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PMI Sept.Oct 03 Covers
8/29/03
12:41 PM
Page 1
September/October 2003
In this Issue...
Horsehair magic
Tile a fireplace
Foil effects
3-D Masks
... and more!
www.potterymaking.org
US $5 (Can $7.50, £4, g6)
Techniques • Tools • Tips • Projects for the Studio Potter
PMI Sept.Oct 03 Covers
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Page 2
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PMI Sept.Oct 03 p1_13
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Photo by “Ken Proper Exposure”
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September/October 2003
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Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
1
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Page 2
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PMI Sept.Oct 03 p1_13
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Page 3
Editor’s Corner
Features
Hairy Pottery:The Technique of Horsehair Pottery............9
by Sumi von Dassow
A step-by-step technique detailing how to achieve this unique decorative technique.
How to Tile a Fireplace Surround ....................................15
by Marcia Selsor
Give your fireplace a facelift by adding a new surround with these easy-to-follow
instructions.
Firing with Aluminum Foil Saggars..................................21
by Paul Antone
Use this common kitchen supply to get striking colors and patterns in the pit.
Educating a Potter............................................................26
Welcome to our 2003-2004 exclusive Education Directory
Education Locator............................................................27
Pottery education venues listed by location
Education Directory ........................................................29
Complete listing information for over 300 teaching venues.
Drape Mold Masks ..........................................................41
by Marj Peeler
Ancient forms in the 21st century—using modern materials to create masks.
Let There Be Lights: Coloring Your Work with Flames ....47
by Hal Silverman
Add the element of flickering flames to your work to change their look.
A Farewell
It doesn’t seem like six years have
passed since we first published the
Pottery Making Illustrated supplement to Ceramics Monthly, but
there you have it. From those humble beginnings, PMI has become
one of the most significant how-to
magazines to ever come on the
ceramic arts publication scene.
We’ve never strayed from our
mission: to provide easy-to-understand pottery making techniques in
a well-illustrated, step-by-step format. We’ve never tried to showcase
the polished gallery aspect of
ceramic art, but concentrated
instead on the behind-the-scenes
mud-and-slip work necessary to
achieve those works of art.
This issue is my last as editor as I
move on to manage the The
American Ceramic Society’s book
program. With this transition, there
are not a few folks to thank—the
Editorial Advisory Board, scores of
contributors, readers, teachers, potters, the Clayart discussion group
and Society employees have all contributed to the success of PMI.
Space prevents me from thanking all
the individuals, but they all know
who they are.
Seen and Heard: Children in the Pottery..........................60 A Welcome
by Marj Peeler
Taking over the helm of PMI is
Tim Frederich. Tim comes to PMI
from the Orton Foundation, maker
of all those cones you use.There he
worked in product support helping
hundreds of customers and potters
PMI Online: Pottery Tips on the Web ..............................................6 on firing and glaze problems. He
has been an active studio potter
by Helen Bates
since 1968, teaches at a local art
Down to Business:The Finishing Touches........................................52 center, and is a member of the PMI
by Chris Campbell
Editorial Board. Pottery Making
Kids Corner: Scarecrows..................................................................56 Illustrated is in good hands and has a
by Craig Hinshaw
bright future!
Mint Condition: Henry Mercer’s Moravian Pottery Tiles ................58
by Jan Durr
Off the Shelf: Crystalline Glaze Books ............................................62
by Sumi von Dassow
Years of experience in retailing from the studio created the need for this innovative
diversion for the children of customers.
Departments
Cover: Jon Kulczycki brushes off the residue of charred hairs. See story on page 9.
September/October 2003
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
3
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Page 4
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Editor: Bill Jones
Editorial Assistant: Jan Moloney
Production Manager: John Wilson
Circulation Manager: Cleopatra G. Eddie
Graphic Design: Debi Hampton
Graphic Production: Dave Houghton
Web Developer: Allison Ruuska
Advertising Manager: Steve Hecker
Advertising Assistant: Debbie Plummer
Publisher: Mark Mecklenborg
Editorial Advisory Board
Tim Frederich, David Gamble, Steven Hill, Anna
Callouri Holcombe, Mel Jacobson, Jonathan Kaplan,
Dannon Rhudy & Anderson Turner
Editorial, Advertising and Circulation Offices
P.O. Box 6136
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Phone: (614) 794-5890
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www.potterymaking.org
Pottery Making Illustrated (ISSN 1096-830X) is published bimonthly by The American Ceramic Society,
735 Ceramic Place, Westerville, Ohio 43081.
Periodical postage paid at Westerville, Ohio, and
additional mailing offices.
Opinions expressed are those of the contributors
and do not necessarily represent those of the editors
or The American Ceramic Society.
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Change of address: Send your change of address via
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This consent does not extend to copying items for
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The
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Copyright © 2003
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All rights reserved
www.ceramics.org
4
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
September/October 2003
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VIDEO WORKSHOPS FOR POTTERS
Form and Function
Ceramic Aesthetics and Design
My highest recommendation for anyone interested in
learning about form and structure, all the parts and details
of good pots as well as how to make specific forms.
Bill Hunt, Ceramics Monthly Editor, 1982-94
Making Marks
Ceramic Surface Decoration
[These videos] are detailed, comprehensive, intelligent,
high-quality productions.
Richard Aerni, Studio Potter Network
Beginning to Throw
It’s hard to imagine a more lucid or comprehensive
introduction to the subject . . . . Highly recommended.
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September/October 2003
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
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5
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Page 6
Pottery Tips on
the Web
Here are some “how-to” pottery web
sites that honestly attempt to provide
helpful and interesting information for
the beginning and intermediate potter
or ceramic artist. It’s likely you’ll find
even more on these sites to interest you,
and I’ve indicated some of this material
in my descriptions as well.
by Helen Bates
Ceramics Today
http://www.ceramicstoday.com/
Australian potter Steven Goldate’s site is a not-for-profit online journal about the
world of the ceramic arts. It includes many articles with tips and techniques for making, glazing, and firing clay objects. Set up in a readable format with a center frame
flanked on the left and right by clickable menus, and with links to major departments
across the top of the page, the site is a joy to navigate.
Clayzee—World of Ceramics
http://www.clayzee.com/
This site is a major international ceramics reference site run by another Australian,
Tad Kozdra.While it’s a commercial site providing an advertising venue for all types
of ceramics-related businesses—anything from art pottery to industrial ceramics to
job placement—this site is structured as a directory of briefly-described free or paid
links to advertisers’ sites.
Brad Sondahl’s Pottery
http://www.sondahl.com/
Idaho potter Brad Sondahl has a simply-written site offering numerous tips and techniques, such as guides to home electric kiln repair and crystalline glazes, a “glazetools
contest,” a page of photos and the plan of his studio, and other ceramics-related information. Some of his tips include recycling clay, keeping glazes from settling, building
a wedging table, fashioning throwing sticks, and making several other tools, such as a
sponge on a stick, a hole puncher, and a cleanup scraper.
Big Ceramic Store
http://www.bigceramicstore.com/
The BigCeramicStore is a web-based studio supply company, but they have an extensive and well-developed web site with informative articles, such as the “Tip of the
Week” series, various how-to columns and other helpful hints. The picture in the
screen shot is from the English Cane Teapot Handle FAQ showing the three styles of
English cane teapot handles, and describing how to measure your pot for them. All
in all, an extremely useful commercial site.
Lakeside Pottery
http://www.lakesidepottery.com/
The Lakeside Pottery and Ceramic School and Gallery operates in Stamford
Connecticut. Its web site has dozens of pages of tips and educational articles for the
potter, and the materials resemble class handouts from the ceramics teachers.To surf
to the site’s educational pages, click on “Pottery Tips.” One article I thought interesting was “An Easy Teapot Project,” with photos and accompanying text on how to
make a teapot the “easy way.”
Gary Ferguson
http://www.garyrferguson.com/
Gary Ferguson is an Idaho potter specializing in raku, and he gets some of the blackest post-firing reduction I’ve ever seen. Gary provides some useful hints, tips, and
techniques uses for a spoon, a hair dryer, dowel rod, newsprint, powder,WD-40, tissue paper, plaster, and a bucket. A very special part of his site is the link to archived
issues of his e-mail newsletter “Just Raku,” where more tips from Gary and his readers abound.
6
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
Helen Bates lives in Ontario, Canada. Check
out PMI Online at www.potterymaking.org for
complete text, more related sites and past columns.
September/October 2003
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Page 8
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8
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
September/October 2003
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Page 9
THE TECHNIQUE OF HORSEHAIR POTTERY
by Sumi von Dassow
A
word has come into currency lately to
describe the way in which words, thoughts
and ideas are propagated throughout society.
The word “meme” refers to an idea that spreads
through a social organization the way a virus spreads
through a community. Potters are like river otters—
always eager to play—so memes sweep easily through
the pottery community. A new idea takes hold of the
collective imagination and suddenly it seems like
everybody is enthusiastic about Shino glazes, or
salt-fuming, or pit-firing. This is, of course, the way
discoveries are made and boundaries expanded.
American-style raku is a perfect example: One potter
dropped a hot pot into a pile of vegetation and it
turned black, and before long everybody wanted to
explore this exciting new way of playing with clay. By
now so many potters have become possessed by the
raku meme that you can do raku all your life and never
exhaust the possibilities.
Wheel-thrown low-fire clay, burnished, bisqued to cone 010, fired
with horsehair and sprayed with ferric chloride.
September/October 2003
A meme I’ve recently noticed spreading is the technique of horsehair pottery, an off-shoot of the raku
meme. Somebody figured out that if you dropped a
horsehair onto a hot pot at just the right time it would
leave a lovely frizzy black mark on the pot, and everybody who sees it wants to try it. One potter who tried
it and liked it is Jon Kulczycki, whose burnished pots
often get decorated with cat, dog or human hair in
addition to horsehair.
One beautiful spring day, Jon graciously demonstrated the horsehair technique for the following photo
sequence. He starts with very simple round thrown
pots made from low-fire clay, with a small opening to
reduce the chance of cracking and increase the amount
of surface area for the horsehair to decorate. Since the
low-fire clay he uses is very smooth, unlike raku clay, it
is more likely to crack when it is removed from the
raku kiln. Therefore, he throws his pots quite thin and
trims off every bit of excess clay.The result is a finished
product that seems as light and delicate as an eggshell.
Jon sands and burnishes his pots when they are bonedry and then bisque fires them to cone 010.
Jon’s basic firing technique is very simple. Take a
burnished pot, put it in a raku kiln and heat it up to
about 1400°F or so. Take it out of the raku kiln and
drop hairs onto it one at a time until you’re satisfied
with the resulting pattern of marks. When it’s cool
enough to handle, brush off the carbonized bits of hair,
and you’re done. If you don’t like it, reheat it and try it
again. For a little extra pizzazz, try spraying the hot pot
with ferric chloride to make it orange, or dropping a
bit of paper inside to blacken the interior while you’re
embellishing it with hair.The horsehair technique can
also be used on unburnished ware, on textured surfaces,
or on pots partially covered with raku or low-fire glaze.
The possibilities are unlimited—once you’ve surmounted the first challenge of getting a supply of
horsehair, you’re free to play and come up with your
own unique style of horsehair pottery.
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
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Page 10
Step 1
Step 2
Jon’s burnishing supplies: a bone-dry pot made from a low-fire
(i.e., high-talc content) clay body, a couple of polished stones, and
a bottle of baby oil.
To prepare the pot for burnishing, it is sanded with very fine sandpaper.
Step 3
Step 4
Next, the pot is doused with baby oil and rubbed in.
The oiled pot is then dampened with a wet cloth.
Step 5
Step 6
The final step is to rub the entire pot with a polished stone. It is then
bisque-fired to cone 010.
Jon has placed the bisqued pot in his raku kiln, and prepares to
light the kiln.
10
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
September/October 2003
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Page 11
Step 7
Step 8
After 20 minutes or so, the cone has melted and Jon removes the
hot pot from the kiln.
The hot pot has been set on a brick and Jon places hairs one at a
time onto the pot. As the hair touches the hot pot it sizzles, filling
the air with the smell of burning hair and leaving a frizzy black line
on the pot.
Step 9
Step 10
Jon pulls a few final hairs from the bunch in his hand to finish decorating this pot.
Jon sprays the pot with ferric chloride to turn it orange. Notice the
safety gear he uses—gloves, safety glasses, and respirator.
WARNING: Ferric chloride is caustic and produces toxic fumes
when sprayed onto a hot pot. It would also be bad for the grass,
thus the tarp on the ground.
Step 11
Ferric chloride can be purchased in crystal form from a scientific
supply company, but Jon prefers to buy it ready-mixed from Radio
Shack. Since ferric chloride is caustic and destroys metal nozzles
he uses a disposable canned air cartridge attached to a cheap
plastic spray bottle instead of an airbrush. Also important, of
course, are the safety glasses, respirator and heavy rubber gloves.
September/October 2003
Step 12
The pot is finished when Jon brushes off the residue of charred
hairs with a soft hake brush.
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
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Page 12
Wheel-thrown low-fire clay, burnished, bisqued to cone 010, fired
with dog hair. This pot was decorated with hairs from Jon’s late dog,
whose ashes now reside in it. Jon occasionally decorates pots for
friends with hairs from their pets, not necessarily deceased.
Wheel-thrown low-fire clay, burnished, bisqued to cone 010, fired
with human hair. Human hair leaves a much finer line than horsehair. This pot was burnished with a spoon instead of a stone, producing a marbled effect.
TIP
Wheel-thrown low-fire clay, burnished, bisqued to cone 010, fired
with horsehair.
Burnishing Jon’s way, by dousing
a bone-dry pot with baby oil,
dampening it, then rubbing it
with a stone, works best with
low-fire high-talc clay bodies.
Jon uses CT3 from Mile-Hi
Ceramics in Denver, but other
low-fire clays should work
equally well.
Sumi von Dassow is a regular contributor to Pottery Making Illustrated, and
edited the popular Barrel, Pit and Saggar Firing, a Ceramics Monthly
handbook.
12
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
September/October 2003
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Page 13
Specialty Art Glazes
Stunn
ing
Cone 5 Lead Free
Mystic
WC-100
Celadon Froth-SO
WC-101
Brilliant Sunburn-SO
WC-102
Pink Ice-SO
WC-110
Turbulent Indigo-SO
WC-111
Spotted Blue-SO
WC-112
Chocolate Mesa-SO
WC-113
Mojave Dusk-SO
WC-114
Mint Irish Cream-SO
*WC-130*
Fractal Cream-T
WC-131
Tang Lime-T
WC-132
Analin Green-T
WC-133
Apache Green-T
WC-134
Emerald Isle-T
WC-140
Forest Jade-T
WC-141
Desert Skye-T
*WC-160*
Lavender Filigree-SO
WC-161
Light Crystal Tea-SO
Crackle
*WC-103*
WC-104
Translucent Cream-SO Caramel Steam-SO
WC-105
Atlantis Aqua-SO
WC-106
Layered Fern-SO
WC-107
Antique Jade-SO
WC-108
Power Turquoise-SO
WC-109
Stormy Blue-Gray-SO
WC-135
Lacy Mauve-T
WC-136
Catalina Crackle-T
WC-137
Skye Crackle-T
WC-138
Twilight Blue-T
WC-139
Ocean Teal-T
MS-133
Satin Blue Jay-MO
MS-134
Sandbar-MO
Crystal Blossom
WC-162
Blue Snowflakes-SO
WC-163
Butter Drop-SO
WC-164
Mint Coffee-SO
WC-165
Translucent Mint-SO
MS-128
Iron Phoenix-MO
MS-129
Burnt Umber Frost-MO
MS-130
Apricot Satin-MO
WC-166
WC-167
Crystal Forest-SO Plum Blossom Green-SO
Satin Texture
*MS-125*
Sunrise-MO
MS-126
Smokey Sun-MO
MS-127
Soft Clover-MO
MS-131
Raspberry Truffle-MO
MS-132
Soft Concrete-MO
*This glaze is the base for the group of glazes with which it is displayed. To expand on our palette, add your choice of stains or oxides to the base.
Different thickness of application will produce varying results. Photographic color reproduction may differ slightly from actual fired color.
Available in pints, gallons, and dry power.
For your local Laguna glaze dealer, contact [email protected]
Laguna Clay Co.• (800) 4-LAGUNA • (626) 330-0631 • www.lagunaclay.com
PMI Sept.Oct 03 p14_25
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Page 14
Great Books for Fall Reading!
Find exciting ceramic art ideas and information
on the pages of these great books
Clay: A Studio Handbook
Vince Pitelka
Drawing on more than 30 years of experience in ceramics, Pitelka has created
the most practical, all-inclusive studio handbook for students, studio artists,
educators, and all those interested in the art of clay. Diligent attention is paid
to safety practices, and numerous step-by-step illustrations guide readers
through the many techniques.
©2001 • Hardcover • 384 pages
ISBN 1-57498-090-4
Order code: G055 • Price: $41.00
The Extruder Book
Daryl E. Baird
This extensive how-to book covers commercially available extruders and
associated equipment, ceramic artists using extruders, and a 96-page fullcolor gallery exhibit of works created with the extruder. An impressive collection of more than 450 photos and drawings demonstrates the versatility and indispensability of the extruder and shows hundreds of ways for
artists to improve and expand their work.
©2000 • Hardcover • 300 pages
ISBN 1-57498-073-4
Order code: CA14 • Price: $43.00
Raku
John Mathieson
In this book author John Mathieson discusses the clays and glazes that are suitable for this technique. He also examines kilns and burners, and firing and postfiring reduction. Along the way the takes a look at the work that is being done in
this field by an international group of artists. The result is a handy and inspirational guide to this most exciting of firing methods and a book that ceramic
artists of any level are sure to love.
©2002 • Softcover • 128 pages
ISBN 1-57498-166-8
Order Code: G075 • Price $26.00
Mary Wondrausch on Slipware
Mary Wondrausch
This new edition features many more color images, as well as
new pictures not previously included. A valuable reference
tool and lively read on the history of slipware!
To Order:
The American Ceramic Society
P.O. Box 6136
Westerville, OH 43086-6136, USA
Phone: 614-794-5890
E-mail: [email protected]
Please include shipping address with order
Shipping/Handling:
North America: $4 for the first book; $2 each additional.
Outside North America: $8 for the first book;
$4 each additional.
Ohio residents, please add 5.75% sales tax.
Canadian residents, please add 7% GST.
14
©2001 • Hardcover • 144 pages
ISBN 1-57498-149-8
Order code: G073 • Price: $40.00
Shop when it’s
convenient
for you—
visit
www.ceramics.org
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
September/October 2003
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Page 15
How to Tile a Fireplace Surround
by Marcia Selsor
“I designed a textured border made with simple repeated impressions from a
45°- angled modeling stick. My idea was to use random color patterns of my
favorite cone 6 reduction base glaze.”
I bought a Craftsman-style home in 1990 and had
planned to eventually tile the fireplace. During my last
year of teaching, prior to retiring, I began making tiles
from all the stoneware clay the students left on the tables
after class. I carried a template of poster paper in my
apron pocket. Having been a fan of Moravian tiles in
Pennsylvania for 30-plus years, I began testing colors in
that venue. I designed a textured border made with simple repeated impressions from a 45°-angled modeling
stick. My idea was to use random color patterns of my
favorite cone 6 reduction base glaze (Figure 1).
PLANNING
Figure 1
My husband and I had selected a gas fireplace insert
for the existing opening, because the chimney structure
was designed for gas and would be unacceptable and
unsafe for wood. It is important to know what size
insert you’ll be using and how the faceplate will overlap the edge of the fireplace surround.
The design for the textured border with random colors in the venue
of the Craftsman era and most inspired by the colors of the
Moravian Tile Factory in Pennsylvania.
Marcia Selsor is a professor emerita from Montana State University in Billings
where she taught for 25 years. She has taught in Spain, Italy, Canada,
Uzbekistan and across the United States. She has been a frequent participant on
Clayart since 1995. She teaches workshops on raku and architectural ceramics.
September/October 2003
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
15
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Page 16
How to Tile a Fireplace Surround
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
The rough brick surface existed when the
house was purchased. Originally there had
been a gas fireplace heater in this opening.
The commercial floor tiles had been
removed at this point. Note the uneven surfaces on the face of the brick.
Mortar and Duracrete were used to level
the surfaces.
A piece of wood was used to flush out the
ledge to support a row of full-size tiles.
PREPARATION
SETTING THE TILE
When I moved into the house, the surface of the fireplace bricks had already been hacked up, possibly in
preparation for tiling (Figure 2). I needed to remove 24
commercial tiles from the hearth. The rate of hand
chiseling was averaging one tile per hour! My friend,
Linda Blossom, suggested renting a power chisel, and I
removed the remaining 16 8×8 tiles in two hours.
To retrofit, I next had to level the uneven face of the
bricks. Use mortar for this and closely follow the directions of whatever product you plan to use. In this case,
I had Premium Floor and Wall Dry Set Mortar (brand
name Mapei Kerabond) with a liquid additive (called
Mapei Keralastic). There are many products on the
market, and I happen to have had 500 pounds of this
mortar in my garage for tiling projects.
Using ½-inch Duracrete sections and thin set mortar, the surfaces started shaping up. Duracrete is a
cement board available at most lumber yards and home
centers such as Lowe’s or Home Depot. It can be easily cut by scoring a line with a utility knife and whacking it over an edge of a table the same way you cut
sheetrock.The edges can be smoothed with a Surform
tool. Two layers of the Duracrete were needed to raise
the surface of the former arch flush to the keystone
brick (Figure 3).
The top ridge was not a good size for my tiles, so I
used a piece of wood to fill the short dimension of the
edge to accommodate the full tile size (Figure 4). Also,
parts of the hearth floor needed leveling as well. Thin
set mortar requires 24 hours to set up, so I waited a day
before putting the second level of Duracrete in place
and waited another day before applying the tile.
Using bright masking tape, the pattern for evenly
distributing the tiles was plotted on the edges of the
face of the bricks. I had made 260 tiles and needed 224.
The tape was marked for the lower section of tiles
(Figure 5). This tape was removed as the tiling progressed upward. I did not mix the entire 50-pound bag
of thin set mortar, but mixed only a quarter of the bag
at a time. A full bag would be enough to tile 20 square
feet, and I wanted to go slowly. The directions require
mixing the correct proportions, letting it stand for 20
minutes, and mixing again. I used a heavy glaze mixer
on a large drill to mix the batch to the consistency of
peanut butter.
When ready, I applied the mortar with a ¼-inch
notched trowel. Combing thick ¼-inch ridges through
the mortar, it was ready to apply the tiles. Good contact with the mortar is essential.A little wiggle with the
hand, and the tile sets in place.Always begin at the bottom and work up. I began on one side and worked up
the other side with alternating batches of mortar.
Spacer pins can be used to assure even spacing, but I
found them unnecessary because the space between the
tiles was so large. The mortar, when mixed correctly,
will hold small tiles such as these where they are placed
without any slipping. After a few hours, the entire face
was tiled. The hearth floor followed relatively quickly
(Figure 6). Let the mortar cure for the recommended
time. This particular mortar required a curing time of
24 hours.
16
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
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Page 17
How to Tile a Fireplace Surround
Figure 5
Figure 6
Figure 7
Tape was marked to plot the pattern for the
tile. The tape was removed as the tiles went
up.
The gray mortar behind the tiles needed to
cure for 24 hours before grout could be
applied.
Terra cotta-colored grout with sand was
applied. The grout with sand must be used
when filling grout lines larger than ¹⁄₈ inch.
RECIPE
Marci’s Matt
Cone 6
Kaolin (EPK) . . . . . . . . . . . . .20.5
Dolomite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17.5
Nepheline syenite . . . . . . . . .33.5
Silica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16.0
Whiting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.5
Gerstley borate . . . . . . . . . . . 9.0
100.0
Figure 8
Figure 9
This is my favorite cone 6 reduction glaze.
A grout float on the left has a spongy pad
for pushing the grout into the spaces
between the tiles. The trowel has ¹⁄₄-inch
teeth, ³⁄₈ inches deep for raising ridges in
the mortar which hold the tiles in place.
Finished and the insert installed with the
doors open with southern sunlight pouring
in on a cold winter morning.
Blue/Lavender
Add: 1% Cobalt Carb.
Gold
Add: 3% Rutile
Light Green
Add: 1.5% Nickel Carb & 1.5% Rutile
FINISHING
Decisions on grout are both technical and aesthetic. I
chose a terra cotta color with sand because the grout lines
were ½ inch (Figure 7). Compare the photo with the grout
to the photo with the mortar showing in Figure 6. When
grout lines are less than ⅛ of an inch, grout without sand can
be used.The color of the grout can change the entire visual
effect of the tiles. Choose wisely. When applying grout, be
excessive. You really need to bury the edges of the tiles.
Using a float, wipe across the face of the tiles to remove the
excess grout. Go back with a damp rag. The following day,
buff the tiles. Let the grout cure for a week before applying
a silicon sealer to the surface.
Applying tiles on hearths or tabletops is a relatively simple
job requiring a few specialized tools.The ¼-notched trowel
is a must. The grout float is handy for pushing the grout
evenly over the surface of the tiles (Figure 8). The most
important things to remember are to measure accurately, and
use the ingredients according to the manufacturer’s specifications, use a sandy grout for large grout spaces.
J anuary/F ebruary 2002
Lt. Blue Gray
Add: 5% Cobalt Carb. & 2.5% Rutile
Gray
2.5% Rutile & 2.5% Nickel Carb
Tan
Add: 2% Red Iron Oxide
Warmer Tan
2.5% Red Iron Oxide & 2.5% Rutile
Darker Brown
Add: 3% Red Iron Ox. & 2% Manganese
DONE!
Shortly after finishing the tiling, our gas insert
was installed. My husband, who is a gadget guy,
even uses a remote control to turn it on and off
and to control the temperature. On cold mornings in Montana, we sit by the fire and do our
morning e-mail correspondence. That is where I
read Clayart (Figure 9).
