Class Frequency Distribution Report

Class Frequency Distribution Report
Applied Technology Dept. Meeting Minutes
April 4, 2017; 11:30-12:00; 470G
Faculty: (Check those present)
____ Diana de la Torre
____ Eric Johnson
____ Jose Ibarra
____ David Preciado
____ Mark Valen
____ Marie Vicario (Chair)
Guests: ______________________________________
Note-taker: M. Vicario
Business Items
I.
SLO and PSLO update per discipline
Details: Be prepared to briefly give an update on what your discipline has done to continue
the SLO/PSLO discussions.
 Marie gave details of what she is doing with SLOs and PSLOs first. She has 3
adjunct faculty that work with her. SLOs are discussed one-on-one based on the
courses each faculty teach. The PSLO are discussed at the annual advisory
committee meeting and on opening day, since these are the only times that all
faculty can meet. Data are reviewed and discussions take place as to the need for
changes or not. So far, students in the program have been achieving with much
success. Faculty have been very satisfied with student performance.
LNT, AT, and ARCH stated that they too follow the same process. Adjunct faculty
from CADD and CI/CM were not available to attend this meeting (there is still no FT
faculty overseeing these programs), but it is likely that they too have the same
challenges being able to meet more regularly than opening day and one-on-one.
Marie will confirm this with the two lead adjuncts.
Mark also mentioned that he is working directly with Randy Beach on a new transfer
degree for LNT.
II.
Perkins update
Details: Information given on Perkins grant:
 There is a question on the table as to whether faculty should be submitting grants
based on the TOP code or based on the discipline. For example, EHMT has 2 TOP
codes that are valid to submit independently. However, past practice has been to
lump TOP codes together under the single “discipline” There is a Perkins Advisory
Committee that meets monthly, your feedback on this is welcomed.
III.
SWP update
Details: SWP proposal process and stipend info:
 The SWP proposal document is almost complete. There are few things that need to
be ironed out because faculty still have some concern with the lack of instructions
that exists and the grading rubric. Marie handed out the draft. There is also an
update on the Strong Workforce Program Incentive Funding (17%). The California
Community Colleges Chancellor's Office convened the 17% Committee, (comprised
of practitioners and other experts) to provide recommendations on the incentive
funding model that will direct 17% of Strong Workforce Program allocations funding
model which will start in 2017-18. Details will be released to the field on Monday,
April 10 that includes a description of the model, background information on its
development, information on upcoming presentations about the model, and a
mechanism to provide input on the funding formula the committee developed.
IV.
Course requisite information
Details: clarification of course requisites
 Marie presented the information listed in the catalog regarding requisites to the
faculty as some had concerns about co-requisites. Marie suggested that if a corequisite is too strict for a course that faculty could consider using a “recommended”
rather than required requisite. This change would need to go through curriculum
committee.
V.
SCEA representative
Details: APT representative needed.
The SCEA meets on the 2nd and 4th Thursday from 11:45-12:35 (lunch included). Marie
asked for volunteers since she is currently on 10 committees and doesn’t have much more
time to add another one. Jose said he will check on his schedule. Eric stated that if Jose
cannot attend he will be able to make that time and day.
Adjourned at ___12:00 pm.
Next Dept. meeting - TBD
4/6/17 Minutes – Council of Chairs, Cynthia McGregor - notetaker
Approval of Agenda – Approved
Public Comment:
SEP (Student Education Plan): David Ramirez
David explained the importance and benefits of SEPs. The abbreviated SEP is a one-semester plan for
students in terms of registration. The Comprehensive SEP maps out the complete path for the student. When
students work on a comprehensive SEP with a counselor, they also discuss deadlines (such as petition to
graduate, transfer to UC or CSU), supplemental forms needed to transfer, etc.
One concern expressed by chairs is the lack of support for students interested in completing CTE program
while concurrently working on a transfer degree. Faculty have experience this lack of support from
counseling is negatively impact not just the programs themselves, but student success. This needs to be an
ongoing conversation with counseling and CTE faculty so that students understand their options and have a
clear plan that benefits them. It was also expressed we need to remember that adding degrees often adds
units, which then puts pressure on financial aid running out over time.
Martina Peinado, Articulation Officer
Martina discussed the SDSU list of courses that articulate with SWC courses that arrived just before spring
break. There are courses that are crossed out, and she is re-submitting them for articulation. There is concern
that all courses submitted for articulation must have a COR (Course of Record in Curricunet) with 3-year
recency. Since we the Chancellor’s Office only requires 5-year recency, this isn’t aligned with the rhythm of
updates provided by faculty. Martina will reach out to faculty when there is specific concern, and she also
encourages faculty to contact her with any questions. Martina provided an overview of articulation and her
role as articulation officer, reminding us that curriculum is faculty driven and she is providing the support we
need. We also got to hear about her boyfriend, Oscar, where only she can access all course outlines for all
community college courses. There were some questions about C-IDs, and her most recent experience was a
one-week turnaround for an approval.
SLOS and Discipline Discussion
Please remember to submit your agendas and minutes with SLO discussions. This is needed for accreditation
follow-up to show campus-wide conversations. Forward the Angie Stuart.
Presiding Chair Report
Department chair elections are in progress. Must be present to vote. Voting occurs during a department
meeting. Results need to be recorded by the end of the semester, so please take action this month or during
May department meeting.
April is “Vote of Confidence” month for chairs. According to the by-laws, please do this as you wish. A paper
ballot is fine. Cynthia will send an email to all chairs and deans with details.
Calendar Survey is coming. It’s short. Please take it. There is concern that the security was faulty and some
people were submitting multiple surveys. Cynthia will pass that along to Linda Hensley.
College Preview Day is April 18th. We expect 700 students. Thank you to faculty how are accommodating the
classroom visits. A sheet went around the table confirming classroom visit list. A few faculty added their class
to the list. Cynthia will forward to Sandra Calderon. Also, we will have another majors pavilion with tables,
banners, and sandwiches for faculty. School Deans should be coordinating this with you. If not, please talk to
your dean. The commitment is 11:45-12:45 (college hour).
Chair By-Laws need to be reviewed annually. We looked them over and included clarifying language about
what happens if a chair goes on leave and then doesn’t come back. It seems some of us find that idea
appealing. Nonetheless, we agreed to clarify if there is no return from leave, there will be an election,
facilitated collaboratively between Dean, Presiding Chair, and department faculty, to elect a chair
replacement to finish the term. After that, business as usual. There was a motion, second, and then vote on
on approving the by-laws. They were unanimously approved, and we are excited to not see them again until
next year.
Next meeting, May 4th 2017.
Curriculum Committee
DE Moratorium has been lifted!
◦ If you have disciplines that want to propose online/hybrid sections, there will be an
additional form to fill out (in development), including a section on 508 Compliance. Word on
the street is that the hiring of a 508 Compliance Officer is in the pipeline
SCC – Report on Financial Aid 101 (Patti Larkin)
- Please review powerpoint sent from Patti Larkin
- 74% of our students receive some type of financial aid
- SWC facilitates over $44 million of financial aid to students
- Students continue to receive financial payments THROUGHOUT the semester
◦ Please remind faculty to drop students if they stop attending – they will continue receiving
their aid until they are officially dropped. If they aren’t dropped until the end of the
semester but stopped attending early on, they will likely owe money back and not be able
to further enroll anywhere until that money is paid.
Calendar Committee
Block scheduling
- Please continue to seek out addressing Calendar Committee if you need to have an exception to the
block scheduling
- Future Calendar Meetings (email Kim Rader to be put on agenda)
◦ 3/3 11am-12pm in L246N
◦ 3/10 1:30-2:30pm in Conf 104
◦ 3/24 1:30-2:30pm in Conf 104
Draft 2018-2019 calendar (Four versions, hand-out has the two that impact faculty schedule)
◦ Student Services prefers to start calendar at the same time as normal (for summer turnaround), therefore added days will be in December
◦ Please put this on your department agenda and email me if there is a favorite version
◦ We need to “pick one” to vote on during the Spring Calendar Survey (April?)
Summer Schedule 2017 – Change in Locations
All three centers are under their target FTES for funding
We currently have over 400 sections scheduled; about 1/3 will be relocated to centers
VPAA will work with Deans on Monday 3/6 to strategize what sections to be moved. If you have any brilliant
ideas or concerns, please send them to your Dean. Cynthia has also sent an email to VPAA to please be
careful with moving courses since many faculty have already assigned their summer sections to faculty. Any
changes in time/days will be a disruption. Though inevitable, hopefully they won’t be disastrous to
scheduling.
Proposed plan:
- 50 sections to National City (-86 FTES)
- 50 sections to Otay Mesa (-114 FTES)
- 25 sections to San Ysidro (at target…)
Chair By-Laws First Read
Email feedback to Cynthia. These will be emailed to all chairs for their perusal.
English Department Meeting
Tuesday, 04 April 2017
11:50 a.m. – 1:05 p.m.
Room 417
Present: Itzel Ortega, Cindy McDaniel, John Rieder, Kathy Parrish, Elisa Hedrick,
Noreen Maddox, Lynn Pollock, Henry Aronson, Heather Eudy, Renee St. Louis, Brendt
Progar, Katie Ness Santana, Dagmar Fields, Claire Utgaard, Vilma Moore, Francisco
Bustos, Josue Arredondo, Leslie Yoder, Susan Yonker, Randy Beach, Jessica Posey,
Michael Wickert
1. Chair’s Report – Leslie Yoder (10 min.)

Fall17 schedule delayed due to changes to Summer 17 schedule
 Most ENGL summer classes have been moved to Otay Mesa,
which is delaying the schedule coordination
 Delay is due to difficulty in finding room for all classes at OM
 Stay tuned for Summer 17 and Fall 17 schedule

Please review Kathy Tyner’s e-mail regarding College Preview Day
(April 18th) - volunteers needed!

Academic Senate has requested that agendas/minutes from
department meetings reflect accurate details of all SLO information
being discussed for accreditation purposes
2. Writing Center and Creative Writing Club – Heather Eudy (5 min.)

Creative Writing Club working on a legacy project to promote AsianAmerican representation
 Club is seeking donations of books/texts that are
representative of Asian-American culture

There will be an open mic in conjunction with Writing Center

Instructors are encouraged to continue to promote writing center
workshops to students
 Please consider offering extra credit to students for attending
workshops
 Suggestions: to video record workshops and post them online
and/or to promote them on the main SWC website

Switching to e-confirmation Writing Center forms soon
 No more yellow paper copies due to high cost
 Details about new e-confirmation still being finalized but
expect an e-mail notification
3. DSS Update – Patricia Flores-Charter, Guest (10min.)

Handout No. 1-

Students with disabilities have federal rights to receive
accommodations and failing to offer such is a violation of their rights
 Students have access to law assistance if they feel
discriminated against

Students may bring documentation to DSS office to verify disability
and request accommodations
 A student can also request to be screened for DSS at any time
 If accommodations are denied, student has right to appeal

Examples of accommodations include using a tape recorder during
lecture and getting extended time on tests
 If a student has severe hearing loss and does not know ASL,
please refer him/her to the High Tech Center in room 421
(walk-ins welcome)

Handout No. 2-

Instructors encouraged to be tactful about expressing to a student
that he/she may need to be screened for DSS

Some things to look for:
 Student has a hard time understanding what is being said or
read
 He/she studies a long time to get an ‘A’ but gets a ‘D’ instead
 Student cannot finish test in time
 ETC
 Students can test for DSS at any point in the semester
 Screening appointment needed
4. ESL Pilot Project – Surian Figueroa and Jessica Whitsett, Guests (15 min.)

Handout-

ESL department is proposing a pilot project that will allow students to
enroll directly into ENGL 114 after completing ESL 159A & ESL 159B
 Pilot project that will last 1 year (2 semesters)
 Students who complete ESL 159A & 159B with an ‘A’ or ‘B’
will be enrolled into ENGL 114 and their progress will be
tracked for a year
 Goal is to reduce exit points and ensure students succeed in
their English classes, after ESL

At present, ENGL 71 is a prerequisite to enroll into ENGL 114;
however, a compare and contrast of between ESL 159A/B & ENGL
71 shows course descriptions/objectives are parallel (handout)
 Exception: ESL 159A/B does not address rhetorical strategies

Questions: Why are students expected to pass with an ‘A’ or ‘B’
instead of just passing the class with a ‘C’? Can ENGL 99 be
included?
 ESL department will consider both questions

ESL department wishes for input/feedback as well as for cooperation
from English department regarding this pilot project- suggestions are
welcomed!
5. Curriculum Update – Claire Utgaard (10 min.)

Proposal for ADN 140 to replace ENGL 115 as a pre-requisite in
Medical Lab Tech program
 The goal is to reduce the number of units for the program after
receiving pressure from state

It was agreed to maintain ENGL 115 for now. However, concerns
remain due to:
 ADN 140 is a 3 unit class that meets the writing proficiency
required for A.A. degree- in theory, any student could chose to
take ADN 140 instead of ENGL 115
 While ADN 140 is supposed to be parallel to ENGL 115 (it’s
not a degree-specific course) there’s still concern regarding its
content/rigor

Proposal to change language regarding RDG proficiency
requirement The goal of the Reading department is to change the catalog
language to say that RDG proficiency can be met by earning a
proficient result in the assessment test OR by earning a ‘C’
grade or higher in RDG 158 or ENGL 116
 Current language lists RDG 158 and ENGL 115 as meeting
proficiency for Reading
o Instructors would like a written description of BOTH
ideas/proposals in order to be able to compare/contrast
 This change requires action from senate to be approved
 There’s a meeting on April 13th to determine whether or not
any changes will be taken to senate- please submit any
recommendations to the RDG dept. soon!
6. SLO Update – Jetta Posey (5 min.)

