TouchEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(TouchEvent event) {

if (event.getTouchPoint().getId() == touchId) {

setTranslateX(event.getTouchPoint().getSceneX() - touchx);

setTranslateY(event.getTouchPoint().getSceneY() - touchy);

}

event.consume();

}

});

}

}

/**

* Ball that can jump from one rectangle to another by touching the

* ball on a touch screen with one finger and touching another rectangle

* with a second finger. As long as the finger currently over the ball is

* not lifted, the ball can be jumped again.

*/

private static class Ball extends Circle {

double touchx, touchy;

TouchEvents.java D-3

public Ball(int x, int y) {

super(35);

RadialGradient gradient = new RadialGradient(0.8, -0.5, 0.5, 0.5, 1,

true, CycleMethod.NO_CYCLE, new Stop [] {

new Stop(0, Color.FIREBRICK),

new Stop(1, Color.BLACK)

});

setFill(gradient);

setTranslateX(x);

setTranslateY(y);

setOnTouchPressed(new EventHandler<TouchEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(TouchEvent event) {

if (event.getTouchCount() == 1) {

touchx = event.getTouchPoint().getSceneX() - getTranslateX();

touchy = event.getTouchPoint().getSceneY() - getTranslateY();

setEffect(new Lighting());

}

event.consume();

}

});

setOnTouchReleased(new EventHandler<TouchEvent>() {

@Override public void handle(TouchEvent event) {

setEffect(null);

event.consume();

}

});

// Jump if the first finger touched the ball and is either

// moving or still, and the second finger touches a rectangle

EventHandler<TouchEvent> jumpHandler = new EventHandler<TouchEvent>()

{

@Override public void handle(TouchEvent event) {

if (event.getTouchCount() != 2) {

// Ignore if this is not a two-finger touch

return;

}

TouchPoint main = event.getTouchPoint();

TouchPoint other = event.getTouchPoints().get(1);

if (other.getId() == main.getId()) {

// Ignore if the second finger is in the ball and

// the first finger is anywhere else

return;

}

if (other.getState() != TouchPoint.State.PRESSED ||

other.belongsTo(Ball.this) ||

!(other.getTarget() instanceof Rectangle) ){

// Jump only if the second finger was just

// pressed in a rectangle

return;

}

// Jump now

setTranslateX(other.getSceneX() - touchx);

setTranslateY(other.getSceneY() - touchy);

// Grab the destination touch point, which is now inside

// the ball, so that jumping can continue without

// releasing the finger

other.grab();

// The original touch point is no longer of interest, so

// call ungrab() to release the target

main.ungrab();

event.consume();

}

};

setOnTouchStationary(jumpHandler);

setOnTouchMoved(jumpHandler);

}

}

/**

* The main() method is ignored in correctly deployed JavaFX application.

* main() serves only as fallback in case the application can not be

* launched through deployment artifacts, e.g., in IDEs with limited FX

* support. NetBeans ignores main().

*

* @param args the command line arguments

*/

public static void main(String[] args) {

launch(args);

}

}

TouchEvents.java D-5

E

E

HelloDragAndDrop.java

For a description, see Implementing a Basic Drag-and-Drop Gesture .

Legal Terms and Copyright Notice

/*

* Copyright (c) 2011, 2014, Oracle and/or its affiliates.

* All rights reserved. Use is subject to license terms.

*

* This file is available and licensed under the following license:

*

* Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without

* modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions

* are met:

*

* - Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright

* notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.

* - Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright

* notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in

* the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.

* - Neither the name of Oracle nor the names of its

* contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived

* from this software without specific prior written permission.

*

* THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS

* "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT

* LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR

* A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT

* OWNER OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL,

* SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT

* LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE,

* DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY

* THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT

* (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE

* OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

*/

Code

package hellodraganddrop; import javafx.application.Application; import javafx.event.EventHandler; import javafx.scene.Group; import javafx.scene.Scene; import javafx.scene.input.*; import javafx.scene.paint.Color;

HelloDragAndDrop.java E-1

import javafx.scene.text.Text; import javafx.stage.Stage;

/**

* Demonstrates a drag-and-drop feature.