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
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Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
September/October 2003
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Page 19
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Making ILLUSTRATED
19
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Page 20
Advertise in
Call
614-794-5809
www.potterymaking.org
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RAKU GLAZES
Our new Raku Glazes produce as wide variety of beautiful effects
from the colors shown on the chips and bells above to highly
metallic finishes which can be produced with higher temperatures and more reduction. These glazes are available wet in 4
oz. pints and gallons as well as dry in 10 lb. bags (862 to
867 not available dry). Many of our other glazes, such as
706 and 817 shown on two of the bells above, also
perform well in raku firings. The large chips and bells
were electric kiln fired to approximately 1800°F and
then reduced in a reduction bin. The small chips
were electric kiln fired to cone 06. Contact us at
one of the addresses shown for a Product Guide
which includes raku firing recommendations
as well as a list of our Distributors.
20
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
September/October 2003
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Page 21
I volunteered one of mine. Randy
generously applied a ferric chloride
solution and rock salt to the pot,
then wrapped it in aluminum foil
and fired it until the foil was just
beginning to disintegrate.When the
firing was finished, and as soon as
the pot could be removed with
gloves, the foil was simply pulled
back. Once exposed to the air, the
colors slowly began to evolve.
The fuming and interaction with
the foil during firing, and relatively
fast cooling, resulted in a rich, deep
red piece, with yellow spots and
white streaks. It also had some
unusual pattern effects wherever
folds of the foil were crinkled
against the pot.
After the workshop, I was determined to learn more about the
process. I have experimented ever
since with different chemical solutions and materials to achieve additional colors and effects.
There are many chemicals and
materials to try with this process. I
would like to hear of other potters’
experiences and results, so please email me at [email protected], with
ideas, and any questions you might
have.
Thanks to Randy Broadnax for
introducing me to the process, and
to Joe Brecha of Clay Art Center,
Tacoma,Washington, for his help in
suggesting and obtaining different
chemical solutions.
1 – Applying terra sigilatta
2 – Burnishing terra sigilatta
3 – Applying chemical solution
After drying a piece of pottery to the bonedry stage, apply several coats of white terra
sigilatta, allowing each coat to dry just
enough so it can be handled between
coats. If you sand your piece prior to applying terra sigilatta, sanding scratches may
be visible.
When the last coat of terra sigilatta has a
cloudy sheen and is still slightly damp, burnish with a soft cloth, a thin plastic bag
drawn over your fingers, or a soft brush.
Once you have finished burnishing, bisque
fire to cone 06.
Generously brush on each chemical solution you plan to use, covering the entire
bisqued pot. If you plan to use a background color, apply that first, then the other
solution(s). Avoid applying the solution by
spraying as this would waste solution, and
can also create unwanted, toxic fumes.
Once applied, the solution is quickly
absorbed by the pot and dries almost
immediately.
by Paul Antone
Many potters and customers have
asked me, “How do you get those
colors and patterns?” I would give
them the basic facts: by using different chemical solutions on the pots
and then firing them in aluminum
foil saggars. A few asked more questions, but many left still a bit
puzzled. Here’s a more complete
description of the process, one that I
hope better answers those questions
and encourages others to give it a try.
I was introduced to firing pots
using aluminum foil during a firing
techniques workshop taught by
Randy Broadnax, a well-known
potter from Texas.When Randy was
looking for a pot to demonstrate,
NOTE: Terra sigilatta is a mixture of very
fine clay particles. When applied, it contributes to achieving a smooth surface.
The mixture can be purchased from your
pottery supplier or you can make your
own. I make my own using materials and
a process described in the book Clay A
Studio Handbook by Vince Pitelka and
published by The American Ceramic
Society in 2001.
September/October 2003
TIP: For best firing effects, the pottery
surface should be smooth. The less
smooth a piece is, the more muted the
colors will be. I use a white cone 6
stoneware clay body and apply at least
five coats of terra sigilatta.
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
WARNING: Many solutions are highly
toxic and every precaution should be
taken when using them. The fumes
should not be inhaled. Any splatter on
your skin can be easily absorbed. Wear
safety goggles, a long-sleeved shirt,
latex or rubber gloves and a respirator
when applying.
21
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4a – Adding optional salt
Page 22
4b – Adding optional horse hair
5a – Wrapping in aluminum foil
Optional Materials
Sprinkle a small amount of salt on various parts of the pot to achieve yellow and white
spots. The solution you applied should remain damp so the salt will stick to where you want
to place it. Have some salt ready so that you can apply it quickly, before the solution dries.
Adding an additional layer of the solution over the salt will help keep it in place and also
produces variations in color. Placing horse hair in the saggar can produce fine black lines.
Brass wool or steel wool can also result in fine lines.
NOTE: If a lot of horse hair or brass or steel wool is used, large black areas will occur.
I usually use a single, long horse hair or four to six wool strands.
5b – Wrapping in aluminum foil
When you finish applying the chemical
solutions and optional materials, wrap each
piece of pottery in aluminum foil as you
would wrap a potato for baking. How tightly
the foil is wrapped around the pot determines the pattern effects.
6a – Adding paper to blacken inside
6b – Adding aluminum foil cover
Optional Inside Reduction
If you want to blacken the inside of a piece of pottery, wrap the foil to just over the edge of
the piece, then place newspaper inside the pot, and cover the top with foil. The newspaper will burn during firing and the cover will create a reduction chamber.
7a – Wrapping to bottom of neck.
7b – Adding cover pot.
Optional Neck and Inside Reduction
If you want to blacken both the neck and inside of the pottery, wrap the foil up to the bottom of the neck and leave the neck area exposed. Newspaper is placed in the pot and also
in a separate pot. The separate pot is placed over the neck and kept there throughout firing and cooling. If the cover pot provides only a loose seal, a gray color will occur instead
of black. If the foil is loose against the pot, some of the black or grey may also leech into
the body of the piece. The different effects can be somewhat controlled and produce interesting contrasts.
22
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
8 – Stacking in the kiln.
Once all of the pieces have been wrapped
in foil, stack them in the kiln so that they lay
atop one another. Optional: Lay a few broken pieces of pottery on top of the stack.
The stacking helps to achieve variations in
color wherever the pots are touching and
broken pieces are laid.
September/October 2003
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Page 23
9 – Firing
10a – Unwrapping
Firing begins in a steady process from a
cold kiln until you reach a target temperature of 1350°F. Above 1500°F, the aluminum foil begins to disintegrate, and will
even stick to the pot if fired too high. As
soon as the temperature is reached, shut
the kiln off and let it cool.
Note: I take about 40 minutes to reach
the target temperature of 1350°F, and
always use a pyrometer to determine
when the temperature is reached. My kiln
is a “cut down” barrel, lined with 2-inch
fiber, and fired with propane.
Warning: Throughout the firing process,
wear an OSHA-approved respirator. The
fumes during firing and cooling are toxic.
10b – Unwrapping
10c – Unwrapping
When the kiln is cool enough to handle the pottery (using gloves), simply pull them out
piece by piece and unwrap them. Only minimal clean up of the pottery is needed. Avoid
washing them. There may be some salt, horse hair, brass or steel wool residue that needs
to be brushed off with a soft cloth.
Warning: Wear a respirator when unwrapping to avoid unsafe escaping fumes.
Caution: Shower and change clothes when finished since the fumes may permeate
your clothing and even your hair.
11 – Spraying with a sealer
12 – Buffing
When the pots are completely cooled,
apply your choice of wax, oil or ceramic
sealer to help protect the finish.
Buff the piece with a soft cloth to further
enhance the colors.
After retiring from information technology consulting, Paul began making pottery in early 2000. He
sells his work primarily from a home studio and at
arts and crafts fairs. He is just beginning to place his
work in some galleries. He and his wife Lynne, also
a potter, own and operate Beaver Creek Arts at
1820 Beaver Cr. Dr. SW in Olympia, WA. The
phone number is (360) 352-4292. Feel free to
drop by the studio (call first). Paul and Lynne can
also be reached by e-mail at [email protected]
NOTE: I use a clear, matte ceramic sealer made by Duncan primarily for its convenience. The sealer goes on quickly and
requires little buffing.
September/October 2003
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
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Page 24
A Word About Chemical Solutions
The following is a list of some of the chemical solutions I
currently use.
Warning!: Many of these solutions are toxic and require
special handling. Read and heed all manufacturers safe
handling instructions and warnings.
PCB Etchant Solution
This is available in liquid form from Radio Shack. The
product contains ferric chloride and is normally sold for
cleaning circuit boards. It can be applied full strength to
the pottery or in a diluted form. Full strength results in
rich reds with less pattern effects. A dilution of 1 oz. of
solution to 2 cups of water results in orange colors with
more patterns.
Note: Ferric chloride is available in a dry form from
some pottery suppliers. Once diluted in water, the compound produces similar results obtained from the etchant
solution described above. I use the liquid PCB etchant
solution instead of the dry ferric chloride, because it is
already in liquid form and contains no solid impurities
that require straining.
Vase, 11 inches high, white stoneware, terra sigilatta,
bisque fired to cone 06, full strength PCB etchant solution and salt applied to surface, aluminum foil saggar
fired in gas kiln to 1350°F.
Potassium Dichromate
Platter, 14 inches in diameter, white stoneware, terra
sigilatta, bisque fired to cone 06, dilution of cobalt sulfate applied as background, strong dilution of potassium dichromate, single horse hair, aluminum foil saggar
fired in gas kiln to 1350°F.
FINISHED PHOTOS: ED SOZINHO, PRO IMAGE PHOTOGRAPHY
Warning: Highly toxic. Use with extreme care.
These bright orange/red crystals are available from many
pottery suppliers. To achieve greens and yellows, add 4
teaspoons of crystals to 2 cups of water and mix well.The
solution will begin to change to an orange/red color even
though the crystals don’t completely dissolve. Green colors are the usual result, although yellow can occur in areas
where the pots are laid against one another in the kiln. A
stronger solution will produce more yellow colors.
Cobalt Sulfate
This is also available from most local pottery suppliers in
dry form. Mix 2 teaspoons with 2 cups of water. Apply
the solution to the pot before brushing on other solutions, to provide a background color. The cobalt sulfate
solution produces darker colors of gray, providing a nice
contrast to brighter colors, especially with the green and
yellow of the potassium dichromate.
Gardening Solutions
The local gardening store has plant foods and treatments
that produce colors during the firing process. Many contain varied levels of minerals including iron, copper, zinc,
and potassium. An iron and zinc (with chelates) liquid
solution made by Lilly Miller produces a rich, bronze
color when used full strength. A dry iron (with chelates)
mixture, also made by Lilly Miller, produces a peach color
when 2 teaspoons are diluted in 1 cup of water.
24
Lidded Pot, 14 inches high, white stoneware, terra sigilatta, bisque fired to cone 06, dilution of cobalt sulfate
applied as background, dilution of potassium dichromate, single horse hair, aluminum foil saggar fired in
gas kiln to 1350°F.
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
September/October 2003
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Page 25
K ICK W HEEL
• 140# balanced and reinforced concrete flywheel
• Table and seat are made from selected hardwood plywoods, finished with 4 coats of varnish
WWW.THOMASSTUART.COM
• Bolt together design for ease in moving & shipping
• Optional motor
PO BOX 9699 DENVER, CO 80209
September/October 2003
800 • 848 • 9565
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
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Page 26
2003 – 2004
Continuing a 10,000
Year Tradition
Once again we’re pleased to provide the only comprehensive listing of pottery teaching venues to studio
potters. With over 300 listings, we’re sure that you’ll
more than likely be able to find a venue near you
where you can take advantage of qualified teachers,
good facilities and interaction with fellow students.
In reading many of the descriptions, note that many
of these schools, art centers and private studios provide
a whole range of opportunities to almost every age
group.While we’re limited by space to provide all the
information you may need, we’ve published contact
information supplied by the teachers themselves.
Make plans now to enroll, either to begin on a lifelong rewarding pursuit of the craft, or to add additional skills to your repertoire.
To locate a venue near you, use the Education
Locator for listings by country, state and city, then turn
to the Education Directory for detailed information.
Working in a large studio setting promotes conversation, sharing
knowledge and mutual support.
Photos taken during a workshop with Greg Seigel at Annie’s Mud Pie Shop,
in Cincinnati, Ohio.
PHOTOS: STEVE HECKER
Demonstrations provide inspiration and immediate feedback.
Here Greg Seigel provides commentary while Annie Swantko
attempts a slip trailing technique.
Experts brought in to teach workshops are a valuable resource. The
variety gained from potters with such diverse backgrounds adds
depth to your own understanding of clay and your creativity with it.
26
Well-lit work areas, ample room and reliable equipment are some
of the features you should also look for in a teaching studio.
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
September/October 2003
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Alabama
Holland Pottery (Muscle Shoals)
Kentuck Association (Northport)
Opelika Arts Center (Lafayette)
University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa)
Alaska
University of Alaska Anchorage (Anchorage)
Arizona
The Persian Potter (Sedona)
California
Azusa Pacific University (Azusa)
Creative Arts Group (Sierra Madre)
Creative Industries (El Cajon)
Idyllwild Arts (Idyllwild)
Mendocino Art Center (Mendocino)
Mission San Juan Capistrano (San Juan Capistrano)
Nottingham Center for the Arts (San Marcos)
Oneill Pottery (Fort Bragg)
Ruby’s Clay Studio & Gallery (San Francisco)
San Diego Mesa College (San Diego)
San Diego State University (San Diego)
Sara Swink Home Studio (Santa Clara)
University of Southern California (Los Angeles)
Visual Arts Studios (Camarillo)
Walnut Creek Civic Arts Education (Walnut Creek)
Colorado
Anderson Ranch Arts Center (Snowmass Village)
Carbondale Clay Center (Carbondale)
Circle D Ceramics Inc. (Colorado Springs)
Greyrock Clay Center (Ft. Collins)
Laloba Ranch Clay Center (Steamboat Spgs.)
Mile Hi Ceramics Inc. (Denver)
Stone Leaf Pottery (Arvada)
Washington Heights Center (Lakewood)
Western State College of Colorado (Gunnison)
Zappa Pottery (Montrose)
Connecticut
Birch Mountain Pottery (Tolland)
Creative Arts Workshop (New Haven)
Expressions Pottery Workshop (Granby)
Hartford Art School (West. Hartford)
Lakeside Pottery (Stamford)
Meiklem Kiln Works (Yantic)
Milkhouse Pottery (Cornwall Bridge)
Wesleyan Potters (Middletown)
Youngberg Pottery (Fairfield)
Delaware
The Art Studio (Wilmington)
District Of Columbia
Howard University (Washington)
Florida
Armory Art Center (West Palm Beach)
Armory Art Center (West Palm Beach)
Bennett’s Pottery Supply (Ocoee)
Central Florida Ceramic Supply (Winter Park)
Colson School of Art, Inc. (Sarasota)
Fire and Mud Ceramics (Hallandale)
Florida Clay Art Co. (Sanford)
George Griffin Pottery & School (Sopchoppy)
Hyde Park Craft Studio (Tampa)
New World School of the Arts (Miami)
Palms Up Pottery (New Smyrna Beach)
Shadow Bay Pottery Studio and Gallery (Stuart)
St. Petersburg Clay Company Inc. (St. Petersburg)
SunFlower Pottery (Williston)
University of Florida Ceramics Program (Gainesville)
University of North Florida (Jacksonville)
Youth Arts Corps (St. Petersburg)
Georgia
Art-Full Barn (Clarkesville)
Chastain Arts Center (Atlanta)
Cherokee County Arts Council (Canton)
Lookout Mountain Pottery (Rising Fawn)
MudFire (Atlanta)
Ruth’s Pottery (Woodstock)
University of Georgia/Studies Abroad (Athens)
Illinois
Black Hawk College (Moline)
The Fine Line Creative Arts Center (St. Charles)
School of the Art Institute of Chicago (Chicago)
Stirling Hall (Lake Forest)
Suburban Fine Arts Center (Highland Park)
Indiana
Artifact Pottery (Kendallville)
Ball State University (Muncie)
September/October 2003
Page 27
Bloomington Area Arts Council (Bloomington)
Clay Horse Studio (Elwood)
Conner Prairie (Fishers)
Herron School of Art, IUPUI (Indianapolis)
Huntington College (Huntington)
Indiana University (Bloomington)
Iowa
Indian Hills Community College (Ottumwa)
Scotlin Ceramics (McGregor)
Kansas
Baker University (Baldwin City)
Fort Hays State University (Hays)
Kansas State University (Manhattan)
McPherson College (McPherson)
Washburn University (Topeka)
The Wichita Center for the Arts (Wichita)
Wichita State University (Wichita)
Kentucky
Kentucky Mudworks LLC (Lexington)
University of Louisville (Louisville)
Louisiana
A Better Potter (Lafayette)
Maine
Haystack Mountain School of Crafts (Deer Isle)
Portland Pottery School and Supply (Portland)
Starflower Studios (Monroe)
Maryland
Baltimore Clayworks (Baltimore)
CeramicsPlus (Cockeysville)
Chester River Artworks (Chestertown)
Frostburg State University (Frostburg)
Greenbelt Community Center (Greenbelt)
Hood College Ceramics Program (Frederick)
Jewish Community Center (Rockville)
Joyce Michaud Gallery (Frederick)
Potters Guild of Baltimore (Baltimore)
Massachusetts
Cynthia Curtis Pottery (Rockport)
DeCordova Museum (Lincoln)
Earth Works Pottery School (East Longmeadow)
Harvard University (Boston)
Horizons (Sunderland)
Interlaken School of Art (Stockbridge)
Leon Nigrosh/Ceramic Designer (Worcester)
Lexington Arts & Crafts Society (Lexington)
Massachusetts College of Art New England (Boston)
Mudflat Pottery School & Studio (Somerville)
Mudpie Potters (Leverett)
Neil Royston Warr Pottery (Sterling)
New Art Center (Newtonville)
The Potters School (Needham)
The Potters Shop and School (Needham)
Worcester Center for Crafts (Worcester)
Michigan
Central Michigan University (Mt. Pleasant)
Eastern Michigan University (Ypsilanti)
Fire & Clay Pottery (Boyne City)
Northern Michigan University (Marquette)
Ox-Bow Summer School of Art (Saugatuck)
Pewabic Pottery (Detroit)
Minnesota
Fired Up Inc. (Minneapolis)
Univ. of Minn.-Split Rock Arts Prg (Minneapolis)
Mississippi
Bodine Pottery & Art Studio (Long Beach)
Ocean Springs Park Commission (Ocean Springs)
University of Mississippi (University)
Missouri
Craft Alliance (St. Louis)
Krueger Pottery Inc. (St. Louis)
L&R Specialties Inc (Nixa)
The Potter’s Obsession (Kansas City)
Red Star Studios (Kansas City)
University of Missouri-Columbia (Columbia)
Washington University St. Louis (St. Louis)
Montana
Archie Bray Foundation (Helena)
The Clay Studio of Missoula (Missoula)
Nevada
Paint-N-Pot Clay Studios (Sparks)
Sierra Nevada College/Lake Tahoe (Incline Village)
Tuscarora Pottery School (Tuscarora)
New Hampshire
Ceramic Design and Creation (Nashua)
Jeff Brown Pottery (Northwood)
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
Laconia Pottery (Laconia)
New Hampshire Institute of Art (Manchester)
Studio Potter (Manchester)
New Jersey
The Clay Garden (Hopewell)
Heart in Hand Pottery (Mt. Holly)
Kean University (Union)
Long Beach Island Foundation (Loveladies)
Mud Alley Pottery (Westmont)
NY/NJ Academy of Ceramic Art (Jersey City)
Old Church Cultural Center School of Art (Demarest)
Peters Valley Craft Education Ctr. (Layton)
New Mexico
Art & Clay (Santa Fe)
Art Center at Fuller Lodge (Los Alamos)
Coyote Clay School & Studios (Albuquerque)
Roswell Museum and Art Center (Roswell)
Santa Fe Clay (Santa Fe)
Taos Art School (Ranchos de Taos)
Taos Institute of Art (Taos)
New York
Alfred University (Alfred)
Artworks/West Side YMCA (New York)
Buffalo State College (Buffalo)
Byrdcliffe Art Colony (Woodstock)
Chambers Pottery (New York)
Clay Art Center (Port Chester)
Clayworks on Columbia, Inc. (Brooklyn)
Corning Community College (Corning)
Craft Students League (New York)
Earth ‘n Vessel Pottery Studio (Bay Shore)
Earthworks Pottery (New York)
Great Neck Adult Program (Great Neck)
Greenwich House Pottery (New York)
Hands on Clay, Inc. (East Setauket)
Hurricane Mountain Clay Studio (Keene)
Long Island University (Brooklyn)
Marie Wynn Studio (Sag Harbor)
The Mudpit (Brooklyn)
Munson Williams Proctor Arts Institute (New York)
The Painted Pot (Brooklyn)
The Potters Wheel (Kew Gardens)
River Street Pottery (Troy)
Rockland Center for the Arts (West Nyack)
Skidmore College (Saratoga Springs)
Wagner College (Staten Island)
Westchester Art Workshop (White Plains)
Women’s Studio Workshop (Rosendale)
North Carolina
The Clayground Pottery Studio (Charlotte)
Claymakers (Durham)
The Crafts Center NCSU (Raleigh)
East Carolina University (Greenville)
Fat Cat Pottery Inc. (Wilmington)
John C. Campbell Folk School (Brasstown)
Living Tree Studios (Summerfield)
Mint Museum of Art (Charlotte)
Montgomery Community College (Troy)
Odyssey Center for the Ceramic Arts (Asheville)
Penland School of Crafts (Penland)
Pottery Central (Charlotte)
Priddy Clay Studio (Beaufort)
Ohio
Angelwood Gallery and Studio (Grand Rapids)
Annie’s Mud Pie Shop (Cincinnati)
Bareclay (Columbus)
Brecksville Center for the Arts (Brecksville)
Ceramic Correspondence Institute (Westerville)
Cleveland Institute of Art (Cleveland)
Cleveland State University (Cleveland)
Fireflower Pottery (Bratenahl)
Miami University/Craftsummer (Oxford)
Muskingum College (New Concord)
The Ohio State University (Columbus)
Ohio University (Athens)
Oklahoma
Cityarts Center (Oklahoma City)
East Central University (Ada)
Oklahoma Panhandle State University (Goodwell)
Oregon
M.T. Sherman Ceramics Center (Salem)
Mt. Hood Community College (Gresham)
Oregon College of Art and Craft (Portland)
Southern Oregon University (Ashland)
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12:49 PM
Pennsylvania
Carlow College (Pittsburgh)
Cheltenham Center for the Arts (Cheltenham)
The Clay Studio (Philadelphia)
Edinboro University of Pennsylvania (Edinboro)
Harrisburg Area Community College (Harrisburg)
The Pottery Studio (Oley)
Russo Park Recreation Center (Philadelphia)
Second Wind Pottery (Red Lion)
Seton Hill University (Greensburg)
Sneddon’s Ceramic Studio (Norristown)
Rhode Island
Dew Claw Studios (Providence)
Providence College (Providence)
South Carolina
Ceramic Tile Education Foundation (Pendleton)
Coastal Clay Co., Inc. (St. Helena Island)
Francis Marion University (Florence)
Southern Moon Pottery LLC (Aiken)
University of South Carolina (Columbia)
Tennessee
Texas A&M University (Corpus Christi)
The University of Texas (Odessa)
Utah
Cedar Mountain Ceramics, Inc. (Cedar City)
Vermont
Fletcher Farm School for the Arts & Crafts (Ludlow)
Springhouse School of the Arts (Hineburg)
Vermont Clay Studio (Waterbury Center)
Windmill Hill Pottery (Brookline)
Virginia
Art League School (Alexandria)
Campbell’s Ceramic Supply Inc. (Alexandria)
City of Charlottesville (Charlottesville)
The Clay Queen Pottery (Alexandria)
Creative Clay Studios (Alexandria)
Hand Workshop Art Center (Richmond)
The Kiln Doctor Inc. (Front Royal)
Libertytown Arts Workshop (Fredericksburg)
Longwood College (Farmville)
Manassas Clay (Manassas)
Northern Virginia Community College (Alexandria)
Old Dominion University (Norfolk)
Sperryville Pottery (Sperryville)
Appalachian Center for Crafts (Smithville)
Arrowmont School of Arts & Crafts (Gatlinburg)
Porcelain Painters International Online
(Hendersonville)
University of Tennessee School of Art (Knoxville)
Washington
American Ceramic Supply Co. (Ft. Worth)
Angelo State University (San Angelo)
Ceramic City Kilns (Canyon Lake)
Enchanted Earth (Fredericksburg)
Greater Denton Arts Council (Denton)
Potters of Hickory Street (Abilene)
School of Art (Lubbock)
Southwestern University (Georgetown)
West Virginia
Texas
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Page 28
ClaySpace on Puget Sound (Suquamish)
Dart Studio (Tacoma)
Fernhill Studios (Tacoma)
Kelsey Creek Fine Arts School (Issaquah)
Spokane Potters’ Guild (Spokane)
Stanwood House Gallery and Art Center (Stanwood)
Tacoma Community College (Tacoma)
Wisconsin
Earthstone Pottery (Wauwatosa)
John Michael Kohler Arts Center (Sheboygan)
Ray F. Sennett Middle School (Madison)
Wyoming
Casper Recreation Center (Casper)
Canada
Antje’s Pottery Studio
Burlington Art Centre
Canadore College
Langara College
London Potters Guild
Metchosin International School
Sheridan College
White Mountain Academy of the Arts
Outside North America
Atelier 64 (Brazil)
Australian National University (AUSTRALIA)
Barton Pottery (UK)
Cencal (Portugal)
Ceramic Association of Thailand (Thailand)
Deruta School of Ceramics (I)
Fernando Arranz (Argentina)
Institution La Meridiana (Italy)
Melinda Collins Clay Studio (Guatemala)
Netra Arts (India)
Otago Polytechnic (New Zealand)
Potclays Ltd. (United Kingdom)
Poterie Ame de l’Argile (France)
The Pottery Workshop (China)
St. Pauls School (Australia)
State University of Campinas-UNICAMP (Brazil)
Marshall University (Huntington)
West Virginia University (Morgantown)
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
September/October 2003
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ALFRED UNIVERSITY
School of Art & Design
Alfred, NY 14802
12:49 PM
607-871-2412
Fax: 601-871-2490
AMERICAN CERAMIC SUPPLY CO.