Fall 2016 classes to be distributed today: ENGL 160,161,162, 255,
260, 272, and 281
 If you have data for them please enter it soon

If you access eLumen you will see the courses have been distributed
to you already
 Please make sure to score students in each one of your
classes for this semester
 E-mail Bob Stretch if you any issues with your rosters

English department will be revising program learning outcomesvolunteers needed to help create action plan for program level
SLO’s! Please contact Jetta if you’re interested
7. Keys to Success Workshop – Kathy Parrish (5 min.)

Upcoming workshop on how to empower students impacted by
incarceration on April 20th, 3-4 PM, Rm. 214

Currently seeking advisor for upcoming student club
8. Senate Update – Cindy McDaniel, Jetta Posey, and Josue Arredondo
(5 min.)

No updates
9. Union Update – Heather Eudy, John Rieder, Laura Brooks, and Josue
Arredondo (5 min.)

Contract vote due today\

Heather Eudy was unanimously elected to another term as English
rep.
10. Other (5 min.)

Canvas training needs to be completed by August 10th- Leslie will be
reaching out to those still needing the training
Family Studies Meeting Agenda
Thursday April 13, 2017
12:30-2:00 RM 560J
Faculty: (Check those present)
_X___ Faculty Virginia Watson
_X___ Faculty Shannon Schiele
__X__ Faculty Patricia Bartow
__X__ Faculty Jenny Sabas
___X_ Faculty Leslynn Gallo, Chair
Excused RWP Faculty Name Sandra Corona
Guests: Silvia Cornejo, Dean 1:00-1:30
Note-taker: Patricia Bartow
Business Items
Topic 1: Adjunct Faculty Retreat
Discussion and Details
The Adjunct Faculty Retreat will be held on Friday April 28, 2017; 11-1
At Mary Holmes, Prof Emeritus home in Jumal. Lunch will be provided.
Ginny volunteered to lead a discussion on Canvas, since she is a Mentor for the Program.
Discussion ensued on what an amazing platform Canvas is and the learning curve would be
manageable because of the work on Blackboard. Leslynn handed out the latest data of program
and class SLO’s to be discussed and modified with adjuncts at retreat. Faculty review of SLO’s
for retreat and volunteered to each oversee 2 courses and lead the discussion of how the
course objectives and the SLO’s could be better aligned. It was agreed that since a majority of
the department’s courses were taught by adjunct faculty their input at open day would be
reviewed and further aligned. All faculty present made suggestions to the Program SLO’s
including the new ATD that has been sent to Chancellor’s office. Shannon agree to make the
changes and provide copies for retreat.
Topic 2: Strong Workforce: Shannon
Discussion and Details:
Shannon explain her role on the Strong Workforce Committee and provided notes from the 411-17 meeting. Practicum Students (282A) might be eligible for internships stipends beginning
as soon as Summer of 2017. Committee commented on the practices and procedures of
Practicum were already strong and in place. Shannon will work with Nelson Riley and keep
department apprised. Discussion ensued about other ways department could participate in
Strong Workforce.
Topic 3: CafeJ
Discussion and Details:
Leslynn passed out Mission Statement currently being reviewed by AJ Department.
Coordinator Position was discussed and some names were mentioned as possible good fits.
Department unanimously decided to recruit in Fall. Ginny discuss how her Sabbatical work
would complement the work begun in CafeJ.
Topic 4: Construction Building 550 – Dean Cornejo
Discussion and Details:
Dean Cornejo discussed the modifications that were approved for Building 560J and what
improvements would be pending. Construction
Shared Resources with AJ would make Department’s both operate more smoothly.
Lab Tech Position was approved and should be posted shortly by HR. Discussion was held on
the importance of the position to smooth operations of both Departments.
Adjourned at 2:00 PM
Next Dept. meeting - Adjunct meeting April 28, 2017
Frontline Education
https://www.mylearningplan.com/Forms.asp?F=54310&M=V&I=5...
GROUP PROPOSAL
Please complete and submit this proposal at least 15 business days prior to the start date of the activity, and only
if the Facilitator/Presenter is a:
District Employee, and there is no additional cost to the District; OR,
District Employee, or a Non-District Employee, and has an approved Human Resources Transaction Form (HRT), or an
approved Volunteer Service Form, or an approved Independent Contractor Agreement. A copy of one of these approved
documents is required to support the request to facilitate/present/propose an activity.
If you do not have a location (room) for this activity, you must contact the Facilities Department at ext. 6319. The
PDP office does not reserve rooms.
IMPORTANT: You will be required to attach above mentioned document(s) or any other document(s) that support your
proposal. Please prior to completing this form attach documents to ‘My Files’ under ‘My File Library’ of the
‘My Info’. Documents will be available under section ‘ATTACH SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION.’
General Info
User
Leslynn Gallo
Building
Chula Vista
Submitted
Dates
4/6/2017 4:45 pm
4/28/2017 to 4/28/2017
Reference ID
D17414-A0-L59528429
ACTIVITY INFORMATION
Activity Title
Family Studies Adjunct Retreat
Description
Full and part time faculty meet off campus to engage in meaningful dialog about SLO's, DE,
teaching strategies and to renew motivation.
FACILITATOR/PRESENTER INFORMATION
Name of District
Facilitator/Presenter:
Gallo, Leslynn
Schiele, Shannon
Watson, Virginia
Name of Non-District
Facilitator/Presenter:
N/A
Employer of Non-District
Facilitator/Presenter:
N/A
Phone # of Non-District
Facilitator/Presenter:
N/A
Full time faculty have received training in SLO's and DE.
If you are the presenter,
please describe how you
gained expertise in this area.
DATES/TIMES/LOCATION
1
# of Meetings
#
Date
1.
Fri Apr 28, 2017 10:00 am to 2:00 pm
Site
1 of 3
Time
Location
Location: Mary Holmes, Prof
Emeritus, SWC, Jumal, ca
Off-District
4/11/17, 6:29 PM
Frontline Education
Max Participants
https://www.mylearningplan.com/Forms.asp?F=54310&M=V&I=5...
25
PARTICIPANTS INFORMATION
Who will participate? Choose
All Applicable Types
FULL-TIME FACULTY
PART-TIME FACULTY
Which group will participate? MY DEPARTMENT
Choose one group
HOURS/CREDITS/UNITS
Hour(s)
0.25
Credit(s)/Unit(s)
0.25
CREDIT TYPE
Credit Type
Hurdle Credit
Flex/PD Credit
FLEX/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CREDIT
HOW WILL THIS TRAINING HAVE AN IMPACT ON – Please describe all applicable in at least three-to-five sentences.
Staff (self) Improvement:
Full and Adjunct faculty will discuss both SLO's and DE which will improve instruction.
Unstructured time is imperative to improving relationships and morale for any team. By
sharing ideas and strategies all learning increases.
Instructional (teaching)
Improvement:
Faculty will share teaching strategies and ideas for each course taught. Small groups will
be formed by teaching assignments. SLO's review and teaching strategies shared.
Student (learning)
improvement:
SLO's is a core component to excellent teaching. The Family Studies Dept has made of
goal of making these meaningful. Students will benefit from fine tuning the SLO's and the
sharing of successful teaching strategies.
Flex/PD Statutory Categories
-- Select all applicable.
A. Course instruction and evaluation
B. Staff development, in service training and instructional improvement
C. Program and course curriculum or learning resource development and
evaluation
G. Department or division meetings, conference workshops and institutional
research
HURDLE CREDIT REQUEST (SALARY ADVANCEMENT FOR FACULTY)
FACULTY WILL BE ABLE TO APPLY WHAT THEY LEARNED TO – Please describe each in at least three-to-five
sentences
Student Learning/Classroom: 1) Fine tune SLO's so that that refelct best practices. 2) Review and modify SLO's to better
support students. 3) Facilitate classroom instructions to clearly embrace SLO's.
College Programs:
1) Increase dept effectiveness in teaching. 2) Increase morale with interactions and
collegiality. 3) Review courses with adjuncts who are professionals in the field.
College Operations:
1) Faculty communication 2) Sharing of resources 3) Collaboration of ideas and strategies
EDUCATIONAL INCENTIVE CREDIT REQUEST (SALARY ADVANCEMENT FOR CLASSIFIED)
2 of 3
4/11/17, 6:29 PM
Frontline Education
https://www.mylearningplan.com/Forms.asp?F=54310&M=V&I=5...
DESCRIBE HOW THIS ACTIVITY WILL – Please describe each in at least three-to-five sentences.
Enhance the standards of
service of the employees:
See above
Improve the standards of
on-the-job performance:
See above
Encourage the employee to See above
improve his/her relationships
with students, faculty,
administrators, and the
general public.
ATTACH SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION
Attach files here
EQUIPMENT REQUEST
Laptops ## (22max):
N/A
Finish
Administrator's Section
Approval Summary
Administrator
Approval Type
Status
Date
Hinck, Patricia
PROPOSAL
APPROVED
4/10/2017 3:24 pm
Williams, Janelle
PROPOSAL
PENDING
Logistics, SWCPD
PROPOSAL
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3 of 3
4/11/17, 6:29 PM
ESL Department Meeting
Notes
April 2017
Announcements and updates
Thank you to Angie S. for her work on accreditation!
Thanks to everyone on hiring committee! Dr. Levine sent out ESL job posting to HR yesterday.
ESL faculty worked on curricular modifications. ESL 54 will be inactivated. Surian signed off on this change 4/4
through CurricuNet. We are still working on ESL 15, 17 (pending changes for objectives), ESL 16 (we
accidentally did a minor mod; we need someone to help - Brian Ebalo?) ESL 52 (we are working with Susie in
Reading). Thanks, Courtney, for taking the lead on curricular modifications!
Courtney, Diane Edwards-LiPera and Suri talked to Mia about noncredit collaborations. We will begin
collaboration with SYSD. Mia will send us information from a church that wants to offer classes. Diane said
it’s important our AEBG reps work on assessment. Stipend available for developing process of working with
outside institutions and administration and working on offering noncredit classes. Thank you, Diane! Who is
interested? Melanie, Jessica’s contact might be a good person to contact. Send questions about CASAS to
Carol before April 7.
ESL Staff Development Opportunity - take part in in-depth discussions on topics relevant to teaching. Begins this
Thursday.
More announcements and updates
Meeting with San Ysidro Adult School tomorrow to talk about pathways. 11:30-12:30 San Ysidro Adult Education, 4220
Otay Mesa Road, San Ysidro, 619-428-7200
Jess and Suri just talked to English about an ESL/English pilot project. One year pilot project. Students who
complete ESL 159A/B successfully will gain entry into ENG 114 without needing to take the English
Placement Assessment. We will track success in the course. English faculty were very supportive. Suri will
call meeting with Mark Samuels, Dr. Levine, Leslie and any ESL faculty who are interested. Thank you,
Jessica!
Jessica submitted a request for new computer labs for room 551a. ESL computers first put in. Rejected BUT
Norma looked into it and straightened things out. Thanks, Norma! :) Released purchase order today! It
might be a few weeks before we get them! Thank you, Jessica! Courtney will work on creating new checkout process.
Courtney, Yuki and I attended TESOL. We would like to have a debrief with you. TBA.
Today is last day to vote for new language on SLOs and other items negotiated by Union.
Almost done with announcements - reminders!
Jessica was voted in as senator for Academic Senate
Financial Aid Reminders: Remind faculty to drop students when absences have exceeded max so they don't
receive financial aid when they are no longer a student
125 SUMMER sections (about 1/3 third of total sections) relocated to a center.
DE Reminders: DEFT training - Three sessions left - register at MyLearningPlan. Blackboard closes
12/31/2017.Curriculum Committee: DE Moratorium lifted - supplemental form on curricunet including 508
compliance is in development and hopefully finished in the next few weeks so that, if desired, faculty can
work on online sections for 2018-2019 school year.
Upcoming Chair election - Ninfa/Dr. Levine will contact you soon! Do you want to nominate yourself or anyone
else? Go for it. :)
Jessica will send out email about summer scoring of EPAs
ESL Community Building Event (10 minutes)
Beach Day at Crown Cove Aquatic
Date and time: Friday April 21 8:30-1:30, water sports 9-12, food 12-1:30 (potluck)
Parking permits: We will get 25 permits free. We will need to purchase the rest with Title V funds. $8 per
vehicle.