*/ public class HelloDragAndDrop extends Application {

@Override

public void start(Stage stage) {

stage.setTitle("Hello Drag And Drop");

Group root = new Group();

Scene scene = new Scene(root, 400, 200);

scene.setFill(Color.LIGHTGREEN);

final Text source = new Text(50, 100, "DRAG ME");

source.setScaleX(2.0);

source.setScaleY(2.0);

final Text target = new Text(250, 100, "DROP HERE");

target.setScaleX(2.0);

target.setScaleY(2.0);

source.setOnDragDetected(new EventHandler <MouseEvent>() {

@Override

public void handle(MouseEvent event) {

/* drag was detected, start drag-and-drop gesture*/

System.out.println("onDragDetected");

/* allow MOVE transfer mode */

Dragboard db = source.startDragAndDrop(TransferMode.MOVE);

/* put a string on dragboard */

ClipboardContent content = new ClipboardContent();

content.putString(source.getText());

db.setContent(content);

event.consume();

}

});

target.setOnDragOver(new EventHandler <DragEvent>() {

@Override

public void handle(DragEvent event) {

/* data is dragged over the target */

System.out.println("onDragOver");

/* accept it only if it is not dragged from the same node

* and if it has a string data */

if (event.getGestureSource() != target &&

event.getDragboard().hasString()) {

/* allow for moving */

event.acceptTransferModes(TransferMode.MOVE);

}

event.consume();

}

});

target.setOnDragEntered(new EventHandler <DragEvent>() {

@Override

public void handle(DragEvent event) {

/* the drag-and-drop gesture entered the target */

System.out.println("onDragEntered");

/* show to the user that it is an actual gesture target */

if (event.getGestureSource() != target &&

event.getDragboard().hasString()) {

target.setFill(Color.GREEN);

}

event.consume();

}

});

target.setOnDragExited(new EventHandler <DragEvent>() {

@Override

public void handle(DragEvent event) {

/* mouse moved away, remove the graphical cues */

target.setFill(Color.BLACK);

event.consume();

}

});

target.setOnDragDropped(new EventHandler <DragEvent>() {

@Override

public void handle(DragEvent event) {

/* data dropped */

System.out.println("onDragDropped");

/* if there is a string data on dragboard, read it and use it */

Dragboard db = event.getDragboard();

boolean success = false;

if (db.hasString()) {

target.setText(db.getString());

success = true;

}

/* let the source know whether the string was successfully

* transferred and used */

event.setDropCompleted(success);

event.consume();

}

});

source.setOnDragDone(new EventHandler <DragEvent>() {

@Override

public void handle(DragEvent event) {

/* the drag-and-drop gesture ended */

System.out.println("onDragDone");

/* if the data was successfully moved, clear it */

if (event.getTransferMode() == TransferMode.MOVE) {

source.setText("");

}

event.consume();

}

});

root.getChildren().add(source);

HelloDragAndDrop.java E-3

root.getChildren().add(target);

stage.setScene(scene);

stage.show();

}

public static void main(String[] args) {

Application.launch(args);

}

}

F

F

Paper Doll Drag-and-Drop Sample

This appendix lists code for the PaperDoll application.

For a description, see PaperDoll Drag-and-Drop Application .

PaperDoll.java

Legal Terms and Copyright Notice

/*

* Copyright (c) 2011, 2014, Oracle and/or its affiliates.

* All rights reserved. Use is subject to license terms.

*

* This file is available and licensed under the following license:

*

* Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without

* modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions

* are met:

*

* - Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright

* notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.

* - Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright

* notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in

* the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.

* - Neither the name of Oracle nor the names of its

* contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived

* from this software without specific prior written permission.

