Upper School Course Catalog

Upper School Course Catalog
Upper School
Course Catalog
2017-18
Preparing Boys for Life.
INTRODUCTION
The Haverford School offers a demanding, college preparatory curriculum within
heterogeneously grouped classes. Certain advanced courses (marked with an asterisk *) are
homogeneously grouped. Within this framework, students are encouraged to pursue a course of
study that challenges them beyond the minimum graduation requirements, while allowing time
for participation in extracurricular activities and programs as well.
Choosing the course of study that is best for you requires thought and care. Students should
consult parents, advisors, department chairs and administrators when choosing their courses.
The goal is to develop a course of study that:
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develops one’s talents and aptitudes through a varied curriculum
underscores talents and strengthens areas of relative weakness
allows time for activities, sports and other extra-curricular activities
challenges you to discover, develop, and expand areas of the liberal arts that can become
sources of pride, joy and fulfillment and
meets all graduation requirements.
Please note:
A student entering the Upper School is placed in the appropriate level of math based on previous
courses, testing, and consultation with the department chair.
In order to graduate, each student must complete one of the following Arts requirements:
• satisfactory completion of a one-year course in the arts
• satisfactory completion of two semester courses in the arts
• satisfactory participation in a one-year Theater Department arts credit activity.
See Theater course descriptions for details.
• satisfactory participation in one of the Music Department’s Arts Credit Activities for one
year.
See Music course descriptions for details.
A course designated with an asterisk (*) is designed to provide a highly motivated, talented,
passionate student with a rigorous academic experience that moves at an accelerated pace.
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Because we want every student to be successful, we are thorough and thoughtful in placing
students in our most demanding (*) courses. A student in an (*) course who does not earn a
final grade of B or better will be reconsidered before he is permitted to matriculate to the next (*)
course in the sequence. A student in a standard course who wishes to be considered for
enrollment in a (*) course must earn a final grade of A-. Please note that these guidelines do not
guarantee (*) placement. Additionally, some departments require readiness diagnostics (math
placement exercise, writing sample, etc.,) and some departments, particularly those whose
courses are cumulative in nature such as math and foreign language, may require a grade of A or
above to advance from a standard to a (*) course. In all cases, the department chair, in
consultation with the classroom teacher, is the final arbiter of student placement.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS ..................................................................................................... 1
GUIDELINES FOR COURSE SELECTION ....................................................................................... 1
COURSE OVERVIEW .............................................................................................................................. 3
ENGLISH ................................................................................................................................................... 7
FINE & PERFORMING ARTS ............................................................................................................ 10
ART .........................................................................................................................................................
10
MUSIC ...................................................................................................................................................... 14
THEATER ................................................................................................................................................ 17
HEALTH & PHYSICAL EDUCATION ............................................................................................ 19
HISTORY ................................................................................................................................................. 20
MATHEMATICS .................................................................................................................................... 24
MODERN & CLASSICAL LANGUAGES ......................................................................................... 32
................................................................................................................................................ 32
LATIN ..................................................................................................................................................... 33
SPANISH ................................................................................................................................................ 35
CHINESE
SCIENCE ................................................................................................................................................. 39
INDEPENDENT STUDY ...................................................................................................................... 47
CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES ....................................................................................................... 48
............................................................................................................................................ 48
MUSIC & THEATER ................................................................................................................................ 48
ATHLETICS
CLUBS
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50
SERVICE LEARNING
........................................................................................................................................... 51
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GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
In the Upper School, a student must complete four years of English, at least three (3) years of
mathematics (four are recommended) in the proper sequence concluding with one of the following
(1) Pre-Calculus or Pre-Calculus*, (2) Statistics, (3) Functions, Statistics, and Trigonometry or (4)
one of the courses with Calculus in the title, two years of the same modern or classical language,
three years of history (including Ancient and Modern World History, and American History), and
three years of laboratory science (Physics, Chemistry, and Biology). Students must also meet a
Fine Arts requirement. Each student must participate in two interscholastic sports or the
equivalent thereof (see handbook) in Third, Fourth, and Fifth Forms, and one interscholastic sport
in the Sixth Form year. Health and Physical Education, given during the Fourth Form year, is
required of all students, even if they are participating in an interscholastic sport. Numerous elective
courses in art, music, and other major disciplines are offered. Advanced elective courses are also
offered, and students who qualify are urged to take these electives and other advanced courses.
Most students exceed minimum requirements in one or more disciplines by Sixth Form. All Third
Form students take six courses. Students in Fourth through Sixth Forms must take at least five
courses in each year of study, and no more than six (not including health/physical education).
GUIDELINES FOR COURSE SELECTION
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Third Form students are required to take six major subjects: English I, Ancient World History,
physics, math, a modern or classical language, and a choice of electives (art, music, and theater
or a second language). A core faculty sensitive to the needs and importance of this transitional
year will teach these courses.
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Single offering, non-required elective courses run only if a minimum number of students
enroll. Department Chairs and the Head of Upper School determine the number.
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Advanced courses designated with an asterisk (*) must be approved by the student’s current
teacher and ultimately by the appropriate Department Chair. To qualify for an advanced
course, a student must earn a grade of A- or higher in that discipline in the previous year.
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Students who wish to take six courses (except Third Formers) must have approval of the Head
of Upper School.
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The Mathematics Department approves placement of students in standard or advanced (*)
sections. Students with special requests and situations (i.e. advanced work in summer school,
enrichment courses, etc.) need to discuss their plans with the Department Chair and current
teachers before such courses are taken. Advanced students must complete three years of math
in proper sequence, even if they have taken the Pre-Calculus course before their third year of
math in the Upper School.
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There will be a week-long Add/Drop period at the beginning of each semester. No courses may
be dropped after the first marking period unless there are extenuating circumstances and only
in consultation with the Head of Upper School, the appropriate Department Chair, and
advisor.
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Independent Study is a privilege generally reserved for Sixth Form students. Independent
Study proposals for the first semester are due by September 14, 2017 and for the second
semester no later than January 3, 2018. The Independent Study Committee, comprised of the
Head of Upper School, the Director of College Counseling, and the appropriate Department
Chair, will review each proposal. In some special cases during the Sixth Form year,
Independent Study may be substituted for a fifth course or added as a sixth course. HONORS
AND YEARLONG COURSES CANNOT BE DROPPED IN ORDER TO TAKE AN
INDEPENDENT STUDY. NB: Independent Study is intended for work that is not available
in the normal school curriculum. No credit toward the graduation requirements is given for
courses taken at a school other than Haverford, though coursework completed in Modern and
Classical Languages and Mathematics in Middle School may allow a student to take more
advanced courses in those subjects in Third Form.
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The Fine Arts requirement in the Upper School can be met by one of the following: satisfactory
completion of a one-year course in the arts; satisfactory completion of two semester courses in
the arts. Students may also fulfill this graduation requirement through satisfactory
participation in a number of “Arts Credit Activities.” See Theatre and Music course
descriptions for detailed information. Some of these activities include being an actor or crew
member in three school dramatic productions; satisfactory participation in the school chorus
or other performance ensemble for one year, satisfactory participation in three trimesters
(sports seasons) in Stage Crew. Stage crew may NOT count for both an Arts credit and a Sports
credit in the same season. Students may combine activities to accrue a total of at least a year’s
participation to complete their Arts requirement.
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Health and Physical Education classes are required during the Fourth Form year. Each student
will be scheduled for three periods per cycle for the entire Fourth Form year. All students are
required to take Physical Education classes, even if they are playing or managing an
interscholastic sport. SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF HEALTH AND PHYSICAL
EDUCATION IS A REQUIREMENT FOR GRADUATION. ALSO, EACH THIRD FIFTH FORM STUDENT MUST PLAY TWO INTERSCHOLASTIC SPORTS PER YEAR
OR THE EQUIVALENT THEREOF (See handbook). Students have the option to play a
sport each season of the school year if they desire. The Athletics Department maintains
records of each student’s participation in interscholastic sports during his Upper School years.
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Students and families, especially those new to the Upper School, will work with the faculty,
advisors, and the Head of Upper School in the course selection process. Please call the Head of
Upper School if you have any questions.
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ENGLISH
Philosophy and Overview
The English Department is dedicated to educating boys to see the world around them clearly,
critically, and sensitively. Through the study of literature, we strive to nurture young men to be
thoughtful and generous forces in their communities and to be able to read, write, and speak with
precision and power. As students examine literature both traditionally Western and more
culturally diverse, they encounter attitudes and lives that expose them to new perspectives. As they
write analytical papers, personal narratives, and creative pieces, they build and explore their
rhetorical and artistic skills. As they speak in small discussion groups and in formal presentation,
they discover their own voices and learn to listen to each other.
The English Department program is structured in such a way that each student’s sharpened critical
awareness—in reading skills, in writing, and in oration—builds incrementally. As students learn to
recognize linguistic structures and possibilities, they also come to understand the basic elements
intrinsic to literature of all genres. We know that close observation of textual detail enriches the
rhetorical quality of thinking, writing, and speaking. In our efforts to shape and sharpen our
students’ verbal skills, to expand their knowledge of literature, and to add to their general
intellectual growth, we provide memorable and useful experiences. Such is our ambition: that our
efforts and associations will instill habits and skills of lifelong value.
English I
This course seeks to ground students in the essential elements of effective reading, writing, and
speaking. Two major objectives of the course are to teach students to read for meaning as well as
pleasure and to teach them to express themselves clearly and logically through the written word.
Writing assignments vary from analytical essays and personal narratives to journal entries and
creative exercises. Most assignments emphasize revision and require multiple drafts. During the
year students study and discuss works from many genres and examine how plot, character, theme,
and language inform each other. Selections from Homer’s The Odyssey familiarize students with
the background of the Western tradition, while providing a common base of reference for the
future study of literature at Haverford. Other works in the recent past have included: A Raisin in
the Sun, Lord of the Flies, American Born Chinese, and selections of short stories and poems.
English I also includes a formal study of grammar, based on online resources, and vocabulary,
largely based on Wordly Wise 3000.
English II: World Literature
This course exposes students to many genres of world literature and introduces them to the critical
idiom. It places special emphasis on close reading and urges students to explore how figurative
language, allusion, connotation, and imagery enhance meaning. Students hone these reading skills
through sources as diverse as the short stories of Jhumpa Lahiri and Ha Jin, the poems of Wilfred
Owen and W.D. Ehrhart, and the drama of Shakespeare’s Macbeth and Athol Fugard’s “Master
Harold”…and the boys. Marjane Satrapi’s graphic novel Persepolis and Chinua Achebe’s novel
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The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog Things Fall Apart round out a selection that we hope will challenge and broaden the perspectives of
our young men. Expository essays help students to develop analytical and critical skills; personal
narrative assignments encourage Fourth Form writers to develop their own voice or rhetorical
style. Original poetry, journalism, and frequent print or online journal entries supplement more
traditional writing assessments. In order to further their ability to communicate effectively and
gracefully, students also continue the study of grammar and vocabulary begun in Third Form,
turning their attention to usage and the mechanics of writing. In addition to the core resources of
IXL.com, they continue to use Wordly Wise 3000 and may refer to sources like Warriner’s High
School Handbook.
English III: American Literature
Building upon the grammatical foundation and introduction to literary genres established in
Fourth Form, this course is a selective survey of important works that reflect the varieties of the
American experience. The course includes selections of poetry, fiction, and essays from authors
such as Edwards, Wheatley, Thoreau, Douglass, Whitman, Dickinson, Hughes, Kesey, and Diaz.
Core texts include One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, The Great Gatsby, and Fences. This study of
American literature serves as the basis for regularly assigned critical papers and personal
narratives. Teachers assign a variety of topics, and as the year progresses, students are given greater
freedom of choice in their topics and their approaches. The department expects papers to be
thorough, well organized, clearly worded, insightful, well documented, and substantially free of
spelling, grammatical, and mechanical errors.
English IV: Early British Literature (fall semester)
For the fourth required year of English, the course is divided into two distinct terms. The fall term
is devoted to honing the Sixth Formers’ skills in close reading and careful writing. Students write
frequent analytical essays on complex literary texts. Texts assigned in the recent past include Brave
New World, Hamlet, and classic and contemporary poetry.
English IV: Spring Seminars
In the spring, English IV becomes a seminar style topic-centered class based on the college model,
in which students will assume more responsibility for class discussion and presentation. The
department will give students the opportunity to indicate preference of seminars, but sections will
be formed in the fall at the discretion of the department and depend upon staffing and class-size
limits. Current offerings include:
American War Poetry
This course will trace the history and development of American war poetry from Phillis Wheatley’s
“To His Excellency General Washington” through all of America’s wars up to and including the
Iraq War. We will observe how war poetry changes as the centuries progress, identify specifically
what these changes are, and try to postulate why they occur.
James Bond: The Cinema of Masculinity
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In this course, we will critically dissect the longest continuously running film series in history. The
works of Ian Fleming serve as a unique way to map American masculinity. The coded objects, in
Bond, point to drastic changes in male identity from 1950s into the present moment.
Journalism: Speaking Truth to Power
Students will further hone their writing abilities through a study of a variety of contemporary
journalistic lenses: investigative, feature, arts criticism, opinion, sports, and world-affairs news
analysis. We will read, write, critique, revise, and publish. We will consider the state of
contemporary American journalism in its print, digital, and social media contexts.