Sports: 2 outriggers (12 people ) 2 LTAs, 2 to 3 sailboats (9 adults) 3 LTAs, 10 kayaks and 15 SUPS (25 people) 5
LTAs, On land 1 LTA
Price: 1 LTA per 5 boats
Total cost approximation: 11 LTAs x 90 = $990, Parking 20 = $160, Bus? Budget code? Interoffice transfer. State
Park fee? Not sure.
Clothes: Exercise clothes not cotton, yes synthetic
Weather cancellation policy: yes. If it rains two days before, one day before or day of, it will be canceled
Follow up: races/team building events. Depends on # of participants
We will get the official contract by today! April 4th
Courtney will send out Sheet to facilitate carpool/Suri will ask about field trip waivers
ESL Certificate Ceremony
Friday, May 5th 11:00 am -12:30 pm
(Set up at 9:00/Clean up 12:30-1:30)
Speakers (last year we 7 speakers and someone thought that was too much)
1. Dr. Levine (Surian will ask)
2. Belkis Miller (student speaker Angie B will ask)
3. Keynote speaker (Angie B? Or can Courtney ask someone)
4. Master of Ceremony (Suri will ask Angie S)
5. Can we invite Child Development students and noncredit students (Alison can you ask?)
6. Can we finalize music, speakers, etc. (on Google Doc please)
Introduction
The Math Department is committed to student success and for that purpose will evaluate its courses and
programs on a regular basis.
Analysis of all courses and programs will be done using SLO assessment results, enrollment/retention/success
rates and any other data that will enhance the process and maintain the integrity of all programs. Official
review will follow the timeline schedule included in this document; however, specific courses or programs may
be reviewed at other times if deemed necessary.
Results of any analysis or discussion will be shared will all Math Department faculty and the Dean of MSE. In
addition, this document will be updated as needed, and uploaded to Sharepoint at the end of each semester.
This current document consolidates past activity and will include any activity through Spring 2019; which is the
end of the program review cycle for Math. In the future, a new document will be created for each program
review cycle.
Following are the courses included in this analysis cycle:
MATH 11 – High School Math Bridge
MATH 35 – Pre-algebra
MATH 45 – Elementary Algebra
MATH 48 – Developmental Mathematics
MATH 60 – Intermediate Algebra I
MATH 70 – Intermediate Algebra II
MATH 100 – Mathematics for General Education
Majors
MATH 101 – College Algebra
MATH 104 – Trigonometry
MATH 110 – Mathematics for Elementary School
Teachers I
MATH 111 – Mathematics for Elementary School
Teachers II
MATH 112 – Children’s Mathematical Thinking
MATH 119 – Elementary Statistics
MATH 120 – Calculus for Business Analysis
MATH 121 – Applied Calculus I
MATH 122 – Applied Calculus II
MATH 130 – Intro to Computer Programing
MATH 140 – Data Structures and Algorithms
MATH 230 – Computer Organization and
Architecture
MATH 241P – Python Programming
MATH 244 – Pre-Calculus with Trigonometry
MATH 250 – Analytic Geometry and Calculus I
MATH 251 - Analytic Geometry and Calculus II
MATH 252 - Analytic Geometry and Calculus III
MATH 253 – Introduction to Differential Equations
MATH 254 – Introduction to Linear Algebra
MATH 260 – Discrete Mathematics
MATH 265 – Discrete Structures
Following are the programs that will be included in this analysis cycle:
Mathematics AA ADT (01585)
Mathematics AA (01580)
Liberal Arts: Math and Science AA (01870)
Computer Science AS ADT (01185)
Computer Science AA (01180)
Computer Science AS (02190)
Computer Science Certificate (02191)
Course and Program Plans of Improvement
Summary and Follow-up Updates
Course /
Program
Original Plan
Date
Course /
Program
Fall 2015
Course
May 6, 2016
Course
August 19,
2016
Course
September
24, 2016
Program
January 27,
2017
Description of Plan of Improvement
Update
In-progress /
Complete
Create NC-1104: Trigonometry Refresher Course first offered Spring 2016 and
Course to improve Calculus student skills offered again Fall 2016 and Spring 2017.
Success of course to be discussed based
on Spring 2017 data.
Changes/improvements to teaching
A PT/FT faculty workshop regarding
practices, material coverage and chapter teaching practices is scheduled for April
exam format. Applicable to Math
21, 2017. At this time teaching
35/45/60/70
strategies and “best practices” will be
exchanged.
Changes/improvements to teaching
To be addressed at PT/FT faculty
practices and chapter exam format.
workshop scheduled for April 21, 2017
Review SLOs assessment: Effectiveness
To be discussed with Course
of SLO statement and numerical
coordinators and presented to Math
assessment (including final exam
Department in Spring 2017.
questions linked to each SLO and rubric).
Applicable to Math 35/45/48/60/70
Increase Math Center resources and
A Math Center staff meeting will be setofferings. Topic centered worksheets
up in Spring 2017 to discuss
and/or workshops. Use of graphing
implementation these and other ideas.
calculator for Math 70. Additional tutor
training.
Re-design Intermediate Algebra path for Workgroup was created in Fall 2016.
STEM Students
Spring 2017: CurricUNET course created
to be presented to Curriculum
committee before the end of the
semester.
Meeting will be set-up among all
Increase conversation between
Calculus and pre-Calculus instructors for
Precalculus and calculus instructors
Spring 2017
(Spring 2017 and ongoing)
In-progress
Will schedule meeting with PSP Program
Inquire about having PSP leaders in
Math 250 courses (inquire in Spring
2017 for Fall 2017 and/or
subsequent semesters – but depends
on funding)
Will discuss during Math Department
Implement workshops (Fall 2017)
In-progress
Implement more non-credit
refreshers (begin research in Spring
2017)
Staff Meeting
Instead of a non-credit course, a 2-unit
credit course will be created in Spring
2017 that will provide a menu of options
for students who need Algebra
In-progress
In-progress
In-progress
In-progress
In-progress
In-progress
In-progress
In-progress
Improve PSLO assessment data by
excluding Math 250 results
Continue to work on
assessment/placement process
Refresher or Test preparation.
Correction was made to prior
assessment results and will continue to
be measured this way.
A pilot “multiple measures” assessment
process was completed for Fall 2016
placement.
Spring 2017: Review results of pilot and
determine future course of action.
Complete
Spring 2016
In-progress
Basic Skills Courses (Math 35/45/48/60/70)
Method of Evaluation
Student Learning Outcomes for Basic Skills courses are assessed through a common Departmental Final Exam
for each course. All course SLO assessment is reported in aggregate form. At this time, eLumen does not
support aggregate input; therefore, the Math Department maintains its own spreadsheet of results.
Evaluation process is as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
The Mathematics Department formed a “Logistics Committee” that is entrusted with evaluating the
validity of all departmental finals. The committee is comprised of full time faculty members.
Each calendar year course coordinators write a departmental final for a particular course. Math 35, 45, 48,
and 60 exams contain 50 multiple choice questions. Exams are carefully drafted to ensure that the
questions are representative of the stated objectives of the course and respect the relative weight
assigned to each objective. To further improve the quality of the questions used, the exam writers use
test reports that provide statistics about the efficiency of the prior year’s exam. The reports include data
for distractor vs. non-distractor answer choices and point biserial analysis per question.
The independent writers submit the exam to the logistics committee whose members gather as a group to
thoroughly proof read each question for accuracy, validity, clarity, and bias. Any changes and suggestions
for improvement are passed along to the writers.
Once the writer implements the suggested changes, the committee reviews the exam again until a
satisfactory version is produced.
After the exams are administered, all test answer sheets (Scantron forms) are collected and analyzed using
a dedicated software package (Remark Classic OMR). The software generates results that allow us to
assess each SLO at the course “aggregate” level.
o Each exam question is assigned to the related SLO. In addition, certain questions are tied to
objectives of particular interest.
o Remark Classic OMR is programmed to assess the SLO questions using the following rubric:
0 = No Proficiency
1 = Low Proficiency
2 = Proficiency
3 = High Proficiency
4 = Mastery
% of questions within SLO
group answered correctly
0% - 25%
25% - 60%
60% - 75%
75% - 90%
90% - 100%
o In addition to SLO data, Remark provides grade distribution and other reports. A sample
for “Fall 2016 Math 60 – Form A” reports are attached.
o The data collected from Remark for Form A and B of each exam is summarized in an Excel
spreadsheet by the Department Chair.
•
Form Math 70, the course coordinator writes an open ended final exam that consists of 35
questions. Of those questions, there are some that are intentionally written to assess all
course SLOs; a detailed rubric to grade these questions for SLO purposes is provided (this
minimizes the differences in instructor grading). At the end of each Spring semester,
instructors provide aggregate SLO results for their course section to the Department Chair.
Transfer Courses Method of Evaluation (Math 100 and above)
Student Learning Outcomes for Transfer courses are assessed through the Final Exam for each course. All
course SLO assessment is reported in aggregate form. At this time, eLumen does not support aggregate input;
therefore, the Math Department maintains its own spreadsheet of results. Evaluation process is as follows:
•
•
•
Course coordinators write question(s) to assess each SLO during the Spring semester. At the
same time, they write an answer key and rubric.
The Department Chair forwards those questions to all faculty teaching a particular course with
the request that they be included in their final exam.
After the exam is administered, instructors provide aggregate SLO results to the Department
Chair.
MATH DEPARTMENT SLO SUMMARY RESULTS - BASIC SKILLS MATH
Perform calculations with, convert
between, solve applications, or
compare whole numbers, fractions,
decimals and percents without a
calculator
MATH 35
Term
Fall 2012
Spring 2013
Fall 2013
Spring 2014
Fall 2014
Spring 2015
Fall 2015
Spring 2016
Fall 2016
F
47%
36%
42%
44%
39%
52%
62%
60%
61%
D
28%
24%
23%
24%
26%
22%
22%
19%
21%
GRADES
C
17%
23%
22%
20%
22%
15%
12%
13%
12%
B
6%
12%
10%
8%
10%
8%
3%
6%
5%
A
2%
5%
3%
3%
4%
2%
1%
2%
2%
F
33%
27%
22%
30%
23%
38%
36%
40%
36%
D
28%
20%
23%
25%
25%
24%
26%
26%
26%
GRADES
C
26%
28%
27%
23%
28%
22%
22%
20%
20%
B
11%
17%
21%
16%
19%
12%
13%
10%
14%
A
2%
7%
7%
6%
5%
4%
3%
4%
4%
F
51%
57%
D
22%
26%
GRADES
C
19%
11%
B
8%
6%
A
0%
1%
F
54%
42%
37%
48%
42%
45%
34%
39%
39%
D
19%
26%
22%
24%
22%
22%
17%
26%
22%
GRADES
C
15%
19%
22%
16%
22%
20%
18%
19%
22%
3
14%
36%
36%
19%
24%
21%
18%
19%
15%
4
3%
10%
6%
18%
21%
2%
1%
7%
6%
0
1%
2%
1%
1%
0%
0%
1%
0%
1%
1
22%
24%
20%
22%
19%
17%
17%
20%
18%
2
35%
25%
29%
34%
33%
27%
37%
40%
39%
3
37%
33%
33%
33%
37%
38%
38%
32%
34%
4
5%
17%
18%
10%
11%
18%
6%
8%
7%
0
0%
2%
1
27%
33%
2
32%
45%
3
31%
17%
4
10%
3%
Recognize and apply algebraic
vocabulary and definitions, symbols,
and properties; evaluate and perform
operations on algebraic expressions,
and solve equations and inequalities
MATH 60
Term
Fall 2012
Spring 2013
Fall 2013
Spring 2014
Fall 2014
Spring 2015
Fall 2015
Spring 2016
Fall 2016
2
19%
21%
20%
38%
34%
21%
17%
23%
27%
Recognize and apply algebraic
vocabulary, symbols, and properties,
and evaluate and perform operations
on algebraic expressions
MATH 48
Term
Spring 2016
Fall 2016
1
55%
30%
35%
24%
20%
50%
53%
47%
48%
Recognize and apply algebraic
vocabulary, symbols, and properties,
and evaluate and perform operations
on algebraic expressions
MATH 45
Term
Fall 2012
Spring 2013
Fall 2013
Spring 2014
Fall 2014
Spring 2015
Fall 2015
Spring 2016
Fall 2016
0
9%
3%
3%
1%
1%
6%
11%
5%
4%
B
8%
10%
15%
8%
12%
10%
12%
12%
13%
A
4%
3%
5%
4%
3%
4%
5%
3%
4%
Demonstrate knowledge and
appropriate application of absolute
Math 70 value, polynomial, radical, rational,
exponential, inverse, and logarithmic
functions.
Term
0
1
2
3
4
Spring 2013
20% 14% 13% 10% 42%
Spring 2014
25%
9% 11% 14% 41%
Spring 2016
27%
8% 17% 11% 36%
0
1%
2%
1%
2%
2%
3%
3%
2%
2%
1
45%
38%
32%
48%
41%
40%
36%
37%
37%
2
29%
34%
36%
32%
33%
34%
31%
38%
34%
3
17%
19%
23%
13%
20%
17%
21%
18%
22%
4
7%
7%
8%
4%
5%
7%
9%
5%
4%
Analyze and graph functions and
conics using algebraic methods and