*

* THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS

* "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT

* LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR

* A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT

* OWNER OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL,

* SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT

* LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE,

* DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY

* THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT

* (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE

* OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

*/

Code

package paperdoll; import paperdoll.clothes.Cloth;

Paper Doll Drag-and-Drop Sample F-1

PaperDoll.java

import paperdoll.clothes.ClothListBuilder; import paperdoll.body.Body; import paperdoll.images.ImageManager; import java.util.HashMap; import java.util.List; import javafx.application.Application; import javafx.geometry.Insets; import javafx.scene.Scene; import javafx.scene.image.ImageView; import javafx.scene.input.DragEvent; import javafx.scene.input.Dragboard; import javafx.scene.input.TransferMode; import javafx.scene.layout.ColumnConstraints; import javafx.scene.layout.FlowPane; import javafx.scene.layout.GridPane; import javafx.scene.layout.Pane; import javafx.scene.layout.Priority; import javafx.scene.layout.VBox; import javafx.stage.Stage;

/**

* The main application class. Most of presentation logic is here.

* Also, a container for unequipped details is created and set up here.

*

* This application uses the Public Domain Images

* from http://karenswhimsy.com/public-domain-images/

*

*/ public class PaperDoll extends Application {

public static void main(String[] args) {

launch(args);

}

/**

* All laying out goes here.

* @param primaryStage

*/

@Override

public void start(Stage primaryStage) {

primaryStage.setTitle("Paper Doll");

ImageView header = new ImageView(ImageManager.getImage("ui/flowers.jpg"));

VBox title = new VBox();

title.getChildren().addAll(header);

title.setPadding(new Insets(10.0));

GridPane content = new GridPane();

content.add(Body.getBody().getNode(), 1, 1);

content.add(createItemPane(Body.getBody().getBodyPane()), 0, 1);

ColumnConstraints c1 = new ColumnConstraints();

c1.setHgrow(Priority.ALWAYS);

ColumnConstraints c2 = new ColumnConstraints();

c2.setHgrow(Priority.NEVER);

c2.setPrefWidth(Body.getBody().getBodyPane().getMinWidth() + 20);

content.getColumnConstraints().addAll(c1, c2);

items = new HashMap<>();

F-2 JavaFX Handling Events

PaperDoll.java

Body.getBody().setItemsInfo(itemPane, items);

populateClothes();

VBox root = new VBox();

root.getChildren().addAll(title, content);

primaryStage.setScene(new Scene(root, 800, 900));

primaryStage.setMinWidth(800);

primaryStage.setMinHeight(900);

primaryStage.show();

}

private FlowPane itemPane = null;

private HashMap<String, Cloth> items;

/**

* A container for unequipped items is created here.

* @param bodyPane body container is needed so that the item is removed from

* it when dropped here.

* @return

*/

private FlowPane createItemPane(final Pane bodyPane) {

if (!(itemPane == null))

return itemPane;

itemPane = new FlowPane();

itemPane.setPadding(new Insets(10.0));

itemPane.setOnDragDropped((DragEvent event) -> {

Dragboard db = event.getDragboard();

// Get the item ID here, which was stored when the drag started.

boolean success = false;

// If this is a meaningful drop...

if (db.hasString()) {

String nodeId = db.getString();

// ... search for the item on body. If it is there...

ImageView cloth = (ImageView) bodyPane.lookup("#" + nodeId);

if (cloth != null) {

// ... the item is removed from body

// and added to an unequipped container.

bodyPane.getChildren().remove(cloth);

itemPane.getChildren().add(cloth);

success = true;

}

// ...anyway, the item is not active or equipped anymore.

items.get(nodeId).takeOff();

}

event.setDropCompleted(success);

event.consume();

});

itemPane.setOnDragOver((DragEvent event) -> {

if (event.getGestureSource() != itemPane &&

event.getDragboard().hasString()) {

event.acceptTransferModes(TransferMode.MOVE);

}

event.consume();

});

return itemPane;

Paper Doll Drag-and-Drop Sample F-3

Cloth.java

}

/**

* Here items are added to an unequipped items container.