Page and Stage
After close readings of contemporary and classic plays, students will attend live performances on
Philadelphia stages. We will evaluate the effectiveness of the productions using the critical
language of the arts journalist. Whenever possible, we will discuss the creative process with writers,
directors, designers, and actors.
Seeing is Believing?
By understanding the power of story in visual media, students will focus on being a critical viewer.
An initial study of advertising will uncover how audience determines all aspects of the final
product: narrative, cast, setting, sound, lighting, framing, acting, and more. In the following larger
unit on fiction film, the focus will be on how the story is delivered, noting that film has its own
technical vocabulary counterpointing those terms used to analyze in literature.
Utopian Literature
Human beings have been fascinated with utopian literature and the notion of intentional
communities before and after Thomas More’s time. What can be learned through the study of
utopian literature and of the historical and contemporary “planned communities”? Can we
envision a better world? Can we implement that vision? Can we foresee the risks in doing so?
English IV*
This English IV fall seminar aims to challenge our most motivated English scholars to
become better writers. Students will read masters of the essay, study their techniques, and imitate
their style. They will learn to write - clearly, accurately, and above all creatively - about the world
that surrounds them. In the second half of the semester we will use our newfound critical reading
and writing skills in a deep dive into Hamlet. Sixth Formers may enroll in this first semester
course if they meet the following prerequisites: A- average in English III, the recommendation
of their English III teacher, and, after consideration of a writing sample, the consent of the
department. In the second semester, the department offers the variety of seminars as described
above in English IV.
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FINE & PERFORMING ARTS
VISUAL ART
Philosophy and Overview
The Haverford Art Department believes that an understanding of the visual arts is an essential part
of a strong liberal arts curriculum. As well as providing learning experiences that lead to further
study and careers in creative professions, the art curriculum emphasizes the ways in which
working in the art studio teaches broader essential life skills. Artists often work from observation
in order to strengthen their ability to see more powerfully and critically. We understand that artists
use this powerful visual language of signs, symbols, colors, and forms to investigate and
communicate ideas. Through their studies, students become aware of how this language is at work
in the world around them and become skilled in their ability to communicate effectively. Works of
art often involve subtle meanings and complex systems of expression that go beyond ordinary
speaking and writing. The actual practice of making art engages the imagination, fosters flexible
ways of thinking, develops disciplined effort, promotes innovation and builds self-confidence.
Creative people of all sorts, artists, writers, designers, scientists and engineers are all well versed in
the complex and challenging process of bringing new ideas into being. Through the Visual Arts
curriculum at Haverford, students are able to gain a facility with this practice, making it
transferable across disciplines. For some students the study of art will lead to careers in the arts.
For many others, it will develop a valuable facility with the often frustrating creative process of
bringing something new into being, whether they do so in the art world, the business world,
scientific careers or wherever they find themselves. Others, too will have permanently enhanced
the quality of their lives with a fluency in the visual language and an informed appreciation of the
arts. Each course offered provides students with a broad survey of contemporary and traditional
art concepts, techniques and working methods. 2-Dimensional courses emphasize the study of art
concepts through the use of drawing, painting and printmaking media. 3-Dimensional courses
emphasize traditional sculptural media such as ceramics and woodworking as well as the most
contemporary techniques such as 3D printing, laser engraving and product design. 2D Design,
Photography and Video & Animation students work with some of the most contemporary digital
media available to artists creating photographs, videos, animations and graphic design works.
Woodworking addresses these same overarching skills through traditional and contemporary work
in this medium. Sequential courses build on the knowledge and skills developed in earlier courses
but are flexible enough to allow students to move between 2-dimensional, 3-dimensional or Digital
media courses. We strive to instill the courage to face challenges, the skills and practices involved
in solving complex problems, a fluency in the primal visual language and an understanding and
appreciation of the visual arts and the work of artists throughout time and across cultures.
Visual Art: Foundations
This yearlong course introduces students to the fundamental vocabulary of the visual artist across a
wide variety of media, and working methods. Students are exposed to those skills, knowledge and
practices fundamental to the visual arts, providing the starting point for all further visual arts
courses at Haverford. Students have the opportunity to work with each art instructor in each of the
four art studios. Drawing, Painting, Sculpture, Ceramics, 3D & 2D Design, Photography, and
Computer Graphics are explored through a variety of hands-on projects. Each project develops
students’ visual acuity, their fluency in the visual language and their practice in the creative
process. Much emphasis is placed on drawing, painting, sculpting from still-life set-ups, the figure,
and objects and environments of the students' real world and experiences. By means of structured
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projects, each student is encouraged to seek imaginative, personal solutions to a wide variety of
problems while learning traditional visual art skills and techniques. Creative concepts, strong
design and effective use of media are stressed in an effort to help the student challenge himself and
tap his deepest creative potential. Historical and contemporary artists and movements are
introduced in relation to each new unit of study. Group critiques, online blogs and written
“reflections” give each student the opportunity to learn to articulate his observations about his own
work and that of his classmates. This process also prepares the students for the written sections of
their two major exams projects. Foundations is an introductory level course open to students
Third through Sixth Forms.
Two-Dimensional Art (fall and/or spring semester)
These semester-long courses serve as the second level in the 2D art sequence, building on the skills
and concepts introduced in the Foundations course. Working in a variety of media with pencil,
charcoal, pastel, printmaking techniques, watercolors, and oil paints, students will explore
fundamentals of line, shape, form, value, color, texture, and composition. Students will begin the
course working in black and white and later explore basic color theory. Through projects rooted in
prevalent themes in contemporary art, students will strive to develop personal concepts that are
well thought out and connected to the work of professional artists. Each project offers significant
freedom for students to explore their own ideas and develop their creative thinking skills. Students
will spend time looking at art throughout history, critiquing each other’s work, and writing virtual
reflections on their process and product. Students can take both the fall and spring semester
course without repeating projects.
Art Portfolio I*: 2D and Digital
is the third level (and most advanced level available to Fifth Form students) in the sequence of
drawing and painting based art courses. This course focuses on using the art elements and design
principles stressed in lower level courses and developing the skills needed to communicate
effectively and passionately. Students will learn to coordinate subject matter, color theory and twodimensional design to support an overall concept. New artists’ materials including oil paints and
gouache will be introduced. Students will begin building a portfolio of high caliber works covering
a range of art concepts suitable for college applications, outside exhibitions and competitions and
will begin developing a possible theme to serve as the core of future work in the “2D Portfolio II”
course. This is an Honors* level course and as such requires significant time in the studio outside
of class (approx 2 periods per week). Prerequisite: successful completion of one or more
yearlong art courses and approval of the instructor. “2-D Art: Portfolio*” is intended for the
most dedicated students, as successful course work is the result of enthusiasm, focus, and a
significant investment of time and work.
Art Portfolio II: 2D and Digital
Art Portfolio II is a culminating course for the most experienced visual art students. The course is
designed to offer students who have taken Portfolio I to continue to develop their technical skills
and explore personal ideas through the creation of projects of their own design. Students will have
the opportunity to experiment with different mediums, explore various artistic voices, and hone
their project management skills. While individual artists will work in different media and
dissimilar concepts, the class will meet as a group to learn about contemporary artists and critique
each other's work. The year finishes with an exhibition of student work. Prerequisite: successful
completion of Portfolio.
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Art Portfolio II*: 2D and Digital
Art Portfolio II* is an intensive culminating thesis seminar for the most experienced visual art
students. The course is designed to transform experienced art students into emerging young artists
by stressing the development of a personal visual arts thesis and a supporting body of work.
During class and two hours of extra studio time per week, students will create a related body of
work in the form of an investigation. Through individual research and experimentation, each
student will discover and refine his most eloquent voice for effective communication in the visual
language. While individual artists will work in different media and dissimilar concepts, the class
will meet as a group to learn about contemporary artists and critique each other's work. The year
finishes with an exhibition of students’ thesis works. To receive Honors* level designation
Portfolio II* students will spend at least 2.5-3 hours a week outside of class on their work.
Prerequisite: successful completion of Portfolio I and approval of the instructor. Art Portfolio
II* is intended for the most dedicated and experienced Sixth Form students only.
Ceramic Arts
Ceramic Arts is one of three second-level courses in the progression of our 3-Dimensional art
curriculum. This full year course is designed to provide a thorough immersion into contemporary
and historical practices within the field of Ceramics and how ceramics fits within the overall art
making world. Ceramic Arts students will be encouraged to pursue a curiosity about the linkages
between process, meaning, and perception within a challenging yet supportive studio environment.
Expanding on the ideas presented during the Foundation year experience, Ceramic Arts students
will be introduced to and use a huge variety of tools and processes including but not limited to the
potter’s wheel, figurative sculpture, mold-making, slab-building, and alternative surface
treatments.The ultimate aim of this class is to gain the tools and skills to become fearless in the
pursuit of an individual artistic voice with skill-building, research, and experimentation happening
simultaneously. The work in Ceramics, as in all visual art classes aims to strengthen students’
ability to think and see critically, to develop a fluency in the visual language, and to become more
adept at the creative process.
Woodworking Arts (fall and/or spring semester)
This course allows interested students the opportunity to explore the sculptural and functional
aspects of design with wood. At the core of our work is developing an understanding for and a
facility with the design process. This project-based course will build from simple construction
methods with wood and wood tools and gradually expand the scope and skills used to more and
complex forms culminating in a project of the student’s own design. Students will have the
opportunity and expectation to work imaginatively while accomplishing the goals of each project.
The use of hand and power tools as well as the qualities of selected woods will be a component of
each unit. Students all learn the basics of linear perspective, orthographic perspective, and scale
drawing techniques used by designers, architects and engineers. Students will maintain
sketchbooks for planning purposes and a shared personal blog where they will document the
progress of their work and learning. Although similar, each semester will vary enough for a student
to take both semesters without repeating any material and to deal with more complex ideas and
techniques. Two instructors will team teach this course. Mr. Thorburn (Assistant Head) and Mr.
Wisniewski (Director of Physical Plant and Facilities) have experience with fine woodworking and
building.
Three-Dimensional Art: Design (fall and/or spring)
These semester-long courses serve as one of three possible second level courses in the Visual Arts
sequence and build on the basic skills acquired in Foundation level courses. Three-Dimensional
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Art: Design features a more in-depth focus on the design process itself at work in the production of
both sculptural and functional objects and will tackle concepts and projects that require real world
problem solving skills. A variety of sculptural and three-dimensional design projects ranging from
simple woodworking projects, to product design and architectural design will provide students
with the multifaceted experience of planning, design and construction of objects. Students will
utilize an array of tools from a personal sketchbook to the industry standard laser cutter. Students
will learn how to incorporate computer software, such as Illustrator and CAD to aid in the
realization of their work. This course will seek out opportunities to do interdisciplinary work
involving engineering and math concepts and skills. Although similar, the first semester focuses
on seeing and creating objects using the basic modeling methods while the second semester
expands into exploring laser cutters and 3D printers.
Three-Dimensional Art: Portfolio I*
Honors 3D Art: Portfolio is a sculpture course that builds on the concepts of three-dimensional
sculpture and design: implicit/explicit volume, balance, rhythm, resemblance, size relation, utility
and craftsmanship etc. Students will focus on technical skills and concepts needed to create threedimensional works in space through the manipulation of various 3D materials and media
including wood, clay, wire, plaster, cardboard, and found objects. Extensive technical
demonstrations will help students develop material interests and studio skills, including innovative
uses of both manual and digital processes. Students will develop imaginative and creative solutions
through a series of structured problem solving projects as well as individual project proposals. As
an honors course, students will be expected to drive their own practice and find engaging topics for
formal inquiry. Every student will be encouraged to follow the creative process, utilizing writing,
sketching, and verbal meetings with peers and faculty. Artistic explorations through prototyping,
skill acquisition and final creation will culminate in a group critique and a written reflection.
Prerequisite: successful completion of one or more year-long art courses and approval of the
instructor. “3-D Art: Portfolio” is intended for the most dedicated and interested students, as
successful completion of this course is the result of enthusiasm, focus, and a significant
investment of time and work.
Three-Dimensional Art: Portfolio II*
is our most advanced sculpture course designed as the continuation and advancement of the work
generated in the 3-D Art Portfolio course (see above description). Students will develop a
sophisticated body of work with individualized areas of research, and a directed, productive
approach to studio practice. There will have monthly meetings with faculty and guest artists. Off
campus opportunities including field trips to exhibitions, museums, and artist studios will
highlight professional practices in contemporary art in the vibrant Philadelphia area. Finally, the
course will introduce students to the possibility of participation in major national competitions
and exhibitions, self-promotion, and various creative opportunities. Prerequisite: successful
completion of the Three-Dimensional Art: Portfolio I* and approval of the instructor.
Photography (fall semester)
With a focus on the digital realm of photography, students will gain an understanding of how
artists have used light to create images with both experimental and traditional methods of using
light sensitive materials and darkroom techniques. Students will explore how digital photography
replicates those traditional techniques and allows for even greater manipulation of images using
computer software. Students will learn to use Photoshop software to not only manipulate their
digital photographs but to create their own composite images. Students will explore the basics of
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graphic design where images, photos and text are combined to create visually powerful
communication. Photography is open to Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Form students with or without
any other art experience.