graphing calculator.
0
5%
5%
3%
1
9%
11%
14%
2
27%
21%
18%
3
28%
32%
30%
4
32%
31%
35%
Set-up and simplify ratios and rates;
solve problems involving proportions,
conversions or geometric problems
involving perimeter, circumference,
area and volume; all without a
calculator
0
8%
3%
2%
15%
12%
14%
13%
15%
15%
1
46%
48%
56%
50%
58%
56%
64%
54%
58%
2
32%
30%
28%
26%
20%
12%
18%
19%
19%
3
9%
10%
8%
6%
5%
16%
4%
9%
6%
4
5%
8%
5%
3%
4%
2%
1%
3%
2%
Solve linear equations, quadratic
equations and linear inequalities,
including applications
0
5%
5%
4%
1%
1%
4%
3%
1%
2%
1
48%
30%
29%
16%
13%
37%
29%
28%
29%
2
0%
26%
28%
17%
15%
18%
22%
26%
22%
3
33%
25%
25%
48%
53%
34%
39%
37%
40%
1
37%
69%
2
46%
10%
4
15%
14%
14%
17%
18%
6%
7%
7%
8%
1
37%
42%
40%
42%
40%
34%
30%
34%
31%
2
31%
20%
19%
19%
18%
24%
23%
23%
24%
3
5%
11%
3
12%
28%
31%
25%
29%
21%
23%
21%
21%
4
7%
6%
4
13%
4%
6%
6%
7%
13%
14%
11%
14%
Recognize mathematical applications
in everyday life and apply appropriate
critical thinking and algebraic problem
solving skills.
0
7%
11%
12%
1
8%
3%
3%
2
16%
15%
8%
3
23%
23%
27%
1
40%
35%
36%
29%
23%
24%
30%
45%
44%
2
25%
21%
23%
37%
34%
27%
29%
28%
30%
3
27%
32%
33%
26%
30%
21%
15%
19%
18%
4
4%
7%
5%
6%
12%
23%
21%
3%
4%
0
11%
8%
9%
16%
10%
18%
22%
20%
17%
Solving Equations
1
2
3
55%
0% 25%
41%
0% 28%
43%
0% 30%
17% 25% 28%
15% 24% 30%
40% 20% 13%
39% 22% 12%
38% 19% 14%
39% 20% 16%
4
9%
22%
18%
14%
20%
9%
5%
8%
7%
0
1%
7%
6%
6%
6%
7%
10%
12%
10%
Word Problems
1
2
3
27% 22% 40%
16% 31% 28%
22% 28% 30%
40% 20% 28%
45% 20% 24%
47% 27% 13%
52% 24% 10%
53% 15% 17%
58% 16% 14%
4
9%
18%
14%
6%
5%
6%
4%
2%
2%
0
5%
4%
3%
8%
5%
9%
7%
5%
5%
1
29%
34%
28%
38%
34%
52%
42%
55%
50%
2
17%
17%
18%
30%
32%
15%
14%
12%
11%
3
38%
35%
41%
10%
13%
20%
29%
20%
23%
4
12%
10%
11%
14%
15%
4%
8%
8%
12%
0
4%
8%
9%
6%
5%
6%
4%
11%
9%
Factoring
1
2
41% 21%
32% 21%
27% 22%
27% 20%
21% 22%
44% 21%
38% 19%
33% 21%
28% 22%
3
20%
22%
27%
26%
26%
20%
32%
19%
21%
4
12%
16%
15%
21%
27%
10%
8%
17%
19%
0
7%
7%
7%
12%
11%
14%
10%
21%
18%
Word Problems
1
2
3
53% 21% 18%
53%
0% 27%
49%
0% 31%
41% 28% 14%
41% 26% 14%
42% 21% 15%
41% 22% 17%
23% 23% 19%
22% 27% 21%
4
1%
13%
13%
6%
7%
8%
9%
14%
13%
18%
16%
0
3%
8%
Factoring
1
2
3
49% 19% 25%
42% 23% 17%
4
3%
10%
0
39%
17%
Word Problems
1
2
3
25% 17% 10%
43% 21% 14%
4
8%
5%
0
29%
19%
0
9%
4%
5%
4%
4%
6%
4%
2%
2%
1
45%
33%
32%
38%
34%
31%
22%
25%
24%
4
10%
15%
17%
7%
10%
15%
25%
17%
20%
0
14%
11%
7%
8%
8%
7%
6%
6%
5%
Systems of Equations
1
2
3
34% 33%
0%
26% 41%
0%
25% 39%
0%
27% 36%
0%
25% 38%
0%
23% 42%
0%
23% 39%
0%
15% 47%
0%
14% 47%
0%
4
18%
22%
29%
28%
29%
28%
32%
32%
34%
0
Systems of Equations
1
2
3
27%
22%
28%
29%
4
19%
22%
9%
11%
Systems of Equations
1
2
3
20% 25% 19%
33% 28% 15%
4
7%
5%
Graph lines in two variables and apply
to linear models
Graph linear, quadratic and radical
functions, and circles
0
6%
6%
5%
8%
6%
8%
10%
10%
11%
0
4%
4%
3%
2%
1%
5%
6%
5%
4%
Graph lines and inequalities in two
variables and apply to linear models
Solve linear equations, quadratic
equations and linear inequalities,
including applications
0
5%
5%
Solve linear equations that contain
integers, fractions or decimals; apply
exponent rules to simplify exponential
expressions; evaluate and perform
algebraic operations on polynomials,
and solve application problems; all
without a calculator
4
47%
48%
50%
0
14%
16%
1
46%
28%
2
19%
29%
3
19%
18%
4
3%
9%
Use algebraic techniques to model and
solve applications
0
7%
5%
5%
10%
10%
12%
14%
9%
11%
1
58%
58%
54%
51%
49%
53%
47%
46%
45%
2
0%
0%
0%
25%
24%
21%
23%
25%
24%
3
25%
27%
30%
12%
13%
12%
13%
15%
15%
4
9%
10%
11%
3%
3%
3%
4%
4%
5%
Radicals
2
27%
36%
32%
19%
17%
25%
31%
37%
34%
3
9%
12%
15%
32%
36%
23%
18%
19%
20%
Rational Expressions and Equations
0
1
2
3
4
5%
7%
25%
24%
19%
16%
23%
23%
27%
30%
MATH DEPARTMENT SLO SUMMARY RESULTS - TRANFER LEVEL MATH COURSES
Math 100
Term
Spring 2014
Spring 2016
Math 101
Term
Spring 2013
Spring 2014
Spring 2016
Math 104
Term
Spring 2013
Spring 2014
Spring 2016
Math 110
Term
Spring 2013
Spring 2014
Spring 2016
Math 111
Term
Spring 2013
Spring 2014
Spring 2016
Math 112
Term
Spring 2016
Math 119
Term
Spring 2013
Spring 2014
Spring 2016
Using real-world data, analyze
Calculate and interpret the probability and
contemporary mathematical problems by
odds of everyday events.
applying problem solving techniques using a
variety of methods. And then, communicate
the results mathematically through a variety
of forms.
0
1
2
3
4
0
1
2
3
4
10%
7%
14%
24%
45%
9%
16%
10%
40%
26%
8%
18%
18%
31%
26%
10%
33%
18%
18%
21%
Use a variety of methods to solve systems of
equations and implement those methods to
solve application problems. Recognize and
graph conic sections. Analyze the behavior
of sequences and series. Apply the binomial
expansion theorem.
Analyze properties and behavior of
functions and implement appropriate
techniques to solve applications.
0
26%
6%
4%
1
10%
2%
13%
2
30%
28%
41%
3
26%
41%
29%
4
7%
22%
13%
Analyze properties and behavior of
trigonometric functions and implement
appropriate techniques to solve
applications.
0
1
2
3
4
20%
15%
25%
24%
16%
0%
0%
7%
47%
47%
4%
9%
18%
28%
41%
0
32%
4%
20%
1
17%
32%
21%
2
27%
37%
24%
3
16%
15%
18%
4
7%
12%
18%
Use polar coordinates; represent complex
numbers in rectangular and trigonometric
forms; perform operations with complex
numbers.
0
1
2
3
4
36%
15%
15%
5%
29%
13%
0%
13%
27%
47%
39%
15%
4%
11%
32%
Apply different strategies to solve problems including but not limited to guess and check,
sketch pictures and diagrams, look for
Identify and apply the properties and basic
patterns, work backwards, and solve similar operations from the whole number to the
problems.
rational number system.
0
1
2
3
4
0
1
2
3
4
30%
25%
10%
5%
30%
5%
5%
15%
40%
35%
4%
31%
8%
31%
27%
15%
4%
8%
58%
15%
4%
4%
22%
41%
30%
7%
11%
22%
4%
56%
Analyze computational situations to obtain
and justify solutions using techniques such
as mental arithmetic, estimation, traditional
and non-traditional algorithms.
0
1
2
3
4
25%
35%
15%
15%
10%
31%
19%
15%
23%
12%
0%
4%
11%
19%
67%
Demonstrate familiarity with basic
geometric vocabulary and find values of
quantities such as perimeter, area, surface
area, volume for certain two and three
dimensional shapes.
0
1
2
3
4
0%
0%
0%
14%
86%
0%
19%
10%
19%
52%
0%
24%
24%
47%
6%
Identify and describe different problem
solving strategies -- including but not
limited to guess and check, pattern
Identify fundamental geometric properties
identification, working backwards, and
of two- and three-dimensional shapes,
Find values of such quantities as perimeter, solving similar problems - and use them to
including congruency, similarity, and
area, surface area, volume, etc. for certain
represent and solve problems in multiple
transformations.
two and three dimensional shapes.
ways
0
1
2
3
4
0
1
2
3
4
0
1
2
3
4
36%
36%
7%
0%
21%
7%
14%
21%
29%
29%
7%
7%
21%
14%
50%
29%
48%
5%
5%
14%
10%
24%
33%
14%
19%
14%
29%
29%
5%
24%
SLO combined with SLO1
0%
0%
0%
0%
100%
12%
18%
12%
35%
24%
Read and critique article(s) pertaining to
problem solving with whole numbers and
fractions
0
1
2
3
4
0%
5%
10%
30%
55%
Analyze children's understanding of basic
arithmetic operations with whole numbers,
fractions and decimals
0
1
2
3
4
0%
0%
15%
15%
70%
Identify, explain and summarize statistical
concepts and terminology.
0
1
2
3
4
7%
10%
25%
28%
31%
18%
9%
16%
17%
39%
1%
6%
17%
30%
45%
Identify, analyze, and construct formal tests
of hypotheses concerning single population
means and single population proportions.
0
1
2
3
4
3%
10%
21%
42%
24%
12%
10%
24%
21%
33%
2%
6%
13%
22%
56%
MATH DEPARTMENT SLO SUMMARY RESULTS - TRANFER LEVEL MATH COURSES
Math 120
Term
Spring 2013
Spring 2014
Spring 2016
Math 121
Term
Spring 2013
Spring 2014
Spring 2016
Math 122
Term
Spring 2013
Spring 2014
Spring 2016
Math 130
Term
Spring 2013
Spring 2014
Spring 2016
Math 140
Term
Spring 2013
Spring 2014
Spring 2016
Math 230
Term
Spring 2014
Spring 2016
Math 241M
Term
Spring 2013
Spring 2014
Spring 2016
Solve equations and inequalities using
algebraic, numerical, and graphical
processes, in both mathematical and applied
settings, and correctly interpret the results
as measured by completion and accuracy of
individual tasks graded by teachergenerated rubric.
0
7%
5%
12%
1
22%
2%
7%
2
37%
28%
7%
3
21%
42%
20%
4
13%
22%
54%
Demonstrate knowledge, comprehension,
and application of concepts from business
calculus including, but not limited to finding
maximum and minimum values of a
function, and describing the behavior of a
function such as the intervals where a
function is increasing, decreasing, concave
upward and concave downward.
0
11%
9%
1%
1
15%
5%
13%
2
17%
16%
18%
3
29%
15%
39%
4
28%
54%
29%
Apply knowledge of the definitions,
properties, and concepts of differential
calculus to evaluating derivatives of
polynomial, rational, radical, exponential,
and logarithmic functions.
0
1
2
3
4
4%
14%
13%
25%
44%
2%
8%
23%
36%
32%
4%
29%
13%
24%
29%
Apply appropriate critical thinking,
analytical reasoning, and concepts of first
semester calculus to the solutions of
problems in the fields of physical science,
social science and biology
0
1
2
3
4
24%
17%
11%
17%
32%
26%
11%
17%
14%
33%
62%
18%
7%
1%
12%
Demonstrate knowledge and appropriate
application of the definitions, rules, and
concepts
0
1
2
3
4
5%
5%
19%
49%
22%
15%
13%
15%
10%
48%
32%
0%
5%
24%
38%
Apply integration techniques to solve
problems including areas, volumes, and
average value.
0
1
2
3
4
5%
8%
13%
50%
24%
19%
13%
17%
29%
23%
5%
5%
7%
14%
69%
Write, compile, run, and test simple Java
programs using a text editor or an
integrated development environment (IDE)
such as Eclipse.
0
1
2
3
4
15%
12%
5%
7%
61%
13%
2%
19%
8%
58%
13%
7%
7%
9%
64%
Apply the key principles of object-oriented
programming, including abstraction,
inheritance, polymorphism, and
encapsulation.
0
1
2
3
4
17%
37%
7%
12%
27%
6%
21%
4%
10%
58%
13%
9%
7%
18%
53%
Describe problem requirements and
employs correct programming constructs
and syntax to create a working solution.
0
1
2
3
4
21%
26%
21%
5%
26%
8%
12%
19%
42%
19%
30%
26%
26%
13%
4%
Identify necessary data structures or
existing algorithms and use them to solve a
problem.
0
1
2
3
4
0%
5%
16%
21%
58%
46%
8%
8%
4%
35%
30%
26%
26%
13%
4%
Demonstrate how fundamental high-level
programming constructs are implemented
at the machine-language level.
Use an understanding of computer
organization and architecture to structure
programs to perform more efficiently.
0
12%
16%
1
18%
36%
2
6%
20%
3
29%
12%
4
35%
16%
Model real world situations with and
interpret solutions.
0
1
2
3
4
17%
17%
0%
0%
67%
0%
0%
62%
15%
23%
Not offered
0
12%
16%
1
18%
36%
2
6%
20%
3
24%
12%
4
41%
16%
Utilize mathematical resources and
technology while demonstrating numerical
reasoning and literacy.
0
1
2
3
4
0%
0%
0%
0%
100%
8%
0%
54%
15%
23%
Demonstrate knowledge and the application
of concepts of algebra, analytic geometry,
and properties and concepts of differential
calculus to finding tangent lines, rates of
change, velocity, curve sketching, and
optimization
0
6%
6%
8%
1
4%
3%
8%
2
4%
5%
11%
3
29%
24%
11%
4
58%
62%
62%
Use conditional logic, loops, and arrays in a
Java application.
0
1
2
3
4
10%
0%
3%
5%
83%
2%
0%
13%
4%
81%
17%
7%
7%
4%
65%
MATH DEPARTMENT SLO SUMMARY RESULTS - TRANFER LEVEL MATH COURSES
Math 244
Term
Spring 2013
Spring 2014
Spring 2016
Math 250
Term
Spring 2013
Spring 2014
Spring 2016
Math 251
Term
Spring 2013
Spring 2014
Spring 2016
Math 252
Term
Spring 2013
Spring 2014
Spring 2016
Math 253
Term
Spring 2013
Spring 2014
Spring 2016
Analyze properties and behavior of
functions and implement appropriate
techniques to solve applications.
0
1
2
3
4
9%
19%
52%
10%
10%
6%
14%
43%
15%
23%
7%
15%
44%
17%
17%
Use a variety of methods to solve systems of
equations and implement those methods to
solve application problems. Recognize and
graph conic sections. Analyze the behavior
of sequences and series. Apply the binomial
expansion theorem.
0
1
2
3
4
28%
24%
24%
14%
10%
20%
11%
18%
16%
35%
18%
20%
34%
17%
10%
Use the basic definitions, properties, and
theorems of first semester Calculus to solve Analyze and sketch graphs using the
problems and applications.
principles of calculus
0
1
2
3
4
0
1
2
3
4
75%
12%
4%
4%
6%
15%
9%
13%
19%
44%
20%
18%
10%
15%
36%
5%
10%
19%
19%
46%
25%
14%
27%
15%
18%
9%
16%
27%
16%
31%
Use the basic definitions, properties, and
theorems of second semester Calculus to
solve problems and applications.
0
12%
5%
8%
1
8%
9%
16%
2
28%
36%
24%
3
30%
28%
34%
4
21%
22%
18%
Apply Calculus techniques using polar and
parametric equations including: slope of
tangent lines, arclength, graphing, and
areas.
0
9%
10%
8%
1
13%
13%
12%
2
17%
23%
24%
3
30%
23%
36%
4
31%
30%
20%
Use the basic definitions, properties,
