Third-octave and Octave Band Pass Filter — Type 1617

Third-octave and Octave Band Pass Filter — Type 1617
Product Data
Third-octave and Octave Band Pass Filter — Type 1617
USES:
In combination with suitable Measuring Amplifier
❍ Third-octave and octave frequency analysis of
sound and vibration
❍ Frequency response measurements on
electroacoustic transducers
❍ Measurement of sound transmission loss
❍ Measurement of vibration isolation
❍ Third-octave and octave filters to IEC 225–1966,
DIN 45651 and 45 652, and ANSI S1.11–1986
❍ IEEE/IEC interface for remote setting of controls via
digital bus
❍ Digital display of selected bandwidth and centre
frequency setting
❍ Built-in A-, B-, C- and D-weighting networks
❍ Manual or electronic control of filter switching
❍ Testing acoustic materials
❍ Programs for automatic selection of Measuring
Amplifier averaging time
❍ Constant confidence level spectrum measurements
❍ Automatic filter scanning via Level Recorder
❍ Automatic control of Level and X–Y Recorders
FEATURES:
❍ 50 third-octave filter bands, centre frequencies from
2 Hz to 160kHz
❍ Selectable scan start frequency, reduces overall
time for analysis
❍ Input overload warning
❍ 41 overlapping octave bands, centre frequencies
from 2 Hz to 20kHz
Third-octave and Octave Band
Pass Filter Type 1617 is used in instrumentation systems for measurement and recording of the frequency
spectra of sound, vibration, and electroacoustic signals. The Type 1617 incorporates electronic filter switching
and digital indication of the selected
filter.
The Type 1617 operates with frequency variable filters which can be
electronically switched to provide
third-octave or full-octave bandwidths.
The frequency range from 2Hz to
160kHz can be divided into 50 thirdoctave bands and the frequency range
2Hz to 20kHz can be divided into 41
overlapping octave bands. The instrument has built-in A-, B-, C- and Dweighting networks.
The Type 1617 has an IEEE/IEC interface for use in bus-controlled measuring set-ups.
Brüel & Kjær
B
K
Introduction
The Type 1617 has filter band centre
frequencies from 2Hz to 160kHz that
can be divided into 50 third-octave
bands. It has 41 overlapping octave
bands covering 14 octaves from 2Hz
to 20kHz. It includes A-, B-, C- and
D-weighting networks, and there is
an input overload indicator lamp. Filter scanning can be controlled by a
Level Recorder, and there is a builtin digital interface compatible with
IEC625–1/IEEE Std. 488 to permit
direct control by other instruments
and systems using these standards.
A DC ramp output can control the
X–axis of an X–Y Recorder, and a control circuit is included to select averaging time programs for use by the
measuring instrument.
The Band Pass Filter will generally
be used with one of the Measuring
Amplifiers Type 2610 or 2636. Together with the Band Pass Filter and
a suitable measurement transducer
and a preamplifier combination, they
permit a wide variety of signals to be
measured and analysed. With a
Brüel & Kjær Condenser Microphone,
they form a sound measurement system fulfilling IEC 651 (Type 0) for
precision sound level meters.
To aid selection of a suitable measuring instrument, summarized specifications for the Brüel & Kjær
Measuring Amplifiers mentioned are
given in Table 1. The basic system of
Band Pass Filter Type 1617 with
Measuring Amplifier Type 2610 is for
analysis with manual selection of av-
eraging time and automatic filter
scanning controlled by a Level Recorder. Full utilization of all measurement and control possibilities,
including automatic selection of averaging time is obtained using the
Measuring Amplifier Type 2636.
With these combinations, either a
Level or X–Y Recorder may be employed for recording analyses. Alternatively, a Type 1617 and 2636
combination can be used.
Filter I
Centre
Frequency
Hz
Filter II
Centre
Frequency
Hz
2
2.5
3.15
4
5
6.3
8
10
12.5
16
20
25
31.5
40
50
63
80
100
125
160
200
250
Fig.1 Measuring Amplifiers Types 2610 and 2636
315
400
500
630
Measuring Amplifiers
800
Brüel & Kjær Type No.