*/

private void populateClothes() {

ClothListBuilder clothBuilder = new ClothListBuilder();

if (itemPane == null)

throw new IllegalStateException("Should call getItems() before populating!");

List<Cloth> clothes = clothBuilder.getClothList();

clothes.stream().map((c) -> {

itemPane.getChildren().add(c.getNode());

return c;

}).forEach((c) -> {

items.put(c.getImageViewId(), c);

});

}

}

Cloth.java

Legal Terms and Copyright Notice

/*

* Copyright (c) 2011, 2014, Oracle and/or its affiliates.

* All rights reserved. Use is subject to license terms.

*

* This file is available and licensed under the following license:

*

* Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without

* modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions

* are met:

*

* - Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright

* notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.

* - Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright

* notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in

* the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.

* - Neither the name of Oracle nor the names of its

* contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived

* from this software without specific prior written permission.

*

* THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS

* "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT

* LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR

* A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT

* OWNER OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL,

* SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT

* LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE,

* DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY

* THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT

* (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE

* OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

*/

Code

package paperdoll.clothes;

F-4 JavaFX Handling Events

Cloth.java

import javafx.scene.Node; import javafx.scene.image.Image; import javafx.scene.image.ImageView; import javafx.scene.input.*;

/**

* Class for a draggable detail. Draggable detail has three states: preview,

* active (dragged), and equipped. Currently, dragged and preview images

* are the same (see the ClothListBuilder class).

*

*/ public class Cloth {

private final Image previewImage;

private final Image activeImage;

private final Image equippedImage;

private final ImageView currentImage;

public void putOn() {

currentImage.setImage(equippedImage);

}

public void takeOff() {

currentImage.setImage(previewImage);

}

private void activate() {

currentImage.setImage(activeImage);

}

public String getImageViewId() {

return currentImage.getId();

}

public Node getNode() {

return currentImage;

}

public Cloth(Image[] images) {

this.previewImage = images[0];

this.activeImage = images[1];

this.equippedImage = images[2];

currentImage = new ImageView();

currentImage.setImage(previewImage);

currentImage.setId(this.getClass().getSimpleName() +

System.currentTimeMillis());

currentImage.setOnDragDetected((MouseEvent event) -> {

activate();

Dragboard db = currentImage.startDragAndDrop(TransferMode.MOVE);

ClipboardContent content = new ClipboardContent();

// Store the node ID in order to know what is dragged.

content.putString(currentImage.getId());

db.setContent(content);

event.consume();

});

}

Paper Doll Drag-and-Drop Sample F-5

ClothListBuilder.java

}

ClothListBuilder.java

Legal Terms and Copyright Notice

/*

* Copyright (c) 2011, 2014, Oracle and/or its affiliates.

* All rights reserved. Use is subject to license terms.

*

* This file is available and licensed under the following license:

*

* Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without

* modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions

* are met:

*

* - Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright

* notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.

* - Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright

* notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in

* the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.

* - Neither the name of Oracle nor the names of its

* contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived

* from this software without specific prior written permission.

*

* THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS

* "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT

* LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR

* A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT

* OWNER OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL,

* SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT

* LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE,

* DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY

* THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT

* (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE

* OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

*/

Code

package paperdoll.clothes; import paperdoll.images.ImageManager; import java.util.ArrayList; import java.util.List; import javafx.scene.image.Image;

/**

* Helper class which generates list of draggable details (the names of the

* details are hard coded here).

* Preview, dragged and equipped images for every detail

* are set here. Currently, dragged and preview images are the same.

*

* Images are taken from: http://karenswhimsy.com/public-domain-images/

*

*/ public class ClothListBuilder {

private List<Cloth> clothList;

F-6 JavaFX Handling Events

Body.java

public List<Cloth> getClothList() {

if (clothList == null) {

buildClothList();

}

return clothList;

}

private Image[] getClothImages(String clothName) {

Image []clothImages = new Image[3];

clothImages[0] = ImageManager.getImage("clothes/preview/" + clothName);

clothImages[1] = ImageManager.getImage("clothes/preview/" + clothName);

clothImages[2] = ImageManager.getImage("clothes/equipped/" + clothName);

return clothImages;

}

private void buildClothList() {

clothList = new ArrayList<>();

for (String clothName : clothNames) {

Cloth c = new Cloth(getClothImages(clothName));

clothList.add(c);

}

}

private final String []clothNames = {

"dress1.png", "dress2.png", "dress3.png", "dress4.png"

};

}

Body.java

Legal Terms and Copyright Notice

/*

* Copyright (c) 2011, 2014, Oracle and/or its affiliates.