theorems, and techniques of Differential
Equations to solve problems and
applications.
0
1
2
3
4
4%
8%
12%
4%
72%
0%
9%
13%
6%
72%
5%
5%
25%
38%
28%
Find and apply power series
representations of functions and determine
possible errors, radius of convergence, and
corresponding derivatives and integrals
0
16%
8%
16%
1
20%
15%
13%
2
23%
34%
28%
3
20%
24%
26%
4
21%
19%
18%
Apply various methods to solve the vast
array of differential equations encountered
in Differential Equations.
0
1
2
3
4
24%
12%
16%
16%
32%
6%
13%
19%
19%
44%
10%
18%
28%
28%
18%
Term
Spring 2013
Spring 2014
Spring 2016
Math 260/65
Communicate mathematical ideas and
concepts to various audiences
Term
Spring 2013
Spring 2014
Spring 2016
Evaluate limits, derivatives and integrals
numerically, graphically and algebraically
0
1
2
3
4
13%
1%
14%
29%
43%
4%
8%
14%
23%
50%
6%
15%
28%
19%
31%
State and apply basic definitions, properties, Apply vector operations in two and three
and theorems of multivariable Calculus to
dimensions and use vector methods to
solve problems and applications.
analyze plane and space curves, and
0
1
2
3
4
0
1
2
3
4
3%
16%
24%
28%
29%
0%
2%
3%
28%
67%
2%
4%
20%
24%
49%
6%
0%
18%
14%
61%
16%
14%
19%
35%
16%
4%
7%
4%
5%
81%
Use matrices and their operations to solve
Write clear and accurate proofs for some of linear systems and use linear
the results used in the course.
transformations to model real-life problems.
0
1
2
3
4
0
1
2
3
4
40%
9%
14%
3%
34%
0%
9%
54%
9%
29%
15%
15%
4%
12%
54%
4%
0%
8%
23%
65%
20%
12%
12%
0%
56%
7%
0%
12%
24%
56%
Math 254
Analyze properties and behavior of
trigonometric functions and implement
appropriate techniques to solve
applications.
0
1
2
3
4
24%
13%
29%
14%
19%
7%
8%
20%
36%
28%
9%
12%
31%
30%
18%
0
3%
0%
0%
1
0%
6%
17%
2
10%
0%
17%
3
0%
12%
34%
4
86%
82%
31%
Construct mathematical proofs using
standard techniques such as induction,
contradiction, and contraposition.
0
1
2
3
4
7%
14%
7%
0%
71%
9%
18%
29%
18%
26%
3%
14%
17%
52%
14%
Assess the validity of mathematical
arguments.
0
4%
0%
0%
1
14%
9%
0%
2
14%
38%
28%
3
7%
21%
7%
4
61%
32%
66%
Use polar coordinates; represent complex
numbers in rectangular and trigonometric
forms; perform operations with complex
numbers.
0
1
2
3
4
43%
19%
4%
14%
20%
27%
10%
33%
4%
28%
27%
19%
23%
16%
15%
Class Frequency Distribution Report
Fall 2016: Math 60 Form A
Mean Score: 63.65%
Overall
Grade
Percent Score
Raw Score
Frequency
Percent
A
B
C
D
F
90.00 - 100.00
80.00 - 89.99
70.00 - 79.99
60.00 - 69.99
0.00 - 59.99
45.00 - 50.00
40.00 - 44.99
35.00 - 39.99
30.00 - 34.99
0.00 - 29.99
22
77
118
115
186
4.25
14.86
22.78
22.20
35.91
200
Frequency
150
100
50
0
A
B
C
D
F
Grade
3/16/2017
Class Frequency Distribution Report
Page 1
Class Frequency Distribution Report
Fall 2016: Math 60 Form A
Recognize and apply algebraic vocabulary and definitions,
symbols, and properties; evaluate and perform operations on
algebraic expressions, and solve equations and inequalities
Mean Score: 63.57%
Grade
Percent Score
Raw Score
Frequency
Percent
Mastery
High Proficiency
Proficiency
Low Proficiency
No Proficiency
90.00 - 100.00
75.00 - 89.99
60.00 - 74.99
25.00 - 59.99
0.00 - 24.99
31.50 - 35.00
26.25 - 31.49
21.00 - 26.24
8.75 - 20.99
0.00 - 8.74
23
122
182
183
8
4.44
23.55
35.14
35.33
1.54
200
Frequency
150
100
50
0
Mastery
High Proficiency
Proficiency
Low Proficiency
No Proficiency
Grade
3/16/2017
Class Frequency Distribution Report
Page 2
Class Frequency Distribution Report
Fall 2016: Math 60 Form A
Graph linear, quadratic and radical functions, and circles
Mean Score: 63.16%
Grade
Percent Score
Raw Score
Frequency
Percent
Mastery
High Proficiency
Proficiency
Low Proficiency
No Proficiency
90.00 - 100.00
75.00 - 89.99
60.00 - 74.99
25.00 - 59.99
0.00 - 24.99
5.40 - 6.00
4.50 - 5.39
3.60 - 4.49
1.50 - 3.59
0.00 - 1.49
83
105
131
144
55
16.02
20.27
25.29
27.80
10.62
Frequency
150
100
50
0
Mastery
High Proficiency
Proficiency
Low Proficiency
No Proficiency
Grade
3/16/2017
Class Frequency Distribution Report
Page 3
Class Frequency Distribution Report
Fall 2016: Math 60 Form A
Use algebraic techniques to model and solve applications
Mean Score: 55.28%
Grade
Percent Score
Raw Score
Frequency
Percent
Mastery
High Proficiency
Proficiency
Low Proficiency
No Proficiency
90.00 - 100.00
75.00 - 89.99
60.00 - 74.99
25.00 - 59.99
0.00 - 24.99
5.40 - 6.00
4.50 - 5.39
3.60 - 4.49
1.50 - 3.59
0.00 - 1.49
30
75
129
235
49
5.79
14.48
24.90
45.37
9.46
250
Frequency
200
150
100
50
0
Mastery
High Proficiency
Proficiency
Low Proficiency
No Proficiency
Grade
3/16/2017
Class Frequency Distribution Report
Page 4
Class Frequency Distribution Report
Fall 2016: Math 60 Form A
Mean Score: 67.59%
Radicals
Grade
Percent Score
Raw Score
Frequency
Percent
Mastery
High Proficiency
Proficiency
Low Proficiency
No Proficiency
90.00 - 100.00
75.00 - 89.99
60.00 - 74.99
25.00 - 59.99
0.00 - 24.99
9.00 - 10.00
7.50 - 8.99
6.00 - 7.49
2.50 - 5.99
0.00 - 2.49
108
106
163
129
12
20.85
20.46
31.47
24.90
2.32
200
Frequency
150
100
50
0
Mastery
High Proficiency
Proficiency
Low Proficiency
No Proficiency
Grade
3/16/2017
Class Frequency Distribution Report
Page 5
Class Frequency Distribution Report
Fall 2016: Math 60 Form A
Mean Score: 72.33%
Systems of Equations
Grade
Percent Score
Raw Score
Frequency
Percent
Mastery
High Proficiency
Proficiency
Low Proficiency
No Proficiency
90.00 - 100.00
75.00 - 89.99
60.00 - 74.99
25.00 - 59.99
0.00 - 24.99
2.70 - 3.00
2.25 - 2.69
1.80 - 2.24
0.75 - 1.79
0.00 - 0.74
193
0
238
69
18
37.26
0.00
45.95
13.32
3.47
250
Frequency
200
150
100
50
0
Mastery
High Proficiency
Proficiency
Low Proficiency
No Proficiency
Grade
3/16/2017
Class Frequency Distribution Report
Page 6
Class Frequency Distribution Report
Fall 2016: Math 60 Form A
Mean Score: 73.10%
Rational Expressions and Equations
Grade
Percent Score
Raw Score
Frequency
Percent
Mastery
High Proficiency
Proficiency
Low Proficiency
No Proficiency
90.00 - 100.00
75.00 - 89.99
60.00 - 74.99
25.00 - 59.99
0.00 - 24.99
5.40 - 6.00
4.50 - 5.39
3.60 - 4.49
1.50 - 3.59
0.00 - 1.49
160
133
84
108
33
30.89
25.68
16.22
20.85
6.37
200
Frequency
150
100
50
0
Mastery
High Proficiency
Proficiency
Low Proficiency
No Proficiency
Grade
3/16/2017
Class Frequency Distribution Report
Page 7
Test Statistics Report
Fall 2016: Math 60 Form A
Overall
Score Data
Number of Graded Items
Total Points Possible
Maximum Score
Minimum Score
Statistics
Mean Score
Mean Percent Score
Benchmark Score
Range of Scores
Standard Deviation
Variance
Percentiles
Percentile (25)
Median Score
Percentile (75)
Inter Quartile Range
Confidence Intervals
1%
5%
95%
99%
Test Reliability
Kuder-Richardson Formula 20
Kuder-Richardson Formula 21
Coefficient (Cronbach) Alpha
3/16/2017
Recognize and
Graph linear,
Use algebraic
Radicals
Systems of
Rational
50
50
50
9
35
35
35
4
6
6
6
0
6
6
6
0
10
10
10
1
3
3
3
0
6
6
6
0
31.82
63.65
41.00
8.32
69.23
22.25
63.57
31.00
6.27
39.33
3.79
63.16
6.00
1.60
2.55
3.32
55.28
6.00
1.37
1.87
6.76
67.59
9.00
1.97
3.88
2.17
72.33
3.00
0.78
0.62
4.39
73.10
6.00
1.57
2.45
26.00
33.00
38.00
12.00
18.00
23.00
27.00
9.00
3.00
4.00
5.00
2.00
2.00
3.00
4.00
2.00
5.00
7.00
8.00
3.00
2.00
2.00
3.00
1.00
3.00
5.00
6.00
3.00
30.88
31.11
32.54
32.77
21.54
21.71
22.79
22.96
3.61
3.65
3.93
3.97
3.16
3.20
3.43
3.47
6.54
6.59
6.93
6.98
2.08
2.10
2.24
2.26
4.21
4.25
4.52
4.56
0.87
0.85
0.87
0.84
0.82
0.84
0.57
0.54
0.57
0.35
0.25
0.35
0.57
0.48
0.57
0.21
0.04
0.21
0.65
0.62
0.65
Test Statistics Report
Page 1
Condensed Test Report
Fall 2016: Math 60 Form A
Legend:
Distractors Chosen More than Correct Answer:
Total Possible Points:
50
518
Mean Score:
Standard Deviation:
8.32
Reliability Coefficient (KR20):
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
Question
Question1
Question2
Question3
Question4
Question5
Question6
Question7
Question8
Question9
Question10
Question11
Question12
Question13
Question14
Question15
Question16
Question17
Question18
Question19
Question20
Question21
Question22
Question23
Question24
Question25
Question26
Question27
Question28
Question29
Question30
Question31
Question32
Question33
Question34
Question35
Question36
Question37
Question38
Question39
Question40
Question41
Question42
Question43
Question44
3/16/2017
Correct
Answer
B
D
C
B
D
B
D
B
B
B
D
C
C
D
C
C
B
D
C
C
A
A
D
A
B
C
B
A
B
D
D
C
C
B
B
A
B
D
B
A
D
C
C
A
Response Frequencies
A
3.28
20.08
10.23
3.28
4.05
0.39
11.00
32.43
14.09
0.39
7.53
9.46
6.56
13.71
1.35
2.12
16.60
28.96
15.83
19.50
60.81
65.25
17.57
44.79
2.32
9.27
3.86
42.66
3.09
13.90
2.51
13.32
12.36
7.53
8.69
67.37
6.76
9.07
9.07
75.10
23.36
8.30
7.34
83.59
33
Maximum Score:
31.82
Minimum Score:
9
0.87
Range of Scores:
41
Median Score:
Total Students:
B
73.36
8.49
7.34
67.57
4.83
91.89
14.48
56.76
47.68
86.49
1.16
8.30
11.39
19.88
3.28
7.72
70.46
6.56
7.72
11.00
10.62
13.32
14.48
11.58
65.25
4.83
85.14
11.20
83.20
16.80
15.25
18.92
18.53
66.02
62.16
10.04
42.08
5.02
62.93
15.06
4.63
16.80
4.63
9.65
C
9.07
13.71
65.83
5.79
2.90
5.98
3.09
3.67
19.11
2.90
18.73
66.22
72.97
18.92
88.22
82.63
3.09
24.52
73.17
48.84
11.78
6.95
14.09
16.80
19.69
69.11
5.98
19.11
7.72
27.61
6.18
47.30
50.77
20.27
18.34
7.92
20.46
6.37
20.27
2.51
4.63
63.71
58.69
2.32
D
6.37
39.38
8.49
22.97
83.59
0.97
61.58
4.05
11.39
8.49
71.04
5.02
1.93
35.33
3.67
3.28
2.32
37.26
1.93
16.02
4.63
10.81
48.65
17.95
7.14
11.20
2.32
18.15
2.32
39.38
65.83
1.74
6.95
5.21
5.60
8.88
23.94
75.68
3.67
6.76
62.16
7.14
22.39
3.09
E
6.95
16.60
7.34
0.19
4.25
0.77
9.46
3.09
7.34
1.54
1.54
10.81
7.14
11.20
3.28
4.05
7.53
2.51
1.35
4.25
12.16
3.28
5.21
6.95
5.21
5.41
2.70
7.34
3.47
2.32
10.23
18.53
10.81
0.77
5.02
5.79
6.56
3.47
3.47
0.58
5.21
3.28
6.76
1.35
Non
Distractor
Condensed Test Report
Correct Group Responses
Total %
73.36
39.38
65.83
67.57
83.59
91.89
61.58
56.76
47.68
86.49
71.04
66.22
72.97
35.33
88.22
82.63
70.46
37.26
73.17
48.84
60.81
65.25
48.65
44.79
65.25
69.11
85.14
42.66
83.20
39.38
65.83
47.30
50.77
66.02
62.16
67.37
42.08
75.68
62.93
75.10
62.16
63.71
58.69
83.59
Upper 27%
93.57
73.57
85.71
90.00
95.71
99.29
92.14
75.00
75.00
100.00
89.29
92.14
89.29
69.29
96.43
91.43
90.71
47.86
86.43
73.57
80.71
79.29
68.57
65.71
87.14
93.57
95.71
65.00
93.57
60.71
85.00
80.71
67.86
85.71
78.57
88.57
70.71
94.29
83.57
91.43
90.00
80.00
74.29
97.14
Lower 27%
44.29
15.00
45.00
37.86
60.00
80.00
35.00
38.57
19.29
70.71
46.43
38.57
42.14
14.29
75.00
67.86
42.86
28.57
50.00
34.29
40.71
45.71
30.00
26.43
38.57
37.86
66.43
25.71
72.86
26.43
52.86
15.00
38.57
42.14
48.57
47.86
22.14
48.57
37.86
50.00
25.71
44.29
40.00
57.14
50
Point
Biserial
0.45
0.44
0.37
0.43
0.38
0.34
0.47
0.31
0.46
0.36
0.35
0.44
0.46
0.44
0.27
0.26
0.44
0.16
0.33
0.30
0.34
0.34
0.30
0.30
0.45
0.44
0.34
0.33
0.25
0.25
0.30
0.51
0.24
0.39
0.23
0.34
0.37
0.43
0.37
0.41
0.53
0.31
0.27
0.45
Page 1
Total Possible Points:
50
518
Mean Score:
Standard Deviation:
8.32
Reliability Coefficient (KR20):
No.
45
46
47
48
49
50
Question
Question45
Question46
Question47
Question48
Question49
Question50
3/16/2017
Correct
Answer
A
C
B
C
A
B
Response Frequencies
A
75.29
10.04
9.46
8.11
72.59
12.74
33
Maximum Score:
50
31.82
Minimum Score:
9
0.87
Range of Scores:
41
Median Score:
Total Students:
B
4.25
25.10
71.81
16.02
4.63
69.11
C
11.78
35.14
10.42
50.58
13.13
8.49
D
4.63
23.55
4.44
7.53
6.56
5.02
E
4.05
5.02
3.86
17.37
3.09
4.63
Non
Distractor
Condensed Test Report
Correct Group Responses
Total %
75.29
35.14
71.81
50.58
72.59
69.11
Upper 27%
93.57
45.00
92.86
80.71
87.14
94.29
Lower 27%
46.43
22.86
42.86
23.57
53.57
41.43
Point
Biserial
0.45
0.23
0.45
0.44
0.31
0.45
Page 2
Test Item Statistics Report
Fall 2016: Math 60 Form A
Question
Question
Question1
Question2
Question3
Question4
Question5
Question6
Question7
Question8
Question9
Question10
Question11
Question12
Question13
Question14
Question15
Question16
Question17
Question18
Question19
Question20
Question21
Question22
Question23
Question24
Question25
Question26
Question27
Question28
Question29
Question30
3/16/2017
Summary Statistics
Points
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Graded
Correct
Incorrect
No
Response
Point
Biserial
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
380
204
341
350
433
476
319
294
247
448
368
343
378
183
457
428
365
193
379
253
315
338
252
232
338
358
441
221
431
204
133
305
173
167
83
42
197
224
269
69
150
174
140
330
60
89
153
324
139
263
203
178
266
276
178
159
77
289
86
314
5
9
4
1
2
0
2
0
2
1
0
1
0
5
1
1
0
1
0
2
0
2
0
10
2
1
0
8
1
0
0.45
0.44
0.37
0.43
0.38
0.34
0.47
0.31
0.46
0.36
0.35
0.44
0.46
0.44
0.27
0.26
0.44
0.16
0.33
0.30
0.34
0.34
0.30
0.30
0.45
0.44
0.34
0.33
0.25
0.25
Test Item Statistics Report
Reliability
Percent
Correct
73.36
39.38
65.83
67.57
83.59
91.89
61.58
56.76
47.68
86.49
71.04
66.22
72.97
35.33
88.22
82.63
70.46
37.26
73.17
48.84
60.81
65.25