2610
Linear Frequency Range
Amplifier
Section
2636
2 Hz to 200 kHz
Voltage Ranges
2000
100 to – 30 dB
3150
2500
4000
RMS
Fast – Slow
20 s Averaging
Fast – Slow
0.1 to 100 s Averaging
5000
Peak
1.7 dB/µs
0.05 – 0.5 – 5 dB/µs
8000
–
✓
12500
RMS – Peak
RMS – Peak – Impulse
Impulse
Hold
Inputs
Direct – Preamp.
AC Lin
1 and 1.6 V FSD
DC Lin
–
1 and 5 V FSD
0 – 12 V
DC Log
Digital
60 dB
–
6300
10000
5 V FSD
Outputs
5 V FSD
IEEE/IEC Interface
* Remote control via averaging time programs of Band Pass Filter Type 1617
Table 1 B&K Measuring Amplifiers for use with Band Pass Filter Type 1617
2
1600
10 µV to 30 V FSD
Amplification
Indicating
Modes
1 Hz to 200 kHz
1000
1250
16000
20000
25000
31500
40000
50000
63000
80000
100000
125000
160000
1/3-octave
Bandwidth
at 3.7 dB
Hz approx.
0.46
0.50
0.73
0.92
1.16
1.45
1.83
2.30
2.90
3.70
4.60
5.8
7.3
9.2
11.6
14.5
18.3
23
29
37
46
58
73
92
116
145
183
230
290
370
460
580
730
920
1160
1450
1830
2300
2900
3700
4600
5800
7300
9200
11600
14500
18300
23000
29000
37000
Table 2 Filter centre frequencies in preferred series. Bold type denotes preferred
series for full-octaves
Description
Input
The Band Pass Filter is designed to
operate on the signals obtained from
the External Filter terminals of the
Measuring Amplifiers, but any input
signal up to 5V peak may be applied.
Input and output are via coaxial
B& K sockets on the front panel, in
parallel with BNC terminals on the
rear panel. Fig. 2 is a block diagram
of Band Pass Filter Type 1617.
Amplifier
A
B
C
Low Pass
Filter
D
Overload
Warning
Third-Octave Band Pass Filters
The active Filter sections consist of a
matched pair of variable frequency
six-pole Butterworth filters which
can be electronically switched to yield
third-octave or full-octave bandwidths. Between them the two filters
cover the frequency range from 2Hz
to 160kHz centre frequencies, with
each filter being switched to alternate third-octave centre frequencies
in the preferred series (see Table 2).
The filter characteristics of the individual third-octave Filters used in
this instrument fulfil the requirements of IEC 225–1966, DIN 45652,
and ANSIS 1.11–1986 (conforming to
Type 1 subtype D or better). The response curve for a typical third-octave filter is shown in Fig.3, and the
top of the curve in the enlarged view
in Fig. 4. The IEC, DIN and ANSI
Input
Amplifier
2 Hz –
20 kHz
1/1-1/3 oct
Filter I
Low Pass
Filter
2.5 Hz –
16 kHz
1/1-1/3 oct
Filter II
Buffer
Filter
Selector II
Output
Amplifier
Output
25 kHz
31.5 kHz
40 kHz
50 kHz
Interface
Filter
Selector I
63 kHz
IEC
Digital
Bus
80 kHz
100 kHz
Averaging Time
125 kHz
Front
Panel
Controls
Digital
Controller
160 kHz
X-Y Recorder
Level Recorder
Control
761039/2e
Fig.2 Block diagram of the Band Pass Filter Type 1617
0
–2
0
20
2
4
30
Attenuation dB
6
40
Attenuation dB
50
60
70
IEC
Typical
Brüel & Kjær
1/3 Octave Filter
ANSI Class III
(DIN 45 652)
75
8
10
12
14
16
IEC
(DIN 45 652)
ANSI
Class II
Typical
Brüel & Kjær
1/3 Octave
Filter
18
20
22
0.4 0.5 0.6 0.70.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.8
2.5
Frequency relative to centre frequency f/fm
0.2
0.5
1
2
4
Frequency relative to centre frequency f/fm
770103/1e
Fig.3 Typical third-octave filter response
170124/2e
Fig.4 Top of a third-octave filter characteristic. The filters in Type 1617 conform
to ANSI S1.11–1896, Type 1 subtype D or
better
Max. Ripple
(peak-to-valley)
0.5 dB
Typical
Brüel & Kjær
1/3 Octave
Filter
–2
–1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
ANSI
8
Class II
9
10
11
IEC
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
0.4 0.5 0.6 0.70.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.8
2.5
Frequency relative to centre frequency f/fm
Attenuation dB
10
Max. Ripple
(peak-to-valley)
0.5 dB
170125/3e
Fig.5 Top of a typical octave filter characteristic
3
+20
Typical Frequency Characteristics
D
+10
+5
Linear 1 Hz to 200kHz
Linear 1 Hz to 200kHz
0
–5
B+C
B
–10
D
A
C
–15
–20
–25
A
–30
0.2
0.5
1
2
5
10
20
50
100
200
500
1k
2k
5k
10k
20k
50k
100k
200k
500k
770105/2e
Fig.6 Weighting networks and Linear function
limitations are also indicated in both
Figures. Peak-to-valley ripple in the
pass band is less than 0.5dB with
attenuation within ±0.5dB. Attenuation of frequencies outside 5 times
and 1/5 of the band centre frequency
is better than 75dB.
