november /1965 - American Radio History

november /1965 - American Radio History
NOVEMBER /1965
Se4Z,Veiee
4
Major- advance in FM from Scott!
New "Field-Effect" transistor circuitry
lets you hear more stations ... more clearly.
Scott announces a significant new
engineering achievement in solid state
circuit design
the first application
of "Field -Effect" transistors to a consumer product! This entirely new Scott
circuit, making its initial appearance in
the new 388 100 -watt AM /FM Receiver, virtually eliminates cross modulation
lets you hear weak or distant
stations which are usually masked out
when ghost signals from strong local
stations appear at unwanted spots on
the dial.
According to recent exhaustive tests
conducted by Texas Instruments, Inc.,
"The H. H. Scott FM tuner front end
exhibited IHF sensitivities of 1.6
to 2 microvolts with cross modulation
rejection of from 96 to 100 db. Two
strong signals, equivalent to more than
50 my per meter and separated by 800
kc, can be fed into the input without
having any measurable intermodulation
products generated. This performance
...
...
.
. is more than 20 db better than the
best bipolar transistorized front ends."
This radical improvement in FM
tuner front end design is but one of
the features that make the 388 your
best value in a powerful, sensitive, nocompromise receiver. The 388 incorporates direct -coupled output circuitry,
utilizing costly silicon transistors, allowing instantaneous power for extreme
music dynamics, and affording complete protection against speaker overload. Both output and driver transformers, major sources of distortion
and diminished power, are thus eliminated from the design of the 388. Silicons are also used in the IF circuit for
superior stability, selectivity, and wide
bandwidth.
Other engineering features of the
388 include: heavy military -type heat
sinks, scientifically designed for optimum heat dissipation; silver-plated
SCOTT®
tuner front end for maximum sensitivity; and extensive protective circuitry
to safeguard the receiver and associated
equipment from such common problems as accidental shorting of speaker
terminals, operating the amplifier section without a load, subjecting the input
to a high level transient signal, or operation with capacitative loads, such as
electrostatic loudspeakers. In addition,
the 388 incorporates famous Scott
wide -range AM for your increased lis-
tening enjoyment.
See and hear the Scott 388 AM /FM
solid state stereo receiver, now at your
Scott dealer's.
388 Specifications: Music power rating, 50 watts per channel at four ohms,
40 watts per channel at eight ohms;
Frequency response, ±1 db, 15- 30,000
cps; Harmonic distortion, 0.8 %; Capture ratio, 4 db; Selectivity, 45 db;
Separation, 35 db. Price, East of the
Rockies, less than $500.
H. H. Scott, Inc., 111 Powdermill Road, Maynard, Mass.
Export: Scott International, Maynard, Mass. Cable HIFI
Circle 100 on Reader Service Card
November, 1965
Vol. 49, No. 11
Dlo,
Successor to
Number 27 in a series of discussions
by Electro -Voice engineers
Est. 1911
LARRY ZIDE
AUDIO
VOICE
Associate Editor
FROM THE
HAROLD D. WEILER
DEPTHS
Roving Editor
LEE HAGEY
JANET M. DURGIN
C. G. McPRouD
Editor and Publisher
SANFORD L. CAHN
Advertising Director
EDGAR
E. NEWMAN
Circulation Director
Bill
Pattis
&
Associates,
Contributing Editors
4761 West Touhy Ave.,
Lincolnwood, 111. 60646
EDWARD TATNALL CANBY
JOSEPH CIOVANELLI
HAROLD LAWRENCE
CHESTER SANTON
HERMAN BURSTEIN
BERTRAM STANLEIGH
James C. Galloway,
6535 Wilshire Blvd.,
Loa Angeles, Calif. 90048
Warren Birkenhead, Inc.,
No. 25, 2- chome, Shiba Hamamatsu-rho,
Mirzato -ku, Tokyo,
Application of Dual -Track Techniques
to Lecture Recording
Evaluating the Performance of
Stereo Cartridges
Microphone Amplifier and Coupling
Unit for the Stereo -Modified Uher 4000 -S
Development of Pulse Modulated
Audio Amplification
In Four Parts, Part Three
Japan
AUDIO
19
C. B. Hagen
21
J. H. Kogen
26
C. G. McProud
36
Norman H. Crowhurst
The transducer (it operates as either a speaker
or hydrophone) is novel in appearance to those
unfamiliar with problems of underwater sound
propagation. Essentially it is a double-sided disc,
about 16" in diameter, made up of 16 pie -shaped
wedges of lead titanate ceramic. The wedges are
fitted in a slotted metal ring and sealed with
silicone rubber compound that allows flexing, yeta
maintains a perfect seal at depths down to 200
feet. While a single slab of ceramic would
preferred, wedges are used since the material be
is
very difficult to fabricate in a single piece
of the
required diameter.
AUDIO Reviews
44
56
Chester Santon
Edward Tatnall Canby
Bertram Stanleigh
52
53
54
Studio 96 /RP 120
SSP -200
Model W -2
69
M55E
8
AUDIO
Viking Tape Recorder System
Mattes Amplifier
Whitecrest Bookshelf Speaker System
Shure Stereo Cartridge with
Elliptical Stylus
Ceramic is used rather than a conventional voice
coil and piston, since it provides a close mechanical impedance match to the water, thus offering
optimum efficiency. Essentially omnidirectional
radiation is achieved despite the size of the
transducer. This is due to the longer wavelength
of sound in water. For example, a 1000
cps tone
in air is about 1' long, but is 5' long in water.
Profiles
Above water, a splashproof dynamic microphone
feeds a solid
-state amplifier which provides up to
80 watts of audio to the transducer. A range
of
several hundred yards is achieved with high
in-
telligibility.
When not transmitting to the diver, the transducer is switched to the input of a high gain
amplifier and used as a sensitive hydrophone. The
gain of the system is so high (120 db) that only
under unusual conditions does underwater ambient
noise permit full use of the gain available.
Of
interest, ordinary ceramic disc capacitors could
not be used in the low -level input stages, since
they proved much too microphonic in this
ap-
AUDIO in General
Audioclinic
Letters
About Music
Audio ETC
Editor's Review
This Month's Cover
Sound and Sight
Tape Guide
New Products
New Literature
Industry Notes and People
Advertising Index
2
6
13
14
16
30
48
50
58
66
Before the era of SCUBA diving, underwater
munications was a relatively simple affair.comA
telephone system was installed in the diver's "hard
hat" with a communications line to the surface.
When divers were freed from their cumbersome
suits, however, they also lost touch with the surface vessel. Underwater wireless systems
were
developed and are in use. However, these require
the diver to carry additional equipment.
To alleviate this problem, the U.S. Navy assigned
Electro -Voice to construct an underwater loudspeaker and associated electronics package that
would restore the ability of the diver and the
ship to communicate without burdening the diver.
Articles
-
Light Listening
Record Revue
Jazz and All That
Senior Engineer
Production Manager
Representatives
Joseph Giovanelli
plication!
Harold Lawrence
Edward Tatnall Canby
While the diver's mask restricts intelligibility
of received underwater speech, he can be easily
understood if his mask is in direct contact
with
the transducer. At greater distances, coded signals
(such as tapping on his air tank) can be readily
heard to provide two -way communications.
not intended for commercial applications, thisWhile
system reflects the wide -ranging Electro -Voice
volvement in every facet of transducer design inand
application.
Harold Weiler
Herman Burstein
73
76
IO (title registered II. $. Pat. OH.)
is published monthly by Radio Magazines, Inc., C. G. McProud, president;
Henry
and Editorial Offices, 204 Front St.. Mineola, A. Schober, Secretary. Executive
N. Y. Subscription rates -U. S.,
Possessions, Canada. and Mexico,
$5.00
other countries $6.00 per year. Single [or one year, $9.00 for two years; all er
Blanchard Press Inc., Garden City, N.Y. copies 006. Printed in U.S.A. at O
All rights reserved. Entire contents
copyrighted 1965 by Radto Magazines, Inc.
Second Class postage paid at
Minada, N.Y. and additional
For technical data on any E-V product, write:
ELECTROVOICE, INC Dept. 1153A
602 Cecil St., Buchanan, Michigan 49107
A UD
,e0fß* a
..cl/15t i
mailing offices.
INC.,
Postmaster: Send GForm 3579 to UDIO,oPO,
Box 629,
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
e
Main
ó
ABC
a, N.Y., 11502
I.
e
SETTING NEW STANDARDS IN SOUND
.K......+:+rt.
Circle 105 on Reader Service Card
1
COMIING
AUMO CUMÇ
Joseph Giovanelli
SPECIAL TAPE
ISSUE
Recording Tapes: newest
developments in the available types, coatings, backings, over -all characteristics.
Language - Lab Applications: the story of this newest use of tape recorders
throughout school systems.
Tape Duplicating: methods
and equipment used in
commercial preparation of
recorded tapes.
Recorder Buying Guide: a
compendium of available
tape recorders with their
essential features.
PROFILES
Scott 2301 Solid -State Stereo Compact
Altec 844A
Monitor Speaker
System
Eico 250-K Wideband A.C.
VTVM
In the December Issue
On the newsstands, at
your favorite audio
dealer's, or in your
own mailbox
2
point C. Most peculiar of all is position Y,
where both sides seem, in effect, to have
disappeared. Also at point Y, signals that
Joseph Giovanelli
2819 Newkirk Ave.
should be coming from A (i.e., violins)
Brooklyn, N. Y.
sometimes actually seem to be coming from
Include stamped, self- addressed
B. In other words, there is general conenvelope.
fused spatial orientation. The depth perception at any listening point is excellent.
Even monophonic records seem to convey
Sound Distribution in a Listening Room
involve
may
the feeling of depth, but mono sources
which
a
question
Q. This is
sound the same from any position. The
acoustics and placement of stereo speakers.
In a relatively "hard" acoustical environ- whole wall (A -B -C) is alive with sound.
Orchestral recordings have a beautiful.
ment, the stereo speakers are placed a few
corners
the
of sound, with instruments generally
near
blend
and
feet from the ceiling
reagainst the short wall of a room whose di- to the right or left. However, operatic of
mensions are approximately 15 feet by 25 cordings demonstrate the impossibility
pin -pointing a singer. Movement is often
feet. This problem does not deal with the
of the
"hole in the middle." It does concern the noticeable, but the actual location
singer is impossible to determine.
"missing sides." Left and right seem to
The speakers cannot easily go elsewhere.
shift toward the center, depending upon
should
1
this problem be merely a matter of
Could
Figure
the listening position.
and
right
insufficient separation? C. J. Spangler,
make this clear: A and B are
left speakers. C is the apparent sound Monterey, Calif.
A. I would, before anything else, do
source. W, X, Y, and Z are listening posiright
and
checking to see if the speakers are
left
some
of
limits
tions. L and R are
in their proper phase relationships and see
sound areas.
if the woofer and tweeter in each system
Only at position W is there a natural
if
as
is
X,
it
are properly phased with respect to one
position
At
spread of sound.
At
posiC.
another. Improper phasing could be the
to
point
speaker B had shifted
cause of much of your entire problem.
tion Z it is as if speaker A had shifted to
Another cause of the difficulty might
stem from the fact that your amplifier's
15'
tone controls are not set to provide identical sound from the two channels. ( Notice
that I didn't say that the controls were
possibly not set identically, but rather,
that they are not adjusted to produce identical sound.) To make this clearer, play a
monophonic disc and listen to the sound
coming from each channel. Do both channels function? Does one channel have
more treble or more bass? Correct these
conditions as far as possible by using the
tone controls on your pre -amplifier. Do not
L
worry if the tone -control setting for one
channel is not the same as for the other
channel insofar as their positions on the
in room acoustics or it can mean that the
front panel are concerned. This can mean
that you are compensating for differences
potentiometers used in the tone -control
circuits are of slightly different tapers.
On stereo, you must expect some loss of
separation as you move back away from
positions A and B. If you attend a concert
of operatic performance, this same loss
of separation will be apparent as you sit
further and further from the stage. Close
your eyes and try to locate an individual
Fig. 1. A and B are left and right
singer or instrumentalist. If you are quite
far from the stage, locating the performer
speakers. C is apparant sound source.
L and
positions.
aurally will be almost impossible, despite
listening
W, X, Y, Z are
sound
the fact that depth perception of the perlimits of left and right
R are
formance as a whole will be excellent.
areas.
Send questions to:
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
As tracking forces have become lighter, and stylus
assemblies more delicate, so has the danger of damage from manual handling increased. To eliminate this
hazard, Garrard has built into the Lab 80 an ingenious tone arm cueing control. This feature protects
your records as no other turntable can..
The lab 80 integral cueing control works for you
in three important ways:
1. To play a single record: Press the Manual
tab.
motor and activates the tone arm cueing
control. The arm stays suspended a safe half inch over
the record. Position the tone arm over the first or any)
groove. Now, press the cueing control and the stylus
lowers gently into the groove.
2. To cue a record during manual or automatic play:
Press the Manual tab. The arm
rises and stays a half inch
above the record. Move
the arm to the band or
groove desired, and press
the cueing control. The
stylus lowers slowly and
accurately into the groove.
With this feature, there is
no necessity to lift the arm
by hand causing accidental jarring or scraping of
the stylus across the record.
3. To pause during manual or automatic
play: When you want to interrupt the music,
press the Manual tab. The arm rises directly
over the record and stays there. The turntable continues to revolve. When you are
ready to resume play, press the cueing control. The stylus lowers accurately and safely,
This starts the
and the music continues from where it left off.
Regarding automatic play: The Lab 80 is a superb
transcription turntable for single play. But, in addition,
it includes an exceptionally gentle, built -in
record
changing device, enabling you to play a stack of
eight records fully automatically.
/
the perfect unit
for taping and
protecting your records
The
CA/VitarLd
LAB 80
Automatic
Transcription Turntable
is the only automatic.
that performs on cue!
LAB 80, $99.50, less base and cartr
-P =rotor Guide, write Garrard, Dept. GS-15, Westbury,
N.Y. 11591.
CIRCLE NO. 103 ON READER SERVICE CARD
HOW TO BUILD YOUR OWN
STEREO TAPE RECORDER...
The confused spatial orientation noted
at position Y is probably the most unexpected aspect of this discussion. The
reversal of some apparent sound sources
must be the result of reflections of sound
waves within the room, rather than any
defects in the equipment. Try to include
some stuffed furniture, heavy draperies,
and carpeting in your listening room. These
items will increase absorption of sound
waves, thereby reducing reflections.
After the room has been treated as just
described, it is likely that you will again
have to adjust the tone controls of your
pre -amplifier so that channel A sounds exactly like channel B and vice versa.
Ground Loops
Q. My trouble: Connection to any of the
high level inputs on Channel B causes loud
hum when I switch to low -level input for
to play
records I have to unplug the tape recorder
and tuner to prevent excessive hum. This
hum does not occur on channel A amplifier; therefore, it must be in channel B
amplifier. Naturally, I have tried all means
of grounding, switching plugs, and so on,
but to no avail. Hum level is very low,
i.e. normal, on low -level inputs after the
high -level sources have been disconnected.
Reid Curtis, Bragg City, Missouri.
A. First of all, place the equipment as
close together as possible, bond the chasses
together with heavy wire. If this bonding
does not eliminate the hum in channel B
when high -level sources are connected to
it, you will have to try something else.
Connect the high -level sources to channel
A as before. Disconnect the grounds from
channel B and connect the high -level
sources into channel B. There are two ways
of handling this. First, you can disconnect
the shields at the equipment end of the
cable. Serond, you can use skirted plugs
which have extra long center pins and
push them only part way into the receptacles. You may find that you will have to
apply the same treatment to the grounds
of channel A or you may find that you will
have to disconnect one or more of the
bonds. I would rather see you try the cable
grounds first, though. This procedure
should eliminate the hum.
playing records. In other words,
tape from one reel
Start out by engineering a mechanical transport to move three hyperbolic
over
to another, tracking accurately within /5000 inch
to hold flutter
heads at 3 -3/4 and 7 -1/2 ips. Tape must run very smooth
rewind with a deand wow below 0.2 %. Provide high speed- take -up and
without snapping or
pendable brake system to stop the tape instantly
stop, pause control,
stretching. Add tape lifters, counter, automatic
section. Decueing. Connect a fool -proof record interlock to the amplifier
a 30- 18,000 cps
sign separate amplifiers for recording and playback with recording. Profrequency range and facilities to monitor the tape while
of 55DB with
vide a bias /erase frequency of 95KC, signal -to -noise ratio
VU meters,
total harmonic distortion not to exceed %. Include calibrated
inputs, mike inputs,
stereo -mono switch, AB monitor switch, high level /playback controls
record
amp outputs, monitor outputs and independent
compact enclosure
for each channel. Package the entire assembly into a
cooling and cover with a
no larger than 13 x 13 x 7 ", provide forced air
decorator styled stainless steel panel.
1
1
IF YOU DON'T FEEL QUITE UP TO MAKING YOUR OWN
TAPE RECORDER, ASK YOUR NEAREST VIKING DEALER
ABOUT THE-
88 STEREO
COMPACT
Hear the magnificent sound,
see the smooth action, all
set and ready to take home
for less than $340.00.
Walnut base $29.95 extra.
V.ir-11-Ming
MADE BY SKILLED AMERICAN CRAFTSMEN AT
OF
MINNEAPOLIS'
9600 Aldrich Ave S. Minneapolis, Minnesota, 55420
429 N.Miami Beach. Florida, U.S.A.
CENTRAL & SOUTH AMERICA:ManRep Corp.. P.O. Boa
Minneapolis. Inc.. 9600 Aid.ic,, Av. S. Minneapolis, M,nn., U.S.A.
OVERSEAS EXPORT: international Division Viking of
Circle 136 on Reader Service Card
4
Selection of High Fidelity Equipment
Q. From the enclosed list, could you
please tell me what is generally considered
to be the finest audio equipment available
for inclusion in a home music system?
Clifton Wright, San Diego, California.
a num( Following this, the reader listed
ber of brand names under each of amplifiers, preamps, tuners, tonearms, cartridges,
turntables, tape recorders, and loudspeaker
systems.)
A. I have been asked this question many
times, so have decided that I shall print
one such inquiry in AunrocLINIC at this
time.
From experience I have learned that a
system which I might select for my own
personal use might well not be suited to
the needs of other audio buffs. Paul Jones
might well select a system which you
would not like; you might select a system
that Paul Jones might not
o n page 61)
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
A Fisher
receiver is greater
than the sum of
its components.
In the 440 -T, Fisher engineering has also achieved a
new degree of reliability in transistorized components.
Conservatively rated silicon output transistors permit
higher undistorted power and long, trouble -free operation. Damaging heat has been designed out. The
receiver can be operated at full power, hour after hour,
without harm. You can even short the speaker leads
without causing damage. Adjustments and alignments
have been practically eliminated, so that the 440 -T will
operate as perfectly after two years as on the first day.
In spite of its technical sophistication (just look at
the specs!), the 440 -T is so simple to operate that even
your wife will enjoy using it from the very first day.
Masses and messes of wire are gone; you simply connect a pair of fine speakers and turn on the music.
It is this total approach to integrated design that
makes the 440 -T more than just the sum of a tuner, an
amplifier and a control center. And that is why it is an
unprecedented buy at $329.50. (Cabinet, $24.95.)
Features and Specifications
Fisher has always maintained that an all -in -one receiver can equal or surpass the performance of separate
components of similar circuitry. And at far lower cost.
The most recent and eloquent proof of this is the
new 440 -T, the first all- solid -state stereo receiver of
Fisher quality under $330.
On a single chassis occupying only I63/4 inches of
shelf space and only 11 inches front to back, the 440 -T
incorporates a sensitive FM- stereo tuner with automatic mono -stereo switching, an extremely versatile
stereo control -preamplifier, and a heavy -duty stereo
amplifier. All transistorized, all with Fisher reliability.
By eliminating duplication of parts and circuits,
such as extra power supplies and the low -impedance
circuitry usually associated with connecting cables, the
440 -T actually has a plus factor of reliability over separate components. Obviously, fewer parts mean fewer
trouble spots. But that isn't all. Hum and noise are
more easily reduced to imperceptible levels. And critical preamplifier and power circuits operate at their
electrical best. Elimination of other unnecessary parts,
such as extra chassis, jacks, knobs, etc., clearly means
a considerable cost saving.
Tuner Section:
4-gang transistor front end; 4 IF stages;
STEREO BEACON.;
automatic stereo switching; sensitivity, 2.03 limiters;
µv (IHF); stereo separation, 35 db; S/N (100% mod.), 68 db; selectivity,
50 db; capture
ratio, 2.2 db.
Amplifier Section:
Silicon output transistors; short circuit protection; speaker
selector
switch (main or aux.); front -panel
jack; music power
(1HF), 4-ohms, 70 watts; harmonic headphone
and
1M distortion, 0.8 %; frequency response (overall), 20- 22,000 cps ± 1.5 db; hum
and noise,
80 db; input sensitivity, phono magnetic (low),
4.5 mv; stereo separation, phono magnetic, 50 db.
Size: 163/4" wide x 5V8" high x 123/x" deep (including knobs
and
heat sink).
Weight: 21 pounds.
eo
FREE! $2.00 VALUE! Mail this coupon for
your free copy of The New Fisher Handbook.
This entirely new, revised and enlarged edition
of the famous Fisher high fidelity reference
guide is a magnificent 80 -page book. Detailed information on all Fisher components is included.
Fisher Radio Corporation
I
-40 45th Road,
Long Island City, N. Y. 11101
1
The Fisher
440-T
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
s`°#
°`
Name__
Address
City
State
Circle 107 on Reader Service Card
5
SPECIAL
FREE OFFER
irony
ÍaIU11WJØ
We Please a Musician
Sm:
in the
Many thanks for Harold Lawrence's ABOUT MUSIC reading
just
October issue. Absolutely delicious! It kept me up,
and re- reading it. What fun!
ABRAHAM CHASENS,
200 East 78th Street,
New York, N.Y. 10021
And Displease an Engineer
Sm:
other magaThere are frequent references in Aunro ' ( and
to be that
seem
might
implication
zines) to "rms power." The
and that
the specification is as opposed to "average power," as is the
value,
"average"
the
than
greater
is
the "rms" value
be an attempt
case for voltage and current. Or possibly it may
from "short-time
to distinguish "continuous sine-wave power"
sine -wave power" or "program power."
of rms
As your technical editor should know, the product
power,
average
the
is
current
potential difference and rms
rms values
not "rms" power. ( After all, the whole reason for value of
"effective"
is to provide, for a sinusoidal wave, an
as for a
voltage and current such as to give the same power current.)
and
voltage
of
d.c. circuit having the same value
in an
"When one speaks of `the' power supplied to a device (rms)
`effective'
The
meant.
is
power
the
average
a.c. circuit,
power has no significance."'
prevent possible
A little more care on this matter would
confusion, especially to the lay reader.
JOHN G. MCKNIGHT,
Staff Engineer,
Ampex Corporation
P.O. Box 1168,
Los Gatos, California
16
AUDIO, see: C. V. Campos, KLH
review,
Product
July;
6,
p.
and 4 -ohm speakers,
Mattes ad,
August; Harvard Electronics ad, p. 85, August;
against
p. 37, August; K. F. Russell, "Protecting loudspeakers
Sept.
47,
p.
ad,
Kenwood
Sept.,
36,
p.
overload,"
Physics," AdF. W. Sears and M. W. Zemansky, "University
1955, 2nd
Mass.,
Reading,
Inc.,
Co.,
dison- Wesley Publishing
ed. p. 680.
'For a few examples in
Two Stereo Speakers
Worth $9900
To introduce the superb Tandberg MINI -SPEAKER Model
free of
113 Stereo Loudspeakers, you will receive a pair
Recorder.
Tape
74B
Model
Tandberg
a
charge when you buy
purA numbered certificate given to you at the time of your
chase, together with your guarantee card, should be forwarded
direct
to us. Upon receipt, we'll ship two MINI -SPEAKERS
free of any additional cost.
The new Tandberg MINI- SPEAKER has been specifically
MINI designed to provide a high fidelity response. The
cabinet.
SPEAKER is housed in an attractive teakwood
IMPEDANCE: 4 ohms
OUTPUT: 8 watts
2"
TWEETER:
WOOFER: 6.5"
cps
FREQUENCY RESPONSE: 60- 16,000
x9 "deep
MINI -SPEAKER DIMENSIONS: 7" Iongx9" high
better,
The Tandberg Model 74B Tape Recorder offers you
to get
where
clearer, more natural sound. If you don't know
list.
dealer
for
your Tandberg Model 74B, write us
31, 1965.
This special free offer begins Oct. 15 and expires Dec.
TANDBERG OF AMERICA,YORKINC.
10803
P.O. BOX
171
/
8
THIRD AVENUE
PELHAM. NEW
Circle 109 on Reader Service Card
Antenna Articles
Sm:
I am continually amazed over
the many yyears that I have
more coverage of antennas
been
not
has
there
that
read AUDIO
has become such a sigantenna
that
the
Now
and feed lines.
system from the point
stereo
nificant part of any good -quality
adequate signal
of view of discrimination between stations,
lack of coverage
the
interference,
multipath
and
strength,
could supplement
seems particularly noticeable. Perhaps you
antennas for FM,
the Product Issue by publishing a list of and related items.
cables and feed components, rotators, masts,
involved in
I would appreciate articles on the considerations
on FM/
effects
propagation
antennas,
installation of rotating
direcomnivarious
of
merits
stereo reception, and the relative
tional and rotating types.
JAMES O. SPRIGGS,
9903 Thornwood Road,
Kensington, Md. 20795
the listing, most any
to
As
articles.
such
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Ea.)
completely.
subject
mail -order catalog covers the
One on Us-and Everyone Else
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article item
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recogbeyond
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July
in
lator article
W. Q. COCHRAN,
Church Road,
R.D. #1, Box 35,
Hatfield, Pa. 19440
Circle 110 on Reader Service Card
AUDIO
6
NOVEMBER, 1965
NEWEST CONCEPT IN SPEAKER DESIGN
MAXIMUS
With CAPS ®(Cushioned
Air Pneumatic Suspension)
PACKS MORE SOUND IN SMALLER SPACE
THAN ANY OTHER SPEAKER SYSTEM!
ULTRA LOW DISTORTION
SPACE -SAVERS
ULTRA COMPACT
The MAXIMUS
sounds so
"alive"
-yet it's
so small you can hide
The MAXIMUS
I
you won't believe your
it on
a
shelf
and hardly know
Less than 3/4% distortion from 50 CPS to 35,000 CPS
it's there.
Less than 3% distortion at 30 CPS
The new UTC cushioned air pneumatic suspension design used in the MAXIMUS 7 speaker system brings the
Actual size:
101/2" x 51/2" x 73/4"
First of a new generation of Speaker Systems designed
depth and brilliance never before possible in a speaker for modern living. Delivers
system this size. Designed
for the new high powered Solid -State Receivers and Amplifiers
as well as present
tube components.
Only 101/2"'x 51/2" x 73/4"
fits everywhere . . , book shelf
,
end table
.
wall! True bass from the specially designed MAXIMUS
woofer, Exceptionally large 31/2
lb. magnet structure provides high acoustic
efficiency and power capability. Unique
L -C crossover network transfers power
at 1900 CPS to a newly developed backloaded mid -range /high frequency
Mid Treble linear
unit. Ideal for wide range mono
Response Direct
two for stereo. 45-20,000 CPS. DeRadiator
Delure 1900 Cyclx
signed for 8 to 16 ohms.
tc
...
..
..
hitherto unattainable ideal right to your unbelieving
ears. Extended bass response with swings of 3 to 75
watts at a distortion level that is less than three quarters of one per cent. This has never been attained
up to now, even in speaker systems five times the
price of the MAXIMUS 7, and all within a cabinet that
is one -third to one -fifth the size of comparable fine
speaker systems. The array of laboratory checked
components comprising this system includes a heavy 12"
pneumatic suspension woofer with a 91/2 lb. ceramic
magnet structure; two shielded back -loaded bi -polar
C105s00eNetwork
-
3- Biggest brother ...
but still only 18" x 123/4" x 10
the MAXIMUS Ill employs 4 MAXI MUS I woofers to give extraordinary
precise critical damping for perfect
transient response. Has 4 woofers
and 2 mid -range and high frequency
units. 30-20,000 CPS. 8 to 16 ohms
impedance.
Net Price $169.00
Massive CushonS
Air Pneumatic
Suspension
Distortion tree
Custom Acoustic
Woofer
Insulation
Extra Heavy Front
encapsulated .079
Custom Formed
Alloy Panel
Decorator Styled
Grill Cloth
"...
Snap -off
and Removable Grill Frame with
ALL NEW fully finished
Walnut Speaker Panel.
MAXIMUS 4
the MAXIM5S 4
MAXIMUS
5
MAXIMUS
6
-
literature and name of dealer nearest you write Dept.
eteatioe epegi.teefie.:T dot the sOeutdoi
15001
k:
Dome Lens
Multicellular
Horn Tweeter
s
1
0
So
100
20O
Sm
1000
2000
SOCO
IooOO
200
mid -treble wide dispers on lens radiators and a dome
fans compression type multicellular ultra high treble
horn. To complete this deluxe system, 3 -way LC crossovers are provided at 1800 and 8000 cycles coupled
to continuously variable mid and treble KONTOURED
controls to satisfy individual listening requirements. Unifdrm response from 25 to 35,000
cycles. Total distortion less than 3/4% from 50 to
35,000 cycles. Distortion at 30 cycles less than 3 %.
Impedance: 8 to 16 ohms. Size: 24" x 14" x 12 ".
Finished on all 6 sides, oiled walnut cabinet with airtight sealed enclosure and custom designed removable
decorator style grill.
Net Price $189.00
ACOUSTIC
Deluxe
Heavy Duty
1800 & 8000
12" Woofer
Cycle CC
Crossover Exclusive Acoustic
Netwoek
Contour Controls
The latest In creative design has been put into the Bookshelf
MAXIMUS
4. 5, 6
7. A new snap -off
grill so as to allow you to
select the rill panel to blend with your room decor. All Speakers are
Oiled Walnut finished on 6 sides. Impedance: 8 to 16 ohms.
-3
-
-3
-
the MAXIMUS 5
-Way Speaker System
Exceeds all extant laboratory standards for a low distortion popular priced space- saving speaker
system. It has high power capability, superb transient control,
exceptionally clean bass response in the critical region of 30 to 50 and
cycles.
It will handle 50 watts IHFM of audio music, and requires only
3 watts of
input drive to fill a large listening area with exciting sound. Features
a
CAPS woofer with a 5 lb. double duty ceramic magnet
structure. The
electrical crossover point as at 1800 and 5000 cycles through an LC
continuously variable KONTOURED ACOUSTIC control to 2 shielded back loaded mid -treble lens speakers. Response virtually flat from 30 to 20,000
cycles. Size: 24" x 14" x 12 ".
Net Price $129.00
the MAXIMUS 6
3-Way Speaker System features the newest 8- version in he family of CAPS woofers. The total inter -modulation
distortion
from 100 to 20,000 cycles is less than sh %. The distortion
at 40 cycles
is less than 3 %. The pneumatic suspension woofer
has an ultra efficient
Ib. double duty ring magnet structure with a total flux
31
of 17,000
gauss. At 1800 and 5000 cycles the audio drive is
transferred to 2
shielded back -loaded mid -range lens speakers. Incorporate
a continuously
variable KONTOURED ACOUSTIC control. Frequency response:
35 to 20.000
cycles. 40 watts IHFM. Size: 213/4" x 113/4" x 113/4 ".
Net Price $97.50
For complete
II
I
Net Price $59.50
the MAXIMUS
Mid -Treble
Unit With
Bi -polar Lens
1
the MAXIMUS 2
This middle-size
brother to the compact MAXIMUS 1
handles twice the power, extends
the bass range down to 35 CPS. It
measures only 141/2" x 11" x 8 ".
35- 20,000 CPS. 8 to 16 ohms.
Net Price $109.00
Custom
Acoustic
Insulation
.duriIw:n1
...
Air Staled
7
Bookshelf
3 -way Speaker System
ears...
All
-Way Speaker System
Boacts tremendous, vital,
uncanny bass, precise transient control, and virtual'y flat response
from
25 to 22,000 cycles. The CAPS woofer Will handle
75 watts of IHFM
music power and responds to high power excursions at less than
distortion. Requires only 3 watts of audio driving power to fill a 3/4%
large
listening area with superb sound. The MAXIMUS 6 utilizes a pneumatic
suspension woofer having a 91/2 lb. double duty ceramic magnet
structure, two shielded back -loaded wide dispersion bipolar mid -treble lens
speakers, and 3 -way LC crossovers at 1800 and 800D cycles with
continuously variable mid -treble KONTOURED ACOUSTIC
controls for
acoustic listening requirements. Size: 24" x 14" x 11 ". Net Priceindividual
$169.50
UTC SOUND DIVISION
809 Stewart
Ave., Garden City, New York
116 lIT U\TENING
Chester Santon
Carousel (Lincoln Center Original Cast)
fully utilize the listening capabilities of your audience! Scientists for
RCA Victor LSO 1114
Now you can
years have investigated and tabulated the
various phenomena that make people want
to listen. These findings come under the
broad category of psycho-acoustics. Now
Fairchild has harnessed many of these
findings and incorporated them into a line
of unique world- renown audio control
devices which produce a sound easier to
listen to and easier to perceive ... in short
a bright, crisp, lively sound which keeps
your audience listening. This is the sound
you need to help you sell your station to
your audience and to your sponsors.
THE DYNALIZER
full
the Psycho- acoustic way to achieve bright,
bodied easy -to- listen -to, easy-to- perceive station
fresound. The Dynalizer contours your station's
capquency response to fully utilize the listening
abilities of your audience. Makes your station
sound really big, big, big even on the smallest
pockat receivers.
a
THE CONAX
the world -accepted way to control high frequency
spillovers in FM due to preemphasis. Lets your
station maintain real high levels even with brass
and crashing cymbals and still avoid FCC citations.
THE REVERBERTRON
the new compact
reverberation system
which gives your sta-
.j
tion that real big
voice. With the Reverbertron you can
have that Carnegie
Hall effect as close as
the gain control on the Reverbertron. And there's
the added plus of an increase in apparent loudness of your station sound due to reverberation,
as originally described by Dr. Maxfield.
For complete details on psycho -acoustic sound
the pacemaker in
that sells write to Fairchild
-
professional audio products.
FAIRCHILD
RECORDING EQUIPMENT CORPORATION
10-40 45th Ave., Long Island City 1, N. Y.
Some fine productions have been
mounted at Lincoln Center's State Theatre but this treatment of "Carousel" is
one of the best. Since Richard Rodgers is
the president and producing director of
the State Theatre, his shows are bound to
get a more than proper revival. Knowing
this, I still wasn't quite prepared for the
beautifully finished production of "Carousel" this recording reveals. This particular
Rodgers and Hammerstein show has always
been a favorite of mine ever since I firs" t
saw it on Broadway some nineteen or
twenty years ago. The songs defy aging
and the presence of John Raitt in the cast
of this revival album preserves a great deal
of the continuity because he created the
leading role of Billy Bigelow in the first
production. His performance of twenty
years ago was voted the best by an actor
in a musical show by the New York Drama
Critics Circle and the Donaldson Award
Committee. Raitt has kept in touch with
the show over the years in summer stock.
With a voice that shows no signs of wear
or strain, he is still the ideal Billy Bigelow.
The supporting cast has been meticulously
groomed down to the last syllable of what
passes for a Maine dialect on the Broadway
stage. There isn't a flaw in the treatment
of the major songs with today's microphones (and master tape) getting every
word of the lyrics along with conductor
Franz Allers' perceptive exploration of orchestral nuance. Until now, I've felt that,
over -all, Capitol has had the most rewarding version of Carousel on records in their
soundtrack album starring Gordon MacRae.
RCA's Lincoln Center release easily
matches the performance of the older version while surpassing it by a comfortable
margin in the sound department. Perhaps
the most heartening note in this new album
is the very healthy state of affairs in the
American musical theatre as revealed by
companies in and out of New York still devoting themselves to Broadway classics.