817-535-2651
2442 Ludelle St.
Fax: 817-536-7120
Ft. Worth, TX 76105-1060
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.americanceramics.com
25 years educating the ceramics industry: traditional,
contemporary, potters, art educators, finished-ware producers, providing certification seminars in all major
color brands and specialty classes and consultation.
Certified international teachers. Visit our website and
click on classes for upcoming schedule and more information on facilities, directions and lodging.
ANDERSON RANCH ARTS CENTER
5263 Owl Creek Rd.
PO Box 5598
Snowmass Village, CO 81615-5598
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.andersonranch.org
970-923-3181
Fax: 970-923-3871
Our ceramics program offers a time and place where clay
artists can come together to discuss, interact, and make
ceramic art and pottery. Summer workshops inform, challenge, and inspire, and provide a broad range of instruction
for beginners thru professional ceramists and sculptors.
ANGELO STATE UNIVERSITY
Station ASU
PO Box 10906
San Angelo, TX 76909
E-mail: [email protected]
915-942-2085 x222
All new BFA program and new ceramics facility (2600 sq.
ft.). 2 Bailey gas kilns, 1 raku kiln, 18 Brent electric wheels,
clay mixer and pug mill. Ceramic professor is Esteban
Apodaca, (MFA Univ. of Arizona and BFA New Mexico
State). Working relationship with San Angelo Museum.
ANGELWOOD GALLERY AND STUDIO
419-832-0625
24195 Front St.
Toll-free: 888-617-6565
Grand Rapids, OH 43522
E-mail: [email protected]
Angelwood Gallery and Studio teaches pottery in its on-site
studio by resident potter Julie Beutler, with a focus on
beginning to intermediate students. Students learn in a caring, open environment. Our class size is small for hands-on
approach to learning. The space also features an art gallery.
ANNIE’S MUD PIE SHOP
513-871-2529
3130 Wasson Rd.
Fax: 513-871-5576
Cincinnati, OH 45209
Toll-free: 866-GET-CLAY
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.anniesmudpieshop.com
Annie’s Mud Pie Shop offers classes in both handbuilding and throwing on the wheel. Both classes take students through the entire sequence of steps required to go
from wet clay to a glazed and fired finished product.
Classes are offered in a 6-week cycle throughout most of
the year.
ANTJE’S POTTERY STUDIO
519-664-2372
4 High Crest Lane West
Fax: 519-664-3082
St. Jacobs, Ontario, N0B 2N0, Canada
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.antjespottery.com
European Trade Master, wheel and sculpting potter with
unique developed talent, shares knowledgable workmanship with students.
September/October 2003
Page 29
APPALACHIAN CENTER FOR CRAFTS
615-597-6801
Tennessee Tech University
Fax: 615-597-6803
1560 Craft Center Dr.
Smithville, TN 37166
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.craftcenter.tntech.edu
The Appalachian Center for Crafts, a division of Tenn.Tech
Univ., offers a BFA degree, craft certificate program, artist
residencies and non-credit workshops in ceramic studies.
The 10,000 sq. ft. ceramics studio offers a variety of firing
and glazing options. Vince Pitelka, Assc. Prof. and author
of Clay: A Studio Handbook, heads the program.
ARCHIE BRAY FOUNDATION
406-442-2521
2915 Country Club Ave.
Fax: 406-443-0934
Helena, MT 59602-9240
Toll-free: 800-443-6434
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.archiebray.org
The Archie Bray Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to the enrichment of the ceramic arts, offers artist
residencies to potters and ceramic sculptors from around
the world, as well as community ceramics classes for
adults and children. Residents have access to a variety of
kilns and equipment.
ARMORY ART CENTER
1703 S. Lake Ave.
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.armoryart.org
561-832-1776
Fax: 561-832-0191
Toll-free: 888-276-6791
Year-round classes in all mediums. State-of-the-art facility for
all levels of ceramic artists. Master artist workshops offered
January through March. Under the direction of ceramics
chairman Harvey Sadow, the clay program also features
assistantships, a residency program, foreign exchange program and the Ceramics National Invitational Exhibition.
ARROWMONT SCHOOL OF ARTS
& CRAFTS
556 Parkway
PO Box 567
Gatlinburg, TN 37738
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.arrowmont.org
865-436-5860
Fax: 865-430-4101
Arrowmont offers one- and two-week, and weekend art
intensives during spring, summer and fall. Wheel throwing
and handbuilding clay techniques taught by nationally and
internationally recognized faculty. Credit is offered through
the Univ. of Tennessee. Residencies, studio assistantships,
work-study and scholarships available.
ART & CLAY
1804 Espinacitas St.
Santa Fe, NM 87505
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.artandclay.com
505-989-4278
Art and Clay is a ceramic and arts center. We offer yearround classes in pottery, sculpture, drawing, writing and
painting for kids, teens and adults.
ART CENTER AT FULLER LODGE
2132 Central Ave.
Los Alamos, NM 87544
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.artfulnm.org
505-662-9331
Fax: 505-662-9334
Beginning and intermediate classes taught by professional
artists, children’s classes, clay sculpture, functional and
decorative art, studio rental available.
ART LEAGUE SCHOOL
Ceramics Program
305 Madison St.
Alexandria, VA 22314
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.theartleague.org
703-683-5358
Our program offers a diverse range of classes in handbuilding and throwing, functional or non-functional, a residency and assistants program. A fully equipped studio with
4 electric kilns, a 32 cu. ft. gas kiln, 32 wheels, 2 extruders,
2 slab rollers and a fully stocked glaze lab.
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
THE ART STUDIO
301 Kiamensi Rd.
Wilmington, DE 19804
E-mail: [email protected]
302-995-7661
Community pottery studio offering classes and open studio
hours. Wheel throwing, handbuilding, Raku techniques,
etc. Beginners through advanced students welcome.
ART-FULL BARN
679 Grant St.
Clarkesville, GA 30523
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.artfullbarn.com
706-754-1247
Fax: 7806-754-5537
Year round classes for children to adults; six week sessions
and workshops in studio equipped with seven wheels, electric, gas, raku kilns, slab roller, extruder, etc. Small class
size allows intense instruction in throwing, building, glaze
and finish. On site gallery sales for over 150 artists and potters.
ARTIFACT POTTERY
508 North Shore Dr.
Kendallville, IN 46755
E-mail: [email protected]
219-347-1669
Adult or children demonstrations and classes in functional
pottery, stoneware, raku, slab, extruded and wheel work.
ATELIER 64
Rua Parati 64
13280-000 Vinhedo SP, Brazil
E-mail: [email protected]
55-193-886-2356
International studio which offers classes for beginners and
advanced students in handbuilding and throwing. We
speak English, German and Portuguese and offer weekly
classes as well as international workshops and accommodations for foreign students for longer periods. Kilns
include electric, gas, raku and anagama.
AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY
61-2-61255823
Canberra
Fax: 61-2-61255705
ACT 0200, Australia
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://anu.edu.au/ita/csa/ceramics
Australia’s premier ceramics department is offering the
only studio-based ceramics award (credit) course delivered in distance mode anywhere in the world. Each
semester has an intensive on-campus session
(December/January and June/July) followed by internetbased supervision for the remainder of the semester. The
on-campus sessions can be attended either at Red Deer
College in Alberta, Canada or the Australian National
University School of Art in Canberra.
AZUSA PACIFIC UNIVERSITY
901 East Alosta Ave.
Azusa, CA 91702-7000
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.apu.edu
626-815-6000
Fax: 626-815-3880
APU offers a sound all around art degree (BA) with a concentration in ceramics. We believe that traditional throwing
and formation of aesthetically pleasing functional vessels
are skills all should master before moving in an individual
direction. Outdoor workspace and proximity to galleries are
advantages to our near-LA location.
BAKER UNIVERSITY
785-594-4537
PO Box 65
Fax: 785-594-2522
Baldwin City, KS 66006
Toll-free: 800-873-4282
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.bakeru.edu
Strong, small art deptartment offering a BA in studio art, art
history or art education. Gas and electric kilns, raku, 12
electric wheels, slab roller, spray booth, 2 galleries (one
student run). Home of the International Edward Orton Cone
Box Show. 4 full-time professors, 1 in ceramics.
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BALL STATE UNIVERSITY
Art Dept/Ceramics, AJ Bldg.
Muncie, IN 47306
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.bsu.edu
12:49 PM
765-285-5800
Our department offers a BFA program in a brand new stateof-the art facility. We have two instructors (MFA, Cranbrook
and Edinboro, PA) 3 large gas Alpines, 9 electrics, outside
raku and pitfire area. Lots of room, beautiful environment
and emphasis on individual attention to each student.
BALTIMORE CLAYWORKS
410-578-1919
5706 Smith Ave.
Fax: 410-578-0058
Baltimore, MD 21209
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.baltimoreclayworks.org
Baltimore Clayworks provides affordable studio space,
equipment and opportunities for ceramic artists; a yearlong fellowship for an emerging artist based on a national
search; year-round, hands-on studio classes and workshops for adults and children; teachers who are professionals in the field; and both on-and off-site exhibitions.
BARECLAY
399 Thurman Ave.
Columbus, OH 43206
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.bareclay.com
614-271-8225
Classes at Bareclay Studio are fun! The classes are small
(five students per class) and run in six-week sessions.
Students are given the freedom to express themselves
through clay on the wheel, handbuilding, sculptural and
surface techniques. Classes are open to all skill levels. Visit
our web site for more information.
BARTON POTTERY
01823-672987
S. Barton Canonsleigh Burlescombe
Tiverton Devon EX16 7JW
United Kingdom
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.bartonpottery.co.uk
Weekend courses with accommodation, for all stages in
400 year old farmhouse easily accessed from J27 M5.
BENNETT’S POTTERY SUPPLY
431 Enterprise St.
Ocoee, FL 34761
Web: http://bennettpottery.com
407-877-6311
A BETTER POTTER
292 Ridge Rd. Ste. 9
Lafayette, LA 70506
E-mail: [email protected]
337-988-5456
Formed in May of 2002 to assist others in improving their
pottery skills. Includes wheel instruction and handbuilding.
Also introduces students to processes such as spraying
glazes, mold making, pug-mill introduction, slab roller use,
glaze formulation, and kiln use. Strives to make students
more self-sufficient.
BIRCH MOUNTAIN POTTERY
223 Merrow Rd., PO Box 422
Tolland, CT 06084
E-mail: [email protected]
860-875-0149
Birch Mountain Pottery offers 8 week sessions for adult
beginner through advanced. Classes meet once a week for
2-1/2 hours and include handbuilding, throwing on the
wheel, glazing and decorating techniques. Also special
workshops for private groups such as Girl Scouts and
home schoolers.
BLACK HAWK COLLEGE
6600 34th Ave.
Moline, IL 61265-5899
E-mail: [email protected]
Page 30
BLOOMINGTON AREA ARTS COUNCIL
812-334-3100
John Waldron Arts Center
Fax: 812-323-2787
122 South Walnut St.
Bloomington, IN 47404
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.artlives.org
The Center offers 60–90 visual arts classes including children’s, teen’s and adult ceramic classes four times a year.
Classes meet once a week for a 6-, 8- or 13-week session.
BODINE POTTERY & ART STUDIO
108 Jeff Davis Ave.
Long Beach, MS 39560
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.bodinepottery.com
228-863-4734
Fax: 228-864-3596
In downtown Long Beach, Mississippi, just blocks from the
beach, this full-time working studio offers classes in wheel
throwing, handbuilding, raku and precious metal clay.
Week long clay camps are held in the summer for kids (or
adults). Tour groups are offered 4 hr. mini-classes, 45
minute tours or demos.
BRECKSVILLE CENTER FOR THE ARTS
440-526-6232
8997 Highland Dr.
Fax: 440-526-1214
Brecksville, OH 44141
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.digitalprime8.com/todd
Beginners will learn the basics of throwing on the potters
wheel and basic handbuilding techniques. Experienced students will refine and expand their skills while learning new
techniques. Open to adults at all levels.
BUFFALO STATE COLLEGE
716-878-4414
Design Dept.,1300 Elmwood Ave.
Fax: 716-878-4231
Buffalo, NY 14222
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.buffalostate.edu/~des
A comprehensive State University of New York (SUNY)
undergraduate liberal arts college with the largest visual
arts program in the SUNY system offering a BFA and BS
degree. A 10,000 sq. ft. well-equipped studio space including 3 primary classrooms/studios, clay and glaze mixing
rooms, 30 wheels, slab roller, extruder, 15 kilns, and more.
BURLINGTON ART CENTRE
905-632-7796
1333 Lakeshore Rd.
Fax: 905-632-0278
Burlington ON L7S 1A9, Canada
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.burlingtonartcentre.on.ca
The largest collection of contemporary Canadian ceramics
in the world. Exhibitions and educational activities in a full
range of craft and art subjects throughout the year. A public non-profit organization.
BYRDCLIFFE ART COLONY
845-679-2079
Woodstock Guild, 34 Tinker St.
Fax: 845-679-4529
Woodstock, NY 12498
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.woodstockguild.org
Byrdcliffe is a multi-faceted art colony which offers summer residencies, community classes and workshops.
Summer residents in ceramics receive private studio and
housing from May to October. Facilities include gas, soda,
raku and electric kilns. Clay mixing and raw materials
room. Please specify ceramics with all inquiries.
CAMPBELL’S CERAMIC SUPPLY INC.
703-750-9437
5704 D General Washington Dr.
Fax: 703-750-9442
Alexandria, VA 22312
Toll-free: 800-657-7222
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.claysupply.com
309-796-1311
Beginning/advanced courses in handbuilding and wheelthrown ceramics. Cone 10 reduction in both electric and
gas kilns. 50+ year old 2-yr. college AA degree program
leading to Univ. of Iowa or Western Ill. Univ. programs.
CANADORE COLLEGE
100 College Dr.
North Bay ON P1B 8K9, Canada
705-474-7600
Fax: 705-494-7462
CARBONDALE CLAY CENTER
970-963-2529
135 Main St.
Fax: 970-963-4492
Carbondale, CO 81623
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.carbondaleclay.com
CARLOW COLLEGE
Art Department, 3333 Fifth Ave.
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.carlow.edu
412-578-6033
Carlow is a small, Catholic, urban, liberal arts college. We
offer a BA in Art and in Art Ed. We have a 1500 square foot
throwing and handbuilding studio, an outbuilding for gas
and raku kilns, and wood kiln access.
CASPER RECREATION CENTER
1801 E. 4th
Casper, WY 82601
E-mail: [email protected]
307-235-8383
Casper Recreation Center provides a program of handbuilding and thrown pottery to all ages and skill levels. Current
staff includes myself, for adult pottery, and teachers for
youth pottery and china painting. Facilities limited to oxidation firing only. Classes usually limited to ten students.
CEDAR MOUNTAIN CERAMICS, INC.
435-867-9966
90 West Hoover Ave.
Fax: 435-867-9976
Cedar City, UT 84720
E-mail: [email protected]
CENCAL
351—262-840-110
Rua Luis Caldas, Apdo 39
Fax: 351-262-842-224
Caldas da Rainha 2504-909, Portugal
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.cencal.pt
A professional ceramics school since 1985, located in Caldas
da Rainha, a traditional region of ceramics in our country.
The ceramics industry is very important in our region, so this
school offers everyone a foundation in ceramics.
CENTRAL FLORIDA CERAMIC SUPPLY
407-657-1505
4760 Palmetto Ave.
Fax: 407-681-4151
Winter Park, FL 32792
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ceramic-store.com
Seminars/classes held throughout the year nearly every
weekend, usually one to two days. Cover various aspects of
the fired arts; cast pieces, coil, slab, handbuilding, glass,
glazing, scraffito, decals, firing instruction, kiln repair. Fees
range from $30.00 to $75.00.
CENTRAL MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
Art Department, 132 Wightman Hall
Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.cmich.edu
517-774-1157
Fax: 517-774-2278
The Art Department of Central Michigan University offers a
BA, BFA, MA and MFA in ceramics. We have a diverse program with a large and well-equipped facility in mid-Michigan.
CERAMIC ASSOCIATION OF THAILAND
66-2-223-2790
18/3 Soi Nakbumrung
Fax: 66-2-226-0327
Bumrungmuang Rd., Pamprab
Bangkok 10100, Thailand
E-mail: [email protected]
Private studio with one-on-one instruction.
CERAMIC CITY KILNS
186 Julius Dr.
Canyon Lake, TX 78133-4540
E-mail: [email protected]
830-964-4038
Fax: 830-899-7617
Kiln repair and firing seminars. Also seminars in ceramics,
stoneware and porcelain, glass painting-fusing-draping
and slumping. Also teach kiln safety, operation and rebuild.
CERAMIC DESIGN AND CREATION
99 Factory St.
Nashua, NH 03060
E-mail: [email protected]
603-889-0843
We make our own casting molds from plaster. We use casting rubber to make master molds for mold reproduction.
We have classes for mold and slip casting!
Carbondale Clay Center’s mission is to serve the community, both locally and beyond by offering strong, diversified,
high-quality ceramic arts educational programs and providing support for working ceramic artist/potters through residency, teaching, exhibiting and educational opportunities.
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CERAMIC TILE EDUCATION FOUNDATION 864-222-2131
5326 Hwy. 76
Fax: 864-222-1299
Pendleton, SC 29670
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://tileschool.org
Classes for aspiring tile installers, floor covering installers,
salespersons, architects, designers, contractors and consumers. CTEF classes cover information regarding ceramic tile, tile setting materials and installation techniques.
Students use the latest in tools and materials to install a
variety of ceramic tiles in room-sized practice modules.
CERAMICSPLUS
410-666-0238
49 Cedar Knoll Rd.
Fax: 410-666-0239
Cockeysville, MD 21030
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ceramicsplusstudio.com
Classes for adults and children in a studio setting that
focuses on stoneware clay techniques on the wheel and
handbuilding. Also available are slip cast ceramic pieces
with myriad glazes and non-fire applications. Birthday parties and work with private and public schools. We also
teach art as therapeutic experience.
CHAMBERS POTTERY
153 Chambers St.
New York, NY 10007
Web: http://chamberspottery.com
CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE
434-970-3269
PO Box 911
Fax: 434-970-3596
Charlottesville, VA 22902
E-mail: [email protected]
CLAY ART CENTER
40 Beech St.
Port Chester, NY 10573
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.clayartcenter.org
Throwing and handbuilding for beginners, intermediate and
advanced students, fall, winter and spring. Open studio
with 8 wheels available to enrolled students. High energy,
experienced, supportive staff. Individualized attention given
to students. Electric, cone 6. Fee: $115 includes clay,
glazes and firing.
CITYARTS CENTER
3000 General Pershing Blvd.
Oklahoma City, OK 73107
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.cityartscenter.com
The Clay Art Center, dedicated to the teaching and nourishment of ceramic artists, has been a nationally recognized
center for the advancement of the ceramic arts since 1957.
The center offers classes for adults and children.
THE CLAY GARDEN
34 Second St.
Hopewell, NJ 08525
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.theclaygarden.com
405-951-0000
Glaze
609-466-2637
Fax: 609-333-0732
The Clay Garden offers handbuilding and potters wheel
classes for children, teens and adults, as well as workshops for scouts and birthday parties. Artist creates unique
white stoneware and porcelain pieces which are for sale
directly from her studio.
Thirteen electric wheels, a high-fire gas kiln and a large
spacious studio.
Clay
914-937-2047
Fax: 914-935-1205
Chemicals
Wheels
212-619-7302
Kilns
Located in the heart of Tribeca, Chambers Pottery provides
a welcoming and relaxed studio environment, an ideal
place for both new and advanced ceramic students.
CHASTAIN ARTS CENTER
135 W. Wieuca Rd. NW
Atlanta, GA 30342
Page 31
Pugmills
Books
Tools
Thorley’s Kiln Furniture
Announcing
Creative Industries
404-252-2927
Fax: 404-851-1270
Gas kiln, electric kiln, raku kiln, kick wheels and electric
wheels, and a separate handbuilding room.
CHELTENHAM CENTER FOR THE ARTS
215-379-4660
439 Ashbourne Rd.
Fax: 215-663-1946
Cheltenham, PA 19012
Cheltenham Center for the Arts offers classes for beginners
and a professional clay guild. Faculty inspire students
through handbuilding, pottery, tile making, sculpture, raku,
glaze chemistry and more. Our studios include: 1 gas, 1
raku and 3 electric kilns, a pit-firing area, 10 electric wheels
and low- and high-fire glazes.
Answers
Debcor Furniture
the website...
Thomas Stuart
Mason Stains
www.continentalclay.com
North Star
Olympic
Bluebird
• Thousands of quality products
Paasche
Soldner
CHEROKEE COUNTY ARTS COUNCIL
PO Box 1503
Canton, GA 30114
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.cherokeearts.org
770-704-6244
• Excellent service
Various levels of clay classes offered throughout the year
for adults and children. Open studio time for students.
CHESTER RIVER ARTWORKS
PO Box 606
Chestertown, MD 21620
E-mail: [email protected]
410-778-6300
Amaco
• Great prices
212-254-3074
Fax: 212-420-9153
• Expert advice
Bailey
• Discounted freight rates
Skutt
Excel
Aim
• Southern Ice Porcelain
• Service and savings
CIRCLE D CERAMICS INC.
719-632-1188
706 Arrawanna
Fax: 719-632-1157
Colorado Springs, CO 80909
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.circledceramics.com
• 2003 catalog available
Certified teachers, hobby ceramics class, Coloramic
Education program.
L&L
Brent
Children’s Aid Society offers pottery classes for children,
teens and adults in both handbuilding and wheel throwing.
The facilities include 4 electric wheels, 3 kick wheels, 2
electric kilns and a slab roller. The children enjoy painting
with the bright underglazes while the teens and adults learn
to use Cone 6 glazes.
September/October 2003
Kemper
Orton
Chester River Artworks is a non-profit art center offering
classes and workshops in fine arts and crafts. We are located in a rustic mill in historic Chestertown on the eastern
shore of Maryland. Please call or write us for information
on current classes and workshops in the clay studio.
CHILDREN’S AID SOCIETY
Greenwich Village Center
219 Sullivan St.
New York, NY 10012
E-mail: [email protected]
Pacifica
(Australian)
(full color 92 pages)
1101 Stinson Blvd. NE
Minneapolis, MN 55413
(612) 331-9332
FAX (612) 331-8564
[email protected]
1 800 432-CLAY
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
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CLAY HORSE STUDIO
1806 South 800 East
Elwood, IN 46036
E-mail: [email protected]
12:49 PM
765-552-6018
Fax: 765-552-3946
Clay Horse Studio specializes in educational programs for
children. Emphasis is on the basics of handbuilding techniques. Classes and studio space are also offered for adults.
THE CLAY QUEEN POTTERY
2303 Mt. Vernon Ave.
Alexandria, VA 22301
E-mail: [email protected]
703-549-7775
I teach adults and children how to make functional pots on
the wheel. Slab work and handbuilding are also available.
Classes are limited to 10 people each Monday, Tuesday or
Thursday nights from 7-10PM and on Saturday there is a
practice session from 12-5 PM. 10 weeks for $290.
THE CLAY STUDIO OF MISSOULA
910 Dickens St.
Missoula, MT 59802
E-mail: [email protected]
406-543-0509
The Clay Studio of Missoula is a nonprofit community clay
center offering classes and studio work facilities for adults
and children.
THE CLAY STUDIO
139 N. Second St.
Philadelphia, PA 19106
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.theclaystudio.org
215-925-3453 x11
Fax: 215-925-7774
The Clay Studio offers daytime and evening classes meeting 3 hours once a week with additional open workshop
times. Enrollment is limited and instructors are professional clay artists from our Resident Artist program. We also
offer workshops in conjunction with our lecture series of
nationally known artists.
THE CLAYGROUND POTTERY STUDIO
704-523-6585
4836 Park Rd.
Charlotte, NC 28209
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.geocities.com/claygroundpottery
The Clayground specializes in beginner and intermediate
level wheel instruction, and handbuilding techniques for
adults. The studio has a 24-hour access policy for currently enrolled adults. We also offer birthday parties, private
lessons and summer camp programs for kids. We use
Cone 6 stoneware and oxidation firing.
CLAYMAKERS
919-530-8355
705 Foster St.
Fax: 919-530-8306
Durham, NC 27701
E-mail: [email protected]
Claymakers is a full-service center for potters and ceramic
artists offering several classes for beginners and continuing potters. Teachers are professional potters who also
enjoy teaching and sharing.
CLAYSPACE ON PUGET SOUND
PO Box 1339
Suquamish, WA 98392
E-mail: [email protected]
360-598-3688
ClaySpace offers workshops with internationally known
potters and sculptors. Our focus is on handbuilding, architectural ceramics and sculpture. Located on scenic Puget
Sound with views of Mount Rainier, ClaySpace is just 45
minutes from downtown Seattle.
CLAYWORKS ON COLUMBIA, INC.
718-694-9540
195 Columbia St.
Fax: 212-656-1697
Brooklyn, NY 11231
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.clayworksoncolumbia.org
Our mission is to provide learning opportunities through
the use of clay for artistic expression. We offer our services
to all ages and levels of ability. We also provide master potters with equipment, glazes, kilns, exhibitions and support
to enhance skills and improve access to Brooklyn’s expanding art communitiy.
32
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CLEVELAND INSTITUTE OF ART
11141 East Blvd.
Cleveland, OH 44106
E-mail: [email protected]
216-421-7353
Fax: 216-421-7333
Toll-free: 800-223-4700
The C.I.A. is a 5 year BFA undergraduate program. The professors are Judith Salomon and William Brouillard.