Octave Band Pass Filters
Octave Filters are formed in the
Band Pass Filter by electronically altering the components and characteristics of the Filter circuits. This
arrangement gives a flat crest to the
characteristic curve, and low peak-tovalley ripple. The octave Filters cover
the frequency range from 2Hz to
20kHz centre frequencies, selectable
at third-octaves in the preferred series. There is no provision for connection of full-octave filters at higher
frequencies.
All octave Filters contained in the
Type 1617 conform to IEC 225–1966,
DIN 45651, and ANSI S 1.11–1986
(conforming to Type 1 subtype D or
better). Fig.5 shows the top of a typical octave filter characteristic, attenuation outside 8 times and 1/8 of the
band centre frequency is better than
60dB. Peak-to-valley ripple is less
than 0.5dB, while attenuation in the
pass band is within ±0.5dB.
The total integrated random
(white) noise power passed by the
practical octave and third-octave Filters in the Type 1617 is equal to that
which would be passed by an ideal
octave or third-octave filter.
Weighting Networks
In addition to linear response, Type
1617 contains A-, B- and C-weighting
networks, plus the D-weighting network specified in IEC 537 for measurement of aircraft noise. The
frequency responses of the four
weighting networks are shown in
Fig.6. Fig.6 also indicates the Linear
4
range 1Hz to 200kHz obtainable
from the Type 1617.
Filter Selection and Scanning
Ranges
Filter switching is accomplished electronically by FET switches in the Filter Selectors that are regulated by
the Digital Controller acting on instructions from internal or remote
control settings. Bandwidth of the
Filter in use is selected by the three
position Selectivity switch, giving a
choice of third-octave bandwidth
scanning in third-octave steps, octave
bandwidth scanning in third-octave
steps (with adjacent bands partially
overlapping), or octave bandwidth
scanning in full-octave steps.
Manual selection of any particular
Filter band is made by turning the
Manual Filter Selector control to the
required position. There are two
measuring ranges, selected by the
Range switch, and hence two frequency scales. One covers the full frequency range with graduations in
third-octaves with centre frequencies
from 2Hz to 160kHz. The other range
covers third-octave centre frequencies between 2Hz and 40kHz, and includes A-, B-, C-, D-weighting, and a
linear position. A “linear” mode is
available on the Range switch, which
permits a Linear output to be ob-
Fig.7 Rear panel of the Band Pass Filter
tained at any point in a scan, without
moving the Manual Filter Selector.
The centre frequency of the selected Filter Band is indicated on a halfinch digital display that also shows
whether the Filter is functioning as
a third-octave or as an octave filter,
or whether a weighting network has
been selected.
Filter Scanning
In addition to filter switching as directed by the Manual Filter Selector,
the Digital Controller can operate the
filter scan on the commands of an
external source. The IEEE/IEC Interface permits either internal or external control in an analysis set-up, e.g
with a computer.
Selection of manual or recorder
control is made by the Filter Control
Mode Manual/Recorder switch, while
the Stop/Run switch enables the Recorder in use to be controlled from
the Band Pass Filter. This control facility is blocked when “Manual” is selected, or when the Type 1617 is
being controlled via the interface.