The Guitars
of
Los Indios Tabajaras
RCA Victor LSP 3413
Those harboring the notion that they've
heard everything that could be done 'with
a guitar were somewhat surprised by the
first record featuring these two Indian
brothers from the iungles of Brazil. Their
talent is a remarkable one and it's a pleasure to note that the latest dice by Los
12 Forest Ave., Hastings-on- Hudson, N.Y.
Circle 154 on Reader Service Card
8
Indios gives that talent a chance to be
heard in improved sound. The appeal of
this duo is based on several factors, all of
them revealed in fine- grained detail in this
recording. The instruments themselves are
exceptionally full in voice, even at the low
level used by Los Indios in their relaxed
stylings of South American and local favorites. Perhaps the most noteworthy accomplishment of these self-taught members
of Northern Brazil's Tabajaras tribe is the
fresh approach they bring to even the most
familiar of American tunes. Their rhythm
and beat seems guided by a rock -steady
gyroscope unavailable to our own purveyors of pleasant background music. The
months they've already spent in American
show business haven't dulled a unique gift
in music making and complicated arrangements will probably never interest them.
Lena Horne: Feelin' Good
United Artists UAS 6433
This is Lena Home's first appearance on
the UA label. Some of her fans, this reviewer among them, may wonder what is
going to happen to Miss Home's earlier
albums in the catalog now that she has
switched from one major label to another.
It has not escaped the notice of record fans
over the years that drastic measures are
sometimes taken by a label once a fairly important artist leaves its ranks. The usual
retaliation is the unceremonious yanking
of the artist's previous releases from the
pages of the current catalogs on the part of
the "deserted" record company. If the artist happened to 'work for several outfits of
similarly petty attitude prior to his present
employment, he can suddenly find himself
with only one album listed in the catalog
stead of the half dozen he recently had
there. It is hard to believe that Lena
Home's outstanding albums made for RCA
Victor will be discontinued by that firm
solely on the basis of this debut United
Artists release. Lena is still in fine voice
hut many of the songs in this new album
lust don't have the stature of the hones in
her Victor discs, many of which featured
sound that was exceptional for its day. In
terms of lasting musical apnea], Side 2 of
her latest album outshines the first side 1wv
a considerable margin. It would take a lot
of doing to convince me that the three
songs by Anthony Newley and Leslie Bricusse heard early in this program are anywhere in the same league with "Willow
Weep for Me" or "Hello Young Lovers"
from The King and I. Lena Home takes a
sensible bit of noetic license in reversing
the lyrics of 'Girl from Inanema" in order
(Continued on page 74)
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
feature by feature
lmpíre components
rave achieved the most
ignificant advance in
tereophonic reproduction.
isten for a moment.
AIPIRE
TROUBADOR RECORD PLAYBACK AND GRENADIER SPEAKER SYSTEMS
CIRCLE NUMBER 108 ON READER SERVICE CARD
other cartridge can repro
duce the entire musical range a
precisely and with such clarit
An important fact to note is tha
Middle C on the music spe
No
sings! It absorbs! It feels! It
aptures every sound, caresses
very note. The new Empire
88P cartridge is the pulse of
our entire music system. Listen
o its unbelievable frequency reponse that spans the complete
)rchestral spectrum one full ocave above and below the funda-
BASSOON
KETTLE DRUM
trum producing 261.6 vibration
per second, can be struck o
¡P
FRENCH HORN
nental range of any musical
nstrument or of any harmonic
VIOL
N
:ontent it can possibly generate.
BASS VIOL
OBE
``
PIANO
!!!WJII !W
!!!WUU!fiWDWU
HARMONIQS
FUNDAMENTALS
- --
FREQUENCY RESPONSE
5
10
50
100
500
1000
PIRE 888P CARTRIDGE
2000
5000
FREQUENCY IN CYCLES PER SECOND
r19,r, i r nii Ir.e,RrR
RFAnFR SFRVICE CARO
10000
20000 50000
piano, blown on a horn or bowel
on a violin. The characteristi
sound of each is determined b
the fundamental vs. harmoni
balance. Failure to produce th
lowest fundamental or the hig
est harmonic frequency lose
the subtle nuances of the mu!
cal note. The new Empire 888
keeps every note "in true chE
acter" from the lowest B of th
contra bassoon to the highest
of the piccolo.
The 888 series is a cartridg
with instinct. It can pick up
sound as low as 8.15 cps -wher
the sense of feeling occurs k
fore the sense of hearing, or E
high as 40,000 cps, well beyor
the normal range of hearir
The new Empire 888 series ci
tridge makes your records con.
alive.
WEST DISTORTION OF ANY
CARTRIDGE
attack square wave with
Empire 888P
Vertical tracking angle vs. distortion
ally straight rising time,
j slight overshoot
and near
. rfect damping (less than
1
cycle of ringing) testify to the
low distortion of the new Empire
888P even while tracking as low
as '/ gram.
sic. Every instrument, every note
creates a sense of presence. It
is a cartridge designed not only
for the appreciation of the music
lover, but in appreciation of music. See your Hi Fi dealer today
and hear the difference. No
other cartridge says it as clearly
as the new Empire 888, 888P, or
the 888PE. They're all alive!
ED
EMPIRE 888 CARTRIDGE SERIES
,I S
PATENT
*2875282
CONE* STYLUS
etic cone* fead
hollow tube,
k, and a hand pol-
Jr-,S
1000 CYCLE/ SEC. SQUARE WAVE
888P
-5
0
+5 +10 +15 +20 +25 +30 +3
Vertical tracking angle in degrees
SHOWS NO FAVORITISM
The 888P gives you razor sharp
ond stylus. The enstereo separation (more than 30
Ire 888P cartridge
DB) over a frequency spectrum
my 7 grams -the ideal There are no foreign noises with of 10 octaves. Instruments don't
dge weight for modern the Empire 888P cartridge. Per- waver. The only sound you hear
pliance requirements.
fect magnetic balance and is of exact depth and dimension
ie lightest, most rugged mov- doubly shielded with a signal to of your recording.
Ig mechanism ever developed.
noise ratio of 80 DB, it instantly The new Empire 888P is, in
)ck it...smack it...rock it... provides clarity and coherent reality, a living cartridge. It is
id then play it. You can't harm musical sound. It was designed vibrant, a precise mechanism
le new Empire 888P or your for ideal 15 degree vertical
that from its first contact with a
!.cords.
tracking.
record, produces a world of mu-
Model
888
883P
Frequency
Response
1224,000
cps
10- 28.000
Compliance
10
o
10,
cm /dyne
Stylus
Type
mil
Diamontl
Price
51985
.7
cps
15
a
10,
cm /dyne
mil Hand
Polished
Diamond
.6
$21.95
I
888PE
8- 30,000
cps
20 8
10,
cm /dyne
ei- Ratlial
Elliptical
Diamond
1.2X.9
$32.95
World's most perfect high fidelity components.
For complete literature write:
Empire Scientific Corp., 845
Stewart Ave., Garden City, N.Y.:
Canada: Empire Scientific Corp.
LTD.,1476 Eglington W.,Toronto.
The new Empire 888P cartridge
ACTUAL SIZE
The Incomparable Troubadors.
World's most perfect record playback s,
The Famous Empire 398. Outstanding! too perfectly engineered for even
awhisperof distortion.. .to handsomely
finished to hide behind cabinet doors.
The new Empire 498 no larger
than a record changer -tailor made for
console or equipment cabinets.
Both Troubadors set a new standard in playback equipment. In fact,
more Empire Playback equipment is
used by FM Stereo Stations than any
other brand. No wonder equipment
reviewers, professionals and audiophiles the world over acclaim the
Troubadors as the best money can buy.
(1) Audio Magazine: "Precise performance. .. an excellent buy for those
who want the quality...we tried to induce acoustic feedback by placing the
turntable on top of our large speaker
system and turning up the gain -we
were unsuccessful."
(2) American Record Guide (Larry
Zide) "I found speed variations -that is,
flutter and wow-to be inaudible...vibration extremely low....Total rumble
figures have not been bettered by any
turntable
I
have tested."
(3) Don Hambly, station mgr. KRE
Berkeley, Calif. "We have long
-FM,
AM
realized that belt driven tables would
be the best to use, but had not been
impressed with those on the market.
The Empire tables, however, have all
the basic requirements of design and
simplicity of operation and maintenance that we have sought."
Only Empire makes a completely
intergrated 3 speed "silent" record
playback system.
Its massive turntable is driven by
a
heavy duty
hysteresis- synchronous motor that provides a
constant speed regardless of current fluctuations. Only two moving parts, resilient nylon
"seat" supports and cushions the rest of the
main bearings. A continuous flexible belt (perfectly ground to a ±0001 inch thickness) also
contributes to its flawless performance.
SPEED
INCOMPARABLE
TROUBADORS
TABLE OF CONTENTS:
Highly accurate Fine Speed Control. Push button power control
with on -off light. Optimum distribution of turntable mass; 6
lb. heavy machined aluminum,
individually balanced to precise
concentricity;machined heavy
aluminum base plate.
Safety suspension rubber mat.
Retractable 45 RPM adapter.
Rumble better than 65 db. Wow
and
flutter
less than .05%.
Power: 117 volt, 60 cycles AC,
30 watts.
980 dynamically balanced playback arm with Dyna-lift; 888P
Living Cartridge with exclusive
magnetic cone stylus.
398 complete in handsome walnut base measures 17 "W x 15 "D
x 83/4 "H. Without base: height
above mounting board 4" depth
required below turntable base plate 21/2".
498 Troubador, complete in
handsome walnut base, measures 16 "W x 133/4 "D x 71/2 "H.
488 Troubador, complete with
walnut mounting board, measures 157/8 "W x 131/4 "D. Height
required above mounting board
23/4", depth required below turntable bass plate 31/2 ".
List Price: 398 Troubador with
walnut base $185.00.
List Price: 498 Troubador with
walnut base $170.00.
Less base $155.00.
l
RETRACTABLE
45 RP
PI.AYTE!
CV-_INDE
.
¡
vN M[111NT
A
AnDTher impressive
77
eat ure
SPINDLE
DOUBLE RIM
FI YWHEIE'¿
multiple-floating suspension sys
..em found only in the 498 anc
488) virtually assures stabulity
under any conceivable si'tuatior
ACOUSTIC
SUSPENSION
ISOLATION
OIL FEED
GROOVE
MICRO
HYSTERESIS SYNCHRONOUS MOTOR
EMPIRE
NYLON SUPPORT
EMPIRE SCIENTIFIC CORP.,
845 STEWART AVE., GARDEN CITY, N.Y.
CANADA: EMPIRE SCIENTIFIC CORP. LTD.
1476 EGLINGTON W., TORONTO
www.americanradiohistory.com
is
Emp're's sensational "Dvn2
mount" (vibration absorbing-
HONED BEARING WELL
DISTRIBUTED BY
ABOUT MUSIC
Harold Lawrence
Eine Grosse NachtmusikOutdoor Sound Reinforcement
THEY BEGAN ARRIYaNC about noon on
a hot August day, carrying picnic
baskets, thermos bottles, blankets,
beach chairs, and portable radios. By six
o'clock, thousands had gathered in front
of the acoustical shell, watching the newcomers tiptoe across the bodies in search
of a bit of earth. The place: Sheep Meadow
in Central Park, unfamiliar even to most
native taxi drivers, but soon to become
famous to all New Yorkers. By 8:30, some
73,000 people had poured into the area,
filling every available plot of grass, and
ovetflowing onto the sidewalks of Central
Park West. They had come to hear the
first of twelve free concerts by the New
York Philharmonic. Nearly half a million
eventually turned out for the series, a larger
audience than that for which the Philharmonic performs during an entire indoor
season. It was easily the biggest musical
news of the summer. For Christopher Jaffe,
the designer of the mobile shell that housed
the orchestra, it was more than that.
When it became clear that the place
was going to be overrun, officials of the
Philharmonic, who had expected a small
turnout, were exultant- Jaffe was worried.
He looked out over the sea of reclining
bodies and shook his head. "It's staggering!
We were prepared for a maximum attendance of 15,000. Now our shell and sound
system will have to reinforce a symphony
orchestra over an area of a quarter of a
mile. This is going to be interesting."
At 8 p.m. Jaffe made a last- minute tour
of inspection. His four -unit 36 -ton shell
(named "Minnie" after Mrs. Charles Guggenheimer, founder of the Lewisohn Stadium Concerts) looked steady enough. It
had taken a team of twelve men ten hours
to erect it. Each of the units rests on a
trailer 43 feet by 9 feet, and is 13;2 feet
tall. 'When the trailers are in position, the
frame of the shell is raised hydraulically
and leveled by transit measurement to a
tolerance of 14th of an inch. "After the rainfall we had yesterday," Jaffe remarked,
"we were afraid our grass pods would
sink unevenly into the ground; fortunately
they remained stable."
Jaffe approached a group of men hovering over a mixing console to the left of the
stage. "The mixer is manufactured by
North American Philips and feeds six Bozak
Concert Column speakers placed on the top
of the shell. We have eight microphones
out there, all AKG C -60's set to cardioid
patterns: three on the grass and three
flying-these pick up the orchestra-and
two more to cover the chorus and soloists
in the Finale of the Beethoven Ninth.
Now here's the rub: the 600 watts of solid state power we have was designed to
reach some 15,000 people, not four or
five time that number."
Joined by conductor Maurice Peress,
we moved out into the now darkened
field. Starting about 500 feet from the
stage, we began to walk from left to right
across the Sheep Meadow. William Steinberg was conducting Wagner's Prelude to
Die Meistersinger. Jaffe raised the walkietalkie to his lips: "How do you read me,
Gordon ?" "Loud and clear. Can you hear
me ?" A few music lovers shot annoyed
glances in our direction. As we picked our
way through the unusually quiet and attentive audience, Jaffe fired off instructions to his crew. "Bring up flying mike
number three and soloist mike number
eight one point each." "I'm not reading
Fig. 1. View of
Sheep
Meadow
in Central Park
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
you, Chris," came the reply, smack in the
middle of a soft passage in the score. Outraged looks and much shushing from disturbd listeners. Jaffe abbreviated the
message: "Eight and three up one point."
Suddenly the music grew louder. "It's
as if we walked into something," said
Peress. "Sounds like a 10 -dB jump," Jaffe
agreed, then turned to his walkie- talkie:
"Ask Paul Stone to take his screw driver
and go into the amplifier deck and cut
back the center amp from full to five . . .
That's better." Similar adjustments were
made throughout the concert as we stumbled over the figures in the dark. Before
the program was over, it was plain that
the shell- speaker system was inadequate
for the throng. Beyond approximately 400
feet, one had had to strain to hear soft
passages. Happily, the audience couldn't
care less. Along the outer fringes of the
crowd, people tuned in to the local radio
station picking up the concert.
What of Jaffe's fiber glass shell and
sound amplification system? "Under the
circumstances, it was hardly a disaster.
But now we knew what to expect. We
added four more Bozaks, along with amplifiers to drive them, bringing the total
to ten speakers. This made it possible for
us to reduce the levels at which we operated the mixer, to cut down on distortion,
and to spread out more sound. And speaking of spread, we selected these column
speakers because of their excellent front to -rear level control. The level differential
from stage to 400 feet was only 6 dB. In
addition, the side -to -side distribution of
sound varied only 3 dB on all readings
taken in a perimeter arc at 400 feet. With
other speakers, the sound up front would
have approached the threshold of pain."
Have you considered the use of tape delay techniques to improve distribution?
"We'll probably experiment next year with
speakers out in the audience at 400 -500
feet and out.
Jaffe was exhausted by his ordeal of
one -night stands. Just as he began to adjust to conditions in one place, he had to
tear down, fold the huge segments of his
shell into their respective trailers, and
drive on to the next park. After Sheep
Meadow, the Philharmonic played to more
than 350,000 more people in Prospect
Park, Brooklyn; Crocheron Park, Queens;
Botanical Gardens, Bronx; Clove Lakes
Park, Staten Island; and back again to
some of these locations. Logistics, sound
distribution, and the mechanical problems
of mounting and demounting the shell
were not the only things Jaffe had to contend with. Up, the shell became a structure in the eyes of the Building Department and had to pass inspection; down, it
was a caravan of trailer trucks, each of
which had to meet the requirements of
the Department of Highways.
Jaffe and his team of engineers at Stage
Craft Corporation are still reeling from the
experience. Recalling his feelings on opening night, Jaffe said: "I kept watching
ever -increasing hordes of people arriving
at Sheep Meadow. As they poured in, I
began to understand how the Union troops
felt at Gettysburg when Pickett's men
started their charge. Fortunately for the
Union and the Philharmonic, neither of
Æ
us ran."
13
AUDIO
M.
Edward Tatnall Canby
AUDIO ENGLISH
IN THE LONG, dreary stretches of summer
vacation, when audio is quiescent, in
front of the scenes ( though not behind), when the spring announcements are
over, and the fall announcements haven't
got past the air conditioners yet, when our
editorial staff is smitten by enormous reams
of new-product data, in anticipation of the
annual New Products issue ( See AUDIO
for August) -I sometimes find myself turning to the oddest aspects of audio, in my
boredom with all the inactivity going on
around me. Like, say, the pronunciation of
the English language as it comes in over
my high -rise FM antenna.
Don't tell me that audio (in this particular form ) isn't changing our lingo! Some
say that the 'teen agers are responsible.
Yesterday, cool meant formal and distant,
like a diplomat. "He got a cool reception." And before that, it merely referred
to the weather. Cool. Now, the 'teen -agers
have managed to air -condition the word
"hot" as we -all once knew it, and so "hot"
is now "cool ". Remember -how we used
to say, "Boy, that's a hot one!" OK -just
try reforming yourselves, and repeat, after
me, "Like it's cool, man!" Thus, you see,
hot becomes cool, and boy becomes man.
Simple.
It's not so simple in the world of audible
audio. It isn't really so much what you say,
as how you say it. Which syl-abble you
ac -cent. And which word, in the sentence
-if it is a sentence. I remember some prefatory symptoms of change back in my early
FM days when I first learned what it was
to write deathless prose for announcers to
read out loud on the air.
Next Sunday
We had one program, for instance, that
came twice a week, say Wednesdays and
Sundays at nine o'clock. It had a standard
opening and close, ending with the inevitable `Be sure to listen again next Sunday
evening"
. etc.
The trouble was that on Wednesdays,
the announcer was supposed to say "next
Sunday," accenting the day, and on Sundays he would have to say, of course,
"next Sunday," accenting the "next". Common sense. But not until I wrote out a
separate script for each day, with the
proper words heavily underlined, could I
persuade the announcers to read that little
passage right. They were too busy listening to the sweet sounds of their own handsome voices to bother about sense.
Nevertheless, broadcasting people do
work hard on pronunciation, and their
1
4
spoken product is heard by millions, including 'teen agers. If the young fry originate most of our slang, then the broadcasting fraternity
backed by Heaven
knows which "authoritative" dictionaries
have the last word on all of us, ever so
definitely -for what they say is what we
hear; and what we hear on the air, in the
long pull, is likely to be what we'll be
saying ourselves one of these days. Enormous influence.
With this in mind, I began awhile back
to make a collection of odd usages I heard
on the air. Not formally, like in a card file.
Most of my "research" has been jotted
down on a batch of convenient Shredded
Wheat separators -which, by the way, I
recommend as the only pure -white blank
cardboard I've ever seen in a commercial
product. No ads, no contests, no coupons.
just blanks. (Apparently he hasn't had any
lately. Mine now come three in a "poor
quality" paper package, and four packages
to the box. Maybe he buys the newer
brand of Shredded Wheat. ED.) So, with
Shredded Wheat cards before me, I now
give you the New Look in audio English,
right out of FM stereo and TV, the linguistic horses' mouths.
-
-
Temper At You Were
1. Of course everybody knows what the
temper-at-you -were is. That's what I said.
"The temper -at- you -were is eighty-five degrees." Five separate syllables. So if you
are in the habit of saying "Temprachrr"
forget it. Learn correct audio English.
2. Then there's that basic institution of
advertising life, the fam- ill -lee. Or rather,
the hole - fam -ill -ee. Nobody in his right
mind, off the air, would ever say anything
but famlee, or even famblee. But on the
air the entity invariably known as the hole fam -ill -lee comes complete in four big syllables.
3. Institutional and scientific English
has developed a fine new broadcast pronunciation all for itself. Take the wind, for
instance. There once was a poetic way of
referring to wind, involving the direct approach. You talked right to the wind itself. Remember this one: "Blow, blow,
thou winter wind, thou art not so unkind
as man's ingratitude. "? ( Have I got it
right?)
Nowadays most of us would speak more
prosaically. "Th' wind's from the West "
we'd say. And we'd say it correctly, too.
The rules tell us we're supposed to pronounce the as thee only before a vowel.
And a then becomes an. Thee apple, an
orange.
Before all consonants, the is correctly
pronounced thuh -or was until now. An
is similarly uh. Thuh peach, uh pear. Peter
Piper picked uh peck of pickled peppers.
But broadcast science has now decided
otherwise. On the scientific air, now, it is
ALWAYS thee. And ay, to rhyme with
may. Says the weather man: thee -wind
blows straight out of thee -South and aystorm is approaching thee -coastline. Very
precise and professional sounding. Can't
you just hear the science announcer on
TV asking us, ever so solemnly, "Now why
did Peter Piper pick ay peck of pickled
peppers ?"
4. That's not the end of scientific talk style on the air. All the uh vowels, all the
rest, of any sort, have now been turned into ee vowels. I took down dozens of examples on my Shredded Wheat list, right
off the air. We have, for instance, something called the ee- lectric ee- conomy, in
my part of the country. And then there's
the ee- lapsed time in the ee-leventh ee -vent
of some sports affair. Highly unscientific
if you ask me. Ee -gods! Where will it all
end.... I mean, where will it all ee -ventuate?
Ex -peuht
5. Another interesting subversion of the
language is the old-fashioned misplaced
syllable, in a brand new ee-volution. The
principle is age -old. Whatever syllable accent is officially correct, you change to another syllable. Thus cigarettes -to rhyme
with Rockettes -long ago changed into cigrets, pronounced cig -r`ts. Now that the
broadcast side of audio has taken up this
principle, things are happening all over
the place.
I was shocked to hear one announcer
speak of a the -ay -ter. I thought that was
something for the small -town farmer. Next
came, instead of Mus- ee -um, the altered
new form, Mew -zeeum. Well, I could let
that pass I suppose -but one that kills me
is that old-fashioned word expert. Evidently the new laws of the air say that when
expert is an adjective, it is to be pronounced ex- peuht. So now you go to your
local living insurance agent (what -life insurance, Never heard of it.) and from him
you ree -ceive ex -peuht advice.
Even the British are going haywire on
audible syllabification. In one imported
BBC news tape I discovered that the old
familiar looker-on, i.e., the spectator, no
longer leans back on his first syllable -spectator -but now balances himself on the
middle one -spec -tay -tor. At least that's the
way BBC says it in reference to the worthy
weekly newspaper of that name, The
Spectator.
The nuttiest one yet under this category,
though, is an American broadcast item
that I picked up one day with utter incredulity. It was the familiar word which means
"think about ", and looks in print this way:
consider. The announcer flummoxed me
by saying, as calmly as a cu-cumb -erCON-skier.
Yeah, yeah! As the bible has it, CONsider the lilies of the field. CON-sider my
eye! It'll be a long time before I'll CON sider that one as part of my way of talking.
6. Then there's the Vanishing Y. That's
a dizzy one. The special word where this
(Continued on page 62)
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
á
4 important ways
different...
It's efficient...ideal for use with moderate
power amplifiers and receivers. W30 doesn't
need powerful amplifiers to fill highly absorbent rooms with impressive sound.
2. Sounds good because it is all there -rich,
musical bass, full -bodied articulate midrange, bright clear-toned treble. W30 produces
this kind of satisfying sound because it doesn't
eliminate the mid -range in order to create an
aural impression of bass and treble; nor does
it bump up the mid -range to provide the illusion of presence.
3. It preserves definition and full -range re1.
presents the
1
I
sponse at
141
all levels.
W30 will not distort at high levels; nor will it
fade into an indiscernible sound played at low
levels. This is because the system is built entirely of genuine Wharfedale components,
renowned for the uncompromising quality designed into them by England's G. A. Briggs.
4. It provides an entirely new technique for
complete acoustical correction of both the
treble and mid ranges, on a frequency dis-
crimination basis.
The W30 Acoustic Compensation Control
doesn't resort to a simple resistor or potentiometer which merely attenuates the tweeter
for only partial adjustment to room acoustics.
-
This is how the Acoustic Compensation
Circuit operates
Switch in "FULL" position:
c nossover network functions as conventional
section LC circuit, permitting speaker sysnt to operate unencumbered through entire
audio spectrum. "FULL " position is suggested
I or "normal" living room acoustic environment having upholstered furniture, wall -towall carpeting, window drapery. It will also
best satisfy listeners who prefer a "lively"
sound to their music, projecting instruments
and vocalists into the room.
2
i
e
Switch in "DE- EMPHASIS" position:
Permeable compression
barrier, equalizes
font and rear
radiation impedance
Cast basket for
lifelong adherence
of critical
relationship between
moving voice coil
and magnetic gap..
2- section LC network
new acoustic
compensation control
that adjusts both
mid and high
frequencies; preserves
., plus
High efficiency tweeter,
uses heavy Alcomax
magnet and low mass
aluminum voice coil;
produces clear,
clean treble
to prevent axial
excursion distortion;
also improves
power handling
capacity and
speaker damping.
New Flexiprene
surround on
definition and range
8" woofer
for high
compliance,
tow resonance.
regardless of
listening level.
to inaudibility.
Reduces reflections, echoes and reverberation
which generally distort the reproduction of
music where acoustical conditions may be
described as "hard surfaced." This position
k tlso suggested for persons who prefer a
mellow, subdued type of sound, but without,
loss of musical timbre, definition or range.
Unlike simple resistors or variable potent
tiometers, which attenuate all frequencies
equally, the W30 acoustic compensation is
frequency discriminating, and is applied both
to mid -range and treble response for preservation of true musical balance. While an alteration in speaker characteristics is apparent
in thé "DE-EMPHASIS" position, the change
is not exaggerated because there is no noticeable loss in frequency range and, therefore,
no loss of musical content.
In "DE-EMPHASIS" position, a shunt circuit, introduced into the crossover network...'
(1) permits bass frequencies to pass freely to the
woofer, but attenuates the
mid -range, starting at
about 500 cps and becoming more prominent above
1250 cps.
(See equivalent
Woofer diaphragm
of specially
Extra heavy
Alcomax magnet and
high excursion
voice coil, for
watts- saving
efficiency.
compounded long-fibred
wool and virgin pulp
Separate tweeter
enclosuré, prevents
mechanical coupling
between woofer and
tweeter; extends lower
frequency range,
reflexes rear wave
through slotted exits.
for enduring resilience,
distortion -free
response.
Cabinet tuning slots,
complements woofer
resonance for greater
linearity and range
Genuine walnut,
fine furniture styling
and finish; floating
True bookshelf dimensions:
Only 19" x 10" x 91/4" deep.
Oiled or Polished Walnut, $64.95..
Utility version in Sanded Birch, $63.95.
(Manufacturer's suggested list prices).
grille to prevent
resonance and
vibration buzz.
of bass response,
eliminates unnatural
one-note
"thump."
circuit.)
(2) attenuates treble energy to the tweeter from
1500 cps to approximately
6000 cps, becoming less effective from that point out
to 20,000 cps.
(See equivalent circuit.)
The net result is to produce a response'
envelope in which the range from 500 to
8000 cps is depressed approximately 3-4 db,
while attenuating the range from 8000 to
20,000 cps significantly less. This produces a
more linear and better balanced response than
systems which cut off tweeter response without regard for the relationship between frequency, hearing acuity and room absorption.
For Comparator Guide,
write Wharfedale, Division
British Industries Corp.,
Dept. WS-25.
Westbury,
New York 11591.
CIRCLE NO. 101 ON READER SERVICE CART
EDITOR'S REVIEW
Cr
and the show is closed!" Those
were probably the most welcome words heard
at the New York High Fidelity Music Show on
Sunday evening, October 3rd. All of us in the industry
look forward to the opening day for at least two
months prior to the event, and then all during the
show we look forward to the closing hour. Not that we
don't enjoy the contact with our respective "customers"
and with the other exhibitors who we see off and on
throughout the year perhaps a half dozen times, and
then every day during the show. That is what makes
the typical high fidelity show bearable -and to a great
extent, enjoyable. But in spite of all that, feet do tire
and throats do feel the strain of much talk.
Actually, in a magazine office we are likely to be
exposed to everything new as soon as -and often before
-it appears on the market, but there is no substitute
for actually seeing, hearing, and-in some cases -operating the new units. Thus we are still always curious
as to what is new.
We are pleased to be able to say that the over -all
sound quality did appear to be better this year than
last. With most of the exhibitors showing their latest
solid -state models, we observed with considerable satisfaction that the quality was uniformly better than it
was a year ago. That is, in itself, a distinct "plus" for
this year's show. Long -time readers will remember our
comments about the beauty of the decor of the shows
in Mexico, and more recently of the Festivals du Son
in Paris. This year it appeared that a number of the
exhibitors devoted more thought to the artistic appearance of their rooms. At the risk of offending some
exhibitors who continued in the old tradition of an
unornamented display of their equipment like what
IGHT O'CLOCK
Walter O. Stanton, President of the Institute of High Fidelity, congratulates Mr. Goddard Lieberson, President of
Columbia Records, on his "Golden Lyre" award at the industry banquet, September 28.
16
might be found in a small hi-fi dealers showroom, we
must give special mention to the displays of British
Industries Corporation, Stanton, Pickering, UTC
Sound, Empire, Harman -Kardon ( with its discotheque
atmosphere ) , Fisher, and a few others who apparently
endeavored to make their rooms decorative as well as
informative. Regrettably, most of the exhibits were
simply designed to display the products -and we must
admit that ours was one of them -with practically no
change from their appearance in 1964, or 1963 or 1962.
In our opinion; there is no good reason why a display
can not be attractively planned, attractively illuminated, and attractively decorated. We must also cite
Superscope, McIntosh, and J.B.L. for the over -all appearance of their exhibit rooms.
As was expected, there was a considerable interest
in the three home video recorders which were exhibited- Ampex, Norelco, and Sony, to list them in alphabetical order. From the standpoint of price, the Sony
is the least expensive, Ampex next, and Norelco the
highest. At the show, all appeared to offer about the
same quality of picture, but we do not feel that a show
is the right place to judge picture quality. But it must
be acknowledged that the VTR, or as Ampex calls it
HVR (home video recorder), appears to be the next
most important component on the agenda of the dyed in- the-wool enthusiast. More on this subject in future
issues, for we realize that the complete home entertainment package must provide for TV with high -fidelity
sound ( which is readily obtainable ) and video recording. We have long wondered why some enterprising
company did not provide a tuner with three bands
low TV -band sound, the FM band, and high TV -band
sound. It must be acknowledged by now that TV
sound is every bit as good in quality ( or at least, can
be, although we do have one notable exception in the
New York area) .
There is no doubt in our mind that video tape recorders will be the next big development in home entertainment during the next year. The three already
mentioned are available now -two more West German
models are announced, and they will certainly be in
the U.S. before long. One more Japanese model has
already been shown, and is said to be ready for the
market by next summer, and we know that several
American companies are definitely including VTR's in
their futures. While AUDIO has rarely acknowledged
the existence of television, this is "ostrichian" in concept. Since closing our eyes to it won't make it go
away, let us strive to make its sound quality good
enough to deserve a place in our home entertainment
centers, with the reproduced quality of which it is
capable. We sorely need TV sound tuners -let's hope
some of them appear on the market, and soon. Then
the audio buff will be glad to include TV in his
revered system.
-
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
Capture natural sound with Tíckeríng.
From the softest flutter of the woodwinds to the fiioor- shaking boom of the bass drum,
natural sound begins with Pickering. Right where the stylus meets the groove.
Any of the new Pickering V -15 stereo cartridges will reproduce the groove, the whole
groove and nothing but the groove. That's why a Pickering can't help sounding natural if
the record and the rest of the equipment are of equa ly high quality.
To assure compatibility with your stereo equipment, there are four different Pickering
V -15 pickups, each designed for a specific app:icatioi. The new V- 15AC -2 is for conventional record changers where high output and heavier tracking forces are required. The new
V- 15AT -2 is for lighter tracking in high -quality automatic turntables. The even more compliant V- 15AM -1 is ideal for professional -type manual turntables. And the V- 15AME -1 with
elliptical stylus is the choice of the technical sopnisticate who demands the last word in
tracking ability.
No other pickup design is quite like the Pickering V-15. The cartridge weighs next to
nothing (5 grams) in order to take full advantage of low -mass tone arm systems. Pickering's
exclusive Floating Stylus and patented replaceab'e V-Guard stylus assembly protect both
the record and the diamond. But the final payoff is in the sound. You will hear the difference.
PICKERING -for those who car
Pickering & Co., Plainview,
AUDIO
the difference.
LI
,
N.Y.
Circle 112 on Reader Service Card
NOVEMBER, 1965
17
}
Compare these Sherwood specs!
S -3300 IHF sensitivity 1.5 pv (30 db quieting), Stereo frequency response 20-15 kc
''4 db., Capture ratio 2.4 db.. Drift
.015 %, Hum and noise -70 db, 16 silicon transistors plus 15 silicon diodes, $167.50. Companion ALL -SILICON Solid -State amplifiers S-9900
o o o o ó o;
90 watts $229.50, S -9500 50 watts $179.50, S-9000a
o .1 160 watts $309.50.
f
Ir 1
tiI
\
WHY DID SHERWOOD
SAY "NO" TO
GERMANIUM
No germanium transistors or nuvistor -tube hybrid designs for Sherwood!
Instead, Sherwood insisted on the acknowledged reliability bf ALL-SILICON
Solid -State circuitry to make the new Model S -3300 the industry's FIRST ALLSILICON Solid -State tuner. The S -3300 achieves the pacesetting sensitivity of
1.5µv (IHF) with newly developed circuits that are immune to overloading.
Sherwood's engineers even included an amplified dual automatic -gain -control
system to maintain proper selectivity under the strongest signals, automatic
stereo /mono switching, and silent- action interchannel hush. All reasons why
we dare to say, "Sherwood ALL -SILICON Solid -State High Fidelity is the best."
Another first from Sherwood: The
Tanglewood II 4-way speaker system features Sherwood's revolutionary omnipolarm high- frequency radiator with 160°
dispersion to 22 kc. A pair of 10-inch
woofers extends response to 24 cps ©
-6db. In oiled walnut: $219.50.
Sherwood Electronic Laboratories, Inc.,
4300
North California Avenue, Chicago, Illinois
60618
Write Dept.
1
1
Circle 113 on Reader Service Card
18
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
A
Application of Dual -Track
Techniques to Lecture
Recording
C. B.
HAGEN*
When the recordist is confronted with the problem of making a usable
tape during a lecture which is followed -or interrupted -by a question -andanswer period, the procedure outlined can provide quite usable results.
a more
general way, multiple -track recordings, are generally associated with the
recording of music and the subsequent
re- creation of what is popularly known
as "stereo- realism," a "wall of sound,"
and so on. It is not generally realized,
however, that these techniques can be
extremely successful when applied to
a different type of recording. One of
such is the recording of lectures or
classes with active participation of audience, such as when a lecture is followed
by a question- and -answer period.
Leaving aside the musically oriented
concept of left and right, we have
here two different sources of sound that
require totally different approaches, especially from the point of view of microphones.
The lecturer is generally stationary
and in such a case microphone placement offers no problem. The questions
from the audience, on the other hand,
can offer quite a challenge to the recording engineer and an almost impossible one if the simple conventional
monophonic method is applied. If the
standard cardioid microphone is used
for the lecturer, any question from the
audience will be almost totally lost.
Sometimes to remedy this the lecturer
or moderator agrees to repeat the question, but this seldom works. A repetition is cumbersome per se, much of the
original spontaneity is lost, and often,
especially in heated exchanges, the repetition of the question is simply forgotten. Other times a bi- directional or
omni -directional microphone is used.
STEREO RECORDINGS or, in
*UCLA Map Librarte, University of California, Los Angeles, Calif. 90024
'H. S. Mawby, "New Microphone Has
Unique Directivity", AUDIO, April, 1960,
pp. 26 & ff.
AIIr1u-1
I.Ir1\/GI.ADCD
10AS
Fig. 1. ElectroVoice microphone
recommended for
this application.