Working in the ceramic studio involves pottery making,
vessel making, architectural ceramics and sculpture. We
have a well-equipped studio facility, about 6000 sq. ft. and
a kiln facility with gas, electric and raku kilns.
CLEVELAND STATE UNIVERSITY
24th and Euclid Ave.
Cleveland, OH 44115
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.allfired-up.com
216-687-2086
Fax: 216-687-2275
BA in Art. We have a large studio space, 15,000 sq. ft. Our
equipment consists of the following: gas and electric kilns,
3 slab rollers, pneumatic extruder, jigger wheel, mold making equipment, casting equipment, 22 wheels (electric and
kick), spray booth, Venco extruder, Soldner clay mixers.
Emphasis is on functional ware and sculpture.
COASTAL CLAY CO., INC.
59 Luther Warren Dr.
St. Helena Island, SC 29920
E-mail: [email protected]
843-838-7040
Fax: 843-838-1187
Private and group lessons.
COLSON SCHOOL OF ART, INC.
1666 Hillview St.
Sarasota, FL 34239
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.colsonart.com
Fax: 941-953-5892
Toll-free: 888-211-3740
Frank Colson has owned and operated the Colson School of
Art since 1963. Workshops available in many phases of
ceramics and bronzecasting. Apprenticeships available.
Contact us for information.
CONNER PRAIRIE
317-776-6000
13400 Allisonville Rd.
Fax: 317-776-6013
Fishers, IN 46038-4499
Toll-free: 888-508-1836
Web: http://www.connerprairie.org
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE
1 Academic Dr.
Corning, NY 14830
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.corning-cc.edu
607-962-9297
Associate degrees and transfer program offers beginning,
intermediate, independent study courses, well-equipped
studio with clay mixing facility, 13 electric wheels, 2 large
electric kilns, visiting artists, active school gallery. Corning
is a great arts town in western New York.
COYOTE CLAY SCHOOL & STUDIOS
5125 Edith Blvd. NE
Albuquerque, NM 87107
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.coyoteclay.com
505-344-2250
Coyote Clay School is dedicated to providing expert quality
instruction in a relaxed and supportive atmosphere. We
teach all skill levels, from complete beginner to practicing
professional. We also rent studio space, and sell supplies
manufactured by our sister company, Coyote Clay & Color.
CRAFT ALLIANCE
6640 Delmar Blvd.
St. Louis, MO 63130
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.craftalliance.org
314-725-1177
Fax: 314-725-2068
Established in 1964, Craft Alliance is a not-for-profit visual
arts center dedicated to excellence in arts education and
reaching a diverse public through instruction and exhibition
of fine art in the craft media.
CRAFT STUDENTS LEAGUE
212-735-9804
610 Lexington Ave.
Fax: 212-223-6438
New York, NY 10022
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ywcanyc.or/csl/ceramics.html
The ceramic studios are spacious, air-conditioned and fully
equipped with electric wheels, slab rollers, extruder, separate glaze laboratory and storage and lockers. Firing is
Cone 6 oxidation. Surface decoration and studio glazes are
included in all courses. Instructors are artists with excellent
training, teaching skills and professional backgrounds.
THE CRAFTS CENTER NCSU
919-515-2457
Campus Box 7320
Fax: 919-515-3679
Raleigh, NC 27695-7320
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ncsu.edu/crafts
The Crafts Center at NC State offers college level classes in
a wide variety of traditional studio crafts. The Crafts Center
provides one of the most specialized and unique programs
of its kind on any university campus. Class sizes are limited to ensure an optimum student/instructor ratio and many
classes fill up within a few days of the start of registration.
CREATIVE ARTS GROUP
108 N. Baldwin Ave.
Sierra Madre, CA 91024
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.creativeartsgroup.org
626-355-8350
Creative Arts Group, a non-profit art center, offers ceramic
classes taught by talented and professional instructors for
adults and children in all phases of wheel throwing, handbuilding techniques in small intimate studio. Cone 10
stoneware clays and procelain are predominately used. All
work fired on site.
CREATIVE ARTS WORKSHOP
203-562-4927
80 Audubon St.
Fax: 203-562-2329
New Haven, CT 06510
E-mail: [email protected]
Various techniques are taught in an encouraging environment to students of all ages and skill levels. Our very talented and highly accredited faculty provide a diverse range
of skills and expertise to continually challenge and educate
students. Studio potters manage the studio.
CREATIVE CLAY STUDIOS
703-750-9480
5704D General Washington Dr.
Fax: 703-750-9442
Alexandria, VA 22312
Toll-free: 800-657-7222
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.claysupply.com
Creative Clay Studios offers studio rentals, beginning to
advanced pottery classes, special interest workshops and
reduction firings for the clay artist.
CYNTHIA CURTIS POTTERY
978-546-6186
80 Pigeon Hill St.
Rockport, MA 01966
E-mail: [email protected]
I teach pottery classes to adults and children year round in
Rockport, MA. Classes include instruction on wheel and
handbuilding and glazing. Classes are small and one-onone instruction a main focus.
DART STUDIO
253-404-1130
747 S. Fawcett Ave.
Fax: 253-627-5889
Tacoma, WA 98402
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.geocities.com/dartceramics
We are a non-profit organization offering studio space for
rent for artists and classes in wheel throwing, handbuilding
and sculpture. For more details check our website.
DECORDOVA MUSEUM
Dept. of Education
51 Sandy Pond Rd.
Lincoln, MA 01773
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.decordova.org
781-259-0505
Fax: 781-259-3651
DeCordova’s Department of Education offers a comprehensive studio program for all levels of ceramics artists. Each
term includes a range of workshops to ensure students
have access to a broad array of topics pertaining to the
ceramic arts. Programs can be found on our website or call
for a copy of our free brochure.
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DERUTA SCHOOL OF CERAMICS
301-424-6446
Via Tiberina sud 330
Fax: 301-424-6446
Deruta 06053, Italy
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.schoolofceramics.org
Our school is located in Deruta, one of Italy’s most renowned
ceramic manufacturing areas. Deruta is recognized worldwide for the quality of its ceramic production and many of its
works have been exhibited in the finest museums.
DEW CLAW STUDIOS
95 Hathaway St. Ste. 30
Providence, RI 02907
E-mail: [email protected]
401-461-2069
Fax: 401-461-3629
Dew Claw Studios offers a variety of dynamic and challenging educational opportunities. From classes and
workshops to demos and lectures, we cater to all levels
of skill and interest. Being located in Providences’
vibrant arts community allows us to tap into a rich pool
of local, national and international teachers.
EARTH ‘N VESSEL POTTERY STUDIO
67 W. Main St.
Bay Shore, Ny 11751
631-665-0060
Earth ‘n Vessel Pottery Studio offers beginner and intermediate classes four times per year. Students learn a wide
range of wheel-throwing techniques, including open and
closed forms, as well as slip and glaze applications.
Advanced techniques are offered as mini-workshops by
regular instructors and guest potters.
EARTH WORKS POTTERY SCHOOL
413-525-5075
Heritage Park Plaza
436 N. Main St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.earthworksclay.homestead.com
We are a non-profit organization offering pottery and
ceramics classes for all ages, kids to seniors. Our classes
encompass many techniques including wheel throwing,
handbuilding, and some decorating of pre-cast ceramic
forms. We also offer many programs to fit your individual
needs as well as clay for kids.
EARTHSTONE POTTERY
7221 West North Ave.
Wauwatosa, WI 53213
E-mail: [email protected]
414-443-9402
We offer evening clases year around for 13 years to adult.
Summertime children’s classes offered starting in June or
July and run for 7 classes. These are divided by age, 3-6
years and 7-13 year olds. Older children will be introduced
to the potters wheel. Call for more information.
EARTHWORKS POTTERY
1705 First Ave. at 88 St.
New York, NY 10128
E-mail: [email protected]
212-876-6945
Earthworks is a friendly, neighborhood pottery on the
Upper East Side, offering day and evening wheel-throwing
and handbuilding classes for adults. Workshops in raku,
woodfire, majolica, surface decoration, focus on forms,
and more. Small classes. We work in cone 6 stoneware and
cone 4 terracotta (summer only).
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF ART
Jenkins Bldg. No. 2000
Greenville, NC 27858
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ecu.edu
252-328-6665
Fax: 252-328-6441
We offer BA, BFA, MA, MFA degrees. 4 faculty; salt, raku, 3
high-fire, wood coffin-type and 9 electric kilns; 28 wheels,
2 slab rollers. NASAD accredited.
September/October 2003
Page 33
EAST CENTRAL UNIVERSITY
Art Department
PO Box L-3 ECU
Ada, OK 74820
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ecok.edu
580-310-5353
Fax: 580-436-3329
ECU offers a BA or a BA with Teachers Certification.
Facilities include 8 new Lockerbie kickwheels, a Bailey
high-fire kiln, two electric kilns, two raku kilns and a wood
fire kiln.
EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
Art Dept. 114 Ford Hall
Ypsilanti, MI 48197
E-mail: [email protected]
734-487-0237
Comprehensive ceramic arts education.
EDINBORO UNIVERSITY OF
814-732-2309
PENNSYLVANIA
Art Dept./Ceramics Doucette Hall
Edinboro, PA 16444
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.edinboro.edu/cwis/art/geninfo.html
Balance of ceramic sculpture and pots. Undergraduate and
active graduate programs (MFA, MA, BFA, Bs.Ed.).
Emphasis for students to develop an individual artistic
direction, supported by a diverse faculty through a wide
variety of course offerings in ceramics. Comprehensively
equipped studio. Any method of firing in over 20 kilns.
ENCHANTED EARTH
830-990-7938
603 Ivydale Rd. Ste. 1102
Toll-free: 888-990-7938
Fredericksburg, TX 78624
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.enchantearth.com
An artist’s studio open to the public for classes in handbuilding and private lessons on the wheel. Personal creativity is encouraged. Pleasant and clean working environment. All classes taught by professional artist with an MFA
degree in ceramics.
EXPRESSIONS POTTERY WORKSHOP
9 School St.
Granby, CT 06026
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.expressionspottery.com
860-844-0138
A cooperative studio started in 1972. There are 25 members with many different and unique styles and talents.
Expressions is maintained without an overall manager, all
work performed by the members. This includes clay and
glaze making, bisque, stoneware and raku kiln firings,
teaching and gallery maintenance. We offer beginner and
intermediate pottery courses.
FAT CAT POTTERY INC.
436-A Raleigh St.
Wilmington, NC 28412
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.fatcatpottery.com
910-395-2529
Fax: 910-395-4684
THE FINE LINE CREATIVE ARTS CENTER 630-584-9443
6N 158 Crane Rd.
Fax: 630-584-9490
St. Charles, IL 60175
E-mail: [email protected]
Classes are taught to adults from beginning to advanced.
Emphasis is on self expression through the arts. Low fire,
high fire, reduction/oxidation, raku and other alternative firing methods are explored during classes and workshops.
Gallery has monthly exhibits of local and national artists.
FIRE & CLAY POTTERY
44 North Lake St.
Boyne City, MI 49712
E-mail: [email protected]
321-582-7689
We teach the fundamentals of handbuilding in 4 sessions to
small groups of people (5 or 6). Students spend 3 classes
making pots and they glaze in the fourth. After a student has
completed the basic session, wheel throwing is offered oneon-one sessions with studio time available for practice.
FIRE AND MUD CERAMICS
134 NE 1st Ave.
Hallandale, FL 33009
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.fireandmud.com
954-455-3099
Fax: 954-977-9012
We are an open ceramics studio inviting potters and handbuilders of all skill levels to create in a relaxed environment.
Studio access available by the day or through monthly
memberships. Bring your tools, friends, creativity and
come join us! We also have classes in beginning wheel.
Check us out on the web for more information.
FIRED UP INC.
1701 E. Hennepin Ave. No. 255
Minneapolis, MN 55414
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.firedupstudios.com
612-852-2787
Fired Up offers a variety of wheel-throwing pottery classes for
adults ranging from beginning to intermediate levels. Classes
are 8 weeks long and meet once a week for 2 1/2 hours.
Limited open studio time is available for practice. Fired Up
also offers a variety of workshops throughout the year.
FIREFLOWER POTTERY
10 West Mather Lane
Bratenahl, OH 44108
E-mail: [email protected]
216-851-3555
Fax: 216-851-3555
Small classes, individually geared to students ability and
experience, hand building and throwing and mold pouring.
Have apprentices teach.
FLETCHER FARM SCHOOL FOR THE
ARTS & CRAFTS
611 Rt 103 South
Ludlow, VT 05149
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.fletcherfarm.com
802-228-8770
Fax: 802-228-7402
Contact us for workshop offerings and course listings.
Fat Cat Pottery offers classes and workshops for all ages as
well as all levels of ability. We have a large, fully-equipped
studio. Our teachers have had many years in the pottery
field and can help expand and fire your imagination.
FLORIDA CLAY ART CO.
1645 Hangar Rd.
Sanford, FL 32773
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.flclay.com
FERNANDO ARRANZ
Moliere 2255
Buenos Aires 1408
Argentina
E-mail: [email protected]
We have recently opened a first class studio/classroom and
are presently offering classes.
FERNHILL STUDIOS
8304 S. Park
Tacoma, WA 98408
E-mail: [email protected]
54-011-4568-1071
253-404-1130
Fernhill Studios is a great place dedicated to providing an
inexpensive facility for artists to create. We have a great
gallery for displaying and selling work. Lessons are offered
in clay sculpture, pottery and glass. Private art studios are
available for rent.
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
407-330-1116
Fax: 407-330-5058
Toll-free: 800-211-7713
FORT HAYS STATE UNIVERSITY
785-628-4273
600 Park St.
Fax: 785-628-4087
Hays, KS 67601
Toll-free: 800-628-3478
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.fhsu.edu
Students explore ceramics as a material self-expression in
functional pottery, the vessel, ceramic sculpture and installation. Developing a personal style in clay is pursued in our
fully equipped large studio space. Electric, gas, wood, raku
kilns, pitfire. Career plan developed. Workshops and trips.
BA, BFA, MFA degrees.
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FRANCIS MARION UNIVERSITY
PO Box 100547
Florence, SC 29505-0547
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.fmarion.edu
12:49 PM
Page 34
843-661-1535
Fax: 843-661-1529
HAND WORKSHOP ART CENTER
804-353-0094
1812 W. Main St.
Fax: 804-353-8018
Richmond, VA 23220
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.handworkshop.org
HERRON SCHOOL OF ART, IUPUI
1701 N. Pennsylvania St.
Indianapolis, IN 46202
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.herron.iupui.edu
Francis Marion offers a BA degree in Visual Arts and a BS
degree in Art Education. Visual Arts majors can specialize
in painting, photography, graphic design and ceramics. All
programs are nationally accredited through NASAD. The
ceramics program offers instruction in pottery, sculpture,
glaze formulation and various firing processes.
The Hand Workshop Art Center offers a wide range of
ceramic classes for children and adults. Classes have different skill levels including beginner, intermediate and
advanced. HWAC has been bringing art to the community
and community to art since 1963.
Our $3 million sculpture and ceramics facility houses a
metal fabrication shop; bronze and aluminum foundry with
a 5-ton overhead crane system; wood sculpture shop, 3
ceramic studios; ceramic kiln space; studios for wax, plaster, figure modeling, fiberglass and resin; a 1,000 sq. ft.
gallery and 4,000 sq. ft. of covered courtyards.
FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY
Visual Arts Dept.
101 Braddock Rd.
Frostburg, MD 21532
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.frostburg.edu
301-687-4797
BFA degrees in ceramics, printmaking, sculpture, photo,
painting, graphic design. Also art certification program. Small
rural setting, a great learning environment. Soda, wood,
reduction, raku, electric kilns. Glaze chemistry class offered.
GEORGE GRIFFIN POTTERY & SCHOOL
One SunCat’s Ridge
Sopchoppy, FL 32358
850-962-9311
A spirited approach to clay. Individualized functional
stoneware, single-fire oxidation, fast-fire wood, business
as an art form. Fee $400 includes materials, firing, lodging.
Beginning and intermediate. Limited to four students. For
dates contact George Griffin Pottery, One SunCat’s Ridge,
Sopchoppy, Fla. 32358, (850) 962-9311.
GREAT NECK ADULT PROGRAM
30 Cumberland Ave.
Great Neck, NY 11020-1499
E-mail: [email protected]
516-773-1713
Fax: 516-482-8685
Our goal is to give students a love of clay. We emphasize
both wheel throwing and handbuilding. By learning the
techniques used by potters, old and new, one comes to
understand the qualities of the clay.
GREATER DENTON ARTS COUNCIL
207 S. Bell
Denton, TX 76201
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.dentonarts.com
940-382-2787
Fax: 940-566-1486
The Center for the Visual Arts is operated by the Greater
Denton Arts Council (GDAC), which is a nonprofit organization serving Denton and the surrounding North Texas area.
GDAC provides facilities, exhibitions, programs, classes,
artist-in-school programs, support, services, original programming, and arts education opportunities for all ages.
GREENBELT COMMUNITY CENTER
City of Greenbelt
15 Crescent Rd.
Greenbelt, MD 20770
E-mail: [email protected]
301-397-2208
HANDS ON CLAY, INC.
128 Old Town Rd.
East Setauket, NY 11733
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.handsonclay.com
631-751-0011
Fax: 631-751-9133
Hands on Clay is a center for learning and the appreciation
of the ceramic arts. Our mission is to provide classes and
workshops that are available to everybody, beginner
through advanced, and all ability levels. We offer a full
range of services including equipment & supplies, studio
design, and ceramic restoration.
HARRISBURG AREA COMM. COLLEGE
1 HACC Dr., A120
Harrisburg, PA 17110
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.hacc.edu
717-780-2435
Contemporary Crafts Marketing AA degree or Certificate
emphasizes production and marketing practices. We support 2 large ceramics studios with 25 wheels, 6 electric
kilns, gas car kiln, wood salt kiln, slip casting/moldmaking
area, 2 mixers, extruders and raku. Jewelry, metal and
glass blowing studios encourage mixed-media production.
HARTFORD ART SCHOOL
200 Bloomfield Ave.
West. Hartford, CT 06117
E-mail: [email protected]
860-768-4029
The Hartford Art School at the University of Hartford offers
a BFA in Ceramics as well as a Special Student Program
one-year post-baccalaurate. The fully-equipped studio
offers 25 potters wheels and gas, electric, raku and soda
kilns. There is a separate glaze lab as well as a clay mixing
room with three clay mixers.
HARVARD UNIVERSITY
617-495-8680
Ceramics Program
Fax: 617-496-9787
219 Western Ave.
Boston, MA 02134
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~ofa
A university-based program with community/professional
participation offering excellent instruction from professional faculty; 10,000 sq ft studio facility; classes, independent
study, and specialized seminars in architectural ceramics,
ceramics history, and glaze chemistry; visiting artists;
shared workspace; gas, electric, soda, raku kilns.
The City of Greenbelt offers a series of ceramic courses
including introduction to the wheel, handbuilding for children and adults, tilemaking, daily open studio and workshops with visiting artists. Studio facilities include 10 electric wheels, slab roller, extruder, and 2 electric kilns.
HAYSTACK MOUNTAIN SCHOOL OF
CRAFTS
PO Box 87C
Deer Isle, ME 04627
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.haystack-mtn.org
GREENWICH HOUSE POTTERY
212-242-4106
16 Jones St.
Fax: 212-645-5486
New York, NY 10014
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.gharts.org/greenwichhousepottery
Haystack is a studio program in the arts providing summer
workshops in ceramics and other media.
Since 1909, Greenwich House Pottery has been a major
center for ceramic arts, offering quality instruction to all
ages in handbuilding, sculpture, wheel throwing and technical processes. The Jane Hartsook Gallery maintains an
ongoing exhibition series and the pottery also offers artist
residencies and intern opportunities.
GREYROCK CLAY CENTER
4221 S. Mason St.
Ft. Collins, CO 80525
34
970-266-2727
207-348-2306
Fax: 207-348-2307
HEART IN HAND POTTERY
609-518-7808
Mill Race Village
Fax: 609-518-7809
37 White St.
Mt. Holly, NJ 08060
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.heartinhandpottery.com
Small classes in handbuilding and workshops with electric
kiln, raku, sagger and pit firing. Held in studio area adjacent
to retail gallery. Taught by resident potter Annie Smith.
Occasional guest artists.
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
HOLLAND POTTERY
408 West Portage Ave.
Muscle Shoals, AL 35661
E-mail: [email protected]
317-920-2416
Fax: 317-920-2401
256-386-0099
Fax: 256-383-5403
BS degree in fine arts from the University of North
Alabama. Ceramic pottery shop for twenty years with classes for individual students.
HOOD COLLEGE CERAMICS PROGRAM
301-696-3456
401 Rosemont Ave.
Fax: 301-846-0035
Frederick, MD 21701
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.hood.edu/art dept
Courses and hands-on workshops for all skill levels, as well
as visiting artists’ workshops, demonstrations and lecture
series. Graduate Certificate in Ceramic Arts designed to
provide an advanced studio experience. Students develop
technical proficiency and focus on universal design principles to refine personal expression.
HORIZONS
108 N. Main St.
Sunderland, MA 01375
E-mail: [email protected]
413-665-0300
Fax: 413-665-4141
Horizons has two bases of operation—our western MA art
center with housing for up to 80 people and our international and nationwide travel programs, which include clay
workshops in New Mexico, southern Utah, Spain, Italy and
Mexico. Both our travel programs and our scenic location
in western MA draw staff and participants nationwide.
HOWARD UNIVERSITY
202-806-7073
Dept. of Art-Ceramics Program
Fax: 202-806-9258
College of Arts and Science
Washington, DC 20059
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.howarduniversity.edu
The ceramics program offers a BFA and MFA. Located within minutes of Smithsonian museums. The studio is
equipped with Brent and Randall wheels; a pugmill and clay
mixer; three electric kilns, one downdraft gas kiln, raku and
smoke-firing facilities.
HUNTINGTON COLLEGE
2303 College Ave.
Huntington, IN 46750
E-mail: [email protected]
219-359-4272
We are a Christian liberal arts college. Students are introduced to handbuilding and throwing in Ceramics I. In
Ceramics II students have the opportunity to develop their
skills in firing kilns, developing clay and glazes and throwing and handbuilding techniques. Our Ceramic Sculpture
course provides the students with the opportunity to
explore a variety of sculptural techniques and concepts.
HURRICANE MOUNTAIN CLAY STUDIO
518-576-9121
24 Hurricane Rd.
Fax: 518-576-9121
Keene, NY 12942
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.hurricanemtnclay.com
In the magnificent Adirondack mountains of New York,
HMCS offers classes for people from beginners through
professionals who love to play with clay. Large, new studio
space and excellent equipment provide for enjoyable learning. We are both a school for the greater community and a
summer residency.
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HYDE PARK CRAFT STUDIO
813-259-1687
702 S. Albany
Fax: 813-274-7744
Tampa, FL 33606
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.tampagov.net/recreation
JOYCE MICHAUD GALLERY
9043 W. Allington Manor Cir.
Frederick, MD 21703
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.hood.edu/artdept
301-698-0929
Fax: 301-846-0035
KRUEGER POTTERY INC.
314-963-0180
8153 Big Bend Blvd.
Fax: 314-963-7712
St. Louis, MO 63119
Toll-free: 800-358-0180
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.kruegerpottery.com
A low-cost, high-quality ceramics program funded by the
city of Tampa. Equipment includes 12 wheels, slab roller,
extruder, electric, raku, salt and gas firings up to Cone 10.
Talented and experienced instructors make this studio a
special environment for all ages and levels.
Joyce Michaud is an internationally recognized master potter as well as a ceramics professor at Hood College. An
MFA from George Washington Univ., Joyce is available to
teach master-level skills, eastern coil, glaze application and
design techniques.
Krueger Pottery offers classes for adults and children in
wheel throwing and handbuilding techniques. We also have
specialty workshops taught by guest artists.
IDYLLWILD ARTS
PO Box 38
Idyllwild, CA 92549
KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY
785-532-6605
322A Willard Hall
Fax: 785-532-0334
Manhattan, KS 66506-3705
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ksu.edu/artdept.html
909-659-2171
Fax: 909-659-5463
The Idyllwild Arts Foundation, offers both a summer program and the arts academy, a private residential arts high
school, during the academic year. The Laura Steere ceramics studio is well equipped and supports handbuilt and
wheel-thrown functional and sculptural forms. Firings
include gas, wood, salt, raku and saggar.
INDIAN HILLS COMMUNITY COLLEGE
641-683-5149
525 Grandview Ave., Bldg. 6
Fax: 641-683-5206
Ottumwa, IA 52501
Toll-free: 800-683-5000
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ihcc.cc.ia.us
AA degree offered. We have two instructors teaching in the
ceramics area. Work is mainly in mid- to high-fire
stoneware and raku.
INDIANA UNIVERSITY
School of Fine Arts, Fine Arts R123
Bloomington, IN 47405
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.fa.indiana.edu
812-855-7766
Fax: 812-855-7498
Graduate students are given private studio space and
undergraduate majors have shared studio space. A variety
of kilns are available for reduction, oxidation, wood, soda
and raku. Students have opportunity to study abroad in
summer programs such as the Faenza, Italy program, or on
exchanges with schools in Scotland and England.
KEAN UNIVERSITY
1000 Morris Ave.
Union, NJ 07083
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.kean.edu
Ceramic program with a broad approach. Stress is on basic
techniques in beginning courses to allow students to gain
the skills, techniques and critical skills necessary to do
advanced work and explore sculptural, vessel and production techniques. MA program in studio arts designed
specifically for teachers and portfolio development.
Program emphasizes the student’s growth and development as a creative clay artist. Students explore aesthetic
interests ranging from vessels to ceramic sculpture; and
are expected to develop a knowledge of art history and a
critical understanding of contemporary art issues.