When operating in any remote control mode, the progress of the scan
can be followed on the Digital Display, as the Manual Filter Selector
does not rotate during an automatic
scan. The Filter frequency sweep always starts from the band in which
Scale 1
Scale 2
the Manual Filter Selector is standing, it sweeps through the selected
range, and being internally actuated,
it returns instantly to its starting
point. This saves analysis time when
low frequencies (with correspondingly long averaging times) will not be
required while operating the Type
1617 with an X–Y Recorder, or under
digital control via the interface bus.
Similarly, when recording sound on a
Level Recorder, unwanted low frequency bands can be excluded from
the trace to yield a clear audio frequency spectrogram.
50
50
40 dB
40
30
30
20
20
10
Fast Random/0.1 s (Scale 2)
10
0
0
20
Averaging Time Control
This ability allows the Type 1617 to
automatically step the averaging
time of the Measuring Amplifier Type
2636 during the course of a frequency
scan. The advantage is that the averaging time can be kept short as possible to obtain an acceptable analysis
time, yet long enough to achieve a
good overall confidence level and
measurement accuracy at low as well
as high frequencies.
The best analysis conditions are
obtained when the product of the
analysis bandwidth B (Hertz) and the
averaging time T (seconds) is held
constant throughout the scan. Accordingly the Type 1617 is equipped
with a choice of averaging programs
to suit analysis of “Sine”, “Fast Random” and “Slow Random” signals,
which help maintain the BT product
as near constant as possible plus giving a constant confidence level.
However, with certain high frequency signals the use of a longer
averaging may be merited. For example, where noise or vibration of slowly
rotating machinery is to be investigated, the low repetition frequency
can cause low frequency modulation
of the measured signal and will result
in inaccurate analysis (see Fig. 8) if
too short an averaging time is employed. To permit accurate analysis
of such signals, the averaging programs of the Type 1617 can be set
not to step the Measuring Amplifier
below a minimum averaging time of
0.1s, 1s or 10s. Fig.9 indicates the
particular averaging times and
change-over frequencies of the different programs.
The choice of required averaging
program is made using the Program
and Min. Time – Averaging Control
switches on the front of the Type
1617 which may be set as indicated
in Table 3. Automatic selection of the
programmed averaging time settings
Variable Averaging Time
25 Hz – 160 kHz, 1/3 octave
Fast Random/1 s (Scale 1)
50
100 200
500
2k
1k
5k
10k 20k
50k 100k Frequency
761044/1e
Fig.8 Conditions where longer averaging times are required for high frequency signals.
The lower curve was made with too short averaging time, while for the upper curve,
averaging was correct
Averaging Time
(s)
100
30
10
3
C,F,J Slow Random
B,E,H Fast
Random
(G)
A,D Sine
1
G
H
J
D
E
10 s
G,H,J
1.0 s
F
D,E,F
0.3
0.1
A
2
5
10
20
50
B
100
200
C
500
1k
2k
5k
10 k
Switchover Frequency (Hz)
0.1 s
A,B,C
20 k
761041/1e
Fig.9 Averaging times and changeover frequencies
Potentiometer Range:
Brüel & Kjær
50 25 60 dB
Measuring Obj.
50
dB
Rectifier: RMS Lower Lim. Freq.: 20 Hz Hz
Wr. Speed:
80
mm/sec. Paper Speed:
50 dB
8 60
40 dB
6 45
20 10
30 dB
4 30
10
20 dB
2 15
Rec. No.:
Date:
Sign:
0
QP 1124
mm/sec.
10 75
dB dB
dB dB
Fixed
Averaging
40 20
Time
1/3 octave
20 Hz - 40 kHz
D-A-B-C-Lin
Time used 30 15
250 s
1
5
0 0 dB
10
20
Hz
50
Multiply Freq. Scale by
1
100
200
500
1 kHz
2
10 dB
Zero Level:
5
10
20
(1612/2112)
40 D A B C Lin.
0
0
A B C Lin. 791007/1e
Fig.10 Frequency analysis with Level Recorder and fixed averaging time
5
Minimum Av. Time(s)
Slow Random
Fast Random
Sinus
0.1
1.0
10
C
B
A
F
E
D
J
H
(G)
Table 3 Selection of the required averaging time program
on the Measuring Amplifier is made
via the 15-pin AVERAGING TIME
CONTROL socket on the rear panel
of the Type 1617 when its Averaging
Time switch is set to “Variable”.