The first microphone is well suited for
a dialogue and the second one for a
round table debate, but, for the purpose
in discussion, they are not the answer.
One reason is that during the entire
lecture such microphones would be
picking up considerable ambient noise
from the auditorium (such as rustle of
feet, coughs, and all other sorts of undesirable noises) . Another reason is that
the difference in levels is considerable, between the lecturer's voice and
the very faint ( from the microphone's
point of view) one from the audience
participant.
Use of a Second
Microphone
Another technique, fortunately not
too frequent, is to provide a second
microphone on the floor for the use of
the participants. In most cases the fact
of having to go to a microphone to ask
the question in front of the audience
inhibits the person to the point where
most of the spontaneity is lost.
Finally, a more advanced technique
is to provide a second microphone, a
directional one, with a mixer, the micro-
phone being aimed at the participant
in the audience. This, the best so far of
the conventional monophonic techniques, has its inconveniences. The main
one is that the signals of both microphones, once mixed, cannot be separated and, therefore, any subsequent
correction or filtering is extremely difficult, not to say impossible, to perform.
All these problems can be easily
solved through the use of a stereo recorder and two microphones, one of
them directional. Thus, one track is for
the lecturer (upper, that is, the usual
left channel) and the other one for the
audience ( lower, that is, the usual right
channel)
The setting we have found most favorable is as follows: a cardioid microphone is used for the lecturer, mounted
on a tripod so as to isolate it from all
noises and vibrations from the lecturer's
platform; then. a highly directional microphone, ideally manned by a second
operator, is used for the audience. The
most favorable and inconspicuous position for this audience microphone is generally at floor level, at one side of the
.
19
LECTURER
TRACK
¡IIIIIIIIIIIIII
HOMO
AUDIENCE
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
11111111
111111111
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIBIII
1
j
TRACK 2
Fig. 2. Alternate recordings from lecturer and audience appear on a stereo
tape in this fashion. Same usage would
appear on a 4 -track machine, allowing
for the different track spacings.
front row. All connections should be
low impedance, of course, to permit
the use of long microphone cables.
Now, in the absence of any highly
directional microphone while operating
in a small auditorium, a good cardioid
microphone can be used for the audience with quite good results. During
the lecture this microphone's gain is
kept at O. During the question period
the engineer can aim the microphone
approximately towards the source of
sound and ride the gain up and down
according the distance and voice level
of the questioner. An additional advantage is to have a microphone provided
with an on -off switch. In this case, however, an assistant to operate the microphone and switch is almost mandatory.
Another good feature for a cardioid microphone used under the circumstances
described is a built -in cut -off filter for
lower frequencies. This in some microphones is indicated as the "V" (voice)
position of the proper switch. But if
there is no such filter, one has to remember that this audience track can always
be filtered and corrected during the
dubbing process.
Highly Directional Microphones
Some significant breakthrough in the
field of directional microphones have
been achieved by Electro- Voice. Their
three models in this line are the Nos.
643, 642, and 644. The 643 is an ultra -
directional "gun" microphone and is the
type used, for example, in Presidential
press conferences to get the questions
from newsmen in the audience. The
cost of these specialized microphones,
however, is so high (around $1,000.00)
that their use is restricted mostly to
networks and remains quite out of reach
for small radio stations, recording studios or similar concerns. Perhaps the
best compromise is the 642 (priced at
about $250.00), a highly directional
microphone now used extensively by
motion picture studios and major radio
stations. The 644 or "Sound- Spot" microphone' shown in Fig. 1 is a welcome
addition to this line of directional microphones and its price ($65.00) puts it
at the reach of almost any concern or
individual.
Another interesting possibility that
111
might be explored is the use for these
purposes of a microphone attached to
a parabolic reflector, a set-up as the
one used by naturalists to record bird
and animal calls and other forest noises.
The biggest difficulty in this regard,
however, is the use of such a conspicuous and obstructive apparatus in an
auditorium. If we remember that the
use of simple recording equipment is
frequently frowned upon by lecturers
and stage managers who regard it as an
obtrusive element, we could foresee
that the use of a parabolic reflector
would most certainly find considerable
resistance for the purposes described.
The Wandering Lecturer
An entirely different advantage of
the second microphone has to do with
the unreliability of some lecturers. In
not too infrequent occasions the engineer carefully sets the microphone for
the lecturer, adjusts volume levels, and
so on, only to find out that -due generally to personal inhibitions or the individual's character
the lecturer stays
away from the microphone and begins
to wander around the stage. This is
especially true in cases where the lecturer has material for exhibition such as
slides, figures, and such, or the lecture
has the format of a class with use of the
blackboard. In these cases a recording
with only one microphone would be
ruined. Having a second microphone,
however, it can be aimed towards the
peripatetic lecturer. We have faced a
number of these situations and in every
case the final recording comes out,
thanks to the audience microphone, almost as good as if done under normal
circumstances.
For the actual recording process, the
microphone for the lecturer is fed to
the left or upper channel and the microphone for the audience is fed to the
right or lower channel. During the lecture the level for the audience microphone is generally set at 0. However,
this is not always the case, especially
when a record of audience participation
-such as in a comic talk or even sounds
of disapproval in case of political mate rial-is felt to be desirable. An assistant
for the audience microphone is quite
-
necessary to aim the microphone towards a certain spot and to operate the
on -off switch. However, since the microphone for the lecturer and its level are
generally fixed elements, a skilled recording engineer can successfully operate the right channel too, using one
hand to operate the microphone boom
and the other to adjust the volume level.
Thus, when somebody in the audience participates, the second microphone is aimed towards that spot and
at the same time its volume level is
adjusted according to the distance and
voice level of the participant. One person could, thus, do all the operations at
once, but generally a better result is
achieved if there is an assistant to handle the audience microphone and if
this instrument is provided with a remote on -off switch.
For monitoring, a couple of pairs of
stereo headphones for the engineer and
assistant will prove convenient. A portable stereo amplifier may be needed
for boosting the monitor signal from the
recorder. Such signal is generally too
weak, even for high -efficiency headphones.
At the end of the recording session
we obtain a tape with two totally independent channels containing separately
the lecturer's address and the questions
or reactions from the audience. Making
the two tracks visible, a condensed
piece of two -track tape would appear
as in Fig. 2. (Two tracks of a four track machine would serve equally well,
of course.)
This master tape could be used for
actual broadcast, playing it back on a
full-track machine. However, a master
tape is seldom used for broadcast for
both safety and editing reasons. Also,
a much better finished product can be
obtained through a skillful handling of
the second channel during dubbing.
For this purpose, and especially for
the question-and- answer period, a useful device is a cue sheet giving starting times for the questions. Such a sheet
can be prepared conveniently during
the actual recording.
Dubbing the Final Tape
During the dubbing, both channels
(Continued on page 67)
PLAYBACK
VOLUMES
FINAL
LECTURER
CONSTANT
IIIIIIIIIIIIII
AUDIENCE
IIIIII
MIXER
IIIIII
VARIABLE
120
Hz TO
6000 Hz
"STEREO" MASTER TAPE
2- OR 4 -TRACK
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
MONO
FULL HALF,
OR
QUARTER TRACK
Fig. 3. Block schematic of the suggested dubbing set -up for making the final tape
from the original two -channel recording made in the auditorium.
^ UDIO
NOVEMBER,
1
965
A
Evaluating the Performance of
Stereo Cartridges
J.
H.
KÖGEN*
If we are to be able to discuss the performance of phonograph cartridges in terms which
will be understandable to everyone, we must make sure that we are talking about the
same things, and our measurements-as opposed to listening tests -must be standardized. Not only must cartridges measure good -they must also sound good.
O
NE OF THE MOST
perplexing prob-
lems confronting both the purchaser and manufacturer of hi -fi
cartridges is that of properly defining
quality. Certainly the major factor is
how the device sounds. This is a subjective quality and relates to the opinions of the listener. To evaluate a phonograph cartridge properly, we should
have some means of measurement which
can be related to this subjective listening quality. This paper will discuss some
of the means now in current use for
making such measurements.
How Do We Define Phonograph
Cartridge Quality
If we are to provide a measurement
of quality, we must first define what we
mean by "quality." What is it that
makes a phonograph cartridge sound
good? This is a difficult question to
answer because it requires that we
relate measured characteristics to the
hearing capability and the psychological
reaction of a human being. We are,
therefore, confronted not only with matters of instrumentation, but factors of
human experience, education, and taste.
We are also concerned with the characteristics of the human ear and the brain.
We will define the reproducing quality of a phonograph cartridge as the
characteristic of accurately translating
the information cut in a record groove
into an electrical signal. This definition
implies that the response of the cartridge will be such as to reproduce the
modulation in the record as accurately
as possible. The adequacy of such a
definition might be questioned by those
who feel that a cartridge should impart some coloration to the reproduction. This type of requirement is often
imposed on microphones and loudspeakers when the response is designed
to be most effective with a particular
type of reproduction. Some microphones
are designed, for example, to work most
effectively in reproducing voice as op-
posed to orchestra or other types of
applications. Similarly, some loudspeakers sound better with one type
of program content than with another.
We would argue against the concept
that the phonograph stylus should impart coloration to the information it reproduces in electrical form. Our argument against coloration is based partially on the method of making a phonograph record. During the mastering
the record is evaluated by being played
back through a high- quality cartridge.
Adjustments are made to perfect the
sound quality. The resulting record is
strongly affected by the taste and desires of the people in charge of making
the record. What these people hear is
directly related to the cartridge used.
If we assume that the record has been
properly made, the purchaser of the
record should then use a cartridge similar in characteristic to the one used
during the mastering. Thus, the requirement of the phonograph cartridge
is not that it alter the information which
appears on the disc, but that it accurately reproduce this information in
the same manner as the cartridge used
by the recording company.
It must be noted that we are implying in our definition of reproducing
quality that an accurate reproduction
of the modulation on the record will
produce a good sound. If we accept
this definition, we must then determine
how to assure ourselves that the cartridge is capable of making an accurate
reproduction. This is the basis of the
problem of which measurements to
make and how to make them.
Factors Which Must be Considered in
Making Measurements
Before stating which measurements
can be used to evaluate a phono cartridge, we must draw guide lines of
practicality. Important factors which
must be considered are as follows:
1. The measurement must be reasonably
easy to accomplish.
*Shure Brothers, Inc., 222 Hartrey Ave.,
Evanston, Illinois.
AUDIO
IVVVC/VIDCK,
IYOJ
2. The measuring equipment
reasonably inexpensive
must be
3. The measurements must be reprochcc-
ible.
4. The measurement must be meaningful in relation to the reproducing
quality of the cartridge.
5. Measurements must be made
under
standardized conditions.
6. Measurements should simulate, insofar as possible, record speeds, recording velocities, and other variables
similar to those in common use.
With respect to 4, we must explain
what we mean by the word "meaningful." To be meaningful in terms of reproducing quality, the characteristic
measured should be directly related to
the functional capability of the cartridge, or how the cartridge sounds. This
is as distinguished from a parameter
relating to the design of the cartridge.
A characteristic related directly to how
the cartridge sounds, for example, is
the frequency response. We feel that
this is a meaningful measurement because it tells us directly which frequencies the cartridge is capable of reproducing. A characteristic which
would be considered a parameter of
design is compliance. This characteristic is important in terms of the overall design, but does not tell us specifically that the cartridge is good or bad.
It is conceivable that a cartridge with
low compliance could be better than
one with high compliance. As an analogy we might cite the case of a cigarette which is claimed to have the
least nicotine and the least tars, but
which at the same time might also be
a very poor tasting cigarette. We should
not confuse individual design parameters with over -all reproducing quality.
There are many variables which
come into play in measuring phonograph cartridge performance. Such
items as tracking force, tracking angle,
temperature, the tone arm, the turntable, the record speed, distance between the center of the record and the
stylus tip, cartridge alignment, tip
radius, record material, and so on, all
come into play. Any measurement will
21
FREQUENCY RESPONSE
CURVE MUST REMAIN
THESE LIMITS
TYPICAL
CURVE
W
7
+2 db
20
Hz
20000
IDEAL FREQUENCY RESPONSE LIMITS
TYPICAL CURVE
+2
db
W
+4
Id,
db
a.
T
20
200
10000 20000
PRACTICAL FREQUENCY RESPONSE
Fig.
1.
I
I' fTti
Frequency- response limits- (A),
Ideal; (B) Practical.
lose meaning
sinless conditions are
standardized. It is important, therefore,
that all of these variables be properly
defined and maintained.
Of particular importance is the test
record, where many sources of error
can be introduced. The master itself
will contain some degree of distortion,
crosstalk, and noise, which may affect
the measurement. Variations have been
noted in different pressings from the
same master. Comparing two of the
best test records available today, measurements clearly indicate a differenc'i
in orientation of the groove which seriously affects separation. These are but
a few of many observations which emphasize the need for high -quality, reproducible test records.
Tests Commonly Used in Evaluating
Performance
A. Frequency Response. Frequency response is measured by determining the
voltage out of the cartridge as the frequency is varied over the range of interest. Frequencies covered extend from
the lowest end of the audio range,
around 20 Hz, to somewhere above the
top of the audio range in the order of
20,000 Hz. The frequency- response
plot, therefore, provides an indication
of the ability of the cartridge to reproduce frequencies in the audio range.
Theoretically, we might say that for
perfect reproduction the frequency response of the cartridge should be flat
over the entire range of interest. To be
realistic, however, we must define what
we mean by the word "flat." It is difficult for even the best listeners to detect
variations in frequency response of ±
2 dB. A cartridge with a response flat
within ± 2 dB as shown at (A) in Fig.
1 would, therefore, provide the practical ultimate in frequency response.
The frequency content of normal pro-
22
gram material, however, does not rerequire such a narrow tolerance on response. The energy content in most program material decreases rapidly in both
low- and high- frequency ranges. As a
result it is possible to broaden the allowable tolerance in response in these
ranges. We believe that (B) of Fig. 1
presents a more realistic approach
wherein the response tolerance is wider
below 200 and above 10,000 Hz. Listening tests on a large variety of program
material indicates that a cartridge falling within the limits shown in (B)
would sound similar to other cartridges
falling within the same limits (other
things such as distortion being equal,
which they frequently are not).
Future improvements in recording
and playback techniques will most probably require a tightening of the specification of (B) between 10,000 and
20,000 Hz. It should be noted that
good frequency response is a necessary,
but not a sufficient criterion, for reproducing quality.
Since there are many factors which
can affect the frequency-response measurement, it is of utmost importance
that we carefully define the details of
measurement. The following are some
12k
13k
3 GRAMS
1.5
GRAMS
FREQUENCY
2. Frequency response of Shure
M33 -7 cartridge using test records of
different speeds
all other conditions
Fig.
identical.
important factors which can affect the
response:
1. Record Speed. Many cartridges exhibit a resonance in the frequency
response in the range between
10,000 and 20,000 Hz. In some
cases, it is found that the frequency
and amplitude of this resonant peak
is affected by record speed. For example, a 78 -rpm test record will
usually provide a response with
a resonant peak at a higher frequency than will a 33 1/3 test record (Fig. 2) . The speed of the record may also affect the amplitude
of this resonance peak. It is important, therefore, to define the rotational record speed and the radius
from the center of the record to the
stylus.
2. Tracking Force. The frequency at
which the resonance peak occurs
generally increases with tracking
force ( Fig. 3) . Although the effect
is small, this variable must be specified.
Recorded Velocity of Test Record.
Theoretically, if the reproduction
were entirely free of distortion, frequency response at one recorded velocity would be the same as that of
another. Since some distortion or
some nonlinearity does exist in a
phonograph reproduction system,
it can be expected that the frequency
response will depend to some extent
on the cutting velocity. This parameter, therefore, should be defined,
and should be a value similar to
the cutting velocity used normally
on standard records. A peak velocity in the order of 5 cm /sec up to
10,000 Hz and 2 cm /sec between
10,000 and 20,000 Hz is reasonable.
4. Distortion. In any case, when measuring frequency response it is assumed that distortion is held to a
minimum. One might achieve a flat
frequency response by simply driving the device to saturation at all
frequencies. Obviously, such a measurement would be meaningless.
Likewise, if in measuring frequency
response at a reasonable cutting velocity, say 5 cm /sec, considerable distortion was noted, the frequency response plot would have little meaning. It is imperative therefore, that
the wave form be monitored, or that
distortion be measured at the same
time frequency response is measured. It is meaningless to claim a
good frequency response for a phonograph cartridge, if the output being
measured is highly distorted.
5. Load. The input resistance of the
amplifier and the capacity of the
cable can affect the response appreciably and must be specified.
B. Separation. Separation is an indication of the capability of the cartridge
to reproduce the stereo effect. The
measurement of separation is made by
determining the output of one channel, while the stylus is tracing a groove
containing modulation only in the other
3.
Fig. 3. Frequency response of Shure M3N22 cartridge at two different stylus
forces.
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
i
MEASURING INSTRUMENT
INPUT TEST RECORD
CHANNEL A
PHONO CARTRIDGE
CHANNEL A
MODULATED
FIRST MEASUREMENT
MEASURING INSTRUMENT
INPUT TEST RECORD
CHANNEL B
MODULATED
PHONO CARTRIDGE
CHANNEL
B
SECOND MEASUREMENT
FUNCTIONAL REPRESENTATION
OF SEPARATION MEASUREMENT
PRIMARY RESPONSE
CHANNEL A
SECONDARY RESPONSE
CHANNEL A
SEPARATION MEASUREMENT
Fig. 4
-Hz
Separation measurement: upper, functional representation; lower, measurements obtained by this method.
channel. This is shown functionally at
(A) in Fig. 4. Two grooves are used,
one with modulation in channel A, and
no modulation in channel B, and the
other the reverse. First, a measurement
of channel A is recorded, and is indicated as primary response at (B) in
Fig. 4. The second groove is then
traced and the output of channel A is
measured, and shown as secondary response at (B) . The difference in response in decibels between the two
curves is defined as separation.
Separation is usually designated at
specific frequencies such as 1000 Hz
and 10,000 Hz. Separation in the range
from roughly 200 to 6000 Hz is most
important and should be a minimum of
20 dB with 25 to 30 dB being preferred. Separation at 10,000 Hz and
above need not be as great because
this range includes primarily harmonic
frequencies which occur at relatively
low energy levels. The major separation
effect is accounted for by the lower
frequencies. A separation value of 10
to 15 dB in the higher range is generally considered adequate.
In measuring separation, we must
take into account the same factors
which were considered in measuring
frequency response. An additional factor which can strongly influence separation is the orientation of the cartridge
and the record. This can alter separation measurements in at least two ways:
1. Looking at the cartridge from the
front, the bottom of the cartridge
should nominally be parallel to the
record. Figure 5 shows how a slight
rotation of the cartridge about its
longitudinal axis can change the separation. It has also been found that
the peak separation on several test
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
records does not occur at exactly 0
deg. Two of the more popular records differ by 6 deg.
2. Vertical tracking angle error can
effect separation'. The effective cutting angle of the record used must
therefore be specified. Lateral-tracking-angle error can also influence separation to a small extent and, as with
all other tests, should be minimized.
C. Distortion. Distortion is a general
term which refers to the difference in
shape of the output signal as opposed
to the input signal. Distortion products
can often be a very disturbing influence in reproduction quality. This
factor must be carefully considered and
defined in evaluating the reproducing
capability of the phonograph cartridge.
The major sources of distortion in phonograph playback are:
Poor Trackabilitys
Tracing Distortion) -s
Lateral Tracking Error4
Vertical Tracking Error 4
pickup can track as a function of
frequency. Since distortion increases
catastrophically when the pickup
ceases to track, all subsequent tests
must be made at a modulation velocity less than the "trackability"
limit.
2. To standardize the effect of tracing
distortion we must specify the record
speed, the radius of the record at
which the measurement is made, the
recorded velocity, tip radius, and the
frequencies employed.
3. To standardize the effect of lateral
tracking error, we should define the
tone arm plus the tone arm turntable
geometry. If possible, an arrangement
using an adjustable tone arm similar
to the configuration in Fig. 7 should
be used to provide a virtual elimination of distortion due to lateral-tracking -angle error.
4. Vertical- tracking -angle error will be
affected by the effective cutting angle
of the record used for testing. It is
recommended that a record which is
cut at 15 deg. be employed. It would
be preferred that measurements be
made on both channels in a 45 -deg.
stereo recording to provide a situation similar to that used in the actual
cutting of program material.
An indication of the distortion products which can be expected from the
last source can be obtained from Fig.
which shows a curve of harmonic dis-
tortion versus vertical- tracking-angle
error. Such a curve can be obtained by
any means which allows the phonograph cartridge angular position to be
changed with respect to the surface of
the record. One such arrangement is
shown in Fig. 7. A turntable is mounted
on a pair of pivots, the centerline of
which runs through the center of the
turntable. A straight tone arm is used,
and positioned so as to be tangent to
the record groove being played. The
needle tip is placed directly on the rotational axis of the turntable. Distortion can then be measured for different
angular positions of the turntable. Vertical tracking angle can then be related
J
Measurement of Distortion
For an over -all measurement, one
would normally not be interested in isolating the various causes of distortion.
Knowledge of these causes of distortion
do however give us some indication of
the factors which must be considered
in performing the measurement. Thus:
guarantee good trackability. By "trackability" we mean the
ability of the pickup to maintain
proper contact with the modulation
in the groove. The pickup must be
able to track reasonable modulation
at all frequencies through the audible spectrum. Records having a
variety of modulation velocities at
several frequencies should be used
to determine the velocity which the
HEAD ON VIEW
OF CARTRIDGE
ZQ
30
°
J
20
10
O
1. We must
-10'
-s°
0°
+s°
+10°
TILT ANGLE BETWEEN CARTRIDGE
BOTTOM AND RECORD SURFACE
Fig. 5. Separation vs. cartridge tilt for
Shure M44-7 cartridge at 1000 Hz.
23
easily with an IM distortion meter
and a proper test record. This type
used for measuring distortion. These
include:
6.0
1.
5.0
4.0
3.0
2.0
1.0
-5
0
5
10 15 20 25
VERTICAL TRACKING ANGLE ERROR
Fig. 6 Harmonic distortion vs. vertical tracking -angle error on vertically modulated groove -400 Hz at 7.5 cm /sec
cutting velocity.
to the angle which produces minimum
distortion.
It should be noted that in this arrangement, distortion cannot become
zero since the residual effects of tracing distortion still exist. Also, we have
made the assumption that distortion
caused by vertical- tracking-angle error
is minimum when this error becomes
zero. This is an assumption based on
theory and might possibly be modified
by factors not considered in the theory.
Because of these factors, one would not
expect the accuracy of a measurement
of this type to be much better than ±
2 or 3 deg.
Once having measured vertical- tracking -angle error, we turn to the means
of eliminating distortion from this
source. The obvious way to do this is
to design phonograph cartridges with
a vertical- tracking -angle to match the
angle at which records are cut. Unfortunately, no standard has existed in
the past for the cutting of records. Both
the RIAA and EIA are now proposing
a standard of 15 -deg. effective cutting
angle. Most of the major record cornpanies in the United States ( including
RCA and Columbia) are using this proposed standard.
A phonograph cartridge designed to
match the proposed 15 -deg. standard
provides for virtual elimination of distortion from this source. Table I shows
several measurements of IM and harmonic distortion with the Shure M44
cartridge which was designed to eliminate distortion due to vertical- trackingangle error. The most important figures
in the table are those for distortion in
the stereo mode since this is a duplication of the way in which stereo records
are played. The measurements for distortion in the lateral mode are, as expected, very low. The values for distortion in the vertical mode are also
rather low, considering the fact that
vertical modulation has always been
considered the most difficult to follow.
To standardize the measurement with
regard to inertial distortion we should
follow the same rules as given for
tracing distortion. Several methods are
24
of measurement is a sensitive one
and is easy to reproduce. One disadvantage is that if only two frequencies are used, no information is
obtained about the effect in other
frequency ranges. For example, if
we use 400 and 4000 Hz. we do
not learn about the distortion occurring at 10,000 Hz. Another problem
arises from the fact that this type
of measurement depends upon one
frequency modulating another frequency. In phonograph reproduction, it is found that frequency or
phase modulation exists as well as
Harmonic Distortion. To measure
harmonic distortion, we use a single
modulation frequency and make a
measurement of the harmonic content of the output signal. Harmonic
distortion is the ratio of the total of
all harmonics compared to the fundamental. This type of measurement
loses significance to some extent at
the higher frequencies of 8000 Hz
and above where the harmonics are
above the audible range. The measurement does, however, have a distinct advantage in that it is quite
simple to perform and to control.
amplitude modulation4. This may
complicate the issue and make the
measurement questionable.
Distortion. This
2. Intermodulation
type of measurement is made using
two frequencies, often 400 and 4000
Hz. The upper frequency is lower
in amplitude, usually ) of the lower
frequency. When two such signals
are fed into a device which produces
no distortion, the output will be only
TABLE
Frequency Method. This
method requires the use of two frequencies separated by a constant
difference. The two frequencies are
varied across the frequency range of
interest. Distortion is defined as the
total of the sum and difference frequencies divided by the sum of the
two fundamentals. The advantage
of this method is that it is useful
up to the very top of the frequency
range of interest and provides a
measurement which is function of
frequency. The disadvantage is that
the measurement is much more complicated than for either harmonic or
IM distortion, in that it requires a readjustment of the measuring equipment at each new frequency. Since
this method depends on modulation.
the same comments as made for IM
distortion apply here as well.
While one might propose any number of additional means of measuring
distortion, we must keep certain factors in mind. First, it is important that
we follow the rules discussed earlier.
3. Difference
1
Distortion measurements on Shure
M44 -5 cartridge
Second Harmonic, 1000 Hz, 5 cm/ sec
800.
Lateral
.1000
Vertical
1
IM -400 Hz at 11.2 cm /sec
4000 Hz at 3.54 cm /sec
2.2%
Lateral
Vertical
7.0%
3.3%
Stereo
Record vertical cutting angle specified by manufacturer as 15 deg.
400 and 4000 Hz. If the device being tested does produce distortion,
the output will include sum and difference frequencies, such as 3600,
4400, 3200, 4800 Hz and so on. IM
distortion can be measured fairly
PIVOT
.
TURNTABLE
Fig. 7. Diagram of
SLIDING WA'
tiltable turntable
for measuring ver-
FOR TONE AR
.
tical tracking
error.
TONE ARM
PIVOT
TOP VIEW
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
standard record speeds. If possible, the
measurement of distortion should be
related in some way to the psycho acoustic effect on the human being.
This means that we must consider the
energy content at different frequencies
in normal program material, as well as
the ability of the ear to hear the distortion products. Unfortunately, sufficient data has not been collected as yet
to define properly the psychoacoustic
relationships to distortion. Although a
number of papers have been written
on the subject, we still do not have adequate data to say precisely that a par ticular percentage of distortion is disturbing, tolerable, or even noticeable.
These effects are related to many factors, including masking, transient phe-
'
nomena, and volume. Although we cannot say that a given percentage of distortion is acceptable and another percentage is not, we can strive to minimize the distortion and to make repeatable measurements of what we
have accomplished.
D. Output Level. The output level is the
voltage obtained for a given modulation on a record. This factor is of practical importance as it relates to signal
to noise ratios. Any phonograph system
contains some residual noise. One major
source is the hum pickup in the phonograph tone arm and its wiring. A larger
signal level from the cartridge tends to
minimize the effect of this hum. Signal
levels in the order of 1 millivolt output
per centimeter per second velocity
modulation on the record have been
found to be a reasonable minimum for
practical installations.
The measurement is made by accurately measuring voltage at the output
of the cartridge while playing a record with a carefully calibrated cutting
velocity. The speed of the turntable
must, of course, be carefully controlled
while making the measurement.
E. Extraneous Pickup. Another characteristic of a phonograph cartridge relating to signal -to -noise ratio is its ability to shield the internal parts from
effects of electromagnetic and electrostatic fields. The measurement of magnetic pickup is made by placing the
cartridge within a loop of wire through
which current is circulated at some defined frequency and current level calculated to provide a specified magnetic
field. Voltage measured across the output terminals of the cartridge under
these conditions is a measurement of the
hum pickup. It is usually found that
a magnetic cartridge with low electromagnetic pickup will also have low
electrostatic pickup.
"
Other Factors
In addition to the tests which have
been described we must, of course,
consider many of the practical aspects
related to a phonograph cartridge. It
is of utmost importance that the unit
be reliable and rugged. Often it is necessary to give up something in the
way of response in order to achieve
the desired ruggedness. The importance
of this factor should not be overlooked
since the phonograph cartridge is designed for practical use in the home or
studio rather than the laboratory.
One must consider the life of the
cartridge. A cartridge which plays well
when it is new, but deteriorates rapidly,
is far less valuable than one which may
not be quite so good when it leaves the
factory, but retains its quality over a
long period.
Another factor which might be considered is the record wear caused by
the stylus. While no standard tests exist
for this variable, some rough indications
can be obtained by repetitive playing
of records. Indications of wear on test
TABLE II
Muffled
Midrange (200 -3000 Hz)
Lacking
Treble (above 3000 Hz)
Lacking
Descriptive terminology
Boomy
Moderately
clear
Smooth
Overemphasized
Smooth
Noticeable
pea k
Clear and
well defined
Overemphasized
throughout
Over -all
Poor balance
Lacking
Presence
Realism (voice)
Realism (percussion)
Realism (applause)
Distortion on highly
modulated passages
Poor
Poor
Poor
Considerable
General comment:
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
Good balance
Moderate
Good
Good
Good
Barely
detectable
Excessive
Excellent
Excellent
Excellent
None
Listening Test
Finally, we come to what is unquestionably the most important factor in
evaluating a phonograph cartridge -how
the cartridge sounds. All of the other
factors are meaningless if the cartridge
does not produce the desired sound.
Thus, our final evaluation is a listening
test. Such a test, because of its importance, must be considered very carefully, and the conditions under which
it is held must be well defined and
practical. To evaluate a cartridge properly, it is of utmost importance that the
equipment used and the room in which
the test is made be of the best possible
quality.
1.
The choice of a tone arm is extremely
critical. Frictional and resonance effects in the tone arm can deteriorate
the performance of the cartridge. The
tone arm chosen should be of highest
practical quality to eliminate this
possible source of error.
2. The electronic amplifier should have
response characteristics, distortion,
and power capability such as to have
no practical effect on the measurement
One point of caution must be noted
here with regard to noise and hum
level. Such factors can be a very disturbing influence and must not be introduced by the amplifier.
3. The choice of a loudspeaker is a difficult one, since this is often a matter
PHONO CARTRIDGE LISTENING TEST- EVALUATION
Characteristics
Bass (below 200 Hz)
records can be found by examining frequency response, separation, distortion,
and noise before and after a series of
repetitive playings.
One should also consider the physical characteristics of the cartridge such
as its weight, its susceptibility to damage, and its versatility. Susceptibility
to damage can be affected appreciably
by the design of the parts surrounding
the stylus and the protection which is
afforded for the stylus. Since many
users follow the practice of changing
styli for different records, as for example new stereo records vs. old monophonic, the facility for making this
change should be considered.
of personal preference. The loudspeaker should have a maximum
bandwidth and must be devoid of any
sharp resonance peaks or valleys in its
response. The speaker must also be
capable of producing adequate output with low distortion. It is often
well to test the phonograph cartridge
with several types of speakers in order to eliminate the possibility that
a particular speaker is masking or
over-emphasizing a defect.
4. A wide variety of
program material
should be used in testing the cartridge. It is often found that a cartridge which may sound excellent for
one type of program material will
not sound as well with another. For
( Continued on page 74 )
25
Microphone Amplifier and
Coupling Unit for the
Stereo -Modified Uher 4000 -5
C. G. McPROIJD
For lecture use, it is desirable for the person speaking to appear to
be in the center, directly between the two stereo loudspeakers. A
simple configuration makes this possible and is combined with the output coupling unit for the modified Uher 4000 Report -S tape recorder.
W I\
E'ER A LECTURER uses a
Microphone for reinforcement
and is reproduced over a stereo
system, his voice should appear to oriI
I
ginate half way between the two speakers. Unless he wants to be troubled by
the need for switching from stereo to
mono each time he speaks, it is more
than likely that he will be reproduced
by only one channel. The writer recognized this problem several years ago on
the occasion of hi fi talks before a few
audio groups, and the circuit employed
seemed to be a simple and effective
solution.
On the assumption that some sort of
microphone amplifier must be used -for
few preamps have mike inputs, and
even if they do -it requires a certain
amount of switching to change the
equalization, or at least to switch from
the sound source being used for demonstration material to the microphone input. This is usually inconvenient, to say
the least, so the ideal sort of device
would appear to be a simple microphone amplifier arranged to feed its
output equally into the two stereo channels.
In the writer's lecture appearances, a
tape recorder is normally used as the
source of program material. Using the
Fig. 2. External appearance of the coupling unit -microphone amplifier.
recorder as a "lectern," the control of
program volume is readily achieved
without the need for another operator.
47k
o
EFT SIGNAL IN
MONO
SIGNAL
SOURCE
LEFT PLUS.'
o
a
á
o
1. Block
schematic of the
method of feeding a mono signal
equally into both
Fig.
channels of
47k
stereo system.
,IGHT SIGNAL IN
26
o
o
RIGHT PLUS
a
Referring to Fig. 1, a block schematic
of the arrangement, it is seen that the
two outputs from the tape recorder are
fed through equal series resistors to the
top ends of a dual potentiometer, and
thence to the power amplifier and
speakers. The arms of the dual pot are
connected together and fed from the
output of the transistorized microphone
amplifier. At the counter-clockwise end
of the dual pot, a switch turns off the
battery supply to the amplifier.
Altogether, this serves two functions
-when the pot is at the counterclockwise position, the output of the microphone amplifier is connected to the
grounded end of the pots, and no signal
is fed to the output. Turning the knob
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
Q
MAS55
33
= ó
N
N
1
j
R12 47k
MV
R13 47k
AAA
R6
1
4
1500
C2
20/2T
ce
o
0
ce
C3
1525
1.0
_-_
co
R4
8 v
mA
2N371
11.3
C5
2N508
1.2
0.05
4.1
5/25
R5
AA
68k
.001v IN/2.2
v OUT
DIST= 1.87
+1 db 20/30 000 Hz
DOWN 3db AT 45 KC
C4
Fig. 3. Schematic of the entire unit, showing wiring to plugs and jacks.
slightly turns on the battery supply, and
since no signal is yet being fed to the
output, there is no click in the speakers
as the battery is turned on. As the pot
is turned further, more and more signal
is fed to the output circuit, and at the
maximum travel of the pot, the low impedance of the mike amplifier output
effectively "swamps out" the signal from
the tape recorder because of the series
resistors. It sounds simple, but it works
perfectly. It is only necessary to adjust
the gain of the amplifier so that when
the pot is at maximum the speech level
is just under feedback. Then the output
level of the recorder is adjusted for suitable reproducing volume, with the mike
amplifier at minimum. The lecturer can
thus adjust the relative levels of speech
and program to any desired degree, yet
when he wishes to drown out the program he can do so with only one control.
terminal socket), it provides a level
control for the recorder output, and it
houses the microphone amplifier, battery, and microphone level control and
switch.
It need not be assumed that the circuit suggested should of necessity be
used only with the converted Uher, or
in the over-all form shown here. It is
equally. While we have here presented
a particular embodiment-as they say in
patentese -of the proposed circuit, it is
not expected that the reader will follow
slavishly the plans of this particular
arrangement. It is suggested, however,
that this circuit and its connection into
a stereo system is one effective solution
to the problem.
Amplifier
Figure 3 shows the schematic of the
amplifier itself, utilizing three transistors in a circuit proposed in one of the
earlier General Electric Transistor ManThe
n+
nuoa
Q
C2
i9
Fig. 4. The complete amplifier on its
printed circuit board.
The Output Coupling Unit
For the use the writer had for the
stereo -converted Uher 4000 -S, some
form of volume control had to be provided, since the 4000 has none in its
high- impedance output circuit. Also
necessary was the microphone amplifier
and control just described. And also
necessary was some means for turning
on and off the new right -channel amplifier. The unit shown in Fig. 2 was the
chosen solution. It incorporates a 5 -pin
plug which fits into the socket in the
recorder (changed from the original 3-
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
suggested, however, that the idea can
be applied to any monophonic source
which is to be fed equally into two
stereo channels.