Video and Animation (spring semester)
Students will learn the basics of video production: storyboarding, shooting, composing, and
editing. Working with digital video cameras and Adobe Premiere video editing software students
will create a variety of short films that explore different techniques, skills, and subject matter.
Students will learn a variety of traditional and contemporary animation techniques to continue
their study of the moving image. Students will learn how to present their video and animation
works in a variety of formats and will integrate writing, design and computer proficiencies to
develop an online portfolio that will demonstrate skills that carry over to many other disciplines.
Video and Animation is open to Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Form students with or without any other
art experience.
Advanced Video and Animation* (spring semester)
After mastering basic video editing techniques in the Video & Animation course, students in the
honors level will have the opportunity to deepen their understanding of this powerful means of
communication and expression, becoming more adept at script writing, editing techniques, idea
pitching, and creating longer length films. Assignments will reinforce and deepen understanding
of the core techniques and skills explored in the introductory level, with more room for exploring
personal interests and artistic goals. Honors level students will create longer, more developed films,
spending at least 2.5-3 hours a week outside of class on their projects as compared to the 1-hour
expectation of intro students. Honors students will read influential texts in film history and film
criticism, applying concepts discussed in the readings to their own films. All advanced students
will be required to submit to specific student film festivals and competitions.
MUSIC
Philosophy and Overview
Participation in musical study and performance facilitates an appreciation for beauty, a means of
self-expression, intellectual growth and a forum for positive community activity. We believe that
one appreciates most what he understands and that one understands best what he has experienced.
The music curriculum is experiential and has as its core musical literacy and artistry. Literacy is not
an end unto itself; rather it is an avenue to artistry, understanding and appreciation. The
curriculum is structured to prepare our boys for a lifetime of participation in the musical arts as
performers or appreciative, well-educated audience members. Students have the option to pursue
an intellectual study of music through the study of theory, guitar, recording and production,
songwriting and history. Students may also pursue performance-based participation in the
school’s musical ensembles. Performance based study includes options in both vocal and
instrumental realms. Students may audition for any number of ensembles, including Men’s Choirs,
String Orchestra, Chamber Music or Jazz Ensemble. Musical ensembles may be taken in fulfillment
of the Upper School Arts Requirement. In addition, because of the physical and cooperative nature
of ensemble work, yearlong participation in one of the school’s musical ensembles may be used to
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 15
fulfill one season of sports requirement. Two ensembles, Glee Club and Orchestra, are offered for
academic credit.
Fundamentals of Music: Theory and Guitar
This is a yearlong introductory level course to understanding, reading, writing, and creating music.
It is intended for students who want to pursue their passion for music but need help building a
strong foundation of musical skills, concepts, and language. This course will function as a
prerequisite for other higher-level music classes unless a firm grasp of the concepts and skills is
demonstrated to the teacher. Students will be expected to begin their mastery of basic to
intermediate rhythms in various time signatures, including rhythmic markings; note identification
in multiple clefs in every key signature including ledger lines. Intervals, scales, triads, and seventh
chords will be introduced both visually and aurally as well as popular song structures/forms,
allowing for both analysis and composition of songs. In order to reinforce these concepts, students
will be singing, playing the guitar, using MIDI keyboards, percussion, and using digital
compositional tools such as Garage Band and Logic Pro.
Music Theory and History*
This is a yearlong honors level course intended for the most musically proficient and inquisitive
students. This is a two-pronged course in which we will cover collegiate level theoretical topics that
are applicable to all styles of music. These skills will be reinforced through an intense study of
music history. We will start in the medieval era and watch and listen to how music evolves
throughout time up to the current hits that are listened to today. As we listen to Gregorian chant
we will find a better understanding of melody. The polyphony of the Renaissance will inform our
understanding of chord progressions, while the Baroque era will be better understood through
counterpoint exercises. While our understanding and appreciation of music deepens through our
study of classical music, it culminates in applying all of these concepts to modern music. We will
analyze what it is that makes music affect us the way it does and learn how to manipulate sound
the same way great musicians have throughout history. Prerequisite: Music Theory and Guitar
or instructor approval.
Advanced Guitar and Bass Guitar
This is a yearlong course for all of the aspiring guitarists/electric bassists. It will teach the necessary
techniques to allow students to learn and play intermediate to advanced repertoire in groups and
as individuals. Some of the skills that will be covered are scales and modes in multiple octaves and
fingering positions; chords in multiple positions across the fret board; fingerpicking exercises
designed to increase speed, control, dexterity, and musicality and applying learned skills to
repertoire from a diverse array of musical genres. Prerequisite: Music Theory and Guitar or
instructor approval.
Music Production and Recording (spring semester)
This course is for students interested in creating and recording music. This course will focus on
digital music production and the art of recording music. Students will learn how to use a
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The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog soundboard to mix music, how to use MIDI instruments and digital instruments to enhance their
compositions, how to use music software to create their own compositions, how to set up
microphones to record voices and/or instruments, and how to produce a finished product such as
a digital album. Students will learn the basics of how to use the relevant technology and then put
their compositional skills to the test. Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Music: Theory and Guitar
or instructor approval.
Music Composition: Traditional and Digital Songwriting (fall semester)
This course is designed to help students compose their own music. A brief study of some modern
compositions will inform us, but the bulk of the course will be the art of writing your own songs.
Students will learn how to compose using digital and traditional methods, but in the end will have
significant authority in deciding what kind of music they are interested in writing. Students will
learn the art of writing a good melody, the art of writing effective harmonies, understanding the
texture, layering of multiple parts in music, analyzing the components of compositions from
various genres, the technological aspect of using digital software to compose music including both
music production software such as Garage Band or Logic and music notation software such as
Finale and the art of lyric writing or being a librettist. Prerequisite: Music Theory and Guitar or
instructor approval.
Glee Club
Students learn the technical aspects of good singing, including breath control, formation of vowel
shapes and vocal tone, proper diction in a variety of languages, range extension and agility.
Students study repertoire from a variety of genres, from classical to folk to jazz and modern. They
perform a capella music as well as music accompanied by piano and orchestra. Through their
rehearsal and performances, students learn a valuable skill that can be used as a form of self
expression as well as a powerful form of communication. As the music is being rehearsed daily,
various compositional techniques and elements of form are pointed out. Glee Club members
participate in service learning through outreach performances. This chorus performs at four major
concerts each year, at Haverford, in New York City, and in our community. The Glee Club joins
forces with area girls' schools and with Haverford's boychoir to perform works such as Vivaldi’s
Gloria, Handel's Messiah, and Haydn, Mozart and Schubert Masses. Glee Club is a graded course
that meets three times a week before school, 8:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m. on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday,
and Friday.
Orchestra
Orchestra is an auditioned ensemble. Students must demonstrate satisfactory ability on their
principal instrument to participate, as determined by the director. Students learn to phrase
artistically, and develop techniques of articulation, expanded dynamic range, and stylistic
interpretation through performance of a range of repertoire covering multiple styles and genres.
Orchestra members develop ensemble skills such as leading, critical listening, and collaboration.
In addition, students refine technical skills on their given instruments. The Orchestra performs
during the annual Haverford School performances. Orchestra is a graded course that meets three
times a week before school, 7:45-8:20 a.m.
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 17
THEATER
Philosophy & Overview
The purpose of acting, Hamlet tells us, is to hold ‘the mirror up to nature.’ Students of theater at
The Haverford School strive to represent most aspects of human behavior in thoughtful, wellprepared performances both in the classroom and on the Centennial Hall stage. Students are
encouraged to understand the world by thinking carefully of their own experience, by inhabiting
the skins of others, and by studying classic and contemporary drama.
Theater students develop a speaking voice of power and expression. They learn to move with
strength and grace. They experience the value of teamwork in large productions including actors,
designers, and technicians. They learn to listen to their peers and to carefully critique their work.
Most importantly, theatre students develop a physical and emotional confidence to complement
their growing intellectual and athletic abilities.
Theater I
Provides students with opportunities to increase self-awareness, develop critical thinking skills,
and explore their talents on page and stage. The course begins with an overview of basic and
improvisational skills. Students put these skills into practice by reading, discussing, and
performing original monologues, scenes, and works of classical and contemporary drama. In
addition, students learn to incorporate their skills in literary analysis by translating their critical
understanding into choices they make as an actor. Participation as audience members at Upper
School productions provides excellent opportunities to connect class work to live theatrical plays
performed by their peers. Students also learn the basics of design and technical theatre to enhance
their understanding of the collaboration that is necessary to bring theatrical works to life. The
course culminates in the writing and performance of an original short play that incorporates
students’ knowledge of acting, design, and directing.
Theater II
is an intermediate level course which builds on the skills acquired in Theater I. Using scripts from
20th and 21st century plays, students read, discuss and act in works by modern playwrights who
are bright examples of the power of drama. Scene study focuses on students taking greater risks in
their acting work and performance exercises will also include roles that will stretch the student
actor. Individual expression and creativity is also encouraged through dramaturgical projects
within the context of each play being studied. Participation in or attendance at all Upper School
productions will be mandatory as a way of studying and experiencing the various tools in action.
Theatre II will also travel off campus to view professional productions to become discriminating
consumers of live theatre. The art of directing is an integral unit in Theater II. Each student will
direct a scene from one of the plays read in class where concentrated study of the world of the play,
character motivation, implementation of blocking, production history, and most importantly,
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 18
communicating the action of the scene to their peers. Finally, students are required to work on a
final project of their choosing for their exam in June. Students may present playwriting work, scene
study intensives, three-minute monologues or directing work of their choice with instructor
approval.
Theater III* (spring semester)
is an advanced level Independent Study in theatre generally reserved for Sixth Form that
incorporates many of the lessons and techniques acquired in Theatre I and II. Students of the
Independent Study form a production company with the goal of presenting a play for The
Haverford School community and general viewing audience. Under instructor supervision and
guidance, participants choose a name for the company, select a play, vote on a student director,
and cast the show. Each member of the course will also help build the set, procure costumes and
props, and will be responsible for the marketing and publicity to promote the show. Professionals
from the theatre community are invited to attend performances to give the students valuable
feedback. The Theatre III Independent Study gives students an excellent, hands-on experience in
establishing and being responsible for their own production company. A focus on playwriting is
also optional. Permission from Head of Upper School, Director of College Counseling, and
Chair of the Drama Department is required.
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 19
HEALTH & PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Philosophy and Overview
The primary goal of the Health and Physical Education curriculum is to provide the boys with the
framework necessary to develop and maintain a fitness plan that they can utilize for a lifetime.
Through the health portion of the curriculum the boys are introduced to the five components of
fitness and sound training techniques that will guide them in their quest for a personal fitness
plan. Principles of diet and exercise and their effect on wellness are incorporated into this plan to
allow the students to integrate this information into their program. Through the physical
education curriculum, we aim to provide the boys with a variety of lifetime sports and activities
that will give the boys the sport skills necessary to establish a lifetime commitment to a healthy
lifestyle. We believe that a sound mind in a sound body is an ideal to aspire to and we strive to
instill those values in the young men we teach. We also believe that regular daily activity is
essential to a healthy cardio-respiratory system, and we try to have at least twenty minutes of
vigorous activity each and every class.
Health & Physical Education
This course is required for all Fourth Form students. The class meets three times per cycle, and is
divided into two separate curricula. The physical education portion occupies roughly two thirds of
the year, with health education taking up the remaining one third. The physical education course
introduces the boys to a variety of activities that will form the basis for their adult fitness program.
The five components of physical fitness are applied to these activities to give the boys an awareness
of the importance of wellness in their lives. The health portion of the course is devoted to current
topics including communicable diseases, cardiovascular disease and cancer, how to develop and
maintain health relationships, and certification in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The current text
is “Get Fit, Stay Fit” by William E. Prentice.
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 20
HISTORY
Philosophy and Overview
The History Department believes that the study of history and social science is at the heart of a
strong liberal arts education and, therefore, vital to the development of the essential qualities of a
Haverford School graduate. It is through the study of world in the contexts of time and space that a
student can understand how the earth and humankind have come to be as they are today and to
foresee how the lessons from the past can guide the interactions between peoples and nations in
the future. Our core program is two years of global history followed by an in-depth study of United
States history. Subsequent electives allow students to closely investigate topics of particular
interest, including those in American and global studies, politics and government, and the
Olympic Games. Throughout the program, students increase their curiosity, develop their capacity
for critical and creative thinking, and expand their openness to new ideas and different ways of
experiencing our common humanity.
The Department emphasizes the development of the following attitudes, attributes and skills:
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Read with an inquisitive, critical mind so as to explore material for authenticity and value
Think critically so as to arrive at well-reasoned conclusions
Communicate effectively orally and in writing
Research effectively using both electronic and printed sources
Apply sound note-taking, memorization, test-taking and other study skills
Use technology to maximize learning
Internalize an ethical, moral compass to guide decisions and actions
Become a life-long student of history
The Department also recognizes the efficaciousness of using collaboration to educate boys by
engaging them in major projects that involve research, writing, debating, and oral presentation
skills. Among them are the Archeology Project (Third Form), the World War I Trials (Fourth
Form), and the Madison Meetings (Fifth Form).