With a Level or X–Y Recorder, automatic averaging time control functions as follows. The Type 1617 starts
by setting the Measuring Amplifier
averaging time to the value programmed for the particular frequency
band selected and keeps the paper
drive or X–deflection of the Recorder
stationary while the Measuring Amplifier rectifies and averages the
measured signal. After a period of approximately five times the programmed averaging time it sets the
Measuring Amplifier to hold the analysed level while the Recorder plots
the level by advancing the paper or
stepping the pen to the next frequency band. The Type 1617 then stops
the Recorder, steps to the next filter
band and selects the programmed averaging time, thus enabling it to continue with the analysis using the
same control sequence. Typical Level
and X–Y recorder read-outs of analyses, employing fixed and variable
averaging time control, are shown in
Figs. 10, 11 and 12.
A similar control sequence is employed when using a Graphics Recorder for read out of analyses
results. Either the filter centre frequencies plus the corresponding signal level in each filter band can be
printed, or a fully annotated, barspectrum plot of analyses can be obtained. However, before a graphic
plot can be printed it is necessary
that the entire frequency spectrum is
entered.
Digital Interface
The Type 1617 is fully programmable
via a built-in IEC 625–1 standard
(IEEE std. 488 compatible) digital interface for programmable instrumentation. This permits the filter
bandwidth, start band, analysis
range and averaging programs to be
selected remotely with aid of a computer, for example, as well as permits
on-line changes to be made to accommodate new events as they occur.
6
Potentiometer Range:
Brüel & Kjær
50 25 60 dB
Measuring Obj.
dB dB
Variable
Averaging
Time
40 20
1/3 octave
Fast Random
0.1 s
25 Hz - 40 kHz
D-A-B-C-Lin
30 15
Time used
105 s
dB
Rectifier: DC
Lower Lim. Freq.: 200
Hz
Wr. Speed:
315 mm/sec. Paper Speed: 10
mm/sec.
10 75
dB dB
50 dB
8 60
40 dB
6 45
20 10
30 dB
4 30
10
20 dB
2 15
Rec. No.:
Date:
Sign:
0
QP 1124
50
5
0 0 dB
10
20
Hz
50
Multiply Freq. Scale by
100
200
1
500
1 kHz
2
10 dB
Zero Level:
5
10
20
40 D A B C Lin.
(1612/2112)
0
0
A B C Lin. 791008/1e
Fig.11 Frequency analysis with Level Recorder and variable averaging times
Brüel & Kjær
Averaging: Fast Random 0.1 s Ref. Level:
0 dB
Rec. No.:
Sign.:
Date:
D A B C Lin
Weight. Netw.:
50
70
dB
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
2,5 Hz
10
20
40
80
160
315
630
1,25
2,5
6
8
16
31,5
63
125
250
1 kHz
2
4
12,5
25
50
100
200
200
400
800
1,6
3,15
Measuring Object: 1/3 Octave 25 Hz to 40 kHz D-A-B-C-Lin. Time used 180 s
2
1,6
5
5
10
4
3,15
20
8
6,3
40
16
12,5
80
31,5
25
63
50
160
125
100
791006/1e
QP 1001
Fig.12 Frequency analysis with X–Y Recorder and variable averaging times
Remote digital control is selected
via the Listen Address switches on
the rear panel of the instrument.
Example of Use
The Type 1617 may be used with
Electroacoustic Test Systems which
are based on Electroacoustic Test
Software Type 5302 (see Fig. 13).
The ETS software is a high-level
applications program which controls
measurements,
performs
postprocessing, creates displays and
stores results in a flexible environment. Pop-up menus simplify the creation of test sequences. These
systems are equally suited for both
development and quality-control applications.
Typical measurement results include frequency response, sensitivity,
loudness rating, distortion, impedance and polarity. It is possible to
check against tolerance limits resulting in a pass/fail indication. A Band
Pass Filter Type 1617 should be included, to minimize the effect of background
noise
on
acoustic
measurements. During the frequency
scan, the Filter tracks the generator
frequency and thus suppresses noise.