KELSEY CREEK FINE ARTS SCHOOL
995 NW Firwood Blvd.
Issaquah, WA 98027
E-mail: [email protected]
INSTITUTION LA MERIDIANA
Loc. Bagnano 135
Certaldo 50052, Italy
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.pietro.net
KENTUCK ASSOCIATION
503 Main Ave.
Northport, AL 35476
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.kentuck.org
39-0571-660084
Fax: 39-0571-660821
La Meridiana is a professional and well equipped ceramic
studio that in the last decade has become an international
center for seminars and workshops. The beautiful geographical setting in Tuscany and the standard of the faculty has made it an ideal place for a short and intensive practice in ceramics.
INTERLAKEN SCHOOL OF ART
PO Box 1400
Stockbridge, MA 01262
E-mail: [email protected]
908-527-2831
Fax: 908-527-2804
425-472-9043
Fine Arts school, ceramic based, drawing & painting included.
205-758-1257
Fax: 205-758-1258
The Kentuck Art Center is home to the Gallery at Kentuck, the
Kentuck Museum, the gallery gift shop, artist studios and the
Kentuck Festival of the Arts. Both the gallery and museum
offer exhibitions to craftspeople, while the gallery shop and
the Kentuck festival feature many artists. Kentuck’s studio
artist, Mark Rigsby, teaches all levels of pottery.
413-298-5252
Fax: 413-298-0274
603-942-8829
KENTUCKY MUDWORKS LLC
859-389-9681
238 Jefferson St.
Fax: 859-389-9681
Lexington, KY 40508
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.kentuckymudworks.com
Beginners/Intermediate/experienced. There will be many
demonstrations, and one-on-one instruction, with a little
coaxing to experiement with clay in new ways. Clay and
glaze will be provided with the class fee. Ambitious potters
may buy more clay and kiln space if desired. Twenty-three
years experience with clay.
Our classes are 6 weeks long, 7 sessions per year, introductory, intermediate and advanced wheel classes as
well as sculptural handbuilding. Workshops and special
topic classes offered periodically during year. Fun, relaxing environment for ages 12 to 70+.
301-881-0100 x6734
Fax: 301-296-2489
We offer a high-level recreational art program. Classes are
offered to preschool through adult in both fine art (painting
and drawing) and ceramics.
JOHN C. CAMPBELL FOLK SCHOOL
828-837-2775
1 Folk School Rd.
Fax: 828-837-8637
Brasstown, NC 28902-9603
Toll-free: 800-365-5724
Web: http://www.folkschool.org
September/October 2003
Wheel-throwing classes, meeting one evening per week
from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. for six weeks. We also host a Raku
Day annually the first Sunday in November. Glazes, kilns
and assistance are provided. Bisque ware can be purchased
or call for details on bringing your own.
LACONIA POTTERY
45 Court St.
Laconia, NH 03246
E-mail: [email protected]
603-528-4997
Fax: 603-528-0498
Learn wheelthrowing basics from a potter with 30 years experience. Classes are small and casual. High fire stoneware and
raku functional and decorative techniques are emphasized.
LAKESIDE POTTERY
543 Newfield Ave.
Stamford, CT 06905
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.lakesidepottery.com
203-323-2222
Lakeside Pottery offers classes for the beginner, intermediate and advanced potters, adult and children using the
wheel, hand-building and glazing. Open studio, custom
classes, summer camp, workshops and demonstrations
for families and organizations are also available.
LALOBA RANCH CLAY CENTER
PO Box 773628
Steamboat Spgs., Co 80477
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.lalobaranch.com
970-870-6423
Fax: 970-870-6452
Laloba Ranch Clay Center is an art school dedicated solely
to the advancement of ceramic arts. Emphasis is on developing techniques and encouraging individual creative
vision. Tuition includes 24-hour studio access, semi-private room, 3 meals per day, firing, spa, incredible sunsets
and elk viewing.
LANGARA COLLEGE
100 West 49th Ave.
Vancouver BC V5Y 2Z6, Canada
E-mail: [email protected]
604-323-5711
Fax: 604-323-5555
Fine arts program with approximately 20 faculty members.
JEFF BROWN POTTERY
162 B, 1st NH Turnpike
Northwood, NH 03261
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.jeffbrownpottery.com
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER OF
GREATER WASHINGTON
6125 Montrose Rd.
Rockville, MD 20854
E-mail: [email protected]
L&R SPECIALTIES INC
417-725-2606
202 East Mount Vernon,PO Box 309 Fax: 417-725-2607
Nixa, MO 65714
Toll-free: 877-454-3914
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.claydogs.com
THE KILN DOCTOR INC.
540-636-6016
202 East Main St.
Fax: 540-635-8699
Front Royal, VA 22630-3338
Toll-free: 877-KILNDOC
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.thekilndoctor.com
Workshops on kiln safety and preventive maintenance.
LEON NIGROSH/CERAMIC DESIGNER
11 Chatanika Ave.
Worcester, MA 01602
Web: http://www.leonnigrosh.com
508-757-0401
A unique opportunity to study one-on-one with an acknowledged master of the ceramic arts and author of the bestselling ceramic text, Claywork: Form and Idea in Ceramic
Design. Each course is tailored to suit individual needs.
Rolling enrollment.
LEXINGTON ARTS & CRAFTS SOCIETY
781-862-9696
Ceramics Guild, 130 Waltham St.
Lexington, MA 01730
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.lexingtonma.org/lacs/index.html
The Ceramics Guild is one of many guilds within the
Lexington Arts & Crafts Society. We have a fully-equipped
studio. Adult and teen classes are offered with a waiting list
being maintained. Membership is available pending a
prospective membership period.
LIBERTYTOWN ARTS WORKSHOP
916 Liberty St.
Fredericksburg, VA 22401
540-371-7255
Our pottery school offers a wide range of classes from
beginner to advanced for both children and adults. While
most of our classes are structured for amateurs, we also
provide a means for serious pottery students to grow.
Facility includes two classrooms, practice studio and gallery.
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
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LIVING TREE STUDIOS
6329 US 158
Summerfield, NC 27358
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.living-tree.net
12:49 PM
336-644-2768
Wheel throwing and handbuilding classes offered to ages 14
and up. Children’s clay classes for ages 7 and up. General art
classes to supplement public or homeschool curricula.
LONDON POTTERS GUILD
519-659-2911
East Lions Artisans Ctr. 1731 Churchill Ave.
London, ON N5W 5P4, Canada
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.members.home.net/londonpotters
The London Potters Guild offers classes from September
through June on an annual basis. Classes are held in the
Guild’s studio and meet for weekly three-hour sessions for
an eight-week period. More information can be found on
our website.
LONG BEACH ISLAND FOUNDATION
OF THE ARTS & SCIENCE
120 Long Beach Blvd.
Loveladies, NJ 08008
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.lbifoundation.org
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609-494-1241
Fax: 609-494-0662
MANASSAS CLAY
703-330-1040
9122 Center St.
Fax: 703-330-1040
Manassas, VA 20110
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.manassasclay.com
Manassas Clay is a gallery featuring the work of over 40
local potters and offering classes in wheel and handbuilding. We have studio memberships, rentals and
carry a full line of supplies.
MARIE WYNN STUDIO
27 Bay View Rd.
Sag Harbor, NY 11963
E-mail: [email protected]
631-725-1195
Fax: 631-725-1195
MFA Alfred Univ. retired professor of art Southampton
College of Long Island University teaching ceramics, pottery, handbuilding, wheel and sculpture. Individual attention, beginner or advanced. Fee $180 for 6 3hr. Sessions.
All materials and tools provided. Beautiful studio on the
water in the Hamptons.
The Foundation offers ceramic workshops and classes for
all levels. Workshops with visiting artist held primarily in
the summer months. Large ceramic studio with electric,
gas and raku kilns.
MARSHALL UNIVERSITY
400 Hal Greer Blvd.
Huntington, WV 25755-2200
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.marshall.edu
LONG ISLAND UNIVERSITY
Art Dept.
1 University Plaza, Brooklyn Campus
Brooklyn, NY 11201
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.liu.edu/bfastu
Students who pursue the BFA or MA degree in ceramics
have 24-hour access to a well-equipped ceramic facility,
which includes separate areas for handbuilding, wheel
throwing, glaze formulation and clay making; a kiln room
equipped with updraft and downdraft gas kilns and outdoor
raku and primitive firing area.
718-488-1051
Fax: 718-488-1372
Located in the heart of NYC, LIU’s art dept. offers access to
major museums, galleries and artists. Our skylit studio
looks out over lower Manhattan and downtown Brooklyn.
Every summer we offer the only raku workshop in NYC. We
are strong on individual mentoring and offer a BFA in
Studio Art. We also offer special woodfire workshops.
LONGWOOD COLLEGE
Art Department
201 High St
Farmville, VA 23909
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.lwc.edu
434-395-2287
Fax: 434-395-2775
Well-equipped state college ceramics program with emphasis on functional, high-fire pottery. Electric, gas and raku
kilns. Access to salt kiln, anagama kiln and noborigama kiln
at nearby professional studios. One full-time professor.
Active visiting artist program. Offers BFA degree in crafts.
LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN POTTERY
3005 Plum Nelly Rd.
Rising Fawn, GA 30738
E-mail: [email protected]
706-398-3232
Lookout Mountain Pottery, home of potter Mark Issenberg,
has electric kilns, raku kiln, and Cone 10 gas kiln. Mark
does mostly ash glazes on high fire stoneware. Mostly
spraying ash glazes, learning the proper techniques. Also 2
miles from Cloudland Canyon State Park and only 30 minutes from Chattanooga, Tenn.
M.T. SHERMAN CERAMICS CENTER
1220 12th St. SE
Salem, OR 97302
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.salemart.org
503-581-7275
Fax: 503-581-9801
Our ceramics and glass facility is a 6800 sq. ft. studio
equipped with 22 wheels, slab roller, extruder, 60 cu. ft.
reduction kiln, 3 computerized bisque kilns, 2 glass kilns
and 2 raku kilns. Professional artists teach lessons in:
wheelthrowing, sculpture, handbuilding, raku, mosaic,
stained glass, cast and fused glass, and other classes.
304-696-6760
Fax: 304-696-6505
Toll-free: 800-642-3499
MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGE OF ART
617-879-7175
NEW ENGLAND
Fax: 617-879-7171
621 Huntington Ave.
Boston, MA 02115
Web: http://www.massart.edu
MCPHERSON COLLEGE
1600 E. Euclid
McPherson, KS 67460
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.mcpherson.edu
620-241-0731
Fax: 620-241-8443
McPherson College is a small 4-year liberal arts institution
that offers a BA in art. Students in ceramics work with
stoneware, raku, porcelain, terra cotta, oxidation and
reduction firing and some salt firing. Emphasis is on functional thrown pottery.
MEIKLEM KILN WORKS
139 Yantic Rd., PO Box 225
Yantic, CT 06389
E-mail: [email protected]
860-887-5182
Meiklem Kiln Works is a privately run teaching studio offering
beginner and intermediate pottery classes for adults and children. Classes are 8 weeks long, 1 class per week with additional studio time offered. Class size is limited to 10 students.
MELINDA COLLINS CLAY STUDIO
32 Callejon del Burrito
Antigua, Guatemala
E-mail: [email protected]
011-502-832-4356
With professional potter and geologist, explore Guatemala,
dig your own materials for micaceous clay pots and identification of ceramic materials. The unique process of
reduced saggar lusters on terra sig and low fire reduced
copper reds. Guided tour of Guatemalan Mayan Highlands
and traditional potters.
MENDOCINO ART CENTER
707-937-5818
45200 Little Lake St.
Fax: 707-937-1764
PO Box 765
Toll-free: 800-653-3328
Mendocino, CA 95460
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.mendocinoartcenter.org
METCHOSIN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL
604-478-5591
650 Pearsons College Dr.
Fax: 250-370-2324
Victoria, BC V9C 4H7, Canada
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.missa.ca
MIAMI UNIVERSITY/CRAFTSUMMER
513-529-7395
School of Fine Art/Rowan Hall
Fax: 513-529-1509
Oxford, OH 45056-1888
MILE HI CERAMICS INC.
303-825-4570
77 Lipan St.
Fax: 303-825-6278
Denver, CO 80223
Toll-free: 800-456-0163
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.milehiceramics.com
MILKHOUSE POTTERY
30 Sharon River Rd.
Cornwall Bridge, CT 06754
E-mail: [email protected]
860-672-6450
Personalized small classes of 3 or 4 students 9 years old to
adult. I’m an experienced professional potter and teacher.
I’ll be happy to give references.
MINT MUSEUM OF ART
2730 Randolph Rd.
Charlotte, NC 28207
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.mintmuseum.org
704-337-2000
Fax: 704-337-2101
The museum offers a wide variety of educational opportunities in connecting artists, collectors and the public.
An active schedule of changing exhibitions, lectures,
artist demonstrations, workshops, guided tours and travel opportunities are available.
MISSION SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO
31522 Camino Capistrano
San Juan Capistrano, CA 92693
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.missionsjc.com
949-234-1300
Fax: 949-240-8091
Students will receive instruction on Mission San Juan
Capistrano’s earliest pottery, both European and indigenous, while learning about the original Mission ceramic
artist, Ireno Mendoza.
MONTGOMERY COMMUNITY COLLEGE
910-576-6222
PO Box 787
Fax: 910-576-2176
Troy, NC 27371-0787
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.montgomery.cc.nc.us
Clay curriculum designed to prepare individuals for
employment as professional potters in pottery related
fields. Using traditional and contemporary concepts,
instruction includes technical knowledge, design skills, and
marketing/business essentials. Course work includes
development of basic and advanced throwing skills.
MT. HOOD COMMUNITY COLLEGE
26000 SE Stark St.
Gresham, OR 97030
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.mhcc.cc.or.us
503-491-7149
Fax: 503-491-6949
Vessel-oriented program that teaches both recent high
school grads and returning adults. Three instructors with
strong vessel orientation. Anagama wood firing and soda
firing are strong components. Ceramic club for fundraising
and field trips.
MUD ALLEY POTTERY
105 Emerald Ave.
Westmont, NJ 08108
E-mail: [email protected]
856-858-6790
Students from novice to expert are welcome, as I will
approach each student on their own level. I encourage each
student to express himself/herself through good technique,
a thorough understanding of clay and various glazing techniques. I received a BFA from East Tennessee State
University in 1982.
Located in Mendocino, a picturesque Victorian northern
California coastal village about 150 miles north of San
Francisco. Hosts a prestigious visiting faculty for weekend
workshops at all levels. The year-round art/retreat campus
has two ceramics studios equipped with wood, salt, soda,
raku, sagger, reduction and electric kilns.
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MUDFIRE
1441 Dresden Dr. Ste. 260
Atlanta, GA 30319
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.mudfire.com
12:49 PM
404-931-4935
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617-964-3424
Fax: 617-630-0081
ODYSSEY CENTER FOR THE
828-285-0210
CERAMIC ARTS
Fax: 828-253-3853
236 Clingman Ave., PO Box 18284
Asheville, NC 28814
E-mail: [email protected]
MudFire pottery studio is housed in a sunlit loft in Atlanta.
Open daily until 10pm. Furnished with new equipment,
including Brent wheels, spacious handbuilding stations,
slab roller, extruder, hand tools, slump molds and a library.
We have four kilns and daily firings. Monthly and annual
memberships available.
New Art Center provides students an opportunity to develop their aesthetic eye and technical ability in clay. Classes
focus on wheel work, offering handbuilding for those interested. Students may also pursue individual projects,
exchanging ideas and approaches to the process in group
critique and independent study.
The mission of the studio school is to promote understanding, appreciation and professional development in the
ceramic arts. This is accomplished through a communitybased educational program which includes lectures and
gallery exhibitions, as well as hands-on classes and workshops for beginners, pre-professional and professional
artists and craftspeople.
MUDFLAT POTTERY SCHOOL & STUDIO 617-628-0589
149 Broadway
Fax: 617-628-2082
Somerville, MA 02145
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.mudflat.org
NEW HAMPSHIRE INSTITUTE
OF ART
148 Concord St.
Manchester, NH 03104-4858
Mudflat offers classes and workshops in wheelthrowing,
handbuilding and sculpture for adults and children in 3
semesters each year. Mudflat also offers studio rentals for
20 clay artists, including one funded artists residency studio. Facilities include 3 classrooms with 27 electric wheels
and 3 gas and 3 electric kilns.
MUDPIE POTTERS
413-548-3939
13 Montague Rd., PO Box 3
Leverett, MA 01054
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.community.masslive.com/cc/mudpiepotters
Mudpie Potters Community Clay Center offers instruction
in all aspects of working with clay. Anyone may take small
classes, join our shared studio for independent learning or
take a summer workshop taught by guest potters and
sculptors who are accomplished in their field.
THE MUDPIT
228 Manhattan Ave.
Brooklyn, NY 11206
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.mudpitnyc.com
718-218-9424
Fax: 718-218-9424
The Mudpit is a fully-equipped clay studio offering classes
in all aspects of clay. Learn wheelthrowing, handbuilding,
tilemaking, mosaics or moldmaking in an informal and
relaxed atmosphere. As of summer 2002, The Mudpit also
offers raku in the city. Hourly and monthly studio rentals as
well as firing and supplies also available.
MUNSON WILLIAMS PROCTOR
ARTS INSTITUTE
310 Genesee St.
New York, NY 13501
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.mwpi.edu
315-797-0000 x2176
Fax: 315-797-9349
Pratt at Munson Williams Proctor Institute is an extension
center campus of Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, NY. Foundation
studies in studio art (freshman and sophomore years)
include ceramics at the introductory level; established continuing education program; beginning through advanced
ceramics courses offered.
MUSKINGUM COLLEGE ART DEPT.
740-826-8102
163 Stormont St.
Fax: 740-826-8109
New Concord, OH 43762
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.muskingum.edu/~art
We offer all levels of sculpture and ceramics. We also offer
opportunities for our students to show their works in our
gallery as well as other exhibitions.
NEIL ROYSTON WARR POTTERY
15 Waushacum Ave.
Sterling, MA 01564
E-mail: [email protected]
978-263-2709
Private classes in my studio, maximum 3 students per
night. Teaching is at your pace and level from beginner to
expert. Throwing classes are blocks of ten nights, Tuesday,
Thursday or by private arrangement. Most students stay
for many blocks.
NETRA ARTS
7/128 Swaroop Nagar
Kanpur Uttar Pradesh 208002, India
E-mail: [email protected]
September/October 2003
91-512292390
NEW ART CENTER
61 Washington Park
Newtonville, MA 02460-1915
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.newartcenter.org
603-623-0313 x548
Fax: 604-641-1832
Adult education offering lifelong learning, certificate program and Bachelor of Fine arts degree with a concentration
in ceramics. Courses are available for all levels of interest
and expertise. Faculty consists of noted New England
ceramic artists with workshops taught by regionally and
nationally known artists.
NEW WORLD SCHOOL OF THE ARTS
305-237-3593
300 NE 2 St.
Fax: 305-237-3794
Miami, FL 33132
E-mail: [email protected]
New World School of the Arts offers a BFA in Visual Arts.
The pottery program at this time is part of the sculpture
major and is not an independent major. The facility offers
potters wheels, a clay mixer and oxidation firing. Professor
Susan Banks is a nationally recognized clay artist.
NORTHERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
906-227-2194
1401 Presque Isle Ave.
Fax: 906-227-2276
Marquette, MI 49855
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.art.nmu.edu/department/home.html
NMU offers BFA, BA and Associates Degrees in the beautiful Upper Peninsula. Our 6000 sq.ft. studio was built in
1996 and houses a state of the art facility. Skylights, individual work spaces for wheel or handbuilding, glaze lab,
mixing area, damp room, and large kiln pad with 10 kilns
(4 electric, 6 gas). Open to all ceramic processes.
NORTHERN VIRGINIA COMM. COLLEGE 703-845-6075
Alexandria Campus
Fax: 703-845-6060
3001 N. Beauregard St.
Alexandria, VA 22311
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.nv.cc.va.us
THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY
146 Hopkins Hall
Columbus, OH 43210
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.osu.edu
614-292-5072
Fax: 614-292-1674
We have a deep commitment to the development of an individual proficiency in the medium at OSU. Faculty: Mary Jo
Bole, Rebecca Harvey and Steven Thurston. Paul Simon:
ceramic area technician. Visiting Faculty Program has been
a significant part of the department for over 20 years.
Artists brought in for 10-week residencies each quarter.
OHIO UNIVERSITY
740-593-9725
The School of Art Ceramics Dept.
Athens, OH 45701-2979
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ohiou.edu/~artdept/soamain.html
Emphasis on realization of individual goals, diversity, challenging contemporary standards while producing work of
exceptional craftsmanship. Fully-equipped studio including
electric wheels; clay mixers; dry materials room; slab
rollers; ball mills; sandblaster; Slipomatic; spray booth;
extruder.
OKLAHOMA PANHANDLE STATE UNIV.
580-349-1484
Aggie Blvd.PO Box 430
Fax: 580-349-2302
Goodwell, OK 73939
Toll-free: 800-664-6778 x1484
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.opsu.edu
Oklahoma Panhandle State University offers AAS, BA and
BFA degree programs in art. In our program we emphasize
marketing skills for the finished work of art. We have a
close relationship with various regional art galleries where
student work is exhibited and sold.
The Alexandria campus ceramics program offers a range of
courses and study, from beginning basic handbuilding to
advanced, individually based, self study.
OLD CHURCH CULTURAL CENTER
201-767-7160
SCHOOL OF ART
Fax: 201-767-0497
561 Piermont Rd
Demarest, NJ 07624
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.occcartschool.org
NOTTINGHAM CENTER FOR THE ARTS
PO Box 460
San Marcos, CA 92079
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.nottinghamarts.org
Our courses are designed to give students a basis in aesthetics as well as technique. We also host the internationally recognized invitational Old Church Cultural Center
School of Art Annual Pottery Show and Sale held the first
weekend in December every year, an incredible opportunity for clay lovers to view museum quality work.
760-752-1020
Supports the studio arts in north San Diego county with
meeting space, event assistance, workshops, artist residencies and facilities use for artists. Our main focus is in
the 3-D arts such as ceramics, metal casting, woodwork
and hot glass.
NY/NJ ACADEMY OF CERAMIC ART
279 Pine St.
Jersey City, NJ 07304
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.nynjceramics.com
201-432-9315
OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY
Art Department
113 Studio Art Bldg.
Norfolk, VA 23529
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://odu.edu/al/art
757-683-4779
Fax: 757-683-5923
Small clay studio with electric kilns, gas kiln, raku kiln;
clay sculpture courses, advanced independent study
(sculpture) courses.
Variety of classes offered both day and night with excellent
clean facility and wonderful people. Friendly, clean and professional - a cut above the rest!
ONEILL POTTERY
18125 N. High One
Fort Bragg, CA 95437
E-mail: [email protected]
OCEAN SPRINGS PARK COMMISSION
Moving Arts Center
Middle St.
Ocean Springs, MS 39553
E-mail: [email protected]
A graduate from OCC in Michigan with a ceramic tech
degree, my studio is nestled on the coast of Mendocino
with tropical gardens. Offer a 6 week class in handbuilding
and wheelthrowing to finished glazed projects with a high
fire white stoneware body. All tools and materials included.
228-875-8460
707-964-1310
A community-based program teaching nine classes each
week in wheel-thrown pottery. Classes meet once a week
for three hours. Eight wheels and two kilns.
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
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OPELIKA ARTS CENTER
PO Box 267
Lafayette, AL 36862
E-mail: [email protected]
12:49 PM
334-705-5558
Comprehensive techniques involving all aspects of pottery
and handbuilding classes are designed for one-on-one and
independent study. Apprenticeships available.
OREGON COLLEGE OF ART AND CRAFT
503-297-5544
8245 SW Barnes Rd.
Fax: 503-297-9651
Portland, OR 97225
Toll-free: 800-390-0632
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ocac.edu
BFA and certificate degree in craft, post-Baccalaureate
studies with portfolio development and business practices,
as well as studio school. We support both pottery and
sculpture. Facilities include handbuilding and wheel throwing areas; electric, gas-fired-reduction, vapor glaze, and
raku kilns; spray booth; sand blaster; welding equipment.
OTAGO POLYTECHNIC
Cnr Albany St. & Anzac Ave.
Dunedin, New Zealand
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.tekotago.ac.nz/art
64-3-477-3014
The only art school in New Zealand offering full-time masters and bachelor degrees and a diploma in ceramic arts.
The school where Matrix Glaze Software was developed.
OX-BOW SUMMER SCHOOL OF ART
312-899-7455
3435 Rupprecht Way
Fax: 312-899-1453
Saugatuck, MI 49453
Toll-free: 800-318-3019
Web: http://www.ox-bow.org
PAINT-N-POT CLAY STUDIOS
1705 Zephyr Way
Sparks, NV 89431
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.paint-n-pot.com
718-222-0334
Fax: 718-222-0335
We have local professional potters instructing an intimate
class of 8 students with 8 wheels. Our studio is bright and
clean with a garden. If you are a serious potter or a business person who needs some clay therapy, welcome to our
studio and immerse yourself in creativity.
PALMS UP POTTERY
413 Flagler Ave.
New Smyrna Beach, FL 32169
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.palmsuppottery.com
386-428-3726
Palms Up Pottery is a full-time production studio featuring
wheel thrown, handbuilt and sculpted stoneware. We also
offer a 6 week basic wheel throwing course. The class is
limited to only 6 per session, which allows me to focus on
each person’s needs. For intermediate potters we also offer
private sessions with the instructor.
PENLAND SCHOOL OF CRAFTS
PO Box 37
Penland, NC 28765-0037
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.penland.org
828-765-2359
Fax: 828-765-7389
Penland has a variety of summer workshops for artists, potters and sculptors of all levels. We have classes in clay, glass,
metal, iron, wood, drawing, painting, print-making, photography, book-making, textiles, etc. We have a 2 year Core program and 3 year residency program. Please access our web
page for more information and to get on our mailing list.
THE PERSIAN POTTER
25 Sierra Roja Cr.
Sedona, AZ 86351
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.persianpotter.com
928-284-3399
My classes are small (5-7) so that I can work closely with
each student. We produce sculptural pieces, tiles and functional pottery fired from cone 5-10 in oxidation and reduction, raku and vapor.