In the same vein, it should not be
assumed that the conversion suggested
for the Uher is limited only to that
particular recorder. It is likely that if we
had had available a Yiff ni ff Model 10
monophonic recorder and were faced
with the same problem, we would undoubtedly have designed a second -channel amplifier which would have served
-18v.
4
Fig. 5. Layout of the printed circuit
board, full size. This may be used to
produce a negative for photo -etching
the laminate.
27
..(4
-1-101,
-
"HOLES FOR OUTP UTT
PHONO JACKS
F-
1'/e..
--
;
e
HOLES ( #36 DRILL) FOR
SCREWS INTO PLUG SHELL
H(6"
3'/e"
INSIDE SECTION
cent while still maintaining an output of
0.5 volts for a 2 -mV input signal. The
first two transistors are GE 2N508's and
the output stage is a 2N322. Supply
voltage is furnished by two 9 -V transistor batteries (RCA VS -323) in series,
at a current drain of 4mA. The resistors in series from the recorder output
are used to provide a relatively high impedance source which could be
swamped out by the lower impedance
of the microphone amplifier output. The
amplifier is shown in Fig. 4, with the
printed circuit plan in Fig. 5. Instructions for making the printed circuit
boards were given in Part 1 of this
article.
Frequency response of the amplifier
was flat within ±2 dB from 30 to 20,000 Hz.
Construction
434"
CENTER OF W HOLE
FOR MIKE SOCKET
/
OUTSIDE SECTION
,is"
%'
ir
HOLES FOR PO TS
1
REMOVE ALL SHADED PORTIONS
Fig. 6. Modifications to standard
Minibox to make the small sloping -panel housing
for the amplifier, batteries and coupling unit.
uals, but, of course, with a few of the
writer's modifications. In the original
GE circuit, Re had a value of 47 ohms.
since the circuit was offered as a phono
preamp, Cs was of a value which pro ided the correct turnover at 500 Hz,
and a small capacitor was placed across
Ra to provide the rolloff. Since our application demanded a "flat" amplifier
or microphone use, C. was increased
considerably, and the shunting capacitor across R, was eliminated.
When the value of R2 was 47 ohms,
in input signal of 2mV provided an
output of 0.87V, with a distortion of 3.2
per cent. The output of the tape recorder was nearer 0.3 volts, and no more
was required of the mike amplifier. It
was found that distortion was lower
when the value of R2 was increased. At
150 ohms, the distortion was 0.8 per
The little sloping -panel housing
shown in Fig. 1 was made from a 534
x 3 x 2',e -in. Bud Minibox, modified as
shown in Fig. 6, which shows the new
cuts and bends. One additional piece of
sheet aluminum is required for the battery- holder bracket, as shown in Fig. 7.
The connection to the new 5 -hole socket
on the recorder is made by a Hirsch mann MAS -5S plug, which is attached
to the rear wall of the housing at the
proper height by two 3 -48 screws which
fit into two matching tapped holes in
the plug shell. The battery-mounting
bracket, with the two battery holders
on it, is held to the panel by the dual
pot, R10-R11.
The left -channel lead is brought out
from pin 3 of the plug, the right channel
from pin 5, and ground from pin 2. Pins
2 and 4 are connected together in the
plug to close the battery circuit when
(Continued on page 67)
MOUNT BATTERY HOLDERS ON SIDES
'lg. 7. Battery holder bracket, which
nounts
2R
under recorder gain -control
potentiometer.
Fig. 8. Underside view of the complete unit.
AUDIO
NOVEMBER. 1965
THE COMPLEAT AUDIOPHILE
The intrepid angler without
a tackle box? The mighty
hunter with no gun case? The philatelist without a stock
book or stamp album? The artist without his taboret? The
chef without a pantry? Never. Never. Never!
is you enjoy an avocation more fully with the
right accoutrements for the task at hand -and, inevitably,
The fact
this leads to the need for a place to store the many small
and delicate items comprising your collection.
Cartridges, for example. The true audiophile invariably
owns more than one. He chooses the correct cartridge for
the record -and for the occasion. Keeping them safe and
handy is a problem that Shure has undertaken to solve. Voila!
(
1
Exclusive, custom -designed,
handsome 12"
x 51/4" x 21/2"
black simulated leather box with
gold leaf tooling. Compartmentalized and fully lined. Holds up
to 4 cartridges and 6 extra styli
3 cartridges and 6 extra
styli, with room to spare for your
pressure gauge, brush, etc. Simply send $4.95 and proof of pur-
CARTRIDGE
CADDY
-or
chase of any Shure Stereo
Dynetic cartridge to the address
below.
-
(Value? Name your own price
the Shure Cartridge Caddy is unavailable anywhere else at any
price!)
...
the Shure Cartridge Caddy
only $4.95
IT'S YOURS FOR ONLY $4.95 WITH THE PURCHASE OF ANY
SHURE STEREO DYNETIC ® CARTRIDGE
(Offer available in U.S.A. only)
SI
M55E
¡gillV-15
THE ULTIMATE! Literally handmade and inspected in accordance with the stringent standards of the Shure Master Quality Control
Program. Features bi- radial elliptical 15°
stylus. Reduces IM, harmonic and tracing distortion. A purist's cartridge throughout. $62.50.
MODERATE PRICE. Compares favorably to the
V-15, but produced under standard quality control conditions. Features elliptical 15° stylus.
Will improve the sound of any system (except
those using the Shure V -15). $35.50.
M80E
"FLOATING" CARTRIDGE. M55E type,
spring- mounted in head -shell for Garrard Lab
80 and Model A70 Series automatic turntables.
Bounce -proof and scratch -proof. Cartridge
retracts when pressure exceeds 11/2 grams.
THE
$38.00.
or the Shure M3D at $15.75; M7 /N21D at $17.95; or any of the Shure M44 series cartridges at $17.95 to $21.95.
Shure Brothers, Inc., 222 Hartrey Ave., Evanston, Illinois
Circle 114 on Reader Service Card
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
29
Present living -room installation showing two folded -horn four -way speaker systems.
THIS MONTH'S COVER
Accent on Stereo
WILLIAM G. DILLEY*
The cover photo is a view of the combination end table /coffee table that houses the TV remote
control. It could, just as easily, house an entire receiver in this day of compact components. This
unit is part of the author's three separate stereo systems which are described in some detail.
Photographs by Dick Jones, San Bernardino, California
FOR ANYONE WHO is
actively engaged
in audio endeavor, the need for a
high -quality reproducing system is
quite obvious. It is difficult to impart
the advantages or disadvantages of the
various aspects of audio reproduction
equipment by words alone, and some
demonstration is usually mandatory for
the uninitiated.
°4168 North 425 West Ogden, Utah 84404
In order to fulfill this requirement,
the author embarked upon a spare -time
home- installation venture that did not
culminate until some nine months and
three stereo systems later, and actually
is really never completed.
The initial objective was to install a
high -quality system of moderate price
range, but this objective slowly became
obscured by mounting enthusiasm to
improve each portion of the system as
"Low- cost"
unit
with E -V SP -12B
speakers in end
compartments
with reflector
doors.
the work progressed. Needless to say,
the completed stereo system does not
have even a nodding acquaintance with
that first established objective of moderate price range! The quality portion
of the objective, however, is met quite
satisfactorily.
Beginning with the ultimate form of
the four-way loudspeakers, the left one
has crossover points at 230, 600, and
3500 Hz. Level controls balance all
speakers to the mid-bass (230 -600)
range. The low end is a folded horn
driven by an 18 -in. Electro- Voice, and
the rest of the system is basically an
E -V Patrician with the exception that
the high end employs four E -VT -350
tweeters mounted for wide coverage.
The right system is essentially the same
except for physical layout and a lower
design with a slightly higher cutoff frequency. These changes were dictated
by the architectural requirements of the
living room in which the speakers were
to be installed.
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
3
YOU DON'T HAVE TO TREAT YOUR AR TURNTABLE GENTLY.
We
published this picture in our first ad for the AR turntable, to illustrate its mechanical
stability. Equipment reviewers, in addition to reporting the lowest wow, flutter, rumble, and speed
error of any turntable they had tested, raved about its insensitivity to mechanical shock
and to acoustic feedback.*
But a few complaints of sensitivity to jarring trickled in. Investigation showed that under special
conditions the complaints were justified; when a floor was exceptionally springy or when
the AR turntable was placed on a shaky surface (factors introducing a horizontal shock component)
the much -vaunted resistance to jarring disappeared. We advised the users who had this
problem to place their turntables on sturdier pieces of furniture, and went back to the lab.
For more than
a
year now we have been using an improved suspension design. As before,
when the turntable is placed on a solid surface you can pound directly on its base or stamp
violently on the floor without making the needle jump grooves. The difference is that
the newer model, designated by serial number prefix XA or TA, ** will take considerable
mechanical abuse when the mounting conditions are less favorable.
Literature on the
magazines (the
*Reprints
on
turntable, plus a survey of the hi -fi equipment recommendations of four
turntable was the top choice of all four), is available on request.
AR
AR
request.
* *The new suspension would not make any difference at all in most cases. However, if you are interested in
converting your old AR turntable to the new XA model (cost $15 plus freight), please write us for details.
$ 780 O
complete with arm, oiled walnut base,
and dust cover, 331/2 and 45 rpm
5% higher in the West and Deep South
ACOUSTIC RESEARCH, INC.,
24 Thorndike Street,
Cambridge, Massachusetts 02141
Circle 115 on Reader Service Card
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
31
Lowery spinet organ and the main recording rack which
provides complete flexibility.
Since the available signal sources
numbered four-phono, tape, TV, and
organ (FM reception is not satisfactory), two Fisher 80C preamps were
selected for the central control, along
with two Fisher 30-watt amplifiers to
drive the speaker systems. A Rek -O -Kut
B -12H turntable with a Fairchild arm
and a choice of cartridges provided for
record playback, while a Viking 85 deck
provided for tape playback.
The TV set was mounted in a cabinet
designed to serve as a room divider,
planter, and corner extension for the
folded horn of the left speaker system.
A cathode-follower stage was then designed to allow the organ to be played
through the entire system.
Progress, thus far, allowed the playing of records, tape, TV, and organ,
but no recording capability had been
planned.
Since insufficient space existed in the
console for this function. It was then
decided to incorporate an improved
playback amplifier, a third channel, and
some live recording facilities. As in
most self- imposed goals, the actual
project turned out to be much more
ambitious than originally programmed,
and like the speaker systems, kept
growing during development.
The result, in its present form, is a
six-foot rack-mounted unit that houses,
from top to bottom, a Concertone tape
32
Close -up view of the equipment in the "low- cost" system to
show arrangement of turntable and tape deck.
deck, a two- channel- record /three -channel- playback amplifier, a six- position
mixer, two separate d.c. heater supplies,
and a regulated high- voltage power
supply.
To provide a maximum flexibility
with a minimum of unsightly patch
cords, a switch -jack arrangement is employed for all electronic switching
functions. The record/playback amplifier, for example, operates through the
main system when all switches are in
the up position. Thus for the normal
operation of recording from the main
console, no patch cords are required
and the unit presents a clean appearance. If, however, any switch is placed
in the nowN position, it divorces that
section from the unit, and the jack position becomes "hot." External recording is accomplished by patching from
the mixer to the record amplifiers. This
patching flexibility makes possible the
following operations:
Two-track recording from any source
available at the main console;
Tape copying from an external recorder;
Tape copying from an external deck,
using the internal preamps for playback;
Sound on sound;
Echo;
Live recording from up to six inputs;
Practically any desired type of dubbing.
To ensure freedom from hum, noise,
and microphonics, hand- picked 12AY7
tubes were employed, and were shock mounted. All critical stages contain
premium low -noise resistors, and two
separate power supplies provide heavily- filtered adjustable d.c. voltages to
the record /playback and mixer units.
No a.c. exists in either of these mixer
chassis-even the meter lights are on
d.c.
The bias oscillator operates at approximately 95 kHz, and has provisions
for noise balance, bias level, and head
balance. The last adjustment allows
identical bias currents to be established
in spite of small differences in the inductance between halves of the record
head and /or circuit capacitances. Mica
capacitors were used throughout the
bias circuit, and all critical capacitors
and resistors were bridge- matched.
The third- channel preamp is the result of electronically combining the two
main channels to eliminate any interaction between them.
Third -Channel Speaker System
Completion of this rack -mounted rig
indicated that a three -channel playback
system must be installed to utilize the
output of the tape system. At this point,
it was decided to retain one of the
original amplifiers for the third channel
and to provide two higher powered
units for the main channels. Two iden-
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
MAE
believes you should know the facts!
THE PROBLEM:
THE SOLUTION:
Achieving the total signal
of a stereo recording.
Straight Line Tracking by
Marantz.
When the master disc is cut, the cutting head travels
across the disc in a straight line. The grooves are cut
proportionately to the volume of the sound; as the
sound ebbs, the grooves narrow
as the sound swells,
they broaden. Each side of the groove carries a separate
track
one for each stereo channel. These grooves
carry the total sound originally recorded.
To reproduce the original sound faithfully, the stylus
must pick up the full track created by the cutting head
on each side of the groove. In order to achieve this result
the tone arm must travel the same straight line created
by the recording cutting head.
During conventional tracking the tone arm moves in an
arc across the surface of the record
completely opposed to the straight path created by the cutting head.
Dynamically the stylus is drawn against the inner side
of the groove and away from the outer. The result is a
clear signal on the inner channel, distortion and loss of
signal on the neglected outer channel. Consequently,
conventional tracking can never faithfully reproduce
the sound as it was originally recorded.
The Marantz SLT-12 tone arm tracks across the disc in
a straight line following the path originally created by
the cutting head. Thus the stylus, always tangent to the
grooves, receives the full signal incised on each side of
the groove. It is the only system available which faithfully reproduces the sound that was originally recorded.
The critical elements of the Marantz SLT -12 Turntable
provide maximum precision and stability in support of
the tone arm assembly. The free -floating stylus is always
fully positioned in the groove by counter-balancing the
tone arm assembly. A 12 lb. cast and dynamically balanced turntable rest upon a massive, precision -ground
tungsten carbide thrust bearing to produce low friction,
dimensional stability. Power is derived from a hysteresissynchronous motor. The precision -ground uscothane
drive belt is noted for its uniquely stable elasticity. Pushbutton controls have been installed for convenience,
while the cueing device eliminates the necessity of ever
touching the tone arm. SLT -12 Turntable $295 complete.
-
-
-
THE SOUND OF MARANTZ IS THE SOUND OF MUSIC AT ITS VERY BEST!
mrnit
Ar
MARANTZ, INC. SUBSIDIARY OF suvENSCOVE ® INC.
25 -14 BROADWAY, LONG ISLAND CITY, NEW YORK
Circle 116 on Reader Service Card
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
33
The "transient" system -an intermediate -priced unit of good quality between that of the main system and the "low- cost"
model.
tical 60 -watt amplifiers were constructed
by the author to satisfy this requirement, and a third speaker system was
to be installed in the main console.
Since the bass provided by the two
main -channel speaker systems was more
than adequate, and since no vibration
could be tolerated in the equipment
cabinet, it was obvious that the best
approach for the bass in the third channel was to omit it. Also to preclude internal vibration, the use of fully enclosed integral horns (rather than open
cone -type speakers) appeared advantageous. This type of speaker limits the
vibration to the mounting board. Two
horns, an E -V T250 and an E -V T350,
were then mounted in one partition of
the sliding drawer, with the mounting
board separated from the drawer and
damped by a half -inch foam -rubber
gasket. The T250 operates from 800 to
3500 Hz, and the T350 above 3500.
The completed system certainly illustrates what can be done, and the results are quite impressive, but the enthusiasm of the majority of people does
not warrant such expenditure. Therefore, design commenced immediately
on a second system of not only moderate price range, but rather a minimum
cost commensurate with high fidelity
standards.
The
"Low- Cost" System
This system was located in the study,
and provided a ready comparison of
quality between these two arbitrary
limits of the cost spectrum. The integral stereo unit performs with a clarity
not usually associated with inexpensive
systems, and under separate listening
conditions impresses the novice quite
favorably. Direct A -B comparison (of
the same source material) from one
system to the other leaves one quite
dissatisfied with the performance of
the inexpensive system, and usually
he imagines the middle ground between
the two as an ideal compromise between quality and expenditure.
It follows, of course, that just such
an intermediate unit should grace the
premises if the spare time, interest, and
energy were still present for this ever
expanding project.
This unit materialized along the
same exterior design as the low -cost rig,
but with much improved internal components and speaker enclosures. The
finished unit was placed in the family
room in what I now refer to as the
"transient" position, for although three
separate stereo units are always present, only two of them remain permanently. The third unit occupies the
transient position only until a new and
different model is ready to take its
place, and then the retiring unit is sold
to some friend who has long since expressed a desire to acquire that particular unit. The present "transient model"
is already scheduled for departure, and
is an expanded version of the original.
Needless to say, all new source material undergoes a listening test on all
three units, and such listening helps
prevent the stagnancy of continued exposure to any one system. It is interesting to note that almost any system of
some quality can be made to sound excellent with the proper choice of source
material. The converse- listening tests
of many and varied sources -is, of
course, the only true test of quality.
While two of these units were designed primarily for demonstration purposes, they have provided many hours
of listening pleasure and have provided
an interesting by- product. Most people,
when listening in the home, listen primarily to the program content, and only
rarely do they consciously evaluate the
reproduction quality of the system, but
when exposed to more than one system
they make an individual effort to note
the differences between the systems
and in so doing have taken the first and
most important step toward complete
g.
enjoyment of music -that of listeninÆ
-
Circle 117 on Reader Service Card
34
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
Of the 3 automatic turntable:
price! at 9950 only one offers ol
these features.
Look into it
cr
e8
Cl. Hysteresis Motor. The 40H is the
only automatic so equipped. Maintains accurate speed even with extreme voltage variations. Uses famous
Papst motor, found in professionzI
turntables and tape transports.
b. Dynamically Balanced Tone Arm.
Tracks any cartridge at its recommended stylus force setting, as low
as ' gram. Calibrated rotating dial
provides direct adjustment of stylus
force. Cartridge head has interchangeable insert; permits interchanging cartridges without rewiring.
C. Dynamically Balanced Turntable.
_
Ii
One- piece, 12 ", non -magnetic casting
machined to precise concentricity,
then individually tested for dynamic
balance. Weights are affixed to one
or more points for equal mass distribution. Rides in Teflon- enclosed, dust free, balibearing races.
d. Feathertouch Push Buttons. A
Miracord exclusive-only the slightest
touch is needed for automatic play or
reject. Arm responds gently without
jumping, slapping or skating.
e.Time-Tested Mechanism. The same
basic internal mechanism which gave
the Miracord 10 and 10H their repuis
,._
tation for trouble -free reliability.
Assures smooth, quiet operation even
with extended bass response.
The Miracord 40H operates at 4
speeds: 78, 45, 33 and 16 rpm, and
handles 7, 10 or 12" records. It plays
single records manually or automatically, and stacks of up to 10 in automatic sequence. It is a modern instrument for modern stereo systems.
See it at your hi -fi dealer, or write.
Benjamin Electronic Sound Corp., 40
Smith St., Farmingdale, N.Y. 11736
The
iracord 40H
Development of Pulse
Modulated Audio Amplification
NORMAN H. CROWHURST
IN FOUR PARTS -PART THREE
Further considerations on the development of this potentially excellent
amplifier system. In this installment, the author actually introduces
some of the "hardware" which brings the unit closer to completion.
W
we have
into a development like this,
one is "hooked." There has
been enough success so far that obviously there must be a way to make the
whole thing work the way we want it
to, even though at times it may seem
as if the gremlins in it are determined
to prevent us from finding that way!
Actually, as we get more familiar with
the whole technique, it turns out that
there are several ways of making the
same principle work. What we are working on is an altogether new mode of
operating audio amplifiers. Like the
superhet in radio, a few decades earlier,
we are working on a new technique
that brings with it a whole bag of new
technology.
So back to work. Adding the negative feedback was no great obstacle.
The bias of the mixer stage is changed
HEN ONE GETS AS FAR as
slightly so that without feedback (the
series transistor non -conducting, or removed from its socket), the pulse width
is definite and no slight changes of voltage will extinguish it; and also so that
shorting the resistor across the series
transistor (emitter to collector) definitely does extinguish the pulse. This
sets the range over which the feedback
will work.
Now put in the npn transistor and
adjust the base resistor, from the positive- going -pulse point (common- collector connection of drive stage) so the
height of the quiescent pulse is just half
its maximum height. This may be done
at the drive stage, with its emitters
grounded, and checked again when the
output stage is coupled on, changing
the value of this base resistor if necessary.
Getting the Required Drive Signal
At this point it is good to check the
audio stages ahead and feed signal into
the phase inverter from an audio gen°Gold Beach, Oregon.
36
erator. Check the quiescent pulses with
the signal off, then gradually increase
the signal to check what happens to the
pulses. Synchronism of the 'scope to
the pulse frequency can be achieved
simply by connecting the output side
of one of the diodes to the external
sync terminal of the 'scope ( Fig. 3-1).
At the common collector of the drive
stage, you can observe both sets of
pulses simultaneously (interleaved),
while at the collectors of the individual
mixer stages you can observe the individual pulses, one for each "side" of
the audio waveform. An advantage of
taking sync from one side (which it
should not load appreciably) is that the
trace lodes tightly on that pulse, and
the pulses on the screen can be identified from their horizontal position along
the trace.
To see what kind of following the
modulator gives to the audio waveform,
we can use the "Lissajou" form of trace
-if you can call it that when it gets that
complicated! To do this, connect the
horizontal input of the 'scope to the
audio generator, before it is attenuated.
(Fig. 3 -2) . There will inevitably be
some phase shift, so the "up" and
"down" traces do not retrace. But a
phase -shift capacitor (shown as .005
µf which will compensate correctly
somewhere between 400 and 1000 Hz)
inserted in the attenuation for the input
will correct this, removing the ambiguity due to the double trace, by adjusting audio frequency till the two concide.
Figure 3 -3 shows some traces obtained with these two time -base connections, at the points and conditions
stated.
Using traces of this type was how
the discontinuity that occurred without
the negative feedback for amplitude
control (a defect we mentioned earlier)
was tracked down. Having satisfied
yourself that this whole drive section
is working fairly well, and giving the
kind of drive you need for the output
stage, you can connect up to the output
stage ( Fig. 3 -4) which uses a push-pull
auto -transformer, with capacitors across
the output side.
Leakage inductance in conjunction
with these capecitors will serve as filtering to remove most of the ultrasonic
residue, before the signal reaches the
load. However, as we are using a method with higher inherent circuit efficiency than the original Class-D arrangement, and with lower residual ultrasonic energy generated, the efficiency
of the filter does not materially affect
operational efficiency. And any residual
that does get into the load is inaudible.
Putting It Together -Instability Appears
Now you may find almost anything
can happen. One thing we had happen
was a violent motorboating as the voltage was turned on to the whole assembly. This cannot be reasoned out in
terms of a low-frequency instability of
normal variety, but must be considered
in terms of time sequence or analysis.
As soon as the output transistors start
taking current, it is many times the magnitude of the current we've been "playing with." So the voltage starts to drop.
What does the dropping voltage affect most? What produces the biggest
effect is the change of voltage between
the phase inverter and the modulating
stages. The coupling capacitors here
have a d.c. charge, which does not
change as rapidly as the change in supply voltage that causes it, so the differential is applied to the mixer -stage
bases as "signal"-not antiphase as
would true audio input, but both working together. The phase is such that this
stage conducts more, lowering (making
more positive) the collectors and thus
reducing current contributed from this
stage to the mixer; so the pulse duration becomes longer, making the output
transistors draw more current, and load-
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
11
SOME SOLID -STATE RECEIVERS USE GERMANIUM TRANSISTORS.
(Better Than Vacuum Tubes.)
i
OTHERS USE BOTH GERMANIUM AND SILICON.
(Better Still!)
W 100 -WATT ALTEC 111 USES ALL SILICON TRANSISTORS!
(Ultimate Performance!)
NEW
°"Ä
4LMAACiC
IL
sO"ÿ g
9fi 98111QIIr?
IO1IIIIï
r18
SERIES
Only silicon transistors have the inherent
ruggedness, the ability to "take it" that
ensures years of trouble -free listening
enjoyment. And by "take it" we mean that
silicons can handle at least 200% more
heat than germaniums (the type of transistor you had to settle for in receivers until
we introduced the 711).
Other stereo receivers may use some
silicon transistors, but only Altee's new
711 is all silicon! No ambiguities like,
"Silicon output transistors for long operating life and better high -frequency performance:' The 711 uses silicons in every stage!
Many receivers advertised as "solid- state"
or "transistorized" use the so-called "nuvistors" in their RF stage -these are nothing
more nor less than miniature metal vacuum
tubes!
The rugged reliability of silicon transis-
tors
is
why military specifications for criti-
cal electronic equipment demand silicon
instead of germanium. This is the reliability
you get in the new Altec 711 receiver -and
what a receiver it is!
SOME AMPLIFIER!
It gives you clean, undistorted power. The
kind you can use, not just talk about!
Turned up to a roof -lifting 70 watts, the
amplifier has a total harmonic distortion of
mere 0.25% Even at the full 100 watts,
distortion is still only 0.5 %!
And if you want to improve on the 711's
frequency response of 20- 20,000 cps -1
db at 100 watts, you can always lower the
power and get a fantastic 10- 100,000 cps
±l db! Rocker switches plus a complete
control panel give you instant mastery of
every audio and electronic function. You
never even have to change fuses, thanks to
a
!
COMPARE FOR YOURSELF THE 711's POWER -PER- DOLLAR VALUE!
Make
Altec
Bogen
Fisher
Fisher
Fisher
Harman -Kardon
Harman-Kardon
Harman -Kardon
Scott
Scott
Scott
Sherwood
Kenwood
Kenwood
Kenwood
Chart is
a
Model
711
RT 6000
500 C
600 T
440 T
SR 300
SR 600
SR 900
344
340 B
348
S -8000 IV
TK 80
KT 10
KW 55
Price
$378.00
359.95
349.50
459.50
329.50
264.00
354.00
434.00
429.95
399.95
499.95
312.50
339.95
269.95
219.95
Watts
100
60
75
110
80
36
50
75
50
70
100
80
80
40
40
Dollarper-watt
$3.78
6.00
4.66
4.17
4.12
7.33
7.08
5.79
8.60
5.70
5.00
3.92
4.22
6.74
5.49
All -Silicon
Transistors
Yes
No
Tube
No
No
No
No
No
No
Tube
No
the 711's automatically resetting circuit breakers. Of course, there are no transformers to cause distortion.
SOME TUNER!
The 711's masterful combination of sensitivity and selectivity picks up even the
weakest stations -then hangs onto them
like a bulldog. Drift is a problem of the
past!
The 711 tuner is extremely sensitive,
with a volume sensitivity of 0.9 µv and
usable sensitivity of 2.2 µv IHF. Other
specs that back up the superior performance of this years -ahead tuner include capture ratio of 2.5 db, stereo separation at
1000 cps of 40 db. and a power bandwidth
of 20- 20,000 cps ± db.
A unique 4 -gang tuning condenser makes
the 711's special sensitivity- selectivity combination possible. The fully neutralized IF
uses the newest high -gain silicon transistors
for optimum integration with the tuning
gang.
1
-
REALLY CONVINCE YOURSELF
COME SEE THE FANTASTIC
ALTEC 711!
It's all silicon -it's all excitement! The 711
comes completely enclosed in a beautiful
metal case (walnut case optional), thanks
to its no -heat operation! Your Altec dealer
is waiting to show you the new 711. Or,
for complete information, write Dept. All
Tube
No
No
Tube
cross -section of comparably priced receivers available at the time this advertisement was prepared. Prices
and wattage
on information contained in advertisements of the respective
figures are based
ALTEC LANSING
ALTE[
A
Division of
Ling Altec, Inc.
ANAHEIY, CALIFORNIA
Circle 118 on Reader Service Card
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
37
SUPPLY
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Fig. 3 -1. Complete circuit, as checked out, with audio drive, prior to connecting on
output stage. Note connection for external 'scope sync.
ing down the voltage in cumulative action.
As the voltage drops to the point
where current drops due to low voltage,
the voltage can start to build up again.
This cuts off pulses altogether, until the
rate of climb starts to level off. Then
pulses start again, and the cycle repeats.
In this circuit, decoupling of the
phase-inverter stage proved to be
enough to regain stability at this point
(Fig. 3 -5) So work proceeded. Although the circuit was now quite stable,
the output -stage current was producing
a residual drop in the supply voltage,
which did affect the pulse magnitude
and required a lower value of resistance
in the base circuit of the negative-feedback transistor, to hold the quiescent
amplitude to its half -value magnitude.
.
38
Over -all Feedback
Next, simple audio stages were built
to precede the phase inverter and provide a means of introducing over -all
negative feedback. There are two
choices ( Fig. 3 -6) : from one side of the
output to the base of the phase inverter,
using the preceding stage as controlled
impedance so any external impedance
will not affect operation; or from the
other side of the output to the base of
the preceding stage, using the first stage
(not shown in Fig. 3 -6) as the controlled impedance ( although here it is
hardly necessary, because the base input resistance of the stage shown is
low) .
To find the correct side to connect
the feedback, you can reason out polarities through the amplifier stages. We
used arrows pointing upward and down-
ward, starting with an upward arrow
at the base of the first stage shown.
Feedback must go from the output
point to an input point where the arrow
points the opposite way, if it is to be
negative.
Checking negative feedback stability at this juncture follows methods similar to those for traditional amplifiers:
check amplitude and phase characteristics with loop open and closed, and
adjust time constants, or roll-offs to get
a satisfactory stability margin with adequate feedback. We suffered some instability here at high frequencies, but
this proved to be our own fault!
We've written more articles then we
care to remember including advice
about proper grounding. So what had
we done? We'd forgotten our own advice, natch! We'd grounded everything
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
r
The last reason in the world to buy an ADC 18 speaker
s that its price has been cut by $65.00.
(But you must admit it's tempting.)
'his is the same ADC
18, newly styled, about which High
said, "The response of the ADC-18 was exremely clean and smooth throughout its range, which
estimated to extend from below 30 cps to beyond aulibility... It is a very smooth, natural-sounding speaker
%fidelity
system that strikes us as one of the finest presently
available ..."
Electronics World reported, "The tone -burst measurements pointed up the excellent transient response and
freedom from breakup and ringing of both drivers ..."
Audio stated, "The ADC 18 ... has one of the fullest
'bottom ends' we have experienced ... This fine speaker
belongs in the top rank of available speakers..."
This is the same ADC 18 that features the first rectangular woofer. You get twice the radiating surface of
conventional woofers.
This is the same ADC 18 that is a fine piece of furniture
as wet as a fine speaker.
Buy it because you can save $65.00 ? ?? Why not!
AUDIO DYNAMICS CORP.
Pickett District Rd., New Milford, Conn.
Circle 119 on Realer Service Card
The ADC 18 is also
available in
contemporary styling
at a slightly
higher price.
cc
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Fig. 3 -2. Input connections to provide
attenuation and phase compensation
for "Lissajou" presentation with audio
horizontal.
at the output end, and the input ground
was getting a bit of everything injected
in series with it, and the whole amplifier shrieked its head off. Fortunately it
made the load hot instead of popping
the output transistors, so presumably
that part was working satisfactorily.
Eventually we deduced what was
happening and changed our grounding
(Fig. 2 -7) Supply positive must go to
the output end of the line. Connection
from the oscillator and to the 'scope
ground, must go to the input end of
the ground line, which is also the best
place to ground the wiring to chassis.
Then there will be no ground loops.
After we had changed this, everything
was stable and quiet, as in any good
.
amplifier.
We went ahead and adjusted feed-
back and were able to use about 14 db
with this model, which we had restricted in frequency range for commercial
use. We had an ultrasonic frequency of
18 kHz with an audio roll-off at 5000
Hz, which doesn't leave much margin
for playing around. But later models
have been built with higher switching
frequency, which allows more latitude.
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Our next step was to have someone
else check the thing over. Tests with
mikes and a speaker were quite impressive, and we were getting over 40 watts
of audio power, working from a 12 -volt
car battery, without bothering the output transistors, which were not those
high -cost silicons, but relatively inexpensive germaniums (in the $5 to $10
bracket). But we were careful to do
everything right: would it stand average handling?
We had tested, then listened. Our
friend reversed the procedure, as many
audio fans would: listen first, then test
to make sure their ears are working
right! He was quite impressed with the
sound, working it from a car battery,
which was the intent of this version,
but to test it, he used a battery eliminaator or charger with a rather poor regulation (which is not a "poor" feature
for its own purpose, of course)
.
PICKUP FROM A
NO AUDIO P
PICKUP FROM B
NO AUDIO P
PICKUP FROM C
NO AUDIO P
PICKUP FROM A
LOW AUDIO L
PICKUP FROM B
LOW AUDIO L
PICKUP FROM C
LOW AUDIO L
PICKUP FROM A
.HIGH AUDIO L
PICKUP FROM B
HIGH AUDIO L
PICKUP FROM C
HIGH AUDIO L
PICKUP FROM A
LOW AUDIO P
5GPII
Fig. 3 -4.
Output stage connected
final completion.
for
In consequence, after turning up the
voltage to supply full current with maximum signal, he turned down the signal,
and the voltage flew up as current
dropped before he realized what was
happening. Apparently they flew a bit
too high for one of the output transistors and it popped. After getting a replacement and putting it in, he was
more careful. But something else had
gone haywire: the replacement transistor, in the socket of the one that had
PICKUP FROM
B
PICKUP FROM
LOW AUDIO
LOW AUDIO P
PICKUP FROM A
HIGH AUDIO P
PICKUP FROM B
HIGH AUDIO P
PICKUP FROM D
HIGH AUDIO L
PICKUP FROM E
HIGH AUDIO L
C
P
PICKUP FROM C
HIGH AUDIO P
PICKUP FROM F
HIGH AUDIO L
'
Fig. 3 -3. Traces obtained at points identified on Fig. 3 -1. Letter P signifies use of internal time base of half the ultrasonic frequency, locked by external sync using the connection shown in Fig. 3 -1. Letter L signifies use of audio input to horizontal input of 'scope, to get "Lissajou" display. Note that in P displays, positioning identifies which pulses belong to which side.
40
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
The splendor of Sound Unbound
...now in a superb
compact music system
-a
Harman -Kardon, creator of Stratophonic Sound
totally new experience in stereo realism-now brings
you this incredibly lifelike quality in a complete
stereo, music system ... the great new Stratophonic
SC -440.
Here for the first time are perfectly matched components: a powerful all- transistor AM /FM stereo
receiver, built -in Garrard automatic turntable with
magnetic cartridge and diamond stylus, and a pair of
radically new Harman -Kardon speakers, designed
especially for this remarkable system
speakers
which disperse the sound widely to produce the full
stereo effect even in a small room.
...
At $399*, the SC -440 brings the magic of Stratophonic Sound quite down to earth. This system is a
worthy addition to the widely acclaimed Harman Kardon Stratophonic Series of solid -state stereo
receivers, tuners, and amplifiers. You'll like it on
sight ... buy it on sound.
Send the coupon for beautiful illustrated HarmanKardon catalog.
*Slightly higher in the West. Dust cover optional.
Harman-Kardon, Inc., Dept. A -11
P.O. Box 12866, Phila., Pa. 19108
complete information
transistor stereo equipment.
Send me
LEADER IN SOLID -STATE STEREO COMPONENTS
harman kardon
Subsidiary of The Jerrold Corporation
on
Harman -Kardon all -
Name
Address
City
State
Zip No
Circle 120 on Render Service Card
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
41
100
changed. Prior to letting my friend have
the amplifier, I had tried a dozen transistors of each type in the various sockets that used them, and found results
consistent enough to believe the amplifier would work satisfactorily provided
transistors of the right types were used
in all the right sockets. But this one had
changed its characteristics further than
the maximum deviation I had found between new transistors, although it had
not blown.
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Anyway, I felt that a circuit in which
the safety of output transistors appeared to depend rather vitally on a
certain pair of transistors (in this case
the modulating stage) staying "put"
rather closely, was not the best we could
do. I had already thought of another
way to do this part, so I set to work,
ripped this section out and started
again.