The inclusion of Type 1617 in the
System also allows noise analyses to
be performed. The user need not
specify whether sine wave signals or
a spectrum should be used to measure responses; the system automatically detects whether the signal is of
a random nature and optimizes the
signal processing accordingly.
Furthermore, the Filter enables selective measurement of harmonic dis-
tortion. This is obtained by specifying
the desired centre order. Since the
Filter may be offset by up to 30 channels (10 octaves) above the generator
frequency, this feature can also be
used for measurement of an ensemble of higher harmonics — a test referred to as a Rub & Buzz test, which
is very useful for revealing mechanical defects in dynamic transducers. It
is also possible to fix the centre frequency of the filter during the frequency scan.
The Electroacoustic Test Systems
are particularly well suited for testing telephones and loudspeakers, as
the software controls the necessary
electrical and acoustical interfaces to
these measurement objects.
Test Head 4602 with
Mouth Simulator 4227
Ear Simulator for
Telephonometry 4185
Band Pass
Filter 1617
IEC/IEEE
Interface
Bus
AO 0087
AO 0087
AO 0194
AO 0264
Preamp.
Input
DC
AO 0087
Direct
Measuring Amplifier
Input
2636/WH 1769
AC Output
AO 0127
AO 0122 +
JP 0145
Input B AO 0127
Phase
Meter
2977
Input A
AO 0265
AO 0087
AO 0142 +
JP 0150
Compressor
Input
Sine/Noise
Generator
1051
Output
AO 0087
AO 0265
IBM Series
PS/2 Computer
with Electroacoustic
Test Software
5302
Telephone Interface
5906/WH3028
AO 0265
881837/3e
Fig.13 Expanded Electroacoustic Test System for telephone measurements
Specifications 1617
BAND PASS FILTERS:
In accordance with IEC 225–1966, DIN 45651
and 45652 and ANSI S1.11–1986
The total integrated random white noise power
passed by the filters in these instruments is
equal to that which would be passed by an ideal
filter
Centre Frequencies:
1/3 oct.: 2Hz to 160kHz (50 bands)
1/1 oct.: 2Hz to 20kHz (41 overlapping bands
at 1/3 octave intervals covering 14 octaves)
Attenuation Outside Pass Band:
1/3 oct.: >75dB at 5 times and 1/5 centre frequency
1/1 oct.: >60dB at 8 times and 1/8 centre frequency
Attenuation at Centre Frequency (fm):
1/3 oct. and 1/1 oct.: 0dB ±0.5dB
Maximum Peak-to-Valley Ripple:
1/3 oct.: 0.5dB
1/1 oct.: 0.5dB
FILTER SELECTION:
2Hz to 160kHz
2Hz to 40kHz, D, A, B, C Linear
Switching Control:
Manual: from “Manual Filter Selector”
Automatic: from a Level Recorder
Automatic: to control an X–Y Recorder
(When scanning octave filters, either full-octave
or third-octave stepping can be selected)
Automatic: via the IEEE/IEC interface bus
OVERALL SELECTIVE FREQUENCY RANGE:
1.4Hz to 180kHz
INPUT:
Via B&K coaxial socket on front panel, in parallel
with a BNC socket on the rear panel
Impedance: 1MΩ || 100pF
Voltage:
1V RMS nominal
5V peak maximum
5.6V (±0.3V) overload warning lamp lights
LINEAR PASS BAND:
(Available from Range switch or Manual Filter
Selector):
1.6Hz to 160kHz attenuation is 0dB ±0.3dB
1Hz to 200kHz attenuation is 0dB ± 0.5dB
WEIGHTING NETWORKS:
Curves A, B, C are in accordance with IEC 651
(Type 0) for precision sound level meters. Curve
D is in accordance with IEC 537
AVERAGING TIME PROGRAMMES:
Used with Measuring Amplifiers that feature remote controlled averaging times (Type 2636)
Programmes Available:
See Table 3 and Fig.9
DISTORTION:
Band Pass Filters:
< 0.1% with 1V signal level
< 0.3% with 3.6V signal level
Linear Range:
< 0.1% with 1V signal level
< 0.3% with 3.6V signal level
NOISE:
< 150µV (typ. 100) Band Pass Filters
< 110µV (typ. 80) A, B, and C-weighting networks
< 250µV (typ. 180) D-weighting network
< 100µV (typ. 80) Linear range
See EMC Immunity, note 2
OUTPUT:
Via B&K coaxial socket on front panel, in parallel
with a BNC socket on the rear panel
Impedance:
< 50Ω
Minimum Load Impedance:
5kΩ || 1nF for less than ±0.2% reading error
DC Ramp Output:
Used for controlling the X–axis of an X–Y Recorder
0V at the starting frequency
0.208V per 1/3 octave increase rate
10.4V maximum output
Load impedance > 10kΩ
7
Specifications 1617 (cont.)