38
PETERS VALLEY CRAFT EDUCATION CTR. 973-948-5200
19 Kuhn Rd.
Fax: 973-948-0011
Layton, NJ 07851
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.pvcrafts.org
Peters Valley ceramics offers a diverse range of workshops
from handbuilding and sculpture to wheel thrown pottery
and offers students opportunities to participate in the firing
of our wood kilns. Summer workshops are typically 2-12
days long beginning in May and running through
September. A full listing of workshops is available online.
PEWABIC POTTERY
10125 E. Jefferson Ave.
Detroit, MI 48214
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.pewabic.com
313-822-0954
Fax: 313-822-6266
Pewabic Pottery, Michigan’s only historic pottery, produces
nationally renowned vessels, tiles, architectural ornamentation for public and private installations. We are a multifaceted institution with active and growing education, exhibition, museum as well as design and fabrication programs.
PORCELAIN PAINTERS INT’L ONLINE
125 Vulco Dr.
Hendersonville, TN 37075
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.porcelainpainters.com
615-824-2609
Online lessons on porcelain painting, luster/gold work
(overglaze) plus a free mailing list discussion group which
provides networking for porcelain artists all over the world.
775-324-1022
We bring in local artists to make it more interesting and
educational.
THE PAINTED POT
339 Smith St.
Brooklyn, NY 11231
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.paintedpot.com
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PORTLAND POTTERY SCHOOL & SUPPLY 207-772-4334
118 Washington Ave.
Fax: 207-780-6451
Portland, ME 04101
Toll-free: 800-539-4301
Web: http://www.portlandpottery.com
POTCLAYS LTD.
44-1782-219816
Brickkiln Ln., Etruria
Fax: 44-1782-286506
Stoke-on-Trent, Staffs ST4 7BP, United Kingdom
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.potclays.co.uk
Offer ceramics courses and seminars.
POTERIE AME DE L’ARGILE
Le Bas Rocher St. Jean Sur Mayenne
69-59
Laval Mayenne 53240, France
E-mail: [email protected]
0871-717-4279
Fax: 0033-243-37-
We offer five-day residential pottery courses in France at a
beautiful riverside location. (Four students for each
course.) Students can handbuild or use electric wheels, we
fire electric, gas, raku and sawdust kilns. We use a variety
of clays, slips and glazes. Glaze test can be made.
Beginners welcome.
THE POTTER’S OBSESSION
512 East 135th St.
Kansas City, MO 64145
E-mail: [email protected]
816-941-2555
Fax: 816-331-3951
The Potter’s Obsession, celebrating its 10th year, offers six
classes a week at its well-equipped studio in south Kansas
City, Missouri. Judy Thompson and a friendly, knowledgable staff, instruct students in beginning through
advanced wheel throwing and handbuilding, as well as
Cone 6 electric kiln decorating techniques and glazes.
POTTERS GUILD OF BALTIMORE
3600 Clipper Mill Rd.
Baltimore, MD 21211
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.pottersguild.org
410-235-4884
The Potters Guild of Baltimore is a cooperative of clay
artists providing a year-round program of pottery instruction for adults. Classes in throwing, handbuilding, sculpture and a variety of special topic workshops are offered to
the public. For more information, visit our website at
www.pottersguild.org.
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
POTTERS OF HICKORY STREET
802 Hickory St.
Abilene, TX 79601
E-mail: [email protected]
915-673-6445
No tests and no grades. We teach non-traditional students
beginning handbuilding and wheelthrowing, electric glaze
firing, pit fire and more. Thirty years experience.
THE POTTERS SCHOOL
31 Thorpe Rd.
Needham, MA 02494
E-mail: [email protected]
781-449-7687
Fax: 781-449-9098
Professional school/studio offering classes for children
through adults and at all levels. Well-equipped facility
with 10 wheels, slab roller, extruder, electric and gas
kilns. Resident and non-resident potter memberships,
internships, work-exchange and staff positions available. Established in 1977.
THE POTTERS WHEEL
120-33 83rd Ave.
Kew Gardens, NY 11415
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.potterswheelny.com
718-441-6614
Peaceful and supportive work environment with a wide
variety of teacher artists who can instruct and develop
throwing and handbuilding skills at all levels. Those with
little or no experience are welcome. A wide variety of classes. Beautiful and spacious studio setting.
POTTERY CENTRAL
3534 Central Ave.
Charlotte, NC 28205
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.potterycentral.com
704-537-4477
The primary function of Pottery Central is to provide quality instruction in an environment that will foster creativity.
To do this, we provide many different options for firing,
constructing and decorating, as well as many different
types of clay.
THE POTTERY STUDIO
313 Main St.
Oley, PA 19547
E-mail: [email protected]
610-987-0273
Fax: 610-987-0274
Adult and children’s classes, children’s summer art program. Concentration in handbuilding.
THE POTTERY WORKSHOP
2 Lower Albert Rd
Hong Kong 00000, China
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ceramics.com.hk
852-2525-7949
Fax: 852-2525-7091
THE POTTERY WORKSHOP
86-21-6445-0902
2nd Fl. 220 Taikang LU
Fax: 86-21-6445-0937
Shanghai 200025, China
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ceramics.com.hk
PRIDDY CLAY STUDIO
252-504-2622
308 Moore St.
Beaufort, NC 28516
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.angelfire.com/nc/clayworkshop
Priddy Clay Studio provides private classes in production
and design for clay workers at any level. Clay workshops
can be arranged on site or at the client’s studio or workshop. PCS specializes in production design and brush
painting. Group classes and references available.
PROVIDENCE COLLEGE
River Ave.
Providence, RI 02918
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.providence.edu
401-865-2401
Fax: 401-865-2410
Providence College is a liberal arts college offering a BA
with a concentration in ceramics. Two gas kilns, four electric kilns, area for raku, smoke and soda firings. Two slab
rollers, two extruders, twelve electric wheels, two
kick/motor wheels and two clay mixers. One full-time day
school instructor and two evening instructors.
September/October 2003
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RAY F. SENNETT MIDDLE SCHOOL
502 Pflaum Rd., Rm. 110
Madison, WI 53716
E-mail: [email protected]
12:49 PM
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ROSWELL MUSEUM AND ART CENTER
505-624-6744
100 W. 11th
Fax: 505-624-6765
Roswell, NM 88201
Web: http://www.roswellmuseum.org
SAN DIEGO MESA COLLEGE
Mesa College Dr.
San Diego, CA 92111
E-mail: [email protected]
Our pottery club program introduces clay as a serious
medium. The students work with basic building technique
and glaze application. The afterschool pottery club is operated to give those interested in going further with clay an
opportunity to learn wheelthrowing techniques. We are
also adding raku capability
We are a non-graded K through adult ceramics program in
which a structured yet individualized program is taught. We
fire Cone 7 stoneware, soda, saggar, raku both hand build
and thrown. 8 week term in fall, winter, spring and summer.
Our workspace is 28x78 with attached storage, studio, kiln
yard and raku yard.
Seven ceramic classes with a comprehensive handbuilding
and wheel throwing program with extruders, 6 electric and
5 gas kilns, slab roller, ram press and much more.
RED STAR STUDIOS
821 W. 17th
Kansas City, MO 64108
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.redstarstudios.org
RUBY’S CLAY STUDIO & GALLERY
552 A Noe St.
San Francisco, CA 94114
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://rubysclaystudio.org
818-474-7316
Steven and Susan Hill’s Red Star Studios features a gallery
of contemporary functional clay, ceramics classes and private/shared studio space. Red Star is a large, well-equipped
facility with reduction, soda and electric kilns. Workshops
presented regularly by renowned potters, including Steven
Hill’s single-firing workshops, are a highlight.
RIVER STREET POTTERY
621 River St.
Troy, NY 12180
E-mail: [email protected]
518-274-2722
Emphasis on throwing from beginning to advanced students.
Six students per class with practice time after classes and one
evening a week. Individual instruction stressed. Fully
equipped teaching studio plus 22 working studio spaces.
Cone 6 oxidation and cone 10 reduction firing for classes.
ROCKLAND CENTER FOR THE ARTS
845-358-0877
27 S. Greenbrush Rd.
Fax: 845-358-0971
West Nyack, NY 10994
Web: http://www.rocklandartcenter.org
The Rockland Center for the Arts offers a ceramics program for both children and adults. Well equipped with potter’s wheels, a slab roller, and gas, electric, raku and wood
firing kilns, the Center offers courses in sculpture, wheel
throwing and handbuilding. Call for catalog.
415-558-9819
SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY
619-594-6511
School of Art, Design and Art History Fax: 619-594-1217
San Diego, CA 92182-4805
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.sdsu.edu/art
SDSU offers a full ceramics program with BA and MFA
degrees, as well as great facilities, including soda and
wood-fired kilns.
Ruby’s Clay studio is an arts center whose primary objectives are to promote community appreciation of the ceramic arts and to encourage self-expression, technical and
artistic development through exhibitions, classes and the
resources provided by a shared learning facility.
RUSSO PARK RECREATION CENTER
Cottman and Torresdale Avenues
Philadelphia, PA 19135
E-mail: [email protected]
858-627-2612
215-685-8747
We hold affordable pottery classes for both youth and
adults. Each two-hour class is held once a week and runs
for ten weeks. Local clay artist teaches all levels of students
all aspects of handbuilding in order to create functional and
sculptural objects. Other topics include handmade tiles,
mosaics and moldmaking.
RUTH’S POTTERY
770-924-1174
1178 Wiley Bridge Rd.
Woodstock, GA 30188
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.hycomdesign.com/pages/ruthspottery.html
SANTA FE CLAY
1615 Paseo de Peralta
Santa Fe, NM 87501
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.santafeclay.com
505-984-1122
Fax: 505-984-1706
Santa Fe Clay is a full ceramic art center. We offer yearround classes and workshops for all ages: children, teens
and adults. We also have a gallery representing national
clay work and a full retail ceramic supply operation. We
have 25 resident artists in 14 private studios on site as well
as approximately 150 students a week.
SARA SWINK HOME STUDIO
669 Salberg Ave.
Santa Clara, CA 95051
E-mail: [email protected]
408-249-8206
Fax: 408-249-2971
Emphasis is on fueling creativity with a process approach
to clay. Multimedia exercises to mine the unconscious for
imagery and following that imagery in clay, wherever it
takes you. Public and private workshops and small, private
ongoing studio classes. Suitable for all levels of experience.
Pottery classes in my private studio. Small classes in wheel
pottery and handbuilding. Individualized instruction with
encouragement in personal creative expression. All levels,
days or evenings.
Bennett’s
POTTERY SUPPLY
431 Enterprise St.
Ocoee, FL 34761
(800) 432•0074
FAX: (407) 877 3559
➤ Skutt Kiln Model 1027
(cone 10) 23"x27" deep $999
➤ North Star Stainless Steel
Extruder Package $345
➤ Brent Potter’s Wheels
Model B $710
Model C $770
Model CXC $905
➤ North Star 24" Slab Roller
Package $715
➤Free Shipping on North Star Slab Roller
and Extruder within Continental USA
WE WELCOME SCHOOL PURCHASE ORDERS
September/October 2003
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
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SCHOOL OF ART
2222 East CR 7130
Lubbock, TX 79404
E-mail: [email protected]
12:49 PM
806-745-6018
Jeanie Jones, BFA, Art Ed, Elementary Ed. TTU. Twenty
years teaching experience. Country studio, near city, features six electric wheels, with oxidation, reduction, raku
and salt firings. Plenty of studio and kilnhouse room. Year
around access, with classes. We sponsor workshops by
well known potters.
SCHOOL OF THE ART INSTITUTE
OF CHICAGO
37 S. Wabash
Chicago, IL 60603-3103
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.artic.edu/saic
312-899-5219
Fax: 312-899-1840
319-873-2289
Fax: 319-873-2366
While many universities offer instruction and/or certification in various clay formation and design concepts, finishing techniques are often under-explored. We attempt to fill
this void with instruction and certification in various finishing media. We teach everything from handbuilding to
brushwork and accessorizing.
SECOND WIND POTTERY
90 Yoe Dr.
Red Lion, PA 17356
E-mail: [email protected]
717-246-2354
Daytime and evening classes offered with emphasis on
wheel throwing; however, basic handbuilding instruction
also available. Classes run 6 weeks, 2-1/2 hrs. per class,
four or five times a year. E-mail for current schedule.
SETON HILL UNIVERSITY
724-830-1020
College Dr.
Fax: 724-830-1294
Greensburg, PA 15601
Toll-free: 800-826-6234
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.setonhill.edu
BA or BFA in clay combined with a liberal arts foundation.
Stoneware, raku; functional and sculptural approaches.
Mixed media and series or thematic work.
SHADOW BAY POTTERY STUDIO
561-692-9712
AND GALLERY
Fax: 561-285-2663
344 NW Alice Ave.
Stuart, FL 34994
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.shadowbaypottery.com
Fully-equipped teaching facility offering an array of classes
and space rentals in a creative and stimulating environment.
Waterfront location, coupled with blue skies, palm trees and
gentle breezes serve to further enhance your experience.
SHERIDAN COLLEGE
905-845-9430 x2589
1430 Trafalgar Rd.
Fax: 905-815-4043
Oakville, ON L6H 2L1, Canada
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.sheridanc.on.ca
In our three-year diploma program we offer students a
thorough education with an emphasis on production skills.
Our 7500 sq. ft. studio is well equipped and offers many
solutions from electric and gas kilns to salt/soda and wood
firings. Field trips to Toronto round out the students experience and access to markets.
SIERRA NEVADA COLLEGE/LAKE
775-831-1314 x5039
TAHOE
Fax: 775-832-1727
999 Tahoe Blvd.
Toll-free: 800-332-8666
Incline Village, NV 89451
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.sierranevada.edu/ceramics
SNC, Lake Tahoe, is located on the north shore of the gorgeous, inspirational lake. The studio is well equipped with
6 electric, 2 gas, wood fired kiln, 2 raku kilns, 20 electric
wheels, extruder, Soldner mixer and pugmill, and fully
equipped glaze room with spray booths. BA and BFA
degrees. Great summer workshops!
40
SKIDMORE COLLEGE/SUMMER ART
PROGRAM
815 N. Broadway
Saratoga Springs, NY 12866
518-580-5052
Fax: 518-580-5029
SNEDDON’S CERAMIC STUDIO
610-539-8190
137 Appledale Rd.
Fax: 610-539-4496
Norristown, PA 19403
E-mail: [email protected]
We teach porcelain doll making and brush-stroke techniques.
SOUTHERN MOON POTTERY LLC
310 Richland Ave. W.
Aiken, SC 29801
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.southernmoon.net
803-641-2309
Southern Moon Pottery offers day and evening wheel and
handbuilding classes for adults and children four days a
week. Student exhibition twice yearly.
BFA and MFA degree programs.
SCOTLIN CERAMICS
236 Main St.
PO Box 179
McGregor, IA 52157-0179
E-mail: [email protected]
Page 40
SOUTHERN OREGON UNIVERSITY
541-552-6331
1250 Siskiyou Blvd.
Fax: 541-552-6047
Ashland, OR 97520
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.sou.edu/ecp/staff.html
The Southern Oregon University Ceramics Dept. boasts a
fully equipped, state-of-the art studio which accommodates the full spectrum of contemporary ceramic arts
endeavors.
STANWOOD HOUSE GALLERY AND
360-629-4933
ART CENTER
Toll-free: 877-629-4966
9915 270th St. NW
Stanwood, WA 98292
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.stanwoodhouse.com
Beginning to Intermediate Ceramics: Handbuilding techniques and introduction to wheel throwing. Advanced
Studio Workshop: Wheelwork and sculpture.
STARFLOWER STUDIOS
941 Jackson Rd.
Monroe, ME 04951
E-mail: [email protected]
207-525-3593
Located in mid-coast Maine, the studios have ample space
for any kind of artistic endeavor. Guests are housed in a renovated 175-year-old farmhouse surrounded by 110 acres of
gardens, fields, pond and woods. Calm atmosphere allows
immersed relaxation and focus. Our teaching enhances and
strengthens personal art practices.
STATE UNIVERSITY OF
CAMPINAS-UNICAMP
Caixa Postal 6159
Sao Paulo 13084-570, Brazil
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.iar.unicamp.br
55-19-3788-7172
Art institute with laboratory of students ceramics.
SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY
512-863-1370
Art Department
Fax: 512-863-1422
Georgetown, TX 78626
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.southwestern.edu
STIRLING HALL
847-615-7480
60 E. Old Mill Rd.
Fax: 847-615-4251
Lake Forest, IL 60045
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.citylf.lfc.edu/cs/rec/cs_rec2d4.htm
Small classes with individualized instruction. Excellent
facilities including woodfire kiln, vapor glaze kiln, reduction
kilns, raku kiln, electric kilns, clay mixing and pugging
equipment, fully-equipped glaze room and workshop.
Visiting artist program, 2000 sq. ft. gallery for display of
student and professional ceramic exhibitions.
Located on twenty-seven wooded acres, Stirling Hall is a
brand new, state-of-the-art ceramic studio. The south walls
of the classrooms are virtually all glass, providing a relaxing and inspirational view of the wooded campus. A high
fire gas kiln, raku kiln, slab roller, pottery wheels and experienced faculty available to all students.
SPERRYVILLE POTTERY
42 Main St.
PO Box 408
Sperryville, VA 22740
E-mail: [email protected]
STONE LEAF POTTERY
303-463-8081
6078 W. 55th Ave.
Fax: 303-463-6005
Arvada, CO 80004
Web: http://www.stoneleafpottery.com
540-987-1000
Fax: 540-987-8770
Quaint pottery in the foothills of the Blue Ridge now offering classes for beginning and advanced throwing and
handbuilding. Functional and non-functional work alike.
Small classes emphasize classic learning and exploration.
Bi-annual student show and sale.
SPOKANE POTTERS’ GUILD
1404 N. Fiske
Spokane, WA 98202
E-mail: [email protected]
509-533-3770
We are a non-profit organization offering four evening
classes and two morning classes in beginning to intermediate throwing and handbuilding, oxidation and reduction
firings, and raku firings.
SPRINGHOUSE SCHOOL OF THE ARTS
802-482-2840
206 Commerce St.
Fax: 802-482-2841
Hineburg, VT 05461
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.springhousearts.com
Springhouse is a school for all arts, but we focus on ceramics. We have a large handbuilding and wheel throwing studio with 12 wheels. Our kiln room consists of three electric
kilns and access to a wood kiln. Classes are held year
round and are for both children and adults. We are located
15 miles southeast of Burlington.
ST. PAULS SCHOOL
61-07-409-00241
Torres Strait
Moa Island
Queensland Thursday Island, Australia
E-mail: [email protected]
Stone Leaf Pottery teaches lessons and sells Laguna,
Duncan, and Kemper supply lines. Headed by Ingred King,
M.Ed. & clay artist of 35+ years, students learn handbuilding, throwing, tile making, sculpture, glaze and underglaze
techniques. Stone Leaf also offers workshops.
STUDIO POTTER
76 N. Adams St.
Manchester, NH 03104
E-mail: [email protected]
603-669-1601
Small classes for the beginner and intermediate student.
Studio has 3 wheels and ample handbuilding space.
SUBURBAN FINE ARTS CENTER
1933 Sheridan Rd.
Highland Park, IL 60035
E-mail: [email protected]
847-432-1888
SFA provides beginning through advanced wheel throwing
instruction with opportunities for lowfire, mid-range and
raku firings. Classes for children and adults available.
SUNFLOWER POTTERY
352-529-2699
1391 NE 157th Terrace
Fax: 352-529-2699
Williston, FL 32696
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.hometown.aol.com/annmarievl/mypottery.html
I offer lessons in handbuilding, wheelthrowing, glaze making,
raku art as well as raku firing. Lessons are private. You must
make an appointment. Visit our web address for more details.
A ceramics art education program is established in our
small island school.
ST. PETERSBURG CLAY COMPANY INC.
420 22nd St. S.
St. Petersburg, FL 33712
727-896-2529
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
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Page 41
Mask making is as old as pottery making itself.
Explore a new technique using a blend of modern materials and ancient methods.
Drape Mold Masks
by Marj Peeler
The problem with masks is in making them three
dimensional. There are many ways of making masks,
and each method can yield different results. Over the
years, I have enjoyed making a variety of clay masks
using a Styrofoam drape mold technique.
One-inch-thick blue residential sheathing (Styrofoam) is easy to cut. It’s lightweight, easy to store,
relatively tough, can be used repeatedly, and clay
releases easily from it. All kinds of simple shapes can
be made for handbuilding. If a deeper form is needed, glue two pieces together with rubber cement, gasket cement, or heavy-duty, two-sided carpet tape.
September/October 2003
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
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Page 42
Drape Mold Masks … The Technique
We used a variety of Styrofoam drape molds for many years in our studio.
I particularly enjoyed making clay masks.This is how to do it:
Figure 1
Make a paper pattern roughly ovoid shaped. This one is 8¹⁄₂×5¹⁄₂.
Draw around the pattern on the Styrofoam. The basic shape cuts
easily with a band saw or jig saw. If no saw is available, cut the
shape with a sharp X-acto knife. Peel off the thin plastic protective
sheet. Warning: Keep fingers away from the sharp blade!
Figure 3
Finish shaping with coarse sandpaper. Then use sandpaper on the
top surface to lightly roughen it. This helps keep the clay slab from
sticking too tightly.
Figure 5
Drape the clay slab over the mold. Gently press the clay
into the eye sockets and around the edge of the form.
42
Figure 2
To shape, slice off thin pieces of Styrofoam with a sharp paring
knife, or use a rasp or Surform tool. Hollow out two eye sockets
about half way down to make a stylized “human” mask. Work over
newspaper or a wastebasket because the pieces of plastic have a
lot of static electricity and are not easy to clean up.
Figure 4
Roll out a clay slab ³⁄₈ inches thick.
Figure 6
Cut away the excess clay. This mask is going to
have a crown or hat.
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
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Page 43
Figure 7
Roll two balls of clay for the eyes. Fashion nose, mouth, and eyebrows from coils of clay. Attach them firmly with slip. This is the
basic way to make a face. By exaggerating these parts of the face,
a funnier or more grotesque mask can be made. Experiment!
Figure 8
Add bits and pieces of clay to make a three-dimensional design.
Use slip, and firmly press on the clay pieces.
Figure 9
After the mask has stiffened a bit, turn it over onto a piece of foam
rubber egg-crate. Add two U-shaped coils to receive a wire or cord
for hanging. Press the clay on firmly and smear it onto the clay surface to make a good joint, as these coils will have to hold the
weight of the finished mask. Sign your name and the year.
Figure 10
Paint colored underglazes on the dry piece. Bisque fire, then brush
on a clear glaze and fire.
TIP: Bevel the sharp edges with a potato peeler.
Figure 11
This mask was fired in an electric kiln at cone
05. The finished mask is 9¹⁄₂×8¹⁄₂ inches.
Marj Peeler and her husband, Richard, worked in
clay for 51 years—their entire married life, and
operated a pottery for 30 years before he passed
away. Still living in rural Indiana, Marj loves clay
work of all kinds, and has contributed several articles to Pottery Making Illustrated.
September/October 2003
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Page 44
A female mask with an owl headdress. The owl wings (ladies’
hair) are covered with pheasant feathers. Stoneware clay fired to
cone 10 reduction.
This mask was made to use as a fountain, with water flowing from a pipe in the mouth. It was used for 40 years. It’s
made of a low-fire white clay, fired in an electric kiln to cone
05. The gold was added and fired to cone 018.
44
The mask was inspired by jade funeral masks. It’s
stoneware clay fired to cone 10 reduction. Lusters and gold
were added to the glazed surface and fired to cone 018.
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
September/October 2003
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Page 45
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Check out our entire selection online at
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Page 46
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46
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Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
770-986-9011 • 800-241-1895
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Page 47
Let There Be Lights: Coloring Your Work With
by Hal Silverman
When I was a little kid, I loved the way a jack-o-lantern’s
candle lit every interior nook and cranny of the carved
pumpkin, and let all the exterior become a dark frame for
the light show.And when I became a grown-up kid, my first
free-form, unglazed stoneware pinch pots became somewhat
more sophisticated sculptured containers that held a single
votive candle.
Like the jack-o-lantern of my childhood, the
matte surfaces of this kind of lamp captured the light,
letting it precisely trace every concave contour it
could reach, and giving me outstanding control of
the yin and yang of sculptured areas.While its inside
glowed warmly and romantically, its outside faded
into shadows and mystery.
I called those lamps “islands in the night, because
each one was a bit of brightness surrounded by the
darkness of the room it occupied.
I don’t think you can create such sharp contrasts
between lit and unlit areas with glazed pieces. I’ve
never seen even a truly flat matte glaze that makes it
happen. (In this respect, a glazed lamp can’t hold a
candle to its unglazed counterpart.)
I made lots of those lamps, many variations on the
original theme. And that was fine for a while. But
one day I looked at those votive candles and thought,
wouldn’t it be neat (literally) if the lamp was simply
a stoneware shape with a flame but no candle?
Which is to say, I really wanted an oil lamp.
Unfortunately, I’d never seen one that used its flame
to help define its shape. So I mulled it over and came
up with an unglazed reservoir that held lamp oil.The
top was saucer-shaped with a short wick that came
up in the middle (to throw the light). And random
upsweeps around the perimeter (to catch the light).
I made a bunch of those single flame oil-lamps in
many shapes and sizes.
But you know what happens, you’re off somewhere, at a concert maybe, or at dinner with friends
when without so much as an “Excuse me,” your
head interrupts your concentration and whispers,
“What if we joined a bunch of those single flames
together? Wouldn’t we have a centerpiece? How
good is that?” And you grab a program, or paper
September/October 2003
napkin, and do a quick sketch so you won’t forget
this notion tomorrow.
Well that’s just what happened to me. When it
came time to decide how many lights to assemble in
a centerpiece, I picked nine (my favorite number).