Ancient World History
This Third Form course is, at its core, an introduction to topics in ancient and medieval
civilizations. The course has, however, other significant dimensions. It is interdisciplinary: it will
involve most other academic disciplines in approaching themes and topics throughout the year. It
will systematically address skills the faculty deem necessary for success in Haverford's curriculum:
effective reading of texts; note-taking from both reading and class; writing the analytical essay;
research techniques using library tools and methods; interpreting maps and other visual
presentations; and making oral presentations, both formal and informal. In addition, students will
learn how to use the computer for both word processing and research. The format of the course
will include seminars, occasional lectures, films/video, and other presentations.
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 21
Modern World History
This yearlong Fourth Form course surveys the history of the world from the 13th century to the
present. The course centers on the development and interaction of western and non-western
civilizations over this period, examining significant ideas, events, and persons from the multiple
perspectives of political, economic, and social history. The students will approach modern world
history both chronologically and thematically, using the six themes of (1) interaction between
societies, (2) change and continuity over time, (3) technology and demography, (4) social
structure, (5) cultural and intellectual developments, and (6) states and political identities.
The course uses and refines the academic skills taught in Third Form Ancient History. Debates,
historical trials (World War I), research papers, analytical essays, and oral presentations are among
the methodologies used in this course.
United States History
This yearlong Fifth Form course covers the breath of American history from colonization to the
present. The political, economic, and diplomatic developments are at the heart of the course, but
social and intellectual history is covered as well. The course combines a traditional chronological
approach with an emphasis on selected themes and topics including: the development of the
United States as a world power; the socio-economic, racial, and ethnic diversity of American
society; the development of the American political tradition (sectionalism, citizenship); and the
role of government in the regulation of the economy. Readings include narrative history, news
articles, primary sources, and other supplementary materials.
United States History*
This is an advanced version of the classic survey course in United States History. The course
provides a foundation for a sophisticated appreciation of the history of the United States,
beginning with the settlement of the colonies and ending with the present day. Events are studied
within the historical contexts of chronology and geography. Students will acquire a critical lens for
the understanding of contemporary issues, such as the tension among liberty, equality, and justice.
College-level texts, advanced work with primary and secondary sources, and work in
historiography are hallmarks of the course. Aside from preparing boys for success on national
examinations, we hope to inspire an active and inquiring sense of citizenship.
European Dictators* (fall semester)
This is a one-semester advanced course for Sixth Form students. It will focus on 20th century
Europe between the world wars with special attention to the rise of totalitarianism and the
conditions and events
that paved the way to power for Benito Mussolini in Italy, Joseph Stalin in the USSR, Adolph Hitler
in Germany, and Francisco Franco in Spain. In addition to traditional history books such as
European Dictatorships: 1918-1945, we will make use of memoirs such as Orwell’s Homage to
Catalonia and Levi’s Christ Stopped at Eboli, Picasso’s Guernica and Kampf’s Venus & Adonis,
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The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog films like the Christopher Isherwood-inspired Cabaret and Leni Riefenstahl’s classic and chilling
documentary Triumph of the Will, and the poetry of Osip Mandelstam and C. Day-Lewis.
Prerequisite: A- in American History and recommendation of teacher.
Government and Politics (fall semester)
This course will present an introduction to the study of government and politics. Our inquiries will
begin with the intellectual and historical foundations of the western style of government. From
there, we will learn about the organization of our own federal government, including the political
forces that dictate its behavior, before discussing various Constitutional issues arising from current
demographic, economic, and political trends. Finally, we will analyze the 2016 general elections in
depth. This course will make use of various outside experts and speakers and will culminate in a
final research project. As an elective honors class, students who wish to pursue the Honors
designation must elect to do so within the initial drop-add period for the fall semester. “Honors”
students will be expected to complete additional reading, research, and written assignments. Any
student may choose honors, but he must meet clearly-defined progress points throughout the
semester in order to maintain the honors designation.
Modern Black Lives: African American History: 1964-Present (fall or spring semester)
This course will explore questions related to the social and historical evolution of the history of
Black America following the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960’s. So often, African American
Studies courses focus on the long period of Enslavement culminating with the legal codes that
emanate from the Civil Rights Act of 1964. This course will use poetry, music, art and traditional
historical primary sources to build the collective narrative of Modern Black Lives from 1964 to the
present day. Anticipated units include: Political Messaging in the Civil Rights Era, Post CivilRights Urban Realities, Black Arts Movement (1970s); The Crack Epidemic and The War on Drugs
(1980s); Hip Hop Politics (1990s); Black Music in the New Millennium; Black Lives Matter
Movement (2010s).
Social Psychology (fall or spring semester)
This course for Sixth Form students examines the principles of social psychology: that is, how
individuals think, feel, and behave in regard to other people and how individuals’ thoughts,
feelings, and behaviors are affected by others. The course will concentrate on the process of social
thinking, such as motivation, leadership, conformity, obedience and persuasion, and social
relations, including aggression, altruism,
prejudice and attraction. General principles of coping, grouping identities, and social stress will be
discussed. In addition to readings from the text, the course will include discussions of “case
studies,” film presentations and journal writing.
Political Olympic History (fall or spring semester)
This course focuses on the study of political conflicts through the lens of the Olympic Games. We
will focus specifically on Olympic years in which the games were particularly controversial.
Starting in Ancient Greece and studying how the games were a direct reflection of Greek society,
we will then turn to the first modern games in 1898. From there, we will examine the 1936 Berlin
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The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog Olympics, Mexico City in 1968 (particularly under the scope of African American rights), Munich
in 1972, and the boycotts of the 1980 and 1984 games in Moscow and Los Angeles. The course will
conclude with an analysis of the Beijing Olympics of 2008.
Modern Middle East History (spring semester)
This one-semester elective provides an overview of the modern Middle East. This examination
includes state and regime formations, international relations, and contrasting domestic politics.
Additionally, the course will examine the theoretical roots of Islamic fundamentalism and its effect
on the formulation, growth, and actions of radical Islamic terrorist organizations. We also will
evaluate contemporary issues surrounding U.S. foreign policy as it pertains to the politics,
economics, and conflicts of the Middle East.
Roman Archaeology (fall or spring semester)
This interdisciplinary class will use material culture in order to understand Roman history and
culture. We will pay particular attention to the relation of art, architecture and artifacts with the
political, social and religious institutions of Rome, Italy and the Roman provinces. Topics will
include the creation of Roman national identity, the landscape of the city of Rome, and the
experience of living in a Roman city. (This is a History course. Knowledge of Latin is NOT
required.)
The U.S. and the Vietnam War (spring semester)
The Vietnam War was arguably the most divisive event in American history since the Civil War,
and the Sixties were certainly among the most turbulent times in American history: the revolt
against the Establishment, the civil rights movement, feminism, the antiwar movement, the
counterculture; JFK, LBJ, RMN, SDS, SCLC, SNCC, VVAW, NOW; the Gulf of Tonkin, the Black
Panthers, My Lai, Woodstock, Altamont; the music, the drugs, the Tet Offensive, the Silent
Majority, Watergate. And running through it all, binding the Sixties together while tearing
America apart: the seemingly endless war in Vietnam. What was it all about? Take this course and
find out.
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 24
MATHEMATICS
It is clear that the chief end of mathematical study must be to make the students think.
—John Wesley Young
Philosophy and Overview
The Upper School Mathematics Program sets forth clear, high-quality academic benchmarks that
all students must master by the end of each course. These are designed to exceed the
Pennsylvania Common Core Standards in their respective subjects. The Haverford School’s
expectations are rigorous, relevant to the real world, and reflect the knowledge and skills our
graduates will need to be well prepared for the mathematical challenges in life beyond Haverford.
Each of our courses offers a comprehensive set of mathematical learning objectives with the
common goal of creating efficient problem solvers, effective communicators, independent learners
and confident critical thinkers; skills that extend beyond mathematics. We remain committed to
improving the mathematics offerings available to our students on a continual basis. Our
instruction and our curriculum are monitored and adjusted to best serve our charges – the future
global citizens of the 21st Century.
About Algebra I and Geometry
Algebra is important as a modeling and problem solving tool, and bridges the gap from
computational mathematics to abstract understanding. Geometry introduces the spatial relationships
that exist in two and three dimensions. The concepts learned in these introductory courses are used
by each of us every day and form the foundation upon which subsequent math courses build.
Algebra I
Algebra I is an introductory course designed for incoming Third Formers who have had little or no
algebra or who need a thorough review of basic algebra. After a review of arithmetic operations,
the first semester focuses on the basic concepts of algebra: using variables to represent numbers,
evaluating formulas, solving algebraic equations, and the graphing of linear equations and basic
transformations. The second semester looks at systems of linear equations, functional notation,
quadratic equations and rational expressions. Use of the graphing calculator will be developed as
an aid to solving systems of equations and quadratic equations.
Geometry
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to Euclidean geometry. Topics covered include
foundations of geometry, deductive reasoning and proof, transformations, coordinate geometry,
congruence and similarity, polygons, circles, area, and volume. A solid foundation in Algebra I is
required.
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 25
Geometry*
This course provides a thorough yearlong study of Euclidean Geometry at an advanced level for
qualifying students from Forms III and IV. The course will include a rigorous treatment of
mathematical proof, and students will be expected to justify the major theorems of the course. The
students will also be expected to connect concepts and the most successful students will solve
problems creatively. A mastery level understanding of Algebra I and a teacher recommendation
are required.
About Algebra II
The Haverford School offers two levels of Algebra II - honors and standard. The goal of each is to
expand and deepen your existing knowledge of Algebra I and Geometry; both courses emphasize the
computational and theoretical components of the subject matter. Successful completion of these
courses will satisfy the Common Core requirements for Algebra (as set by the Pennsylvania
Department of Education) and will prepare students to tackle more advanced coursework in the
future.
Algebra II
This yearlong, standard level course is intended to cover (and surpass) the Common Core
requirements. This is an exhaustive curriculum with particular emphasis on the
practical/computational components of the subject and on the use of functions as mathematical
models for solving real-world problems. Prerequisite: Geometry
In particular, the topics to be covered will include (but not necessarily to be limited to) the
following:
• Properties of Sets of Numbers and Number Systems
• Solving Equations, Inequalities and Absolute Value Problems
• Functions and Relations, and their Graphs
• Transformations of Functions
• Linear Functions and Systems of Linear Equations
• Quadratic Functions and Introduction to Complex Numbers
• Properties of Higher-Degree Functions and Polynomials
• Radical Functions and Rational Exponents (Roots and Powers)
• Exponential and Logarithmic (Common) Functions
• Rational Functions
• Use of Functions as Mathematical Models
• Elementary Probability
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 26
Algebra II*
This yearlong course covers the topics outlined above, but in a much more rigorous fashion. There
are a number of additional topics presented as well. One of the distinguishing features of this
course over its standard counterpart is the greater commitment in both time and effort required
for success. This course delves much deeper into the theory behind the basics and contemplates a
wider range of topics. The curriculum reaches well beyond the Common Core requirements and
prepares the students to tackle PreCalculus at the honors level the following year. Prerequisites:
Geometry* and teacher recommendation OR Standard Geometry with a grade of “A” for both
semesters and both semester exams and teacher recommendation.
Some of the enhanced/additional topics that will be studied in detail include the following:
• Domain and Range of Functions and their Inverses
• Systems of Inequalities and Absolute Value Equations
• Families of Functions and their Transformations and Graphs; End Behavior of the
Functions
• Quadratic Equations (using advanced Factoring Techniques)
• Complex Number System/Operations
• Systems of Quadratic Equations/Inequalities
• Exponential and Logarithmic Functions using e and Change in Base Theorem
• Rational Functions and their Graphs – Asymptotes, Discontinuities, Intercepts, Roots and
End Behavior
• Conic Sections – their Transformations and Graphs
• Probability (Combinatorics) and Introduction to Statistics (including Binomial and
Normal Distributions)
• Matrix Mathematics (solving real-world problems via matrices)
• Linear Programming (solving real-world problems)
• Functions as Mathematical Models (using technology/software to solve real-world
problems)
• Periodic Functions and Trigonometry; Trigonometric Identities/Equations (time
permitting)
Functions, Statistics, and Trigonometry:
This course provides a preparation for the study of PreCalculus, geared toward those students
needing further review of advanced algebra concepts. First semester topics include functions,
transformations, polynomials, and rational functions. Second semester topics include exponential
and logarithmic functions, unit circle, basic trigonometry, and an introduction to statistics. Realworld models are developed throughout. Prerequisite: Algebra II.
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 27
About PreCalculus
PreCalculus builds on the concepts from Algebra and Geometry to create the foundation for the study
of Calculus and is offered in standard and honors levels. This challenging course includes an
examination of many types of functions including trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic, rational,
quadratic, and higher degree polynomials. Students will be challenged to examine mathematics
graphically, analytically, verbally and numerically. The use of the graphing calculator will be
required in this course, and students will be expected to know the five basic graphical functions:
minimum, maximum, value, zero, and intersection.
PreCalculus
This course provides a comprehensive preparation for the study of Calculus at Haverford or an
Introductory Calculus course in college. Polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions are
emphasized in the first semester and trigonometry, sequences and series, and probability are the
focus of the second semester. Real-world models are developed throughout. This course requires a
strong working knowledge of material from Algebra II and will include both computational and
theoretical components. Prerequisites: A grade of B or higher in Algebra II and teacher
recommendation.