IEEE/IEC DIGITAL INTERFACE:
Conforms to IEC 625–1 standard, compatible
with IEEE std. 488
IEC Functions Implemented:
Acceptor Handshake (AH 1)
Listener (L2)
Remote Local (RL2)
Parallel Poll (PP2)
COMPLIANCE WITH STANDARDS:
CE-mark indicates compliance with: EMC Directive and Low Voltage Directive.
Safety
IEC 348: Safety requirements for electronic measuring apparatus
EMC Emission
EN 50081–1: Generic emission standard. Part 1: Residential, commercial and
light industry.
CISPR 22: Radio disturbance characteristics of information technology
equipment. Class B Limits.
FCC Rules, Part 15: Complies with the limits for a Class B digital device.
EMC Immunity
EN 50082–1: Generic immunity standard. Part 1: Residential, commercial and
light industry.
Note 1: The above is guaranteed using accessories listed in this Product Data
sheet only.
Note 2: Susceptibility to radiated RF (3 V/m, 80% AM): Input noise in all filter
bands up to 2.3 mV
Temperature
IEC 68–2–1 & IEC 68–2–2: Environmental Testing. Cold and Dry Heat.
Operating Temperature: 5 to 40 °C (41 to 104 °F)
Storage Temperature: –25 to +70 °C (–13 to +158 °F)
Humidity
IEC 68–2–3: Damp Heat: 90% RH (non-condensing at 30 °C (86 °F))
Mechanical
Non-operating:
IEC 68–2–6: Vibration: 0.3 mm, 20 m/s2, 10–500 Hz
IEC 68–2–27: Shock: 1000 m/s2
IEC 68–2–29: Bump: 1000 bumps at 250 m/s2
Enclosure
IEC 529: Protection provided by enclosures: IP 20
POWER REQUIREMENTS:
Supply Voltage: 100; 115; 127; 200; 220; 240V
(50–60Hz) ±10% AC
Power Consumption: ~37VA
CABINET:
Supplied as model A (light-weight metal cabinet),
or C (as A but with Flanges for standard 19"
rack mounting)
DIMENSIONS:
Height: 133mm (5.25in)
Width: 430mm (16.9in)
Depth: 200mm (7.9in)
WEIGHT:
6.5kg (14.3lb.)
Ordering Information
Type 1617:
Includes the
JP0703:
JP0802:
2×VF0012:
3×VF0039
Band Pass Filter
following Accessories:
7–pin DIN Plug
8–pin DIN Plug
200mA Fuses
400mA Fuses
Power Cable
Accessories Available
AO0195:
AO0184:
AO0264:
AO0194:
Interface Cable (2m), IEC (25way male, slide lock) to IEC 6251 (25-way)
Interface Cable (2m), IEC 625-1
(25-way)
AO0265:
AO0145:
Adaptor to convert IEEE-488
connector to IEC 625-1 (25-way)
Interface Cable (2m), IEC 625-1
(25-way) to IEEE-488
Interface Cable (2m), IEEE-488
Averaging Time Control Cable
Brüel&Kjær reserves the right to change specifications and accessories without notice
Brüel & Kjær
B
K
WORLD HEADQUARTERS:
DK-2850 Naerum · Denmark · Telephone: +45 45 80 05 00 · Fax: +45 45 80 14 05 · Internet: http://www.bk.dk · e-mail: [email protected]
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Local representatives and service organisations worldwide
BP 0163–16
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