And soon I had the making of oil-burning centerpieces down to a system. Or as much of a system as
on can have if one never turns out the same exact
piece twice.
Technique
If you’d like to create your version of my multiple
flame oil-burning centerpiece, here’s how:
Step 1: Select the clay
First find the right clay body. It has to look good and
hold oil without being glazed. To see if it vitrifies
well enough to hold oil, make a little pinch pot with
thin walls (no more than ⅛-inch thick). After firing,
fill it with oil and put it on a non-absorbent surface
for 24 hours. If no oil gets through, the clay body
will work.
Note: The only oil I use is the paraffin/petroleumbased lamp oil sold in hardware stores.
Step 2: Determine the design
After you’ve picked your clay and verified its
shrinkage (very important), decide how many flames
you want. For the height, if you’re making a centerpiece for a dinner table, you want a relatively low
profile. That will allow all the seated diners to gaze
down and admire the lighted top of your lamp. And
it will give the oil lamp an untippable, low center of
gravity. (If ever there was a burning issue, this would
be one.) So far, I’ve never gone higher than 4½ inches, after firing.
Step 3: Reservoirs
Before forming your reservoirs, you’ll need to
know how big they should be,which is a function of
how long you want the wicks to burn. One teaspoon
(0.3 cubic inch) of lamp oil burns with a nice
smokeless ½-inch flame for about an hour. So each
moist clay reservoir has to be big enough to hold at
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
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Page 48
“Island In The Night,” 6 inches (15 centimeters) in width, handbuilt, unglazed
stoneware, fired to Cone 5 in oxidation.
“Island In The Night” In the light.
least 4 or 5 teaspoonfuls of oil after post-firing
shrinkage (about 1.5 cubic inches of oil—enough to
stay lit through a 5-hour-long banquet); plus extra
room for about 0.1 cubic inch of wick for a total of
about 1.6 cubic inches inside volume. If your clay
body shrinks 12%, for instance, you could make a
moist reservoir with 1.5 inch inside diameter and 1.5
inch inside depth. After firing, you’d end up with
about 1.8 cubic inches inside.You’ll need that extra
0.2 cubic inch of space (maybe even more than that).
Because you’ll be pushing down on the tops of each
reservoir to make the cups that the flames will fill
with light. And, depending on how much you push
them in, you’ll be taking away oil-holding capacity.
A wall thickness of about ¼ inch met my needs for
working and refining the reservoir sides and top, but
your needs may vary. I also found that making reservoir floors deepest where the wicks will stand allows
the last of the oil to be burned out cleanly.
When you’ve made all your reservoirs, before you
add their tops, place them in their proper positions. I
sit all the components on two sheets of waxed paper
on a level work surface during the entire building
and subsequent drying process to lessen stresses
caused by horizontal shrinkage.
Step 4: Adjusting the height
This is the time to assign the height of each reservoir if you haven’t already done it. My moist reservoirs usually range from 2 to 3 inches in height,
including upswept tops.To make the top of one end
higher than that, weld a cylinder of the required
height to that reservoir’s bottom. Instead of cylindrical reservoirs, I vary cross-sectional shapes to get
more interesting lighted areas in the finished piece.
48
Oil lamp, 4 inches (10 centimeters) in
height, handbuilt, unglazed stoneware,
fired to Cone 5 in oxidation.
Step 5: Construction
When your rough layout looks good, weld the
sides of all the reservoirs together with slip, pressing
their adjoining sides together firmly. If you want
extra space between reservoirs, connect them with
slab walls of the appropriate length. Make sure you
aren’t creating any closed air pockets.
Now you can roll out some ¼-inch slabs, cut them
to cover the reservoir openings, and weld them in
place. Add any upsweeps you want around the
perimeters. And do as much preliminary smoothing
and refining as your design dictates.
With a needle tool, make a small breathing hole in
the top of each sealed reservoir (where its wick will
eventually go). This will let trapped air come out as
you gently press each top down to make the kind of
concave shape you want. Ideally, this hole will be
over the deepest part of the reservoir, but it should
be at the lowest spot in the reservoir top.That way, if
any oil should spill during the eventual filling operation, it will drain inside.
Step 6: Wick holes
Once your piece has firmed a bit, make the wick
holes. I use a drill bit turned by hand to make a nice
neat wick hole.The wick hole has to be big enough
after firing to hold a copper tube with an outside
diameter of ¼ inch, plus enough room at the sides for
easy oil filling. As you can see, the time to find out
how much your clay shrinks is NOT after firing
when you’re trying to see if the wicks will fit into
their holes! My clay bodies have a maximum shrinkage of 12.5%. So for me, a ⅜ -inch drill bit is just fine.
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
September/October 2003
PMI Sept.Oct 03 p41_51
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Page 49
Step 7: Finishing
Finish refining the shape of top
and sides and begin drying. Since
this is a complex piece, usually full
of thick and thin components,
remember that, aside from trapping air someplace, the biggest
mistake you can make is to dry it
too fast. I make a plastic tent big
enough to surround the piece
without touching it and place it
securely over the work for two to
three weeks. Every day, I turn the
tent inside-out so its inner walls
stay relatively dry. Whenever the
piece becomes leather hard, invert
it carefully onto supporting foam
pillows and carefully trim the
underside. This is also the time to
open any suspected inter-reservoir
air pockets. Use a needle tool to
open the air pocket from the bottom, but be careful not to pierce
the reservoir wall.
Return the piece under the
tent until it’s well on the way to
bone dry. If this drying process
sounds like a pain, it is. But it’s
nowhere near as painful as doing
all the work and the firing and
then finding the hairline crack
that would turn an oil lamp into a
disaster. My loss rate for these
lamps is under 3 percent, including the few that I bash with a
hammer when some great design
experiment turns out less than
great.
Fire nice and slow.
Oil-burning Hanukkah lamp, forefather of my centerpieces, 15 inches (38 centimeters)
long, handbuilt, unglazed stoneware, fired to Cone 5 oxidation.
Oblong Multiple Flame Oil-burning
Centerpiece, 10¹⁄₂ inches (26 centimeters)
long,
handbuilt,
unglazed
stoneware, fired to Cone 5 in oxidation.
Circular Multiple Flame Oil-burning
Centerpiece, lit in partial darkness.
September/October 2003
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
Oblong Multiple Flame Oil-burning
Centerpiece, lit in a completely
dark room.
Circular Multiple Flame Oil-burning
Centerpiece, approximately 11 inches (28 centimeters) in diameter,
handbuilt, unglazed stoneware, fired
to Cone 5 in oxidation, by Hal
Silverman, White Plains, New York.
49
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Page 50
Axner High
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This is Axner’s smallest
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800-843-7057
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[email protected]
PO Box 621484
Oviedo FL
Making the Wicks
The wick is ³ ⁄₁ ₆ -inch round fiberglass wicking
twisted into a ¼-inch outside-diameter copper tube.
The fiberglass never needs to be replaced. And the
copper tube keeps the wick from collapsing into its
reservoir and disappearing forever. Also, by simply
raising or lowering the fiberglass above the top of the
tube, you raise or lower the height of the flame without the need for any ugly hardware.
Because the depths of your reservoirs will probably vary a bit, lower a ¼-inch diameter dowel to the
deepest spot in each reservoir to determine the
length of its wick tube. Add about ¼-inch extra
length to the tube so it will rise above the top of the
wick hole. Cut the tube, file the ends smooth, twist
the wicking into it, and leave about 1 inch of fiberglass dangling from the bottom to soak up the oil.
As you finish each wick, insert it in the reservoir
for which it was measured (it’s embarrassing to lose a
short wick inside a deep reservoir). The easiest way
to insert a wick without getting the dangling fibers
jammed up in the opening is to twist the wick tube
and lower it slowly (as though you were gently
screwing the fibers into the hole).
Place your lamp on a sheet of aluminum foil, and
fill its reservoirs.The easiest way to do this is with a
plastic pediatric dosage dripper with a flexible bulb
at the top.They hold one teaspoonful of oil, enough
to burn for one hour.
Gently squirt the oil against the tubes where they
enter their holes, but don’t light the wicks yet. After
an hour, check underneath for oil leaks from hidden
hairline cracks. If your lamp passes that test, leave it
on the foil the first time you light it. Now light it.
Dim the room lights. Happy?
One Last Thing
To produce clean ½-inch flames, the tops of the
wicks should rise above the tops of the tubes by less
than the thickness of a dime to avoid high smoky
flames.
Hal Silverman is a self-taught potter producing mostly make hand-built, freeform, unglazed, one-of-a-kind stoneware lamps and planters. He can be reached
at [email protected]
50
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
September/October 2003
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Page 51
INSPIRING NEW BOOKS!! COMING SOON
Lettering on
Clay
Pottery
Making
Techniques
Mary White
Co-published by The American Ceramic
Society, Westerville, Ohio, USA, and A&C
Black Publishers, Ltd., London, UK
Imposing letters onto ceramics
started as an ancient form of communication and has gradually
evolved into an art form in its own
right. Mary White shows how this
tradition has developed, covering
methods of imposing letters on to
clay, including stamping, stencils, slip
trailing, resist methods, carving and relief work amongst others.
She also looks at a number of artists working in this area, showing beautiful examples of their work, and examining their
approach and methods of lettering. As well as many beautiful
images of ceramics with lettering, there also is a selection of calligraphic alphabets to use for inspiration or to copy.
Fall 2003 (tent.) • Paperback • 96 pages
ISBN 1-57498-216-8 • Order code: CA25 • Price: $24.95
To Order:
Edited by
Anderson Turner
At last! Some of the most
requested technique-related articles and materials from Pottery
Making Illustrated.This book provides you with some of the most
popular out-of-print techniques
published in PMI since the first
issue was published as a supplement to Ceramics Monthly in 1997. You'll find dozens of techniques, tips and projects on wheel throwing, handbuilding, finishing and firing: all presented in an easy-to-understand, stepby-step format.
Fall 2003 (tent.) • Paperback • 144 pages
ISBN: 1-57498-201-X • Order code: CA23
Price: $28.95
Please include shipping address with order
Shipping/Handling: North America: $4 for the first book; $2 each additional. Outside North America: $8 for the first book; $4 each additional.
The American Ceramic Society
P.O. Box 6136, Westerville, OH 43086-6136, USA
Phone: 614-794-5890 • E-mail: [email protected]
Ohio residents, please add 5.75% sales tax.
Canadian residents, please add 7% GST.
Timeless Techniques
Each issue of Pottery Making Illustrated contains useful
information about all facets of ceramic techniques
and processes. We’ve got a limited supply of back
issues still available to help you in the studio.
Order online at www.potterymaking.org
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Mar/Apr 03
Sept/Oct 02
Fall 01
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Back issues are available for $5.00 each plus
$3.00 for the first copy and $1.00 for each additional copy for shipping and handling. Outside
North America S&H is $6.00 for the first copy and
$2.00 for each additional copy. Checks must be
payable in US dollars drawn on a US bank.
September/October 2003
May/June 03
Nov/Dec 02
May/June 02
Spring 01
Pottery Making Illustrated
PO Box 6136
Westerville, OH 43086-6136
Phone: 614-794-5890
Fax: 614-794-5892
E-mail: [email protected]
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Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
PMIBK
51
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Page 52
DOWN TO BUSINESS
The Finishing Touches
by Chris Campbell
What’s the difference between a
pot that’s “ready for sale” and one
that’s “ready to sell”? Your functional work is technically ready for the
marketplace when you have done
the following:
• Assured a good glaze fit with no
crazing, crawling or pitting;
• Fired food-safe glazes to the correct temperature;
• Tested food contact surfaces for
leaching;
• Sanded lips and bases to prevent
scratches;
• Securely attached all handles,
bases, and decorations.
This is just what you do to ante
up and get in the game though.You
take the next step by striving to create pottery so beautifully executed
it can almost sell itself.
Before your first firing, take a
critical look. Did this pot meet your
expectations or could you create a
better one? Is the design pleasing to
the hand and eye? Could you refine
the lip or the base to make it more
graceful or welcoming?
Finishing Your Pottery
2 – Your Signature
A “finished pot” is one that is produced and completed with skill and
professionalism. Finishing a pot
means producing wares that can
survive scrutiny by knowing eyes. It
means adding distinctive personal
touches to set your piece apart from
all others on the shelf. It’s the spark
that makes your work sell.
As I searched my pottery collection
for examples of work to illustrate
this article, I was amazed at the
number of untraceable pots I own.
I met you when I bought them. I
might even have your business card
somewhere, but I sure can’t find
your name on the pot! This means I
also cannot use an image of it, buy
more of them or recommend you
to my friends. A stamp or “chop” is
cute but who can remember all of
them? If you want repeat business,
point out the marking and make
the story behind it an integral part
of your sales presentation.
1 – Complete the Pot
Clean up the inside surfaces until
they are as beautiful as the outside
of the pot. Tidy up around all handle attachments. It takes only a
moment to sand the bottoms before
and after firing (especially near your
signature) so they do not scratch
hands or furniture.
52
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
Look at this bowl by Richard Aerni. The
graceful rim and handles took extra time
and effort but the visual impact is
marvelous.
September/October 2003
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Page 53
Add a wooden dipper to the
honey jar or a decorative spoon to a
nut bowl. The cost is minimal but
the “something for nothing” perception takes over.
Steve and Lynnette Loucks give forgetful
folks like me some help. In this sample, you
can see how they’ ve used the end of a needle tool or a blunt pencil to carve their
names. After bisque firing they highlight it
with a touch of under glaze.
3 – Decoration
I will not attempt to list the infinite
variety of ways you can decorate a
pot, but I will list a few ways to
increase the chances of it appealing
to more people. Perfect matches are
not as exciting as using the same
colors and decorations in a variety
of ways.
These mugs by Ron and Sarah Philbeck
look so wonderful together it’ s hard to resist
buying multiples.
Take the time to really look at
your designs and consider how to
add a light touch of personal flair.
This small tea bowl by Sheila Clennell is a
great example. Who would think a strip of
bamboo could enhance the form so well?
September/October 2003
I added a .25-cent bird to the roof of my
porcelain birdhouses on a whim. I could not
believe how many $80 birdhouses sold on
condition the buyer could keep the bird!
4 – Extra Touches
Just show people how to use it and
often you have a sale. Place candles
in the holder, toothbrushes in the
cup or candies in a bowl.
At Sour Cherry Pottery, I saw this great
shaped vessel and could not figure out how
to use it. Then I noticed Tony and Sheila
Clennell had beautiful paper whites blooming in one on the counter. Instant sale.
How about adding a hangtag?
Anyone with a computer can
design and produce interesting hang
tags in a few hours. Go to you nearest stationery store and buy simple
heavy card stock. Forty words about
yourself, or the pot or your studio.
Make it serious or funny. Cut them
to size, add a small removable price
tag and you have a silent sales partner.
Chris Campbell is a full-time potter living in
Raleigh, North Carolina. E-mail comments to her
at [email protected]
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
53
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TACOMA COMMUNITY COLLEGE
253-566-5346
6501 South 19th St.
Fax: 253-566-6070
Tacoma, WA 98466
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.tacoma.ctc.edu
Our primary emphasis is on pottery. We encourage our students to explore all facets of ceramics. Students can learn
aspects of studio operations including kiln loading, kiln firing in electric, gas cone 10 reduction, saggar, and raku
kilns. We offer an AA degree as well as a place to work on
a portfolio. We have traveled to Japan, China and Turkey.
TAOS ART SCHOOL
PO Box 2245
Ranchos de Taos, NM 87557
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.taosartschool.org
505-758-0350
Fax: 505-758-0350
TAOS INSTITUTE OF ART
505-758-2793
108 Civic Plaza Dr.
Fax: 505-737-2466
Taos, NM 87571
Toll-free: 800-822-7183
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.taosnet.com/tia
TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY
361-825-5987
6300 Ocean Dr.
Corpus Christi, TX 78412
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.2tamucc.edu/~dvpa/artsite/default.html
A small yet diverse program with close personal attention.
Two instructors, a soda kiln, raku and good studio space.
We offer an MFA, MA, BA and BFA, as well as a BFA with
teacher’s certification. We also offer an MA in interdisciplinary studies.
TUSCARORA POTTERY SCHOOL
PO Box 6
Tuscarora, NV 89834-0006
775-756-5526
Fax: 775-756-6598
During the summer we offer three, two-week sessions for
all skill levels.
UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA
Dept. of Art Box 870270
Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0270
E-mail: [email protected]
205-348-1889
Ceramics at The University of Alabama offers a wide range
of construction and firing opportunities with four woodfired kilns and four gas kilns, as well as a number of electric kilns. This program offers the BA, BFA, MA, and MFA
degrees in Ceramics. Advanced and graduate students are
given private and semi-private studio space.
UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE
907-786-1321
3211 Providence Dr.
Fax: 907-786-1799
Anchorage, AK 99508-8116
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.uaa.alaska.edu
The Art Department at UAA offers BA and BFA degree programs. Two ceramic faculty members teach in traditional
handbuilding and wheel throwing studios.
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
352-392-0201 x218
CERAMICS PROGRAM
Fax: 352-392-8453
School of Art & Art History 302 FAC
Gainesville, FL 32611
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.arts.ufl.edu
The Ceramics Program at the University of Florida is one of
the major programs in the southeast. The program is
designed to promote growth in aesthetics, technical knowledge and conceptual approaches. The strength of the program lies in its diversity; no one style, aesthetic, or technical focus is stressed over others.
UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA/
STUDIES ABROAD
Visual Art Bldg.
Athens, GA 30602
706-542-7011
Fax: 706-542-2467
UNIVERSITY OF LOUISVILLE
502-852-6796
Hite Art Institute
Fax: 502-852-6791
104 Schneider Hall
Louisville, KY 40292
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.louisville.edu
We offer a BA, BFA and MA in Studio Art. Ceramics program
features an emphasis on functional pottery, but all expres-
54
Page 54
sions are supported. Scholarships and assistantships are
available. A good place to build a strong portfolio.
UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA612-624-6800
SPLIT ROCK ARTS PROGRAM
Fax: 612-625-2568
306 Wesbrook Hall, 77 Pleasant St SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455-0216
E-mail: [email protected]
UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI
Art Department 204 Bryant Hall
University, MS 38677
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.olemiss.edu
662-915-6985
Fax: 662-915-5013
BFA, MFA degrees offered. Maintain a diverse program,
with equal emphasis on ceramic sculpture and pottery.
Work in all temperature ranges. Well-equipped studio with
gas reduction, salt/soda, raku and electric kilns. Ron Dale
is area head (BA Goddard College, MFA LSU).
UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI-COLUMBIA
573-882-7120
A 126 Fine Arts Bldg.
Fax: 573-884-6807
Columbia, MO 65211
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.bedeclarkestudio.com
BA, BFA and MFA offered in ceramics. Vessel and sculptural orientations. Facilities include 2 wood kilns, soda kiln,
electric, gas and raku kilns. Professor Bede Clarke,
Professor David East.
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH FLORIDA
4567 St. Johns Bluff Rd. S.
Jacksonville, FL 32224
E-mail: [email protected]
904-620-2650
Fax: 904-620-2652
The main thrust of the 30-year-old ceramic program is the
development of the individual student as an artist. New $26
million Fine Arts Center with equipment arriving weekly to
complement the 18 wheels and 6 kilns that we already
have. BA and BFA degrees. Located in 1000-acre woods
and close to the beach and large metro area.
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA
McMaster College
1615 Senate St.
Columbia, SC 29208
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.sc.edu
803-777-7077
Fax: 803-777-0535
State-of-the-art ceramic facility with 10 computerized electric kilns, salt, raku and gas car kiln. Private studio space
and assistantships for MA and MFA graduate students.
Three-year program with individual attention, artistic freedom and international student body.
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 213-740-2787
School of Fine Arts
Fax: 213-740-8938
Watt Hall 104 University Park
Los Angeles, CA 90089-0292
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.usc.edu/dept/finearts
USC Fine Arts offers a BA, BFA and MFA with emphasis in
fine art ceramics/sculpture. Internationally known ceramic
sculptor Ken Price heads our dynamic program, along with
majolica expert Karen Koblitz and production expert Kevin
Myers. Huge, well-equipped studios. MFA Teaching assistantships available.
UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE
SCHOOL OF ART
1715 Volunteer Blvd.
Knoxville, TN 37996-2410
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://utk.edu/~art
865-974-0432
Fax: 865-974-3198
We offer a motivated, self-directed exploration, balanced by
varied philosophies, viewpoints and technical ability. MFA,
BFA, Post-baccalaureate degrees. Visiting artists. Private
and semiprivate studios, electric wheels, clay mixers, glaze
lab, spray booth, slab rollers, ball mill, sandblaster, extruders. 18 kilns total, all types.
THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS OF
915-552-2287
THE PERMIAN BASIN
Visual Arts Studio
4901 East University
Odessa, TX 79762-0001
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.utpb.edu/courses/arts4365
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
All levels of ceramics from introductory to clay and glaze
calculation and kiln building. We have two wood kilns, a
soda kiln, a raku kiln, and two Alpine gas kilns. We also
teach printmaking, painting, drawing, graphic design, art
history and photography. BA in art only.
VERMONT CLAY STUDIO
802-244-1126
2802 Waterbury Stowe Rd
Fax: 802-244-8760
Waterbury Center, VT 05677
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.vermontclaystudio.com
A nonprofit educational center, dedicated solely to the clay
arts. 65 classes per year, plus clay workshops, private
lessons, studio rental, a traveling Claymobile, firing services
and lending library. Our gallery carries 82 contemporary potters plus an exhibition area that hosts 10-12 shows annually.
VISUAL ARTS STUDIOS
470 West Highland Dr.
Camarillo, CA 93010
E-mail: [email protected]
805-987-0746
Fax: 805-987-0746
We offer a comprehensive art experience for all ages K-12
in a 16-week after-school program of drawing, painting,
print making, sculpture and ceramics. Age and abilitygrouped classes of 6 or less and adult evening classes.
WAGNER COLLEGE
One Campus Rd.
Staten Island, NY 10301
718-420-4042
Fax: 718-390-3118
WALNUT CREEK CIVIC ARTS
EDUCATION CLAY ARTS GUILD
1313 Civic Dr., PO Box 8039
Walnut Creek, CA 94596
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.arts-ed.org
925-943-5800 x407
Fax: 925-937-ARTS
WASHBURN UNIVERSITY
785-231-1010
1700 College
Fax: 785-231-1089
Topeka, KS 66621
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.washburn.edu/cas/art
After building a solid foundation of knowledge about clay
and glazes in beginning classes, students are encouraged
to follow their own ceramic interests. Past students have
explored wall tiles, photographic images, figure sculpture,
paper clay, pottery, raku, alternative firing, multimedia construction and more. Students and faculty work together to
achieve aesthetic and technical goals.
WASHINGTON HEIGHTS CENTER
6375 W. 1st Ave.
Lakewood, CO 80226
E-mail: [email protected]
303-987-5436
Fax: 303-987-5437
Once-a-week classes for students of all skill levels cover
handbuilding, wheel throwing, glazing and decorating.
Equipment includes electric and kickwheels, slab roller, an
extruder and a spray booth. Firing is to Cone 6 in oxidation.
Occasional special classes and workshops include raku,
Southwest pottery, pit firing and children’s classes.
WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY ST LOUIS
The Lewis Center
721 Kingsland Ave.
St. Louis, MO 63130
E-mail: [email protected]
314-935-8408
Focus is on preparing young artists with the technical and
conceptual framework to pursue a career in the ceramic
arts. Much time is spent in critique of what a good idea is
and why it is meaningful to ceramic history. We have a very
open definition of ceramics. We are equipped with 4 gas
and 9 electric kilns, hot glass and a foundry.
WESLEYAN POTTERS
350 S. Main St.
Middletown, CT 06457`
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://wesleyanpotters.com
860-347-5925
Fax: 860-343-1096
Instruction in pottery and other crafts is scheduled during
four terms each year, with one class offered per week for
nine weeks. Equipment includes two large gas kilns suitable for high-fire reduction stoneware and porcelain, as
well as five electric kilns used for bisque and low fire.
WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY
Division of Art/Rm. 419A
Morgantown, WV 26506
304-293-2140 x3228
Fax: 304-293-5731
September/October 2003
PMI Sept.Oct 03 p52_64
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WESTCHESTER ART WORKSHOP
196 Central Ave.
White Plains, NY 10606
E-mail: [email protected]
1:27 PM
914-684-0094
Fax: 914-684-0608
The Westchester Art Workshop, a division of SUNY
Westchester Community College, offers a full schedule of
ceramic classes. Courses may be taken on a credit or noncredit basis and may be applied toward an Associate
Degree. We offer classes and seminars in handbuilding,
wheel throwing, and glazes. Our faculty are highly skilled
professionals who provide instruction for all skill levels, in
day, evening, and weekend classes.
WESTERN STATE COLLEGE OF COLORADO 970-943-3083
Adams St.
Fax: 970-943-2329
Gunnison, CO 81231
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.western.edu
The department offers several multilevel courses in pottery,
sculpture and theory. Complete clay facilities are available
for students: several styles of wheels, bulk materials clay,
slip, and glazes. Most styles of kilns are available, including soda and raku, as well as separate facilities for electric
and reduction firing.
Page 55
Pottery and ceramics classes for ages six through adult
offered trimesterly. Previous workshops by Eddie
Dominguez, Ken Ferguson, Marko Fields, Scott Dooley,
Michael Smith, Paul Soldner and Chris Staley. Home of the
Wichita National. Features gas, electric, wood-fire kilns;
soda kiln in development.
WICHITA STATE UNIVERSITY
1845 Fairmount
Wichita, KS 67260-0067
E-mail: [email protected]
316-978-3518
Fax: 316-978-5418
The focus is to develop a personal statement through the use
of the ceramics medium by idea development and excellence
in craftsmanship. Supports a wide range of artistic investigation. Functional pottery, interpretation of the vessel, sculptural
ceramics, and installation are all supported by our program.
WINDMILL HILL POTTERY
842 Grassy Brook Rd.
Brookline, VT 05345
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.fireandfiber.com
802-348-9300
Small classes, adults and children. Electric firing at Cone 6.