PreCalculus*
This course covers all of the topics in regular PreCalculus with additional topics of conic sections,
parametric equations, polar coordinates, vectors, and the complex plane. The course is fast paced
and requires a solid understanding of the skills from Algebra II. Connections with the sciences,
economics and other real world applications are developed throughout. This course will also
develop the student’s skills in the use of the graphing calculator, in all of its modes. Prerequisite: A
grade of “B+” or better in Algebra II* or “A” or better in Algebra II and teacher
recommendation.
The following mathematics courses are primarily for Fifth and Sixth Form students and
require departmental approval to enroll.
About Calculus
Inspired by problems in astronomy, Newton and Leibniz developed the ideas of calculus more than
300 years ago. Since then, each century has demonstrated the power of calculus to illuminate
questions in mathematics, the physical sciences, engineering, and the social and biological sciences.
Calculus is an extraordinarily powerful tool when reducing complicated problems to manageable
procedures.
The Haverford School offers two levels of Calculus: standard and honors. The goal of both courses is
to provide students with a clear understanding of the ideas of calculus as well as provide a solid
foundation for subsequent courses. Both courses require a strong working knowledge of material
from Algebra II and PreCalculus, the ability to work independently, and include both computational
and theoretical components.
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The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog Calculus
This yearlong course begins with a brief review of functions including logarithmic, exponential and
trigonometric. After developing the ideas of limits and continuity, the course will focus on the two
major concepts of Differential and Integral Calculus. Students will learn methods for taking
derivatives and antiderivatives and use these methods in various applications. Although not as
theoretical as Honors Calculus, this course requires a strong working knowledge of previous
courses, the ability to work independently, and a desire to learn high-level mathematics. The
students will use their graphing calculators as well as various online resources. Prerequisite: A
final grade of “B+” in PreCalculus and the recommendation of your current teacher.
Calculus I*
This course is a thorough and challenging analysis of limits, derivatives, and Riemann integration.
In addition to numerous applications, this course includes a theoretical component and advanced
methods of differentiation and integration that will not be covered in Standard Calculus. This
course will prepare students to take Calculus II* at THS or move into a more theoretical Calculus
course in college, such as required for Mathematics, Engineering or applied science majors. It is
anticipated that students, having successfully completed Calculus*, may successfully sit for the AP
Examination in the spring. Prerequisite: A grade of “B” or above in PreCalculus* and teacher
recommendation OR a final grade of “A” in PreCalculus and teacher recommendation.
Calculus II* (fall semester)
This is a rigorous and fast paced one semester course which builds on the foundation of Calculus
I*. Topics covered include applications of differential equation to physics, engineering, and
biology, infinite series, parametric and polar representation, and the foundations of vector
calculus. Prerequisite: Calculus I* and teacher recommendation.
Linear Algebra* (spring semester)
This is a one semester Honors level mathematics elective that studies systems of linear equations
and the properties of matrices. The concepts of linear algebra are extremely useful in physics,
economics and social sciences, natural sciences, and engineering. Due to its broad range of
applications, linear algebra is one of the most widely taught subjects in college-level mathematics
(and increasingly in high school).
Prerequisite: Completion of Calculus I* or Standard Calculus and teacher recommendation.
About Statistics
In a society inundated with information, the ability to analyze and interpret data is an invaluable
tool. Statistics provides the opportunity for students of the subject to learn how to make good
decisions with data. Statistics permeates every branch of the natural and social sciences, and the
ability to infer from statistical analysis is crucial in business, economics, political science and
medicine. It is very likely that you will be required to take a Statistics course in college and then use it
in your career.
The Haverford School offers two levels of Statistics: Honors and Standard. Both courses are designed
to meet (and exceed) the Data Analysis Core Curriculum requirements (as adopted by the
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 29
Pennsylvania Department of Education); both will include computational and theoretical
components dealing with descriptive and inferential statistical techniques.
Statistics
This yearlong course is intended to provide students a framework to think about the world
“statistically.” Real-world problems will be solved using 21st century methodologies, i.e. by
incorporating useful technologies and working collaboratively; the process will be project-based,
highly interactive, and engaging. This course is open to V and VI Form students. It is ideally suited
for students who have completed FST or PreCalculus and are now looking to expand their
mathematical horizons. The course utilizes an online textbook for readings and exercises.
Prerequisite: Completion of PreCalculus with a grade of B+ or PreCalculus* and a teacher
recommendation.
Statistics*
This is a yearlong comprehensive survey of the foundations of probability theory and statistical
methods for collecting, organizing, displaying, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data.
Emphasis is placed on clear and accurate reporting of the results obtained from these activities.
Statistics* is a demanding course (both in time commitment and complexity), open to qualified
Form V or VI students who wish to study statistics at a level comparable to a rigorous college
course. It is anticipated that students, having successfully completed Statistics*, may successfully sit
for the AP Examination in the spring. Technology will be used extensively for solving problems
contemplated in the course. No specific textbook shall be required (although classroom copies of
Stats: Modeling the World by: Bock, Velleman & De Veaux will be available for reference).
Students may take this course concurrently with Calculus, Calculus I* or Calculus II*.
Prerequisite: Completion of PreCalculus with a grade of B+ or PreCalculus* and a teacher
recommendation.
About Finance and Economics
Making sound fiscal and monetary decisions is an essential life skill, yet most people acquire it only
with age and through a process of trial and error. Studying Finance and Economics will equip
students with powerful mathematical and decision-making skills to help them take control of and
proactively map their lives in an uncertain world. Clear financial and economic thinking will yield
profound benefits for students of the subjects, as well as for society-at-large.
Finance: Theory of Interest (fall semester)
Open to VI Form students, this course explores the theories and applications of both simple and
compound interest. We will learn the basics of general annuities and perpetuities; amortization
tables and sinking funds will be developed; bonds and equity instruments will be compared and
contrasted; and capital budgeting will be discussed. In addition to valuing various financial
securities using both simple and compound interest, this course analyzes current events and their
impact on the markets. A major goal of the course will be to teach students effective problemsolving techniques using real-world monetary transactions. Technological solutions to all of the
problems contemplated will be emphasized. No specific textbook shall be required (although
classroom copies of Schaum’s Outline - Mathematics of Finance will be available for reference).
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 30
Theory of Interest is offered in the fall as a stand-alone course; taking Portfolio Analysis in the
spring is not required, although it is desirable. Prerequisite: Algebra II
Finance: Portfolio Analysis (spring semester)
Open to Sixth Form students, the main objective is to provide students with a sound
understanding of the concepts and practices associated with making sound investments. We will
contemplate topics such as: financial statements, financial instruments, the markets and related
indices, risk and return vs. pricing theory, performance evaluation, and efficient diversification. A
wide variety of securities will be discussed. Among them are: common stocks, bonds, mutual
funds, real estate, options and tax-advantaged investments. The capstone project for the course will
be the design, construction, and management of a hypothetical portfolio by the students. This
course additionally examines the impact of current events on a weekly basis. Students will evaluate
various current events and examine the positive or negative results on stock price, market indices,
and the economy as a whole. All of the required reading material is available online, so no specific
textbook will be utilized. Portfolio Analysis is offered in the spring as a stand-alone course; taking
Theory of Interest in the fall is not a prerequisite, although it is helpful. Prerequisite: Algebra II
Economics: Macro* (fall semester)
This conceptually challenging VI Form elective covers the main ideas of macroeconomics, the
study of the large-scale structure of the national and world economy. The mathematical level is
comparable to that of an introductory college class in macroeconomics. Topics include national
income accounting (GDP), economic growth, unemployment and inflation, the financial sector,
money and banking, aggregate supply and demand, and fiscal and monetary policy. Prerequisite:
Students must be enrolled in or have completed a Calculus course.
Economics: Micro* (spring semester)
This mathematically demanding VI Form elective covers the main ideas of microeconomics, the
study of the decision-making processes of consumers and producers in a market economy. The
mathematical level is comparable to that of an introductory college class in microeconomics.
Topics include market equilibrium, elasticity, taxes and price controls, international trade,
consumer and producer decisions, competition and monopoly, and externalities, such as pollution
and global climate change. Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in or have completed a
Calculus course.
Software Programming I (fall or spring semester)
This course begins with learning how to write and develop algorithms, and the students explore
how to program a computer to solve such algorithms using the Python programming language.
During the course, students will work through pre-designed projects, develop their own projects,
design solutions, and learn how to test and debug their programs. There are several work days
dedicated to independent work on projects. Due to the nature of the material, students can
anticipate spending several hours outside of class working on their programs as well. It is expected
that students will master algorithm building and develop an understanding of the object oriented
nature of Python. Prerequisite: Algebra II
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 31
Software Programming II (spring semester)
Students will learn to identify interesting problems that can be addressed with software. They will
explore Python’s usage of classes and objects and use them in programs they build. Working as a
collective is an essential skill for future programmers and students taking this course will learn to
develop this skill and practice it regularly. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation and
completion of SPI with a B or higher. Students must demonstrate a strong work ethic and a
history of consistent homework and project completion to qualify.
The following course progression may be used to determine your plan for each year.
Although not included in the chart, math electives are also available in Forms V and VI.
Form II
Form III
Form IV
Form V
PreAlgebra
Algebra I
Geometry
Algebra II
Functions, Statistics, and
Trigonometry or PreCalculus
Algebra I
Geometry
Algebra II
PreCalculus
Calculus or Statistics or
Statistics*
Algebra I
Geometry*
Algebra II*
PreCalculus*
Calculus I*
and/or Statistics*
Geometry
Algebra II
PreCalculus
Calculus
Calculus I*
or Statistics* or Statistics
Geometry
Algebra II*
PreCalculus*
Calculus I*
Calculus II*
and/or Statistics*
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog Form VI
32
MODERN & CLASSICAL LANGUAGES
Philosophy and Overview
The Modern and Classical Languages Department prepares boys for a future in the global
community. In order to create the best target language experience for our students, we seek to
cultivate a program that incorporates the following interconnected principles:
Cultural understanding and empathy: The study of languages beyond English provides a unique
opportunity to not only gain perspective on cultures separated from ours in space and time, but
also better understand our own. Our culture-centered language curriculum, while maintaining
rigorous linguistic standards, intentionally teaches our boys empathy and appreciation for
diversity.
Language acquisition: Our program provides the opportunity for students to become proficient at
reading, writing, speaking and listening in the respective languages. To achieve these proficiencies,
we provide a learning environment that fosters intellectual risk-taking and problem-solving skills.
Incorporation of authentic experience: We put the study of language in context by incorporating
meaningful, real life resources into the curriculum. We value experiences beyond our school walls,
both in the local community and abroad, and strive to provide opportunities for our boys to travel.
Chinese I
This introductory course is offered to students with little or no prior experience in Mandarin
Chinese. Basic background information of the language such as tone graphs, pinyin, and formation
of characters will be introduced. Vocabulary, grammatical structures, and cultural references will
be taught and discussed at an elementary level. Students will learn to read simple passages and
write in simplified Chinese characters. In the second semester, students will engage in basic
communicative tasks related to daily settings. This course is mostly conducted in Chinese, with the
exception of addressing important and difficult concepts.
Chinese II
This course continues to build on skills, comprehension and proficiency developed previously in
Chinese I. More vocabulary and grammatical structures will be introduced. Students will be
equipped with the ability to communicate with native speakers in everyday settings and sustain
meaningful conversations. Emphasis will be placed on performing culturally authentic and
pragmatic communicative tasks.
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 33
Chinese III*
This course continues to build on skills, comprehension and proficiency developed previously in
Chinese II. More vocabulary and grammatical structures will be introduced. Students will be
equipped with the ability to communicate with native speakers in everyday settings and sustain
meaningful conversations. Emphasis will be placed on performing culturally authentic and
pragmatic communicative tasks. Chinese is the main medium in the classroom and in casual
situations throughout the school day. Prerequisite: department approval.
Chinese IV*
This course continues to refine students’ listening, speaking, reading and writing skills previously
developed in Chinese III*. Conversations and discussions will be based on socially and culturally
authentic context and materials. Students will learn to compose descriptive passages using
advanced vocabulary, sentence structures, and both traditional and up­to­date idioms that have
substantial reflection on Chinese current affairs. Chinese is the main medium in the classroom and
in casual situations throughout the school day. Prerequisite: B+ average in Chinese III and
department approval.
Latin I
This introductory course examines the linguistic, cultural and historical traditions of the GrecoRoman civilizations. As a way to foster clear and logical thinking, Latin grammar, syntax and
translation form the core of study. Since Latin is a basic constituent of the English language, the
course examines vocabulary with particular emphasis on English derivatives and related
definitions. Students also study mythological, historical and cultural themes in order to broaden
their appreciation of the foundations of Western civilization.
Latin II
This course, offered to students who have completed Latin I in the Middle or Upper School,
reviews the fundamentals of Latin I and introduces more sophisticated grammatical concepts
requisite for success at the intermediate level. To introduce the art of translation, fables and
mythological stories are read, as well as adapted selections from ancient literature. Emphasis is
placed on precise analysis and expression in preparation for reading the original works of the Latin
writers in Latin III. Prerequisite: department approval.
Latin II*
Students who choose this course should be especially eager to continue their study of Latin and
classical literature. While including the elements described for Latin II, the pace and depth of the
curriculum are aggressive and presume an avid enthusiasm for scholarship. Students will complete
the majority of Latin grammar while reading and translating extensive selections from classical and
medieval literature. In addition, students will study the history and culture of ancient Rome in
depth, using archaeological and epigraphic as well as literary sources. Prerequisite: A- in Latin I
and department approval.