Briefly, the new way to do the job
of phase -inverte
stage to achieve stability.
Fig. 3 -5. Decoupling
popped, started to overheat quickly.
So, reluctant to pop more transistors
without knowing what he was doing,
he hurried my baby back to me!
Apparently the over -voltage strain
had been a little too much for one of
the modulator-stage transistors. It had
not popped, but its characteristic had
consists of removing the modulating
stage (before the mixer stage) as an
amplifying stage, and using resistors to
achieve the bias for the mixer stage,
with the negative pulse feedback applied to the top end of these resistors
(Fig. 3 -8) . Then audio is introduced
through an a.c. coupling of suitable
form, with series resistors to convert a
basic voltage signal (from the phaseinverter stage) to the required current
signal.
At this point the change seemed obvious and much more sensible. But
when we tried it, new instabilities appeared. The positive feedback, to sharpen the pulses, had to be taken from the
common collector of the drive stage to
the mixer bases, instead of the preceding stage, which has now been eliminated. But won't this mean we'll have to
use separate collector resistors for the
drive stage?
Actually, separate collector resistors
( Continued on page 70)
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R3, R4, C:0,
42
C4)
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
You are
n 4r4 wl nt
N
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nl
looking at the world's only true longhair cartridge.
a
9,l
In this unretouched photograph, the
long, black hair of the brush built into
the new Stanton 581 is shown in action
on a rather dusty record. Note that all
the loose lint, fuzz and dust are kept out
of the groove and away from the stylus.
That's why the Longhair is the ideal
stereo cartridge for your Gesualdo madrigals and Frescobaldi toccatas. Its protective action is completely automatic,
every time you play the record, without
extra gadgets or accessories.
The stem of the brush is ingeniously
hinged on an off- center pivot, so that,
regardless of the stylus force, the bristles
never exert a pressure greater than 1
gram and always stay the right number
of grooves ahead of the stylus point. The
bristles provide just the right amount
/wl A] ßl G]
s:
of resistance to skating, too.
But even without the brush, the
Stanton 581 Longhair is today's most
desirable stereo cartridge. Like its
predecessors in the Stanton Calibration
Standard series, it is built to the uniquely stringent tolerances of Stanton professional audio products. Its amazingly
small size and light weight (only 5
grams!) make it possible to take full advantage of the new low -mass tone arms.
And its frequency response is factory
calibrated within 1 db from 20 to 10,000
cps and within 2 db from 10,000 to
20,000 cps. Available with 0.5 -mil diamond (581AA) or elliptical diamond
(581EL) ; price $49.50.
For free literature, write to Stanton
Magnetics, Inc., Plainview, L.I., N.Y.
Stanton
AUDIO
Circle 121 on Reader Service Card
NOVEMBER, 1965
43
RECORD REVUE
Edward Tatnall Canby
JUNIOR ELECTRONICS
Electronic
Music.
(Lewin- Richter,
Ilhan
Mimaroglu, Tzvi Avni, Walter Caros).
Turnabout TV 34004S stereo
This discful of intriguing sound
is a kind of low -price junior counterpart to Columbia's recent electronic
music album; both are products of
the very "in" electronic music center at Columbia University, now
handsomely foundation-aided and
sporting the unique RCA Music
Synthesizer. (Well, it's the only one
of its kind made by RCA, anyhow.)
The Columbia disc featured some
of the bigger shots plus a brace of
then -current student composers;
this one, with the blessing of originator Vladimir Ussachevsky of Columbia, presents more students
from many lands.
Well, tape music is tape music,
you'll be inclined to say. It all
sounds alike -but then, so does Mozart. Who knows? Each of these
works is, according to its author's
own account, a monumental study
in extremely careful sound- architecture, done with the typical deadly seriousness of the young experimenter. If there is humor (and
you will be bound to laugh when
you aren't supposed to), then it is
not often admitted -though occasionally it is. I liked the Tombeau
d'Edgar Poe, which breaks up the
sound of a Turkish reader orating
a poem about Poe-in French, by
Mallarmé-treated "with the entire
range of classic studio techniques" including plots, gurgles,
belches, and gargles. Also Bowery
Bum, whose earth -shaking noises
apparently all originate from one
rubber band, twanged. One piece
has a vocalizing element (the composer's wife), another student composer pits a "live" flute and a "live"
piano against electrical sounds in
two of his pieces. (The "live" in-,
struments are recorded, minus dick-'
ering. )
It's all settling down to a pattern,'
or should I say a vast complex of
patterns. Now, if we could only begin to hear the Higher Organization for ourselves, we might be able
to separate the electronic sheep
from the goats! No doubt Posterity
will be able to tell in an instant.
I have my own ideas, but they probably aren't yours.
-
SPECIALTY BAROQUE
Henry Purcell: Music for the Chapel Royal.
Soloists, Choir of St. John's College, Cambridge, Academy of St. Martin -in- the -Fieds.
Argo ZRG 5444 stereo
Here's a British offering, one devoted entirely to the great Purcell and
44
the music composed for that giddy, sharp
monarch Charles II, who was brought
up in exile in France and came back
to England full of French ideas and a
decided taste for the new Baroque instrumental music, even in his Chapel.
He was right on the crest of the musical
wave of the time, the "modern" trend
of the day, King Charles, and Purcell
was right with him.
Purcell's anthems for the Chapel Royal are accordingly spiced with solo
parts and orchestral music in a rich
tapestry, though the traditional elements
of an Anglican service are still there
boy solos, boy choir, countertenors and
what -not. But what counts most, of
course, is the persuasiveness of Purcell
himself, the finest composer Britain
produced for many an age. It shows.
You can hear it.
Six anthems on the records, varying
greatly in length and make -up. And an
authentically British group of performers, right out of Cambridge, which is almost the same as being right out of
Oxford.
-
Zelenka: Sonatas IV, V, VI for Two Oboes,
Bassoon and Continuo.
Cambridge CRS 1814 stereo
They've found another lost composer,
this one is quite a character, in his
Baroque (1723) style a Bohemian -that
is, a Czech -whose music is of the Bach Vivaldi-Handel period, sounding more
like Telemann than any of those. His
music is unusual in its virtuoso writing
for oboes and bassoons as well as for
the length of the movements, which are
as long as those of comparable Bach
works. (Bach's music is not notable for
brevity.)
The two oboes and bassoon, plus continuo of harpsichord and cello or, in one
sonate, a second bassoon, make a rich,
chortling melange of sound; oboists and
bassoonists will be startled at some of
the things these players must do. Pretty
fancy interesting, solidly made harmony
and good professional Baroque counterpoint-this man was no amateur. It's
good, enterprising music any way you
look at it.
Hay Toubman and Wilfred Burkle
play the oboes, John Miller the solo bassoon, with Daniel Pinkham at the harpsichord, the whole recorded in Jordan
Hall in Boston.
Heinrich Biber: Eight Sonatas for Violin and
Continuo (1681). Sonya Monosoff, Melville
Smith, hps., Janos Scholz, gamba.
Cambridge CRS 1812, 13 (2) stereo
Here's the same superb and winning
combination that appeared awhile back
in the big Cambridge album of Scordatura violin sonatas by this man Biber
really first -rate "unknown" composer,
master of the early Baroque, plus an
extraordinarily musical lady violinist
and an unusually fine sound produced by
Cambridge's recording team.
Biber? A Bohemian -born composer
who ended up in Salzburg, preceding
-a
Mozart there by a century, a contemporary of the great Corelli (nine years
older, in fact) and a German-Corelli-ofthe- violin whose music is as good for my
ear as that of the far better known
Italian master. Moreover, it isn't copied
sonatas with their
-these splendid little were
printed when
virtuoso violin tricks
Bach and Handel were minus -four years
old and Corelli himself was not even yet
compoestablished as a leading Italianmusic
of
ser. Quite extraordinarily rich
its sort.
Monosoff? She plays with a gorgeous
big tone and the most sensitive atviolin.
tuned pitch I've ever heard in a harpsiThe continuo accompaniment,
excellent,
is
chord and viola da gamba,
too. It comes from the grave. Melville
Smith died in 1962 shortly after these
tapes were completed.
Julian Bream in Concert (Lute music of Dowland and Byrd; Dowland Songs) with Peter
Pears, tenor
RCA Victor LSC 2819 stereo
Julian Bream is to the lute what . to
er, well, what Benny Goodman was He
days.
the Clarinet in the bad old Quite
serisure can play a mean lute.where many
ously, he "brings it to life"
merean earlier present-day performer
ly made it sound antique. The Elizabethan music sparkles with color and
(inexpression. Guitarists in particular
hear
cluding folk-type) will wantthetoinstruwith
what this man can do
ment but anybody can go along with
its lively sound.
The first side here is worth the whole.
it inExcerpted from Bream concerts,
cludes just enough of his highly humorreacous commentary (with audience
of
tion) to inform and to break a lotside,
ice for you. Excellent! The second
the eminent
featuring Peter Pears, happy.
Pears,
British tenor, is not so
as he once
young
as
alas, is no longer
far from
was and the singing here is and
physaccurate, often tired soundingwho know
ically out of tune. Those
intuitive
a
good
Dowland and /or have
ear will love the songs, but this performance is not for the newcomer.
Forget about Side 2 -buy the record
for Side 1. Well worth it.
Music of the 17th and 18th
Centuries. Luigi Ferdinando Tagliavini, Serassi
organ, Piscogne. Music Guild MS 129 stereo
Italian Organ
kind
This is a first -rate disc of its more
and at a bargain price. It's one
for
example of the new Economic Law
records: the more abstrusely connoisthe
cheaper
seur -like the music, the
rather
disc! Music Guild was once anow,
as
exclusive connoisseur's label;has been
part of Westminster, itnew Bargainwhisked in a jiffy to the
Basement Baroque price slot. Who can
complain? Not me!
An unusual collection of "early" Itala fine old
ian organ works played on
for the music
organ (though a bit "late" man
who can
a
by
-mid -19th century)
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
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Circle 122
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
aim
MINiIE7 rt
9500 W. Reno
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Reader Service Card
45
Have you read this
EQUI PMENT
OM=
PROFILE
from the February, 1965, issue?
"NETWORK" SPARK INJECTOR
With the curiosity indigenous to a long -time
hi fi enthusiast, this observer was naturally intrigued by the advertisement of this product in a
recent issue. "High Fidelity" performance from an
automobile appeared to be a new category of
criteria.
Accordingly we obtained one for "test," not
knowing just exactly how one would measure performance of such a device with the sort of objectivity we attempt to attain with the usual hi fi
component.
In the first place, installation is slightly simpler
than claimed in the advertisement, since it took
just eight minutes to put it in place, connect the
four wires, and start the car
4600 -lb 1961
model. It started off immediately -better, if any-
-a
thing, than usual. Then, before essaying any longtrips, we "broke it in" around town for long
enough to have confidence that it would continue
to work -no real problem if it hadn't, really, since
it is only necessary to move two wires from their
usual terminals to a third one, all of which are
readily accessible, to restore the normal ignition
system to operation.
After sufficient local driving to establish confidence, we went on a couple of 450 -mile trips.
There was no noticeable performance difference up
to 60 mph, but above that when acceleration
usually drops off, it was another story. Step on
the gas at 60 and the car simply jumped-about
like it usually did at 30. With the usual test figure
of time to reach 60 from a standing start, we
measured 10 seconds, and another six from 60 to
80-sports -car performance from the "family
sedan." A more important figure for the user is the
gasoline mileage, which showed an increase of 13
per cent over the normal ignition system. This was
on a reasonably accurate controlled test. On a
500 -mile trip, one way was with the Spark Injector
and the return on normal ignition.
We had previously used another type of transistorized ignition for some 15,000 miles without
changing plugs or points, and both were still like
new -no point wear at all. With no stress on the
points they should last until mechanically worn
out, but not from pitting of the contacts.
Later we had the opportunity of observing a
bench comparison of the Spark Injector with a
normal ignition system. At engine speeds of over
4000 rpm, the normal- system spark became erratic,
and ceased altogether at about 5000. With the
Spark Injector, the spark was still "fat" up to
7000 rpm, which is well above any speed a normal
engine ever reaches.
With increased gasoline mileage, snappier acceleration at high speeds, easier starting, and
longer spark -plug and point life, we are most enthusiastic over the Spark Injector.
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Circle 132 on Reader Service Card
really bring out the sense of the rather
difficult organ music of the 17th century.
The first side, all 17th-century, centers on Frescobaldi, the "father" of organ music, but also includes three items
each by Trabaci and Merula. Most organists can make nothing out of these
masses of rapid scale passages, ornamenting obscure and modal -sounding
harmonies. Our man, instead, thrives on
the stuff-and so do we, as listeners. It
makes sense.
The second side is easier because
later; but it is still enterprisingly unusual. Two D. Scarlatti sonatas, ordinarily heard on the harpsichord but excellent on organ manuals, plus listenable
items by Pasquini, Rossi, Zipoli -three
by the last-named.
An excellent idea to play not one but
three items each by three lesser composers. Gives us a good sense of their
musical personalities.
BIG BAROQUE
Bach: The Six Brandenburg Concertos. SouthWest German Chamber Orch., Friedrich Tile -
gant
RCA Victor LSG 7038 (2) stereo
Some few months after Vox's excellent ominbus box of Brandenburg concertos and Bach concertos for violin
(Auno, Oct. 1965), big old RCA Victor
barges into the High Baroque with this
Brandenburg album -and it's good. Very
good.
RCA, indeed, is beginning to show
signs of an awareness that Baroque is
here to stay on records and that the
standard American or European symphony orchestras aren't going to do it
justice. Instead of the Chicago or Boston Symphony here, we have an "unknown" German outfit-probably at a
much lower cost to RCA. And the results are tops. The style is good, the
music is lively, beautifully played and
beautifully recorded in non -Dynagroove.
Vox's Brandenburgs are good, too.
(SVBX 567). The two albums are gratifyingly within an over -all tradition of
knowledgeable performance. RCA's is
the cleaner sound, in a more expansive
acoustics, in fact quite lovely, all golden
sheen. The Vox sound is more chamber like -which is a 100 per cent OK option,
and very authentic. Even so
found
the expansive RCA sound quite thrilling, especially at loud volume. There is
a good close -up clarity and separation
for the many solo instruments and it
goes well with the over-all bigness.
-I
Recorder players (the musical instrument!) will note with interest that Vox
uses two solo recorders in No. 4, rightly.
RCA's version has two flutes, instead.
Vivaldi: The Four Seasons. New York Philharmonic, Bernstein.
Columbia MS 6744 stereo.
Not bad! Not bad at all, considering.
It's a very touchy thing for the big
American symphony orchestras, this
new craze for Vivaldi and for Baroque
in general. They are dismally unsuited
to it, out of a wholly different tradition.
the big 19th century symphony ensemble grown even bigger in the 20th. Most
of our players (and a lot of conductors)
are almost totally ignorant of present
Baroque goings -on elsewhere. Not good.
And so Bernstein has done relatively
nobly here. A small string group, of the
right size, definitely (or so it sounds
which is what matters). He plays his
own harpsichord continuo, and does it
nicely, with a minimum of ostentation.
His violin concert master, John Corigliano, plays the main violin solo and does
it well, inspite of obstinately wrong
ornamentation. The other (anonymous)
Philharmonic solos are good too.
Only the ripieno players. the "background" orchestral strings that play the
loud tutti parts, are not really up to
present Baroque -style standards else-
-
where. They remain, so to speak, unconvinced. They still bounce out the
fast parts as though the stuff were hack
work and dull. It sounds that way under
their treatment. And, too, they tend to
ham up the more vividly pictorial sections, the summer storms, the winter
freezes (with Bernstein's connivance)
as though to make up for Vivaldi's deficiencies as compared with, say, Richard Strauss! That gets us nowhere, and
it shows up negatively in performance.
Vivaldi is Vivaldi. And he was no latter -day Romantic.
Nevertheless -this adds up to a good
version of the piece, alongside of any
body else's; which is saying a great
deal, let me tell you.
Maybe the N.Y. Philharmonic will be
the first great orchestra to survive the
Big Change that is manifestly on the
way-when the present young people
grow up, make their piles and begin
Supporting Culture with Cash. Most of
them intensely dislike all Romantic
music, and symphony orchestras in particular! They dig Baroque instead -any
old Baroque. So something must be
done, some day, to keep our live music
alive! Here's a start.
-
Bach Organ Favorites, Vol. 2.
E.
Power Biggs,
Flentrop Organ.
-
Columbia MS 6748 stereo
Favorites can mean any old thing
in this case it refers to some of the
biggest of all Bach organ works, and no
sissy-music, either. The huge "St. Anne"
Prelude and Fugue in E Flat, and the
"Great" Prelude and Fugue in A Minor,
plus the F Major Toccata, Pastorale in
F and the Chorale Prelude Schmücke
dich. It's a super-colossal program: for
in fact it largely duplicates an 1840 program played at St. Thomas' Church in
Leipsic on Bach's own organ -by, of all
people, Felix Mendelssohn, the modern
rediscoverer of Bach. Interesting. The
program is slightly rearranged, to fit
the LP record (and one item, the C
Minor Passacaglia, is to be found on
another Columbia Biggs recording).
E. Power Biggs has superb organ
ideas. This is a brilliant one, as were
his pioneering travel -albums to Europe's
famed Baroque organs. His organ, at
home is a good one too, right in style.
His playing on this disc is, as usual,
technically fleet and stylistically correct
but musically not all it could be. Bach
isn't as big here as he must have been
when Mendelssohn played the same music. Big enough to be enjoyable, even so.
Goldberg
harpsichord.
Bach:
Variations.
Martin
Galling,
Turnabout TV 34015S stereo
At a $2.50 list price in stereo this is
surely a bargain "Goldberg," though it
is not exactly an inspired performance.
It is not in any way inept, or out of
style. Far from it. Martin Galling is one
of those classic Germans who leave no
stone unturned. He is a finished pianist
and also a finished harpsichordist, of
the modern no-nonsense school, who
knows all about proper ornaments and
harpsichord technique, is easily capable
of whirling off these difficult keyboard
pieces, and sails through the Goldbergs
with never a hitch or lapse, in the most
correct fashion you can imagine.
That's it. What does not come through
here, unfortunately, is the greatness of
the Goldberg Variations. For all Mr.
Galling conveys, they might be no more
than inspired finger exercises.
Oddly enough, that is exactly what
they are! Does one have to be "Romantic" in order to "bring out" the profundity of the music, the over -all dramatic
shape, the inner contrasts? If correctly
played, don't the notes themselves tell
their own story?
Superficially, yes. One may be very
"Romantic" with these superb little
pieces in a great big framework -wit(Continued on page 64)
Circle 123 on Reader Service Card
46
AUDIO
I
NOVEMBER, 1965
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These are but a few of the superb features of PIONEER's handsome new stereo receiver,
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ii Its large power output comes from the two pairs of pow-
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erful type 2SD -45 transistors (Mesa type silicon power
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transistors) that provide a total of 90 watts of clean
Li Other features include: a precision tuning meter for
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pinpoint tuning, replacing the conventional tuning eye;
Ii The SX -1000T has a built -in highly sensitive protective
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tors, such as in the case of overloading due to a short cirindependent tone controls for each channel, to provide
cuit of the speaker terminal, are prevented with this
the exact shades of tones you want; a muting circuit
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Di The FM tuner is equipped
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The handsome exterior destation is transmitting stereo.
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FM TUNER SECTION 4 Frequency Range: 88 -108mc *Usable Sensitivity (IHF): 2.0pv *Antenna Input: 300 ohms (balanced
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AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
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47
aK±
OUD
AND
XIIIIIT
HAROLD D. WEILER
A RECENT ISSUE Of the New 1 ork
Times, we find that a group of
young men began a training program
in Hollywood to prepare themselves for
jobs which could eventually pay $500,000
a year and more. They were the first recruits in a new apprenticeship program established by the Directors Guild of
America.
This is the first time that members of
a major Hollywood craft have recruited
and trained newcomers from outside the
industry. One of the trainees had been attempting to become a director for ten years.
The apprentices will start at $125 a
week; if after a short period their ability
merits, they will become second-assistant
directors at more than double this salary.
After three years they can be promoted to
first- assistant directors, earning about $500
a week.
Eventually the trainees will have the opportunity of becoming full- fledged motion- picture directors, a delightful prospect,
with a salary ranging up to $500,000 for
a single film, or television directors who
may make $1,500 or more for a single,
half-hour TV show.
These men were selected only after a
protracted series of interviews with officials of the Directors Guild and a seven and- one -half-hour examination designed by
professors from the University of Southern
California.
"The old system (of obtaining new directors) is simply outmoded," said George
Sidney, president of the Directors Guild.
"Some sort of a systematic, organized training program had long been overdue."
This news item indicates the serious lack
of top-flight personnel in entertainment
filming. This lack is even more pronounced
in the field of non -entertainment filming
for science, industry, education, and religion. The imminent arrival of video re-
FROM
carding in these fields will further increase
the demand for trained personnel, as we
indicated in an earlier column.
*
e
*
More on Edison's Early Work
From the material in the Edison Archives
and other contemporary sources, we are
able to further reconstruct Thomas A. Edison's early experiments which eventually
led to the invention of the motion picture
as we know it today.
Thomas A. Edison's early attempts at
combining sound and sight make it quite
obvious that he and his associates were
either not aware of or chose to ignore the
basic principle of "moving pictures."
The illusion of motion is created primarily
through our persistence of vision -the eye
requires a fraction of a second to record
the impression of an image and transmit
it to the brain. Once this impression is received by the eye it is retained for 1/20
to 1 /10 of a second after the image which
created it has been removed. For this reason any device which is to be employed
to view or project motion pictures must
include some provision for moving the
previously recorded images past the viewing lens with a stop- and -go motion. The
pause must be of sufficient duration to
allow the eye to receive and record the
impressions of the images and transmit
them to the brain. The eye then retains
each image long enough for the following
one to be received and recorded. When
these images are viewed at the rate of
more than 12 per second we fuse them
into the illusion of continuous motion.
When the viewed images are not allowed
this momentary pause the received impressions are blurred.
This is exactly what occurred with Edison's first experiment for the method of
viewing did not incorporate a stop and go
mechanism. However, Edison was not dis-
An
early Edison
photographic
cylinder.
48
lief7..?
couraged; he felt that the comparatively
insensitive emulsion employed for coating
the photograph cylinder was at fault. He
was correct in blaming the speed of the
emulsion; however, as we know today, this
was only one of his problems. They tried
three or four different types of emulsions.
The most successful evidently was the still
very insensitive collodion/silver- bromide.
It was Marey, one of the early moving picture experimenters, that we can thank,
and Edison did credit him for the next
step in the invention of motion pictures,
for in his Chronophotographs, he employed
gelatin silver bromide plates which were
considerably more sensitive than the collodion emulsion Edison had employed in
his previous experiments. These, in addition, were made even more sensitive by
ammonia acceleration.
To again quote Dickson's Century article, "A hold leap was made to the gelatin/
bromide -of-silver emulsion." A distinct improvement was noted when the microphotographs were viewed as "stills" for this
emulsion was much more sensitive. However, the grain of the pictures was understandably much more noticeable and most
objectionable. The pictures were, of course,
still blurred due to the continuous motion
of the cylinder during recording.
The next step was obvious -since the
grain was objectionable due to the large
magnification required, why not make a
larger image which would require less magnification and thereby result in less grain.
This did not solve the problem, however,
for the cylinders still moved continuously.
In addition, Edison was confronted with a
new problem -due to the increased image
size and curvature of the photographic cylinder the microscope employed for viewing could not be focused evenly and only
the center of the picture was in focus. The
next experiment employed a larger photographic cylinder, one whose greater diameter would provide less curvature -it was
built and the experiment continued- unsuccessfully. There was evidently still too
much curvature, for Dickson writes ( September, 1933, J.S.M.P.E.), "I have not
mentioned some of my earlier failures,
such as the use of vertical disc, which,
however, being flat, got rid of the distortion of the drum." Edison's insistence
upon combining sound and sight was to
cost him almost a year's delay in obtaining
the first successful moving pictures.
As Dickson was to comment later in the
Century article, "The establishment of harmonious relations between the kinetoscope
and the phonograph was a harrowing tack
and would have broken the spirit of inventors less inured to hardship and discouragement."
Incidentally, this Century Magazine article written in 1894 makes most interesting
reading, for it contains descriptions which
better fit the modern home video recorder
than they did the Edison kinetoscope of the
period. For those of our readers who are
interested, this most prophetic article appears in June, 1894, issue, and can be seen
in most larger public libraries. It is also
one of the best contemporary accounts of
Edison's invention of the kineto- phono(Continued on page 60)
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
71
110
Now, there's a tape that lets you
vivAti
V
V
/. .N
record twice the music per foot.
How? It's so sensitive you can cut
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Savings start with this box.
SCOTCH` Brand "Dynarange" Series Recording Tape is the name on the box. The tape
that just prepared your recorder for the best
performance of its life. This new tape makes all
music come clearer, particularly in the critical
soprano or high- frequency range. So much
clearer, you can now record at 3% ips and enjoy
all the fidelity until now possible only at 7% on
your recorder. Your dealer has a demonstration
reel that proves the case.
And by cutting your recording speed in half,
you won't need as much tape -can save 25% or
more in costs. Or, you can use new "Dynarange"
Tape at 7'/2 -and discover sound quality you
didn't know your recorder had.
The technical achievement behind all this ...
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
we've cut background tape noise (what little
there is in "SCOTCH" Recording Tape) in half
so the iistening's better. And we made the wear life better, too! 15 times greater than ordinary
tape. Exceedingly low rub -off keeps equipment
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Hear new "Dynarange" Tape demonstrated at
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"SCOTCH"
9H10 THE PLAID DESIGN ARE REG. TMS OF 3M CO., ST.
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55119. 01965,
3M CO
magnetic Products Division 3PrAti
49
KEEP
I'OIJIi,
RECORDER
IN
'l'I l' 'l'() l'
SHAPE
BY
ALWAYS
USING
'l'IP 'l'O l'
A
TAPE!
t*
HERMAN BURSTEIN
Send questions to:
Herman Burstein
280 Twin Lane
Wantagh, N.
E.
Y.
Include stamped, self -addressed
envelope.
Headphones Across Speaker Connections?
Q. I have a Tandberg Model 64 and
wish to connect high quality stereo headphones to its outputs. Can I use the headphones for connection to the speaker outputs of my amplifier?
A. You require high -impedance headphones to avoid overloading the Tandberg.
Although there will be substantial signal
loss if these headphones are connected to
a power amplifier, there might be sufficient
TARZ/AN
A good tape recorder deserves good
care. Handle yours respectfully, maintain it regularly, and protect it by using
brand -name tape exclusively.
Off-brands and "white box" tapes are
manufacturer rejects! They give you no
assurance of quality in performance, and
they may seriously damage the magnetic
recording head in your instrument.
Brand -name tape protects you and your
recorder.
Of course, we hope you'll choose
Tarzian Tape. (Triple your tape recording fun; buy it three reels at a time.)
The finest materials, most advanced
manufacturing techniques, and strictest
quality control are your assurance that
you can't do better.
FREE: Our brand-new 24page
booklet, "Everybody's Tape
Recording Handbook.'
Write for your copy.
SARKES TARZIAN, INC.
World's Leading Manufacturers of TV and FM Tuners
Broadcast Equipment
Closed Circuit TV Systems
Air Trimmers Semiconductor Devices
MAGNETIC TAPE DIVISION
BLOOMINGTON, INDIANA
Export: Ad Auriemo, Inc., N.Y.
signal for your purposes. Connect the headphones to the highest output tap of the
amplifier (16 ohms or perhaps higher).
If the high -impedance headphones don't
work satisfactorily at the power amplifier
output, you can try step -up transformers
between this output and the headphones.
Copying Tapes
Q. I have been taping opera broadcasts
with my Ampex 601. I also have an Ampex
936. I would like to exchange tape copies
of broadcasts, and would like to know the
requirements to get really top -quality duplicates. rue read somewhere that the treble
has to be boosted to compensate for losses
in the copying process.
A. For copying a tape with your equipment, simply connect the output of the
601 into the high -level input of the 936,
or vice versa. At 7.5 ips the treble loss
will probably be negligible if you go
through just one or two generations of
copying. Of course, you can make as
many copies as you desire from your
original tape. With respect to the legalities
of exchanging tapes of broadcasts, I suggest that you consult an attorney.
Distortion vs. Frequency Range
Q. I ant trying to choose between two
tape machines. According to test reports,
one of them has low distortion at 3.75
ips but also a relatively limited frequency
range, while the other has a more extended range but also higher distortion.
Please tell me what you suggest to select
the better machine.
A. I think the best way out of your
perplexity is to listen carefully to both
tape recorders and choose the one that
sounds best to your ears, regardless of how
it measures with instruments.
In operating at slow speed, such as 3.75
ips, the designer must achieve a corn promise betwen extended treble response
and low distortion. The better he wants
the treble response to be, the more treble
boost is required in recording, with a
resultant increase in distortion. Another
factor in distortion is tape motion. Wow
and flutter, particularly the latter, contribute to IM distortion. It is harder to
maintain good motion at slow speed, so
that distortion rises.
Recorded Tape Problems
Q. Enclosed you will find a recorded
tape which was bought six months ago.
At that time it was played back several
times and was in perfect condition with
a beautiful sound. Afterwards it was
stored with the rest of my tapes. A few
weeks ago I played it back but it sounded
terrible, with a lot of wow. If you inspect
the tape you will notice some waving at
the edges, which is causing the wow. I
have had the same trouble with some
other tapes of different companies, but
not on all my tapes. What do you think
is causing these wavy edges? Is there a
humidity problem? Are acetate tapes less
affected by humidity than Mylar tapes?
Can the use of a metal or plastic tape
storage can solve the problem? Is there
a chance that the recording company
might replace the useless tape?
A. I have played your tape on my machine and find that Track 1 ( upper edge)
is very badly distorted due to deformation
of the tape, while Track 4 (lower edge)
is also distorted but not as badly. The
inside tracks (2 and 3) seem all right. As
a guess, the stretched edges are due to
your having rewound the tape at high
speed and then stored the tape in a very
warm place; the stresses accumulated in
the tape caused the tape to acquire a "set"
under the storage conditions. I noticed that
when I wound you tape from one reel to
another at high speed, the tape wound
into an oval rather than circular form.
This indicates that the tape was subject
to considerable stress.
So far as I know, Mylar tapes are less
subject than acetate ones to the problem
you have experienced. I don't know that
(Continued on page 63)
Circe) 125 on Reader Service Card
50
AUDIO
NOVEMBER,
1965
The Prestigious World of the Classic New
SONY
777
47,
fr:
.4i4k
11
`
is Open to only 500 Audio Connoisseurs
The new, limited edition Sony 777 was conceived for the truly discriminating audiophile who will settle for nothing less than the finest
stereo instrument. Only 500 are being hand -crafted, each bearing its
own Certified Specification Chart. In construction, design and
performance, the Sony 777 is conspicuously outstanding. Priced at $695.
Features & Representative Specifications: Frequency response 30-16,000 cps ± 2 db @ 71/2 ips. Signal -to-noise ratio
50 db or better overall. Wow & flutter 0.09 @71/2 ips. Military type modular circuit boards with all playback and record
adjustments centralized on one panel having tilt-out construction for greatest accessibility. Professional VU Meters.
Automatic Tape Lifters. Outside rotor supply reel motor. Superscope, Inc., 8150 Vineland Ave., Sun Valley, Calif.
Circle 126 on Reader Service Card
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
51
EQUI PMEN-r
PROFILE
VIKING STUDIO 96 /RP 120
TAPE RECORDER SYSTEM
This is the cream of the Viking line and
sweet cream it is too. This is not "sub professional" equipment; it is, by all standards, broadcast grade. As the heading indicates, there are actually two units involved here. The Studio 96 is the transport and the RP 120 the all solid -state
stereo record /play amplifier.
The Transport
The Studio 96, upon first examination
impresses one with its solid bulk. It
weighs in at 50 pounds and that's heavy
even for such a deck. The front of the
transport is distinguished by its lack of
clutter, as seen in Fig. 1. There are the
two reel platters, set far enough away to
accommodate 103's -inch reels. There are the
two head covers separated only by the
slot into which the tape falls. A three position digital counter is located in the
upper cover. Finally, across the lower portion of the transport are four telephonetype switches. Each of these has three
positions. The first switch, from the left
( facing the transport ), selects the proper
hold-back tension for the feed reel, 10,
7 or 5 inches. The second switch is the
speed selector. Its three positions are
labelled HIGH, ore, and Low. This con.
Figs.
52
1
trots only the capstan speed. Our sample
had as its high speed 731 ips. and, as its
low speed, 3% ips. Transports are also
available at 15 -7% and 3% -1%.
The third switch is labelled PLAY, STOP,
CUE. And, the final one is called out at
FAST FORWARD, STOP, and REWIND.
Under the grey hammertone, 5 /32-in.
steel panel are the real complexities of this
transport. Figure 2 shows the rear, with
the three motors. Two, for take -up and rewind, are hefty 1 -amp, 6-pole units. These
use extensions of their rotors as the center
of the tape reel. The third motor is a
two- speed, hysteresis -synchronous unit of
inside-out construction. This drives the
capstan via a triple belt arrangement that
wraps around the 311 -lb. capstan flywheel.
It should be pointed out that this drive
motor is considerably larger than the usual
run -of-the -mill phono -type motors.
All mechanical operation is by solenoids
or relays. One solenoid operates the pinch
roller in the play mode. A second offers a
unique fail -safe service. Braking on the
Studio 96 is by direct current application
to the appropriate motors. So too, is the
hold-back tension. These, of course, would
become inactive in the event of a power
failure during operation. So there is a
separate solenoid connected to a pair of
mechanical brakes. These are normally
on. When the deck is activated, the solen-
oid pulls the brakes off. Should power fail,
the brakes are applied instantly. The solenoid also has the secondary function of
acting as a bleeder resistor for the d.c.
power supply.
Latching relays and a memory -latching
relay are in use for the various tape motions. As a result it is possible to move to
FAST FORWARD Or REWIND without disengaging the play switch. When the tape is
stopped, the pinch roller solenoid will not
be reactivated until the reels have fully
stopped.
There is an additional relay system, using a light activated photo -electric cell to
sense the physical position of the tape.
If the tape should run out, in any mode of
operation, or break, the d.c. brakes are
instantly activated. Clear portions of tape
can thus be used as stop cues at any
point on a reel.
As a result of the interaction of these
relays the deck becomes as close as possible
to completely foolproof. It just won't snap
a normal tape. Note that word normal. The
excellent Viking manual that accompanies
the deck warns against the 0.5 -mil and
thinner tapes. The high forward and rewind speeds, and their concomitant high
braking forces, can do harm to these tapes.
These tapes can be used, but special care
must be taken to prevent full high -speed
motion by mechanically hand braking the
reels.
These reel tables have an interesting
feature. They are normally set for the
standard small reels. However, they contain pull out hubs to fit the large. NAB
standard. Also, Viking supplies two excellent screw -on reel locks that will fit all
types of reels.
Preamplifier
physical match to the transport. Like it, it is equipped to fit a standard 19 -inch rack mount, as shown in Fig.
3. Also, it has the same grey hammertone
finish, though the panel is thinner metal.
The over -all feel is entirely in keeping
v.'ith the professionalism of the entire unit.
The external appesance is dominated by
two true VU meters. Flanking these on
the outside are respectively, an equalizaiion selector ( also the a.c. on -off switch),
The RP 120
This is a
and 2. Front and rear views of the Viking Studio -96 transport.
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
Prt'iTqFP,AihrtIT
Fig. 3 (left). Front
and rear views of
the RP -120 ampli-
fier.
and a monitor selector. On the inboard
side of the meters are two push buttons
used to activate the record circuits. The
three lower knobs for each channel are
for mike, high-level inputs and for playback level. Finally there is an earphone
jack designed to accept the standard three contact stereo plug.
The rear panel has all other connectors.
In addition to the feeds from the transport, there are the two sets of inputs and
the pair of outputs. These use standard
three -contact Cannon XL type connectors.
Normal input is for high-impedance microphone and unbalanced lines. Viking has
provision, and accessory plug -ins, for converting to low impedance and balanced line input from 600 ohms. The output is
also unbalanced and at high impedance.