Instructor trained in Switzerland; can offer bauernmalerei
design instruction. Instruction in handbuilding and throwing.
WHITE MOUNTAIN ACADEMY OF
705-848-4347
THE ARTS
Fax: 705-848-0588
99 Spine Rd.
Toll-free: 800-368-8655
Elliot Lake, ON P5A 3S9, Canada
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.whitemountainacademy.edu
WOMEN’S STUDIO WORKSHOP
PO Box 489
Rosendale, NY 12472
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.wsworkshop.org
Natural clay bodies - (July22nd - August 2nd, 2002). Share the
experience as we tap the resources of the Precambrian Shield,
prospect for native clay, experiment with found materials and
help dig a pit to smoke fire your ware. Let nature inspire and
refresh you as you design new forms and surfaces.
The WSW clay program offers residencies, fellowships and
classes. Studios are equipped for potters and sculptors. A
limited number of residencies are available for potters to
trade bowls for time. Summer weekend workshops in clay
sculpture and functional ceramics are taught by top professionals from across the country.
THE WICHITA CENTER FOR THE ARTS
316-634-2787
9112 E. Central
Fax: 316-634-0593
Wichita, KS 67206
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://wcfta.com
WORCESTER CENTER FOR CRAFTS 508-753-8183 x3014
25 Sagamore Rd.
Fax: 508-797-5626
Worcester, MA 01605
E-mail: [email protected]
Soldner Clay Mixers
by Muddy Elbow Manufacturing
simple and elegant
safe and easy
845-658-9133
Fax: 845-658-9031
Web: http://www.craftcenter.worcester.org
The Worcester Center for Crafts ceramics studio provides
education and direction to students of all skill levels and ages
in a creative, supportive environment. A broad range of classes, workshops, and special events are provided in our spacious, well-equipped studio. We also offer a full-time twoyear certificate program and an artists-in-residence program.
YOUNGBERG POTTERY
203-319-0706
1159 Bronson Rd.
Fax: 203-254-2701
Fairfield, CT 06430
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.youngbergpottery.homestead.com
A studio pottery run by potter, Trevor Youngberg. Children
and adults welcome for weekly classes. Class size is 1-3
students at a time. Glazed terra cotta pots and sculpture
are emphasized.
YOUTH ARTS CORPS
727-552-1825
1000 28th St. South
Fax: 727-893-1660
St. Petersburg, FL 33712
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.youthartscorps.org
Youth Arts Corps at Wildwood is a free after-school and summer arts and job training program for youth ages 13-17. Clay
classes offered include beginning and advanced instruction in
hand building, wheel and commercial production.
ZAPPA POTTERY
970-249-6819
18800 P-61 Trail
Toll-free: 877-504-6819
Montrose, CO 81401
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.zappapottery.com
My wife and I have been full-time potters for over 25 years. We
have taught privately and have a wonderful studio set up. We
work with people who have never touched clay to those who
have had a lot of experience. We do raku, cone 10 gas firing.
Not listed? Complete our Free Listing form on
our web site at www.potterymaking.org
U.S. Pigment Corporation
P.O. Box 756, Bloomingdale, IL 60108
Tel: 800-472-9500/630-893-9217
Fax: 630-893-4763
e.mail: [email protected]
Visit us at: www.uspigment.com
50 Lbs. SPECIALS
FERRO
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3110
3124
3134
3269
call or email for a demo video
phone/fax (316) 281-9132
[email protected]
310 W. 4th • Newton, KS • 67114
soldnerequipment.com
September/October 2003
FRIT
$60
$50
$45
$45
$55
Chemicals
Barium Carbonate(55lbs.) $45
Copper Carbonate(55lbs.) $165
Grolleg China Clay(55lbs.) $22
Spanish Iron Oxide(55lbs.) $35
Strontium Carb(55lbs.)
$65
Zinc Oxide(55lbs.)
$65
10 Lbs. SPECIALS(Per pound Price)
Chrome Oxide
$3.50 Tin Oxide
Copper Carbonate $3.50 Titanium Dioxide
Cobalt Carbonate
$19 Lithium Carbonate
Cobalt Oxide
$29 Mason Stain 6008
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
$7.50
$2.50
$4.00
$8.00
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Page 56
Scarecrows
by Craig Hinshaw
Scarecrows seem to be a symbol of fall,
even though they watch over the fields
from spring planting until the
autumn’s harvest. We made these
terra-cotta scarecrows in October.They
were so wonderful I displayed them in
student art shows throughout the year,
returning them to the students after
our district’s spring art show.
Materials
Terra-cotta
Pieces of burlap
Underglaze watercolor glazes
Clear cover glaze
3. With a small piece of burlap, texture can be impressed into the clay.
Hats, patches on the clothes, and
“straw” are added or drawn in the
clay. Using a ¼-inch dowel rod,
push a hole into the clay, between
the legs.A 4-inch-square slab of clay
is used for the base and may be decorated with small clay pumpkins.
Add a hole in the center of the base.
4. After bisque firing, brush on
low-fire underglaze watercolors.
Use a generous amount of water
with the underglazes to create a
diluted and worn look. Once dry,
brush a clear glaze on top and fire
to cone 04.
5. A 4-inch piece of ¼-inch dowel
rod is inserted and glued to connect
the scarecrow and base.
Procedure
1. Begin by showing students pictures of scarecrows. Call attention to
how the arms are often
stretched out straight and
rigid due to the pole
extending through a scarecrow’s sleeves. To emphasize this with younger
children, I have a student
stand erect with arms
extended, then I carefully
insert a yard stick through
his/her sleeves, which
keeps his arms perpendicular to their body, scarecrow-like.
2. The scarecrow’s body
and arms and legs are
shaped by squeezing or
rolling out thick pieces of
clay.The head is formed by
rolling clay into a ball.
These are connected by
scoring then brushing on
water or slip. The scarecrow is then flattened to Third-grade student working with terra cotta. I purchased
about ½-inch thick—like inexpensive scarecrow decorations from a craft store for
the students to use as visual aids.
a fat cookie.
56
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Page 57
Closing Thoughts
In introducing this lesson, I discuss with the students what scarecrows are,
where they might have seen them, and famous scarecrows (e.g., in the
Wizard of Oz). I provide lots of visuals to stimulate ideas. One year, I took
photos of scarecrows at my town’s fall Pumpkin Festival for students to
refer to. I also purchased small, inexpensive scarecrows at a craft shop that
students could handle and study.
Although the lesson is about making scarecrows, it also serves as an
introduction to human anatomy. While the students work, they become
aware of the body’s proportions, even though the body they are making is
stuffed with straw.
Low-fire watercolor underglazes are used to decorate the bisqued scarecrows and bases.
Finished scarecrows.
Craig Hinshaw is an elementary school art specialist in the Lamphere School district in
Madison Heights, Michigan. E-mail comments to Craig at [email protected]
September/October 2003
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
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CHICAGO
Page 58
Mint
Condition
by Jan Durr
Distributing for
Standard Ceramic
L&L Kilns
Laguna
Amaco/Brent
Duncan
Opulence
Spectrum
Dolan
Kemper
942 Pitner Ave.
Evanston, IL 60202
Henry Chapman Mercer was
a prominent figure in
America’s early Arts and
Crafts movement. Harvard
educated with a degree in
fine arts, Mercer instead chose
clay for his artistic medium in
operating the Moravian
Pottery and Tile Works in
Doylestown, Pennsylvania
beginning in 1898.
Henry
Mercer’s
Moravian
Pottery
Tiles
847.425.1900
Fax 847.332.2575
www.potterymaking.org
58
While studying old tools in abandoned Pennsylvania potteries his
interest in clay was born. Mercer
was determined to resurrect the
craftsmanship of the early GermanPennsylvania potters, which was in
danger of becoming extinct. These
early settlers brought with them
artistry of elaborate slip-decorated
and sgraffito wares mastered by
their ancestors in the Rhenish
Palatinate, boldly decorated utilitarian wares with applied tulips, birds,
animals, human figures, and inscriptions in High German.
These Pennsylvania family potters could no longer compete with
mass-produced ceramic wares. The
secluded settlers that had remained
true to their German heritage in
language, folk art, and livelihood
became “Americanized” in the next
generation, losing the skills of this
pottery art.
Mercer felt he could master the
craft in restoring a Bucks County
pottery. Upon determining that the
red clay native to the area was suitable for terra cotta tile-making,
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
Mercer embarked on what he perceived as a profitable endeavor.
Mercer was further encouraged by
the architectural use of terra cotta
during the last half of the 19th century and the revival of fireplace-tile
ornamentation.
The Arkansas Traveller
Between 1914 and 1925, Mercer
focused on modular brocade panels
of well-known stories originating
from American folklore and literature. Charlotte’s Mint Museum of
Art features Mercer’s second
American legend brocade, The
Arkansas Traveller, as a fireplace
surround. Based on a mid-19th
century tale popular on the
American frontier, this musical
myth centers on a fiddle tune.
Prints published as a pair by
Currier & Ives provided Mercer
with the characterization for seven
fireplace panels depicting an
encounter between a backwoods
Arkansas fiddler and a sophisticated
city-gentleman. Mercer named the
panels “Lost in the Woods,” “The
Log House,” “The Squatter,” “The
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Arkansas
Traveller and His
Question,”“The ‘ Turn’ of
the Tune,” “The Demijohn,” and
“The Dry Spot.”The panels portray
the "before and after" of the backwoods distrust of the gentleman
stranger until he proves himself by
expertly playing the fiddle.
Page 59
Technique
Mercer drafted the original
designs for these picture book fireplaces, and his potters produced the
sculptural relief. Rather than a
stamp molding, they were press
molded. Plastic, moist clay was
placed by hand in each mold and
pounded with a seven-inch round
plastic disc, especially designed by
Mercer. Each tile was treated individually, becoming a full silhouette,
with piercing to produce greater
contrast of light and shadow. Once
the tiles were released from the
mold they were dried on a rack in
front of a pot-bellied stove.
The fired examples in the Mint
Museum are unglazed producing a
bold earthen red clay finish. The
prominence of the figures and liveliness of the story revealed brings an
almost animated feel to the panels.
Mercer’s distancing of his sculptural tiles from the traditional flat,
conservative designs of the Arts and
Crafts movement proved not as successful as he had envisioned.
However, they are some of his most
important works
and are historic
to
American
ceramics
and
sculpture. Henry
C h a p m a n
Mercer said it
best in 1925,
stating, “But if
tiles could tell no
story, inspire or
teach nobody,
and only served
to produce aesthetic thrills, I
would
have
stopped making
them long ago.”
This is a full shot of the fireplace surround. Above it are two Currier
& Ives prints entitled The Arkansas Traveller and The Turn of the
Tune in which Henry Chapman based his tile depictions. The prints
are dated 1870 while the fireplace is dated 1916.
Jan Durr is a retired registered nurse who has always been interested in antiquity. She owned an antique
shop in Pineville, North Carolina, for many years and still sells on the Internet and as a dealer in an antique
mall in Charlotte. She is an accredited appraiser and a member of The International Society of Appraisers.
September/October 2003
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
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Page 60
SEEN
AND
HEARD
Children
in the
Pottery
Figure 1
Richard enjoyed an audience while throwing a pot on the potters’
wheel. It kept kids interested for a little while.
by Marj Peeler
We had many visitors and customers come to our pottery.
The Peeler Pottery was 15 miles from Greencastle,
Indiana, out in the country. To entice people to come that
far, we believed we needed to be very good to our customers.
Some of these people were little, short, bouncy, and not very
old. They generally brought their mothers who wanted to
buy our pots. So the problem was how to manage kids in
the pottery.
Figure 2
A student films Richard while working on the potters’ wheel.
We tried several activities that we thought would
entertain children: throwing a pot on a “magic potters’
wheel,” giving the kids a piece of clay to play with, and
stocking a toy box. Well, the pottery demonstration
held their attention for a few minutes; making something in clay required firing and a return trip; and toys
lasted
awhile,
but
required
cleanup
by their parents or me. If we could interest the kids into
going outside in our large yard, so much
the better.
THE CONTRAPTION
I considered building something for kids to climb on as
climbing uses up more energy, then I happened to hear
a symphonic piece of percussion music. Ah, yes! Kids
love to pound on things that make noise! So
I built “The Peeler Pottery Percussion Contraption.” I
used plastic buckets for drums, and for better noise,
I used pan lids, wind chimes, hanging tin cans, an old
skillet, and bells. For drumsticks, I used dowel rods tied
to the frame of the contraption with a strong nylon
60
Figure 3
For toddlers, “Five Wooden Doll People,” each had arms that could
be moved and wiggled.
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
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Page 61
cord. This kept the drumsticks out of the yard, and
there was enough cord to let the sticks “ding” every
thing, but was too short to allow kids to “sword fight.”
All the noisemakers needed to be plastic or metal
because they remained outside in the weather. The
plastic buckets usually held up pretty well until about
midsummer, then we’d get a couple of 9-year-old boys
who would manage to beat the buckets until they split.
It took about two sets of buckets a season—cheap
enough price to pay to guard pots from kids.
Figure 4
Our bench/sculpture for bored husbands to sit on. People needed
a place to sit or rest in the yard by our Pottery.
Figure 5
Our “Percussion Contraption” for kids to drum, ding, and whack on.
This worked well with a couple or more kids.
DOLL PEOPLE
For the toddlers, I made five “Doll People.” Toddlers
seek out anything that moves (it’s in the genes, I think),
so the arms of the doll people move.That was enough
to keep little kids wiggling and moving arms for a few
moments, giving Mama a little more time to shop. My
granddaughter painted these dolls 12 years ago when
she was 18, and they’ve held up very well (I do put
them away for winter).The dolls are set onto iron reinforcing rods driven into the ground, and in spite of little kids pushing, pulling, and trying to rock them, they
have stayed upright.
A GOOD L IFE
The Peeler Pottery had great customers and visitors.
Although it was too far for browsers to drive, our
customers would bring us their guests from all over the
world—51 different foreign countries in all. We made
our living doing what we enjoyed for 28 years.
(Richard taught at DePauw University until we were
46 years old. Then we set out on our own. Scary! But
it worked!)
Each person has to run his or her pottery in their
own way. We did things backwards, sideways, and
wrong. We learned from our mistakes. Kids are OK in
the pottery if they’re kept busy. Senior citizens are
another story! Never let them near unfired glazed ware.
They’ll touch the ware and smear the decoration.
Richard built a sturdy bench/sculpture that has
worked out well for bored husbands. A pottery needs
some place for people to sit.
We had two fishponds with gold fish for little kids
to feed. This also appealed to bored husbands.
Fortunately we never had a child fall into the pond.
We watched them if their parents didn’t.We did, however, hand out a few band-aids and first aid cream for
an occasional bee sting.
Figure 6
“The Peeler Pottery Percussion Contraption.”
September/October 2003
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
61
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The Original &
Proven System for
Kiln Venting
3-year
Warranty
Page 62
Of f
• Removes heat, reducing chance of setting off
overhead sprinklers
• Removes fumes at their source
• Adjustable, overhead design conforms to OSHA
Phone: 716-876-2023 • Fax: 716-876-4383
E-mail: [email protected]
Visit us at www.ventakiln.com
the
Shelf
Crystalline Glaze Books
by
Sumi von Dassow
Of all the many types of glazes, crystalline glazes probably rank as both the most
beautiful and the most difficult to work with. Crystalline glazes contain actual
mineral crystals suspended in a (usually) glossy background glaze, achieved by
mixing a recipe correctly, then following a carefully timed and controlled heating
and cooling schedule. In addition to mixing and firing requirements, these glazes
are also extremely runny. Each pot needs to be fired on a pedestal with a catchbasin, which is removed only with a hammer and chisel after firing, necessitating additional grinding. Naturally, in addition to taking a lot of time, there is a
high loss rate with these techniques.
Many potters nurse a deep-down desire to someday try crystalline glazes; most
of us, however, never muster the will to actually put in the work required. If
you’ve been captivated by the beauty of crystalline glazes, and think you’d like to
try them, read at least one of the following books. If a thorough explanation of
the subject doesn’t deter you, by all means, try it!
Crystalline Glazes
Diane Creber
University of Pennsylvania Press, 1998
MINNESOTA CLAY CO. USA
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Like all the books in the Ceramic Handbook series, this
small book contains a concise and accurate explanation
of its subject. Creber covers the history and science of
crystalline glazes, recommended clay bodies and forms,
and the makeup, application and firing of these glazes.
Though various types of crystalline glazes are briefl y
mentioned, the book focuses on high temperature (cone
8-12) zinc-based macro-crystalline glazes. The crucial
subjects of glaze composition and application; forming,
using (and removing) the necessary pedestal and catchbasin; and loading and firing the kiln are clearly explained. There is even an
informative chapter on firing crystalline glazes in reduction, an intriguing but
somewhat tricky practice.
If you’re comfortable with mixing glazes, the recipes given are generally simple, precise, and call for readily available materials. If you don’t already mix your
own glazes, you might want to study the subject in a basic glaze text. As for firing an electric kiln, this book covers the basics on installation and firing, as well
as what functions kiln sitters, pyrometers, and electronic controllers serve.
OR VISIT OUR EXPANDED
WEBSITE AT:
www.minnesotaclayusa.com
62
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Page 63
Macro-Crystalline Glazes: The
Challenge of Crystals
Peter Ilsley
Crowood Press, Ramsbury, Marlborough England, 1999
This book is beautifully illustrated, including an interesting history of crystalline glazing with many examples
of early 20th-century work. Chapters on suitable clay
bodies and forms for crystalline glazing echo the advice
given in Creber’s book: use porcelain and make simple
vase and bottle forms. Ilsley also focuses on high-temperature zinc-silicate glazes, though he includes examples and recipes for aventurine glazes (which contain
many small sparkly crystals) at various temperatures and a very low-fire chromium red glaze. The glaze recipes come with many suggested combinations of colorants, though this book also presumes an understanding of mixing glazes.
One of the best features of this book is the “Contemporary Review” chapter,
containing accounts by several potters who work with macro-crystalline glazes.
Some of these essays include interesting technical information, including recipes,
firing schedules, and instructions for reduction firing in an electric kiln to
achieve copper red crystals. The luscious photographs in this section will make
you eager to try these glazes; the technical information just might lure you into
doing some experiments on your own.
The Art of Crystalline Glazing: Basic
Techniques
LeRoy Price and Jon Price
Krause Publications, Iola WI, 2003
I will confess that while reading the other two books
made me want to try crystalline glazes, I was still holding back until I read this book. This is the book that
makes it practical for me, since I fire at cone 6 with clays
that mature at that temperature, and both other books
insist that the best results are achieved at higher temperatures. The Prices assure me that though you will achieve
larger and more spectacular crystals at higher temperatures, crystals do grow at my preferred temperature. They even give me 15 easy
recipes in the cone 5-7 range, made with readily available materials, and they
include specific suggestions for firing schedules for each one. There are another
40 recipes in the cone 8-12 range, also with suggested firing schedules.
In addition, this book is going to be the most accessible to students and lessexperienced potters. Each subject discussed includes a suggested “exercise”— a
one-page step-by-step set of instructions for everything you might need to do,
including forming test shapes, mixing the glaze, loading the kiln, removing the
pedestal, growing larger crystals, growing more crystals, etc. Some of these exercises are extremely basic, but they make for a very well-organized and easy-toread book. The authors include helpful tips in boxes scattered throughout, and
though they give advice based on their own experience, they also list “what others say” at the end of each chapter, which often contradicts the author’s advice.
Though this book doesn’t cover the history of crystalline glazing, and doesn’t
include photographs of contemporary work other than the authors’ own beautiful pots, this is an outstanding “how-to” manual.
Sumi von Dassow teaches pottery at the Washington
Heights Center for the Traditional Arts in Lakewood,
Colorado.You can send comments to her through her web
site at www.well.com/~sumi. Check out all her previous
recommendations at www.potterymaking.org.
September/October 2003
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
Internet e-mail: [email protected]
1230 E Mermaid Lane
Wyndmoor, PA 19038
215-233-0655
fax 215-233-0496
email [email protected]
Distributors of Standard & Miller Clays
63
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Page 64
INDEX
NEW JANE CULLUM VIDEO!
“Making Bowls with a Big Rib” 40:02
and “Rims and Handles” 72:52
Videos for the
experienced beginner
or intermediate potter
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Price:
Video 1: $34.95
Video 2: $39.95
Both: $69.90
To order, please
call 703-330-1040
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Manassas Clay
9122 Center Street, Manassas, VA 20110
Available online at www.howtopot.com
Vol. 1 and 2 in the Cullum Series
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Complete selection of kiln building materials
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Aardvark Clay & Supplies . . . . . . . 39
ACerS Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14, 51
Aftosa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Amaco/Brent/Genesis . . . . . . .Cover 2
Annie’s Mud Pie Shop . . . . . . . . . . 1
Australian National University . . . . 25
Axner Pottery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Bailey Pottery . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cover 3
BatGrabber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Bennett’s Pottery . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Big Pots Made Easy . . . . . . . . . . . 20
BigCeramicStore.com . . . . . . . . . . 4
Bluebird Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . 63
Bracker’s Good Earth Clays . . . . . 57
Ceramic Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Ceramic Supply Chicago . . . . . . . . 58
Ceramics Monthly . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Ceramics Today . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
Clay Art Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Clay in Motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Clayworks Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Continental Clay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Cornell Studio Supply . . . . . . . . . . 8
Creative Industries . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Davens Ceramic Center . . . . . . . . 59
Del Val Potters Supply . . . . . . . . . . 63
Dew Claw Studios . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Euclid’s/PSH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Flat Rock Studio Clay Supplies . . . 64
Great Lakes Clay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Herring Designs/SlabMat . . . . . . . 58
Hydro-Bat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Kentucky Mudworks . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Kickwheel Pottery . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Kiln Doctor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
L & L Kiln Mfg. . . . . . . . . . . . .Cover 4
Laguna Clay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Lincoln Arts Cultural Foundation . . 63
Manassas Clay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Mile Hi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
Minnesota Clay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
New Mexico Clay . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
North Star Equipment . . . . . . . . . . 53
Northwinds Ceramics . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Olympic Kilns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Orton Ceramic Foundation . . . . . . . 5
Paragon Industries . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Peter Pugger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Portland Pottery Supply . . . . . . . . 25
Potters Council . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
Potters Shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Pottery Making Illustrated . . . . . . . .51
PotteryVideos.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Sheffield Pottery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Shimpo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Skutt Ceramic Products . . . . . . . . . 2
Smith-Sharpe Fire Brick Supply . . 64
Soldner Clay Mixers . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Spectrum Glazes . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Standard Ceramic Supply . . . . . . . 8
Studio Sales Pottery . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Thomas Stuart Wheels . . . . . . . . . 25
U.S. Pigment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
Vent-A-Kiln . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
West Coast Kiln . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
www.Clay-King.com . . . . . . . . . . . 28
INTERESTED IN
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w w w . k i l n s h e l f. c o m
Call (614)-794-5809
64
Pottery Making ILLUSTRATED
September/October 2003
PMI Sept.Oct 03 Covers
8/29/03
12:41 PM
Page 3
The New Color Bailey Catalog.
Our new catalog is packed with great products and loads of information. We have
greatly expanded our selections of wheels, kilns, mixers, pugmills, books, tools,
glazes, videos, and other studio equipment. As always, we cater to potters and
schools who look for the most diverse selections of pottery products. You can
depend on Bailey for straightforward technical advice and the best prices. See
for yourself. Get your free copy today. We know you will be impressed with
our product lines, our technical information, and our incredibly low prices.
Bailey has it all!
Here are some examples.
20% off our Huge Selection of Books. And there is no minimum!
These are just a sample of the many new titles in stock now. See the complete selection in full color with informative
reviews and descriptions. Check out our new additions at our web site at www.BaileyPottery.com.
Bailey Cone 10 LOWEST PRICES on Wheels!!!
Top Loading
Pacifica
Shimpo
C.I.
Brent
Electrics
Massive Elements
Giffin Grips $144
Double-Insulated Walls
Elements-in-the-Floor
Lowest Prices on Bats
8-Step Controller
Call about our
FREE FREIGHT
OFFER.
Bailey 3/4” Baltic Birch Bats
Plasti-Bat
M asonite
C.I.
Ware Racks
and more.......
Whatever furniture
you need to set up
your studio, Bailey
has it. Ware racks,
glaze tables, work
tables, & wedging
tables. See it in the
Bailey Catalog.
Bailey Wheels This is the wheel everyone is raving
about because of its fabulous counter-pan design, easy clean
up features, powerful drive, whisper q uiet operation, and buttery
smooth pedal. Choose from 5 models. Prices start at only
$590 plus freight.
Bailey Slab Rollers
Since 1975, Bailey has been famous
for building the best slab rollers on the market. From beginner to
architectural ceramics, we have models that will satisfy every
level of need. Check out Architectural Ceramics for the Potter
by Peter King for more information on slab building.
Bailey Extruders Bailey Extruders come in all different sizes and have
the professional features that will allow you to explore the extruding medium.
We also have extruding books to teach you more about the process. Nobody
knows more about extruders than Bailey.
Bailey Gas Kilns
Bailey Kilns are inexpensive to fire and a dream to
operate. Our expert staff is always there to provide valuable technical support.
Your firings will be beautiful throughout the entire kiln! Find out more about
the many advantages of using a Bailey Forced Air Downdraft.
MASON STAINS
- Spectrum Glazes Super Discounts!
Huge Selection
Bailey Ceramic Supply
Toll Free 800 431-6067
PO 1577 Kingston, NY 12402
(845) 339-3721 Fax (845) 339-5530
e-mail: [email protected]
web: www.baileypottery.com
PMI Sept.Oct 03 Covers
8/29/03
12:41 PM
Page 4
The Three Year Warranty tells me
everything I need to know about
L&L quality.
New!
TOLL FREE: 877.HOTKILN
FAX: 610.485.4665
EMAIL: [email protected]
POB 1898, Boothwyn PA 19061
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