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 34
Latin III
This course continues with the mastery of sophisticated grammatical concepts which are studied in
the context of historical writings. With the text Duces Romanorum the students examine ancient
Rome with an emphasis on its greatest leaders from its founding through the Republic. In the
spring, particular emphasis will be placed on the works of Caesar. Prerequisite: department
approval.
Latin III*
This course allows the student to apply his knowledge of Latin grammar, syntax and vocabulary to
the reading, translating, analyzing and understanding of Latin literature from the late Republic.
Particular emphasis will be placed on the works of Caesar and Cicero. In conjunction with our
translations, students will study the literary, cultural, intellectual and historical contributions of the
ancient Roman world. This course, in comparison with the Latin III course, proceeds at an
enhanced pace and depth. Prerequisite: B in Latin II* and department approval.
Latin IV
Students study the traditions of ancient epic by reading the Iliad, its ancient Latin translation, the
Ilias Latina, and Vergil’s epic poem The Aeneid. Selections are translated from the Latin, while
other passages are examined and discussed in English. In addition to mastering Latin epic meter,
students become familiar with Latin poetic style and its place in the Western literary canon .
Through extensive translation and textual analysis, students develop their confidence in reading at
sight and, by writing short papers and giving oral reports on relevant topics, they enhance their
appreciation of poetic artistry. Prerequisite: B- in Latin III and department approval.
Latin IV*
Students study Vergil’s epic poem The Aeneid in its historical setting as well as in its place within
the traditions of epic genre. Selections are translated from the Latin, while other passages are
examined and discussed in English. In addition to mastering Latin epic meter, students become
familiar with figures of speech and the Vergil’s unparalleled poetic style. Through extensive
translation and textual analysis, students develop their confidence in reading at sight and, by
writing short papers and giving oral reports on relevant topics, they enhance their appreciation of
Vergil’s artistry. This course, in comparison with the Latin IV course, proceeds at a greatly
enhanced pace and depth. Prerequisite: B in Latin III* and department approval.
Latin V* Prose (fall semester)
In this course students will have the opportunity to read and study a variety of Roman prose
writings including history, political commentary, philosophy and letters. The works of authors
such as Livy, Tacitus, Suetonius, Caesar, Cicero and/or Pliny will provide the basis for a more
thorough understanding of the Roman Republic and Empire. The prose selections will enable
students to improve both their reading fluency and literary analysis skills as they gain a better
appreciation of Roman culture, history and literature. Prerequisite: A in Latin IV and
department approval.
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 35
Latin V* Poetry (spring semester)
In this course, students will have the opportunity to read and study a range of Roman poetry
including epic, lyric and satire. The works of authors such as Ovid, Catullus, Martial and/or
Juvenal will offer the student insights into Roman thinking about politics, love, everyday life,
mythology and poetry. The poetry will enable students to improve both their reading fluency and
literary analysis skills as they gain a better appreciation of Roman culture, history and literature.
Prerequisite: A in Latin IV and department approval.
Spanish I
This course is designed for the student who has had little or no prior exposure to the Spanish
language. It emphasizes the acquisition of fundamental practical vocabulary, a solid foundation in
basic grammatical structures, a detailed study of the verb system and the development of sound
pronunciation and speaking skills.
Spanish II
Students enrolled in this course have successfully completed Haverford’s first year of the language.
In Spanish II, students will continue to build a solid foundation in the fundamentals of grammar
and in the acquisition of a practical, useful, contemporary vocabulary for oral and written
communication in a variety of everyday situations. Furthermore, through various cultural
explorations, students will continue to expand their knowledge of Hispanic cultures. Students
participate in daily oral drills, complete translation exercises, read short passages and write onepage compositions. Throughout the year, the students continue to expand their vocabulary and
strengthen their precision both in speaking and writing, and gain mastery of the future,
conditional, imperfect and perfect tenses. Prerequisite: department approval.
Spanish II*
Students enrolled in this course have successfully completed Haverford’s first year of the language,
and are prepared for the significantly faster pace of this course. Students in this class will master
the future, conditional, imperfect and perfect tenses of the indicative mood, and will also
undertake a thorough study of the present subjunctive. The class will be conducted almost entirely
in Spanish, unless the explanation of a complex grammatical concept demands otherwise.
Students will engage in oral drills, and translation exercises, and will create presentations and onepage compositions. The class will read and discuss short literary passages and current articles
relevant to Hispanic culture. Prerequisite: A- average in Spanish I and department approval.
Spanish III
Students enrolled in this course have successfully completed Haverford’s Spanish II curriculum.
Spanish III begins with a thorough review of grammar covered in the second year. Students will
then continue their study of the subjunctive mood, and will be introduced to more complex
grammatical structures. Students will read longer passages, and sections of authentic literary
works, and will engage in class discussion primarily in Spanish. In Spanish III, students complete
their study of the Spanish verb system, and begin to apply their skills to a variety of exercises
36
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog designed to promote greater fluency in spoken and written Spanish. Prerequisite: department
approval.
Spanish III*
This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Haverford’s Spanish II*
curriculum. Emphasis in Spanish III* is divided among five basic language skills: listening
comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural understanding. This third-year course
begins with a review of second year skills and introduces appropriate new material to help students
improve their command of grammatical structures, active and passive vocabulary, and
comprehension of both literary and non-literary written Spanish. Short stories, films, and
newspaper articles are incorporated into the curriculum, in order to foster greater understanding
of Hispanic culture, and to help the student develop the skills necessary to express himself in
spoken Spanish. Students in Spanish III* make the transition from sequential materials used at the
previous levels of language instruction to the ability to express themselves creatively in oral and
written Spanish. Prerequisite: B average in Spanish II* and department approval.
Spanish IV
The objective of this course is to help the students to convert the linguistic skills acquired during
the three previous years into a coherent, clear, and useful means of communication. It prepares
students to converse at length and handle everyday situations with confidence. Students view films
in Spanish, and read literary works from world-renowned Spanish and Latin American authors.
They also use the Internet, magazines and newspapers to read about current events in the Spanish
speaking world. The films, literary readings and articles are the basis for classroom discussion and
provide students with a general understanding and appreciation for the Hispanic culture. By the
end of this course the student should have developed the self-assurance and confidence necessary
for using the target language in informal conversations, or before a variety of audiences, ranging
from a small circle of friends to a full class. Prerequisite: B- average in Spanish III and
department approval.
Spanish IV*
This is an interactive course involving advanced vocabulary and grammatical structure, as well as
intensive study and usage of the Spanish language. Students in this class will continue to develop
greater proficiency in all four language skills: listening, reading, writing, and speaking. Students in
Spanish IV * will discuss contemporary news, cultural topics, literary readings, and Spanish films.
The goal of this course is to help students achieve fluency, and, as such, it will enable students to
communicate with greater confidence, giving them the tools they need to handle day-to-day
situations in a contextualized setting. Prerequisite: B average in Spanish III* and department
approval.
Spanish V: Cine del mundo hispano (fall semester)
This course addresses themes relevant to the 21st century in the Hispanic world, many of them
polemic in nature. Topics include immigration, oppressive government regimes, global
responsibility and regionalism versus globalization. Students learn the skill set necessary to watch,
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 37
understand and interpret Hispanic film and ultimately enabling the students to view films critically
and as empathetic global citizens. Advanced grammar and vocabulary will be reinforced through
discussion and composition. Prerequisite: B- average in Spanish IV and department approval.
Spanish V: Conversación y Controversia (spring semester)
In this semester-long course, students will explore global issues through the literature, art, history,
politics, film, and culture of the Spanish-speaking world. Particular emphasis will be placed on
developing speaking skills, but students will be required to complete nightly readings in order to
participate effectively in class. Readings will be aimed at helping students develop cultural
empathy and an understanding of current world events, and will include newspapers, blogs, and
other internet sources, as well as literary works. In addition to daily class participation, students
will be expected to work individually and in groups on diverse oral projects such as podcasts,
Powerpoint presentations and debates. Additionally, several films will be chosen to complement
the themes of the texts explored in class. Prerequisite: B- average in Spanish IV and department
approval.
Spanish V*: Latinoamérica en el siglo XX (fall semester)
This advanced class will use the literature, art and film of the last century to explore the role of
political and economic events in the Spanish-speaking world. In particular the political changes,
economic crises and social movements that have so influenced and affected countries such as
Chile, Guatemala, Venezuela, Cuba, Argentina and México. The content of this course will be
tailored to student interest and current events. Students will be exposed to the unique voices of
novelists, short story writers, journalists, poets, artists and filmmakers whose work was informed
by these events. Students will also gain insight into the socio-political antecedents and
repercussions of these critical events. Prerequisite: A average in Spanish IV and department
approval.
Spanish V*: Literatura y cultura latinoamericana (spring semester)
In this course students will explore latin american culture through literature. The short stories of
such authors as Rulfo and Márquez will transform the reader’s understanding of the human
experience. This advanced course is dedicated to reading and interpreting literature of the Spanish
speaking world with particular emphasis on the short narrative. Immersed in the target language,
students will participate actively in discussions and write reflections on literary and social justice
topics. Students will explore the historical, cultural, and literary influence of various authors from
all over Latin America and Spain through the 21st century. Prerequisite: A average in Spanish
IV and department approval.
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 38
CLASSICS ELECTIVES
Ancient Greek
This course will endeavor to immerse the student in the rich intellectual, cultural, historical and
literary heritage of ancient Greece, with particular emphasis on Athens in the fifth century BC.
Through daily reading of ancient Greek, the students will gain mastery of grammatical concepts,
acquire a substantial, working vocabulary and attain proficiency in translation. Initially reading
Greek passages adapted from such Classical authors as Herodotus, Thucydides and Aeschylus, by
the end of the course we will be reading those same authors in the original. We will also be
exploring additional literary traditions by reading several Greek tragedies in translation. The
students will be encouraged at all times to examine and reflect upon the myriad of contributions
that the ancient Greeks have made to Western Civilization. Prerequisite: department approval.
Mythology (fall or spring semester)
Though we are separated from the ancient Greeks by millennia, Greek mythology continues to
play an important role in shaping and understanding our culture. In this class, we will become
familiar with major stories and themes from Greek myths, as well as examine how myths are
structured, how people use myths to understand their experiences, how societies apply myths to
political purposes, and how myths are depicted in ancient and modern art. No knowledge of Latin
is necessary to enjoy and succeed in this class. [This is a Classics course. Knowledge of Latin is
NOT required.]
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 39
SCIENCE
Philosophy and Overview
The Haverford School Science Department strives to produce graduates who demonstrate a welldeveloped scientific intellect. Crucial to this goal is the development of critical thinking and the
ability to synthesize and analyze available information. Possessing those tools, the boys can then
apply their knowledge to the integration of concepts within the realm of science and across
disciplines. We want the boys to understand that science is an active and ongoing process. We
mold active learners who are capable of independent, cooperative, and collaborative work using
the available technology and tools. We emphasize the students’ status as global citizens, including
but not limited to the stewardship of their environment, ethical decision making, and possessing
comprehensive historical perspective. We consistently model for and try to instill in the boys,
personal qualities that will sustain open-mindedness, creativity, imagination, and curiosity. By
supporting informed risk-taking and encouraging the patient pursuit of goals, we look to cultivate
persevering, hard-working students who will possess the confidence and resiliency to continue
their study of science regardless of obstacles they may encounter. Through this process we hope to
nurture and help the boys sustain the inherent awe, passion, and wonder that science can inspire.
Physics
The Haverford student sets out on his Upper School science journey with an exploration of
fundamental physics, laying the foundation for in-depth explorations of chemistry and biology.
Third Form students will have a choice between a conceptual or a problem based approach. The
two physics courses are designed around a project-based curriculum and strive to be the
cornerstone in our development of scientifically literate graduates who appreciate science and are
curious about the natural world. Both courses are structured around pillars of physics such as
Newton's Laws, the Law of Conservation of Energy, and electricity and magnetism. Both
approaches provide the student with the opportunity for intellectual investigation, tactile
experience, and the development of appropriate and vital critical thinking and problem solving
skills. The students, through individual and collaborative work, will engage in laboratory research,
reading, writing, problem-solving, and relevant and creative projects. Successful completion of
one of these courses is required of all Third Form students.
Within the construct described above we incorporate project-based inquiries that allow students to
explore foundational aspects of topics that could include applications of engineering, robotics,
programming, and collaborative problem-solving. Centered around the concepts and phenomena
discussed in class, these open-ended experiences help to further develop the skills of scientific
problem-solving and reasoning that will be relevant to their future science classes and their lives
well beyond Haverford. Therefore, class time is often devoted as much to laboratory study and
peer discussion as to the more traditional lecture and recitation. The student learns to write formal
laboratory reports in the format expected throughout his Upper School science experience and
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 40
beyond. During his laboratory exercises, the student will be required to capture data, work
collaboratively with colleagues, and use imagination, ingenuity, and creativity to solve the practical
problems presented.
Physics-A Conceptual Journey
This physics course is conceptually challenging while supporting development of essential problem
solving skills. Detailed, challenging, and in-depth projects, modeling, and collaborative
experiences will be the primary modes of exploration with the intentional and appropriate
incorporation of mathematical principles. Third Form students will have the opportunity to
develop or reinforce their mathematical problem solving skills at the Algebra I level.