48.65
44.79
65.25
69.11
85.14
42.66
83.20
39.38
Page 1
Question
Question
Question31
Question32
Question33
Question34
Question35
Question36
Question37
Question38
Question39
Question40
Question41
Question42
Question43
Question44
Question45
Question46
Question47
Question48
Question49
Question50
3/16/2017
Summary Statistics
Points
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Graded
Correct
Incorrect
No
Response
Point
Biserial
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
518
341
245
263
342
322
349
218
392
326
389
322
330
304
433
390
182
372
262
376
358
177
272
252
175
195
169
299
124
189
129
196
184
213
85
128
330
146
254
142
160
0
1
3
1
1
0
1
2
3
0
0
4
1
0
0
6
0
2
0
0
0.30
0.51
0.24
0.39
0.23
0.34
0.37
0.43
0.37
0.41
0.53
0.31
0.27
0.45
0.45
0.23
0.45
0.44
0.31
0.45
Test Item Statistics Report
Reliability
Percent
Correct
65.83
47.30
50.77
66.02
62.16
67.37
42.08
75.68
62.93
75.10
62.16
63.71
58.69
83.59
75.29
35.14
71.81
50.58
72.59
69.11
Page 2
Detail of Math Department Course/Program Discussions based on SLO and
other Data:
2012 – Spring 2019 (End of Current Program Review Cycle)
Friday, January 6, 2012 – Room 344 – participants FT faculty
Opening Day SLO Activity
Courses: Math 20/35/45/60
Describe how SLOs were measured:
A standardized final exam is given to all sections of this course. The final exam is created by a full time
faculty member and then reviewed by a committee of different full time faculty to ensure accuracy. The
results of this multiple choice exam are analyzed by an independent firm and individual data analysis
reports are returned directly to each instructor at the beginning of the following semester.
This firm also provides aggregate SLO assessment data for the department.
After analyzing aggregated course data collected, what strengths and/or weaknesses in achieving
student learning outcomes are indicated?
At the time of the analysis, sufficient information was not available to formulate accurate results or
perform comparative analysis; given that:
• Data received was for Spring 2011 semester only
• A direct objective/SLO link was not available
What can faculty within your discipline do to improve your students’ performance? Offer a plan(s) for
improvement.
First we will be improving the method of assessment to obtain reliable results. During the Spring 2012
semester, new final exams will be written for all developmental courses. Each exam will include a record of
the link between individual question and the corresponding SLO/Objective tested. This will be used to
target specific questions for SLO assessment.
Although data analysis did not provide direct results, the Math Department is committed to student success
and plans to promote student understanding through the Math Center by:
• Providing assistance during the semester via weekly workshops and at the end of the semester
through final exam reviews
• Having some faculty available during office hours held at the Math Center
• Conducting a student survey at the end of the semester requesting for input and suggestions to
better serve their needs
• Seeking additional budget funds to increase the tutor staff so that we may better service our
students’ needs
Course: Math 70
Describe how SLOs were measured:
A common, open-response, final exam was written by a committee of full-time faculty and administered to
all Math 70 students by all Math 70 faculty. The first, multipart question assessed student’s ability to graph
a basic function, find the domain and range, and use interval notation. The instructors used a general
rubric and reported aggregate scores using 0 – 1 point as No Pass and 2 – 4 points and Pass. The same
question was used in both Spring and Fall 2011.
After analyzing aggregated course data collected, what strengths and/or weaknesses in achieving
student learning outcomes are indicated?
Following is a summary of the Spring/Fall data using the Pass/No Pass rubric:
Spring 2011 – 76 (24%) No pass
Fall 2011 –
61 (17%) No pass
235 (75%) Pass
289 (83%) Pass
Total Students: 315
Total Students: 350
This reflects improvement from Spring to Fall, with most students proficient in both semesters.
What can faculty within your discipline do to improve your students’ performance? Offer a plan(s) for
improvement.
In Spring 2012, we will be providing:
• More questions to assess
• More than one SLO
• Specific grading rubrics for each question (rather than the department guidelines only) to insure
uniformity in instructor scoring.
Individual instructors are becoming more aware of the unusual content of this course, and report making
refinements of instruction regarding procedural vs. analytical methods.
Instructors have the option to use graphing calculator worksheets provided by a full time faculty member’s
sabbatical project.
Courses: All Transfer Level, Math 100 and above
Describe how SLOs were measured:
One question specifically formulated by full time faculty was included in the final exam for each section of
the course. Individual instructors then graded the question using a 0 to 4 rubric and submitted their
aggregate results to the Math Department Chair. However, those aggregate results consisted of a simpler
Pass/No Pass scale using 0 or 1 scores for No Pass and 2, 3, or 4 for Pass.
After analyzing aggregated course data collected, what strengths and/or weaknesses in achieving
student learning outcomes are indicated?
Our analysis suggested that the method of assessment was not sufficient to arrive at any meaningful
conclusions about learning outcomes. Instead, the need for changing and improving the assessment
process was thoroughly discussed.
What can faculty within your discipline do to improve your students’ performance? Offer a plan(s) for
improvement.
At this moment, our faculty will focus on improving the assessment tools so that we can obtain more
reliable and meaningful data. Some of the changes suggested include increasing the number of questions
that are used to assess a specific SLO and changing the rubric to a true 0 – 4 scale (instead of Pass/No Pass).
FALL 2015 – DISCUSSIONS AMONG FACULTY TEACHING CALCULUS COURSES
FT faculty had several discussions related to inadequate trigonometry skills noted in Calculus students.
As a result, a non-credit Trigonometry refresher course was created. The details of the course (which
was submitted in CurricUNET on August 9, 2016) are as follows:
Hours of instruction: 9; Class maximum: 24
Course Description & Scope: Provides a review to students who wish to refresh their trigonometry skills.
Includes topics such as trigonometric functions; radian measure of angles; graphs of sine, cosine, and
tangent; trigonometric equations and inverse trigonometric equations; and law of sines and cosines.
Consists of personalized computer-assisted instruction to refresh those concepts identified as needed for
each student.
Calculus instructors would refer students to the course for enrollment. The course will be set to begin
during the second or third week of the semester, beginning Spring 2016.
Friday, May 6, 2016 – Room 342 – 11 participants FT and PT faculty
SLO results up to Fall 2015 considered for Math 34/45/60
Math 35:
After analyzing aggregate course data, what strengths and/or weaknesses in achieving SLOs are
indicated:
For Spring and Fall 2015 we achieved roughly 60% proficiency in SLO 3 (Solving linear equations…). We
would consider this strength in our SLO achievement. However, for SLO 1 and 2 (Perform calculations
with… and Set-up and simplify ratios…) we achieved only 20-30% proficiency. We would consider SLOs 1
and 2 our weakness in achieving SLO goals.
What can faculty do to improve students’ performance in achieving SLOs? Offer a plan or plans of
improvement:
To improve SLO 1, faculty could have multiplication table drills. For SLO 2, many topics are based on
formulas and students struggle to remember those formulas. We can work on teaching students to form
relationships between formulas. Another suggestion would be for all Math 35 instructors to have an
understanding of the “most important” or essential formulas and to concentrate on teaching those
(depth not breath).
Also, we could include some multiple choice assessments throughout the semester to prepare students
for the final.
Math 45:
After analyzing aggregate course data, what strengths and/or weaknesses in achieving SLOs are
indicated:
Strengths were noted in SLO 1 (Recognize and apply…) at 80% proficiency, and SLO 2 (Solve linear
equations…) at 60% proficiency. However, SLO 3 (Graph lines and inequalities…) was identified as a
weakness given the 40-50% proficiency levels.
What can faculty do to improve students’ performance in achieving SLOs? Offer a plan or plans of
improvement:
One suggestion is to re-arrange the suggested sequence of topics by having the chapter in factoring
introduced earlier and then incorporate the topic into every assessment thereafter. Suggested order is:
Chapter 1, 2, 5, 6, 3, 4. This rearrangement might help strengthen factoring and graphing. To assess
results we would need to split SLO data based on course arrangement.
Math 60:
After analyzing aggregate course data, what strengths and/or weaknesses in achieving SLOs are
indicated:
Strengths were SLO 1 (Recognize and apply algebraic vocabulary…) and SLO 2 (Graph linear, quadratic…)
which are topics that students would have seen before and may be review.
Weaknesses were noted in SLO 3 (Use algebraic techniques…) which is the outcome related to word
problems and applications.
What can faculty do to improve students’ performance in achieving SLOs? Offer a plan or plans of
improvement:
Introduce word problems and application problems at the beginning of each chapter and throughout the
chapter (not necessarily solving the problem, but practicing set-up and variable definition) rather than at
the end.
Write a final exam question where students have to write an equation of the word problem. Also,
incorporate some multiple choice questions in semester exams so that students get familiar with multiple
choice format.
Friday, August 19, 2016 – Participants: FT and PT faculty
Opening Day SLO Activity
MATH 35:
Which SLO did you assess?
All Math 35 SLOs
How did your discipline collect data for this SLO?
Departmental Exam Final – selected questions are assigned to assess each SLO
Is this outcome measuring what should be measured in this course, and are students achieving an
acceptable level of proficiency in your opinion? Please explain.
On SLO 1 36% of students scored as proficient or better; on SLO 2 only 23% were proficient or better;
however, on SLO 3, 65% were proficient or better.
SLOs are measured via the final exam, but the level of difficulty among SLO questions is not consistent
(fractions/decimals – harder questions; word problems – easier).
What conclusions did you make after looking at the data? What did you discuss?
SLOs are very broad, need to be more specific.
Make a recommendation that you think will help to increase student learning for this outcome.
Break the three SLOs into sub-SLOs.
Move ratios and rates to SLO1
Move proportions to SLO 3
Review course topics for overlap
Shorten final exam
A new text might help
Build questions that are appropriate for a non-calculator exam
What resources, if any, does your discipline need to accomplish your action step?
PSP and Math Center tutors
Describe the steps we will take to implement the recommendation made above and please include an
estimated timeline.
• Have regular multiplication table drills – this will improve performance in SLO1
• Students tend to struggle to remember formulas. As instructors, we could work on teaching students
to form relationships between the formulas.
• Have an understanding of the most essential formulas and concentrate on teaching those (depth, not
breath).
•
Include some multiple choice questions on exams to prepare students for the final.
MATH 45:
Which SLO did you assess?
All Math 45 SLOs
How did your discipline collect data for this SLO?
Departmental Exam Final – selected questions are assigned to assess each SLO
Is this outcome measuring what should be measured in this course, and are students achieving an
acceptable level of proficiency in your opinion? Please explain.
SLOs are too broad so we are unable to pin down a specific proficiency.
Data is not great, better proficiency levels should be expected; however, data only comes from final
exam (excluding any work done during the semester)
What conclusions did you make after looking at the data? What did you discuss?
Split data is more helpful. It would be best to have data segregated by topic – then we can better discuss
results and improvements
Consider data of classes that have PSP tutors – classes that meet during different days, etc.