And, again, there is a plug -in transformer
available for conversion to broadcast-line
requirements.
The RP 120 is entirely solid -state in
design. A total of 20 silicon planar transistors; one germanium power transistor; 6
silicon diodes; 8 germanium diodes; and
one Zener diode are employed. The bulk
of these are to be found on five circuit
boards. These boards are: a bias oscillator,
stereo record circuit, stereo play circuit,
stereo input circuit, and stereo output circuit. These boards slide into plug -in contact holders. Thus they are instantly replaceable if necessary.
Servicability seems to be one strong
point of both the deck and the preamp.
Whenever possible, Viking has provided
sectional plug-in design. For example, in
addition to the circuit boards, there are
plug -in control boxes for the transport.
The over -all approach seems to be that
of a unit that will suffer a minimum of
downtime in any professional application.
Test Results
It must be
first stated that the transport/
preamplifier performed as easily and as
surely as the most fussy user could re-
quire. Tape motion is faultless. There is
no tape slap, even if the start follows a
rewind motion. What with the memory
relay system, it apparently takes considerable skill to arrive at a situation where
you can break a tape -a skill which we
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
lacked. Tape would not break and it would
not spill. Even pulling the a.c. plug in
high -speed motion will do nothing since
the mechanical relay comes into play to
brake the reels to a stop.
The preamp offers the same satisfactions.
The VU meters in addition to being electrically flat, have the kind of ballistics we
like in a volume indicator. The respective
gain pots are positive, smooth, and nonbinding.
Fig. 4 shows the 7'z -ips NARTB response
to Ampex Test Tape 31321 -01. Except for
the slight rise in the bass region, it could
hardly be improved upon.
Also shown is the over-all record playback response at the two speeds. They
were taken at a -10 dB record level on
Scotch brand 111 tape.
What the curves do not show is that
waveform purity was exceptional. Even
111111
O
Fig. 4 (right). Frequency - response
curves
of the
Viking Studio -96/
RP -120 tape recorder system.
Z _
z
+5
Ñ
D
111111
111111
SSP -200
MATTES
.:
K<
AMPLIFIER
Listening to premium amplifiers these
days is rather the same as sampling several different vintage wines from the same
province. There may well be subtle differences in flavor and bouquet-but the acknowledgement of greatness is there. So
is it with this amplifier. We do not subscribe to the concept that all good amplifiers sound alike. None of them is yet
perfect, and imperfection is all too audible.
Still, the really good product, as with the
great wine, offers immense satisfaction.
This Mattes amplifier is a first product
for a new company. If it is a portend of
things to come, we await them with eagerness. Certainly, this amplifier sounds as
good as any we have heard. Maybe even
better.
1"!!I
.ligü.
t
.
Flutter and wow measurements came up
with figures that exceed the manufacturer's specifications. At 71/2 ips, flutter was
0.08 per cent; at 3l ips, it was 0.2 per
cent.
Separation at 1000 Hz was in excess of
the signal-to -noise ratio. At 10,000 Hz the
channels were still 46 dB apart. At the
extreme of 20,000 Hz separation was a
highly satisfactory -41 dB.
Finally, we checked the fast forward
and rewind speeds. 1800 feet on a 7 -inch
reel took 1 minute 28 seconds. A bit slower than we expected but certainly satisfactory.
At $598.95 for the Studio 96 and $399.00
for the RP 120, much is to be expected
from this system. What the specifications
fail to tell, and our physical examination
did, is that these units are built to last.
One of the prime demands of a professional piece of gear is a long -term reliability. This is something that is difficult indeed to test in the laboratory. However,
we can see the quality of componentry
used. Good solenoids and relays are expensive. But to the professional that expense is an economy since down time is
lost money. These Viking units show every
evidence to the effect that down time
will be a rarity. Further, the units are
readily serviceable. Add, to this the fact
that our ears fully agree with that which
our instruments have found. The net result is a pair of units that have every
right to that much abused word "profesCircle 200
sional."
at the extraordinary high frequency extremes harmonic distortion was extremely
low. We also made specific measurement
of IM distortion at various record levels.
At a 100 per cent equivalent figure, IM
was 2.8 per cent. Note that this is playback off the tape. This is indeed an excellent figure.
Total signal -to -noise unweighted was -47
db left and -45 db right. This is below
a maximum 1000 Hz signal and also represents an excellent figure for quarter track heads.
+5
,
i111111u111111
r1111111
STANDARD TAPE PLAYBACK -71/2
111
i
111/,
111111
111111q
-71/2
iIMP._
*iiRll
Paoli
i111111u111111u111111
-33/4
RIMS=
RECORD PLAYBACK
ins
.1'"11
!flììIiIIiIIIUIIIIIÌk
.11111
ßi11
5
+5
RECORD PLAYBACK
w
`.
ips
5
-
I
LEFT CHANNEL
.11111
M
loo
- --RIGHT
CHANNEL
111II
Ice)
FREQUENCY IN Hz
oo1,
woo
]woo
53
This Mattes hurtles itself to the top- of -theheap category at once. It is an amplifier
with which we could live indefinitely. That
is saying a lot, and it says enough. The
price is $375.00
Circle 201
WHITECREST BOOKSHELF
SPEAKER SYSTEM, MODEL W -2
One the most difficult items to profile
the bookshelf speaker. With the exception of the most elaborate models -that
is, the 3- and 4 -way systems -they are
much of a sameness. With no practical
way to evaluate loudspeakers objectively,
particularly with respect to the potential
owners' acoustical environments, it becomes almost subjective, which brings the
reviewer's personal preferences into the
picture. Most of us who are charged with
the responsibility of reviewing speakers
will have, assuming we have been "in the
business" for a number of years, accumulated for our own system a speaker which
we must consider well nigh perfect. If we
didn't, we'd undoubtedly upgrade it to
is
Fig. 5. Mattes SSP -200 amplifier, a solid -state model with an output of 100 w /chan.
There are many innovations here. For
one, this is the first quality amplifier we
know of that will deliver an honest 100
watts of distortion -free sound per channel. Second, it is an all -solid -state product
and the first one, again that we know of,
that would seem to be completely fail safe against the usual transistor hazards.
Is there another amplifier that will allow
you to place a screwdriver across the output terminals, leave it there for a few
minutes, all while the amplifier is being
driven to overload (115 watts) at 20,000
Hz and suffer no ill effect at all!!!? This
one will.
The basic circuitry of this amplifier is
based on principles not in general hi -fi use.
There is no bias on the output transistors.
Latching diodes are used for controlled
isolation of the power stage from the
driver. Study of the schematic will reveal
many other interesting features ( For a
full discussion of the Mattes amplifier,
the reader is referred to the Journal of
the Audio Engineering Society for July,
1965.)
We must confess to having had considerable scepticism regarding the need for
100 watts of power per channel. After
all, average home levels rarely exceed 1
or 2 watts RMS. A ten or even twenty
times distortion -free peak factor is more
than adequate to handle the dynamics that
are possible from recordings. So it would
seem that there should be no power sound
difference between this amplifier and a
good 30- watts- per -channel that we have
used with our medium efficiency speakers.
There is a large sound difference. There
seems to be no end at all to the power
limits available from this product. We
had begun to develop fear for the safety
of our speakers, yet the Mattes pushed
on as if it were merely loafing. (It was.)
This is a low-distortion amplifier. The
worst IM figure, the downfall of many
solid -state amps, was 0.3 per cent. This
was at about half a watt. At other levels
right up to full output IM was under 0.1
per cent. 1000 Hz THD too, was very low
at all power levels including maximum. At
20,000 Hz, waveforms were well nigh perfect up to within 1 db of maximum power.
Over -all 1 -watt frequency response is
+0, -2 dB from 12 to 40,000 Hz. Full power response was +0, -2 dB 10 to
54
22,000 Hz. Square-wave observations bore
this out. There also was no visible overshoot. At 1000 Hz, a square wave was
completely flat- topped. 20,000 Hz showed
smooth rounding off and 50 Hz showed
a straight tilt of 30 deg.
When we first hooked up the amplifier
we were distressed to hear a fair amount
of hum in our speakers. Then we realized that it was preamp hum ( and our
preamp has very low hum ). It only takes
0.9 volts to drive the Mattes to full output. So, even a few millivolts of hum became audible. However, Mattes has provided input pots to the first stage. We
were able to turn these down to the point
where the hum was squelched but there
still was plenty of gain. The amplifier
itself had total noise 92 db below 100
watts.
All measurements were made at 8 ohms.
As with all amplifiers using transistors, the
load presented can have a profound effect
on available power. Thus, the SSP -200
will deliver 121 watts into 4 ohms and
56 watts into 16. So, no one is likely
to feel a lack of power.
The rear panel contains a three -way
switch. Normal play is in the 8-16 -ohm
position. If 4-ohm speakers are used, the
equivalent position should be employed.
When the amplifier is first installed, the
high power capabilities need controlling
lest a connection transient blow out a
speaker. So, Mattes has provided a third
position. Labelled TEST, it limits maximum
power to a safe 12 watts.
Output connections are via three -way
terminals. Dual General -type plugs, banana plugs, spade lugs or just plain wire
ends are all accommodated. Input. is by
standard phono jack. Mattes has conveniently given us parallel sets of inputs
one set on the front panel, one on the back.
The front panel also contains two lights.
One comes on if the main fuse should
blow. The other comes on, if in the event
of a long -term short, the output stage
overheats, temporarily shutting itself off.
We tested the fuse light by pulling the
fuse. The other light, however, never went
on for us. Not that it didn't work. Rather.
we gave up trying to overheat the transistors after about two minutes. with a full
power short.
It all comes down, in the end, to sound.
something we considered better.
With all of this in mind, it must be
admitted that the Whitecrest W -2 came
somewhat as a surprise. In the first place,
it was completely free from the usual midrange deficiency which is so common in
small enclosues, it had a smooth high end,
and reasonably adequate bass. The midrange deficiency is apparently acceptable
to most ears, particularly in small rooms,
( since so many are sold ), and this is probably due to the apparent reinforcement of
the mid -range by typical reverberation
characteristics of the "average" living
room-say, 10 x 12 ft. However, in rooms
of larger dimensions-and they are becoming more common every year -the midrange hole is noticeable. The Whitecrest
W -2 seems quite smooth and well balanced, extending down to around 50 Hz
at the bottom, and quite audible at 14,000
Hz, above which we don't hear much
from any speaker.
Measuring only 12 in. wide by 18 in.
high and 9% in deep, the W -2 is relatively
compact. Its components include an 8 -in.
extended -range bass /mid -range cone and
( Continued on page 69)
-
Fig. 5. Whitecrest Model W -2 Bookshelf
speaker system.
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
NEW ELECTRO-VOICE
HEAVY DUTY
DYNAMIC MICROPHONES
QNow! Three exciting new answers
to your most demanding microphone needs: The Electro-Voice Model
634A, 638, and 641 dynamic microphones. Handsome new style, wedded
to rugged, dependable performance.
They look good anywhere... sound great
everywhere.
Specify the Model 638 or 641 for floor
or desk stand use in school sound systems, tape recording, or industrial application. Or choose the Model 634A for
custom mounting on boom or gooseneck
in language laboratories, paging systems,
or wherever semi -permanent mounting
is required.
All models feature a precision dynamic
element with the remarkable E -V Acoustalloyo diaphragm for smooth, peakfree response and unparalleled reliability
despite shock, moisture, or heat. The
generous diaphragm diameter plus a
high -energy magnetic structure offers excellent sensitivity for every application.
This precision element is carefully
"packaged" in a high- density die casting,
finished in satin -chromium to stay
attractive for years despite daily abuse.
Models 634A and 641 also utilize modern, unbreakable "Cycolac" plastic for
added utility and beauty. On -off switch
on Model 641. Choice of Hi -Z or balanced Low-Z for all models.
In every way these fresh dynamics set
new standards of appearance and performance ... yet the price is surprisingly
low! The difference is in advanced engineering plus the most modern and efficient production facilities in the industry.
Put these hard -working new beauties to
work for you, today!
SPECIFICATIONS: Omni -directional. Response 70. 10,000 cps
Sensitivity: -57 db. Specify HI -Z or balanced 150 ohms. 16 -foot
cable (6-foot, Model 634A). 5/8" -27 mounting thread. List
price: Model 634A, $30.00: Model 638, $33.50; Model 641,$35.00
(Normal trade discounts apply).
ELECTRO- VOICE, INC.
Dept. 1152A, 602 Cecil Street
Buchanan, Michigan 49107
gLCUPYIN.CC.
SETTING NEW STANDARDS IN SOUND
Circle 127 on Reader Service Card
New York Art Quartet
ESP
JAll and all that
Bertram Stanleigh
SEVEN RECORDS
from a new label -ESP
-are the occasion for taking special
note of this entrant into that small
group of independent record firms that devote their output to the very latest developments in jazz. As a matter of fact, even
the term "jazz" is a bit too old hat for
ESP; they prefer to call their output simply "the new music." Whatever you call
it, you'll have to concede that the young
men represented on these new recordings
have a lot to say, an abundance of enthusiasm, and all the technique necessary
to put their ideas across. The results are
always interesting, frequently stimulating,
but some of the aspects of their first productions are a bit amateurish and the
length of some of the musical material has
been stretched out beyond the limits justified by its creative elements. Don't however, overlook these platters because they
aren't representative of the ultimate in
highly-polished sophistication. Their major
merit is in the very lack of the sort of
high lustre that comes with repeating the
same tired ideas over and over again. ESP
has a host of young musicians with new
ideas, and the very real impact of these
records is in the direct simplicity with
which they make their points.
It's clear from the packaging as well as
the music that ESP is trying hard to do
something absolutely new and different.
To this end they have experimented with
a number of graphic techniques not commonly found on disc jackets and have made
innovations in label design and pressing
material. They have also had the courage
to dispense with the conventional pseudo scholarly blather that is generally carried
on the liners of serious jazz discs.
If the reviews that follow pose reservations about one or another aspect of these
new releases, please bear in mind that
these are simply matters of detail. The
broad effect of these recordings is imposing, and it is clear that ESP has launched
an ambitious program that aspires to the
most creative jazz standards. These are not
easy discs to listen to. They aren't agreeable background music; they're not always even agreeable foreground music,
but they do have a lot to say. Not many
new records can make that claim.
Albert Ayler Trio: Spiritual Unity
ESP
mono 1002
Albert Ayler, sax, Gary Peacock, bass,
and Sunny Murray, drums, are heard in
four improvisations. Two of these are sets
of variations on a rather romantic, folksy
theme by Ayler called Ghosts. The other
two numbers are also Ayler compositions:
56
The Wizard and Spirits. For all the supernatural sound of the titles, there is nothing of an eerie or mystical sound to these
pieces. Everything moves along at a lively
clip with Albert Ayler's upper register
carrying most of the weight. Peacock's
bass has not been recorded with the prominence it deserves, and more's the pity because the present platter offers some of
the most moving, introspective performances by this former Miles Davis collaborator. Sunny Murray's contribution is notable for some particularly stylish cymbal
work.
Albert Ayler Quintet: Bells
ESP
stereo 1010
The physical appearance of this disc is
almost as deserving of attention as its
contents. Pressed on clear, colorless vinyl,
it bears no labels but has the title motif of
the record jacket imprinted in cherry red
on the back of the clear plastic record.
The jacket has the same design silk- screen
printed in bright yellow on a matte -black
background. The recording, made at a
May 1, 1965, Town Hall concert, features
Albert Ayler and Charles Tyler on sax,
Donald Ayler, trumpet, Lewis Worrell,
bass, and Sunny Murray, drums. The title
number comprises the entire contents of
the disc; it's an alternation of violent, cacophonous riffs with a round -like theme
imitative of bells and rather like a medieval folk song, sort of a cross between Frere
Jacques and Sur le Pont D'Avignon. Stereo
balance and low- frequency response both
suffer due to the live concert recording,
but none of the intruding noises that often
disturb concert recordings is present. A
word of warning -this is a one -sided record; anyone who tries to play the flip side
may damage his stylus.
stereo 1004
The outspoken and talented poet -playwright, LeRoi Jones, is heard in a recitation of his Black Dada Nihilismus, a characteristically bitter, white-hating message
read to the accompaniment of Lewis Worrell, bass, and Milford Graves, drums. The
balance of the quartet, Roswell Rudd,
trombone, and John Tchicai, sax, join in
at the end of the reading in Rudd's rather
wailing number called Sweet. Similar wailings in Short are relieved by an extended
bowed -bass solo with rim -shot accompaniment. A considerably more extrovert attitude is expressed on side B in Rudd's
Rosmosis and Tchicai's No. 6, both of
which give Milford Graves opportunity
for percussion solos that are worthy of
note.
Paul Bley Quintet: Barrage
ESP
Bob James Trio: Explosions
ESP
ESP
stereo 1003
Two side -long compositions by Pharaoh
Sanders, Seven by Seven and Bethera, are
given attractive performances by an extremely agile, well -balanced group consisting of Sanders, sax, Stan Foster, trumpet, Jane Getz, piano, William Bennett,
bass, and Marvin Patti llo, drums. The
pace is a briskly swinging one that slows
down for a long solo by Bennett on Bethera. Sanders, Foster, and Miss Getz work
tightly together, never allowing the pace
to flag or the ideas to grow stale. The recording by Jerry Newman is well spread
out and even in balance. More discs by
the same performers, recorded with the
same natural clarity, would be most welcome.
stereo 1009
Bob James, piano, Barre Phillips, bass,
and Robert Pozar, drums, are heard in a
group of compositions that make use of a
number of technical effects that include
taped sounds on one or another channel
and directional shifts in the source of
sound. Both the musical ideas and the directional devices make for interesting listening. However, the electronic sounds are
all of a conventional variety that have
been rather extensively exploited by elecronic composers. If they had been more
closely related to the rhythmic pattern of
the music played by the performers, they
might have been a worthwhile element
within the compositions. As it is, they
sound like outer -space intrusions.
Ron Blake Plays Solo Piano
ESP
Pharaoh Sanders Quintet: Pharaoh
stereo 1008
Paul Bley, piano, Marshall Allen, alto,
Dewey Johnson, trumpet, Eddie Gomez,
bass, and Milford Graves, drums, are heard
in six compositions by Carla Bley. Graves
imaginative percussion is the chief distinction on a platter that demonstrates lots of
nimble playing but is somewhat short of
ideas. Credit is given on the cover to Alfred Wade, Jr., for special engineering on
the title tune, Barrage, but aside from one
brief second near the start of that number
when the music is displaced by a sound
that resembles a skidding locomotive, I was
unable to detect any unusual effects.
mono 1011
pianist
without bass and drum accompaniment is
rather a novelty these days, but when the
pianist has the full tone that Ron Blake
manages to coax from a keyboard, no
rhythm background is required. Indeed, it
would be almost impossible for assisting
musicians to keep pace with Blake's constantly shifting tempos. Each of the ten
numbers in this fascinating recital is imbued with a tonal and rhythmic variety
that makes it a complete expression. At
the same time, the grouping of works has
been planned so that they make a unified
statement as a suite. The recorded sound
does full justice to the superb timbre that
Blake draws from his instrument. It compares favorably with the best stereo recordings of solo piano.
A solo performance by a jazz
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
T&tiA
Sid, $pWtwvt
An excitiing journey
into the World of Sound...
Model
Shown
FOR INFORMATION WRITE:
RJZIER
INSTRUMENTE. COURTESY McCOR J
MUT
CO.
INCORPORATED
1930 VALLEY VIEW LANE
DALLAS, TEXAS
75234
Circle 128 an Reader Service Card
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
57
NEW PRODUCTS
C
pact Music System. Handsome is
the appropriate word for the new Harman- Kardon SC -440 system. In the main
cabinet are to be found a sensitive AM
and FM (mono and stereo) tuner, master control amplifier, and automatic record player. The two other cabinets contain the speakers
each a two -way
acoustic- suspension- woofer system. The
turntable is a four -speed automatic by
Special Feature Magnetic Tape. Ferro dynamics Corporation has announced improvements in the performance and
characteristics of their Ferrotape line.
Available in lengths of 300 to 2400 feet,
1.5 -mil and 1.0 'mil acetate; 1.5 -mil, 1.0and 0.5 mil Mylartt: these tapes have
halt heen fitted with special leaders.
-
are among the features that pain: this
recorder directly at the serious I L
ist. Three speeds are provided: 71/2,
11/2 ips. Total wow and flutter is less
than 0.2 per cent; total power output is
10 watts. Frequency response at maximum speed is 30- 20,000 Hz ± 2 dB. THD
is quoted as 2 per cent at 3 dB below
rated output. Finally, signal -to -noise is
claimed as better than 50 dB per channel. Dimensions are 111/2 in. x 13% in. x
14 in. deep. Weight is 341 , lbs. Selling
price of the Model 555 is less than $250.
Circle 212
Super- Long -Play Tape. Micro Media
25 is the name of a new ultra -thin
audio tape being marketed by the Magnetic Media c'orporatian. A 1', -mil ten silized polyester base combined with a
high- density magnetic coating mares
I
4;arrart fitted with a high -compliance
magnetic cartridge. The amplifier/control
center offers 36 watts of IHF power output. The tuners offer sensitivities of 2.9 µv
IHF on Flt and 50 µv /meter on the AM
band. The speakers each contain a 10inch woofer and a 31/2 -inch curvilinear
price
ultra - wide -dispersion tweeter. List
of the system is $399.00. The tuner/ampli-
-
fier portion alone (sans enclosure) is the
model SR -400 at $289.00. Circle 210
All Solid -State FM Receiver. Moderate cost and all transistor design are
combined to make the new Fisher 440 -T
a majar rival to that manufacturer's popular tube -type 500 -C. Many innovations
are to be found on this receiver. The
FM front end has a four -gang design
that promises low distortion and excellent overload characteristics. All con-
Each reel now contains a front and rear
leader that has head cleaning properties.
In addition, each reel has front and
hack reversing/stop tabs for the new
automatic bi- directional machines. Ferrodynamics is also claiming improved
quality and frequency response of their
tapes due to important advances in formulation of the magnetic coating.
Circle 215
Tape Accessory Kit. The TAK -100 is a
new package from American Recording
Tape that contains the following: A 1500 foot reel of American tape; a recorded
tape featuring musical hits by big -name
artists; a heavy -duty take -up reel; a 350 foat Mail -A -Tape in a handy self -mailing
trols are logically grouped on the front
panel and include separate program and
mode selector controls. Automatic FM
mono -stereo switching, an extremely
versatile stereo control panel, time -division multiplex, and a silicon -powered
ere.. amplifier complete this unit's
armaments. One unusual feature is the
addition of girt: I. and TAPE It positions
to the mode switch. This makes it possible for the user to listen to only a
single track of a four -track tape, without manipulation of the tape recorder.
Important specifications include: 2.0microvolt sensitivity (IHF); 50 watts
IHF into an 8 -ohm load; harmonic distortion at 1000 Hz and full -rated output is
0.8 per cent; over -all frequency response
is 20- 20,000 Hz ±1.5 dB. Amplifier response alone is 18- 25,000 Hz +0, -2 dB.
The 440 -T is only í6'Y1 in. wide. 51/2 in.
high and 11 in. deep. Weight is 21
pounds. List price: $330.00. Circle 211.
Versatile Push- Batton Tape Recorder. Following the trend to all- transistor
design, the new Concord Model 555 offers
a host of practical features at a modest
price. The dress plate is heavy stainless
steel. Separate extension speaker systems in the split lid provide stereo separation adjustable to the listener's
tastes. Built -in sound -with -sound permits dual -track recordings of separate
sound sources for simultaneous play back. There is also facility for multiple
recording on the same track without
erasing. Separate VIT -type meters, record monitoring, automatic- record -equalization shift with speed change, a digital
counter and two dynamic microphones
58
possible playing times longer than here tufur possible. A standard 3 "+ -inch reel
will hold up to 1200 feet of this new
tape. Packaging of this reel is in a molded plastic container complete with a
recording time chart and product warranty.
Circle 213
Earphone Control Unit. Lafayette
Radio has just released a remote stereo
headphone control unit. Designated as
the "Stereo- Trol," this unit enables the
user to control accurately the amount
of channel separation thus making earphone listening as enjoyable as speaker
stereo listening. Separate controls affect
container; a head- cleaning kit including
liquid, applicators, and brush: a professional tape splicer: pre -cut splicing
strips of Mylar; a reel of leader tape;
and a 16 -page book of care and usage of
tape recorders. List price of the kit is
$17.95. Circle 216
Soldering Iron Heat Control. An all -
solid -state heat control system for soldering irons has been released by the
Heyacon Electric Company. Controlled
a.o. input is provided for voltages from
0 I.. 95 per cent of line voltage. The packa:4e is compact and features built -in fuse
pro t,., fion and a three -wire grounded
recel,lacte. The nominal position mark-
.,"4'I
41k
volume, balance, and "dimensional stereo"
mixing of each channel. There is also a
speaker on -off switch. Two sets of low impedance earphones may he inserted
into the front panel jacks. The unit is
mounted in an oiled -walnut finished cabinet and sells for $24.95. The stock number is 99 -1041.
Circle 214
t
ings of the control knob may be marked
with calibrated settings for both idling
current and thermal working zones as
required by government specification. In
this way, one iron may be used for a
wide variety of jobs, each requiring its
own thermal conditions. Circle 217
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE
McIntosh Laboratory, inc., 6 Chambers St., Binghamton, N. Y.
Name
Street
City
State
Zip
DON'T ENVYAI,[ItItIt05h OWNER...
McINTOSH ONLY COSTS
MORE A MONTH
THAN A COMMON STEREO
$3
The new McIntosh 24 page catalog is great.
Write for your free copy today.
McIntosh
McIntosh Laboratory, Inc., 6 Chambers St., Binghamton, N. Y.
AUDIO
Circle 129 on Readier Service Caid
NOVEMBER, 1965
59
$IIPERLAIIVE
SQUI%1 D
SOUND AND SIGHT
(from page 48)
graph, and as such should be of interest to
anyone in the video tape or motion picture
field.
For the next step in the invention of
motion pictures we must travel 5000 miles
to Polish Lissa, there Ottomar Anschutz,
a professional photographer, was working
on a similar problem, employing an entirely different approach. His apparatus
was completely described in Eder's Yearbook of Photography for 1888, and employed the vertical disc referred to by
Dickson. Edison's natural curiosity and
tremendous interest led him to build a
similar device. Perhaps it would provide a
clue!
FM -3 Stereomatic Tuner-$99.95 Kit; $154.95 Assembled.
"High Fidelity" cannot be defined numerically. Good music reproduction depends too much on little known and difficult to specify
relationships between physical laws and auditory pleasure.
Those factors which determine the quality of the reproduced
sound are rarely described in the specifications because they are
too difficult to quantify. The stability of an amplifier under varying
speaker loads; transient and overload performance; the proportions
of higher order distortion components in what is already vanishingly
low total distortion; lowest phase shift through all stages including
tone control networks: these are some of the crucial design aspects
of vital concern to the Dynakit engineer. The results of designing for
such subtle characteristics are evident in the repeated demonstrations of Live vs Recorded comparisons where thousands of critical
listeners have found it difficult to distinguish the real musicians from
the reproduction of their music through Dynakit amplifiers and
preamplifiers.
Make one of these listening tests yourself with a Dynatuner.
While differences between the best amps and preamps are not as
easily detected by the casual listener, tuner differences stand out
in typical home use tests. The Dynatuner has been universally
recognized as providing notably superior FM and Multiplex stereo
reception to tuners which cost far more, and which advertise much
fancier specs. WHY?
The answer in part is lower distortion on very weak and very
strong signals; exceptional ability to reject the effects of multipath,
ignition and other interference; superior AM rejection; near -perfect
volume sensitivity; vastly superior acceptance of over -modulation;
stereo sensitivity within 3 db of mono specification; and unexcelled
ability to maintain separation with even the weakest stereo signals.
Most important, though, is its minimum phase shift design which
delivers lower distortion reception of normal signals, too, and makes
possible accurate home alignment of all stages to preserve peak
Dynatuner exclusive.
performance
Prove it for yourself at your nearest Dynakit dealer's showroom,
and take advantage of the Dynatuner's newly lowered prices
bigger bargain than ever before.
-a
-a
Write for descriptive literature and complete specifications.
3912 POWELTON AVENUE, PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 19104
The device, the Electrotachyscope, as it
was called by Anschutz, employed glass diapositives arranged at the outer edge of a
circle on a steel disc which rotated. The
disc was supplied with a number of contact pins, so arranged as to project
under the center of each picture. At the
rear of the disc was a Geissler tube connected to the secondary of a transformer.
The projecting contact pins were connected
to the primary. When the picture was centered in the peep hole for viewing, the
pins closed the circuit providing a momentary flash of light which enabled the observer to see the picture.
The device worked -it provided a better
picture than Edison had obtained -but only
for a few seconds. Edison's goal was pictures which could accompany his sound
cylinders, each of the cylinders recording
sound and sight for the same length of
time. Anschutz's crude device, however,
did provide some important clues. ( Anschutz in his later models ( 1890 ) was also
to reach the same conclusion for they too
employed a cylinder instead of a disc.)
Edison returned to the cylinder once
again. He had a larger photographic cylinder built as illustrated. The images were
photographed on an emulsion coated plaster
sleeve. For viewing, however, the images
were illuminated this time by the intermittent light from a Geissler tube.
A substantial improvement resulted -the
eye saw the image only 'when it was centered in the peep hole and illuminated by
the Geissler flash. The forward motion of
the cylinder to the next image was concealed by darkness. As soon as the following image appeared at the center of the
peep hole it was again illuminated by the
Geissler flash and could he seen.
The photographic images, while far from
perfect, were now sufficiently clear for
more detailed analysis. It was evidently discovered that all blurring of the images was
in a vertical direction only, as they would
be if a still camera were jerked downward
at the moment of exposure. It then became
obvious that this blurring was due to the
rapid continuous movement of the photographic cylinder while recording the
images.
The solution was simple! The motion of
the cylinder must he arrested momentar-
Circle 130 on Reader Service Cord
60
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
ily at the time of exposure. We know today that the film must be made to pause
briefly at each exposure for a sufficient
length of time to permit it to receive and
record the image, Edison obtained still
another clue from Anschutz's device -persistence of vision would compensate for the
intermittent motion and provide the illusion
of continuous motion.
Still another model of the camera was
built. We are able to describe it in detail
from Edison's notice to the patent office:
"The invention consists in photographing
continuously a series of pictures occurring
at intervals, which intervals are greater
than eight per second, and photographing
these series of pictures in a continuous
spiral on a cylinder or plate in the same
manner as sound is recorded on the phonograph. At the instant the chemical action
on the cylinder takes place the cylinder is
at rest and is only advanced in rotation a
single step. This motion takes place while
the light is cut off by a shutter. Thus, there
is practically continuous rotation of the
cylinder but it takes place step -by-step and
at such times no photographic effect takes
place." This was the most successful model
built thus far. Edison was evidently sufficently satisfied to write on October 8, 1888,
his Caveat 110 which was sent to his patent
attorney on October 17 with a notation
on the margin to "rush this" for he was
getting "good results."
It was probably at this point, after Edison had discovered that intermittent motion
was required to record and view images,
and that it was incompatible with the continuous motion required for recording the
sound, that he decided to concentrate for
the time being on the moving picture aspect and return to the sound aspect after
he had perfected the pictures.
We will continue the historical reconstruction of Edison's motion picture experiments next month.
Æ
AUDIOCLINIC
(from page 4)
which I might like very well except for
one or two pieces of equipment. You can
see the various combinations of likes and
dislikes which can develop between you
and your friends, relations, and so- called
experts.
The main thing to consider is that if
you are selecting the system, you are the
one who must live with that system.
There are various considerations which
dictate a choice in equipment. There is
the matter of the features contained in
the equipment. Some equipment contains
features which you may well decide that
you will never use. On the other hand,
someone else might want this very same
piece of equipment because of the features it contains. The performance of the
equipment must be good, both as it appears in brochures and as it sounds to you.
All of this must be balanced against the
space available for the equipment and
against the money available.
Æ
rRAsisroRESs
I%1 I
SQl)
SCA35 Amplifier -$99.95 Kit; $139.95 Assembled.
Yes, we mean it! No Dynakit uses transistors. Further, they do not
sound as if they have transistors, nor do they have any other
characteristic sound
if we can help it. Our philosophy has
always been that Dynakit equipment should not have distortion of
any kind, limitations of bandwidth, noise, or any other effects which
can intrude on the accurate reproduction of the original. Further,
it should be rugged and reliable, good for many years of trouble -free
service. Last, it should be of fair value with superior quality at the
lowest possible cost.
Right now, we can adhere to this philosophy best with tube
equipment: PAS -3's, Stereo 70's, SCA -35's and Dynatuners which have
been installed in more home music systems, laboratories and test
facilities than any other similar components, and which have won
the respect and praise of countless reviewers, hobbyists and con-
-not
sumer testing organizations.
Present tube designs have been refined through decades of
steady progress, while audio transistorization is still in the guinea
pig stage. Dynaco is fully aware of the potential capabilities of
properly designed solid state components, and we have been working
for several years with transistorized hi fi products. Dynaco will offer
solid state components when we are convinced that transistors are
equivalent to our current tube designs in both absolute performance
and relative value, or when they are superior to tubes in either of
these respects. We value our customers, not as guinea pigs for field
testing experimental circuits, but as our best advertising medium for
our proven designs.
Current technology indicates that solid state components are
steadily improving in reliability, quality and economy. In such units
as portable radios and tape recorders, their advantages are manifest.
Further progress will undoubtedly make them suitable for critical
high fidelity applications, particularly as transistor uniformity and
reliability improves.
Comparison of sound quality, specifications and price will prove
that Dynakits offer the most logical choice of any components
regardless of whether they are designed around transistors or tubes.
It is the end result which counts, not the novelty of the ingredients.
-
Write for descriptive literature and complete specifications.
3912 POWELTON AVENUE, PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 19104
Circle 131 on Reader Service Card
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
61
AUDIO, ETC.
FILTER
(from page 14)
More of the music and
less of the distortion!
The processing- and production of discs produces a waveform in which distortion rises extremely rapidly as the
upper frequency limit is approached. To obtain the best
quality under such conditions the very high harmonics
must be attenuated at a rate whioh.is a function of the rate
of rise of distortion.x
The QUAD filters provide both switched adjustment for
frequency and continuously variable adjustment for rate of
attenuation. The degree of attenuation need therefore
never be greáter than necessary to clean up the programme
but is always adequate even for very bad cases.
For the closest approach to the original sound
Our slogan for fifteen years and our design objective for
twice that long. Ask your dealer for details of the QUAD
range of high fidelity units or write direct to:-
Ref. F.D. Acoustical Manufacturing Co. Ltd.,
Huntingdon, England.
Circke 133 on Reader Service Card
6L
crops up again and again has to do with
labor relations, which are often quite audible in the broadcast news. The word is
employee -and just you guess how it must
now be pronounced, if the air waves are
right. Nope, you couldn't guess. It's EmPLO-eee. Yep. Heard it a dozen times if
I've aheerd it onct.
Next thing you know, they'll have to get
Management to adopt the vanishing Y
too. Then we'll not only have the present
em- PLO -ees but also the managerial emPLO -ers. So far I haven't caught that one
-but I will, don't you doubt it. The van-
ished Y.
In fact I heard Nos. 5 and 6 in a
single sentence one day. Said the announcer, "just CON -sider the em- PLO -ees'
budget." That rocked me back for fair.
7. Well, ee -nuff is ee -nuff, but I still
have another category of audio English.
That's the converted word. It's a word that
is common enough in one form, say, as a
noun, which gets converted into another,
say, a verb.
Now this goes on all the time in our
dynamic language; but on the air waves
the principle gets a dizzy workout. We're
long since used to such items as the hi fi
( or the stereo), which are nouns made out
of adjectives. Or finalize, a verb made out
of an adjective. Or normalcy, still another
noun out of an adjective. The editor hereabout disapproves of convertible words
made with -wise, like business -wise (Ah
show duz. En. )- though there's a real oldy
of that sort 'which Shakespeare probably
invented- sidewise. The New Deal's prewar alphabet soup and the postwar period's
officialese, both descendents of something
called gobbledegook, are as nothing to what
is coming up now -but I'm giving way my
story.