Physics concepts will be explored through the perspective of how they relate to real world
problems and issues. Mathematical and problem solving skills will be incorporated as needed
within the context of the conceptual foundation that forms the fundamental structure of the
course. It is designed to challenge each boy to stretch and grow through scientific inquiry,
collaboration, concept mastery and appropriate mathematical applications.
Physics-A Problem Based Journey
This course is designed to build the same foundation as the conceptual journey with an emphasis
on a deeper and broader mathematical exploration. Mathematical concepts will be essential in
forming the basis of the conceptual foundation in physics. It is designed with the intent of offering
those boys who really enjoy the challenges of establishing a clear and lasting connection between
the conceptual foundation and the mathematics that predict and define their physical experiences
in the world around them. It is recommended that boys enrolling in this course have completed
geometry successfully or have demonstrated appropriate skills on a readiness assessment codesigned by The Haverford Science and Math departments.
Both courses will provide a thorough and challenging exploration of fundamental physics while
providing the student with the opportunity to master the essential mathematical skills needed for
success in both levels of Fourth Form chemistry.
Chemistry
The second of three required courses, Chemistry is an integral component of Haverford’s Upper
School science sequence. Like Physics, Chemistry emphasizes problem-solving strategies,
experimentation, teamwork, project based activities, and the fundamental principles of physical
science. To that foundation it adds an understanding of modern theoretical concepts, the
relationship between structure and function, multi-step calculations, and qualitative and
quantitative laboratory work. All Chemistry courses provide students with an understanding of
basic chemical concepts: atomic and molecular structure, periodic properties of elements,
reactions, stoichiometric calculations, thermochemistry, solution chemistry, acids and bases, and
equilibrium. We expect students who have completed a course in Chemistry to have a firm
grounding in experimental procedures, calculations, basic error analysis, and lab report writing
skills. Students should also be able to manage an appropriate schedule of reading, problem solving,
preparation, and participation. Calculators and computers with related software are frequently
41
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog used for problem solving and data analysis. Chemistry is an important prerequisite for the Biology
course which students customarily complete in their Fifth Form year.
•
•
Chemistry - This is a broad introduction to, and overview of, the general principles and
problem-solving techniques in the study of the composition of substances and the changes
these substances undergo. The course touches on all of the five major branches in
chemistry: inorganic, organic, analytical, physical, and biochemical.
Chemistry* - This fast moving and very challenging course includes all the requirements of
Chemistry with an added emphasis on more complex and mathematically intense problemsolving techniques, independent learning, and detailed applications to contemporary
science and technology. Topics will be explored in more depth and at a faster pace than in
Chemistry, and students may explore additional topics in Thermodynamics,
Electrochemistry, and/or Reaction Kinetics. Students should expect frequent and
challenging out of class assignments for its entirety. Prerequisite: Successful completion
of Geometry and an established record of dedication to fulfilling course requirements
and a conscientious commitment to excel. Completion of Physics with a final grade of
A or better and endorsement of the Physics and Math instructors, with approval of the
Science Department Chair. It is advantageous to have completed Algebra II before
enrolling in this course. However, students may enroll in Chemistry* while concurrently
enrolled in Algebra II provided they have the endorsement from their math and science
instructors, and permission of the Science Chair.
Biology
Fifth Form Biology is the last of the science requirements for graduation from The Haverford
School. The course takes advantage of the experience students have acquired in their earlier physics
and chemistry courses. As the science of biology takes an increasingly molecular approach to
pursuing answers to questions about life processes, and as technological advances provide tools of
studying phenomena with more and more precision, a student must demonstrate competency in
the physical sciences in order to achieve the greatest understanding of modern biology.
Each student should gain a thorough knowledge of biological processes that apply to him and to
the natural world around him. He should, therefore be able to make intelligent decisions about
biological issues affecting him and his community, as they will certainly arise in his future. What is
more, we want students to grow to have an appreciation for the richness of the natural world, a
curiosity about the many mysteries that remain, and the confidence to continue to study biology at
the higher levels of college and graduate school.
•
Biology - Principle topics may include cell biology, biochemistry, classical and modern
genetics, molecular biology, evolution, and animal and plant physiology. Besides acquiring
new knowledge, students refine their laboratory skills: making careful, quantitative
observations, asking good questions, forming testable hypotheses, designing laboratory
procedures, effectively and safely manipulating laboratory apparatus, gathering, analyzing,
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 42
and presenting laboratory data, and coming to reasonable conclusions. Prerequisite:
Third Form Physics and Chemistry or permission of the Science Chair.
•
Biology* - Similar in content to Biology, general topics may include evolution, cell biology,
biochemistry, classical and modern genetics, molecular biology, and animal and plant
physiology. This course examines these phenomena at an accelerated pace and in greater
breadth and depth. Understandably, daily workload is heavier in this course, and some
laboratories are more challenging, than in standard Biology. Throughout the year we will
exercise our freedom to pursue subjects that catch our particular interest. Prerequisite: An
established record of dedication to fulfilling course requirements and a conscientious
commitment to excel. Third Form Physics and a grade of A or better in Chemistry or
successful completion of Honors Chemistry with the endorsement of the Chemistry
instructor and permission of the Science Chair.
Advanced Physics*
A yearlong course designed for those Sixth-Formers who are seriously considering the physical,
medical, or engineering sciences as a future college major or career path. The purpose of this
course is to revisit topics from Third-Form physics while exploring additional topics common to a
second-year physics curriculum. All topics will be explored from a conceptually deep and
computationally intense perspective that often relies on calculus. Students will need to be
proficient in algebra, trigonometry, and basic calculus. Students will explore relativity, linear and
circular motion, fluid dynamics, temperature and heat transfer, quantum physics, health physics,
and much more. The course will be conducted at an accelerated pace with a strong focus on
problem-solving. Finally, students should expect frequent and challenging class assignments
including group collaborations as well as reading and interpreting actual academic papers.
Prerequisite: An established record of dedication to fulfilling course requirements and a
conscientious commitment to excel. Completion of Algebra II with a grade of A- or better.
Completion of Pre-Calculus. Completion of Honors Chemistry with endorsement of the
science faculty and permission of the Science Chair. Co-requisite: Completion of or
concurrent enrollment in Calculus or a more advanced course in mathematics.
Astronomy (spring semester)
The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to compelling aspects of Astronomy that
they may be less familiar with, namely to those areas of our universe that extend beyond our local
solar system. We will investigate such areas as cosmology, galactic morphology, stellar evolution,
dark matter and energy, evidence for intelligent life beyond our solar system, and the ultimate fate
of the universe itself. We will be utilizing one of the more definitive classroom texts about
Astronomy, Universe by Freedman and Kaufmann. Our discussion will begin with a look at the
origin and development of the universe and some of the largest-scale aspects of Astronomy,
effectively moving backwards through the book.
Electronics* (fall semester)
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 43
This course provides an introduction to electricity and electronics with a focus on hands-on
experience and practical applications. Electronics is one of the fastest expanding fields in research.
From the invention of the transistor almost sixty years ago to our current reliance on the
“Information Superhighway”, electronics has been a vital part of our modern technological society.
The semester will begin with a look at the evolution of electronics over the last century. This will
be followed by a thorough examination of the basic principles: voltage, current, resistance, Ohm's
Law, Kirchoff's Law, etc. After a significant amount of time is spent on identifying and
understanding how various electronic components work, students will design their own circuits.
Using a solder gun and solderless breadboards, students will learn how to build
analog circuits that accomplish particular tasks. Later in the semester, students will also have an
opportunity to work with integrated circuits. Teamwork, critical thinking, and problem solving
will be important attributes. Assessment will be based on weekly lab projects, quizzes, homework,
and a long-term circuit project. Prerequisite: An established record of dedication to fulfilling
course requirements and a conscientious commitment to excel. Completion of pre-Calculus
with a grade of A- or better and a grade of B or better in Honors Chemistry or A- or better in
Chemistry. Endorsement of the current science teacher and permission of the Science Chair.
Co-requisite: Enrollment in a Calculus course or higher
Engineering*(fall semester)
Engineering* is a semester-long course designed for students who are seriously considering any
engineering discipline as a college major. Students will be required to use first principles of physics,
mathematics, chemistry, and biology to design, build, and test structures and devices. Prior to
building, students will apply their developing knowledge of mechanics while preparing calculationbased designs. Students will then construct working prototypes to test their models, while
gathering and analyzing data to inform the iterative process. The goal of each project will be to
address an engineering problem relevant to practicing engineers while adhering to specific design
and economic constraints. The accelerated pace of Engineering* will require students to complete
calculations, modeling, and data analysis independently. The course will cover the same
fundamental topics included in Engineering in addition to topics requiring advanced mathematics
and rigorous problem solving. These topics will include energy transfer, fluid dynamics,
biomechanics, materials chemistry, mechanics of materials, programming, systems integration and
others as time permits. Students should expect frequent and challenging out of class assignments
for its entirety. Prerequisite: An established record of dedication to fulfilling course
requirements and a conscientious commitment to excel. Completion of pre-Calculus with a
grade of A- or better and a grade of B or better in Honors Chemistry or A- or better in
Chemistry with endorsement of the current science teacher and permission of the Science
Chair. Co-requisite: Enrollment in a Calculus course or higher.
Engineering: People and Processes (fall semester)
Engineering is the discipline that makes the modern world tick. Students will learn exactly what
Engineering is and who are engineers. They will explore the practical process philosophies that a
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 44
good engineer must use. Through a series of real world applications they will investigate the
complexities of the
decisions faced by engineers and develop the thought processes that guide engineers through these
mazes. Included in these are the trade-offs to find optimum solutions, the design process and the
importance of failure. The students will conclude this semester with a team based project, where in
a real business environment, they must deliver a product against a series of specifications, on-time
and to cost. Prerequisite: Endorsement of the current science teacher and permission of the
Science Chair.
Engineering: Design, Build, and Test (spring semester)
The class provides students with the opportunity to design, build and test projects in teams of two
or three. The projects, which will vary year by year, will be based around a definable goal. In this
environment the students will practice real world engineering in that they will be responsible for
not only achievement of the end goals, but also for creating the detailed discrete steps that need to
be taken to achieve those goals. The projects will always challenge the student to work in a
collaborative environment where a drive to consensus is vital. Previous projects have included:
designing and prototyping sports equipment, designing and manufacturing Trebuchets to meet
specific ballistic goals, and designing, programming, and assembling Sumo Wrestling Robots. The
projects are rooted in the real world and through them the students will benefit from not only the
hands-on engineering experience but also the development of life skills that are the hallmarks of
good engineers. Prerequisite: Endorsement of the current science teacher and permission of the
Science Chair.
Environmental Ethics and Policy (fall semester)
As young adults, it is of paramount importance that Haverford students understand some of the
most pressing environmental challenges that confront their generation in the new millennium.
Essential global issues such as water scarcity, peak oil, climate change, and much more will be
explored. Local issues in the state of Pennsylvania involving hydraulic fracking and environmental
justice will also be discussed. We will take a holistic approach to confronting environmental
challenges by not only discussing the scientific factors at play, but the social, moral, political, and
economic factors as well. The course will be conducted like a discussion-driven graduate seminar
where different points of view are encouraged. Course content will be borrowed from the
University of Pennsylvania’s graduate program in Environmental Studies. Students will be
expected to read and interpret policy assessment reports and academic papers, constructively
debate their peers, reach out to experts in the field, and collectively seek meaningful solutions.
Global Impacts of Infectious Disease (spring semester)
This course will examine the historical and contemporary impacts of infectious disease on our
planet and its inhabitants. To demonstrate understanding, students will independently research
and present proposals to minimize or eliminate the effects of a particular disease. Course and lab
work will focus on the intersections of molecular and cellular biology, microbiology, immunology,
physiology, ecology, epidemiology, and principles of public health. Students can expect to gain a
breadth
of
knowledge
in
these
45
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog areas; depth of study for particular topics will be determined by needs for student projects and
student interest. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology with the endorsement of the
Biology instructor and permission of the Science Chair.
Molecular Biology* (spring semester)
This course is the synthesis of several disciplines: biochemistry, genetics, cell biology, and
microbiology. Biologists have the means to analyze the Human Genome. The dissection of the
molecular pathway through which hereditary information flows between DNA, RNA, and protein
molecules adds to our understanding of human development and disease. Technological
developments have provided powerful methods to isolate, analyze, and manipulate DNA, RNA
and protein molecules. These developments have transformed biological and medical research.
The majority of class time will be spent in the lab, learning and using molecular and cell biology
research techniques to sequence a gene. Biotechnology will be provided to students, so they can
learn theory, practice, and applications with hands-on experimental work. The curriculum may
include applications of biotechnology such as genetic engineering, gene therapy, immunotherapy,
and regenerative medicine. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology*. The endorsement
of the Biology instructor and permission of the Science Chair.