Make a recommendation that you think will help to increase student learning for this outcome.
Re-write SLOs and assessment method to better indentify weaknesses and steps to improve student
learning.
What resources, if any, does your discipline need to accomplish your action step?
More funding for Math Center tutors and PSP tutors.
Describe the steps we will take to implement the recommendation made above and please include an
estimated timeline.
• Re-arrange the sequence in which topics are covered ie. Chapter 1, 2, 5, 6, 3, 4. This way factoring is
covered earlier in the semester.
• Incorporate topics that represent weaknesses in every assessment. i.e. After factoring is covered
(with the re-arranged sequence), include some factoring problems in each exam.
• Analyze results by splitting the information between classes that re-arrange the schedule and classes
that do not.
• Have FT math faculty in the Math Center
• Create worksheets/handout to be available in the Math Center for specific topics – introduce
uniformity in tutoring.
• Improve tutor training
• Have a site where instructor materials can be shared (ie. Worksheet or practice activities that work
well for certain topics). Use Sharepoint for teaching resources.
•
Encourage students to keep a portfolio of their work to include class notes, handouts,
graded work,etc. All of these materials can be used as reference to study and prepare for
exams.
MATH 60:
Which SLO did you assess?
All Math 60 SLOs
How did your discipline collect data for this SLO?
Departmental Exam Final – selected questions are assigned to assess each SLO
Is this outcome measuring what should be measured in this course, and are students achieving an
acceptable level of proficiency in your opinion? Please explain.
Rational expressions should be measured separately.
Data shows that students are not achieving an acceptable level of proficiency:
SLO 1: 39% at low/no proficiency
SLO 2: 40% at low/no proficiency
SLO 3: 60% at low/no proficiency
What conclusions did you make after looking at the data? What did you discuss?
Rewrite SLOs (take vocabulary from SLO 1 to SLO3)
Re-visit some questions for the SLO and replace
Grading scale and weight for final is inconsistent – therefore student performance is inconsistent
Make a recommendation that you think will help to increase student learning for this outcome.
Math Center tutors can have weekly review workshops during the semester for specific topics – integrate
questions related to the SLO that is being covered by then.
Include free response questions on the final exam review.
What resources, if any, does your discipline need to accomplish your action step?
More PSP tutors – with more time in the classroom.
Describe the steps we will take to implement the recommendation made above and please include an
estimated timeline.
• To help students understand word problems we should introduce them at the beginning and
throughout the chapter (not just at the end). Also, have some questions where they do not have to
solve the problem, but just describe the meaning of the variable and set-up an equation.
• Incorporate some multiple choice questions into some exams to expose student to the type of
questions they will see in the final.
•
Incorporate previous chapter problems on current exams.
MATH 70:
Which SLO did you assess?
All Math 70 SLOs
How did your discipline collect data for this SLO?
Departmental Exam Final – selected questions are assigned to assess each SLO
Is this outcome measuring what should be measured in this course, and are students achieving an
acceptable level of proficiency in your opinion? Please explain.
This outcome ismeasuring a portion of the SLO topics. Particularly on SLO 1, improvements are needed
since 35% of students scored at Low or No proficiency.
What conclusions did you make after looking at the data? What did you discuss?
Will consider re-writing SLOs to break them appart.
Make a recommendation that you think will help to increase student learning for this outcome.
Final Exam: Use 6 questions to assess 3 SLOs, as done in Math 250.
Final Exam/SLO: Instructors – conscientiously use grading rubric and send feedback to course
coordinator.
Math Center: Have tutors ask students which course they are in before they start tutoring – especially
since Math 70 should include GC methods.
What resources, if any, does your discipline need to accomplish your action step?
Document cameras in all classrooms
Tablet computers for all faculty
New projectors in 398, 397, others?? (because tablet images become square)
If internet connection is down, emulator in classroom does not work – provide all Math 70 instructors
with emulators on memory disk
ASO rental calculator upgrade
Upgrade classroom computers (e.g. room 555 in National City)
Describe the steps we will take to implement the recommendation made above and please include an
estimated timeline.
• Will make request for materials through program review and other sources of funding such as BSI.
• Communicate with all instructors teaching Math 70 to improve accuracy and reliability of SLO
assessment process.
•
Ensure that tutors in the Math Center include a graphing calculator approach when helping
Math 70 students.
Saturday, September 24, 2016 – Participants: FT and PT faculty
MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT RETREAT
Objective: Explore re-design options to streamline the current Developmental Mathematics course
sequence through changes to course offerings and/or course content.
A total of 30 FT, PT Math faculty and 2 counselors came together for 4 hours to discuss the Math
program for Developmental courses. Data considered included course SLO analysis completed during
opening day (8/19/2016), successful completion rates for the courses in questions and Basic Skills Tracker
Data from the Chancellor’s office and CAP (California Acceleration Project) information.
Small group discussion yielded similar results: It is necessary to shorten the developmental path. It was
decided that the focus at this time would be on STEM pathway.
Plan of Improvement:
Create a FT faculty group to explore Intermediate Algebra re-design options for STEM pathway.
This group (called Intermediate Algebra Acceleration Project) was formed immediately after the retreat
took place; Martha Carey is the lead faculty member coordinating this effort. The team is comprised of 8
members.
Friday, January 27, 2017 – Participants: FT and PT faculty
Opening Day SLO Activity
Which PSLO did you assess?
Program: Associate of Science in Mathematics Studies in Transfer 01585:
SLO: Use the basic definitions, properties, theorems, and techniques of Calculus.
Is this outcome accurately measuring what should be measured in this program, and are students
achieving an acceptable level of proficiency in your opinion? Please explain.
• The SLO may be adequate to assess the content knowledge, but not necessarily success of the
program. To evaluate program success we need transfer data
• Currently, assessment numbers are pulled from CSLOs for Math 250/251/252. However, not all
students taking the Calculus sequence are Math Majors; many are majoring in engineering,
computer science, physics, etc. This will cause inaccuracies in program data.
Considering Math 250/251/252 CSLO data, 44% of the students in the program are receiving a score 3 or
higher, which is an acceptable level of proficiency while we have 65% with a score that is not proficient (2
or less). We believe that we need to improve the level of proficiency in the program.
What conclusions did you make after looking at the data? What did you discuss?
• Many students take Math 250, but do not move on to Math 251 and 252; therefore, PSLO data
would be better represented by considering only CSLOs from Math 251/252.
• To better assess our program, it was discussed that an additional PSLO should measure also include
transfer rates of students in the program. For this analysis we would also need success data (at the
transfer institution) to assess how well we are preparing students. In addition, it would be great to
have data on time-to-completion; to see how fast our students are able to complete the program.
Make at least one recommendation that you think will help to increase student learning for this
outcome.
• Make corrections to the way data is assessed (i.e. exclude Math 250 from the results for the
program).
• Improve collaboration between pre-calculus and calculus instructors to ensure that students are
better prepared.
• Implement PSP tutoring for Calculus sequence
• Continue non-credit trigonometry refresher
• Implement other non-credit refreshers
• Expand workshop offerings for the calculus sequence.
• Expand offerings for transfer level courses (consider high-school offerings). Also, need classrooms to
offer more courses. Improve scheduling by have a more flexible college hour or offer additional
MWF sections.
• Improve study group facilitations.
• Improve assessment/placement methods
• Improve and revise our pedagogical methods for teaching calculus and possibly include a lab portion.
In the lab portion, we could have students do collaborative learning projects or have faculty
demonstrate where the calculus topics they are learning appear in upper level science and
•
engineering classes as well as how it is used in STEM research programs.
Considering what other colleges are using as a PSLO and CSLOs and how their data looks to help us
improve our PSLO and CSLO process.
What resources, if any, does your discipline need to accomplish your actions step(s)?
• More tutors and larger space for tutoring centers. To also include the centers.
• Improve communication with transfer students and transfer institutions.
• Additional funding for MESA Center
Describe the steps that will be taken to implement the recommendation(s) made above and please
include an estimated timeline.
Steps:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Increase conversation between Precalculus and calculus instructors (Spring 2017 and
ongoing)
Inquire about having PSP leaders in Math 250 courses (inquire in Spring 2017 for Fall 2017
and/or subsequent semesters – but depends on funding)
Implement workshops (Fall 2017)
Implement more non-credit refreshers (begin research in Spring 2017)
Improve PSLO assessment data by excluding Math 250 results
Continue to work on assessment/placement process
Timeline:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Spring 2017 and ongoing
Begin inquiries in Spring 2017 for Fall 2017 and/or subsequent semesters – but depends on
funding
Earliest possible would be Fall 2017
Begin research for non-credit course offerings in Spring 2017
Spring 2017
Ongoing from Spring 2016
Thursday, February 16, 2017 – MATH DEPARTMENT MEETING
UPDATE ON PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT FROM SEPTEMBER 24, 2016
During the first Math Department Meeting of Spring 2017, the team coordinating the Intermediate
Algebra Acceleration Project provided the following update:
Goal: Math 60 (4 units) + Bridge (2 units) = New Math 70 (6 units)
Reduce the STEM/business path by 1 semester & 2 units (from 12 M45/48-60-70 to 10 for M45/48-70).
Bridge to be offered Intersession, Summer, and as short-course during regular terms.
Both Bridge and New Math 70 have required graphing calculator.
Timeline:
Full implementation in Fall 2018
This semester: CurricUNET to add the Bridge path to Math and MSE classes having Math 70
prerequisites
STEM/Business path will become: Math 45/48 -> Math 70 -> Transfer-level
Non-STEM/Non-business path will remain: Math 45/48 -> Math 60 -> Math 100 or 110.
STEM/Business alternate path: Math 45/48 -> Math 60 -> Bridge ->Transfer-level
Students who take Math 60 by mistake can take the Bridge course (number between 61 and 64 TBA)
during Intersession or Summer, and go directly from Bridge to Transfer-level.
Students will need to decide after Math 45/48 (instead of Math 60) which path to take.
Communication with
•
Math 45 and Math 48 students, esp. in Spring 2018 and Fall 2018.
•
MSE faculty (starting now)
•
Counselors (soon)
Outcome Assessment Timeline
Academic Programs
In the spaces provided below, please list course-level and program-level student learning outcomes and when each will be assessed.
When completing the timeline, consider the assessment process (writing outcomes, measuring outcomes, discussing results with colleagues, formulating plans for
improvement where necessary, implementing plans and reporting results of implemented plans.
Course ID
MATH 100
*Term Measured
or
Term to be
Measured
Date Data Analyzed
with Colleagues
or
Approximate Date
Scheduled to
Analyze Data with
Colleagues
Term Plan(s) of
Improvement
Implemented
or