I give you two examples of currently convertible word forms, taken right off the
air and free to every listener. The first
has to do with the oldest advertising dodge
in existence, the ultra familiar stall tactic,
to introduce an ad. The old- fashioned
forms are now standard English. "But first,
a word from our sponetc." (`But first
sor," or even simpler, "Bomb blows up
White House, Russians reach the moon,
Vesuvius destroys Italy, typhoon Annie
swamps Guam, details of these and other
stories in JOHST WON MINNIT.")
My first convertible used for these introductions, is sort of anticlimactic. I heard it
in connection with a staid, stuffy classical
music program. It went like this. "We
invite you to momentarily listen to Mozart's `Haffner' Serenade . . ." ( followed
by a discreet commercial, for two minutes ).
Now quite aside from splitting a beaut
of an IN- finitive, I just don't see how you
can listen "momentarily" to anything, much
less listen while a commercial is playing!
But let it pass. It's merely an adverb made
out of a noun, moment -or an adverbial
phrase, just- one -minute.
My other example derives from the corn-
...
AUDIO
.
NOVEMBER, 1965
monest of all familiar terms of immediacy.
When we were all kids, the cry, Hot dogs
-COMING UP! was as common as kids
camping. And every dog wagon had its
version: "Two and one on rye over, COMING UP!" And up it came, and slid across
the counter.
Radio, of course, couldn't leave this
one alone. So in no time at all, the thing
got turned into a bona fide adjective
upcoming. Made the whole thing sound
much more serious. "The upcoming conference at Geneva, according to most expeuht opinion, is CON-sidered crucial for
world ee- eventualities." But that wasn't
enough. Upcoming is, after all, a present
participle. That means it could be a verb.
So why not upcame? Or upcome? I heard
just that very verb, the other day. Like
this:
"In just five minutes, the news upcomes
-after the following message."
I almost upcame all over the floor.
-
ANNOUNCING the NEW
THOREfS
TURNTABLES
NEW - THORENS TD -150AB Integrated Turntable.you pay no more
for Thorens Traditional quality. Features galore: COMPLETELY SILENT OPERATION
. two speeds, (331/3 and 45 rpm). An integrated tone arm that incorporates the
latest safety lowering device with hydraulic damping action. An extra -light, low -mass
aluminum plug -in shell with exclusive adjustable vertical tracking angle
An
Industry First! A handsome slim -line chassis. A unified suspension of turntable
platter and tone arm. Speed regularity better than ±0.1 %. Tracking Error below
0.2% c m radius. A low speed double synchronous motor (375 rpm) drive system.
Only $99.50. You receive everything you ever wanted in an integrated Transcription
Turntable, especially Thorens quality.
The
...
Pepper MINT
P.S. NYC SPECIAL. Inhabitants of the
Big City, Eastcoastwise, ( ouch. En.) delight in their own special broadcast accents- unmistakeable once you catch on.
Of course, our local announcers are highly
professional and very polished and all that.
But they give themselves away every time
on just one syllable, always the same, the
one that sounds like the green stuff you
put in juleps and on roast lamb. MINT.
What happens in NYC is that all syllables of every sort ending with an N
sound are given the MINT treatment.
Everything from -int to -ent to -ant and
even -onn and -unt come out sounding like
so much peppermint. I give you a few
phinetikilly spelled ixamples:
Gov -mint.
Kin- siderible.
Min -hattin.
Kin -etti -kit. Apottmint. Pridicimint. Kin sensis of opinyin. Depotmint of Gas & Eelectricity.
EE -nuff? Dicididly. And don't ever tell
me that audio on the air isn't influinsing
thee pure Americin spokin languidge. Uhpoddin me. I mean in- FLU -insing. Almost
forgot that one.
,zE
TD -150 A B
The THORENS TD -124 HAS CHANGED! We've changed the color
...
we've
changed the knobs . . we've changed the motor mounts and, by popular demand,a
non -ferrous turntable. We didn't change another thing, not even the model number.
NOT because we couldn't, simply because no other change would be an improvement. The TD-124 SERIES II still has more performance features, more built -in
extras than any Transcription Turntable available today. Still $125 less arm. See
it at your dealer. (Illustrated with the Ortofon RMG -212 tone arm )
TAPE GUIDE
(from page 50)
storage in any particular type of can will
solve this problem.
There seems no harm in asking the recording company to replace your tape free
of charge, but I have no way of knowing
how the company will respond. I think you
should first conscientiously ask yourself
whether the fault was yours owing to the
manner in which you stored the tape (perhaps in a very hot attic, above a radiator,
in the trunk of an automobile on a hot
day or the like) .
Response Change
Q. My problem, in simplest terms, is
a loss of high- frequency response and an
apparent increase in bass response. Recorded tapes do not exhibit this trouble;
only my own recordings do. The tape
heads are cleaned regularly, and since the
tape machine is less than six months old,
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 19A5
-124
SERIES II
Don't settle for less than the best
E L P A
ELPA MARKETING INDUSTRIES, INC,
when you're upgrading or startNEW HYDE PARK, N. Y.
ing a music system. Have the
proud knowledge that you own
the best ... insist on a THORENS.
Circle 134 on Reader Service Card
63
head wear does not appear to be the
cause.
A. Inasmuch as the treble loss occurs
only in recording, it appears that the
trouble may be due to one or both of the
following: (1) Insufficient treble boost;
this should be somewhere between 15 and
20 db at 15 kHz. (2) Excessive bias
current supplied to the record head; the
amount of current can be measured by
inserting a 100 -ohm resistor between the
record head and ground, measuring voltage across the resistor ,and computing
current by Ohm's Law. Treble boost can
be measured across the same resistor; but
first disable the oscillator so that you will
be reading only audio current and not
bias current.
Bach: The Six Sonatas for Violin and Harpsichord. Erick Friedman, vl., Bruce Prince -Joseph
RECORDS
hps.
{from page 46)
Here is home -grown U.S. Baroque,
with all its faults and virtues. Erick
Friedman "has appeared with most of
the major American orchestras -the
Boston Symphony, the Chicago Symphony, TheNew York Philharmonic
Exactly! How should he know,
then, of the German -continental tradition in which these sonatas are played
in a pure, self -effacing violin style, the
fiddle blending into the keyboard sound
as though it were almost an extra stop
on the harpsichord? Even Yehudi
Menuhin, in England, knows a bit about
that (on Angel). Friedman attacks the
violin parts with sincerity, in good
Carnegie Hall concert style. His ear is
good enough to prevent disaster, but
some of his emotional ilungings and
slidings will make Bach lovers cringe.
RCA -next time you try this, why not
present your soloist with a pile of rival
recordings and make him listen? He's
under contract, after all, isn't he?
N. B. Bruce Prince -Joseph, of New
York, is much too knowing an all- around
keyboardist to play a poor harpsichord
second here and much of his work is
just fine. But he doesn't mix with Friedman -it's physically impossible-and so
his own playing is sometimes loose jointed, perhaps in unconscious protest.
ness Landowska (harpsichord) and
Glenn Gould (piano). The music can
take it. But there are other ways, too,
of indicating the bigness of concept, in
a more literally exact performance.
Subtleties of tempo and registration,
of pauses -but most of all, awareness.
I just don't hear it here. The "big
moments" sound exactly like the (equally important) lesser moments. It's all
the same, from beginning to end. For
my ear, the thing is shapeless and slack,
if technically excellent.
Too bad -for he plays so well, his
harpsichord is such a lovely one, and
Vox's Turnabout sound is so good.
RCA Victor LSC 7033 stereo
Who knows!
MISCELLANY
Lowell: Benito Cereno (from "The Old Glory ").
American Place Theatre prod.
Columbia DOS 719 (2) stereo
-I
-.
A song composed by
drumming fingers,
Whispered words,
a mood that lingers,
Patterned on the
window pane;
The soft soliloquy
of rain.
Sounds that whisper, sourds that roar.
The quality of sound you hear from your high fidelity system
depends on the sensitivity and efficiency of the loudspeakers
and other component parts. Sometimes that quality lacks the
full dimension of life. JBL cc.mponerts are meticu ously crafted
to work together as an organic unit, to express the widest
spectrum of sound you can experience.
Discover what sound is all about.
JAMES B. LANSING SOUND, INC.
3249
Casitas Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 90039
Incomplete report here too
played
the first side of this and found it so
unsympathetic that I listened no further. Sorry.
Like music festivals and live concerts,
stage plays do not always adapt literally
to the recorded medium, especially when
they are highly charged emotionally, or
are "controversial," with some special
significance. What goes over splendidly
in front of a sympathetic large audience sounds mawkish in the private living room.
That's part of the trouble here. The
play, out of a novelette by Melville, is all
about slavery and it is racially "hot."
Fine -but art is art, even in the drama,
and when the young sailor here began
mouthing such meaningful speeches is
"Aye, aye, Sir" and "Yes, Captain," as
though they were passages from the
bible I gave up. Didn't like the Captain
either.
Again-why not try for yourself?
There's a slave massacre, they say, before the thing ends.
My feeling is that the cause of racial
equality is much too serious a thing to
merit less than superb writing and acting, with depth and subtlety. Melodrama
gets it nowhere.
Favorite Romantic Waltzes. Phila. Orch., Ormandy.
Columbia MS 6687 stereo
Music of the Strauss Family (Johann
Jr., Josef). Eduard Strauss and his Orch.
Vox SVBX T600 (3) stereo
Here are two approaches to the Waltz.
Columbia's is big, smooth, silky and
avoids the Strausses entirely-the record
runs to Chopin, Delibes, Tchaikovsky,
Offenbach, all ultra-familiar works. This
is listening waltz music, recorded by a
huge concert-hall orchestra in a suave
and rather distant fashion (speaking
acoustically). Like most Ormandy music,
it is utterly polished and glib, perfectly
tailored and quite without profundity.
Why not? It's that kind of music when
detached from the ballets with which all
of these pieces are associated. Fine
background music.
As for the Strauss album, it is another
of Vox's monumental efforts-three
Circle 135 on Reader Service Card
64
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
whole LPs and a good booklet on 19th
century Viennese life. Eduard Strauss
is a descendant, fortunately a very musical one. The orchestra is fine, the style
solid, the impact (with plenty of big
bass) rather pronounced-much more
positive than the Ormandy stuff, and
rather better for foreground listening,
or even dancing. No point wasting all
this on discreet low-volume background
listening!
Dylan. Alec Guinness, Kate Reid, etc. Peter
Glenville prod.
Columbia DOL 3013 mono
(also DOS 701 stereo)
say-better
late than never. In the normal course of recording
there are many plays put down today
As I always
and available for home listening;
enough, of course, to keep a specialized
drama reviewer busy 100 per cent of his
time So I finally tried this one on the
spur of a moment. It knocked me for
a loop. Terrific. Or so it hit me.
I once spent part of a day watching
the original Dylan Thomas make recordings, out of a near -total drunk on
beer). He couldn't stand -but the instant the signal was given, he pulled
himself up and recited flawlessly in that
famous voice that, once heard, is not
to be forgotten. Since then, of course,
I've kept up with the Dylan Thomas
legend as well as his many recordings.
This is a play, though. Not the real
Thomas but Alec Guinness, substituting.
I didn't think I could take it.
Instead, it turned out to be a wonderfully moving, easy- going, never overdone treatment, bringing out the full
tragedy of this amazing man. And I
never hope to hear a better, more subtly "staged" LP recorded production
even though my copy is mono.
If you want an evening that will leave
you shaken out of yourself and aston-
-
ished at the power of the recorded word
used wisely and dramatically, just try
this.
O'Neill: Strange Interlude. Quintero prod.
Columbia DOL 288 (5) mono
This is very late-and only by proxy.
It came out almost two years back -and
I just couldn't face the size of it. I'm
no O'Neill fan, anyhow. But a proxy
has just listened and reported to me-
he heard "all five hours" of it with his
family, one of whom is conveniently an
active invalid with time to burn. The
verdict left me wondering whether
maybe I wasn't right: "Like all the
soap operas you ever heard, put together into one!" That's what they felt
Well -'tis a great classic, or so they
say. So if you don't like my report, go
right ahead and try for yourself! Five
very well-loaded LP's, ten full sides.
Mélisande, and the older Golaud, Pelléas' half-brother. Plus, of course, the
conductor. Here we have a first-rate
conductor (and lovely recording of his
orchestra) plus a Pelléas who is a
splendid French -style tenor with diction so clear you can get everything, a
fine tone and perfect musicianship. Golaud, the baritone, is marvelously well
done by the American George London.
Only Mélisande is a bit strange. She
is Dutch, and though her musicianship
is good and her sincerity unquestioned,
she does not have that peculiar French
voice production that is so necessary for
this strange, frail, mysteriously feminine nymph of the woods. Her frequent
anguish is, in the Italian manner, often
out of tune, her French diction is not
as clear as it might be. She is not bad;
and yet she is the one flaw in an otherwise lovely production of the Impressionist masterpiece.
Debussy:
Pelléas et Mélisande. Erna Spoorenberg, Camille Maurane, Geo. London, Guus
Haekman, L'Orch. de la Suisse Romande, An-
sermet.
London OAS 1379 (3) stereo
It isn't often I can take a whole evening to listen to one of London's many
full-length stereo operas, what with so
much folk and Baroque and what -not.
On the rare occasions, I really revel.
Debussy's "Pelléas" is an opera like no
other ever written and it is particularly
lovely in living room stereo, for much
of it is an intimate, conversational sort
of music that lends wings to the imagination and makes scenery and "action"
almost superfluous. Especially if you
can follow a bit of French -in the complete libretto, with English translation
in parallel columns.
There are really only three personages that count in this atmospheric
work-the tenor, Pelléas, the soprano,
ACOUSTICAL REARGUARD
Dvoark: Serenade in E for Strings, Op. 22
Mozart: Divertimento in D, K. 136. Princeton
Chamber Orch., Harsanyi.
Decca DL 710109 stereo
The finest in European string -orchestra tradition, transplanted to
Princeton, N. J., and Decca has grabbed
it for one of those rare domestic-made
recordings. It's a beautifully performed
disc, too though the recorded sound itself is (by present standards) somewhat
distant and undefined.
Two all- string pieces. The Dvorak
Serenade is pure late-Romantic gold, a
memorable and lovely work. The Mozart,
neatly and humorously played here, is
one of those whimsically perfect little
entertainment works of the youthful
Salzburg period. About 20 players in this
group-just right for recording and just
right for the music.
FOR SUPERIOR SOUND
C-60
Range: 30- 18,000 cps (cardioid)
30- 30,000 cps (omni- directional)
Response: ± 2.5 db over entire range
Dimensions: 3/4" Dia. x 4"
Data sheet available on request
Range: 40. 15,000 cps
Response: =- 3db over entire range
Dimensions: 55/8" x 21/2" x 27A"
Data sheet available on request
Insensitive to sound reaching this dynamic
microphone from the rear...An exceptionally
pronounced cardioid pattern produces an acoustical shield of approximately 180° that effectively
isolates unwanted sounds originating from noisy
audiences, feed -back or reflection.
quality condenser microphone for music
Its characteristics provide truest
fidelity for reproduction and recording. The C -60's
many uses and users attest to the unusual versatility of this microphone. Available with either
cardioid or omni -directional capsule.
A high
and speech.
DYNAMIC MICROPHONES
CONDENSER
MADE
IN AUSTRIA
BY
Ivoreko®
AKG GMBH.
AUDIO VIDEO
PRODUCTS
NORTH AMERICAN PHILIPS COMPANY, INC.
2.65
Professional Products
D
v,s,on, 100 East 42nd St., New York, N.Y. 10017
Circle 137 on Reader Service Card
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
65
NEW LITERATURE
yauiJ
Retail Catalog. The annual Lafayette
Radio Catalog is now available in its 1966
edition. As always, the book is free. This
is volume No. 660 with 512 pages offering
a comprehensive retail listing of stereo
equipment, citizens band, tape recorders,
ham gear, test equipment, auto accessories, radios, TV sets, cameras, optics,
marine equipment, tools, electronics and
other books -in fact, just about everything electronic for the home, industry,
and laboratory. Specification and retail
price listings are ofl., re I for most major
manufacturers and, of course, La fay et te's
vt-n equipment. Circle 3311
%ire /Cable Harness Systems. A new
four -page brochure describes the complete line of the Electrovert Company. Included in this publication are listings of
cradleclip harnessing systems, strapping
wire, and cable tieing systems; Spiroband
spiral wire -wrapping system; markers for all sizes of wire and cable; self locking permanent -type harness, and
grommet strip. Each of these systems is
fully described and illustrated. Tables,
catalog numbers, dimensions, physical
and chemical properties, and suggested
applications are also included. Circle 221
Packaged Sound Systems. This is the
Ampli -Vox Catalog No. 13278. It describes
live systems available that can solve a
wide variety of sound -systems installation headaches: The five units are a
sound- column lectern, a portable rostrum, an attache -cased portable PA system, an automobile paging and announcing system, tied a compact 35 -watt
paging and background music system.
The catalog describes these systems
fully, along with a full line of accessories that increase the versatility and
application of them. Circle 222
Component Speaker Listing. A new
color catalog from Jensen Manufacturing
Division /The Muter Company describes
the newest in their high -fidelity loudspeakers, headphones, speaker systems,
and speaker -kits. Complete acoustical
and dimensional specifications and prices
are given. There is no charge for this
24 -page booklet. Circle 223
Switch Catalog. Engineers and purchasing agents are hereby alerted to
release of the new Orayhill 24 -page catalog. It contains complete technical data
on several new series of ultra- miniature
and miniature rotary switches and pushbutton switches. Also included is a handy
rotary switch reference guide. This two page spread lists all the technical parameters of these switches in tabular and
readily comparable columns. Other products listed in this catalog include a new
transistor socket, a pencil tube socket,
bi -pin lamp socket, and thermosetting
plastic module cases and headers. Circle
-a
Model
631
Model 634 (Stereo) $597
(Mono) $468
i
If you want chromium trim, light weight,
eye- catching colours and built -in obsolescence
-if you read exciting specifications and
pretend they are true -if you acquire a
recorder solely to keep up with the Joneses
-the Ferrograph is not for you.
Ferrograph tape recorders are built in a
tradition of engineering that believes the
weight of the instrument, within reason, to
be of small moment- that you cannot have
quality without amply designed components
that there is no easy way to achieve quality.
The Ferrograph is designed for the man who
wants a tape recorder to perform as well some
years hence as it does when first delivered to
him. He is concerned with the pleasure -. the
quality instrument
enduring pleasure
adequately designed and well engineered will
give him. He is a discerning character who is
able to appreciate quality when he hears it,
recognize engineering skill when he sees
in a word, he is a connoisseur.
-
-a
it-
Ike EKduri
THE
FERROGRAPH
CO. LTD.
84,
The Manual of the Ferrograph, a sixty -four page
illustrated volume, bound in cloth, and containing full operational and technical data, is
supplied to every Ferrograph owner. You can
obtain this manual in advance however by sending S3 with the coupon below to us in London.
(Indicate Stereo or Mono).
/
Please send me a copy of the
Ferrograph leaflet.
Please send me a copy of the
"Manual of the Ferrograph" for which
Stereo or Mono
enclose $3.
I
224
Audio Products Catalog. A new sixteen
page catalog from Sonotone Corporation
outlines in detail that company's audio
products. It includes items sold to disTechnical detributor and ODM markets. the
Sonotone
tails and illustration of
ceramic and crystal cartridges, replacement needles, tonearms, ceramic microphones, and learning -lab microphone
units are provided, making this a valuable booklet for those engaged in the
replacement service field. In addition the
catalog lists the Sonotone line of loudspeakers and the new compact high -com-pliance speaker systems. All of the Sono
tone products listed are factory- packed
and fully guaranteed by Sonotone. Circle
225
NAME
ADDRESS
Blackfriars
Road, London,
SUPPORT
P
YOUR'
MENTAL
HEALTH
S.E.-1.
England
55soc,4,
?°
<M
N
os
=
`'"'^,
"t''
ASSOCIATION
Circle 138 on Reader Service Card
66
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
LECTURE RECORDING
(from page 20)
are mixed together, introducing improvements on the right one and feeding the signals thus mixed onto another
tape. Editing can be done directly
through skillful use of pause and stop
controls, and again, a cue sheet is essential. However, as two machines are
involved, editing at this stage can be
quite tricky. It can be done much more
easily through cutting and splicing of
the re- recorded tape.
In the actual dubbing the master
tape is played back on a stereo machine. Level for the left channel (lecturer) is adjusted and generally left
constant. The signal from the right channel (audience) is here given a second
boost in gain (first one was in the actual recording) depending on the
strength of the recorded signal. Again,
a cue sheet is essential. This second
channel, due to increases in gain and
acoustical conditions, is affected by:
1) considerable ambient auditorium
noise which generally produces a boomy
sound which is mostly due to lower frequencies of the audio spectrum. 2) In-
creased tape hiss. To cut down these
spurious noises somewhat, the signal is
passed through filters. Cut -off settings
we have found quite satisfactory for
most conditions are 120 and 5000 Hz.
Thus, most of the noise is considerably
reduced and an adequate range of frequencies is maintained so as to preserve voice naturalness. During the dubbing, each channel can be handled separately so as to obtain a perfect balance. For example, if a question from
the back rows of the auditorium comes
out too weak, the volume can be increased and the filter settings changed
at will. These are some of the great advantages of having a master with two
independent channels.
After the filter stage almost any kind
of mixer can be used. If no mixer is
available, even a "Y" adapter could be
used. The mixed signals are then fed
as a mono program to another machine.
Figure 3 is a simplified block diagram
of the dubbing process:
Summary
The results of this technique are remarkable. Questions from way back in
the auditorium, sometimes spoken in a
soft voice that the lecturer himself has
trouble understanding, can be handled
in such a way that on the mixed broad-
cast tape they can be heard almost as
clearly as the voice of the lecturer himself. Besides, having a master tape with
two independent channels has the advantage that for second or third dub bings, the quality of the re- recording
can be improved on the basis of observations of the previous trials.
UHER
4000-S
(from page 28)
the unit is plugged into the recorder
socket. The two leads from pins 3 and 5
are brought to the top terminals of RloR11 and from pin 2 to the ground ends
of both. The latter lead is continued to
the ground terminals of Rib-R15, and
thence up to the ground hole on the
amplifier board. Ris and R1,, are connected from the arms of the dual pot,
R1$ -R15 to the tops of the microphonelevel pot, also a dual unit but with an
attached SPST switch, and thence to
the two output jacks. The two arms of
R14 and R15 are connected together, and
thence to the output terminal of the circuit board. The positive terminal of the
series- connected batteries is led to the
ground terminal of the circuit board,
an eye opener for those who seek NEUMANN quality..
.
but think they
can't afford it!
(NEW NEUMANN
/s NEUMANN
LINEAR ADMITTANCE CAPSULE)
CARDIOID CONDENSER MICROPHONE
Once again, NEUMANN proves its leadership! The linear admittance capsule... a new condenser element concept
two years in development ends usual cardioid mid -range deficiency for non-centered sound sources. This important
innovation is enhanced by another exciting feature... NEUMANN quality at new lower prices. Six U -64's from 6-way
power supply -$260 per mike, dual /stereo system- $310 per mike, single system-$360. For any cardioid application the U -64 is the best answer and your best buy! Ask your franchised dealer for a demonstration or contact:
G4=0
AM
AUDIO CORPORATION
2 WEST 46 STREET, NEW YORK, N.Y.. 10036
212 -00 -5 -4111
©
1965
GAC
Circle 139 on Reader Service Card
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
67
q3( !-',g'7:.i ."ì7,.1
and the negative terminal goes to the with the recorder socket, and a small
switch, and thence to the -18 -V ter- hole on the left side of the housing
minal of the amplifier board. All this engages the handle button of the rewiring is made with solid hookup wire, corder. Four adhesive rubber feet, from
and serves to support the amplifier. The 3M, can be applied to adjust the height
unmarked terminal on the board is used of the housing to permit the plug to
as a support for the back end of the match the recorder socket. Microphone
board, with the other end of the wire connection is made by way of a Preh
being soldered to the plug shell. Fig. 8 -6998 socket (obtainable from Switchshows the underside of the panel sec- craft jobbers) mounted on the front
tion. Two knobs and the two batteries apron.
complete the construction. A little spray
paint and decal markings give the panel Operation
and cabinet a finished appearance. The
In use, the lecturer has control over
location of the plug is such that it mates the level of the recorder signal, and
"It Takes Two
To Speak The TruthOne To Speak
And Another To Hear"
Henry David Thoreau
(1817-1862)
Fig. 9. Diagram of circuit specified by
Uher for the measurement of bias voltage. This gives a value which is 1 per
cent of the actual bias voltage, and
eliminates the shunting effect of the
input capacitance of the a.c. voltmeter.
whenever he wishes to speak, he simply
turns up the microphone control, which
switches the battery on and adjusts the
speech level. There is adequate output
level for lecture work when feeding
the coupling unit directly into a basic
stereo power amplifier and thence to
two loudspeakers.
If it is desired to use the recorder
without the coupling unit, make up a
cable with the 5 -pin Hirschmann plug
and three shielded cables, with all the
shields connected to pin 2, and one
"hot" lead to each of pins 3, 4, and 5.
The amplifier in the recorder can then
be turned on by slipping shorted female
phono socket onto the plug from pin 4.
Recorder Bias Adjustment
Choosing the right speaker is an
exciting adventure in seeking truth.
If clean beautifully balanced sound makes
you glow and twinkle ... Have a fling ...
Listen to the superb new WHITECREST W -2 °`
Speaker System ... and fall in love again ...
SPECIFICATIONS
truly astonishing big system sound of the W -2
is not the result
of a happy accident. Consider the five unique technical features
not found in any other one speaker system regardless of price:
1. Specially designed 8" edge damped and reinforced low and
mid range driver
2. Four -circuit air -core dual -coil L.C. network
3. Oil -filled capacitor
4. Special 9500-cycle crossover point
5. Unique damping technique, instrument precision controlled.
The
With the recommended stereo head,
Nortronics 1202, it will be found that
there is too much bias on the record
head for the normally flat response of
which the Uher 4000 is capable. Instructions indicate that a bias signal of 0.25
volts should be measured as shown in
Fig. 9. This is too much, and will cause
a reduction in high -frequency response
when recording. It is suggested that the
bias be reduced, as described in the
alignment instructions, so that a signal
of 0.13 to 0.15 volts is measured in the
features: Unique portings for perfect loading. Cabinet
below audibility. Extremely low distortion. Plastic 3" domed
spherical tweeter. Carefully designed and constructed cabinet. Response
extremely smooth from 30 to 20,000 cycles.
Size 18" x 12" x 91/z ". Finished on all four sides in oiled walnut.
Other
great
resonance
Price: $69.50
*Full 5 -year Guaranty.
Manufactured by
WIIITECREST INDUSTRIES, INC.
251 East 139th Street
Bronx, New York 10037
Fig. 10. Rear view of the auxiliary coupling unit.
Circle 140 on Reader Service Card
68
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
circuit of Fig. 9. This should give flat
response within a dB or so up to
20,000 Hz.
ALTEC'S new studio equipment makes the beauty
of these custom consoles more than skin deep!
PARTS LIST
C,, C,, C, 5 µf, 25 v., Sprague TE -1202
C, 20 pf, 25 v., Sprague TE-1206
C4 50 µf, 3 v., Sprague TE -1058
],, J, Switchcraft 3501 FP phono jacks
J, Preh 6998 panel mounting socket
(Switchcraft)
P, Hirschmann MAS -5S plug
Q,, Q, GE 2N508 transistors
Q, GE 2N322 transistor
R, 100 k ohms, 34 -watt resistor
R, 150 ohms, ;i -watt resistor
R, 15,000 ohms, '.4 -watt resistor
R, 150 k ohms, 34-watt resistor
Rs 68,000 ohms, g -watt resistor
RF, R, 1500 ohms, '.4-watt resistors
RA 8200 ohms, g -watt resistor
113 4700 ohms, 34 -watt resistor
R,,,
Dual pot, 250 k ohms; IRC A -254,
MA -254
R,,,
47,000 ohms, 34 -watt resistors
R,,, R,,, S, Dual pot, 100 k ohms, with
switch; IRC A -104, MA -104, 76 -1 switch
Battery mounting bracket, Keystone, for
VS -323 battery
B,, Bs RCA 9 -v. transistor batteries, VS -323
Case Bud 2106A Minibox, 534 x 3 x Di in.
R
R
CUSTOM CONSOLE DESIGNED AND BUILT BY COMMERCIAL ELECTRONICS, INC., INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA
Though they're located many miles
apart, one in Michigan and one in Indiana, these beautiful new custom control
consoles have one thing in common
Altec's most recent studio products.
For example, one console utilizes 43
Altec 9470A solid -state plug -in amplifiers, the other 14! The reason for
choosing this advanced, all- silicon
amplifier is immediately apparent from
CUSTOM CONSOLE DESIGNED AND BUILT
CLEVELAND RECORDING COMPANY, CLEVELAND, OHIO
the description below.Other Altec components in these sophisticated consoles include 9550A solid -state power supplies, 9061A program equalizers, and the advanced straight -line attenuators.
These are just a few of the many new products with unique advantages
available for your custom console from the world's largest manufacturer of
sound equipment exclusively. Before you build your "dream console,' be sure
to take a look at the latest and the best -from Altec!
-
BY
EQUIP. PROFILE
(from page 54)
a 3 -in. high-frequency "resonator," which
we assume means tweeter. Two independent frequency- dividing networks are employed, and the cabinet is well damped
to prevent any resonances. Over -all weight
is 19 lbs. List price is $69.50
The apparent smoothness of response of
this system is helped by a slight -3 to 4dB -rise at around 300 Hz, which is where
most small speakers show their deficiency.
It is truly a pleasure to find one that is
free of this particular fault.
Circle 202
SHURE M55E STEREO
CARTRIDGE WITH
ELLIPTICAL STYLUS
Phono cartridges are a second class of
component that is difficult to profile. There
are quite a few really good ones, and the
differences in the easily measurable parameters are not great. In the areas of notso-easily-measuped parameters, principally
distortion, the differences are more likely
to appear, and to influence the over-all
sound, which likely accounts for the coloration which may be attributed to a cartridge. What makes it difficult to judge
quality is that we have no means for
knowing just exactly what "coloration" is
in the record itself, and this makes it imperative that any listening assessment of a
cartridge be based on a large number of
records, preferably from different companies.
Among the cartridges recognized as of
excellent quality is the Shure V -15, one of
the earliest to appear on the market with
a 15 -deg. vertical stylus angle, and with
the elliptical stylus. This model, which
NEW ALTEC 9470A AMPLIFIER
This unit can serve as
preamp, line, booster
noise attenuators
feature gold-tipped
bifurcated sliding
or program amplifier with no internal
changes. All- silicon
transistor circuitry delivers 0.5 watt; Fre-
contact brushes.
Sliding bearings
quency response,
20- 20,000 cps ±0.5
db; THD, less than
1 %, 20- 20,000 cps @ +27 dbm; Noise level
(unweighted, 10-25,000-cps bandpass), equivalent input noise, -127 dbm (input untermi-
nated); Overload recovery,
overload.
50
for 100%
This all- solid -state
unit can power up
fifteen
9470A
amplifiers at full output! External sensing
circuit ensures constant output voltage
regardless of line -voltage fluctuations. Under
ripple and noise is only
full 2 -amp load, output
2000
RMS.
NEW ALTEC 9061A PROGRAM EQUALIZER
This passive unit pro-
vides continuously
variable equalization
are made of friction -free Delrin and slide
on polished chrome-plated
shaft. Available in slide
wire and step type models.
ALTEC PUTS NEW THINKING FOR BETTER
PERFORMANCE IN ALL ITS STUDIO AND
NEW ALTEC 9550A POWER SUPPLY
to
NEW ALTEC STRAIGHT -LINE ATTENUATORS
Extremely low-
AUDIO CONTROLS PRODUCTS!
The equipment here is but a small fraction of the advanced Altec audio products
you can use to build a better console.
Other off -the -shelf audio control items
include graphic and microphone equalizers, filters, precision networks, matching pads, rotary attenuators, precision
rotary switches, dynamic and condenser
microphones, monitor speakers plus several new products on the way!
of your nearest Professional Altec Distributor plus our latest
catalog of studio and audio control components, write dept. AM 11 B.
FOR THE NAME
at selectable frequencies: up to 12 -db boost
at 40 or 100 cps and
10 kc. Straight -line
A®:
controls, ready for
plug -in mounting.
91955 AL
ALTEC LANSING
ANAHEIM, CALIF.
Circle 141 Reader Service Card
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
A9
STATEMENT OF. OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT, AND CIRCULATION,
was given the de luxe treatment in pack -,
aging, along with a price of $62.50, waa
well accepted for its reproduction quality,
and has made a notable place for itself
amongst music lovers, and most audio
buffs managed to include a Shure V -15
in his cartridge kit -it being well recognized that the serious audio hobbyist is
likely to have at least a half dozen cartridges available.
But with plenty of cartridges available
at around $20, it takes some convincing to
elicit $62.50 from the potential purchaser.
But with 100 per cent inspection and an
actual listening test for each individual
cartridge, the price was inevitable.
Now comes the M55E, which this observer dubbed -and requested permission
to say so publicly-"the poor man's V -15."
Act of October 23,.
_.
1962; Section 4369, Title 39, United States Code).
1. Date of Filing, Oct. 1, 1965; 2. Title of Publication, AUDIO; 3. Frequency
of Issue, Monthly; 4. Location of Known Office of Publication, Zeckendorf and
Eastgate Blvds., Garden City, N.Y. 11532; 5. Location of Headquarters or
General Business Offices of the Publishers, 204 Front Street, Mineola, N.Y. 11502.
6. Names and Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing Editor: Publisher,
C. G. McProud, 190 Mineola Blvd., Mineola, N.Y. 11501. Editor, C. G. McProud,
190 Mineola Blvd., Mineola, N.Y. 11501. Managing Editor, none.
7. Owner: Radio Magazines, Inc., 204 Front Street, Mineola, N.Y. 11502.
C. G. McProud, 190 Mineola Blvd., Mineola, N.Y. 11501. E. A. McProud, 190
Mineola Blvd., Mineola, N.Y. 11501.
8. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and other Security Holders Owning or
Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or Other Securities; none.
9. Paragraphs 7 and 8 include, in cases where the stockholder or security holder
appears upon the books of the company as trustee or in any other fiduciary relation,
the name of the person or corporation for whom such trustee is acting, also the
statements in the two paragraphs show the affiant's full knowledge and belief as
to the circumstances and conditions under which stockholders and security holders
who do not appear upon the books of the company as trustees, hold stock and securities in a capacity other than that of a bona -fide owner. Names and addresses
of individuals who are stockholders of a corporation which itself is a stockholder or
holder of bonds, mortgages, or other securities of the publishing corporation have
been included in paragraphs 7 and 8 when the interests of such individuals are
equivalent to 1 per cent or more of the total amount of the stock or securities of
the publishing corporation.
10. This item must be completed for all publications except those which do not
carry advertising other than the publisher's own and which are named in Sections
132.231, 132.232, and 132.233, Postal Manual (Sections 4355a, 43556, and 4356
of Title 39, United States Code)
Av. no. copies
each issue during preceding 12 months
A. Total no. copies printed (Net Press Run)
37,908
B. Paid circulation
To term subscribers by mail, carrier delivery or by
other means.
18,362
2. Sales through agents, news dealers, or otherwise.
8,211
C. Free distribution (including samples) by mail, carrier
759
delivery, or by other means.
27,332
D. Total no. copies distributed (Sum of lines BI, B2 and C)
I certify that the statements made by me above are correct and complete.
Charles G. McProud, Publisher
1.
Anthology
Edited by
The 6th AUDIO
Anthology
Edited by C. G.
The 5th AUDIO
ity:
student, hob and hi -fi fan. 144
teacher,
pages.
No
The 7th AUDIO
Edited by C. G. McProud. A compendium
of articles relative to
the art of high fidelity
reprinted from AUDIO
Magazine. A valuable
reference tool for the
audio hobbyist, the latest edition of this great
series. 144 pages.
No. 135
130
$3.95
I
STEREO
pages.
AUDIO AMP
orders shipped postpaid.
135
S567
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130
In comparative listening tests, it would be
next to impossible to tell the difference.