Organic Chemistry* or Organic Chemistry (fall semester)
This second-year chemistry course will provide a solid foundation in some of the fundamental
concepts of organic chemistry. Topics will include; organic nomenclature, functional groups,
acid/base theory, isomerism, resonance, and basic reaction mechanisms related to synthesis and
polymerization. The lab component of the course will introduce students to some skills and
techniques essential for experimentation in an organic chemistry laboratory course. There is no
doubt that organic chemistry touches almost every aspect of our daily lives. Emphasis will be
placed on establishing connections to biology, biochemistry, material science, pharmacology, and
art. The course will be designed so that, by completing additional assignments and meeting clearly
delineated expectations, students can choose to augment the standard requirements of the course
to constitute mastery at the honors level. The differences in those requirements will be founded in
independent study, depth of knowledge, and complexity of problems and interpretations.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Chemistry* or a grade of B or better in Chemistry,
endorsement of the chemistry instructor, and permission of the Science Chair.
Physiology (spring semester)
Physiology is a biological sciences course that focuses specifically on the normal functions and
components of living organisms, especially human. Major themes are the mechanisms the sustain
life and the ways in which these normal processes can be disrupted. Depending on student interest,
topics may include locomotion, digestion, respiration, reproduction, transportation, transmission
of information, regulation of body functions, and/or defenses against disease. Student
understanding will be assessed by tests, laboratories, and projects. Prerequisite: Successful
completion of biology.
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 46
Physiology* (fall semester)
Physiology is a biological sciences course that focuses specifically on the normal functions and
components of living organisms, especially human. Major themes are the mechanisms the sustain
life and the ways in which these normal processes can be disrupted. The honors level of this course
will focus on different and more complex topics than standard level and may include, but is not
limited to, immunology, neurology, and/or reproductive anatomy. Students will be expected to
examine topics in more depth, augment classroom learning by reading current literature, and
communicate their understanding via a culminating research paper. Prerequisite: Successful
completion of Biology with the endorsement of the Biology instructor and permission of the
Science Chair.
Advanced Laboratory Research Cooperative I* (spring semester Fifth Form)
Boys will explore several scientific fields via exploration as well as reading and discussion of
selected current scientific research. Once they have identified a particular area of interest, the boys
will begin investigating opportunities for placement in a cooperating local University or Private
laboratory. Boys who complete this independent study portion of the course may be asked, based
on their performance, to commit to enrolling in ALRC II*. Following that invitation and
commitment the boys will be enrolled in a six to eight-week summer research experience in which
they will work closely with investigators and/or graduate students at area university, or private
laboratories on research projects they have selected. Upon successful completion of the summer
research portion of the course, boys will receive retroactive credit for ALRC I*. Prerequisite:
Completion of Chemistry* and Biology* with a grade of “A-“ or better. Students will apply and
be selected for this course by the science department during the fall semester of the Fifth Form
year. Academic achievement, discipline record, attendance record, and input from past and
current instructors will be considered during the application process. Formal invitations to
enroll will be extended by the lead instructor or the Science Chair. Co-requisite: Students who
receive credit for ALRC I* must enroll in ALRC II* in the Sixth Form
Advanced Laboratory Research Cooperative II* (fall semester Sixth Form)
This is a one semester course for Sixth Form students who have completed ALRC I*. If necessary,
students continue to gather and analyze experimental data based on their summer research work.
Time is then devoted to the organization, analysis, evaluation, and interpretation of their data.
Concurrently the boys will discuss each other’s data in a presentation/seminar format. The boys
will then formally write up their research for possible submission to competitions or publications
and begin preparations for presentation of their research experience to the Haverford School
Community. If time permits, students will explore possible research extension questions based on
their original work. During the spring semester they will occasionally be asked to advise and
interact with Fifth Formers currently enrolled in ALRC I*. Students will meet with the research
advisor at least one double period each cycle. They will be expected to work independently
between meetings. This course will be scheduled in addition to the students’ regular five class load.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of ALRC I* and permission of the ALRC I* instructor and
the Science Chair.
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 47
INDEPENDENT STUDY
This is an opportunity primarily for Sixth Form students to pursue an academic interest in a
tutorial setting. Independent study can further the academic and intellectual interest of both
students and faculty, enrich the curriculum, and encourage interdepartmental courses and
cooperation. STUDENTS MAY NOT DROP AN HONORS COURSE OR A YEARLONG
COURSE IN ORDER TO TAKE AN INDEPENDENT STUDY. Be sure to include this in your
planning for your academic course load. This course is available to students during the fall or
spring semesters of the Sixth Form year or, in rare cases, the Fifth Form year. A student, in
conjunction with the appropriate teacher, will develop his independent study proposal that is then
forwarded to the Independent Study Committee. Please ask the Head of the Upper School or the
Director of College Counseling about further details.
Note: Independent Study is intended for work that is not available in the normal school
curriculum.
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 48
CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES
ATHLETICS
Each student must participate in two interscholastic sports or the equivalent thereof in Third,
Fourth, and Fifth Forms and one interscholastic sport in the Sixth Form year.
Fall
Winter
Spring
Cross-Country
Football
Soccer
Water Polo
Crew
Golf
Basketball
Ice Hockey
Winter Track
Squash
Swimming & Diving
Wrestling
Crew
Baseball
Crew
Lacrosse
Tennis
Track & Field
Ultimate Frisbee
MUSIC AND THEATER
Notables
This is the premier vocal ensemble at The Haverford School. An auditioned vocal ensemble,
students sing a variety of a cappella music from around the world. Students refine the proper use
of their voice, enabling them to sing music of great complexity and vocal range. The Notables
perform music in a variety of musical styles, with emphasis placed on historical and stylistic
performance practice techniques. Students sing in balanced voice parts, and sing music with up to
eight parts. They sing in a number of languages, and memorize a substantial repertoire for
performance. Additionally, elements of stage deportment, ambassadorship, and community service
comprise a substantial part of ensemble study. The students rehearse extensively, and perform at
school and in the larger community. The Notables are committed to providing community service
through artistic performance. They perform numerous concerts each year, with the majority
performed at hospitals, nursing homes, senior centers and the like. The ensemble frequently
produces recordings. Students are evaluated on their level of artistry, coachability, memorization
skills, and adherence to performance practices of the various styles in which they sing.
The Haverford School Jazz Ensemble
This ensemble performs a variety of contemporary, jazz-influenced arrangements for winds, brass,
and percussion section. Students are auditioned and must demonstrate a satisfactory skill level to
participate, as determined by the director. Students learn the skills of performing in an ensemble.
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 49
They hone their technical skills and play in a variety of jazz styles. More advanced students apply
their skills and knowledge to the art of improvisation. Performance venues include school
functions as well as evening concerts in the winter and spring. Students must inform their advisor
and the Jazz Ensemble Director of their intent for this activity to count towards their Arts
graduation requirement.
The Haverford Advanced Chamber Ensembles
These are auditioned ensembles for advanced instrumental players. Students refine their musical
skills by studying and performing literature from the standard chamber music repertoire. They
focus on playing soloistically within a small ensemble while matching bow strokes, articulations,
tone colors and interpretations. The ensembles meet one morning per week and perform
throughout the school year.
Glee Club
Students learn the technical aspects of good singing, including breath control, formation of vowel
shapes and vocal tone, proper diction in a variety of languages, range extension and agility.
Students study repertoire from a variety of genres, from classical to folk to jazz and modern. They
perform a capella music as well as music accompanied by piano and orchestra. Through their
rehearsal and performances, students learn a valuable skill that can be used as a form of self
expression as well as a powerful form of communication. As the music is being rehearsed daily,
various compositional techniques and elements of form are pointed out. Glee Club members
participate in service learning through outreach performances. This chorus performs at 4 major
concerts each year, at Haverford, in New York City, and in our community. The Glee Club joins
forces with area girls' schools and with Haverford's boychoir to perform works such as Vivaldi’s
Gloria, Handel's Messiah, and Haydn, Mozart and Schubert Masses. Glee Club is a graded course
that meets three times a week before school, 8:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m. on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday
for tenors or Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday (for bass/baritones) with Wednesday being a make up day to allow
for morning conflicts.
Orchestra
Orchestra is an auditioned ensemble. Students must demonstrate satisfactory ability on their
principal instrument to participate, as determined by the director. Students learn to phrase
artistically, and develop techniques of articulation, expanded dynamic range, and stylistic
interpretation through performance of a range of repertoire covering multiple styles and genres.
Orchestra members develop ensemble skills such as leading, critical listening, and collaboration.
In addition, students refine technical skills on their given instruments. The Orchestra performs
during the annual Haverford School performances. Orchestra is a graded course that meets before
school, 7:45-8:20 a. m. 3 times a week.
Stage Crew
As a member of stage crew, students have the opportunity to participate in the active creation of
theatre. Working both on school productions and with professional organizations, students have
hands-on experience with carpentry, lighting technology, and with scenic painting. To fulfill one
sports requirement through this activity, students must complete one semester of stage crew
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 50
participation. To fulfill both sports requirements, students need to participate in stage crew for the
school year. However, all Haverford students must participate in the athletic program at least once
before graduation.
Performance and Production Opportunities
Each year, The Haverford School Drama Department produces a minimum of two Upper School
plays and/or musicals. By participating in theatrical productions either on the stage or back stage,
students will become a vital part of a collaborative team. Students may count their participation in
one of the upper school productions as one of their sports requirements. Students may not count
participation in both productions as a fulfillment of their sports requirements for the school year.
CLUBS
With more than 50 clubs and activities to choose from, our Upper School offers myriad
opportunities for students to explore extracurricular activities and to develop leadership skills. All
clubs are student-designed and student-led, with a faculty adviser who offers guidance and
mentoring. Students and faculty are passionate about their interests – and they often extend their
club commitments well beyond the boundaries of our schedule and campus.
All of our clubs and activities are active during the full School year. At the beginning of each
academic year, students have the opportunity to join or start clubs based on their personal
interests, and we enthusiastically encourage them to get involved. The list below is a representative,
but not comprehensive, sampling of clubs and activities that have been offered in the Upper School
over the past several years. Clubs will be offered each year based on student interest.
Actors’ Studio
Art Club
Car Club
Ceramics Club
Chess Club
Coding Club
Creative Writing
Debate and Speech
DECA
Diplomacy Society
Diversity Alliance
Economics Club
Fantasy Sports Club
Film Club
Glee Club
Global Leadership
Haligoluk (yearbook)
Hero-X
Math Club
Mock Trial
Model UN
Monster Mask Creation
PB&J Club
Pegasus (literary
magazine)
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog Philosophy Club
Poetry Club
Politics Club
Robotics
Science Olympiad
Signet Society
Spirit of Innovation
Stage Crew
Student Council
Sustainability Alliance
The Index (newspaper)
Yoga Club
51
SERVICE LEARNING
The Upper School Student Service Board at Haverford is very active, with a wide variety of
activities and opportunities. These events are student driven and student run and all students are
invited to participate. Students who are not on the Service Board are welcome to present ideas for
projects at each of our twice-monthly meetings. Some examples of service projects are as follows:
City Year Servathon is a day where volunteers renovate community centers in Philadelphia.
Special Olympics invites students to support special needs kids with a weekend of sport activities
and “competitions” at this annual event held at Villanova each November.
Riverbend Environmental Center’s Haunted Trails is an annual opportunity for students to help
one of our environmental partners stage a fun evening of ghoulish activities for children and
nature lovers.
Literacy Program supports Bryn Mawr Tutoring and goes to West Philadelphia to tutor young
people.
Empty Bowls is our yearlong hunger awareness education program, culminating with the Empty
Bowls supper in April, which raises funds for our local hunger partners and advocates for those
challenged by hunger and homelessness.
Helping Hunger Cooking Club meets several times throughout the year to prepare meals for 200
homeless people at Life Centers of Delaware County and Ronald McDonald House. Together with
Agnes Irwin, students cook and later serve these meals.
Philadelphia Cares Day is a day of service involving urban renewal in the Philadelphia schools.
Environmental Work Days Throughout the year we partner with local organizations to support
and promote environmental projects including: clearing bike and walking trails, cleaning up
streambeds, prepping playgrounds for physically disabled, helping plant and harvest at our local
CSAs, etc. in Radnor, Haverford and Lower Merion
To raise awareness and funds, boys participate along with students from Agnes Irwin and Baldwin
in various walks such as: AIDS Walk Philly, Juvenile Diabetes Walk, American Heart
Walk, Out of the Darkness Suicide Awareness Walk, The Buddy Walk to support kids with
Down Syndrome, Walk to Cure MS, and several others throughout the year.
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 52
In the spring, we participate in Race for the Cure for Breast Cancer and the Home Run Baseball
Derby to raise funds for Prostate Cancer Research. Our Lacrosse team runs the annual Checking
for Cancer Tournament to support male cancer research.
Students also have the opportunity to lead campaigns to support those in need such as Hunger
Relief, the elderly, the homeless, and a variety of other crisis situations as they occur.
SERVICE LEARNING IN THE CLASSROOM
Whenever possible, we seek to integrate service opportunities into the classroom and curriculum
to offer students real-life context to what it is they are learning. Examples might be: students in
American History class will run a voter registration project for our own students; Ceramics
students build bowls to be painted and sold at our Empty Bowls Supper; Engineering students
design a water collection and irrigation system to help make the Learning Garden sustainable and
environmentally responsible; Spanish classes tutoring immigrant workers in our region.
These efforts put their education and knowledge into action, and are offered to students
throughout all divisions at The Haverford School.
QUESTIONS
If you have any questions about the contents of this Course Catalog, please contact:
Adele Kasmen
Administrative Assistant
484-417-2750
[email protected]
The Haverford School – Upper School Course Catalog 53
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