* All rights reserved. Use is subject to license terms.

*

* This file is available and licensed under the following license:

*

* Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without

* modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions

* are met:

*

* - Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright

* notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.

* - Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright

* notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in

* the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.

* - Neither the name of Oracle nor the names of its

* contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived

* from this software without specific prior written permission.

*

* THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS

* "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT

* LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR

* A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT

* OWNER OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL,

* SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT

* LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE,

* DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY

Paper Doll Drag-and-Drop Sample F-7

BodyElement.java

* THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT

* (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE

* OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

*/

Code

package paperdoll.body;

/**

* Singleton container for body that allows accessing it from static methods.

*

*/ public class Body {

private static BodyElement body;

public static BodyElement getBody() {

if (body == null)

body = new BodyElement();

return body;

}

}

BodyElement.java

Legal Terms and Copyright Notice

/*

* Copyright (c) 2011, 2014, Oracle and/or its affiliates.

* All rights reserved. Use is subject to license terms.

*

* This file is available and licensed under the following license:

*

* Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without

* modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions

* are met:

*

* - Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright

* notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.

* - Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright

* notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in

* the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.

* - Neither the name of Oracle nor the names of its

* contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived

* from this software without specific prior written permission.

*

* THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS

* "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT

* LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR

* A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT

* OWNER OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL,

* SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT

* LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE,

* DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY

* THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT

* (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE

* OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

*/

F-8 JavaFX Handling Events

BodyElement.java

Code

package paperdoll.body; import paperdoll.clothes.Cloth; import paperdoll.images.ImageManager; import java.util.Map; import javafx.geometry.Insets; import javafx.scene.Node; import javafx.scene.image.ImageView; import javafx.scene.input.DragEvent; import javafx.scene.input.Dragboard; import javafx.scene.input.TransferMode; import javafx.scene.layout.Pane;

/**

* Container for body that accepts drops. Draggable details dropped here

* are equipped.

*

*/ public class BodyElement {

private final Pane bodyPane;

private final ImageView bodyImage;

private Pane itemPane;

private Map<String, Cloth> items;

public void setItemsInfo(Pane p, Map<String, Cloth> m) {

itemPane = p;

items = m;

}

public Pane getBodyPane() {

return bodyPane;

}

public BodyElement() {

bodyPane = new Pane();

bodyImage = new ImageView(ImageManager.getResource("body.png"));

bodyPane.setOnDragDropped((DragEvent event) -> {

Dragboard db = event.getDragboard();

boolean success = false;

// If this is a meaningful drop...

if (db.hasString()) {

// Get an item ID here, which was stored when the drag started.

String nodeId = db.getString();

// ... search for the item in unequipped items. If it is there...

ImageView cloth = (ImageView) itemPane.lookup("#" + nodeId);

if (cloth != null) {

// ... the item is removed from the unequipped list

// and attached to body.

itemPane.getChildren().remove(cloth);

bodyPane.getChildren().add(cloth);

cloth.relocate(0, 0);

success = true;

}

// ...anyway, the item is now equipped.

items.get(nodeId).putOn();

}

event.setDropCompleted(success);

Paper Doll Drag-and-Drop Sample F-9

BodyElement.java

event.consume();

});

bodyPane.setOnDragOver((DragEvent event) -> {

if (event.getGestureSource() != bodyImage &&

event.getDragboard().hasString()) {

event.acceptTransferModes(TransferMode.MOVE);

}

event.consume();

});

bodyPane.getChildren().add(bodyImage);

bodyPane.setMinWidth(bodyImage.getImage().getWidth());

bodyPane.setPadding(new Insets(10.0));

}

public Node getNode() {

return bodyPane;

}

}

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