Term Plan(s) of
Improvement to be
Implemented
Date Plan(s) for
Improvement Data
Analyzed with
Colleagues
or
Approximate Date
Scheduled to
Analyze Plan(s) for
improvement Data
with Colleagues
Spring 2016
Fall 2016
Spring 2017
Fall 2017
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Course-Level Student Learning Outcome (CSLO)
Calculate and interpret the probability and odds of everyday
events.
Using real-world data, analyze contemporary mathematical
problems by applying problem solving techniques using a variety
of methods. And then, communicate the results mathematically
through a variety of forms.
Analyze properties and behavior of functions and implement
appropriate techniques to solve applications.
MATH 101
Use a variety of methods to solve systems of equations and
implement those methods to solve application problems.
Recognize and graph conic sections. Analyze the behavior of
sequences and series. Apply the binomial expansion theorem.
MATH 104
MATH 110
Analyze properties and behavior of trigonometric functions
and implement appropriate techniques to solve applications.
Use polar coordinates; represent complex numbers in
rectangular and trigonometric forms; perform operations with
complex numbers.
Apply different strategies to solve problems - including but
not limited to guess and check, sketch pictures and
diagrams, look for patterns, work backwards, and solve
similar problems.
Identify and apply the properties and basic operations from
the whole number to the rational number system.
Analyze computational situations to obtain and justify solutions
using techniques such as mental arithmetic, estimation,
traditional and non-traditional algorithms.
Demonstrate familiarity with basic geometric vocabulary.
Identify fundamental geometric properties of two- and threedimensional shapes, including congruency, similarity, and
transformations.
MATH 111
MATH 112
MATH 115
MATH 119
MATH 120
Find values of such quantities as perimeter, area, surface area,
volume, etc. for certain two and three dimensional shapes.
Identify and describe different problem solving strategies -including but not limited to guess and check, pattern
identification, working backwards, and solving similar problems and use them to represent and solve problems in multiple ways
Read and critique article(s) pertaining to problem solving with
whole numbers or fractions.
Analyze children's understanding of basic arithmetic operations
with whole numbers, fractions, and decimals.
Use appropriate vocabulary and tools to analyze and describe a
statistical question.
Recognize statistical applications in everyday life and apply
appropriate analytical tools and problem solving skills.
Recognize and apply algebraic vocabulary, symbols, and
properties, and evaluate and perform operations on algebraic
expressions.
Identify, explain and summarize statistical concepts and
terminology.
Identify, analyze, and construct formal tests of hypotheses
concerning single population means and single population
proportions.
Solve equations and inequalities using algebraic, numerical,
and graphical processes, in both mathematical and applied
settings, and correctly interpret the results as measured by
completion and accuracy of individual tasks graded by
teacher-generated rubric.
Demonstrate knowledge, comprehension, and application of
concepts from business calculus including, but not limited to
finding maximum and minimum values of a function, and
describing the behavior of a function such as the intervals
where a function is increasing, decreasing, concave upward
and concave downward.
Spring 2016
Fall 2016
Spring 2017
Fall 2017
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MATH 121
MATH 122
MATH 130
MATH 140
MATH 230
MATH
241M
MATH
241P
Apply knowledge of the definitions, properties, and concepts
of differential calculus to evaluating derivatives of polynomial,
rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic functions.
Apply appropriate critical thinking, analytical reasoning, and
concepts of first semester calculus to the solutions of
problems in the fields of physical science, social science and
biology
Demonstrate knowledge and the application of concepts of
algebra, analytic geometry, and properties and concepts of
differential calculus to finding tangent lines, rates of change,
velocity, curve sketching, and optimization
Demonstrate knowledge and appropriate application of the
definitions, rules, and concepts
Apply integration techniques to solve problems including
areas, volumes, and average value
Write, compile, run, and test simple Java programs using a text
editor or an integrated development environment (IDE), such as
Eclipse.
Apply the key principles of object-oriented programming,
including abstraction, inheritance, polymorphism, and
encapsulation.
Use conditional logic, loops, and arrays in a Java application.
Describe problem requirements and employs correct
programming constructs and syntax to create a working solution.
Identify necessary data structures or existing algorithms and use
them to solve a problem.
Demonstrate how fundamental high-level programming
constructs are implemented at the machine-language level.
Use an understanding of computer organization and architecture
to structure programs to perform more efficiently.
Model real world situations with and interpret solutions.
Utilize mathematical resources and technology while
demonstrating numerical reasoning and literacy.
Use conditional logic, loops, and arrays to analyze data.
Write, compile, run, and test Python applications using an
integrated development environment (IDE) such as Eclipse.
Use object-oriented programming to model real-world
applications.
Spring 2016
Fall 2016
Spring 2017
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MATH 244
MATH 250
MATH 251
MATH 252
MATH 253
MATH 254
Analyze properties and behavior of functions and implement
appropriate techniques to solve applications.
Use a variety of methods to solve systems of equations and
implement those methods to solve application problems.
Recognize and graph conic sections. Analyze the behavior of
sequences and series. Apply the binomial expansion theorem.
Analyze properties and behavior of trigonometric functions and
implement appropriate techniques to solve applications.
Use polar coordinates; represent complex numbers in
rectangular and trigonometric forms; perform operations with
complex numbers.
Use the basic definitions, properties, theorems, and techniques
of first semester Calculus to solve problems and applications.
Analyze and sketch graphs using the principles of calculus.
Evaluate limits, derivatives and integrals numerically, graphically
and algebraically.
Use the basic definitions, properties, theorems, and techniques
of second semester Calculus to solve problems and
applications.
Apply Calculus techniques to curves given in polar and
parametric form, including graphing, equations of tangent lines,
arclength, and area.
Find and apply power series representations of functions and
determine possible errors, radius of convergence, and
corresponding derivatives and integrals.
State and apply basic definitions, properties, and theorems of
multivariable Calculus to solve problems and applications.
Apply vector operations in two and three dimensions and use
vector methods to analyze plane and space curves, and
curvilinear motion.
Use the basic definitions, properties, theorems, and techniques
of Differential Equations to solve problems and applications.
Apply various methods to solve the vast array of differential
equations encountered in Differential Equations.
Write clear and accurate proofs for some of the results used in
the course.
Use matrices and their operations to solve linear systems and
use linear transformations to model real-life problems.
Spring 2016
Fall 2016
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Fall 2017
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Fall 2017
MATH 11
MATH 260
MATH 35
MATH 45
MATH 48
MATH 57
Retake the Math Assessment test and place at least two levels
above prior placement.
Score at least 70% on a Math 60 Departmental Final Exam.
Communicate mathematical ideas and concepts to various
audiences.
Construct mathematical proofs using standard techniques such
as induction, contradiction, and contraposition.
Assess the validity of mathematical arguments.
Perform calculations with, convert between, solve applications,
or compare whole numbers, fractions, decimals and percents
without a calculator
Set-up and simplify ratios and rates; solve problems involving
proportions, conversions or geometric problems involving
perimeter, circumference, area and volume; all without a
calculator
Solve linear equations that contain integers, fractions or
decimals; apply exponent rules to simplify exponential
expressions; evaluate and perform algebraic operations on
polynomials, and solve application problems; all without a
calculator
Recognize and apply algebraic vocabulary, symbols, and
properties, and evaluate and perform operations on algebraic
expressions
Solve linear equations, quadratic equations and linear
inequalities, including applications
Graph lines and inequalities in two variables and apply to linear
models
Recognize and apply algebraic vocabulary, symbols, and
properties, and evaluate and perform operations on algebraic
expressions
Graph lines in two variables and apply to linear models
Solve linear equations, quadratic equations and linear
inequalities, including applications
Use appropriate vocabulary and tools to analyze and describe a
statistical question.
Recognize statistical applications in everyday life and apply
appropriate analytical tools and problem solving skills.
Recognize and apply algebraic vocabulary, symbols, and
properties, and evaluate and perform operations on algebraic
expressions
Spring 2017
Fall 2017
Spring 2018
Fall 2018
Spring 2017
Fall 2017
Spring 2018
Fall 2018
Spring 2016
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Fall 2018
MATH 60
Recognize and apply algebraic vocabulary and definitions,
symbols, and properties; evaluate and perform operations on
algebraic expressions, and solve equations and inequalities
Graph linear, quadratic and radical functions, and circles
Use algebraic techniques to model and solve applications
MATH 70
Demonstrate knowledge and appropriate application of absolute
value, polynomial, radical, rational, exponential, inverse, and
logarithmic functions.
Analyze and graph functions and conics using algebraic
methods and graphing calculator.
Recognize mathematical applications in everyday life and apply
appropriate critical thinking and algebraic problem solving skills.
Spring 2016
Fall 2016
Spring 2017
Fall 2017
Spring 2016
Fall 2016
Spring 2017
Fall 2017
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Program
Mathematics
01580 Associate
in Art
Associate of
Science in
Mathematics
Studies in
Transfer 01585
Associate in
Science
Computer
Science 02191
Certificate
Computer
Science 02190
Associate in
Science
Computer
Science 01180
Associate in Arts
Associate
Degree in
Computer
Science for
Transfer 01185
Associate in
Science Transfer
Term Measured
or
Term to be Measured
Date Data Analyzed
with Colleagues
or
Approximate Date
Scheduled to
Analyze Data with
Colleagues
Term Plan(s) of
Improvement
Implemented
or
Term Plan(s) of
Improvement to be
Implemented
Date Plan(s) for
Improvement Data
Analyzed with
Colleagues
or
Approximate Date
Scheduled to
Analyze Plan(s) for
improvement Data
with Colleagues
Spring 2016
Fall 2016
Spring 2017
Fall 2017
Spring 2016
Fall 2016
Spring 2017
Fall 2017
Spring 2016
Fall 2016
Spring 2017
Fall 2017
Spring 2016
Fall 2016
Spring 2017
Fall 2017
Spring 2016
Fall 2016
Spring 2017
Fall 2017
Spring 2016
Fall 2016
Spring 2017
Fall 2017
Program-Level Student Learning Outcome (PSLO)
Use the basic definitions, properties, theorems, and
techniques of Calculus.
Use the basic definitions, properties, theorems, and
techniques of Calculus.
Recognize and appropriately apply current and historical
Software Engineering design patterns, algorithms, and
data structures to produce efficient, well-engineered
software products.
Recognize and appropriately apply current and historical
Software Engineering design patterns, algorithms, and
data structures to produce efficient, well-engineered
software products.
Recognize and appropriately apply current and historical
Software Engineering design patterns, algorithms, and
data structures to produce efficient, well-engineered
software products.
Recognize and appropriately apply Software Engineering
design patterns, algorithms, and data structures to
produce efficient, well-engineered software products.
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