According to Shure engineers, the two are
essentially identical, differing primarily in
that the M55E is not given the same 100 per cent quality control as the V -15. However, we have "lived with" two separate
M55E's over the past few months, and
they are as alike as the proverbial two peas
in a pod.
The M55E has an output of approximately 1.3 mV /cm /sec, and tracks perfectly at 1 to 1.5 grams stylus force. It is
pleasant to listen to, apparently free of
distortion, crisp and brilliant with a minimum of peak in the highest frequency
range.
In technical terms, channel separation
is in excess of 25 dB at 1000 Hz, and
about 15 dB at 20,000 Hz. Its compliance
is high, even by today's high figures, and
is stated as 25 x 10-6 cm /dyne. A soft
plastic bumper prevents damage to the
record in case the cartridge is dropped
accidentally. In all, the Shure M55E is a
very listenable and serviceable cartridge.
Circle 203
YOUR COST $7.95
53.50
have circled below.
125
and
SAVE $3.00
Circle 5567
AUDIO Bookshelf -AUDIO MAGAZINES, INC.
P. O. Box 629, Mineola, New York 11502
Please send me the books
full remittance of $
FM
AUDIO EQUIPMENT. A
meaningful reference for
everyone in the fields
of audio engineering,
recording, broadcasting,
manufacturing and servicing of components
and equipment. A necessary book for the high
fidelity enthusiast. 144
SPECIAL
Order all three
Anthology
AUDIU
nrhoiogy
G.
TRANSISTORS IN
fessional engineer,
$3.50 byist
C.
McProud, publisher of
AUDIO. Includes articles on the two most
significant milestones in
the field of high fidel-
McProud, publisher of
AUDIO. An anthology
of the most significant
articles covering: stereo
recording and reproduction; stereo multiplex;
measurements; stereo
technology, construction
and theory -which appeared in AUDIO during 1958 and 1959. The
5th is truly a collectors'
item and a valuable
reference for the pro -
No. 125
Fig. 6. Shure M55E stereo cartridge with
elliptical stylus.
STATE
ZIP
did not prove necessary. Whenever one
mixer stage is being pulsed, the other
one is a good safe margin inside its conduction range, so the minute positive going pulse derived from the driver collectors has no effect, except when it's
supposed to. The positive fed -back pulse
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
only affects the transistor that is ready
for it at that instant, which makes things
simpler. It enables us to continue using
the single negative- feedback arrangement to control amplitude near quiescence, which is a convenience.
But the negative -pulse feedback did
not behave quite as simply as we had
hoped. With the first circuit, it just
dropped in like magic and did what we
wanted it to, even though it needed a
minor change when we hooked the output transistors on. But now it not only
cut the amplitude, it also broadened the
pulse. We tried changing the positive
and negative feedback in every conceivable combination (working on one `side'
of the push -pull pair, while leaving the
other alone, so we could compare the
effect of changes we made) , but we just
could not get a sharp signal of half
amplitude, or of any amplitude short of
full, in fact.
The solution, at this stage, proved to
be using a capacitor to bypass the base feed resistor of the series -feedback transistor (dashed line connection, Fig.
2 -8). We had tried this with the original circuit, but then found that any
capacitance in shunt with the base resistor produced instability, indicating
that resistance only was needed; now
the capacitor sharpened up the pulses
magically and the resistor needed to
SUPPLY+
FWIING
CORRECT GROUND
GROUND
AUDIO
OSCILLATOR
VERT HOR
0
o
Fig. 3 -7. A mistake in test connection that caused instability- improper grounding;
we should have known better!
be of much larger value. Apparently the
capacitor was what provided the negative feedback at each pulse occurrence,
and the resistor served to discharge it
again by the time it was needed for the
next pulse. A time constant of about
half the ultrasonic period proved ideal,
which confirmed this functional explanation.
Now we're again ready to try it with
output transistors. But this time we've
really got instability when they're coupled on. And nothing will cure it short
of a few farads decoupling on the phase
inverter stage. We actually tried a 5300
µf capacitor that we had lying around
and that didn't quite stabilize it, but
made it slightly less violent. Well, we
neat stereo
gat low, low price; in tiny, tiny 'baby' size.
New RM -0.5 Sonomastere Smallest, quality high -fidelity speaker system. Smooth response
from 55 to 20,000 cps from this tiny acoustic
suspension system; handles 20 watts average;
attractive oiled walnut cabinet.Two of the "baby"
RM -0.5's fit in the space of one average bookshelf speaker. Cost, under $80 a pair.
Select from a complete line of Sono -
master acoustic suspension speaker
Sonotone Corp., Electronic Applications
Div
systems. The RM -1, acclaimed "a powerful
entry in the new breed of very compact
speaker systems." Handles 40 watts average. $44.50. Save money on easy -to -build
kit, RM-1K, $35.50. New RM -2, big brother
of the line, is a true bookshelf size system
andli
watts
w
e. $ 56.50.
Hear Sonotone Sonomaster speakers at
ONE leading high-fid50elitty dealersaverag.
®hng
Elmsford, N.Y. Export: Singer Prods. Co., Inc., N.Y.C., Cable: EXREGNIS, N.Y.
Circle 142 on Reader Service Card
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
71
-
A
convenient service to AUDIO readers. ^
^
-
Order your books leisurely
save time and travel,
by mail
we pay the postage.
1
111 ,
anyone whose living or
hobby is servicing hi -fi
equipment. Outlines the
professional approach for
servicing all types of hi-
fi
components. Covers
trouble- shooting of electronic, mechanical and
problems.
acoustic
pages.
HI -FI TROUBLES
By Herman Durstein
Designing and Building Hi -Fi Furniture
Jeff Markel
Written by a professional
hi -fi furniture designer
who has taught furniture
design at leading colleges, this book is an authentic reference of value
to the hi -fi fan and professional custom builder.
Covers everything from
types of woods to furniture finishing for the
mechanically adept; de.
Maintaining Hi -Fi Equipment
Joseph Marshall
A valuable reference for
224
HOW YOU CAN AVOID THEM
HOW YOU CAN CURE THEM
Just published! At last, a
book which deals directly
with the problems you face
in maintaining your audio
system in peak condition.
Tells you how to locate
troubles, what to do about
them and how to do it -and,
just as important: what NOT
to do. Helps you to achieve
the best in listening pleasure from your equipment.
$3.95
No. 120
sign principles, styles and
No.58 Paperback $2.90*
arrangements for the
decor minded. 224 pages.
No. 79 Paperback $2.90*
"The AUDIO Cyclopedia"
Howard M. Tremaine
McProud High Fidelity Omnlbook
Prepared and edited by
C. G. McProud, publisher
of Audio and noted authority and pioneer in
the field of high fidelity.
The 5th AUDIO
McProud,
publisher of AUDIO. An anthology of the most significant articles covering: stereo
recording and reproduction;
stereo multiplex; measure-
Contains a wealth of
ideas, how to's, what
;
$3.50
No. 125
"the best of AUDIO"
I,:PE. RECORDI1iG
G.
-
edited by
Tape Recorders and Tape Recording'
Harold D. Weiler
RECORDERS.
AM
C.
ments; stereo technology,
construction and theory
which appeared in AUDIO
during 1958 and 1959. The
5th is truly a collectors' item
and a valuable reference for
the professional engineer,
teacher, student, hobbyist and
hi -fi fan. 144 pages.
to's, and when to's, written so plainly that both
engineer and layman can
appreciate its valuable
context. Covers planning,
problems with decoration,
cabinets and building hi.
fi furniture. A perfect.
guide.
No.115 $2.50*
ï
Anthology
Edited by
C. G.
-
Invaluable to recording
enthusiasts.
No.112 Paper Cover $2.935
Save almost 50a/a with this collection of AUDIO books.
5th AUDIO ANTHOLOGY ($3.50)
"best of AUDIO" ($2.00)
McProud High Fidelity Omnlbook ($2.50) and
Tape Recorders & Tape Recording ($2.95)
BOOKS
ALL FOUR
...
...
$10.95
$5.95 Postpaid
CIRCLE 0S400
This offer expires November 30, 1965, and is good only on direct order to the Publisher.
AUDIO Bookshelf-RADIO MAGAZINES,
*AII U.S.A. and Canadian
orders shipped postpaid.
INC.
O. Box 629, Mineola, New York 11502
Please send me the books
full remittance of $
I
have circled below.
I
Edited by C. G. McProud,
publisher of AUDIO. Includes
articles on the two most significant milestones in the field
of high fidelity: FM STEREO
and TRANSISTORS IN AUDIO
EQUIPMENT. A meaningful
reference for everyone in the
fields of audio engineering,
am enclosing the
recording, broadcasting, manufacturing and servicing of
components and equipment.
A necessary book for the
high fidelity enthusiast. 144
1
High Fidelity Simplified
Harold
(No C.O.D. or billing.)
115
120
123
124
125
130
142
251
05400
-
tuners, changers, amplifiers,
tape recorders, speakers,
record players, etc. Lots of
Ideas for custom installations. Tells how to achieve
concert hall reception in
your home. 216 pages.
No. 142
$3.30
Getting The Most Out Of Your Tape Recorder
Herman Burstein
Written in "plain talk" for
JAINIM_
the man who has, or wishes
to buy, a tape recorder. It
answers the myriad questions raised by tape recording enthusiasts. Its chapters
cover every phase of opera-
tion and maintenance -from
adding a tape recorder to
the hi -fi system, to a thorough dissertation on microphones. Lots of practical
information on how to buy.
ADDRESS
72
1313=111
Weiler
D.
TAPE RECORDER
58
112
$3.95
The complete hi-fi story
answers all questions about
-MI-
79
pages.
No. 130
NAME
CITY
No.123 $19.95*
The 6th AUDIO Anthology
new
MONTHLY SPECIAL! SAVE $5.00
P.
audiophile.
-
techniques, sound effects,
editing and splicing, etc.
VALUE
every audio engineer,
technician, and serious
-
corders. Covers room
acoustics, microphone
Your cost only
instant answers to any
question. A vital complete reference book for
compendium of
AUDIO knowledge. Here
is a collection of the
The
best of AUDIO
AUDIO Clinic by Joseph
Giovanelli . . . noted
audio engineer and the
original high fidelity anEQUIPMENT
swer -man
PROFILES edited by C. G.
Editor of
.
McProud .
AUDIO. Here is a wealth
of hi -fi and audio information. Answers to the
most important issues in
high fidelity and a valuable reference.
No. 124 Volume I $2.00*
A complete book on home
recording by the author
of High Fidelity Simplified. Easy to read and
learn the techniques required for professional
results with home re-
TOTAL
Here is one single volume
with the most comprehensive coverage of every
phase of audio. Concise,
accurate explanations of
all audio and hi -fi sub jects. More than 7 years
in preparation -the most
authoritative encyclopedic work with a unique
quick reference system for
McProud
A
1280 pages
3400 topics
1600 illustrations
176 pages.
STATE
-ZIP
No. 251
AUDIO
$4.25
NOVEMBER, 1965
SUPPLY --
Fig. 3 -8. Revised
modulation sec-
TO
DRIVE STA
tion, that proved
much
less
dependent-in fact
completely independent of transistor characterist i c s,
provided
they work at all.
But it introduced
its own instability
problems
when
connected to the
output stages.
ICrL1TOR
GEFORE
1
i
LJI
Gives You Such Great Sound Per Pound!
anything that
lize that stage,
)ther "answer."
ut of space for
i
this month, and it took us quite a bit
of experimentation to find the way, so
we'll save that for the next and final
installment.
Jstry Notes and People
enmin Electroni.. Sound Corpora-
, an importer, distributor and manu,.eturer of home entertainment prod-
ucts, has moved its executive offices,
factory, and research and development
from
-
i
III
NC,
ar,
"'
',
c
to
40
Smith
i.! II IIII111
threading, rewinding, or tape handling.
It employs a G -watt transistorized amplifier capable of driving 32 speakers at the
levels normally employed for background
music. Additional amplifiers are available for localities requiring more than
32 speakers. The entire playback unit
only requires a space 15 x 7 x 12 inches.
The Model 700 is priced at
(suggested retail price) including$429
one cartridge. Additional cartridges are available at $100 each, this price includes all
performance royalty payments for three
years.
Additional information can be obtained
by contacting 3M Company Background
Music Systems, Building 220 -7, W. 2501
Hudson Road, St. Paul, Minnesota
The Oki 555 lightweight solid -state portable
stereo tape system weighs less than 25
pounds, yet gives you better than concert
hall sound reproduction. And the price?
Only $349.95* complete with two unique
"OKldizine" Speaker Systems, each containing two speakers with a crossover network.
Oki has a fine choice of other solid state
tape recorders, starting at $129.95 *. See
and hear them now at your Oki dealer.
55119.
Wharfedale Sales Division of Brit TheIndustrie..
Corp. announces the appointment of Larry Epstein as Manager
of this rapidly expanding division. In
his new position Mr. Epstein will be responsible for all mattters concerning
the product and sales aspects of the
Wharfedale line. George Cohen, former
occupant of the chair now taken over
by Larry Epstein, now moves on to product responsibilities for the entire BIC
Iwh
street,
off Route 110 Farmingdale. New
York. Pictured here Is the new plant.
The company will expand Its research
and development In an effort to manufacture new products for the home entertainment field.
The company was formed by Mr. Ben-
jamin five years ago with r:. T. Thal berg.
. Minne'.otri )lining and
Manufacturing
Corp. i:t)li has just introduced a commercial background music system which
is revolutionary for a number of reasons: 1. It will be sold outright, not
leased as are the majority of background
music systems available today. 2. Tt employs cartridges each containing 700 individual selections and will play
for
26 hours without repeating
selection. 3. Most Important to athesingle
corn mercial user, the sales price of a cartridge includes all performance royalties
for a period of three years. 4. Purchasers
of the unit will be offered a $35 per
year service contract which will be handled by 3M's Thermofax national service organization.
We believe this new concept
background music systems will ingreatly
broaden their use by making them available to small locations which previously
could not afford a leased service.
Playing music from its own stored
sound tape library, the 3M "Cantata"
does not depend upon a central studio and
does not require external telephone
lines or complex antenna systems,
The IM "Cantata" 700 operates at a
speed of 174 fps. and automatically
switches channels to provide a continuous 26-hour program. The
is
completely automatic and operation
requires no
line.
Paul R. Abbey has been appointed
consultant for 1)enki
Onkyo Co. Ltd.,
Tokyo, Japan. The company is one of
Japan's principal producers of tape recordera and has been manufacturing the
Concertone models 800 and 400 as well
as their own Dokorder brand.
Louis J. Criwpinno has been appointed
marketing and planning manager for
the Products Engineering Division of
Sony Corporation of America, according
to Dr. Sam Mahuchi, vice president. Mr.
Crispiano brings to Sony a background
of experience in the marketing of electronic products. Prior to Joining Sony,
he was manager of the commercial products department of ITT Distributor Prod-
ucts, and product line Sales Manager for
iTT Components Division.
Robert Bach, (Bach Sales Company)
of Old Bethpage, New York, was cited
as "Salesman-of- the -Year" by John C.
Koss for the outstanding work done on
Koss and Rek -O -Kut lines. Bach has represented Koss Stereophones in the New
York -New Jersey ara since they came
on the market in 195R, and has continually 'maintained a high position among
Koss representatives. He took over the
Rek -O -Kut line a year ago. Each received a new Mustang as his prize for
winning the award. Presentation was
made at the New York HI -FI Show.
ONLY
OKI
555
'manufacturer's suggested list price
Chancellor Electronics, Inc.
457 Chancellor Avenue, Newark, New Jersey 07112
Circle 143 on Reader Service Card
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
73
LIGHT LISTENING
INTERNATIONAL
- Firstdemand
Choice of those
who
the Best!
ir0
IIIF
velopment.
Odi)
Judy Garland /Liza Minelli: Concert at London
Palladium
IS
.
:
1
Capitol SWBO 2295
!MI
60"44.4
From
OLIO
Model SS824
TATE 1/4 Track Stereo
$1295
Unsurpassed Performance
ips
db
7 -1/2
+2
±2
+3
3 -3/4
1
-7/8
ftlW
.
cps
s/n
30-30,000
55 db
30- 20,000
52 dó
50- 13,000 45 db
G>..-.. -Th International
Box 1000, Dept.
All
Elkhart, Indiana 46517
ut
a
c._
(from page 8)
to sing the praises of a masculine native.
Ray Ellis is the musician in charge of arrangements and conducting chores. By far
the best rapport in the Home-Ellis collaboration occurs in the very nimble treatment
of "Hello Young Lovers ". This is popular
singing in a highly advanced stage of de-
...
in Your Future!
Circle 144 on Reader Service
Card
SAVE MOST ON
stereo hi -fi
and
Tape
Recording
WORLD'S LARGEST
Where was the well -known British reserve while this concert was being taped
at the Palladium? It apparently was relegated to the same ash bin used by Amerien fans to shed their inhibitions whenever
Judy Garland or daughter Liza Minelli
appear in public individually. Since this
London event was their first concert appearance together, Capitol Records was on
hand to capture the outpouring of audience
sentiment along with the generous quota of
entertainment on stage. Under the circumstances, it is somewhat pointless to attempt
to divorce the recorded performances of
Judy and Liza from the event itself. Separately and in duet, mother and daughter
flail the audience with the all -out Garland
brand of showmanship. Rafter -bending
medleys are followed by hushed ballads
as the audience goes .wild at the first note
of each old favorite or the special lyrics
inserted into the act for the occasion. In
the welter of togetherness that fills the two record album, few people will stoop so low
as to draw comparisons between the singers. About all that can be said is that
similarities in voice provided by Mother
Nature to two members of the family have
been emphasized by the response curve of
the hand -held mikes used in the concert.
Either singer could have benefited under
circumstances where less stage movement
would have permitted use of stationary
mikes.
SELECTION
PHONO CARTRIDGE
send today for your money- saving
,áWED
1966 CATALOG
See what's new and best in stereo hi
-fi-
latest solid -state components...everything in
tape recording. Save handsomely on famous
build -your -own Knight - Kits ®. For everything
in Hi -Fi, for everything in Electronics, get the
1966 Allied Catalog.
ALLIED RADIO
ALLIED RADIO, Dept. 11-L
100 N. Western Ave., Chicago, III. 60680
Send FREE 1966 Allied Catalog.
free
508 -PAGE
CATALOG
NAME
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ADDRESS
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STATE
ZIP
(from page 25)
example, a cartridge with a limited
response range may be perfectly suitable for a single singing voice, but
may be very poor for an orchestral
work. The cartridge which may play
well for a basso profundo may not do
so well for a mezzo soprano. Since the
same argument applies to the loud speakers, it is often well not only to
play a variety of records, but to do
so with several loudspeakers.
The evaluation of a phonograph cartridge based on a listening test is diffi-
cult to define since we cannot use numbers, but must resort to adjectives. It
is helpful to develop some agreement
as to standard adjectives. Table II
shows some suggested terms which may
be used. When this type of table is
employed regularly, the listeners tend
to use the same words for what they
hear.
Rate
Rates:
y
jay
allowed. Co, per
first of the . pe,. lase
get Wo,1/
a
HIGH FIDE i% p'
o,.
ro,
^cja
aisoh
168 W. 2arto nitr
6; em+rawtae7
t
HARPSICHORD.
Elelphia Orchestra a
form for home wot' A7.4Ì,,s
Clavichord kit, $100.
Zuckermann Harpsich&z
Christopher St., New Ya
LEARN WHILE ASLEL
recorder, phonograph Deb.
log free. Sleep-Learning, Box
Washington.
FREE Send for money -saviL
log A11M and lowest quotation
dividual components, tape record
requirements. Electronic Values.
20th Street, New York, N. Y. 1001
RE
HI -FI SPEAKERS EXPERTLY
USED SPEAKERS BOUGHT
TECHNIC'
AUDIO SPEAKERS
22 Astor Place, New York 3, N. Y.
!
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AL 4-2140
AUDIO EQUIPMENT : Ampex, Altec, F.N
child, Langevin, Neumann, etc. Trades.
and used. Get our list. Audio Distributor.
Inc. 2342 S. Division, Grand Rapids, Mich.
TAPES.
YOUR
FROM
PRESSINGS
IN WHOLESALE PRICES. SPECIALIZING
DUBLYU
DUBLE
SMALL QUANTITIES.
RECORDING COMPANY, 221 Carton Avenue, Neptune, N. J. 07753.
,
CONCERTONE professional stereo tape
machine Model 93 -2A, $695. Model 507-4K
$395. Dr. Tom Nash, 1100 Canterbury, Dallas
8, Texas.
STEREO-REVERBERATORS for experimental applications, $7. Cal's, Box 2, Dearborn, Mich.
Muzak.
Collector wants World, Associated, catalogs,
MacGregor, Standard transcriptions, Nicholas.
Bob
player.
ERPI -WE transcription Beach, Calif. 90808.
4200 Blackthorne, Long
McFOR SALE McIntosh C -11, $150 ; 2tuner,
DIX
Intosh MC -30's. $170 ; Citation $250
J.B.
: 2
$150 : Viking 88 RMQ H.M.S.,
Lansing LE14C's, $130. H. W. Davis, 6040
Sheridan, Chicago, Ill.
exAUDIO Magazine, 1953- 65.Complete (Feb.
of 1957
cepting 1/58, 12/62, and most
heavy
in
others
volumes,
4
bound
only).
J. Grauer, 8
cardboard. $50 plus shipping.
Garden St., Great Neck, N. Y. 11021.
FOR SALE : New professional condenser
pattern.
microphone with variable directivitySan
Jose,
Lou Oros, 46 E. San Antonio St.,
Calif.
ANY RECORD PUT ON TAPE : Single,
LP, stereo. Quantity prices. Tapes duplicated
Los
1 or 100. Write Box 15852, Del Valle,
:
:
Angeles, Calif. 90015.
Plus
AVANTIC DL7 -35W and Leak TL50 FOB,
amplifiers. New condition. Best offer.
Columbus,
Drive,
Jordan
Steve Shepard, 2725
Indiana.
KSC -3 speakers. walnut, excellent condiTrade
tion, 6 months old. $235 for pair. Fair
Boxnew price, $390. John McBride, 2626
wood Drive, Wilmington, Delaware 19803.
QUAD full-range electrostatic speaker. $150.
Olsen, 310 Bode Road, Hoffman Estates,
Illinois 60173.
Fisher 80C preamp, $50 ;
FOR SALE
80 -AZ power amplifier, $40 ; FM -90 tuner,
$75 ; Garrard All with stereo cartridge, $40;
Bogen 901 and Heath AJ -21 AM tuners, $20
each. Don Schroder, 3405 Telford, Apt. 26,
Cincinnati, Ohio 45220.
:
SITUATION WANTED
O -Kut,
Sidney Simonson, formerly of aRekmanufacavailable for consulting with
or
production protner having engineering
blems of mechanical or electro- mechanical
devices. Sidney Simonson, 137 -14 233 St.,
Laurelton, N.Y. 11422 Telephone: 212 LA 84626.
is
Circle 145 on Reader Service Card
74
Ptto
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
NOW...PERFECT FM
ELIMINATE
FM
INTERFERENCE!
With the Sensational
Mew/ FINCO
FM BAND PASS FILTER
A
ENGINEERED TO
Get only pure FM signals. Use a
Finco FM Band Pass Filter to stop
interference and block out unwanted signals from T.V., Citizens
Band and Amateur transmitters,
motors, autos and fluorescent
lamps. Size: 41/4" x 2" x 11/2".
Available at your Finco Hi -Fi
dealer. Satisfaction guaranteed!
Model 3007
Only $6.95 List
THE FINNEY COMPANY
34 W. Interstate St.
Bedford, Ohio
Circle 146 on Reader Service Card
Conclusion
We have discussed a number of the
important criteria related to measuring
the performance of a phonograph cartridge. The final evaluation of the quality of the cartridge must be based on
the consideration of all of these factors.
While it is impossible to assess the relative importance of the various characteristics, the reproducing quality must
certainly be one of the major considerations. Measurements of frequency
response, separation, and distortion help
in evaluating the reproducing quality,
and must therefore be considered as
being of major importance.
Probably the weakest factor related
to our measuring techniques is the correlation between measurements and
listening tests. Our measurements provide a good indication of whether one
cartridge is better or worse than another, i.e., a relative indication. The
measurements do not provide a good
absolute indication of whether the cartridge is good or bad. The definition of
good or bad must be made in terms of
listening tests, and this is where the correlation has not been satisfactorily
made.
Finally, we wish to re- emphasize the
importance of reproducibility in measurements. To make measurements
meaningful, it is extremely important
that test conditions be standardized.
Gross variations in measured performance can occur because of differences
in test records, measuring equipment,
and environmental conditions. Unless
all of these factors are carefully controlled, the measurements are mean-
ingless.
Easy-Pay-Plan--Up to 24 mos. to pay.
15 day money -back guarantee.
Franchised all lines, assuring you up to
5 yr. Mfr. Warranty.
Most items shipped promptly from our
$250,000.00 inventory.
Trade -Ins -Highest allow-Send your list.
Shipments double packed & fully insured.
Special consideration
Export & APO
inquiries.
21st yr. dependable service -World Wide.
Write for our price first. You'll be glad
you did.
"We own the sharpest pencils in the U.S.A."
-
Best Buy.
Hi -Fi List Free.
.,o
The House of Low Low P,aceti'
1797 -U 1st Aye.
10028
New York, N. Y.
Circle 147 on Reader Service Card
CANADA
High Fidelity Equipment
Complete Lines
Complete Service
Hl -Fi Records
Components
-
and Accessories
&LECTRO-1)OlcE
SOUND SYSTEMS
126 DUNDAS ST. WEST. TORONTO. CANADA
Circle 148 on Reader Service Card
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
Æ
Tracing Distortion in Stereophonic Disc
Recording, M. S. Corrington and T. Murakami, RCA Review, June, 1958, p 216
° Stylus Mass & Distortion, J. Walton, Wireless World, April, 1963, p 171
BOYNTON HAS IT!
THE NEW
SYNCRON AU -la
CONDENSER
MICROPHONE
FOR PREMIUM SOUND PICKUP
AT A FRACTION OF USUAL COST!
At last! An American made quality condenser
microphone in a self- contained 93/4" unit that is
reshaping the recording industry.
Now . . P. A. engineers, broadcasters, studios
and audiophiles can utilize the full potentials of
"condenser" sound without the bulk and expense
of conventional condenser mikes.
Connect the cable and it's ready to go. Over
2500 hours transistor battery life with low cost
e
mercury cells.
Frequency range: ±3 db 40- 20,000. Directional
characteristics cardioid, with front to back ratio
of better than 20 db.
Output level: -50 db. Distortion: less than
0.5 %. Rugged diaphragm provides broad, smooth
frequency response with total absence of annoying
peaks. Maximum sensitivity,
outstanding clarity of sound. PRICE $16950
ONLY SYNCRON MAKES IT. ONLY BOYNTON SELLS IT.
°Psychoacoustics -The Determining Factor
in Stereo Disc Distortion, J. Jacobs and P.
Wittman, ( Presented at Annual Meeting
of Audio Engineering Society, October,
1963)
'A Study in Tracking -Angle Errors in
Stereo Disc Recording, J. G. Woodward
and E. C. Fox, IRE Transactions on Audio,
July, 1963
'Reducing Distortion in Stereo Phono Systems, J. G. Woodward, Aunro, February' larch, 1964
'Stereo Disc Recording Comes of Age,
D. C. Cooper, AUDIO, January, 1964
'Further Thoughts on Geometric Condition in the Cutting and Playing of Stereo
Discs, C. R. Bastians, J.A.E.S. Jan. 1963
BOYNTON STUDIO
DEPT.
A -11
295 Main St., Tuckahoe, N.Y. 10707 Tel. (914) SP
SOLE DISTRIBUTOR FOR
9
-5278
SYNCRON AU -7a CONDENSER MICROPHONE
Dealerships available
Circle 149 o- Reader Service Card
75
laboratory standard
Better Electronically With
Live
LAFAYETTE
ADVERTISING
INDEX
RADIO ELECTRONICS
Acoustic Research, Inc.
Acoustical Manufacturing Co., Ltd.
1.
real
Allied
Altec
Audio
Audio
31
62
74
37, 69
72
39
Radio
Lansing Corporation
Bookshelf
Dynamics Corporation
(g
1°w+w+^
k
}SMYEAß
Benjamin Electronic Sound Corporation 35
75
Boynton Studios
3, 15
British Industries Corporation
tsp{Ebt
Dynaco,
Q2yERfl
VEGA
Capacitor Microphone
73
74
74
Chancellor Electronics, Inc.
Classified
Crown International
You capture the complete sound every
time. Whether it's a big symphony orchestra, a mighty pipe organ or a combo.
Ultra low distortion. Exciting fidelity,
60, 61
Inc.
transparency and clarity. 10- 20,000 hz
linear response guaranteed. Switchable
low or high impedance output. Switch able low frequency filter. Superior stability. Why accept less?
Coy IV, I, 55
Electro -Voice, Inc.
75
Electro -Voice Sound Systems
Elpa Marketing Industries,
Coy III, 63
Inc.
9.12
Empire Scientific Corporation
LAFAYETTE
Fairchild Recording Equipment Corp. 8
75
Finney Company
5
Fisher Radio Corporation
66
Ferrograph Co., Ltd. _ _
1966 Catalog 660
Now BETTER THAN EVER
Frazier,
Featuring Everything
512
Pages
57
Inc.
Garrard Sales Corporation
Gotham Audio Corporation
in Electronics for
3
Harman -Kardon, Inc.
Hi Fidelity Center
41
Lafayette Radio Electronics
76
64
45
Lansing, James
"World's Hi -Fi & Electronics Center"
LTV
CRITERION 10008
4 -TRACK STEREO
RECORDER IN
TEAK CABINET
B.,
Sound
University
33
.
Network Research & Mfg. Corp.
North American Philips Company
Pinkering & Company, Inc.
Pioneer Electronic Corporation
Sarkes Tarzian,
Use Lafayette's Easy -Pay Budget Plan
Down...Up to 24 Months to Pay
Satisfaction Guaranteed or Money Refunded
NM MIN
LAFAYETTE Radio ELECTRONICS
Dept. AK -5, P.O. Box 10
Syosset, L.I., N.Y. 11791
I=
46
.
65
_
17
47
50
Inc.
Cov II
Scott, H. H., Inc.
Sherwood Electronic Laboratories,
No Money
MI
18
Inc.
Shure Brothers, Inc.
Sonotone Corporation
Stanton
Superscope, Inc.
29
71
43
...
Tandberg
Name
UTC Sound
Address
Vega Electronics Corporation
..
6
..........
Viking of Minneapolis
EOSIN
51
Send me the Free 1966
Lafayette Catalog 660
MULTILORE
7
..
_
76
4
...
Wharfedale Div.,
Corp. ..
Whitecrest
State
..
(Please Give Your Zip Code No.)
Circle 150 on Reader Service Card
76
59
76
Multicore Sales Corporation
SOLID STATE
COMPONENT STEREO
MUSIC SYSTEM
WORLD'S
FINEST
49
Company
Maranta, Inc. .._
McIntosh Laboratory, Inc.
"PRO -50" COMPACT
I-
1161 Richard Ave., Santa Clara,
Calif. 95050. (Ask any franchised
Vega dealer for a demonstration.)
75
3M
50 -WATT SOLID STATE
STEREO AMPLIFIER
MODEL LA -248
Zip
$315
ical stereo arrangement
Write for free brochure.Vega Electronics
Corp. (creator of the world- famous
Vega-Alike wireless microphone),
Circle 151 on Reader Service Card
INDUSTRY
MN
$185
67
HOME
LABORATORY
from the
City
Single microphone, power supply
Two microphones and dual
power supply for econom-
British
Industries
15
68
BUY IT AT RADIO -TV PARTS STORES
Multicore Sales Corp., Westbury, New York 11591
Circle 152 on Reader Service Card
AUDIO
NOVEMBER, 1965
r
The Remarkable
has finally arrived in the U.S.
You've heard of the remarkable REVOX, of course. You've heard them rave about this recorder in
London. Paris. Rome. Johannesburg. Everywhere. But you couldn't buy it in the U. S. until now. Now,
finally, REVOX is ready for its American and Canadian debut. Is there another tape recorder anywhere that matches it, feature for feature? Decide for yourself:
the REVOX different? Consider these features, found only in the most expensive,
professional tape recorders. Each of the
two reels has its own Pabst motor. There is
also a separate, heavy duty Pabst 6/12 pole
hysteresis synchronous capstan motor that
electrically changes the number of poles
for the speeds. This is a direct drive unit
assuring linear tape speed, whether at 33/4
ips or 71/2 ips. Direct coupling eliminates
wow and flutter; no belts to break or slip.
Tension adjustment contrast assures use of
any reel up to 101/2 inches with assurance
that tape will not snap or break. There are
three ring -core heads, specially designed
and manufactured by REVOX
each head
performing its own function of record, playback and erase. Other features? All operating modes are switched electrically by
push- buttons; you can use remote control
on the REVOX; also a highly accurate tape
counter; no pressure pads (for long head
life); no need for hum -bucking gimmicks.
Is
...
Vertical or Horizontal Mounting.
EXCLUSIVE BENEFITS
The REVOX is the only recorder in its price
category that takes a 101/2 -inch reel. You
can record up to 4,800 feet of LP tape with
unsurpassed sound quality. It's a complete
4-track stereo recorder. Exceptionally fast
rewind. Oversized, solenoid- operated brakes
assure quick and positive braking, even
with extremely fast winding speeds. A
microswitch senses the end of the tape and
automatically stops the motor after a reel
has been rewound or where a splice has
opened. Tape breakage and tape spill are
virtually impossible.
CREATING SPECIAL EFFECTS
With the built in mixing facilities of the
REVOX, you can mix and record any two
signals. You can also set one channel for
playback, while the other is recording, and
thus achieve all kinds of multiplay and
duoplay effects
sound with sound
even
sound on sound with echo.
-
-
PROFESSIONAL QUALITY FEATURES
The REVOX G -36 includes two VU meters,
one for each channel, for accurate control
of recording levels. All operating controls
are electrically operated by pushbuttons.
There are no gears, belts, levers or friction
drives. In its smart gray, portable carrying
Circle 102 on Reader Service Card
case, with pockets for reels (reels not in-
cluded), the REVOX is built for a lifetime of
proud performance. Only $500.
AN EXPERT'S VIEW
Recently, British critic Geoffrey Horn wrote
this about the REVOX: "One can record a
piano at 33/4 ips, and if on listening critically
to a held chord one detects the slightest
waver, then it is likely to be the piano tuner
you should send for, not the tape mechanic.
This is a superlative machine, quite the best
domestic tape recorder have experienced,
and so well worth saving and waiting for."
I
The REVOX is available only through carefully selected Franchised Dealers. Complete
literature and Dealer listings are available
upon request. Write Dept. A -11.
ELPA MARKETING INDUSTRIES, Inc.,
NEW HYDE PARK, N. Y.
LPA
REVOX
-
another Elpa quality product distributed in the U. S., Canada and Puerto Rico.
REVOX
You'll never know how beautiful
a room can be...
until you fill it with music
from this miraculously small,
modestly priced, solid- state,
50 Watt AM /FM Stereo Receiver.
The New E-V 1178.
The E -V 1178 is ho taller than a
coffee cup, no bigger than an open
book. But listen. There's power and
sensitivity to spare, plus every control
you need to satisfy your highest musical
standards.
The handsome case with solid walnut
end -panels is standard. So is our full time stereo light, easy -to -use tuning
meter, movable station locators, and a
host of other features.
You do have one option. Choose the
E -V 1178 with AM
and FM Stereo for
$315.00, or select the E -V 1177 with FM
Stereo only for just $280.00. Either way
you get 50 watts of fun that may well
last you a lifetime.
Write today for free literature on the
entire line of Electro -Voice solid-state
$160.00. E -V 1156 AM /FM Stereo Tuner,
$195.00. Matching E-V 1144 50 Watt Stereo
Control Amplifier, $124.50.
ELECTRO -VOICE, INC., Dept. 1154A
602 Cecil Street, Buchanan, Michigan 49107
electronics and co- ordinated loud-
speaker systems. They make the difference that high fidelity is all about!
Also New From Electro -Voice
E -V 1155 Stereo
FM Tuner, just
81/4"
Circle 104 on Reader Service Card
wide,
gkererefez.
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